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Sample records for 5-fluorouracil 5-fu enhances

  1. Synthesis of PEGylated fullerene-5-fluorouracil conjugates to enhance the antitumor effect of 5-fluorouracil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Zengpei; Xu, Yingying; Sun, Hongfang; Liu, Yuanfang

    2012-07-01

    Many drugs have been delivered by different types of nanoscale vehicles to enhance their therapeutic efficacy. 5-Fluorouracil (5FU) is a widely used antitumor drug, however its bioavailability still needs to be improved. Herein we synthesized a polyethylene glycol monomethylether-C60-5FU conjugate (mPEG-C60-5FU) and evaluated its antitumor efficacy in vitro. The results show that the inhibition abilities of mPEG-C60-5FU to the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 and the human gastric carcinoma cell line BGC-823 are significantly higher than that of 5FU. The conjugate has good stability in murine serum for at least 24 h. Moreover, the PEGylated fullerene (mPEG-C60) vehicle is non-toxic to MCF-7 cells. These results demonstrate that mPEG-C60 is an efficient vehicle for the delivery of 5FU.

  2. Layered inorganic nanocomposites: a promising carrier for 5-fluorouracil (5-FU).

    PubMed

    Kevadiya, Bhavesh D; Patel, Tapan A; Jhala, Devendrasinh D; Thumbar, Rahul P; Brahmbhatt, Harshad; Pandya, Maharshi P; Rajkumar, Shalini; Jena, Prasant K; Joshi, Ghanshyam V; Gadhia, Pankaj K; Tripathi, C B; Bajaj, Hari C

    2012-05-01

    We report here the intercalation of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), an anticancer drug in interlayer gallery of Na(+) clay (Montmorillonite, MMT), with the assistance of biopolymer (chitosan, CS). The X-ray diffraction patterns, thermal and spectroscopic analyses indicated the drug intercalation into the clay interlayer space in support of CS and stabilized in the longitudinal monolayer by electrostatic interaction. In vitro drug release showed controlled release pattern. The genotoxic effect of drug was in vitro evaluated in human lymphocyte cell culture by comet assay, and results indicated significant reduction in DNA damage when drug was intercalated with clay and formulated in composites. The results of in vitro cell viability assay in cancer cells pointed at decreased toxicity of drug when encapsulated in Na(+)-clay plates than the pristine drug. In vivo pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, hepatotoxicity markers, e.g., SGPT and SGOT, and liver/testicular histology in rats showed plasma/tissue drug levels were within therapeutic window as compared to pristine drug. Therefore, drug-clay hybrid and composites can be of considerable value in chemotherapy of cancer with reduced side effects.

  3. The herbal extract, Iberogast, improves jejunal integrity in rats with 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced mucositis.

    PubMed

    Wright, Tessa H; Yazbeck, Roger; Lymn, Kerry A; Whitford, Eleanor J; Cheah, Ker Y; Butler, Ross N; Feinle-Bisset, Christine; Pilichiewicz, Amelia N; Mashtoub, Suzanne; Howarth, Gordon S

    2009-05-01

    There is an acute need for the development of effective therapies for mucositis, a debilitating side effect of cancer chemotherapy. Iberogast is a herbal extract reported to possess anti-inflammatory properties. We investigated Iberogast for its potential to reduce the severity of 5-Fluorouracil (FU)-induced mucositis in rats. Rats were allocated to three treatment groups (n = 8) and gavaged daily with a 10% solution of Iberogast or water from day 0 to day 8. Rats were injected intraperitoneally with 5-FU (150 mg/kg) or saline on day 6, and killed after 72 h. In vivo and in vitro sucrase activity was assessed by (13)C-sucrose breath test (SBT) and sucrase assay respectively. Intestinal disease severity was determined by histological assessment of villus height and crypt depth. Significant increases in villus height (277 +/- 9 microm) and crypt depth (67 +/- 3 microm) were observed in 5-FU + Iberogast-treated rats compared with 5-FU + Water (224 +/- 13 microm and 48 +/- 2 microm respectively; p < 0.05). Sucrase activity was significantly reduced in all 5-FU groups compared to control. Significant reductions in SBT and sucrase activity were observed in all 5-FU groups compared with Saline + Water controls (p < 0.05). We conclude that although Iberogast partially improved the histopathological features of 5-FU induced mucositis, it conferred no significant protection as indicated by the assessed endpoints.

  4. Effects of Streptococcus thermophilus TH-4 on intestinal mucositis induced by the chemotherapeutic agent, 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU).

    PubMed

    Whitford, Eleanor J; Cummins, Adrian G; Butler, Ross N; Prisciandaro, Luca D; Fauser, Jane K; Yazbeck, Roger; Lawrence, Andrew; Cheah, Ker Y; Wright, Tessa H; Lymn, Kerry A; Howarth, Gordon S

    2009-03-15

    Beneficial bacteria (probiotics) and probiotic-derived factors have the potential to ameliorate disorders of the intestine. The aim of this study was to compare live Streptococcus thermophilus TH-4 (TH-4), dead TH-4 and TH-4 supernatant in rats treated with 5-Fluorouracil. Rats were randomly allocated to five treatment groups (n=8-10): Saline+Water; 5-FU+Skim Milk; 5-FU+Live TH-4; 5-FU+Supernatant TH-4; and 5-FU+Dead TH-4. 5-FU (150mg.kg(-1)) was administered by a single intraperitoneal injection on day 0; animals were killed on day 4. Treatments were administered daily from days -2 to 3 via oro-gastric gavage. Metabolic parameters were measured daily. Blood was obtained by cardiac puncture, and intestinal tissues removed for quantitative and qualitative histological assessment, including: villous height and area; crypt depth and area, mitotic count and crypt fission; biochemical determination of sucrase and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity; and disease severity scoring. One-way ANOVA statistical analyses were conducted for the majority of outcome measures. Live TH-4 significantly reduced disease severity score by 13% (p< 0.05), and partially normalised mitotic counts compared with 5-FU+Skim milk controls. Live and supernatant TH-4 reduced crypt fission by 69% and 48% (p< 0.05), respectively, compared to 5-FU+Skim Milk controls. No significant differences (p> 0.05) in the occurrence of bacteraemia were evident across all groups. Live TH-4 partially normalised mitotic count and histological severity score in 5-FU treated rats. The inhibitory effect of live TH-4 and TH-4 supernatant on crypt fission suggests therapeutic utility in the prevention of disorders characterised by increased crypt fission, such as colorectal carcinoma.

  5. Effects of Streptococcus thermophilus TH-4 on intestinal mucositis induced by the chemotherapeutic agent 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU).

    PubMed

    Whitford, Eleanor J; Cummins, Adrian G; Butler, Ross N; Prisciandaro, Luca D; Fauser, Jane K; Yazbeck, Roger; Lawrence, Andrew; Cheah, Ker Y; Wright, Tessa H; Lymn, Kerry A; Howarth, Gordon S

    2009-03-15

    Beneficial bacteria (probiotics) and probiotic-derived factors have the potential to ameliorate disorders of the intestine. The aim of this study was to compare live Streptococcus thermophilus TH-4 (TH-4), dead TH-4 and TH-4 supernatant in rats treated with 5-Fluorouracil. Rats were randomly allocated to five treatment groups (n = 8–10): Saline + Water; 5-FU + Skim Milk; 5-FU+ Live TH-4; 5-FU + Supernatant TH-4; and 5-FU + Dead TH-4.5-FU (150 mg.kg-1) was administered by a single intraperitoneal injection on day zero; animals were killed on day four. Treatments were administered daily from days -2 to +3 via oro-gastric gavage. Metabolic parameters were measured daily. Blood was obtained by cardiac puncture, and intestinal tissues removed for quantitative and qualitative histological assessment, including: villus height and area; crypt depth and area, mitotic count and crypt fission;biochemical determination of sucrase and myeloperoxidase (MPO)activity; and disease severity scoring. One-way ANOVA statistical analyses were conducted for the majority of outcome measures. Live TH-4 significantly reduced disease severity score by 13% (p< 0.05), and partially normalized mitotic counts compared with 5-FU + Skim Milk controls. Live and Supernatant TH-4 reduced crypt fission by 69% and 48% (p < 0.05), respectively, compared to 5-FU + Skim Milk controls. No significant differences (p > 0.05) in the occurrence of bacteraemia were evident across all groups. Live TH-4 partially normalized mitotic count and histological severity score in 5-FU treated rats. The inhibitory effect of live TH-4 and TH-4 Supernatant on crypt fission suggests therapeutic utility in the prevention of disorders characterized by increased crypt fission,such as colorectal carcinoma.

  6. Assessment of surface concentrations in resorbable ocular implants: controlled drug delivery devices for 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milne, Peter J.; Gautier, Sandrine; Parel, Jean-Marie A.; Jallet, Valerie

    1997-05-01

    The antineoplastic drug 5-fluorouracil (5-fluoro- 2,4,(1H,3H)-pyrimidinedione; 5-FU) has been used to control proliferation of penetrating fibroblasts and to prevent channel closure following glaucoma filtration surgery (trabeculectomy) or laser sclerectomy. Because of the toxicity of the drug, administration of low dosages slowly over time, at the site of the desired treatment, is indicated for optimum efficacy. Repeated injections of low dosages of the drug represent an undesirable intervention and may also result in unwanted toxicity to the corneal epithelium. A suitable biocompatible and resorbable polymer matrix composed of a poly (D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid: PLGA) has been admixed with varying amounts of 5-FU and cast as shapes suitable for intracorneal implantation. Slow biodegradation of this polymer over a one to two week period has been shown to result in an acceptably slow drug release mechanism. An issue arising during the clinical evaluation of the efficacy of this drug delivery system was how best to quantify the concentration of 5-FU and its distribution spatially in the solid implant. FT-IR and FT-Raman spectroscopies distinguishes between the drug and the polymer matrix and were used to differentiate and quantitate the 5-FU concentration of the implants.

  7. Irinotecan (CPT-11) in metastatic colorectal cancer patients resistant to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU): a phase II study.

    PubMed

    Antón, A; Aranda, E; Carrato, A; Marcuello, E; Massutti, B; Cervantes, A; Abad, A; Sastre, J; Fenández-Martos, C; Gallén, M; Díaz-Rubio, E; Huarte, L; Balcells, M

    2003-10-01

    The efficacy and toxicity of irinotecan (CPT-11) 350 mg/m(2) i.v. once every 3 weeks was assessed in 60 patients with advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) showing failure to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) treatment. The overall objective response rate was 13.6% (1 complete response and 4 partial responses) and 25 patients (42.4%) showed stable disease; the median time to disease progression was 4.4 months and the median survival was 10.5 months. The main non-hematological toxicities were alopecia (80.3% of patients), diarrhea (75.0%), and nausea/vomiting (71.7%); neutropenia was the main hematological toxicity. Grade 3 or 4 diarrhea appeared in 21 of 131 cycles (16.1%), whereas grade 3 or 4 neutropenia appeared in 78 cycles (25.0%). In conclusion, the present phase II study confirms that CPT-11 350 mg/m(2) every 3 weeks is active and well tolerated as second-line chemotherapy for CRC in 5-FU resistant patients. (c) 2003 Prous Science. All rights reserved.

  8. Absorption and distribution characteristics of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) after an application to the liver surface in rats in order to reduce systemic side effects.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Yukinobu; Fumoto, Shintaro; Nishi, Junya; Nakashima, Mikiro; Sasaki, Hitoshi; Nakamura, Junzo; Nishida, Koyo

    2008-05-01

    The present study was undertaken to elucidate the absorption and distribution characteristics of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) after its application to the liver surface in rats to examine the possibility of reducing the systemic side effects of this agent. 5-FU was applied to the surface of the liver by employing a cylindrical diffusion cell. Approximately 69% of the dose was absorbed in 360 min. The time course of the change in the amount of 5-FU remaining in the diffusion cell obeyed first-order kinetics. Also, a linear relationship was observed between the apparent permeability coefficient, P app, and the reciprocal of the square root of the molecular weight of several compounds including 5-FU. The estimated P app value of 5-FU was in good agreement with the experimental value. The plasma concentration of 5-FU was low (<1.2 microg/ml) until 360 min after the application. Following i.v. administration, 5-FU was rapidly eliminated from the plasma and could not be detected at 120 min. In the analysis of tissue distribution, the liver was divided into three sites; the region under the diffusion cell attachment site (site 1), the treated lobe excluding site 1 (site 2), and untreated lobes (site 3). After being administered i.v., 5-FU mainly distributed in the kidney, and the concentration in the liver was significantly lower than that in kidney, spleen, or heart. After its application to the liver surface, however, 5-FU preferentially distributed at site 1, and was not detected at the other sites or in other tissues. Thus, these results suggested the possibility of a reduction in the systemic side effect of 5-FU on its application to the liver surface.

  9. A novel 5-fluorouracil-resistant human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cell line Eca-109/5-FU with significant drug resistance-related characteristics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chi; Ma, Qunfeng; Shi, Yinan; Li, Xue; Wang, Ming; Wang, Junfeng; Ge, Jianlin; Chen, Zhinan; Wang, Ziling; Jiang, Hong

    2017-05-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is used for the clinical treatment of esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (ESCCs), yet it also induces chemoresistant cancer cells during treatment, which leads to the failure of the therapy. To further explore the resistance mechanism of 5-FU in ESCC, we established the 5-FU-resistant ESCC cell line Eca-109/5-FU, which was prepared by the stepwise exposure to increasing 5-FU concentrations. MTT assay and nude mouse xenograft models were used to test the drug resistance and proliferation of Eca-109 and Eca-109/5-FU cells in vitro and in vivo. Apoptosis and cell cycle distribution were determined using flow cytometry. Drug resistance-related proteins were detected by western blotting. Metabolomic profiles were obtained from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) tests. In regards to Eca-109/5-FU, the decreased susceptibility to 5-FU was determined in vitro and in vivo with slower rate of proliferation. Drug resistance-related proteins (multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 and ATP-binding cassette superfamily G member 2), epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related proteins (E-cadherin and vimentin) and cancer stem cell-related proteins (prominin-1 and hyaluronate receptor) exhibited significant differences between the two cell lines. The 5-FU-resistant cell line Eca-109/5-FU achieved the ability to tolerate 5-FU, which may depend on significant drug resistance-related characteristics, such as EMT and cancer stem cell-like properties. The metabolism of Eca-109/5-FU was altered, and more than 15 metabolites was found to contribute to the difference in the metabolite profile, such as lactate, glutamate, taurine, glutamine, proline, aspartate, methanol, cystine, glycine and uracil. Our results identified that the resistant cell line Eca-109/5-FU showed quite different characteristics compared with the parental Eca-109 cells. The Eca-109/5-FU cell line provides an experimental model for further steps to select chemotherapeutic

  10. Gold nanoparticles enhance 5-fluorouracil anticancer efficacy against colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Safwat, Mohamed A; Soliman, Ghareb M; Sayed, Douaa; Attia, Mohamed A

    2016-11-20

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU), an antimetabolite drug, is extensively used in the treatment solid tumors. However, its severe side effects limit its clinical benefits. To enhance 5-FU anticancer efficacy and reduce its side effects it was loaded onto gold nanoparticles (GNPs) using two thiol containing ligands, thioglycolic acid (TGA) and glutathione (GSH). The GNPs were prepared at different 5-FU/ligand molar ratios and evaluated using different techniques. Anticancer efficacy of 5-FU/GSH-GNPs was studied using flow cytometry in cancerous tissue obtained from patients having colorectal cancer. The GNPs were spherical in shape and had a size of ∼9-17nm. Stability of the GNPs and drug release were studied as a function of salt concentration and solution pH. Maximum 5-FU loading was achieved at 5-FU/ligand molar ratio of 1:1 and 2:1 for TGA-GNPs and GSH-GNPs, respectively. GNPs coating with pluronic F127 improved their stability against salinity. 5-FU release from GNPs was slow and pH-dependent. 5-FU/GSH-GNPs induced apoptosis and stopped the cell cycle progression in colorectal cancer cells. They also had a 2-fold higher anticancer effect compared with free 5-FU. These results confirm the potential of GNPs to enhance 5-FU anticancer efficacy.

  11. Enhancement of 5- Fluorouracil-induced In Vitro and In Vivo Radiosensitization with MEK Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Urick, Mary Ellen; Chung, Eun Joo; Shield, William P.; Gerber, Naamit; White, Ayla; Sowers, Anastasia; Thetford, Angela; Camphausen, Kevin; Mitchell, James; Citrin, Deborah E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Gastrointestinal cancers frequently exhibit mutational activation of the Ras/MAPK pathway, which is implicated in resistance to ionizing radiation (IR) and chemotherapy. Concurrent radiotherapy and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) based chemotherapy is commonly used for treatment of gastrointestinal malignancies. We previously reported radiosensitization with selumetinib, an inhibitor of MEK1/2. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate if selumetinib could enhance radiosensitivity induced by 5-FU. Experimental Design Clonogenic survival assays were performed with the HT29 (colorectal), HCT116 (colorectal) and MiaPaca-2 (pancreatic) cell lines using pre-IR treatment with selumetinib, 5-FU and 5-FU+selumetinib. Cell proliferation was determined using a tetrazolium conversion assay. Mitotic catastrophe and DNA repair were analyzed using immunocytochemistry. Flow cytometry was used to analyze cell cycle and apoptosis. Growth delay was used to determine effects of 5-FU+selumetinib on in vivo tumor radiosensitivity. Results Pre-IR treatment with 5-FU+selumetinib significantly decreased clonogenic survival compared to either agent alone. Dose modifying factors at a surviving fraction of 0.1 for 5-FU+selumetinib was 1.78, 1.52, and 1.3 for HT29, HCT116, and MiaPaca-2, respectively. Cell proliferation was decreased by treatment with selumetinib+5-FU as compared to single agent treatment regardless of treatment sequencing. Enhancement of 5-FU cytotoxicity and 5-FU mediated radiosensitization with selumetinib treatment was accompanied by an increase in mitotic catastrophe and apoptosis, and reductions in Stat3 phosphorylation and survivin expression. In vivo, an additive growth delay was observed with 5-FU+selumetinib+5Gy versus 5-FU+5Gy and selumetinib alone. Conclusion These data suggest that selumetinib can be used with 5-FU to augment radiation response. PMID:21690569

  12. Factors predicting efficacy of oxaliplatin in combination with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) ± folinic acid in a compassionate-use cohort of 481 5-FU-resistant advanced colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Bensmaïne, M A; Marty, M; Gramont, A de; Brienza, S; Lévi, F; Ducreux, M; François, E; Gamelin, E; Bleiberg, H; Cvitkovic, E

    2001-01-01

    A statistical analysis was performed on the patient data collected from two compassionate-use programmes using oxaliplatin (Eloxatin®) + 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) ± folinic acid (FA), to identify predictive factors for oxaliplatin-based salvage treatment in patients with 5-FU-resistant advanced colorectal cancer (ACRC). 481 5-FU-resistant ACRC patients, most with performance status ≤ 2, ≥ 3 involved sites, and ≥ 2 prior lines of chemotherapy, received oxaliplatin + 5-FU ± FA. Prognostic factors associated with overall response rate (ORR), time to progression (TTP) and overall survival (OS) were identified using univariate and multivariate logistic and/or Cox proportional hazards analyses. The ORR was 16% (95% CI: 13–20), the median TTP was 4.2 months (95% CI: 3.4–4.6), and the median OS was 9.6 months (95% CI: 8.6–10.6). The multivariate analysis indicated poor (≥ 2 WHO) performance status (PS), a large number of prior chemotherapy regimens (≥ 3), a low baseline haemoglobin level (< 10 g/dl), and a triweekly (vs biweekly) treatment administration schedule as significantly associated (P< 0.05) with a lower ORR. Sex (male), number of organs involved (≥3) and alkaline phosphatase (AP) level (≥ 2 × the upper limit of normal) were associated (P< 0.05) with shorter TTP. Poor PS, a large number of organs involved, and elevated AP were independently and significantly correlated with shorter OS. Our analysis identified a relationship between efficacy results of oxaliplatin + 5-FU ± FA treatment in 5-FU-resistant ACRC patients and baseline prognostic factors related to PS, extent of disease and number of prior regimens. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11506488

  13. Surface-enhanced Raman spectral measurements of 5-fluorouracil in saliva.

    PubMed

    Farquharson, Stuart; Gift, Alan; Shende, Chetan; Inscore, Frank; Ordway, Beth; Farquharson, Carl; Murren, John

    2008-10-22

    The ability of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) to measure 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in saliva is presented. The approach is based on the capacity of Raman spectroscopy to provide a unique spectral signature for virtually every chemical, and the ability of SERS to provide microg/mL sensitivity. A simple sampling method, that employed 1-mm glass capillaries filled with silver-doped sol-gels, was developed to isolate 5-FU from potential interfering chemical components of saliva and simultaneously provide SERSactivity. The method involved treating a 1 mL saliva sample with 1 mL of acetic acid, drawing 10 microL of sample into a SERS-active capillary by syringe, and then measuring the SER spectrum. Quality SER spectra were obtained for samples containing as little as 2 microg of 5-FU in 1 mL saliva. The entire process, the acid pretreatment, extraction and spectral measurement, took less than 5 minutes. The SERS of 5-fluorouridine and 5-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine, two major metabolites of 5-FU, were also measured and shown to have unique spectral peaks. These measurements suggest that disposable SERS-active capillaries could be used to measure 5-FU and metabolite concentrations in chemotherapy patient saliva, thereby providing metabolic data that would allow regulating dosage. Tentative vibrational mode assignments for 5-FU and its metabolites are also given.

  14. A phase II experience with neoadjuvant irinotecan (CPT-11), 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and leucovorin (LV) for colorectal liver metastases

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Chemotherapy may improve survival in patients undergoing resection of colorectal liver metastases (CLM). Neoadjuvant chemotherapy may help identify patients with occult extrahepatic disease (averting unnecessary metastasectomy), and it provides in vivo chemosensitivity data. Methods A phase II trial was initiated in which patients with resectable CLM received CPT-11, 5-FU and LV for 12 weeks. Metastasectomy was performed unless extrahepatic disease appeared. Postoperatively, patients with stable or responsive disease received the same regimen for 12 weeks. Patients with progressive disease received either second-line chemotherapy or best supportive care. The primary endpoint was disease-free survival (DFS); secondary endpoints included overall survival (OS) and safety. Results 35 patients were accrued. During preoperative chemotherapy, 16 patients (46%) had grade 3/4 toxicities. Resection was not possible in 5 patients. One patient died of arrhythmia following surgery, and 1 patient had transient liver failure. During the postoperative treatment phase, 12 patients (55%) had grade 3/4 toxicities. Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) occurred in 11 patients (34%) at various times during treatment. Of those who underwent resection, median DFS was 23.0 mo. and median OS has not been reached. The overall survival from time of diagnosis of liver metastases was 51.6 mo for the entire cohort. Conclusion A short course of chemotherapy prior to hepatic metastasectomy may serve to select candidates best suited for resection and it may also direct postoperative systemic treatment. Given the significant incidence of DVT, alternative systemic neoadjuvant regimens should be investigated, particularly those that avoid the use of a central venous line. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00168155. PMID:19457245

  15. [Evolving 5-Fluorouracil Therapy to Achieve Enhanced Efficacy-Past and Current Efforts of Researchers].

    PubMed

    Maehara, Yoshihiko; Oki, Eiji; Saeki, Hiroshi; Tokunaga, Eriko; Kitao, Hiroyuki; Iimori, Makoto; Niimi, Shinichiro; Kataoka, Yuki; Emi, Yasunori; Kakeji, Yoshihiro; Baba, Hideo; Shirasaka, Tetsuhiko

    2016-07-01

    5-fluorouracil(5-FU)therapy has advanced greatly over the past 50 years, achieving enhanced therapeutic effects and reduced adverse effects. By taking advantage of the metabolism of 5-FU, researchers have made efforts to develop prodrugs, combination drug products, and combination therapy regimens via biochemical modulation(BCM)with alteration of the drug metabolism. Examples include the advent of the prodrug tegafur(FT), followed by tegafur-uracil(UFT)and tegafurgimeracil- potassium oxonate(S-1)as combined products based on BCM. In the current standard treatment for gastrointestinal cancers, anticancer 5-FU derivatives serve as a platform for combination regimens with other cytotoxic agents or molecular- targeted drugs. To provide further improvements in anticancer therapy outcomes, novel molecular-targeted agents, immune checkpoint inhibitors, and other drugs are being developed, but 5-FU remains an attractive target that shows further potential for increased efficacy. In the future, the evolution of anticancer therapy with 5-FU derivatives is expected to continue via a variety of approaches.

  16. Anti-mitotic potential of 7-diethylamino-3(2 Prime -benzoxazolyl)-coumarin in 5-fluorouracil-resistant human gastric cancer cell line SNU620/5-FU

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Nam Hyun; Kim, Su-Nam; Oh, Joa Sub; Lee, Seokjoon; Kim, Yong Kee

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DBC exerts antiproliferative potential against 5FU-resistant human gastric cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This effect is mediated by destabilization of microtubules and subsequent mitotic arrest. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DBC enhances apoptosis via caspase activation and downregulation of antiapoptotic genes. -- Abstract: In this study, we investigate an anti-mitotic potential of the novel synthetic coumarin-based compound, 7-diethylamino-3(2 Prime -benzoxazolyl)-coumarin, in 5-fluorouracil-resistant human gastric cancer cell line SNU-620-5FU and its parental cell SNU-620. It exerts the anti-proliferative effects with similar potencies against both cancer cells, which is mediated by destabilization of microtubules and subsequent mitotic arrest. Furthermore, this compound enhances caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death via decreased expression of anti-apoptotic genes. Taken together, our data strongly support anti-mitotic potential of 7-diethylamino-3(2 Prime -benzoxazolyl)-coumarin against drug-resistant cancer cells which will prompt us to further develop as a novel microtubule inhibitor for drug-resistant cancer chemotherapy.

  17. CTGF enhances resistance to 5-FU-mediating cell apoptosis through FAK/MEK/ERK signal pathway in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kai; Gao, Kai; Hu, Gui; Wen, Yanguang; Lin, Changwei; Li, Xiaorong

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers among both males and females; the chemotherapy drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is one of a doctors’ first lines of defense against CRC. However, therapeutic failures are common because of the emergence of drug resistance. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is a secreted protein that binds to integrins, and regulates the invasiveness and metastasis of certain carcinoma cells. Here, we found that CTGF was upregulated in drug-resistant phenotype of human CRC cells. Overexpression of CTGF enhanced the resistance to 5-FU-induced cell apoptosis. Moreover, downregulating the expression of CTGF promoted the curative effect of chemotherapy and blocked the cell cycle in the G1 phase. We also found that CTGF facilitated resistance to 5-FU-induced apoptosis by increasing the expression of B-cell lymphoma-extra large (Bcl-xL) and survivin. Then we pharmacologically blocked MEK/ERK signal pathway and assessed 5-FU response by MTT assays. Our current results indicate that the expression of phosphorylated forms of MEK/ERK increased in high CTGF expression cells and MEK inhibited increases in 5-FU-mediated apoptosis of resistant CRC cells. Therefore, our data suggest that MEK/ERK signaling contributes to 5-FU resistance through upstream of CTGF, and supports CRC cell growth. Comprehending the molecular mechanism underlying 5-FU resistance may ultimately aid the fight against CRC. PMID:27942222

  18. Poloxamer 188 and propylene glycol-based rectal suppository enhances anticancer effect of 5-fluorouracil in mice.

    PubMed

    Paek, Seung-Hwan; Xuan, Jing-Ji; Choi, Han-Gon; Park, Byung Chul; Lee, Yoon-Seok; Jeong, Tae-Cheon; Jin, Chun Hua; Oh, Yu-Kyoung; Kim, Jung-Ae

    2006-05-01

    The tumoricidal and apoptosis-inducing activities of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) have been demonstrated in experimental and clinical investigations. Clinically, the 5-FU suppository form has been widely adopted for its advantages of less systemic toxicity, higher local tissue concentrations, and reduced first-pass effect. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of rectal administration of 5-FU suppository based on poloxamer 188 (P188) and propylene glycol (PG) and its anticancer effect on the murine experimental cancer models. The rectal suppository was made with 70% P188 and 30% PG, which was a solid phase at room temperature and instantly melted at physiological temperature. The treatment with the 5-FU suppository was more effective than the oral route in decreasing the volume of rectal cancer in mice. In addition, the survival rate of the mice with rectal cancer was higher in the group treated with the 5-FU suppository than in the group treated with 5-FU orally. Furthermore, in mice skin cancers induced by inoculation of murine CT-26 colon carcinoma cells, the anticancer effect of 5-FU was significantly enhanced by the rectal administration of the suppository than by oral treatment. Taken together, the results suggest that a poloxamer gel system with 5-FU/P188/PG is an effective rectal dosage form for the treatment of both rectal and non-rectal cancers.

  19. Design and development of folate appended liposomes for enhanced delivery of 5-FU to tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Yashwant; Jain, Anekant; Jain, Priyanka; Jain, Sanjay K

    2007-04-01

    Folate appended sterically-stabilized liposomes (FA-SL) were investigated for tumor targeting. Liposomes were prepared using HSPC, cholesterol and FA-polyethylene glycol (PEG)-SA. The liposomes with polyethylene glycol (PEG) without folic acid which has similar lipid composition were used for comparison. Liposomal preparations were characterized for shape, size and percent entrapment. The average size of liposomes was found to be in range 124-163 nm and maximum drug entrapment was found to be 34.2-40.3%. In vitro drug release from the formulations is obeying fickian release kinetics. Cellular uptake and IC(50) values of the FR-targeted formulation were determined in vitro in FR (+) B16F10 melanoma cells. In vitro cell binding of FA-SL exhibits 11-folds higher binding to B16F10 melanoma cells in comparison to SL. In vivo cytotoxicy assay on FR targeted liposomes gave IC(50) of 1.87 microM and non-targeted liposomes gave IC(50) of 4.02 microM. In therapeutic experiments 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), SL and FA-SL were administered at the dose of 10 mg 5-FU/kg body weight to B16F10 tumor bearing Balb/c mice. Administration of FA-SL formulation results in effective reduction in tumor growth as compared with free 5-FU and SL. Results indicate that folic acid appended SL bearing 5-FU are significantly (P < 0.01) active against primary tumor and metastasis than non-targeted sterically-SL. Thus, it could be concluded that folate coupled liposomal formulations enhanced drug uptake by tumor cells.

  20. Sesquiterpene components of volatile oils as skin penetration enhancers for the hydrophilic permeant 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Cornwell, P A; Barry, B W

    1994-04-01

    Twelve sesquiterpene compounds, derived from natural volatile oils, were investigated as putative skin penetration enhancers for human skin. Pretreatment of epidermal membranes with sesquiterpene oils, or solid sesquiterpenes saturated in dimethyl isosorbide, increased the rate of absorption of the model hydrophilic permeant, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Enhancers with polar functional groups were generally more potent than pure hydrocarbons. Furthermore, enhancers with the least bunched structures were the most active. The largest effect was observed following pretreatment with nerolidol, which increased pseudo-steady-state 5-FU flux over 20-fold. Molecular modelling suggested that terpenes with structures suitable for alignment within lipid lamellae were the most potent enhancers. Sesquiterpene enhancers had long durations of action implying that they did not wash out of the skin easily. This study attempted to improve enhancer clearance by replacing the aqueous donor and receptor phases by ethanol:water (1:1) solutions. Ethanol increased the permeability coefficient for 5-FU 13-fold, demonstrating that, in aqueous solution, it is a moderately potent penetration enhancer. Sesquiterpene and ethanol enhancement effects were approximately additive. Sesquiterpene effects were almost fully maintained for at least 4.5 days following pretreatment, illustrating poor reversibility. Stratum corneum/water drug partitioning studies suggested that an important mechanism of action of the enhancers was to increase the apparent drug diffusivity in the stratum corneum. Increases in drug partitioning into the entire stratum corneum following enhancer pretreatment were relatively small. Diffusivity increases were directly related to overall rises in permeability. This study has shown that sesquiterpene compounds, which are of low toxicity and cutaneous irritancy, can promote 5-FU absorption across human skin. Sesquiterpene compounds, therefore, show promise as clinically-acceptable skin

  1. A multicentre, randomised phase III trial comparing protracted venous infusion (PVI) 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) with PVI 5-FU plus mitomycin C in patients with inoperable oesophago-gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Tebbutt, N C; Norman, A; Cunningham, D; Iveson, T; Seymour, M; Hickish, T; Harper, P; Maisey, N; Mochlinski, K; Prior, Y; Hill, M

    2002-10-01

    This randomised study compared protracted venous infusion (PVI) fluorouracil (5-FU) with PVI 5-FU plus mitomycin C (MMC) in patients with advanced oesophago-gastric cancer. Two hundred and fifty-four patients with adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma or undifferentiated carcinoma involving the oesophagus, oesophago-gastric junction or the stomach were randomised. The major end points were tumour response, survival, toxicity and quality of life. The median age of patients treated was 72 years and the two arms were well-balanced for baseline demographic factors. The overall response rate was 16.1% [95% confidence interval (CI) 9.5% to 22.7%] in patients treated with PVI 5-FU alone compared with 19.1% (95% CI 12.0% to 26.0%) for those treated with PVI 5-FU plus MMC (P = 0.555). Median time to treatment failure was 3.9 months for PVI 5-FU and 3.8 months for PVI 5-FU plus MMC (P = 0.195). Median survival was 6.3 months for PVI 5-FU and 5.3 months for PVI 5-FU plus MMC (P = 1.0). Toxicity was mild for both treatments. Symptomatic benefit measured by improvement in pain control, weight loss, dysphagia and oesophageal reflux was observed in over 64% of patients in each arm. Quality of life scores were comparable in each arm. PVI 5-FU is a safe, effective form of palliation for patients with advanced oesophago-gastric cancer although the addition of MMC adds little extra benefit.

  2. 5-Fluorouracil as an enhancer of aminolevulinate-based photodynamic therapy for skin cancer: New use for a venerable agent?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maytin, Edward V.; Anand, Sanjay; Wilson, Clara; Iyer, Karthik

    2011-02-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) was developed in the 1950s as an anticancer drug and is now widely used to treat many cancers, including colon and breast carcinoma. 5-FU causes fluoronucleotide misincorporation into RNA and DNA, inhibits thymidylate synthase, and leads to growth arrest and apoptosis. For skin precancers (actinic keratoses; AK), 5-FU is prescribed as a topical agent and was essentially the only option for treating widespread AK of the skin prior to FDA approval of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in 1999. PDT is now gradually replacing 5-FU as a preferred treatment for AK, but neither PDT nor 5-FU are effective for true skin cancers (basal or squamous cell), particularly for tumors >1 mm in depth. In our ongoing work to improve the efficacy of PDT for skin cancer, we previously showed that PDT efficacy can be significantly enhanced by preconditioning tumors with methotrexate (MTX), which leads to increased production of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) in target cells. However, because MTX must be given orally or intravenously, it is considered unacceptable for widespread human use due to potential toxicity. MTX and 5-FU exert similar effects on the thymidylate synthesis pathway, so we reasoned that topical 5-FU could be a potential alternative to MTX. In this paper, exploratory studies that test 5-FU as a preconditioning agent for PDT are presented. In a cutaneous model of squamous cell carcinoma (chemically-induced papillomatous tumors in mice), 5-FU significantly enhances PpIX accumulation and therefore emerges as a new candidate agent for combination therapy with PDT.

  3. Amphiphilic dendritic nanomicelle-mediated co-delivery of 5-fluorouracil and doxorubicin for enhanced therapeutic efficacy.

    PubMed

    Han, Rui; Sun, Yuan; Kang, Chen; Sun, Huijing; Wei, Wenguang

    2017-02-01

    Combination cancer therapy has attracted considerable attention due to its enhanced antitumor efficacy and reduced toxicity granted by synergistic effects over monotherapy. The application of nanotechnology is expected to achieve coencapsulation of multiple anticancer agents with enhanced therapeutic efficacy. Herein, a unique nanomicelle based on amphiphilic dendrimer (AmD) consisting of a hydrophilic polyamidoamine dendritic shell and a hydrophobic polylactide core is developed for effectively loading and shuttling 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu) and doxorubicin (Dox). The yielded drug-encapsulated dendritic nanomicelle (5-Fu/Dox-DNM) has a modest average size of 68.6 ± 3.3 nm and shows pH-sensitive drug release manner. The parallel activity of 5-Fu and Dox show synergistic anticancer efficacy. The IC50 value of 5-Fu/Dox-DNM toward human breast cancer (MDA-MB-231) cells was 0.25 μg/mL, presenting an 11.2-fold and 6.1-fold increase in cytotoxicity compared to Dox-DNM and 5-Fu-DNM, respectively. Furthermore, 5-Fu/Dox-DNM significantly inhibits the progression of tumor growth in the MDA-MB-231 xenograft tumor mice model. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that our AmD-based combination therapeutic system has promising potential to open an avenue for coencapsulation of multiple chemotherapeutic agents to promote superior anticancer effect.

  4. Laser treatments on skin enhancing and controlling transdermal delivery of 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Clara; Costela, Angel; García-Moreno, Inmaculada; Llanes, Felipe; Teijón, José M; Blanco, Dolores

    2008-01-01

    Laser ablation of stratum corneum (SC) enhances transdermal delivery of hydrophilic drugs. The influence of the infrared (IR) (lambda = 1,064 nm), visible (lambda = 532 nm), and ultraviolet (UV) (lambda = 355 nm) radiations of a Nd:YAG laser on transdermal delivery of 5-Fluorouracil (5-Fu) across skin was studied in vitro. Pinna skin of the inner side of rabbit ear, was used for the skin permeation. The light source for laser treatment was a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (Lotis TII SL-2132). Ablation thresholds were estimated by using a photoacoustic technique. In addition, permeation study, and morphological and structural skin examination by histology and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were carried out. A significant increase in the permeation of 5-Fu across skin pre-treatment with the three different wavelengths studied was obtained. Since irradiation at 1,064 nm allows deep penetration of the radiation, collagen fibers were affected [7.7 J/cm(2) (15 Hz)]. Visible radiation of Nd:YAG laser showed the wider range of fluences (3-8.4 J/cm(2) at 15 Hz) to enhance skin delivery of 5-Fu, without risk of skin lesion. UV radiation required minor energy contribution to produce the same effects within a narrower range of fluences [0.3 J/cm(2) (5 Hz)-1.5 J/cm(2) (15 Hz)] so the process is less controlled and this radiation shows greater impact on the lipidic structure than visible and IR radiations. Use of the visible radiation of a Nd:YAG laser is a good method for improving the efficacy of topical chemotherapy of 5-Fu.

  5. Enhancing the efficiency of 5-aminolevulinic acid-mediated photodynamic therapy using 5-fluorouracil on human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Tahmasebi, Hadis; Khoshgard, Karim; Sazgarnia, Ameneh; Mostafaie, Ali; Eivazi, Mohammad Taghi

    2016-03-01

    5-Aminolevulinic acid-mediated photodynamic therapy (ALA-PDT) is an effective and noninvasive modality for treatment of several types of non-melanoma skin cancers. This in-vitro study attempted to know whether the killing effect of ALA-PDT on the human melanoma cells (Mel-Rm cell line) could be increased by the presence of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). To evaluate the effect of ALA-PDT in combination with 5-FU on viability of human melanoma Mel-Rm cells, the cells incubated with 5-ALA and 5-FU for 3h in nontoxic concentrations, and subsequently illuminated with a 630 nm light-emitting diode array. The cells viability and cytotoxicity determined by mitochondrial activity and lactate dehydrogenase assays. Combination of ALA-PDT and 5-FU (FU-ALA-PDT) showed a considerable growth inhibition according to the results of MTT assay compared to ALA-PDT. The results of LDH assay also showed a cytotoxicity effect in ALA-PDT; however, the FU-ALA-PDT showed no significantly enhancement in cytotoxicity compared to ALA-PDT using LDH assay. The Mel-Rm cells incubation with 5-FU before PDT enhances the efficiency of 5-Aminolevulinic acid-mediated photodynamic therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Vitamin D analogs enhance the anticancer activity of 5-fluorouracil in an in vivo mouse colon cancer model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Active vitamin D analogs that are less toxic than calcitriol can be useful in the combined treatment of patients suffering from colon cancer. In the present study we demonstrate, for the first time in an in vivo model system, the biological effect of combined therapy using 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) along with vitamin D analog PRI-2191 (tacalcitol, 1,24-dihydroxyvitamin D3) or PRI-2205 (5,6-trans-isomer of calcipotriol) on colon cancer. Methods We investigated the influence of vitamin D analogs on the anticancer activity of 5-FU or capecitabine in the treatment of mice bearing MC38 mouse colon tumors implanted subcutaneously or orthotopically. The cell cycle distribution, E-cadherin expression and caspase 3/7 activity in vitro were also evaluated. Results We observed that both PRI-2191 and PRI-2205 significantly enhanced the antitumor activity of 5-FU; but these results depend on the treatment regimen. Applying the optimal schedule of combined therapy we observed a significant decrease in tumor growth, metastasis and also a prolongation of the survival time of mice, in comparison with the administrations of 5-FU given alone. Both combinations indicated a synergistic effect and did not cause toxicity. Moreover, analogs applied after completed course of administration of 5-FU, prolonged the antitumor effect of the drug. Furthermore, when the prodrug of 5-FU, capecitabine, was used, potentiation of its activity was also observed. Conclusions Our data suggest that vitamin D analogs (especially PRI-2191) might be potentially applied to clinical use in order to enhance the anticancer effect of 5-FU and also prolong its activity against colon cancer. The activity of PRI-2191 is realized through stopping the cells in the G0/G1 cell cycle phase and increasing the expression of E-cadherin. PMID:23777514

  7. Hedyotis diffusa Willd overcomes 5-fluorouracil resistance in human colorectal cancer HCT-8/5-FU cells by downregulating the expression of P-glycoprotein and ATP-binding casette subfamily G member 2

    PubMed Central

    LI, QIONGYU; WANG, XIANGFENG; SHEN, ALING; ZHANG, YUCHEN; CHEN, YOUQIN; SFERRA, THOMAS J.; LIN, JIUMAO; PENG, JUN

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that Hedyotis diffusa Willd (HDW), a traditional Chinese herbal medicine, exhibits potent anticancer activity in models of colorectal cancer (CRC). Aggressive forms of CRC exhibit resistance to widely used chemotherapeutic drugs, including the antimetabolite, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU); however, less is known with regard to the activity of HDW against 5-FU-resistant cancer. In the present study, the mechanism of action and the potency of ethanol extracts of HDW (EEHDW) were investigated on a multidrug-resistant CRC HCT-8/5-FU cell line. Using an MTT cell proliferation assay, EEHDW treatment was shown to significantly reduce the cell viability of HCT-8/5-FU cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, EEHDW significantly increased the retention of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter substrate, rhodamine-123, as compared with the untreated controls. To further investigate the molecular mechanisms targeted by EEHDW in the resistant cells, the expression levels of the ABC drug transporter protein, P-glycoprotein (P-gp), and ABC subfamily G member 2 (ABCG2), were analyzed using reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. The mRNA and protein expression levels of P-gp and ABCG2 were reduced in the HCT-8/5-FU cells following EEHDW treatment, indicating that EEHDW inhibits ABCG2-mediated drug resistance by downregulating the expression of ABCG2 and P-gp. Therefore, the potential application of EEHDW as a chemotherapeutic adjuvant represents a promising alternative approach to the treatment of drug-resistant CRC. PMID:26640560

  8. Hedyotis diffusa Willd overcomes 5-fluorouracil resistance in human colorectal cancer HCT-8/5-FU cells by downregulating the expression of P-glycoprotein and ATP-binding casette subfamily G member 2.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiongyu; Wang, Xiangfeng; Shen, Aling; Zhang, Yuchen; Chen, Youqin; Sferra, Thomas J; Lin, Jiumao; Peng, Jun

    2015-11-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that Hedyotis diffusa Willd (HDW), a traditional Chinese herbal medicine, exhibits potent anticancer activity in models of colorectal cancer (CRC). Aggressive forms of CRC exhibit resistance to widely used chemotherapeutic drugs, including the antimetabolite, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU); however, less is known with regard to the activity of HDW against 5-FU-resistant cancer. In the present study, the mechanism of action and the potency of ethanol extracts of HDW (EEHDW) were investigated on a multidrug-resistant CRC HCT-8/5-FU cell line. Using an MTT cell proliferation assay, EEHDW treatment was shown to significantly reduce the cell viability of HCT-8/5-FU cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, EEHDW significantly increased the retention of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter substrate, rhodamine-123, as compared with the untreated controls. To further investigate the molecular mechanisms targeted by EEHDW in the resistant cells, the expression levels of the ABC drug transporter protein, P-glycoprotein (P-gp), and ABC subfamily G member 2 (ABCG2), were analyzed using reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. The mRNA and protein expression levels of P-gp and ABCG2 were reduced in the HCT-8/5-FU cells following EEHDW treatment, indicating that EEHDW inhibits ABCG2-mediated drug resistance by downregulating the expression of ABCG2 and P-gp. Therefore, the potential application of EEHDW as a chemotherapeutic adjuvant represents a promising alternative approach to the treatment of drug-resistant CRC.

  9. Zebrafish stem cell differentiation stage factors suppress Bcl-xL release and enhance 5-Fu-mediated apoptosis in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    D'Anselmi, F; Cucina, A; Biava, P M; Proietti, S; Coluccia, P; Frati, L; Bizzarri, M

    2011-02-01

    Stem cell differentiation stage factors (SCDSF), taken from Zebrafish embryos during the stage in which totipotent stem cells are differentiating into pluripotent stem cells, have been shown to inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis in colon tumors. In order to ascertain if these embryonic factors could synergistically/additively interact with 5-Fluorouracil (5-Fu), whole cell-count, flow-cytometry analysis and apoptotic parameters were recorded in human colon cancer cells (Caco2) treated with Zebrafish stem cell differentiation stage factors (SCDSF 3 µg/ml) in association or not with 5-Fu in the sub-pharmacological therapeutic range (0.01 mg/ml). Cell proliferation was significantly reduced by SCDSF, meanwhile SCDSF+5-Fu leads to an almost complete growth-inhibition. SCDSF produces a significant apoptotic effect, meanwhile the association with 5-FU leads to an enhanced additive apoptotic rate at both 24 and 72 hrs. SCDSF alone and in association with 5-Fu trigger both the extrinsic and the intrinsic apoptotic pathways, activating caspase-8, -3 and -7. SCDSF and 5-Fu alone exerted opposite effects on Bax and Bcl-xL proteins, meanwhile SCDSF+5-Fu induced an almost complete suppression of Bcl-xL release and a dramatic increase in the Bax/Bcl-xL ratio. These data suggest that zebrafish embryo factors could improve chemotherapy efficacy by reducing anti-apoptotic proteins involved in drug-resistance processes.

  10. Quercetin induces apoptosis and enhances 5-FU therapeutic efficacy in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dai, Wei; Gao, Quangen; Qiu, Jianping; Yuan, Jianmao; Wu, Guoliang; Shen, Genhai

    2016-05-01

    Quercetin (Q), a flavonoid compound, which is obtained in variety of fruits, seeds, and vegetables, has been reported to possess many pharmacological properties including cancer-preventive and anticancer effects. However, studies on the anticancer effects and underlying mechanisms of Q in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are still limited. The present study is conducted to investigate the anticancer efficacy and adjuvant chemotherapy action of Q in HCC. HCC cell lines HepG2 and SMCC-7721 were treated with different concentrations of Q. The antiproliferative effects of Q were measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), and the apoptosis and cell cycle dynamics were assessed by flow cytometry; the expression of apoptosis-associated proteins were evaluated by Western blot and immunohistochemistry staining; the tumor growth in vivo was evaluated in a xenograft mouse model. Our results showed that Q effectively inhibited human HCC cell proliferation and induced apoptosis by upregulating the expression of Bad and Bax and downregulating the expression of Bcl-2 and Survivin in vitro. Furthermore, Q obviously inhibited the tumor growth and enhanced the 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) therapeutic efficacy in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, our findings highlight that Q effectively inhibited the growth of tumor and enhanced the sensitivity to thermotherapy, indicating Q is a potential treatment option for HCC.

  11. Hydroxyflutamide enhances cellular sensitivity to 5-fluorouracil by suppressing thymidylate synthase expression in bicalutamide-resistant human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Rumi; Oie, Shinji; Oka, Toshinori; Takahashi, Masayuki; Kanayama, Hiroomi; Itoh, Kohji

    2011-03-01

    We investigated the antitumor effects of combination therapy with anti-androgens and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and examined the underlying mechanism of the treatment. Initially, we established the bicalutamide-resistant subline CDX25R from the androgen receptor (AR)-positive human prostate cancer cell line LNCaP through continuous exposure to bicalutamide. CDX25R cells lost the ability to respond to androgens, but still expressed AR. They showed significant resistance to bicalutamide, but had high sensitivity to hydroxyflutamide (OH-flutamide) compared with LNCaP cells. The CDX25R subline was thus considered to be a suitable model for prostate cancer that has developed resistance to first-line hormonal therapy but shows sensitivity to an alternative approach. Combined treatment with 5-FU and OH-flutamide had a synergistic effect on CDX25R cells. OH-flutamide decreased expression of the transcription factor E2F1, and subsequently of thymidylate synthase (TS), in CDX25R cells but not in AR-negative DU145 cells. This suggested that OH-flutamide enhanced the growth-inhibitory activity of 5-FU in CDX25R cells by reducing TS expression through the AR pathway. Combined therapy with 5-FU and OH-flutamide may, therefore, be appropriate for patients with prostate cancer that has acquired resistance to initial hormone therapy including bicalutamide.

  12. Overexpression of ECRG4 enhances chemosensitivity to 5-fluorouracil in the human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cell line.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Cheng-Ping; Wu, Bi-Hua; Wang, Bai-Qiang; Fu, Mao-Yong; Yang, Ming; Zhou, Yue; Liu, Fu

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of esophageal cancer-related gene 4 (ECRG4) expression levels on chemotherapeutic sensitivity of gastric cancer cells. A SGC-7901 cell system with tetracycline-inducible ECRG4 expression (SGC-7901/ECRG4) was successfully established. ECRG4 mRNA and protein expression levels were detected using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting, respectively. Chemosensitivity to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) was examined by cell proliferation assay and cell apoptosis assay. ECRG4 mRNA and protein expression levels were significantly upregulated in SGC-7901/ECRG4 cells induced with tetracycline. Compared with control cells, the growth inhibition rate of cells with ECRG4 overexpression was significantly increased when treated with 5-FU. Treatment with 5 μmol/l 5-FU resulted in 15.2 % apoptotic cells, whereas such treatment after overexpression of ECRG4 resulted in 44.5 % apoptotic cells. In conclusion, overexpression of ECRG4 enhanced the chemosensitivity of gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells to 5-FU through induction of apoptosis.

  13. Lupeol enhances inhibitory effect of 5-fluorouracil on human gastric carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Bi, Tingting; Dai, Wei; Wang, Gang; Qian, Liqiang; Shen, Genhai; Gao, Quangen

    2016-05-01

    Lupeol, a dietary triterpene present in many fruits and medicinal plants, has been reported to possess many pharmacological properties including cancer-preventive and anti-cancer effects in vitro and in vivo. Here, we investigated the anti-cancer efficacy and adjuvant chemotherapy action of lupeol in gastric cancer (GC) cells (SGC7901 and BGC823) and explored the underlying mechanisms. Cells were treated with lupeol and/or 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu) and subjected to cell viability, colony formation, apoptosis, western blot, semiquantitative RT-PCR, and xenograft tumorigenicity assay. Our results showed that lupeol and 5-Fu inhibited the proliferation of SGC7901 and BGC823 cells, and combination treatment with lupeol and 5-Fu resulted in a combination index < 1, indicating a synergistic effect. Co-treatment with lupeol and 5-Fu induced apoptosis through up-regulating the expressions of Bax and p53 and down-regulating the expressions of survivin and Bcl-2. Furthermore, co-treatment displayed more efficient inhibition of tumor weight and volume on BGC823 xenograft mouse model than single-agent treatment with 5-Fu or lupeol. Taken together, our findings highlight that lupeol sensitizes GC to 5-Fu treatment, and combination treatment with lupeol and 5-Fu would be a promising therapeutic strategy for human GC treatment.

  14. Experiments on the efficacy and toxicity of locoregional chemotherapy of liver tumors with 5-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine (FUDR) and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in an animal model.

    PubMed

    Bartkowski, R; Berger, M R; Aguiar, J L; Henne, T H; Dörsam, J; Geelhaar, G H; Schlag, P; Herfarth, C

    1986-01-01

    For the investigation of locoregional chemotherapy of liver neoplasms we developed a standardized animal model in the rat. Continuous infusion therapy or repeated bolus injections of FUDR or 5-FU were given via the hepatic artery, the portal vein or the vena cava in tumor-bearing animals. The efficacy of the treatment was determined by measuring the tumor volume 3 weeks after tumor cell implantation. For the evaluation of the local and systemic toxicity serum GOT, GPT, and total bilirubin were determined. DNA single strand breaks were assessed in isolated liver and bone marrow cells. Inhibition of colony formation of bone marrow stem cells was determined by CFU-C and CFU-S bioassay. A significant reduction of tumor growth was observed only after continuous infusion of FUDR via the hepatic artery. Systemic toxicity was lowest in this group for both compounds while the local liver toxicity was only slightly elevated.

  15. Modified 5-fluorouracil: Uridine phosphorylase inhibitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lashkov, A. A.; Shchekotikhin, A. A.; Shtil, A. A.; Sotnichenko, S. E.; Mikhailov, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is a medication widely used in chemotherapy to treat various types of cancer. Being a substrate for the reverse reaction catalyzed by uridine phosphorylase (UPase), 5-FU serves as a promising prototype molecule (molecular scaffold) for the design of a selective UPase inhibitor that enhances the antitumor activity of 5-FU and exhibits intrinsic cytostatic effects on cancer cells. The chemical formula of the new compound, which binds to the uracil-binding site and, in the presence of a phosphate anion, to the phosphate-binding site of UPase, is proposed and investigated by molecular simulation methods.

  16. Enhanced in Vivo Delivery of 5-Fluorouracil by Ethosomal Gels in Rabbit Ear Hypertrophic Scar Model

    PubMed Central

    Wo, Yan; Zhang, Zheng; Zhang, Yixin; Zhang, Zhen; Wang, Kan; Mao, Xiaohui; Su, Weijie; Li, Ke; Cui, Daxiang; Chen, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Applying Ethosomal Gels (EGs) in transdermal drug delivery systems has evoked considerable interest because of their good water-solubility and biocompatibility. However, there has not been an explicit description of applying EGs as a vehicle for hypertrophic scars treatment. Here, a novel transdermal EGs loaded with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU EGs) was successfully prepared and characterized. The stability assay in vitro revealed that 5-FU EGs stored for a period of 30 days at 4 ± 1 °C had a better size stability than that at 25 ± 1 °C. Furthermore, using confocal laser scanning microscopy, EGs labeled with Rhodamine 6 G penetrated into the deep dermis of the hypertrophic scar within 24 h in the rabbit ear hypertrophic model suggested that the EGs were an optional delivery carrier through scar tissues. In addition, the value of the Scar Elevation Index (SEI) of 5-FU EGs group in the rabbit ear scar model was lower than that of 5-FU Phosphate Buffered Saline gel and Control groups. To conclude, these results suggest that EGs delivery system loaded 5-fluorouracil is a perfect candidate drug for hypertrophic scars therapy in future. PMID:25501333

  17. Rare sugar D-allose enhances anti-tumor effect of 5-fluorouracil on the human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HuH-7.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Fuminori; Kamitori, Kazuyo; Sanada, Keiko; Horii, Mariko; Dong, Youyi; Sui, Li; Tokuda, Masaaki

    2008-09-01

    d-Allose is a novel anti-tumor monosaccharide that causes cell growth inhibition, specifically of the cancer cells, by inducing the tumor suppressor gene thioredoxin interacting protein (TXNIP). The commonly used anti-tumor drug, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), blocks the cell cycle by inhibiting thymidylate synthase, and is also known to induce TXNIP gene expression. In this study, we examined the synergistic effect of d-allose and 5-FU and the role of TXNIP on cancer cell growth. The treatment of HuH-7 cells with d-allose or 5-FU inhibited the cell growth in a dose-dependent manner (75.2+/-2.7% with 50 mM d-allose and 66.1+/-2.7% with 0.5 mug/ml 5-FU) and d-allose enhanced the anti-tumor effect of 5-FU (55.3+/-1.1 %). TUNEL analysis did not show any evidence of apoptosis with either d-allose or 5-FU treatment. 5-FU suppressed the expression of p27(kip1), p53, and cyclin E, whereas d-allose induced p53 and reduced cyclins D, A, and E. The expression of p27(kip1) remained unchanged by d-allose at transcriptional level, but increased at the protein level suggesting an increase in protein stability by TXNIP. d-Allose and to a lesser extent 5-FU induced TXNIP expression significantly (808.4+/-122.9% and 186.8+/-32.9%, respectively) and the combination of both further enhanced TXNIP expression. As d-allose has no known side effects on normal cells, the combination of d-allose and 5-FU might be a potent candidate for cancer therapy.

  18. Enhanced Efficacy of 5-Fluorouracil in Combination with a Dual Histone Deacetylase and Phosphatidylinositide 3-Kinase Inhibitor (CUDC-907) in Colorectal Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hamam, Rimi; Ali, Dalia; Vishnubalaji, Radhakrishnan; Alsaaran, Zaid F.; Chalisserry, Elna Paul; Alfayez, Musaad; Aldahmash, Abdullah; Alajez, Nehad M.

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims: 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is widely used in the treatment of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the efficacy of 5-FU as a single agent is limited, with multiple undesired side effects. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to assess the efficacy of CUDC-907 (a dual inhibitor of histone deacetylase and phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase) in combination with 5-FU against CRC cells. Materials and Methods: Cell viability was determined using AlamarBlue and colony formation assays. Acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining and flow cytometry were used to measure apoptotic and necrotic events, as well as cell cycle progression. Immunoblotting was used to assess acetylation of histone H3 and phosphorylation of AKT. Results: Our data revealed enhanced toxicity of CUDC-907 against HCT116, RKO, COLO-205, and HT-29 CRC cells when combined with 5-FU. Similarly, the colony formation capability of HCT116 cells was suppressed by the combination treatment. Cells treated with CUDC-907 and 5-FU underwent apoptosis and necrosis, and exhibited increased polyploidy. Furthermore, CRC cells treated with CUDC-907 exhibited a higher degree of histone H3 lysine 9 acetylation (H3K9ac) and reduced AKT phosphorylation (Ser473). Conclusion: Our data revealed, for the first time, the enhanced inhibitory effect of CUDC-907 against CRC cells when combined with 5-FU, supporting the application of this combination as a potential therapeutic strategy in CRC treatment. PMID:28139498

  19. Combination photodynamic therapy using 5-fluorouracil and aminolevulinate enhances tumor-selective production of protoporphyrin IX and improves treatment efficacy of squamous skin cancers and precancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maytin, Edward V.; Anand, Sanjay

    2016-03-01

    In combination photodynamic therapy (cPDT), a small-molecule drug is used to modulate the physiological state of tumor cells prior to giving aminolevulinate (ALA; a precursor for protoporphyrin IX, PpIX). In our laboratory we have identified three agents (methotrexate, 5-fluorouracil, and vitamin D) that can enhance therapeutic effectiveness of ALAbased photodynamic therapy for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). However, only one (5-fluorouracil; 5-FU) is FDA-approved for skin cancer management. Here, we describe animal and human studies on 5-FU mechanisms of action, in terms of how 5-FU pretreatment leads to enhanced PpIX accumulation and improves selectivity of ALA-PDT treatment. In A431 subcutaneous tumors in mice, 5-FU changed expression of heme enzyme (upregulating coproporphyrinogen oxidase, and down-regulating ferrochelatase), inhibited tumor cell proliferation (Ki-67), enhanced differentiation (E-cadherin), and led to strong, tumor-selective increases in apoptosis. Interestingly, enhancement of apoptosis by 5-FU correlated strongly with an increased accumulation of p53 in tumor cells that persisted for 24 h post- PDT. In a clinical trial using a split-body, bilaterally controlled study design, human subjects with actinic keratoses (AK; preneoplastic precursors of SCC) were pretreated on one side of the face, scalp, or forearms with 5-FU cream for 6 days, while the control side received no 5-FU. On the seventh day, the levels of PpIX in 4 test lesions were measured by noninvasive fluorescence dosimetry, and then all lesions were treated with PDT using methyl-aminolevulinate (MAL) and red light (635 nm). Relative amounts of PpIX were found to be increased ~2-fold in 5-FU pretreated lesions relative to controls. At 3 months after PDT, the overall clinical response to PDT (reduction in lesion counts) was 2- to 3-fold better for the 5-FU pretreated lesions, a clinically important result. In summary, 5-FU is a useful adjuvant to aminolevulinate-based PDT

  20. Fermented wheat germ extract induced cell death and enhanced cytotoxicity of Cisplatin and 5-Fluorouracil on human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Tai, Cheng-Jeng; Wang, Wen-Ching; Wang, Chien-Kai; Wu, Chih-Hsiung; Yang, Mei-Due; Chang, Yu-Jia; Jian, Jiun-Yu; Tai, Chen-Jei

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common causes of cancer-related death worldwide. Due to the difficulties of early diagnosis, curative treatments are not available for most patients. Palliative treatments such as chemotherapy are often associated with low response rate, strong adverse effects and limited clinical benefits for patients. The alternative approaches such as fermented wheat germ extract (FWGE) with anti-tumor efficacy may provide improvements in the clinical outcome of current therapy for HCC. This study aimed to clarify antitumor efficacy of FWGE and the combination drug effect of FWGE with chemotherapeutic agents, cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu) in human HCC cells, HepG2, Hep3B, and HepJ5. The present study indicated that FWGE exhibited potential to suppress HepG2, Hep3B, and HepJ5 cells, with the half maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of FWGE were 0.494, 0.371 and 1.524 mg/mL, respectively. FWGE also induced Poly (Adenosine diphosphate ribose) polymerase (PARP) associated cell death in Hep3B cells. Moreover, the FWGE treatment further enhanced the cytotoxicity of cisplatin in all tested HCC cells, and cytotoxicity of 5-Fu in a synergistic manner in HepJ5 cells. Collectively, the results identified the anti-tumor efficacy of FWGE in HCC cells and suggested that FWGE can be used as a supplement to effectively improve the tumor suppression efficiency of cisplatin and 5-Fu in HCC cells.

  1. Multicenter phase II study of infusional 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), leucovorin, and oxaliplatin, plus biweekly cetuximab as first-line treatment in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (CELINE trial)

    PubMed Central

    Kotake, Masanori; Aoyama, Toru; Munemoto, Yoshinori; Doden, Kenji; Kataoka, Masato; Kobayashi, Kenji; Nishimura, Genichi; Fujita, Hidehito; Nakamura, Keishi; Takehara, Akira; Tanaka, Chihiro; Sakamoto, Junichi; Nagata, Naoki; Oba, Koji; Kondo, Ken

    2017-01-01

    The current phase II study investigated the efficacy and safety of biweekly cetuximab combined with standard oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy [infusional 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), leucovorin, and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX-6)] in the first-line treatment of KRAS wild-type metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Sixty patients with a median age of 64 years (range, 38–82 syears) received a biweekly intravenous infusion of cetuximab (500 mg/m2 on day 1) followed by FOLFOX-6 (2-hour oxaliplatin 85 mg/m2 infusion on day 1 in tandem with a 2-h leucovorin 200 mg/m2 infusion on days 1 and 2, and 5-FU as a 400 mg/m2 bolus followed by a 46-hour 2,400 mg/m2 infusion on days 1–3). Patient response rate was 70%, with 95% disease control rates. The median progression-free survival was 13.8 months. Thirteen patients (21.7%) were able to undergo resection of previously unresectable metastases, with the aim of curing them. The median follow-up was 22.7 months, and median overall survival was 31.0 months. Cetuximab did not increase FOLFOX-6 toxicity and was generally well tolerated. The results of the current study demonstrate that the combination of biweekly cetuximab with FOLFOX-6 was well tolerated and had a manageable safety profile for the first-line treatment of KRAS wild-type metastatic colorectal cancer. Efficacy was comparable to other treatment regimens. The results support the administration of biweekly cetuximab in combination with FOLFOX-6, which may be more convenient and provide treatment flexibility in this setting for patients with metastatic colorectal cancers.

  2. [A Case of Stage IV Colon Cancer Relapsed 10 Years after Curative Resection with Adjuvant Chemotherapy Using Long-Term, Low-Dose Leucovorin and 5-Fluorouracil(LV/5-FU)].

    PubMed

    Yoshimatsu, Kazuhiko; Yokomizo, Hajime; Yano, Yuki; Okayama, Sachiyo; Satake, Masaya; Yamada, Yasufumi; Shiozawa, Shunichi; Shimakawa, Takeshi; Katsube, Takao; Endo, Shungo; Kato, Hiroyuki; Naritaka, Yoshihiko

    2016-10-01

    A 57-year-old woman had been diagnosed with sigmoid colon cancer at surgery for ovarian cancer, and underwent simultaneous radical resection. Because of the pathological diagnosis of sigmoid cancer with ovarian metastasis, adjuvant chemotherapy was scheduled, with Leucovorin(LV)25 mg. This was immediately followed with 5-fluorouracil(5-FU)500 mg, via a 2-hour systemic intravenous infusion daily for 5 consecutive days, with courses repeated at 5 weeks, followed by maintenance once every 1 or 2 weeks for 2 years. There had been no evidence of recurrence for 10 years after surgery; however, peritoneal recurrence and a thyroid tumor were found using computed tomography(CT)at the 10-yearsur veillance. Chemotherapy with mFOLFOX6+bevacizumab was initiated because the peritoneal recurrence was determined to be unresectable and because of the metastasis to the thyroid. Chemotherapy was maintained, except for oxaliplatin(L-OHP)due to toxicity, with shrinkage of the peritoneal tumor; however, it was difficult to maintain the chemotherapy due to toxicity. Eleven months after initiation of chemotherapy, lung and bone metastases were detected, and she subsequently died.

  3. DKK4 enhances resistance to chemotherapeutics 5-Fu and YN968D1 in colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    He, Shengli; Shen, Jie; Hu, Nanhua; Xu, Xuanfu; Li, Jin

    2017-01-01

    Dickkopf-related protein 4 (DKK4) is a target of the β-catenin/transcription factor 4 complex in colorectal cancer. Previous research has demonstrated that its expression level may vary and has indicated that it may have a role in the development of resistance to chemotherapy in colorectal cancer cells. In the present study, DKK4 was over expressed in several colorectal cancer cell lines. The DKK4 over-expressing cell lines were screened using reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis and western blotting. Analysis of cell viability in the control and DKK4 over-expressing cell lines, following treatment with 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu), YN968D1 or both, indicated that DKK4 over-expressing cells exhibit increased drug resistance. The results of Transwell chamber assays suggested that DKK4 had an effect on cell migration. Furthermore, the results from flow cytometric analysis showed that the percentage of apoptotic cells was reduced in the DKK4 over-expressing cell lines, following drug treatment, compared with the control. The present data suggested that DKK4 may enhance the resistance of colorectal cancer cells to 5-Fu and YN968D1 treatment, when used alone or in combination. PMID:28356933

  4. Protocol of a randomised phase III clinical trial of sequential capecitabine or 5-fluorouracil plus bevacizumab (Cape/5-FU-Bmab) to capecitabine or 5-fluorouracil plus oxaliplatin plus bevacizumab (CapeOX/mFOLFOX6-Bmab) versus combination CapeOX/mFOLFOX6-Bmab in advanced colorectal cancer: the C-cubed (C3) study

    PubMed Central

    Mishima, Hideyuki; Sawaki, Akira; Shimokawa, Mototsugu; Inukai, Michio; Shinozaki, Katsunori; Tanioka, Hiroaki; Nasu, Junichiro; Nishina, Tomohiro; Hazama, Shoichi; Okajima, Masazumi; Yamaguchi, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Results from several randomised trials suggest that the sequential use of cytotoxic agents in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) has the potential to improve overall survival compared with combination chemotherapy. This study is designed to investigate whether sequential treatment with bevacizumab-based first-line treatment with oxaliplatin is superior to combination treatment of mCRC. Methods and analysis The C-cubed (C3) study is a two-arm, multicentre, open-label, randomised phase III trial in Japan comparing the efficacy and safety of sequential capecitabine or 5-fluorouracil plus bevacizumab (Cape/5-FU-Bmab) with escalation to capecitabine or 5-fluorouracil plus oxaliplatin plus bevacizumab (CapeOX/mFOLFOX6-Bmab) versus combination CapeOX/mFOLFOX6-Bmab as the first-line treatment of mCRC. In the sequential arm (Arm A: oxaliplatin ‘wait-and-go’), treatment escalation from Cape/5-FU-Bmab to CapeOX/mFOLFOX6-Bmab is recommended in the case of progressive disease. In the combination arm (Arm B: oxaliplatin ‘stop-and-go’), de-escalation from CapeOX/mFOLFOX6-Bmab to Cape/5-FU-Bmab is possible after 12 weeks of treatment. Re-escalation to CapeOX/mFOLFOX6-Bmab after progressive disease is considered only for patients who received de-escalation of oxaliplatin after 12 weeks of treatment not caused by oxaliplatin-associated toxicity. A target sample size of 304 evaluable patients is considered sufficient to validate an expected HR for time to failure of strategy of the sequential approach ‘wait-and-go’ compared to the combination approach ‘stop-and go’ with 80% power and 2-sided 5% α in case of a true HR<0.69. Ethics and dissemination This study is conducted according to the standards of Good Clinical Practice and in compliance with the Declaration of Helsinki 2013 and local regulations, and has been submitted and approved by the Ethical Committee of the Non-Profit Organization MINS Institutional Review Board. The protocol

  5. β-Carotene synergistically enhances the anti-tumor effect of 5-fluorouracil on esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanting; Zhu, Xiangzhan; Huang, Tuanjie; Chen, Lei; Liu, Yanxia; Li, Qinghua; Song, Jishi; Ma, Shanshan; Zhang, Kun; Yang, Bo; Guan, Fangxia

    2016-11-02

    Recently, we reported that β-carotene exhibited anticancer activity against human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cells in vitro. In the present study, we examined a novel therapeutic strategy by combining β-carotene with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in human esophageal cancer in vitro and in vivo, and elucidated the underlying mechanisms. We found that the combination of 5-FU and β-carotene displayed greater growth inhibitory effects than did either compound alone in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cells. In addition, the combination of 5-FU and β-carotene displayed greater tumor growth inhibition in an Eca109 xenograft mouse model than did a single agent with low systemic toxicity. β-Carotene enhanced 5-FU-induced apoptosis. TUNEL staining revealed that the rate of TUNEL-positive cells was markedly increased in tumor tissues after treatment with 5-FU and β-carotene. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry revealed the down-regulation of Bcl-2 and PCNA and the up-regulation of Bax and caspase-3 in tumor tissues. Further studies demonstrated that the combined administration of 5-FU and β-carotene significantly down-regulated the protein levels of Cav-1, p-AKT, p-NF-κB, p-mTOR and p-p70S6K in Eca109 cells more effectively than did 5-FU alone. These data suggested that the combined therapy of 5-FU and β-carotene exerted synergistic antitumor effects in vivo and in vitro and could constitute a novel therapeutic treatment for ESCC.

  6. In Vitro Synergistic Enhancement of Newcastle Disease Virus to 5-Fluorouracil Cytotoxicity against Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shammari, Ahmed M.; Salman, Marwa I.; Saihood, Yahya D.; Yaseen, Nahi Y.; Raed, Khansaa; Shaker, Hiba Kareem; Ahmed, Aesar; Khalid, Aseel; Duiach, Ahlam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chemotherapy is one of the antitumor therapies used worldwide in spite of its serious side effects and unsatisfactory results. Many attempts have been made to increase its activity and reduce its toxicity. 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is still a widely-used chemotherapeutic agent, especially in combination with other chemotherapies. Combination therapy seems to be the best option for targeting tumor cells by different mechanisms. Virotherapy is a promising agent for fighting cancer because of its safety and selectivity. Newcastle disease virus is safe, and it selectively targets tumor cells. We previously demonstrated that Newcastle disease virus (NDV) could be used to augment other chemotherapeutic agents and reduce their toxicity by halving the administered dose and replacing the eliminated chemotherapeutic agents with the Newcastle disease virus; the same antitumor activity was maintained. Methods: In the current work, we tested this hypothesis on different tumor cell lines. We used the non-virulent LaSota strain of NDV in combination with 5-FU, and we measured the cytotoxicity effect. We evaluated this combination using Chou–Talalay analysis. Results: NDV was synergistic with 5-FU at low doses when used as a combination therapy on different cancer cells, and there were very mild effects on non-cancer cells. Conclusion: The combination of a virulent, non-pathogenic NDV–LaSota strain with a standard chemotherapeutic agent, 5-FU, has a synergistic effect on different tumor cells in vitro, suggesting this combination could be an important new adjuvant therapy for treating cancer. PMID:28536371

  7. Fermented Wheat Germ Extract Induced Cell Death and Enhanced Cytotoxicity of Cisplatin and 5-Fluorouracil on Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Cheng-Jeng; Wang, Wen-Ching; Wang, Chien-Kai; Wu, Chih-Hsiung; Yang, Mei-Due; Chang, Yu-Jia; Jian, Jiun-Yu; Tai, Chen-Jei

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common causes of cancer-related death worldwide. Due to the difficulties of early diagnosis, curative treatments are not available for most patients. Palliative treatments such as chemotherapy are often associated with low response rate, strong adverse effects and limited clinical benefits for patients. The alternative approaches such as fermented wheat germ extract (FWGE) with anti-tumor efficacy may provide improvements in the clinical outcome of current therapy for HCC. This study aimed to clarify antitumor efficacy of FWGE and the combination drug effect of FWGE with chemotherapeutic agents, cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu) in human HCC cells, HepG2, Hep3B, and HepJ5. The present study indicated that FWGE exhibited potential to suppress HepG2, Hep3B, and HepJ5 cells, with the half maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of FWGE were 0.494, 0.371 and 1.524 mg/mL, respectively. FWGE also induced Poly (Adenosine diphosphate ribose) polymerase (PARP) associated cell death in Hep3B cells. Moreover, the FWGE treatment further enhanced the cytotoxicity of cisplatin in all tested HCC cells, and cytotoxicity of 5-Fu in a synergistic manner in HepJ5 cells. Collectively, the results identified the anti-tumor efficacy of FWGE in HCC cells and suggested that FWGE can be used as a supplement to effectively improve the tumor suppression efficiency of cisplatin and 5-Fu in HCC cells. PMID:24454483

  8. 5-fluorouracil induced pericarditis.

    PubMed

    Killu, Ammar; Madhavan, Malini; Prasad, Kavita; Prasad, Abhiram

    2011-04-15

    Cardiac toxicity is an infrequent, but potentially serious side effect of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). The reported incidence of 5-FU-induced cardiotoxicity is approximately 3%, although estimates vary from 1.2% to 18%. Cardiac death occurs in less than 1%. The prompt recognition of cardiac toxicity demands a thorough understanding of the myriad of potential cardiac manifestations and a high index of suspicion. The most common presentation is angina pectoris while other manifestations, namely myocardial infarction, left ventricular dysfunction, arrhythmias and sudden death have been recognised. The authors report an unusual case of myopericarditis masquerading as myocardial infarction.

  9. Sanguisorba officinalis L synergistically enhanced 5-fluorouracil cytotoxicity in colorectal cancer cells by promoting a reactive oxygen species-mediated, mitochondria-caspase-dependent apoptotic pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Meng-ping; Liao, Min; Dai, Cong; Chen, Jie-feng; Yang, Chun-juan; Liu, Ming; Chen, Zuan-guang; Yao, Mei-cun

    2016-01-01

    Sanguisorba officinalis L. radix is a widely used herb called DiYu (DY) in China and has an extensive range of bioactivities, including anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, and anti-oxidative activities. However, there is little evidence to support its anti-cancer effects against colorectal cancer (CRC). The first-line chemotherapeutic agent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is used to treat CRC, but its efficiency is hampered by acquired drug resistance. This study found that a water extract of DY exerted anti-proliferative effects against two CRC cell lines (HCT-116 and RKO), and it sensitized CRC cells to 5-FU therapy by activating a reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated, mitochondria-caspase-dependent apoptotic pathway. Co-treatment of DY and 5-FU significantly elevated ROS levels, up-regulated Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and triggered mitochondrial dysfunction, followed by a release of cytochrome c and up-regulation of proteins such as cleaved-caspase-9/3 and cleaved-PARP. Additionally, the induction of autophagy may be involved in mediating synergism of DY in HCT-116 cells. Gallic acid (GA), catechinic acid (CA) and ellagic acid (EA) were identified as the potential chief constituents responsible for the synergistic effects of DY. In conclusion, co-treatment of DY, specifically GA, CA and EA, with 5-FU may be a potential alternative therapeutic strategy for CRC by enhancing an intrinsic apoptotic pathway. PMID:27671231

  10. Oxymatrine synergistically enhances the inhibitory effect of 5-fluorouracil on hepatocellular carcinoma in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Bi, Tingting; Dai, Wei; Wang, Gang; Qian, Liqiang; Gao, Quangen; Shen, Genhai

    2016-06-01

    Oxymatrine (OMT), one of the main active components of extracts from the dry roots of Sophora flavescens, has long been employed clinically to treat cancers. Here, we investigated the synergistic effect of OMT with 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu) on the tumor growth inhibition of hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HCC; Hep-G2 and SMMC-7721) and explored the underlying mechanism. Cells were treated with OMT and/or 5-Fu and subjected to cell viability, colony formation, apoptosis, cell cycle, western blotting, xenograft tumorigenicity assay, and immunohistochemistry. OMT and 5-Fu inhibited the proliferation of Hep-G2 and SMMC-7721 cells, and combination treatment with OMT and 5-Fu resulted in a combination index <1, indicating a synergistic effect. Co-treatment with OMT and 5-Fu caused G0/G1 phase arrest by upregulating P21 and P27 and downregulating cyclin D, and induced apoptosis through increasing the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and decreasing the levels of p-ERK. In addition, the inhibition of ROS respectively reversed the cell death induced by 5-Fu + OMT, suggesting the key roles of ROS in the process. More importantly, 5-Fu and OMT in combination exhibit much superior tumor weight and volume inhibition on SMMC-7721 xenograft mouse model in comparison to 5-Fu or OMT alone. Immunohistochemistry analysis suggests the combinations greatly suppressed tumor proliferation, which was consistent with our in vitro results. Taken together, our findings indicated that OMT sensitizes HCC to 5-Fu treatment by the suppression of ERK activation through the overproduction of ROS, and combination treatment with OMT and 5-Fu would be a promising therapeutic strategy for HCC treatment.

  11. Low molecular weight procyanidins from grape seeds enhance the impact of 5-Fluorouracil chemotherapy on Caco-2 human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Ker Y; Howarth, Gordon S; Bindon, Keren A; Kennedy, James A; Bastian, Susan E P

    2014-01-01

    Grape seed procyanidins (PC) are flavan-3-ol oligomers and polymers known for their biological activity in the gut. Grape seed extract (GSE) have been reported to reduce intestinal injury in a rat model of mucositis. We sought to investigate effects of purified PC fractions differing in mean degree of polymerization (mDP) combined with 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) chemotherapy on the viability of colon cancer cells (Caco-2). SixPC fractions (F1-F6) were isolated from Cabernet Sauvignon seeds at two ripeness stages: pre-veraison unripe (immature) and ripe (mature), utilizing step gradient, low-pressure chromatography on a Sephadex LH-20 resin. Fractions were tested on Caco-2 cells, alone and in combination with 5-FU. Eluted fractions were characterized by phloroglucinolysis and gel permeation chromatography. Cell viability was determined by the 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide) (MTT) assay. All isolated fractions significantly reduced Caco-2 cell viability compared to the control (P<0.05), but F2 and F3 (mDP 2-6) were the most active fractions (immature F2 = 32% mDP 2.4, F3 = 35% mDP 5.8 and mature F2 = 13% mDP 3.6 and F3 = 17% mDP 5.9; percentage of viable cells remaining) on Caco-2 cells. When combined with 5-FU, immature fractions F1-F3 enhanced the cell toxicity effects of 5-FU by 27-73% (P<0.05). Mature seed PC fractions (F1-F4) significantly enhanced the toxicity of 5-FU by 60-83% against Caco-2 cells (P<0.05). Moreover, some fractions alone were more potent at decreasing viability in Caco-2 cells (P<0.05; immature fractions = 65-68% and mature fractions = 83-87%) compared to 5-FU alone (37%). PCs of mDP 2-6 (immature F1-F3 and mature F1 and F4)not only enhanced the impact of 5-FU in killing Caco-2 cells, but also surpassed standard 5-FU chemotherapy as an anti-cancer agent.The bioactivity of PC is therefore attributed primarily to lower molecular weight PCs.

  12. Teng-Long-Bu-Zhong-Tang, a Chinese herbal formula, enhances anticancer effects of 5 - Fluorouracil in CT26 colon carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer remains one of the leading causes of cancer death worldwide. Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) has played a positive role in colorectal cancer treatment. There is a great need to establish effective herbal formula for colorectal cancer treatment. Based on TCM principles and clinical practices, we have established an eight herbs composed formula for colorectal cancer treatment, which is Teng-Long-Bu-Zhong-Tang (TLBZT). We have demonstrated the anticancer effects of TLBZT against colorectal carcinoma in vitro. In present study, we evaluated the anticancer potential of TLBZT, used alone or in combination with low dose of 5-Fluorouracil (5-Fu), in CT26 colon carcinoma in vivo. Methods CT26 colon carcinoma was established in BALB/c mice and treated with TLBZT, 5-Fu, or TLBZT plus 5-Fu. The tumor volumes were observed. Apoptosis was detected by TUNEL assay. Caspases activities were detected by colorimetric assay. Cell senescence was indentified by senescence β-galactosidase staining. Gene expression and angiogenesis was observed by immunohistochemistry or western blot. Results TLBZT significantly inhibited CT26 colon carcinoma growth. TLBZT elicited apoptosis in CT26 colon carcinoma, accompanied by Caspase-3, 8, and 9 activation and PARP cleavage, and downregulation of XIAP and Survivin. TLBZT also induced cell senescence in CT26 colon carcinoma, with concomitant upregulation of p16 and p21 and downregulation of RB phosphorylation. In addition, angiogenesis and VEGF expression in CT26 colon carcinoma was significantly inhibited by TLBZT treatment. Furthermore, TLBZT significantly enhanced anticancer effects of 5-Fu in CT26 colon carcinoma. Conclusions TLBZT exhibited significantly anticancer effect, and enhanced the effects of 5-Fu in CT26 colon carcinoma, which may correlate with induction of apoptosis and cell senescence, and angiogenesis inhibition. The present study provides new insight into TCM approaches for colon cancer treatment

  13. Enhancing effect of N-acetyl-l-cysteine or 2-mercaptoethanol on the in vitro permeation of 5-fluorouracil or tolnaftate through the human nail plate.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Y; Miyamoto, M; Sugibayashi, K; Morimoto, Y

    1998-11-01

    The enhancing effects of various vehicles on the in vitro permeation of a hydrophilic model drug, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), or a lipophilic model drug, tolnaftate (TN), through human nail plates were investigated using a modified side-by-side diffusion cell. Tip pieces from the 5th finger-nail, clipped from healthy volunteers, were used in this permeation study. The swelling and softening properties of the nail pieces were also measured in each vehicle. The weights and stresses of the nail pieces were dramatically changed after immersion in aqueous solvents containing N-acetyl-L-cysteine (AC) or 2-mercaptoethanol (ME). However, no significant change in the physicochemical properties of the nail pieces was found in the lipophilic vehicles. Thus, the water content in the nail plates absorbed from vehicles may relate to their physicochemical properties. Although keratin-softening agents and new skin permeation enhancers did not significantly promote 5-FU permeation compared with water alone, the flux from solvent systems containing AC or ME was substantially higher. In addition, TN permeation from solvents containing AC or ME could be measured, whereas that from other solvents was undetectable. When the AC concentration was increased, the 5-FU permeation and the nail weight increased and the stress of each nail piece decreased. It is concluded from these experimental results that AC and ME may be useful as enhancers for increasing drug permeation through the human nail plate.

  14. Enhanced anticancer efficacy and tumor targeting through folate-PEG modified nanoliposome loaded with 5-fluorouracil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Van Minh; Tran Nho, Trung Duc; Trieu Ly, Hai; Vo, Thanh Sang; Dung Nguyen, Hoang; Thu Huong Phung, Thi; Zou, Aihua; Liu, Jianwen

    2017-03-01

    Cancer targeted therapies have attracted considerable attention over the past year. Recently, 5-fluouracil (5-FU), which has high toxicity to normal cells and short half-life associated with rapid metabolism, is one of the most commonly used therapies in the treatment of cancer. In this study the folic acid-conjugated pegylated nanoliposomes were synthesized and then loaded into them with 5-FU to improve the anti-tumor efficacy. The average size of liposomes (LPs) was about 52.7 nm which was identified by TEM. In the liposome uptake studies, the level uptake of folate-conjugated liposomes has increased compared to non-conjugated LPs according to LPs concentration, incubation time and presence of concentration of free folic acid (FA). The MTT assay and apoptotic test were carried out in HCT116 and MCF-7 cells for 24 or 48 h. The results revealed that the folate-PEG modified 5-Fu loaded nanoliposomes had strong cytotoxicity to cancer cell compared to pure 5-FU or PEG modified 5-FU loaded liposomes in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, and mainly enhanced the cancer cell death through folate-mediated endocytosis. Hence, the folate-PEG modified nanoliposome is a potential targeted drug-delivery system for the treatment of FR-positive cancers.

  15. Methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin enhances the susceptibility of human breast cancer cells to carboplatin and 5-fluorouracil: Involvement of Akt, NF-{kappa}B and Bcl-2

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyay, Ankur Kumar; Singh, Sandeep; Chhipa, Rishi Raj; Vijayakumar, Maleppillil Vavachan; Ajay, Amrendra Kumar; Bhat, Manoj Kumar . E-mail: manojkbhat@nccs.res.in

    2006-10-15

    The response rates of extensively used chemotherapeutic drugs, carboplatin (Carb) or 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) are relatively disappointing because of considerable side effects associated with their high-dose regimen. In the present study, we determined whether treatment with a cholesterol depleting agent, methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin (MCD), enhances the weak efficacy of low doses of Carb or 5-FU in human breast cancer cells. Data demonstrate that pretreatment with MCD significantly potentiates the cytotoxic activity of Carb and 5-FU in both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231. Furthermore, we explored the molecular basis of enhanced cytotoxicity, and our data revealed that low-dose treatment with these drugs in MCD pretreated cells exhibited significantly decreased Akt phosphorylation, NF-{kappa}B activity and down-regulation in expression of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. In addition, MCD pretreated cells demonstrated an increased intracellular drug accumulation as compared to cells treated with drugs alone. Taken together, our data provide the basis for potential therapeutic application of MCD in combination with other conventional cytotoxic drugs to facilitate reduction of drug dosage that offers a better chemotherapeutic approach with low toxicity.

  16. Mismatch Repair Proficiency and In Vitro Response to 5-Fluorouracil

    PubMed Central

    CARETHERS, JOHN M.; CHAUHAN, DHARAM P.; FINK, DANIEL; NEBEL, SIBYLLE; BRESALIER, ROBERT S.; HOWELL, STEPHEN B.; BOLAND, C. RICHARD

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims The DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system recognizes certain DNA adducts caused by alkylation damage in addition to its role in recognizing and directing repair of interstrand nucleotide mismatches and slippage mistakes at microsatellite sequences. Because defects in the MMR system can confer tolerance to acquired DNA damage and, by inference, the toxic effects of certain chemotherapeutic agents, we investigated the effect of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) on colon cancer cell lines. Methods We determined growth selection by cell enrichment assay and cloning efficiency after treatment with 5 μmol/L 5-FU, assayed nucleic 3H–5-FU incorporation, and analyzed the cell cycle by flow cytometry. Results 5-FU treatment provided a growth advantage for MMR-deficient cell lines, indicating a relative degree of tolerance to 5-FU by the MMR-deficient cell lines. Enhanced survival was statistically significant after 5 days of growth, and a 28-fold reduction in survival was noted in the MMR-proficient cells by clonagenic assays after 10 days of growth. Differences in nucleotide uptake of 5-FU did not account for the observed growth differences, and specific cell cycle checkpoint arrest was not detected. Conclusions Intact DNA MMR seems to recognize 5-FU incorporated into DNA but may do so in a different manner than other types of alkylation damage. Defective DNA MMR might be one mechanism for tumor resistance to 5-FU. PMID:10381918

  17. Lin28A enhances chemosensitivity of colon cancer cells to 5-FU by promoting apoptosis in a let-7 independent manner.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianzhen; Han, Peng; He, Yan; Zhao, Ci; Wang, Guangyu; Yang, Weiwei; Shan, Ming; Zhu, Yuanyuan; Yang, Chao; Weng, Mingjiao; Wu, Di; Gao, Lin; Jin, Xiaoming; Wei, Yunwei; Cui, BinBin; Shen, Guomin; Li, Xiaobo

    2016-06-01

    RNA-binding protein Lin28A is frequently over-expressed in human malignant tumors and is associated with tumor advance and poor prognosis. However, the expression pattern and functions of Lin28A in colon cancer are unknown. In this study, we detected the expression of Lin28A in colon cancer patients and tested the effect of Lin28A on the chemotherapeutic sensitivity of colon cancer cells to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). As expected, we showed that Lin28A is up-regulated in 73.3 % of colon cancer patients. However, to our surprise, we found that oncogenic protein Lin28A-enforced expression in colon cancer cells enhanced the chemosensitivity of cancer cells to 5-FU via promoting the cell apoptosis. Further mechanisms study revealed that the effect of Lin28A increasing chemosensitivity of cancer cells is in a let-7 independent manner, but which is associated with decreasing the expression of DNA damage repair protein H2AX. Conclusively, here we reported an unexpected function of Lin28A, which may shed lights on fully understanding the physiological and pathological roles of this oncogene.

  18. Effects of 5-FU.

    PubMed

    Wigmore, Peter M; Mustafa, Sarah; El-Beltagy, Maha; Lyons, Laura; Umka, Jariya; Bennett, Geoff

    2010-01-01

    5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is a chemotherapeutical agent used to treat cancers including breast and colorectal. Working as an antimetabolite to prevent cell proliferation, it primarily inhibits the enzyme thymidylate synthase blocking the thymidine formation required for DNA synthesis. Although having a relatively short half-life (< 30 mins) it readily enters the brain by passive diffusion. Clinically, it is used both as a single agent or in combination with other chemotherapies and has been associated with the long-term side effects of cognitive impairment, known as "chemo brain" or "chemo fog" These accounts have come primarily from patients undergoing treatment for breast cancer who report symptoms including confusion and memory impairment, which can last for months to years. Psychometric studies of patients have suffered from confounding variables, which has led to the use of rodent models to assess the cognitive effects of this drug. Researchers have used behavioral and physiological tests including the Morris water maze, novel object location/recognition tests, shock motivated T-maze, sensory gating and conditioning, to investigate the effect of this drug on cognition. The variety of cognitive tests and the difference in dosing and administration of 5-FU has led to varied results, possibly due to the different brain regions associated with each test and the subtlety of the drug's effect, but overall these studies indicates that 5-FU has a negative effect on memory, executive function and sensory gating. 5-FU has also been demonstrated to have biochemical and structural changes on specific regions of the brain. Evidence shows it can induce apoptosis and depress cell proliferation in the neurogenic regions of the adult brain including the sub granular zone (SGZ) within the hippocampus and in oligodendrocyte precursor populations within white matter tracts. Furthermore, investigations indicate levels ofdoublecortin, a marker for newly formed neurons and brain derived

  19. Hemostatic absorbable gelatin sponge loaded with 5-fluorouracil for treatment of tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wei; Chen, Yinghui; Yuan, Weien

    2013-01-01

    Background Surgical tumor resection is the main treatment for tumors however the treatment process often results in massive bleeding and tumor cell residue. The main aim of this research was to address problems such as bleeding, systemic chemotherapy side effects while enhancing quality of life, and increasing drug concentrations at the tumor site by developing a novel formulation with local long-term efficacy for treatment of tumors and to stop bleeding. Methods 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) was suspended in an ethyl acetate solution of poly D,L-lactide-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) and a vacuum drying method was applied. The hemostatic gelatin sponge loaded with 5-FU was prepared by absorption of the suspension. The in vitro and in vivo characteristics of the hemostatic gelatin sponge loaded with 5-FU (5-FU-HAGS) were investigated. Results 5-FU-HAGS (hemostatic absorbable gelatin sponge loaded with 5-fluorouracil) was successfully produced with controlled release of the content and was reproducibly suitable for local tumor treatment as an implant to stop bleeding. The encapsulation efficiency of 5-FU-HAGS was above 98%. The in vitro 5-FU release kinetic profile matched a near zero-order equation for 20 days. The in vivo 5-FU plasma concentration was at a more stable level than when 5-FU solution was administered by subcutaneous injection. Bleeding can be stopped more effectively by coating a piece of blank gelatin sponge. The survival ratio of tumor-bearing mice using a 5-FU-HAGS subcutaneous implant was higher when compared to mice given a subcutaneous injection of 5-FU solution. Conclusion The 5-FU-HAGS system is a potential and effective way of enhancing the survival ratio and improving the quality of life of tumor-bearing mice. PMID:23626465

  20. Enhancement of 5-FU sensitivity by the proapoptotic rpL3 gene in p53 null colon cancer cells through combined polymer nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Annapina; Maiolino, Sara; Pagliara, Valentina; Ungaro, Francesca; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Leone, Alessandra; Scalia, Giulia; Budillon, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Colon cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide and the therapy with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is mainly limited due to resistance. Recently, we have demonstrated that nucleolar stress upon 5-FU treatment leads to the activation of ribosome-free rpL3 (L3) as proapoptotic factor. In this study, we analyzed L3 expression profile in colon cancer tissues and demonstrated that L3 mRNA amount decreased with malignant progression and the intensity of its expression was inversely related to tumor grade and Bcl-2/Bax ratio. With the aim to develop a combined therapy of 5-FU plus plasmid encoding L3 (pL3), we firstly assessed the potentiation of the cytotoxic effect of 5-FU on colon cancer cells by L3. Next, 10 μM 5-FU and 2 μg of pL3 were encapsulated in biocompatible nanoparticles (NPs) chemically conjugated with HA to achieve active tumor-targeting ability in CD44 overexpressing cancer cells. We showed the specific intracellular accumulation of NPs in cells and a sustained release for 5-FU and L3. Analysis of cytotoxicity and apoptotic induction potential of combined NPs clearly showed that the 5-FU plus L3 were more effective in inducing apoptosis than 5-FU or L3 alone. Furthermore, we show that the cancer-specific chemosensitizer effect of combined NPs may be dependent on L3 ability to affect 5-FU efflux by controlling P-gp (P-glycoprotein) expression. These results led us to propose a novel combined therapy with the use of 5-FU plus L3 in order to establish individualized therapy by examining L3 profiles in tumors to yield a better clinical outcomes. PMID:27835895

  1. CXCL12/CXCR4 axis induced miR-125b promotes invasion and confers 5-fluorouracil resistance through enhancing autophagy in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xinfeng; Shi, Wenna; Zhang, Yuhang; Wang, Xiaohui; Sun, Shiyue; Song, Zhiyu; Liu, Man; Zeng, Qiao; Cui, Shuxiang; Qu, Xianjun

    2017-01-01

    The activation of CXCL12/CXCR4 axis is associated with potential progression of cancer, such as invasion, metastasis and chemoresistance. However, the underlying mechanisms of CXCL12/CXCR4 axis and cancer progression have been poorly explored. We hypothesized that miRNAs might be critical downstream mediators of CXCL12/CXCR4 axis involved in cancer invasion and chemoresistance in CRC. In human CRC cells, we found that the activation of CXCL12/CXCR4 axis promoted epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and concurrent upregulation of miR-125b. Overexpression of miR-125b robustly triggered EMT and cancer invasion, which in turn enhanced the expression of CXCR4. Importantly, the reciprocal positive feedback loop between CXCR4 and miR-125b further activated the Wnt/β-catenin signaling by targeting Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene. There was a negative correlation of the expression of miR-125b with APC mRNA in paired human colorectal tissue specimens. Further experiments indicated a role of miR-125b in conferring 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) resistance in CRC probably through increasing autophagy both in vitro and in vivo. MiR-125b functions as an important downstream mediator upon the activation of CXCL12/CXCR4 axis that involved in EMT, invasion and 5-FU resistance of CRC. These findings shed a new insight into the role of miR-125b and provide a potential therapeutic target in CRC. PMID:28176874

  2. CXCL12/CXCR4 axis induced miR-125b promotes invasion and confers 5-fluorouracil resistance through enhancing autophagy in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xinfeng; Shi, Wenna; Zhang, Yuhang; Wang, Xiaohui; Sun, Shiyue; Song, Zhiyu; Liu, Man; Zeng, Qiao; Cui, Shuxiang; Qu, Xianjun

    2017-02-08

    The activation of CXCL12/CXCR4 axis is associated with potential progression of cancer, such as invasion, metastasis and chemoresistance. However, the underlying mechanisms of CXCL12/CXCR4 axis and cancer progression have been poorly explored. We hypothesized that miRNAs might be critical downstream mediators of CXCL12/CXCR4 axis involved in cancer invasion and chemoresistance in CRC. In human CRC cells, we found that the activation of CXCL12/CXCR4 axis promoted epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and concurrent upregulation of miR-125b. Overexpression of miR-125b robustly triggered EMT and cancer invasion, which in turn enhanced the expression of CXCR4. Importantly, the reciprocal positive feedback loop between CXCR4 and miR-125b further activated the Wnt/β-catenin signaling by targeting Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene. There was a negative correlation of the expression of miR-125b with APC mRNA in paired human colorectal tissue specimens. Further experiments indicated a role of miR-125b in conferring 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) resistance in CRC probably through increasing autophagy both in vitro and in vivo. MiR-125b functions as an important downstream mediator upon the activation of CXCL12/CXCR4 axis that involved in EMT, invasion and 5-FU resistance of CRC. These findings shed a new insight into the role of miR-125b and provide a potential therapeutic target in CRC.

  3. Development of sulfadiazine-decorated PLGA nanoparticles loaded with 5-fluorouracil and cell viability.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Pedro Pires Goulart; Oliveira, Sheila Rodrigues; de Castro Rodrigues, Gabrielle; Gontijo, Savio Morato Lacerda; Lula, Ivana Silva; Cortés, Maria Esperanza; Denadai, Ângelo Márcio Leite; Sinisterra, Rubén Dario

    2015-01-08

    The aim of this work was to synthesize sulfadiazine-poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (SUL-PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) for the efficient delivery of 5-fluorouracil to cancer cells. The SUL-PLGA conjugation was assessed using FTIR, 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, elemental analysis and TG and DTA analysis. The SUL-PLGA NPs were characterized using transmission and scanning electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. Additionally, the zeta potential, drug content, and in vitro 5-FU release were evaluated. We found that for the SUL-PLGA NPs, Dh = 114.0 nm, ZP = -32.1 mV and the encapsulation efficiency was 49%. The 5-FU was released for up to 7 days from the NPs. Cytotoxicity evaluations of 5-FU-loaded NPs (5-FU-SUL-PLGA and 5-FU-PLGA) on two cancer cell lines (Caco-2, A431) and two normal cell lines (fibroblast, osteoblast) were compared. Higher cytotoxicity of 5-FU-SUL-PLGA NPs were found to both cancer cell lines when compared to normal cell lines, demonstrating that the presence of SUL could significantly enhance the cytotoxicity of the 5-FU-SUL-PLGA NPs when compared with 5-FU-PLGA NPs. Thus, the development of 5-FU-SUL-PLGA NPs to cancer cells is a promising strategy for the 5-FU antitumor formulation in the future.

  4. Cicatricial ectropion secondary to 5-fluorouracil therapy.

    PubMed

    Straus, D J; Mausolf, F A; Ellerby, R A; McCracken, J D

    1977-01-01

    Four cases of cicatricial ectropion secondary to prolonged systemic administration of 5-fluorouracil are described. In 1 patient ectropion resolved with conservative treatment and discontinuation of 5-FU. Another patient developed the ectropion terminally and died before its resolution. In 2 patients surgical repair of the ectropion was unsuccessful in relieving conjunctival symptoms while 5-FU was continued. With prolonged adjuvant chemotherapy programs utilizing 5-FU, this complication may be seen with increasing frequency. Conservative management should be attempted, and patients with this problem should be reassured that symptoms will resolve when 5-FU is stopped.

  5. Ciprofloxacin decreases survival in HT-29 cells via the induction of TGF-β1 secretion and enhances the anti-proliferative effect of 5-fluorouracil

    PubMed Central

    Bourikas, Leonidas A; Kolios, George; Valatas, Vassilis; Notas, George; Drygiannakis, Ioannis; Pelagiadis, Iordanis; Manousou, Pinelopi; Klironomos, Stefanos; Mouzas, Ioannis A; Kouroumalis, Elias

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Fluoroquinolones are potent anti-microbial agents with multiple effects on host cells and tissues. Previous studies have highlighted their pro-apoptotic effect on human cancer cells and an immunoregulatory role in animal models of inflammatory bowel disease. We examined the effect of ciprofloxacin on proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis of HT-29 cells, a human colonic epithelial cell line sensitive to transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1-mediated growth inhibition and its role in TGF-β1 production. We also examined the effect of ciprofloxacin on proliferation of HT-29 cells in combination with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), a well-established pro-apoptotic agent. Experimental approach: Using subconfluent cultures of HT-29 and Caco-2 cells, we studied the effect of ciprofloxacin, TGF-β1 and 5-FU on proliferation, apoptosis, necrosis and cell cycle. The effect of ciprofloxacin on TGF-β1 mRNA expression and production was studied in RNA extracts and cell culture supernatants respectively, using confluent cultures. Key results: Ciprofloxacin decreased proliferation of HT-29 cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. This was mediated by accumulation of HT-29 cells into the S-phase but without any effect on apoptosis or necrosis. Additionally, ciprofloxacin enhanced the antiproliferative effect of 5-FU. Interestingly, ciprofloxacin was found to up-regulate TGF-β1 production by HT-29 cells and its anti-proliferative effect was abolished when TGF-β1 was blocked. Confirming this mechanism further, ciprofloxacin had no effect on Caco-2, a human colonic epithelial cell line that lacks functional TGF-β1 receptors. Conclusions and implications: We demonstrate a novel anti-proliferative and immunoregulatory effect of ciprofloxacin on human intestinal epithelial cells mediated via TGF-β1. PMID:19371339

  6. Antioxidants decrease the apoptotic effect of 5-Fu in colon cancer by regulating Src-dependent caspase-7 phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Y; Yang, G; Zhu, F; Peng, C; Li, W; Li, H; Kim, H-G; Bode, A M; Dong, Z; Dong, Z

    2014-01-01

    Although the rate of development of drug resistance remains very high, 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu) is still the most common chemotherapeutic drug used for the treatment of colon cancer. A better understanding of the mechanism of why cancers develop resistance to 5-Fu could improve its therapeutic effect. Sometimes, antioxidants are used simultaneously with 5-Fu treatment. However, a recent clinical trial showed no advantage or even a harmful effect of combining antioxidants with 5-Fu compared with administration of 5-Fu alone. The mechanism explaining this phenomenon is still poorly understood. In this study, we show that 5-Fu can induce reactive oxygen species-dependent Src activation in colon cancer cells. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts that are deficient in Src showed a clear resistance to 5-Fu, and knocking down Src protein expression in colon cancer cells also decreased 5-Fu-induced apoptosis. We found that Src could interact with and phosphorylate caspase-7 at multiple tyrosine sites. Functionally, the tyrosine phosphorylation of caspase-7 increases its activity, thereby enhancing cellular apoptosis. When using 5-Fu and antioxidants together, Src activation was blocked, resulting in decreased 5-Fu-induced apoptosis. Our results provide a novel explanation as to why 5-Fu is not effective in combination with some antioxidants in colon cancer patients, which is important for clinical chemotherapy. PMID:24407236

  7. Insulin-induced enhancement of MCF-7 breast cancer cell response to 5-fluorouracil and cyclophosphamide.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Siddarth; Łuc, Mateusz; Ziółkowski, Piotr; Agrawal, Anil Kumar; Pielka, Ewa; Walaszek, Kinga; Zduniak, Krzysztof; Woźniak, Marta

    2017-06-01

    The study was designed to evaluate the potential use of insulin for cancer-specific treatment. Insulin-induced sensitivity of MCF-7 breast cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents 5-fluorouracil and cyclophosphamide was evaluated. To investigate and establish the possible mechanisms of this phenomenon, we assessed cell proliferation, induction of apoptosis, activation of apoptotic and autophagic pathways, expression of glucose transporters 1 and 3, formation of reactive oxygen species, and wound-healing assay. Additionally, we reviewed the literature regarding theuse of insulin in cancer-specific treatment. We found that insulin increases the cytotoxic effect of 5-fluorouracil and cyclophosphamide in vitro up to two-fold. The effect was linked to enhancement of apoptosis, activation of apoptotic and autophagic pathways, and overexpression of glucose transporters 1 and 3 as well as inhibition of cell proliferation and motility. We propose a model for insulin-induced sensitization process. Insulin acts as a sensitizer of cancer cells to cytotoxic therapy through various mechanisms opening a possibility for metronomic insulin-based treatments.

  8. 5-Fluorouracil-radiation interactions in human colon adenocarcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Buchholz, D.J.; Lepek, K.J.; Rich, T.A.

    1995-07-15

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effect of cellular proliferation and cell cycle stage on the ability of postirradiation 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) to radiosensitize cultured human colon adenocarcinoma Clone A cells. Cell survival curves were generated for irradiated: (a) log- and plateau-phase Clone A cells; and (b) Clone A cells separated by centrifugal elutriation into the various phases of the cell cycle; with and without postirradiation treatment with 100 {mu}g/ml 5-FU. Postirradiation treatment with 5-FU sensitized proliferating cells to a greater degree than it sensitized cells growing in plateau phase. The {beta} component of cell kill in log-phase cells was increased by a factor of 1.5 with a sensitizer enhancement ratio of 1.21 at the 0.01 survival level. Plateau-phase cells showed less radiosensitization (sensitizer enhancement ratio of 1.13 at the 0.01 survival level); however, there was a mild increase in both {alpha} and {beta} kill in plateau-phase cells. Elutriated G{sub 1} cells were the most radiosensitive, independent of treatment with 5-FU. The phase of the cell cycle had little effect on the ability of fluorouracil to radiosensitize Clone A cells. Proliferating cells are more susceptible to radiosensitization with 5-FU than plateau-phase cells are, but this effect appears to be independent of the phase of the cell cycle. 18 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Fluctuation in Plasma 5-Fluorouracil Concentration During Continuous 5-Fluorouracil Infusion for Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Hideo; Okumura, Hideo; Murakami, Haruaki; Kubota, Hisako; Higashida, Masaharu; Tsuruta, Atsushi; Tohyama, Kaoru; Hirai, Toshihiro

    2015-11-01

    It is generally believed that the plasma concentration of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is constant when 5-FU is continually administered for chemotherapy. The aim of the present study was to verify whether this is true. Nine patients with colorectal cancer were enrolled in this study. All patients received chemotherapy; four patients received FOLFIRI (leucovorin, 5-fluorouracil, irinotecan) and five received FOLFOX (leucovorin, 5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin). 5-FU was administered continuously (2400 mg/m(2)) for 46 h. Serum was collected at 12 points after the start of administration. The concentration of 5-FU was evaluated using a new immunoassay method and gas chromatography-mass spectrometric (GC/MS) method. The concentrations of 5-FU fluctuated dramatically over time, with greater than 3-fold changes in each individual, and the pattern was not constant. Because the serum concentration of 5-FU fluctuates and displays various patterns, the dosage should not be based on body surface area. A new individualized method for determining the 5-FU dosage should be developed. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  10. Analysis of chemotherapy drug 5-fluorouracil and its metabolites by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gift, Alan D.; Shende, Chetan S.; Inscore, Frank E.; Farquharson, Stuart

    2004-12-01

    Chemotherapy drug dosage is based on the limited statistics of the response of previously treated patients and administered according to body surface area. Considerably better dose regulation could be performed if the drug metabolism of each patient could be monitored. Unfortunately, current technologies require multiple withdrawals of blood to determine metabolism, a precious fluid in limited supply. Saliva analysis has long been considered an attractive alternative, but unfortunately standard techniques require large quantities that are difficult to obtain. In an effort to overcome this limitation we have been investigating the ability of metal-doped sol-gels to both separate drugs and their metabolites from saliva and generate surface-enhanced Raman spectra. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy has the potential to perform this analysis with just a few drops of sample due to its extreme sensitivity. Preliminary measurements are presented for the chemotherapy drug, 5-fluorouracil, and its two metabolites 5-fluorouridine and 5-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine, and the potential of determining metabolism on a patient-by-patient basis.

  11. Ell3 stimulates 5-FU resistance in a breast cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Kim, Isaac; Kim, Kwang-Soo; Kwon, Ok-Seon; Cha, Hyuk-Jin; Park, Kyung-Soon

    2017-06-01

    Ell3 is an RNA polymerase II transcription elongation factor that acts as a negative regulator of p53 expression, and regulates cell proliferation and survival. Recent studies by our group have demonstrated that ectopic expression of Ell3 in breast cancer cell lines enhances cell proliferation, potentiates cancer stem cell properties, and promotes 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) resistance. In the present study, the underlying mechanism for the induction of 5-FU resistance was investigated in Ell3 over-expressing MCF-7 cells (Ell3 OE cells). By comparing the gene expression profiles of Ell3 OE cells with control cells, the present data revealed that Lipocalin2 (LCN2) and Wnt signaling activity are associated with 5-FU resistance of Ell3 OE. siRNA-mediated suppression of LCN2 reversed 5-FU resistance in Ell3 OE cells. Chemical inhibition of Wnt signaling also reversed 5-FU resistance in Ell3 OE cells. Furthermore, the expression levels of survivin, which is a direct transcriptional target of Wnt/β-catenin and an inhibitor of apoptosis, were markedly elevated when Ell3 OE cells were treated with 5-FU, as detected by western blot analysis. These findings suggest that enhanced expression of LCN2 and activation of the Wnt signaling pathway may induce 5-FU resistance in Ell3 OE cells as a means of evading apoptosis.

  12. Cytotoxicity and antitumour activity of 5-fluorouracil-loaded polyhydroxybutyrate and cellulose acetate phthalate blend microspheres.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Kiran; Tripathi, Santosh Kumar; Kulkarni, Anandrao R; Aminabhavi, Tejraj M

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and antitumour activity of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-loaded polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) and cellulose acetate phthalate (CAP) blend microspheres were investigated in chemically induced colorectal cancer in albino male Wistar rats and compared with pristine 5-FU given as a suspension. The microspheres were characterised for particle size, encapsulation efficiency, in vitro release and in vitro cytotoxicity on human HT-29 colon cancer cell line. Spherical particles with a mean size of 44 ± 11 µm were obtained that showed sustained release of 5-FU. A high concentration of 5-FU was achieved in colonic tissues and significant reduction in tumour volume and multiplicity were observed in animals treated with 5-FU-loaded microspheres. The decreased levels of plasma albumin, creatinine, leucocytopenia and thrombocytopenia were observed in animals for 5-FU microspheres compared to the standard 5-FU formulation. The results suggest the extended release of 5-FU from the PHB-CAP blend microspheres in colonic region to enhance the antitumour efficacy.

  13. Distinct TRPV1- and TRPA1-based mechanisms underlying enhancement of oral ulcerative mucositis-induced pain by 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Kiichiro; Ono, Kentaro; Hitomi, Suzuro; Ito, Misa; Nodai, Tomotaka; Goto, Tetsuya; Harano, Nozomu; Watanabe, Seiji; Inoue, Hiromasa; Miyano, Kanako; Uezono, Yasuhito; Matoba, Motohiro; Inenaga, Kiyotoshi

    2016-05-01

    In many patients with cancer, chemotherapy-induced severe oral ulcerative mucositis causes intractable pain, leading to delays and interruptions in therapy. However, the pain mechanism in oral ulcerative mucositis after chemotherapy has not been extensively studied. In this study, we investigated spontaneous pain and mechanical allodynia in a preclinical model of oral ulcerative mucositis after systemic administration of the chemotherapy drug 5-fluorouracil, using our proprietary pain assay system for conscious rats. 5-Fluorouracil caused leukopenia but did not induce pain-related behaviors. After 5-fluorouracil administration, oral ulcers were developed with topical acetic acid treatment. Compared with saline-treated rats, 5-fluorouracil-exposed rats showed more severe mucositis with excessive bacterial loading due to a lack of leukocyte infiltration, as well as enhancements of spontaneous pain and mechanical allodynia. Antibacterial drugs, the lipid A inhibitor polymyxin B and the TRPV1/TRPA1 channel pore-passing anesthetic QX-314, suppressed both the spontaneous pain and the mechanical allodynia. The cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin and the TRPV1 antagonist SB-366791 inhibited the spontaneous pain, but not the mechanical allodynia. In contrast, the TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031 and the N-formylmethionine receptor FPR1 antagonist Boc MLF primarily suppressed the mechanical allodynia. These results suggest that 5-fluorouracil-associated leukopenia allows excessive oral bacterial infection in the oral ulcerative region, resulting in the enhancement of spontaneous pain through continuous TRPV1 activation and cyclooxygenase pathway, and mechanical allodynia through mechanical sensitization of TRPA1 caused by neuronal effects of bacterial toxins. These distinct pain mechanisms explain the difficulties encountered with general treatments for oral ulcerative mucositis-induced pain in patients with cancer and suggest more effective approaches.

  14. Hepatocellular carcinoma stem cell-like cells are enriched following low-dose 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Yongqiang; Mou, Lisha; Cheng, Kangwen; Wang, Chengyou; Deng, Xuesong; Chen, Junren; Fan, Zhibing; Ni, Yong

    2016-10-01

    It has been proposed that cancer stem cells (CSCs) are involved in tumor resistance to chemotherapy and tumor relapse. The goal of the present study was to determine the effect of low-dose 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu) on enriched hepatocellular CSC-like cells. Increased cell motility and epithelial-mesenchymal transition were observed by migration assay in human hepatoblastoma PLC/RAF/5 cells following 5-Fu treatment, as well as a significant enhancement in their sphere-forming abilities. CSC-like cells were identified by side population cell analysis. The percentage of CSC-like cells in the surviving cells was greatly increased in response to 5-Fu. These findings indicate that low-dose 5-Fu treatment may efficiently enrich the CSC-like cell population in PLC/RAF/5 cells.

  15. Selenium nanoparticles as a carrier of 5-fluorouracil to achieve anticancer synergism.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen; Li, Xiaoling; Wong, Yum-Shing; Zheng, Wenjie; Zhang, Yibo; Cao, Wenqiang; Chen, Tianfeng

    2012-08-28

    A simple method for preparing 5-fluorouracil surface-functionalized selenium nanoparticles (5FU-SeNPs) with enhanced anticancer activity has been demonstrated in the present study. Spherical SeNPs were capped with 5FU through formation of Se-O and Se-N bonds and physical adsorption, leading to the stable structure of the conjugates. 5FU surface decoration significantly enhanced the cellular uptake of SeNPs through endocytosis. A panel of five human cancer cell lines was shown to be susceptible to 5FU-SeNPs, with IC(50) values ranging from 6.2 to 14.4 μM. Despite this potency, 5FU-SeNP possesses great selectivity between cancer and normal cells. Induction of apoptosis in A375 human melanoma cells by 5FU-SeNPs was evidenced by accumulation of sub-G1 cell population, DNA fragmentation, and nuclear condensation. The contribution of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway to the cell apoptosis was confirmed by activation of caspase-9 and depletion of mitochondrial membrane potential. Pretreatment of cells with a general caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk significantly prevented 5FU-SeNP-induced apoptosis, indicating that 5FU-SeNP induced caspase-dependent apoptosis in A375 cells. Furthermore, 5FU-SeNP-induced apoptosis was found dependent on ROS generation. Our results suggest that the strategy to use SeNPs as a carrier of 5FU could be a highly efficient way to achieve anticancer synergism. 5FU-SeNPs may be a candidate for further evaluation as a chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agent for human cancers, especially melanoma.

  16. Onset of Manic Episode during Chemotherapy with 5-Fluorouracil

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Jee Hyun; Hwang, Dae-Yong; Park, Doo-Heum; Ryu, Seung-Ho

    2011-01-01

    The authors report a case of 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) induced manic episode in an elderly female without any previous psychiatric history. The patient presented manic symptoms after 4th cycle of 5-FU chemotherapy after surgery of rectal cancer. After cessation of chemotherapy and administration of olanzapine and divalproex sodium, symptoms were subsided within 10 days. PMID:21519541

  17. Andrographolide enhances 5-fluorouracil-induced apoptosis via caspase-8-dependent mitochondrial pathway involving p53 participation in hepatocellular carcinoma (SMMC-7721) cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lu; Wu, Dingfang; Luo, Kewang; Wu, Shihua; Wu, Ping

    2009-04-18

    Despite recent significant advances in the treatment of human carcinoma (HCC), the results of chemotherapy to date remain unsatisfactory. 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) still represents the cornerstone of treatment of carcinoma, and resistance to the actions of 5-FU is a major obstacle to successful chemotherapy. More effective treatment strategies may involve combinations of agents with activity against HCC. Andrographolide (ANDRO), a natural bicyclic diterpenoid lactone isolated from Andrographis paniculata, has been shown to suppress the growth of HCC cells and trigger apoptosis in vitro. To assess the suitability of ANDRO as a chemotherapeutic agent in HCC, its cytotoxic effects have been evaluated both as a single agent and in combination with 5-FU. ANDRO potentiates the cytotoxic effect of 5-FU in HCC cell line SMMC-7721 through apoptosis. ANDRO alone induces SMMC-7721 apoptosis with p53 expression, Bax conformation and caspase-3,8,9 activation. Surprisingly, the addition of ANDRO to 5-FU induces synergistic apoptosis, which could be corroborated to the increased caspase-8, p53 activity and the significant changes of Bax conformation in these cells, resulting in increased losses of mitochondrial membrane potential, increased release of cytochrome c, and activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3. Suppression of caspase-8 with the specific inhibitor z-IETD-fmk abrogates largely ANDRO/5-FU biological activity by preventing mitochondrial membrane potential disappearance, caspase-3,9 activation and subsequent apoptosis. The results suggest that ANDRO may be effective in combination with 5-FU for the treatment of HCC cells SMMC-7721.

  18. Development of rectal delivered thermo-reversible gelling film encapsulating a 5-fluorouracil hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin complex.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu-Lu; Zheng, Wen-Sheng; Chen, Shao-Hua; Han, Yan-Xing; Jiang, Jian-Dong

    2016-02-10

    We have developed a novel 5-Fluorouracil (5FU) formulation for rectal application to improve its therapeutic efficiency in colorectal cancer. The results indicated that 5FU formed an inclusion complex with Hydroxypropyl-β-Cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD). The stoichiometry of the complex was 1:1, with apparent stability constant of 100.4M(-1). After investigating physicochemical properties of the 5FU-HP-β-CD complex encapsulated with thermo-reversible gelling film, the optimized formulation P407/P188/HPMC/5FU-HP-β-CD (18.5/2.5/0.2/15%) was selected and evaluated. The result showed that the 5FU-HP-β-CD complex increased the solubility of 5FU, prolonged and enhanced its releasing. As compared to the raw drug, the transport efficiency of the 5FU-HP-β-CD complex itself or entrapped in thermo-reversible gelling film were respectively 7.3- and 6.8-fold increased, and the cellular uptake of 5-FU 4.9- and 5.4-fold elevated. There was no irritation or damage to rectal sites in the 10h treatment period. Therefore, this HP-β-CD based formulation might improve the therapeutic effect of 5FU on colon-rectal cancer.

  19. 5-Fluorouracil catabolism to 5-fluoro-5,6-dihydrouracil is reduced by acute liver impairment in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Innocenti, Federico; Danesi, Romano; Bocci, Guido; Natale, Gianfranco . E-mail: gianfranco.natale@anist.med.unipi.it; Del Tacca, Mario

    2005-03-01

    This study investigated the effect of acute liver damage on the inactivation of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) to its main catabolite 5-fluoro-5,6-dihydrouracil (5-FUH{sub 2}) in mice. Plasma pharmacokinetics of 5-FU and 5-FUH{sub 2} in mice receiving 5-FU (10, 30, and 90 mg/kg) were compared to those in mice pretreated with carbon tetrachloride and receiving the same 5-FU doses. Carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatic damage was histopathologically examined under light microscopy and serum transaminases and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase activities were also measured. Liver histopathology and elevated aminotransferase activity levels confirmed the presence of liver damage. 5-FU C{sub max} and AUC both increased up to 71% in mice with liver damage. This was reflected by decreased 5-FUH{sub 2} production, since 5-FUH{sub 2} C{sub max} and AUC levels decreased up to 47% and 61%, respectively. Metabolic ratios between 5-FUH{sub 2} and 5-FU AUCs were considerably decreased as well, further suggesting that liver damage caused a reduction in 5-FU catabolism. DPD activity was not altered in damaged livers. The present results indicate that 5-FU disposition in mice could be profoundly altered in the presence of severe liver impairment, potentially leading to enhanced anabolic activation of 5-FU. This effect seems to be ascribed to a reduction of viable hepatocytes, rather than to an inactivation of DPD activity.

  20. Degradation of cyclophosphamide and 5-fluorouracil by UV and simulated sunlight treatments: Assessment of the enhancement of the biodegradability and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Lutterbeck, Carlos Alexandre; Wilde, Marcelo Luís; Baginska, Ewelina; Leder, Christoph; Machado, Ênio Leandro; Kümmerer, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    The presence of pharmaceuticals in the environment has triggered concern among the general population and received considerable attention from the scientific community in recent years. However, only a few publications have focused on anticancer drugs, a class of pharmaceuticals that can exhibit cytotoxic, genotoxic, mutagenic, carcinogenic and teratogenic effects. The present study investigated the photodegradation, biodegradation, bacterial toxicity, mutagenicity and genotoxicity of cyclophosphamide (CP) and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). The photodegradation experiments were performed at a neutral to slight pH range (7-7.8) using two different lamps (medium-pressure mercury lamp and a xenon lamp). The primary elimination of the parent compounds was monitored by means of liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-IT-MS/MS). NPOC (non-purgeable organic carbon) analyses were carried out in order to assess mineralization rates. The Closed Bottle Test (CBT) was used to assess ready biodegradability. A new method using Vibrio fischeri was adopted to evaluate toxicity. CP was not degraded by any lamp, whereas 5-FU was completely eliminated by irradiation with the mercury lamp but only partially by the Xe lamp. No mineralization was observed for the experiments performed with the Xe lamp, and a NPOC removal of only 18% was registered for 5-FU after 256 min using the UV lamp. Not one of the parent compounds was readily biodegradable in the CBT. Photo transformation products (PTPs) resulting from photolysis were neither better biodegradable nor less toxic than the parent compound 5-FU. In contrast, the results of the tests carried out with the UV lamp indicated that more biodegradable and non-toxic PTPs of 5-FU were generated. Three PTPs were formed during the photodegradation experiments and were identified. The results of the in silico QSAR predictions showed positive mutagenic and genotoxic alerts for 5-FU, whereas only one of the formed PTPs presented positive alerts

  1. Dystrophic psoriatic fingernails treated with 1% 5-fluorouracil in a nail penetration-enhancing vehicle: a double-blind study.

    PubMed

    de Jong, E M; Menke, H E; van Praag, M C; van De Kerkhof, P C

    1999-01-01

    Topically applied nail therapeutics need to permeate the nail plate to reach the nail bed or nail matrix and exert their potential beneficial effect at these locations to obtain a therapeutic benefit. So far only topically applied 5-fluorouracil on affected nails of psoriatic patients has been shown to produce a notable clearance. Vehicle formulations enhancing nail permeation processes are thought to increase the concentration of the active agent and therefore therapeutic efficacy, possibly enabling the use of a low concentration of the active agent thereby lowering the incidence of adverse effects. This study was designed to verify whether a recently developed nail penetration enhancer in a lotion formulation, Belanyx((R)) (urea, propylene glycol), improves the efficacy of a low concentration of 5-fluorouracil (1%) in psoriatic fingernail lesions. In a randomised, double-blind, left-right study the efficacy of 1% 5-fluorouracil in the Belanyx vehicle was compared to the vehicle preparation Belanyx in dystrophic fingernails of 57 psoriatic patients. Both preparations were applied in a once daily regimen for 12 weeks. Responses and adverse effects of one selected target nail were recorded at screening, at baseline and at weeks 2, 4, 8 and 12 of treatment with a final assessment at week 16: 4 weeks after the end of treatment. As parameter of efficacy was chosen the total nail area severity (NAS) score, consisting of the separate parameters nail pitting area, number of nail pits, subungual keratosis, onycholysis, oil spots and the various scores of overall improvement. The efficacy of 1% 5-fluorouracil in lotion and that of the vehicle in suppressing the parameters of dystrophy were shown to be similar at the end of treatment (p = 0.063) or follow-up (p = 0.130). Both preparations produced statistically significant improvements (p

  2. Effect of 5-fluorouracil combination therapy on RNA processing in human colonic carcinoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Greenhalgh, D. A.; Parish, J. H.

    1990-01-01

    We have evaluated the RNA-directed cytotoxicity of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in human colonic carcinoma cells. The mode of action of 5-FU and its effects on human pre-rRNA processing were then examined. From these data, possible reasons why the disruption of pre-rRNA maturation could induce cytotoxic effects are considered. The results imply that inhibition of thymidylate synthase is not the sole primary cytotoxic lesion in this cell line. First, exogenous thymidine (dTHd) enchanced cytotoxicity. Second, addition of dThd to the cells was found to enhance incorporation of 5-FU into total cellular RNA. Third, 5-FU disrupted rRNA processing by a different mechanism from actinomycin D and methotrexate (MTX), suggesting that the inhibition was not just a consequence of cell death. Finally, the addition of dThd was found to enhance the disruption of rRNA processing consistent with an increase in concentration of 5-FU. These data are discussed in the light of literature reports and their potential for optimising 5-FU protocols. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:2328208

  3. Factors derived from Escherichia coli Nissle 1917, grown in different growth media, enhance cell death in a model of 5-fluorouracil-induced Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cell damage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hanru; Bastian, Susan E P; Lawrence, Andrew; Howarth, Gordon S

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated supernatants (SNs) from Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) grown in commonly used growth media for their capacity to affect the viability of Caco-2 colon cancer cells in the presence and absence of 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) chemotherapy. EcN was grown in Luria-Bertani (LB), tryptone soya (TSB), Man Rogosa Sharpe (MRS), and M17 broth supplemented with 10% (v/v) lactose solution (M17). Human Caco-2 colon cancer cells were treated with DMEM (control), growth media alone (LB, TSB, MRS, and M17) or EcN SNs derived from these 4 media, in the presence and absence of 5-FU. Cell viability, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and cell monolayer permeability were determined. EcN SN in LB medium reduced Caco-2 cell viability significantly, to 51% at 48 h. The combination of this EcN SN and 5-FU further reduced cell viability to 37% at 48 h, compared to 5-FU control. MRS broth and EcN SN in MRS, together with 5-FU, generated significantly lower levels of ROS compared to 5-FU control. However, all 5-FU treatments significantly disrupted the Caco-2 cell barrier compared to control; with no significant differences observed among any of the 5-FU treatments. EcN SNs (LB+) was most effective at decreasing the viability of Caco-2 cells. This could indicate a potential role for this EcN SN in chemoprevention for colon cancer.

  4. The effect of microneedles on the skin permeability and antitumor activity of topical 5-fluorouracil

    PubMed Central

    Naguib, Youssef W.; Kumar, Amit; Cui, Zhengrong

    2014-01-01

    Topical 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is approved for the treatment of superficial basal cell carcinoma and actinic keratosis. However, 5-FU suffers from poor skin permeation. Microneedles have been successfully applied to improve the skin permeability of small and large molecules, and even nanoparticles, by creating micron-sized pores in the stratum corneum layer of the skin. In this report, the feasibility of using microneedles to increase the skin permeability of 5-FU was tested. Using full thickness mouse skin mounted on Franz diffusion apparatus, it was shown that the flux of 5-FU through the skin was increased by up to 4.5-fold when the skin was pretreated with microneedles (500 μm in length, 50 μm in base diameter). In a mouse model with B16-F10 mouse melanoma cells implanted in the subcutaneous space, the antitumor activity of a commercially available 5-FU topical cream (5%) was significantly enhanced when the cream was applied on a skin area that was pretreated with microneedles, as compared to when the cream was simply applied on a skin area, underneath which the tumor cells were implanted, and without pretreatment of the skin with microneedles. Fluorouracil is not approved for melanoma therapy, but the clinical efficacy of topical 5-FU against tumors such as basal cell carcinoma may be improved by integrating microneedle technology into the therapy. PMID:25313350

  5. Iontophoretic delivery of 5-fluorouracil through excised human stratum corneum.

    PubMed

    Singh, B N; Jayaswal, S B

    2008-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of ionization, current density and penetration enhancers on the iontophoretic delivery of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) through excised human stratum corneum (HSC). The iontophoretic (cathodal) transport of 5-FU was assessed in vitro at three physiologically relevant pH values of 5.0, 7.4 and 8.0, at various levels of current density ranging between 0.15 to 0.98 mA/cm2, and in the presence of suitable penetration enhancers, namely Azone(®) (AZ), lauryl alcohol (LA), and isopropyl myristate (IPM). The steady-state flux at constant current density (0.47 mA/cm(2)) was increased by approximately 19, 10 and 27 fold at pH 5, 7.4 and 8.0, respectively. The effect of current density at pH 7.4 exhibited a linear correlation between current density and steady-state flux (r = 0.98, p = 0.002), which indicates the potential of iontophoresis for controlled transdermal delivery of 5-FU. The combination of cathodal iontophoresis with IPM produced an additive enhancement which may be attributed to aggravated skin perturbation effect and increased skin conductivity. Other enhancers such as AZ and LA produced negative or no further enhancement respectively, when used in conjunction with cathodal iontophoresis. It may be therefore concluded that pH and current density play critical role during iontophoretic delivery of 5-FU, and combination of a chemical penetration enhancer and iontophoresis can not be always viewed as a synergistic strategy which should be evaluated on a case-by-case basis for each drug candidate/enhancer combination.

  6. Allicin sensitizes hepatocellular cancer cells to anti-tumor activity of 5-fluorouracil through ROS-mediated mitochondrial pathway.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xuejing; Liang, Jiyun; Sun, Jingyuan; Hu, Xiaoyun; Lei, Ling; Wu, Dehua; Liu, Li

    2016-08-01

    Drug resistance and hepatic dysfunction are the two major factors that limit the application of chemotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). It has been reported that allicin has the hepatic protective effect and antitumor activity. Hence allicin may be an ideal enhancer to chemotherapy regimen of HCC. In the present study, we demonstrated that allicin enhanced 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) inducing cytotoxicity in HCC cells. In vivo experiment, combined treatment group with allicin (5 mg/kg/d; every two days for 3 weeks) and 5-FU (20 mg/kg/d; 5 consecutive days) showed a dramatic inhibitory effect on the growth of HCC xenograft tumors in nude mice. The co-treatment group showed highly apoptotic level compared with 5-FU treated alone. Cells combined treatment with allicin and 5-FU increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level, reduced mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), activated caspase-3 and PARP, and down-regulated Bcl-2 compared with DMSO, allicin and 5-FU treated alone. Moreover, the increase of activated caspase-3 and PARP was blocked by the ROS inhibitor antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC). In conclusion, this is the first study to demonstrate that allicin sensitized HCC cells to 5-FU induced apoptosis through ROS-mediated mitochondrial pathway. These results provided evidences for the combination used of allicin and 5-FU as a novel chemotherapy regimen in HCC.

  7. High glucose-induced resistance to 5-fluorouracil in pancreatic cancer cells alleviated by 2-deoxy-D-glucose.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yao; Diao, Dongmei; Zhang, Hao; Guo, Qi; Wu, Xuandi; Song, Yongchun; Dang, Chengxue

    2014-03-01

    Abnormal glucose metabolism from hyperglycemia or diabetes aggravates the progression of pancreatic cancer. It is unknown whether high glucose has an impact on the antitumor effect of 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu) and whether targeting aberrant glucose metabolism using 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) may reverse this effect in high-glucose microenvironments. The cell viability of AsPC-1 and Panc-1 was analyzed by MTT assay following 5-Fu treatment at different glucose concentrations. Altered sensitivity to 5-Fu by 2-DG was also analyzed. LY294002 was used to inhibit PI3K-Akt signaling to determine the mechanism involved. In response to glucose, 5-Fu-induced cell growth inhibition was attenuated in a dose-dependent manner, accompanied with activated p-Akt, while 2-DG enhanced 5-Fu-induced cell growth inhibition. Moreover, blocking the PI3K/Akt pathway by LY294002 effectively eliminated 2-DG-induced apoptosis. In conclusion, high glucose weakens the antitumor effect of 5-Fu via PI3K/Akt signaling. Using 2-DG in combination with 5-Fu significantly increased their therapeutic effectiveness in high-glucose microenvironments.

  8. In vitro evaluation of cancer-specific NF-kappaB-CEA enhancer-promoter system for 5-fluorouracil prodrug gene therapy in colon cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Guo, X; Evans, T R J; Somanath, S; Armesilla, A L; Darling, J L; Schatzlein, A; Cassidy, J; Wang, W

    2007-09-17

    Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB) is a transcription factor with high transcriptional activity in cancer cells. In this study, we developed a novel enhancer-promoter system, kappaB4-CEA205, in which the basal carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) promoter sequence (CEA205) was placed downstream of the four tandem-linked NF-kappaB DNA-binding sites (kappaB4). In combination with a kappaB4 enhancer, the transcriptional activity of the CEA promoter was significantly enhanced (three- to eight-fold) in cancer cell lines but not in normal cells. In cancer cell lines, the transcriptional activity of kappaB4-CEA205 was comparable with that of the SV40 promoter. We also constructed vectors in which the thymidine phosphorylase (TP) cDNA was under the control of CEA205, kappaB4, kappaB4-CEA205 and CMV promoters, respectively. TP protein and enzyme activity were detected at comparable levels in kappaB4-CEA205- and CMV-driven TP cDNA-transfected cancer cell lines (H630 and RKO). The kappaB4-TP and CEA205-TP-transfected cell lines, respectively, only demonstrated negligible and low levels of TP protein and enzyme activity. Both CMV- and kappaB4-CEA205-driven TP cDNA transiently transfected cells were 8- to 10-fold sensitised to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) prodrug, 5'-deoxy-5-fluorouradine (5'-DFUR), in contrast to only 1.5- to 2-fold sensitised by the kappaB4- and CEA205-driven TP cDNA-transfected cells. The bystander killing effect of CMV- and kappaB4-CEA205-driven TP cDNA-transfected cells was comparable. This is the first report that indicates that the NF-kappaB DNA-binding site could be used as a novel cancer-specific enhancer to improve cancer-specific promoter activity in gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy.

  9. Gambogic acid potentiates the chemosensitivity of colorectal cancer cells to 5-fluorouracil by inhibiting proliferation and inducing apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jianchang; Yang, Ping; Li, Wanglin; He, Feng; Zeng, Shanqi; Zhang, Tong; Zhong, Junbin; Huang, Di; Chen, Zhuanpeng; Wang, Chengxing; Chen, Huacui; Hu, He; Cao, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Chemotherapy using 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) for colorectal cancer (CRC) has low specificity and response rates, leading to severe side effects. Gambogic acid (GA), a traditional Chinese medicine, has multi-targeted anticancer effects, including growth inhibition and apoptosis induction. However, it is unclear whether a combination of 5-FU and GA has synergistic anticancer effects in CRC cells. In this study, SW480 and HCT116 human CRC cells and human intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) were treated with different concentrations of 5-FU, GA or 5-FU+GA. A Cell Counting kit-8 assay was conducted to quantify cell proliferation. The combination index (CI) was calculated and the median-effect principle was applied to analyze the interaction between 5-FU and GA. Flow cytometry was used to determine the percentage of cells undergoing apoptosis. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting were applied to measure P53, survivin and thymidylate synthase (TS) mRNA and protein levels. It was found that 5-FU+GA more pronouncedly inhibited cell growth and induced apoptosis, compared with either monotherapy. CI values <1 indicated the synergistic effects of the drugs. 5-FU+GA further decreased P53, survivin and TS mRNA and protein levels in the two CRC cell lines compared with single drugs, whereas increased P53 protein levels were observed in HCT116 cells. Moreover, 5-FU+GA did not increase cytotoxicity to IECs. These results demonstrate that GA enhances the anticancer effects of 5-FU on CRC cells. Combined treatment with 5-FU and GA is effective and safe for CRC cells, and may become a promising chemotherapy treatment. PMID:28352348

  10. Minocycline attenuates 5-fluorouracil-induced small intestinal mucositis in mouse model.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tien-Yu; Chu, Heng-Cheng; Lin, Yi-Ling; Ho, Whae-Hong; Hou, Hsien-San; Chao, You-Chen; Liao, Ching-Len

    2009-11-27

    Minocycline exerts anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects distinct from its antimicrobial function. In this study we investigated the effect of this drug on chemotherapy-induced gut damage. Body weight loss results, diarrhea scores, and villi measurements showed that minocycline attenuated the severity of intestinal mucositis induced by 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Minocycline repressed the expression of TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and iNOS, decreased the apoptotic index, and inhibited poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) activity in the mouse small intestine. In vitro experiments showed that minocycline suppressed the upregulation of PARP-1 activity in enterocyte IEC-6 cells treated with 5-FU. In addition, minocycline treatment appeared to enhance the antitumor effects of 5-FU in tumor CT-26 xenograft mice. Our results indicate that minocycline protects mice from gut injury induced by 5-FU and enhances the antitumor effects of 5-FU in xenograft mice. These observations suggest that minocycline treatment may benefit patients undergoing standard cancer chemotherapy by alleviating chemical-associated intestinal mucositis.

  11. Chromosome segregation and organization are targets of 5'-Fluorouracil in eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Mojardín, Laura; Botet, Javier; Moreno, Sergio; Salas, Margarita

    2015-01-01

    The antimetabolite 5'-Fluorouracil (5FU) is an analog of uracil commonly employed as a chemotherapeutic agent in the treatment of a range of cancers including colorectal tumors. To assess the cellular effects of 5FU, we performed a genome-wide screening of the haploid deletion library of the eukaryotic model Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Our analysis validated previously characterized drug targets including RNA metabolism, but it also revealed unexpected mechanisms of action associated with chromosome segregation and organization (post-translational histone modification, histone exchange, heterochromatin). Further analysis showed that 5FU affects the heterochromatin structure (decreased levels of histone H3 lysine 9 methylation) and silencing (down-regulation of heterochromatic dg/dh transcripts). To our knowledge, this is the first time that defects in heterochromatin have been correlated with increased cytotoxicity to an anticancer drug. Moreover, the segregation of chromosomes, a process that requires an intact heterochromatin at centromeres, was impaired after drug exposure. These defects could be related to the induction of genes involved in chromatid cohesion and kinetochore assembly. Interestingly, we also observed that thiabendazole, a microtubule-destabilizing agent, synergistically enhanced the cytotoxic effects of 5FU. These findings point to new targets and drug combinations that could potentiate the effectiveness of 5FU-based treatments.

  12. Preparation of 5-fluorouracil nanoparticles by supercritical antisolvents for pulmonary delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kalantarian, Pardis; Najafabadi, Abdolhosein Rouholamini; Haririan, Ismaeil; Vatanara, Alireza; Yamini, Yadollah; Darabi, Majid; Gilani, Kambiz

    2010-01-01

    This study concerns the supercritical antisolvent process which allows single-step production of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) nanoparticles. This process enhances the physical characteristics of 5-FU in order to deliver it directly to the respiratory tract. Several mixtures of methanol with dichloromethane, acetone, or ethanol were used for particle preparation, and their effects on the physical characteristics of the final products were studied. The conditions of the experiment included pressures of 100 and 150 bar, temperature of 40°C, and a flow rate of 1 mL/min. The particles were characterized physicochemically before and after the process for their morphology and crystallinity. In spite of differences in size, the particles were not very different regarding their morphology. The resulting particles were of a regular shape, partly spherical, and appeared to have a smooth surface, whereas the mechanically milled particles showed less uniformity, had surface irregularities and a high particle size distribution, and seemed aggregated. Particles of 5-FU precipitated from methanol-dichloromethane 50:50 had a mean particle size of 248 nm. In order to evaluate the aerodynamic behavior of the nanoparticles, six 5-FU dry powder formulations containing mixtures of coarse and fine lactose of different percentages were prepared. Deposition of 5-FU was measured using a twin-stage liquid impinger and analyzed using a validated high pressure liquid chromatography method. Addition of fine lactose improved the aerodynamic performance of the drug, as determined by the fine particle fraction. PMID:21042422

  13. Loss of Smad4 in colorectal cancer induces resistance to 5-fluorouracil through activating Akt pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, B; Zhang, B; Chen, X; Bae, S; Singh, K; Washington, M K; Datta, P K

    2014-01-01

    Background: Higher frequency of Smad4 inactivation or loss of expression is observed in metastasis of colorectal cancer (CRC) leading to unfavourable survival and contributes to chemoresistance. However, the molecular mechanism of how Smad4 regulates chemosensitivity of CRC is unknown. Methods: We evaluated how the loss of Smad4 in CRC enhanced chemoresistance to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) using two CRC cell lines in vitro and in vivo. Immunoblotting with cell and tumour lysates and immunohistochemical analyses with tissue microarray were performed. Results: Knockdown or loss of Smad4 induced tumorigenicity, migration, invasion, angiogenesis, metastasis, and 5-FU resistance. Smad4 expression in mouse tumours regulated cell-cycle regulatory proteins leading to Rb phosphorylation. Loss of Smad4 activated Akt pathway that resulted in upregulation of anti-apoptotic proteins, Bcl-2 and Bcl-w, and Survivin. Suppression of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway by LY294002 restored chemosensitivity of Smad4-deficient cells to 5-FU. Vascular endothelial growth factor-induced angiogenesis in Smad4-deficient cells might also lead to chemoresistance. Low levels of Smad4 expression in CRC tissues correlated with higher levels of Bcl-2 and Bcl-w and with poor overall survival as observed in immunohistochemical staining of tissue microarrays. Conclusion: Loss of Smad4 in CRC patients induces resistance to 5-FU-based therapy through activation of Akt pathway and inhibitors of this pathway may sensitise these patients to 5-FU. PMID:24384683

  14. Biodegradable three-dimension micro-device delivering 5-fluorouracil in tumor bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiaojiao; Zheng, Na; Gao, Yang; Chen, Tianning; Lu, Wen

    2012-01-01

    A novel three-dimension micro-device was formulated to control delivery of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) for the treatment of solid tumors. The poly-(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA), which is both biocompatible and biodegradable, was used as carrier material. The characteristics of drug release in vitro and in vivo and the performance of the micro-device after implantation in tumor bearing mice were evaluated. A constant release profile from in vitro test was obtained for a period of 7 days, and it correlated well with the in vivo release profile. In the distribution experiment of 5-FU micro-device, it was demonstrated that 5-FU remained in the tumor tissues for more than 7 days after implantation. Likewise, we found that the 5-FU concentration in tumor correlated well with the in vivo release. Tumors treated with 5-FU loaded micro-device of three different dosages showed significant tumor reduction (P < 0.05) compared with empty control micro-device 7 days after administration. Moreover, the implantation treatment showed enhanced efficacy compared with the intraperitoneal administration with the same dosage. These results suggested that the three-dimensional micro-device may provide a promising local and controlled release drug delivery system, which may enable delivery of multiple drugs for post-surgical chemotherapy against solid tumor.

  15. Bioavailability and feasibility of subcutaneous 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Borner, M M; Kneer, J; Crevoisier, C; Brunner, K W; Cerny, T

    1993-09-01

    Continuous intravenous (i.v.) infusion of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) has been shown to be superior to bolus regimens in terms of response rates and toxicity. However, a continuous infusion is more expensive and prone to complications such as thromboembolism and infections. A way to circumvent these problems would be to administer 5-FU subcutaneously (s.c.). To assess feasibility and bioavailability of s.c. 5-FU, eight patients with advanced cancer received 250 mg 5-FU as an infusion over 90 min either intravenously (i.v.) or s.c. into the abdominal wall. The mean +/- s.d. bioavailability of s.c. 5-FU was 0.89 +/- 0.23. The interpatient variability for the area under the plasma concentration-time curve was 48% for the s.c. and 36% for the i.v. infusion. No local side effects were observed. To test the local tolerance of a more prolonged administration three patients received 930-1,000 mg m-2 5-FU by 24-h continuous s.c. infusion. The steady-state plasma levels were comparable to i.v. infusion. One patient developed a painless skin pigmentation at the s.c. infusion site. However, the same reaction was observed at the forearm after i.v. infusion. We conclude that at the dose studied s.c. 5-FU has an almost complete bioavailability and is well tolerated. Further work will show, whether prolonged s.c. infusion can be used as a safe and economical alternative to i.v. infusion.

  16. Bioavailability and feasibility of subcutaneous 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed Central

    Borner, M. M.; Kneer, J.; Crevoisier, C.; Brunner, K. W.; Cerny, T.

    1993-01-01

    Continuous intravenous (i.v.) infusion of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) has been shown to be superior to bolus regimens in terms of response rates and toxicity. However, a continuous infusion is more expensive and prone to complications such as thromboembolism and infections. A way to circumvent these problems would be to administer 5-FU subcutaneously (s.c.). To assess feasibility and bioavailability of s.c. 5-FU, eight patients with advanced cancer received 250 mg 5-FU as an infusion over 90 min either intravenously (i.v.) or s.c. into the abdominal wall. The mean +/- s.d. bioavailability of s.c. 5-FU was 0.89 +/- 0.23. The interpatient variability for the area under the plasma concentration-time curve was 48% for the s.c. and 36% for the i.v. infusion. No local side effects were observed. To test the local tolerance of a more prolonged administration three patients received 930-1,000 mg m-2 5-FU by 24-h continuous s.c. infusion. The steady-state plasma levels were comparable to i.v. infusion. One patient developed a painless skin pigmentation at the s.c. infusion site. However, the same reaction was observed at the forearm after i.v. infusion. We conclude that at the dose studied s.c. 5-FU has an almost complete bioavailability and is well tolerated. Further work will show, whether prolonged s.c. infusion can be used as a safe and economical alternative to i.v. infusion. PMID:8353044

  17. Multiple nanoemulsion system for an oral combinational delivery of oxaliplatin and 5-fluorouracil: preparation and in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Pangeni, Rudra; Choi, Sang Won; Jeon, Ok-Cheol; Byun, Youngro; Park, Jin Woo

    Oxaliplatin (OXA) is a third-generation cisplatin analog that has been approved as first-line chemotherapy in combination with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) for the treatment of resectable and advanced colorectal cancer. However, the therapeutic efficacy of oral OXA and 5-FU is limited by their low bioavailability due to poor membrane permeability. The aim of the present study was to develop an oral delivery system for OXA and 5-FU. We constructed an ion-pairing complex of OXA with a deoxycholic acid derivative (N(α)-deoxycholyl-l-lysyl-methylester, DCK) (OXA/DCK) as a permeation enhancer. Next, we prepared multiple water-in-oil-in-water nanoemulsions incorporating OXA/DCK and 5-FU to enhance their oral absorption. To evaluate their membrane permeability, we assessed in vitro permeabilities of OXA/DCK and 5-FU through an artificial intestinal membrane and Caco-2 cell monolayer. Finally, oral bioavailability in rats and tumor growth inhibition in the colorectal adenocarcinoma cell (CT26)-bearing mouse model were investigated after oral administration of nanoemulsion containing OXA/DCK and 5-FU. The droplet size of the optimized nanoemulsion was 20.3±0.22 nm with a zeta potential of -4.65±1.68 mV. In vitro permeabilities of OXA/DCK and 5-FU from the nanoemulsion through a Caco-2 cell monolayer were 4.80- and 4.30-fold greater than those of OXA and 5-FU, respectively. The oral absorption of OXA/DCK and 5-FU from the nanoemulsion also increased significantly, and the resulting oral bioavailability values of OXA/DCK and 5-FU in the nanoemulsive system were 9.19- and 1.39-fold higher than those of free OXA and 5-FU, respectively. Furthermore, tumor growth in CT26 tumor-bearing mice given the oral OXA/DCK- and 5-FU-loaded nanoemulsion was maximally inhibited by 73.9%, 48.5%, and 38.1%, compared with tumor volumes in the control group and the oral OXA and 5-FU groups, respectively. These findings demonstrate the therapeutic potential of a nanoemulsion incorporating OXA/DCK and

  18. Multiple nanoemulsion system for an oral combinational delivery of oxaliplatin and 5-fluorouracil: preparation and in vivo evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Pangeni, Rudra; Choi, Sang Won; Jeon, Ok-Cheol; Byun, Youngro; Park, Jin Woo

    2016-01-01

    Oxaliplatin (OXA) is a third-generation cisplatin analog that has been approved as first-line chemotherapy in combination with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) for the treatment of resectable and advanced colorectal cancer. However, the therapeutic efficacy of oral OXA and 5-FU is limited by their low bioavailability due to poor membrane permeability. The aim of the present study was to develop an oral delivery system for OXA and 5-FU. We constructed an ion-pairing complex of OXA with a deoxycholic acid derivative (Nα-deoxycholyl-l-lysyl-methylester, DCK) (OXA/DCK) as a permeation enhancer. Next, we prepared multiple water-in-oil-in-water nanoemulsions incorporating OXA/DCK and 5-FU to enhance their oral absorption. To evaluate their membrane permeability, we assessed in vitro permeabilities of OXA/DCK and 5-FU through an artificial intestinal membrane and Caco-2 cell monolayer. Finally, oral bioavailability in rats and tumor growth inhibition in the colorectal adenocarcinoma cell (CT26)-bearing mouse model were investigated after oral administration of nanoemulsion containing OXA/DCK and 5-FU. The droplet size of the optimized nanoemulsion was 20.3±0.22 nm with a zeta potential of −4.65±1.68 mV. In vitro permeabilities of OXA/DCK and 5-FU from the nanoemulsion through a Caco-2 cell monolayer were 4.80- and 4.30-fold greater than those of OXA and 5-FU, respectively. The oral absorption of OXA/DCK and 5-FU from the nanoemulsion also increased significantly, and the resulting oral bioavailability values of OXA/DCK and 5-FU in the nanoemulsive system were 9.19- and 1.39-fold higher than those of free OXA and 5-FU, respectively. Furthermore, tumor growth in CT26 tumor-bearing mice given the oral OXA/DCK- and 5-FU-loaded nanoemulsion was maximally inhibited by 73.9%, 48.5%, and 38.1%, compared with tumor volumes in the control group and the oral OXA and 5-FU groups, respectively. These findings demonstrate the therapeutic potential of a nanoemulsion incorporating OXA/DCK and

  19. Effects of a bolus injection of 5-fluorouracil on dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase activity in rats receiving continuous infusion of 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Kobuchi, Shinji; Hayashi, Asuka; Taniguchi, Mayu; Ito, Yukako; Tamura, Takao; Sakaeda, Toshiyuki

    2016-09-01

    The options for improving the chemotherapeutic regimen consisting of bolus plus infusion of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) include omitting the 5-FU bolus injection. We examined the effects of a 5-FU bolus injection on the activity of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD), which is the first and rate-limiting enzyme of 5-FU catabolism, in rats. The rats were divided into three groups, and then continuous infusion (50 mg/m(2)/h) for 4 h was started with a bolus injection of saline, 20 mg/kg 5-FU, or 60 mg/kg 5-FU. Plasma 5-FU, uracil (Ura), dihydrouracil (UH2) levels, and hepatic DPD activity were determined after administration of 5-FU. The half-life after the end of the infusion (t 1/2, 4-8 h) of 5-FU in the rats given the bolus injection was significantly longer than in those that had been given saline, and it increased with increasing 5-FU bolus injection dosage (r = 0.801, p < 0.01). The plasma UH2/Ura ratio, an indirect biomarker of hepatic DPD activity, tended to be lower in the rats that had received a 5-FU bolus injection than in those that had not, and it remained low after infusion ended. The hepatic DPD activity in rats that had received a 5-FU bolus injection was significantly lower than in those that had not. Negative correlation was observed between DPD activity and bolus injection dosage (r = -0.691, p < 0.05). A bolus injection suppresses hepatic DPD activity and its effects are dependent on dosage, resulting in slower elimination of 5-FU from the blood and contributing to long-term systemic exposure to 5-FU.

  20. Construction of METHFR shRNA/5-fluorouracil co-loaded folate-targeted chitosan polymeric nanoparticles and its anti-carcinoma effect on gastric cells growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Lin; Fan, Ji-Chang; Le, Yi-Guan; Zeng, Fei; Cheng, Hua; Hu, Xiao-yun; Cao, Jia-Qing

    2016-05-01

    PEGylated and folate-targeted chitosan polymeric nanoparticles (FPNs) for the treatment of gastric carcinoma were prepared successfully. OQC-anchored folate conjugates were synthesized and used in assembling FPNs nano-system for enhancing intracellular uptake against folate receptor overexpressing cancer cells. The results indicated that folate-targeted chitosan polymeric nanoparticles (CPNs) can reverse drug-resistant SGC-7901 cells of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) compared with non-targeted CPNs. Increased therapeutic efficiency of 5-FU/METHFR shRNA co-loaded PNs were also tested in SGC-7901 cells and compaed with 5-FU or METHFR shRNA in solution, which was associated with increased cell inhibition function for single drug group and synergistic effects of 5-FU and METHFR shRNA at 2.0 µg/mL FPNs concentration. In addition, the cell accumulation levels of 5-FU in SGC-7901 cells was time dependent for these nanoparticles. FPNs (effective diameter: 83.2 ± 1.1 nm; polydispersity index: 0.193) could significantly boost cellular accumulation of 5-FU and overcome the drug efflux mechanism of MDR than 5-FU-loaded NPNs and 5-FU in solution. In conclusion, ligand-targeted PNs can be used as a potentially effective drug delivery system.

  1. Application of artificial neural network to investigate the effects of 5-fluorouracil on ribonucleotides and deoxyribonucleotides in HepG2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jianru; Chen, QianQian; Lam, Christopher Wai Kei; Wang, Caiyun; Wong, Vincent Kam Wai; Xu, Fengguo; Jiang, ZhiHong; Zhang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous ribonucleotides and deoxyribonucleotides are essential metabolites that play important roles in a broad range of key cellular functions. Their intracellular levels could also reflect the action of nucleoside analogues. We investigated the effects of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) on ribonucleotide and deoxyribonucleotide pool sizes in cells upon exposure to 5-FU for different durations. Unsupervised and supervised artificial neural networks were compared for comprehensive analysis of global responses to 5-FU. As expected, deoxyuridine monophosphate (dUMP) increased after 5-FU incubation due to the inhibition of thymine monophosphate (TMP) synthesis. Interestingly, the accumulation of dUMP could not lead to increased levels of deoxyuridine triphosphate (dUTP) and deoxyuridine diphosphate (dUDP). After the initial fall in intracellular deoxythymidine triphosphate (TTP) concentration, its level recovered and increased from 48 h exposure to 5-FU, although deoxythymidine diphosphate (TDP) and TMP continued to decrease compared with the control group. These findings suggest 5-FU treatment caused unexpected changes in intracellular purine polls, such as increases in deoxyadenosine triphosphate (dATP), adenosine-triphosphate (ATP), guanosine triphosphate (GTP) pools. Further elucidation of the mechanism of action of 5-FU in causing these changes should enhance development of strategies that will increase the anticancer activity of 5-FU while decreasing its resistance. PMID:26578061

  2. A case of acute myocardial infarction during 5-fluorouracil infusion.

    PubMed

    Canale, Maria Laura; Camerini, Andrea; Stroppa, Stefano; Porta, Romana Prosperi; Caravelli, Paolo; Mariani, Mario; Balbarini, Alberto; Ricci, Sergio

    2006-11-01

    Cardiac toxicity is an uncommon side-effect of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) treatment, consisting mainly of chest pain episodes with or without electrocardiographic changes and dysrhythmias. Here, we describe the case of a 56-year-old male patient with a diagnosis of advanced colorectal cancer who developed an acute myocardial infarction during 5-FU infusion. The patient was not affected by prior heart disease and did not show any classic risk factors for coronary heart disease. Coronary angiography examination revealed no evidence of coronary stenosis, supporting the hypothesis of a coronary artery spasm related to 5-FU infusion. Given the great number of cancer patients receiving 5-FU containing chemotherapeutic regimens, this rare but severe cardiac side-effect may be observed in both cardiologic and oncologic clinical practice. We suggest a tight clinical monitoring of all patients receiving 5-FU infusions, even in those without a prior history of heart disease.

  3. Experimental cystic echinococcosis therapy: In vitro and in vivo combined 5-fluorouracil/albendazole treatment.

    PubMed

    Pensel, Patricia E; Elissondo, Natalia; Gambino, Guillermo; Gamboa, Gabriela Ullio; Benoit, J P; Elissondo, María C

    2017-10-15

    Human cystic echinococcosis is a zoonosis caused by the larval stage of the tapeworm Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato (s. l.). Although benzimidazole compounds such as albendazole (ABZ) and mebendazole have been the cornerstone of chemotherapy for the disease, there is often no complete recovery after treatment. Hence, new strategies are required to improve treatment of human cystic echinococcosis. The goals of the current study were as follows: (i) to evaluate the in vitro efficacy of the 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and ABZ combination against E. granulosus s. l. protoscoleces and cysts, (ii) to compare the clinical efficacy of 5-FU alone or in combination with ABZ in infected mice. The combination of 5-FU+ABZ had a stronger in vitro effect against larval stage than that did both drugs alone. Even at the lowest concentration of 5-FU+ABZ combination (1μg/ml), the reduction of the viability of protoscoleces and cysts was greater than that observed with drugs alone at 10μg/ml. The results were confirmed at the ultrastructural level by scanning electron microscopy. These data helped to justify the in vivo investigations assessing the therapeutic potential of the combination of 5-FU and ABZ suspension in CF-1 mice infected with E. granulosus sensu stricto (s. s.) metacestodes. Treatment with 5-FU (10mg/kg) or 5-FU (10mg/kg) + ABZ suspension (5mg/kg) reduced the weight of cysts recovered from mice compared with control groups. Interestingly, the effect of 5-FU given weekly for 5 consecutive weeks was comparable to that observed with ABZ suspension under a daily schedule during 30days. Co-administration of 5-FU with ABZ did not enhance the in vivo efficacy of drugs alone calculated in relation to cysts weights. However, the combination provoked greater ultrastructural alterations compared to the monotherapy. In conclusion, we demonstrated the efficacy of 5-FU either alone or co-administrated with ABZ against murine experimental cystic echinococcosis. Since 5-FU treatments

  4. Melatonin synergizes the chemotherapeutic effect of 5-fluorouracil in colon cancer by suppressing PI3K/AKT and NF-κB/iNOS signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yue; Xiao, Xiangsheng; Zhang, Changlin; Yu, Wendan; Guo, Wei; Zhang, Zhifeng; Li, Zhenglin; Feng, Xu; Hao, Jiaojiao; Zhang, Kefang; Xiao, Bingyi; Chen, Miao; Huang, Wenlin; Xiong, Shunbin; Wu, Xiaojun; Deng, Wuguo

    2017-03-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is one of the most commonly used chemotherapeutic agents in colon cancer treatment, but has a narrow therapeutic index limited by its toxicity. Melatonin exerts antitumor activity in various cancers, but it has never been combined with 5-FU as an anticolon cancer treatment to improve the chemotherapeutic effect of 5-FU. In this study, we assessed such combinational use in colon cancer and investigated whether melatonin could synergize the antitumor effect of 5-FU. We found that melatonin significantly enhanced the 5-FU-mediated inhibition of cell proliferation, colony formation, cell migration and invasion in colon cancer cells. We also found that melatonin synergized with 5-FU to promote the activation of the caspase/PARP-dependent apoptosis pathway and induce cell cycle arrest. Further mechanism study demonstrated that melatonin synergized the antitumor effect of 5-FU by targeting the PI3K/AKT and NF-κB/inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) signaling. Melatonin in combination with 5-FU markedly suppressed the phosphorylation of PI3K, AKT, IKKα, IκBα, and p65 proteins, promoted the translocation of NF-κB p50/p65 from the nuclei to cytoplasm, abrogated their binding to the iNOS promoter, and thereby enhanced the inhibition of iNOS signaling. In addition, pretreatment with a PI3K- or iNOS-specific inhibitor synergized the antitumor effects of 5-FU and melatonin. Finally, we verified in a xenograft mouse model that melatonin and 5-FU exerted synergistic antitumor effect by inhibiting the AKT and iNOS signaling pathways. Collectively, our study demonstrated that melatonin synergized the chemotherapeutic effect of 5-FU in colon cancer through simultaneous suppression of multiple signaling pathways. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Dual Inhibition of Cdc7 and Cdk9 by PHA-767491 Suppresses Hepatocarcinoma Synergistically with 5-Fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Zhao, Xiao-Le; Shang, Shi-Qiang; Shen, Hong-Qiang; Chen, Xi

    2015-01-01

    Activation of checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) is essential in chemoresistance of hepatocarcinoma (HCC) to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and other antimetabolite family of drugs. In this study, we demonstrated that PHA-767491, a dual inhibitor of two cell cycle checkpoint kinases, cell division cycle kinase 7 (Cdc7) and cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (Cdk9), has synergistic antitumor effect with 5-FU to suppress human HCC cells both in vitro and in vivo. Compared with the sole use of each agent, PHA-767491 in combination with 5-FU exhibited much stronger cytotoxicity and induced significant apoptosis manifested by remarkably increased caspase 3 activation and poly(ADP-Ribose) polymerase fragmentation in HCC cells. PHA-767491 directly counteracted the 5-FU-induced phosphorylation of Chk1, a substrate of Cdc7; and decreased the expression of the anti-apoptotic protein myeloid leukemia cell 1, a downstream target of Cdk9. In tumor tissues sectioned from nude mice HCC xenografts, administration of PHA-767491 also decreased Chk1 phosphorylation and increased in situ cell apoptosis. Our study suggests that PHA- 767491 could enhance the efficacy of 5-FU by inhibiting Chk1 phosphorylation and down-regulating Mcl1 expression through inhibition of Cdc7 and Cdk9, thus combinational administration of PHA-767491 with 5-FU could be potentially beneficial to patients with advanced and resistant HCC.

  6. Apigenin potentiates the antitumor activity of 5-FU on solid Ehrlich carcinoma: Crosstalk between apoptotic and JNK-mediated autophagic cell death platforms.

    PubMed

    Gaballah, Hanaa H; Gaber, Rasha A; Mohamed, Darin A

    2017-02-01

    Although 5- Fluorouracil (5-FU) has exhibited effectiveness against cancer, novel therapeutic strategies are needed to enhance its antitumor efficiency and modulate its cytotoxity. Apigenin, a flavonoid present in fruits and vegetables, is a potent dietary phytochemical effective in cancer chemoprevention. This study was undertaken to investigate the potential synergistic antitumor activity of apigenin and 5-FU on Solid Ehrlich carcinoma (SEC). Eighty Swiss albino male mice were divided into four equal groups: vehicle treated control SEC, SEC+5-FU, SEC+apigenin, SEC+ 5-FU+apigenin. Beclin-1 and caspases 3, 9 and JNK activities were estimated by ELISA; mRNA expression levels of the antiapoptotic gene Mcl-1 were estimated using quantitative real-time RT-PCR, while tissue malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione peroxidase and total antioxidant capacity were evaluated spectrophotometrically. A part of the tumor was examined for histopathological and Ki-67 immunohistochemistry analysis. 5-FU and/or apigenin caused significant increase in tissue levels of Beclin-1, caspases 3, 9 and JNK activities, MDA with significant decrease in tumor volume, Mcl-1expression, tissue glutathione peroxidase and total antioxidant capacity and alleviated the histopathological changes with significant decrease of Ki-67 proliferation index compared to vehicle treated SEC control group. The combination of 5-FU and apigenin had a greater effect than each of 5-FU or apigenin alone against solid Ehrlich carcinoma in mice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Angina induced by 5-fluorouracil infusion in a patient with normal coronaries.

    PubMed

    Tajik, Reza; Saadat, Habib; Taherkhani, Maryam; Movahed, Mohammad Reza

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the occurrence of angina in patients treated with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) without significant coronary artery disease. We present a case followed by a review of the literature. A 43-year-old man with a history of colon cancer developed typical angina during intravenous infusion of 5-FU. His electrocardiogram (ECG) showed tall T waves during his angina episode. His angina and ECG changes reoccurred during a second 5-FU infusion. His coronary angiography was normal. This case is consistent with a rare occurrence of 5-FU-induced angina despite normal coronaries. Physician should be aware of this important side effect of 5-FU infusion.

  8. 5-fluorouracil resistant colon cancer cells are addicted to OXPHOS to survive and enhance stem-like traits.

    PubMed

    Denise, Corti; Paoli, Paolo; Calvani, Maura; Taddei, Maria Letizia; Giannoni, Elisa; Kopetz, Scott; Kazmi, Syed Mohammad Ali; Pia, Morelli Maria; Pettazzoni, Piergiorgio; Sacco, Elena; Caselli, Anna; Vanoni, Marco; Landriscina, Matteo; Cirri, Paolo; Chiarugi, Paola

    2015-12-08

    Despite marked tumor shrinkage after 5-FU treatment, the frequency of colon cancer relapse indicates that a fraction of tumor cells survives treatment causing tumor recurrence. The majority of cancer cells divert metabolites into anabolic pathways through Warburg behavior giving an advantage in terms of tumor growth. Here, we report that treatment of colon cancer cell with 5-FU selects for cells with mesenchymal stem-like properties that undergo a metabolic reprogramming resulting in addiction to OXPHOS to meet energy demands. 5-FU treatment-resistant cells show a de novo expression of pyruvate kinase M1 (PKM1) and repression of PKM2, correlating with repression of the pentose phosphate pathway, decrease in NADPH level and in antioxidant defenses, promoting PKM2 oxidation and acquisition of stem-like phenotype. Response to 5-FU in a xenotransplantation model of human colon cancer confirms activation of mitochondrial function. Combined treatment with 5-FU and a pharmacological inhibitor of OXPHOS abolished the spherogenic potential of colon cancer cells and diminished the expression of stem-like markers. These findings suggest that inhibition of OXPHOS in combination with 5-FU is a rational combination strategy to achieve durable treatment response in colon cancer.

  9. 5-Fluorouracil resistant colon cancer cells are addicted to OXPHOS to survive and enhance stem-like traits

    PubMed Central

    Calvani, Maura; Taddei, Maria Letizia; Giannoni, Elisa; Kopetz, Scott; Kazmi, Syed Mohammad Ali; Pia, Morelli Maria; Pettazzoni, Piergiorgio; Sacco, Elena; Caselli, Anna; Vanoni, Marco; Landriscina, Matteo; Cirri, Paolo; Chiarugi, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Despite marked tumor shrinkage after 5-FU treatment, the frequency of colon cancer relapse indicates that a fraction of tumor cells survives treatment causing tumor recurrence. The majority of cancer cells divert metabolites into anabolic pathways through Warburg behavior giving an advantage in terms of tumor growth. Here, we report that treatment of colon cancer cell with 5-FU selects for cells with mesenchymal stem-like properties that undergo a metabolic reprogramming resulting in addiction to OXPHOS to meet energy demands. 5-FU treatment-resistant cells show a de novo expression of pyruvate kinase M1 (PKM1) and repression of PKM2, correlating with repression of the pentose phosphate pathway, decrease in NADPH level and in antioxidant defenses, promoting PKM2 oxidation and acquisition of stem-like phenotype. Response to 5-FU in a xenotransplantation model of human colon cancer confirms activation of mitochondrial function. Combined treatment with 5-FU and a pharmacological inhibitor of OXPHOS abolished the spherogenic potential of colon cancer cells and diminished the expression of stem-like markers. These findings suggest that inhibition of OXPHOS in combination with 5-FU is a rational combination strategy to achieve durable treatment response in colon cancer. PMID:26527315

  10. Apigenin induces apoptosis via tumor necrosis factor receptor- and Bcl-2-mediated pathway and enhances susceptibility of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma to 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Chan, Leong-Perng; Chou, Tzung-Han; Ding, Hsiou-Yu; Chen, Pin-Ru; Chiang, Feng-Yu; Kuo, Po-Lin; Liang, Chia-Hua

    2012-07-01

    Apigenin, a natural plant flavone, may have chemopreventive and therapeutic potentials for anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anti-cancer. Nevertheless, the anti-tumor effect of apigenin on human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is not fully understood. The antioxidant capacity and protective effects of apigenin against oxidative stress in murine normal embryonic liver BNLCL2 cells are examined. Cell viability, morphologic change, clonogenic survival, cell cycle distribution, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, glutathione formation, and death receptors- and Bcl-2-mediated caspase pathways of HNSCC SCC25 cells and A431 cells with apigenin are investigated. Apigenin inhibits the growth of SCC25 and A431 cells and induces cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase. Apigenin has an antioxidant capacity as well as the ability to inhibit lipid peroxidation. It protects BNLCL2 cells against oxidative damage, and is potentially able to prevent cancer. Apigenin increases intracellular ROS levels and reduces levels of glutathione; it also induces cell apoptosis via tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNF-R)-, TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand receptor (TRAIL-R)-, and Bcl-2-mediated caspase-dependent cell death pathways in SCC25 cells. The combination of apigenin with 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu) or cisplatin induces the dramatic death of SCC25 cells. Apigenin induces SCC25 cell apoptosis via the up-regulation of both TNF-R and TRAIL-R signaling pathways, and has a synergistic effect on the inhibition of cell proliferation in combination with 5-Fu or cisplatin. These analytical findings suggest that apigenin may be a good therapeutic agent against HNSCC cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Combination of thymidine phosphorylase gene transfer and deoxyinosine treatment greatly enhances 5-fluorouracil antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ciccolini, J; Cuq, P; Evrard, A; Giacometti, S; Pelegrin, A; Aubert, C; Cano, J P; Iliadis, A

    2001-12-01

    We reported previously that 5-fluorouracil (FUra) efficacy could be enhanced by increasing tumoral thymidine phosphorylase (TP) activity. Potentiated TP yield was achieved by either transfecting cells with human TP gene (A. Evrard et al., Br. J. Cancer, 80: 1726-1733, 1999) or associating FUra with 2'-deoxyinosine (d-Ino), a modulator providing the tumors with TP cofactor deoxyribose 1-phosphate (J. Ciccolini et al., Clin. Cancer Res., 6: 1529-1535, 2000). The purpose of the present work was to study the effects of a combined modulation (TP gene transfer + use of d-Ino) on the sensitivity to FUra of the LS174T human colorectal cell line. Results showed a near 4000 times increase of cell sensitivity in vitro after double (genetic + biochemical) modulation. This potentiation of tumor response was accompanied by a total change in the FUra anabolic pathway with a 5000% increase of cytosolic fluorodeoxyuridine monophosphate, a stronger and longer inhibition of thymidylate synthase, and 300% augmentation of DNA damage. Besides, whereas thymidine failed to inhibit FUra cytotoxicity in LS174T wild-type cells, the potentiation of the antitumor activity observed in the modulating regimen was partly reversed by thymidine, indicative of thymidylate synthase as the main drug target. The impact of this double modulation was next investigated in xenograft-bearing nude mice. Results showed that whereas FUra alone was completely ineffective on wild-type tumor growth, the size of TP-transfected tumors in animals treated with the FUra/d-Ino combination was reduced by 80% (P < 0.05). Our results suggest that FUra exhibits stronger antiproliferative activity when activated via TP through the DNA pathway and that high tumoral TP activity therefore leads to enhanced sensitivity to fluoropyrimidines.

  12. Antitumor effects of anti-CD40/CpG immunotherapy combined with gemcitabine or 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy in the B16 melanoma model.

    PubMed

    Qu, Xiaoyi; Felder, Mildred A R; Perez Horta, Zulmarie; Sondel, Paul M; Rakhmilevich, Alexander L

    2013-12-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that anti-CD40 mAb (anti-CD40) can synergize with CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG) to mediate antitumor effects by activating myeloid cells, such as macrophages in tumor-bearing mice. Separate teams have shown that chemotherapy with gemcitabine (GEM) or 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) can reduce tumor-induced myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) in mice. In this study we asked if the same chemotherapy regimens with GEM or 5-FU will enhance the antitumor effect of anti-CD40 and CpG. Using the model of B16 melanoma growing intraperitoneally in syngeneic C57BL/6 mice, we show that these GEM or 5-FU treatment regimens reduced MDSC in the peritoneal cavity of tumor-bearing mice. Treatment of mice with GEM or 5-FU did not significantly affect the antitumor function of macrophages as assessed in vitro. In vivo, treatment with these GEM or 5-FU regimens followed by anti-CD40/CpG resulted in antitumor effects similar to those of anti-CD40/CpG in the absence of GEM or 5-FU. Likewise, reduction of MDSC by in vivo anti-Gr-1 mAb treatment did not significantly affect anti-CD40/CpG antitumor responses. Together, the results show that the GEM or 5-FU chemotherapy regimens did not substantially affect the antitumor effects induced by anti-CD40/CpG immunotherapy.

  13. Development and characterization of chitosan-polycarbophil interpolyelectrolyte complex-based 5-fluorouracil formulations for buccal, vaginal and rectal application

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background of the study The present investigation was designed with the intention to formulate versatile 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) matrix tablet that fulfills the therapeutic needs that are lacking in current cancer treatment and aimed at minimizing toxic effect, enhancing efficacy and increasing patient compliance. The manuscript presents the critical issues of 5-FU associate with cancer and surpasses issues by engineering novel 5-FU matrix tablets utilizing chitosan- polycarbophil interpolyelectrolyte complex (IPEC). Methods Precipitation method is employed for preparation of chitosan and polycarbophil interpolyelectrolyte complex (IPEC) followed by characterization with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Differential Scanning calorimeter (DSC) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). 5-FU tablets were prepared by direct compression using IPEC. Six formulations were prepared with IPEC alone and in combination with chitosan, polycarbophil and Sodium deoxycholate. The formulations were tested for drug content, hardness, friability, weight variation, thickness, swelling studies, in vitro drug release (buccal, vaginal and rectal pH), ex vivo permeation studies, mucoadhesive strength and in vivo studies. Results FT-IR studies represent the change in spectra for the IPEC than single polymers.DSC study represents the different thermo gram for chitosan, polycarbophil and IPEC whereas in X-ray diffraction, crystal size alteration was observed. Formulations containing IPEC showed pH independent controlled 5-FU without an initial burst release effect in buccal, vaginal and rectal pH. Furthermore, F4 formulations showed controlled release 5-FU with highest bioadhesive property and satisfactory residence in both buccal and vaginal cavity of rabbit. 3% of SDC in formulation F6 exhibited maximum permeation of 5-FU. Conclusion The suitable combination of IPEC, chitosan and polycarbophil demonstrated potential candidate for controlled release of 5-FU in buccal, vaginal and rectal p

  14. Sinomenine sensitizes gastric cancer cells to 5-fluorouracil in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    LIAO, FEI; YANG, ZIRONG; LU, XIAOHONG; GUO, XUFENG; DONG, WEIGUO

    2013-01-01

    Sinomenine (SIN) has been reported to exert antitumor effects in various types of human cancer. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of SIN on gastric cancer and to briefly address its mechanism of action. In this study, the single and combined effects of SIN with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) on human gastric cancer cells were assessed using an MTT assay, a combination index method and an MKN-28 xenograft mice model. Levels of apoptosis were determined using Hoechst 33258 staining and flow cytometry. Expression levels of certain apoptosis-related proteins were examined by western blotting. mRNA levels of the 5-FU-associated gene, thymidylate synthase (TS), were measured by RT-PCR. The results showed that SIN enhances 5-FU-mediated cellular growth inhibition and apoptosis in gastric cancer cells, reduces TS mRNA accumulation and activates the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. The same chemotherapy sensitizer effect of SIN was confirmed in vivo. SIN is a promising chemotherapy sensitizer for 5-FU. Our results indicate that this may be a potential combination chemotherapeutic strategy for gastric cancer. PMID:24260052

  15. Chemoprevention of skin cancer using low HLB surfactant nanoemulsion of 5-fluorouracil: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Shakeel, Faiyaz; Haq, Nazrul; Al-Dhfyan, Abdullah; Alanazi, Fars K; Alsarra, Ibrahim A

    2015-01-01

    Oral delivery of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is difficult due to its serious adverse effects and extremely low bioavailability. Therefore, the aim of present investigation was to develop and evaluate low HLB surfactant nanoemulsion of 5-FU for topical chemoprevention of skin cancer. Low HLB surfactant nanoemulsions were prepared by oil phase titration method. Thermodynamically stable nanoemulsions were characterized in terms of droplet size distribution, zeta potential, viscosity and refractive index. Selected formulations and control were subjected to in vitro skin permeation studies through rat skin using Franz diffusion cells. Optimized formulation F9 was subjected to stability and in vitro cytotoxic studies on melanoma cell lines. Enhancement ratio was found to be 22.33 in formulation F9 compared with control and other formulations. The values of steady state flux and permeability coefficient for formulation F9 were found to be 206.40 ± 14.56 µg cm(-2) h(-1) and 2.064 × 10(-2) ± 0.050 × 10(-2 )cm h(-1), respectively. Optimized formulation F9 was found to be physical stable. In vitro cytotoxicity studies on SK-MEL-5 cancer cells indicated that 5-FU in optimized nanoemulsion is much more efficacious than free 5-FU. From these results, it can be concluded that the developed nanoemulsion might be a promising vehicle for chemoprevention of skin cancer.

  16. Curcumin Inhibits 5-Fluorouracil-induced Up-regulation of CXCL1 and CXCL2 of the Colon Associated with Attenuation of Diarrhoea Development.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Hiroyasu; Kai, Yuki; Oguchi, Aya; Kimura, Minami; Tabata, Shoko; Yaegashi, Miyabi; Saito, Taiki; Sato, Ken; Sato, Fumiaki; Yumoto, Tetsuro; Narita, Minoru

    2016-12-01

    The compound 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is used in cancer chemotherapy and is known to cause diarrhoea. We recently reported that chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 (CXCL1) and neutrophils in the colonic mucosa were markedly increased by the administration of 5-FU in mice. Curcumin has anti-inflammatory, antitumour and antioxidant properties. Therefore, we examined the effect of curcumin on 5-FU-induced diarrhoea development and CXCL1 and CXCL2 up-regulation in the colon. Mice were given 5-FU (50 mg/kg, i.p.) daily for 4 days. Curcumin (100 or 300 mg/kg, p.o.) was administered on the day before the first administration of 5-FU and administered 30 min. before the administration of 5-FU. Gene expression levels of CXCL1 and CXCL2 in the colon were examined by real-time RT-PCR. Curcumin reduced the 5-FU-induced diarrhoea development. Under this condition, the CXCL1 and CXCL2 gene up-regulated by 5-FU administration was inhibited by curcumin. The gene expression of CXCL1 and CXCL2 was also enhanced by 5-FU application in vitro. The 5-FU-induced up-regulated CXCL1 and CXCL2 gene expressions were inhibited by curcumin, Bay-117082 and bortezomib, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) inhibitors, C646, a p300/cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein-histone acetyltransferase (HAT) inhibitor. In conclusion, these findings suggested that curcumin prevented the development of diarrhoea by inhibiting NF-κB and HAT activation.

  17. Treatment of advanced medullary thyroid cancer with an alternating combination of 5 FU-streptozocin and 5 FU-dacarbazine. The Groupe d'Etude des Tumeurs a Calcitonine (GETC).

    PubMed Central

    Schlumberger, M.; Abdelmoumene, N.; Delisle, M. J.; Couette, J. E.

    1995-01-01

    Combinations of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and streptozocin and 5-FU and dacarbazine were given alternately to 20 patients with metastatic medullary thyroid carcinoma. Three partial responses and 11 long-term stabilizations were observed. No unexpected toxicity occurred. PMID:7530987

  18. Over-expression of TSC-22 (TGF-beta stimulated clone-22) markedly enhances 5-fluorouracil-induced apoptosis in a human salivary gland cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Uchida, D; Kawamata, H; Omotehara, F; Miwa, Y; Hino, S; Begum, N M; Yoshida, H; Sato, M

    2000-06-01

    We have recently isolated TSC-22 (transforming growth factor-beta-stimulated clone-22) cDNA as an anticancer, drug-inducible (with vesnarinone) gene in a human salivary gland cancer cell line, TYS. We have also reported that TSC-22 negatively regulates the growth of TYS cells and that down-regulation of TSC-22 in TYS cells plays a major role in salivary gland tumorigenesis (Nakashiro et al, 1998). In this study, we transfected TYS cells with an expression vector encoding the TSC-22-GFP (green fluorescent protein) fusion protein, and we established TSC-22-GFP-expressing TYS cell clones. Next, we examined (a) the subcellular localization of the fusion protein, (b) the sensitivity of the transfectants to several anticancer drugs (5-fluorouracil, cis-diaminedichloroplatinum, peplomycin), and (c) induction of apoptotic cell death in the transfectants by 5-fluorouracil treatment. The TSC-22-GFP fusion protein was clearly localized to the cytoplasm, but not to the nucleus. Over-expression of the TSC-22-GFP fusion protein did not affect cell growth, but significantly increased the sensitivity of the cells to the anticancer drugs (p < 0.01; one-way ANOVA). Furthermore, over-expression of the TSC-22-GFP fusion protein markedly enhanced 5-fluorouracil-induced apoptosis. These findings suggest that over-expression of TSC-22-GFP protein in TYS cells enhances the chemosensitivity of the cells via induction of apoptosis.

  19. Microprocessor-controlled iontophoretic drug delivery of 5-fluorouracil: pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Chandrashekar, N S; Shobha Rani, R H

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to fabricate monolithic 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) transdermal patch with microprocessor- controlled iontophoretic delivery, to evaluate the pharmacodynamic effects on Dalton's lymphoma ascites (DLA) induced in Balb/c mice, and to study pharmacokinetics in rabbits. The transdermal patches were prepared by solvent casting method; a reprogrammable microprocessor was developed and connected to the patches. DLA cells were injected to the hind limb of Balb/c mice (10 animals/group). In the first group of mice 5-FU was administered i.v. (12 mg/kg). In the second group of mice, transdermal patches (20 mg/patch/animal) were installed and kept for 10 consecutive days, while the third (control) group was kept without any treatment. The tumor diameter was measured every 5th day for 30 days, and the animal survival time and death pattern were studied. The electric current density protocol of 0.5 mA/cm(2) for 30 min was used in the pharmacokinetic study in rabbits. There was a significant reduction in tumor volume in the animals treated with monolithic matrix 5-FU transdermal patch compared to untreated controls and i.v. therapy. Tumor volume of the control animals was 5.8 cm(3) on the 30th day, while in 5-FU with transdermal patch delivery animals it was only 0.23 cm(3) (p <0.05). DLA cells tumor-bearing mice treated with 5-FU with transdermal patch had significantly increased lifespan (ILS). Control animals survived only 21+/-1 days after the tumor inoculation, while i.v. 5-FU and 5-FU patches animals survived 24+/-2.7 days and 39.5+/-1.87 days with ILS of 25.58% and 88.09%, respectively (p <0.01). There was significant sustained release of 5-FU through microprocessor-controlled patches and half-life was significantly higher (p <0.05) compared to the i.v. route. Cytotoxic concentration of 5-FU can be achieved through the transdermal drug delivery and effective therapeutic drug concentration can be maintained up to 24 h, with less toxicity. A new

  20. In situ delivery of thermosensitive gel-mediated 5-fluorouracil microemulsion for the treatment of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lu-Lu; Huang, Shuai; Guo, Hui-Hui; Han, Yan-Xing; Zheng, Wen-Sheng; Jiang, Jian-Dong

    2016-01-01

    In situ administration of 5-fluorouracil (5FU) “thermosensitive” gel effectively reduced systemic side effects in treating colon rectal cancer; however, the penetration efficacy of the formulation was considerably low due to the poor lipid solubility of 5FU. The aim of this study was to develop thermosensitive gel-mediated 5FU water-in-oil microemulsion (TG-5FU-ME) for improving the infiltration of 5FU. An in vitro release test showed that TG-5FU-ME sustained the drug’s release up to 10 hours. TG-5FU-ME exhibited good stability, and the microemulsion entrapped did not show any change in morphology and 5FU content during the 4-month storage. Transportation test in the Caco-2 cell monolayer showed that TG-5FU-ME had a permeability 6.3 times higher than that of 5FU thermosensitive gel, and the intracellular uptake of 5FU increased by 5.4-fold compared to that of 5FU thermosensitive gel. In vivo tissue distribution analysis exhibited that the TG-5FU-ME group had drug levels in rectal tissue and mesenteric lymph nodes, which were significantly higher than those of 5FU thermosensitive gel group, with very low blood levels of 5FU in both groups. Furthermore, TG-5FU-ME was not associated with detectable morphological damage to the rectal tissue. Conclusively, TG-5FU-ME might be an efficient rectal delivery system to treat colorectal cancer. PMID:27660416

  1. The complex mechanism of antimycobacterial action of 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vinayak; Brecik, Miroslav; Mukherjee, Raju; Evans, Joanna C; Svetlíková, Zuzana; Blaško, Jaroslav; Surade, Sachin; Blackburn, Jonathan; Warner, Digby F; Mikušová, Katarína; Mizrahi, Valerie

    2015-01-22

    A combination of chemical genetic and biochemical assays was applied to investigate the mechanism of action of the anticancer drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). 5-FU resistance was associated with mutations in upp or pyrR. Upp-catalyzed conversion of 5-FU to FUMP was shown to constitute the first step in the mechanism of action, and resistance conferred by nonsynonymous SNPs in pyrR shown to be due to derepression of the pyr operon and rescue from the toxic effects of FUMP and downstream antimetabolites through de novo production of UMP. 5-FU-derived metabolites identified in Mtb were consistent with the observed incorporation of 5-FU into RNA and DNA and the reduced amount of mycolyl arabinogalactan peptidoglycan in 5-FU-treated cells. Conditional depletion of the essential thymidylate synthase ThyX resulted in modest hypersensitivity to 5-FU, implicating inhibition of ThyX by fluorodeoxyuridylate as a further component of the mechanism of antimycobacterial action of this drug.

  2. Synthesis, in vitro cytotoxicity and radiosensitizing activity of novel 3-[(2,4-dinitrophenylamino)alkyl] derivatives of 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Khalaj, Ali; Abdi, Khosrou; Ostad, Seyed Nasser; Khoshayand, Mohammad Reza; Lamei, Navid; Nedaie, Hasan Ali

    2014-02-01

    Previously, it was reported that 3[3-(2,4-dinitrophenylamino)-propyl]-5-fluorouracil 8c unlike its components 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) 6 and 2,4-dinitroaniline 2 in HT-29 cells under aerobic conditions had no cytotoxicity but showed radiosensitizing activity. In this study several analogues of 8c differing in the number of linking methylene groups were prepared and tested for in vitro cytotoxicity and radiosensitizing activity under both aerobic and hypoxic conditions. Tethered compound 8a was prepared in one pot by the reaction of 5-FU 6 with paraformaldehyde and 2,4-dinitroaniline 2 in the presence of the concentrated hydrochloric acid, and compounds 8b-f were prepared by the reaction of N-(bromoalkyl)-2,4-dinitrobenzeneamines 5b-f with 1-(t-butoxycarbonyl)-5-fluorouracil 7 followed by hydrolysis of the protecting group. The cytotoxicity of the tested compounds were measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), and propidium iodide (PI)-digitonin assays and values of sensitization enhancement ratio (SER) as a measure of the radiosensitizing activity were measured from radiation survival curves in the absence and presence of each sensitizer for 37% survival respectively. Results showed that tethered compounds 8a-f induced time- and concentration-dependent cytotoxicity under hypoxia but had no significant effect under aerobic conditions. These compounds also showed selective and concentration-dependent radiocytotoxicity under hypoxic conditions.

  3. Chemoresistance to 5-FU inhibited by 635 nm LED irradiation in CD133+ KB cell line.

    PubMed

    Kim, Donghwi; Park, Mineon; Jang, Hyunwoong; Hyun, Hoon; Lim, Wonbong

    2017-09-27

    Consistent with cancer stem cell theory, a small fraction of cancer cells, described as cancer stem cells (CSCs), may promote tumor recurrence and anti-cancer drug resistance. Therefore, much effort has been devoted to the development of CSC targeted therapy to vanquish drug resistance. In this study, we have investigated the effect of multiple light-emitting diode (LED) irradiation treatments with conventional anti-cancer drugs on CSC-like oral cancer cells that acquired stemness by ectopic over expression of CD133. To evaluate combined LED irradiation anti-cancer drug effects, we investigated the chemosensitizing effect of 635 nm irradiation on 5-fluorouracil (5FU)-treated KB(CD133+) and KB(Vec) cells, interrogating the underlying molecular mechanisms associated with stemness and apoptosis that are responsible for chemopreventive activity. In addition, combination therapy with LED irradiation and 5-FU treatment was carried out in KB(CD133+) and KB(Vec) cell-inoculated mouse models. LED irradiation of 635 nm inhibited CSC-like properties consistent with a decrease in OCT4 and NANOG protein expression, reducing colony-forming ability. In addition, LED irradiation enhanced 5-FU-induced cytotoxicity and improved 5-FU chemosensitivity in KB(CD133+) via enhancement of apoptosis. These findings were validated in vivo, wherein LED irradiation combined with 5-FU treatment inhibited tumor growth in KB(CD133+)-inoculated mice. Collectively, our results provide novel evidence for 635 nm irradiation-induced 5-FU chemosensitization of CSC in oral cancer. In addition, this research highlights that 635 nm LED irradiation may serve as an adjunct treatment to conventional chemotherapeutic drugs in patients with oral cancer.

  4. The ellagic acid-derived gut microbiota metabolite, urolithin A, potentiates the anticancer effects of 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy on human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    González-Sarrías, Antonio; Tomé-Carneiro, Joao; Bellesia, Andrea; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A; Espín, Juan Carlos

    2015-05-01

    Chemotherapy increases the overall survival in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) remains as a drug of first choice in CRC therapy over the last four decades. However, only 10-15% of patients with advanced CRC respond positively to 5-FU monotherapy. Therefore, new strategies to enhance the 5-FU effectiveness, overcome the tumor cell resistance and decrease the unspecific toxicity are critically needed. Urolithin A (Uro-A) is the main metabolite produced by the human gut microbiota from the dietary polyphenol ellagic acid. Uro-A targets the colonic mucosa of CRC patients, and preclinical studies have shown the anti-inflammatory and cancer chemopreventive activities of this metabolite. We evaluated here whether Uro-A, at concentrations achievable in the human colorectum, could sensitize colon cancer cells to 5-FU and 5'DFUR (a pro-drug intermediate of 5-FU). We found that both 5-FU and 5'DFUR arrested the cell cycle at the S phase by regulating cyclins A and B1 in the human colon cancer cells Caco-2, SW-480 and HT-29, and also triggered apoptosis through the activation of caspases 8 and 9. Co-treatments with Uro-A decreased IC50 values for both 5-FU and 5'DFUR and additionally arrested the cell cycle at the G2/M phase together with a slight increase in caspases 8 and 9 activation. Overall, we show that Uro-A potentiated the effects of both 5-FU and 5'DFUR on colon cancer cells. This suggests the need for lower 5-FU doses to achieve similar effects, which could reduce possible adverse effects. Further in vivo investigations are warranted to explore the possible role of Uro-A as a chemotherapy adjuvant.

  5. Nobiletin induces apoptosis and potentiates the effects of the anticancer drug 5-fluorouracil in p53-mutated SNU-16 human gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jeong Yong; Cho, Moonjae; Ahn, Kwang Seok; Cho, Somi Kim

    2013-01-01

    Nobiletin is a typical polymethoxyl flavone from citrus fruits that has anticancer properties, but the molecular mechanism of its inhibitory effects on the growth of p53-mutated SNU-16 human gastric cancer cells has not been explored. In this study, nobiletin was found to be effective at inhibiting the proliferation of SNU-16 cells than other flavonoids. Nobiletin induced the death of SNU-16 cells through apoptosis, as evidenced by the increased cell population in the sub-G1 phase, the appearance of fragmented nuclei, an increase in the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, the proteolytic activation of caspase-9, an increase in caspase-3 activity, and the degradation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) protein. We found that the combination of nobiletin plus the anticancer drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) reduced the viability of SNU-16 cells in a concentration-dependent manner and exhibited a synergistic anticancer effect (combination index = 0.38) when 5-FU was used at relatively low concentrations. The expression of p53 protein increased after treatment with 5-FU, but not nobiletin, whereas the expression of p21 (WAF1/CIP1) protein increased after treatment with nobiletin, but not 5-FU. The cellular responses to nobiletin and 5-FU occurred through different pathways. The results of this study suggest the potential application of nobiletin to the enhancement of 5-FU efficiency in p53 mutant tumors.

  6. Colon cancer cells escape 5FU chemotherapy-induced cell death by entering stemness and quiescence associated with the c-Yes/YAP axis.

    PubMed

    Touil, Yasmine; Igoudjil, Wassila; Corvaisier, Matthieu; Dessein, Anne-Frédérique; Vandomme, Jérôme; Monté, Didier; Stechly, Laurence; Skrypek, Nicolas; Langlois, Carole; Grard, Georges; Millet, Guillaume; Leteurtre, Emmanuelle; Dumont, Patrick; Truant, Stéphanie; Pruvot, François-René; Hebbar, Mohamed; Fan, Fan; Ellis, Lee M; Formstecher, Pierre; Van Seuningen, Isabelle; Gespach, Christian; Polakowska, Renata; Huet, Guillemette

    2014-02-15

    Metastasis and drug resistance are the major limitations in the survival and management of patients with cancer. This study aimed to identify the mechanisms underlying HT29 colon cancer cell chemoresistance acquired after sequential exposure to 5-fluorouracil (5FU), a classical anticancer drug for treatment of epithelial solid tumors. We examined its clinical relevance in a cohort of patients with colon cancer with liver metastases after 5FU-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy and surgery. We show that a clonal 5F31 cell population, resistant to 1 μmol/L 5FU, express a typical cancer stem cell-like phenotype and enter into a reversible quiescent G0 state upon reexposure to higher 5FU concentrations. These quiescent cells overexpressed the tyrosine kinase c-Yes that became activated and membrane-associated upon 5FU exposure. This enhanced signaling pathway induced the dissociation of the Yes/YAP (Yes-associated protein) molecular complex and depleted nuclear YAP levels. Consistently, YES1 silencing decreased nuclear YAP accumulation and induced cellular quiescence in 5F31 cells cultured in 5FU-free medium. Importantly, YES1 and YAP transcript levels were higher in liver metastases of patients with colon cancer after 5FU-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Moreover, the YES1 and YAP transcript levels positively correlated with colon cancer relapse and shorter patient survival (P < 0.05 and P < 0.025, respectively). We identified c-Yes and YAP as potential molecular targets to eradicate quiescent cancer cells and dormant micrometastases during 5FU chemotherapy and resistance and as predictive survival markers for colon cancer. ©2013 AACR

  7. Colon cancer cells escape 5FU chemotherapy-induced cell death by entering stemness and quiescence associated with the c-Yes/YAP axis

    PubMed Central

    Touil, Yasmine; Igoudjil, Wassila; Corvaisier, Matthieu; Dessein, Anne-Frédérique; Vandomme, Jérôme; Monté, Didier; Stechly, Laurence; Skrypek, Nicolas; Langlois, Carole; Grard, Georges; Millet, Guillaume; Leteurtre, Emmanuelle; Dumont, Patrick; Truant, Stéphanie; Pruvot, François-René; Hebbar, Mohamed; Fan, Fan; Ellis, Lee M.; Formstecher, Pierre; Van Seuningen, Isabelle; Gespach, Christian; Polakowska, Renata; Huet, Guillemette

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Metastasis and drug resistance are the major limitations in the survival and management of cancer patients. This study aimed to identify the mechanisms underlying HT29 colon cancer cell chemoresistance acquired after sequential exposure to 5-fluorouracil (5FU), a classical anticancer drug for treatment of epithelial solid tumors. We examined its clinical relevance in a cohort of colon cancer patients with liver metastases after 5FU-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy and surgery. Results We show that a clonal 5F31 cell population, resistant to 1μM 5FU, express a typical cancer stem cell-like phenotype and enter into a reversible quiescent G0-state upon re-exposure to higher 5FU concentrations. These quiescent cells overexpressed the tyrosine kinase c-Yes that became activated and membrane-associated upon 5FU exposure. This enhanced signaling pathway induced the dissociation of the Yes/YAP (Yes-associated protein) molecular complex and depleted nuclear YAP levels. Consistently, c-Yes silencing decreased nuclear YAP accumulation and induced cellular quiescence in 5F31 cells cultured in 5FU-free medium. Importantly, c-Yes and YAP transcript levels were higher in liver metastases of colon cancer patients after 5FU-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Moreover, the c-Yes and YAP levels positively correlated with colon cancer relapse and shorter patient survival (p<0.05 and p<0.025, respectively). Conclusions We identified c-Yes and YAP as potential molecular targets to eradicate quiescent cancer cells and dormant micrometastases during 5FU chemotherapy and resistance and as predictive survival markers for colon cancer. PMID:24323901

  8. 5-Fluorouracil combined with apigenin enhances anticancer activity through induction of apoptosis in human breast cancer MDA-MB-453 cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun J; Kim, Gun-Hee

    2009-12-01

    We investigated the effects of combined treatment with 5-fluorouracil and apigenin on proliferation and apoptosis, as well as the underlying mechanism, in human breast cancer MDA-MB-453 cells. The MDA-MB-453 cells, which have been shown to overexpress ErbB2, were resistant to 5-fluorouracil; 5-fluorouracil exhibited a small dose-dependent anti-proliferative effect, with an IC50 of 90 microM. Interestingly, combined treatment with apigenin significantly decreased the resistance. Cellular proliferation was significantly inhibited in cells exposed to 5-fluorouracil at its IC50 and apigenin (5, 10, 50 and 100 microM), compared with proliferation in cells exposed to 5-fluorouracil alone. This inhibition in turn led to apoptosis, as evidenced by an increased number of apoptotic cells and the activation of caspase-3. To investigate the mechanism by which the combination of 5-fluorouracil and apigenin induces apoptosis, ErbB2 expression was analyzed. The level of ErbB2 was unchanged by 5-fluorouracil alone but was drastically reduced in cells treated with 5-fluorouracil plus apigenin. Moreover, compared with 5-fluorouracil alone, 5-fluorouracil in combination with apigenin at concentrations >10 microM exerted a pro-apoptotic effect via the inhibition of Akt expression. Taken together, our results suggest that 5-fluorouracil acts synergistically with apigenin inhibiting cell growth and inducing apoptosis via the down-regulation of ErbB2 expression and Akt signaling.

  9. Participation of DNA repair in the response to 5-fluorouracil

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, Michael D.; Wilson, David M.

    2008-01-01

    The anti-metabolite 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is employed clinically to manage solid tumors including colorectal and breast cancer. Intracellular metabolites of 5-FU can exert cytotoxic effects via inhibition of thymidylate synthetase, or through incorporation into RNA and DNA, events that ultimately activate apoptosis. In this review, we cover the current data implicating DNA repair processes in cellular responsiveness to 5-FU treatment. Evidence points to roles for base excision repair (BER) and mismatch repair (MMR). However, mechanistic details remain unexplained, and other pathways have not been exhaustively interrogated. Homologous recombination is of particular interest, because it resolves unrepaired DNA intermediates not properly dealt with by BER or MMR. Furthermore, crosstalk among DNA repair pathways and S-phase checkpoint signaling has not been examined. Ongoing efforts aim to design approaches and reagents that (i) approximate repair capacity and (ii) mediate strategic regulation of DNA repair in order to improve the efficacy of current anti-cancer treatments. PMID:18979208

  10. The Clinical Significance of MiR-429 as a Predictive Biomarker in Colorectal Cancer Patients Receiving 5-Fluorouracil Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Sheng-jian; Cai, Xiao-jun; Li, Shu-jin

    2016-01-01

    Background 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) based treatment is the standard therapy for metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC), but the development of chemoresistance is inevitable. Increasing evidence shows that dysregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) is involved in malignant transformation. Thus, it is imperative that we find new diagnostic and prognostic marker for chemotherapy in CRC. Material/Methods For clinical parameter analysis, 78 CRC tissues and adjacent normal tissues and 45 serum specimens from CRC patients were included in this study. For chemo-response analysis, 116 primary tissues were collected from the patients receiving first-line 5-FU treatment. Quantitative Real-Time PCR (qRT-PCR) was used to detect microRNAs expression. Results The expression of miR-429 was significantly increased in both serum and primary tissues from CRC patients, and enhanced miR-429 level was associated with tumor size, lymph node metastasis, and TNM stage. The diagnostic and prognostic values were also confirmed in CRC by using primary tissues. For patients receiving 5-FU-based treatment, miR-429 levels were significantly lower in responding group. The proportions of patients that did not experience response to therapy were higher in primary tumors with high miR-429 expression levels as compared with primary tumors with low miR-429 expression levels. Finally, Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that miR-429 is an independent prognostic indicator for chemo-response to 5-FU therapy among CRC patients. Conclusions High level of miR-429 expression was correlated with enhanced malignant potential and poor prognosis of CRC patients. Furthermore, miR-429 could affect the chemo-sensitivity of CRC patients to 5-FU therapy and was associated with poor response to 5-FU-based chemotherapy in patients with CRC. PMID:27654003

  11. Neem (Azadirachta indica) leaf preparation prevents leukocyte apoptosis mediated by cisplatin plus 5-fluorouracil treatment in Swiss mice.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Diptendu; Bose, Anamika; Haque, Enamul; Baral, Rathindranath

    2009-01-01

    Neem (Azadirachta indica) is widely regarded as a wonder tree because of its diverse medicinal applications. We investigated the ability of neem leaf preparation (NLP) to protect against apoptosis of circulating blood cells induced by cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (cis + 5-FU) in carcinoma-bearing mice. Apoptosis was studied by annexin V-propidium iodide method. Total white blood cell count was performed using 3% glacial acetic acid on hemocytometer. Cytotoxicity was determined by LDH release assay and T/NK cell status was determined by flow cytometry. In comparison to untreated control, during cis + 5-FU therapy, significant down-regulation of leukocyte apoptosis was noted in mice pretreated with NLP or granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF) during cis + 5-FU therapy. This enhanced cytotoxicity may be associated with NLP-induced increase of the cytotoxic T and NK cell pool. Efficacy of NLP is comparable to GCSF in its ability to protect against leukocyte apoptosis induced by cis + 5-FU. NLP would be a better choice of treatment because GCSF is tumor promoting, angiogenic and expensive. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. 5-Fluorouracil-lipid conjugate: potential candidate for drug delivery through encapsulation in hydrophobic polyester-based nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ashwanikumar, N; Kumar, Nisha Asok; Nair, S Asha; Kumar, G S Vinod

    2014-11-01

    The encapsulation of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in hydrophobic polymeric materials is made feasible by a lipid-based prodrug approach. A lipid-5-FU conjugate of 5-FU with palmitic acid was synthesized in two-step process. A synthesized dipalmitoyl derivative (5-FUDIPAL) was characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance. The 5-FUDIPAL was encapsulated in polyester-based polymers by the double emulsion-solvent evaporation method. The nanoparticles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The thermal stability was assessed by differential scanning calorimetry data. In vitro release kinetics measurements of the drug from nanoparticles showed the controlled release pattern over a period of time. Cytotoxicity measurements by MTT assay confirmed that dipalmitoyl derivative in nano formulation successfully inhibited the cell growth. Thus the combined physical and biological evaluation of the different polyester-based nanoparticle containing the modified drug showed a facile approach to delivering 5-FU to the tumour site with enhanced efficacy.

  13. Mulberry leaf extract fermented with Lactobacillus acidophilus A4 ameliorates 5-fluorouracil-induced intestinal mucositis in rats.

    PubMed

    Oh, N S; Lee, J Y; Lee, J M; Lee, K W; Kim, Y

    2017-06-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of mulberry leaf extract (ME) fermented with Lactobacillus acidophilus A4 (A4) on intestinal mucositis induced by 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in a rat model. Male Wistar rats were gavaged with A4, ME, fermented mulberry leaf extract FME) or lafutidine (LAF) for 10 days and injected intraperitoneally with 5-FU (150 mg kg(-1) ) or saline (normal control) on day 7 to induce mucositis. After euthanizing the animals, their small and large intestines were removed for evaluation of histopathologic parameters, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, mucin content, and mRNA expression of the mucin gene and pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-1β. 5-FU induced significant weight loss, shortened villi height, and increased histological severity, IL-1β expression, and MPO activity compared to the normal control group. These pathological changes were markedly ameliorated by treatment with A4, ME and FME. These treatments also stimulated MUC2 and MUC5AC gene expression and mucin production, and reduced IL-1β expression and MPO level. Interestingly, FME had the greatest protective effect on 5-FU-induced mucositis in rats. Our results suggest that fermented mulberry leaf extract (ME) may provide synergistic therapeutic benefits of both probiotics and natural plant extracts in prevention of 5-fluorouracil-induced mucositis. These impacts are particularly significant given the induction of MUC2 and MUC5AC gene expressions for production of mucins and the reduction of pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β in gut environments. Therefore, we proposed that enhanced functionality of ME by fermentation of Lactobacillus acidophilus A4 can be applied as food-grade adjuncts for mucositis therapy and prevention in food industry. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  14. Transcription and activity of 5-fluorouracil converting enzymes in fluoropyrimidine resistance in colon cancer in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mader, R M; Sieder, A E; Braun, J; Rizovski, B; Kalipciyan, M; Mueller, M W; Jakesz, R; Rainer, H; Steger, G G

    1997-12-01

    Cellular resistance to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is not completely understood. Since 5-FU shares the pyrimidine pathway with the physiological pyrimidines, we investigated the relationship between fluoropyrimidine metabolism, nucleic acid uptake and cytotoxicity of 5-FU in eight colon tumour cell lines including 5-FU-resistant subclones. The cytotoxicity of 5-FU was increased up to 423-fold when the anabolites 5-fluorouridine (FUrd), 5-fluorodeoxyuridine (FdUrd), and 5-fluorodeoxyuridine monophosphate (FdUMP) were compared with the parent drug in vitro. The enzymes uridine phosphorylase and thymidine phosphorylase were predictive for the cytotoxicity of 5-FU in 5/7 cell lines. Inhibition of uridine phosphorylase and thymidine phosphorylase by antisense strategies effectively antagonised 5-FU, abolishing 84% and 79% of its toxicity. The importance of thymidine phosphorylase was supported by a highly restricted enzyme activity in 5-FU-resistant cells. In 5-FU naive cells, a stimulating effect of 5-FU on thymidylate synthase mRNA and ribonucleotide reductase mRNA expression was observed. In these cells, antisense oligonucleotides to ribonucleotide reductase significantly reduced cell growth. Downregulation of ribonucleotide reductase mRNA in 5-FU-resistant subclones suggests different mechanisms in primary and secondary resistance to 5-FU. Most of the intracellular 5-FU was selectively incorporated into RNA (range: 45-91%) and generally spared DNA (range: 0.2-11%). In synthesising our data, we conclude that drug resistance could be overwhelmed through bypassing limiting steps in the activation of 5-FU. In the majority of colonic tumours, the activity of uridine phosphorylase and thymidine phosphorylase may have prognostic relevance for the cytotoxicity of 5-FU in vitro.

  15. Synergistic effects of methylnaltrexone with 5-fluorouracil and bevacizumab on inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor-induced angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Singleton, Patrick A; Garcia, Joe G N; Moss, Jonathan

    2008-06-01

    Many patients with cancer receive combinations of drug treatments that include 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and bevacizumab. Therapeutic doses of 5-FU are often associated with unwanted side effects, and bevacizumab is costly. Therefore, we explored potential agents that can reduce the therapeutic concentration of these drugs. Our data indicate that methylnaltrexone (MNTX), a peripheral antagonist of the mu-opioid receptor, exerts a synergistic effect with 5-FU and bevacizumab on inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cell (EC) proliferation and migration, two key components in cancer-associated angiogenesis. MNTX inhibited EC proliferation with an IC(50) of approximately 100 nmol/L. Adding 100 nmol/L MNTX to EC shifted the IC(50) of 5-FU from approximately 5 micromol/L to approximately 7 nmol/L. Further, adding 50 ng/mL MNTX shifted the IC(50) of bevacizumab on inhibition of EC migration from approximately 25 to approximately 6 ng/mL. These synergistic effects were not observed with naltrexone, a tertiary mu-opioid receptor antagonist. On a mechanistic level, we observed that treatment of human EC with MNTX, but not naltrexone, increased receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase mu activity, which was independent of mu-opioid receptor expression. Silencing receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase mu expression (small interfering RNA) in human EC inhibited both synergy between MNTX and bevacizumab or 5-FU and increased VEGF-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of Src and p190 RhoGAP with enhanced activation of Akt and the actin cytoskeletal regulatory protein, RhoA, whereas silencing Src, Akt, or RhoA blocked VEGF-induced angiogenic events. Therefore, addition of MNTX could potentially lower the therapeutic doses of 5-FU and bevacizumab, which could improve index.

  16. Resveratrol synergistically augments anti-tumor effect of 5-FU in vitro and in vivo by increasing S-phase arrest and tumor apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Dun, Jiening; Chen, Xueyan; Gao, Haixia; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Huajun; Zhang, Yongjian

    2015-12-01

    Many studies have shown that natural dietary agents, in combination with chemical agents, can improve the therapeutic response of cancers to chemotherapy and reduce the associated side-effects. In the present study, we investigated the therapeutic potential and mechanisms of anticancer effects for the combination of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and resveratrol (Res). In these studies, we employed the cancer cell lines TE-1 and A431 and an animal model of skin cancer. The presented results provide the first evidence that Res can enhance the anti-tumor potency of 5-FU by inducing S-phase arrest. The combination of Res and 5-FU demonstrates synergistic efficacy, causing tumor regression in a two-stage model of mouse skin carcinogenesis induced by DMBA and TPA. There was clear evidence of Res augmenting the growth inhibitory effect of 5-FU on the TE-1 and A431 cancer cells in vitro. In the in vivo studies, the tumor regression rate in the combination group increased significantly after four weeks of treatment (P < 0.01). The combination of 5-FU and Res significantly increased the percentage of apoptotic cells and the level of activated caspase-3, cleaved PARP and p53 proteins as well as increased the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. In conclusion, the 5-FU/Res combination enabled a more effective inhibition of cell growth and the induction of apoptosis in cancer cells than 5-FU alone. The results of this study suggest that chemotherapy using natural dietary agents with chemical agents represents a superior cancer treatment option.

  17. Examination of the kinetics of degradation of the antineoplastic drug 5-fluorouracil by chlorine and bromine.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Tanumihardja, Jessica; Masuyama, Takaaki; Korshin, Gregory

    2015-01-23

    This study examined the degradation of the widely used antineoplastic drug 5-fluorouracil (5FU) by chlorine and bromine. 5FU was determined to interact readily with free chlorine and bromine but was stable in the presence of chloramine. The removal of 5FU followed a second-order kinetic pattern. Apparent rates (kapp) of 5FU removal by chlorine and bromine were strongly pH dependent and had maximum 14.8M(-1)s(-1) and 1.9×10(3)M(-1)s(-1)kapp values, respectively at pH 7. Modeling of the dependence of the kapp values vs. pH indicated the presence of a relatively acidic (pK 6.4 vs. 8.5 of 5FU per se) 5FU intermediate generated in the presence of halogen species. Spectrophotometric measurements confirmed the increased acidity of 5FU chlorination products and allowed proposing a degradation pathway of 5FU by chlorine. This pathway suggests that 5FU chlorination proceeds via chlorine incorporation at the 6th carbon in the heterocyclic ring of 5FU.

  18. Probiotic effects on 5-fluorouracil-induced mucositis assessed by the sucrose breath test in rats.

    PubMed

    Mauger, Chad A; Butler, Ross N; Geier, Mark S; Tooley, Katie L; Howarth, Gordon S

    2007-03-01

    The sucrose breath test (SBT) was employed to noninvasively assess the efficacy of probiotics in 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced intestinal mucositis. Dark Agouti rats were allocated to 5 groups (n = 10): 5-FU + L. fermentum BR 11, 5-FU + L. rhamnosus GG, 5-FU + B. lactis BB 12, 5-FU + skim milk (SM), and saline + SM. Probiotics were administered by oral gavage for 10 days. Mucositis was induced on day 7 by intraperitoneal injection of 5-FU (150 mg/kg) or vehicle (saline). Rats were sacrificed 72 h after 5-FU injection. The SBT measured breath 13CO2 (expressed as percentage cumulative dose at 90 min; %CD90) on days 0, 7, and 10. %CD90 was significantly lower in 5-FU-treated controls compared with that in saline-treated controls on day 10. 5-FU caused an 83% reduction in sucrase and a 510% increase in MPO activity. The SBT detected damage induced by 5-FU and is a simple, noninvasive indicator of small bowel injury. The probiotics assessed offered no protection from mucositis at the dose tested.

  19. Is 5-fluorouracil-induced vasospasm a Kounis syndrome? A diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Karabay, C Y; Gecmen, C; Aung, S M; Guler, A; Candan, O; Batgerel, U; Kalayci, A; Kirma, C

    2011-11-01

    Cardiovascular hypersensitivity is a rare and well-documented side-effect of 5-FU (5-fluorouracil). Besides the common complications such as angina pectoris and myocardial infarction, it can also cause cardiogenic shock, and supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias. Studies have reported that FU-induced angina most commonly occurred due to vasospasm. In our case, 9 hours after stopping the infusion of 5-FU, the patients developed symptoms and electrocardiographic (ECG) findings consistent with acute myocardial infarction. We intend to share this rare case and discuss whether this late complication after 5-FU infusion is an FU-induced vasospasm or rather an allergic reaction leading to Kounis syndrome.

  20. Development and characterization of hyaluronic acid decorated PLGA nanoparticles for delivery of 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Awesh K; Agarwal, Abhinav; Rai, Gopal; Mishra, Pradeep; Jain, Sanyog; Mishra, Anil K; Agrawal, Himanshu; Agrawal, Govind P

    2010-11-01

    The present investigation was aimed to develop and explore the prospective of engineered PLGA nanoparticles as vehicles for targeted delivery of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Nanoparticles of 5-FU-loaded hyaluronic acid-poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (HA-PEG-PLGA-FU) copolymer were prepared and characterized by FTIR, NMR, transmission electron microscopy, particle size analysis, DSC, and X-ray diffractometer measurement studies. The nanoparticulate formulation was evaluated for in vitro release, hemolytic toxicity, and hematological toxicity. Cytotoxicity studies were performed on Ehrlich ascites tumor (EAT) cell lines using MTT cell proliferation assay. Biodistribution studies of 99m Tc labeled formulation were conducted on EAT-bearing mice. The in vivo tumor inhibition study was also performed after i.v. administration of HA-PEG-PLGA-FU nanoparticles. The HA conjugated formulation was found to be less hemolytic but more cytotoxic as compared to free drug. The hematological data suggested that HA-PEG-PLGA-FU formulation was less immunogenic compared to plain drug. The tissue distribution studies displayed that HA-PEG-PLGA-FU were able to deliver a higher concentration of 5-FU in the tumor mass. In addition, the HA-PEG-PLGA-FU nanoparticles reduced tumor volume significantly in comparison with 5-FU. Thus, it was concluded that the conjugation of HA imparts targetability to the formulation, and enhanced permeation and retention effect ruled out its access to the non-tumor tissues, at the same time favored selective entry in tumors, thereby reducing the side-effects both in vitro and in vivo.

  1. 5-Fluorouracil sensitivity varies among oral micro-organisms.

    PubMed

    Vanlancker, Eline; Vanhoecke, Barbara; Smet, Rozel; Props, Ruben; Van de Wiele, Tom

    2016-08-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU), a commonly used chemotherapeutic agent, often causes oral mucositis, an inflammation and ulceration of the oral mucosa. Micro-organisms in the oral cavity are thought to play an important role in the aggravation and severity of mucositis, but the mechanisms behind this remain unclear. Although 5-FU has been shown to elicit antibacterial effects at high concentrations (>100 µM), its antibacterial effect at physiologically relevant concentrations in the oral cavity is unknown. This study reports the effect of different concentrations of 5-FU (range 0.1-50 µM) on the growth and viability of bacterial monocultures that are present in the oral cavity and the possible role in the activity of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD), an enzyme involved in 5-FU resistance. Our data showed a differential sensitivity among the tested oral species towards physiological concentrations of 5-FU. Klebsiellaoxytoca, Streptococcus salivarius, Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus oralis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Lactobacillus salivarius appeared to be highly resistant to all tested concentrations. In contrast, Lactobacillusoris, Lactobacillus plantarum, Streptococcus pyogenes, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Neisseria mucosa showed a significant reduction in growth and viability starting from very low concentrations (0.2-3.1 µM). We can also provide evidence that DPD is not involved in the 5-FU resistance of the selected species. The observed variability in response to physiological 5-FU concentrations may explain why certain microbiota lead to a community dysbiosis and/or an overgrowth of certain resistant micro-organisms in the oral cavity following cancer treatment.

  2. CD133+CD24lo defines a 5-Fluorouracil-resistant colon cancer stem cell-like phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Paschall, Amy V.; Yang, Dafeng; Lu, Chunwan; Redd, Priscilla S.; Choi, Jeong-Hyeon; Heaton, Christopher M.; Lee, Jeffrey R.; Nayak-Kapoor, Asha; Liu, Kebin

    2016-01-01

    The chemotherapeutic agent 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is the most commonly used drug for patients with advanced colon cancer. However, development of resistance to 5-FU is inevitable in almost all patients. The mechanism by which colon cancer develops 5-FU resistance is still unclear. One recently proposed theory is that cancer stem-like cells underlie colon cancer 5-FU resistance, but the phenotypes of 5-FU-resistant colon cancer stem cells are still controversial. We report here that 5-FU treatment selectively enriches a subset of CD133+ colon cancer cells in vitro. 5-FU chemotherapy also increases CD133+ tumor cells in human colon cancer patients. However, sorted CD133+ colon cancer cells exhibit no increased resistance to 5-FU, and CD133 levels exhibit no correlation with colon cancer patient survival or cancer recurrence. Genome-wide analysis of gene expression between sorted CD133+ colon cancer cells and 5-FU-selected colon cancer cells identifies 207 differentially expressed genes. CD24 is one of the genes whose expression level is lower in the CD133+ and 5-FU-resistant colon cancer cells as compared to CD133+ and 5-FU-sensitive colon cancer cells. Consequently, CD133+CD24lo cells exhibit decreased sensitivity to 5-FU. Therefore, we determine that CD133+CD24lo phenotype defines 5-FU-resistant human colon cancer stem cell-like cells. PMID:27659530

  3. [Antineoplastic activity of 5-fluorouracil upon transdermal adminstration using "Coletex" napkins].

    PubMed

    Vartanian, L P; Oltarzhevskaia, N D; Vershinina, S F; Gornaeva, G F; Pustovalov, Iu I; Korovina, M A

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents data on the effect of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-impregnated Coletex napkins on rats and mice with transplantable subcutaneous tumors of different histological patterns: Pliss lymphosarcoma, Walker carcinosarcoma and Ehrlich carcinoma. Since the napkins showed antitumor activity it is suggested that they might find application in treating a number of oncological pathologies, particularly, skin lesions and ulcerated and necrotized tumors.

  4. Symmetrical drug-related intertriginous and flexural exanthema secondary to topical 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Powers, Roxann; Gordon, Rachel; Roberts, Kenrick; Kovach, Rodney

    2012-05-01

    We report the case of a 56-year-old man who developed a distinctive skin eruption after treating actinic keratoses on the dorsal aspects of his right and left hands with topical 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). The distribution of his rash was characteristic of symmetrical drug-related intertriginous and flexural exanthema (SDRIFE), also known as baboon syndrome.

  5. A NONSTEADY STATE MODEL FOR THE TIGHT-BINDING INHIBITION OF THYMIDYLATE SYNTHETASE BY 5-FLUOROURACIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    5-Fluorouracil (5_FU) is a widely used chemotherapeutic drug and tratogen that was chosen as a prototypic toxicant to contruct a biologically based dose-resonse (BBDR) model (Setzer et. al., 2001). Part of the BBDR model simulates the inhibition of thymidylate synthetase (TS), a...

  6. Wogonin potentiates the antitumor effects of low dose 5-fluorouracil against gastric cancer through induction of apoptosis by down-regulation of NF-kappaB and regulation of its metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qing; Wang, Jia; Zou, Mei-Juan; Hu, Rong; Zhao, Li; Qiang, Lei; Rong, Jing-Jing; You, Qi-Dong; Guo, Qing-Long

    2010-09-01

    Traditional Chinese medicines have been recognized as a new source of anticancer drugs or chemotherapy adjuvant to enhance the efficacy of chemotherapy and to ameliorate the side effects. Wogonin (WOG) has a potential for therapeutic use in the treatment of antitumor and chemoprophylaxis. 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is a key systemic chemotherapy drug and widely use in the treatment of solid tumors. In this study, we found that combination of WOG and 5-FU inhibited the viability of MGC-803 cells in a concentration-dependent manner and exhibited a synergistic anticancer effect (CI<1) when 5-FU was used at relatively low concentrations. The pro-apoptotic activity of two-drug combination was much stronger than single. Furthermore, WOG could decrease the mRNA levels of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD), the metabolic enzymes of 5-FU. WOG could inhibit the NF-kappaB nuclear translocation and I-kappaB phosphorylation. Moreover, combined treatment caused significantly growth inhibition of human tumor xenografts. In addition, WOG markedly enhanced the antitumor activity of low dose 5-FU (i.p. 10mg/kg/day), however there is no toxicity and influence on diet consumption in experimental animals. Taken together, our data's showed that WOG increased 5-FU retention for a prolonged catabolism by modulating 5-FU metabolic enzymes and sensitized the MGC-803 cells to 5-FU induced apoptosis by inhibiting the NF-kappaB nuclear translocation. The anti-gastric cancer effect of two-drug combination was much stronger than that of WOG or 5-FU alone. These results may be relevant to design new clinical therapeutic strategies against gastric cancer in future.

  7. [Analysis of sensitivity of stromal stem cells (CFU-f) from rat bone marrow and fetal liver to 5-fluorouracil].

    PubMed

    Paiushina, O V; Damaratskaia, E I; Bueverova, E I; Nikonova, T M; Butorina, N N; Molchanova, E A; Starostin, V I

    2006-01-01

    The sensitivity of stromal stem cells (CFU-f) from rat bone marrow and fetal liver to the cytotoxic effect of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) was compared in vivo and in vitro. Cells from both tissues demonstrated a similar resistance to 5-FU in vitro; however, stromal stem cells from fetal liver proved notably more sensitive to 5-FU compared to marrow CFU-f in vivo. Cells forming colonies of different size were identified in stem cell populations from both tissues. Cells giving rise to small colonies had a higher resistance to 5-FU both in vivo and in vitro.

  8. Inhibition of 5-fluorouracil-induced ocular irritation by ocular ice packs.

    PubMed

    Loprinzi, C L; Wender, D B; Veeder, M H; O'Fallon, J R; Vaught, N L; Dose, A M; Ghosh, C; Bartel, J; Leitch, J M

    1994-08-01

    This clinical trial was developed to determine whether ocular ice pack therapy would decrease 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced ocular toxicity. Sixty-two patients who suffered from 5-FU-induced ocular toxicity, and were scheduled to receive another cycle of the chemotherapy that caused the ocular toxicity, were entered in this clinical trial. A randomized, crossover design was used, with patients documenting their ocular toxicity by the use of daily diaries. The results from the first cycle of treatment suggested that ocular ice pack therapy decreased 5-FU-induced ocular toxicity (P = 0.056). The 38 evaluable patients in the crossover analyses demonstrated decreased ocular toxicity with ocular ice pack therapy (p = .001). The ocular ice pack therapy was well tolerated by most of the study participants. Ocular ice pack therapy appears to lessen 5-FU-induced ocular toxicity to a clinically moderate degree. Better methods for decreasing 5-FU-induced ocular toxicity are necessary.

  9. Investigations on the Interactions of 5-Fluorouracil with Herring Sperm DNA: Steady State/Time Resolved and Molecular Modeling Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinnathambi, Shanmugavel; Karthikeyan, Subramani; Velmurugan, Devadasan; Hanagata, Nobutaka; Aruna, Prakasarao; Ganesan, Singaravelu

    2015-04-01

    In the present study, the interaction of 5-Fluorouracil with herring sperm DNA is reported using spectroscopic and molecular modeling techniques. This binding study of 5-FU with hs-DNA is of paramount importance in understanding chemico-biological interactions for drug design, pharmacy and biochemistry without altering the original structure. The challenge of the study was to find the exact binding mode of the drug 5-Fluorouracil with hs-DNA. From the absorption studies, a hyperchromic effect was observed for the herring sperm DNA in the presence of 5-Fluorouracil and a binding constant of 6.153 × 103 M-1 for 5-Fluorouracil reveals the existence of weak interaction between the 5-Fluorouracil and herring sperm DNA. Ethidium bromide loaded herring sperm DNA showed a quenching in the fluorescence intensity after the addition of 5-Fluorouracil. The binding constants for 5-Fluorouracil stranded DNA and competitive bindings of 5-FU interacting with DNA-EB systems were examined by fluorescence spectra. The Stern-Volmer plots and fluorescence lifetime results confirm the static quenching nature of the drug-DNA complex. The binding constant Kb was 2.5 × 104 L mol-1 and the number of binding sites are 1.17. The 5-FU on DNA system was calculated using double logarithmic plot. From the Forster nonradiative energy transfer study it has been found that the distance of 5-FU from DNA was 4.24 nm. In addition to the spectroscopic results, the molecular modeling studies also revealed the major groove binding as well as the partial intercalation mode of binding between the 5-Fluorouracil and herring sperm DNA. The binding energy and major groove binding as -6.04 kcal mol-1 and -6.31 kcal mol-1 were calculated from the modeling studies. All the testimonies manifested that binding modes between 5-Fluorouracil and DNA were evidenced to be groove binding and in partial intercalative mode.

  10. Synergistic anticancer effect of exogenous wild-type p53 gene combined with 5-FU in human colon cancer resistant to 5-FU in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Qi; Wu, Min-Yi; Zhang, Ding-Xuan; Yang, Yi-Ming; Wang, Bao-Shuai; Zhang, Jing; Xu, Jin; Zhong, Wei-De; Hu, Jia-Ni

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the anticancer effect of a recombinant adenovirus-mediated p53 (rAd-p53) combined with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in human colon cancer resistant to 5-FU in vivo and the mechanism of rAd-p53 in reversal of 5-FU resistance. METHODS Nude mice bearing human colon cancer SW480/5-FU (5-FU resistant) were randomly assigned to four groups (n = 25 each): control group, 5-FU group, rAd-p53 group, and rAd-p53 + 5-FU group. At 24 h, 48 h, 72 h, 120 h and 168 h after treatment, 5 mice were randomly selected from each group and sacrificed using an overdose of anesthetics. The tumors were removed and the protein expressions of p53, protein kinase C (PKC), permeability-glycoprotein (P-gp) and multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) (Western blot) and apoptosis (TUNEL) were determined. RESULTS The area ratios of tumor cell apoptosis were larger in the rAd/p53 + 5-FU group than that in the control, 5-FU and rAd/p53 groups (P < 0.05), and were larger in the rAd/p53 group than that of the control group (P < 0.05) and the 5-FU group at more than 48 h (P < 0.05). The p53 expression was higher in the rAd/p53 and the rAd/p53 + 5-FU groups than that of the control and 5-FU groups (P < 0.05), and were higher in the rAd/p53 + 5-FU group than that of the rAd/p53 group (P < 0.05). Overexpression of PKC, P-gp and MRP1 was observed in the 5-FU and control groups. In the rAd/p53 + 5-FU group, the expression of P-gp and MRP1 was lower that of the control and 5-FU groups (P < 0.05), and the expression of PKC was lower than that of the control, 5-FU and rAd/p53 groups at more than 48 h (P < 0.05). In the rAd/p53 group, the expression of P-gp and MRP1 was lower that of the control and 5-FU groups at more than 48 h (P < 0.05), and the expression of PKC was lower than that of the control and 5-FU groups at more than 120 h (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION 5-FU combined with rAd-p53 has a synergistic anticancer effect in SW480/5-FU (5-FU resistance), which contributes to reversal of 5-FU

  11. 53BP1 loss induces chemoresistance of colorectal cancer cells to 5-fluorouracil by inhibiting the ATM-CHK2-P53 pathway.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jing; Huang, Ai; Zheng, Xiumei; Liu, Tao; Lin, Zhenyu; Zhang, Sheng; Yang, Qin; Zhang, Tao; Ma, Hong

    2017-03-01

    Loss of P53 binding protein 1 (53BP1) is considered a poor prognostic factor for colorectal cancer. However, its effect on chemosensitivity of colorectal cancer to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) remains elusive. This study aimed to examine the association of 53BP1 expression with chemosensitivity of colorectal cancer cells to 5-FU. Immunohistochemistry was performed on 30 metastatic colorectal cancer samples to assess the associations of 53BP1 levels with clinical therapeutic effects. In vitro, IC50 values for 5-FU and 53BP1 levels were determined by MTT assay and Western blot in 5 colorectal cancer cell lines. Then, 53BP1 was silenced in HCT116 and HT29 cells, and cell proliferation, apoptosis and cell cycle distribution were evaluated. Relative protein levels of ATM-CHK2-P53 pathway effectors and Bcl-2 family members were measured by Western blot. Finally, the effects of 53BP1 knockdown on tumor growth and 5-FU chemoresistance were investigated in vivo. 53BP1 expression was closely related to time to progression (TTP) after first-line chemotherapy. Namely, 53BP1 downregulation resulted in reduced TTP. In addition, 53BP1 silencing increased proliferation, inhibited apoptosis and induced S phase arrest in HCT116 and HT29 cells after 5-FU treatment. Moreover, 53BP1 knockdown also reduced the protein levels of ATM-CHK2-P53 apoptotic pathway effectors, caspase9 and caspase3, while increasing Bcl-2 expression. In vivo, 53BP1 silencing accelerated tumor proliferation in nude mice and enhanced resistance to 5-FU. These findings confirmed that 53BP1 loss might be a negative factor for chemotherapy efficacy, promoting cell proliferation and inhibiting apoptosis by suppressing ATM-CHK2-P53 signaling, and finally inducing 5-FU resistance.

  12. Increased cytotoxicity and bystander effect of 5-fluorouracil and 5′-deoxy-5-fluorouridine in human colorectal cancer cells transfected with thymidine phosphorylase

    PubMed Central

    Evrard, A; Cuq, P; Ciccolini, J; Vian, L; Cano, J-P

    1999-01-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) and 5′-deoxy-5-fluorouridine (5′-DFUR), a prodrug of 5-FU, are anticancer agents activated by thymidine phosphorylase (TP). Transfecting the human TP cDNA into cancer cells in order to sensitize them to these pyrimidine antimetabolites may be an important approach in human cancer gene therapy research. In this study, an expression vector containing the human TP cDNA (pcTP5) was transfected into LS174T human colon carcinoma cells. Eight stable transfectants were randomly selected and analysed. The cytotoxic effects of 5-FU and 5′-DFUR were higher in TP-transfected cells as compared to wild-type cells. The maximal decreases in the IC50 were 80-fold for 5-FU and 40-fold for 5′-DFUR. The increase in sensitivity to these pyrimidines of TP-transfected cells significantly correlated with the increase in both TP activity and TP expression. Transfected clone LS174T-c2 but not wild-type cells exhibited formation of [3H]FdUMP from [3H]5-FU. In addition the LS174T-c2 clone enhanced the cytotoxic effect of 5′-DFUR, but also that of 5-FU, towards co-cultured parental cells. For both anti-cancer agents, this bystander effect did not require cell–cell contact. These results show that both 5-FU or 5′-DFUR could be used together with a TP-suicide vector in cancer gene therapy. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10468288

  13. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of cubosomes containing 5-fluorouracil for liver targeting

    PubMed Central

    Nasr, Mohamed; Ghorab, Mohamed K.; Abdelazem, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to prepare cubosomal nanoparticles containing a hydrophilic anticancer drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) for liver targeting. Cubosomal dispersions were prepared by disrupting a cubic gel phase of monoolein and water in the presence of Poloxamer 407 as a stabilizer. Cubosomes loaded with 5-FU were characterized in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, 5-FU-loaded cubosomes entrapped 31.21% drug and revealed nanometer-sized particles with a narrow particle size distribution. In vitro 5-FU release from cubosomes exhibited a phase of rapid release of about half of the entrapped drug during the first hour, followed by a relatively slower drug release as compared to 5-FU solution. In vivo biodistribution experiments indicated that the cubosomal formulation significantly (P<0.05) increased 5-FU liver concentration, a value approximately 5-fold greater than that observed with a 5-FU solution. However, serum serological results and histopathological findings revealed greater hepatocellular damage in rats treated with cubosomal formulation. These results demonstrate the successful development of cubosomal nanoparticles containing 5-FU for liver targeting. However, further studies are required to evaluate hepatotoxicity and in vivo antitumor activity of lower doses of 5-FU cubosomal formulation in treatment of liver cancer. PMID:26579429

  14. The therapy with ethosomes containing 5-fluorouracil for laryngotracheal stenosis in rabbit models.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiaohui; Cheng, Xuefeng; Zhang, Zheng; Wang, Zhaoyan; Wang, Zhentao

    2016-12-21

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of ethosomes encapsulated with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in treatment of laryngotracheal stenosis in rabbit models. The 5-FU ethosome was prepared by the thin film hydration method, and the amorphous, size distribution and the encapsulation efficiency was investigated. The tracheal mucosa were scraped about 0.5 cm with a nylon brush to induce the scar in airway grow, then models were divided into three groups: 5-FU ethosome group, 5-FU group and saline group, drug were injected into scar of every group by paracentesis guided under endoscope, respectively. The stenosis states were observed under laryngo fiberscope immediate, 7, 14 and 21 days after administrated. Airway stenosis of 5-FU ethosome group has no significant difference when compared with 5-FU group at 7 days after administration, but 5-FU ethosome significantly reduced the airway stenosis after 21-day administration when compared with 5-FU group again and has no restenosis during the period under observation. The fact that ethosomes encapsulated with 5-FU were effective for laryngotracheal stenosis suggests that it has potential as a new method for ameliorating airway stenosis originating from granulation tissue.

  15. A morphometric study of the protective effect of cryotherapy on oral mucositis in cancer patients treated with 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Turkeli, M; Aldemir, M N; Bingol, F; Dogan, C; Kara, A

    2016-10-01

    We investigated cytological changes in oral mucosa smears from patients treated with cryotherapy to determine whether cryotherapy prevented mucositis caused by 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) therapy. Patients with gastrointestinal malignancies were divided into four groups; control patients before 5-FU therapy, patients after 5-FU therapy without cryotherapy, patients with cryotherapy before 5-FU therapy and patients with cryotherapy after 5-FU therapy. Oral mucosa samples from all patients were assessed at the beginning and on day 14 of chemotherapy. We used exfoliative cytology to evaluate cellular changes in the oral mucosa that were caused by 5-FU. Smears from each patient were stained using the Papanicolaou method and analyzed using stereology. Smears were taken from each group before and after 5-FU infusion. We found that nuclear volume was decreased significantly in cells of the 5-FU therapy after cryotherapy patients compared to the 5-FU therapy before cryotherapy patients. We also found significantly decreased cytoplasmic volumes in the 5-FU therapy after cryotherapy patients compared to the 5-FU therapy before cryotherapy patients. The results of cytomorphometric estimations revealed that cryotherapy may be used to prevent damage to oral tissue and may decrease the frequency and duration of oral mucositis caused by 5-FU.

  16. Association of thymidylate synthase variants with 5-fluorouracil cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Peters, Eric J; Kraja, Aldi T; Lin, Shiow J; Yen-Revollo, Jane L; Marsh, Sharon; Province, Michael A; McLeod, Howard L

    2009-05-01

    Identifying relevant cytotoxicity genes using an ex-vivo lymphoblastoid cell line (LCLs) model has distinct advantages for pharmacogenomic discovery studies of cancer chemotherapy, including standardized treatment conditions, availability of large numbers of samples, and publicly available genotypic data. However, there is little proof of principal data to confirm the promise of this approach. One of the known targets of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) treatment is thymidylate synthase (TYMS). We hypothesized that genetic variants in TYMS would alter cytotoxicity because of 5-FU treatment using a LCL model system. LCLs from the Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH) pedigrees (N=427) were treated with eight concentrations of 5-FU for 72 h, and cytotoxicity was determined using an Alamar Blue assay. For a subset of the 30 International Haplotype Mapping project (HapMap) trios, genotype data for 46 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) variants encompassing the TYMS gene were downloaded from the HapMap website. Using a mixed models approach, each SNP was tested for association to 5-FU cytotoxicity in the subset of HapMap trios. Putatively associated SNPs (P<0.01), were then genotyped in the remaining LCLs in the CEPH pedigrees and tested for association. Two intronic SNPs in TYMS (rs2847153 and rs2853533) were significantly associated (P<0.01) with 5-FU cytotoxicity in the HapMap subset using the mixed models approach. After genotyping these SNPs in the full CEPH pedigrees, the associations with cytotoxicity showed a more reliable significance (P<0.0005), as a result of the increase in sample size. These results highlight the importance of the TYMS gene variants in response to 5-FU treatment. Furthermore, they provide additional biological validation of the relevance of LCLs as a model for pharmacogenomic gene discovery in cancer chemotherapy.

  17. Controlled release of 5-fluorouracil from microporous zeolites.

    PubMed

    Spanakis, Marios; Bouropoulos, Nikolaos; Theodoropoulos, Dimitrios; Sygellou, Lamprini; Ewart, Sinead; Moschovi, Anastasia Maria; Siokou, Angeliki; Niopas, Ioannis; Kachrimanis, Kyriakos; Nikolakis, Vladimiros; Cox, Paul A; Vizirianakis, Ioannis S; Fatouros, Dimitrios G

    2014-01-01

    Zeolite particles with different pore diameter and particle size were loaded with the model anticancer drug 5-fluorouracil. The loaded zeolites were characterized by means of SEM, XRD, DSC, XPS, N2 physisorption and FT-IR. Higher loading of 5-FU was observed for NaX-FAU than BEA. Release studies were carried out in HCl 0.1N. Release of 5-FU from NaX-FAU showed exponential-type behaviour with the drug fully released within 10 min. In the case of BEA, the kinetics of 5-FU shows a multi-step profile with prolonged release over time. Molecular dynamics simulations showed that diffusion of the drug molecule through the BEA framework is lower than for NaX-FAU due to increased van der Waals interaction between the drug and the framework. The effect of zeolitic particles on the viability of Caco-2 monolayers showed that the NaX-FAU particles cause a reduction of cell viability in a more pronounced way compared with the BEA particles. This article describes zeolite-based nanoparticles in generating time-controlled release of 5-FU from zeolite preparations for anti-cancer therapy. © 2013.

  18. Synergistic effect of puerarin and 5-fluorouracil on hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    ZENG, YAN-PING; YANG, ZI-RONG; GUO, XU-FENG; JUN, WANG; DONG, WEI-GUO

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common types of human malignancy worldwide, which is becoming increasingly resistant to traditional drug treatments. Puerarin combined with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) may be a useful treatment for liver cancer. The primary aim of the present study was to determine whether combined treatment with 5-FU and puerarin is more effective against the hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell line, SMMC7721, than treatment with 5-FU or puerarin alone. The growth inhibition of SMMC7721 cells by puerarin or 5-FU alone or in combination was determined by the Cell Counting Kit-8 assay, in vitro. Apoptotic morphological features and the percentage of apoptotic cells were detected using Hoechst 33258 staining and an Annexin V/PI apoptosis kit, respectively. In addition, a tumor xenograft model was established in nude mice using SMMC7721 cells. Puerarin and 5-FU alone or in combination were injected into the mice, and the inhibition of tumor growth was evaluated by monitoring tumor volume and weight. Treatment with 6,400 or 640 μM 5-FU resulted in growth inhibition of 95.56±0.81 and 75.91±3.54%, respectively. The combination index values were <1 when the fraction of affected cells was between 0.2555 and 0.7420. Furthermore, the percentage of apoptotic cells was markedly increased in the combined treatment group when compared with that of the individual treatment groups, in vitro and in vivo. Individual treatment with puerarin resulted in a tumor volume inhibition rate (IR) of 70.58% and a tumor weight IR of 46.20%. Treatment with 5-FU was found to decrease the tumor volume by 76.26% and tumor weight by 49.86%. In the combined treatment group, the tumor volume and weight IRs were 93.11 and 75.21%, respectively. A marked increase in the inhibition of tumor growth and the number of apoptotic cells in response to combined treatment with puerarin and 5-FU was identified with no observed liver or renal toxicity. These results suggest that

  19. Synergistic effect of puerarin and 5-fluorouracil on hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yan-Ping; Yang, Zi-Rong; Guo, Xu-Feng; Jun, Wang; Dong, Wei-Guo

    2014-12-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common types of human malignancy worldwide, which is becoming increasingly resistant to traditional drug treatments. Puerarin combined with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) may be a useful treatment for liver cancer. The primary aim of the present study was to determine whether combined treatment with 5-FU and puerarin is more effective against the hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell line, SMMC7721, than treatment with 5-FU or puerarin alone. The growth inhibition of SMMC7721 cells by puerarin or 5-FU alone or in combination was determined by the Cell Counting Kit-8 assay, in vitro. Apoptotic morphological features and the percentage of apoptotic cells were detected using Hoechst 33258 staining and an Annexin V/PI apoptosis kit, respectively. In addition, a tumor xenograft model was established in nude mice using SMMC7721 cells. Puerarin and 5-FU alone or in combination were injected into the mice, and the inhibition of tumor growth was evaluated by monitoring tumor volume and weight. Treatment with 6,400 or 640 μM 5-FU resulted in growth inhibition of 95.56±0.81 and 75.91±3.54%, respectively. The combination index values were <1 when the fraction of affected cells was between 0.2555 and 0.7420. Furthermore, the percentage of apoptotic cells was markedly increased in the combined treatment group when compared with that of the individual treatment groups, in vitro and in vivo. Individual treatment with puerarin resulted in a tumor volume inhibition rate (IR) of 70.58% and a tumor weight IR of 46.20%. Treatment with 5-FU was found to decrease the tumor volume by 76.26% and tumor weight by 49.86%. In the combined treatment group, the tumor volume and weight IRs were 93.11 and 75.21%, respectively. A marked increase in the inhibition of tumor growth and the number of apoptotic cells in response to combined treatment with puerarin and 5-FU was identified with no observed liver or renal toxicity. These results suggest that

  20. [Angina related to 5-Fluorouracil].

    PubMed

    Luján, Juan; García De Burgos, Fernando; Jordán, Alejandro; García, Miguel; Reyes, Fernando; Espinosa, María D

    2002-07-01

    Treatment with 5-fluorouracil is common in oncological patients. Side effects on bone marrow, skin, and mucous membranes have been reported. Cardiotoxicity, which is less predictable, can be life-threatening. Manifestations include angina, arrhythmias, infarction, heart failure and cardiogenic shock. The toxic mechanisms that might be involved have been much discussed but have not yet been clearly established. Current evidence supports the possibility of a metabolic effect in common with the cascade secondary to ischemia due to coronary disease. Based on a case report, we discuss the usual clinical presentation, treatment and prognosis. Finally we make recommendations for managing patients being treated with 5-fluorouracil.

  1. A systematic review of the pathophysiology of 5-fluorouracil-induced cardiotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiotoxicity is a serious side effect to treatment with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. The objective of this systematic review was to evaluate the pathophysiology of 5-FU- induced cardiotoxicity. Methods We systematically searched PubMed for articles in English using the search terms: 5-FU OR 5-fluorouracil OR capecitabine AND cardiotoxicity. Papers evaluating the pathophysiology of this cardiotoxicity were included. Results We identified 27 articles of 26 studies concerning the pathophysiology of 5-FU-induced cardiotoxicity. The studies demonstrated 5-FU-induced: hemorrhagic infarction, interstitial fibrosis and inflammatory reaction in the myocardium; damage of the arterial endothelium followed by platelet aggregation; increased myocardial energy metabolism and depletion of high energy phosphate compounds; increased superoxide anion levels and a reduced antioxidant capacity; vasoconstriction of arteries; changes in red blood cell (RBC) structure, function and metabolism; alterations in plasma levels of substances involved in coagulation and fibrinolysis and increased endothelin-1 levels and N-terminal-pro brain natriuretic peptide levels. Based on these findings the proposed mechanisms are: endothelial injury followed by thrombosis, increased metabolism leading to energy depletion and ischemia, oxidative stress causing cellular damage, coronary artery spasm leading to myocardial ischemia and diminished ability of RBCs to transfer oxygen resulting in myocardial ischemia. Conclusions There is no evidence for a single mechanism responsible for 5-FU-induced cardiotoxicity, and the underlying mechanisms might be multifactorial. Further research is needed to elucidate the pathogenesis of this side effect. PMID:25186061

  2. 5-Fluorouracil enteric-coated nanoparticles for improved apoptotic activity and therapeutic index in treating colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Tummala, Shashank; Kuppusamy, Gowthamarajan; Satish Kumar, M N; Praveen, T K; Wadhwani, Ashish

    2016-10-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is one among the anti-cancer agents in FOLFORINOX treatment along with oxaliplatin and irinotecan for the treatment of colorectal cancer. Despite its potential activity on the tumor cells, it lacks site specificity partly attributed by its biodistribution to healthy cells resulting in toxic effects to healthy cells. Therefore, we have formulated 5-fluorouracil enteric-coated nanoparticles (5-FUEC) to localize the drug in the colon area that enables its prolonged presence in target area in a sustained manner. The current work emphasizes on enhanced anti-cancer activity of 5-FUEC sequencing its apoptotic activity on HCT 116 colorectal cancer cell lines in vitro. MTT assay exhibited 5.5-fold decrease in IC50 value of nanoparticles comparable to 5-FU. Nuclear fragmentation with irregular edges in nucleus of cells justified its improved activity. Furthermore, flow cytometric analysis confirms the majority of cells gated in early apoptotic (39.75%) and late apoptotic phase (36.25%). Acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining (AO/EB) exhibited cells with red fluorescence (indicating apoptosis) comparable to the control and 5-FU. γ-Scintigraphic studies determined the applicability and feasibility of the enteric coating with mean gastric emptying time, mean intestinal transit time and mean colon arrival time of 1.89 ± 0.03, 2.15 ± 0.05 and 4.03 ± 0.27 h, respectively. Moreover, nanoparticulate approach was found significant in reducing tumor size and volume in xenograft tumor models in vivo along with sustained release. These superior anti-cancer activities exhibited by 5-FUEC indicated that it could be a potential alternative to chemotherapy for colorectal cancer.

  3. Amplification of Thymidylate Synthetase in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Patients Pretreated with 5-Fluorouracil-based Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Roshawn G; Muhale, Filipe; Thorne, Leigh B; Yu, Jinsheng; O'Neil, Bert H; Hoskins, Janelle M; Meyers, Michael O; Deal, Allison M; Ibrahim, Joseph G; Hudson, Michael L; Walko, Christine M; McLeod, Howard L; Auman, James T

    2010-01-01

    Resistance to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) represents a major contributor to cancer-related mortality in advanced colorectal cancer patients. Genetic variations and expression alterations in genes involved in 5-FU metabolism and effect have been shown to modulate 5-FU sensitivity in vitro, however these alterations do not fully explain clinical resistance to 5-FU-based chemotherapy. To determine if alterations of DNA copy number in genes involved in 5-FU metabolism impacted clinical resistance to 5-FU-based chemotherapy, we assessed thymidylate synthetase (TYMS) and thymidine phosphorylase (TYMP) copy number in colorectal liver metastases. DNA copy number of TYMS and TYMP was evaluated using real time quantitative PCR in frozen colorectal liver metastases procured from 62 patients who were pretreated with 5-FU-based chemotherapy prior to surgical resection (5-FU exposed) and from 51 patients who received no pretreatment (unexposed). Gain of TYMS DNA copy number was observed in 18% of the 5-FU exposed metastases, while only 4% of the unexposed metastases exhibited TYMS copy gain (p=0.036). No significant differences were noted in TYMP copy number alterations between 5-FU exposed and unexposed metastases. Median survival time was similar in 5-FU exposed patients with metastases containing TYMS amplification and those with no amplification. However, TYMS amplification was associated with shorter median survival in patients receiving post-resection chemotherapy (hazard ratio = 2.7, 95% confidence interval = 1.1 to 6.6; p=0.027). These results suggest amplification of TYMS amplification as a putative mechanism for clinical resistance to 5-FU-based chemotherapy and may have important ramifications for the post-resection chemotherapy choices for metastatic colorectal cancer. PMID:20727737

  4. Amplification of thymidylate synthetase in metastatic colorectal cancer patients pretreated with 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Watson, Roshawn G; Muhale, Filipe; Thorne, Leigh B; Yu, Jinsheng; O'Neil, Bert H; Hoskins, Janelle M; Meyers, Michael O; Deal, Allison M; Ibrahim, Joseph G; Hudson, Michael L; Walko, Christine M; McLeod, Howard L; Auman, James T

    2010-12-01

    Resistance to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) represents a major contributor to cancer-related mortality in advanced colorectal cancer patients. Genetic variations and expression alterations in genes involved in 5-FU metabolism and effect have been shown to modulate 5-FU sensitivity in vitro, however these alterations do not fully explain clinical resistance to 5-FU-based chemotherapy. To determine if alterations of DNA copy number in genes involved in 5-FU metabolism-impacted clinical resistance to 5-FU-based chemotherapy, we assessed thymidylate synthetase (TYMS) and thymidine phosphorylase (TYMP) copy number in colorectal liver metastases. DNA copy number of TYMS and TYMP was evaluated using real time quantitative PCR in frozen colorectal liver metastases procured from 62 patients who were pretreated with 5-FU-based chemotherapy prior to surgical resection (5-FU exposed) and from 51 patients who received no pretreatment (unexposed). Gain of TYMS DNA copy number was observed in 18% of the 5-FU exposed metastases, while only 4% of the unexposed metastases exhibited TYMS copy gain (p = 0.036). No significant differences were noted in TYMP copy number alterations between 5-FU-exposed and -unexposed metastases. Median survival time was similar in 5-FU-exposed patients with metastases containing TYMS amplification and those with no amplification. However, TYMS amplification was associated with shorter median survival in patients receiving post-resection chemotherapy (hazard ratio = 2.7, 95% confidence interval = 1.1-6.6; p = 0.027). These results suggest amplification of TYMS amplification as a putative mechanism for clinical resistance to 5-FU-based chemotherapy and may have important ramifications for the post-resection chemotherapy choices for metastatic colorectal cancer. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Development and evaluation of nanostructured lipid carrier-based hydrogel for topical delivery of 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Rajinikanth, Paruvathanahalli Siddalingam; Chellian, Jestin

    The aim of this study was to develop a nanostructured lipid carrier (NLC)-based hydrogel and study its potential for the topical delivery of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Precirol(®) ATO 5 (glyceryl palmitostearate) and Labrasol(®) were selected as the solid and liquid lipid phases, respectively. Poloxamer 188 and Solutol(®) HS15 (polyoxyl-15-hydroxystearate) were selected as surfactants. The developed lipid formulations were dispersed in 1% Carbopol(®) 934 (poly[acrylic acid]) gel medium in order to maintain the topical application consistency. The average size, zeta potential, and polydispersity index for the 5-FU-NLC were found to be 208.32±8.21 nm, -21.82±0.40 mV, and 0.352±0.060, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy study revealed that 5-FU-NLC was <200 nm in size, with a spherical shape. In vitro drug permeation studies showed a release pattern with initial burst followed by sustained release, and the rate of 5-FU permeation was significantly improved for 5-FU-NLC gel (10.27±1.82 μg/cm(2)/h) as compared with plain 5-FU gel (2.85±1.12 μg/cm(2)/h). Further, skin retention studies showed a significant retention of 5-FU from the NLC gel (91.256±4.56 μg/cm(2)) as compared with that from the 5-FU plain gel (12.23±3.86 μg/cm(2)) in the rat skin. Skin irritation was also significantly reduced with 5-FU-NLC gel as compared with 5-FU plain gel. These results show that the prepared 5-FU-loaded NLC has high potential to improve the penetration of 5-FU through the stratum corneum, with enormous retention and with minimal skin irritation, which is the prerequisite for topically applied formulations.

  6. Levofolene modulates apoptosis induced by 5-fluorouracil through autophagy inhibition: clinical and occupational implications.

    PubMed

    Lamberti, Monica; Porto, Stefania; Zappavigna, Silvia; Stiuso, Paola; Tirino, Virginia; Desiderio, Vincenzo; Mele, Luigi; Caraglia, Michele

    2015-05-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU), often used in combination with levofolene (LF), can induce, as an important side effect, the hand-foot syndrome (HFS) due to toxicity on keratinocytes. This can also damage workers involved in its handling. In the present study, we investigated the mechanisms of the toxicity induced by 5-FU alone or together with LF on human keratinocytes in culture. We found that the two drugs, as expected, had potentiating activity on keratinocyte growth inhibition and that this effect was mediated by induction of apoptosis. In our experimental model, an increased autophagic vacuole accumulation was observed in keratinocytes treated with 5-FU as a significant increase of the monodansylcadaverine (MDC) labeling (marker of late autophagy vacuoles) was recorded. However, the synergism of 5-FU with LF on apoptotic occurrence was not paralleled by a similar increase in autophagic vacuoles at 72 h suggesting an antagonistic effect of LF on autophagy elicited by 5-FU. Differential effects on reactive oxygen species (ROS) elevation in cells treated with 5-FU alone or the combination between 5-FU and LF were also observed. 5-FU induced a time-dependent increase of both O2- and lipid peroxidation while the combination of 5-FU and LF caused a stronger intracellular O2- increase only at 24 h while at 48 and 72 h its effect was lower when compared with that one of 5-FU alone. On the other hand, the addition of LF to 5-FU caused a stronger increase of lipid peroxidation at 48 and 72 h, but its effects were significantly lower at 24 h. These results suggest for the first time that LF potentiates the cytotoxicity of 5-FU on keratinocytes likely through the antagonism on autophagy escape pathway and consequent apoptosis potentiation.

  7. Monocarboxylate transport inhibition potentiates the cytotoxic effect of 5-fluorouracil in colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Amorim, Ricardo; Pinheiro, Céline; Miranda-Gonçalves, Vera; Pereira, Helena; Moyer, Mary P; Preto, Ana; Baltazar, Fátima

    2015-08-28

    Cancer cells rely mostly on glycolysis to meet their energetic demands, producing large amounts of lactate that are extruded to the tumour microenvironment by monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs). The role of MCTs in the survival of colorectal cancer (CRC) cells is scarce and poorly understood. In this study, we aimed to better understand this issue and exploit these transporters as novel therapeutic targets alone or in combination with the CRC classical chemotherapeutic drug 5-Fluorouracil. For that purpose, we characterized the effects of MCT activity inhibition in normal and CRC derived cell lines and assessed the effect of MCT inhibition in combination with 5-FU. Here, we demonstrated that MCT inhibition using CHC (α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid), DIDS (4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid) and quercetin decreased cell viability, disrupted the glycolytic phenotype, inhibited proliferation and enhanced cell death in CRC cells. These results were confirmed by specific inhibition of MCT1/4 by RNA interference. Notably, we showed that 5-FU cytotoxicity was potentiated by lactate transport inhibition in CRC cells, either by activity inhibition or expression silencing. These findings provide novel evidence for the pivotal role of MCTs in CRC maintenance and survival, as well as for the use of these transporters as potential new therapeutic targets in combination with CRC conventional therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Interactions of radiation and 5-fluorouracil, cyclophosphamide or methotrexate in intestinal crypt cells

    SciTech Connect

    von der Maase, H.

    1984-01-01

    The interactions of radiation and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), cyclophosphamide (CTX), or methotrexate (MTX) in mouse jejunal crypt cells were studied using the microcolony survival assay. 5-FU given from 48 hr before to 24 hr after irradiation resulted in an almost constant, increased cell kill except at injection 6 hr after irradiation, which resulted in a more pronounced effect. CTX enhanced the radiation effect only when given simultaneously with or up to 3 hr after irradiation. The effect of MTX, extremely dependent on the sequence and interval between drug administration and irradiation, was most prominent when administered 1 hr before irradiation. At this drug-radiation interval, the D/sub 0/ surprisingly increased by a factor of 2.4, whereas MTX 15 min before irradiation displaced the survival curve to the left without changing the D/sub 0/. The influence of MTX on the radiation response disappeared when the drug was given either 96 hr before or 3 hr after irradiation.

  9. Oxidation and pH responsive nanoparticles based on ferrocene-modified chitosan oligosaccharide for 5-fluorouracil delivery.

    PubMed

    Xu, Youqian; Wang, Liang; Li, Ya-Kun; Wang, Cai-Qi

    2014-12-19

    Stimuli-responsive nanoparticles based on biodegradable and biocompatible saccharides are potentially superior carriers under different physical conditions. In this study, we present a detailed investigation on the oxidation and pH responses of ferrocene-modified chitosan oligosaccharide (FcCOS) nanoparticles for 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) Delivery. The dispersion of FcCOS nanoparticles depends strongly on pH change. NaClO, H2O2 and oxygen, as oxidant models, in a weak acid solution displayed varying accelerations as the disassembly progressed. 5-FU, as a drug model, is efficiently uploaded in FcCOS nanoparticle (approximately 238 nm). The in vitro release of 5-FU from FcCOS nanoparticles studies show that the accumulative release increased with the decrease of pH under bubbled N2. Interestingly, the sample under bubbled air has a higher accumulative release up to 59.64% at pH 3.8, compared with samples under bubbled N2 just 49.02%. The results suggested that FcCOS nanoparticles disassembled faster and the release of drug molecules was accelerated because of the synergistic effect of oxidative agent and low pH. Thus, FcCOS can be developed as an effective pH and oxidation dual-responsive carrier to enhance drug efficacy for cancer treatment.

  10. [Four cases of 5-fluorouracil-related hyperammonemia in patients with large intestinal cancer and multiple liver metastases, including a case of hyperammonemia treated using hemodialysis].

    PubMed

    Iida, Tomoya; Wagatsuma, Kohei; Tani, Motohiro; Sasaki, Hajime; Naganawa, Yumiko; Isshiki, Hiroyuki; Murakami, Kayo; Satoh, Shuji; Shimizu, Haruo; Kaneto, Hiroyuki

    2015-02-01

    Systemic chemotherapy based on 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is a standard treatment for unresectable or recurrent large intestinal cancer. Although hyperammonemia is a known side effect of 5-FU that can cause serious pathological conditions, only a few cases have been reported. We describe 4 cases of 5-FU-related hyperammonemia with impairment of consciousness in patients who received 5-FU chemotherapy for large intestinal cancer with multiple liver metastases. Hemodialysis was effective in 1 severe case. There have been no detailed reports on the use of hemodialysis for hyperammonemia caused by 5-FU. Renal dysfunction is considered to be a risk factor for hyperammonemia caused by 5-FU and it is necessary to pay particular attention in patients with renal dysfunction who receive chemotherapy with 5-FU. Here we summarize our cases together with 16 previously reported cases of hyperammonemia caused by 5-FU in Japan.

  11. The potential protective role of taurine against 5-fluorouracil-induced nephrotoxicity in adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Yousef, Hany N; Aboelwafa, Hanaa R

    2017-02-08

    Nephrotoxicity is common with the use of the chemotherapeutic agent 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU). The current study aimed to investigate the probable protective effect of taurine (TAU) against 5-FU-induced nephrotoxicity in rats using biochemical, histological and ultrastructural approaches. Twenty-four rats were equally divided into control, TAU, 5-FU and 5-FU+TAU groups. 5-FU significantly elevated levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine, and uric acid; while it reduced activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px). Also, 5-FU induced significant elevation in malondialdehyde (MDA) levels accompanied with marked decline in γ-glutamyltranspeptidase (GGT) and alkaline phosphatase (AP) levels in kidney tissues. These biochemical alterations were accompanied by histopathological changes marked by destruction of the normal renal structure, in addition to ultrastructural alterations represented by thickened and irregular glomerular basement membranes, congested glomerular capillaries, damaged lining fenestrated endothelium, mesangial cells hyperplasia with expanded mesangial matrix, and distorted podocyte's processes. Also, the proximal (PCT) and distal (DCT) convoluted tubules showed thickened basement membranes, destructed apical microvilli and loss of basal infoldings of their epithelial cells. Administration of TAU to 5-FU-treated rats reversed most of the biochemical, histological, and ultrastructural alterations. These results indicate that TAU has a protective effect against 5-FU-induced nephrotoxicity.

  12. Probiotic factors partially improve parameters of 5-fluorouracil-induced intestinal mucositis in rats.

    PubMed

    Prisciandaro, Luca D; Geier, Mark S; Butler, Ross N; Cummins, Adrian G; Howarth, Gordon S

    2011-04-01

    Certain live bacteria have demonstrated preliminary indications of efficacy for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced intestinal mucositis. However, probiotic derived supernatants (SN) have yet to be investigated in the mucositis setting. We evaluated SN from Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) and Lactobacillus fermentum BR11 (BR11) for their capacity to decrease 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced damage in vivo. Female Dark Agouti rats were gavaged with 1 mL of either SN or vehicle daily (days 0-8) and intraperitoneally injected with 5-FU (150 mg/kg) on day 5 to induce mucositis. On day 9, animals were culled and intestinal tissues collected. Significantly lower histological damage scores were apparent in the jejunum of 5-FU treated rats receiving SN compared to 5-FU controls. Myeloperoxidase levels in the jejunum of 5-FU treated rats were increased in vehicle and BR11 SN treatments compared to untreated controls, whereas no significant increase was observed after EcN SN treatment. 5-FU treatment significantly reduced villus height and crypt depth in the jejunum compared to normal controls; however no significant reduction in these parameters was observed in 5-FU treated rats receiving either SN. We conclude that bacterial SN, especially EcN, partially protect the intestine from 5-FU mucositis. Further studies are required to define specific mechanisms by which SN exert their beneficial effects.

  13. 5-Fluorouracil delivery from metal-ion mediated molecularly imprinted cryogel discs.

    PubMed

    Çetin, Kemal; Denizli, Adil

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study is to prepare imprinted cryogel discs for delivery of 5-fluorouracil. The coordinate bond interactions are utilized to accomplish a coordination complex between metal-chelate monomer N-methacryloyl-L-histidine and 5-FU with the assistance of Cu(2+) ion. The complex is copolymerized with hydroxyethyl methacrylate to produce poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate-N-methacryloyl-(L)-histidine methyl ester) cryogel discs. The cryogel discs are characterized thoroughly by performing swelling tests, scanning electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction studies. In vitro delivery studies are performed to investigate the effects of cross-linker ratio, medium pH and drug concentration. 5-FU imprinted cryogel discs have highly macroporous structures. Drug molecules are homogeneously dispersed in the 5-FU imprinted cryogel matrix. The cumulative release of 5-FU decreased by increasing the cross-linker density in the polymer matrix. Delivery rate of 5-FU varied with different pH values in a coordination complex since metal ion acts as a Lewis acid, and the ligand, i.e. 5-FU acts as a Lewis base. The cumulative release of 5-FU increased with increasing drug concentration in polymer matrix. The nature of the 5-FU transport mechanism is non-Fickian.

  14. Oral Administration of Surface-Deacetylated Chitin Nanofibers and Chitosan Inhibit 5-Fluorouracil-Induced Intestinal Mucositis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Ryo; Azuma, Kazuo; Izawa, Hironori; Morimoto, Minoru; Ochi, Kosuke; Tsuka, Takeshi; Imagawa, Tomohiro; Osaki, Tomohiro; Ito, Norihiko; Okamoto, Yoshiharu; Saimoto, Hiroyuki; Ifuku, Shinsuke

    2017-01-27

    This study investigated the prophylactic effects of orally administered surface-deacetylated chitin nanofibers (SDACNFs) and chitosan against 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced intestinal mucositis, which is a common side effect of 5-FU chemotherapy. SDACNFs and chitosan abolished histological abnormalities associated with intestinal mucositis and suppressed hypoproliferation and apoptosis of intestinal crypt cells. These results indicate that SDACNF and chitosan are useful agents for preventing mucositis induced by anti-cancer drugs.

  15. Oral Administration of Surface-Deacetylated Chitin Nanofibers and Chitosan Inhibit 5-Fluorouracil-Induced Intestinal Mucositis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Koizumi, Ryo; Azuma, Kazuo; Izawa, Hironori; Morimoto, Minoru; Ochi, Kosuke; Tsuka, Takeshi; Imagawa, Tomohiro; Osaki, Tomohiro; Ito, Norihiko; Okamoto, Yoshiharu; Saimoto, Hiroyuki; Ifuku, Shinsuke

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the prophylactic effects of orally administered surface-deacetylated chitin nanofibers (SDACNFs) and chitosan against 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced intestinal mucositis, which is a common side effect of 5-FU chemotherapy. SDACNFs and chitosan abolished histological abnormalities associated with intestinal mucositis and suppressed hypoproliferation and apoptosis of intestinal crypt cells. These results indicate that SDACNF and chitosan are useful agents for preventing mucositis induced by anti-cancer drugs. PMID:28134832

  16. Aqueous Extract of Solanum nigrum Leaves Induces Autophagy and Enhances Cytotoxicity of Cisplatin, Doxorubicin, Docetaxel, and 5-Fluorouracil in Human Colorectal Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Chen-Jei; Tai, Cheng-Jeng; Lin, Yi-Feng; Jian, Jiun-Yu; Chang, Yu-Jia; Chang, Chun-Chao

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a common cancer worldwide, and chemotherapy is a mainstream approach for advanced and recurrent cases. Development of effective complementary drugs could help improve tumor suppression efficiency and control adverse effects from chemotherapy. The aqueous extract of Solanum nigrum leaves (AE-SN) is an essential component in many traditional Chinese medicine formulas for treating cancer, but there is a lack of evidence verifying its tumor suppression efficacy in colorectal cancer. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the tumor suppression efficacy of AE-SN using DLD-1 and HT-29 human colorectal carcinoma cells and examine the combined drug effect when combined with the chemotherapeutic drugs cisplatin, doxorubicin, docetaxel, and 5-fluorouracil. The results indicated that AE-SN induced autophagy via microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 A/B II accumulation but not caspase-3-dependent apoptosis in both cell lines. The IC50s after 48 hours of treatment were 0.541 and 0.948 mg/ml AE-SN in DLD-1 and HT-29, respectively. AE-SN also demonstrated a combined drug effect with all tested drugs by enhancing cytotoxicity in tumor cells. Our results suggest that AE-SN has potential in the development of complementary chemotherapy for colorectal cancer. PMID:23843876

  17. A 5-fluorouracil-loaded floating gastroretentive hollow microsphere: development, pharmacokinetic in rabbits, and biodistribution in tumor-bearing mice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu; Wei, Yumeng; Yang, Hongru; Pi, Chao; Liu, Hao; Ye, Yun; Zhao, Ling

    2016-01-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) was loaded in hollow microspheres to improve its oral bioavailability. 5-FU hollow microspheres were developed by a solvent diffusion–evaporation method. The effect of Span 80 concentration, ether/ethanol volume ratio, and polyvinyl pyrrolidone/ethyl cellulose weight ratio on physicochemical characteristics, floating, and in vitro release behaviors of 5-FU hollow microspheres was investigated and optimized. The formulation and technology composed of Span 80 (1.5%, w/v), ether/ethanol (1.0:10.0, v/v), and polyvinyl pyrrolidone/ethyl cellulose (1.0:10.0, w/w) were employed to develop three batch samples, which showed an excellent reproducibility. The microspheres were spherical with a hollow structure with high drug loading amount (28.4%±0.5%) and production yield (74.2%±0.6%); they exhibited excellent floating and sustained release characteristics in simulated gastric and intestinal fluid. Pharmacokinetic studies demonstrated that 5-FU hollow microspheres significantly enhanced oral bioavailability (area under curve, [AUC](0−t): 12.53±1.65 mg/L*h vs 7.80±0.83 and 5.82±0.83 mg/L*h) with longer elimination half-life (t1/2) (15.43±2.12 hours vs 2.25±0.22 and 1.43±0.18 hours) and mean residence time (7.65±0.97 hours vs 3.61±0.41 and 2.34±0.35 hours), in comparison with its solid microspheres and powder. In vivo distribution results from tumor-bearing nude mice demonstrated that the animals administered with 5-FU hollow microspheres had much higher drug content in tumor, plasma, and stomach at 1 and 8 hours except for 0.5 hours sample collection time point in comparison with those administered with 5-FU solid microspheres and its powder. These results suggested that the hollow microspheres would be a promising controlled drug delivery system for an oral chemotherapy agent like 5-FU. PMID:27042001

  18. A 5-fluorouracil-loaded floating gastroretentive hollow microsphere: development, pharmacokinetic in rabbits, and biodistribution in tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu; Wei, Yumeng; Yang, Hongru; Pi, Chao; Liu, Hao; Ye, Yun; Zhao, Ling

    2016-01-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) was loaded in hollow microspheres to improve its oral bioavailability. 5-FU hollow microspheres were developed by a solvent diffusion-evaporation method. The effect of Span 80 concentration, ether/ethanol volume ratio, and polyvinyl pyrrolidone/ethyl cellulose weight ratio on physicochemical characteristics, floating, and in vitro release behaviors of 5-FU hollow microspheres was investigated and optimized. The formulation and technology composed of Span 80 (1.5%, w/v), ether/ethanol (1.0:10.0, v/v), and polyvinyl pyrrolidone/ethyl cellulose (1.0:10.0, w/w) were employed to develop three batch samples, which showed an excellent reproducibility. The microspheres were spherical with a hollow structure with high drug loading amount (28.4%±0.5%) and production yield (74.2%±0.6%); they exhibited excellent floating and sustained release characteristics in simulated gastric and intestinal fluid. Pharmacokinetic studies demonstrated that 5-FU hollow microspheres significantly enhanced oral bioavailability (area under curve, [AUC](0-t): 12.53±1.65 mg/L(*)h vs 7.80±0.83 and 5.82±0.83 mg/L(*)h) with longer elimination half-life (t1/2) (15.43±2.12 hours vs 2.25±0.22 and 1.43±0.18 hours) and mean residence time (7.65±0.97 hours vs 3.61±0.41 and 2.34±0.35 hours), in comparison with its solid microspheres and powder. In vivo distribution results from tumor-bearing nude mice demonstrated that the animals administered with 5-FU hollow microspheres had much higher drug content in tumor, plasma, and stomach at 1 and 8 hours except for 0.5 hours sample collection time point in comparison with those administered with 5-FU solid microspheres and its powder. These results suggested that the hollow microspheres would be a promising controlled drug delivery system for an oral chemotherapy agent like 5-FU.

  19. A DFT study of 5-fluorouracil adsorption on the pure and doped BN nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltani, Alireza; Baei, Mohammad T.; Tazikeh Lemeski, E.; Kaveh, Sara; Balakheyli, Hanzaleh

    2015-11-01

    The electronic and adsorption properties of the pristine, Al-, Ga-, and Ge-doped BN nanotubes interacted with 5-fluorouracil molecule (5-FU) were theoretically investigated in the gas phase using the B3LYP density functional theory (DFT) calculations. It was found that the adsorption behavior of 5FU molecule on the pristine (8, 0) and (5, 5) BNNTs are electrostatic in nature. In contrast, the 5FU molecule (O-side) implies strong adsorption on the metal-doped BNNTs. Our results indicate that the Ga-doped presents high sensitivity and strong adsorption with the 5-FU molecule than the Al- and Ge-doped BNNTs. Therefore, it can be introduced as a carrier for drug delivery applications.

  20. Suppressive effect of sinomenine combined with 5-fluorouracil on colon carcinoma cell growth.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ji-Xiang; Yang, Zi-Rong; Wu, Dan-Dan; Song, Jia; Guo, Xu-Feng; Wang, Jing; Dong, Wei-Guo

    2014-01-01

    It is reported that sinomenine (SIN) and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) both are effective for colon cancer, but their cooperative suppressive effects and toxicity remain to be clarified in detail. This study aimed to determine suppressive effects and toxicity of sinomenine (SIN) plus 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) on LoVo colon carcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo. CCK-8, Hoechst 33258 staining and an annexin V-FITC/PI apoptosis kit were used to detect suppressive effects. Western blotting was applied to investigate the essential mechanism underlying SIN and 5-FU-induced apoptosis. SIN or 5-FU or both were injected into nude mice, and then suppressive effects and side effects were observed. SIN plus 5-FU apparently inhibited the proliferation of LoVo cells and induced apoptosis. Moreover the united effects were stronger than individually (p<0.05). The results of annexin V-FITC /PI staining and Hoechst 33258 staining showed that the percentage of apoptotic cells induced by SIN and 5-FU combined or alone was significantly higher than the control group (p<0.05). Expression of Bax and Bcl-2 was up-regulated and down-regulated respectively. SIN or 5-FU significantly inhibited effects on the volume of tumour xenografts and their combined suppressive effects were stronger (p<0.05). No obvious side effects were observed. It was apparent that the united effects of SIN and 5-FU on the growth of colorectal carcinoma LoVo cells in vitro and in vivo were superior to those using them individually, and it did not markedly increase the side effects of chemotherapy.

  1. [Cardiac toxicity of 5-fluorouracil].

    PubMed

    Fournier, C; Benahmed, M; Blondeau, M

    1989-02-01

    A 67 year-old patient receives 5-fluorouracil for vocal chord cancer. During the perfusion, atypical angina pain occurs, accompanied with offset of ST above the baseline in standard leads and in V4 through V6. The pain subsides spontaneously in 45 minutes. These ECG alterations are followed 48 hours later by diffuse inverted T waves with lengthened QT. Cardiac ultrasonography and isotopic angiography do not show any abnormality of the left ventricular function, but myocardial tomoscintigraphy with labelled thallium show a lower hypofixation on exertion. The cardiac toxicity of 5-fluorouracil is in frequent. It is usually believed that it involves a coronary spasm, as suggested by the ECG tracing in the reported cases. The incident, which may be painful or painless, may result in a myocardial infarction or even sudden death during the perfusion. Therefore, it is advisable to discontinue the treatment as soon as an angina-type pain occurs.

  2. Development of an LC-MS/MS assay for the quantitative determination of the intracellular 5-fluorouracil nucleotides responsible for the anticancer effect of 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Derissen, Ellen J B; Hillebrand, Michel J X; Rosing, Hilde; Schellens, Jan H M; Beijnen, Jos H

    2015-06-10

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) and its oral prodrug capecitabine are among the most widely used chemotherapeutics. For cytotoxic activity, 5-FU requires cellular uptake and intracellular metabolic activation. Three intracellular formed metabolites are responsible for the antineoplastic effect of 5-FU: 5-fluorouridine 5'-triphosphate (FUTP), 5-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine 5'-triphosphate (FdUTP) and 5-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine 5'-monophosphate (FdUMP). In this paper, we describe the development of an LC-MS/MS assay for quantification of these active 5-FU nucleotides in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Because the intracellular 5-FU nucleotide concentrations were very low, maximization of the release from the cell matrix and minimization of interference were critical factors. Therefore, a series of experiments was performed to select the best method for cell lysis and nucleotide extraction. Chromatography was optimized to obtain separation from endogenous nucleotides, and the effect of different cell numbers was examined. The assay was validated for the following concentration ranges in PBMC lysate: 0.488-19.9 nM for FUTP, 1.66-67.7 nM for FdUTP and 0.748-30.7 nM for FdUMP. Accuracies were between -2.2 and 7.0% deviation for all analytes, and the coefficient of variation values were ≤ 4.9%. The assay was successfully applied to quantify 5-FU nucleotides in PBMC samples from patients treated with capecitabine and patients receiving 5-FU intravenously. FUTP amounts up to 3054 fmol/10(6) PBMCs and FdUMP levels up to 169 fmol/10(6) PBMCs were measured. The FdUTP concentrations were below the lower limit of quantification. To our knowledge, this is the first time that 5-FU nucleotides were quantified in cells from patients treated with 5-FU or capecitabine without using a radiolabel.

  3. Evaluation of magnetic nanoparticles coated by 5-fluorouracil imprinted polymer for controlled drug delivery in mouse breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Hashemi-Moghaddam, Hamid; Kazemi-Bagsangani, Saeed; Jamili, Mahdi; Zavareh, Saeed

    2016-01-30

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have been extensively investigated to improve delivery efficiency of therapeutic and diagnostic agents. In this study, magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) was synthesized by using polydopamine. Synthesized MIP was used for controlled 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) delivery in a spontaneous model of breast adenocarcinoma in Balb/c mice in the presence of an external magnetic field. Antitumor effectiveness of 5-FU imprinted polymer (5-FU-IP) was evaluated in terms of tumor-growth delay, tumor-doubling time, inhibition ratio, and histopathology. Results showed higher efficacy of 5-FU-IP in the presence of magnetic field upon suppressing tumor growth than free 5-FU and 5-FU-IP without magnetic field. The 5-FU and Fe distribution among tissues were evaluated by high-performance liquid chromatography and flame atomic absorption spectrometry, respectively. The obtained results, showed significantly deposition of 5-FU in the 5-FU-IP treated group with magnetic field. Thus, magnetic 5-FU-IP is promising for breast cancer therapy with high efficacy.

  4. Treatment of solar keratoses with a 5-fluorouracil and salicylic acid varnish.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, J C

    1975-01-01

    In an attempt to avoid the side-effects of treating solar keratoses with 5% 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) ointment, a new pharmacological varnish containing 5% 5-FU and 5-10% salicylic acid to collodium was tried. Twenty patients with such lesions were treated. A drop of the varnish was applied on each lesion every 3 weeks. Only one to five applications on facial lesions were necessary to obtain apparent cure in all patients. Lesions reappeared in four patients, but were cured after a second and similar treatment. The keratoses of the hands were more resistant and needed seven applications in one patient and nine in the other.

  5. Interaction of fluorescence dyes with 5-fluorouracil: A photoinduced electron transfer study in bulk and biologically relevant water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchlyan, Jagannath; Banik, Debasis; Kundu, Niloy; Roy, Arpita; Sarkar, Nilmoni

    2014-10-01

    The interactions of widely used chemotherapeutic drug, 5-fluorouracil (5FU) with coumarin dyes have been investigated for the first time using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopic measurements. The fluorescence quenching along with the decrease in lifetimes of excited state of coumarin derivatives with gradual addition of 5FU is explained by photoinduced electron transfer (PET) mechanism. Our studies were performed in bulk water and confined water of AOT (aerosol OT) reverse micelle to investigate the effect of confinement on PET dynamics. The feasibility of PET reaction for coumarin-5FU systems is investigated calculating the standard free energy changes using the Rehm-Weller equation.

  6. Hyaluronidase enzyme core-5-fluorouracil-loaded chitosan-PEG-gelatin polymer nanocomposites as targeted and controlled drug delivery vehicles.

    PubMed

    Rajan, M; Raj, V; Al-Arfaj, Abdullah A; Murugan, A M

    2013-09-10

    This study examines the performance of novel hyaluronidase enzyme core-5-fluorouracil-loaded chitosan-polyethylene glycol-gelatin polymer nanocomposites, which were prepared using an ionic gelation technique, as targeted and controlled drug delivery vehicles. These hyaluronidase-loaded nanoparticles have recently been proposed as targeted and controlled drug delivery vehicle systems to tissues due to their ability to loosen the intercellular connective matrix of hyaluronic acid. The encapsulation efficiency and loading capacities of the nanoparticles demonstrated that these nanocomposites displayed sufficient binding ability, which depends on the pH and initial concentration of the drug. The cytotoxic effects of the chitosan-hyaluronidase-5-fluorouracil (CS-HYL-5-FU), chitosan-hyaluronidase-5-fluorouracil polyethylene glycol (CS-HYL-5-FU-PEG), and chitosan-hyaluronidase-5-fluorouracil polyethylene glycol-gelatin (CS-HYL-5-FU-PEG-G) nanoparticles were assessed using MTT assays, and the nanovectors were found to be less cytotoxic than the chemotherapeutic 5-FU after incubation for 3-12h. The particle sizes of the CS-HYL-5-FU, CS-HYL-5-FU-PEG and CS-HYL-5-FU-PEG-G polymer composites were between 300 and 580 nm, as determined by a Zetasizer. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis indicated that the nanocomposites exhibit a clear, smooth surface and fine morphology. Linkages of the polymers, enzyme, and drug were confirmed by FTIR spectroscopy. Atomic fluorescence microscopy (AFM) analysis confirmed the size of the polymer composite nanoparticles. Therefore, this work established that the drug can be successfully encapsulated in chitosan-polyethylene glycol-gelatin-accompanied hyaluronidase nanoparticles with a homogeneous distribution. These nanoparticles can be potential carriers for targeted and controlled drug delivery to cancer cells.

  7. Resistance of colorectal cancer cells to radiation and 5-FU is associated with MELK expression

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Seungho; Ku, Ja-Lok

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} MELK expression significantly increased when the cells are exposed to radiation or 5-FU. {yields} Suppression of MELK caused cell cycle changes and decrease in proliferation. {yields} Radiation or 5-FU treatment after MELK suppression by siRNA induced growth inhibition. -- Abstract: It was reported that the local recurrence would be caused by cancer stem cells acquiring chemo- and radio-resistance. Recently, one of the potential therapeutic targets for colorectal and other cancers has been identified, which is maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK). MELK is known as an embryonic and neural stem cell marker, and associated with the cell survival, cell proliferation, and apoptosis. In this study, SNU-503, which is a rectal cancer cell line, was treated with radiation or 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and elevation of the MELK expression level was observed. Furthermore, the cell line was pre-treated with small interfering RNA (siRNA) against MELK mRNA before treatment of radiation or 5-FU and its effects on cell cycle and proliferation were observed. We demonstrated that knockdown of MELK reduced the proliferation of cells with radiation or 5-FU treatment. In addition, MELK suppression caused changes in cell cycle. In conclusion, MELK could be associated with increased resistance of colorectal cancer cells against radiation and 5-FU.

  8. TP53 Mutational Status and Prediction of Benefit from Adjuvant 5-Fluorouracil in Stage III Colon Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Kandioler, Daniela; Mittlböck, Martina; Kappel, Sonja; Puhalla, Harald; Herbst, Friedrich; Langner, Cord; Wolf, Brigitte; Tschmelitsch, Jörg; Schippinger, Walter; Steger, Günther; Hofbauer, Friedrich; Samonigg, Hellmut; Gnant, Michael; Teleky, Bela; Kührer, Irene

    2015-08-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that the varying treatment efficacy of adjuvant 5-fluorouracil (5FU) in stage III colon cancer is linked to the TP53 mutational status. ABCSG-90 was a prospective randomized trial in which effect of adjuvant 5FU was studied in stage III colon cancer patients. Tumor material of 70% of these patients (389/572) was available for analysis of the biomarker TP53 using a TP53-gene-specific Sanger sequencing protocol. Median follow-up was 88 months. TP53 mutation frequency was 33%. A significant interaction between TP53 status, outcomes and nodal category was found (P = 0.0095). In the N1 category, TP53 wildtype patients had significantly better overall survival than TP53 mutated (81.0% vs. 62.0% overall survival at 5 years; HR = 2.131; 95% CI: 1.344-3.378; P = 0.0010). In the N2 category, the TP53 status did not affect survival (P = 0.4992). In TP53 wildtype patients, the prognostic significance of N category was significantly enhanced (P = 0.0002). In TP53 mutated patients, survival curves of N1 and N2 patients overlapped and nodal category was no longer prognostic. The biomarker TP53 independently predicted effect of adjuvant 5FU in N1 colon cancer patients. TP53 was not predictive in N2 patients, in whom 5FU is known to have no effect.

  9. Oral Nucleotides Only Minimally Improve 5-Fluorouracil-Induced Mucositis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Mashtoub, Suzanne; Feo, Benjamin; Whittaker, Alexandra L; Lymn, Kerry A; Martinez-Puig, Daniel; Howarth, Gordon S

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced mucositis is characterized by inflammation and ulceration of the intestinal mucosa, compromising intestinal function. Exogenous nucleotides have been reported to repair the mucosa. The nucleotide preparation, Nucleoforce F0328 (Nucleoforce), was investigated for its potential to ameliorate intestinal mucositis in rats. Female Dark Agouti rats (n = 8/group) were gavaged once daily with Nucleoforce (175 mg/kg) or water from Days 0 to 8 and injected (i.p.) with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU; 150 mg/kg) or saline on Day 5. Histological parameters (disease severity, crypt depth, and villus height measurements) and myeloperoxidase activity were quantified. P < 0.05 was considered significant. Jejunal and ileal histological disease severity scores were significantly increased by 5-FU, compared to normal controls (P < 0.05). Nucleoforce treatment in 5-FU-injected rats significantly reduced jejunal and ileal disease severity compared to 5-FU controls (P < 0.05). In 5-FU-injected rats, jejunal and ileal villus heights and crypt depths were significantly decreased compared to 5-FU controls, with no additional Nucleoforce effect (P > 0.05). Intestinal myeloperoxidase activity was significantly elevated by 5-FU (8.8-fold), compared to normal controls (P < 0.05), which was not normalized by Nucleoforce treatment (P > 0.05). Nucleoforce only partially improved parameters associated with experimentally-induced mucositis. Future studies could investigate increased concentrations, more frequent administration, or protective microencapsulation delivery methods, to increase bioavailability.

  10. Bifidobacterium infantis has a beneficial effect on 5-fluorouracil-induced intestinal mucositis in rats.

    PubMed

    Yuan, K-T; Yu, H-L; Feng, W-D; Chong, P; Yang, T; Xue, C-L; Yu, M; Shi, H-P

    2015-03-01

    Intestinal mucositis is a common toxic side effect in cancer patients receiving high-dose chemotherapy. This study aimed to evaluate the beneficial effects of Bifidobacterium infantis in a rat model of intestinal mucositis induced by 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Thirty male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups: control, 5-FU, and 5-FU + B. infantis. A single intraperitoneal injection of 5-FU (150 mg/kg) was used to induce intestinal mucositis. B. infantis (1×109 cfu) was administered for 11 days, starting from 7 days before 5-FU injection. Intestinal mucositis was evaluated based on body weight, villus height, immunohistological expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and nuclear factor kappa beta (NF-κB), levels of the pro-inflammatory factors interleukin 1 beta and tumour necrosis factor alpha, and myeloperoxidase (MPO) concentration. The results showed that the 5-FU + B. infantis group demonstrated a higher body weight and villus height, increased expression of PCNA, reduced expression of NF-κB and pro-inflammatory factors, and lower MPO concentration compared to the 5-FU group. These data suggest that probiotic B. infantis is effective in reducing chemotherapy-induced intestinal mucositis in rats.

  11. Cytostatic and cytotoxic effects of 5-fluorouracil on human corneal epithelial cells and keratocytes.

    PubMed

    Midena, Edoardo; Lazzarini, Daniela; Catania, Anton Giulio; Moretto, Erika; Fregona, Iva; Parrozzani, Raffaele

    2013-03-01

    To investigate the effects of various 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) concentrations, exposure times, and application techniques on in vitro-cultured human corneal cells. Human corneal epithelial cell (HCEC) and human corneal keratocyte (HCK) cultures were exposed to different 5-FU concentrations (0.025%-1%) and incubation durations (5 minutes to 2 hours). The cytostatic effect was evaluated as the percentage of inhibition of migration relative to the control. The evaluation of cytotoxic effect included both phase contrast microscopic observations and viability measures performed using an MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide)] colorimetric assay. The results are expressed as ratio of optical density (OD) reduction 24 hours after exposure. The cytostatic effect was time and dose dependent. The 50% inhibiting dose was 0.55% after 1 hour of incubation for HCECs and was 0.5% after 2 hours of incubation for HCKs. A 100% inhibitory effect was never observed at any concentration or incubation duration. No cytotoxic changes were observed using an 5-FU concentration of <1%; 1% 5-FU showed time-dependent cytotoxic changes in HCEC cultures only. MTT analysis showed no OD reduction at 5-FU concentrations of <1%, whereas 1% 5-FU showed OD reduction <50% at any tested exposure time. HCECs showed higher reduction in OD than HCKs. 5-FU formulations topically used in clinical practice showed limited toxicity in normal cultured corneal epithelial cells and keratocytes.

  12. In Vitro Circuit Stability of 5-Fluorouracil and Oxaliplatin in Support of Hyperthermic Isolated Hepatic Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Colville, Heidi; Dzadony, Ryan; Kemp, Rebecca; Stewart, Stephen; Zeh, Herbert J.; Bartlett, David L.; Holleran, Julianne; Schombert, Kevin; Kosovec, Juliann E.; Egorin, Merrill J.; Beumer, Jan H.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: Over the years, a large number of drugs have been used in isolated perfusion of extremities or organs. To interpret the pharmacokinetics of these drugs correctly, the contributions of tissue or organ clearance and chemical degradation, respectively, to overall drug elimination from the circuit need to be identified. In support of a phase I clinical trial of isolated hepatic perfusion (IHP), delivering 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and oxaliplatin to patients with colorectal cancer hepatic metastases, we aimed to characterize the stability of 5-FU and oxaliplatin in the IHP circuit. Stability of 5-FU and oxaliplatin was assessed in human blood, lactated Ringer infusion (LRI), and in an in vitro IHP circuit consisting of both blood and LRI. Samples were analyzed with liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (5-FU) and atomic absorption spectrophotometry (oxaliplatin). 5-FU was stable under all tested in vitro conditions, but ultrafilterable platinum concentrations decreased slowly with a half-life of 85 minutes in both IHP perfusate and whole blood. The stability of 5-FU in the media containing blood is likely attributable to saturation of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase. The decrease of ultrafilterable platinum in blood-containing media with an 85 minutes half-life is in agreement with previous reports on oxaliplatin biotransformation. Oxaliplatin and 5-FU are sufficiently stable in the circuit for the 1-hour perfusion in ongoing and planned clinical trials. PMID:20437796

  13. Effects of American ginseng on pharmacokinetics of 5-fluorouracil in rats.

    PubMed

    He, Yi-Sheng; Sun, Wei; Wang, Chong-Zhi; Qi, Lian-Wen; Yang, Jie; Li, Ping; Wen, Xiao-Dong; Yuan, Chun-Su

    2015-05-01

    The pharmacokinetics of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in combination with or without American ginseng (seven-consecutive days oral dose) in rats were evaluated using liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Chromatographic separation was performed on a reverse LC column within a total run time of 6.5 min, which allowed for a relatively quick analysis. The limit of quantification for 5-FU was 15 ng/mL and this method was linear over 15-50,000 ng/mL. This method supported stabilizing determination of the plasma concentration of 5-FU over a period of 24 h. Precision both interday and intraday (coefficient of variation) was within 14% and accuracy (relative error) ranged from -5 to 14%. In view of the observed pharmacokinetic parameters, including maximum concentration, time to maximum concentration, area under the concentration-time curve (AUC), mean residence time, elimination half-life and clearance, our results showed no significant differences in all of the pharmacokinetic parameters between the ginseng co-treated group and 5-FU alone group. Some increase in AUC was observed in 5-FU plus ginseng group; however, the difference did not reach statistical significance compared with 5-FU alone. It appeared that American ginseng administration did not significantly alter the kinetics of 5-FU. More studies are still needed to confirm our results.

  14. New chitosan nanospheres for the delivery of 5-fluorouracil: preparation, characterization and in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Cavalli, Roberta; Leone, Federica; Minelli, Rosalba; Fantozzi, Roberto; Dianzani, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to develop new chitosan nanospheres for the delivery of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Drug loaded nanospheres were prepared using a technique derived from a combination of coacervation and emulsion droplet coalescence methods. The size and morphology of nanospheres were characterized by laser light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. The 5-FU interaction with chitosan nanospheres was investigated by DSC analysis and FT-IR spectroscopy. The in vitro release was studied by dialysis bag technique. Cytotoxicity of 5-FU loaded chitosan nanospheres was evaluated in vitro on HT29 and PC-3 cell lines. The effects of 5-FU loaded chitosan nanospheres on adhesion of tumor cells to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were also investigated. 5-FU loaded chitosan nanospheres appeared with a spherical shape, with a mean diameter of about 200 nm and a negative zeta potential of about - 6.0 mV. The successful interaction between drug and chitosan nanosphere matrix was demonstrated by both DSC and FT-IR analyses. The quantitative determination of 5-FU was assayed by UV-Vis analysis. The encapsulation efficiency of 5-FU content was about 70%. A kinetic study of in vitro release demonstrated that the percentages of 5-FU delivered from nanospheres was approx. 10% after 3 hours. The in vitro studies showed that 5-FU loaded nanospheres were effective in reducing tumor cell proliferation in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. 5-FU nanospheres were also able to inhibit both HT29 and PC-3 adhesion to HUVEC after 48 hours of treatment.

  15. Therapy of locally unresectable pancreatic carcinoma: a randomized comparison of high dose (6000 rads) radiation alone, moderate dose radiation (4000 rads + 5-fluorouracil), and high dose radiation + 5-fluorouracil: the Gastrointestinal Tumor Study Group. [X ray

    SciTech Connect

    Moertel, C.G.; Frytak, S.; Hahn, R.G.

    1981-10-15

    One-hundred-ninety-four eligible and evaluable patients with histologically confirmed locally unresectable adenocarcinoma of the pancreas were randomly assigned to therapy with high-dose (6000 rads) radiation therapy alone, to moderate-dose (4000 rads) radiation + 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and to high-dose radiation plus 5-FU. Median survival with radiation alone was only 5 1/2 months from date of diagnosis. Both 5-FU-containing treatment regimens produced a highly significant survival improvement when compared with radiation alone. Survival differences between 4000 rads plus 5-FU and 6000 rads plus 5-FU were not significant with an overall median survival of ten months. Significant prognostic variables, in addition to treatment, were pretreatment performance status and pretreatment CEA level. The toxic reactions related to the treatment are discussed.

  16. TOWARD A BIOLOGICALLY BASED DOSE-RESPONSE MODEL FOR DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY OF 5-FLUOROURACIL IN THE RAT: A MATHEMATICAL CONSTRUCT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biologically based dose-response (BBDR) models comprise one way to incorporate mechanistic information into a dose-response assessment to be used for risk assessments. The chemotherapeutic drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) has been used as a prototypic compound for the construction of ...

  17. Preparation of ethosomes and deformable liposomes encapsulated with 5-fluorouracil and their investigation of permeability and retention in hypertrophic scar.

    PubMed

    Wo, Yan; Zhang, Zhen; Zhang, Yixin; Wang, Danru; Pu, Zheming; Su, Weijie; Qian, Yunliang; Li, Yunwu; Cui, Daxiang

    2011-09-01

    With the aim of comparing scar penetration efficiency and retention between ethosomes and deformable liposomes both encapsulated with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), the 5-FU ethosomal suspensions (5-FU ES, 81.74 +/- 9.37 nm) and the 5-FU Deformable Liposomal Suspensions (5-FU DS, 73.7 +/- 9.45 nm) were prepared respectively by Touitou method and Cevc method, their sizes were determined by Particle Sizer System (PSS), and their entrapment Efficiency (EE) was detected by ultracentrifugation and microcolumn centrifugation. Their transdermal delivery experiments were done in hypertrophic scars in vitro. The permeated amount of 5-FU and retention contents of 5-FU were both calculated by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). Fluorescence intensities of ES and DS labeled with Rodanmin 6GO (Rho) were measured by Laser Scanning Microscopy (LSM). The control groups such as the 5-FU and empty ethosomal vesicles (5-FU + EEV), the 5-FU and empty deformable liposomal vesicles (5-FU + EDV) and 5-FU PBS Solution (5-FU Sol) were set up. Results showed that, prepared 5-FU ES was 81.74 +/- 9.37 nm in size, 5-FU DS was 73.7 +/- 9.45 nm, EE of 5-FU ES was 10.95%, EE of 5-FU DS was 15.05%. Within 24 hours, in the group of 5-FU ES, the penetration amount of 5-FU in scar was 14.12 +/- 0.1 microg/mL/cm2, the retention contents of 5-FU was 10.74 +/- 1.17 microg/cm2, and the fluorescence intensity of Rho in hypertrophic scar tissues were 182 +/- 18.3; in the group of 5-FU DS: the penetration amount of 5-FU was 12.35 +/- 1.21 microg/mLcm2; the retention contents of 5-FU was 17.48 +/- 0.82 microg/cm2, and the fluorescence intensity of Rho was 241.45 +/- 7.63; there existed statistical difference between penetration amount in the group of 5-FU ES and that in the group of 5-FU DS as well as control groups (P < 0.05, P < 0.01), the penetration amount in the group of ES is markedly higher than DS group or control groups. Conversely, the retention contents of 5-FU and the fluorescence intensity of

  18. Double-blind randomised placebo-controlled phase III study of an E. coli extract plus 5-fluorouracil versus 5-fluorouracil in patients with advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Unger, C; Häring, B; Kruse, A; Thumann, A; Schneider, B; Clemm, C; Weber, B; Clevert, H D; Hockertz, S; Kalousek, M B

    2001-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the toxicity (mucositis, diarrhea and leucopenia) of a therapy with 5-fluorouracil (CAS 51-21-8; 5-FU) plus an E. coli extract (LC-Extract, Laves coli extract, Colibiogen inject, cell-free soluble fraction from lysed E. coli, Laves strain) in comparison with 5-FU plus placebo. Secondary endpoints included general toxicity, response rate according to WHO, survival time and quality of life. 164 patients with advanced colorectal cancer were enrolled in this randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind, multicenter phase III study. The treatment consisted of 0.167 ml/kg/d LC-Extract or placebo followed by 500-750 mg/m2/d 5-FU on five consecutive days, repeated every three weeks for up to six treatment cycles. 158 (77 verum, 81 placebo) patients were evaluable for toxicity, 144 (72 verum, 72 placebo) evaluable for response. The therapy with LC-Extract was well tolerated. Adverse events that occurred during the study were mainly judged as 5-FU- or tumor-related. Toxicity from treatment with 600 mg/m2/d 5-FU in both treatment groups was very low. After treatment with 750 mg/m2/d 5-FU patients in the placebo-group experienced a higher CTC toxicity than in the LC-Extract groups. Remission rate and survival time showed a slight trend in favour of LC-Extract. These results suggest a positive benefit-risk ratio of the additional application of LC-Extract to 5-FU in the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer especially for administration of high doses of 5-FU.

  19. Effect of intralesional 5 fluorouracil injection in primary pterygium

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Muhammad Saim; Malik, Sidra; Basit, Imran

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine mean change in visual acuity, corneal astigmatism and clinical appearance of pterygium after intralesional injection of 5-Fluorouracil. Methods: This was a Quasi experimental study conducted at Armed Forces Institute of Ophthalmology, Rawalpindi, Pakistan from June 2014 to May 2015. Total 68 eyes of 54 patients were included in the study. Patients were treated by injecting 0.1 ml of 5-FU (5mg) weekly injections for 04 weeks. All the patients underwent ophthalmic clinical examination that included Uncorrected distant visual acuity (UCVA), corrected distant visual acuity (CDVA), keratometery with Auto Ref-keratometer (RK-F1, Canon) and slit lamp examination before and 04 weeks after the last injection. Results: Total 68 eyes of 54 patients (18 females and 36 males) were treated with intralesional injection of 5 FU. Out of total, 30 were right eyes while 38 were left eyes. Age of patients ranged from 23 to 53 years with mean age of 39.2 ± 4.90 years. Mean UCVA and corneal astigmatism before treatment were 0.162 ± 0.167 and 2.12 ± 1.53 respectively while the same parameters 04 weeks after last injection of 5 FU were 0.166 ± 0.168 and 1.92±1.45 respectively. The magnitude of induced change in astigmatism was (0.235 ± 1.35). Ninety seven percent of the patients showed improvement in clinical appearance. Conclusion: Intralesional 5-FU injection results in significant clinical and cosmetic improvement of primary pterygium. PMID:27022360

  20. Tautomeric equilibria of 5-fluorouracil anionic species in water.

    PubMed

    Markova, Nadezhda; Enchev, Venelin; Ivanova, Galya

    2010-12-23

    It has long been postulated that rare tautomeric or ionized forms of nucleic acid bases may play a role in mispair formation. Therefore, ab initio quantum chemical investigations on the tautomeric equilibrium in 5-fluorouracil (5FU) and its anions (deprotonated from N1, AN1, and from N3, AN3) and their tautomeric forms in water were performed. The effect of the water as solvent was introduced using solute-solvent clusters (four water molecules). The influence of the water molecules on the tautomeric reactions between different forms was considered by multiple proton transfer mechanisms. We show that when a water dimer is located in the reaction site between the two pairs of N-H and C═O groups, the assistive effect of the water molecules is strengthened. All calculations of the solute-water complexes were carried out at an MP2 level of theory and supplemented with correction for higher order correlation terms at CCSD(T) level, using the 6-31+G(d,p) basis set. The ab initio calculated frequencies and Raman intensities of 5FU and its anions AN1, AN3, and dianion are in good agreement with the experimental Raman frequencies in aqueous solution at different pH. In order to establish the pH-induced structural transformation in the molecule of 5FU, further (1)H, (19)F, and (13)C NMR spectra in water solution for pH = 6.9-13.8 were acquired and the chemical shift alterations were determined as a function of pH. On the basis of NMR spectroscopic data obtained for 5FU in aqueous solution at alkaline pH, we suggest the existence of a mixture of the anionic tautomeric forms predicted by our theoretical calculations.

  1. Mechanistic Study on Triptorelin Action in Protecting From 5-FU-Induced Ovarian Damage in Rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Tian, Xiaoyu; Liang, Lingxia; Wang, Yan; Wang, Ruifang; Cheng, Xiaolin; Yan, Zhen; Chen, Yawei; Qi, Pengwei

    2014-01-01

    Triptorelin, a kind of GnRH agonist, is widely used in the treatment of hormone-responsive cancers in the clinic. This study aimed to discover the underlying mechanism of triptorelin in protection from 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced ovarian damage in Sprague-Dawley rats. In the present study, after using 5-FU to induce ovarian damage in rats, body weight and wet ovaries were weighed, the levels of estradiol (E2), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), and anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) in blood were detected, and the expression of Bcl-2, Bax, and NF-κB was determined. It suggested that, compared to the control, body weight gain, the ratio of ovarian wet weight to body weight, primary follicle numbers, and the levels of AMH were significantly decreased, while the concentration of E2 and FSH was heavily increased following 5-FU administration. In contrast, after coadministration of triptorelin with 5-FU, the ratio of ovarian wet weight to body weight and the levels of AMH were significantly increased, whereas the level of E2 and FSH was decreased significantly when compared with the 5-FU group. Furthermore, at indicated times, 5-FU led to the reduced Bcl-2 and NF-κB expression and increased Bax expression while triptorelin plus 5-FU increased Bcl-2 and NF-κB expression and decreased Bax expression. It was indicated that triptorelin could protect rats from 5-FU-induced ovarian damage by modulation of hormones, Bcl-2, Bax, and NF-κB. These results might highlight the mechanism of triptorelin as a protective agent in clinical chemotherapy for ovarian damage.

  2. Pharmacokinetic, biodistribution and therapeutic efficacy of 5-fluorouracil-loaded pH-sensitive PEGylated liposomal nanoparticles in HCT-116 tumor bearing mouse

    PubMed Central

    Udofot, Ofonime; Affram, Kevin; Smith, Taylor; Tshabe, Bulumko; Krishnan, Sunil; Sachdeva, Mandip; Agyare, Edward

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the pharmacokinetics and efficacy of 5-FU entrapped pH-sensitive liposomal nanoparticles with surface-modified anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibody (pHLNps-5-FU) delivery system. Cytotoxicity of 5-FU and pHLNps-5-FU was determined in vitro against HCT-116 cells. The biodistribution and pharmacokinetic parameters of the administered 5-FU and pHLNps-5-FU as well as efficacy of 5-FU and pHLNps-5-FU were determined in HCT-116 subcutaneous mouse model. Mean size of pHLNp-5-FU was 164.3 ± 8.4 nm with entrapment efficiency (E.E) of 54.17%. While cytotoxicity of 5-FU and pHLNps-5-FU showed a strong dose-dependent, pHLNps-5-FU proved to be more effective (2–3 fold high) than that of 5-FU against HCT-116 cells. Pharmacokinetic study showed a prolonged plasma circulation of pHLNps-5-FU and a more significant body exposure while accumulation of pHLNps-5-FU in tumor was significantly higher than that of free 5-FU. Further, the efficacy of pHLNps-5-FU, was greater than free 5-FU at equivalent 5-FU dose. The study suggests that pHLNps may be an effective drug delivery system to enhance the anticancer activity of 5-FU against colorectal tumor growth. PMID:27200415

  3. High Glucose Modulates Antiproliferative Effect and Cytotoxicity of 5-Fluorouracil in Human Colon Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yi-Shing; Yang, I-Ping; Tsai, Hsiang-Lin; Huang, Ching-Wen

    2014-01-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemotherapy is widely used for the treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC). While optimal doses of 5-FU are generally established based on a patient's estimated body surface area, the plasma concentrations of 5-FU vary among patients. In addition, hyperglycemia in patients with CRC has been reported as a risk factor in poor prognosis. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether hyperglycemia affects antiproliferative effect of 5-FU on the human colon cancer cells (SW480, SW620, LoVo, and HCT116). Growth inhibition of 5-FU was accessed by WST-8 assay. The effect of high glucose (HG, 15 mM) and 5-FU on the cellular proliferation was evaluated by flow cytometry analysis using 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxy-uridine (EdU) incorporation plus 7-AAD. Cell death was determined by flow cytometry using Annexin V-FITC and PI. The results showed that HG, compared to physiological normal glucose (NG) concentration (5 mM), leads to increased cell proliferation and increased GI50 of 5-FU in the four colon cancer cell lines. When the cells were pretreated with a low-dose 5-FU in NG condition, subsequent HG treatment eliminated inhibitory effect of 5-FU in cancer cell growth. In the presence of 5-FU (0.5 μg/mL for LoVo and HCT116; 1 μg/mL for SW480 and SW620), culture with HG for 72 h does not significantly altered cell cycle profile in the four cell lines but significantly increased DNA replication in SW620 (21%) and LoVo (17%). Flow cytometric analysis showed that HG protects cells against 5-FU-induced cell death in SW480. Finally, HG did not alter intracellular level of reactive oxygen species (ROS), although 5-FU indeed induced higher intracellular level of ROS. In conclusion, HG attenuates growth inhibition of 5-FU and our results indicate that decreased cell death and increased DNA replication may account for the attenuating effect of a HG environment on 5-FU-induced tumor growth inhibition. PMID:24283362

  4. Spectrofluorimetric determination of 5-fluorouracil by fluorescence quenching of 9-anthracenecarboxylic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khot, M. S.; Bhattar, S. L.; Kolekar, G. B.; Patil, S. R.

    2010-09-01

    Photo-induced intermolecular electron transfer (PET) interaction between excited singlet (S 1) state of 9-anthracene carboxylic acid (9-ANCA) and DNA bases of pyrimidines as uracil and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) has been studied in water and ethanol solutions using steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy. The intensity of all emission bands of 9-ANCA was quenched in presence of uracil and 5-FU by electron transfer reaction without formation of an exciplex. It was found that uracil and 5-fluorouracil acts as effective electron donors and simultaneously quench the fluorescence of electron-accepting sensitizer 9-ANCA. The quenching by diffusion-controlled rate coincides well with the dynamic Stern-Volmer correlation. The bimolecular quenching rate constant (kqss) and electron transfer rate constant ( ket) observed are seen to be much higher for 5-fluorouracil than those for uracil. The thermodynamic parameters estimated by using the Rehm-Weller equation were used to propose a suitable mechanism for PET occurring between uracils and 9-ANCA. The proposed method was used to determine 5-fluorouracil from pharmaceutical samples with satisfactory results. The technique is more selective, sensitive and relatively free from coexisting substances.

  5. Thymoquinone subdues tumor growth and potentiates the chemopreventive effect of 5-fluorouracil on the early stages of colorectal carcinogenesis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kensara, Osama Adnan; El-Shemi, Adel Galal; Mohamed, Amr Mohamed; Refaat, Bassem; Idris, Shakir; Ahmad, Jawwad

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most prevalent cancers and has a high mortality rate. Insensitivity and the limited therapeutic efficacy of its standard chemotherapeutic drug, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), represents an important challenge in CRC treatment. The robust antitumor properties of thymoquinone (TQ), the main bioactive constituent of Nigella sativa, have recently been demonstrated on different cancers. We investigated whether TQ could potentiate the chemopreventive effect of 5-FU to eradicate the early stages of CRC and elucidated its underlying mechanisms. An intermediate-term (15 weeks) model of colorectal tumorigenesis was induced in male Wistar rats by azoxymethane (AOM), and the animals were randomly and equally divided into five groups: control, AOM, AOM/5-FU, AOM/TQ, and AOM/5-FU/TQ. TQ (35 mg/kg/d; 3 d/wk) was given during the seventh and 15th weeks post-AOM injection, while 5-FU was given during the ninth and tenth weeks (12 mg/kg/d for 4 days; then 6 mg/kg every other day for another four doses). At week 15, the resected colons were subjected to macroscopic, histopathological, molecular, and immunohistochemical examinations. Interestingly, 5-FU/TQ combination therapy resulted in a more significant reduction on AOM-induced colorectal tumors and large aberrant crypts foci than treatment with the individual drugs. Mechanistically, 5-FU and TQ remarkably cooperated to repress the expression of procancerous Wnt, β-catenin, NF-κB, COX-2, iNOS, VEGF, and TBRAS and upregulate the expression of anti-tumorigenesis DKK-1, CDNK-1A, TGF-β1, TGF-βRII, Smad4, and GPx. Overall, our findings present the first report describing the in vivo enhancement effect of combined TQ and 5-FU against early stages of CRC; however, further studies are required to determine the value of this combination therapy in an advanced long-term model of CRC and also to realize its clinical potential. PMID:27468227

  6. The influence of the structure and the composition of water/AOT-Tween 85/IPM microemulsion system on transdermal delivery of 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Yanyu, Xiao; Fang, Liu; Qineng, Ping; Hao, Cai

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of the structure and the composition of water/Aerosol-OT (AOT)-Tween 85/isopropylmyristate (IPM) microemulsion system (WATI) on transdermal delivery of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). The structure of WATI was characterized by measuring surface tension, density, viscosity, electric conductivity, and differential scanning calorimetry. The effect of the drug loading, water content, component compositions and the amount of mixed surfactant on permeation of 5-FU through mice skin was evaluated by using Franz-type diffusion cells. The results in vitro implied that WATI was W/O microemulsion when the water content was below 20 wt% at fixed 20 wt% of mixed surfactant at 25°C, then might be transformed to a bicontinuous structure, finally, formed O/W microemulsion with water content over 30 wt%. Increase of the drug loading can directly facilitate the penetration of the drug across the skin. Drug diffusion after 12 h from the bicontinuous microemulsion (795.1 ± 22.3 µg·cm(-2)) would be fastest compared to that from the W/O microemulsion (650.2 ± 11.7 µg·cm(-2)) and the O/W microemulsion (676.6 ± 14.8 µg·cm(-2)). The combination of AOT and IPM could bring about synergistic effect on the skin enhancement, however, Tween 85 in WATI decreased the cumulative permeation amount of 5-FU. The content of mixed surfactant had no effect on the permeation of 5-FU at fixed surfactant/cosurfactant ratio (K(m) = 2). Thus, the increased transdermal delivery the hydrophilic drug of 5-FU was found to be concerned with both of the structure and the composition of WATI.

  7. The over-expression of FGFR4 could influence the features of gastric cancer cells and inhibit the efficacy of PD173074 and 5-fluorouracil towards gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingjing; Ye, Yanwei; Wang, Min; Lu, Lisha; Han, Chao; Zhou, Yubing; Zhang, Jingmin; Yu, Zujiang; Zhang, Xiefu; Zhao, Chunlin; Wen, Jianguo; Kan, Quancheng

    2016-05-01

    The aim was to investigate the function of fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) in gastric cancer (GC) and explore the treatment value of agent targeted to FGFR4. Function assays in vitro and in vivo were performed to investigate the discrepancy of biological features among the GC cells with different expression of FGFR4. GC cells were treated with the single and combination of PD173074 (PD, an inhibitor of FGFR4) and 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu). The invasion ability were stronger, and the apoptosis rates were lower in MGC803 and BGC823 cells treated with FGFR4-LV5 (over-expression of FGFR4 protein) (P < 0.05). The proliferation ability of GC cells is reduced when treated by the single and combination of 5-Fu and PD while that of the FGFR4-LV5 group was less inhibited compared with control group (P < 0.05). The apoptosis rates are remarkably increased in GC cells treated with the single and combination of 5-Fu and PD (P < 0.05). However, the apoptosis rate obviously is reduced in GC cells treated with FGFR4-LV5 compared with control group (P < 0.05). The expression of PCNA and Bcl-XL is remarkably decreased, and the expression of Caspase-3 and cleaved Caspase-3 is obviously increased in GC cells treated with the single and combination of 5-Fu and PD. The tumor volumes of nude mice in FGFR4-LV5 group were much more increased (P < 0.05). The over-expression of FGFR4 enhanced the proliferation ability of GC in vitro and in vivo. The combination of 5-Fu and PD exerted synergetic effect in weakening the proliferation ability and promoting apoptosis in GC cells, while the over-expression of FGFR4 might inhibit the efficacy of two drugs.

  8. Rebamipide attenuates 5-Fluorouracil-induced small intestinal mucositis in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Jin; Kim, Jin Hyun; Moon, Won; Park, Jongha; Park, Seun Ja; Song, Geun Am; Han, Seung Hee; Lee, Jong Hun

    2015-01-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced intestinal mucositis is one of the most common morbidities in chemotherapy and involves the reactive oxygen species (ROS) system, apoptosis, and inflammatory cytokines. Rebamipide exerts a mucosal-protective effect, mediated through several mechanisms. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of rebamipide in 5-FU-induced mouse small-intestinal mucositis. BALB/c mice were assigned randomly to four groups; (1) control group (n=10; receiving saline orally for 6 d), (2) rebamipide group (n=10; 150 mg/kg rebamipide for 6 d orally), (3) 5-FU group (n=10; 30 mg/kg 5-FU for 5 d, intraperitoneally (i.p.)), and (4) rebamipide +5-FU group (n=10; 150 mg/kg rebamipide for 6 d orally and 30 mg/kg 5-FU for 5 d, i.p.). Body weights and diarrhea scales were assessed. At day 5, the mice were sacrificed. Small intestinal tissue was used for: (1) hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining for determination of small intestinal villi height, (2) terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay, (3) immunohistochemistry for inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), F4/80, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, (4) measurement of serum and tissue GSH levels, and (5) measurement of serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels. Rebamipide attenuated the severity of mucosal injury reflected by body weight changes, degrees of diarrhea, and heights of villi. Rebamipide reduced the expression of iNOS and TGF-β1, apoptosis, macrophage accumulation, serum TNF-α levels, and prevented reductions in serum and tissue glutathione (GSH) levels by 5-FU administration. These results suggest that rebamipide promotes several mechanisms of mucosal protection and attenuated the 5-FU-induced mucosal injury. In conclusion, administration of rebamipide may have significant protective effects against 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis.

  9. Cooperative inhibitory effect of sinomenine combined with 5-fluorouracil on esophageal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Yang, Zi-Rong; Dong, Wei-Guo; Zhang, Ji-Xiang; Guo, Xu-Feng; Song, Jia; Qiu, Shi

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the inhibitory effects of sinomenine (SIN) combined with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) on esophageal carcinoma in vitro and in vivo. METHODS: Esophageal carcinoma (Eca-109) cells were cultured in DMEM. The single or combined growth inhibition effects of SIN and 5-FU on the Eca-109 cells were examined by measuring the absorbance of CCK-8 dye in living cells. Hoechst 33258 staining and an Annexin V/PI apoptosis kit were used to detect the percentage of cells undergoing apoptosis. Western blotting was used to investigate the essential mechanism underlying SIN and 5-FU-induced apoptosis. SIN at 25 mg/kg and 5-FU at 12 mg/kg every 3 d, either combined or alone, was injected into nude mice and tumor growth inhibition and side effects of the drug treatment were observed. RESULTS: SIN and 5-FU, both in combination and individually, significantly inhibited the proliferation of Eca-109 cells and induced obvious apoptosis. Furthermore, the combined effects were greater than those of the individual agents (P < 0.05). Annexin V/PI staining and Hoechst 33258 staining both indicated that the percentage of apoptotic cells induced by SIN and 5-FU combined or alone were significantly different from the control (P < 0.05). The up-regulation of Bax and down-regulation of Bcl-2 showed that the essential mechanism of apoptosis induced by SIN and 5-FU occurs via the mitochondrial pathway. SIN and 5-FU alone significantly inhibited the growth of tumor xenografts in vivo, and the combined inhibition rate was even higher (P < 0.05). During the course of chemotherapy, no obvious side effects were observed in the liver or kidneys. CONCLUSION: The combined effects of SIN and 5-FU on esophageal carcinoma were superior to those of the individual compounds, and the drug combination did not increase the side effects of chemotherapy. PMID:24363520

  10. Radiosensitization of human breast cancer cells to ultraviolet light by 5-fluorouracil

    PubMed Central

    SASAKI, KAZUHITO; TSUNO, NELSON H.; SUNAMI, EIJI; KAWAI, KAZUSHIGE; SHUNO, YASUTAKA; HONGO, KUMIKO; HIYOSHI, MASAYA; KANEKO, MANABU; MURONO, KOJI; TADA, NORIKO; NIREI, TAKAKO; KITAYAMA, JOJI; TAKAHASHI, KOKI; NAGAWA, HIROKAZU

    2011-01-01

    Ultraviolet light B (UVB) phototherapy is widely used to treat dermatological diseases and therefore may be a potential optional strategy in the treatment of a skin lesion infiltrated by a malignant tumor. Currently, little is known regarding the effect of UVB phototherapy on human breast cancer cells. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of UVB phototherapy, as well as the potential effect of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), the first-line anticancer drug for breast cancer, on radiosensitizing MCF-7 human breast cancer cells, in an attempt to develop new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of locoregional recurrence of breast cancer. MCF-7 cells were incubated in the presence of 5-FU for 48 h, and UVB irradiation at 750 mJ/cm2 was administered in the midterm of 5-FU treatment. The viability of MCF-7 cells was analyzed by the trypan blue staining method. Apoptosis was quantified by flow cytometry and Hoechst 33258 staining. The cell cycle was evaluated by flow cytometry after the staining of cells with propidium iodide. The combination treatment of 5-FU and UVB resulted in a strong potentiation of the inhibitory effect of MCF-7 cell growth, dependent on the intra-S phase cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis, when compared to treatment with 5-FU or UVB alone. In conclusion, 5-FU sensitized human breast cancer cells to UVB phototherapy, and this combination therapy is an effective and promising strategy for the treatment of breast cancer, particularly for locoregional recurrence. PMID:22866105

  11. [A case of liver metastasis of rectal cancer demonstrating complete response to 5-FU + Leucovorin + UFT].

    PubMed

    Ishida, Hideyuki; Ohsawa, Tomonori; Takeuchi, Ikuya; Nakada, Hiroshi; Inokuma, Shigehisa; Hoshino, Takanobu; Daijo, Hashimoto

    2002-04-01

    Dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) is a rate-limiting enzyme that metabolizes 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). We report a patient with metachronous liver metastasis from rectal cancer with low expression of DPD, who demonstrated complete response to chemotherapy comprising 5-FU, Leucovorin, and UFT. A 53-year-old man underwent macroscopically curative proctectomy with coloanal anastomosis for lower rectal cancer (Curability B). The DPD level in the primary tumor determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was extremely low (10.3 U/mg.protein). Three months postoperatively, 5-FU (333 mg/m2) + Leucovorin (200 mg/m2) therapy (once a week for 3 weeks with a one-week rest interval, repeatedly) was started as an adjuvant therapy. However, computed tomography demonstrated a solitary liver metastasis 3 cm in size 1 month later. Chemotherapy was continued with dose escalation of 5-FU (500 mg/m2) and with oral administration of UFT-E (400 mg/body, daily). Five months later, computed tomography did not detect the liver metastasis, and this finding was maintained for two months (complete response). This case provides evidence that a low expression of DPD in the primary lesion is related to a favorable response of liver metastasis to 5-FU-based systemic chemotherapy.

  12. Oral 5-fluorouracil colon-specific delivery through in vivo pellet coating for colon cancer and aberrant crypt foci treatment.

    PubMed

    Bose, A; Elyagoby, A; Wong, T W

    2014-07-01

    In situ coating of 5-fluorouracil pellets by ethylcellulose and pectin powder mixture (8:3 weight ratio) in capsule at simulated gastrointestinal media provides colon-specific drug release in vitro. This study probes into pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic profiles of intra-capsular pellets coated in vivo in rats with reference to their site-specific drug release outcomes. The pellets were prepared by extrusion-spheronization technique. In vitro drug content, drug release, in vivo pharmacokinetics, local colonic drug content, tumor, aberrant crypt foci, systemic hematology and clinical chemistry profiles of coated and uncoated pellets were examined against unprocessed drug. In vivo pellet coating led to reduced drug bioavailability and enhanced drug accumulation at colon (179.13 μg 5-FU/g rat colon content vs 4.66 μg/g of conventional in vitro film-coated pellets at 15 mg/kg dose). The in vivo coated pellets reduced tumor number and size, through reforming tubular epithelium with basement membrane and restricting expression of cancer from adenoma to adenocarcinoma. Unlike uncoated pellets and unprocessed drug, the coated pellets eliminated aberrant crypt foci which represented a putative preneoplastic lesion in colon cancer. They did not inflict additional systemic toxicity. In vivo pellet coating to orally target 5-fluorouracil delivery at cancerous colon is a feasible therapeutic treatment approach.

  13. Synthesis and properties of Mg{sub 2}Al layered double hydroxides containing 5-fluorouracil

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhongliang; Wang Enbo . E-mail: wangenbo@public.cc.jl.cn; Gao Lei; Xu Lin

    2005-03-15

    A pharmaceutically active compound, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) has been firstly intercalated into layered double hydroxide with the restructure method. Powder X-ray diffraction and spectroscopic analysis indicate that 5-FU molecule is stabilized in the host interlayer by electrostatic interaction and intermolecular interaction, and that the orientation of 5-FU is different when changing the pattern of aging treatment or the swelling agent. The release studies show that a rapid release of the drug during the first 40min is followed by a more sustained one, and that the total amount of drug released from hybrid material into the aqueous solution is almost 87% and 74% at pH 4 and 7, respectively. The studies mentioned above suggest that layered double hydroxide might be used as the basis of a tunable drug delivery carrier.

  14. The possible protective effect of L-arginine against 5-fluorouracil-induced nephrotoxicity in male albino rats.

    PubMed

    Badawoud, Mohamed H; Elshal, Eman B; Zaki, Azza I; Amin, Hanan A

    2017-05-29

    5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is a potent antineoplastic agent used for the treatment of various malignancies. The L-argininenitric oxide (NO) pathway involved in the pathogenesis of chemotherapy induced kidney damage. This work investigated the beneficial mechanism of L-arginine supplementation in 5 FU induced nephropathy. Eighty male Wistar rats were divided into four equal groups: Control group; L-arginine group (378 mg/rat /day for 4 weeks); 5-FU group (189 mg/rat/week for 4 weeks) and L-arginine for one week before and 4 weeks concomitant with 5-FU group. At the end of experiment, the kidney functions were assessed and kidneys specimens were processed for paraffin sections and stained with H&E, Masson's Trichome and PAS stains. Immunohistochemical demonstration of caspase-3 for apoptosis and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Image analyzer was used to analyze the results morphometrically and statisticaly analyzed. L-arginine administration to 5-FU treated animals elicited significant reduction in serum urea and creatinine levels, urine volume, urinary protein excretion and kidney / body weight ratio in comparison to fluorouracil treated group. L-arginine improved glomeruloscelerosis, degeneration of convoluted tubules and interstitial fibrosis in 5-FU treated animals. L-arginine attenuated effectively some biochemical and histological changes in 5-fluorouracil nephrotoxicity.

  15. Cyclin E and histone H3 levels are regulated by 5-fluorouracil in a DNA mismatch repair-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Heekyung; Chaudhry, Joy; Lopez, Claudia G

    2010-01-01

    Several studies indicate that the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system may trigger cytotoxicity upon 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) recognition, but signaling pathways regulated by MMR in response to 5-FU are unknown. We hypothesize that recognition of 5-FU in DNA by MMR proteins trigger specific signaling cascades that results in slowing of the cell cycle and cell death. Whole human genome cDNA microarrays were used to examine relative signaling responses induced in MMR-proficient cells after 5-FU (5 µM) treatment for 24 hours. Analysis revealed 43 pathways differentially affected by 5-FU compared to control (p < 0.05), including cyclin and cell cycle regulation involving G1-S cell cycle transition, activation of Src, MAP K, p53 and base excision repair. In particular, 5-FU upregulated cyclins E1 and E2 (≥1.4-fold) and downregulated cdc25C, cyclins B1 and B2, histone H2A, H2B and H3 (≤-1.4-fold) over control. Cell cycle analysis revealed a G1/S arrest by 5-FU that was congruent with increased cyclin E and decreased cdc25C protein expression. Importantly, with knockdown of hMLH1 and hMSH2, we observed that decreased histone H3 expression by 5-FU was dependent on hMLH1. Additionally, 5-FU treatment dramatically decreased levels of several histone H3 modifications. Our data suggest that 5-FU induces a G1/S arrest by regulating cyclin E and cdc25C expression and MMR recognition of 5-FU in DNA may modulate cyclin E to affect the cell cycle. Furthermore, MMR recognition of 5-FU reduces histone H3 levels that could be related to DNA access by proteins and/or cell death during the G1/S phase of the cell cycle. PMID:20930505

  16. Phase I clinical and pharmacokinetic study of protein kinase C-alpha antisense oligonucleotide ISIS 3521 administered in combination with 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin in patients with advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Mani, Sridhar; Rudin, Charles M; Kunkel, Katie; Holmlund, Jon T; Geary, Richard S; Kindler, Hedy L; Dorr, F Andrew; Ratain, Mark J

    2002-04-01

    The present study was designed to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), toxicity profile, pharmacokinetics (PKs), and antitumor activity of the protein kinase C-alpha antisense oligonucleotide ISIS 3521 (ISIS Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Carlsbad, CA) when administered in combination with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and leucovorin (LV). Patients with refractory solid tumors received ISIS 3521 as a 21-day continuous infusion administered simultaneously with 5-FU and LV given daily for 5 days repeated every 4-5 weeks (one cycle). 5-FU and ISIS 3521 PK analysis were performed on samples taken during the first cycle in all patients. Fifteen patients received ISIS 3521 at one of three dose levels: (a) 1.0 (n = 3 patients); (b) 1.5 (n = 3 patients); and (c) 2.0 (n = 9 patients) mg/kg/day. All patients simultaneously received 5-FU (425 mg/m(2)/day) and LV (20 mg/m(2)/day) for 5 consecutive days. Grade 1-2 toxicities included alopecia, fatigue, mucositis, diarrhea, anorexia, nausea/vomiting, and tumor pain. One patient had grade 3 chest pain considered to be related to 5-FU therapy, another patient had dose-limiting grade 3 mucositis resolving in <7 days, and one patient with a history of gastritis had an acute upper gastrointestinal bleed thought to be 5-FU-induced toxicity. Five patients developed cycle 1 grade 4 neutropenia, which resolved without colony-stimulating factors before the next treatment cycle. There were no effects on prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time. A clinically defined MTD was not reached. The character and severity of these toxicities do not seem to be dose related, and, as such, there was no classical dose-limiting toxicity defining the MTD. ISIS 3521 PKs in the presence of 5-FU was consistent with those reported previously. 5-FU PK parameters were also similar in the presence or absence of ISIS 3521. Six of 14 patients ( approximately 43%) across all dose cohorts had an improvement in measurable tumor response ranging from minor

  17. Synthesis of 5-Fluorouracil conjugated LaF3:Tb3+/PEG-COOH nanoparticles and its studies on the interaction with bovine serum albumin: spectroscopic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangaiyarkarasi, Rajendiran; Chinnathambi, Shanmugavel; Aruna, Prakasarao; Ganesan, Singaravelu

    2015-03-01

    The luminescent lanthanide-doped nanoparticles have gathered considerable attention in many fields especially in biomedicine. In this work, the lanthanum fluoride-doped terbium nanoparticles (LaF3:Tb3+ NPs) via simple chemical precipitation method has been synthesized and functionalized with polyethylene glycol. The size and the shape of the nanoparticles are confirmed using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The conjugation of 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) and thus synthesized nanoparticles (NPs) were confirmed using various spectroscopic methods such as UV-Visible spectroscopy, fluorescence steady state, and excited state spectroscopy studies. The enhancement in fluorescence emission ( λ = 543 nm) of drug-conjugated nanoparticles confirms the Vander Waals force of attraction due to F-F bonding between the drug and the nanoparticles. Further, the effects of 5FU-NPs in carrier protein were investigated using bovine serum albumin as a protein model. The 5FU-LaF3:Tb3+ nanoparticles binding is illustrated with binding constant and number of binding sites. The structural change of bovine serum albumin has been studied using circular dichroism and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis.

  18. Topical Delivery of 5-Fluorouracil from Pheroid™ Formulations and the In Vitro Efficacy Against Human Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Chinembiri, Tawona N; Gerber, Minja; du Plessis, Lissinda; du Preez, Jan; du Plessis, Jeanetta

    2015-12-01

    Drug delivery vehicles can influence the topical delivery and the efficacy of an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). In this study, the influence of Pheroid™ technology, which is a unique colloidal drug delivery system, on the skin permeation and antimelanoma efficacy of 5-fluorouracil were investigated. Lotions containing Pheroid™ with different concentrations of 5-fluorouracil were formulated then used in Franz cell skin diffusion studies and tape stripping. The in vitro efficacy of 5-fluorouracil against human melanoma cells (A375) was investigated using a flow cytometric apoptosis assay. Statistically significant concentrations of 5-fluorouracil diffused into and through the skin with Pheroid™ formulations resulting in an enhanced in vitro skin permeation from the 4.0% 5-fluorouracil lotion (p < 0.05). The stratum corneum-epidermis and epidermis-dermis retained 5-fluorouracil concentrations of 2.31 and 6.69 μg/ml, respectively, after a diffusion study with the 4.0% Pheroid™ lotion. Subsequent to the apoptosis assay, significant differences were observed between the effect of 13.33 μg/ml 5-fluorouracil in Pheroid™ lotion and the effects of the controls. The results obtained suggest that the Pheroid™ drug delivery system possibly enhances the flux and delivery of 5-fluorouracil into the skin. Therefore, using Pheroid™ could possibly be advantageous with respect to topical delivery of 5-fluorouracil.

  19. Molecularly imprinted polymers for 5-fluorouracil release in biological fluids.

    PubMed

    Puoci, Francesco; Iemma, Francesca; Cirillo, Giuseppe; Picci, Nevio; Matricardi, Pietro; Alhaiqu, Franco

    2007-04-18

    The aim of this work was to investigate the possibility of employing Molecularly Imprinted Polymers (MIPs) as a controlled release device for 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in biological fluids, especially gastrointestinal ones, compared to Non Imprinted Polymers (NIPs). MIPs were synthesized using methacrylic acid (MAA) as functional monomer and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as crosslinking agent. The capacity of the polymer to recognize and to bind the template selectively in both organic and aqueous media was evaluated. An in vitro release study was performed both in gastrointestinal and in plasma simulating fluids. The imprinted polymers bound much more 5-Fu than the corresponding non-imprinted ones and showed a controlled/sustained drug release, with MIPs release rate being indeed much more sustained than that obtained from NIPs. These polymers represent a potential valid system for drug delivery and this study indicates that the selective binding characteristic of molecularly imprinted polymers is promising for the preparation of novel controlled release drug dosage form.

  20. 5-Fluorouracil-induced apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells is caspase-9-dependent and mediated by activation of protein kinase C-δ

    PubMed Central

    MHAIDAT, NIZAR M.; BOUKLIHACENE, MOHAMMED; THORNE, RICK F.

    2014-01-01

    Elucidation of the molecular mechanisms by which 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) induces apoptosis is required in order to understand the resistance of colorectal cancer (CRC) cells to 5-FU. In the current study, 5-FU-induced apoptosis was assessed using the propidium iodide method. Involvement of protein kinase C (PKC) was assessed by evaluating the extent of their activation in CRC, following treatment with 5-FU, using biochemical inhibitors and western blot analysis. The results revealed that 5-FU induces varying degrees of apoptosis in CRC cells; HCT116 cells were identified to be the most sensitive cells and SW480 were the least sensitive. In addition, 5-FU-induced apoptosis was caspase-dependent as it appeared to be initiated by caspase-9. Furthermore, PKCɛ was marginally expressed in CRC cells and no changes were observed in the levels of cleavage or phosphorylation following treatment with 5-FU. The treatment of HCT116 cells with 5-FU increased the expression, phosphorylation and cleavage of PKCδ. The inhibition of PKCδ was found to significantly inhibit 5-FU-induced apoptosis. These results indicated that 5-FU induces apoptosis in CRC by the activation of PKCδ and caspase-9. In addition, the levels of PKCδ activation may determine the sensitivity of CRC to 5-FU. PMID:25013487

  1. Pneumocystis Carinii Pneumonia Following 5-Fluorouracil Administration

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Robert; Cummings, Clinton; Faulkner, Marquetta; Obianyo, Ifeanyi

    1987-01-01

    A 54-year-old man who had been treated with monthly courses of 5-fluorouracil for one year developed Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. No evidence of significant, permanent, immunologic impairment was evident one year after the patient became infected. An infection associated with 5-fluorouracil treatment is implicated. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:3501015

  2. MicroRNA-21 induces 5-fluorouracil resistance in human pancreatic cancer cells by regulating PTEN and PDCD4.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xueju; Wang, Weibin; Wang, Lanlan; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Xian; Chen, Mingtai; Wang, Fang; Yu, Jia; Ma, Yanni; Sun, Guotao

    2016-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer patients are often resistant to chemotherapy treatment, which results in poor prognosis. The objective of this study was to delineate the mechanism by which miR-21 induces drug resistance to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in human pancreatic cancer cells (PATU8988 and PANC-1). We report that PATU8988 cells resistant to 5-FU express high levels of miR-21 in comparison to sensitive primary PATU8988 cells. Suppression of miR-21 expression in 5-Fu-resistant PATU8988 cells can alleviate its 5-FU resistance. Meanwhile, lentiviral vector-mediated overexpression of miR-21 not only conferred resistance to 5-FU but also promoted proliferation, migration, and invasion of PATU8988 and PANC-1 cells. The proresistance effects of miR-21 were attributed to the attenuated expression of tumor suppressor genes, including PTEN and PDCD4. Overexpression of PTEN and PDCD4 antagonized miR-21-induced resistance to 5-FU and migration activity. Our work demonstrates that miR-21 can confer drug resistance to 5-FU in pancreatic cancer cells by regulating the expression of tumor suppressor genes, as the target genes of miR-21, PTEN and PDCD4 can rescue 5-FU sensitivity and the phenotypic characteristics disrupted by miR-21.

  3. Polymeric nanoparticles for oral delivery of 5-fluorouracil: Formulation optimization, cytotoxicity assay and pre-clinical pharmacokinetics study.

    PubMed

    Mattos, Ana Cristina de; Altmeyer, Clescila; Tominaga, Tania Toyomi; Khalil, Najeh Maissar; Mainardes, Rubiana Mara

    2016-03-10

    Poly(lactic acid) (PLA) or poly(lactic acid)-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLA-PEG) blend nanoparticles were developed loading 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), an antitumor agent broadly used in therapy. A 2(3) factorial experimental design was conducted to indicate an optimal formulation and demonstrate the influence of the interactions of components on the mean particle size and drug encapsulation efficiency. Optimized PLA nanoparticles presented 294nm and 51% of 5-FU encapsulation efficiency and PLA-PEG blend nanoparticles presented 283nm and 55% of 5-FU encapsulation efficiency. In vitro release assay demonstrated after 320h about 50% of 5-FU was released from PLA and PLA-PEG blend nanoparticles. Release kinetics of 5-FU from nanoparticles followed second order and the release mechanism calculated by Korsmeyer-Peppas model was diffusion and erosion. In the assessment of cytotoxicity over Hep-2 tumor cells, PLA or PLA-PEG blend nanoparticles presented similar IC50 value than free 5-FU. Pharmacokinetic parameters after oral administration of 5-FU were improved by nanoencapsulation. Bioavailability, Cmax, Tmax, t1/2 and distribution volume were significantly improved, while clearance were decreased. PEG presence in nanoparticles didn't influence physicochemical and biological parameters evaluated. PLA and PLA-PEG nanoparticles can be potential carriers for oral delivery of 5-FU.

  4. Chitosan-graft-mPEG based 5-Fluorouracil loaded polymeric nanoparticles for tumor targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Antoniraj, M Gover; Ayyavu, Mahesh; Henry, Linda Jeeva Kumari; Nageshwar Rao, Goutham; Natesan, Subramanian; Sundar, D Sathish; Kandasamy, Ruckmani

    2017-08-24

    Biodegradable materials like chitosan (CH) and methoxy polyethylene glycol (mPEG) are widely being used as drug delivery carriers for various therapeutic applications. In the present study, copolymer (CH-g-mPEG) of chitosan and carboxylic acid terminated mPEG was synthesized by carbodiimide mediated acid amine reaction. The resultant hydrophilic copolymer was characterized by FTIR and (1)H NMR studies, revealing its relevant functional bands and proton peaks respectively. Blank polymeric nanoparticles (B-PNPs) and 5-Fluorouracil loaded polymeric nanoparticles (5-FU-PNPs) were formulated by ionic gelation method. Furthermore, folic acid functionalized FA-PNPs and FA-5-FU-PNPs were prepared for folate receptor targeted drug delivery. FA-5-FU-PNPs were characterized by particle size, zeta potential and in vitro drug release studies, resulting in 197.7 nm, +29.9 mv and sustained drug release of 88% in 24 h respectively. Cytotoxicity studies were performed for FA-PNPs and FA-5-FU-PNPs in MCF-7 cell line, which exhibited a cell viability of 80% and 41%, respectively. In vitro internalization studies were carried out for 5-FU-PNPs and FA-5-FU-PNPs which demonstrated increased cellular uptake of FA-5-FU-PNPs by receptor-mediated transport. Significant (p < 0.01) reduction (1.5-fold) of reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation was observed in lipopolysaccharides-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages, revealing its potent antioxidant property. From the obtained results, it is concluded that folic acid functionalization of 5-FU-PNPs is an ideal approach for sustained and targeted drug delivery, thereby influencing better therapeutic effect.

  5. Development of in situ gelling and bio adhesive 5-Fluorouracil enema.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu-Lu; Zheng, Wen-Sheng; Chen, Shao-Hua; Fang, Xia-Qin

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a novel 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) enema with good bio adhesion and temperature sensitivity was developed using in situ gelling technology. The preparation was formulated as a free-flowing liquid before use, while a layer of gel film was quickly formed when administered in the rectum, with a large contact surface area. It also demonstrated good biocompatibility, appropriate gel strength and bio adhesive force with excellent adhesion to rectal mucosa and prolonged action time, allowing more effective drug absorption and diffusion to surrounding tissues. Poloxamer 407 and poloxamer 188 were applied to adjust the gelling temperature. With the addition of carbopol and polycarbophil (bio adhesive substances), the solubility of 5-FU and gel strength increased, the temperature of gelation and the surface area of drug contact on mucous epithelium decreased. Decreased adhesive force between the preparation and the mucous membrane of the rectum was demonstrated with improving carbopol and polycarbophil's concentration. In vitro release demonstrated that 5-FU in situ gelling enema with different bases had a rapid and almost complete drug release. We used an optimized formulation of P407/P188/polycarbophil/5-FU (17/2.5/0.2/1.0) for animal experiments. The result showed that the drug evenly covered the surface of the rectum and there was no leakage in 6 hours. The in situ gelling enema showed significantly higher rectal tissue levels of 5-FU compared with suppository and intravenous administration, indicating that 5-FU could be well absorbed due to the enlarged releasing area, longer retention time and larger amount of dissolved active ingredients. Systemically, 5-FU levels in the enema group were similar to those in the suppository group and significantly lower than the intravenous group. The enema was not associated with morphological damage to rectal tissue. These results suggest that the bio adhesive and in situ gelling enema could be a more effective rectal

  6. Development of In Situ Gelling and Bio Adhesive 5-Fluorouracil Enema

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lu-Lu; Zheng, Wen-Sheng; Chen, Shao-Hua; Fang, Xia-Qin

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a novel 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) enema with good bio adhesion and temperature sensitivity was developed using in situ gelling technology. The preparation was formulated as a free-flowing liquid before use, while a layer of gel film was quickly formed when administered in the rectum, with a large contact surface area. It also demonstrated good biocompatibility, appropriate gel strength and bio adhesive force with excellent adhesion to rectal mucosa and prolonged action time, allowing more effective drug absorption and diffusion to surrounding tissues. Poloxamer 407 and poloxamer 188 were applied to adjust the gelling temperature. With the addition of carbopol and polycarbophil (bio adhesive substances), the solubility of 5-FU and gel strength increased, the temperature of gelation and the surface area of drug contact on mucous epithelium decreased. Decreased adhesive force between the preparation and the mucous membrane of the rectum was demonstrated with improving carbopol and polycarbophil’s concentration. In vitro release demonstrated that 5-FU in situ gelling enema with different bases had a rapid and almost complete drug release. We used an optimized formulation of P407/P188/polycarbophil/5-FU (17/2.5/0.2/1.0) for animal experiments. The result showed that the drug evenly covered the surface of the rectum and there was no leakage in 6 hours. The in situ gelling enema showed significantly higher rectal tissue levels of 5-FU compared with suppository and intravenous administration, indicating that 5-FU could be well absorbed due to the enlarged releasing area, longer retention time and larger amount of dissolved active ingredients. Systemically, 5-FU levels in the enema group were similar to those in the suppository group and significantly lower than the intravenous group. The enema was not associated with morphological damage to rectal tissue. These results suggest that the bio adhesive and in situ gelling enema could be a more effective rectal

  7. Carcinoembryonic antigen expression level as a predictive factor for response to 5-fluorouracil in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Eftekhar, Ebrahim; Naghibalhossaini, Fakhraddin

    2014-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) expression has been shown to protect cancer cell lines from apoptosis and anoikis. The aim of this study was to further elucidate the role of CEA expression on resistance to anticancer drugs in human colorectal cancer (CRC). We transfected CEA negative CRC cell line SW742 as well as CHO cells to overexpress CEA and their chemoresistance were assessed by MTT assay. In comparison to the parental cell lines, transfected cells had significantly increased resistance to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). The results also showed a direct correlation between the amount of cellular CEA protein and 5-FU resistance in CEA expressing cells. We found no significant difference in sensitivity to cisplatin and methotrexate between CEA-transfected cells and their counter parental cells. We also compared the association between CEA expression and chemoresistance of 4 CRC cell lines which differed in the levels of CEA production. The CEA expression levels in monolayer cultures of these cell lines did not correlate with the 5-FU resistance. However, 5-FU treatment resulted in the selection of sub-populations of resistant cells that displayed increased CEA expression levels by increasing drug concentration. We analyzed the effect of 5-FU in a 3D multicellular culture generated from the two CRC cell lines, LS180 and HT29/219. Compared with monolayer culture, CEA production and 5-FU resistance in both cell lines were stimulated by 3D growth. In comparison to the 3D spheroids of parental CHO, we observed a significantly elevated 5-FU resistance in 3D culture of the CEA-expressing CHO transfectants. Our findings suggest that the CEA level may be a suitable biomarker for predicting tumor response to 5-FU-based chemotherapy in CRC.

  8. A mechanistic study on the cardiotoxicity of 5-fluorouracil in vitro and clinical and occupational perspectives.

    PubMed

    Lamberti, Monica; Porto, Stefania; Zappavigna, Silvia; Addeo, Erasmo; Marra, Monica; Miraglia, Nadia; Sannolo, Nicola; Vanacore, Daniela; Stiuso, Paola; Caraglia, Michele

    2014-06-16

    Fluoropyrimidines are key agents for the treatment of gastrointestinal tract adenocarcinomas. The possible cardiotoxic effects in patients and occupationally exposed workers are multifactorial and remain a puzzle to solve for investigators. In the present study, we study what cell death pathways and what doses can determine direct cardiotoxic effects of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and doxorubicin (DOXO) on rat cardiocytes (H9c2) and a human colon adenocarcinoma (HT-29) cell line, already reported to be sensitive to 5-FU. We have found that 5-FU induced 50% growth inhibition (IC:50) at 72 h with concentrations of 400 μM and 4 μM on H9c2 and HT-29, respectively. Moreover, we have found that the addition of Levofolinic Acid (LF) to 5-FU potentiated the growth inhibition induced by 5-FU. The growth inhibition induced by 5-FU alone or in combination with LF in cardiocytes was paralleled by an increase of thiobarbituric acid-reactive species (Tbars) and end products of nitric oxide (NO) suggesting the increase of the oxidative stress status in cardiocytes. Interestingly, these effects were strongly potentiated by the addition of LF, a biochemical modulator of 5-FU activity. Our data suggest that agents such as 5-FU different from anthracyclines, conventionally related to the induction of cardiotoxic effects, can also induce cardiocyte damage paralleled by oxidative stress. The strategies based upon the use of scavengers could be used in order to prevent this effect. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Ethogel topical formulation for increasing the local bioavailability of 5-fluorouracil: a mechanistic study.

    PubMed

    Puri, Richa; Jain, Subheet

    2012-10-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is an anticancer drug and is considered a gold standard for the treatment of skin cancer. At present, topical chemotherapy with 5-FU is associated with the limitations of poor skin permeation, retention at target site, and skin irritation potential. In the present study, an attempt has been made to develop an ethosome-based topical gel formulation (ethogel) for skin targeting of 5-FU. The ethosomal formulation was prepared using the classical dispersion method, and loading of 5% w/w of the drug was optimized to the commercial strength of marketed 5-FU cream. Carbopol 934P was used as a gel former in 0.5, 0.75, 1.0, and 1.5% w/w concentration for preparation of ethosome-based ethogel formulation. The ethogel formulation was characterized for viscosity, spreadability, extrudability, and pH. Viscosity of the developed ethogel and that of the marketed formulation was found to be 3070±14.7 and 2870±14.4 cP, respectively. An in-vitro skin permeation and deposition study was carried out across rat skin using the marketed cream and 5-FU drug solution as controls. The amount of drug deposition was found to increase 5.9- and 9.4-fold on treatment with ethogel in comparison with the marketed cream and drug solution, respectively. The result of antitumor activity evaluated using a Cytoselect 96-well cell transformation assay revealed a large reduction in tumor density with treatment with the 5-FU ethogel formulation in comparison with the marketed formulation. A significant reduction in the skin irritation potential of 5-FU ethogel formulation was also found in comparison with that of the marketed formulation as measured by the Draize test. The results of the present study demonstrated ethogel as a better alternative for increasing the local bioavailability of 5-FU in comparison to the marketed formulation.

  10. Neoadjuvant Bevacizumab, Oxaliplatin, 5-Fluorouracil, and Radiation for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dipetrillo, Tom; Pricolo, Victor; Lagares-Garcia, Jorge; Vrees, Matt; Klipfel, Adam; Cataldo, Tom; Sikov, William; McNulty, Brendan; Shipley, Joshua; Anderson, Elliot; Khurshid, Humera; Oconnor, Brigid; Oldenburg, Nicklas B.E.; Radie-Keane, Kathy; Husain, Syed; Safran, Howard

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and pathologic complete response rate of induction bevacizumab + modified infusional fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX) 6 regimen followed by concurrent bevacizumab, oxaliplatin, continuous infusion 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and radiation for patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients received 1 month of induction bevacizumab and mFOLFOX6. Patients then received 50.4 Gy of radiation and concurrent bevacizumab (5 mg/kg on Days 1, 15, and 29), oxaliplatin (50 mg/m{sup 2}/week for 6 weeks), and continuous infusion 5-FU (200 mg/m{sup 2}/day). Because of gastrointestinal toxicity, the oxaliplatin dose was reduced to 40 mg/m{sup 2}/week. Resection was performed 4-8 weeks after the completion of chemoradiation. Results: The trial was terminated early because of toxicity after 26 eligible patients were treated. Only 1 patient had significant toxicity (arrhythmia) during induction treatment and was removed from the study. During chemoradiation, Grade 3/4 toxicity was experienced by 19 of 25 patients (76%). The most common Grade 3/4 toxicities were diarrhea, neutropenia, and pain. Five of 25 patients (20%) had a complete pathologic response. Nine of 25 patients (36%) developed postoperative complications including infection (n = 4), delayed healing (n = 3), leak/abscess (n = 2), sterile fluid collection (n = 2), ischemic colonic reservoir (n = 1), and fistula (n = 1). Conclusions: Concurrent oxaliplatin, bevacizumab, continuous infusion 5-FU, and radiation causes significant gastrointestinal toxicity. The pathologic complete response rate of this regimen was similar to other fluorouracil chemoradiation regimens. The high incidence of postoperative wound complications is concerning and consistent with other reports utilizing bevacizumab with chemoradiation before major surgical resections.

  11. [Dihydropirymidine dehydrogenase (DPD)--a toxicity marker for 5-fluorouracil?].

    PubMed

    Jedrzychowska, Adriana; Dołegowska, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    In proceedings relating to patients suffering from cancer, an important step is predicting response and toxicity to treatment. Depending on the type of cancer, physicians use the generally accepted schema of treatment, for example pharmacotherapy. 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is the most widely used anticancer drug in chemotherapy for colon, breast, and head and neck cancer. Patients with dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) deficiency, which is responsible for the metabolism of 5-FU, may experience severe side effects during treatment, and even death. In many publications the need for determining the activity of DPD is discussed, which would protect the patient from the numerous side effects of treatment. However, in practice these assays are not done routinely, despite the high demand. In most cases, a genetic test is used to detect changes in the gene encoding DPD (such as in the USA), but because of the large number of mutations the genetic test cannot be used as a screening test. Dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase activity has been shown to have high variability among the general population, with an estimated proportion of at least 3-5% of individuals showing low or deficient DPD activity. In this publication we presents data about average dihydropirymidine dehydrogenase activity in various populations of the world (e.g. Japan, Ghana, Great Britain) including gender differences and collected information about the possibility of determination of DPD activity in different countries. Detection of reduced DPD activity in patients with planned chemotherapy will allow a lower dosage of 5-FU or alternative treatment without exposing them to adverse reactions.

  12. Development and evaluation of nanostructured lipid carrier-based hydrogel for topical delivery of 5-fluorouracil

    PubMed Central

    Rajinikanth, Paruvathanahalli Siddalingam; Chellian, Jestin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a nanostructured lipid carrier (NLC)-based hydrogel and study its potential for the topical delivery of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Precirol® ATO 5 (glyceryl palmitostearate) and Labrasol® were selected as the solid and liquid lipid phases, respectively. Poloxamer 188 and Solutol® HS15 (polyoxyl-15-hydroxystearate) were selected as surfactants. The developed lipid formulations were dispersed in 1% Carbopol® 934 (poly[acrylic acid]) gel medium in order to maintain the topical application consistency. The average size, zeta potential, and polydispersity index for the 5-FU-NLC were found to be 208.32±8.21 nm, −21.82±0.40 mV, and 0.352±0.060, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy study revealed that 5-FU-NLC was <200 nm in size, with a spherical shape. In vitro drug permeation studies showed a release pattern with initial burst followed by sustained release, and the rate of 5-FU permeation was significantly improved for 5-FU-NLC gel (10.27±1.82 μg/cm2/h) as compared with plain 5-FU gel (2.85±1.12 μg/cm2/h). Further, skin retention studies showed a significant retention of 5-FU from the NLC gel (91.256±4.56 μg/cm2) as compared with that from the 5-FU plain gel (12.23±3.86 μg/cm2) in the rat skin. Skin irritation was also significantly reduced with 5-FU-NLC gel as compared with 5-FU plain gel. These results show that the prepared 5-FU-loaded NLC has high potential to improve the penetration of 5-FU through the stratum corneum, with enormous retention and with minimal skin irritation, which is the prerequisite for topically applied formulations. PMID:27785014

  13. Lipoic acid induces p53-independent cell death in colorectal cancer cells and potentiates the cytotoxicity of 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Dörsam, Bastian; Göder, Anja; Seiwert, Nina; Kaina, Bernd; Fahrer, Jörg

    2015-10-01

    Alpha-lipoic acid (LA), which plays a pivotal role in mitochondrial energy metabolism, is an endogenous dithiol compound with an array of antioxidative functions. It has been shown that LA triggers cell death in tumor cell lines, whereas non-transformed cells are hardly affected. In the present study, we analyzed the cytotoxicity of LA on colorectal cancer (CRC) cells differing in their p53 status and investigated a putative synergistic effect with the anticancer drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). We show that LA induces a dose-dependent decrease in cell viability, which was independent of the p53 status as attested in isogenic p53-proficient and p53-deficient cell lines. This effect was largely attributable to cell death induction as revealed by Annexin-V/PI staining. LA-treated HCT116 cells underwent caspase-dependent and caspase-independent cell death, which was blocked by the pan-caspase inhibitor zVAD and the RIP-kinase inhibitor Necrostatin-1, respectively. In CaCO-2 and HT29 cells, LA induced caspase-dependent cell demise via activation of caspase-9, caspase-3 and caspase-7 with subsequent PARP-1 cleavage as demonstrated by immunoblot analysis, activity assays and pan-caspase inhibition. Interestingly, LA treatment did neither activate p53 nor induced genotoxic effects as shown by lack of DNA strand breaks and phosphorylation of histone 2AX. Finally, we provide evidence that LA increases the cytotoxic effect induced by the anticancer drug 5-FU as revealed by significantly enhanced cell death rates in HCT116 and CaCO-2 cells. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that LA induces CRC cell death independent of their p53 status and potentiates the cytotoxicity of 5-FU without causing DNA damage on its own, which makes it a candidate for tumor therapy.

  14. Preparation and in vitro evaluation of 5-flourouracil loaded magnetite-zeolite nanocomposite (5-FU-MZNC) for cancer drug delivery applications.

    PubMed

    Sağir, Tuğba; Huysal, Merve; Durmus, Zehra; Kurt, Belma Zengin; Senel, Mehmet; Isık, Sevim

    2016-02-01

    In this work, super paramagnetic magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized onto/into zeolite, then loaded with anti-cancer drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). The physical properties of the prepared nanocomposite and drug loaded nanocomposite were characterized using different techniques. The drug loading and releasing behavior of the magnetic nanocarrier was investigated and the drug-loaded nanoparticles exhibited a sustained release of drug without any burst release phenomenon. Furthermore, 5-FU loaded MZNC were evaluated for its biological characteristics. The functional 5-FU-MZNC has been triggered intra-cellular release of the cancer therapeutic agent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Cytotoxic effects of 5-FU loaded MZNC on human gastric carcinoma (AGS) cells were determined by real time cell analysis and colorimetric WST-1 cell viability assay. Apoptosis of cells was further investigated by Annexin-V staining which indicates the loss of cell membrane integrity. According to our results, 5-FU-MZNC showed a concentration-dependent cell proliferation inhibitory function against AGS cells. Morphologic and apoptotic images were consistent with the cytotoxicity results. In conclusion, 5-FU loaded MZNC efficiently inhibit the proliferation of AGS cells in vitro through apoptotic mechanisms, and may be a beneficial agent against cancer, however further animal study is still required. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Kinetics of membrane binding and dissociation of 5-fluorouracil by pulsed-field-gradient 19F NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshii, Noriyuki; Okamura, Emiko

    2009-06-01

    The kinetics of membrane binding and dissociation of an anticancer drug, 5-fluorouracil (5FU) is quantified by high resolution NMR with the pulsed-field-gradient technique. The 19F NMR signal of 5FU is analyzed at 293-313 K by the solution of Bloch equation with exchange terms. The rate constants of 5FU binding and dissociation are 0.2 and 4.1 s -1 at 303 K. The 5FU motion in the vertical direction to the membrane surface is restricted as compared with the lateral diffusion, judging from the activation energy (57 kJ/mol) larger than the lateral diffusion in membrane (26 kJ/mol [E. Okamura, N. Yoshii, J. Chem. Phys. 129 (2008) 215102]).

  16. Andrographolide reversed 5-FU resistance in human colorectal cancer by elevating BAX expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weicheng; Guo, Wenjie; Li, Lele; Fu, Zan; Liu, Wen; Gao, Jian; Shu, Yongqian; Xu, Qiang; Sun, Yang; Gu, Yanhong

    2016-12-01

    5-FU is the first line therapy for colorectal cancer, however, treatment effect is often hampered by the development of drug resistance or toxicity at high doses. Andrographolide is a natural diterpenoid from Andrographis paniculata which has anti-bacterial, anti-antiviral and anti-inflammation activities. In the current study, we test the hypothesis that Andrographolide reverses 5-FU resistance in colorectal cancer and examine the underlying mechanism. In vitro and vivo studies indicated that Andrographolide treatment significantly re-sensitizes HCT116/5-FUR cells (HCT116 cells which are 5-FU resistant) to cytotoxicity of 5-FU. Mechanism analysis showed that Andrographolide/5-FU co-treatment elevated apoptosis level of HCT116/5-FUR cells with highly increased level of BAX. By using biotin-Andrographolide pull down and cellular thermal shift assay, we found out that Andrographolide can directly target to BAX. Andrographolide-BAX interaction prevented BAX degradation, enhancing mitochondria-mediated apoptosis thus reversed 5-FU resistance while BAX silence diminished this effect. Further, by analyzing patient samples who received 5-FU involved chemotherapy, we found that expression level of BAX is correlated with PFS. Our results here provide a novel combination treatment strategy, especially for patients with 5-FU-resistant tumors expressing low level of BAX. Meanwhile, we also proposed that BAX expression may be a predicted and prognosis marker of 5-FU involved chemotherapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Photoreactivity of 5-fluorouracil under UVB light: photolysis and cytotoxicity studies.

    PubMed

    Miolo, Giorgia; Marzano, Christine; Gandin, Valentina; Palozzo, Angelo C; Dalzoppo, Daniele; Salvador, Alessia; Caffieri, Sergio

    2011-08-15

    The photodegradation of the chemotherapeutic agent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) under UVB light was studied both in aqueous and methanol solutions and in systemic and topical formulations. As monitored by HPLC, photodegradation in solution takes place in a concentration dependent manner; thus, the solution for parenteral administration (10(-1) M) showed negligible loss of the active principle. On the contrary, the commercial cream containing 5% of 5-FU showed low stability under UVB exposure. When dissolved either in water or methanol, 5-FU yields two photoproducts which have been characterized as two isomers coming from the addition of the solvent to the 5,6 double bond of the drug. As a consequence, photomodified 5-FU loses its antiproliferative activity on HCT-15 and HeLa cells. MS analysis showed that photoaddition occurred with nucleophilic amino acids, such as cysteine and serine, while susceptible amino acids (cysteine and methionine) were oxidized. In fact, high production of the superoxide anion under UVB light as well as photooxidation of BSA suggests protein photodamage as a mechanism of photosensitization. Indeed, some phototoxicity was shown in experiments on NCTC keratinocytes and MCF-7 resistant cells irradiated with UVB light. The interactions with these biological targets may contribute to skin phototoxicity and photoallergy induced by 5-FU in vivo.

  18. Quantitative, Qualitative and In Vitro Evaluation of Solid Lipid Nanoparticles Containing 5-Fluorouracil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majrad, Mohamed Saleh

    The primary goal of this research work was to develop solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) containing 5-Flourouracil and to evaluate its effect on various cell lines. The solid lipid nanoparticles were prepared through a new temperature modulated solidification technique developed in our laboratory. Particle size analysis by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and morphology evaluation by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) demonstrated that the SLNs are nanoparticulates. Cytotoxic activity of SLN loaded 5-Fluorouracil showed a decrease in viability when compared to pure solution of 5-FU on PC-3 and Caco-2 cell line. Blank SLN showed no decrease in cell viability when the concentration increased. Biocompatibility studies of SLNs in human RBCs indicated that 5-FU SLN formulations are compatible. Bovine permeability study shows that apparent permeability for 5-FU SLN was 0.000348 cm/s and 1.339 cm/s for 5-FU solution. The preliminary results from various in vitro evaluations suggest that 5-FU loaded SLNs have the potential to be used as an anti-cancer drug delivery system.

  19. Pectin-coated chitosan microgels crosslinked on superhydrophobic surfaces for 5-fluorouracil encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Puga, Ana M; Lima, Ana Catarina; Mano, Joao F; Concheiro, Angel; Alvarez-Lorenzo, Carmen

    2013-10-15

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU)-loaded chitosan microgels for oral and topical chemotherapy were prepared applying a superhydrophobic surface-based encapsulation technology. Drug-loaded chitosan dispersions were cross-linked and then coated with drug-free chitosan or pectin layers at the solid-air interface in a highly efficient and environment-friendly way. The size of the microgels (with diameters of ca. 280 and 557 μm for the chitosan seeds and pectin-coated microgels respectively) was the lowest obtained until now using similar biomimetic methodologies. The microgels were characterized regarding 5-FU release profiles in vitro in aqueous media covering the pH range of the gastrointestinal tract, and cytotoxicity against two cancer cell lines sensitive to 5-FU. Owing to their control of 5-FU release in acidic medium, calcium pectinate-coated microgels can be considered as suitable for oral administration. Growth inhibition of cancer cells by 5-FU was greater when incorporated to chitosan microgels; these being potentially useful for treatment of skin and colorectal tumors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Targeted delivery of 5-fluorouracil to cholangiocarcinoma cells using folic acid as a targeting agent.

    PubMed

    Ngernyuang, Nipaporn; Seubwai, Wunchana; Daduang, Sakda; Boonsiri, Patcharee; Limpaiboon, Temduang; Daduang, Jureerut

    2016-03-01

    There are limits to the standard treatment for cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) including drug resistance and side effects. The objective of this study was to develop a new technique for carrying drugs by conjugation with gold nanoparticles and using folic acid as a targeting agent in order to increase drug sensitivity. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were functionalized with 5-fluorouracil (5FU) and folic acid (FA) using polyethylene glycol (PEG) shell as a linker (AuNPs-PEG-5FU-FA). Its cytotoxicity was tested in CCA cell lines (M139 and M213) which express folic acid receptor (FA receptor). The results showed that AuNPs-PEG-5FU-FA increased the cytotoxic effects in the M139 and M213 cells by 4.76% and 7.95%, respectively compared to those treated with free 5FU+FA. It is found that the cytotoxicity of the AuNPs-PEG-5FU-FA correlates with FA receptor expression suggested the use of FA as a targeted therapy. The mechanism of cytotoxicity was mediated via mitochondrial apoptotic pathway as determined by apoptosis array. In conclusion, our findings shed some light on the use of gold nanoparticles for conjugation with potential compounds and FA as targeted therapy which contribute to the improvement of anti-cancer drug efficacy. In vivo study should be warranted for its effectiveness of stability, biosafety and side effect reduction.

  1. Combination of the histone deacetylase inhibitor depsipeptide and 5-fluorouracil upregulates major histocompatibility complex class II and p21 genes and activates caspase-3/7 in human colon cancer HCT-116 cells

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Kouji; Hakata, Shuko; Terashima, Jun; Gamou, Toshie; Habano, Wataru; Ozawa, Shogo

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic anticancer drugs such as histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors have been combined with existing anticancer drugs for synergistic or additive effects. In the present study, we found that a very low concentration of depsipeptide, an HDAC inhibitor, potentiated the antitumor activity of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in a human colon cancer cell model using HCT-116, HT29, and SW48 cells via the inhibition of colony formation ability or cellular viability. Exposure to a combination of 5-FU (1.75 µM) and 1 nM depsipeptide for 24 and 48 h resulted in a 3- to 4-fold increase in activated caspase-3/7, while 5-FU alone failed to activate caspase-3/7. Microarray and subsequent gene ontology analyses revealed that compared to 5-FU or depsipeptide alone, the combination treatment of 5-FU and depsipeptide upregulated genes related to cell death and the apoptotic process consistent with the inhibition of colony formation and caspase-3/7 activation. These analyses indicated marked upregulation of antigen processing and presentation of peptide or polysaccharide antigen via major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class (GO:0002504) and MHC protein complex (GO:0042611). Compared with vehicle controls, the cells treated with the combination of 5-FU and depsipeptide showed marked induction (3- to 8.5-fold) of expression of MHC class II genes, but not of MHC class I genes. Furthermore, our global analysis of gene expression, which was focused on genes involved in the molecular regulation of MHC class II genes, showed enhancement of pro-apoptotic PCAF and CIITA after the combination of 5-FU and depsipeptide. These results may indicate a closer relationship between elevation of MHC class II expression and cellular apoptosis induced by the combination of depsipeptide and 5-FU. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to report that the combination of 5-FU and depsipeptide induces human colon cancer cell apoptosis in a concerted manner with the induction of MHC class II gene

  2. Chitosan stabilized Ag-Au nanoalloy for colorimetric sensing and 5-Fluorouracil delivery.

    PubMed

    E A K, Nivethaa; S, Dhanavel; Narayanan, V; A, Stephen

    2017-02-01

    Fluorescent CS/Ag-Au (chitosan/silver-gold) nanocomposite containing different weight percentage of Ag and Au was synthesized using the chemical reduction method. 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) encapsulated nanocomposite was also synthesized and its cytotoxicity towards breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7) studied. The XRD pattern of the nanocomposite shows peaks of chitosan, silver and gold. The peaks corresponding to gold and silver indicate the face centered cubic structure of silver and gold nanoparticles. The polymer matrix nanocomposite structure with chitosan as the matrix and silver-gold as the filler phase is evident from the high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images and an increase in particle size from∼5nm to about 12nm is noticeable on encapsulation of 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU). The presence of fluorine in the case of 5-FU encapsulated nanocomposite and the presence of reflections corresponding to 5-FU in the SAED pattern confirms the encapsulation of 5-FU into the nanocomposite, which is also confirmed by elemental mapping. The presence of a single surface plasmon resonance (SPR) peak in the case of the nanocomposite in a position in between the SPR bands of pure silver and gold nanoparticles confirms the formation of Ag-Au alloy and the elemental mapping results obtained for the nanocomposite also supports the UV-vis results. The photoluminescence (PL) spectrum clearly shows an emission peak in the near infrared region (700-900nm), which makes the nanocomposite suitable for use in cellular imaging. The application of the nanocomposite as a colorimetric sensor was also studied and it was found to be useful for the specific detection of mercury (Hg) without much interference and the detection limit was found to be 5.0×10(-8)M. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Bcl-2/Bax protein ratio predicts 5-fluorouracil sensitivity independently of p53 status

    PubMed Central

    Mirjolet, J-F; Barberi-Heyob, M; Didelot, C; Peyrat, J-P; Abecassis, J; Millon, R; Merlin, J-L

    2000-01-01

    p53 tumour-suppressor gene is involved in cell growth control, arrest and apoptosis. Nevertheless cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction can be observed in p53-defective cells after exposure to DNA-damaging agents such as 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) suggesting the importance of alternative pathways via p53-independent mechanisms. In order to establish relationship between p53 status, cell cycle arrest, Bcl-2/Bax regulation and 5-FU sensitivity, we examined p53 mRNA and protein expression and p53 protein functionality in wild-type (wt) and mutant (mt) p53 cell lines. p53 mRNA and p53 protein expression were determined before and after exposure to equitoxic 5-FU concentration in six human carcinoma cell lines differing in p53 status and displaying marked differences in 5-FU sensitivity, with IC 50 values ranging from 0.2–22.6 mM. 5-FU induced a rise in p53 mRNA expression in mt p53 cell lines and in human papilloma virus positive wt p53 cell line, whereas significant decrease in p53 mRNA expression was found in wt p53 cell line. Whatever p53 status, 5-FU altered p53 transcriptional and translational regulation leading to up-regulation of p53 protein. In relation with p53 functionality, but independently of p53 mutational status, after exposure to 5-FU equitoxic concentration, all cell lines were able to arrest in G1. No relationship was evidenced between G1 accumulation ability and 5-FU sensitivity. Moreover, after 5-FU exposure, Bax and Bcl-2 proteins regulation was under p53 protein control and a statistically significant relationship (r= 0.880,P= 0.0097) was observed between Bcl-2/Bax ratio and 5-FU sensitivity. In conclusion, whatever p53 status, Bcl-2 or Bax induction and Bcl-2/Bax protein ratio were correlated to 5-FU sensitivity. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:11044365

  4. Prophylactic pretreatment of mice with hematopoietic growth factors induces expansion of primitive cell compartments and results in protection against 5-fluorouracil-induced toxicity.

    PubMed

    de Haan, G; Donte, B; Engel, C; Loeffler, M; Nijhof, W

    1996-06-01

    The aim of this study was to expand the primitive and committed hematopoietic cell compartments in vivo in order to confer resistance of the blood cell forming system against the cytotoxic, cell cycle specific drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Possible chemoprotective effects of such a pretreatment could result from increased numbers of hematopoietic cells, present before 5-FU administration. In addition, we hypothesized that an enhanced number of primitive and progenitor calls would result in a reduced cycling activity, ie, 5-FU sensitivity, of these same cells, due to normal physiological feedback loops. Administration of stem cell factor (SCF) plus interleukin-11 (IL-11) to mice was shown to result in expansion of the various immature cell compartments in marrow and, in particular, spleen. The total body content of the primitive cobblestone area forming cells (CAFC)-day 28 was increased to 140%, whereas the more committed cells (CAFC-day 7, erythroid and granuloid progenitors) were increased to 500%. This in vivo expansion resulted in a decreased 5-FU sensitivity of the hematopoietic system. In particular, mice that had received 5-FU 24 hours after discontinuation of growth factor pretreatment showed significantly less toxicity of committed cell stages. Compared with mice not pretreated, it appeared that in pretreated mice, 24 hours after 5-FU administration, the absolute number, but also the fraction of surviving CAFC, was much higher in both marrow and spleen. This was caused by a decrease in the cycling activity of all primitive cell subsets. To explore the possible use of this finding in a chemotherapeutic setting, we determined the interval between two subsequent doses of 5-FU (160 mg/kg) that was required to prevent drug-induced mortality. When control mice received a second dose of 5-FU 7, 10, or 14 days after the first, respectively 0%, 20%, and 80% survived. In contrast, 40% and 100% of mice that received SCF + IL-11 before the first dose of 5-FU, survived a

  5. Randomized trial of calcipotriol combined with 5-fluorouracil for skin cancer precursor immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Trevor J; Tabacchi, Mary; Eliane, Jean-Pierre; Tuchayi, Sara Moradi; Manivasagam, Sindhu; Mirzaalian, Hengameh; Turkoz, Ahu; Kopan, Raphael; Schaffer, Andras; Saavedra, Arturo P; Wallendorf, Michael; Cornelius, Lynn A; Demehri, Shadmehr

    2017-01-03

    Actinic keratosis is a precursor to cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma. Long treatment durations and severe side effects have limited the efficacy of current actinic keratosis treatments. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is an epithelium-derived cytokine that induces a robust antitumor immunity in barrier-defective skin. Here, we investigated the efficacy of calcipotriol, a topical TSLP inducer, in combination with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) as an immunotherapy for actinic keratosis. The mechanism of calcipotriol action against skin carcinogenesis was examined in genetically engineered mouse models. The efficacy and safety of 0.005% calcipotriol ointment combined with 5% 5-FU cream were compared with Vaseline plus 5-FU for the field treatment of actinic keratosis in a randomized, double-blind clinical trial involving 131 participants. The assigned treatment was self-applied to the entirety of the qualified anatomical sites (face, scalp, and upper extremities) twice daily for 4 consecutive days. The percentage of reduction in the number of actinic keratoses (primary outcome), local skin reactions, and immune activation parameters were assessed. Calcipotriol suppressed skin cancer development in mice in a TSLP-dependent manner. Four-day application of calcipotriol plus 5-FU versus Vaseline plus 5-FU led to an 87.8% versus 26.3% mean reduction in the number of actinic keratoses in participants (P < 0.0001). Importantly, calcipotriol plus 5-FU treatment induced TSLP, HLA class II, and natural killer cell group 2D (NKG2D) ligand expression in the lesional keratinocytes associated with a marked CD4+ T cell infiltration, which peaked on days 10-11 after treatment, without pain, crusting, or ulceration. Our findings demonstrate the synergistic effects of calcipotriol and 5-FU treatment in optimally activating a CD4+ T cell-mediated immunity against actinic keratoses and, potentially, cancers of the skin and other organs. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02019355. Not applicable

  6. Combined environmental risk assessment for 5-fluorouracil and capecitabine in Europe.

    PubMed

    Straub, Jürg Oliver

    2010-07-01

    An environmental risk assessment (ERA) was made for the old cytostatic active pharmaceutical ingredient 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and for capecitabine (CAP), which is a prodrug of 5-FU. This ERA is based on published and company internal data as well as new test results for physicochemical, human metabolism, biodegradability, environmental partitioning and fate, and acute and chronic ecotoxicity properties of the active substance 5-FU as well as on use sales data for 5-FU and CAP in Europe. Predicted environmental concentrations (PECs) were extrapolated following the EMEA 2006 Guideline on ERA for human pharmaceuticals and the European Union 2003 Technical Guidance Document (TGD) for risk assessment as well as the TGD-based application EUSES v2.0. Actual amounts sold were taken from IMS Health Databases, in order to refine the default use and EMEA penetration factor as well as the PECs. Moreover, available measured environmental concentrations (MECs) were used to supplement PECs. A predicted no-effect concentration (PNEC) for 5-FU was derived from chronic ecotoxicity data. Except for the simplistic EMEA Phase I default PEC, the risk characterization by PEC:PNEC and MEC:PNEC ratios for various environmental compartments resulted in no significant risk. As the EMEA Phase I PEC does not integrate documented human metabolism and environmental degradation, in contrast to refined PEC derivations, it is inferred that the current use of CAP and 5-FU does not present any evident risk to the environment. An additional evaluation of persistence, bioaccumulation, and toxicity (PBT) properties supports the conclusion of no significant environmental risk for 5-FU and CAP.

  7. Emu oil expedites small intestinal repair following 5-fluorouracil-induced mucositis in rats.

    PubMed

    Mashtoub, Suzanne; Tran, Cuong D; Howarth, Gordon S

    2013-11-01

    Mucositis resulting from cancer chemotherapy is characterized by intestinal inflammation and ulceration. Previously, emu oil (EO) improved intestinal architecture (Br J Nutr, 2010) in a rat model of chemotherapy-induced mucositis. We investigated EO for its further potential to promote intestinal repair in this mucositis model. Female Dark Agouti rats (n = 8/group) were gavaged with water, olive oil (OO) or EO once daily (1 mL), injected with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) or saline on day 5 and euthanized on day 8, 9, 10 or 11. Intestinal villus height (VH) and crypt depth (CD), neutral mucin-secreting goblet cell (GC) count, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and selected cytokines were quantified; P < 0.05 was considered significant. In 5-FU-injected rats, only EO administration significantly increased VH in the ileum (day 8), jejunum and jejunum-ileum junction (days 8 and 9) compared to 5-FU controls (P < 0.05). GC count was significantly reduced by 5-FU (jejunum: days 8 and 9; ileum: day 8; P < 0.05) and EO increased ileal GC on days 10 and 11 compared to 5-FU controls. MPO activity was significantly increased in jejunum (days 8 and 9) and ileum (day 8) following 5-FU injection, compared to normal controls (P < 0.05). Both EO and OO significantly reduced jejunal MPO on days 8 and 9; however, only EO decreased ileal MPO on day 8. Cytokine levels were not significantly affected by either oil or 5-FU administration at the day 8 time point. Promotion of repair from injury could represent a new mechanism of action for EO, suggesting potential as an adjunct to conventional treatment approaches for cancer management.

  8. Degradation of the cytostatic 5-Fluorouracil in water by Fenton and photo-assisted oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Governo, Mariana; Santos, Mónica S F; Alves, Arminda; Madeira, Luís M

    2017-01-01

    Cytostatics are part of the forefront research topics due to their high prescription, high toxicity, and the lack of effective solutions to stop their entrance and spread in the environment. Among them, 5-Fluorouracil (5-Fu) has received particular attention because is one of the most prescribed active substances in chemotherapy worldwide. The degradation of 5-Fu by advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) is a poorly addressed topic, and this work brings valuable inputs concerning this matter. Herein, the efficacy of Fenton's process in the degradation of 5-Fu is explored for the first time; the study of the main variables and its successful application to the treatment of real wastewaters is demonstrated. Moreover, hydrogen peroxide-based and photo-assisted techniques (direct photolysis, photodegradation with H2O2 and photo-Fenton) are also investigated for purposes of comparison. Under the best operation conditions obtained (T = 30 °C, [Fe(2+)]0 = 0.5 mM; [H2O2]0 = 240 mM and pH = 3 for [5-Fu]0 = 0.38 mM), 5-Fu was completely eliminated after 2 h of Fenton's reaction and about 50 % of mineralization was reached after 8 h. The best performance was obtained by the photo-Fenton process, with 5-Fu mineralization level as high as 67 %, using an iron dose within the legal limits required for direct water discharge. Toxicity (towards Vibrio fischeri) of the effluents that resulted from the application of the above-mentioned AOPs was also evaluated; it was found that the degradation products generated from the photo-assisted processes are less toxic than the parent compound, putting into evidence the relevance of such technologies for degradation of cytostatics like 5-Fu.

  9. Impact of 5-fluorouracil metabolizing enzymes on chemotherapy in patients with resectable colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Takumi; Umeki, Masahiko; Miyake, Hiroshi; Iida, Tatsumi; Okumura, Minoru; Ohno, Kazuhide; Sakamoto, Masashi; Miyoshi, Nobukazu; Takahashi, Masahiko; Tsumura, Hidenori; Tokunaga, Yukihiko; Naitou, Haruhiko; Fukui, Takuji

    2014-09-01

    Although 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is an important drug for colorectal cancer (CRC) treatment, no useful biomarker is currently available to predict treatment response. Since 5-FU is converted into active or inactive forms by orotate phosphoribosyltransferase (OPRT) or dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD), a correlation between these enzymes and response to 5-FU has been suggested. However, such a correlation has not been investigated prospectively. Therefore, in the present study, we aimed to prospectively evaluate whether OPRT and DPD were predictive factors of the response to 5-FU treatment in patients with resectable CRC. The present investigation was designed as a multicenter prospective cohort study. OPRT and DPD activities were assessed in biopsy samples, obtained surgically from patients with resectable CRC. The OPRT/DPD ratio was calculated and the cut-off values for this ratio were determined for 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Patients were treated with 5-FU/leucovorin (LV) regimens and oral 5-FU. The endpoint of this study was the correlation between the OPRT/DPD ratio and 5-year DFS and OS. The cut-off value for the OPRT/DPD ratio was determined by using the maximum χ2 statistic method against 5-year DFS and OS. Sixty-eight patients were enrolled from July 2003 to May 2005. The median follow-up period was 1925 days. The OPRT/DPD ratio cut-off values for 5-year DFS and OS were 0.015 and 0.013, respectively. During the 5-year DFS and OS periods, patients with higher cut-off values had a better prognosis than those with lower ratios (P=0.03 and 0.02, respectively). In conclusion, our results suggest that the OPRT/DPD ratio could be a predictive factor for response to 5-FU/LV adjuvant chemotherapy.

  10. Randomized trial of calcipotriol combined with 5-fluorouracil for skin cancer precursor immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Trevor J.; Tabacchi, Mary; Eliane, Jean-Pierre; Tuchayi, Sara Moradi; Manivasagam, Sindhu; Mirzaalian, Hengameh; Turkoz, Ahu; Kopan, Raphael; Schaffer, Andras; Saavedra, Arturo P.; Wallendorf, Michael; Cornelius, Lynn A.; Demehri, Shadmehr

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Actinic keratosis is a precursor to cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma. Long treatment durations and severe side effects have limited the efficacy of current actinic keratosis treatments. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is an epithelium-derived cytokine that induces a robust antitumor immunity in barrier-defective skin. Here, we investigated the efficacy of calcipotriol, a topical TSLP inducer, in combination with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) as an immunotherapy for actinic keratosis. METHODS. The mechanism of calcipotriol action against skin carcinogenesis was examined in genetically engineered mouse models. The efficacy and safety of 0.005% calcipotriol ointment combined with 5% 5-FU cream were compared with Vaseline plus 5-FU for the field treatment of actinic keratosis in a randomized, double-blind clinical trial involving 131 participants. The assigned treatment was self-applied to the entirety of the qualified anatomical sites (face, scalp, and upper extremities) twice daily for 4 consecutive days. The percentage of reduction in the number of actinic keratoses (primary outcome), local skin reactions, and immune activation parameters were assessed. RESULTS. Calcipotriol suppressed skin cancer development in mice in a TSLP-dependent manner. Four-day application of calcipotriol plus 5-FU versus Vaseline plus 5-FU led to an 87.8% versus 26.3% mean reduction in the number of actinic keratoses in participants (P < 0.0001). Importantly, calcipotriol plus 5-FU treatment induced TSLP, HLA class II, and natural killer cell group 2D (NKG2D) ligand expression in the lesional keratinocytes associated with a marked CD4+ T cell infiltration, which peaked on days 10–11 after treatment, without pain, crusting, or ulceration. CONCLUSION. Our findings demonstrate the synergistic effects of calcipotriol and 5-FU treatment in optimally activating a CD4+ T cell–mediated immunity against actinic keratoses and, potentially, cancers of the skin and other organs. TRIAL

  11. 5-Fluorouracil chemotherapy affects spatial working memory and newborn neurons in the adult rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Sarah; Walker, Alex; Bennett, Geoffrey; Wigmore, Peter M

    2008-07-01

    Chemotherapy-associated memory deficits in adults are prevalent with systemic treatment utilizing 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu). 5-Fu disrupts cell proliferation and readily crosses the blood-brain barrier. Proliferating cells within the adult dentate gyrus of the hippocampus give rise to new neurons involved in memory and learning and require neurotrophic factors such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) to nurture this process of adult neurogenesis. Some of these proliferating cells are anatomically and functionally supported by vascular endothelial cells. We propose that systemically administered 5-Fu chemotherapy will cause deficits in hippocampal memory that are associated with altered BDNF levels and proliferating cells (particularly vascular-associated cells) in the dentate gyrus. This was tested by determining the effect of 5-Fu on spatial working memory as modelled by the object location recognition test. Numbers of vascular-associated (VA) and non-vascular-associated (NVA) proliferating cells in the dentate gyrus were measured using double-labelling immunohistochemistry with markers of proliferation (Ki67) and endothelial cells (RECA-1). 5-Fu-induced changes in hippocampal BDNF and doublecortin (DCX) protein levels were quantified using Western immunoblotting. 5-Fu chemotherapy caused a marginal disruption in spatial working memory and did not alter the total proliferating cell counts or the percentage of VA and NVA proliferating cells in the dentate gyrus. In contrast, 5-Fu significantly reduced BDNF and DCX levels in the hippocampus, indicating alterations in neurotrophin levels and neurogenesis. These findings highlight the usefulness of animal models of 'chemobrain' for understanding the mechanisms that underlie chemotherapy-associated declines in cognitive performance and memory.

  12. Hyaluronic acid embedded cellulose acetate phthlate core/shell nanoparticulate carrier of 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Garg, Ashish; Rai, Gopal; Lodhi, Santram; Jain, Alok Pal; Yadav, Awesh K

    2016-06-01

    Aim of this research was to prepare hyaluronic acid-modified-cellulose acetate phthalate (HAC) core shell nanoparticles (NPs) of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). HAC copolymer was synthesized and confirmed by fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. HAC NPs with 5-FU were prepared using HAC copolymer and compared with 5-FU loaded cellulose acetate phthalate (CAP) NPs. NPs were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), particle size, zeta potential, polydispersity index, entrapment efficiency, in-vitro release, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). HAC NPs were found slower release (97.30% in 48h) than (99.25% in 8h) CAP NPs. In cytotoxicity studies, showed great cytotoxic potential of 5-FU loaded HAC NPs in A549, MDA-MD-435 and SK-OV-3 cancer cellline. HAC NPs showing least hemolytic than CAP NPs and 5-FU. Area under curve (AUC), maximum plasma concentration (Cmax), mean residence time (MRT) and time to reach maximum plasma concentration Tmax), were observed 4398.1±7.90μgh/mL, 145.45±2.25μg/L, 45.74±0.25h, 72±0.50h, respectively of HAC NPs and 119.92±1.78μgh/mL, 46.38±3.42μg/L, 1.2±0.25h, 0.5±0.02h were observed in plain 5-FU solution. In conclusion, HAC NPs is effective deliver carrier of 5-FU for lung cancer.

  13. In vitro anticancer evaluation of 5-fluorouracil lipid nanoparticles using B16F10 melanoma cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenoy, Vikram S.; Gude, Rajiv P.; Murthy, Rayasa S. Ramachandra

    2013-05-01

    The present study is aimed to investigate the formulation and in vitro anticancer activities of solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) prepared using glyceryl monostearate (GMS) and cetyl palmitate (CP) by hot homogenization method. The lipids were selected based on the partition coefficient of 5-FU in lipids. The lipid nanoparticles were optimized for process and formulation parameters. The optimized nanoparticles were characterized for their zeta potential, morphology, release kinetics, and anticancer activity. Higher entrapments were achieved using a combination of emulsifiers. The zeta potential of the optimized CP and GMS SLN formulation were -8.26 and -9.35 mV, respectively. Both the optimized formulations were spherical. The in vitro release studies of SLNs of both the lipid carriers followed Peppas-Korsenmeyer equation when carried out at pH 3.5 and 7.4. The chemosensitivity assay carried out in B16F10 cell lines revealed that CP SLNs had better cytotoxicity than 5-FU solution and GMS SLNs at 48 h of incubation. Subtoxic concentration of 5-FU-loaded CP SLNs (0.12 μg/mL) possessed comparable antimigrational activity, colony inhibition activity, and cytopathic as that of 5-FU solution effects. The results indicated that encapsulating 5-FU in CP would be a promising delivery system for delivering 5-FU.

  14. Potential role of the NADPH oxidase NOX1 in the pathogenesis of 5-fluorouracil-induced intestinal mucositis in mice.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Masashi; Kato, Shinichi; Yamanaka, Naoki; Iimori, Maho; Utsumi, Daichi; Kitahara, Yumeno; Iwata, Kazumi; Matsuno, Kuniharu; Amagase, Kikuko; Yabe-Nishimura, Chihiro; Takeuchi, Koji

    2012-05-15

    Although NADPH oxidase 1 (NOX1) has been shown to be highly expressed in the gastrointestinal tract, the physiological and pathophysiological roles of this enzyme are not yet fully understood. In the present study, we investigated the role of NOX1 in the pathogenesis of intestinal mucositis induced by the cancer chemotherapeutic agent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in mice. Intestinal mucositis was induced in Nox1 knockout (Nox1KO) and littermate wild-type (WT) mice via single, daily administration of 5-FU for 5 days. In WT mice, 5-FU caused severe intestinal mucositis characterized by a shortening of villus height, a disruption of crypts, a loss of body weight, and diarrhea. In Nox1KO mice, however, the severity of mucositis was significantly reduced, particularly with respect to crypt disruption. The numbers of apoptotic caspase-3- and caspase-8-activated cells in the intestinal crypt increased 24 h after the first 5-FU administration but were overall significantly lower in Nox1KO than in WT mice. Furthermore, the 5-FU-mediated upregulation of TNF-α, IL-1β, and NOX1 and the production of reactive oxygen species were significantly attenuated in Nox1KO mice compared with that in WT mice. These findings suggest that NOX1 plays an important role in the pathogenesis of 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis. NOX1-derived ROS production following administration of 5-FU may promote the apoptotic response through upregulation of inflammatory cytokines.

  15. New insights into the RNA-based mechanism of action of the anticancer drug 5'-fluorouracil in eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Mojardín, Laura; Botet, Javier; Quintales, Luis; Moreno, Sergio; Salas, Margarita

    2013-01-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5FU) is a chemotherapeutic drug widely used in treating a range of advanced, solid tumours and, in particular, colorectal cancer. Here, we used high-density tiling DNA microarray technology to obtain the specific transcriptome-wide response induced by 5FU in the eukaryotic model Schizosaccharomyces pombe. This approach combined with real-time quantitative PCR analysis allowed us to detect splicing defects of a significant number of intron-containing mRNA, in addition to identify some rRNA and tRNA processing defects after 5FU treatment. Interestingly, our studies also revealed that 5FU specifically induced the expression of certain genes implicated in the processing of mRNA, tRNA and rRNA precursors, and in the post-transcriptional modification of uracil residues in RNA. The transcription of several tRNA genes was also significantly induced after drug exposure. These transcriptional changes might represent a cellular response mechanism to counteract 5FU damage since deletion strains for some of these up-regulated genes were hypersensitive to 5FU. Moreover, most of these RNA processing genes have human orthologs that participate in conserved pathways, suggesting that they could be novel targets to improve the efficacy of 5FU-based treatments.

  16. In vivo distribution of 5-Fluorouracil after peritumoral implantation using a biodegradable micro-device in tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Na; Zhou, Mingyao; Lu, Wen

    2013-09-01

    A novel implantable micro-device was used for delivery of 5-Fluorouracil (5-Fu), which was often used in the treatment of various human malignancies. The biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) was used as material. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficiency of delivery of 5-Fu to the tumor via this delivery system. The distribution characters of the 5-Fu in tumor, plasma, peritumoral tissue, liver and kidney were compared after peritumoral implantation of micro-device and intraperitoneal injection of solution. After administration of micro-device, the 5-Fu was absorbed into the tumor on Day 1, and Cmax (4.14 μg/g) was reached on Day 6. The half life for the elimination was 4.48 d and the AUC was 46.78 μg × d/g. Similar pharmacokinetic behaviors were observed in plasma, peritumoral tissue, kidney and liver, while the Cmax and the AUC of plasma and these tissues were lower than those of tumor. When administered the solution, 5-Fu was rapidly absorbed into plasma, liver, kidney, spleen and tumor, and rapidly cleared from these tissues after 2 or 4 h. And the AUC in tumor of 5-Fu solution was significantly lower than that of the micro-device. These results indicated that 5-Fu loaded biodegradable micro-device offered a relatively high concentration and long-term delivery of the drug to the tumor site.

  17. Synergetic Effect of SLN-Curcumin and LDH-5-Fu on SMMC-7721 Liver Cancer Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Rongrong; Wu, Xianzheng; Xiao, Yu; Gao, Bo; Xie, Qian

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Curcumin and 5-Fluorouracil (5-Fu) have been reported to have anticancer potentials and show certain synergetic effect on some cancer cell lines. However, the poor bioavailability and rapid metabolism limited their medical application. In this study, we encapsulated curcumin with solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN), 5-Fu with Layered double hydroxides (LDHs) separately and tested its properties and anticancer potentials. SLN-curcumin and LDH-5-Fu were determined to be 100 and 60 nm by Transmission Electron Microscopy detection, and the loading efficiency were 28%±2.5% and 16.7%±1.8%, individually. Furthermore, SLN-curcumin and LDH-5-Fu showed a significantly synergetic effect on SMMC-7721 cell stronger than plain drugs together, of which the Idrug loaded nano-carriers was only 0.315. FACS analysis revealed that the combination of SLN-curcumin and LDH-5-Fu induced 80.1% apoptosis in SMMC-7721 cells, which were 1.7-folds of the sum of the two plain drug loaded carriers. The results demonstrated the significant synergetic anticancer potentials of nano-encapsulated curcumin and 5-Fu, which could be further explored for the treatment of other carcinoma. PMID:23808828

  18. Synergetic effect of SLN-curcumin and LDH-5-Fu on SMMC-7721 liver cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Rongrong; Wu, Xianzheng; Xiao, Yu; Gao, Bo; Xie, Qian; Liu, Hui; Wang, Shilong

    2013-10-01

    Curcumin and 5-Fluorouracil (5-Fu) have been reported to have anticancer potentials and show certain synergetic effect on some cancer cell lines. However, the poor bioavailability and rapid metabolism limited their medical application. In this study, we encapsulated curcumin with solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN), 5-Fu with Layered double hydroxides (LDHs) separately and tested its properties and anticancer potentials. SLN-curcumin and LDH-5-Fu were determined to be 100 and 60 nm by Transmission Electron Microscopy detection, and the loading efficiency were 28%±2.5% and 16.7%±1.8%, individually. Furthermore, SLN-curcumin and LDH-5-Fu showed a significantly synergetic effect on SMMC-7721 cell stronger than plain drugs together, of which the Idrug loaded nano-carriers was only 0.315. FACS analysis revealed that the combination of SLN-curcumin and LDH-5-Fu induced 80.1% apoptosis in SMMC-7721 cells, which were 1.7-folds of the sum of the two plain drug loaded carriers. The results demonstrated the significant synergetic anticancer potentials of nano-encapsulated curcumin and 5-Fu, which could be further explored for the treatment of other carcinoma.

  19. Incorporation of 5-fluorouracil into U2 snRNA blocks pseudouridylation and pre-mRNA splicing in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xinliang; Yu, Yi-Tao

    2007-01-01

    5-fluorouracil (5FU) is an effective anti-cancer drug, yet its mechanism of action remains unclear. Here, we examine the effect of 5FU on pre-mRNA splicing in vivo. Using RT-PCR, we show that the splicing of a number of pre-mRNAs is inhibited in HeLa cells that have been exposed to a low dose of 5FU. It appears that this inhibitory effect is not due to its incorporation into pre-mRNA, because partially or fully 5FU-substituted pre-mRNA, when injected into Xenopus oocytes, is spliced just as well as is the unsubstituted pre-mRNA. Detailed analyses of 5FU-treated cells indicate that 5FU is incorporated into U2 snRNA at important naturally occurring pseudouridylation sites. Remarkably, 5FU incorporation effectively blocks the formation of important pseudouridines in U2 snRNA, as only a trace of pseudouridine is detected when cells are exposed to a low dose of 5FU for 5 days. Injection of the hypopseudouridylated HeLa U2 snRNA into U2-depleted Xenopus oocytes fails to reconstitute pre-mRNA splicing, whereas control U2 isolated from untreated or uracil-treated HeLa cells completely reconstitutes the splicing. Our results demonstrate for the first time that 5FU incorporates into a spliceosomal snRNA at natural pseudouridylation sites in vivo, thereby inhibiting snRNA pseudouridylation and splicing. This mechanism may contribute substantially to 5FU-mediated cell death.

  20. Incorporation of 5-fluorouracil into U2 snRNA blocks pseudouridylation and pre-mRNA splicing in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xinliang; Yu, Yi-Tao

    2007-01-01

    5-fluorouracil (5FU) is an effective anti-cancer drug, yet its mechanism of action remains unclear. Here, we examine the effect of 5FU on pre-mRNA splicing in vivo. Using RT–PCR, we show that the splicing of a number of pre-mRNAs is inhibited in HeLa cells that have been exposed to a low dose of 5FU. It appears that this inhibitory effect is not due to its incorporation into pre-mRNA, because partially or fully 5FU-substituted pre-mRNA, when injected into Xenopus oocytes, is spliced just as well as is the unsubstituted pre-mRNA. Detailed analyses of 5FU-treated cells indicate that 5FU is incorporated into U2 snRNA at important naturally occurring pseudouridylation sites. Remarkably, 5FU incorporation effectively blocks the formation of important pseudouridines in U2 snRNA, as only a trace of pseudouridine is detected when cells are exposed to a low dose of 5FU for 5 days. Injection of the hypopseudouridylated HeLa U2 snRNA into U2-depleted Xenopus oocytes fails to reconstitute pre-mRNA splicing, whereas control U2 isolated from untreated or uracil-treated HeLa cells completely reconstitutes the splicing. Our results demonstrate for the first time that 5FU incorporates into a spliceosomal snRNA at natural pseudouridylation sites in vivo, thereby inhibiting snRNA pseudouridylation and splicing. This mechanism may contribute substantially to 5FU-mediated cell death. PMID:17169984

  1. Pancytopenia and Severe Gastrointestinal Toxicities Associated with 5-Fluorouracil in a Patient with Thymidylate Synthase (TYMS) Polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo; Walsh, Shannon J

    2016-01-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is one of the most commonly used chemotherapeutic agents in solid tumors, including colon, gastric and breast cancers. The pharmacogenetic syndrome of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) deficiency leading to severe toxicity after administration of 5-flourouracil (5-FU) and capecitabine has been well-recognized. However, the data about the association of the target enzyme, thymidylate synthase (TYMS) with the toxicity of these agents is limited. A 50-year-old Caucasian woman with T2N2M0 Stage IIIB squamous cell rectal cancer after local surgical excision initiated 5-FU therapy with mitomycin-C and radiation therapy in the adjuvant setting. Following the first treatment with 5-FU, she developed grade III mucositis and grade IV neutropenia which delayed her second dose of therapy. Following her second dose of 5-FU, she again developed grade III mucositis, grade II diarrhea, pancytopenia, fever, and rectal bleeding requiring hospitalization. She was treated with blood and platelet transfusion, pegfilgrastim, IV antibiotics, and supportive therapy. Due to her severe clinical toxicity following chemotherapy involving 5-FU, we tested her for both DPD deficiency andTYMS polymorphisms. The patient was found to be homozygous for the TYMS polymorphism 5’TSER genotype 2R/2R*f, which has been associated with increased 5-FU drug sensitivity and susceptibility to 5-FU toxicity. Our case report further underlines the fact that TYMS polymorphism not only predicts response to 5-FU by relating to intratumoral-TYMS mRNA expression but also the toxicity in these patients receiving fluoropyrimidines. In brief, TYMS genotype variations present a dilemma in 5-FU-driven cancer therapy- overexpression leads to decreased drug sensitivity and poor prognosis, while underexpression leads to the manifestation of toxic drug effects that may halt therapy altogether. Future prospective translational studies in a larger population are warranted to validate its role as a

  2. Neutrophil recruitment is critical for 5-fluorouracil-induced diarrhea and the decrease in aquaporins in the colon.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Hiroyasu; Sagara, Atsunobu; Matsumoto, Kenjiro; Jo, Ara; Hirosaki, Akiko; Takase, Kazuhide; Sugiyama, Ryoto; Sato, Ken; Ikegami, Daigo; Horie, Syunji; Matoba, Motohiro; Narita, Minoru

    2014-09-01

    Diarrhea is a common side effect experienced by cancer patients undergoing clinical chemotherapy, such as with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). However, the precise mechanisms underlying 5-FU-induced diarrhea remain unclear. In the present study, we examined the role of neutrophil in 5-FU-induced diarrhea. Mice were given 5-FU (50mg/kg, i.p.) daily for 4 days. Sivelestat sodium (100 or 300 mg/kg, i.p., neutorophil elastase inhibitor) or SB225002 (3 or 9 mg/kg, i.p., CXCR2 antagonist) was administered before the administration of 5-FU. Gene expression levels of aquaporin (AQP) 4 and 8, CXCL1, CXCL2, CXCL3, neutrophil elastase (Elane) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) in the colon were examined by real-time RT-PCR. The neutrophil (Ly-6G positive cell) number in the mucosa of colon was measured by flow-cytometric analysis. Administration of 5-FU induced diarrhea and decreased the expression levels of AQP 4 and 8 in the colon. Under the present conditions, the expression levels of CXCL1, CXCL2, CXCL3, the neutrophil markers Elane and MPO, as well as Ly-6G-positive neutrophils, in the colon were significantly increased by 5-FU. Neutrophil recruitment with decreased levels of AQP 4 and 8 were dramatically inhibited by either sivelestat sodium or SB225002. Furthermore, these reagents reduced the 5-FU-induced body weight loss and diarrhea. These findings provide evidence that neutrophil recruitment and neutrophil elastase may decrease the levels of AQP 4 and 8 in the colon of mice treated with 5-FU and contribute to the pathophysiology of 5-FU-induced body weight loss and diarrhea.

  3. The c-MYC-ABCB5 axis plays a pivotal role in 5-fluorouracil resistance in human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kugimiya, Naruji; Nishimoto, Arata; Hosoyama, Tohru; Ueno, Koji; Enoki, Tadahiko; Li, Tao-Sheng; Hamano, Kimikazu

    2015-07-01

    c-MYC overexpression is frequently observed in various cancers including colon cancer and regulates many biological activities such as aberrant cell proliferation, apoptosis, genomic instability, immortalization and drug resistance. However, the mechanism by which c-MYC confers drug resistance remains to be fully elucidated. In this study, we found that the c-MYC expression level in primary colorectal cancer tissues correlated with the recurrence rate following 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based adjuvant chemotherapy. Supporting this finding, overexpression of exogenous c-MYC increased the survival rate following 5-FU treatment in human colon cancer cells, and knockdown of endogenous c-MYC decreased it. Furthermore, c-MYC knockdown decreased the expression level of ABCB5, which is involved in 5-FU resistance. Using a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, we found that c-MYC bound to the ABCB5 promoter region. c-MYC inhibitor (10058-F4) treatment inhibited c-MYC binding to the ABCB5 promoter, leading to a decrease in ABCB5 expression level. ABCB5 knockdown decreased the survival rate following 5-FU treatment as expected, and the ABCB5 expression level was increased in 5-FU-resistant human colon cancer cells. Finally, using a human colon cancer xenograft murine model, we found that the combined 5-FU and 10058-F4 treatment significantly decreased tumorigenicity in nude mice compared with 5-FU or 10058-F4 treatment alone. 10058-F4 treatment decreased the ABCB5 expression level in the presence or absence of 5-FU. In contrast, 5-FU treatment alone increased the ABCB5 expression level. Taken together, these results suggest that c-MYC confers resistance to 5-FU through regulating ABCB5 expression in human colon cancer cells.

  4. IDH1 R132H Mutation Enhances Cell Migration by Activating AKT-mTOR Signaling Pathway, but Sensitizes Cells to 5-FU Treatment as NADPH and GSH Are Reduced

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jiangdong; Huang, Keting; Wu, Mindan; Xia, Chunlin

    2017-01-01

    Aim of study Mutations of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1 and IDH2) gene were recently discovered in vast majority of World Health Organization (WHO) grade II/III gliomas. This study is to understand the effects of IDH1 R132H mutation in gliomagenesis and to develop new strategies to treat glioma with IDH1 R132H mutation. Materials and methods Over expression of IDH1 R132H in U87MG cells was done by transfecting cells with IDH1 R132H plasmid. MTT assay, scratch repair assay and western blot were performed to study effects of IDH1 R132H mutation on cell proliferation, migration, regulating AKT-mTOR signaling pathway and cell death respectively. NADP+/NADPH and GSH quantification assays were performed to evaluate effects of IDH1 R132H mutation on the production of antioxidant NADPH and GSH. Results We found that over expression of IDH1 R132H mutation decreased cell proliferation consistent with previous reports; however, it increased cell migration and enhanced AKT-mTOR signaling pathway activation. Mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) 1 also change the function of the enzymes and cause them to produce 2-hydroxyglutarate and not produce NADPH. We tested the level of NADPH and GSH and demonstrated that IDH1 R132H mutant stable cells had significantly low NADPH and GSH level compared to control or IDH1 wild type stable cells. The reduced antioxidants (NADPH and GSH) sensitized U87MG cells with IDH R132H mutant to 5-FU treatment. Conclusion Our study highlights the important role of IHD1 R132H mutant in up- regulating AKT-mTOR signaling pathway and enhancing cell migration. Furthermore, we demonstrate that IDH1 R132H mutation affects cellular redox status and sensitizes gliomas cells with IDH1 R132H mutation to 5FU treatment. PMID:28052098

  5. The antitumor activity of a red alga polysaccharide complexes carrying 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaomei; Zhang, Zhongshan

    2014-08-01

    Porphyran is a sulfated galactan isolated from red algae Porphyra haitanensis, and have been reported to have many kinds of biological activities such as antitumor activity. In order to provide a water-soluble macromolecule prodrug of 5-Fu showing slow release of 5-Fu and reducing side-effect, we carried out fixation of 5-Fu to porphyran at 6-position. In this study, the antitumor and immunomodulation activities of low MW porphyran carrying 5-Fu on transplanted S180 tumor mice were studied. Weight of immune organ, proliferation ratio of lymphocyte concentration of TNF-α and NO from the transplanted S180 tumor mice were also determined. Results indicated that the conjugate could enhance antitumor activity of 5-Fu and improve immunocompetence damaged by 5-Fu.

  6. Comparison of 5% 5-fluorouracil cream and 5% imiquimod cream in the management of actinic keratoses on the face and scalp.

    PubMed

    Tanghetti, Emil; Werschler, Philip

    2007-02-01

    It is timely to compare the efficacy and tolerability of 2 actinic keratosis (AK) therapies--5% 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) cream and imiquimod cream. Thirty-six patients with 4 or more AKs were randomly assigned to receive 5% 5-FU cream twice daily for 2 to 4 weeks or 5% imiquimod cream twice weekly for 16 weeks. Five percent 5-FU was more effective than imiquimod in exposing what were presumed to be subclinical AKs, reducing the final AK count (total AK count declined during the 24-week study by 94% vs. 66%, P < .05), achieving complete clearance (incidence of 84% vs. 24% by week 24, P < .01), and achieving clearance rapidly. Tolerability was similar except for erythema, which was initially significantly higher with 5-FU than imiquimod but resolved rapidly and was significantly lower than imiquimod by week 16. Five percent 5-FU remains the gold standard field therapy for AKs.

  7. Acquisition of 5-fluorouracil resistance induces epithelial-mesenchymal transitions through the Hedgehog signaling pathway in HCT-8 colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    LIU, YANJUN; DU, FANGFANG; ZHAO, QIANNAN; JIN, JIAN; MA, XIN; LI, HUAZHONG

    2015-01-01

    Colon cancer has a high incidence in individuals >60-years-old. The commonly used chemotherapeutic agent, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), has gradually lost its potency in treating colorectal cancer following the acquisition of resistance. Drug resistance is usually associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transitions (EMTs) in cancer cells. In the present study, the EMT phenotypes of two colon cancer cell lines, wild-type (HCT-8/WT) and 5-FU-resistant (HCT-8/5-FU), were characterized following the analysis of cellular migration, proliferation, morphology and molecular changes. In order to further clarify the mechanism of EMT in HCT-8/5-FU cells, the effect of EMT pathway inhibitors upon drug sensitivity was investigated. The results revealed that the Hedgehog signaling pathway inhibitor, GDC0449, reversed drug resistance. Therefore, inhibition of the Hedgehog pathway may provide a novel chemotherapeutic strategy for the treatment of patients with 5-FU-resistant colon cancer. PMID:26137127

  8. Post-5-fluorouracil human marrow: stem cell characteristics and renewal properties after autologous marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Stewart, F M; Temeles, D; Lowry, P; Thraves, T; Grosh, W W; Quesenberry, P J

    1993-05-01

    The effect of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) pretreatment on human bone marrow (BM) progenitor/stem cells and recovery of hematopoiesis after autologous marrow transplant was studied. Twenty-one patients were treated with 5-FU (15 mg/kg to 45 mg/kg) intravenously (IV) for 1 to 3 days administered 6 to 22 days before BM harvest. Post-FU marrow was infused into 15 patients after high-dose cyclophosphamide, carmustine (BCNU), and VP-16 (CBV). Seventeen patients (historical controls) were treated with CBV and autologous BM transplantation but did not receive 5-FU before marrow harvest. The groups were comparable for diagnosis and prior therapy. In the 5-FU-treated group and control group, median recovery times for platelet count to 50,000/mm3 were 20 and 30 days, respectively (P = .007), and for platelet count to 100,000/mm3, 23 and 38 days, respectively (P = .007), while neutrophil recovery was not significantly altered. In vitro cultures with 1 to 7 growth factors (interleukin-1 [IL-1], IL-3, IL-4, IL-6, colony-stimulating factor-1 [CSF-1], granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor [GM-CSF], and G-CSF) were performed. In 8 of 10 patients whose marrow was studied before and after 5-FU treatment, the numbers of CFU-C responsive to the combination of GM-CSF and IL-3 was increased 6.15-fold by 5-FU pretreatment. In 4 of these patients, thymidine suicide of GM-CSF- and IL-3-stimulated CFU-C ranged from 17% to 42%. High proliferative potential colony-forming cell (HPP-CFC) was observed in low frequency in normal marrow and patient's marrow before 5-FU treatment. In 11 of 16 patients pretreated with 5-FU, increased numbers of HPP-CFC were noted. GM-CSF and IL-3 interacted synergistically to stimulate HPP-CFC. Multifactor combinations, especially GM-CSF + G-CSF + IL-3 + IL-6 + IL-1 + CSF-1 did not increase total colony count or classic HPP-CFC but did result in altered morphology, producing huge, loose colonies. The marrow from patients pretreated with 5-FU is enriched with

  9. Chloroquine potentiates the anti-cancer effect of 5-fluorouracil on colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Chloroquine (CQ), the worldwide used anti-malarial drug, has recently being focused as a potential anti-cancer agent as well as a chemosensitizer when used in combination with anti-cancer drugs. It has been shown to inhibit cell growth and/or to induce cell death in various types of cancer. 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is the chemotherapeutic agent of first choice in colorectal cancer, but in most cases, resistance to 5-FU develops through various mechanisms. Here, we focused on the combination of CQ as a mechanism to potentiate the inhibitory effect of 5-FU on human colon cancer cells. Methods HT-29 cells were treated with CQ and/or 5-FU, and their proliferative ability, apoptosis and autophagy induction effects, and the affection of the cell cycle were evaluated. The proliferative ability of HT-29 was analyzed by the MTS assay. Apoptosis was quantified by flow-cytometry after double-staining of the cells with AnnexinV/PI. The cell cycle was evaluated by flow-cytometry after staining of cells with PI. Autophagy was quantified by flow-cytometry and Western blot analysis. Finally, to evaluate the fate of the cells treated with CQ and/or 5-FU, the colony formation assay was performed. Results 5-FU inhibited the proliferative activity of HT-29 cells, which was mostly dependent on the arrest of the cells to the G0/G1-phase but also partially on apoptosis induction, and the effect was potentiated by CQ pre-treatment. The potentiation of the inhibitory effect of 5-FU by CQ was dependent on the increase of p21Cip1 and p27Kip1 and the decrease of CDK2. Since CQ is reported to inhibit autophagy, the catabolic process necessary for cell survival under conditions of cell starvation or stress, which is induced by cancer cells as a protective mechanism against chemotherapeutic agents, we also analyzed the induction of autophagy in HT-29. HT-29 induced autophagy in response to 5-FU, and CQ inhibited this induction, a possible mechanism of the potentiation of the anti

  10. Kinetic modeling of 5-fluorouracil anabolism in colorectal adenocarcinoma: a positron emission tomography study in rats.

    PubMed

    Bading, James R; Yoo, Paul B; Fissekis, John D; Alauddin, Mian M; D'Argenio, David Z; Conti, Peter S

    2003-07-01

    Drug uptake and anabolism by tumors are prerequisites of response to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Positron emission tomography (PET) with 5-[(18)F]FU (PET/5-[(18)F]FU) is potentially useful for noninvasive measurement of these processes, but is severely hampered by rapid catabolism of 5-[(18)F]FU in vivo. This study explored the combined use of PET/5-[(18)F]FU and eniluracil (5-ethynyluracil), a potent inhibitor of 5-FU catabolism, to measure the pharmacokinetics of 5-FU uptake and metabolism in tumors. Rats bearing a s.c. implanted rat colon tumor were given eniluracil and injected i.v. with 5-[(18)F]FU. Dynamic PET and arterial blood sampling were performed 0-2 h. Tumors (n = 5) were then rapidly excised, frozen, and analyzed for labeled metabolites by high performance liquid chromatography. Tumor TACs were analyzed by compartmental modeling. Compartments were identified with molecular species by comparison with ex vivo assays. Tumor extracellular fluid volume was determined in a separate group of rats. Kinetic analysis indicated partial trapping of (18)F within tumors 0-2 h after injection. Tumor time-activity curves conformed closely to a catenary 3-compartment, 5-parameter model. The model yielded values for 5-FU clearance from plasma into the trap that agreed closely with those reported previously for gastrointestinal tumors from a PET/5-[(18)F]FU + eniluracil study in humans. Tumor extracellular fluid volume as measured with (99m)Tc DTPA [(3.1 +/- 0.2) x 10(-1) ml/g; n = 5] agreed well with the distribution volume for compartment 1 of the 3-compartment, 5-parameter model [(3.7 +/- 0.3) x 10(-1) ml/g; n = 5], thus indicating that compartment 1 corresponds to tumor extracellular space. Compartment 3 closely matched the combined magnitudes of (18)F fluoronucleoside (FN) triphosphates and macromolecules in all of the cases, and compartment 2 was quantitatively consistent with the sum of intracellular 5-FU, FNs, and FN mono- and diphosphates. These observations show

  11. Treatment of Actinic Keratoses: A Randomized Split-Site Approach Comparison of Sequential 5-Fluorouracil and 5-Aminolevulinic Acid Photodynamic Therapy to 5-Aminolevulinic Acid Photodynamic Monotherapy.

    PubMed

    Pei, Susan; Kaminska, Edidiong C N; Tsoukas, Maria M

    2017-09-01

    Actinic keratoses (AKs) are skin lesions resulting from sun exposure and carry a risk of developing into squamous cell carcinoma. Current therapies for AK eradication include topical 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and photodynamic therapy (PDT) with topical 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA). However, sequential therapy with 5-FU-ALA-PDT may offer improved outcome compared to ALA-PDT alone. The purpose of this study is to compare the long-term efficacy of AK clearance by sequential therapy with 5-FU-ALA-PDT versus ALA-PDT alone. This is a single center, randomized split-site approach study on equivalent anatomical and clinical sites. Seventeen patients were enrolled with one half of the site randomized to receive sequential 5-FU-ALA-PDT and the other side with ALA-PDT monotherapy. Total AKs were counted at baseline, 6 and 12 months. Median percentage reduction in AK number at 6 months for 5-FU-ALA-PDT versus ALA-PDT was 100% for 5-FU-ALA-PDT (N = 21) and 66.7% for ALA-PDT (N = 21), p = .001. Median percentage reduction in AK number at 12 months for 5-FU-ALA-PDT versus ALA-PDT was 100% for 5-FU-ALA-PDT (N = 22) and 82.6% for ALA-PDT (N = 22), p = .0002. Sequential therapy with 5-FU-ALA-PDT is more effective at AK clearance at 6 and 12 months compared to ALA-PDT monotherapy.

  12. The polycondensing temperature rather than time determines the degradation and drug release of poly(glycerol-sebacate) doped with 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhi-Jie; Sun, Cheng-Wu; Sun, Bo; Lu, Xi-Li; Dong, De-Li

    2012-01-01

    Poly(glycerol-sebacate) (PGS) is an elastomeric biodegradable polyester that could be used as biodegradable drug carrier. We have previously prepared PGS implants doped with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU-PGSs) and found that 5-FU-PGSs exhibited an initial burst of 5-FU release during in vitro degradation. The synthesis temperature and time are two of the most important reaction conditions for polymer synthesis. Therefore, in order to establish a controllable drug-release manner, we prepared a series of 5-FU-PGS with 2% weight of 5-FU under synthesis conditions with different polycondensing temperature and time and characterized the infrared spectrum properties, in vitro degradation and drug release. Results showed that the polycondensing temperature determined the mechanical properties, degradation and drug release of 5-FU-PGSs. With the polycondensing temperature increasing, the elastic modulus and hardness of 5-FU-PGSs increased, and the mass loss and 5-FU release rate decreased. The polycondensing time had no significant influence on the mechanical property, degradation and drug release of 5-FU-PGSs. We suggest that the polycondensing temperature is the factor to control the drug-release manner.

  13. Predictive markers for the response to 5-fluorouracil therapy in cancer cells: Constant-field gel electrophoresis as a tool for prediction of response to 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Saleh, E M; El-Awady, R A; Anis, N

    2013-01-01

    The prediction of response or severe toxicity and therapy individualisation are extremely important in cancer chemotherapy. There are few tools to predict chemoresponse or toxicity in cancer patients. We investigated the correlation between the induction and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) using constant-field gel electrophoresis (CFGE) and evaluating cell cycle progression and the sensitivity of four cancer cell lines to 5-fluorouracil (5FU). Using a sulphorhodamine-B assay, colon carcinoma cells (HCT116) were found to be the most sensitive to 5FU, followed by liver carcinoma cells (HepG2) and breast carcinoma cells (MCF-7). Cervical carcinoma cells (HeLa) were the most resistant. As measured by CFGE, DSB induction, but not residual DSBs, exhibited a significant correlation with the sensitivity of the cell lines to 5FU. Flow cytometric cell cycle analysis revealed that 14% of HCT116 or HepG2 cells and 2% of MCF-7 cells shifted to sub-G1 phase after a 96-h incubation with 5FU. Another 5FU-induced cell cycle change in HCT116, HepG2 and MCF-7 cells was the mild arrest of cells in G1 and/or G2/M phases of the cell cycle. In addition, 5FU treatment resulted in the accumulation of HeLa cells in the S and G2/M phases. Determination of Fas ligand (Fas-L) and caspase 9 as representative markers for the extrinsic and intrinsic pathways of apoptosis, respectively, revealed that 5FU-induced apoptosis in HCT116 and HepG2 results from the expression of Fas-L (extrinsic pathway). Therefore, the induction of DNA DSBs by 5FU, detected using CFGE, and the induction of apoptosis are candidate predictive markers that may distinguish cancer cells which are likely to benefit from 5FU treatment and the measurement of DSBs using CFGE may aid the prediction of clinical outcome.

  14. Healing acceleration in hamsters of oral mucositis induced by 5-fluorouracil with topical Calendula officinalis.

    PubMed

    Tanideh, Nader; Tavakoli, Parisa; Saghiri, Mohammad Ali; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Amanat, Dariush; Tadbir, Azadeh Andisheh; Samani, Soleiman Mohammadi; Tamadon, Amin

    2013-03-01

    This study assessed the potential of topical Calendula officinalis extract on the healing of oral mucositis induced by 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in hamsters. Oral mucositis was induced in 60 male hamsters by 5-FU (60 mg/kg) on days 0, 5, and 10 of the study. The cheek pouch was scratched with a sterile needle on days 1 and 2. On days 12-17, 5% and 10% C. officinalis gel and gel base groups were treated and then compared with a control group. Macroscopic and microscopic scores and weights were evaluated. Microscopic and macroscopic scores of mucositis were lower in the 5% and 10% C. officinalis gel groups than in the gel base and control groups (P < .05). Weight gain was noted in the treatment groups compared with the gel base and control groups (P < .05). Calendula officinalis extract accelerated the healing of oral mucositis in hamsters. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Preliminary evaluation of molecular imprinting of 5-fluorouracil within hydrogels for use as drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Singh, Baljit; Chauhan, Nirmala

    2008-09-01

    Molecular imprinting is a new and rapidly evolving technique used to create synthetic receptors and it possesses great potential in a number of applications in the life sciences. Keeping in mind the therapeutic importance of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and the technological significance of molecular imprinting polymers, the present study is an attempt to synthesize 2-hydroxyethylmetacrylate- and acrylic acid-based 5-FU imprinted hydrogels. For the synthesis of these hydrogels, N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide was used as a crosslinker, ammonium persulfate as an initiator and N,N,N',N'-tetramethylethylenediamine as an accelerator. Both molecular imprinted polymers (MIPs) and non-imprinted polymers were synthesized at the optimum crosslinker concentration obtained from swelling studies and used to study their recognition affinity, their swelling and the in vitro release dynamics of the drug. It was observed from this study that the recognition affinity of MIPs is increased when these are synthesized in a high concentration template solution.

  16. Synthesis of liver-targeting dual-ligand modified GCGA/5-FU nanoparticles and their characteristics in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Mingrong; Gao, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yong; Chen, Houxiang; He, Bing; Li, Yingchun; Han, Jiang; Zhang, Zhiping

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticle drug delivery systems using polymers hold promise for clinical applications. We synthesized dual-ligand modified chitosan (GCGA) nanoparticles using lactic acid, glycyrrhetinic acid, and chitosan to target the liver in our previous studies. We then synthesized the GCGA/5-FU nanoparticles by conjugating 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) onto the GCGA nanomaterial, which had a mean particle size of 239.9 nm, a polydispersity index of 0.040, a zeta potential of +21.2 mV, and a drug loading of 3.90%. GCGA/5-FU nanoparticles had good slow release properties, and the release process could be divided into five phases: small burst release, gentle release, second burst release, steady release, and slow release. Inhibitory effects of GCGA/5-FU on tumor cells targeted the liver, and were time and dose dependent. GCGA nanoparticles significantly prolonged the efficacy of 5-FU on tumor cells, and alleviated the resistance of tumor cells to 5-FU. GCGA/5-FU nanoparticles were mostly concentrated in the liver, indicating that the GCGA nanoparticles were liver targeting. GCGA/5-FU nanoparticles significantly suppressed tumor growth in orthotopic liver transplantation mouse model, and improved mouse survival. PMID:24232303

  17. [Performance of a portable continuous infusion pump (SUREFUSER A) in continuous infusion of 5-FU].

    PubMed

    Kimata, Tsukasa; Sakamoto, Eiji; Kawachi, Aya; Takahashi, Yayoi; Kuroki, Asako; Nakamura, Masashi; Kawade, Yoshihiro; Tokui, Kenji; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Oyama, Takashi; Uchida, Toshiki; Yamada, Tomonori; Kondoh, Masahiro; Ogura, Michinori

    2010-08-01

    Therapy with mFOLFOX6/FOLFIRI used in treating colorectal cancer is typical of the regimens performed in outpatient settings. In this therapy, 46-h continuous infusion of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) with concomitant oxaliplatin and irinotecan hydrochloride is conducted. The portable continuous infusion pump that makes continuous infusion possible has a non-electric structure, so variation in the infusion rate is seen. There are known effects of 5-FU concentration and temperature, and many studies have reported on the precision. In our hospital, we have experienced many cases of incomplete infusion and delays for the above reasons. We changed the specifications of the infusion pump to correspond to the kinematic viscosity of 5-FU and made all drug solution amounts uniform. We measured the time required to administer the drug solution from the time the infusion was started (recorded by a nurse) and the time it was completed (recorded by the patient), and confirmed the precision of the pump after the changes were made. It was found that while there was a decrease in the infusion rate at which the effect of the kinematic viscosity of 5-FU is seen, the mean infusion time was kept to within 46+/-10% hours in more than 90% of patients. There were no effects from concentration differences in 5-FU, and the completion time was reduced. The management and lifestyles of individual patients are potential factors in precision errors, and it is important to explain in advance to patients the necessity of secure fixation and infusion pump problems that might occur.

  18. Regulatory role of Lactobacillus acidophilus on inflammation and gastric dysmotility in intestinal mucositis induced by 5-fluorouracil in mice.

    PubMed

    Justino, Priscilla F C; Melo, Luis F M; Nogueira, Andre F; Morais, Cecila M; Mendes, Walber O; Franco, Alvaro X; Souza, Emmanuel P; Ribeiro, Ronaldo A; Souza, Marcellus H L P; Soares, Pedro Marcos Gomes

    2015-03-01

    Lactobacillus acidophilus is widely used for gastrointestinal disorders, but its role in inflammatory conditions like in chemotherapy-induced mucositis is unclear. Here, we report the effect of L. acidophilus on 5-fluorouracil-induced (5-FU) intestinal mucositis in mice. Mice weighing 25-30 g (n = 8) were separated into three groups, saline, 5-FU, and 5-FU + L. acidophilus (5-FU-La) (16 × 10(9) CFU/kg). In the 5-FU-La group, L. acidophilus was administered concomitantly with 5-FU on the first day and alone for two additional days. Three days after the last administration of L. acidophilus, the animals were euthanized and the jejunum and ileum were removed for histopathological assessment and for evaluation of levels of myeloperoxidase activity, sulfhydryl groups, nitrite, and cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, CXCL-1, and IL-10). In addition, we investigated gastric emptying using spectrophotometry after feeding a 1.5-ml test meal by gavage and euthanasia. Data were submitted to ANOVA and Bonferroni's test, with the level of significance at p < 0.05. Intestinal mucositis induced by 5-FU significantly (p < 0.05) reduced the villus height-crypt depth ratio and GSH concentration and increased myeloperoxidase activity and the nitrite concentrations compared with the control group. Furthermore, 5-FU significantly (p < 0.05) increased cytokine (TNF-α, IL-1β, and CXCL-1) concentrations and decreased IL-10 concentrations compared with the control group. 5-FU also significantly (p < 0.05) delayed gastric emptying and gastrointestinal transit compared with the control group. All of these changes were significantly (p < 0.05) reversed by treatment with L. acidophilus. Lactobacillus acidophilus improves the inflammatory and functional aspects of intestinal mucositis induced by 5-FU.

  19. Overcoming acquired drug resistance in colorectal cancer cells by targeted delivery of 5-FU with EGF grafted hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lijue; She, Xiaodong; Wang, Tao; He, Li; Shigdar, Sarah; Duan, Wei; Kong, Lingxue

    2015-08-01

    Acquired drug resistance (ADR) can be developed in colorectal cancer cells after 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) treatment and diminish the effectiveness of chemotherapy. In this work, acquired 5-FU resistance in the colorectal cancer cell line SW480 was obtained with the up-regulation of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPYD) gene expression which can convert 5-FU to its inactive metabolite. To overcome ADR in colorectal cancer, hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles (HMSNs) grafted with epidermal growth factor (EGF) were used as nanocarriers to deliver 5-FU to colorectal cancer cells with acquired drug resistance. The effect and mechanism of 5-FU loaded EGF grafted HMSNs (EGF-HMSNs-5-FU) in overcoming acquired drug resistance in SW480/ADR cells were studied. The EGF-HMSNs were demonstrated to be specifically internalized in EGFR overexpressed SW480/ADR cells via a receptor-mediated endocytosis and can escape from endo-lysosomes. The EGF-HMSNs-5-FU exhibited much higher cytotoxicity on SW480/ADR cells than HMSNs-5-FU and free 5-FU while the plain HMSNs did not show significant cytotoxicity. The mechanism of EGF-HMSNs-5-FU in overcoming drug resistance in SW480/ADR cells could be attributed to the specific internalization of EGF-HMSNs-5-FU in EGFR overexpressed cells which can lead to high intracellular drug accumulation and cause cell death through S phase arrest.Acquired drug resistance (ADR) can be developed in colorectal cancer cells after 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) treatment and diminish the effectiveness of chemotherapy. In this work, acquired 5-FU resistance in the colorectal cancer cell line SW480 was obtained with the up-regulation of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPYD) gene expression which can convert 5-FU to its inactive metabolite. To overcome ADR in colorectal cancer, hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles (HMSNs) grafted with epidermal growth factor (EGF) were used as nanocarriers to deliver 5-FU to colorectal cancer cells with acquired drug resistance. The

  20. Autophagy in 5-Fluorouracil Therapy in Gastrointestinal Cancer: Trends and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jia-Cheng; Feng, Yi-Li; Liang, Xiao; Cai, Xiu-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Objective: 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU)-based combination therapies are standard treatments for gastrointestinal cancer, where the modulation of autophagy is becoming increasingly important in offering effective treatment for patients in clinical practice. This review focuses on the role of autophagy in 5-FU-induced tumor suppression and cancer therapy in the digestive system. Data Sources: All articles published in English from 1996 to date those assess the synergistic effect of autophagy and 5-FU in gastrointestinal cancer therapy were identified through a systematic online search by use of PubMed. The search terms were “autophagy” and “5-FU” and (“colorectal cancer” or “hepatocellular carcinoma” or “pancreatic adenocarcinoma” or “esophageal cancer” or “gallbladder carcinoma” or “gastric cancer”). Study Selection: Critical reviews on relevant aspects and original articles reporting in vitro and/or in vivo results regarding the efficiency of autophagy and 5-FU in gastrointestinal cancer therapy were reviewed, analyzed, and summarized. The exclusion criteria for the articles were as follows: (1) new materials (e.g., nanomaterial)-induced autophagy; (2) clinical and experimental studies on diagnostic and/or prognostic biomarkers in digestive system cancers; and (3) immunogenic cell death for anticancer chemotherapy. Results: Most cell and animal experiments showed inhibition of autophagy by either pharmacological approaches or via genetic silencing of autophagy regulatory gene, resulting in a promotion of 5-FU-induced cancer cells death. Meanwhile, autophagy also plays a pro-death role and may mediate cell death in certain cancer cells where apoptosis is defective or difficult to induce. The dual role of autophagy complicates the use of autophagy inhibitor or inducer in cancer chemotherapy and generates inconsistency to an extent in clinic trials. Conclusion: Autophagy might be a therapeutic target that sensitizes the 5-FU treatment in

  1. Carcinoembryonic Antigen Expression and Resistance to Radiation and 5-Fluorouracil-Induced Apoptosis and Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Eftekhar, Ebrahim; Jaberie, Hajar; Naghibalhossaini, Fakhraddin

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the mechanism of tumor resistance is critical for cancer therapy. In this study, we investigated the effect of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) overexpression on UV-and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced apoptosis and autophagy in colorectal cancer cells. We used histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, NaB and DNA demethylating agent, 5-azacytidine (5-AZA) to induce CEA expression in HT29/219 and SW742 colorectal cancer cell lines. MTT assay was used to measure IC50 value of the cells exposed to graded concentrations of 5- FU with either 0.1 mM NaB or 1 μM 5-AZA for 72 h . Using CHO- and SW742-CEA transfectants, we also investigated the effect of CEA expression on UV- and 5-FU-induced apoptosis and autophagy. Treatment of HT29/219 cell line with NaB and 5-AZA increased CEA expression by 29% and 31%, respectively. Compared with control cells, the IC50 value for 5-FU of NaB and 5-AZA-treated cells increased by 40% and 57%, respectively. Treatment of SW742 cells with NaB or 5-AZA increased neither CEA expression nor the IC50 value for 5-FU. In comparison to parental cells, CEA expression also significantly protected transfected cells against UV-induced apoptosis. Decreased proportions of autophagy and apoptosis were also observed in 5-FU treated SW742- and CHO-CEA transfectants. We conclude that CEA expression can effectively protect colorectal cancer cells against radiation and drug-induced apoptosis and autophagy. PMID:27478804

  2. Carcinoembryonic Antigen Expression and Resistance to Radiation and 5-Fluorouracil-Induced Apoptosis and Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Eftekhar, Ebrahim; Jaberie, Hajar; Naghibalhossaini, Fakhraddin

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the mechanism of tumor resistance is critical for cancer therapy. In this study, we investigated the effect of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) overexpression on UV-and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced apoptosis and autophagy in colorectal cancer cells. We used histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, NaB and DNA demethylating agent, 5-azacytidine (5-AZA) to induce CEA expression in HT29/219 and SW742 colorectal cancer cell lines. MTT assay was used to measure IC50 value of the cells exposed to graded concentrations of 5- FU with either 0.1 mM NaB or 1 μM 5-AZA for 72 h . Using CHO- and SW742-CEA transfectants, we also investigated the effect of CEA expression on UV- and 5-FU-induced apoptosis and autophagy. Treatment of HT29/219 cell line with NaB and 5-AZA increased CEA expression by 29% and 31%, respectively. Compared with control cells, the IC50 value for 5-FU of NaB and 5-AZA-treated cells increased by 40% and 57%, respectively. Treatment of SW742 cells with NaB or 5-AZA increased neither CEA expression nor the IC50 value for 5-FU. In comparison to parental cells, CEA expression also significantly protected transfected cells against UV-induced apoptosis. Decreased proportions of autophagy and apoptosis were also observed in 5-FU treated SW742- and CHO-CEA transfectants. We conclude that CEA expression can effectively protect colorectal cancer cells against radiation and drug-induced apoptosis and autophagy.

  3. Self-assembling peptide nanofibers containing phenylalanine for the controlled release of 5-fluorouracil

    PubMed Central

    Ashwanikumar, Narayanan; Kumar, Nisha Asok; Saneesh Babu, Padma S; Sivakumar, Krishnankutty C; Vadakkan, Mithun Varghese; Nair, Parvathi; Hema Saranya, Ilamathi; Asha Nair, Sivakumari; Vinod Kumar, Gopalakrishnapillai S

    2016-01-01

    The study shows that RADA-F6 peptide with pH-responsive self-assembling nature can be effectively used as a drug delivery system for the sustained release of a potent anticancer drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) at basic pH. As 5-FU contains the aromatic pyrimidine ring, RADA-F6 system is suitable for entrapping an aromatic drug due to effective π–π stacking with phenylalanine and be able to show better controlled release behavior. The stability and controlled release nature of RADA-F6 in different conditions followed by 5-FU entrapment at in silico conditions was confirmed by molecular dynamics simulation taking RADA-16 as control. Cytotoxicity of the drug-loaded RADA-F6 was measured by MTT assay and cellular uptake by confocal microscopy. Physicochemical characterization and further Western blot analysis and flow cytometric studies confirm that RADA-F6 can be successfully used as an efficient vector for pH-sensitive, controlled 5-FU delivery system. PMID:27822037

  4. Multifunctional nanovehicles for combined 5-fluorouracil and gold nanoparticles based on the nanoprecipitation method.

    PubMed

    Karmi, Abeer; Husseini, Ghaleb A; Faroun, Maryam; Sowwan, Mukhles

    2011-06-01

    To facilitate the administration of combined 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) and gold nanoparticles (for photothermal treatment purposes), we developed 5-FU-gold-poly(lactide-co-glycolic acid) (5-FU-Au-PLGA) nanovehicles, via the nanoprecipitation method. The gold nanoparticles were incorporated inside the 5-FU-PLGA carriers using a roller mixer. Morphological analysis using atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), indicated uniform, singly separated spherical nanoparticles (NPs). Drug content, recovery and entrapment in the NPs were approximated using UV-spectrophotometer data. Approximately 26% of nanoparticles were recovered after drying. The percentage of total drug content was about 30%, and the percentage of drug entrapment reached 57%. Electrostatic Force Microscopy images confirmed the presence of gold inside the drug-loaded nanoparticles. We speculate that the 20-nm gold particles were able to diffuse, after 12 hours of mixing (using the roller mixer), into the PLGA matrix through the 100-nm pores (observed by SEM) without affecting the integrity of the drug delivery vehicle. These synthesized nanoparticles show promise as multimodal vehicles in the delivery of chemotherapeutic agents.

  5. Gene Amplification and Point Mutations in Pyrimidine Metabolic Genes in 5-Fluorouracil Resistant Leishmania infantum

    PubMed Central

    Ritt, Jean-François; Raymond, Frédéric; Leprohon, Philippe; Légaré, Danielle; Corbeil, Jacques; Ouellette, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Background The human protozoan parasites Leishmania are prototrophic for pyrimidines with the ability of both de novo biosynthesis and uptake of pyrimidines. Methodology/Principal Findings Five independent L. infantum mutants were selected for resistance to the pyrimidine analogue 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in the hope to better understand the metabolism of pyrimidine in Leishmania. Analysis of the 5-FU mutants by comparative genomic hybridization and whole genome sequencing revealed in selected mutants the amplification of DHFR-TS and a deletion of part of chromosome 10. Point mutations in uracil phosphorybosyl transferase (UPRT), thymidine kinase (TK) and uridine phosphorylase (UP) were also observed in three individual resistant mutants. Transfection experiments confirmed that these point mutations were responsible for 5-FU resistance. Transport studies revealed that one resistant mutant was defective for uracil and 5-FU import. Conclusion/Significance This study provided further insights in pyrimidine metabolism in Leishmania and confirmed that multiple mutations can co-exist and lead to resistance in Leishmania. PMID:24278495

  6. Novel PEG-coated niosomes based on bola-surfactant as drug carriers for 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Cosco, D; Paolino, D; Muzzalupo, R; Celia, C; Citraro, R; Caponio, D; Picci, N; Fresta, M

    2009-10-01

    Innovative niosomes made up of α,ω-hexadecyl-bis-(1-aza-18-crown-6) (bola), Span 80® and cholesterol (2:5:2 molar ratio) are proposed as suitable delivery systems for the administration of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), an antitumoral compound largely used in the treatment of breast cancer. The bola-niosomes, after sonication procedure, showed mean sizes of ~200 nm and a loading capacity of ~40% with respect to the amount of 5-FU added during the preparation. Similar findings were achieved with PEG-coated bola-niosomes (bola, Span 80(R), cholesterol, DSPE-mPEG2000, 2:5:2:0.1 molar ratio respectively). 5-FU-loaded PEG-coated and uncoated bola-niosomes were tested on MCF-7 and T47D cells. Both bola-niosome formulations provided an increase in the cytotoxic effect with respect to the free drug. Confocal laser scanning microscopy studies were carried out to evaluate both the extent and the time-dependent bola-niosome-cell interaction. In vivo experiments on MCF-7 xenograft tumor SCID mice models showed a more effective antitumoral activity of the PEGylated niosomal 5-FU at a concentration ten times lower (8 mg/kg) than that of the free solution of the drug (80 mg/kg) after a treatment of 30 days.

  7. Oral cooling (cryotherapy), an effective treatment for the prevention of 5-fluorouracil-induced stomatitis.

    PubMed

    Cascinu, S; Fedeli, A; Fedeli, S L; Catalano, G

    1994-07-01

    Recently, a randomised study demonstrated the utility of oral cooling (cryotherapy) in the prevention of 5-fluorouracil (5FU)-induced stomatitis. In order to verify these results a confirmatory study, using identical treatment regimen, was initiated. 84 patients treated with a 5-FU-containing regimen were randomised to a control arm or to receive oral cryotherapy. End point evaluation was obtained by a global assessment of the physician's judgement and patients' description of mucositis severity graded 0-4. Mucositis was significantly reduced by cryotherapy considering both the first cycle of therapy (the mean toxicity score for cryotherapy was 0.59 and it was 1.1 for the control group, P < or = 0.05) and all the chemotherapeutic courses (the mean toxicity score for cryotherapy was 0.36 when it was 0.69 for the control group, P < or = 0.05). In conclusion, the present study confirms that cryotherapy can decrease 5FU-induced stomatitis and should be recommended for patients receiving bolus 5FU-containing regimens.

  8. Molecular mechanisms of platelet and stem cell rebound after 5-fluorouracil treatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaomiao; Slayton, William B

    2013-07-01

    Sublethal irradiation and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) treatment are two commonly used myelosuppressive methods used in the study of hematopoiesis. These methods have been considered interchangeable by some researchers because the morphological changes in the bone marrow to these treatments are similar. Here, we sought to compare the responses of hematopoietic cells, stem and progenitor cells and the bone marrow microenvironment to these treatments. Although bone marrow cellularity decreased after both treatments, the underlying mechanism of the bone marrow cell regression and recovery were very different between the two models. We found: 1. Myeloid cells and lymphoid cells had different sensitivity to the different treatments. 2. Following an initial decrease in stem cell number, 5-FU treated mice had profound thrombopoietin (Tpo) dependent stem cell rebound above baseline levels. 3. Platelet rebound in 5-FU treated animals was not the result of stem cell rebound. 4. Stem cell and platelet rebound did not occur in sub-lethally irradiated mice. 5. Platelet rebound resulted from an indirect effect of 5-FU on the microenvironment cells, but not a direct effect on the stem cells. 6. Microarray studies demonstrated that up-regulation of the angiopoietin-1/Tie2 signaling pathway coincided with platelet rebound. 7. Suppression of genes involved in chromosomal organization coincided with stem cell and platelet rebound. Copyright © 2013 ISEH - Society for Hematology and Stem Cells. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Cytoprotective effects of fucoidan, an algae-derived polysaccharide on 5-fluorouracil-treated dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Bo-Eun; Ko, Eun-Ju; Joo, Hong-Gu

    2012-05-01

    Although chemotherapeutic anticancer agents are effective, they also attack normal immune cells due to a lack of selectivity. 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is a representative anticancer agent that induces immunosuppression in cancer patients as a side effect. Fucoidan is an algae-derived sulfated polysaccharide that has recently been recognized as a hematopoietic mobilizer and immunomodulator. In this study, we investigated the cytoprotective effect of fucoidan on dendritic cells (DCs) against 5-FU-induced cellular damage. Several kinds of assays including flow cytometric analysis demonstrated the cytoprotective efficacy of fucoidan. In addition, fucoidan increased the expression of immune-related surface markers on and the alloproliferative capacity of DCs exposed to 5-FU. For investigating action mechanism, the expression levels of apoptosis-related molecules were measured. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that fucoidan, a marine-derived polysaccharide, has cytoprotective effects on DCs, the most potent antigen-presenting cell type, against 5-FU-induced cellular damage. These results provide valuable information to use fucoidan as an immunostimulatory agent for the chemotherapy of cancer patients.

  10. Vitamin D analogs combined with 5-fluorouracil in human HT-29 colon cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    MILCZAREK, MAGDALENA; FILIP-PSURSKA, BEATA; ŚWIĘTNICKI, WIESŁAW; KUTNER, ANDRZEJ; WIETRZYK, JOANNA

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we evaluated the antitumor effect of two synthetic analogs of vitamin D, namely PRI-2191 [(24R)-1,24-dihydroxyvitamin D3] and PRI-2205 (5,6-trans calcipotriol), in combined human colon HT-29 cancer treatment with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Mice bearing HT-29 tumors transplanted subcutaneously or orthotopically were injected with vitamin D analogs and 5-FU in various schedules. A statistically significant inhibition of subcutaneous or orthotopic tumor growth was observed as a result of combined therapy. In HT-29 tumors and in cells from in vitro culture, we observed increased vitamin D receptor (VDR) expression after treatment with either PRI-2205 or 5-FU alone, or in combination. Moreover, PRI-2205 decreased the percentage of cells from intestinal tumors in G2/M and S stages and increased sub-G1. Increased VDR expression was also observed after combined treatment of mice with 5-FU and PRI-2191. Moreover, our docking studies showed that PRI-2205 has stronger affinity for VDR, DBP and CAR/RXR ligand binding domains than PRI-2191. PRI-2191 analog, used with 5-FU, increased the percentage of subcutaneous tumor cells in G0/G1 and decreased the percentage in G2/M, S and sub-G1 populations as compared to 5-FU alone. In in vitro studies, we observed increased expression of p21 and p-ERK1/2 diminution via use of both analogs as compared to use of 5-FU alone. Simultaneously, PRI-2191 antagonizes some pro-apoptotic activities of 5-FU in vitro. However, in spite of these disadvantageous effects in terms of apoptosis, the therapeutic effect expressed as tumor growth retardation by PRI-2191 is significant. Our results suggest that the mechanism of potentiation of 5-FU antitumor action by both analogs is realized via increased p21 expression and decreased p-ERK1/2 level which may lead to diminution of thymidylate synthase expression. Higher binding affinity for VDR, DBP, but also for CAR\\RXR ligand binding domain of PRI-2205 may, in part, explain its very low

  11. Inhibition of Growth and Metastasis of Colon Cancer by Delivering 5-Fluorouracil-loaded Pluronic P85 Copolymer Micelles

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Pengxi; Zhao, Naping; Sheng, Dandan; Hou, Jing; Hao, Chong; Yang, Xue; Zhu, Bing; Zhang, Shanshan; Han, Zhipeng; Wei, Lixin; Zhang, Li

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic metastasis is the leading cause of mortality of colon cancer, which is still lack of an effective therapy. A new delivery system, pluronic P85 block copolymers, conveying chemotherapeutic agent 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu) for inhibiting growth and metastasis of colon cancer was designed and developed. In this study, we demonstrated that 5-Fu produce strong pesticide effect at lower doses in the present of pluronic P85 compared with control groups. The migration and invasion of HCT116 cells and RKO cells were examined and the results showed that migration and invasion capacities of HCT116 cells and RKO cells were reduced by administering 5-Fu/P85 copolymer micelles in vitro and in vivo which indicating an effectively activity. Interestingly, the content of CD133 + CXCR4+ cells in HCT116 cancer cells and RKO cells treated by 5-Fu/P85 copolymer micelles was decreased. Importantly, the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of CD133 + CXCR4+ cells, which was strongly associated with liver metastasis of colon cancer, was also suppressed by giving 5-Fu/P85 copolymer micelles. The results indicated that 5-Fu/P85 copolymer micelles could inhibit the growth and metastasis of colon cancer, which could be attributed to the decrease of the content of CD133 + CXCR4+ cells and suppression of EMT of CD133 + CXCR4+ cells. PMID:26864651

  12. 5-Fluorouracil induces diarrhea with changes in the expression of inflammatory cytokines and aquaporins in mouse intestines.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Hiroyasu; Sagara, Atsunobu; Matsumoto, Kenjiro; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Sato, Ken; Nishizaki, Maiko; Shoji, Tetsuro; Horie, Syunji; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Tokuyama, Shogo; Narita, Minoru

    2013-01-01

    Although the mechanisms of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced diarrhea remain unclear, accumulating evidence has indicated that changes in the mucosal immune system and aquaporins (AQPs) may play a role in its pathogenesis. Therefore, we investigated the possible changes in the gene expression of inflammatory cytokines and AQPs in the intestines of mice with 5-FU-induced diarrhea. In the present study, the expressions of mRNAs that encode inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, Il-17A and IL-22, were significantly increased throughout the entire colon of mice that exhibited diarrhea following 5-FU administration. In contrast, the gene expression of IFNγ was upregulated only in the distal colon. These increases were significantly reduced by the administration of etanercept. However, 5-FU-induced diarrhea was not recovered by etanercept. On the other hand, the genes for AQPs 4 and 8 were markedly present in the colon, and these expressions in the intestines were significantly decreased by treatment with 5-FU. These decreases were not reversed by etanercept. These findings suggest TNF-α neutralization had no effect on the acutely 5-FU-induced diarrhea and impaired AQPs but reduced dramatically several inflammatory cytokines.

  13. 5-Fluorouracil-induced vasculitic injury manifesting as a multiorgan dysfunction in a patient with esophageal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zahid, Mohammad Faizan; Masood, Nehal; Shabbir-Moosajee, Munira

    2015-01-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is an active chemoetheraputic agent in many malignancies, used both in the curative and metastatic setting. Therefore, the side effect profile of 5-FU is well-described and recognized. Here, we present a case of a 28-year-old male, who received 5-FU and carboplatin concurrently, with radiation, for esophageal carcinoma. On Day 3 of his 5-FU infusion, he developed simultaneous cardiac arrhythmias, renal dysfunction, and aphasia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of his brain revealed acute demyelination of the white matter corresponding to diffusion restriction, pointing toward a small vessel injury. The 5-FU infusion was promptly discontinued and stress dose steroids were administered. The patient's symptoms resolved rapidly with no residual effects. We believe this is the first case of multisystem, small-vessel, vasculopathy secondary to 5-FU. Early recognition and prompt discontinuation of the offending drug is essential for resolution of symptoms. Steroids, with their anti-inflammatory effects can aid in rapid recovery.

  14. Preparation of chitosan-polyaspartic acid-5-fluorouracil nanoparticles and its anti-carcinoma effect on tumor growth in nude mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dan-Ying; Shen, Xi-Zhong; Wang, Ji-Yao; Dong, Ling; Zheng, Yong-Li; Wu, Li-Li

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To prepare chitosan-polyaspartic acid-5-fluorouracil (CTS-Pasp-5Fu) nanoparticles and investigate its anti-carcinoma effect and toxicity. METHODS: CTS-Pasp-5Fu nanoparticles were synthesized by ionic gelatification. Male BABL/c nude mice were injected with SGC-7901 gastric carcinoma cell line mass to establish a human gastric carcinoma model. They were randomly allocated into 4 groups: CTS-Pasp-5Fu (containing 5-Fu 1.25 mg/kg), 5-Fu (1.25 mg/kg), CTS-Pasp and normal saline groups. Tumor weight was measured and assay of colony forming unit-granulocyte and macrophage (CFU-GM) was performed. The structural change of cells and tissues was observed and the Bax and Bcl-2 genes were detected. RESULTS: Compared with normal saline, the inhibition rates of tumor growth for the CTS-Pasp, 5-Fu and CTS-Pasp-5Fu groups were 5.58%, 58.69% and 70.82%, respectively. The tumor inhibition rates for the CTS-Pasp, 5-Fu and CTS-Pasp-5Fu groups were 5.09%, 65.3% and 72.79%, respectively. There was a significant decrease in the number of CFU-GM formation and increase of total bilirubin, and alanine aminotransferase in the 5-Fu group, but no change in those of the other three groups. There was no change in white blood cell count and creatinine among the four groups. Pathological section of liver and nephridial tissues showed that the damage in the 5-Fu group was more severe than that in the CTS-Pasp-5Fu group. 5-Fu and CTS-Pasp-5Fu groups could both down-regulate the Bcl-2 expression and up-regulate the Bax expression to different extent, and the accommodate effect of CTS-Pasp-5Fu was more obvious than 5-Fu. CONCLUSION: The tumor inhibition rate of CTS-Pasp-5Fu nanoparticles is much higher than that of 5-Fu alone. PMID:18567086

  15. Nal-IRI With 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and Leucovorin or Gemcitabine Plus Cisplatin in Advanced Biliary-tract Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-03

    Adenocarcinoma Metastatic; Biliary Tract Cancer; Adenocarcinoma of the Biliary Tract; Adenocarinoma Locally Advanced; Non-Resectable Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Intrahepatic Bile Duct Carcinoma; Extrahepatic Bile Duct Carcinoma

  16. Moderate intensity static magnetic fields affect mitotic spindles and increase the antitumor efficacy of 5-FU and Taxol.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yan; Ji, Xinmiao; Liu, Juanjuan; Li, Zhiyuan; Wang, Wenchao; Chen, Wei; Wang, Junfeng; Liu, Qingsong; Zhang, Xin

    2016-06-01

    Microtubules are the fundamental components in mitotic spindle, which plays essential roles in cell division. It was well known that purified microtubules could be affected by static magnetic fields (SMFs) in vitro because of the diamagnetic anisotropy of tubulin. However, whether these effects lead to cell division defects was unknown. Here we find that 1T SMFs induce abnormal mitotic spindles and increase mitotic index. Synchronization experiments show that SMFs delay cell exit from mitosis and cause mitotic arrest. These mimic the cellular effects of a microtubule-targeting drug Paclitaxel (Taxol), which is frequently used in combination with 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) and Cisplatin in cancer treatment. Using four different human cancer cell lines, HeLa, HCT116, CNE-2Z and MCF7, we find that SMFs increase the antitumor efficacy of 5-FU or 5-FU/Taxol, but not Cisplatin, which indicates that the SMF-induced combinational effects with chemodrugs are drug-specific. Our study not only reveals the effect of SMFs on microtubules to cause abnormal mitotic spindles and delay cells exit from mitosis, but also implies the potential applications of SMFs in combination with chemotherapy drugs 5-FU or 5-FU/Taxol, but not with Cisplatin in cancer treatment.

  17. 5-Fluorouracil-induced mitochondrial oxidative cytotoxicity and apoptosis are increased in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells by TRPV1 channel activation but not Hypericum perforatum treatment.

    PubMed

    Deveci, Haci Ahmet; Nazıroğlu, Mustafa; Nur, Gökhan

    2017-08-09

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is a widely used chemotherapy agent for breast cancer, although drug resistance is a critical issue regarding the use of this agent in the disease. Calcium signaling is a well-known main cause of proliferation and apoptosis in breast cancer cells. Although previous studies have implicated TRPV1 inhibitor, anticancer, and apoptotic roles of Hypericum perforatum (HPer) in several cells, the synergistic inhibition effects of HPer and 5-FU in cancer and the stimulation of ongoing apoptosis have not yet been clarified in MCF-7 cells. Therefore, we investigated the apoptotic and antioxidant properties of 5-FU with/without HPer through activation of TRPV1 in MCF-7 cells. The MCF-7 cells were divided into four groups: the control group, the HPer-treated group (0.3 mM), the 5-FU-treated group (25 μM), and the 5-FU+HPer-treated group. The intracellular free calcium ion concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) increased with 5-FU treatments, but they decreased with the HPer and HPer+5-FU treatments. The [Ca(2+)]i is further decreased in the four groups by TRPV1 channel antagonist (capsazepine and 0.01 mM) treatments. However, mitochondrial membrane depolarization and apoptosis levels, and the PARP1, caspase 3, and caspase 9 expression levels were increased by 5-FU treatment, although the values were decreased by the HPer and 5-FU+HPer treatments. Cell viability level was also decreased by 5-FU treatment. In conclusion, antitumor and apoptosis effects of 5-FU are up-regulated by activation of TRPV1 channels, but its action was down-regulated by HPer treatment. It seems that HPer cannot be used for increasing the antitumor effect of 5-FU through modulation of the TRPV1.

  18. Herb-drug pharmacokinetic interaction of a traditional chinese medicine jia-wei-xiao-yao-san with 5-Fluorouracil in the blood and brain of rat using microdialysis.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Meng-Hsuan; Chang, Li-Wen; Wang, Ju-Wen; Lin, Lie-Chwen; Tsai, Tung-Hu

    2015-01-01

    According to a survey from the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD), Jia-Wei-Xiao-Yao-San (JWXYS) is the most popular Chinese medicine for cancer patients in Taiwan. 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is a general anticancer drug for the chemotherapy. To investigate the herb-drug interaction of JWXYS on pharmacokinetics of 5-FU, a microdialysis technique coupled with a high-performance liquid chromatography system was used to monitor 5-FU in rat blood and brain. Rats were divided into four parallel groups, one of which was treated with 5-FU (100 mg/kg, i.v.) alone and the remaining three groups were pretreated with a different dose of JWXYS (600, 1200, or 2400 mg/kg/day for 5 consecutive days) followed by a combination with 5-FU. This study demonstrates that 5-FU with JWXYS (600 mg/kg/day or 1200 mg/kg/day) has no significant effect on the pharmacokinetics of 5-FU in the blood and brain. However, JWXYS (2400 mg/kg/day) coadministered with 5-FU extends the elimination half-life and increases the volume of distribution of 5-FU in the blood. The elimination half-life of 5-FU in the brain for the pretreatment group with 2400 mg/kg/day of JWXYS is significantly longer than that for the group treated with 5-FU alone and also reduces the clearance. This study provides practical dosage information for clinical practice and proves the safety of 5-FU coadministered with JWXYS.

  19. Herb-Drug Pharmacokinetic Interaction of a Traditional Chinese Medicine Jia-Wei-Xiao-Yao-San with 5-Fluorouracil in the Blood and Brain of Rat Using Microdialysis

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Meng-Hsuan; Chang, Li-Wen; Wang, Ju-Wen; Lin, Lie-Chwen; Tsai, Tung-Hu

    2015-01-01

    According to a survey from the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD), Jia-Wei-Xiao-Yao-San (JWXYS) is the most popular Chinese medicine for cancer patients in Taiwan. 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is a general anticancer drug for the chemotherapy. To investigate the herb-drug interaction of JWXYS on pharmacokinetics of 5-FU, a microdialysis technique coupled with a high-performance liquid chromatography system was used to monitor 5-FU in rat blood and brain. Rats were divided into four parallel groups, one of which was treated with 5-FU (100 mg/kg, i.v.) alone and the remaining three groups were pretreated with a different dose of JWXYS (600, 1200, or 2400 mg/kg/day for 5 consecutive days) followed by a combination with 5-FU. This study demonstrates that 5-FU with JWXYS (600 mg/kg/day or 1200 mg/kg/day) has no significant effect on the pharmacokinetics of 5-FU in the blood and brain. However, JWXYS (2400 mg/kg/day) coadministered with 5-FU extends the elimination half-life and increases the volume of distribution of 5-FU in the blood. The elimination half-life of 5-FU in the brain for the pretreatment group with 2400 mg/kg/day of JWXYS is significantly longer than that for the group treated with 5-FU alone and also reduces the clearance. This study provides practical dosage information for clinical practice and proves the safety of 5-FU coadministered with JWXYS. PMID:25861367

  20. An intravitreal biodegradable sustained release naproxen and 5-fluorouracil system for the treatment of experimental post-traumatic proliferative vitreoretinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cardillo, J A; Farah, M E; Mitre, J; Morales, P H; Costa, R A; Melo, L A S; Kuppermann, B; Jorge, R; Ashton, P

    2004-01-01

    Background/aims: To determine the potential of an intravitreal sustained release naproxen and 5-fluorouracil (NA/5-FU) codrug for the treatment of experimental proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) in a model for trauma associated tractional retinal detachment (TRD). Methods: Sustained release pellets were prepared by covalently linking naproxen to 5-fluorouracil. Drug release was tested in vitro and toxic effects were evaluated by electroretinography and light microscopy. Traumatic PVR was induced in pigmented rabbits by performing a scleral laceration, followed by repair and intravitreal injection of 0.4 ml of autologous blood. Thirty six eyes were treated with a sustained release implant containing 1.5 mg NA/5-FU as a codrug and 36 control eyes were submitted to surgery alone. Eyes were evaluated for TRD by serial indirect ophthalmoscope examination at different time points followed by postmortem fundus evaluation of the enucleated eye Results: The NA/5-FU pellets were found to provide linear release of 5-FU and naproxen over the 30 day duration of the in vitro release test. Both the severity of PVR grade and the percentage of eyes with moderate or worse tractional detachment were significantly lower in eyes treated with the codrug pellet. There were no drug related toxic effects evident on histopathological or electroretinograph examination of eyes containing the NA/5-FU pellet. Conclusions: The results suggest that this NA/5-FU codrug device effectively inhibits the progression of PVR in a rabbit trauma model that closely resembles PVR in humans. Additional studies to add knowledge to these initial findings and to clarify the potential of the codrug device for the treatment of human PVR are warranted. PMID:15317716

  1. Temperature and magnetism bi-responsive molecularly imprinted polymers: Preparation, adsorption mechanism and properties as drug delivery system for sustained release of 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Li, Longfei; Chen, Lin; Zhang, Huan; Yang, Yongzhen; Liu, Xuguang; Chen, Yongkang

    2016-04-01

    Temperature and magnetism bi-responsive molecularly imprinted polymers (TMMIPs) based on Fe3O4-encapsulating carbon nanospheres were prepared by free radical polymerization, and applied to selective adsorption and controlled release of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) from an aqueous solution. Characterization results show that the as-synthesized TMMIPs have an average diameter of about 150 nm with a typical core-shell structure, and the thickness of the coating layer is approximately 50 nm. TMMIPs also displayed obvious magnetic properties and thermo-sensitivity. The adsorption results show that the prepared TMMIPs exhibit good adsorption capacity (up to 96.53 mg/g at 25 °C) and recognition towards 5-FU. The studies on 5-FU loading and release in vitro suggest that the release rate increases with increasing temperature. Meanwhile, adsorption mechanisms were explored by using a computational analysis to simulate the imprinted site towards 5-FU. The interaction energy between the imprinted site and 5-FU is -112.24 kJ/mol, originating from a hydrogen bond, Van der Waals forces and a hydrophobic interaction between functional groups located on 5-FU and a NIPAM monomer. The electrostatic potential charges and population analysis results suggest that the imprinted site of 5-FU can be introduced on the surface of TMMIPs, confirming their selective adsorption behavior for 5-FU. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Differential interference of vitamin D analogs PRI-1906, PRI-2191, and PRI-2205 with the renewal of human colon cancer cells refractory to treatment with 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Kotlarz, Agnieszka; Przybyszewska, Małgorzata; Swoboda, Paweł; Miłoszewska, Joanna; Grygorowicz, Monika Anna; Kutner, Andrzej; Markowicz, Sergiusz

    2016-04-01

    This study was aimed to determine whether hypocalcemic analogs of active forms of vitamins D modulate expression of genes related to stem-like phenotype in colon cancer cell lines HT-29 and HCT-116 undergoing renewal after the treatment with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Both lines express vitamin D receptor, but differ in differentiation stage and vitamin D sensitivity. Cells that resisted the 5-FU exposure were treated with synthetic analog of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D2 (PRI-1906) and analogs of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (PRI-2191 and PRI-2205). Proliferative activity was more profoundly affected by vitamin D analogs in HT-29/5-FU than in HCT-116/5-FU cells. In HT-29/5-FU cells, analogs PRI-1906 and PRI-2191 downregulated the expression of genes related to survival, re-growth, and invasiveness during renewal, while PRI-2205 increased expression of genes related to differentiation only. In HCT-116/5-FU cells, PRI-2191 decreased the expression of stemness- and angiogenesis-related genes, whereas PRI-1906 augmented their expression. The effects in HCT-116/5-FU cells were observed at higher concentrations of the analogs than those used for HT-29/5-FU cells. Out of the series of analogs studied, PRI-2191 might be used to counteract the renewal of both moderately and poorly differentiated cancer cells following conventional treatment.

  3. Drug-specific [sup 19]F NMR and dynamic [sup 18]F PET imaging of the cytostatic agent 5-fluorouracil

    SciTech Connect

    Bellemann, M.E.; Brix, G.; Haberkorn, U.; Ostertag, H.J.; Lorenz, W.J. )

    1994-12-01

    The spatial distribution of the antineoplastic agent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) has been mapped both with [sup 19]F NMR and [sup 18]F PET imaging techniques. For [sup 19]F NMR imaging of 5-FU and its major catabolite [alpha]-fluoro-[beta]-alanine (FBAL), a fast gradient-echo pulse sequence was employed. A chemical-shift selective saturation pulse was used to suppress either the 5-FU or the FBAL resonance before the other component of the [sup 19]F NMR spectrum was images. This approach yielded selective 5-FU and FBAL NMR images free of chemical-shift artifacts in readout and slice-selection direction. In phantom experiments, [sup 19]F 5-FU and FBAL images with a spatial resolution of 12.5 x 12.5 x 20 mm[sup 3] were obtained in 32 min from model solutions with drug and catabolite concentrations similar to those estimated in animals and patients undergoing i.v. chemotherapy with 5-FU. The biodistribution of 5-[[sup 18]F]FU in rats shortly after administration of the drug demonstrated the good vascularization of the transplanted tumors. The metabolic turnover of the cytostatic agent started about 10--20 min p.i. and was predominant in the tumor and liver tissue. The rapid adjustment of the [sup 18]F metabolite concentrations in the transplanted tumors to a steady state provides evidence of anabolic tumor activity, which supports the hypothesis of 5-FU trapping in malignant cells based on [sup 19]F NMR spectroscopy data. The high uptake of 5-[[sup 18]F]FU in the liver, on the other hand, mainly reflects the catabolization of 5-FU to the noncytotoxic FBAL, which leads to a reduced bioavailability of the drug.

  4. Toxicity and efficacy of 5-fluorouracil and capecitabine in a patient with TYMS gene polymorphism: A challenge or a dilemma?

    PubMed

    Shahrokni, Armin; Rajebi, Mohammad Reza; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2009-10-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is an antimetabolite that acts during the S phase of the cell cycle. The active metabolite, 5-fluorodeoxyuridine monophosphate inhibits thymidylate synthase (TS), thus preventing DNA synthesis, which leads to imbalanced cell growth and ultimately cell death. 5-FU and its oral prodrug capecitabine are used in the treatment of a number of solid tumors, including colorectal, breast, gastric, pancreatic, prostate, and bladder cancers. Common side effects include leukopenia, diarrhea, stomatitis, nausea, vomiting, and alopecia. Hand-foot syndrome (HFS) is a relatively common side effect of cytotoxic chemotherapy. It is more frequently associated with 5-FU, capecitabine, and cytarabine. This article reports on the case of a 55-year-old black man with metastatic colorectal carcinoma that was refractory to recommended treatment measures who developed grade 3 HFS after treatment with modified FOLFOX6 (leucovorin [LV]/5-FU/oxaliplatin) and bFOL (bolus 5-FU/LV/oxaliplatin) regimens. Treatment was discontinued despite excellent response to chemotherapy. The patient had progression of disease on IROX (irinotecan/oxaliplatin) and irinotecan/cetuximab regimens. He was started on gemcitabine/capecitabine and developed HFS again, which was controlled with aggressive skin care and vitamin B6 treatment. Full sequencing of the dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPYD) gene and analysis of the human TS gene (TYMS) promoter region was performed. Pharmacogenetic testing revealed 2R/2R genotype of TYMS gene, which is associated with up to a 2.5-fold risk of toxicity to 5-FU therapy. Hand-foot syndrome has proven to be a dose-limiting toxicity of 5-FU, especially of capecitabine, leading to significant morbidity. Hand-foot syndrome seems to be dose dependent, and both peak drug concentration and total cumulative dose determine its occurrence. Genetic variations such as polymorphic abnormality of TYMS are potential causative factors for a significant portion of serious

  5. 5-fluorouracil permits access to a primitive subpopulation of peripheral blood stem cells.

    PubMed

    Rice, A; Barbot, C; Lacombe, F; Dubosc-Marchenay, N; Marit, G; Hau, F; Boiron, J M; Reiffers, J

    1993-07-01

    Peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) contain a mixture of mature and immature hematopoietic progenitors. Resistance to 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) has been used to identify and characterize primitive quiescent stem cells among bone marrow (BM) cells. To see if the same technique could be used to isolate a similar population of cells among PBSC, low-density peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNC) were collected by cytapheresis in the regenerative phase after high-dose chemotherapy from patients with hematological malignancies. These PBMNC were incubated with increasing concentrations of 5-FU for 24 h. The viable 5-FU resistant cells were then cultured in semi-solid media in the presence of either single cytokines: TCM 5637, Granulocyte Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF), or a combination of cytokines: interleukin 1 (IL-1) IL-1 + IL-3 + 5637, IL-1 + IL-3 + Stem Cell Factor (SCF). Low concentrations (5-10 micrograms/ml 5-FU) eliminated mature day 7 Colony Forming Units-Granulocyte Macrophage (CFU-GM) and spared day 7 clusters while enriching for day 14 CFU-GM, irrespective of the growth factors used. Higher concentrations of 5-FU (15, 20, 25 micrograms/ml) selected for later forming clonogenic elements. A combination of synergistic growth factors was required for the development of morphologically identifiable clonogenic elements resistant to 25 micrograms/ml 5-FU at day 21 of culture. Further experimentation demonstrated that SCF could effectively replace TCM 5637 in the cytokine combination for the detection of primitive late forming clonogenic elements. The presence of SCF potentiated colony formation by 5-FU resistant PBMNC. It was confirmed that GM-CSF alone was unable to support colony formation by PBMNC resistant to 25 micrograms/ml. These observations demonstrate that PBSC contain a heterogenous mixture of hematopoietic progenitors and that incubation with 25 micrograms/ml 5-FU permits access to a quiescent primitive stem cell population that requires a

  6. SM5-1-conjugated PLA nanoparticles loaded with 5-fluorouracil for targeted hepatocellular carcinoma imaging and therapy.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xibo; Cheng, Zhen; Jin, Yushen; Liang, Xiaolong; Yang, Xin; Dai, Zhifei; Tian, Jie

    2014-03-01

    SM5-1 is a humanized mouse antibody which has a high binding specificity for a membrane protein of about 230 kDa overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), melanoma and breast cancer. In this study, SM5-1-conjugated poly D, L (lactide-coglycolide) (PLA) PLA containing Cy7 (PLA-Cy7-SM5-1) was prepared to study the targeting specificity of the bioconjugate to HCC-LM3-fLuc cell. Then, SM5-1-conjugated PLA containing 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) (PLA-5FU-SM5-1) and PLA containing 5-FU (PLA-5FU) were prepared for treatment of subcutaneous HCC-LM3-fLuc tumor mice. The results showed that PLA-5FU-SM5-1, PLA-5FU and 5-FU induced a 45.07%, 23.56% and 19.05% tumor growth inhibition rate, respectively, on day 31 post-treatment as determined by bioluminescent intensity. In addition, in order to evaluate the antitumor efficacy of PLA-5FU-SM5-1, HCC-LM3-fLuc cells were injected into the liver to establish the experimental orthotopic liver tumor models. The experiments showed that PLA-5FU-SM5-1, PLA-5FU and 5-FU induced a 53.24%, 31.00%, and 18.11% tumor growth inhibition rate, respectively, on day 31 post-treatment determined by the bioluminescent intensity of the abdomen in tumor-bearing mice. Furthermore, we have calculated the three-dimensional location of the liver cancer in mice using a multilevel adaptive finite element algorithm based on bioluminescent intensity decay calibration. The reconstruction results demonstrated that PLA-5FU-SM5-1 inhibited the tumor rapid progression, which were consistent with the results of subcutaneous tumor mice experiments and in vitro cell experiment results. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Randomised phase II evaluation of irinotecan plus high-dose 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin (ILF) vs 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, and etoposide (ELF) in untreated metastatic gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Moehler, M; Eimermacher, A; Siebler, J; Höhler, T; Wein, A; Menges, M; Flieger, D; Junginger, T; Geer, T; Gracien, E; Galle, P R; Heike, M

    2005-06-20

    An open-label randomised comparison of efficacy and tolerability of irinotecan plus high-dose 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and leucovorin (LV) (ILF) with etoposide plus 5-FU/LV (ELF) in patients with untreated metastatic or locally advanced gastric cancer. One cycle of ILF comprised six once-weekly infusions of irinotecan 80 mg m(-2), LV 500 mg m(-2), 24-h 5-FU 2000 mg m(-2), and ELF comprised three once-daily doses of etoposide 120 mg m(-2), LV 300 mg m(-2), 5-FU 500 mg m(-2). In all, 56 patients received ILF and 58 ELF. Median age was 62 years, Karnofsky performance 90%, and disease status was comparable for both arms. The objective clinical response rates after 14 weeks treatment (primary end point) were 30% for ILF and 17% for ELF (risk ratio (RR) 0.57, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.29-1.13, P = 0.0766). Overall response rates over the entire treatment period for ILF and ELF were 43 and 24%, respectively (RR 0.56, 95% CI 0.33-0.97; P = 0.0467). For ILF and ELF, respectively, median progression-free survival was 4.5 vs 2.3 months, time to treatment failure was 3.6 vs 2.2 months (P = 0.4542), and overall survival was 10.8 vs 8.3 months (P = 0.2818). Both regimens were well tolerated, the main grade 3/4 toxicities being diarrhoea (18%, ILF) and neutropenia (57%, ELF). The data from this randomised phase II study indicate that ILF provides a better response rate than ELF, and that ILF should be investigated further for the treatment of metastatic gastric cancer.

  8. Concomitant administration of bevacizumab, irinotecan, 5-fluorouracil, and leucovorin: nonclinical safety and pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Gaudreault, Jacques; Shiu, Vanessa; Bricarello, Ann; Christian, Brian J; Zuch, Christina L; Mounho, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    Bevacizumab (Avastin) is a humanized monoclonal antibody against vascular endothelial growth factor approved for use in combination with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemotherapy for first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. The Saltz regimen (irinotecan/5-FU/leucovorin [LV]) is a first-line treatment for this indication. The objective of this study was to evaluate the safety of bevacizumab when administered concomitantly with the Saltz regimen to cynomolgus monkeys, and to determine if the pharmacokinetics of bevacizumab, irinotecan, SN38 (the active metabolite of irinotecan), or 5-FU were affected by combined administration. Male cynomolgus monkeys were intravenously administered the Saltz regimen (125 mg/m2 irinotecan, 500 mg/m2 5-FU, 20 mg/m2 LV) alone (n = 4) or concomitantly with 10 mg/kg bevacizumab (n = 5) on days 1 and 8. All animals survived to euthanasia on day 15. Adverse effects associated with the Saltz regimen included diarrhea and neutropenia. Macroscopically, two animals from each group had small thymus glands that correlated microscopically with lymphoid depletion. Myeloid hypoplasia and/or erythroid hyperplasia was observed in the sternal bone marrow of most animals. These effects were considered to be associated with the Saltz regimen; concomitant bevacizumab administration did not alter the severity of these findings. Irinotecan and 5-FU were observed to be rapidly eliminated (t1/2 = 1 h and 0.5 h, respectively). Although the number of animals in each group was small and no statistical comparison between groups was performed, bevacizumab did not affect the disposition of either agent. These results indicate that bevacizumab can be safely administered in combination with the Saltz regimen without pharmacokinetic interaction.

  9. Impact of Rhenium-188, Gemcitabine, and 5-Fluorouracil on Cholangiocellular Carcinoma Cells: An In Vitro Study

    SciTech Connect

    Wiesinger, Benjamin Farkas, Emese; Kehlbach, Rainer; Bantleon, Ruediger; Werner, Matthias; Wiskirchen, Jakub

    2009-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to compare the beneficial effects of radioactive stents and radioactive stents plus additional chemotherapy in the palliative treatment of cholangiocellular carcinomas. Cholangiocellular carcinoma cells (TFK-1 cells) were treated either with 8 Gy (RTB group) or 16 Gy (RTA group) {sup 188}Re or with {sup 188}Re irradiation (8 Gy) combined with either gemcitabine (8 Gy/Gem) or 5-fluorouracil (8 Gy/5-FU) at a dosage of 20 {mu}g/ml medium for 4 days and subsequently compared with an untreated control group. Proliferation kinetics were assessed on days 4, 7, 11, 18, 25, and 32. Colony formation assays were performed on days 7, 18, and 32 and cell cycle distribution was examined on days 4, 7, 11, 15, 25, and 39. Cell proliferation kinetics showed the lowest cell numbers in the 8 Gy/5-FU group (control, 15,390,000; RTA group, 8,394,000; RTB group, 5,609,000; 8 Gy/Gem group, 423,000; and 8 Gy/5-FU group, 297,667). In contrast, clonogenic activity on day 32 was lower in the 8 Gy/Gem group (control, 29.3 colonies; RTB group, 23.1 colonies; 8 Gy/5-FU group, 21.5 colonies; 8 Gy/Gem, 3.3 colonies; and even augmented in the RTA group, with 37.7 colonies). Cell cycle distribution showed similar curves for all groups on slightly different levels except for the 8 Gy/5-FU group, which showed a relatively augmented percentage of cells on day 7 in the G2 M cycle phase and on day 4 in the S phase. In conclusion, irradiation (8 Gy) with {sup 188}Re administered, e.g., via coated stents, combined with Gem could be a valid option for the treatment of CCCs.

  10. Preserved learning and memory following 5-fluorouracil and cyclophosphamide treatment in rats.

    PubMed

    Long, Jeffrey M; Lee, Garrick D; Kelley-Bell, Bennett; Spangler, Edward L; Perez, Evelyn J; Longo, Dan L; de Cabo, Rafael; Zou, Sige; Rapp, Peter R

    2011-11-01

    Some patients experience enduring cognitive impairment after cancer treatment, a condition termed "chemofog". Animal models allow assessment of chemotherapy effects on learning and memory per se, independent of changes due to cancer itself or associated health consequences such as depression. The present study examined the long-term learning and memory effects of a chemotherapy cocktail used widely in the treatment of breast cancer, consisting of 5-fluorouracil (5FU) and cyclophosphamide (CYP). Eighty 5-month old male F344 rats received contextual and cued fear conditioning before treatment with saline, or a low or high dose drug cocktail (50mg/kg CYP and 75 mg/kg 5FU, or 75 mg/kg CYP and 120 mg/kg 5FU, i.p., respectively) every 30 days for 2 months. After a 2-month, no-drug recovery, both long-term retention and new task acquisition in the water maze and 14-unit T-maze were assessed. Neither dose of the CYP/5FU cocktail impaired retrograde fear memory despite marked toxicity documented by enduring weight loss and 50% mortality at the higher dose. Acquisition in the water maze and Stone maze was also normal relative to controls in rats treated with CYP/5FU. The results contribute to a growing literature suggesting that learning and memory mediated by the hippocampus can be relatively resistant to chemotherapy. Future investigation may need to focus on assessments of processing speed, executive function and attention, and the possible interactive contribution of cancer itself and aging to the post-treatment development of cognitive impairment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy on fatigue: role of MCP-1.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, S E; Davis, J M; Murphy, E A; McClellan, J L; Gordon, B; Pena, M M

    2013-01-01

    Chemotherapy has been known to cause severe side effects, including fatigue. While the mechanisms for chemotherapy induced fatigue (CIF) are likely to be multi-factorial in origin, it is thought that inflammation and anemia may play a role. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of chemotherapy on fatigue in mice, and further, to begin to determine if inflammation and anemia may contribute to this response. For experiment 1, C57BL/6 mice were assigned to: vehicle (PBS), low (20 mg/kg), medium (40 mg/kg), or high (60 mg/kg) doses of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Voluntary physical activity (PA) was measured throughout the treatment period (day 1-5) as well as during the recovery period (day 6-14). In experiment 2, we examined the effects of 5-FU (60 mg/kg) on the inflammatory mediator MCP-1 and on markers of anemia (RBC, Hct and Hb). Finally, using MCP-1(-/-) mice we examined the role of MCP-1 on CIF (experiment 3). 5-FU reduced voluntary PA in a dose response manner (p<0.05). Plasma MCP-1 was increased following 5-FU treatment on both days 5 (p=0.10) and 14 (p<0.05). In addition, RBCs, Hct and Hb were reduced with 5-FU on days 5 and 14 (p<0.05). Both C57BL/6 and MCP-1(-/-) mice saw similar decrements in PA through the duration of the treatment period (days 1-5), however the MCP-1(-/-) mice recovered much earlier than wildtype mice. This study provides evidence of the dose response effect of a standard chemotherapy agent on fatigue and demonstrates a potential role of MCP-1 and presumably inflammation, and anemia.

  12. Effects of 5-fluorouracil in nuclear and cellular morphology, proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis, cytoskeletal and caveolar distribution in primary cultures of smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Filgueiras, Marcelo de Carvalho; Morrot, Alexandre; Soares, Pedro Marcos Gomes; Costa, Manoel Luis; Mermelstein, Cláudia

    2013-01-01

    Colon cancer is one of the most prevalent types of cancer in the world and is one of the leading causes of cancer death. The anti-metabolite 5- fluorouracil (5-FU) is widely used in the treatment of patients with colon cancer and other cancer types. 5-FU-based chemotherapy has been shown to be very efficient in the improvement of overall survival of the patients and for the eradication of the disease. Unfortunately, common side effects of 5-FU include severe alterations in the motility of the gastrointestinal tissues. Nevertheless, the molecular and cellular effects of 5-FU in smooth muscle cells are poorly understood. Primary smooth muscle cell cultures are an important tool for studies of the biological consequences of 5-FU at the cellular level. The avian gizzard is one of the most robust organs of smooth muscle cells. Here we studied the molecular and cellular effects of the chemotherapic drug 5-FU in a primary culture of chick gizzard smooth muscle cells. We found that treatment of smooth muscle cells with 5-FU inhibits cell proliferation by the arrest of cells in the G1 phase of cell cycle and induce apoptosis. 5-FU induced a decrease in the percentage of histone H3-positive cells. Treatment of cells with 5-FU induced changes in cellular and nuclear morphology, a decrease in the number of stress fibers and a major decrease in the number of caveolin-3 positive cells. Our results suggest that the disorganization of the actin cytoskeleton and the reduction of caveolin-3 expression could explain the alterations in contractility observed in patients treated with 5-FU. These findings might have an impact in the understanding of the cellular effects of 5-FU in smooth muscle tissues and might help the improvement of new therapeutic protocols for the treatment of colon cancer.

  13. Elastic liposome-based gel for topical delivery of 5-fluorouracil: in vitro and in vivo investigation.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Afzal; Samad, Abdus; Ramzan, Mohammad; Ahsan, Mohd Neyaz; Ur Rehman, Zia; Ahmad, Farhan Jalees

    2016-05-01

    This investigation has focused to characterize the elastic liposome containing 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and to enhance drug permeation across stratum corneum (SC) of the skin (rat) using various surfactants and in vivo dermal toxicity evaluation. 5-FU-loaded elastic liposomes were developed, prepared and characterized for their entrapment efficiency, vesicle size, number of vesicles, morphological characteristics, surface charge and turbidity. In vitro drug release profile, in vitro skin permeation potential and in vitro hemolytic ability of the formulation have been evaluated to compare with drug solution for 24 h. In vitro skin permeation potential was also compared with marketed cream. Furthermore, in vivo skin irritation potential, drug penetration into the skin using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and in vivo toxicity studies were performed. The optimized elastic liposomes demonstrated maximum drug entrapment efficiency, optimum vesicular size and considerable elasticity. In vitro skin permeation studies showed the highest drug permeation flux like 77.07 ± 6.34, 89.74 ± 8.5 and 70.90 ± 9.6 µg/cm(2)/h for EL3-S60, EL3-S80 and EL3-T80, respectively, as compared to drug solution (8.958 ± 6.9 µg/cm(2)/h) and liposome (36.80 ± 6.4 µg/cm(2)/h). Drug deposition of optimized elastic liposome EL3-S80 was about three fold higher than drug solution. Skin irritation and CLSM studies suggested that optimized gel was free from skin irritation and capable to deliver 5-FU into the epidermal area for enhanced topical delivery than drug solution. The in vitro study showed minimum hemolysis in the optimized formulation. Finally, in vivo toxicity studies followed with hisptopathological assessment showed that elastic liposome was able to extract SC to improve drug permeation without changing general anatomy of the skin.

  14. Mitomycin C versus 5-Fluorouracil for wound healing in glaucoma surgery.

    PubMed

    Cabourne, Emily; Clarke, Jonathan C K; Schlottmann, Patricio G; Evans, Jennifer R

    2015-11-06

    Raised intraocular pressure is a risk factor for glaucoma. One treatment option is glaucoma drainage surgery (trabeculectomy). Antimetabolites are used during surgery to reduce postoperative scarring during wound healing. Two agents in common use are mitomycin C (MMC) and 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU). To assess the effects of MMC compared to 5-FU as an antimetabolite adjunct in trabeculectomy surgery. We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (2015 Issue 9), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to October 2015), EMBASE (January 1980 to October 2015), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database (LILACS) (January 1982 to October 2015), the ISRCTN registry (www.isrctn.com/editAdvancedSearch), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 2 October 2015. We included randomised controlled trials where wound healing had been modified with MMC compared to 5-FU. Two review authors independently selected trials and collected data. The primary outcome was failure of a functioning trabeculectomy one year after surgery. Secondary outcomes included mean intraocular pressure at one year. We considered three subgroups: high risk of trabeculectomy failure (people with previous glaucoma surgery, extracapsular cataract surgery, African origin and people with secondary glaucoma or congenital glaucoma); medium risk of trabeculectomy failure (people undergoing trabeculectomy with extracapsular cataract surgery) and low risk of trabeculectomy failure (people who have received no previous surgical eye intervention). We identified 11 trials that enrolled 687 eyes of 679 participants. The

  15. Cell Line Derived 5-FU and Irinotecan Drug-Sensitivity Profiles Evaluated in Adjuvant Colon Cancer Trial Data

    PubMed Central

    Delorenzi, Mauro; Jensen, Thomas; Jensen, Peter Buhl; Bosman, Fred; Tejpar, Sabine; Roth, Arnaud; Brunner, Nils; Hansen, Anker; Knudsen, Steen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study evaluates whether gene signatures for chemosensitivity for irinotecan and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) derived from in vitro grown cancer cell lines can predict clinical sensitivity to these drugs. Methods To test if an irinotecan signature and a SN-38 signature could identify patients who benefitted from the addition of irinotecan to 5-FU, we used gene expression profiles based on cell lines and clinical tumor material. These profiles were applied to expression data obtained from pretreatment formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tumor tissue from 636 stage III colon cancer patients enrolled in the PETACC-3 prospective randomized clinical trial. A 5-FU profile developed similarly was assessed by comparing the PETACC-3 cohort with a cohort of 359 stage II colon cancer patients who underwent surgery but received no adjuvant therapy. Results There was no statistically significant association between the irinotecan or SN-38 profiles and benefit from irinotecan. The 5-FU sensitivity profile showed a statistically significant association with relapse free survival (RFS) (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.54 (0.41–0.71), p<1e-05) and overall survival (HR = 0.47 (0.34–0.63), p<1e-06) in the PETACC-3 subpopulation. The effect of the 5-FU profile remained significant in a multivariable Cox Proportional Hazards model, adjusting for several relevant clinicopathological parameters. No statistically significant effect of the 5-FU profile was observed in the untreated cohort of 359 patients (relapse free survival, p = 0.671). Conclusion The irinotecan predictor had no predictive value. The 5-FU predictor was prognostic in stage III patients in PETACC-3 but not in stage II patients with no adjuvant therapy. This suggests a potential predictive ability of the 5-FU sensitivity profile to identify colon cancer patients who may benefit from 5-FU, however, any biomarker predicting benefit for adjuvant 5-FU must be rigorously evaluated in independent cohorts. Given differences

  16. Porokeratosis (Mibelli): treatment with topical 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    McDonald, S G; Peterka, E S

    1983-01-01

    The case history of a patient with a solitary classic porokeratosis (Mibelli) on the hand is described. The lesion cleared without scarring with the use of topical 5-fluorouracil until a strong dermatitis was elicited, thus avoiding surgery and attendant restriction of function. No sign of recurrence developed in the following 2 years. The potential for malignant change in porokeratosis (Mibelli) and its resistance to topical treatment as documented in the literature are also reviewed.

  17. Sorivudine and 5-fluorouracil; a clinically significant drug-drug interaction due to inhibition of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Diasio, Robert B

    1998-01-01

    Sorivudine (1-β-d-arabinofuranosyl-E-5-[2-bromovinyl] uracil; BV-araU; SQ32,756) is an antimetabolite which is a synthetic analogue of thymidine. This drug has demonstrated antiviral activity against varicella zoster virus, herpes simplex type 1 virus, and Epstein-Barr virus. Clinical studies in Japan and subsequently worldwide showed this drug to be a potent agent for treating varicella zoster infections. Although in general well tolerated, a fatal drug interaction with fluoropyrimidine drugs was subsequently observed. While three deaths resulting from this interaction were recognized to have occurred during the initial clinical evaluation in Japan, the full impact of the interaction was not recognized in Japan until post-marketing when an additional 23 cases of severe toxicity were reported including 16 patients who subsequently died from fluoro-pyrimidine toxicity. Worldwide recognition of this potentially fatal drug-drug interaction led to subsequent disapproval in the US and elsewhere. The interaction has been shown to be due to suppression of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) catabolism, resulting in higher levels of 5-FU than would normally be observed. The mechanism of this interaction is mediated through inhibition of the 5-FU rate-limiting catabolizing enzyme dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) by the BV-araU metabolite BVU. This drug-drug interaction of sorivudine and 5-FU further emphasizes the critical importance of DPD on the clinical pharmacology of 5-FU. PMID:9690942

  18. Modulation of 5-fluorouracil as adjuvant systemic chemotherapy in colorectal cancer: the IGCS-COL multicentre, randomised, phase III study

    PubMed Central

    De Placido, S; Lopez, M; Carlomagno, C; Paoletti, G; Palazzo, S; Manzione, L; Iannace, C; Ianniello, G P; De Vita, F; Ficorella, C; Farris, A; Pistillucci, G; Gemini, M; Cortesi, E; Adamo, V; Gebbia, N; Palmeri, S; Gallo, C; Perrone, F; Persico, G; Bianco, A R

    2005-01-01

    The aims of this multicentre, randomised phase III trial were to evaluate: (1) the role of levamisol (LEV); and (2) the role of folinic acid (FA), added to 5-fluorouracil (5FU) in the adjuvant treatment of colorectal cancer. Patients with histologically proven, radically resected stage II or III colon or rectal cancer were eligible. The study had a 2 × 2 factorial design with four treatment arms: (a) 5FU alone, (b) 5FU+LEV, (c) 5FU+FA, (d) 5FU+LEV+FA, and two planned comparisons, testing the role of LEV and of FA, respectively. From March 1991, to September 1998, 1327 patients were randomised. None of the two comparisons resulted in a significant disease-free (DFS) or overall (OAS) survival advantage. The hazard ratio (HR) of relapse was 0.89 (95% confidence intervals (CI): 0.73–1.09) for patients receiving FA and 0.99 (95% CI 0.80–1.21) for those receiving LEV; corresponding HRs of death were 1.02 (95% CI: 0.80–1.30) and 0.94 (95% CI 0.73–1.20). Nonhaematological toxicity (all grade vomiting, diarrhoea, mucositis, congiuntivitis, skin, fever and fatigue) was significantly worse with FA, while all other toxicities were similar. In the present trial, there was no evidence that the addition of FA or LEV significantly prolongs DFS and OAS of radically resected colorectal cancer patients. PMID:16222322

  19. Novel carbopol-based transfersomal gel of 5-fluorouracil for skin cancer treatment: in vitro characterization and in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammed Ashif; Pandit, Jayamanti; Sultana, Yasmin; Sultana, Sarwat; Ali, Asgar; Aqil, Mohammed; Chauhan, Meenakshi

    2015-01-01

    5-fluorouracil (5-Fu) is an antineoplastic drug, topically used for the treatment of actinic keratosis and nonmelanoma skin cancer. It shows poor percutaneous permeation through the conventionally applicable creams and thus inefficient for the treatment of deep-seated skin cancer. In the present article, transfersomal gel containing 5-Fu was investigated for the treatment of skin cancer. Different formulation of tranfersomes was prepared using Tween-80 and Span-80 as edge activators. The vesicles were characterized for particle size, shape, entrapment efficiency, deformability and in vitro skin permeation. Optimized formulation was incorporated into 1% carbopol 940 gel and evaluated for efficacy in the treatment of skin cancer. 5-Fu-loaded transfersomes (TT-2) has the size of 266.9 ± 2.04 nm with 69.2 ± 0.98% entrapment efficiency and highest deformability index of 27.8 ± 1.08. Formulation TT-2 showed maximum skin deposition (81.3%) and comparable transdermal flux of 21.46 µg/cm(2) h. The TT-2-loaded gel showed better skin penetration and skin deposition of the drug than the marketed formulation. Composition of the transfersomal gel has been proved nonirritant to the skin. We concluded that the developed 5-Fu-loaded transfersomal gel improves the skin absorption of 5-Fu and provide a better treatment for skin cancer.

  20. A phase I and pharmacokinetic study of lapatinib in combination with infusional 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin and irinotecan.

    PubMed

    Midgley, R S; Kerr, D J; Flaherty, K T; Stevenson, J P; Pratap, S E; Koch, K M; Smith, D A; Versola, M; Fleming, R A; Ward, C; O'Dwyer, P J; Middleton, M R

    2007-12-01

    This study determined the optimally tolerated regimen (OTR) of oral lapatinib administered in combination with infusional 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), leucovorin and irinotecan (FOLFIRI) and assessed the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of the combination. Twenty-five patients were enrolled; 12 patients were treated at three dose levels to determine OTR; then 13 patients were treated at OTR to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of the combination. The 2-weekly OTR comprised lapatinib 1250 mg/day with irinotecan 108 mg/m(2) (day 1) and leucovorin 200 mg/m(2), 5-FU bolus 240 mg/m(2) and 5-FU infusion 360 mg/m(2) (days 1 and 2); doses of 5-FU and irinotecan represent a 40% reduction in dose compared to conventional FOLFIRI. Dose-limiting toxicities were grade 3 diarrhoea and grade 4 neutropenia. Co-administration of lapatinib increased the area under the plasma concentration-time curve of SN-38, the active metabolite of irinotecan, by an average of 41%; no other pharmacokinetic interactions were observed. Of 19 patients evaluable for disease response assessment, four patients had partial response and nine patients had stable disease. The combination of lapatinib and FOLFIRI is safe and demonstrates clinical activity; the documented PK interaction can effectively be compensated by lowering the doses of 5-FU and irinotecan. This regime may be further tested in a phase II trial.

  1. Effects of atmospheric pressure cold plasma on human hepatocarcinoma cell and its 5-fluorouracil resistant cell line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, H.; Lu, R.; Xian, Y.; Gan, L.; Lu, X.; Yang, X.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric pressure cold plasma showed selective killing efficiency on cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, which makes plasma a potential option for cancer therapy. However, the plasma effects on chemotherapeutic drugs-resistant cells are rarely to be found. In this paper, the effects of plasma on human hepatocellular carcinoma Bel7402 cells and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) resistant Bel7402/5FU cells were intensively investigated. The results showed that plasma induced superior toxicity to Bel7402 cells compared with Bel7402/5FU cells. Incubation with plasma-treated medium for 20 s induced more than 85% death rate in Bel7402 cells, while the same death ratio was achieved when Bel7402/5FU cells were treated for as long as 300 s. The hydrogen peroxide in the medium played a leading role in the cytotoxicity effects. Further studies implicated that when the treatment time was shorter than 60 s, the depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential and apoptosis occurred through the intracellular reactive oxygen species accumulation in Bel7402 cells. Molecular analysis showed an increase in the transcription factor activity for AP-1, NF-кB, and p53 in Bel7402 cells. No obvious damage could be detected in plasma-treated Bel7402/5FU cells due to the strong intracellular reactive oxygen stress scavenger system.

  2. Potentiation of 5-fluorouracil encapsulated in zeolites as drug delivery systems for in vitro models of colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Vilaça, Natália; Amorim, Ricardo; Machado, Ana F; Parpot, Pier; Pereira, Manuel F R; Sardo, Mariana; Rocha, João; Fonseca, António M; Neves, Isabel C; Baltazar, Fátima

    2013-12-01

    The studies of potentiation of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), a traditional drug used in the treatment of several cancers, including colorectal (CRC), were carried out with zeolites Faujasite in the sodium form, with different particle sizes (NaY, 700nm and nanoNaY, 150nm) and Linde type L in the potassium form (LTL) with a particle size of 80nm. 5-FU was loaded into zeolites by liquid-phase adsorption. Characterization by spectroscopic techniques (FTIR, (1)H NMR and (13)C and (27)Al solid-state MAS NMR), chemical analysis, thermal analysis (TGA), nitrogen adsorption isotherms and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), demonstrated the successful loading of 5-FU into the zeolite hosts. In vitro drug release studies (PBS buffer pH 7.4, 37°C) revealed the release of 80-90% of 5-FU in the first 10min. To ascertain the drug release kinetics, the release profiles were fitted to zero-order, first-order, Higuchi, Hixson-Crowell, Korsmeyer-Peppas and Weibull kinetic models. The in vitro dissolution from the drug delivery systems (DDS) was explained by the Weibull model. The DDS efficacy was evaluated using two human colorectal carcinoma cell lines, HCT-15 and RKO. Unloaded zeolites presented no toxicity to both cancer cells, while all DDS allowed an important potentiation of the 5-FU effect on the cell viability. Immunofluorescence studies provided evidence for zeolite-cell internalization. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of atmospheric pressure cold plasma on human hepatocarcinoma cell and its 5-fluorouracil resistant cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, H.; Gan, L.; Yang, X. E-mail: yangxl@mail.hust.edu.cn; Lu, R.; Xian, Y.; Lu, X. E-mail: yangxl@mail.hust.edu.cn

    2015-12-15

    Atmospheric pressure cold plasma showed selective killing efficiency on cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, which makes plasma a potential option for cancer therapy. However, the plasma effects on chemotherapeutic drugs-resistant cells are rarely to be found. In this paper, the effects of plasma on human hepatocellular carcinoma Bel7402 cells and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) resistant Bel7402/5FU cells were intensively investigated. The results showed that plasma induced superior toxicity to Bel7402 cells compared with Bel7402/5FU cells. Incubation with plasma-treated medium for 20 s induced more than 85% death rate in Bel7402 cells, while the same death ratio was achieved when Bel7402/5FU cells were treated for as long as 300 s. The hydrogen peroxide in the medium played a leading role in the cytotoxicity effects. Further studies implicated that when the treatment time was shorter than 60 s, the depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential and apoptosis occurred through the intracellular reactive oxygen species accumulation in Bel7402 cells. Molecular analysis showed an increase in the transcription factor activity for AP-1, NF-kB, and p53 in Bel7402 cells. No obvious damage could be detected in plasma-treated Bel7402/5FU cells due to the strong intracellular reactive oxygen stress scavenger system.

  4. Mitigation of 5-Fluorouracil induced renal toxicity by chrysin via targeting oxidative stress and apoptosis in wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Summya; Ali, Nemat; Nafees, Sana; Hasan, Syed Kazim; Sultana, Sarwat

    2014-04-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is a potent antineoplastic agent commonly used for the treatment of various malignancies. It has diverse adverse effects such as cardiotoxicity, nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity which restrict its wide and extensive clinical usage. It causes marked organ toxicity coupled with increased oxidative stress and apoptosis. Chrysin (CH), a natural flavonoid found in many plant extracts, propolis, blue passion flower. It has antioxidative and anti-cancerous properties. The present study was designed to investigate the protective effects of CH against 5-FU induced renal toxicity in wistar rats using biochemical, histopathological and immunohistochemical approaches. Rats were subjected to prophylactic oral treatment of CH (50 and 100mg/kg b.wt.) for 21 days against renal toxicity induced by single intraperitoneal administration of 5-FU (150 mg/kg b.wt.). The possible mechanism of 5-FU induced renal toxicity is the induction of oxidative stress; activation of apoptotic pathway by upregulation of p53, bax, caspase-3 and down regulating Bcl-2. However prophylactic treatment of CH decreased serum toxicity markers, increased anti-oxidant armory as well as regulated apoptosis in kidney. Histopathological changes further confirmed the biochemical and immunohistochemical results. Therefore, results of the present finding suggest that CH may be a useful modulator in mitigating 5-FU induced renal toxicity.

  5. Innovative bola-surfactant niosomes as topical delivery systems of 5-fluorouracil for the treatment of skin cancer.

    PubMed

    Paolino, Donatella; Cosco, Donato; Muzzalupo, Rita; Trapasso, Elena; Picci, Nevio; Fresta, Massimo

    2008-04-02

    An innovative niosomal system made up of alpha,omega-hexadecyl-bis-(1-aza-18-crown-6) (Bola), Span 80 and cholesterol (2:5:2 molar ratio) was proposed as a topical delivery system for 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), largely used in the treatment of different forms of skin cancers. Bola-niosomes showed a mean size of approximately 400 nm, which were reduced to approximately 200 nm by a sonication procedure with a polydispersion index value of 0.1. Bola-niosomes showed a loading capacity of approximately 40% with respect to the amount of 5-FU added during the preparation. 5-FU-loaded bola-niosomes were tested on SKMEL-28 (human melanoma) and HaCaT (non-melanoma skin cancer with a specific mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene) to assess the cytotoxic activity with respect to the free drug. 5-FU-loaded bola-niosomes showed an improvement of the cytotoxic effect with respect to the free drug. Confocal laser scanning microscopy studies were carried out to evaluate both the extent and the time-dependent bola-niosome-cell interaction. The percutaneous permeation of 5-FU-loaded niosomes was evaluated by using human stratum corneum and epidermis membranes. Bola-niosomes provided an increase of the drug penetration of 8- and 4-folds with respect to a drug aqueous solution and to a mixture of empty bola-niosomes with a drug aqueous solution.

  6. Thymidylate Synthase Gene Polymorphism Affects the Response to Preoperative 5-Fluorouracil Chemoradiation Therapy in Patients With Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hur, Hyuk; Kang, Jeonghyun; Kim, Nam Kyu; Min, Byung Soh; Lee, Kang Young; Shin, Sang Joon; Keum, Ki Chang; Choi, Junjeong; Kim, Hoguen; Choi, Sung Ho; Lee, Mi-Young

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: This study aims to correlate thymidylate synthase (TS) gene polymorphisms with the tumor response to preoperative 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemoradiation therapy (CRT) in patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty-four patients with rectal cancer treated with 5-FU-based preoperative CRT were prospectively enrolled in this study. Thymidylate synthase expression and TS gene polymorphisms were evaluated in tumor obtained before preoperative CRT and were correlated with the pathologic response, as assessed by histopathologic staging (pTNM) and tumor regression grade. Results: Patients exhibited 2R/3R and 3R/3R tandem repeat polymorphisms in the TS gene. With regard to TS expression in these genotypes, 2R/3RC and 3RC/3RC were defined as the low-expression group and 2R/3RG, 3RC/3RG, and 3RG/3RG as the high-expression group. There was no significant correlation between TS expression and tumor response. There was no significant difference in the tumor response between patients homozygous for 3R/3R and patients heterozygous for 2R/3R. However, 13 of 14 patients in the low-expression group with a G>C single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) (2R/3RC [n = 5] or 3RC/3RC [n = 9]) exhibited a significantly greater tumor downstaging rate, as compared with only 12 of 30 patients in the high-expression group without the SNP (2R/3RG [n = 10], 3RC/3RG [n = 9], or 3RG/3RG [n = 11]) (p = 0.001). The nodal downstaging rate was also significantly greater in this low-expression group, as compared with the high-expression group (12 of 14 vs. 14 of 30, p = 0.014). However, there was no significant difference in the tumor regression grade between these groups. Conclusions: This study suggests that SNPs within the TS enhancer region affect the tumor response to preoperative 5-FU-based CRT in rectal cancer.

  7. Combined effect of clinically relevant doses of emitefur, a new 5-fluorouracil derivative, and radiation in murine tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Shibamoto, Y.; Murata, R.; Miyauchi, S.; Hirohashi, M.; Takagi, T.; Sasai, K.; Shibata, T.; Oya, N.; Takahashi, M.

    1996-01-01

    We investigated the combined effect of radiation and clinically relevant doses of emitefur (BOF-A2), a newly developed anti-cancer agent consisting of a masked form of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and a potent inhibitor of 5-FU degradation, in two types of murine tumours. In preliminary pharmacokinetic studies, the area under the curve for 5-FU in plasma, after administration of 12.5 mg kg-1 and 25 mg kg-1 emitefur in mice, appeared to be similar to that obtained on the first day and that on the seventh day, respectively, after starting administration of 400-600 mg day-1 in humans. These doses (12.5 and 25 mg kg-1) of emitefur were evaluated either alone or in combination with single (15 Gy), five-fraction (4 Gy each) or ten-fraction (2.8 Gy each) irradiation using a tumour growth delay assay for SCCVII tumours and in combination with four-fraction (5 Gy each) irradiation using an in vivo-in vitro assay for EMT6 tumours. The anti-tumour and radiation-enhancing effects of 12.5 mg kg-1 emitefur were not significant in any except the ten-fraction experiment. On the other hand, multiple doses of 25 mg kg-1 emitefur given either alone or in combination with radiation produced marked effects. The mean tumour growth delay time (the time to double in volume for treated tumours minus that for untreated tumours) was 8.1 days for five administrations of 25 mg kg-1 emitefur. 10.4 days for five fractions of 4 Gy and 22.1 days for five treatments with the combination of the two. Thus, the increase in growth delay afforded by this combination was at least additive. The effect of four fractions of 5 Gy with 25 mg kg-1 emitefur in EMT6 tumours was lower than that of four fractions of 7.5 Gy, but the effect of five fractions of 4 Gy with this dose of emitefur in SCCVII tumours was similar to the effect of five fractions of 6 Gy, and the effect of ten fractions of 2.8 Gy with 25 mg kg-1 emitefur was much higher than that of ten fractions of 4.2 Gy. In conclusion, emitefur given either alone

  8. Development and Characterization of Novel Site Specific Hollow Floating Microspheres Bearing 5-Fu for Stomach Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Peeyush; Singh, Ranjit; Swarup, Anoop

    2014-01-01

    Multiple-unit-type oral floating hollow microspheres of 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu) were developed using modified solvent evaporation technique to prolong gastric residence time, to target stomach cancer, and to increase drug bioavailability. The prepared microspheres were characterized for micromeritic properties, floating behavior, entrapment efficiency, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The in vitro drug release and floating behavior were studied in simulated gastric fluid (SGF) at pH 1.2. The yield of microspheres was obtained up to 84.46 ± 6.47%. Microspheres showed passable flow properties. Based on optical microscopy, particle size was found to be ranging from 158.65 ± 12.02 to 198.67 ± 17.45 μm. SEM confirmed spherical size, perforated smooth surface, and a hollow cavity inside the microspheres. Different kinetic models for drug release were also applied on selected batches. PMID:25383377

  9. Metastatic basaloid-squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus treated by 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Yoshihiro; Baba, Eishi; Ariyama, Hiroshi; Miki, Ryusuke; Ogami, Nobumichi; Arita, Shuji; Qin, Baoli; Kusaba, Hitoshi; Mitsugi, Kenji; Noshiro, Hirokazu; Yao, Takashi; Nakano, Shuji

    2007-07-14

    Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma (BSC) of the esophagus is a rare malignant disease. We report here a patient with recurrent esophageal BSC, who was successfully treated by systemic chemotherapy containing 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and cisplatin (CDDP). A 57-year-old woman was diagnosed as having squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus upon endoscopic examination. Curative esophagectomy with lymph node dissection was performed under the thoracoscope. The pathological diagnosis of the surgical specimen was BSC. Five months after operation, the patient was diagnosed as having a recurrence of the BSC with metastases to the liver and spleen, and a right paraclavicular lymph node. She was given systemic chemotherapy consisting of continuous infusion of 800 mg/d of 5-FU and 3 h infusion of 20 mg/d of CDDP for 5 consecutive days every 4 wk. The metastatic lesions in the spleen and right paraclavicular lymph node disappeared, and the liver metastasis was apparently reduced in size after 2 courses of chemotherapy. The tumor regression was seen over 6 courses, with progression afterwards. Although subsequent treatment with CPT-11 and CDDP was not effective, docetaxel and vinorelbine temporarily controlled the tumor growth for 2 mo. 5-FU and CDDP combination may be useful for the patients with advanced BSC.

  10. CD24 Expression Is Increased in 5-Fluorouracil-Treated Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, Pilar; Chueca, Eduardo; Arruebo, María; Strunk, Mark; Solanas, Estela; Serrano, Trinidad; García-González, María A.; Lanas, Ángel

    2017-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) model suggests that there are subsets of cells within a tumor with increased proliferation and self-renewal capacity, which play a key role in therapeutic resistance. The importance of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in carcinogenesis has been previously established and the use of COX-2 inhibitors as celecoxib has been shown to exert antitumor effects. The present study investigated whether treatment of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) cells with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) or the growth of tumor spheres increased the proportion of CSCs and also if treatment with celecoxib was able to reduce the putative CSC markers in this tumor. OE19 and OE33 EAC cells surviving 5-FU exposure exhibited an increase in CSC markers CD24 and ABCG2 and also an increased resistance to apoptosis. EAC cell lines had the capacity to form multiple spheres displaying typical CSC functionalities such as self-renewal and increased CD24 levels. In addition, after the induction of differentiation, cancer cells reached levels of CD24 similar to those observed in the parental cells. Treatment with celecoxib alone or in combination with 5-FU also resulted in a reduction of CD24 expression. Moreover, celecoxib inhibited the growth of tumor spheres. These findings showing a reduction in CSC markers induced by celecoxib suggest that the COX-2 inhibitor might be a candidate for combined chemotherapy in the treatment of EAC. However, additional clinical and experimental studies are needed. PMID:28611669

  11. CD24 Expression Is Increased in 5-Fluorouracil-Treated Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Pilar; Chueca, Eduardo; Arruebo, María; Strunk, Mark; Solanas, Estela; Serrano, Trinidad; García-González, María A; Lanas, Ángel

    2017-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) model suggests that there are subsets of cells within a tumor with increased proliferation and self-renewal capacity, which play a key role in therapeutic resistance. The importance of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in carcinogenesis has been previously established and the use of COX-2 inhibitors as celecoxib has been shown to exert antitumor effects. The present study investigated whether treatment of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) cells with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) or the growth of tumor spheres increased the proportion of CSCs and also if treatment with celecoxib was able to reduce the putative CSC markers in this tumor. OE19 and OE33 EAC cells surviving 5-FU exposure exhibited an increase in CSC markers CD24 and ABCG2 and also an increased resistance to apoptosis. EAC cell lines had the capacity to form multiple spheres displaying typical CSC functionalities such as self-renewal and increased CD24 levels. In addition, after the induction of differentiation, cancer cells reached levels of CD24 similar to those observed in the parental cells. Treatment with celecoxib alone or in combination with 5-FU also resulted in a reduction of CD24 expression. Moreover, celecoxib inhibited the growth of tumor spheres. These findings showing a reduction in CSC markers induced by celecoxib suggest that the COX-2 inhibitor might be a candidate for combined chemotherapy in the treatment of EAC. However, additional clinical and experimental studies are needed.

  12. Metformin reverses multidrug resistance in human hepatocellular carcinoma Bel-7402/5-fluorouracil cells

    PubMed Central

    LING, SUNBIN; TIAN, YU; ZHANG, HAIQUAN; JIA, KAIQI; FENG, TINGTING; SUN, DEGUANG; GAO, ZHENMING; XU, FEI; HOU, ZHAOYUAN; LI, YAN; WANG, LIMING

    2014-01-01

    Metformin exhibits anti-proliferative effects in tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. The present study investigated the ability of metformin to reverse multidrug resistance (MDR) in human hepatocellular carcinoma Bel-7402/5-fluorouracil (5-Fu; Bel/Fu) cells. The synergistic anti-proliferative effect of metformin combined with 5-Fu was evaluated using a Cell Counting kit-8 assay. The variation in apoptotic rates and cell cycle distribution were evaluated using a flow cytometric assay and variations in target gene and protein expression were monitored using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. The results demonstrated that metformin had a synergistic anti-proliferative effect with 5-Fu in the Bel/Fu cells. The variations in the number of apoptotic cells and distribution of the cell cycle were consistent with the variability in cell viability. Metformin targeted the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, suppressed the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and transcriptionally downregulated the expression of multidrug resistance protein 1/P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1). Collectively, these findings suggested that metformin may target the AMPK/mTOR/HIF-1α/P-gp and MRP1 pathways to reverse MDR in hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:25310259

  13. Synergistic antitumor effect of puerarin combined with 5-fluorouracil on gastric carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    GUO, XU-FENG; YANG, ZI-RONG; WANG, JUN; LEI, XIAO-FEI; LV, XIAO-GUANG; DONG, WEI-GUO

    2015-01-01

    Combination chemotherapy is a crucial method in the treatment of gastric cancer. The aim of the present study was to investigate the inhibitory effects of puerarin and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) on BGC-823 gastric cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. The in vitro growth inhibition of puerarin or 5-FU alone or combined on BGC-823 cells was determined using a cell counting kit 8 (CCK-8) on living cells. Apoptotic morphological features and proteins expression levels were detected by Hoechst 33258 staining, an Annexin V/propidium iodide apoptosis kit and western blot analysis, respectively. Tumor xenografts were established in nude mice and the inhibitory effects and side effects were detected. Results of the CCK-8, Hoechst 33258 staining and flow cytometry revealed that the combined treatment was more effective than the separate treatments. The tumor volume was 90.65% of that of the controls and the mean tumor weight was only 0.125 g at the end of the experiment in the combination group compared with the control group (0.822 g). In addition, it was determined that liver and renal toxicity did not increase in combined treatment. These findings showed that puerarin and 5-FU produced a significant synergic effect on gastric cancer cells, while there was no increase in side effects. PMID:25434307

  14. Evaluation of the cytotoxic effects of PLGA coated iron oxide nanoparticles as a carrier of 5- fluorouracil and mega-voltage X-ray radiation in DU145 prostate cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Hajikarimi, Zahra; Khoei, Samideh; Khoee, Sepideh; Mahdavi, Seied Rabi

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the uptake and cytotoxic effects of magnetic poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA)-coated iron oxide nanoparticles as a carrier of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and X-ray on the level of proliferation capacity of DU145 prostate carcinoma cell line in monolayer culture. Following monolayer culture, DU 145 cells were treated with different concentrations of 5-FU or 5-FU loaded nanoparticles for 24 h and 2Gy X-ray (6 Mega-voltage (MV)). The rate of nanoparticles penetration was then measured using atomic adsorption spectroscopy (AAS). The cytotoxicity effect of these nanoparticles with/ without X-ray radiation was evaluated using colony formation assay. Spectroscopy results showed that iron content and therefore the cellular uptake of 5-FU loaded nanoparticles increased with increasing nanoparticle concentrations. Further, the proliferation capacity of the cells decreased with the increase of 5-FU and 5- FU loaded nanoparticle concentrations in combination with X-ray radiation. However the extent of reduction in colony number following treatment with 5-FU-loaded nanoparticles in combination with 2Gy of megavoltage X-ray radiation was significantly more than for free 5-FU. Thus, drug-loaded nanoparticles could deliver 5-FU more efficiently into the cells. PLGA coated iron oxide nanoparticles are therefore effective drug delivery vehicles for 5-FU. PLGA coated iron oxide nanoparticles are biocompatible and this coating is an appropriate surface that can penetrate into the cells.

  15. Preparation of magnetite-chitosan/methylcellulose nanospheres by entrapment and adsorption techniques for targeting the anti-cancer drug 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Şanlı, Oya; Kahraman, Aslı; Kondolot Solak, Ebru; Olukman, Merve

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we have formulated novel nanospheres that could be used in the controlled release of the anticancer drug, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). The nanospheres are composed of magnetite, containing chitosan (CS) and methylcellulose (MC). The drug entrapment was achieved through the encapsulation and adsorption processes. The effects of the preparation conditions, such as magnetite content, CS/MC ratio, crosslinking concentration, exposure time to glutaraldehyde (GA), and the drug/polymer ratio were investigated for both processes. The 5-FU release was found to follow the Fickian mechanism, and the Langmuir isotherm for the nanospheres was achieved through encapsulation and adsorption processes, respectively.

  16. Antitumor and immunomodulatory effects of low-dose 5-FU on hepatoma 22 tumor-bearing mice

    PubMed Central

    CAO, ZHIYUN; ZHANG, ZHIDENG; HUANG, ZHENGRONG; WANG, RONGPING; YANG, AILIAN; LIAO, LIANMING; DU, JIAN

    2014-01-01

    Low-dose 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), a widely used chemotherapeutic, has been reported to have immunomodulatory effects. This study aimed to evaluate the optimal dose of 5-FU that produces antitumor and immunomodulatory effects. In a hepatoma 22 tumor-bearing mouse model, 0, 10, 20 and 40 mg/kg 5-FU (i.p.) was administered for 10 days. Tumor weight and volume were measured, thymus index (TI) and spleen index (SI) were calculated, and the number of white blood cells (WBCs) and lymphocytes (LYs) were counted following treatment. The percentages of CD3+, CD4+, CD8+ and natural killer (NK) cells were measured by flow cytometry. In addition, the body weights of the mice were measured and the average diet consumption was calculated. Administration of 5-FU produced a potent antitumor effect in a dose-dependent manner (P<0.01). At 20 and 40 mg/kg, a significant reduction of body weight and food consumption was observed. TI and SI decreased in the 20- and 40-mg/kg groups (P<0.01) for 10 days. The number of WBCs significantly decreased in each group (P<0.01); however, the number of LYs only decreased in the 40-mg/kg group (P<0.01). Percentages of CD3+ and CD4+ cells were increased in the 10- and 20-mg/kg groups (P<0.01). Thus, 5-FU at 10 mg/kg inhibits tumor growth while maintaining the immune function of the mice. 5-FU may exert its antitumor effect at a low dose with low toxicity and stimulate the host immune system. Future clinical trials taking into account the immunostimulatory capacity of chemotherapeutic agents are desirable for certain patients. PMID:24660037

  17. NSC30049 inhibits Chk1 pathway in 5-FU-resistant CRC bulk and stem cell populations.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Satya; Jaiswal, Aruna S; Sharma, Ritika; Nawab, Akbar; Duckworth, Lizette Vila; Law, Brian K; Zajac-Kaye, Maria; George, Thomas J; Sharma, Jay; Sharma, Arun K; Hromas, Robert A

    2017-08-22

    The 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) treatment induces DNA damage and stalling of DNA replication forks. These stalled replication forks then collapse to form one sided double-strand breaks, leading to apoptosis. However, colorectal cancer (CRC) stem cells rapidly repair the stalled/collapsed replication forks and overcome treatment effects. Recent evidence suggests a critical role of checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) in preventing the replicative stress. Therefore, Chk1 kinase has been a target for developing mono or combination therapeutic agents. In the present study, we have identified a novel orphan molecule NSC30049 (NSC49L) that is effective alone, and in combination potentiates 5-FU-mediated growth inhibition of CRC heterogeneous bulk and FOLFOX-resistant cell lines in culture with minimal effect on normal colonic epithelial cells. It also inhibits the sphere forming activity of CRC stem cells, and decreases the expression levels of mRNAs of CRC stem cell marker genes. Results showed that NSC49L induces 5-FU-mediated S-phase cell cycle arrest due to increased load of DNA damage and increased γ-H2AX staining as a mechanism of cytotoxicity. The pharmacokinetic analysis showed a higher bioavailability of this compound, however, with a short plasma half-life. The drug is highly tolerated by animals with no pathological aberrations. Furthermore, NSC49L showed very potent activity in a HDTX model of CRC stem cell tumors either alone or in combination with 5-FU. Thus, NSC49L as a single agent or combined with 5-FU can be developed as a therapeutic agent by targeting the Chk1 pathway in 5-FU-resistant CRC heterogeneous bulk and CRC stem cell populations.

  18. Kinetics and efficiency of a methyl-carboxylated 5-Fluorouracil-bovine serum albumin adduct for targeted delivery.

    PubMed

    Koziol, Michael J; Sievers, Torsten K; Smuda, Kathrin; Xiong, Yu; Müller, Angelika; Wojcik, Felix; Steffen, Axel; Dathe, Margitta; Georgieva, Radostina; Bäumler, Hans

    2014-03-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is a clinically well-established anti-cancer drug effectively applied in chemotherapy, mainly for the treatment of breast and colorectal cancer. Substantial disadvantages are adverse effects, arising from serious damage of healthy tissues, and shortcoming pharmacokinetics due to its low molecular weight. A promising approach for improvement of such drugs is their coupling to suitable carriers. Here, a 5-FU adduct, 5-fluorouracil acetate (FUAc) is synthesized and covalently coupled to bovine serum albumin (BSA) as model carrier molecule. On average, 12 molecules FUAc are bound to one BSA. Circular dichriosm (CD)-spectra of BSA and FUAc-BSA are identical, suggesting no significant conformational differences. FUAc-BSA is tested on T-47D and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Proliferation inhibition of membrane albumin-binding protein (mABP)-expressing T-47D cells by FUAc-BSA is similar to that of 5-FU and only moderate for MDA-MB-231 cells that lack such expression. Therefore, a crucial role of mABP expression in effective cell growth inhibition by FUAc-BSA is assumed.

  19. Alanyl-glutamine attenuates 5-fluorouracil-induced intestinal mucositis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, C.V.; Lazzarotto, C.R.; Aquino, C.C.; Figueiredo, I.L.; Costa, T.B.; de Oliveira Alves, L.A.; Ribeiro, R.A.; Bertolini, L.R.; Lima, A.A.M.; Brito, G.A.C.; Oriá, R.B.

    2015-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (APOE=gene, apoE=protein) is a known factor regulating the inflammatory response that may have regenerative effects during tissue recovery from injury. We investigated whether apoE deficiency reduces the healing effect of alanyl-glutamine (Ala-Gln) treatment, a recognized gut-trophic nutrient, during tissue recovery after 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis. APOE-knockout (APOE-/-) and wild-type (APOE+/+) C57BL6J male and female mice (N=86) were given either Ala-Gln (100 mM) or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) by gavage 3 days before and 5 days after a 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) challenge (450 mg/kg, via intraperitoneal injection). Mouse body weight was monitored daily. The 5-FU cytotoxic effect was evaluated by leukometry. Intestinal villus height, villus/crypt ratio, and villin expression were monitored to assess recovery of the intestinal absorptive surface area. Crypt length, mitotic, apoptotic, and necrotic crypt indexes, and quantitative real-time PCR for insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) intestinal mRNA transcripts were used to evaluate intestinal epithelial cell turnover. 5-FU challenge caused significant weight loss and leukopenia (P<0.001) in both mouse strains, which was not improved by Ala-Gln. Villus blunting, crypt hyperplasia, and reduced villus/crypt ratio (P<0.05) were found in all 5-FU-challenged mice but not in PBS controls. Ala-Gln improved villus/crypt ratio, crypt length and mitotic index in all challenged mice, compared with PBS controls. Ala-Gln improved villus height only in APOE-/- mice. Crypt cell apoptosis and necrotic scores were increased in all mice challenged by 5-FU, compared with untreated controls. Those scores were significantly lower in Ala-Gln-treated APOE+/+ mice than in controls. Bcl-2 and IGF-1 mRNA transcripts were reduced only in the APOE-/--challenged mice. Altogether our findings suggest APOE-independent Ala-Gln regenerative effects after 5-FU challenge. PMID:25945744

  20. Topical Mitomycin-C versus Subconjunctival 5-Fluorouracil for Management of Bleb Failure

    PubMed Central

    Pakravan, Mohammad; Miraftabi, Arezoo; yazdani, Shahin; Koohestani, Nasim; yaseri, Mehdi

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To compare the efficacy and safety of topical mitomycin-C (MMC) drops with that of subconjunctival 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) injections for management of early bleb failure after trabeculectomy or combined phacoemulsification and trabeculectomy with posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation (PT+PCIOL). Methods In a randomized comparative study, 37 eyes of 37 patients with impending early bleb failure received MMC 0.02% eye drops for 2 or 4 weeks (19 eyes) or subconjunctival 5-FU injections, 5 mg per dose (18 eyes). Complete success was defined as 5 < IOP ≤ 18 mmHg without medications. Results Baseline characteristics were comparable between the study groups. However, there were more cases of combined PT+PCIOL in the MMC group [11 (57.9%) eyes versus 3 (16.7%) eyes, P = 0.017]. Mean preoperative IOP was 20.5±8.85 mmHg in the MMC group and 25.82±11.35 mmHg in the 5-FU group (P = 0.129), which was decreased to 13.2±6.1 and 10.6±4.8 mmHg respectively after 12 months (P = 0.159). There was no significant difference between the study groups in terms of bleb extent (P = 0.170), height (P = 0.178) or vascularity (P = 0.366). At the end of the study, complete success was achieved in 13 eyes (68.4%) in the MMC group and 14 eyes (77.8%) in the 5-FU group (P = 0.714). The survival of success at 8 months (median follow-up) was 89.5% and 86.5% in the MMC and 5-FU groups respectively; the number of glaucoma medications (P = 0.707) and best-corrected visual acuity (P = 0.550) were also comparable. Complication rates were similar in the study groups (P = 0.140). Conclusion Topical MMC 0.02% has comparable safety and efficacy to subconjunctival 5-FU injections for management of early bleb failure. Topical MMC 0.02% drops are more convenient and can be initiated first, while 5-FU injections may be reserved for eyes with an insufficient response to topical MMC. PMID:22454715

  1. Phase I trial of escalating-dose cisplatin with 5-fluorouracil and concurrent radiotherapy in Chinese patients with esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qiang; Gao, Xian-Shu; Qiao, Xue-Ying; Zhou, Zhi-Guo; Zhang, Ping; Chen, Kun; Zhao, Yan-Nan; Asaumi, Junichi

    2008-02-01

    We defined the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) of chemoradiotherapy (cisplatin (CDDP) with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and concurrent chemoradiotherapy) for Chinese patients with esophageal cancer. Twenty-one previously untreated patients with primary esophageal cancer were entered into this study. Escalating doses of CDDP with 5-FU were administered in a modified Fibonacci sequence, with concurrent conventional fractionation radiotherapy (CFR) of 60 Gy or 50 Gy. The starting doses were CDDP 37.5 mg/m2 on day 1, and 5-FU 500 mg/m2 on days 1-5, respectively. The regimen was repeated 4 times every 28 days. If no dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was observed, the next dose level was applied. The procedures were repeated until DLT appeared. The MTD was declared to be 1 dose level below the level at which DLT appeared. DLT was grade 3 radiation-induced esophagitis at a dose level of CDDP 60 mg/m2 with 5-FU 700 mg/m2 and concurrent 60 Gy CFR. MTD was defined as CDDP 52.5 mg/m2 with 5-FU 700 mg/m2 and concurrent 50 Gy CFR. The MTD of CDDP with 5-FU and in concurrent chemoradiotherapy for Chinese patients with esophageal cancer is CDDP 52.5 mg/m2 on day 1 and 5FU 700 mg/m2 on days 1-5, repeated 4 times every 28 days, and concurrent 50 Gy CFR. Further evaluation of this regimen in a prospective phase II trial is ongoing.

  2. Combination of the FGFR4 inhibitor PD173074 and 5-fluorouracil reduces proliferation and promotes apoptosis in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yan-Wei; Hu, Shuang; Shi, Ying-Qiang; Zhang, Xie-Fu; Zhou, Ye; Zhao, Chun-Lin; Wang, Guo-Jun; Wen, Jian-Guo; Zong, Hong

    2013-12-01

    Our previous findings revealed that FGFR4 may be a novel therapeutic target for gastric cancer. The aim of the present study was to explore the effects of a combination of PD173074 (PD) and 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu) on the biological behavior of gastric cancer cell lines and the relevant mechanisms involved. MKN45, a gastric cancer cell line, was treated with each single agent alone or a combination of FGF19, PD and 5-Fu. Then, a series of functional assays were performed using CCK-8 assay and flow cytometry. Western blot analysis was used to determine the expression of signaling pathway and downstream-related molecules in the MKN45 cells following the different treatments. As the concentration of PD and 5-Fu increased, the cell viability gradually decreased; the viability of the combination group was less than the viability following single administration. Western blot analysis showed that FGFR4 expression was weak in the 5-Fu-treated groups when compared with the control. PD markedly increased the apoptosis rate of MKN45 cells when compared to the control; the apoptosis rate in the cells treated with the combination of PD and 5-Fu was higher than that in the cells following single treatment. Furthermore, PD reduced the expression of p-ERK and Bcl-xl and increased caspase-3 expression. Inhibition of the activity of FGFR4 may be the main mechanisms of PD effect while 5-Fu reduced FGFR4 expression. Furthermore, the effects of the combination of 5-Fu and PD in inhibiting proliferation, increasing apoptosis and arresting cell cycle were superior to these effects following the single agent treatments, suggesting that the two drugs applied in combination may contribute to the effective treatment of gastric cancer.

  3. A Community-Based Multicenter Trial of Pharmacokinetically Guided 5-Fluorouracil Dosing for Personalized Colorectal Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    O’Neil, Bert H.; Deal, Allison M.; Ibrahim, Joseph G.; Sherrill, Gary B.; Olajide, Oludamilola A.; Atluri, Prashanti M.; Inzerillo, John J.; Chay, Christopher H.; McLeod, Howard L.; Walko, Christine M.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Pharmacokinetically guided (PK-guided) versus body surface area-based 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) dosing results in higher response rates and better tolerability. A paucity of data exists on PK-guided 5-FU dosing in the community setting. Patients and Methods. Seventy colorectal cancer patients, from one academic and five community cancer centers, received the mFOLFOX6 regimen (5-FU 2,400 mg/m2 over 46 hours every 2 weeks) with or without bevacizumab at cycle 1. The 5-FU continuous-infusion dose was adjusted for cycles 2–4 using a PK-guided algorithm to achieve a literature-based target area under the concentration-time curve (AUC). The primary objective was to demonstrate that PK-guided 5-FU dosing improves the ability to achieve a target AUC within four cycles of therapy. The secondary objective was to demonstrate reduced incidence of 5-FU-related toxicities. Results. At cycles 1 and 4, 27.7% and 46.8% of patients achieved the target AUC (20–25 mg × hour/L), respectively (odds ratio [OR]: 2.20; p = .046). Significantly more patients were within range at cycle 4 compared with a literature rate of 20% (p < .0001). Patients had significantly higher odds of not being underdosed at cycle 4 versus cycle 1 (OR: 2.29; p = .037). The odds of a patient being within range increased by 30% at each subsequent cycle (OR: 1.30; p = .03). Less grade 3/4 mucositis and diarrhea were observed compared with historical data (1.9% vs 16% and 5.6% vs 12%, respectively); however, rates of grade 3/4 neutropenia were similar (33% vs 25%–50%). Conclusion. PK-guided 5-FU dosing resulted in significantly fewer underdosed patients and less gastrointestinal toxicity and allows for the application of personalized colorectal cancer therapy in the community setting. PMID:25117066

  4. Comparison of Subconjunctival Mitomycin C and 5-Fluorouracil Injection for Needle Revision of Early Failed Trabeculectomy Blebs

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Wang, Jianrong; Zhang, Miaomiao; Tao, Yuan; Sun, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background. To compare the efficacy of needle revision with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and mitomycin C (MMC) on dysfunctional filtration blebs shortly after trabeculectomy. Methods. It is a prospective randomized study comparing needle revision augmented with MMC or 5-FU for failed trabeculectomy blebs. Results. To date 71 patients (75 eyes) have been enrolled, 40 eyes in the MMC group and 35 in the 5-FU group. 68 patients (72 eyes) have completed 12-month follow-up, 38 eyes in the MMC group and 34 in the 5-FU group. The mean IOP before and that after needle revision in the MMC group were 26.5 ± 4.3 mmHg and 11.3 ± 3.4 mmHg, respectively (P < 0.05), and in the 5-FU group were 27.1 ± 3.8 mmHg and 10.9 ± 3.4 mmHg, respectively (P < 0.05). At 12-month follow-up, complete success rates were 57.5% for MMC group and 34.3% for 5-FU group (P = 0.042; log-rank test) and 75% and 60% (P = 0.145; log-rank test), respectively, for the qualified success. Complication rates between the two groups were not statistically different (P > 0.05). Conclusions. Needle revision and subconjunctival MMC injection were more effective than needling and subconjunctival 5-FU injection for early dysfunctional filtration blebs after trabeculectomies. PMID:26989499

  5. Gene expression in colorectal cancer and in vitro chemosensitivity to 5-fluorouracil: a study of 88 surgical specimens.

    PubMed

    Yoshinare, Kentaro; Kubota, Tetsuro; Watanabe, Masahiko; Wada, Norihito; Nishibori, Hideki; Hasegawa, Hirotoshi; Kitajima, Masaki; Takechi, Teiji; Fukushima, Masakazu

    2003-07-01

    To predict the sensitivity of colorectal cancer to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), we compared the gene expression of surgically obtained colorectal cancer specimens with chemosensitivity to 5-FU as detected by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Eighty-eight patients with advanced and/or metastatic colorectal cancer provided written informed consent and entered the trial from September 2000 to October 2001. Fresh surgical specimens were used for the MTT assay, and sensitivity to 5-FU was evaluated at a cutoff concentration of 50 microg/ml and 48-h incubation time. Frozen samples were stored at - 80 degrees C until mRNA analysis of thymidylate synthetase (TS), dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD), thymidine phosphorylase (TP), es-nucleoside transporter (NT), and E2F1 by real-time RT-PCR. The correlations between the variables were analyzed, and the predictive value of these mRNAs was assessed statistically using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. NT and DPD, TP and DPD, and TP and NT mRNA expression levels correlated significantly, while TS and E2F1 showed no correlations. High NT expression was associated with low sensitivity to 5-FU (P < 0.013), as were high DPD and E2F1 expression (P < 0.022 for both). High TP mRNA expression correlated with low sensitivity to 5-FU (P < 0.034), although high TS mRNA expression did not. ROC curves indicated that DPD and NT mRNAs were possible predictors of sensitivity to 5-FU, with cutoff values of 0.6 and 0.4, respectively. The sensitivity of colorectal cancer to 5-FU may be regulated by DPD, the rate-limiting enzyme of catabolism, and NT, an important transmembrane transporter of nucleosides.

  6. Nitinol stents loaded with a high dose of antitumor 5-fluorouracil or paclitaxel: esophageal tissue responses in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhongmin; Liu, Jieying; Wu, Keqin; Shen, Yuanyuan; Mao, Aiwu; Li, Jian; Chen, Zhijin; Guo, Shengrong

    2015-07-01

    A poor prognosis associated with esophageal cancer leads to surgical resection not suitable for most patients. Nitinol stents loaded with 50% 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) or paclitaxel (PTX), functioning both as a stent and local chemotherapy, could provide a new therapy modality for these patients. To investigate esophageal tissue responses to nitinol stents loaded with 50% 5-FU or PTX implanted in the esophagus of healthy pigs. Twenty-three healthy Bama mini-pigs were randomly divided into 4 groups for stent implantation: group A (PTX stent, n = 13), group B (5-FU stent, n = 8), group C (blank film-covered stent, n = 1), and group D (bare stent, n = 1). Tissue responses were observed by endoscopy or pathologic analyses, and 5-FU or PTX concentrations were measured in the esophagus at the stent implantation site at different time points. Animal laboratory. Endoscopic placement of esophagus stent. Endoscopic examination, histology, and drug concentration analysis. In general, the esophageal tissue responses varied according to different parts of 5-FU or PTX stent (middle part [drug-containing part] and bare ends [drug-free part]). Severe tissue responses at the bare ends of the stent included inflammation, ulceration, and granulation. However, the tissue responses were greatly reduced in the middle part of the stent. The drug concentrations in the esophagus that had contact with the 5-FU stent or PTX stent were very high, especially for the first period after implantation, which did not cause obvious tissue damage. Some subjects had incomplete follow-up because of unexpected deaths and stent migration. The nitinol stents loaded with 50% 5-FU or PTX did not cause severe esophageal tissue responses, although there was a large concentration of the drug in these tissues. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Intravital imaging of the effects of 5-fluorouracil on the murine liver microenvironment using 2-photon laser scanning microscopy

    PubMed Central

    OKIGAMI, MASATO; TANAKA, KOJI; INOUE, YASUHIRO; SAIGUSA, SUSUMU; OKUGAWA, YOSHINAGA; TOIYAMA, YUJI; MOHRI, YASUHIKO; KUSUNOKI, MASATO

    2016-01-01

    5-fluorouracil (5FU) is often used in the treatment of colorectal cancer. 5FU improves the median overall and disease-free survival rates and reduces recurrence rates in patients who have undergone curative surgical resection. However, in the adjuvant setting, whether 5FU eradicates clinically undetectable micrometastases in target organs such as the liver, or whether 5-FU inhibits the adhesion of circulating tumor cells has not yet been established. In the present study, 5FU was administered following the inoculation of red fluorescent protein-expressing HT29 cells into green fluorescent protein (GFP)-transgenic nude mice to examine its inhibitory effect. 2-photon laser scanning microscopy was performed at selected time points for time-series imaging of liver metastasis of GFP-transgenic mice. The cell number in vessels was quantified to evaluate the response of the tumor microenvironment to chemotherapy. HT29 cells were visualized in hepatic sinusoids at the single-cell level. A total of 2 hours after the injection (early stage), time-series imaging revealed that the number of caught tumor cells gradually reduced over time. In the 5FU treatment group, no significant difference was observed in the cell number in the early stage. One week after the injection (late stage), a difference in morphology was observed. The results of the present study indicated that 5FU eradicated clinically undetectable micrometastases in liver tissues by acting as a cytotoxic agent opposed to preventing adhesion. The present study indicated that time-series intravital 2-photon laser scanning microscopic imaging of metastatic tumor xenografts may facilitate the screening and evaluation of novel chemotherapeutic agents with less interindividual variability. PMID:27073493

  8. [Chemopreventive effects of 5-fluorouracil and lactoferrin on goldfish intestinal carcinogenesis induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine].

    PubMed

    Takase, Kiyomi; Kakuta, Izuru

    2011-01-01

    The present study was carried out to examine the chemopreventive effects of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and lactoferrin (LF) on goldfish intestinal carcinogenesis induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH). DMH was given to fish by intraperitoneal injection in a dosage of 15 mg/kg body weight once a week for 6 weeks. Eight weeks after the initial DMH injection, fish were randomly divided into 2 groups, control and LF-treated groups. Control fish fed a commercial diet. LF- treated fish fed a commercial diet with bovine lactoferrin (oral administration at 200 mg/kg body weight/day). Ten weeks after the initial DMH injection, each was divided into 2 groups, saline- and 5-FU- treated groups. Physiological saline for freshwater fish (0.75% NaCl solution) in the saline-treated fish and 5-FU dissolved in 0.75% NaCl solution in the 5-FU-treated (75 mg/kg body weight) fish were injected intramuscularly three times every other day, respectively. The mean number of precancer cell foci (PCF) per intestine was 2.7 in DMH treated fish. PCF showed broader distribution in the entire intestine derived from DMH-treated fish. LF-only-treatment has no effect on the number of PCF. Mean number of PCF in 5-FU-only-treated fish decreased in comparison with that of the saline-treated control group, though no statistically significant reduction in PCF was found. But if 5-FU treatment was added to LF pretreatment, a statistically significant reduction in the number of PCF was observed. Pretreatment with LF for 2 weeks also reduced the deleterious side effects of 5-FU.

  9. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy with capecitabine versus protracted infusion 5-fluorouracil for rectal cancer: A matched-pair analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Prajnan . E-mail: PrajDas@mdanderson.org; Lin, Edward H.; Bhatia, Sumita; Skibber, John M.; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.; Feig, Barry W.; Chang, George J.; Hoff, Paulo M.; Eng, Cathy; Wolff, Robert A.; Delclos, Marc E.; Krishnan, Sunil; Janjan, Nora A.; Crane, Christopher H.

    2006-12-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively compare the acute toxicity, pathologic response, relapse rates, and survival in rectal cancer patients treated with preoperative radiotherapy (RT) and either concurrent capecitabine or concurrent protracted infusion 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Methods: Between June 2001 and February 2004, 89 patients with nonmetastatic rectal adenocarcinoma were treated with preoperative RT and concurrent capecitabine, followed by mesorectal excision. These patients were individually matched by clinical T and N stage (as determined by endoscopic ultrasound and CT scans) with 89 control patients treated with preoperative RT and concurrent protracted infusion 5-FU between September 1997 and August 2002. Results: In each group, 5 patients (6%) had Grade 3-4 toxicity during chemoradiotherapy. The pathologic complete response rate was 21% with capecitabine and 12% with protracted infusion 5-FU (p = 0.19). Of the 89 patients in the capecitabine group and 89 in the 5-FU group, 46 (52%) and 55 (62%), respectively, had downstaging of the T stage after chemoradiotherapy (p = 0.20). The estimated 3-year local control (p = 0.15), distant control (p = 0.86), and overall survival (p = 0.12) rate was 94.4%, 86.3%, and 89.8% for patients treated with capecitabine and 98.6%, 86.6%, and 96.4% for patients treated with protracted infusion 5-FU, respectively. Conclusion: Preoperative concurrent capecitabine and concurrent protracted infusion 5-FU were both well tolerated, with similar, low rates of Grade 3-4 acute toxicity. No significant differences were seen in the pathologic response, local and distant recurrence, or overall survival among patients treated with preoperative RT and concurrent capecitabine compared with those treated with RT and concurrent protracted infusion 5-FU.

  10. Diamine oxidase as a marker of intestinal mucosal injury and the effect of soluble dietary fiber on gastrointestinal tract toxicity after intravenous 5-fluorouracil treatment in rats.

    PubMed

    Fukudome, Ian; Kobayashi, Michiya; Dabanaka, Ken; Maeda, Hiromichi; Okamoto, Ken; Okabayashi, Takehiro; Baba, Ryoko; Kumagai, Nana; Oba, Koji; Fujita, Mamoru; Hanazaki, Kazuhiro

    2014-06-01

    The level of plasma diamine oxidase (DAO) activity is associated with the maturation and integrity of small intestinal mucosa. This study in rats investigated whether a decreased level of plasma DAO could reflect the severity of mucosal injury due to intravenous 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) treatment. The beneficial effect of soluble dietary fiber (SDF) on preventing diarrhea after 5-FU treatment was also examined. To induce diarrhea, 5-FU (50 mg/kg/day for four days) was administered via the tail vein with or without SDF supplementation. After 5-FU treatment, the majority of rats developed moderate to severe diarrhea, and levels of plasma DAO activity significantly decreased compared to those of control group (P < 0.05). Scanning electron microscopy revealed disarrangement of the small intestinal villi. Contrarily, the rats supplemented with SDF had diarrhea less frequently (50.0 vs. 91.7 %, P = 0.025) on day five, and DAO activity levels were significantly higher than in those rats administered 5-FU alone (8.25 ± 5.34 vs. 5.50 ± 4.32, P = 0.023). In conclusion, plasma DAO activity decreases in response to severe intestinal mucosal injury after 5-FU treatment, and SDF supplementation might be a practical and useful treatment for reducing the intestinal toxicity of 5-FU.

  11. Targeting the DNA replication checkpoint by pharmacologic inhibition of Chk1 kinase: a strategy to sensitize APC mutant colon cancer cells to 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Martino-Echarri, Estefania; Henderson, Beric R; Brocardo, Mariana G

    2014-10-30

    5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is the first line component used in colorectal cancer (CRC) therapy however even in combination with other chemotherapeutic drugs recurrence is common. Mutations of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene are considered as the initiating step of transformation in familial and sporadic CRCs. We have previously shown that APC regulates the cellular response to DNA replication stress and recently hypothesized that APC mutations might therefore influence 5-FU resistance. To test this, we compared CRC cell lines and show that those expressing truncated APC exhibit a limited response to 5-FU and arrest in G1/S-phase without undergoing lethal damage, unlike cells expressing wild-type APC. In SW480 APC-mutant CRC cells, 5-FU-dependent apoptosis was restored after transient expression of full length APC, indicating a direct link between APC and drug response. Furthermore, we could increase sensitivity of APC truncated cells to 5-FU by inactivating the Chk1 kinase using drug treatment or siRNA-mediated knockdown. Our findings identify mutant APC as a potential tumor biomarker of resistance to 5-FU, and importantly we show that APC-mutant CRC cells can be made more sensitive to 5-FU by use of Chk1 inhibitors.

  12. Synthesis of glycyrrhetinic acid-modified chitosan 5-fluorouracil nanoparticles and its inhibition of liver cancer characteristics in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Mingrong; Gao, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yong; Chen, Houxiang; He, Bing; Xu, Hongzhi; Li, Yingchun; Han, Jiang; Zhang, Zhiping

    2013-09-17

    Nanoparticle drug delivery (NDDS) is a novel system in which the drugs are delivered to the site of action by small particles in the nanometer range. Natural or synthetic polymers are used as vectors in NDDS, as they provide targeted, sustained release and biodegradability. Here, we used the chitosan and hepatoma cell-specific binding molecule, glycyrrhetinic acid (GA), to synthesize glycyrrhetinic acid-modified chitosan (GA-CTS). The synthetic product was confirmed by Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and ¹H-nuclear magnetic resonance (¹H-NMR). By combining GA-CTS and 5-FU (5-fluorouracil), we obtained a GA-CTS/5-FU nanoparticle, with a particle size of 217.2 nm, a drug loading of 1.56% and a polydispersity index of 0.003. The GA-CTS/5-FU nanoparticle provided a sustained release system comprising three distinct phases of quick, steady and slow release. We demonstrated that the nanoparticle accumulated in the liver. In vitro data indicated that it had a dose- and time-dependent anti-cancer effect. The effective drug exposure time against hepatic cancer cells was increased in comparison with that observed with 5-FU. Additionally, GA-CTS/5-FU significantly inhibited the growth of drug-resistant hepatoma, which may compensate for the drug-resistance of 5-FU. In vivo studies on an orthotropic liver cancer mouse model demonstrated that GA-CTS/5-FU significantly inhibited tumor growth, resulting in increased survival time.

  13. Effects of Supernatants from Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii on Intestinal Epithelial Cells and a Rat Model of 5-Fluorouracil-Induced Mucositis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hanru; Jatmiko, Yoga D; Bastian, Susan E P; Mashtoub, Suzanne; Howarth, Gordon S

    2017-01-01

    Faecalibacterium prausnitzii (Fp) and Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) are probiotics, which have been reported to ameliorate certain gastrointestinal disorders. We evaluated the effects of supernatants (SN) derived from Fp and EcN on 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-treated intestinal cells and in a rat model of mucositis. In vitro: IEC-6, Caco-2, and T-84 cells were analyzed for viability and monolayer permeability. In vivo: Female dark agouti rats were gavaged with Fp or EcN SN and injected intraperitoneally with saline (control) or 5-FU to induce mucositis. Rats were euthanized and intestinal tissues collected for myeloperoxidase assay and histological analyses. In vitro: Caco-2 cell viability was further reduced when treated with Fp SN + 5-FU compared to 5-FU controls. In both Caco-2 and T-84 cells, Fp SN partially prevented the decrease in transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) caused by 5-FU administration. In vivo: 5-FU-injected rats administered Fp SN or EcN SN partly prevented body weight loss and normalized water intake compared to 5-FU controls. These results suggest a growth inhibitory mechanism of Fp SN action on transformed epithelial cells that could be mediated by effects on tight junctions. Factors derived from Fp SN and EcN SN could have a role in reducing the severity of intestinal mucositis.

  14. A Phase I trial of preoperative eniluracil plus 5-fluorouracil and radiation for locally advanced or unresectable adenocarcinoma of the rectum and colon.

    PubMed

    Czito, Brian G; Hong, Timothy J; Cohen, Darrel P; Tyler, Douglas S; Lee, Catherine G; Anscher, Mitchell S; Ludwig, Kirk A; Seigler, Hilliard F; Mantyh, Christopher; Morse, Michael A; Lockhart, Albert C; Petros, William P; Honeycutt, Wanda; Spector, Neil L; Ertel, Phillip J; Mangum, Steve G; Hurwitz, Herbert I

    2004-03-01

    Eniluracil, an effective inactivator of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase, allows for oral dosing of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), which avoids the morbidity of continuous infusion 5-FU. We addressed the safety of oral eniluracil and 5-FU combined with preoperative radiotherapy and determined the recommended Phase II dose and dose-limiting toxicity in patients with locally advanced rectal and colon cancer. Patients with TNM Stage II or III rectal cancer and residual or recurrent colon cancer received eniluracil (starting at 6.0 mg/m(2) every 12 h) and 5-FU (starting at 0.6 mg/m(2) every 12 h). Eniluracil and 5-FU were given with a 5-week course of preoperative radiotherapy of 4500 cGy, with a possible 540-cGy boost. Surgery was performed approximately 4 weeks after completion of chemoradiotherapy. Twenty-two patients were enrolled; 1 patient was withdrawn owing to noncompliance. Chemotherapy was completed in all patients; radiotherapy was completed in 20 patients. The recommended Phase II dose of eniluracil and 5-FU was 8 mg/m(2) every 12 h and 0.8 mg/m(2) every 12 h, respectively. Diarrhea was the dose-limiting toxicity. Eleven of the 17 patients with primary rectal cancer underwent a sphincter-sparing procedure. One patient had a pathologic complete response. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy with oral eniluracil and 5-FU is feasible and well tolerated. Additional investigation is warranted.

  15. A retrospective study on TS mRNA expression and prediction of the effects of adjuvant oral 5-fluorouracil in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    AKI, FUMINORI; BANDO, YOSHIMI; TAKAHASHI, TETSUYUKI; UEHARA, HISANORI; NUMOTO, SATOSHI; ITO, SUEYOSHI; SASA, MITSUNORI; IZUMI, KEISUKE

    2010-01-01

    Nucleic acid-metabolizing enzymes, such as thymidylate synthase (TS), dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD), thymidine phosphorylase (TP) and orotate phosphoribosyl transferase (OPRT), have attracted attention as candidates for response determinants of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Whether the expression levels of these enzymes can be adopted as valuable parameters for 5-FU sensitivity in breast cancer has yet to be elucidated. In the present study, intratumoral mRNA expression of TS, DPD, TP and OPRT were determined in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded surgical specimens collected from 217 breast cancer patients, using the Danenberg Tumor Profile method, which combines microdissection and real-time-polymerase chain reaction. The significance of these enzymes as prognostic and 5-FU efficacy-predicting factors was evaluated. Our data showed that a low DPD expression is related to a high nuclear grade and other factors including hormone receptor-negativity. Low expression levels of TP were found in hormone receptor-negative tumors. TS and OPRT expression were not related to various clinicopathological factors, but patients with a high TS mRNA expression showed a significantly poorer prognosis in cases where 5-FU was not administered. The efficacy of 5-FU was more significant when administered for more than 6 months in the group with a high TS mRNA expression. These data suggest that TS mRNA expression in breast cancer tissue is an ideal predictor of outcomes for patients with no administration of 5-FU, and of the efficacy of 5-FU. PMID:22870098

  16. Protective effect of Bu-Zhong-Yi-Qi decoction, the water extract of Chinese traditional herbal medicine, on 5-fluorouracil-induced intestinal mucositis in mice.

    PubMed

    Gou, H; Gu, L Y; Shang, B Z; Xiong, Y; Wang, C

    2016-12-01

    Intestinal mucositis is a serious toxic side effect of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) treatment. Bu-Zhong-Yi-Qi decoction (BZYQD), a water extract of Chinese traditional herbal medicine, is widely used in chemotherapy in Asia as an alternative treatment to reduce the side effects of chemotherapy. However, the mechanism is unknown. To evaluate its mechanism, we investigated the effect of BZYQD on 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis in mice, especially with regard to apoptosis in the intestinal mucosal epithelia. In the present study, mice were divided into three groups: control, 5-FU, and 5-FU + BZYQD. Mice in the 5-FU and 5-FU + BZYQD groups were administered 5-FU (100 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneally) for 6 days, and the mice in the latter group were given BZYQD (8 g/kg/day, intragastrically) beginning 4 days before 5-FU and continuing until the termination of the experiment. Loss in body weight and diarrhea during the 5-FU treatment were significantly attenuated by administration of BZYQD. The morphological signs of intestinal damage, including shortened villi height, crypt destruction, apoptosis, and necrosis, in intestinal mucosal epithelia were also reversed, accompanied by reduced neutrophil infiltration, nitrite levels, and inflammatory factors (tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin 1β) and increased levels of reduced glutathione. These results suggest that BZYQD inhibits 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis, and this effect may be due to the reduction in apoptosis and necrosis in intestinal mucosal epithelia via the suppression of inflammatory cytokine upregulation. In conclusion, inhibiting cytokine-mediated apoptosis or necrosis can be the molecular mechanism by which BZYQD reduces the gastrointestinal side effects of cancer chemotherapy.

  17. Asiatic acid protects against cognitive deficits and reductions in cell proliferation and survival in the rat hippocampus caused by 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Chaisawang, Pornthip; Sirichoat, Apiwat; Chaijaroonkhanarak, Wunnee; Pannangrong, Wanassanun; Sripanidkulchai, Bungorn; Wigmore, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The chemotherapy drug, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), has been reported to cause cognitive impairments in cancer patients. The drug also reduces cell proliferation and survival in the brain. Asiatic acid (AA) is a triterpene compound found in Centella asiatica that can protect against reduction of neurogenesis in the hippocampus and memory deficits induced by valproic acid (VPA). In the present study, we investigated the preventive effects of AA on the deficits in spatial working memory and cell proliferation and survival caused by 5-FU chemotherapy in a rat model. Male Sprague Dawley rats received 5-FU (5 i.v. injections, 25 mg/kg) on day 8, 11, 14, 17 and 20 of the study. This was co-administered with AA (30 mg/kg, oral gavage tube) either 20 days before receiving 5-FU (preventive), after receiving 5-FU (recovery), or for the entire period of the experiment (throughout). Spatial working memory was determined using the novel object location (NOL) test and hippocampal cell proliferation and survival of dividing cells were quantified using immunohistochemistry. Rats in the 5-FU alone and recovery groups showed memory deficits in the NOL test and reductions in cell proliferation and cell survival in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Rats in the control, AA alone, and both preventive and throughout co-administration groups, however, did not exhibit these characteristics. The results showed that 5-FU chemotherapy impaired memory and reduced cell proliferation and cell survival in the SGZ of the hippocampal dentate gyrus. However, these impairments in the animals receiving 5-FU chemotherapy were restored to control levels when AA was co-administered before and during 5-FU treatment. These data demonstrate that AA can prevent the spatial working memory and hippocampal neurogenesis impairments caused by 5-FU chemotherapy. PMID:28700628

  18. The c-MYC-ABCB5 axis plays a pivotal role in 5-fluorouracil resistance in human colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kugimiya, Naruji; Nishimoto, Arata; Hosoyama, Tohru; Ueno, Koji; Enoki, Tadahiko; Li, Tao-Sheng; Hamano, Kimikazu

    2015-01-01

    c-MYC overexpression is frequently observed in various cancers including colon cancer and regulates many biological activities such as aberrant cell proliferation, apoptosis, genomic instability, immortalization and drug resistance. However, the mechanism by which c-MYC confers drug resistance remains to be fully elucidated. In this study, we found that the c-MYC expression level in primary colorectal cancer tissues correlated with the recurrence rate following 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based adjuvant chemotherapy. Supporting this finding, overexpression of exogenous c-MYC increased the survival rate following 5-FU treatment in human colon cancer cells, and knockdown of endogenous c-MYC decreased it. Furthermore, c-MYC knockdown decreased the expression level of ABCB5, which is involved in 5-FU resistance. Using a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, we found that c-MYC bound to the ABCB5 promoter region. c-MYC inhibitor (10058-F4) treatment inhibited c-MYC binding to the ABCB5 promoter, leading to a decrease in ABCB5 expression level. ABCB5 knockdown decreased the survival rate following 5-FU treatment as expected, and the ABCB5 expression level was increased in 5-FU-resistant human colon cancer cells. Finally, using a human colon cancer xenograft murine model, we found that the combined 5-FU and 10058-F4 treatment significantly decreased tumorigenicity in nude mice compared with 5-FU or 10058-F4 treatment alone. 10058-F4 treatment decreased the ABCB5 expression level in the presence or absence of 5-FU. In contrast, 5-FU treatment alone increased the ABCB5 expression level. Taken together, these results suggest that c-MYC confers resistance to 5-FU through regulating ABCB5 expression in human colon cancer cells. PMID:25689483

  19. Efficacy and Safety of Bolus 5-Fluorouracil and L-Leucovorin as Salvage Chemotherapy for Oral Fluoropyrimidine-Resistant Unresectable or Recurrent Gastric Cancer: A Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Muranaka, Tetsuhito; Yuki, Satoshi; Sawada, Kentaro; Harada, Kazuaki; Kawamoto, Yasuyuki; Nakatsumi, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The International Organization for Standardization-5fluorouracil (FU) 10 trial found that bolus 5-FU and l-leucovorin was not inferior to S-1 in the treatment of gastric cancer (GC). Continuous 5-FU and the rapid injection of 5-FU have different anti-cancer effects. Thus, bolus 5-FU and l-leucovorin treatment might be useful for oral FU-resistant GC. Materials and Methods We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of all patients with S-1 or capecitabine-resistant, unresectable, or recurrent GC treated with bolus 5-FU and l-leucovorin between January 2010 and December 2015 at Hokkaido University Hospital. The bolus 5-FU and l-leucovorin regimen consisted of intravenous l-leucovorin (250 mg/m2/2 h) and bolus 5-FU (600 mg/m2) administered once weekly followed by a 2-week rest period; each cycle was repeated every 8 weeks. Results A total of 14 patients were identified. The disease control rate was 35.7%. The median progression-free survival was 1.6 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3~2.0 months), and the median overall survival was 6.3 months (95% CI, 4.7~7.9 months). No patient died from treatment-related causes. The most common severe adverse event associated with bolus 5-FU and l-leucovorin was neutropenia, which occurred in 21.4% of patients. Conclusions Bolus 5-FU and l-leucovorin treatment might be useful for oral FU-resistant GC. We are planning a multi-center prospective phase II trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of bolus 5-FU and l-leucovorin treatment for pre-treated unresectable or recurrent GC to confirm the results of this limited, retrospective study. PMID:27752395

  20. Wheat germ agglutinin-functionalised crosslinked polyelectrolyte microparticles for local colon delivery of 5-FU: in vitro efficacy and in vivo gastrointestinal distribution.

    PubMed

    Glavas-Dodov, Marija; Steffansen, Bente; Crcarevska, Maja S; Geskovski, Nikola; Dimchevska, Simona; Kuzmanovska, Sonja; Goracinova, Katerina

    2013-01-01

    We have previously reported the development and characterisation of wheat germ agglutinin (WGA)-functionalised chitosan-Ca-alginate (CTS-Ca-ALG) microparticles (MPs) loaded with acid-resistant particles of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). In the present work, our goal was to evaluate the potential of these carriers for efficient treatment of colon cancer by studying in vitro permeability and cell association of 5-FU and [methyl-³H]thymidine uptake in Caco-2 cells, as well as in vivo gastrointestinal distribution. The amount of 5-FU permeated through Caco-2 cells was 15.1, 7.7 and 6.5% for 5-FU solution, CTS-Ca-ALG MPs and WGA conjugates. The concentration of 5-FU associated with Caco-2 cells was significantly greater when delivered from MPs. By incorporation of 5-FU into MPs and further decoration with WGA, an increased [methyl-³H]thymidine uptake was observed few hours after continuous drug treatment followed by significantly reduced uptake after 6 h. Gastrointestinal distribution was in favour of increased localisation and concentration of the particles in colon region.

  1. L-arginine pretreatment reduces intestinal mucositis as induced by 5-FU in mice.

    PubMed

    Leocádio, Paola C L; Antunes, Maísa M; Teixeira, Lílian G; Leonel, Alda J; Alvarez-Leite, Jacqueline I; Machado, Denise C C; Generoso, Simone V; Cardoso, Valbert N; Correia, Maria Isabel T D

    2015-01-01

    Beneficial effects of L-arginine on immune responses and bowel function have been reported. Mucositis is a side effect of chemotherapy treatment that affects approximately 40% of patients. This complication is characterized by inflammation that affects the gastrointestinal tract, increasing permeability and causing abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea, which worsen the patient's nutritional status and increases morbimortality. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of pretreating with 2% L-arginine supplementation in water on mucositis as induced by 5-fluorouracil (5-FU; a single dose of 200 mg/kg body weight) in Swiss male mice. The effect of L-arginine on weight, intestinal permeability, morphology, and the histopathological score of the small intestine (from 0 to 12), oxidative stress, myeloperoxidase (MPO), and N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAG) activities were evaluated. Intestinal length improvement was observed, in addition to the partial recovery of the mucosal architecture. L-arginine attenuated the histopathological score and MPO activity. There was also an improvement in intestinal permeability, despite weight loss after 5-FU administration. In conclusion, L-arginine can positively impact intestinal mucositis by promoting partial mucosal recovery, reducing inflammation and improving intestinal permeability.

  2. Dosimetric study of photobiomodulation therapy in 5-FU-induced oral mucositis in hamsters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotomacio, Claudia Carrara; Campos, Luana; Nesadal de Souza, Douglas; Arana-Chavez, Victor Elias; Simões, Alyne

    2017-01-01

    Oral mucositis (OM) is a debilitating consequence of cancer treatment that could be treated with photobiomodulation therapy (PBMT); however, there is no consensus about its dosimetric parameters for OM healing. The aim of this study was to compare different PBMT protocols on OM treatment, through clinical and histological analysis. Thirty hamsters were used, in an induced model of OM by 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and superficial scratching, in seven days of follow-up. The animals were divided into five groups: control (C), which received only anesthesia and chemotherapeutic vehicle; chemotherapy (Ch), which received anesthesia, 5-FU, and scratches; laser 1 (L1), the same as Ch group, PBMT 6 J/cm2 and 0.24 J (one point); laser 2 (L2), the same as Ch group, PBMT 25 J/cm2 and 1 J (one point); and laser 3 (L3), the same as Ch group, PBMT 4 points of 0.24 J and 6 J/cm2 each. The laser used has λ=660 nm, 0.04 cm2 of spot area, and 40 mW. The best PBMT protocol to maintain lowest OM levels compared to Ch group was L1, followed by L2 and L3. Our results suggest that the application mode of PBMT and the energy delivered per area could interfere with the OM healing.

  3. Characterization of a 5-fluorouracil-enriched osteoprogenitor population of the murine bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Falla, N; Van Vlasselaer; Bierkens, J; Borremans, B; Schoeters, G; Van Gorp, U

    1993-12-15

    In the presence of beta-glycerophosphate and vitamin C, cultures of normal mouse bone marrow cells form three-dimensional structures that stain positive with the Von Kossa technique and express alkaline phosphatase (ALP), collagen type I, and osteocalcin. Little is known about the characteristics and frequency of the cells that contribute to this phenomenon. Most likely, mature osteoblastic cells do not contribute to the nodule formation because no osteocalcin expressing cells are detected in the flushed marrow by in situ hybridization. Limiting dilution analysis shows that, in normal bone marrow, 1 of 2.2 x 10(5) cells has the potency to form a bone nodule and to express ALP, collagen, and osteocalcin in a temporal fashion. Upon in vivo treatment with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), this frequency increases 12-fold, eg, 1 in 1.75 x 10(4) cells shows osteogenic activity. In comparison, fibroblast colony forming cells occur at a frequency of 1 of 2.5 x 10(4) or 1 of 5 x 10(3) plated cells in normal or 5-FU-treated marrow, respectively. Using density centrifugation, the majority of the osteoprogenitor cells in 5-FU marrow are found in the low-density (1.066 to 1.067 g/mL) fractions. In addition, these cells bind to nylon wool but not to plastic and aggregate in the presence of wheat germ agglutinin and soybean agglutinin. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy shows that the bone nodules in 5-FU marrow cultures are composed of fibroblastoid cells embedded in a mineralized collagen matrix. In conclusion, our results show that a quiescent cell population in the murine bone marrow with fibroblastoid characteristics contributes to the formation of bone-like nodules in vitro.

  4. 5-Fluorouracil shell-enriched solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) for effective skin carcinoma treatment.

    PubMed

    Khallaf, Rasha A; Salem, Heba F; Abdelbary, Ahmed

    2016-11-01

    The effective treatment of skin carcinoma is warranted for targeting the chemotherapeutic agents into tumor cells and avoiding unwanted systemic absorption. This work was dedicated to the purpose of engineering highly penetrating shell-enriched nanoparticles that were loaded with a hydrophilic chemotherapeutic agent, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Varying ratios of lecithin and poloxamer188 were used to produce shell-enriched nanoparticles by enabling the formation of reversed micelles within this region of the SLN. The localization of 5-FU within the shell region of the SLN, was confirmed using 5-FU nanogold particles as a tracer. SLN were introduced within sodium carboxy methylcellulose hydrogel, and then applied onto the skin of mice-bearing Ehrlich's ascites carcinoma. The mice were treated with the gel twice daily for 6 weeks. The transmission electron microscope (TEM) revealed the formation of uniform nanoparticles, which captured reversed micelles within their shell region. The SLNs' had particle size that ranged from 137 ± 5.5 nm to 800 ± 53.6, zeta potential of -19.70 ± 0.40 mV and entrapment efficiency of 47.92 ± 2.34%. The diffusion of the drug-loaded SLN (269.37 ± 10.92 μg/cm(2)) was doubled when compared with the free drug (122 ± 3.09 μg/cm(2)) when both diffused through a hydrophobic membrane. SLN-treated mice exhibited reduced inflammatory reactions, with reduced degrees of keratosis, in addition to reduced symptoms of angiogenesis compared to 5-FU-treated mice. SLN possesses the capacity to be manipulated to entrap and release hydrophilic antitumor drugs with ease.

  5. Phase I/II Trial of 5-Fluorouracil and a Noncytotoxic Dose Level of Suramin in Patients with Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    George, Saby; Dreicer, Robert; Au, Jessie J. L.; Shen, Tong; Rini, Brian I.; Roman, Susan; Cooney, Matthew M.; Mekhail, Tarek; Elson, Paul; Wientjes, Guillaume M.; Ganapathi, Ram; Bukowski, Ronald M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is recognized as a neoplasm resistant to chemotherapy. In vitro experiments demonstrated that suramin, at noncytotoxic doses, enhanced the activity of chemotherapy including 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in xenograft models. Patients and Methods A phase I/II trial of noncytotoxic suramin in combination with weekly 5-FU in patients with metastatic RCC was conducted. The treatment consisted of intravenous (I.V.) suramin followed by a 500 mg/m2 I.V. bolus of 5-FU given 4.5 hours after starting suramin. In the phase I portion, a cohort of 6 patients received a suramin dose calculated to achieve a plasma level of 10–50 μmol/L. Therapy was administered once weekly for 6 doses, followed by 2 weeks off. This was followed by a phase II portion in which the primary goal was to determine the objective response rate. Results Twenty-three patients were enrolled in the study: 6 in the phase I portion and 17 in phase II. Seventy-eight percent of patients were men, the mean age was 58.8 years, 96% had previous nephrectomy, and 70% had received previous systemic therapy. Histologic subtype was clear cell in 91%. Dose-limiting toxicity was observed in 1 of 6 patients (grade 3 hypersensitivity related to suramin infusion). The suramin dosing nomogram used in phase I and II portions of the trial yielded the desired plasma level of 10–50 μmol/L from 4.5 hours to 48 hours after infusion in 94 of 115 treatments. No objective responses were noted, and the median time to treatment failure was 2.5 months. The major toxicities (all grades) were fatigue (83%), nausea/vomiting (78%), diarrhea (61%), and chills (61%). Conclusion Suramin levels expected to reverse fibroblast growth factor–induced resistance can be achieved with the dosing regimen used in this study. The toxicity observed with suramin and 5-FU was acceptable. The combination does not have clinical activity in patients with metastatic RCC. PMID:18824429

  6. Luteolin synergizes the antitumor effects of 5-fluorouracil against human hepatocellular carcinoma cells through apoptosis induction and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huanli; Yang, Tao; Liu, Xiaohui; Tian, Ye; Chen, Xiaoliang; Yuan, Ru; Su, Shuonan; Lin, Xiukun; Du, Guanhua

    2016-01-01

    Some compounds derived from Chinese medicine have demonstrated great prospective roles in sensitization to chemotherapy. This study aimed to investigate the combination of luteolin and 5-fluorouracil on proliferations of hepatocellular carcinoma cells and the potential mechanisms. The antitumor effects of luteolin, 5-fluorouracil, and their combinations were detected by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium/phenazine methosulfate assay, and isobole method was used to evaluate drug combinations. CellTiter-Blue and Caspase-Glo 3/7 assay were used for assessment of cell viability and apoptosis after treatment with luteolin, 5-fluorouracil and their combinations. Cell cycle distributions and apoptosis were detected by PI staining, Hoechst 33342 staining and FITC-Annexin V/PI staining. Bcl-2, bax, p53 and PARP expressions were determined by Western blot. Furthermore, mRNA levels of 5-fluorouracil metabolism related enzymes were detected by RT-PCR. Drug combination study showed that luteolin could synergize the antitumor effects of 5-fluorouracil at different dose ratios (luteolin: 5-fluorouracil=10:1, 20:1, 40:1) against HepG2 and Bel7402 cells. Cell viability and cell apoptosis analysis showed that the synergistic growth inhibition caused by combined luteolin and 5-fluorouracil was closely related to apoptosis. Further mechanism studies showed that the synergistic effects of drug combinations were related with enhanced bax/bcl-2 ratios and p53 expressions, and induced PARP cleavage. Also, combined luteolin and 5-fluorouracil could significantly decrease the dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase. These results showed that luteolin could synergize the antitumor effects of 5-fluorouracil on HepG2 and Bel7402 cells, which might be related with apoptosis and regulation of 5-fluorouracil metabolism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Real time in vitro regulation of DNA methylation using a 5-fluorouracil conjugated DNA-based stimuli-responsive platform.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiuhai; Wei, Ming; Zhu, Chengfeng; Lu, Jianxin; Gao, Jimin; Simon, Anna J; Shi, Jiye; Huang, Qing; Fan, Chunhai

    2013-04-10

    DNA methylation, catalyzed by methylases, plays a critical role in many biological processes, and many methylases have been regarded as promising targets for antimicrobial drugs. In this work, we report a stimulus responsive, self-regulating anticancer drug release platform, comprising a multifunctional DNA that upon methylation by methyltransferase (MTase) releases 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu) and in turn inhibits subsequent expression of MTase. The multifunctional DNA with anticancer drug are first methylated by DNA adenine methylation (DAM) methyltransferase (MTase) and then cut by the methylation-sensitive restriction endonuclease Dpn I. Removal of duplex from the functional DNA by the methylation/cleavage process will release the anticancer drug, resulting in inhibition of the activity of DAM in turn. Consequently, the enzyme activity of DAM MTase can be self-regulated. Furthermore, we found that the inhibition efficiency of 5-Fu significantly increase as it is functionalized with DNA.

  8. A multicenter phase II study of irinotecan in patients with advanced colorectal cancer previously treated with 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Méndez, Miguel; Salut, Antonieta; García-Girón, Carlos; Navalon, Marta; Diz, Pilar; García López, Maria José; España, Pilar; de la Torre, Ascensión; Martínez del Prado, Purificación; Duarte, Isabel; Pujol, Eduardo; Arizcun, Alberto; Cruz, Juan Jesús

    2003-11-01

    This multicenter, open-label, phase II study was performed to assess the efficacy and toxicity of irinotecan 350 mg/m2 intravenously every 3 weeks in patients with advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) previously treated with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). The study enrolled 115 patients and a total of 558 cycles (median, 6 per patient) were administered. The overall objective response rate on an intent-to-treat basis was 18% (with 1 complete response and 20 partial responses), whereas 42 patients (37%) showed stable disease. Median time to progression was 4.8 months and median survival was 13.6 months. Grade 3/4 toxicities included delayed diarrhea (19.1%), nausea/vomiting (10.4%), and neutropenia (8.7%). There were 2 toxic deaths, 1 from delayed diarrhea and 1 from hemorrhage and grade 4 mucositis. In conclusion, the present study confirms the antitumor efficacy of irinotecan monotherapy in patients with CRC pretreated with 5-FU.

  9. Pharmacogenomics in colorectal cancer: a genome-wide association study to predict toxicity after 5-fluorouracil or FOLFOX administration.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Rozadilla, C; Cazier, J B; Moreno, V; Crous-Bou, M; Guinó, E; Durán, G; Lamas, M J; López, R; Candamio, S; Gallardo, E; Paré, L; Baiget, M; Páez, D; López-Fernández, L A; Cortejoso, L; García, M I; Bujanda, L; González, D; Gonzalo, V; Rodrigo, L; Reñé, J M; Jover, R; Brea-Fernández, A; Andreu, M; Bessa, X; Llor, X; Xicola, R; Palles, C; Tomlinson, I; Castellví-Bel, S; Castells, A; Ruiz-Ponte, C; Carracedo, A

    2013-06-01

    The development of genotyping technologies has allowed for wider screening for inherited causes of variable outcomes following drug administration. We have performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) on 221 colorectal cancer (CRC) patients that had been treated with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), either alone or in combination with oxaliplatin (FOLFOX). A validation set of 791 patients was also studied. Seven SNPs (rs16857540, rs2465403, rs10876844, rs10784749, rs17626122, rs7325568 and rs4243761) showed evidence of association (pooled P-values 0.020, 9.426E-03, 0.010, 0.017, 0.042, 2.302E-04, 2.803E-03) with adverse drug reactions (ADRs). This is the first study to explore the genetic basis of inter-individual variation in toxicity responses to the administration of 5-FU or FOLFOX in CRC patients on a genome-wide scale.

  10. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of Salmonella typhimurium uridine phosphorylase complexed with 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Lashkov, A A; Gabdoulkhakov, A G; Shtil, A A; Mikhailov, A M

    2009-06-01

    Uridine phosphorylase (UPh; EC 2.4.2.3) catalyzes the phosphorolytic cleavage of the N-glycosidic bond of uridine to form ribose 1-phosphate and uracil. This enzyme also activates pyrimidine-containing drugs, including 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). In order to better understand the mechanism of the enzyme-drug interaction, the complex of Salmonella typhimurium UPh with 5-FU was cocrystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at 294 K. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.2 A resolution. Analysis of these data revealed that the crystal belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 158.26, b = 93.04, c = 149.87 A, alpha = gamma = 90, beta = 90.65 degrees . The solvent content was 45.85% assuming the presence of six hexameric molecules of the complex in the unit cell.

  11. Clinical experience with chronomodulated infusional 5-fluorouracil chemoradiotherapy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Keene, Kimberly S. . E-mail: Kimberlykeene@earthlink.net; Rich, Tyvin A.; Penberthy, David R.; Shepard, Robert C.; Adams, Reid; Jones, R. Scott

    2005-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate retrospectively the efficacy and chronic toxicities of concurrent radiotherapy and chronomodulated infusion 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: Twenty-eight patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma were treated between January 1997 and May 2000 with 5-FU chronomodulated chemoradiotherapy. Chronomodulated delivery of chemotherapy was chosen on the basis of a lower toxicity profile in the treatment of GI malignancies. The median age was 64 years. Of the 28 patients, 12 were men and 16 were women. Eight patients had unresectable disease and 20 were treated after pancreatic resection. The median radiation dose was 50.4 Gy given in 28 fractions. The median field length and width was 10.6 cm and 10.9 cm, respectively. Concurrent chemotherapy with 5-FU was administered 5 d/wk, with a median total dose of 8.4 g/m{sup 2} (300 mg/m{sup 2}/d). Chronomodulated 5-FU delivery consisted of a low basal infusion for 16 h followed by an 8-h escalating-deescalating infusion peaking at 10 PM. Survival and recurrence data were evaluated using Kaplan-Meier actuarial analysis. Toxicities were recorded using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grading system. Results: The median follow-up for all patients was 26 months (range, 4-68 months). The median overall survival for the 20 patients treated postoperatively was 34 months, with a 3- and 5-year actuarial survival rate of 40% and 21%, respectively. If the 3 patients with carcinoma of the ampulla were removed from the data set, the mean overall survival in the resected patients was 34 months, with a 3-year and 5-year actuarial survival rate of 40% and 17%, respectively. The 8 unresectable patients had a median overall survival of 14 months, and none lived past 2 years. No patient experienced Grade 3 or 4 hematologic toxicity or weight loss. Five patients had nausea and dehydration requiring i.v. fluids; only one (4%) was hospitalized. Four patients required a dose

  12. Pharmacoeconomic analysis of adjuvant oral capecitabine vs intravenous 5-FU/LV in Dukes' C colon cancer: the X-ACT trial.

    PubMed

    Cassidy, J; Douillard, J-Y; Twelves, C; McKendrick, J J; Scheithauer, W; Bustová, I; Johnston, P G; Lesniewski-Kmak, K; Jelic, S; Fountzilas, G; Coxon, F; Díaz-Rubio, E; Maughan, T S; Malzyner, A; Bertetto, O; Beham, A; Figer, A; Dufour, P; Patel, K K; Cowell, W; Garrison, L P

    2006-04-24

    Oral capecitabine (Xeloda) is an effective drug with favourable safety in adjuvant and metastatic colorectal cancer. Oxaliplatin-based therapy is becoming standard for Dukes' C colon cancer in patients suitable for combination therapy, but is not yet approved by the UK National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) in the adjuvant setting. Adjuvant capecitabine is at least as effective as 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin (5-FU/LV), with significant superiority in relapse-free survival and a trend towards improved disease-free and overall survival. We assessed the cost-effectiveness of adjuvant capecitabine from payer (UK National Health Service (NHS)) and societal perspectives. We used clinical trial data and published sources to estimate incremental direct and societal costs and gains in quality-adjusted life months (QALMs). Acquisition costs were higher for capecitabine than 5-FU/LV, but higher 5-FU/LV administration costs resulted in 57% lower chemotherapy costs for capecitabine. Capecitabine vs 5-FU/LV-associated adverse events required fewer medications and hospitalisations (cost savings pound3653). Societal costs, including patient travel/time costs, were reduced by >75% with capecitabine vs 5-FU/LV (cost savings pound1318), with lifetime gain in QALMs of 9 months. Medical resource utilisation is significantly decreased with capecitabine vs 5-FU/LV, with cost savings to the NHS and society. Capecitabine is also projected to increase life expectancy vs 5-FU/LV. Cost savings and better outcomes make capecitabine a preferred adjuvant therapy for Dukes' C colon cancer. This pharmacoeconomic analysis strongly supports replacing 5-FU/LV with capecitabine in the adjuvant treatment of colon cancer in the UK.

  13. Preoperative Capecitabine and Pelvic Radiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer-Is it Equivalent to 5-FU Infusion Plus Leucovorin and Radiotherapy?

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Alexander K.; Wong, Alfred O.; Jenken, Daryl A.

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: The aim of this retrospective case-matching study was to compare the treatment outcomes and acute toxicity of preoperative radiotherapy (RT) with capecitabine vs. preoperative RT with intermittent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) infusion, leucovorin, and mitomycin C in rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: We matched 34 patients who were treated with preoperative concurrent capecitabine and 50 Gy of RT by their clinical T stage (T3 or T4) and the tumor location (<=7 cm or >7 cm from the anal verge) with another 68 patients who were treated with preoperative intermittent 5-FU infusion, leucovorin, mitomycin C, and 50 Gy of RT for a comparison of the pathologic tumor response, local control, distant failure, and survival rates. Results: The pathologic complete response rate was 21% with capecitabine and 18% with 5-FU and leucovorin (p = 0.72). The rate of T downstaging after chemoradiation was 59% for both groups. The rate of sphincter-sparing resection was 38% after capecitabine plus RT and 43% after 5-FU plus RT (p = 0.67). At 3 years, there was no significant difference in the local control rate (93% for capecitabine and 92% for 5-FU and leucovorin), relapse-free rate (74% for capecitabine and 73% for 5-FU and leucovorin), or disease-specific survival rate (86% for capecitabine and 77% for 5-FU and leucovorin). The acute toxicity profile was comparable, with little Grade 3 and 4 toxicity. Conclusions: When administered with concurrent preoperative RT, both capecitabine and intermittent 5-FU infusion with leucovorin modulation provided comparable pathologic tumor response, local control, relapse-free survival, and disease-specific survival rates in rectal cancer.

  14. Combination of 5-fluorouracil and genistein induces apoptosis synergistically in chemo-resistant cancer cells through the modulation of AMPK and COX-2 signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Jin-Taek; Ha, Joohun; Park, Ock Jin . E-mail: ojpark@hannam.ac.kr

    2005-07-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is one of the widely used chemotherapeutic drugs targeting various cancers, but its chemo-resistance remains as a major obstacle in clinical settings. In the present study, HT-29 colon cancer cells were markedly sensitized to apoptosis by both 5-FU and genistein compared to the 5-FU treatment alone. There is an emerging evidence that genistein, soy-derived phytoestrogen, may have potential as a chemotherapeutic agent capable of inducing apoptosis or suppressing tumor promoting proteins such as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). However, the precise mechanism of cellular cytotoxicity of genistein is not known. The present study focused on the correlation of AMPK and COX-2 in combined cytotoxicity of 5-FU and genistein, since AMPK is known as a primary cellular homeostasis regulator and a possible target molecule of cancer treatment, and COX-2 as cell proliferation and anti-apoptotic molecule. Our results demonstrated that the combination of 5-FU and genistein abolished the up-regulated state of COX-2 and prostaglandin secretion caused by 5-FU treatment in HT-29 colon cancer cells. These appear to be followed by the specific activation of AMPK and the up-regulation of p53, p21, and Bax by genistein. Under same conditions, the induction of Glut-1 by 5-FU was diminished by the combination treatment with 5-FU and genistein. Furthermore, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) was found as an upstream signal for AMPK activation by genistein. These results suggested that the combination of 5-FU and genistein exert a novel chemotherapeutic effect in colon cancers, and AMPK may be a novel regulatory molecule of COX-2 expression, further implying its involvement in cytotoxicity caused by genistein.

  15. Probiotic Bifidobacterium bifidum G9-1 attenuates 5-fluorouracil-induced intestinal mucositis in mice via suppression of dysbiosis-related secondary inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shinichi; Hamouda, Nahla; Kano, Yoshitaro; Oikawa, Yousuke; Tanaka, Yoshiki; Matsumoto, Kenjiro; Amagase, Kikuko; Shimakawa, Masaki

    2017-10-01

    Bifidobacterium, a major component of the intestinal microbiota, has been clinically used for the treatment of diarrhoea and constipation. 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU), widely used for cancer chemotherapy, is known to frequently induce intestinal mucositis accompanied by severe diarrhoea. The present study examined the effect of Bifidobacterium bifidum G9-1 (BBG9-1) on 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis in mice. Intestinal mucositis was induced by repeated administration of 5-FU for 6 days. BBG9-1 was administered orally once daily for 9 days, beginning 3 days before the onset of 5-FU treatment. Repeated administration of 5-FU caused severe intestinal mucositis, characterised by shortening of villi and destruction of crypts, accompanied by increases in intestinal myeloperoxidase activity and inflammatory cytokine expression, body weight loss, and diarrhoea on day 6. Daily administration of BBG9-1 significantly reduced the severity of intestinal mucositis and inflammatory responses and tended to attenuate clinical symptoms. In contrast, BBG9-1 failed to prevent apoptosis induction on day 1 after the first 5-FU administration. The structure of the intestinal microbiota, as analysed by weighted UniFrac distance, was largely altered by 5-FU treatment, but this change was mitigated by daily administration of BBG9-1. Moreover, 5-FU treatment decreased the abundance of Firmicutes and increased the abundance of Bacteroidetes, but these responses were also significantly inhibited by daily administration of BBG9-1. These results suggest that BBG9-1 has an ameliorative effect against 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis through the attenuation of inflammatory responses via improve dysbiosis. BBG9-1 could be useful for the prevention of intestinal mucositis during cancer chemotherapy. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  16. Chan-Yu-Bao-Yuan-Tang and 5-fluorouracil synergistically induce apoptosis by means of the caspase-3 signaling pathway in lung and cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Fang; Liu, Xiaoguang; Li, Yuncheng; Chen, Gang; Wang, Yekai; Zhou, Shiquan; Zhu, Wangyu; Huang, Yanyan; Zhou, Jiehang; Li, Shibo; Zhang, Yongkui

    2011-01-01

    Previous clinical studies have shown the safety and efficacy of the traditional Chinese medicinal herbal aqueous extract Chan-Yu-Bao-Yuan-Tang (CYBYT) for the treatment of lung and cervical cancer patients. Used in combination with 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu), CYBYT has been observed to be particularly effective in cancer treatment. Herein, the combined anticancer effect and the underlying mechanisms of 5-Fu and CYBYT in the human lung cancer cell line A549 and the human cervical cancer cell line HeLa were investigated in vitro. The MTT assay, Annexin V-FITC staining and Western blotting were applied to identify cell viability, the stages of apoptosis and the expression of signaling proteins, respectively. The results indicated that CYBYT and 5-Fu, alone or in combination, significantly inhibited proliferation and induced marked apoptosis in A549 and HeLa cells, but had no significant inhibitory effects on normal human IMR-90 fibroblasts. The rate of mid and late apoptosis or necrosis was greater after 5-Fu treatment compared to treatment with CYBYT or the combination of agents; however, the early apoptotic rate showed opposite results. CYBYT and 5-Fu, alone or in combination, up-regulated cleaved caspase-3 expression in a time-dependent manner, with CYBYT being more effective than 5-Fu. Taken together, our data show that the pro-apoptotic activity of the two-drug combination was much stronger than that of CYBYT or 5-Fu alone; CYBYT combined with 5-Fu had synergistic effects at lower concentrations and promoted apoptosis, while the combined treatment also decreased the cytotoxic side effects of 5-Fu.

  17. Predictive markers for the response to 5-fluorouracil therapy in cancer cells: Constant-field gel electrophoresis as a tool for prediction of response to 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    SALEH, E. M.; EL-AWADY, R. A.; ANIS, N.

    2013-01-01

    The prediction of response or severe toxicity and therapy individualisation are extremely important in cancer chemotherapy. There are few tools to predict chemoresponse or toxicity in cancer patients. We investigated the correlation between the induction and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) using constant-field gel electrophoresis (CFGE) and evaluating cell cycle progression and the sensitivity of four cancer cell lines to 5-fluorouracil (5FU). Using a sulphorhodamine-B assay, colon carcinoma cells (HCT116) were found to be the most sensitive to 5FU, followed by liver carcinoma cells (HepG2) and breast carcinoma cells (MCF-7). Cervical carcinoma cells (HeLa) were the most resistant. As measured by CFGE, DSB induction, but not residual DSBs, exhibited a significant correlation with the sensitivity of the cell lines to 5FU. Flow cytometric cell cycle analysis revealed that 14% of HCT116 or HepG2 cells and 2% of MCF-7 cells shifted to sub-G1 phase after a 96-h incubation with 5FU. Another 5FU-induced cell cycle change in HCT116, HepG2 and MCF-7 cells was the mild arrest of cells in G1 and/or G2/M phases of the cell cycle. In addition, 5FU treatment resulted in the accumulation of HeLa cells in the S and G2/M phases. Determination of Fas ligand (Fas-L) and caspase 9 as representative markers for the extrinsic and intrinsic pathways of apoptosis, respectively, revealed that 5FU-induced apoptosis in HCT116 and HepG2 results from the expression of Fas-L (extrinsic pathway). Therefore, the induction of DNA DSBs by 5FU, detected using CFGE, and the induction of apoptosis are candidate predictive markers that may distinguish cancer cells which are likely to benefit from 5FU treatment and the measurement of DSBs using CFGE may aid the prediction of clinical outcome. PMID:23255942

  18. In vitro cytotoxicity and genotoxicity studies of gold nanoparticles-mediated photo-thermal therapy versus 5-fluorouracil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomaa, Iman E.; Abdel Gaber, Sara A.; Bhatt, Samarth; Liehr, Thomas; Glei, Michael; El-Tayeb, Tarek A.; Abdel-Kader, Mahmoud H.

    2015-02-01

    This study evaluates tumour cell-killing efficacy of metallic gold nanoparticles (AuNPs)-mediated photo-thermal therapy (PTT) in comparison to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) as a standard chemotherapeutic drug. It also focuses on the possible genetic abnormalities of both drugs in normal blood lymphocytes. Both 5-FU and light-activated spherical AuNPs of 15± nm diameter were used to target MCF-7 breast cancer cell line. Alkaline comet assay, standard karyotyping and multiplex fluorescent in situ hybridization were applied in order to investigate the respective possible genotoxic and mutagenic side effects that might result from the application of each therapeutic modality. Results showed that the LC25 of AuNPs-mediated PTT was achieved at a concentration of 100 µM for 12-h incubation and exposure to light energy of 50 J/cm2, while the same cytotoxic effect was obtained by incubating the MCF-7 cells with the same concentration of the chemotherapeutic drug 5-FU for 24 h. On the other hand, AuNPs showed insignificant genotoxic effect of DNA damage represented by 4.6 % in comparison to 18.58 % exerted by 5-FU. The chromosomal studies resulted in normal karyotypes for cells treated with AuNPs-mediated PTT, while those treated with 5-FU showed several types of numerical as well as structural chromosomal aberrations. In conclusion, compared to 5-FU, light-activated AuNPs-mediated PTT provides considerable efficacy in breast cancer cells killing with no genetic side effects under the proposed experimental conditions.

  19. Biomechanical and Macroscopic Evaluations of the Effects of 5-Fluorouracil on Partially Divided Flexor Tendon Injuries in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Duci, Shkelzen B; Arifi, Hysni M; Ahmeti, Hasan R; Manxhuka-Kerliu, Suzana; Neziri, Burim; Mekaj, Agon Y; Lajqi, Shpetim; Shahini, Labinot

    2015-06-20

    The main goals of flexor tendon surgery are to restore digital motion by providing tendon healing and to preserve tendon gliding. Our purpose was to investigate the effects of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) on tendon adhesions in partially divided profundus flexor tendons (flexor digitorum profundus [FDPs]) following surgical repair and in partially divided FDPs without surgical repair, and to compare the results of the repair versus the nonrepair of zone two injuries via macroscopic and biomechanical evaluations of tendon adhesions. We used 32 adult male European rabbits (Oryctolagus cunniculus) weighing from 2.5 to 3.5 kg. The study was performed on the deep flexor tendons of the second and third digits of the right hind paws of the rabbits; thus, a total of 64 tendons were examined in this study. Based on the results achieved in our experimental study, the load (N) significantly increased in subgroup 1a in which the tendons were surgically repaired and were not treated with 5-FU compared with subgroup 2a in which tendons were surgically repaired and treated with 5-FU. The load (N) significantly increased in subgroup 1a in which the tendons were surgically repaired and were not treated with 5-FU compared to subgroup 2a in which the tendons were surgically repaired and treated with 5-FU. Therefore, these results revealed a decrease in adhesion formation in the subgroup that was treated with 5-FU due to increased resistance to tendon adhesions during their excursion through the tendon sheath, which in this case required greater traction force.

  20. Administration of probiotic mixture DM#1 ameliorated 5-fluorouracil-induced intestinal mucositis and dysbiosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yan; Wu, Yingtao; Huang, Ziyi; Dong, Weiwei; Deng, Ying; Wang, Fengjiao; Li, Ming; Yuan, Jieli

    2017-01-01

    The use of probiotics to alleviate chemotherapy-induced intestinal mucositis is supported by clinical consensus. However, no studies to date, to our knowledge, have systematically analyzed the effects of a probiotic mixture on chemotherapy-induced mucositis or assessed changes in the intestinal microbiota after probiotic treatment. The aim of this study was to report the effects of a probiotic mixture, DM#1, on intestinal mucositis and dysbiosis of rats treated with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Twenty-eight male Sprague Dawley rats weighing 180 to 220 g were randomly divided into four groups: control, 5-FU, probiotic high (PH), and probiotic low (PL). Except for the control group, all other groups received intraperitoneal injections of 5-FU for 5 d, and the PH and PL groups received DM#1 intragastrically (1 × 10(9) or 1 × 10(8) colony-forming units/kg, respectively) for 8 d. One day after the last administration, rats were sacrificed and the ilea were removed for histopathologic assessment and evaluation of permeability, myeloperoxidase activity, levels of cytokines (interleukin [IL]-4, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-α), and mRNA of toll-like receptors (TLR; TLR2, TLR4, and TLR9). Additionally, intestinal microbiota profiles were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and quantitative real-time PCR. Treatment with DM#1 ameliorated 5-FU-induced intestinal mucosal injury in rats, possibly by reducing proinflammatory cytokine levels and neutrophil infiltration. The increased intestinal permeability caused by 5-FU was ameliorated. These results were closely associated with the reestablishment of intestinal microbial homeostasis and alteration of the TLR2/TLR4 signaling pathway. Administration of the probiotic mixture DM#1 ameliorated 5-FU-induced intestinal mucositis and dysbiosis in rats. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Dual role of macrophages in the response of C26 colon carcinoma cells to 5-fluorouracil administration

    PubMed Central

    Patras, Laura; Sesarman, Alina; Licarete, Emilia; Luca, Lavinia; Alupei, Marius Costel; Rakosy-Tican, Elena; Banciu, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are pivotal players in tumor progression via modulation of tumor angiogenesis, inflammation, metastasis and oxidative stress, as well as of the response of cancer cells to cytotoxic drugs. Nevertheless, the role of TAMs in the prognosis of colorectal cancer remains controversial. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate how TAMs mediate the response of C26 colon carcinoma cells to the cytotoxic drug 5-