Science.gov

Sample records for 5-bp classical satellite

  1. 5-bp Classical Satellite DNA Loci from Chromosome-1 Instability in Cervical Neoplasia Detected by DNA Breakage Detection/Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization (DBD-FISH).

    PubMed

    Cortés-Gutiérrez, Elva I; Ortíz-Hernández, Brenda L; Dávila-Rodríguez, Martha I; Cerda-Flores, Ricardo M; Fernández, José Luis; López-Fernández, Carmen; Gosálvez, Jaime

    2013-02-19

    We aimed to evaluate the association between the progressive stages of cervical neoplasia and DNA damage in 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 in cervical epithelium and in peripheral blood lymphocytes using DNA breakage detection/fluorescence in situ hybridization (DBD-FISH). A hospital-based unmatched case-control study was conducted in 2011 with a sample of 30 women grouped according to disease stage and selected according to histological diagnosis; 10 with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LG-SIL), 10 with high-grade SIL (HG-SIL), and 10 with no cervical lesions, from the Unidad Medica de Alta Especialidad of The Mexican Social Security Institute, IMSS, Mexico. Specific chromosome damage levels in 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 were evaluated in cervical epithelium and peripheral blood lymphocytes using the DBD-FISH technique. Whole-genome DNA hybridization was used as a reference for the level of damage. Results of Kruskal-Wallis test showed a significant increase according to neoplastic development in both tissues. The instability of 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1 was evidenced using chromosome-orientation FISH. In conclusion, we suggest that the progression to malignant transformation involves an increase in the instability of 5-bp classical satellite DNA sequences from chromosome-1.

  2. THE COSMIC ABUNDANCE OF CLASSICAL MILKY WAY SATELLITES

    SciTech Connect

    Strigari, Louis E.; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2012-04-10

    We study the abundance of satellites akin to the brightest, classical dwarf spheroidals around galaxies similar in magnitude and isolation to the Milky Way and M31 in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. From a combination of photometric and spectroscopic redshifts, we bound the mean and the intrinsic scatter in the number of satellites down to 10 mag fainter than the Milky Way. Restricting to magnitudes brighter than Sagittarius, we show that the Milky Way is not a significant statistical outlier in its population of classical dwarf spheroidals. At fainter magnitudes, we find an upper limit of 13 on the mean number of satellites brighter than the Fornax dwarf spheroidal. Methods to improve these limits that utilize full photometric redshift distributions hold promise, but are currently limited by incompleteness at the very lowest redshifts. Theoretical models are left to explain why the majority of dark matter subhalos that orbit Milky-Way-like galaxies are inefficient at making galaxies at the luminosity scale of the brightest dwarf spheroidals, or why these subhalos predicted by {Lambda}CDM do not exist.

  3. A comparison of three classical analytical theories for the motion of artificial satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, R. A.; Mistreets, G. D.; Watson, J. S.

    1978-01-01

    Motivated by the heavy reliance upon the analytic orbit theory in orbit determination operations at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), a comparison study is performed for three classical analytical theories of artificial satellite motion about an oblate earth. The three analytical theories are: (1) Brouwer, (2) a modified Brouwer, i.e., Brouwer-Lyddane and Cohen, and (3) Vinti. Comparison results for each theory are produced for a number of representative satellites of current or past interest which proved amenable to analytic theory application. The uniformity of these results has significant implications for current and future mission operations and planning activities. Subsidiary topics arising from the results of this study which relate to the optimum usage of the individual theories are also discussed

  4. A mixed quantum-classical description of pheophorbide a linear absorption spectra: Quantum-corrections of the Qy- and Qx-absorption vibrational satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megow, Jörg; Kulesza, Alexander; May, Volkhard

    2016-01-01

    The ground-state classical path approximation is utilized to compute molecular absorption spectra in a mixed quantum-classical frame. To improve the description for high-frequency vibrational satellites, related quantum correction factors are introduced. The improved method is demonstrated for the Qy- and Qx-bands of pheophorbide a.

  5. Satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, J.A.; Matthews, M.S.

    1986-01-01

    The present work is based on a conference: Natural Satellites, Colloquium 77 of the IAU, held at Cornell University from July 5 to 9, 1983. Attention is given to the background and origins of satellites, protosatellite swarms, the tectonics of icy satellites, the physical characteristics of satellite surfaces, and the interactions of planetary magnetospheres with icy satellite surfaces. Other topics include the surface composition of natural satellites, the cratering of planetary satellites, the moon, Io, and Europa. Consideration is also given to Ganymede and Callisto, the satellites of Saturn, small satellites, satellites of Uranus and Neptune, and the Pluto-Charon system.

  6. Constraining the processes modifying the surfaces of the classical Uranian satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, Richard J.; Emery, Joshua P.

    2016-10-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) observations of the classical Uranian moons have detected relatively weak H2O ice bands, mixed with a spectrally red, low albedo constituent on the surfaces of their southern hemispheres (sub-observer lat. ~10 - 75°S). The H2O bands and the degree of spectral reddening are greatest on the leading hemispheres of these moons. CO2 ice bands have been detected in spectra collected over their trailing hemispheres, with stronger CO2 bands on the moons closest to Uranus. Our preferred hypotheses to explain the distribution of CO2, H2O, and dark material are: bombardment by magnetospherically-embedded charged particles, primarily on the trailing hemispheres of these moons, and bombardment by micrometeorites, primarily on their leading hemispheres.To test these complementary hypotheses, we are constraining the distribution and spectral characteristics of surface constituents on the currently observable northern hemispheres (sub-observer lat. ~20 - 35°N) to compare with existing southern hemisphere data. Analysis of northern hemisphere data shows that CO2 is present on their trailing hemispheres, and H2O bands and the degree of spectral reddening are strongest on their leading hemispheres, in agreement with the southern hemisphere data. This longitudinal distribution of constituents supports our preferred hypotheses.However, tantalizing mysteries regarding the distribution of constituents remain. There has been no detection of CO2 on Miranda, and H2O bands are stronger on its trailing hemisphere. NIR slope measurements indicate that the northern hemisphere of Titania is redder than Oberon, unlike the spectral colors of their southern hemispheres. There are latitudinal variations in H2O band strengths on these moons, with stronger H2O bands at northern latitudes compared to southern latitudes on Umbriel and Titania. Several Miranda and Ariel spectra potentially include weak and unconfirmed NH3-hydrate bands, which could be tracers of cryovolcanic

  7. A 5-bp Insertion in Mip Causes Recessive Congenital Cataract in KFRS4/Kyo Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Tomoko; Okubo, Saki; Takekuma, Kensuke; Hashizume, Ryoichi; Hayashi, Jun-Ichi; Serikawa, Tadao; Kuramoto, Takashi; Kikkawa, Yoshiaki

    2012-01-01

    We discovered a new cataract mutation, kfrs4, in the Kyoto Fancy Rat Stock (KFRS) background. Within 1 month of birth, all kfrs4/kfrs4 homozygotes developed cataracts, with severe opacity in the nuclei of the lens. In contrast, no opacity was observed in the kfrs4/+ heterozygotes. We continued to observe these rats until they reached 1 year of age and found that cataractogenesis did not occur in kfrs4/+ rats. To define the histological defects in the lenses of kfrs4 rats, sections of the eyes of these rats were prepared. Although the lenses of kfrs4/kfrs4 homozygotes showed severely disorganised fibres and vacuolation, the lenses of kfrs4/+ heterozygotes appeared normal and similar to those of wild-type rats. We used positional cloning to identify the kfrs4 mutation. The mutation was mapped to an approximately 9.7-Mb region on chromosome 7, which contains the Mip gene. This gene is responsible for a dominant form of cataract in humans and mice. Sequence analysis of the mutant-derived Mip gene identified a 5-bp insertion. This insertion is predicted to inactivate the MIP protein, as it produces a frameshift that results in the synthesis of 6 novel amino acid residues and a truncated protein that lacks 136 amino acids in the C-terminal region, and no MIP immunoreactivity was observed in the lens fibre cells of kfrs4/kfrs4 homozygous rats using an antibody that recognises the C- and N-terminus of MIP. In addition, the kfrs4/+ heterozygotes showed reduced expression of Mip mRNA and MIP protein and the kfrs4/kfrs4 homozygotes showed no expression in the lens. These results indicate that the kfrs4 mutation conveys a loss-of-function, which leads to functional inactivation though the degradation of Mip mRNA by an mRNA decay mechanism. Therefore, the kfrs4 rat represents the first characterised rat model with a recessive mutation in the Mip gene. PMID:23226368

  8. A Classical Science Transformed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovalevsky, Jean

    1979-01-01

    Describes how satellites and other tools of space technology have transformed classical geodesy into the science of space geodynamics. The establishment and the activities of the French Center for Geodynamic and Astronomical Research Studies (CERGA) are also included. (HM)

  9. Classics Online.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clayman, Dee L.

    1995-01-01

    Appraises several databases devoted to classical literature. Thesaurus Linguae Graecae (TLG) contains the entire extant corpus of ancient Greek literature, including works on lexicography and historiography, extending into the 15th century. Other works awaiting completion are the Database of Classical Bibliography and a CD-ROM pictorial dictionary…

  10. Classical integrability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrielli, Alessandro

    2016-08-01

    We review some essential aspects of classically integrable systems. The detailed outline of the sections consists of: 1. Introduction and motivation, with historical remarks; 2. Liouville theorem and action-angle variables, with examples (harmonic oscillator, Kepler problem); 3. Algebraic tools: Lax pairs, monodromy and transfer matrices, classical r-matrices and exchange relations, non-ultralocal Poisson brackets, with examples (non-linear Schrödinger model, principal chiral field); 4. Features of classical r-matrices: Belavin-Drinfeld theorems, analyticity properties, and lift of the classical structures to quantum groups; 5. Classical inverse scattering method to solve integrable differential equations: soliton solutions, spectral properties and the Gel’fand-Levitan-Marchenko equation, with examples (KdV equation, Sine-Gordon model). Prepared for the Durham Young Researchers Integrability School, organised by the GATIS network. This is part of a collection of lecture notes.

  11. Classical Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bode, Michael F.; Evans, Aneurin

    2012-07-01

    Preface; 1. Novae - a historical perspective Hilmar W. Duerbeck; 2. Properties of novae: an overview Brian Warner; 3. The evolution of nova-producing binary stars Icko Iben, Jr and Masayuki Y. Fujimoto; 4. Thermonuclear processes S. Starrfield, C. Iliadis and W. R. Hix; 5. Nova atmospheres and winds P. H. Hauschildt; 6. Observational mysteries and theoretical challenges Jordi Jose and Steven N. Shore; 7. Radio emission from novae E. R. Seaquist and M. F. Bode; 8. Infrared studies of classical novae Robert D. Gehrz; 9. Optical and ultraviolet evolution Steven N. Shore; 10. X-ray emission from classical novae in outburst Joachim Krautter; 11. Gamma-rays from classical novae Margarita Hernanz; 12. Resolved nova remnants T. J. O'Brien and M. F. Bode; 13. Dust and molecules in nova environments A. Evans and J. M. C. Rawlings; 14. Extragalactic novae Allen Shafter; Index.

  12. Classical Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Tai L.

    1995-05-01

    Bring Classical Mechanics To Life With a Realistic Software Simulation! You can enhance the thorough coverage of Chow's Classical Mechanics with a hands-on, real-world experience! John Wiley & Sons, Inc. is proud to announce a new computer simulation for classical mechanics. Developed by the Consortium for Upper-Level Physics Software (CUPS), this simulation offers complex, often realistic calculations of models of various physical systems. Classical Mechanics Simulations (54881-2) is the perfect complement to Chow's text. Like all of the CUPS simulations, it is remarkably easy to use, yet sophisticated enough for explorations of new ideas. Other Important Features Include: * Six powerful simulations include: The Motion Generator, Rotation of Three-Dimensional Objects, Coupled Oscillators, Anharmonic Oscillators, Gravitational Orbits, and Collisions * Pascal source code for all programs is supplied and a number of exercises suggest specific ways the programs can be modified. * Simulations usually include graphical (often animated) displays. The entire CUPS simulation series consists of nine book/software simulations which comprise most of the undergraduate physics major's curriculum.

  13. Elovl4 5-bp deletion knock-in mouse model for Stargardt-like macular degeneration demonstrates accumulation of ELOVL4 and lipofuscin

    PubMed Central

    Vasireddy, Vidyullatha; Jablonski, Monica M.; Khan, Naheed W.; Wang, Xiao Fei; Sahu, Priya; Sparrow, Janet R; Ayyagari, Radha

    2009-01-01

    The mechanism underlying photoreceptor degeneration in autosomal dominant Stargardt like macular degeneration (STGD3) due to mutations in the elongation of very long chain fatty acids-4 (ELOVL4) gene is not fully understood. To evaluate the pathological events associated with STGD3, we used a mouse model that mimics the human STGD3 phenotype and studied the progression of retinal degeneration. Morphological changes in the retina of Elovl4 5 bp-deletion knock-in mice (E_mut+/− ) were evaluated at 22 months of age. The localization of ELOVL4, and the expression pattern of inner retinal tissue marker proteins, and ubiquitin were determined by immunofluorescence labeling of retinal sections. Levels of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) lipofuscin fluorophores were measured by quantitative HPLC. Morphological evaluation of the retina revealed an accumulation of RPE debris in the subretinal space. A significant increase in the amount of ELOVL4 was observed in the outer plexiform layer in E_mut +/− mice compared to controls. Apart from the accumulation of ELOVL4, E_mut +/− mice also exhibited high expression of ubiquitin in the retina. Analysis of lipofuscin fluorophores in the RPE showed a significant elevation of A2E and compounds of the all-trans- retinal dimer series in retinas from four and ten month old E_mut +/− mice compared to wild-type littermates. These observations suggest that abnormal accumulation of ELOVL4 protein and lipofuscin may lead to photoreceptor degeneration in E_mut +/− mice. PMID:19682985

  14. What classicality? Decoherence and Bohr's classical concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlosshauer, Maximilian; Camilleri, Kristian

    2011-03-01

    Niels Bohr famously insisted on the indispensability of what he termed "classical concepts." In the context of the decoherence program, on the other hand, it has become fashionable to talk about the "dynamical emergence of classicality" from the quantum formalism alone. Does this mean that decoherence challenges Bohr's dictum—for example, that classical concepts do not need to be assumed but can be derived? In this paper we'll try to shed some light down the murky waters where formalism and philosophy cohabitate. To begin, we'll clarify the notion of classicality in the decoherence description. We'll then discuss Bohr's and Heisenberg's take on the quantum—classical problem and reflect on different meanings of the terms "classicality" and "classical concepts" in the writings of Bohr and his followers. This analysis will allow us to put forward some tentative suggestions for how we may better understand the relation between decoherence-induced classicality and Bohr's classical concepts.

  15. Multidisciplinary studies of the social, economic and political impact resulting from recent advances in satellite meteorology. Volume 6: Executive summary. [technological forecasting spacecraft control/attitude (inclination) -classical mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    An assessment of the technological impact of modern satellite weather forecasting for the United States is presented. Topics discussed are: (1) television broadcasting of weather; (2) agriculture (crop production); (3) water resources; (4) urban development; (5) recreation; and (6) transportation.

  16. Satellite Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technology Teacher, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Presents a discussion of communication satellites: explains the principles of satellite communication, describes examples of how governments and industries are currently applying communication satellites, analyzes issues confronting satellite communication, links mathematics and science to the study of satellite communication, and applies…

  17. Satellite Laser Ranging operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearlman, Michael R.

    1994-01-01

    Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) is currently providing precision orbit determination for measurements of: 1) Ocean surface topography from satellite borne radar altimetry, 2) Spatial and temporal variations of the gravity field, 3) Earth and ocean tides, 4) Plate tectonic and regional deformation, 5) Post-glacial uplift and subsidence, 6) Variations in the Earth's center-of-mass, and 7) Variations in Earth rotation. SLR also supports specialized programs in time transfer and classical geodetic positioning, and will soon provide precision ranging to support experiments in relativity.

  18. The Classical Vacuum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Timothy H.

    1985-01-01

    The classical vacuum of physics is not empty, but contains a distinctive pattern of electromagnetic fields. Discovery of the vacuum, thermal spectrum, classical electron theory, zero-point spectrum, and effects of acceleration are discussed. Connection between thermal radiation and the classical vacuum reveals unexpected unity in the laws of…

  19. The Classics Revivified.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Dorothy, Ed.

    1979-01-01

    The eight articles in this bulletin suggest methods of introducing classical literature into the English curriculum. Article titles are: "Ideas for Teaching Classical Mythology"; "What Novels Should High School Students Read?"; "Enlivening the Classics for Live Students"; "Poetry in Performance: The Value of Song and Oral Interpretation in…

  20. Satellite Geodesy—Foundations, Methods, and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fell, Patrick

    This text is an updated English translation of Satellitengeodasie, a book that was published in German in 1989. The text is the first in many years that attempts to cover the broad spectrum of methods, applications, and systems, both classical and current, that have developed in the field of satellite geodesy.The material is presented in a structure that follows the major observational methods used in satellite geodesy: classical techniques, Doppler, GPS, laser, altimetry, and special methods including satellite-to-satellite tracking, satellite radiometry, and VLBI. Before introducing these observational techniques in detail, the author provides the fundamentals on reference frames, time signal propagation, orbital mechanics and basic applications of satellite geodesy in positioning, gravity field modeling, navigation, marine geodesy, kinematics, and geodynamics. An excellent reference list completes the text.

  1. Satellite RNAs and Satellite Viruses.

    PubMed

    Palukaitis, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Satellite RNAs and satellite viruses are extraviral components that can affect either the pathogenicity, the accumulation, or both of their associated viruses while themselves being dependent on the associated viruses as helper viruses for their infection. Most of these satellite RNAs are noncoding RNAs, and in many cases, have been shown to alter the interaction of their helper viruses with their hosts. In only a few cases have the functions of these satellite RNAs in such interactions been studied in detail. In particular, work on the satellite RNAs of Cucumber mosaic virus and Turnip crinkle virus have provided novel insights into RNAs functioning as noncoding RNAs. These effects are described and potential roles for satellite RNAs in the processes involved in symptom intensification or attenuation are discussed. In most cases, models describing these roles involve some aspect of RNA silencing or its suppression, either directly or indirectly involving the particular satellite RNA.

  2. Absolutely classical spin states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnet-Waldraff, F.; Giraud, O.; Braun, D.

    2017-01-01

    We introduce the concept of "absolutely classical" spin states, in analogy to absolutely separable states of bipartite quantum systems. Absolutely classical states are states that remain classical (i.e., a convex sum of projectors on coherent states of a spin j ) under any unitary transformation applied to them. We investigate the maximal size of the ball of absolutely classical states centered on the maximally mixed state and derive a lower bound for its radius as a function of the total spin quantum number. We also obtain a numerical estimate of this maximal radius and compare it to the case of absolutely separable states.

  3. Nonzero Classical Discord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheorghiu, Vlad; de Oliveira, Marcos C.; Sanders, Barry C.

    2015-07-01

    Quantum discord is the quantitative difference between two alternative expressions for bipartite mutual information, given respectively in terms of two distinct definitions for the conditional entropy. By constructing a stochastic model of shared states, classical discord can be similarly defined, quantifying the presence of some stochasticity in the measurement process. Therefore, discord can generally be understood as a quantification of the system's state disturbance due to local measurements, be it quantum or classical. We establish an operational meaning of classical discord in the context of state merging with noisy measurement and thereby show the quantum-classical separation in terms of a negative conditional entropy.

  4. Satellite Vulnerabilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-18

    per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and...allies. 8  Satellites and Intelligence , Surveillance, and Reconnaissance We have become dependent also on our satellite surveillance assets...uninterrupted ISR”, with “space intelligence , surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) systems…fundamental to air power—especially to the execution

  5. Meteorological satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, L. J. (Editor); Schnapf, A.; Diesen, B. C., III; Martin, P. S.; Schwalb, A.; Bandeen, W. R.

    1980-01-01

    An overview is presented of the meteorological satellite programs that have been evolving from 1958 to the present, and plans for the future meteorological and environmental satellite systems that are scheduled to be placed into service in the early 1980's are reviewed. The development of the TIROS family of weather satellites, including TIROS, ESSA, ITOS/NOAA, and the present TIROS-N (the third generation operational system) is summarized. The contribution of the Nimbus and ATS technology satellites to the development of the operational-orbiting and geostationary satellites is discussed. Included are descriptions of both the TIROS-N and the DMSP payloads currently under development to assure a continued and orderly growth of these systems into the 1980's.

  6. The Classics, Con Brio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, James

    1978-01-01

    Sponsored by a consortium of 30 American universities, Rome's Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies offers a year of study to American undergraduate classics majors. Instructors are also American and normally stay only a year; teaching assistants are always ex-students of the center. Extensive field trips are an important part of the…

  7. Classic-Ada(TM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valley, Lois

    1989-01-01

    The SPS product, Classic-Ada, is a software tool that supports object-oriented Ada programming with powerful inheritance and dynamic binding. Object Oriented Design (OOD) is an easy, natural development paradigm, but it is not supported by Ada. Following the DOD Ada mandate, SPS developed Classic-Ada to provide a tool which supports OOD and implements code in Ada. It consists of a design language, a code generator and a toolset. As a design language, Classic-Ada supports the object-oriented principles of information hiding, data abstraction, dynamic binding, and inheritance. It also supports natural reuse and incremental development through inheritance, code factoring, and Ada, Classic-Ada, dynamic binding and static binding in the same program. Only nine new constructs were added to Ada to provide object-oriented design capabilities. The Classic-Ada code generator translates user application code into fully compliant, ready-to-run, standard Ada. The Classic-Ada toolset is fully supported by SPS and consists of an object generator, a builder, a dictionary manager, and a reporter. Demonstrations of Classic-Ada and the Classic-Ada Browser were given at the workshop.

  8. Classical/Non‐classical Polyoxometalate Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Santiago‐Schübel, Beatrix; Willbold, Sabine; Heß, Volkmar

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Two polyanions [SeI V 2PdII 4WVI 14O56H]11− and [SeI V 4PdII 4WVI 28O108H12]12− are the first hybrid polyoxometalates in which classical (Group 5/6 metal based) and non‐classical (late transition‐metal based) polyoxometalate units are joined. Requiring no supporting groups, this co‐condensation of polyoxotungstate and isopolyoxopalladate constituents also provides a logical link between POM‐PdII coordination complexes and the young subclass of polyoxopalladates. Solid‐state, solution, and gas‐phase studies suggest interesting specific reactivities for these hybrids and point to several potential derivatives and functionalization strategies. PMID:27617918

  9. Classical-Quantum Limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliynyk, Todd A.

    2016-12-01

    We introduce a new approach to analyzing the interaction between classical and quantum systems that is based on a limiting procedure applied to multi-particle Schrödinger equations. The limit equations obtained by this procedure, which we refer to as the classical-quantum limit, govern the interaction between classical and quantum systems, and they possess many desirable properties that are inherited in the limit from the multi-particle quantum system. As an application, we use the classical-quantum limit equations to identify the source of the non-local signalling that is known to occur in the classical-quantum hybrid scheme of Hall and Reginatto. We also derive the first order correction to the classical-quantum limit equation to obtain a fully consistent first order approximation to the Schrödinger equation that should be accurate for modeling the interaction between particles of disparate mass in the regime where the particles with the larger masses are effectively classical.

  10. Satellite Videoconferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    NASA is helping thousands of teachers to learn more about aerospace matters, improve their classroom skills, and expand significantly the content of their aerospace education curricula by means of live educational satellite videoconferences. The 1 1/2 hour 'Update for Teachers' programs originate at Oklahoma State University (OSU) Telecommunications Center. The television signals are transmitted to the WESTAR IV communications satellite, which remits them to participating schools across the U.S. and in parts of Mexico and Canada. The schools are equipped with small home style satellite reception dishes. Education Satellite Videoconference programs are conducted four times yearly, covering a variety of aerospace subjects. Teachers can call toll-free and have questions answered after the speaker's presentations. Information about NASA educational resources and how to obtain them will be provided.

  11. Satellite (Natural)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    In its most general sense, any celestial object in orbit around a similar larger object. Thus, for example, the Magellanic Clouds are satellite galaxies of our own Milky Way galaxy. Without qualification, the term is used to mean a body in orbit around a planet; an alternative term is moon. The term natural satellite distinguishes these bodies from artificial satellites—spacecraft placed in orbi...

  12. The classical Bloch equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frimmer, Martin; Novotny, Lukas

    2014-10-01

    Coherent control of a quantum mechanical two-level system is at the heart of magnetic resonance imaging, quantum information processing, and quantum optics. Among the most prominent phenomena in quantum coherent control are Rabi oscillations, Ramsey fringes, and Hahn echoes. We demonstrate that these phenomena can be derived classically by use of a simple coupled-harmonic-oscillator model. The classical problem can be cast in a form that is formally equivalent to the quantum mechanical Bloch equations with the exception that the longitudinal and the transverse relaxation times (T1 and T2) are equal. The classical analysis is intuitive and well suited for familiarizing students with the basic concepts of quantum coherent control, while at the same time highlighting the fundamental differences between classical and quantum theories.

  13. Classical confined particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horzela, Andrzej; Kapuscik, Edward

    1993-01-01

    An alternative picture of classical many body mechanics is proposed. In this picture particles possess individual kinematics but are deprived from individual dynamics. Dynamics exists only for the many particle system as a whole. The theory is complete and allows to determine the trajectories of each particle. It is proposed to use our picture as a classical prototype for a realistic theory of confined particles.

  14. Randomness: Quantum versus classical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrennikov, Andrei

    2016-05-01

    Recent tremendous development of quantum information theory has led to a number of quantum technological projects, e.g. quantum random generators. This development had stimulated a new wave of interest in quantum foundations. One of the most intriguing problems of quantum foundations is the elaboration of a consistent and commonly accepted interpretation of a quantum state. Closely related problem is the clarification of the notion of quantum randomness and its interrelation with classical randomness. In this short review, we shall discuss basics of classical theory of randomness (which by itself is very complex and characterized by diversity of approaches) and compare it with irreducible quantum randomness. We also discuss briefly “digital philosophy”, its role in physics (classical and quantum) and its coupling to the information interpretation of quantum mechanics (QM).

  15. Satellite Coordination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, R. J.

    2004-06-01

    The Radio Regulations set out complex procedures to ensure that when new systems start to use the frequency bands allocated to them there is minimal disruption to existing systems using the same bands. The process of satellite coordination is described, and the issues for radio astronomy are discussed. In order to be protected by the ITU-R machinery radio telescopes need to be officially registered. The issue of paper satellites highlights the need for early registration to gain priority over incoming systems. Modern developments including the use of complex Monte-Carlo simulations to predict interference levels, and the issue of adjacent band interference, are discussed.

  16. Classicism and Romanticism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huddleston, Gregory H.

    1993-01-01

    Describes one teacher's methods for introducing to secondary English students the concepts of Classicism and Romanticism in relation to pictures of gardens, architecture, music, and literary works. Outlines how the unit leads to a writing assignment based on collected responses over time. (HB)

  17. Classical Mythology. Fourth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morford, Mark P. O.; Lenardon, Robert J.

    Designed for students with little or no background in classical literature, this book introduces the Greek and Roman myths of creation, myths of the gods, Greek sagas and local legends, and presents contemporary theories about the myths. Drawing on Homer, Hesiod, Pindar, Vergil, and others, the book provides many translations and paraphrases of…

  18. Renewing Literary Classics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karolides, Nicholas J., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    The articles in this journal issue suggest techniques for classroom use of literature that has "withstood the test of time." The titles of the articles and their authors are as follows: (1) "The Storytelling Connection for the Classics" (Mary Ellen Martin); (2) "Elizabeth Bennet: A Liberated Woman" (Geneva Marking);…

  19. Careers in the Classics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lum, Lydia

    2005-01-01

    America's few Black classics professors have overcome contempt and criticism to contribute a unique perspective to the study of the ancient world. Dr. Patrice Rankine, an associate professor from Purdue University, has grown used to the irony. As one of the few Black classicists teaching at an American university, he has drawn plenty of skepticism…

  20. Classics in What Sense?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camic, Charles

    2008-01-01

    They seem the perfect bookends for the social psychologist's collection of "classics" of the field. Two volumes, nearly identical in shape and weight and exactly a century old in 2008--each professing to usher "social psychology" into the world as they both place the hybrid expression square in their titles but then proceed to stake out the field…

  1. Children's Classics. Fifth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Alice M.

    "Children's Classics," a 1947 article by Alice M. Jordan reprinted from "The Horn Book Magazine," examines the dynamics and appeal of some of the most famous books for young readers, including "Alice in Wonderland,""The Wind in the Willows,""Robinson Crusoe," and "Andersen's Fairy Tales." Paul Hein's annotated bibliography, a revision of Jordan's…

  2. Teaching Tomorrow's Classics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tighe, Mary Ann; Avinger, Charles

    1994-01-01

    Describes young adult novels that may prove to be classics of the genre. Discusses "The "Chocolate War" by Robert Cormier, "The Outsiders" by S. E. Hinton, "The Witch of Blackbird Pond" by Elizabeth George Speare, and "On Fortune's Wheel" by Cynthia Voight. (HB)

  3. Getting into Classical Chinese

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, George W.

    1976-01-01

    The world of classical Chinese is distant both in time and space from the world of the English-speaking American. The instructor must not, however, use a no-attention-to-meaning approach assuming some words are untranslateable or create confusion in discussing the nature of Chinese script. (CFM)

  4. Observations of classical cepheids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pel, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    The observations of classical Cepheids are reviewed. The main progress that has been made is summarized and some of the problems yet to be solved are discussed. The problems include color excesses, calibration of color, duplicity, ultraviolet colors, temperature-color relations, mass discrepancies, and radius determination.

  5. Classical Demonstration of Polarization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauman, Robert P.; Moore, Dennis R.

    1980-01-01

    Presents a classical demonstration of polarization for high school students. The initial state of this model, which demonstrates the important concepts of the optical and quantum problems, was developed during the 1973 summer program on lecture demonstration at the U.S. Naval Academy. (HM)

  6. Classical galactosaemia revisited.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Annet M

    2006-08-01

    Classical galactosaemia (McKusick 230400) is an: autosomal recessive disorder of galactose metabolism, caused by a deficiency of the enzyme galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT; EC 2.7.712). Most patients present in the neonatal period, after ingestion of galactose, with jaundice, hepatosplenomegaly, hepatocellular insufficiency, food intolerance, hypoglycaemia, renal tubular dysfunction, muscle hypotonia, sepsis and cataract. The gold standard for diagnosis of classical galactosaemia is measurement of GALT activity in erythrocytes. Gas-chromatographic determination of urinary sugars and sugar alcohols demonstrates elevated concentrations of galactose and galactitol. The only therapy for patients with classical galactosaemia is a galactose-restricted diet, and initially all galactose must be removed from the diet as soon as the diagnosis is suspected. After the neonatal period, a lactose-free diet is advised in most countries, without restriction of galactose-containing fruit and vegetables. In spite of the strict diet, long-term complications such as retarded mental development, verbal dyspraxia, motor abnormalities and hypergonadotrophic hypogonadism are frequently seen in patients with classical galactosaemia. It has been suggested that these complications may result from endogenous galactose synthesis or from abnormal galactosylation. Novel therapeutic strategies, aiming at the prevention of galactose 1-phosphate production, should be developed. In the meantime, the follow-up protocol for patients with GALT deficiency should focus on early detection, evaluation and, if possible, early intervention in problems of motor, speech and cognitive development.

  7. The classic project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iselin, F. Christoph

    1997-02-01

    Exchange of data and algorithms among accelerator physics programs is difficult because of unnecessary differences in input formats and internal data structures. To alleviate these problems a C++ class library called CLASSIC (Class Library for Accelerator System Simulation and Control) is being developed with the goal to provide standard building blocks for computer programs used in accelerator design. It includes modules for building accelerator lattice structures in computer memory using a standard input language, a graphical user interface, or a programmed algorithm. It also provides simulation algorithms. These can easily be replaced by modules which communicate with the control system of the accelerator. Exchange of both data and algorithm between different programs using the CLASSIC library should present no difficulty.

  8. Classical swine fever.

    PubMed

    Moennig, V; Becher, P; Beer, M

    2013-01-01

    Classical swine fever is a serious and economically important transboundary disease threatening pig production globally. The infection may occur in backyard pigs, feral pig populations and domestic pigs. Whereas there are proven control strategies for the latter pig population, control in backyard pigs with poor biosecurity settings or in wild boar populations of high density still poses a problem in some parts of the world. Laboratory diagnostic methods, efficacious vaccines and contingency plans are in place in most industrialised countries. So far modified live vaccines (MLV) are still the first choice for rapid and reliable immune protection. Since antibodies elicited by conventional MLV cannot be distinguished from antibodies after natural infection, considerable efforts are put into the development of a live marker vaccine accompanied by a serological test. Nevertheless, some remaining gaps with respect to the diagnosis of and vaccination against classical swine fever have been identified.

  9. Classical Vs. Superfluid Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, P.-E.

    2008-11-01

    Thanks to a zero-viscosity, superfluids offer a unique testing ground for hydrodynamic models, in particular for turbulence ones. In Kolmogorov's turbulence model, viscosity is well known to damp the kinetic energy of the smallest eddies, and thus to introduce a cut-off at one end of the turbulent cascade. Significant differences between this ``classical'' turbulence and the turbulence of a superfluid are therefore expected, but --surprisingly- most experiments rather evidenced strong similarities. We will give an overview of a set of experiments designed to compare in details the classical versus superfluid turbulences, up to a record mass flow of superfluid (700g/s of He @ 1.6K). Then, we will focus on some unexpected vorticity measurements, which can be interpreted assuming that the superfluid vortices are passively advected by the largest scales of the flow, in contrast with the ``classical'' turbulence counterpart. Numerical simulations -based on regular DNS- will be presented to complete this interpretation. In collaboration with C. Barenghi, University of Newcastle; B. Castaing and E. Levèque, ENSL, Lyon; S. David, IEF, CNRS, Orsay; B. Rousset, SBT/CEA, Grenoble; and P. Tabeling, H. Willaime MMN, ESPCI, Paris.

  10. Entanglement with classical fields

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.F.; Thomas, J.E.

    2004-05-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a simple classical-field optical heterodyne method which employs postselection to reproduce the polarization correlations of a four-particle entangled state. We give a heuristic argument relating this method to the measurement of multiple quantum fields by correlated homodyne detection. We suggest that using multiple classical fields and postselection, one can reproduce the polarization correlations obtained in quantum experiments which employ multiple single-photon sources and linear optics to prepare multiparticle entangled states. Our experimental scheme produces four spatially separated beams which are separately detected by mixing with four independent optical local oscillators (LO) of variable polarization. Analog multiplication of the four beat signals enables projection onto a four-particle polarization-state basis. Appropriate band pass filtering is used to produce a signal proportional to the projections of the maximally entangled four-field polarization state, H{sub 1})H{sub 2})H{sub 3})H{sub 4})+V{sub 1})V{sub 2})V{sub 3})V{sub 4}), onto the product of the four LO polarizations. Since the data from multiple observers is combined prior to postselection, this method does not constitute a test of nonlocality. However, we reproduce the polarization correlations of the 32 elements in the truth table from the quantum mechanical Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger experiments on the violation of local realism. We also demonstrate a form of classical entanglement swapping in a four-particle basis.

  11. Virtual Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammrs, Stephan R.

    2008-01-01

    Virtual Satellite (VirtualSat) is a computer program that creates an environment that facilitates the development, verification, and validation of flight software for a single spacecraft or for multiple spacecraft flying in formation. In this environment, enhanced functionality and autonomy of navigation, guidance, and control systems of a spacecraft are provided by a virtual satellite that is, a computational model that simulates the dynamic behavior of the spacecraft. Within this environment, it is possible to execute any associated software, the development of which could benefit from knowledge of, and possible interaction (typically, exchange of data) with, the virtual satellite. Examples of associated software include programs for simulating spacecraft power and thermal- management systems. This environment is independent of the flight hardware that will eventually host the flight software, making it possible to develop the software simultaneously with, or even before, the hardware is delivered. Optionally, by use of interfaces included in VirtualSat, hardware can be used instead of simulated. The flight software, coded in the C or C++ programming language, is compilable and loadable into VirtualSat without any special modifications. Thus, VirtualSat can serve as a relatively inexpensive software test-bed for development test, integration, and post-launch maintenance of spacecraft flight software.

  12. Isolation and Culture of Satellite Cells from Mouse Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Musarò, Antonio; Carosio, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    Skeletal muscle tissue is characterized by a population of quiescent mononucleated myoblasts, localized between the basal lamina and sarcolemma of myofibers, known as satellite cells. Satellite cells play a pivotal role in muscle homeostasis and are the major source of myogenic precursors in mammalian muscle regeneration.This chapter describes protocols for isolation and culturing satellite cells isolated from mouse skeletal muscles. The classical procedure, which will be discussed extensively in this chapter, involves the enzymatic dissociation of skeletal muscles, while the alternative method involves isolation of satellite cells from isolated myofibers in which the satellite cells remain in their in situ position underneath the myofiber basal lamina.In particular, we discuss the technical aspect of satellite cell isolation, the methods necessary to enrich the satellite cell fraction and the culture conditions that optimize proliferation and myotube formation of mouse satellite cells.

  13. Semi-classical Electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lestone, John

    2016-03-01

    Quantum electrodynamics is complex and its associated mathematics can appear overwhelming for those not trained in this field. We describe semi-classical approaches that can be used to obtain a more intuitive physical feel for several QED processes including electro-statics, Compton scattering, pair annihilation, the anomalous magnetic moment, and the Lamb shift, that could be taught easily to undergraduate students. Any physicist who brings their laptop to the talk will be able to build spread sheets in less than 10 minutes to calculate g/2 =1.001160 and a Lamb shift of 1057 MHz.

  14. Fano Interference in Classical Oscillators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satpathy, S.; Roy, A.; Mohapatra, A.

    2012-01-01

    We seek to illustrate Fano interference in a classical coupled oscillator by using classical analogues of the atom-laser interaction. We present an analogy between the dressed state picture of coherent atom-laser interaction and a classical coupled oscillator. The Autler-Townes splitting due to the atom-laser interaction is analogous to the…

  15. Classical Trajectories and Quantum Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielnik, Bogdan; Reyes, Marco A.

    1996-01-01

    A classical model of the Schrodinger's wave packet is considered. The problem of finding the energy levels corresponds to a classical manipulation game. It leads to an approximate but non-perturbative method of finding the eigenvalues, exploring the bifurcations of classical trajectories. The role of squeezing turns out decisive in the generation of the discrete spectra.

  16. How Long Does It Take for a Satellite to Fall to Earth?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lira, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce students of science and engineering to the orbital lifetimes of satellites in circular low Earth orbits. It is only necessary to know about classical mechanics for this calculation. The orbital decay of satellites is due to the interaction of the satellite with the surrounding gas, atmospheric drag.…

  17. Perspective: Quantum or classical coherence?

    PubMed

    Miller, William H

    2012-06-07

    Some coherence effects in chemical dynamics are described correctly by classical mechanics, while others only appear in a quantum treatment--and when these are observed experimentally it is not always immediately obvious whether their origin is classical or quantum. Semiclassical theory provides a systematic way of adding quantum coherence to classical molecular dynamics and thus provides a useful way to distinguish between classical and quantum coherence. Several examples are discussed which illustrate both cases. Particularly interesting is the situation with electronically non-adiabatic processes, where sometimes whether the coherence effects are classical or quantum depends on what specific aspects of the process are observed.

  18. Supersymmetry in classical mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suen, W. M.; Wong, C. W.; Young, K.

    2000-06-01

    The concept of supersymmetry extended to classical mechanics relates one-parameter families of Hamiltonians H( ξ, x, p)= p2+ V( ξ, x), such that the mapping from the phase space of H( ξ1, x, p) to that of H( ξ2, x, p) preserves time-evolution and conserves total energy; as a result, equal-energy periodic orbits in the two have the same period. While t-evolution is a contact transformation generated by H, ξ-evolution is a generalized contact transformation generated by a function K, and preserves phase volume except for a point sink (source) as ξ increases (decreases). Closed-form solutions of ξ-evolution include several well-known examples.

  19. The classical vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, T. H.

    1985-08-01

    The history of vacuum concepts is reviewed, noting that no way is known to physically produce a true void. Even at absolute zero, a pattern of electromagnetic wave fluctuations are still present. The fluctuations are called zero-point radiation (ZPR). To be invariant to Lorentz transformation, ZPR has a spectral intensity proportional to the cube of each frequency. ZPR does not change in response to compression and produces a force between objects that is inversely proportional to the 4th power of the separation distance. The ZPR scale value has been measured to be one-half of the Planck constant, and is the measure of the energy of a harmonic oscillator, such as the electron, in a vacuum. Finally, since gravitational accelerations always occur in the physical space, a minimum thermal radiation can also be found for the vacuum, implying that a fixed relationship exists between thermal radiation and the classical vacuum.

  20. Supersymmetric classical cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Escamilla-Rivera, Celia; Obregón, Octavio; Ureña-López, L. Arturo E-mail: octavio@fisica.ugto.mx

    2010-12-01

    In this work a supersymmetric cosmological model is analyzed in which we consider a general superfield action of a homogeneous scalar field supermultiplet interacting with the scale factor in a supersymmetric FRW model. There appear fermionic superpartners associated with both the scale factor and the scalar field, and classical equations of motion are obtained from the super-Wheeler-DeWitt equation through the usual WKB method. The resulting supersymmetric Einstein-Klein-Gordon equations contain extra radiation and stiff matter terms, and we study their solutions in flat space for different scalar field potentials. The solutions are compared to the standard case, in particular those corresponding to the exponential potential, and their implications for the dynamics of the early Universe are discussed in turn.

  1. Classical and quantum ghosts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sbisà, Fulvio

    2015-01-01

    The aim of these notes is to provide a self-contained review of why it is generically a problem when a solution of a theory possesses ghost fields among the perturbation modes. We define what a ghost field is and we show that its presence is associated with a classical instability whenever the ghost field interacts with standard fields. We then show that the instability is more severe at quantum level, and that perturbative ghosts can exist only in low energy effective theories. However, if we do not consider very ad hoc choices, compatibility with observational constraints implies that low energy effective ghosts can exist only at the price of giving up Lorentz invariance or locality above the cut-off, in which case the cut-off has to be much lower that the energy scales we currently probe in particle colliders. We also comment on the possible role of extra degrees of freedom which break Lorentz invariance spontaneously.

  2. Grassmannization of classical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollet, Lode; Kiselev, Mikhail N.; Prokof'ev, Nikolay V.; Svistunov, Boris V.

    2016-11-01

    Applying Feynman diagrammatics to non-fermionic strongly correlated models with local constraints might seem generically impossible for two separate reasons: (i) the necessity to have a Gaussian (non-interacting) limit on top of which the perturbative diagrammatic expansion is generated by Wick’s theorem, and (ii) Dyson’s collapse argument implying that the expansion in powers of coupling constant is divergent. We show that for arbitrary classical lattice models both problems can be solved/circumvented by reformulating the high-temperature expansion (more generally, any discrete representation of the model) in terms of Grassmann integrals. Discrete variables residing on either links, plaquettes, or sites of the lattice are associated with the Grassmann variables in such a way that the partition function (as well as all correlation functions) of the original system and its Grassmann-field counterpart are identical. The expansion of the latter around its Gaussian point generates Feynman diagrams. Our work paves the way for studying lattice gauge theories by treating bosonic and fermionic degrees of freedom on equal footing.

  3. Extended symmetrical classical electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Fedorov, A V; Kalashnikov, E G

    2008-03-01

    In this paper, we discuss a modification of classical electrodynamics in which "ordinary" point charges are absent. The modified equations contain additional terms describing the induced charges and currents. The densities of the induced charges and currents depend on the vector k and the vectors of the electromagnetic field, E and B . It is shown that the vectors E and B can be defined in terms of two four-potentials and the components of k are the components of a four-tensor of the third rank. The Lagrangian of the modified electrodynamics is defined. The conditions are derived at which only one four-potential determines the behavior of the electromagnetic field. It is also shown that static modified electrodynamics can describe the electromagnetic field in the inner region of an electric monopole. In the outer region of the electric monopole the electric field is governed by the Maxwell equations. It follows from boundary conditions at the interface between the inner and outer regions of the monopole that the vector k has a discrete spectrum. The electric and magnetic fields, energy, and angular momentum of the monopole are found for different eigenvalues of k .

  4. Innovation: the classic traps.

    PubMed

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss

    2006-11-01

    Never a fad, but always in or out of fashion, innovation gets rediscovered as a growth enabler every half dozen years. Too often, though, grand declarations about innovation are followed by mediocre execution that produces anemic results, and innovation groups are quietly disbanded in cost-cutting drives. Each managerial generation embarks on the same enthusiastic quest for the next new thing. And each generation faces the same vexing challenges- most of which stem from the tensions between protecting existing revenue streams critical to current success and supporting new concepts that may be crucial to future success. In this article, Harvard Business School professor Rosabeth Moss Kanter reflects on the four major waves of innovation enthusiasm she's observed over the past 25 years. She describes the classic mistakes companies make in innovation strategy, process, structure, and skills assessment, illustrating her points with a plethora of real-world examples--including AT&T Worldnet, Timberland, and Ocean Spray. A typical strategic blunder is when managers set their hurdles too high or limit the scope of their innovation efforts. Quaker Oats, for instance, was so busy in the 1990s making minor tweaks to its product formulas that it missed larger opportunities in distribution. A common process mistake is when managers strangle innovation efforts with the same rigid planning, budgeting, and reviewing approaches they use in their existing businesses--thereby discouraging people from adapting as circumstances warrant. Companies must be careful how they structure fledgling entities alongside existing ones, Kanter says, to avoid a clash of cultures and agendas--which Arrow Electronics experienced in its attempts to create an online venture. Finally, companies commonly undervalue and underinvest in the human side of innovation--for instance, promoting individuals out of innovation teams long before their efforts can pay off. Kanter offers practical advice for avoiding

  5. A Classic Beauty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    M51, whose name comes from being the 51st entry in Charles Messier's catalog, is considered to be one of the classic examples of a spiral galaxy. At a distance of about 30 million light-years from Earth, it is also one of the brightest spirals in the night sky. A composite image of M51, also known as the Whirlpool Galaxy, shows the majesty of its structure in a dramatic new way through several of NASA's orbiting observatories. X-ray data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory reveals point-like sources (purple) that are black holes and neutron stars in binary star systems. Chandra also detects a diffuse glow of hot gas that permeates the space between the stars. Optical data from the Hubble Space Telescope (green) and infrared emission from the Spitzer Space Telescope (red) both highlight long lanes in the spiral arms that consist of stars and gas laced with dust. A view of M51 with the Galaxy Evolution Explorer telescope shows hot, young stars that produce lots of ultraviolet energy (blue).

    The textbook spiral structure is thought be the result of an interaction M51 is experiencing with its close galactic neighbor, NGC 5195, which is seen just above. Some simulations suggest M51's sharp spiral shape was partially caused when NGC 5195 passed through its main disk about 500 million years ago. This gravitational tug of war may also have triggered an increased level of star formation in M51. The companion galaxy's pull would be inducing extra starbirth by compressing gas, jump-starting the process by which stars form.

  6. Iodine Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Dankanich, John; Martinez, Andres; Petro, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The Iodine Satellite (iSat) spacecraft will be the first CubeSat to demonstrate high change in velocity from a primary propulsion system by using Hall thruster technology and iodine as a propellant. The mission will demonstrate CubeSat maneuverability, including plane change, altitude change and change in its closest approach to Earth to ensure atmospheric reentry in less than 90 days. The mission is planned for launch in fall 2017. Hall thruster technology is a type of electric propulsion. Electric propulsion uses electricity, typically from solar panels, to accelerate the propellant. Electric propulsion can accelerate propellant to 10 times higher velocities than traditional chemical propulsion systems, which significantly increases fuel efficiency. To enable the success of the propulsion subsystem, iSat will also demonstrate power management and thermal control capabilities well beyond the current state-of-the-art for spacecraft of its size. This technology is a viable primary propulsion system that can be used on small satellites ranging from about 22 pounds (10 kilograms) to more than 1,000 pounds (450 kilograms). iSat's fuel efficiency is ten times greater and its propulsion per volume is 100 times greater than current cold-gas systems and three times better than the same system operating on xenon. iSat's iodine propulsion system consists of a 200 watt (W) Hall thruster, a cathode, a tank to store solid iodine, a power processing unit (PPU) and the feed system to supply the iodine. This propulsion system is based on a 200 W Hall thruster developed by Busek Co. Inc., which was previously flown using xenon as the propellant. Several improvements have been made to the original system to include a compact PPU, targeting greater than 80 percent reduction in mass and volume of conventional PPU designs. The cathode technology is planned to enable heaterless cathode conditioning, significantly increasing total system efficiency. The feed system has been designed to

  7. Tethered Communication Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Tiesenhausen, G.

    1986-01-01

    Report describes concept for placing several communication satellites in geostationary orbit without taking up more space than assigned to single satellite. Proposed scheme eases orbital crowding more economically than space platforms. Concept requires minimal redesign of existing satellites and accommodates many satellites in just one orbital slot. System much lighter in weight than geostationary platform and easier and more economical to transport.

  8. Dynamical Symmetries in Classical Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boozer, A. D.

    2012-01-01

    We show how symmetries of a classical dynamical system can be described in terms of operators that act on the state space for the system. We illustrate our results by considering a number of possible symmetries that a classical dynamical system might have, and for each symmetry we give examples of dynamical systems that do and do not possess that…

  9. Operator Formulation of Classical Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohn, Jack

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the construction of an operator formulation of classical mechanics which is directly concerned with wave packets in configuration space and is more similar to that of convential quantum theory than other extant operator formulations of classical mechanics. (Author/HM)

  10. Teaching and Demonstrating Classical Conditioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparrow, John; Fernald, Peter

    1989-01-01

    Discusses classroom demonstrations of classical conditioning and notes tendencies to misrepresent Pavlov's procedures. Describes the design and construction of the conditioner that is used for demonstrating classical conditioning. Relates how students experience conditioning, generalization, extinction, discrimination, and spontaneous recovery.…

  11. Outer planet satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Schenk, P.M. )

    1991-01-01

    Recent findings on the outer-planet satellites are presented, with special consideration given to data on the rheologic properties of ice on icy satellites, the satellite surfaces and exogenic processes, cratering on dead cratered satellites, volcanism, and the interiors of outer-planet satellites. Particular attention is given to the state of Titan's surface and the properties of Triton, Pluto, and Charon. 210 refs.

  12. Exploring the Uranian satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Robert Hamilton

    1986-01-01

    Data on the Uranian satellites from the January 25, 1986 flyby of Voyager 2 are presented. Ten new satellites were discovered by Voyager 2; the features and orbits of these ten satellites are examined. The main geological characteristics for Oberon, Umbriel, Titania, Ariel, and Miranda discovered in the Voyager 2 images are described. Possible relationships between the Uranian satellites and Jovian and Saturnian satellites are being researched.

  13. AKSATINT - SATELLITE INTERFERENCE ANALYSIS AND SIMULATION USING PERSONAL COMPUTERS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantak, A.

    1994-01-01

    In the late seventies, the number of communication satellites in service increased, and interference has become an increasingly important consideration in designing satellite/ground station communications systems. Satellite Interference Analysis and Simulation Using Personal Computers, AKSATINT, models the interference experienced by a generic satellite communications receiving station due to an interfering satellite. Both the desired and the interfering satellites are considered to be in elliptical orbits. The simulation contains computation of orbital positions of both satellites using classical orbital elements, calculation of the satellite antennae look angles for both satellites and elevation angles at the desired-satellite ground-station antenna, and computation of Doppler effect due to the motions of the satellites and the Earth's rotation. AKSATINT also computes the interference-tosignal-power ratio, taking into account losses suffered by the links. After computing the interference-to-signal-power ratio, the program computes the statistical quantities. The statistical formulation of the interference effect is presented in the form of a histogram of the interference to the desired signal power ratio. The program includes a flowchart, a sample run, and results of that run. AKSATINT is expected to be of general use to system designers and frequency managers in selecting the proper frequency under an interference scenario. The AKSATINT program is written in BASIC. It was designed to operate on the IBM Personal Computer AT or compatibles, and has been implemented under MS DOS 3.2. AKSATINT was developed in 1987.

  14. Precise Orbit Determination of Low Earth Satellites at AIUB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaggi, A.; Bock, H.; Thaller, D.; Dach, R.; Beutler, G.; Prange, L.; Meyer, U.

    2010-12-01

    Many low Earth orbiting (LEO) satellites are nowadays equipped with on-board receivers to collect the observations from Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), such as the Global Positioning System (GPS), or with retro-reflectors for Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR). At the Astronomical Institute of the University of Bern (AIUB) LEO precise orbit determination (POD) using either GPS or SLR data is performed for satellites at very different altitudes. The classical numerical integration techniques used for dynamic orbit determination of LEO satellites at high altitudes are extended by pseudo-stochastic orbit modeling techniques for satellites at low altitudes to efficiently cope with force model deficiencies. Accuracies of a few centimeters are achieved by pseudo-stochastic orbit modeling, e.g., for the Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE).

  15. Quantum reduplication of classical solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sveshnikov, Konstantin

    1993-09-01

    The possible existence of a series of quantum copies of classical soliton solutions is discussed, which do not exist when the effective Planck constant of the theory γ tends to zero. Within the conventional weak-coupling expansion in √ γ such non-classical solitons are O(√ γ) in energy and therefore lie in between the true classical solutions and elementary quantum excitations. Analytic results concerning the shape functions, masses and characteristic scales of such quantum excitations are given for soliton models of a self-interacting scalar field. Stability properties and quantization of fluctuations in the neighborhood of these configurations are also discussed in detail.

  16. Classical and quantum Malus laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wódkiewicz, Krzysztof

    1995-04-01

    The classical and the quantum Malus laws for light and spin are discussed. It is shown that for spin 1/2, the quantum Malus law is equivalent in form to the classical Malus law provided the statistical average involves a quasidistribution function that can become negative. A generalization of Malus's law for arbitrary spin s is obtained in the form of a Feynman path-integral representation for the Malus amplitude. The classical limit of the Malus amplitude for s-->∞ is discussed.

  17. Quantum localization of classical mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batalin, Igor A.; Lavrov, Peter M.

    2016-07-01

    Quantum localization of classical mechanics within the BRST-BFV and BV (or field-antifield) quantization methods are studied. It is shown that a special choice of gauge fixing functions (or BRST-BFV charge) together with the unitary limit leads to Hamiltonian localization in the path integral of the BRST-BFV formalism. In turn, we find that a special choice of gauge fixing functions being proportional to extremals of an initial non-degenerate classical action together with a very special solution of the classical master equation result in Lagrangian localization in the partition function of the BV formalism.

  18. Geostationary satellite log

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, C. H.

    The present listing of current and planned geostationary satellites for the Fixed Satellite Service, Maritime Mobile Satellite Service, Broadcasting Satellite Service, and Space Research Service, are ordered along increasing East longitude orbit position; they update previously published lists through December, 1985. Also given is a key to the frequency bands used by current and planned satellites and replacement satellites; subband locations are designated by an up/down-link frequency column. Service allocations and the applicable ITU region for bands not allocated worldwide are included.

  19. China's satellite communications discussed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruhou, Z.

    1986-04-01

    In 1972, China began to enter the age of satellite comunications, and it was realized that satellites could play a large role in television transmission in China. The experimental broadcasting of satellite television programs was begun in 1978, and satisfactory results were obtained. The success of the television transmission demonstration has led to important decisions regarding development of a domestic satellite communications system. Before specialized communications satellites are launched, the decision was made to lease an international communications satellite transmitter. The responsibility of the ground stations were discussed.

  20. Small satellite product assurance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demontlivault, J.; Cadelec, Jacques

    1993-01-01

    In order to increase the interest in small satellites, their cost must be reduced; reducing product assurance costs induced by quality requirements is a major objective. For a logical approach, small satellites are classified in three main categories: satellites for experimental operations with a short lifetime, operational satellites manufactured in small mass with long lifetime requirements, operational satellites (long lifetime required), of which only a few models are produced. The various requirements as regards the product assurance are examined for each satellite category: general requirements for space approach, reliability, electronic components, materials and processes, quality assurance, documentation, tests, and management. Ideal product assurance system integrates quality teams and engineering teams.

  1. Satellite orbit predictor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, Morton l.; Garrett, James, Major

    An analog aid to determine satellite coverage of Emergency Locator Transmitters Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon (ELT/EPIRB) distress incidence is discussed. The satellite orbit predictor is a graphical aid for determining the relationship between the satellite orbit, antenna coverage of the spacecraft and coverage of the Local User Terminal. The predictor allows the user to quickly visualize if a selected position will probably be detected and is composed of a base map and a satellite track overlay for each satellite.A table of equator crossings for each satellite is included.

  2. A new quick algorithm for GPS/Galileo/BD satellite selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Miaoyan; Zhang, Jun; Qin, Yong

    2007-11-01

    There will be 70-90 navigation satellites in the sky at the same time when GALILEO and BD reach full operation capability, and the visible satellite number can reach 30. Then satellite selection will be very important to decrease computing time for many applications whose processing capability and time are limited such as aviation. The classical optimal algorithm selects a n-satellite subset from m visible satellites with the minimum GDOP. It requires a long time for computing especially for much many satellites. This paper proposes a quickly satellite selection algorithm which is more adaptive when the number of visible satellites is very large. The computer simulation results show that the quickly satellite selection algorithm has much lower computation load, shortens the computation time greatly than the optimal algorithm and the increased GDOP is less than 10%.

  3. Experimental contextuality in classical light

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tao; Zeng, Qiang; Song, Xinbing; Zhang, Xiangdong

    2017-01-01

    The Klyachko, Can, Binicioglu, and Shumovsky (KCBS) inequality is an important contextuality inequality in three-level system, which has been demonstrated experimentally by using quantum states. Using the path and polarization degrees of freedom of classical optics fields, we have constructed the classical trit (cetrit), tested the KCBS inequality and its geometrical form (Wright’s inequality) in this work. The projection measurement has been implemented, the clear violations of the KCBS inequality and its geometrical form have been observed. This means that the contextuality inequality, which is commonly used in test of the conflict between quantum theory and noncontextual realism, may be used as a quantitative tool in classical optical coherence to describe correlation characteristics of the classical fields. PMID:28291227

  4. Classical Foundations: Leah Rochel Johnson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lum, Lydia

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses the accomplishments of Leah Rochel Johnson, Assistant Professor of Classics and Ancient Mediterranean Studies and History, Pennsylvania State University. It provides insight into her values and beliefs and testimony from those who work most closely with her.

  5. Experimental contextuality in classical light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tao; Zeng, Qiang; Song, Xinbing; Zhang, Xiangdong

    2017-03-01

    The Klyachko, Can, Binicioglu, and Shumovsky (KCBS) inequality is an important contextuality inequality in three-level system, which has been demonstrated experimentally by using quantum states. Using the path and polarization degrees of freedom of classical optics fields, we have constructed the classical trit (cetrit), tested the KCBS inequality and its geometrical form (Wright’s inequality) in this work. The projection measurement has been implemented, the clear violations of the KCBS inequality and its geometrical form have been observed. This means that the contextuality inequality, which is commonly used in test of the conflict between quantum theory and noncontextual realism, may be used as a quantitative tool in classical optical coherence to describe correlation characteristics of the classical fields.

  6. Galileo satellite antenna modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steigenberger, Peter; Dach, Rolf; Prange, Lars; Montenbruck, Oliver

    2015-04-01

    The space segment of the European satellite navigation system Galileo currently consists of six satellites. Four of them belong to the first generation of In-Orbit Validation (IOV) satellites whereas the other two are Full Operational Capability (FOC) satellites. High-precision geodetic applications require detailed knowledge about the actual phase center of the satellite and receiver antenna. The deviation of this actual phase center from a well-defined reference point is described by phase center offsets (PCOs) and phase center variations (PCVs). Unfortunately, no public information is available about the Galileo satellite antenna PCOs and PCVs, neither for the IOV, nor the FOC satellites. Therefore, conventional values for the IOV satellite antenna PCOs have been adopted for the Multi-GNSS experiment (MGEX) of the International GNSS Service (IGS). The effect of the PCVs is currently neglected and no PCOs for the FOC satellites are available yet. To overcome this deficiency in GNSS observation modeling, satellite antenna PCOs and PCVs are estimated for the Galileo IOV satellites based on global GNSS tracking data of the MGEX network and additional stations of the legacy IGS network. Two completely independent solutions are computed with the Bernese and Napeos software packages. The PCO and PCV values of the individual satellites are analyzed and the availability of two different solutions allows for an accuracy assessment. The FOC satellites are built by a different manufacturer and are also equipped with another type of antenna panel compared to the IOV satellites. Signal transmission of the first FOC satellite has started in December 2014 and activation of the second satellite is expected for early 2015. Based on the available observations PCO estimates and, optionally PCVs of the FOC satellites will be presented as well. Finally, the impact of the new antenna model on the precision and accuracy of the Galileo orbit determination is analyzed.

  7. Quantum money with classical verification

    SciTech Connect

    Gavinsky, Dmitry

    2014-12-04

    We propose and construct a quantum money scheme that allows verification through classical communication with a bank. This is the first demonstration that a secure quantum money scheme exists that does not require quantum communication for coin verification. Our scheme is secure against adaptive adversaries - this property is not directly related to the possibility of classical verification, nevertheless none of the earlier quantum money constructions is known to possess it.

  8. New Perspective on Classical Electromagnetism

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    R. Feynman , R. Leighton, and M. Sands, The Feynman Lectures in Physics vol II (Addison-Wesley, Reading, MA, 1964). 6. W.K.H. Panofsky and M...of the basics of classical electromagnetism is provided by recognizing a previously overlooked law of induction as well as the physical reality of the...classical electromagnetism is provided by recognizing a previously overlooked law of induction as well as the physical reality of the vector potential

  9. Classical theory of radiating strings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copeland, Edmund J.; Haws, D.; Hindmarsh, M.

    1990-01-01

    The divergent part of the self force of a radiating string coupled to gravity, an antisymmetric tensor and a dilaton in four dimensions are calculated to first order in classical perturbation theory. While this divergence can be absorbed into a renormalization of the string tension, demanding that both it and the divergence in the energy momentum tensor vanish forces the string to have the couplings of compactified N = 1 D = 10 supergravity. In effect, supersymmetry cures the classical infinities.

  10. Quantum money with classical verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavinsky, Dmitry

    2014-12-01

    We propose and construct a quantum money scheme that allows verification through classical communication with a bank. This is the first demonstration that a secure quantum money scheme exists that does not require quantum communication for coin verification. Our scheme is secure against adaptive adversaries - this property is not directly related to the possibility of classical verification, nevertheless none of the earlier quantum money constructions is known to possess it.

  11. Satellite RNAs and Satellite Viruses of Plants

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chung-Chi; Hsu, Yau-Heiu; Lin, Na-Sheng

    2009-01-01

    The view that satellite RNAs (satRNAs) and satellite viruses are purely molecular parasites of their cognate helper viruses has changed. The molecular mechanisms underlying the synergistic and/or antagonistic interactions among satRNAs/satellite viruses, helper viruses, and host plants are beginning to be comprehended. This review aims to summarize the recent achievements in basic and practical research, with special emphasis on the involvement of RNA silencing mechanisms in the pathogenicity, population dynamics, and, possibly, the origin(s) of these subviral agents. With further research following current trends, the comprehensive understanding of satRNAs and satellite viruses could lead to new insights into the trilateral interactions among host plants, viruses, and satellites. PMID:21994595

  12. Satellite RNAs and Satellite Viruses of Plants.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chung-Chi; Hsu, Yau-Heiu; Lin, Na-Sheng

    2009-12-01

    The view that satellite RNAs (satRNAs) and satellite viruses are purely molecular parasites of their cognate helper viruses has changed. The molecular mechanisms underlying the synergistic and/or antagonistic interactions among satRNAs/satellite viruses, helper viruses, and host plants are beginning to be comprehended. This review aims to summarize the recent achievements in basic and practical research, with special emphasis on the involvement of RNA silencing mechanisms in the pathogenicity, population dynamics, and, possibly, the origin(s) of these subviral agents. With further research following current trends, the comprehensive understanding of satRNAs and satellite viruses could lead to new insights into the trilateral interactions among host plants, viruses, and satellites.

  13. Stereo Measurements from Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, R.

    1982-01-01

    The papers in this presentation include: 1) 'Stereographic Observations from Geosynchronous Satellites: An Important New Tool for the Atmospheric Sciences'; 2) 'Thunderstorm Cloud Top Ascent Rates Determined from Stereoscopic Satellite Observations'; 3) 'Artificial Stereo Presentation of Meteorological Data Fields'.

  14. Searching for satellites of Ceres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, B.; Li, J.; McFadden, L.; Mutchler, M.; McLean, B.; Russell, C.

    2014-07-01

    The existence of satellites, or lack thereof, around Ceres is of great interest to the Dawn mission, which is currently en route to Ceres and will arrive in February 2015. The Dawn spacecraft will orbit Ceres at altitudes of 1180 to 6400 km, well within the satellite stability region. The final opportunity for observations of Ceres with HST prior to Dawn's arrival occurred in April 2014, when Ceres will make a close pass at opposition to Earth. In addition to providing additional targets for exciting physical studies by the Dawn instruments, satellites, if there were any, would substantially affect Dawn's orbit planning in order to accommodate observations and ensure spacecraft safety. For example, detection of satellites would allow this program to derive a more accurate measurement of the mass of Ceres, which is important for the mission planners to determine the orbit of the spacecraft. With the observation planning process already underway, early detection of satellites will provide sufficient time to adapt mission plans to be able to observe any satellites on ingress or during the mapping orbits. The timing is particularly important, since the spacecraft now has use of only two reaction wheels, which is already impacting mission design, and which prevents Dawn from conducting its own deep satellite search as was accomplished prior to arrival at Vesta. Because of this, an HST survey is critical for Dawn operations at Ceres. Since satellite detection could require a change to the mission's nominal orbital strategy and present risk from dust associated with any satellites, it is crucial to put Dawn in the best position to succeed. HST observed Ceres using the High Resolution Channel (HRC) of the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) to study the physical properties of Ceres and carried out surface mapping (Parker et al. 2004, Thomas et al. 2005, Li et al. 2006). Several ''long-V'' (F555W filter) exposures were taken using the full field of view of the ACS-HRC to

  15. SATELLITE DYNAMICS ON THE LAPLACE SURFACE

    SciTech Connect

    Tremaine, Scott; Touma, Jihad; Namouni, Fathi E-mail: jihad.touma@gmail.com

    2009-03-15

    The orbital dynamics of most planetary satellites is governed by the quadrupole moment from the equatorial bulge of the host planet and the tidal field from the Sun. On the Laplace surface, the long-term orbital evolution driven by the combined effects of these forces is zero, so that orbits have a fixed orientation and shape. The 'classical' Laplace surface is defined for circular orbits, and coincides with the planet's equator at small planetocentric distances and with its orbital plane at large distances. A dissipative circumplanetary disk should settle to this surface, and hence satellites formed from such a disk are likely to orbit in or near the classical Laplace surface. This paper studies the properties of Laplace surfaces. Our principal results are: (1) if the planetary obliquity exceeds 68.{sup 0}875, there is a range of semimajor axes in which the classical Laplace surface is unstable; (2) at some obliquities and planetocentric distances, there is a distinct Laplace surface consisting of nested eccentric orbits, which bifurcates from the classical Laplace surface at the point where instability sets in; (3) there is also a 'polar' Laplace surface perpendicular to the line of nodes of the planetary equator on the planetary orbit; (4) for circular orbits, the polar Laplace surface is stable at small planetocentric distances and unstable at large distances; (5) at the onset of instability, this polar Laplace surface bifurcates into two polar Laplace surfaces composed of nested eccentric orbits.

  16. Tracking Weather Satellites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Helen E.

    1996-01-01

    Describes the use of weather satellites in providing an exciting, cohesive framework for students learning Earth and space science and in providing a hands-on approach to technology in the classroom. Discusses the history of weather satellites and classroom satellite tracking. (JRH)

  17. Which satellites were used?

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-12-08

    The three satellites ERBS, NOAA-9, NOAA-10 carrying two ERBE instrument packages (Scanner and NonScanner) were used. The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center built the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) on which ... and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) weather monitoring satellites, NOAA-9 and NOAA-10 in 1984 and 1986, respectively. ...

  18. Geodetic Secor Satellite

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-06-01

    simple, and had low-power lem. 17 14. Satellite Orientation . The satellite was designed to maintain a constant relationship between the antenna...the same satellite orientation . Further considerations were Th oscillations, however, when higher orbital ranges (500-2500 nautical miles) -, 3 a

  19. Survey: National Environmental Satellite Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The national Environmental Satellite Service (NESS) receives data at periodic intervals from satellites of the Synchronous Meteorological Satellite/Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite series and from the Improved TIROS (Television Infrared Observational Satellite) Operational Satellite. Within the conterminous United States, direct readout and processed products are distributed to users over facsimile networks from a central processing and data distribution facility. In addition, the NESS Satellite Field Stations analyze, interpret, and distribute processed geostationary satellite products to regional weather service activities.

  20. Classical approach in atomic physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solov'ev, E. A.

    2011-12-01

    The application of a classical approach to various quantum problems - the secular perturbation approach to quantization of a hydrogen atom in external fields and a helium atom, the adiabatic switching method for calculation of a semiclassical spectrum of a hydrogen atom in crossed electric and magnetic fields, a spontaneous decay of excited states of a hydrogen atom, Gutzwiller's approach to Stark problem, long-lived excited states of a helium atom discovered with the help of Poincaré section, inelastic transitions in slow and fast electron-atom and ion-atom collisions - is reviewed. Further, a classical representation in quantum theory is discussed. In this representation the quantum states are treated as an ensemble of classical states. This approach opens the way to an accurate description of the initial and final states in classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) method and a purely classical explanation of tunneling phenomenon. The general aspects of the structure of the semiclassical series such as renormgroup symmetry, criterion of accuracy and so on are reviewed as well.

  1. Hermeneutic reading of classic texts.

    PubMed

    Koskinen, Camilla A-L; Lindström, Unni Å

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to broaden the understandinfg of the hermeneutic reading of classic texts. The aim is to show how the choice of a specific scientific tradition in conjunction with a methodological approach creates the foundation that clarifies the actual realization of the reading. This hermeneutic reading of classic texts is inspired by Gadamer's notion that it is the researcher's own research tradition and a clearly formulated theoretical fundamental order that shape the researcher's attitude towards texts and create the starting point that guides all reading, uncovering and interpretation. The researcher's ethical position originates in a will to openness towards what is different in the text and which constantly sets the researcher's preunderstanding and research tradition in movement. It is the researcher's attitude towards the text that allows the text to address, touch and arouse wonder. Through a flexible, lingering and repeated reading of classic texts, what is different emerges with a timeless value. The reading of classic texts is an act that may rediscover and create understanding for essential dimensions and of human beings' reality on a deeper level. The hermeneutic reading of classic texts thus brings to light constantly new possibilities of uncovering for a new envisioning and interpretation for a new understanding of the essential concepts and phenomena within caring science.

  2. Fundamentals of satellite navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiller, A. H.

    The basic operating principles and capabilities of conventional and satellite-based navigation systems for air, sea, and land vehicles are reviewed and illustrated with diagrams. Consideration is given to autonomous onboard systems; systems based on visible or radio beacons; the Transit, Cicada, Navstar-GPS, and Glonass satellite systems; the physical laws and parameters of satellite motion; the definition of time in satellite systems; and the content of the demodulated GPS data signal. The GPS and Glonass data format frames are presented graphically, and tables listing the GPS and Glonass satellites, their technical characteristics, and the (past or scheduled) launch dates are provided.

  3. Public service satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    The development of the communications satellite system is discussed, taking into account a suggestion by Clarke in 1945 concerning the significance of geosynchronous satellites, the establishment of Intelsat, reductions in the cost of transatlantic telephone calls as a result of satellite communications service, questions of satellite cost, and the need for larger satellites. It is pointed out that the use of the Space Shuttle will reduce the cost of placing a satellite in orbit from more than half to less than a quarter of the total cost of design, construction, and launch. Attention is given to studies of a personal communications system which involves direct broadcast from a 'wrist watch radio' to a high-capacity, multibeam satellite for retransmission to ground communications centrals.

  4. Quantum remnants in the classical limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, A. M.; Plastino, A.

    2016-09-01

    We analyze here the common features of two dynamical regimes: a quantum and a classical one. We deal with a well known semi-classic system in its route towards the classical limit, together with its purely classic counterpart. We wish to ascertain i) whether some quantum remnants can be found in the classical limit and ii) the details of the quantum-classic transition. The so-called mutual information is the appropriate quantifier for this task. Additionally, we study the Bandt-Pompe's symbolic patterns that characterize dynamical time series (representative of the semi-classical system under scrutiny) in their evolution towards the classical limit.

  5. Classical anomalies for spinning particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamboa, Jorge; Plyushchay, Mikhail

    1998-02-01

    We discuss the phenomenon of classical anomaly. It is observed for 3D Berezin-Marinov (BM), Barducci-Casalbuoni-Lusanna (BCL) and Cortés-Plyushchay-Velázquez (CPV) pseudoclassical spin particle models. We show that quantum mechanically these different models correspond to the same P, T-invariant system of planar fermions, but the quantum system has global symmetries being not reproducible classically in full in any of the models. We demonstrate that the specific U(1) gauge symmetry characterized by the opposite coupling constants of spin s = + {1}/{2} and s = - {1}/{2} states has a natural classical analog in the CPV model but can be reproduced in the BM and BCL models in an obscure and rather artificial form. We also show that the BM and BCL models quantum mechanically are equivalent in any odd-dimensional space-time, but describe different quantum systems in even space-time dimensions.

  6. From classical to quantum criticality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podolsky, Daniel; Shimshoni, Efrat; Silvi, Pietro; Montangero, Simone; Calarco, Tommaso; Morigi, Giovanna; Fishman, Shmuel

    2014-06-01

    We study the crossover from classical to quantum phase transitions at zero temperature within the framework of ϕ4 theory. The classical transition at zero temperature can be described by the Landau theory, turning into a quantum Ising transition with the addition of quantum fluctuations. We perform a calculation of the transition line in the regime where the quantum fluctuations are weak. The calculation is based on a renormalization group analysis of the crossover between classical and quantum transitions, and is well controlled even for space-time dimensionality D below 4. In particular, for D =2 we obtain an analytic expression for the transition line which is valid for a wide range of parameters, as confirmed by numerical calculations based on the density matrix renormalization group. This behavior could be tested by measuring the phase diagram of the linear-zigzag instability in systems of trapped ions or repulsively interacting dipoles.

  7. Entropy concepts in classical electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Daniel C.

    2002-11-01

    Aspects of entropy and related thermodynamic analyses are discussed here that have been deduced in recent years in the area of classical electrodynamics. A motivating factor for most of this work has been an attempted theory of nature often called, "stochastic electrodynamics" (SED). This theory involves classical electrodynamics (Maxwell's equations plus the relativistic version of Newton's second law of motion for particles), but with the consideration that motion and fluctuations should not necessarily be assumed to reduce to zero at temperature T = 0. Both fairly subtle and rather blatant assumptions were often imposed in early thermodynamic analyses of electrodynamic systems that prevented the analyses from being sufficiently general to account for these "zero-point" properties, which hindered classical physics from being able to better account for quantum mechanical phenomena observed in nature. In turn, such thermodynamic considerations have helped motivate many of the key ideas of SED.

  8. Optimum Onager: The Classical Mechanics of a Classical Siege Engine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denny, Mark

    2009-01-01

    The onager is a throwing weapon of classical antiquity, familiar to both the ancient Greeks and Romans. Here we analyze the dynamics of onager operation and derive the optimum angle for launching a projectile to its maximum range. There is plenty of scope for further considerations about increasing onager range, and so by thinking about how this…

  9. Overview of Classical Swine Fever (Hog Cholera, Classical Swine fever)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Classical swine fever is a contagious often fatal disease of pigs clinically characterized by high body temperature, lethargy, yellowish diarrhea, vomits and purple skin discoloration of ears, lower abdomen and legs. It was first described in the early 19th century in the USA. Later, a condition i...

  10. Quantum teleportation without classical channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Amri, M.; Li, Zheng-Hong; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2016-11-01

    For the first time, we show how quantum teleportation can be achieved without the assistance of classical channels. Our protocol does not need any pre-established entangled photon pairs beforehand. Just by utilizing quantum Zeno effect and couterfactual communication idea, we can achieve two goals; entangling a photon and an atom and also disentangling them by non-local interaction. Information is completely transferred from atom to photon with controllable disentanglement processes. More importantly, there is no need to confirm teleportation results via classical channels.

  11. Classical three-box 'paradox'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkpatrick, K. A.

    2003-05-01

    A simple classical probabilistic system (a simple card game) classically exemplifies Aharonov and Vaidman's 'three-box 'paradox'' (1991 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 24 2315), implying that the three-box example is neither quantal nor a paradox and leaving one with less difficulty to busy the interpreters of quantum mechanics. An ambiguity in the usual expression of the retrodiction formula is shown to have misled Albert et al (1985 Phys. Rev. Lett. 54 5) to a result not, in fact, 'curious'; the discussion illustrates how to avoid this ambiguity.

  12. Comparing classical and quantum equilibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malabarba, Artur S. L.; Farrelly, Terry; Short, Anthony J.

    2016-09-01

    By using a physically relevant and theory independent definition of measurement-based equilibration, we show quantitatively that equilibration is easier for quantum systems than for classical systems, in the situation where the initial state of the system is completely known (a pure state). This shows that quantum equilibration is a fundamental aspect of many quantum systems, while classical equilibration relies on experimental ignorance. When the state is not completely known (a mixed state), this framework also shows that quantum equilibration requires weaker conditions.

  13. Why baryons matter: The kinematics of dwarf spheroidal satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Alyson M.; Zolotov, Adi E-mail: zolotov@physics.huji.ac.il

    2014-05-10

    We use high-resolution cosmological simulations of Milky Way (MW) mass galaxies that include both baryons and dark matter (DM) to show that baryonic physics (energetic feedback from supernovae and subsequent tidal stripping) significantly reduces the DM mass in the central regions of luminous satellite galaxies. The reduced central masses of the simulated satellites reproduce the observed internal dynamics of MW and M31 satellites as a function of luminosity. We use these realistic satellites to update predictions for the observed velocity and luminosity functions of satellites around MW-mass galaxies when baryonic effects are accounted for. We also predict that field dwarf galaxies in the same luminosity range as the MW classical satellites should not exhibit velocities as low as the satellites because the field dwarfs do not experience tidal stripping. Additionally, the early formation times of the satellites compared to field galaxies at the same luminosity may be apparent in the star formation histories of the two populations. Including baryonic physics in cold dark matter (CDM) models naturally explains the observed low DM densities in the MWs dwarf spheroidal population. Our simulations therefore resolve the tension between kinematics predicted in CDM theory and observations of satellites, without invoking alternative forms of DM.

  14. Classical Music as Enforced Utopia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leech-Wilkinson, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    In classical music composition, whatever thematic or harmonic conflicts may be engineered along the way, everything always turns out for the best. Similar utopian thinking underlies performance: performers see their job as faithfully carrying out their master's (the composer's) wishes. The more perfectly they represent them, the happier the…

  15. Classical and molecular genetic mapping

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A brief history of classical genetic mapping in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] is described. Detailed descriptions are given of the development of molecular genetic linkage maps based upon various types of DNA markers Like many plant and animal species, the first molecular map of soybean was bas...

  16. Classics in Reading: A Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Froese, Victor

    1982-01-01

    Frank Smith and Kenneth Goodman were the most frequently cited authors; Bond and Dykstra's "The Cooperative Research Program in First Grade Reading Instruction" and Chall's "Learning to Read: The Great Debate" the most frequently cited works in a survey that asked graduate faculty in reading to name "classics" in reading research. (FL)

  17. Teaching Classical Mechanics Using Smartphones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chevrier, Joel; Madani, Laya; Ledenmat, Simon; Bsiesy, Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    A number of articles published in this column have dealt with topics in classical mechanics. This note describes some additional examples employing a smartphone and the new software iMecaProf. Steve Jobs presented the iPhone as "perfect for gaming." Thanks to its microsensors connected in real time to the numerical world, physics…

  18. Classical simulation of entangled states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharath, H. M.; Ravishankar, V.

    2014-06-01

    Characterization of nonclassicality or quantumness of a state is fundamental to foundations of quantum mechanics and quantum information. At the heart of the problem is the question whether there exist classical systems—howsoever complicated—that can mimic a given quantum state. Whilst this has been traditionally addressed through the violation of Bell inequality or nonseparability, we show that it is possible to go beyond them, by introducing the concept of classical simulation. Focusing on the two-qubit case, we show that, while for pure states, classical simulability is equivalent to existence of a local hidden variable (LHV) model, the conditions for simulability can be weaker for mixed states, demanding what we call only a generalized LHV description. Consequently, quantum states which defy a classical simulation—which we call exceptional—may require conditions which are more stringent than violation of Bell inequalities. We illustrate these features with a number of representative examples and discuss the underlying reasons, by employing fairly simple arguments.

  19. Relative Clauses in Classical Nahuatl

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langacker, Ronald W.

    1975-01-01

    Jane Rosenthal's paper on relative clauses in Classical Nahuatl is discussed, and it is argued that she misses an important generalization. An alternative analysis to a class of relative pronouns and new rules for the distribution of relative pronouns are proposed. (SC)

  20. Vowel intelligibility in classical singing.

    PubMed

    Gregg, Jean Westerman; Scherer, Ronald C

    2006-06-01

    Vowel intelligibility during singing is an important aspect of communication during performance. The intelligibility of isolated vowels sung by Western classically trained singers has been found to be relatively low, in fact, decreasing as pitch rises, and it is lower for women than for men. The lack of contextual cues significantly deteriorates vowel intelligibility. It was postulated in this study that the reduced intelligibility of isolated sung vowels may be partly from the vowels used by the singers in their daily vocalises. More specifically, if classically trained singers sang only a few American English vowels during their vocalises, their intelligibility for American English vowels would be less than for those classically trained singers who usually vocalize on most American English vowels. In this study, there were 21 subjects (15 women, 6 men), all Western classically trained performers as well as teachers of classical singing. They sang 11 words containing 11 different American English vowels, singing on two pitches a musical fifth apart. Subjects were divided into two groups, those who normally vocalize on 4, 5, or 6 vowels, and those who sing all 11 vowels during their daily vocalises. The sung words were cropped to isolate the vowels, and listening tapes were created. Two listening groups, four singing teachers and five speech-language pathologists, were asked to identify the vowels intended by the singers. Results suggest that singing fewer vowels during daily vocalises does not decrease intelligibility compared with singing the 11 American English vowels. Also, in general, vowel intelligibility was lower with the higher pitch, and vowels sung by the women were less intelligible than those sung by the men. Identification accuracy was about the same for the singing teacher listeners and the speech-language pathologist listeners except for the lower pitch, where the singing teachers were more accurate.

  1. No return to classical reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennings, David; Leifer, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    At a fundamental level, the classical picture of the world is dead, and has been dead now for almost a century. Pinning down exactly which quantum phenomena are responsible for this has proved to be a tricky and controversial question, but a lot of progress has been made in the past few decades. We now have a range of precise statements showing that whatever the ultimate laws of nature are, they cannot be classical. In this article, we review results on the fundamental phenomena of quantum theory that cannot be understood in classical terms. We proceed by first granting quite a broad notion of classicality, describe a range of quantum phenomena (such as randomness, discreteness, the indistinguishability of states, measurement-uncertainty, measurement-disturbance, complementarity, non-commutativity, interference, the no-cloning theorem and the collapse of the wave-packet) that do fall under its liberal scope, and then finally describe some aspects of quantum physics that can never admit a classical understanding - the intrinsically quantum mechanical aspects of nature. The most famous of these is Bell's theorem, but we also review two more recent results in this area. Firstly, Hardy's theorem shows that even a finite-dimensional quantum system must contain an infinite amount of information, and secondly, the Pusey-Barrett-Rudolph theorem shows that the wave function must be an objective property of an individual quantum system. Besides being of foundational interest, results of this sort now find surprising practical applications in areas such as quantum information science and the simulation of quantum systems.

  2. Satellite Data Communications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-04-01

    emphasized. After a discussion of existing standard tariffed satellite data services and special tariffed data services we list some possible future data...international maritime cammunica- tions satellite (MARISAT) is scheduled for launch early in 1975, and an inter- national aeronautical satellite (AEROSAT...circuit may achieve a data rate of 9600 bits per second under carefully controlled conditions [8]. A 50,000 bits per second data circuit, tariffed

  3. Satellite communication antenna technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittra, R. (Editor); Imbriale, W. A. (Editor); Maanders, E. J. (Editor)

    1983-01-01

    A general overview of current technology in the field of communication satellite antennas is presented. Among the topics discussed are: the design of multiple beam systems; frequency reuse; and polarization control of antenna measurements. Consideration is also given to: contour beam synthesis; dual shaped reflector synthesis; beam shaping; and offset reflector design. The applications of the above technologies to present and future generations of communications satellites is considered, with emphasis given to such systems as: the Intelsats; the Defense Satellite Communications System, (DSCS-III); Satellite Business System (SBS), and Comstar.

  4. Satellite networks for education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. P.; Morgan, R. P.; Rosenbaum, F. J.

    1972-01-01

    Satellite based educational networking is discussed with particular attention given to the potential uses of communications satellites to help meet educational needs in the United states. Four major subject areas were covered; (1) characteristics and structure of networks, (2) definition of pressures within educational establishment that provide motivation for various types of networks, (3) examination of current educational networking status for educational radio and television, instructional television fixed services, inter- and intra-state educational communication networks, computer networks, and cable television for education, and (4) identification of possible satellite based educational telecommunication services and three alternatives for implementing educational satellite systems.

  5. Satellite Tracking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Researchers at the Center for Aerospace Sciences of the University of North Dakota (UND), Grand Forks, used three NASA Computer programs (SANDTRACKS, ODG, NORAD) to develop a Satellite Tracking System for real time utilization of TIROS weather/environment satellite information. SANDTRACKS computes the satellite's position relative to the Earth. ODG allows plotting a view of Earth as seen by the satellite. NORAD computes sight direction, visibility times and maximum elevation angle during each orbit. With the system, UND's Earth System Science Institute will be able to routinely monitor agricultural and environmental conditions of the Northern Plains.

  6. Satellite Antenna Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Through the Technology Affiliates Program at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the ACTS antenna system was transferred from experimental testing status to commercial development with KVH Industries, Inc. The ACTS design enables mobile satellite antennas to remain pointed at the satellite, regardless of the motion or vibration on which it is mounted. KVH's first product based on the ACTS design is a land-mobile satellite antenna system that will enable direct broadcast satellite television aboard moving trucks, recreational vehicles, trains, and buses. Future products could include use in broadcasting, emergency medical and military vehicles.

  7. Classical Analog to Entanglement Reversibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitambar, Eric; Fortescue, Ben; Hsieh, Min-Hsiu

    2015-08-01

    In this Letter we study the problem of secrecy reversibility. This asks when two honest parties can distill secret bits from some tripartite distribution pX Y Z and transform secret bits back into pX Y Z at equal rates using local operation and public communication. This is the classical analog to the well-studied problem of reversibly concentrating and diluting entanglement in a quantum state. We identify the structure of distributions possessing reversible secrecy when one of the honest parties holds a binary distribution, and it is possible that all reversible distributions have this form. These distributions are more general than what is obtained by simply constructing a classical analog to the family of quantum states known to have reversible entanglement. An indispensable tool used in our analysis is a conditional form of the Gács-Körner common information.

  8. Invariants from classical field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, Rafael; Leal, Lorenzo

    2008-06-15

    We introduce a method that generates invariant functions from perturbative classical field theories depending on external parameters. By applying our methods to several field theories such as Abelian BF, Chern-Simons, and two-dimensional Yang-Mills theory, we obtain, respectively, the linking number for embedded submanifolds in compact varieties, the Gauss' and the second Milnor's invariant for links in S{sup 3}, and invariants under area-preserving diffeomorphisms for configurations of immersed planar curves.

  9. Classical photometry of prefractal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Shkuratov, Yuriy; Petrov, Dmitriy; Videen, Gorden

    2003-11-01

    Using the scale invariance of classical photometry, we develop an approach to finding the photometric function of prefractal structures that form a random topography. The photometric function of the prefractal surfaces is found as the general solution of the resulting differential equation in partial derivatives. The function depends on two parameters: the number of hierarchical levels of the prefractal structures and the roughness parameter of the single-level generation. As a limiting case, the approach includes our previous theory that considered fractoids.

  10. Psoriasis: classical and emerging comorbidities*

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Maria de Fátima Santos Paim; Rocha, Bruno de Oliveira; Duarte, Gleison Vieira

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory systemic disease. Evidence shows an association of psoriasis with arthritis, depression, inflammatory bowel disease and cardiovascular diseases. Recently, several other comorbid conditions have been proposed as related to the chronic inflammatory status of psoriasis. The understanding of these conditions and their treatments will certainly lead to better management of the disease. The present article aims to synthesize the knowledge in the literature about the classical and emerging comorbidities related to psoriasis. PMID:25672294

  11. Quantum to classical randomness extractors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehner, Stephanie; Berta, Mario; Fawzi, Omar

    2013-03-01

    The goal of randomness extraction is to distill (almost) perfect randomness from a weak source of randomness. When the source yields a classical string X, many extractor constructions are known. Yet, when considering a physical randomness source, X is itself ultimately the result of a measurement on an underlying quantum system. When characterizing the power of a source to supply randomness it is hence a natural question to ask, how much classical randomness we can extract from a quantum system. To tackle this question we here introduce the notion of quantum-to-classical randomness extractors (QC-extractors). We identify an entropic quantity that determines exactly how much randomness can be obtained. Furthermore, we provide constructions of QC-extractors based on measurements in a full set of mutually unbiased bases (MUBs), and certain single qubit measurements. As the first application, we show that any QC-extractor gives rise to entropic uncertainty relations with respect to quantum side information. Such relations were previously only known for two measurements. As the second application, we resolve the central open question in the noisy-storage model [Wehner et al., PRL 100, 220502 (2008)] by linking security to the quantum capacity of the adversary's storage device.

  12. Processing of satellite imagery at the National Environmental Satellite Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowe, M.

    1977-01-01

    The National Environmental Satellite Service (NESS) image product processing system is described. Other topics discussed include: (1) image processing of polar-orbiter satellite data; (2) image processing of geostationary satellite data; and (3) quality assurance and product monitoring.

  13. Signals from Communications Satellites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomsen, Volker

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the Doppler effect for relative motion between a source of waves and an observer and the orbital dynamics of communications satellites. Presents preliminary calculations of the satellite's altitude and linear velocity using only the concepts of the Doppler shift and the mechanics of motion in a circular path. (JRH)

  14. Amateur Radio Satellite Communications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koch, David P.

    The Amateur Radio Satellite Communications project had, as its goal, the assembly of an amateur radio satellite station in a high school physics classroom. Specific objectives were to provide: (1) a special source of interest as a motivator for attracting students and building public relations; (2) a center of interest as a motivator for the study…

  15. Jovian satellite nomenclature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, T.

    1976-01-01

    A brief review of the history of Jovian satellite nomenclature is given to indicate the background for the names proposed for the numbered satellites. The new names are consistent with established tradition and should cause minimal confusion with other named objects in the solar system.

  16. Communications technology satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A description of the Communications Technology Satellite (CTS), its planned orbit, its experiments, and associated ground facilities was given. The communication experiments, to be carried out by a variety of groups in both the United States and Canada, include tele-education, tele-medicine, community interaction, data communications and broadcasting. A historical summary of communications satellite development was also included.

  17. Communication satellite technology trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuccia, Louis

    1986-01-01

    A chronology of space-Earth interconnectivity is presented. The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) system, Land Mobile Satellite, space-Earth antennas, impact of antenna size on coverage, intersatellite links are outlined. This presentation is represented by graphs and charts only.

  18. Tethered satellite control mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyrias, G. M.

    1983-01-01

    The tethered satellite control mechanisms consist of four major subsystems. The reel drive mechanism stores the tether. It is motor driven and includes a level wind to uniformly feed the tether to the reel. The lower boom mechanism serves two primary functions: (1) it measures tether length and velocity as the tether runs through the mechanism, and (2) it reads the tether tension at the reel. It also provides change the direction for the tether from the reel to the upper boom mechanism. The deployment boom positions the upper boom mechanism with satellite out of the cargo bay. The deployment function places the 500-kg satellite 20 m away from the Space Shuttle (producing a small natural gravity gradient force), impacts an initial velocity to the satellite for deployment, and allows for satellite docking at a safe distance from the body of the Space Shuttle. The upper boom mechanism (UBM) services three functions: (1) it provides tether control to the satellite as the satellite swings in and out of plane; (2) it reads tether tension in the low range during the early deployment and final retrieval parts of the mission; and (3) it produces additional tether tension at the reel when tether tension to the satellite is in the low range.

  19. Analytical satellite theories based on a new set of canonical elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheifele, G.; Graf, O.

    1974-01-01

    A new analytical satellite theory is presented. Instead of the 6 classical elements of Delaunay, a set of 8 canonical elements is used. Whereas the time is the independent variable in classical theory, the true anomaly is the independent variable in the new theory. The new approach has four features: (1) The amount of formulas in the solution is reduced considerably. (2) The first order results are almost as accurate as second order results in classical theory. (3) The theory is easier to understand from a didactical point of view. (4) The problems connected with the inaccuracy of the mean motion that are typical for classical satellite theory are no longer present. The new elements are applied to analytical solutions of the zonal oblateness problem and to the problem of the 24 hour satellite.

  20. Optimum Onager: The Classical Mechanics of a Classical Siege Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denny, Mark

    2009-12-01

    The onager is a throwing weapon of classical antiquity, familiar to both the ancient Greeks and Romans. Here we analyze the dynamics of onager operation and derive the optimum angle for launching a projectile to its maximum range. There is plenty of scope for further considerations about increasing onager range, and so by thinking about how this machine might be improved, a student can gain insight beyond the equations of motion and can test hypotheses on readily available working models. Some of these performance improvements are considered in this paper.

  1. Satellite networks for education.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. P.; Morgan, R. P.; Rosenbaum, F. J.

    1972-01-01

    Consideration of satellite-based educational networking. The characteristics and structure of networks are reviewed, and pressures within the educational establishment that are providing motivation for various types of networks are discussed. A number of studies are cited in which networking needs for educational sectors and services are defined. The current status of educational networking for educational radio and television, instructional television fixed services, inter- and intrastate educational communication networks, computer networks, cable television for education, and continuing and proposed educational experiments using NASA's Applications Technology Satellites is reviewed. Possible satellite-based educational telecommunication services and three alternatives for implementing educational satellite systems are described. Some remarks are made concerning public policy aspects of future educational satellite system development.

  2. Communications satellite needs examined

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supharat

    1985-02-01

    Thailand can use a communications satellite to provide various forms of international and domestic telecommunications services such as telephone, teleprinter, telephotograph, television and radio service. This can be done in a manner that is just as efficient as using a microwave radio and underwater and optical fiber cable system. A communications satellite is also superior in terms of flexibility and speed in putting it into operation with no restrictions on distance, routes or geographical characteristics. A ground radio transmitter-receiver station can be built anywhere radio waves from the satellite can be picked up. Costs of launching a satellite into orbit and procedures involved from a regulatory point of view are examined. Initiatives taken to provide Thailand with its own satellites are highlighted.

  3. Classical novae and recurrent novae: General properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hack, Margherita; Selvelli, Pierluigi; Duerbeck, Hilmar W.

    1993-01-01

    We describe the observable characteristics of classical novae and recurrent novae obtained by different techniques (photometry, spectroscopy, and imaging) in all the available spectral ranges. We consider the three stages in the life of a nova: quiescence (pre- and post-outburst), outburst, final decline and nebular phase. We describe the photometric properties during the quiescent phase. We describe the photometric properties during outburst, the classification according the rate of decline (magnitudes per day), which permits us to define very fast, fast, intermediate, slow, and very slow novae and the correlation between luminosity and speed class. We report the scanty data on the spectra of the few known prenovae and those on the spectra of old novae and those of dwarf novae and nova-like, which, however, are almost undistinguishable. We describe the typical spectra appearing from the beginning of the outburst, just before maximum, up to the nebular phase and the correlation between spectral type at maximum, expansional velocity, and speed class of the nova. We report the existing infrared observations, which permit us to explain some of the characteristics of the outburst light curve, and give evidence of the formation of a dust shell in slow and intermediate novae (with the important exception of the very slow nova HR Del 1967) and its absence or quasi-absence in fast novae. The ultraviolet and X-ray observations are described. The X ray observations of novae, mainly from the two satellites EINSTEIN and EXOSAT, are reported. Observations of the final decline and of the envelopes appearing several months after outburst are also reported.

  4. Classical Optics and its Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansuripur, Masud

    2009-02-01

    Preface; Introduction; 1. Abbe's sine condition; 2. Fourier optics; 3. Effect of polarization on diffraction in systems of high numerical aperture; 4. Gaussian beam optics; 5. Coherent and incoherent imaging; 6. First-order temporal coherence in classical optics; 7. The Van Cittert-Zernike theorem; 8. Partial polarization, Stokes parameters, and the Poincarè Sphere; 9. Second-order coherence and the Hanbury Brown - Twiss experiment; 10. What in the world are surface plasmons?; 11. Surface plasmon polaritons on metallic surfaces; 12. The Faraday effecy; 13. The magneto-optical Kerr effect; 14. The Sagnac interferometer; 15. Fabry-Perot etalons in polarized light; 16. The Ewald-Oseen extinction theorem; 17. Reciprocity in classical Linear optics; 18. Optical pulse compression; 19. The uncertainty principle in classical optics; 20. Omni-directional dielectric mirrors; 21. Optical vortices; 22. Geometric-optical rays, Poynting's vector, and field momenta; 23. Doppler shift, stellar aberration, and convection of light by moving Media; 24. Diffraction gratings; 25. Diffractive optical elements; 26. The talbot effect; 27. Some quirks of total internal reflection; 28. Evanescent coupling; 29. Internal and external conical refraction; 30. Transmission of light through small elliptical apertures; 31. The method of Fox and Li; 32. The beam propagation method; 33. Launching light into a Fiber; 34. The optics of demiconductor fiode Laser; 35. Michelson's dtellar interferometer; 36. Bracewell's interferometric telescope; 37. Scanning optical microscopy; 38. Zernike's method of phase contrast; 39. Polarization microscopy; 40. Nomarski's differential interference contrast microscope; 41. The Van Leeuwenhoek microscope; 42. Projection photolithography; 43. Interaction of light with subwavelength structures; 44 The Ronchi test; 45. The Shack-Hartmann Wavefront sensor; 46. Ellipsometry; 47. Holography and holographic interferometry; 48. Self-focusing in non-linear optical media; 49

  5. Transit satellite system timing capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finsod, T. D.

    1978-01-01

    Current time transfer capabilities of the Transit Satellite System are reviewed. Potential improvements in the changes in equipment and operational procedures using operational satellites are discussed.

  6. Satellite Services Workshop, Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Key issues associated with the orbital servicing of satellites are examined including servicing spacecraft and equipment, servicing operations, economics, satellite design, docking and berthing, and fluid management.

  7. Classical analog of quantum phase

    SciTech Connect

    Ord, G.N.

    1992-07-01

    A modified version of the Feynman relativistic chessboard model (FCM) is investigated in which the paths involved are spirals in the space-time. Portions of the paths in which the particle`s proper time is reversed are interpreted in terms of antiparticles. With this intepretation the particle-antiparticle field produced by such trajectories provides a classical analog of the phase associated with particle paths in the unmodified FCM. It is shwon that in the nonrelativistic limit the resulting kernel is the correct Dirac propagator and that particle-antiparticle symmetry is in this case responsible for quantum interference. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Superadditivity of classical capacity revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Pilyavets, Oleg V.; Karpov, Evgueni A.; Schäfer, Joachim

    2014-12-04

    We introduce new type of superadditivity for classical capacity of quantum channels, which involves the properties of channels’ environment. By imposing different restrictions on the total energy contained in channels’ environment we can consider different types of superadditivity. Using lossy bosonic and additive noise quantum channels as examples, we demonstrate that their capacities can be either additive or superadditive depending on the values of channels parameters. The parameters corresponding to transition between the additive and superadditive cases are related with recently found critical and supercritical parameters for Gaussian channels.

  9. Classical dynamics on Snyder spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignemi, S.

    2015-04-01

    We study the classical dynamics of a particle in Snyder spacetime, adopting the formalism of constrained Hamiltonian systems introduced by Dirac. We show that the motion of a particle in a scalar potential is deformed with respect to special relativity by terms of order βE2. A remarkable result is that in the relativistic Snyder model a consistent choice of the time variable must necessarily depend on the dynamics. This is a consequence of the nontrivial mixing between position and momentum coordinates intrinsic to the Snyder model.

  10. Classics in Chemical Neuroscience: Haloperidol.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Marshall W; Zaldivar-Diez, Josefa; Haggarty, Stephen J

    2017-02-15

    The discovery of haloperidol catalyzed a breakthrough in our understanding of the biochemical basis of schizophrenia, improved the treatment of psychosis, and facilitated deinstitutionalization. In doing so, it solidified the role for chemical neuroscience as a means to elucidate the molecular underpinnings of complex neuropsychiatric disorders. In this Review, we will cover aspects of haloperidol's synthesis, manufacturing, metabolism, pharmacology, approved and off-label indications, and adverse effects. We will also convey the fascinating history of this classic molecule and the influence that it has had on the evolution of neuropsychopharmacology and neuroscience.

  11. Iridium Satellite Signal Exploitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonough, Peter

    2010-03-01

    The Iridium Satellite constellation is unique to satellite communication networks in that it allows for transmission of data between satellites instead of relying on transmission by the bent pipe methodology. As such, this network is far more secure than other satellite communication networks, and forces interception to occur within the locale of the transmission from modem to satellite or within the locale of the downlink from the satellite other modem. The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the security weaknesses within the Iridium protocol, showing that it was possible to track one of these satellites with a high gain antenna, resulting in the ability to anticipate transmission, to acquire the location of that transmission, and to uncover the content of that transmission. This project was completed as part of the summer student program at the Southwest Research Institute. The presentation will demonstrate the thought process used in chronological order, essentially demonstrating how I achieved the result from my point of view as the summer progressed.

  12. Probability of satellite collision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarter, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    A method is presented for computing the probability of a collision between a particular artificial earth satellite and any one of the total population of earth satellites. The collision hazard incurred by the proposed modular Space Station is assessed using the technique presented. The results of a parametric study to determine what type of satellite orbits produce the greatest contribution to the total collision probability are presented. Collision probability for the Space Station is given as a function of Space Station altitude and inclination. Collision probability was also parameterized over miss distance and mission duration.

  13. Land mobile communications satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnebianca, C.; Pavesi, B.; Tuozzi, A.

    1986-09-01

    The economic value and salient technical and operational characteristics of a European Land Mobile Communication Satellite (LMCS) to complement and supplement the demand for mobile services of Western European countries in the 1995 to 2005 time frames were assessed. A significant future expansion of demand for LCMS services on the part of the public is anticipated. Important augmentations of current service capabilities could be achieved by a satellite service, improving the overall system performances and/or assisting the PTT's in containing their investments in the required infrastructure. The satellite service itself could represent a profitable revenue producer.

  14. Skeletal muscle satellite cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, E.; McCormick, K. M.

    1994-01-01

    Evidence now suggests that satellite cells constitute a class of myogenic cells that differ distinctly from other embryonic myoblasts. Satellite cells arise from somites and first appear as a distinct myoblast type well before birth. Satellite cells from different muscles cannot be functionally distinguished from one another and are able to provide nuclei to all fibers without regard to phenotype. Thus, it is difficult to ascribe any significant function to establishing or stabilizing fiber type, even during regeneration. Within a muscle, satellite cells exhibit marked heterogeneity with respect to their proliferative behavior. The satellite cell population on a fiber can be partitioned into those that function as stem cells and those which are readily available for fusion. Recent studies have shown that the cells are not simply spindle shaped, but are very diverse in their morphology and have multiple branches emanating from the poles of the cells. This finding is consistent with other studies indicating that the cells have the capacity for extensive migration within, and perhaps between, muscles. Complexity of cell shape usually reflects increased cytoplasmic volume and organelles including a well developed Golgi, and is usually associated with growing postnatal muscle or muscles undergoing some form of induced adaptive change or repair. The appearance of activated satellite cells suggests some function of the cells in the adaptive process through elaboration and secretion of a product. Significant advances have been made in determining the potential secretion products that satellite cells make. The manner in which satellite cell proliferative and fusion behavior is controlled has also been studied. There seems to be little doubt that cellcell coupling is not how satellite cells and myofibers communicate. Rather satellite cell regulation is through a number of potential growth factors that arise from a number of sources. Critical to the understanding of this form

  15. Satellite Multicarrier Demodulation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budinger, James; Kwatra, Subhash C.; Jamale, Mohsin M.; Fernandez, John P.; Eugene, Linus P.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed onboard signal processing system for communications satellites performs real-time conversion of multiple uplink (received) signals in single-channel-per-carrier, frequency-division-multiple-access (SCPC/FDMA) format to downlink (transmitted) signals in time-division-multiplexed (TDM) format. Conversion approach enhances use of allocated spectrum and reduces required effective isotropic radiated power at both transponder (satellite) and Earth stations. Equipment needed to implement scheme less complex and less expensive than time-division-multiple-access (TDMA) formats. More economical future satellite communication systems made possible through use of many small-capacity multiservice Earth terminals.

  16. Physiological characteristics of classical ballet.

    PubMed

    Schantz, P G; Astrand, P O

    1984-10-01

    The aerobic and anaerobic energy yield during professional training sessions ("classes") of classical ballet as well as during rehearsed and performed ballets has been studied by means of oxygen uptake, heart rate, and blood lactate concentration determinations on professional ballet dancers from the Royal Swedish Ballet in Stockholm. The measured oxygen uptake during six different normal classes at the theatre averaged about 35-45% of the maximal oxygen uptake, and the blood lactate concentration averaged 3 mM (N = 6). During 10 different solo parts of choreographed dance (median length = 1.8 min) representative for moderately to very strenuous dance, an average oxygen uptake (measured during the last minute) of 80% of maximum and blood lactate concentration of 10 mM was measured (N = 10). In addition, heart rate registrations from soloists in different ballets during performance and final rehearsals frequently indicated a high oxygen uptake relative to maximum and an average blood lactate concentration of 11 mM (N = 5). Maximal oxygen uptake, determined in 1971 (N = 11) and 1983 (N = 13) in two different groups of dancers, amounted to on the average 51 and 56 ml X min-1 X kg-1 for the females and males, respectively. In conclusion, classical ballet is a predominantly intermittent type of exercise. In choreographed dance each exercise period usually lasts only a few minutes, but can be very demanding energetically, while during the dancers' basic training sessions, the energy yield is low.

  17. Overuse injuries in classical ballet.

    PubMed

    Khan, K; Brown, J; Way, S; Vass, N; Crichton, K; Alexander, R; Baxter, A; Butler, M; Wark, J

    1995-05-01

    Successful management of classical ballet dancers with overuse injuries requires an understanding of the art form, precise knowledge of anatomy and awareness of certain conditions. Turnout is the single most fundamental physical attribute in classical ballet and 'forcing turnout' frequently contributes to overuse injuries. Common presenting conditions arising from the foot and ankle include problems at the first metatarsophalangeal joint, second metatarsal stress fractures, flexor hallucis longus tendinitis and anterior and posterior ankle impingement syndromes. Persistent shin pain in dancers is often due to chronic compartment syndrome, stress fracture of the posteromedial or anterior tibia. Knee pain can arise from patellofemoral syndrome, patellar tendon insertional pathologies, or a combination of both. Hip and back problems are also prevalent in dancers. To speed injury recovery of dancers, it is important for the sports medicine team to cooperate fully. This permits the dancer to benefit from accurate diagnosis, technique correction where necessary, the full range of manual therapies to joint and soft tissue, appropriate strengthening programmes and maintenance of dance fitness during any time out of class with Pilates-based exercises and nutrition advice. Most overuse ballet conditions respond well to a combination of conservative therapies. Those dancers that do require surgical management still depend heavily on ballet-specific rehabilitation for a complete recovery.

  18. Teaching classical mechanics using smartphones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevrier, Joel; Madani, Laya; Ledenmat, Simon; Bsiesy, Ahmad

    2013-09-01

    A number of articles published in this column have dealt with topics in classical mechanics. This note describes some additional examples employing a smartphone and the new software iMecaProf.4 Steve Jobs presented the iPhone as "perfect for gaming."5 Thanks to its microsensors connected in real time to the numerical world, physics teachers could add that smartphones are "perfect for teaching science." The software iMecaProf displays in real time the measured data on a screen. The visual representation is built upon the formalism of classical mechanics. iMecaProf receives data 100 times a second from iPhone sensors through a Wi-Fi connection using the application Sensor Data.6 Data are the three components of the acceleration vector in the smartphone frame and smartphone's orientation through three angles (yaw, pitch, and roll). For circular motion (uniform or not), iMecaProf uses independent measurements of the rotation angle θ, the angular speed dθ/dt, and the angular acceleration d2θ/dt2.

  19. Friedreich Ataxia in Classical Galactosaemia.

    PubMed

    Neville, Siobhán; O'Sullivan, Siobhan; Sweeney, Bronagh; Lynch, Bryan; Hanrahan, Donncha; Knerr, Ina; Lynch, Sally Ann; Crushell, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Movement disorders such as ataxia are a recognized complication of classical galactosaemia, even in diet-compliant patients. Here, we report the coexistence of classical galactosaemia and Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) in nine children from seven Irish Traveller families. These two autosomal recessive disorders, the loci for which are located on either side of the centromere of chromosome 9, appear to be in linkage disequilibrium in this subgroup. Both conditions are known to occur with increased frequency amongst the Irish Traveller population.Each member of our cohort had been diagnosed with galactosaemia in the neonatal period, and all are homozygous for the common Q188R mutation in the GALT gene. Eight of the nine patients later presented with progressive ataxia, between the ages of 5-13 years. Another child presented in cardiac failure secondary to dilated cardiomyopathy at 7 years of age. He was not ataxic at presentation and, one year from diagnosis, his neurological examination remains normal. The diagnosis of FRDA was confirmed by detecting the common pathogenic GAA expansion in both alleles of the frataxin gene (FXN) in each patient.Neurological symptoms are easily attributed to an underlying diagnosis of galactosaemia. It is important to consider a diagnosis of Friedreich ataxia in a child from the Irish Traveller population with galactosaemia who presents with ataxia or cardiomyopathy.

  20. Classically spinning and isospinning solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battye, Richard A.; Haberichter, Mareike

    2012-09-01

    We investigate classically spinning topological solitons in (2+1)- and (3+1)-dimensional models; more explicitely spinning sigma model solitons in 2+1 dimensions and Skyrme solitons in 2+1 and 3+1 dimensions. For example, such types of solitons can be used to describe quasiparticle excitations in ferromagnetic quantum Hall systems or to model spin and isospin states of nuclei. The standard way to obtain solitons with quantised spin and isospin is the semiclassical quantization procedure: One parametrizes the zero-mode space - the space of energy-degenerate soliton configurations generated from a single soliton by spatial translations and rotations in space and isospace - by collective coordinates which are then taken to be time-dependent. This gives rise to additional dynamical terms in the Hamiltonian which can then be quantized following semiclassical quantization rules. A simplification which is often made in the literature is to apply a simple adiabatic approximation to the (iso)rotational zero modes of the soliton by assuming that the soliton's shape is rotational frequency independent. Our numerical results on classically spinning arbitrarily deforming soliton solutions clearly show that soliton deformation cannot be ignored.

  1. Overview of commercial satellite communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beakley, G. W.

    1984-07-01

    A brief history of communications satellites is presented, taking into account the launching of Sputnik 1 in October 1957, the Explorer 1 in January of 1958, the launch of the Score as the world's first active communications satellite in December 1958, the Communications Satellite Act in 1962, and the launch of 'Early Bird' in 1964. The Intelsat satellites are considered along with maritime satellite communications, the U.S. domestic satellite systems, Alaskan satellite communications, cable television, broadcast TV stations, print media, the hotel/motel industry as a large market for satellite communications terminals, the opening of a minicable and satellite master antenna TV market for TV receive-only systems, and business telecommunications earth terminals. Attention is also given to future directions regarding satellite positions, the concept of 'video-plus', and direct broadcast satellites.

  2. Diminuendo: Classical Music and the Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asia, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    How is the tradition of Western classical music faring on university campuses? Before answering this question, it is necessary to understand what has transpired with classical music in the wider culture, as the relationship between the two is so strong. In this article, the author discusses how classical music has taken a big cultural hit in…

  3. Africa in Classical Antiquity: A Curriculum Resource

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masciantonio, Rudolph

    1977-01-01

    A curriculum resource developed by the School District of Philadelphia deals with Africa in Classical Antiquity. Each unit contains suggestions for lower, middle and upper schools. Topics covered are: history of Africa; great Africans in the Graeco-Roman world; racial attitudes; blacks in classical art, and Africa in classical literature. (CHK)

  4. Africa in Classical Antiquity: A Curriculum Resource.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masciantonio, Rudolph; And Others

    This curriculum resource is intended primarily to assist teachers of Latin and Greek to infuse material on Africa in classical antiquity into the curriculum at all levels. It gathers together background information on the role of Africa in classical antiquity that has not been treated in traditional classical language courses. The resource guide…

  5. Reexamining the Quantum-Classical Relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokulich, Alisa

    2008-10-01

    1. Intertheoretic relations: are imperialism and isolationism our only options?; 2. Heisenberg's closed theories and pluralistic realism; 3. Dirac's open theories and the reciprocal correspondence principle; 4. Bohr's generalization of classical mechanics; 5. Semiclassical mechanics: putting quantum flesh on classical bones; 6. Can classical structures explain quantum phenomena?; 7. A structural approach to intertheoretic relations; References; Index.

  6. Introducing the Classics to Reluctant Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazarus, Lissa J.

    Using the pocket classics can be a painless way to introduce the classics to eighth-grade students. Condensed versions of the classics can take the sting out of the reading, stimulate students' interest, and help prepare them for high school. To offer students in one eighth-grade class some control over their own learning, a contract system was…

  7. Orbit determination accuracies using satellite-to-satellite tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonbun, F. O.; Argentiero, P. D.; Schmid, P. E.

    1977-01-01

    The uncertainty in relay satellite sate is a significant error source which cannot be ignored in the reduction of satellite-to-satellite tracking data. Based on simulations and real data reductions, it is numerically impractical to use simultaneous unconstrained solutions to determine both relay and user satellite epoch states. A Bayesian or least squares estimation technique with an a priori procedure is presented which permits the adjustment of relay satellite epoch state in the reduction of satellite-to-satellite tracking data without the numerical difficulties introduced by an ill-conditioned normal matrix.

  8. Origins of satellites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, D. J.; Harris, A. W.; Lunine, J. I.

    Satellites are an inevitable consequence of most plausible planetary accumulation processes. They can arise from gaseous or particulate circumplanetary disks, continuously fed during accretion of the planet or infrequently created by large impacts. They can also arise from capture, aided by gas drag. Fission (in the Darwinian sense) is highly unlikely. This review seeks to assess critically the alternatives within the context of current ideas of the early solar system, guided by both cosmochemical and dynamical constraints, but unencumbered by prejudices concerning planetary growth. Topics discussed include the dynamics of both gaseous and particulate disks, the role of large impacts in creating satellite source material, the role of capture, and the thermodynamics of satellite accretion. Possible explanations for each of the satellite systems are offered.

  9. Satellites map the oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hibbs, A. R.; Wilson, W. S.

    1983-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing systems, both operational and planned, for monitoring the ocean winds, temperatures, chlorophyll concentrations, ice flows, and the sea surface and ocean floor topographies are described. Seasat demonstrated the effectiveness of scatterometer measurements for measuring wind velocities and directions, and a new scatterometer may be launched on the U.S. Navy NROSS spacecraft in 1988. The NOAA-7 and -8 satellites carry IR sensors to monitor ocean temperatures, and can thus forewarn of the onset of El Nino. Ocean currents are traced with radar altimeters such as the one planned for the Topex satellite as a follow-on to instrumentation tested during the three-month lifetime of the Seasat satellite. Further analytical development is required, however, to improve the data analyses of the altimeter and scatterometer readings, and to account for errors introduced by the observed features and the interposed atmospheric phenomena.

  10. Meteorological satellite accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, L. J.; Arking, A.; Bandeen, W. R.; Shenk, W. E.; Wexler, R.

    1974-01-01

    The various types of meteorological satellites are enumerated. Vertical sounding, parameter extraction technique, and both macroscale and mesoscale meteorological phenomena are discussed. The heat budget of the earth-atmosphere system is considered, along with ocean surface and hydrology.

  11. Biological satellite Kosmos-936

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vedeshin, L. A.

    1978-01-01

    A description is given of physiological experiments performed on the biological satellite Kosmos-936. Other experiments to determine the electrostatic and dielectric responses to the effects of cosmic radiation are discussed.

  12. Satellite positioning systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keydel, W.

    The basic physical principles, technology, and capabilities of satellite position-finding systems (SPFSs) are examined in a general overview. Topics discussed include the properties of EM waves as a basis for measurement; two-way (radar) SPFSs with active satellites (to locate passive targets); one-way SPFSs with active satellites (for self-location using a passive receiver); one-way SPFSs with passive satellites and active objects (for emergency search-and-rescue use); radar altimeters, radar scatterometers, and SARs; Doppler methods; and range-difference and pseudorange time-of-flight methods. Consideration is given to problems of precision in time measurements and orbit measurement and prediction, improved precision using differential methods, the predicted accuracy of Navstar GPS, propagation-related limitations, user demands, and political and economic factors influencing future SPFS development.

  13. Domestic Communication Satellites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horowitz, Andrew

    1974-01-01

    A discussion of the Federal Communications Commission's new policy on domestic satellites in light of our 1) military and economic history; 2) corporate interests; 3) citizen surveillance; and 4) media control. (HB)

  14. Virophages or satellite viruses?

    PubMed

    Krupovic, Mart; Cvirkaite-Krupovic, Virginija

    2011-11-01

    It has been argued that the smaller viruses associated with giant DNA viruses are a new biological entity. However, Mart Krupovic and Virginija Cvirkaite-Krupovic argue here that these smaller viruses should be classified with the satellite viruses.

  15. Trends In Satellite Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poley, William A.; Stevens, Grady H.; Stevenson, Steven M.; Lekan, Jack; Arth, Clifford H.; Hollansworth, James E.; Miller, Edward F.

    1988-01-01

    Report assesses trends in satellite communication from present to year 2010. Examines restrictions imposed by limited spectrum resource and technology needs created by trends. Personal communications, orbiting switchboards, and videophones foreseen.

  16. Weather, land satellite sale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    President Ronald Reagan announced on March 8 plans to sell to private industry the nation's land and meteorological remote-sensing satellites, including the responsibility for any future ocean-observing systems. According to the plan, the private firm successful in its bid to buy the five satellites would sell back to the government the data received by the satellites. The Reagan administration says the sale will save money and will put activities appropriate for commercial ventures into the commercial sector. Response to the announcement from scientists and congressmen has been anything but dulcet; one senator, in fact, charges that the Commerce Department and the corporation most likely to purchase the satellites are engaged in a ‘sweetheart deal.’

  17. Epos TCS Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manunta, Michele; Mandea, Mioara; Fernández-Turiel, José Luis; Stramondo, Salvatore; Wright, Tim; Walter, Thomas; Bally, Philippe; Casu, Francesco; Zeni, Giovanni; Buonanno, Sabatino; Zinno, Ivana; Tizzani, Pietro; Castaldo, Raffaele; Ostanciaux, Emilie; Diament, Michel; Hooper, Andy; Maccaferri, Francesco; Lanari, Riccardo

    2016-04-01

    TCS Satellite Data is devoted to provide Earth Observation (EO) services, transversal with respect to the large EPOS community, suitable to be used in several application scenarios. In particular, the main goal is to contribute with mature services that have already well demonstrated their effectiveness and relevance in investigating the physical processes controlling earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and unrest episodes as well as those driving tectonics and Earth surface dynamics. The TCS Satellite Data will provide two kinds of services: satellite products/services, and Value-added satellite products/services. The satellite products/services are composed of three (EPOSAR, GDM and COMET) well-identified and partly already operational elements for delivering Level 1 products. Such services will be devoted to the generation of SAR interferograms, DTM and ground displacement maps through the exploitation of different advanced EO techniques for InSAR and optical data analysis. The Value-added satellite products/services are composed of 4 elements (EPOSAR, 3D-Def, Mod and COMET) of Level 2 and 3 products. Such services integrate satellite and in situ measurements and observations to retrieve information on source mechanism, such as the geometry (spatial location, depth, volume changes) and the physical parameters of the deformation sources, through the exploitation of modelling approaches. The TCS Satellite Data will provide products in two different processing and delivery modes: 1- surveillance mode - routinely product generation; 2- on demand mode - product generation performed on demand by the user. Concerning the surveillance mode, the goal is providing continuous satellite measurements in areas of particular interest from a geophysical perspective (supersites). The objective is the detection of displacement patterns changing along time and their geophysical explanation. This is a valid approach for inter-seismic movements and volcanic unrest, post-seismic and post

  18. Tactical Satellite 3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-01

    TACTICAL SATELLITE 3 THE 4S SYMPOSIUM Thomas M. Davis (1), Stanley D. Straight (2), Dr. Ronald B. Lockwood (3) (1) Air Force Research...Laboratory Science and Technology ( S &T) initiative that explores the capability and technological maturity of small, low-cost satellites. It features a...technology area, these S &T efforts also help mitigate technology risk and establish a potential concept of operations for future acquisitions. The

  19. Solar Power Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, C. C., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A satellite based energy concept is described, including the advantages of the basic concept, system characteristics, cost, and environmental considerations. An outline of a plan for the further evaluation and implementation of the system is given. It is concluded that the satellite concept is competitive with other advanced power generation systems when a variety of factors are considered, including technical feasibility, cost, safety, natural resources, environment, baseload capability, location flexibility, land use, and existing industrial base for implementation.

  20. Satellite battery testing status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haag, R.; Hall, S.

    1986-01-01

    Because of the large numbers of satellite cells currently being tested and anticipated at the Naval Weapons Support Center (NAVWPNSUPPCEN) Crane, Indiana, satellite cell testing is being integrated into the Battery Test Automation Project (BTAP). The BTAP, designed to meet the growing needs for battery testing at the NAVWPNSUPPCEN Crane, will consist of several Automated Test Stations (ATSs) which monitor batteries under test. Each ATS will interface with an Automation Network Controller (ANC) which will collect test data for reduction.

  1. The Archimedes satellite system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Stuart C.; Shurvinton, William D.

    1992-03-01

    Archimedes is a satellite system conceived by the European Space Agency (ESA) to effectively serve the European market for Mobile Radio Services (MRS). This paper describes the requirements and technical design of the Archimedes satellite system. The underlying assumptions and trade-offs behind the design are detailed and the design is compared and contrasted against alternative design solutions, both technically and economically. A path forward for the development of the system is indicated.

  2. Radio determination satellite service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briskman, Robert D.

    1990-07-01

    The capabilities and measured performance of a geosynchronous satellite-based service called the radio determination satellite service (RDSS), which operates at radio frequencies allocated by the International Telecommunications Union (ITU) and is licensed in the United States by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), are discussed. Plans for both improvement in capability and expansion to nearly global coverage are described. Since RDSS can also provide radio navigation, some comparisons of this service with the Global Positioning System (GPS) are made.

  3. Satellite Communications Industry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-01

    got access to GE’s corporate R&D center as part of the acquisition of GE Aerospace. A recent (5 FEB 93) NASA/National Science Foundation (NSF...million and $175 million. Cost of Products - Satellite Communicatons Services The cost of Satellite Communications Services is going down steadily, and...agreement also covers procurement by Nippon Telegraph and Telephone (NTT) Corporation (Japan’s largest telecom company), and Nippon Hoso Kyokai (NHK

  4. Satellite Applications for Public Service: Project Summaries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauffer, Sandra; And Others

    Summaries of 18 different projects involving the use of satellite communications are presented in this report, including PEACESAT Education and Communication Experiments, USP Network Satellite Communication Project, Project Satellite, Satellite Instructional Television Experiment (SITE), Appalachian Education Satellite Program, Alaska Education…

  5. Jupiter: its captured satellites.

    PubMed

    Bailey, J M

    1971-08-27

    Because of the small size and irregular orbits of the seven outer satellites of Jupiter, it is often assumed that they were derived by capture. The conditions whereby Jupiter can capture satellites have therefore been examined. Relationships derived on the basis of the three-body problem for planets in elliptical orbits enable the dimensions of the capture orbits around Jupiter to be calculated. It is found that Jupiter may capture satellites through the inner Lagrangian point when at perihelion or at aphelion. Captures at perihelion should give rise to satellites in direct orbits of 11.48 x 10(6) kilometers and capture at aphelion to retrograde orbits of 21.7 x 10(6) kilometers. The correspondence with the seven outer satellites suggests that Jupiter VI, VIl, and X in direct orbits at 11.47, 11.74, and 11.85 x 10(6) kilometers were captured at Jupiter perihelion, whereas Jupiter VIII, IX, XI, and XII in retrograde orbits of 23.5, 23.7, 22.5, and 21.2 x 10(6) kilometers were captured when Jupiter was at aphelion. Examination of the precapture orbits indicates that the seven outer satellites were derived from the asteroid belt.

  6. The satellites of Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruikshank, D. P.

    1982-01-01

    Observations and the probable natures of the five known satellites of Uranus are reviewed. Photographic, photoelectric and CCD photometry of the satellites since 1961, although in agreement within experimental error, is not as mutually consistent as may be expected, and broadband JHK photometry falls in a portion of the J-H, H-K color diagram difficult to interpret. Spectrophotometry in the range 0.3-1.1 microns taken on two separate occasions is inconsistent, with only the relatively neutral reflectances of Titania and Oberon regarded as well established. Near-infrared spectrophotometry has revealed the presence of water ice or frost on the satellite surfaces, possibly in a very pure state, with spectra most similar to Ganymede. Estimations of the properties of the satellites from their surface geometric albedos, assumed mean densities and dynamics yield radii in the range 160-520 km, albedos on the order of 0.5 and densities of about 1.3 g/cu cm, similar to the icy Saturn satellites. The satellites are also believed to have formed after the event that caused the planet to tilt to its present obliquity.

  7. Satellite Technologies in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portz, Stephen M.

    1999-01-01

    Focuses on ways of using satellite imagery obtained from the Internet, to enhance classroom learning. Discusses satellite deployment; classroom applications, including infrared imagery, high-resolution photography, and global positioning satellites; and use of satellite data for hands-on activities, including cartography, city and community…

  8. Direct Broadcasting Satellites in Japan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maeda, Jiro

    The development and use of broadcasting satellites in Japan are discussed in this paper. The paper describes the medium-scale experimental broadcasting satellite, YURI, launched by NASA in 1978, and reports that experiments with YURI in the areas of basic technologies in the broadcasting satellite system, experiments on satellite control…

  9. Un-renormalized classical electromagnetism

    SciTech Connect

    Ibison, Michael . E-mail: ibison@earthtech.org

    2006-02-15

    This paper follows in the tradition of direct-action versions of electromagnetism having the aim of avoiding a balance of infinities wherein a mechanical mass offsets an infinite electromagnetic mass so as to arrive at a finite observed value. However, the direct-action approach ultimately failed in that respect because its initial exclusion of self-action was later found to be untenable in the relativistic domain. Pursing the same end, this paper examines instead a version of electromagnetism wherein mechanical action is excluded and self-action is retained. It is shown that the resulting theory is effectively interacting due to the presence of infinite forces. A vehicle for the investigation is a pair of classical point charges in a positronium-like arrangement for which the orbits are found to be self-sustaining and naturally quantized.

  10. DOE Fundamentals Handbook: Classical Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    The Classical Physics Fundamentals Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors provide operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of physical forces and their properties. The handbook includes information on the units used to measure physical properties; vectors, and how they are used to show the net effect of various forces; Newton's Laws of motion, and how to use these laws in force and motion applications; and the concepts of energy, work, and power, and how to measure and calculate the energy involved in various applications. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for understanding the basic operation of various types of DOE nuclear facility systems and equipment.

  11. Classical mechanics of nonconservative systems.

    PubMed

    Galley, Chad R

    2013-04-26

    Hamilton's principle of stationary action lies at the foundation of theoretical physics and is applied in many other disciplines from pure mathematics to economics. Despite its utility, Hamilton's principle has a subtle pitfall that often goes unnoticed in physics: it is formulated as a boundary value problem in time but is used to derive equations of motion that are solved with initial data. This subtlety can have undesirable effects. I present a formulation of Hamilton's principle that is compatible with initial value problems. Remarkably, this leads to a natural formulation for the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian dynamics of generic nonconservative systems, thereby filling a long-standing gap in classical mechanics. Thus, dissipative effects, for example, can be studied with new tools that may have applications in a variety of disciplines. The new formalism is demonstrated by two examples of nonconservative systems: an object moving in a fluid with viscous drag forces and a harmonic oscillator coupled to a dissipative environment.

  12. Classically Stable Nonsingular Cosmological Bounces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ijjas, Anna; Steinhardt, Paul J.

    2016-09-01

    One of the fundamental questions of theoretical cosmology is whether the Universe can undergo a nonsingular bounce, i.e., smoothly transit from a period of contraction to a period of expansion through violation of the null energy condition (NEC) at energies well below the Planck scale and at finite values of the scale factor such that the entire evolution remains classical. A common claim has been that a nonsingular bounce either leads to ghost or gradient instabilities or a cosmological singularity. In this Letter, we consider a well-motivated class of theories based on the cubic Galileon action and present a procedure for explicitly constructing examples of a nonsingular cosmological bounce without encountering any pathologies and maintaining a subluminal sound speed for comoving curvature modes throughout the NEC violating phase. We also discuss the relation between our procedure and earlier work.

  13. Classically Stable Nonsingular Cosmological Bounces.

    PubMed

    Ijjas, Anna; Steinhardt, Paul J

    2016-09-16

    One of the fundamental questions of theoretical cosmology is whether the Universe can undergo a nonsingular bounce, i.e., smoothly transit from a period of contraction to a period of expansion through violation of the null energy condition (NEC) at energies well below the Planck scale and at finite values of the scale factor such that the entire evolution remains classical. A common claim has been that a nonsingular bounce either leads to ghost or gradient instabilities or a cosmological singularity. In this Letter, we consider a well-motivated class of theories based on the cubic Galileon action and present a procedure for explicitly constructing examples of a nonsingular cosmological bounce without encountering any pathologies and maintaining a subluminal sound speed for comoving curvature modes throughout the NEC violating phase. We also discuss the relation between our procedure and earlier work.

  14. Classical Cosmology Through Animation Stories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mijic, Milan; Kang, E. Y. E.; Longson, T.; State LA SciVi Project, Cal

    2010-05-01

    Computer animations are a powerful tool for explanation and communication of ideas, especially to a younger generation. Our team completed a three part sequence of short, computer animated stories about the insight and discoveries that lead to the understanding of the overall structure of the universe. Our principal characters are Immanuel Kant, Henrietta Leavitt, and Edwin Hubble. We utilized animations to model and visualize the physical concepts behind each discovery and to recreate the characters, locations, and flavor of the time. The animations vary in length from 6 to 11 minutes. The instructors or presenters may wish to utilize them separately or together. The animations may be used for learning classical cosmology in a visual way in GE astronomy courses, in pre-college science classes, or in public science education setting.

  15. Gamma Rays from Classical Novae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    NASA at the University of Chicago, provided support for a program of theoretical research into the nature of the thermonuclear outbursts of the classical novae and their implications for gamma ray astronomy. In particular, problems which have been addressed include the role of convection in the earliest stages of nova runaway, the influence of opacity on the characteristics of novae, and the nucleosynthesis expected to accompany nova outbursts on massive Oxygen-Neon-Magnesium (ONeMg) white dwarfs. In the following report, I will identify several critical projects on which considerable progress has been achieved and provide brief summaries of the results obtained:(1) two dimensional simulation of nova runaway; (2) nucleosynthesis of nova modeling; and (3) a quasi-analytic study of nucleosynthesis in ONeMg novae.

  16. GALK inhibitors for classic galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Lai, Kent; Boxer, Matthew B; Marabotti, Anna

    2014-06-01

    Classic galactosemia is an inherited metabolic disease for which, at present, no therapy is available apart from galactose-restricted diet. However, the efficacy of the diet is questionable, since it is not able to prevent the insurgence of chronic complications later in life. In addition, it is possible that dietary restriction itself could induce negative side effects. Therefore, there is a need for an alternative therapeutic approach that can avert the manifestation of chronic complications in the patients. In this review, the authors describe the development of a novel class of pharmaceutical agents that target the production of a toxic metabolite, galactose-1-phosphate, considered as the main culprit for the cause of the complications, in the patients.

  17. Gastrointestinal Health in Classic Galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Kelly A; Mulle, Jennifer G; Epstein, Michael P; Fridovich-Keil, Judith L

    2016-07-01

    Classic galactosemia (CG) is an autosomal recessive disorder of galactose metabolism that affects approximately 1/50,000 live births in the USA. Following exposure to milk, which contains large quantities of galactose, affected infants may become seriously ill. Early identification by newborn screening with immediate dietary galactose restriction minimizes or prevents the potentially lethal acute symptoms of CG. However, more than half of individuals with CG still experience long-term complications including cognitive disability, behavioral problems, and speech impairment. Anecdotal reports have also suggested frequent gastrointestinal (GI) problems, but this outcome has not been systematically addressed. In this study we explored the prevalence of GI symptoms among 183 children and adults with CG (cases) and 190 controls. Cases reported 4.5 times more frequent constipation (95% CI 1.8-11.5) and 4.2 times more frequent nausea (95% CI 1.2-15.5) than controls. Cases with genotypes predicting residual GALT activity reported less frequent constipation than cases without predicted GALT activity but this difference was not statistically significant. Because the rigor of dietary galactose restriction varies among individuals with galactosemia, we further tested whether GI symptoms associated with diet in infancy. Though constipation was almost four times as common among cases reporting a more restrictive diet in infancy, this difference was not statistically significant. These data confirm that certain GI symptoms are more common in classic galactosemia compared to controls and suggest that future studies should investigate associations with residual GALT activity and dietary galactose restriction in early life.

  18. ISDN - The case for satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelton, J. N.; McDougal, P. J.

    1987-05-01

    The role of satellites in the proposed Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) is examined. ISDN is to be a unified global network providing international telecommunication services. The delay time connected with satellite communications is considered. The advantages of using satellites in ISDN are: (1) the digital services available with satellites (time-division multiple access, intermediate data rate, and Intelsat business services); (2) satellite networking features; (3) flexibility; and (4) global interconnectivity. It is noted that with the use of powerful transmitters on satellites, the growth of small earth stations, and developments in band switching and intersatellite links that satellites are applicable to ISDN.

  19. Satellite Communications for ATM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shamma, Mohammed A.

    2003-01-01

    This presentation is an overview on Satellite Communication for the Aeronautical Telecommunication Management (ATM) research. Satellite Communications are being considered by the FAA and NASA as a possible alternative to the present and future ground systems supporting Air Traffic Communications. The international Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) have in place Standards and Recommended Practices (SARPS) for the Aeronautical Mobile Satellite Services (AMSS) which is mainly derived from the pre-existing Inmarsat service that has been in service since the 1980s. The Working Group A of the Aeronautical Mobile Communication Panel of ICAO has also been investigating SARPS for what is called the Next Generation Satellite Service (NGSS) which conforms less to the Inmarsat based architecture and explores wider options in terms of satellite architectures. Several designs are being proposed by Firms such as Boeing, ESA, NASA that are geared toward full or secondary usage of satellite communications for ATM. Satellite communications for ATM can serve several purposes ranging from primary usage where ground services would play a minimal backup role, to an integrated solution where it will be used to cover services, or areas that are less likely to be supported by the proposed and existing ground infrastructure. Such Integrated roles can include usage of satellite communications for oceanic and remote land areas for example. It also can include relieving the capacity of the ground network by providing broadcast based services of Traffic Information Services messages (TIS-B), or Flight Information Services (FIS-B) which can take a significant portion of the ground system capacity. Additionally, satellite communication can play a backup role to support any needs for ground replacement, or additional needed capacity even after the new digital systems are in place. The additional bandwidth that can be provided via satellite communications can also open the door for many new

  20. International communications via satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLucas, J. L.

    The evolution of communications satellite systems is traced in terms of technical capabilities and technological advances. The Communications Act of 1962 led to the establishment of INTELSAT on an international basis in 1964. The original 19 signatory nations has grown to over 100, and over 800 ground relay stations have been built. The INTELSAT system comprises spacecraft over the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans and handles 2/3 of the world's international electronic communications and all transoceanic television. The 1965 Early Bird satellite had a 240 two-way telephone link capacity and weighed 38 kg, while the Intelsat V satellites, of which there will be nine, have increased the capacity to 20,000 voice circuits and Intelsat VI will double the number by 1993. Increasing demand for satellite communications links is driving the design and development of space platforms for multiple missions of communications, meteorological studies, and on-board switching and data processing in excess of current multiple satellite systems.

  1. Classical vs. non-classical pathways of mineral formation (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Yoreo, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    Recent chemical analyses, microscopy studies and computer simulations suggest many minerals nucleate through aggregation of pre-nucleation clusters and grow by particle-mediated processes that involve amorphous or disordered precursors. Still other analyses, both experimental and computational, conclude that even simple mineral systems like calcium carbonate form via a barrier-free process of liquid-liquid separation, which is followed by dehydration of the ion-rich phase to form the solid products. However, careful measurements of calcite nucleation rates on a variety of ionized surfaces give results that are in complete agreement with the expectations of classical nucleation theory, in which clusters growing through ion-by-ion addition overcome a free energy barrier through the natural microscopic density fluctuations of the system. Here the challenge of integrating these seemingly disparate observations and analyses into a coherent picture of mineral formation is addressed by considering the energy barriers to calcite formation predicted by the classical theory and the changes in those barriers brought about by the introduction of interfaces and clusters, both stable and metastable. Results from a suite of in situ TEM, AFM, and optical experiments combined with simulations are used to illustrate the conclusions. The analyses show that the expected barrier to homogeneous calcite nucleation is prohibitive even at concentrations exceeding the solubility limit of amorphous calcium carbonate. However, as demonstrated by experiments on self-assembled monolayers, the introduction of surfaces that moderately decrease the interfacial energy associated with the forming nucleus can reduce the magnitude of the barrier to a level that is easily surmounted under typical laboratory conditions. In the absence of such surfaces, experiments that proceed by continually increasing supersaturation with time can easily by-pass direct nucleation of calcite and open up pathways through

  2. Open questions in classical gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Mannheim, P.D. )

    1994-04-01

    In this work, the authors discuss some outstanding open questions regarding the validity and uniqueness of the standard second-order Newton-Einstein classical gravitational theory. On the observational side the authors discuss the degree to which the realm of validity of Newton's law of gravity can actually be extended to distances much larger than the solar system distance scales on which the law was originally established. On the theoretical side the authors identify some commonly accepted (but actually still open to question) assumptions which go into the formulation of the standard second-order Einstein theory in the first place. In particular, it is shown that while the familiar second-order Poisson gravitational equation (and accordingly its second-order covariant Einstein generalization) may be sufficient to yield Newton's law of gravity they are not in fact necessary. The standard theory thus still awaits the identification of some principle which would then make it necessary too. It is shown that current observational information does not exclusively mandate the standard theory, and that the conformal invariant fourth-order theory of gravity considered recently by Mannheim and Kazanas is also able to meet the constraints of data, and in fact to do so without the need for any so far unobserved nonluminous or dark matter. 37 refs., 7 figs.

  3. Relaxation properties in classical diamagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carati, A.; Benfenati, F.; Galgani, L.

    2011-06-01

    It is an old result of Bohr that, according to classical statistical mechanics, at equilibrium a system of electrons in a static magnetic field presents no magnetization. Thus a magnetization can occur only in an out of equilibrium state, such as that produced through the Foucault currents when a magnetic field is switched on. It was suggested by Bohr that, after the establishment of such a nonequilibrium state, the system of electrons would quickly relax back to equilibrium. In the present paper, we study numerically the relaxation to equilibrium in a modified Bohr model, which is mathematically equivalent to a billiard with obstacles, immersed in a magnetic field that is adiabatically switched on. We show that it is not guaranteed that equilibrium is attained within the typical time scales of microscopic dynamics. Depending on the values of the parameters, one has a relaxation either to equilibrium or to a diamagnetic (presumably metastable) state. The analogy with the relaxation properties in the Fermi Pasta Ulam problem is also pointed out.

  4. Pembrolizumab in classical Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Maly, Joseph; Alinari, Lapo

    2016-09-01

    Pembrolizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody directed against programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1), a key immune-inhibitory molecule expressed on T cells and implicated in CD4+ T-cell exhaustion and tumor immune-escape mechanisms. Classical Hodgkin's lymphoma (cHL) is a unique B-cell malignancy in the sense that malignant Reed-Sternberg (RS) cells represent a small percentage of cells within an extensive immune cell infiltrate. PD-1 ligands are upregulated on RS cells as a consequence of both chromosome 9p24.1 amplification and Epstein-Barr virus infection and by interacting with PD-1 promote an immune-suppressive effect. By augmenting antitumor immune response, pembrolizumab and nivolumab, another monoclonal antibody against PD-1, have shown significant activity in patients with relapsed/refractory cHL as well as an acceptable toxicity profile with immune-related adverse events that are generally manageable. In this review, we explore the rationale for targeting PD-1 in cHL, review the clinical trial results supporting the use of checkpoint inhibitors in this disease, and present future directions for investigation in which this approach may be used.

  5. Ordering in classical Coulombic systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffer, J. P.

    1998-01-22

    The author discusses the properties of classical Coulombic matter at low temperatures. It has been well known for some time [1,2] that infinite Coulombic matter will crystallize in body-centered cubic form when the quantity {Lambda} (the dimensionless ratio of the average two-particle Coulomb energy to the kinetic energy per particle) is larger than {approximately}175. But the systems of such particles that have been produced in the laboratory in ion traps, or ion beams, are finite with surfaces defined by the boundary conditions that have to be satisfied. This results in ion clouds with sharply defined curved surfaces, and interior structures that show up as a set of concentric layers that are parallel to the outer surface. The ordering does not appear to be cubic, but the charges on each shell exhibit a ''hexatic'' pattern of equilateral triangles that is the characteristic of liquid crystals. The curvature of the surfaces prevents the structures on successive shells from interlocking in any simple fashion. This class of structures was first found in simulations [3] and later in experiments [4].

  6. Structure of classical affine and classical affine fractional W-algebras

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, Uhi Rinn

    2015-01-15

    We introduce a classical BRST complex (See Definition 3.2.) and show that one can construct a classical affine W-algebra via the complex. This definition clarifies that classical affine W-algebras can be considered as quasi-classical limits of quantum affine W-algebras. We also give a definition of a classical affine fractional W-algebra as a Poisson vertex algebra. As in the classical affine case, a classical affine fractional W-algebra has two compatible λ-brackets and is isomorphic to an algebra of differential polynomials as a differential algebra. When a classical affine fractional W-algebra is associated to a minimal nilpotent, we describe explicit forms of free generators and compute λ-brackets between them. Provided some assumptions on a classical affine fractional W-algebra, we find an infinite sequence of integrable systems related to the algebra, using the generalized Drinfel’d and Sokolov reduction.

  7. Soviet early warning satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, G. E.

    1982-02-01

    Satellite orbits and groups for the Cosmos spacecraft are discussed, noting that the orbits are configured to provide full early warning system coverage. The regular crossing of a ground track which includes all the Minuteman bases in the U.S. is noted, as are time constraints for the launch into a suitable orbit without introducing orbital anomalies. Cosmos 1024 was observed to need four corrections in order to reach a point where free libration over a fixed ground station was possible for a year until replacement by the Cosmos 1124 occurred. The current configuration is a total of nine satellites with 40 deg spacing, which yields full coverage, although it is indicated that only three satellites ever operate simultaneously.

  8. Estimation in satellite control.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Debra, D. B.

    1971-01-01

    The use of estimators or observers is discussed as applied to satellite attitude control and the control of drag-free satellites. The practical problems of implementation are discussed, and the relative advantages of full and reduced state estimators are compared, particularly in terms of their effectiveness and bandwidth as filters. Three applications are used to illustrate the principles. They are: (1) a reaction wheel control system, (2) a spinning attitude control system, and (3) a drag-free satellite translational control system. Fixed estimator gains are shown to be adequate for these (and many other) applications. Our experience in the hardware realization of estimators has led to categorize the error sources in terms of those that improve with increased estimator gains and those that get worse with increased estimator gains.

  9. Uranus satellites - Surface properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veverka, J.; Brown, R. H.; Bell, Jeffrey F.

    The post-Voyager knowledge of the photometric, colorimetric, spectral, and thermal properties of the Uranian satellites is reviewed, focusing on such fundamental physical properties as albedo, color, and surface texture. While albedo variations of at least a factor of 2 exist, color differences are almost absent (Miranda) or subdued (Oberon). In the case of Titania, the strong opposition effect reported by ground-based observers was confirmed by Voyager. Voyager did not observe the opposition parts of the phase curves of the other satellites. Voyager thermal observations of Ariel and Miranda suggest that both have highly porous regoliths, thermophysically similar to those of Jupiter's icy satellites. At the time of the flyby (south pole facing the sun), maximum surface temperatures reached or exceeded 85 K, but nighttime polar temperatures are predicted to drop to 20 to 30 K because each pole spends about 40 yr in darkness. Ground-based spectroscopy identified water ice as an important surface constituent.

  10. Uranus satellites - Surface properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veverka, J.; Brown, R. H.; Bell, Jeffrey F.

    1991-01-01

    The post-Voyager knowledge of the photometric, colorimetric, spectral, and thermal properties of the Uranian satellites is reviewed, focusing on such fundamental physical properties as albedo, color, and surface texture. While albedo variations of at least a factor of 2 exist, color differences are almost absent (Miranda) or subdued (Oberon). In the case of Titania, the strong opposition effect reported by ground-based observers was confirmed by Voyager. Voyager did not observe the opposition parts of the phase curves of the other satellites. Voyager thermal observations of Ariel and Miranda suggest that both have highly porous regoliths, thermophysically similar to those of Jupiter's icy satellites. At the time of the flyby (south pole facing the sun), maximum surface temperatures reached or exceeded 85 K, but nighttime polar temperatures are predicted to drop to 20 to 30 K because each pole spends about 40 yr in darkness. Ground-based spectroscopy identified water ice as an important surface constituent.

  11. ESA's satellite communications programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartholome, P.

    1985-02-01

    The developmental history, current status, and future plans of the ESA satellite-communications programs are discussed in a general survey and illustrated with network diagrams and maps. Consideration is given to the parallel development of national and European direct-broadcast systems and telecommunications networks, the position of the European space and electronics industries in the growing world market, the impact of technological improvements (both in satellite systems and in ground-based networks), and the technological and commercial advantages of integrated space-terrestrial networks. The needs for a European definition of the precise national and international roles of satellite communications, for maximum speed in implementing such decisions (before the technology becomes obsolete), and for increased cooperation and standardization to assure European equipment manufacturers a reasonable share of the market are stressed.

  12. The Clementine satellite

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The first US satellite to the Moon in more than two decades was launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base (Santa Barbara County), California, on January 25, 1994. The satellite was named Clementine because it carried only enough fuel to complete its mission before it was [open quotes]lost and gone forever.[close quotes] The Clementine satellite tested 23 advanced technologies during its mission for the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization. In fulfilling its scientific goals, Clementine provided a wealth of information relevant to the mineralogy of the lunar surface. Using six on-board cameras designed and built at the Laboratory, Clementine mapped the entire surface of the Moon at resolutions never before attained. Clementine also provided range data that will be used to construct a relief map of the lunar surface.

  13. Classical underpinnings of gravitationally induced quantum interference

    SciTech Connect

    Mannheim, P.D.

    1998-02-01

    We show that the gravitational modification of the phase of a neutron beam [the Colella-Overhauser-Werner (COW) experiment] has a classical origin, being due to the time delay that classical particles experience in traversing a background gravitational field. Similarly, we show that classical light waves also undergo a phase shift in traversing a gravitational field. We show that the COW experiment respects the equivalence principle even in the presence of quantum mechanics. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  14. Diagrammar in classical scalar field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Cattaruzza, E.; Gozzi, E.; Francisco Neto, A.

    2011-09-15

    In this paper we analyze perturbatively a g{phi}{sup 4}classical field theory with and without temperature. In order to do that, we make use of a path-integral approach developed some time ago for classical theories. It turns out that the diagrams appearing at the classical level are many more than at the quantum level due to the presence of extra auxiliary fields in the classical formalism. We shall show that a universal supersymmetry present in the classical path-integral mentioned above is responsible for the cancelation of various diagrams. The same supersymmetry allows the introduction of super-fields and super-diagrams which considerably simplify the calculations and make the classical perturbative calculations almost 'identical' formally to the quantum ones. Using the super-diagrams technique, we develop the classical perturbation theory up to third order. We conclude the paper with a perturbative check of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. - Highlights: > We provide the Feynman diagrams of perturbation theory for a classical field theory. > We give a super-formalism which links the quantum diagrams to the classical ones. > We check perturbatively the fluctuation-dissipation theorem.

  15. Classical teleportation of a quantum Bit

    PubMed

    Cerf; Gisin; Massar

    2000-03-13

    Classical teleportation is defined as a scenario where the sender is given the classical description of an arbitrary quantum state while the receiver simulates any measurement on it. This scenario is shown to be achievable by transmitting only a few classical bits if the sender and receiver initially share local hidden variables. Specifically, a communication of 2.19 bits is sufficient on average for the classical teleportation of a qubit, when restricted to von Neumann measurements. The generalization to positive-operator-valued measurements is also discussed.

  16. Classical Solution Thermodynamics: A Retrospective View.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Ness, H. C.; Abbott, M. M.

    1985-01-01

    Examines topics related to classical solution thermodynamics, considering energy, enthalpy, and the Gibbs function. Applicable mathematical equations are introduced and discussed when appropriate. (JN)

  17. Primitive Ontology and the Classical World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allori, Valia

    In this chapter, I present the common structure of quantum theories with a primitive ontology (PO), and discuss in what sense the classical world emerges from quantum theories as understood in this framework. In addition, I argue that the PO approach is better at analyzing the classical limit than the rival wave function ontology approach or any other approach in which the classical world is non-reductively "emergent:" even if the classical limit within this framework needs to be fully developed, the difficulties are technical rather than conceptual, while this is not true for the alternatives.

  18. Satellite communications system 'Tyulpan'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchuyan, R. K.; Tarasov, E. V.; Belousov, A. P.; Balyk, V. M.; Kovtunenko, V. M.; Morozov, V. A.; Andreev, V. A.; v'yunenko, K. A.

    1993-10-01

    A concept of the satellite communication system called 'Tyulpan' (because or its tulip-resembling shape) is considered. This conception envisages the use of six satellites-retranslators installed on high-latitude elliptic orbits. Such a system can provide the communication for mean- and high-latitude region of Europe, Asia, and America. For the communication, super small ground stations of 0.4 m in diameter can be used. In the development of system conception, the already existing technical solutions and possibility of conversion or existing installations of military destination were taken into account. Therefore, the system considered can be realized at the earliest possible date.

  19. Satellite altitude determination uncertainties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siry, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    Satellite altitude determination uncertainties will be discussed from the standpoint of the GEOS-C satellite, from the longer range viewpoint afforded by the Geopause concept. Data are focused on methods for short-arc tracking which are essentially geometric in nature. One uses combinations of lasers and collocated cameras. The other method relies only on lasers, using three or more to obtain the position fix. Two typical locales are looked at, the Caribbean area, and a region associated with tracking sites at Goddard, Bermuda and Canada which encompasses a portion of the Gulf Stream in which meanders develop.

  20. Public service satellite communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolff, E. A.

    1978-01-01

    It is suggested that the high effective isotropic radiated power provided by high-power satellite transmitters and high-gain antennas could be used in conjunction with economical ground receivers to furnish public services in remote areas of the U.S. Applications to health care, education and public safety are mentioned. A system concept involving a communications satellite operating in the Ku-band (12-GHz down, 14-GHz up) and either 100/30 watt stationary earth terminals with 1-1.8 m antennas or mobile terminals with omnidirectional antennas is presented.

  1. Mexico's first domestic satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Ruiz, M. E.; Elbert, B. R.

    The principal features of the Morelos communications satellite program, providing Mexico with C-band and Ku-band TV and telephone services beginning in 1985, are reviewed. Two satellites, modified versions of the Hughes HS-376 dual-spin bus, will be launched by STS and controlled from a tracking, telemetery, and command station near Mexico City; the 184-station ground network currently operating with Intelsat-IV will be expanded to about 1000 C-band stations (plus numerous small Ku-band receivers) by 1990. The spacecraft design, communications-subsystem performance, repeater equipment, antennas, and coverage pattern are presented in tables, drawings, diagrams, photographs and maps and discussed.

  2. Land mobile satellite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiesling, John D.

    1990-07-01

    The general advantages and potential operating characteristics of the mobile satellite service (MSS) are described, and distinctions are made between radio telephone, which is interconnected to the public switched telephone network, and private mobile radio systems. Mobile satellite service offers voice, data, position location, and paging services, interconnection to the public switched telephone network, and the possibility of private networks. Performance and cost characteristics are given along with summaries of market needs and market demands. The space and ground systems of the MSS are described.

  3. Declassified intelligence satellite photographs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1998-01-01

    Recently declassified photographs from spy satellites are an important addition to the record of the Earth?s land surface held by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). More than 800,000 high-resolution photos taken between 1959 through 1972 were made available by Executive Order of the President. The collection is held at the USGS EROS Data Center, near Sioux Falls, S. Dak., and are offered for public sale. For some purposes in earth science studies, these photos extend the record of changes in the land surface another decade back in time from the advent of the Landsat earth-observing satellite program.

  4. Satellites For Sale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Astronaut Dale A. Gardner, having just completed the major portion of his second extravehicular activity (EVA) period in three days, holds up a 'For Sale' sign refering to the two satellites, Palapa B-2 and Westar 6 that they retrieved from orbit after their Payload Assist Modules (PAM) failed to fire. Astronaut Joseph P. Allen IV, who also participated in the two EVAs, is reflected in Gardner's helmet visor. A portion of each of two recovered satellites is in the lower right corner, with Westar 6 nearer Discovery's aft.

  5. Statistical analysis and modelling of small satellite reliability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jian; Monas, Liora; Gill, Eberhard

    2014-05-01

    This paper attempts to characterize failure behaviour of small satellites through statistical analysis of actual in-orbit failures. A unique Small Satellite Anomalies Database comprising empirical failure data of 222 small satellites has been developed. A nonparametric analysis of the failure data has been implemented by means of a Kaplan-Meier estimation. An innovative modelling method, i.e. Bayesian theory in combination with Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulations, has been proposed to model the reliability of small satellites. An extensive parametric analysis using the Bayesian/MCMC method has been performed to fit a Weibull distribution to the data. The influence of several characteristics such as the design lifetime, mass, launch year, mission type and the type of satellite developers on the reliability has been analyzed. The results clearly show the infant mortality of small satellites. Compared with the classical maximum-likelihood estimation methods, the proposed Bayesian/MCMC method results in better fitting Weibull models and is especially suitable for reliability modelling where only very limited failures are observed.

  6. The American Satellite Company (ASC) satellite deployed from payload bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The American Satellite Company (ASC) communications satellite is deployed from the payload bay of the Shuttle Discovery. A portion of the cloudy surface of the earth can be seen to the left of the frame.

  7. Satellite orbit determination and gravity field recovery from satellite-to-satellite tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakker, K. F.; Ambrosius, B. A. C.; Leenman, H.

    1989-07-01

    Studies on satellite-to-satellite tracking (SST) with POPSAT (a geodetic satellite concept) and a ERS-class (Earth observation) satellite, a Satellite-to-Satellite Tracking (SST) gravity mission, and precise gravity field determination methods and mission requirements are reported. The first two studies primarily address the application of SST between the high altitude POPSAT and an ERS-class or GRM (Geopotential Research Mission) satellite to the orbit determination of the latter two satellites. Activities focussed on the determination of the tracking coverage of the lower altitude satellite by ground based tracking systems and by POPSAT, orbit determination error analysis and the determination of the surface forces acting on GRM. The third study surveys principles of SST, uncertainties of existing drag models, effects of direct luni-solar attraction and tides on orbit and the gravity gradient observable. Detailed ARISTOTELES (which replaced POPSAT) orbit determination error analyses were performed for various ground based tracking networks.

  8. The satellite configuration of satellite-TV navigation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yu-Ping

    2001-02-01

    The positioning accuracy and availability of navigation system are affected directly by the quality of satellite configuration. The possible satellite configurations for satellite-TV navigation system are discussed and estimated in this paper. The results show that a well setted configuration or a resonable integration of satellite-TV navigation system and Chinese Loran-C will improve the positioning accuracy and availability of the system.

  9. Classical and semiclassical aspects of chemical dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, S.K.

    1982-08-01

    Tunneling in the unimolecular reactions H/sub 2/C/sub 2/ ..-->.. HC/sub 2/H, HNC ..-->.. HCN, and H/sub 2/CO ..-->.. H/sub 2/ + CO is studied with a classical Hamiltonian that allows the reaction coordinate and transverse vibrational modes to be considered directly. A combination of classical perturbation theory and the semiclassical WKB method allows tunneling probabilities to be obtained, and a statistical theory (RRKM) is used to construct rate constants for these reactions in the tunneling regime. In this fashion, it is found that tunneling may be important, particularly for low excitation energies. Nonadiabatic charge transfer in the reaction Na + I ..-->.. Na /sup +/ + I/sup -/ is treated with classical trajectories based on a classical Hamiltonian that is the analogue of a quantum matrix representation. The charge transfer cross section obtained is found to agree reasonably well with the exact quantum results. An approximate semiclassical formula, valid at high energies, is also obtained. The interaction of radiation and matter is treated from a classical viewpoint. The excitation of an HF molecule in a strong laser is described with classical trajectories. Quantum mechanical results are also obtained and compared to the classical results. Although the detailed structure of the pulse time averaged energy absorption cannot be reproduced classically, classical mechanics does predict the correct magnitude of energy absorption, as well as certain other qualitative features. The classical behavior of a nonrotating diatomic molecule in a strong laser field is considered further, by generating a period advance map that allows the solution over many periods of oscillation of the laser to be obtained with relative ease. Classical states are found to form beautiful spirals in phase space as time progresses. A simple pendulum model is found to describe the major qualitative features. (WHM)

  10. Inertial storage for satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisenhaure, D.

    1984-01-01

    A new system is being developed that performs satellite attitude control, attitude reference, and energy storage utilizing inertia wheels. The baseline approach consists of two counter rotating flywheels suspended in specially designed magnetic bearings, spin axis motor/generators, and a control system. The control system regulates the magnetic bearings and spin axis motor/generators and interacts with other satellite subsystems (photovoltaic array, star trackers, Sun sensors, magnetic torquers, etc.) to perform the three functions. Existing satellites utilize separate subsystems to perform attitude control, provide attitude reference, and store energy. These functions are currently performed using reaction or momentum wheels, gyros, batteries, and devices that provide an absolute reference (Sun sensors and star trackers). A Combined Attitude, Reference, and Energy Storage (CARES) system based on high energy density inertial energy storage wheels (flywheels) has potential advantages over existing technologies. Even when used only for energy storage, this system offers the potential for substantial improvements in life, energy efficiency, and weight over existing battery technologies. Utilizing this same device for both attitude control and attitude reference would result in significant additional savings in overall satellite weight and complexity.

  11. Learning Through Satellite Broadcasting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krishnamoorthy, P. V.

    1975-01-01

    SITE is an experimental project which would provide vital inputs in designing and executing a satellite-based instructional television system, particularly in rural areas, to stimulate national development in India with important managerial, economic, technological, and social implications. (Author/BP)

  12. Small satellite radiometric measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, P.G.

    1991-01-01

    A critical need for the Mission to Planet Earth is to provide continuous, well-calibrated radiometric data for the radiation budget. This paper describes a new, compact, flexible radiometer which will provide both spectrally integrated data and data in selected spectral bands. The radiometer design is suitable for use on small satellites, aircraft, or remotely piloted vehicles (RPVs). 12 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Ocean surveillance satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, D.

    Soviet and U.S. programs involving satellites for surveillance of ships and submarines are discussed, considering differences in approaches. The Soviet program began with the Cosmos 198 in 1967 and the latest, the Cosmos 1400 series, 15 m long and weighing 5 tons, carry radar for monitoring ships and a nuclear reactor for a power supply. Other Soviet spacecraft carrying passive microwave sensors and ion drives powered by solar panels have recently been detonated in orbit for unknown reasons. It has also been observed that the Soviet satellites are controlled in pairs, with sequential orbital changes for one following the other, and both satellites then overflying the same points. In contrast, U.S. surveillance satellites have been placed in higher orbits, thus placing greater demands on the capabilities of the on-board radar and camera systems. Project White Cloud and the Clipper Bow program are described, noting the continued operation of the White Cloud spacecraft, which are equipped to intercept radio signals from surface ships. Currently, the integrated tactical surveillance system program has completed its study and a decision is expected soon.

  14. Perception via satellite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinove, Charles J.

    1970-01-01

    The earth resources observation satellite (EROS) program in the Department of the Interior is intended to gather and use data from satellites and aircraft on natural and man-made features of the earth's surface. Earth resources technology satellite will provide the EROS program with data for use in dealing with natural resource problems and understanding the interaction between man and the environment. Applications will include studies of tectonic features, hydrologic problems, location of fish schools, determination of the conditions of range land, mapping land use for urban planning, studies of erosion and change along coastlines and major streams, and inventories of land use and land forms. In addition, the ERTS data may be used for detecting forest and crop diseases and inventorying crops. The ERTS satellite will be in a polar, sun-synchronous orbit so that each point on the earth's surface will be sensed every 17 to 20 days, at the same time of day. Multispectral photography is being investigated for its usefulness in hydrology. Side-looking airborne radar has not yet been widely used in hydrologic studies, although it is an excellent tool for all-weather, day or night, coverage of large areas. Other techniques being investigated include passive microwave radiometry, ultraviolet and visible stimulated luminescence, and absorption spectroscopy.

  15. Data distribution satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, Kent M.; Jorasch, Ronald E.; Wiskerchen, Michael J.

    1991-01-01

    A description is given of a data distribution satellite (DDS) system. The DDS would operate in conjunction with the tracking and data relay satellite system to give ground-based users real time, two-way access to instruments in space and space-gathered data. The scope of work includes the following: (1) user requirements are derived; (2) communication scenarios are synthesized; (3) system design constraints and projected technology availability are identified; (4) DDS communications payload configuration is derived, and the satellite is designed; (5) requirements for earth terminals and network control are given; (6) system costs are estimated, both life cycle costs and user fees; and (7) technology developments are recommended, and a technology development plan is given. The most important results obtained are as follows: (1) a satellite designed for launch in 2007 is feasible and has 10 Gb/s capacity, 5.5 kW power, and 2000 kg mass; (2) DDS features include on-board baseband switching, use of Ku- and Ka-bands, multiple optical intersatellite links; and (3) system user costs are competitive with projected terrestrial communication costs.

  16. Satellite-Based Videoconferencing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Distance Education Report, 1997

    1997-01-01

    Educators can broadcast videoconferences to students in different parts of the world at an affordable cost using geostationary satellites. Describes the design and presentation of videoconferences and outlines steps in their development: budgeting, scheduling, selecting presenters and moderators, choosing production and telecast facilities,…

  17. On satellite constellation selection

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1991-05-01

    Analytical estimates can be used to produce and discuss optimal constellations. They are in close agreement with phase-space estimates and exact solutions. They suggest that distributions of inclined orbits could reduce satellite numbers by factors of 2--3 while improving uniformity. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Experimental Satellite Quantum Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallone, Giuseppe; Bacco, Davide; Dequal, Daniele; Gaiarin, Simone; Luceri, Vincenza; Bianco, Giuseppe; Villoresi, Paolo

    2015-07-01

    Quantum communication (QC), namely, the faithful transmission of generic quantum states, is a key ingredient of quantum information science. Here we demonstrate QC with polarization encoding from space to ground by exploiting satellite corner cube retroreflectors as quantum transmitters in orbit and the Matera Laser Ranging Observatory of the Italian Space Agency in Matera, Italy, as a quantum receiver. The quantum bit error ratio (QBER) has been kept steadily low to a level suitable for several quantum information protocols, as the violation of Bell inequalities or quantum key distribution (QKD). Indeed, by taking data from different satellites, we demonstrate an average value of QBER =4.6 % for a total link duration of 85 s. The mean photon number per pulse μsat leaving the satellites was estimated to be of the order of one. In addition, we propose a fully operational satellite QKD system by exploiting our communication scheme with orbiting retroreflectors equipped with a modulator, a very compact payload. Our scheme paves the way toward the implementation of a QC worldwide network leveraging existing receivers.

  19. OMV With Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This 1986 artist's concept shows the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) towing a satellite. As envisioned by Marshall Space Flight Center plarners, the OMV would be a remotely-controlled free-flying space tug which would place, rendezvous, dock, and retrieve orbital payloads.

  20. Satellite camera image navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamel, Ahmed A. (Inventor); Graul, Donald W. (Inventor); Savides, John (Inventor); Hanson, Charles W. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Pixels within a satellite camera (1, 2) image are precisely located in terms of latitude and longitude on a celestial body, such as the earth, being imaged. A computer (60) on the earth generates models (40, 50) of the satellite's orbit and attitude, respectively. The orbit model (40) is generated from measurements of stars and landmarks taken by the camera (1, 2), and by range data. The orbit model (40) is an expression of the satellite's latitude and longitude at the subsatellite point, and of the altitude of the satellite, as a function of time, using as coefficients (K) the six Keplerian elements at epoch. The attitude model (50) is based upon star measurements taken by each camera (1, 2). The attitude model (50) is a set of expressions for the deviations in a set of mutually orthogonal reference optical axes (x, y, z) as a function of time, for each camera (1, 2). Measured data is fit into the models (40, 50) using a walking least squares fit algorithm. A transformation computer (66 ) transforms pixel coordinates as telemetered by the camera (1, 2) into earth latitude and longitude coordinates, using the orbit and attitude models (40, 50).

  1. THE ONE ROOM SATELLITE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DREYFUS, LEE S.

    A WISCONSIN HIGH SCHOOL FRENCH CLASS AND A GROUP OF STUDENTS IN AN ENGLISH CALSS AT THE LYCEE HENRI IV OF PARIS, FRANCE, PARTICIPATED IN A COMBINED CLASS SESSION IN THE FIRST INTERNATIONAL TV CLASSROOM EXCHANGE. THE TV SIGNALS WERE EXCHANGED BY MEANS OF THE EARLY BIRD SATELLITE AND PERMITTED THE STUDENTS TO EXCHANGE MESSAGES. DURING THE TELECAST…

  2. Building Satellites is Easier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, Phyllis Nimmo

    1996-01-01

    'Building Satellites' is a story about Jim Marsh's recovery from a severe head injury told by his wife Phyllis from the moment she learned of its happening, through the ups and downs of a lengthy rehabilitation, until his return to work and daily living. It continues on, however, and narrates his battle with the more insidious Grave's disease. Told in the first person, 'Building Satellites' vividly portrays Phyllis's thoughts and feelings throughout this experience with scrupulous honestly. This is a story worth reading for many reasons. First of all, Jim was an accomplished scientist, respected by his colleagues both in this country and abroad. Secondly, it narrates the many stages of his recovery from head injury with detailed readable accuracy; it informs us as well as inspires. Finally, 'Building Satellites" also tells us the story of Phyllis Marsh's remarkable creative response to this crisis. It narrates her personal experiences as she progresses through the strange and somewhat bizarre world of medicine and rehabilitation, guided by a few basic beliefs, which she learned as a child in Iowa, that provided her with the strength to endure. 'Building Satellites' seems to reaffirm our unconscious, but settled conviction, that when confornted overnight with adversity, we are somehow given the means for coping, supported by our basic beliefs, strengthened by family and friends, and eventually learning to accept any outcome.

  3. Experimental Satellite Quantum Communications.

    PubMed

    Vallone, Giuseppe; Bacco, Davide; Dequal, Daniele; Gaiarin, Simone; Luceri, Vincenza; Bianco, Giuseppe; Villoresi, Paolo

    2015-07-24

    Quantum communication (QC), namely, the faithful transmission of generic quantum states, is a key ingredient of quantum information science. Here we demonstrate QC with polarization encoding from space to ground by exploiting satellite corner cube retroreflectors as quantum transmitters in orbit and the Matera Laser Ranging Observatory of the Italian Space Agency in Matera, Italy, as a quantum receiver. The quantum bit error ratio (QBER) has been kept steadily low to a level suitable for several quantum information protocols, as the violation of Bell inequalities or quantum key distribution (QKD). Indeed, by taking data from different satellites, we demonstrate an average value of QBER=4.6% for a total link duration of 85 s. The mean photon number per pulse μ_{sat} leaving the satellites was estimated to be of the order of one. In addition, we propose a fully operational satellite QKD system by exploiting our communication scheme with orbiting retroreflectors equipped with a modulator, a very compact payload. Our scheme paves the way toward the implementation of a QC worldwide network leveraging existing receivers.

  4. Satellite Weather Watch.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summers, R. Joe

    1982-01-01

    Describes an inexpensive (about $1,500) direct-readout ground station for use in secondary school science/mathematics programs. Includes suggested activities including, among others, developing map overlays, operating station equipment, interpreting satellite data, developing weather forecasts, and using microcomputers for data storage, orbit…

  5. Domestic Communications Satellites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Network Project Notebook, 1972

    1972-01-01

    The June, 1972 Federal Communications Commission's (FCC) decision allowed an "open skies" policy in regard to domestic communication satellites and raised Liberal opposition to a situation where exclusive and unchecked communications power is now in the hands of private entrepreneurs, primarily the big Defense Department oriented…

  6. Small satellite space operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiss, Keith

    1994-01-01

    CTA Space Systems has played a premier role in the development of the 'lightsat' programs of the 80's and 90's. The high costs and development times associated with conventional LEO satellite design, fabrication, launch, and operations continue to motivate the development of new methodologies, techniques, and generally low cost and less stringently regulated satellites. These spacecraft employ low power 'lightsat' communications (versus TDRSS for NASA's LEO's) and typically fly missions with payload/experiment suites that can succeed, for example, without heavily redundant backup systems and large infrastructures of personnel and ground support systems. Such small yet adaptable satellites are also typified by their very short contract-to-launch times (often one to two years). This paper reflects several of the methodologies and perspectives of our successful involvement in these innovative programs and suggests how they might relieve NASA's mounting pressures to reduce the cost of both the spacecraft and their companion mission operations. It focuses on the use of adaptable, sufficiently powerful yet inexpensive PC-based ground systems for wide ranging user terminal (UT) applications and master control facilities for mission operations. These systems proved themselves in successfully controlling more than two dozen USAF, USN, and ARPA satellites at CTA/SS. UT versions have linked with both GEO and LEO satellites and functioned autonomously in relay roles often in remote parts of the world. LEO applications particularly illustrate the efficacy of these concepts since a user can easily mount a lightweight antenna, usually an omni or helix with light duty rotors and PC-based drivers. A few feet of coax connected to a small transceiver module (the size of a small PC) and a serial line to an associated PC establishes a communications link and together with the PC constitute a viable ground station. Applications included geomagnetic mapping; spaceborne solid state

  7. Aqua satellite orbiting the Earth

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows the Aqua satellite orbiting the Earth on August 27, 2005 by revealing MODIS true-color imagery for that day. This animation is on a cartesian map projection, so the satellite w...

  8. Congestion control and routing over satellite networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jinhua

    Satellite networks and transmissions find their application in fields of computer communications, telephone communications, television broadcasting, transportation, space situational awareness systems and so on. This thesis mainly focuses on two networking issues affecting satellite networking: network congestion control and network routing optimization. Congestion, which leads to long queueing delays, packet losses or both, is a networking problem that has drawn the attention of many researchers. The goal of congestion control mechanisms is to ensure high bandwidth utilization while avoiding network congestion by regulating the rate at which traffic sources inject packets into a network. In this thesis, we propose a stable congestion controller using data-driven, safe switching control theory to improve the dynamic performance of satellite Transmission Control Protocol/Active Queue Management (TCP/AQM) networks. First, the stable region of the Proportional-Integral (PI) parameters for a nominal model is explored. Then, a PI controller, whose parameters are adaptively tuned by switching among members of a given candidate set, using observed plant data, is presented and compared with some classical AQM policy examples, such as Random Early Detection (RED) and fixed PI control. A new cost detectable switching law with an interval cost function switching algorithm, which improves the performance and also saves the computational cost, is developed and compared with a law commonly used in the switching control literature. Finite-gain stability of the system is proved. A fuzzy logic PI controller is incorporated as a special candidate to achieve good performance at all nominal points with the available set of candidate controllers. Simulations are presented to validate the theory. An effocient routing algorithm plays a key role in optimizing network resources. In this thesis, we briefly analyze Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellite networks, review the Cross Entropy (CE

  9. Why/How Does Classics Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cartledge, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Classics is in the news--or on the screen: "Gladiator" a few years ago, "Troy" very recently, "Alexander" as I write. How significant is this current Hollywood fascination with the ancient Greeks and Romans? Or should we take far more seriously the decline of the teaching of the Classical languages in schools, a…

  10. Velopharyngeal Port Status during Classical Singing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanner, Kristine; Roy, Nelson; Merrill, Ray M.; Power, David

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This investigation was undertaken to examine the status of the velopharyngeal (VP) port during classical singing. Method: Using aeromechanical instrumentation, nasal airflow (mL/s), oral pressure (cm H[subscript 2]O), and VP orifice area estimates (cm[squared]) were studied in 10 classically trained sopranos during singing and speaking.…

  11. Rediscovering the Classics: The Project Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Ruth; Lubell, Marcia

    Focusing on seven classics of literature that are most challenging for teachers and students, but which are also a part of the high school literary canon, this book shares ways to create a learner-centered classroom for the study of literature. For each of the seven classics, the book "walks teachers through" the teaching-learning…

  12. Tarnished Gold: Classical Music in America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asia, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    A few articles have appeared recently regarding the subject of the health of classical music (or more broadly, the fine arts) in America. These include "Classical Music's New Golden Age," by Heather Mac Donald, in the "City Journal" and "The Decline of the Audience," by Terry Teachout, in "Commentary." These articles appeared around the time of…

  13. Linguistic Investigations into Ellipsis in Classical Sanskrit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillon, Brendan S.

    Ellipsis is a common phenomenon of Classical Sanskrit prose. No inventory of the forms of ellipsis in Classical Sanskrit has been made. This paper presents an inventory, based both on a systematic investigation of one text and on examples based on sundry reading.

  14. Converting Projects from STK Classic to STK

    SciTech Connect

    Foucar, James G.

    2014-08-01

    The version of STK (Sierra ToolKit) that has long been provided with Trilinos is no longer supported by the core develop- ment team. With the introduction of a the new STK library into Trilinos, the old STK has been renamed to stk classic. This document contains a rough guide of how to port a stk classic code to STK.

  15. Classical and Quantum-Mechanical State Reconstruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khanna, F. C.; Mello, P. A.; Revzen, M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the subject of state reconstruction in classical and in quantum physics, a subject that deals with the experimentally acquired information that allows the determination of the physical state of a system. Our first purpose is to explain a method for retrieving a classical state in phase space, similar to that…

  16. Milgram's Obedience Study: A Contentious Classic Reinterpreted

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griggs, Richard A.

    2017-01-01

    Given the many older criticisms of Milgram's obedience study and the more damning recent criticisms based on analyses of materials available in the Milgram archives at Yale, this study has become a contentious classic. Yet, current social psychology textbooks present it as an uncontentious classic, with no coverage of the recent criticisms and…

  17. Factors Influencing the Learning of Classical Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Champagne, Audrey B.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Describes a study investigating the combined effect of certain variables on student achievement in classical mechanics. The purpose was to (1) describe preinstructional knowledge and skills; (2) correlate these variables with the student's success in learning classical mechanics; and (3) develop hypothesis about relationships between these…

  18. Classic and Romantic in Irish Curriculum Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKernan, Jim

    Recent trends in curriculum development in Irish post-primary schools are traced according to two models: the classic-centrist and the romantic-decentralist. The classic model, initiated by agencies external to the school, views curriculum development as a science and focuses on accountability and competency-based teaching and testing. The…

  19. The Classical Performing Arts of India.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtiss, Marie Joy

    A monograph of the numerous activities that have contributed to the current renaissance of India's classical performing arts covers the theoretical aspects, musical instruments, the main schools of classical dance, and drama. Besides the basic research described, the total project produced a set of 300 slides with annotated listing, picturing the…

  20. New Classical and New Keynesian Macroeconomics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vane, Howard; Snowdon, Brian

    1992-01-01

    Summarizes underlying tenets and policy implications of new classical and new Keynesian macroeconomics. Compares new approaches with orthodox Keynesian and monetarist schools of thought. Identifies the fundamental difference between new classical and new Keynesian models as the assumption regarding the speed of wage and price adjustment following…

  1. Teaching the Classics in High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelley, Anne Crout

    1998-01-01

    Discusses why the classics can be difficult to teach in high schools. Offers suggestions for making difficult literature more approachable for high school students by scaffolding students' engagement with classic texts; building background knowledge; developing vocabulary; facilitating the reading of the text; and through enrichment an extension.…

  2. A Classical Rhetoric for "Powerful" Argumentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiethoff, William E.

    1980-01-01

    Analyzes a 1976 House of Representatives' debate in light of classical writings on the problem of defining and using "power" for rhetorical ends. Outlines the classical solution of powerful diction, brevity, and figures of speech for intensifying the impact of already compelling argument and applies these to the contemporary analysis.…

  3. Quantum phase uncertainties in the classical limit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franson, James D.

    1994-01-01

    Several sources of phase noise, including spontaneous emission noise and the loss of coherence due to which-path information, are examined in the classical limit of high field intensities. Although the origin of these effects may appear to be quantum-mechanical in nature, it is found that classical analogies for these effects exist in the form of chaos.

  4. Classical transport in disordered systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papaioannou, Antonios

    This thesis reports on the manifestation of structural disorder on molecular transport and it consists of two parts. Part I discusses the relations between classical transport and the underlying structural complexity of the system. Both types of molecular diffusion, namely Gaussian and non- Gaussian are presented and the relevant time regimes are discussed. In addition the concept of structural universality is introduced and connected with the diffusion metrics. One of the most robust techniques for measuring molecular mean square displacements is magnetic resonance. This method requires encoding and subsequently reading out after an experimentally controlled time, a phase φ to the spins using magnetic field gradients. The main limitation for probing short diffusion lengths L(t) ˜ 1micro m with magnetic resonance is the requirement to encode and decode the phase φ in very short time intervals. Therefore, to probe such displacements a special probe was developed equipped with a gradient coil capable of delivering magnetic field gradients of approximately 90 G/cmA . The design of the probe is reported. Part I also includes a discussion of experiments of transport in two qualitatively different disordered phantoms and reports on a direct observation of universality in one-dimension. The results reveal the universal power law scaling of the diffusion coefficient at the long-time regime and illustrate the essence of structural universality by experimentally determining the structure correlation function of the phantoms. In addition, the scaling of the diffusive permeability of the phantoms with respect to the pore size is investigated. Additional work presented includes a detailed study of adsorption of methane gas in Vycor disordered glass. The techniques described in Part I of this thesis are widely used for measuring structural parameters of porous media, such as the surface-to-volume ratio or diffusive permeability. Part II of this thesis discusses the

  5. NUCLEAR THERMOMETERS FOR CLASSICAL NOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Downen, Lori N.; Iliadis, Christian; Jose, Jordi; Starrfield, Sumner

    2013-01-10

    Classical novae are stellar explosions occurring in binary systems, consisting of a white dwarf and a main-sequence companion. Thermonuclear runaways on the surface of massive white dwarfs, consisting of oxygen and neon, are believed to reach peak temperatures of several hundred million kelvin. These temperatures are strongly correlated with the underlying white dwarf mass. The observational counterparts of such models are likely associated with outbursts that show strong spectral lines of neon in their shells (neon novae). The goals of this work are to investigate how useful elemental abundances are for constraining the peak temperatures achieved during these outbursts and determine how robust 'nova thermometers' are with respect to uncertain nuclear physics input. We present updated observed abundances in neon novae and perform a series of hydrodynamic simulations for several white dwarf masses. We find that the most useful thermometers, N/O, N/Al, O/S, S/Al, O/Na, Na/Al, O/P, and P/Al, are those with the steepest monotonic dependence on peak temperature. The sensitivity of these thermometers to thermonuclear reaction rate variations is explored using post-processing nucleosynthesis simulations. The ratios N/O, N/Al, O/Na, and Na/Al are robust, meaning they are minimally affected by uncertain rates. However, their dependence on peak temperature is relatively weak. The ratios O/S, S/Al, O/P, and P/Al reveal strong dependences on temperature and the poorly known {sup 30}P(p, {gamma}){sup 31}S rate. We compare our model predictions to neon nova observations and obtain the following estimates for the underlying white dwarf masses: 1.34-1.35 M {sub Sun} (V838 Her), 1.18-1.21 M {sub Sun} (V382 Vel), {<=}1.3 M {sub Sun} (V693 CrA), {<=}1.2 M {sub Sun} (LMC 1990 no. 1), and {<=}1.2 M {sub Sun} (QU Vul).

  6. ASAP- ARTIFICIAL SATELLITE ANALYSIS PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwok, J.

    1994-01-01

    The Artificial Satellite Analysis Program (ASAP) is a general orbit prediction program which incorporates sufficient orbit modeling accuracy for mission design, maneuver analysis, and mission planning. ASAP is suitable for studying planetary orbit missions with spacecraft trajectories of reconnaissance (flyby) and exploratory (mapping) nature. Sample data is included for a geosynchronous station drift cycle study, a Venus radar mapping strategy, a frozen orbit about Mars, and a repeat ground trace orbit. ASAP uses Cowell's method in the numerical integration of the equations of motion. The orbital mechanics calculation contains perturbations due to non-sphericity (up to a 40 X 40 field) of the planet, lunar and solar effects, and drag and solar radiation pressure. An 8th order Runge-Kutta integration scheme with variable step size control is used for efficient propagation. The input includes the classical osculating elements, orbital elements of the sun relative to the planet, reference time and dates, drag coefficient, gravitational constants, and planet radius, rotation rate, etc. The printed output contains Cartesian coordinates, velocity, equinoctial elements, and classical elements for each time step or event step. At each step, selected output is added to a plot file. The ASAP package includes a program for sorting this plot file. LOTUS 1-2-3 is used in the supplied examples to graph the results, but any graphics software package could be used to process the plot file. ASAP is not written to be mission-specific. Instead, it is intended to be used for most planetary orbiting missions. As a consequence, the user has to have some basic understanding of orbital mechanics to provide the correct input and interpret the subsequent output. ASAP is written in FORTRAN 77 for batch execution and has been implemented on an IBM PC compatible computer operating under MS-DOS. The ASAP package requires a math coprocessor and a minimum of 256K RAM. This program was last

  7. Meteorological measurements from satellite platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suomi, V. E.

    1972-01-01

    Quantitative exploitation of meteorological data from geosynchronous satellites is starting to move from the laboratory to operational practice. Investigations of the data applications portion of the total meteorological satellite system include: (1) tropospheric wind shear and the related severe storm circulations; (2) kinematic properties of the tropical atmosphere as derived from cloud motion vectors; (3) application of a geostationary satellite rake system to measurements of rainfall; and (4) pointing error analysis of geosynchronous satellites.

  8. Quantum simulation of classical thermal states.

    PubMed

    Dür, W; Van den Nest, M

    2011-10-21

    We establish a connection between ground states of local quantum Hamiltonians and thermal states of classical spin systems. For any discrete classical statistical mechanical model in any spatial dimension, we find an associated quantum state such that the reduced density operator behaves as the thermal state of the classical system. We show that all these quantum states are unique ground states of a universal 5-body local quantum Hamiltonian acting on a (polynomially enlarged) qubit system on a 2D lattice. The only free parameters of the quantum Hamiltonian are coupling strengths of two-body interactions, which allow one to choose the type and dimension of the classical model as well as the interaction strength and temperature. This opens the possibility to study and simulate classical spin models in arbitrary dimension using a 2D quantum system.

  9. Classical field approach to quantum weak measurements.

    PubMed

    Dressel, Justin; Bliokh, Konstantin Y; Nori, Franco

    2014-03-21

    By generalizing the quantum weak measurement protocol to the case of quantum fields, we show that weak measurements probe an effective classical background field that describes the average field configuration in the spacetime region between pre- and postselection boundary conditions. The classical field is itself a weak value of the corresponding quantum field operator and satisfies equations of motion that extremize an effective action. Weak measurements perturb this effective action, producing measurable changes to the classical field dynamics. As such, weakly measured effects always correspond to an effective classical field. This general result explains why these effects appear to be robust for pre- and postselected ensembles, and why they can also be measured using classical field techniques that are not weak for individual excitations of the field.

  10. Mobile satellite service for Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sward, David

    1988-01-01

    The Mobile Satellite (MSAT) system and a special program designed to provide interim mobile satellite services (IMSS) during the construction phase of MSAT are described. A mobile satellite system is a key element in extending voice and and data telecommunications to all Canadians.

  11. Telelibrary: Library Services via Satellite.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Rosa

    1979-01-01

    Investigates the provision of library services via satellite, explains briefly the operation and advantages of communication satellites, and discusses the various telecommunications equipment and services which, when coupled with satellite transmission, will enhance library activities. Demand trend projections for telecommunications services…

  12. Karyopherin Alpha 1 Regulates Satellite Cell Proliferation and Survival by Modulating Nuclear Import.

    PubMed

    Choo, Hyo-Jung; Cutler, Alicia; Pavlath, Grace K

    2016-07-19

    Satellite cells are stem cells with an essential role in skeletal muscle repair. Precise regulation of gene expression is critical for proper satellite cell quiescence, proliferation, differentiation and self-renewal. Nuclear proteins required for gene expression are dependent on the nucleocytoplasmic transport machinery to access to nucleus, however little is known about regulation of nuclear transport in satellite cells. The best characterized nuclear import pathway is classical nuclear import which depends on a classical nuclear localization signal (cNLS) in a cargo protein and the heterodimeric import receptors, karyopherin alpha (KPNA) and beta (KPNB). Multiple KPNA1 paralogs exist and can differ in importing specific cNLS proteins required for cell differentiation and function. We show that transcripts for six Kpna paralogs underwent distinct changes in mouse satellite cells during muscle regeneration accompanied by changes in cNLS proteins in nuclei. Depletion of KPNA1, the most dramatically altered KPNA, caused satellite cells in uninjured muscle to prematurely activate, proliferate and undergo apoptosis leading to satellite cell exhaustion with age. Increased proliferation of satellite cells led to enhanced muscle regeneration at early stages of regeneration. In addition, we observed impaired nuclear localization of two key KPNA1 cargo proteins: p27, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor associated with cell cycle control and lymphoid enhancer factor 1, a critical cotranscription factor for β-catenin. These results indicate that regulated nuclear import of proteins by KPNA1 is critical for satellite cell proliferation and survival and establish classical nuclear import as a novel regulatory mechanism for controlling satellite cell fate. Stem Cells 2016.

  13. Building Halos by Digesting Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-05-01

    We think galactic halos are built through the addition of material from the smaller subhalos of satellites digested by their hosts. Though most of the stars in Milky-Way-mass halos were probably formed in situ, many were instead accumulated over time, as orbiting dwarf galaxies were torn apart and their stars flung throughout the host galaxy. A recent set of simulations has examined this brutal formation process.In the authors simulations, a subhalo first falls into the host halo. At this point, it can either survive to present day as a satellite galaxy, or it can be destroyed, its stars scattering throughout the host halo. [Deason et al. 2016]Subhalo FateThere are many open questions about the growth of Milky-Way-mass halos from the accretion of subhalos. Which subhalos are torn apart and accreted, and which ones survive intact? Are more small or large subhalos accreted? Does subhalo accretion affect the host galaxys metallicity? And what can we learn from all of this about the Milky Ways formation history?In a recently published study, a team of scientists from Stanford University and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory set out to answer these questions using a suite of 45 zoom-in simulations of Milky-Way-mass halos. Led by Alis Deason, the team tracked the accretion history of these 45 test galaxies to determine how their halos were built.Piecing Together HistoryDeason and collaborators reach several new and interesting conclusions based on the outcomes of their simulations.Average accreted stellar mass from destroyed dwarfs for each host halo, as a function of the time of the last major accretion event. More stellar mass is accreted in more recent accretion events. [Deason et al. 2016]Most of the stellar mass accreted by the Milky-Way-mass halos typically comes from only one or two destroyed dwarfs. The accreted dwarfs are usually low-mass if they were accreted early on in the simulation (i.e., in the early universe), and high-mass if they were accreted

  14. Satellite Aerodynamics and Density Determination from Satellite Dynamic Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, G. R.

    1972-01-01

    The aerodynamic drag and lift properties of a satellite are first expressed as a function of two parameters associated with gas-surface interaction at the satellite surface. The dynamic response of the satellite as it passes through the atmosphere is then expressed as a function of the two gas-surface interaction parameters, the atmospheric density, the satellite velocity, and the satellite orientation to the high speed flow. By proper correlation of the observed dynamic response with the changing angle of attack of the satellite, it is found that the two unknown gas-surface interaction parameters can be determined. Once the gas-surface interaction parameters are known, the aerodynamic properties of the satellite at all angles of attack are also determined.

  15. Irregular Satellites of the Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewitt, David

    2005-01-01

    This proposal is directed towards the observational exploration of the irregular satellite systems of the planets. Primarily we use large-format CCD cameras on the world's largest telescopes, on Mauna Kea, to discover new irregular satellites and then to monitor their positions in order to ascertain their orbital characteristics. Separate observations are taken to determine the physical properties of the irregular satellites. The big picture science objective is to determine how these satellites were captures, and to use the properties of the satellites and their orbits to place constraints on early solar system (including formation) processes. Work in the first year has focussed on a major investigation of the Saturn irregular satellite system. We secured observing time on the Subaru and Gemini 8-m diameter telescopes in December 2004, January, February and March 2005 for the conduct of a deep, wide-area survey. This has resulted in the detection and orbit determination for 12 new satellites to be announced in the next week or two. Additional satellites were lost, temporarily, due to unusually poor weather conditions on Mauna Kea. These objects will be recovered and their orbits published next year. A separate survey of the Uranus irregular satellites was published (Sheppard, Jewitt and Kleyna 2005). Away from the telescope, we have discovered the amazing result that the four giant planets possess similar numbers of irregular satellites. This flies in the face of the standard gas-drag model for satellite capture, since only two of the giant planets are gas giants and the others (Uranus and Neptune) formed by a different process and in the absence of much gas. The constancy of the satellite number (each giant holds approximately 100 irregular satellites measured down to the kilometer scale) is either a coincidence, with different capture mechanisms at different planets giving by chance the same total numbers of irregular satellites, or indicates that the satellites

  16. Catalytically active geometry in the reversible circularization of 'mini-monomer' RNAs derived from the complementary strand of tobacco ringspot virus satellite RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Feldstein, P A; Bruening, G

    1993-01-01

    The less abundant polarity of the satellite RNA of tobacco ringspot virus, designated sTobRV(-)RNA, contains a ribozyme and its substrate. We demonstrate that the ribozyme can catalyze the ligation of substrate cleavage products and that oligoribonucleotides, termed 'mini-monomers' and containing little more than covalently attached ribozyme and substrate cleavage products, circularized spontaneously, efficiently and reversibly. The kinetics of ligation and cleavage of one such mini-monomer was consistent with a simple unimolecular reaction at some temperatures. Evidence suggests that the circular ligation product includes a 5 bp stem that is connected to a 4 bp stem by a bulge loop. Reduction of the bulge loop to one nt is expected to place the 4 and 5 bp helices in a nearly coaxial, rather than an angled or parallel, orientation. Such molecules did not circularize in a unimolecular reaction but did when incubated with second, trans-acting oligoribonucleotides that had either the original or a substituted 4 bp helix. These results suggest that a bulge loop that is too small prevents formation of geometry essential for unimolecular ligation. We suggest the term 'paperclip' to represent the arrangement of RNA strands in the region of sTobRV(-)RNA that participates in the cleavage and ligation reactions. Images PMID:7684131

  17. [The influence of satellite cells on meat quality and its differential regulation].

    PubMed

    Shen, Lin-Yuan; Zhang, Shun-Hua; Wu, Ze-Hui; Zheng, Meng-Yue; Li, Xue-Wei; Zhu, Li

    2013-09-01

    Satellite cell is a kind of myogenic stem cells, which plays an important role in muscle development and injury repair. Through proliferation, differentiation and fusion of muscle fiber can satellite cells make new myonuclear, leading to the hypertrophy of skeletal muscle and fiber type transformation, and this would further affect the meat quality. Here, we review the relationship between muscle fiber development and meat quality attributes as well as the influence of the satellite cell differentiation on muscle fiber character. Besides, we also summarize the classical signaling pathway (i.e., Notch etc.) and influence of epigenetic regulation (i.e. miRNA) on muscle quality.

  18. An aeronautical mobile satellite experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedrey, T. C.; Dessouky, K. I.; Lay, N. E.

    1990-01-01

    The various activities and findings of a NASA/FAA/COMSAT/INMARSAT collaborative aeronautical mobile satellite experiment are detailed. The primary objective of the experiment was to demonstrate and evaluate an advanced digital mobile satellite terminal developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory under the NASA Mobile Satellite Program. The experiment was a significant milestone for NASA/JPL, since it was the first test of the mobile terminal in a true mobile satellite environment. The results were also of interest to the general mobile satellite community because of the advanced nature of the technologies employed in the terminal.

  19. The AMSC mobile satellite system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agnew, Carson E.; Bhagat, Jai; Hopper, Edwin A.; Kiesling, John D.; Exner, Michael L.; Melillo, Lawrence; Noreen, Gary K.; Parrott, Billy J.

    1988-01-01

    The American Mobile Satellite Consortium (AMSC) Mobile Satellite Service (MSS) system is described. AMSC will use three multi-beam satellites to provide L-band MSS coverage to the United States, Canada and Mexico. The AMSC MSS system will have several noteworthy features, including a priority assignment processor that will ensure preemptive access to emergency services, a flexible SCPC channel scheme that will support a wide diversity of services, enlarged system capacity through frequency and orbit reuse, and high effective satellite transmitted power. Each AMSC satellite will make use of 14 MHz (bi-directional) of L-band spectrum. The Ku-band will be used for feeder links.

  20. Driven topological systems in the classical limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Callum W.; Öhberg, Patrik; Valiente, Manuel

    2017-03-01

    Periodically driven quantum systems can exhibit topologically nontrivial behavior, even when their quasienergy bands have zero Chern numbers. Much work has been conducted on noninteracting quantum-mechanical models where this kind of behavior is present. However, the inclusion of interactions in out-of-equilibrium quantum systems can prove to be quite challenging. On the other hand, the classical counterpart of hard-core interactions can be simulated efficiently via constrained random walks. The noninteracting model, proposed by Rudner et al. [Phys. Rev. X 3, 031005 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevX.3.031005], has a special point for which the system is equivalent to a classical random walk. We consider the classical counterpart of this model, which is exact at a special point even when hard-core interactions are present, and show how these quantitatively affect the edge currents in a strip geometry. We find that the interacting classical system is well described by a mean-field theory. Using this we simulate the dynamics of the classical system, which show that the interactions play the role of Markovian, or time-dependent disorder. By comparing the evolution of classical and quantum edge currents in small lattices, we find regimes where the classical limit considered gives good insight into the quantum problem.

  1. TOPEX satellite option study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The basic design of the fleet satellite communication spacecraft (FLTSATCOM) can easily accommodate any of the three payload options for the ocean dynamic topography experiment (TOPEX). The principal mission requirements as well as the payload accommodations and communications systems needed for launching this payload are reviewed. The existing FLTSATCOM satellite design is identified and the approaches for the proposed propulsion system are described in addition to subsystems for mechanical; power; attitude and velocity control; and telemetry, tracking and control are described. The compatability of FLTSATCOM with the launch vehicle is examined and its capabilities vs TOPEX requirements are summarized. Undetermined changes needed to meet data storage, thermal control, and area to mass ratio requirements are discussed. Cost estimates are included for budgetary and planning purposes. The availability of the described design is assessed based on the continuing production of FLTSATCOM spacecraft during the schedule span planned for TOPEX.

  2. Future switching satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campanella, S. Joseph; Pontano, Benjamin A.; Chalmers, Harvey

    1988-01-01

    Communications satellites of the future are likely to use much narrower beams in order to increase the uplink G/T and the downlink EIRP so that small earth terminals of the VSAT class can achieve full mesh connectivity. These satellites will need onboard switches to route traffic from originating upbeams to destination downbeams. This paper presents a new approach to accomplishing this rerouting using destination-directed packets that inherently carry the information needed to control the onboard switch connections and to adjust the traffic flow among the beams and the stations. The method also inherently provides channel multiplication and DAMA advantages which result in maximally efficient utilization of the space segment resource.

  3. Saturn's outer satellite - Phoebe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Voyager 2 took these images of Saturn's outer satellite Phoebe, on Sept. 4, 1981, from 2.2 million kilometers (1.36 million miles)away. This pair shows two different hemispheres of the satellite. The left image shows a bright mountain on the upper right edge reflecting the light of the setting sun. This mountain is possibly the central peak of a large impact crater taking up most of the upper right quadrant of Phoebe in this view. The right images shows a hemisphere with an intrinsically bright spot in the top portion of the image as well as the ridges appearing bright in the sunset light of the lower right. These images were processed by the Multimission Image Processing Laboratory of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the Voyager Project for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications.

  4. Introduction to Satellite Communications.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-04-15

    vector (meters/second) m is mass of the oahect (knnrl: ’ ) 2-3 Cl1, CCP IlOb 5 10 November 1975 ( )) I tie Indjbs Lit d bid\\, is ’Ilk’d’/ ~~ Sd t...Careful 1. 1, iil V CIS theto; iul.plI it; it 0’elocii% perpelid tiu t to tile idditiS vector . This \\’elocitV, (.oiiiwiilit is cdjli--ti tilt 11i dC5Vui st...velocity, v, is the vector sum of these two velocities. (6) Artificial satellites. Artificial satellites obey the samp sf-t of laws and follow the

  5. Manned engineering test satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seko, Hiromi; Satou, Masao; Tomoeda, Hisao; Obara, Hiroaki; Oomura, Katsutoshi

    1992-07-01

    An overview of the conceptual design of manned engineering satellites is presented. The mission scenarios for developing manned engineering satellites involve: (1) selecting mission equipment to enable preferential development and validation of mandatory technologies among those for Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS); (2) selecting mission equipment to enable development and validation of independent domestic technologies as well as utilizing to the utmost the manned space technology acquired through the Japanese Experimental Module (JEM); and (3) installing the most effective mission on the basis of relationships with Extravehicular Activity (EVA), robot, and retrieval-type spacecraft technologies, and trends of overseas manned space technology. The results of reviews on the system and subsystems, such as attitude and orbit control, structure, thermal control, electric power, communication, and data processing subsystems are outlined. The results of reviews on the structure, weight, and reentry phase operation are presented.

  6. Commercial satellite communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcolin, C.

    1991-09-01

    Telespazio provides satellites services for fixed and mobile telecommunications utilizing the space segments of INTELSAT, EUTELSAT and INMARSAT since inception. Telespazio's main facilities are located in the three centers of Fucino (central Italy), Lario (northern Italy) and Scanzano (Sicily) for a total of 7 stations operating traffic for a number of Italian and Foreign Telecommunications organizations. As at December 31, 1990 a total of 4500 voice grade and data circuits were in operations connecting Italy to nearly a hundred Overseas and European destinations. Over 400,000 and 530,000 minutes of telephone and telex were transmitted, respectively, through Fucino Coast Earth Station via INMARSAT satellite during 1990 to and from ships and other mobile vehicles. Both occasional and regular television services are broadcast and received. The total number of hours of TV services broadcast in 1990 reached the record figure of more than 5500.

  7. Satellite Tracking and Observability.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-01

    Turailic Code 62xC DO FORM 1473,84 MAR B3APRed,tonmaybeuseduntIeshausted SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE All other editions are obsolete...kepler and Newton. These laws of motion apply to artificial satellites as well as planets and moons. The physical geometries and forces are the same...and are evenly spaced from each other . These are called meridians and they intersect with the equator at right angles. Meridians 3oin at both poles

  8. Satellite servicing economic study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that satellite servicing is cost effective; however, all of these studies were of different formats, dollar year, learning rates, availability, etc. Therefore, it was difficult to correlate any useful trends from these studies. The reviewed study was initiated to correlate the economic data into a common data base, using a common set of assumptions. A selected set of existed funded programs was then analyzed to provide an independent analysis of the servicing options and potential economic benefits.

  9. Satellite freeze forecast system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martsolf, J. D. (Principal Investigator)

    1983-01-01

    Provisions for back-up operations for the satellite freeze forecast system are discussed including software and hardware maintenance and DS/1000-1V linkage; troubleshooting; and digitized radar usage. The documentation developed; dissemination of data products via television and the IFAS computer network; data base management; predictive models; the installation of and progress towards the operational status of key stations; and digital data acquisition are also considered. The d addition of dew point temperature into the P-model is outlined.

  10. Recovery of spinning satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coppey, J. M.; Mahaffey, W. R.

    1977-01-01

    The behavior of a space tug and a spinning satellite in a coupled configuration was simulated and analyzed. A docking concept was developed to investigate the requirements pertaining to the design of a docking interface. Sensing techniques and control requirements for the chase vehicle were studied to assess the feasibility of an automatic docking. The effects of nutation dampers and liquid propellant slosh motion upon the docking transient were investigated.

  11. Balancing Vanguard Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simkovich, A.; Baumann, Robert C.

    1961-01-01

    The Vanguard satellites and component parts were balanced within the specified limits by using a Gisholt Type-S balancer in combination with a portable International Research and Development vibration analyzer and filter, with low-frequency pickups. Equipment and procedures used for balancing are described; and the determination of residual imbalance is accomplished by two methods: calculation, and graphical interpretation. Between-the-bearings balancing is recommended for future balancing of payloads.

  12. ASPEC: Solar power satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The solar power satellite (SPS) will provide a clean, reliable source of energy for large-scale consumption. The system will use satellites in geostationary orbits around the Earth to capture the Sun's energy. The intercepted sunlight will be converted to laser beam energy that can be transmitted to the Earth's surface. Ground systems on the Earth will convert the transmissions from space into electric power. The preliminary design for the SPS consists of one satellite in orbit around the Earth transmitting energy to a single ground station. The SPS design uses multilayer solar cell technology arranged on a 20 km squared planar array to intercept sunlight and convert it to an electric voltage. Power conditioning devices then send the electricity to a laser, which transmits the power to the surface of the Earth. A ground station will convert the beam into electricity. Typically, a single SPS will supply 5 GW of power to the ground station. Due to the large mass of the SPS, about 41 million kg, construction in space is needed in order to keep the structural mass low. The orbit configuration for this design is to operate a single satellite in geosynchronous orbit (GEO). The GEO allows the system to be positioned above a single receiving station and remain in sunlight 99 percent of the time. Construction will take place in low Earth orbit (LEO); array sections, 20 in total, will be sailed on solar wind out to the GEO location in 150 days. These individual transportation sections are referred to as solar sailing array panels (SSAP's). The primary truss elements used to support the array are composed of composite tubular members in a pentahedral arrangement. Smart segments consisting of passive and active damping devices will increase the control of dynamic SPS modes.

  13. Satellite servicing economic study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that satellite servicing is cost effective; however, all of these studies were of different formats, dollar year, learning rates, availability, etc. Threfore, it was difficult to correlate any useful trends from these studies. The reviewed study was initiated to correlate the economic data into a common data base, using a common set of assumptions. A selected set of existed funded programs was then analyzed to provide an independent analysis of the servicing options and potential economic benefits.

  14. Satellite Surveillance: Domestic Issues

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-27

    Council in Los Angeles, California, July 25, 1996. 9 Robert B Murrett, “NGA — Then and Now; Celebrating 10 Years of GEOINT,” Pathfinder , September/October...Domestic Spy Satellites before the House Committee on Homeland Security, September 6, 2007; also, Statement of Lisa Graves, Deputy Director of the Center...United States House of Representatives, September 1, 2007. 24 Lisa Graves, Deputy Director of the Center for National Security Studies, Statement before

  15. Survival of classic cholera in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Siddique, A K; Baqui, A H; Eusof, A; Haider, K; Hossain, M A; Bashir, I; Zaman, K

    1991-05-11

    During the present cholera pandemic the El Tor biotype of Vibrio cholerae has completely displaced the classic biotype, except in Bangladesh. We studied the distribution of these two biotypes in twenty-four rural districts during epidemics in 1988-89; there was clustering of the classic biotype in the southern region and of the El Tor biotype in all other regions. These findings suggest that the southern coastal region is now (and may always have been) the habitat of classic cholera. The selective distribution of V cholerae O1 biotypes in Bangladesh may have been affected by ecological changes occurring in the country.

  16. Failure of classical elasticity in auxetic foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roh, J. H.; Giller, C. B.; Mott, P. H.; Roland, C. M.

    2013-04-01

    Poisson's ratio, ν, was measured for four materials, a rubbery polymer, a conventional soft foam, and two auxetic foams. We find that for the first two materials, having ν ≥ 0.2, the experimental determinations of Poisson's ratio are in good agreement with values calculated from the shear and tensile moduli using the equations of classical elasticity. However, for the two auxetic materials (ν < 0), the equations of classical elasticity give values significantly different from the measured ν. We offer an interpretation of these results based on a recently published analysis of the bounds on Poisson's ratio for classical elasticity to be applicable.

  17. Coherent quantum states from classical oscillator amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, John S.; Eisfeld, Alexander

    2012-05-01

    In the first days of quantum mechanics Dirac pointed out an analogy between the time-dependent coefficients of an expansion of the Schrödinger equation and the classical position and momentum variables solving Hamilton's equations. Here it is shown that the analogy can be made an equivalence in that, in principle, systems of classical oscillators can be constructed whose position and momenta variables form time-dependent amplitudes which are identical to the complex quantum amplitudes of the coupled wave function of an N-level quantum system with real coupling matrix elements. Hence classical motion can reproduce quantum coherence.

  18. Origin of the Uranian satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, James B.; Lunine, Jonathan I.; Tittemore, William C.

    1991-01-01

    The current understanding of the origin of the Uranian satellites is assessed by reviewing relevant data on the Uranian satellites, including those obtained by Voyager, and comparing these properties with those of the satellites of the other outer planets. The nature of the early solar system, including the origin of the giant planets, is discussed as a preface to alternative hypotheses for the origin of the nebular disk within which the Uranian satellites formed. The chemical and physical properties of this disk are discussed, as well as the accretion of the satellites from disk solid matter. Predictions of alternative scenarios for the satellites' origin with the relevant observational constraint are compared. The orbital evolution of the larger satellites of Uranus is discussed to gain an understanding of their present orbital properties and possibly important past tidal heating episodes.

  19. Communications satellites - The experimental years

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelson, B. I.

    1983-01-01

    Only eight years after the launc of Sputnik-1 by the Soviet Union, the first commercial satellite, 'Early Bird', entered service. In just twelve years commercial satellite service extended around the earth and became profitable. The reasons for the successful development of the communications satellite services in a comparatively short time are considered. These reasons are related to the presence of three ingredients, taking into account technology to create the system, communications requirements to form a market, and a management structure to implement the system. The formation of the concept of using earth orbiting satellites for telecommunications is discussed. It is pointed out that the years from 1958 to 1964 were the true 'experimental years' for satellite communications. The rapid development of technology during this crucial period is described, giving attention to passive satellites, active systems, and development satellites.

  20. Satellite Servicing Technology Development Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, R.; Waltz, D.; Schrock, S.

    1984-01-01

    A new capability regarding the U.S. space efforts will be related to the servicing of satellites in orbit utilizing first-generation space station as the collection point or base for Shuttle-delivered payloads. Orbital maneuvering vehicles could move payloads or spacecraft assembled at the Shuttle/space station terminus to other earth orbit locations. It is assumed that such a capability will be initially available in the early 1990's. The benefits provided by satellite servicing in orbit are discussed, taking into account extended satellite lifetimes, lower acquisition cost, improved satellite performance, the possibility to change a satellite's mission, optimized science, and higher satellite reliability. The requirements for Satellite Servicing Technology Development Missions (TDMs) are considered. It is found that existing technology is insufficient, in various areas, to perform the servicing operations. A list is provided of critical technologies which must be developed.

  1. Larger Icy Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vance, Steven; Buratti, B. J.; Hansen, C.; Hurford, T.; McKinnon, W. B.; Pappalardo, R. T.; Turtle, E. P.

    2009-09-01

    Outer planets exploration in the past three decades has revealed a diverse host of large icy bodies undergoing a myriad of geological and chemical processes remarkably similar yet alien to those occurring on Earth. The most active of these, including the Galilean satellites and Saturn's moons Enceladus and Titan, are obvious targets for future robotic exploration. The broader host of satellites larger than 100 km should also figure into NASA's goals, owing to their abundance and insights they offer into past and present geological processes, Solar System formation and planetary evolution. Included in this class are the enigmatic objects Dione, with its smooth planes and fractured regions; Mimas with its giant crater Herschel; Iapetus, which has an odd shape and a mysterious equatorial ridge; Miranda, which has been subjected to drastic geologic reconfiguration; and Triton, with its geyser-like plumes. Many bodies in this class are of sufficient size and density to have hosted internal liquid water oceans in their early history, or even in the present epoch, making them targets of astrobiological interest. We discuss the importance of larger icy satellites to NASA's objectives, their importance for understanding, geology, chemistry and dynamics in the Solar System, and observational and experimental challenges that need to be addressed in the next decade.

  2. A satellite anemometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, W. B.; Heelis, R. A.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the design, development, and testing of components of a satellite anemometer, an instrument for measuring neutral winds in the upper atmosphere from a satellite platform. The device, which uses four nearly identical pressure sensors, measures the angle of arrival of the bulk neutral flow in the satellite frame of reference. It could also be used in a feedback loop to control spacecraft attitude with respect to the ram velocity direction. We have now developed miniaturized ionization pressure gauges that will work well from the slip flow region near 115 km up to the base of the exosphere, which covers the entire altitude range currently being considered for Tether. Laboratory tests have demonstrated a very linear response to changes in ram angle out to +/- 20 deg. (transverse wind component of 2.7 km s(exp -1)) from the ram, and a monotonic response to out beyond 45 deg. Pitch (vertical wind) and yaw (horizontal wind) can be sampled simultaneously and meaningfully up to 10 Hz. Angular sensitivity of 30 arc seconds (approximately 1 ms(exp -1) is readily attainable, but absolute accuracy for winds will be approximately 1 deg (130 m/s) unless independent attitude knowledge is available. The critical elements of the design have all been tested in the laboratory.

  3. Vanguard Satellite Separation Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumann, Robert C.

    1961-01-01

    Early in the Vanguard program it became apparent that a thoroughly reliable means of separating the satellite packages from the third-stage rocket would be required. A completely self -contained standard mechanism was developed with redundant firing circuits for use on both test vehicles and satellite-launching vehicles. A change in the experimental objectives of the test-vehicle payload units necessitated modification of some of the standard separation mechanisms. A strap, pull-pin, girth-ring separation device was developed which employed the basic actuation of the standard mechanisms. Evidence of residual burning of the third stage made it necessary to delay separation longer than the time designed into the long-delay separation device. The standard separation mechanism was modified and integrated with the satellite command receiver system so that a ground command after third-stage burnout would cause separation. Flight performance of the various separation mechanisms proved their reliability; they performed without failure in all Vanguard launchings.

  4. Tethered satellite design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manarini, G.

    1986-01-01

    The capability of the satellite to perform a variety of space operations to be accomplished from the shuttle is reviewed considering use of the satellite with man-in-loop and closed loop modes and deployment (toward or away from Earth, up to 100 km), stationkeeping, retrieval and control of the satellite. Scientific payloads are to be used to perform experiments and scientific investigation for applications such as magnetometry, electrodynamics, atmospheric science, chemical release, communications, plasmaphysics, dynamic environment, and power and thrust generation. The TSS-S will be reused for at least 3 missions after reconfiguration and refurbishment by changing the peculiar mission items such as thermal control, fixed boom for experiments, aerodynamic tail for yaw attitude control, external skin, experiments, and any other feature. The TSS-S is to be composed of three modules in order to allow independent integration of a single module and to facilitate the refurbishment and reconfiguration between flights. The three modules are service, auxiliary propulsion, and payload modules.

  5. Laser satellite power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Walbridge, E.W.

    1980-01-01

    A laser satellite power system (SPS) converts solar power captured by earth-orbiting satellites into electrical power on the earth's surface, the satellite-to-ground transmission of power being effected by laser beam. The laser SPS may be an alternative to the microwave SPS. Microwaves easily penetrate clouds while laser radiation does not. Although there is this major disadvantage to a laser SPS, that system has four important advantages over the microwave alternative: (1) land requirements are much less, (2) radiation levels are low outside the laser ground stations, (3) laser beam sidelobes are not expected to interfere with electromagnetic systems, and (4) the laser system lends itself to small-scale demonstration. After describing lasers and how they work, the report discusses the five lasers that are candidates for application in a laser SPS: electric discharge lasers, direct and indirect solar pumped lasers, free electron lasers, and closed-cycle chemical lasers. The Lockheed laser SPS is examined in some detail. To determine whether a laser SPS will be worthy of future deployment, its capabilities need to be better understood and its attractiveness relative to other electric power options better assessed. First priority should be given to potential program stoppers, e.g., beam attenuation by clouds. If investigation shows these potential program stoppers to be resolvable, further research should investigate lasers that are particularly promising for SPS application.

  6. Heart Monitoring By Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The ambulance antenna shown is a specially designed system that allows satellite-relayed two-way communications between a moving emergency vehicle and a hospital emergency room. It is a key component of a demonstration program aimed at showing how emergency medical service can be provided to people in remote rural areas. Satellite communication permits immediate, hospital- guided treatment of heart attacks or other emergencies by ambulance personnel, saving vital time when the scene of the emergency is remote from the hospital. If widely adopted, the system could save tens of thousands of lives annually in the U.S. alone, medical experts say. The problem in conventional communication with rural areas is the fact that radio signals travel in line of sight. They may be blocked by tall buildings, hills and mountains, or even by the curvature of the Earth, so signal range is sharply limited. Microwave relay towers could solve the problem, but a complete network of repeater towers would be extremely expensive. The satellite provides an obstruction-free relay station in space.

  7. NORAD satellite tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Joseph J. F.

    1987-01-01

    NORAD routinely tracks about 6000 orbiting objects. During the last 30 days of orbital time, prior to reentry, special perturbations are used in the orbital update procedure. Besides routine orbit determination, NORAD does special tasks such as predicting satellite orbit conjunctions within 20 km, ephimerides of weather satellites, satellite decay predictions and other studies. Since their mission is operational, they do not store the data from their analyses. The ballistic coefficient is not known for most of the orbiting objects. If a ballistic coefficient were derived that was consistent with one density model, it might give erroneous results if used with a different density model. Given the ballistic coefficient, density values could, in principle, be obtained from their tracking data. The densities would represent an integrated mean over the orbital path near perigee. They would be model dependent and would not necessarily represent the real density. In summary, the primary need is for reliable forecasts of solar flux (F10.7) and geomagnetic activity (Ap) in the 1 to 4 week time scale. Forecasts over longer time spans would also be useful for special projects.

  8. DS-SS with de Bruijn sequences for secure Inter Satellite Links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinsante, S.; Warty, C.; Gambi, E.

    Today, both the military and commercial sectors are placing an increased emphasis on global communications. This has prompted the development of several Low Earth Orbit satellite systems that promise a worldwide connectivity and real-time voice, data and video communications. Constellations that avoid repeated uplink and downlink work by exploiting Inter Satellite Links have proved to be very economical in space routing. However, traditionally Inter Satellite Links were considered to be out of reach for any malicious activity and thus little, or no security was employed. This paper proposes a secured Inter Satellite Links based network, built upon the adoption of the Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum technique, with binary de Bruijn sequences used as spreading codes. Selected sequences from the de Bruijn family may be used over directional spot beams. The main intent of the paper is to propose a secure and robust communication link for the next generation of satellite communications, relying on a classical spread spectrum approach employing innovative sequences.

  9. A classical case of the Gasul phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Sabnis, Girish R; Phadke, Milind S; Kerkar, Prafulla G

    2016-02-01

    This case demonstrates the development of secondary infundibular stenosis in a 10-year-old male child with documented large non-restrictive perimembranous ventricular septal defect in infancy - the classical Gasul phenomenon.

  10. Classic Phenylketonuria: Diagnosis Through Heterozygote Detection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Robert F.; Elsas, Louis J.

    1975-01-01

    In an attempt to improve the identification of the asymptomatic carrier of classic phenylketonuria (PKU) 59 male and female normal control Ss were differentiated from 18 males and females heterozgous for PKU. (DB)

  11. Secure quantum communication using classical correlated channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, D.; de Almeida, N. G.; Villas-Boas, C. J.

    2016-10-01

    We propose a secure protocol to send quantum information from one part to another without a quantum channel. In our protocol, which resembles quantum teleportation, a sender (Alice) and a receiver (Bob) share classical correlated states instead of EPR ones, with Alice performing measurements in two different bases and then communicating her results to Bob through a classical channel. Our secure quantum communication protocol requires the same amount of classical bits as the standard quantum teleportation protocol. In our scheme, as in the usual quantum teleportation protocol, once the classical channel is established in a secure way, a spy (Eve) will never be able to recover the information of the unknown quantum state, even if she is aware of Alice's measurement results. Security, advantages, and limitations of our protocol are discussed and compared with the standard quantum teleportation protocol.

  12. Three Neglected Advances in Classical Genetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Wilmer J.; Hollander, Willard F.

    1995-01-01

    This article describes three advances in classical genetics: improved pedigree charting, use of a standard of reference, and calculation of probabilities in complex assortment. Provides support for the importance of teaching these methods in addition to new techniques. (LZ)

  13. Classical decoherence in a nanomechanical resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maillet, Olivier; Fefferman, Andrew; Gazizulin, Rasul; Godfrin, Henri; Bourgeois, Olivier; Collin, Eddy; ULT Grenoble Team

    Decoherence can be viewed either in its quantum picture, where it stands for the loss of phase coherence of a superposition state, or as its classical equivalent, where the phase of an oscillating signal is smeared due to frequency fluctuations. Little is known about quantum coherence of mechanical systems, as opposed to electromagnetic degrees of freedom. Indeed the bridge between quantum and classical physics is under intense investigation, using in particular classical nanomechanical analogues of quantum phenomena. Here we report on a model experiment in which the coherence of a high quality silicon-nitride mechanical resonator is defined in the classical picture. Its intrinsic properties are characterized over an unprecedentedly large dynamic range. By engineering frequency fluctuations, we can create artificial pure dephasing and study its effects on the dynamics of the system. Finally, we develop the methods to characterize pure dephasing that can be applied to a wide range of mechanical devices.

  14. Classical and Quantum Spreading of Position Probability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farina, J. E. G.

    1977-01-01

    Demonstrates that the standard deviation of the position probability of a particle moving freely in one dimension is a function of the standard deviation of its velocity distribution and time in classical or quantum mechanics. (SL)

  15. Classics in the Classroom: Great Expectations Fulfilled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearl, Shela

    1986-01-01

    Describes how an English teacher in a Queens, New York, ghetto school introduced her grade nine students to Charles Dickens's "Great Expectations." Focuses on students' responses, which eventually became enthusiastic, and discusses the use of classics within the curriculum. (KH)

  16. Factorizations of one-dimensional classical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kuru, Senguel; Negro, Javier

    2008-02-15

    A class of one-dimensional classical systems is characterized from an algebraic point of view. The Hamiltonians of these systems are factorized in terms of two functions that together with the Hamiltonian itself close a Poisson algebra. These two functions lead directly to two time-dependent integrals of motion from which the phase motions are derived algebraically. The systems so obtained constitute the classical analogues of the well known factorizable one-dimensional quantum mechanical systems.

  17. Understanding singularities — Classical and quantum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konkowski, Deborah A.; Helliwell, Thomas M.

    2016-01-01

    The definitions of classical and quantum singularities are reviewed. Examples are given of both as well as their utility in general relativity. In particular, the classical and quantum singularity structure of certain interesting conformally static spherically symmetric spacetimes modeling scalar field collapse are reviewed. The spacetimes include the Roberts spacetime, the Husain-Martinez-Nuñez spacetime and the Fonarev spacetime. The importance of understanding spacetime singularity structure is discussed.

  18. Automatic target recognition via classical detection theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Douglas R.

    1995-07-01

    Classical Bayesian detection and decision theory applies to arbitrary problems with underlying probabilistic models. When the models describe uncertainties in target type, pose, geometry, surround, scattering phenomena, sensor behavior, and feature extraction, then classical theory directly yields detailed model-based automatic target recognition (ATR) techniques. This paper reviews options and considerations arising under a general Bayesian framework for model- based ATR, including approaches to the major problems of acquiring probabilistic models and of carrying out the indicated Bayesian computations.

  19. Quantum Simulations of Classical Annealing Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somma, R. D.; Boixo, S.; Barnum, H.; Knill, E.

    2008-09-01

    We describe a quantum algorithm that solves combinatorial optimization problems by quantum simulation of a classical simulated annealing process. Our algorithm exploits quantum walks and the quantum Zeno effect induced by evolution randomization. It requires order 1/δ steps to find an optimal solution with bounded error probability, where δ is the minimum spectral gap of the stochastic matrices used in the classical annealing process. This is a quadratic improvement over the order 1/δ steps required by the latter.

  20. Quantum and Classical Electrostatics Among Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerr, T. P.; Obolensky, O. I.; Ogurtsov, A. Y.; Yu, Yi-Kuo

    Quantum theory has been unquestionably successful at describing physics at the atomic scale. However, it becomes more difficult to apply as the system size grows. On the other hand, classical physics breaks down at sufficiently short length scales but is clearly correct at larger distances. The purpose of methods such as QM/MM is to gain the advantages of both quantum and classical regimes: quantum theory should provide accuracy at the shortest scales, and classical theory, with its somewhat more tractable computational demands, allows results to be computed for systems that would be inaccessible with a purely quantum approach. This strategy will be most effective when one knows with good accuracy the length scale at which quantum calculations are no longer necessary and classical calculations are sufficient. To this end, we have performed both classical and quantum calculations for systems comprising a small number of atoms for which experimental data is also available. The classical calculations are fully exact; the quantum calculations are at the MP4(SDTQ)/aug-cc-pV5Z and CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pV5Z levels. The precision of both sets of calculations along with the existence of experimental results allows us to draw conclusions about the range of utility of the respective calculations. This research was supported by the Intramural Research Program of the NIH, NLM and utilized the computational resources of the NIH HPC Biowulf cluster.

  1. ACTS Satellite Telemammography Network Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kachmar, Brian A.; Kerczewski, Robert J.

    2000-01-01

    The Satellite Networks and Architectures Branch of NASA's Glenn Research Center has developed and demonstrated several advanced satellite communications technologies through the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) program. One of these technologies is the implementation of a Satellite Telemammography Network (STN) encompassing NASA Glenn, the Cleveland Clinic Foundation. the University of Virginia, and the Ashtabula County Medical Center. This paper will present a look at the STN from its beginnings to the impact it may have on future telemedicine applications. Results obtained using the experimental ACTS satellite demonstrate the feasibility of Satellite Telemammography. These results have improved teleradiology processes and mammography image manipulation, and enabled advances in remote screening methodologies. Future implementation of satellite telemammography using next generation commercial satellite networks will be explored. In addition, the technical aspects of the project will be discussed, in particular how the project has evolved from using NASA developed hardware and software to commercial off the shelf (COTS) products. Development of asymmetrical link technologies was an outcome of this work. Improvements in the display of digital mammographic images, better understanding of end-to-end system requirements, and advances in radiological image compression were achieved as a result of the research. Finally, rigorous clinical medical studies are required for new technologies such as digital satellite telemammography to gain acceptance in the medical establishment. These experiments produced data that were useful in two key medical studies that addressed the diagnostic accuracy of compressed satellite transmitted digital mammography images. The results of these studies will also be discussed.

  2. Improved accuracies for satellite tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kammeyer, P. C.; Fiala, A. D.; Seidelmann, P. K.

    1991-01-01

    A charge coupled device (CCD) camera on an optical telescope which follows the stars can be used to provide high accuracy comparisons between the line of sight to a satellite, over a large range of satellite altitudes, and lines of sight to nearby stars. The CCD camera can be rotated so the motion of the satellite is down columns of the CCD chip, and charge can be moved from row to row of the chip at a rate which matches the motion of the optical image of the satellite across the chip. Measurement of satellite and star images, together with accurate timing of charge motion, provides accurate comparisons of lines of sight. Given lines of sight to stars near the satellite, the satellite line of sight may be determined. Initial experiments with this technique, using an 18 cm telescope, have produced TDRS-4 observations which have an rms error of 0.5 arc second, 100 m at synchronous altitude. Use of a mosaic of CCD chips, each having its own rate of charge motion, in the focal place of a telescope would allow point images of a geosynchronous satellite and of stars to be formed simultaneously in the same telescope. The line of sight of such a satellite could be measured relative to nearby star lines of sight with an accuracy of approximately 0.03 arc second. Development of a star catalog with 0.04 arc second rms accuracy and perhaps ten stars per square degree would allow determination of satellite lines of sight with 0.05 arc second rms absolute accuracy, corresponding to 10 m at synchronous altitude. Multiple station time transfers through a communications satellite can provide accurate distances from the satellite to the ground stations. Such observations can, if calibrated for delays, determine satellite orbits to an accuracy approaching 10 m rms.

  3. Mobile satellite service communications tests using a NASA satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, Katherine H.; Koschmeder, Louis A.; Hollansworth, James E.; ONeill, Jack; Jones, Robert E.; Gibbons, Richard C.

    1995-01-01

    Emerging applications of commercial mobile satellite communications include satellite delivery of compact disc (CD) quality radio to car drivers who can select their favorite programming as they drive any distance; transmission of current air traffic data to aircraft; and handheld communication of data and images from any remote corner of the world. Experiments with the enabling technologies and tests and demonstrations of these concepts are being conducted before the first satellite is launched by utilizing an existing NASA spacecraft.

  4. An introductory analysis of satellite collision probabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlton-Wippern, Kitt C.

    This paper addresses a probailistic approach in assessing the probabilities of a satellite collision occurring due to relative trajectory analyses and probability density functions representing the satellites' position/momentum vectors. The paper is divided into 2 parts: Static and Dynamic Collision Probabilities. In the Static Collision Probability section, the basic phenomenon under study is: given the mean positions and associated position probability density functions for the two objects, calculate the probability that the two objects collide (defined as being within some distance of each other). The paper presents the classic Laplace problem of the probability of arrival, using standard uniform distribution functions. This problem is then extrapolated to show how 'arrival' can be classified as 'collision', how the arrival space geometries map to collision space geometries and how arbitrary position density functions can then be included and integrated into the analysis. In the Dynamic Collision Probability section, the nature of collisions based upon both trajectory and energy considerations is discussed, and that energy states alone cannot be used to completely describe whether or not a collision occurs. This fact invalidates some earlier work on the subject and demonstrates why Liouville's theorem cannot be used in general to describe the constant density of the position/momentum space in which a collision may occur. Future position probability density functions are then shown to be the convolution of the current position and momentum density functions (linear analysis), and the paper further demonstrates the dependency of the future position density functions on time. Strategies for assessing the collision probabilities for two point masses with uncertainties in position and momentum at some given time, and thes integrated with some arbitrary impact volume schema, are then discussed. This presentation concludes with the formulation of a high level design

  5. De-Aliasing in Satellite Gravimetry - revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murböck, Michael; Gruber, Thomas; Daras, Ilias; Pail, Roland

    2016-04-01

    Temporal Aliasing of high-frequent signals is a dominating error source in satellite gravimetry. The reduction of temporal aliasing errors is required in order to be sensitive to the global time variable gravity signal dominated by continental hydrology and ice. Within the gravity field processing of the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) and its follow-on mission temporal aliasing errors are often reduced by subtracting atmospheric and oceanic induced high-frequent signal contents on observation level. This is done by using independent tidal and non-tidal models. Hereafter this is called the classical de-aliasing approach. In addition to the classical approach the co-estimation of high-frequent low resolution gravity field parameters proposed by Wiese et al. (2011) further reduces temporal aliasing errors. In order to be independent of external models the optimum de-aliasing procedure for temporal gravity retrieval would be without the classical. Then the philosophy also changes. The high-frequent signal contents are not reduced any more but they have to be observed. To improve the observability of high-frequent signals on a global scale a second pair is required in addition to a single GRACE-like pair. On the one hand the observation geometry is improved by having a second pair in an inclined orbit besides the polar pair. On the other hand this automatically doubles the temporal resolution of the retrieved gravity fields. In this study we discuss the different aspects of classical de-aliasing versus observation of high-frequent signals based on full-scale closed-loop simulations. We focus on the analysis and validation of high-frequent gravity field estimates from single and double pairs and the capability of this approach to replace the classical de-aliasing approach at least for the non-tidal part. Wiese D, Visser P, Nerem R (2011) Estimating low resolution gravity fields at short time intervals to reduce temporal aliasing errors. Advances in Space

  6. Satellite-to-satellite system and orbital error estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, P. E.; Argentiero, P. D.; Vonbun, F. O.

    1976-01-01

    Satellite-to-satellite tracking and orbit computation accuracy is evaluated on the basis of data obtained from near earth spacecraft via the geostationary ATS-6. The near earth spacecraft involved are Apollo-Soyuz, GEOS-3, and NIMBUS-6. In addition ATS-6 is being tracked by a new scheme wherein a single ground transmitter interrogates several ground based transponders via ATS-6 to achieve the precision geostationary orbits essential in satellite-to-satellite orbit computation. Also one way Doppler data is being recorded aboard NIMBUS-6 to determine the position of meteorological platforms. Accuracy assessments associated with the foregoing mission related experiments are discussed.

  7. Nano-Satellite Avionics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culver, Harry

    1999-01-01

    Abstract NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is currently developing a new class of satellites called the nano-satellite (nano-sat). A major objective of this development effort is to provide the technology required to enable a constellation of tens to hundreds of nano-satellites to make both remote and in-situ measurements from space. The Nano-sat will be a spacecraft weighing a maximum of 10 kg, including the propellant mass, and producing at least 5 Watts of power to operate the spacecraft. The electronics are required to survive a total radiation dose rate of 100 krads for a mission lifetime of two years. There are many unique challenges that must be met in order to develop the avionics for such a spacecraft. The first challenge is to develop an architecture that will operate on the allotted 5 Watts and meet the diverging requirements of multiple missions. This architecture will need to incorporate a multitude of new advanced microelectronic technologies. The microelectronics developed must be a modular and scalable packaging of technology to solve the problem of developing a solution to both reduce cost and meet the requirements of various missions. This development will utilize the most cost effective approach, whether infusing commercially driven semiconductor devices into spacecraft applications or partnering with industry to design and develop low cost, low power, low mass, and high capacity data processing devices. This paper will discuss the nano-sat architecture and the major technologies that will be developed. The major technologies that will be covered include: (1) Light weight Low Power Electronics Packaging, (2) Radiation Hard/Tolerant, Low Power Processing Platforms, (3) High capacity Low Power Memory Systems (4) Radiation Hard reconfiguragble field programmable gate array (rFPGA)

  8. Explorer Satellite Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eyraud, J. P.; Richter, H. L.; Victor, W. K.

    1960-01-01

    A discussion is presented of the design restrictions and the philosophy which enabled the Explorer satellites to be first during the IGY to reveal the presence of a belt of intense cosmic radiation encircling the earth's equator. In addition, an indication of the amount and momentum of cosmic dust in the solar system was obtained from the Explorers. Methods used to obtain reliability in the transducing and communications system are described, together with interpretations of space-environment information as deduced from the narrow-band telemetry.

  9. LDEF Satellite Radiation Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, T. W.; Colborn, B. L.

    1996-01-01

    Model calculations and analyses have been carried out to compare with several sets of data (dose, induced radioactivity in various experiment samples and spacecraft components, fission foil measurements, and LET spectra) from passive radiation dosimetry on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) satellite, which was recovered after almost six years in space. The calculations and data comparisons are used to estimate the accuracy of current models and methods for predicting the ionizing radiation environment in low earth orbit. The emphasis is on checking the accuracy of trapped proton flux and anisotropy models.

  10. Flexible satellite data services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, L.; Dinwiddy, S.

    Four different satellite data service system concepts are examined, and are all shown to be useful, depending on the applications. A 34-Mbit/s TDMA system is an excellent choice for a large fully meshed network using relatively few earth stations. A twin 2-Mbit/s TDM-plus-TDMA system is good for small predominantly star-connected networks. In addition, it is suggested that a 2/8/34 Mbit/s multicarrier hybrid system can be used as a low-risk alternative to immediate full-scale TDMA, particularly when system growth is in the number of earth stations and not in traffic per station.

  11. Radio broadcasting via satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helm, Neil R.; Pritchard, Wilbur L.

    1990-10-01

    Market areas offering potential for future narrowband broadcast satellites are examined, including international public diplomacy, government- and advertising-supported, and business-application usages. Technical issues such as frequency allocation, spacecraft types, transmission parameters, and radio receiver characteristics are outlined. Service and system requirements, advertising revenue, and business communications services are among the economic issues discussed. The institutional framework required to provide an operational radio broadcast service is studied, and new initiatives in direct broadcast audio radio systems, encompassing studies, tests, in-orbit demonstrations of, and proposals for national and international commercial broadcast services are considered.

  12. X-ray satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    An overview of the second quarter 1985 development of the X-ray satellite project is presented. It is shown that the project is proceeding according to plan and that the projected launch date of September 9, 1987 is on schedule. An overview of the work completed and underway on the systems, subsystems, payload, assembly, ground equipment and interfaces is presented. Problem areas shown include cost increases in the area of focal instrumentation, the star sensor light scattering requirements, and postponements in the data transmission subsystems.

  13. Satellite attitude control simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Debra, D. B.; Powell, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    Work was conducted to develop an extremely low drift rate gyroscope and a very precise star tracker. A proposed relativity satellite will measure very accurately the theoretically predicted 'relativistic' precession of the gyroscope relative to an inertial reference frame provided by the star tracker. Aspects of precision spinning attitude control are discussed together with questions of gyro operation, and the hopping mode for lunar transportation. For the attitude control system of the lunar hopper, a number of control laws were investigated. The studies indicated that some suboptimal controls should be adequate for the system.

  14. The Galilean Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This composite includes the four largest moons of Jupiter which are known as the Galilean satellites. The Galilean satellites were first seen by the Italian astronomer Galileo Galilei in 1610. Shown from left to right in order of increasing distance from Jupiter, Io is closest, followed by Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto.

    The order of these satellites from the planet Jupiter helps to explain some of the visible differences among the moons. Io is subject to the strongest tidal stresses from the massive planet. These stresses generate internal heating which is released at the surface and makes Io the most volcanically active body in our solar system. Europa appears to be strongly differentiated with a rock/iron core, an ice layer at its surface, and the potential for local or global zones of water between these layers. Tectonic resurfacing brightens terrain on the less active and partially differentiated moon Ganymede. Callisto, furthest from Jupiter, appears heavily cratered at low resolutions and shows no evidence of internal activity.

    North is to the top of this composite picture in which these satellites have all been scaled to a common factor of 10 kilometers (6 miles) per picture element.

    The Solid State Imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft acquired the Io and Ganymede images in June 1996, the Europa images in September 1996, and the Callisto images in November 1997.

    Launched in October 1989, the spacecraft's mission is to conduct detailed studies of the giant planet, its largest moons and the Jovian magnetic environment. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web

  15. The Galilean Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This composite includes the four largest moons of Jupiter which are known as the Galilean satellites. From left to right, the moons shown are Ganymede, Callisto, Io, and Europa. The Galilean satellites were first seen by the Italian astronomer Galileo Galilei in 1610. In order of increasing distance from Jupiter, Io is closest, followed by Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto.

    The order of these satellites from the planet Jupiter helps to explain some of the visible differences among the moons. Io is subject to the strongest tidal stresses from the massive planet. These stresses generate internal heating which is released at the surface and makes Io the most volcanically active body in our solar system. Europa appears to be strongly differentiated with a rock/iron core, an ice layer at its surface, and the potential for local or global zones of water between these layers. Tectonic resurfacing brightens terrain on the less active and partially differentiated moon Ganymede. Callisto, furthest from Jupiter, appears heavily cratered at low resolutions and shows no evidence of internal activity.

    North is to the top of this composite picture in which these satellites have all been scaled to a common factor of 10 kilometers (6 miles) per picture element.

    The Solid State Imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft obtained the Io and Ganymede images in June 1996, while the Europa images were obtained in September 1996. Because Galileo focuses on high resolution imaging of regional areas on Callisto rather than global coverage, the portrait of Callisto is from the 1979 flyby of NASA's Voyager spacecraft.

    Launched in October 1989, the spacecraft's mission is to conduct detailed studies of the giant planet, its largest moons and the Jovian magnetic environment. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World

  16. LDEF satellite radiation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, T. W.; Colborn, B. L.

    1994-01-01

    Some early results are summarized from a program under way to utilize LDEF satellite data for evaluating and improving current models of the space radiation environment in low earth orbit. Reported here are predictions and comparisons with some of the LDEF dose and induced radioactivity data, which are used to check the accuracy of current models describing the magnitude and directionality of the trapped proton environment. Preliminary findings are that the environment models underestimate both dose and activation from trapped protons by a factor of about two, and the observed anisotropy is higher than predicted.

  17. Future communications satellite applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagwell, James W.

    1992-01-01

    The point of view of the research is made through the use of viewgraphs. It is suggested that future communications satellite applications will be made through switched point to point narrowband communications. Some characteristics of which are as follows: small/low cost terminals; single hop communications; voice compatible; full mesh networking; ISDN compatible; and possible limited use of full motion video. Some target applications are as follows: voice/data networks between plants and offices in a corporation; data base networking for commercial and science users; and cellular radio internodal voice/data networking.

  18. About mechanisms of tetonic activity of the satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkin, Yu. V.

    2003-04-01

    ABOUT MECHANISMS OF TECTONIC ACTIVITY OF THE SATELLITES Yu.V. Barkin Sternberg Astronomical Institute, Moscow, Russia, barkin@sai.msu.ru Due to attraction of the central planet and others external bodies satellite is subjected by tidal and non-tidal deformations. Elastic energy is changed in dependence from mutual position and motion of celestial bodies and as result the tensional state of satellite and its tectonic (endogenous) activity also is changed. Satellites of the planets have the definite shell’s structure and due to own rotation these shells are characterized by different oblatenesses. Gravitational interaction of the satellite and its mother planet generates big additional mechanical forces (and moments) between the neighboring non-spherical shells of the satellite (mantle, core and crust). These forces and moments are cyclic functions of time, which are changed in the different time-scales. They generate corresponding cyclic perturbations of the tensional state of the shells, their deformations, small relative transnational displacements and slow rotation of the shells and others. In geological period of time it leads to a fundamental tectonic reconstruction of the body. Definite contribution to discussed phenomena are caused by classical tidal mechanism. of planet-satellite interaction. But in this report we discuss in first the new mechanisms of endogenous activity of celestial bodies. They are connected with differential gravitational attraction of non-spherical satellite shells by the external celestial bodies which leads: 1) to small relative rotation (nutations) of the shells; 2) to small relative translational motions of the shells (displacements of their center of mass); 3) to relative displacements and rotations of the shells due to eccentricity of their center of mass positions; 4) to viscous elastic deformations of the shells and oth. (Barkin, 2001). For higher evaluations of the power of satellite endogenous activities were obtained

  19. TDRSS Augmentation System for Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckler, Gregory W.; Gramling, Cheryl; Valdez, Jennifer; Baldwin, Philip

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) reinvigorated the development of the TDRSS Augmentation Service for Satellites (TASS). TASS is a global, space-based, communications and navigation service for users of Global Navigation Satellite Systems(GNSS) and the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). TASS leverages the existing TDRSS to provide an S-band beacon radio navigation and messaging source to users at orbital altitudes 1400 km and below.

  20. Satellite stabilization using space leeches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Michael W.; Kim, Dong-Min

    1990-01-01

    A control algorithm for satellite stabilization using a space leech is presented. The space leech is assumed to have n reaction wheels with known moments of inertia about their axis of rotation. All mass properties of the satellite are assumed to be unknown. The algorithm brings the satellite to a specified attitude trajectory. Simulations were performed to demonstrate the controller. The model parameters and specific algorithm used and the results obtained are presented.

  1. Detection and localization of satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bautista Aranda, Manuel

    The surveillance of orbital space is conducted in order to (1) detect military activities, (2) keep a tally of active and 'dead' satellites, launch vehicle upper stages, explosion debris, etc., and (3) prevent collisions with active satellites, as well as anticipate the exact timing of satellite reentries. An account is presently given of the complex system of optical- and radar-sensor space surveillance conducted by agencies of the U.S. government.

  2. Direct broadcast satellite technical issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McManamon, P. M.

    The satellites discussed here are those that have been proposed for operation in the 12.2-12.7 GHz band in the U.S. to provide domestic services. Technical issues are summarized which will influence policy, regulatory practices, and decisions bearing on domestic and international sharing. Technical approaches are presented for the efficient use of the orbit to be used by direct broadcast satellites for the Broadcasting-Satellite Service.

  3. Satellite relocation by tether deployment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Hrach, Frank J.

    1989-01-01

    Several new uses of satellite tethers are discussed, including: (1) using tether extension to reposition a satellite in orbit without fuel expenditure by extending a mass on the end of a tether; (2) using a tether for energy storage to power the satellite during eclipse; and (3) using a tether for eccentricity pumping to correct perturbations in the orbit and as a means of adding energy to the orbit for boosting and orbital transfer.

  4. Satellite relocation by tether deployment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Hrach, Frank J.

    1991-01-01

    Several new uses of satellite tethers are discussed, including: (1) using tether extension to reposition a satellite in orbit without fuel expenditure by extending a mass on the end of a tether; (2) using a tether for energy storage to power the satellite during eclipse; and (3) using a tether for eccentricity pumping to correct perturbations in the orbit and as a means of adding energy to the orbit for boosting and orbital transfer.

  5. A classical nova, V2487 Oph 1998, seen in x-rays before and after its explosion.

    PubMed

    Hernanz, Margarita; Sala, Glòria

    2002-10-11

    Classical nova explosions are very energetic and frequent phenomena caused by explosive hydrogen burning on top of an accreting white dwarf. Observations of the recent nova V2487 Oph 1998 by the X-ray Multi-Mirror satellite (XMM-Newton) provide evidence that accretion (probably on a magnetic white dwarf) was reestablished as early as 2.7 years after the explosion. In addition, positional correlation with a source previously discovered by the Röntgen Satellite (ROSAT) in 1990 suggests that the site of a nova explosion had been seen in x-rays before the outburst.

  6. Geometric control of quantum mechanical and nonlinear classical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Richard Joseph

    1999-10-01

    Geometric control refers to the judicious use of the non- commuting nature of inputs and natural dynamics as the basis for control. The last few decades in control system theory have seen the application of differential geometry in proving several important properties of systems, including controllability and observability. Until recently, however, the results of this mathematical geometry have rarely been used as the basis for designing and implementing an actual controller. This thesis demonstrates the application of a judicious selection of inputs, so that if the system is proven to be controllable using geometric methods, one can design input sequences using the same geometry. A demonstration of this method is shown in simulating the attitude control of a satellite: a highly non-linear, non- holonomic control problem. Although not a practical method for large re-orientations of a typical satellite, the approach can be applied to other nonlinear systems. The method is also applied to the closed-loop performance of a quantum mechanical system to demonstrate the feasibility of coherent quantum feedback-something impossible using a conventional controller. Finally, the method is applied in the open-loop control of a quantum mechanical system: in this case, the creation of Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger correlations among the nuclei of an ensemble of alanine molecules in a nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer. In each case, the data demonstrate the usefulness of a geometric approach to control. In addition to demonstrations of geometric control in practice, the quantum mechanical experiments also demonstrate for the first time peculiar quantum correlations, including GHZ correlations, that have no classical analog. The quantum experiments further establish nuclear magnetic resonance as a viable and accessible testbed of quantum predictions and processes. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14- 0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax

  7. Communications satellite systems capacity analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browne, L.; Hines, T.; Tunstall, B.

    1982-01-01

    Analog and digital modulation techniques are compared with regard to efficient use of the geostationary orbit by communications satellites. Included is the definition of the baseline systems (both space and ground segments), determination of interference susceptibility, calculation of orbit spacing, and evaluation of relative costs. It is assumed that voice or TV is communicated at 14/11 GHz using either FM or QPSK modulation. Both the Fixed-Satellite Service and the Broadcasting-Satellite Service are considered. For most of the cases examined the digital approach requires a satellite spacing less than or equal to that required by the analog approach.

  8. The inner satellites of Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veverka, J.; Thomas, P.; Synott, S.

    1981-01-01

    The Jupiter moon Amalthea and the smaller satellites J1, J2, and J3, discovered by Voyagers 1 and 2, are discussed under the collective appellation of 'inner satellites', which distinguishes them from the Galilean satellites and the outer satellites, J6-J13. Amalthea is a dark, irregular body on which two large craters are visible, with an estimated surface gravity of 5-7 cm/sec-squared. It is speculated that Amalthea's unique color/reflectance characteristics are due to prolonged charged particle and high-velocity micrometeoroid exposure. Dimensional data are presented for J1-3.

  9. Satellite communication for public services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, R. S.; Redisch, W. N.

    1977-01-01

    Public service programs using NASA's ATS-6 and CTS satellites are discussed. Examples include the ATS-6 Health and Education Telecommunications experimental program and the use of CTS to enable students in one university to take courses presented at another distant university. Possible applications of satellite communication systems to several areas of public service are described, and economic and political obstacles hindering the implementation of these programs are considered. It is suggested that a federally sponsored program demonstrating the utility of satellites accomodating a large number of small terminals is needed to encourage commercial satellite operations.

  10. Land mobile satellite demonstration system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gooch, Guy M.; Nicholas, David C.

    1988-01-01

    A land mobile satellite demonstration system is described. It ulilizes the INMARSAT MARECS B2 satellite at 26 degrees W. The system provides data transmission using a poll-response protocol with error detection and retransmission at 200 b/s rate. For most tests a 1.8 inch monopole antenna was used, along with a satellite EIRP normally used for four voice channels. A brief summary of the results are given and the overall system consisting of three elements in addition to the satellite (the mobile unit, the base station, and the office terminal and map display) is described. Throughput statistics from one trip are summarized.

  11. Business Use of Satellite Communications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edelson, Burton I.; Cooper, Robert S.

    1982-01-01

    Reviews business communications development and discusses business applications of satellite communications, system technology, and prospects for future developments in digital transmission systems. (JN)

  12. Relation between the Classical Sciences and Geographic Information Systems (GIS).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petropoulou, A.

    2012-04-01

    As is already known, in recent years, the use of satellite remote sensing and GIS is a deployable occupation. With their help, we offer the opportunity to acquire knowledge through spatial, temporal, spectral and radiometric resolutions of remote sensing systems and through analysis and incorporation of data Gis. The representation of facts and results of research on the topography and geomorphology sites of archaeological interest, visualization of them with the help of modern software, is growing. The application of innovative technological methods in classical sciences was and is certainly a challenge for scientists, especially when using them to produce results that lead to understanding the history of a place. So far the formulation of conclusions from the archaeologists was with traditional practices, through sources from the extant ancient texts and by archaeological excavations. In some cases lack of data, to find the exact position of the archaeological monument needs to take place science and technology of Geoinformatics methods and techniques that enable the management of various information from anthropogenic and natural geographic area below of a single digital environment. Since that archeology examines the evolution of historical events through the geography, geomorphology, time and culture, the results of archaeological research is rich in spatial information. The Gis is an experienced program to process these large volumes of data, particularly those referred to the geomorphology. Consequently the aim of the paper is to show us that through the help of software can visualize the archaeological monuments of the region through the geomorphologic background mainly. Having as a study area the prefecture of Arcadia owned in the Peloponnese/ Greece shows the direct relation of geomorphology with archeology through the Geographic Information Systems. Keywords: Gis, Classic science, history, geomorphology and archeology

  13. Icy Satellites: Perpetual Permafrost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappalardo, R. T.; Moore, J. M.

    2003-12-01

    The ice-rich moons of the outer solar system are worlds of perpetual permafrost. By analogy to the terrestrial roles of silicates and water ice, surface materials of these worlds commonly consist of components that are respectively refractory and volatile at local environmental conditions. We consider the physical properties, volatile components, and geomorphological characteristics of outer planet satellite surfaces and shallow regoliths as analogs to permafrost environments. Near-surface temperatures of ~40 to 165 K preclude melting of water-ice, except where endogenic activity has increased surface temperatures locally. However, water and/or more volatile ices can be transported in the vapor phase, and can liquefy in the deeper subsurface. In the water-ice-poor regolith of Io, SO2 and possibly H2S are volatile ices that can be transported in the vapor phase and can liquefy at depth, resulting in degradation and local collapse of the ground surface. Sublimation degradation is especially evident in images of Callisto, where slow diffusive loss of CO2 is the likely erosive agent. On Neptune's large moon Triton, nitrogen plays the role of a permafrost volatile, near its melting temperature in a regolith of more refractory ices. Most large icy satellites probably have water-rich subsurface oceans, and it has been proposed that Europa's subsurface ocean might sustain life. Frigid surface temperatures and severe charged particle radiation preclude near-surface metabolism, but organisms could potentially survive within deeper regions and local upwelling plumes that approach the ice melting temperature.

  14. The power relay satellite

    SciTech Connect

    Glaser, P.E.

    1994-12-31

    The availability and use of renewable energy sources compatible with reducing risks to the global environment are key to sustainable development. Large-scale, renewable energy resources at undeveloped or underutilized sites are potentially available on several continents. The Power Relay Satellite (PRS) concept has the potential to access these remote energy resources by coupling primary electricity generation from terrestrial transmission lines. A global PRS network can be envisioned to provide a high degree of flexibility for supplying energy demands worldwide with wireless power transmitted from sites on Earth to geosynchronous orbit and then reflected to receivers interfacing with terrestrial power transmision networks. Past developments in wireless power transmission (WPT) are reviewed and recent successful results are noted. The origins of the PRS concept, and a possible configuration are discussed, principles of WPT at microwave frequencies, functional requirements, and system design contraints are outlined, and space transportation concepts presented. PRS assessments including applicable technologies, economic projections, and societal issues are highlighted. It is concluded that the PRS provides a promising option to access renewable resources at great distances from major markets, and represents an important stage in the future development in the future of solar power satellites.

  15. The power relay satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaser, Peter E.

    The availability and use of renewable energy sources compatible with reducing risks to the global environment are key to sustainable development. Large-scale, renewable energy resources at undeveloped or underutilized sites are potentially available on several continents. The Power Relay Satellite (PRS) concept has the potential to access these remote energy resources by coupling primary electricity generation from terrestrial transmission lines. A global PRS network can be envisioned to provide a high degree of flexibility for supplying energy demands worldwide with wireless power transmitted from sites on Earth to geosynchronous orbit and then reflected to receivers interfacing with terrestrial power transmision networks. Past developments in wireless power transmission (WPT) are reviewed and recent successful results are noted. The origins of the PRS concept, and a possible configuration are discussed, principles of WPT at microwave frequencies, functional requirements, and system design contraints are outlined, and space transportation concepts presented. PRS assessments including applicable technologies, economic projections, and societal issues are highlighted. It is concluded that the PRS provides a promising option to access renewable resources at great distances from major markets, and represents an important stage in the future development in the future of solar power satellites.

  16. Declassified Intelligence Satellite Photographs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2008-01-01

    Declassified photographs from U.S. intelligence satellites provide an important worldwide addition to the public record of the Earth’s land surface. This imagery was released to the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in accordance with Executive Order 12951 on February 23, 1995. The NARA has the original declassified film and a viewing copy. The USGS has another copy of the film to complement the Landsat archive.The declassified collection involves more than 990,000 photographs taken from 1959 through 1980 and was released on two separate occasions: February 1995 (Declass 1) and September 2002 (Declass 2). The USGS copy is maintained by the Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center, near Sioux Falls, South Dakota. Both the NARA and EROS provide public access to this unique collection that extends the record of land-surface change back another decade from the advent of the Landsat program that began satellite operations in 1972.

  17. Nonlinear atom interferometer surpasses classical precision limit.

    PubMed

    Gross, C; Zibold, T; Nicklas, E; Estève, J; Oberthaler, M K

    2010-04-22

    Interference is fundamental to wave dynamics and quantum mechanics. The quantum wave properties of particles are exploited in metrology using atom interferometers, allowing for high-precision inertia measurements. Furthermore, the state-of-the-art time standard is based on an interferometric technique known as Ramsey spectroscopy. However, the precision of an interferometer is limited by classical statistics owing to the finite number of atoms used to deduce the quantity of interest. Here we show experimentally that the classical precision limit can be surpassed using nonlinear atom interferometry with a Bose-Einstein condensate. Controlled interactions between the atoms lead to non-classical entangled states within the interferometer; this represents an alternative approach to the use of non-classical input states. Extending quantum interferometry to the regime of large atom number, we find that phase sensitivity is enhanced by 15 per cent relative to that in an ideal classical measurement. Our nonlinear atomic beam splitter follows the 'one-axis-twisting' scheme and implements interaction control using a narrow Feshbach resonance. We perform noise tomography of the quantum state within the interferometer and detect coherent spin squeezing with a squeezing factor of -8.2 dB (refs 11-15). The results provide information on the many-particle quantum state, and imply the entanglement of 170 atoms.

  18. Unraveling Quantum Annealers using Classical Hardness.

    PubMed

    Martin-Mayor, Victor; Hen, Itay

    2015-10-20

    Recent advances in quantum technology have led to the development and manufacturing of experimental programmable quantum annealing optimizers that contain hundreds of quantum bits. These optimizers, commonly referred to as 'D-Wave' chips, promise to solve practical optimization problems potentially faster than conventional 'classical' computers. Attempts to quantify the quantum nature of these chips have been met with both excitement and skepticism but have also brought up numerous fundamental questions pertaining to the distinguishability of experimental quantum annealers from their classical thermal counterparts. Inspired by recent results in spin-glass theory that recognize 'temperature chaos' as the underlying mechanism responsible for the computational intractability of hard optimization problems, we devise a general method to quantify the performance of quantum annealers on optimization problems suffering from varying degrees of temperature chaos: A superior performance of quantum annealers over classical algorithms on these may allude to the role that quantum effects play in providing speedup. We utilize our method to experimentally study the D-Wave Two chip on different temperature-chaotic problems and find, surprisingly, that its performance scales unfavorably as compared to several analogous classical algorithms. We detect, quantify and discuss several purely classical effects that possibly mask the quantum behavior of the chip.

  19. The classical model for moment tensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tape, W.; Tape, C.

    2013-12-01

    A seismic moment tensor is a description of an earthquake source, but the description is indirect. The moment tensor describes seismic radiation rather than the actual physical process that initiates the radiation. A moment tensor 'model' then ties the physical process to the moment tensor. The model is not unique, and the physical process is therefore not unique. In the classical moment tensor model (Aki and Richards, 1980), an earthquake arises from slip along a planar fault, but with the slip not necessarily in the plane of the fault. The model specifies the resulting moment tensor in terms of the slip vector, the fault normal vector, and the Lame elastic parameters, assuming isotropy. We review the classical model in the context of the fundamental lune. The lune is closely related to the space of moment tensors, and it provides a setting that is conceptually natural as well as pictorial. In addition to the classical model, we consider a crack plus double couple model (CDC model) in which a moment tensor is regarded as the sum of a crack tensor and a double couple. A compilation of full moment tensors from the literature reveals large deviations in Poisson's ratio as implied by the classical model. Either the classical model is inadequate or the published full moment tensors have very large uncertainties. We question the common interpretation of the isotropic component as a volume change in the source region.

  20. Effective dynamics of a classical point charge

    SciTech Connect

    Polonyi, Janos

    2014-03-15

    The effective Lagrangian of a point charge is derived by eliminating the electromagnetic field within the framework of the classical closed time path formalism. The short distance singularity of the electromagnetic field is regulated by an UV cutoff. The Abraham–Lorentz force is recovered and its similarity to quantum anomalies is underlined. The full cutoff-dependent linearized equation of motion is obtained, no runaway trajectories are found but the effective dynamics shows acausality if the cutoff is beyond the classical charge radius. The strength of the radiation reaction force displays a pole in its cutoff-dependence in a manner reminiscent of the Landau-pole of perturbative QED. Similarity between the dynamical breakdown of the time reversal invariance and dynamical symmetry breaking is pointed out. -- Highlights: •Extension of the classical action principle for dissipative systems. •New derivation of the Abraham–Lorentz force for a point charge. •Absence of a runaway solution of the Abraham–Lorentz force. •Acausality in classical electrodynamics. •Renormalization of classical electrodynamics of point charges.

  1. Population structure of the Classic period Maya.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Andrew K

    2007-03-01

    This study examines the population structure of Classic period (A.D. 250-900) Maya populations through analysis of odontometric variation of 827 skeletons from 12 archaeological sites in Mexico, Guatemala, Belize, and Honduras. The hypothesis that isolation by distance characterized Classic period Maya population structure is tested using Relethford and Blangero's (Hum Biol 62 (1990) 5-25) approach to R matrix analysis for quantitative traits. These results provide important biological data for understanding ancient Maya population history, particularly the effects of the competing Tikal and Calakmul hegemonies on patterns of lowland Maya site interaction. An overall F(ST) of 0.018 is found for the Maya area, indicating little among-group variation for the Classic Maya sites tested. Principal coordinates plots derived from the R matrix analysis show little regional patterning in the data, though the geographic outliers of Kaminaljuyu and a pooled Pacific Coast sample did not cluster with the lowland Maya sites. Mantel tests comparing the biological distance matrix to a geographic distance matrix found no association between genetic and geographic distance. In the Relethford-Blangero analysis, most sites possess negative or near-zero residuals, indicating minimal extraregional gene flow. The exceptions were Barton Ramie, Kaminaljuyu, and Seibal. A scaled R matrix analysis clarifies that genetic drift is a consideration for understanding Classic Maya population structure. All results indicate that isolation by distance does not describe Classic period Maya population structure.

  2. Quantum-classical crossover in electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Polonyi, Janos

    2006-09-15

    A classical field theory is proposed for the electric current and the electromagnetic field interpolating between microscopic and macroscopic domains. It represents a generalization of the density functional for the dynamics of the current and the electromagnetic field in the quantum side of the crossover and reproduces standard classical electrodynamics on the other side. The effective action derived in the closed time path formalism and the equations of motion follow from the variational principle. The polarization of the Dirac-sea can be taken into account in the quadratic approximation of the action by the introduction of the deplacement field strengths as in conventional classical electrodynamics. Decoherence appears naturally as a simple one-loop effect in this formalism. It is argued that the radiation time arrow is generated from the quantum boundary conditions in time by decoherence at the quantum-classical crossover and the Abraham-Lorentz force arises from the accelerating charge or from other charges in the macroscopic or the microscopic side, respectively. The functional form of the quantum renormalization group, the generalization of the renormalization group method for the density matrix, is proposed to follow the scale dependence through the quantum-classical crossover in a systematical manner.

  3. Enceladus: a vanishing satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czechowski, Leszek

    2014-05-01

    Enceladus, a satellite of Saturn, is the smallest celestial body in the Solar System where volcanic activity is observed. Every second, the mass of ~200 kg is ejecting into space. The size of the satellite directly after accretion (this body is referred here as proto-Enceladus) is unknown. It can be estimated in two ways. First, if the average mass outflow is equal to the present rate then the satellite's original mass was ~30% bigger than today. Second, we assume here that density of proto-Enceladus was equal to the present density of Mimas because they were formed in the same part of the nebula. Mimas is dead, so it preserves original composition. Both approaches give similar initial Enceladus' radius (~296 km) and its surface area (~1.1×106 km2). The present values are: 252 km and 7.99×105 km2. The loss of matter should lead to global compression of the crust. Typical effects of compression are: thrust faults, folding, and subduction. However, such forms are not dominant on Enceladus. We propose here special tectonic model that could explain this paradox. The volatiles escape from the hot region through the fractures forming plumes in the space. The loss of the volatiles results in a void, an instability, and motion of solid matter into hot region to fill the void in statu nascendi. The motion includes: Subsidence of the lithosphere of SPT. Flow of matter in the mantle. Motion of lithospheric plates adjacent to SPT towards the active region. If emerging void is being filled by the subsidence of SPT only, then the velocity of subsidence is ~0.05 mm·yr-1. However, all three types of motion are probably important, so the subsidence is slower but mantle flow and plates' motion also play a role in filling the void. Note that in our model reduction of the crust area is not a result of compression but it is a result of the plate sinking. Therefore the compressional surface features do not have to be dominant. Note also that we do not know the present age of the

  4. Workshop on Satellite Meteorology. Part 1; Satellite and Their Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The Workshop on Satellite Meteorology is co-sponsored by the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA) at Colorado State University and the American Meteorlogical Society's Committee on Meteorological Aspects of Aerospace Systems. The workshop covers uses of satellite data in atmospheric science. It provides state-of-the-art information to those in Universities, research groups, and other users. One area of primary focus is to provide source material to university personnel for developing and augmenting courses in satellite meteorology and the atmospheric sciences. The items in the program include information on meteorological satellites and data sources, uses of satellite imagery for all scales of weather analysis and forecasting, uses of sounding data and other radiance information and research opportunities on interactive systems. Each session is presented by a group of experts in the field and includes an open discussion of the state-of-the-art and promising areas for future development. This pre-print volume is one of three parts on the workshop. The three parts are: PART I. Satellites and Their Data; PART II. Satellite Image Analysis and Interpretation; PART III. Satellite Soundings and Their Uses.

  5. Gigabit Satellite Network for NASA's Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoder, Douglas; Bergamo, Marcos

    1996-01-01

    The advanced communication technology satellite (ACTS) gigabit satellite network provides long-haul point-to-point and point-to-multipoint full-duplex SONET services over NASA's ACTS. at rates up to 622 Mbit/s (SONET OC-12), with signal quality comparable to that obtained with terrestrial fiber networks. Data multiplexing over the satellite is accomplished using time-division multiple access (TDMA) techniques coordinated with the switching and beam hopping facilities provided by ACTS. Transmissions through the satellite are protected with Reed-Solomon encoding. providing virtually error-free transmission under most weather conditions. Unique to the system are a TDMA frame structure and satellite synchronization mechanism that allow: (a) very efficient utilization of the satellite capacity: (b) over-the-satellite dosed-loop synchronization of the network in configurations with up to 64 ground stations: and (c) ground station initial acquisition without collisions with existing signalling or data traffic. The user interfaces are compatible with SONET standards, performing the function of conventional SONET multiplexers and. as such. can be: readily integrated with standard SONET fiber-based terrestrial networks. Management of the network is based upon the simple network management protocol (SNMP). and includes an over-the-satellite signalling network and backup terrestrial internet (IP-based) connectivity. A description of the ground stations is also included.

  6. Satellite-Based Educational Services. Technical Memorandum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Operations Research, Inc., Silver Spring, MD.

    This memorandum contains engineering information relevant to the use of communication satellites for educational purposes. Information is provided for ground terminals as well as satellites. Satellite related issues addressed include: (1) expected life of service of various satellites, (2) constraints on the availability of the satellites, (3)…

  7. The Future of Satellite Communications Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nowland, Wayne

    1985-01-01

    Discusses technical advances in satellite technology since the 1960s, and the International Telecommunications Satellite Organization's role in these developments; describes how AUSSAT, Australia's domestic satellite system, exemplifies the latest developments in satellite technology; and reviews satellite system features, possible future…

  8. Sentinels in the Sky: Weather Satellites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haynes, Robert

    This publication describes forecasting weather activity using satellites. Information is included on the development of weather satellites, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Satellite System (including the polar-orbiting satellites), and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES). The publication…

  9. Exchange potentials for semi-classical electrons.

    PubMed

    Herzfeld, Judith; Ekesan, Solen

    2016-11-09

    Semi-classical electrons offer access to efficient and intuitive simulations of chemical reactions. As for any treatment of fermions, the greatest difficulty is in accounting for anti-symmetry effects. Semi-classical efforts to-date either reference Slater-determinants from ab initio treatments or adopt a heuristic approach inspired by density functional treatments. Here we revisit the problem with a combined approach. We conclude that semi-classical electrons need to reference a non-conventional wave function and find that (1) contrary to earlier suppositions, contributions from the electrostatic terms in the Hamiltonian are of similar magnitude to those from the kinetic terms and (2) the former point to a need to supplement pair potentials with 3-body potentials. The first result explains features of reported heuristic potentials, and the second provides a firm footing for extending the transferability of potentials across a wider range of elements and bonding scenarios.

  10. Non-Classical Inhibition of Carbonic Anhydrase

    PubMed Central

    Lomelino, Carrie L.; Supuran, Claudiu T.; McKenna, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Specific isoforms from the carbonic anhydrase (CA) family of zinc metalloenzymes have been associated with a variety of diseases. Isoform-specific carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (CAIs) are therefore a major focus of attention for specific disease treatments. Classical CAIs, primarily sulfonamide-based compounds and their bioisosteres, are examined as antiglaucoma, antiepileptic, antiobesity, antineuropathic pain and anticancer compounds. However, many sulfonamide compounds inhibit all CA isoforms nonspecifically, diluting drug effectiveness and causing undesired side effects due to off-target inhibition. In addition, a small but significant percentage of the general population cannot be treated with sulfonamide-based compounds due to a sulfa allergy. Therefore, CAIs must be developed that are not only isoform specific, but also non-classical, i.e. not based on sulfonamides, sulfamates, or sulfamides. This review covers the classes of non-classical CAIs and the recent advances in the development of isoform-specific inhibitors based on phenols, polyamines, coumarins and their derivatives. PMID:27438828

  11. Fractionalized Z_{2} Classical Heisenberg Spin Liquids.

    PubMed

    Rehn, J; Sen, Arnab; Moessner, R

    2017-01-27

    Quantum spin systems are by now known to exhibit a large number of different classes of spin liquid phases. By contrast, for classical Heisenberg models, only one kind of fractionalized spin liquid phase, the so-called Coulomb or U(1) spin liquid, has until recently been identified: This exhibits algebraic spin correlations and impurity moments, "orphan spins," whose size is a fraction of that of the underlying microscopic degrees of freedom. Here, we present two Heisenberg models exhibiting fractionalization in combination with exponentially decaying correlations. These can be thought of as a classical continuous spin version of a Z_{2} spin liquid. Our work suggests a systematic search and classification of classical spin liquids as a worthwhile endeavor.

  12. Machian classical and semiclassical emergent time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Classical and semiclassical schemes are presented that are timeless at the primary level and recover time from Mach’s ‘time is to be abstracted from change’ principle at the emergent secondary level. The semiclassical scheme is a Machian variant of the semiclassical approach to the problem of time in quantum gravity. The classical scheme is Barbour’s, cast here explicitly as the classical precursor of the semiclassical approach. Thus the two schemes have been married up, as equally-Machian and necessarily distinct, since the latter’s timestandard is abstracted in part from quantum change. I provide perturbative schemes for these in which the timefunction is to be determined rather than assumed. This paper is useful modelling as regards the Halliwell-Hawking arena for the quantum origin of the inhomogeneous cosmological fluctuations.

  13. Quantum approach to classical statistical mechanics.

    PubMed

    Somma, R D; Batista, C D; Ortiz, G

    2007-07-20

    We present a new approach to study the thermodynamic properties of d-dimensional classical systems by reducing the problem to the computation of ground state properties of a d-dimensional quantum model. This classical-to-quantum mapping allows us to extend the scope of standard optimization methods by unifying them under a general framework. The quantum annealing method is naturally extended to simulate classical systems at finite temperatures. We derive the rates to assure convergence to the optimal thermodynamic state using the adiabatic theorem of quantum mechanics. For simulated and quantum annealing, we obtain the asymptotic rates of T(t) approximately (pN)/(k(B)logt) and gamma(t) approximately (Nt)(-c/N), for the temperature and magnetic field, respectively. Other annealing strategies are also discussed.

  14. Classical Ising model test for quantum circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraci, Joseph; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2010-07-01

    We exploit a recently constructed mapping between quantum circuits and graphs in order to prove that circuits corresponding to certain planar graphs can be efficiently simulated classically. The proof uses an expression for the Ising model partition function in terms of quadratically signed weight enumerators (QWGTs), which are polynomials that arise naturally in an expansion of quantum circuits in terms of rotations involving Pauli matrices. We combine this expression with a known efficient classical algorithm for the Ising partition function of any planar graph in the absence of an external magnetic field, and the Robertson-Seymour theorem from graph theory. We give as an example a set of quantum circuits with a small number of non-nearest-neighbor gates which admit an efficient classical simulation.

  15. Quantum and classical optics-emerging links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberly, J. H.; Qian, Xiao-Feng; Qasimi, Asma Al; Ali, Hazrat; Alonso, M. A.; Gutiérrez-Cuevas, R.; Little, Bethany J.; Howell, John C.; Malhotra, Tanya; Vamivakas, A. N.

    2016-06-01

    Quantum optics and classical optics are linked in ways that are becoming apparent as a result of numerous recent detailed examinations of the relationships that elementary notions of optics have with each other. These elementary notions include interference, polarization, coherence, complementarity and entanglement. All of them are present in both quantum and classical optics. They have historic origins, and at least partly for this reason not all of them have quantitative definitions that are universally accepted. This makes further investigation into their engagement in optics very desirable. We pay particular attention to effects that arise from the mere co-existence of separately identifiable and readily available vector spaces. Exploitation of these vector-space relationships are shown to have unfamiliar theoretical implications and new options for observation. It is our goal to bring emerging quantum-classical links into wider view and to indicate directions in which forthcoming and future work will promote discussion and lead to unified understanding.

  16. Voice disorders in children with classic galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Potter, Nancy L

    2011-04-01

    Children with classic galactosemia are at risk for motor speech disorders resulting from disruptions in motor planning and programming (childhood apraxia of speech or CAS) or motor execution (dysarthria). In the present study of 33 children with classic galactosemia, 21% were diagnosed with CAS, 3% with ataxic dysarthria, and 3% with mixed CAS-dysarthria. Voice disorders due to laryngeal insufficiency were common in children with dysarthria and co-occurred with CAS. Most (58%) of the children with classic galactosemia had decreased respiratory-phonatory support for speech, and 33% had disturbed vocal quality that was indicative of cerebellar dysfunction. Three children, two diagnosed with CAS and one not diagnosed with a motor speech disorder, had vocal tremors. Treatment of voice dysfunction in neurogenic speech disorders is discussed.

  17. Modeling Classical Heat Conduction in FLAG

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, Scott D.; Hendon, Raymond Cori

    2015-01-12

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory FLAG code contains both electron and ion heat conduction modules; these have been constructed to be directly relevant to user application problems. However, formal code verification of these modules requires quantitative comparison to exact solutions of the underlying mathematical models. A wide variety of exact solutions to the classical heat conduction equation are available for this purpose. This report summarizes efforts involving the representation of the classical heat conduction equation as following from the large electron-ion coupling limit of the electron and ion 3T temperature equations, subject to electron and ion conduction processes. In FLAG, this limiting behavior is quantitatively verified using a simple exact solution of the classical heat conduction equation. For this test problem, both heat conduction modules produce nearly identical spatial electron and ion temperature profiles that converge at slightly less than 2nd order to the corresponding exact solution.

  18. Coarse initial orbit determination for a geostationary satellite using single-epoch GPS measurements.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ghangho; Kim, Chongwon; Kee, Changdon

    2015-04-01

    A practical algorithm is proposed for determining the orbit of a geostationary orbit (GEO) satellite using single-epoch measurements from a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver under the sparse visibility of the GPS satellites. The algorithm uses three components of a state vector to determine the satellite's state, even when it is impossible to apply the classical single-point solutions (SPS). Through consideration of the characteristics of the GEO orbital elements and GPS measurements, the components of the state vector are reduced to three. However, the algorithm remains sufficiently accurate for a GEO satellite. The developed algorithm was tested on simulated measurements from two or three GPS satellites, and the calculated maximum position error was found to be less than approximately 40 km or even several kilometers within the geometric range, even when the classical SPS solution was unattainable. In addition, extended Kalman filter (EKF) tests of a GEO satellite with the estimated initial state were performed to validate the algorithm. In the EKF, a reliable dynamic model was adapted to reduce the probability of divergence that can be caused by large errors in the initial state.

  19. Observable signatures of a classical transition

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Matthew C.; Lin, Wei E-mail: lewisweilin@gmail.com

    2016-03-01

    Eternal inflation arising from a potential landscape predicts that our universe is one realization of many possible cosmological histories. One way to access different cosmological histories is via the nucleation of bubble universes from a metastable false vacuum. Another way to sample different cosmological histories is via classical transitions, the creation of pocket universes through the collision between bubbles. Using relativistic numerical simulations, we examine the possibility of observationally determining if our observable universe resulted from a classical transition. We find that classical transitions produce spatially infinite, approximately open Friedman-Robertson-Walker universes. The leading set of observables in the aftermath of a classical transition are negative spatial curvature and a contribution to the Cosmic Microwave Background temperature quadrupole. The level of curvature and magnitude of the quadrupole are dependent on the position of the observer, and we determine the possible range of observables for two classes of single-scalar field models. For the first class, where the inflationary phase has a lower energy than the vacuum preceding the classical transition, the magnitude of the observed quadrupole generally falls to zero with distance from the collision while the spatial curvature grows to a constant. For the second class, where the inflationary phase has a higher energy than the vacuum preceding the classical transition, the magnitude of the observed quadrupole generically falls to zero with distance from the collision while the spatial curvature grows without bound. We find that the magnitude of the quadrupole and curvature grow with increasing centre of mass energy of the collision, and explore variations of the parameters in the scalar field lagrangian.

  20. Decoherence, chaos, the quantum and the classical

    SciTech Connect

    Zurek, W.H.; Paz, J.P.

    1994-04-01

    The key ideas of the environment-induced decoherence approach are reviewed. Application of decoherence to the transition from quantum to classical in open quantum systems with chaotic classical analogs is described. The arrow of time is, in this context, a result of the information loss to the correlations with the environment. The asymptotic rate of entropy production (which is reached quickly, on the dynamical timescale) is independent of the details of the coupling of the quantum system to the environment, and is set by the Lyapunov exponents. We also briefly outline the existential interpretation of quantum mechanics, justifying the slogan ``No information without representation.``

  1. Classical ultra-relativistic scattering in ADD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal'tsov, Dmitry V.; Kofinas, Georgios; Spirin, Pavel; Tomaras, Theodore N.

    2009-05-01

    The classical differential cross-section is calculated for high-energy small-angle gravitational scattering in the factorizable model with toroidal extra dimensions. The three main features of the classical computation are: (a) It involves summation over the infinite Kaluza-Klein towers but, contrary to the Born amplitude, it is finite with no need of an ultraviolet cutoff. (b) It is shown to correspond to the non-perturbative saddle-point approximation of the eikonal amplitude, obtained by the summation of an infinite number of ladder graphs of the quantum theory. (c) In the absence of extra dimensions it reproduces all previously known results.

  2. Communication: quantum dynamics in classical spin baths.

    PubMed

    Sergi, Alessandro

    2013-07-21

    A formalism for studying the dynamics of quantum systems embedded in classical spin baths is introduced. The theory is based on generalized antisymmetric brackets and predicts the presence of open-path off-diagonal geometric phases in the evolution of the density matrix. The weak coupling limit of the equation can be integrated by standard algorithms and provides a non-Markovian approach to the computer simulation of quantum systems in classical spin environments. It is expected that the theory and numerical schemes presented here have a wide applicability.

  3. Classical noise, quantum noise and secure communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tannous, C.; Langlois, J.

    2016-01-01

    Secure communication based on message encryption might be performed by combining the message with controlled noise (called pseudo-noise) as performed in spread-spectrum communication used presently in Wi-Fi and smartphone telecommunication systems. Quantum communication based on entanglement is another route for securing communications as demonstrated by several important experiments described in this work. The central role played by the photon in unifying the description of classical and quantum noise as major ingredients of secure communication systems is highlighted and described on the basis of the classical and quantum fluctuation dissipation theorems.

  4. Classical swine fever in China: a minireview.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yuzi; Li, Su; Sun, Yuan; Qiu, Hua-Ji

    2014-08-06

    Classical swine fever (CSF), caused by Classical swine fever virus (CSFV), is an OIE-listed, highly contagious, often fatal disease of swine worldwide. Currently, the disease is controlled by prophylactic vaccination in China and many other countries using the modified live vaccines derived from C-strain, which was developed in China in the mid-1950s. This minireview summarizes the epidemiology, diagnostic assays, control and challenges of CSF in China. Though CSF is essentially under control, complete eradication of CSF in China remains a challenging task and needs long-term, joint efforts of stakeholders.

  5. Quantization of soluble classical constrained systems

    SciTech Connect

    Belhadi, Z.; Menas, F.; Bérard, A.; Mohrbach, H.

    2014-12-15

    The derivation of the brackets among coordinates and momenta for classical constrained systems is a necessary step toward their quantization. Here we present a new approach for the determination of the classical brackets which does neither require Dirac’s formalism nor the symplectic method of Faddeev and Jackiw. This approach is based on the computation of the brackets between the constants of integration of the exact solutions of the equations of motion. From them all brackets of the dynamical variables of the system can be deduced in a straightforward way.

  6. The classic. Review article: Traffic accidents. 1966.

    PubMed

    Tscherne, H

    2013-09-01

    This Classic Article is a translation of the original work by Prof. Harald Tscherne, Der Straßenunfall [Traffic Accidents]. An accompanying biographical sketch of Prof. Tscherne is available at DOI 10.1007/s11999-013-3011-x . An online version of the original German article is available as supplemental material. The Classic Article is reproduced with permission from Brüder Hollinek & Co. GesmbH, Purkersdorf, Austria. The original article was published in Wien Med Wochenschr. 1966;116:105-108. (Translated by Dr. Roman Pfeifer.).

  7. Are Volume Plasmons Excitable by Classical Light?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höflich, Katja; Gösele, Ulrich; Christiansen, Silke

    2009-08-01

    Volume plasmons are collective eigenmodes of the free-electron gas inside a metal. Because of their longitudinal character and the transversal nature of light, the photoexcitation of volume plasmons is forbidden in classical electrodynamics. Nevertheless, we show their existence for metallic nanoshells using analytical solutions of the classical scattering problem. Solely for the case of a vanishing real part of the shell permittivity, a local maximum at the natural plasma frequency appears in the extinction spectra. For explaining our observations, we suggest a simple physical picture which is supported by examples on silver and gold shells.

  8. Thermodynamic integration from classical to quantum mechanics.

    PubMed

    Habershon, Scott; Manolopoulos, David E

    2011-12-14

    We present a new method for calculating quantum mechanical corrections to classical free energies, based on thermodynamic integration from classical to quantum mechanics. In contrast to previous methods, our method is numerically stable even in the presence of strong quantum delocalization. We first illustrate the method and its relationship to a well-established method with an analysis of a one-dimensional harmonic oscillator. We then show that our method can be used to calculate the quantum mechanical contributions to the free energies of ice and water for a flexible water model, a problem for which the established method is unstable.

  9. Force fields for classical molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Monticelli, Luca; Tieleman, D Peter

    2013-01-01

    In this chapter we review the basic features and the principles underlying molecular mechanics force fields commonly used in molecular modeling of biological macromolecules. We start by summarizing the historical background and then describe classical pairwise additive potential energy functions. We introduce the problem of the calculation of nonbonded interactions, of particular importance for charged macromolecules. Different parameterization philosophies are then presented, followed by a section on force field validation. We conclude with a brief overview on future perspectives for the development of classical force fields.

  10. Simulation of Pake doublet with classical spins and correspondence between the quantum and classical approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henner, Victor K.; Klots, Andrey; Belozerova, Tatyana

    2016-12-01

    Problems of interacting quantum magnetic moments become exponentially complex with increasing number of particles. As a result, classical equations are often used to model spin systems. In this paper we show that a classical spins based approach can be used to describe the phenomena essentially quantum in nature such as of the Pake doublet.

  11. Comparisons of classical chemical dynamics simulations of the unimolecular decomposition of classical and quantum microcanonical ensembles.

    PubMed

    Manikandan, Paranjothy; Hase, William L

    2012-05-14

    Previous studies have shown that classical trajectory simulations often give accurate results for short-time intramolecular and unimolecular dynamics, particularly for initial non-random energy distributions. To obtain such agreement between experiment and simulation, the appropriate distributions must be sampled to choose initial coordinates and momenta for the ensemble of trajectories. If a molecule's classical phase space is sampled randomly, its initial decomposition will give the classical anharmonic microcanonical (RRKM) unimolecular rate constant for its decomposition. For the work presented here, classical trajectory simulations of the unimolecular decomposition of quantum and classical microcanonical ensembles, at the same fixed total energy, are compared. In contrast to the classical microcanonical ensemble, the quantum microcanonical ensemble does not sample the phase space randomly. The simulations were performed for CH(4), C(2)H(5), and Cl(-)---CH(3)Br using both analytic potential energy surfaces and direct dynamics methods. Previous studies identified intrinsic RRKM dynamics for CH(4) and C(2)H(5), but intrinsic non-RRKM dynamics for Cl(-)---CH(3)Br. Rate constants calculated from trajectories obtained by the time propagation of the classical and quantum microcanonical ensembles are compared with the corresponding harmonic RRKM estimates to obtain anharmonic corrections to the RRKM rate constants. The relevance and accuracy of the classical trajectory simulation of the quantum microcanonical ensemble, for obtaining the quantum anharmonic RRKM rate constant, is discussed.

  12. Magnetopause structure from satellite observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnerup, B. U. O.

    1979-01-01

    Observations on magnetopause structure are reported. Major topics covered include: classical reconnection, transport mechanisms, magnetospheric boundary layers, tearing modes, and Jupiter's magnetopause.

  13. Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, J. W., Jr.; Arnold, C. P., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The Defense Meteorological Satellite Program is a total satellite system composed of spacecraft with meteorological sensors, an Earth-based command and control network, user stations, launch vehicle and support; with a communication network linking the various segments together. The various system segments are described.

  14. Satellite Geography: Tomorrow's Perspective Today.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiteford, Gary T.

    1985-01-01

    Advocates the implementation of satellite geography programs to increase student interest and ability in monitoring earth conditions. Recommends integration and application of remotely sensed data to all levels of the curriculum and especially in environmental education programs. Discusses future developments in satellite information systems. (ML)

  15. Satellite (IRLS) tracking of elk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buechner, H. K.

    1972-01-01

    The practicability of tracking free roaming animals in natural environments by satellite systems is reported. Satellite systems combine continuous tracking with simultaneous monitoring of physiological and environmental parameters through a combination of radio tracking and biotelemetric ground systems that lead to a better understanding of animal behavior and migration patterns.

  16. Drag-free satellite control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Debra, Daniel B.

    1989-01-01

    A drag-free satellite cancels the effect of external disturbances. Although the forces may be small, a satellite is disturbed by residual air drag, radiation pressure, micrometeorite impact, and other small forces that act on its surface disturbing its orbit, which is principally determined by the gravity field. In some missions, these small perturbations that make the satellite deviate from its purely gravitational orbit are limiting. An internal unsupported proof mass is shielded by the satellite from the external disturbances. The position of the shield (or the main part of the satellite) is measured with respect to the internal proof mass, and this information is used to actuate a propulsion system which moves the satellite to follow the proof mass. A drag-free control system is illustrated. Since the proof mass is shielded it follows a purely gravitational orbit - as does the satellite following it - hence the name drag-free satellite. The idea was conceived by Lange (1964) and has been applied to many mission studies since. In some cases, it is not necessary to cancel the disturbances, only to measure them so they may be taken into account. In such cases, an accelerometer may be a more suitable solution (for example, using the ONERA Cactus or the Bell Aerosystems MESA).

  17. Radiocommunications for meteorological satellite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, B. A.

    1975-01-01

    A general overview is presented of the spectrum utilization and frequency requirements of present and planned meteorological satellite programs. The sensors, and TIROS operational systems are discussed along with the Nimbus and Synchronous Meteorological Satellites. STORMSAT, SEASAT, and the Spacelab are briefly described.

  18. Satellite Technology Demonstration; Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federation of Rocky Mountain States, Inc., Denver, CO.

    The goal of the Satellite Technology Demonstration project (STD) was to show the feasibility of a satellite-based media system for isolated, rural populations and to test and evaluate user acceptance and the cost of various delivery modes using a variety of materials. The STD amalgamated the resources of government, health, education, and…

  19. Satellites: Teaching Technology Looks Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Philip

    1973-01-01

    A Satellite will beam career education programs to 56 rural junior high schools and 12 public broadcasting stations in eight Rocky Mountain States. Programing on health, drug education, and English as a second language will be beamed to Alaskan elementary schools. Satellite beamed programs to India are planned on improving occupations skills, food…

  20. Newspaper Uses of Satellite Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johns, David

    Replacing slower mail service, satellite transmission now gives the newspaper industry a practical and almost spontaneous method for sending all kinds of information to any newspaper across the country. Unlike other communication industries, newspapers did not begin to make widespread use of satellite technology until 1979, when government…

  1. Spacetime geodesy and the LAGEOS-3 satellite experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.A.; Chen, Kaiyou; Habib, S.; Kheyfets, A.; Holz, D.E.

    1996-04-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). LAGEOS-1 is a dense spherical satellite whose tracking accuracy is such as to yield a medium-term inertial reference frame and that is used as an adjunct to more difficult and more data-intensive absolute frame measurements. LAGEOS-3, an identical satellite to be launched into an orbit complementary to that of LAGEOS-1, would experience an equal and opposite classical precession to that of LAGEOS- 1. Besides providing a more accurate real-time measurement of the earth`s length of day and polar wobble, this paired-satellite system would provide the first direct measurement of the general relativistic frame-dragging effect. Of the five dominant error sources in this experiment, the largest one involves surface forces on the satellite and their consequent impact on the orbital nodal precession. The surface forces are a function of the spin dynamics of the satellite. We have modeled the spin dynamics of a LAGEOS-type satellite and used this spin model to estimate the impact of the thermal rocketing effect on the LAGEOS-3 experiment. We have also performed an analytic tensor expansion of Synge`s world function to better reveal the nature of the predicted frame-dragging effect. We showed that this effect is not due to the Riemann curvature tensor, but rather is a ``potential effect`` arising from the acceleration of the world lines in the Kerr spacetime geometry.

  2. Satellite Rings Movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This brief movie clip (of which the release image is a still frame), taken by NASA's Cassini spacecraft as it approached Jupiter, shows the motions, over a 16 hour-period, of two satellites embedded in Jupiter's ring. The moon Adrastea is the fainter of the two, and Metis the brighter. Images such as these will be used to refine the orbits of the two bodies.

    The movie was made from images taken during a 40-hour sequence of the Jovian ring on December 11, 2000.

    Cassini is a cooperative mission of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages Cassini for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

  3. Solar power from satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaser, P. E.

    1977-01-01

    Microwave beaming of satellite-collected solar energy to earth for conversion to useful industrial power is evaluated for feasibility, with attention given to system efficiencies and costs, ecological impact, hardware to be employed, available options for energy conversion and transmission, and orbiting and assembly. Advantages of such a power generation and conversion system are listed, plausible techniques for conversion of solar energy (thermionic, thermal electric, photovoltaic) and transmission to earth (lasers, arrays of mirrors, microwave beams) are compared. Structural fatigue likely to result from brief daily eclipses, 55% system efficiency at the present state of the art, present projections of system costs, and projected economic implications of the technology are assessed. Two-stage orbiting and assembly plans are described.

  4. Astronomy from satellite clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stachnik, R.; Labeyrie, A.

    1984-03-01

    Attention is called to the accumulating evidence that giant space telescopes, comprising a number of separate mirrors on independent satellites, are a realistic prospect for providing research tools of extraordinary power. The ESA-sponsored group and its counterpart in the US have reached remarkably similar conclusions regarding the basic configuration of extremely large synthetic-aperture devices. Both share the basic view that a cluster of spacecraft is preferable to a single monolithic structure. The emphasis of the US group has been on a mission that sweeps across as many sources as possible in the minimum time; it is referred to as SAMSI (Spacecraft Array for Michelson Spatial Interferometry). The European group has placed more emphasis on obtaining two-dimensional images. Their system is referred to as TRIO because, at least initially, it involves three independent systems. Detailed descriptions are given of the two systems.

  5. Satellite Power System (SPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edler, H. G.

    1978-01-01

    Potential organizational options for a solar power satellite system (SPS) were investigated. Selection and evaluation criteria were determined to include timeliness, reliability, and adequacy to contribute meaningfully to the U.S. supply; political feasibility (both national and international); and cost effectiveness (including environmental and other external costs). Based on these criteria, four organizational alternatives appeared to offer reasonable promise as potential options for SPS. A large number of key issues emerged as being factors which would influence the final selection process. Among these issues were a variety having to do with international law, international institutions, environmental controls, economics, operational flexibility, congressional policies, commercial-vs-governmental ownership, national dedication, and national and operational stategic issues.

  6. A satellite anemometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, W. B.; Ponzi, Ugo; Arduini, Carlo; Di Ruscio, Maurizio

    1992-01-01

    We present the conceptual design of an instrument that can provide a continuous analog measure of the pitch and yaw angles of a low altitude satellite in the frame of the neutral atmosphere. The device, which uses pressure sensor orientation to provide its signal, can function in an attitude control loop and/or be used to measure atmospheric winds or wave motions. Any arbitrary angle of attack (pitch and yaw) less than +/- 45 deg can be selected for a heading. The sensitivity of the device is 0.1 deg but this would be limited by low ambient pressure at high altitudes and by multiple particle collisions in and below the slip flow region. The development of a prototype flight unit is in progress.

  7. Capture-ejector satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macconochie, I. O.; Eldred, C. H.; Martin, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    A satellite in the form of a large rotating rim which can be used to boost spacecraft from low-Earth orbit to higher orbits is described. The rim rotates in the plane of its orbit such that the lower portion of the rim is traveling at suborbital velocity, while the upper portion is travelling at greater than orbital velocity. Ascending spacecraft or payloads arrive at the lowest portion of the rim at suborbital velocities, where the payloads are released on a trajectory for higher orbits; descending payloads employ the reverse procedure. Electric thrusters placed on the rim maintain rim rotational speed and altitude. From the standpoint of currently known materials, the capture-ejector concept may be useful for relatively small velocity increments.

  8. Alaska's giant satellite network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hills, A.

    1983-07-01

    The evolution and features of the Alaskan telecommunications network are described, with emphasis on the satellite links. The Alaskan terrain is rugged and largely unpopulated. Satcom V provides C-band (6/4 GHz) transmission with 24 transponders, each having a 40 MHz bandwidth. The Alascom company operated 105 4.5 m earth-based antennas for remote villages, which receive both telephone and television services. There are also 27 10-m dishes for regional and military applications and a 30 m dish, one of three dishes for links to the centerminous U.S. Currently, half the villages have private and business telephone communications facilities and 200 villages have access to two television stations, one educational, one entertainment. Teleconferencing is possible for government and educational purposes, and discussions are underway with NASA to establish a mobile radio communications capacity.

  9. Polar research from satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Robert H.

    1991-01-01

    In the polar regions and climate change section, the topics of ocean/atmosphere heat transfer, trace gases, surface albedo, and response to climate warming are discussed. The satellite instruments section is divided into three parts. Part one is about basic principles and covers, choice of frequencies, algorithms, orbits, and remote sensing techniques. Part two is about passive sensors and covers microwave radiometers, medium-resolution visible and infrared sensors, advanced very high resolution radiometers, optical line scanners, earth radiation budget experiment, coastal zone color scanner, high-resolution imagers, and atmospheric sounding. Part three is about active sensors and covers synthetic aperture radar, radar altimeters, scatterometers, and lidar. There is also a next decade section that is followed by a summary and recommendations section.

  10. Enceladus: a vanishing satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czechowski, Leszek

    Enceladus, a satellite of Saturn, is the smallest celestial body in the Solar System where volcanic activity is observed. Every second, the mass of 200 kg is ejecting into space. The size of the satellite directly after accretion (this body is referred here as proto-Enceladus) is unknown. It can be estimated in two ways. First, if the average mass outflow is equal to the present rate then the satellite’s original mass was 30% bigger than today. Second, we assume here that density of proto-Enceladus was equal to the present density of Mimas because they were formed in the same part of the nebula. Mimas is dead, so it preserves original composition. Both approaches give similar initial Enceladus’ radius ( 296 km) and its surface area ( 1.1×106 km2). The present values are: 252 km and 7.99×105 km2. The loss of matter should lead to global compression of the crust. Typical effects of compression are: thrust faults, folding, and subduction. However, such forms are not dominant on Enceladus. We propose here special tectonic model that could explain this paradox. The volatiles escape from the hot region through the fractures forming plumes in the space. The loss of the volatiles results in a void, an instability, and motion of solid matter into hot region to fill the void in statu nascendi. The motion includes: (i) Subsidence of the lithosphere of SPT. (ii) Flow of matter in the mantle. (iii) Motion of lithospheric plates adjacent to SPT towards the active region. If emerging void is being filled by the subsidence of SPT only, then the velocity of subsidence is 0.05 mm·yr-1. However, all three types of motion are probably important, so the subsidence is slower but mantle flow and plates’ motion also play a role in filling the void. Note that in our model reduction of the crust area is not a result of compression but it is a result of the plate sinking. Therefore the compressional surface features do not have to be dominant. Note also that we do not know the

  11. Icy Satellites of Saturn: Impact Cratering and Age Determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dones, L.; Chapman, C. R.; McKinnon, William B.; Melosh, H. J.; Kirchoff, M. R.; Neukum, G.; Zahnle, K. J.

    2009-01-01

    Saturn is the first giant planet to be visited by an orbiting spacecraft that can transmit large amounts of data to Earth. Crater counts on satellites from Phoebe inward to the regular satellites and ring moons are providing unprecedented insights into the origin and time histories of the impacting populations. Many Voyager-era scientists concluded that the satellites had been struck by at least two populations of impactors. In this view, the Population I impactors, which were generally judged to be comets orbiting the Sun, formed most of the larger and older craters, while Population II impactors, interpreted as Saturn-orbiting ejecta from impacts on satellites, produced most of the smaller and younger craters. Voyager data also implied that all of the ring moons, and probably some of the midsized classical moons, had been catastrophically disrupted and reaccreted since they formed. We examine models of the primary impactor populations in the Saturn system. At the present time, ecliptic comets, which likely originate in the Kuiper belt/scattered disk, are predicted to dominate impacts on the regular satellites and ring moons, but the models require extrapolations in size (from the observed Kuiper belt objects to the much smaller bodies that produce the craters) or in distance (from the known active Jupiter family comets to 9.5 AU). Phoebe, Iapetus, and perhaps even moons closer to Saturn have been struck by irregular satellites as well. We describe the Nice model, which provides a plausible mechanism by which the entire Solar System might have experienced an era of heavy bombardment long after the planets formed. We then discuss the three cratering chronologies, including one based upon the Nice model, that have been used to infer surface ages from crater densities on the saturnian satellites. After reviewing scaling relations between the properties of impactors and the craters they produce, we provide model estimates of the present-day rate at which comets impact

  12. Advanced satellite communication system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staples, Edward J.; Lie, Sen

    1992-05-01

    The objective of this research program was to develop an innovative advanced satellite receiver/demodulator utilizing surface acoustic wave (SAW) chirp transform processor and coherent BPSK demodulation. The algorithm of this SAW chirp Fourier transformer is of the Convolve - Multiply - Convolve (CMC) type, utilizing off-the-shelf reflective array compressor (RAC) chirp filters. This satellite receiver, if fully developed, was intended to be used as an on-board multichannel communications repeater. The Advanced Communications Receiver consists of four units: (1) CMC processor, (2) single sideband modulator, (3) demodulator, and (4) chirp waveform generator and individual channel processors. The input signal is composed of multiple user transmission frequencies operating independently from remotely located ground terminals. This signal is Fourier transformed by the CMC Processor into a unique time slot for each user frequency. The CMC processor is driven by a waveform generator through a single sideband (SSB) modulator. The output of the coherent demodulator is composed of positive and negative pulses, which are the envelopes of the chirp transform processor output. These pulses correspond to the data symbols. Following the demodulator, a logic circuit reconstructs the pulses into data, which are subsequently differentially decoded to form the transmitted data. The coherent demodulation and detection of BPSK signals derived from a CMC chirp transform processor were experimentally demonstrated and bit error rate (BER) testing was performed. To assess the feasibility of such advanced receiver, the results were compared with the theoretical analysis and plotted for an average BER as a function of signal-to-noise ratio. Another goal of this SBIR program was the development of a commercial product. The commercial product developed was an arbitrary waveform generator. The successful sales have begun with the delivery of the first arbitrary waveform generator.

  13. Advanced satellite communication system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staples, Edward J.; Lie, Sen

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this research program was to develop an innovative advanced satellite receiver/demodulator utilizing surface acoustic wave (SAW) chirp transform processor and coherent BPSK demodulation. The algorithm of this SAW chirp Fourier transformer is of the Convolve - Multiply - Convolve (CMC) type, utilizing off-the-shelf reflective array compressor (RAC) chirp filters. This satellite receiver, if fully developed, was intended to be used as an on-board multichannel communications repeater. The Advanced Communications Receiver consists of four units: (1) CMC processor, (2) single sideband modulator, (3) demodulator, and (4) chirp waveform generator and individual channel processors. The input signal is composed of multiple user transmission frequencies operating independently from remotely located ground terminals. This signal is Fourier transformed by the CMC Processor into a unique time slot for each user frequency. The CMC processor is driven by a waveform generator through a single sideband (SSB) modulator. The output of the coherent demodulator is composed of positive and negative pulses, which are the envelopes of the chirp transform processor output. These pulses correspond to the data symbols. Following the demodulator, a logic circuit reconstructs the pulses into data, which are subsequently differentially decoded to form the transmitted data. The coherent demodulation and detection of BPSK signals derived from a CMC chirp transform processor were experimentally demonstrated and bit error rate (BER) testing was performed. To assess the feasibility of such advanced receiver, the results were compared with the theoretical analysis and plotted for an average BER as a function of signal-to-noise ratio. Another goal of this SBIR program was the development of a commercial product. The commercial product developed was an arbitrary waveform generator. The successful sales have begun with the delivery of the first arbitrary waveform generator.

  14. 30 GHz Commercial Satellite Receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Ponchak, George E.; Romanofsky, Robert R.

    1989-01-01

    NASA's research and development work in satellite communications for the past 10 years has included a major technology thrust aimed at opening the Ka frequency band to commercial exploitation. This has included the development and testing of advanced system network architectures, on-board switching and processing, multibeam and phased array antennas, and satellite and ground terminal RF and digital hardware. Development work in system hardware has focused on critical components including power amplifiers, satellite IF switch matrices, low noise receivers, baseband processors, and high data rate bandwidth efficient modems. This paper describes NASA's work in developing and testing 30 GHz low noise satellite receivers for commercial space communications uplink applications. Frequencies allotted for fixed service commercial satellite communications in the Ka band are 27.5 - 30.0 GHz for uplink transmission and 17.7 - 20.2 GHz for downlink transmission. The relatively large 2.5 GHz bandwidth lends itself to wideband, high data rate digital transmission applications.

  15. Cratering of the Uranian satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinnon, William B.; Chapman, Clark R.; Housen, Kevin R.

    Available crater counts and their interpretations are reviewed, with emphasis on essential scaling considerations and comparisons with hypotheses developed for interpreting the cratering records on other planets and satellites. New approaches are employed to scaling based on new measurements of crater depths and morphology, which show craters in ice to be unexpectedly different from those in rock. It is found that the published crater counts on the Uranian satellites, despite mutual inconsistencies, can be interpreted as compatible with cratering by the heliocentric population of cometary bodies that was responsible for much of the cratering of the satellites of Jupiter and Saturn. Scaling arguments are applied to the catastrophic breakup of icy satellites and ring particles. The importance of large-scale collisions in disrupting the inner Uranian satellites is found to depend on the shape of the size distribution of cometary bodies at large sizes.

  16. Land mobile satellite system requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiesling, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    A Land Mobile Satellite System (LMSS) provides voice, data and related communications services to moving vehicles and persons. Communications between the mobiles and satellite are in the 806-890 MHz band. The satellite translates these signals to a ""fixed services band'' such as 14/12 GHz band (Ku-band), and communicates in this band with fixed terminals called gateways. The gateways are located at convenient places such as telephone switches (which provide entry into the national telephone system), dispatcher headquarters, computer centers, etc. Communications are therefore principally mobile to fixed. A third communications link, also at Ku-band, is needed between the satellite and a single fixed ground station. This link provides satellite command, telemetry and ranging and also provides a network control function. The latter, through a common signalling system, receives requests and assigns channel slots, and otherwise controls, monitors and polices the network and collects billing information.

  17. Direct Broadcast Satellite: Radio Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollansworth, James E.

    1992-01-01

    NASA is committed to providing technology development that leads to the introduction of new commercial applications for communications satellites. The Direct Broadcast Satellite-Radio (DBS-R) Program is a joint effort between The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and The United States Information Agency/Voice of America (USIA/VOA) directed at this objective. The purpose of this program is to define the service and develop the technology for a direct-to-listener satellite sound broadcasting system. The DBS-R Program, as structured by NASA and VOA, is now a three-phase program designed to help the U.S. commercial communications satellite and receiver industry bring about this new communications service. Major efforts are being directed towards frequency planning hardware and service development, service demonstration, and experimentation with new satellite and receiver technology.

  18. The APL satellite refrigerator program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leffel, C. S., Jr.; Vonbriesen, R.

    1981-07-01

    Four satellite refrigerators were built and installed on a satellite to cool gamma ray spectrometers. The p-78-1 satellite, launched on February 24, 1979, was the first satellite to carry gamma ray detectors that were cooled by mechanical refrigerators. Still operating successfully after over 18 months in orbit, this is the first satellite experiment of any kind on which mechanical refrigerators have been operated for longer than a few weeks. This report describes the selection and specifications of the refrigerators as determined by APL and Lockheed, the design and construction of the refrigerators by Philips Laboratories, the design and construction of the motor drive and instrumentation electronics by APL, the APL qualification and acceptance test programs, and the APL laboratory life test program. The orbital performance of the refrigerators is discussed.

  19. Cratering of the Uranian satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckinnon, William B.; Chapman, Clark R.; Housen, Kevin R.

    1991-01-01

    Available crater counts and their interpretations are reviewed, with emphasis on essential scaling considerations and comparisons with hypotheses developed for interpreting the cratering records on other planets and satellites. New approaches are employed to scaling based on new measurements of crater depths and morphology, which show craters in ice to be unexpectedly different from those in rock. It is found that the published crater counts on the Uranian satellites, despite mutual inconsistencies, can be interpreted as compatible with cratering by the heliocentric population of cometary bodies that was responsible for much of the cratering of the satellites of Jupiter and Saturn. Scaling arguments are applied to the catastrophic breakup of icy satellites and ring particles. The importance of large-scale collisions in disrupting the inner Uranian satellites is found to depend on the shape of the size distribution of cometary bodies at large sizes.

  20. A human factors approach to range scheduling for satellite control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Cameron H. G.; Aitken, Donald J.

    1991-01-01

    Range scheduling for satellite control presents a classical problem: supervisory control of a large-scale dynamic system, with unwieldy amounts of interrelated data used as inputs to the decision process. Increased automation of the task, with the appropriate human-computer interface, is highly desirable. The development and user evaluation of a semi-automated network range scheduling system is described. The system incorporates a synergistic human-computer interface consisting of a large screen color display, voice input/output, a 'sonic pen' pointing device, a touchscreen color CRT, and a standard keyboard. From a human factors standpoint, this development represents the first major improvement in almost 30 years to the satellite control network scheduling task.

  1. Analysis on the long term orbital evolution of Molniya satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ting-Lei; Zhao, Chang-Yin; Wang, Hong-Bo; Zhang, Ming-Jiang

    2015-06-01

    Long term evolution of the Molniya satellites are investigated by means of historical data analysis, theoretical analysis and numerical integration. Both the mean motion resonance problem and the critical inclination problem are studied. The period and the amplitude of the semi-major axis for each satellite are obtained analytically and compared with the observational data. In addition, the reason of the observed sudden changes in the center and the amplitude of the oscillating semi-major axes is determined as the effect of the atmosphere drag. For the long period perigee motion, the dominant perturbations come from the luni-solar gravity. A two-degree-of freedom system is established by adding the two periodic terms of the neighbor resonances to the Hamiltonian of the classical single resonance model. In theory, the resulting resonance overlap model is responsible for the chaotic layer between the libration region and the circulation region. In practice, it is applied to explain the quick decay of the earliest Molniya satellites and to study the satellites that still orbiting the Earth at present.

  2. The Communications Satellite as Educational Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Peter

    1982-01-01

    Drawing on the experiences of several countries, the author describes satellite technology, discusses the feasibility of satellite use in traditional educational institutions, and analyzes the role of satellites in social development. (SK)

  3. Unraveling Quantum Annealers using Classical Hardness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Mayor, Victor; Hen, Itay

    2015-10-01

    Recent advances in quantum technology have led to the development and manufacturing of experimental programmable quantum annealing optimizers that contain hundreds of quantum bits. These optimizers, commonly referred to as ‘D-Wave’ chips, promise to solve practical optimization problems potentially faster than conventional ‘classical’ computers. Attempts to quantify the quantum nature of these chips have been met with both excitement and skepticism but have also brought up numerous fundamental questions pertaining to the distinguishability of experimental quantum annealers from their classical thermal counterparts. Inspired by recent results in spin-glass theory that recognize ‘temperature chaos’ as the underlying mechanism responsible for the computational intractability of hard optimization problems, we devise a general method to quantify the performance of quantum annealers on optimization problems suffering from varying degrees of temperature chaos: A superior performance of quantum annealers over classical algorithms on these may allude to the role that quantum effects play in providing speedup. We utilize our method to experimentally study the D-Wave Two chip on different temperature-chaotic problems and find, surprisingly, that its performance scales unfavorably as compared to several analogous classical algorithms. We detect, quantify and discuss several purely classical effects that possibly mask the quantum behavior of the chip.

  4. Can Communicative Principles Enhance Classical Language Acquisition?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Overland, Paul; Fields, Lee; Noonan, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Is it feasible for nonfluent instructors to teach Biblical Hebrew by communicative principles? If it is feasible, will communicative instruction enhance postsecondary learning of a classical language? To begin answering these questions, two consultants representing second language acquisition (SLA) and technology-assisted language learning led 8…

  5. Using CAS to Solve Classical Mathematics Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Maurice J.; Burroughs, Elizabeth A.

    2009-01-01

    Historically, calculus has displaced many algebraic methods for solving classical problems. This article illustrates an algebraic method for finding the zeros of polynomial functions that is closely related to Newton's method (devised in 1669, published in 1711), which is encountered in calculus. By exploring this problem, precalculus students…

  6. Comparison of Classical and Quantum Mechanical Uncertainties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peslak, John, Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Comparisons are made for the particle-in-a-box, the harmonic oscillator, and the one-electron atom. A classical uncertainty principle is derived and compared with its quantum-mechanical counterpart. The results are discussed in terms of the statistical interpretation of the uncertainty principle. (Author/BB)

  7. Entanglement in Quantum-Classical Hybrid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail

    2011-01-01

    It is noted that the phenomenon of entanglement is not a prerogative of quantum systems, but also occurs in other, non-classical systems such as quantum-classical hybrids, and covers the concept of entanglement as a special type of global constraint imposed upon a broad class of dynamical systems. Application of hybrid systems for physics of life, as well as for quantum-inspired computing, has been outlined. In representing the Schroedinger equation in the Madelung form, there is feedback from the Liouville equation to the Hamilton-Jacobi equation in the form of the quantum potential. Preserving the same topology, the innovators replaced the quantum potential with other types of feedback, and investigated the property of these hybrid systems. A function of probability density has been introduced. Non-locality associated with a global geometrical constraint that leads to an entanglement effect was demonstrated. Despite such a quantum like characteristic, the hybrid can be of classical scale and all the measurements can be performed classically. This new emergence of entanglement sheds light on the concept of non-locality in physics.

  8. Selected topics from classical bacterial genetics.

    PubMed

    Raleigh, Elisabeth A; Elbing, Karen; Brent, Roger

    2002-08-01

    Current cloning technology exploits many facts learned from classical bacterial genetics. This unit covers those that are critical to understanding the techniques described in this book. Topics include antibiotics, the LAC operon, the F factor, nonsense suppressors, genetic markers, genotype and phenotype, DNA restriction, modification and methylation and recombination.

  9. Unraveling a classical mechanics brain twister

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paris, Norman; Broide, Michael L.

    2011-12-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of an intriguing classical mechanics problem involving the coupled motion of two blocks. The problem illustrates fundamental physics concepts and theoretical techniques. We solve the equations of motion numerically and gain insight into common misconceptions about this system. The problem provides rich opportunities for student investigations using analytical and numerical methods.

  10. The classical pion field in a nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripka, Georges

    2008-12-01

    A self-consistent symmetry arises when the nucleon angular momentum j and the isospin t are coupled to a grand spin G. Closed G shells become sources of a classical pion field with a hedgehog shape. Although the amplitude of the pion field, as measured by the chiral angle, is small, it is found to perturb significantly the energies of the nucleon orbits.

  11. Concerning gauge field fluctuations around classical configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, Dennis D.

    2009-05-15

    We treat the fluctuations of non-Abelian gauge fields around a classical configuration by means of a transformation from the Yang-Mills gauge field to a homogeneously transforming field variable. We use the formalism to compute the effective action induced by these fluctuations in a static background without Wu-Yang ambiguity.

  12. Essays on Classical Rhetoric and Modern Discourse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, Robert J., Ed.; And Others

    Noting the rediscovery by composition scholars of the tradition of classical rhetoric, this collection of essays explores the resurgence in the teaching of written discourse in college English departments. The 18 articles and their authors are as follows: (1) "The Revival of Rhetoric in America," by Robert Connors, Lisa Ede, and Andrea…

  13. Medical and rehabilitation issues in classical ballet.

    PubMed

    Stretanski, Michael F; Weber, G J

    2002-05-01

    Classical ballet is a demanding professional occupation, with participants who are often underserved in terms of accurate diagnosis and appropriate comprehensive medical care. The view that follows is designed to be as global and insightful as published to date. Specific rehabilitation considerations, dance mechanics, idiosyncratic differential diagnosis, and personality and equipment issues are discussed, and a rational view of dogma is presented.

  14. The Oxford Treasury of Classic Poems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Michael, Ed.; Stuart-Clark, Christopher, Ed.

    This book contains over 90 classic poems for children. The collection of poems includes nonsense verse by Lear and Carroll, story poems by Tennyson and Keats, and humorous poems by Belloc and Betjeman. The collection also includes poems by modern poets, such as Charles Causley, Ted Hughes, John Agard, Roger McGough, and Stevie Smith. The…

  15. Foreign Language, the Classics, and College Admissions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaFleur, Richard A.

    1993-01-01

    This article reports the results of a survey, funded by the American Classical League (ACL) and conducted during 1990-91, that assessed attitudes toward high school foreign-language study, in particular the study of Latin and Greek, in the college admissions process. (21 references) (VWL)

  16. Gender and the Classics Curriculum: A Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blundell, Sue

    2009-01-01

    A survey was carried out in 2006 of all the UK universities where Classics and Ancient History degrees are taught at undergraduate level. The results reveal that nearly half of these courses include at least one dedicated gender module, and that the great majority also have gender embedded in the content of modules dealing with other topics.…

  17. Classical Pragmatism on Mind and Rationality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maattanen, Pentti

    2005-01-01

    One of the major changes in twentieth century philosophy was the so-called linguistic turn, in which natural and formal languages became central subjects of study. This meant that theories of meaning became mostly about linguistic meaning, thinking was now analyzed in terms of symbol manipulation, and rules of classical logic formed the nucleus of…

  18. Classic hallucinogens in the treatment of addictions.

    PubMed

    Bogenschutz, Michael P; Johnson, Matthew W

    2016-01-04

    Addictive disorders are very common and have devastating individual and social consequences. Currently available treatment is moderately effective at best. After many years of neglect, there is renewed interest in potential clinical uses for classic hallucinogens in the treatment of addictions and other behavioral health conditions. In this paper we provide a comprehensive review of both historical and recent clinical research on the use of classic hallucinogens in the treatment of addiction, selectively review other relevant research concerning hallucinogens, and suggest directions for future research. Clinical trial data are very limited except for the use of LSD in the treatment of alcoholism, where a meta-analysis of controlled trials has demonstrated a consistent and clinically significant beneficial effect of high-dose LSD. Recent pilot studies of psilocybin-assisted treatment of nicotine and alcohol dependence had strikingly positive outcomes, but controlled trials will be necessary to evaluate the efficacy of these treatments. Although plausible biological mechanisms have been proposed, currently the strongest evidence is for the role of mystical or other meaningful experiences as mediators of therapeutic effects. Classic hallucinogens have an excellent record of safety in the context of clinical research. Given our limited understanding of the clinically relevant effects of classic hallucinogens, there is a wealth of opportunities for research that could contribute important new knowledge and potentially lead to valuable new treatments for addiction.

  19. Metal Ion Modeling Using Classical Mechanics.

    PubMed

    Li, Pengfei; Merz, Kenneth M

    2017-02-08

    Metal ions play significant roles in numerous fields including chemistry, geochemistry, biochemistry, and materials science. With computational tools increasingly becoming important in chemical research, methods have emerged to effectively face the challenge of modeling metal ions in the gas, aqueous, and solid phases. Herein, we review both quantum and classical modeling strategies for metal ion-containing systems that have been developed over the past few decades. This Review focuses on classical metal ion modeling based on unpolarized models (including the nonbonded, bonded, cationic dummy atom, and combined models), polarizable models (e.g., the fluctuating charge, Drude oscillator, and the induced dipole models), the angular overlap model, and valence bond-based models. Quantum mechanical studies of metal ion-containing systems at the semiempirical, ab initio, and density functional levels of theory are reviewed as well with a particular focus on how these methods inform classical modeling efforts. Finally, conclusions and future prospects and directions are offered that will further enhance the classical modeling of metal ion-containing systems.

  20. The Strange World of Classical Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, David

    2010-01-01

    We have heard many times that the commonsense world of classical physics was shattered by Einstein's revelation of the laws of relativity. This is certainly true; the shift from our everyday notions of time and space to those revealed by relativity is one of the greatest stretches the mind can make. What is seldom appreciated is that the laws of…

  1. Metal Ion Modeling Using Classical Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Metal ions play significant roles in numerous fields including chemistry, geochemistry, biochemistry, and materials science. With computational tools increasingly becoming important in chemical research, methods have emerged to effectively face the challenge of modeling metal ions in the gas, aqueous, and solid phases. Herein, we review both quantum and classical modeling strategies for metal ion-containing systems that have been developed over the past few decades. This Review focuses on classical metal ion modeling based on unpolarized models (including the nonbonded, bonded, cationic dummy atom, and combined models), polarizable models (e.g., the fluctuating charge, Drude oscillator, and the induced dipole models), the angular overlap model, and valence bond-based models. Quantum mechanical studies of metal ion-containing systems at the semiempirical, ab initio, and density functional levels of theory are reviewed as well with a particular focus on how these methods inform classical modeling efforts. Finally, conclusions and future prospects and directions are offered that will further enhance the classical modeling of metal ion-containing systems. PMID:28045509

  2. On the emergence of classical gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larjo, Klaus

    In this thesis I will discuss how certain black holes arise as an effective, thermodynamical description from non-singular microstates in string theory. This provides a possible solution to the information paradox, and strengthens the case for treating black holes as thermodynamical objects. I will characterize the data defining a microstate of a black hole in several settings, and demonstrate that most of the data is unmeasurable for a classical observer. I will further show that the data that is measurable is universal for nearly all microstates, making it impossible for a classical observer to distinguish between microstates, thus giving rise to an effective statistical description for the black hole. In the first half of the thesis I will work with two specific systems: the half-BPS sector of [Special characters omitted.] = 4 super Yang-Mills the and the conformal field theory corresponding to the D1/D5 system; in both cases the high degree of symmetry present provides great control over potentially intractable computations. For these systems, I will further specify the conditions a quantum mechanical microstate must satisfy in order to have a classical description in terms of a unique metric, and define a 'metric operator' whose eigenstates correspond to classical geometries. In the second half of the thesis I will consider a much broader setting, general [Special characters omitted.] = I superconformal quiver gauge the= ories and their dual gravity theories, and demonstrate that a similar effective description arises also in this setting.

  3. Maxwell and the classical wave particle dualism.

    PubMed

    Mendonça, J T

    2008-05-28

    Maxwell's equations are one of the greatest theoretical achievements in physics of all times. They have survived three successive theoretical revolutions, associated with the advent of relativity, quantum mechanics and modern quantum field theory. In particular, they provide the theoretical framework for the understanding of the classical wave particle dualism.

  4. Louis Guttman's Contributions to Classical Test Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman, Donald W.; Williams, Richard H.; Zumbo, Bruno D.; Ross, Donald

    2005-01-01

    This article focuses on Louis Guttman's contributions to the classical theory of educational and psychological tests, one of the lesser known of his many contributions to quantitative methods in the social sciences. Guttman's work in this field provided a rigorous mathematical basis for ideas that, for many decades after Spearman's initial work,…

  5. Classic Readers Theatre for Young Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barchers, Suzanne I.; Kroll, Jennifer L.

    This book presents 16 original scripts that have been adapted from classic works of literature for use for readers theatre with young adults and ESL (English as a Second Language) students. Adaptations of the following works are included: "Little Women" (Louisa May Alcott); episodes from "Don Quixote" (Miguel de Cervantes; "The Necklace" (Guy de…

  6. Unified classical path theories of pressure broadening.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bottcher, C.

    1971-01-01

    Derivation of a unified classical path theory of pressure broadening, using only elementary concepts. It is shown that the theory of Smith, Cooper and Vidal (1969) is only correct at all frequencies to first order in the number density of perturbers.

  7. An Approach to Teaching Classical Chinese Poetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hung, Ming-shui

    1980-01-01

    English translations can be used to teach classical Chinese poetry to students above the intermediate level who have a limited vocabulary. To overcome this deficiency, and to bridge the gap between vernacular and literary Chinese, several texts are suggested. Examples are given to show the benefit of English translations. (PJM)

  8. Unraveling Quantum Annealers using Classical Hardness

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Mayor, Victor; Hen, Itay

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in quantum technology have led to the development and manufacturing of experimental programmable quantum annealing optimizers that contain hundreds of quantum bits. These optimizers, commonly referred to as ‘D-Wave’ chips, promise to solve practical optimization problems potentially faster than conventional ‘classical’ computers. Attempts to quantify the quantum nature of these chips have been met with both excitement and skepticism but have also brought up numerous fundamental questions pertaining to the distinguishability of experimental quantum annealers from their classical thermal counterparts. Inspired by recent results in spin-glass theory that recognize ‘temperature chaos’ as the underlying mechanism responsible for the computational intractability of hard optimization problems, we devise a general method to quantify the performance of quantum annealers on optimization problems suffering from varying degrees of temperature chaos: A superior performance of quantum annealers over classical algorithms on these may allude to the role that quantum effects play in providing speedup. We utilize our method to experimentally study the D-Wave Two chip on different temperature-chaotic problems and find, surprisingly, that its performance scales unfavorably as compared to several analogous classical algorithms. We detect, quantify and discuss several purely classical effects that possibly mask the quantum behavior of the chip. PMID:26483257

  9. The Classical Version of Stokes' Theorem Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markvorsen, Steen

    2008-01-01

    Using only fairly simple and elementary considerations--essentially from first year undergraduate mathematics--we show how the classical Stokes' theorem for any given surface and vector field in R[superscript 3] follows from an application of Gauss' divergence theorem to a suitable modification of the vector field in a tubular shell around the…

  10. Fertility preservation in female classic galactosemia patients.

    PubMed

    van Erven, Britt; Gubbels, Cynthia S; van Golde, Ron J; Dunselman, Gerard A; Derhaag, Josien G; de Wert, Guido; Geraedts, Joep P; Bosch, Annet M; Treacy, Eileen P; Welt, Corrine K; Berry, Gerard T; Rubio-Gozalbo, M Estela

    2013-07-16

    Almost every female classic galactosemia patient develops primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) as a diet-independent complication of the disease. This is a major concern for patients and their parents, and physicians are often asked about possible options to preserve fertility. Unfortunately, there are no recommendations on fertility preservation in this group. The unique pathophysiology of classic galactosemia with a severely reduced follicle pool at an early age requires an adjusted approach. In this article recommendations for physicians based on current knowledge concerning galactosemia and fertility preservation are made. Fertility preservation is only likely to be successful in very young prepubertal patients. In this group, cryopreservation of ovarian tissue is currently the only available technique. However, this technique is not ready for clinical application, it is considered experimental and reduces the ovarian reserve. Fertility preservation at an early age also raises ethical questions that should be taken into account. In addition, spontaneous conception despite POI is well described in classic galactosemia. The uncertainty surrounding fertility preservation and the significant chance of spontaneous pregnancy warrant counseling towards conservative application of these techniques. We propose that fertility preservation should only be offered with appropriate institutional research ethics approval to classic galactosemia girls at a young prepubertal age.

  11. Studying the Leaders of Classical Antiquity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moritz, Helen E.

    This paper describes a graduate seminar for educational administrators, using works of ancient Greek and Roman literature as bases for the consideration of organization and leadership problems identified in theoretical literature. The seminar was team taught by professors from the Departments of Educational Administration and Classics at the…

  12. Classical enhancement of quantum vacuum fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lorenci, V. A.; Ford, L. H.

    2017-01-01

    We propose a mechanism for the enhancement of vacuum fluctuations by means of a classical field. The basic idea is that if an observable quantity depends quadratically upon a quantum field, such as the electric field, then the application of a classical field produces a cross term between the classical and quantum fields. This cross term may be significantly larger than the purely quantum part, but also undergoes fluctuations driven by the quantum field. We illustrate this effect in a model for light-cone fluctuations involving pulses in a nonlinear dielectric. Vacuum electric field fluctuations produce fluctuations in the speed of a probe pulse, and form an analog model for quantum gravity effects. If the material has a nonzero third-order susceptibility, then the fractional light speed fluctuations are proportional to the square of the fluctuating electric field. Hence the application of a classical electric field can enhance the speed fluctuations. We give an example where this enhancement can be an increase of 1 order of magnitude, increasing the possibility of observing the effect.

  13. Lunar Orbit Stability for Small Satellite Mission Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dono, Andres

    2015-01-01

    The irregular nature of the lunar gravity field will severely affect the orbit lifetime and behavior of future lunar small satellite missions. These spacecraft need stable orbits that do not require large deltaV budgets for station-keeping maneuvers. The initial classical elements of any lunar orbit are critical to address its stability and to comply with mission requirements. This publication identifies stable regions according to different initial conditions at the time of lunar orbit insertion (LOI). High fidelity numerical simulations with two different gravity models were performed. We focus in low altitude orbits where the dominant force in orbit propagation is the existence of unevenly distributed lunar mass concentrations. These orbits follow a periodic oscillation in some of the classical elements that is particularly useful for mission design. A set of orbital maintenance strategies for various mission concepts is presented.

  14. The exterior tidal potential acting on a satellite. [satellite orbits/satellite perturbation - gravitation effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musen, P.

    1975-01-01

    A theory is presented that points out the existence of several long period and 'cross effects' in the coefficients in the expansion of the geopotential and in the motion of satellites. The tidal potential, defined as small periodic variations in the geopotential, was calculated. The influence of these geopotential variations on satellite perturbation is examined. Spherical harmonics were employed.

  15. Adaptive sliding mode control of tethered satellite deployment with input limitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zhiqiang; Sun, Guanghui

    2016-10-01

    This paper proposes a novel adaptive sliding mode tension control method for the deployment of tethered satellite, where the input tension limitation is taken into account. The underactuated governing equations of the tethered satellites system are firstly derived based on Lagrangian mechanics theory. Considering the fact that the tether can only resist axial stretching, the tension input is modelled as input limitation. New adaptive sliding mode laws are addressed to guarantee the stability of the tethered satellite deployment with input disturbance, meanwhile to eliminate the effect of the limitation features of the tension input. Compared with the classic control strategy, the newly proposed adaptive sliding mode control law can deploy the satellite with smaller overshoot of the in-plane angle and implement the tension control reasonably and effectively in engineering practice. The numerical results validate the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  16. The Galilean Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    In this 'family portrait,' the four Galilean Satellites are shown to scale. These four largest moons of Jupiter shown in increasing distance from Jupiter are (left to right) Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto.

    These global views show the side of volcanically active Io which always faces away from Jupiter, icy Europa, the Jupiter-facing side of Ganymede, and heavily cratered Callisto. The appearances of these neighboring satellites are amazingly different even though they are relatively close to Jupiter (350,000 kilometers for Io; 1, 800,000 kilometers for Callisto). These images were acquired on several orbits at very low 'phase' angles (the sun, spacecraft, moon angle) so that the sun is illuminating the Jovian moons from completely behind the spacecraft, in the same way a full moon is viewed from Earth. The colors have been enhanced to bring out subtle color variations of surface features. North is to the top of all the images which were taken by the Solid State Imaging (SSI) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft.

    Io, which is slightly larger than Earth's moon, is the most colorful of the Galilean satellites. Its surface is covered by deposits from actively erupting volcanoes, hundreds of lava flows, and volcanic vents which are visible as small dark spots. Several of these volcanoes are very hot; at least one reached a temperature of 2000 degrees Celsius (3600 degrees Fahrenheit) in the summer of 1997. Prometheus, a volcano located slightly right of center on Io's image, was active during the Voyager flybys in 1979 and is still active as Galileo images were obtained. This global view was obtained in September 1996 when Galileo was 485,000 kilometers from Io; the finest details that can be discerned are about 10 km across. The bright, yellowish and white materials located at equatorial latitudes are believed to be composed of sulfur and sulfur dioxide. The polar caps are darker and covered by a redder material.

    Europa has a very different surface from its

  17. Report of the Colloquium on the Classics in Education, 1965.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Else, Gerald F., Ed.

    This is the report of an international meeting on the Classics, conducted August 1965 in London, England. Resolutions adopted by the Colloquium, minutes of group sessions, papers, and national reports on the state of classical education are presented. Group sessions discuss the teaching of classical languages, classical literatures, and ancient…

  18. Multi-mission Satellite Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamilkowski, M. L.; Teter, M. A.; Grant, K. D.; Dougherty, B.; Cochran, S.

    2015-12-01

    NOAA's next-generation environmental satellite, the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) replaces the current Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES). JPSS satellites carry sensors which collect meteorological, oceanographic, climatological, and solar-geophysical observations of the earth, atmosphere, and space. The first JPSS satellite was launched in 2011 and is currently NOAA's primary operational polar satellite. The JPSS ground system is the Common Ground System (CGS), and provides command, control, and communications (C3) and data processing (DP). A multi-mission system, CGS provides combinations of C3/DP for numerous NASA, NOAA, DoD, and international missions. In preparation for the next JPSS satellite, CGS improved its multi-mission capabilities to enhance mission operations for larger constellations of earth observing satellites with the added benefit of streamlining mission operations for other NOAA missions. CGS's multi-mission capabilities allows management all of assets as a single enterprise, more efficiently using ground resources and personnel and consolidating multiple ground systems into one. Sophisticated scheduling algorithms compare mission priorities and constraints across all ground stations, creating an enterprise schedule optimized to mission needs, which CGS executes to acquire the satellite link, uplink commands, downlink and route data to the operations and data processing facilities, and generate the final products for delivery to downstream users. This paper will illustrate the CGS's ability to manage multiple, enterprise-wide polar orbiting missions by demonstrating resource modeling and tasking, production of enterprise contact schedules for NOAA's Fairbanks ground station (using both standing and ad hoc requests), deconflicting resources due to ground outages, and updating resource allocations through dynamic priority definitions.

  19. Satellite Data Assimilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fukumori, Ichiro

    1999-01-01

    Satellite altimetry provides the only routine observation of a dynamic variable of the global ocean. For instance, measurements from the TOPEX/POSEIDON altimeter have provided dramatic basin-wide images of the space-time evolution of sea level associated with the 1997-98 El Nino event. The nature of large-scale ocean circulation is being studied that underlies such sea level changes measured by satellite altimetry. To first approximation, properties of large-scale (order 1000 km and larger) sea level variability is latitudinally dependent. An analysis using a general circulation model shows that sea level changes are largely due to wind-driven baroclinic (depth dependent) circulation in the tropics (within 20 degrees of the equator), but are primarily due to the expansion and contraction of near surface water in temperate latitudes (between 20 deg. and 40 deg.) forced by seasonal heating and cooling. In contrast, wind-driven barotropic (depth independent) circulation dominates sea level variability in high latitudes (40 deg. and higher) characterized by periods that are as short as a few days. The presence of such inhomogeneity and the significance of high-frequency, large-scale sea level changes had not been fully recognized prior to this study, and are summarized in Fukumori et al. Numerical models provide theoretical relationships among properties that can be inverted using observations so as to estimate the entire state of the ocean, including properties that are otherwise difficult to measure remotely. The process is data assimilation. An approximate Kalman filter and smoother have been devised to assimilate three years of TOPEX/POSEIDON sea level data into a global ocean general circulation model. The figure below demonstrates the skill of the assimilation, and shows the altimeter assimilated estimate being in closer agreement than the simulation is with independent in situ measurements of subsur ace temperature and velocity, consistent with formal

  20. Artificial satellite break-ups. I - Soviet ocean surveillance satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, N. L.

    1983-02-01

    An analysis of the breakup patterns of eight Soviet Kosmos series ocean surveillance satellites is presented. It is noted that half of the 4700 objects presently detected in earth orbit are shards from destroyed objects. The locations and heading of each Soviet satellite breakup were tracked by the Naval Space Survelliance System. All events in the eastern hemisphere occurred in the ascending phase, while western hemisphere breakups happened in the descending phase. Gabbard (1971) diagrams of altitude vs. period are plotted as a function of a fragment's orbital period. The diagrams have been incorporated into a NASA computer program to backtrack along the fragments' paths to determine the pattern of the breakup. Although objects have been projected to have separated from some of the satellites before breakup, a discussion of the evidence leads to the conclusion that even though the satellites may have exploded no purpose can yet be discerned for the actions.

  1. Observations of classical novae in outburst

    SciTech Connect

    Starrfield, S.; Stryker, L.L.; Sonneborn, G.; Sparks, W.M.; Ferland, G.; Wagner, R.M.; Williams, R.E.; Gehrz, R.D.; Ney, E.P.; Kenyon, S.

    1988-01-01

    Over the past 10 years the IUE Satellite has obtained ultraviolet data on a number of novae in outbursts and the characteristics of every one of the outbursts have been different. In addition, our group has also obtained optical and infrared data on many of the same novae. In this paper we present the data on three members of the carbon-oxygen class of novae. 6 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Satellite Data Simulator Unit: A Multisensor, Multispectral Satellite Simulator Package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masunaga, Hirohiko; Matsui, Toshihisa; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Hou, Arthur Y.; Kummerow, Christian D.; Nakajima, Teruyuki; Bauer, Peter; Olson, William S.; Sekiguchi, Miho; Nakajima, Teruyuki

    2010-01-01

    Several multisensor simulator packages are being developed by different research groups across the world. Such simulator packages [e.g., COSP , CRTM, ECSIM, RTTO, ISSARS (under development), and SDSU (this article), among others] share overall aims, although some are targeted more on particular satellite programs or specific applications (for research purposes or for operational use) than others. The SDSU or Satellite Data Simulator Unit is a general-purpose simulator composed of Fortran 90 codes and applicable to spaceborne microwave radiometer, radar, and visible/infrared imagers including, but not limited to, the sensors listed in a table. That shows satellite programs particularly suitable for multisensor data analysis: some are single satellite missions carrying two or more instruments, while others are constellations of satellites flying in formation. The TRMM and A-Train are ongoing satellite missions carrying diverse sensors that observe clouds and precipitation, and will be continued or augmented within the decade to come by future multisensor missions such as the GPM and Earth-CARE. The ultimate goals of these present and proposed satellite programs are not restricted to clouds and precipitation but are to better understand their interactions with atmospheric dynamics/chemistry and feedback to climate. The SDSU's applicability is not technically limited to hydrometeor measurements either, but may be extended to air temperature and humidity observations by tuning the SDSU to sounding channels. As such, the SDSU and other multisensor simulators would potentially contribute to a broad area of climate and atmospheric sciences. The SDSU is not optimized to any particular orbital geometry of satellites. The SDSU is applicable not only to low-Earth orbiting platforms as listed in Table 1, but also to geostationary meteorological satellites. Although no geosynchronous satellite carries microwave instruments at present or in the near future, the SDSU would be

  3. Galilean satellites - Anomalous temperatures disputed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, D.; Lebofsky, L. A.; Veeder, G. J.; Cutts, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Anomalous averaged infrared brightness temperatures of the Galilean satellites of Jupiter reported by Gross (1975) are rejected as falsely conceived and lacking physical reality. It is argued that the calculations of equilibrium temperatures should be corrected, whereupon predictions would be in satisfactory agreement with observations, in conformity with the radiometric method of determining the diameters of asteroids and satellites. The IR irradiance and the related disk-averaged brightness temperature for the spectral band are recommended as more relevant. Attention is drawn to some interesting discrepancies between calculated and observed temperatures of the Jovian satellites which merit further investigation.

  4. Satellite signatures in SLR observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleby, G. M.

    1993-01-01

    We examine the evidence for the detection of satellite-dependent signatures in the laser range observations obtained by the UK single-photon Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) System models of the expected observation distributions from Ajisai and Lageos are developed from the published satellite spread functions and from the characteristics of the SLR System and compared with the observations. The effects of varying return strengths are discussed using the models and by experimental observations of Ajisai, during which a range of return levels from single to multiple photons is achieved. The implications of these results for system-dependent center for mass corrections are discussed.

  5. The economics of satellite retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, Kent M.; Greenberg, Joel S.

    1988-01-01

    The economics of space operations with and without the Space Station have been studied in terms of the financial performance of a typical communications-satellite business venture. A stochastic Monte-Carlo communications-satellite business model is employed which includes factors such as satellite configuration, random and wearout failures, reliability of launch and space operations, stand-down time resulting from failures, and insurance by operation. Financial performance impacts have been evaluated in terms of the magnitude of investment, net present value, and return on investment.

  6. ISDN - The case for satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelton, Joseph N.; McDougal, Patrick J.

    1987-05-01

    The Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) holds much promise for both suppliers and users of telecommunications in the near future. This article examines the role of satellites in this new ISDN environment and emphasizes several advantages of satellites in the ongoing evolution to an all-digital world. In specific, the role of Intelsat, the global satellite system, is discussed with emphasis on Intelsat's digital services which today can offer all the characteristics and standards of ISDN in a flexible, cost-efficient manner.

  7. Use of communications. [satellite communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Progress in the field of satellite communications is reviewed, and useful services which may be provided by future satellite communications systems are considered. Recommendations are made with regard to mobile communications for use on land and at sea, position determination, mineral and energy exploration, the possibility of using electronic means to assist in main delivery, education and health-care experiments, and the use of satellite telecommunications to enhance the quality of life in rural areas by making available a full range of educational and entertainment programs. The needs of the amateur radio community are also considered.

  8. Progress in satellite tracking cranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, D.H.; Smith, D.G.; Olsen, G.H.; Fuller, M.R.; Landfried, S.E.; Higuchi, H.; Vermillion, C.H.

    1992-01-01

    We review the history of tracking cranes with satellite telemetry and identify some of the difficulties in designing satellite transmitters and harnesses for cranes. Miniaturization of these transmitters and a plethora of harnessing experiments since 1989 allow us to recommend limited application of this technology to all species of cranes. We are still uncertain, however, if cranes harnessed with satellite telemetry devices are able to reproduce after migration. Because of this uncertainty, we urge caution in the use of this technology, especially with breeding adults in severely endangered populations. This manuscript also describes continuing research needs.

  9. Geometry of a mapping satellite.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snyder, J.P.

    1982-01-01

    The proposed mapping satellite Mapsat is to consist of fixed fore, vertical, and aft linear detector arrays, any two of which may be used simultaneously to obtain digital images for one- dimensional stereo correlation. The satellite attitude may be varied according to Fourier series to enable a given detector on one array to follow closely the groundtrack sensed by the corresponding detector on another array throughout the orbit. These tracking errors are negligible for a satellite stable within anticipated ranges. The required computations have been programmed in FORTRAN IV. -Author

  10. Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gedney, Richard T.; Schertler, Ronald J.

    1989-01-01

    The NASA Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) was conceived to help maintain U.S. leadership in the world's communications-satellite market. This experimental satellite is expected to be launched by NASA in 1992 and to furnish the technology necessary for establishing very small aperture terminal digital networks which provide on-demand full-mesh connectivity, and 1.544-MBPS services with only a single hop. Utilizing on-board switching and processing, each individual voice or data circuit can be separately routed to any location in the network. This paper provides an overview of the ACTS and discusses the value of the technology for future communications systems.

  11. Satellite co-locations as a link between SLR, GPS and Low Earth Orbiting (LEO) satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melachroinos, S. A.; Lemoine, F. G.; Chinn, D. S.; Nicolas, J. B.; Zelensky, N. P.; Wimert, J.; Radway, Y.

    2013-12-01

    The procedure applied for the determination of the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF) requires the combination of all four major techniques of Space Geodesy. This combination is only possibly realized by the introduction of the local-ties between co-located techniques. A local-tie is the lever arm vector between the marker points on the sites where two or more space geodesy instruments operate. The local ties are used as additional observations with proper variances. They are usually derived from local surveys using either classical geodesy or the global navigation satellite systems (GNSS). The Global Positioning System (GPS) plays a major role in the ITRF combination by linking together all the other three techniques SLR, DORIS and VLBI (Altamimi and Collilieux 2009). However, discrepancies between local ties and space geodesy estimates are well known although the reasons for these discrepancies are often not clear. These discrepancies could be either due to errors in local ties and in coordinate estimates or in both. In this study, we use the tracking to G05-35 and G06-36 and one LEO by SLR sites and their combined orbits, earth rotation parameters (ERPs) and station positions in order to establish space-based co-location ties on the stations. The LEO satellite used in this experiment is Jason-2, which carries both GPS and SLR. Therefore from the data-processing point of view the LEO satellite is used as a fast moving station (Thaller et al. 2011). Jason-2 is also equipped with DORIS, but it will be included into another combined analysis. Subsequently, we compare the consistency of our space-based co-locations to the ones from ITRF08 and SLRF08 - IGb08 solutions.

  12. Cholera outbreaks in the classical biotype era.

    PubMed

    Siddique, A K; Cash, Richard

    2014-01-01

    In the Indian subcontinent description of a disease resembling cholera has been mentioned in Sushruta Samita, estimated to have been written between ~400 and 500 BC. It is however not clear whether the disease known today as cholera caused by Vibrio cholerae Vibrio cholerae O1 is the evolutionary progression of the ancient disease. The modern history of cholera began in 1817 when an explosive epidemic broke out in the Ganges River Delta region of Bengal. This was the first of the seven recorded cholera pandemics cholera pandemics that affected nearly the entire world and caused hundreds of thousands of deaths. The bacterium responsible for this human disease was first recognised during the fifth pandemic and was named V. cholerae which was grouped as O1, and was further differentiated into Classical and El Tor biotypes. It is now known that the fifth and the sixth pandemics were caused by the V. cholerae O1 of the Classical biotype Classical biotype and the seventh by the El Tor biotype El Tor biotype . The El Tor biotype of V. cholerae, which originated in Indonesia Indonesia and shortly thereafter began to spread in the early 1960s. Within the span of 50 years the El Tor biotype had invaded nearly the entire world, completely displacing the Classical biotype from all the countries except Bangladesh. What prompted the earlier pandemics to begin is not clearly understood, nor do we know how and why they ended. The success of the seventh pandemic clone over the pre-existing sixth pandemic strain remains largely an unsolved mystery. Why classical biotype eventually disappeared from the world remains to be explained. For nearly three decades (1963-1991) during the Seventh cholera pandemic seventh pandemic, cholera in Bangladesh has recorded a unique history of co-existence of Classical and El Tor biotypes of V. cholerae O1 as epidemic and endemic strain. This long co-existence has provided us with great opportunity to improve our understanding of the disease itself

  13. Classical Photogrammetry and Uav - Selected Ascpects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikrut, S.

    2016-06-01

    The UAV technology seems to be highly future-oriented due to its low costs as compared to traditional aerial images taken from classical photogrammetry aircrafts. The AGH University of Science and Technology in Cracow - Department of Geoinformation, Photogrammetry and Environmental Remote Sensing focuses mainly on geometry and radiometry of recorded images. Various scientific research centres all over the world have been conducting the relevant research for years. The paper presents selected aspects of processing digital images made with the UAV technology. It provides on a practical example a comparison between a digital image taken from an airborne (classical) height, and the one made from an UAV level. In his research the author of the paper is trying to find an answer to the question: to what extent does the UAV technology diverge today from classical photogrammetry, and what are the advantages and disadvantages of both methods? The flight plan was made over the Tokarnia Village Museum (more than 0.5 km2) for two separate flights: the first was made by an UAV - System FT-03A built by FlyTech Solution Ltd. The second was made with the use of a classical photogrammetric Cesna aircraft furnished with an airborne photogrammetric camera (Ultra Cam Eagle). Both sets of photographs were taken with pixel size of about 3 cm, in order to have reliable data allowing for both systems to be compared. The project has made aerotriangulation independently for the two flights. The DTM was generated automatically, and the last step was the generation of an orthophoto. The geometry of images was checked under the process of aerotriangulation. To compare the accuracy of these two flights, control and check points were used. RMSE were calculated. The radiometry was checked by a visual method and using the author's own algorithm for feature extraction (to define edges with subpixel accuracy). After initial pre-processing of data, the images were put together, and shown side by side

  14. IONOSAT Ionospheric satellite cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korepanov, V.; Lizunov, G.; Fedorov, O.; Yampolsky, Yu.; Ivchenko, V.

    2008-11-01

    The IONOSAT project (from IONOspheric SATellites) is proposed by National Space Agency of Ukraine for First European Space Program as a part of Space Weather (SW) Program. As it is commonly accepted, Space Weather means the changes of the conditions on the Sun, in solar wind, magnetosphere and ionosphere which may affect the operation and reliability of on-board and ground technological systems and threaten human health. In this chain ionosphere is specific and integral part of SW formation. Moreover, namely in the ionosphere main part of the energy absorption of Sun-activated sporadic corpuscular and radiation fluxes takes places. The excitation of ionosphere by falling fluxes produces its "luminescence" in wide frequency band - from ULF waves till ultraviolet - and by this ionosphere works as an efficient "screen" or SW indicator. A goal of the proposed project is long-term spatial-temporal monitoring of main field and plasma parameters of ionosphere with aim to further develop fundamental conceptions of solar-terrestrial connections physics, nowcasting and forecast of SW, and diagnostics of natural and technogenic hazards with the help of scientific payload installed on-board a cluster of 3 low-Earth orbit (LEO) microsatellites (tentative launch date - 2012 year). The state of the project proposal and realization plans are discussed.

  15. Hubble Space Telescope satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope, named for the American astronomer Edwin Powell Hubble, will be the largest and most powerful astronomical instrument ever orbited. Placed above the obscuring effects of the earth's atmosphere in a 600-km orbit, this remotely-controlled, free-flying satellite observatory will expand the terrestrial-equivalent resolution of the universe by a factor of seven, or a volumetric factor of 350. This telescope has a 2.4-m primary mirror and can accommodate five scientific instruments (cameras, spectrographs and photometers). The optics are suitable for a spectral range from 1100 angstrom to 1 mm wavelength. With a projected service life of fifteen years, the spacecraft can be serviced on-orbit for replacement of degraded systems, to insert advanced scientific instruments, and to reboost the telescope from decayed altitudes. The anticipated image quality will be a result of extremely precise lambda/20 optics, stringent cleanliness, and very stable pointing: jitter will be held to less than 0.01 arcsecond for indefinite observation periods, consistent with instrument apertures as small as 0.1 arcsecond.

  16. Satellite Propellant Pump Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J.; Veres, Joseph P.; Hah, Chunill; Nerone, Anthony L.; Cunningham, Cameron C.; Kraft, Thomas G.; Tavernelli, Paul F.; Fraser, Bryan

    2005-01-01

    NASA Glenn initiated a satellite propellant pump technology demonstration program. The goal was to demonstrate the technologies for a 60 percent efficient pump at 1 gpm flow rate and 500 psia pressure rise. The pump design and analysis used the in-house developed computer codes named PUMPA and HPUMP3D. The requirements lead to a 4-stage impeller type pump design with a tip diameter of 0.54 inches and a rotational speed of 57,000 rpm. Analyses indicated that flow cavitation was not a problem in the design. Since the flow was incompressible, the stages were identical. Only the 2-stage pump was designed, fabricated, assembled, and tested for demonstration. Water was selected as the surrogate fluid for hydrazine in this program. Complete mechanical design including stress and dynamic analyses were conducted. The pump was driven by an electric motor directly coupled to the impellers. Runs up to 57,000 rpm were conducted, where a pressure rise of 200 psia at a flow rate of 0.8 gpm was measured to validate the design effort.

  17. The Classical Laplace Plane and Its use as a Stable Disposal Orbit for GEO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosengren, A.; Scheeres, D.; McMahon, J.

    2013-09-01

    The geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO) is the most susceptible region to space debris because there is no natural cleansing mechanism, such as atmospheric drag. Placing satellites in super-synchronous disposal orbits at the ends of their operational lifetimes has been recommended and practiced as one possible means of protecting this environment. The discovery of the high area-to-mass ratio (HAMR) debris population in near geosynchronous orbit (ca. 2004) raises concern for the long-term sustainability of this unique resource. It is currently believed that HAMR objects are sheets of multilayer insulation detaching from satellites in GEO disposal orbits due to surface degradation and material deterioration. The low energy release of HAMR objects from aging satellites abandoned in disposal orbits is not directly addressed in the national policies that established the graveyard. The current disposal regions cannot account for the large solar radiation pressure (SRP) perturbations of HAMR objects, implying that these storage orbits are not well suited as a graveyard. The orbital dynamics of uncontrolled GEO satellites is governed by the oblateness of the Earth and luni-solar gravitational interactions. By itself, Earth's oblateness causes the pole of the orbital plane to precess around Earth's rotation pole. Lunisolar perturbations will have a similar effect, but the precession will now take place about the orbit poles of the Moon and the Sun, respectively. The classical Laplace plane is the mean reference plane about whose axis the satellite's orbit precesses. On the Laplace place, the secular orbital evolution driven by the combined effects of these perturbations is zero, so that the orbits are frozen. The Laplace plane at GEO lies between the plane of the Earth's equator and that of the ecliptic, passing through their intersection, and has an inclination of about 7.5 degrees relative to Earth's equator. The uncontrolled GEO satellites precess at a constant inclination

  18. First micro-satellite and new enhanced small satellite series in DFH Satellite Co. Ltd.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaomin; Xie, Bin; Dai, Shoulun; Zhang, Weiwen; Hu, Gefeng; Lan, Ding

    2007-06-01

    As one important department of CAST (Chinese Academy of Space Technology), with responsibility for small and micro-satellite development, DFH Satellite Co. Ltd. (DFHSat) manufactured and launched six small satellites from 2000 to 2004. Nowadays, DFHSat is developing micro-satellite and new enhanced small satellite series. The first micro-satellite as a basic type is named HummerSat-1. HummerSat-1 is three-axis stabilized with orbit control capability. Information and power control are implemented through an on-board network, GaAs solar cell and Li-ion battery are adopted to obtain and storage power, S-band TT&C and data transmission works are used. The payload of HummerSat-1 has a weight of 60 kg and power consumption of 200 W. The enhanced small satellite series based on technology of HummerSat-1 is planned by DFHSat. It would be aiming to form a continuative product spectrum of 80-200 kg. The enhanced series is focused on satisfying different missions, including earth remote sensing, communication, science exploration, etc.

  19. Phase difference enhancement with classical intensity interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirai, Tomohiro

    2016-12-01

    It is demonstrated theoretically and experimentally that, as a novel function of classical intensity interferometry, a phase difference distribution recorded in the form of an interferogram can be enhanced by a factor of 2 on the basis of the classical intensity correlation. Such phase difference enhancement which is also referred to as phase difference amplification is, in general, known to be practically important since it increases sensitivity and accuracy in interferometric measurements. The method proposed in this study prevails over the existing methods in the sense that it can be readily implemented without difficulty in comparison with all other methods so far proposed, although the phase difference enhancement is limited to a factor of 2 in our method and thus so is the improvement of sensitivity and accuracy.

  20. Fast forward to the classical adiabatic invariant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarzynski, Christopher; Deffner, Sebastian; Patra, Ayoti; Subaşı, Yiǧit

    2017-03-01

    We show how the classical action, an adiabatic invariant, can be preserved under nonadiabatic conditions. Specifically, for a time-dependent Hamiltonian H =p2/2 m +U (q ,t ) in one degree of freedom, and for an arbitrary choice of action I0, we construct a so-called fast-forward potential energy function VFF(q ,t ) that, when added to H , guides all trajectories with initial action I0 to end with the same value of action. We use this result to construct a local dynamical invariant J (q ,p ,t ) whose value remains constant along these trajectories. We illustrate our results with numerical simulations. Finally, we sketch how our classical results may be used to design approximate quantum shortcuts to adiabaticity.

  1. Macroscopic quantum mechanics in a classical spacetime.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huan; Miao, Haixing; Lee, Da-Shin; Helou, Bassam; Chen, Yanbei

    2013-04-26

    We apply the many-particle Schrödinger-Newton equation, which describes the coevolution of a many-particle quantum wave function and a classical space-time geometry, to macroscopic mechanical objects. By averaging over motions of the objects' internal degrees of freedom, we obtain an effective Schrödinger-Newton equation for their centers of mass, which can be monitored and manipulated at quantum levels by state-of-the-art optomechanics experiments. For a single macroscopic object moving quantum mechanically within a harmonic potential well, its quantum uncertainty is found to evolve at a frequency different from its classical eigenfrequency-with a difference that depends on the internal structure of the object-and can be observable using current technology. For several objects, the Schrödinger-Newton equation predicts semiclassical motions just like Newtonian physics, yet quantum uncertainty cannot be transferred from one object to another.

  2. Isoperiodic classical systems and their quantum counterparts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asorey, M.; Cariñena, J. F.; Marmo, G.; Perelomov, A.

    2007-06-01

    One-dimensional isoperiodic classical systems have been first analyzed by Abel. Abel's characterization can be extended for singular potentials and potentials which are not defined on the whole real line. The standard shear equivalence of isoperiodic potentials can also be extended by using reflection and inversion transformations. We provide a full characterization of isoperiodic rational potentials showing that they are connected by translations, reflections or Joukowski transformations. Upon quantization many of these isoperiodic systems fail to exhibit identical quantum energy spectra. This anomaly occurs at order O( ℏ2) because semiclassical corrections of energy levels of order O( ℏ) are identical for all isoperiodic systems. We analyze families of systems where this quantum anomaly occurs and some special systems where the spectral identity is preserved by quantization. Conversely, we point out the existence of isospectral quantum systems which do not correspond to isoperiodic classical systems.

  3. Classical simulation of quantum fields I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirayama, T.; Holdom, B.

    2006-10-01

    We study classical field theories in a background field configuration where all modes of the theory are excited, matching the zero-point energy spectrum of quantum field theory. Our construction involves elements of a theory of classical electrodynamics by Wheeler-Feynman and the theory of stochastic electrodynamics of Boyer. The nonperturbative effects of interactions in these theories can be very efficiently studied on the lattice. In lambda phi(4) theory in 1 + 1 dimensions, we find results, in particular, for mass renormalization and the critical coupling for symmetry breaking that are in agreement with their quantum counterparts. We then study the perturbative expansion of the n-point Green's functions and find a loop expansion very similar to that of quantum field theory. When compared to the usual Feynman rules, we find some differences associated with particular combinations of internal lines going on-shell simultaneously.

  4. Coherently enhanced measurements in classical mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Daniel; Popescu, Sandu

    2014-08-01

    In all quantitative sciences, it is common practice to increase the signal-to-noise ratio of noisy measurements by measuring identically prepared systems N times and averaging the measurement results. This leads to a scaling of the sensitivity as 1/√N, known in quantum measurement theory as the "standard quantum limit" (SQL). It is known that if one puts the N systems into an entangled state, a scaling as 1/N can be achieved, the socalled "Heisenberg limit" (HL), but decoherence problems have so far prevented implementation of such protocols for large N. Here we show that a method of coherent averaging inspired by a recent entanglement-free quantum enhanced measurement protocol is capable of achieving a sensitivity that scales as 1/N in a purely classical setup. This may substantially improve the measurement of very weak interactions in the classical realm, and, in particular, open a novel route to measuring the gravitational constant with enhanced precision.

  5. Hidden invariance of the free classical particle

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, S. )

    1994-06-01

    A formalism describing the dynamics of classical and quantum systems from a group theoretical point of view is presented. We apply it to the simple example of the classical free particle. The Galileo group [ital G] is the symmetry group of the free equations of motion. Consideration of the free particle Lagrangian semi-invariance under [ital G] leads to a larger symmetry group, which is a central extension of the Galileo group by the real numbers. We study the dynamics associated with this group, and characterize quantities like Noether invariants and evolution equations in terms of group geometric objects. An extension of the Galileo group by [ital U](1) leads to quantum mechanics.

  6. Quantum and classical phases in optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armata, Federico; Latmiral, Ludovico; Pikovski, Igor; Vanner, Michael R.; Brukner, Časlav; Kim, M. S.

    2016-06-01

    The control of quantum systems requires the ability to change and read-out the phase of a system. The noncommutativity of canonical conjugate operators can induce phases on quantum systems, which can be employed for implementing phase gates and for precision measurements. Here we study the phase acquired by a radiation field after its radiation pressure interaction with a mechanical oscillator, and compare the classical and quantum contributions. The classical description can reproduce the nonlinearity induced by the mechanical oscillator and the loss of correlations between mechanics and optical field at certain interaction times. Such features alone are therefore insufficient for probing the quantum nature of the interaction. Our results thus isolate genuine quantum contributions of the optomechanical interaction that could be probed in current experiments.

  7. Classical sequential growth dynamics for causal sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rideout, D. P.; Sorkin, R. D.

    2000-01-01

    Starting from certain causality conditions and a discrete form of general covariance, we derive a very general family of classically stochastic, sequential growth dynamics for causal sets. The resulting theories provide a relatively accessible ``halfway house'' to full quantum gravity that possibly contains the latter's classical limit (general relativity). Because they can be expressed in terms of state models for an assembly of Ising spins residing on the relations of the causal set, these theories also illustrate how nongravitational matter can arise dynamically from the causal set without having to be built in at the fundamental level. Additionally, our results bring into focus some interpretive issues of importance for a causal set dynamics and for quantum gravity more generally.

  8. Quantum-classical path integral. I. Classical memory and weak quantum nonlocality.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Roberto; Makri, Nancy

    2012-12-14

    We consider rigorous path integral descriptions of the dynamics of a quantum system coupled to a polyatomic environment, assuming that the latter is well approximated by classical trajectories. Earlier work has derived semiclassical or purely classical expressions for the influence functional from the environment, which should be sufficiently accurate for many situations, but the evaluation of quantum-(semi)classical path integral (QCPI) expressions has not been practical for large-scale simulation because the interaction with the environment introduces couplings nonlocal in time. In this work, we analyze the nature of the effects on a system from its environment in light of the observation [N. Makri, J. Chem. Phys. 109, 2994 (1998)] that true nonlocality in the path integral is a strictly quantum mechanical phenomenon. If the environment is classical, the path integral becomes local and can be evaluated in a stepwise fashion along classical trajectories of the free solvent. This simple "classical path" limit of QCPI captures fully the decoherence of the system via a classical mechanism. Small corrections to the classical path QCPI approximation may be obtained via an inexpensive random hop QCPI model, which accounts for some "back reaction" effects. Exploiting the finite length of nonlocality, we argue that further inclusion of quantum decoherence is possible via an iterative evaluation of the path integral. Finally, we show that the sum of the quantum amplitude factors with respect to the system paths leads to a smooth integrand as a function of trajectory initial conditions, allowing the use of Monte Carlo methods for the multidimensional phase space integral.

  9. New variables for classical and quantum gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashtekar, Abhay

    1986-01-01

    A Hamiltonian formulation of general relativity based on certain spinorial variables is introduced. These variables simplify the constraints of general relativity considerably and enable one to imbed the constraint surface in the phase space of Einstein's theory into that of Yang-Mills theory. The imbedding suggests new ways of attacking a number of problems in both classical and quantum gravity. Some illustrative applications are discussed.

  10. Wei-Norman equations for classical groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charzyński, Szymon; Kuś, Marek

    2015-08-01

    We show that the nonlinear autonomous Wei-Norman equations, expressing the solution of a linear system of non-autonomous equations on a Lie algebra, can be reduced to the hierarchy of matrix Riccati equations in the case of all classical simple Lie algebras. The result generalizes our previous one concerning the complex Lie algebra of the special linear group. We show that it cannot be extended to all simple Lie algebras, in particular to the exceptional G2 algebra.

  11. Maxwellian distribution in non-classical regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohazzabi, Pirooz; L. Helvey, Shannon; McCumber, Jeremy

    2002-12-01

    A molecular dynamics investigation shows that the assumption of molecular chaos remains valid in the non-classical regime. Consequently, the velocity distribution function of an extremely dense system of spinless particles relaxes into Maxwellian, even in the presence of arbitrary interactions between the particles of the system. Systems with densities exceeding 30 times solid densities are investigated using a soft Lennard-Jones interparticle potential energy function.

  12. INCLINATION MIXING IN THE CLASSICAL KUIPER BELT

    SciTech Connect

    Volk, Kathryn; Malhotra, Renu

    2011-07-20

    We investigate the long-term evolution of the inclinations of the known classical and resonant Kuiper Belt objects (KBOs). This is partially motivated by the observed bimodal inclination distribution and by the putative physical differences between the low- and high-inclination populations. We find that some classical KBOs undergo large changes in inclination over gigayear timescales, which means that a current member of the low-inclination population may have been in the high-inclination population in the past, and vice versa. The dynamical mechanisms responsible for the time variability of inclinations are predominantly distant encounters with Neptune and chaotic diffusion near the boundaries of mean motion resonances. We reassess the correlations between inclination and physical properties including inclination time variability. We find that the size-inclination and color-inclination correlations are less statistically significant than previously reported (mostly due to the increased size of the data set since previous works with some contribution from inclination variability). The time variability of inclinations does not change the previous finding that binary classical KBOs have lower inclinations than non-binary objects. Our study of resonant objects in the classical Kuiper Belt region includes objects in the 3:2, 7:4, 2:1, and eight higher-order mean motion resonances. We find that these objects (some of which were previously classified as non-resonant) undergo larger changes in inclination compared to the non-resonant population, indicating that their current inclinations are not generally representative of their original inclinations. They are also less stable on gigayear timescales.

  13. Semi-classical methods in nuclear physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brink, David M.

    These lecture notes present an introduction to some semi-classical techniques which have applications in nuclear physics. Topics discussed include the WKB method, approaches based on the Feynman path integral, the Gutzwiller trace formula for level density fluctuations and the Thomas-Fermi approximation and the Vlasov equation for many-body problems. There are applications to heavy ion fusion reactions, bremsstrahlung emission in alpha decay and nuclear response functions.

  14. Classical Analogs of a Diatomic Chain

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez, L.; Diaz-de-Anda, A.; Mendez-Sanchez, R. A.; Morales, A.; Flores, J.; Monsivais, G.

    2010-12-21

    Using one dimensional rods with different configurations classical analogs of quantum mechanical systems frequently used in solid state physics can be obtained. Among this analogs we have recently discussed locally periodic rods which lead to band spectra; the effect of a topological defect, and the Wannier Stark ladders. In this paper, we present an elastic analog of the diatomic chain and show how the acoustical and optical bands emerge, as well of the nature of the wave amplitudes.

  15. Large numbers hypothesis. I - Classical formalism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, P. J.

    1982-01-01

    A self-consistent formulation of physics at the classical level embodying Dirac's large numbers hypothesis (LNH) is developed based on units covariance. A scalar 'field' phi(x) is introduced and some fundamental results are derived from the resultant equations. Some unusual properties of phi are noted such as the fact that phi cannot be the correspondence limit of a normal quantum scalar field.

  16. Electromagnetically induced classical and quantum Lau effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Tianhui; Yang, Guojian; Xiong, Jun; Xu, Deqin

    2016-07-01

    We present two schemes of Lau effect for an object, an electromagnetically induced grating generated based on the electromagnetically induced effect. The Lau interference pattern is detected either directly in the way of the traditional Lau effect measurement with a classical thermal light being the imaging light, or indirectly and nonlocally in the way of two-photon coincidence measurement with a pair of entangled photons being the imaging light.

  17. Uniform Additivity in Classical and Quantum Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Andrew; Li, Ke; Smith, Graeme

    2017-01-01

    Information theory quantifies the optimal rates of resource interconversions, usually in terms of entropies. However, nonadditivity often makes evaluating entropic formulas intractable. In a few auspicious cases, additivity allows a full characterization of optimal rates. We study uniform additivity of formulas, which is easily evaluated and captures all known additive quantum formulas. Our complete characterization of uniform additivity exposes an intriguing new additive quantity and identifies a remarkable coincidence—the classical and quantum uniformly additive functions with one auxiliary variable are identical.

  18. Time in classical and in quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elçi, A.

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the time concept in classical mechanics from the perspective of the invariants of a motion. The analysis shows that there is a conceptual gap concerning time in the Dirac-Heisenberg-von Neumann formalism and that Bohr's complementarity principle does not fill the gap. In the Dirac-Heisenberg-von Neumann formalism, a particle's properties are represented by Heisenberg matrices. This axiom is the source of the time problem in quantum mechanics.

  19. Lie algebras of classical and stochastic electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neto, J. J. Soares; Vianna, J. D. M.

    1994-03-01

    The Lie algebras associated with infinitesimal symmetry transformations of third-order differential equations of interest to classical electrodynamics and stochastic electrodynamics have been obtained. The structure constants for a general case are presented and the Lie algebra for each particular application is easily achieved. By the method used here it is not necessary to know the explicit expressions of the infinitesimal generators in order to determine the structure constants of the Lie algebra.

  20. Precise Orbit Determination Of Low Earth Satellites At AIUB Using GPS And SLR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaggi, A.; Bock, H.; Thaller, D.; Sosnica, K.; Meyer, U.; Baumann, C.; Dach, R.

    2013-12-01

    An ever increasing number of low Earth orbiting (LEO) satellites is, or will be, equipped with retro-reflectors for Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) and on-board receivers to collect observations from Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) such as the Global Positioning System (GPS) and the Russian GLONASS and the European Galileo systems in the future. At the Astronomical Institute of the University of Bern (AIUB) LEO precise orbit determination (POD) using either GPS or SLR data is performed for a wide range of applications for satellites at different altitudes. For this purpose the classical numerical integration techniques, as also used for dynamic orbit determination of satellites at high altitudes, are extended by pseudo-stochastic orbit modeling techniques to efficiently cope with potential force model deficiencies for satellites at low altitudes. Accuracies of better than 2 cm may be achieved by pseudo-stochastic orbit modeling for satellites at very low altitudes such as for the GPS-based POD of the Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE).