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Sample records for 5-day biochemical-oxygen demand

  1. Determination of Biochemical Oxygen Demand of Area Waters: A Bioassay Procedure for Environmental Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riehl, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    A graphical method for determining the 5-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5) for a body of water is described. In this bioassay, students collect a sample of water from a designated site, transport it to the laboratory, and evaluate the amount of oxygen consumed by naturally occurring bacteria during a 5-day incubation period. An accuracy check,…

  2. Biochemical oxygen demand measurement by mediator method in flow system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ling; Bai, Lu; Yu, Dengbin; Zhai, Junfeng; Dong, Shaojun

    2015-06-01

    Using mediator as electron acceptor for biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) measurement was developed in the last decade (BODMed). However, until now, no BOD(Med) in a flow system has been reported. This work for the first time describes a flow system of BOD(Med) method (BOD(Med)-FS) by using potassium ferricyanide as mediator and carbon fiber felt as substrate material for microbial immobilization. The system can determine the BOD value within 30 min and possesses a wider analytical linear range for measuring glucose-glutamic acid (GGA) standard solution from 2 up to 200 mg L(-1) without the need of dilution. The analytical performance of the BOD(Med)-FS is comparable or better than that of the previously reported BOD(Med) method, especially its superior long-term stability up to 2 months under continuous operation. Moreover, the BOD(Med)-FS has same determination accuracy with the conventional BOD5 method by measuring real samples from a local wastewater treatment plant (WWTP).

  3. Effects of dilution on dissolved oxygen depletion and microbial populations in the biochemical oxygen demand determination.

    PubMed

    Seo, Kyo Seong; Chang, Ho Nam; Park, Joong Kon; Choo, Kwang-Ho

    2007-09-01

    The biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) value is still a key parameter that can determine the level of organics, particularly the content of biodegradable organics in water. In this work, the effects of sample dilution, which should be done inevitably to get appropriate dissolved oxygen (DO) depletion, on the measurement of 5-day BOD (BOD(5)), was investigated with and without seeding using natural and synthetic water. The dilution effects were also evaluated for water samples taken in different seasons such as summer and winter because water temperature can cause a change in the types of microbial species, thus leading to different oxygen depletion profiles during BOD testing. The predation phenomenon between microbial cells was found to be dependent on the inorganic nutrients and carbon sources, showing a change in cell populations according to cell size after 5-day incubation. The dilution of water samples for BOD determination was linked to changes in the environment for microbial growth such as nutrition. The predation phenomenon between microbial cells was more important with less dilution. BOD(5) increased with the specific amount of inorganic nutrient per microbial mass when the natural water was diluted. When seeding was done for synthetic water samples, the seed volume also affected BOD due to the rate of organic uptake by microbes. BOD(5) increased with the specific bacterial population per organic source supplied at the beginning of BOD measurement. For more accurate BOD measurements, specific guidelines on dilution should be established.

  4. Biochemical Oxygen Demand and Dissolved Oxygen. Training Module 5.105.2.77.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood Community Coll., Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This document is an instructional module package prepared in objective form for use by an instructor familiar with the azide modification of the Winkler dissolved oxygen test and the electronic dissolved oxygen meter test procedures for determining the dissolved oxygen and the biochemical oxygen demand of a wastewater sample. Included are…

  5. Ultimate biochemical oxygen demand in semi-intensively managed shrimp pond waters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three independent studies were conducted to quantified ultimate biochemical oxygen demand (UBOD) and the corresponding decomposition rate constant for production pond (average 21.5 ha each) waters and effluents on six semi-intensively managed marine shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) farms in Honduras. S...

  6. Alternative aircraft anti-icing formulations with reduced aquatic toxicity and biochemical oxygen demand

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gold, Harris; Joback, Kevin; Geis, Steven; Bowman, George; Mericas, Dean; Corsi, Steven R.; Ferguson, Lee

    2010-01-01

    The current research was conducted to identify alternative aircraft and pavement deicer and anti-icer formulations with improved environmental characteristics compared to currently used commercial products (2007). The environmental characteristics of primary concern are the biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) and aquatic toxicity of the fully formulated products. Except when the distinction among products is necessary for clarity, “deicer” will refer to aircraft-deicing fluids (ADFs), aircraft anti-icing fluids (AAFs), and pavementdeicing materials (PDMs).

  7. Chapter A7. Section 7.0. Five-Day Biochemical Oxygen Demand

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Delzer, Gregory C.; McKenzie, Stuart W.

    1999-01-01

    The presence of a sufficient concentration of dissolved oxygen is critical to maintaining the aquatic life and aesthetic quality of streams and lakes. Determinng how organic matter affects the concentration of dissolved oxygen (DO) in a stream or lake is integral to water-quality management. The decay of organic matter in water is measured as biochemical or chemical oxygen demand. This report describes the field protocols used by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel to determine the five-day test for biochemical oxygen demand.

  8. Non-steady response of BOD biosensor for the determination of biochemical oxygen demand in wastewater.

    PubMed

    Velling, Siiri; Mashirin, Alexey; Hellat, Karin; Tenno, Toomas

    2011-01-01

    A biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) biosensor for effective and expeditious BOD(7) estimations was constructed and the non-steady phase of the output signal was extensively studied. The modelling approach introduced allows response curve reconstruction and a curve fitting procedure of good quality, resulting in parameters indicating the relationship between response and organic substrate concentration and stability properties of the BOD biosensor. Also, the immobilization matrixes of different thicknesses were characterized to determine their suitability for bio-sensing measurements in non-stationary conditions, as well as for the determination of the mechanical durability of the BOD biosensor in time. The non-steady response of the experimental output of the BOD biosensor was fitted according to the developed model that enables to determine the stability of the biosensor output and dependency on biodegradable organic substrate concentration. The calibration range of the studied BOD biosensor in OECD synthetic wastewater was 15-110 mg O(2) L(-1). Repeatability tests showed relative standard deviation (RSD) values of 2.8% and 5.8% for the parameter τ(d), characterizing the transient output of the amperometric oxygen sensor in time, and τ(s), describing the dependency of the transient response of the BOD biosensor on organic substrate concentration, respectively. BOD biosensor experiments for the evaluation of the biochemical oxygen demand of easily degradable and refractory municipal wastewater showed good concurrence with traditional BOD(7) analysis.

  9. Inverse calculation of biochemical oxygen demand models based on time domain for the tidal Foshan River.

    PubMed

    Er, Li; Xiangying, Zeng

    2014-01-01

    To simulate the variation of biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) in the tidal Foshan River, inverse calculations based on time domain are applied to the longitudinal dispersion coefficient (E(x)) and BOD decay rate (K(x)) in the BOD model for the tidal Foshan River. The derivatives of the inverse calculation have been respectively established on the basis of different flow directions in the tidal river. The results of this paper indicate that the calculated values of BOD based on the inverse calculation developed for the tidal Foshan River match the measured ones well. According to the calibration and verification of the inversely calculated BOD models, K(x) is more sensitive to the models than E(x) and different data sets of E(x) and K(x) hardly affect the precision of the models.

  10. Rapid field estimation of biochemical oxygen demand in a subtropical eutrophic urban lake with chlorophyll a fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhen; Xu, Y Jun

    2015-01-01

    Development of a technique for rapid field estimation of biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) is necessary for cost-effective monitoring and management of urban lakes. While several studies reported the usefulness of laboratory tryptophan-like fluorescence technique in predicting 5-day BOD (BOD₅) of wastewater and leachates, little is known about the predictability of field chlorophyll fluorescence measurements for BOD of urban lake waters that are constantly exposed to the mixture of chemical compounds. This study was conducted to develop a numeric relationship between chlorophyll a fluorescence and BOD for a eutrophic urban lake that is widely representative of lake water conditions in the subtropical southern USA. From October 2012 to September 2013, in situ measurements at the studied lake were made every 2 weeks on chlorophyll a fluorescence and other water quality parameters including water temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen, and specific conductivity. Water samples were taken for 5-day BOD and 10-day BOD (BOD₁₀) analysis with and without incubation. The results showed a clear seasonal trend of both BOD measurements being high during the summer and low during the winter. There was a linear, positive relationship between chlorophyll a fluorescence and BOD, and the relationship appeared to be stronger with the 10-day BOD (r(2) = 0.83) than with the 5-day BOD (r(2) = 0.76). BOD dropped each day with declining chlorophyll a fluorescence, suggesting that die-off of phytoplankton has been the main consumption of oxygen in the studied lake. Ambient conditions such as rainfall and water temperature may have partially affected BOD variation.

  11. MICREDOX--development of a ferricyanide-mediated rapid biochemical oxygen demand method using an immobilised Proteus vulgaris biocomponent.

    PubMed

    Pasco, Neil; Baronian, Keith; Jeffries, Cy; Webber, Judith; Hay, Joanne

    2004-10-15

    Biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) is an international regulatory environmental index for monitoring organic pollutants in wastewater and the current legislated standard test for BOD monitoring requires 5 days to complete (BOD5 test). We are developing a rapid microbial technique, MICREDOX, for measuring BOD by eliminating oxygen and, instead, quantifying an equivalent biochemical co-substrate demand, the co-substrate being a redox mediator. Elevated concentrations of Proteus vulgaris, either as free cells or immobilised in Lentikat disks, were incubated with an excess of redox mediator (potassium hexacyanoferrate(III)) and organic substrate for 1h at 37 degrees C without oxygen. The addition of substrate increased the catabolic activity of the microorganisms and the accumulation of reduced mediator, which was subsequently re-oxidised at a working electrode generating a current quantifiable by a coulometric transducer. The recorded currents were converted to their BOD5 equivalent with the only assumption being a fixed conversion of substrate and known stoichiometry. Measurements are reported both for the BOD5 calibration standard solution (150 mg l(-1) glucose, 150 mg l(-1) glutamic acid) and for filtered effluent sampled from a wastewater treatment plant. The inclusion of a highly soluble mediator in place of oxygen facilitated a high ferricyanide concentration in the incubation, which in turn permitted increased concentrations of microorganisms to be used. This substantially reduced the incubation time, from 5 days to 1h, for the biological oxidation of substrates equivalent to those observed using the standard BOD5 test. Stoichiometric conversion efficiencies for the oxidation of the standard substrate by P. vulgaris were typically 60% for free cells and 35-50% for immobilised cells.

  12. Biofilm reactor based real-time analysis of biochemical oxygen demand.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changyu; Jia, Jianbo; Dong, Shaojun

    2013-04-15

    We reported a biofilm reactor (BFR) based analytical system for real-time biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) monitoring. It does not need a blank solution and other chemical reagents to operate. The initial dissolved oxygen (DO) in sample solution was measured as blank, while DO in the BFR effluent was measured as response. The DO difference obtained before and after the sample solution flowed through the BFR was regarded as an indicator of real-time BOD. The analytical performance of this reagent-free BFR system was equal to the previous BFR system operated using phosphate buffer saline (PBS) and high purity deionized water in reproducibility, accuracy and long-term stability. Besides, this method embraces many notable advantages, such as no secondary pollution. Additionally, the sample solutions are free from temperature controlling and air-saturation before injection. Significantly, this is a real-time BOD analysis method. This method was successfully carried out in a simulated emergency, and the obtained results agreed well with conventional BOD₅. These advantages, coupled with simplicity in device, convenience in operation and minimal maintenance, make such a reagent-free BFR analytical system promising for practical BOD real-time warning.

  13. A reagent-free tubular biofilm reactor for on-line determination of biochemical oxygen demand.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changyu; Zhao, Huijun; Gao, Shan; Jia, Jianbo; Zhao, Limin; Yong, Daming; Dong, Shaojun

    2013-07-15

    We reported a reagent-free tubular biofilm reactor (BFR) based analytical system for rapid online biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) determination. The BFR was cultivated using microbial seeds from activated sludge. It only needs tap water to operate and does not require any chemical reagent. The analytical performance of this reagent-free BFR system was found to be equal to or better than the BFR system operated using phosphate buffer saline (PBS) and high purity deionized water. The system can readily achieve a limit of detection of 0.25 mg O2 L(-1), possessing superior reproducibility, and long-term operational and storage stability. More importantly, we confirmed for the first time that the BFR system is capable of tolerating common toxicants found in wastewaters, such as 3,5-dichlorophenol and Zn(II), Cr(VI), Cd(II), Cu(II), Pb(II), Mn(II) and Ni(II), enabling the method to be applied to a wide range of wastewaters. The sloughing and clogging are the important attributes affecting the operational stability, hence, the reliability of most online wastewater monitoring systems, which can be effectively avoided, benefiting from the tubular geometry of the reactor and high flow rate conditions. These advantages, coupled with simplicity in device, convenience in operation and minimal maintenance, make such a reagent-free BFR analytical system promising for practical BOD online determination.

  14. Biochemical oxygen demand and algae: Fractionation of phytoplankton and nonphytoplankton respiration in a large river

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, R.R.H. )

    1990-04-01

    Mass balance equations for dissolved oxygen in streams are formulated to account for, among other variables, algal respiration (R), and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD). The oxygen consumption measured in primary productivity-respiration analyses is not R but is total community oxygen consumption (TCOC), and BOD measurements are complicated by undefined algal components. Ultimate BOD was found to be 0.24 mg of O{sub 2} consumed per {mu}g chlorophyll a and carbonaceous BOD was 0.20 per {mu}g chlorophyll a in excess of background BOD. The results were similar for live and dead algae. Phytoplankton respiration was fractionated from nonphytoplankton oxygen consumption (NPOC) by the regression of respiration against chlorophyll a to obtain a y intercept of zero chlorophyll. The intercepts, NPOC, closely matched O{sub 2} consumption measured when phytoplankton biomass was very low. Phytoplankton respiration, calculated as the residual of the difference between TCOC and NPOC,ranged from 0.2 to 1.5 (mean = 0.88) mg O{sub 2} per mg chlorophyll a per hour, close to the literature value of 1 (in cultures). Depth-integrated (DI) phytoplankton respiration was 1/4 to 1/3 of DI gross primary productivity and 1-3% of maximum primary productivity. The separation of phytoplankton R and NPOC permitted the demonstration that R probably is not a simple function of productivity.

  15. A sensitive ferricyanide-mediated biochemical oxygen demand assay for analysis of wastewater treatment plant influents and treated effluents.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Mark A; Welsh, David T; John, Richard; Catterall, Kylie; Teasdale, Peter R

    2013-02-01

    Representative and fast monitoring of wastewater influent and effluent biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) is an elusive goal for the wastewater industry and regulatory bodies alike. The present study describes a suitable assay, which incorporates activated sludge as the biocatalyst and ferricyanide as the terminal electron acceptor for respiration. A number of different sludges and sludge treatments were investigated, primarily to improve the sensitivity of the assay. A limit of detection (LOD) (2.1 mg BOD₅ L⁻¹) very similar to that of the standard 5-day BOD₅ method was achieved in 4 h using raw influent sludge that had been cultured overnight as the biocatalyst. Reducing the microbial concentration was the most effective means to improve sensitivity and reduce the contribution of the sludge's endogenous respiration to total ferricyanide-mediated (FM) respiration. A strong and highly significant relationship was found (n = 33; R = 0.96; p < 0.001; slope = 0.94) between BOD₅ and FM-BOD equivalent values for a diverse range of samples including wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) influent and treated effluent, as well as several grey water samples. The activated sludge FM-BOD assay presented here is an exceptional surrogate method to the standard BOD₅ assay, providing representative, same-day BOD analysis of WWTP samples with a comparable detection limit, a 4-fold greater analytical range and much faster analysis time. The industry appeal of such an assay is tremendous given that ~90% of all BOD₅ analysis is dedicated to measurement of WWTP samples, for which this assay is specifically designed.

  16. Using electrochemistry - total internal refection imaging ellipsometry to monitor biochemical oxygen demand on the surface tethered polyelectrolyte modified electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Li, Meng; Lv, Bei'er; Chen, YanYan; Ma, Hongwei; Jin, Gang

    2015-03-01

    Our previous work has proposed an electrochemistry - total internal reflection imaging ellipsometry (EC-TIRIE) technique to observe the dissolved oxygen (DO) reduction on Clark electrode since high interface sensitivity makes TIRIE a useful tool to study redox reactions on the electrode surface. To amplify the optical signal noise ratio (OSNR), a surface tethered weak polyelectrolyte, carboxylated poly(oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate-random- 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate) (abbreviated as carboxylated poly(OEGMA-r-HEMA)), has been introduced on the electrode surface. Since Clark electrode is widely used in biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) detection, we use this technique to measure BOD in the sample. The dynamic range of the system is from 0 ˜ 25 mg/L. Two samples have been measured. Compared with the conventional method, the deviation of both optical and electrical signals are less than 10%.

  17. Enhanced response of microbial fuel cell using sulfonated poly ether ether ketone membrane as a biochemical oxygen demand sensor.

    PubMed

    Ayyaru, Sivasankaran; Dharmalingam, Sangeetha

    2014-03-25

    The present study is focused on the development of single chamber microbial fuel cell (SCMFC) using sulfonated poly ether ether ketone (SPEEK) membrane to determine the biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) matter present in artificial wastewater (AW). The biosensor produces a good linear relationship with the BOD concentration up to 650 ppm when using artificial wastewater. This sensing range was 62.5% higher than that of Nafion(®). The most serious problem in using MFC as a BOD sensor is the oxygen diffusion into the anode compartment, which consumes electrons in the anode compartment, thereby reducing the coulomb yield and reducing the electrical signal from the MFC. SPEEK exhibited one order lesser oxygen permeability than Nafion(®), resulting in low internal resistance and substrate loss, thus improving the sensing range of BOD. The system was further improved by making a double membrane electrode assembly (MEA) with an increased electrode surface area which provide high surface area for electrically active bacteria.

  18. High removal of chemical and biochemical oxygen demand from tequila vinasses by using physicochemical and biological methods.

    PubMed

    Retes-Pruneda, Jose Luis; Davila-Vazquez, Gustavo; Medina-Ramírez, Iliana; Chavez-Vela, Norma Angelica; Lozano-Alvarez, Juan Antonio; Alatriste-Mondragon, Felipe; Jauregui-Rincon, Juan

    2014-08-01

    The goal of this research is to find a more effective treatment for tequila vinasses (TVs) with potential industrial application in order to comply with the Mexican environmental regulations. TVs are characterized by their high content of solids, high values of biochemical oxygen demand (BODs), chemical oxygen demand (COD), low pH and intense colour; thus, disposal of untreated TVs severely impacts the environment. Physicochemical and biological treatments, and a combination of both, were probed on the remediation of TVs. The use of alginate for the physicochemical treatment of TVs reduced BOD5 and COD values by 70.6% and 14.2%, respectively. Twenty white-rot fungi (WRF) strains were tested in TV-based solid media. Pleurotus ostreatus 7992 and Trametes trogii 8154 were selected due to their ability to grow on TV-based solid media. Ligninolytic enzymes' production was observed in liquid cultures of both fungi. Using the selected WRF for TVs' bioremediation, both COD and BOD5 were reduced by 88.7% and 89.7%, respectively. Applying sequential physicochemical and biological treatments, BOD5 and COD were reduced by 91.6% and 93.1%, respectively. Results showed that alginate and selected WRF have potential for the industrial treatment of TVs.

  19. Semi-specific Microbacterium phyllosphaerae-based microbial sensor for biochemical oxygen demand measurements in dairy wastewater.

    PubMed

    Kibena, Elo; Raud, Merlin; Jõgi, Eerik; Kikas, Timo

    2013-04-01

    Although the long incubation time of biochemical oxygen demand (BOD7) measurements has been addressed by the use of microbial biosensors, the resulting sensor-BOD values gained from the measurements with specific industrial wastewaters still underestimates the BOD value of such samples. This research aims to provide fast and more accurate BOD measurements in the dairy wastewater samples. Unlike municipal wastewater, wastewater from the dairy industry contains many substrates that are not easily accessible to a majority of microorganisms. Therefore, a bacterial culture, Microbacterium phyllosphaerae, isolated from dairy wastewater was used to construct a semi-specific microbial biosensor. A universal microbial biosensor based on Pseudomonas fluorescens, which has a wide substrate spectrum but is nonspecific to dairy wastewater, was used as a comparison. BOD biosensors were calibrated with OECD synthetic wastewater, and experiments with different synthetic and actual wastewater samples were carried out. Results show that the semi-specific M. phyllosphaerae-based microbial biosensor is more sensitive towards wastewaters that contain milk derivates and butter whey than the P. fluorescens-based biosensor. Although the M. phyllosphaerae biosensor underestimates the BOD7 value of actual dairy wastewaters by 25-32%, this bacterial culture is more suitable for BOD monitoring in dairy wastewater than P. fluorescens, which underestimated the same samples by 46-61%.

  20. Effects of Operating Parameters on Measurements of Biochemical Oxygen Demand Using a Mediatorless Microbial Fuel Cell Biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Min-Chi; Cheng, Chiu-Yu; Liu, Man-Hai; Chung, Ying-Chien

    2015-01-01

    The conventional Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD) method takes five days to analyze samples. A microbial fuel cell (MFC) may be an alternate tool for rapid BOD determination in water. However, a MFC biosensor for continuous BOD measurements of water samples is still unavailable. In this study, a MFC biosensor inoculated with known mixed cultures was used to determine the BOD concentration. Effects of important parameters on establishing a calibration curve between the BOD concentration and output signal from the MFC were evaluated. The results indicate monosaccharides were good fuel, and methionine, phenylalanine, and ethanol were poor fuels for electricity generation by the MFC. Ions in the influent did not significantly affect the MFC performance. CN− in the influent could alleviate the effect of antagonistic electron acceptors on the MFC performance. The regression equation for BOD concentration and current density of the biosensor was y = 0.0145x + 0.3317. It was adopted to measure accurately and continuously the BOD concentration in actual water samples at an acceptable error margin. These results clearly show the developed MFC biosensor has great potential as an alternative BOD sensing device for online measurements of wastewater BOD. PMID:26729113

  1. A novel open-type biosensor for the in-situ monitoring of biochemical oxygen demand in an aerobic environment

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Takahiro; Ookawa, Natsuki; Ishida, Mitsuyoshi; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Harumi; Katayose, Yuichi; Yokoyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) is a widely used index of water-quality assessment. Since bioelectrochemical BOD biosensors require anaerobic conditions for anodic reactions, they are not directly used in aerobic environments such as aeration tanks. Normally, the BOD biosensors are closed-type, where the anode is packed inside a closed chamber to avoid exposure to oxygen. In this study, a novel bioelectrochemical open-type biosensor was designed for in-situ monitoring of BOD during intermittent aeration. The open-type anode, without any protection against exposure to oxygen, was directly inserted into an intermittently aerated tank filled with livestock wastewater. Anodic potential was controlled using a potentiostat. Interestingly, this novel biosensor generated similar levels of current under both aerating and non-aerating conditions, and showed a logarithmic correlation (R2 > 0.9) of current with BOD concentrations up to 250 mg/L. Suspended solids in the wastewater attached to and covered the whole anode, presumably leading to the production of anaerobic conditions inside the covered anode via biological oxygen removal. Exoelectrogenic anaerobes (Geobacter spp.) were detected inside the covered anode using the 16S-rRNA gene. This biosensor will have various practical applications, such as the automatic control of aeration intensity and the in-situ monitoring of natural water environments. PMID:27917947

  2. Effects of Operating Parameters on Measurements of Biochemical Oxygen Demand Using a Mediatorless Microbial Fuel Cell Biosensor.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Min-Chi; Cheng, Chiu-Yu; Liu, Man-Hai; Chung, Ying-Chien

    2015-12-28

    The conventional Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD) method takes five days to analyze samples. A microbial fuel cell (MFC) may be an alternate tool for rapid BOD determination in water. However, a MFC biosensor for continuous BOD measurements of water samples is still unavailable. In this study, a MFC biosensor inoculated with known mixed cultures was used to determine the BOD concentration. Effects of important parameters on establishing a calibration curve between the BOD concentration and output signal from the MFC were evaluated. The results indicate monosaccharides were good fuel, and methionine, phenylalanine, and ethanol were poor fuels for electricity generation by the MFC. Ions in the influent did not significantly affect the MFC performance. CN(-) in the influent could alleviate the effect of antagonistic electron acceptors on the MFC performance. The regression equation for BOD concentration and current density of the biosensor was y = 0.0145x + 0.3317. It was adopted to measure accurately and continuously the BOD concentration in actual water samples at an acceptable error margin. These results clearly show the developed MFC biosensor has great potential as an alternative BOD sensing device for online measurements of wastewater BOD.

  3. Simulating unsteady transport of nitrogen, biochemical oxygen demand, and dissolved oxygen in the Chattahoochee River downstream from Atlanta, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jobson, Harvey E.

    1985-01-01

    As part of an intensive water-quality assessment of the Chattahoochee River, repetitive water-quality measurements were made at 12 sites along a 69-kilometer reach of the river downstream of Atlanta, Georgia. Concentrations of seven constituents (temperature, dissolved oxygen, ultimate carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), organic nitrogen, ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate) were obtained during two periods of 36 hours, one starting on August 30, 1976, and the other starting on May 31, 1977. The study reach contains one large and several small sewage outfalls and receives the cooling water from two large powerplants. An unsteady water-quality model of the Lagrangian type was calibrated using the 1977 data and verified using the 1976 data. The model provided a good means of interpreting these data even though both the flow and the pollution loading rates were highly unsteady. A kinetic model of the cascade type accurately described the physical and biochemical processes occurring in the river. All rate coefficients, except reaeration coefficients and those describing the resuspension of BOD, were fitted to the 1977 data and verified using the 1976 data. The study showed that, at steady low flow, about 38 percent of the BOD settled without exerting an oxygen demand. At high flow, this settled BOD was resuspended and exerted an immediate oxygen demand. About 70 percent of the ammonia extracted from the water column was converted to nitrite, but the fate of the remaining 30 percent is unknown. Photosynthetic production was not an important factor in the oxygen balance during either run.

  4. Development and characterization of a novel immobilized microbial membrane for rapid determination of biochemical oxygen demand load in industrial waste-waters.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Shikha; Kumar, Anil; Mehra, N K; Makhijani, S D; Manoharan, A; Gangal, V; Kumar, Rita

    2003-01-01

    The rapid determination of waste-water quality of waste-water treatment plants in terms of pollutional strength, i.e. biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) is difficult or even impossible using the chemical determination method. The present study reports the determination of BOD within minutes using microbial BOD sensors, as compared to the 5-day determination using the conventional method. Multiple criteria establish the basis for the development of a BOD biosensor useful for rapid and reliable BOD estimation in industrial waste-waters. Of these, preparation of a suitable novel immobilized microbial membrane used in conjunction with an apt transducer is discussed. As a result, a microbial biosensor based on a formulated, synergistic, pre-tested microbial consortium has been developed for the measurement of BOD load of various industrial waste-waters. The sensor showed maximum response in terms of current difference, when a cell concentration of 2.25 x 10(10) CFU, harvested in their log phase of growth were utilized for microbial membrane construction. The sensor showed a stability of 180 days when the prepared membranes were stored at a temperature of 4 degrees C in 50 mM phosphate buffer of pH 6.8. The reusability of the immobilized membranes was up to 200 cycles without appreciable loss of their response characteristics. A linear relationship between the current change and a glucose-glutamic acid (GAA) concentration up to 60 mg l(-1) was observed (r=0.999). The lower detection limit was 1.0 mg l(-1) BOD. The sensor response was reproducible within +/-5% of the mean in a series of ten samples having 44 mg l(-1) BOD using standard a GGA solution. When used for the BOD estimation of industrial waste-waters, a relatively good agreement was found between the two methods, i.e. 5-day BOD and that measured by the developed microbial sensor.

  5. Simulation of Temperature, Nutrients, Biochemical Oxygen Demand, and Dissolved Oxygen in the Catawba River, South Carolina, 1996-97

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Feaster, Toby D.; Conrads, Paul A.; Guimaraes, Wladmir B.; Sanders, Curtis L.; Bales, Jerad D.

    2003-01-01

    Time-series plots of dissolved-oxygen concentrations were determined for various simulated hydrologic and point-source loading conditions along a free-flowing section of the Catawba River from Lake Wylie Dam to the headwaters of Fishing Creek Reservoir in South Carolina. The U.S. Geological Survey one-dimensional dynamic-flow model, BRANCH, was used to simulate hydrodynamic data for the Branched Lagrangian Transport Model. Waterquality data were used to calibrate the Branched Lagrangian Transport Model and included concentrations of nutrients, chlorophyll a, and biochemical oxygen demand in water samples collected during two synoptic sampling surveys at 10 sites along the main stem of the Catawba River and at 3 tributaries; and continuous water temperature and dissolved-oxygen concentrations measured at 5 locations along the main stem of the Catawba River. A sensitivity analysis of the simulated dissolved-oxygen concentrations to model coefficients and data inputs indicated that the simulated dissolved-oxygen concentrations were most sensitive to watertemperature boundary data due to the effect of temperature on reaction kinetics and the solubility of dissolved oxygen. Of the model coefficients, the simulated dissolved-oxygen concentration was most sensitive to the biological oxidation rate of nitrite to nitrate. To demonstrate the utility of the Branched Lagrangian Transport Model for the Catawba River, the model was used to simulate several water-quality scenarios to evaluate the effect on the 24-hour mean dissolved-oxygen concentrations at selected sites for August 24, 1996, as simulated during the model calibration period of August 23 27, 1996. The first scenario included three loading conditions of the major effluent discharges along the main stem of the Catawba River (1) current load (as sampled in August 1996); (2) no load (all point-source loads were removed from the main stem of the Catawba River; loads from the main tributaries were not removed); and (3

  6. Aircraft and runway deicers at General Mitchell International Airport, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA. 1. Biochemical oxygen demand and dissolved oxygen in receiving streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corsi, S.R.; Booth, N.L.; Hall, D.W.

    2001-01-01

    Aircraft and runway deicers are used during cold weather at many of the world's airports to facilitate safe air travel. Propylene glycol-, ethylene glycol-, and urea-based deicers are known to have very high biochemical oxygen demand. At General Mitchell International Airport (GMIA) in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA, deicer application, water chemistry, and dissolved oxygen (DO) data were collected for two deicing seasons in order to evaluate and define premanagement water quality parameters prior to the implementation of a glycol management program. Calculations using stream-monitoring data during a controlled release of deicer provided an estimate of 0.8/d for the first-order decay rate constant, substantially higher than published laboratory test results. For eight precipitation events with deicing activities, between 2.4 and 99% of propylene and ethylene glycol applied to aircraft was delivered directly to receiving streams. The percentage of glycol runoff during an event increased with increasing storm-flow volume. Elevated concentrations of glycol and biochemical oxygen demand were measured downstream from the airport. However, the frequency of low DO concentrations in the receiving streams is comparable with that at an upstream reference site. This is possibly due to slowed bacteria metabolism at low water temperatures, short travel times, and dilution from downstream tributaries.

  7. Characterization of water quality and simulation of temperature, nutrients, biochemical oxygen demand, and dissolved oxygen in the Wateree River, South Carolina, 1996-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Feaster, Toby D.; Conrads, Paul A.

    2000-01-01

    In May 1996, the U.S. Geological Survey entered into a cooperative agreement with the Kershaw County Water and Sewer Authority to characterize and simulate the water quality in the Wateree River, South Carolina. Longitudinal profiling of dissolved-oxygen concentrations during the spring and summer of 1996 revealed dissolved-oxygen minimums occurring upstream from the point-source discharges. The mean dissolved-oxygen decrease upstream from the effluent discharges was 2.0 milligrams per liter, and the decrease downstream from the effluent discharges was 0.2 milligram per liter. Several theories were investigated to obtain an improved understanding of the dissolved-oxygen dynamics in the upper Wateree River. Data suggest that the dissolved-oxygen concentration decrease is associated with elevated levels of oxygen-consuming nutrients and metals that are flowing into the Wateree River from Lake Wateree. Analysis of long-term streamflow and water-quality data collected at two U.S. Geological Survey gaging stations suggests that no strong correlation exists between streamflow and dissolved-oxygen concentrations in the Wateree River. However, a strong negative correlation does exist between dissolved-oxygen concentrations and water temperature. Analysis of data from six South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control monitoring stations for 1980.95 revealed decreasing trends in ammonia nitrogen at all stations where data were available and decreasing trends in 5-day biochemical oxygen demand at three river stations. The influence of various hydrologic and point-source loading conditions on dissolved-oxygen concentrations in the Wateree River were determined by using results from water-quality simulations by the Branched Lagrangian Transport Model. The effects of five tributaries and four point-source discharges were included in the model. Data collected during two synoptic water-quality samplings on June 23.25 and August 11.13, 1997, were used to calibrate

  8. Simulation of dissolved oxygen and biochemical oxygen demand, Plantation Canal, Broward County, Florida with an evaluation of the QUAL-I model for use in south Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Russo, Thomas N.; McQuivey, Raul S.

    1975-01-01

    A mathematical model; QUAL-I, developed by the Texas Water Development Board, was evaluated as a management tool in predicting the spatial and temporal distribution of dissolved oxygen and biochemical oxygen demand in Plantation Canal. Predictions based on the QUAL-I model, which was verified only against midday summer-flow conditions, showed that improvement of quality of inflows from sewage treatment plants and use of at least 130 cubic feet per second of dilution water would improve water quality in the canal significantly. The model was not fully amenable to use on Plantation Canal because: (1) it did not consider photosynthetic production, nitrification, and benthic oxygen demand as sources and sinks of oxygen; (2) the model assumptions of complete mixing, transport, and steady state were not met; and (3) the data base was inadequate because it consisted of only one set of data for each case. However, it was felt that meaningful results could be obtained for some sets of conditions. (Woodard-USGS)

  9. Estimates of Nitrogen, Phosphorus, Biochemical Oxygen Demand, and Fecal Coliforms Entering the Environment Due to Inadequate Sanitation Treatment Technologies in 108 Low and Middle Income Countries.

    PubMed

    Fuhrmeister, Erica R; Schwab, Kellogg J; Julian, Timothy R

    2015-10-06

    Understanding the excretion and treatment of human waste (feces and urine) in low and middle income countries (LMICs) is necessary to design appropriate waste management strategies. However, excretion and treatment are often difficult to quantify due to decentralization of excreta management. We address this gap by developing a mechanistic, stochastic model to characterize phosphorus, nitrogen, biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), and fecal coliform pollution from human excreta for 108 LMICs. The model estimates excretion and treatment given three scenarios: (1) use of existing sanitation systems, (2) use of World Health Organization-defined "improved sanitation", and (3) use of best available technologies. Our model estimates that more than 10(9) kg/yr each of phosphorus, nitrogen and BOD are produced. Of this, 22(19-27)%, 11(7-15)%, 17(10-23)%, and 35 (23-47)% (mean and 95% range) BOD, nitrogen, phosphorus, and fecal coliforms, respectively, are removed by existing sanitation systems. Our model estimates that upgrading to "improved sanitation" increases mean removal slightly to between 17 and 53%. Under the best available technology scenario, only approximately 60-80% of pollutants are treated. To reduce impact of nutrient and microbial pollution on human and environmental health, improvements in both access to adequate sanitation and sanitation treatment efficiency are needed.

  10. Defining nutrient and biochemical oxygen demand baselines for tropical rivers and streams in São Paulo State (Brazil): a comparison between reference and impacted sites.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Davi G F; Dodds, Walter K; Carmo Calijuri, Maria do

    2011-11-01

    Determining reference concentrations in rivers and streams is an important tool for environmental management. Reference conditions for eutrophication-related water variables are unavailable for Brazilian freshwaters. We aimed to establish reference baselines for São Paulo State tropical rivers and streams for total phosphorus (TP) and nitrogen (TN), nitrogen-ammonia (NH(4) (+)) and Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD) through the best professional judgment and the trisection methods. Data from 319 sites monitored by the São Paulo State Environmental Company (2005 to 2009) and from the 22 Water Resources Management Units in São Paulo State were assessed (N = 27,131). We verified that data from different management units dominated by similar land cover could be analyzed together (Analysis of Variance, P = 0.504). Cumulative frequency diagrams showed that industrialized management units were characterized by the worst water quality (e.g. average TP of 0.51 mg/L), followed by agricultural watersheds. TN and NH(4) (+) were associated with urban percentages and population density (Spearman Rank Correlation Test, P < 0.05). Best professional judgment and trisection (median of lower third of all sites) methods for determining reference concentrations showed agreement: 0.03 & 0.04 mg/L (TP), 0.31 & 0.34 mg/L (TN), 0.06 & 0.10 mg-N/L (NH(4) (+)) and 2 & 2 mg/L (BOD), respectively. Our reference concentrations were similar to TP and TN reference values proposed for temperate water bodies. These baselines can help with water management in São Paulo State, as well as providing some of the first such information for tropical ecosystems.

  11. Demonstrate a Low Biochemical Oxygen Demand Aircraft Deicing Fluid

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-04

    mg and placed in separate beakers containing at least 30 millimeters of 70% nitric acid . Constant heat was applied with a hot plate up to 40°C...digested in nitric acid to remove the laminate material Type/Number of Specimens Samples (4) from density measurement (Section 4.2.2.1...panels performed the same. No corrosion was observed after 168 hours. Because no corrosion was formed at the 1.0% deicer concentration , the 0.25

  12. Demonstrate a Low Biochemical Oxygen Demand Aircraft Deicing Fluid

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    viscosity and increase the freezing point at higher fluid concentrations. Given budget and schedule constraints, the project team acknowledged that...product that comes from bio-fuel production. Limitations of EcoFlo and EcoFlo II include higher viscosity , reduced freezing point depression...PG. The EcoFlo II formulation is anticipated to have a LOUT closer to that of PG. Also, the higher surface tension and higher viscosity of EcoFlo did

  13. Analysis of nitrogenous and algal oxygen demand in effluent from a system of aerated lagoons followed by polishing pond.

    PubMed

    Khorsandi, Hassan; Alizadeh, Rahimeh; Tosinejad, Horiyeh; Porghaffar, Hadi

    2014-01-01

    In this descriptive-analytical study, nitrogenous and algal oxygen demand were assessed for effluent from a system of facultative partially mixed lagoons followed by the polishing pond using 120 grab samples over 1 year. Filtered and non-filtered samples of polishing pond effluent were tested in the presence and absence of a nitrification inhibitor. Effective factors, including 5-day biochemical and chemical oxygen demand (BOD and COD), total suspended solids (TSS), dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll A, and temperature, were measured using standard methods for water and wastewater tests. The results were analyzed using repeated measures analysis of variance with SPSS version 16. Findings show that the annual mean of the total 5-day BOD in the effluent from the polishing pond consisted of 44.92% as the algal carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand (CBOD), 43.61% as the nitrogenous biochemical oxygen demand (NBOD), and 11.47% as the soluble CBOD. According to this study, the annual mean ratios of algal COD and 5-day algal CBOD to TSS were 0.8 and 0.37, respectively. As the results demonstrate, undertaking quality evaluation of the final effluent from the lagoons without considering nitrogenous and algal oxygen demand would undermine effluent quality assessment and interpretation of the performance of the wastewater treatment plant.

  14. Your Child's Development: 3-5 Days

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Your Child’s Development: 3-5 Days KidsHealth > For Parents > Your Child’s Development: 3-5 Days A A A Though only ... the sole of the foot Social and Emotional Development soothed by a ... When to Talk to Your Doctor Every child develops at his or her own pace, but ...

  15. Your Child's Development: 3-5 Days

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Your Child’s Development: 3-5 Days KidsHealth > For Parents > Your Child’s Development: 3-5 Days Print A A A en ... the sole of the foot Social and Emotional Development soothed by a ... When to Talk to Your Doctor Every child develops at his or her own pace, but ...

  16. Modeling of Aircraft Deicing Fluid Induced Biochemical Oxygen Demand in Subsurface-Flow Constructed Treatment Wetlands

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    meters. The input and output control structures are modeled as sharp crested , rectangular weirs one meter in width. The elevation of the input weir is...manipulated by adjusting the width of both the input and output weirs and the crest height of the output weir . All of these adjustments were found to be...reduction of the weir crest height had an effect on the amount of storm water retained during low precipitation conditions, but not on the crest

  17. A Terrestrial Single Chamber Microbial Fuel Cell-based Biosensor for Biochemical Oxygen Demand of Synthetic Rice Washed Wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Logroño, Washington; Guambo, Alex; Pérez, Mario; Kadier, Abudukeremu; Recalde, Celso

    2016-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells represent an innovative technology which allow simultaneous waste treatment, electricity production, and environmental monitoring. This study provides a preliminary investigation of the use of terrestrial Single chamber Microbial Fuel Cells (SMFCs) as biosensors. Three cells were created using Andean soil, each one for monitoring a BOD concentration of synthetic washed rice wastewater (SRWW) of 10, 100, and 200 mg/L for SMFC1, SMFC2 and SMFC3, respectively. The results showed transient, exponential, and steady stages in the SMFCs. The maximum open circuit voltage (OCV) peaks were reached during the elapsed time of the transient stages, according to the tested BOD concentrations. A good linearity between OCV and time was observed in the increasing stage. The average OCV in this stage increased independently of the tested concentrations. SMFC1 required less time than SMFC2 to reach the steady stage, suggesting the BOD concentration is an influencing factor in SMFCs, and SMFC3 did not reach it. The OCV ratios were between 40.6–58.8 mV and 18.2–32.9 mV for SMFC1 and SMFC2. The reproducibility of the SMFCs was observed in four and three cycles for SMFC1 and SMFC2, respectively. The presented SMFCs had a good response and reproducibility as biosensor devices, and could be an alternative for environmental monitoring. PMID:26784197

  18. A System Dynamics Approach to Modelling the Degradation of Biochemical Oxygen Demand in A Constructed Wetland Receiving Stormwater Runoff

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-12-01

    supplies since "little control over the basic management mechanism ( hydrology ) will be possible and falling groundwater levels could jeopardize the...44 System Hydrology ................................................... 45 Existing Constructed Wetland Systems...72 Defining System Hydrology ................................................................ 73 Detention Pond

  19. A Terrestrial Single Chamber Microbial Fuel Cell-based Biosensor for Biochemical Oxygen Demand of Synthetic Rice Washed Wastewater.

    PubMed

    Logroño, Washington; Guambo, Alex; Pérez, Mario; Kadier, Abudukeremu; Recalde, Celso

    2016-01-15

    Microbial fuel cells represent an innovative technology which allow simultaneous waste treatment, electricity production, and environmental monitoring. This study provides a preliminary investigation of the use of terrestrial Single chamber Microbial Fuel Cells (SMFCs) as biosensors. Three cells were created using Andean soil, each one for monitoring a BOD concentration of synthetic washed rice wastewater (SRWW) of 10, 100, and 200 mg/L for SMFC1, SMFC2 and SMFC3, respectively. The results showed transient, exponential, and steady stages in the SMFCs. The maximum open circuit voltage (OCV) peaks were reached during the elapsed time of the transient stages, according to the tested BOD concentrations. A good linearity between OCV and time was observed in the increasing stage. The average OCV in this stage increased independently of the tested concentrations. SMFC1 required less time than SMFC2 to reach the steady stage, suggesting the BOD concentration is an influencing factor in SMFCs, and SMFC3 did not reach it. The OCV ratios were between 40.6-58.8 mV and 18.2-32.9 mV for SMFC1 and SMFC2. The reproducibility of the SMFCs was observed in four and three cycles for SMFC1 and SMFC2, respectively. The presented SMFCs had a good response and reproducibility as biosensor devices, and could be an alternative for environmental monitoring.

  20. NASA Animation Shows Hurricane Otto Over 5 Days

    NASA Video Gallery

    A 5-day movie of NOAA's GOES-East satellite infrared and visible imagery of Hurricane Otto was created by the NASA/NOAA GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. Th...

  1. Fluidized sand biofilters used to remove ammonia, biochemical oxygen demand, total coliform bacteria, and suspended solids from an intensive aquaculture effluent

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effluents from aquaculture facilities must be effectively managed to remove dissolved wastes and suspended solids that can pollute receiving bodies of water. High volume, dilute flows leaving settling or filtration units can appear pristine, but still contain dissolved wastes. Effective technologie...

  2. Efficacy and tolerability of 5-day azacytidine dose-intensified regimen in higher-risk MDS.

    PubMed

    Pierdomenico, Francesca; Esteves, Susana; Almeida, Antonio

    2013-09-01

    Higher-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are aggressive disorders with rapid progression to AML and short survival. Azacitidine has shown unprecedented survival advantage in these patients but its treatment schedule involves daily hospital administrations for 7 days every 4 weeks. Due to patient and staffing constraints, we have treated 50 patients with a 5-day dose-intensified (500 mg/m(2) total monthly dose divided in 5 days) azacitidine schedule in our center. The regimen was well tolerated, with Grade 3/4 adverse events seen in 24 % patients and only two discontinuations due to toxicity. The response rate was similar to that reported with the 7-day schedule: 16 % complete remissions, 32 % partial remissions, and 62 % transfusion independence. The median survival was 19.2 months from diagnosis. In addition, this regimen reduced hospital visits by 28 % and drug use by 30 %. Our results demonstrate the safety and efficacy of a dose-intensified 5-day regimen.

  3. An Uncontrolled Examination of a 5-Day Intensive Treatment for Pediatric OCD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiteside, Stephen P.; Jacobsen, Amy Brown

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the feasibility of a 5-day intensive treatment for pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Fifteen children with OCD received a week-long treatment based on exposure and response prevention (ERP). The intervention also emphasized teaching children and parents how to conduct ERP independently at home. All families…

  4. Zonal Wave Number 2 Rossby Wave (3.5-day oscillation) Over The Martian Lower Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, P.; Thokuluwa, R. K.

    2013-12-01

    Over the Mars, height (800-50 Pascal pressure coordinate) profiles of temperature (K), measured by radio occultation technique during the MGS (Mars Global Surveyor) mission, obtained for the period of 1-10 January 2006 at the Martian latitude of ~63N in almost all the longitudes are analyzed to study the characteristics of the 3.5-day oscillation. To avoid significant data gaps in a particular longitude sector, we selected a set of 7 Mars longitude regions with ranges of 0-30E, 35-60E, 65-95E, 190-230E, 250-280E, 290-320E, and 325-360E to study the global characteristics of the 3.5-day oscillation. The 3.5-day oscillation is not selected as a-priori but observed as a most significant oscillation during this period of 1-10 January 2006. It is observed that in the longitude of 0-30E, the 3.5-day oscillation shows statistically significant power (above the 95% confidence level white noise) from the lowest height (800 Pascal, 8 hPa) itself and up to the height of 450 Pascal level with the maximum power of ~130 K^2 at the 600 & 650 Pascal levels. It started to grow from the power of ~ 50 K^2 at the lowest height of 800 Pascal level and reached the maximum power in the height of 600-650 Pascal level and then it started to get lessened monotonously up to the height of 450 Pascal level where its power is ~ 20 K^2. Beyond this height and up to the height of 50 Pascal level, the wave amplitude is below the white noise level. As the phase of the wave is almost constant at all the height levels, it seems that the observed 3.5-day oscillation is a stationary wave with respect to the height. In the 35-60 E longitude sector, the vertical structure of the 3.5-day oscillation is similar to what observed for the 0-30 E longitude region but the power is statistically insignificant at all the heights. However in the 65-95E longitude sector, the wave grows from the lowest level (70 K^2) of 800 Pascal to its maximum power of 280 K^2 in the height of 700 Pascal level and then it started

  5. Alterations in erythrocyte survival parameters in rats after 19.5 days aboard Cosmos 782

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leon, H. A.; Serova, L. V.; Cummins, J.; Landaw, S. A.

    1978-01-01

    Rats were subjected to 19.5 days of weightless space flight aboard the Soviet biosatellite, Cosmos 782. Based on the output of CO-14, survival parameters of a cohort of erythrocytes labeled 15.5 days preflight were evaluated upon return from orbit. These were compared to vivarium control rats injected at the same time. Statistical evaluation indicates that all survival factors were altered by the space flight. The mean potential lifespan, which was 63.0 days in the control rats, was decreased to 59.0 days in the flight rats, and random hemolysis was increased three-fold in the flight rats. The measured size of the cohort was decreased, lending further support to the idea that hemolysis was accelerated during some portion of the flight. A number of factors that might be contributory to these changes are discussed, including forces associated with launch and reentry, atmospheric and environmental parameters, dietary factors, radiation, and weightlessness.

  6. Biochemical changes in rat liver after 18.5 days of spaceflight (41566)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, S.; Lin, C.Y.; Volkmann, C. M.; Klein, H. P.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of weightlessness on liver metabolism was investigated using tissue from rats flown in earth orbit for 18.5 days on the Soviet Cosmos 936 biosatellite and the changes in the activities of 28 carbohydrate and lipid enzymes were determined. The activities of two enzymes, palmitoyl-CoA desaturase and lactate dehydrogenase, increased, while the activities of five, glycogen phosphorylase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, both acyltransferases which act on alpha-glycerolphosphate and diglycerides, and and aconitate hydratase decreased. The other enzyme activities were found to be unchanged. In addition, increased levels of liver glycogen and palmitoleate were detected which probably resulted from the lowered glycogen phosphorylase and increased palmitoyl-CoA desaturase activities, respectively, in those animals that experienced weightlessness. All of the changes observed in the rats after 18.5 days of spaceflight disappear by 25 days after the flight.

  7. Administration of hCG 5 days after breeding and reproductive performance in nulliparous dairy goats.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, J F; Torres, C A A

    2005-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of hCG administration 5 days after breeding on plasma progesterone (P4) concentration and reproductive performance of oestrous-induced nulliparous dairy goats. A total of 59 nulliparous goats (36 Alpine and 23 Saanen) received intravaginal sponges with 60 mg medroxyprogesterone acetate for 9 days plus 200 IU equine chorionic gonadotrophin (eCG) and 22.5 microg d-cloprostenol 24 h before sponge removal. After detection of oestrus (day of oestrus = day 0) and breeding, 49 females were randomly assigned, according to the breed, into two treatments (T1 and T2). In T1 (n = 25) and T2 (n = 24), animals received intramuscular injection of 1 ml of saline solution (control) or 250 IU hCG, respectively, 5 days after breeding. Plasma P4 concentration (ng/ml) was determined from blood sampled on days 0, 5, 7, 13, 17, 21, 28 and 45 after breeding. Animals were scanned by transrectal ultrasound (5 MHz probe) on days 35 and 70 after breeding for detection of pregnancy. Plasma P4 concentration did not differ (p > 0.05) between treatments in all days, but it was increased (p < 0.05) in Saanen than in Alpine goats from days 13 to 45. Pregnancy and parturition rates, litter size and gestation period were similar (p > 0.05) to treatments and breeds. Results of this study indicate that human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) administration 5 days after breeding did not significantly alter reproductive performance in dairy nulliparous goats and that plasma P4 differed between Saanen and Alpine goats.

  8. The relationship between overactivity and opioid use in chronic pain: a 5-day observational study.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Nicole Emma; Strong, Jenny; Meredith, Pamela Joy; Fleming, Julia Ann

    2016-02-01

    With increasing concerns about the potential harm of long-term opioid therapy, there is a need for the development and implementation of alternative treatment strategies for patients with chronic pain who have been using opioids for a prolonged period of time. Based on the findings from a recent qualitative investigation that suggested there may be a bidirectional association between opioid reliance and habitual overactivity behaviour (activity engagement that significantly exacerbates pain), this study was designed to quantitatively investigate the association between opioid use and habitual overactivity over a 5-day period in a group of chronic pain patients. Participants provided a list of their prescribed pain medication, completed a self-report measure of habitual overactivity, and then commenced 5 days of data collection. Data collection required participants to wear an activity monitor and to complete a diary that detailed their daily activities and the time at which they took medication. Individuals reporting higher levels of habitual overactivity were more likely to be prescribed opioids. In addition, higher levels of habitual overactivity were associated with more frequent pro re nata ("as needed") opioid use over the 5 days, and with a discrepancy between the prescribed and actual oral morphine-equivalent daily dose, where more medication was taken than was prescribed. There was no predominant context for pro re nata use. The results of this study support the idea that habitual overactivity behaviour may play a role in the development of reliance on opioid medication and that such an association may provide a potential treatment target for opioid therapy rationalisation.

  9. Does the adolescent patellar tendon respond to 5 days of cumulative load during a volleyball tournament?

    PubMed

    van Ark, M; Docking, S I; van den Akker-Scheek, I; Rudavsky, A; Rio, E; Zwerver, J; Cook, J L

    2016-02-01

    Patellar tendinopathy (jumper's knee) has a high prevalence in jumping athletes. Excessive load on the patellar tendon through high volumes of training and competition is an important risk factor. Structural changes in the tendon are related to a higher risk of developing patellar tendinopathy. The critical tendon load that affects tendon structure is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate patellar tendon structure on each day of a 5-day volleyball tournament in an adolescent population (16-18 years). The right patellar tendon of 41 players in the Australian Volleyball Schools Cup was scanned with ultrasound tissue characterization (UTC) on every day of the tournament (Monday to Friday). UTC can quantify structure of a tendon into four echo types based on the stability of the echo pattern. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) were used to test for change of echo type I and II over the tournament days. Participants played between eight and nine matches during the tournament. GEE analysis showed no significant change of echo type percentages of echo type I (Wald chi-square = 4.603, d.f. = 4, P = 0.331) and echo type II (Wald chi-square = 6.070, d.f. = 4, P = 0.194) over time. This study shows that patellar tendon structure of 16-18-year-old volleyball players is not affected during 5 days of cumulative loading during a volleyball tournament.

  10. [Antibacterial activity of urine after administration of ofloxacin for 5 days].

    PubMed

    Drugeon, H; Veyries, M L; Levacher, M; Garnier, M; Aymard, G; Giroud, J P; Rouveix, B

    2000-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of ofloxacin was evaluated in urine over a period of 96 h after oral administration for 5 days of 200 mg twice a day in 12 healthy female volunteers. Bacteriostatic and bactericidal activity of urines were studied for five strains of enterobacterias recovered from urinary infections: two strains of Escherichia Coli Nal-S and Nal-R, two strains of Proteus mirabilis Nal-S and Nal-R, and one strain of Klebsiella pneumoniae Nal-S. Mean urinary concentrations of ofloxacin were very high during the first 12 h following last intake. They were still above 7 mg/l till the 48th hour and above 1.6 mg/l till the 72nd hour. Bactericidal activity of urine was present for 72 h in respect of four strains studied at that time; urine was not bactericidal as regards E. coli Nal-R. After 5 days of oral treatment with ofloxacin (200 mg b.i.d.), urine retains a bactericidal activity for at least 72 h against bacterial strains of urinary tract infections.

  11. 40 CFR 412.2 - General definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) means ammonia reported as nitrogen. (2) BOD5 means 5-day biochemical oxygen demand. (3) Nitrate (as N) means nitrate reported as nitrogen. (4) Total dissolved solids means nonfilterable residue. (k)...

  12. 40 CFR 412.2 - General definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) means ammonia reported as nitrogen. (2) BOD5 means 5-day biochemical oxygen demand. (3) Nitrate (as N) means nitrate reported as nitrogen. (4) Total dissolved solids means nonfilterable residue. (k)...

  13. 40 CFR 412.2 - General definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) means ammonia reported as nitrogen. (2) BOD5 means 5-day biochemical oxygen demand. (3) Nitrate (as N) means nitrate reported as nitrogen. (4) Total dissolved solids means nonfilterable residue. (k)...

  14. [Dynamics of the protein content of human urine during 5-day immersion].

    PubMed

    Vorontsov, A L; Nesterovskaia, A Iu; Morukov, B L; Markin, A A; Zhuravleva, O A; Zabolotskaia, I V; Vostrikova, L V

    2011-01-01

    Variations in the protein spectrum (12 groups) of native daily urine were studied during 5-day dry immersion (DI) of 14 subjects at the age of 19 to 26 years using gradient electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gel. Protein excretion with urine did not alter in the course of the experiment. However, the urine proteins spectrum trended to some shifts. Excretion of low-molecular proteins decreased and of albumin increased pointing to remodulation of tubular reabsorption initiated by the experimental conditions. Steady growth of the Tamm-Horsfall protein concentration seems to be a defense reaction. There was an incremental decrease in immunoglobulins that could be associated with a reduction of glomerular filter permeability for high-molecular proteins.

  15. Playback Station #2 for Cal Net and 5-day-recorder tapes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eaton, Jerry P.

    1978-01-01

    A second system (Playback Station #2) has been set up to play back Cal Net 1" tapes and 5-day-recorder 1/2" tapes. As with the first playback system (Playback Station #1) the tapes are played back on a Bell and Howell VR3700B tape deck and the records are written out on a 16-channel direct-writing Siemens "0scillomink." Separate reproduce heads, tape guides, and tape tension sensor rollers are required for playing back 111 tapes and 1/2" tapes, but changing these tape deck components is a simple task that requires only a few minutes. The discriminators, patch panels, selector switches, filters, time code translators, and signal conditioning circuits for the time code translators and for the tape-speed-compensation signal are all mounted in an equipment rack that stands beside the playback tape deck. Changing playback speeds (15/16 ips or 3 3/4 ips) or changing from Cal Net tapes to 5-day-recorder tapes requires only flipping a few switches and/or changing a few patch cables on the patch panel (in addition to changing the reproduce heads, etc., to change from 1" tape to 1/2" tape). For the Cal Net tapes, the system provides for playback of 9 data channels (680 Hz thru 3060 Hz plus 400 Hz) and 3 time signals (IRIG-E, IRIG-C, and WWVB) at both 15/16 ips (x1 speed) and 3 3/4 ips (x4 speed). Available modes of compensation (using either a 4688 Hz reference or a 3125 Hz reference) are subtractive, capstan, capstan plus subtractive, or no compensation.

  16. Evaluation of 5-day therapy with telithromycin, a novel ketolide antibacterial, for the treatment of tonsillopharyngitis.

    PubMed

    Norrby, S R; Quinn, J; Rangaraju, M; Leroy, B

    2004-07-01

    A pooled analysis of two double-blind, multicentre, Phase III studies compared oral telithromycin 800 mg once-daily for 5 days with penicillin V 500 mg three-times-daily or clarithromycin 250 mg twice-daily for 10 days in the treatment of Streptococcus pyogenes (group A beta-haemolytic streptococcus; GABHS) tonsillopharyngitis. Patients aged > or = 13 years with acute GABHS tonsillopharyngitis were randomised to receive telithromycin (n = 430), penicillin (n = 197) or clarithromycin (n = 231). Clinical isolates of S. pyogenes (n = 590) obtained from throat swab samples on study entry were tested for their in-vitro susceptibility to telithromycin, clarithromycin and azithromycin. Telithromycin demonstrated in-vitro activity against the clinical isolates of S. pyogenes (MIC50/90 0.03/0.06 mg/L) higher than clarithromycin or azithromycin (MIC50/90 0.06/0.06 mg/L and 0.12/0.25 mg/L, respectively), including erythromycin-resistant strains. At the post-therapy/test of cure (TOC) visit (days 16-23), satisfactory bacteriological outcome was demonstrated for 88.3% (234/265) and 88.6% (225/254) of telithromycin- and comparator-treated patients, respectively (per-protocol population). Overall, GABHS eradication rates were 88.7% (235/265) for telithromycin and 89.0% (226/254) for comparators. The clinical cure rates at the post-therapy/TOC visit were 93.6% (248/265) and 90.9% (220/242) for telithromycin and pooled comparators, respectively. Telithromycin was generally well-tolerated. Most adverse events considered to be possibly related to study medication were gastrointestinal and of mild intensity. Discontinuations as a result of adverse events were few in both treatment groups. In conclusion, telithromycin 800 mg once-daily for 5 days was as effective as penicillin V or clarithromycin for 10 days in the treatment of GABHS tonsillopharyngitis.

  17. The 6.5-day wave and its seasonal variability in the middle and upper atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H.-L.; Talaat, E. R.; Roble, R. G.; Lieberman, R. S.; Riggin, D. M.; Yee, J.-H.

    2004-11-01

    The zonal wave number 1 planetary wave of period near 6.5 days is a robust feature in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) region with prominent seasonal variability as revealed by ground based and satellite observations. This wave and its seasonal variability are well reproduced in a recent one model year run of the National Center for Atmospheric Research thermosphere-ionosphere-mesosphere-electrodynamics general circulation model (TIME-GCM) with its lower boundary specified according to the National Centers for Environmental Prediction analysis (year 1993). Wavelet analysis of the model output shows that in the MLT region the wave maximizes before and after the equinoxes and minimizes at solstices. The wave amplitudes at the equinoxes are smaller than the peaks before and after but are still larger than the wave amplitudes at solstices. However, at the lower boundary near 30 km the wave peaks are predominantly between fall and the following spring. By examining the episodes of maximum and minimum wave amplitude and by conducting additional control experiments using the TIME-GCM, the structure of this planetary wave and the factors determining the wave characteristics and seasonal variability are studied in detail. It is found that the wave source, mean wind structure, instability, and the critical layers of the wave can all affect the wave response in the MLT region and can have a strong seasonal dependence. Before and after equinox, the wave follows the waveguide and propagates from the stratosphere to the summer mesosphere/mesopause, where it may amplify due to baroclinic/barotropic instability. Such instability is usually absent from the equinoctial atmosphere, so that there is no wave amplification at equinox. At solstice the wave decays significantly when propagating away from its winter source due to the strong eastward winter stratospheric jet. In the summer side the westward jet is also strong, and the meridional and vertical extension of the

  18. Preosteoblast production 55 hours after a 12.5-day spaceflight on Cosmos 1887.

    PubMed

    Garetto, L P; Gonsalves, M R; Morey, E R; Durnova, G; Roberts, W E

    1990-01-01

    The influence of 12.5 days of spaceflight and a 55 h stressful recovery period (at 1 g) on fibroblastlike osteoblast precursor cells was assessed in the periodontal ligament (PDL) of rats that were 91 days old at launch. Nuclear morphometry was used as a marker for precursor cell differentiation in 3 microns sections cut in the midsagittal plane from the maxillary first molar. According to nuclear volume, cells were classified as preosteoblasts (C + D cells, greater than or equal to 120 microns 3) and less differentiated progenitor cells (A + A' cells, 40-79 microns 3). Compared with synchronous controls (simulated flight conditions), the 55 h postflight recovery period at 1 g resulted in a 40% decrease in the A + A' cell population, a 42% increase in the C + D cells, and a 39% increase in the number of PDL fibroblastlike cells near the bone surface. These results are consistent with a postflight osteogenic response in PDL. This recovery response occurred despite physiological stress in the flight animals that resulted in a highly significant (P less than or equal to 0.001) increase in adrenal weight. The data suggest that after spaceflight there is a strong and rapid recovery mechanism for osteoblast differentiation that is not suppressed by physiological stress.

  19. 5-day storage of platelet concentrates in CLX containers: effect of type of agitation.

    PubMed

    Snyder, E L; Bookbinder, M; Kakaiya, R; Ferri, P; Kiraly, T

    1983-01-01

    To determine the degree of platelet damage produced by different modes of agitation during storage of concentrates for 5 days in CLX blood bags, we studied pH, platelet counts, release of LDH and beta thromboglobulin, morphology and osmotic recovery. Platelets were maintained at 20-24 degrees C on elliptical, 6-rpm circular, 2-rpm circular and flat bed agitators. At 72-120 h platelet concentrates stored on the flat bed shaker had significantly lower pH values than units stored on the elliptical or on either of the circular rotators (p less than 0.05). The percent LDH discharged was highest for the units stored on the elliptical rotator (p less than 0.05). Remaining tests of platelet function were not significantly different for concentrates stored on any of the four agitators. Flat bed shakers were unable to resuspend the platelet 'button' which formed after the final preparative centrifugation. Based on our in vitro studies, we conclude that due to problems with low pH values, flat bed shakers may not be optimal for storing platelet concentrates in CLX blood bags and that some other form of agitation should be used.

  20. Preosteoblast production 55 hours after a 12.5-day spaceflight on Cosmos 1887

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garetto, L. P.; Gonsalves, M. R.; Morey, E. R.; Durnova, G.; Roberts, W. E.; Morey-Holton, E. (Principal Investigator)

    1990-01-01

    The influence of 12.5 days of spaceflight and a 55 h stressful recovery period (at 1 g) on fibroblastlike osteoblast precursor cells was assessed in the periodontal ligament (PDL) of rats that were 91 days old at launch. Nuclear morphometry was used as a marker for precursor cell differentiation in 3 microns sections cut in the midsagittal plane from the maxillary first molar. According to nuclear volume, cells were classified as preosteoblasts (C + D cells, greater than or equal to 120 microns 3) and less differentiated progenitor cells (A + A' cells, 40-79 microns 3). Compared with synchronous controls (simulated flight conditions), the 55 h postflight recovery period at 1 g resulted in a 40% decrease in the A + A' cell population, a 42% increase in the C + D cells, and a 39% increase in the number of PDL fibroblastlike cells near the bone surface. These results are consistent with a postflight osteogenic response in PDL. This recovery response occurred despite physiological stress in the flight animals that resulted in a highly significant (P less than or equal to 0.001) increase in adrenal weight. The data suggest that after spaceflight there is a strong and rapid recovery mechanism for osteoblast differentiation that is not suppressed by physiological stress.

  1. Interhemispheric structure and variability of the 5-day planetary wave from meteor radar wind measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iimura, H.; Fritts, D. C.; Janches, D.; Singer, W.; Mitchell, N. J.

    2015-11-01

    A study of the quasi-5-day wave (5DW) was performed using meteor radars at conjugate latitudes in the Northern and Southern hemispheres. These radars are located at Esrange, Sweden (68° N) and Juliusruh, Germany (55° N) in the Northern Hemisphere, and at Tierra del Fuego, Argentina (54° S) and Rothera Station, Antarctica (68° S) in the Southern Hemisphere. The analysis was performed using data collected during simultaneous measurements by the four radars from June 2010 to December 2012 at altitudes from 84 to 96 km. The 5DW was found to exhibit significant short-term, seasonal, and interannual variability at all sites. Typical events had planetary wave periods that ranged between 4 and 7 days, durations of only a few cycles, and infrequent strongly peaked variances and covariances. Winds exhibited rotary structures that varied strongly among sites and between events, and maximum amplitudes up to ~ 20 m s-1. Mean horizontal velocity covariances tended to be largely negative at all sites throughout the interval studied.

  2. Platelet function testing during 5-day storage of single and random donor plateletpheresis.

    PubMed

    Akay, O Meltem; Gündüz, Eren; Başyiğit, Hatice; Gulbas, Zafer

    2007-06-01

    Platelet concentrates are routinely manufactured from whole blood by differential centrifugation (random donor platelets-RDP) or by plateletpheresis (single donor platelets-SDP). These platelet concentrates have a storage period of 5 days and many different approaches exist to measure the condition of platelets during their storage. In this study, platelet aggregation testing using adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and collagen and flow cytometric platelet activation analysis using CD41 FITC and CD62 PE before and after ADP was performed on days 1, 3 and 5 of storage of platelet preparations. Thirty three RDPs, stored in Baxter and Kansuk blood bags and 18 SDPs stored in Fresenius blood bags were evaluated. In RDPs and in SDPs; ADP and collagen induced PA responses were decreased significantly on the 3rd and 5th days compared to 1st day. CD62 positive platelet percentage after ADP were decreased significantly on the 3rd and 5th days compared to the 1st day in Kansuk bags. Flow cytometric analysis revealed minor changes in CD41 expression after ADP on the 3rd day compared to 1st day and on the 5th day compared to 3rd day. Differences in CD62 positive platelet percentage were not significant between the RDPs and SDPs. Our results suggest that: (1) ADP and collagen induced PA responses decrease both in RDPs and SDPs during storage. (2) Flow cytometric analysis does not show major significant changes in platelet activation after ADP during storage. (3) Continous shaking on the agitator does not cause a significant change in CD62 positive platelet percentage during storage. (4) Platelet aggregation responses in RDPs stored in Baxter and Kansuk blood bags do not differ during storage.

  3. Shoot growth in aseptically cultivated daylily and haplopappus plantlets after a 5-day spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, H. G.; Krikorian, A. D.

    1992-01-01

    Plantlets of daylily (Hemerocallis cv. Autumn Blaze) regenerated from cell suspensions, and 4 clonal populations of Haplopappus gracilis were aseptically cultivated aboard the Shuttle "Discovery" during a 5-day mission within NASA's Plant Growth Unit (PGU) apparatus. Daylily was selected as a representative herbaceous perennial monocotyledon and the haplopappus clones represented an annual dicotyledon. The latter included 4 strains with different physiological and morphological characteristics: two aseptic seedling clones (each generated from a single seedling) and two tissue culture-derived lines. Mean daily growth rates for the primary shoots of all plantlets averaged 4.13 mm day-1 (SD = 2.20) for the flight experiment and 4.68 mm day-1 (SD = 2.59) for the ground control. Comparable growth rates calculated by summing both the primary and secondary shoots for all plantlets were 5.94 mm day-1 (SD = 2.89) for the flight experiment and 6.38 mm day-1 (SD = 3.71) for the control. Statistically significant differences existed between: (1) flight vs control primary shoot growth (the controls growing more than plantlets subjected to spaceflight conditions), (2) the different populations (the daylily gaining more shoot material than any of the haplopappus populations and the haplopappus seedling clones outperforming the tissue culture-derived haplopappus lines), and (3) the individual Plant Growth Chambers contained within the PGU. The data suggest that some spaceflight-associated factor(s) increased the tendency for primary shoot apices to degrade or senesce, resulting in the release of apical dominance and permitting the emergence of axillary branches, which subsequently partially compensated for the reduced primary axis growth. In addition to spaceflight-associated factors, the physiologically diverse nature of the experimental material as well as environmental heterogeneities within the culture apparatus contributed to the variation in growth results. The findings

  4. Pilot study: rapidly cycling hypobaric pressure improves pain after 5 days in adiposis dolorosa

    PubMed Central

    Herbst, Karen L; Rutledge, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Adiposis dolorosa (AD) is a rare disorder of painful nodular subcutaneous fat accompanied by fatigue, difficulty with weight loss, inflammation, increased fluid in adipose tissue (lipedema and lymphedema), and hyperalgesia. Sequential compression relieves lymphedema pain; we therefore hypothesized that whole body cyclic pneumatic hypobaric compression may relieve pain in AD. To avoid exacerbating hyperalgesia, we utilized a touch-free method, which is delivered via a high-performance altitude simulator, the Cyclic Variations in Altitude Conditioning™ (CVAC™) process. As a pilot study, 10 participants with AD completed pain and quality of life questionnaires before and after 20–40 minutes of CVAC process daily for 5 days. Participants lost weight (195.5 ± 17.6–193.8 ± 17.3 lb; P = 0.03), and bioimpedance significantly decreased (510 ± 36–490 ± 38 ohm; P = 0.01). There was a significant decrease in scores on the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (P = 0.039), in average (P = 0.002), highest (P = 0.029), lowest (P = 0.04), and current pain severity (P = 0.02) on the Visual Analogue Scale, but there was no change in pain quality by the McGill Pain Questionnaire. There were no significant changes in total and physical SF-36 scores, but the mental score improved significantly (P = 0.049). There were no changes in the Pain Disability Index or Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. These data present a potential, new, noninvasive means of treating pain in AD by whole body pneumatic compression as part of the CVAC process. Although randomized, controlled trials are needed to confirm these data, the CVAC process could potentially help in treating AD pain and other chronic pain disorders. PMID:21197318

  5. Outcomes of a 5-day physiotherapy programme for functional (psychogenic) motor disorders.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, G; Ricciardi, L; Demartini, B; Hunter, R; Joyce, E; Edwards, M J

    2015-03-01

    Patients with functional motor disorder (FMD) are commonly seen by physiotherapists and there is growing evidence to support a physical rehabilitation approach. There are, however, few descriptions in the literature of the content of successful physiotherapy treatment. This prospective cohort study reports the practicalities and outcomes of a pilot 5-day physiotherapy programme. Patients were referred from a specialist movement disorders clinic. The treatment consisted of education and movement retraining, with a long-term self-management focus. Education and movement retraining was based on a pathophysiological model for FMD that stresses the importance of self-focussed attention and illness belief. Patients were assessed at baseline, end of treatment and 3-month follow-up. 47 patients completed the programme, mean symptom duration was 5.5 years, 64 % were unemployed due to ill health. At the end of treatment, 65 % rated their symptoms as "very much improved" or "much improved", this reduced to 55 % at 3 months. At follow-up, there was a significant improvement in physical domains of the SF-36, Berg Balance Scale and 10 Metre Timed Walk. Measures of mental health did not change. This prospective cohort study adds to the growing evidence that supports the use of specialist physiotherapy treatment for FMD. Improvements here were made despite the cohort having characteristics associated with poor prognosis. We argue that specific treatment techniques are important and have the potential to improve physical function, quality of life and may prove to be a cost-effective treatment for selected patients with FMD.

  6. Response of mice to continuous 5-day passive hyperthermia resembles human heat acclimation.

    PubMed

    Sareh, Houtan; Tulapurkar, Mohan E; Shah, Nirav G; Singh, Ishwar S; Hasday, Jeffrey D

    2011-05-01

    Chronic repeated exposure to hyperthermia in humans results in heat acclimation (HA), an adaptive process that is attained in humans by repeated exposure to hyperthermia and is characterized by improved heat elimination and increased exercise capacity, and acquired thermal tolerance (ATT), a cellular response characterized by increased baseline heat shock protein (HSP) expression and blunting of the acute increase in HSP expression stimulated by re-exposure to thermal stress. Epidemiologic studies in military personnel operating in hot environments and elite athletes suggest that repeated exposure to hyperthermia may also exert long-term health effects. Animal models demonstrate that coincident exposure to mild hyperthermia or prior exposure to severe hyperthermia can profoundly affect the course of experimental infection and injury, but these models do not represent HA. In this study, we demonstrate that CD-1 mice continuously exposed to mild hyperthermia (ambient temperature ~37°C causing ~2°C increase in core temperature) for 5 days and then exposed to a thermal stress (42°C ambient temperature for 40 min) exhibited some of the salient features of human HA, including (1) slower warming during thermal stress and more rapid cooling during recovery and (2) increased activity during thermal stress, as well as some of the features of ATT, including (1) increased baseline expression of HSP72 and HSP90 in lung, heart, spleen, liver, and brain; and (2) blunted incremental increase in HSP72 expression following acute thermal stress. This study suggests that continuous 5-day exposure of CD-1 mice to mild hyperthermia induces a state that resembles the physiologic and cellular responses of human HA. This model may be useful for analyzing the molecular mechanisms of HA and its consequences on host responsiveness to subsequent stresses.

  7. Continuing Assessment of the 5-Day Sodium Carbonate-Ammonium Nitrate Extraction Assay as an Indicator Test for Silicon Fertilizers.

    PubMed

    Zellner, Wendy; Friedrich, Russell L; Kim, Sujin; Sturtz, Douglas; Frantz, Jonathan; Altland, James; Krause, Charles

    2015-01-01

    The 5-day sodium carbonate-ammonium nitrate extraction assay (5-day method) has been recognized by the American Association of Plant Food Control Officials as a validated test method to identify fertilizers or beneficial substances that provide plant-available silicon (Si). The test method used the molybdenum blue colorimetric assay to quantify percentage Si; however, laboratories may use inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) for elemental analysis. To examine the use of either colorimetric or ICP-OES methods for Si determination, the 5-day method was performed on the following Si-containing compounds; wollastonite, sand, biochar, and a basic oven furnace (BOF) slag. Grow-out studies using Zinnia elegans were also performed using varying rates of the wollastonite, biochar, and BOF slag. Our results show using the 5-day method, wollastonite had the highest extracted amounts of silicic acid (H4SiO4) at 4% followed by biochar (2%), BOF slag (1%), and sand (0%). Extraction values calculated using either the molybdenum blue colorimetric assay or ICP-OES for detection of the H4SiO4 had a significant correlation, supporting the application of either detection method for this type of analysis. However, when extracted values were compared to amounts of Si taken up by the plants, the 5-day method overestimated both wollastonite and biochar. While this method is a valid indicator test for determining a soluble Si source, other plant species and methods should be perused to potentially provide more quantitative analyses for plant-available Si content of all materials.

  8. Translocation and biokinetic behavior of nanoscaled europium oxide particles within 5 days following an acute inhalation in rats.

    PubMed

    Creutzenberg, Otto; Kock, Heiko; Schaudien, Dirk

    2016-03-01

    Nanoscaled europium oxide (Eu2O3) particles were inhaled by rats after acute exposure and the potential translocation of particles followed by chemical analysis and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was investigated. An aqueous dispersion (phosphate buffer/bovine serum albumin) of a commercially available Eu2O3 particle fraction consisting partially of nanoscaled particles was aerosolized with pressurized air. After rapid evaporation, rats inhaled the dry aerosol for 6 h in a single exposure resulting in an alveolar calculated dose of approximately 39.5 μg Eu2O3. Using chemical analysis, 36.8 μg Eu2O3 was detected 1 h after lung inhalation. The amount declined slightly to 34.5 μg after 1 day and 35.0 μg after 5 days. The liver showed an increase of Eu2O3 from 32.3 ng 1 h up to 294 ng 5 days after inhalation. Additionally, lung-associated lymph nodes, thymus, kidneys, heart and testis exhibited an increase of europium over the period investigated. In the blood, the highest amount of europium was found 1 h after treatment whereas feces, urine and mesenteric lymph nodes revealed the highest amount 1 day after treatment. Using TEM analysis, particles could be detected only in lungs, and in the liver, no particles were detectable. In conclusion, the translocation of Eu2O3 within 5 days following inhalation could be determined very precisely by chemical analysis. A translocation of Eu2O3 particulate matter to liver was not detectable by TEM analysis; thus, the overproportional level of 0.8% of the lung load observed in the liver after 5 days suggests a filtering effect of dissolved europium with accumulation.

  9. Initiation of GnRH agonist treatment on 3-5 days postoperatively in endometriosis patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Gong, Lili; Zhang, Shaofen; Han, Yi; Long, Qiqi; Zou, Shien; Cao, Yuankui

    2015-08-01

    Seventy patients with stage III or IV endometriosis were randomly assigned to 2 groups after conservative surgery. Group O (n = 35) received 3 cycles of a 28-day gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRH-a) treatment (goserelin, 3.6 mg) starting 3-5 days postoperatively. Group M (n = 35) received the same treatment starting on days 1-5 of menstruation. Groups were further subdivided according to add-back treatment. Pre- and posttreated levels of estradiol (E2 ), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), and luteinizing hormone (LH) and visual analog scale (VAS), Kupperman menopausal index (KMI), and bone mineral density (BMD) scores were recorded. The incidence of uterine bleeding was assessed. In both groups, serum levels of E2 , FSH, and LH and VAS scores decreased significantly after treatment. Spotting was the most frequent bleeding pattern. During cycle 1, the bleeding time in group M was much longer that than that in group O (P =.001), and the bleeding rate in group M was significantly higher than that in group O (P =.024, RR = 1.185). In patients with stage III or IV endometriosis, the efficacy of GnRH-a initiated 3-5 days postoperatively was equivalent to that of GnRH-a initiated on days 1-5 of menstruation. Female patients who initiated GnRH-a treatment 3-5 days postoperatively experienced less uterine bleeding during the first cycle of treatment.

  10. Responses of the lower thermospheric temperature to the 9 day and 13.5 day oscillations of recurrent geomagnetic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Guoying; Wang, Wenbin; Xu, Jiyao; Yue, Jia; Burns, Alan G.; Lei, Jiuhou; Mlynczak, Martin G.; Rusell, James M.

    2014-06-01

    Responses of the lower thermospheric temperature to the 9 day and 13.5 day oscillations of recurrent geomagnetic activity and solar EUV radiation have been investigated using neutral temperature data observed by the TIMED/SABER (Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics/Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry) instrument and numerical experiments by the NCAR-TIME-GCM (National Center for Atmospheric Research-thermosphere-ionosphere-mesosphere electrodynamics-general circulation model). The TIMED/SABER data analyzed were for the period from 2002 to 2007 during the declining phase of solar cycle 23. The observations show that the zonal mean temperature in the lower thermosphere oscillated with periods of near 9 and 13.5 days in the height range of 100-120 km. These oscillations were more strongly correlated with the recurrent geomagnetic activity than with the solar EUV variability of the same periods. The 9 day and 13.5 day oscillations of lower thermospheric temperature had greater amplitudes at high latitudes than at low latitudes; they also had larger amplitudes at higher altitudes, and the oscillations could penetrate down to ~105 km, depending on the strength of the recurrent geomagnetic activity for a particular time period. The data further show that the periodic responses of the lower thermospheric temperature to recurrent geomagnetic activity were different in the two hemispheres. In addition, numerical experiments have been carried out using the NCAR-TIME-GCM to investigate the causal relationship between the temperature oscillations and the geomagnetic activity and solar EUV variations of the same periods. Model simulations showed the same periodic oscillations as those seen in the observations when the real geomagnetic activity index, Kp, was used to drive the model. These numerical results show that recurrent geomagnetic activity is the main cause of the 9 day and 13.5 day variations in the lower thermosphere

  11. Demanding Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oguntoyinbo, Lekan

    2010-01-01

    It was the kind of crisis most universities dread. In November 2006, a group of minority student leaders at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) threatened to sue the university if administrators did not heed demands that included providing more funding for multicultural student groups. This article discusses how this threat…

  12. Effectiveness of short-course therapy (5 days) with grepafloxacin in the treatment of acute bacterial exacerbations of chronic bronchitis.

    PubMed

    DeAbate, C A; Bettis, R; Munk, Z M; Fleming, H; Munn, N J; Riffer, E; Bagby, B; Giguere, G; Collins, J J

    1999-01-01

    Three hundred eighty-nine patients were enrolled in a double-masked, multicenter, randomized clinical trial comparing the clinical and bacteriologic efficacies and safety of a 5-day course (n = 195) versus a 10-day course (n = 194) of grepafloxacin 400 mg once daily in the treatment of acute bacterial exacerbations of chronic bronchitis (ABECB). Patients in the 5-day treatment group received placebo on days 6 through 10. Bacteriologic assessments were based on cultures of sputum specimens obtained before and, when possible, during and after treatment. Organisms were isolated from the pretreatment sputum specimens of 332 of 388 (86%) patients, the primary pathogens being Haemophilus parainfluenzae, Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Moraxella catarrhalis, and Staphylococcus aureus (29%, 19%, 4%, 5%, and 5% of isolates, respectively). Among isolates tested for beta-lactamase production, results were positive in 25% of H influenzae isolates and 90% of M catarrhalis isolates. Forty-two percent of S pneumoniae isolates demonstrated reduced susceptibility (intermediate or high-level resistance) to penicillin. A satisfactory clinical outcome (cure or improvement) was achieved in 83% (128 of 155) and 81% (122 of 150) of clinically evaluable patients treated with grepafloxacin for 5 or 10 days, respectively. Pathogens were eradicated or presumed eradicated in 77% (106 of 138) and 80% (98 of 123) of bacteriologically evaluable patients treated with grepafloxacin for 5 or 10 days, respectively. The 2 treatment groups were equivalent with respect to both clinical and bacteriologic efficacy, and no statistically significant differences in the incidence of drug-related adverse events were seen between the 2 groups. Substantial symptom relief was evident with both treatment regimens by the first during-treatment measurement, which occurred between days 3 through 5. These results indicate that treatment with 400 mg grepafloxacin once daily for 5 days is as well

  13. Daily Profiles of Fibrinogen Metabolism for 5 Days Following Hemorrhage and Lactated Ringer’s Resuscitation in Pigs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    DAILY PROFILES OF FIBRINOGEN METABOLISM FOR 5 DAYS FOLLOWING HEMORRHAGE AND LACTATED RINGER’S RESUSCITATION IN PIGS Wenjun Z. Martini , Kevin K. Chung...for measurement of mean arterial pressure 605 SHOCK, Vol. 37, No. 6, pp. 605 610, 2012 Address reprint requests to Wenjun Z. Martini , PhD, The US...Ringerâs Resuscitation in Pigs 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Martini W. Z., Chung K. K., Dubick M. A

  14. Evaluation of platelets prepared by apheresis and stored for 5 days. In vitro and in vivo studies

    SciTech Connect

    Shanwell, A.; Gulliksson, H.; Berg, B.K.; Jansson, B.A.; Svensson, L.A.

    1989-11-01

    To evaluate the effect of storage on apheresis platelets collected with a closed-system blood cell separator, an in vitro investigation was performed, with measurements of pH, lactate, ATP, the ratio of ATP to the total adenine nucleotide content, and adenylate kinase. Unmodified apheresis platelets and apheresis platelets with plasma added were compared with conventional platelets stored in PL-1240 or PL-732 plastic containers. During 6 days of storage, there were similar changes in all variables with one exception: the extracellular activity of adenylate kinase was lower in apheresis platelets with plasma than in the other three groups (p less than 0.01). In vivo studies were carried out with 111Indium-labeled autologous platelets in eight volunteers. Apheresis platelets with 100 mL of plasma added were stored in two 1000-mL containers (PL-732) at 22 degrees C during agitation. Platelets from one of the containers were labeled with 111Indium and transfused into the volunteer within 24 hours. Platelets from the other container were labeled after 5 days of storage and transfused into the same donor. There were no significant differences between apheresis platelets stored for 1 day and those stored for 5 days: the mean percentage of recovery was 58.4 and 57.6 percent, t1/2 was 69 and 67 hours, and the survival time was 5.5 and 5.6 days, respectively.

  15. Sediments, nutrients, and oxygen-demanding substances in the Minnesota River: Selected water-quality data, 1989-90

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Payne, G.A.

    1991-01-01

    This report presents selected physical and chemical data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey for the Minnesota River Assessment Project, a four-year interagency study coordinated by the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency. Water samples were collected at 12 sites on the Minnesota River and at the mouths of 10 major tributary streams located from the outlet of Lac qui Parle Reservoir to Henderson, Minnesota. Sampling from August 1989 through September 1990 resulted in collection of 171 stream-water samples. This report includes data on streamflow, total suspended solids, nitrite plus nitrate nitrogen, total phosphorus, biochemical oxygen demand, and chlorophyll a.

  16. Efficacy and safety of 3 versus 5 days of meloxicam as an analgesic for feline onychectomy and sterilization

    PubMed Central

    Ingwersen, Walt; Fox, Ronald; Cunningham, Gail; Winhall, Martha

    2012-01-01

    Three- or 5-day courses of meloxicam [0.2 mg/kg body weight (BW) subcutaneously pre- or postoperatively on Day 1 followed by 0.05 mg/kg BW, PO per day thereafter] were assessed for analgesic efficacy and safety in 50 client-owned cats undergoing onychectomy and sterilization. Primary outcome parameters were analgesia score, gait/lameness score, and need for rescue analgesia assessed at times 0, 1, 4, 7, 24, 28, 35, 48, 52, 57 hours and on Day 5. Packed cell volume/total solids and serum biochemistry were assessed at time 0 and Days 3 and 5. There were no differences in efficacy and safety parameters regardless of the treatment protocol employed and no cat required rescue analgesia. The patients that received meloxicam preoperatively had statistically better gait/lameness scores than those that received meloxicam postoperatively, supporting the principle of preemptive analgesia. PMID:22942440

  17. Efficacy and safety of 3 versus 5 days of meloxicam as an analgesic for feline onychectomy and sterilization.

    PubMed

    Ingwersen, Walt; Fox, Ronald; Cunningham, Gail; Winhall, Martha

    2012-03-01

    Three- or 5-day courses of meloxicam [0.2 mg/kg body weight (BW) subcutaneously pre- or postoperatively on Day 1 followed by 0.05 mg/kg BW, PO per day thereafter] were assessed for analgesic efficacy and safety in 50 client-owned cats undergoing onychectomy and sterilization. Primary outcome parameters were analgesia score, gait/lameness score, and need for rescue analgesia assessed at times 0, 1, 4, 7, 24, 28, 35, 48, 52, 57 hours and on Day 5. Packed cell volume/total solids and serum biochemistry were assessed at time 0 and Days 3 and 5. There were no differences in efficacy and safety parameters regardless of the treatment protocol employed and no cat required rescue analgesia. The patients that received meloxicam preoperatively had statistically better gait/lameness scores than those that received meloxicam postoperatively, supporting the principle of preemptive analgesia.

  18. A 2l-He hybrid cryostat with 5 days holdtime for a 690 GHz InSb-bolometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woestenburg, E. E. M.; Casse, J. L.

    The design and construction of a 2-liter helium cryostat are described, using a closed cycle refrigerator to cool the cryostat radiation shields. A 5-day hold-time at 4.2 K has been achieved with this configuration. The cryostat is being used to cool a Schottky diode mixer at 350 GHz and an InSb bolometer at 690 GHz to 20 K and 4.2 K, respectively. The heat load on the 4 K cold station has been minimized using a thermal model of the cryostat, partly developed on the basis of measurements on the real cryostat. Using the model, insight was gained into the importance of various heat loads, permitting improvements in the original cryostat.

  19. Discovery of a Similar to 5 Day Characteristic Timescale in the Kepler Power Spectrum of Zw 229-15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelson, R.; Vaughan, S.; Malkan, M.; Kelly, B. C.; Smith, K. L.; Boyd, P. T.; Mushotzky, R.

    2014-01-01

    We present time series analyses of the full Kepler dataset of Zw 229- 15. This Kepler light curve- with a baseline greater than three years, composed of virtually continuous, evenly sampled 30-minute measurements - is unprecedented in its quality and precision. We utilize two methods of power spectral analysis to investigate the optical variability and search for evidence of a bend frequency associated with a characteristic optical variability timescale. Each method yields similar results. The first interpolates across data gaps to use the standard Fourier periodogram. The second, using the CARMA-based time-domain modeling technique of Kelly et al., does not need evenly-sampled data. Both methods find excess power at high frequencies that may be due to Kepler instrumental effects. More importantly both also show strong bends (delta alpha is approx. 2) at timescales of approx. 5 days, a feature similar to those seen in the X-ray PSDs of AGN but never before in the optical. This observed approx. 5 day timescale may be associated with one of several physical processes potentially responsible for the variability. A plausible association could be made with light -crossing, dynamical or thermal timescales, depending on the assumed value of the accretion disk size and on unobserved disk parameters such as alpha and H¬R. This timescale is not consistent with the viscous timescale, which would be years in a approx. 10(exp7) solar mass AGN such as Zw 229- 15. However there must be a second bend on long (& 1 year) timescales, and that feature could be associated with the viscous timescale.

  20. Discovery of a ∼5 day characteristic timescale in the Kepler power spectrum of Zw 229–15

    SciTech Connect

    Edelson, R.; Smith, K. L.; Mushotzky, R.; Vaughan, S.; Malkan, M.; Kelly, B. C.; Boyd, P. T.

    2014-11-01

    We present time series analyses of the full Kepler data set of Zw 229–15. This Kepler light curve—with a baseline greater than 3 yr, composed of virtually continuous, evenly sampled 30 minute measurements—is unprecedented in its quality and precision. We utilize two methods of power spectral analysis to investigate the optical variability and search for evidence of a bend frequency associated with a characteristic optical variability timescale. Each method yields similar results. The first interpolates across data gaps to use the standard Fourier periodogram. The second, using the CARMA-based time-domain modeling technique of Kelly et al., does not need evenly sampled data. Both methods find excess power at high frequencies that may be due to Kepler instrumental effects. More importantly, both also show strong bends (Δα ∼ 2) at timescales of ∼5 days, a feature similar to those seen in the X-ray power spectral densities of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) but never before in the optical. This observed ∼5 day timescale may be associated with one of several physical processes potentially responsible for the variability. A plausible association could be made with light-crossing dynamical or thermal timescales depending on the assumed value of the accretion disk size and on unobserved disk parameters such as α and H/R. This timescale is not consistent with the viscous timescale, which would be years in a ∼10{sup 7} M {sub ☉} AGN such as Zw 229–15. However, there must be a second bend on long (≳ 1 yr) timescales and that feature could be associated with the viscous timescale.

  1. Lipid droplet dynamics and insulin sensitivity upon a 5-day high-fat diet in Caucasians and South Asians.

    PubMed

    Gemmink, Anne; Bakker, Leontine E H; Guigas, Bruno; Kornips, Esther; Schaart, Gert; Meinders, A Edo; Jazet, Ingrid M; Hesselink, Matthijs K C

    2017-02-14

    A 5-day High-Fat High-Calorie diet (HFHC-diet) reduces insulin-stimulated glucose disposal (Rd) in South Asian, but not Caucasian healthy lean males. We aimed to investigate if differences in myocellular lipid handling are underlying this differential response. A two-step hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp and muscle biopsies were performed in 12 healthy lean Caucasian and South Asian males (BMI < 25 kg/m(2), 19-25 years) before and after a 5-day HFHC-diet (regular diet + 375 mL cream/day; 1275 kcal/day; 94% fat). Triglyceride extractions and Western Blots for lipid droplet and mitochondrial proteins were performed. Intramyocellular lipid content and HFHC-diet response were similar between ethnicities (group effect: P = 0.094; diet effect: +~30%, P = 0.044). PLIN5 protein content increased upon the HFHC-diet (P = 0.031) and tended to be higher in South Asians (0.87 ± 0.42 AU vs. 1.35 ± 0.58 AU, P = 0.07). 4-HNE tended to increase in South Asians upon the HFHC-diet (interaction effect: P = 0.057). In Caucasians ΔPLIN5 content correlated with ΔRd (Caucasians: r = 0.756, P = 0.011; South Asians: r = -0.085, P = 0.816), while in South Asians Δ4-HNE associated with ΔPLIN5 content (Caucasians: r = 0.312, P = 0.380; South Asians: r = 0.771, P = 0.003). These data indicate that in Caucasians, PLIN5 may be protective against HFHC-diet induced insulin resistance, which for reasons not yet understood is not observed in South Asians, who possess increased lipid peroxidation levels.

  2. Lipid droplet dynamics and insulin sensitivity upon a 5-day high-fat diet in Caucasians and South Asians

    PubMed Central

    Gemmink, Anne; Bakker, Leontine E. H.; Guigas, Bruno; Kornips, Esther; Schaart, Gert; Meinders, A. Edo; Jazet, Ingrid M.; Hesselink, Matthijs K. C.

    2017-01-01

    A 5-day High-Fat High-Calorie diet (HFHC-diet) reduces insulin-stimulated glucose disposal (Rd) in South Asian, but not Caucasian healthy lean males. We aimed to investigate if differences in myocellular lipid handling are underlying this differential response. A two-step hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp and muscle biopsies were performed in 12 healthy lean Caucasian and South Asian males (BMI < 25 kg/m2, 19–25 years) before and after a 5-day HFHC-diet (regular diet + 375 mL cream/day; 1275 kcal/day; 94% fat). Triglyceride extractions and Western Blots for lipid droplet and mitochondrial proteins were performed. Intramyocellular lipid content and HFHC-diet response were similar between ethnicities (group effect: P = 0.094; diet effect: +~30%, P = 0.044). PLIN5 protein content increased upon the HFHC-diet (P = 0.031) and tended to be higher in South Asians (0.87 ± 0.42 AU vs. 1.35 ± 0.58 AU, P = 0.07). 4-HNE tended to increase in South Asians upon the HFHC-diet (interaction effect: P = 0.057). In Caucasians ΔPLIN5 content correlated with ΔRd (Caucasians: r = 0.756, P = 0.011; South Asians: r = −0.085, P = 0.816), while in South Asians Δ4-HNE associated with ΔPLIN5 content (Caucasians: r = 0.312, P = 0.380; South Asians: r = 0.771, P = 0.003). These data indicate that in Caucasians, PLIN5 may be protective against HFHC-diet induced insulin resistance, which for reasons not yet understood is not observed in South Asians, who possess increased lipid peroxidation levels. PMID:28195217

  3. Effects of endurance training on endocrine response to physical exercise after 5 days of bed rest in healthy male subjects.

    PubMed

    Koska, Juraj; Ksinantová, Lucia; Kvetnanský, Richard; Hamar, Dusan; Martinkovic, Miroslav; Vigas, Milan

    2004-06-01

    The study was designed to evaluate how a bout of endurance training (ET) influences the endocrine response after head-down bed rest (HDBR). Eleven healthy males completed the study, which consisted of a 6-wk ET followed by 5 days of -6 degrees head-down HDBR. Treadmill exercise at 80% of pretraining maximal aerobic capacity (VO(2max)) was performed before and after ET as well as after HDBR. ET increased VO(2max) by 13%. The response of norepinephrine was attenuated after ET and exaggerated after HDBR (P < 0.001). The differences in epinephrine responses were not statistically significant. The responses of cortisol and plasma renin activity (PRA) were unchanged after ET and were enhanced after HDBR (P < 0.001). The response of growth hormone after HDBR was reduced (P < 0.05). Only the change in cortisol response was associated with the increment of VO(2max) after ET (r = 0.68, P < 0.01). Endurance training failed to completely prevent changes in endocrine responses seen after HDBR. Improvement of physical fitness was associated with an enhancement of the cortisol response to exercise following the period of bed rest.

  4. Estimation of biological oxygen demand and chemical oxygen demand for combined sewer systems using synchronous fluorescence spectra.

    PubMed

    Hur, Jin; Lee, Bo-Mi; Lee, Tae-Hwan; Park, Dae-Hee

    2010-01-01

    Real-time monitoring of water quality for sewer system is required for efficient sewer network design because it provides information on the precise loading of pollutant to wastewater treatment facilities and the impact of loading on receiving water. In this study, synchronous fluorescence spectra and its first derivatives were investigated using a number of wastewater samples collected in sewer systems in urban and non-urban areas, and the optimum fluorescence feature was explored for the estimation of biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) concentrations of sewer samples. The temporal variations in BOD and COD showed a regular pattern for urban areas whereas they were relatively irregular for non-urban areas. Irrespective of the sewer pipes and the types of the areas, two distinct peaks were identified from the synchronous fluorescence spectra, which correspond to protein-like fluorescence (PLF) and humic-like fluorescence (HLF), respectively. HLF in sewer samples appears to be associated with fluorescent whitening agents. Five fluorescence characteristics were selected from the synchronous spectra and the first-derivatives. Among the selected fluorescence indices, a peak in the PLF region (i.e., Index I) showed the highest correlation coefficient with both BOD and COD. A multiple regression approach based on suspended solid (SS) and Index I used to compensate for the contribution of SS to BOD and COD revealed an improvement in the estimation capability, showing good correlation coefficients of 0.92 and 0.94 for BOD and COD, respectively.

  5. Chemical oxygen demand analysis of wastewater using trivalent manganese oxidant with chloride removal by sodium bismuthate pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Miller, D G; Brayton, S V; Boyles, W T

    2001-01-01

    Current chemical oxygen demand (COD) analyses generate wastes containing hexavalent and trivalent chromium, mercury, and silver. Waste disposal is difficult, expensive, and poses environmental hazards. A new COD test is proposed that eliminates these metals and shortens analysis time, where trivalent manganese oxidant replaces hexavalent chromium (dichromate). A silver catalyst is not required. Optional pretreatment removes chloride via oxidation to chlorine using sodium bismuthate, eliminating the need for mercury. Sample aqueous and solid components are separated for chloride removal, then recombined for total COD measurement. Soluble and nonsoluble COD can be determined separately. Digestion at 150 degrees C is complete in 1 hour. Results are determined by titration or by spectrophotometric reading. Test wastes contain none of the metals regulated for disposal under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Results are shown for selected organic compounds and various wastewaters. Statistical comparisons are made with dichromate COD and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5) test values.

  6. Comparison of the effects of adenine-ribose with adenosine for maintenance of ATP concentrations in 5-day hypothermically perfused dog kidneys.

    PubMed

    McAnulty, J F; Southard, J H; Belzer, F O

    1988-10-01

    The quality of preservation of kidneys is dependent upon a number of factors, one of which may be the concentration of adenine nucleotides in the tissue during long-term perfusion preservation. In this study we have investigated how adenine (5 mM) and ribose (5 mM) in combination affect the concentration of adenine nucleotides in dog kidney cortical tissue after 5 days of continuous hypothermic perfusion preservation. These results were compared to kidneys perfused with adenosine and without any added purine precursors of adenine nucleotide synthesis. Additionally, we investigated how these conditions affected renal tissue slice function after 5 days of preservation and how adenine plus ribose affected renal function after autotransplantation in the dog. Adenosine is nearly completely degraded during 5 days of perfusion but there was little loss of adenine (10%). The adenosine triphosphate concentration in kidney cortical tissue was higher in adenine/ribose-perfused kidneys (1.41 +/- 0.19 mumol/g) than in adenosine-perfused kidneys (0.71 +/- 0.1 mumol/g) after 5 days of preservation. Tissue slices prepared from kidneys preserved in the presence of adenine plus ribose were metabolically more functional (slice volume control and electrolyte pump activity) than slices from adenosine-perfused kidneys. Adenine plus ribose had no detrimental effects on kidneys preserved for 3 days as tested in the autotransplant model but did not yield successful 5-day preservation. Because of some potentially detrimental factors in using adenosine as an adenine nucleotide synthesis precursor, we have now switched to the combination of adenine and ribose for perfusion preservation of kidneys both in the laboratory and in the clinic.

  7. Comparative study of 5-day cefcapene-pivoxil and 10-day amoxicillin or cefcapene-pivoxil for treatment of group A streptococcal pharyngitis in children.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Hiroshi

    2008-06-01

    In order to compare the bacteriological and clinical efficacy and safety of cefcapene-pivoxil (CFPN-PI) for 5 days, CFPN-PI for 10 days, and amoxicillin (AMPC) for 10 days for the treatment of pharyngitis due to group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus (GAS) in children, a prospective multicenter randomized open-label comparative study was performed with 12 pediatric clinics in Asahikawa between June 2006 and February 2007. Two hundred and fifty children (age range 6 months to 12 years) with signs and symptoms of acute pharyngitis were enrolled. All had a positive throat culture for GAS and were fully evaluable. Eighty-two patients received CFPN-PI 9-10 mg/kg/day three times a day for 5 days, 88 received CFPN-PI three times a day for 10 days, and 80 received AMPC three times a day for 10 days. The CFPN-PI for 5 days regimen, the CFPN-PI for 10 days regimen, and the AMPC for 10 days regimen produced bacteriological eradication at the end of treatment in 93.8%, 96.2%, and 91.7% of the patients, respectively. The clinical cure rate observed at the end of therapy was 100% of the patients in the three groups. Relapse rates were 1.3% in CFPN-PI for 5 days, 4.0% in CFPN-PI for 10 days, and 2.9% in AMPC for 10 days. There were no significant differences in eradication rate, clinical cure rate, and relapse rate between the three treatment groups. The only adverse effects were infrequent diarrhea in all three groups, and a rash which occurred in 6 patients (8.0%) of the AMPC treatment group. Five days of treatment with CFPN-PI was as efficacious in bacteriological eradication and clinical response as 10 days of CFPN-PI or AMPC treatment.

  8. Tranexamic acid mouthwash--a prospective randomized study of a 2-day regimen vs 5-day regimen to prevent postoperative bleeding in anticoagulated patients requiring dental extractions.

    PubMed

    Carter, G; Goss, A

    2003-10-01

    This prospective randomized study analyses the use of a prescribed 4.8% tranexamic acid post-operative mouthwash over 2 days vs 5 days to prevent bleeding in patients taking warfarin who require dental extractions. Eighty-five patients therapeutically anticoagulated with warfarin for various conditions, ranging in age from 21 to 86 years and requiring dental extractions, were randomly divided into two groups. Group A postoperatively received a 4.8% tranexamic acid mouthwash to be used over a 2-day period. Group B received the same mouthwash and instructions postoperatively, to be taken over 5 days. All procedures were performed on an ambulatory basis under local anaesthetic by the same surgeon. Patients were reviewed 1, 3, and 7 days postoperatively to assess bleeding. Eighty-two of the 85 patients encountered no postoperative problems. Two patients in group A and one in group B had minor postoperative bleeds that required minor ambulatory intervention to control. This study shows that a 2-day postoperative course of a 4.8% tranexamic acid mouthwash is as equally effective as a 5-day course in controlling haemostasis post-dental extractions in patient's anticoagulated with warfarin.

  9. Hydrologic and water-quality data for the East River Basin in northeastern Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hughes, P.E.

    1993-01-01

    Mean concentrations for 5-day biochemical oxygen demand, total-phosphorus concentration, fecal-coliform counts, and fecal-streptococcus counts were higher at Bower Creek than any of the other sites monitored during 1985-86. Mean chlorophyll a concentrations were highest at the East River sites at Monroe Street in Green Bay and at Allouez Avenue bridge at Allouez.

  10. Electricity demand curtailment planning

    SciTech Connect

    Allentuck, J; Carroll, O; Schnader, M

    1980-01-01

    The state of electricity demand curtailment planning for long term electricity supply disruptions is reviewed. Legal, institutional and technological problems associated with demand curtailment plans are examined, and the existence of well defined social objectives on the part of planners is questioned. A linear programming approach to electricity demand curtailment planning is presented.

  11. Demand Response Analysis Tool

    SciTech Connect

    2012-03-01

    Demand Response Analysis Tool is a software developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. It is initially funded by Southern California Edison. Our goal in developing this tool is to provide an online, useable, with standardized methods, an analysis tool to evaluate demand and demand response performance of commercial and industrial facilities. The tool provides load variability and weather sensitivity analysis capabilities as well as development of various types of baselines. It can be used by researchers, real estate management firms, utilities, or any individuals who are interested in analyzing their demand and demand response capabilities.

  12. Replacement of chemical oxygen demand (COD) with total organic carbon (TOC) for monitoring wastewater treatment performance to minimize disposal of toxic analytical waste.

    PubMed

    Dubber, Donata; Gray, Nicholas F

    2010-10-01

    Chemical oxygen demand (COD) is widely used for wastewater monitoring, design, modeling and plant operational analysis. However this method results in the production of hazardous wastes including mercury and hexavalent chromium. The study examined the replacement of COD with total organic carbon (TOC) for general performance monitoring by comparing their relationship with influent and effluent samples from 11 wastewater treatment plants. Biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5) was also included in the comparison as a control. The results show significant linear relationships between TOC, COD and BOD5 in settled (influent) domestic and municipal wastewaters, but only between COD and TOC in treated effluents. The study concludes that TOC can be reliably used for the generic replacement of both COD (COD=49.2+3.00*TOC) and BOD5 (BOD5=23.7+1.68*TOC) in influent wastewaters but only for COD (COD=7.25+2.99*TOC) in final effluents.

  13. The effect of a single high dose of PGF2α administered to dairy cattle 3.5 days after ovulation on luteal function, morphology, and follicular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Cuervo-Arango, J; García-Roselló, E; García-Muñoz, A; Valldecabres-Torres, X; Martínez-Ros, P; González-Bulnes, A

    2011-12-01

    A single treatment with PGF2α is assumed to have no luteolytic effect on cows with corpora lutea < 5 days old. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of a single high dose of PGF2α administered to dairy cattle on the morphology and function of the early CL. The study followed a crossover design with a treatment cycle in which 50 mg of dinoprost were administered 3.5 days postovulation and a control untreated cycle. Ultrasound examination and blood samples were performed during the two consecutive cycles. Corpus luteum (CL) diameter, progesterone concentration, and follicular dynamics characteristics were compared between control and treated cycles. Two of nine cows (22%) developed full luteolysis. The remaining seven cows (78%) had partial luteolysis with a decrease (P < 0.05) in progesterone concentration and CL diameter for two and 12 days post-treatment, respectively. The interovulatory interval of treated cycles (19.7 ± 2.4 days) was not different (P > 0.05) from that of controls (23.8 ± 0.9 days). The transient reduction in progesterone of cows with partial luteolysis had no effect on the proportion of cows with two or three follicular waves, follicle growth rate, or preovulatory diameter (P > 0.05). Two cows developed ovarian cystic degeneration during the PGF2α-induced cycle. In conclusion, the treatment of cows with a high dose of PGF2α 3.5 days postovulation induced some degree of luteolysis in all treated cows. This resulted in partial luteolysis in 78% of treated animals and in full luteolysis in the remaining 22%.

  14. Development and validation of a 5-day-ahead hay fever forecast for patients with grass-pollen-induced allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    de Weger, Letty A; Beerthuizen, Thijs; Hiemstra, Pieter S; Sont, Jacob K

    2014-08-01

    One-third of the Dutch population suffers from allergic rhinitis, including hay fever. In this study, a 5-day-ahead hay fever forecast was developed and validated for grass pollen allergic patients in the Netherlands. Using multiple regression analysis, a two-step pollen and hay fever symptom prediction model was developed using actual and forecasted weather parameters, grass pollen data and patient symptom diaries. Therefore, 80 patients with a grass pollen allergy rated the severity of their hay fever symptoms during the grass pollen season in 2007 and 2008. First, a grass pollen forecast model was developed using the following predictors: (1) daily means of grass pollen counts of the previous 10 years; (2) grass pollen counts of the previous 2-week period of the current year; and (3) maximum, minimum and mean temperature (R (2)=0.76). The second modeling step concerned the forecasting of hay fever symptom severity and included the following predictors: (1) forecasted grass pollen counts; (2) day number of the year; (3) moving average of the grass pollen counts of the previous 2 week-periods; and (4) maximum and mean temperatures (R (2)=0.81). Since the daily hay fever forecast is reported in three categories (low-, medium- and high symptom risk), we assessed the agreement between the observed and the 1- to 5-day-ahead predicted risk categories by kappa, which ranged from 65 % to 77 %. These results indicate that a model based on forecasted temperature and grass pollen counts performs well in predicting symptoms of hay fever up to 5 days ahead.

  15. Development and validation of a 5-day-ahead hay fever forecast for patients with grass-pollen-induced allergic rhinitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Weger, Letty A.; Beerthuizen, Thijs; Hiemstra, Pieter S.; Sont, Jacob K.

    2014-08-01

    One-third of the Dutch population suffers from allergic rhinitis, including hay fever. In this study, a 5-day-ahead hay fever forecast was developed and validated for grass pollen allergic patients in the Netherlands. Using multiple regression analysis, a two-step pollen and hay fever symptom prediction model was developed using actual and forecasted weather parameters, grass pollen data and patient symptom diaries. Therefore, 80 patients with a grass pollen allergy rated the severity of their hay fever symptoms during the grass pollen season in 2007 and 2008. First, a grass pollen forecast model was developed using the following predictors: (1) daily means of grass pollen counts of the previous 10 years; (2) grass pollen counts of the previous 2-week period of the current year; and (3) maximum, minimum and mean temperature ( R 2 = 0.76). The second modeling step concerned the forecasting of hay fever symptom severity and included the following predictors: (1) forecasted grass pollen counts; (2) day number of the year; (3) moving average of the grass pollen counts of the previous 2 week-periods; and (4) maximum and mean temperatures ( R 2 = 0.81). Since the daily hay fever forecast is reported in three categories (low-, medium- and high symptom risk), we assessed the agreement between the observed and the 1- to 5-day-ahead predicted risk categories by kappa, which ranged from 65 % to 77 %. These results indicate that a model based on forecasted temperature and grass pollen counts performs well in predicting symptoms of hay fever up to 5 days ahead.

  16. Randomized, double-blind study of short-course (5 day) grepafloxacin versus 10 day clarithromycin in patients with acute bacterial exacerbations of chronic bronchitis.

    PubMed

    Langan, C E; Zuck, P; Vogel, F; McIvor, A; Peirzchala, W; Smakal, M; Staley, H; Marr, C

    1999-10-01

    The efficacy and safety of grepafloxacin were compared with clarithromycin in a randomized, double-blind, multicentre clinical trial of 805 patients with acute bacterial exacerbations of chronic bronchitis (ABECB). Patients were randomized to receive grepafloxacin 400 mg od for either 5 (n = 273) or 10 days (n = 268) or clarithromycin 250 mg bd for 10 days (n = 261). Patients were assessed pre-treatment, 3-5 days during treatment, 1-3 days post-treatment and at follow-up (21-28 days post-treatment). The clinical success rates for the evaluable patients were 91% in the 5 day grepafloxacin group, 95% in the 10 day grepafloxacin group and 86% in the clarithromycin group. At follow-up, respective rates were 72%, 81% and 73%. A total of 513 pathogens were isolated from the pre-treatment sputum specimens of 400 (49%) patients. The primary pathogens were Haemophilus influenzae (36% of isolates), Haemophilus parainfluenzae (27%), Moraxella catarrhalis (12%), Streptococcus pneumoniae (11%) and Staphylococcus aureus (3%). Pathogens were eradicated or presumed eradicated at post-treatment in 85%, 91% and 58% of evaluable patients treated with grepafloxacin for 5 days, grepafloxacin 10 days and clarithromycin 10 days, respectively. The eradication rates in both grepafloxacin groups were significantly greater than the clarithromycin group (P<0.001). All treatments were well tolerated and incidence of drug-related adverse events in each group was comparable. This study demonstrates that both a 5 and a 10 day regimen of grepafloxacin 400 mg od are as clinically and bacteriologically effective as in the treatment of ABECB clarithromycin 250 mg bd. for 10 days.

  17. [Structural and functional organization of the vestibular apparatus in rats maintained under weightless conditions for 19.5 days aboard the satellite "Cosmos-782"].

    PubMed

    Vinnikov, Ia A; Gazenko, O G; Titova, L K; Bronshteĭn, A A; Govardovskiĭ, V I

    1978-01-01

    Vestibular apparatus was investigated in rats subjected to weightlessness for 19.5 days in the satelite "Cosmos-782" and experienced acceleration on launching and landing. Some structural and functional changes were noted. They were seen in otolith clinging to the utricular receptor surface and in the peripheral arrangement of the nucleolus in the nuclei of the receptor cells. It is also possible that increased edema of the vestibular tissue resulted in destruction of some receptor cells, and within the otolith--changes in the form and structure of otoconia. In the horizontal crista the cupula was separated.

  18. Structural and Functional Organization of the Vestibular Apparatus in Rats Subjected to Weightlessness for 19.5 Days Aboard the Kosmos-782 Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinnikov, Y. A.; Gazenko, O. G.; Titova, L. K.; Bronshteyn, A. A.; Govardovskiy, V. I.; Pevzner, R. A.; Gribakin, G. G.; Aronova, M. Z.; Kharkeyevich, T. A.; Tsirulis, T. P.

    1978-01-01

    The vestibular apparatus was investigated in rats subjected to weightlessness for 19.5 days. The vestibular apparatus was removed and its sections were fixed in a glutaraldehyde solution for investigation by light and electron microscopes. Structural and functional charges were noted in the otolith portions of the ear, with the otolith particles clinging to the utricular receptor surface and with the peripheral arrangement of the nucleolus in the nuclei of the receptor cells. It is possible that increased edema of the vestibular tissue resulted in the destruction of some receptor cells and in changes in the form and structure of the otolith. In the horizontal crista, the capula was separated.

  19. A Whole-Genome Microarray Study of Arabidopsis thaliana Semisolid Callus Cultures Exposed to Microgravity and Nonmicrogravity Related Spaceflight Conditions for 5 Days on Board of Shenzhou 8

    PubMed Central

    Neef, Maren; Ecke, Margret; Hampp, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    The Simbox mission was the first joint space project between Germany and China in November 2011. Eleven-day-old Arabidopsis thaliana wild type semisolid callus cultures were integrated into fully automated plant cultivation containers and exposed to spaceflight conditions within the Simbox hardware on board of the spacecraft Shenzhou 8. The related ground experiment was conducted under similar conditions. The use of an in-flight centrifuge provided a 1 g gravitational field in space. The cells were metabolically quenched after 5 days via RNAlater injection. The impact on the Arabidopsis transcriptome was investigated by means of whole-genome gene expression analysis. The results show a major impact of nonmicrogravity related spaceflight conditions. Genes that were significantly altered in transcript abundance are mainly involved in protein phosphorylation and MAPK cascade-related signaling processes, as well as in the cellular defense and stress responses. In contrast to short-term effects of microgravity (seconds, minutes), this mission identified only minor changes after 5 days of microgravity. These concerned genes coding for proteins involved in the plastid-associated translation machinery, mitochondrial electron transport, and energy production. PMID:25654111

  20. Mean winds, temperatures and the 16- and 5-day planetary waves in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere over Bear Lake Observatory (42° N 111° W)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, K. A.; Taylor, M. J.; Mitchell, N. J.

    2011-11-01

    Atmospheric temperatures and winds in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere have been measured simultaneously using the Aura satellite and a meteor radar at Bear Lake Observatory (42° N, 111° W). The data presented in this study is from the interval March 2008 to July 2011. The mean winds observed in the summer-time over Bear Lake Observatory show the meridional winds to be equatorward at all heights during April-August and to reach monthly-mean speeds of -12 ms-1. The mean winds are closely related to temperatures in this region of the atmosphere and in the summer the coldest mesospheric temperatures occur about two weeks after the strongest equatorward meridional winds. In other seasons the meridional winds are poleward, reaching monthly-mean values of up to 12 ms-1. The zonal winds are eastward through most of the year and in the summer strong eastward zonal wind shears of up to ~4.5 ms-1 km-1 are present. However, westward winds are observed at the upper heights in winter and sometimes during the equinoxes. Considerable inter-annual variability is observed in the mean winds and temperatures. Comparisons of the observed winds with URAP and HWM-07 reveal some significant differences. Our radar zonal wind observations are generally more weakly eastward than these predicted by the URAP model zonal winds. Considering the radar meridional winds, in comparison to the HWM-07 our observations reveal equatorward flow at all heights in the summer whereas HWM-07 suggests that only weakly equatorward, or even poleward, flows occur at the lower heights. However, the zonal winds observed by the radar and modelled by HWM-07 are generally similar in structure and strength. Signatures of the 16- and 5-day planetary waves are clearly evident in both the radar-wind data and Aura-temperature. Short-lived wave events can reach large amplitudes of up to ~15 ms-1 and 8 K and 20 ms-1 and 10 K for the 16- and 5-day wave, respectively. A clear seasonal and short-term variability are

  1. A phase I study of 1,2-diamminomethyl-cyclobutane-platinum (II)-lactate (D-19466; lobaplatin) administered daily for 5 days.

    PubMed Central

    Gietema, J. A.; de Vries, E. G.; Sleijfer, D. T.; Willemse, P. H.; Guchelaar, H. J.; Uges, D. R.; Aulenbacher, P.; Voegeli, R.; Mulder, N. H.

    1993-01-01

    A phase I trial was conducted with lobaplatin (D-19466; 1,2-diamminomethyl-cyclobutane-platinum (II)-lactate) i.v. bolus daily for 5 days every 4 weeks. After entering five patients toxicity appeared to be related to renal function, therefore the individual dose (total dose 20-100 mg m-2 over 5 days) of lobaplatin was modified according to creatinine clearance (CRCL) and escalated in patients. Twenty-seven patients with refractory solid tumours received 72 courses. Thrombocytopenia was dose-limiting, its degree was related to dose and CRCL at time of drug administration. With a CRCL of 60-80 ml min-1 the maximum tolerated dose was 40 mg m-2, with a CRCL of 81-100 ml min-1 70 mg m-2, and with a CRCL > 100 ml min-1 it was 85 mg m-2. Platelet and leukocyte nadirs were observed around day 21. The percentual platelet nadir (percentage of day 1 platelet count) correlated with CRCL at different dose levels and could be described by 0.76 x CRCL (ml min-1) - (1.45 x dose (mg m-2) + 43.38. This equation tested in 20 patients (28 courses) produced a correlation between observed and predicted percentual platelet nadir (r = 0.82, P < 0.001). No renal function impairment occurred. Urinary excretion of platinum (by A.A.S) was estimated in six patients and revealed that 91.5% (s.e. +/- 7.9) of the platinum dose was excreted within 4 h. Responses (one PR, one CR) occurred in two patients with ovarian cancer (both pretreated with carboplatin and cisplatin). The recommended dose of lobaplatin i.v. bolus daily for 5 days for phase II studies depends on renal function, namely 30 mg m-2 at CRCL 60-80 ml min-1; 55 mg m-2 at CRCL 81-100 ml min-1; 70 mg m-2 at CRCL > 100 ml min-1. PMID:8431374

  2. A study of gravity-wave spectra in the troposphere and stratosphere at 5-min to 5-day periods with the Poker Flat MST radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bemra, R. S.; Rastogi, P. K.; Balsley, B. B.

    1986-01-01

    An analysis of frequency spectra at periods of about 5 days to 5 min from two 20-day sets of velocity measurements in the stratosphere and troposphere region obtained with the Poker Flat mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere (MST) radar during January and June, 1984 is presented. A technique based on median filtering and averaged order statistics for automatic editing, smoothing and spectral analysis of velocity time series contaminated with spurious data points or outliers is outlined. The validity of this technique and its effects on the inferred spectral index was tested through simulation. Spectra obtained with this technique are discussed. The measured spectral indices show variability with season and height, especially across the tropopause. The discussion briefly outlines the need for obtaining better climatologies of velocity spectra and for the refinements of the existing theories to explain their behavior.

  3. The 27-day versus 13.5-day variations in the solar Lyman-alpha radiation and the radio wave absorption in the lower ionosphere over Europe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delamorena, B. A.; Lastovicka, Jan; Rapoport, Z. TS.; Alberca, L.

    1989-01-01

    In order to clarify the question of solar periods in absorption, the pattern was studied of the solar Lyman-alpha radiation (the principal ionizing agent of the lower ionosphere) and of the radio wave absorption at five widely spaced places in Europe. When the solar Lyman-alpha flux variability is very well developed, then it dominates in the lower ionospheric variability. The most pronounced Lyman-alpha variation on time scale day-month is the solar rotation variation (about 27 days). When the Lyman-alpha variability is developed rather poorly, as it is typical for periods dominated by the 13.5 day variability, then the lower ionospheric variability appears to be dominated by variations of meteorological origin. The conclusions hold for all five widely spaced placed in Europe.

  4. Hepatic transcriptomic alterations for N,N-dimethyl-p-toluidine (DMPT) and p-toluidine after 5-day exposure in rats.

    PubMed

    Dunnick, June K; Shockley, Keith R; Morgan, Daniel L; Brix, Amy; Travlos, Gregory S; Gerrish, Kevin; Michael Sanders, J; Ton, T V; Pandiri, Arun R

    2017-04-01

    N,N-dimethyl-p-toluidine (DMPT), an accelerant for methyl methacrylate monomers in medical devices, was a liver carcinogen in male and female F344/N rats and B6C3F1 mice in a 2-year oral exposure study. p-Toluidine, a structurally related chemical, was a liver carcinogen in mice but not in rats in an 18-month feed exposure study. In this current study, liver transcriptomic data were used to characterize mechanisms in DMPT and p-toluidine liver toxicity and for conducting benchmark dose (BMD) analysis. Male F344/N rats were exposed orally to DMPT or p-toluidine (0, 1, 6, 20, 60 or 120 mg/kg/day) for 5 days. The liver was examined for lesions and transcriptomic alterations. Both chemicals caused mild hepatic toxicity at 60 and 120 mg/kg and dose-related transcriptomic alterations in the liver. There were 511 liver transcripts differentially expressed for DMPT and 354 for p-toluidine at 120 mg/kg/day (false discovery rate threshold of 5 %). The liver transcriptomic alterations were characteristic of an anti-oxidative damage response (activation of the Nrf2 pathway) and hepatic toxicity. The top cellular processes in gene ontology (GO) categories altered in livers exposed to DMPT or p-toluidine were used for BMD calculations. The lower confidence bound benchmark doses for these chemicals were 2 mg/kg/day for DMPT and 7 mg/kg/day for p-toluidine. These studies show the promise of using 5-day target organ transcriptomic data to identify chemical-induced molecular changes that can serve as markers for preliminary toxicity risk assessment.

  5. Prenatal exposure to ethanol during late gestation facilitates operant self-administration of the drug in 5-day-old rats

    PubMed Central

    Miranda-Morales, Roberto Sebastián; Nizhnikov, Michael E.; Spear, Norman E.

    2014-01-01

    Prenatal ethanol exposure modifies postnatal affinity to the drug, increasing the probability of ethanol use and abuse. The present study tested developing rats (5-day-old) in a novel operant technique to assess the degree of ethanol self-administration as a result of prenatal exposure to low ethanol doses during late gestation. On a single occasion during each of gestational days 17–20, pregnant rats were intragastrically administered ethanol 1 g/kg, or water (vehicle). On postnatal day 5, pups were tested on a novel operant conditioning procedure in which they learned to touch a sensor to obtain 0.1% saccharin, 3% ethanol, or 5% ethanol. Immediately after a 15-min training session, a 6-min extinction session was given in which operant behavior had no consequence. Pups were positioned on a smooth surface and had access to a touch-sensitive sensor. Physical contact with the sensor activated an infusion pump, which served to deliver an intraoral solution as reinforcement (Paired group). A Yoked control animal evaluated at the same time received the reinforcer when its corresponding Paired pup touched the sensor. Operant behavior to gain access to 3% ethanol was facilitated by prenatal exposure to ethanol during late gestation. In contrast, operant learning reflecting ethanol reinforcement did not occur in control animals prenatally exposed to water only. Similarly, saccharin reinforcement was not affected by prenatal ethanol exposure. These results suggest that in 5-day-old rats, prenatal exposure to a low ethanol dose facilitates operant learning reinforced by intraoral administration of a low-concentration ethanol solution. This emphasizes the importance of intrauterine experiences with ethanol in later susceptibility to drug reinforcement. The present operant conditioning technique represents an alternative tool to assess self-administration and seeking behavior during early stages of development. PMID:24355072

  6. Enhancement of chemical-oxygen demand and color removal of distillery spent-wash by ozonation.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, S; Bose, P; Tare, V

    2006-04-01

    Distillery spent-wash has very high organic content (75,000 to 125,000 mg/L chemical-oxygen demand [COD]), color, and contains difficult-to-biodegrade organic compounds. For example, anaerobic treatment of the distillery spent-wash used in this study resulted in 60% COD reduction and low color removal. Subsequent aerobic treatment of the anaerobic effluent resulted in enhancement of COD removal to 66%. In this paper, the effect of ozonation on various properties of the anaerobically treated distillery effluent, including the effect on its subsequent aerobic biodegradation, was investigated. Ozonation of the anaerobically treated distillery effluent at various ozone doses resulted in the reduction of total-organic carbon (TOC), COD, COD/TOC ratio, absorbance, color, and increase in the biochemical-oxygen demand (BOD)/COD ratio of the effluent. Further, ozonation of the anaerobically treated distillery effluent at an ozone dose of 2.08 mg/mg initial TOC and subsequent aerobic biodegradation resulted in 87.4% COD removal, as compared to 66% removal when ozonation was not used.

  7. Impact of Energy Demands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cambel, Ali B.

    1970-01-01

    The types of pollutants associated with the process of power production are identified. A nine-point proposal is presented on the ways the increase in power demands might be achieved with the minimum threat to the environment. (PR)

  8. Latin American demand

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-01

    From Mexico to Argentina, independent power companies are finding great demand for their services in Latin America. But while legal and economic conditions are increasingly favorable, political and financial uncertainties make power development challenging.

  9. Demand Response Dispatch Tool

    SciTech Connect

    2012-08-31

    The Demand Response (DR) Dispatch Tool uses price profiles to dispatch demand response resources and create load modifying profiles. These annual profiles are used as inputs to production cost models and regional planning tools (e.g., PROMOD). The tool has been effectively implemented in transmission planning studies conducted by the Western Electricity Coordinating Council via its Transmission Expansion Planning and Policy Committee. The DR Dispatch Tool can properly model the dispatch of DR resources for both reliability and economic conditions.

  10. Emergence of multipotent hemopoietic cells in the yolk sac and paraaortic splanchnopleura in mouse embryos, beginning at 8.5 days postcoitus.

    PubMed Central

    Godin, I; Dieterlen-Lièvre, F; Cumano, A

    1995-01-01

    We show by an in vitro approach that multipotent hemopoietic cells can be detected in the body of the mouse embryo between the stages of 10-25 somites (8.5-9.5 days of gestation)--i.e., prior to liver colonization (28-32 pairs of somites). Interestingly, hemopoietic cells appear in parallel in this location, the paraaortic splanchnopleura, and in the yolk sac, where they represent a new generation by reference to the primitive hemopoietic stem cells. Lymphoid cell clones, which could differentiate into mature B cells, were obtained from yolk sac and paraaortic splanchnopleura cell preparations but not from other tissues of the embryonic body. These B-cell precursors were first detected around the stage of 10 somites; thereafter, their initial minute numbers increased in parallel in the yolk sac and the paraaortic splanchnopleura, suggesting that their emergence in the two sites was simultaneous. By single cell manipulation, we show that these precursors can generate B and T lymphocytes and myeloid cells; these precursors can thus be defined as multipotent hemopoietic cells. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 PMID:7846049

  11. 14 CFR 93.226 - Allocation of slots in low-demand periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Allocation of slots in low-demand periods... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES Allocation of... available less than 5 days per week. (2) Any time period for which a slot is available for less than a...

  12. Travel Demand Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Southworth, Frank; Garrow, Dr. Laurie

    2011-01-01

    This chapter describes the principal types of both passenger and freight demand models in use today, providing a brief history of model development supported by references to a number of popular texts on the subject, and directing the reader to papers covering some of the more recent technical developments in the area. Over the past half century a variety of methods have been used to estimate and forecast travel demands, drawing concepts from economic/utility maximization theory, transportation system optimization and spatial interaction theory, using and often combining solution techniques as varied as Box-Jenkins methods, non-linear multivariate regression, non-linear mathematical programming, and agent-based microsimulation.

  13. Fertility of Holstein heifers after two doses of PGF2α in 5-day CO-Synch progesterone-based synchronization protocol.

    PubMed

    Say, Erkan; Çoban, Serdal; Nak, Yavuz; Nak, Deniz; Kara, Uğur; White, Stephanie; Kasimanickam, Vanmathy; Kasimanickam, Ramanathan

    2016-09-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the effect of three different PGF2α (PGF) treatments in the 5-day CO-Synch progesterone-based synchronization protocol on artificial insemination (AI) pregnancy rate (PR) in Holstein heifers in Turkey and the United States. We hypothesized that two doses of PGF administered concurrently or 6 hours apart would result in greater AI pregnancy compared with a single dose of PGF on Day 5 at controlled internal drug release (CIDR) removal. In Turkey, Holstein heifers (n = 450) from one farm in the province of Adana and another farm in the province of Bursa were included. In the US, Holstein heifers (n = 483) from two locations in the state of Idaho were included. Heifers within locations were randomly allocated to one of three protocol groups: 1PGF-received 25 mg IM of dinoprost at CIDR removal; 2Co-PGF-received 50 mg IM of dinoprost at CIDR removal, and 2PGF-received 25 mg IM of dinoprost at CIDR removal and an additional 25 mg IM of dinoprost 6 hours later. All heifers received a CIDR (1.38 g of progesterone) and GnRH (10 μg IM of Buserelin [Turkey] or gonadorelin hydrochloride [US]) on Day 0. The CIDRs were removed on Day 5, and each heifer was given PGF according to the assigned treatments. On Day 7, each heifer was given another dose of GnRH and concurrently inseminated at 56 hours after CIDR removal. Heifers in both experiments were examined for pregnancy status between 35 and 45 days after AI. Overall, controlling for age, the heifers in the 2PGF group had greater AI-PR (61.7% [192/311]) than heifers in 2Co-PGF (48.2% [149/309]; P < 0.001) or 1PGF (53.7% [168/313]; P < 0.05) groups. No difference was observed between 2Co-PGF and 1PGF groups (P > 0.1). In Turkey, the heifers in the 2PGF group had a greater AI-PR (60% [90/150]) than 2Co-PGF (45.3% (68/150); P < 0.01] group. No difference was observed between 2PGF and 1PGF (55.3% [83/150]) groups (P > 0.1). There was a trend for AI pregnancy between 1

  14. Comparison of follicular dynamics and hormone concentrations between the 7-day and 5-day CO-Synch + CIDR program in primiparous beef cows.

    PubMed

    Bridges, G A; Mussard, M L; Helser, L A; Day, M L

    2014-03-01

    The objectives were to compare follicular dynamics, preovulatory estradiol concentrations, and progesterone concentrations between the 7-day (7CO, n = 15) and 5-day (5CO, n = 13) CO-Synch + controlled internal drug release device (CIDR) program in primiparous suckled beef cows. On Day -7 (7CO) or Day -5 (5CO), GnRH (100 μg) was administered (GnRH-1) and a CIDR was inserted. On Day 0, hour 0, CIDR was removed and cows received PGF2α (25 mg) at hours 0 and 12. Animals were administered GnRH (100 μg, GnRH-2) at either hour 60 (7CO) or 72 (5CO). Follicular growth and ovulation to both GnRH-1 and GnRH-2 were evaluated using ultrasonography. Concentrations of estradiol were determined in blood samples taken at hours 0, 36, 60, and 72 (5CO). Blood samples were collected on Days 5, 8, and 14 for progesterone quantification. Ovulation rate to GnRH-1 did not differ between the 7CO (11/15) and 5CO (8/13) treatments, and for all dependent variables the statistical model included treatment, ovulation to GnRH-1, and their interaction. Diameter (mm) of the ovulatory follicle did not differ between treatments (13.4 ± 0.3) but was greater (P < 0.05) in cows that responded to GnRH-1 (13.8 ± 0.3) than those did not (12.6 ± 0.6). Maximum estradiol concentrations tended (P = 0.06) to be greater in the 5CO (7.3 ± 0.5 pg/mL) than 7CO (6.1 ± 0.7 pg/mL) treatment and tended to be greater (P = 0.08) in cows that responded to GnRH-1 (7.1 ± 0.5 pg/mL) than those did not (5.6 ± 0.9 pg/mL). Three cows in the 7CO treatment failed to develop a CL after GnRH-2. There was a treatment by response to GnRH-1 interaction (P < 0.05) for progesterone concentrations. In cows that did not respond to GnRH-1 in the 7CO treatment, progesterone concentrations were less (P < 0.05) than in those that responded to GnRH-1 in the 7CO treatment and tended (P = 0.09) to be less than in cows in the 5CO treatment that did not respond to GnRH-1. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that failure to

  15. Decontamination efficacy of erbium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet and diode laser light on oral Candida albicans isolates of a 5-day in vitro biofilm model.

    PubMed

    Sennhenn-Kirchner, Sabine; Schwarz, Peter; Schliephake, Henning; Konietschke, Frank; Brunner, Edgar; Borg-von Zepelin, Margarete

    2009-05-01

    The different forms of superficial and systemic candidiasis are often associated with biofilm formation on surfaces of host tissues or medical devices. The biofilm formation of Candida spp., in general, necessitates significantly increased amounts of antifungal agents for therapy. Often the therapeutic effect is doubtful. A 5-day biofilm model with oral Candida isolates was established according to Chandra et al. (J Dent Res 80:903-908, 2001) on glass and titanium surfaces and was modified by Sennhenn-Kirchner et al. (Z Zahnärztl Implantol 3:45-51, 2007) to investigate different aspects unanswered in the field of dentistry. In this model, the efficacy of erbium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet (Er:YAG) light (2940 nm, 100 mJ, 10 Hz, 300 micros pulsed mode applied for 80 s) and diode laser light (810 nm, 1 W, continuous wave mode applied for 20 s with four repetitions after 30 s pauses each) was evaluated and compared to untreated controls. The photometric evaluation of the samples was completed by observations on morphological changes of yeast cells grown in the biofilm. Compared to the untreated controls Candida cells grown in mature in vitro biofilms were significantly reduced by both wavelengths investigated. Comparison between the different methods of laser treatment additionally revealed a significantly greater effect of the Er:YAG over the diode laser. Scanning electron microscopy findings proved that the diode laser light was effective in direct contact mode. In contrast, in the areas without direct contact, the fungal cells were left almost unchanged. The Er:YAG laser damaged the fungal cells to a great extent wherever it was applied.

  16. One session of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) every 5 days, improves muscle power but not static balance in lifelong sedentary ageing men

    PubMed Central

    Sculthorpe, Nicholas F.; Herbert, Peter; Grace, Fergal

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Declining muscle power during advancing age predicts falls and loss of independence. High-intensity interval training (HIIT) may improve muscle power, but remains largely unstudied in ageing participants. Methods: This randomized controlled trial (RCT) investigated the efficacy of a low-frequency HIIT (LfHIIT) intervention on peak muscle power (peak power output [PPO]), body composition, and balance in lifelong sedentary but otherwise healthy males. Methods: Thirty-three lifelong sedentary ageing men were randomly assigned to either intervention (INT; n = 22, age 62.3 ± 4.1 years) or control (n = 11, age 61.6 ± 5.0 years) who were both assessed at 3 distinct measurement points (phase A), after 6 weeks of conditioning exercise (phase B), and after 6 weeks of HIIT once every 5 days in INT (phase C), where control remained inactive throughout the study. Results: Static balance remained unaffected, and both absolute and relative PPO were not different between groups at phases A or B, but increased significantly in INT after LfHIIT (P < 0.01). Lean body mass displayed a significant interaction (P < 0.01) due to an increase in INT between phases B and C (P < 0.05). Conclusions: 6 weeks of LfHIIT exercise feasible and effective method to induce clinically relevant improvements in absolute and relative PPO, but does not improve static balance in sedentary ageing men. PMID:28178145

  17. Evaluation of Biomarkers of Exposure in Smokers Switching to a Carbon-Heated Tobacco Product: A Controlled, Randomized, Open-Label 5-Day Exposure Study

    PubMed Central

    Haziza, Christelle; Weitkunat, Rolf; Magnette, John

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Tobacco harm reduction aims to provide reduced risk alternatives to adult smokers who would otherwise continue smoking combustible cigarettes (CCs). This randomized, open-label, three-arm, parallel-group, single-center, short-term confinement study aimed to investigate the effects of exposure to selected harmful and potentially harmful constituents (HPHCs) of cigarette smoke in adult smokers who switched to a carbon-heated tobacco product (CHTP) compared with adult smokers who continued to smoke CCs and those who abstained from smoking for 5 days. Methods: Biomarkers of exposure to HPHCs, including nicotine and urinary excretion of mutagenic material, were measured in 24-hour urine and blood samples in 112 male and female Caucasian smokers switching from CCs to the CHTP ad libitum use. Puffing topography was assessed during product use. Results: Switching to the CHTP or smoking abstinence (SA) resulted in marked decreases from baseline to Day 5 in all biomarkers of exposure measured, including carboxyhemoglobin (43% and 55% decrease in the CHTP and SA groups, respectively). The urinary excretion of mutagenic material was also markedly decreased on Day 5 compared with baseline (89% and 87% decrease in the CHTP and SA groups, respectively). No changes in biomarkers of exposure to HPHCs or urinary mutagenic material were observed between baseline and Day 5 in the CC group. Conclusions: Our results provide clear evidence supporting a reduction in the level of exposure to HPHCs of tobacco smoke in smokers who switch to CHTP under controlled conditions, similar to that observed in SA. Implications: The reductions observed in biomarkers of exposure to HPHCs of tobacco smoke in this short-term study could potentially also reduce the incidence of cancer, cardiovascular and respiratory diseases in those smokers who switch to a heated tobacco product. PMID:26817490

  18. Demanding Divestment from Sudan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asquith, Christina

    2006-01-01

    Bowing to student demands to "stop supporting genocide," the University of California regents voted earlier this year to divest millions of dollars from companies working in the war-torn African nation of Sudan, the first major public university in the nation to take such action. Since student protests on the subject began at Harvard…

  19. Demand, Growth, and Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoskins, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    The paradigm shift to engaged and collaborative learning delivered via distance education technologies has been led by practitioners in adult and continuing education. Online and blended courses are experiencing increased demand and continued growth at all levels of higher education, professional development, and K-12 education. Adult and…

  20. Textbook Factor Demand Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Joe C.

    1994-01-01

    Maintains that teachers and textbook graphics follow the same basic pattern in illustrating changes in demand curves when product prices increase. Asserts that the use of computer graphics will enable teachers to be more precise in their graphic presentation of price elasticity. (CFR)

  1. Sediment oxygen demand in the Saddle River and Salem River watersheds, New Jersey, July-August 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heckathorn, Heather A.; Gibs, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    Many factors, such as river depth and velocity, biochemical oxygen demand, and algal productivity, as well as sediment oxygen demand, can affect the concentration of dissolved oxygen in the water column. Measurements of sediment oxygen demand, in conjunction with those of other water-column water-quality constituents, are useful for quantifying the mechanisms that affect in-stream dissolved-oxygen concentrations. Sediment-oxygen-demand rates are also needed to develop and calibrate a water-quality model being developed for the Saddle River and Salem River Basins in New Jersey to predict dissolved-oxygen concentrations. This report documents the methods used to measure sediment oxygen demand in the Saddle River and Salem River watersheds along with the rates of sediment oxygen demand that were obtained during this investigation. In July and August 2008, sediment oxygen demand was measured in situ in the Saddle River and Salem River watersheds. In the Saddle River Basin, sediment oxygen demand was measured twice at two sites and once at a third location; in the Salem River Basin, sediment oxygen demand was measured three times at two sites and once at a third location. In situ measurements of sediment oxygen demand in the Saddle River and Salem River watersheds ranged from 0.8 to 1.4 g/m2d (grams per square meter per day) and from 0.6 to 7.1 g/m2d at 20 degrees Celsius, respectively. Except at one site in this study, rates of sediment oxygen demand generally were low. The highest rate of sediment oxygen demand measured during this investigation, 7.1 g/m2d, which occurred at Courses Landing in the Salem River Basin, may be attributable to the consumption of oxygen by a large amount of organic matter (54 grams per kilogram as organic carbon) in the streambed sediments or to potential error during data collection. In general, sediment oxygen demand increased with the concentration of organic carbon in the streambed sediments. Repeated measurements made 6 to 7 days apart

  2. Metabolic Response of Visceral White Adipose Tissue of Obese Mice Exposed for 5 Days to Human Room Temperature Compared to Mouse Thermoneutrality

    PubMed Central

    van der Stelt, Inge; Hoevenaars, Femke; Široká, Jitka; de Ronde, Lidwien; Friedecký, David; Keijer, Jaap; van Schothorst, Evert

    2017-01-01

    Housing of laboratory mice at room temperature (22°C) might be considered a constant cold stress, which induces a thermogenic program in brown adipose tissue (BAT). However, the early adaptive response of white adipose tissue (WAT), the fat storage organ of the body, to a change from thermoneutrality to room temperature is not known. This was investigated here for various WAT depots, focusing on epididymal WAT (eWAT), widely used as reference depot. Male adult diet-induced obese (DIO) C57BL/6JOlaHsd mice housed at thermoneutrality (29°C), were for 5 days either switched to room temperature (22°C) or remained at thermoneutrality. Energy metabolism was continuously measured using indirect calorimetry. At the end of the study, serum metabolomics and WAT transcriptomics were performed. We confirmed activation of the thermogenic program in 22°C housed mice. Body weight and total fat mass were reduced. Whole body energy expenditure (EE) was increased, with a higher fatty acid to carbohydrate oxidation ratio and increased serum acylcarnitine levels, while energy intake was not significantly different between the two groups. Transcriptome analysis of eWAT identified tissue remodeling and inflammation as the most affected processes. Expression of pro-inflammatory M1 macrophage-related genes, and M1 over M2 macrophage ratio were decreased, which might be linked to an increased insulin sensitivity. Markers of thermogenesis were not altered in eWAT. Decreased expression of tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (Tph2) and cholecystokinin (Cck) might represent altered neuroendocrine signaling. eWAT itself does not show increased fatty acid oxidation. The three measured WATs, epididymal, mesenteric, and retroperitoneal, showed mainly similar responses; reduced inflammation (s100a8), decreased carbohydrate oxidation, and no or small differences in fatty acid oxidation. However, Ucp1 was only expressed and increased in rWAT in 22°C housed mice. Cck expression was decreased in the three

  3. Demand surge following earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olsen, Anna H.

    2012-01-01

    Demand surge is understood to be a socio-economic phenomenon where repair costs for the same damage are higher after large- versus small-scale natural disasters. It has reportedly increased monetary losses by 20 to 50%. In previous work, a model for the increased costs of reconstruction labor and materials was developed for hurricanes in the Southeast United States. The model showed that labor cost increases, rather than the material component, drove the total repair cost increases, and this finding could be extended to earthquakes. A study of past large-scale disasters suggested that there may be additional explanations for demand surge. Two such explanations specific to earthquakes are the exclusion of insurance coverage for earthquake damage and possible concurrent causation of damage from an earthquake followed by fire or tsunami. Additional research into these aspects might provide a better explanation for increased monetary losses after large- vs. small-scale earthquakes.

  4. Dividends with Demand Response

    SciTech Connect

    Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Goldman, Charles; Sezgen, O.; Pratt, D.

    2003-10-31

    To assist facility managers in assessing whether and to what extent they should participate in demand response programs offered by ISOs, we introduce a systematic process by which a curtailment supply curve can be developed that integrates costs and other program provisions and features. This curtailment supply curve functions as bid curve, which allows the facility manager to incrementally offer load to the market under terms and conditions acceptable to the customer. We applied this load curtailment assessment process to a stylized example of an office building, using programs offered by NYISO to provide detail and realism.

  5. Oxygen demand of aircraft and airfield pavement deicers and alternative freezing point depressants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corsi, Steven R.; Mericas, Dean; Bowman, George

    2012-01-01

    Aircraft and pavement deicing formulations and other potential freezing point depressants were tested for biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) and chemical oxygen demand (COD). Propylene glycol-based aircraft deicers exhibited greater BOD5 than ethylene glycol-based aircraft deicers, and ethylene glycol-based products had lower degradation rates than propylene glycol-based products. Sodium formate pavement deicers had lower COD than acetate-based pavement deicers. The BOD and COD results for acetate-based pavement deicers (PDMs) were consistently lower than those for aircraft deicers, but degradation rates were greater in the acetate-based PDM than in aircraft deicers. In a 40-day testing of aircraft and pavement deicers, BOD results at 20°C (standard) were consistently greater than the results from 5°C (low) tests. The degree of difference between standard and low temperature BOD results varied among tested products. Freshwater BOD test results were not substantially different from marine water tests at 20°C, but glycols degraded slower in marine water than in fresh water for low temperature tests. Acetate-based products had greater percentage degradation than glycols at both temperatures. An additive component of the sodium formate pavement deicer exhibited toxicity to the microorganisms, so BOD testing did not work properly for this formulation. BOD testing of alternative freezing point depressants worked well for some, there was little response for some, and for others there was a lag in response while microorganisms acclimated to the freezing point depressant as a food source. Where the traditional BOD5 test performed adequately, values ranged from 251 to 1,580 g/kg. Where the modified test performed adequately, values of BOD28 ranged from 242 to 1,540 g/kg.

  6. Sources and transport of sediment, nutrients, and oxygen-demanding substances in the Minnesota River basin, 1989-92

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Payne, G.A.

    1994-01-01

    The Minnesota River, 10 major tributaries, and 21 springs were sampled to determine the sources and transport of sediment, nutrients, and oxygen- demanding substances. The study was part of a four-year assessment of non-point source pollution in the Minnesota River Basin. Runoff from tributary watersheds was identified as the primary source of suspended sediment and nutrients in the Minnesota River mainstem. Suspended-sediment, phosphorus, and nitrate concentrations were elevated in all major tributaries during runoff, but tributaries in the south-central and eastern part of the basin produce the highest annual loading to the mainstem because of higher annual precipitation and runoff in that part of the basin. Particle-size analyses showed that most of the suspended sediment in transport consisted of silt- and clay-size material. Phosphorus enrichment was indicated throughout the mainstem by total phosphorus concentrations that ranged from 0.04 to 0.48 mg/L with a median value of 0.22 mg/L, and an interquartile range of 0.15 to 0.29 mg/L. Nitrate concentrations periodically exceeded drinking water standards in tributaries draining the south-central and eastern part of the basin. Oxygen demand was most elevated during periods of summer low flow. Correlations between levels of biochemical oxygen demand and levels of algal productivity suggest that algal biomass comprises much of the oxygen-demanding material in the mainstem. Transport of sediment, nutrients, and organic carbon within the mainstem was found to be conservative, with nearly all tributary inputs being transported downstream. Uptake and utilization of nitrate and orthophosphorus was indicated during low flow, but at normal and high flow, inputs of these constituents greatly exceeded biological utilization.

  7. An integrated communications demand model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doubleday, C. F.

    1980-11-01

    A computer model of communications demand is being developed to permit dynamic simulations of the long-term evolution of demand for communications media in the U.K. to be made under alternative assumptions about social, economic and technological trends in British Telecom's business environment. The context and objectives of the project and the potential uses of the model are reviewed, and four key concepts in the demand for communications media, around which the model is being structured are discussed: (1) the generation of communications demand; (2) substitution between media; (3) technological convergence; and (4) competition. Two outline perspectives on the model itself are given.

  8. Factors affecting the performance of a single-chamber microbial fuel cell-type biological oxygen demand sensor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Gai-Xiu; Sun, Yong-Ming; Kong, Xiao-Ying; Zhen, Feng; Li, Ying; Li, Lian-Hua; Lei, Ting-Zhou; Yuan, Zhen-Hong; Chen, Guan-Yi

    2013-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are devices that exploit microorganisms as biocatalysts to degrade organic matter or sludge present in wastewater (WW), and thereby generate electricity. We developed a simple, low-cost single-chamber microbial fuel cell (SCMFC)-type biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) sensor using carbon felt (anode) and activated sludge, and demonstrated its feasibility in the construction of a real-time BOD measurement system. Further, the effects of anodic pH and organic concentration on SCMFC performance were examined, and the correlation between BOD concentration and its response time was analyzed. Our results demonstrated that the SCMFC exhibited a stable voltage after 132 min following the addition of synthetic WW (BOD concentration: 200 mg/L). Notably, the response signal increased with an increase in BOD concentration (range: 5-200 mg/L) and was found to be directly proportional to the substrate concentration. However, at higher BOD concentrations (>120 mg/L) the response signal remained unaltered. Furthermore, we optimized the SCMFC using synthetic WW, and tested it with real WW. Upon feeding real WW, the BOD values exhibited a standard deviation from 2.08 to 8.3% when compared to the standard BOD5 method, thus demonstrating the practical applicability of the developed system to real treatment effluents.

  9. Demand Activated Manufacturing Architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, T.R.; Zimmerman, J.J.

    2001-02-07

    Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T) engineers John Zimmerman and Tom Bender directed separate projects within this CRADA. This Project Accomplishments Summary contains their reports independently. Zimmerman: In 1998 Honeywell FM&T partnered with the Demand Activated Manufacturing Architecture (DAMA) Cooperative Business Management Program to pilot the Supply Chain Integration Planning Prototype (SCIP). At the time, FM&T was developing an enterprise-wide supply chain management prototype called the Integrated Programmatic Scheduling System (IPSS) to improve the DOE's Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC) supply chain. In the CRADA partnership, FM&T provided the IPSS technical and business infrastructure as a test bed for SCIP technology, and this would provide FM&T the opportunity to evaluate SCIP as the central schedule engine and decision support tool for IPSS. FM&T agreed to do the bulk of the work for piloting SCIP. In support of that aim, DAMA needed specific DOE Defense Programs opportunities to prove the value of its supply chain architecture and tools. In this partnership, FM&T teamed with Sandia National Labs (SNL), Division 6534, the other DAMA partner and developer of SCIP. FM&T tested SCIP in 1998 and 1999. Testing ended in 1999 when DAMA CRADA funding for FM&T ceased. Before entering the partnership, FM&T discovered that the DAMA SCIP technology had an array of applications in strategic, tactical, and operational planning and scheduling. At the time, FM&T planned to improve its supply chain performance by modernizing the NWC-wide planning and scheduling business processes and tools. The modernization took the form of a distributed client-server planning and scheduling system (IPSS) for planners and schedulers to use throughout the NWC on desktops through an off-the-shelf WEB browser. The planning and scheduling process within the NWC then, and today, is a labor-intensive paper-based method that plans and schedules more than 8,000 shipped parts

  10. CAREER GUIDE FOR DEMAND OCCUPATIONS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LEE, E.R.; WELCH, JOHN L.

    THIS PUBLICATION UPDATES THE "CAREER GUIDE FOR DEMAND OCCUPATIONS" PUBLISHED IN 1959 AND PROVIDES COUNSELORS WITH INFORMATION ABOUT OCCUPATIONS IN DEMAND IN MANY AREAS WHICH REQUIRE PREEMPLOYMENT TRAINING. IT PRESENTS, IN COLUMN FORM, THE EDUCATION AND OTHER TRAINING USUALLY REQUIRED BY EMPLOYERS, HIGH SCHOOL SUBJECTS OF PARTICULAR PERTINENCE TO…

  11. Harnessing the power of demand

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffrin, Anjali; Yoshimura, Henry; LaPlante, David; Neenan, Bernard

    2008-03-15

    Demand response can provide a series of economic services to the market and also provide ''insurance value'' under low-likelihood, but high-impact circumstances in which grid reliablity is enhanced. Here is how ISOs and RTOs are fostering demand response within wholesale electricity markets. (author)

  12. Automated Demand Response and Commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

    2005-04-01

    This paper describes the results from the second season of research to develop and evaluate the performance of new Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR) hardware and software technology in large facilities. Demand Response (DR) is a set of activities to reduce or shift electricity use to improve the electric grid reliability and manage electricity costs. Fully-Automated Demand Response does not involve human intervention, but is initiated at a home, building, or facility through receipt of an external communications signal. We refer to this as Auto-DR. The evaluation of the control and communications must be properly configured and pass through a set of test stages: Readiness, Approval, Price Client/Price Server Communication, Internet Gateway/Internet Relay Communication, Control of Equipment, and DR Shed Effectiveness. New commissioning tests are needed for such systems to improve connecting demand responsive building systems to the electric grid demand response systems.

  13. Demand Response for Ancillary Services

    SciTech Connect

    Alkadi, Nasr E; Starke, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    Many demand response resources are technically capable of providing ancillary services. In some cases, they can provide superior response to generators, as the curtailment of load is typically much faster than ramping thermal and hydropower plants. Analysis and quantification of demand response resources providing ancillary services is necessary to understand the resources economic value and impact on the power system. Methodologies used to study grid integration of variable generation can be adapted to the study of demand response. In the present work, we describe and illustrate a methodology to construct detailed temporal and spatial representations of the demand response resource and to examine how to incorporate those resources into power system models. In addition, the paper outlines ways to evaluate barriers to implementation. We demonstrate how the combination of these three analyses can be used to translate the technical potential for demand response providing ancillary services into a realizable potential.

  14. A 5-day method for determination of soluble silicon concentrations in nonliquid fertilizer materials using a sodium carbonate-ammonium nitrate extractant followed by visible spectroscopy with heteropoly blue analysis: single-laboratory validation.

    PubMed

    Sebastian, Dennis; Rodrigues, Hugh; Kinsey, Charles; Korndörfer, Gaspar; Pereira, Hamilton; Buck, Guilherme; Datnoff, Lawrence; Miranda, Stephen; Provance-Bowley, Mary

    2013-01-01

    A 5-day method for determining the soluble silicon (Si) concentrations in nonliquid fertilizer products was developed using a sodium carbonate (Na2CO3)-ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3) extractant followed by visible spectroscopy with heteropoly blue analysis at 660 nm. The 5-Day Na2CO3-NH4NO3 Soluble Si Extraction Method can be applied to quantify the plant-available Si in solid fertilizer products at levels ranging from 0.2 to 8.4% Si with an LOD of 0.06%, and LOQ of 0.20%. This Si extraction method for fertilizers correlates well with plant uptake of Si (r2 = 0.96 for a range of solid fertilizers) and is applicable to solid Si fertilizer products including blended products and beneficial substances. Fertilizer materials can be processed as received using commercially available laboratory chemicals and materials at ambient laboratory temperatures. The single-laboratory validation of the 5-Day Na2CO3-NH4NO3 Soluble Si Extraction Method has been approved by The Association of American Plant Food Control Officials for testing nonliquid Si fertilizer products.

  15. Nuclear criticality safety: 5-day training course

    SciTech Connect

    Schlesser, J.A.

    1992-11-01

    This compilation of notes is presented as a source reference for the criticality safety course. It represents the contributions of many people, particularly Tom McLaughlin, the course's primary instructor. At the completion of this training course, the attendee will: be able to define terms commonly used in nuclear criticality safety; be able to appreciate the fundamentals of nuclear criticality safety; be able to identify factors which affect nuclear criticality safety; be able to identify examples of criticality controls as used at Los Alamos; be able to identify examples of circumstances present during criticality accidents; be able to identify examples of computer codes used by the nuclear criticality safety specialist; be able to identify examples of safety consciousness required in nuclear criticality safety.

  16. Nuclear criticality safety: 5-day training course

    SciTech Connect

    Schlesser, J.A.

    1992-11-01

    This compilation of notes is presented as a source reference for the criticality safety course. It represents the contributions of many people, particularly Tom McLaughlin, the course`s primary instructor. At the completion of this training course, the attendee will: be able to define terms commonly used in nuclear criticality safety; be able to appreciate the fundamentals of nuclear criticality safety; be able to identify factors which affect nuclear criticality safety; be able to identify examples of criticality controls as used at Los Alamos; be able to identify examples of circumstances present during criticality accidents; be able to identify examples of computer codes used by the nuclear criticality safety specialist; be able to identify examples of safety consciousness required in nuclear criticality safety.

  17. Apollo Soyuz Mission: 5-Day Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The Apollo Soyuz Test Project mission objectives and technical investigations are summarized. Topics discussed include: spacecraft and crew systems performance; joint flight activities; scientific and applications experiments; in-flight demonstrations; biomedical considerations; and mission support performance.

  18. Modeling the Demand for Cocaine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    the Demand for Cocaine Susan S. Everingham C. Peter Rydell Pre~redfor the Office of NatinalDrug Control Policy United States Army DRUG POLICY...Demand for Cocaine . 60 50- sm 40- squared 30- delta prevalence 20- 10- 0.2 0 0.15 0.15 󈧄 b C; 0 i Sum squared delta 0.2 prevalence 0.195 EQ 50-50 0,19...model of the demand for cocaine that was fit to 20 years of data on the current cocaine epidemic in the United States. It also describes the analysis

  19. Discriminating between west-side sources of nutrients and organiccarbon contributing to algal growth and oxygen demand in the San JoaquinRiver

    SciTech Connect

    Wstringfellow@lbl.gov

    2002-07-24

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the Salt and Mud Slough tributaries as sources of oxygen demanding materials entering the San Joaquin River (SJR). Mud Slough and Salt Slough are the main drainage arteries of the Grasslands Watershed, a 370,000-acre area west of the SJR, covering portions of Merced and Fresno Counties. Although these tributaries of the SJR are typically classified as agricultural, they are also heavily influenced by Federal, State and private wetlands. The majority of the surface water used for both irrigation and wetland management in the Grassland Watershed is imported from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta through the Delta-Mendota Canal. In this study, they measured algal biomass (as chlorophyll a), organic carbon, ammonia, biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), and other measures of water quality in drainage from both agricultural and wetland sources at key points in the Salt Slough and Mud Slough tributaries. This report includes the data collected between June 16th and October 4th, 2001. The objective of the study was to compare agricultural and wetland drainage in the Grasslands Watershed and to determine the relative importance of each return flow source to the concentration and mass loading of oxygen demanding materials entering the SJR. Additionally, they compared the quality of water exiting our study area to water entering our study area. This study has demonstrated that Salt and Mud Sloughs both contribute significant amounts of oxygen demand to the SJR. Together, these tributaries could account for 35% of the oxygen demand observed below their confluence with the SJR. This study has characterized the sources of oxygen demanding materials entering Mud Slough and evaluated the oxygen demand conditions in Salt Slough. Salt Slough was found to be the dominant source of oxygen demand load in the study area, because of the higher flows in this tributary. The origins of oxygen demand in Salt Slough still remain largely uninvestigated

  20. Saving Electricity and Demand Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Nobuyuki

    A lot of people lost their lives in the tremendous earthquake in Tohoku region on March 11. A large capacity of electric power plants in TEPCO area was also damaged and large scale power shortage in this summer is predicted. In this situation, electricity customers are making great effort to save electricity to avoid planned outage. Customers take actions not only by their selves but also by some customers' cooperative movements. All actions taken actually are based on responses to request form the government or voluntary decision. On the other hand, demand response based on a financial stimulus is not observed as an actual behavior. Saving electricity by this demand response only discussed in the newspapers. In this commentary, the events regarding electricity-saving measure after this disaster are described and the discussions on demand response, especially a raise in power rate, are put into shapes in the context of this electricity supply-demand gap.

  1. Speech measures indicating workload demand.

    PubMed

    Brenner, M; Doherty, E T; Shipp, T

    1994-01-01

    Heart rate and six speech measures were evaluated using a manual tracking task under different workload demands. Following training, 17 male subjects performed three task trials: a difficult trial, with a $50 incentive for successful performance at a very demanding level; an easy trial, with a $2 incentive for successful performance at a simple level; and a baseline trial, in which there was physiological monitoring but no tracking performance. Subjects counted aloud during the trials. It was found that heart rate, speaking fundamental frequency (pitch), and vocal intensity (loudness) increased significantly with workload demands. Speaking rate showed a marginal increase, while vocal jitter and vocal shimmer did not show reliable changes. A derived speech measure, which statistically combined information from all other speech measures except shimmer, was also evaluated. It increased significantly with workload demands and was surprisingly robust in showing differences for individual subjects. It appears that speech analysis can provide practical workload information.

  2. Industrial Demand Module - NEMS Documentation

    EIA Publications

    2014-01-01

    Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

  3. Residential Demand Module - NEMS Documentation

    EIA Publications

    2014-01-01

    Model Documentation - Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

  4. Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Eto, Joseph H.; Nelson-Hoffman, Janine; Torres, Carlos; Hirth,Scott; Yinger, Bob; Kueck, John; Kirby, Brendan; Bernier, Clark; Wright,Roger; Barat, A.; Watson, David S.

    2007-05-01

    The Demand Response Spinning Reserve project is a pioneeringdemonstration of how existing utility load-management assets can providean important electricity system reliability resource known as spinningreserve. Using aggregated demand-side resources to provide spinningreserve will give grid operators at the California Independent SystemOperator (CAISO) and Southern California Edison (SCE) a powerful, newtool to improve system reliability, prevent rolling blackouts, and lowersystem operating costs.

  5. Energy supply and demand in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffith, E. D.

    1978-01-01

    The author expresses his views on future energy demand on the west coast of the United States and how that energy demand translates into demand for major fuels. He identifies the major uncertainties in determining what future demands may be. The major supply options that are available to meet projected demands and the policy implications that flow from these options are discussed.

  6. Fundamental Travel Demand Model Example

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanssen, Joel

    2010-01-01

    Instances of transportation models are abundant and detailed "how to" instruction is available in the form of transportation software help documentation. The purpose of this paper is to look at the fundamental inputs required to build a transportation model by developing an example passenger travel demand model. The example model reduces the scale to a manageable size for the purpose of illustrating the data collection and analysis required before the first step of the model begins. This aspect of the model development would not reasonably be discussed in software help documentation (it is assumed the model developer comes prepared). Recommendations are derived from the example passenger travel demand model to suggest future work regarding the data collection and analysis required for a freight travel demand model.

  7. Turkey's energy demand and supply

    SciTech Connect

    Balat, M.

    2009-07-01

    The aim of the present article is to investigate Turkey's energy demand and the contribution of domestic energy sources to energy consumption. Turkey, the 17th largest economy in the world, is an emerging country with a buoyant economy challenged by a growing demand for energy. Turkey's energy consumption has grown and will continue to grow along with its economy. Turkey's energy consumption is high, but its domestic primary energy sources are oil and natural gas reserves and their production is low. Total primary energy production met about 27% of the total primary energy demand in 2005. Oil has the biggest share in total primary energy consumption. Lignite has the biggest share in Turkey's primary energy production at 45%. Domestic production should be to be nearly doubled by 2010, mainly in coal (lignite), which, at present, accounts for almost half of the total energy production. The hydropower should also increase two-fold over the same period.

  8. International Oil Supplies and Demands

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    The eleventh Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) working group met four times over the 1989--90 period to compare alternative perspectives on international oil supplies and demands through 2010 and to discuss how alternative supply and demand trends influence the world's dependence upon Middle Eastern oil. Proprietors of eleven economic models of the world oil market used their respective models to simulate a dozen scenarios using standardized assumptions. From its inception, the study was not designed to focus on the short-run impacts of disruptions on oil markets. Nor did the working group attempt to provide a forecast or just a single view of the likely future path for oil prices. The model results guided the group's thinking about many important longer-run market relationships and helped to identify differences of opinion about future oil supplies, demands, and dependence.

  9. International Oil Supplies and Demands

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    The eleventh Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) working group met four times over the 1989--1990 period to compare alternative perspectives on international oil supplies and demands through 2010 and to discuss how alternative supply and demand trends influence the world's dependence upon Middle Eastern oil. Proprietors of eleven economic models of the world oil market used their respective models to simulate a dozen scenarios using standardized assumptions. From its inception, the study was not designed to focus on the short-run impacts of disruptions on oil markets. Nor did the working group attempt to provide a forecast or just a single view of the likely future path for oil prices. The model results guided the group's thinking about many important longer-run market relationships and helped to identify differences of opinion about future oil supplies, demands, and dependence.

  10. Computational Imaging in Demanding Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-18

    interest in nanoscience in many research fields like  physics,  chemistry , and biology, including the  environmental  fate of the  produced nano-objects...to the Air Force; namely, the removal of disturbances due to demanding physical and environmental conditions. We considered degradations of interest...of  disturbances due to demanding physical and  environmental  conditions. We considered  degradations of interest that can be caused by a number of

  11. Towards Real Information on Demand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Philip

    The phrase "information on demand" is often used to describe situations in which digital electronic information can be delivered to particular points of need at times and in ways that are determined by the specific requirements of individual consumers or client groups. The advent of "mobile" computing equipment now makes the…

  12. Employer Demands from Business Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMurray, Stephen; Dutton, Matthew; McQuaid, Ronald; Richard, Alec

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on research carried out with employers to determine demand for business and management skills in the Scottish workforce. Design/methodology/approach: The research used a questionnaire in which employers were interviewed (either telephone or face to face), completed themselves and returned by e-mail,…

  13. Projecting Electricity Demand in 2050

    SciTech Connect

    Hostick, Donna J.; Belzer, David B.; Hadley, Stanton W.; Markel, Tony; Marnay, Chris; Kintner-Meyer, Michael C. W.

    2014-07-01

    This paper describes the development of end-use electricity projections and load curves that were developed for the Renewable Electricity (RE) Futures Study (hereafter RE Futures), which explored the prospect of higher percentages (30% - 90%) of total electricity generation that could be supplied by renewable sources in the United States. As input to RE Futures, two projections of electricity demand were produced representing reasonable upper and lower bounds of electricity demand out to 2050. The electric sector models used in RE Futures required underlying load profiles, so RE Futures also produced load profile data in two formats: 8760 hourly data for the year 2050 for the GridView model, and in 2-year increments for 17 time slices as input to the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model. The process for developing demand projections and load profiles involved three steps: discussion regarding the scenario approach and general assumptions, literature reviews to determine readily available data, and development of the demand curves and load profiles.

  14. Smart Buildings and Demand Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Ghatikar, Girish

    2011-11-01

    Advances in communications and control technology, the strengthening of the Internet, and the growing appreciation of the urgency to reduce demand side energy use are motivating the development of improvements in both energy efficiency and demand response (DR) systems in buildings. This paper provides a framework linking continuous energy management and continuous communications for automated demand response (Auto-DR) in various times scales. We provide a set of concepts for monitoring and controls linked to standards and procedures such as Open Automation Demand Response Communication Standards (OpenADR). Basic building energy science and control issues in this approach begin with key building components, systems, end-uses and whole building energy performance metrics. The paper presents a framework about when energy is used, levels of services by energy using systems, granularity of control, and speed of telemetry. DR, when defined as a discrete event, requires a different set of building service levels than daily operations. We provide examples of lessons from DR case studies and links to energy efficiency.

  15. Residential electricity demand in Arkansas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resendez, Ileana M.

    This study analyzes residential electricity demand in Arkansas. Explanatory variables utilized include real per capita income, residential electricity price, heating degree days, cooling degree days, and residential natural gas price. The results indicate that the income effect dominates the substitution effect given a real personal income increase and a decline in real electricity rates in the state of Arkansas during the period under study.

  16. Commercial Demand Module - NEMS Documentation

    EIA Publications

    2014-01-01

    Documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Commercial Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components.

  17. Demand Controlled Ventilation and Classroom Ventilation

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, William J.; Mendell, Mark J.; Davies, Molly; Eliseeva, Ekaterina; Faulkner, David; Hong, Tienzen; Sullivan, Douglas P.

    2012-05-01

    This document summarizes a research effort on demand controlled ventilation and classroom ventilation. The research on demand controlled ventilation included field studies and building energy modeling.

  18. Annual maximum 5-day rainfall total and maximum number of consecutive dry days over Central America and the Caribbean in the late twenty-first century projected by an atmospheric general circulation model with three different horizontal resolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakaegawa, T.; Kitoh, A.; Murakami, H.; Kusunoki, S.

    2014-04-01

    We simulated changes in annual maximum 5-day rainfall (RX5D) and annual maximum number of consecutive dry days (CDD) in Central America, Mexico, and the Caribbean with three different horizontal resolution atmospheric global general circulation models (AGCMs) and quantified the uncertainty of the projections. The RX5Ds and CDDs were projected to increase in most areas in response to global warming. However, consistent changes were confined to small areas: for RX5D, both coastal zones of northern Mexico and the Yucatan Peninsula; for CDD, the Pacific coastal zone of Mexico, the Yucatan Peninsula, and Guatemala. All three AGCMs projected that RX5Ds and CDDs averaged over only the land area and over the entire area (land and ocean) would increase. The dependence of RX5D probability density functions on the horizontal resolutions was complex. Precipitation unrelated to tropical cyclones was primarily responsible for the projected increases in the frequency of RX5Ds greater than 300 mm.

  19. The alchemy of demand response: turning demand into supply

    SciTech Connect

    Rochlin, Cliff

    2009-11-15

    Paying customers to refrain from purchasing products they want seems to run counter to the normal operation of markets. Demand response should be interpreted not as a supply-side resource but as a secondary market that attempts to correct the misallocation of electricity among electric users caused by regulated average rate tariffs. In a world with costless metering, the DR solution results in inefficiency as measured by deadweight losses. (author)

  20. Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response. International Experiences and Practices

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Bo; Ghatikar, Girish; Ni, Chun Chun; Dudley, Junqiao; Martin, Phil; Wikler, Greg

    2012-06-01

    Demand response (DR) is a load management tool which provides a cost-effective alternative to traditional supply-side solutions to address the growing demand during times of peak electrical load. According to the US Department of Energy (DOE), demand response reflects “changes in electric usage by end-use customers from their normal consumption patterns in response to changes in the price of electricity over time, or to incentive payments designed to induce lower electricity use at times of high wholesale market prices or when system reliability is jeopardized.” 1 The California Energy Commission (CEC) defines DR as “a reduction in customers’ electricity consumption over a given time interval relative to what would otherwise occur in response to a price signal, other financial incentives, or a reliability signal.” 2 This latter definition is perhaps most reflective of how DR is understood and implemented today in countries such as the US, Canada, and Australia where DR is primarily a dispatchable resource responding to signals from utilities, grid operators, and/or load aggregators (or DR providers).

  1. [Antibiotic therapy against acute tonsillopharyngitis in children due to group A beta-hemolytic streptococci: comparison of clinical efficacy, the bactericidal effects, and effects on oral flora between cefditoren pivoxil for 5 days and amoxicillin for 10 days].

    PubMed

    Tsumura, Naoki; Nagai, Kensuke; Hidaka, Hidenobu; Otsu, Yasushi; Tanaka, Yuhei; Ikezawa, Shigeru; Honma, Shinichi; Shindo, Shizuo; Ubukata, Kimiko

    2011-06-01

    We compared the clinical efficacy, the bactericidal effects, effect on the oral microbial flora, and adverse reactions between cefditoren pivoxil (CDTR-PI) for 5 days and amoxicillin (AMPC) for 10 days in children with acute group A beta-hemolytic streptococci (GAS) tonsillopharyngitis, and simultaneously examined the emm genotype and drug susceptibility of the isolated GAS. The results showed that the clinical efficacy was 100% for CDTR-PI and 97.9% for AMPC, with no difference between the two groups, and the bacterial elimination rate was 100% in both groups. No serious adverse event was noted in either group. On the other hand, concerning changes in the oral microbial flora between before and after treatment, the amount of bacteria showed no change in the CDTR-PI group (p = 0.5761) but clearly decreased in the AMPC group (p = 0.0049). This indicates that CDTR-PI does not disturb the oral microbial flora compared with AMPC. Also, the emm types determined in the 112 GAS strains isolated in this study were similar to those that have recently been isolated frequently in Japan. Concerning the drug resistance, none of the isolates showed resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics, but 45% of them were resistant to macrolides. The advantages of short-term treatment are considered to include a lower cost, improvement in drug compliance, decrease in the frequency of the occurrence of adverse reactions, decrease in the frequency of the appearance of drug-resistant strains, and alleviation of the psychological burden of patients and their parents. For these reasons, we conclude that CDTR-PI for 5 days is a useful option for the treatment of acute GAS tonsillopharyngitis in children.

  2. Efficacy and safety profile of combination of tramadol-diclofenac versus tramadol-paracetamol in patients with acute musculoskeletal conditions, postoperative pain, and acute flare of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis: a Phase III, 5-day open-label study

    PubMed Central

    Chandanwale, Ajay S; Sundar, Subramanian; Latchoumibady, Kaliaperumal; Biswas, Swati; Gabhane, Mukesh; Naik, Manoj; Patel, Kamlesh

    2014-01-01

    Objective We aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of a fixed-dose combination (FDC) of tramadol and diclofenac versus a standard approved FDC of tramadol and paracetamol, in patients with acute moderate to severe pain. Methods A total of 204 patients with moderate to severe pain due to acute musculoskeletal conditions (n=52), acute flare of osteoarthritis (n=52), acute flare of rheumatoid arthritis (n=50), or postoperative pain (n=50) were enrolled in the study at baseline. Each disease category was then randomized to receive either of two treatments for 5 days: group A received an FDC of immediate-release tramadol hydrochloride (50 mg) and sustained-release diclofenac sodium (75 mg) (one tablet, twice daily), and group B received an FDC of tramadol hydrochloride (37.5 mg) and paracetamol (325 mg) (two tablets every 4–6 hours, up to a maximum of eight tablets daily). The primary efficacy end points were reductions in pain intensity from baseline at day 3 and day 5 as assessed by a Visual Analog Scale (VAS) score. Results Group A showed a significant reduction in the VAS score for overall pain from baseline on day 3 (P=0.001) and day 5 (P<0.0001) as compared with group B. The combination of tramadol-diclofenac resulted in few mild to moderate adverse events (nausea, vomiting, epigastric pain, and gastritis), which required minimal management, without any treatment discontinuation. The number of adverse events in group A was nine (8.82%) compared with 22 (21.78%) in group B, after 5 days of treatment. Conclusion An FDC of tramadol-diclofenac showed a significantly greater reduction in pain intensity and was well tolerated compared with tramadol-paracetamol, resulting in better analgesia in patients suffering from moderate to severe pain due to acute musculoskeletal conditions, postoperative pain following orthopedic surgery, or acute flare of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:25152629

  3. Advertising increases demand for vasectomy.

    PubMed

    Mehta, M; Mckenzie, M

    1996-01-01

    The recent evaluation of a 2-year no-scalpel vasectomy (NSV) training program providing on-site, hands-on training for physicians working in 43 publicly funded health centers in 17 states found that demand for vasectomy in low-income and minority communities in the US increased following the implementation of innovative advertising strategies. The program also provided sites with surgical instruments, training materials, a press kit, and some help with public information activities. Participating clinics used a range of formal and informal advertising strategies, including radio and printed advertisements, to inform potential clients about vasectomy services. Many interested clients presented to clinics to undergo vasectomy once they had been made aware of the service and its availability. Several providers even stated that advertising caused the demand for vasectomy to exceed their capacity to provide services. The provision of low- or no-cost procedures helped to attract new clients.

  4. Advertising media and cigarette demand.

    PubMed

    Goel, Rajeev K

    2011-01-01

    Using state-level panel data for the USA spanning three decades, this research estimates the demand for cigarettes. The main contribution lies in studying the effects of cigarette advertising disaggregated across five qualitatively different groups. Results show cigarette demand to be near unit elastic, the income effects to be generally insignificant and border price effects and habit effects to be significant. Regarding advertising effects, aggregate cigarette advertising has a negative effect on smoking. Important differences across advertising media emerge when cigarette advertising is disaggregated. The effects of public entertainment and Internet cigarette advertising are stronger than those of other media. Anti-smoking messages accompanying print cigarette advertising seem relatively more effective. Implications for smoking control policy are discussed.

  5. Disruptive innovation: the demand side.

    PubMed

    Havighurst, Clark C

    2008-01-01

    The notion of disruptive innovation provides a welcome framework for considering the prospects for low-cost alternatives in American medicine. Such innovations as have been seen, however, are largely the result of demand by patients paying their own bills because they have high-deductible coverage or are uninsured. Many other cost-saving innovations are discouraged by financing systems that are themselves largely immune to competition from disruptive innovators.

  6. 46 CFR 169.689 - Demand loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Demand loads. 169.689 Section 169.689 Shipping COAST... Electrical Electrical Installations on Vessels of 100 Gross Tons and Over § 169.689 Demand loads. Demand loads must meet § 111.60-7 of this chapter except that smaller demand loads for motor feeders...

  7. 46 CFR 169.689 - Demand loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Demand loads. 169.689 Section 169.689 Shipping COAST... Electrical Electrical Installations on Vessels of 100 Gross Tons and Over § 169.689 Demand loads. Demand loads must meet § 111.60-7 of this chapter except that smaller demand loads for motor feeders...

  8. Automation of energy demand forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddique, Sanzad

    Automation of energy demand forecasting saves time and effort by searching automatically for an appropriate model in a candidate model space without manual intervention. This thesis introduces a search-based approach that improves the performance of the model searching process for econometrics models. Further improvements in the accuracy of the energy demand forecasting are achieved by integrating nonlinear transformations within the models. This thesis introduces machine learning techniques that are capable of modeling such nonlinearity. Algorithms for learning domain knowledge from time series data using the machine learning methods are also presented. The novel search based approach and the machine learning models are tested with synthetic data as well as with natural gas and electricity demand signals. Experimental results show that the model searching technique is capable of finding an appropriate forecasting model. Further experimental results demonstrate an improved forecasting accuracy achieved by using the novel machine learning techniques introduced in this thesis. This thesis presents an analysis of how the machine learning techniques learn domain knowledge. The learned domain knowledge is used to improve the forecast accuracy.

  9. Energy demand and population change.

    PubMed

    Allen, E L; Edmonds, J A

    1981-09-01

    During the post World War 2 years energy consumption has grown 136% while population grew about 51%; per capita consumption of energy expanded, therefore, about 60%. For a given population size, demographic changes mean an increase in energy needs; for instance the larger the group of retirement age people, the smaller their energy needs than are those for a younger group. Estimates indicate that by the year 2000 the energy impact will be toward higher per capita consumption with 60% of the population in the 19-61 age group of workers. Rising female labor force participation will increase the working group even more; it has also been found that income and energy grow at a proportional rate. The authors predict that gasoline consumption within the US will continue to rise with availability considering the larger number of female drivers and higher per capita incomes. The flow of illegal aliens (750,000/year) will have a major impact on income and will use greater amounts of energy than can be expected. A demographic change which will lower energy demands will be the slowdown of the rate of household formation caused by the falling number of young adults. The response of energy demand to price changes is small and slow but incomes play a larger role as does the number of personal automobiles and social changes affecting household formation. Households, commercial space, transportation, and industry are part of every demand analysis and population projections play a major role in determining these factors.

  10. Role of H2O2 in the fluctuating patterns of COD (chemical oxygen demand) during the treatment of palm oil mill effluent (POME) using pilot scale triple frequency ultrasound cavitation reactor.

    PubMed

    Manickam, Sivakumar; Abidin, Norhaida binti Zainal; Parthasarathy, Shridharan; Alzorqi, Ibrahim; Ng, Ern Huay; Tiong, Timm Joyce; Gomes, Rachel L; Ali, Asgar

    2014-07-01

    Palm oil mill effluent (POME) is a highly contaminating wastewater due to its high chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD). Conventional treatment methods require longer residence time (10-15 days) and higher operating cost. Owing to this, finding a suitable and efficient method for the treatment of POME is crucial. In this investigation, ultrasound cavitation technology has been used as an alternative technique to treat POME. Cavitation is the phenomenon of formation, growth and collapse of bubbles in a liquid. The end process of collapse leads to intense conditions of temperature and pressure and shock waves which assist various physical and chemical transformations. Two different ultrasound systems i.e. ultrasonic bath (37 kHz) and a hexagonal triple frequency ultrasonic reactor (28, 40 and 70 kHz) of 15 L have been used. The results showed a fluctuating COD pattern (in between 45,000 and 60,000 mg/L) while using ultrasound bath alone, whereas a non-fluctuating COD pattern with a final COD of 27,000 mg/L was achieved when hydrogen peroxide was introduced. Similarly for the triple frequency ultrasound reactor, coupling all the three frequencies resulted into a final COD of 41,300 mg/L compared to any other individual or combination of two frequencies. With the possibility of larger and continuous ultrasonic cavitational reactors, it is believed that this could be a promising and a fruitful green process engineering technique for the treatment of POME.

  11. Evaluation of Demand Prediction Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-01

    Road Bethesda, Maryland 20817 5886 JiZ A q C64 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Robert Arnberg of LMI deserves credit for assembling many files cf D041 data for...the best techniques of those we studied. • Use of a Poisson or constant variance-to-mean ratio (VMR) leads to poor allocation of resources. Treating...the program element is not in the D041 record or is zero for some quarters with positive demand, or has apparent errors that lead to a less stable

  12. Demand Side Bidding. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Spahn, Andrew

    2003-12-31

    This document sets forth the final report for a financial assistance award for the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) to enhance coordination between the building operators and power system operators in terms of demand-side responses to Location Based Marginal Pricing (LBMP). Potential benefits of this project include improved power system reliability, enhanced environmental quality, mitigation of high locational prices within congested areas, and the reduction of market barriers for demand-side market participants. NARUC, led by its Committee on Energy Resources and the Environment (ERE), actively works to promote the development and use of energy efficiency and clean distributive energy policies within the framework of a dynamic regulatory environment. Electric industry restructuring, energy shortages in California, and energy market transformation intensifies the need for reliable information and strategies regarding electric reliability policy and practice. NARUC promotes clean distributive generation and increased energy efficiency in the context of the energy sector restructuring process. NARUC, through ERE's Subcommittee on Energy Efficiency, strives to improve energy efficiency by creating working markets. Market transformation seeks opportunities where small amounts of investment can create sustainable markets for more efficient products, services, and design practices.

  13. Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper

    SciTech Connect

    Heffner, Grayson

    2009-02-01

    While there is general agreement that demand response (DR) is a valued component in a utility resource plan, there is a lack of consensus regarding how to value DR. Establishing the value of DR is a prerequisite to determining how much and what types of DR should be implemented, to which customers DR should be targeted, and a key determinant that drives the development of economically viable DR consumer technology. Most approaches for quantifying the value of DR focus on changes in utility system revenue requirements based on resource plans with and without DR. This ''utility centric'' approach does not assign any value to DR impacts that lower energy and capacity prices, improve reliability, lower system and network operating costs, produce better air quality, and provide improved customer choice and control. Proper valuation of these benefits requires a different basis for monetization. The review concludes that no single methodology today adequately captures the wide range of benefits and value potentially attributed to DR. To provide a more comprehensive valuation approach, current methods such as the Standard Practice Method (SPM) will most likely have to be supplemented with one or more alternative benefit-valuation approaches. This report provides an updated perspective on the DR valuation framework. It includes an introduction and four chapters that address the key elements of demand response valuation, a comprehensive literature review, and specific research recommendations.

  14. Prospects for European labour demand.

    PubMed

    Lindley, R M

    1988-07-01

    The impact of economic and technological trends upon the level and structure of labor demand is examined, exploring the methods used to model the labor market and making special reference to demography and technology. Evidence on recent and prospective changes in labor demand is reviewed for France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, and the UK. The models used to explore future employment scenarios usually fail to incorporate the linkages required to fully analyze the various demographic-economic interactions. Further, this is not generally viewed as a limitation, given the time frame of most employment projections and their preoccupation with changes in the structure of labor demand. Medium-term multisectoral models tend to pay more attention to both demographic and technical change, but the treatment of both aspects is limited. The projections provide a framework for considering how both socioeconomic behavior and policy might change to achieve different outcomes. The greater a model's behavioral content, as expressed in its relationships between different variables, the greater the insight obtainable from simulation exercises. The 1st half of the 1970s was characterized by a reduction in German employment, representing the severest of European reactions to the oil crisis. The 2nd half of the decade recorded rapid growth in Italy and the Netherlands. The 1980s started with marked declines in Germany and the UK. Overall, the net gains of the 1970s were lost in the recession following the 2nd oil crisis. In none of the 5 countries studied does any realistic prospect emerge of achieving full employment before 2000. The most optimistic outcome is that unemployment will decline only slowly, it at all. The growth of both new forms and areas of employment will not compensate sufficiently for the loss of jobs elsewhere and the growth of labor supply. The industrial sector will continue to experience change in favor of the service sector but at a slower rate than during

  15. Cut Electric Bills by Controlling Demand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grumman, David L.

    1974-01-01

    Electric bills can be reduced by lowering electric consumption and by controlling demand -- the amount of electricity used at a certain point in time. Gives tips to help reduce electric demand at peak power periods. (Author/DN)

  16. Energy demand and population changes

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, E.L.; Edmonds, J.A.

    1980-12-01

    Since World War II, US energy demand has grown more rapidly than population, so that per capita consumption of energy was about 60% higher in 1978 than in 1947. Population growth and the expansion of per capita real incomes have led to a greater use of energy. The aging of the US population is expected to increase per capita energy consumption, despite the increase in the proportion of persons over 65, who consume less energy than employed persons. The sharp decline in the population under 18 has led to an expansion in the relative proportion of population in the prime-labor-force age groups. Employed persons are heavy users of energy. The growth of the work force and GNP is largely attributable to the growing participation of females. Another important consequence of female employment is the growth in ownership of personal automobiles. A third factor pushing up labor-force growth is the steady influx of illegal aliens.

  17. Soft lithography: masters on demand.

    PubMed

    Abdelgawad, Mohamed; Watson, Michael W L; Young, Edmond W K; Mudrik, Jared M; Ungrin, Mark D; Wheeler, Aaron R

    2008-08-01

    We report an ultra-rapid prototyping technique for forming microchannel networks for lab-on-a-chip applications, called masters on-demand. Channels are produced by replica molding on masters formed by laser printing on flexible copper printed circuit board (PCB) substrates. Masters of various designs and dimensions can be individually or mass produced in less than 10 minutes. Using this technique, we have fabricated channels as narrow as 100 microm with heights ranging between 9 microm and 70 microm. Multi-depth channel fabrication is also reported, using a two-step printing process. The functionality of devices formed in this manner is verified by performing in-channel electrophoretic separations and culture and analysis of primary mammalian cells.

  18. Video on demand internal trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sell, Chris

    1993-02-01

    This NYNEX internal trial was designed to test a variety of technical concepts pertaining to a true video on demand system. A three building complex was selected for the trial using coaxial and fiber optic transport systems. The trial period was approximately six weeks long with a total of eighteen movies available twenty four hours a day. A fully automated system was designed at the NYNEX Science and Technology Laboratory that incorporated video equipment and laser disk players. This system is controlled by a pair of Sun Microsystems workstations communicating via a local area network. Valuable knowledge was gained in the area of jukebox design, control systems, and menuing. Fiber optic delivery systems were investigated along with coaxial systems. The user base for this trial consisted of NYNEX employees instead of residential customers. Although the user base was not ideal, we gained insight into how people interact with a fully automated system.

  19. Positional demands of professional rugby.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Angus; Draper, Nick; Lewis, John; Gieseg, Steven P; Gill, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Rugby union is a physically intense intermittent sport coupled with high force collisions. Each position within a team has specific requirements which are typically based on speed, size and skill. The aim of this study was to investigate the contemporary demands of each position and whether they can explain changes in psychophysiological stress. Urine and saliva samples were collected before and after five selected Super 15 rugby games from 37 players. Total neopterin (NP), cortisol and immunoglobulin A were analysed by SCX-high performance liquid chromatography and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Global positioning system software provided distance data, while live video analysis provided impact data. All contemporary demands were analysed as events per minute of game time. Forwards were involved in more total impacts, tackles and rucks compared to backs (p < 0.001), while backs were involved in more ball carries and covered more total distance and distance at high speed per minute of game time (p < 0.01). Loose forwards, inside and outside backs covered significantly more distance at high speed (p < 0.01), while there was a negligible difference with number of impacts between the forward positions. There was also minimal difference between positions in the percentage change in NP, cortisol and sIgA. The results indicate distance covered and number of impacts per minute of game time is position-dependent whereas changes in psychophysiological stress are independent. This information can be used to adapt training and recovery interventions to better prepare each position based on the physical requirements of the game.

  20. Price elasticity of demand: An overlooked concept

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    An all-too-common mistake in analyzing the uranium market is to assume that demand for uranium is driven only by the design and operational parameters of nuclear power plants. Because it is generally accepted that demand for uranium is inelastic, not much attention has been given to how prices can indirectly affect demand. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the factors that are most sensitive to uranium prices, and to show how they alter uranium demand.

  1. The Aggregate Demand Curve: A Reply.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Richard B.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Responds to claims about the instructional value of the downward-sloping aggregate demand curve in teaching principles of macroeconomics. Examines the effects of interest-rates and the role of money on demand curves. Concludes by arguing against the use of downward-sloping aggregate demand curves in textbooks. (RKM)

  2. 7 CFR 987.11 - Trade demand.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Trade demand. 987.11 Section 987.11 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 987.11 Trade demand. Trade demand...

  3. 7 CFR 987.11 - Trade demand.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Trade demand. 987.11 Section 987.11 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 987.11 Trade demand. Trade demand...

  4. EDITORIAL: Photonic materials on demand Photonic materials on demand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheludev, Nikolay; Padilla, Willie J.; Brener, Igal

    2012-11-01

    As David Payne famously said, 'we never have a photonic material that we want...'. This has changed with the proliferation of nanotechnology. Metamaterials—artificial media structured on a sub-wavelength scale—offer a radical paradigm for the engineering of optical properties. Some remarkable advances have been possible with metamaterials. These include, for instance, negative-index media that refract light in the opposite direction from that of conventional materials, chiral materials that rotate the polarization state of light hundreds of thousands of times more strongly than natural optical crystals, and structured thin films with remarkably strong dispersion that can slow light in much the same way as resonant atomic systems with electromagnetically induced transparency. The research agenda is now shifting towards achieving tunable and switchable functionalities with metamaterials [1] where the goal is, paraphrasing Dave Payne, 'to have on demand the photonic material that we want'. The papers in this Journal of Optics special issue explore and review the different approaches to both switching and tuning of metamaterial properties through exploiting effects such as phase conjugation, intense photo-excitation and photoconductivity, the use of electro-optical effects in conductive oxides, the exploitation global quantum coherency and resonantly coupled classical resonator and quantum structures, hybridization with gain media and the manipulation with shapes and constitution of the complex metamolecules and metamaterial reliefs by design, or using MEMS actuation. References [1] Zheludev N I and Kivshar Y 2012 From metamaterials to metadevices Nature Mater.11 917

  5. Demands of immigration among Chinese immigrant nurses.

    PubMed

    Ma, Amy X; Griffin, Mary T Quinn; Capitulo, Katie L; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the demands of immigration among Chinese nurses that have immigrated to the USA. The relationship between the demands of immigration and length of stay in the USA was investigated also. A descriptive correlational study design was used. A convenience sample of 128 nurses was recruited. A self-administered survey was conducted using the demands of immigration scale developed by Aroian, along with a demographic questionnaire. The results showed Chinese immigrant nurses have high demands of immigration. There were significant negative relationships between the demands of immigration and length of stay in the USA. Immigration demands decreased as length of stay increased but remained high even for those who had been in the USA for > 5 years. This information is vital to health-care agencies designing and implementing adaptation programmes targeting these demands to facilitate Chinese nurses' adaptation process.

  6. A 5-day cytoreductive chemotherapy followed by haplo-identical hsct (FA5-BUCY) as a tumor-ablative regimen improved the survival of patients with advanced hematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ping; Yuan, Xiaohong; Luo, Xiaofeng; Liu, Tingbo; Zheng, Jing; Zheng, Zhihong; Zheng, Xiaoyun; Chen, Xinji; Zhang, Langhui; Zheng, Hao; Chen, Zaisheng; Hua, Xueling; Le, Shaohua; Li, Jian; Chen, Zhizhe; Hu, Jianda

    2016-01-01

    Haplo-HSCT has been used when HLA-matched siblings are not available. Conditioning regimens aim to reduce tumor burden prior to HSCT and provide sufficient immunoablation. We report the outcome of haplo-HSCT in 63 consecutive patients from 2/2013 to 12/2015 (19 females/44 males) with high-risk or relapsed/refractory hematological malignancies (n=29-AML; 8-sAML; 19-ALL; 5-advanced-MDS; 2-CML-BC). Median age was 20 years (range: 1.1-49). Twenty-one patients achieved remission prior to transplant, while 42 did not. Patients received FA5-BUCY, i.e., 5-day salvage chemotherapy (Fludarabine/Ara-C) and conditioning (Busulfan/Cyclophosphamide). GvHD prophylaxis included ATG, CsA, MMF and short-term MTX. All patients received stem cells from bone marrow and peripheral blood, and achieved successful engraftment, except two who died before. With a median follow-up of 269 days (120-1081), 42/63 patients are still alive and disease-free. Two-year OS and RFS were similar in patients not in remission and in those in complete remission (61.3% vs 56.3%, p=0.88; 58.3% vs 56.3%, p=0.991). Non-relapse mortality and relapse incidence were 22.2% and 11.1%, respectively. Severe acute-GvHD occurred in 4/63 patients. Transplant-related mortality was low at day+100 (17.5%) and for the entire study period (20.6%). Unexpectedly, few patients experienced mild-to-moderate toxicity, and main causes of death were infection and GvHD. BM blast counts, age, and donor-recipient gender-pairs did not affect the outcome. Less chemotherapy cycles prior to HSCT might result in more favorable outcome. Thus, haplo-HSCT with FA5-BUCY appears promising for advanced disease, especially when TBI and amsacrine, used for FLAMSA, are not available and in pediatric patients for whom TBI is not recommended. PMID:27705929

  7. Worldwide satellite market demand forecast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowyer, J. M.; Frankfort, M.; Steinnagel, K. M.

    1981-01-01

    The forecast is for the years 1981 - 2000 with benchmark years at 1985, 1990 and 2000. Two typs of markets are considered for this study: Hardware (worldwide total) - satellites, earth stations and control facilities (includes replacements and spares); and non-hardware (addressable by U.S. industry) - planning, launch, turnkey systems and operations. These markets were examined for the INTELSAT System (international systems and domestic and regional systems using leased transponders) and domestic and regional systems. Forecasts were determined for six worldwide regions encompassing 185 countries using actual costs for existing equipment and engineering estimates of costs for advanced systems. Most likely (conservative growth rate estimates) and optimistic (mid range growth rate estimates) scenarios were employed for arriving at the forecasts which are presented in constant 1980 U.S. dollars. The worldwide satellite market demand forecast predicts that the market between 181 and 2000 will range from $35 to $50 billion. Approximately one-half of the world market, $16 to $20 billion, will be generated in the United States.

  8. BATMAN: MOS Spectroscopy on Demand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinari, E.; Zamkotsian, F.; Moschetti, M.; Spano, P.; Boschin, W.; Cosentino, R.; Ghedina, A.; González, M.; Pérez, H.; Lanzoni, P.; Ramarijaona, H.; Riva, M.; Zerbi, F.; Nicastro, L.; Valenziano, L.; Di Marcantonio, P.; Coretti, I.; Cirami, R.

    2016-10-01

    Multi-Object Spectrographs (MOS) are the major instruments for studying primary galaxies and remote and faint objects. Current object selection systems are limited and/or difficult to implement in next generation MOS for space and ground-based telescopes. A promising solution is the use of MOEMS devices such as micromirror arrays, which allow the remote control of the multi-slit configuration in real time. TNG is hosting a novelty project for real-time, on-demand MOS masks based on MOEMS programmable slits. We are developing a 2048×1080 Digital-Micromirror-Device-based (DMD) MOS instrument to be mounted on the Galileo telescope, called BATMAN. It is a two-arm instrument designed for providing in parallel imaging and spectroscopic capabilities. With a field of view of 6.8×3.6 arcmin and a plate scale of 0.2 arcsec per micromirror, this astronomical setup can be used to investigate the formation and evolution of galaxies. The wavelength range is in the visible and the spectral resolution is R=560 for a 1 arcsec object, and the two arms will have 2k × 4k CCD detectors. ROBIN, a BATMAN demonstrator, has been designed, realized and integrated. We plan to have BATMAN first light by mid-2016.

  9. Photosynthesis of young apple trees in response to low sink demand under different air temperatures.

    PubMed

    Fan, Pei G; Li, Lian S; Duan, Wei; Li, Wei D; Li, Shao H

    2010-03-01

    Gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence, photosynthetic end products and related enzymes in source leaves in response to low sink demand after girdling to remove the root sink were assessed in young apple trees (Malus pumila) grown in two greenhouses with different air temperatures for 5 days. Compared with the non-girdled control in the low-temperature greenhouse (diurnal maximum air temperature <32 degrees C), low sink demand resulted in lower net photosynthetic rate (P(n)), stomatal conductance (g(s)) and transpiration rate (E) but higher leaf temperature on Day 5, while in the high-temperature greenhouse (diurnal maximum air temperature >36 degrees C), P(n), g(s) and E declined from Day 3 onwards. Moreover, gas exchange responded more to low sink demand in the high-temperature greenhouse than in the low-temperature greenhouse. Decreased P(n) at low sink demand was accompanied by lower intercellular CO(2) concentrations in the low-temperature greenhouse. However, decreased maximal photochemical efficiency, potential activity, efficiency of excitation capture, actual efficiency and photochemical quenching, with increased minimal fluorescence and non-photochemical quenching of photosystem II (PSII), were observed in low sink demand leaves only in the high-temperature greenhouse. In addition, low sink demand increased leaf starch and soluble carbohydrate content in both greenhouses but did not result in lower activity of enzymes involved in metabolism. Thus, decreased P(n) under low sink demand was independent of a direct effect of end-product feedback but rather depended on a high temperature threshold. The lower P(n) was likely due to stomatal limitation in the low-temperature greenhouse, but mainly due to non-stomatal limitation in the high-temperature greenhouse.

  10. Demand forecast model based on CRM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yuancui; Chen, Lichao

    2006-11-01

    With interiorizing day by day management thought that regarding customer as the centre, forecasting customer demand becomes more and more important. In the demand forecast of customer relationship management, the traditional forecast methods have very great limitation because much uncertainty of the demand, these all require new modeling to meet the demands of development. In this paper, the notion is that forecasting the demand according to characteristics of the potential customer, then modeling by it. The model first depicts customer adopting uniform multiple indexes. Secondly, the model acquires characteristic customers on the basis of data warehouse and the technology of data mining. The last, there get the most similar characteristic customer by their comparing and forecast the demands of new customer by the most similar characteristic customer.

  11. The Market Demand for Air Transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taneja, N.

    1972-01-01

    Although the presentation will touch upon the areas of market for air transportation, the theoretical foundations of the demand function, the demand models, and model selection and evaluation, the emphasis of the presentation will be on a qualitative description of the factors affecting the demand for air transportation. The presentation will rely heavily on the results of market surveys carried out by the Port of New York Authority, the University of Michigan, and Census of Transportation.

  12. Robust Unit Commitment Considering Uncertain Demand Response

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Guodong; Tomsovic, Kevin

    2014-09-28

    Although price responsive demand response has been widely accepted as playing an important role in the reliable and economic operation of power system, the real response from demand side can be highly uncertain due to limited understanding of consumers' response to pricing signals. To model the behavior of consumers, the price elasticity of demand has been explored and utilized in both research and real practice. However, the price elasticity of demand is not precisely known and may vary greatly with operating conditions and types of customers. To accommodate the uncertainty of demand response, alternative unit commitment methods robust to themore » uncertainty of the demand response require investigation. In this paper, a robust unit commitment model to minimize the generalized social cost is proposed for the optimal unit commitment decision taking into account uncertainty of the price elasticity of demand. By optimizing the worst case under proper robust level, the unit commitment solution of the proposed model is robust against all possible realizations of the modeled uncertain demand response. Numerical simulations on the IEEE Reliability Test System show the e ectiveness of the method. Finally, compared to unit commitment with deterministic price elasticity of demand, the proposed robust model can reduce the average Locational Marginal Prices (LMPs) as well as the price volatility.« less

  13. Robust Unit Commitment Considering Uncertain Demand Response

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guodong; Tomsovic, Kevin

    2014-09-28

    Although price responsive demand response has been widely accepted as playing an important role in the reliable and economic operation of power system, the real response from demand side can be highly uncertain due to limited understanding of consumers' response to pricing signals. To model the behavior of consumers, the price elasticity of demand has been explored and utilized in both research and real practice. However, the price elasticity of demand is not precisely known and may vary greatly with operating conditions and types of customers. To accommodate the uncertainty of demand response, alternative unit commitment methods robust to the uncertainty of the demand response require investigation. In this paper, a robust unit commitment model to minimize the generalized social cost is proposed for the optimal unit commitment decision taking into account uncertainty of the price elasticity of demand. By optimizing the worst case under proper robust level, the unit commitment solution of the proposed model is robust against all possible realizations of the modeled uncertain demand response. Numerical simulations on the IEEE Reliability Test System show the e ectiveness of the method. Finally, compared to unit commitment with deterministic price elasticity of demand, the proposed robust model can reduce the average Locational Marginal Prices (LMPs) as well as the price volatility.

  14. Use of a latency-based demand assessment to identify potential demands for functional analyses.

    PubMed

    Call, Nathan A; Miller, Sarah J; Mintz, Joslyn Cynkus; Mevers, Joanna Lomas; Scheithauer, Mindy C; Eshelman, Julie E; Beavers, Gracie A

    2016-12-01

    Unlike potential tangible positive reinforcers, which are typically identified for inclusion in functional analyses empirically using preference assessments, demands are most often selected arbitrarily or based on caregiver report. The present study evaluated the use of a demand assessment with 12 participants who exhibited escape-maintained problem behavior. Participants were exposed to 10 demands, with aversiveness measured by average latency to the first instance of problem behavior. In subsequent functional analyses, results of a demand condition that included the demand with the shortest latency to problem behavior resulted in identification of an escape function for 11 of the participants. In contrast, a demand condition that included the demand with the longest latency resulted in identification of an escape function for only 5 participants. The implication of these findings is that for the remaining 7 participants, selection of the demand for the functional analysis without using the results of the demand assessment could have produced a false-negative finding.

  15. Drivers of U.S. mineral demand

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sznopek, John L.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: The word 'demand' has different meanings for different people. To some, it means their 'wants and needs,' to others it is what they consume. Yet, when considering economics, demand refers to the specific amounts of goods or services that individuals will purchase at various prices. Demand is measured over a given time period. It is determined by a number of factors including income, tastes, and the price of complementary and substitute goods. In this paper, the term consumption is used fairly synonymously with the term demand. Most mineral commodities, like iron ore, copper, zinc, and gravel, are intermediate goods, which means that they are used in the production of other goods, called final goods. Demand for intermediate goods is called derived demand because such demand is derived from the demand for final goods. When demand increases for a commodity, generally the price rises. With everything else held constant, this increases the profits for those who provide this commodity. Normally, this would increase profits of existing producers and attract new producers to the market. When demand for a commodity decreases, generally the price falls. Normally, this would cause profits to fall and, as a consequence, the least efficient firms may be forced from the industry. Demand changes for specific materials as final goods or production techniques are reengineered while maintaining or improving product performance, for example, the use of aluminum in the place of copper in long distance electrical transmission lines or plastic replacing steel in automobile bumpers. Substitution contributes to efficient material usage by utilizing cheaper or technically superior materials. In this way, it may also alleviate materials scarcity. If a material becomes relatively scarce (and thus more expensive), a more abundant (and less expensive) material generally replaces it (Wagner and others, 2003, p. 91).

  16. Ensemble forecasting of short-term system scale irrigation demands using real-time flow data and numerical weather predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perera, Kushan C.; Western, Andrew W.; Robertson, David E.; George, Biju; Nawarathna, Bandara

    2016-06-01

    Irrigation demands fluctuate in response to weather variations and a range of irrigation management decisions, which creates challenges for water supply system operators. This paper develops a method for real-time ensemble forecasting of irrigation demand and applies it to irrigation command areas of various sizes for lead times of 1 to 5 days. The ensemble forecasts are based on a deterministic time series model coupled with ensemble representations of the various inputs to that model. Forecast inputs include past flow, precipitation, and potential evapotranspiration. These inputs are variously derived from flow observations from a modernized irrigation delivery system; short-term weather forecasts derived from numerical weather prediction models and observed weather data available from automatic weather stations. The predictive performance for the ensemble spread of irrigation demand was quantified using rank histograms, the mean continuous rank probability score (CRPS), the mean CRPS reliability and the temporal mean of the ensemble root mean squared error (MRMSE). The mean forecast was evaluated using root mean squared error (RMSE), Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency (NSE) and bias. The NSE values for evaluation periods ranged between 0.96 (1 day lead time, whole study area) and 0.42 (5 days lead time, smallest command area). Rank histograms and comparison of MRMSE, mean CRPS, mean CRPS reliability and RMSE indicated that the ensemble spread is generally a reliable representation of the forecast uncertainty for short lead times but underestimates the uncertainty for long lead times.

  17. Pathological Demand Avoidance: Exploring the Behavioural Profile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Nions, Elizabeth; Viding, Essi; Greven, Corina U; Ronald, Angelica; Happé, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    "Pathological Demand Avoidance" is a term increasingly used by practitioners in the United Kingdom. It was coined to describe a profile of obsessive resistance to everyday demands and requests, with a tendency to resort to "socially manipulative" behaviour, including outrageous or embarrassing acts. Pathological demand…

  18. Evaluation of the MEDLARS Demand Search Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancaster, F.W.

    A detailed analysis was made by the National Library of Medicine of the performance of the Medical Literature and Analysis System (MEDLARS) in relation to 300 actual "demand search" requests made to the systems in 1966 and 1967. The objectives of the study were : (1) to study the demand search requirements of MEDLARS users, (2) to…

  19. Information management - Assessing the demand for information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, William H.

    1991-01-01

    Information demand is defined in terms of both information content (what information) and form (when, how, and where it is needed). Providing the information richness required for flight crews to be informed without overwhelming their information processing capabilities will require a great deal of automated intelligence. It is seen that the essence of this intelligence is comprehending and capturing the demand for information.

  20. MAJOR AGRICULTURAL MIGRANT LABOR DEMAND AREAS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Labor, Washington, DC.

    DEPICTED ARE 12 CHARTS OF MAJOR CROP PRODUCTION CENTERS IN THE UNITED STATES WHICH DEMAND THE LABOR OF MIGRATORY FARM WORKERS THROUGHOUT THE YEAR. EACH CHART ILLUSTRATES THE AREAS OF AGRICULTURAL MIGRANT LABOR DEMAND FOR ONE MONTH OF THE YEAR. THE PURPOSE IS TO ACQUAINT THE PUBLIC WITH THE COMPLEXITY OF PLACING AND SCHEDULING MIGRATORY WORKERS…

  1. 46 CFR 169.689 - Demand loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Demand loads. 169.689 Section 169.689 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Machinery and Electrical Electrical Installations on Vessels of 100 Gross Tons and Over § 169.689 Demand loads....

  2. School Characteristics and the Demand for College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bezmen, Trisha; Depken, Craig A., II

    1998-01-01

    Estimates demand for 772 U.S. colleges in 1994 by relating new applications to easily confirmable institutional characteristics. Demand is positively related to out-of-state tuition but inversely related to in-state tuition. Those who apply to public and private colleges are distinct subpopulations. Private-school applicants are less price- and…

  3. Supply and Demand for Education Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Board of Education, Springfield, Dept. of Planning, Research and Evaluation.

    This report provides an overview of educator supply and demand, educator under/oversupply, projected areas of greatest demand and need, and information regarding retirement of teachers in Illinois. Major findings include the following: there appears to be a sufficient number of qualified teachers, yet there are still a number of unfilled positions…

  4. Career Technical Education and Labor Market Demand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of State Directors of Career Technical Education Consortium, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Current data indicates that Career Technical Education (CTE) graduates with high school diplomas or postsecondary skills are preparing for careers in fields that are growing or in high-demand. Matching employability skills with workforce demand has been an issue among industries across the nation. CTE provides relevant academic and technical…

  5. Teaching Aggregate Demand and Supply Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Graeme

    2010-01-01

    The author analyzes the inflation-targeting model that underlies recent textbook expositions of the aggregate demand-aggregate supply approach used in introductory courses in macroeconomics. He shows how numerical simulations of a model with inflation inertia can be used as a tool to help students understand adjustments in response to demand and…

  6. Faculty Supply and Demand in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castle, Sharon; Arends, Richard I.

    2003-01-01

    Investigated current levels of faculty supply and demand at 752 American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education member institutions. Survey data indicate that demand is greater than supply, shortages are more critical in some program areas than others (e.g., early childhood and special education), the percentage of minority hires has…

  7. 46 CFR 169.689 - Demand loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Demand loads. 169.689 Section 169.689 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Machinery and Electrical Electrical Installations on Vessels of 100 Gross Tons and Over § 169.689 Demand loads....

  8. 46 CFR 169.689 - Demand loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Demand loads. 169.689 Section 169.689 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Machinery and Electrical Electrical Installations on Vessels of 100 Gross Tons and Over § 169.689 Demand loads....

  9. Strategies for Demand Response in Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, David S.; Kiliccote, Sila; Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann

    2006-06-20

    This paper describes strategies that can be used in commercial buildings to temporarily reduce electric load in response to electric grid emergencies in which supplies are limited or in response to high prices that would be incurred if these strategies were not employed. The demand response strategies discussed herein are based on the results of three years of automated demand response field tests in which 28 commercial facilities with an occupied area totaling over 11 million ft{sup 2} were tested. Although the demand response events in the field tests were initiated remotely and performed automatically, the strategies used could also be initiated by on-site building operators and performed manually, if desired. While energy efficiency measures can be used during normal building operations, demand response measures are transient; they are employed to produce a temporary reduction in demand. Demand response strategies achieve reductions in electric demand by temporarily reducing the level of service in facilities. Heating ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) and lighting are the systems most commonly adjusted for demand response in commercial buildings. The goal of demand response strategies is to meet the electric shed savings targets while minimizing any negative impacts on the occupants of the buildings or the processes that they perform. Occupant complaints were minimal in the field tests. In some cases, ''reductions'' in service level actually improved occupant comfort or productivity. In other cases, permanent improvements in efficiency were discovered through the planning and implementation of ''temporary'' demand response strategies. The DR strategies that are available to a given facility are based on factors such as the type of HVAC, lighting and energy management and control systems (EMCS) installed at the site.

  10. Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, Charles; Reid, Michael; Levy, Roger; Silverstein, Alison

    2010-01-29

    This paper reviews the relationship between energy efficiency and demand response and discusses approaches and barriers to coordinating energy efficiency and demand response. The paper is intended to support the 10 implementation goals of the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency's Vision to achieve all cost-effective energy efficiency by 2025. Improving energy efficiency in our homes, businesses, schools, governments, and industries - which consume more than 70 percent of the nation's natural gas and electricity - is one of the most constructive, cost-effective ways to address the challenges of high energy prices, energy security and independence, air pollution, and global climate change. While energy efficiency is an increasingly prominent component of efforts to supply affordable, reliable, secure, and clean electric power, demand response is becoming a valuable tool in utility and regional resource plans. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) estimated the contribution from existing U.S. demand response resources at about 41,000 megawatts (MW), about 5.8 percent of 2008 summer peak demand (FERC, 2008). Moreover, FERC recently estimated nationwide achievable demand response potential at 138,000 MW (14 percent of peak demand) by 2019 (FERC, 2009).2 A recent Electric Power Research Institute study estimates that 'the combination of demand response and energy efficiency programs has the potential to reduce non-coincident summer peak demand by 157 GW' by 2030, or 14-20 percent below projected levels (EPRI, 2009a). This paper supports the Action Plan's effort to coordinate energy efficiency and demand response programs to maximize value to customers. For information on the full suite of policy and programmatic options for removing barriers to energy efficiency, see the Vision for 2025 and the various other Action Plan papers and guides available at www.epa.gov/eeactionplan.

  11. Effects of rainfalls variability and physical-chemical parameters on enteroviruses in sewage and lagoon in Yopougon, Côte d'Ivoire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momou, Kouassi Julien; Akoua-Koffi, Chantal; Traoré, Karim Sory; Akré, Djako Sosthène; Dosso, Mireille

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the variability of the content of nutrients, oxidizable organic and particulate matters in raw sewage and the lagoon on the effect of rainfall. Then evaluate the impact of these changes in the concentration of enteroviruses (EVs) in waters. The sewage samples were collected at nine sampling points along the channel, which flows, into a tropical lagoon in Yopougon. Physical-chemical parameters (5-day Biochemical Oxygen Demand, Chemical Oxygen Demand, Suspended Particulate Matter, Total Phosphorus, Orthophosphate, Total Kjeldahl Nitrogen and Nitrate) as well as the concentration of EV in these waters were determined. The average numbers of EV isolated from the outlet of the channel were 9.06 × 104 PFU 100 ml-1. Consequently, EV was present in 55.55 and 33.33 % of the samples in the 2 brackish lagoon collection sites. The effect of rainfall on viral load at the both sewage and brackish lagoon environments is significant correlate (two-way ANOVA, P < 0.05). Furthermore, in lagoon environment, nutrients (Orthophosphate, Total Phosphorus), 5-day Biochemical Oxygen Demand, Chemical Oxygen Demand and Suspended Particulate Matter were significant correlated with EVs loads (P < 0.05 by Pearson test). The overall results highlight the problem of sewage discharge into the lagoon and correlation between viral loads and water quality parameters in sewage and lagoon.

  12. Trends of jet fuel demand and properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, R.

    1984-01-01

    Petroleum industry forecasts predict an increasing demand for jet fuels, a decrease in the gasoline-to-distillate (heavier fuel) demand ratio, and a greater influx of poorer quality petroleum in the next two to three decades. These projections are important for refinery product analyses. The forecasts have not been accurate, however, in predicting the recent, short term fluctuations in jet fuel and competing product demand. Changes in petroleum quality can be assessed, in part, by a review of jet fuel property inspections. Surveys covering the last 10 years show that average jet fuel freezing points, aromatic contents, and smoke points have trends toward their specification limits.

  13. Agricultural Irrigation Demand Response Estimation Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    This program is used to model the energy demand of agricultural irrigation pumps, used to maintain soil moisture levels in irrigated fields. This modeling is accomplished using historical data from evapotranspirationmeasuring weather stations (from the California Irrigation Management Information System) as well as irrigation system characteristics for the field(s) to be modeled. The modelled energy demand is used to estimate the achievable demand response (DR) potential of the field(s), for use in assessing the value of the DR for the utility company. The program can accept input data with varying degrees of rigor, and estimate the uncertainty of the output accordingly.

  14. On-demand therapy for hereditary angioedema.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Jonathan A

    2013-11-01

    Consensus guidelines on hereditary angioedema (HAE) recommend that all patients have access to on-demand treatment of acute attacks. A recent patientcentric guideline recommended that at least 2 on-demand therapies be available because patients often have heterogeneous responses to different medications. Self-administration of therapeutic agents, or administration under supervision by a health care provider in the home setting, is the preferred treatment approach. Future studies are needed to show the benefits of acute on-demand therapies at improving quality of life and reducing morbidity and mortality in patients with HAE.

  15. Autonomous Demand Response for Primary Frequency Regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, Matt; Trudnowski, Daniel J.; Mattix, S.; Dagle, Jeffery E.

    2012-02-28

    The research documented within this report examines the use of autonomous demand response to provide primary frequency response in an interconnected power grid. The work builds on previous studies in several key areas: it uses a large realistic model (i.e., the interconnection of the western United States and Canada); it establishes a set of metrics that can be used to assess the effectiveness of autonomous demand response; and it independently adjusts various parameters associated with using autonomous demand response to assess effectiveness and to examine possible threats or vulnerabilities associated with the technology.

  16. 7 CFR 981.21 - Trade demand.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Trade demand. 981.21 Section 981.21 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... distribution worldwide....

  17. 7 CFR 981.21 - Trade demand.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Trade demand. 981.21 Section 981.21 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... distribution worldwide....

  18. 7 CFR 981.21 - Trade demand.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Trade demand. 981.21 Section 981.21 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS... distribution worldwide....

  19. 7 CFR 981.21 - Trade demand.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Trade demand. 981.21 Section 981.21 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... distribution worldwide....

  20. Demand Response and Energy Storage Integration Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Ookie; Cheung, Kerry

    2016-03-01

    Demand response and energy storage resources present potentially important sources of bulk power system services that can aid in integrating variable renewable generation. While renewable integration studies have evaluated many of the challenges associated with deploying large amounts of variable wind and solar generation technologies, integration analyses have not yet fully incorporated demand response and energy storage resources. This report represents an initial effort in analyzing the potential integration value of demand response and energy storage, focusing on the western United States. It evaluates two major aspects of increased deployment of demand response and energy storage: (1) Their operational value in providing bulk power system services and (2) Market and regulatory issues, including potential barriers to deployment.

  1. Teacher Demand and Supply in Western Canada.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapuscinski, B. Phyllis; Haug, F. M.

    1982-01-01

    The article reviews the current status of teacher supply and demand, examines needs that have been identified, and draws implications for teacher education. The focus of the needs assessment is on one province: Saskatchewan. (AH)

  2. Electronic Eye: Streaming Video On-Demand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meulen, Kathleen

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the use of on-demand streaming video in school libraries. Explains how streaming works, considers advantages and technical issues, and describes products from three companies that are pioneering streaming in the educational video market. (LRW)

  3. Global Energy: Supply, Demand, Consequences, Opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, Arun

    2008-08-14

    July 29, 2008 Berkeley Lab lecture: Arun Majumdar, Director of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division, discusses current and future projections of economic growth, population, and global energy demand and supply, and explores the implications of these trends for the environment.

  4. A historical analysis of natural gas demand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalbec, Nathan Richard

    This thesis analyzes demand in the US energy market for natural gas, oil, and coal over the period of 1918-2013 and examines their price relationship over the period of 2007-2013. Diagnostic tests for time series were used; Augmented Dickey-Fuller, Kwiatkowski-Phillips-Schmidt-Shin, Johansen cointegration, Granger Causality and weak exogeneity tests. Directed acyclic graphs were used as a complimentary test for endogeneity. Due to the varied results in determining endogeneity, a seemingly unrelated regression model was used which assumes all right hand side variables in the three demand equations were exogenous. A number of factors were significant in determining demand for natural gas including its own price, lagged demand, a number of structural break dummies, and trend, while oil indicate some substitutability with natural gas. An error correction model was used to examine the price relationships. Natural gas price was found not to have a significant cointegrating vector.

  5. Global Energy: Supply, Demand, Consequences, Opportunities

    ScienceCinema

    Majumdar, Arun

    2016-07-12

    July 29, 2008 Berkeley Lab lecture: Arun Majumdar, Director of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division, discusses current and future projections of economic growth, population, and global energy demand and supply, and explores the implications of these trends for the environment.

  6. Hawaiian Electric Company Demand Response Roadmap Project

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, Roger; Kiliccote, Sila

    2013-01-12

    The objective of this project was to develop a “roadmap” to guide the Hawaiian Electric Company (HECO) demand response (DR) planning and implementation in support of the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI) 70% clean energy goal by 2030.

  7. Climate policy implications for agricultural water demand

    SciTech Connect

    Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.

    2013-03-01

    Energy, water and land are scarce resources, critical to humans. Developments in each affect the availability and cost of the others, and consequently human prosperity. Measures to limit greenhouse gas concentrations will inevitably exact dramatic changes on energy and land systems and in turn alter the character, magnitude and geographic distribution of human claims on water resources. We employ the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), an integrated assessment model to explore the interactions of energy, land and water systems in the context of alternative policies to limit climate change to three alternative levels: 2.5 Wm-2 (445 ppm CO2-e), 3.5 Wm-2 (535 ppm CO2-e) and 4.5 Wm-2 (645 ppm CO2-e). We explore the effects of two alternative land-use emissions mitigation policy options—one which taxes terrestrial carbon emissions equally with fossil fuel and industrial emissions, and an alternative which only taxes fossil fuel and industrial emissions but places no penalty on land-use change emissions. We find that increasing populations and economic growth could be anticipated to almost triple demand for water for agricultural systems across the century even in the absence of climate policy. In general policies to mitigate climate change increase agricultural demands for water still further, though the largest changes occur in the second half of the century, under both policy regimes. The two policies examined profoundly affected both the sources and magnitudes of the increase in irrigation water demands. The largest increases in agricultural irrigation water demand occurred in scenarios where only fossil fuel emissions were priced (but not land-use change emission) and were primarily driven by rapid expansion in bioenergy production. In these scenarios water demands were large relative to present-day total available water, calling into question whether it would be physically possible to produce the associated biomass energy. We explored the potential of improved

  8. Ethanol Demand in United States Gasoline Production

    SciTech Connect

    Hadder, G.R.

    1998-11-24

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (OWL) Refinery Yield Model (RYM) has been used to estimate the demand for ethanol in U.S. gasoline production in year 2010. Study cases examine ethanol demand with variations in world oil price, cost of competing oxygenate, ethanol value, and gasoline specifications. For combined-regions outside California summer ethanol demand is dominated by conventional gasoline (CG) because the premised share of reformulated gasoline (RFG) production is relatively low and because CG offers greater flexibility for blending high vapor pressure components like ethanol. Vapor pressure advantages disappear for winter CG, but total ethanol used in winter RFG remains low because of the low RFG production share. In California, relatively less ethanol is used in CG because the RFG production share is very high. During the winter in California, there is a significant increase in use of ethanol in RFG, as ethanol displaces lower-vapor-pressure ethers. Estimated U.S. ethanol demand is a function of the refiner value of ethanol. For example, ethanol demand for reference conditions in year 2010 is 2 billion gallons per year (BGY) at a refiner value of $1.00 per gallon (1996 dollars), and 9 BGY at a refiner value of $0.60 per gallon. Ethanol demand could be increased with higher oil prices, or by changes in gasoline specifications for oxygen content, sulfur content, emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCS), and octane numbers.

  9. Demand for Self-Employed Health Insurance

    PubMed Central

    Emamgholipour, Sara; Arab, Mohammad; Ebrahimzadeh, Javad

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Health insurance provides financial support for health care expenditures. There are two types of health insurance: compulsory and voluntary. Voluntary health insurance can be divided into two categories: self-employed and supplementary. In this study, the main factors that affect the demand for self-employed health insurance in Iran were determined. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, data were derived from the 2013 Household Income and Expenditure Survey from the Statistical Center of Iran. Then, a logistic regression model was designed to determine the factors influencing health insurance demand. Results: The age, income, and education level of the head of the household directly correlated with the demand for self-employed health insurance. There was no significant relationship between the demand for health insurance and the gender or marital status of the head of the household. In addition, there were no significant relationships between occupation or house ownership and the demand for health insurance in rural households. Conclusion: To promote voluntary health insurance, it is helpful to identify effective factors that stimulate the health insurance demand. PMID:28149140

  10. Refrigerated Warehouse Demand Response Strategy Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Doug; Castillo, Rafael; Larson, Kyle; Dobbs, Brian; Olsen, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    This guide summarizes demand response measures that can be implemented in refrigerated warehouses. In an appendix, it also addresses related energy efficiency opportunities. Reducing overall grid demand during peak periods and energy consumption has benefits for facility operators, grid operators, utility companies, and society. State wide demand response potential for the refrigerated warehouse sector in California is estimated to be over 22.1 Megawatts. Two categories of demand response strategies are described in this guide: load shifting and load shedding. Load shifting can be accomplished via pre-cooling, capacity limiting, and battery charger load management. Load shedding can be achieved by lighting reduction, demand defrost and defrost termination, infiltration reduction, and shutting down miscellaneous equipment. Estimation of the costs and benefits of demand response participation yields simple payback periods of 2-4 years. To improve demand response performance, it’s suggested to install air curtains and another form of infiltration barrier, such as a rollup door, for the passageways. Further modifications to increase efficiency of the refrigeration unit are also analyzed. A larger condenser can maintain the minimum saturated condensing temperature (SCT) for more hours of the day. Lowering the SCT reduces the compressor lift, which results in an overall increase in refrigeration system capacity and energy efficiency. Another way of saving energy in refrigerated warehouses is eliminating the use of under-floor resistance heaters. A more energy efficient alternative to resistance heaters is to utilize the heat that is being rejected from the condenser through a heat exchanger. These energy efficiency measures improve efficiency either by reducing the required electric energy input for the refrigeration system, by helping to curtail the refrigeration load on the system, or by reducing both the load and required energy input.

  11. USGS Map-on-Demand Printing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1999-01-01

    Currently, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) uses conventional lithographic printing techniques to produce paper copies of most of its mapping products. This practice is not economical for those products that are in low demand. With the advent of newer technologies, high-speed, large-format printers have been coupled with innovative computer software to turn digital map data into a printed map. It is now possible to store and retrieve data from vast geospatial data bases and print a map on an as-needed basis; that is, print on demand, thereby eliminating the need to warehouse an inventory of paper maps for which there is low demand. Using print-on-demand technology, the USGS is implementing map-on-demand (MOD) printing for certain infrequently requested maps. By providing MOD, the USGS can offer an alternative to traditional, large-volume printing and can improve its responsiveness to customers by giving them greater access to USGS scientific data in a format that otherwise might not be available.

  12. Analysing the lack of Demand Organisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boxer, Philip; Cohen, Bernard

    1998-07-01

    We seek to develop means of intervention in Enterprises that will enable them to react in an effective, sustainable and timely fashion to changes in the ways that markets and demand are organized; that is, to act strategically. We take an enterprise to be some entity that seeks to provide its clients with services that they value while maintaining its ability to do so in the face of changes in the demands of its clients and in the resources at its disposal. The services that clients value form around what the organization of their demands lack. The concept of strategy therefore rests on critically evaluating the ontology and semantics of the Enterprise in relation to these holes in demand organization. We access ontology and semantics by constructing and manipulating hypothetical, first-order, mathematical models of the Enterprise's services and of its value-adding processes. Because an enterprise is an anticipatory system, its semantic domain must include representations of the enterprise's model of itself and of the market and demand organizations within which it competes. First-order (set) theory provides adequate expressive power here, but alternative, higher order, mathematical frameworks, such as Dubois' hyperincursion, provide inadequate power, particularly in relation to the analysis of the properties of emergence. Knowing exactly why and where this mathematical lack manifests in the analysis process enables effective collaboration between systems analysts and psychoanalysts, and suggest directions for mathematical research.

  13. Regional recreation demand and benefits model

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, R.J.

    1983-03-01

    This report describes a regional recreation demand and benefits model that is used to estimate recreation demand and value (consumers' surplus) of four activities at each of 195 sites in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and western Montana. The recreation activities considered are camping, fishing, swimming, and boating. The model is a generalization of the single-site travel-cost method of estimating a recreation demand curve to virtually an unlimited number of sites. The major components of the analysis include the theory of recreation benefits, a travel-cost recreation demand curve, and a gravity model of regional recreation travel flows. Existing recreation benefits are estimated for each site in the region and for each activity. Recreation benefits of improved water quality in degraded rivers and streams in the Pacific Northwest are estimated on a county basis for Washington, Oregon, and Idaho. Although water quality is emphasized, the model has the capability of estimating demand and value for new or improved recreation sites at lakes, streams, or reservoirs.

  14. Cognitive task demands, self-control demands and the mental well-being of office workers.

    PubMed

    Bridger, Robert S; Brasher, Kate

    2011-09-01

    The cognitive task demands of office workers and the self-control demands of their work roles were measured in a sample of 196 employees in two different office layouts using a self-report questionnaire, which was circulated electronically. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that both factors were associated with mental well-being, but not with physical well-being, while controlling for exposure to psychosocial stressors. The interaction between cognitive task demands and self-control demands had the strongest association with mental well-being, suggesting that the deleterious effect of one was greater when the other was present. An exploratory analysis revealed that the association was stronger for employees working in a large open-plan office than for those working in smaller offices with more privacy. Frustration of work goals was the cognitive task demand having the strongest negative impact on mental well-being. Methodological limitations and scale psychometrics (particularly the use of the NASA Task Load Index) are discussed. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: Modern office work has high mental demands and low physical demands and there is a need to design offices to prevent adverse psychological reactions. It is shown that cognitive task demands interact with self-control demands to degrade mental well-being. The association was stronger in an open-plan office.

  15. 31 CFR 344.7 - What are Demand Deposit securities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are Demand Deposit securities... LOCAL GOVERNMENT SERIES Demand Deposit Securities § 344.7 What are Demand Deposit securities? Demand... in the Federal Register. (b) What happens to Demand Deposit securities during a Debt...

  16. Hospital demand for licensed practical nurses.

    PubMed

    Spetz, Joanne; Dyer, Wendy T; Chapman, Susan; Seago, Jean Ann

    2006-10-01

    Despite evidence that hospital use of licensed practical nurses (LPNs) declined in the 1990s, the current registered nurse (RN) shortage has prompted interest in LPNs as substitutes for RNs. Hospitals, being the dominant employer of RNs, have an economic incentive to use less expensive LPNs as substitutes. Beside wages, there are several forces underlying hospital demand for LPNs. In this article, the authors model and estimate hospital demand for LPNs as a function of nurse wages and hospital, market, and patient characteristics using a longitudinal data set of short-term general hospitals in the United States. The authors find evidence that higher RN wages increase hospital demand for LPNs, both in levels and relative to RNs, suggesting that hospitals at least partially substitute RNs with LPNs.

  17. Wireless Demand Response Controls for HVAC Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Federspiel, Clifford

    2009-06-30

    The objectives of this scoping study were to develop and test control software and wireless hardware that could enable closed-loop, zone-temperature-based demand response in buildings that have either pneumatic controls or legacy digital controls that cannot be used as part of a demand response automation system. We designed a SOAP client that is compatible with the Demand Response Automation Server (DRAS) being used by the IOUs in California for their CPP program, design the DR control software, investigated the use of cellular routers for connecting to the DRAS, and tested the wireless DR system with an emulator running a calibrated model of a working building. The results show that the wireless DR system can shed approximately 1.5 Watts per design CFM on the design day in a hot, inland climate in California while keeping temperatures within the limits of ASHRAE Standard 55: Thermal Environmental Conditions for Human Occupancy.

  18. International Oil Supplies and Demands. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    The eleventh Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) working group met four times over the 1989--1990 period to compare alternative perspectives on international oil supplies and demands through 2010 and to discuss how alternative supply and demand trends influence the world`s dependence upon Middle Eastern oil. Proprietors of eleven economic models of the world oil market used their respective models to simulate a dozen scenarios using standardized assumptions. From its inception, the study was not designed to focus on the short-run impacts of disruptions on oil markets. Nor did the working group attempt to provide a forecast or just a single view of the likely future path for oil prices. The model results guided the group`s thinking about many important longer-run market relationships and helped to identify differences of opinion about future oil supplies, demands, and dependence.

  19. International Oil Supplies and Demands. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    The eleventh Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) working group met four times over the 1989--90 period to compare alternative perspectives on international oil supplies and demands through 2010 and to discuss how alternative supply and demand trends influence the world`s dependence upon Middle Eastern oil. Proprietors of eleven economic models of the world oil market used their respective models to simulate a dozen scenarios using standardized assumptions. From its inception, the study was not designed to focus on the short-run impacts of disruptions on oil markets. Nor did the working group attempt to provide a forecast or just a single view of the likely future path for oil prices. The model results guided the group`s thinking about many important longer-run market relationships and helped to identify differences of opinion about future oil supplies, demands, and dependence.

  20. Utility Sector Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand

    SciTech Connect

    Coughlin, Katie

    2014-12-01

    This report presents a new approach to estimating the marginal utility sector impacts associated with electricity demand reductions. The method uses publicly available data and provides results in the form of time series of impact factors. The input data are taken from the Energy Information Agency's Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) projections of how the electric system might evolve in the reference case, and in a number of side cases that incorporate different effciency and other policy assumptions. The data published with the AEO are used to define quantitative relationships between demand-side electricity reductions by end use and supply-side changes to capacity by plant type, generation by fuel type and emissions of CO2, Hg, NOx and SO2. The impact factors define the change in each of these quantities per unit reduction in site electricity demand. We find that the relative variation in these impacts by end use is small, but the time variation can be significant.

  1. China's Coal: Demand, Constraints, and Externalities

    SciTech Connect

    Aden, Nathaniel; Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina

    2009-07-01

    This study analyzes China's coal industry by focusing on four related areas. First, data are reviewed to identify the major drivers of historical and future coal demand. Second, resource constraints and transport bottlenecks are analyzed to evaluate demand and growth scenarios. The third area assesses the physical requirements of substituting coal demand growth with other primary energy forms. Finally, the study examines the carbon- and environmental implications of China's past and future coal consumption. There are three sections that address these areas by identifying particular characteristics of China's coal industry, quantifying factors driving demand, and analyzing supply scenarios: (1) reviews the range of Chinese and international estimates of remaining coal reserves and resources as well as key characteristics of China's coal industry including historical production, resource requirements, and prices; (2) quantifies the largest drivers of coal usage to produce a bottom-up reference projection of 2025 coal demand; and (3) analyzes coal supply constraints, substitution options, and environmental externalities. Finally, the last section presents conclusions on the role of coal in China's ongoing energy and economic development. China has been, is, and will continue to be a coal-powered economy. In 2007 Chinese coal production contained more energy than total Middle Eastern oil production. The rapid growth of coal demand after 2001 created supply strains and bottlenecks that raise questions about sustainability. Urbanization, heavy industrial growth, and increasing per-capita income are the primary interrelated drivers of rising coal usage. In 2007, the power sector, iron and steel, and cement production accounted for 66% of coal consumption. Power generation is becoming more efficient, but even extensive roll-out of the highest efficiency units would save only 14% of projected 2025 coal demand for the power sector. A new wedge of future coal consumption is

  2. Accuracy analysis of TDRSS demand forecasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Daniel C.; Levine, Allen J.; Pitt, Karl J.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews Space Network (SN) demand forecasting experience over the past 16 years and describes methods used in the forecasts. The paper focuses on the Single Access (SA) service, the most sought-after resource in the Space Network. Of the ten years of actual demand data available, only the last five years (1989 to 1993) were considered predictive due to the extensive impact of the Challenger accident of 1986. NASA's Space Network provides tracking and communications services to user spacecraft such as the Shuttle and the Hubble Space Telescope. Forecasting the customer requirements is essential to planning network resources and to establishing service commitments to future customers. The lead time to procure Tracking and Data Relay Satellites (TDRS's) requires demand forecasts ten years in the future a planning horizon beyond the funding commitments for missions to be supported. The long range forecasts are shown to have had a bias toward underestimation in the 1991 -1992 period. The trend of underestimation can be expected to be replaced by overestimation for a number of years starting with 1998. At that time demand from new missions slated for launch will be larger than the demand from ongoing missions, making the potential for delay the dominant factor. If the new missions appear as scheduled, the forecasts are likely to be moderately underestimated. The SN commitment to meet the negotiated customer's requirements calls for conservatism in the forecasting. Modification of the forecasting procedure to account for a delay bias is, therefore, not advised. Fine tuning the mission model to more accurately reflect the current actual demand is recommended as it may marginally improve the first year forecasting.

  3. DEMAND CONTROLLED VENTILATION AND CLASSROOM VENTILATION

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, William J.; Mendell, Mark J.; Davies, Molly; Eliseeva, Ekaterina; Faulkner, David; Hong, Tienzen; Sullivan, Douglas P.

    2014-01-06

    This document summarizes a research effort on demand controlled ventilation and classroom ventilation. The research on demand controlled ventilation included field studies and building energy modeling. Major findings included: ? The single-location carbon dioxide sensors widely used for demand controlled ventilation frequently have large errors and will fail to effectively control ventilation rates (VRs).? Multi-location carbon dioxide measurement systems with more expensive sensors connected to multi-location sampling systems may measure carbon dioxide more accurately.? Currently-available optical people counting systems work well much of the time but have large counting errors in some situations. ? In meeting rooms, measurements of carbon dioxide at return-air grilles appear to be a better choice than wall-mounted sensors.? In California, demand controlled ventilation in general office spaces is projected to save significant energy and be cost effective only if typical VRs without demand controlled ventilation are very high relative to VRs in codes. Based on the research, several recommendations were developed for demand controlled ventilation specifications in the California Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards.The research on classroom ventilation collected data over two years on California elementary school classrooms to investigate associations between VRs and student illness absence (IA). Major findings included: ? Median classroom VRs in all studied climate zones were below the California guideline, and 40percent lower in portable than permanent buildings.? Overall, one additional L/s per person of VR was associated with 1.6percent less IA. ? Increasing average VRs in California K-12 classrooms from the current average to the required level is estimated to decrease IA by 3.4percent, increasing State attendance-based funding to school districts by $33M, with $6.2 M in increased energy costs. Further VR increases would provide additional benefits

  4. Demand Responsive Lighting: A Scoping Study

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinstein, Francis; Kiliccote, Sila

    2007-01-03

    The objective of this scoping study is: (1) to identify current market drivers and technology trends that can improve the demand responsiveness of commercial building lighting systems and (2) to quantify the energy, demand and environmental benefits of implementing lighting demand response and energy-saving controls strategies Statewide. Lighting systems in California commercial buildings consume 30 GWh. Lighting systems in commercial buildings often waste energy and unnecessarily stress the electrical grid because lighting controls, especially dimming, are not widely used. But dimmable lighting equipment, especially the dimming ballast, costs more than non-dimming lighting and is expensive to retrofit into existing buildings because of the cost of adding control wiring. Advances in lighting industry capabilities coupled with the pervasiveness of the Internet and wireless technologies have led to new opportunities to realize significant energy saving and reliable demand reduction using intelligent lighting controls. Manufacturers are starting to produce electronic equipment--lighting-application specific controllers (LAS controllers)--that are wirelessly accessible and can control dimmable or multilevel lighting systems obeying different industry-accepted protocols. Some companies make controllers that are inexpensive to install in existing buildings and allow the power consumed by bi-level lighting circuits to be selectively reduced during demand response curtailments. By intelligently limiting the demand from bi-level lighting in California commercial buildings, the utilities would now have an enormous 1 GW demand shed capability at hand. By adding occupancy and light sensors to the remotely controllable lighting circuits, automatic controls could harvest an additional 1 BkWh/yr savings above and beyond the savings that have already been achieved. The lighting industry's adoption of DALI as the principal wired digital control protocol for dimming ballasts and

  5. Competitive Facility Location with Random Demands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, Takeshi; Katagiri, Hideki; Kato, Kosuke

    2009-10-01

    This paper proposes a new location problem of competitive facilities, e.g. shops and stores, with uncertain demands in the plane. By representing the demands for facilities as random variables, the location problem is formulated to a stochastic programming problem, and for finding its solution, three deterministic programming problems: expectation maximizing problem, probability maximizing problem, and satisfying level maximizing problem are considered. After showing that one of their optimal solutions can be found by solving 0-1 programming problems, their solution method is proposed by improving the tabu search algorithm with strategic vibration. Efficiency of the solution method is shown by applying to numerical examples of the facility location problems.

  6. Demand Response as a System Reliability Resource

    SciTech Connect

    Eto, Joseph H.; Lewis, Nancy Jo; Watson, David; Kiliccote, Sila; Auslander, David; Paprotny, Igor; Makarov, Yuri

    2012-12-31

    The Demand Response as a System Reliability Resource project consists of six technical tasks: • Task 2.1. Test Plan and Conduct Tests: Contingency Reserves Demand Response (DR) Demonstration—a pioneering demonstration of how existing utility load-management assets can provide an important electricity system reliability resource known as contingency reserve. • Task 2.2. Participation in Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) IntelliGrid—technical assistance to the EPRI IntelliGrid team in developing use cases and other high-level requirements for the architecture. • Task 2.3. Research, Development, and Demonstration (RD&D) Planning for Demand Response Technology Development—technical support to the Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program on five topics: Sub-task 1. PIER Smart Grid RD&D Planning Document; Sub-task 2. System Dynamics of Programmable Controllable Thermostats; Sub-task 3. California Independent System Operator (California ISO) DR Use Cases; Sub-task 4. California ISO Telemetry Requirements; and Sub-task 5. Design of a Building Load Data Storage Platform. • Task 2.4. Time Value of Demand Response—research that will enable California ISO to take better account of the speed of the resources that it deploys to ensure compliance with reliability rules for frequency control. • Task 2.5. System Integration and Market Research: Southern California Edison (SCE)—research and technical support for efforts led by SCE to conduct demand response pilot demonstrations to provide a contingency reserve service (known as non-spinning reserve) through a targeted sub-population of aggregated residential and small commercial customers enrolled in SCE’s traditional air conditioning (AC) load cycling program, the Summer Discount Plan. • Task 2.6. Demonstrate Demand Response Technologies: Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E)—research and technical support for efforts led by PG&E to conduct a demand response pilot demonstration to provide non

  7. Installation and Commissioning Automated Demand Response Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Global Energy Partners; Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Kiliccote, Sila; Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Wikler, Greg; Prijyanonda, Joe; Chiu, Albert

    2008-04-21

    Demand Response (DR) can be defined as actions taken to reduce electric loads when contingencies, such as emergencies and congestion, occur that threaten supply-demand balance, or market conditions raise supply costs. California utilities have offered price and reliability DR based programs to customers to help reduce electric peak demand. The lack of knowledge about the DR programs and how to develop and implement DR control strategies is a barrier to participation in DR programs, as is the lack of automation of DR systems. Most DR activities are manual and require people to first receive notifications, and then act on the information to execute DR strategies. Levels of automation in DR can be defined as follows. Manual Demand Response involves a labor-intensive approach such as manually turning off or changing comfort set points at each equipment switch or controller. Semi-Automated Demand Response involves a pre-programmed demand response strategy initiated by a person via centralized control system. Fully-Automated Demand Response does not involve human intervention, but is initiated at a home, building, or facility through receipt of an external communications signal. The receipt of the external signal initiates pre-programmed demand response strategies. We refer to this as Auto-DR (Piette et. al. 2005). Auto-DR for commercial and industrial facilities can be defined as fully automated DR initiated by a signal from a utility or other appropriate entity and that provides fully-automated connectivity to customer end-use control strategies. One important concept in Auto-DR is that a homeowner or facility manager should be able to 'opt out' or 'override' a DR event if the event comes at time when the reduction in end-use services is not desirable. Therefore, Auto-DR is not handing over total control of the equipment or the facility to the utility but simply allowing the utility to pass on grid related information which then triggers facility defined and programmed

  8. Energy technologies and their impact on demand

    SciTech Connect

    Drucker, H.

    1995-06-01

    Despite the uncertainties, energy demand forecasts must be made to guide government policies and public and private-sector capital investment programs. Three principles can be identified in considering long-term energy prospects. First energy demand will continue to grow, driven by population growth, economic development, and the current low per capita energy consumption in developing countries. Second, energy technology advancements alone will not solve the problem. Energy-efficient technologies, renewable resource technologies, and advanced electric power technologies will all play a major role but will not be able to keep up with the growth in world energy demand. Third, environmental concerns will limit the energy technology choices. Increasing concern for environmental protection around the world will restrict primarily large, centralized energy supply facilities. The conclusion is that energy system diversity is the only solution. The energy system must be planned with consideration of both supply and demand technologies, must not rely on a single source of energy, must take advantage of all available technologies that are specially suited to unique local conditions, must be built with long-term perspectives, and must be able to adapt to change.

  9. Posing Cognitively Demanding Tasks to All Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Rachel; Stylianou, Despina A.

    2013-01-01

    Cognitively demanding tasks (CDT) (Stein et al. 2000) are necessary for the development of students' mathematical reasoning skills. Research is unequivocal on the importance of giving students opportunities to engage in such tasks. Although current reform efforts call for mathematics learning for "all" students, learners who…

  10. Multicultural Schools and New Demands on Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersen, Fred Carlo

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the Norwegian Government's expectations pertaining to new demands on leadership expressed in policy documents with regard to a multicultural society. Data from seven government's white papers were thematically analyzed with regard to knowledge, skills and attitudes. The study is framed within a theoretical…

  11. Assessing Demand for Graduate and Professional Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Syverson, Peter D.

    1996-01-01

    Graduate education is entering an era of market segmentation, varying student demand, and changing requirements from employers, meaning graduate students will assess graduate opportunities differently and institutions will assess programs differently. The traditional view of graduate study as preparation for a research or teaching career and…

  12. Money Demand and Risk: A Classroom Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewing, Bradley T.; Kruse, Jamie B.; Thompson, Mark A.

    2004-01-01

    The authors describe a classroom experiment that motivates student understanding of behavior toward risk and its effect on money demand. In this experiment, students are endowed with an income stream that they can allocate between a risk-free fund and a risky fund. Changes in volatility are represented by mean-preserving changes in the variance of…

  13. Aviation Frontiers: On-Demand Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Mark D.

    2010-01-01

    Throughout the 20th Century, NASA has defined the forefront of aeronautical technology, and the aviation industry owes much of its prosperity to this knowledge and technology. In recent decades, centralized aeronautics has become a mature discipline, which raises questions concerning the future aviation innovation frontiers. Three transformational aviation capabilities, bounded together by the development of a Free Flight airspace management system, have the potential to transform 21st Century society as profoundly as civil aviation transformed the 20th Century. These mobility breakthroughs will re-establish environmental sustainable centralized aviation, while opening up latent markets for civil distributed sensing and on-demand rural and regional transportation. Of these three transformations, on-demand aviation has the potential to have the largest market and productivity improvement to society. The information system revolution over the past 20 years shows that vehicles lead, and the interconnecting infrastructure to make them more effective follows; that is, unless on-demand aircraft are pioneered, a distributed Air Traffic Control system will likely never be established. There is no single technology long-pole that will enable on-demand vehicle solutions. However, fully digital aircraft that include electric propulsion has the potential to be a multi-disciplinary initiator of solid state technologies that can provide order of magnitude improvements in the ease of use, safety/reliability, community and environmental friendliness, and affordability.

  14. Education and the Demand for Emancipation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skarpenes, Ove

    2014-01-01

    This paper puts forward the hypothesis that in recent decades, pupils of schools in the western world have been given a new form of individuality. This construction has been nourished by both the demand for emancipation as it was expressed in the critical sociology of education (and pedagogy) and by the neoliberal turn in education policy. It…

  15. Demand management implementation in Southeast Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaboriboon, Y.

    1995-12-31

    The need to apply transportation system management, to developing countries is urgent. Attempts to alleviate severe traffic congestion in their metropolises have so far failed to provide adequate solutions. The countries are faced with many difficulties because of the lack of sufficient financial resources together with their complex internal administrative and political problems. They are incapable of providing sufficient road space to cope with the escalating demand in private automobiles. This has led to excessive delays in urban traveling, environmental pollution problems, decline of road-based public transit services and deterioration of the quality of life in these metropolises. Demand management, in use for decades in the Western world, has also been recognized in Singapore`s famous area licensing scheme (ALS) making other Southeast Asian Metropolises aware of its advantages as an alternative in solving their chaotic traffic problems. However, realization is far different from implementation and still many metropolises are not able to apply the technique. Singapore and Thailand, two leaders among many other Southeast Asian regions in economics, tourism, trade and industry handle their problems far differently, especially the traffic congestion problem. While a number of demand management schemes have been implemented successfully in Singapore since 1975, Bangkok is still struggling to implement such measures to alleviate severe traffic congestion problems. This article intends to high light the successful practices and unsuccessful attempts of demand management techniques applied in Singapore and Bangkok.

  16. University Transformation: New Demands and Coping Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chidindi, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    University education system is undergoing transformation requirements particularly in the developing world. The demands require adaptation to the prevailing circumstances hence the need for relevant strategies for universities. Issues such as institutional profiles, organizational structure and work integration, research activities, and funding…

  17. Market Demand for Special Education Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montrosse, Bianca Elizabeth; Young, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    Since 1988, researchers have monitored the extent and severity of the chronic special education (SE) faculty shortage. The present study sought to add to this knowledge base by (a) gathering data on the supply and demand of leadership personnel in SE since the "2001 Faculty Shortage Study"; (b) combining and comparing these data with other sources…

  18. Educational Technology on Demand: It's about Time!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weir, Bob; Mickool, Rick; Hitch, Leslie

    2006-01-01

    Today's incoming freshmen, born in 1988, have never known a time when the Internet and personal computers were not ubiquitous. They expect "what I want, when I need it, wherever I happen to be, on whatever workstation I have available." Many industries already meet this demand--entertainment (legal or pirated), cable TV, digital video recorders,…

  19. Demand for Telecommunications Services in the Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Ronald J.

    Although the availability of telecommunications services from the home has been limited because of the high costs and available technology, a restrictive regulatory environment, the conservative nature of communications systems operators, single technology thinking, and uncertain consumer demand, the situation is changing, resulting in expanded…

  20. Estimating Reduced Consumption for Dynamic Demand Response

    SciTech Connect

    Chelmis, Charalampos; Aman, Saima; Saeed, Muhammad Rizwan; Frincu, Marc; Prasanna, Viktor K.

    2015-01-30

    Growing demand is straining our existing electricity generation facilities and requires active participation of the utility and the consumers to achieve energy sustainability. One of the most effective and widely used ways to achieve this goal in the smart grid is demand response (DR), whereby consumers reduce their electricity consumption in response to a request sent from the utility whenever it anticipates a peak in demand. To successfully plan and implement demand response, the utility requires reliable estimate of reduced consumption during DR. This also helps in optimal selection of consumers and curtailment strategies during DR. While much work has been done on predicting normal consumption, reduced consumption prediction is an open problem that is under-studied. In this paper, we introduce and formalize the problem of reduced consumption prediction, and discuss the challenges associated with it. We also describe computational methods that use historical DR data as well as pre-DR conditions to make such predictions. Our experiments are conducted in the real-world setting of a university campus microgrid, and our preliminary results set the foundation for more detailed modeling.

  1. Delivering Training for Highly Demanding Information Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, Andrew Lawrence; Coulson-Thomas, Yvette May; Coulson-Thomas, Colin Joseph; Ashurst, Colin

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: There is a lack of research covering the training requirements of organisations implementing highly demanding information systems (HDISs). The aim of this paper is to help in the understanding of appropriate training requirements for such systems. Design/methodology/approach: This research investigates the training delivery within a…

  2. Demand Better Results -- and Get Them

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffer, Robert H.

    1974-01-01

    While most organizations could easily outstrip their current productivity, most managers don't communicate expectations of high achievement in a way that produces results. After analyzing the psychological barriers that keep managers from expecting and demanding more from their subordinates, the author outlines a five-point plan to upgrade…

  3. Education, Demand, and Unemployment in Metropolitan America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothwell, Jonathan; Berube, Alan

    2011-01-01

    This report examines education gaps and industry demand in the nation's 100 largest metropolitan areas. Metropolitan areas are a natural unit of analysis given that they offer the best approximation of a regional labor market. Moreover, the wide variation in metropolitan area economic performance, as documented by the Brookings MetroMonitor…

  4. Onshore rig surplus diminishes as demand rises

    SciTech Connect

    Isenberg, E.M.

    1997-09-22

    US and international onshore surplus rig supply is diminishing rapidly as rig demand in many regions continues to increase. Consequently, capital costs associated with reactivating, constructing, and refurbishing new and existing rigs are on the rise. In addition, rising operating costs are putting upward pressure on operating costs. In order to justify replacement of existing rigs, US rig day rates will need to more than double. Current rig-market indicators show that rig demand should continue to rise at current levels, or even accelerate. Day rates will have to rise to a level that justifies investments in new capacity, and with continuing rig attrition, even more rigs will have to be built to offset deletions. It is not a matter of whether this will occur, but only when. This will not necessarily threaten the operators` returns over the long-term because technological advances will continue, resulting in lower exploration and production costs. The paper discusses the drivers of increasing demand, faster recovery rates, increasing rig demand, diminishing rig supply, and escalating component costs.

  5. Job Demand in the Cosmetology Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudner, Lawrence M.; Deutermann, William V., Jr.

    In order to determine job demand in the cosmetology industry, a survey was made of a nationally representative stratified random sample of 1,454 beauty salons, barber shops, and unisex salons in July 1991. Salon owners were asked about 1990 and their plans for the future. Survey results were supplemented with information about the industry…

  6. [Visual-manual tracking during 5-day dry immersion].

    PubMed

    Kornilova, L N; Naumov, I A; Glukhikh, D O

    2011-01-01

    Level dry immersion (DI), a model of the physiological effects of microgravity, support deprivation, minimization of muscle activity and proprioceptive afferentation specifically, was used to determine the effects of low proprioceptive, tactile and support afferentation on visual-manual tracking. Hand-eye motor coordination was tested in 13 subjects in 5-d DI who tracked jerky and smooth (linear and pendulum-like horizontal and vertical, circular clockwise and counterclockwise) motions of point visual stimulus. Binocular electrooculography was used to register ocular movements and a joystick with a biological visual feedback to register manual motor acts (1 of 2 stimuli on the screen showed the actual joystick inclination). Computerized stimulation was provided with the help of virtual goggles. Evaluated parameters were latent and total reaction time, amplitude and velocity of eye and hand movements, coefficients of effectiveness (amplitudes ratio) and gain (velocity ratio). Testing was performed before DI, after 3 hours in DI, on DI days 3 and 5, during the first hours and in 3 days after DI (all subjects) and on post-DI days 5-7 (4 subjects). It was demonstrated that support deprivation and minimization of proprioceptive afferentation affect ocular tracking to a larger degree than accuracy of the manual motor act of following the visual stimulus. Manual tracking by all subjects was found more accurate than visual and did not alter significantly during tests sessions; on the contrary, visual tracking accuracy altered noticeably as in the course, so after DI.

  7. Multivariate time series modeling of short-term system scale irrigation demand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perera, Kushan C.; Western, Andrew W.; George, Biju; Nawarathna, Bandara

    2015-12-01

    Travel time limits the ability of irrigation system operators to react to short-term irrigation demand fluctuations that result from variations in weather, including very hot periods and rainfall events, as well as the various other pressures and opportunities that farmers face. Short-term system-wide irrigation demand forecasts can assist in system operation. Here we developed a multivariate time series (ARMAX) model to forecast irrigation demands with respect to aggregated service points flows (IDCGi, ASP) and off take regulator flows (IDCGi, OTR) based across 5 command areas, which included area covered under four irrigation channels and the study area. These command area specific ARMAX models forecast 1-5 days ahead daily IDCGi, ASP and IDCGi, OTR using the real time flow data recorded at the service points and the uppermost regulators and observed meteorological data collected from automatic weather stations. The model efficiency and the predictive performance were quantified using the root mean squared error (RMSE), Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency coefficient (NSE), anomaly correlation coefficient (ACC) and mean square skill score (MSSS). During the evaluation period, NSE for IDCGi, ASP and IDCGi, OTR across 5 command areas were ranged 0.98-0.78. These models were capable of generating skillful forecasts (MSSS ⩾ 0.5 and ACC ⩾ 0.6) of IDCGi, ASP and IDCGi, OTR for all 5 lead days and IDCGi, ASP and IDCGi, OTR forecasts were better than using the long term monthly mean irrigation demand. Overall these predictive performance from the ARMAX time series models were higher than almost all the previous studies we are aware. Further, IDCGi, ASP and IDCGi, OTR forecasts have improved the operators' ability to react for near future irrigation demand fluctuations as the developed ARMAX time series models were self-adaptive to reflect the short-term changes in the irrigation demand with respect to various pressures and opportunities that farmers' face, such as

  8. Forecasting residential electricity demand in provincial China.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hua; Liu, Yanan; Gao, Yixuan; Hao, Yu; Ma, Xiao-Wei; Wang, Kan

    2017-03-01

    In China, more than 80% electricity comes from coal which dominates the CO2 emissions. Residential electricity demand forecasting plays a significant role in electricity infrastructure planning and energy policy designing, but it is challenging to make an accurate forecast for developing countries. This paper forecasts the provincial residential electricity consumption of China in the 13th Five-Year-Plan (2016-2020) period using panel data. To overcome the limitations of widely used predication models with unreliably prior knowledge on function forms, a robust piecewise linear model in reduced form is utilized to capture the non-deterministic relationship between income and residential electricity consumption. The forecast results suggest that the growth rates of developed provinces will slow down, while the less developed will be still in fast growing. The national residential electricity demand will increase at 6.6% annually during 2016-2020, and populous provinces such as Guangdong will be the main contributors to the increments.

  9. Characteristics of power demand in Tokyo

    SciTech Connect

    Meguro, Kimiro; Yamazaki, Fumio; Katayama, Tsuneo; Soejima, Michiyo

    1995-12-31

    Modern societies suffer functional damage due to power outage when natural disasters strike. As the first step for developing a new methodology for estimating the effects of power outage on city functions considering the characteristics of the area, and time and duration of outage, a database is made which consists of regional characteristics and electric power demand in the Tokyo metropolis using geographic information system (GIS). Power demand is examined as a function of time, season and region. With a statistical technique, four elemental load curves of residential, office, industrial and entertainment components are calculated. Assuming that every load curve is a combination of the four elemental curves, the contribution rate of the four elements in each area is calculated. Then the areas could be classified based on the contribution rate.

  10. Natural gas demand surges among European customers

    SciTech Connect

    Knott, D.

    1993-12-27

    Europe's view of natural gas as a clean fuel is driving demand faster than European producers can supply the fuel. By 2010 European gas demand is expected to rise by 50%, so imports will need to rise in step. There are plenty of gas reserves within and in reach of the European market to meet increasing needs. But current low gas prices in Europe are a barrier to development of gas projects, which are large, long term investments. Meanwhile, the structure of Europe and its gas markets is changing. There is a trend to privatization and uncertainty over the future role of state gas monopolies. The paper discusses European production, natural gas as a primary energy source, gas sources, price requirements, megaprojects, the Middle East promise, new infrastructure, power generation, privatization, and third party access.

  11. A Demand Access Protocol for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Jay L.; Leang, Dee

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a demand access protocol for space communications, which is a messaging procedure that facilitates the exchange of resource requests and grants between users and service providers. A minimal set of operational and environmental needs and constraints are assumed since the intent is to keep the protocol flexible and efficient for a wide-range of envisioned NASA robotic and human exploration missions. The protocol described in this document defines the message format and procedures used to ensure proper and correct functioning of a demand access communications system, which must operate under customized resource management policies applied by the users and service providers. This protocol also assumes a minimal set of capabilities from the underlying communications system so that no unique requirements are imposed on the communications sub-systems.

  12. Competitive Facility Location with Fuzzy Random Demands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, Takeshi; Katagiri, Hideki; Kato, Kosuke

    2010-10-01

    This paper proposes a new location problem of competitive facilities, e.g. shops, with uncertainty and vagueness including demands for the facilities in a plane. By representing the demands for facilities as fuzzy random variables, the location problem can be formulated as a fuzzy random programming problem. For solving the fuzzy random programming problem, first the α-level sets for fuzzy numbers are used for transforming it to a stochastic programming problem, and secondly, by using their expectations and variances, it can be reformulated to a deterministic programming problem. After showing that one of their optimal solutions can be found by solving 0-1 programming problems, their solution method is proposed by improving the tabu search algorithm with strategic oscillation. The efficiency of the proposed method is shown by applying it to numerical examples of the facility location problems.

  13. Demand and Congestion in Multiplex Transportation Networks.

    PubMed

    Chodrow, Philip S; Al-Awwad, Zeyad; Jiang, Shan; González, Marta C

    Urban transportation systems are multimodal, sociotechnical systems; however, while their multimodal aspect has received extensive attention in recent literature on multiplex networks, their sociotechnical aspect has been largely neglected. We present the first study of an urban transportation system using multiplex network analysis and validated Origin-Destination travel demand, with Riyadh's planned metro as a case study. We develop methods for analyzing the impact of additional transportation layers on existing dynamics, and show that demand structure plays key quantitative and qualitative roles. There exist fundamental geometrical limits to the metro's impact on traffic dynamics, and the bulk of environmental accrue at metro speeds only slightly faster than those planned. We develop a simple model for informing the use of additional, "feeder" layers to maximize reductions in global congestion. Our techniques are computationally practical, easily extensible to arbitrary transportation layers with complex transfer logic, and implementable in open-source software.

  14. Demand and Congestion in Multiplex Transportation Networks

    PubMed Central

    al-Awwad, Zeyad; Jiang, Shan; González, Marta C.

    2016-01-01

    Urban transportation systems are multimodal, sociotechnical systems; however, while their multimodal aspect has received extensive attention in recent literature on multiplex networks, their sociotechnical aspect has been largely neglected. We present the first study of an urban transportation system using multiplex network analysis and validated Origin-Destination travel demand, with Riyadh’s planned metro as a case study. We develop methods for analyzing the impact of additional transportation layers on existing dynamics, and show that demand structure plays key quantitative and qualitative roles. There exist fundamental geometrical limits to the metro’s impact on traffic dynamics, and the bulk of environmental accrue at metro speeds only slightly faster than those planned. We develop a simple model for informing the use of additional, “feeder” layers to maximize reductions in global congestion. Our techniques are computationally practical, easily extensible to arbitrary transportation layers with complex transfer logic, and implementable in open-source software. PMID:27657738

  15. Can Evolution Supply What Ecology Demands?

    PubMed

    Kokko, Hanna; Chaturvedi, Anurag; Croll, Daniel; Fischer, Martin C; Guillaume, Frédéric; Karrenberg, Sophie; Kerr, Ben; Rolshausen, Gregor; Stapley, Jessica

    2017-03-01

    A simplistic view of the adaptive process pictures a hillside along which a population can climb: when ecological 'demands' change, evolution 'supplies' the variation needed for the population to climb to a new peak. Evolutionary ecologists point out that this simplistic view can be incomplete because the fitness landscape changes dynamically as the population evolves. Geneticists meanwhile have identified complexities relating to the nature of genetic variation and its architecture, and the importance of epigenetic variation is under debate. In this review, we highlight how complexity in both ecological 'demands' and the evolutionary 'supply' influences organisms' ability to climb fitness landscapes that themselves change dynamically as evolution proceeds, and encourage new synthetic effort across research disciplines towards ecologically realistic studies of adaptation.

  16. Home Network Technologies and Automating Demand Response

    SciTech Connect

    McParland, Charles

    2009-12-01

    Over the past several years, interest in large-scale control of peak energy demand and total consumption has increased. While motivated by a number of factors, this interest has primarily been spurred on the demand side by the increasing cost of energy and, on the supply side by the limited ability of utilities to build sufficient electricity generation capacity to meet unrestrained future demand. To address peak electricity use Demand Response (DR) systems are being proposed to motivate reductions in electricity use through the use of price incentives. DR systems are also be design to shift or curtail energy demand at critical times when the generation, transmission, and distribution systems (i.e. the 'grid') are threatened with instabilities. To be effectively deployed on a large-scale, these proposed DR systems need to be automated. Automation will require robust and efficient data communications infrastructures across geographically dispersed markets. The present availability of widespread Internet connectivity and inexpensive, reliable computing hardware combined with the growing confidence in the capabilities of distributed, application-level communications protocols suggests that now is the time for designing and deploying practical systems. Centralized computer systems that are capable of providing continuous signals to automate customers reduction of power demand, are known as Demand Response Automation Servers (DRAS). The deployment of prototype DRAS systems has already begun - with most initial deployments targeting large commercial and industrial (C & I) customers. An examination of the current overall energy consumption by economic sector shows that the C & I market is responsible for roughly half of all energy consumption in the US. On a per customer basis, large C & I customers clearly have the most to offer - and to gain - by participating in DR programs to reduce peak demand. And, by concentrating on a small number of relatively sophisticated

  17. Water-quality assessment and wastewater-management alternatives for Dardenne Creek in St Charles County, Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berkas, W.R.; Lodderhose, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    The quality of water in the 15 mile downstream reach of Dardenne Creek in St. Charles County, Missouri, was assessed to determine if it met the Missouri water quality standards. Concentrations of dissolved oxygen and total ammonia failed to meet water quality standards downstream from the Harvester-Dardenne and St. Peters Wastewater-Treatment Plants. The QUAL-II SEMCOG water quality model was calibrated and verified using two independent data sets from Dardenne Creek. Management alternatives using current, design capacity, and future expansion wastewater discharges from the St. Peters Wastewater-Treatment Plant were evaluated. Results of the computer simulation indicate that a nitrification-type advanced-treatment facility installed at the plant would produce a 5-day carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand of 10 mg/L. An effluent limit of 5.0 mg/L of 5-day carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand would further improve the water quality of Dardenne Creek; however, an additional treatment process, such as sand filtration, would be needed to meet this criterion. (USGS)

  18. Distributional Analysis of Inventory Demand over Leadtime.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    is the sample standard deviation of the natural log of all non-zero demand observations. An alternate method for estimating the mean and stan- dard...deviation of the lognormal distribution is to use the method of moments. The procedure in effect, transforms the mean and standard deviation obtained...from the untransformed sample data vice transforming the data first and then computing the sample mean and standard deviation. This method involves

  19. Physiological Demands of Flat Horse Racing Jockeys.

    PubMed

    Cullen, SarahJane; OʼLoughlin, Gillian; McGoldrick, Adrian; Smyth, Barry; May, Gregory; Warrington, Giles D

    2015-11-01

    The physiological demands of jockeys during competition remain largely unknown, thereby creating challenges when attempting to prescribe sport-specific nutrition and training guidelines. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the physiological demands and energy requirements of jockeys during flat racing. Oxygen uptake (V[Combining Dot Above]O2) and heart rate (HR) were assessed in 18 male trainee jockeys during a race simulation trial on a mechanical horse racing simulator for the typical time duration to cover a common flat race distance of 1,400 m. In addition, 8 male apprentice jockeys participated in a competitive race, over distances ranging from 1,200 to 1,600 m, during which HR and respiratory rate (RR) were assessed. All participants performed a maximal incremental cycle ergometer test. During the simulated race, peak V[Combining Dot Above]O2 was 42.74 ± 5.6 ml·kg·min (75 ± 11% of V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak) and below the mean ventilatory threshold (81 ± 5% of V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak) reported in the maximal incremental cycle test. Peak HR was 161 ± 16 b·min (86 ± 7% of HRpeak). Energy expenditure was estimated as 92.5 ± 18.8 kJ with an associated value of 9.4 metabolic equivalents. During the competitive race trial, peak HR reached 189 ± 5 b·min (103 ± 4% of HRpeak) and peak RR was 50 ± 7 breaths per minute. Results suggest that horse racing is a physically demanding sport, requiring jockeys to perform close to their physiological limit to be successful. These findings may provide a useful insight when developing sport-specific nutrition and training strategies to optimally equip and prepare jockeys physically for the physiological demands of horse racing.

  20. Automated Demand Response for Energy Sustainability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    ahead price incentives to customers for reducing energy consumption during a DBP Event. The DR controlled electric loads at Fort Irwin consisted of...offers Day-Ahead price incentives to customers for reducing energy consumption during a DBP Event. A Day-Ahead DBP Event may be called at SCE’s...sometimes struggle to meet customer demands, which can cause instability, rolling blackouts, and high energy prices . This technology enables the

  1. 29 CFR 100.610 - Written demand for payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Written demand for payment. 100.610 Section 100.610 Labor... Procedures § 100.610 Written demand for payment. (a) The NLRB will promptly make written demand upon the debtor for payment of money or the return of specific property. The written demand for payment will...

  2. 10 CFR 15.21 - Written demands for payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Written demands for payment. 15.21 Section 15.21 Energy... Written demands for payment. (a) The NRC shall make appropriate written demands upon the debtor for... made (which is normally the date the initial written demand letter statement was mailed or...

  3. 29 CFR 100.610 - Written demand for payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Written demand for payment. 100.610 Section 100.610 Labor... Procedures § 100.610 Written demand for payment. (a) The NLRB will promptly make written demand upon the debtor for payment of money or the return of specific property. The written demand for payment will...

  4. 10 CFR 15.21 - Written demands for payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Written demands for payment. 15.21 Section 15.21 Energy... Written demands for payment. (a) The NRC shall make appropriate written demands upon the debtor for... made (which is normally the date the initial written demand letter statement was mailed or...

  5. 29 CFR 100.610 - Written demand for payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Written demand for payment. 100.610 Section 100.610 Labor... Procedures § 100.610 Written demand for payment. (a) The NLRB will promptly make written demand upon the debtor for payment of money or the return of specific property. The written demand for payment will...

  6. 29 CFR 100.610 - Written demand for payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Written demand for payment. 100.610 Section 100.610 Labor... Procedures § 100.610 Written demand for payment. (a) The NLRB will promptly make written demand upon the debtor for payment of money or the return of specific property. The written demand for payment will...

  7. Impact of improved building thermal efficiency on residential energy demand

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, R.C.; Rockwood, A.D.

    1983-04-01

    The impact of improved building shell thermal efficiency on residential energy demand is explored in a theoretical framework. The important economic literature on estimating the price elasticity of residential energy demand is reviewed. The specification of the residential energy demand model is presented. The data used are described. The empirical estimation of the residential energy demand model is described. (MHR)

  8. Chlorine demand of Savannah River water

    SciTech Connect

    Wilde, E.W.

    1989-01-01

    Savannah River water used for cooling SRS reactors was tested for chlorine demand and the rate of decay for both free and total residual chlorine on seven quarterly dates between 1986 and 1988. Test conditions included chlorine dosages of 1, 3, and 5 mg/l and a variety of contact times ranging from less than 1 minute to one day. Statistically significant differences were detected in the chlorine demand for the seven dates; however, there was no discernible seasonality to the variation. The chlorine demand, amount of combined residual chlorine formed and the persistence of total residual chlorine following a dose of 5 mg/l was significantly greater on one of the seven sampling dates (February, 1988) compared to all of the other dates. These differences could not be attributed to water temperature, pH, ammonia nitrogen concentration, or the amount of rainfall prior to or during the collection of the cooling water. Except as noted above, dissipation of chlorine was similar among the sampling dates. Most reactions of available chlorine with other constituents in the cooking water occurred in the first minute of contact, although measurable total chlorine residuals generally persisted for 24 hours after the dose had been administered. The results of this study indicate that, with occasional exceptions, a chlorine dose of between 3 and 5 mg/l will provide a free chlorine residual of 1 mg/l in Savannah River water. 14 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Demand or Request: Will Load Behave?

    SciTech Connect

    Widergren, Steven E.

    2009-07-30

    Power planning engineers are trained to design an electric system that satisfies predicted electrical demand under stringent conditions of availability and power quality. Like responsible custodians, we plan for the provision of electrical sustenance and shelter to those in whose care regulators have given us the responsibility to serve. Though most customers accept this nurturing gladly, a growing number are concerned with the economic costs and environmental impacts of service at a time when technology (particularly distributed generation, storage, automation, and information networks) offers alternatives for localized control and competitive service. As customers’ and their systems mature, a new relationship with the electricity provider is emerging. Demand response is perhaps the first unsteady step where the customer participates as a partner in system operations. This paper explores issues system planners need to consider as demand response matures to significant levels beyond direct load control and toward a situation where service is requested and bargains are reached with the electricity provider based on desired load behavior. On one hand, predicting load growth and behavior appears more daunting than ever. On the other, for the first time load becomes a new resource whose behavior can be influenced during system operations to balance system conditions.

  10. Remote sensing inputs to water demand modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, J. E.; Jensen, J. R.; Tinney, L. R.; Rector, M.

    1975-01-01

    In an attempt to determine the ability of remote sensing techniques to economically generate data required by water demand models, the Geography Remote Sensing Unit, in conjunction with the Kern County Water Agency of California, developed an analysis model. As a result it was determined that agricultural cropland inventories utilizing both high altitude photography and LANDSAT imagery can be conducted cost effectively. In addition, by using average irrigation application rates in conjunction with cropland data, estimates of agricultural water demand can be generated. However, more accurate estimates are possible if crop type, acreage, and crop specific application rates are employed. An analysis of the effect of saline-alkali soils on water demand in the study area is also examined. Finally, reference is made to the detection and delineation of water tables that are perched near the surface by semi-permeable clay layers. Soil salinity prediction, automated crop identification on a by-field basis, and a potential input to the determination of zones of equal benefit taxation are briefly touched upon.

  11. Water demand management research: A psychological perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Sally; Fielding, Kelly

    2010-05-01

    The availability of fresh water for human consumption is a critical global issue and one that will be exacerbated by the impacts of climate change. Water demand management has an important role to play in reducing the vulnerability of freshwater supplies to climate change impacts. In this paper, we argue that the field of psychology and environmental psychology in particular can make a vital contribution in understanding further the drivers of residential water demand. A growing body of literature in environmental psychology has examined the determinants of water conservation behavior, and this research has many potential applications for water demand policy. In this paper we offer a review of current psychological research that examines the five broad causes of residential water conservation behaviors: attitudes, beliefs, habits or routines, personal capabilities, and contextual factors. We assess how psychologists have studied water conservation behavior to date, identify shortcomings, and indicate how this research can be used to further promote residential water conservation and to inform evidence-based policy and practice.

  12. Demand access communications for TDRSS users

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zillig, David; Weinberg, Aaron; Mcomber, Robert

    1994-01-01

    The Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) has long been used to provide reliable low and high-data rate relay services between user spacecraft in Earth orbit and the ground. To date, these TDRSS services have been implemented via prior scheduling based upon estimates of user needs and mission event timelines. While this approach may be necessary for large users that require greater amounts of TDRSS resources, TDRSS can potentially offer the planned community of smaller science missions (e.g., the small explorer missions), and other emerging users, the unique opportunity for services on demand. In particular, innovative application of the existing TDRSS Multiple Access (MA) subsystem, with its phased array antenna, could be used to implement true demand access services without modification to either the TDRSS satellites or the user transponder, thereby introducing operational and performance benefits to both the user community and the Space Network. In this paper, candidate implementations of demand access service via the TDRSS MA subsystem are examined in detail. Both forward and return link services are addressed and a combination of qualitative and quantitative assessments are provided. The paper also identifies further areas for investigation in this ongoing activity that is being conducted by GSFC/Code 531 under the NASA Code O Advanced Systems Program.

  13. Asymmetric demand for energy: A cointegration approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maclean, Thomas Frank

    1997-12-01

    This paper uses time series data in a study of the demand for energy. One goal is to compare the results from the traditional autoregressive distributed lag (ADL) model to the error correction model (ECM) using cointegration. The second goal is to determine if the demand elasticity is asymmetric with respect to increasing and decreasing prices. This paper discusses three topics that are important to the use of time series data. The first topic is the presence and consequences unit roots which are common in time series data. The second topic is the identification of cointegrated variables and the third topic is a development of the ECM. This results in a model that can be used in either a single equation or multivariate system context and it will estimate both long run and short run elasticities. Asymmetry theory and its implications are studied along with an investigation into competing methods of creating the asymmetric variables. Simulations provided evidence that the use of dummy variables results in biased estimates and that the cumulative difference method of Wolffram/Houck gives valid estimates. The results of the empirical part of the paper show that the short run estimates of the ADL model are like those of the error correction model, but the cointegration method's long run estimates are better since they are known to be consistent and asymptotically unbiased. Tests for asymmetry do not support the theory of asymmetric long run price elasticities; however there is evidence to support the presence of asymmetric demand in the short run.

  14. Demand management in healthcare IT. Controlling IT demand to meet constrained IT resource supply.

    PubMed

    Mohrmann, Gregg; Schlusberg, Craig; Kropf, Roger

    2007-01-01

    Healthcare is behind other industries in the ability to manage and control increasing demand for IT services, and to ensure that IT staff are available when and where needed. From everyday support requests to large capital projects, the IT department's ability to meet demand is limited. Organizational and IT leaders need to proactively address this issue and do a better job of predicting when services will be needed and whether appropriate resources will be available. This article describes the common issues that healthcare IT departments face in the efficient delivery of services as a result of factors such as budget constraints, skill sets and project dependencies. Best practices for controlling demand are discussed, including resource allocation, governance processes and a graphical analysis of forecasted vs. actual thresholds. Using specific healthcare provider examples, the article intends to provide IT management with an approach to predicting and controlling resource demand.

  15. ASSESSING THE UTILITY OF A DEMAND ASSESSMENT FOR FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS

    PubMed Central

    Roscoe, Eileen M; Rooker, Griffin W; Pence, Sacha T; Longworth, Lynlea J

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated the utility of an assessment for identifying tasks for the functional analysis demand condition with 4 individuals who had been diagnosed with autism. During the demand assessment, a therapist presented a variety of tasks, and observers measured problem behavior and compliance to identify demands associated with low levels of compliance or high levels of problem behavior (low-probability demands) and demands associated with high levels of compliance or low levels of problem behavior (high-probability demands). Results showed that clearer functional analysis outcomes were obtained for 3 of the 4 participants when low-probability rather than high-probability demands were used. PMID:20514188

  16. Assessing the utility of a demand assessment for functional analysis.

    PubMed

    Roscoe, Eileen M; Rooker, Griffin W; Pence, Sacha T; Longworth, Lynlea J

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated the utility of an assessment for identifying tasks for the functional analysis demand condition with 4 individuals who had been diagnosed with autism. During the demand assessment, a therapist presented a variety of tasks, and observers measured problem behavior and compliance to identify demands associated with low levels of compliance or high levels of problem behavior (low-probability demands) and demands associated with high levels of compliance or low levels of problem behavior (high-probability demands). Results showed that clearer functional analysis outcomes were obtained for 3 of the 4 participants when low-probability rather than high-probability demands were used.

  17. Grid Integration of Aggregated Demand Response, Part 2: Modeling Demand Response in a Production Cost Model

    SciTech Connect

    Hummon, Marissa; Palchak, David; Denholm, Paul; Jorgenson, Jennie; Olsen, Daniel J.; Kiliccote, Sila; Matson, Nance; Sohn, Michael; Rose, Cody; Dudley, Junqiao; Goli, Sasank; Ma, Ookie

    2013-12-01

    This report is one of a series stemming from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Demand Response and Energy Storage Integration Study. This study is a multi-national-laboratory effort to assess the potential value of demand response (DR) and energy storage to electricity systems with different penetration levels of variable renewable resources and to improve our understanding of associatedmarkets and institutions. This report implements DR resources in the commercial production cost model PLEXOS.

  18. A hybrid inventory management system respondingto regular demand and surge demand

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammad S. Roni; Mingzhou Jin; Sandra D. Eksioglu

    2014-06-01

    This paper proposes a hybrid policy for a stochastic inventory system facing regular demand and surge demand. The combination of two different demand patterns can be observed in many areas, such as healthcare inventory and humanitarian supply chain management. The surge demand has a lower arrival rate but higher demand volume per arrival. The solution approach proposed in this paper incorporates the level crossing method and mixed integer programming technique to optimize the hybrid inventory policy with both regular orders and emergency orders. The level crossing method is applied to obtain the equilibrium distributions of inventory levels under a given policy. The model is further transformed into a mixed integer program to identify an optimal hybrid policy. A sensitivity analysis is conducted to investigate the impact of parameters on the optimal inventory policy and minimum cost. Numerical results clearly show the benefit of using the proposed hybrid inventory model. The model and solution approach could help healthcare providers or humanitarian logistics providers in managing their emergency supplies in responding to surge demands.

  19. Dramatic Demand Reduction In The Desert Southwest

    SciTech Connect

    Boehm, Robert; Hsieh, Sean; Lee, Joon; Baghzouz, Yahia; Cross, Andrew; Chatterjee, Sarah

    2015-07-06

    This report summarizes a project that was funded to the University of Nevada Las Vegas (UNLV), with subcontractors Pulte Homes and NV Energy. The project was motivated by the fact that locations in the Desert Southwest portion of the US demonstrate very high peak electrical demands, typically in the late afternoons in the summer. These high demands often require high priced power to supply the needs, and the large loads can cause grid supply problems. An approach was proposed through this contact that would reduce the peak electrical demands to an anticipated 65% of what code-built houses of the similar size would have. It was proposed to achieve energy reduction through four approaches applied to a development of 185 homes in northwest part of Las Vegas named Villa Trieste. First, the homes would all be highly energy efficient. Secondly, each house would have a PV array installed on it. Third, an advanced demand response technique would be developed to allow the resident to have some control over the energy used. Finally, some type of battery storage would be used in the project. Pulte Homes designed the houses. The company considered initial cost vs. long-term savings and chose options that had relatively short paybacks. HERS (Home Energy Rating Service) ratings for the homes are approximately 43 on this scale. On this scale, code-built homes rate at 100, zero energy homes rate a 0, and Energy Star homes are 85. In addition a 1.764 Wp (peak Watt) rated PV array was used on each house. This was made up of solar shakes that were in visual harmony with the roofing material used. A demand response tool was developed to control the amount of electricity used during times of peak demand. While demand response techniques have been used in the utility industry for some time, this particular approach is designed to allow the customer to decide the degree of participation in the response activity. The temperature change in the residence can be decided by the residents by

  20. Demand better results--and get them.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, R H

    1991-01-01

    This HBR classic, first published in 1974, asks and answers one of management's most important questions: Why do so few organizations reach their productivity potential? The answer: because most senior executives fail to establish expectations of performance improvement in ways that get results. They fail because making heavy demands involves taking risks and threatens those who have the demands imposed on them. It's safer to ask for less. To avoid facing the reality of underachievement, managers may rationalize that their subordinates are doing the best they can or that better performance requires more authority or greater resources. They may put their faith in incentive plans that don't need their personal intervention. They may actually set high goals but let subordinates escape accountability for results. To get out of these doldrums, executives have to be willing to invest time and energy; responsibility can be delegated only so far. The key to the recovery strategy is to set a specific, modest, measurable goal pertaining to an important problem in the organization. If this goal is met, management uses the success as a springboard for more ambitious demands, each one carefully supported by plans, controls, and persistence directed from the top. Resistance can be expected from many levels. But as the organization registers genuine achievement, consciousness-raising in the form of recognition transforms expectations into positive factors. The fact is, most people like to work in a results-oriented environment. In a retrospective commentary, the author writes that while companies today are more impressed with the need for performance improvement, the ability to establish high expectations is still the most universally underdeveloped managerial skill.

  1. Taxonomy for Modeling Demand Response Resources

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Daniel; Kiliccote, Sila; Sohn, Michael; Dunn, Laura; Piette, Mary, A

    2014-08-01

    Demand response resources are an important component of modern grid management strategies. Accurate characterizations of DR resources are needed to develop systems of optimally managed grid operations and to plan future investments in generation, transmission, and distribution. The DOE Demand Response and Energy Storage Integration Study (DRESIS) project researched the degree to which demand response (DR) and energy storage can provide grid flexibility and stability in the Western Interconnection. In this work, DR resources were integrated with traditional generators in grid forecasting tools, specifically a production cost model of the Western Interconnection. As part of this study, LBNL developed a modeling framework for characterizing resource availability and response attributes of DR resources consistent with the governing architecture of the simulation modeling platform. In this report, we identify and describe the following response attributes required to accurately characterize DR resources: allowable response frequency, maximum response duration, minimum time needed to achieve load changes, necessary pre- or re-charging of integrated energy storage, costs of enablement, magnitude of controlled resources, and alignment of availability. We describe a framework for modeling these response attributes, and apply this framework to characterize 13 DR resources including residential, commercial, and industrial end-uses. We group these end-uses into three broad categories based on their response capabilities, and define a taxonomy for classifying DR resources within these categories. The three categories of resources exhibit different capabilities and differ in value to the grid. Results from the production cost model of the Western Interconnection illustrate that minor differences in resource attributes can have significant impact on grid utilization of DR resources. The implications of these findings will be explored in future DR valuation studies.

  2. Mechanical demands of kettlebell swing exercise.

    PubMed

    Lake, Jason P; Lauder, Mike A

    2012-12-01

    The aims of this study were to establish mechanical demands of kettlebell swing exercise and provide context by comparing them to mechanical demands of back squat and jump squat exercise. Sixteen men performed 2 sets of 10 swings with 16, 24, and 32 kg, 2 back squats with 20, 40, 60, and 80% 1-repetition maximum (1RM), and 2 jump squats with 0, 20, 40, and 60% 1RM. Sagittal plane motion and ground reaction forces (GRFs) were recorded during swing performance, and GRFs were recorded during back and jump squat performances. Net impulse, and peak and mean propulsion phase force and power applied to the center of mass (CM) were obtained from GRF data and kettlebell displacement and velocity from motion data. The results of repeated measures analysis of variance showed that all swing CM measures were maximized during the 32-kg condition but that velocity of the kettlebell was maximized during the 16-kg condition; displacement was consistent across different loads. Peak and mean force tended to be greater during back and jump squat performances, but swing peak and mean power were greater than back squat power and largely comparable with jump squat power. However, the highest net impulse was recorded during swing exercise with 32 kg (276.1 ± 45.3 N·s vs. 60% 1RM back squat: 182.8 ± 43.1 N·s, and 40% jump squat: 231.3 ± 47.1 N·s). These findings indicate a large mechanical demand during swing exercise that could make swing exercise a useful addition to strength and conditioning programs that aim to develop the ability to rapidly apply force.

  3. Demand-Side Response from Industrial Loads

    SciTech Connect

    Starke, Michael R; Alkadi, Nasr E; Letto, Daryl; Johnson, Brandon; Dowling, Kevin; George, Raoule; Khan, Saqib

    2013-01-01

    Through a research study funded by the Department of Energy, Smart Grid solutions company ENBALA Power Networks along with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have geospatially quantified the potential flexibility within industrial loads to leverage their inherent process storage to help support the management of the electricity grid. The study found that there is an excess of 12 GW of demand-side load flexibility available in a select list of top industrial facilities in the United States. Future studies will expand on this quantity of flexibility as more in-depth analysis of different industries is conducted and demonstrations are completed.

  4. Gasoline demand in developing Asian countries

    SciTech Connect

    McRae, R.

    1994-12-31

    This paper presents econometric estimates of motor gasoline demand in eleven developing countries of Asia. The price and GDP per capita elasticities are estimated for each country separately, and for several pooled combinations of the countries. The estimated elasticities for the Asian countries are compared with those of the OECD countries. Generally, one finds that the OECD countries have GDP elasticities that are smaller, and price elasticities that are larger (in absolute value). The price elasticities for the low-income Asian countries are more inelastic than for the middle-income Asian countries, and the GDP elasticities are generally more elastic. 13 refs., 6 tabs.

  5. Combined Standby Transvenous Defibrillator and Demand Pacemaker.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-12-01

    AD-A097 441 CARDIAC CARE SYSTEMS INC RED BANK NJ F/B 6/5 COM13INED STANDBY TRANSVENOJS DEFIBRILLATOR AND DEMAND PACEMAKER--ETC(U) DEC 75 L RUBIN...Development Command Fort Detrick, Frederick, MD 21701 Contract Number DAMD17-74-C-4108. Cardiac Care Systems, Inc. 80 E. Front Street Red Bank , NJ...8217 Cardiac Care Systems, Inc. 4I 80 E. Front Street 61 3121A1j0.4 Red Bank , NJ 07701 a .0_ e- /i\\ - -__________ I1. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS 1.)42

  6. Air freight demand models: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dajani, J. S.; Bernstein, G. W.

    1978-01-01

    A survey is presented of some of the approaches which have been considered in freight demand estimation. The few existing continuous time computer simulations of aviation systems are reviewed, with a view toward the assessment of this approach as a tool for structuring air freight studies and for relating the different components of the air freight system. The variety of available data types and sources, without which the calibration, validation and the testing of both modal split and simulation models would be impossible are also reviewed.

  7. China's rising hydropower demand challenges water sector.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junguo; Zhao, Dandan; Gerbens-Leenes, P W; Guan, Dabo

    2015-07-09

    Demand for hydropower is increasing, yet the water footprints (WFs) of reservoirs and hydropower, and their contributions to water scarcity, are poorly understood. Here, we calculate reservoir WFs (freshwater that evaporates from reservoirs) and hydropower WFs (the WF of hydroelectricity) in China based on data from 875 representative reservoirs (209 with power plants). In 2010, the reservoir WF totaled 27.9 × 10(9) m(3) (Gm(3)), or 22% of China's total water consumption. Ignoring the reservoir WF seriously underestimates human water appropriation. The reservoir WF associated with industrial, domestic and agricultural WFs caused water scarcity in 6 of the 10 major Chinese river basins from 2 to 12 months annually. The hydropower WF was 6.6 Gm(3) yr(-1) or 3.6 m(3) of water to produce a GJ (10(9) J) of electricity. Hydropower is a water intensive energy carrier. As a response to global climate change, the Chinese government has promoted a further increase in hydropower energy by 70% by 2020 compared to 2012. This energy policy imposes pressure on available freshwater resources and increases water scarcity. The water-energy nexus requires strategic and coordinated implementations of hydropower development among geographical regions, as well as trade-off analysis between rising energy demand and water use sustainability.

  8. Grower demand for sensor-controlled irrigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtenberg, Erik; Majsztrik, John; Saavoss, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Water scarcity is likely to increase in the coming years, making improvements in irrigation efficiency increasingly important. An emerging technology that promises to increase irrigation efficiency substantially is a wireless irrigation sensor network that uploads sensor data into irrigation management software, creating an integrated system that allows real-time monitoring and control of moisture status that has been shown in experimental settings to reduce irrigation costs, lower plant loss rates, shorten production times, decrease pesticide application, and increase yield, quality, and profit. We use an original survey to investigate likely initial acceptance, ceiling adoption rates, and profitability of this new sensor network technology in the nursery and greenhouse industry. We find that adoption rates for a base system and demand for expansion components are decreasing in price, as expected. The price elasticity of the probability of adoption suggests that sensor networks are likely to diffuse at a rate somewhat greater than that of drip irrigation. Adoption rates for a base system and demand for expansion components are increasing in specialization in ornamental production: growers earning greater shares of revenue from greenhouse and nursery operations are willing to pay more for a base system and are willing to purchase larger numbers of expansion components at any given price. We estimate that growers who are willing to purchase a sensor network expect investment in this technology to generate significant profit, consistent with findings from experimental studies.

  9. Demand for Child Healthcare in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Olaniyan, Olanrewaju; Sunkanmi, Odubunmi Ayoola

    2012-01-01

    Nigeria with an estimated $350 per capital annually still ranks near the bottom 158 out of 177 countries in the UN Human Capital Development Index in terms of per capita income, with more than half of the population living in poverty. Over the past decade U5MR is estimated to be 201 deaths/1000 lives births, the high rates of child mortality especially the 0-5 years shows the total breakdown of social and economic well-being of the country. This paper examined child health care demand in Nigeria using the Nested Multinomial Logit Model estimation technique. The study used parents’ education as a proxy for child education, while the decision to make a choice of the health facilities was also assumed to be that of the House-Hold head. The study found out that female child has a higher probability of seeking health care facility ahead of their male counterpart. Also, the household head educational level was found to be a determinant of health care seeking behavior of the child. Empirical evidence also revealed that that the probability of seeking healthcare increases with household size and that demand for child health care in Nigeria is non linear in nature. Based on this, the paper recommends the need to show greater commitment to child health care and that government should reduce the problems militating against effective performance of the health sector such as, inefficiency, wasteful use of resources, low quality of service and poor enabling environment. PMID:23121749

  10. Growing demand for gas spawns pipeline projects

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-09

    This paper reports that burgeoning demand for gas is fueling pipeline construction in Eastern and Western hemispheres. In the East, the North Sea is the focal point for activity. And in the West, the U.S. gas market is the power behind construction. As predictions of U.S. gas demand increase, Canadian pipeliners adjust expansion plans to be ready to capture greater shares of markets. Canada's TransCanada Pipelines Ltd. is racing to step up its share of the U.S. market. TransCanada's Western Gas Marketing Ltd. sold 242.3 bcf of gas in the 3 months ended last June 30, a 9.8% increase from last year. TransCanada reported lower volumes sold into Canadian markets, while exports into the U.S. continued to rise. Gas Research Institute (GRI) projects Canadian gas exports to the U.S. by 2000 will reach 2 tcf/year and LNG exports 800 bcf/year. U.S. gas supplies could increase to 23.9 tcf/year by 2010, mostly from Lower 48 production. GRI says supplies from Canada will make up the balance. In the past 2 years, TransCanada has spent about $1 billion expanding its interprovincial main line system.

  11. Economic Rebalancing and Electricity Demand in China

    SciTech Connect

    He, Gang; Lin, Jiang; Yuan, Alexandria

    2015-11-01

    Understanding the relationship between economic growth and electricity use is essential for power systems planning. This need is particularly acute now in China, as the Chinese economy is going through a transition to a more consumption and service oriented economy. This study uses 20 years of provincial data on gross domestic product (GDP) and electricity consumption to examine the relationship between these two factors. We observe a plateauing effect of electricity consumption in the richest provinces, as the electricity demand saturates and the economy develops and moves to a more service-based economy. There is a wide range of forecasts for electricity use in 2030, ranging from 5,308 to 8,292 kWh per capita, using different estimating functions, as well as in existing studies. It is therefore critical to examine more carefully the relationship between electricity use and economic development, as China transitions to a new growth phase that is likely to be less energy and resource intensive. The results of this study suggest that policymakers and power system planners in China should seriously re-evaluate power demand projections and the need for new generation capacity to avoid over-investment that could lead to stranded generation assets.

  12. Converting Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) of Cellulosic Ethanol Fermentation Wastewater into Microbial Lipid by Oleaginous Yeast Trichosporon cutaneum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Hu, Mingshan; Zhang, Huizhan; Bao, Jie

    2017-01-27

    Cellulosic ethanol fermentation wastewater is the stillage stream of distillation column of cellulosic ethanol fermentation broth with high chemical oxygen demand (COD). The COD is required to reduce before the wastewater is released or recycled. Without any pretreatment nor external nutrients, the cellulosic ethanol fermentation wastewater bioconversion by Trichosporon cutaneum ACCC 20271 was carried out for the first time. The major components of the wastewater including glucose, xylose, acetic acid, ethanol, and partial of phenolic compounds could be utilized by T. cutaneum ACCC 20271. In a 3-L bioreactor, 2.16 g/L of microbial lipid accumulated with 55.05% of COD reduced after a 5-day culture of T. cutaneum ACCC 20271 in the wastewater. The fatty acid composition of the derived microbial lipid was similar with vegetable oil, in which it could be used as biodiesel production feedstock. This study will both solve the environmental problem and offer low-cost lipid feedstock for biodiesel production.

  13. The metabolic demands of kayaking: a review.

    PubMed

    Michael, Jacob S; Rooney, Kieron B; Smith, Richard

    2008-03-01

    Flat-water kayaking is one of the best-known competitive canoeing disciplines in Australia and across the European countries. From a stationary start, paddlers are required to paddle their kayaks with maximal effort along the length of the competing distance. The ultimate criterion of kayak performance is the time taken to paddle a designated competition distance. In flat-water racing, events are contested over 500 and 1000 metres. To approximate the ultimate criterion over these distances, the velocity of the kayak should be measured. Furthermore, other factors that affect performance, such as force, power, technique and aerobic fitness, would all provide a valuable insight to the success of the kayak paddler. Specific research performed examining the physiological demands on kayak paddlers demonstrate high levels of both aerobic power and anaerobic capacity. It is the purpose if this review to present the published physiological data relating to men's and women's kayaking. With a number of recent publications, a need for an updated review is necessary. The present review summarises recent data on anthropometrics, physiological characteristics of successful and unsuccessful kayak athletes and methods of physiological testing. Due to the fact that more data have been reported for male competitors than for their female counterparts, the demands of kayaking on male athletes will be the main focus for this review. The review also suggests areas for future research into flatwater kayaking performance. Understanding the physiological requirements of kayaking can assist coaches and athletes in a number of ways. During competition or training, such information is helpful in the selection of appropriate protocols and metabolic indices to monitor an athlete's performance improvements and assess an athlete's suitability for a particular race distance. Furthermore, it may aid the coach in the development of more specific training programs for their athletes. Key points

  14. The Metabolic Demands of Kayaking: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Michael, Jacob S.; Rooney, Kieron B.; Smith, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Flat-water kayaking is one of the best-known competitive canoeing disciplines in Australia and across the European countries. From a stationary start, paddlers are required to paddle their kayaks with maximal effort along the length of the competing distance. The ultimate criterion of kayak performance is the time taken to paddle a designated competition distance. In flat-water racing, events are contested over 500 and 1000 metres. To approximate the ultimate criterion over these distances, the velocity of the kayak should be measured. Furthermore, other factors that affect performance, such as force, power, technique and aerobic fitness, would all provide a valuable insight to the success of the kayak paddler. Specific research performed examining the physiological demands on kayak paddlers demonstrate high levels of both aerobic power and anaerobic capacity. It is the purpose if this review to present the published physiological data relating to men’s and women’s kayaking. With a number of recent publications, a need for an updated review is necessary. The present review summarises recent data on anthropometrics, physiological characteristics of successful and unsuccessful kayak athletes and methods of physiological testing. Due to the fact that more data have been reported for male competitors than for their female counterparts, the demands of kayaking on male athletes will be the main focus for this review. The review also suggests areas for future research into flatwater kayaking performance. Understanding the physiological requirements of kayaking can assist coaches and athletes in a number of ways. During competition or training, such information is helpful in the selection of appropriate protocols and metabolic indices to monitor an athlete’s performance improvements and assess an athlete’s suitability for a particular race distance. Furthermore, it may aid the coach in the development of more specific training programs for their athletes. Key

  15. A Note on Comparing the Elasticities of Demand Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nieswiadomy, Michael

    1986-01-01

    Demonstrates a simple and useful way to compare the elasticity of demand at each price (or quantity) for different demand curves. The technique is particularly useful for the intermediate microeconomic course. (Author)

  16. Customer premises services market demand assessment 1980 - 2000: Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamble, R. B.; Saporta, L.; Heidenrich, G. A.

    1983-01-01

    Potential customer premises service (CPS), telecommunication services, potential CPS user classes, a primary research survey, comparative economics, market demand forcasts, distance distribution of traffic, segmentation of market demand, and a nationwide traffic distribution model are discussed.

  17. Telephone triage improves demand management effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Sabin, M

    1998-08-01

    Telephone triage, or telephone advice counseling, is becoming a key managed care point-of-entry tool for patients and health plan members accessing the health system. Telephone triage functions as a logical front-end for health plans, integrated physician groups, or integrated delivery systems that want to shift their managed care efforts toward demand management. Key components of telephone triage include patient education, patient information, and guided access to appropriate care. Telephone triage generally requires 24-hour staffing by registered nurses and a computer software package based on either clinical protocols or clinical algorithms. Organizations can either install an in-house system or purchase this service from a vendor, health plan, or another provider. The decision to develop a telephone triage service in-house or to out-source it is determined largely by volume and the user's strategy for moving to successive levels of risk management.

  18. Future satellite systems - Market demand assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiner, P. S.

    1981-01-01

    During 1979-80, a market study was performed regarding the future total demand for communications services, and satellite transmission service at the 4/6 GHz, 12/14 GHz, and 20/30 GHz frequencies. Included in the study were a variety of communications traffic characteristics as well as projections of the cost of C and Ku band satellite systems through the year 2000. In connection with the considered study, a total of 15 major study tasks and subtasks were undertaken and were all interrelated in various ways. The telecommunications service forecasts were concerned with a total of 21 data services, 5 voice services, and 5 video services. The traffic volumes within the U.S. for the three basic services were projected for three time periods. It is found that the fixed frequency allocation for domestic satellites combined with potential interference from adjacent satellites means a near term lack of orbital positions above the U.S.

  19. Laughing: a demanding exercise for trunk muscles.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Heiko; Rehmes, Ulrich; Kohle, Daniel; Puta, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Social, psychological, and physiological studies have provided evidence indicating that laughter imposes an increased demand on trunk muscles. It was the aim of this study to quantify the activation of trunk muscles during laughter yoga in comparison with crunch and back lifting exercises regarding the mean trunk muscle activity. Muscular activity during laughter yoga exercises was measured by surface electromyography of 5 trunk muscles. The activation level of internal oblique muscle during laughter yoga is higher compared to the traditional exercises. The multifidus, erector spinae, and rectus abdominis muscles were nearly half activated during laughter yoga, while the activation of the external oblique muscle was comparable with the crunch and back lifting exercises. Our results indicate that laughter yoga has a positive effect on trunk muscle activation. Thus, laughter seems to be a good activator of trunk muscles, but further research is required whether laughter yoga is a good exercise to improve neuromuscular recruitment patterns for spine stability.

  20. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool

    SciTech Connect

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Heffner, Grayson; Goldman, Charles

    2009-01-30

    In 2007, the Southwest Power Pool (SPP) formed the Customer Response Task Force (CRTF) to identify barriers to deploying demand response (DR) resources in wholesale markets and develop policies to overcome these barriers. One of the initiatives of this Task Force was to develop more detailed information on existing retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs, program rules, and utility operating practices. This report describes the results of a comprehensive survey conducted by LBNL in support of the Customer Response Task Force and discusses policy implications for integrating legacy retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs into wholesale markets in the SPP region. LBNL conducted a detailed survey of existing DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs administered by SPP's member utilities. Survey respondents were asked to provide information on advance notice requirements to customers, operational triggers used to call events (e.g. system emergencies, market conditions, local emergencies), use of these DR resources to meet planning reserves requirements, DR resource availability (e.g. seasonal, annual), participant incentive structures, and monitoring and verification (M&V) protocols. Nearly all of the 30 load-serving entities in SPP responded to the survey. Of this group, fourteen SPP member utilities administer 36 DR programs, five dynamic pricing tariffs, and six voluntary customer response initiatives. These existing DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs have a peak demand reduction potential of 1,552 MW. Other major findings of this study are: o About 81percent of available DR is from interruptible rate tariffs offered to large commercial and industrial customers, while direct load control (DLC) programs account for ~;;14percent. o Arkansas accounts for ~;;50percent of the DR resources in the SPP footprint; these DR resources are primarily managed by cooperatives. o Publicly-owned cooperatives accounted for 54percent of the existing DR resources

  1. Downsizing, role demands, and job stress.

    PubMed

    Reissman, D B; Orris, P; Lacey, R; Hartman, D E

    1999-04-01

    This is a cross-sectional study consisting of self-administered survey instruments to measure psychological distress and stress-inducing work demands after 6 months of rumors about an upcoming corporate downsizing event. The workforce consisted predominantly of white males who were married, college-educated, and nonsmokers. Higher stress levels were seen among older, more educated workers, who had longer company tenure. Role boundary problems, noxious physical environments, and company tenure were retained in the final multivariable model predicting distress level. The ongoing time delay for management to implement the threatened layoff and peer rankings for a new job performance appraisal contributed to a decline in worker solidarity because of concerns about career and job security. These uncertainties reduced worker productivity and effective teamwork.

  2. U. S. plastics demand drops sharply

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-07-28

    According to the Society of the Plastics Industry, plastics demand dropped sharply in the U.S. during second-quarter 1980. U.S. exports of themoplastics are down slightly from year-ago levels, and PVC and low-density polyethylene (LDPE) exports are increasing strongly, but strong exports can not offset a weak domestic market. The weakness in domestic PVC sales is due mostly to large drops in contruction pipe (-49%) and automotive uses, its leading markets, in the last year. LDPE sales have dropped 3% over the year, and 8% in film, LPDE's largest market. Polypropylene's two largest U.S. markets, molding and fibers, have also dropped sharply. Epoxy resin showed a May 1979 to May 1980 gain of 28% in exports, but three other thermosets, polyesters, urea-melamine, and phenolics, have dropped sharply since May 1979.

  3. Demand Response For Power System Reliability: FAQ

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, Brendan J

    2006-12-01

    Demand response is the most underutilized power system reliability resource in North America. Technological advances now make it possible to tap this resource to both reduce costs and improve. Misconceptions concerning response capabilities tend to force loads to provide responses that they are less able to provide and often prohibit them from providing the most valuable reliability services. Fortunately this is beginning to change with some ISOs making more extensive use of load response. This report is structured as a series of short questions and answers that address load response capabilities and power system reliability needs. Its objective is to further the use of responsive load as a bulk power system reliability resource in providing the fastest and most valuable ancillary services.

  4. Demanding strategic leadership. Sudan. The Hague Forum.

    PubMed

    Garang, G D

    1999-01-01

    The establishment of the Sudan National Population Council in the wake of the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) showed strong political commitment to implementing the ICPD's program of action at the national level. Sudan has also participated in a number of regional and international meetings which recommended various ways of accelerating the implementation of the program of action. The successful implementation of Sudan's national population policy demands strategic leadership at various levels to ensure that the government, with the active participation of the civil society, work together to design, implement, coordinate, monitor, and evaluate population and development programs. However, the country's longstanding civil war and other manmade and natural disasters have caused ongoing population displacement and resettlement processes, impeding development efforts. Sudan's government is concentrating mainly upon ending the war and addressing its negative consequences upon population development before addressing any development plans and programs. The ICPD quantitative targets will be hard to reach in Sudan given current conditions.

  5. Building a print on demand web service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Prakash; Rozario, Benedict; Dudekula, Shariff; V, Anil Dev

    2011-03-01

    There is considerable effort underway to digitize all books that have ever been printed. There is need for a service that can take raw book scans and convert them into Print on Demand (POD) books. Such a service definitely augments the digitization effort and enables broader access to a wider audience. To make this service practical we have identified three key challenges that needed to be addressed. These are: a) produce high quality image images by eliminating artifacts that exist due to the age of the document or those that are introduced during the scanning process b) develop an efficient automated system to process book scans with minimum human intervention; and c) build an eco system which allows us the target audience to discover these books.

  6. Industrial demand side management: A status report

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, M.F.; Conger, R.L.; Foley, T.J.

    1995-05-01

    This report provides an overview of and rationale for industrial demand side management (DSM) programs. Benefits and barriers are described, and data from the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey are used to estimate potential energy savings in kilowatt hours. The report presents types and examples of programs and explores elements of successful programs. Two in-depth case studies (from Boise Cascade and Eli Lilly and Company) illustrate two types of effective DSM programs. Interviews with staff from state public utility commissions indicate the current thinking about the status and future of industrial DSM programs. A comprehensive bibliography is included, technical assistance programs are listed and described, and a methodology for evaluating potential or actual savings from projects is delineated.

  7. Portable, On-Demand Biomolecular Manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Pardee, Keith; Slomovic, Shimyn; Nguyen, Peter Q; Lee, Jeong Wook; Donghia, Nina; Burrill, Devin; Ferrante, Tom; McSorley, Fern R; Furuta, Yoshikazu; Vernet, Andyna; Lewandowski, Michael; Boddy, Christopher N; Joshi, Neel S; Collins, James J

    2016-09-22

    Synthetic biology uses living cells as molecular foundries for the biosynthesis of drugs, therapeutic proteins, and other commodities. However, the need for specialized equipment and refrigeration for production and distribution poses a challenge for the delivery of these technologies to the field and to low-resource areas. Here, we present a portable platform that provides the means for on-site, on-demand manufacturing of therapeutics and biomolecules. This flexible system is based on reaction pellets composed of freeze-dried, cell-free transcription and translation machinery, which can be easily hydrated and utilized for biosynthesis through the addition of DNA encoding the desired output. We demonstrate this approach with the manufacture and functional validation of antimicrobial peptides and vaccines and present combinatorial methods for the production of antibody conjugates and small molecules. This synthetic biology platform resolves important practical limitations in the production and distribution of therapeutics and molecular tools, both to the developed and developing world.

  8. The demand for fertility control in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, N; Zahid, G M

    1993-01-01

    The analysis of fertility and contraceptive use data for Pakistan is directed toward estimating the likelihood of contraceptive use. Data are drawn from the 1975 Fertility Survey, the 1979-80 Population, Labor Force, and Migration Survey, the 1984-85 Contraceptive Prevalence Survey, and the 1990-91 Demographic and Health Survey. Increased demand for family planning is construed to be reflected in the excess number of children over the desired number of children according to the Easterlin and Crimmons and the Bulatao and Lee frameworks. A higher probability of contraceptive use is expected to be related to having a large family. Findings indicate that there was a lack of correspondence between the desire for no more children and actual use of contraception. The proportion desiring no more children was 40-50%. In the logistic model, the findings show that the likelihood of contraceptive use in all surveys was significantly increased with women's education, urban residence, and family planning accessibility. The number of living and desired children were independent of each other, and neither factor influenced significantly the demand for contraception. The nature of and magnitude of the effect varied for each survey. The generalized conclusion was that contraceptive use is not being used by women who desire no more children. Although contraceptive use has increased over time, the number of desired children has remained stable. The suggestion is to target women aged 35-44 years who appear to have achieved their desired fertility and to expand levels of education and economic and social opportunities for women.

  9. Training needs for water demand management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumbo, Bekithemba; van der Zaag, Pieter; Robinson, Peter; Jonker, Lewis; Buckle, Hannes

    There is no doubt that delivery of education and training is essential in increasing awareness and equipping various stakeholders with the necessary skills and tools to implement Water Demand Management (WDM) in the Southern African region. At present there is limited capacity in the region to drive WDM programmes. One of the identified major constraints to the adoption of Water Demand Management (WDM) measures is the absence of well structured educational and training programmes or courses suitably targeted to all stakeholders in the water management chain. As one unpacks the Pandora’s Box of education and training certain key questions arise. What form of education and training in required? How does it fit in broader programmes like Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM)? Who should be educated or trained and what are the target figures? And, importantly, who funds the exercise? As much as WDM awareness has been given due attention, education and training to move beyond the barriers to implementation have been lacking. This paper describes the development of the IUCN-WaterNet WDM Tertiary Training Module for middle and senior managers in institutions within the Southern Africa Development Community (SADC). The paper outlines the structure of the module and the philosophy which guided its development and selection of content. The results of relevant training needs surveys are also highlighted. Human development indicators for the SADC member states are provided as background information to contextualise the challenges facing the region. There are a number of constraints and threats to building WDM human resource capital. Recommendations are made for possible co-operation among the educators and trainers, public and private sectors, and possibly within the framework and mandate of the SADC Water Sector Co-ordinating Unit. Cooperation would ensure that WDM knowledge and skills are imparted to a significant number of water professionals in the region within

  10. Sensor-based demand controlled ventilation

    SciTech Connect

    De Almeida, A.T.; Fisk, W.J.

    1997-07-01

    In most buildings, occupancy and indoor pollutant emission rates vary with time. With sensor-based demand-controlled ventilation (SBDCV), the rate of ventilation (i.e., rate of outside air supply) also varies with time to compensate for the changes in pollutant generation. In other words, SBDCV involves the application of sensing, feedback and control to modulate ventilation. Compared to ventilation without feedback, SBDCV offers two potential advantages: (1) better control of indoor pollutant concentrations; and (2) lower energy use and peak energy demand. SBDCV has the potential to improve indoor air quality by increasing the rate of ventilation when indoor pollutant generation rates are high and occupants are present. SBDCV can also save energy by decreasing the rate of ventilation when indoor pollutant generation rates are low or occupants are absent. After providing background information on indoor air quality and ventilation, this report provides a relatively comprehensive discussion of SBDCV. Topics covered in the report include basic principles of SBDCV, sensor technologies, technologies for controlling air flow rates, case studies of SBDCV, application of SBDCV to laboratory buildings, and research needs. SBDCV appears to be an increasingly attractive technology option. Based on the review of literature and theoretical considerations, the application of SBDCV has the potential to be cost-effective in applications with the following characteristics: (a) a single or small number of dominant pollutants, so that ventilation sufficient to control the concentration of the dominant pollutants provides effective control of all other pollutants; (b) large buildings or rooms with unpredictable temporally variable occupancy or pollutant emission; and (c) climates with high heating or cooling loads or locations with expensive energy.

  11. Colour vision requirements in visually demanding occupations.

    PubMed

    Barbur, J L; Rodriguez-Carmona, M

    2017-03-18

    Normal trichromatic colour vision (CV) is often required as a condition for employment in visually demanding occupations. If this requirement could be enforced using current, colour assessment tests, a significant percentage of subjects with anomalous, congenital trichromacy who can perform the suprathreshold, colour-related tasks encountered in many occupations with the same accuracy as normal trichromats would fail. These applicants would therefore be discriminated against unfairly. One solution to this problem is to produce minimum, justifiable CV requirements that are specific to each occupation. This has been done successfully for commercial aviation (i.e. the flight crew) and for Transport for London train drivers. An alternative approach is to make use of new findings and the statistical outcomes of past practices to produce graded, justifiable CV categories that can be enforced. To achieve this aim, we analysed colour assessment outcomes and quantified severity of CV loss in 1363 subjects. The severity of CV loss was measured in each subject and statistical, pass/fail outcomes established for each of the most commonly used, conventional colour assessment tests and protocols. This evidence and new findings that relate severity of loss to the effective use of colour signals in a number of tasks provide the basis for a new colour grading system based on six categories. A single colour assessment test is needed to establish the applicant's CV category which can range from 'supernormal', for the most stringent, colour-demanding tasks, to 'severe colour deficiency', when red/green CV is either absent or extremely weak.

  12. Consumer demand for patient-oriented pharmacy services.

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, N V; Gagnon, J P

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the extent of consumer demand for patient-oriented pharmacy services. Data, collected via a self-administered questionnaire distributed to 300 households, were analyzed using Kruskal's program for additive conjoint analysis. The results indicate substantial consumer demand for making advisory services available on request, moderate demand for provision of patient medication records, and little demand for voluntary provision of advisory services. PMID:6721020

  13. Demand Reduction: Reducing the Demand for Illegal Drugs in the United States

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-28

    individuals who receive specialty treatment is about 10 percent – lower than almost any other serious medical disorder in the United States population.” 44...have a “diagnosable drug abuse disorder ”.50 Our national demand for illegal drugs is the area where the United States has spent the least amount of

  14. International Demand for American Higher Education: An Extension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mixon, J. Wilson, Jr.; Wan, Weidong

    1990-01-01

    A study of the relationship of population and income in Asian countries and Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) members to their demand for American higher education found that both population and income significantly affect demand, but not proportionally. Findings suggest countries meet most change in citizens' demand with…

  15. Intermittent Demand Forecasting in a Tertiary Pediatric Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chen-Yang; Chiang, Kuo-Liang; Chen, Meng-Yin

    2016-10-01

    Forecasts of the demand for medical supplies both directly and indirectly affect the operating costs and the quality of the care provided by health care institutions. Specifically, overestimating demand induces an inventory surplus, whereas underestimating demand possibly compromises patient safety. Uncertainty in forecasting the consumption of medical supplies generates intermittent demand events. The intermittent demand patterns for medical supplies are generally classified as lumpy, erratic, smooth, and slow-moving demand. This study was conducted with the purpose of advancing a tertiary pediatric intensive care unit's efforts to achieve a high level of accuracy in its forecasting of the demand for medical supplies. On this point, several demand forecasting methods were compared in terms of the forecast accuracy of each. The results confirm that applying Croston's method combined with a single exponential smoothing method yields the most accurate results for forecasting lumpy, erratic, and slow-moving demand, whereas the Simple Moving Average (SMA) method is the most suitable for forecasting smooth demand. In addition, when the classification of demand consumption patterns were combined with the demand forecasting models, the forecasting errors were minimized, indicating that this classification framework can play a role in improving patient safety and reducing inventory management costs in health care institutions.

  16. 37 CFR 1.480 - Demand for international preliminary examination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... TRADEMARK OFFICE, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL RULES OF PRACTICE IN PATENT CASES International Processing... forth in PCT Rule 57.3. (b) The Demand shall be made on a standardized form (PCT Rule 53). Copies of the... printed Demand forms should be marked “Mail Stop PCT.” (c) Withdrawal of a proper Demand prior to...

  17. 37 CFR 1.480 - Demand for international preliminary examination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... TRADEMARK OFFICE, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL RULES OF PRACTICE IN PATENT CASES International Processing... forth in PCT Rule 57.3. (b) The Demand shall be made on a standardized form (PCT Rule 53). Copies of the... printed Demand forms should be marked “Mail Stop PCT.” (c) Withdrawal of a proper Demand prior to...

  18. Easton's Demand Processing in the School Districts of Two States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michel, George J.

    This study produces demonstrable evidence that content analysis of school board minutes is a useful and promising methodology for studying demand processing. Demand processing is the conversion to outputs of the demands, needs, desires, or inputs presented to the school board. Use of the technique in a school district in each of two States showed…

  19. 49 CFR 1018.20 - Written demand for payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Written demand for payment. 1018.20 Section 1018... Collection of Claims § 1018.20 Written demand for payment. (a) The Board shall make appropriate written... Board normally shall send three progressively stronger written demands at not more than 30-day...

  20. 49 CFR 1018.20 - Written demand for payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Written demand for payment. 1018.20 Section 1018... Collection of Claims § 1018.20 Written demand for payment. (a) The Board shall make appropriate written... Board normally shall send three progressively stronger written demands at not more than 30-day...

  1. 49 CFR 1018.20 - Written demand for payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Written demand for payment. 1018.20 Section 1018... Collection of Claims § 1018.20 Written demand for payment. (a) The Board shall make appropriate written... Board normally shall send three progressively stronger written demands at not more than 30-day...

  2. Assessing the Utility of a Demand Assessment for Functional Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roscoe, Eileen M.; Rooker, Griffin W.; Pence, Sacha T.; Longworth, Lynlea J.

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated the utility of an assessment for identifying tasks for the functional analysis demand condition with 4 individuals who had been diagnosed with autism. During the demand assessment, a therapist presented a variety of tasks, and observers measured problem behavior and compliance to identify demands associated with low levels of…

  3. The Impact of Labor Demand on Time to the Doctorate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groen, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to estimate the impact of labor demand on time to the doctorate. Empirical investigation of this relationship in previous research was hampered by the difficulty of measuring labor demand. I construct a measure of labor demand in seven fields in the humanities and social sciences based on the annual number of job listings…

  4. 32 CFR 700.1101 - Demand for court-martial.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Demand for court-martial. 700.1101 Section 700... Standards of Conduct § 700.1101 Demand for court-martial. Except as otherwise provided in the Uniform Code of Military Justice, no person in the naval service may demand a court martial either on him...

  5. 32 CFR 700.1101 - Demand for court-martial.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Demand for court-martial. 700.1101 Section 700... Standards of Conduct § 700.1101 Demand for court-martial. Except as otherwise provided in the Uniform Code of Military Justice, no person in the naval service may demand a court martial either on him...

  6. 32 CFR 700.1101 - Demand for court-martial.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Demand for court-martial. 700.1101 Section 700... Standards of Conduct § 700.1101 Demand for court-martial. Except as otherwise provided in the Uniform Code of Military Justice, no person in the naval service may demand a court martial either on him...

  7. 46 CFR 111.60-7 - Demand loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Demand loads. 111.60-7 Section 111.60-7 Shipping COAST... REQUIREMENTS Wiring Materials and Methods § 111.60-7 Demand loads. Generator, feeder, and bus-tie cables must be selected on the basis of a computed load of not less than the demand load given in Table...

  8. 46 CFR 111.60-7 - Demand loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Demand loads. 111.60-7 Section 111.60-7 Shipping COAST... REQUIREMENTS Wiring Materials and Methods § 111.60-7 Demand loads. Generator, feeder, and bus-tie cables must be selected on the basis of a computed load of not less than the demand load given in Table...

  9. 46 CFR 111.60-7 - Demand loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Demand loads. 111.60-7 Section 111.60-7 Shipping COAST... REQUIREMENTS Wiring Materials and Methods § 111.60-7 Demand loads. Generator, feeder, and bus-tie cables must be selected on the basis of a computed load of not less than the demand load given in Table...

  10. Employer Demand for Welfare Recipients by Race. Discussion Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holzer, Harry J.; Stoll, Michael A.

    This paper uses new survey data on employers in four large metropolitan areas to examine the determinants of employer demand for welfare recipients. Data come from a telephone survey of approximately 750 establishments. Results suggest a high level of demand for welfare recipients, although such demand appears fairly sensitive to business cycle…

  11. 24 CFR 2004.24 - Processing demands or requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... PRODUCTION IN RESPONSE TO SUBPOENAS OR DEMANDS OF COURTS OR OTHER AUTHORITIES Requests for Testimony and... of the demand or request. The time for response will depend upon the scope of the request. (c) The... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Processing demands or...

  12. How can we obtain data on the demand for nurses?

    PubMed

    Spetz, Joanne; Kovner, Christine T

    2013-01-01

    Sources related to demand for nurses data are more difficult to find, and also more difficult to interpret relative to supply. When people talk about the "demand" for nurses, they can have multiple concepts in mind. Even if the concept is well-defined, the data may not clearly align with the intended concept. As with data on RN supply, the relative value of different data sources on RN demand depends on the goals of the data collection and analysis. To measure the current demand for nurses, employer surveys are ideal. Such surveys can explicitly obtain information about vacant positions to measure the total demand for nurses.

  13. Environmental preservation demand: Altruistic, bequest, and intrinsic motives

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, J.C.; Thompson, C.Y. )

    1993-01-01

    When the demand for environmental preservation is not explicitly revealed in markets, motivating attitudes toward environmental preservation become important. A survey approach allows revelation and measurement of demand for environmental preservation. Indices which measure the altruistic, bequest, intrinsic, and option to use motives and other attitudes are utilized as determinants in a model that measures the demand for environmental preservation. Demand is more likely with greater preservation motives. Preservation demand also depends on individual preferences for economic development, perceptions of affordability and responsibility for preservation of the wetlands. 17 refs., 3 tabs.

  14. Demand for nest boxes in laying hens.

    PubMed

    Cooper, J J; Appleby, M C

    1996-04-01

    Domestic hens (Gallus gallus domesticus) from commercial laying strains have been selected for high egg yield and may lay over 300 eggs in their working lives. In conventional wire cages, there is little opportunity to perform either nest seeking or nest building activities, which may lead to frustration each time an egg is laid. To measure the demand for a well-defined nest-site, which may act as a consummatory stimulus for nest seeking behaviour and an appetitive stimulus for nest building behaviour, 16 hens were allowed to work to gain access to a pen containing two littered, enclosed nest boxes. The cost of access to the nest boxes was varied by changing the width of the vertical gap, which divided a home pen containing food, water and a perch from the pen containing the nest boxes (gaps of 220, 140, 125, 110 and 95 mm, compared with mean body width of 117 mm). The number of entries to the nest pen declined with narrowing gap, whilst the number of failed attempts to enter rose, but all 16 hens persevered with entering the nest pen prior to oviposition and laid in the nest boxes. Between 120 and 30 min to oviposition hens made many entries with the 220 mm gap (27.6), but this declined to no entries with 95 mm gap. Hens made few entries in the last half hour prior to ovipositoin (1.3) but there was no significant decline in entries as the gap narrowed (1.1 with 95 mm gap). The number of nest inspections and nest entries also declined with width of gap, but there was no effect on time spent in the nest boxes. Hens passed gaps of 220, and 140 mm to return to the nest pen following oviposition, but did not pass gaps of 125, 110 or 95 mm. We therefore conclude that the narrow gap width can be used to assess the demand for environmental requirements. Hens were willing to pay a high cost to gain access to a nest box prior to oviposition, so prelaying behaviour may be frustrated in hens without a well-defined, littered nest site.

  15. Service on demand for ISS users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hüser, Detlev; Berg, Marco; Körtge, Nicole; Mildner, Wolfgang; Salmen, Frank; Strauch, Karsten

    2002-07-01

    Since the ISS started its operational phase, the need of logistics scenarios and solutions, supporting the utilisation of the station and its facilities, becomes increasingly important. Our contribution to this challenge is a SERVICE On DEMAND for ISS users, which offers a business friendly engineering and logistics support for the resupply of the station. Especially the utilisation by commercial and industrial users is supported and simplified by this service. Our industrial team, consisting of OHB-System and BEOS, provides experience and development support for space dedicated hard- and software elements, their transportation and operation. Furthermore, we operate as the interface between customer and the envisaged space authorities. Due to a variety of tailored service elements and the ongoing servicing, customers can concentrate on their payload content or mission objectives and don't have to deal with space-specific techniques and regulations. The SERVICE On DEMAND includes the following elements: ITR is our in-orbit platform service. ITR is a transport rack, used in the SPACEHAB logistics double module, for active and passive payloads on subrack- and drawer level of different standards. Due to its unique late access and early retrieval capability, ITR increases the flexibility concerning transport capabilities to and from the ISS. RIST is our multi-functional test facility for ISPR-based experiment drawer and locker payloads. The test program concentrates on physical and functional interface and performance testing at the payload developers site prior to the shipment to the integration and launch. The RIST service program comprises consulting, planning and engineering as well. The RIST test suitcase is planned to be available for lease or rent to users, too. AMTSS is an advanced multimedia terminal consulting service for communication with the space station scientific facilities, as part of the user home-base. This unique ISS multimedia kit combines

  16. Automated Demand Response Opportunities in Wastewater Treatment Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Lisa; Song, Katherine; Lekov, Alex; McKane, Aimee

    2008-11-19

    Wastewater treatment is an energy intensive process which, together with water treatment, comprises about three percent of U.S. annual energy use. Yet, since wastewater treatment facilities are often peripheral to major electricity-using industries, they are frequently an overlooked area for automated demand response opportunities. Demand response is a set of actions taken to reduce electric loads when contingencies, such as emergencies or congestion, occur that threaten supply-demand balance, and/or market conditions occur that raise electric supply costs. Demand response programs are designed to improve the reliability of the electric grid and to lower the use of electricity during peak times to reduce the total system costs. Open automated demand response is a set of continuous, open communication signals and systems provided over the Internet to allow facilities to automate their demand response activities without the need for manual actions. Automated demand response strategies can be implemented as an enhanced use of upgraded equipment and facility control strategies installed as energy efficiency measures. Conversely, installation of controls to support automated demand response may result in improved energy efficiency through real-time access to operational data. This paper argues that the implementation of energy efficiency opportunities in wastewater treatment facilities creates a base for achieving successful demand reductions. This paper characterizes energy use and the state of demand response readiness in wastewater treatment facilities and outlines automated demand response opportunities.

  17. Measurement and evaluation techniques for automated demand response demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Sezgen, Osman; ten Hope, Laurie

    2004-08-01

    The recent electricity crisis in California and elsewhere has prompted new research to evaluate demand response strategies in large facilities. This paper describes an evaluation of fully automated demand response technologies (Auto-DR) in five large facilities. Auto-DR does not involve human intervention, but is initiated at a facility through receipt of an external communications signal. This paper summarizes the measurement and evaluation of the performance of demand response technologies and strategies in five large facilities. All the sites have data trending systems such as energy management and control systems (EMCS) and/or energy information systems (EIS). Additional sub-metering was applied where necessary to evaluate the facility's demand response performance. This paper reviews the control responses during the test period, and analyzes demand savings achieved at each site. Occupant comfort issues are investigated where data are available. This paper discusses methods to estimate demand savings and results from demand response strategies at five large facilities.

  18. The interpersonal process model of demand/withdraw behavior.

    PubMed

    Baucom, Brian R; Dickenson, Janna A; Atkins, David C; Baucom, Donald H; Fischer, Melanie S; Weusthoff, Sarah; Hahlweg, Kurt; Zimmermann, Tanja

    2015-02-01

    The demand/withdraw interaction pattern is a destructive cycle of relationship communication behavior that is associated with negative individual and relationship outcomes. Demand/withdraw behavior is thought to be strongly linked to partners' emotional reactions, but current theories are inconsistent with empirical findings. The current study proposes the interpersonal process model of demand/withdraw behavior, which includes linkages between each partners' emotional reactions and the interpersonal behavior of demanding and withdrawing. Data come from problem solving discussions of 55 German couples with observationally coded demand/withdraw behavior and fundamental frequency (f₀) to measure vocally encoded emotional arousal. Actor-partner interdependence models (Kenny, Kashy, & Cook, 2006) were used to examine associations among demand/withdraw behavior and f₀ in the overall discussion and 5-min segments. Significant cross-partner associations emerged for demanding and withdrawing behavior across the whole conversation as well as within 5-min segments, and these associations are partially accounted for by each individual's f₀. When behaviorally coded demanders expressed more vocal arousal, they demanded more and withdrew less while their partners withdrew more. In contrast, when behaviorally coded withdrawers expressed more vocal arousal, their partners demanded less and withdrew more. Findings demonstrate that demand/withdraw behavior varies between couples (i.e., some couples engage in a stronger demand/withdraw cycle than others) and between segments (i.e., when 1 partner increases demanding, the other increases withdrawing). Findings support key elements of the interpersonal process model, showing intra- and interpersonal pathways linking demand/withdraw behavior and emotion and demonstrate the importance of partners' behavioral roles in these linkages.

  19. Clean fuel for demanding environmental markets

    SciTech Connect

    Josewicz, W.; Natschke, D.E.

    1995-12-31

    Acurex Environmental Corporation is bringing Clean Fuel to the environmentally demand Krakow market, through the cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy. Clean fuel is a proprietary clean burning coal-based energy source intended for use in stoves and hand stoked boilers. Clean Fuel is a home heating fuel that is similar in form and function to raw coal, but is more environmentally friendly and lower in cost. The heating value of Clean Fuel is 24,45 kJ/kg. Extensive sets of confirmation runs were conducted in the Academy of Mining and Metallurgy in the Krakow laboratories. It demonstrated up to 54 percent reduction of particulate matter emission, up to 35 percent reduction of total hydrocarbon emissions. Most importantly, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (toxic and carcinogens compounds) emissions were reduced by up to 85 percent, depending on species measured. The above comparison was made against premium chunk coal that is currently available in Krakow for approximately $83 to 93/ton. Clean Fuel will be made available in Krakow at a price approximately 10 percent lower than that of the premium chunk coal.

  20. Low demand for nontraditional cookstove technologies

    PubMed Central

    Mobarak, Ahmed Mushfiq; Dwivedi, Puneet; Bailis, Robert; Hildemann, Lynn; Miller, Grant

    2012-01-01

    Biomass combustion with traditional cookstoves causes substantial environmental and health harm. Nontraditional cookstove technologies can be efficacious in reducing this adverse impact, but they are adopted and used at puzzlingly low rates. This study analyzes the determinants of low demand for nontraditional cookstoves in rural Bangladesh by using both stated preference (from a nationally representative survey of rural women) and revealed preference (assessed by conducting a cluster-randomized trial of cookstove prices) approaches. We find consistent evidence across both analyses suggesting that the women in rural Bangladesh do not perceive indoor air pollution as a significant health hazard, prioritize other basic developmental needs over nontraditional cookstoves, and overwhelmingly rely on a free traditional cookstove technology and are therefore not willing to pay much for a new nontraditional cookstove. Efforts to improve health and abate environmental harm by promoting nontraditional cookstoves may be more successful by designing and disseminating nontraditional cookstoves with features valued more highly by users, such as reduction of operating costs, even when those features are not directly related to the cookstoves’ health and environmental impacts. PMID:22689941

  1. Low demand for nontraditional cookstove technologies.

    PubMed

    Mobarak, Ahmed Mushfiq; Dwivedi, Puneet; Bailis, Robert; Hildemann, Lynn; Miller, Grant

    2012-07-03

    Biomass combustion with traditional cookstoves causes substantial environmental and health harm. Nontraditional cookstove technologies can be efficacious in reducing this adverse impact, but they are adopted and used at puzzlingly low rates. This study analyzes the determinants of low demand for nontraditional cookstoves in rural Bangladesh by using both stated preference (from a nationally representative survey of rural women) and revealed preference (assessed by conducting a cluster-randomized trial of cookstove prices) approaches. We find consistent evidence across both analyses suggesting that the women in rural Bangladesh do not perceive indoor air pollution as a significant health hazard, prioritize other basic developmental needs over nontraditional cookstoves, and overwhelmingly rely on a free traditional cookstove technology and are therefore not willing to pay much for a new nontraditional cookstove. Efforts to improve health and abate environmental harm by promoting nontraditional cookstoves may be more successful by designing and disseminating nontraditional cookstoves with features valued more highly by users, such as reduction of operating costs, even when those features are not directly related to the cookstoves' health and environmental impacts.

  2. Electroresponsive nanoparticles for drug delivery on demand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Devleena; Hosseini-Nassab, Niloufar; Zare, Richard N.

    2016-04-01

    The potential of electroresponsive conducting polymer nanoparticles to be used as general drug delivery systems that allow electrically pulsed, linearly scalable, and on demand release of incorporated drugs is demonstrated. As examples, facile release from polypyrrole nanoparticles is shown for fluorescein, a highly water-soluble model compound, piroxicam, a lipophilic small molecule drug, and insulin, a large hydrophilic peptide hormone. The drug loading is about 13 wt% and release is accomplished in a few seconds by applying a weak constant current or voltage. To identify the parameters that should be finely tuned to tailor the carrier system for the release of the therapeutic molecule of interest, a systematic study of the factors that affect drug delivery is performed, using fluorescein as a model compound. The parameters studied include current, time, voltage, pH, temperature, particle concentration, and ionic strength. Results indicate that there are several degrees of freedom that can be optimized for efficient drug delivery. The ability to modulate linearly drug release from conducting polymers with the applied stimulus can be utilized to design programmable and minimally invasive drug delivery devices.

  3. Water demands for expanding energy development

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, G.H.; Wood, Leonard A.

    1974-01-01

    Water is used in producing energy for mining and reclamation of mined lands, onsite processing, transportation, refining, and conversion of fuels to other forms of energy. In the East, South, Midwest, and along the seacoasts, most water problems are related to pollution rather than to water supply. West of about the 100th meridian, however, runoff is generally less than potential diversions, and energy industries must compete with other water users. Water demands for extraction of coal, oil shale, uranium, and oil and gas are modest, although large quantities of water are used in secondary recovery operations for oil. The only significant use of water for energy transportation, aside from in-stream navigation use, is for slurry lines. Substantial quantities of water are required in the retorting and the disposal of spent oil shale. The conversion of coal to synthetic gas or oil or to electric power and the generation of electric power with nuclear energy require large quantities of water, mostly for cooling. Withdrawals for cooling of thermal-electric plants is by far the largest category of water use in energy industry, totaling about 170 billion gallons (644 million m3) per day in 1970. Water availability will dictate the location and design of energy-conversion facilities, especially in water deficient areas of the West.

  4. Disability, resources, role demands and mobility handicap.

    PubMed

    McDonough, P A; Badley, E M; Tennant, A

    1995-01-01

    Research on disablement highlights a wide variability in the impact of disabling conditions on individuals' lives. However, in most of this work, the relationships between impairment/disability and features of individuals' social and physical environments are not specified conceptually. Recent conceptual work in the context of the International Classification of Impairments, Disabilities, and Handicaps (ICIDH) suggests that the impact of impairment/disability on individuals' lives is contingent on levels of resources and other aspects of social context. The research question addressed in this paper is whether selected social factors affect the impact of impairment/disability on mobility handicap, defined as 'the individual's ability to move about effectively in his/her surroundings'. Two types of social factors are considered: resources such as help from others or having a car available; and social role obligations such as having a job or visiting relatives. Data are derived from a 1986 probability sample of 570 individuals with disabilities living in communities in Calderdale, Yorkshire, England. Multiple-regression models indicate that the impact of walking disability on mobility handicap was reduced by availability of a car in the household and school or job obligations. Other impairments/disabilities, resources and social role demands examined did not act on mobility outcomes in this manner. Implications for conceptualizing and testing relationships between impairment, disability, handicap and social and physical environments are discussed. A critical task for future research is the investigation of personal and social resources and barriers that may moderate the impact of disability on individuals' lives.

  5. Mechanisms that match ATP supply to demand in cardiac pacemaker cells during high ATP demand.

    PubMed

    Yaniv, Yael; Spurgeon, Harold A; Ziman, Bruce D; Lyashkov, Alexey E; Lakatta, Edward G

    2013-06-01

    The spontaneous action potential (AP) firing rate of sinoatrial node cells (SANCs) involves high-throughput signaling via Ca(2+)-calmodulin activated adenylyl cyclases (AC), cAMP-mediated protein kinase A (PKA), and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII)-dependent phosphorylation of SR Ca(2+) cycling and surface membrane ion channel proteins. When the throughput of this signaling increases, e.g., in response to β-adrenergic receptor activation, the resultant increase in spontaneous AP firing rate increases the demand for ATP. We hypothesized that an increase of ATP production to match the increased ATP demand is achieved via a direct effect of increased mitochondrial Ca(2+) (Ca(2+)m) and an indirect effect via enhanced Ca(2+)-cAMP/PKA-CaMKII signaling to mitochondria. To increase ATP demand, single isolated rabbit SANCs were superfused by physiological saline at 35 ± 0.5°C with isoproterenol, or by phosphodiesterase or protein phosphatase inhibition. We measured cytosolic and mitochondrial Ca(2+) and flavoprotein fluorescence in single SANC, and we measured cAMP, ATP, and O₂ consumption in SANC suspensions. Although the increase in spontaneous AP firing rate was accompanied by an increase in O₂ consumption, the ATP level and flavoprotein fluorescence remained constant, indicating that ATP production had increased. Both Ca(2+)m and cAMP increased concurrently with the increase in AP firing rate. When Ca(2+)m was reduced by Ru360, the increase in spontaneous AP firing rate in response to isoproterenol was reduced by 25%. Thus, both an increase in Ca(2+)m and an increase in Ca(2+) activated cAMP-PKA-CaMKII signaling regulate the increase in ATP supply to meet ATP demand above the basal level.

  6. Open Automated Demand Response Communications in Demand Response for Wholesale Ancillary Services

    SciTech Connect

    Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Ghatikar, Girish; Koch, Ed; Hennage, Dan; Hernandez, John; Chiu, Albert; Sezgen, Osman; Goodin, John

    2009-11-06

    The Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) is conducting a pilot program to investigate the technical feasibility of bidding certain demand response (DR) resources into the California Independent System Operator's (CAISO) day-ahead market for ancillary services nonspinning reserve. Three facilities, a retail store, a local government office building, and a bakery, are recruited into the pilot program. For each facility, hourly demand, and load curtailment potential are forecasted two days ahead and submitted to the CAISO the day before the operation as an available resource. These DR resources are optimized against all other generation resources in the CAISO ancillary service. Each facility is equipped with four-second real time telemetry equipment to ensure resource accountability and visibility to CAISO operators. When CAISO requests DR resources, PG&E's OpenADR (Open Automated DR) communications infrastructure is utilized to deliver DR signals to the facilities energy management and control systems (EMCS). The pre-programmed DR strategies are triggered without a human in the loop. This paper describes the automated system architecture and the flow of information to trigger and monitor the performance of the DR events. We outline the DR strategies at each of the participating facilities. At one site a real time electric measurement feedback loop is implemented to assure the delivery of CAISO dispatched demand reductions. Finally, we present results from each of the facilities and discuss findings.

  7. Opportunities for Automated Demand Response in California Agricultural Irrigation

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Daniel; Aghajanzadeh, Arian; McKane, Aimee

    2015-08-01

    Pumping water for agricultural irrigation represents a significant share of California’s annual electricity use and peak demand. It also represents a large source of potential flexibility, as farms possess a form of storage in their wetted soil. By carefully modifying their irrigation schedules, growers can participate in demand response without adverse effects on their crops. This report describes the potential for participation in demand response and automated demand response by agricultural irrigators in California, as well as barriers to widespread participation. The report first describes the magnitude, timing, location, purpose, and manner of energy use in California. Typical on-­farm controls are discussed, as well as common impediments to participation in demand response and automated demand response programs. Case studies of demand response programs in California and across the country are reviewed, and their results along with overall California demand estimates are used to estimate statewide demand response potential. Finally, recommendations are made for future research that can enhance the understanding of demand response potential in this industry.

  8. Motor Demands Constrain Cognitive Rule Structures

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Anne Gabrielle Eva; Frank, Michael Joshua

    2016-01-01

    Study of human executive function focuses on our ability to represent cognitive rules independently of stimulus or response modality. However, recent findings suggest that executive functions cannot be modularized separately from perceptual and motor systems, and that they instead scaffold on top of motor action selection. Here we investigate whether patterns of motor demands influence how participants choose to implement abstract rule structures. In a learning task that requires integrating two stimulus dimensions for determining appropriate responses, subjects typically structure the problem hierarchically, using one dimension to cue the task-set and the other to cue the response given the task-set. However, the choice of which dimension to use at each level can be arbitrary. We hypothesized that the specific structure subjects adopt would be constrained by the motor patterns afforded within each rule. Across four independent data-sets, we show that subjects create rule structures that afford motor clustering, preferring structures in which adjacent motor actions are valid within each task-set. In a fifth data-set using instructed rules, this bias was strong enough to counteract the well-known task switch-cost when instructions were incongruent with motor clustering. Computational simulations confirm that observed biases can be explained by leveraging overlap in cortical motor representations to improve outcome prediction and hence infer the structure to be learned. These results highlight the importance of sensorimotor constraints in abstract rule formation and shed light on why humans have strong biases to invent structure even when it does not exist. PMID:26966909

  9. Downscaling the chemical oxygen demand test.

    PubMed

    Carbajal-Palacios, Patricia; Balderas-Hernandez, Patricia; Ibanez, Jorge G; Roa-Morales, Gabriela

    2014-01-01

    The usefulness of the standard chemical oxygen demand (COD) test for water characterization is offset to some extent by its requirement for highly toxic or expensive Cr, Ag, and Hg species. In addition, oxidation of the target samples by chromate requires a 2-3 h heating step. We have downscaled this method to obtain a reduction of up to ca. 80% in the use and generation of toxic residues and a time reduction of up to ca. 67%. This also translates into considerable energy savings by reducing the time required for heating as well as costly labour time. Such reductions can be especially important for analytical laboratories with heavy loads of COD analyses. Numerical results obtained with the standard COD method for laboratory KHP samples (potassium hydrogen phthalate) show an average relative error of 1.41% vs. an average of 2.14% obtained with the downsized or small-scale version. The average % standard deviation when using the former is 2.16% vs. 3.24% obtained with the latter. When analysing municipal wastewater samples, the relative error is smaller for the proposed small-scale method than for the standard method (0.05 vs. 0.58, respectively), and the % std. dev. is 1.25% vs. 1.06%. The results obtained with various industrial wastewaters show good agreement with those obtained using the standard method. Chloride ions do not interfere at concentrations below 2000 mg Nacl/L. This highly encouraging proof-of-concept offers a potentially alternative greener approach to COD analysis.

  10. Performance demands of professional male tennis players

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, C D

    2006-01-01

    Objective To quantify the performance demands in professional male tennis. Methods Games from three grand slam tournaments were analysed by an elite tennis player from video recordings. Game related data were collected on 22 players (French Open, 8 (186 games); Wimbledon, 11 (206 games); US Open, 9 (224 games)). Total number of strokes per game was quantified separately for service and return games. Strokes were categorised by type and designated as forehand or backhand. Differences in the types of strokes in a game were analysed using one factor (type of stroke) repeated measures analysis of variance. Differences in total strokes and stroke distributions between playing surfaces were analysed by analysis of variance (surface type) with Tukey's post hoc pairwise comparisons. Results For service games there were more serves per game than any other type of stroke (p<0.001), with topspin forehand and topspin backhand the only other strokes averaging more than one per service game. For return games there were more forehand and backhand returns and topspin forehands and backhands than other types of stroke (p<0.01). Total number of strokes per game was greater in the French Open than Wimbledon (p<0.01), with more topspin forehands (p<0.01) and more topspin backhands (p<0.01). Total strokes per game in the US Open were not different from the other two tournaments. Conclusions The serve was the predominant stroke accounting for 45% (French Open) to 60% (Wimbledon) of strokes during service games. The greater number of strokes per game on clay v grass may contribute to earlier fatigue. PMID:16864564

  11. Demand for electric automobiles. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Beggs, S.D.

    1981-10-01

    The objective of this report is to specify and estimate models suitable for predicting the demand for electric automobiles, taking into account their key limitations relative to conventional alternatives: limited range, lengthy refueling, lower performance, higher initial price, and greater relative cost for providing additional load-carrying capacity or amenities such as air conditioning. Possible advantages of electric vehicles relative to conventional vehicles, notably lower operating costs, are also considered. Interest centers on the possibility of a mass market for electric vehicles, not identification of specialized markets. Only the private market for electric cars is considered, not commercial or industrial users, and it is assumed multi-car households are the most likely purchasers. Logit models of multi-vehicle households' choices of their smallest cars are estimated on two bodies of data: a panel study conducted by Arthur D. Little (ADL) in the spring of 1978, specifically to test consumers' reactions to hypothetical configurations for electric vehicles; and a sample of multi-vehicle households gathered in Baltimore in the spring of 1977. The ADL panel data allows estimation of consumers' valuations of novel characteristics of electric vehicles, notably limited range coupled with lengthy refueling time. The actual market data from Baltimore serves largely as a check on the validity of estimates obtained from the ADL panel. A generalization of the usual multinomial logit model, called the ordered logit model, is derived in this study from basic economic and statistical principles, and is applied to the ranked choices of the ADL panel; the ordered logit model is compared to the conjoint model employed earlier by ALD.

  12. Demand for electric automobiles. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Beggs, S.D.

    1981-10-01

    The objective of this report is to specify and estimate models suitable for predicting the demand for electric automobiles, taking into account their key limitations relative to conventional alternatives: limited range, lengthy refueling, lower performance, higher initial price, and greater relative cost for providing additional load-carrying capacity or amenities such as air conditioning. Possible advantages of electric vehicles relative to conventional vehicles, notably lower operating costs, are also considered. Interest centers on the possibility of a mass market for electric vehicles, not identification of specialized markets. Only the private market for electric cars is considered, not commercial or industrial users, and it is assumed multi-car households are the most likely purchasers. Logit models of multi-vehicle households' choices of their smllest cars are estimated on two bodies of data: a panel study conducted by Arthur D. Little (ADL) in the spring of 1978, specifically to test consumers' reactions to hypothetical configurations for electric vehicles; and a sample of multi-vehicle households gathered in Baltimore in the spring of 1977. The ADL panel data allows estimation of consumers' valuations of novel characteristics of electric vehicles, notably limited range coupled with lengthy refueling time. The actual market data from Baltimore serves largely as a check on the validity of estimates obtained from the ADL panel. A generalization of the usual multinomial logit model, called the ordered logit model, is derived in this study from basic economicand statistical principles, and is applied to the ranked choices of the ADL panel; the ordered logit model is compared to the conjoint model employed earlier by ADL.

  13. Improving financial and patient outcomes: the future of demand management.

    PubMed

    Marosits, M J

    1997-08-01

    Demand management has evolved from early managed care models that sought to curtail rising costs through demand-side utilization controls. The first generation of demand management relied heavily on financial incentives for consumers and physicians to demand fewer and less costly resources. The second generation of demand management complemented financial incentives with clinically focused strategies. Often, these strategies were implemented directly by the payer on through a primary care physician gatekeeper. The current and coming generation of demand management activities emphasizes informed consumer choice and active participation in preventative health care, resource utilization decisions, and customization of healthcare services. This personal health management aligns financial incentives, clinical care protocols, and consumer decision-support systems to balance outcomes and resource consumption.

  14. China expands refining sector to handle booming oil demand

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-10

    China's refining sector is in the midst of a major expansion and reorganization in response to booming domestic demand for petroleum products. Plans call for hiking crude processing capacity to 3.9 million b/d in 1995 from the current 3.085 million b/d. Much of that 26% increase will come where the products demand growth is the strongest: China's coastal provinces, notably those in the southeast. Despite the demand surge, China's refineries operated at only 74% of capacity in 1991, and projections for 1992 weren't much better. Domestic crude supply is limited because of Beijing's insistence on maintaining crude export levels, a major source of hard currency foreign exchange. The paper discusses the superheated demand; exports and imports; the refining infrastructure; the Shenzhen refinery; Hong Kong demand; southeast coast demand; 1993 plans; and foreign investment.

  15. Energy demand on dairy farms in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Upton, J; Humphreys, J; Groot Koerkamp, P W G; French, P; Dillon, P; De Boer, I J M

    2013-10-01

    Reducing electricity consumption in Irish milk production is a topical issue for 2 reasons. First, the introduction of a dynamic electricity pricing system, with peak and off-peak prices, will be a reality for 80% of electricity consumers by 2020. The proposed pricing schedule intends to discourage energy consumption during peak periods (i.e., when electricity demand on the national grid is high) and to incentivize energy consumption during off-peak periods. If farmers, for example, carry out their evening milking during the peak period, energy costs may increase, which would affect farm profitability. Second, electricity consumption is identified in contributing to about 25% of energy use along the life cycle of pasture-based milk. The objectives of this study, therefore, were to document electricity use per kilogram of milk sold and to identify strategies that reduce its overall use while maximizing its use in off-peak periods (currently from 0000 to 0900 h). We assessed, therefore, average daily and seasonal trends in electricity consumption on 22 Irish dairy farms, through detailed auditing of electricity-consuming processes. To determine the potential of identified strategies to save energy, we also assessed total energy use of Irish milk, which is the sum of the direct (i.e., energy use on farm) and indirect energy use (i.e., energy needed to produce farm inputs). On average, a total of 31.73 MJ was required to produce 1 kg of milk solids, of which 20% was direct and 80% was indirect energy use. Electricity accounted for 60% of the direct energy use, and mainly resulted from milk cooling (31%), water heating (23%), and milking (20%). Analysis of trends in electricity consumption revealed that 62% of daily electricity was used at peak periods. Electricity use on Irish dairy farms, therefore, is substantial and centered around milk harvesting. To improve the competitiveness of milk production in a dynamic electricity pricing environment, therefore, management

  16. Managing the demands of professional life.

    PubMed

    Dickey, Jamie; Ungerleider, Ross

    2007-09-01

    't forgive, we create toxic relationships, both with ourselves and with others. It is the heaviness of resentment that prevents us from being at ease. The final concept concerns management of stress. We should learn to recognize when we are stressed. We cannot manage what we don't know. It is our belief that attention to these features will help you better manage the numerous demands of your life.

  17. Decision Making and the Avoidance of Cognitive Demand

    PubMed Central

    Kool, Wouter; McGuire, Joseph T.; Rosen, Zev B.; Botvinick, Matthew M.

    2010-01-01

    Behavioral and economic theories have long maintained that actions are chosen so as to minimize demands for exertion or work, a principle sometimes referred to as the “law of less work.” The data supporting this idea pertain almost entirely to demands for physical effort. However, the same minimization principle has often been assumed also to apply to cognitive demand. We set out to evaluate the validity of this assumption. In six behavioral experiments, participants chose freely between courses of action associated with different levels of demand for controlled information processing. Together, the results of these experiments revealed a bias in favor of the less demanding course of action. The bias was obtained across a range of choice settings and demand manipulations, and was not wholly attributable to strategic avoidance of errors, minimization of time on task, or maximization of the rate of goal achievement. Remarkably, the effect also did not depend on awareness of the demand manipulation. Consistent with a motivational account, avoidance of demand displayed sensitivity to task incentives and co-varied with individual differences in the efficacy of executive control. The findings reported, together with convergent neuroscientific evidence, lend support to the idea that anticipated cognitive demand plays a significant role in behavioral decision-making. PMID:20853993

  18. Identification of supplier induced demand in the health care sector.

    PubMed

    Auster, R D; Oaxaca, R L

    1981-01-01

    This paper explores the issues and pitfalls encountered when attempting to test empirically the hypothesis that physician, hospital, or any other input supply level induces increasing demand for health services in the strict sense of demand shift and, through that, increased demand for the input in question. Evidence is presented which suggests that an empirical test of the supplier induced demand (SID) hypothesis of the type traditionally performed may not in fact be feasible with cross-sectional aggregate data such as is usually used.

  19. Decision making and the avoidance of cognitive demand.

    PubMed

    Kool, Wouter; McGuire, Joseph T; Rosen, Zev B; Botvinick, Matthew M

    2010-11-01

    Behavioral and economic theories have long maintained that actions are chosen so as to minimize demands for exertion or work, a principle sometimes referred to as the law of less work. The data supporting this idea pertain almost entirely to demands for physical effort. However, the same minimization principle has often been assumed also to apply to cognitive demand. The authors set out to evaluate the validity of this assumption. In 6 behavioral experiments, participants chose freely between courses of action associated with different levels of demand for controlled information processing. Together, the results of these experiments revealed a bias in favor of the less demanding course of action. The bias was obtained across a range of choice settings and demand manipulations and was not wholly attributable to strategic avoidance of errors, minimization of time on task, or maximization of the rate of goal achievement. It is remarkable that the effect also did not depend on awareness of the demand manipulation. Consistent with a motivational account, avoidance of demand displayed sensitivity to task incentives and covaried with individual differences in the efficacy of executive control. The findings reported, together with convergent neuroscientific evidence, lend support to the idea that anticipated cognitive demand plays a significant role in behavioral decision making.

  20. Maximum spectral demands in the near-fault region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huang, Yin-Nan; Whittaker, Andrew S.; Luco, Nicolas

    2008-01-01

    The Next Generation Attenuation (NGA) relationships for shallow crustal earthquakes in the western United States predict a rotated geometric mean of horizontal spectral demand, termed GMRotI50, and not maximum spectral demand. Differences between strike-normal, strike-parallel, geometric-mean, and maximum spectral demands in the near-fault region are investigated using 147 pairs of records selected from the NGA strong motion database. The selected records are for earthquakes with moment magnitude greater than 6.5 and for closest site-to-fault distance less than 15 km. Ratios of maximum spectral demand to NGA-predicted GMRotI50 for each pair of ground motions are presented. The ratio shows a clear dependence on period and the Somerville directivity parameters. Maximum demands can substantially exceed NGA-predicted GMRotI50 demands in the near-fault region, which has significant implications for seismic design, seismic performance assessment, and the next-generation seismic design maps. Strike-normal spectral demands are a significantly unconservative surrogate for maximum spectral demands for closest distance greater than 3 to 5 km. Scale factors that transform NGA-predicted GMRotI50 to a maximum spectral demand in the near-fault region are proposed.

  1. Efficacy and safety of pharmacokinetically enhanced amoxicillin-clavulanate at 2,000/125 milligrams twice daily for 5 days versus amoxicillin-clavulanate at 875/125 milligrams twice daily for 7 days in the treatment of acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Sanjay; Breton, John; Wynne, Brian

    2005-01-01

    This randomized, controlled trial was designed to show that a short, 5-day course of pharmacokinetically enhanced amoxicillin-clavulanate at 2,000/125 mg (Augmentin XR) is as effective clinically as a longer, 7-day course of conventional amoxicillin-clavulanate at 875/125 mg (both given twice daily) in the treatment of acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis (AECB). Amoxicillin-clavulanate at 2,000/125 mg was designed to extend the therapeutic levels of amoxicillin in serum over the 12-h dosing interval, compared with conventional formulations, to eradicate bacterial strains for which amoxicillin MICs were < or =4 microg/ml while retaining efficacy against beta-lactamase-producing pathogens. A total of 893 patients were randomized and received study medication (amoxicillin-clavulanate at 2,000/125 mg for 443 patients and 875/125 mg for 450 patients). Overall, 141 patients receiving amoxicillin-clavulanate at 2,000/125 mg and 135 receiving the comparator formulation had at least one pathogen identified at screening. Amoxicillin-clavulanate at 2,000/125 mg was as effective clinically in the per-protocol (PP) population at the test of cure (days 14 to 21, primary efficacy endpoint) as amoxicillin-clavulanate at 875/125 mg (clinical success rates of 93.0 and 91.2%, respectively; treatment difference, 1.8; 95% confidence interval [CI], -2.2, 5.7). Bacteriological success in the bacteriology PP population was high for both formulations (amoxicillin-clavulanate at 2,000/125 mg, 76.7%; amoxicillin-clavulanate at 875/125 mg, 73.0%; treatment difference, 3.8; 95% CI, -7.5, 15.0). Both therapies were well tolerated, with a similar incidence of adverse events. Fewer than 5% of patients in each group withdrew from the study due to adverse events. The shorter, 5-day course of amoxicillin-clavulanate at 2,000/125 mg was shown to be as effective clinically as a longer, 7-day course of amoxicillin-clavulanate at 875/125 mg, with high bacteriological efficacy and no difference in

  2. Quality of surface water at selected sites in the Suwannee River basin, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coffin, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    This report presents the results of analyses of water-quality samples collected from 14 surface-water sites in the Suwannee River basin in Florida from January through December 1980. The analyses of samples collected routinely included: nutrients, total organic carbon, and 5-day biochemical oxygen demand, bimonthly; and trace metals, annually. The array of constituents sampled was expanded in October 1978 at three of the original nine stations to provide quality-of-water information for streams draining an industrial area: Rocky Creek near Belmont, Hunter Creek near Belmont, and Swift Creek at Facil. Data collected at these three sites now include: major chemical constituents, six times per year: radium-226, two times per year; and trace metals, one time per year. These constituents are determined in addition to nutrients, total organic carbon, and bio-chemical oxygen demand which continue to be analyzed six times per year. All results of analyses of the water-quality samples collected from January through December 1980 remained within, or near, previously measured ranges and water-quality fluctuations were similar to those noted from data collected since 1971. (USGS)

  3. Opportunities for Automated Demand Response in California Wastewater Treatment Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Aghajanzadeh, Arian; Wray, Craig; McKane, Aimee

    2015-08-30

    Previous research over a period of six years has identified wastewater treatment facilities as good candidates for demand response (DR), automated demand response (Auto-­DR), and Energy Efficiency (EE) measures. This report summarizes that work, including the characteristics of wastewater treatment facilities, the nature of the wastewater stream, energy used and demand, as well as details of the wastewater treatment process. It also discusses control systems and automated demand response opportunities. Furthermore, this report summarizes the DR potential of three wastewater treatment facilities. In particular, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has collected data at these facilities from control systems, submetered process equipment, utility electricity demand records, and governmental weather stations. The collected data were then used to generate a summary of wastewater power demand, factors affecting that demand, and demand response capabilities. These case studies show that facilities that have implemented energy efficiency measures and that have centralized control systems are well suited to shed or shift electrical loads in response to financial incentives, utility bill savings, and/or opportunities to enhance reliability of service. In summary, municipal wastewater treatment energy demand in California is large, and energy-­intensive equipment offers significant potential for automated demand response. In particular, large load reductions were achieved by targeting effluent pumps and centrifuges. One of the limiting factors to implementing demand response is the reaction of effluent turbidity to reduced aeration at an earlier stage of the process. Another limiting factor is that cogeneration capabilities of municipal facilities, including existing power purchase agreements and utility receptiveness to purchasing electricity from cogeneration facilities, limit a facility’s potential to participate in other DR activities.

  4. Interoperability of Demand Response Resources Demonstration in NY

    SciTech Connect

    Wellington, Andre

    2014-03-31

    The Interoperability of Demand Response Resources Demonstration in NY (Interoperability Project) was awarded to Con Edison in 2009. The objective of the project was to develop and demonstrate methodologies to enhance the ability of customer sited Demand Response resources to integrate more effectively with electric delivery companies and regional transmission organizations.

  5. Bangladesh to prepare for rise in gas demand

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    Bangladesh is moving to expand its natural gas infrastructure in response to rising domestic demand. This paper reports that Bangladesh natural gas demand is expected to rise to 700-850 MMcfd in the next few years from the current level of about 500 MMcfd, the Prime Minister Khaleda Zia.

  6. Oil and Energy Demand in Developing Countries in 1990,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    demand adjusts rapidly to income and price changes, and hence desired demand is realized quickly; the converse is implied asX approaches unity). a... principle , reconciliation between these differing U. S. policy interests may lie in our encouraging the NOLDCs to follow "soft energy paths" (i.e

  7. Watchable Wildlife and Demand-Driven General Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alley, Richard B.

    2013-01-01

    The societal benefits of an educated citizenry may be lost if "customers" at tuition-driven universities demand less of what they pay for because they value a credential more than the education it represents. Insights from potential employers may help students see the value of education and demand their money's worth.

  8. Supply and Demand for Scientists and Engineers. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vetter, Betty M.

    This report, which includes 51 tables and charts, examines past, present, and future imbalances in the supply of and demand for scientists and engineers. The supply is assessed by source and by field, and compared with current and short-range demand for new graduates and for experienced scientists and engineers, including assessment of the…

  9. 22 CFR 34.8 - Notice and demand for payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Actions § 34.8 Notice and demand for payment. (a) STATE shall promptly hand deliver or send by first-class mail to the debtor at the debtor's most current address in the records of STATE at least one written notice. Written demand under this subpart may be preceded by other appropriate actions under this...

  10. 22 CFR 34.8 - Notice and demand for payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Actions § 34.8 Notice and demand for payment. (a) STATE shall promptly hand deliver or send by first-class mail to the debtor at the debtor's most current address in the records of STATE at least one written notice. Written demand under this subpart may be preceded by other appropriate actions under this...

  11. Factors Affecting Nurse Supply and Demand: An Exploration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Mary Ann

    1982-01-01

    This article addresses the nursing shortage from an economic standpoint by exploring supply and demand factors that influence the availability of nurses. Demand factors include payment mechanisms, cost containment, and availability of substitutes. Supply factors include the women's movement, labor force participation, and entry-level preparation.…

  12. 32 CFR 700.1101 - Demand for court-martial.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Demand for court-martial. 700.1101 Section 700.1101 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY UNITED STATES NAVY... Standards of Conduct § 700.1101 Demand for court-martial. Except as otherwise provided in the Uniform...

  13. Tapping Alternatives: The Benefits of Managing Urban Water Demands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dziegielewski, Benedykt; Baumann, Duane D.

    1992-01-01

    Presents the California plan for water demand management. Water conservation techniques are used to balance demand with supply. Discusses the implementation process: (1) water-use and service area analysis; (2) water-use forecasts; (3) benefit-cost analysis; (4) and development of a long-term water management plan. (17 references) (MCO)

  14. Progress toward Producing Demand-Response-Ready Appliances

    SciTech Connect

    Hammerstrom, Donald J.; Sastry, Chellury

    2009-12-01

    This report summarizes several historical and ongoing efforts to make small electrical demand-side devices like home appliances more responsive to the dynamic needs of electric power grids. Whereas the utility community often reserves the word demand response for infrequent 2 to 6 hour curtailments that reduce total electrical system peak load, other beneficial responses and ancillary services that may be provided by responsive electrical demand are of interest. Historically, demand responses from the demand side have been obtained by applying external, retrofitted, controlled switches to existing electrical demand. This report is directed instead toward those manufactured products, including appliances, that are able to provide demand responses as soon as they are purchased and that require few, or no, after-market modifications to make them responsive to needs of power grids. Efforts to be summarized include Open Automated Demand Response, the Association of Home Appliance Manufacturer standard CHA 1, a simple interface being developed by the U-SNAP Alliance, various emerging autonomous responses, and the recent PinBus interface that was developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  15. Global food demand and the sustainable intensification of agriculture.

    PubMed

    Tilman, David; Balzer, Christian; Hill, Jason; Befort, Belinda L

    2011-12-13

    Global food demand is increasing rapidly, as are the environmental impacts of agricultural expansion. Here, we project global demand for crop production in 2050 and evaluate the environmental impacts of alternative ways that this demand might be met. We find that per capita demand for crops, when measured as caloric or protein content of all crops combined, has been a similarly increasing function of per capita real income since 1960. This relationship forecasts a 100-110% increase in global crop demand from 2005 to 2050. Quantitative assessments show that the environmental impacts of meeting this demand depend on how global agriculture expands. If current trends of greater agricultural intensification in richer nations and greater land clearing (extensification) in poorer nations were to continue, ~1 billion ha of land would be cleared globally by 2050, with CO(2)-C equivalent greenhouse gas emissions reaching ~3 Gt y(-1) and N use ~250 Mt y(-1) by then. In contrast, if 2050 crop demand was met by moderate intensification focused on existing croplands of underyielding nations, adaptation and transfer of high-yielding technologies to these croplands, and global technological improvements, our analyses forecast land clearing of only ~0.2 billion ha, greenhouse gas emissions of ~1 Gt y(-1), and global N use of ~225 Mt y(-1). Efficient management practices could substantially lower nitrogen use. Attainment of high yields on existing croplands of underyielding nations is of great importance if global crop demand is to be met with minimal environmental impacts.

  16. Open Automated Demand Response for Small Commerical Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Dudley, June Han; Piette, Mary Ann; Koch, Ed; Hennage, Dan

    2009-05-01

    This report characterizes small commercial buildings by market segments, systems and end-uses; develops a framework for identifying demand response (DR) enabling technologies and communication means; and reports on the design and development of a low-cost OpenADR enabling technology that delivers demand reductions as a percentage of the total predicted building peak electric demand. The results show that small offices, restaurants and retail buildings are the major contributors making up over one third of the small commercial peak demand. The majority of the small commercial buildings in California are located in southern inland areas and the central valley. Single-zone packaged units with manual and programmable thermostat controls make up the majority of heating ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems for small commercial buildings with less than 200 kW peak electric demand. Fluorescent tubes with magnetic ballast and manual controls dominate this customer group's lighting systems. There are various ways, each with its pros and cons for a particular application, to communicate with these systems and three methods to enable automated DR in small commercial buildings using the Open Automated Demand Response (or OpenADR) communications infrastructure. Development of DR strategies must consider building characteristics, such as weather sensitivity and load variability, as well as system design (i.e. under-sizing, under-lighting, over-sizing, etc). Finally, field tests show that requesting demand reductions as a percentage of the total building predicted peak electric demand is feasible using the OpenADR infrastructure.

  17. 6 CFR 11.3 - Demand for payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Demand for payment. 11.3 Section 11.3 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY CLAIMS § 11.3 Demand for payment. (a) Notice requirements. Generally, before DHS starts the collection actions described in this subpart,...

  18. 6 CFR 11.3 - Demand for payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Demand for payment. 11.3 Section 11.3 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY CLAIMS § 11.3 Demand for payment. (a) Notice requirements. Generally, before DHS starts the collection actions described in this subpart,...

  19. 6 CFR 11.3 - Demand for payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Demand for payment. 11.3 Section 11.3 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY CLAIMS § 11.3 Demand for payment. (a) Notice requirements. Generally, before DHS starts the collection actions described in this subpart,...

  20. 6 CFR 11.3 - Demand for payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Demand for payment. 11.3 Section 11.3 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY CLAIMS § 11.3 Demand for payment. (a) Notice requirements. Generally, before DHS starts the collection actions described in this subpart,...

  1. 32 CFR 700.1101 - Demand for court-martial.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Demand for court-martial. 700.1101 Section 700.1101 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS General Regulations Standards of Conduct § 700.1101 Demand for...

  2. The Demand for Higher Education: Pennsylvania's Nonresident Tuition Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noorbakhsh, Abbas; Culp, David

    2002-01-01

    Explores the estimation of tuition elasticity of resident and nonresident demand for higher education in the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education. Finds that nonresident demand is price elastic, thus explaining the 40 percent decline in nonresident enrollment between 1991 and 1996 after average nonresident tuition increased nearly 20…

  3. Modeling water demand when households have multiple sources of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulibaly, Lassina; Jakus, Paul M.; Keith, John E.

    2014-07-01

    A significant portion of the world's population lives in areas where public water delivery systems are unreliable and/or deliver poor quality water. In response, people have developed important alternatives to publicly supplied water. To date, most water demand research has been based on single-equation models for a single source of water, with very few studies that have examined water demand from two sources of water (where all nonpublic system water sources have been aggregated into a single demand). This modeling approach leads to two outcomes. First, the demand models do not capture the full range of alternatives, so the true economic relationship among the alternatives is obscured. Second, and more seriously, economic theory predicts that demand for a good becomes more price-elastic as the number of close substitutes increases. If researchers artificially limit the number of alternatives studied to something less than the true number, the price elasticity estimate may be biased downward. This paper examines water demand in a region with near universal access to piped water, but where system reliability and quality is such that many alternative sources of water exist. In extending the demand analysis to four sources of water, we are able to (i) demonstrate why households choose the water sources they do, (ii) provide a richer description of the demand relationships among sources, and (iii) calculate own-price elasticity estimates that are more elastic than those generally found in the literature.

  4. The Demand for Higher Education Facing an Individual Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghali, Moheb; And Others

    1977-01-01

    A model is used to analyze the choices made by a sample of high school graduates in Hawaii and estimates of the price elasticity and the cross-price elasticities of demand for enrollment at the University of Hawaii are obtained. Findings show that the demand is quite inelastic and that changes in tuition will not affect enrollment appreciably.…

  5. What Every Worker Wants? Evidence about Employee Demand for Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Findlay, Jeanette; Findlay, Patricia; Warhurst, Chris

    2012-01-01

    In order to boost learning, recent UK governments have invested in trade union-led workplace learning. Investing in the supply of learning is useful but ignores the demand for learning by workers, about which there is little research. This paper addresses this lacunae by analysing worker demand for learning, which workers want learning, what…

  6. Effects of Demand Complexity on Echolalia in Students with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edelstein, Matthew Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Echolalia is a linguistic phenomenon common in individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder. This study examined the relationship between demand complexity and immediate echolalia in 4 students with an autism diagnosis in a university-based academic setting. Mastered and novel antecedent verbal demands that required an intraverbal response were…

  7. 32 CFR 537.19 - Demands arising from maritime claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Demands arising from maritime claims. 537.19 Section 537.19 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS ON BEHALF OF THE UNITED STATES § 537.19 Demands arising from maritime claims. (a) It...

  8. Decision Making and the Avoidance of Cognitive Demand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kool, Wouter; McGuire, Joseph T.; Rosen, Zev B.; Botvinick, Matthew M.

    2010-01-01

    Behavioral and economic theories have long maintained that actions are chosen so as to minimize demands for exertion or work, a principle sometimes referred to as the "law of less work". The data supporting this idea pertain almost entirely to demands for physical effort. However, the same minimization principle has often been assumed also to…

  9. 46 CFR 111.60-7 - Demand loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Demand loads. 111.60-7 Section 111.60-7 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Wiring Materials and Methods § 111.60-7 Demand loads. Generator, feeder, and bus-tie cables...

  10. 46 CFR 111.60-7 - Demand loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Demand loads. 111.60-7 Section 111.60-7 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Wiring Materials and Methods § 111.60-7 Demand loads. Generator, feeder, and bus-tie cables...

  11. Opportunities for Libraries with Print-on-Demand Publishing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blummer, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    Academic libraries, university presses, and commercial ventures are embracing print-on-demand publishing to improve services as well as reduce costs. The concept dates to the early 1990s, but problems with the technology coupled with a lack of interest by libraries and book vendors hindered its popularity. Today, print-on-demand remains ideal for…

  12. The Good Daughter Dilemma: Latinas Managing Family and School Demands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espinoza, Roberta

    2010-01-01

    This study documents strategies employed by Latina doctoral graduate students to balance family relationships with the demands of school to maintain their status of a "good daughter". In-depth interviews reveal some women integrate family and school by explaining the demands placed on them to enlist support while others keep their two social…

  13. Why Should We Demand Equality of Educational Opportunity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    This paper reveals how equal educational opportunities, equal job opportunities and equality of opportunity for welfare are related to each other, and how they are related to other demands for justice. There are several important objections to the emphasis on equal educational opportunities. Nevertheless, this paper shows that demanding equal…

  14. Role of Storage and Demand Response, Greening the Grid

    SciTech Connect

    2015-09-01

    Greening the Grid provides technical assistance to energy system planners, regulators, and grid operators to overcome challenges associated with integrating variable renewable energy into the grid. This document, part of a Greening the Grid toolkit, examines storage and demand response as means to match renewable energy supply with demand.

  15. Growing Demands for Public Records: How Should Boards Respond?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levinson-Waldman, Rachel; O'Neil, Robert

    2012-01-01

    In an era of demands for greater accountability in higher education, an increasingly polarized political environment, and scandals such as that at Penn State, access to information is becoming everyone's business, affecting public and independent institutions alike. Although Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) demands are often annoying or…

  16. System proportions fluid-flow in response to demand signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Control system provides proportioned fluid flow rates in response to demand signals. It compares a digital signal, representing a flow demand, with a reference signal to yield a control voltage to one or more solenoid valves connected to orifices of a predetermined size.

  17. Lower Extremity Biomechanical Demands During Saut de Chat Leaps.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Danielle N; Kulig, Kornelia

    2016-12-01

    In dance, high demands are placed on the lower extremity joints during jumping tasks. The purpose of this study was to compare biomechanical demands placed on the lower extremity joints during the takeoff and landing phases of saut de chat leaps.

  18. Expanding Regional Airport Usage to Accommodate Increased Air Traffic Demand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Carl R.

    2009-01-01

    Small regional airports present an underutilized source of capacity in the national air transportation system. This study sought to determine whether a 50 percent increase in national operations could be achieved by limiting demand growth at large hub airports and instead growing traffic levels at the surrounding regional airports. This demand scenario for future air traffic in the United States was generated and used as input to a 24-hour simulation of the national airspace system. Results of the demand generation process and metrics predicting the simulation results are presented, in addition to the actual simulation results. The demand generation process showed that sufficient runway capacity exists at regional airports to offload a significant portion of traffic from hub airports. Predictive metrics forecast a large reduction of delays at most major airports when demand is shifted. The simulation results then show that offloading hub traffic can significantly reduce nationwide delays.

  19. America's water: Agricultural water demands and the response of groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, M.; Parthasarathy, V.; Etienne, E.; Russo, T. A.; Devineni, N.; Lall, U.

    2016-07-01

    Agricultural, industrial, and urban water use in the conterminous United States (CONUS) is highly dependent on groundwater that is largely drawn from nonsurficial wells (>30 m). We use a Demand-Sensitive Drought Index to examine the impacts of agricultural water needs, driven by low precipitation, high agricultural water demand, or a combination of both, on the temporal variability of depth to groundwater across the CONUS. We characterize the relationship between changes in groundwater levels, agricultural water deficits relative to precipitation during the growing season, and winter precipitation. We find that declines in groundwater levels in the High Plains aquifer and around the Mississippi River Valley are driven by groundwater withdrawals used to supplement agricultural water demands. Reductions in agricultural water demands for crops do not, however, lead to immediate recovery of groundwater levels due to the demand for groundwater in other sectors in regions such as Utah, Maryland, and Texas.

  20. Estimating Demand for Alternatives to Cigarettes With Online Purchase Tasks

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Richard J.; June, Kristie M.; Bansal-Travers, Maansi; Rousu, Matthew C.; Thrasher, James F.; Hyland, Andrew; Cummings, K. Michael

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study explored how advertising affects demand for cigarettes and potential substitutes, including snus, dissolvable tobacco, and medicinal nicotine. Methods A web-based experiment randomized 1062 smokers to see advertisements for alternative nicotine products or soft drinks, then complete a series of purchase tasks, which were used to estimate demand elasticity, peak consumption, and cross-price elasticity (CPE) for tobacco products. Results Lower demand elasticity and greater peak consumption were seen for cigarettes compared to all alternative products (p < .05). CPE did not differ across the alternative products (p ≤ .03). Seeing relevant advertisements was not significantly related to demand. Conclusions These findings suggest significantly lower demand for alternative nicotine sources among smokers than previously revealed. PMID:24034685

  1. Demand for oil and energy in developing countries

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, C. Jr.; Relles, D.A.; Navarro, J.

    1980-05-01

    How much of the world's oil and energy supply will the non-OPEC less-developed countries (NOLDCs) demand in the next decade. Will their requirements be small and thus fairly insignificant compared with world demand, or large and relatively important. How will world demand be affected by the economic growth of the NOLDCs. In this report, we try to develop some reasonable forecasts of NOLDC energy demands in the next 10 years. Our focus is mainly on the demand for oil, but we also give some attention to the total commercial energy requirements of these countries. We have tried to be explicit about the uncertainties associated with our forecasts, and with the income and price elasticities on which they are based. Finally, we consider the forecasts in terms of their implications for US policies concerning the NOLDCs and suggest areas of future research on NOLDC energy issues.

  2. State of the Art of Demand Surge Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, A.; Porter, K.

    2009-04-01

    Among other phenomena, many insurance loss models estimate the increased losses in large-scale disasters--referred to here as catastrophes--compared to the losses in small-scale disasters. This amplification of loss has been traditionally and loosely called "demand surge," although there is a clear need for more specific terminology. Many factors have been identified as drivers of demand surge. First among them is the sudden and temporary increased demand for construction materials and labor that overwhelms local supplies. The purpose of the present research is to describe in qualitative terms the current understanding of demand surge in the broad sense of amplification of insured loss. Aspects of demand surge were observed following the 1886 Charleston, South Carolina, and 1906 San Francisco, U.S. earthquakes. More recently, the aftermaths of Cyclone Tracy, Hurricane Andrew, the Northridge Earthquake, the 1999 windstorms in France, the 2004-5 hurricane seasons on the Gulf Coast, and the 2007 floods in the U.K. all evidenced demand surge in one form or another. Each event highlights particular aspects of the broader demand-surge phenomena. In other words, there are general themes associated with demand surge, which have greater or lesser expression in each historic event. Pieces of the broader demand-surge phenomena have been described by mathematical models, with varying degrees of complexity. For example, researchers have used linear input-output or nonlinear computable general equilibrium models to describe the response of construction costs to a catastrophe. Ultimately the present research will include the gathering of evidence through interviews, field observations, reviews of academic and insurance industry literature, and data collection. This evidence will then inform and validate a general quantitative, mathematical model of the demand-surge process.

  3. Colorado River Basin Water Supply and Demand Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prairie, J. R.; Jerla, C.

    2012-12-01

    The Colorado River Basin Water Supply & Demand Study (Study), part of the Basin Study Program under the Department of the Interior's WaterSMART Program, is being conducted by the Bureau of Reclamation and agencies representing the seven Colorado River Basin States. The purpose of the Study is to assess future water supply and demand imbalances in the Colorado River Basin over the next 50 years and develop and evaluate options and strategies to resolve those imbalances. The Study is being conducted over the period from January 2010 to September 2012 and contains four major phases: Water Supply Assessment, Water Demand Assessment, System Reliability Analysis, and Development and Evaluation of Opportunities for balancing supply and demand. To address the considerable amount of uncertainty in projecting the future state of the Colorado River system, the Study has adopted a scenario planning approach that has resulted in four water supply scenarios and up to six water demand scenarios. The water supply scenarios consider hydrologic futures derived from the observed historical and paleo-reconstructed records as well as downscaled global climate model (GCM) projections. The water demand scenarios contain differing projections of parameters such as population growth, water use efficiency, irrigated acreage, and water use for energy that result in varying projections of future demand. Demand for outdoor municipal uses as well as agricultural uses were adjusted based on changing rates of evapotranspiration derived from downscaled GCM projections. Water supply and demand scenarios are combined through Reclamation's long-term planning model to project the effects of future supply and demand imbalances on Colorado River Basin resources. These projections lend to an assessment of the effectiveness of a broad range of options and strategies to address future imbalances.

  4. The Job Demands-Resources Model: An Analysis of Additive and Joint Effects of Demands and Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Qiao; Schaufeli, Wilmar B.; Taris, Toon W.

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated the additive, synergistic, and moderating effects of job demands and job resources on well-being (burnout and work engagement) and organizational outcomes, as specified by the Job Demands-Resources (JD-R) model. A survey was conducted among two Chinese samples: 625 blue collar workers and 761 health professionals. A…

  5. Demand Intensity, Market Parameters and Policy Responses towards Demand and Supply of Private Supplementary Tutoring in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwok, Percy Lai Yin

    2010-01-01

    Based on some longitudinal studies of private tutoring in twelve cities, towns, municipalities and provinces of China, the paper endeavours to depict demand intensity, articulate market parameters and reflect on policy responses towards the demand-supply mechanism of the vast shadowy educational phenomena at primary and secondary levels. Such…

  6. Global Food Demand Scenarios for the 21st Century

    PubMed Central

    Biewald, Anne; Weindl, Isabelle; Popp, Alexander; Lotze-Campen, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    Long-term food demand scenarios are an important tool for studying global food security and for analysing the environmental impacts of agriculture. We provide a simple and transparent method to create scenarios for future plant-based and animal-based calorie demand, using time-dependent regression models between calorie demand and income. The scenarios can be customized to a specific storyline by using different input data for gross domestic product (GDP) and population projections and by assuming different functional forms of the regressions. Our results confirm that total calorie demand increases with income, but we also found a non-income related positive time-trend. The share of animal-based calories is estimated to rise strongly with income for low-income groups. For high income groups, two ambiguous relations between income and the share of animal-based products are consistent with historical data: First, a positive relation with a strong negative time-trend and second a negative relation with a slight negative time-trend. The fits of our regressions are highly significant and our results compare well to other food demand estimates. The method is exemplarily used to construct four food demand scenarios until the year 2100 based on the storylines of the IPCC Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (SRES). We find in all scenarios a strong increase of global food demand until 2050 with an increasing share of animal-based products, especially in developing countries. PMID:26536124

  7. Assessment of Industrial Load for Demand Response across Western Interconnect

    SciTech Connect

    Alkadi, Nasr E; Starke, Michael R; Ma, Ookie

    2013-11-01

    Demand response (DR) has the ability to both increase power grid reliability and potentially reduce operating system costs. Understanding the role of demand response in grid modeling has been difficult due to complex nature of the load characteristics compared to the modeled generation and the variation in load types. This is particularly true of industrial loads, where hundreds of different industries exist with varying availability for demand response. We present a framework considering industrial loads for the development of availability profiles that can provide more regional understanding and can be inserted into analysis software for further study. The developed framework utilizes a number of different informational resources, algorithms, and real-world measurements to perform a bottom-up approach in the development of a new database with representation of the potential demand response resource in the industrial sector across the U.S. This tool houses statistical values of energy and demand response (DR) potential by industrial plant and geospatially locates the information for aggregation for different territories without proprietary information. This report will discuss this framework and the analyzed quantities of demand response for Western Interconnect (WI) in support of evaluation of the cost production modeling with power grid modeling efforts of demand response.

  8. Global Food Demand Scenarios for the 21st Century.

    PubMed

    Bodirsky, Benjamin Leon; Rolinski, Susanne; Biewald, Anne; Weindl, Isabelle; Popp, Alexander; Lotze-Campen, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    Long-term food demand scenarios are an important tool for studying global food security and for analysing the environmental impacts of agriculture. We provide a simple and transparent method to create scenarios for future plant-based and animal-based calorie demand, using time-dependent regression models between calorie demand and income. The scenarios can be customized to a specific storyline by using different input data for gross domestic product (GDP) and population projections and by assuming different functional forms of the regressions. Our results confirm that total calorie demand increases with income, but we also found a non-income related positive time-trend. The share of animal-based calories is estimated to rise strongly with income for low-income groups. For high income groups, two ambiguous relations between income and the share of animal-based products are consistent with historical data: First, a positive relation with a strong negative time-trend and second a negative relation with a slight negative time-trend. The fits of our regressions are highly significant and our results compare well to other food demand estimates. The method is exemplarily used to construct four food demand scenarios until the year 2100 based on the storylines of the IPCC Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (SRES). We find in all scenarios a strong increase of global food demand until 2050 with an increasing share of animal-based products, especially in developing countries.

  9. Rates and technologies for mass-market demand response

    SciTech Connect

    Herter, Karen; Levy, Roger; Wilson, John; Rosenfeld, Arthur

    2002-07-21

    Demand response programs are often quickly and poorly crafted in reaction to an energy crisis and disappear once the crisis subsides, ensuring that the electricity system will be unprepared when the next crisis hits. In this paper, we propose to eliminate the event-driven nature of demand response programs by considering demand responsiveness a component of the utility obligation to serve. As such, demand response can be required as a condition of service, and the offering of demand response rates becomes a requirement of utilities as an element of customer service. Using this foundation, we explore the costs and benefits of a smart thermostat-based demand response system capable of two types of programs: (1) a mandatory, system-operator controlled, contingency program, and (2) a voluntary, customer controlled, bill management program with rate-based incentives. Any demand response program based on this system could consist of either or both of these components. Ideally, these programs would be bundled, providing automatic load management through customer-programmed price response, plus up to 10 GW of emergency load shedding capability in California. Finally, we discuss options for and barriers to implementation of such a program in California.

  10. Open Automated Demand Response Communications Specification (Version 1.0)

    SciTech Connect

    Piette, Mary Ann; Ghatikar, Girish; Kiliccote, Sila; Koch, Ed; Hennage, Dan; Palensky, Peter; McParland, Charles

    2009-02-28

    The development of the Open Automated Demand Response Communications Specification, also known as OpenADR or Open Auto-DR, began in 2002 following the California electricity crisis. The work has been carried out by the Demand Response Research Center (DRRC), which is managed by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. This specification describes an open standards-based communications data model designed to facilitate sending and receiving demand response price and reliability signals from a utility or Independent System Operator to electric customers. OpenADR is one element of the Smart Grid information and communications technologies that are being developed to improve optimization between electric supply and demand. The intention of the open automated demand response communications data model is to provide interoperable signals to building and industrial control systems that are preprogrammed to take action based on a demand response signal, enabling a demand response event to be fully automated, with no manual intervention. The OpenADR specification is a flexible infrastructure to facilitate common information exchange between the utility or Independent System Operator and end-use participants. The concept of an open specification is intended to allow anyone to implement the signaling systems, the automation server or the automation clients.

  11. Impacts of Demand-Side Resources on Electric Transmission Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, Stanton W.; Sanstad, Alan H.

    2015-01-01

    Will demand resources such as energy efficiency (EE), demand response (DR), and distributed generation (DG) have an impact on electricity transmission requirements? Five drivers for transmission expansion are discussed: interconnection, reliability, economics, replacement, and policy. With that background, we review the results of a set of transmission studies that were conducted between 2010 and 2013 by electricity regulators, industry representatives, and other stakeholders in the three physical interconnections within the United States. These broad-based studies were funded by the US Department of Energy and included scenarios of reduced load growth due to EE, DR, and DG. While the studies were independent and used different modeling tools and interconnect-specific assumptions, all provided valuable results and insights. However, some caveats exist. Demand resources were evaluated in conjunction with other factors, and limitations on transmission additions between scenarios made understanding the role of demand resources difficult. One study, the western study, included analyses over both 10- and 20-year planning horizons; the 10-year analysis did not show near-term reductions in transmission, but the 20-year indicated fewer transmission additions, yielding a 36percent capital cost reduction. In the eastern study the reductions in demand largely led to reductions in local generation capacity and an increased opportunity for low-cost and renewable generation to export to other regions. The Texas study evaluated generation changes due to demand, and is in the process of examining demand resource impacts on transmission.

  12. Western municipal water conservation policy: The case of disaggregated demand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burness, Stuart; Chermak, Janie; Krause, Kate

    2005-03-01

    We investigate aspects of the felicity of both incentive-based and command and control policies in effecting municipal water conservation goals. When demand can be disaggregated according to uses or users, our results suggest that policy efforts be focused on the submarket wherein demand is more elastic. Under plausible consumer parameters, a household production function approach to water utilization prescribes the nature of demand elasticities in alternative uses and squares nicely with empirical results from the literature. An empirical example illustrates. Overall, given data and other informational limitations, extant institutional structures, and in situ technology, our analysis suggests a predisposition for command and control policies over incentive-based tools.

  13. Analysis of recent projections of electric power demand

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, Jr, D V

    1993-08-01

    This report reviews the changes and potential changes in the outlook for electric power demand since the publication of Review and Analysis of Electricity Supply Market Projections (B. Swezey, SERI/MR-360-3322, National Renewable Energy Laboratory). Forecasts of the following organizations were reviewed: DOE/Energy Information Administration, DOE/Policy Office, DRI/McGraw-Hill, North American Electric Reliability Council, and Gas Research Institute. Supply uncertainty was briefly reviewed to place the uncertainties of the demand outlook in perspective. Also discussed were opportunities for modular technologies, such as renewable energy technologies, to fill a potential gap in energy demand and supply.

  14. Non-urban mobile radio market demand forecast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castruccio, P. A.; Cooper, J.

    1982-01-01

    A national nonmetropolitan land mobile traffic model for 1990-2000 addresses user classes, density classes, traffic mix statistics, distance distribution, geographic distribution, price elasticity, and service quality elasticity. Traffic demands for business, special industrial, and police were determined on the basis of surveys in 73 randomly selected nonurban counties. The selected services represent 69% of total demand. The results were extrapolated to all services in the non-SMSA areas of the contiguous United States. Radiotelephone services were considered separately. Total non-SMSA mobile radio demand (one way) estimates are given. General functional requirements include: hand portability, privacy, reduction of blind spots, two way data transmission, position location, slow scan imagery.

  15. On the demand for prescription drugs: heterogeneity in price responses.

    PubMed

    Skipper, Niels

    2013-07-01

    This paper estimates the price elasticity of demand for prescription drugs using an exogenous shift in consumer co-payment caused by a reform in the Danish subsidy scheme for the general public. Using purchasing records for the entire Danish population, I show that the average price response for the most commonly used drug yields demand elasticities in the range of -0.36 to -0.5. The reform is shown to affect women, the elderly, and immigrants the most. Furthermore, this paper shows significant heterogeneity in the price response over different types of antibiotics, suggesting that the price elasticity of demand varies considerably even across relatively similar drugs.

  16. Large Field Visualization with Demand-Driven Calculation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, Patrick J.; Henze, Chris

    1999-01-01

    We present a system designed for the interactive definition and visualization of fields derived from large data sets: the Demand-Driven Visualizer (DDV). The system allows the user to write arbitrary expressions to define new fields, and then apply a variety of visualization techniques to the result. Expressions can include differential operators and numerous other built-in functions, ail of which are evaluated at specific field locations completely on demand. The payoff of following a demand-driven design philosophy throughout becomes particularly evident when working with large time-series data, where the costs of eager evaluation alternatives can be prohibitive.

  17. Demand impact and policy implications from taxing nitrogen fertilizer

    SciTech Connect

    Foltz, J.C.

    1992-12-01

    Recent concern has focused on nitrogen fertilizer as a potential contaminant of groundwater. A demand function for fertilizer was developed using the quantity of fertilizer purchased, corn yield, real price of nitrogen fertilizer, lagged fertilizer purchases, a land value variable and the real price of corn as explanatory variables. Short and long-run price elasticities of demand were estimated to be inelastic. Support was found for the hypothesis that demand for nitrogen fertilizer has become more price inelastic over time. From a policy standpoint, a tax on nitrogen fertilizer may not be the most effective method to reduce consumption.

  18. Healthcare Demand in the Presence of Discrete Price Changes.

    PubMed

    Gerfin, Michael; Kaiser, Boris; Schmid, Christian

    2015-09-01

    Deductibles in health insurance generate nonlinear budget sets and dynamic incentives. Using detailed individual health expenditure data from a Swiss health insurer, we estimate the response in healthcare demand to the discrete price increase generated by resetting the deductible at the start of each calendar year. We find that for individuals with high deductibles, healthcare demand drops by 27%. The decrease is most pronounced for inpatient care and prescription drugs. By contrast, for individuals with low deductibles, there is no significant change in healthcare demand (except for prescription drugs). Overall our results suggest that healthy individuals respond much stronger to the price change.

  19. Projected Demand and Potential Impacts to the National Airspace System of Autonomous, Electric, On-Demand Small Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jeremy C.; Viken, Jeffrey K.; Guerreiro, Nelson M.; Dollyhigh, Samuel M.; Fenbert, James W.; Hartman, Christopher L.; Kwa, Teck-Seng; Moore, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    Electric propulsion and autonomy are technology frontiers that offer tremendous potential to achieve low operating costs for small-aircraft. Such technologies enable simple and safe to operate vehicles that could dramatically improve regional transportation accessibility and speed through point-to-point operations. This analysis develops an understanding of the potential traffic volume and National Airspace System (NAS) capacity for small on-demand aircraft operations. Future demand projections use the Transportation Systems Analysis Model (TSAM), a tool suite developed by NASA and the Transportation Laboratory of Virginia Polytechnic Institute. Demand projections from TSAM contain the mode of travel, number of trips and geographic distribution of trips. For this study, the mode of travel can be commercial aircraft, automobile and on-demand aircraft. NASA's Airspace Concept Evaluation System (ACES) is used to assess NAS impact. This simulation takes a schedule that includes all flights: commercial passenger and cargo; conventional General Aviation and on-demand small aircraft, and operates them in the simulated NAS. The results of this analysis projects very large trip numbers for an on-demand air transportation system competitive with automobiles in cost per passenger mile. The significance is this type of air transportation can enhance mobility for communities that currently lack access to commercial air transportation. Another significant finding is that the large numbers of operations can have an impact on the current NAS infrastructure used by commercial airlines and cargo operators, even if on-demand traffic does not use the 28 airports in the Continental U.S. designated as large hubs by the FAA. Some smaller airports will experience greater demand than their current capacity allows and will require upgrading. In addition, in future years as demand grows and vehicle performance improves other non-conventional facilities such as short runways incorporated into

  20. A novel approach for examining future US domestic water demand

    EPA Science Inventory

    Costs of repairing and expanding aging infrastructure and competing demands for water from other sectors such as industry and agriculture are stretching policy makers’ abilities to meet essential domestic drinking water needs for future generations. Using Bayesian statistic...

  1. Global Energy: Supply, Demand, Consequences, Opportunities (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, Arun

    2008-07-29

    Summer Lecture Series 2009: Arun Majumdar, Director of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division, discusses current and future projections of economic growth, population, and global energy demand and supply, and explores the implications of these trends for the environment.

  2. Market-based demand forecasting promotes informed strategic financial planning.

    PubMed

    Beech, A J

    2001-11-01

    Market-based demand forecasting is a method of estimating future demand for a healthcare organization's services by using a broad range of data that describe the nature of demand within the organization's service area. Such data include the primary and secondary service areas, the service-area populations by various demographic groupings, discharge utilization rates, market size, and market share by service line and organizationwide. Based on observable market dynamics, strategic planners can make a variety of explicit assumptions about future trends regarding these data to develop scenarios describing potential future demand. Financial planners then can evaluate each scenario to determine its potential effect on selected financial and operational measures, such as operating margin, days cash on hand, and debt-service coverage, and develop a strategic financial plan that covers a range of contingencies.

  3. Forecasting urban water demand: A meta-regression analysis.

    PubMed

    Sebri, Maamar

    2016-12-01

    Water managers and planners require accurate water demand forecasts over the short-, medium- and long-term for many purposes. These range from assessing water supply needs over spatial and temporal patterns to optimizing future investments and planning future allocations across competing sectors. This study surveys the empirical literature on the urban water demand forecasting using the meta-analytical approach. Specifically, using more than 600 estimates, a meta-regression analysis is conducted to identify explanations of cross-studies variation in accuracy of urban water demand forecasting. Our study finds that accuracy depends significantly on study characteristics, including demand periodicity, modeling method, forecasting horizon, model specification and sample size. The meta-regression results remain robust to different estimators employed as well as to a series of sensitivity checks performed. The importance of these findings lies in the conclusions and implications drawn out for regulators and policymakers and for academics alike.

  4. Estimates of the Supply and Demand for Doctorally Prepared Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacox, Ada

    1993-01-01

    Estimates the current supply of doctorally prepared nurses and compares the supply with projected estimates of demand. Addresses the need for nursing to maintain visibility within the broader scientific community. (JOW)

  5. Automated Demand Response Strategies and Commissioning CommercialBuilding Controls

    SciTech Connect

    Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila; Linkugel, Eric

    2006-05-01

    California electric utilities have been exploring the use of dynamic critical peak pricing (CPP) and other demand response programs to help reduce peaks in customer electric loads. CPP is a new electricity tariff design to promote demand response. This paper begins with a brief review of terminology regarding energy management and demand response, followed by a discussion of DR control strategies and a preliminary overview of a forthcoming guide on DR strategies. The final section discusses experience to date with these strategies, followed by a discussion of the peak electric demand savings from the 2005 Automated CPP program. An important concept identified in the automated DR field tests is that automated DR will be most successful if the building commissioning industry improves the operational effectiveness of building controls. Critical peak pricing and even real time pricing are important trends in electricity pricing that will require new functional tests for building commissioning.

  6. Detailed Modeling and Response of Demand Response Enabled Appliances

    SciTech Connect

    Vyakaranam, Bharat; Fuller, Jason C.

    2014-04-14

    Proper modeling of end use loads is very important in order to predict their behavior, and how they interact with the power system, including voltage and temperature dependencies, power system and load control functions, and the complex interactions that occur between devices in such an interconnected system. This paper develops multi-state time variant residential appliance models with demand response enabled capabilities in the GridLAB-DTM simulation environment. These models represent not only the baseline instantaneous power demand and energy consumption, but the control systems developed by GE Appliances to enable response to demand response signals and the change in behavior of the appliance in response to the signal. These DR enabled appliances are simulated to estimate their capability to reduce peak demand and energy consumption.

  7. Job Demands & Pesticide Exposure among Immigrant Latino Farmworkers

    PubMed Central

    Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Quandt, Sara A.; Vallejos, Quirina M.; Whalley, Lara E.; Chen, Haiying; Isom, Scott; Barr, Dana B.; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study was to understand the potential threat of job stressors to farmworker health. To accomplish this goal we studied pesticide exposure, an issue with immediate and long-term health consequences, and predictions from the demands-control model of occupational stress. Longitudinal, self-report data and urine samples were collected at monthly intervals from a cohort of Latino farmworkers (N=287) during the 2007 agricultural season. The primary hypothesis was that greater exposure to psychological demands, physical exertion, and hazardous work conditions are associated with greater odds of detecting DAP urinary pesticide metabolites, biomarkers indicating exposure to pesticides. Contrary to this hypothesis, results indicated that none of the elements of the Demands-Control model were independently associated with detection of DAP urinary pesticide metabolites. However, analyses produced several interaction effects, including evidence that high levels of control may buffer the effects of physical job demands on detection of DAP urinary pesticide metabolites. PMID:20604632

  8. Educational Demands and Institutional Response: Dowa Education in Japan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, John N.

    1983-01-01

    Concentrates on political organizations and educational demands of Japan's burakumin, a group persistently isolated and discriminated against. Directs attention to recent political struggles carried out by burakumin and their representative organizations through "dowa education" (assimilation or liberation education). Examines…

  9. Expanding Demand for Online Higher Education: Surveying Prospective Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, Richard

    2007-01-01

    The Eduventures survey examined next-generation demand for online postsecondary education, assessing online experience, delivery mode and marketing channels preferences, and perceptions of price, quality and location, identifying key takeaways in each area.

  10. Use of microcomputers for inventory management with uncertain demand

    SciTech Connect

    Meadows, B F

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes how a microcomputer is used for analysis of inventory trends to optimize inventory investment and customer service level in a distribution environment with uncertain demand, and to support an inventory subsystem resident on a main computer.

  11. MODELING THE DEMAND FOR E85 IN THE UNITED STATES

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Changzheng; Greene, David L

    2013-10-01

    How demand for E85 might evolve in the future in response to changing economics and policies is an important subject to include in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). This report summarizes a study to develop an E85 choice model for NEMS. Using the most recent data from the states of Minnesota, North Dakota, and Iowa, this study estimates a logit model that represents E85 choice as a function of prices of E10 and E85, as well as fuel availability of E85 relative to gasoline. Using more recent data than previous studies allows a better estimation of non-fleet demand and indicates that the price elasticity of E85 choice appears to be higher than previously estimated. Based on the results of the econometric analysis, a model for projecting E85 demand at the regional level is specified. In testing, the model produced plausible predictions of US E85 demand to 2040.

  12. Studies in the demand for short haul air transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanafani, A.; Gosling, G.; Taghavi, S.

    1975-01-01

    Demand is analyzed in a short haul air transportation corridor. Emphasis is placed on traveler selection from available routes. Model formulations, estimation techniques, and traffic data handling are included.

  13. U.S. electric utility demand-side management 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    This report presents comprehensive information on electric power industry demand-side management activities in the United States at the national, regional, and utility levels. Data is included for energy savings, peakload reductions, and costs.

  14. Global Energy: Supply, Demand, Consequences, Opportunities (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema

    Majumdar, Arun

    2016-07-12

    Summer Lecture Series 2009: Arun Majumdar, Director of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division, discusses current and future projections of economic growth, population, and global energy demand and supply, and explores the implications of these trends for the environment.

  15. Demand Response and Open Automated Demand Response Opportunities for Data Centers

    SciTech Connect

    Ghatikar, Girish; Piette, Mary Ann; Fujita, Sydny; McKane, Aimee; Dudley, Junqiao Han; Radspieler, Anthony; Mares, K.C.; Shroyer, Dave

    2009-12-30

    This study examines data center characteristics, loads, control systems, and technologies to identify demand response (DR) and automated DR (Open Auto-DR) opportunities and challenges. The study was performed in collaboration with technology experts, industrial partners, and data center facility managers and existing research on commercial and industrial DR was collected and analyzed. The results suggest that data centers, with significant and rapidly growing energy use, have significant DR potential. Because data centers are highly automated, they are excellent candidates for Open Auto-DR. 'Non-mission-critical' data centers are the most likely candidates for early adoption of DR. Data center site infrastructure DR strategies have been well studied for other commercial buildings; however, DR strategies for information technology (IT) infrastructure have not been studied extensively. The largest opportunity for DR or load reduction in data centers is in the use of virtualization to reduce IT equipment energy use, which correspondingly reduces facility cooling loads. DR strategies could also be deployed for data center lighting, and heating, ventilation, and air conditioning. Additional studies and demonstrations are needed to quantify benefits to data centers of participating in DR and to address concerns about DR's possible impact on data center performance or quality of service and equipment life span.

  16. Household water demand and welfare loss for future Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhard, Jeroen; Reynaud, Arnaud; Lanzanova, Denis; de Roo, Ad

    2015-04-01

    Matching the availability of water to its demand in Europe is a major challenge for the future due to expected economic and demographic developments and climate change. This means there is a growing need to estimate future water demand and to optimize the water allocation to all end users to counteract welfare loss. At the European scale it is currently not possible to assess the impact of social and economic changes on future water demand or to prioritize water allocation amongst different sectors based on economic damage without extensive use of assumptions and generalizations. Indeed, our review of existing regional optimization models for Europe reveals that the social-economic component of the water use system needs to be improved by complementing them with detailed water use estimates and cost/benefit functions in order to determine the optimal situation. Our study contributes to closing this knowledge gap for the European household sector by quantifying future water demand and the effect of water pricing, as well as providing a method for the calculation of monetary damage due to unmet demand at the highest spatial resolution possible. We used a water demand function approach in which household water consumption depends upon some exogenous drivers including water price, household income, population and household characteristics and climate conditions. For each European country, the annual water consumption per capita was calculated at regional level (NUTS3) and subsequently disaggregated to five kilometer grid level based on a population density map. In order to produce estimates of water demand, the evolution of the explanatory variables of the water demand functions and population density map were simulated until 2050 based on related variables such as GDP and demographic projections. The results of this study will be integrated into the JRC hydro-economic modelling framework for an assessment of the Water-Agriculture-Energy-Ecosystems Nexus.

  17. The demand for family planning: a new approach.

    PubMed

    Easterlin, R A; Wongboonsin, K; Ahmed, M A

    1988-01-01

    A new "supply-demand" measure of family planning demand is compared with others commonly used to target prospective family planning clients. In analyses of data from six cross-sectional surveys the new measure consistently explains past contraceptive use better than the others. Time series analysis for two countries yields similar results. Family planning program officials may wish to consider exploring the use of this measure to target prospective clients.

  18. Incorporating weather uncertainty in demand forecasts for electricity market planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziser, C. J.; Dong, Z. Y.; Wong, K. P.

    2012-07-01

    A major component of electricity network planning is to ensure supply capability into the future, through generation and transmission development. Accurate forecasts of maximum demand are a crucial component of this process, with future weather conditions having a large impact on forecast accuracy. This article presents an improved methodology for the consideration of weather uncertainty in electricity demand forecasts. Case studies based on the Australian national electricity market are used to validate the proposed methodology.

  19. Forecasting the demand potential for STOL air transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, S.; Horonjeff, R.; Kanafani, A.; Mogharabi, A.

    1973-01-01

    A process for predicting the potential demand for STOL aircraft was investigated to provide a conceptual framework, and an analytical methodology for estimating the STOL air transportation market. It was found that: (1) schedule frequency has the strongest effect on the traveler's choice among available routes, (2) work related business constitutes approximately 50% of total travel volume, and (3) air travel demand follows economic trends.

  20. Historical patterns and drivers of global crop water demand.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, D.; Lobell, D. B.; Sheffield, J.

    2015-12-01

    With climate change expected to subject staple crops in major growing regions to increased heat exposure, a critical question for agriculture and global food security is the degree to which crop water demand is also likely to change. Recent work has explored the relationship between extreme temperatures and crop water demand, finding that vapor pressure deficit (VPD), through its dependence on both temperature and humidity, provides a very good meteorological predictor of water stress. However, assessing crop water demand solely through atmospheric conditions ignores the roles of radiation and transpiration efficiency, which are increased through elevated CO2. We provide a 60-year global assessment of crop water demand in the world's major growing areas, comparing trends and drivers across key growing regions. We find that an atmospheric-based demand measure can differ significantly from that of a crop-specific sink-based approach that incorporates radiation and CO2 effects, sometimes enough to reverse the sign of historical trends. We also find that these changes differ significantly by region, and that multi-decadal trends can mask large decadal swings. To our knowledge, our work is the first to use global meteorological datasets in a global analysis of crop water demand, and should serve as a valuable reference for future work examining the interaction of hydrological, temperature, and CO2 changes on crop yields.

  1. Potential oxygen demand of sediments from Lake Erie

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schloesser, D.W.; Stickel, R.G.; Bridgeman, T.B.

    2005-01-01

    Dreissenid mussels (Dreissena polymorpha and D. bugensis) biodeposit large quantities of filtered materials (i.e., feces and pseudofeces) directly on bottom substrates. These biodeposits have the potential to increase oxygen demand in sediments and overlying waters and thus contribute to hypolimnetic anoxia in Lake Erie. We hypothesized that higher potential oxygen demand of sediments would occur in areas near shore than in offshore hypolimnetic waters as a result of biodeposits carried by currents from littoral water where mussels, available foods, and biodeposits may be most abundant. To address this hypothesis, we measured potential oxygen demand (mg O2/L/120 h incubation) at six sites near shore and six sites offshore monthly June to September 2002 and August 2003. In addition, we compared, in post priori hypothesis, seven sites with and five sites without dreissenid mussels. Contrary to our hypotheses, potential oxygen demand was not significantly higher in bottles containing nearshore sediments than offshore sediments. Similarly, potential oxygen demand was not significantly higher at sites with dreissenid mussels than at sites without mussels. Data are consistent with pre-dreissenid studies which show oxygen demand and percent ash-free dry weights of sediments were higher offshore than near shore and ash-free dry weight of sediments decreased June to September. Therefore, the present study provides no evidence that dreissenid mussels have contributed directly-via biodeposition-to increased anoxia observed in Lake Erie in the mid to late 1990s.

  2. Gravitational demand on the neck musculature during tablet computer use.

    PubMed

    Vasavada, Anita N; Nevins, Derek D; Monda, Steven M; Hughes, Ellis; Lin, David C

    2015-01-01

    Tablet computer use requires substantial head and neck flexion, which is a risk factor for neck pain. The goal of this study was to evaluate the biomechanics of the head-neck system during seated tablet computer use under a variety of conditions. A physiologically relevant variable, gravitational demand (the ratio of gravitational moment due to the weight of the head to maximal muscle moment capacity), was estimated using a musculoskeletal model incorporating subject-specific size and intervertebral postures from radiographs. Gravitational demand in postures adopted during tablet computer use was 3-5 times that of the neutral posture, with the lowest demand when the tablet was in a high propped position. Moreover, the estimated gravitational demand could be correlated to head and neck postural measures (0.48 < R(2) < 0.64, p < 0.001). These findings provide quantitative data about mechanical requirements on the neck musculature during tablet computer use and are important for developing ergonomics guidelines. Practitioner Summary: Flexed head and neck postures occur during tablet computer use and are implicated in neck pain. The mechanical demand on the neck muscles was estimated to increase 3-5 times during seated tablet computer use versus seated neutral posture, with the lowest demand in a high propped tablet position but few differences in other conditions.

  3. Load Reduction, Demand Response and Energy Efficient Technologies and Strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, Paul A.; Parker, Graham B.; Hatley, Darrel D.

    2008-11-19

    The Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by the DOE Office of Electricity (OE) to recommend load reduction and grid integration strategies, and identify additional demand response (energy efficiency/conservation opportunities) and strategies at the Forest City Housing (FCH) redevelopment at Pearl Harbor and the Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH) at Kaneohe Bay. The goal was to provide FCH staff a path forward to manage their electricity load and thus reduce costs at these FCH family housing developments. The initial focus of the work was at the MCBH given the MCBH has a demand-ratchet tariff, relatively high demand (~18 MW) and a commensurate high blended electricity rate (26 cents/kWh). The peak demand for MCBH occurs in July-August. And, on average, family housing at MCBH contributes ~36% to the MCBH total energy consumption. Thus, a significant load reduction in family housing can have a considerable impact on the overall site load. Based on a site visit to the MCBH and meetings with MCBH installation, FCH, and Hawaiian Electric Company (HECO) staff, recommended actions (including a "smart grid" recommendation) that can be undertaken by FCH to manage and reduce peak-demand in family housing are made. Recommendations are also made to reduce overall energy consumption, and thus reduce demand in FCH family housing.

  4. An analysis of short haul air passenger demand, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blumer, T. P.; Swan, W. M.

    1978-01-01

    Several demand models for short haul air travel are proposed and calibrated on pooled data. The models are designed to predict demand and analyze some of the motivating phenomena behind demand generation. In particular, an attempt is made to include the effects of competing modes and of alternate destinations. The results support three conclusions: (1) the auto mode is the air mode's major competitor; (2) trip time is an overriding factor in intermodal competition, with air fare at its present level appearing unimportant to the typical short haul air traveler; and (3) distance appears to underly several demand generating phenomena, and therefore, must be considered very carefully to any intercity demand model. It may be the cause of the wide range of fare elasticities reported by researchers over the past 15 years. A behavioral demand model is proposed and calibrated. It combines the travel generating effects of income and population, the effects of modal split, the sensitivity of travel to price and time, and the effect of alternative destinations satisfying the trip purpose.

  5. Service Demand Discovery Mechanism for Mobile Social Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dapeng; Yan, Junjie; Wang, Honggang; Wang, Ruyan

    2016-01-01

    In the last few years, the service demand for wireless data over mobile networks has continually been soaring at a rapid pace. Thereinto, in Mobile Social Networks (MSNs), users can discover adjacent users for establishing temporary local connection and thus sharing already downloaded contents with each other to offload the service demand. Due to the partitioned topology, intermittent connection and social feature in such a network, the service demand discovery is challenging. In particular, the service demand discovery is exploited to identify the best relay user through the service registration, service selection and service activation. In order to maximize the utilization of limited network resources, a hybrid service demand discovery architecture, such as a Virtual Dictionary User (VDU) is proposed in this paper. Based on the historical data of movement, users can discover their relationships with others. Subsequently, according to the users activity, VDU is selected to facilitate the service registration procedure. Further, the service information outside of a home community can be obtained through the Global Active User (GAU) to support the service selection. To provide the Quality of Service (QoS), the Service Providing User (SPU) is chosen among multiple candidates. Numerical results show that, when compared with other classical service algorithms, the proposed scheme can improve the successful service demand discovery ratio by 25% under reduced overheads. PMID:27886096

  6. A Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS) Demand Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Dou; Lee, David; Johnson, Jesse; Kostiuk, Peter; Yackovetsky, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS) demand modeling is a tool that will be useful for decision-makers to analyze SATS demands in both airport and airspace. We constructed a series of models following the general top-down, modular principles in systems engineering. There are three principal models, SATS Airport Demand Model (SATS-ADM), SATS Flight Demand Model (SATS-FDM), and LMINET-SATS. SATS-ADM models SATS operations, by aircraft type, from the forecasts in fleet, configuration and performance, utilization, and traffic mixture. Given the SATS airport operations such as the ones generated by SATS-ADM, SATS-FDM constructs the SATS origin and destination (O&D) traffic flow based on the solution of the gravity model, from which it then generates SATS flights using the Monte Carlo simulation based on the departure time-of-day profile. LMINET-SATS, an extension of LMINET, models SATS demands at airspace and airport by all aircraft operations in US The models use parameters to provide the user with flexibility and ease of use to generate SATS demand for different scenarios. Several case studies are included to illustrate the use of the models, which are useful to identify the need for a new air traffic management system to cope with SATS.

  7. Aging and the Vulnerability of Speech to Dual Task Demands

    PubMed Central

    Kemper, Susan; Schmalzried, RaLynn; Hoffman, Lesa; Herman, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    Tracking a digital pursuit rotor task was used to measure dual task costs of language production by young and older adults. Tracking performance by both groups was affected by dual task demands: time on target declined and tracking error increased as dual task demands increased from the baseline condition to a moderately demanding dual task condition to a more demanding dual task condition. When dual task demands were moderate, older adults’ speech rate declined but their fluency, grammatical complexity, and content were unaffected. When the dual task was more demanding, older adults’ speech, like young adults’ speech, became highly fragmented, ungrammatical, and incoherent. Vocabulary, working memory, processing speed, and inhibition affected vulnerability to dual task costs: vocabulary provided some protection for sentence length and grammaticality, working memory conferred some protection for grammatical complexity, and processing speed provided some protection for speech rate, propositional density, coherence, and lexical diversity. Further, vocabulary and working memory capacity provided more protection for older adults than for young adults although the protective effect of processing speed was somewhat reduced for older adults as compared to the young adults. PMID:21186917

  8. Professional commitment: Does it buffer or intensify job demands?

    PubMed

    Nesje, Kjersti

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether professional commitment can be seen as a moderator in the relationship between job demands and emotional exhaustion among Norwegian nurses. Inspired by the job demands-resources model, this study explores whether having a strong commitment to the nursing profession can be seen as a resource that buffers the effect of job demands on emotional exhaustion or, conversely, intensifies the impact of job demands. A survey that comprised Norwegian nurses who had graduated three years previously (N = 388) was conducted. Multiple regression was performed to test the hypothesis. The results provide support to a buffering effect; thus, individuals with a higher degree of professional commitment conveyed a weaker association between job demands and emotional exhaustion compared with nurses with a lower degree of commitment. Developing a better understanding of the potential buffering effect of professional commitment is of great interest. The present study is the first to utilize professional commitment as a resource within the job demands-resources framework.

  9. Service Demand Discovery Mechanism for Mobile Social Networks.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dapeng; Yan, Junjie; Wang, Honggang; Wang, Ruyan

    2016-11-23

    In the last few years, the service demand for wireless data over mobile networks has continually been soaring at a rapid pace. Thereinto, in Mobile Social Networks (MSNs), users can discover adjacent users for establishing temporary local connection and thus sharing already downloaded contents with each other to offload the service demand. Due to the partitioned topology, intermittent connection and social feature in such a network, the service demand discovery is challenging. In particular, the service demand discovery is exploited to identify the best relay user through the service registration, service selection and service activation. In order to maximize the utilization of limited network resources, a hybrid service demand discovery architecture, such as a Virtual Dictionary User (VDU) is proposed in this paper. Based on the historical data of movement, users can discover their relationships with others. Subsequently, according to the users activity, VDU is selected to facilitate the service registration procedure. Further, the service information outside of a home community can be obtained through the Global Active User (GAU) to support the service selection. To provide the Quality of Service (QoS), the Service Providing User (SPU) is chosen among multiple candidates. Numerical results show that, when compared with other classical service algorithms, the proposed scheme can improve the successful service demand discovery ratio by 25% under reduced overheads.

  10. The evaporative demand drought index: Part I 1 – Linking drought evolution to variations in evaporative demand

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many operational drought indices focus primarily on precipitation and temperature when depicting hydroclimatic anomalies, and this perspective can be augmented by analyses and products that reflect the evaporative dynamics of drought. We leverage the linkage between atmospheric evaporative demand (E...

  11. Integration of Renewables Via Demand Management: Highly Dispatchable and Distributed Demand Response for the Integration of Distributed Generation

    SciTech Connect

    2012-02-11

    GENI Project: AutoGrid, in conjunction with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Columbia University, will design and demonstrate automated control software that helps manage real-time demand for energy across the electric grid. Known as the Demand Response Optimization and Management System - Real-Time (DROMS-RT), the software will enable personalized price signal to be sent to millions of customers in extremely short timeframes—incentivizing them to alter their electricity use in response to grid conditions. This will help grid operators better manage unpredictable demand and supply fluctuations in short time-scales —making the power generation process more efficient and cost effective for both suppliers and consumers. DROMS-RT is expected to provide a 90% reduction in the cost of operating demand response and dynamic pricing Projects in the U.S.

  12. Flow based vs. demand based energy-water modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozos, Evangelos; Nikolopoulos, Dionysis; Efstratiadis, Andreas; Koukouvinos, Antonios; Makropoulos, Christos

    2015-04-01

    The water flow in hydro-power generation systems is often used downstream to cover other type of demands like irrigation and water supply. However, the typical case is that the energy demand (operation of hydro-power plant) and the water demand do not coincide. Furthermore, the water inflow into a reservoir is a stochastic process. Things become more complicated if renewable resources (wind-turbines or photovoltaic panels) are included into the system. For this reason, the assessment and optimization of the operation of hydro-power systems are challenging tasks that require computer modelling. This modelling should not only simulate the water budget of the reservoirs and the energy production/consumption (pumped-storage), but should also take into account the constraints imposed by the natural or artificial water network using a flow routing algorithm. HYDRONOMEAS, for example, uses an elegant mathematical approach (digraph) to calculate the flow in a water network based on: the demands (input timeseries), the water availability (simulated) and the capacity of the transmission components (properties of channels, rivers, pipes, etc.). The input timeseries of demand should be estimated by another model and linked to the corresponding network nodes. A model that could be used to estimate these timeseries is UWOT. UWOT is a bottom up urban water cycle model that simulates the generation, aggregation and routing of water demand signals. In this study, we explore the potentials of UWOT in simulating the operation of complex hydrosystems that include energy generation. The evident advantage of this approach is the use of a single model instead of one for estimation of demands and another for the system simulation. An application of UWOT in a large scale system is attempted in mainland Greece in an area extending over 130×170 km². The challenges, the peculiarities and the advantages of this approach are examined and critically discussed.

  13. 42 CFR 84.163 - Man test for gases and vapors; Type C supplied-air respirators, demand and pressure-demand...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... respirators, demand and pressure-demand classes; test requirements. 84.163 Section 84.163 Public Health PUBLIC... RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.163 Man test for gases and vapors; Type C supplied-air respirators, demand and pressure-demand classes;...

  14. 42 CFR 84.163 - Man test for gases and vapors; Type C supplied-air respirators, demand and pressure-demand...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... respirators, demand and pressure-demand classes; test requirements. 84.163 Section 84.163 Public Health PUBLIC... RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.163 Man test for gases and vapors; Type C supplied-air respirators, demand and pressure-demand classes;...

  15. 42 CFR 84.163 - Man test for gases and vapors; Type C supplied-air respirators, demand and pressure-demand...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... respirators, demand and pressure-demand classes; test requirements. 84.163 Section 84.163 Public Health PUBLIC... RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.163 Man test for gases and vapors; Type C supplied-air respirators, demand and pressure-demand classes;...

  16. 42 CFR 84.163 - Man test for gases and vapors; Type C supplied-air respirators, demand and pressure-demand...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... respirators, demand and pressure-demand classes; test requirements. 84.163 Section 84.163 Public Health PUBLIC... RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.163 Man test for gases and vapors; Type C supplied-air respirators, demand and pressure-demand classes;...

  17. 42 CFR 84.163 - Man test for gases and vapors; Type C supplied-air respirators, demand and pressure-demand...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... respirators, demand and pressure-demand classes; test requirements. 84.163 Section 84.163 Public Health PUBLIC... RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.163 Man test for gases and vapors; Type C supplied-air respirators, demand and pressure-demand classes;...

  18. A submersible magnetic stirrer for use in measuring photosynthesis in a biofloc technology production system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Measuring photosynthesis or primary productivity in biofloc technology production systems is challenging because the biofloc must be maintained in suspension constantly. Photosynthesis can be measured in external incubators designed to keep the biofloc suspended in the biochemical oxygen demand (BOD...

  19. A LOW-COST THREE-DIMENSIONAL SAMPLE COLLECTION ARRAY TO EVALUATE AND MONITOR CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Artificially constructed wetlands are gaining acceptance as a low cost treatment alternative to remove a number of undesirable constituents from water. Wetlands can be used to physically remove compounds such as suspended solids through sedimentation. Dissolved nutrients, biochemical oxygen demand, ...

  20. Climate change and peak demand for electricity: Evaluating policies for reducing peak demand under different climate change scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, Abigail Walker

    This research focuses on the relative advantages and disadvantages of using price-based and quantity-based controls for electricity markets. It also presents a detailed analysis of one specific approach to quantity based controls: the SmartAC program implemented in Stockton, California. Finally, the research forecasts electricity demand under various climate scenarios, and estimates potential cost savings that could result from a direct quantity control program over the next 50 years in each scenario. The traditional approach to dealing with the problem of peak demand for electricity is to invest in a large stock of excess capital that is rarely used, thereby greatly increasing production costs. Because this approach has proved so expensive, there has been a focus on identifying alternative approaches for dealing with peak demand problems. This research focuses on two approaches: price based approaches, such as real time pricing, and quantity based approaches, whereby the utility directly controls at least some elements of electricity used by consumers. This research suggests that well-designed policies for reducing peak demand might include both price and quantity controls. In theory, sufficiently high peak prices occurring during periods of peak demand and/or low supply can cause the quantity of electricity demanded to decline until demand is in balance with system capacity, potentially reducing the total amount of generation capacity needed to meet demand and helping meet electricity demand at the lowest cost. However, consumers need to be well informed about real-time prices for the pricing strategy to work as well as theory suggests. While this might be an appropriate assumption for large industrial and commercial users who have potentially large economic incentives, there is not yet enough research on whether households will fully understand and respond to real-time prices. Thus, while real-time pricing can be an effective tool for addressing the peak load

  1. Flexible Demand Management under Time-Varying Prices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yong

    In this dissertation, the problem of flexible demand management under time-varying prices is studied. This generic problem has many applications, which usually have multiple periods in which decisions on satisfying demand need to be made, and prices in these periods are time-varying. Examples of such applications include multi-period procurement problem, operating room scheduling, and user-end demand scheduling in the Smart Grid, where the last application is used as the main motivating story throughout the dissertation. The current grid is experiencing an upgrade with lots of new designs. What is of particular interest is the idea of passing time-varying prices that reflect electricity market conditions to end users as incentives for load shifting. One key component, consequently, is the demand management system at the user-end. The objective of the system is to find the optimal trade-off between cost saving and discomfort increment resulted from load shifting. In this dissertation, we approach this problem from the following aspects: (1) construct a generic model, solve for Pareto optimal solutions, and analyze the robust solution that optimizes the worst-case payoffs, (2) extend to a distribution-free model for multiple types of demand (appliances), for which an approximate dynamic programming (ADP) approach is developed, and (3) design other efficient algorithms for practical purposes of the flexible demand management system. We first construct a novel multi-objective flexible demand management model, in which there are a finite number of periods with time-varying prices, and demand arrives in each period. In each period, the decision maker chooses to either satisfy or defer outstanding demand to minimize costs and discomfort over a certain number of periods. We consider both the deterministic model, models with stochastic demand or prices, and when only partial information about the stochastic demand or prices is known. We first analyze the stochastic

  2. Climate Mitigation Policy Implications for Global Irrigation Water Demand

    SciTech Connect

    Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Wise, Marshall A.

    2013-08-22

    Energy, water and land are scarce resources, critical to humans. Developments in each affect the availability and cost of the others, and consequently human prosperity. Measures to limit greenhouse gas concentrations will inevitably exact dramatic changes on energy and land systems and in turn alter the character, magnitude and geographic distribution of human claims on water resources. We employ the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), an integrated assessment model to explore the interactions of energy, land and water systems in the context of alternative policies to limit climate change to three alternative levels: 2.5 Wm-2 (445 ppm CO2-e), 3.5 Wm-2 (535 ppm CO2-e) and 4.5 Wm-2 (645 ppm CO2-e). We explore the effects of alternative land-use emissions mitigation policy options—one which values terrestrial carbon emissions equally with fossil fuel and industrial emissions, and an alternative which places no penalty on land-use change emissions. We find that increasing populations and economic growth could be anticipated to lead to increased demand for water for agricultural systems (+200%), even in the absence of climate change. In general policies to mitigate climate change will increase agricultural demands for water, regardless of whether or not terrestrial carbon is valued or not. Burgeoning demands for water are driven by the demand for bioenergy in response to emissions mitigation policies. We also find that the policy matters. Increases in the demand for water when terrestrial carbon emissions go un-prices are vastly larger than when terrestrial system carbon emissions are prices at the same rate as fossil fuel and industrial emissions. Our estimates for increased water demands when terrestrial carbon systems go un-priced are larger than earlier studies. We find that the deployment of improved irrigation delivery systems could mitigate some of the increase in water demands, but cannot reverse the increases in water demands when terrestrial carbon

  3. Chapter A7. Biological Indicators

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Myers, Donna N.; Wilde, Franceska D.

    2003-01-01

    The National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data (National Field Manual) provides guidelines and standard procedures for U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel who collect data used to assess the quality of the Nation's surface-water and ground-water resources. This chapter of the manual includes procedures for the (1) determination of biochemical oxygen demand using a 5-day bioassay test; (2) collection, identification, and enumeration of fecal indicator bacteria; (3) collection of samples and information on two laboratory methods for fecal indicator viruses (coliphages); and (4) collection of samples for protozoan pathogens. Each chapter of the National Field Manual is published separately and revised periodically. Newly published and revised chapters are posted on the World Wide Web on the USGS page 'National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data.' The URL for this page is http://pubs.water.usgs.gov/twri9A/ (accessed November 25, 2003).

  4. Performance of a constructed wetland treating intensive shrimp aquaculture wastewater under high hydraulic loading rate.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ying-Feng; Jing, Shuh-Ren; Lee, Der-Yuan; Chang, Yih-Feng; Chen, Yi-Ming; Shih, Kai-Chung

    2005-04-01

    A water treatment unit, mainly consisting of free water surface (FWS) and subsurface flow (SF) constructed wetland cells, was integrated into a commercial-scale recirculating aquaculture system for intensive shrimp culture. This study investigated performance of the treatment wetlands for controlling water quality. The results showed that the FWS-SF cells effectively removed total suspended solids (55-66%), 5-day biochemical oxygen demand (37-54%), total ammonia (64-66%) and nitrite (83-94%) from the recirculating water under high hydraulic loading rates (1.57-1.95 m/day). This led to a water quality that was suitable for shrimp culture and effluent that always satisfied the discharge standards. The area ratios of wetlands to culture tank being demonstrated (0.43) and calculated (0.096) in this study were both significantly lower than the reported values. Accordingly, a constructed wetland was technically and economically feasible for managing water quality of an intensive aquaculture system.

  5. Phytochrome A increases tolerance to high evaporative demand.

    PubMed

    Auge, Gabriela Alejandra; Rugnone, Matías Leandro; Cortés, Leandro Emanuel; González, Carina Verónica; Zarlavsky, Gabriela; Boccalandro, Hernán Esteban; Sánchez, Rodolfo Augusto

    2012-10-01

    Stresses resulting from high transpiration demand induce adjustments in plants that lead to reductions of water loss. These adjustments, including changes in water absorption, transport and/or loss by transpiration, are crucial to normal plant development. Tomato wild type (WT) and phytochrome A (phyA)-mutant plants, fri1-1, were exposed to conditions of either low or high transpiration demand and several morphological and physiological changes were measured during stress conditions. Mutant plants rapidly wilted compared to WT plants after exposure to high evaporative demand. Root size and hydraulic conductivity did not show significant differences between genotypes, suggesting that water absorption and transport through this organ could not explain the observed phenotype. Moreover, stomatal density was similar between genotypes, whereas transpiration and stomatal conductance were both lower in mutant than in WT plants. This was accompanied by a lower stem-specific hydraulic conductivity in mutant plants, which was associated to lower xylem vessel number and transversal area in fri1-1 plants, producing a reduction in water supply to the leaves, which rapidly wilted under high evaporative demand. PhyA signaling might facilitate the adjustment to environments differing widely in water evaporative demand in part through the modulation of xylem dimensions.

  6. Accounting for Water Insecurity in Modeling Domestic Water Demand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galaitsis, S. E.; Huber-lee, A. T.; Vogel, R. M.; Naumova, E.

    2013-12-01

    Water demand management uses price elasticity estimates to predict consumer demand in relation to water pricing changes, but studies have shown that many additional factors effect water consumption. Development scholars document the need for water security, however, much of the water security literature focuses on broad policies which can influence water demand. Previous domestic water demand studies have not considered how water security can affect a population's consumption behavior. This study is the first to model the influence of water insecurity on water demand. A subjective indicator scale measuring water insecurity among consumers in the Palestinian West Bank is developed and included as a variable to explore how perceptions of control, or lack thereof, impact consumption behavior and resulting estimates of price elasticity. A multivariate regression model demonstrates the significance of a water insecurity variable for data sets encompassing disparate water access. When accounting for insecurity, the R-squaed value improves and the marginal price a household is willing to pay becomes a significant predictor for the household quantity consumption. The model denotes that, with all other variables held equal, a household will buy more water when the users are more water insecure. Though the reasons behind this trend require further study, the findings suggest broad policy implications by demonstrating that water distribution practices in scarcity conditions can promote consumer welfare and efficient water use.

  7. Versatile on-demand droplet generation for controlled encapsulation

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Minsoung; Liu, Peng; Meagher, Robert J.; Light, Yooli K.; Singh, Anup K.

    2014-01-01

    We present a droplet-based microfluidic system for performing bioassays requiring controlled analyte encapsulation by employing highly flexible on-demand droplet generation. On-demand droplet generation and encapsulation are achieved pneumatically using a microdispensing pump connected to a constant pressure source. The system generates single droplets to the collection route only when the pump is actuated with a designated pressure level and produces two-phase parallel flow to the waste route during the stand-by state. We analyzed the effect of actuation pressure on the stability and size of droplets and optimized conditions for generation of stable droplets over a wide pressure range. By increasing the duration of pump actuation, we could either trigger a short train of identical size droplets or generate a single larger droplet. We also investigated the methodology to control droplet contents by fine-tuning flow rates or implementing a resistance bridge between the pump and main channels. We demonstrated the integrated chip for on-demand mixing between two aqueous phases in droplets and on-demand encapsulation of Escherichia coli cells. Our unique on-demand feature for selective encapsulation is particularly appropriate for bioassays with extremely dilute samples, such as pathogens in a clinical sample, since it can significantly reduce the number of empty droplets that impede droplet collection and subsequent data analysis. PMID:25379072

  8. Hedonic Hotspots Regulate Cingulate-driven Adaptation to Cognitive Demands.

    PubMed

    van Steenbergen, Henk; Band, Guido P H; Hommel, Bernhard; Rombouts, Serge A R B; Nieuwenhuis, Sander

    2015-07-01

    Positive hedonic states are known to attenuate the impact of demanding events on our body and brain, supporting adaptive behavior in response to changes in the environment. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine the neural mechanism of this hedonic regulation. The effect of hedonic state (as induced by funny vs. neutral cartoons) on flexible behavioral and neural adaptation to cognitive demands was assessed in a flanker task in female volunteers. Behavioral results showed that humor reduced the compensatory adjustments to cognitive demands, as observed in sequential adaptations. This modulation was also reflected in midcingulate cortex (MCC; also known as the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, ACC) activation. Furthermore, hedonic context increased activation in ventral striatum (VS) and ventral pallidum (VP). These hedonic hotspots attenuated the medial prefrontal cortex response to the cognitive demands in the ACC (also known as the rostral ACC). Activity in the ACC proved predictive of subsequent behavioral adaptation. Moreover, psychophysiological interaction analyses revealed that the MCC and the ACC were functionally connected with VS and VP, respectively. These observations reveal how MCC-VS and VP-ACC interactions are involved in the detection and hedonic modulation of behavioral adaptations to cognitive demands, which supports behavioral flexibility.

  9. Rates and technologies for mass-market demand response

    SciTech Connect

    Herter, Karen; Levy, Roger; Wilson, John; Rosenfeld, Arthur

    2002-07-21

    Demand response programs are often quickly and poorlycrafted in reaction to an energy crisis and disappear once the crisissubsides, ensuring that the electricity system will be unprepared whenthe next crisis hits. In this paper, we propose to eliminate theevent-driven nature of demand response programs by considering demandresponsiveness a component of the utility obligation to serve. As such,demand response can be required as a condition of service, and theoffering of demand response rates becomes a requirement of utilities asan element of customer service. Using this foundation, we explore thecosts and benefits of a smart thermostat-based demand response systemcapable of two types of programs: (1) a mandatory, system-operatorcontrolled, contingency program, and (2) a voluntary, customercontrolled, bill management program with rate-based incentives. Anydemand response program based on this system could consist of either orboth of these components. Ideally, these programs would be bundled,providing automatic load management through customer-programmed priceresponse, plus up to 10 GW of emergency load shedding capability inCalifornia. Finally, we discuss options for and barriers toimplementation of such a program in California.

  10. Unlocking the potential for efficiency and demand response throughadvanced metering

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, Roger; Herter, Karen; Wilson, John

    2004-06-30

    Reliance on the standard cumulative kilowatt-hour meter substantially compromises energy efficiency and demand response programs. Without advanced metering, utilities cannot support time-differentiated rates or collect the detailed customer usage information necessary to (1)educate the customer to the economic value of efficiency and demand response options, or (2) distribute load management incentives proportional to customer contribution. These deficiencies prevent the customer feedback mechanisms that would otherwise encourage economically sound demand-side investments and behaviors. Thus, the inability to collect or properly price electricity usage handicaps the success of almost all efficiency and demand response options. Historically, implementation of the advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) necessary for the successful efficiency and demand response programs has been prevented by inadequate cost-benefit analyses. A recent California effort has produced an expanded cost-effectiveness methodology for AMI that introduces previously excluded benefits. In addition to utility-centric costs and benefits, the new model includes qualitative and quantitative costs and benefits that accrue to both customers and society.

  11. Providing Reliability Services through Demand Response: A Prelimnary Evaluation of the Demand Response Capabilities of Alcoa Inc.

    SciTech Connect

    Starke, Michael R; Kirby, Brendan J; Kueck, John D; Todd, Duane; Caulfield, Michael; Helms, Brian

    2009-02-01

    Demand response is the largest underutilized reliability resource in North America. Historic demand response programs have focused on reducing overall electricity consumption (increasing efficiency) and shaving peaks but have not typically been used for immediate reliability response. Many of these programs have been successful but demand response remains a limited resource. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) report, 'Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering' (FERC 2006) found that only five percent of customers are on some form of demand response program. Collectively they represent an estimated 37,000 MW of response potential. These programs reduce overall energy consumption, lower green house gas emissions by allowing fossil fuel generators to operate at increased efficiency and reduce stress on the power system during periods of peak loading. As the country continues to restructure energy markets with sophisticated marginal cost models that attempt to minimize total energy costs, the ability of demand response to create meaningful shifts in the supply and demand equations is critical to creating a sustainable and balanced economic response to energy issues. Restructured energy market prices are set by the cost of the next incremental unit of energy, so that as additional generation is brought into the market, the cost for the entire market increases. The benefit of demand response is that it reduces overall demand and shifts the entire market to a lower pricing level. This can be very effective in mitigating price volatility or scarcity pricing as the power system responds to changing demand schedules, loss of large generators, or loss of transmission. As a global producer of alumina, primary aluminum, and fabricated aluminum products, Alcoa Inc., has the capability to provide demand response services through its manufacturing facilities and uniquely through its aluminum smelting facilities. For a typical aluminum smelter, electric power

  12. Using Utility Load Data to Estimate Demand for Space Cooling and Potential for Shiftable Loads

    SciTech Connect

    Denholm, P.; Ong, S.; Booten, C.

    2012-05-01

    This paper describes a simple method to estimate hourly cooling demand from historical utility load data. It compares total hourly demand to demand on cool days and compares these estimates of total cooling demand to previous regional and national estimates. Load profiles generated from this method may be used to estimate the potential for aggregated demand response or load shifting via cold storage.

  13. Future land-use related water demand in California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Tamara; Sleeter, Benjamin M.; Cameron, D. Richard

    2016-01-01

    Water shortages in California are a growing concern amidst ongoing drought, earlier spring snowmelt, projected future climate warming, and currently mandated water use restrictions. Increases in population and land use in coming decades will place additional pressure on already limited available water supplies. We used a state-and-transition simulation model to project future changes in developed (municipal and industrial) and agricultural land use to estimate associated water use demand from 2012 to 2062. Under current efficiency rates, total water use was projected to increase 1.8 billion cubic meters(+4.1%) driven primarily by urbanization and shifts to more water intensive crops. Only if currently mandated 25% reductions in municipal water use are continuously implemented would water demand in 2062 balance to water use levels in 2012. This is the first modeling effort of its kind to examine regional land-use related water demand incorporating historical trends of both developed and agricultural land uses.

  14. Water supply and demand in an energy supply model

    SciTech Connect

    Abbey, D; Loose, V

    1980-12-01

    This report describes a tool for water and energy-related policy analysis, the development of a water supply and demand sector in a linear programming model of energy supply in the United States. The model allows adjustments in the input mix and plant siting in response to water scarcity. Thus, on the demand side energy conversion facilities can substitute more costly dry cooling systems for conventional evaporative systems. On the supply side groundwater and water purchased from irrigators are available as more costly alternatives to unappropriated surface water. Water supply data is developed for 30 regions in 10 Western states. Preliminary results for a 1990 energy demand scenario suggest that, at this level of spatial analysis, water availability plays a minor role in plant siting. Future policy applications of the modeling system are discussed including the evaluation of alternative patterns of synthetic fuels development.

  15. Synthesizing Econometric Evidence: The Case of Demand Elasticity Estimates.

    PubMed

    DeCicca, Philip; Kenkel, Don

    2015-06-01

    Econometric estimates of the responsiveness of health-related consumer demand to higher prices are often key ingredients for risk policy analysis. We review the potential advantages and challenges of synthesizing econometric evidence on the price-responsiveness of consumer demand. We draw on examples of research on consumer demand for health-related goods, especially cigarettes. We argue that the overarching goal of research synthesis in this context is to provide policy-relevant evidence for broad-brush conclusions. We propose three main criteria to select among research synthesis methods. We discuss how in principle and in current practice synthesis of research on the price-elasticity of smoking meets our proposed criteria. Our analysis of current practice also contributes to academic research on the specific policy question of the effectiveness of higher cigarette prices to reduce smoking. Although we point out challenges and limitations, we believe more work on research synthesis in this area will be productive and important.

  16. Oral literacy demand of health care communication: challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    Roter, Debra L

    2011-01-01

    Literacy deficits are widespread; one-quarter of the U.S. population has below basic literacy skills and the health consequences of literacy deficits are well-known and significant. While the need to simplify written health education print material is widely recognized, there has been little attempt to describe or reduce the literacy demand of health care dialogue. Patients with limited literacy complain they are not given information about their problems in ways they can understand, leaving them uninformed, frustrated, and distrustful. The purpose of this article is to review a conceptual approach to describing oral literacy demand in health care dialogue, to review several key studies that support the predictive validity of the conceptual framework in regard to patient satisfaction and recall of information, and to propose several practical ways to diminish literacy demand and facilitate more effective health care exchanges with patients.

  17. Future land-use related water demand in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Tamara S.; Sleeter, Benjamin M.; Cameron, D. Richard

    2016-05-01

    Water shortages in California are a growing concern amidst ongoing drought, earlier spring snowmelt, projected future climate warming, and currently mandated water use restrictions. Increases in population and land use in coming decades will place additional pressure on already limited available water supplies. We used a state-and-transition simulation model to project future changes in developed (municipal and industrial) and agricultural land use to estimate associated water use demand from 2012 to 2062. Under current efficiency rates, total water use was projected to increase 1.8 billion cubic meters (+4.1%) driven primarily by urbanization and shifts to more water intensive crops. Only if currently mandated 25% reductions in municipal water use are continuously implemented would water demand in 2062 balance to water use levels in 2012. This is the first modeling effort of its kind to examine regional land-use related water demand incorporating historical trends of both developed and agricultural land uses.

  18. Estimating elasticity for residential electricity demand in China.

    PubMed

    Shi, G; Zheng, X; Song, F

    2012-01-01

    Residential demand for electricity is estimated for China using a unique household level dataset. Household electricity demand is specified as a function of local electricity price, household income, and a number of social-economic variables at household level. We find that the residential demand for electricity responds rather sensitively to its own price in China, which implies that there is significant potential to use the price instrument to conserve electricity consumption. Electricity elasticities across different heterogeneous household groups (e.g., rich versus poor and rural versus urban) are also estimated. The results show that the high income group is more price elastic than the low income group, while rural families are more price elastic than urban families. These results have important policy implications for designing an increasing block tariff.

  19. Demand-withdraw interaction in couples with a violent husband.

    PubMed

    Berns, S B; Jacobson, N S; Gottman, J M

    1999-10-01

    This study examined the relationship between demand-withdraw interaction and battering in couples with a violent husband. The authors compared the interaction patterns of 47 couples with a violent husband with the interaction patterns of 28 distressed but nonviolent couples and 16 happily married nonviolent couples. All couples engaged in videotaped discussions of problem areas in their marriage. Both batterers and battered women showed less positive communication and more negative communication than did their nonviolent counterparts. Additionally, batterers showed significantly higher levels of both demanding and withdrawing than did other men. Battered women demanded more change than did women in nonviolent marriages but were significantly less inclined to withdraw than were their husbands. The discussion of these findings focuses on the interactional dynamics between batterers and battered women and how these interactions might be understood.

  20. Towards improved measurement of cognitive and behavioural work demands.

    PubMed

    Lysaght, Rosemary; Shaw, Lynn; Almas, Andrea; Jogia, Anita; Larmour-Trode, Sherrey

    2008-01-01

    Determination of the cognitive and behavioural demands of work is an important part of holistic workplace intervention. Attention to these factors is especially important when developing return-to-work programs for persons with reduced cognitive, behavioural or psycho-emotional capacity, and when designing risk management programs in organizations. Occupational therapists have the background knowledge and skills to assess these components of work, but often lack valid and reliable measurement tools. This paper reports on three field studies that assessed the reliability and validity of ratings made by novice users of the City of Toronto Job Demands Analysis, which includes a measure of cognitive and behavioural work demands. Numerous challenges to accuracy and reliability that are common to empirical measurement were disclosed, including the necessity for clear and strong definitions, and the importance of thorough rater training. Implications for therapist training and mentorship are discussed.