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Sample records for 5-axis sculptured surface

  1. Automatic Tool Path Generation for Robot Integrated Surface Sculpturing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jiang; Suzuki, Ryo; Tanaka, Tomohisa; Saito, Yoshio

    In this paper, a surface sculpturing system based on 8-axis robot is proposed, the CAD/CAM software and tool path generation algorithm for this sculpturing system are presented. The 8-axis robot is composed of a 6-axis manipulator and a 2-axis worktable, it carves block of polystyrene foams by heated cutting tools. Multi-DOF (Degree of Freedom) robot benefits from the faster fashion than traditional RP (Rapid Prototyping) methods and more flexibility than CNC machining. With its flexibility driven from an 8-axis configuration, as well as efficient custom-developed software for rough cutting and finish cutting, this surface sculpturing system can carve sculptured surface accurately and efficiently.

  2. Tektites that were partially plastic after completion of surface sculpturing.

    PubMed

    Nininger, H H; Huss, G I

    1967-07-01

    Among the 50,000 tektites collected over an 8-year period as part of a representative collection of the indochinities in an area near Dalat, South Vietnam, several individual ones have been found that show evidence of having been internally plastic after surface sculpturing was essentially completed. Two drops, which were bent after having formed a thin exterior skin or crust, exhibit surface breaks and stretching of their plastic interiors within the breaks. The lack of deep sculpturing in this interior stretched area, coupled with twisting within the break on one of them, indicates that the surface features on these tektites were formed in the atmosphere and not by etching by soil acids, as had been widely believed.

  3. A novel path generation method of onsite 5-axis surface inspection using the dual-cubic NURBS representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wen-long; Wang, Gang; Zhang, Gang; Pang, Chang-tao; Yin, Zhou-pin

    2016-09-01

    Onsite surface inspection with a touch probe or a laser scanner is a promising technique for efficiently evaluating surface profile error. The existing work of 5-axis inspection path generation bears a serious drawback, however, as there is a drastic orientation change of the inspection axis. Such a sudden change may exceed the stringent physical limit on the speed and acceleration of the rotary motions of the machine tool. In this paper, we propose a novel path generation method for onsite 5-axis surface inspection. The accessibility cones are defined and used to generate alternative interference-free inspection directions. Then, the control points are optimally calculated to obtain the dual-cubic non-Uniform rational B-splines (NURBS) curves, which respectively determine the path points and the axis vectors in an inspection path. The generated inspection path is smooth and non-interference, which deals with the ‘mutation and shake’ problems and guarantees a stable speed and acceleration of machine tool rotary motions. Its feasibility and validity is verified by the onsite inspection experiments of impeller blade.

  4. Er:YAG Laser Applications on Marble and Limestone Sculptures with Polychrome and Patina Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    deCruz, A.; Wolbarsht, M. L.; Palmer, R. A.; Pierce, S. E.; Adamkiewicz, E.

    The Er:YAG laser (2.94 µm) has been used safely and effectively to ablate contaminants from polychrome surfaces of marble and limestone sculptures. The pieces studied were 13th, 14th and 15th century polychromes and a patina surface of a Roman marble sculpture from the 2nd Century AD. The surface encrustations removed included calcite, gypsum, whewellite, soluble salts, atmospheric deposits, organic films, lichen and other fungal growths that cover the sculptures. The laser removal of organic deposits with the Er:YAG laser was especially effective. A microscopic study of the polychrome surfaces before and after removal of the encrustations showed preservation of the polychrome pigments. Infrared absorption and x-ray fluorescence spectral analyses of the ablated materials and of the surfaces before and after laser ablation were used for evaluation of the mechanism of the laser action and for comparison of the results of Er:YAG laser treatment with traditional conservation methods.

  5. Study of the laser cleaning on plaster sculptures. The effect of laser irradiation on the surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelosi, C.; Fodaro, D.; Sforzini, L.; Rubino, A. R.; Falqui, A.

    2013-06-01

    The focus of this paper is to study the effects caused by the laser irradiation on nineteenth and twentieth century plaster sculptures. Before applying the laser cleaning on the sculptures, it was tested on samples prepared in laboratory according to the results of the scientific investigation carried out on the selected works of art. The characterization of the surface finishing materials of the sculptures was performed by Fourier Transform Infrared spectrometry (FTIR), X-ray Fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF), UV fluorescence photography, and internal micro stratigraphic analysis. Regarding the finishing materials, shellac, zinc white, siccative oil and proteins were found on the surfaces. The results of the scientific investigation, together with the examination of the ancient technical manuals, were used to create the laboratory samples to carry out the irradiation tests with laser. The laser irradiation and cleaning tests were carried out with a Q-switched Nd:YAG system. The irradiated surfaces were analyzed before and after the laser tests with the aid of a video microscope and a reflectance spectrophotometer, in order to evaluate the color changes of the surfaces. The possible morphological modifications caused by laser irradiation were also investigated by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) together with ancillary Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) elemental analysis. Concerning the laser cleaning test on the samples, in general little color changes were observed both with the 532 and 1064 nm wavelength. Total color changes, expressed as Δ E*, are always small apart from the samples made of shellac and zinc white in linseed oil, as finishing layer. As regards these samples the surface irradiated with the laser greyed lightly, corresponding to a decrease of L* parameter (lightness). SEM imaging of the treated and not-treated samples, both at low and high magnification, does not show evidence of significant morphological differences due to the laser beam

  6. Surface-enhanced fluorescence from metal sculptured thin films with application to biosensing in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulhalim, I.; Karabchevsky, Alina; Patzig, Christian; Rauschenbach, Bernd; Fuhrmann, Bodo; Eltzov, Evgeni; Marks, Robert; Xu, Jian; Zhang, Fan; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2009-02-01

    Surface-enhanced fluorescence from porous, metallic sculptured thin films (STFs) was demonstrated for sensing of bacteria in water. Enhancement factors larger than 15 were observed using STFs made of silver, aluminum, gold, and copper with respect to their dense film counterparts. The STFs used are assemblies of tilted, shaped, parallel nanowires prepared with several variants of the oblique-angle-deposition technique. Comparison between the different films indicates that the enhancement factor is higher when the tilt is either small (<30 deg) or large (>80 deg); thus, the enhancement is higher when only a single resonance in the nanowires is excited.

  7. Get Aboard for Sculpture!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, Linda

    1976-01-01

    An art teacher from Big Bear Lake Middle School in California started an art project that wouldn't use the paper, paint and paste of her previous classes. What she came up with was quickly dubbed "wood sculpture". Describes the priorities for creating wood sculpture. (Author/RK)

  8. Very Soft Sculpture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    deGrassi, Jennifer

    1979-01-01

    Instructions are provided for making dolls, or soft people sculptures, by stuffing nylons with cotton and shaping the result with stitching and decoration. This article is one of seven in this issue on fiber arts. (SJL)

  9. Ferrocement Playground Sculpture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridenour, Marcella; Garozzo, Louis

    1979-01-01

    Ferrocement, a mixture of portland cement, fine sand, and wire mesh, provides an inexpensive medium for creative playground equipment. The steps involved in building a ferrocement playground sculpture are described, and a bibliography for additional information is provided. (JMF)

  10. Sculpture Sketches in Bloom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiJulio, Betsy

    2009-01-01

    The best artistic challenges open students' eyes, hearts, and minds by combining both formal and conceptual concerns. In this article, the author describes a project inspired by a temporary exhibition of African Shona sculpture entitled "Mutambo! (Celebrate!)" at the Norfolk Botanical Gardens in Norfolk, Virginia. (Contains 2 online resources.)

  11. Chihuly-Inspired Balloon Sculptures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morice, Erin

    2009-01-01

    When the glass artist Dale Chihuly exhibited his work at the Missouri Botanical Garden, the author took a class of fourth-grade students to view the artist's extraordinary sculptures. Just as the author predicted, the students were in awe of Chihuly's organic three-dimensional sculptures. Before taking the field trip to the Missouri Botanical…

  12. 4D Visualization of Painted Sculpture and Murals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, M. Y.; Tong, H.; Shen, L.; Wang, R. X.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, Z. C.; Hu, Q. W.; Zhu, Y. X.; Zhang, H.

    2015-08-01

    Most cultural heritage applications address visualization with using various media or platforms: desktop-based multimedia presentations, museum kiosks, or videos produced with computer animation. However, these techniques can not directly reveal or show the course that the colorful surface of painted sculpture and murals becomes faint along with the change of the climate and time. Most current techniques just preserve the current appearance and disseminate the current situation of the painted sculpture and murals. The course how these forms of cultural heritage change along the time has not been visualized. In this paper we developed an approach to modelling of painted sculpture and murals that has undergone changes over the years. Different hypotheses has also be given if there is uncertainty. A painted sculpture of Mogao Grottoes is used to demonstate this approach.

  13. Shaving a Shell: Effect of Manipulated Sculpture and Feeding on Shell Growth and Sculpture Development in Nucella lamellosa (Muricidae: Ocenebrinae).

    PubMed

    Webster, Nicole B; Palmer, A Richard

    2016-02-01

    Gastropod shell sculpture offers a novel tool for studying morphological patterning. Existing shell features may be manipulated experimentally to test how alteration affects subsequent shell growth and form. Axial sculpture occurs in many gastropod groups, and spacing of sculpture may be regular or irregular. But how gastropods control sculpture placement during shell growth is unknown. We studied the growth and positioning of axial lamellae in the muricid Nucella lamellosa, and compared these to the superficially similar axial varices seen in other muricids. First, we tested whether the feeding rate had any effect on the rate of addition or positioning of new lamellae. Second, we tested what effect previous shell sculpture had on lamellar placement, and shell growth in general, by removing all shell sculpture and allowing snails to grow over the "shaved" shell surface. Lamellar growth appeared to be relatively plastic; spacing was highly variable both within and among individual snails, and 1-2 weeks were required to complete the addition of a new lamella. Body growth rate was the primary determinant of lamellar growth; past lamellae had no effect on placement of new lamellae or rate of shell length increase. Feeding rate and body size affected only growth in shell length, and had no direct effect on spacing or on the rate of addition of new lamellae. The growth of axial lamellae in N. lamellosa differed from that of varices by exhibiting neither a) regular spacing nor b) a growth hiatus after completion of a lamella. Significantly, despite the obvious impediment of previous sculpture to future shell growth, removal of this sculpture had no observable effect on the rate of body growth or on any aspect of subsequent lamellar growth.

  14. An Approach to 3d Digital Modeling of Surfaces with Poor Texture by Range Imaging Techniques. `SHAPE from Stereo' VS. `SHAPE from Silhouette' in Digitizing Jorge Oteiza's Sculptures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García Fernández, J.; Álvaro Tordesillas, A.; Barba, S.

    2015-02-01

    Despite eminent development of digital range imaging techniques, difficulties persist in the virtualization of objects with poor radiometric information, in other words, objects consisting of homogeneous colours (totally white, black, etc.), repetitive patterns, translucence, or materials with specular reflection. This is the case for much of the Jorge Oteiza's works, particularly in the sculpture collection of the Museo Fundación Jorge Oteiza (Navarra, Spain). The present study intend to analyse and asses the performance of two digital 3D-modeling methods based on imaging techniques, facing cultural heritage in singular cases, determined by radiometric characteristics as mentioned: Shape from Silhouette and Shape from Stereo. On the other hand, the text proposes the definition of a documentation workflow and presents the results of its application in the collection of sculptures created by Oteiza.

  15. Inspection of a Medieval Wood Sculpture Using Computer Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapitany, K.; Somogyi, A.; Barsi, A.

    2016-06-01

    Computer tomography (CT) is an excellent technique for obtaining accurate 3D information about the human body. It allows to visualize the organs, bones and blood vessels, furthermore it enables to diagnose anomalies and diseases. Its spatial reconstruction capability supports other interesting applications, such as inspecting different, even valuable objects like ancient sculptures. Current paper presents a methodology of evaluating CT and video imagery through the example of investigating a wood Madonna with infant Jesus sculpture from the 14th century. The developed techniques extract the outer boundary of the statue, which has been triangulated to derive the surface model. The interior of the sculpture has also been revealed: the iron bolts and rivets as well as the woodworm holes can be mapped. By merging the interior and outer data (geometry and texture) interesting visualizations (perspective views, sections etc.) have been created.

  16. Ion Beam Micro-Sculpturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubby, Joel Alan

    Unique experimental observations are reported on the quasi-dynamic evolution of surface morphology during sputter erosion on two different length scales. The results provide qualitative confirmation of current first and second order approximation theories of cone evolution. On a length scale that is large in comparison to the incident ions projected range R(,p)(E) within a target matrix, experimental observations using the Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) show the initiation and temporal development of sputter induced morphology that can be explained by the variation of sputter efficiency with angle of ion incidence. On a length scale of ion penetration depth, typically 5 to 20 nm, the unique target configuration used in our experiments allows a high resolution study to be performed by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) that reveals changes in surface topography on the 10's of nanometers length scale. The first high resolution TEM observations of a sputter induced cone show a reduced sputter yield within a distance of R(,p)(E) of the cone apex. These experimental observations support mechanisms that link the events taking place on an atomic length scale within the atomic collision cascade with those features that are predicted by first order erosion theory. Previous experimental SEM observations had concentrated on the enhanced erosion predicted by this mechanism at the base of a cone. However results in this basal region are also influenced by secondary (recoil) sputtering that obscures experimental confirmation of these cascade density effects. Qualitative agreement between the observed surface evolution and analytical analysis using computer simulations on both length scales allows these analytical tools, in conjunction with a model of the erosion (and accretion) processes, to be used to physically control surface evolution in a useful manner. This ion beam sculpturing technique is used to produce field emitters for application to charged particle sources

  17. Computer Aided Simulation Machining Programming In 5-Axis Nc Milling Of Impeller Leaf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huran, Liu

    At present, cad/cam (computer-aided design and manufacture) have fine wider and wider application in mechanical industry. For the complex surfaces, the traditional machine tool can no longer satisfy the requirement of such complex task. Only by the help of cad/cam can fulfill the requirement. The machining of the vane surface of the impeller leaf has been considered as the hardest challenge. Because of their complex shape, the 5-axis cnc machine tool is needed for the machining of such parts. The material is hard to cut, the requirement for the surface finish and clearance is very high, so that the manufacture quality of impeller leaf represent the level of 5-axis machining. This paper opened a new field in machining the complicated surface, based on a relatively more rigid mathematical basis. The theory presented here is relatively more systematical. Since the lack of theoretical guidance, in the former research, people have to try in machining many times. Such case will be changed. The movement of the cutter determined by this method is definite, and the residual is the smallest while the times of travel is the fewest. The criterion is simple and the calculation is easy.

  18. Sculpture preferences and personality traits.

    PubMed

    Moffett, L A; Dreger, R M

    1975-02-01

    Factor analyzed the preference ratings of 70 male and 70 female undergraduates for 36 slides of sculpture. A principal factors solution with orthogonal rotations yielded 6 factors: ambiguous abstraction vs. controlled human realism, mildly distorted representation, emotional detachment, traditional portraiture vs. surrealism, highly distorted representation, and geometric abstraction. Some of these factors were similar to the Apollonian, the Dionysian, and the Pythagorean dimensions previously postualted by Nietzsche and Knapp. Preference scores for each factor were computed and correlated with scores on the 16 PF and with selected educational and physical variables. A few small, significant (p less than .05) correlations were found, supporting the hypothesis that artistic style preferences resemble the personality traits of the spectator. PMID:1113250

  19. Sculpture unveiled in tribute to Irish physicist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Michael

    2014-01-01

    A sculpture celebrating the life and work of Ernest Walton - Ireland's only Nobel laureate in science - was unveiled by the Irish Minister for Education and Skills, Ruairí Quinn, at Trinity College Dublin in November 2013.

  20. Accurate identification and compensation of geometric errors of 5-axis CNC machine tools using double ball bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasemi, Ali; Xue, Deyi; Gu, Peihua

    2016-05-01

    Five-axis CNC machine tools are widely used in manufacturing of parts with free-form surfaces. Geometric errors of machine tools have significant effects on the quality of manufactured parts. This research focuses on development of a new method to accurately identify geometric errors of 5-axis CNC machines, especially the errors due to rotary axes, using the magnetic double ball bar. A theoretical model for identification of geometric errors is provided. In this model, both position-independent errors and position-dependent errors are considered as the error sources. This model is simplified by identification and removal of the correlated and insignificant error sources of the machine. Insignificant error sources are identified using the sensitivity analysis technique. Simulation results reveal that the simplified error identification model can result in more accurate estimations of the error parameters. Experiments on a 5-axis CNC machine tool also demonstrate significant reduction in the volumetric error after error compensation.

  1. Submicron sculpturing on chalcogenide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dror, Raphi; Feigel, A. I.; Veinguer, Maya; Sfez, Bruno G.; Klebanov, Matvei; Arsh, A.; Lyubin, Victor

    2005-01-01

    Arsenic based chalcogenide glasses present several advantages for nano-structured optical devices in the infrared. First they possess a good transparency in this optical window, second their amorphous nature is ideal for coating based applications or for hybrid integration, third their photo-structural transformation properties give the possibility of creating high-resolution patterns on films and finally their high index make them particularly suitable for the fabrication of photonic crystal devices. We have demonstrated the fabrication of two-dimensional and three-dimensional (wood-pile) photonic crystal structures for typically 500 nm period structures using interferometric lithography to create the periodic pattern. We show here different techniques in order to obtain specific patterns on the chalcogenide glass using a combination of illumination, etching and redeposition techniques. Moreover, in order to create very steep contrast, we have used the fact that silver ions can freely propagate in the glass under light action, providing a very effective contrast between illuminated and non-illuminated regions. 130 nm patterns with a 500 nm periodicity have been obtained using silver doping of chalcogenide glasses. We will finally show different examples of pattern sculpturing using different illumination and film preparation conditions.

  2. 37 CFR 202.10 - Pictorial, graphic, and sculptural works.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... sculptural works. 202.10 Section 202.10 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights COPYRIGHT OFFICE, LIBRARY OF... Pictorial, graphic, and sculptural works. (a) In order to be acceptable as a pictorial, graphic, or sculptural work, the work must embody some creative authorship in its delineation or form. The...

  3. Is There a Scribble Stage for Sculpture?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathaway, Nan

    2006-01-01

    Most parents and educators are not as familiar or comfortable with the developmental stages that may also occur in three-dimensional work, yet no doubt a similar progression exists. Is there a scribble stage in sculpture? Do children need to master one set of skills before they are able to move on to the next? Do students have opportunity and…

  4. American Sculpture and the Library of Congress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somma, Thomas P.

    2010-01-01

    The Thomas Jefferson Building of the Library of Congress is one of the more significant public structures in American architecture, due for the most part to its wealth and quality of decoration, including an extensive sculptural program executed in 1894-97. The architects entrusted the program to a committee of three prominent sculptors, J. Q. A.…

  5. Some Call It Stone: Teaching Abstract Sculpture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asher, Rikki

    2004-01-01

    Abstract visual art is not for everybody. Some people find it threatening, uncomfortable, and often, inaccessible. Understandably, this can result in a lack of attention paid to nonrepresentational works of art in the visual arts curriculum. This article describes an experiential, hands-on, field trip that sought to demystify abstract sculpture,…

  6. The Book as a Sculptural Object

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    Although the craft and art of bookmaking has a rich history, artworks about books are relatively new. The author teaches in a school that has an international population where a variety of languages and cultures flourish. He took this opportunity to develop a ceramic unit that combined sculptural design, the history of bookmaking, and traditional…

  7. The Joy of Creating Virtual Mathematical Sculptures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chuan, Jen-chung

    The process of turning symbols into a mathematical sculpture has never been easier. A copy of Maple V release five and a Web browser configured with a VRML plug-in such as the Cosmo Player is necessary to do these activities. Maple V furnishes the computing environment with the capability of allowing for concentration on the mathematical…

  8. Improvement of the Laser Direct Metal Deposition Process in 5-axis Configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisselier, Didier; Sankaré, Simon; Engel, Thierry

    The implementation of the continuous 5-axis configuration can extend the limits of the Laser Direct Metal Deposition (LDMD) processes, especially when the complexity of the parts to be built is growing. In order to follow the profile of a part, we use the orientation of its growth axis. Although 5-axis machining is well known nowadays, LDMD processes require a specific optimization that depends on many parameters. Unlike conventional machining, it has to be noted that the speed variation tool tip affects the stability of deposition. Thus, we have to smooth trajectories in order to provide fluid movements and also to ensure the stability of deposition. This article describes the method and results in the optimization of trajectories to build metallic parts with freeform. Optical sensors have been implemented in the focusing unit in order to follow the variations of the laser-powder-substrate interaction and also to detect the process instabilities. Thanks to the right use of a new and large 5 axis machine and specific setting trajectories, manufacturing parts in 5-axis, with no concession on the construction rate has been possible.

  9. DETAIL OF PLAQUE DESCRIBING LION SCULPTURES BY ROLAND HINTON PERRY, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF PLAQUE DESCRIBING LION SCULPTURES BY ROLAND HINTON PERRY, NORTHWEST ABUTMENT - Connecticut Avenue Bridge, Spans Rock Creek & Potomac Parkway at Connecticut Avenue, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  10. 13. WEST END, LOOKING NE, PHILADELPHIA ZOO LION SCULPTURE IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. WEST END, LOOKING NE, PHILADELPHIA ZOO LION SCULPTURE IN FOREGROUND. - Connecting Railway, Schuylkill River Bridge, Spanning Schuylkill River, north of Girard Avenue Bridge, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  11. 4. HISTORIC PHOTOGRAPH, DETAIL OF ABUTMENT, GRIFFIN RELIEF SCULPTURE, CA. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. HISTORIC PHOTOGRAPH, DETAIL OF ABUTMENT, GRIFFIN RELIEF SCULPTURE, CA. 1940. COLLECTION CONNECTICUT DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION. - Merritt Parkway, Grumman Avenue Bridge, Spanning Merritt Parkway, Norwalk, Fairfield County, CT

  12. The CCL5/CCR5 axis promotes metastasis in basal breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Velasco-Velázquez, Marco; Pestell, Richard G.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, we have shown that the CCL5/CCR5 axis is active in patients affected by an aggressive basal subtype of breast cancer. Using preclinical models, we have demonstrated that CCR5 promotes breast cancer invasiveness and metastatic potential, while CCR5 inhibition abrogates them. Thus, CCR5 antagonists may constitute an alternative therapeutic approach for patients affected by metastatic basal breast cancer. PMID:23734321

  13. Virtual Steel Connection Sculpture--Student Learning Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chou, Karen C.; Moaveni, Saeed; Drane, Denise

    2016-01-01

    A Virtual Steel Connection Sculpture was developed through a grant from the National Science Foundation. The Virtual Sculpture is an interactive tool that shows students and anyone interested in connections how steel members are connected. This tool is created to complement students' steel design courses. The features of this educational tool,…

  14. 37 CFR 202.10 - Pictorial, graphic, and sculptural works.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pictorial, graphic, and... Pictorial, graphic, and sculptural works. (a) In order to be acceptable as a pictorial, graphic, or..., graphic, or sculptural authorship. (b) A claim to copyright cannot be registered in a print or...

  15. 37 CFR 202.10 - Pictorial, graphic, and sculptural works.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pictorial, graphic, and... Pictorial, graphic, and sculptural works. (a) In order to be acceptable as a pictorial, graphic, or..., graphic, or sculptural authorship. (b) A claim to copyright cannot be registered in a print or...

  16. Public Sculpture: America's Legacy. America Past and Present. Study Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powe, Faye; Carter, Richard, Ed.

    This guide presents public sculpture as an effective instructional tool, with the primary emphasis on works contributing to a sense of national or community identity. Sculptures are introduced according to the chronology of persons or events commemorated. The 10 lessons focus on United States history from the Civil War to the present. Unit 1:…

  17. Kinetic Sculpture. (Tentative Course Outline). Art Education: 6683.09.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubocq, Edward R.

    The Quinmester Visual Arts Education Curriculum, of which this is one course of study, is described in SO 007 721. In this course on kinetic sculpture, or three dimensional forms that move, students become familiar with sculpturing techniques and vocabulary, with four kinetic sculptors and their work, with correct and professional attitudes toward…

  18. Figurative Sculpture: An Interview with Jeff Rouse. Clay Corner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, Harriet

    1999-01-01

    Presents an interview with Jeff Rouse, a dentist and sculptor, in which he shares his history, his artistic development, the evolution of his work, and an overview of the process of creating bronze sculptures. Includes directions for sculpting a mouth and creating a bronze sculpture. (CMK)

  19. Laser cleaning experiences on sculptures' materials: terracotta, plaster, wood, and wax

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelosi, Claudia; Fodaro, D.; Sforzini, Livia; Lo Monaco, Angela

    2013-11-01

    The focus of this paper is to show the work experiences with laser cleaning on sculptures made of terracotta, plaster, wood and wax. These materials exhibit peculiar features that often prevent the use of traditional cleaning procedures to remove the surface dirt, soot or carbonaceous deposits and other materials coming from environment or ancient conservative interventions. To overcome the difficulties in the cleaning of the above mentioned materials, laser technology was tested. The laser irradiation and cleaning tests were carried out with a Q-switched Nd:YAG system under the following conditions: wavelength 1064 nm and 532 nm; energy 4-28 mJ; pulse duration 10 ns; spot diameter 2-8 mm; frequency 5 Hz. The irradiated surfaces were analyzed before and after the laser tests, with the aid of a video microscope and a reflectance spectrophotometer, in order to evaluate the morphology and colour changes of the surfaces. Before starting with the cleaning intervention, some diagnostic analysis was performed on the sculptures in order to obtain the identification of the original materials and of the surface deposits. Concerning this, Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, and internal micro stratigraphic analysis were performed. This research demonstrated that the laser cleaning is an effective method to remove the surface deposits preserving the original patina of the sculptures and the opacity of the wax. The results gathered in this work encourage to continue the research in order to better understand the interactions between the laser beam and the surfaces and to find the most appropriate laser conditions to clean the sculptures.

  20. 5-Axis Force Calibration Test Results for the JAXA 60cm MSBS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, Hideo; Kunimasu, Tetsuya; Suda, Shinichi; Mizoguti, Yasushi; Okada, Takumi

    In 5-axis balance calibration test except rolling moment of 60cmMSBS, the relation between coil currents and magnetic force was able to be obtained by varying current in each coil and measuring the force with an industry manufactured balance with very small influence of magnetic field. Consequently, there is a relation between an appropriate coil current combination and the force which can be decided uniquely, and it concludes that 60cmMSBS works as a 5-axis balance. The errors of drag, side force, lift, pitching and yawing moments are below 1.6, 1.4, 4.1, 0.8, and 0.9% in the tested range, respectively. These figures are the error evaluation limits by accuracy of the balance, and a possibility of being still higher accuracy remains. All the errors shown are due to a loop-like hysteresis. If the balance calibration range narrows, it is effective in suppressing nonlinearity and a loop-like hysteresis, and making the balance error smaller.

  1. 3D reconstruction and restoration monitoring of sculptural artworks by a multi-sensor framework.

    PubMed

    Barone, Sandro; Paoli, Alessandro; Razionale, Armando Viviano

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays, optical sensors are used to digitize sculptural artworks by exploiting various contactless technologies. Cultural Heritage applications may concern 3D reconstructions of sculptural shapes distinguished by small details distributed over large surfaces. These applications require robust multi-view procedures based on aligning several high resolution 3D measurements. In this paper, the integration of a 3D structured light scanner and a stereo photogrammetric sensor is proposed with the aim of reliably reconstructing large free form artworks. The structured light scanner provides high resolution range maps captured from different views. The stereo photogrammetric sensor measures the spatial location of each view by tracking a marker frame integral to the optical scanner. This procedure allows the computation of the rotation-translation matrix to transpose the range maps from local view coordinate systems to a unique global reference system defined by the stereo photogrammetric sensor. The artwork reconstructions can be further augmented by referring metadata related to restoration processes. In this paper, a methodology has been developed to map metadata to 3D models by capturing spatial references using a passive stereo-photogrammetric sensor. The multi-sensor framework has been experienced through the 3D reconstruction of a Statue of Hope located at the English Cemetery in Florence. This sculptural artwork has been a severe test due to the non-cooperative environment and the complex shape features distributed over a large surface. PMID:23223079

  2. Detail view of basrelief sculpture in tympanum at south wall ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of bas-relief sculpture in tympanum at south wall of east entrance loggia, with scale stick - National Zoological Park, Elephant House, 3001 Connecticut Avenue NW, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  3. Detail view of basrelief sculpture in tympanum at south wall ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of bas-relief sculpture in tympanum at south wall of west entrance loggia, with scale stick - National Zoological Park, Elephant House, 3001 Connecticut Avenue NW, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  4. 19 CFR 10.48 - Engravings, sculptures, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. General Provisions Works of Art § 10.48 Engravings, sculptures, etc. (a) Invoices covering works of art claimed to be free of duty...

  5. 19 CFR 10.48 - Engravings, sculptures, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. General Provisions Works of Art § 10.48 Engravings, sculptures, etc. (a) Invoices covering works of art claimed to be free of duty...

  6. Sculpture, standing Lion, with scale (note: not in original location, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Sculpture, standing Lion, with scale (note: not in original location, now placed at the south side of Building No. 188) - National Park Seminary, Bounded by Capitol Beltway (I-495), Linden Lane, Woodstove Avenue, & Smith Drive, Silver Spring, Montgomery County, MD

  7. Sculpture, perspective view looking to pair of lions positioned at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Sculpture, perspective view looking to pair of lions positioned at top of stairs leading down into the Glen - National Park Seminary, Bounded by Capitol Beltway (I-495), Linden Lane, Woodstove Avenue, & Smith Drive, Silver Spring, Montgomery County, MD

  8. Sculpture, general view looking to the seated lions, probably from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Sculpture, general view looking to the seated lions, probably from the American Bungalow - National Park Seminary, Bounded by Capitol Beltway (I-495), Linden Lane, Woodstove Avenue, & Smith Drive, Silver Spring, Montgomery County, MD

  9. Detail view of lunette with Justice sculpture on west wall ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of lunette with Justice sculpture on west wall of gallery, with scale - U.S. Capitol, Old Supreme Court Chamber, Intersection of North, South, & East Capitol Streets & Capitol Mall, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  10. View of fireplace and Justice sculpture on west wall of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of fireplace and Justice sculpture on west wall of gallery - U.S. Capitol, Old Supreme Court Chamber, Intersection of North, South, & East Capitol Streets & Capitol Mall, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  11. Detail view of lunette with Justice sculpture on west wall ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of lunette with Justice sculpture on west wall of gallery - U.S. Capitol, Old Supreme Court Chamber, Intersection of North, South, & East Capitol Streets & Capitol Mall, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  12. Matisse to Picasso: a compositional study of modern bronze sculptures.

    PubMed

    Young, Marcus L; Schnepp, Suzanne; Casadio, Francesca; Lins, Andrew; Meighan, Melissa; Lambert, Joseph B; Dunand, David C

    2009-09-01

    Inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) was used to determine the bulk metal elemental composition of 62 modern bronze sculptures cast in Paris in the first half of the twentieth century from the collections of The Art Institute of Chicago and the Philadelphia Museum of Art. As a result, a comprehensive survey of the alloy composition of the sculptures of many prominent European artists of the early twentieth century is presented here for the first time. The sculptures in this study consist of predominantly copper with two main alloying elements (zinc and tin). By plotting the concentrations of these two elements (zinc and tin) against each other for all the sculptures studied, three clusters of data become apparent: (A) high-zinc brass; (B) low-zinc brass; (C) tin bronze. These clusters correlate to specific foundries, which used specific casting methods (sand or lost wax) that were influenced by individual preferences and technical skills of the foundry masters. For instance, the high-zinc brass alloys (with the highest levels of tin and zinc and the lowest melting temperature) correspond to most of the Picasso sculptures, correlate with the Valsuani foundry, and are associated with the most recent sculptures (post-WWII) and with the lost-wax casting method. By expanding the ICP-OES database of objects studied, these material correlations may become useful for identifying, dating, or possibly even authenticating other bronzes that do not bear foundry marks. Figure. PMID:19629458

  13. The thinker: opposing directionality of lighting bias within sculptural artwork

    PubMed Central

    Sedgewick, Jennifer R.; Weiers, Bradley; Stewart, Aaron; Elias, Lorin J.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals tend to perceive the direction of light to come from above and slightly from the left; it has been speculated that this phenomenon is also producing similar lighting preferences within 2-dimensional artworks (e.g., paintings, advertisements). The purpose of the present study was to address if lighting bias was present in the 3-dimensional medium of sculpture by implementing a virtual art gallery lighting paradigm. Thirty-nine participants completed a computer task that consisted of 48 galleries each containing one sculpture (24 original sculptures, 24 mirror-reversed) which was surrounded by eight lights (above/below, left/right, front/back). Participants would select one light source to illuminate the sculpture in a manner they perceived to be the most aesthetically pleasing. The results indicated a significant preference for lights positioned from above and from the right, a finding that is contradictory to previous lighting bias research examining artworks. An interpretation for the rightward bias applies the perceptual concept of subjective lighting equality. Objects illuminated from the left typically appear brighter in comparison to right-side lighting; in sculpture, however, increased luminosity can reduce the sculptural detail, and may have been compensated via right-side lighting choices within the lighting task. PMID:25999840

  14. The thinker: opposing directionality of lighting bias within sculptural artwork.

    PubMed

    Sedgewick, Jennifer R; Weiers, Bradley; Stewart, Aaron; Elias, Lorin J

    2015-01-01

    Individuals tend to perceive the direction of light to come from above and slightly from the left; it has been speculated that this phenomenon is also producing similar lighting preferences within 2-dimensional artworks (e.g., paintings, advertisements). The purpose of the present study was to address if lighting bias was present in the 3-dimensional medium of sculpture by implementing a virtual art gallery lighting paradigm. Thirty-nine participants completed a computer task that consisted of 48 galleries each containing one sculpture (24 original sculptures, 24 mirror-reversed) which was surrounded by eight lights (above/below, left/right, front/back). Participants would select one light source to illuminate the sculpture in a manner they perceived to be the most aesthetically pleasing. The results indicated a significant preference for lights positioned from above and from the right, a finding that is contradictory to previous lighting bias research examining artworks. An interpretation for the rightward bias applies the perceptual concept of subjective lighting equality. Objects illuminated from the left typically appear brighter in comparison to right-side lighting; in sculpture, however, increased luminosity can reduce the sculptural detail, and may have been compensated via right-side lighting choices within the lighting task. PMID:25999840

  15. Matisse to Picasso: a compositional study of modern bronze sculptures.

    PubMed

    Young, Marcus L; Schnepp, Suzanne; Casadio, Francesca; Lins, Andrew; Meighan, Melissa; Lambert, Joseph B; Dunand, David C

    2009-09-01

    Inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) was used to determine the bulk metal elemental composition of 62 modern bronze sculptures cast in Paris in the first half of the twentieth century from the collections of The Art Institute of Chicago and the Philadelphia Museum of Art. As a result, a comprehensive survey of the alloy composition of the sculptures of many prominent European artists of the early twentieth century is presented here for the first time. The sculptures in this study consist of predominantly copper with two main alloying elements (zinc and tin). By plotting the concentrations of these two elements (zinc and tin) against each other for all the sculptures studied, three clusters of data become apparent: (A) high-zinc brass; (B) low-zinc brass; (C) tin bronze. These clusters correlate to specific foundries, which used specific casting methods (sand or lost wax) that were influenced by individual preferences and technical skills of the foundry masters. For instance, the high-zinc brass alloys (with the highest levels of tin and zinc and the lowest melting temperature) correspond to most of the Picasso sculptures, correlate with the Valsuani foundry, and are associated with the most recent sculptures (post-WWII) and with the lost-wax casting method. By expanding the ICP-OES database of objects studied, these material correlations may become useful for identifying, dating, or possibly even authenticating other bronzes that do not bear foundry marks. Figure.

  16. An ERK/Cdk5 axis controls the diabetogenic actions of PPARγ.

    PubMed

    Banks, Alexander S; McAllister, Fiona E; Camporez, João Paulo G; Zushin, Peter-James H; Jurczak, Michael J; Laznik-Bogoslavski, Dina; Shulman, Gerald I; Gygi, Steven P; Spiegelman, Bruce M

    2015-01-15

    Obesity-linked insulin resistance is a major precursor to the development of type 2 diabetes. Previous work has shown that phosphorylation of PPARγ (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ) at serine 273 by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) stimulates diabetogenic gene expression in adipose tissues. Inhibition of this modification is a key therapeutic mechanism for anti-diabetic drugs that bind PPARγ, such as the thiazolidinediones and PPARγ partial agonists or non-agonists. For a better understanding of the importance of this obesity-linked PPARγ phosphorylation, we created mice that ablated Cdk5 specifically in adipose tissues. These mice have both a paradoxical increase in PPARγ phosphorylation at serine 273 and worsened insulin resistance. Unbiased proteomic studies show that extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) kinases are activated in these knockout animals. Here we show that ERK directly phosphorylates serine 273 of PPARγ in a robust manner and that Cdk5 suppresses ERKs through direct action on a novel site in MAP kinase/ERK kinase (MEK). Importantly, pharmacological inhibition of MEK and ERK markedly improves insulin resistance in both obese wild-type and ob/ob mice, and also completely reverses the deleterious effects of the Cdk5 ablation. These data show that an ERK/Cdk5 axis controls PPARγ function and suggest that MEK/ERK inhibitors may hold promise for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:25409143

  17. A Virtual Steel Sculpture for Structural Engineering Education: Development and Initial Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dib, Hazar Nicholas; Adamo-Villani, Nicoletta

    2016-01-01

    We describe the development and evaluation of a virtual steel sculpture for engineering education. A good connection design requires the engineer to have a solid understanding of the mechanics and steel behavior. To help students better understand various connection types, many schools have acquired steel sculptures. A steel sculpture is a…

  18. The Sculpture Park as a Teaching Resource: Storm King Center, Mountainville, N.Y.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, David

    1991-01-01

    Explains how proper preparation, including giving students specific tasks to accomplish, helps focus a museum or sculpture garden visit. Outlines two basic ways that a teacher might organize a tour: (1) by showing a progression from figurative to abstract sculpture, and (2) by discussing design concepts. Includes pictures of four sculptures,…

  19. The Common Ground of Figurative Sculpture: An Approach Towards Art Appreciation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devlin-Gascard, Lorettann

    1996-01-01

    Utilizes a 17th-century Italian sculpture and an African fetish figure to illustrate essential qualities and characteristics of figurative sculpture. Points out the extreme differences and the many similarities between the two and offers explanations. Includes a process for leading students through "reading" the sculptures. (MJP)

  20. FTIR spectroscopy of woods: A new approach to study the weathering of the carving face of a sculpture.

    PubMed

    Emmanuel, Vartanian; Odile, Barres; Céline, Roque

    2015-02-01

    Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), a useful method to study woods, has been applied in order to measure an eventual gradient of water absorbed (more precisely, hydroxyl groups, OH) between the surface and the inner part of an ancient and a modern wooden sculptures. The methodology adopted has consisted in comparing FTIR bands within two spectral ranges, one corresponding to the OH content in the wood (around 3400cm(-1)) and the other to the lignin molecules (aromatic CC, around 1610cm(-1)). The ratio between the intensities of the peaks leads to a self-normalization of the measurements which avoids the effects of some experimental parameters (such as sample preparation). The results obtained show that there is a significant and progressive penetration of OH groups from the surface to the inside part of the ancient sculpture (more OH on the surface than inside the wood, due to the aging of the surface and the creation of sites which are able to fix OH groups). In contrary, for the modern one, we measure an increase of OH contents from the surface to the inner part of the sculpture.

  1. Thin-section microscopy of decayed crystalline marble from the garden sculptures of Schoenbrunn Palace in Vienna

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, J.

    2007-11-15

    Sterzing marble, a crystalline white marble used in the late-Baroque garden sculptures of Schoenbrunn Palace in Vienna, was studied by means of thin-section and scanning electron microscopy in order to obtain a better understanding of its surface decay caused by atmospheric weathering. Following the classification of distinct phenomena of deterioration by visual on-site inspection, the microstructural features including surface erosion, micro-cracking, soiling, black crust formation, and microbiological infestation are exemplified by microscopical images and are briefly discussed. The results proved useful for evaluating and understanding the various types of marble decay for creating a safer basis for establishing the procedural principles aimed at conservation and maintenance of the sculptures.

  2. 28. THE UNICORN LADY, PHOTOGRAPH OF SCULPTURE NOW LOCATED JUST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. THE UNICORN LADY, PHOTOGRAPH OF SCULPTURE NOW LOCATED JUST NORTH OF THE MUSIC ROOM, DUMBARTON OAKS MANSION; FORMERLY LOCATED WITHIN THE PARK, NEAR THE ANIMAL CEMETERY 1990 - Dumbarton Oaks Park, Thirty-second & R Streets Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  3. Sculpture, view looking to pair of lions, positioned at top ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Sculpture, view looking to pair of lions, positioned at top of stairs leading down into the Glen from DeWitt Circle, just north of the American Bungalow (note: Windmill in background) - National Park Seminary, Bounded by Capitol Beltway (I-495), Linden Lane, Woodstove Avenue, & Smith Drive, Silver Spring, Montgomery County, MD

  4. Sculpture: Creative Designs with Modern Materials (Tentative Course Outline).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubocq, Edward R.

    This document reports on a course in comprehension and application of various techniques of sculpture and collage, using a contemporary point of view. Students will work with contemporary materials such as wood, metals, plaster, plastics, styrofoam, and many other cardboard basic materials suitable for creative design products. This unit will…

  5. The Eco-Sculpture Assignment: Using Art to Scaffold Metacognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polegato, Rosemary

    2014-01-01

    The Eco-Sculpture Assignment demonstrates that art may be used as a conduit to scaffold metacognition in marketing courses. Theoretical underpinnings are drawn from the literature on pedagogy used in general, marketing, and art education contexts. The assignment is described in detail, followed by examples of learner response that illustrate…

  6. 19 CFR 10.48 - Engravings, sculptures, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. General Provisions Works of Art § 10.48 Engravings, sculptures, etc. (a) Invoices covering works of art claimed to be free of duty under... artist who produced the article, or by the seller, shipper or importer, showing whether it is...

  7. 37 CFR 202.10 - Pictorial, graphic, and sculptural works.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pictorial, graphic, and... Pictorial, graphic, and sculptural works. (a) In order to be acceptable as a pictorial, graphic, or... utility or design patent will not affect the registrability of a claim in an original work of...

  8. 37 CFR 202.10 - Pictorial, graphic, and sculptural works.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pictorial, graphic, and... Pictorial, graphic, and sculptural works. (a) In order to be acceptable as a pictorial, graphic, or... utility or design patent will not affect the registrability of a claim in an original work of...

  9. The golden beauty: brain response to classical and renaissance sculptures.

    PubMed

    Di Dio, Cinzia; Macaluso, Emiliano; Rizzolatti, Giacomo

    2007-01-01

    Is there an objective, biological basis for the experience of beauty in art? Or is aesthetic experience entirely subjective? Using fMRI technique, we addressed this question by presenting viewers, naïve to art criticism, with images of masterpieces of Classical and Renaissance sculpture. Employing proportion as the independent variable, we produced two sets of stimuli: one composed of images of original sculptures; the other of a modified version of the same images. The stimuli were presented in three conditions: observation, aesthetic judgment, and proportion judgment. In the observation condition, the viewers were required to observe the images with the same mind-set as if they were in a museum. In the other two conditions they were required to give an aesthetic or proportion judgment on the same images. Two types of analyses were carried out: one which contrasted brain response to the canonical and the modified sculptures, and one which contrasted beautiful vs. ugly sculptures as judged by each volunteer. The most striking result was that the observation of original sculptures, relative to the modified ones, produced activation of the right insula as well as of some lateral and medial cortical areas (lateral occipital gyrus, precuneus and prefrontal areas). The activation of the insula was particularly strong during the observation condition. Most interestingly, when volunteers were required to give an overt aesthetic judgment, the images judged as beautiful selectively activated the right amygdala, relative to those judged as ugly. We conclude that, in observers naïve to art criticism, the sense of beauty is mediated by two non-mutually exclusive processes: one based on a joint activation of sets of cortical neurons, triggered by parameters intrinsic to the stimuli, and the insula (objective beauty); the other based on the activation of the amygdala, driven by one's own emotional experiences (subjective beauty).

  10. Analysis of sculptures using XRF and X-ray radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calza, C.; Oliveira, D. F.; Freitas, R. P.; Rocha, H. S.; Nascimento, J. R.; Lopes, R. T.

    2015-11-01

    This work reports the analysis of two sacred images on polychrome wood using X-ray Radiography and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence. The first case is the analysis of a sculpture portraying Saint Sebastian, the patron saint of Rio de Janeiro, which is considered the second most ancient sacred image of Brazil. This sculpture was made in Portugal and was transported to Brazil by Estácio Sá, founder of the city of Rio de Janeiro, in 1565. Nowadays, it is located on the main altar of the Church of Capuchin Friars. The second case is the analysis of a sculpture representing Our Lady of Conception, which is located in the D. João VI Museum (EBA/UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro). The objective of these analyses was to evaluate the general conditions of the sculptures, identifying possible problems and internal damages, areas that revealed signs of previous retouchings and the materials and pigments employed by the artists, in order to assist its restoration procedures. EDXRF measurements were carried out with a portable system, developed at the Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory, consisting of a Si-PIN XR-100CR detector from Amptek and an Oxford TF3005 X-ray tube with W anode. An X-ray source, a CR System GE CR50P and IP detectors were used to perform the radiographs. The XRF analysis of the sculptures identified the original pigments in both cases and the radiographic images revealed details of the manufacture; restored regions; extensive use of lead white; presence of cracks on the wood; use of nails and spikes, etc.

  11. Fabrication of TEOS/PDMS/F127 hybrid coating materials for conservation of historic stone sculptures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yurong; Liu, Jia

    2016-08-01

    The present work was aimed to develop a new kind of stone conservation materials (TEOS/PDMS/F127 hybrid coating) by a facile sol-gel method for the protection of decayed sandstones of Chongqing Dazu stone sculptures in China. The hydrophobic property, surface morphology, water vapor permeability, ultraviolet aging resistance and mechanical properties were measured to evaluate the effectiveness of TEOS/PDMS/F127 hybrid coating as a stone conservation material. The results showed that the addition of hydroxyl-terminated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS-OH) contributed to improve the hydrophobic properties and incorporation of PEO-PPO-PEO (F127) surfactant resulted in the formation of superficial protrusions with micro- and nanoscopic structures and overall alteration of surface morphology and roughness, thus preventing the coating materials from cracking. After treatment with TEOS/PDMS/F127 hybrid coating materials, the ultraviolet aging resistance and mechanical properties of stone were also improved without the obvious effects on the breathability and color of the stone, indicating promising applications of TEOS/PDMS/F127 hybrid coating materials for conservation of historic stone sculptures.

  12. Three Dimensional Sculpturing of Vertical Nanowire Arrays by Conventional Photolithography.

    PubMed

    Shi, Run; Huang, Chengzi; Zhang, Linfei; Amini, Abbas; Liu, Kai; Shi, Yuan; Bao, Shuhan; Wang, Ning; Cheng, Chun

    2016-01-05

    Ordered nanoarchitectures have attracted an intense research interest recently because of their promising device applications. They are always fabricated by self-assembling building blocks such as nanowires, nanodots. This kind of bottom up approaches is limited in poor control over height, lateral resolution, aspect ratio, and patterning. Here, we break these limits and realize 3D sculpturing of vertical ZnO nanowire arrays (NAs) based on the conventional photolithography approach. These are achieved by immersing nanowire NAs in thick photoresist (PR) layers, which enable the cutting and patterning of ZnO NAs as well as the tailoring of NAs. Our strategy of 3D sculpturing of NAs promisingly paves the way for designing novel NAs-based nanoarchitectures.

  13. Three Dimensional Sculpturing of Vertical Nanowire Arrays by Conventional Photolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Run; Huang, Chengzi; Zhang, Linfei; Amini, Abbas; Liu, Kai; Shi, Yuan; Bao, Shuhan; Wang, Ning; Cheng, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Ordered nanoarchitectures have attracted an intense research interest recently because of their promising device applications. They are always fabricated by self-assembling building blocks such as nanowires, nanodots. This kind of bottom up approaches is limited in poor control over height, lateral resolution, aspect ratio, and patterning. Here, we break these limits and realize 3D sculpturing of vertical ZnO nanowire arrays (NAs) based on the conventional photolithography approach. These are achieved by immersing nanowire NAs in thick photoresist (PR) layers, which enable the cutting and patterning of ZnO NAs as well as the tailoring of NAs. Our strategy of 3D sculpturing of NAs promisingly paves the way for designing novel NAs-based nanoarchitectures.

  14. Three Dimensional Sculpturing of Vertical Nanowire Arrays by Conventional Photolithography

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Run; Huang, Chengzi; Zhang, Linfei; Amini, Abbas; Liu, Kai; Shi, Yuan; Bao, Shuhan; Wang, Ning; Cheng, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Ordered nanoarchitectures have attracted an intense research interest recently because of their promising device applications. They are always fabricated by self-assembling building blocks such as nanowires, nanodots. This kind of bottom up approaches is limited in poor control over height, lateral resolution, aspect ratio, and patterning. Here, we break these limits and realize 3D sculpturing of vertical ZnO nanowire arrays (NAs) based on the conventional photolithography approach. These are achieved by immersing nanowire NAs in thick photoresist (PR) layers, which enable the cutting and patterning of ZnO NAs as well as the tailoring of NAs. Our strategy of 3D sculpturing of NAs promisingly paves the way for designing novel NAs-based nanoarchitectures. PMID:26729069

  15. 14. LION SCULPTURE, AT THE PHILADELPHIA MUSEUM OF ART, MOVED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. LION SCULPTURE, AT THE PHILADELPHIA MUSEUM OF ART, MOVED FROM MERCHANTS' EXCHANGE, WHERE IT RESTED ON THE STAIR WALL OF SIDE ENTRANCE STAIRS. (A REPLACEMENT LION HAS BEEN PLACED IN THE ORIGINAL SITE, AS DID ANOTHER REPLACEMENT IN THE OTHER SIDE OF THE BUILDING. FOR THIS LATTER REPLACEMENT SEE PA-1028-15). A VIEW OF THE MUSEUM IS IN THE BACKGROUND - Philadelphia Exchange Company, 143 South Third Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  16. Activity Sculptures: Exploring the Impact of Physical Visualizations on Running Activity.

    PubMed

    Stusak, Simon; Tabard, Aurélien; Sauka, Franziska; Khot, Rohit Ashok; Butz, Andreas

    2014-12-01

    Data sculptures are a promising type of visualizations in which data is given a physical form. In the past, they have mostly been used for artistic, communicative or educational purposes, and designers of data sculptures argue that in such situations, physical visualizations can be more enriching than pixel-based visualizations. We present the design of Activity Sculptures: data sculptures of running activity. In a three-week field study we investigated the impact of the sculptures on 14 participants' running activity, the personal and social behaviors generated by the sculptures, as well as participants' experiences when receiving these individual physical tokens generated from the specific data of their runs. The physical rewards generated curiosity and personal experimentation but also social dynamics such as discussion on runs or envy/competition. We argue that such passive (or calm) visualizations can complement nudging and other mechanisms of persuasion with a more playful and reflective look at ones' activity. PMID:26356934

  17. Non-destructive Investigation of "The Violinist" a Lead Sculpture by Pablo Gargallo, Using the Neutron Imaging Facility NEUTRA in the Paul Scherrer Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masalles, Alex; Lehmann, Eberhard; Mannes, David

    The Violinist (1920), the only sculpture made by Gargallo using lead sheet and wood, is being corroded by carbonation, most probably due to the organic vapours released by the wood inside, a material not chemically compatible with lead. Hydrogen plasma has been tested and proved to be an effective treatment meaning that the sculpture has to be dismantled in order to give the plasma gas access to the lead carbonate crusts on the inner surface of the lead sheet. Prior to dismantling, a complete exploration and diagnosis of this lead sculpture has been carried out through neutron imaging at the Paul Scherrer Institute. This non-destructive technique has produced different sets of images including radiography, tomography and 3D reconstruction. Despite the presence of a core made of an organic material such as wood, the digital processing of the images and their in depth visual analysis have yielded new three-dimensional information of inaccessible details of the sculpture, allowing us to assess its present state of conservation and the manufacturing technique and materials used by the artist. The results presented in this article highlight how information from neutron imaging can be of great value when it comes to set the strategies for future conservation treatment

  18. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy in paintings and sculptures research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarzyński, A.; Skrzeczanowski, W.; Marczak, J.

    2007-07-01

    Application of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) for investigation of chemical constitution and stratigraphy of artworks, and metallic objects with multilayer structures is described in the paper. Physical phenomena accompanying LIBS investigations, especially temporal evolution and spectral lines broadening are described. Operational characteristics of experimental equipment are shown. Results obtained with use of two different echelle spectrometers are compared. Pigments used in oil paintings are analyzed and analysis results are presented. Experimental results of measurements of various objects like paintings, sculptures and artifacts are shown. Works on dating of investigated paintings are described.

  19. Beyond Illustration: Sculpture Trails and Parks as Environmental and Historic Interpretation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hull, Lynne

    1996-01-01

    Some parks and some artists working outdoors are interacting with the environment and interpreting ecology through artworks in ways related to methodology of interpreters. Several sculpture parks are described. Sculptures include those that interpret local history and ecology, teach about tree function or historic use of stone, or supply habitats…

  20. Analysis of a Brazilian baroque sculpture using Raman spectroscopy and FT-IR.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Renato P; Ribeiro, Iohanna M; Calza, Cristiane; Oliveira, Ana L; Felix, Valter S; Ferreira, Douglas S; Pimenta, André R; Pereira, Ronaldo V; Pereira, Marcelo O; Lopes, Ricardo T

    2016-02-01

    In this study, samples were taken from the sculpture of Our Lady of Sorrows and analyzed by Raman spectroscopy and FT-IR. This sculpture has been dated to the early eighteenth century. Samples were also examined using optical microscopy and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS). Based on chemical analysis, the pigments vermilion [HgS], massicot [PbO] and azurite [Cu3(CO3)2(OH)2]were found in the sculpture polychrome. The results indicate that the green polychrome of the sculpture's mantle comes from the blending of massicot and azurite. Because the literature reports that the mantle of the Our Lady of Sorrows sculpture is blue, the mixing of these pigments results from a production error. The results also indicate the presence of Au in the sculpture, which indicates the originality of the piece. The results from this study helped restorers to choose the appropriate procedures for intervening in the sculpture and contributed to the knowledge about the manufacturing process of Brazilian baroque sculptures. PMID:26513229

  1. Analysis of a Brazilian baroque sculpture using Raman spectroscopy and FT-IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, Renato P.; Ribeiro, Iohanna M.; Calza, Cristiane; Oliveira, Ana L.; Felix, Valter S.; Ferreira, Douglas S.; Pimenta, André R.; Pereira, Ronaldo V.; Pereira, Marcelo O.; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2016-02-01

    In this study, samples were taken from the sculpture of Our Lady of Sorrows and analyzed by Raman spectroscopy and FT-IR. This sculpture has been dated to the early eighteenth century. Samples were also examined using optical microscopy and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS). Based on chemical analysis, the pigments vermilion [HgS], massicot [PbO] and azurite [Cu3(CO3)2(OH)2] were found in the sculpture polychrome. The results indicate that the green polychrome of the sculpture's mantle comes from the blending of massicot and azurite. Because the literature reports that the mantle of the Our Lady of Sorrows sculpture is blue, the mixing of these pigments results from a production error. The results also indicate the presence of Au in the sculpture, which indicates the originality of the piece. The results from this study helped restorers to choose the appropriate procedures for intervening in the sculpture and contributed to the knowledge about the manufacturing process of Brazilian baroque sculptures.

  2. Mathematical String Sculptures: A Case Study in Computationally-Enhanced Mathematical Crafts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenberg, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Mathematical string sculptures constitute an extremely beautiful realm of mathematical crafts. This snapshot begins with a description of a marvelous (and no longer manufactured) toy called Space Spider, which provided a framework with which children could experiment with string sculptures. Using a computer-controlled laser cutter to create frames…

  3. A novel IL-17 signaling pathway controlling keratinocyte proliferation and tumorigenesis via the TRAF4–ERK5 axis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ling; Chen, Xing; Zhao, Junjie; Martin, Bradley; Zepp, Jarod A.; Ko, Jennifer S.; Gu, Chunfang; Cai, Gang; Ouyang, Wenjun; Sen, Ganes; Stark, George R.; Su, Bing; Vines, Charlotte M.; Tournier, Cathy; Hamilton, Thomas A.; Vidimos, Allison; Gastman, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Although IL-17 is emerging as an important cytokine in cancer promotion and progression, the underlining molecular mechanism remains unclear. Previous studies suggest that IL-17 (IL-17A) sustains a chronic inflammatory microenvironment that favors tumor formation. Here we report a novel IL-17–mediated cascade via the IL-17R–Act1–TRAF4–MEKK3–ERK5 positive circuit that directly stimulates keratinocyte proliferation and tumor formation. Although this axis dictates the expression of target genes Steap4 (a metalloreductase for cell metabolism and proliferation) and p63 (a transcription factor for epidermal stem cell proliferation), Steap4 is required for the IL-17–induced sustained expansion of p63+ basal cells in the epidermis. P63 (a positive transcription factor for the Traf4 promoter) induces TRAF4 expression in keratinocytes. Thus, IL-17–induced Steap4-p63 expression forms a positive feedback loop through p63-mediated TRAF4 expression, driving IL-17–dependent sustained activation of the TRAF4–ERK5 axis for keratinocyte proliferation and tumor formation. PMID:26347473

  4. An open CAM system for dentistry on the basis of China-made 5-axis simultaneous contouring CNC machine tool and industrial CAM software.

    PubMed

    Lu, Li; Liu, Shusheng; Shi, Shenggen; Yang, Jianzhong

    2011-10-01

    China-made 5-axis simultaneous contouring CNC machine tool and domestically developed industrial computer-aided manufacture (CAM) technology were used for full crown fabrication and measurement of crown accuracy, with an attempt to establish an open CAM system for dental processing and to promote the introduction of domestic dental computer-aided design (CAD)/CAM system. Commercially available scanning equipment was used to make a basic digital tooth model after preparation of crown, and CAD software that comes with the scanning device was employed to design the crown by using domestic industrial CAM software to process the crown data in order to generate a solid model for machining purpose, and then China-made 5-axis simultaneous contouring CNC machine tool was used to complete machining of the whole crown and the internal accuracy of the crown internal was measured by using 3D-MicroCT. The results showed that China-made 5-axis simultaneous contouring CNC machine tool in combination with domestic industrial CAM technology can be used for crown making and the crown was well positioned in die. The internal accuracy was successfully measured by using 3D-MicroCT. It is concluded that an open CAM system for dentistry on the basis of China-made 5-axis simultaneous contouring CNC machine tool and domestic industrial CAM software has been established, and development of the system will promote the introduction of domestically-produced dental CAD/CAM system. PMID:22038364

  5. Fabrication, characterization and some applications of graded chiral zigzag shaped nano-sculptured silver thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savaloni, Hadi; Esfandiar, Ali

    2011-09-01

    Graded chiral zig-zag shaped nano-sculptured silver thin films (GCZSSTF) were produced in two stages using oblique deposition technique together with rotation of substrate about its surface normal while a shadowing block was also fixed at the center of the substrate holder. Chrystallographic and morphological structure of these films were obtained using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Spectrophotometry was used to obtain their optical behavior while their application in both hydrophobicity and gas sensing was also investigated. XRD results showed a dominant (1 1 1) orientation growth on the zig arm of the structure while by addition of the second arm (zag) the crystallographical growth orientation changed to (2 2 0). The anisotropic nano-structure of these films was also distinguished through (1 - R) spectra. A common peak at about 350 nm related to the TM mode of plasmon resonances and a broad shoulder at about 420 nm for the s-polarized light and at 620 nm for the p-polarized light corresponding to the LM mode of plasmon resonances are observed. These peaks are directly related to the nano-columns topography. The film system used here proved to act as a physical method for producing layer-by-layer structure for obtaining enhanced hydrophobic surfaces rather than the usual chemical methods reported in the literature. In addition, the GCZSSTF also acted as good as reported results for nano-tubes when applied as cathode in the field ionization gas sensing setup.

  6. Three-dimensional periodic chiral sculptured thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopal, Vijayakumar C.

    2013-01-01

    Sculptured thin films (STFs) are nano-engineered materials that have controllable porosity, structural chirality, and periodicity in one, two, or three dimensions. They have been exploited in developing optical elements such as thin-film filters, polarizers, sensors, and waveguides for integrated optics. A grating theory-based modeling approach for STFs as fully three-dimensional (3-D) periodic structures is developed. Input for this model consists of a structural parameter set that is easily accessible experimentally. This parameter set is common to evaluating STFs from a fabrication as well as modeling perspective and thus furnishes a basis for developing appropriate process monitoring and control methods necessary for successful commercial production. Using the proposed model, a quantitative understanding of the limits of applicability of traditional modeling methods for STFs and guidelines for robust design of STF-based devices are developed. This knowledge gained is applied to explore STFs in two illustrative examples: (1) as a notch filter and (2) as a 3-D photonic crystal.

  7. Sculptured thin films as 3D photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopal, Vijayakumar C.

    2012-10-01

    Sculptured thin films (STFs) are columnar thin films nano-engineered to have controllable porosity, structural chirality and periodicity in one, two or three dimensions. These characteristics of STFs have been exploited in developing optical elements such as thin film filters, polarizers, sensors, and waveguides for integrated optics. They can be fabricated by a simple two-stage (lithography and deposition) process. In this paper, we develop a grating theory-based modeling approach for STFs as fully 3D periodic structures. Input for this model consists of a structural parameter set that is easily accessible experimentally. This helps establish a common parameter set for evaluating STFs from a fabrication as well as modeling perspective, thus laying the base required for developing appropriate process monitoring and control methods necessary for successful commercial production. Using the proposed model, we develop a quantitative understanding of the limits of applicability of traditional modeling methods for STFs and develop guidelines for robust design of STF-based devices. We apply this knowledge gained to explore STFs in two illustrative examples: (i) as a notch filter, and (ii) as a 3D photonic crystal. The results demonstrate the potential for success and highlight the remaining challenges that need to be overcome.

  8. Dying star creates sculpture of gas and dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-09-01

    Sculpture of gas and dust hi-res Size hi-res: 125 Kb Credits: ESA, NASA, HEIC and The Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA) Dying star creates sculpture of gas and dust The so-called Cat's Eye Nebula, formally catalogued NGC 6543 and seen here in this detailed view from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, is one of the most complex planetary nebulae ever seen in space. A planetary nebula forms when Sun-like stars gently eject their outer gaseous layers to form bright nebulae with amazing twisted shapes. Hubble first revealed NGC 6543's surprisingly intricate structures including concentric gas shells, jets of high-speed gas and unusual shock-induced knots of gas in 1994. This new image, taken with Hubble's Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS), reveals the full beauty of a bull's-eye pattern of eleven or more concentric rings, or shells, around the Cat’s Eye. Each ‘ring’ is actually the edge of a spherical bubble seen projected onto the sky - which is why it appears bright along its outer edge. High resolution version (JPG format) 125 Kb High resolution version (TIFF format) 2569 Kb Acknowledgment: R. Corradi (Isaac Newton Group of Telescopes, Spain) and Z. Tsvetanov (NASA). Sculpture of gas and dust hi-res Size hi-res: 287 Kb Credits: Nordic Optical Telescope and Romano Corradi (Isaac Newton Group of Telescopes, Spain) Dying star creates sculpture of gas and dust An enormous but extremely faint halo of gaseous material surrounds the Cat’s Eye Nebula and is over three light-years across. Some planetary nebulae been found to have halos like this one, likely formed of material ejected during earlier active episodes in the star's evolution - most likely some 50 000 to 90 000 years ago. This image was taken by Romano Corradi with the Nordic Optical Telescope on La Palma in the Canary Islands. The image is constructed from two narrow-band exposures showing oxygen atoms (1800 seconds, in blue) and nitrogen atoms (1800 seconds, in red). High resolution version (JPG

  9. Restitution of Sculptural Groups Using 3D Scanners

    PubMed Central

    Merchán, Pilar; Salamanca, Santiago; Adán, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Imagine for a moment that you have to solve a 3D jigsaw of which you have lost several pieces. You have also lost the original box-top showing the final picture, and as if that were not enough, some of the pieces you do have may belong to some other jigsaw. This is in essence the sort of challenge that we faced in the novel project that we shall be describing in this paper. The final aim of the project was, with the help of 3D scanners, to digitalize and reconstruct multi-piece classical sculptures. Particularly, we tackle the restitution of the so-called “Aeneas Group”, a famous iconographic reference during the Roman Empire. We have undertaken this ambitious project in collaboration with the research department of the Spanish National Museum of Roman Art (MNAR). This paper summarizes the real problems that arose and had to be solved, the innovations, and the main results of the work that we have carried out over these recent years. PMID:22164088

  10. 37 CFR 253.8 - Terms and rates of royalty payments for the use of published pictorial, graphic, and sculptural...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... payments for the use of published pictorial, graphic, and sculptural works. 253.8 Section 253.8 Patents... BROADCASTING § 253.8 Terms and rates of royalty payments for the use of published pictorial, graphic, and..., graphic, and sculptural works by public broadcasting entities for the activities described in 17...

  11. 37 CFR 381.8 - Terms and rates of royalty payments for the use of published pictorial, graphic, and sculptural...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... payments for the use of published pictorial, graphic, and sculptural works. 381.8 Section 381.8 Patents... Terms and rates of royalty payments for the use of published pictorial, graphic, and sculptural works. (a) Scope. This section establishes rates and terms for the use of published pictorial, graphic,...

  12. 37 CFR 253.8 - Terms and rates of royalty payments for the use of published pictorial, graphic, and sculptural...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... payments for the use of published pictorial, graphic, and sculptural works. 253.8 Section 253.8 Patents... BROADCASTING § 253.8 Terms and rates of royalty payments for the use of published pictorial, graphic, and..., graphic, and sculptural works by public broadcasting entities for the activities described in 17...

  13. 37 CFR 381.8 - Terms and rates of royalty payments for the use of published pictorial, graphic, and sculptural...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... payments for the use of published pictorial, graphic, and sculptural works. 381.8 Section 381.8 Patents... Terms and rates of royalty payments for the use of published pictorial, graphic, and sculptural works. (a) Scope. This section establishes rates and terms for the use of published pictorial, graphic,...

  14. Study of Italian Renaissance sculptures using an external beam nuclear microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucchiatti, A.; Bouquillon, A.; Moignard, B.; Salomon, J.; Gaborit, J. R.

    2000-03-01

    The use of an extracted proton micro-beam for the PIXE analysis of glazes is discussed in the context of the growing interest in the creation of an analytical database on Italian Renaissance glazed terracotta sculptures. Some results concerning the frieze of an altarpiece of the Louvre museum, featuring white angels and cherubs heads, are presented.

  15. Creating Cast Paper Sculpture: A Simple Lesson in Papermaking and Moldmaking. AMACO[R] Lesson.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, Harriet; Gamble, David

    This lesson combines two significant art forms into one lesson. Students first learn the techniques necessary to create a relief sculpture terra cotta clay mold. Using that mold, students will experience the art of paper making and paper casting simply, safely, and economically. A brief history of the art of paper making is provided, along with…

  16. Life-Size Sculptural Heads: A Lesson in Three-Dimensional Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, Harriet

    2003-01-01

    Presents a lesson in which students created three-dimensional self-portraits, using papier-mache, clay, and plaster, designed to develop their modeling skills as they learn about art history. Discusses how the students created their sculptures, offering detailed directions on creating the three-dimensional heads. (CMK)

  17. Commemorative Sculpture in the United States: A Unit of Study for Grades 8-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Percoco, James; Richman, Michael

    Using primary source documents, this teaching unit focuses on the role monuments and memorials play in the culture. Teacher background materials include a unit overview and unit context, correlation to National Standards for United States History, unit objectives, a lesson plan list, and historical background on commemorative sculpture in the…

  18. From Postmodernism to Milk Cartons: Junk Art Sculptures and Pre-Service Teachers' Philosophies of Schooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermott, Morna

    2008-01-01

    This essay focuses of an arts-informed inquiry performed by sixteen pre-service teachers who created sculptures to explore their teaching philosophies. Through this creative process changes occurred in their assumptions and expectations about what is of value in teaching and relationships between themselves, their students, and the community. The…

  19. What a Relief: Using Paper Relief Sculpture to Teach Topographic Map Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Kelly

    2005-01-01

    While the struggle persists in science classes to help students visualize in three dimensions, art classes are creating unique sculptures out of paper that produce three-dimensional displays from two-dimensional resources. The translation of paper relief sculpting from the art classroom to the science classroom adds dimension to the teaching of…

  20. Polyhedral Sculpture: The Path from Computational Artifact to Real-World Mathematical Object.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenberg, Michael; Nishioka, Ann

    Mathematics educators often despair at math's austere, "abstract" reputation. This paper describes recent work in developing an application named "HyperGami," which is designed to integrate both the abstract and"real-world" aspects of mathematics by allowing children to design and construct polyhedral models and sculptures. Children use formal…

  1. Marsdenia tenacissima extract suppresses A549 cell migration through regulation of CCR5-CCL5 axis, Rho C, and phosphorylated FAK.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sen-Sen; Li, Fang-Fang; Sun, Li; Fan, Wei; Gu, Ming; Zhang, Lu-Yong; Qin, Song; Yuan, Sheng-Tao

    2016-03-01

    Marsdenia tenacissima, a traditional Chinese medicine, is long been used to treat various diseases including asthma, cancer, trachitis, tonsillitis, pharyngitis, cystitis, and pneumonia. Although Marsdenia tenacissima has been demonstrated to have strong anti-tumor effects against primary tumors, its effect on cancer metastasis remains to be defined, and the molecular mechanism underlying the anti-metastatic effect is unknown. In the present study, we investigated the effects of XAP (an extract of Marsdenia tenacissima) on A549 lung cancer cell migration and explored the role of CCR5-CCL5 axis in the anti-metastatic effects of XAP. Our resutls showed that XAP inhibited A549 lung cancer cell migration and invasion in a dose-dependent manner. The protein levels of CCR5, but not CCR9 and CXCR4, were decreased by XAP. The secretion of CCL5, the ligand of CCR5, was reduced by XAP. XAP down-regulated Rho C expression and FAK phosphorylation. In conclusion, XAP inhibited A549 cell migration and invasion through down-regulation of CCR5-CCL5 axis, Rho C, and FAK. PMID:27025367

  2. Marsdenia tenacissima extract suppresses A549 cell migration through regulation of CCR5-CCL5 axis, Rho C, and phosphorylated FAK.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sen-Sen; Li, Fang-Fang; Sun, Li; Fan, Wei; Gu, Ming; Zhang, Lu-Yong; Qin, Song; Yuan, Sheng-Tao

    2016-03-01

    Marsdenia tenacissima, a traditional Chinese medicine, is long been used to treat various diseases including asthma, cancer, trachitis, tonsillitis, pharyngitis, cystitis, and pneumonia. Although Marsdenia tenacissima has been demonstrated to have strong anti-tumor effects against primary tumors, its effect on cancer metastasis remains to be defined, and the molecular mechanism underlying the anti-metastatic effect is unknown. In the present study, we investigated the effects of XAP (an extract of Marsdenia tenacissima) on A549 lung cancer cell migration and explored the role of CCR5-CCL5 axis in the anti-metastatic effects of XAP. Our resutls showed that XAP inhibited A549 lung cancer cell migration and invasion in a dose-dependent manner. The protein levels of CCR5, but not CCR9 and CXCR4, were decreased by XAP. The secretion of CCL5, the ligand of CCR5, was reduced by XAP. XAP down-regulated Rho C expression and FAK phosphorylation. In conclusion, XAP inhibited A549 cell migration and invasion through down-regulation of CCR5-CCL5 axis, Rho C, and FAK.

  3. AC1MMYR2 impairs high dose paclitaxel-induced tumor metastasis by targeting miR-21/CDK5 axis.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yu; Zhou, Xuan; Yang, Juan-Juan; Liu, Xia; Zhao, Xiao-hui; Wang, Qi-xue; Han, Lei; Song, Xin; Zhu, Zhi-yan; Tian, Wei-ping; Zhang, Lun; Mei, Mei; Kang, Chun-sheng

    2015-07-01

    Paclitaxel (taxol) is a widely used chemo-drug for many solid tumors, while continual taxol treatment is revealed to stimulate tumor dissemination. We previously found that a small molecule inhibitor of miR-21, termed AC1MMYR2, had the potential to impair tumorigenesis and metastasis. The aim of this study was to investigate whether combining AC1MMYR2 with taxol could be explored as a means to limit tumor metastasis. Here we showed that abnormal activation of miR-21/CDK5 axis was associated with breast cancer lymph node metastasis, which was also contribute to high dose taxol-induced invasion and epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) in both breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 and glioblastoma cell line U87VIII. AC1MMYR2 attenuated CDK5 activity by functional targeting CDK5RAP1, CDK5 activator p39 and target p-FAK(ser732). A series of in vitro assays indicated that treatment of AC1MMYR2 combined with taxol suppressed tumor migration and invasion ability in both MDA-MB-231 and U87VIII cell. More importantly, combination therapy impaired high-dose taxol induced invadopodia, and EMT markers including β-catenin, E-cadherin and vimentin. Strikingly, a significant reduction of lung metastasis in mice was observed in the AC1MMYR2 plus taxol treatment. Taken together, our work demonstrated that AC1MMYR2 appeared to be a promising strategy in combating taxol induced cancer metastasis by targeting miR-21/CDK5 axis, which highlighted the potential for development of therapeutic modalities for better clinic taxol application.

  4. AC1MMYR2 impairs high dose paclitaxel-induced tumor metastasis by targeting miR-21/CDK5 axis.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yu; Zhou, Xuan; Yang, Juan-Juan; Liu, Xia; Zhao, Xiao-hui; Wang, Qi-xue; Han, Lei; Song, Xin; Zhu, Zhi-yan; Tian, Wei-ping; Zhang, Lun; Mei, Mei; Kang, Chun-sheng

    2015-07-01

    Paclitaxel (taxol) is a widely used chemo-drug for many solid tumors, while continual taxol treatment is revealed to stimulate tumor dissemination. We previously found that a small molecule inhibitor of miR-21, termed AC1MMYR2, had the potential to impair tumorigenesis and metastasis. The aim of this study was to investigate whether combining AC1MMYR2 with taxol could be explored as a means to limit tumor metastasis. Here we showed that abnormal activation of miR-21/CDK5 axis was associated with breast cancer lymph node metastasis, which was also contribute to high dose taxol-induced invasion and epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) in both breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 and glioblastoma cell line U87VIII. AC1MMYR2 attenuated CDK5 activity by functional targeting CDK5RAP1, CDK5 activator p39 and target p-FAK(ser732). A series of in vitro assays indicated that treatment of AC1MMYR2 combined with taxol suppressed tumor migration and invasion ability in both MDA-MB-231 and U87VIII cell. More importantly, combination therapy impaired high-dose taxol induced invadopodia, and EMT markers including β-catenin, E-cadherin and vimentin. Strikingly, a significant reduction of lung metastasis in mice was observed in the AC1MMYR2 plus taxol treatment. Taken together, our work demonstrated that AC1MMYR2 appeared to be a promising strategy in combating taxol induced cancer metastasis by targeting miR-21/CDK5 axis, which highlighted the potential for development of therapeutic modalities for better clinic taxol application. PMID:25827073

  5. The great beauty: a neuroaesthetic study by neuroelectric imaging during the observation of the real Michelangelo's Moses sculpture.

    PubMed

    Babiloni, F; Cherubino, P; Graziani, I; Trettel, A; Bagordo, G M; Cundari, C; Borghini, G; Arico, P; Maglione, A G; Vecchiato, G

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have been showed as the perception of real or displayed masterpieces by ancient or modern painters generate stable neuroelectrical correlates in humans. In this study, we collected the neuroelectrical brain activity correlated with the observation of the real sculpture of Michelangelo's Moses within the church where it is actually installed in a group of healthy subjects. In addition to the cerebral activity also the heart rate (HR) and the galvanic skin response (GSR) were collected simultaneously, to assess the emotional engage of the investigated population. The Moses sculpture was observed by the group from three different point of views, each one revealing different details of the sculpture. In addition, in each location the light conditions related to the specific observation of the sculpture were explicitly changed. Results showed that cerebral activity of the subjects varied significantly across the three different views and for light condition against no light condition (p<;0.04). Furthermore, the emotional engage estimated on the whole population is higher for a point of observation in which the Mose's face is directed toward the eyes of the observers (p<;0.02). Finally, the cerebral appreciation of the investigated group was found maximum from a perspective in which all the details of the sculpture could be easily grab by the eyes. Results suggested how the perception of the sculpture depends critically by the point of view of the observers and how such point of view can produce separate emotional and cerebral responses.

  6. PIXE and /μ-PIXE analysis of glazes from terracotta sculptures of the della Robbia workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucchiatti, Alessandro; Bouquillon, Anne; Giancarlo Lanterna; Lucarelli, Franco; Mandò, Pier Andrea; Prati, Paolo; Salomon, Joseph; Vaccari, Maria Grazia

    2002-04-01

    A series of PIXE analyses has been performed on glazes from terracotta sculptures of the Italian Renaissance and on reference standards. The problems related to the investigation of such heterogeneous materials are discussed and the experimental uncertainties are evaluated, for each element, from the PIXE analysis of standard glasses. Some examples from artefacts coming from Italian collections are given. This research has been conducted in the framework of the COST-G1 European action.

  7. Visiting Richard Serra's "Promenade" sculpture improves postural control and judgment of subjective visual vertical.

    PubMed

    Kapoula, Zoï; Lang, Alexandre; Lê, Thanh-Thuan; Adenis, Marie-Sarah; Yang, Qing; Lipede, Gabi; Vernet, Marine

    2014-01-01

    Body sway while maintaining an upright quiet stance reflects an active process of balance based on the integration of visual, vestibular, somatosensory, and proprioceptive inputs. Richard Serra's Promenade sculpture featured in the 2008 Monumenta exhibition at the Grand Palais in Paris, France is herein hypothesized to have stimulated the body's vertical and longitudinal axes as it showcased five monumental rectangular solids pitched at a 1.69(°) angle. Using computerized dynamic posturography we measured the body sway of 23 visitors when fixating a cross, or when observing the artwork (fixating it or actively exploring it with eye movements) before and after walking around and alongside the sculpture (i.e., before and after a promenade). A first fixation at the sculpture increased medio-lateral stability (in terms of spectral power of body sway). Eye movement exploration in the depth of the sculpture increased antero-posterior stability [in terms of spectral power and canceling time (CT) of body sway] at the expense of medio-lateral stability (in terms of CT). Moreover, a medio-lateral instability associated with eye movement exploration before the promenade (in terms of body sway sensu stricto) was canceled after the promenade. Finally, the overall medio-lateral stability (in terms of spectral power) increased after the promenade. Fourteen additional visitors were asked to stand in a dark room and adjust a luminous line to what they considered to be the earth-vertical axis. The promenade executed within the sculpted environment afforded by Serra's monumental statuary works resulted in significantly improved performances on the subjective visual vertical test. We attribute these effects to the sculpted environment provided by the exhibition which may have acted as a kind of physiologic "training ground" thereby improving the visitors' overall sense of visual perspective, equilibrium, and gravity.

  8. From the Lab to the Scaffold: Laser Cleaning of Polychromed Architectonic Elements and Sculptures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillejo, M.; Domingo, C.; Guerra-Librero, F.; Jadraque, M.; Martín, M.; Oujja, M.; Rebollar, E.; Torres, R.

    This work presents the results of laboratory tests aiming at the characterization of painting materials by LIB and FT-Raman spectroscopies and at identification of the best laser cleaning conditions of polychromes of Spanish Heritage: polychromes on gypsum mortar of the Church-Fortress of Santa Tecla of Cervera de la Cañada, Zaragoza, fifteenth century, and appliqué relief brocades on wooden sculptures of the Chapel of San Miguel, Cathedral of Jaca, Huesca, sixteenth century.

  9. Spectral responses of gyrotropic chiral sculptured thin films to obliquely incident plane waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickett, Matthew D.; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh; Polo, John A., Jr.

    Gyrotropic chiral sculptured thin films (STFs) exhibit optical activity due to their structural chirality, local anisotropy, and magneto-optic gyrotropy. We adapted two algorithms for nongyrotopic chiral STFs to investigate the circular-polarization-sensitivity of gyrotropic chiral STFs to incident plane waves. The impacts of gyrotropy and oblique angles of incidence on the reflectances and the transmittances were examined, and several conclusions drawn. In particular, we found that the incorporation of gyrotropy results in a blueshift of the Bragg regime.

  10. Visiting Richard Serra's "Promenade" sculpture improves postural control and judgment of subjective visual vertical.

    PubMed

    Kapoula, Zoï; Lang, Alexandre; Lê, Thanh-Thuan; Adenis, Marie-Sarah; Yang, Qing; Lipede, Gabi; Vernet, Marine

    2014-01-01

    Body sway while maintaining an upright quiet stance reflects an active process of balance based on the integration of visual, vestibular, somatosensory, and proprioceptive inputs. Richard Serra's Promenade sculpture featured in the 2008 Monumenta exhibition at the Grand Palais in Paris, France is herein hypothesized to have stimulated the body's vertical and longitudinal axes as it showcased five monumental rectangular solids pitched at a 1.69(°) angle. Using computerized dynamic posturography we measured the body sway of 23 visitors when fixating a cross, or when observing the artwork (fixating it or actively exploring it with eye movements) before and after walking around and alongside the sculpture (i.e., before and after a promenade). A first fixation at the sculpture increased medio-lateral stability (in terms of spectral power of body sway). Eye movement exploration in the depth of the sculpture increased antero-posterior stability [in terms of spectral power and canceling time (CT) of body sway] at the expense of medio-lateral stability (in terms of CT). Moreover, a medio-lateral instability associated with eye movement exploration before the promenade (in terms of body sway sensu stricto) was canceled after the promenade. Finally, the overall medio-lateral stability (in terms of spectral power) increased after the promenade. Fourteen additional visitors were asked to stand in a dark room and adjust a luminous line to what they considered to be the earth-vertical axis. The promenade executed within the sculpted environment afforded by Serra's monumental statuary works resulted in significantly improved performances on the subjective visual vertical test. We attribute these effects to the sculpted environment provided by the exhibition which may have acted as a kind of physiologic "training ground" thereby improving the visitors' overall sense of visual perspective, equilibrium, and gravity. PMID:25566107

  11. Comparing Compositions of Modern Cast Bronze Sculptures: Optical Emission Spectroscopy Versus x-Ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, M. L.; Dunand, D. C.

    2015-07-01

    Bulk elemental compositions of 74 modern cast bronze sculptures from the collection at the Art Institute of Chicago, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and the Rodin Museum (Philadelphia, PA) were determined using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and a handheld x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer. The elemental compositions of the cast sculptures as measured previously by ICP-OES and presently by XRF are compared: A good match is found between the two methods for the base metal (Cu) and the two majority alloying elements (Zn and Sn). For both ICP-OES and XRF data, when the Zn composition is plotted versus the Sn composition, three discernable clusters are found that are related to the artist, foundry, casting date, and casting method; they consist of (A) high-zinc brass, (B) low-zinc, low-tin brass, and (C) low-zinc, tin bronze. Thus, our study confirms that the relatively fast, nondestructive XRF spectrometry can be used effectively over slower and invasive, but more accurate, ICP-OES to help determine a sculpture's artist, foundry, date of creation, date of casting, and casting method.

  12. "Lesbians are not women": feminine and lesbian sensibilities in Harmony Hammond's late-1970s sculpture.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Margo Hobbs

    2008-01-01

    Harmony Hammond's wrapped fabric sculptures are placed in context of the theories of gender and sexuality that circulated among lesbian and straight feminists at the time they were made, the late 1970s. Hammond has cited in particular Monique Wittig's novels, such as The Lesbian Body, and her essays including "The Straight Mind" where Wittig concludes that the lesbian is not a woman. The critique to which Wittig's lesbian separatism has been subjected by Judith Butler in her consideration of the appeal and limitations of essentialism also applies to Hammond's art. Hammond's use of vaginal imagery was instrumental to visualizing a lesbian sensibility, but the proposition of such a sensibility established a new problematic: a new essential category. The article concludes that because Hammond's work was produced in the context of a complex set of discourses, lesbian, feminist, and aesthetic, it resisted reduction to a singular meaning. Her sculptures avoided the pitfall of substituting one essence for another, lesbian for feminine sensibility, but activated both. The sculptures effectively queered vaginal imagery: When Hammond used vaginal imagery to represent lesbian sensibility, she subverted the equation of sex and gender and the essentialist notion of feminine sensibility. PMID:19042751

  13. Study of the quantitative evaluation of the visual satisfaction of environmental space of urban sculpture based on relationship between human and environment: taking three environmental spaces of urban sculpture in Nanjing as an example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhou; Wang, Nana; Qi, Qiuyin; Qin, Chuan

    2007-06-01

    Using the methods of Semantic Differential Method and Factor analysis, and taking three environmental space of urban sculpture in Nanjing city as an example, we quantitatively evaluated the urban dwellers' subjective impressions of the different types of environmental space of urban sculpture. The result shows that the feelings of psychological environment of the target audience and the effects of landscape of the environmental space account for a very large component in the quantitative evaluation of the visual satisfaction of environmental space of urban sculpture. So the visual satisfaction research should focus on the feelings of psychological environment of the target audience and the effects of landscape of the environmental space, which are both valuable aspects.

  14. Analysis of medieval limestone sculpture from southwestern France and the Paris Basin by NAA

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, L.; Harbottle, G.

    1994-12-31

    Compositional characterization of limestone from sources known to medieval craftsmen and from the monuments they built can be used in conjunction with stylistic and iconographic criteria to infer geographic origin of sculptures that have lost their histories. Limestone from 47 quarrying locations in France and from numerous medieval monuments have been subjected to neutron activation analysis (NAA) to form the nucleus of the Brookhaven Limestone Database. Even though the method and techniques of NAA are well established, this paper briefly summarizes the parameters and experimental conditions useful for determining those concentration variables for which limestone from different sources exhibits significant and reproducible differences.

  15. Alter ego representations in San Agustin monolithic sculptures: possible plant hallucinogenic influences.

    PubMed

    de Rios, Marlene Dobkin

    2009-12-01

    This article examines the evidence for plant hallucinogenic use (possibly Brugmansia, Brunfelsia chiricaspi, Desfontainia R., Anadenanthera peregrina, Banisteriopsis sps, Psychotropia viridis and Virola theidora) by the San Agustin culture, an extinct peoples who resided in the Magdelena River area of Colombia from the third century B.C. until the sixteenth century A.D. Based on thematic materials gathered from a cross-cultural survey of plant hallucinogens, the author examines themes in the monolithic sculptures of this culture in light of man-animal transformations and shamanic themes linked to plant hallucinogenic ingestion.

  16. Nondestructive measurement of large objects with electron paramagnetic resonance: Pottery, sculpture, and jewel ornament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeya, Motoji; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Ishii, Hiroshi

    1994-12-01

    A cylindicral cavity of TE111 mode with an aperture of 3 mm in diameter has been used to measure the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum of a large object placed over the aperture. EPR spectra of a precious fossil of a dinosaur tooth piece and a fossil bone of the Machikane Alligator were measured nondestructively in addition to a jadeite sculpture, a pearl and turquoise necklace, a large turmaline, a star ruby, and ceramic pottery. Thus, EPR can be a nondestructive tool to detect forgery and to test the authenticity in art as well as to allocate ancient objects in archaeological provenance study.

  17. Wetting and elasto-plasticity based sculpture of liquid marbles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianlin; Zuo, Pingcheng

    2016-02-01

    As an emerging material with exotic properties, liquid marble holds great potential for such areas as microfluidics, stimuli-responsive sensors, micro-chemical reactors, micro-bioreactors, energy harvesting devices, and mechanical structures. In this study, we mainly concentrate on the mechanical behaviors, such as elasto-plasticity of liquid marble with the decrease of liquid volume. The contact radius with the substrate and Young's contact angle of liquid marble are both measured with the change of water volume, and those of a water droplet are compared. The mechanism for the different responses for liquid marble and water droplet is clarified according to the mechanics analysis. Moreover, it is found that liquid marble can behave like an elasto-plastic material when the particle surface density is big enough. Based upon this fact, liquid marble can be sculpted to all kinds of special shapes as expected. These investigations may cast new light on how to engineer multifunctional materials and devices, which are beneficial to microprinting and micromachining.

  18. Wetting and elasto-plasticity based sculpture of liquid marbles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianlin; Zuo, Pingcheng

    2016-02-01

    As an emerging material with exotic properties, liquid marble holds great potential for such areas as microfluidics, stimuli-responsive sensors, micro-chemical reactors, micro-bioreactors, energy harvesting devices, and mechanical structures. In this study, we mainly concentrate on the mechanical behaviors, such as elasto-plasticity of liquid marble with the decrease of liquid volume. The contact radius with the substrate and Young's contact angle of liquid marble are both measured with the change of water volume, and those of a water droplet are compared. The mechanism for the different responses for liquid marble and water droplet is clarified according to the mechanics analysis. Moreover, it is found that liquid marble can behave like an elasto-plastic material when the particle surface density is big enough. Based upon this fact, liquid marble can be sculpted to all kinds of special shapes as expected. These investigations may cast new light on how to engineer multifunctional materials and devices, which are beneficial to microprinting and micromachining. PMID:26920520

  19. Origin and implications of non-radial Imbrium Sculpture on the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Peter H.; Crawford, David A.

    2016-07-01

    Rimmed grooves, lineations and elongate craters around Mare Imbrium shape much of the nearside Moon. This pattern was coined the Imbrium Sculpture, and it was originally argued that it must have been formed by a giant oblique (~30°) impact, a conclusion echoed by later studies. Some investigators, however, noticed that many elements of the Imbrium Sculpture are not radial to Imbrium, thereby implicating an endogenic or structural origin. Here we use these non-radial trends to conclude that the Imbrium impactor was a proto-planet (half the diameter of Vesta), once part of a population of large proto-planets in the asteroid belt. Such independent constraints on the sizes of the Imbrium and other basin-forming impactors markedly increase estimates for the mass in the asteroid belt before depletion caused by the orbital migration of Jupiter and Saturn. Moreover, laboratory impact experiments, shock physics codes and the groove widths indicate that multiple fragments (up to 2% of the initial diameter) from each oblique basin-forming impactor, such as the one that formed Imbrium, should have survived planetary collisions and contributed to the heavy impact bombardment between 4.3 and 3.8 billion years ago.

  20. Origin and implications of non-radial Imbrium Sculpture on the Moon.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Peter H; Crawford, David A

    2016-07-21

    Rimmed grooves, lineations and elongate craters around Mare Imbrium shape much of the nearside Moon. This pattern was coined the Imbrium Sculpture, and it was originally argued that it must have been formed by a giant oblique (~30°) impact, a conclusion echoed by later studies. Some investigators, however, noticed that many elements of the Imbrium Sculpture are not radial to Imbrium, thereby implicating an endogenic or structural origin. Here we use these non-radial trends to conclude that the Imbrium impactor was a proto-planet (half the diameter of Vesta), once part of a population of large proto-planets in the asteroid belt. Such independent constraints on the sizes of the Imbrium and other basin-forming impactors markedly increase estimates for the mass in the asteroid belt before depletion caused by the orbital migration of Jupiter and Saturn. Moreover, laboratory impact experiments, shock physics codes and the groove widths indicate that multiple fragments (up to 2% of the initial diameter) from each oblique basin-forming impactor, such as the one that formed Imbrium, should have survived planetary collisions and contributed to the heavy impact bombardment between 4.3 and 3.8 billion years ago. PMID:27443741

  1. Origin and implications of non-radial Imbrium Sculpture on the Moon.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Peter H; Crawford, David A

    2016-07-21

    Rimmed grooves, lineations and elongate craters around Mare Imbrium shape much of the nearside Moon. This pattern was coined the Imbrium Sculpture, and it was originally argued that it must have been formed by a giant oblique (~30°) impact, a conclusion echoed by later studies. Some investigators, however, noticed that many elements of the Imbrium Sculpture are not radial to Imbrium, thereby implicating an endogenic or structural origin. Here we use these non-radial trends to conclude that the Imbrium impactor was a proto-planet (half the diameter of Vesta), once part of a population of large proto-planets in the asteroid belt. Such independent constraints on the sizes of the Imbrium and other basin-forming impactors markedly increase estimates for the mass in the asteroid belt before depletion caused by the orbital migration of Jupiter and Saturn. Moreover, laboratory impact experiments, shock physics codes and the groove widths indicate that multiple fragments (up to 2% of the initial diameter) from each oblique basin-forming impactor, such as the one that formed Imbrium, should have survived planetary collisions and contributed to the heavy impact bombardment between 4.3 and 3.8 billion years ago.

  2. Origin and implications of non-radial Imbrium Sculpture on the Moon

    DOE PAGES

    Schultz, Peter H.; Crawford, David A.

    2016-07-20

    Rimmed grooves, lineations and elongate craters around Mare Imbrium shape much of the nearside Moon. This pattern was coined the Imbrium Sculpture1, and it was originally argued that it must have been formed by a giant oblique (~30°) impact, a conclusion echoed by later studies2. Some investigators, however, noticed that many elements of the Imbrium Sculpture are not radial to Imbrium, thereby implicating an endogenic or structural origin3, 4. Here we use these non-radial trends to conclude that the Imbrium impactor was a proto-planet (half the diameter of Vesta), once part of a population of large proto-planets in the asteroidmore » belt. Such independent constraints on the sizes of the Imbrium and other basin-forming impactors markedly increase estimates for the mass in the asteroid belt before depletion caused by the orbital migration of Jupiter and Saturn5. Furthermore, laboratory impact experiments, shock physics codes and the groove widths indicate that multiple fragments (up to 2% of the initial diameter) from each oblique basin-forming impactor, such as the one that formed Imbrium, should have survived planetary collisions and contributed to the heavy impact bombardment between 4.3 and 3.8 billion years ago.« less

  3. The Visualization of Native-American Peoples in a Late-Nineteenth-Century Sculpture Program in Vienna, Austria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Bussel, Gerard W.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author addresses historical representational strategies in his "inside" look at how Native culture and people were viewed from the perspective of Europeans. He presents an interesting study of a series of late-nineteenth-century sculptures at the Natural History Museum in Vienna that represents Indians from throughout the…

  4. Studio in Sculpture, Ceramics, Jewelry. Advanced Elective Courses in Art for Grades 10, 11, or 12: Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    This is the second volume in a series that includes the syllabi for the advanced elective courses in the New York state art program for grades 10, 11, and 12. The first volume is described in ED 100 747. The guide consists of the following three sections: (1) Studio in Ceramics, (2) Studio in Sculpture, and (3) Studio in Jewelry and…

  5. Ars Moriendi Tradition and Visualization of Death in Roman Baroque Sculpture: Death Education in the Seventeenth Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westin, Robert H.

    1980-01-01

    The tradition of the Ars Moriendi influenced art by creating a new reality in which the dead could appear eternally alive. A good death was seen as an act of faith. The literature of Ars Moriendi influenced baroque sculpture which today is viewed as almost bizarre. (JAC)

  6. 37 CFR 253.8 - Terms and rates of royalty payments for the use of published pictorial, graphic, and sculptural...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Terms and rates of royalty payments for the use of published pictorial, graphic, and sculptural works. 253.8 Section 253.8 Patents... BROADCASTING § 253.8 Terms and rates of royalty payments for the use of published pictorial, graphic,...

  7. 37 CFR 253.8 - Terms and rates of royalty payments for the use of published pictorial, graphic, and sculptural...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Terms and rates of royalty payments for the use of published pictorial, graphic, and sculptural works. 253.8 Section 253.8 Patents... BROADCASTING § 253.8 Terms and rates of royalty payments for the use of published pictorial, graphic,...

  8. Homogeneity analysis of sculptured thin films deposited in symmetric style through glancing angle deposition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Qi, Hong-Ji; Sun, Wei; He, Jun; Zhao, Jiao-Ling; Wang, Hu; Hou, Yong-Qiang

    2014-11-01

    The symmetric deposition technique is often used to improve the uniformity of sculptured thin film (STF). In this paper, optical properties of STF with the columnar angles ±β are analyzed theoretically, based on the characteristic matrix method for extraordinary waves. Then, the transmittances of uniformity monolayer and bilayer STF in symmetrical style are calculated to show the effect of the bilayer structure on the optical properties of STF. The inhomogeneity of STF is involved in analyzing the differences in transmittance and phase retardation between monolayer and bilayer STF deposited in symmetric style. The results show that optical homogeneity of STF can be improved by depositing in symmetric style at the normal incidence, but it is not the same case as the oblique incidence.

  9. Painted Fiberglass-Reinforced Contemporary Sculpture: Investigating Composite Materials, Techniques and Conservation Using a Multi-Analytical Approach.

    PubMed

    Salvadori, Barbara; Cantisani, Emma; Colombini, Maria Perla; Tognon, Cecilia Gaia Rachele

    2016-01-01

    A multi-analytical approach was used to study the constituent materials, manufacturing technique, and state of conservation of a contemporary sculpture. This sculpture, entitled Nuredduna, was created by Aligi Sassu in 1995 and is located in the "Bellariva garden" in Florence (Italy). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), optical and electronic microscopy (OM and SEM-EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) highlighted the multi-layered structure of the statue: fiberglass and an overlay of different layers (gel coat) applied with an unsaturated polyester resin added with aggregate materials and bromine compounds. A top-coat in acrylic black varnish, used as a finish, was also found. The combination of these materials with their different compositions, environmental impact, and even vandalism have negatively affected the state of conservation of Nuredduna, causing the loss of strata in its lower parts (legs and feet). PMID:26767643

  10. Visiting Richard Serra’s “Promenade” sculpture improves postural control and judgment of subjective visual vertical

    PubMed Central

    Kapoula, Zoï; Lang, Alexandre; Lê, Thanh-Thuan; Adenis, Marie-Sarah; Yang, Qing; Lipede, Gabi; Vernet, Marine

    2014-01-01

    Body sway while maintaining an upright quiet stance reflects an active process of balance based on the integration of visual, vestibular, somatosensory, and proprioceptive inputs. Richard Serra’s Promenade sculpture featured in the 2008 Monumenta exhibition at the Grand Palais in Paris, France is herein hypothesized to have stimulated the body’s vertical and longitudinal axes as it showcased five monumental rectangular solids pitched at a 1.69° angle. Using computerized dynamic posturography we measured the body sway of 23 visitors when fixating a cross, or when observing the artwork (fixating it or actively exploring it with eye movements) before and after walking around and alongside the sculpture (i.e., before and after a promenade). A first fixation at the sculpture increased medio-lateral stability (in terms of spectral power of body sway). Eye movement exploration in the depth of the sculpture increased antero-posterior stability [in terms of spectral power and canceling time (CT) of body sway] at the expense of medio-lateral stability (in terms of CT). Moreover, a medio-lateral instability associated with eye movement exploration before the promenade (in terms of body sway sensu stricto) was canceled after the promenade. Finally, the overall medio-lateral stability (in terms of spectral power) increased after the promenade. Fourteen additional visitors were asked to stand in a dark room and adjust a luminous line to what they considered to be the earth-vertical axis. The promenade executed within the sculpted environment afforded by Serra’s monumental statuary works resulted in significantly improved performances on the subjective visual vertical test. We attribute these effects to the sculpted environment provided by the exhibition which may have acted as a kind of physiologic “training ground” thereby improving the visitors’ overall sense of visual perspective, equilibrium, and gravity. PMID:25566107

  11. Petrographic characterization and provenance determination of the white marbles used in the Roman sculptures of Forum Sempronii (Fossombrone, Marche, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonelli, Fabrizio; Columbu, Stefano; Lezzerini, Marco; Miriello, Domenico

    2014-06-01

    The Roman municipium of Forum Sempronii (Fossombrone, Marche) was located along the `Via Consolare Flaminia', in the stretch of road where it ran along the final sector of the valley of the River Metauro ( Mataurus). The ancient colony of Forum Sempronii, which is cited by Strabo, Pliny, and Ptolemy, was found in the second century BC, probably on the site of an earlier community and its activity continued until the end of the fifth century AD. During ancient and more recent archaeological excavations, many fragments of coloured stones and marbles, and some white marble sculptures have been unearthed. In this paper, we report the results of the provenance identification of the white marbles used for the sculptures found in the archaeological site of Forum Sempronii and now displayed at the local archaeological museum. The determination of the source origin of the white marbles used for the sculptures has been established by mineralogical-petrographic and geochemical analyses. Microscopic study of thin sections together with carbon and oxygen stable isotope ratios indicate that more than one type of white marbles was used: Pentelikon, Lunense, and Thasian.

  12. [Diprosopus triophthalmus. From ancient terracotta sculptures to spiral computer tomographic reconstruction].

    PubMed

    Sokiranski, R; Pirsig, W; Nerlich, A

    2005-03-01

    A still-born male fetus from the 19th century, fixed in formalin and presenting as diprosopia triophthalmica, was analysed by helical computer tomography and virtually reconstructed without damage. This rare, incomplete, symmetrical duplication of the face on a single head with three eyes, two noses and two mouths develops in the first 3 weeks of gestation and is a subset of the category of conjoined twins with unknown underlying etiology. Spiral computer tomography of fixed tissue demonstrated in the more than 100 year old specimen that virtual reconstruction can be performed in nearly the same way as in patients (contrast medium application not possible). The radiological reconstruction of the Munich fetus, here confined to head and neck data, is the basis for comparison with a number of imaging procedures of the last 3000 years. Starting with some Neolithic Mesoamerican ceramics, the "Pretty Ladies of Tlatilco", diprosopia triophthalmica was also depicted on engravings of the 16th and 17th century A.D. by artists as well as by the anatomist Soemmering and his engraver Berndt in the 18th century. Our modern spiral computer tomography confirms the ability of our ancestors to depict diprosopia triophthalmica in paintings and sculptures with a high level of natural precision.

  13. Ancient lenses in art and sculpture and the objects viewed through them, dating back 4500 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enoch, Jay M.

    1998-07-01

    The early history of lenses is controversial. The author has sought to address the problem by identifying lens elements (mainly convex/plano) which remain associated with objects intended to be viewed through them (i.e., in their original context). These are found in museums in sculptures, rings, pendants, etc. A number of outstanding examples will be illustrated in the talk; these sophisticated pieces of art are certainly not first constructs. Most are of rock crystal, rose quartz, or glass. Lenses have origin among artisans rather than scientists. Clearly, skills were often lost and rediscovered. Early lens-like objects have been found broadly in the eastern Mediterranean area/Middle East, in France, in Italy (Rome), and possibly in Peru and Scandinavia, etc. To date, the earliest lenses identified in context are from the IV/V Dynasties of Egypt, dating back to about 4500 years ago (e.g., the superb `Le Scribe Accroupi' and `the Kai' in the Louvre; added fine examples are located in the Cairo Museum). Latter examples have been found in Knossos (Minoan [Herakleion Museum]; ca. 3500 years ago); others had origin in Greece (examples in the Athens National Archeological Museum and the British Museum equals BM), in Rome (Metropolitan Museum, NY; BM; Vatican Museums; Bologna Archeological Museum), etc. Also. of great interest is the study of possible lens applications. This is a fascinating scientific, artistic and intellectual project.

  14. Effect of tooth brushing and thermal cycling on a surface change of ceromers finished with different methods.

    PubMed

    Cho, L-R; Yi, Y-J; Heo, S-J

    2002-09-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effect of tooth brushing and thermal cycling on the surface lustre and surface roughness of three ceromer systems treated with different surface finishing methods. The ceromers studied were: (1). Artglass, (2). Targis, (3). Sculpture and (4). the control group, Z 100. Half of the Targis and Sculpture groups were polished and the rest were coated with staining and glazing solution, respectively. All specimens were subjected to thermocycling 10000 times. Tooth brushing abrasion tests were performed in a customized tooth-brushing machine with 500 g weight applied on a back-and-forth cycle for 20000 repetitions. The lustre determined by measuring the light reflection area and the average roughness was compared between groups and between pre- and post-test values. All materials showed a lower lustre and rougher surface after thermocycling and tooth brushing (P < 0.05). All ceromer specimens, except glazed Sculpture, showed a higher lustre and similar roughness to the control group. The post-brushing results revealed that glazed Sculpture presented discretely fallen out glaze coatings and had maximum change. However, stained Targis showed minimum change (P < 0.05) and polished Targis presented more changes than that of the staining treatment. It is therefore concluded that the glaze coatings for Sculpture don't exhibit long-term durability, while stain coatings for Targis acted like a protective layer.

  15. Documentation and dissemination of the sculptural elements of Canada's Parliamentary Buildings: Methodology development and evolution, a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouimet, C.; Gregg, J.; Kretz, S.; Chandler, C.; Hayes, J.

    2015-08-01

    Parliament Hill consists of four historic gothic revival buildings, which form part of the Parliament Buildings National Historic Site of Canada in the National Capital of Ottawa. There are more than 2000 masonry sculptural elements throughout the four buildings. Three of the buildings are in the middle of multi-year rehabilitation projects. Extensive Heritage Documentation is being undertaken to support various activities and conservation teams throughout the interior and exterior of the buildings while also serving as a key posterity records. One of the significant heritage documentation projects is the 3D digitization of the 2000+ heritage character defining sculptural elements. The Heritage Conservation Directorate (HCD) of Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC) was tasked by the Parliamentary Precinct Branch (PPB) of PWGSC to document these character defining elements. The sculptures vary in size from as small as 100mm in width to up to 2 meters in size. This project is in its third year and much has been learned and researched about the most appropriate and efficient means by which to document these elements. Although a methodology was in place to document the sculptures at the inception of the project, it has gone through several iterations in order to improve the gathered data, and in turn increase the efficiency, quality and speed of data acquisition. This paper will describe the evolution of the methodology, as well as the rationale for the alterations in technique. With over 600 of the approximate 2000 (heritage character defining) sculptural elements captured to date, the project is entering a critical phase where an efficient and effective method for sharing and disseminating the information to a wide audience is being explored and evaluated. The end result is intended to allow the client (PPB) and the general public a way to look at and interactively manipulate the viewpoint of each digital model. This will provide a unique opportunity

  16. Pigment identification on ``Pietà'' of Barletta, example of Renaissance Apulian sculpture: A Raman microscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marano, D.; Catalano, I. M.; Monno, A.

    2006-08-01

    A study of the original painting layer of the "Pietà" of Barletta, a polychrome statue, important example of Renaissance Apulian sculpture, was performed by μ-Raman spectroscopy. Vermilion was identified in the original layer of the blood drops on Jesus knee. Lazurite was identified as the original blue pigment on Our Lady's veil and lace, currently a yellow ochre-like color. The use of lazurite demonstrates the historical-artistic importance of this polychrome statue, and supports the hypothesis that this artwork was probably commissioned by Our Lady's devotees to itinerant artists inspired by the more precious Vesperbilder model.

  17. "Petit Granit": a Belgian limestone used in heritage, construction and sculpture.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Dolores; Touneur, Francis; Bernáldez, Lorenzo; García Blázguez, Ana

    2014-05-01

    "Petit Granit" is a Lower Carboniferous (Tournaisian) grey-bluish crinoidal limestone that becomes shiny black when polished. The rock is known under several other names like Pierre Bleue (Blue Stone), but at the same time it should not be confused with other natural stones having a similar commercial name (e.g. Chinese Bluestone or Irish Bluestone) which are superficially similar limestones. It consists of around 96% microcrystalline calcite and a high proportion of fossils, mainly crinoids. In addition some dolomite, quartz, pyrite, marcasite and fluorite are present. Around fifteen quarries are active these days, employing almost one thousand people and thus is an important part of the natural stone economy in Belgium. "Petit Granit" has an Appellation d'Origine Locale (Local Appellation of Origin) designation since 1999. It has been extracted in several regions of South Belgium since the Middle Ages. In a sense the name is misleading because it is not an igneous rock and therefore not a true granite, but it derives from the profusion of numerous white fossil fragments in a dark carbonaceous matrix which look similar to feldspar crystals in a granitic background. The stone characterizes many façades of the urban architecture of Brussels and other Belgian cities, and since the second half of the 19th century it has been used in various countries in Europe and overseas. Its high density and uniformity mean that it takes an excellent polish and thus has versatile use as a dimension stone. "Petit Granit" has also been used widely in sculpture and architecture by several well known artists (e.g. Mateo Hernández, Michel Smolders, Tom Blatt, Elise Delbrassinne, Benoît Luyckx, Santiago Calatrava, among others). However, deterioration has been observed when it has been used for exterior purposes, and appropriate measures need to be taken to prevent this. This stone can be considered as Global Heritage Stone Resource in Europe, for both its use in construction and for

  18. Beating the wavelength limit: three-dimensional imaging of buried subwavelength fractures in sculpture and construction materials by terahertz time-domain reflection spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schwerdtfeger, M; Castro-Camus, E; Krügener, K; Viöl, W; Koch, M

    2013-01-20

    We use reflection terahertz spectroscopy to locate and produce three-dimensional images of air gaps between stones that resemble fractures, even of subwavelength thicknesses. This technique is found to be promising tool for sculpture and building damage evaluation as well as structural quality control in other dielectric materials. PMID:23338182

  19. Terracotta polychrome sculptures examined before and after their conservation work: contributions from non-invasive in situ analytical techniques.

    PubMed

    Colombo, C; Bevilacqua, F; Brambilla, L; Conti, C; Realini, M; Striova, J; Zerbi, G

    2011-08-01

    The potential of non-invasive in situ analytical techniques such as portable Raman, portable X-ray fluorescence, portable optical microscope and fibre optics reflectance spectroscopy has been shown studying painted layers of Renaissance terracotta polychrome sculptures belonging to the statuary of Santo Sepolcro Church in Milan. The results obtained allowed pointing out the contribution of these techniques to the compositional diagnostic, providing complete information, in some cases, better than micro-destructive techniques, on the kind of pigments used on the external painted layers. Moreover, a comparison with the results obtained before the last conservation work (2009) with micro-destructive techniques allowed ascertaining the removal of the external painted layers during the conservation operations.

  20. Multicutter machining of compound parametric surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatna, Abdelmadjid; Grieve, R. J.; Broomhead, P.

    2000-10-01

    Parametric free forms are used in industries as disparate as footwear, toys, sporting goods, ceramics, digital content creation, and conceptual design. Optimizing tool path patterns and minimizing the total machining time is a primordial issue in numerically controlled (NC) machining of free form surfaces. We demonstrate in the present work that multi-cutter machining can achieve as much as 60% reduction in total machining time for compound sculptured surfaces. The given approach is based upon the pre-processing as opposed to the usual post-processing of surfaces for the detection and removal of interference followed by precise tracking of unmachined areas.

  1. The Sculptured Hills of the Taurus Highlands: Implications for the relative age of Serenitatis, basin chronologies and the cratering history of the Moon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spudis, P.D.; Wilhelms, D.E.; Robinson, M.S.

    2011-01-01

    New images from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera show the distribution and geological relations of the Sculptured Hills, a geological unit widespread in the highlands between the Serenitatis and Crisium basins. The Sculptured Hills shows knobby, undulating, radially textured, and plains-like morphologies and in many places is indistinguishable from the similarly knobby Alpes Formation, a facies of ejecta from the Imbrium basin. The new LROC image data show that the Sculptured Hills in the Taurus highlands is Imbrium ejecta and not directly related to the formation of the Serenitatis basin. This occurrence and the geological relations of this unit suggests that the Apollo 17 impact melts may not be not samples of the Serenitatis basin-forming impact, leaving their provenance undetermined and origin unexplained. If the Apollo 17 melt rocks are Serenitatis impact melt, up to half of the basin and large crater population of the Moon was created within a 30 Ma interval around 3.8 Ga in a global impact "cataclysm." Either interpretation significantly changes our view of the impact process and history of the Earth-Moon system. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  2. Comparison among GPR measurements and ultrasonic tomographies with different inversion strategies applied to the basement of an ancient egyptian sculpture.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambuelli, Luigi; Bohm, Gualtiero; Capizzi, Patrizia; Cardarelli, Ettore; Cosentino, Pietro; D'Onofrio, Laurent; Marchisio, Mario

    2010-05-01

    By the late 2008 one of the most important pieces of the "Museo delle Antichità Egizie" in Turin, the sculpture of the Pharaoh with god Amun, was planned to be one of the masterpieces of a travelling exhibition in Japan. The "Fondazione Museo delle Antichità Egizie di Torino", managing the museum, was concerned with the integrity of the basement of the statue which actually presents visible signs of restorations dating back to the early IXX century. The questions put by the museum managers were to estimate the internal extension of some visible fractures, to search for unknown internal ones and to provide information about the overall mechanical strength of the basement. In order to tackle the first and second questions a GPR reflection survey of the basement along three sides was performed and the results were assembled in a 3D rendering. As far as the third question is concerned, two parallel, horizontal ultrasonic 2D tomographies across the basement were made with a source-receiver layout able to acquire, for each section, 723 ultrasonic signals correspondent to different transmitter and receiver positions. The ultrasonic tomographic data were inverted using different software based upon different algorithms. The obtained velocity images were then compared with the GPR results and with the visible joints on the basement. A critical analysis of the comparisons is finally presented.

  3. Linking groundwater pollution to the decay of 15th-century sculptures in Burgos Cathedral (northern Spain).

    PubMed

    Gázquez, Fernando; Rull, Fernando; Medina, Jesús; Sanz-Arranz, Aurelio; Sanz, Carlos

    2015-10-01

    Precipitation of salts-mainly hydrated Mg-Na sulfates-in building materials is rated as one of the most severe threats to the preservation of our architectural and cultural heritage. Nevertheless, the origin of this pathology is still unknown in many cases. Proper identification of the cause of damage is crucial for correct planning of future restoration actions. The goal of this study is to identify the source of the degradation compounds that are affecting the 15th-century limestone sculptures that decorate the retro-choir of Burgos Cathedral (northern Spain). To this end, detailed characterization of minerals by in situ (Raman spectroscopy) and laboratory techniques (XRD, Raman and FTIR) was followed by major elements (ICP and IC) and isotopic analysis (δ(34)S and δ(15)N) of both the mineral phases precipitated on the retro-choir and the dissolved salts in groundwater in the vicinity of the cathedral. The results reveal unequivocal connection between the damage observed and capillary rise of salts-bearing water from the subsoil. The multianalytical methodology used is widely applicable to identify the origin of common affections suffered by historical buildings and masterpieces. PMID:26018286

  4. Linking groundwater pollution to the decay of 15th-century sculptures in Burgos Cathedral (northern Spain).

    PubMed

    Gázquez, Fernando; Rull, Fernando; Medina, Jesús; Sanz-Arranz, Aurelio; Sanz, Carlos

    2015-10-01

    Precipitation of salts-mainly hydrated Mg-Na sulfates-in building materials is rated as one of the most severe threats to the preservation of our architectural and cultural heritage. Nevertheless, the origin of this pathology is still unknown in many cases. Proper identification of the cause of damage is crucial for correct planning of future restoration actions. The goal of this study is to identify the source of the degradation compounds that are affecting the 15th-century limestone sculptures that decorate the retro-choir of Burgos Cathedral (northern Spain). To this end, detailed characterization of minerals by in situ (Raman spectroscopy) and laboratory techniques (XRD, Raman and FTIR) was followed by major elements (ICP and IC) and isotopic analysis (δ(34)S and δ(15)N) of both the mineral phases precipitated on the retro-choir and the dissolved salts in groundwater in the vicinity of the cathedral. The results reveal unequivocal connection between the damage observed and capillary rise of salts-bearing water from the subsoil. The multianalytical methodology used is widely applicable to identify the origin of common affections suffered by historical buildings and masterpieces.

  5. Application of binocular vision probe on measurement of highly reflective metallic surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongwei; Zhang, Guoxiong; Shi, Ying; Zhao, Xiaosong

    2005-01-01

    Reverse engineering of free-form surfaces is one of the most challenging technologies in advanced manufacturing. With the development of industry more and more sculptured surfaces, such as molds and turbine blades, are required to measure quickly and accurately. Optical non-contact probes possess many advantages, such as high speed, no measuring force, in comparison with contact ones. The ability of stereo vision probe with CCD cameras in gathering a large amount of information simultaneously makes it the most popularly used one in sculptured surface measurements. So a non-contact measurement system is built which consists of CMM and a vision probe with many techniques. It distinguishes itself by high efficiency, high accuracy and reliability, as well as applicability for on-line measurement of complicated sculptured surfaces. With a virtual 3D target in form of a grid plate, all the intrinsic and extrinsic parameters of CCD camera including the uncertainty of image scale factor and optical center of camera can be readily calibrated. Through measuring cylindrical section and surface of gauge block, this system is viable to measure free-form surface and high-reflective metallic surface.

  6. Antibacterial effect, structural characterization, and some applications of silver chiral nano-flower sculptured thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savaloni, Hadi; Haydari-Nasab, Fatemh; Abbas-Rohollahi, Abbas

    2015-06-01

    Silver chiral nano-flowers with 3-, 4-, and 5-fold symmetry were produced using oblique angle deposition method in conjunction with the rotation of sample holder with different speeds at different sectors of each revolution. X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy were employed to obtain the nanostructure and morphology of the films. Their antibacterial, electrical, and hydrophobic properties were investigated. Antibacterial properties were investigated against a range of microorganisms including Escherichia coli ATCC 8739 , Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, and Candida albicans PTCC 5027. Electrical conductivity of these films relative to that of bulk sample is reduced by a factor of about 103 due to porosity, surface roughness, and anisotropic structure of these films. Hydrophobicity results show dependence on the symmetry of these chiral nano-flowers.

  7. Nano-structural characteristics and optical properties of silver chiral nano-flower sculptured thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savaloni, Hadi; Haydari-Nasab, Fatemh; Malmir, Mariam

    2011-08-01

    Silver chiral nano-flowers with 3-, 4- and 5-fold symmetry were produced using oblique angle deposition method in conjunction with the rotation of sample holder with different speeds at different sectors of each revolution corresponding to symmetry order of the acquired nano-flower. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), were employed to obtain morphology and nano-structure of the films. Optical characteristics of silver chiral nano-flower thin films were obtained using single beam spectrophotometer with both s- and p-polarization incident light at 30° and 70° incidence angles and at different azimuthal angles ( φ). Optical spectra showed both TM (TDM (transverse dipole mode) and TQM (transverse quadruple mode)) and LM (longitudinal mode) Plasmon resonance peaks. For 3- and 4-fold symmetry chiral nano-flowers the s-polarization extinction spectra obtained at different azimuthal angles did not show significant change in the Plasmon peak position while 5-fold symmetry chiral nano-flower showed a completely different behavior, which may be the result of increased surface anisotropy, so when the φ angle is changed the s-polarization response from the surface can change more significantly than that for lower symmetries. In general, for 3-, 4- and 5-fold symmetry chiral nano-flowers a sharp peak at lower wavelengths (<450 nm) is observed in the s-polarization spectra, while in addition to this peak a broad peak at longer wavelengths (i.e., LM) observed in the p-polarization spectra, which is more dominant for 70° incidence angle.

  8. XRF, μ-XRD and μ-spectroscopic techniques for revealing the composition and structure of paint layers on polychrome sculptures after multiple restorations.

    PubMed

    Franquelo, M L; Duran, A; Castaing, J; Arquillo, D; Perez-Rodriguez, J L

    2012-01-30

    This paper presents the novel application of recently developed analytical techniques to the study of paint layers on sculptures that have been restored/repainted several times across centuries. Analyses were performed using portable XRF, μ-XRD and μ-Raman instruments. Other techniques, such as optical microscopy, SEM-EDX and μ-FTIR, were also used. Pigments and other materials including vermilion, minium, red lac, ivory black, lead white, barium white, zinc white (zincite), titanium white (rutile and anatase), lithopone, gold and brass were detected. Pigments from both ancient and modern times were found due to the different restorations/repaintings carried out. μ-Raman was very useful to characterise some pigments that were difficult to determine by μ-XRD. In some cases, pigments identification was only possible by combining results from the different analytical techniques used in this work. This work is the first article devoted to the study of sculpture cross-section samples using laboratory-made μ-XRD systems.

  9. Recycled Paper Beam Sculpture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Kristin; Tabacchi, Jo

    2011-01-01

    As art department budgets across the country continue to shrink, art teachers are increasingly on the lookout for inexpensive materials that can be used to teach a range of concepts. In this article, the authors describe a newspaper beam tower project inspired by the book, "The Wonderful Towers of Watts" by Patricia Zelver. There are many more…

  10. Sculpturing new muscle phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Babij, P; Booth, F W

    1988-06-01

    Changes in the pattern of muscle activity are followed by new patterns of protein synthesis, both in the contractile elements and in the enzymes of energy metabolism. Although the signal transducers have not been identified, techniques of molecular biology have clearly shown that the adaptive responses are the regulated consequence of differential gene expression.

  11. Forms of Soft Sculpture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Dorothy

    1978-01-01

    For the past several years, students at Madison Senior High School in San Diego have responded to the tactile texture and draping quality of soft materials. They experimented enthusiastically with three-dimensional forms made out of foam rubber. Here is the result of their efforts and experimentation. (Author/RK)

  12. Sculptures of Ordinary People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Guy

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the presence of ordinary people in art. Features four sculptors and examples of their work: (1) "Janitor" by Duane Hanson; (2) "The Red Light" by George Segal; (3) "The Sodbuster" by Luis A. Jimenez; and (4) "The Driller" by Mahonri Young. (CMK)

  13. Geomorphology: Emergent sculpture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paola, Chris

    2014-08-01

    Sandstone arches and other striking landforms are the showpieces of national parks around the globe. Experiments and numerical analyses show that they result from a self-organization process that involves vertical load, wind erosion and grain locking.

  14. Sculpturing new muscle phenotypes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babij, P.; Booth, F. W.

    1988-01-01

    Changes in the pattern of muscle activity are followed by new patterns of protein synthesis, both in the contractile elements and in the enzymes of energy metabolism. Although the signal transducers have not been identified, techniques of molecular biology have clearly shown that the adaptive responses are the regulated consequence of differential gene expression.

  15. An operator calculus for surface and volume modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, W. J.

    1984-01-01

    The mathematical techniques which form the foundation for most of the surface and volume modeling techniques used in practice are briefly described. An outline of what may be termed an operator calculus for the approximation and interpolation of functions of more than one independent variable is presented. By considering the linear operators associated with bivariate and multivariate interpolation/approximation schemes, it is shown how they can be compounded by operator multiplication and Boolean addition to obtain a distributive lattice of approximation operators. It is then demonstrated via specific examples how this operator calculus leads to practical techniques for sculptured surface and volume modeling.

  16. Modeling three-dimensional sculptures of australopithecines (Australopithecus afarensis) for the Museum of Natural History of Vienna (Austria): the post-cranial hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Berge, C; Daynes, E

    2001-12-01

    In March 1999, E. Daynes, a sculptor specializing in fossil hominid reconstruction, asked C. Berge to take over the scientific supervision of the reconstruction of two australopithecine post-crania. The heads had been modeled from two skulls found in Hadar (AL 444-2, AL 417). The sculptures were to be represented in a walking stance. The female proportions (AL 417) are estimated from the skeleton of 'Lucy' (AL 288), and the male proportions (AL 444-2) extrapolated from the female ones. Biomechanical and anatomical data (comparison with great apes and humans) are used to reconstruct both dynamic equilibrium and muscular systems. The reconstruction suggests that the fossils moved the pelvis and shoulders extensively when they walked. The hindlimb muscles (such as adductors, gluteal muscles and calf) are fleshy and not or very little tendinous. As indicated by the Laetoli step prints (belonging to a close and contemporaneous species), the foot is adducted during the walk and the support is internal just before take off. In spite of inevitable approximations, such a reconstruction appears to be particularly helpful to bring out morphological and functional traits of the first hominids which are both close to and different from modern humans. PMID:11733173

  17. Comparison between GPR measurements and ultrasonic tomography with different inversion algorithms: an application to the base of an ancient Egyptian sculpture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambuelli, L.; Bohm, G.; Capizzi, P.; Cardarelli, E.; Cosentino, P.

    2011-09-01

    By late 2008 one of the most important pieces of the 'Museo delle Antichità Egizie' of Turin, the sculpture of the Pharaoh with god Amun, was planned to be one of the masterpieces of a travelling exhibition in Japan. The 'Fondazione Museo delle Antichità Egizie di Torino', who manages the museum, was concerned with the integrity of the base of the statue which actually presents visible signs of restoration dating back to the early 19th century. It was required to estimate the persistence of the visible fractures, to search for unknown ones and to provide information about the overall mechanical strength of the base. To tackle the first question a GPR reflection survey along three sides of the base was performed and the results were assembled in a 3D rendering. As far as the second question is concerned, two parallel, horizontal ultrasonic 2D tomograms across the base were made. We acquired, for each section, 723 ultrasonic signals corresponding to different transmitter and receiver positions. The tomographic data were inverted using four different software packages based upon different algorithms. The obtained velocity images were then compared each other, with the GPR results and with the visible fractures in the base. A critical analysis of the comparisons is finally presented.

  18. Modeling three-dimensional sculptures of australopithecines (Australopithecus afarensis) for the Museum of Natural History of Vienna (Austria): the post-cranial hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Berge, C; Daynes, E

    2001-12-01

    In March 1999, E. Daynes, a sculptor specializing in fossil hominid reconstruction, asked C. Berge to take over the scientific supervision of the reconstruction of two australopithecine post-crania. The heads had been modeled from two skulls found in Hadar (AL 444-2, AL 417). The sculptures were to be represented in a walking stance. The female proportions (AL 417) are estimated from the skeleton of 'Lucy' (AL 288), and the male proportions (AL 444-2) extrapolated from the female ones. Biomechanical and anatomical data (comparison with great apes and humans) are used to reconstruct both dynamic equilibrium and muscular systems. The reconstruction suggests that the fossils moved the pelvis and shoulders extensively when they walked. The hindlimb muscles (such as adductors, gluteal muscles and calf) are fleshy and not or very little tendinous. As indicated by the Laetoli step prints (belonging to a close and contemporaneous species), the foot is adducted during the walk and the support is internal just before take off. In spite of inevitable approximations, such a reconstruction appears to be particularly helpful to bring out morphological and functional traits of the first hominids which are both close to and different from modern humans.

  19. Laser surface texturing of tool steel: textured surfaces quality evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šugár, Peter; Šugárová, Jana; Frnčík, Martin

    2016-05-01

    In this experimental investigation the laser surface texturing of tool steel of type 90MnCrV8 has been conducted. The 5-axis highly dynamic laser precision machining centre Lasertec 80 Shape equipped with the nano-second pulsed ytterbium fibre laser and CNC system Siemens 840 D was used. The planar and spherical surfaces first prepared by turning have been textured. The regular array of spherical and ellipsoidal dimples with a different dimensions and different surface density has been created. Laser surface texturing has been realized under different combinations of process parameters: pulse frequency, pulse energy and laser beam scanning speed. The morphological characterization of ablated surfaces has been performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) technique. The results show limited possibility of ns pulse fibre laser application to generate different surface structures for tribological modification of metallic materials. These structures were obtained by varying the processing conditions between surface ablation, to surface remelting. In all cases the areas of molten material and re-cast layers were observed on the bottom and walls of the dimples. Beside the influence of laser beam parameters on the machined surface quality during laser machining of regular hemispherical and elipsoidal dimple texture on parabolic and hemispherical surfaces has been studied.

  20. Oblique projection approach to generating trajectory along arbitrary direction on NURBS surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xubing; Hu, Guofan; Xiong, Youlun

    2013-03-01

    Aiming at geometric rules of trajectory generation, the oblique projection approach is proposed to generating trajectories along arbitrary direction to improve reach-ability and provide more choices for 5-axis machining. First of all, a middle plane is constructed with the normal direction at the center point and passing through the center point of the encapsulating box. Secondly, a set of parallel and equidistant lines in the middle plane is constructed as the source object of oblique projection, and the inclination angles of the line set are uniformed as any value in the range of 0 to 2π. Thirdly, oblique projections are employed to produce projection trajectories on the machined surface. Finally, a user function APathGenerator V1.0 is developed in UG NX. The algorithm is robust and provides a feasible way to control direction angle and trajectory gap for the 5-axis machining of any smooth surfaces whether concave, convex or mixed.

  1. Characterization of three types of silicon solar cells for SEPS Deep Space Mission. Volume 3: Current-voltage characteristics of spectrolab sculptured BSR/P+ (K7), BSR/P+ (K6.5) and BSR (K4.5) cells as a function of temperature and intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, A. F.; Little, S. A.; Wooden, V. A.; Carter, D. E.; Cothren, B. E.; Torstenson, C. A.

    1980-01-01

    Three types of high performance silicon solar cells, sculptured BSR/P+(K7), BSR/P+(K6.5) and BSR(K4.5) manufactured by Spectrolab were evaluated for their low temperature and low intensity performance. Sixteen cells of each type were subjected to 11 temperatures and 9 intensities. The sculptured BSR/P+(K7) cells provided the greatest maximum power output both at 1 AU and at LTLI conditions. The average efficiencies of this cell were 14.4 percent at 1 SC/+25 deg C and 18.5 percent at 0.086 SC/-100 deg C.

  2. Characterization of three types of silicon solar cells for SEPS Deep Space Mission. Volume 3: Current-voltage characteristics of spectrolab sculptured BSR/P+ (K7), BSR/P+ (K6.5) and BSR (K4.5) cells as a function of temperature and intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitaker, A. F.; Little, S. A.; Wooden, V. A.; Carter, D. E.; Cothren, B. E.; Torstenson, C. A.

    1980-08-01

    Three types of high performance silicon solar cells, sculptured BSR/P+(K7), BSR/P+(K6.5) and BSR(K4.5) manufactured by Spectrolab were evaluated for their low temperature and low intensity performance. Sixteen cells of each type were subjected to 11 temperatures and 9 intensities. The sculptured BSR/P+(K7) cells provided the greatest maximum power output both at 1 AU and at LTLI conditions. The average efficiencies of this cell were 14.4 percent at 1 SC/+25 deg C and 18.5 percent at 0.086 SC/-100 deg C.

  3. Representing the Self in Sculpture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelken, Miranda

    2011-01-01

    Deborah Rael-Buckley creates stunning figurative self-portraits in clay that layer "personal, cultural, historical, and biological imagery" in a narrative style. Her work provides an exciting challenge in three-dimensional self-portraits for eighth graders. In this article, the author suggests some exercises to get students brainstorming visual…

  4. Designing potentials by sculpturing wires

    SciTech Connect

    Della Pietra, Leonardo; Aigner, Simon; Groth, Soenke; Hagen, Christoph von; Schmiedmayer, Joerg; Bar-Joseph, Israel; Lezec, Henri J.

    2007-06-15

    Magnetic trapping potentials for atoms on atom chips are determined by the current flow in the chip wires. By modifying the shape of the conductor we can realize specialized current flow patterns and therefore microdesign the trapping potentials. We have demonstrated this by nano-machining an atom chip using the focused ion beam technique. We built a trap, a barrier, and using a Bose-Einstein Condensate as a probe we showed that by polishing the conductor edge the potential roughness on the selected wire can be reduced. Furthermore, we give different other designs and discuss the creation of a one-dimensional magnetic lattice on an atom chip.

  5. Marching Monsters: Sculpture in Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfe, George

    1984-01-01

    With a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts, teenage art club members made a 20-foot float called "Bad Seed," which they entered in a parade spoofing the Mardi Gras. It had a purple volcano drooling chartreuse lava while giving birth to a huge dragon. (RM)

  6. To attach or not to attach? The effect of carrier surface morphology and topography on attachment of phoretic deutonymphs of Uropoda orbicularis (Acari)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajerlein, Daria; Adamski, Zbigniew; Kacalak, Wojciech; Tandecka, Katarzyna; Wiesner, Maciej; Jurga, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    Previous studies on preferences of phoretic deutonymphs of Uropodina for attachment sites have shown that they frequently select smooth and hydrophobic surfaces. The aim of our study was to provide the detailed morphological and topographical characteristics of beetle body surfaces to which deutonymphs frequently attach and to verify how the presence of setae and surface sculpture affects deutonymph attachment. The study was conducted on Uropoda orbicularis (Müller, 1776) and its common beetle carriers: Aphodius prodromus (Brahm, 1790), Aphodius fimetarius (Linnaeus, 1758), Onthophagus nuchicornis (Linnaeus, 1758) and Margarinotus carbonarius (Hoffmann, 1803). Morphology and topography of elytra, femora, propygidia and pygidia of beetles were analysed mainly using SEM methods supported with CLSM and AFM techniques. The hypothesis that deutonymphs may attach to surfaces covered with setae, if seta density is low enough not to disturb mite movement, was tested. The study revealed that deutonymphs attach to surfaces of various types as follows: (i) smooth, (ii) hairy, i.e., covered with setae, (iii) flat and (iv) sculptured. Smooth body parts and body parts covered with setae of low density were most frequently and intensively occupied with deutonymphs. Surfaces of high seta density were avoided by mites. Within elytra of Aphodius beetles, deutonymphs definitely preferred flat surfaces of elytral intervals. On the contrary, densely punctuated propygidium and pygidium in M. carbonarius were heavily infested with deutonymphs. We conclude that carrier surface morphology and topography are important for Uropodina deutonymph attachment, but these two factors cannot fully explain the observed relation.

  7. Drop shape visualization and contact angle measurement on curved surfaces.

    PubMed

    Guilizzoni, Manfredo

    2011-12-01

    The shape and contact angles of drops on curved surfaces is experimentally investigated. Image processing, spline fitting and numerical integration are used to extract the drop contour in a number of cross-sections. The three-dimensional surfaces which describe the surface-air and drop-air interfaces can be visualized and a simple procedure to determine the equilibrium contact angle starting from measurements on curved surfaces is proposed. Contact angles on flat surfaces serve as a reference term and a procedure to measure them is proposed. Such procedure is not as accurate as the axisymmetric drop shape analysis algorithms, but it has the advantage of requiring only a side view of the drop-surface couple and no further information. It can therefore be used also for fluids with unknown surface tension and there is no need to measure the drop volume. Examples of application of the proposed techniques for distilled water drops on gemstones confirm that they can be useful for drop shape analysis and contact angle measurement on three-dimensional sculptured surfaces.

  8. Drop shape visualization and contact angle measurement on curved surfaces.

    PubMed

    Guilizzoni, Manfredo

    2011-12-01

    The shape and contact angles of drops on curved surfaces is experimentally investigated. Image processing, spline fitting and numerical integration are used to extract the drop contour in a number of cross-sections. The three-dimensional surfaces which describe the surface-air and drop-air interfaces can be visualized and a simple procedure to determine the equilibrium contact angle starting from measurements on curved surfaces is proposed. Contact angles on flat surfaces serve as a reference term and a procedure to measure them is proposed. Such procedure is not as accurate as the axisymmetric drop shape analysis algorithms, but it has the advantage of requiring only a side view of the drop-surface couple and no further information. It can therefore be used also for fluids with unknown surface tension and there is no need to measure the drop volume. Examples of application of the proposed techniques for distilled water drops on gemstones confirm that they can be useful for drop shape analysis and contact angle measurement on three-dimensional sculptured surfaces. PMID:21889152

  9. Experimental study of free-surface flow instability and bedforms in shallow flows.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karcz, I.; Kersey, D.

    1980-01-01

    To test erosion and development of bed sculpture in unstable, pulsating shallow flow, 3 series of experiments were performed in a 10-m flume with flows of Reynolds Number up to 103, Froude Number up to 3.0, and slope up to 2%. In the first, the bed was rigid, in the second and third series planar beds were made from well-sorted and poorly sorted sand, respectively. Development of flow surface instability above the rigid bed showed the following stages: smooth surface; small wavelets; well-developed waves; and rough flow. The second series showed the following sequence: smooth bed; flow-aligned ridge and trough pattern; combined ridge and rhomboid pattern; and rhomboid configuration. The third series demonstrated transverse segregation of the bed material across the ridges.- from Authors

  10. Microanalysis of organic pigments and glazes in polychrome works of art by surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering

    PubMed Central

    Leona, Marco

    2009-01-01

    Scientific studies of works of art are usually limited by severe sampling restrictions. The identification of organic colorants, a class of compounds relevant for attribution and provenance studies, is further complicated by the low concentrations at which these compounds are used and by the interference of the protein-, gum-, or oil-binding media present in pigment and glaze samples. Surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) was successfully used to identify natural organic colorants in archaeological objects, polychrome sculptures, and paintings from samples smaller than 25 μm in diameter. The key factors in achieving the necessary sensitivity were a highly active stabilized silver colloid, obtained by the reproducible microwave-supported reduction of silver sulfate with glucose and sodium citrate, and a non-extractive hydrolysis sample treatment procedure that maximizes dye adsorption on the colloid. Among the examples presented are the earliest so far found occurrence of madder lake (in a 4,000 years old Egyptian object dating to the Middle Kingdom period), and the earliest known occurrence in Europe of the South Asian dyestuff lac (in the Morgan Madonna, a 12th century polychrome sculpture from Auvergne, France). PMID:19667181

  11. Optical sensing of analytes in aqueous solutions with a multiple surface-plasmon-polariton-wave platform

    PubMed Central

    Swiontek, Stephen E.; Pulsifer, Drew P.; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2013-01-01

    The commonly used optical sensor based on surface plasmon-polariton wave phenomenon can sense just one chemical, because only one SPP wave can be guided by the interface of a metal and a dielectric material contained in the sensor. Multiple analytes could be detected and/or the sensing reliability for a single analyte could be enhanced, if multiple SPP-wave modes could be excited on a single metal/dielectric interface. For that to happen, the partnering dielectric material must be periodically non-homogeneous. Using a chiral sculptured thin film (CSTF) as that material in a SPP-wave platform, we show that the angular locations of multiple SPP-wave modes shift when the void regions of the CSTF are infiltrated with a fluid. The sensitivities realized in the proof-of-concept experiments are comparable to state-of-research values. PMID:23474988

  12. Optical contouring of an acrylic surface for non-intrusive diagnostics in pipe-flow investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Witt, Benjamin J.; Coronado-Diaz, Haydee; Hugo, Ronald J.

    2008-07-01

    In this work, an acrylic surface was optically contoured to correct for the optical distortion caused by a transparent pipe wall. This method can be applied to non-invasive viewing/imaging techniques for fluid flow experiments. Software tools were developed to aid in the design of an optically contoured acrylic test section for pipe-flow experiments. Numerical models were computed for a standard acrylic pipe, inner diameter 57.15 mm, with water enclosed. An optical contour prototype was machined on a 5-axis CNC machine, and polished with 1-15 μm diamond paste, alleviating any surface imperfections without significantly altering the contoured surface. Experiments were then performed to measure the emerging optical wavefront and was found to emerge planar when utilizing the optical contour. It was determined that the wavefront was corrected to within ten wavelengths of a Helium-Neon (He-Ne) laser beam.

  13. Controlled Sculpture of Black Phosphorus Nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Masih Das, Paul; Danda, Gopinath; Cupo, Andrew; Parkin, William M; Liang, Liangbo; Kharche, Neerav; Ling, Xi; Huang, Shengxi; Dresselhaus, Mildred S; Meunier, Vincent; Drndić, Marija

    2016-06-28

    Black phosphorus (BP) is a highly anisotropic allotrope of phosphorus with great promise for fast functional electronics and optoelectronics. We demonstrate the controlled structural modification of few-layer BP along arbitrary crystal directions with sub-nanometer precision for the formation of few-nanometer-wide armchair and zigzag BP nanoribbons. Nanoribbons are fabricated, along with nanopores and nanogaps, using a combination of mechanical-liquid exfoliation and in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning TEM nanosculpting. We predict that the few-nanometer-wide BP nanoribbons realized experimentally possess clear one-dimensional quantum confinement, even when the systems are made up of a few layers. The demonstration of this procedure is key for the development of BP-based electronics, optoelectronics, thermoelectrics, and other applications in reduced dimensions. PMID:27192448

  14. Controlled Sculpture of Black Phosphorus Nanoribbons

    DOE PAGES

    Masih Das, Paul; Danda, Gopinath; Cupo, Andrew; Parkin, William M.; Liang, Liangbo; Kharche, Neerav; Ling, Xi; Huang, Shengxi; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.; Meunier, Vincent; et al

    2016-05-18

    Black phosphorus (BP) is a highly anisotropic allotrope of phosphorus with high promise for fast functional electronics and optoelectronics. We demonstrate that high-resolution and controlled structural modification of few-layer BP along arbitrary crystal direction can be achieved with nanometer-scale precision on a few-minute timescales leading to the formation of sub-nm wide armchair and zigzag BP nanoribbons. The nanoribbons are assembled, along with nanopores and nanogaps, using a combination of mechanical-liquid exfoliation and in situ transmission electron microscope (TEM) and scanning TEM nanosculpting. Here we report time-dependent structural properties of the one-dimensional systems under electron irradiation and probe their oxidation propertiesmore » with electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). Finally, we demonstrate the use of STEM to controllably narrow and thin the nanoribbons until they break into nanogaps. The observations are rationalized using density functional theory for transition state calculations and electronic band-structure evolution for the various stages of the narrowing procedure. In particular, we predict that the sub- and few-nm wide BP nanoribbons realized experimentally possess clear one-dimensional quantum confinement, even when the systems are made up of a few layers. We find the demonstration of this procedure is key for the development of BP-based electronic, optoelectronic, thermoelectric, and other applications in reduced dimensions.« less

  15. Ice sculpture in the Martian outflow channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucchitta, B. K.

    1982-01-01

    Viking Orbiter and terrestrial satellite images are examined at similar resolution to compare features of the Martian outflow channels with features produced by the movement of ice on earth, and many resemblances are found. These include the anastomoses, sinuosities, and U-shaped cross profiles of valleys; hanging valleys; linear scour marks on valley walls; grooves and ridges on valley floors; and the streamlining of bedrock highs. Attention is given to the question whether ice could have moved in the Martian environment. It is envisaged that springs or small catastrophic outbursts discharged fluids from structural outlets or chaotic terrains. These fluids built icings that may have grown into substantial masses and eventually flowed like glaciers down preexisting valleys. An alternative is that the fluids formed rivers or floods that in turn formed ice jams and consolidated into icy masses in places where obstacles blocked their flow.

  16. Strange Creatures: An Additive Wood Sculpture Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wales, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    Describes an art project where students create strange creatures using scraps of wood. Discusses how the students use the wood and other materials. Explains that the students also write about the habitat characteristics of their creatures. Includes learning objectives. (CMK)

  17. Generalized Ellipsometry on Ferromagnetic Sculptured Thin Films.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Daniel; Hofmann, Tino; Mok, Kah; Schmidt, Heidemarie; Skomski, Ralf; Schubert, Eva; Schubert, Mathias

    2011-03-01

    We present and discuss generalized ellipsometry and generalized vector-magneto-optic ellipsometry investigations on cobalt nanostructured thin films with slanted, highly-spatially coherent, columnar arrangement. The samples were prepared by glancing angle deposition. The thin films are highly transparent and reveal strong form-induced birefringence. We observe giant Kerr rotation in the visible spectral region, tunable by choice of the nanostructure geometry. Spatial magnetization orientation hysteresis and magnetization magnitude hysteresis properties are studied using a 3-dimensional Helmholtz coil arrangement allowing for arbitrary magnetic field direction at the sample position for field strengths up to 0.4 Tesla. Analysis of data obtained within this novel vector-magneto-optic setup reveals magnetization anisotropy of the Co slanted nanocolumns supported by mean-field theory modeling.

  18. Potential Hazards of Plastics Used in Sculpture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siedlecke, Jerome T.

    1972-01-01

    This paper discusses the thermoplastic and thermosetting resins presently being used by the artist, and the potential for exposure to the toxic chemicals and other hazards during the development of his creative work. (Author)

  19. Controlled Sculpture of Black Phosphorus Nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Masih Das, Paul; Danda, Gopinath; Cupo, Andrew; Parkin, William M; Liang, Liangbo; Kharche, Neerav; Ling, Xi; Huang, Shengxi; Dresselhaus, Mildred S; Meunier, Vincent; Drndić, Marija

    2016-06-28

    Black phosphorus (BP) is a highly anisotropic allotrope of phosphorus with great promise for fast functional electronics and optoelectronics. We demonstrate the controlled structural modification of few-layer BP along arbitrary crystal directions with sub-nanometer precision for the formation of few-nanometer-wide armchair and zigzag BP nanoribbons. Nanoribbons are fabricated, along with nanopores and nanogaps, using a combination of mechanical-liquid exfoliation and in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning TEM nanosculpting. We predict that the few-nanometer-wide BP nanoribbons realized experimentally possess clear one-dimensional quantum confinement, even when the systems are made up of a few layers. The demonstration of this procedure is key for the development of BP-based electronics, optoelectronics, thermoelectrics, and other applications in reduced dimensions.

  20. Dusty Sculptures in the MIPSGAL Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flagey, Nicolas; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Carey, S.; MIPSGAL Team

    2006-12-01

    The active star-forming region M16, also known as the Eagle Nebula, has become famous for its pillars that the Hubble Space Telescope has imaged more than ten years ago. The interaction between the radiation field of young stars and the inhomogeneous molecular cloud where they were born results in these structures and triggers the formation of a new generation of stars. The dust, mixed with the gas, is highly processed and its properties significantly change across the entire region. The analysis of the dust emission in M16 may thus help to improve our understanding of the dust evolution cycle and properties. I combine data from the MIPSGAL and GLIMPSE surveys of the Spitzer Space Telescope, as well as ancillary images and spectra from ISOCAM, IRAS and MSX, in order to probe the Near to Far Infrared emission of the smallest to biggest dust grains, respectively. Using an updated version of the model of Desert et al. (1990), I aim at constraining the smallest dust grains (PAH) properties in terms of size and ionization state, as well as the dust size distribution, in agreement with these observations. I will present some preliminary results of this work, which is my current research project as a Visiting Graduate Student at the Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology.

  1. Living Sculptures: Performance Art in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pembleton, Matthew; LaJevic, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    What does an introduction to and engagement in performance art offer K-12 students? In this article, we respond to this question by proposing a lesson inspired by the artmaking practices of the contemporary artist Erwin Wurm. Performance art can be defined as any form of work that combines the artist's body and a live-action event with or…

  2. Superamphiphobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Chu, Zonglin; Seeger, Stefan

    2014-04-21

    Superamphiphobicity is an effect where surface roughness and surface chemistry combine to generate surfaces which are both superhydrophobic and superoleophobic, i.e., contact angles (θCA) greater than 150° along with low contact angle hysteresis (CAH) not only towards probing water but also for low-surface-tension 'oils'. In this review, we summarize the research on superamphiphobic surfaces, including the characterization of superamphiphobicity, different techniques towards the fabrication of surface roughness and surface modification with low-surface-energy materials as well as their functional applications.

  3. XPS characterization of (copper-based) coloured stains formed on limestone surfaces of outdoor Roman monuments

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Limestone basements holding bronzes or other copper alloys artefacts such as sculptures, decorations and dedicatory inscriptions are frequently met both in modern and ancient monuments. In outdoor conditions, such a combination implies the corrosion products of the copper based alloy, directly exposed to rainwater, will be drained off and migrate through the porous surfaces, forming stains of different colours and intensities, finally causing the limestone structures to deteriorate. In this work we have analysed samples from two modern limestone monuments in Rome, the Botticino surfaces of the ‘Vittoriano’ (by G.Sacconi, 1885-1911- Piazza Venezia) and the travertine basement of the ‘Statua dello Studente’ (by A.Cataldi, 1920- University city, La Sapienza), and focussed our investigation on the chemical composition of the copper-stained zones using XPS (X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy) as a surface-specific technique. Based on observations reporting on the structure and bonding at the calcite surfaces we have identified copper complexes and mixed calcium/copper carbonates associated with the stains, as well as the chemical state of other elements therein included, and related the compositional changes with differences in chromatic characteristics and sampling locations. PMID:22594435

  4. XPS characterization of (copper-based) coloured stains formed on limestone surfaces of outdoor Roman monuments.

    PubMed

    Salvi, Anna Maria; Langerame, Fausto; Macchia, Andrea; Sammartino, Maria Pia; Tabasso, Marisa Laurenzi

    2012-01-01

    Limestone basements holding bronzes or other copper alloys artefacts such as sculptures, decorations and dedicatory inscriptions are frequently met both in modern and ancient monuments. In outdoor conditions, such a combination implies the corrosion products of the copper based alloy, directly exposed to rainwater, will be drained off and migrate through the porous surfaces, forming stains of different colours and intensities, finally causing the limestone structures to deteriorate.In this work we have analysed samples from two modern limestone monuments in Rome, the Botticino surfaces of the 'Vittoriano' (by G.Sacconi, 1885-1911- Piazza Venezia) and the travertine basement of the 'Statua dello Studente' (by A.Cataldi, 1920- University city, La Sapienza), and focussed our investigation on the chemical composition of the copper-stained zones using XPS (X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy) as a surface-specific technique.Based on observations reporting on the structure and bonding at the calcite surfaces we have identified copper complexes and mixed calcium/copper carbonates associated with the stains, as well as the chemical state of other elements therein included, and related the compositional changes with differences in chromatic characteristics and sampling locations. PMID:22594435

  5. Surface Tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theissen, David B.; Man, Kin F.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of surface tension is observed inmany everyday situations. For example, a slowly leaking faucet drips because the force surface tension allows the water to cling to it until a sufficient mass of water is accumulated to break free.

  6. Surface finishing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinzler, J. A.; Hefferman, J. T.; Fehrenkamp, L. G.; Lee, W. S. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A surface of an article adapted for relative motion with a fluid environment is finished by coating the surface with a fluid adhesive, covering the adhesive with a sheet of flexible film material under tension on the film material whereby the tensioned film material is bonded to the surface by the adhesive.

  7. Classification of grass pollen through the quantitative analysis of surface ornamentation and texture.

    PubMed

    Mander, Luke; Li, Mao; Mio, Washington; Fowlkes, Charless C; Punyasena, Surangi W

    2013-11-01

    Taxonomic identification of pollen and spores uses inherently qualitative descriptions of morphology. Consequently, identifications are restricted to categories that can be reliably classified by multiple analysts, resulting in the coarse taxonomic resolution of the pollen and spore record. Grass pollen represents an archetypal example; it is not routinely identified below family level. To address this issue, we developed quantitative morphometric methods to characterize surface ornamentation and classify grass pollen grains. This produces a means of quantifying morphological features that are traditionally described qualitatively. We used scanning electron microscopy to image 240 specimens of pollen from 12 species within the grass family (Poaceae). We classified these species by developing algorithmic features that quantify the size and density of sculptural elements on the pollen surface, and measure the complexity of the ornamentation they form. These features yielded a classification accuracy of 77.5%. In comparison, a texture descriptor based on modelling the statistical distribution of brightness values in image patches yielded a classification accuracy of 85.8%, and seven human subjects achieved accuracies between 68.33 and 81.67%. The algorithmic features we developed directly relate to biologically meaningful features of grass pollen morphology, and could facilitate direct interpretation of unsupervised classification results from fossil material.

  8. Superhydrophobic surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Evelyn N; McCarthy, Matthew; Enright, Ryan; Culver, James N; Gerasopoulos, Konstantinos; Ghodssi, Reza

    2015-03-24

    Surfaces having a hierarchical structure--having features of both microscale and nanoscale dimensions--can exhibit superhydrophobic properties and advantageous condensation and heat transfer properties. The hierarchical surfaces can be fabricated using biological nanostructures, such as viruses as a self-assembled nanoscale template.

  9. Aspects on the relief of living surfaces using atomic force microscopy allow "art" to imitate nature.

    PubMed

    Polymeni, Rosa; Spanakis, Emmanuel; Argiropoulos, Apostolos; Rhizopoulou, Sophia

    2010-09-01

    The visualization of the surface of biological samples using an atomic force microscope reveals features of the external relief and can resolve very fine and detailed features of the surface. We examined specimens from the skin of the amphibians Salamandra salamandra Linnaeus, 1758, Lyciasalamandra luschani basoglui Baran & Atatür, 1980 and Mesotriton alpestris Laurenti, 1768, and from the surface of pollen grains of the plant species Cyclamen graecum Link, 1835 and Cistus salviifolius Linnaeus, 1753, which exhibit certain interesting features, imaged at the nanoscale level. It is likely that the relief influences the attributes of the interfaces between the tissues and the environment. We found that the microsculpture increases in size the surface of the examined tissues and this might be particularly important for their performance in the field. Microsculpturing of amphibians' skin may affect water regulation, dehydration and rehydration, and cutaneous gas exchange. Pollen grain relief might affect the firmness of the contact between pollen surface and water droplets. High resolution imaging of the external relief showed that roughening might induce wetting and influence the water status of the specimens. In addition, roughness affects the radius of water droplets retained in between the projections of the external relief. Roughness of the tissues was highly correlated with their vertical distance, whereas surface distances were highly correlated with horizontal distances. By enabling a more detailed characterization of the external sculptures, through sophisticated techniques, a more comprehensive examination of the samples indicates similarities among different living tissues, originated from different kingdoms, which can be attributed to environmental conditions and physiological circumstances.

  10. Surface Treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Cheol (Inventor); Lowther, Sharon E. (Inventor); St.Clair, Terry L. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A simple surface treatment process is provided which offers a high performance surface for a variety of applications at low cost. This novel surface treatment, which is particularly useful for Ti-6Al-4V alloys, is achieved by forming oxides on the surface with a two-step chemical process and without mechanical abrasion. First, after solvent degreasing, sulfuric acid is used to generate a fresh titanium surface. Next, an alkaline perborate solution is used to form an oxide on the surface. This acid-followed-by-base treatment is cost effective and relatively safe to use in commercial applications. In addition, it is chromium-free, and has been successfully used with a sol-gel coating to afford a strong adhesive bond that exhibits excellent durability after the bonded specimens have been subjected to a harsh 72 hour water boil immersion. Phenylethynyl containing adhesives were used to evaluate this surface treatment with a novel coupling agent containing both trialkoxysilane and phenylethynyl groups. 8 Claims, 16 Drawing Sheets

  11. On some surface structures of potential taxonomic importance in families of the suborders Polydesmidea and Dalodesmidea (Polydesmida, Diplopoda)

    PubMed Central

    Akkari, Nesrine; Enghoff, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Surface structures have rarely been the subject of a comprehensive study in Polydesmida despite their tremendous variety within this order. A number of these peripheral structures are here studied in most families of the suborders Polydesmidea and Dalodesmidea (sensu Hoffman 1980), using scanning electron microscopy. An illustrated description of the surface sculpture of the prozonite, the limbus and the intercalary cuticular micro-scutes on the metazonite is given for the first time for the studied families, together with an account of some other poorly known surface structures. Taken together, these characters allow us to recognize two main groupings of families. The families Ammodesmidae, Cryptodesmidae, Cyrtodesmidae, Haplodesmidae, Oniscodesmidae and Pyrgodesmidae have knobs on the posterior part of the prozonites, a toothed to lobed limbus, and no micro-scutes on the metazonites, wheras the families Fuhrmannodesmidae, Polydesmidae, Dalodesmidae, Macrosternodesmidae, Nearctodesmidae, Opisotretidae and Trichopolydesmidae have no knobs on the posterior part of the prozonites, a spiky or reduced limbus, and intercalary micro-scutes on the metazonites. The results are complemented with literature records and compared with current taxonomic and phylogenetic interpretations of the group. PMID:22303092

  12. Boundary|Time|Surface: Art and Geology Meet in Gros Morne National Park, NL, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lancaster, Sydney; Waldron, John

    2015-04-01

    Environmental Art works range in scope from major permanent interventions in the landscape to less intrusive, more ephemeral site-specific installations constructed of materials from the local environment. Despite this range of intervention, however, these works all share in a tradition of art making that situates the artwork in direct response to the surrounding landscape. Andy Goldsworthy and Richard Long, for example, both favour methods that combine elements of both sculpture and performance in the creation of non-permanent interventions in the landscape, and both rely upon photographic, text-based, or video documentation as the only lasting indication of the works' existence. Similarly, Earth Scientists are responsible for interventions in the landscape, both physical and conceptual. For example, in Earth science, the periods of the geologic timescale - Cambrian, Ordovician, Silurian, etc. - were established by 19th century pioneers of geology at a time when they were believed to represent natural chapters in Earth history. Since the mid-20th century, stratigraphers have attempted to resolve ambiguities in the original definitions by defining stratotypes: sections of continuously deposited strata where a single horizon is chosen as a boundary. One such international stratotype, marking the Cambrian-Ordovician boundary, is defined at Green Point in Gros Morne National Park, Newfoundland. Boundary|Time|Surface was an ephemeral sculptural installation work constructed in June 2014. The main installation work was a fence of 52 vertical driftwood poles, 2-3 m tall, positioned precisely along the boundary stratotype horizon at Green Point in Newfoundland. The fence extended across a 150 m wave-cut platform from sea cliffs to the low-water mark, separating Ordovician from Cambrian strata. The installation was constructed by hand (with volunteer assistance) on June 22, as the wave-cut platform was exposed by the falling tide. During the remainder of the tidal cycle

  13. An error compensation method of laser displacement sensor in the inclined surface measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Feng; Xiong, Zhongxing; Li, Bin

    2015-10-01

    Laser triangulation displacement sensor is an important tool in non-contact displacement measurement which has been widely used in the filed of freeform surface measurement. However, measurement accuracy of such optical sensors is very likely to be influenced by the geometrical shape and face properties of the inspected surfaces. This study presents an error compensation method for the measurement of inclined surfaces using a 1D laser displacement sensor. The effect of the incident angle on the measurement results was investigated by analyzing the laser spot projected on the inclined surface. Both the shape and the light intensity distribution of the spot will be influenced by the incident angle, which lead to the measurement error. As the beam light spot size is different at different measurement position according to Gaussian beam propagating laws, the light spot projectted on the inclinde surface will be an ellipse approximatively. It's important to note that this ellipse isn't full symmetrical because the spot size of Gaussian beam is different at different position. By analyzing the laws of the shape change, the error compensation model can be established. This method is verified through the measurement of an ceramic plane mounted on a high-accuracy 5-axis Mikron UCP 800 Duro milling center. The results show that the method is effective in increasing the measurement accuracy.

  14. Surface Tension

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    Surface tension in the kitchen sink. At Berkeley Lab's Molecular Foundry, scientists study surface tension to understand how molecules "self-assemble." The coin trick in the video uses the re-arrangement of water molecules to seemingly create order out of disorder. The same principle can be used to create order in otherwise hard-to-handle nano materials. Scientists can then transfer these ordered materials onto surfaces by dipping them through the air-water interface, or (as we've recently shown) squeeze them so that they collapse into the water as two-molecule-thick nano sheets. http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2011/10/17/shaken-not-stirred/

  15. Monopolar surfaces.

    PubMed

    van Oss, C J; Chaudhury, M K; Good, R J

    1987-11-01

    Following the development of a methodology for determining the apolar components as well as the electron donor and the electron acceptor parameters of the surface tension of polar surfaces, surfaces of a number of quite common materials were found to manifest virtually only electron donor properties and no, or hardly, any electron acceptor properties. Such materials may be called monopolar; they can strongly interact with bipolar materials (e.g., with polar liquids such as water); but one single polar parameter of a monopolar material cannot contribute to its energy of cohesion. Monopolar materials manifesting only electron acceptor properties also may exist, but they do not appear to occur in as great an abundance. Among the electron donor monopolar materials are: polymethylmethacrylate, polyvinylalcohol, polyethyleneglycol, proteins, many polysaccharides, phospholipids, nonionic surfactants, cellulose esters, etc. Strongly monopolar materials of the same sign repel each other when immersed or dissolved in water or other polar liquids. The interfacial tension between strongly monopolar surfaces and water has a negative value. This leads to a tendency for water to penetrate between facing surfaces of a monopolar substance and hence, to repulsion between the molecules or particles of such a monopolar material, when immersed in water, and thus to pronounced solubility or dispersibility. Monopolar repulsion energies can far outweigh Lifshitz-van der Waals attractions as well as electrostatic and "steric" repulsions. In aqueous systems the commonly observed stabilization effects, which usually are ascribed to "steric" stabilization, may in many instances be attributed to monopolar repulsion between nonionic stabilizing molecules. The repulsion between monopolar molecules of the same sign can also lead to phase separation in aqueous solutions (or suspensions), where not only two, but multiple phases are possible. Negative interfacial tensions between monopolar

  16. Ultrasonic Surface Measurements for the investigation of superficial alteration of natural stones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Thomas; Auras, Michael; Bilgili, Filiz; Christen, Sandra; Cristiano, Luigia; Krompholz, Rolf; Mosca, Ilaria; Rose, David

    2013-04-01

    Seismic waveform analysis is applicable also to the centimeter and decimeter scale for non-destructive testing of pavement, facades, plaster, sculptures, or load-bearing structures like pillars. Mostly transmission measurements are performed and travel-times of first arriving P-waves are considered that have limited resolution for the upper centimeters of an object. In contrast, surface measurements are well suited to quantify superficial alterations of material properties e.g. due to weathering. A number of surface measurements have been carried out in the laboratory as well as on real structures in order to study systematically the information content of ultrasonic waveforms and their variability under real conditions. As a preposition for ultrasonic waveform analysis, reproducible, broad-band measurements have to be carried out with a definite radiation pattern and an about 1 mm accuracy of the measurement geometry. We used special coupling devices for effective ultrasonic surface measurements in the laboratory as well as at real objects. Samples of concrete with varying composition and samples of natural stone - marble, tuff, and sandstone - were repeatedly weathered and tested by ultrasonic measurements. The resistance of the samples to weathering and the penetration depth of the weathering are analyzed. Furthermore, material specific calibration curves for changes in velocities of elastic waves due to weathering can be obtained by these tests. Tests on real structures have been carried out for marble (Schlossbrücke, Berlin) and sandstone (Porta Nigra, Trier). Altogether, these test measurements show clearly that despite of the internal inhomogeneity of many real objects, their surface roughness and topography especially ultrasonic Rayleigh waves are well suited to study material alterations in the upper centimeters. Dispersion of Rayleigh waves may be inverted for shear-wave velocity as a function of depth.

  17. Directed self-assembly of colloidal particles onto the chemically anchoring patterned surface in a nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao; Armas-Pérez, Julio; Hernandez-Ortiz, Juan; de Pablo, Juan; Nealey, Paul

    The defects assisted assembly of colloidal particles works are more focused on the defects created in the bulk or the interface of nematic liquid crystal, which usually observe a group of particles spontaneously forming a chain or aggregating over the defects. The confining surface with specific 3D sculptured structures, such as pyramid or zig-zag grooves, offers the opportunity to isolate the trapped particles into certain position. Here, we explore a new method to direct self-assemble the colloidal particles through manipulating defects on the 2D geometry confined anchoring surface. Since the director of the preferred planar orientation of LCs could be manipulated by the pattern geometry and dimension, the topological defects could be engineered based on multi-stable orientation by designed 2D geometry pattern of different controllable direction at sub-micrometer dimension. We demonstrate that the designed one single middle straight stripe with disjoint two groups of straight stripe array on both side of the middle stripe as 45 angle of different orientation director could control the distortion of the disjoint gap space thus acting as defects template to trap the colloidal particles directed self-assembly at the designed positions. Through anchoring distribution on the pattern areas, geometry design of pattern, and also the external electric field applied on the system, those defects areas could be generate, erase, resume or even correct.

  18. Hypothesis: Neuroendocrine Mechanisms (Hypothalamus–Growth Hormone–STAT5 Axis) Contribute to Sex Bias in Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Pravin B; Yang, Yang-Ming; Miller, Edmund J

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a disease with high morbidity and mortality. The prevalence of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) and hereditary pulmonary arterial hypertension (HPAH) is approximately two- to four-fold higher in women than in men. Paradoxically, there is an opposite male bias in typical rodent models of PH (chronic hypoxia or monocrotaline); in these models, administration of estrogenic compounds (for example, estradiol-17β [E2]) is protective. Further complexities are observed in humans ingesting anorexigens (female bias) and in rodent models, such as after hypoxia plus SU5416/Sugen (little sex bias) or involving serotonin transporter overexpression or dexfenfluramine administration (female bias). These complexities in sex bias in PH remain incompletely understood. We recently discovered that conditional deletion of signal transducer and activator of transcription 5a/b (STAT5a/b) in vascular smooth muscle cells abrogated the male bias in PH in hypoxic mice and that late-stage obliterative lesions in patients of both sexes with IPAH and HPAH showed reduced STAT5a/b, reduced Tyr-P-STAT5 and reduced B-cell lymphoma 6 protein (BCL6). In trying to understand the significance of these observations, we realized that there existed a well-characterized E2-sensitive central neuroendocrine mechanism of sex bias, studied over the last 40 years, that, at its peripheral end, culminated in species-specific male (“pulsatile”) versus female (“more continuous”) temporal patterns of circulating growth hormone (GH) levels leading to male versus female patterned activation of STAT5a/b in peripheral tissues and thus sex-biased expression of hundreds of genes. In this report, we consider the contribution of this neuroendocrine mechanism (hypothalamus-GH-STAT5) in the generation of sex bias in different PH situations. PMID:26252185

  19. Importance of the CCR5-CCL5 axis for mucosal Trypanosoma cruzi protection and B cell activation.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Nicole L; Eickhoff, Christopher S; Zhang, Xiuli; Giddings, Olivia K; Lane, Thomas E; Hoft, Daniel F

    2011-08-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is an intracellular parasite and the causative agent of Chagas disease. Previous work has shown that the chemokine receptor CCR5 plays a role in systemic T. cruzi protection. We evaluated the importance of CCR5 and CCL5 for mucosal protection against natural oral and conjunctival T. cruzi challenges. T. cruzi-immune CCR5(-/-) and wild-type C57BL/6 mice were generated by repeated infectious challenges with T. cruzi. CCR5(-/-) and wild-type mice developed equivalent levels of cellular, humoral, and protective mucosal responses. However, CCR5(-/-)-immune mice produced increased levels of CCL5 in protected gastric tissues, suggesting compensatory signaling through additional receptors. Neutralization of CCL5 in CCR5(-/-)-immune mice resulted in decreased mucosal inflammatory responses, reduced T. cruzi-specific Ab-secreting cells, and significantly less mucosal T. cruzi protection, confirming an important role for CCL5 in optimal immune control of T. cruzi replication at the point of initial mucosal invasion. To investigate further the mechanism responsible for mucosal protection mediated by CCL5-CCR5 signaling, we evaluated the effects of CCL5 on B cells. CCL5 enhanced proliferation and IgM secretion in highly purified B cells triggered by suboptimal doses of LPS. In addition, neutralization of endogenous CCL5 inhibited B cell proliferation and IgM secretion during stimulation of highly purified B cells, indicating that B cell production of CCL5 has important autocrine effects. These findings demonstrate direct effects of CCL5 on B cells, with significant implications for the development of mucosal adjuvants, and further suggest that CCL5 may be important as a general B cell coactivator.

  20. Surface Variety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA02175 Surface Variety This image of part of Aram Chaos shows two different surface textures with distinctly different brightnesses. The lighter layer appears to be on top (therefore younger) than the darker surface.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 2.1N, Longitude 338.7E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  1. Analyzing the Deposition of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles at Model Rough Mineral Surfaces Using a Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Kananizadeh, N.; Rodenhausen, K. B.; Schubert, M.; Bartelt-Hunt, S.

    2015-12-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nTiO2) is the most extensively manufactured engineered materials. nTiO2 from sunscreens was found to enter sediments after released into a lake. nTiO2 may also enter the subsurface via irrigation using effluents from wastewater treatment plants. Interaction of nTiO2 with soils and sediments will largely influence their fate, transport, and ecotoxicity. Measuring the interaction between nTiO2 and natural substrates (e.g. such as sands) is particularly challenging due to highly heterogeneous and rough natural sand surfaces. In this study, an engineered controllable rough surface known as three dimensional nanostructured sculptured columnar thin films (SCTFs) has been used to mimic surface roughness. SCTFs were fabricated by glancing angle deposition (GLAD), a physical vapor deposition technique facilitated by electron beam evaporation. Interaction between nTiO2 and SCTF coated surfaces was investigated using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). In parallel, a Generalized Ellipsometry (GE) was coupled with the QCM-D to measure the deposition of nTiO2. We found that the typical QCM-D modeling approach, e.g. viscoelastic model, would largely overestimate the mass of deposited nTiO2, because the frequency drops due to particle deposition or water entrapment in rough areas were not differentiated. Here, we demonstrate a new approach to model QCM-D data for nTiO2 deposition on rough surfaces, which couples the viscoelastic model with a model of flow on the non-uniform surface.

  2. Diamond Provenance Through Shape, Colour, Surface Features and Value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, J.

    2002-05-01

    The physical properties of diamond provide a possible means by which run-of-mine productions may be identified. Such properties as shape, the regularity and angularity of the crystal form, the level of transparency, colour, syngenetic inclusion content and surface feature characteristics, all as a function of diamond size, can classify diamond productions. In early work, up to 1500 diamonds in specific sizes ranging from just under 2mm up to 6mm were evaluated. Using this procedure, most of the diamonds from the main mines in southern Africa have now been classified. Within South Africa, the mine at Swartruggens is the only one to have measurable levels of cube-shaped diamonds and an absence of the spinel twin form of diamond, more commonly known as the macle. In Botswana, the proportion of cube related forms at Jwaneng is about four times that at Orapa. Whilst the common diamond colours, colourless, yellow and brown, occur in most mines, there is a marked change in the proportion of transparent green-coated diamonds with depth in mines such as Finsch and Jwaneng. Individual mines may also have very small proportions of distinctive diamond colours, such as pinks at the Argyle mine in Australia and blues in the Premier mine in South Africa. More recently, classification emphasis has shifted away from large numbers of diamonds examined and particular attention has been paid to surface features, which reflect changes to the diamond either whilst still in the kimberlite, or subsequently during transport to an alluvial source. A classification of diamonds at the Venetia mine, South Africa, for example, showed that the proportion of diamonds with the feature referred to as corrosion sculpture, was distinctive between kimberlite types within the mine. With alluvial diamonds, transport causes further defects, particularly a general increase in the proportion of diamonds with surface features referred to as percussion marks and edge abrasion. The above observational

  3. Eroded Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 19 August 2003

    The knobby terrain and eroded impact crater observed in this THEMIS image of the Eumenides Dorsum region are evidence to a surface that has been heavily modified and stripped over time. Variable layering of material within the impact crater suggest a succession of events which eroded the surface and exposed possibly different units. Slope streaks and dust avalanches are also observed within the impact crater and point to recent and continued modification of the surface.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 4.9, Longitude 203.6 East (156.4 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  4. Surface mining

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-06-01

    This paper reports on a GAO study of attorney and expert witness fees awarded as a result of litigation brought under the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act. As of March 24, 1989, a total of about $1.4 million had been awarded in attorney fees and expenses - about $1.3 subject to the provisions of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act, a comparison of its features with provisions of ERISA showed that the plan differed from ERISA provisions in areas such as eligibility, funding, and contribution limits.

  5. Fractured Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03084 Fractured Surface

    These fractures and graben are part of Gordii Fossae, a large region that has undergone stresses which have cracked the surface.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 16.6S, Longitude 234.3E. 18 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  6. Oxide surfaces.

    PubMed

    Willmott, Phil

    2008-07-01

    Although the history of metal oxides and their surfaces goes back several decades to landmark studies, such as Mott and Peierls' explanation of electrical insulation in materials that are predicted in band theory to be conducting, or the observation by Morin of the superfast metal-to-insulator transition in vanadium dioxide, it is only in the last two decades that the world of condensed matter physics has become increasingly dominated by research into complex metal oxides. This has been driven most notably by an attempt to better understand and describe the fundamental physical processes behind their seemingly endless spectrum of properties, which in turn has also led to the discovery of novel phenomena, most prominently demonstrated by the discovery of high-temperature superconductivity in 1986, colossal magnetoresistance in 1994, and most recently, the formation of a two-dimensional conducting layer at the interface between two band insulators in 2004. One important reason why metal oxides, particularly in the form of thin films, have become such a popular subject for basic condensed matter research is that they offer a uniquely versatile materials base for the development of novel technologies. They owe this versatility both to the many different elemental combinations that lead to structurally similar forms, and also to the fact that in many cases, the strong interaction between the valence electrons means that there is a subtle interplay between structure and magnetic and electronic properties. This aspect has led in recent years to the birth or renaissance of research fields such as spintronics, orbital ordering, and multiferroics. Surfaces and interfaces are especially interesting in these strongly-correlated electron systems, where the rearrangement of electrical charge resulting from a minimization of surface or interfacial energy can have unexpected and often exciting consequences. Indeed, as the drive to miniaturize devices well below the micron size

  7. Toroidal surfaces compared with spherocylindrical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malacara-Doblado, Daniel; Malacara-Hernandez, Daniel; Garcia-Marquez, Jorge L.

    1995-08-01

    Toroidal and sphero-cylindrical optical surfaces are two different kinds of surfaces (Menchaca and Malacara, 1986), but they are almost identical in the vicinity of the optical axis. The separation between these two surfaces increases when the distance to the optical axis increases. In this work the separation between these two surfaces outside of the central region is analytically studied.

  8. Web-Based Interactive Steel Sculpture for the Google Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chou, Karen C.; Moaveni, Saeed

    2009-01-01

    In almost all the civil engineering programs in the United States, a student is required to take at least one design course in either steel or reinforced concrete. One of the topics covered in an introductory steel design course is the design of connections. Steel connections play important roles in the integrity of a structure, and many…

  9. The Holocaust Memorial Sculpture Project: An Artist's Tale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houlihan, Elena Hiatt

    2005-01-01

    This article describes a school residency project which balloons in complexity, difficulty and meaning--making the incomprehensible tangible. The project had started in the spring of 1996, when the social studies teacher of Community Day School in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Mr. Bill Walter, wanted the students to understand the enormity of the…

  10. Light, Wind and Fire - Beautiful Image of a Cosmic Sculpture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-02-01

    Today ESO has released a dramatic new image of NGC 346, the brightest star-forming region in our neighbouring galaxy, the Small Magellanic Cloud, 210 000 light-years away towards the constellation of Tucana (the Toucan). The light, wind and heat given off by massive stars have dispersed the glowing gas within and around this star cluster, forming a surrounding wispy nebular structure that looks like a cobweb. NGC 346, like other beautiful astronomical scenes, is a work in progress, and changes as the aeons pass. As yet more stars form from loose matter in the area, they will ignite, scattering leftover dust and gas, carving out great ripples and altering the face of this lustrous object. NGC 346 spans approximately 200 light-years, a region of space about fifty times the distance between the Sun and its nearest stellar neighbours. Astronomers classify NGC 346 as an open cluster of stars, indicating that this stellar brood all originated from the same collapsed cloud of matter. The associated nebula containing this clutch of bright stars is known as an emission nebula, meaning that gas within it has been heated up by stars until the gas emits its own light, just like the neon gas used in electric store signs. Many stars in NGC 346 are relatively young in cosmic terms with their births dating back only a few million years or so (eso0834). Powerful winds thrown off by a massive star set off this recent round of star birth by compressing large amounts of matter, the first critical step towards igniting new stars. This cloud of material then collapses under its own gravity, until some regions become dense and hot enough to roar forth as a brilliantly shining, nuclear fusion-powered furnace - a star, illuminating the residual debris of gas and dust. In sufficiently congested regions like NGC 346, with high levels of recent star birth, the result is a glorious, glowing vista for our telescopes to capture. NGC 346 is in the Small Magellanic Cloud, a dwarf galaxy some 210 000 light-years away from Earth and in close proximity to our home, the much larger Milky Way Galaxy. Like its sister the Large Magellanic Cloud, the Small Magellanic Cloud is visible with the unaided eye from the southern hemisphere and has served as an extragalactic laboratory for astronomers studying the dynamics of star formation. This particular image was obtained using the Wide Field Imager (WFI) instrument at the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla Observatory in Chile. Images like this help astronomers chronicle star birth and evolution, while offering glimpses of how stellar development influences the appearance of the cosmic environment over time. More information ESO, the European Southern Observatory, is the foremost intergovernmental astronomy organisation in Europe and the world's most productive astronomical observatory. It is supported by 14 countries: Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Finland, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. ESO carries out an ambitious programme focused on the design, construction and operation of powerful ground-based observing facilities enabling astronomers to make important scientific discoveries. ESO also plays a leading role in promoting and organising cooperation in astronomical research. ESO operates three unique world-class observing sites in Chile: La Silla, Paranal and Chajnantor. At Paranal, ESO operates the Very Large Telescope, the world's most advanced visible-light astronomical observatory, and VISTA the largest survey telescope. ESO is the European partner of a revolutionary astronomical telescope ALMA, the largest astronomical project in existence. ESO is currently planning a 42-metre European Extremely Large optical/near-infrared Telescope, the E-ELT, which will become "the world's biggest eye on the sky".

  11. Teaching Steel Connections Using an Interactive Virtual Steel Sculpture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moaveni, Saeed; Chou, Karen C.

    2015-01-01

    Steel connections play important roles in the integrity of a structure, and many structural failures are attributed to connection failures. Connections are the glue that holds a structure together. The failures of the Hartford Coliseum in 1977, the Hyatt Regency Hotel in Kansas City in 1980, and the I-35W Bridge in Minneapolis in 2007 are all…

  12. Sculpture, Metallic Formations II, Art Education: 6683.12b.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubocq, Edward R.

    An exploratory course in the creation of shapes using a variety of metals and techniques is described in this guide for quinmester elective course for grades 7-12. Students cut, form, weld, rivet, cast and finish such metals as steel, copper, aluminum, brass, pewter, and bronze. They develop a working knowledge of the various tools and processes,…

  13. A sculpture masterpiece for the teaching of anatomy

    PubMed Central

    DUMITRASCU, DINU IULIU; CRIVII, CARMEN BIANCA; OPINCARU, IULIAN

    2016-01-01

    Background and aim The study of anatomy remains the backbone of medical education in the first years. There is a constant need for educational materials that enable the assimilation of knowledge by students. The casts after human bodies have not lost the value, even in the era of virtual education. We present in this paper a museal item destined to improve the anatomy teaching. Methods Given the existence in the department of anatomy from Cluj –Napoca of an item of exceptional artistic and scientific value, we intensively searched Pubmed and Scopus, as well as by manual search of printed only documents, for all papers related to the muscle man by Brancusi created for educational purposes of anatomy students. Results This paper presents summary data from the biography of the creators of this item, the world famous sculptor Constantin Brancusi and the professor of anatomy and surgery from Bucharest Dimitrie Gerota. We also describe this item and the conditions which generated it Conclusion Teaching anatomy relies on the quality of the didactic support. The muscle man by Brancusi is a very realistic reproduction of a man, very useful for anatomical training and teaching. PMID:27152086

  14. 19 CFR 10.48 - Engravings, sculptures, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... artist as evidence of their authenticity. In the absence of such a signature or mark, other evidence shall be required which will establish the authenticity of the work to the satisfaction of the...

  15. Anisotropic vanadium dioxide sculptured thin films with superior thermochromic properties

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yaoming; Xiao, Xiudi; Xu, Gang; Dong, Guoping; Chai, Guanqi; Zhang, Hua; Liu, Pengyi; Zhu, Hanmin; Zhan, Yongjun

    2013-01-01

    VO2 (M) STF through reduction of V2O5 STF was prepared. The results illustrate that V2O5 STF can be successfully obtained by oblique angle thermal evaporation technique. After annealing at 550°C/3 min, the V2O5 STF deposited at 85° can be easily transformed into VO2 STF with slanted columnar structure and superior thermochromic properties. After deposition SiO2 antireflective layer, Tlum of VO2 STF is enhanced 26% and ΔTsol increases 60% compared with that of normal VO2 thin films. Due to the anisotropic microstructure of VO2 STF, angular selectivity transmission of VO2 STF is observed and the solar modulation ability is further improved from 7.2% to 8.7% when light is along columnar direction. Moreover, the phase transition temperature of VO2 STF can be depressed into 54.5°C without doping. Considering the oblique incidence of sunlight on windows, VO2 STF is more beneficial for practical application as smart windows compared with normal homogenous VO2 thin films. PMID:24067743

  16. Anisotropic vanadium dioxide sculptured thin films with superior thermochromic properties.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yaoming; Xiao, Xiudi; Xu, Gang; Dong, Guoping; Chai, Guanqi; Zhang, Hua; Liu, Pengyi; Zhu, Hanmin; Zhan, Yongjun

    2013-01-01

    VO2 (M) STF through reduction of V2O5 STF was prepared. The results illustrate that V2O5 STF can be successfully obtained by oblique angle thermal evaporation technique. After annealing at 550 °C/3 min, the V2O5 STF deposited at 85° can be easily transformed into VO2 STF with slanted columnar structure and superior thermochromic properties. After deposition SiO2 antireflective layer, Tlum of VO2 STF is enhanced 26% and ΔTsol increases 60% compared with that of normal VO2 thin films. Due to the anisotropic microstructure of VO2 STF, angular selectivity transmission of VO2 STF is observed and the solar modulation ability is further improved from 7.2% to 8.7% when light is along columnar direction. Moreover, the phase transition temperature of VO2 STF can be depressed into 54.5 °C without doping. Considering the oblique incidence of sunlight on windows, VO2 STF is more beneficial for practical application as smart windows compared with normal homogenous VO2 thin films. PMID:24067743

  17. Overview on surface representations for freeform surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, H.; Brömel, A.; Beier, M.; Steinkopf, R.; Hartung, J.; Zhong, Y.; Oleszko, M.; Ochse, D.

    2015-09-01

    Freeform surfaces are a new and exciting opportunity in lens design. The technological boundary conditions for manufacturing surfaces with reduced symmetry are complicated. Recently the progress in understanding and controlling this kind of components is ready for use in commercial products. Nearly all procedures of classical design development are changing, if freeform surfaces are used. The mathematical description of the surfaces, the optimization algorithms in lens design and their convergence, the initial design approaches, the evaluation of performance over the field of view, the data transfer in the mechanical design software and in the manufacturing machines, the metrology for characterization of real surfaces and the return of the real surfaces into the simulation are affected. In this contribution, in particular an overview on possible mathematical formulations of the surfaces is given. One of the requirements on the descriptions is a good performance to correct optical aberrations. After fabrication of real surfaces, there are typical deviations seen in the shape. First more localized deformations are observed, which are only poorly described by mode expansions. Therefore a need in describing the surface with localized finite support exists. Secondly the classical diamond turning grinding process typically shows a regular ripple structure. These midfrequency errors are best described by special approaches. For all these cases it would be the best to have simple, robust solutions, that allow for fast calculation in fitting measured surfaces and in raytrace.

  18. Fast Disinfecting Antimicrobial Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Madkour, Ahmad E.; Dabkowski, Jeffery M.; Nüsslein, Klaus; Tew, Gregory N.

    2013-01-01

    Silicon wafers and glass surfaces were functionalized with facially amphiphilic antimicrobial copolymers using the “grafting from” technique. Surface initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) was used to grow poly(butylmethacrylate)-co-poly(Boc-aminoethyl methacrylate) from the surfaces. Upon Boc-deprotection, these surfaces became highly antimicrobial and killed S. aureus and E. coli 100% in less than 5 min. The molecular weight and grafting density of the polymer were controlled by varying the polymerization time and initiator surface density. Antimicrobial studies showed that the killing efficiency of these surfaces was independent of polymer layer thickness or grafting density within the range of surfaces studied. PMID:19177651

  19. Computer aided surface representation

    SciTech Connect

    Barnhill, R.E.

    1990-02-19

    The central research problem of this project is the effective representation, computation, and display of surfaces interpolating to information in three or more dimensions. If the given information is located on another surface, then the problem is to construct a surface defined on a surface''. Sometimes properties of an already defined surface are desired, which is geometry processing''. Visualization of multivariate surfaces is possible by means of contouring higher dimensional surfaces. These problems and more are discussed below. The broad sweep from constructive mathematics through computational algorithms to computer graphics illustrations is utilized in this research. The breadth and depth of this research activity makes this research project unique.

  20. Computer aided surface representation

    SciTech Connect

    Barnhill, R E

    1987-11-01

    The aims of this research are the creation of new surface forms and the determination of geometric and physical properties of surfaces. The full sweep from constructive mathematics through the implementation of algorithms and the interactive computer graphics display of surfaces is utilized. Both three-dimensional and multi- dimensional surfaces are considered. Particular emphasis is given to the scientific computing solution of Department of Energy problems. The methods that we have developed and that we are proposing to develop allow applications such as: Producing smooth contour maps from measured data, such as weather maps. Modeling the heat distribution inside a furnace from sample measurements. Terrain modeling based on satellite pictures. The investigation of new surface forms includes the topics of triangular interpolants, multivariate interpolation, surfaces defined on surfaces and monotone and/or convex surfaces. The geometric and physical properties considered include contours, the intersection of surfaces, curvatures as a interrogation tool, and numerical integration.

  1. Designing Superoleophobic Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuteja, Anish; Choi, Wonjae; Ma, Minglin; Mabry, Joseph M.; Mazzella, Sarah A.; Rutledge, Gregory C.; McKinley, Gareth H.; Cohen, Robert E.

    2007-12-01

    Understanding the complementary roles of surface energy and roughness on natural nonwetting surfaces has led to the development of a number of biomimetic superhydrophobic surfaces, which exhibit apparent contact angles with water greater than 150 degrees and low contact angle hysteresis. However, superoleophobic surfaces—those that display contact angles greater than 150 degrees with organic liquids having appreciably lower surface tensions than that of water—are extremely rare. Calculations suggest that creating such a surface would require a surface energy lower than that of any known material. We show how a third factor, re-entrant surface curvature, in conjunction with chemical composition and roughened texture, can be used to design surfaces that display extreme resistance to wetting from a number of liquids with low surface tension, including alkanes such as decane and octane.

  2. Surface characteristics of thermally treated titanium surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yang-Jin; Cui, De-Zhe; Jeon, Ha-Ra; Chung, Hyun-Ju; Park, Yeong-Joon; Kim, Ok-Su

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The characteristics of oxidized titanium (Ti) surfaces varied according to treatment conditions such as duration time and temperature. Thermal oxidation can change Ti surface characteristics, which affect many cellular responses such as cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. Thus, this study was conducted to evaluate the surface characteristics and cell response of thermally treated Ti surfaces. Methods The samples were divided into 4 groups. Control: machined smooth titanium (Ti-S) was untreated. Group I: Ti-S was treated in a furnace at 300℃ for 30 minutes. Group II: Ti-S was treated at 500℃ for 30 minutes. Group III: Ti-S was treated at 750℃ for 30 minutes. A scanning electron microscope, atomic force microscope, and X-ray diffraction were used to assess surface characteristics and chemical composition. The water contact angle and surface energy were measured to assess physical properties. Results The titanium dioxide (TiO2) thickness increased as the treatment temperature increased. Additional peaks belonging to rutile TiO2 were only found in group III. The contact angle in group III was significantly lower than any of the other groups. The surface energy significantly increased as the treatment temperature increased, especially in group III. In the 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, after 24 hours of incubation, the assessment of cell viability showed that the optical density of the control had a higher tendency than any other group, but there was no significant difference. However, the alkaline phosphatase activity increased as the temperature increased, especially in group III. Conclusions Consequently, the surface characteristics and biocompatibility increased as the temperature increased. This indicates that surface modification by thermal treatment could be another useful method for medical and dental implants. PMID:22803009

  3. Fluorinated silica microchannel surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Kirby, Brian J.; Shepodd, Timothy Jon

    2005-03-15

    A method for surface modification of microchannels and capillaries. The method produces a chemically inert surface having a lowered surface free energy and improved frictional properties by attaching a fluorinated alkane group to the surface. The coating is produced by hydrolysis of a silane agent that is functionalized with either alkoxy or chloro ligands and an uncharged C.sub.3 -C.sub.10 fluorinated alkane chain. It has been found that the extent of surface coverage can be controlled by controlling the contact time from a minimum of about 2 minutes to a maximum of 120 minutes for complete surface coverage.

  4. Extremal surface barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhardt, Netta; Wall, Aron C.

    2014-03-01

    We present a generic condition for Lorentzian manifolds to have a barrier that limits the reach of boundary-anchored extremal surfaces of arbitrary dimension. We show that any surface with nonpositive extrinsic curvature is a barrier, in the sense that extremal surfaces cannot be continuously deformed past it. Furthermore, the outermost barrier surface has nonnegative extrinsic curvature. Under certain conditions, we show that the existence of trapped surfaces implies a barrier, and conversely. In the context of AdS/CFT, these barriers imply that it is impossible to reconstruct the entire bulk using extremal surfaces. We comment on the implications for the firewall controversy.

  5. Laser Surface Profiler

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, M.A.; Chu, A.

    1998-11-24

    By accurately measuring the angle of reflection of a laser beam incident on a reflective surface with a position sensitive detector, changes in the surface normal direction (slope of the surface) can be determined directly. An instrument has been built that makes repeated measurements over the surface, and uses this data to produce a grayscale image of the slope. The resolution of this system to changes in the surface normal direction is found to be better than 0.01 degrees. By focusing the Iaser beam to achieve a lateral resolution of 5 pm, the resolvable surface height change due to a variation in slope is estimated to be <1 nm.

  6. PREFACE: Vibrations at surfaces Vibrations at surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Talat S.

    2011-12-01

    This special issue is dedicated to the phenomenon of vibrations at surfaces—a topic that was indispensible a couple of decades ago, since it was one of the few phenomena capable of revealing the nature of binding at solid surfaces. For clean surfaces, the frequencies of modes with characteristic displacement patterns revealed how surface geometry, as well as the nature of binding between atoms in the surface layers, could be different from that in the bulk solid. Dispersion of the surface phonons provided further measures of interatomic interactions. For chemisorbed molecules on surfaces, frequencies and dispersion of the vibrational modes were also critical for determining adsorption sites. In other words, vibrations at surfaces served as a reliable means of extracting information about surface structure, chemisorption and overlayer formation. Experimental techniques, such as electron energy loss spectroscopy and helium-atom-surface scattering, coupled with infra-red spectroscopy, were continually refined and their resolutions enhanced to capture subtleties in the dynamics of atoms and molecules at surfaces. Theoretical methods, whether based on empirical and semi-empirical interatomic potential or on ab initio electronic structure calculations, helped decipher experimental observations and provide deeper insights into the nature of the bond between atoms and molecules in regions of reduced symmetry, as encountered on solid surfaces. Vibrations at surfaces were thus an integral part of the set of phenomena that characterized surface science. Dedicated workshops and conferences were held to explore the variety of interesting and puzzling features revealed in experimental and theoretical investigations of surface vibrational modes and their dispersion. One such conference, Vibrations at Surfaces, first organized by Harald Ibach in Juelich in 1980, continues to this day. The 13th International Conference on Vibrations at Surfaces was held at the University of

  7. Study on weld bead surface profile and angular distortion in 6 mm thick butt weld joints of SS304 using fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhargava, P.; Paul, C. P.; Mundra, G.; Premsingh, C. H.; Mishra, S. K.; Nagpure, D.; Kumar, Atul; Kukreja, L. M.

    2014-02-01

    We deployed a 2 kW continuous wave fiber laser integrated with the 5-axis workstation to understand the effect of various processing parameters (laser power, welding speed, beam spot size and chamfer at welded edges) on depth of penetration, angular distortion and welded bead surface profile during autogenous laser welding of 6 mm thick austenitic stainless steel type 304 plates. Full penetration with reduced weld bead surface undulation (<100 µm) and least angular distortion (<0.8°) was achieved for butt joints having chamfered edges of 0.8 mm. The microscopic studies revealed grossly defect-free fusion zone with a few porosities at isolated locations. The microstructure at the fusion zone was largely austenitic with few ferrites and the direction of growth was epitaxial towards the fusion line. The measured values of microhardness at base material and fusion zone were 208±4 HV0.1 and 235±10 HV0.1 respectively. The tensile testing of laser welded samples indicated the ultimate strength >605 MPa and these samples could be bent for an angle >170° without noticeable crack during bend test. The study opened the avenues for the deployment of fiber laser welding technology for applications demanding critical values of surface weld bead profile and distortion.

  8. Durable low surface-energy surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, Paul B. (Inventor); McElroy, Paul M. (Inventor); Hickey, Gregory H. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A formulation for forming a low surface-energy surface on a substrate having (i) a fluoroalkyl silane having a low surface energy part, (ii) a liquid crystal silane operable for enhancing the orientation of the molecules of the fluoroalkyl silane and for crosslinking with the fluoroalkyl silane, and, (iii) a transport medium for applying the fluoroalkyl silane and the liquid crystal silane to the surface of a substrate. In one embodiment the formulation can includes a crosslinking agent for crosslinking the fluoroalkyl silane. In another embodiment the formulation has a condensation catalyst for enhancing chemical bonding of the fluoroalkyl silane to the substrate. The transport medium can be an alcohol such as methanol or ethanol.

  9. Laser textured surface gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ta, Van Duong; Dunn, Andrew; Wasley, Thomas J.; Li, Ji; Kay, Robert W.; Stringer, Jonathan; Smith, Patrick J.; Esenturk, Emre; Connaughton, Colm; Shephard, Jonathan D.

    2016-05-01

    This work demonstrates a novel technique for fabricating surfaces with roughness and wettability gradients and their subsequent applications for chemical sensors. Surface roughness gradients on brass sheets are obtained directly by nanosecond laser texturing. When these structured surfaces are exposed to air, their wettability decreases with time (up to 20 days) achieving both spatial and temporal wettability gradients. The surfaces are responsive to organic solvents. Contact angles of a series of dilute isopropanol solutions decay exponentially with concentration. In particular, a fall of 132° in contact angle is observed on a surface gradient, one order of magnitude higher than the 14° observed for the unprocessed surface, when the isopropanol concentration increased from 0 to 15.6 wt%. As the wettability changes gradually over the surface, contact angle also changes correspondingly. This effect offers multi-sensitivity at different zones on the surface and is useful for accurate measurement of chemical concentration.

  10. Durable superoleophobic polypropylene surfaces.

    PubMed

    Brown, Philip S; Bhushan, Bharat

    2016-08-01

    Polypropylene (PP) is a popular plastic material used in consumer packaging. It would be desirable if such plastic containers were liquid repellent and not so easily fouled by their contents. Existing examples of superoleophobic surfaces typically rely on poorly adhered coatings or delicate surface structures, resulting in poor mechanical durability. Here, we report a facile method for creating superoleophobic PP surfaces via incorporation of nanoparticles (NPs) into the polymer surface. A solvent-NP-PP mixture was spin coated at high temperature to achieve the necessary roughness. Such surfaces were further functionalized with fluorosilane to result in a durable, super-repellent surface. They were also found to exhibit some repellency towards shampoos. This method of incorporating NPs into polymer surfaces could also prove useful in improving the anti-bacterial, mechanical and liquid-repellent properties of plastic devices.This article is part of the themed issue 'Bioinspired hierarchically structured surfaces for green science'. PMID:27354730

  11. EPA Permeable Surface Research

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA recognizes permeable surfaces as an effective post-construction infiltration-based Best Management Practice to mitigate the adverse effects of stormwater runoff. The professional user community conceptually embraces permeable surfaces as a tool for making runoff more closely...

  12. On neutron surface waves

    SciTech Connect

    Ignatovich, V. K.

    2009-01-15

    It is shown that neutron surface waves do not exist. The difference between the neutron wave mechanics and the wave physics of electromagnetic and acoustic processes, which allows the existence of surface waves, is analyzed.

  13. Silica reusable surface insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, H. E.; Smith, M.; Leiser, D. B. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A reusable silica surface insulation material is provided by bonding amorphous silica fibers with colloidal silica at an elevated temperature. The surface insulation is ordinarily manufactured in the form of blocks (i.e., tiles).

  14. Demonstration of Surface Tension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenthal, Andrew J.

    2001-01-01

    Surface tension is a fundamental obstacle in the spontaneous formation of bubbles, droplets, and crystal nuclei in liquids. Describes a simple overhead projector demonstration that illustrates the power of surface tension that can prevent so many industrial processes. (ASK)

  15. Surface drip irrigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For many years, surface drip irrigation has been used to irrigation high value vegetable crops. In recent years, surface drip of row crops has been increasing throughout the United States. Surface drip irrigation can precisely deliver water and nutrients to the crop root zone. This article provides ...

  16. Surface Conductive Glass.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanaka, John; Suib, Steven L.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the properties of surface-conducting glass and the chemical nature of surface-conducting stannic (tin) oxide. Also provides the procedures necessary for the preparation of surface-conducting stannic oxide films on glass substrates. The experiment is suitable for the advanced inorganic chemistry laboratory. (JN)

  17. PSC: protein surface classification.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Yan Yuan; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2012-07-01

    We recently proposed to classify proteins by their functional surfaces. Using the structural attributes of functional surfaces, we inferred the pairwise relationships of proteins and constructed an expandable database of protein surface classification (PSC). As the functional surface(s) of a protein is the local region where the protein performs its function, our classification may reflect the functional relationships among proteins. Currently, PSC contains a library of 1974 surface types that include 25,857 functional surfaces identified from 24,170 bound structures. The search tool in PSC empowers users to explore related surfaces that share similar local structures and core functions. Each functional surface is characterized by structural attributes, which are geometric, physicochemical or evolutionary features. The attributes have been normalized as descriptors and integrated to produce a profile for each functional surface in PSC. In addition, binding ligands are recorded for comparisons among homologs. PSC allows users to exploit related binding surfaces to reveal the changes in functionally important residues on homologs that have led to functional divergence during evolution. The substitutions at the key residues of a spatial pattern may determine the functional evolution of a protein. In PSC (http://pocket.uchicago.edu/psc/), a pool of changes in residues on similar functional surfaces is provided.

  18. The neutral surface layer above rough surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smedman, Ann-Sofi; Sahlee, Erik

    2014-05-01

    It is generally accepted that turbulent fluxes (momentum and scalar fluxes) are approx. constant with height above horizontal surfaces with low roughness. But what will happen when the roughness sub-layer is large as found over cities, forests and rough seas? In a study of the kinematic structure of the near neutral atmospheric surface layer, Högström, Hunt and Smedman, 2002, it was demonstrated that a model with detached eddies from above the surface layer impinging on to the surface (Hunt and Morison, 2000) could explain some of the observed features in the neutral atmospheric boundary layer. Thus the detached eddy model proved successful in explaining the dynamic structure of the near neutral atmospheric surface layer, especially the shape of the spectra of the wind components and scalars and corresponding fluxes. Here we make the hypothesis that the detached-eddy model can also be used to explain the experimental results related to the 3-dimensional turbulence structure above rough surfaces. Measurements are taken both over land (grass and forest) and over sea (Baltic Sea and hurricane Fabian in the Atlantic) above the roughness sub-layer. Analysis of the turbulence structure shows a striking similarity between the different sites. Hunt, J.C.R and Morrison, J.F., 2000: Eddy structure in turbulent boundary layers, Euro. J. Mech. B-Fluids, 19, 673-694. Högström, U., Hunt, J.C.R., and Smedman, A., 2002: Theory and measurements for turbulence spectra and variances in the atmospheric neutral surface layer, Bound.-Layer Meteorol., 103,101-124.

  19. Surface cleanliness measurement procedure

    DOEpatents

    Schroder, Mark Stewart; Woodmansee, Donald Ernest; Beadie, Douglas Frank

    2002-01-01

    A procedure and tools for quantifying surface cleanliness are described. Cleanliness of a target surface is quantified by wiping a prescribed area of the surface with a flexible, bright white cloth swatch, preferably mounted on a special tool. The cloth picks up a substantial amount of any particulate surface contamination. The amount of contamination is determined by measuring the reflectivity loss of the cloth before and after wiping on the contaminated system and comparing that loss to a previous calibration with similar contamination. In the alternative, a visual comparison of the contaminated cloth to a contamination key provides an indication of the surface cleanliness.

  20. Celebratory Cakes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahoney, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    Cakes are no longer the simple desserts they once were. The cake has evolved into an elaborate, sculptural form that represents a special occasion. Sculptural cake forms have become expressive designs using three-dimensional shapes, an array of surface textures, and a range of colors. The use of cakes in the artwork of David Gilhooly, Wayne…

  1. Surface freezing of water.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Díaz, J L; Álvarez-Valenzuela, M A; Rodríguez-Celis, F

    2016-01-01

    Freezing, melting, evaporation and condensation of water are essential ingredients for climate and eventually life on Earth. In the present work, we show how surface freezing of supercooled water in an open container is conditioned and triggered-exclusively-by humidity in air. Additionally, a change of phase is demonstrated to be triggered on the water surface forming surface ice crystals prior to freezing of bulk. The symmetry of the surface crystal, as well as the freezing point, depend on humidity, presenting at least three different types of surface crystals. Humidity triggers surface freezing as soon as it overpasses a defined value for a given temperature, generating a plurality of nucleation nodes. An evidence of simultaneous nucleation of surface ice crystals is also provided. PMID:27330895

  2. Surface freezing of water.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Díaz, J L; Álvarez-Valenzuela, M A; Rodríguez-Celis, F

    2016-01-01

    Freezing, melting, evaporation and condensation of water are essential ingredients for climate and eventually life on Earth. In the present work, we show how surface freezing of supercooled water in an open container is conditioned and triggered-exclusively-by humidity in air. Additionally, a change of phase is demonstrated to be triggered on the water surface forming surface ice crystals prior to freezing of bulk. The symmetry of the surface crystal, as well as the freezing point, depend on humidity, presenting at least three different types of surface crystals. Humidity triggers surface freezing as soon as it overpasses a defined value for a given temperature, generating a plurality of nucleation nodes. An evidence of simultaneous nucleation of surface ice crystals is also provided.

  3. DNA ELECTROPHORESIS AT SURFACES

    SciTech Connect

    RAFAILOVICH, MIRIAM; SOKOLOV, JONATHAN; GERSAPPE, DILIP

    2003-09-01

    During this year we performed two major projects: I. We developed a detailed theoretical model which complements our experiments on surface DNA electrophoresis. We found that it was possible to enhance the separation of DNA chains by imposing a chemical nanoscale pattern on the surface. This approach utilized the surface interaction effect of the DNA chains with the substrate and is a refinement to our previous method in which DNA chains were separated on homogeneous flat surfaces. By introducing the nano-patterns on the surface, the conformational changes of DNA chains of different lengths can be amplified, which results in the different friction strengths with the substrate surface. Our results also show that, when compared to the DNA electrophoresis performed on homogeneous flat surfaces, nanopatterned surfaces offer a larger window in choosing different surface interactions to achieve separation. II. In collaboration with a large international manufacturer of skin care products we also embarked on a project involving photo toxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles, which are a key ingredient in sunscreen and cosmetic lotions. The results clearly implicated the nanoparticles in catalyzing damage to chromosomal DNA. We then used this knowledge to develop a polymer/anti-oxidant coating which prevented the photocatalytic reaction on DNA while still retaining the UV absorptive properties of the nanoparticles. The standard gel electrophoresis was not sufficient in determining the extent of the DNA damage. The conclusions of this study were based predominantly on analysis obtained with the surface electrophoresis method.

  4. Periodic minimal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, Alan L.

    1985-04-01

    A minimal surface is one for which, like a soap film with the same pressure on each side, the mean curvature is zero and, thus, is one where the two principal curvatures are equal and opposite at every point. For every closed circuit in the surface, the area is a minimum. Schwarz1 and Neovius2 showed that elements of such surfaces could be put together to give surfaces periodic in three dimensions. These periodic minimal surfaces are geometrical invariants, as are the regular polyhedra, but the former are curved. Minimal surfaces are appropriate for the description of various structures where internal surfaces are prominent and seek to adopt a minimum area or a zero mean curvature subject to their topology; thus they merit more complete numerical characterization. There seem to be at least 18 such surfaces3, with various symmetries and topologies, related to the crystallographic space groups. Recently, glyceryl mono-oleate (GMO) was shown by Longley and McIntosh4 to take the shape of the F-surface. The structure postulated is shown here to be in good agreement with an analysis of the fundamental geometry of periodic minimal surfaces.

  5. Interactions of silica surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, G.; Xu, Z.; Steinberg, S.; Israelachvili, J. . Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering and Materials Dept.)

    1994-07-01

    Adhesion, friction, and colloidal forces in air and aqueous salt solutions have been measured between various silica surfaces prepared by depositing amorphous but highly smooth silica films on mica. The results show four interesting and interrelated phenomena: (i) the adhesion of silica surfaces in air increases slowly with contact time, especially in humid air where the contacting surfaces become separated by an [approximately]20-[angstrom]-thick layer of hydrated silica or silica gel; (ii) the friction of two silica surfaces exhibits large sticking or stiction spikes, whose magnitude increases in the presence of water and when the surfaces are kept in contact longer before sliding; (iii) the non-DLVO repulsion commonly seen at short range (<40 A) between silica surfaces immersed in aqueous solutions is monotonically repulsive, with no oscillatory component, and is quite unlike theoretical expectations and previous measurements of forces due to solvent structure; (iv) dynamic contact angle measurements reveal time-dependent effects which cannot be due to a fixed surface chemical heterogeneity or roughness. The results indicate that silica surfaces undergo slow structural and chemical changes during interactions with water and with each other. More specifically, the authors propose that the unusual interfacial and colloidal properties of silica are due, not to hydration effects, but to the presence of an [approximately]10-[angstrom]-thick gel-like layer of protruding silanol and silicilic acid groups that grow on the surfaces in the presence of water. These protruding groups react chemically (sinter) with similar groups located on an opposing surface and give rise to the unusual time-dependent adhesion, friction, and non-DLVO forces observed. The proposed mechanism in terms of a surface layer of silica gel is consistent with the known surface chemistry of silica and accounts for the results reported and for other unusual surface and colloidal properties of silica.

  6. On orbit surfacing of thermal control surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Racette, G. W.

    1984-01-01

    Substrates to be contaminated and contamination source were prepared. Additional information on paint spray method apparatus was obtained. Silver teflon second surface mirror samples and S 13 GLO paint samples were mounted, photographed under the microscope and measured to establish baseline data. Atomic oxygen cleaning and spray painting are being considered. Electrostatic powder and plasma spray coating systems appear to have serious drawbacks.

  7. Collapse of Surface Nanobubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Longquan; Chan, Chon U.; Arora, Manish; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2014-11-01

    Surface nanobubbles are nanoscopic gaseous domains that entrap on immersed solid surfaces in water. They are surprisingly stable and are difficult to be distinguished from polymeric/hydrophobic drops and solid particles (contamination). Here, we report a comparative study of contact line motion across surface nanobubbles, polymeric drops and solid particles. We show that surface nanobubbles spontaneously collapse once contact line touches them while a fast jump process and a pinning process are observed on polymeric drops and on solid particles, respectively. These distinct contact line dynamics provide a new approach to identify surface nanobubbles. The collapse of surface nanobubbles demonstrates their gaseous property and also indicates that they are metastable. The collapse process last few milliseconds with a characteristic speed of 0.1 mm/s, which is much longer and slower than that of hydrodynamic phenomena. We further show that the collapse phenomenon can be explained with a microscopic contact line dynamics.

  8. Surface modification to waveguides

    DOEpatents

    Timberlake, J.R.; Ruzic, D.N.; Moore, R.L.; Cohen, S.A.; Manos, D.M.

    1982-06-16

    A method is described for treating the interior surfaces of a waveguide to improve power transmission comprising the steps of mechanically polishing to remove surface protrusions; electropolishing to remove embedded particles; ultrasonically cleaning to remove any residue; coating the interior waveguide surfaces with an alkyd resin solution or electrophoretically depositing carbon lamp black suspended in an alkyd resin solution to form a 1..mu.. to 5..mu.. thick film; vacuum pyrolyzing the film to form a uniform adherent carbon coating.

  9. Impact of surface chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Li, Yimin

    2011-01-01

    The applications of molecular surface chemistry in heterogeneous catalyst technology, semiconductor-based technology, medical technology, anticorrosion and lubricant technology, and nanotechnology are highlighted in this perspective. The evolution of surface chemistry at the molecular level is reviewed, and the key roles of surface instrumentation developments for in situ studies of the gas–solid, liquid–solid, and solid–solid interfaces under reaction conditions are emphasized. PMID:20880833

  10. Landsat surface reflectance data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2015-01-01

    Landsat satellite data have been produced, archived, and distributed by the U.S. Geological Survey since 1972. Users rely on these data for historical study of land surface change and require consistent radiometric data processed to the highest science standards. In support of the guidelines established through the Global Climate Observing System, the U.S. Geological Survey has embarked on production of higher-level Landsat data products to support land surface change studies. One such product is Landsat surface reflectance.

  11. Surface modification to waveguides

    DOEpatents

    Timberlake, John R.; Ruzic, David N.; Moore, Richard L.; Cohen, Samuel A.; Manos, Dennis M.

    1983-01-01

    A method of treating the interior surfaces of a waveguide to improve power transmission comprising the steps of mechanically polishing to remove surface protrusions; electropolishing to remove embedded particles; ultrasonically cleaning to remove any residue; coating the interior waveguide surfaces with an alkyd resin solution or electrophoretically depositing carbon lamp black suspended in an alkyd resin solution to form a 1.mu. to 5.mu. thick film; vacuum pyrolyzing the film to form a uniform adherent carbon coating.

  12. Tribological properties of surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    The real area of contact between two solid surfaces is only a small portion of the apparent area. Deformation of these areas can result in solid state contact through surface films. For clean solid to solid contact strong adhesive bonding occurs across the interface. Under these conditions many properties of the solid such as the metallurgical and chemical nature of metals can influence adhesion, friction, and wear behavior. The presence of gases, liquids, and solid films on the surface of solids alter markedly tribological characteristics. These surface films can also considerably change the mechanical effects of solid state contact on bulk material behavior.

  13. Martian surface simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskell, R. W.

    1992-01-01

    Current scenarios for a Mars landing involve the extensive analysis of the surface near the landing site. Pinpoint landing, for example, requires a detailed mapping of the area from orbit for landmark identification and landing site selection, and the use by the lander of its own imaging data to recognize these landmarks and to guide itself safely to the surface. Hazard avoidance requires sufficient orbital imaging to ensure that safe landing sites exist, with the lander using its sensory data to find one of them. Once on the surface, a rover must be able to avoid or surmount obstacles, travel across surfaces with varying compositions and slopes, and navigate to a desired destination. Computer simulated Martian surfaces are being constructed to aid in the development of these exploration technologies. These surface simulations attempt to mimic the specific geologic episodes that built the surface, such as cratering, lava flows, and aeolian activity. Each episode takes a preexisting surface as a starting point, alters it in some way, and stores the new surface for further processing. This modular construction makes it possible for new processes to be included without altering existing software.

  14. Chemistry of ferroelectric surfaces.

    PubMed

    Garrity, K; Kolpak, A M; Ismail-Beigi, S; Altman, E I

    2010-07-20

    It has been recognized since the 1950s that the polar and switchable nature of ferroelectric surfaces can potentially lead to polarization direction-dependent surface chemistry. Recent theoretical studies and advances in growing high quality epitaxial ferroelectric thin films have motivated a flurry of experimental studies aimed at creating surfaces with switchable adsorption and catalytic properties, as well as films whose polarization direction switches depending on the gas phase environment. This research news article briefly reviews the key findings of these studies. These include observations that the adsorption strengths, and in certain cases the activation energies for reactions, of polar molecules on the surfaces of ferroelectric materials are sensitive to the polarization direction. For bare ferroelectric surfaces, the magnitudes of these differences are not large, but are still comparable to the energy barrier required to switch the polarization of approximately 10 nm thick films. Highlights of a recent study where chemical switching of a thin film ferroelectric was demonstrated are presented. Attempts to use the ferroelectric polarization to influence the behavior of supported catalytic metals will also be described. It will be shown that the tendency of the metals to cluster into particles makes it difficult to alter the chemical properties of the metal surface, since it is separated from the ferroelectric by several layers of metal atoms. An alternate approach to increasing the reactivity of ferroelectric surfaces is suggested that involves modifying the surface with atoms that bind strongly to the surface and thus remain atomically dispersed.

  15. Mars surface transportation options

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leitner, Jeffrey M.; Alred, John W.

    1986-01-01

    As the number of scientific experiments for the surface of Mars grows, the need for effective surface transportation becomes critical. Because of the diversity of the experiments proposed, as well as the desire to explore Mars from the equator to the poles, the optimum surface vehicle configuration is not obvious. Five candidate vehicles are described, with an estimate of their size and performance. In order to maximize the success of a manned Mars mission, it appears that two vehicles should be designed for surface transportation: an advanced long-range rover, and a remotely-piloted airplane.

  16. Martian surface simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaskell, R. W.

    1993-06-01

    Computer generated surfaces have been created to aid in imaging, landing and rover studies for Mars and the moon. They are also being applied to the study of cratering histories. The surfaces are generated in steps which attempt to mimic geologic episodes. Surface roughness is realized fractally, while craters and other specific features have shapes and distributions dictated by observation. Surface materials are assigned appropriate albedos, making the images more realistic. With the inclusion of correlations between crater and rock distributions, the simulations are beginning to acquire a predictive capability.

  17. Incompressible Flows Free Surfaces

    1992-02-01

    NASA-VOF3D is a three-dimensional, transient, free surface, incompressible fluid dynamics program. It is specifically designed to calculate confined flows in a low gravity environment in which surface physics must be accurately treated. It allows multiple free surfaces with surface tension and wall adhesion and includes a partial cell treatment that allows curved boundaries and internal obstacles. Variable mesh spacing is permitted in all three coordinate directions. Boundary conditions available are rigid free-slip wall, rigid no-slipmore » wall, continuative, periodic, and specified pressure outflow boundary.« less

  18. Surface nanobubbles and nanodroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohse, Detlef; Zhang, Xuehua

    2015-07-01

    Surface nanobubbles are nanoscopic gaseous domains on immersed substrates which can survive for days. They were first speculated to exist about 20 years ago, based on stepwise features in force curves between two hydrophobic surfaces, eventually leading to the first atomic force microscopy (AFM) image in 2000. While in the early years it was suspected that they may be an artifact caused by AFM, meanwhile their existence has been confirmed with various other methods, including through direct optical observation. Their existence seems to be paradoxical, as a simple classical estimate suggests that they should dissolve in microseconds, due to the large Laplace pressure inside these nanoscopic spherical-cap-shaped objects. Moreover, their contact angle (on the gas side) is much smaller than one would expect from macroscopic counterparts. This review will not only give an overview on surface nanobubbles, but also on surface nanodroplets, which are nanoscopic droplets (e.g., of oil) on (hydrophobic) substrates immersed in water, as they show similar properties and can easily be confused with surface nanobubbles and as they are produced in a similar way, namely, by a solvent exchange process, leading to local oversaturation of the water with gas or oil, respectively, and thus to nucleation. The review starts with how surface nanobubbles and nanodroplets can be made, how they can be observed (both individually and collectively), and what their properties are. Molecular dynamic simulations and theories to account for the long lifetime of the surface nanobubbles are then reported on. The crucial element contributing to the long lifetime of surface nanobubbles and nanodroplets is pinning of the three-phase contact line at chemical or geometric surface heterogeneities. The dynamical evolution of the surface nanobubbles then follows from the diffusion equation, Laplace's equation, and Henry's law. In particular, one obtains stable surface nanobubbles when the gas influx from

  19. Robust omniphobic surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Tuteja, Anish; Choi, Wonjae; Mabry, Joseph M.; McKinley, Gareth H.; Cohen, Robert E.

    2008-01-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces display water contact angles greater than 150° in conjunction with low contact angle hysteresis. Microscopic pockets of air trapped beneath the water droplets placed on these surfaces lead to a composite solid-liquid-air interface in thermodynamic equilibrium. Previous experimental and theoretical studies suggest that it may not be possible to form similar fully-equilibrated, composite interfaces with drops of liquids, such as alkanes or alcohols, that possess significantly lower surface tension than water (γlv = 72.1 mN/m). In this work we develop surfaces possessing re-entrant texture that can support strongly metastable composite solid-liquid-air interfaces, even with very low surface tension liquids such as pentane (γlv = 15.7 mN/m). Furthermore, we propose four design parameters that predict the measured contact angles for a liquid droplet on a textured surface, as well as the robustness of the composite interface, based on the properties of the solid surface and the contacting liquid. These design parameters allow us to produce two different families of re-entrant surfaces— randomly-deposited electrospun fiber mats and precisely fabricated microhoodoo surfaces—that can each support a robust composite interface with essentially any liquid. These omniphobic surfaces display contact angles greater than 150° and low contact angle hysteresis with both polar and nonpolar liquids possessing a wide range of surface tensions. PMID:19001270

  20. Lunar Surface-to-Surface Power Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerslake, Thomas W.

    2007-01-01

    A human lunar outpost, under NASA study for construction in the 2020's, has potential requirements to transfer electric power up to 50-kW across the lunar surface from 0.1 to 10-km distances. This power would be used to operate surface payloads located remotely from the outpost and/or outpost primary power grid. This paper describes concept designs for state-of-the-art technology power transfer subsystems including AC or DC power via cables, beamed radio frequency power and beamed laser power. Power transfer subsystem mass and performance are calculated and compared for each option. A simplified qualitative assessment of option operations, hazards, costs and technology needs is also described. Based on these concept designs and performance analyses, a DC power cabling subsystem is recommended to minimize subsystem mass and to minimize mission and programmatic costs and risks. Avenues for additional power transfer subsystem studies are recommended.

  1. Bacteria-surface interactions

    PubMed Central

    Tuson, Hannah H.; Weibel, Douglas B.

    2013-01-01

    The interaction of bacteria with surfaces has important implications in a range of areas, including bioenergy, biofouling, biofilm formation, and the infection of plants and animals. Many of the interactions of bacteria with surfaces produce changes in the expression of genes that influence cell morphology and behavior, including genes essential for motility and surface attachment. Despite the attention that these phenotypes have garnered, the bacterial systems used for sensing and responding to surfaces are still not well understood. An understanding of these mechanisms will guide the development of new classes of materials that inhibit and promote cell growth, and complement studies of the physiology of bacteria in contact with surfaces. Recent studies from a range of fields in science and engineering are poised to guide future investigations in this area. This review summarizes recent studies on bacteria-surface interactions, discusses mechanisms of surface sensing and consequences of cell attachment, provides an overview of surfaces that have been used in bacterial studies, and highlights unanswered questions in this field. PMID:23930134

  2. Protective Surfacing for Playgrounds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frost, Joe L.

    Noting that 90 percent of serious playground injuries result from falls to hard surfaces, this paper reviews the advantages and disadvantages of various playground surfacing materials in terms of cost, climate, durability, aesthetics, and play value. Findings are based on the personal experience of the author, government documents, laboratory…

  3. Mechanically durable superhydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Verho, Tuukka; Bower, Chris; Andrew, Piers; Franssila, Sami; Ikkala, Olli; Ras, Robin H A

    2011-02-01

    Development of durable non-wetting surfaces is hindered by the fragility of the microscopic roughness features that are necessary for superhydrophobicity. Mechanical wear on superhydrophobic surfaces usually shows as increased sticking of water, leading to loss of non-wettability. Increased wear resistance has been demonstrated by exploiting hierarchical roughness where nanoscale roughness is protected to some degree by large scale features, and avoiding the use of hydrophilic bulk materials is shown to help prevent the formation of hydrophilic defects as a result of wear. Additionally, self-healing hydrophobic layers and roughness patterns have been suggested and demonstrated. Nevertheless, mechanical contact not only causes damage to roughness patterns but also surface contamination, which shortens the lifetime of superhydrophobic surfaces in spite of the self-cleaning effect. The use of photocatalytic effect and reduced electric resistance have been suggested to prevent the accumulation of surface contaminants. Resistance to organic contaminants is more challenging, however, oleophobic surface patterns which are non-wetting to organic liquids have been demonstrated. While the fragility of superhydrophobic surfaces currently limits their applicability, development of mechanically durable surfaces will enable a wide range of new applications in the future. PMID:21274919

  4. Chemical Reactions at Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Henderson and Nancy Ryan Gray

    2010-04-14

    Chemical reactions at surfaces underlie some of the most important processes of today, including catalysis, energy conversion, microelectronics, human health and the environment. Understanding surface chemical reactions at a fundamental level is at the core of the field of surface science. The Gordon Research Conference on Chemical Reactions at Surfaces is one of the premiere meetings in the field. The program this year will cover a broad range of topics, including heterogeneous catalysis and surface chemistry, surfaces in environmental chemistry and energy conversion, reactions at the liquid-solid and liquid-gas interface, electronic materials growth and surface modification, biological interfaces, and electrons and photons at surfaces. An exciting program is planned, with contributions from outstanding speakers and discussion leaders from the international scientific community. The conference provides a dynamic environment with ample time for discussion and interaction. Attendees are encouraged to present posters; the poster sessions are historically well attended and stimulate additional discussions. The conference provides an excellent opportunity for junior researchers (e.g. graduate students or postdocs) to present their work and interact with established leaders in the field.

  5. Solar absorption surface panel

    DOEpatents

    Santala, Teuvo J.

    1978-01-01

    A composite metal of aluminum and nickel is used to form an economical solar absorption surface for a collector plate wherein an intermetallic compound of the aluminum and nickel provides a surface morphology with high absorptance and relatively low infrared emittance along with good durability.

  6. Environmental surface asepsis.

    PubMed

    Palenik, Charles John

    2005-09-01

    Environmental surface disinfection is easily accomplished with precleaning and disinfection techniques, and prepared surfaces or difficult-to-clean items can be covered with impermeable barriers. When carried out effectively, both practitioners and patients are protected from exposure to microorganisms that transmit disease and cause illness.

  7. Touching the Surface.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sussman, Beverly

    1992-01-01

    Author describes five self-developed activities that utilize readily available materials to help students understand surface tension in liquids. The hands-on activities allow students to see that strong bonds hold molecules together in a liquid and the molecules seem to stretch producing a "skin" at the surface of liquids. (PR)

  8. Mechanically durable superhydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Verho, Tuukka; Bower, Chris; Andrew, Piers; Franssila, Sami; Ikkala, Olli; Ras, Robin H A

    2011-02-01

    Development of durable non-wetting surfaces is hindered by the fragility of the microscopic roughness features that are necessary for superhydrophobicity. Mechanical wear on superhydrophobic surfaces usually shows as increased sticking of water, leading to loss of non-wettability. Increased wear resistance has been demonstrated by exploiting hierarchical roughness where nanoscale roughness is protected to some degree by large scale features, and avoiding the use of hydrophilic bulk materials is shown to help prevent the formation of hydrophilic defects as a result of wear. Additionally, self-healing hydrophobic layers and roughness patterns have been suggested and demonstrated. Nevertheless, mechanical contact not only causes damage to roughness patterns but also surface contamination, which shortens the lifetime of superhydrophobic surfaces in spite of the self-cleaning effect. The use of photocatalytic effect and reduced electric resistance have been suggested to prevent the accumulation of surface contaminants. Resistance to organic contaminants is more challenging, however, oleophobic surface patterns which are non-wetting to organic liquids have been demonstrated. While the fragility of superhydrophobic surfaces currently limits their applicability, development of mechanically durable surfaces will enable a wide range of new applications in the future.

  9. Antibacterial Au nanostructured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Songmei; Zuber, Flavia; Brugger, Juergen; Maniura-Weber, Katharina; Ren, Qun

    2016-01-01

    We present here a technological platform for engineering Au nanotopographies by templated electrodeposition on antibacterial surfaces. Three different types of nanostructures were fabricated: nanopillars, nanorings and nanonuggets. The nanopillars are the basic structures and are 50 nm in diameter and 100 nm in height. Particular arrangement of the nanopillars in various geometries formed nanorings and nanonuggets. Flat surfaces, rough substrate surfaces, and various nanostructured surfaces were compared for their abilities to attach and kill bacterial cells. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a Gram-positive bacterial strain responsible for many infections in health care system, was used as the model bacterial strain. It was found that all the Au nanostructures, regardless their shapes, exhibited similar excellent antibacterial properties. A comparison of live cells attached to nanotopographic surfaces showed that the number of live S. aureus cells was <1% of that from flat and rough reference surfaces. Our micro/nanofabrication process is a scalable approach based on cost-efficient self-organization and provides potential for further developing functional surfaces to study the behavior of microbes on nanoscale topographies.We present here a technological platform for engineering Au nanotopographies by templated electrodeposition on antibacterial surfaces. Three different types of nanostructures were fabricated: nanopillars, nanorings and nanonuggets. The nanopillars are the basic structures and are 50 nm in diameter and 100 nm in height. Particular arrangement of the nanopillars in various geometries formed nanorings and nanonuggets. Flat surfaces, rough substrate surfaces, and various nanostructured surfaces were compared for their abilities to attach and kill bacterial cells. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a Gram-positive bacterial strain responsible for many infections in health care system, was used as the model bacterial strain. It

  10. The Martian Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Jim

    2008-06-01

    Dedication; Acknowledgements; Foreword; Part I. Introduction and Historical Perspective: 1. Exploration of the Martian surface: 1992-2007; 2. Historical context: the pre-MGS view of Mars' surface composition; Part II. Elemental Composition: Orbital and In Situ Surface Measurements: Part II. A. Results and Interpretations from New In Situ APXS Measurements: 3. Martian surface chemistry: APXS results from the Pathfinder landing site; 4. Mars exploration rovers - chemical composition by the APXS; Part II. B. Results and Interpretations from New Orbital Elemental Measurements: 5. Elemental abundances determined via the Mars Odyssey GRS; 6. Volatiles on Mars: scientific results from the Mars Odyssey Neutron Spectrometer; Part III. Mineralogy and Remote Sensing of Rocks, Soil, Dust, and Ices: Part III. A. Visible to Near-IR Telescopic and Orbital Measurements: 7. Mineralogy of the Martian surface from Mars Express OMEGA Observations; 8. Visible to near-IR multispectral orbital observations; Part III. B. Mid-IR and Magnetic Orbital Measurements: 9. Global mineralogy mapped from the Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer; 10. The compositional diversity and physical properties mapped from the Mars Odyssey Thermal Emission Imaging System; 11. Mars' crustal magnetization: a window into the past; Part III. C. Observations from Surface Landers/Rovers: 12. Multispectral imaging from Mars Pathfinder; 13. Mars Exploration Rover Pancam multispectral imaging of rocks, soil, and dust at Gusev Crater and Meridiani Planum ; 14. The mineralogy of Gusev Crater and Meridiani Planum derived from the Miniature Thermal Emission Spectrometers on the Spirit and Opportunity Rovers; 15. Iron mineralogy and aqueous alteration on Mars from the MER Mössbauer Spectrometers; 16. Magnetic properties results from surface landers and rovers; Part III. D: 17. Martian meteorites as crustal samples; Part IV. Physical Properties of Surface Materials: 18. The thermal inertia of the surface of

  11. Electrohydrodynamics Near Hydrophobic Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maduar, S. R.; Belyaev, A. V.; Lobaskin, V.; Vinogradova, O. I.

    2015-03-01

    We show that an electro-osmotic flow near the slippery hydrophobic surface depends strongly on the mobility of surface charges, which are balanced by counterions of the electrostatic diffuse layer. For a hydrophobic surface with immobile charges, the fluid transport is considerably amplified by the existence of a hydrodynamic slippage. In contrast, near the hydrophobic surface with mobile adsorbed charges, it is also controlled by an additional electric force, which increases the shear stress at the slipping interface. To account for this, we formulate electrohydrodynamic boundary conditions at the slipping interface, which should be applied to quantify electro-osmotic flows instead of hydrodynamic boundary conditions. Our theoretical predictions are fully supported by dissipative particle dynamics simulations with explicit charges. These results lead to a new interpretation of zeta potential of hydrophobic surfaces.

  12. Collapse of Surface Nanobubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Chon U.; Chen, Longquan; Arora, Manish; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2015-03-01

    Surface attached nanobubbles populate surfaces submerged in water. These nanobubbles have a much larger contact angle and longer lifetime than predicted by classical theory. Moreover, it is difficult to distinguish them from hydrophobic droplets, e.g., polymeric contamination, using standard atomic force microscopy. Here, we report fast dynamics of a three phase contact line moving over surface nanobubbles, polymeric droplets, and hydrophobic particles. The dynamics is distinct: across polymeric droplets the contact line quickly jumps and hydrophobic particles pin the contact line, while surface nanobubbles rapidly shrink once merging with the contact line, suggesting a method to differentiate nanoscopic gaseous, liquid, and solid structures. Although the collapse process of surface nanobubbles occurs within a few milliseconds, we show that it is dominated by microscopic dynamics rather than bulk hydrodynamics.

  13. Surface nanoscale axial photonics.

    PubMed

    Sumetsky, M; Fini, J M

    2011-12-19

    Dense photonic integration promises to revolutionize optical computing and communications. However, efforts towards this goal face unacceptable attenuation of light caused by surface roughness in microscopic devices. Here we address this problem by introducing Surface Nanoscale Axial Photonics (SNAP). The SNAP platform is based on whispering gallery modes circulating around the optical fiber surface and undergoing slow axial propagation readily described by the one-dimensional Schrödinger equation. These modes can be steered with dramatically small nanoscale variation of the fiber radius, which is quite simple to introduce in practice. Extremely low loss of SNAP devices is achieved due to the low surface roughness inherent in a drawn fiber surface. In excellent agreement with the developed theory, we experimentally demonstrate localization of light in quantum wells, halting light by a point source, tunneling through potential barriers, dark states, etc. This demonstration has intriguing potential applications in filtering, switching, slowing light, and sensing.

  14. Electrohydrodynamics near hydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Maduar, S R; Belyaev, A V; Lobaskin, V; Vinogradova, O I

    2015-03-20

    We show that an electro-osmotic flow near the slippery hydrophobic surface depends strongly on the mobility of surface charges, which are balanced by counterions of the electrostatic diffuse layer. For a hydrophobic surface with immobile charges, the fluid transport is considerably amplified by the existence of a hydrodynamic slippage. In contrast, near the hydrophobic surface with mobile adsorbed charges, it is also controlled by an additional electric force, which increases the shear stress at the slipping interface. To account for this, we formulate electrohydrodynamic boundary conditions at the slipping interface, which should be applied to quantify electro-osmotic flows instead of hydrodynamic boundary conditions. Our theoretical predictions are fully supported by dissipative particle dynamics simulations with explicit charges. These results lead to a new interpretation of zeta potential of hydrophobic surfaces.

  15. Surface topography by caustics.

    PubMed

    Theocaris, P S; Gdoutos, E E

    1976-06-01

    The optical method of caustics, initially developed for recording abrupt plate slopes created by singularities in elastic stress fields, was extended to incorporate the study of the general case of any type of surface. A universal technique, based on the general theory of caustics developed in this paper, was formulated to study the topography of any surface from its corresponding caustics obtained by illuminating the surface by a parallel, convergent, or divergent light beam. The special case of an axisymmetric mirror with elliptical cross section, whose ellipticity varies from zero to infinity, was studied extensively to show the potentialities of the technique developed. It was shown that the caustics obtained are very sensitive to the particular form of the surface considered. From the procedure developed in this paper it was concluded that the method of caustics can be successfully used to record the topography of any surface with large or infinitesimal slopes.

  16. Breakdown of the FLT3-ITD/STAT5 axis and synergistic apoptosis induction by the histone deacetylase inhibitor panobinostat and FLT3-specific inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pietschmann, Kristin; Bolck, Hella Anna; Buchwald, Marc; Spielberg, Steffi; Polzer, Harald; Spiekermann, Karsten; Bug, Gesine; Heinzel, Thorsten; Böhmer, Frank-Dietmar; Krämer, Oliver H

    2012-11-01

    Activating mutations of the class III receptor tyrosine kinase FLT3 are the most frequent molecular aberration in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Mutant FLT3 accelerates proliferation, suppresses apoptosis, and correlates with poor prognosis. Therefore, it is a promising therapeutic target. Here, we show that RNA interference against FLT3 with an internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD) potentiates the efficacy of the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) panobinostat (LBH589) against AML cells expressing FLT3-ITD. Similar to RNA interference, tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI; AC220/cpd.102/PKC412) in combination with LBH589 exhibit superior activity against AML cells. Median dose-effect analyses of drug-induced apoptosis rates of AML cells (MV4-11 and MOLM-13) revealed combination index (CI) values indicating strong synergism. AC220, the most potent and FLT3-specific TKI, shows highest synergism with LBH589 in the low nanomolar range. A 4-hour exposure to LBH589 + AC220 already generates more than 50% apoptosis after 24 hours. Different cell lines lacking FLT3-ITD as well as normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells are not significantly affected by LBH589 + TKI, showing the specificity of this treatment regimen. Immunoblot analyses show that LBH589 + TKI induce apoptosis via degradation of FLT3-ITD and its prosurvival target STAT5. Previously, we showed the LBH589-induced proteasomal degradation of FLT3-ITD. Here, we show that activated caspase-3 also contributes to the degradation of FLT3-ITD and that STAT5 is a direct target of this protease. Our data strongly emphasize HDACi/TKI drug combinations as promising modality for the treatment of FLT3-ITD-positive AMLs. PMID:22942377

  17. Interactive separating streak surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ferstl, Florian; Bürger, Kai; Theisel, Holger; Westermann, Rüdiger

    2010-01-01

    Streak surfaces are among the most important features to support 3D unsteady flow exploration, but they are also among the computationally most demanding. Furthermore, to enable a feature driven analysis of the flow, one is mainly interested in streak surfaces that show separation profiles and thus detect unstable manifolds in the flow. The computation of such separation surfaces requires to place seeding structures at the separation locations and to let the structures move correspondingly to these locations in the unsteady flow. Since only little knowledge exists about the time evolution of separating streak surfaces, at this time, an automated exploration of 3D unsteady flows using such surfaces is not feasible. Therefore, in this paper we present an interactive approach for the visual analysis of separating streak surfaces. Our method draws upon recent work on the extraction of Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) and the real-time visualization of streak surfaces on the GPU. We propose an interactive technique for computing ridges in the finite time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) field at each time step, and we use these ridges as seeding structures to track streak surfaces in the time-varying flow. By showing separation surfaces in combination with particle trajectories, and by letting the user interactively change seeding parameters such as particle density and position, visually guided exploration of separation profiles in 3D is provided. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that the reconstruction and display of semantic separable surfaces in 3D unsteady flows can be performed interactively, giving rise to new possibilities for gaining insight into complex flow phenomena.

  18. PREFACE: Nanostructured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Richard E.

    2003-10-01

    We can define nanostructured surfaces as well-defined surfaces which contain lateral features of size 1-100 nm. This length range lies well below the micron regime but equally above the Ångstrom regime, which corresponds to the interatomic distances on single-crystal surfaces. This special issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter presents a collection of twelve papers which together address the fabrication, characterization, properties and applications of such nanostructured surfaces. Taken together they represent, in effect, a status report on the rapid progress taking place in this burgeoning area. The first four papers in this special issue have been contributed by members of the European Research Training Network ‘NanoCluster’, which is concerned with the deposition, growth and characterization of nanometre-scale clusters on solid surfaces—prototypical examples of nanoscale surface features. The paper by Vandamme is concerned with the fundamentals of the cluster-surface interaction; the papers by Gonzalo and Moisala address, respectively, the optical and catalytic properties of deposited clusters; and the paper by van Tendeloo reports the application of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to elucidate the surface structure of spherical particles in a catalyst support. The fifth paper, by Mendes, is also the fruit of a European Research Training Network (‘Micro-Nano’) and is jointly contributed by three research groups; it reviews the creation of nanostructured surface architectures from chemically-synthesized nanoparticles. The next five papers in this special issue are all concerned with the characterization of nanostructured surfaces with scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The papers by Bolotov, Hamilton and Dunstan demonstrate that the STM can be employed for local electrical measurements as well as imaging, as illustrated by the examples of deposited clusters, model semiconductor structures and real

  19. Surface Habitat Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Kriss J.

    2009-01-01

    The Surface Habitat Systems (SHS) Focused Investment Group (FIG) is part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Johnson Space Center (JSC) effort to provide a focused direction and funding to the various projects that are working on human surface habitat designs and technologies for the planetary exploration missions. The overall SHS-FIG effort focuses on directing and guiding those projects that: 1) develop and demonstrate new surface habitat system concepts, innovations, and technologies to support human exploration missions, 2) improve environmental systems that interact with human habitats, 3) handle and emplace human surface habitats, and 4) focus on supporting humans living and working in habitats on planetary surfaces. The activity areas of the SHS FIG described herein are focused on the surface habitat project near-term objectives as described in this document. The SHS-FIG effort focuses on mitigating surface habitat risks (as identified by the Lunar Surface Systems Project Office (LSSPO) Surface Habitat Element Team; and concentrates on developing surface habitat technologies as identified in the FY08 gap analysis. The surface habitat gap assessment will be updated annually as the surface architecture and surface habitat definition continues to mature. These technologies are mapped to the SHS-FIG Strategic Development Roadmap. The Roadmap will bring to light the areas where additional innovative efforts are needed to support the development of habitat concepts and designs and the development of new technologies to support of the LSSPO Habitation Element development plan. Three specific areas of development that address Lunar Architecture Team (LAT)-2 and Constellation Architecture Team (CxAT) Lunar habitat design issues or risks will be focused on by the SHS-FIG. The SHS-FIG will establish four areas of development that will help the projects prepare in their planning for surface habitat systems development. Those development areas are

  20. Dynamics of surface melting

    SciTech Connect

    Elsayed-Ali, H.E.

    1990-08-01

    The objectives of this program is to study the phenomenon of surface melting of single crystals of metals, to test for its existence, and to investigate its dynamics. Both conventional static electron diffraction and dynamic ultrafast electron diffraction are used in our study. This year, the ultrahigh vacuum facility containing the picosecond electron reflection high-energy electron diffraction system was equipped with a cylindrical mirror analyzer and a static electron gum for Auger spectroscopy. An image analysis system capable of acquiring the pulsed diffraction patterns was assembled and used in analysis of picosecond laser heated surfaces. A large set of time-resolved experiments were conducted to study the thermal response of Pb(110) to picosecond laser heating. The surface Debye-Waller effect was used to time-resolve the evolution of surface temperature. This provided us with a picosecond time-resolved surface lattice temperature probe. Results for laser fluences below surface melting show agreement with a heat-diffusion model. The temperature dependence of the Pb(100) along the (110) and the (001) azimuths using x-ray photoelectron forward scattering of the 4f{sub 7/2} core-level photoelectrons confirmed, for the first time, surface melting of Pb(100) at temperatures as low as 560 K.

  1. Choking loops on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xin; Tong, Yiying

    2013-08-01

    We present a method for computing "choking" loops--a set of surface loops that describe the narrowing of the volumes inside/outside of the surface and extend the notion of surface homology and homotopy loops. The intuition behind their definition is that a choking loop represents the region where an offset of the original surface would get pinched. Our generalized loops naturally include the usual 2g handles/tunnels computed based on the topology of the genus-g surface, but also include loops that identify chokepoints or bottlenecks, i.e., boundaries of small membranes separating the inside or outside volume of the surface into disconnected regions. Our definition is based on persistent homology theory, which gives a measure to topological structures, thus providing resilience to noise and a well-defined way to determine topological feature size. More precisely, the persistence computed here is based on the lower star filtration of the interior or exterior 3D domain with the distance field to the surface being the associated 3D Morse function. PMID:23744260

  2. Dynamics at Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Sylvia Ceyer, Nancy Ryan Gray

    2010-05-04

    The 2009 Gordon Conference on Dynamics at Surfaces is the 30th anniversary of a meeting held every two years that is attended by leading researchers in the area of experimental and theoretical dynamics at liquid and solid surfaces. The conference focuses on the dynamics of the interaction of molecules with either liquid or solid surfaces, the dynamics of the outermost layer of liquid and solid surfaces and the dynamics at the liquid-solid interface. Specific topics that are featured include state-to-state dynamics, non-adiabatic interactions in molecule-metal systems, photon induced desorption from semiconductor and metal surfaces, ultrafast x-ray and electron diffraction as probes of the dynamics of ablation, ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy of water surface dynamics, dynamics of a single adsorbate, growth at nano-scale mineral surfaces, dynamics of atom recombination on interstellar dust grains and the dynamics of the interaction of water with lipid bilayers. The conference brings together investigators from a variety of scientific disciplines including chemistry, physics, materials science, geology and biophysics.

  3. Large Surface Measuring Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egdall, Mark; Breidenthal, Robert S.

    1983-09-01

    A new surface measuring concept developed under government contract at Itek Optical Systems has been previously reported by Allen Greenleaf. The method uses four steerable distance-measuring interferometers at the corners of a tetrahedron to determine the posi-tions of a retroreflecting target at various locations on the surface being measured. A small wooden breadboard had been built and tested, demonstrating the feasibility of the concept. This paper reports the building of a scaled-up prototype surface measuring machine to allow the measurement of large aspheric surfaces. A major advantage of the device is that, unlike conventional interferometry, it provides surface measurement in absolute coordinates, thus allowing direct determination of radius of curvature. In addition, the device is self-calibrating. Measurements of a 24-inch mirror have been made with the new machine, giving repeatability of 4 µ m peak sag in the curvature and accuracy of 0.7 μm rms in the surface figure at best focus. The device is currently being used in the production grinding of large aspheric mirrors at Itek. The device is potentially scalable to other industries where highly accurate measurement of unusual surfaces is required.

  4. Progressive Response Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romero, V. J.; Swiler, L. P.

    2004-01-01

    Response surface functions are often used as simple and inexpensive replacements for computationally expensive computer models that simulate the behavior of a complex system over some parameter space. Progressive response surfaces are ones that are built up progressively as global information is added from new sample points in the parameter space. As the response surfaces are globally upgraded based on new information, heuristic indications of the convergence of the response surface approximation to the exact (fitted) function can be inferred. Sampling points can be incrementally added in a structured fashion, or in an unstructured fashion. Whatever the approach, at least in early stages of sampling it is usually desirable to sample the entire parameter space uniformly. At later stages of sampling, depending on the nature of the quantity being resolved, it may be desirable to continue sampling uniformly over the entire parameter space (Progressive response surfaces), or to switch to a focusing/economizing strategy of preferentially sampling certain regions of the parameter space based on information gained in early stages of sampling (Adaptive response surfaces). Here we consider Progressive response surfaces where a balanced indication of global response over the parameter space is desired.We use a variant of Moving Least Squares to fit and interpolate structured and unstructured point sets over the parameter space. On a 2-D test problem we compare response surface accuracy for three incremental sampling methods: Progressive Lattice Sampling; Simple-Random Monte Carlo; and Halton Quasi-Monte-Carlo sequences. We are ultimately after a system for constructing efficiently upgradable response surface approximations with reliable error estimates.

  5. Vacuum probe surface sampler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahlava, B. A. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A vacuum probe surface sampler is described for rapidly sampling relatively large surface areas which possess relatively light loading densities of micro-organism, drug particles or the like. A vacuum head with a hollow handle connected to a suitable vacuum source is frictionally attached to a cone assembly terminating in a flared tip adapted to be passed over the surface to be sampled. A fine mesh screen carried by the vacuum head provides support for a membrane filter which collects the microorganisms or other particles. The head assembly is easily removed from the cone assembly without contacting the cone assembly with human hands.

  6. Planetary surface weathering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gooding, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    The weathering of planetary surfaces is treated. Both physical and chemical weathering (reactions between minerals or mineraloids and planetary volatiles through oxidation, hydration, carbonation, or solution processes) are discussed. Venus, earth, and Mars all possess permanent atmospheres such that weathering should be expected to significantly affect their respective surfaces. In contrast, Mercury and the moon lack permanent atmospheres but conceivably could experience surface weathering in response to transient atmospheres generated by volcanic or impact cratering events. Weathering processes can be postulated for other rocky objects including Io, Titan, asteroids, and comets.

  7. Localized acoustic surface modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, Mohamed; Chen, Pai-Yen; Bağcı, Hakan

    2016-04-01

    We introduce the concept of localized acoustic surface modes. We demonstrate that they are induced on a two-dimensional cylindrical rigid surface with subwavelength corrugations under excitation by an incident acoustic plane wave. Our results show that the corrugated rigid surface is acoustically equivalent to a cylindrical scatterer with uniform mass density that can be represented using a Drude-like model. This, indeed, suggests that plasmonic-like acoustic materials can be engineered with potential applications in various areas including sensing, imaging, and cloaking.

  8. Vortex pairs on surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Koiller, Jair

    2009-05-06

    A pair of infinitesimally close opposite vortices moving on a curved surface moves along a geodesic, according to a conjecture by Kimura. We outline a proof. Numerical simulations are presented for a pair of opposite vortices at a close but nonzero distance on a surface of revolution, the catenoid. We conjecture that the vortex pair system on a triaxial ellipsoid is a KAM perturbation of Jacobi's geodesic problem. We outline some preliminary calculations required for this study. Finding the surfaces for which the vortex pair system is integrable is in order.

  9. Morpheus Surface Approach

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows the Project Morpheus lander flying a kilometer-long simulated surface approach while avoiding hazards in a landing field. The approach takes place at the Shuttle Landing Facili...

  10. Triangulation of NURBS Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samareh-Abolhassani, Jamshid

    1994-01-01

    A technique is presented for triangulation of NURBS surfaces. This technique is built upon an advancing front technique combined with grid point projection. This combined approach has been successfully implemented for structured and unstructured grids.

  11. Surface and submicron physics

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, H. A.

    1982-01-01

    The following research projects are briefly described: resonance ionization mass spectroscopy, an extreme uv transmission grating monochrometers, electon attenuation lengths in solids, surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy, and easy events in irradiated liquid water. (WHK)

  12. Sea Surface Salinity

    NASA Video Gallery

    The heat of the sun also forces evaporation at the ocean's surface, which puts water vapor into the atmosphere but leaves minerals and salts behind, keeping the ocean salty. The salinity of the oce...

  13. Mars Surface Mission Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duke, M. B. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    A workshop was held at the Lunar and Planetary Institute on September 4-5, 1997, to address the surface elements of the Mars Reference Mission now being reviewed by NASA. The workshop considered the current reference mission and addressed the types of activities that would be expected for science and resource exploration and facilities operations. A set of activities was defined that can be used to construct "vignettes" of the surface mission. These vignettes can form the basis for describing the importance of the surface mission, for illustrating aspects of the surface mission, and for allowing others to extend and revise these initial ideas. The topic is rich with opportunities for additional conceptualization. It is recommended that NASA consider supporting university design teams to conduct further analysis of the possibilities.

  14. Surface Plasmon Based Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wig, Andrew; Passian, Ali; Boudreaux, Philip; Ferrell, Tom

    2008-03-01

    A spectrometer that uses surface plasmon excitation in thin metal films to separate light into its component wavelengths is described. The use of surface plasmons as a dispersive medium sets this spectrometer apart from prism, grating, and interference based variants and allows for the miniaturization of this device. Theoretical and experimental results are presented for two different operation models. In the first case surface plasmon tunneling in the near field is used to provide transmission spectra of different broad band-pass, glass filters across the visible wavelength range with high stray-light rejection at low resolution as well as absorption spectra of chlorophyll extracted from a spinach leaf. The second model looks at the far field components of surface plasmon scattering.

  15. Biological surface science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasemo, Bengt

    2002-03-01

    Biological surface science (BioSS), as defined here is the broad interdisciplinary area where properties and processes at interfaces between synthetic materials and biological environments are investigated and biofunctional surfaces are fabricated. Six examples are used to introduce and discuss the subject: Medical implants in the human body, biosensors and biochips for diagnostics, tissue engineering, bioelectronics, artificial photosynthesis, and biomimetic materials. They are areas of varying maturity, together constituting a strong driving force for the current rapid development of BioSS. The second driving force is the purely scientific challenges and opportunities to explore the mutual interaction between biological components and surfaces. Model systems range from the unique water structures at solid surfaces and water shells around proteins and biomembranes, via amino and nucleic acids, proteins, DNA, phospholipid membranes, to cells and living tissue at surfaces. At one end of the spectrum the scientific challenge is to map out the structures, bonding, dynamics and kinetics of biomolecules at surfaces in a similar way as has been done for simple molecules during the past three decades in surface science. At the other end of the complexity spectrum one addresses how biofunctional surfaces participate in and can be designed to constructively participate in the total communication system of cells and tissue. Biofunctional surfaces call for advanced design and preparation in order to match the sophisticated (bio) recognition ability of biological systems. Specifically this requires combined topographic, chemical and visco-elastic patterns on surfaces to match proteins at the nm scale and cells at the micrometer scale. Essentially all methods of surface science are useful. High-resolution (e.g. scanning probe) microscopies, spatially resolved and high sensitivity, non-invasive optical spectroscopies, self-organizing monolayers, and nano- and microfabrication

  16. Surface Temperatures of Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisfeiler, M.; Turcotte, D. L.; Kellogg, L. H.

    2015-12-01

    In the search for habitable exoplanets, the planet's surface temperature plays a crucial role. Unfortunately, direct measurements of surface temperature are not available at this time. Many physical processes influence the surface temperature distribution of a planet. However, the dominating influence is an energy balance between the stellar radiation input and the radiative surface loss of heat. With the further assumptions of a uniform planetary surface temperature, no filtering of the incoming radiation, and black body emission, the only variables are the stellar luminosity and the radial distance of the exoplanet from the star. For the solar system, agreement with observations is quite good except for Venus. The agreement is good for both the inner planets and the outer planets. In this paper we systematically look at methods of improving the zero order approach given above. We consider the filtering of the incoming radiation and the grey body emission. This accounts for the greenhouse effect and can explain the surface temperature of Venus. We systematically vary the filtering of incoming radiation and the emissivities of the daytime and nighttime surfaces. There is evidence that greenhouse heating on the Earth is primarily at nighttime. Different emissivities can explain this effect. It is straightforward to extend the energy balance analysis to include the latitude dependence of surface temperature. Good agreement is obtained at low latitudes but temperature buffering and heat transport by the oceans and atmosphere are clearly important at high latitudes. It is also straightforward to estimate the difference between the daytime and nighttime temperatures. The important parameter is the rotation rate of the exoplanet. The roles of the oceans and the atmosphere in moderating this difference on the Earth will be discussed. Some exoplanets are sufficiently close to their star to have temperatures above the melting temperatures and even the vaporization

  17. Theory of lifting surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prandtl , L

    1920-01-01

    The general basis of the theory of lifting surfaces is discussed. The problem of the flow of a fluid about a lifting surface of infinite span is examined in terms of the existence of vortexes in the current. A general theory of permanent flow is discussed. Formulas for determining the influence of aspect ratio that may be applied to all wings, whatever their plane form, are given.

  18. Multifunctional thin film surface

    DOEpatents

    Brozik, Susan M.; Harper, Jason C.; Polsky, Ronen; Wheeler, David R.; Arango, Dulce C.; Dirk, Shawn M.

    2015-10-13

    A thin film with multiple binding functionality can be prepared on an electrode surface via consecutive electroreduction of two or more aryl-onium salts with different functional groups. This versatile and simple method for forming multifunctional surfaces provides an effective means for immobilization of diverse molecules at close proximities. The multifunctional thin film has applications in bioelectronics, molecular electronics, clinical diagnostics, and chemical and biological sensing.

  19. Computer aided surface representation

    SciTech Connect

    Barnhill, R.E.

    1989-02-09

    The central research problem of this project is the effective representation and display of surfaces, interpolating to given information, in three or more dimensions. In a typical problem, we wish to create a surface from some discrete information. If this information is itself on another surface, the problem is to determine a surface defined on a surface,'' which is discussed below. Often, properties of an already constructed surface are desired: such geometry processing'' is described below. The Summary of Proposed Research from our original proposal describes the aims of this research project. This Summary and the Table of Contents from the original proposal are enclosed as an Appendix to this Progress Report. The broad sweep from constructive mathematics through algorithms and computer graphics displays is utilized in the research. The wide range of activity, directed in both theory and applications, makes this project unique. Last month in the first Ardent Titan delivered in the State of Arizona came to our group, funded by the DOE and Arizona State University. Although the Titan is a commercial product, its newness requires our close collaboration with Ardent to maximize results. During the past year, four faculty members and several graduate research assistants have worked on this DOE project. The gaining of new professionals is an important aspect of this project. A listing of the students and their topics is given in the Appendix. The most significant publication during the past year is the book, Curves and Surfaces for Computer Aided Geometric Design, by Dr. Gerald Farin. This 300 page volume helps fill a considerable gap in the subject and includes many new results on Bernstein-Bezier curves and surfaces.

  20. Lights illuminate surfaces superluminally

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemiroff, Robert J.; Zhong, Qi; Lilleskov, Elias

    2016-07-01

    When a light bulb is turned on, light moves away from it at speed c, by definition. When light from this bulb illuminates a surface, however, this illumination front is not constrained to move at speed c. A simple proof is given that this illumination front always moves faster than c. Generalized, when any compact light source itself varies, this information spreads across all of the surfaces it illuminates at speeds faster than light.

  1. Handsfree Surface Analysis

    2006-11-01

    The HANDSFREE SURFACE ANALYSIS software code enables unattended analysis of surfaces by desorption electrospray (DESI) and liquid-junction surface sampling probe (SSP) mass spectrometry. The software allows automated lane scanning, imaging (e.g. lane rastering), spot and array sampling, and array scanning methods by controlling the movement of the sample attached to a computer-controlled stage. The software is able to collect, visualize and analyze mass spectrometry data real-time for surface analysis purposes by interacting with mass spectrometrymore » instrumentation software. The software also enables data post processing for imaging and other analytical purposes. The software also contains image analysis approaches to control the sampling capillary-to-surface distance when used with DESI, and for automated formation and real-time reoptimization of the sampling probe-to-surface liquid microjunction when used with SSP. Control of these distances is essential to automated, hands-free operation of a DESI or SSP mass spectrometry system.« less

  2. Iron oxide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, Gareth S.

    2016-03-01

    The current status of knowledge regarding the surfaces of the iron oxides, magnetite (Fe3O4), maghemite (γ-Fe2O3), haematite (α-Fe2O3), and wüstite (Fe1-xO) is reviewed. The paper starts with a summary of applications where iron oxide surfaces play a major role, including corrosion, catalysis, spintronics, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), biomedicine, photoelectrochemical water splitting and groundwater remediation. The bulk structure and properties are then briefly presented; each compound is based on a close-packed anion lattice, with a different distribution and oxidation state of the Fe cations in interstitial sites. The bulk defect chemistry is dominated by cation vacancies and interstitials (not oxygen vacancies) and this provides the context to understand iron oxide surfaces, which represent the front line in reduction and oxidation processes. Fe diffuses in and out from the bulk in response to the O2 chemical potential, forming sometimes complex intermediate phases at the surface. For example, α-Fe2O3 adopts Fe3O4-like surfaces in reducing conditions, and Fe3O4 adopts Fe1-xO-like structures in further reducing conditions still. It is argued that known bulk defect structures are an excellent starting point in building models for iron oxide surfaces. The atomic-scale structure of the low-index surfaces of iron oxides is the major focus of this review. Fe3O4 is the most studied iron oxide in surface science, primarily because its stability range corresponds nicely to the ultra-high vacuum environment. It is also an electrical conductor, which makes it straightforward to study with the most commonly used surface science methods such as photoemission spectroscopies (XPS, UPS) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The impact of the surfaces on the measurement of bulk properties such as magnetism, the Verwey transition and the (predicted) half-metallicity is discussed. The best understood iron oxide surface at present is probably Fe3O4(100); the structure is

  3. Lunar Surface Operations. Part 2; Surface Duration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Interbartolo, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this slide presentation are to review the activities on the lunar surface during the stay. The objectives include (1) Summarize Lunar Module Basics emphasizing module layout and storage. (2) Identify the primary activities occurring during each of the lunar s urface timelines, (3) List the EVA Prep tasks, (4) Identify the EVA Objectives, (5) Identify the activities associated with Post EVA (6) Describe the lessons learned during both EVA and Non EVA activities. Included are overview drawings of the Lunar Roving Vehicle, pictures of the tools, and sample return containers. There are also time lines for the Apollo 11, and Apollo 12 through 14, Apollo 15, Apollo 16 and Apollo 17. Diagrams of the EVA suits are shown, including the Liquid Cooling Garment, and the Pressure Garment Assembly. The activity prior to the EVA are reviewed. The science mission assignments of each mission are viewed. The activities after the EVA are reviewed

  4. Mars Surface Environmental Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charles, John

    2002-01-01

    Planetary exploration by astronauts will require extended periods of habitation on a planet's surface, under the influence of environmental factors that are different from those of Earth and the spacecraft that delivered the crew to the planet. Human exploration of Mars, a possible near-term planetary objective, can be considered a challenging scenario. Mission scenarios currently under consideration call for surface habitation periods of from 1 to 18 months on even the earliest expeditions. Methods: Environmental issues associated with Mars exploration have been investigated by NASA and the National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) as part of the Bioastronautics Critical Path Roadmap Project (see http ://criticalpath.jsc.nasa.gov). Results: Arrival on Mars will immediately expose the crew to gravity only 38% of that at Earth's surface in possibly the first prolonged exposure to gravity other than the 1G of Earth's surface and the zero G of weightless space flight, with yet unknown effects on crew physiology. The radiation at Mars' surface is not well documented, although the planet's bulk and even its thin atmosphere may moderate the influx of galactic cosmic radiation and energetic protons from solar flares. Secondary radiation from activated components of the soil must also be considered. Ultrafine and larger respirable and nonrespirable particles in Martian dust introduced into the habitat after surface excursions may induce pulmonary inflammation exacerbated by the additive reactive and oxidizing nature of the dust. Stringent decontamination cannot eliminate mechanical and corrosive effects of the dust on pressure suits and exposed machinery. The biohazard potential of putative indigenous Martian microorganisms may be assessed by comparison with analog environments on Earth. Even in their absence, human microorganisms, if not properly controlled, can be a threat to the crew's health. Conclusions: Mars' surface offers a substantial challenge to the

  5. In Situ Surface Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deen, Robert G.; Leger, Patrick C.; Yanovsky, Igor

    2011-01-01

    Operation of in situ space assets, such as rovers and landers, requires operators to acquire a thorough understanding of the environment surrounding the spacecraft. The following programs help with that understanding by providing higher-level information characterizing the surface, which is not immediately obvious by just looking at the XYZ terrain data. This software suite covers three primary programs: marsuvw, marsrough, and marsslope, and two secondary programs, which together use XYZ data derived from in situ stereo imagery to characterize the surface by determining surface normal, surface roughness, and various aspects of local slope, respectively. These programs all use the Planetary Image Geometry (PIG) library to read mission-specific data files. The programs themselves are completely multimission; all mission dependencies are handled by PIG. The input data consists of images containing XYZ locations as derived by, e.g., marsxyz. The marsuvw program determines surface normals from XYZ data by gathering XYZ points from an area around each pixel and fitting a plane to those points. Outliers are rejected, and various consistency checks are applied. The result shows the orientation of the local surface at each point as a unit vector. The program can be run in two modes: standard, which is typically used for in situ arm work, and slope, which is typically used for rover mobility. The difference is primarily due to optimizations necessary for the larger patch sizes in the slope case. The marsrough program determines surface roughness in a small area around each pixel, which is defined as the maximum peak-to-peak deviation from the plane perpendicular to the surface normal at that pixel. The marsslope program takes a surface normal file as input and derives one of several slope-like outputs from it. The outputs include slope, slope rover direction (a measure of slope radially away from the rover), slope heading, slope magnitude, northerly tilt, and solar energy

  6. How to clean surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Jean M.

    2004-06-01

    Various cleaning methods are available depending on the sizes of the parts, mounted or unmounted, and purpose of the cleaning. Dust and other particle contamination affect scattering and act as nuclei for defects in optical coatings. In some cases, these defects can initiate laser damage. Noncontact cleaning methods to eliminate particle contamination include blowing large particles from surfaces with an air bulb, "canned air," or a nitrogen gas jet, for a gentle cleaning and CO2 snow for more aggressive particle removal. Laser assisted particle removal is a new high tech method. A strip coating material applied to the surface and subsequently removed will remove large fresh particles and often fingerprints. Contamination films affect the quality and adherence of optical coatings. These are usually removed (from unmounted optics) by cleaning the surface in a detergent and water bath followed by extensive rinsing and non-contact drying. Alternate methods when immersion in water is not possible are drag wiping, or spraying or squirting organic solvents over the surface. Before cleaning, surfaces must be visually inspected to determine the type and location of the contamination, to decide if cleaning is necessary, and what type of cleaning technique to use. Finally, bad cleaning is much worse than no cleaning! Illustrations of the cleaning methods described above will be given.

  7. Surface roughness measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Thomas G.

    1994-01-01

    The Optics Division is currently in the research phase of producing grazing-incidence mirrors to be used in x-ray detector applications. The traditional method of construction involves labor-intensive glass grinding. This also culminates in a relatively heavy mirror. For lower resolution applications, the mirrors may be of a replicated design which involves milling a mandrel as a negative of the final shape and electroplating the cylindrical mirror onto it. The mirror is then separated from the mandrel by cooling. The mandrel will shrink more than the 'shell' (mirror) allowing it to be pulled from the mandrel. Ulmer (2) describes this technique and its variations in more detail. To date, several mirrors have been tested at MSFC by the Optical Fabrication Branch by focusing x-ray energy onto a detector with limited success. Little is known about the surface roughness of the actual mirror. Hence, the attempt to gather data on these surfaces. The test involves profiling the surface of a sample, replicating the surface as described above, and then profiling the replicated surface.

  8. Surface inspection operator interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creek, Russell C.

    1992-03-01

    Surface inspection systems are widely used in many industries including steel, tin, aluminum, and paper. These systems generally use machine vision technology to detect defective surface regions and can generate very high data output rates which can be difficult for line operators to absorb and use. A graphical, windowing interface is described which provides the operators with an overview of the surface quality of the inspected web while still allowing them to select individual defective regions for display. A touch screen is used as the only operator input. This required alterations to some screen widgets due to subtle ergonomic differences of touch screen input over mouse input. The interface, although developed for inspecting coated steel, has been designed to be adaptable to other surface inspection applications. Facility is provided to allow the detection, classification, and display functions of the inspection system to be readily changed. Modifications can be implemented on two main levels; changes that reflect the configuration of the hardware system and control the detection and classification components of the surface inspection system are accessible only to authorized staff while those affecting the display and alarm settings of defect types may be changed by operators and this can generally be done dynamically.

  9. Anticipating land surface change.

    PubMed

    Streeter, Richard; Dugmore, Andrew J

    2013-04-01

    The interplay of human actions and natural processes over varied spatial and temporal scales can result in abrupt transitions between contrasting land surface states. Understanding these transitions is a key goal of sustainability science because they can represent abrupt losses of natural capital. This paper recognizes flickering between alternate land surface states in advance of threshold change and critical slowing down in advance of both threshold changes and noncritical transformation. The early warning signals we observe are rises in autocorrelation, variance, and skewness within millimeter-resolution thickness measurements of tephra layers deposited in A.D. 2010 and A.D. 2011. These signals reflect changing patterns of surface vegetation, which are known to provide early warning signals of critical transformations. They were observed toward migrating soil erosion fronts, cryoturbation limits, and expanding deflation zones, thus providing potential early warning signals of land surface change. The record of the spatial patterning of vegetation contained in contemporary tephra layers shows how proximity to land surface change could be assessed in the widespread regions affected by shallow layers of volcanic fallout (those that can be subsumed within the existing vegetation cover). This insight shows how we could use tephra layers in the stratigraphic record to identify "near misses," close encounters with thresholds that did not lead to tipping points, and thus provide additional tools for archaeology, sustainability science, and contemporary land management.

  10. Epidermal surface lipids

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    A layer of lipids, which are of both sebaceous and keratinocyte origin, covers the surface of the skin. The apparent composition of surface lipids varies depending on the selected method of sampling. Lipids produced by the epidermal cells are an insignificant fraction of the total extractable surface lipid on areas rich in sebaceous glands. Due to the holocrine activity of the sebaceous gland, its product of secretion (sebum) is eventually released to the surface of the skin and coats the fur as well. Lipids of epidermal origin fill the spaces between the cells, like mortar or cement. The sebaceous lipids are primarily non polar lipids as triglycerides, wax esters and squalene, while epidermal lipids are a mixture of ceramides, free fatty acids and cholesterol. The composition of the sebaceous lipids is unique and intriguing and elevated sebum excretion is a major factor involved in the pathophysiology of acne. Recent studies have elucidated the roles that epidermal surface lipids have on normal skin functions and acne. PMID:20224687

  11. Asteroid Surface Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdoch, N.; Sánchez, P.; Schwartz, S. R.; Miyamoto, H.

    The regolith-covered surfaces of asteroids preserve records of geophysical processes that have occurred both at their surfaces and sometimes also in their interiors. As a result of the unique microgravity environment that these bodies possess, a complex and varied geophysics has given birth to fascinating features that we are just now beginning to understand. The processes that formed such features were first hypothesized through detailed spacecraft observations and have been further studied using theoretical, numerical, and experimental methods that often combine several scientific disciplines. These multiple approaches are now merging toward a further understanding of the geophysical states of the surfaces of asteroids. In this chapter we provide a concise summary of what the scientific community has learned so far about the surfaces of these small planetary bodies and the processes that have shaped them. We also discuss the state of the art in terms of experimental techniques and numerical simulations that are currently being used to investigate regolith processes occurring on small-body surfaces and that are contributing to the interpretation of observations and the design of future space missions.

  12. Surface energy of zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Bilello, J.C.; Dew-Hughes, D.; Pucino, A.T.

    1983-04-01

    The influence of temperature and associated dislocation microstructure on the energetics of basal plane cleavage in zinc crystals has been investigated using the method of Hull, Beardmore, and Valentine (HBV). A marked temperature dependence was observed in the zinc surface energy, over the range 77--298 /sup 0/K, contrary to previous expectations. Plastic relaxation was associated with crack initiation at 77 /sup 0/K, but not propagation; while at room temperature a plastic zone of 1200--1500 ..mu..m in depth was produced by crack extension. The surface energy could be estimated, independent of the usual Griffith analysis, by measuring the energy dissipation in a fully relaxed deformed zone associated with an explosively formed precursor crack. This method yielded surface energies of 0.066 to 0.079 J m/sup -2/ which was in good agreement with previous work. It is demonstrated that the cleavage surface energy of zinc is well below the thermodynamic surface energy and that this discrepancy is not related to plastic deformation.

  13. Anticipating land surface change

    PubMed Central

    Streeter, Richard; Dugmore, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    The interplay of human actions and natural processes over varied spatial and temporal scales can result in abrupt transitions between contrasting land surface states. Understanding these transitions is a key goal of sustainability science because they can represent abrupt losses of natural capital. This paper recognizes flickering between alternate land surface states in advance of threshold change and critical slowing down in advance of both threshold changes and noncritical transformation. The early warning signals we observe are rises in autocorrelation, variance, and skewness within millimeter-resolution thickness measurements of tephra layers deposited in A.D. 2010 and A.D. 2011. These signals reflect changing patterns of surface vegetation, which are known to provide early warning signals of critical transformations. They were observed toward migrating soil erosion fronts, cryoturbation limits, and expanding deflation zones, thus providing potential early warning signals of land surface change. The record of the spatial patterning of vegetation contained in contemporary tephra layers shows how proximity to land surface change could be assessed in the widespread regions affected by shallow layers of volcanic fallout (those that can be subsumed within the existing vegetation cover). This insight shows how we could use tephra layers in the stratigraphic record to identify “near misses,” close encounters with thresholds that did not lead to tipping points, and thus provide additional tools for archaeology, sustainability science, and contemporary land management. PMID:23530230

  14. Iron oxide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, Gareth S.

    2016-03-01

    The current status of knowledge regarding the surfaces of the iron oxides, magnetite (Fe3O4), maghemite (γ-Fe2O3), haematite (α-Fe2O3), and wüstite (Fe1-xO) is reviewed. The paper starts with a summary of applications where iron oxide surfaces play a major role, including corrosion, catalysis, spintronics, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), biomedicine, photoelectrochemical water splitting and groundwater remediation. The bulk structure and properties are then briefly presented; each compound is based on a close-packed anion lattice, with a different distribution and oxidation state of the Fe cations in interstitial sites. The bulk defect chemistry is dominated by cation vacancies and interstitials (not oxygen vacancies) and this provides the context to understand iron oxide surfaces, which represent the front line in reduction and oxidation processes. Fe diffuses in and out from the bulk in response to the O2 chemical potential, forming sometimes complex intermediate phases at the surface. For example, α-Fe2O3 adopts Fe3O4-like surfaces in reducing conditions, and Fe3O4 adopts Fe1-xO-like structures in further reducing conditions still. It is argued that known bulk defect structures are an excellent starting point in building models for iron oxide surfaces. The atomic-scale structure of the low-index surfaces of iron oxides is the major focus of this review. Fe3O4 is the most studied iron oxide in surface science, primarily because its stability range corresponds nicely to the ultra-high vacuum environment. It is also an electrical conductor, which makes it straightforward to study with the most commonly used surface science methods such as photoemission spectroscopies (XPS, UPS) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The impact of the surfaces on the measurement of bulk properties such as magnetism, the Verwey transition and the (predicted) half-metallicity is discussed. The best understood iron oxide surface at present is probably Fe3O4(100); the structure is

  15. Analytical caustic surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, R. F.

    1987-01-01

    This document discusses the determination of caustic surfaces in terms of rays, reflectors, and wavefronts. Analytical caustics are obtained as a family of lines, a set of points, and several types of equations for geometries encountered in optics and microwave applications. Standard methods of differential geometry are applied under different approaches: directly to reflector surfaces, and alternatively, to wavefronts, to obtain analytical caustics of two sheets or branches. Gauss/Seidel aberrations are introduced into the wavefront approach, forcing the retention of all three coefficients of both the first- and the second-fundamental forms of differential geometry. An existing method for obtaining caustic surfaces through exploitation of the singularities in flux density is examined, and several constant-intensity contour maps are developed using only the intrinsic Gaussian, mean, and normal curvatures of the reflector. Numerous references are provided for extending the material of the present document to the morphologies of caustics and their associated diffraction patterns.

  16. Hot Billet Surface Qualifier

    SciTech Connect

    Tzyy-Shuh Chang

    2007-04-30

    OG Technologies, Inc. (OGT), developed a prototype of a Hot Billet Surface Qualifier (“Qualifier”) based on OGT’s patented HotEye™ technology and other proprietary imaging and computing technologies. The Qualifier demonstrated its ability of imaging the cast billets in line with high definition pictures, pictures capable of supporting the detection of surface anomalies on the billets. The detection will add the ability to simplify the subsequent process and to correct the surface quality issues in a much more timely and efficient manner. This is challenging due to the continuous casting environment, in which corrosive water, temperature, vibration, humidity, EMI and other unbearable factors exist. Each installation has the potential of 249,000 MMBTU in energy savings per year. This represents a cost reduction, reduced emissions, reduced water usage and reduced mill scale.

  17. Excitonic surface lattice resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphrey, A. D.; Gentile, M. J.; Barnes, W. L.

    2016-08-01

    Electromagnetic resonances are important in controlling light at the nanoscale. The most studied such resonance is the surface plasmon resonance that is associated with metallic nanostructures. Here we explore an alternative resonance, the surface exciton-polariton resonance, one based on excitonic molecular materials. Our study is based on analytical and numerical modelling. We show that periodic arrays of suitable molecular nanoparticles may support surface lattice resonances that arise as a result of coherent interactions between the particles. Our results demonstrate that excitonic molecular materials are an interesting alternative to metals for nanophotonics; they offer the prospect of both fabrication based on supramolecular chemistry and optical functionality arising from the way the properties of such materials may be controlled with light.

  18. Surface Hopping by Consensus.

    PubMed

    Martens, Craig C

    2016-07-01

    We present a new stochastic surface hopping method for modeling molecular dynamics with electronic transitions. The approach, consensus surface hopping (CSH), is a numerical framework for solving the semiclassical limit Liouville equation describing nuclear dynamics on coupled electronic surfaces using ensembles of trajectories. In contrast to existing techniques based on propagating independent classical trajectories that undergo stochastic hops between the electronic states, the present method determines the probabilities of transition of each trajectory collectively with input from the entire ensemble. The full coherent dynamics of the coupled system arise naturally at the ensemble level and ad hoc corrections, such as momentum rescaling to impose strict trajectory energy conservation and artificial decoherence to avoid the overcoherence of the quantum states associated with independent trajectories, are avoided. PMID:27345103

  19. Stereoscopic surface perception.

    PubMed

    Anderson, B L

    1999-12-01

    Physiological, computational, and psychophysical studies of stereopsis have assumed that the perceived surface structure of binocularly viewed images is primarily specified by the pattern of binocular disparities in the two eyes' views. A novel set of stereoscopic phenomena are reported that demonstrate the insufficiency of this view. It is shown that the visual system computes the contrast relationships along depth discontinuities to infer the depth, lightness, and opacity of stereoscopically viewed surfaces. A novel theoretical framework is introduced to explain these results. It is argued that the visual system contains mechanisms that enforce two principles of scene interpretation: a generic view principle that determines qualitative scene geometry, and anchoring principles that determine how image data are quantitatively partitioned between different surface attributes. PMID:10624955

  20. Direct heating surface combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beremand, D. G.; Shire, L. I.; Mroz, T. S. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    The combustor utilizes a non-adiabatic flame to provide low-emission combustion for gas turbines. A fuel-air mixture is directed through a porous wall, the other side of which serves as a combustion surface. A radiant heat sink disposed adjacent to and spaced from the combustion surface controls the combustor flame temperature in order to prevent the formation of oxides of nitrogen. A secondary air flow cools the heat sink. Additionally, up to 100% of secondary air flow is mixed with the combustion products at the direct heating surface combustor to dilute such products thereby reducing exit temperature. However, if less than 100% secondary air is mixed to the combustor, the remainder may be added to the combustion products further downstream.

  1. Vortex/surface interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodstein, G. C. R.; George, A. R.; Hui, C. Y.

    1993-01-01

    This paper considers the interaction of a vortex generated upstream in a flow field with a downstream aerodynamic surface that possesses a large chord. The flow is assumed to be steady, incompressible, inviscid and irrotational, and the surface to be semiinfinite. The vortex is considered to be a straight vortex filament. To lowest order the problem is modeled using potential theory, where the 3D Laplace's equation for the velocity potential on the surface is solved exactly. The closed-form equation for pressure distribution obtained from this theory is found to have a square root singularity at the leading-edge. It also converges, as x goes to infinity, to the solution of the 2D point-vortex/infinite plane problem. The pressure coefficient presents an anti-symmetric behavior, near the leading-edge and a symmetric behavior as x goes to infinity.

  2. Dual surface interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Pardue, R.M.; Williams, R.R.

    1980-09-12

    A double-pass interferometer is provided which allows direct measurement of relative displacement between opposed surfaces. A conventional plane mirror interferometer may be modified by replacing the beam-measuring path cube-corner reflector with an additional quarterwave plate. The beam path is altered to extend to an opposed plane mirrored surface and the reflected beam is placed in interference with a retained reference beam split from dual-beam source and retroreflected by a reference cube-corner reflector mounted stationary with the interferometer housing. This permits direct measurement of opposed mirror surfaces by laser interferometry while doubling the resolution as with a conventional double-pass plane mirror laser interferometer system.

  3. Dual surface interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Pardue, Robert M.; Williams, Richard R.

    1982-01-01

    A double-pass interferometer is provided which allows direct measurement of relative displacement between opposed surfaces. A conventional plane mirror interferometer may be modified by replacing the beam-measuring path cube-corner reflector with an additional quarter-wave plate. The beam path is altered to extend to an opposed plane mirrored surface and the reflected beam is placed in interference with a retained reference beam split from dual-beam source and retroreflected by a reference cube-corner reflector mounted stationary with the interferometer housing. This permits direct measurement of opposed mirror surfaces by laser interferometry while doubling the resolution as with a conventional double-pass plane mirror laser interferometer system.

  4. Magnetic surface anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rado, George T.

    1992-02-01

    Selected aspects of magnetic surface anisotropy are reviewed. The emphasis is on methods for deducing reliable surface anisotropy values from experiments such as ferromagnetic resonance at microwave frequencies and Brillouin scattering at optical frequencies. The methods used are the "general exchange boundary condition method" and the "effective volume anisotropy method". The essence of the former is the supplementing of the equation of motion of the magnetization with the general exchange boundary condition whereas the latter consists of using the "stratagem" of effective volume anisotropy. We find that use of the general exchange boundary condition method is not only preferable in principle but often actually necessary to prevent the prediction of wrong surface anisotropy values and to permit the prediction of some observable Brillouin shifts.

  5. Surface-water surveillance

    SciTech Connect

    Saldi, K.A.; Dirkes, R.L.; Blanton, M.L.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the Surface water on and near the Hanford Site is monitored to determine the potential effects of Hanford operations. Surface water at Hanford includes the Columbia River, riverbank springs, ponds located on the Hanford Site, and offsite water systems directly east and across the Columbia River from the Hanford Site, and offsite water systems directly east and across the Columbia River from the Hanford Site. Columbia River sediments are also included in this discussion. Tables 5.3.1 and 5.3.2 summarize the sampling locations, sample types, sampling frequencies, and sample analyses included in surface-water surveillance activities during 1994. Sample locations are also identified in Figure 5.3.1. This section describes the surveillance effort and summarizes the results for these aquatic environments. Detailed analytical results are reported by Bisping (1995).

  6. Martian surface materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, H. J.

    1991-01-01

    A semiquantitative appreciation for the physical properties of the Mars surface materials and their global variations can be gained from the Viking Lander and remote sensing observations. Analyses of Lander data yields estimates of the mechanical properties of the soil-like surface materials and best guess estimates can be made for the remote sensing signatures of the soil-like materials at the landing sites. Results show that significant thickness of powderlike surface materials with physical properties similar to drift material are present on Mars and probably pervasive in the Tharsis region. It also appears likely that soil-like materials similar to crusty to cloddy material are typical for Mars, and that soil-like material similar to blocky material are common on Mars.

  7. Uranus satellites - Surface properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veverka, J.; Brown, R. H.; Bell, Jeffrey F.

    1991-01-01

    The post-Voyager knowledge of the photometric, colorimetric, spectral, and thermal properties of the Uranian satellites is reviewed, focusing on such fundamental physical properties as albedo, color, and surface texture. While albedo variations of at least a factor of 2 exist, color differences are almost absent (Miranda) or subdued (Oberon). In the case of Titania, the strong opposition effect reported by ground-based observers was confirmed by Voyager. Voyager did not observe the opposition parts of the phase curves of the other satellites. Voyager thermal observations of Ariel and Miranda suggest that both have highly porous regoliths, thermophysically similar to those of Jupiter's icy satellites. At the time of the flyby (south pole facing the sun), maximum surface temperatures reached or exceeded 85 K, but nighttime polar temperatures are predicted to drop to 20 to 30 K because each pole spends about 40 yr in darkness. Ground-based spectroscopy identified water ice as an important surface constituent.

  8. Unidirectional superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Manu; Bush, John

    2007-11-01

    It has long been known that the hairy, waxy cuticle of water-walking insects renders them water-repellent; they thus exhibit high static contact angles. We have recently demonstrated that by the virtue of the geometry and flexibility of the hair, the integument is also directionally anisotropic and so plays a key propulsive role. We here report our attempts to design and implement an analogous synthetic surface that exhibits unidirectional adhesion. The surface effectively acts like a fluidic-diode; allowing contact lines to advance in only one direction. When vibrated randomly, drops suspended on the surface advance in only one direction. Applications in valve-less pumps and drop transport in microfluidic devices are discussed.

  9. Changes on Titan's surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomonidou, A.; Lopes, R. M. C.; Coustenis, A.; Malaska, M. J.; Sotin, C.; Rodriguez, S.; Janssen, M. A.; Drossart, P.; Lawrence, K. J.; Matsoukas, C. K.; Hirtzig, M.; Le Mouelic, S.; Jaumann, R.; Brown, R. H.; Bratsolis, E.

    2015-12-01

    Cassini's Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) and the Titan Radar Mapper have investigated Titan's surface since 2004, unveiling a complex, dynamic and Earth-like surface. Understanding the distribution and interplay of geologic processes is important for constraining models of its interior, surface-atmospheric interactions, and climate evolution. We focus on understanding the origin of the major geomorphological units identified by Lopes et al. (2010, 2015) [1,2], Malaska et al. (2015) [3] and regions we studied in Solomonidou et al. (2014; 2015) [4,5]. Here, we investigate the nature of: Undifferentiated Plains, Hummocky/Mountainous terrains, candidate cryovolcanic sites, Labyrinth, and Dunes in terms of surface albedo behavior and spectral evolution with time to identify possible changes. Using a radiative transfer code, we find that temporal variations of surface albedo occur for some areas. Tui Regio and Sotra Patera, both candidate cryovolcanic regions, change with time, becoming darker and brighter respectively in surface albedo. In contrast, we find that the Undifferentiated Plains and the suggested evaporitic areas [6] in the equatorial regions do not present any significant changes. We are able to report the differences and similarities among the various regions and provide constraints on their chemical composition and specific processes of origin. Our results support the hypothesis that both endogenic and exogenic processes have played important roles in shaping Titan's geologic evolution. Such a variety of geologic processes and their relationship to the methane cycle make Titan important for astrobiology and habitability studies and particularly significant in solar system studies. [1] Lopes, R.M.C., et al.: Icarus, 205, 540-588, 2010; [2] Lopes, R.M.C., et al.: JGR, 118, 416-435, 2013; [3] Malaska, M., et al : Icarus, submitted, 2015;[4] Solomonidou et al.: JGR, 119, 1729-1747, 2014; [5] Solomonidou, A., et al.: In press, 2015; [6] Barnes

  10. Surface Aesthetics and Analysis.

    PubMed

    Çakır, Barış; Öreroğlu, Ali Rıza; Daniel, Rollin K

    2016-01-01

    Surface aesthetics of an attractive nose result from certain lines, shadows, and highlights with specific proportions and breakpoints. Analysis emphasizes geometric polygons as aesthetic subunits. Evaluation of the complete nasal surface aesthetics is achieved using geometric polygons to define the existing deformity and aesthetic goals. The relationship between the dome triangles, interdomal triangle, facet polygons, and infralobular polygon are integrated to form the "diamond shape" light reflection on the nasal tip. The principles of geometric polygons allow the surgeon to analyze the deformities of the nose, define an operative plan to achieve specific goals, and select the appropriate operative technique.

  11. Low surface brightness galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderhulst, J. M.; Deblok, W. J. G.; Mcgaugh, S. S.; Bothun, G. D.

    1993-01-01

    A program to investigate the properties of low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies involving surface photometry in U, B, V, R, I, and H-alpha, HI imaging with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) and the very large array (VLA) and spectrophotometry of H2 regions in LSB galaxies is underway. The goal is to verify the idea that LSB galaxies have low star formation rates because the local gas density falls below the critical density for star formation, and to study the stellar population and abundances in LSB galaxies. Such information should help understanding the evolutionary history of LSB galaxies. Some preliminary results are reported.

  12. Compliant layer chucking surface

    DOEpatents

    Blaedel, Kenneth L.; Spence, Paul A.; Thompson, Samuel L.

    2004-12-28

    A method and apparatus are described wherein a thin layer of complaint material is deposited on the surface of a chuck to mitigate the deformation that an entrapped particle might cause in the part, such as a mask or a wafer, that is clamped to the chuck. The harder particle will embed into the softer layer as the clamping pressure is applied. The material composing the thin layer could be a metal or a polymer for vacuum or electrostatic chucks. It may be deposited in various patterns to affect an interrupted surface, such as that of a "pin" chuck, thereby reducing the probability of entrapping a particle.

  13. Strongly correlated surface states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, Victor A.

    Everything has an edge. However trivial, this phrase has dominated theoretical condensed matter in the past half a decade. Prior to that, questions involving the edge considered to be more of an engineering problem rather than a one of fundamental science: it seemed self-evident that every edge is different. However, recent advances proved that many surface properties enjoy a certain universality, and moreover, are 'topologically' protected. In this thesis I discuss a selected range of problems that bring together topological properties of surface states and strong interactions. Strong interactions alone can lead to a wide spectrum of emergent phenomena: from high temperature superconductivity to unconventional magnetic ordering; interactions can change the properties of particles, from heavy electrons to fractional charges. It is a unique challenge to bring these two topics together. The thesis begins by describing a family of methods and models with interactions so high that electrons effectively disappear as particles and new bound states arise. By invoking the AdS/CFT correspondence we can mimic the physical systems of interest as living on the surface of a higher dimensional universe with a black hole. In a specific example we investigate the properties of the surface states and find helical spin structure of emerged particles. The thesis proceeds from helical particles on the surface of black hole to a surface of samarium hexaboride: an f-electron material with localized magnetic moments at every site. Interactions between electrons in the bulk lead to insulating behavior, but the surfaces found to be conducting. This observation motivated an extensive research: weather the origin of conduction is of a topological nature. Among our main results, we confirm theoretically the topological properties of SmB6; introduce a new framework to address similar questions for this type of insulators, called Kondo insulators. Most notably we introduce the idea of Kondo

  14. Surface controlled blade stabilizer

    DOEpatents

    Russell, Larry R.

    1983-01-01

    Drill string stabilizer apparatus, controllable to expand and retract entirely from the surface by control of drill string pressure, wherein increase of drill string pressure from the surface closes a valve to create a piston means which is moved down by drill string pressure to expand the stabilizer blades, said valve being opened and the piston moving upward upon reduction of drill string pressure to retract the stabilizer blades. Upward and downward movements of the piston and an actuator sleeve therebelow are controlled by a barrel cam acting between the housing and the actuator sleeve.

  15. Surface defects and symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Jürgen; Schweigert, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    In quantum field theory, defects of various codimensions are natural ingredients and carry a lot of interesting information. In this contribution we concentrate on topological quantum field theories in three dimensions, with a particular focus on Dijkgraaf-Witten theories with abelian gauge group. Surface defects in Dijkgraaf-Witten theories have applications in solid state physics, topological quantum computing and conformal field theory. We explain that symmetries in these topological field theories are naturally defined in terms of invertible topological surface defects and are thus Brauer-Picard groups.

  16. Photometric Lunar Surface Reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nefian, Ara V.; Alexandrov, Oleg; Morattlo, Zachary; Kim, Taemin; Beyer, Ross A.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate photometric reconstruction of the Lunar surface is important in the context of upcoming NASA robotic missions to the Moon and in giving a more accurate understanding of the Lunar soil composition. This paper describes a novel approach for joint estimation of Lunar albedo, camera exposure time, and photometric parameters that utilizes an accurate Lunar-Lambertian reflectance model and previously derived Lunar topography of the area visualized during the Apollo missions. The method introduced here is used in creating the largest Lunar albedo map (16% of the Lunar surface) at the resolution of 10 meters/pixel.

  17. Chemically functionalized surface patterning.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaozhu; Boey, Freddy; Huo, Fengwei; Huang, Ling; Zhang, Hua

    2011-08-22

    Patterning substrates with versatile chemical functionalities from micro- to nanometer scale is a long-standing and interesting topic. This review provides an overview of a range of techniques commonly used for surface patterning. The first section briefly introduces conventional micropatterning tools, such as photolithography and microcontact printing. The second section focuses on the currently used nanolithographic techniques, for example, scanning probe lithography (SPL), and their applications in surface patterning. Their advantages and disadvantages are also demonstrated. In the last section, dip-pen nanolithography (DPN) is emphatically illustrated, with a particular stress on the patterning and applications of biomolecules.

  18. Safety Play Surfaces Buying Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Susan

    1990-01-01

    Describes standards for playing surfaces and characteristics of play surfaces made of organic loose material, inorganic loose material, and compact materials. Necessary site preparation is discussed. An extensive, annotated list of manufacturers of surfaces is included. (DR)

  19. Fluid Dynamics with Free Surfaces

    1992-02-01

    RIPPLE is a two-dimensional, transient, free surface incompressible fluid dynamics program. It allows multiple free surfaces with surface tension and wall adhesion forces and has a partial cell treatment which allows curved boundaries and interior obstacles.

  20. Organometallic chemistry of metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Muetterties, E.L.

    1981-06-01

    The organometallic chemistry of metal surfaces is defined as a function of surface crystallography and of surface composition for a set of cyclic hydrocarbons that include benzene, toluene, cyclohexadienes, cyclohexene, cyclohexane, cyclooctatetraene, cyclooctadienes, cyclooctadiene, cycloheptatriene and cyclobutane. 12 figures.

  1. A Thermochromic Superhydrophobic Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cataldi, Pietro; Bayer, Ilker S.; Cingolani, Roberto; Marras, Sergio; Chellali, Ryad; Athanassiou, Athanassia

    2016-06-01

    Highly enhanced solid-state thermochromism is observed in regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene), P3HT, when deposited on a superhydrophobic polymer-SiO2 nanocomposite coating. The conformal P3HT coating on the nanocomposite surface does not alter or reduce superhydrophicity while maintaining its reversible enhanced thermochromism. The polymeric matrix of the superhydrophobic surface is comprised of a blend of poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) copolymer and an acrylic adhesive. Based on detailed X-ray diffraction measurements, this long-lasting, repeatable and hysteresis-free thermochromic effect is attributed to the enhancement of the Bragg peak associated with the d-spacing of interchain directional packing (100) which remains unaltered during several heating-cooling cycles. We propose that the superhydrophobic surface confines π–π interchain stacking in P3HT with uniform d-spacing into its nanostructured texture resulting in better packing and reduction in face-on orientation. The rapid response of the system to sudden temperature changes is also demonstrated by water droplet impact and bounce back on heated surfaces. This effect can be exploited for embedded thin film temperature sensors for metal coatings.

  2. Experiments with Planing Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sottorf, W

    1934-01-01

    A previous report discusses the experimental program of a systematic exploration of all questions connected with the planing problem as well as the first fundamental results of the investigation of a flat planing surface. The present report is limited to the conversion of the model test data to full scale.

  3. A Thermochromic Superhydrophobic Surface.

    PubMed

    Cataldi, Pietro; Bayer, Ilker S; Cingolani, Roberto; Marras, Sergio; Chellali, Ryad; Athanassiou, Athanassia

    2016-01-01

    Highly enhanced solid-state thermochromism is observed in regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene), P3HT, when deposited on a superhydrophobic polymer-SiO2 nanocomposite coating. The conformal P3HT coating on the nanocomposite surface does not alter or reduce superhydrophicity while maintaining its reversible enhanced thermochromism. The polymeric matrix of the superhydrophobic surface is comprised of a blend of poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) copolymer and an acrylic adhesive. Based on detailed X-ray diffraction measurements, this long-lasting, repeatable and hysteresis-free thermochromic effect is attributed to the enhancement of the Bragg peak associated with the d-spacing of interchain directional packing (100) which remains unaltered during several heating-cooling cycles. We propose that the superhydrophobic surface confines π-π interchain stacking in P3HT with uniform d-spacing into its nanostructured texture resulting in better packing and reduction in face-on orientation. The rapid response of the system to sudden temperature changes is also demonstrated by water droplet impact and bounce back on heated surfaces. This effect can be exploited for embedded thin film temperature sensors for metal coatings. PMID:27301422

  4. Checking Surface Contours

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Velega, D.

    1983-01-01

    Rubber impressions viewed with optical comparator. Simple mold constructed from aluminum sheet or any other easily shaped material compatible with silicone rubber ingredients. Mold placed over surface to be measured. Newly-mixed silicone rubber compound poured in mold and allowed to cure.

  5. Surface Induced Anomalous Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, Herman J.; Haley, Stephen B.

    The Ginzburg Landau (GL) theory is recast using a Hamiltonian involving the complete kinetic energy density which requires that the surface energy must contain a term ∇∣ψ∣2 to support superconducting (SC) states. The GL equations contain two temperature t dependent parameters α(t) and β(t), which are respectively the coefficients of the SC pair density ∝∣ψ∣2, and the pair interaction term ∝∣ψ∣4 in the free energy density. The sign of these parameters, which defines distinct solution classes, and the ratio s(t)=√ {|α |/|β |} are governed by the characteristics of the surface energy density. In addition to the conventional bulk superconducting states with (α < 0, β > 0), anomalous superconducting states exist for all other sign combinations, including cases with β < 0 which may exist only when surface pair interactions are significant. All possible solutions of our generalized nonlinear, one-dimensional GL equations are found analytically and applied to a thin superconducting slab which manifests the possibility of states exhibiting enhanced, diminished, and pre-wetting superconductivity. Critical currents are determined as functions of s(t) and surface parameters. The results are applied to critical current experiments on SNS systems.

  6. A Thermochromic Superhydrophobic Surface

    PubMed Central

    Cataldi, Pietro; Bayer, Ilker S.; Cingolani, Roberto; Marras, Sergio; Chellali, Ryad; Athanassiou, Athanassia

    2016-01-01

    Highly enhanced solid-state thermochromism is observed in regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene), P3HT, when deposited on a superhydrophobic polymer-SiO2 nanocomposite coating. The conformal P3HT coating on the nanocomposite surface does not alter or reduce superhydrophicity while maintaining its reversible enhanced thermochromism. The polymeric matrix of the superhydrophobic surface is comprised of a blend of poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) copolymer and an acrylic adhesive. Based on detailed X-ray diffraction measurements, this long-lasting, repeatable and hysteresis-free thermochromic effect is attributed to the enhancement of the Bragg peak associated with the d-spacing of interchain directional packing (100) which remains unaltered during several heating-cooling cycles. We propose that the superhydrophobic surface confines π–π interchain stacking in P3HT with uniform d-spacing into its nanostructured texture resulting in better packing and reduction in face-on orientation. The rapid response of the system to sudden temperature changes is also demonstrated by water droplet impact and bounce back on heated surfaces. This effect can be exploited for embedded thin film temperature sensors for metal coatings. PMID:27301422

  7. Copernicus: Lunar surface mapper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redd, Frank J.; Anderson, Shaun D.

    1992-01-01

    The Utah State University (USU) 1991-92 Space Systems Design Team has designed a Lunar Surface Mapper (LSM) to parallel the development of the NASA Office of Exploration lunar initiatives. USU students named the LSM 'Copernicus' after the 16th century Polish astronomer, for whom the large lunar crater on the face of the moon was also named. The top level requirements for the Copernicus LSM are to produce a digital map of the lunar surface with an overall resolution of 12 meters (39.4 ft). It will also identify specified local surface features/areas to be mapped at higher resolutions by follow-on missions. The mapping operation will be conducted from a 300 km (186 mi) lunar-polar orbit. Although the entire surface should be mapped within six months, the spacecraft design lifetime will exceed one year with sufficient propellant planned for orbit maintenance in the anomalous lunar gravity field. The Copernicus LSM is a small satellite capable of reaching lunar orbit following launch on a Conestoga launch vehicle which is capable of placing 410 kg (900 lb) into translunar orbit. Upon orbital insertion, the spacecraft will weigh approximately 233 kg (513 lb). This rather severe mass constraint has insured attention to component/subsystem size and mass, and prevented 'requirements creep.' Transmission of data will be via line-of-sight to an earth-based receiving system.

  8. Surface tension and microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meseguer, J.; Sanz-Andrés, A.; Pérez-Grande, I.; Pindado, S.; Franchini, S.; Alonso, G.

    2014-09-01

    The behaviour of confined liquids on board an orbiting spacecraft is mainly driven by surface tension phenomena, which cause an apparently anomalous response of the liquid when compared with the behaviour that can be observed on an Earth laboratory provided that the amount of liquid is high enough. The reason is that in an orbiting spacecraft the different inertial forces acting on the bulk of the liquid are almost zero, causing thus capillary forces to be the dominant ones. Of course, since gravity forces are proportional to the liquid volume, whereas surface tension forces are proportional to the liquid surface, there are situations on Earth where capillarity can be the dominant effect, as it happens when very small volume liquid samples are considered. However, work with small size samples may require the use of sophisticated optical devices. Leaving aside the neutral buoyancy technique, a way of handling large liquid interfaces is by using drop towers, where the sample falls subjected to the action of Earth’s gravity. This approach is suitable when the characteristic time of the problem under consideration is much smaller than the drop time. In this work the transformation of an out-of-use chimney into a drop tower is presented. Because of the miniaturization, hardiness and low cost of current electronic devices, a drop tower can be used as an inexpensive tool for undergraduate students to experimentally analyse a large variety of surface tension driven phenomena.

  9. Surface Analysis and Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    2002-01-01

    This article is a chapter of the book entitled, "Tribology of Mechanical Systems," to be published by ASME Press, New York, NY. It describes selected analytical techniques, which are being used in understanding phenomena and mechanisms of oxidation, adhesion, bonding, friction, erosion, abrasion, and wear, and in defining the problems. The primary emphasis is on microanalytical approaches to engineering surfaces.

  10. Decontaminating metal surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Childs, Everett L.

    1984-11-06

    Radioactively contaminated surfaces can be electrolytically decontaminated with greatly increased efficiencies by using electrolytes containing higher than heretofore conventional amounts of nitrate, e.g.,>600 g/l of NaNO.sub.3, or by using nitrate-containing electrolytes which are acidic, e.g., of a pH<6.

  11. Planetary Surface Instruments Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Charles (Editor); Treiman, Allan H. (Editor); Kostiuk, Theodor (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    This report on planetary surface investigations and planetary landers covers: (1) the precise chemical analysis of solids; (2) isotopes and evolved gas analyses; (3) planetary interiors; planetary atmospheres from within as measured by landers; (4) mineralogical examination of extraterrestrial bodies; (5) regoliths; and (6) field geology/processes.

  12. Surface Traffic Management Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jung, Yoo Chul

    2012-01-01

    This presentation discusses an overview of the surface traffic management research conducted by NASA Ames. The concept and human-in-the-loop simulation of the Spot and Runway Departure Advisor (SARDA), an integrated decision support tool for the tower controllers and airline ramp operators, is also discussed.

  13. Decontaminating metal surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Childs, E.L.

    1984-01-23

    Radioactively contaminated surfaces can be electrolytically decontaminated with greatly increased efficiencies by using electrolytes containing higher than heretofore conventional amounts of nitrate, e.g., >600 g/1 of NaNO/sub 3/, or by using nitrate-containing electrolytes which are acidic, e.g., of a pH < 6.

  14. Binocular visual surface perception.

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, K

    1996-01-01

    Binocular disparity, the differential angular separation between pairs of image points in the two eyes, is the well-recognized basis for binocular distance perception. Without denying disparity's role in perceiving depth, we describe two perceptual phenomena, which indicate that a wider view of binocular vision is warranted. First, we show that disparity can play a critical role in two-dimensional perception by determining whether separate image fragments should be grouped as part of a single surface or segregated as parts of separate surfaces. Second, we show that stereoscopic vision is not limited to the registration and interpretation of binocular disparity but that it relies on half-occluded points, visible to one eye and not the other, to determine the layout and transparency of surfaces. Because these half-visible points are coded by neurons carrying eye-of-origin information, we suggest that the perception of these surface properties depends on neural activity available at visual cortical area V1. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:8570607

  15. Surface and submicron physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, H. A.

    1982-04-01

    Subjects discussed at the annual radiological/physics contractors meeting held in Gettysburg, Pa., 4 May 1982 are presented. The following research projects are briefly described: resonance ionization mass spectroscopy, an extreme uv transmission grating monochrometers, electron attenuation lengths in solids, surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy, and easy events in irradiated liquid water.

  16. Random rough surface photofabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brissonneau, Vincent; Escoubas, Ludovic; Flory, François; Berginc, Gérard

    2011-10-01

    Random rough surfaces are of primary interest for their optical properties: reducing reflection at the interface or obtaining specific scattering diagram for example. Thus controlling surface statistics during the fabrication process paves the way to original and specific behaviors of reflected optical waves. We detail an experimental method allowing the fabrication of random rough surfaces showing tuned statistical properties. A two-step photoresist exposure process was developed. In order to initiate photoresist polymerization, an energy threshold needs to be reached by light exposure. This energy is brought by a uniform exposure equipment comprising UV-LEDs. This pre-exposure is studied by varying parameters such as optical power and exposure time. The second step consists in an exposure based on the Gray method.1 The speckle pattern of an enlarged scattered laser beam is used to insolate the photoresist. A specific photofabrication bench using an argon ion laser was implemented. Parameters such as exposure time and distances between optical components are discussed. Then, we describe how we modify the speckle-based exposure bench to include a spatial light modulator (SLM). The SLM used is a micromirror matrix known as Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) which allows spatial modulation by displaying binary images. Thus, the spatial beam shape can be tuned and so the speckle pattern on the photoresist is modified. As the photoresist photofabricated surface is correlated to the speckle pattern used to insolate, the roughness parameters can be adjusted.

  17. Surface Mesohighs and Mesolows.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Richard H.

    2001-01-01

    Through detailed and remarkably insightful analyses of surface data, Tetsuya Theodore Fujita pioneered modern mesoanalysis, unraveling many of the mysteries of severe storms. In this paper Fujita's contributions to the analysis and description of surface pressure features accompanying tornadic storms and squall lines are reviewed.On the scale of individual thunderstorm cells Fujita identified pressure couplets: a mesolow associated with the tornado cyclone and a mesohigh in the adjacent heavy precipitation area to the north. On larger scales, he found that squall lines contain mesohighs associated with the convective line and wake depressions (now generally called wake lows) to the rear of storms. Fujita documented the structure and life cycles of these phenomena using time-to-space conversion of barograph data.Subsequent investigations have borne out many of Fujita's findings of nearly 50 years ago. His analyses of the surface pressure field accompanying tornadic supercells have been validated by later studies, in part because of the advent of mobile mesonetworks. The analyses of squall-line mesohighs and wake lows have been confirmed and extended, particularly by advances in radar observations. These surface pressure features appear to be linked to processes both in the convective line and attendant stratiform precipitation regions, as well as to rear-inflow jets, gravity currents, and gravity waves, but specific roles of each of these phenomena in the formation of mesohighs and wake lows have yet to be fully resolved.

  18. Active frequency selective surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchwald, Walter R.; Hendrickson, Joshua; Cleary, Justin W.; Guo, Junpeng

    2013-05-01

    Split ring resonator arrays are investigated for use as active elements for the realization of voltage controllable frequency selective surfaces. Finite difference time domain simulations suggest the absorptive and reflective properties of such surfaces can be externally controlled through modifications of the split ring resonator gap impedance. In this work, such voltage-controlled resonance tuning is obtained through the addition of an appropriately designed high electron mobility transistor positioned across the split ring resonator gap. It is shown that a 0.5μm gate length high electron mobility transistor allows voltage controllable switching between the two resonant conditions associated with a split ring resonator and that of a closed loop geometry when the surface is illuminated with THz radiation. Partial switching between these two resonant conditions is observed at larger gate lengths. Such active frequency selective surfaces are proposed, for example, for use as modulators in THz detection schemes and as RF filters in radar applications when scaled to operate at GHz frequencies.

  19. Managing Surface Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marable, Michele A.; Raimondi, Sharon L.

    1995-01-01

    Nonverbal and verbal techniques that teachers can use to manage surface behaviors are suggested, including planned ignoring, eye contact, facial expression, body posture, close proximity, touch control, limitation of space, redirection to another activity, ventilation, distraction, understanding and reassurance, modeling, humor, one-to-one…

  20. Titan's surface and atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Alexander G.; Soderblom, Jason M.; Ádámkovics, Máté

    2016-05-01

    Since its arrival in late 2004, the NASA/ESA Cassini-Huygens mission to Saturn has revealed Titan to be a world that is both strange and familiar. Titan is the only extraterrestrial body known to support standing bodies of stable liquid on its surface and, along with Earth and early Mars, is one of three places in the Solar System known to have had an active hydrologic cycle. With atmospheric pressures of 1.5 bar and temperatures of 90-95 K at the surface, methane and ethane condense out of Titan's nitrogen-dominated atmosphere and flow as liquids on the surface. Despite vast differences in environmental conditions and materials from Earth, Titan's methane-based hydrologic cycle drives climatic and geologic processes which generate landforms that are strikingly similar to their terrestrial counterparts, including vast equatorial dunes, well-organized channel networks that route material through erosional and depositional landscapes, and lakes and seas of liquid hydrocarbons. These similarities make Titan a natural laboratory for studying the processes that shape terrestrial landscapes and drive climates, probing extreme conditions impossible to recreate in earthbound laboratories. Titan's exotic environment ensures that even rudimentary measurements of atmospheric/surface interactions, such as wind-wave generation or aeolian dune development, provide valuable data to anchor physical models.

  1. Surface complexation modeling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adsorption-desorption reactions are important processes that affect the transport of contaminants in the environment. Surface complexation models are chemical models that can account for the effects of variable chemical conditions, such as pH, on adsorption reactions. These models define specific ...

  2. Computer aided surface representation

    SciTech Connect

    Barnhill, R.E.

    1991-04-02

    Modern computing resources permit the generation of large amounts of numerical data. These large data sets, if left in numerical form, can be overwhelming. Such large data sets are usually discrete points from some underlying physical phenomenon. Because we need to evaluate the phenomenon at places where we don't have data, a continuous representation (a surface'') is required. A simple example is a weather map obtained from a discrete set of weather stations. (For more examples including multi-dimensional ones, see the article by Dr. Rosemary Chang in the enclosed IRIS Universe). In order to create a scientific structure encompassing the data, we construct an interpolating mathematical surface which can evaluate at arbitrary locations. We can also display and analyze the results via interactive computer graphics. In our research we construct a very wide variety of surfaces for applied geometry problems that have sound theoretical foundations. However, our surfaces have the distinguishing feature that they are constructed to solve short or long term practical problems. This DOE-funded project has developed the premiere research team in the subject of constructing surfaces (3D and higher dimensional) that provide smooth representations of real scientific and engineering information, including state of the art computer graphics visualizations. However, our main contribution is in the development of fundamental constructive mathematical methods and visualization techniques which can be incorporated into a wide variety of applications. This project combines constructive mathematics, algorithms, and computer graphics, all applied to real problems. The project is a unique resource, considered by our peers to be a de facto national center for this type of research.

  3. Surface Water in Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oki, Delwyn S.

    2003-01-01

    Surface water in Hawaii is a valued resource as well as a potential threat to human lives and property. The surface-water resources of Hawaii are of significant economic, ecologic, cultural, and aesthetic importance. Streams supply more than 50 percent of the irrigation water in Hawaii, and although streams supply only a few percent of the drinking water statewide, surface water is the main source of drinking water in some places. Streams also are a source of hydroelectric power, provide important riparian and instream habitats for many unique native species, support traditional and customary Hawaiian gathering rights and the practice of taro cultivation, and possess valued aesthetic qualities. Streams affect the physical, chemical, and aesthetic quality of receiving waters, such as estuaries, bays, and nearshore waters, which are critical to the tourism-based economy of the islands. Streams in Hawaii pose a danger because of their flashy nature; a stream's stage, or water level, can rise several feet in less than an hour during periods of intense rainfall. Streams in Hawaii are flashy because rainfall is intense, drainage basins are small, basins and streams are steep, and channel storage is limited. Streamflow generated during periods of heavy rainfall has led to loss of property and human lives in Hawaii. Most Hawaiian streams originate in the mountainous interiors of the islands and terminate at the coast. Streams are significant sculptors of the Hawaiian landscape because of the erosive power of the water they convey. In geologically young areas, such as much of the southern part of the island of Hawaii, well-defined stream channels have not developed because the permeability of the surface rocks generally is so high that rainfall infiltrates before flowing for significant distances on the surface. In geologically older areas that have received significant rainfall, streams and mass wasting have carved out large valleys.

  4. In-surface confinement of topological insulator nanowire surface states

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Fan W.; Jauregui, Luis A.; Tan, Yaohua; Manfra, Michael; Klimeck, Gerhard; Chen, Yong P.; Kubis, Tillmann

    2015-09-21

    The bandstructures of [110] and [001] Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanowires are solved with the atomistic 20 band tight binding functionality of NEMO5. The theoretical results reveal: The popular assumption that all topological insulator (TI) wire surfaces are equivalent is inappropriate. The Fermi velocity of chemically distinct wire surfaces differs significantly which creates an effective in-surface confinement potential. As a result, topological insulator surface states prefer specific surfaces. Therefore, experiments have to be designed carefully not to probe surfaces unfavorable to the surface states (low density of states) and thereby be insensitive to the TI-effects.

  5. Surface-enhanced spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskovits, Martin

    1985-07-01

    In 1978 it was discovered, largely through the work of Fleischmann, Van Duyne, Creighton, and their coworkers that molecules adsorbed on specially prepared silver surfaces produce a Raman spectrum that is at times a millionfold more intense than expected. This effect was dubbed surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Since then the effect has been demonstrated with many molecules and with a number of metals, including Cu, Ag, Au, Li, Na, K, In, Pt, and Rh. In addition, related phenomena such as surface-enhanced second-harmonic generation, four-wave mixing, absorption, and fluorescence have been observed. Although not all fine points of the enhancement mechanism have been clarified, the majority view is that the largest contributor to the intensity amplification results from the electric field enhancement that occurs in the vicinity of small, interacting metal particles that are illuminated with light resonant or near resonant with the localized surface-plasmon frequency of the metal structure. Small in this context is gauged in relation to the wavelength of light. The special preparations required to produce the effect, which include among other techniques electrochemical oxidation-reduction cycling, deposition of metal on very cold substrates, and the generation of metal-island films and colloids, is now understood to be necessary as a means of producing surfaces with appropriate electromagnetic resonances that may couple to electromagnetic fields either by generating rough films (as in the case of the former two examples) or by placing small metal particles in close proximity to one another (as in the case of the latter two). For molecules chemisorbed on SERS-active surface there exists a "chemical enhancement" in addition to the electromagnetic effect. Although difficult to measure accurately, the magnitude of this effect rarely exceeds a factor of 10 and is best thought to arise from the modification of the Raman polarizability tensor of the adsorbate

  6. Surface Enhanced Quantum Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangan, Chitra

    2013-05-01

    Miniaturization of quantum technologies have led to physics that require the marriage of atomic physics and nanomaterials science. Some of the resulting areas of research are hybrid quantum devices, single-molecule spectroscopies, table-top intense field generators, etc. I will present an area of research that I dub ``Surface-enhanced quantum control'' that is an exciting way of controlling light and nanomatter. By combining the electromagnetic enhancement properties of plasmonic nanomaterials with the modification of the atomic properties, we can achieve an unprecedented level of control over quantum dynamics. I will present examples of surface-enhanced state purification, in which quantum states near metal nanostructures can be rapidly purified by the application of a weak near-resonant control field. We gratefully acknowledge support from the NSERC Discovery Grant Program and the NSERC Strategic Network for Bioplasmonic Systems.

  7. Pocked surface neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    McGregor, Douglas; Klann, Raymond

    2003-04-08

    The detection efficiency, or sensitivity, of a neutron detector material such as of Si, SiC, amorphous Si, GaAs, or diamond is substantially increased by forming one or more cavities, or holes, in its surface. A neutron reactive material such as of elemental, or any compound of, .sup.10 B, .sup.6 Li, .sup.6 LiF, U, or Gd is deposited on the surface of the detector material so as to be disposed within the cavities therein. The portions of the neutron reactive material extending into the detector material substantially increase the probability of an energetic neutron reaction product in the form of a charged particle being directed into and detected by the neutron detector material.

  8. Remote surface inspection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayati, S.; Balaram, J.; Seraji, H.; Kim, W. S.; Tso, K.; Prasad, V.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports on an on-going research and development effort in remote surface inspection of space platforms such as the Space Station Freedom (SSF). It describes the space environment and identifies the types of damage for which to search. This paper provides an overview of the Remote Surface Inspection System that was developed to conduct proof-of-concept demonstrations and to perform experiments in a laboratory environment. Specifically, the paper describes three technology areas: (1) manipulator control for sensor placement; (2) automated non-contact inspection to detect and classify flaws; and (3) an operator interface to command the system interactively and receive raw or processed sensor data. Initial findings for the automated and human visual inspection tests are reported.

  9. Cryptosporidiosis and surface water.

    PubMed Central

    Gallaher, M M; Herndon, J L; Nims, L J; Sterling, C R; Grabowski, D J; Hull, H F

    1989-01-01

    In the period July through October, 1986, 78 laboratory-confirmed cases of cryptosporidiosis were identified in New Mexico. To determine possible risk factors for development of this disease, we conducted a case-control study; 24 case-patients and 46 neighborhood controls were interviewed. Seventeen (71 per cent) of the 24 case-patients were females, seven (29%) were males; their ages ranged from 4 months to 44 years, median 3 years. There was a strong association between drinking surface water and illness: five of the 24 case-patients, but none of the 46 controls drank untreated surface water. Among children, illness was also associated with attending a day care center where other children were ill (odds ratio = 13.1). PMID:2909180

  10. Martian surface weathering studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvin, M.

    1973-01-01

    The nature of the Martian surface was characterized by means of its reflectance properties. The Mariner 9 photography was used to establish terrain units which were crossed by the Mariner 6 and 7 paths. The IR reflectance measured by the IR spectrometers on these spacecraft was to be used to indicate the nature of the surface within these units. There is an indication of physical size and/or compositional variation between units but too many natural parameters can vary (size, shape, composition, adsorbed phases, reradiation, atmospheric absorbtion, temperature gradients, etc.) to be certain what effect is causing those variations observed. It is suggested that the characterization could be fruitfully pursued by a group which was dedicated to peeling back the layers of minutia affecting IR reflectance.

  11. NIMS Ganymede Surface Map

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Galileo has eyes that can see more than ours can. By looking at what we call the infrared wavelengths, the NIMS (Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) instrument can determine what type and size of material is on the surface of a moon. Here, 3 images of Ganymede are shown.

    Left: Voyager's camera.

    Middle: NIMS, showing water ice on the surface. Dark is less water, bright is more.

    Right: NIMS, showing the locations of minerals in red, and the size of ice grains in shades of blue.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov.

  12. Discrete Minimal Surface Algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnlind, Joakim; Hoppe, Jens

    2010-05-01

    We consider discrete minimal surface algebras (DMSA) as generalized noncommutative analogues of minimal surfaces in higher dimensional spheres. These algebras appear naturally in membrane theory, where sequences of their representations are used as a regularization. After showing that the defining relations of the algebra are consistent, and that one can compute a basis of the enveloping algebra, we give several explicit examples of DMSAs in terms of subsets of sln (any semi-simple Lie algebra providing a trivial example by itself). A special class of DMSAs are Yang-Mills algebras. The representation graph is introduced to study representations of DMSAs of dimension d ≤ 4, and properties of representations are related to properties of graphs. The representation graph of a tensor product is (generically) the Cartesian product of the corresponding graphs. We provide explicit examples of irreducible representations and, for coinciding eigenvalues, classify all the unitary representations of the corresponding algebras.

  13. Measurement of surface microtopography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, S. D.; Farr, T. G.; Muller, J.-P.; Lewis, P.; Leberl, F. W.

    1991-01-01

    Acquisition of ground truth data for use in microwave interaction modeling requires measurement of surface roughness sampled at intervals comparable to a fraction of the microwave wavelength and extensive enough to adequately represent the statistics of a surface unit. Sub-centimetric measurement accuracy is thus required over large areas, and existing techniques are usually inadequate. A technique is discussed for acquiring the necessary photogrammetric data using twin film cameras mounted on a helicopter. In an attempt to eliminate tedious data reduction, an automated technique was applied to the helicopter photographs, and results were compared to those produced by conventional stereogrammetry. Derived root-mean-square (RMS) roughness for the same stereo-pair was 7.5 cm for the automated technique versus 6.5 cm for the manual method. The principal source of error is probably due to vegetation in the scene, which affects the automated technique but is ignored by a human operator.

  14. Clusters, surfaces, and catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Contreras, Anthony M.; Montano, Max; Rioux, Robert M.

    2006-01-01

    The surface science of heterogeneous metal catalysis uses model systems ranging from single crystals to monodispersed nanoparticles in the 1–10 nm range. Molecular studies reveal that bond activation (C–H, H–H, C–C, CO) occurs at 300 K or below as the active metal sites simultaneously restructure. The strongly adsorbed molecules must be mobile to free up these sites for continued turnover of reaction. Oxide–metal interfaces are also active for catalytic turnover. Examples using C–H and CO activation are described to demonstrate these properties. Future directions include synthesis, characterization, and reaction studies with 2D and 3D monodispersed metal nanoclusters to obtain 100% selectivity in multipath reactions. Investigations of the unique structural, dynamic, and electronic properties of nanoparticles are likely to have major impact in surface technologies. The fields of heterogeneous, enzyme, and homogeneous catalysis are likely to merge for the benefit of all three. PMID:16740668

  15. Lunar Surface Radiation Display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, James; Albalat, Andrea Jaime; Tlustos, Reinhard

    2014-05-01

    Effects of the lunar surface environment can be observed with a simple passive experiment consisting of small material samples placed in view of a lander or rover camera. This paper will describe, advocate and demonstrate the creation, ideally by students or young professionals, of a small standard sample holder, for example a string of different glass beads in front of a white or detector background, that can be replicated and installed on any of the coming series of lunar surface spacecraft. Effects of solar and cosmic ionizing radiation and local temperature, such as darkening and annealing, will be readily apparent in different kinds of glass, plastic and crystalline beads. Costs of preparation and installation, and impact on the main mission, can be kept to a level essentially negligible in proportion to project budgets.

  16. Secure surface identification codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beekhof, F.; Voloshynovskiy, S.; Koval, O.; Villan, R.; Pun, T.

    2008-02-01

    This paper introduces an identification framework for random microstructures of material surfaces. These microstructures represent a kind of unique fingerprints that can be used to track and trace an item as well as for anti-counterfeiting. We first consider the architecture for mobile phone-based item identification and then introduce a practical identification algorithm enabling fast searching in large databases. The proposed algorithm is based on reference list decoding. The link to digital communications and robust perceptual hashing is shown. We consider a practical construction of reference list decoding, which comprizes computational complexity, security, memory storage and performance requirements. The efficiency of the proposed algorithm is demonstrated on experimental data obtained from natural paper surfaces.

  17. Integrated Airport Surface Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koczo, S.

    1998-01-01

    The current air traffic environment in airport terminal areas experiences substantial delays when weather conditions deteriorate to Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC). Research activity at NASA has culminated in the development, flight test and demonstration of a prototype Low Visibility Landing and Surface Operations (LVLASO) system. A NASA led industry team and the FAA developed the system which integrated airport surface surveillance systems, aeronautical data links, DGPS navigation, automation systems, and controller and flight deck displays. The LVLASO system was demonstrated at the Hartsfield-Atlanta International Airport using a Boeing 757-200 aircraft during August, 1997. This report documents the contractors role in this testing particularly in the area of data link and DGPS navigation.

  18. Surface control of flexoelectricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stengel, Massimiliano

    2014-11-01

    The polarization response of a material to a strain gradient, known as flexoelectricity, holds great promise for novel electromechanical applications. Despite considerable recent progress, however, the effect remains poorly understood. From both the fundamental and practical viewpoints, it is of crucial importance to know whether the coupling coefficients are primarily governed by the properties of the bulk material or by the details of the sample surface. Here we provide, by means of first-principles calculations, quantitative evidence supporting the latter scenario. In particular, we demonstrate that a SrTiO3 film can yield a positive or negative voltage upon bending, depending on whether it is terminated by a TiO2 or SrO layer. This result points to a full control of the flexoelectric effect via surface/interface engineering, opening exciting new avenues for device design.

  19. Automated airplane surface generation

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.E.; Cordero, Y.; Jones, W.

    1996-12-31

    An efficient methodology and software axe presented for defining a class of airplane configurations. A small set of engineering design parameters and grid control parameters govern the process. The general airplane configuration has wing, fuselage, vertical tall, horizontal tail, and canard components. Wing, canard, and tail surface grids axe manifested by solving a fourth-order partial differential equation subject to Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. The design variables are incorporated into the boundary conditions, and the solution is expressed as a Fourier series. The fuselage is described by an algebraic function with four design parameters. The computed surface grids are suitable for a wide range of Computational Fluid Dynamics simulation and configuration optimizations. Both batch and interactive software are discussed for applying the methodology.

  20. Surface decontamination compositions and methods

    DOEpatents

    Wright; Karen E.; Cooper, David C.; Peterman, Dean R.; Demmer, Ricky L.; Tripp, Julia L.; Hull, Laurence C.

    2011-03-29

    Clay-based compositions capable of absorbing contaminants from surfaces or objects having surface faces may be applied to a surface and later removed, the removed clay-based compositions absorbing at least a portion of the contaminant from the surface or object to which it was applied.

  1. Smart, passive sun facing surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Hively, Lee M.

    1996-01-01

    An article adapted for selectively utilizing solar radiation comprises an absorptive surface and a reflective surface, the absorptive surface and the reflective surface oriented to absorb solar radiation when the sun is in a relatively low position, and to reflect solar radiation when the sun is in a relatively high position.

  2. Smart, passive sun facing surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Hively, L.M.

    1996-04-30

    An article adapted for selectively utilizing solar radiation comprises an absorptive surface and a reflective surface, the absorptive surface and the reflective surface oriented to absorb solar radiation when the sun is in a relatively low position, and to reflect solar radiation when the sun is in a relatively high position. 17 figs.

  3. Deflation of elastic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quilliet, Catherine; Quemeneur, François; Marmottant, Philippe; Imhof, Arnout; Pépin-Donat, Brigitte; van Blaaderen, Alfons

    2010-03-01

    The deflation of elastic spherical surfaces has been numerically investigated, and show very different types of deformations according the range of elastic parameters, some of them being quantitatively explained through simple calculations. This allows to retrieve various shapes observed on hollow shells (from colloidal to centimeter scale), on lipid vesicles, or on some biological objects. The extension of this process to other geometries allows to modelize vegetal objects such as the ultrafast trap of carnivorous plants.

  4. Cryogenic Selective Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert C.; Nurge, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Under our NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts (NIAC) project we have theoretically demonstrated a novel selective surface that reflects roughly 100 times more solar radiation than any other known coating. If this prediction holds up under experimental tests it will allow cryogenic temperatures to be reached in deep space even in the presence of the sun. It may allow LOX to be carried to the Moon and Mars. It may allow superconductors to be used in deep space without a refrigeration system.

  5. Surface electrical properties experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simmons, Gene; Strangway, David; Annan, Peter; Baker, Richard G.; Bannister, Lawrence; Brown, Raymon; Cooper, William; Cubley, Dean; deBettencourt, Joseph; England, Anthony W.; Groener, John; Kong, Jin-Au; LaTorraca, Gerald; Meyer, James; Nanda, Ved; Redman, David; Rossiter, James; Tsang, Leung; Urner, Joseph; Watts, Raymond

    1973-01-01

    The surface electrical properties (SEP) experiment was used to explore the subsurface material of the Apollo 17 landing site by means of electromagnetic radiation. The experiment was designed to detect electrical layering, discrete scattering bodies, and the possible presence of water. From the analysis of the data, it was expected that values of the electrical properties (dielectric constant and loss tangent) of lunar material in situ would be obtained.

  6. Surface polymerization agents

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, C.; Wilkerson, C.

    1996-12-01

    This is the final report of a 1-year, Laboratory-Directed R&D project at LANL. A joint technical demonstration was proposed between US Army Missile Command (Redstone Arsenal) and LANL. Objective was to demonstrate that an unmanned vehicle or missile could be used as a platform to deliver a surface polymerization agent in such a manner as to obstruct the filters of an air-breathing mechanism, resulting in operational failure.

  7. Laser surface cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    Crivella, E.C.; Freiwald, J.; Freiwald, D.A.

    1996-12-31

    Decontamination of contaminated metal and material recycle, two of 31 priority needs identified by the D&D focus group, are the most promising applications for laser ablation within the DOE complex. F2 Associates has developed a robotic laser ablation system that is capable of high contamination rates, waste volume reduction, surface pore cleaning, and real-time characterization of materials. It is being demonstrated that this system will be the most cost-effective technology for metal decontamination and material recycle.

  8. Surface processes on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arvidson, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    Magellan synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and altimetry data were analyzed to determine the nature and extent of surface modification for venusian plains in the Sedna Planitia, Alpha Regio, and western Ovda Regio areas. Specific cross sections derived from the SAR data were also compared to similar data for dry terrestrial basaltic lava flows (Lunar Crater and Cima volcanic fields) and playas (Lunar and Lavic Lakes) for which microtopographic profiles (i.e., quantitative roughness information) were available.

  9. Laboratory surface astrochemistry experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Frankland, V. L.; Rosu-Finsen, A. Lasne, J.; Collings, M. P.; McCoustra, M. R. S.

    2015-05-15

    Although several research groups have studied the formation of H{sub 2} on interstellar dust grains using surface science techniques, few have explored the formation of more complex molecules. A small number of these reactions produce molecules that remain on the surface of interstellar dust grains and, over time, lead to the formation of icy mantles. The most abundant of these species within the ice is H{sub 2}O and is of particular interest as the observed molecular abundance cannot be accounted for using gas-phase chemistry alone. This article provides a brief introduction to the astronomical implications and motivations behind this research and the requirement for a new dual atomic beam ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) system. Further details of the apparatus design, characterisation, and calibration of the system are provided along with preliminary data from atomic O and O{sub 2} beam dosing on bare silica substrate and subsequent temperature programmed desorption measurements. The results obtained in this ongoing research may enable more chemically accurate surface formation mechanisms to be deduced for this and other species before simulating the kinetic data under interstellar conditions.

  10. Surface profiling interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Takacs, Peter Z.; Qian, Shi-Nan

    1989-01-01

    The design of a long-trace surface profiler for the non-contact measurement of surface profile, slope error and curvature on cylindrical synchrotron radiation (SR) mirrors. The optical system is based upon the concept of a pencil-beam interferometer with an inherent large depth-of-field. The key feature of the optical system is the zero-path-difference beam splitter, which separates the laser beam into two colinear, variable-separation probe beams. A linear array detector is used to record the interference fringe in the image, and analysis of the fringe location as a function of scan position allows one to reconstruct the surface profile. The optical head is mounted on an air bearing slide with the capability to measure long aspheric optics, typical of those encountered in SR applications. A novel feature of the optical system is the use of a transverse "outrigger" beam which provides information on the relative alignment of the scan axis to the cylinder optic symmetry axis.

  11. Mapping stellar surface features

    SciTech Connect

    Noah, P.V.

    1987-01-01

    New photometric and spectroscopic observations of the RS Canum Venaticorum binaries Sigma Geminorum and UX Arietis are reported along with details of the Doppler-imaging program SPOTPROF. The observations suggest that the starspot activity on Sigma Gem has decreased to 0.05 magnitude in two years. A photometric spot model for September 1984 to January 1985 found that a single spot covering 2% of the surface and 1000 K cooler than the surrounding photosphere could model the light variations. Equivalent-width observations contemporaneous with the photometric observations did not show any significant variations. Line-profile models from SPOTPROF predict that the variation of the equivalent width of the 6393 A Fe I line should be approx. 1mA. Photometric observations of UX Ari from January 1984 to March 1985 show an 0.3 magnitude variation indicating a large spot group must cover the surface. Contemporaneous spectroscopic observations show asymmetric line profiles. The Doppler imaging and the photometric light-curve models were used in an iterative method to describe the stellar surface-spot distribution and successfully model both the photometric and the spectroscopic variations.

  12. Antifungal nanoparticles and surfaces.

    PubMed

    Paulo, Cristiana S O; Vidal, Maria; Ferreira, Lino S

    2010-10-11

    Nosocomial fungal infections, an increasing healthcare concern worldwide, are often associated with medical devices. We have developed antifungal nanoparticle conjugates that can act in suspension or attach to a surface, efficiently killing fungi. For that purpose, we immobilized covalently amphotericin B (AmB), a potent antifungal agent approved by the FDA, widely used in clinical practice and effective against a large spectrum of fungi, into silica nanoparticles. These antifungal nanoparticle conjugates are fungicidal against several strains of Candida sp., mainly by contact. In addition, they can be reused up to 5 cycles without losing their activity. Our results show that the antifungal nanoparticle conjugates are more fungistatic and fungicidal than 10 nm colloidal silver. The antifungal activity of the antifungal nanoparticle conjugates is maintained when they are immobilized on a surface using a chemical adhesive formed by polydopamine. The antifungal nanocoatings have no hemolytic or cytotoxic effect against red blood cells and blood mononuclear cells, respectively. Surfaces coated with these antifungal nanoparticle conjugates can be very useful to render medical devices with antifungal properties. PMID:20845938

  13. High surface area calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, L. N.; Andersson, M. P.; Dalby, K. N.; Müter, D.; Okhrimenko, D. V.; Fordsmand, H.; Stipp, S. L. S.

    2013-05-01

    Calcite (CaCO3) is important in many fields—in nature, because it is a component of aquifers, oil reservoirs and prospective CO2 storage sites, and in industry, where it is used in products as diverse as paper, toothpaste, paint, plastic and aspirin. It is difficult to obtain high purity calcite with a high surface area but such material is necessary for industrial applications and for fundamental calcite research. Commercial powder is nearly always contaminated with growth inhibitors such as sugars, citrate or pectin and most laboratory synthesis methods deliver large precipitates, often containing vaterite or aragonite. To address this problem, we (i) adapted the method of carbonating a Ca(OH)2 slurry with CO2 gas to develop the first simple, cheap, safe and reproducible procedure using common laboratory equipment, to obtain calcite that reproducibly had a surface area of 14-17 m2/g and (ii) conducted a thorough characterization of the product. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed nanometer scale, rhombohedral crystals. X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and infrared spectroscopy (IR) confirmed highly crystalline, pure calcite that more closely resembles the dimensions of the biogenic calcite produced by algae in coccoliths than other methods for synthesizing calcite. We suggest that this calcite is useful when purity and high surface area are important.

  14. Surface imaging microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogala, Eric W.; Bankman, Isaac N.

    2008-04-01

    The three-dimensional shapes of microscopic objects are becoming increasingly important for battlespace CBRNE sensing. Potential applications of microscopic 3D shape observations include characterization of biological weapon particles and manufacturing of micromechanical components. Aerosol signatures of stand-off lidar systems, using elastic backscatter or polarization, are dictated by the aerosol particle shapes and sizes that must be well characterized in the lab. A low-cost, fast instrument for 3D surface shape microscopy will be a valuable point sensor for biological particle sensing applications. Both the cost and imaging durations of traditional techniques such as confocal microscopes, atomic force microscopes, and electron scanning microscopes are too high. We investigated the feasibility of a low-cost, fast interferometric technique for imaging the 3D surface shape of microscopic objects at frame rates limited only by the camera in the system. The system operates at two laser wavelengths producing two fringe images collected simultaneously by a digital camera, and a specialized algorithm we developed reconstructs the surface map of the microscopic object. The current implementation assembled to test the concept and develop the new 3D reconstruction algorithm has 0.25 micron resolution in the x and y directions, and about 0.1 micron accuracy in the z direction, as tested on a microscopic glass test object manufactured with etching techniques. We describe the interferometric instrument, present the reconstruction algorithm, and discuss further development.

  15. Unoccupied surface states on GaP(111) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamza, Alex V.

    1993-06-01

    Unoccupied surface electronic states have been observed on GaP(111) surfaces by momentum- resolved inverse photoemission spectroscopy (IPES). On the GaP(111):P surface an unoccupied state is detected 1.2 eV above the Fermi level. This state is associated with Ga surface adatoms, since prolonged exposure to the incident electron beam removes this IPES feature and reduces the Ga/P ratio in Auger electron spectrum. Preferential photon absorption at 2.27 eV by this surface can be explained by promotion of an electron from the valence band maximum to the unoccupied surface state detected in this work.

  16. Imaging of Surfaces by Concurrent Surface Plasmon Resonance and Surface Plasmon Resonance-Enhanced Fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Thariani, Rahber; Yager, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance imaging and surface plasmon induced fluorescent are sensitive tools for surface analysis. However, existing instruments in this area have provided limited capability for concurrent detection, and may be large and expensive. We demonstrate a highly cost-effective system capable of concurrent surface plasmon resonance microscopy (SPRM) and surface plasmon resonance-enhanced fluorescence (SPRF) imaging, allowing for simultaneous monitoring of reflectivity and fluorescence from discrete spatial regions. The instrument allows for high performance imaging and quantitative measurements with surface plasmon resonance, and surface plasmon induced fluorescence, with inexpensive off-the-shelf components. PMID:20360841

  17. Surface forces: Surface roughness in theory and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, Drew F. Walsh, Rick B.; Craig, Vincent S. J.

    2014-04-28

    A method of incorporating surface roughness into theoretical calculations of surface forces is presented. The model contains two chief elements. First, surface roughness is represented as a probability distribution of surface heights around an average surface height. A roughness-averaged force is determined by taking an average of the classic flat-surface force, weighing all possible separation distances against the probability distributions of surface heights. Second the model adds a repulsive contact force due to the elastic contact of asperities. We derive a simple analytic expression for the contact force. The general impact of roughness is to amplify the long range behaviour of noncontact (DLVO) forces. The impact of the elastic contact force is to provide a repulsive wall which is felt at a separation between surfaces that scales with the root-mean-square (RMS) roughness of the surfaces. The model therefore provides a means of distinguishing between “true zero,” where the separation between the average centres of each surface is zero, and “apparent zero,” defined by the onset of the repulsive contact wall. A normal distribution may be assumed for the surface probability distribution, characterised by the RMS roughness measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Alternatively the probability distribution may be defined by the histogram of heights measured by AFM. Both methods of treating surface roughness are compared against the classic smooth surface calculation and experimental AFM measurement.

  18. Laser heterodyne surface profiler

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, G.E.

    1980-06-16

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for testing the deviation of the face of an object from a flat smooth surface using a beam of coherent light of two plane-polarized components, one of a frequency constantly greater than the other by a fixed amount to produce a difference frequency with a constant phase to be used as a reference, and splitting the beam into its two components. The separate components are directed onto spaced apart points on the face of the object to be tested for smoothness while the face of the object is rotated on an axis normal to one point, thereby passing the other component over a circular track on the face of the object. The two components are recombined after reflection to produce a reflected frequency difference of a phase proportional to the difference in path length of one component reflected from one point to the other component reflected from the other point. The phase of the reflected frequency difference is compared with the reference phase to produce a signal proportional to the deviation of the height of the surface along the circular track with respect to the fixed point at the center, thereby to produce a signal that is plotted as a profile of the surface along the circular track. The phase detector includes a quarter-wave plate to convert the components of the reference beam into circularly polarized components, a half-wave plate to shift the phase of the circularly polarized components, and a polarizer to produce a signal of a shifted phase for comparison with the phase of the frequency difference of the reflected components detected through a second polarizer. Rotation of the half-wave plate can be used for phase adjustment over a full 360/sup 0/ range.

  19. Nature Inspired Surface Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubner, Michael

    2011-04-01

    Materials Scientists more and more are looking to nature for clues on how to create highly functional surface coatings with exceptional properties. The fog harvesting capabilities of the Namib Desert beetle, the beautiful iridescent colors of the hummingbird, and the super water repellant abilities of the Lotus leaf are but a few examples of the amazing properties developed over many years in the natural world. Nature also makes extensive use of the pH-dependent behavior of weak functional groups such as carboxylic acid and amine functional groups. This presentation will explore synthetic mimics to the nano- and microstructures responsible for these fascinating properties. For example, we have demonstrated a pH-induced porosity transition that can be used to create porous films with pore sizes that are tunable from the nanometer scale to the multiple micron scale. The pores of these films, either nano- or micropores, can be reversibly opened and closed by changes in solution pH. The ability to engineer pH-gated porosity transitions in heterostructured thin films has led to the demonstration of broadband anti-reflection coatings that mimic the anti-reflection properties of the moth eye and pH-tunable Bragg reflectors with a structure and function similar to that found in hummingbird wings and the Longhorn beetle. In addition, the highly textured honeycomb-like surfaces created by the formation of micron-scale pores are ideally suited for the creation of superhydrophobic surfaces that mimic the behavior of the self-cleaning lotus leaf. The development of synthetic "backbacks" on immune system cells that may one day ferry drugs to disease sites will also be discussed.

  20. The martian surface.

    PubMed

    Opik, E J

    1966-07-15

    With the scarcity of factual data and the difficulty of applying crucial tests, many of the properties of the Martian surface remain a mystery; the planet may become a source of great surprises in the future. In the following, the conclusions are enumerated more or less in the order of their reliability, the more certain ones first, conjectures or ambiguous interpretations coming last. Even if they prove to be wrong, they may serve as a stimulus for further investigation. Impact craters on Mars, from collisions with nearby asteroids and other stray bodies, were predicted 16 years ago (5-7) and are now verified by the Mariner IV pictures. The kink in the frequency curve of Martian crater diameters indicates that those larger than 20 kilometers could have survived aeolian erosion since the "beginning." They indicate an erosion rate 30 times slower than that in terrestrial deserts and 70 times faster than micrometeorite erosion on the moon. The observed number, per unit area, of Martian craters larger than 20 kilometers exceeds 4 times that calculated from the statistical theory of interplanetary collisions with the present population of stray bodies and for a time interval of 4500 million years, even when allowance is made for the depletion of the Martian group of asteroids, which were more numerous in the past. This, and the low eroded rims of the Martian craters suggest that many of the craters have survived almost since the formation of the crust. Therefore, Mars could not have possessed a dense atmosphere for any length of time. If there was abundant water for the first 100 million years or so, before it escaped it could have occurred only in the solid state as ice and snow, with but traces of vapor in the atmosphere, on account of the low temperature caused by the high reflectivity of clouds and snow. For Martian life there is thus the dilemma: with water, it is too cold; without, too dry. The crater density on Mars, though twice that in lunar maria, is much

  1. Aircraft surface coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Liquid, spray on elastomeric polyurethanes are selected and investigated as best candidates for aircraft external protective coatings. Flight tests are conducted to measure drag effects of these coatings compared to paints and a bare metal surface. The durability of two elastometric polyurethanes are assessed in airline flight service evaluations. Laboratory tests are performed to determine corrosion protection properties, compatibility with aircraft thermal anti-icing systems, the effect of coating thickness on erosion durability, and the erosion characteristics of composite leading edges-bare and coated. A cost and benefits assessment is made to determine the economic value of various coating configurations to the airlines.

  2. Aircraft surface coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A series of studies in which films and liquid spray-on materials were evaluated in the laboratory for transport aircraft external surface coatings are summarized. Elastomeric polyurethanes were found to best meet requirements. Two commercially available products, CAAPCO B-274 and Chemglaze M313, were subjected to further laboratory testing, airline service evaluations, and drag-measurement flight tests. It was found that these coatings were compatible with the severe operating environment of airlines and that coatings reduced airplane drag. An economic analysis indicated significant dollar benefits to airlines from application of the coatings.

  3. Stability at the surface

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, Scott A.

    2014-12-05

    Metal oxides are ubiquitous as minerals in the terrestrial environment, as well as in a variety of technologically important structures such as electronic devices and heterogeneous catalysts. Within these various contexts, interfaces between oxides and gases, liquids and solids drive many critically important phenomena ranging from the uptake of contaminants in groundwater by redox-active minerals to the switching of the millions of transistors found in every cell phone and computer. Function is tied to structure. Therefore, fundamental understanding of the structure of oxide surfaces and interfaces is of crucial importance to the comprehension of a plethora of phenomena involving this broad class of materials.

  4. Surface modified aerogel monoliths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leventis, Nicholas (Inventor); Johnston, James C. (Inventor); Kuczmarski, Maria A. (Inventor); Meador, Mary Ann B. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    This invention comprises reinforced aerogel monoliths such as silica aerogels having a polymer coating on its outer geometric surface boundary, and to the method of preparing said aerogel monoliths. The polymer coatings on the aerogel monoliths are derived from polymer precursors selected from the group consisting of isocyanates as a precursor, precursors of epoxies, and precursors of polyimides. The coated aerogel monoliths can be modified further by encapsulating the aerogel with the polymer precursor reinforced with fibers such as carbon or glass fibers to obtain mechanically reinforced composite encapsulated aerogel monoliths.

  5. Martian Surface Beneath Phoenix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This is an image of the Martian surface beneath NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander. The image was taken by Phoenix's Robotic Arm Camera (RAC) on the eighth Martian day of the mission, or Sol 8 (June 2, 2008). The light feature in the middle of the image below the leg is informally called 'Holy Cow.' The dust, shown in the dark foreground, has been blown off of 'Holy Cow' by Phoenix's thruster engines.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  6. TREATMENT OF URANIUM SURFACES

    DOEpatents

    Slunder, C.J.

    1959-02-01

    An improved process is presented for prcparation of uranium surfaces prior to electroplating. The surfacc of the uranium to be electroplated is anodized in a bath comprising a solution of approximately 20 to 602 by weight of phosphoric acid which contains about 20 cc per liter of concentrated hydrochloric acid. Anodization is carried out for approximately 20 minutes at a current density of about 0.5 amperes per square inch at a temperature of about 35 to 45 C. The oxidic film produced by anodization is removed by dipping in strong nitric acid, followed by rinsing with water just prior to electroplating.

  7. Semiconductor surface protection material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packard, R. D. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A method and a product for protecting semiconductor surfaces is disclosed. The protective coating material is prepared by heating a suitable protective resin with an organic solvent which is solid at room temperature and converting the resulting solution into sheets by a conventional casting operation. Pieces of such sheets of suitable shape and thickness are placed on the semiconductor areas to be coated and heat and vacuum are then applied to melt the sheet and to drive off the solvent and cure the resin. A uniform adherent coating, free of bubbles and other defects, is thus obtained exactly where it is desired.

  8. Monitoring the analytic surface.

    PubMed

    Spence, D P; Mayes, L C; Dahl, H

    1994-01-01

    How do we listen during an analytic hour? Systematic analysis of the speech patterns of one patient (Mrs. C.) strongly suggests that the clustering of shared pronouns (e.g., you/me) represents an important aspect of the analytic surface, preconsciously sensed by the analyst and used by him to determine when to intervene. Sensitivity to these patterns increases over the course of treatment, and in a final block of 10 hours shows a striking degree of contingent responsivity: specific utterances by the patient are consistently echoed by the analyst's interventions. PMID:8182248

  9. Multilayer Relaxation and Surface Energies of Metallic Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Rodriguez, Agustin M.; Ferrante, John

    1994-01-01

    The perpendicular and parallel multilayer relaxations of fcc (210) surfaces are studied using equivalent crystal theory (ECT). A comparison with experimental and theoretical results is made for AI(210). The effect of uncertainties in the input parameters on the magnitudes and ordering of surface relaxations for this semiempirical method is estimated. A new measure of surface roughness is proposed. Predictions for the multilayer relaxations and surface energies of the (210) face of Cu and Ni are also included.

  10. Surface photovoltage spectroscopy applied to gallium arsenide surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bynik, C. E.

    1975-01-01

    The experimental and theoretical basis for surface photovoltage spectroscopy is outlined. Results of this technique applied to gallium arsenide surfaces, are reviewed and discussed. The results suggest that in gallium arsenide the surface voltage may be due to deep bulk impurity acceptor states that are pinned at the Fermi level at the surface. Establishment of the validity of this model will indicate the direction to proceed to increase the efficiency of gallium arsenide solar cells.

  11. Surface tension of spherical drops from surface of tension

    SciTech Connect

    Homman, A.-A.; Bourasseau, E.; Malfreyt, P.; Strafella, L.; Ghoufi, A.

    2014-01-21

    The determination of surface tension of curved interfaces is a topic that raised many controversies during the last century. Explicit liquid-vapor interface modelling (ELVI) was unable up to now to reproduce interfacial behaviors in drops due to ambiguities in the mechanical definition of the surface tension. In this work, we propose a thermodynamic approach based on the location of surface of tension and its use in the Laplace equation to extract the surface tension of spherical interfaces from ELVI modelling.

  12. Surface tension of spherical drops from surface of tension.

    PubMed

    Homman, A-A; Bourasseau, E; Stoltz, G; Malfreyt, P; Strafella, L; Ghoufi, A

    2014-01-21

    The determination of surface tension of curved interfaces is a topic that raised many controversies during the last century. Explicit liquid-vapor interface modelling (ELVI) was unable up to now to reproduce interfacial behaviors in drops due to ambiguities in the mechanical definition of the surface tension. In this work, we propose a thermodynamic approach based on the location of surface of tension and its use in the Laplace equation to extract the surface tension of spherical interfaces from ELVI modelling.

  13. Laser heterodyne surface profiler

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    1984-01-01

    Method and apparatus for testing the deviation of the face of an object from a flat smooth surface using a laser beam having two plane-polarized components, one of a frequency greater than the other to produce a difference frequency with a phase to be used as a reference. The beam also is split into its two components which are directed onto spaced apart points on the face of the object. The object is rotated on an axis coincident with one component as a reference. The other component follows a circular track on the face of the object as the object is rotated. The two components are recombined after reflection to produce a difference frequency having a phase that is shifted in an amount that is proportional to the difference in path length as compared to the reference phase to produce an electrical output signal proportional to the deviation of the height of the surface along the circular track. The output signal is generated by means of a phase detector that includes a first photodetector in the path of the recombined components and a second photodetector in the path of the reference phase. The output signal is dependent on the phase difference of the two photodetector signals. A polarizer, a quarter-wave plate and a half-wave plate are in series in the path of the reference phase. Rotation of the half-wave plate can be used for phase adjustment over a full 360.degree. range for initial calibration of the apparatus.

  14. SUPER HARD SURFACED POLYMERS

    SciTech Connect

    Mansur, Louis K; Bhattacharya, R; Blau, Peter Julian; Clemons, Art; Eberle, Cliff; Evans, H B; Janke, Christopher James; Jolly, Brian C; Lee, E H; Leonard, Keith J; Trejo, Rosa M; Rivard, John D

    2010-01-01

    High energy ion beam surface treatments were applied to a selected group of polymers. Of the six materials in the present study, four were thermoplastics (polycarbonate, polyethylene, polyethylene terephthalate, and polystyrene) and two were thermosets (epoxy and polyimide). The particular epoxy evaluated in this work is one of the resins used in formulating fiber reinforced composites for military helicopter blades. Measures of mechanical properties of the near surface regions were obtained by nanoindentation hardness and pin on disk wear. Attempts were also made to measure erosion resistance by particle impact. All materials were hardness tested. Pristine materials were very soft, having values in the range of approximately 0.1 to 0.5 GPa. Ion beam treatment increased hardness by up to 50 times compared to untreated materials. For reference, all materials were hardened to values higher than those typical of stainless steels. Wear tests were carried out on three of the materials, PET, PI and epoxy. On the ion beam treated epoxy no wear could be detected, whereas the untreated material showed significant wear.

  15. Laser heterodyne surface profiler

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    1982-01-01

    A method and apparatus is disclosed for testing the deviation of the face of an object from a flat smooth surface using a beam of coherent light of two plane-polarized components, one of a frequency constantly greater than the other by a fixed amount to produce a difference frequency with a constant phase to be used as a reference. The beam also is split into its two components with the separate components directed onto spaced apart points onthe face of the object to be tested for smoothness. The object is rotated on an axis coincident with one component which is directed to the face of the object at the center which constitutes a virtual fixed point. This component also is used as a reference. The other component follows a circular track on the face of the object as the object is rotated. The two components are recombined after reflection to produce a reflected frequency difference of a phase proportional to the difference in path length which is compared with the reference phase to produce a signal proportional to the deviation of the height of the surface along the circular track with respect to the fixed point at the center.

  16. Global Surface Temperature Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, J.; Ruedy, R.; Sato, M.; Lo, K.

    2010-12-01

    We update the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) analysis of global surface temperature change, compare alternative analyses, and address questions about perception and reality of global warming. Satellite-observed night lights are used to identify measurement stations located in extreme darkness and adjust temperature trends of urban and periurban stations for nonclimatic factors, verifying that urban effects on analyzed global change are small. Because the GISS analysis combines available sea surface temperature records with meteorological station measurements, we test alternative choices for the ocean data, showing that global temperature change is sensitive to estimated temperature change in polar regions where observations are limited. We use simple 12 month (and n × 12) running means to improve the information content in our temperature graphs. Contrary to a popular misconception, the rate of warming has not declined. Global temperature is rising as fast in the past decade as in the prior 2 decades, despite year-to-year fluctuations associated with the El Niño-La Niña cycle of tropical ocean temperature. Record high global 12 month running mean temperature for the period with instrumental data was reached in 2010.

  17. Surface Characterization and Contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.

    1999-01-01

    Nondestructive characterization of surface contamination can play an extremely important role in improving quality in manufacturing processes. This area of interest led to the formation of a Surface Contamination Analysis Team (SCAT) at Marshall Space Flight Center, which is primarily concerned with critical bondlines and has provided the major focus for activities under this grant. In addition, determining minute levels of contamination on emerging aerospace systems fabricated from composites has also been an area of interest for which the methods being presented here can be used. Important considerations for the inspection methodologies are good sensitivity, large area coverage, robustness, portability and ease of use for normal production personnel. In parallel with the evaluation of detection methods, considerable effort has been made to developing good, uniform contamination films to use as calibration standards. This activity within itself has presented unique challenges. The development of NIR methods for detecting and identifying contaminants has been in progress for several years. Cooperative efforts between the University, NASA, and Thiokol Corporation has shown some useful results for implementation in both laboratory and on-line procedures.

  18. The Martian surface layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, Philip R.; Moore, Henry J.

    1992-01-01

    The global characteristics of the Martian surface layer are discussed on the basis of thermal, albedo, color, and radar data for the region between approximately 60 deg S and 60 deg N. Thermal data reveal the presence of large low- and high-inertia regions of the northern hemisphere, with much of the south covered by material of moderate inertia. There is a strong anticorrelation between inertia and albedo, a correlation between inertia and rock abundance, and, over much of the planet, a correlation of radar-derived density with inertia. Viking Orbiter color data indicate the presence of three major surface materials: low-inertia, bright-red material that is presumably dust; high-inertia, dark-grey material interpreted to be lithic material mixed with palagonitelike dust; and moderate-inertia, dark-red material that is rough at subpixel scales and interpreted to be indurated. Observations from the Viking landing sites show rocks, fines of varying cohesion and crusts. These sites have indications of aeolian erosion and deposition in the recent past.

  19. Upscaling and downscaling of land surface fluxes with surface temperature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Land surface temperature (LST) is a key surface boundary condition that is significantly correlated to surface flux partitioning between latent and sensible heat. The spatial and temporal variation in LST is driven by radiation, wind, vegetation cover and roughness as well as soil moisture status ...

  20. Test surfaces useful for calibration of surface profilometers

    DOEpatents

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V; McKinney, Wayne R; Takacs, Peter Z

    2013-12-31

    The present invention provides for test surfaces and methods for calibration of surface profilometers, including interferometric and atomic force microscopes. Calibration is performed using a specially designed test surface, or the Binary Pseudo-random (BPR) grating (array). Utilizing the BPR grating (array) to measure the power spectral density (PSD) spectrum, the profilometer is calibrated by determining the instrumental modulation transfer.

  1. Smooth surfaces from bilinear patches: Discrete affine minimal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Käferböck, Florian; Pottmann, Helmut

    2013-06-01

    Motivated by applications in freeform architecture, we study surfaces which are composed of smoothly joined bilinear patches. These surfaces turn out to be discrete versions of negatively curved affine minimal surfaces and share many properties with their classical smooth counterparts. We present computational design approaches and study special cases which should be interesting for the architectural application.

  2. Attraction between hydrated hydrophilic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanduč, Matej; Schneck, Emanuel; Netz, Roland R.

    2014-08-01

    According to common knowledge, hydrophilic surfaces repel via hydration forces while hydrophobic surfaces attract, but mounting experimental evidence suggests that also hydrophilic surfaces can attract. Using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations at prescribed water chemical potential we study the crossover from hydration repulsion to hydrophobic attraction for planar polar surfaces of varying stiffness and hydrogen-bonding capability. Rescaling the partial charges of the polar surface groups, we cover the complete spectrum from very hydrophobic surfaces (characterized by contact angles θ ≃ 135°) to hydrophilic surfaces exhibiting complete wetting (θ = 0°). Indeed, for a finite range θadh < θ < 90°, we find a regime where hydrophilic surfaces attract at sub-nanometer separation and stably adhere without intervening water. The adhesive contact angle θadh depends on surface type and lies in the range 65° < θadh < 80°, in good agreement with experiments. Analysis of the total number of hydrogen bonds (HBs) formed by water and surface groups rationalizes this crossover between hydration repulsion and hydrophilic attraction in terms of a subtle balance: Highly polar surfaces repel because of strongly bound hydration water, less polar hydrophilic surfaces attract because water-water HBs are preferred over surface-water HBs. Such solvent reorganization forces presumably underlie also other important phenomena, such as selective ion adsorption to interfaces as well as ion pair formation.

  3. Surface properties of beached plastics.

    PubMed

    Fotopoulou, Kalliopi N; Karapanagioti, Hrissi K

    2015-07-01

    Studying plastic characteristics in the marine environment is important to better understand interaction between plastics and the environment. In the present study, high-density polyethylene (HDPE), polyethylene terephalate (PET), and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) samples were collected from the coastal environment in order to study their surface properties. Surface properties such as surface functional groups, surface topography, point of zero charge, and color change are important factors that change during degradation. Eroded HDPE demonstrated an altered surface topography and color and new functional groups. Eroded PET surface was uneven, yellow, and occasionally, colonized by microbes. A decrease in Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) peaks was observed for eroded PET suggesting that degradation had occurred. For eroded PVC, its surface became more lamellar and a new FTIR peak was observed. These surface properties were obtained due to degradation and could be used to explain the interaction between plastics, microbes, and pollutants. PMID:25787219

  4. EPA Permeable Surface Research - Poster

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA recognizes permeable surfaces as an effective post-construction infiltration-based Best Management Practice to mitigate the adverse effects of stormwater runoff. The professional user community conceptually embraces permeable surfaces as a tool for making runoff more closely...

  5. Computer representation of molecular surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Max, N.L.

    1981-07-06

    This review article surveys recent work on computer representation of molecular surfaces. Several different algorithms are discussed for producing vector or raster drawings of space-filling models formed as the union of spheres. Other smoother surfaces are also considered.

  6. Surface properties of beached plastics.

    PubMed

    Fotopoulou, Kalliopi N; Karapanagioti, Hrissi K

    2015-07-01

    Studying plastic characteristics in the marine environment is important to better understand interaction between plastics and the environment. In the present study, high-density polyethylene (HDPE), polyethylene terephalate (PET), and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) samples were collected from the coastal environment in order to study their surface properties. Surface properties such as surface functional groups, surface topography, point of zero charge, and color change are important factors that change during degradation. Eroded HDPE demonstrated an altered surface topography and color and new functional groups. Eroded PET surface was uneven, yellow, and occasionally, colonized by microbes. A decrease in Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) peaks was observed for eroded PET suggesting that degradation had occurred. For eroded PVC, its surface became more lamellar and a new FTIR peak was observed. These surface properties were obtained due to degradation and could be used to explain the interaction between plastics, microbes, and pollutants.

  7. Ion beam texturing of surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.; Robinson, R. S.

    1979-01-01

    Textured surfaces, typically with conical structures, have been produced previously by simultaneously etching a surface and seeding that surface with another material. A theory based on surface diffusion predicts a variation in cone spacing with surface temperature, as well as a critical temperature below which cones will not form. Substantial agreement with theory has been found for several combinations of seed and surface materials, including one with a high sputter yield seed on a low sputter yield surface (gold on aluminum). Coning with this last combination was predicted by the theory for a sufficiently mobile seed material. The existence of a minimum temperature for the formation of cones should also be important to those interested in ion-beam machining smooth surfaces. Elements contained in the environmental contaminants or in the sputtered alloys or compounds may serve as seed material.

  8. Surface engineering with soft matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genzer, Jan

    2005-03-01

    In my presentation, I will outline several novel strategies facilitating the generation of functional polymeric surfaces. In particular, I will present and discuss simple methodologies leading to the formation of complex surface assemblies of surface-tethered polymers with continuous variation of physico- chemical properties (e.g., wettability, molecular weight, grafting density, composition). I will illustrate how these grafted “gradient” surfaces can be utilized to control the spatial distribution of adsorbates, such as nanoparticles and proteins, and administer the proliferation of living cells on the surfaces. Furthermore, I will illustrate how flexible elastomeric networks can be utilized to tailor the grafting density of oligomers or polymers, create responsive (``smart'') surfaces, and generate topographically corrugated surfaces comprising multidimensional cascades of wrinkles. Application of these wrinkled surfaces for material assembly will also be demonstrated.

  9. The surface science of nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boles, Michael A.; Ling, Daishun; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Talapin, Dmitri V.

    2016-02-01

    All nanomaterials share a common feature of large surface-to-volume ratio, making their surfaces the dominant player in many physical and chemical processes. Surface ligands -- molecules that bind to the surface -- are an essential component of nanomaterial synthesis, processing and application. Understanding the structure and properties of nanoscale interfaces requires an intricate mix of concepts and techniques borrowed from surface science and coordination chemistry. Our Review elaborates these connections and discusses the bonding, electronic structure and chemical transformations at nanomaterial surfaces. We specifically focus on the role of surface ligands in tuning and rationally designing properties of functional nanomaterials. Given their importance for biomedical (imaging, diagnostics and therapeutics) and optoelectronic (light-emitting devices, transistors, solar cells) applications, we end with an assessment of application-targeted surface engineering.

  10. Surface Characterization Techniques: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    2002-01-01

    To understand the benefits that surface modifications provide, and ultimately to devise better ones, it is necessary to study the physical, mechanical, and chemical changes they cause. This chapter surveys classical and leading-edge developments in surface structure and property characterization methodologies. The primary emphases are on the use of these techniques as they relate to surface modifications, thin films and coatings, and tribological engineering surfaces and on the implications rather than the instrumentation.

  11. Flow over riblet curved surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loureiro, J. B. R.; Silva Freire, A. P.

    2011-12-01

    The present work studies the mechanics of turbulent drag reduction over curved surfaces by riblets. The effects of surface modification on flow separation over steep and smooth curved surfaces are investigated. Four types of two-dimensional surfaces are studied based on the morphometric parameters that describe the body of a blue whale. Local measurements of mean velocity and turbulence profiles are obtained through laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) and particle image velocimetry (PIV).

  12. Method for lubricating contacting surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Dugger, Michael T.; Ohlhausen, James A.; Asay, David B.; Kim, Seong H.

    2011-12-06

    A method is provided for tribological lubrication of sliding contact surfaces, where two surfaces are in contact and in motion relative to each other, operating in a vapor-phase environment containing at least one alcohol compound at a concentration sufficiently high to provide one monolayer of coverage on at least one of the surfaces, where the alcohol compound continuously reacts at the surface to provide lubrication.

  13. Chemical enhancement of surface deposition

    DOEpatents

    Patch, Keith D.; Morgan, Dean T.

    1997-07-29

    A method and apparatus for increasing the deposition of ions onto a surface, such as the adsorption of uranium ions on the detecting surface of a radionuclide detector. The method includes the step of exposing the surface to a complexing agent, such as a phosphate ion solution, which has an affinity for the dissolved species to be deposited on the surface. This provides, for example, enhanced sensitivity of the radionuclide detector.

  14. Chemical enhancement of surface deposition

    DOEpatents

    Patch, K.D.; Morgan, D.T.

    1997-07-29

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for increasing the deposition of ions onto a surface, such as the adsorption of uranium ions on the detecting surface of a radionuclide detector. The method includes the step of exposing the surface to a complexing agent, such as a phosphate ion solution, which has an affinity for the dissolved species to be deposited on the surface. This provides, for example, enhanced sensitivity of the radionuclide detector. 16 figs.

  15. Surface Acoustic Wave Microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Leslie Y.; Friend, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Fluid manipulations at the microscale and beyond are powerfully enabled through the use of 10-1,000-MHz acoustic waves. A superior alternative in many cases to other microfluidic actuation techniques, such high-frequency acoustics is almost universally produced by surface acoustic wave devices that employ electromechanical transduction in wafer-scale or thin-film piezoelectric media to generate the kinetic energy needed to transport and manipulate fluids placed in adjacent microfluidic structures. These waves are responsible for a diverse range of complex fluid transport phenomena - from interfacial fluid vibration and drop and confined fluid transport to jetting and atomization - underlying a flourishing research literature spanning fundamental fluid physics to chip-scale engineering applications. We highlight some of this literature to provide the reader with a historical basis, routes for more detailed study, and an impression of the field's future directions.

  16. Bacterial surface adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utada, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    Biofilms are structured multi-cellular communities that are fundamental to the biology and ecology of bacteria. Parasitic bacterial biofilms can cause lethal infections and biofouling, but commensal bacterial biofilms, such as those found in the gut, can break down otherwise indigestible plant polysaccharides and allow us to enjoy vegetables. The first step in biofilm formation, adaptation to life on a surface, requires a working knowledge of low Reynolds number fluid physics, and the coordination of biochemical signaling, polysaccharide production, and molecular motility motors. These crucial early stages of biofilm formation are at present poorly understood. By adapting methods from soft matter physics, we dissect bacterial social behavior at the single cell level for several prototypical bacterial species, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Vibrio cholerae.

  17. Tunable surface plasmon devices

    DOEpatents

    Shaner, Eric A.; Wasserman, Daniel

    2011-08-30

    A tunable extraordinary optical transmission (EOT) device wherein the tunability derives from controlled variation of the dielectric constant of a semiconducting material (semiconductor) in evanescent-field contact with a metallic array of sub-wavelength apertures. The surface plasmon resonance wavelength can be changed by changing the dielectric constant of the dielectric material. In embodiments of this invention, the dielectric material is a semiconducting material. The dielectric constant of the semiconducting material in the metal/semiconductor interfacial region is controllably adjusted by adjusting one or more of the semiconductor plasma frequency, the concentration and effective mass of free carriers, and the background high-frequency dielectric constant in the interfacial region. Thermal heating and/or voltage-gated carrier-concentration changes may be used to variably adjust the value of the semiconductor dielectric constant.

  18. Reusable Surface Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Advanced Flexible Reusable Surface Insulation, developed by Ames Research Center, protects the Space Shuttle from the searing heat that engulfs it on reentry into the Earth's atmosphere. Initially integrated into the Space Shuttle by Rockwell International, production was transferred to Hi-Temp Insulation Inc. in 1974. Over the years, Hi-Temp has created many new technologies to meet the requirements of the Space Shuttle program. This expertise is also used commercially, including insulation blankets to cover aircrafts parts, fire barrier material to protect aircraft engine cowlings and aircraft rescue fire fighter suits. A Fire Protection Division has also been established, offering the first suit designed exclusively by and for aircraft rescue fire fighters. Hi-Temp is a supplier to the Los Angeles City Fire Department as well as other major U.S. civil and military fire departments.

  19. Measurement of complex surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G.M.

    1993-05-01

    Several of the components used in coil fabrication involve complex surfaces and dimensions that are not well suited to measurements using conventional dimensional measuring equipment. Some relatively simple techniques that are in use in the SSCL Magnet Systems Division (MSD) for incoming inspection will be described, with discussion of their suitability for specific applications. Components that are submitted for MSD Quality Assurance (QA) dimensional inspection may be divided into two distinct categories; the first category involves components for which there is an approved drawing and for which all nominal dimensions are known; the second category involves parts for which `reverse engineering` is required, the part is available but there are no available drawings or dimensions. This second category typically occurs during development of coil end parts and coil turn filler parts where it is necessary to manually shape the part and then measure it to develop the information required to prepare a drawing for the part.

  20. Mars Surface Habitability Options

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, A. Scott; Simon, Matthew; Smitherman, David; Howard, Robert; Toups, Larry; Hoffman, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on current habitability concepts for an Evolvable Mars Campaign (EMC) prepared by the NASA Human Spaceflight Architecture Team (HAT). For many years NASA has investigated alternative human Mars missions, examining different mission objectives, trajectories, vehicles, and technologies; the combinations of which have been referred to as reference missions or architectures. At the highest levels, decisions regarding the timing and objectives for a human mission to Mars continue to evolve while at the lowest levels, applicable technologies continue to advance. This results in an on-going need for assessments of alternative system designs such as the habitat, a significant element in any human Mars mission scenario, to provide meaningful design sensitivity characterizations to assist decision-makers regarding timing, objectives, and technologies. As a subset of the Evolvable Mars Campaign activities, the habitability team builds upon results from past studies and recommends options for Mars surface habitability compatible with updated technologies.

  1. Surface nanobubbles nucleate microdroplets.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuehua; Lhuissier, Henri; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2014-04-11

    When a hydrophobic solid is in contact with water, surface nanobubbles often form at the interface. They have a lifetime many orders of magnitude longer than expected. Here, we show that they even withstand a temperature increase to temperatures close to the boiling point of bulk water; i.e., they do not nucleate larger bubbles ("superstability"). On the contrary, when the vapor-liquid contact line passes a nanobubble, a liquid film remains around it, which, after pinch-off, results in a microdroplet in which the nanobubbles continue to exist. Finally, the microdroplet evaporates and the nanobubble consequently bursts. Our results support that pinning plays a crucial role for nanobubble stability. PMID:24765973

  2. Lunar surface roving explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, Youko

    1992-07-01

    An overview of the results of a system study of an unmanned lunar surface rover is presented. The rover is to have a mass of 900 kg and to be launched by the H-2 launch vehicle. The system study focussed on functional requirements, algorithms, and the major equipment structure necessary for partially autonomous operation. The results of the mission study are presented. The study included the following: outlines of equipment structure; data capacity of the image processing equipment for lunar topography mapping; mission requirements for analyzing elements of the lunar substances and acquiring characteristic data of regolith, for acquiring environmental data, and for experiments utilizing lunar substances--such as oxygen manufacturing experiment and volatile component retrieval experiment; and metal production and sintering experiments using regolith.

  3. Extraterrestrial surface propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ash, Robert L.; Blackstock, Dexter L.; Barnhouse, K.; Charalambous, Z.; Coats, J.; Danagan, J.; Davis, T.; Dickens, J.; Harris, P.; Horner, G.

    1992-01-01

    Lunar traction systems, Mars oxygen production, and Mars methane engine operation were the three topics studied during 1992. An elastic loop track system for lunar construction operations was redesigned and is being tested. A great deal of work on simulating the lunar environment to facilitate traction testing has been reported. Operation of an oxygen processor under vacuum conditions has been the focus of another design team. They have redesigned the processor facility. This included improved seals and heat shields. Assuming methane and oxygen can be produced from surface resources on Mars, a third design team has addressed the problem of using Mars atmospheric carbon dioxide to control combustion temperatures in an internal combustion engine. That team has identified appropriate tests and instrumentation. They have reported on the test rig that they designed and the computer-based system for acquiring data.

  4. Dropwise condensation of low surface tension fluids on omniphobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Rykaczewski, Konrad; Paxson, Adam T; Staymates, Matthew; Walker, Marlon L; Sun, Xiaoda; Anand, Sushant; Srinivasan, Siddarth; McKinley, Gareth H; Chinn, Jeff; Scott, John Henry J; Varanasi, Kripa K

    2014-03-05

    Compared to the significant body of work devoted to surface engineering for promoting dropwise condensation heat transfer of steam, much less attention has been dedicated to fluids with lower interfacial tension. A vast array of low-surface tension fluids such as hydrocarbons, cryogens, and fluorinated refrigerants are used in a number of industrial applications, and the development of passive means for increasing their condensation heat transfer coefficients has potential for significant efficiency enhancements. Here we investigate condensation behavior of a variety of liquids with surface tensions in the range of 12 to 28 mN/m on three types of omniphobic surfaces: smooth oleophobic, re-entrant superomniphobic, and lubricant-impregnated surfaces. We demonstrate that although smooth oleophobic and lubricant-impregnated surfaces can promote dropwise condensation of the majority of these fluids, re-entrant omniphobic surfaces became flooded and reverted to filmwise condensation. We also demonstrate that on the lubricant-impregnated surfaces, the choice of lubricant and underlying surface texture play a crucial role in stabilizing the lubricant and reducing pinning of the condensate. With properly engineered surfaces to promote dropwise condensation of low-surface tension fluids, we demonstrate a four to eight-fold improvement in the heat transfer coefficient.

  5. Dropwise Condensation of Low Surface Tension Fluids on Omniphobic Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rykaczewski, Konrad; Paxson, Adam T.; Staymates, Matthew; Walker, Marlon L.; Sun, Xiaoda; Anand, Sushant; Srinivasan, Siddarth; McKinley, Gareth H.; Chinn, Jeff; Scott, John Henry J.; Varanasi, Kripa K.

    2014-03-01

    Compared to the significant body of work devoted to surface engineering for promoting dropwise condensation heat transfer of steam, much less attention has been dedicated to fluids with lower interfacial tension. A vast array of low-surface tension fluids such as hydrocarbons, cryogens, and fluorinated refrigerants are used in a number of industrial applications, and the development of passive means for increasing their condensation heat transfer coefficients has potential for significant efficiency enhancements. Here we investigate condensation behavior of a variety of liquids with surface tensions in the range of 12 to 28 mN/m on three types of omniphobic surfaces: smooth oleophobic, re-entrant superomniphobic, and lubricant-impregnated surfaces. We demonstrate that although smooth oleophobic and lubricant-impregnated surfaces can promote dropwise condensation of the majority of these fluids, re-entrant omniphobic surfaces became flooded and reverted to filmwise condensation. We also demonstrate that on the lubricant-impregnated surfaces, the choice of lubricant and underlying surface texture play a crucial role in stabilizing the lubricant and reducing pinning of the condensate. With properly engineered surfaces to promote dropwise condensation of low-surface tension fluids, we demonstrate a four to eight-fold improvement in the heat transfer coefficient.

  6. Interaction between heterogeneously charged surfaces: Surface patches and charge modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Yaakov, Dan; Andelman, David; Diamant, Haim

    2013-02-01

    When solid surfaces are immersed in aqueous solutions, some of their charges can dissociate and leave behind charged patches on the surface. Although the charges are distributed heterogeneously on the surface, most of the theoretical models treat them as homogeneous. For overall non-neutral surfaces, the assumption of surface charge homogeneity is rather reasonable since the leading terms of two such interacting surfaces depend on the nonzero average charge. However, for overall neutral surfaces the nature of the surface charge distribution is crucial in determining the intersurface interaction. In the present work we study the interaction between two charged surfaces across an aqueous solution for several charge distributions. The analysis is preformed within the framework of the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann theory. For periodic charge distributions the interaction is found to be repulsive at small separations, unless the two surface distributions are completely out-of-phase with respect to each other. For quenched random charge distributions we find that due to the presence of the ionic solution in between the surfaces, the intersurface repulsion dominates over the attraction in the linear regime of the Poisson-Boltzmann theory. The effect of quenched charge heterogeneity is found to be particularly substantial in the case of large charged domains.

  7. Dropwise condensation of low surface tension fluids on omniphobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Rykaczewski, Konrad; Paxson, Adam T; Staymates, Matthew; Walker, Marlon L; Sun, Xiaoda; Anand, Sushant; Srinivasan, Siddarth; McKinley, Gareth H; Chinn, Jeff; Scott, John Henry J; Varanasi, Kripa K

    2014-01-01

    Compared to the significant body of work devoted to surface engineering for promoting dropwise condensation heat transfer of steam, much less attention has been dedicated to fluids with lower interfacial tension. A vast array of low-surface tension fluids such as hydrocarbons, cryogens, and fluorinated refrigerants are used in a number of industrial applications, and the development of passive means for increasing their condensation heat transfer coefficients has potential for significant efficiency enhancements. Here we investigate condensation behavior of a variety of liquids with surface tensions in the range of 12 to 28 mN/m on three types of omniphobic surfaces: smooth oleophobic, re-entrant superomniphobic, and lubricant-impregnated surfaces. We demonstrate that although smooth oleophobic and lubricant-impregnated surfaces can promote dropwise condensation of the majority of these fluids, re-entrant omniphobic surfaces became flooded and reverted to filmwise condensation. We also demonstrate that on the lubricant-impregnated surfaces, the choice of lubricant and underlying surface texture play a crucial role in stabilizing the lubricant and reducing pinning of the condensate. With properly engineered surfaces to promote dropwise condensation of low-surface tension fluids, we demonstrate a four to eight-fold improvement in the heat transfer coefficient. PMID:24595171

  8. Surface characteristics and bioactivity of an anodized titanium surface

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyul; Lee, Bo-Ah; Piao, Xing-Hui; Chung, Hyun-Ju

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the surface properties and biological response of an anodized titanium surface by cell proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity analysis. Methods Commercial pure titanium (Ti) disks were prepared. The samples were divided into an untreated machined Ti group and anodized Ti group. The anodization of cp-Ti was formed using a constant voltage of 270 V for 60 seconds. The surface properties were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and an image analyzing microscope. The surface roughness was evaluated by atomic force microscopy and a profilometer. The contact angle and surface energy were analyzed. Cell adhesion, cell proliferation, and alkaline phosphatase activity were evaluated using mouse MC3T3-E1 cells. Results The anodized Ti group had a more porous and thicker layer on its surface. The surface roughness of the two groups measured by the profilometer showed no significant difference (P>0.001). The anodized Ti dioxide (TiO2) surface exhibited better corrosion resistance and showed a significantly lower contact angle than the machined Ti surface (P>0.001). Although there was no significant difference in the cell viability between the two groups (P>0.001), the anodized TiO2 surface showed significantly enhanced alkaline phosphatase activity (P<0.001). Conclusions These results suggest that the surface modification of Ti by anodic oxidation improved the osteogenic response of the osteoblast cells. PMID:24040573

  9. Surface analysis of surface-passivated intraocular lenses.

    PubMed

    Koch, D D; Samuelson, S W; Dimonie, V

    1991-03-01

    We analyzed the surfaces of six different types of poly(methyl methacrylate) intraocular lenses using electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA), static secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS), and two techniques for determining surface energies. The tested lenses were (1) Ioptex lathe-cut surface-passivated, (2) Ioptex lathe-cut, (3) another manufacturer's lathe-cut, (4) cast-molded, (5) polyfluorocarbon-coated, and (6) polyvinylpyrrolidone-grafted. The ESCA testing revealed marked differences in the chemical composition of the surfaces of the polyfluorocarbon-coated and polyvinylpyrrolidone-grafted lenses compared to the other four. Minute amounts of silicon were present on the cast-molded and surface-passivated lenses. Static SIMS testing revealed the presence of siloxane contaminants on the three lathe-cut and the cast-molded lenses; a statistically smaller amount of siloxane was present on the surface-passivated lenses. Contact angle and surface energy analysis revealed statistically lower surface energies for the polyfluorocarbon-coated materials and statistically higher surface energies for the polyvinylpyrrolidone-grafted; we found no differences in the contact angles and surface energies among the surface-passivated, lathe-cut, and cast-molded lenses. PMID:2040969

  10. Surface diffraction study of the hydrated hematite (1102) surface.

    SciTech Connect

    Tanwar, K. S.; Lo, C. S.; Eng, P. J.; Catalano, J. G.; Walko, D. A.; Brown, G. E., Jr.; Waychunas, G. A.; Chaka, A. M.; Trainor, T. P.; X-Ray Science Division; Univ. of Alaska Fairbanks; NIST; Univ. of Chicago; Stanford Univ.; LBNL; SSRL

    2007-01-01

    The structure of the hydroxylated {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3(1{bar 1}02)} surface prepared via a wet chemical and mechanical polishing (CMP) procedure was determined using X-ray crystal truncation rod diffraction. The experimentally determined surface model was compared with theoretical structures developed from density functional theory (DFT) calculations to identify the most likely protonation states of the surface (hydr)oxo moieties. The results show that the hydroxylated CMP-prepared surface differs from an ideal stoichiometric termination due to vacancies of the near surface bulk Fe sites. This result differs from previous ultra high vacuum studies where two stable terminations were observed: a stoichiometric (1 x 1) termination and a partially reduced (2 x 1) reconstructed surface. The complementary DFT studies suggest that hydroxylated surfaces are thermodynamically more stable than dehydroxylated surfaces in the presence of water. The results illustrate that the best fit surface model has predominantly three types of (hydr)oxo functional groups exposed at the surface at circumneutral pH: Fe-OH{sub 2}, Fe{sub 2}-OH, and Fe{sub 3}-O and provide a structural basis for interpreting the reactivity of model iron-(hydr)oxide surfaces under aqueous conditions.

  11. Brain Surface Conformal Parameterization Using Riemann Surface Structure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yalin; Lui, Lok Ming; Gu, Xianfeng; Hayashi, Kiralee M.; Chan, Tony F.; Toga, Arthur W.; Thompson, Paul M.; Yau, Shing-Tung

    2011-01-01

    In medical imaging, parameterized 3-D surface models are useful for anatomical modeling and visualization, statistical comparisons of anatomy, and surface-based registration and signal processing. Here we introduce a parameterization method based on Riemann surface structure, which uses a special curvilinear net structure (conformal net) to partition the surface into a set of patches that can each be conformally mapped to a parallelogram. The resulting surface subdivision and the parameterizations of the components are intrinsic and stable (their solutions tend to be smooth functions and the boundary conditions of the Dirichlet problem can be enforced). Conformal parameterization also helps transform partial differential equations (PDEs) that may be defined on 3-D brain surface manifolds to modified PDEs on a two-dimensional parameter domain. Since the Jacobian matrix of a conformal parameterization is diagonal, the modified PDE on the parameter domain is readily solved. To illustrate our techniques, we computed parameterizations for several types of anatomical surfaces in 3-D magnetic resonance imaging scans of the brain, including the cerebral cortex, hippocampi, and lateral ventricles. For surfaces that are topologically homeomorphic to each other and have similar geometrical structures, we show that the parameterization results are consistent and the subdivided surfaces can be matched to each other. Finally, we present an automatic sulcal landmark location algorithm by solving PDEs on cortical surfaces. The landmark detection results are used as constraints for building conformal maps between surfaces that also match explicitly defined landmarks. PMID:17679336

  12. Dropwise Condensation of Low Surface Tension Fluids on Omniphobic Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Rykaczewski, Konrad; Paxson, Adam T.; Staymates, Matthew; Walker, Marlon L.; Sun, Xiaoda; Anand, Sushant; Srinivasan, Siddarth; McKinley, Gareth H.; Chinn, Jeff; Scott, John Henry J.; Varanasi, Kripa K.

    2014-01-01

    Compared to the significant body of work devoted to surface engineering for promoting dropwise condensation heat transfer of steam, much less attention has been dedicated to fluids with lower interfacial tension. A vast array of low-surface tension fluids such as hydrocarbons, cryogens, and fluorinated refrigerants are used in a number of industrial applications, and the development of passive means for increasing their condensation heat transfer coefficients has potential for significant efficiency enhancements. Here we investigate condensation behavior of a variety of liquids with surface tensions in the range of 12 to 28 mN/m on three types of omniphobic surfaces: smooth oleophobic, re-entrant superomniphobic, and lubricant-impregnated surfaces. We demonstrate that although smooth oleophobic and lubricant-impregnated surfaces can promote dropwise condensation of the majority of these fluids, re-entrant omniphobic surfaces became flooded and reverted to filmwise condensation. We also demonstrate that on the lubricant-impregnated surfaces, the choice of lubricant and underlying surface texture play a crucial role in stabilizing the lubricant and reducing pinning of the condensate. With properly engineered surfaces to promote dropwise condensation of low-surface tension fluids, we demonstrate a four to eight-fold improvement in the heat transfer coefficient. PMID:24595171

  13. Laser heterodyne surface profiler

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, G.E.

    1984-06-26

    Method and apparatus are disclosed for testing the deviation of the face of an object from a flat smooth surface using a laser beam having two plane-polarized components, one of a frequency greater than the other to produce a difference frequency with a phase to be used as a reference. The beam also is split into its two components which are directed onto spaced apart points on the face of the object. The object is rotated on an axis coincident with one component as a reference. The other component follows a circular track on the face of the object as the object is rotated. The two components are recombined after reflection to produce a difference frequency having a phase that is shifted in an amount that is proportional to the difference in path length as compared to the reference phase to produce an electrical output signal proportional to the deviation of the height of the surface along the circular track. The output signal is generated by means of a phase detector that includes a first photodetector in the path of the recombined components and a second photodetector in the path of the reference phase. The output signal is dependent on the phase difference of the two photodetector signals. A polarizer, a quarter-wave plate and a half-wave plate are in series in the path of the reference phase. Rotation of the half-wave plate can be used for phase adjustment over a full 360[degree] range for initial calibration of the apparatus. 12 figs.

  14. Where's the Surface?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA02182 Where's the Surface?

    In this image the martian surface is completely hidden from view by thick clouds. The thickness of the clouds indicates the dust is a major component of the clouds. Images like this one can provide vital information about the atmosphere and climate of Mars today. This image was collected during late summer near the south pole.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -69.9N, Longitude 235.3E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  15. Platy Lava Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This VIS image was taken in the Tartarus region of Mars. The lava flows covering the upper right portion of the image have a very different texture than the Arsia Mons flows. These flows illustrate a platy lava surface. This surface type develops when the top of a lava flows cools and then is broken into pieces by continued movement of the flow. Molten lava will squeeze up between the plates of cooled lava, forming the ridges seen in the image.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 5.9, Longitude 157.8 East (202.2 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  16. SDL: A Surface Description Language

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maple, Raymond C.

    1992-01-01

    A new interpreted language specifically designed for surface grid generation is introduced. Many unique aspects of the language are discussed, including the farray, vector, curve, and surface data types and the operators used to manipulate them. Custom subroutine libraries written in the language are used to easily build surface grids for generic missile shapes.

  17. Bibliography of the lunar surface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Freeberg, Jacquelyn H.

    1970-01-01

    The term "surface" in this bibliography is defined to include landforms and surface materials and the nature of, and processes responsible for, their physical characteristics. References are divided into two listings: (1) Surface features and materials; and (2) Telescopic observations. The former is accompanied by a subject index, the latter by a locality index.

  18. Plasma surface modification of polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirotsu, T.

    1980-01-01

    Thin plasma polymerization films are discussed from the viewpoint of simplicity in production stages. The application of selective, absorbent films and films used in selective permeability was tested. The types of surface modification of polymers discussed are: (1) plasma etching, (2) surface coating by plasma polymerized thin films, and (3) plasma activation surface graft polymerization.

  19. Surface properties of HMX crystal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, R. Y.; Adicoff, A.; Dibble, E. J.

    1980-01-01

    The surface properties of Beta-HMX crystals were studied. The surface energies of three principal crystal faces were obtained by measuring contact angles with several reference liquids. The surface energies and polarity of the three crystal faces are found to be different.

  20. Surface nanobubbles and micropancakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seddon, James R. T.

    2013-05-01

    When looking at a wetted surface with a technique that can probe the nanoscale, a high surface coverage of gas bubbles is often revealed. So what? Well, if we believe in classical diffusion, these bubbles should dissolve in microseconds, but in reality they are found to remain stable for as long as anyone has observed (five days thus far, which is 10-11 orders of magnitude longer than would be expected). As well as the obvious question of why the lifetime is so long, and also the question of how the bubbles nucleate in the first place, we rapidly find ourselves asking can we use the bubbles to our benefit? A clear example would be in controlling slip in micro/nanofluidics: effectively, replacing a solid wall with a 'gassy' wall replaces the no-slip boundary condition with one of slip. Several other potential applications have also been suggested and nanobubbles have, in fact, already proven useful in the antifouling world. Returning to fundamentals, another near-wall gas domain has also come to light through our investigations into nanobubbles. The micropancake is thought to be a quasi-2D dense adsorbate of gas molecules (i.e. N2 or O2) which grows epitaxially on the surface. New questions now include: why are micropancakes stable, how do they form, and what is their relationship with nanobubbles? Progress is being made in this field and, as with all new topics, the community is rapidly converging toward a standard set of 'minimum' requirements for scientific reporting. For example, taking single-shot atomic force microscopy data is almost definitely no longer sufficient to be additive to the field (there are far too many unrepeatable single-shot measurements in the literature which are too often used as 'evidence', even though there are a seemingly equal number of single-shot measurements that may disagree). Just quoting a 'set-point' is now also insufficient (both set-point and free (or interaction) amplitude are required to know the applied force of an AFM

  1. The surface learned from nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, H.; Kim, W. D.

    2010-07-01

    In this work, I would like to introduce the emerging surface of nature. The surface in nature, has the multi and optimized function with well organized structure. There are so many examples that we learn and apply to technology. First example is self-cleaning surface. Some plants (such as lotus leaf, taro leaf) and the wings of many large-winged insects (such as moth, butterfly, dragonfly) remain their surface clean in the very dirty environment. This self cleaning effect is accomplished by the superhydrophobic surfaces which exhibit the water contact angle of more than 150° with low sliding angle. Generally, the superhydrophobic surface is made up the two factors. One is the surface composition having the low surface tension energy. The other is the surface morphology of hierarchical structure of micro and nano size. Because almost nature surface have the hierarchical structures range from macro to nano size, their topography strength their function to adjust the life in nature environment. The other example is the surface to use for drag reduction. The skin friction drag causes eruptions of air or water resulting in greater drag as the speed is increased. This drag requires more energy to overcome. The shark skin having the fine sharp-edged grooves about 0.1 mm wide known riblet reduces in skin friction drag by being far away the vortex. Among a lot of fuctional surface, the most exciting surface the back of stenocara a kind of desert beetles. Stenocara use the micrometre-sized patterns of hydrophobic, wax-coated and hydrophilic, non-waxy regions on their backs to capture water from fog. This fog-collecting structure improves the water collection of fog-capture film, condenser, engine, and future building. Here, the efforts to realize these emerging functional surfaces in nature on technology are reported with the fabrication method and their properties, especially for the control of surface wettability.

  2. Tools for measuring surface cleanliness

    DOEpatents

    Schroder, Mark Stewart; Woodmansee, Donald Ernest; Beadie, Douglas Frank

    2002-01-01

    A procedure and tools for quantifying surface cleanliness are described. Cleanliness of a target surface is quantified by wiping a prescribed area of the surface with a flexible, bright white cloth swatch, preferably mounted on a special tool. The cloth picks up a substantial amount of any particulate surface contamination. The amount of contamination is determined by measuring the reflectivity loss of the cloth before and after wiping on the contaminated system and comparing that loss to a previous calibration with similar contamination. In the alternative, a visual comparison of the contaminated cloth to a contamination key provides an indication of the surface cleanliness.

  3. Surface-stabilized gold nanocatalysts

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Sheng [Knoxville, TN; Yan, Wenfu [Oak Ridge, TN

    2009-12-08

    A surface-stabilized gold nanocatalyst includes a solid support having stabilizing surfaces for supporting gold nanoparticles, and a plurality of gold nanoparticles having an average particle size of less than 8 nm disposed on the stabilizing surfaces. The surface-stabilized gold nanocatalyst provides enhanced stability, such as at high temperature under oxygen containing environments. In one embodiment, the solid support is a multi-layer support comprising at least a first layer having a second layer providing the stabilizing surfaces disposed thereon, the first and second layer being chemically distinct.

  4. Water on a Hydrophobic surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scruggs, Ryan; Zhu, Mengjue; Poynor, Adele

    2012-02-01

    Hydrophobicity, meaning literally fear of water, is exhibited on the surfaces of non-stick cooking pans and water resistant clothing, on the leaves of the lotus plan, or even during the protein folding process in our bodies. Hydrophobicity is directly measured by determining a contact angle between water and an objects surface. Associated with a hydrophobic surface is the depletion layer, a low density region approximately 0.2 nm thick. We study this region by comparing data found in lab using surface plasmon resonance techniques to theoretical calculations. Experiments use gold slides coated in ODT and Mercapto solutions to model both hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces respectively.

  5. Topics in theoretical surface science

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, R.

    1991-10-25

    The energetics and structures of clean and adsorbate covered surfaces are investigated in this dissertation. First, the formalism, within the Corrected Effective Medium (CEM) method, for calculating the surface energy of a clean surface is derived. The surface energies for many different metals and their low index surfaces are presented. The minimization of the surface energy is then used to predict the multilayer relaxation of the Al(111), (100), Ni(100), (110) and Fe(100) surfaces. Extensions of the surface CEM formalism to calculate the binding energies of ordered adsorbates on metals surfaces are also derived. The minimization of the binding energy allowed determination of the binding heights, sites and the extent of induced multilayer relaxation for H and N atoms on the Fe(110), (100) and W(110) surfaces. The last topic deals with the dynamics of the epitaxial growth of metals on metal surfaces. The CEM method was first modified by making approximations to enable faster evaluations of the potential and its corresponding forces for molecular dynamics simulations. The goal of these simulations was to identify the important steps in the formation of equilibrium epitaxial structures. 180 refs., 31 figs., 18 tabs.

  6. Does surface roughness amplify wetting?

    SciTech Connect

    Malijevský, Alexandr

    2014-11-14

    Any solid surface is intrinsically rough on the microscopic scale. In this paper, we study the effect of this roughness on the wetting properties of hydrophilic substrates. Macroscopic arguments, such as those leading to the well-known Wenzel's law, predict that surface roughness should amplify the wetting properties of such adsorbents. We use a fundamental measure density functional theory to demonstrate the opposite effect from roughness for microscopically corrugated surfaces, i.e., wetting is hindered. Based on three independent analyses we show that microscopic surface corrugation increases the wetting temperature or even makes the surface hydrophobic. Since for macroscopically corrugated surfaces the solid texture does indeed amplify wetting there must exist a crossover between two length-scale regimes that are distinguished by opposite response on surface roughening. This demonstrates how deceptive can be efforts to extend the thermodynamical laws beyond their macroscopic territory.

  7. A Graphene Surface Force Balance

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We report a method for transferring graphene, grown by chemical vapor deposition, which produces ultraflat graphene surfaces (root-mean-square roughness of 0.19 nm) free from polymer residues over macroscopic areas (>1 cm2). The critical step in preparing such surfaces involves the use of an intermediate mica template, which itself is atomically smooth. We demonstrate the compatibility of these model surfaces with the surface force balance, opening up the possibility of measuring normal and lateral forces, including friction and adhesion, between two graphene sheets either in contact or across a liquid medium. The conductivity of the graphene surfaces allows forces to be measured while controlling the surface potential. This new apparatus, the graphene surface force balance, is expected to be of importance to the future understanding of graphene in applications from lubrication to electrochemical energy storage systems. PMID:25171130

  8. Surface melting of electronic order.

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, S. B.; Liu, X.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Kim, J.-W.; Ryan, P. J.; Mitchell, J. F.; Hill, J. P.

    2011-01-01

    We report temperature-dependent surface x-ray scattering studies of the orbital ordered surface in La{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 1.5}MnO{sub 4}. We find that as the bulk ordering temperature is approached from below the thickness of the interface between the electronically ordered and electronically disordered regions at the surface grows, though the bulk correlation length remains unchanged. Close to the transition, the surface is so rough that there is no well-defined electronic surface, despite the presence of bulk electronic order. That is, the electronic ordering at the surface has melted. Above the bulk transition, long-range ordering in the bulk is destroyed but finite-sized isotropic fluctuations persist, with a correlation length roughly equal to that of the low-temperature in-plane surface correlation length.

  9. Dynamic electrowetting on microstructured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nita, Satoshi; Wang, Jiayu; Do-Quang, Minh; Chen, Yu-Chung; Suzuki, Yuji; Amberg, Gustav; Shiomi, Junichiro

    2015-11-01

    Surface modification such as surface charging or microstructuring has been shown as an effective method to control static wetting, but its influence on dynamic wetting is still unclear. Previously, we found that the initial stage of droplet spreading can be significantly hindered by surface microstructures, while previous experiments showed that the effect of surface charge on dynamic wetting on a flat surface is minor. Here, we combine microstructuring and electrowetting to further enhance the controllability of the dynamic wetting. Microstructures are fabricated on silicon wafers and the spontaneous spreading of a droplet is imaged with a high-speed camera. We reveal that the spreading rate sensitivity to surface charge increases in the presence of microstructures. Furthermore, numerical simulations solving Cahn-Hilliard/Navier-Stokes equations are performed and the effect of surface modification is quantified in terms of the contact-line friction. This work was financially supported in part by the Japan Science and Technology Agency through CREST.

  10. Quantification of surface amorphous content using dispersive surface energy: the concept of effective amorphous surface area.

    PubMed

    Brum, Jeffrey; Burnett, Daniel

    2011-09-01

    We investigate the use of dispersive surface energy in quantifying surface amorphous content, and the concept of effective amorphous surface area is introduced. An equation is introduced employing the linear combination of surface area normalized square root dispersive surface energy terms. This equation is effective in generating calibration curves when crystalline and amorphous references are used. Inverse gas chromatography is used to generate dispersive surface energy values. Two systems are investigated, and in both cases surface energy data collected for physical mixture samples comprised of amorphous and crystalline references fits the predicted response with good accuracy. Surface amorphous content of processed lactose samples is quantified using the calibration curve, and interpreted within the context of effective amorphous surface area. Data for bulk amorphous content is also utilized to generate a thorough picture of how disorder is distributed throughout the particle. An approach to quantifying surface amorphous content using dispersive surface energy is presented. Quantification is achieved by equating results to an effective amorphous surface area based on reference crystalline, and amorphous materials. PMID:21725707

  11. Mars Surface Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nørnberg, Per; Merrison, Jonathan P.; Gunnlaugsson, Haraldur P.

    2010-05-01

    Laboratory simulations of the Martian surface are of importance to broaden scientific understanding of the physical processes, but also in order to develop the technology necessary for exploration of the planet. The Mars Simulation Laboratory at Aarhus University [1] has been involved in such simulations for around ten years and has developed several experimental facilities for carrying out science or instrument testing under conditions similar to those at the Martian surface, specifically low pressure, low temperature and importantly recreating the wind flow environment and dust suspension (reproducing the Martian dusty aerosol) using Mars analogue material [2]. The science involved in this simulation work has covered a broad spectrum including, erosion induced mineralogy/chemistry, particulate electrification, magnetic properties of Martian dust, biological survival, UV induced chemistry/mineralogy (using a solar simulator), adhesion/cohesion processes and the wind driven transport of dust and sand [3,4]. With regard to technology the wind tunnel facilities have been used in the development of the latest wind and dust sensing instrumentation [5,6]. With support from the European Space Agency (ESA) and Danish national funding an advanced Mars simulation facility has recently been constructed (2009). This wind tunnel facility has a cross section of 2 x 1 m and a length of 8 m, a temperature range down to below -120C, wind speeds in excess of 20m/s, and automated dust control. With a range of (specialised) sensing instrumentation it provides the opportunity to perform a new generation of scientific experiments and allow testing and technology development in the most realistic and rigorous environment. As well as being available for the space agencies, this facility will be open to all potential scientific collaborators. Also European planetary scientists may benefit from support through the EU Europlanet FP7 networking programme. For more information on access

  12. Surface acoustic wave microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xiaoyun; Li, Peng; Lin, Sz-Chin Steven; Stratton, Zackary S.; Nama, Nitesh; Guo, Feng; Slotcavage, Daniel; Mao, Xiaole; Shi, Jinjie; Costanzo, Francesco; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-01-01

    The recent introduction of surface acoustic wave (SAW) technology onto lab-on-a-chip platforms has opened a new frontier in microfluidics. The advantages provided by such SAW microfluidics are numerous: simple fabrication, high biocompatibility, fast fluid actuation, versatility, compact and inexpensive devices and accessories, contact-free particle manipulation, and compatibility with other microfluidic components. We believe that these advantages enable SAW microfluidics to play a significant role in a variety of applications in biology, chemistry, engineering, and medicine. In this review article, we discuss the theory underpinning SAWs and their interactions with particles and the contacting fluids in which they are suspended. We then review the SAW-enabled microfluidic devices demonstrated to date, starting with devices that accomplish fluid mixing and transport through the use of travelling SAW; we follow that by reviewing the more recent innovations achieved with standing SAW that enable such actions as particle/cell focusing, sorting, and patterning. Finally, we look forward and appraise where the discipline of SAW microfluidics could go next. PMID:23900527

  13. Surface waves affect frontogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Fox-Kemper, Baylor; Hamlington, Peter E.; Van Roekel, Luke P.

    2016-05-01

    This paper provides a detailed analysis of momentum, angular momentum, vorticity, and energy budgets of a submesoscale front undergoing frontogenesis driven by an upper-ocean, submesoscale eddy field in a Large Eddy Simulation (LES). The LES solves the wave-averaged, or Craik-Leibovich, equations in order to account for the Stokes forces that result from interactions between nonbreaking surface waves and currents, and resolves both submesoscale eddies and boundary layer turbulence down to 4.9 m × 4.9 m × 1.25 m grid scales. It is found that submesoscale frontogenesis differs from traditional frontogenesis theory due to four effects: Stokes forces, momentum and kinetic energy transfer from submesoscale eddies to frontal secondary circulations, resolved turbulent stresses, and unbalanced torque. In the energy, momentum, angular momentum, and vorticity budgets for the frontal overturning circulation, the Stokes shear force is a leading-order contributor, typically either the second or third largest source of frontal overturning. These effects violate hydrostatic and thermal wind balances during submesoscale frontogenesis. The effect of the Stokes shear force becomes stronger with increasing alignment of the front and Stokes shear and with a nondimensional scaling. The Stokes shear force and momentum transfer from submesoscale eddies significantly energize the frontal secondary circulation along with the buoyancy.

  14. Surface Mounted Neutron Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elizondo-Decanini, Juan M.

    2012-10-01

    A deuterium-tritium (DT) base reaction pulsed neutron generator packaged in a flat computer chip shape of 1.54 cm (0.600 in) wide by 3.175 cm (1.25 in) length and 0.3 cm (0.120 in) thick has been successfully demonstrated to produce 14 MeV neutrons at a rate of 10^9 neutrons per second. The neutron generator is based on a deuterium ion beam accelerated to impact a tritium loaded target. The accelerating voltage is in the 15 to 20 kV in a 3 mm (0.120 in) gap, the ion beam is shaped by using a lens design to produce a flat ion beam that conforms to the flat rectangular target. The ion source is a simple surface mounted deuterium filled titanium film with a fused gap that operates at a current-voltage design to release the deuterium during a pulse length of about 1 μs. We present the general description of the working prototypes, which we have labeled the ``NEUTRISTOR.''[4pt] Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration. Work funded by the LDRD office.

  15. Surface Erosion and Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 7 April 2003

    The mottled surface texture and flow features observed in this THEMIS image suggest materials may be, or have been, mixed with ice. There is also evidence in some areas for infilling of sediments as crater rims and ridges appear covered.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 45.3, Longitude 48.8 East (311.2 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

  16. Ariel's Densely Pitted Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This mosaic of the four highest-resolution images of Ariel represents the most detailed Voyager 2 picture of this satellite of Uranus. The images were taken through the clear filter of Voyager's narrow-angle camera on Jan. 24, 1986, at a distance of about 130,000 kilometers (80,000 miles). Ariel is about 1,200 km (750 mi) in diameter; the resolution here is 2.4 km (1.5 mi). Much of Ariel's surface is densely pitted with craters 5 to 10 km (3 to 6 mi) across. These craters are close to the threshold of detection in this picture. Numerous valleys and fault scarps crisscross the highly pitted terrain. Voyager scientists believe the valleys have formed over down-dropped fault blocks (graben); apparently, extensive faulting has occurred as a result of expansion and stretching of Ariel's crust. The largest fault valleys, near the terminator at right, as well as a smooth region near the center of this image, have been partly filled with deposits that are younger and less heavily cratered than the pitted terrain. Narrow, somewhat sinuous scarps and valleys have been formed, in turn, in these young deposits. It is not yet clear whether these sinuous features have been formed by faulting or by the flow of fluids.

    JPL manages the Voyager project for NASA's Office of Space Science.

  17. Designing durable icephobic surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Golovin, Kevin; Kobaku, Sai P. R.; Lee, Duck Hyun; DiLoreto, Edward T.; Mabry, Joseph M.; Tuteja, Anish

    2016-01-01

    Ice accretion has a negative impact on critical infrastructure, as well as a range of commercial and residential activities. Icephobic surfaces are defined by an ice adhesion strength τice < 100 kPa. However, the passive removal of ice requires much lower values of τice, such as on airplane wings or power lines (τice < 20 kPa). Such low τice values are scarcely reported, and robust coatings that maintain these low values have not been reported previously. We show that, irrespective of material chemistry, by tailoring the cross-link density of different elastomeric coatings and by enabling interfacial slippage, it is possible to systematically design coatings with extremely low ice adhesion (τice < 0.2 kPa). These newfound mechanisms allow for the rational design of icephobic coatings with virtually any desired ice adhesion strength. By using these mechanisms, we fabricate extremely durable coatings that maintain τice < 10 kPa after severe mechanical abrasion, acid/base exposure, 100 icing/deicing cycles, thermal cycling, accelerated corrosion, and exposure to Michigan wintery conditions over several months. PMID:26998520

  18. Surface mount component jig

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1990-08-07

    A device for bending and trimming the pins of a dual-inline-package component and the like for surface mounting rather than through mounting to a circuit board comprises, in a first part, in pin cutter astride a holder having a recess for holding the component, a first spring therebetween, and, in a second part, two flat members pivotally interconnected by a hinge and urged to an upward peaked position from a downward peaked position by a second spring. As a downward force is applied to the pin cutter it urges the holder downward, assisted by the first spring and a pair of ridges riding on shoulders of the holder, to carry the component against the upward peaked flat members which guide the pins outwardly. As the holder continues downwardly, the flat members pivot to the downward peaked position bending the pins upwardly against the sides of the holder. When the downward movement is met with sufficient resistance, the ridges of the pin cutter ride over the holder's shoulders to continue downward to cut any excess length of pin.

  19. Designing durable icephobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Golovin, Kevin; Kobaku, Sai P R; Lee, Duck Hyun; DiLoreto, Edward T; Mabry, Joseph M; Tuteja, Anish

    2016-03-01

    Ice accretion has a negative impact on critical infrastructure, as well as a range of commercial and residential activities. Icephobic surfaces are defined by an ice adhesion strength τice < 100 kPa. However, the passive removal of ice requires much lower values of τice, such as on airplane wings or power lines (τice < 20 kPa). Such low τice values are scarcely reported, and robust coatings that maintain these low values have not been reported previously. We show that, irrespective of material chemistry, by tailoring the cross-link density of different elastomeric coatings and by enabling interfacial slippage, it is possible to systematically design coatings with extremely low ice adhesion (τice < 0.2 kPa). These newfound mechanisms allow for the rational design of icephobic coatings with virtually any desired ice adhesion strength. By using these mechanisms, we fabricate extremely durable coatings that maintain τice < 10 kPa after severe mechanical abrasion, acid/base exposure, 100 icing/deicing cycles, thermal cycling, accelerated corrosion, and exposure to Michigan wintery conditions over several months. PMID:26998520

  20. Surface acoustic wave microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiaoyun; Li, Peng; Lin, Sz-Chin Steven; Stratton, Zackary S; Nama, Nitesh; Guo, Feng; Slotcavage, Daniel; Mao, Xiaole; Shi, Jinjie; Costanzo, Francesco; Huang, Tony Jun

    2013-09-21

    The recent introduction of surface acoustic wave (SAW) technology onto lab-on-a-chip platforms has opened a new frontier in microfluidics. The advantages provided by such SAW microfluidics are numerous: simple fabrication, high biocompatibility, fast fluid actuation, versatility, compact and inexpensive devices and accessories, contact-free particle manipulation, and compatibility with other microfluidic components. We believe that these advantages enable SAW microfluidics to play a significant role in a variety of applications in biology, chemistry, engineering and medicine. In this review article, we discuss the theory underpinning SAWs and their interactions with particles and the contacting fluids in which they are suspended. We then review the SAW-enabled microfluidic devices demonstrated to date, starting with devices that accomplish fluid mixing and transport through the use of travelling SAW; we follow that by reviewing the more recent innovations achieved with standing SAW that enable such actions as particle/cell focusing, sorting and patterning. Finally, we look forward and appraise where the discipline of SAW microfluidics could go next.

  1. Internal Surface Water Flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murray, Mitchell H.

    1999-01-01

    Introduction The South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Program is an intergovernmental effort to reestablish and maintain the ecosystem of south Florida. One element of the restoration effort is the development of a firm scientific basis for resource decision making.The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) provides scientitic information as part of the South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Program. The USGS began its own project, called the South Florida Ecosystem Project in fiscal year 1995 for the purpose of gathering hydrologic, cartographic, and geologic data that relate to the mainland of south Florida, Florida Bay, and the Florida Keys and Reef ecosystems. Historical changes in water-management practices to accommodate a large and rapidly growing urban population along the Atlantic coast, as well as intensive agricultural activities, have resulted in a highly managed hydrologic system with canals, levees, and pumping stations. These structures have altered the hydology of the Everglades ecosystem on both coastal and interior lands. Surface-water flows in a direction south of Lake Okeechobee have been regulated by an extensive canal network, begun in the 1940's, to provide for drainage, flood control, saltwater intrusion control, agricultural requirements, and various environmental needs. Much of the development and subsequent monitoring of canal and river discharge south of Lake Okeechobee has traditionally emphasized the eastern coastal areas of Florida. Recently, more emphasis has been placed on providing a more accurate water budget for internal canal flows.

  2. Wetting failure of hydrophilic surfaces promoted by surface roughness

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Meng-Hua; Chen, Xiao-Peng; Wang, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Wetting failure is of vital importance to many physical phenomena, such as industrial coating and drop emission. Here we show when and how the surface roughness promotes the destabilization of a moving contact line on a hydrophilic surface. Beyond the balance of the driving force and viscous resistance where a stable wetting interface is sustained, wetting failure occurs and is modified by the roughness of the surface. The promoting effect arises only when the wetting velocity is high enough to create a gas-liquid-solid composite interface in the vicinity of the moving contact line, and it is a function of the intrinsic contact angle and proportion of solid tops. We propose a model to explain splashes of rough solid spheres impacting into liquids. It reveals a novel concept that dynamic wetting on hydrophilic rough surfaces can be similar to that on hydrophobic surfaces, and brings a new way to design surfaces with specific wetting properties. PMID:24948390

  3. Tunable superomniphobic surfaces for sorting droplets by surface tension.

    PubMed

    Movafaghi, S; Wang, W; Metzger, A; Williams, D D; Williams, J D; Kota, A K

    2016-08-16

    We utilized tunable superomniphobic surfaces with flower-like TiO2 nanostructures to fabricate a simple device with precisely tailored surface energy domains that, for the first time, can sort droplets by surface tension. We envision that our methodology for droplet sorting will enable inexpensive and energy-efficient analytical devices for personalized point-of-care diagnostic platforms, lab-on-a-chip systems, biochemical assays and biosensors. PMID:27412084

  4. Charge heterogeneity of surfaces: mapping and effects on surface forces.

    PubMed

    Drelich, Jaroslaw; Wang, Yu U

    2011-07-11

    The DLVO theory treats the total interaction force between two surfaces in a liquid medium as an arithmetic sum of two components: Lifshitz-van der Waals and electric double layer forces. Despite the success of the DLVO model developed for homogeneous surfaces, a vast majority of surfaces of particles and materials in technological systems are of a heterogeneous nature with a mosaic structure composed of microscopic and sub-microscopic domains of different surface characteristics. In such systems, the heterogeneity of the surface can be more important than the average surface character. Attractions can be stronger, by orders of magnitude, than would be expected from the classical mean-field DLVO model when area-averaged surface charge or potential is employed. Heterogeneity also introduces anisotropy of interactions into colloidal systems, vastly ignored in the past. To detect surface heterogeneities, analytical tools which provide accurate and spatially resolved information about material surface chemistry and potential - particularly at microscopic and sub-microscopic resolutions - are needed. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) offers the opportunity to locally probe not only changes in material surface characteristic but also charges of heterogeneous surfaces through measurements of force-distance curves in electrolyte solutions. Both diffuse-layer charge densities and potentials can be calculated by fitting the experimental data with a DLVO theoretical model. The surface charge characteristics of the heterogeneous substrate as recorded by AFM allow the charge variation to be mapped. Based on the obtained information, computer modeling and simulation can be performed to study the interactions among an ensemble of heterogeneous particles and their collective motions. In this paper, the diffuse-layer charge mapping by the AFM technique is briefly reviewed, and a new Diffuse Interface Field Approach to colloid modeling and simulation is briefly discussed.

  5. Topographic characterization of glazed surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fröberg, Linda; Hupa, Leena

    2008-01-01

    Detailed characterization of surface microstructure, i.e. phase composition and surface geometry, has become an important criterion of glazed ceramics. Topographic characterization is an important parameter in, e.g. estimating the influence of additional films on the average roughness of a surface. Also, the microscaled and nanoscaled roughnesses correlate with the cleanability and the self-cleaning properties of the surfaces. In this work the surface geometry of several matte glazes were described by topography and roughness as given by whitelight confocal microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Different measuring parameters were compared to justify the usefulness of the techniques in giving a comprehensive description of the surface microstructure. The results suggest that confocal microscopy is well suited for giving reliable topographical parameters for matte surfaces with microscaled crystals in the surfaces. Atomic force microscopy was better suited for smooth surfaces or for describing the local topographic parameters of closely limited areas, e.g. the surroundings of separate crystals in the surface.

  6. Adhesion behaviors on superhydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Huan; Guo, Zhiguang; Liu, Weimin

    2014-04-18

    The adhesion behaviors of superhydrophobic surfaces have become an emerging topic to researchers in various fields as a vital step in the interactions between materials and organisms/materials. Controlling the chemical compositions and topological structures via various methods or technologies is essential to fabricate and modulate different adhesion properties, such as low-adhesion, high-adhesion and anisotropic adhesion on superhydrophobic surfaces. We summarize the recent developments in both natural superhydrophobic surfaces and artificial superhydrophobic surfaces with various adhesions and also pay attention to superhydrophobic surfaces switching between low- and high-adhesion. The methods to regulate or translate the adhesion of superhydrophobic surfaces can be considered from two perspectives. One is to control the chemical composition and change the surface geometric structure on the surfaces, respectively or simultaneously. The other is to provide external stimulations to induce transitions, which is the most common method for obtaining switchable adhesions. Additionally, adhesion behaviors on solid-solid interfaces, such as the behaviors of cells, bacteria, biomolecules and icing on superhydrophobic surfaces are also noticeable and controversial. This review is aimed at giving a brief and crucial overview of adhesion behaviors on superhydrophobic surfaces.

  7. Surface Modification of Intraocular Lenses

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Qi; Cheng, George Pak-Man; Chiu, Kin; Wang, Gui-Qin

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This paper aimed to review the current literature on the surface modification of intraocular lenses (IOLs). Data Sources: All articles about surface modification of IOLs published up to 2015 were identified through a literature search on both PubMed and ScienceDirect. Study Selection: The articles on the surface modification of IOLs were included, but those on design modification and surface coating were excluded. Results: Technology of surface modification included plasma, ion beam, layer-by-layer self-assembly, ultraviolet radiation, and ozone. The main molecules introduced into IOLs surface were poly (ethylene glycol), polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane, 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine, TiO2, heparin, F-heparin, titanium, titanium nitride, vinyl pyrrolidone, and inhibitors of cytokines. The surface modification either resulted in a more hydrophobic lens, a more hydrophilic lens, or a lens with a hydrophilic anterior and hydrophobic posterior surface. Advances in research regarding surface modification of IOLs had led to a better biocompatibility in both in vitro and animal experiments. Conclusion: The surface modification is an efficient, convenient, economic and promising method to improve the biocompatibility of IOLs. PMID:26830993

  8. Role of surface temperature in fluorocarbon plasma-surface interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Caleb T.; Overzet, Lawrence J.; Goeckner, Matthew J.

    2012-07-15

    This article examines plasma-surface reaction channels and the effect of surface temperature on the magnitude of those channels. Neutral species CF{sub 4}, C{sub 2}F{sub 6}, and C{sub 3}F{sub 8} are produced on surfaces. The magnitude of the production channel increases with surface temperature for all species, but favors higher mass species as the temperature is elevated. Additionally, the production rate of CF{sub 2} increases by a factor of 5 as the surface temperature is raised from 25 Degree-Sign C to 200 Degree-Sign C. Fluorine density, on the other hand, does not change as a function of either surface temperature or position outside of the plasma glow. This indicates that fluorine addition in the gas-phase is not a dominant reaction. Heating reactors can result in higher densities of depositing radical species, resulting in increased deposition rates on cooled substrates. Finally, the sticking probability of the depositing free radical species does not change as a function of surface temperature. Instead, the surface temperature acts together with an etchant species (possibly fluorine) to elevate desorption rates on that surface at temperatures lower than those required for unassisted thermal desorption.

  9. Advances in surfaces and osseointegration in implantology. Biomimetic surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Albertini, Matteo; Fernandez-Yague, Marc; Lázaro, Pedro; Herrero-Climent, Mariano; Bullon, Pedro; Gil, Francisco-Javier

    2015-01-01

    The present work is a revision of the processes occurring in osseointegration of titanium dental implants according to different types of surfaces -namely, polished surfaces, rough surfaces obtained from subtraction methods, as well as the new hydroxyapatite biomimetic surfaces obtained from thermochemical processes. Hydroxyapatite’s high plasma-projection temperatures have proven to prevent the formation of crystalline apatite on the titanium dental implant, but lead to the formation of amorphous calcium phosphate (i.e., with no crystal structure) instead. This layer produce some osseointegration yet the calcium phosphate layer will eventually dissolve and leave a gap between the bone and the dental implant, thus leading to osseointegration failure due to bacterial colonization. A new surface -recently obtained by thermochemical processes- produces, by crystallization, a layer of apatite with the same mineral content as human bone that is chemically bonded to the titanium surface. Osseointegration speed was tested by means of minipigs, showing bone formation after 3 to 4 weeks, with the security that a dental implant can be loaded. This surface can be an excellent candidate for immediate or early loading procedures. Key words:Dental implants, implants surfaces, osseointegration, biomimetics surfaces. PMID:25662555

  10. Airport Surface Network Architecture Definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Thanh C.; Eddy, Wesley M.; Bretmersky, Steven C.; Lawas-Grodek, Fran; Ellis, Brenda L.

    2006-01-01

    Currently, airport surface communications are fragmented across multiple types of systems. These communication systems for airport operations at most airports today are based dedicated and separate architectures that cannot support system-wide interoperability and information sharing. The requirements placed upon the Communications, Navigation, and Surveillance (CNS) systems in airports are rapidly growing and integration is urgently needed if the future vision of the National Airspace System (NAS) and the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NGATS) 2025 concept are to be realized. To address this and other problems such as airport surface congestion, the Space Based Technologies Project s Surface ICNS Network Architecture team at NASA Glenn Research Center has assessed airport surface communications requirements, analyzed existing and future surface applications, and defined a set of architecture functions that will help design a scalable, reliable and flexible surface network architecture to meet the current and future needs of airport operations. This paper describes the systems approach or methodology to networking that was employed to assess airport surface communications requirements, analyze applications, and to define the surface network architecture functions as the building blocks or components of the network. The systems approach used for defining these functions is relatively new to networking. It is viewing the surface network, along with its environment (everything that the surface network interacts with or impacts), as a system. Associated with this system are sets of services that are offered by the network to the rest of the system. Therefore, the surface network is considered as part of the larger system (such as the NAS), with interactions and dependencies between the surface network and its users, applications, and devices. The surface network architecture includes components such as addressing/routing, network management, network

  11. Surface Properties of Vitreous Fibers.

    PubMed

    Ottaviani; Tomatis; Fubini

    2000-04-01

    The surface properties of various vitreous fibers, suspected to be toxic to humans and animals, were investigated by means of paramagnetic labels covalently linked to the surface. Computer-aided analysis of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra provided structural and dynamic information on the label and its environment. Calorimetric measurements provided information on the hydration mechanism. The results were analyzed in terms of (a) different polarity and interaction abilities of surface regions, (b) presence of ions at the surface, (c) silica contents, (d) vicinity of the interacting sites, (e) fiber dimension and morphology of the surfaces, and (f) water hydration. The mobility of the labels decreased due to interaction of the fibers with ions or ionic and polar groups at the surface. Close interacting sites were identified on the basis of spin-spin effects and were distinguished and quantified in strongly and weakly interacting sites. The spin-labeling technique indicated decreased ability of the surface to interact with decreased silicon concentration and in the presence of contaminants at the surface. The interaction with water revealed in all cases a substantial heterogeneity in hydrophilicity of surface sites. The labels were not easily hydrated. Vitreous fibers of various compositions adsorbed much more water than crystalline or amorphous silica; water coordinated to surface cations played a major role in the overall adsorption. The surface reaction mechanisms were the same on fibers of different compositions, but the surface composition affected the extent of adsorption. Glass wool exhibited a much higher adsorption capacity than rock wool under the same experimental conditions. In conclusion, the combination of EPR and calorimetric measurements provided insight into the surface properties of silica-based fibers. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  12. Materials surface contamination analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Arendale, William F.

    1992-01-01

    The original research objective was to demonstrate the ability of optical fiber spectrometry to determine contamination levels on solid rocket motor cases in order to identify surface conditions which may result in poor bonds during production. The capability of using the spectral features to identify contaminants with other sensors which might only indicate a potential contamination level provides a real enhancement to current inspection systems such as Optical Stimulated Electron Emission (OSEE). The optical fiber probe can easily fit into the same scanning fixtures as the OSEE. The initial data obtained using the Guided Wave Model 260 spectrophotometer was primarily focused on determining spectra of potential contaminants such as HD2 grease, silicones, etc. However, once we began taking data and applying multivariate analysis techniques, using a program that can handle very large data sets, i.e., Unscrambler 2, it became apparent that the techniques also might provide a nice scientific tool for determining oxidation and chemisorption rates under controlled conditions. As the ultimate power of the technique became recognized, considering that the chemical system which was most frequently studied in this work is water + D6AC steel, we became very interested in trying the spectroscopic techniques to solve a broad range of problems. The complexity of the observed spectra for the D6AC + water system is due to overlaps between the water peaks, the resulting chemisorbed species, and products of reaction which also contain OH stretching bands. Unscrambling these spectral features, without knowledge of the specific species involved, has proven to be a formidable task.

  13. Remote Sensing of Planetary Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakosky, Bruce M.

    2001-01-01

    Our efforts have been focused on understanding the physical properties of planetary surfaces using remote sensing techniques. Specific application has been to the surfaces of the Moon and Mars. Our approach has been to use thermal-infrared emission and radar reflectance and scattering as a way of exploring the decimeter-scale structure of these surfaces. At this scale, the techniques are sensitive to physical parameters such as the average or effective particle size of surface materials, the degree of induration or physical bonding between individual regolith grains, and the abundance of rocks of different sizes resting on or admixed in to the surface. The results are relevant to understanding the geological processes that have affected the surface and, in the case of Mars, determining site safety and scientific relevance for planning upcoming lander, rover, and sample-return spacecraft missions. Specific results are discussed below, and publications that have resulted are listed at the end.

  14. Surface energies of elemental crystals.

    PubMed

    Tran, Richard; Xu, Zihan; Radhakrishnan, Balachandran; Winston, Donald; Sun, Wenhao; Persson, Kristin A; Ong, Shyue Ping

    2016-01-01

    The surface energy is a fundamental property of the different facets of a crystal that is crucial to the understanding of various phenomena like surface segregation, roughening, catalytic activity, and the crystal's equilibrium shape. Such surface phenomena are especially important at the nanoscale, where the large surface area to volume ratios lead to properties that are significantly different from the bulk. In this work, we present the largest database of calculated surface energies for elemental crystals to date. This database contains the surface energies of more than 100 polymorphs of about 70 elements, up to a maximum Miller index of two and three for non-cubic and cubic crystals, respectively. Well-known reconstruction schemes are also accounted for. The database is systematically improvable and has been rigorously validated against previous experimental and computational data where available. We will describe the methodology used in constructing the database, and how it can be accessed for further studies and design of materials. PMID:27622853

  15. Drop Impact on Superheated Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Tuan; Staat, Hendrik J. J.; Prosperetti, Andrea; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2012-01-01

    At the impact of a liquid droplet on a smooth surface heated above the liquid’s boiling point, the droplet either immediately boils when it contacts the surface (“contact boiling”), or without any surface contact forms a Leidenfrost vapor layer towards the hot surface and bounces back (“gentle film boiling”), or both forms the Leidenfrost layer and ejects tiny droplets upward (“spraying film boiling”). We experimentally determine conditions under which impact behaviors in each regime can be realized. We show that the dimensionless maximum spreading γ of impacting droplets on the heated surfaces in both gentle and spraying film boiling regimes shows a universal scaling with the Weber number We (γ˜We2/5), which is much steeper than for the impact on nonheated (hydrophilic or hydrophobic) surfaces (γ˜We1/4). We also interferometrically measure the vapor thickness under the droplet.

  16. Friction surfaced Stellite6 coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, K. Prasad; Damodaram, R.; Rafi, H. Khalid; Ram, G.D. Janaki; Reddy, G. Madhusudhan; Nagalakshmi, R.

    2012-08-15

    Solid state Stellite6 coatings were deposited on steel substrate by friction surfacing and compared with Stellite6 cast rod and coatings deposited by gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred arc welding processes. Friction surfaced coatings exhibited finer and uniformly distributed carbides and were characterized by the absence of solidification structure and compositional homogeneity compared to cast rod, gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred coatings. Friction surfaced coating showed relatively higher hardness. X-ray diffraction of samples showed only face centered cubic Co peaks while cold worked coating showed hexagonally close packed Co also. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stellite6 used as coating material for friction surfacing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Friction surfaced (FS) coatings compared with casting, GTA and PTA processes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Finer and uniformly distributed carbides in friction surfaced coatings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Absence of melting results compositional homogeneity in FS Stellite6 coatings.

  17. Undergraduate Laboratory for Surface Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, Mitchio; Beauchamp, Jesse L.; Dickert, Jeffrey M.; Essy, Blair R.; Claypool, Christopher L.

    1996-02-01

    Surface science has developed into a multidisciplinary field of research with applications ranging from heterogeneous catalysis to semiconductor etching (1). Aspects of surface chemistry are now included in physical chemistry textbooks (2) and undergraduate curricula (3), but the perceived cost and complexity of equipment has deterred the introduction of surface science methods in undergraduate laboratories (4). Efforts to expose chemistry undergraduates to state-of-the-art surface instrumentation have just begun (5). To provide our undergraduates with hands-on experience in using standard techniques for characterizing surface morphology, adsorbates, kinetics, and reaction mechanisms, we have developed a set of surface science experiments for our physical chemistry laboratory sequence. The centerpiece of the laboratory is an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) chamber for studies of single crystal surfaces. This instrument, shown in the figure, has surface analysis capabilities including low energy electron diffraction (LEED), Auger spectroscopy, and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD). The laboratory exercises involve experiments on the well-studied Pt(111) surface. Students prepare a previously mounted single crystal sample by sputtering it with an argon ion gun and heating it under O2. Electron diffraction patterns from the cleaned surface are then obtained with a reverse view LEED apparatus (Princeton Instruments). Images are captured by a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera interfaced to a personal computer for easy downloading and subsequent analysis. Although the LEED images from a Pt(111) surface can be readily interpreted using simple diffraction arguments, this lab provides an excellent context for introducing Miller indices and reciprocal lattices (6). The surface chemical composition can be investigated by Auger spectroscopy, using the LEED apparatus as a simple energy analyzer. The temperature programmed desorption experiment, which is nearly complete, will be

  18. Method of modifying a surface

    DOEpatents

    Renk, Timothy J.; Sorensen, Neil R.; Senft, Donna Cowell; Buchheit, Jr., Rudolph G.; Thompson, Michael O.; Grabowski, Kenneth S.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides a surface modification method that provides beneficial changes in surface properties, can modify a surface to a greater depth than previous methods, and that is suitable for industrial application. The present method comprises applying a thin-film coating to a surface of a substrate, then subjecting the coated surface to an ion beam. The ion beam power pulse heats the coated surface, leading to alloying between the material in the coating and the material of the substrate. Rapid cooling of the alloyed layer after an ion beam pulse can lead to formation of metastable alloys and microstructures not accessible by conventional alloying methods or intense ion beam treatment of the substrate alone.

  19. Slope sensitivities for optical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, John R.

    2015-09-01

    Setting a tolerance for the slope errors of an optical surface (e.g., surface form errors of the "mid-spatial-frequencies") requires some knowledge of how those surface errors affect the final image of the system. While excellent tools exist for simulating those effects on a surface-by-surface basis, considerable insight may be gained by examining, for each surface, a simple sensitivity parameter that relates the slope error on the surface to the ray displacement at the final image plane. Snell's law gives a relationship between the slope errors of a surface and the angular deviations of the rays emerging from the surface. For a singlet or thin doublet acting by itself, these angular deviations are related to ray deviations at the image plane by the focal length of the lens. However, for optical surfaces inside an optical system having a substantial axial extent, the focal length of the system is not the correct multiplier, as the sensitivity is influenced by the optical surfaces that follow. In this paper, a simple expression is derived that relates the slope errors at an arbitrary optical surface to the ray deviation at the image plane. This expression is experimentally verified by comparison to a real-ray perturbation analysis. The sensitivity parameter relates the RMS slope errors to the RMS spot radius, and also relates the peak slope error to the 100% spot radius, and may be used to create an RSS error budget for slope error. Application to various types of system are shown and discussed.

  20. Titan's rotation - Surface feature observed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemmon, M. T.; Karkoschka, E.; Tomasko, M.

    1993-06-01

    A surface feature or a near-surface fracture is suggested to account for the time variations in the 0.94, 1.08, and 1.28 micron atmospheric windows of Titan's geometric albedo, relative to its albedo in adjacent methane bands. These observations are noted to be consistent with synchronous rotation. They can also be explained by a 0.1-higher surface albedo on Titan's leading hemisphere.