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Sample records for 5-fu-based chemoradiation therapy

  1. E2F1/TS Immunophenotype and Survival of Patients with Colorectal Cancer Treated with 5FU-Based Adjuvant Therapy.

    PubMed

    Sulzyc-Bielicka, Violetta; Domagala, Pawel; Bielicki, Dariusz; Safranow, Krzysztof; Rogowski, Wojciech; Domagala, Wenancjusz

    2016-07-01

    The predictive value of thymidylate synthase (TS) expression alone for 5FU-based treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC) has not been clinically confirmed. Little is known on the association of expression of E2F1, which controls the transcription of genes encoding proteins engaged in DNA synthesis including TS, and survival of patients with CRC. The purpose of this study is to assess the correlation between expression of both E2F1 and TS in CRCs and survival of patients administered adjuvant 5FU-based chemotherapy, in order to find a better predictor of treatment outcome than expression of TS or E2F1 alone. Nuclear TS and E2F1 were detected by immunohistochemistry in tissue microarrays from 190 CRCs (Astler-Coller stage B2 or C). Multivariate analysis identified significant association of the combined E2F1+TS+ immunophenotype with worse OS (HR = 3,78, P = 0,009) and DFS (HR = 2,30, P = 0,03) of patients with colon cancer. There were significant differences between E2F1+TS+ and E2F1-TS- Kaplan-Meier survival curves in relation to DFS (P = 0.008) and OS (P = 0.01). About 37 and 31 % difference in 3-year DFS and OS respectively were seen between patients with E2F1+TS+ vs. E2F1-TS- colon cancer immunophenotype. The E2F1+TS+ immunophenotype may be a marker of poor prognosis (the worst DFS and OS) of patients with colon cancer treated with 5FU-based adjuvant therapy. A subgroup of patients with this immunophenotype may require different and perhaps more aggressive treatment than 5FU-based chemotherapy. Thus, the combined E2F1/TS immunophenotype could be a potential indicator of colon cancer sensitivity to 5FU. PMID:26831819

  2. Thymidylate Synthase Gene Polymorphism Affects the Response to Preoperative 5-Fluorouracil Chemoradiation Therapy in Patients With Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hur, Hyuk; Kang, Jeonghyun; Kim, Nam Kyu; Min, Byung Soh; Lee, Kang Young; Shin, Sang Joon; Keum, Ki Chang; Choi, Junjeong; Kim, Hoguen; Choi, Sung Ho; Lee, Mi-Young

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: This study aims to correlate thymidylate synthase (TS) gene polymorphisms with the tumor response to preoperative 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemoradiation therapy (CRT) in patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty-four patients with rectal cancer treated with 5-FU-based preoperative CRT were prospectively enrolled in this study. Thymidylate synthase expression and TS gene polymorphisms were evaluated in tumor obtained before preoperative CRT and were correlated with the pathologic response, as assessed by histopathologic staging (pTNM) and tumor regression grade. Results: Patients exhibited 2R/3R and 3R/3R tandem repeat polymorphisms in the TS gene. With regard to TS expression in these genotypes, 2R/3RC and 3RC/3RC were defined as the low-expression group and 2R/3RG, 3RC/3RG, and 3RG/3RG as the high-expression group. There was no significant correlation between TS expression and tumor response. There was no significant difference in the tumor response between patients homozygous for 3R/3R and patients heterozygous for 2R/3R. However, 13 of 14 patients in the low-expression group with a G>C single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) (2R/3RC [n = 5] or 3RC/3RC [n = 9]) exhibited a significantly greater tumor downstaging rate, as compared with only 12 of 30 patients in the high-expression group without the SNP (2R/3RG [n = 10], 3RC/3RG [n = 9], or 3RG/3RG [n = 11]) (p = 0.001). The nodal downstaging rate was also significantly greater in this low-expression group, as compared with the high-expression group (12 of 14 vs. 14 of 30, p = 0.014). However, there was no significant difference in the tumor regression grade between these groups. Conclusions: This study suggests that SNPs within the TS enhancer region affect the tumor response to preoperative 5-FU-based CRT in rectal cancer.

  3. Absence of large intragenic rearrangements in the DPYD gene in a large cohort of colorectal cancer patients treated with 5-FU-based chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Paré, Laia; Paez, David; Salazar, Juliana; del Rio, Elisabeth; Tizzano, Eduardo; Marcuello, Eugenio; Baiget, Montserrat

    2010-01-01

    AIMS To study the relationship between the toxicity associated with a 5-FU-based therapy and the presence of (i) the large intragenic rearrangements in the DPYD gene and (ii) the IVS14+1G>A mutation. METHODS We used the multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification technique (MLPA) to study genomic DNA from 234 colorectal cancer patients treated with 5-FU-based chemotherapy. RESULTS We did not detect any deletion/duplication in the DPYD gene. The presence of the IVS14+1G>A mutation was also excluded. CONCLUSIONS Neither the large genomic rearrangements in the DPYD gene nor the IVS14+1G>A mutation play a significant role in the development of serious toxicity associated with a 5-FU containing regimen. PMID:20653680

  4. Preoperative infusional chemoradiation therapy for stage T3 rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, T.A.; Skibber, J.M.; Ajani, J.A.

    1995-07-15

    To evaluate preoperative infusional chemoradiation for patients with operable rectal cancer. Preoperative chemoradiation therapy using infusional 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), (300 mg/m{sup 2}/day) together with daily irradiation (45 Gy/25 fractions/5 weeks) was administered to 77 patients with clinically Stage T3 rectal cancer. Endoscopic ultrasound confirmed the digital rectal exam in 63 patients. Surgery was performed approximately 6 weeks after the completion of chemoradiation therapy and included 25 abdominoperineal resections and 52 anal-sphincter-preserving procedures. Posttreatment tumor stages were T1-2, N0 in 35%, T3, N0 in 25%, and T1-3, N1 in 11%; 29% had no evidence of tumor. Local tumor control after chemoradiation was seen in 96% (74 out of 77); 2 patients had recurrent disease at the anastomosis site and were treated successfully with abdominoperineal resection. Overall, pelvic control was obtained in 99% (76 out of 77). The survival after chemoradiation was higher in patients without node involvement than in those having node involvement (p = n.s.). More patients with pathologic complete responses or only microscopic foci survived than did patients who had gross residual tumor (p = 0.07). The actuarial survival rate was 83% at 3 years; the median follow-up was 27 months, with a range of 3 to 68 months. Acute, perioperative, and late complications were not more numerous or more severe with chemoradiation therapy than with traditional radiation therapy (XRT) alone. Excellent treatment response allowed two-thirds of the patients to have an anal-sphincter-sparing procedure. Gross residual disease in the resected specimen indicates a poor prognosis, and therapies specifically targeting these patients may improve survival further. 22 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Oral surgery in patients undergoing chemoradiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Demian, Nagi M; Shum, Jonathan W; Kessel, Ivan L; Eid, Ahmed

    2014-05-01

    Oral health care in patients undergoing chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy can be complex. Care delivered by a multidisciplinary approach is timely and streamlines the allocation of resources to provide prompt care and to attain favorable outcomes. A hospital dentist, oral and maxillofacial surgeon, and a maxillofacial prosthodontist must be involved early to prevent avoidable oral complications. Prevention and thorough preparation are vital before the start of chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Oral complications must be addressed immediately and, even with the best management, can cause delays and interruption in treatment, with serious consequences for the outcome and prognosis. PMID:24794266

  6. Absence of large intragenic rearrangements in the DPYD gene in a large cohort of colorectal cancer patients treated with 5-FU-based chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Paré, Laia; Paez, David; Salazar, Juliana; Del Rio, Elisabeth; Tizzano, Eduardo; Marcuello, Eugenio; Baiget, Montserrat

    2010-08-01

    WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN ABOUT THIS SUBJECT * Dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) is the enzyme responsible for the elimination of approximately 80% of the administered dose of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). * Mutations in the DPD-coding gene have been shown to increase the risk of severe toxicity in 5-FU treated patients. * The IVS14+1G>A is the most common DPYD mutation. WHAT THIS STUDY ADDS * The intragenic rearrangements of DPYD using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) were studied for the first time in a large series of 234 colorectal cancer patients treated with 5-FU-containing chemotherapy. * No deletions or duplications of one or more DPYD exons were detected. The presence of the IVS14+1G>A mutation was also excluded. * These data show that neither the large genomic rearrangements in the DPYD gene nor the IVS14+1G>A mutation are responsible for the serious toxicity associated with a 5-FU containing regimen in this cohort of Spanish patients. AIMS To study the relationship between the toxicity associated with a 5-FU-based therapy and the presence of (i) the large intragenic rearrangements in the DPYD gene and (ii) the IVS14+1G>A mutation. METHODS We used the multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification technique (MLPA) to study genomic DNA from 234 colorectal cancer patients treated with 5-FU-based chemotherapy. RESULTS We did not detect any deletion/duplication in the DPYD gene. The presence of the IVS14+1G>A mutation was also excluded. CONCLUSIONS Neither the large genomic rearrangements in the DPYD gene nor the IVS14+1G>A mutation play a significant role in the development of serious toxicity associated with a 5-FU containing regimen. PMID:20653680

  7. Dose-Volume Effects on Patient-Reported Acute Gastrointestinal Symptoms During Chemoradiation Therapy for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ronald C.; Mamon, Harvey J.; Ancukiewicz, Marek; Killoran, Joseph H.; Crowley, Elizabeth M.; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S.; Wo, Jennifer Y.; Ryan, David P.; Hong, Theodore S.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Research on patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in rectal cancer is limited. We examined whether dose-volume parameters of the small bowel and large bowel were associated with patient-reported gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms during 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemoradiation treatment for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: 66 patients treated at the Brigham and Women's Hospital or Massachusetts General Hospital between 2006 and 2008 were included. Weekly during treatment, patients completed a questionnaire assessing severity of diarrhea, urgency, pain, cramping, mucus, and tenesmus. The association between dosimetric parameters and changes in overall GI symptoms from baseline through treatment was examined by using Spearman's correlation. Potential associations between these parameters and individual GI symptoms were also explored. Results: The amount of small bowel receiving at least 15 Gy (V15) was significantly associated with acute symptoms (p = 0.01), and other dosimetric parameters ranging from V5 to V45 also trended toward association. For the large bowel, correlations between dosimetric parameters and overall GI symptoms at the higher dose levels from V25 to V45 did not reach statistical significance (p = 0.1), and a significant association was seen with rectal pain from V15 to V45 (p < 0.01). Other individual symptoms did not correlate with small bowel or large bowel dosimetric parameters. Conclusions: The results of this study using PROs are consistent with prior studies with physician-assessed acute toxicity, and they identify small bowel V15 as an important predictor of acute GI symptoms during 5-FU-based chemoradiation treatment. A better understanding of the relationship between radiation dosimetric parameters and PROs may allow physicians to improve radiation planning to optimize patient outcomes.

  8. Symptomatic Pericardial Effusion After Chemoradiation Therapy in Esophageal Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Fukada, Junichi; Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Takeuchi, Hiroya; Ohashi, Toshio; Saikawa, Yoshiro; Takaishi, Hiromasa; Hanada, Takashi; Shiraishi, Yutaka; Kitagawa, Yuko; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: We investigated clinical and treatment-related factors as predictors of symptomatic pericardial effusion in esophageal cancer patients after concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Methods and Materials: We reviewed 214 consecutive primary esophageal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy between 2001 and 2010 in our institute. Pericardial effusion was detected on follow-up computed tomography. Symptomatic effusion was defined as effusion ≥grade 3 according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v4.0 criteria. Percent volume irradiated with 5 to 65 Gy (V5-V65) and mean dose to the pericardium were evaluated employing dose-volume histograms. To evaluate dosimetry for patients treated with two-dimensional planning in the earlier period (2001-2005), computed tomography data at diagnosis were transferred to a treatment planning system to reconstruct three-dimensional plans without modification. Optimal dosimetric thresholds for symptomatic pericardial effusion were calculated by receiver operating characteristic curves. Associating clinical and treatment-related risk factors for symptomatic pericardial effusion were detected by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: The median follow-up was 29 (range, 6-121) months for eligible 167 patients. Symptomatic pericardial effusion was observed in 14 (8.4%) patients. Dosimetric analyses revealed average values of V30 to V45 for the pericardium and mean pericardial doses were significantly higher in patients with symptomatic pericardial effusion than in those with asymptomatic pericardial effusion (P<.05). Pericardial V5 to V55 and mean pericardial doses were significantly higher in patients with symptomatic pericardial effusion than in those without pericardial effusion (P<.001). Mean pericardial doses of 36.5 Gy and V45 of 58% were selected as optimal cutoff values for predicting symptomatic pericardial effusion. Multivariate analysis identified mean pericardial dose as the

  9. CLOSURE OF LARYNGECTOMY DEFECTS IN THE AGE OF CHEMORADIATION THERAPY

    PubMed Central

    Hanasono, Matthew M.; Lin, Derrick; Wax, Mark K.

    2014-01-01

    The use of chemoradiation therapy in laryngeal cancer has resulted in significant reconstructive challenges. Although reconstruction of salvage laryngectomy defects remains controversial, current literature supports aggressive management of these defects with vascularized tissue, even when there is sufficient pharyngeal tissue present for primary closure. Significant advancement in reconstructive techniques has permitted improved outcomes in patients with advanced disease who require total laryngopharyngectomy or total laryngoglossectomy. Use of enteric and fasciocutaneous flaps result in good patient outcomes. Finally, wound complication rates after salvage surgery approach 60% depending on comorbid conditions such as cardiac insufficiency, hypothyroidism, or extent of previous treatment. Neck dehiscence, great vessel exposure, fistula formation, or cervical skin necrosis results in complex wounds that can often be treated initially with negative pressure dressings followed by definitive reconstruction. The timing of repair and approach to the vessel-depleted neck also present challenges in this patient population. Currently, there is significant institutional bias in the management of the patient with postchemoradiation salvage laryngectomy. Future prospective multi-institutional studies are certainly needed to more clearly define optimal treatment of these difficult patients. PMID:21416549

  10. Outcomes and Tolerability of Chemoradiation Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer Patients Aged 75 Years or Older

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, David T.; Mamon, Harvey J.

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To review the outcomes and tolerability of full-dose chemoradiation in elderly patients aged 75 years or older with localized pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed patients aged 75 years or older with nonmetastatic pancreatic cancer treated with chemoradiation therapy at two institutions from 2002 to 2007. Patients were analyzed for treatment toxicity, local recurrences, distant metastases, and survival. Results: A total of 42 patients with a median age of 78 years (range, 75-90 years) who received chemoradiation therapy for pancreatic cancer were identified. Of the patients, 24 had locally advanced disease treated with definitive chemoradiation, and 18 had disease treated with surgery and chemoradiation. Before chemoradiotherapy, the mean Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status was 1.0 {+-} 0.8, and the mean 6-month weight loss was 5.3 {+-} 3.8 kg. The mean radiation dose delivered was 48.1 {+-} 9.2 Gy. All patients received fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy concurrently with radiotherapy. In all, 8 patients (19%) were hospitalized, 7 (17%) had an emergency room visit, 15 (36%) required a radiation treatment break, 3 (7%) required a chemotherapy break, 9 (21%) did not complete therapy, and 22 (49%) had at least one of these adverse events. The most common toxicities were nausea, pain, and failure to thrive. Median overall survival was 8.6 months (95% confidence interval, 7.2-13.1) in patients who received definitive chemoradiation therapy and 20.6 months (95% confidence interval, 9.5-{infinity}) in patients who underwent resection and chemoradiation therapy. Conclusions: In this dataset of very elderly patients with pancreatic cancer and good Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, outcomes after chemoradiotherapy were similar to those among historic controls for patients with locally advanced and resected pancreatic cancer, although many patients experienced substantial treatment

  11. Neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy and pathological complete response in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Linda; Fichera, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    The management of rectal cancer has evolved significantly in the last few decades. Significant improvements in local disease control were achieved in the 1990s, with the introduction of total mesorectal excision and neoadjuvant radiotherapy. Level 1 evidence has shown that, with neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) the rates of local recurrence can be lower than 6% and, as a result, neoadjuvant CRT currently represents the accepted standard of care. This approach has led to reliable tumor down-staging, with 15–27% patients with a pathological complete response (pCR)—defined as no residual cancer found on histological examination of the specimen. Patients who achieve pCR after CRT have better long-term outcomes, less risk of developing local or distal recurrence and improved survival. For all these reasons, sphincter-preserving procedures or organ-preserving options have been suggested, such as local excision of residual tumor or the omission of surgery altogether. Although local recurrence rate has been stable at 5–6% with this multidisciplinary management method, distal recurrence rates for locally-advanced rectal cancers remain in excess of 25% and represent the main cause of death in these patients. For this reason, more recent trials have been looking at the administration of full-dose systemic chemotherapy in the neoadjuvant setting (in order to offer early treatment of disseminated micrometastases, thus improving control of systemic disease) and selective use of radiotherapy only in non-responders or for low rectal tumors smaller than 5 cm. PMID:26290512

  12. PAK6 increase chemoresistance and is a prognostic marker for stage II and III colon cancer patients undergoing 5-FU based chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Dongwang; Cui, Feifei; Wang, Xiaoliang; Yu, Fudong; Xue, Yingming; Feng, Xiaodong; Wang, Jingtao; Wang, Xiao; Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Meng; Zhao, Senlin; Yu, Yang; Tang, Huamei; Peng, Zhihai

    2015-01-01

    p21-Activated kinase 6 (PAK6) has been implicated in radiotherapy and docetaxel resistance. We have further evaluated PAK6 as a predictor of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) treatment response in colon cancer. Here we report that in colon cancer PAK6 promotes tumor progression and chemoresistance both in vitro and in vivo. In the clinical analysis, PAK6 was overexpressed in 104 of 147 (70.75%) stage II and III patients who received 5-FU based chemotherapy after surgery. Multivariate Cox regression analysis indicated that PAK6 was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival (P < 0.001) and disease-free survival (P < 0.001). Colon cancer cell lines showed increased PAK6 expression upon 5-FU treatment. In PAK6-knockdown cells treated with 5-FU, cell viability and phosphorylation of BAD decreased, and the number of apoptotic cells, levels of cleaved caspase 3 and PARP increased compared to control cells. The opposite was observed in PAK6 overexpressing cells. Short hairpin RNA knockdown of PAK6 blocked cells in G2-M phase. Furthermore, Animal experiments results in vivo are consistent with outcomes in vitro. This study demonstrates that PAK6 is an independent prognostic factor for adjuvant 5-FU-based chemotherapy in patients with stage II and stage III colon cancer. PMID:25426562

  13. Low levels of Caspase-3 predict favourable response to 5FU-based chemotherapy in advanced colorectal cancer: Caspase-3 inhibition as a therapeutic approach

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan, L; Meyer, M; Fay, J; Curry, S; Bacon, O; Duessmann, H; John, K; Boland, K C; McNamara, D A; Kay, E W; Bantel, H; Schulze-Bergkamen, H; Prehn, J H M

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers in the Western world. 5-Fluorouracil (5FU)-based chemotherapy (CT) remains the mainstay treatment of CRC in the advanced setting, and activates executioner caspases in target cells. Executioner caspases are key proteins involved in cell disassembly during apoptosis. Activation of executioner caspases also has a role in tissue regeneration and repopulation by stimulating signal transduction and cell proliferation in neighbouring, non-apoptotic cells as reported recently. Tissue microarrays (TMAs) consisting of tumour tissue from 93 stage II and III colon cancer patients were analysed by immunohistochemistry. Surprisingly, patients with low levels of active Caspase-3 had an increased disease-free survival time. This was particularly pronounced in patients who received 5FU-based adjuvant CT. In line with this observation, lower serum levels of active Caspase-3 were found in patients with metastasised CRC who revealed stable disease or tumour regression compared with those with disease progression. The role of Caspase-3 in treatment responses was explored further in primary human tumour explant cultures from fresh patient tumour tissue. Exposure of explant cultures to 5FU-based CT increased the percentage of cells positive for active Caspase-3 and Terminal Deoxynucleotidyl Transferase dUTP Nick end Labelling (TUNEL), but also the expression of regeneration and proliferation markers β-Catenin and Ki-67, as well as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Of note, selective inhibition of Caspase-3 with Ac-DNLD-CHO, a selective, reversible inhibitor of Caspase-3, significantly reduced the expression of proliferation markers as well as COX-2. Inhibition of COX-2 with aspirin or celecoxib did not affect Caspase-3 levels but also reduced Ki-67 and β-Catenin levels, suggesting that Caspase-3 acted via COX-2 to stimulate cell proliferation and tissue regeneration. This indicates that low levels of active Caspase-3 may represent a

  14. Low levels of Caspase-3 predict favourable response to 5FU-based chemotherapy in advanced colorectal cancer: Caspase-3 inhibition as a therapeutic approach.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, L; Meyer, M; Fay, J; Curry, S; Bacon, O; Duessmann, H; John, K; Boland, K C; McNamara, D A; Kay, E W; Bantel, H; Schulze-Bergkamen, H; Prehn, J H M

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers in the Western world. 5-Fluorouracil (5FU)-based chemotherapy (CT) remains the mainstay treatment of CRC in the advanced setting, and activates executioner caspases in target cells. Executioner caspases are key proteins involved in cell disassembly during apoptosis. Activation of executioner caspases also has a role in tissue regeneration and repopulation by stimulating signal transduction and cell proliferation in neighbouring, non-apoptotic cells as reported recently. Tissue microarrays (TMAs) consisting of tumour tissue from 93 stage II and III colon cancer patients were analysed by immunohistochemistry. Surprisingly, patients with low levels of active Caspase-3 had an increased disease-free survival time. This was particularly pronounced in patients who received 5FU-based adjuvant CT. In line with this observation, lower serum levels of active Caspase-3 were found in patients with metastasised CRC who revealed stable disease or tumour regression compared with those with disease progression. The role of Caspase-3 in treatment responses was explored further in primary human tumour explant cultures from fresh patient tumour tissue. Exposure of explant cultures to 5FU-based CT increased the percentage of cells positive for active Caspase-3 and Terminal Deoxynucleotidyl Transferase dUTP Nick end Labelling (TUNEL), but also the expression of regeneration and proliferation markers β-Catenin and Ki-67, as well as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Of note, selective inhibition of Caspase-3 with Ac-DNLD-CHO, a selective, reversible inhibitor of Caspase-3, significantly reduced the expression of proliferation markers as well as COX-2. Inhibition of COX-2 with aspirin or celecoxib did not affect Caspase-3 levels but also reduced Ki-67 and β-Catenin levels, suggesting that Caspase-3 acted via COX-2 to stimulate cell proliferation and tissue regeneration. This indicates that low levels of active Caspase-3 may represent a

  15. Nanoparticles based brachytherapy spacers for delivery of localized combined chemo-radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rajiv; Belz, Jodi; Markovic, Stacey; Jadhav, Tej; Fowle, William; Niedre, Mark; Cormack, Robert; Makrigiorgos, Mike G; Sridhar, Srinivas

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In radiation therapy (RT), brachytherapy inert source spacers are commonly used in clinical practice to achieve high spatial accuracy. These implanted devices are critical technical components of precise radiation delivery but provide no direct therapeutic benefits. Materials and Methods Here we have fabricated Implantable Nanoplatforms or Chemo-Radiation Therapy (INCeRT) spacers loaded with silica nanoparticles (SNPs) conjugated containing a drug, to act as a slow release drug depot for simultaneous localized chemo-radiation therapy. The spacers are made of poly(lactic-coglycolic) acid (PLGA) as matrix, were physically identical (size) to the commercially available brachytherapy spacers (5mm×0.8mm). The silica nanoparticles with diameter 250nm conjugated with near infrared fluorophore Cy7.5 as a model drug and the INCeRT spacers were characterized in terms of size, morphology and composition using different instrumentation techniques. The spacers were further doped with anticancer drug, docetaxel. We have evaluated the in vivo stability, biocompatibility and biodegradation of these spacers in live mouse tissues. Results The electron microscopy studies showed that nanoparticles were distributed throughout the spacers. These INCeRT spacers remained stable and can be tracked using optical fluorescence. In vivo optical imaging studies showed a slow diffusion of nanoparticles from the spacer to the adjacent tissue as opposed to the control Cy7.5-PLGA spacer which showed rapid disintegration in a few days with a burst release of Cy7.5. The docetaxel spacers showed suppression of tumor growth as opposed to control mice over 16 days. Conclusions The imaging with the Cy7.5-spacer and therapeutic efficacy with docetaxel-spacers supports the hypothesis that INCeRT spacers can be used for delivering the drugs in slow, sustained manner in conjunction with brachytherapy, as opposed to rapid clearance of the drugs when administered systemically. The results demonstrate

  16. Nanoparticle-Based Brachytherapy Spacers for Delivery of Localized Combined Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Rajiv; Belz, Jodi; Markovic, Stacey; Jadhav, Tej; Fowle, William; Niedre, Mark; Cormack, Robert; Makrigiorgos, Mike G.; Sridhar, Srinivas

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: In radiation therapy (RT), brachytherapy-inert source spacers are commonly used in clinical practice to achieve high spatial accuracy. These implanted devices are critical technical components of precise radiation delivery but provide no direct therapeutic benefits. Methods and Materials: Here we have fabricated implantable nanoplatforms or chemoradiation therapy (INCeRT) spacers loaded with silica nanoparticles (SNPs) conjugated containing a drug, to act as a slow-release drug depot for simultaneous localized chemoradiation therapy. The spacers are made of poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) as matrix and are physically identical in size to the commercially available brachytherapy spacers (5 mm × 0.8 mm). The silica nanoparticles, 250 nm in diameter, were conjugated with near infrared fluorophore Cy7.5 as a model drug, and the INCeRT spacers were characterized in terms of size, morphology, and composition using different instrumentation techniques. The spacers were further doped with an anticancer drug, docetaxel. We evaluated the in vivo stability, biocompatibility, and biodegradation of these spacers in live mouse tissues. Results: The electron microscopy studies showed that nanoparticles were distributed throughout the spacers. These INCeRT spacers remained stable and can be tracked by the use of optical fluorescence. In vivo optical imaging studies showed a slow diffusion of nanoparticles from the spacer to the adjacent tissue in contrast to the control Cy7.5-PLGA spacer, which showed rapid disintegration in a few days with a burst release of Cy7.5. The docetaxel spacers showed suppression of tumor growth in contrast to control mice over 16 days. Conclusions: The imaging with the Cy7.5 spacer and therapeutic efficacy with docetaxel spacers supports the hypothesis that INCeRT spacers can be used for delivering the drugs in a slow, sustained manner in conjunction with brachytherapy, in contrast to the rapid clearance of the drugs when

  17. [A Case of Pancreatic Head Cancer Showing Pathological Complete Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy].

    PubMed

    Nakama, Yohei; Kawahara, Ryuichi; Nomura, Yoriko; Muroya, Daisuke; Arai, Shoichiro; Ishikawa, Hiroto; Yasunaga, Masafumi; Horiuchi, Hiroyuki; Akagi, Yoshito; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Yasumoto, Makiko; Okabe, Yoshinobu; Torimura, Takuji; Naito, Yoshiki; Okuda, Koji

    2015-11-01

    The patient was a 64-year-old woman. She was referred to our institute because of a chief complaint of upper abdominal pain. Abdominal computed tomographic scan revealed a 35 mm hypovascular tumor in the pancreatic head and superior mesenteric vein (SMV), as well as thrombosis. We chose neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (NACRT) (S-1/RT, 50.4 Gy/28 Fr) and anticoagulants. After the treatment, the primary lesion showed a partial response, and the SMV thrombosis was reduced. We performed pancreaticoduodenectomy. Histopathological examination revealed no cancer cells in the pancreas. Pathological evaluation revealed grade Ⅳ tumor according to the Evans classification. The patient had had no recurrence for 10 months after the pancreaticoduodenectomy. PMID:26805369

  18. Modern radiation therapy and potential fertility preservation strategies in patients with cervical cancer undergoing chemoradiation.

    PubMed

    Ghadjar, Pirus; Budach, Volker; Köhler, Christhardt; Jantke, Andreas; Marnitz, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Young patients with cervical cancer who undergo chemoradiation might be interested in fertility preservation, not only dependent upon the use of a gestational carrier as maybe achieved by the use of ovarian transposition and cryo-conservation of oocytes or ovarian tissue, but may prefer to carry pregnancy to term after cancer treatment. The latter approach is a non-established concept needing both modern radiation therapy approaches as well as modifications -if at all possible- in current recommendations for target volume delineation to spare dose to the unaffected uterus. Future strategies to serve selected patients in this respect should only be conducted in prospective clinical evaluations and are critically discussed in this article. PMID:25890342

  19. The indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase pathway controls complement-dependent enhancement of chemo-radiation therapy against murine glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is an enzyme with immune-suppressive properties that is commonly exploited by tumors to evade immune destruction. Anti-tumor T cell responses can be initiated in solid tumors, but are immediately suppressed by compensatory upregulation of immunological checkpoints, including IDO. In addition to these known effects on the adaptive immune system, we previously showed widespread, T cell-dependent complement deposition during allogeneic fetal rejection upon maternal treatment with IDO-blockade. We hypothesized that IDO protects glioblastoma from the full effects of chemo-radiation therapy by preventing vascular activation and complement-dependent tumor destruction. Methods To test this hypothesis, we utilized a syngeneic orthotopic glioblastoma model in which GL261 glioblastoma tumor cells were stereotactically implanted into the right frontal lobes of syngeneic mice. These mice were treated with IDO-blocking drugs in combination with chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Results Pharmacologic inhibition of IDO synergized with chemo-radiation therapy to prolong survival in mice bearing intracranial glioblastoma tumors. We now show that pharmacologic or genetic inhibition of IDO allowed chemo-radiation to trigger widespread complement deposition at sites of tumor growth. Chemotherapy treatment alone resulted in collections of perivascular leukocytes within tumors, but no complement deposition. Adding IDO-blockade led to upregulation of VCAM-1 on vascular endothelium within the tumor microenvironment, and further adding radiation in the presence of IDO-blockade led to widespread deposition of complement. Mice genetically deficient in complement component C3 lost all of the synergistic effects of IDO-blockade on chemo-radiation-induced survival. Conclusions Together these findings identify a novel mechanistic link between IDO and complement, and implicate complement as a major downstream effector mechanism for the beneficial

  20. [Successful chemoradiation therapy for local control of rectal cancer with multiple bone metastases--a case report].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tetsu; Kamigaki, Takashi; Takase, Shiro; Sakai, Tetsuya; Yamashita, Kimihiro; Sumi, Yasuo; Matsuda, Yoshiko; Imanishi, Tatsuya; Suzuki, Satoshi; Iwatani, Yoshiteru; Kuroda, Daisuke; Kuroda, Yoshikazu

    2009-11-01

    A 78-year-old man was admitted to our institute with the symptom of melena. The patient was diagnosed as having advanced rectal cancer (T4N2M1) with multiple bone metastases. Chemoradiation therapy was chosen for the local control because our proposal of colostomy was rejected. Concurrent chemoradiation therapy [46 Gy/23 Fr+tegafur/uraci (l UFT 400 mg/m2)/calcium folinate (Leucovorin: LV 75 mg/body)] resulted in a good partial response and the patient became asymptomatic. UFT/LV were administrated and most of the bone metastases were diminished. After 3 years of disease remission with good quality of life, local tumor recurred with the symptoms of melena and bowel obstruction. Colostomy and additional radiotherapy were performed for the palliation. He died after 4 years from the initial treatment. In advanced rectal cancer with distant metastases, chemoradiation therapy for local control plus systemic chemotherapy could be an alternative to improve quality of life. PMID:20037328

  1. Phase 3 Trial of Postoperative Chemotherapy Alone Versus Chemoradiation Therapy in Stage III-IV Gastric Cancer Treated With R0 Gastrectomy and D2 Lymph Node Dissection

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Tae Hyun; Park, Sook Ryun; Ryu, Keun Won; Kim, Young-Woo; Bae, Jae-Moon; Lee, Jun Ho; Choi, Il Ju; Kim, Yeon-Joo; Kim, Dae Yong

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To compare chemotherapy alone with chemoradiation therapy in stage III-IV(M0) gastric cancer treated with R0 gastrectomy and D2 lymph node dissection. Methods and Materials: The chemotherapy arm received 5 cycles of fluorouracil and leucovorin (FL), and the chemoradiation therapy arm received 1 cycle of FL, then radiation therapy of 45 Gy concurrently with 2 cycles of FL, followed by 2 cycles of FL. Intent-to-treat analysis and per-protocol analyses were performed. Results: Between May 6, 2002 and June 29, 2006, a total of 90 patients were enrolled. Forty-four were randomly assigned to the chemotherapy arm and 46 to the chemoradiation therapy arm. Treatment was completed as planned by 93.2% of patients in the chemotherapy arm and 87.0% in the chemoradiation therapy arm. Overall intent-to-treat analysis showed that addition of radiation therapy to chemotherapy significantly improved locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRRFS) but not disease-free survival. In subgroup analysis for stage III, chemoradiation therapy significantly prolonged the 5-year LRRFS and disease-free survival rates compared with chemotherapy (93.2% vs 66.8%, P=.014; 73.5% vs 54.6%, P=.056, respectively). Conclusions: Addition of radiation therapy to chemotherapy could improve the LRRFS in stage III gastric cancer treated with R0 gastrectomy and D2 lymph node dissection.

  2. Adjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy After Pancreaticoduodenectomy in Elderly Patients With Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Horowitz, David P.; Hsu, Charles C.; Wang Jingya; Makary, Martin A.; Winter, Jordan M.; Robinson, Ray; Schulick, Richard D.; Cameron, John L.; Pawlik, Timothy M.; Herman, Joseph M.

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of adjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for pancreatic adenocarcinoma patients {>=}75 years of age. Methods: The study group of 655 patients underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) for pancreatic adenocarcinoma at the Johns Hopkins Hospital over a 12-year period (8/30/1993 to 2/28/2005). Demographic characteristics, comorbidities, intraoperative data, pathology data, and patient outcomes were collected and analyzed by adjuvant treatment status and age {>=}75 years. Cox proportional hazards analysis determined clinical predictors of mortality and morbidity. Results: We identified 166 of 655 (25.3%) patients were {>=}75 years of age and 489 of 655 patients (74.7%) were <75 years of age. Forty-nine patients in the elderly group (29.5%) received adjuvant CRT. For elderly patients, node-positive metastases (p = 0.008), poor/anaplastic differentiation (p = 0.012), and undergoing a total pancreatectomy (p = 0.010) predicted poor survival. The 2-year survival for elderly patients receiving adjuvant therapy was improved compared with surgery alone (49.0% vs. 31.6%, p = 0.013); however, 5-year survival was similar (11.7% vs. 19.8%, respectively, p = 0.310). After adjusting for major confounders, adjuvant therapy in elderly patients had a protective effect with respect to 2-year survival (relative risk [RR] 0.58, p = 0.044), but not 5-year survival (RR 0.80, p = 0.258). Among the nonelderly, CRT was significantly associated with 2-year survival (RR 0.60, p < 0.001) and 5-year survival (RR 0.69, p < 0.001), after adjusting for confounders. Conclusions: Adjuvant therapy after PD is significantly associated with increased 2-year but not 5-year survival in elderly patients. Additional studies are needed to select which elderly patients are likely to benefit from adjuvant CRT.

  3. Effects of Treatment Duration During Concomitant Chemoradiation Therapy for Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Shaverdian, Narek; Gondi, Vinai; Sklenar, Kathryn L.; Dunn, Emily F.; Petereit, Daniel G.; Straub, Margaret R.; Bradley, Kristin A.

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: To determine whether extended treatment duration (TD) impacts in-field relapse and survival in the setting of concomitant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 480 consecutive cervical cancer patients treated with radiation therapy (RT) alone or concomitant CRT for curative intent were retrospectively analyzed. Relapse was defined as in-field with respect to external beam radiation therapy fields. The effects of TD on in-field relapse, disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) rates were assessed continuously and categorically within the separate RT and CRT cohorts. Covariates included age, histology, stage, and cumulative dose to point A. In-field relapse, DFS, and OS rates were estimated with Kaplan-Meier analysis; comparisons used log–rank statistic. Multivariate analysis used the Cox proportional hazards model. Results: A total of 372 patients (RT n=206, CRT n=166) were evaluable, with a median follow-up for relapse-free patients of 4.2 years (RT 4.4 years, CRT 4.2 years; P=.807). Treatment duration was longer in the RT cohort (median 55 days; range 35-99 days) versus the CRT cohort (median 51 days; range 35-92 days) (P=.001). In the RT cohort, TD ≥62 days trended to significance for predicting inferior DFS (hazard ratio 1.42, 95% confidence interval 0.86-1.98, P=.086). However, in the CRT cohort, TD assessed continuously or categorically across multiple cutoff thresholds did not predict for in-field relapse, DFS, or OS. Conclusion: With RT alone, extended TD ≥62 days may adversely impact treatment efficacy. With the addition of concomitant chemotherapy to RT, however, extended TD has no effect on treatment efficacy.

  4. Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy in Combination With Panitumumab for Patients With Resectable Esophageal Cancer: The PACT Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kordes, Sil; Berge Henegouwen, Mark I. van; Hulshof, Maarten C.; Bergman, Jacques J.G.H.M.; Vliet, Hans J. van der; Kapiteijn, Ellen; Laarhoven, Hanneke W.M. van; Richel, Dick J.; Klinkenbijl, Jean H.G.; Meijer, Sybren L.; Wilmink, Johanna W.

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: Preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) has become the standard treatment strategy for patients with resectable esophageal cancer. This multicenter phase 2 study investigated the efficacy of the addition of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor panitumumab to a preoperative CRT regimen with carboplatin, paclitaxel, and radiation therapy in patients with resectable esophageal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with resectable cT1N1M0 or cT2-3N0 to -2M0 tumors received preoperative CRT consisting of panitumumab (6 mg/kg) on days 1, 15, and 29, weekly administrations of carboplatin (area under the curve [AUC] = 2), and paclitaxel (50 mg/m{sup 2}) for 5 weeks and concurrent radiation therapy (41.4 Gy in 23 fractions, 5 days per week), followed by surgery. Primary endpoint was pathologic complete response (pCR) rate. We aimed at a pCR rate of more than 40%. Furthermore, we explored the predictive value of biomarkers (EGFR, HER 2, and P53) for pCR. Results: From January 2010 until December 2011, 90 patients were enrolled. Patients were diagnosed predominantly with adenocarcinoma (AC) (80%), T3 disease (89%), and were node positive (81%). Three patients were not resected due to progressive disease. The primary aim was unmet, with a pCR rate of 22%. Patients with AC and squamous cell carcinoma reached a pCR of 14% and 47%, respectively. R0 resection was achieved in 95% of the patients. Main grade 3 toxicities were rash (12%), fatigue (11%), and nonfebrile neutropenia (11%). None of the biomarkers was predictive for response. Conclusions: The addition of panitumumab to CRT with carboplatin and paclitaxel was safe and well tolerated but could not improve pCR rate to the preset criterion of 40%.

  5. Neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy for borderline pancreatic adenocarcinoma: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Galindo, José; Gabrielli, Mauricio; Guerra, Juan Francisco; Cassina, Juan Carlos; Garrido, Marcelo; Jarufe, Nicolás; Borghero, Yerko; Madrid, Jorge; Zoroquiain, Pablo; Roa, Juan Carlos; Martínez, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains as one of the most aggressive human neoplasms, with overall poor survival rates. Radical surgery of the primary lesion is the best option for treatment. Borderline resectable pancreatic tumors (BRPT), defined as partial involvement of peripancreatic vasculature, may benefit from neoadjuvant therapy. We report on the first two BRPT cases treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation at our institution. Preoperative CT and MRI demonstrated pancreatic tumors encasing the porto-mesenteric confluence suggestive of BRPT. Patients received neoadjuvant chemotherapy (gemcitabine/cisplatin), followed by radiochemotherapy. After treatment, follow-up images demonstrated tumor downsize, allowing for the tumors to be considered then as resectable. They underwent partial pancreatoduodenectomies (Whipple procedure). In case 1, histopathology revealed a complete, margin-free resection, whereas in case 2 there was a complete pathological response, with no evidence of residual tumor. According to the literature, our initial experience using neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy on BRPT allowed us to downsize the tumor and, subsequently, to perform a curative surgery. PMID:23379413

  6. Role of Adjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy in Adenocarcinomas of the Ampulla of Vater

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, Sunil Rana, Vishal; Evans, Douglas B.; Varadhachary, Gauri; Das, Prajnan; Bhatia, Sumita; Delclos, Marc E.; Janjan, Nora A.; Wolff, Robert A.; Crane, Christopher H.; Pisters, Peter W.

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: The role of adjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) in the treatment of ampullary cancers remains undefined. We retrospectively compared treatment outcomes in patients treated with pancreaticoduodenectomy alone versus those who received additional adjuvant CRT. Methods and Materials: Between May 1990 and January 2006, 54 of 96 patients with ampullary adenocarcinoma who underwent potentially curative pancreaticoduodenectomy also received adjuvant CRT. The median preoperative radiation dose was 45 Gy (range, 30-50.4 Gy) and median postoperative dose was 50.4 Gy (range, 45-55.8 Gy). Concurrent chemotherapy included primarily 5-fluorouracil (52%) and capecitabine (43%). Median follow-up was 31 months. Univariate and multivariate statistical methodologies were used to determine significant prognostic factors for local control (LC), distant control (DC), and overall survival (OS). Results: Actuarial 5-year LC, DC, and OS were 77%, 69%, and 64%, respectively. On univariate analysis, age, gender, race/ethnicity, tumor grade, use of adjuvant treatment, and sequencing of adjuvant therapy were not significantly associated with LC, DC, or OS. However, on univariate analysis, T3/T4 tumor stage was prognostic for poorer LC and OS (p = 0.02 and p < 0.001, respectively); node-positive disease was prognostic for poorer LC (p = 0.03). On multivariate analysis, T3/T4 tumor stage was independently prognostic for decreased OS (p = 0.002). Among these patients (n = 34), those who received adjuvant CRT had a trend toward improved OS (median, 35.2 vs. 16.5 months; p = 0.06). Conclusions: Ampullary cancers have a distinctly better treatment outcome than pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Higher primary tumor stage (T3/T4), an independent adverse risk factor for poorer treatment outcomes, may warrant the addition of adjuvant CRT to pancreaticoduodenectomy.

  7. Gastroduodenal Complications After Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy in Patients With Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Endoscopic Findings and Risk Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Chon, Young Eun; Seong, Jinsil; Kim, Beom Kyung; Cha, Jihye; Kim, Seung Up; Park, Jun Yong; Ahn, Sang Hoon; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Chon, Chae Yoon; Shin, Sung Kwan; Kim, Do Young

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) is useful in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but little is known about radiation-induced gastroduodenal complications following therapy. To determine risk factors, we investigated the prevalence and patterns of gastroduodenal complications following CCRT using endoscopy. Methods and Materials: Enrolled in the study were 123 patients treated with CCRT for unresectable HCC between January 1998 and December 2005. Radiation-induced gastroduodenal complications were defined as radiation gastritis/duodenitis, radiation gastric/duodenal ulcer, or other gastroduodenal toxicity associated with radiation, based on Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE 3.0). Serious gastroduodenal complications were defined as events occurring within 12 months from completion of CCRT, those requiring prompt therapeutic intervention, or symptoms equivalent to Grade 3 or 4 radiation-related gastroduodenal toxicity, including nausea or vomiting, based on CTCAE 3.0. Results: A month after completion of CCRT, 65 (52.8%) patients displayed endoscopic evidence of radiation-induced gastroduodenal complications. Radiation gastric and duodenal ulcers were found in 32 (26.0%) and 20 (16.3%) patients, respectively; radiation gastritis and duodenitis were found in 50 (40.7%) and 42 (34.1%) patients, respectively. Radiation-related bleeding was observed in 13 patients (10.6%). Serious gastroduodenal complications occurred in 18 patients (14.6%) and were significantly more frequent in patients with liver cirrhosis than in those without cirrhosis (p = 0.043). There were no radiation-related deaths. Conclusions: Endoscopically detectable radiation-induced gastroduodenal complications were common in HCC following CCRT. Although serious complications were uncommon, the frequency was higher in patients with liver cirrhosis; thus, these patients should be closely monitored when receiving CCRT.

  8. Radiation Dose-Response Model for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer After Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Appelt, Ane L.; Ploen, John; Vogelius, Ivan R.; Bentzen, Soren M.; Jakobsen, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) is part of the standard treatment of locally advanced rectal cancers. Tumor regression at the time of operation is desirable, but not much is known about the relationship between radiation dose and tumor regression. In the present study we estimated radiation dose-response curves for various grades of tumor regression after preoperative CRT. Methods and Materials: A total of 222 patients, treated with consistent chemotherapy and radiation therapy techniques, were considered for the analysis. Radiation therapy consisted of a combination of external-beam radiation therapy and brachytherapy. Response at the time of operation was evaluated from the histopathologic specimen and graded on a 5-point scale (TRG1-5). The probability of achieving complete, major, and partial response was analyzed by ordinal logistic regression, and the effect of including clinical parameters in the model was examined. The radiation dose-response relationship for a specific grade of histopathologic tumor regression was parameterized in terms of the dose required for 50% response, D{sub 50,i}, and the normalized dose-response gradient, {gamma}{sub 50,i}. Results: A highly significant dose-response relationship was found (P=.002). For complete response (TRG1), the dose-response parameters were D{sub 50,TRG1} = 92.0 Gy (95% confidence interval [CI] 79.3-144.9 Gy), {gamma}{sub 50,TRG1} = 0.982 (CI 0.533-1.429), and for major response (TRG1-2) D{sub 50,TRG1} and {sub 2} = 72.1 Gy (CI 65.3-94.0 Gy), {gamma}{sub 50,TRG1} and {sub 2} = 0.770 (CI 0.338-1.201). Tumor size and N category both had a significant effect on the dose-response relationships. Conclusions: This study demonstrated a significant dose-response relationship for tumor regression after preoperative CRT for locally advanced rectal cancer for tumor dose levels in the range of 50.4-70 Gy, which is higher than the dose range usually considered.

  9. Radiobiological Determination of Dose Escalation and Normal Tissue Toxicity in Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy for Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Samantha; Partridge, Mike; Carrington, Rhys; Hurt, Chris; Crosby, Thomas; Hawkins, Maria A.

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the trade-off in tumor coverage and organ-at-risk sparing when applying dose escalation for concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT) of mid-esophageal cancer, using radiobiological modeling to estimate local control and normal tissue toxicity. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients with mid-esophageal cancer were selected from the SCOPE1 database (International Standard Randomised Controlled Trials number 47718479), with a mean planning target volume (PTV) of 327 cm{sup 3}. A boost volume, PTV2 (GTV + 0.5 cm margin), was created. Radiobiological modeling of tumor control probability (TCP) estimated the dose required for a clinically significant (+20%) increase in local control as 62.5 Gy/25 fractions. A RapidArc (RA) plan with a simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) to PTV2 (RA{sub 62.5}) was compared to a standard dose plan of 50 Gy/25 fractions (RA{sub 50}). Dose-volume metrics and estimates of normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for heart and lungs were compared. Results: Clinically acceptable dose escalation was feasible for 16 of 21 patients, with significant gains (>18%) in tumor control from 38.2% (RA{sub 50}) to 56.3% (RA{sub 62.5}), and only a small increase in predicted toxicity: median heart NTCP 4.4% (RA{sub 50}) versus 5.6% (RA{sub 62.5}) P<.001 and median lung NTCP 6.5% (RA{sub 50}) versus 7.5% (RA{sub 62.5}) P<.001. Conclusions: Dose escalation to the GTV to improve local control is possible when overlap between PTV and organ-at-risk (<8% heart volume and <2.5% lung volume overlap for this study) generates only negligible increase in lung or heart toxicity. These predictions from radiobiological modeling should be tested in future clinical trials.

  10. Caveolin-1 as a Prognostic Marker for Local Control After Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy in Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Roedel, Franz Capalbo, Gianni; Roedel, Claus; Weiss, Christian

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: Caveolin-1 is a protein marker for caveolae organelles and has an essential impact on cellular signal transduction pathways (e.g., receptor tyrosine kinases, adhesion molecules, and G-protein-coupled receptors). In the present study, we investigated the expression of caveolin-1 in patients with rectal adenocarcinoma and correlated its expression pattern with the risk for disease recurrences after preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) and surgical resection. Methods and Materials: Caveolin-1 mRNA and protein expression were evaluated by Affymetrix microarray analysis (n = 20) and immunohistochemistry (n = 44) on pretreatment biopsy samples of patients with locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the rectum, and were correlated with clinical and histopathologic characteristics as well as with 5-year rates of local failure and overall survival. Results: A significantly decreased median caveolin-1 intracellular mRNA level was observed in tumor biopsy samples as compared with noncancerous mucosa. Individual mRNA levels and immunohistologic staining, however, revealed an overexpression in 7 of 20 patients (35%) and 17 of 44 patients (38.6%), respectively. Based on immunohistochemical evaluation, local control rates at 5 years for patients with tumors showing low caveolin-1 expression were significantly better than for patients with high caveolin-1-expressing carcinoma cells (p = 0.05; 92%, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 82-102% vs. 72%, 95% CI = 49-84%). A low caveolin-1 protein expression was also significantly related to an increased overall survival rate (p = 0.05; 45%, 95% CI 16-60% vs. 82%, 95% CI = 67-97%). Conclusion: Caveolin-1 may provide a novel prognostic marker for local control and survival after preoperative CRT and surgical resection in rectal cancer.

  11. Systematic review, including meta-analyses, on the management of locally advanced pancreatic cancer using radiation/combined modality therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sultana, A; Tudur Smith, C; Cunningham, D; Starling, N; Tait, D; Neoptolemos, J P; Ghaneh, P

    2007-01-01

    There is no consensus on the management of locally advanced pancreatic cancer, with either chemotherapy or combined modality approaches being employed (Maheshwari and Moser, 2005). No published meta-analysis (Fung et al, 2003; Banu et al, 2005; Liang, 2005; Bria et al, 2006; Milella et al, 2006) has included randomised controlled trials employing radiation therapy. The aim of this systematic review was to compare the following: (i) chemoradiation followed by chemotherapy (combined modality therapy) vs best supportive care (ii) radiotherapy vs chemoradiation (iii) radiotherapy vs combined modality therapy (iv) chemotherapy vs combined modality therapy (v) 5FU-based combined modality treatment vs another-agent-based combined modality therapy. Relevant randomised controlled trials were identified by searching databases, trial registers and conference proceedings. The primary end point was overall survival and secondary end points were progression-free survival/time-to-progression, response rate and adverse events. Survival data were summarised using hazard ratio (HR) and response-rate/adverse-event data with relative risk. Eleven trials involving 794 patients met the inclusion criteria. Length of survival with chemoradiation was increased compared with radiotherapy alone (two trials, 168 patients, HR 0.69; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.51–0.94), but chemoradiation followed by chemotherapy did not lead to a survival advantage over chemotherapy alone (two trials, 134 patients, HR 0.79; CI 0.32–1.95). Meta-analyses could not be performed for the other comparisons. A survival benefit was demonstrated for chemoradiation over radiotherapy alone. Chemoradiation followed by chemotherapy did not demonstrate any survival advantage over chemotherapy alone, but important clinical differences cannot be ruled out due to the wide CI. PMID:17406358

  12. Does gap-free intensity modulated chemoradiation therapy provide a greater clinical benefit than 3D conformal chemoradiation in patients with anal cancer?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Chemoradiation is the standard treatment for anal cancer. 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) is usually split in 2 sequences with a therapeutic break (gap) in between. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) makes it possible to reduce treatment time by abandoning this gap. The purpose of this study was to compare outcomes and toxicities in patients treated with either IMRT or 3D-CRT. Methods Between 2004 and 2011, the data of 51 patients treated with exclusive radiotherapy with or without concomitant chemotherapy for non-metastatic anal carcinoma were retrospectively analyzed. Twenty-seven patients were treated with 3D-CRT and 24 patients with IMRT, with a median dose delivered to the tumor of 59.4Gy [30.6-66.6], whatever the radiotherapy technique (p= 0.99). The median follow-up was 40 months [26.4-51.6]. Results There was no difference between the two groups for response to treatment (p= 0.46). Two-year overall survival, locoregional relapse-free survival and colostomy-free survival rates were 88.5%, 63% and 60.3%, respectively for the IMRT group and 81%, 76.5% and 81.1% for the 3D-CRT group (all NS). Ten patients (37%) in 3D-CRT and 11 patients (45.8%) in IMRT (p= 0.524) had grade 3 acute toxicity. No grade 4 toxicity occurred. Conclusions Our study suggests that further investigations concerning the use of IMRT to treat cancer of the anus are warranted. IMRT makes it possible to remove the gap, but with no impact on the prognosis. Nonetheless, a longer follow-up is essential to determine whether or not IMRT has an impact on late toxicity, local control and survival compared with conventional 3D-CRT. PMID:23190693

  13. Intensity modulated radiation therapy with simultaneous integrated boost based dose escalation on neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy for locally advanced distal esophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Ming; Aguila, Fernando N; Patel, Taral; Knapp, Mark; Zhu, Xue-Qiang; Chen, Xi-Lin; Price, Phillip D

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate impact of radiation therapy dose escalation through intensity modulated radiation therapy with simultaneous integrated boost (IMRT-SIB). METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the patients who underwent four-dimensional-based IMRT-SIB-based neoadjuvant chemoradiation protocol. During the concurrent chemoradiation therapy, radiation therapy was through IMRT-SIB delivered in 28 consecutive daily fractions with total radiation doses of 56 Gy to tumor and 5040 Gy dose-painted to clinical tumor volume, with a regimen at the discretion of the treating medical oncologist. This was followed by surgical tumor resection. We analyzed pathological completion response (pCR) rates its relationship with overall survival and event-free survival. RESULTS: Seventeen patients underwent dose escalation with the IMRT-SIB protocol between 2007 and 2014 and their records were available for analysis. Among the IMRT-SIB-treated patients, the toxicity appeared mild, the most common side effects were grade 1-3 esophagitis (46%) and pneumonitis (11.7%). There were no cardiac events. The Ro resection rate was 94% (n = 16), the pCR rate was 47% (n = 8), and the postoperative morbidity was zero. There was one mediastinal failure found, one patient had local failure at the anastomosis site, and the majority of failures were distant in the lung or bone. The 3-year disease-free survival and overall survival rates were 41% (n = 7) and 53% (n = 9), respectively. CONCLUSION: The dose escalation through IMRT-SIB in the chemoradiation regimen seems responsible for down-staging the distal esophageal with well-tolerated complications. PMID:27190587

  14. SU-E-J-268: Change of CT Number During the Course of Chemoradiation Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X; Dalah, E; Liu, F; Li, X; Zhang, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: It has been observed radiation can induce changes in CT number (CTN) inside tumor during the course of radiation therapy (RT) for several tumor sites including lung and head and neck, suggesting that the CTN change may be potentially used to assess RT response. In this study, we investigate the CTN changes inside tumor during the course of chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for pancreatic cancer. Methods: Daily diagnostic-quality CT data acquired during IGRT for 17 pancreatic head cancer patients using an in-room CT (CTVision, Siemens) were analyzed. All patients were treated with a radiation dose of 50.4 in 1.8 Gy per fraction. On each daily CT set, The contour of the pancreatic head, included in the treatment target, was generated by populating the pancreatic head contour from the planning CT or MRI using an auto-segmentation tool based on deformable registration (ABAS, Elekta) with manual editing if necessary. The CTN at each voxel in the pancreatic head contour was extracted and the 3D distribution of the CTNs was processed using MATLAB. The mean value of CTN distribution was used to quantify the daily CTN change in the pancreatic head. Results: Reduction of CTN in pancreatic head was observed during the CRT delivery in 14 out the 17 (82%) patients studied. Although the average reduction is only 3.5 Houncefield Unit (HU), this change is significant (p<0.01). Among them, there are 7 patients who had a CTN drop larger than 5 HU, ranging from 6.0 to 11.8 HU. In contrast to this trend, CTN was increased in 3 patients. Conclusion: Measurable changes in the CT number in tumor target were observed during the course of chemoradiation therapy for the pancreas cancer patients, indicating this radiation-induced CTN change may be used to assess treatment response.

  15. Buschke-Löwenstein tumor with squamous cell carcinoma treated with chemo-radiation therapy and local surgical excision: report of three cases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of anorectal Buschke-Löwenstein tumor (BLT) with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) transformation is not univocal given the rarity of the disease. BLT is characterized by its large size and tendency to infiltrate into underlying tissues. Malignant transformation can occur and it is important to identify the presence of neoplastic foci to decide the proper treatment. Our aim was to assess the effectiveness of neo-adjuvant chemo-radiation therapy (CRT) and local excision in order to avoid abdomino-perineal resection (APR). Three cases of anorectal BLT with SCC transformation are presented. All patients were HIV positive and treated with antiretroviral drugs. They underwent preoperative endoanal ultrasound, biopsies, total body tomography and anal brushing. Treatment consisted of neo-adjuvant chemo-radiation therapy (45 Gy to the pelvis plus a boost with 14.40 Gy to the primary tumor for a total of 59.40 Gy, and mitomycin-C in bolus on the first day, plus 5-fluorouracil by continuous infusion in the first and in the sixth week) and subsequent local surgical excision. During the follow-up, patients were subjected to the same preoperative diagnostic investigations and high resolution anoscopy. All patients showed a complete regression of the lesion after CRT and were treated by local surgical excision, thus avoiding permanent colostomy. In conclusion neo-adjuvant chemo-radiation therapy with local surgical excision could be considered an effective therapy in the treatment of anorectal BLT with SCC transformation to avoid APR. PMID:24040860

  16. Buschke-Löwenstein tumor with squamous cell carcinoma treated with chemo-radiation therapy and local surgical excision: report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Indinnimeo, Marileda; Impagnatiello, Alessio; D'Ettorre, Gabriella; Bernardi, Gloria; Moschella, Cosima Maria; Gozzo, Paolo; Ciardi, Antonio; Bangrazi, Caterina; De Felice, Francesca; Musio, Daniela; Tombolini, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of anorectal Buschke-Löwenstein tumor (BLT) with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) transformation is not univocal given the rarity of the disease. BLT is characterized by its large size and tendency to infiltrate into underlying tissues. Malignant transformation can occur and it is important to identify the presence of neoplastic foci to decide the proper treatment. Our aim was to assess the effectiveness of neo-adjuvant chemo-radiation therapy (CRT) and local excision in order to avoid abdomino-perineal resection (APR). Three cases of anorectal BLT with SCC transformation are presented. All patients were HIV positive and treated with antiretroviral drugs. They underwent preoperative endoanal ultrasound, biopsies, total body tomography and anal brushing. Treatment consisted of neo-adjuvant chemo-radiation therapy (45 Gy to the pelvis plus a boost with 14.40 Gy to the primary tumor for a total of 59.40 Gy, and mitomycin-C in bolus on the first day, plus 5-fluorouracil by continuous infusion in the first and in the sixth week) and subsequent local surgical excision. During the follow-up, patients were subjected to the same preoperative diagnostic investigations and high resolution anoscopy. All patients showed a complete regression of the lesion after CRT and were treated by local surgical excision, thus avoiding permanent colostomy. In conclusion neo-adjuvant chemo-radiation therapy with local surgical excision could be considered an effective therapy in the treatment of anorectal BLT with SCC transformation to avoid APR. PMID:24040860

  17. Expression of Folate Pathway Genes in Stage III Colorectal Cancer Correlates with Recurrence Status Following Adjuvant Bolus 5-FU-Based Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Odin, Elisabeth; Sondén, Arvid; Gustavsson, Bengt; Carlsson, Göran; Wettergren, Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is commonly treated with 5-fluorouracil and 5-formyltetrahydrofolate (leucovorin). Metabolic action of leucovorin requires several enzymatic steps that are dependent on expression of corresponding coding genes. To identify folate pathway genes with possible impact on leucovorin metabolism, a retrospective study was performed on 193 patients with stage III colorectal cancer. Relative expression of 22 genes putatively involved in leucovorin transport, polyglutamation and metabolism was determined in tumor and mucosa samples using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. After surgery, patients received adjuvant 5-fluorouracil-based bolus chemotherapy with leucovorin during six months, and were followed for 3 to 5 years. Cox regression analysis showed that high tumoral expression of the genes SLC46A1/PCFT (proton-coupled folate transporter) and SLC19A1/RFC-1 (reduced folate carrier 1) correlated significantly (p < 0.001 and p < 0.01, respectively) with a decreased risk of recurrent disease, measured as disease-free survival (DFS). These two genes are involved in the transport of folates into the cells and each functions optimally at a different pH. We conclude that SLC46A1/PCFT and SLC19A1/RFC-1 are associated with DFS of patients with colorectal cancer and hypothesize that poor response to 5-fluorouracil plus leucovorin therapy in some patients may be linked to low expression of these genes. Such patients might need a more intensified therapeutic approach than those with high gene expression. Future prospective studies will determine if the expression of any of these genes can be used to predict response to leucovorin. PMID:26193446

  18. Expression of Folate Pathway Genes in Stage III Colorectal Cancer Correlates with Recurrence Status Following Adjuvant Bolus 5-FU-Based Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Odin, Elisabeth; Sondén, Arvid; Gustavsson, Bengt; Carlsson, Göran; Wettergren, Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is commonly treated with 5-fluorouracil and 5-formyltetrahydrofolate (leucovorin). Metabolic action of leucovorin requires several enzymatic steps that are dependent on expression of corresponding coding genes. To identify folate pathway genes with possible impact on leucovorin metabolism, a retrospective study was performed on 193 patients with stage III colorectal cancer. Relative expression of 22 genes putatively involved in leucovorin transport, polyglutamation and metabolism was determined in tumor and mucosa samples using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. After surgery, patients received adjuvant 5-fluorouracil-based bolus chemotherapy with leucovorin during six months, and were followed for 3 to 5 years. Cox regression analysis showed that high tumoral expression of the genes SLC46A1/PCFT (proton-coupled folate transporter) and SLC19A1/RFC-1 (reduced folate carrier 1) correlated significantly (p < 0.001 and p < 0.01, respectively) with a decreased risk of recurrent disease, measured as disease-free survival (DFS). These two genes are involved in the transport of folates into the cells and each functions optimally at a different pH. We conclude that SLC46A1/PCFT and SLC19A1/RFC-1 are associated with DFS of patients with colorectal cancer and hypothesize that poor response to 5-fluorouracil plus leucovorin therapy in some patients may be linked to low expression of these genes. Such patients might need a more intensified therapeutic approach than those with high gene expression. Future prospective studies will determine if the expression of any of these genes can be used to predict response to leucovorin. PMID:26193446

  19. Intra-arterial chemoradiation therapy with weekly low-dose cisplatin for squamous cell carcinoma of the maxillary sinus.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, T; Tada, Y; Maruya, S; Takeishi, E; Miura, K; Masubuchi, T; Fushimi, C; Hasegawa, H; Kamata, S

    2015-06-01

    A new intra-arterial chemoradiation regimen that involves infusing low-dose cisplatin in combination with definitive irradiation was used in 36 patients diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma of the maxillary sinus. The safety and therapeutic efficacy of this regimen were reviewed retrospectively. An intra-arterial catheter was inserted in a retrograde manner into the target artery via the superficial temporal artery or occipital artery. Intra-arterial infusion was performed using cisplatin at a dose of 20-50mg/m(2) per week for 6-8 weeks. At the same time, sodium thiosulphate was infused as a neutralizing agent. Irradiation was performed at 60Gy in 30 fractions. All 36 patients completed treatment. Grade 3 adverse events occurred in only seven patients (19.4%) and no grade 4 events were noted. As a primary therapy, the complete response rate was 83.3%, the partial response rate was 16.7%, and the overall response rate was 100%. The 2-year local control rate was 63.0%, and the 2-year overall survival rate was 75.5%. The 2-year preservation rate of the hard palate was 97.1%, that of the eyeball was 97.2%, and that of visual function was 94.4%. This treatment regimen can contribute to improving the quality of life of patients without reducing the curability of the therapy. PMID:25843537

  20. High preoperative serum globulin in rectal cancer treated with neoadjunctive chemoradiation therapy is a risk factor for poor outcome

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qingguo; Meng, Xianke; Liang, Lei; Xu, Ye; Cai, Guoxiang; Cai, Sanjun

    2015-01-01

    An elevated serum albumin (ALB) and albumin/globulin ratio (AGR) has been reported to be associated with a favorable prognosis for certain malignancies; however, little is known about the prognostic significance of globulin (GLB) in rectal cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (NCRT). The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether GLB analysis could predict the prognosis of patients received NCRT. A retrospective cohort of 293 locally advanced rectal cancer patients receiving NCRT followed by radical surgery was recruited between January 2006 and December 2012 at Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center. Levels for preoperative GLB and ALB were obtained and used to calculate the AGR. Survival analysis was used to evaluate the predictive value of GLB. X-tile program determined 28.50, 36.20 and 1.20 as optimal cut-off value for GLB, ALB and AGR in terms of survival. Univariate and multivariate analysis revealed that low GLB levels were significantly associated with favorable rectal cancer-specific survival (RCSS) (P < 0.05). Conversely, low ALB levels were associated with a significantly worse RCSS (P = 0.010). Collectively, high preoperative GLB level was a significantly unfavorable factor for rectal cancer patients treated with NCRT. This easily obtained variable may serve as a valuable marker to predict the outcomes of such patient population. PMID:26609491

  1. Temporal Patterns of Fatigue Predict Pathologic Response in Patients Treated With Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Hee Chul; Janjan, Nora A.; Mendoza, Tito R.; Lin, Edward H.; Vadhan-Raj, Saroj; Hundal, Mandeep; Zhang Yiqun; Delclos, Marc E.; Crane, Christopher H.; Das, Prajnan; Wang, Xin Shelley; Cleeland, Charles S.; Krishnan, Sunil

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether symptom burden before and during preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for rectal cancer predicts for pathologic tumor response. Methods and Materials: Fifty-four patients with T3/T4/N+ rectal cancers were treated on a Phase II trial using preoperative capecitabine and concomitant boost radiotherapy. Symptom burden was prospectively assessed before (baseline) and weekly during CRT by patient self-reported questionnaires, the MD Anderson Symptom Inventory (MDASI), and Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI). Survival probabilities were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Symptom scores according to tumor downstaging (TDS) were compared using Student's t tests. Logistic regression was used to determine whether symptom burden levels predicted for TDS. Lowess curves were plotted for symptom burden across time. Results: Among 51 patients evaluated for pathologic response, 26 patients (51%) had TDS. Fatigue, pain, and drowsiness were the most common symptoms. All symptoms increased progressively during treatment. Patients with TDS had lower MDASI fatigue scores at baseline and at completion (Week 5) of CRT (p = 0.03 for both) and lower levels of BFI 'usual fatigue' at baseline. Conclusion: Lower levels of fatigue at baseline and completion of CRT were significant predictors of pathologic tumor response gauged by TDS, suggesting that symptom burden may be a surrogate for tumor burden. The relationship between symptom burden and circulating cytokines merits evaluation to characterize the molecular basis of this phenomenon.

  2. New Perspectives on Predictive Biomarkers of Tumor Response and Their Clinical Application in Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy for Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nam Kyu; Hur, Hyuk

    2015-11-01

    Preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) is the standard treatment for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) and can improve local control and survival outcomes. However, the responses of individual tumors to CRT are not uniform and vary widely, from complete response to disease progression. Patients with resistant tumors can be exposed to irradiation and chemotherapy that are both expensive and at times toxic without benefit. In contrast, about 60% of tumors show tumor regression and T and N down-staging. Furthermore, a pathologic complete response (pCR), which is characterized by sterilization of all tumor cells, leads to an excellent prognosis and is observed in approximately 10-30% of cases. This variety in tumor response has lead to an increased need to develop a model predictive of responses to CRT in order to identify patients who will benefit from this multimodal treatment. Endoscopy, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, serum carcinoembryonic antigen, and molecular biomarkers analyzed using immunohistochemistry and gene expression profiling are the most commonly used predictive models in preoperative CRT. Such modalities guide clinicians in choosing the best possible treatment options and the extent of surgery for each individual patient. However, there are still controversies regarding study outcomes, and a nomogram of combined models of future trends is needed to better predict patient response. The aim of this article was to review currently available tools for predicting tumor response after preoperative CRT in rectal cancer and to explore their applicability in clinical practice for tailored treatment. PMID:26446626

  3. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Expression As Prognostic Marker in Patients With Anal Carcinoma Treated With Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fraunholz, Ingeborg; Falk, Stefan

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic value of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression in pretreatment tumor biopsy specimens of patients with anal cancer treated with concurrent 5-fluorouracil and mitomycin C-based chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: Immunohistochemical staining for EGFR was performed in pretreatment biopsy specimens of 103 patients with anal carcinoma. EGFR expression was correlated with clinical and histopathologic characteristics and with clinical endpoints, including local failure-free survival (LFFS), colostomy-free survival (CFS), distant metastases-free survival (DMFS), cancer-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS). Results: EGFR staining intensity was absent in 3%, weak in 23%, intermediate in 36% and intense in 38% of the patients. In univariate analysis, the level of EGFR staining was significantly correlated with CSS (absent/weak vs intermediate/intense expression: 5-year CSS, 70% vs 86%, P=.03). As a trend, this was also observed for DMFS (70% vs 86%, P=.06) and LFFS (70% vs 87%, P=.16). In multivariate analysis, N stage, tumor differentiation, and patients’ sex were independent prognostic factors for CSS, whereas EGFR expression only reached borderline significance (hazard ratio 2.75; P=.08). Conclusion: Our results suggest that elevated levels of pretreatment EGFR expression could be correlated with favorable clinical outcome in anal cancer patients treated with CRT. Further studies are warranted to elucidate how EGFR is involved in the response to CRT.

  4. New Perspectives on Predictive Biomarkers of Tumor Response and Their Clinical Application in Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy for Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Hyuk

    2015-01-01

    Preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) is the standard treatment for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) and can improve local control and survival outcomes. However, the responses of individual tumors to CRT are not uniform and vary widely, from complete response to disease progression. Patients with resistant tumors can be exposed to irradiation and chemotherapy that are both expensive and at times toxic without benefit. In contrast, about 60% of tumors show tumor regression and T and N down-staging. Furthermore, a pathologic complete response (pCR), which is characterized by sterilization of all tumor cells, leads to an excellent prognosis and is observed in approximately 10-30% of cases. This variety in tumor response has lead to an increased need to develop a model predictive of responses to CRT in order to identify patients who will benefit from this multimodal treatment. Endoscopy, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, serum carcinoembryonic antigen, and molecular biomarkers analyzed using immunohistochemistry and gene expression profiling are the most commonly used predictive models in preoperative CRT. Such modalities guide clinicians in choosing the best possible treatment options and the extent of surgery for each individual patient. However, there are still controversies regarding study outcomes, and a nomogram of combined models of future trends is needed to better predict patient response. The aim of this article was to review currently available tools for predicting tumor response after preoperative CRT in rectal cancer and to explore their applicability in clinical practice for tailored treatment. PMID:26446626

  5. Enteral Feeding Tubes in Patients Undergoing Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer: A Critical Review

    SciTech Connect

    Koyfman, Shlomo A.; Adelstein, David J.

    2012-11-01

    Definitive chemoradiation therapy has evolved as the preferred organ preservation strategy in the treatment of locally advanced head-and-neck cancer (LA-HNC). Dry mouth and dysphagia are among the most common and most debilitating treatment-related toxicities that frequently necessitate the placement of enteral feeding tubes (FT) in these patients to help them meet their nutritional requirements. The use of either a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube or a nasogastric tube, the choice of using a prophylactic vs a reactive approach, and the effects of FTs on weight loss, hospitalization, quality of life, and long-term functional outcomes are areas of continued controversy. Considerable variations in practice patterns exist in the United States and abroad. This critical review synthesizes the current data for the use of enteral FTs in this patient population and clarifies the relative advantages of different types of FTs and the timing of their use. Recent developments in the biologic understanding and treatment approaches for LA-HNC appear to be favorably impacting the frequency and severity of treatment-related dysphagia and may reduce the need for enteral tube feeding in the future.

  6. Role of Genetic Polymorphisms in NFKB-Mediated Inflammatory Pathways in Response to Primary Chemoradiation Therapy for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dzhugashvili, Maia; Luengo-Gil, Ginés; García, Teresa; González-Conejero, Rocío; Conesa-Zamora, Pablo; Escolar, Pedro Pablo; Calvo, Felipe; Vicente, Vicente; Ayala de la Peña, Francisco

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether polymorphisms of genes related to inflammation are associated with pathologic response (primary endpoint) in patients with rectal cancer treated with primary chemoradiation therapy (PCRT). Methods and Materials: Genomic DNA of 159 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer treated with PCRT was genotyped for polymorphisms rs28362491 (NFKB1), rs1213266/rs5789 (PTGS1), rs5275 (PTGS2), and rs16944/rs1143627 (IL1B) using TaqMan single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping assays. The association between each genotype and pathologic response (poor response vs complete or partial response) was analyzed using logistic regression models. Results: The NFKB1 DEL/DEL genotype was associated with pathologic response (odds ratio [OR], 6.39; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.78-52.65; P=.03) after PCRT. No statistically significant associations between other polymorphisms and response to PCRT were observed. Patients with the NFKB1 DEL/DEL genotype showed a trend for longer disease-free survival (log-rank test, P=.096) and overall survival (P=.049), which was not significant in a multivariate analysis that included pathologic response. Analysis for 6 polymorphisms showed that patients carrying the haplotype rs28362491-DEL/rs1143627-A/rs1213266-G/rs5789-C/rs5275-A/rs16944-G (13.7% of cases) had a higher response rate to PCRT (OR, 8.86; 95% CI, 1.21-64.98; P=.034) than the reference group (rs28362491-INS/rs1143627-A/rs1213266-G/rs5789-C/rs5275-A/rs16944-G). Clinically significant (grade ≥2) acute organ toxicity was also more frequent in patients with that same haplotype (OR, 4.12; 95% CI, 1.11-15.36; P=.037). Conclusions: Our results suggest that genetic variation in NFKB-related inflammatory pathways might influence sensitivity to primary chemoradiation for rectal cancer. If confirmed, an inflammation-related radiogenetic profile might be used to select patients with rectal cancer for preoperative combined-modality treatment.

  7. Phase 1 Trial of Bevacizumab With Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy for Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck With Exploratory Functional Imaging of Tumor Hypoxia, Proliferation, and Perfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Nyflot, Matthew J.; Kruser, Tim J.; Traynor, Anne M.; Khuntia, Deepak; Yang, David T.; Hartig, Gregory K.; McCulloch, Timothy M.; Wiederholt, Peggy A.; Gentry, Lindell R.; Hoang, Tien; Jeraj, Robert; and others

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: A phase 1 trial was completed to examine the safety and feasibility of combining bevacizumab with radiation and cisplatin in patients with locoregionally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) treated with curative intent. Additionally, we assessed the capacity of bevacizumab to induce an early tumor response as measured by a series of biological imaging studies. Methods and Materials: All patients received a single induction dose of bevacizumab (15 mg/kg) delivered 3 weeks (±3 days) before the initiation of chemoradiation therapy. After the initial dose of bevacizumab, comprehensive head and neck chemoradiation therapy was delivered with curative intent to 70 Gy in 33 fractions with concurrent weekly cisplatin at 30 mg/m{sup 2} and bevacizumab every 3 weeks (weeks 1, 4, 7) with dose escalation from 5 to 10 to 15 mg/kg. All patients underwent experimental imaging with [{sup 18}F]fluorothymidine positron emission tomography (FLT-PET) (proliferation), [{sup 61}Cu]Cu-diacetyl-bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) PET (Cu-ATSM-PET) (hypoxia), and dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) (perfusion) at 3 time points: before bevacizumab monotherapy, after bevacizumab monotherapy, and during the combined therapy course. Results: Ten patients were enrolled. All had stage IV HNSCC, all achieved a complete response to treatment, and 9 of 10 remain alive, with a mean survival time of 61.3 months. All patients experienced grade 3 toxicity, but no dose-limiting toxicities or significant bleeding episodes were observed. Significant reductions were noted in tumor proliferation (FLT-PET), tumor hypoxia (Cu-ATSM-PET), and DCE-CT contrast enhancement after bevacizumab monotherapy, with further decreases in FLT-PET and Cu-ATSM-PET during the combined therapy course. Conclusions: The incorporation of bevacizumab into comprehensive chemoradiation therapy regimens for patients with HNSCC appears safe and feasible. Experimental imaging

  8. Predicting Radiation Pneumonitis After Chemoradiation Therapy for Lung Cancer: An International Individual Patient Data Meta-analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Palma, David A.; Senan, Suresh; Tsujino, Kayoko; Barriger, Robert B.; Rengan, Ramesh; Moreno, Marta; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Kim, Tae Hyun; Ramella, Sara; Marks, Lawrence B.; De Petris, Luigi; Stitt, Larry; Rodrigues, George

    2013-02-01

    Background: Radiation pneumonitis is a dose-limiting toxicity for patients undergoing concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We performed an individual patient data meta-analysis to determine factors predictive of clinically significant pneumonitis. Methods and Materials: After a systematic review of the literature, data were obtained on 836 patients who underwent CCRT in Europe, North America, and Asia. Patients were randomly divided into training and validation sets (two-thirds vs one-third of patients). Factors predictive of symptomatic pneumonitis (grade {>=}2 by 1 of several scoring systems) or fatal pneumonitis were evaluated using logistic regression. Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) was used to define risk groups. Results: The median radiation therapy dose was 60 Gy, and the median follow-up time was 2.3 years. Most patients received concurrent cisplatin/etoposide (38%) or carboplatin/paclitaxel (26%). The overall rate of symptomatic pneumonitis was 29.8% (n=249), with fatal pneumonitis in 1.9% (n=16). In the training set, factors predictive of symptomatic pneumonitis were lung volume receiving {>=}20 Gy (V{sub 20}) (odds ratio [OR] 1.03 per 1% increase, P=.008), and carboplatin/paclitaxel chemotherapy (OR 3.33, P<.001), with a trend for age (OR 1.24 per decade, P=.09); the model remained predictive in the validation set with good discrimination in both datasets (c-statistic >0.65). On RPA, the highest risk of pneumonitis (>50%) was in patients >65 years of age receiving carboplatin/paclitaxel. Predictors of fatal pneumonitis were daily dose >2 Gy, V{sub 20}, and lower-lobe tumor location. Conclusions: Several treatment-related risk factors predict the development of symptomatic pneumonitis, and elderly patients who undergo CCRT with carboplatin-paclitaxel chemotherapy are at highest risk. Fatal pneumonitis, although uncommon, is related to dosimetric factors and tumor location.

  9. Performance of a Nomogram Predicting Disease-Specific Survival After an R0 Resection for Gastric Cancer in Patients Receiving Postoperative Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dikken, Johan L.; Coit, Daniel G.; Baser, Raymond E.; Gönen, Mithat; Goodman, Karyn A.; Brennan, Murray F.; Jansen, Edwin P.M.; Boot, Henk; Velde, Cornelis J.H. van de; Cats, Annemieke; Verheij, Marcel

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: The internationally validated Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) gastric carcinoma nomogram was based on patients who underwent curative (R0) gastrectomy, without any other therapy. The purpose of the current study was to assess the performance of this gastric cancer nomogram in patients who received chemoradiation therapy after an R0 resection for gastric cancer. Methods and Materials: In a combined dataset of 76 patients from the Netherlands Cancer Institute (NKI), and 63 patients from MSKCC, who received postoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) after an R0 gastrectomy, the nomogram was validated by means of the concordance index (CI) and a calibration plot. Results: The concordance index for the nomogram was 0.64, which was lower than the CI of the nomogram for patients who received no adjuvant therapy (0.80). In the calibration plot, observed survival was approximately 20% higher than the nomogram-predicted survival for patients receiving postoperative CRT. Conclusions: The MSKCC gastric carcinoma nomogram significantly underpredicted survival for patients in the current study, suggesting an impact of postoperative CRT on survival in patients who underwent an R0 resection for gastric cancer, which has been demonstrated by randomized controlled trials. This analysis stresses the need for updating nomograms with the incorporation of multimodal strategies.

  10. Phase II Study of Preoperative Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy With S-1 in Patients With T4 Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nomura, Tomoko; Murakami, Ryuji; Toya, Ryo; Teshima, Keiko; Nakahara, Aya; Hirai, Toshinori; Hiraki, Akimitsu; Nakayama, Hideki; Yoshitake, Yoshihiro; Ota, Kazutoshi; Obayashi, Takehisa; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Oya, Natsuo; Shinohara, Masanori

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility and efficacy of preoperative concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) with S-1, an oral fluoropyrimidine derivative, in patients with T4 oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Methods and Materials: Only patients with histologically proven T4 oral SCC were included. Radiotherapy (total dose, 30 Gy) was delivered in 2-Gy daily fractions over a period of 3 weeks. Concurrently, S-1 (80 mg/m{sup 2}/day) was administered orally twice daily for 14 consecutive days. Results: We enrolled 46 patients. All underwent radiotherapy as planned; however, oral S-1 was discontinued in 3 patients who manifested acute toxicity. Grade 3 toxicities were mucositis (20%), anorexia (9%), and neutropenia (4%). We encountered no Grade 4 adverse events or serious postoperative morbidity requiring surgical intervention. After CCRT, 32 of the 46 patients underwent radical resection; in 17 (53%) of the operated patients, the pathologic response was complete. During follow-up ranging from 7 to 58 months (median, 22 months), tumor control failed in 5 (16%) of the 32 operated patients; there were 3 local and 2 regional failures. Of the 14 non-operated patients, 8 (57%) manifested local (n = 7) or regional failure (n = 1). The 3-year overall survival rate for all 46 patients was 69%; it was significantly higher for operated than for non-operated patients (82% vs. 48%; p = 0.0288). Conclusion: Preoperative CCRT with S-1 is feasible and effective in patients with T4 oral SCC. Even in inoperable cases, CCRT with S-1 provides adequate tumor control.

  11. Treatment Outcomes, Growth Height, and Neuroendocrine Functions in Patients With Intracranial Germ Cell Tumors Treated With Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Odagiri, Kazumasa; Omura, Motoko; Hata, Masaharu; Aida, Noriko; Niwa, Tetsu; Ogino, Ichiro; Kigasawa, Hisato; Adachi, Masataka; Inoue, Tomio

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: We carried out a retrospective review of patients receiving chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for intracranial germ cell tumor (GCT) using a lower dose than those previously reported. To identify an optimal GCT treatment strategy, we evaluated treatment outcomes, growth height, and neuroendocrine functions. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two patients with GCT, including 4 patients with nongerminomatous GCT (NGGCT) were treated with CRT. The median age at initial diagnosis was 11.5 years (range, 6-19 years). Seventeen patients initially received whole brain irradiation (median dose, 19.8 Gy), and 5 patients, including 4 with NGGCT, received craniospinal irradiation (median dose, 30.6 Gy). The median radiation doses delivered to the primary site were 36 Gy for pure germinoma and 45 Gy for NGGCT. Seventeen patients had tumors adjacent to the hypothalamic-pituitary axis (HPA), and 5 had tumors away from the HPA. Results: The median follow-up time was 72 months (range, 18-203 months). The rates of both disease-free survival and overall survival were 100%. The standard deviation scores (SDSs) of final heights recorded at the last assessment tended to be lower than those at initial diagnosis. Even in all 5 patients with tumors located away from the HPA, final height SDSs decreased (p = 0.018). In 16 patients with tumors adjacent to the HPA, 8 showed metabolic changes suggestive of hypothalamic obesity and/or growth hormone deficiency, and 13 had other pituitary hormone deficiencies. In contrast, 4 of 5 patients with tumors away from the HPA did not show any neuroendocrine dysfunctions except for a tendency to short stature. Conclusions: CRT for GCT using limited radiation doses resulted in excellent treatment outcomes. Even after limited radiation doses, insufficient growth height was often observed that was independent of tumor location. Our study suggests that close follow-up of neuroendocrine functions, including growth hormone, is essential for all patients with

  12. Novel Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism Markers Predictive of Pathologic Response to Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy in Rectal Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jin C.; Ha, Ye J.; Roh, Seon A.; Cho, Dong H.; Choi, Eun Y.; Kim, Tae W.; Kim, Jong H.; Kang, Tae W.; Kim, Seon Y.; Kim, Yong S.

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: Studies aimed at predicting individual responsiveness to preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) are urgently needed, especially considering the risks associated with poorly responsive patients. Methods and Materials: A 3-step strategy for the determination of CRT sensitivity is proposed based on (1) the screening of a human genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array in correlation with histopathologic tumor regression grade (TRG); (2) clinical association analysis of 113 patients treated with preoperative CRT; and (3) a cell-based functional assay for biological validation. Results: Genome-wide screening identified 9 SNPs associated with preoperative CRT responses. Positive responses (TRG 1-3) were obtained more frequently in patients carrying the reference allele (C) of the SNP CORO2A rs1985859 than in those with the substitution allele (T) (P=.01). Downregulation of CORO2A was significantly associated with reduced early apoptosis by 27% (P=.048) and 39% (P=.023) in RKO and COLO320DM colorectal cancer cells, respectively, as determined by flow cytometry. Reduced radiosensitivity was confirmed by colony-forming assays in the 2 colorectal cancer cells (P=.034 and .015, respectively). The SNP FAM101A rs7955740 was not associated with radiosensitivity in the clinical association analysis. However, downregulation of FAM101A significantly reduced early apoptosis by 29% in RKO cells (P=.047), and it enhanced colony formation in RKO cells (P=.001) and COLO320DM cells (P=.002). Conclusion: CRT-sensitive SNP markers were identified using a novel 3-step process. The candidate marker CORO2A rs1985859 and the putative marker FAM101A rs7955740 may be of value for the prediction of radiosensitivity to preoperative CRT, although further validation is needed in large cohorts.

  13. Epigenetic Regulation of KLHL34 Predictive of Pathologic Response to Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy in Rectal Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, Ye J.; Kim, Chan W.; Roh, Seon A.; Cho, Dong H.; Park, Jong L.; Kim, Seon Y.; Kim, Jong H.; Choi, Eun K.; Kim, Yong S.; Kim, Jin C.

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: Prediction of individual responsiveness to preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) is urgently needed in patients with poorly responsive locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Methods and Materials: Candidate methylation genes associated with radiosensitivity were identified using a 3-step process. In the first step, genome-wide screening of methylation genes was performed in correlation with histopathologic tumor regression grade in 45 patients with LARC. In the second step, the methylation status of selected sites was analyzed by pyrosequencing in 67 LARC patients, including 24 patients analyzed in the first step. Finally, colorectal cancer cell clones with stable KLHL34 knockdown were generated and tested for cellular sensitivity to radiation. Results: Genome-wide screening identified 7 hypermethylated CpG sites (DZIP1 cg24107021, DZIP1 cg26886381, ZEB1 cg04430381, DKK3 cg041006961, STL cg00991794, KLHL34 cg01828474, and ARHGAP6 cg07828380) associated with preoperative CRT responses. Radiosensitivity in patients with hypermethylated KLHL34 cg14232291 was confirmed by pyrosequencing in additional cohorts. Knockdown of KLHL34 significantly reduced colony formation (KLHL34 sh#1: 20.1%, P=.0001 and KLHL34 sh#2: 15.8%, P=.0002), increased the cytotoxicity (KLHL34 sh#1: 14.8%, P=.019 and KLHL34 sh#2: 17.9%, P=.007) in LoVo cells, and increased radiation-induced caspase-3 activity and the sub-G1 population of cells. Conclusions: The methylation status of KLHL34 cg14232291 may be a predictive candidate of sensitivity to preoperative CRT, although further validation is needed in large cohorts using various cell types.

  14. Residual Tumor After Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Outside the Radiation Therapy Target Volume: A New Prognostic Factor for Survival in Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Muijs, Christina; Smit, Justin; Karrenbeld, Arend; Beukema, Jannet; Mul, Veronique; Dam, Go van; Hospers, Geke; Kluin, Phillip; Langendijk, Johannes; Plukker, John

    2014-03-15

    Purpose/Objective(s): The aim of this study was to analyze the accuracy of gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation and clinical target volume (CTV) margins for neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (neo-CRT) in esophageal carcinoma at pathologic examination and to determine the impact on survival. Methods and Materials: The study population consisted of 63 esophageal cancer patients treated with neo-CRT. GTV and CTV borders were demarcated in situ during surgery on the esophagus, using anatomical reference points to provide accurate information regarding tumor location at pathologic evaluation. To identify prognostic factors for disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS), a Cox regression analysis was performed. Results: After resection, macroscopic residual tumor was found outside the GTV in 7 patients (11%). Microscopic residual tumor was located outside the CTV in 9 patients (14%). The median follow-up was 15.6 months. With multivariate analysis, only microscopic tumor outside the CTV (hazard ratio [HR], 4.96; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03-15.36), and perineural growth (HR, 5.77; 95% CI, 1.27-26.13) were identified as independent prognostic factors for OS. The 1-year OS was 20% for patients with tumor outside the CTV and 86% for those without (P<.01). For DFS, microscopic tumor outside the CTV (HR, 5.92; 95% CI, 1.89-18.54) and ypN+ (HR, 3.36; 95% CI, 1.33-8.48) were identified as independent adverse prognostic factors. The 1-year DFS was 23% versus 77% for patients with or without tumor outside the CTV (P<.01). Conclusions: Microscopic tumor outside the CTV is associated with markedly worse OS after neo-CRT. This may either stress the importance of accurate tumor delineation or reflect aggressive tumor behavior requiring new adjuvant treatment modalities.

  15. Dose-Volume Histogram Predictors of Chronic Gastrointestinal Complications After Radical Hysterectomy and Postoperative Concurrent Nedaplatin-Based Chemoradiation Therapy for Early-Stage Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Isohashi, Fumiaki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Mabuchi, Seiji; Konishi, Koji; Koizumi, Masahiko; Takahashi, Yutaka; Ogata, Toshiyuki; Maruoka, Shintaroh; Kimura, Tadashi; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate dose-volume histogram (DVH) predictors for the development of chronic gastrointestinal (GI) complications in cervical cancer patients who underwent radical hysterectomy and postoperative concurrent nedaplatin-based chemoradiation therapy. Methods and Materials: This study analyzed 97 patients who underwent postoperative concurrent chemoradiation therapy. The organs at risk that were contoured were the small bowel loops, large bowel loop, and peritoneal cavity. DVH parameters subjected to analysis included the volumes of these organs receiving more than 15, 30, 40, and 45 Gy (V15-V45) and their mean dose. Associations between DVH parameters or clinical factors and the incidence of grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications were evaluated. Results: Of the clinical factors, smoking and low body mass index (BMI) (<22) were significantly associated with grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications. Also, patients with chronic GI complications had significantly greater V15-V45 volumes and higher mean dose of the small bowel loops compared with those without GI complications. In contrast, no parameters for the large bowel loop or peritoneal cavity were significantly associated with GI complications. Results of the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis led to the conclusion that V15-V45 of the small bowel loops has high accuracy for prediction of GI complications. Among these parameters, V40 gave the highest area under the ROC curve. Finally, multivariate analysis was performed with V40 of the small bowel loops and 2 other clinical parameters that were judged to be potential risk factors for chronic GI complications: BMI and smoking. Of these 3 parameters, V40 of the small bowel loops and smoking emerged as independent predictors of chronic GI complications. Conclusions: DVH parameters of the small bowel loops may serve as predictors of grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications after postoperative

  16. Nomogram Prediction of Survival and Recurrence in Patients With Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer Undergoing Curative Resection Followed by Adjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Changhoon; Kim, Kyubo; Chie, Eui Kyu; Kim, Jin Ho; Jang, Jin-Young; Kim, Sun Whe; Han, Sae-Won; Oh, Do-Youn; Im, Seock-Ah; Kim, Tae-You; Bang, Yung-Jue; Ha, Sung W.

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To develop nomograms for predicting the overall survival (OS) and relapse-free survival (RFS) in patients with extrahepatic bile duct cancer undergoing adjuvant chemoradiation therapy after curative resection. Methods and Materials: From January 1995 through August 2006, a total of 166 consecutive patients underwent curative resection followed by adjuvant chemoradiation therapy. Multivariate analysis using Cox proportional hazards regression was performed, and this Cox model was used as the basis for the nomograms of OS and RFS. We calculated concordance indices of the constructed nomograms and American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) staging system. Results: The OS rate at 2 years and 5 years was 60.8% and 42.5%, respectively, and the RFS rate at 2 years and 5 years was 52.5% and 38.2%, respectively. The model containing age, sex, tumor location, histologic differentiation, perineural invasion, and lymph node involvement was selected for nomograms. The bootstrap-corrected concordance index of the nomogram for OS and RFS was 0.63 and 0.62, respectively, and that of AJCC staging for OS and RFS was 0.50 and 0.52, respectively. Conclusions: We developed nomograms that predicted survival and recurrence better than AJCC staging. With caution, clinicians may use these nomograms as an adjunct to or substitute for AJCC staging for predicting an individual's prognosis and offering tailored adjuvant therapy.

  17. Health-Related Quality of Life in SCALOP, a Randomized Phase 2 Trial Comparing Chemoradiation Therapy Regimens in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hurt, Christopher N.; Mukherjee, Somnath; Bridgewater, John; Falk, Stephen; Crosby, Tom; McDonald, Alec; Joseph, George; Staffurth, John; Abrams, Ross A.; Blazeby, Jane M.; Bridges, Sarah; Dutton, Peter; Griffiths, Gareth; Maughan, Tim; Johnson, Colin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) provides survival benefits but may result in considerable toxicity. Health-related quality of life (HRQL) measurements during CRT have not been widely reported. This paper reports HRQL data from the Selective Chemoradiation in Advanced Localised Pancreatic Cancer (SCALOP) trial, including validation of the QLQ-PAN26 tool in CRT. Methods and Materials Patients with locally advanced, inoperable, nonmetastatic carcinoma of the pancreas were eligible. Following 12 weeks of induction gemcitabine plus capecitabine (GEMCAP) chemotherapy, patients with stable and responding disease were randomized to a further cycle of GEMCAP followed by capecitabine- or gemcitabine-based CRT. HRQL was assessed with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30) and the EORTC Pancreatic Cancer module (PAN26). Results A total of 114 patients from 28 UK centers were registered and 74 patients randomized. There was improvement in the majority of HRQL scales during induction chemotherapy. Patients with significant deterioration in fatigue, appetite loss, and gastrointestinal symptoms during CRT recovered within 3 weeks following CRT. Differences in changes in HRQL scores between trial arms rarely reached statistical significance; however, where they did, they favored capecitabine therapy. PAN26 scales had good internal consistency and were able to distinguish between subgroups of patients experiencing toxicity. Conclusions Although there is deterioration in HRQL following CRT, this resolves within 3 weeks. HRQL data support the use of capecitabine- over gemcitabine-based chemoradiation. The QLQ-PAN26 is a reliable and valid tool for use in patients receiving CRT. PMID:26530749

  18. Predicting Esophagitis After Chemoradiation Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: An Individual Patient Data Meta-Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Palma, David A.; Senan, Suresh; Oberije, Cary; Belderbos, Jose; Dios, Núria Rodríguez de; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Barriger, R. Bryan; Moreno-Jiménez, Marta; Kim, Tae Hyun; Ramella, Sara; Everitt, Sarah; Rengan, Ramesh; Marks, Lawrence B.; De Ruyck, Kim; and others

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) improves survival compared with sequential treatment for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer, but it increases toxicity, particularly radiation esophagitis (RE). Validated predictors of RE for clinical use are lacking. We performed an individual-patient-data meta-analysis to determine factors predictive of clinically significant RE. Methods and Materials: After a systematic review of the literature, data were obtained on 1082 patients who underwent CCRT, including patients from Europe, North America, Asia, and Australia. Patients were randomly divided into training and validation sets (2/3 vs 1/3 of patients). Factors predictive of RE (grade ≥2 and grade ≥3) were assessed using logistic modeling, with the concordance statistic (c statistic) used to evaluate the performance of each model. Results: The median radiation therapy dose delivered was 65 Gy, and the median follow-up time was 2.1 years. Most patients (91%) received platinum-containing CCRT regimens. The development of RE was common, scored as grade 2 in 348 patients (32.2%), grade 3 in 185 (17.1%), and grade 4 in 10 (0.9%). There were no RE-related deaths. On univariable analysis using the training set, several baseline factors were statistically predictive of RE (P<.05), but only dosimetric factors had good discrimination scores (c > .60). On multivariable analysis, the esophageal volume receiving ≥60 Gy (V60) alone emerged as the best predictor of grade ≥2 and grade ≥3 RE, with good calibration and discrimination. Recursive partitioning identified 3 risk groups: low (V60 <0.07%), intermediate (V60 0.07% to 16.99%), and high (V60 ≥17%). With use of the validation set, the predictive model performed inferiorly for the grade ≥2 endpoint (c = .58) but performed well for the grade ≥3 endpoint (c = .66). Conclusions: Clinically significant RE is common, but life-threatening complications occur in <1% of patients. Although several factors

  19. MRI Risk Stratification for Tumor Relapse in Rectal Cancer Achieving Pathological Complete Remission after Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy and Curative Resection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Honsoul; Myoung, Sungmin; Koom, Woong Sub; Kim, Nam Kyu; Kim, Myeong-Jin; Ahn, Joong Bae; Hur, Hyuk; Lim, Joon Seok

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Rectal cancer patients achieving pCR are known to have an excellent prognosis, yet no widely accepted consensus on risk stratification and post-operative management (e.g., adjuvant therapy) has been established. This study aimed to identify magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) high-risk factors for tumor relapse in pathological complete remission (pCR) achieved by rectal cancer patients who have undergone neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT) and curative resection. Materials and Methods We analyzed 88 (male/female = 55/33, median age, 59.5 years [range 34–78]) pCR-proven rectal cancer patients who had undergone pre-CRT MRI, CRT, post-CRT MRI and curative surgery between July 2005 and December 2012. Patients were observed for post-operative tumor relapse. We analyzed the pre/post-CRT MRIs for parameters including mrT stage, mesorectal fascia (mrMRF) status, tumor volume, tumor regression grade (mrTRG), nodal status (mrN), and extramural vessel invasion (mrEMVI). We performed univariate analysis and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Results Post-operative tumor relapse occurred in seven patients (8.0%, n = 7/88) between 5.7 and 50.7 (median 16.8) months. No significant relevance was observed between tumor volume, volume reduction rate, mrTRG, mrT, or mrN status. Meanwhile, positive mrMRF (Ppre-CRT = 0.018, Ppre/post-CRT = 0.006) and mrEMVI (Ppre-CRT = 0.026, Ppre-/post-CRT = 0.008) were associated with higher incidence of post-operative tumor relapse. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed a higher risk of tumor relapse in patients with positive mrMRF (Ppre-CRT = 0.029, Ppre-/post-CRT = 0.009) or mrEMVI (Ppre-CRT = 0.024, Ppre-/post-CRT = 0.003). Conclusion Positive mrMRF and mrEMVI status was associated with a higher risk of post-operative tumor relapse of pCR achieved by rectal cancer patients, and therefore, can be applied for risk stratification and to individualize treatment plans. PMID:26730717

  20. [Retrospective Study of Induction Chemotherapy and Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy for Oropharyngeal Cancer].

    PubMed

    Asakage, Takahiro; Ando, Mizuo; Yoshida, Masafumi; Saito, Yuki; Omura, Go; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2015-10-01

    We carried out this study to clarify the treatment outcomes and problems associated with induction chemotherapy (using taxotere, cisplatin and 5-FU [TPF therapy]) and chemoradiotherapy in patients with oropharyngeal cancer. The data of 44 patients receiving their initial treatment for oropharyngeal cancer (including 2, 9 and 33 patients with stage II, stage III and stage IV disease, respectively, and 31, 8 and 3 patients with side wall, front wall and upper wall (soft palate and uvula) involvement) were examined. Of the 44 patients, 33 received induction chemotherapy and 11 received chemoradiotherapy. The feasibility, incidence of neutropenia, response rate, and 3 year disease-specific survival rate in the induction chemotherapy group vs. chemoradiotherapy group were 70%, 88%, 82% and 73%, respectively, vs. 63%, 91%, 82% and 55%, respectively. A statistically significant difference in the 3-year disease-specific survival rate was seen between the p16-positive and p16-negative patients in the induction chemotherapy group: while the rate was 100% in the p16-positive patients, it was only 51% in the p16-negative patients (p=0.004). Of the patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy, 3 developed mandibular osteomyelitis, which was considered as one of the important problems associated with this therapy. PMID:26727822

  1. RECQ1 A159C Polymorphism Is Associated With Overall Survival of Patients With Resected Pancreatic Cancer: A Replication Study in NRG Oncology Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9704

    PubMed Central

    Li, Donghui; Moughan, Jennifer; Crane, Christopher; Hoffman, John P.; Regine, William F.; Abrams, Ross A.; Safran, Howard; Liu, Chang; Chang, Ping; Freedman, Gary M.; Winter, Kathryn A.; Guha, Chandan; Abbruzzese, James L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To confirm whether a previously observed association between RECQ1 A159C variant and clinical outcome of resectable pancreatic cancer patients treated with preoperative chemoradiation is reproducible in another patient population prospectively treated with postoperative chemoradiation. Methods and Materials Patients were selected, according to tissue availability, from eligible patients with resected pancreatic cancer who were enrolled on the NRG Oncology Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9704 trial of 5-fluorouacil (5-FU)-based chemoradiation preceded and followed by 5-FU or gemcitabine. Deoxyribonucleic acid was extracted from paraffin-embedded tissue sections, and genotype was determined using the Taqman method. The correlation between genotype and overall survival was analyzed using a Kaplan-Meier plot, log-rank test, and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models. Results In the 154 of the study’s 451 eligible patients with evaluable tissue, genotype distribution followed Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (ie, 37% had genotype AA, 43% AC, and 20% CC). The RECQ1 variant AC/CC genotype carriers were associated with being node positive compared with the AA carrier (P = .03). The median survival times (95% confidence interval [CI]) for AA, AC, and CC carriers were 20.6 (16.3–26.1), 18.8 (14.2–21.6), and 14.2 (10.3–21.0) months, respectively. On multivariate analysis, patients with the AC/CC genotypes were associated with worse survival than patients with the AA genotype (hazard ratio [HR] 1.54, 95% CI 1.07–2.23, P =.022). This result seemed slightly stronger for patients on the 5-FU arm (n = 82) (HR 1.64, 95% CI 0.99–2.70, P =.055) than for patients on the gemcitabine arm (n = 72, HR 1.46, 95% CI 0.81–2.63, P =.21). Conclusions Results of this study suggest that the RECQ1 A159C genotype may be a prognostic or predictive factor for resectable pancreatic cancer patients who are treated with adjuvant 5-FU before and after 5-FU-based chemoradiation

  2. MRI Predictive Factors for Tumor Response in Rectal Cancer Following Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy - Implications for Induction Chemotherapy?

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Stanley K.T.; Tait, Diana

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics at baseline and following chemoradiation therapy (CRT) most strongly associated with histopathologic response were investigated and survival outcomes evaluated in accordance with imaging and pathological response. Methods and Materials: Responders were defined as mrT3c/d-4 downstaged to ypT0-2 on pathology or low at risk mrT2 downstaged to ypT1 or T0. Multivariate logistic regression of baseline and posttreatment MRI: T, N, extramural venous invasion (EMVI), circumferential resection margin, craniocaudal length <5 cm, and MRI tumor height ≤5 cm were used to identify independent predictor(s) for response. An association between induction chemotherapy and EMVI status was analyzed. Survival outcomes for pathologic and MRI responders and nonresponders were analyzed. Results: Two hundred eighty-one patients were eligible; 114 (41%) patients were pathology responders. Baseline MRI negative EMVI (odds ratio 2.94, P=.007), tumor height ≤5 cm (OR 1.96, P=.02), and mrEMVI status change (positive to negative) following CRT (OR 3.09, P<.001) were the only predictors for response. There was a strong association detected between induction chemotherapy and ymrEMVI status change after CRT (OR 9.0, P<.003). ymrT0-2 gave a positive predictive value of 80% and OR of 9.1 for ypT0-2. ymrN stage accuracy of ypN stage was 75%. Three-year disease-free survival for pathology and MRI responders were similar at 80% and 79% and significantly better than poor responders. Conclusions: Tumor height and mrEMVI status are more important than baseline size and stage of the tumor as predictors of response to CRT. Both MRI- and pathologic-defined responders have significantly improved survival. “Good response” to CRT in locally advanced rectal cancer with ypT0-2 carries significantly better 3-year overall survival and disease-free survival. Use of induction chemotherapy for improving mrEMVI status and knowledge of MRI

  3. Risk Factors for Pericardial Effusion in Inoperable Esophageal Cancer Patients Treated With Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Xiong; Liu, H. Helen Tucker, Susan L.; Wang Shulian; Mohan, Radhe; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao Zhongxing

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: To identify clinical and dosimetric factors influencing the risk of pericardial effusion (PCE) in patients with inoperable esophageal cancer treated with definitive concurrent chemotherapy and radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Data for 101 patients with inoperable esophageal cancer treated with concurrent chemotherapy and RT from 2000 to 2003 at our institution were analyzed. The PCE was confirmed from follow-up chest computed tomography scans and radiologic reports, with freedom from PCE computed from the end of RT. Log-rank tests were used to identify clinical and dosimetric factors influencing freedom from PCE. Dosimetric factors were calculated from the dose-volume histogram for the whole heart and pericardium. Results: The crude rate of PCE was 27.7% (28 of 101). Median time to onset of PCE was 5.3 months (range, 1.0-16.7 months) after RT. None of the clinical factors investigated was found to significantly influence the risk of PCE. In univariate analysis, a wide range of dose-volume histogram parameters of the pericardium and heart were associated with risk of PCE, including mean dose to the pericardium, volume of pericardium receiving a dose greater than 3 Gy (V3) to greater than 50 Gy (V50), and heart volume treated to greater than 32-38 Gy. Multivariate analysis selected V30 as the only parameter significantly associated with risk of PCE. Conclusions: High-dose radiation to the pericardium may strongly increase the risk of PCE. Such a risk may be reduced by minimizing the dose-volume of the irradiated pericardium and heart.

  4. Outcomes for patients with anaplastic astrocytoma treated with chemoradiation, radiation therapy alone or radiation therapy followed by chemotherapy: a retrospective review within the era of temozolomide.

    PubMed

    Shonka, Nicole A; Theeler, Brett; Cahill, Daniel; Yung, Alfred; Smith, Lynette; Lei, Xiudong; Gilbert, Mark R

    2013-06-01

    Treatment for anaplastic astrocytoma (AA) is controversial. To assess three primary treatment approaches, patients from a single institution were retrospectively evaluated. To represent modern treatment selection, patients diagnosed with AA from December 2003 to December 2009 were selected. Those with insufficient data, incomplete pathology, and transformation or reclassification to glioblastoma in fewer than 6 months were excluded. A total of 163 patients were included in the final analyses. Median follow-up time was 4.2 years (range 0.5-7.8 years). Median age and Karnofsky performance status at diagnosis were 39.2 years and 90, respectively. 23.6 % of patients underwent biopsy, and 72.2 % underwent resection. Approximately 31 % received concurrent chemoradiation (CRT), 26.1 % had radiation therapy alone (RT), 38.2 % had radiation therapy followed by chemotherapy (RT-C), and 3 % were treated only with chemotherapy. Temozolomide was used almost exclusively during CRT (94.2 %) and adjuvantly. A median of 9.5 cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy was given. The combination of radiation and chemotherapy, either concurrent or sequential trended toward a higher rate of radiation necrosis. Median progression free survival (PFS) favored RT (not reached) over CRT (1.5 years) and RT-C (3.6 years) adjusted for pairwise comparison (p = 0.033, p = 0.050). Median overall survival (OS) was 5.7 years, and did not differ significantly by treatment group. OS for patients with AA did not vary by initial treatment selection. Although the longer PFS in those receiving RT versus CRT may be confounded by pseudoprogression, the equivalent OS among groups supports RT. PMID:23526410

  5. Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy With Capecitabine/Oxaliplatin and Cetuximab in Rectal Cancer: Long-Term Results of a Prospective Phase 1/2 Study

    SciTech Connect

    Fokas, Emmanouil; Conradi, Lena; Weiss, Christian; Sprenger, Thilo; Middel, Peter; Rau, Tillman; Dellas, Kathrin; Kitz, Julia; Rödel, Franz; Sauer, Rolf; Rüschoff, Josef; Beissbarth, Tim; Arnold, Dirk; Ghadimi, B. Michael; Rödel, Claus; Liersch, Torsten

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: We have previously shown that the addition of cetuximab to chemoradiation therapy failed to improve complete response rates (pCR) in rectal cancer. Here we report the long-term results of the cetuximab added to preoperative radiation therapy with capecitabine and oxaliplatin (CET-CAPOX-RT) phase 1/2 study that evaluated preoperative chemoradiation with cetuximab, capecitabine, and oxaliplatin in patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: The median follow-up was 63 months (range, 5-73 months). Sixty patients were enrolled; 3 patients were excluded due to protocol violation, and 4 died before surgery. Total mesorectal excision was performed in 53 patients, in 85% (n=45) with curative intention (M0-status). Secondary end points including overall survival (OS) disease-free survival (DFS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS) were calculated. The prognostic value of KRAS mutation status was also assessed. Results: Histopathological examination confirmed ypUICC stages 0 (n=4; pCR), I (n=17), II (n=10), III (n=14), and IV (n=8). For patients who underwent surgery (n=53), OS at 1, 3, and 5 years was 88.7%, 83%, and 75.5%, respectively, whereas CSS rates were 94.1%, 88.1%, and 78.1%, respectively. In the 45 patients who were treated with curative intent (M0), the OS rates at 1, 3, and 5 years were 91.1%, 88.9%, and 86.7%, respectively; whereas CSS rates were 97.6%, 95.2%, and 90.3%, respectively; and DFS rates were 90.7%, 88.3%, and 88.3%, respectively. We did not find any locoregional failure in patients with M0-status (n=45). Chronic toxicity was rare. KRAS mutations, as detected in 33.3%, showed no correlation with the clinicopathological parameters nor significance for either OS (P=.112), CSS (P=.264), or DFS (P=.565). Conclusions: Taken together, chemoradiation therapy combined with cetuximab is safe, feasible, and offers excellent survival rates. KRAS mutation status was not a predictive factor. Importantly, lack of improvement in pCR rate did not

  6. Improving the efficacy of chemoradiation with targeted agents

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Meredith A.; Parsels, Leslie A.; Maybaum, Jonathan; Lawrence, Theodore S.

    2014-01-01

    Chemoradiation is the standard therapy for the majority of inoperable, locally advanced cancers. While there is a need to improve chemoradiation efficacy, normal tissue toxicity limits our ability to give additional chemotherapy or higher doses of radiation. Thus, there is excitement about the addition of molecularly targeted agents, which tend to be less toxic than chemotherapy, to chemoradiation regimens. Unfortunately, initial empiric attempts have not been successful. This review will focus on the evidence that supports rational combinations of targeted agents with chemoradiation, with an emphasis on agents that target the DNA damage response and radiation-induced membrane signaling. PMID:24550033

  7. Esophageal involvement by extranodal natural killer T cell lymphoma, nasal type, mimicking Ebstein Barr viral esophagitis in a tonsillar lymphoma patient undergoing chemoradiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Se Ryeon; Park, Eun Kyung; Won, Nam Hee; Kim, Byung Soo

    2010-09-01

    Esophageal involvement by extranodal natural killer (NK)/T cell lymphoma, nasal type, is rare. As a result, esophageal symptoms in these patients might at first be thought to originate from a benign condition, such as viral esophagitis. It is important to note, however, that benign conditions may mask esophageal involvement by lymphoma. Until now, there has been no report documenting esophageal involvement by lymphoma mimicking viral esophagitis in an extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma patient undergoing active treatment. Here, we report a case of esophageal involvement by extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma, nasal type, initially misdiagnosed as Ebstein Barr virus esophagitis. Lymphoma invasion of the esophagus should be considered if esophageal symptoms do not respond to usual medical esophagitis therapy in an extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma, nasal type, patient undergoing chemoradiation. PMID:20887494

  8. Phase I Study of Preoperative Short-Course Chemoradiation With Proton Beam Therapy and Capecitabine for Resectable Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma of the Head

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Theodore S.; Ryan, David P.; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S.; Mamon, Harvey J.; Mino-Kenudson, Mari; Adams, Judith; Yeap, Beow; Winrich, Barbara; DeLaney, Thomas F.; Fernandez-Del Castillo, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety of 1 week of chemoradiation with proton beam therapy and capecitabine followed by early surgery. Methods and Materials: Fifteen patients with localized resectable, pancreatic adenocarcinoma of the head were enrolled from May 2006 to September 2008. Patients received radiation with proton beam. In dose level 1, patients received 3 GyE x 10 (Week 1, Monday-Friday; Week 2, Monday-Friday). Patients in Dose Levels 2 to 4 received 5 GyE x 5 in progressively shortened schedules: level 2 (Week 1, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday; Week 2, Tuesday and Thursday), Level 3 (Week 1, Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday; Week 2, Monday), Level 4 (Week 1, Monday through Friday). Capecitabine was given as 825 mg/m{sup 2} b.i.d. Weeks 1 and 2 Monday through Friday for a total of 10 days in all dose levels. Surgery was performed 4 to 6 weeks after completion of chemotherapy for Dose Levels 1 to 3 and then after 1 to 3 weeks for Dose Level 4. Results: Three patients were treated at Dose Levels 1 to 3 and 6 patients at Dose Level 4, which was selected as the MTD. No dose limiting toxicities were observed. Grade 3 toxicity was noted in 4 patients (pain in 1; stent obstruction or infection in 3). Eleven patients underwent resection. Reasons for no resection were metastatic disease (3 patients) and unresectable tumor (1 patient). Mean postsurgical length of stay was 6 days (range, 5-10 days). No unexpected 30-day postoperative complications, including leak or obstruction, were found. Conclusions: Preoperative chemoradiation with 1 week of proton beam therapy and capecitabine followed by early surgery is feasible. A Phase II study is underway.

  9. NRG Oncology Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0822: A Phase 2 Study of Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy Using Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Combination With Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin for Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Theodore S.; Moughan, Jennifer; Garofalo, Michael C.; Bendell, Johanna; Berger, Adam C.; Oldenburg, Nicklas B.E.; Anne, Pramila Rani; Perera, Francisco; Jabbour, Salma K.; Nowlan, Adam; DeNittis, Albert; Crane, Christopher

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the rate of gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity of neoadjuvant chemoradiation with capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in cT3-4 rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with localized, nonmetastatic T3 or T4 rectal cancer <12 cm from the anal verge were enrolled in a prospective, multi-institutional, single-arm study of preoperative chemoradiation. Patients received 45 Gy with IMRT in 25 fractions, followed by a 3-dimensional conformal boost of 5.4 Gy in 3 fractions with concurrent capecitabine/oxaliplatin (CAPOX). Surgery was performed 4 to 8 weeks after the completion of therapy. Patients were recommended to receive FOLFOX chemotherapy after surgery. The primary endpoint of the study was acute grade 2 to 5 GI toxicity. Seventy-one patients provided 80% probability to detect at least a 12% reduction in the specified GI toxicity with the treatment of CAPOX and IMRT, at a significance level of .10 (1-sided). Results: Seventy-nine patients were accrued, of whom 68 were evaluable. Sixty-one patients (89.7%) had cT3 disease, and 37 (54.4%) had cN (+) disease. Postoperative chemotherapy was given to 42 of 68 patients. Fifty-eight patients had target contours drawn per protocol, 5 patients with acceptable variation, and 5 patients with unacceptable variations. Thirty-five patients (51.5%) experienced grade ≥2 GI toxicity, 12 patients (17.6%) experienced grade 3 or 4 diarrhea, and pCR was achieved in 10 patients (14.7%). With a median follow-up time of 3.98 years, the 4-year rate of locoregional failure was 7.4% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.0%-13.7%). The 4-year rates of OS and DFS were 82.9% (95% CI: 70.1%-90.6%) and 60.6% (95% CI: 47.5%-71.4%), respectively. Conclusion: The use of IMRT in neoadjuvant chemoradiation for rectal cancer did not reduce the rate of GI toxicity.

  10. Helical Tomotherapy Versus Conventional Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Primary Chemoradiation in Cervical Cancer Patients: An Intraindividual Comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Marnitz, Simone; Lukarski, Dusko; Koehler, Christhardt; Wlodarczyk, Waldemar; Ebert, Andreas; Budach, Volker; Schneider, Achim; Stromberger, Carmen

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To compare intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) delivered by helical tomotherapy (HT) with conventional IMRT for primary chemoradiation in cervical cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Twenty cervical cancer patients undergoing primary chemoradiation received radiation with HT; 10 patients underwent pelvic irradiation (PEL) and 10 extended-field irradiation (EXT). For treatment planning, the simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) concept was applied. Tumor, pelvic, with or without para-aortic lymph nodes were defined as planning target volume A (PTV-A) with a prescribed dose of 1.8/50.4 Gy (28 fractions). The SIB dose for the parametrium (PTV-B), was 2.12/59.36 Gy. The lower target constraints were 95% of the prescribed dose in 95% of the target volume, and the upper dose constraint was 107%. The irradiated small-bowel volumes were kept as low as possible. For every HT plan, a conventional IMRT plan was calculated and compared with regard to dose-volume histogram, conformity index and conformity number, and homogeneity index. Results: Both techniques allowed excellent target volume coverage and sufficient SB sparing. Conformity index and conformity number results for both PTV-A and PTV-B, homogeneity index for PTV-B, and SB sparing for V45, V50, Dmax, and D1% were significantly better with HT. SB sparing was significantly better for conventional IMRT at low doses (V10). Conclusions: Both HT and conventional IMRT provide optimal treatment of cervical cancer patients. The HT technique was significantly favored with regard to target conformity, homogeneity, and SB sparing. Randomized trials are needed to assess the oncological outcome, toxicity, and clinical relevance of these differences.

  11. Nanomedicine in chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Seth M; Wang, Andrew Z

    2013-01-01

    Chemoradiotherapy, the concurrent administration of chemotherapy and radiotherapy, is a treatment paradigm in oncology. It is part of the standard of care and curative treatment of many cancers. Given its importance, one of the primary goals of cancer research has been to identify agents and/or strategies that can improve the therapeutic index of chemoradiation. Recent advances in nanomedicine have provided a unique and unprecedented opportunity for improving chemoradiotherapy. Nanoparticles possess properties that are ideally suited for delivering chemotherapy in the chemoradiation setting. The goal of this review is to examine the role of incorporating nanomedicine into chemoradiation and the potential impact of nanomedicine to chemoradiotherapy. PMID:23343162

  12. Relationship Between Radiation Therapy Dose and Outcome in Patients Treated With Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy and Surgery for Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Population-Based, Comparative Effectiveness Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sher, David J.; Fidler, Mary Jo; Seder, Christopher W.; Liptay, Michael J.; Koshy, Matthew

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: To compare, using the National Cancer Database, survival, pathologic, and surgical outcomes in patients with stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer treated with differential doses of neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy, with the aim to discern whether radiation dose escalation was associated with a comparative effectiveness benefit and/or toxicity risk. Methods and Materials: Patients in the National Cancer Database with stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy and surgery between 1998 and 2005 were analyzed. Dose strata were divided between 36 to 45 Gy (low-dose radiation therapy, LD-RT), 45 to 54 Gy (inclusive, standard-dose, SD-RT), and 54 to 74 Gy (high-dose, HD-RT). Outcomes included overall survival, residual nodal disease, positive surgical margin status, hospital length of stay, and adverse surgical outcomes (30-day mortality or readmission). Results: The cohort consisted of 1041 patients: 233 (22%) LD-RT, 584 (56%) SD-RT, and 230 (22%) HD-RT. The median, 3-year, and 5-year overall survival outcomes were 34.9 months, 48%, and 37%, respectively. On univariable analysis, patients treated with SD-RT experienced prolonged overall survival (median 38.3 vs 31.8 vs 29.0 months for SD-RT, LD-RT, and HD-RT, respectively, P=.0089), which was confirmed on multivariable analysis (hazard ratios 0.77 and 0.81 vs LD and HD, respectively). Residual nodal disease was seen less often after HD-RT (25.5% vs 31.8% and 37.5% for HD-RT, LD-RT, and SD-RT, respectively, P=.0038). Patients treated with SD-RT had fewer prolonged hospital stays. There were no differences in positive surgical margin status or adverse surgical outcomes between the cohorts. Conclusions: Neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy between 45 and 54 Gy was associated with superior survival in comparison with doses above and below this threshold. Although this conclusion is limited by selection bias, clear candidates for trimodality therapy do not seem to

  13. Local Recurrence After Complete Clinical Response and Watch and Wait in Rectal Cancer After Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation: Impact of Salvage Therapy on Local Disease Control

    SciTech Connect

    Habr-Gama, Angelita; Gama-Rodrigues, Joaquim; São Julião, Guilherme P.; Proscurshim, Igor; Sabbagh, Charles; Lynn, Patricio B.; Perez, Rodrigo O.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To review the risk of local recurrence and impact of salvage therapy after Watch and Wait for rectal cancer with complete clinical response (cCR) after chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: Patients with cT2-4N0-2M0 distal rectal cancer treated with CRT (50.4-54 Gy + 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy) and cCR at 8 weeks were included. Patients with cCR were enrolled in a strict follow-up program with no immediate surgery (Watch and Wait). Local recurrence-free survival was compared while taking into account Watch and Wait strategy alone and Watch and Wait plus salvage. Results: 90 of 183 patients experienced cCR at initial assessment after CRT (49%). When early tumor regrowths (up to and including the initial 12 months of follow-up) and late recurrences were considered together, 28 patients (31%) experienced local recurrence (median follow-up time, 60 months). Of those, 26 patients underwent salvage therapy, and 2 patients were not amenable to salvage. In 4 patients, local re-recurrence developed after Watch and Wait plus salvage. The overall salvage rate for local recurrence was 93%. Local recurrence-free survival at 5 years was 69% (all local recurrences) and 94% (after salvage procedures). Thirteen patients (14%) experienced systemic recurrence. The 5-year cancer-specific overall survival and disease-free survival for all patients (including all recurrences) were 91% and 68%, respectively. Conclusions: Local recurrence may develop in 31% of patients with initial cCR when early regrowths (≤12 months) and late recurrences are grouped together. More than half of these recurrences develop within 12 months of follow-up. Salvage therapy is possible in ≥90% of recurrences, leading to 94% local disease control, with 78% organ preservation.

  14. Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy Following Surgical Resection or Radiosurgery Plus Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients With Synchronous Solitary Brain Metastasis: A Curative Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Parlak, Cem; Mertsoylu, Hüseyin; Güler, Ozan Cem; Onal, Cem; Topkan, Erkan

    2014-03-15

    Purpose/Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of definitive thoracic chemoradiation therapy following surgery or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) on the outcomes of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with synchronous solitary brain metastasis (SSBM). Methods and Materials: A total of 63 NSCLC patients with SSBM were retrospectively evaluated. Patients were staged using positron emission tomography-computed tomography in addition to conventional staging tools. Thoracic radiation therapy (TRT) with a total dose of 66 Gy in 2 Gy fractions was delivered along with 2 cycles of cisplatin-based chemotherapy following either surgery plus 30 Gy of WBRT (n=33) or SRS plus 30 Gy of WBRT (n=30) for BM. Results: Overall, the treatment was well tolerated. All patients received planned TRT, and 57 patients (90.5%) were also able to receive 2 cycles of chemotherapy. At a median follow-up of 25.3 months (7.1-52.1 months), the median months of overall, locoregional progression-free, neurological progression-free, and progression-free survival were 28.6, 17.7, 26.4, and 14.6, respectively. Both univariate and multivariate analyses revealed that patients with a T1-T2 thoracic disease burden (P=.001), a nodal stage of N0-N1 (P=.003), and no weight loss (P=.008) exhibited superior survival. Conclusions: In the present series, surgical and radiosurgical treatments directed toward SSBM in NSCLC patients were equally effective. The similarities between the present survival outcomes and those reported in other studies for locally advanced NSCLC patients indicate the potentially curative role of definitive chemoradiation therapy for highly selected patients with SSBM.

  15. Clinical Usefulness of {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography in Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Planned to Undergo Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Jee Suk; Choi, Seo Hee; Lee, Youngin; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Park, Jeong Youp; Song, Si Young; Cho, Arthur; Yun, Mijin; Lee, Jong Doo; Seong, Jinsil

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: To assess the role of coregistered {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in detecting radiographically occult distant metastasis (DM) at staging in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) and to study whether FDG-PET parameters can predict relatively long-term survival in patients who are more likely to benefit from chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: From our institutional database, we identified 388 LAPC patients with M0 on conventional computed tomography (CT) who were planned to undergo CRT. Coregistered FDG-PET staging was offered to all patients, and follow-up FDG-PET was used at the clinical discretion of the physician. Results: FDG-PET detected unsuspected CT-occult DM in 33% of all 388 patients and allowed them to receive systemic therapy immediately. The remaining 260 patients (PET-M0) underwent CRT selectively as an initial treatment. Early DM arose in 13.1% of 260 patients, and the 1-year estimated locoregional recurrence rate was 5.4%. Median overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were 14.6 and 9.3 months, respectively, at a median follow-up time of 32.3 months (range, 10-99.1 months). Patients with a baseline standardized uptake value (SUV) <3.5 and/or SUV decline ≥60% had significantly better OS and PFS than those having none, even after adjustment for all potential confounding variables (all P<.001). Conclusions: FDG-PET can detect radiographically occult DM at staging in one-third of patients and spare them from the potentially toxic therapy. Additionally, FDG-PET parameters including baseline SUV and SUV changes may serve as useful clinical markers for predicting the prognosis in LAPC patients.

  16. Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy Using Concurrent S-1 and Irinotecan in Rectal Cancer: Impact on Long-Term Clinical Outcomes and Prognostic Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Takatoshi; Yamashita, Keishi; Sato, Takeo; Ema, Akira; Naito, Masanori; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To assess the long-term outcomes of patients with rectal cancer who received neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (NCRT) with concurrent S-1 and irinotecan (S-1/irinotecan) therapy. Methods and Materials: The study group consisted of 115 patients with clinical stage T3 or T4 rectal cancer. Patients received pelvic radiation therapy (45 Gy) plus concurrent oral S-1/irinotecan. The median follow-up was 60 months. Results: Grade 3 adverse effects occurred in 7 patients (6%), and the completion rate of NCRT was 87%. All 115 patients (100%) were able to undergo R0 surgical resection. Twenty-eight patients (24%) had a pathological complete response (ypCR). At 60 months, the local recurrence-free survival was 93%, disease-free survival (DFS) was 79%, and overall survival (OS) was 80%. On multivariate analysis with a proportional hazards model, ypN2 was the only independent prognostic factor for DFS (P=.0019) and OS (P=.0064) in the study group as a whole. Multivariate analysis was additionally performed for the subgroup of 106 patients with ypN0/1 disease, who had a DFS rate of 85.3%. Both ypT (P=.0065) and tumor location (P=.003) were independent predictors of DFS. A combination of these factors was very strongly related to high risk of recurrence (P<.0001), which occurred most commonly in the lung. Conclusions: NCRT with concurrent S-1/irinotecan produced high response rates and excellent long-term survival, with acceptable adverse effects in patients with rectal cancer. ypN2 is a strong predictor of dismal outcomes, and a combination of ypT and tumor location can identify high-risk patients among those with ypN0/1 disease.

  17. Preoperative Short-Course Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy Followed by Delayed Surgery for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: A Phase 2 Multicenter Study (KROG 10-01)

    SciTech Connect

    Yeo, Seung-Gu; Oh, Jae Hwan; Kim, Dae Yong; Baek, Ji Yeon; Kim, Sun Young; Park, Ji Won; Kim, Min Ju; Chang, Hee Jin; Kim, Tae Hyun; Lee, Jong Hoon; Jang, Hong Seok; Kim, Jun-Gi; Lee, Myung Ah; Nam, Taek-Keun

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: A prospective phase 2 multicenter trial was performed to investigate the efficacy and safety of preoperative short-course concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT) followed by delayed surgery for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Seventy-three patients with cT3-4 rectal cancer were enrolled. Radiation therapy of 25 Gy in 5 fractions was delivered over 5 consecutive days using helical tomotherapy. Concurrent chemotherapy was administered on the same 5 days with intravenous bolus injection of 5-fluorouracil (400 mg/m{sup 2}/day) and leucovorin (20 mg/m{sup 2}/day). After 4 to 8 weeks, total mesorectal excision was performed. The primary endpoint was the pathologic downstaging (ypStage 0-I) rate, and secondary endpoints included tumor regression grade, tumor volume reduction rate, and toxicity. Results: Seventy-one patients completed the planned preoperative CRT and surgery. Downstaging occurred in 20 (28.2%) patients, including 1 (1.4%) with a pathologic complete response. Favorable tumor regression (grade 4-3) was observed in 4 (5.6%) patients, and the mean tumor volume reduction rate was 62.5 ± 21.3%. Severe (grade ≥3) treatment toxicities were reported in 27 (38%) patients from CRT until 3 months after surgery. Conclusions: Preoperative short-course concurrent CRT followed by delayed surgery for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer demonstrated poor pathologic responses compared with conventional long-course CRT, and it yielded considerable toxicities despite the use of an advanced radiation therapy technique.

  18. Thymidine phosphorylase and hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α expression in clinical stage II/III rectal cancer: association with response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shuhan; Lai, Hao; Qin, Yuzhou; Chen, Jiansi; Lin, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether pretreatment status of thymidine phosphorylase (TP), and hypoxia-inducible factor alpha (HIF-1α) could predict pathologic response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy with oxaliplatin and capecitabine (XELOXART) and outcomes for clinical stage II/III rectal cancer patients. A total of 180 patients diagnosed with clinical stage II/III rectal cancer received XELOXART. The status of TP, and HIF-1α were determined in pretreatment biopsies by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Tumor response was assessed in resected regimens using the tumor regression grade system and TNM staging system. 5-year disease free survival (DFS) and 5-year overall survival (OS) were evaluated with the Kaplan-Meier method and were compared by the log-rank test. Over expression of TP and low expression of HIF-1α were associated with pathologic response to XELOXART and better outcomes (DFS and OS) in clinical stage II/III rectal cancer patients (P < 0.05). Our result suggested that pretreatment status of TP and HIF-1α were found to predict pathologic response and outcomes in clinical stage II/III rectal cancer received XELOXART. Additional well-designed, large sample, multicenter, prospective studies are needed to confirm the result of this study. PMID:26617778

  19. A Phase 1/2 Study of Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy Using Docetaxel, Nedaplatin, and 5-Fluorouracil (DNF-R) for Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnuma, Hiroyuki; Sato, Yasushi; Hirakawa, Masahiro; Okagawa, Yutaka; Osuga, Takahiro; Hayashi, Tsuyoshi; Sato, Tsutomu; Miyanishi, Koji; Kobune, Masayoshi; Takimoto, Rishu; Sagawa, Tamotsu; Hori, Masakazu; Someya, Masanori; Nakata, Kensei; Sakata, Koh-ichi; Takayama, Tetsuji; Kato, Junji

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: Patient survival in esophageal cancer (EC) remains poor. The purpose of this study was to investigate a regimen of definitive chemoradiation therapy (CRT) that exerts good local control of EC. We performed a phase 1/2 study to assess the safety and efficacy of CRT with docetaxel, nedaplatin, and 5-fluorouracil (DNF-R). Methods and Materials: Eligible patients presented with stage IB to IV EC. Patients received 2 cycles of docetaxel (20, 30, or 40 mg/m{sup 2}) and nedaplatin (50 mg/m{sup 2}) on days 1 and 8 and a continuous infusion of 5-fluorouracil (400 mg/m{sup 2}/day) on days 1 to 5 and 8 to 12, every 5 weeks, with concurrent radiation therapy (59.4 Gy/33 fractions). The recommended dose (RD) was determined using a 3 + 3 design. Results: In the phase 1 study, the dose-limiting toxicities were neutropenia and thrombocytopenia. The RD of docetaxel was determined to be 20 mg/m{sup 2}. In the phase 2 study, grade 3 to 4 acute toxicities included neutropenia (42.8%), febrile neutropenia (7.14%), thrombocytopenia (17.9%), and esophagitis (21.4%). Grade 3 to 4 late radiation toxicity included esophagostenosis (10.7%). The complete response rate was 82.1% (95% confidence interval: 67.9-96.3%). Both the median progression-free survival and overall survival were 41.2 months. Conclusions: DNF-R showed good tolerability and strong antitumor activity, suggesting that it is a potentially effective therapeutic regimen for EC.

  20. Nuclear NF-κB Expression Correlates With Outcome Among Patients With Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Treated With Primary Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Balermpas, Panagiotis; Michel, Yvonne; Wagenblast, Jens; Seitz, Oliver; Sipek, Florian; Rödel, Franz; Rödel, Claus; Fokas, Emmanouil

    2013-07-15

    Background: To examine whether nuclear NF-κB expression correlates with outcome in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) treated with primary chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: Between 2007 and 2010, 101 patients with locally advanced primary HNSCC were treated with definitive simultaneous CRT. Pretreatment biopsy specimens were analyzed for NF-κB p65 (RelA) nuclear immunoreactivity. A sample was assigned to be positive with more than 5% positive nuclear expression. The predictive relevance of NF-κB and clinicopathologic factors for overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), local progression-free survival (LPFS), and metastasis-free survival (DMFS) was examined by univariate and multivariate analysis. Results: No significant differences between the groups were observed with regard to age, sex, total radiation dose, fractionation mode, total chemotherapy applied, T stage or grading. Patients with p65 nuclear positive biopsy specimens showed significantly a higher rate of lymph node metastasis (cN2c or cN3 status, P=.034). Within a mean follow-up time of 25 months (range, 2.33-62.96 months) OS, PFS, and DMFS were significantly poorer in the p65 nuclear positive group (P=.008, P=.027, and P=.008, respectively). These correlations remained significant in multivariate analysis. Conclusion: NF-κB/p65 nuclear expression is associated with increased lymphatic and hematogenous tumor dissemination and decreased survival in HNSCC patients treated with primary CRT. Our results may foster further investigation of a predictive relevance of NF-κB/p65 and its role as a suitable target for a molecular-based targeted therapy in HNSCC cancer.

  1. Impact of Weight Change During the Course of Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy on Outcomes in Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients: Retrospective Analysis of 425 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Topkan, Erkan; Parlak, Cem; Selek, Ugur

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: We retrospectively investigated the impact of weight change (WC) during concurrent chemoradiation therapy (C-CRT) on clinical outcomes of stage 3B non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 425 patients treated with C-CRT were included. All patients received 60 to 66 Gy of thoracic radiation therapy concurrently with 1 to 3 cycles of platinum-based chemotherapy. Pre- and posttreatment weight measurements on first and last days of C-CRT were used for WC. Patients were divided into 2 groups: group 1 = weight loss (WL); group 2 = weight preservation/gain (WP) for comparative analyses. Results: Following C-CRT, 252 patients (59.3%) experienced WL, while 89 patients (20.9%) and 84 patients (19.8%) showed WP or WG. At median 24.2 months of follow-up, 142 patients (33.4%) were alive (84 WP [48.6%] and 58 WL [23.0%]), and 58 (13.6%) of them were free of disease progression (41 [23.7%] for WP and 17 [6.7%] for WL). Median overall survival (OS), locoregional progression-free survival (LRPFS), progression-free survival (PFS), and distant metastases-free survival (DMFS) for the entire population were 22.8, 14.4, 10.6, and 11.7 months, respectively. Intergroup comparisons between WP and WL cohorts revealed significantly superior OS, LRPFS, PFS, and DMFS in WP patients (P<.05 for each). On multivariate analyses, only WL and advanced T stage were associated with poor prognosis (P<.05). Conclusions: Present results in 425 stage 3B NSCLC patients demonstrated that WL during C-CRT is strongly associated with inferior survival outcomes compared to WP. This emerging finding might be useful by forming an encouraging basis for future investigations in facilitating a way to improve the outcomes of these patients experiencing WL during C-CRT.

  2. Spatial-Temporal [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET Features for Predicting Pathologic Response of Esophageal Cancer to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Shan; Kligerman, Seth; Chen, Wengen; Lu, Minh; Kim, Grace; Feigenberg, Steven; D'Souza, Warren D.; Suntharalingam, Mohan; Lu, Wei

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To extract and study comprehensive spatial-temporal {sup 18}F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose ([{sup 18}F]FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) features for the prediction of pathologic tumor response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) in esophageal cancer. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients with esophageal cancer were treated with trimodal therapy (CRT plus surgery) and underwent [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET/CT scans both before (pre-CRT) and after (post-CRT) CRT. The 2 scans were rigidly registered. A tumor volume was semiautomatically delineated using a threshold standardized uptake value (SUV) of ≥2.5, followed by manual editing. Comprehensive features were extracted to characterize SUV intensity distribution, spatial patterns (texture), tumor geometry, and associated changes resulting from CRT. The usefulness of each feature in predicting pathologic tumor response to CRT was evaluated using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) value. Results: The best traditional response measure was decline in maximum SUV (SUV{sub max}; AUC, 0.76). Two new intensity features, decline in mean SUV (SUV{sub mean}) and skewness, and 3 texture features (inertia, correlation, and cluster prominence) were found to be significant predictors with AUC values ≥0.76. According to these features, a tumor was more likely to be a responder when the SUV{sub mean} decline was larger, when there were relatively fewer voxels with higher SUV values pre-CRT, or when [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake post-CRT was relatively homogeneous. All of the most accurate predictive features were extracted from the entire tumor rather than from the most active part of the tumor. For SUV intensity features and tumor size features, changes were more predictive than pre- or post-CRT assessment alone. Conclusion: Spatial-temporal [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET features were found to be useful predictors of pathologic tumor response to neoadjuvant CRT in esophageal cancer.

  3. Role of Adjuvant Chemotherapy in ypT0-2N0 Patients Treated with Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy and Radical Resection for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Park, In Ja; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Hee Cheol; Kim, Nam Kyu; Kim, Hyeong-Rok; Kang, Sung-Bum; Choi, Gyu-Seog; Lee, Kang Young; Kim, Seon-Hahn; Oh, Seung Taek; Lim, Seok-Byung; Kim, Jin Cheon; Oh, Jae Hwan; Kim, Sun Young; Lee, Woo Yong; Lee, Jung Bok; Yu, Chang Sik

    2015-07-01

    Objective: To explore the role of adjuvant chemotherapy for patients with ypT0-2N0 rectal cancer treated by preoperative chemoradiation therapy (PCRT) and radical resection. Patients and Methods: A national consortium of 10 institutions was formed, and patients with ypT0-2N0 mid- and low-rectal cancer after PCRT and radical resection from 2004 to 2009 were included. Patients were categorized into 2 groups according to receipt of additional adjuvant chemotherapy: Adj CTx (+) versus Adj CTx (−). Propensity scores were calculated and used to perform matched and adjusted analyses comparing relapse-free survival (RFS) between treatment groups while controlling for potential confounding. Results: A total of 1016 patients, who met the selection criteria, were evaluated. Of these, 106 (10.4%) did not receive adjuvant chemotherapy. There was no overall improvement in 5-year RFS as a result of adjuvant chemotherapy [91.6% for Adj CTx (+) vs 87.5% for Adj CTx (−), P=.18]. There were no differences in 5-year local recurrence and distant metastasis rate between the 2 groups. In patients who show moderate, minimal, or no regression in tumor regression grade, however, possible association of adjuvant chemotherapy with RFS would be considered (hazard ratio 0.35; 95% confidence interval 0.14-0.88; P=.03). Cox regression analysis after propensity score matching failed to show that addition of adjuvant chemotherapy was associated with improved RFS (hazard ratio 0.81; 95% confidence interval 0.39-1.70; P=.58). Conclusions: Adjuvant chemotherapy seemed to not influence the RFS of patients with ypT0-2N0 rectal cancer after PCRT followed by radical resection. Thus, the addition of adjuvant chemotherapy needs to be weighed against its oncologic benefits.

  4. Low miR-187 expression promotes resistance to chemoradiation therapy in vitro and correlates with treatment failure in patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lynam-Lennon, Niamh; Bibby, Becky A; Mongan, Ann Marie; Marignol, Laure; Paxton, Christian N; Geiersbach, Katherine; Bronner, Mary P; O'Sullivan, Jacintha; Reynolds, John; Maher, Stephen G

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) has a poor prognosis and is increasing in incidence in many western populations. Neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) followed by surgery is increasingly the standard of care for locally advanced EAC; however, resistance to treatment is a significant clinical problem. The identification of both novel biomarkers predicting response to treatment and novel therapeutic targets to enhance the efficacy of CRT are key to improving survival rates in EAC. In this study we performed global microRNA (miRNA) profiling of pre-treatment EAC biopsies and identified 67 miRNA significantly altered in patients who are resistant to CRT. One of these miRNA, miR-187, was significantly decreased in pre-treatment EAC tumors from patients having a poor response to neoadjuvant CRT, highlighting downregulation of miR-187 as a potential mechanism of treatment resistance in EAC. In vitro, miR-187 was demonstrated to play a functional role in modulating sensitivity to X-ray radiation and cisplatin in EAC and its dysregulation was demonstrated to be due to chromosomal alterations. In vitro, miR-187 altered expression of a diverse array of pathways, including the immune regulator complement component 3 (C3), serum levels of which we have previously demonstrated to predict patient response to CRT. In vivo, expression of C3 was significantly increased in tumors from patients having a poor response to CRT. This study highlights for the first time a role for miR-187 as a novel biomarker of response to CRT and a potential therapeutic target for enhancing the efficacy of CRT in EAC. PMID:27254108

  5. Modeling Pathologic Response of Esophageal Cancer to Chemoradiation Therapy Using Spatial-Temporal {sup 18}F-FDG PET Features, Clinical Parameters, and Demographics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hao; Tan, Shan; Chen, Wengen; Kligerman, Seth; Kim, Grace; D'Souza, Warren D.; Suntharalingam, Mohan; Lu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To construct predictive models using comprehensive tumor features for the evaluation of tumor response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) in patients with esophageal cancer. Methods and Materials: This study included 20 patients who underwent trimodality therapy (CRT + surgery) and underwent {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) both before and after CRT. Four groups of tumor features were examined: (1) conventional PET/CT response measures (eg, standardized uptake value [SUV]{sub max}, tumor diameter); (2) clinical parameters (eg, TNM stage, histology) and demographics; (3) spatial-temporal PET features, which characterize tumor SUV intensity distribution, spatial patterns, geometry, and associated changes resulting from CRT; and (4) all features combined. An optimal feature set was identified with recursive feature selection and cross-validations. Support vector machine (SVM) and logistic regression (LR) models were constructed for prediction of pathologic tumor response to CRT, cross-validations being used to avoid model overfitting. Prediction accuracy was assessed by area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC), and precision was evaluated by confidence intervals (CIs) of AUC. Results: When applied to the 4 groups of tumor features, the LR model achieved AUCs (95% CI) of 0.57 (0.10), 0.73 (0.07), 0.90 (0.06), and 0.90 (0.06). The SVM model achieved AUCs (95% CI) of 0.56 (0.07), 0.60 (0.06), 0.94 (0.02), and 1.00 (no misclassifications). With the use of spatial-temporal PET features combined with conventional PET/CT measures and clinical parameters, the SVM model achieved very high accuracy (AUC 1.00) and precision (no misclassifications)—results that were significantly better than when conventional PET/CT measures or clinical parameters and demographics alone were used. For groups with many tumor features (groups 3 and 4), the SVM model achieved significantly higher

  6. Reduction in Tumor Volume by Cone Beam Computed Tomography Predicts Overall Survival in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Jabbour, Salma K.; Kim, Sinae; Haider, Syed A.; Xu, Xiaoting; Wu, Alson; Surakanti, Sujani; Aisner, Joseph; Langenfeld, John; Yue, Ning J.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Zou, Wei

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: We sought to evaluate whether tumor response using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) performed as part of the routine care during chemoradiation therapy (CRT) could forecast the outcome of unresectable, locally advanced, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: We manually delineated primary tumor volumes (TV) of patients with NSCLC who were treated with radical CRT on days 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, 36, and 43 on CBCTs obtained as part of the standard radiation treatment course. Percentage reductions in TV were calculated and then correlated to survival and pattern of recurrence using Cox proportional hazard models. Clinical information including histologic subtype was also considered in the study of such associations. Results: We evaluated 38 patients with a median follow-up time of 23.4 months. The median TV reduction was 39.3% (range, 7.3%-69.3%) from day 1 (D1) to day 43 (D43) CBCTs. Overall survival was associated with TV reduction from D1 to D43 (hazard ratio [HR] 0.557, 95% CI 0.39-0.79, P=.0009). For every 10% decrease in TV from D1 to D43, the risk of death decreased by 44.3%. For patients whose TV decreased ≥39.3 or <39.3%, log-rank test demonstrated a separation in survival (P=.02), with median survivals of 31 months versus 10 months, respectively. Neither local recurrence (HR 0.791, 95% CI 0.51-1.23, P=.29), nor distant recurrence (HR 0.78, 95% CI 0.57-1.08, P=.137) correlated with TV decrease from D1 to D43. Histologic subtype showed no impact on our findings. Conclusions: TV reduction as determined by CBCT during CRT as part of routine care predicts post-CRT survival. Such knowledge may justify intensification of RT or application of additional therapies. Assessment of genomic characteristics of these tumors may permit a better understanding of behavior or prediction of therapeutic outcomes.

  7. Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy With Docetaxel, Cisplatin, and 5-Fluorouracil (DCF-R) in Advanced Esophageal Cancer: A Phase 2 Trial (KDOG 0501-P2)

    SciTech Connect

    Higuchi, Katsuhiko; Komori, Shouko; Tanabe, Satoshi; Katada, Chikatoshi; Azuma, Mizutomo; Ishiyama, Hiromichi; Sasaki, Tohru; Ishido, Kenji; Katada, Natsuya; Hayakawa, Kazushige; Koizumi, Wasaburo

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: A previous phase 1 study suggested that definitive chemoradiation therapy with docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil (DCF-R) is tolerable and active in patients with advanced esophageal cancer (AEC). This phase 2 study was designed to confirm the efficacy and toxicity of DCF-R in AEC. Methods and Materials: Patients with previously untreated thoracic AEC who had T4 tumors or M1 lymph node metastasis (M1 LYM), or both, received intravenous infusions of docetaxel (35 mg/m{sup 2}) and cisplatin (40 mg/m{sup 2}) on day 1 and a continuous intravenous infusion of 5-fluorouracil (400 mg/m{sup 2}/day) on days 1 to 5, every 2 weeks, plus concurrent radiation. The total radiation dose was initially 61.2 Gy but was lowered to multiple-field irradiation with 50.4 Gy to decrease esophagitis and late toxicity. Consequently, the number of cycles of DCF administered during radiation therapy was reduced from 4 to 3. The primary endpoint was the clinical complete response (cCR) rate. Results: Characteristics of the 42 subjects were: median age, 62 years; performance status, 0 in 14, 1 in 25, 2 in 3; TNM classification, T4M0 in 20, non-T4M1LYM in 12, T4M1LYM in 10; total scheduled radiation dose: 61.2 Gy in 12, 50.4 Gy in 30. The cCR rate was 52.4% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 37.3%-67.5%) overall, 33.3% in the 61.2-Gy group, and 60.0% in the 50.4-Gy group. The median progression-free survival was 11.1 months, and the median survival was 29.0 months with a survival rate of 43.9% at 3 years. Grade 3 or higher major toxicity consisted of leukopenia (71.4%), neutropenia (57.2%), anemia (16.7%), febrile neutropenia (38.1%), anorexia (31.0%), and esophagitis (28.6%). Conclusions: DCF-R frequently caused myelosuppression and esophagitis but was highly active and suggested to be a promising regimen in AEC. On the basis of efficacy and safety, a radiation dose of 50.4 Gy is recommended for further studies of DCF-R.

  8. Factors Predictive of Protracted Course of Radiation Therapy in Patients Treated with Definitive Chemoradiation for Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dominello, Michael; Morris, Robert; Miller, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a benefit to completing definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for cervical cancer within 56 days. However, many patients experience delays due to missed radiation treatments that prolong the overall course of therapy. In order to improve patient care, we performed a quality improvement project to determine factors predictive of protracted treatment and develop strategies to enable timely treatment completion. Methods  Seventy-one patients treated for cervical cancer with CRT were identified. Medical records were reviewed to gather demographic, clinical, and treatment data. Prolonged treatment was defined as >56 days per the American Brachytherapy Society guidelines. The following variables were evaluated using paired t-tests and univariate logistic regression: demographics, Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) versus conventional radiation technique, use of a boost, time to stent placement, time to first brachytherapy (BT), and genitourinary (GU) or gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity. Results The median treatment length for all patients was 59 days. Factors associated with prolonged treatment were time to cervical stent placement (p=0.001), delay ≥2 days between final external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and initial BT (p=0.0195), any grade GU toxicity (p=0.0007), or GI toxicity (p=0.0002), and the presence of a boost (p=0.0006). Age, stage, and IMRT versus conventional technique were not associated with protracted treatment. Conclusion  In this series of patients, acute toxicity, increased time to cervical stent placement, and time to first BT treatment were associated with prolonged treatment time. The patients who completed treatment in ≤56 days had a lower average time to cervical stent placement, 27 versus 31 days. Our results suggest that cervical stent placement during week four of treatment can enhance patient care and improve outcomes.  PMID:27182472

  9. Prognostic Significance of Tumor Response as Assessed by Sequential {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography During Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy for Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Dongryul; Lee, Jeong Eun; Huh, Seung Jae; Park, Won; Nam, Heerim; Choi, Joon Young; Kim, Byung-Tae

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic role of metabolic response by the use of serial sets of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in patients with cervical cancer who were treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 60 patients who were treated with CCRT between February 2009 and December 2010 were analyzed. Three sequential PET/CT images were acquired for each patient: pre-CCRT, during-CCRT at 4 weeks of CCRT, and 1 month post-CCRT PET/CT. Metabolic responses were assessed qualitatively. The percentage changes in the maximum values of standardized uptake value (ΔSUV{sub max}%) from the PET/CT images acquired pre-CCRT and during-CCRT were calculated. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to evaluate whether ΔSUV{sub max}% could predict complete response (CR) on the post-CCRT PET/CT and to identify the best cutoff value. Prognostic factors of progression-free survival (PFS) were analyzed. Results: During-CCRT PET/CT showed that 8 patients (13%) had CR, and the other 52 patients (87%) had partial response (PR). On the post-CCRT PET/CT, 43 patients (73%) had CR, 12 patients (20%) had PR, and 4 patients (7%) had progressive disease. The average SUV{sub max} in primary tumors was 16.3 (range, 6.4-53.0) on the pre-CCRT PET/CT images and 5.3 (range, 0-19.4) on the during-CCRT PET/CT images. According to ROC curve analysis, ΔSUV{sub max}% could predict CR response on post-CCRT PET/CT (P<.001, cutoff value of 59.7%). In all patients, the PFS rate was 71.9% at 2 years. Multivariate analysis showed that ΔSUV{sub max}% ≥60% (P=.045) and CR response on the post-CCRT PET/CT (P=.012) were statistically significant predictors of PFS. Conclusion: Metabolic responses on the during-CCRT images at 4 weeks of treatment and 1-month post-CCRT PET/CT images may predict treatment outcomes in patients with cervical cancer. ΔSUV{sub max}% ≥60% at 4 weeks of CCRT may predict CR response

  10. The Significance of Tumoral ERCC1 Status in Patients With Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer Treated With Chemoradiation Therapy: A Multicenter Clinicopathologic Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Doll, Corinne M.; Aquino-Parsons, Christina; Pintilie, Melania; Petrillo, Stephanie K.; Milosevic, Michael; Craighead, Peter S.; Clarke, Blaise; Lees-Miller, Susan P.; Fyles, Anthony W.; Magliocco, Anthony M.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: ERCC1 (excision repair cross-complementation group 1) expression has been shown to be a molecular marker of cisplatin resistance in many tumor sites, but has not been well studied in cervical cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to measure tumoral ERCC1 in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer treated with chemoradiation therapy (CRT) in a large multicenter cohort, and to correlate expression with clinical outcome parameters. Methods and Materials: A total of 264 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, treated with curative-intent radical CRT from 3 major Canadian cancer centers were evaluated. Pretreatment formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor specimens were retrieved, and tissue microarrays were constructed. Tumoral ERCC1 (FL297 antibody) was measured using AQUA (R) technology. Statistical analysis was performed to determine the significance of clinical factors and ERCC1 status with progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) at 5 years. Results: The majority of patients had International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage II disease (n=119, 45%); median tumor size was 5 cm. OS was associated with tumor size (HR 1.16, P=.018), pretreatment hemoglobin status (HR 2.33, P=.00027), and FIGO stage. In addition, tumoral ERCC1 status (nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio) was associated with PFS (HR 2.33 [1.05-5.18], P=.038) and OS (HR 3.13 [1.27-7.71], P=.013). ERCC1 status was not significant on multivariate analysis when the model was adjusted for the clinical factors: for PFS (HR 1.49 [0.61-3.6], P=.38); for OS (HR 2.42 [0.94-6.24] P=.067). Conclusions: In this large multicenter cohort of locally advanced cervical cancer patients treated with radical CRT, stage, tumor size, and pretreatment hemoglobin status were significantly associated with PFS and OS. ERCC1 status appears to have prognostic impact on univariate analysis in these patients, but was not independently associated with outcome on

  11. SU-C-BRA-04: Use of Esophageal Wall Thickness in Evaluation of the Response to Chemoradiation Therapy for Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J; Kligerman, S; Lu, W; Kang, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To quantitatively evaluate the esophageal cancer response to chemoradiation therapy (CRT) by measuring the esophageal wall thickness in CT. Method: Two datasets were used in this study. The first dataset is composed of CT scans of 15 esophageal cancer patients and 15 normal controls. The second dataset is composed of 20 esophageal cancer patients who underwent PET/CT scans before (Pre-CRT) and after CRT (Post-CRT). We first segmented the esophagus using a multi-atlas-based algorithm. The esophageal wall thickness was then computed, on each slice, as the equivalent circle radius of the segmented esophagus excluding the lumen. To evaluate the changes of wall thickness, we computed the standard deviation (SD), coefficient of variation (COV, SD/Mean), and flatness [(Max–Min)/Mean] of wall thickness along the entire esophagus. Results: For the first dataset, the mean wall thickness of cancer patients and normal controls were 6.35 mm and 6.03 mm, respectively. The mean SD, COV, and flatness of the wall thickness were 2.59, 0.21, and 1.27 for the cancer patients and 1.99, 0.16, and 1.13 for normal controls. Statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) were identified in SD and flatness. For the second dataset, the mean wall thickness of pre-CRT and post-CRT patients was 7.13 mm and 6.84 mm, respectively. The mean SD, COV, and flatness were 1.81, 0.26, and 1.06 for pre-CRT and 1.69, 0.26, and 1.06 for post-CRT. Statistically significant difference was not identified for these measurements. Current results are based on the entire esophagus. We believe significant differences between pre- and post-CRT scans could be obtained, if we conduct the measurements at tumor sites. Conclusion: Results show thicker wall thickness in pre-CRT scans and differences in wall thickness changes between normal and abnormal esophagus. This demonstrated the potential of esophageal wall thickness as a marker in the tumor CRT response evaluation. This work was supported in part by

  12. Gender-based analysis of esophageal cancer patients undergoing preoperative chemoradiation: differences in presentation and therapy outcome.

    PubMed

    Rohatgi, P R; Correa, A M; Swisher, S G; Wu, T T; Liao, Z; Komaki, R; Walsh, G L; Vaporciyan, A A; Lee, J H; Rice, D C; Roth, J A; Ajani, J A

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify gender-dependent differences in presentation at baseline and therapy outcome in esophageal carcinoma patients treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CTRT). We stratified patients according to gender and statistically compared pretreatment clinical stage, post-CTRT effect on carcinoma in the resected specimen, overall survival (OS), and patterns of failure. Of the 235 patients who underwent preoperative CTRT, 203 were men and 32 were women. Carcinomas in women correlated significantly with clinical stage II classification (78%vs. 55%) while cancers in men correlated significantly with clinical stage III classification (39%vs. 16%; P = 0.02). Carcinomas in women also correlated significantly with lower clinical N classification; more women had cN0 (52%) compared to men (28%; P = 0.01). Similarly, in the surgical specimens, more women had pN0 (78%) compared to men (64%; P = 0.06). At a median follow-up of 37 months, 10% more women than men remain alive (63%vs. 53%; P = 0.3). Distant metastases-free survival time was longer for women than men. Our results suggest that localized esophageal carcinoma is diagnosed in more advanced stages in men than in women. The reasons for these differences remain unclear and further expansion of these observations and study of biologic differences that might exist are warranted. PMID:16722991

  13. Clinical outcomes in elderly patients with human papillomavirus–positive squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx treated with definitive chemoradiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hanasoge, Sheela; Magliocca, Kelly R.; Switchenko, Jeffrey M.; Saba, Nabil F.; Wadsworth, J. Trad; El-Deiry, Mark W.; Shin, Dong M.; Khuri, Fadlo; Beitler, Jonathan J.; Higgins, Kristin A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The benefit of combined chemoradiation in elderly patients with human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive locally advanced oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) must be balanced with the potential for higher toxicity rates. We performed a retrospective review of our institutional experience. Methods Patients 70 years or older with p16-positive oropharyngeal SCC treated with definitive chemoradiation from 2005 to 2013 were evaluated. Overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), and locoregional failure–free survival were calculated. Results Twenty-one eligible patients had a follow-up of 22.4 months. Estimated 5-year OS, DFS, and locoregional failure–free survival were 76.0%, 40%, and 95%, respectively. There was 1 death from acute toxicity, and 50% had unplanned hospitalizations. Sixty percent had late toxicity, and 6-month feeding tube dependence was 25%. Conclusion Elderly patients with HPV-positive locally advanced SCC of the oropharynx treated with definitive chemoradiation had good OS but high rates of acute and long-term toxicity. PMID:25899391

  14. Long-term Follow-up Results of a Multi-institutional Phase 2 Study of Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy for Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer in East and Southeast Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Shingo; Ohno, Tatsuya; Thephamongkhol, Kullathorn; Chansilpa, Yaowalak; Cao, Jianping; Xu, Xiaoting; Devi, C. R. Beena; Swee, Tang Tieng; Calaguas, Miriam J.C.; Reyes, Rey H. de los; Cho, Chul-Koo; Dung, To Anh; Supriana, Nana; Erawati, Dyah; Mizuno, Hideyuki; Nakano, Takashi; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To report the long-term survival and toxicity of a multi-institutional phase 2 study of concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) for locally advanced cervical cancer in east and southeast Asia. Methods and Materials: Ten institutions from 8 Asian countries participated in the study. Between April 2003 and March 2006, 120 patients (60 with bulky stage IIB and 60 with stage IIIB) were treated with CCRT. Radiation therapy consisted of pelvic external beam radiation therapy and either high-dose-rate or low-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy. Five cycles of weekly cisplatin (40 mg/m{sup 2}) were administered during the course of radiation therapy. Treatment results were evaluated by the rates of local control, overall survival, and late toxicities. Results: Median follow-up was 63.7 months, and the follow-up rate at 5 years was 98%. The 5-year local control and overall survival rates for all patients were 76.8% and 55.1%, respectively. The 5-year rates of major late toxicities of the rectum and bladder were 7.9% and 0%, respectively. Conclusions: The long-term results have suggested that CCRT is safe and effective for patients with locally advanced cervical cancer in east and southeast Asia. However, further efforts are needed to improve overall survival.

  15. Current strategies in chemoradiation for esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Shane

    2014-01-01

    Chemoradiotherapy (CRT) has an important role in the treatment of esophageal cancer in both the inoperable and the pre-operative settings. Pre-operative chemoradiation therapy is generally given to 41.4-50.4 Gy with platinum or paclitaxel based chemotherapy. The most common definitive dose in the U.S. is 50-50.4 Gy. New advances in CRT for esophageal cancer have come from looking for ways to minimize toxicity and maximize efficacy. Recent investigations for minimizing toxicity have focused advanced radiation techniques such as IMRT and proton therapy, have sought to further define normal tissue tolerances, and have examined the use of tighter fields with less elective clinical target volume coverage. Efforts to maximize efficacy have included the use of early positron emission tomography (PET) response directed therapy, molecularly targeted therapies, and the use of tumor markers that predict response. PMID:24982764

  16. Phase 2 Study of Temozolomide-Based Chemoradiation Therapy for High-Risk Low-Grade Gliomas: Preliminary Results of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0424

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Barbara J.; Hu, Chen; Macdonald, David R.; Lesser, Glenn J.; Coons, Stephen W.; Brachman, David G.; Ryu, Samuel; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Bahary, Jean-Paul; Liu, Junfeng; Chakravarti, Arnab; Mehta, Minesh

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0424 was a phase 2 study of a high-risk low-grade glioma (LGG) population who were treated with temozolomide (TMZ) and radiation therapy (RT), and outcomes were compared to those of historical controls. This study was designed to detect a 43% increase in median survival time (MST) from 40.5 to 57.9 months and a 20% improvement in 3-year overall survival (OS) rate from 54% to 65% at a 10% significance level (1-sided) and 96% power. Methods and Materials: Patients with LGGs with 3 or more risk factors for recurrence (age ≥40 years, astrocytoma histology, bihemispherical tumor, preoperative tumor diameter of ≥6 cm, or a preoperative neurological function status of >1) were treated with RT (54 Gy in 30 fractions) and concurrent and adjuvant TMZ. Results: From 2005 to 2009, 129 evaluable patients (75 males and 54 females) were accrued. Median age was 49 years; 91% had a Zubrod score of 0 or 1; and 69%, 25%, and 6% of patients had 3, 4, and 5 risk factors, respectively. Patients had median and minimum follow-up examinations of 4.1 years and 3 years, respectively. The 3-year OS rate was 73.1% (95% confidence interval: 65.3%-80.8%), which was significantly improved compared to that of prespecified historical control values (P<.001). Median survival time has not yet been reached. Three-year progression-free survival was 59.2%. Grades 3 and 4 adverse events occurred in 43% and 10% of patients, respectively. One patient died of herpes encephalitis. Conclusions: The 3-year OS rate of 73.1% for RTOG 0424 high-risk LGG patients is higher than that reported for historical controls (P<.001) and the study-hypothesized rate of 65%.

  17. Phase II Study of the Addition of Bevacizumab to Standard Chemoradiation for Loco-regionally Advanced Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) Trial 0615

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Nancy Y.; Zhang, Ed; Pfister, David. G.; Kim, John; Garden, Adam. S.; Mechalakos, James; Hu, Kenneth; Le, Quynh T.; Colevas, A. Dimitrios; Glisson, Bonnie S.; Chan, Anthony T.C.; Ang, K. Kian

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We sought to improve the outcomes for loco-regionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) by testing the feasibility/safety of adding bevacizumab to chemoradiation. Patients/Methods Eligible patients with ≥T2b and/or positive node(s) were prescribed 3 cycles of bevacizumab (15 mg/kg) and cisplatin (100 mg/m2) both given on days 1, 22, and 43 of radiation (70 Gy) using IMRT delivered over 33 days on a daily basis, Monday through Friday. This is followed by 3 cycles of bevacizumab (15 mg/kg), cisplatin (80 mg/m2) both were given on days 64, 85, and 106 and fluorouracil (1000 mg/m2/d) on days 64–67, 85–88, 106–109 after radiation. The primary endpoint was to evaluate the safety of the addition of bevacizumab to chemoradiation, specifically looking at treatment-related Grade 4 hemorrhage and/or any Grade 5 adverse event in the first year. Toxicity during and after treatment were collected along with tumor control endpoints. The analysis was done per protocol. This protocol has completed its target accrual. Results There were a total of 46 patients enrolled in this study of whom 44 patients were eligible for analysis. No grade 3–4 hemorrhage or grade 5 adverse events were observed; 9 patients (20.5%) experienced grade 1–2 hemorrhage. Grade 4 adverse events were experienced by the following numbers of patients: leukopenia NOS – 6; lymphopenia – 5; neutrophil count – 5; pharyngolaryngeal pain – 2; hemoglobin – 1; infection with grade 3–4 neutrophils (blood) – 1; infection with grade 3–4 neutrophils [skin (cellulitis)] – 1; tinnitus – 1; thrombosis – 1; radiation mucositis – 1. The most common grade 3 adverse events were radiation mucositis – 33; dysphagia – 25; and mucositis/stomatitis (clinical exam) (pharynx) – 15. Two patients experienced late grade 3 xerostomia. Other late grade 3 adverse events were: dysphagia – 5; hearing impaired – 3; neuralgia NOS – 2; constitutional symptoms (other) – 1; dehydration

  18. Combined Chemoradiation Therapy With Twice-Weekly Gemcitabine and Cisplatin for Organ Preservation in Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: Long-Term Results of a Phase 1 Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Azria, David; Riou, Olivier; Rebillard, Xavier; Thezenas, Simon; Thuret, Rodolphe; Fenoglietto, Pascal; Pouessel, Damien; Culine, Stephane

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Concomitant treatment with radiation therapy and cisplatin (CDDP) remains the gold standard for bladder preservation in the treatment of muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC). We present the long-term results of a phase 1 clinical trial to assess the association of twice-weekly gemcitabine with CDDP and radiation therapy in this setting. Methods and Materials: Patients with pT2-pT4N0M0 MIBC without hydronephrosis or diffuse carcinoma in situ were enrolled in this study. After maximal transurethral resection of the bladder tumor, patients received concomitant radiation therapy (63 Gy in 1.8 fractions) and chemotherapy (CDDP 20 mg/m²/day over 4 days every 21 days and gemcitabine twice a week). The starting dose of gemcitabine was 15 mg/m² with dose escalation to 20, 25, and 30 mg/m². The primary endpoint was the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Secondary endpoints included toxicity and tumor control. Results: Fourteen patients were enrolled. Dose-limiting toxicity occurred in 2 patients treated with 30 mg/m² gemcitabine (grade 4 thrombocytopenia and severe impairment of World Health Organization performance status, respectively). Nine patients received the complete chemoradiation therapy protocol. The recommended dose of gemcitabine was 25 mg/m². The median follow-up time was 53 months, and the overall and disease-specific 5-year survival rates were 62% and 77%, respectively. Among the patients who received the complete treatment, bladder-intact survival was 76% at 5 years, and the median overall survival was 69.6 months. Conclusions: This regimen was well tolerated. The gemcitabine MTD was 25 mg/m². Bladder preservation and disease control were promising. A multicenter phase 2 randomized trial is ongoing.

  19. Esophagectomy Compared to Chemoradiation for Early Stage Esophageal Cancer in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Abrams, Julian A.; Buono, Donna L.; Strauss, Joshua; McBride, Russell B.; Hershman, Dawn L.; Neugut, Alfred I.

    2009-01-01

    Background Esophagectomy has been the traditional treatment of choice for early stage esophageal cancer. However, esophagectomy is associated with high mortality and morbidity in the elderly, and these patients often receive chemoradiation instead. We compared outcomes of esophagectomy versus chemoradiation in a population-based sample of elderly patients with early stage esophageal cancer. Methods We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare database to identify patients ≥65 years diagnosed with stage 1 or 2 esophageal cancer from 1991–2002. We assessed associations of treatment with esophagectomy or chemoradiation with demographic and clinical variables. We performed survival analyses to compare outcomes with treatment modality, adjusted for potential confounders. Results We identified 730 patients with stage 1 or 2 esophageal cancer who underwent esophagectomy (n=341; 46.7%) or chemoradiation (n=389, 53.3%). Older age, squamous cell histology, and lower socioeconomic status were associated with increased odds of receipt of chemoradiation. In multivariable analyses, chemoradiation was associated with worse disease-specific (HR 2.08, 95%CI 1.64–2.64) and overall survival (HR 1.92, 95%CI 1.58–2.34). Receipt of chemoradiation was associated with worse survival for adenocarcinoma (HR 3.01, 95%CI 2.24–4.04), but there was no significant difference for squamous cell (HR 1.33, 95%CI 0.98–1.80). Conclusion Compared to chemoradiation, esophagectomy may be associated with improved survival for early stage esophageal cancer in the elderly. The results suggest that there may also be a subset of squamous cell patients for whom chemoradiation is adequate therapy. A randomized trial would be useful to determine optimal treatment for elderly patients with early stage esophageal cancer. PMID:19637343

  20. The Role of Dual-Time Combined 18-Fluorideoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography and Computed Tomography in the Staging and Restaging Workup of Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer, Treated With Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy and Radical Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Capirci, Carlo Rubello, Domenico; Pasini, Felice; Galeotti, Fabrizio; Bianchini, Enzo; Del Favero, Giuseppe; Panzavolta, Riccardo; Crepaldi, Giorgio; Rampin, Lucia; Facci, Enzo; Gava, Marcello; Banti, Elena; Marano, Gianfranco

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: In patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) staging and, after preoperative chemo-radiation therapy (CRT), restaging workup could be useful to tailor therapeutic approaches. Fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ([{sup 18}F]FDG-PET) is a promising tool for monitoring the effect of antitumor therapy. This study was aimed to evaluate the possible role of dual time sequential FDG-PET scans in the staging and restaging workup of LARC. Methods and Materials: Eighty-seven consecutive patients with LARC were enrolled. CRT consisted of external-beam intensified radiotherapy (concurrent boost), with concomitant chemotherapy PVI 5-FU (300mg/m{sup 2}/day) followed 8-10 weeks later by surgery. All patients underwent [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET/CT before and 5-6 weeks later after the completion of CRT. Measurements of FDG uptake (SUV{sub max}), and percentage of SUV{sub max} difference (Response Index = RI) between pre- and post-CRT [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET scans were evaluated. Results: Six of 87 patients were excluded due to protocol deviation. Following CRT, 40/81 patients (49%) were classified as responders according to Mandard's criteria (TRG1-2). The mean pre-CRT SUV{sub max} was significantly higher than post-CRT (15.8, vs 5.9; p < 0.001). The mean RI was significantly higher in responders than in nonresponder patients (71.3% vs 38%; p = 0.0038). Using a RI cut-off of 65% for defining response to therapy, the following parameters have been obtained: 84.5% sensitivity, 80% specificity, 81.4% positive predictive value, 84.2% negative predictive value, and 81% overall accuracy. Conclusion: These results suggest the potential role of [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET in the restaging workup after preoperative CRT in LARC. RI seems the best predictor to identify CRT response.

  1. A Phase 1/2 and Biomarker Study of Preoperative Short Course Chemoradiation With Proton Beam Therapy and Capecitabine Followed By Early Surgery for Resectable Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Theodore S.; Ryan, David P.; Borger, Darrell R.; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S.; Yeap, Beow Y.; Ancukiewicz, Marek; Deshpande, Vikram; Shinagare, Shweta; Wo, Jennifer Y.; Boucher, Yves; Wadlow, Raymond C.; Kwak, Eunice L.; Allen, Jill N.; Clark, Jeffrey W.; Zhu, Andrew X.; Ferrone, Cristina R.; Mamon, Harvey J.; Adams, Judith; Winrich, Barbara; Grillo, Tarin; Jain, Rakesh K.; DeLaney, Thomas F.; Castillo, Carlos Fernandez-del; Duda, Dan G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the safety, efficacy and biomarkers of short-course proton beam radiation and capecitabine, followed by pancreaticoduodenectomy in a phase 1/2 study in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patients. Methods and Materials Patients with radiographically resectable, biopsy-proven PDAC were treated with neoadjuvant short-course (2-week) proton-based radiation with capecitabine, followed by surgery and adjuvant gemcitabine. The primary objective was to demonstrate a rate of toxicity grade ≥3 of <20%. Exploratory biomarker studies were performed using surgical specimen tissues and peripheral blood. Results The phase 2 dose was established at 5 daily doses of 5 GyE. Fifty patients were enrolled, of whom 35 patients were treated in the phase 2 portion. There were no grade 4 or 5 toxicities, and only 2 of 35 patients (4.1%) experienced a grade 3 toxicity event (chest wall pain grade 1, colitis grade 1). Of 48 patients eligible for analysis, 37 underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy. Thirty of 37 (81%) had positive nodes. Locoregional failure occurred in 6 of 37 resected patients (16.2%), and distant recurrence occurred in 35 of 48 patients (72.9%). With median follow-up of 38 months, the median progression-free survival for the entire group was 10 months, and overall survival was 17 months. Biomarker studies showed significant associations between worse survival outcomes and the KRAS point mutation change from glycine to aspartic acid at position 12, stromal CXCR7 expression, and circulating biomarkers CEA, CA19-9, and HGF (all, P<.05). Conclusions This study met the primary endpoint by showing a rate of 4.1% grade 3 toxicity for neoadjuvant short-course proton-based chemoradiation. Treatment was associated with favorable local control. In exploratory analyses, KRASG12D status and high CXCR7 expression and circulating CEA, CA19-9, and HGF levels were associated with poor survival. PMID:24867540

  2. [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET Standard Uptake Value as a Metabolic Predictor of Bone Marrow Response to Radiation: Impact on Acute and Late Hematological Toxicity in Cervical Cancer Patients Treated With Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Elicin, Olgun; Callaway, Sharon; Prior, John O.; Bourhis, Jean; Ozsahin, Mahmut; Herrera, Fernanda G.

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To quantify the relationship between bone marrow (BM) response to radiation and radiation dose by using {sup 18}F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET standard uptake values (SUV) and to correlate these findings with hematological toxicity (HT) in cervical cancer (CC) patients treated with chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: Seventeen women with a diagnosis of CC were treated with standard doses of CRT. All patients underwent pre- and post-therapy [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET/computed tomography (CT). Hemograms were obtained before and during treatment and 3 months after treatment and at last follow-up. Pelvic bone was autosegmented as total bone marrow (BM{sub TOT}). Active bone marrow (BM{sub ACT}) was contoured based on SUV greater than the mean SUV of BM{sub TOT}. The volumes (V) of each region receiving 10, 20, 30, and 40 Gy (V{sub 10}, V{sub 20}, V{sub 30}, and V{sub 40}, respectively) were calculated. Metabolic volume histograms and voxel SUV map response graphs were created. Relative changes in SUV before and after therapy were calculated by separating SUV voxels into radiation therapy dose ranges of 5 Gy. The relationships among SUV decrease, radiation dose, and HT were investigated using multiple regression models. Results: Mean relative pre-post-therapy SUV reductions in BM{sub TOT} and BM{sub ACT} were 27% and 38%, respectively. BM{sub ACT} volume was significantly reduced after treatment (from 651.5 to 231.6 cm{sup 3}, respectively; P<.0001). BM{sub ACT} V{sub 30} was significantly correlated with a reduction in BM{sub ACT} SUV (R{sup 2}, 0.14; P<.001). The reduction in BM{sub ACT} SUV significantly correlated with reduction in white blood cells (WBCs) at 3 months post-treatment (R{sup 2}, 0.27; P=.04) and at last follow-up (R{sup 2}, 0.25; P=.04). Different dosimetric parameters of BM{sub TOT} and BM{sub ACT} correlated with long-term hematological outcome. Conclusions: The volumes of BM

  3. Apolipoprotein C-II Is a Potential Serum Biomarker as a Prognostic Factor of Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer After Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Harima, Yoko; Ikeda, Koshi; Utsunomiya, Keita; Komemushi, Atsushi; Kanno, Shohei; Shiga, Toshiko; Tanigawa, Noboru

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To determine pretreatment serum protein levels for generally applicable measurement to predict chemoradiation treatment outcomes in patients with locally advanced squamous cell cervical carcinoma (CC). Methods and Materials: In a screening study, measurements were conducted twice. At first, 6 serum samples from CC patients (3 with no evidence of disease [NED] and 3 with cancer-caused death [CD]) and 2 from healthy controls were tested. Next, 12 serum samples from different CC patients (8 NED, 4 CD) and 4 from healthy controls were examined. Subsequently, 28 different CC patients (18 NED, 10 CD) and 9 controls were analyzed in the validation study. Protein chips were treated with the sample sera, and the serum protein pattern was detected by surface-enhanced laser desorption and ionization–time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF MS). Then, single MS-based peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) and tandem MS (MS/MS)-based peptide/protein identification methods, were used to identify protein corresponding to the detected peak. And then, turbidimetric assay was used to measure the levels of a protein that indicated the best match with this peptide peak. Results: The same peak 8918 m/z was identified in both screening studies. Neither the screening study nor the validation study had significant differences in the appearance of this peak in the controls and NED. However, the intensity of the peak in CD was significantly lower than that of controls and NED in both pilot studies (P=.02, P=.04) and validation study (P=.01, P=.001). The protein indicated the best match with this peptide peak at 8918 m/z was identified as apolipoprotein C-II (ApoC-II) using PMF and MS/MS methods. Turbidimetric assay showed that the mean serum levels of ApoC-II tended to decrease in CD group when compared with NED group (P=.078). Conclusion: ApoC-II could be used as a biomarker for detection in predicting and estimating the radiation treatment outcome of patients with CC.

  4. A Phase 1/2 and Biomarker Study of Preoperative Short Course Chemoradiation With Proton Beam Therapy and Capecitabine Followed By Early Surgery for Resectable Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Theodore S.; Ryan, David P.; Borger, Darrell R.; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S.; Yeap, Beow Y.; Ancukiewicz, Marek; Deshpande, Vikram; Shinagare, Shweta; Wo, Jennifer Y.; Boucher, Yves; Wadlow, Raymond C.; Kwak, Eunice L.; Allen, Jill N.; Clark, Jeffrey W.; Zhu, Andrew X.; Ferrone, Cristina R.; Mamon, Harvey J.; and others

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety, efficacy and biomarkers of short-course proton beam radiation and capecitabine, followed by pancreaticoduodenectomy in a phase 1/2 study in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patients. Methods and Materials: Patients with radiographically resectable, biopsy-proven PDAC were treated with neoadjuvant short-course (2-week) proton-based radiation with capecitabine, followed by surgery and adjuvant gemcitabine. The primary objective was to demonstrate a rate of toxicity grade ≥3 of <20%. Exploratory biomarker studies were performed using surgical specimen tissues and peripheral blood. Results: The phase 2 dose was established at 5 daily doses of 5 GyE. Fifty patients were enrolled, of whom 35 patients were treated in the phase 2 portion. There were no grade 4 or 5 toxicities, and only 2 of 35 patients (4.1%) experienced a grade 3 toxicity event (chest wall pain grade 1, colitis grade 1). Of 48 patients eligible for analysis, 37 underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy. Thirty of 37 (81%) had positive nodes. Locoregional failure occurred in 6 of 37 resected patients (16.2%), and distant recurrence occurred in 35 of 48 patients (72.9%). With median follow-up of 38 months, the median progression-free survival for the entire group was 10 months, and overall survival was 17 months. Biomarker studies showed significant associations between worse survival outcomes and the KRAS point mutation change from glycine to aspartic acid at position 12, stromal CXCR7 expression, and circulating biomarkers CEA, CA19-9, and HGF (all, P<.05). Conclusions: This study met the primary endpoint by showing a rate of 4.1% grade 3 toxicity for neoadjuvant short-course proton-based chemoradiation. Treatment was associated with favorable local control. In exploratory analyses, KRAS{sup G12D} status and high CXCR7 expression and circulating CEA, CA19-9, and HGF levels were associated with poor survival.

  5. Refining Preoperative Therapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In the PROSPECT trial, patients with locally advanced, resectable rectal cancer will be randomly assigned to receive either standard neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy or neoadjuvant FOLFOX chemotherapy, with chemoradiation reserved for nonresponders.

  6. Correlation Among Six Biologic Factors (p53, p21{sup WAF1}, MIB-1, EGFR, HER2, and Bcl-2) and Clinical Outcomes After Curative Chemoradiation Therapy in Squamous Cell Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yamashita, Hideomi; Murakami, Naoya; Asari, Takao; Okuma, Kae; Ohtomo, Kuni; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: The expressions of six cell-cycle-associated proteins were analyzed in cervical squamous cell carcinomas in correlation in a search for prognostic correlations in tumors treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy (cCRT). Methods and Materials: The expressions of p53, p21/waf1/cip1, molecular immunology borstel-1 (MIB-1), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2), and Bcl-2 were studied using an immunohistochemical method in 57 cases of cervical squamous cell carcinoma treated with cCRT. Patients received cCRT between 1998 and 2005. The mean patient age was 61 years (range, 27-82 years). The number of patients with Stage II, III, and IVA disease was 18, 29, and 10, respectively. Results: The number of patients with tumors positive for p53, p21/waf1/cip1, MIB-1, EGFR, HER2, and Bcl-2 was 26, 24, 49, 26, 13, and 11, respectively; no significant correlation was noted. The 5-year overall survival rates of HER2-positive and -negative patients was 76% vs. 44%, which was of borderline significance (p = 0.0675). No significant correlation was noted between overall survival and expressions of p53, p21/waf1/cip1, MIB-1, EGFR, and Bcl-2. No correlation was observed between local control and expression of any of the proteins. Conclusion: Expression of HER2 protein had a weak impact of borderline significance on overall survival in squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix treated with cCRT. However, no clinical associations could be established for p53, p21/waf1/cip1, MIB-1, EGFR, and Bcl-2 protein expressions.

  7. Safety and Palliative Efficacy of Single-Dose 8-Gy Reirradiation for Painful Local Failure in Patients With Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Previously Treated With Radical Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Topkan, Erkan; Yildirim, Berna Akkus; Guler, Ozan Cem; Parlak, Cem; Pehlivan, Berrin; Selek, Ugur

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the safety and efficacy of single-dose 8-Gy palliative chest reirradiation (CRI) in metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (M-NSCLC) patients with painful thoracic failures (TF) within the previous radiation portal. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of 78 M-NSCLC patients who received single-dose 8-Gy CRI for painful TF after concurrent chemoradiation therapy to a total radiation dose of 52 to 66 Gy between 2007 and 2012. Primary endpoints included significant pain relief (SPR) defined as a ≥2 point decrement in the Visual Analogue Scale for Pain inventory (VAS-P), time to pain relief, and duration of pain control. Secondary objectives were survival and prognostic factors. Results: Treatment was well tolerated, with only 5.1% grade 3 pneumonitis and 1.3% grade 2 esophagitis. Pre-CRI median and post-CRI minimum VAS-P were 7 and 3 (P<.001), respectively. SPR was noted in 67 (85.9%) patients, and only 3 (3.9%) scored progressive pain. Median time to lowest VAS-P and duration of pain control were 27 days and 6.1 months, respectively. Median overall survival (OS) was 7.7 months, and the 1-year OS rate was 26.5%. On multivariate analyses, lower Eastern Cooperative Oncology group score (1-2; P<.001), absence of anemia (P=.001), and fewer metastatic sites (1-2; P<.001) were found to be associated with longer OS. Conclusions: Single-dose 8-Gy CRI provides safe, effective, and durable pain palliation for TF in radically irradiated M-NSCLC patients. Because of its convenience, lower cost, and higher comfort, the present protocol can be considered an appropriate option for patients with limited life spans.

  8. Chemoradiation of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Arrazubi, V; Suárez, J; Novas, P; Pérez-Hoyos, M T; Vera, R; Martínez Del Prado, P

    2013-02-01

    The treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer is a challenge. Surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy comprise the multimodal therapy that is administered in most cases. Therefore, a multidisciplinary approach is required. Because this cancer has a high rate of local recurrence, efforts have been made to improve clinical outcomes while minimizing toxicity and maintaining quality of life. Thus, total mesorectal excision technique was developed as the standard surgery, and chemotherapy and radiotherapy have been established as neoadjuvant treatment. Both approaches reduce locoregional relapse. Two neoadjuvant treatments have emerged as standards of care: short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiotherapy with fluoropyrimidines; however, long-course chemoradiotherapy might be more appropriate for low-lying neoplasias, bulky tumours or tumours with near-circumferential margins. If neoadjuvant treatment is not administered and locally advanced stage is demonstrated in surgical specimens, adjuvant chemoradiotherapy is recommended. The addition of chemotherapy to the treatment regimen confers a significant benefit. Adjuvant chemotherapy is widely accepted despite scarce evidence of its benefit. The optimal time for surgery after neoadjuvant therapy, the treatment of low-risk T3N0 neoplasms, the convenience of avoiding radiotherapy in some cases and tailoring treatment to pathological response have been recurrent subjects of debate that warrant more extensive research. Adding new drugs, changing the treatment sequence and selecting the treatment based on prognostic or predictive factors other than stage remain experimental. PMID:23584263

  9. Clinical observation of gene expression-guided chemoradiation therapy for nonsurgical esophageal squamous cell carcinoma patients: a retrospective analysis of 36 cases

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhe; Dai, Honghai; Lv, Dongxiao; Feng, A Lei; Shu, Weibin; Han, Junqing

    2016-01-01

    Objective To make an informed choice of chemotherapy drugs according to the oncogene mRNA expression and to explore whether it could increase the survival rate of patients. Patients and methods The study retrospectively analyzed 36 cases of nonsurgical esophageal squamous cell carcinoma patients treated at the Center for Oncology of Shandong Provincial Hospital from December 1, 2010, to November 1, 2013. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy was used for the treatment with a conventional radiotherapy dose of 60–66 Gy. Chemotherapy started 1–5 weeks after radiation therapy. The selection of the chemotherapy drug was based on the mRNA expression levels of excision repair cross-complementation 1, thymidylate synthetase, ribonucleotide reductase M1, and β-tubulin isotype III. The objective response rate, progression-free survival, and overall survival were observed. Results The reason for poor prognosis of patients with high expression of excision repair cross-complementation 1 was unknown. No correlation was observed between patient survival and expression of thymidylate synthetase, ribonucleotide reductase M1, and β-tubulin isotype III. Complete response, partial response, stable disease, and progressive disease were observed in 25, five, three, and three patients, respectively. The objective response rate was 83.3%. The 1-year, 2-year, and 3-year progression-free survival rates were 79.8%, 58.9%, and 54.4%, respectively. The 1-year, 2-year, and 3-year overall survival rates were 83.3%, 68.1%, and 58.4%, respectively. Conclusion Selecting the chemotherapy drug according to the oncogene expression, combined with radiation therapy, could increase the 3-year survival rate in nonsurgical esophageal squamous cell carcinoma patients. Such conclusion needs to be further confirmed using a larger sample size. PMID:27524911

  10. Preservation of Immune Function in Cervical Cancer Patients during Chemoradiation using a Novel Integrative Approach

    PubMed Central

    Lutgendorf, Susan K.; Mullen-Houser, Elizabeth; Russell, Daniel; DeGeest, Koen; Jacobson, Geraldine; Hart, Laura; Bender, David; Anderson, Barrie; Buekers, Thomas E.; Goodheart, Michael J.; Antoni, Michael H.; Sood, Anil K.; Lubaroff, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Patients receiving chemoradiation for cervical cancer are at risk for distress, chemoradiation-related side-effects, and immunosuppression. This prospective randomized clinical trial examined effects of a complementary therapy, Healing Touch (HT), versus relaxation training (RT) and usual care (UC) for 1) supporting cellular immunity, 2) improving mood and quality of life (QOL), and 3) reducing treatment-associated toxicities and treatment delay in cervical cancer patients receiving chemoradiation. Sixty women with stages IB1 to IVA cervical cancer were randomly assigned to receive UC or 4×/weekly individual sessions of either HT or RT immediately following radiation during their 6-week chemoradiation treatment. Patients completed psychosocial assessments and blood sampling before chemoradiation at baseline, weeks 4 and 6. Multilevel regression analyses using orthogonal contrasts tested for differences between treatment conditions over time. HT patients had a minimal decrease in natural killer cell cytotoxicity (NKCC) over the course of treatment whereas NKCC of RT and UC patients declined sharply during chemoradiation (group by time interaction: p=0.018). HT patients showed greater decreases in 2 different indicators of depressed mood (CESD depressed mood subscale and POMS depression scale) compared to RT and UC (group by time interactions: p < 0.05). No between group differences were observed in QOL, treatment delay, or clinically-rated toxicities. HT may benefit cervical cancer patients by moderating effects of chemoradiation on depressed mood and cellular immunity. Effects of HT on toxicities, treatment delay, QOL, and fatigue were not observed. Long-term clinical implications of findings are not known. PMID:20600809

  11. Higher Biologically Effective Dose of Radiotherapy Is Associated With Improved Outcomes for Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma Treated With Chemoradiation: An Analysis of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group

    SciTech Connect

    Machtay, Mitchell; Movsas, Benjamin; Paulus, Rebecca; Gore, Elizabeth M.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Albain, Kathy; Sause, William T.; Curran, Walter J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Patients treated with chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced non-small-cell lung carcinoma (LA-NSCLC) were analyzed for local-regional failure (LRF) and overall survival (OS) with respect to radiotherapy dose intensity. Methods and Materials: This study combined data from seven Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trials in which chemoradiotherapy was used for LA-NSCLC: RTOG 88-08 (chemoradiation arm only), 90-15, 91-06, 92-04, 93-09 (nonoperative arm only), 94-10, and 98-01. The radiotherapeutic biologically effective dose (BED) received by each individual patient was calculated, as was the overall treatment time-adjusted BED (tBED) using standard formulae. Heterogeneity testing was done with chi-squared statistics, and weighted pooled hazard ratio estimates were used. Cox and Fine and Gray's proportional hazard models were used for OS and LRF, respectively, to test the associations between BED and tBED adjusted for other covariates. Results: A total of 1,356 patients were analyzed for BED (1,348 for tBED). The 2-year and 5-year OS rates were 38% and 15%, respectively. The 2-year and 5-year LRF rates were 46% and 52%, respectively. The BED (and tBED) were highly significantly associated with both OS and LRF, with or without adjustment for other covariates on multivariate analysis (p < 0.0001). A 1-Gy BED increase in radiotherapy dose intensity was statistically significantly associated with approximately 4% relative improvement in survival; this is another way of expressing the finding that the pool-adjusted hazard ratio for survival as a function of BED was 0.96. Similarly, a 1-Gy tBED increase in radiotherapy dose intensity was statistically significantly associated with approximately 3% relative improvement in local-regional control; this is another way of expressing the finding that the pool-adjusted hazard ratio as a function of tBED was 0.97. Conclusions: Higher radiotherapy dose intensity is associated with improved local-regional control and

  12. The Association Between Chemoradiation-related Lymphopenia and Clinical Outcomes in Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wild, Aaron T.; Ye, Xiaobu; Ellsworth, Susannah G.; Smith, Jessica A.; Narang, Amol K.; Garg, Tanu; Campian, Jian; Laheru, Daniel A.; Zheng, Lei; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Grossman, Stuart A.; Herman, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Lymphopenia is a common consequence of chemoradiation therapy yet is seldom addressed clinically. This study was conducted to determine if patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) treated with definitive chemoradiation develop significant lymphopenia and if this affects clinical outcomes. Methods A retrospective analysis of patients with LAPC treated with chemoradiation at a single institution from 1997 to 2011 was performed. Total lymphocyte counts (TLCs) were recorded at baseline and then monthly during and after chemoradiation. The correlation between treatment-induced lymphopenia, established prognostic factors, and overall survival was analyzed using univariate Cox regression analysis. Important factors identified by univariate analysis were selected as covariates to construct a multivariate proportional hazards model for survival. Results A total of 101 patients met eligibility criteria. TLCs were normal in 86% before chemoradiation. The mean reduction in TLC per patient was 50.6% (SD, 40.6%) 2 months after starting chemoradiation (P< 0.00001), and 46% had TLC< 500 cells/mm3. Patients with TLC < 500 cells/mm3 2 months after starting chemoradiation had inferior median survival (8.7 vs. 13.3mo, P= 0.03) and PFS (4.9 vs. 9.0mo, P = 0.15). Multivariate analysis revealed TLC< 500 cells/mm3 to be an independent predictor of inferior survival (HR= 2.879, P= 0.001) along with baseline serum albumin (HR= 3.584, P = 0.0002), BUN (HR = 1.060, P= 0.02), platelet count (HR= 1.004, P = 0.005), and radiation planning target volume (HR= 1.003, P= 0.0006). Conclusions Severe treatment-related lymphopenia occurs frequently after chemoradiation for LAPC and is an independent predictor of inferior survival. PMID:23648440

  13. Safety and efficacy of quadrapeutics versus chemoradiation in head and neck carcinoma xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Lukianova-Hleb, Ekaterina Y; Kim, Yoo-Shin; Aryasomayajula, Bhawani; Boulikas, Teni; Phan, Jack; Hung, Mien-Chie; Torchilin, Vladimir P; O'Neill, Brian E; Lapotko, Dmitri O

    2015-01-01

    Chemoradiation is the strongest anti-tumor therapy but in resistant unresectable cancers it often lacks safety and efficacy. We compared our recently developed cell-level combination approach, quadrapeutics, to chemoradiation therapy to establish pre-clinical data for its biodistribution, safety and efficacy in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), as a clinically challenging aggressive and resistant cancer. In vitro and in vivo models of four carcinomas were treated with standard chemoradiation and quadrapeutics using identical drug and radiation doses. We applied liposomal cisplatin or doxorubicin, colloidal gold, near-infrared laser pulses and radiation, all at low safe doses. The final evaluation used a xenograft model of HNSCC. Quadrapeutics enhanced standard chemoradiation in vitro by reducing head and neck cancer cell proliferation by 1000-fold, inhibiting tumor growth in vivo by 34-fold and improving animal survival by 5-fold, and reducing the side effects to a negligible level. In quadrapeutics, we observed an "inversion" of the drug efficacy of two standard drugs: doxorubicin, a low efficacy drug for the cancers studied, was two times more efficient than cisplatin, the first choice drug in clinic for HNSCC. The radical therapeutic gain of quadrapeutics resulted from the intracellular synergy of the four components employed which we administered in a specific sequence, while the reduction in the toxicity was due to the low doses of all four components. The biodistribution, safety and efficacy data for quadrapeutics in HNSCC ensure its high translational potential and justify the possibility of clinical trials. PMID:26885444

  14. Safety and efficacy of quadrapeutics versus chemoradiation in head and neck carcinoma xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Lukianova-Hleb, Ekaterina Y; Kim, Yoo-Shin; Aryasomayajula, Bhawani; Boulikas, Teni; Phan, Jack; Hung, Mien-Chie; Torchilin, Vladimir P; O’Neill, Brian E; Lapotko, Dmitri O

    2015-01-01

    Chemoradiation is the strongest anti-tumor therapy but in resistant unresectable cancers it often lacks safety and efficacy. We compared our recently developed cell-level combination approach, quadrapeutics, to chemoradiation therapy to establish pre-clinical data for its biodistribution, safety and efficacy in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), as a clinically challenging aggressive and resistant cancer. In vitro and in vivo models of four carcinomas were treated with standard chemoradiation and quadrapeutics using identical drug and radiation doses. We applied liposomal cisplatin or doxorubicin, colloidal gold, near-infrared laser pulses and radiation, all at low safe doses. The final evaluation used a xenograft model of HNSCC. Quadrapeutics enhanced standard chemoradiation in vitro by reducing head and neck cancer cell proliferation by 1000-fold, inhibiting tumor growth in vivo by 34-fold and improving animal survival by 5-fold, and reducing the side effects to a negligible level. In quadrapeutics, we observed an “inversion” of the drug efficacy of two standard drugs: doxorubicin, a low efficacy drug for the cancers studied, was two times more efficient than cisplatin, the first choice drug in clinic for HNSCC. The radical therapeutic gain of quadrapeutics resulted from the intracellular synergy of the four components employed which we administered in a specific sequence, while the reduction in the toxicity was due to the low doses of all four components. The biodistribution, safety and efficacy data for quadrapeutics in HNSCC ensure its high translational potential and justify the possibility of clinical trials. PMID:26885444

  15. Chemoradiation for gastric cancer: controversies, updates and novel techniques

    PubMed Central

    Fan, M; Hu, W

    2015-01-01

    The INT0116 trial established the role of adjuvant chemoradiation (CRT) in the multidisciplinary approach to the management of locally advanced gastric cancer. However, whether adjuvant CRT is indispensable for patients undergoing D2 dissection remains undefined. The adjuvant chemoradiation therapy in stomach cancer (ARTIST) trial, which was designed to compare adjuvant chemotherapy to CRT, failed to demonstrate differences in disease-free and overall survival in the whole study group; however, subgroup analysis indicated that patients with lymph node metastasis may benefit from additional radiation. A follow-up ARTIST II trial is currently under way. The efficacy of adjuvant CRT remains controversial because of variation among studies in the inclusion criteria and treatment delivery methods; however, the identification of patients who would benefit from CRT is critical. Advanced radiotherapy techniques such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy protect normal tissues via motion management and decreased radiation-induced toxicity and contribute to plan optimization. Further studies integrating clinical and molecular factors as well as neoadjuvant CRT are warranted. PMID:25827208

  16. Pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma: postoperative adjuvant chemoradiation improves survival. A prospective, single-institution experience.

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, C J; Abrams, R A; Grochow, L B; Sohn, T A; Ord, S E; Hruban, R H; Zahurak, M L; Dooley, W C; Coleman, J; Sauter, P K; Pitt, H A; Lillemoe, K D; Cameron, J L

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study was designed to evaluate prospectively survival after pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma, comparing two different postoperative adjuvant chemoradiation protocol to those of no adjuvant therapy. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Based on limited data from the Gastrointestinal Tumor Study Group, adjuvant chemoradiation therapy has been recommended after pancreaticoduodenectomy for adenocarcinoma of the head, neck, or uncinate process of the pancrease. However, many patients continue to receive no such therapy. METHODS: From October 1991 through September 1995, all patients with resected, pathologically confirmed adenocarcinoma of the head, neck, or uncinate process of the pancreas were reviewed by a multidisciplinary group (surgery, radiation oncology, medical oncology, and pathology) and were offered three options for postoperative treatment after pancreaticoduodenectomy: 1) standard therapy: external beam radiation therapy to the pancreatic bed (4000-4500 cGy) given with two 3-day fluorouracil (5-FU) courses and followed by weekly bolus 5-FU (500 mg/m2 per day) for 4 months; 2) intensive therapy: external beam radiation therapy to the pancreatic bed (5040-5760 cGy) with prophylactic hepatic irradiation (2340-2700 cGy) given with and followed by infusional 5-FU (200 mg/m2 per day) plus leucovorin (5 mg/m2 per day) for 5 of 7 days for 4 months; or 3) no therapy: no postoperative radiation therapy or chemotherapy. RESULTS: Pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed in 174 patients, with 1 in-hospital death (0.6%). Ninety-nine patients elected standard therapy, 21 elected intensive therapy, and 53 patients declined therapy. The three groups were comparable with respect to race, gender, intraoperative blood loss, tumor differentiation, lymph node status, tumor diameter, and resection margin status. Univariate analyses indicated that tumor diameter < 3 cm, intraoperative blood loss < 700 mL, absence of intraoperative blood transfusions, and use

  17. The spectrum of histopathological changes encountered in pancreatectomy specimens after neoadjuvant chemoradiation, including subtle and less-well-recognised changes.

    PubMed

    Kalimuthu, Sangeetha N; Serra, Stefano; Dhani, Neesha; Chetty, Runjan

    2016-06-01

    Preoperative (neoadjuvant) chemoradiation therapy/treatment (NCRT) is emerging as an important treatment modality in borderline resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). The constellation of histopathological changes secondary to chemoradiation is diverse and has been well documented, particularly in other gastrointestinal organs such as the oesophagus and colorectum. However, the histological changes specific to the pancreas have not been fully characterised and described. This review aims to provide a detailed catalogue of histological features associated with NCRT-treated PDAC and highlight any subtle, less-recognised changes. PMID:26915370

  18. Prognostic Cell Biological Markers in Cervical Cancer Patients Primarily Treated With (Chemo)radiation: A Systematic Review

    SciTech Connect

    Noordhuis, Maartje G.; Eijsink, Jasper J.H.; Roossink, Frank; Graeff, Pauline de; Pras, Elisabeth; Schuuring, Ed; Wisman, G. Bea A.; Bock, Geertruida H. de; Zee, Ate G.J. van der

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically review the prognostic and predictive significance of cell biological markers in cervical cancer patients primarily treated with (chemo)radiation. A PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane literature search was performed. Studies describing a relation between a cell biological marker and survival in {>=}50 cervical cancer patients primarily treated with (chemo)radiation were selected. Study quality was assessed, and studies with a quality score of 4 or lower were excluded. Cell biological markers were clustered on biological function, and the prognostic and predictive significance of these markers was described. In total, 42 studies concerning 82 cell biological markers were included in this systematic review. In addition to cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and serum squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC-ag) levels, markers associated with poor prognosis were involved in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling (EGFR and C-erbB-2) and in angiogenesis and hypoxia (carbonic anhydrase 9 and hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha}). Epidermal growth factor receptor and C-erbB-2 were also associated with poor response to (chemo)radiation. In conclusion, EGFR signaling is associated with poor prognosis and response to therapy in cervical cancer patients primarily treated with (chemo)radiation, whereas markers involved in angiogenesis and hypoxia, COX-2, and serum SCC-ag levels are associated with a poor prognosis. Therefore, targeting these pathways in combination with chemoradiation may improve survival in advanced-stage cervical cancer patients.

  19. Duodenal Toxicity After Fractionated Chemoradiation for Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Patrick; Das, Prajnan; Pinnix, Chelsea C.; Beddar, Sam; Briere, Tina; Pham, Mary; Krishnan, Sunil; Delclos, Marc E.; Crane, Christopher H.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Improving local control is critical to improving survival and quality of life for patients with locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer (LAPC). However, previous attempts at radiation dose escalation have been limited by duodenal toxicity. In order to guide future studies, we analyzed the clinical and dosimetric factors associated with duodenal toxicity in patients undergoing fractionated chemoradiation for LAPC. Methods and Materials: Medical records and treatment plans of 106 patients with LAPC who were treated with chemoradiation between July 2005 and June 2010 at our institution were reviewed. All patients received neoadjuvant and concurrent chemotherapy. Seventy-eight patients were treated with conventional radiation to 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions; 28 patients received dose-escalated radiation therapy (range, 57.5-75.4 Gy in 28-39 fractions). Treatment-related toxicity was graded according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to assess prognostic influence of clinical, pathologic, and treatment-related factors by using Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression methods. Results: Twenty patients had treatment-related duodenal toxicity events, such as duodenal inflammation, ulceration, and bleeding. Four patients had grade 1 events, 8 had grade 2, 6 had grade 3, 1 had grade 4, and 1 had grade 5. On univariate analysis, a toxicity grade ≥2 was associated with tumor location, low platelet count, an absolute volume (cm{sup 3}) receiving a dose of at least 55 Gy (V{sub 55} {sub Gy} > 1 cm{sup 3}), and a maximum point dose >60 Gy. Of these factors, only V{sub 55} {sub Gy} ≥1 cm{sup 3} was associated with duodenal toxicity on multivariate analysis (hazard ratio, 6.7; range, 2.0-18.8; P=.002). Conclusions: This study demonstrates that a duodenal V{sub 55} {sub Gy} >1 cm{sup 3} is an important dosimetric predictor of grade 2 or greater duodenal toxicity and establishes it as a

  20. Case Report: En Bloc Resection of Pancoast Tumor with Adjuvant Aortic Endograft and Chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Tony; Fischer, Uwe M.; Marco, Rex A.; Naoum, Joseph J.; Reardon, Michael J.; Lumsden, Alan B.; Blackmon, Shanda H.; Davies, Mark G.

    2015-01-01

    “Pancoast” tumors frequently require a multidisciplinary approach to therapy and are still associated with high morbidity and mortality. Due to their sensitive anatomic location, complex resections and chemoradiation regimens are typically required for treatment. Those with signs of aortic invasion pose an even greater challenge, given the added risks of cardiopulmonary bypass for aortic resection and interposition. Placement of an aortic endograft can facilitate resection if the tumor is in close proximity to or is invading the aorta. Prophylactic endografting to prevent radiation-associated aortic rupture has also been described. This case describes a 60-year-old female who presented with a stage IIIa left upper lobe undifferentiated non-small-cell carcinoma encasing the subclavian artery with thoracic aorta and bony invasion. Following carotid-subclavian bypass with Dacron, en bloc resection of the affected lung, ribs, and vertebral bodies was performed. The aorta was prophylactically reinforced with a Gore TAG thoracic endograft prior to adjuvant chemoradiation. The patient remains disease-free at more than 5 years follow-up after completing her treatment course. Endovascular stenting with subsequent chemoradiation may prove to be a viable alternative to palliation or open operative management and prevention of aortic injury during tumor resection and/or adjuvant therapy in select patients with aortic involvement. PMID:26306134

  1. On-demand intracellular amplification of chemoradiation with cancer-specific plasmonic nanobubbles

    PubMed Central

    Lukianova-Hleb, Ekaterina Y; Wu, Xiangwei; Torchilin, Vladimir P; Lapotko, Dmitri O

    2014-01-01

    Chemoradiation-resistant cancers limit treatment efficacy and safety. We show here the cancer cell–specific, on-demand intracellular amplification of chemotherapy and chemoradiation therapy via gold nanoparticle– and laser pulse–induced mechanical intracellular impact. Cancer aggressiveness promotes the clustering of drug nanocarriers and gold nanoparticles in cancer cells. This cluster, upon exposure to a laser pulse, generates a plasmonic nanobubble, the mechanical explosion that destroys the host cancer cell or ejects the drug into its cytoplasm by disrupting the liposome and endosome. The same cluster locally amplifies external X-rays. Intracellular synergy of the mechanical impact of plasmonic nanobubble, ejected drug and amplified X-rays improves the efficacy of standard chemoradiation in resistant and aggressive head and neck cancer by 100-fold in vitro and 17-fold in vivo, reduces the effective entry doses of drugs and X-rays to 2–6% of their clinical doses and efficiently spares normal cells. The developed quadrapeutics technology combines four clinically validated components and transforms a standard macrotherapy into an intracellular on-demand theranostic microtreatment with radically amplified therapeutic efficacy and specificity. PMID:24880615

  2. On-demand intracellular amplification of chemoradiation with cancer-specific plasmonic nanobubbles.

    PubMed

    Lukianova-Hleb, Ekaterina Y; Ren, Xiaoyang; Sawant, Rupa R; Wu, Xiangwei; Torchilin, Vladimir P; Lapotko, Dmitri O

    2014-07-01

    Chemoradiation-resistant cancers limit treatment efficacy and safety. We show here the cancer cell-specific, on-demand intracellular amplification of chemotherapy and chemoradiation therapy via gold nanoparticle- and laser pulse-induced mechanical intracellular impact. Cancer aggressiveness promotes the clustering of drug nanocarriers and gold nanoparticles in cancer cells. This cluster, upon exposure to a laser pulse, generates a plasmonic nanobubble, the mechanical explosion that destroys the host cancer cell or ejects the drug into its cytoplasm by disrupting the liposome and endosome. The same cluster locally amplifies external X-rays. Intracellular synergy of the mechanical impact of plasmonic nanobubble, ejected drug and amplified X-rays improves the efficacy of standard chemoradiation in resistant and aggressive head and neck cancer by 100-fold in vitro and 17-fold in vivo, reduces the effective entry doses of drugs and X-rays to 2-6% of their clinical doses and efficiently spares normal cells. The developed quadrapeutics technology combines four clinically validated components and transforms a standard macrotherapy into an intracellular on-demand theranostic microtreatment with radically amplified therapeutic efficacy and specificity. PMID:24880615

  3. Molecular Markers Predict Distant Metastases After Adjuvant Chemoradiation for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jun Won; Kim, Yong Bae; Choi, Jun Jeong; Koom, Woong Sub; Kim, Hoguen; Kim, Nam-Kyu; Ahn, Joong Bae; Lee, Ikjae; Cho, Jae Ho; Keum, Ki Chang

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: The outcomes of adjuvant chemoradiation for locally advanced rectal cancer are nonuniform among patients with matching prognostic factors. We explored the role of molecular markers for predicting the outcome of adjuvant chemoradiation for rectal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: The study included 68 patients with stages II to III rectal adenocarcinoma who were treated with total mesorectal excision and adjuvant chemoradiation. Chemotherapy based on 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin was intravenously administered each month for 6-12 cycles. Radiation therapy consisted of 54 Gy delivered in 30 fractions. Immunostaining of surgical specimens for COX-2, EGFR, VEGF, thymidine synthase (TS), and Raf kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP) was performed. Results: The median follow-up was 65 months. Eight locoregional (11.8%) and 13 distant (19.1%) recurrences occurred. Five-year locoregional failure-free survival (LRFFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) rates for all patients were 83.9%, 78.7%, 66.7%, and 73.8%, respectively. LRFFS was not correlated with TNM stage, surgical margin, or any of the molecular markers. VEGF overexpression was significantly correlated with decreased DMFS (P=.045), while RKIP-positive results were correlated with increased DMFS (P=.025). In multivariate analyses, positive findings for COX-2 (COX-2+) and VEGF (VEGF+) and negative findings for RKIP (RKIP-) were independent prognostic factors for DMFS, DFS, and OS (P=.035, .014, and .007 for DMFS; .021, .010, and <.0001 for DFS; and .004, .012, and .001 for OS). The combination of both COX-2+ and VEGF+ (COX-2+/VEGF+) showed a strong correlation with decreased DFS (P=.007), and the combinations of RKIP+/COX-2- and RKIP+/VEGF- showed strong correlations with improved DFS compared with the rest of the patients (P=.001 and <.0001, respectively). Conclusions: Molecular markers can be valuable in predicting treatment outcome of adjuvant

  4. Biomarkers for Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kuremsky, Jeffrey G.; Tepper, Joel E.; McLeod, Howard L. Phar

    2009-07-01

    Locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) is currently treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Although approximately 45% of patients respond to neoadjuvant therapy with T-level downstaging, there is no effective method of predicting which patients will respond. Molecular biomarkers have been investigated for their ability to predict outcome in LARC treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiation. A literature search using PubMed resulted in the initial assessment of 1,204 articles. Articles addressing the ability of a biomarker to predict outcome for LARC treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiation were included. Six biomarkers met the criteria for review: p53, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), thymidylate synthase, Ki-67, p21, and bcl-2/bax. On the basis of composite data, p53 is unlikely to have utility as a predictor of response. Epidermal growth factor receptor has shown promise as a predictor when quantitatively evaluated in pretreatment biopsies or when EGFR polymorphisms are evaluated in germline DNA. Thymidylate synthase, when evaluated for polymorphisms in germline DNA, is promising as a predictive biomarker. Ki-67 and bcl-2 are not useful in predicting outcome. p21 needs to be further evaluated to determine its usefulness in predicting outcome. Bax requires more investigation to determine its usefulness. Epidermal growth factor receptor, thymidylate synthase, and p21 should be evaluated in larger prospective clinical trials for their ability to guide preoperative therapy choices in LARC.

  5. Post operative stereotactic radiosurgery for positive or close margins after preoperative chemoradiation and surgery for rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dagoglu, Nergiz; Nedea, Elena; Poylin, Vitaliy; Nagle, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Background The incidence of positive margins after neoadjuvant chemoradiation and adequate surgery is very low. However, when patients do present with positive or close margins, they are at a risk of local failure and local therapy options are limited. We evaluated the role of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in patients with positive or close margins after induction chemoradiation and total mesorectal excision. Methods This is a retrospective evaluation of patients treated with SBRT after induction chemoradiation and surgery for positive or close margins. Seven evaluable patients were included. Fiducial seeds were place at surgery. The CyberknifeTM system was used for planning and treatment. Patients were followed 1 month after treatment and 3-6 months thereafter. Descriptive statistics and Kaplan-Meir method was used to repot the findings. Results Seven patients (3 men and 4 women) were included in the study with a median follow-up of 23.5 months. The median initial radiation dose was 5,040 cGy (in 28 fractions) and the median SBRT dose was 2,500 cGy (in 5 fractions). The local control at 2 years was 100%. The overall survival at 1 and 2 years was 100% and 71% respectively. There was no Grade III or IV toxicity. Conclusions SBRT reirradiation is an effective and safe method to address positive or close margins after neoadjuvant chemoradiation and surgery for rectal cancer. PMID:27284461

  6. Radiotherapy and chemoradiation after surgery for early cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Linda; Siu, Shing Shun N; Luesley, David; Bryant, Andrew; Dickinson, Heather O

    2014-01-01

    Background This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review first published in Issue 4, 2009. There is an ongoing debate about the indications for, and value of, adjuvant pelvic radiotherapy after radical surgery in women with early cervical cancer. Certain combinations of pathological risk factors are thought to represent sufficient risk for recurrence, that they justify the use of postoperative pelvic radiotherapy, though this has never been shown to improve overall survival, and use of more than one type of treatment (surgery and radiotherapy) increases the risks of side effects and complications. Objectives To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of adjuvant therapies (radiotherapy, chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy, chemoradiation) after radical hysterectomy for early-stage cervical cancer (FIGO stages IB1, IB2 or IIA). Search methods For the original review, we searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Issue 4, 2008. The Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Group Trials Register, MEDLINE (January 1950 to November 2008), EMBASE (1950 to November 2008). We also searched registers of clinical trials, abstracts of scientific meetings, reference lists of included studies and contacted experts in the field. For this update, we extended the database searches to September 2011 and searched the MetaRegister for ongoing trials. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared adjuvant therapies (radiotherapy, chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy, or chemoradiation) with no radiotherapy or chemoradiation, in women with a confirmed histological diagnosis of early cervical cancer who had undergone radical hysterectomy and dissection of the pelvic lymph nodes. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently abstracted data and assessed risk of bias. Information on grade 3 and 4 adverse events was collected from the trials. Results were pooled using random-effects meta-analyses. Main results Two RCTs

  7. Association of statin use with a pathologic complete response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation for rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, Matthew S.; Minsky, Bruce D. . E-mail: minskyb@mskcc.org; Saltz, Leonard B.; Riedel, Elyn; Chessin, David B.; Guillem, Jose G.

    2005-08-01

    Purpose: To assess whether 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, or statins, might enhance the efficacy of neoadjuvant chemoradiation in rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 1996 and 2001, 358 patients with clinically resectable, nonmetastatic rectal cancer underwent surgery at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center after neoadjuvant chemoradiation for either locally advanced tumors or low-lying tumors that would require abdominoperineal resection. We excluded 9 patients for radiation therapy dose <45 Gy or if statin use was unknown, leaving 349 evaluable patients. Median radiation therapy dose was 50.4 Gy (range, 45-55.8 Gy), and 308 patients (88%) received 5-flurouracil-based chemotherapy. Medication use, comorbid illnesses, clinical stage as assessed by digital rectal examination and ultrasound, and type of chemotherapy were analyzed for associations with pathologic complete response (pCR), defined as no microscopic evidence of tumor. Fisher's exact test was used for categoric variables, Mantel-Haenszel test for ordered categoric variables, and logistic regression for multivariate analysis. Results: Thirty-three patients (9%) used a statin, with no differences in clinical stage according to digital rectal examination or ultrasound compared with the other 324 patients. At the time of surgery, 23 nonstatin patients (7%) were found to have metastatic disease, compared with 0% for statin patients. The unadjusted pCR rates with and without statin use were 30% and 17%, respectively (p = 0.10). Variables significant univariately at the p = 0.15 level were entered into a multivariate model, as were nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), which were strongly associated with statin use. The odds ratio for statin use on pCR was 4.2 (95% confidence interval, 1.7-12.1; p = 0.003) after adjusting for NSAID use, clinical stage, and type of chemotherapy. Conclusion: In multivariate analysis, statin use is associated with an improved p

  8. A PHASE II STUDY OF A PACLITAXEL-BASED CHEMORADIATION REGIMEN WITH SELECTIVE SURGICAL SALVAGE FOR RESECTABLE LOCOREGIONALLY ADVANCED ESOPHAGEAL CANCER: INITIAL REPORTING OF RTOG 0246

    PubMed Central

    Swisher, Stephen G.; Winter, Kathryn A.; Komaki, Ritsuko U.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Wu, Tsung T.; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Konski, Andre A.; Willett, Christopher G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The strategy of definitive chemoradiation with selective surgical salvage in locoregionally advanced esophageal cancer was evaluated in a Phase II trial in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)-affiliated sites. Methods and Materials The study was designed to detect an improvement in 1-year survival from 60% to 77.5% (α= 0.05; power = 80%). Definitive chemoradiation involved induction chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) (650 mg/mg2/day), cisplatin (15 mg/mg2/day), and paclitaxel (200 mg/mg2/day) for two cycles, followed by concurrent chemoradiation with 50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/fraction) and daily 5-FU (300 mg/mg2/day) with cisplatin (15 mg/mg2/day) over the first 5 days. Salvage surgical resection was considered for patients with residual or recurrent esophageal cancer who did not have systemic disease. Results Forty-three patients with nonmetastatic resectable esophageal cancer were entered from Sept 2003 to March 2006. Forty-one patients were eligible for analysis. Clinical stage was ≥T3 in 31 patients (76%) and N1 in 29 patients (71%), with adenocarcinoma histology in 30 patients (73%). Thirty-seven patients (90%) completed induction chemotherapy followed by concurrent chemoradiation. Twenty-eight patients (68%) experienced Grade 3+ nonhematologic toxicity. Four treatment-related deaths were noted. Twenty-one patients underwent surgery following definitive chemoradiation because of residual (17 patients) or recurrent (3 patients) esophageal cancer,and 1 patient because of choice. Median follow-up of live patients was 22 months, with an estimated 1-year survival of 71%. Conclusions In this Phase II trial (RTOG 0246) evaluating selective surgical salvage after definitive chemoradiation in locoregionally advanced esophageal cancer, the hypothesized 1-year RTOG survival rate (77.5%) was not achieved (1 year, 71%; 95% confidence interval< 54%–82%). PMID:21507583

  9. Sacral Insufficiency Fractures After Preoperative Chemoradiation for Rectal Cancer: Incidence, Risk Factors, and Clinical Course

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, Michael P.; Kopetz, Scott; Bhosale, Priya R.; Eng, Cathy; Skibber, John M.; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.; Feig, Barry W.; Chang, George J.; Delclos, Marc E.; Krishnan, Sunil; Crane, Christopher H.; Das, Prajnan

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: Sacral insufficiency (SI) fractures can occur as a late side effect of pelvic radiation therapy. Our goal was to determine the incidence, risk factors, and clinical course of SI fractures in patients treated with preoperative chemoradiation for rectal cancer. Materials and Methods: Between 1989 and 2004, 562 patients with non-metastatic rectal adenocarcinoma were treated with preoperative chemoradiation followed by mesorectal excision. The median radiotherapy dose was 45 Gy. The hospital records and radiology reports of these patients were reviewed to identify those with pelvic fractures. Radiology images of patients with pelvic fractures were then reviewed to identify those with SI fractures. Results: Among the 562 patients, 15 had SI fractures. The 3-year actuarial rate of SI fractures was 3.1%. The median time to SI fractures was 17 months (range, 2-34 months). The risk of SI fractures was significantly higher in women compared to men (5.8% vs. 1.6%, p = 0.014), and in whites compared with non-whites (4% vs. 0%, p = 0.037). On multivariate analysis, gender independently predicted for the risk of SI fractures (hazard ratio, 3.25; p = 0.031). Documentation about the presence or absence of pain was available for 13 patients; of these 7 (54%) had symptoms requiring pain medications. The median duration of pain was 22 months. No patient required hospitalization or invasive intervention for pain control. Conclusions: SI fractures were uncommon in patients treated with preoperative chemoradiation for rectal cancer. The risk of SI fractures was significantly higher in women. Most cases of SI fractures can be managed conservatively with pain medications.

  10. Rectal Cancer: Mucinous Carcinoma on Magnetic Resonance Imaging Indicates Poor Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Oberholzer, Katja; Menig, Matthias; Kreft, Andreas; Schneider, Astrid; Junginger, Theodor; Heintz, Achim; Kreitner, Karl-Friedrich; Hoetker, Andreas M.; Hansen, Torsten; Dueber, Christoph; Schmidberger, Heinz

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To assess response of locally advanced rectal carcinoma to chemoradiation with regard to mucinous status and local tumor invasion found at pretherapeutic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods and Materials: A total of 88 patients were included in this prospective study of patients with advanced mrT3 and mrT4 carcinomas. Carcinomas were categorized by MRI as mucinous (mucin proportion >50% within the tumor volume), and as nonmucinous. Patients received neoadjuvant chemoradiation consisting of 50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/fraction) and 5-fluorouracil on Days 1 to 5 and Days 29 to 33. Therapy response was assessed by comparing pretherapeutic MRI with histopathology of surgical specimens (minimum distance between outer tumor edge and circumferential resection margin = CRM, T, and N category). Results: A mucinous carcinoma was found in 21 of 88 patients. Pretherapeutic mrCRM was 0 mm (median) in the mucinous and nonmucinous group. Of the 88 patients, 83 underwent surgery with tumor resection. The ypCRM (mm) at histopathology was significantly lower in mucinous carcinomas than in nonmucinous carcinomas (p {<=} 0.001). Positive resection margins (ypCRM {<=} 1 mm) were found more frequently in mucinous carcinomas than in nonmucinous ones (p {<=} 0.001). Treatment had less effect on local tumor stage in mucinous carcinomas than in nonmucinous carcinomas (for T downsizing, p = 0.012; for N downstaging, p = 0.007). Disease progression was observed only in patients with mucinous carcinomas (n = 5). Conclusion: Mucinous status at pretherapeutic MRI was associated with a noticeably worse response to chemoradiation and should be assessed by MRI in addition to local tumor staging to estimate response to treatment before it is initiated.

  11. Chemoradiation in pancreatic adenocarcinoma: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Roy, Rajarshi; Maraveyas, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the exocrine pancreas has an annual incidence of 7,400 cases in the U.K. In comparison with other common cancers of solid organs, namely, breast, colorectal, and prostate cancer, pancreatic cancer has a high morbidity and mortality. Radical resection is possible in only 15%-20% of patients, and only 3%-4% of all patients presenting with this condition achieve long-term control and cure. Various strategies in the form of neoadjuvant and adjuvant treatment have been employed over the years to improve outcome, with limited success. Systemic chemotherapy remains the gold standard in the metastatic setting in good performance status patients, and adjuvant chemotherapy after resection of localized and locally advanced cancer has been found to improve outcome. The role of radiotherapy, however, remains controversial and is an area that merits further investigation in well-conducted multicenter trials at various stages of the disease in combination with systemic agents and exploiting recent advances in the delivery of radiotherapy. In this article, we review the published literature on the use of chemoradiation as a modality in various stages of pancreatic adenocarcinoma and highlight areas that future trials in this field should target for a way forward in this malignancy. PMID:20203172

  12. Predictive Biomarkers to Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Conde-Muíño, Raquel; Cuadros, Marta; Zambudio, Natalia; Segura-Jiménez, Inmaculada; Cano, Carlos; Palma, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    There has been a high local recurrence rate in rectal cancer. Besides improvements in surgical techniques, both neoadjuvant short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiation improve oncological results. Approximately 40-60% of rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation achieve some degree of pathologic response. However, there is no effective method of predicting which patients will respond to neoadjuvant treatment. Recent studies have evaluated the potential of genetic biomarkers to predict outcome in locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The articles produced by the PubMed search were reviewed for those specifically addressing a genetic profile's ability to predict response to neoadjuvant treatment in rectal cancer. Although tissue gene microarray profiling has led to promising data in cancer, to date, none of the identified signatures or molecular markers in locally advanced rectal cancer has been successfully validated as a diagnostic or prognostic tool applicable to routine clinical practice. PMID:26504848

  13. Predictive Biomarkers to Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Conde-Muíño, Raquel; Cuadros, Marta; Zambudio, Natalia; Segura-Jiménez, Inmaculada; Cano, Carlos; Palma, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    There has been a high local recurrence rate in rectal cancer. Besides improvements in surgical techniques, both neoadjuvant short-course radiotherapy and long-course chemoradiation improve oncological results. Approximately 40–60% of rectal cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation achieve some degree of pathologic response. However, there is no effective method of predicting which patients will respond to neoadjuvant treatment. Recent studies have evaluated the potential of genetic biomarkers to predict outcome in locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The articles produced by the PubMed search were reviewed for those specifically addressing a genetic profile's ability to predict response to neoadjuvant treatment in rectal cancer. Although tissue gene microarray profiling has led to promising data in cancer, to date, none of the identified signatures or molecular markers in locally advanced rectal cancer has been successfully validated as a diagnostic or prognostic tool applicable to routine clinical practice. PMID:26504848

  14. Survival After Chemoradiation in Resected Pancreatic Cancer: The Impact of Adjuvant Gemcitabine

    SciTech Connect

    Baschnagel, Andrew; Shah, Chirag; Margolis, Jeffrey; Nadeau, Laura; Stein, Julie; Jury, Robert; Robertson, John M.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate survival in patients with resected pancreatic cancer treated with concurrent chemoradiation with or without adjuvant gemcitabine (Gem). Methods and Materials: From 1998 to 2010, 86 patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma who underwent resection were treated with adjuvant concurrent chemoradiation. Thirty-four patients received concurrent 5-fluorouracil-based chemoradiation (5-FU/RT) with traditional field radiation (range, 45-61.2 Gy; median, 50.4 Gy) without further adjuvant therapy. Thirty patients received traditional field 5-FU/RT (range, 45-60.4 Gy; median, 50.4 Gy) with Gem (1,000 mg/m{sup 2} weekly) either before and after radiotherapy or only after radiotherapy. Twenty-two patients received concurrent full-dose Gem (1,000 mg/m{sup 2} weekly)-based chemoradiation (Gem/RT), consisting of involved-field radiation (range, 27-38 Gy; median, 36 Gy) followed by further adjuvant Gem. Results: The median age of the cohort was 65 years (range, 40-80 years). Of the patients, 58 had T3 tumors (67%), 22 had T2 tumors (26%), and 6 had T1 tumors (7%). N1 disease was present in 61 patients (71%), whereas 18 patients (21%) had R1 resections. Performance status, lymph node status, and margin status were all similar among the treatment groups. Median follow-up was 19.0 months. Median overall survival (OS) (19.2 months, 19.0 months, and 21.0 months) and 3-year OS rates (26.5%, 27.2%, and 32.1%) were similar among patients with 5-FU/RT with no adjuvant Gem, those with 5-FU/RT with adjuvant Gem, and those with Gem/RT with adjuvant Gem, respectively (p = 0.88). Patients who received adjuvant Gem had a similar median OS (22.1 months) and 3-year OS rate (29%) compared to patients who did not (19.2 months and 26.5%, respectively) (p = 0.62). There was a trend for improved 3-year OS rates in patients with R0 vs. R1 resections (28.1% vs. 14.2%, p = 0.06) and in patients with T1 and T2 vs. T3 tumors (38% vs. 20%, p = 0.09). Node-negative patients had an improved 3

  15. Hypersensitivity reaction to cisplatin during chemoradiation therapy for gynecologic malignancy.

    PubMed

    Koren, Claude; Yerushalmi, Rinat; Katz, Alan; Malik, Hana; Sulkes, Aaron; Fenig, Eyal

    2002-12-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions to intravenous cisplatin are rare. The appearance of hypersensitivity reactions in 4 of 25 consecutive patients treated with concomitant pelvic radiation and weekly intravenous cisplatin for gynecologic malignancies is reported. The reactions appeared within hours of cisplatin delivery and included primarily fever, rash, and pruritus. Infection was ruled out by blood cultures and other laboratory studies. Affected patients were treated prophylactically with an antihistamine before subsequent courses of cisplatin, with excellent results. The high rate of hypersensitivity reactions in our series may be attributable to tumor necrosis and cytokine release caused by the pelvic irradiation. Clinicians should be aware of this potential side effect so that early premedication regimens can be instituted to prevent unnecessary toxicity. PMID:12478013

  16. Sequential chemoradiation in locally advanced head and neck cancer after induction chemotherapy: an induction chemotherapy schedule more suited to a limited resource setting

    PubMed Central

    Gangopadhyay, Aparna; Nath, Partha; Biswas, Jaydip

    2015-01-01

    Background In our experience, induction docetaxel, platinum, and fluorouracil (TPF) chemotherapy and sequential chemoradiation in locally advanced head and neck cancer lowers compliance owing to their considerable toxicity. Most of our head and neck cancer patients have locally advanced disease at presentation. Physicians frequently prefer paclitaxel–cisplatin induction chemotherapy instead, because of better patient tolerance. Materials and methods A total of 207 locally advanced head and neck cancer patients receiving paclitaxel and cisplatin prior to chemoradiation from November 2010 to October 2013 were studied retrospectively. Parameters like febrile neutropaenia, treatment compliance, and response rates were compared to our institutional retrospective data with TPF chemotherapy. Response was assessed by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumours (Recist) version 1.1. Toxicity was assessed by Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 4.0 during chemotherapy. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) acute toxicity criteria were used for assessment during chemoradiation. Results Febrile neutropaenia with paclitaxel– cisplatin was significantly lower 3.4% (7/207) versus 44.5% (73/164) with TPF chemotherapy (two-tailed P value < 0.0001). A 95.7 % (198/207) paclitaxel–cisplatin patients completed chemoradiation versus 87% with TPF. The difference was significant (two-tailed P value = 0.0070). Response rate at treatment completion with paclitaxel –cisplatin was 89.7% versus 88% with TPF chemotherapy. No significant differences were observed (two-tailed P value = 0.7007). Conclusion Induction paclitaxel and cisplatin with sequential chemoradiation in locally advanced head and neck cancer is more suitable in a limited resource setting. Lower toxicity, better compliance, and comparable response are encouraging in our study cohort. PMID:26082800

  17. KRAS Mutation Status and Clinical Outcome of Preoperative Chemoradiation With Cetuximab in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: A Pooled Analysis of 2 Phase II Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sun Young; Shim, Eun Kyung; Yeo, Hyun Yang; Baek, Ji Yeon; Hong, Yong Sang; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Tae Won; Kim, Jee Hyun; Im, Seock-Ah; Jung, Kyung Hae; Chang, Hee Jin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Cetuximab-containing chemotherapy is known to be effective for KRAS wild-type metastatic colorectal cancer; however, it is not clear whether cetuximab-based preoperative chemoradiation confers an additional benefit compared with chemoradiation without cetuximab in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: We analyzed EGFR, KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA mutation status with direct sequencing and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) expression status with immunohistochemistry in tumor samples of 82 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who were enrolled in the IRIX trial (preoperative chemoradiation with irinotecan and capecitabine; n=44) or the ERBIRIX trial (preoperative chemoradiation with irinotecan and capecitabine plus cetuximab; n=38). Both trials were similarly designed except for the administration of cetuximab; radiation therapy was administered at a dose of 50.4 Gy/28 fractions and irinotecan and capecitabine were given at doses of 40 mg/m{sup 2} weekly and 1650 mg/m{sup 2}/day, respectively, for 5 days per week. In the ERBIRIX trial, cetuximab was additionally given with a loading dose of 400 mg/m{sup 2} on 1 week before radiation, and 250 mg/m{sup 2} weekly thereafter. Results: Baseline characteristics before chemoradiation were similar between the 2 trial cohorts. A KRAS mutation in codon 12, 13, and 61 was noted in 15 (34%) patients in the IRIX cohort and 5 (13%) in the ERBIRIX cohort (P=.028). Among 62 KRAS wild-type cancer patients, major pathologic response rate, disease-free survival and pathologic stage did not differ significantly between the 2 cohorts. No mutations were detected in BRAF exon 11 and 15, PIK3CA exon 9 and 20, or EGFR exon 18-24 in any of the 82 patients, and PTEN and EGFR expression were not predictive of clinical outcome. Conclusions: In patients with KRAS wild-type locally advanced rectal cancer, the addition of cetuximab to the chemoradiation with

  18. [Retrospective analysis of 24 recurrent glioblastoma after chemoradiation and treated with nitrosoureas or irinotecan and bevacizumab].

    PubMed

    Vauleon, Elodie; Mesbah, Habiba; Gedouin, Daniel; Lecouillard, Isabelle; Louvel, Guillaume; Hamlat, Abderrahmane; Riffaud, Laurent; Carsin, Béatrice; Quillien, Véronique; Audrain, Odile; Lesimple, Thierry

    2012-02-01

    Despite progress in the initial management of glioblastoma (GB), the vast majority of patients will experience recurrence within 2-3 years. The medical treatment of these recurrences is being modified by the use of antiangiogenic therapies. Twenty-four patients, who relapsed from GB after chemoradiation followed by adjuvant temozolomide in Rennes, were treated by conventional chemotherapy (nitrosourea) or by the combination of irinotecan and bevacizumab. In this retrospective analysis, overall survival from diagnosis of recurrence was significantly longer in patients treated with the combination of bevacizumab and irinotecan than with nitrosourea (5 months versus 11.5 months). The combination of irinotecan and bevacizumab appeared to provide clinical benefit to patients with recurrent GB. PMID:22257744

  19. Sensitization of Pancreatic Cancers to Gemcitabine Chemoradiation by WEE1 Kinase Inhibition Depends on Homologous Recombination Repair12

    PubMed Central

    Kausar, Tasneem; Schreiber, Jason S.; Karnak, David; Parsels, Leslie A.; Parsels, Joshua D.; Davis, Mary A.; Zhao, Lili; Maybaum, Jonathan; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Morgan, Meredith A.

    2015-01-01

    To improve the efficacy of chemoradiation therapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer and begin to establish patient selection criteria, we investigated the combination of the WEE1 inhibitor AZD1775 with gemcitabine-radiation in homologous recombination (HR) repair proficient and deficient pancreatic cancers. Sensitization to gemcitabine-radiation by AZD1775 was assessed in pancreatic cancer cells by clonogenic survival and in patient-derived xenografts by tumor growth. The contributions of HR repair inhibition and G2 checkpoint abrogation to sensitization were assessed by γH2AX, BRCA2 manipulation, and RAD51 focus formation and pHistone H3 flow cytometry, respectively. We found that AZD1775 sensitized to gemcitabine-radiation in BRCA2 wild-type but not BRCA2 mutant pancreatic cancer cells. In all cells, AZD1775 caused inhibition of CDK1 phosphorylation and G2 checkpoint abrogation. However, sensitization by AZD1775 was associated with persistent γH2AX and inhibition of RAD51 focus formation. In HR-proficient (BRCA2 wild-type) or -deficient (BRAC2 null) isogenic cells, AZD1775 sensitized to gemcitabine-radiation in BRCA2 wild-type, but not in BRCA2 null cells, despite significant G2 checkpoint abrogation. In patient-derived pancreatic tumor xenografts, AZD1775 significantly inhibited tumor growth and impaired RAD51 focus formation in response to gemcitabine-radiation. In conclusion, WEE1 inhibition by AZD1775 is an effective strategy for sensitizing pancreatic cancers to gemcitabine chemoradiation. Although this sensitization is accompanied by inhibition of CDK1 phosphorylation and G2 checkpoint abrogation, this mechanism is not sufficient for sensitization. Our findings demonstrate that sensitization to chemoradiation by WEE1 inhibition results from inhibition of HR repair and suggest that patient tumors without underlying HR defects would benefit most from this therapy. PMID:26585231

  20. Drug Combinations in Preoperative Chemoradiation for Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Glynne-Jones, Rob; Carvalho, Carlos

    2016-07-01

    Preoperative radiotherapy has an accepted role in reducing the risk of local recurrence in locally advanced resectable rectal cancer, particularly when the circumferential resection margin is breached or threatened, according to magnetic resonance imaging. Fluoropyrimidine-based chemoradiation can obtain a significant down-sizing response and a curative resection can then be achieved. Approximately, 20% of the patients can also obtain a pathological complete response, which is associated with less local recurrences and increased survival. Patients who achieve a sustained complete clinical response may also avoid radical surgery. In unresectable or borderline resectable tumors, around 20% of the patients still fail to achieve a sufficient down-staging response with the current chemoradiation schedules. Hence, investigators have aspired to increase pathological complete response rates, aiming to improve curative resection rates, enhance survival, and potentially avoid mutilating surgery. However, adding additional cytotoxic or biological agents have not produced dramatic improvements in outcome and often led to excess surgical morbidity and higher levels of acute toxicity, which effects on compliance and in the global efficacy of chemoradiation. PMID:27238473

  1. Celiac Node Failure Patterns After Definitive Chemoradiation for Esophageal Cancer in the Modern Era

    SciTech Connect

    Amini, Arya; Xiao Lianchun; Allen, Pamela K.; Suzuki, Akihiro; Hayashi, Yuki; Liao, Zhongxing; Hofstetter, Wayne; Crane, Christopher; Komaki, Ritsuko; Bhutani, Manoop S.; Lee, Jeffrey H.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Welsh, James

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: The celiac lymph node axis acts as a gateway for metastatic systemic spread. The need for prophylactic celiac nodal coverage in chemoradiation therapy for esophageal cancer is controversial. Given the improved ability to evaluate lymph node status before treatment via positron emission tomography (PET) and endoscopic ultrasound, we hypothesized that prophylactic celiac node irradiation may not be needed for patients with localized esophageal carcinoma. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the radiation treatment volumes for 131 patients who underwent definitive chemoradiation for esophageal cancer. Patients with celiac lymph node involvement at baseline were excluded. Median radiation dose was 50.4 Gy. The location of all celiac node failures was compared with the radiation treatment plan to determine whether the failures occurred within or outside the radiation treatment field. Results: At a median follow-up time of 52.6 months (95% CI 46.1-56.7 months), 6 of 60 patients (10%) without celiac node coverage had celiac nodal failure; in 5 of these patients, the failures represented the first site of recurrence. Of the 71 patients who had celiac coverage, only 5 patients (7%) had celiac region relapse. In multivariate analyses, having a pretreatment-to-post-treatment change in standardized uptake value on PET >52% (odds ratio [OR] 0.198, p = 0.0327) and having failure in the clinical target volume (OR 10.72, p = 0.001) were associated with risk of celiac region relapse. Of those without celiac coverage, the 6 patients that later developed celiac failure had a worse median overall survival time compared with the other 54 patients who did not fail (median overall survival time: 16.5 months vs. 31.5 months, p = 0.041). Acute and late toxicities were similar in both groups. Conclusions: Although celiac lymph node failures occur in approximately 1 of 10 patients, the lack of effective salvage treatments and subsequent low morbidity may justify prophylactic treatment

  2. A Swallow Preservation Protocol Improves Function for Veterans Receiving Chemoradiation for Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Kevin A.; Kuan, Edward C.; Unger, Lindsey; Lorentz, William C.; Wang, Marilene B.; Long, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Determine the efficacy of a swallow preservation protocol (SPP) on maintaining swallow function in patients undergoing chemoradiation (CRT) or radiation therapy alone (RT) for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Study design Retrospective case series. Setting Veterans Affairs medical center. Subjects and Methods Patients treated with CRT or RT for HNSCC between February 2006 and November 2013 were studied. Those enrolled in the SPP participated in swallowing, jaw, and tongue exercises during cancer therapy. The comparator group received no swallowing intervention during CRT. A previously described functional outcome swallowing scale (FOSS; 0 = no symptoms and 5 = nonoral feeding for all nutrition) was used to quantify dysphagia prior to and at the completion of cancer therapy, and an analysis was performed to compare swallowing function. Results Forty-one (all male; mean age, 66 years) and 66 patients (all male; mean age, 61 years) were included in the SPP and comparator groups, respectively. In the SPP group, mean pre- and posttreatment FOSS scores were 2.2 and 2.2, respectively, while the corresponding scores in the comparator group were 1.8 and 2.7, respectively, with posttreatment FOSS scores being significantly worse than pre-treatment FOSS scores in the comparator group only. Conclusion Patients enrolled in the SPP demonstrated preserved swallowing function over the course of cancer treatment compared with a comparator group. This confirms the importance of early evaluation and intervention for dysphagia prior to and during CRT or RT alone. PMID:25829388

  3. Chemoradiation for the treatment of epidermoid anal cancer: 13-year follow-up of the first randomised UKCCCR Anal Cancer Trial (ACT I)

    PubMed Central

    Northover, J; Glynne-Jones, R; Sebag-Montefiore, D; James, R; Meadows, H; Wan, S; Jitlal, M; Ledermann, J

    2010-01-01

    Background: The first UKCCCR Anal Cancer Trial (1996) demonstrated the benefit of chemoradiation over radiotherapy (RT) alone for treating epidermoid anal cancer, and it became the standard treatment. Patients in this trial have now been followed up for a median of 13 years. Methods: A total of 577 patients were randomised to receive RT alone or combined modality therapy using 5-fluorouracil and mitomycin C. All patients were scheduled to receive 45 Gy by external beam irradiation. Patients who responded to treatment were recommended to have boost RT, with either an iridium implant or external beam irradiation. Data on relapse and deaths were obtained until October 2007. Results: Twelve years after treatment, for every 100 patients treated with chemoradiation, there are an expected 25.3 fewer patients with locoregional relapse (95% confidence interval (CI): 17.5–32.0 fewer) and 12.5 fewer anal cancer deaths (95% CI: 4.3–19.7 fewer), compared with 100 patients given RT alone. There was a 9.1% increase in non-anal cancer deaths in the first 5 years of chemoradiation (95% CI +3.6 to +14.6), which disappeared by 10 years. Conclusions: The clear benefit of chemoradiation outweighs an early excess risk of non-anal cancer deaths, and can still be seen 12 years after treatment. Only 11 patients suffered a locoregional relapse as a first event after 5 years, which may influence the choice of end points in future studies. PMID:20354531

  4. Analysis of Clinical and Dosimetric Factors Associated With Change in Renal Function in Patients With Gastrointestinal Malignancies After Chemoradiation to the Abdomen

    SciTech Connect

    May, Kilian Salerno; Khushalani, Nikhil I.; Chandrasekhar, Rameela; Wilding, Gregory E.; Iyer, Renuka V.; Ma, Wen W.; Flaherty, Leayn; Russo, Richard C. C.; Fakih, Marwan; Kuvshinoff, Boris W.; Gibbs, John F.; Javle, Milind M.; Yang, Gary Y.

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To analyze clinical and dosimetric factors associated with change in renal function in patients with gastrointestinal malignancies after chemoradiation to the abdomen. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review of 164 patients with gastrointestinal malignancies treated between 2002 and 2007 was conducted to evaluate change in renal function after concurrent chemotherapy and three-dimensional conformal abdominal radiotherapy (RT). Laboratory and biochemical endpoints were determined before RT and after RT at 6-month intervals. Factors assessed included smoking, diabetes, hypertension, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, creatinine clearance (CrCl), chemotherapy, and dose-volume parameters. Renal toxicity was assessed by decrease in CrCl and scored using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer late radiation morbidity scoring schema. Results: Of 164 patients, 63 had clinical and dosimetric data available. Median follow-up was 17.5 months. Creatinine clearance declined from 98.46 mL/min before RT to 74.20 mL/min one year after chemoradiation (p < 0.0001). Mean decrease in CrCl was 21.37%. Pre-RT CrCl, percentage of bilateral renal volume receiving at least 10 Gy (V{sub 10}), and mean kidney dose were significantly associated with development of Grade >=2 renal complications at 1 year after chemoradiation (p = 0.0025, 0.0170, and 0.0095, respectively). Conclusions: We observed correlation between pre-RT CrCl, V{sub 10}, and mean kidney dose and decline in CrCl 1 year after chemoradiation. These observations can assist in treatment planning and renal dose constraints in patients receiving chemotherapy and abdominal RT and may help identify patients at increased risk for renal complications.

  5. Cetuximab With Concurrent Chemoradiation for Esophagogastric Cancer: Assessment of Toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Safran, Howard Suntharalingam, Mohan; Dipetrillo, Thomas; Ng, Thomas; Doyle, L. Austin; Krasna, Mark; Plette, Angela; Evans, Devon; Wanebo, Harold; Akerman, Paul; Spector, Jeremy; Kennedy, Nancy; Kennedy, Teresa

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility and toxicity of the addition of cetuximab with paclitaxel, carboplatin, and radiation for patients with esophagogastric cancer on a Phase II study. Methods and Materials: Patients with locoregional esophageal and proximal gastric cancer without distant organ metastases were eligible. All patients received cetuximab, paclitaxel, and carboplatin weekly for 6 weeks with 50.4 Gy radiation. Results: Sixty patients were enrolled, 57 with esophageal cancer and 3 with gastric cancer. Forty-eight had adenocarcinoma and 12 had squamous cell cancer. Fourteen of 60 patients (23%) had Grade 3 dermatologic toxicity consisting of a painful, pruritic acneiform rash on the face outside of the radiation field. The rates of Grades 3 and 4 esophagitis were 12% and 3%, respectively. Three patients had Grade 3/4 cetuximab hypersensitivity reactions and were not assessable for response. Forty of 57 patients (70%) had a complete clinical response after chemoradiation. Conclusion: Cetuximab can be safely administered with chemoradiation for esophageal cancer. Dermatologic toxicity and hypersensitivity reactions were associated with the addition of cetuximab. There was no increase in esophagitis or other radiation-enhanced toxicity.

  6. Induction Therapy for Thymoma.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Usman; Huang, James

    2016-08-01

    Thymomas are uncommon tumors that can present as locally advanced tumors in approximately 30% of the patients. Stage and complete resection are the strongest prognostic factors. For locally advanced tumors, induction treatment may improve the ability to achieve a complete resection. Combination treatment with cisplatin, doxorubicin, and cyclophosphamide is the most commonly used induction regimen. Similar rates of resectability are noted with the use of induction chemotherapy and chemoradiation therapy; however, more tumor necrosis is noted with the addition of radiation. PMID:27427527

  7. Preoperative Chemoradiation for Rectal Cancer Using Capecitabine and Celecoxib Correlated With Posttreatment Assessment of Thymidylate Synthase and Thymidine Phosphorylase Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Unger, Keith R.; Romney, Davis A.; Koc, Mehmet; Moskaluk, Christopher A.; Friel, Charles M.; Foley, E.F.; Rich, Tyvin A.

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: Thymidylate synthase (TS) and thymidine phosphorylase (TP) expression have been shown to be predictors of response to therapy. The toxicity, efficacy, surgical morbidity, and immunohistochemical TS and TP expression were assessed in surgical resection specimens after preoperative chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients with clinical stage I to III rectal adenocarcinoma received preoperative chemoradiation and underwent surgical resection 6 weeks later. Results: Posttreatment tumor stages were T1 to T2 and N0 in 30% of patients; T3 to T4 and N0 in 30% of patients; and T1 to T3 and N1 to N2 in 15% of patients. Pathologic complete response (pCR) was evident in 25% and tumor regression occurred in a total of 80% of patients. Anal sphincter-sparing surgery was performed in 80% of cases. Acute and perioperative complications were minimal, with no grade 3/4 toxicity or treatment breaks. Pelvic control was obtained in 90% of patients. With a median follow-up of 65.5 months (range, 8-80 months), the 6-year actuarial survival rate was 75%. Local failure was significantly associated with nonresponse to therapy and with high TS and low TP expression (p = 0.008 and p = 0.04, respectively). Conclusions: The combination of capecitabine, celecoxib, and x-radiation therapy yields excellent response: a 25% pathologic pCR, no acute grade 3/4 toxicity, and minimal surgical morbidity. Nonresponders expressed significantly increased TS levels and decreased TP levels in posttreatment resection specimens compared to responders.

  8. The Role of Chemoradiation for Patients with Resectable or Potentially Resectable Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kimple, Randall J.; Russo, Suzanne; Monjazeb, Arta; Blackstock, A. William

    2013-01-01

    Conflicting data and substantial controversy exist regarding optimal adjuvant treatment for those patients with resectable or potentially resectable adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. Despite improvements in short-term surgical outcomes, the use of newer chemotherapeutic agents, development of targeted agents, and more precise delivery of radiation, the 5-year survival rates for early stage patients remains less than 25%. This article critically reviews the existing data for various adjuvant treatment approaches for patients with surgically resectable pancreatic cancer. Our review confirms that despite several randomized clinical trials, the optimal adjuvant treatment approach for these patients remains unclear. Summary Despite improvements in short-term surgical outcomes, use of newer chemotherapeutic agents, development of targeted agents, and more precise delivery of radiation, the 5-year survival rates for early stage patients remains less than 25%. Despite several randomized clinical trials in these patients, the optimal treatment approach remains unclear. We review data the data regarding adjuvant therapy for patients with early stage pancreas cancer and discuss potential tumor factors that can be used to select patients for optimal adjuvant therapy. The probability of long-term survival is higher in patients who undergo margin-negative resections but local and distant failures are common, indicating the need for adjuvant therapies. Improved systemic treatment is desperately needed and the role of adjuvant radiation remains unclear. Neoadjuvant chemoradiation is being studied as an alternative to postoperative therapy. Potential molecular targets have been identified and the benefit of the addition of biologic agents to adjuvant treatments is being explored. PMID:22500684

  9. Overcoming toxicity-challenges in chemoradiation for non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Concurrent chemoradiation (CCRT) is the treatment of choice for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with a modest survival benefit over sequential chemoradiation or radiotherapy (SCRT) alone. However, this benefit is at the cost of increasing acute toxicity such as esophagitis. Previous analysis revealed several predictive parameters in dose-volume and patient characteristics which helped us to identify those patients at risk for severe esophagus toxicity. As a result, supportive care interventions including individualized patient information, dietary guidance, adequate medication, hydration and tubefeeding could be initiated. This paper discusses the challenges in overcoming chemoradiation induced acute esophageal toxicity (AET). PMID:27413701

  10. The Quality-of-Life Effects of Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, Joseph M.; Narang, Amol K.; Griffith, Kent A.; Zalupski, Mark M.; Reese, Jennifer B.; Gearhart, Susan L.; Azad, Nolifer S.; Chan, June; Olsen, Leah; Efron, Jonathan E.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Ben-Josef, Edgar

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Existing studies that examine the effect of neoadjuvant chemoradiation (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer on patient quality of life (QOL) are limited. Our goals were to prospectively explore acute changes in patient-reported QOL endpoints during and after treatment and to establish a distribution of scores that could be used for comparison as new treatment modalities emerge. Methods and Materials: Fifty patients with locally advanced rectal cancer were prospectively enrolled at 2 institutions. Validated cancer-specific European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC QLQ-CR30) and colorectal cancer-specific (EORTC QLQ-CR38 and EORTC QLQ-CR 29) QOL questionnaires were administered to patients 1 month before they began CRT, at week 4 of CRT, and 1 month after they had finished CRT. The questionnaires included multiple symptom scales, functional domains, and a composite global QOL score. Additionally, a toxicity scale was completed by providers 1 month before the beginning of CRT, weekly during treatment, and 1 month after the end of CRT. Results: Global QOL showed a statistically significant and borderline clinically significant decrease during CRT (-9.50, P=.0024) but returned to baseline 1 month after the end of treatment (-0.33, P=.9205). Symptoms during treatment were mostly gastrointestinal (nausea/vomiting +9.94, P<.0001; and diarrhea +16.67, P=.0022), urinary (dysuria +13.33, P<.0001; and frequency +11.82, P=.0006) or fatigue (+16.22, P<.0001). These symptoms returned to baseline after therapy. However, sexual enjoyment (P=.0236) and sexual function (P=.0047) remained persistently diminished after therapy. Conclusions: Rectal cancer patients undergoing neoadjuvant CRT may experience a reduction in global QOL along with significant gastrointestinal and genitourinary symptoms during treatment. Moreover, provider-rated toxicity scales may not fully capture this decrease in patient-reported QOL. Although most symptoms are transient

  11. Liver Transplantation with Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation is More Effective than Resection for Hilar Cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Rea, David J.; Heimbach, Julie K.; Rosen, Charles B.; Haddock, Michael G.; Alberts, Steven R.; Kremers, Walter K.; Gores, Gregory J.; Nagorney, David M.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Compare survival after neoadjuvant therapy and liver transplantation with survival after resection for patients with hilar CCA. Summary Background Data: We developed a protocol combining neoadjuvant radiotherapy, chemosensitization, and orthotopic liver transplantation for patients with operatively confirmed stage I and II hilar CCA in 1993. Since then, patients with unresectable CCA or CCA arising in the setting of PSC have been enrolled in the transplant protocol. Patients with tumors amenable to resection have undergone excision of the extrahepatic duct with lymphadenectomy and liver resection. Methods: We reviewed our experience between January 1993 and August 2004 and compared patient survival between the treatment groups. Results: Seventy-one patients entered the transplant treatment protocol and 38 underwent liver transplantation. Fifty-four patients were explored for resection. Twenty-six (48%) underwent resection, and 28 (52%) had unresectable disease. One-, 3-, and 5-year patient survival were 92%, 82%, and 82% after transplantation and 82%, 48%, and 21% after resection (P = 0.022). There were fewer recurrences in the transplant patients (13% versus 27%). Conclusions: Liver transplantation with neoadjuvant chemoradiation achieved better survival with less recurrence than conventional resection and should be considered as an alternative to resection for patients with localized, node-negative hilar CCA. PMID:16135931

  12. Preoperative hyperfractionated chemoradiation for locally recurrent rectal cancer in patients previously irradiated to the pelvis: A multicentric phase II study

    SciTech Connect

    Valentini, Vincenzo . E-mail: vvalentini@rm.unicatt.it; Morganti, Alessio G.; Gambacorta, M. Antonietta; Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Doglietto, G. Battista; Coco, Claudio; De Paoli, Antonino; Rossi, Carlo; Di Russo, Annamaria; Valvo, Francesca; Bolzicco, Giampaolo; Dalla Palma, Maurizio

    2006-03-15

    -classification (F0: no side-wall involvement; F1, F2, F3: 1, 2, and 3-4 side-walls involved, respectively). Toxicity was evaluated on the basis of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) criteria. Results: Fifty-nine patients (38 male, 21 female; median age, 62 years; range, 43-77 years) were enrolled in the study, by 12 different Italian radiotherapy departments. Previous surgery was anterior resection in 45 patients (76.3%) and abdominal-perineal resection in 14 patients (23.7%); previous radiotherapy dosage ranged between 30 and 55 Gy (median, 50.4 Gy); the median interval between prior radiation therapy to the onset of reirradiation was 27 months (range, 9-106 months); 44 patients (74.6%) had received some form of previous chemotherapy (concurrent and/or adjuvant). Fifty-one of 59 patients (86.4%) completed chemoradiation without treatment interruptions: 6 patients (10.2%) had temporary treatment interruption due to toxicity or patient compliance, and 2 patients (3.4%) had definitive treatment interruption. The incidence of Grade 3 lower gastrointestinal acute toxicity was only 5.1%. No patient developed Grade 4 acute toxicity. After chemoradiation, 5 patients (8.5%) had complete response (CR), 21 patients (35.6%) had partial response (PR), 31 patients (52.6%) had no change (NC) and 2 patients (3.4%) showed progressive disease (PD). Overall, the response rate (PR + CR) was 44.1% (95% confidence interval, 29.0-58.9%). Twenty of 24 patients (83.3%) with pelvic pain before treatment had symptomatic response. Tumor resection was performed in 30 of 59 patients (50.8%) including 2 local excisions, 4 anterior resections, 18 abdominoperineal resections, and 6 other. Surgical resection resulted as R0 and R1 in 21 patients (35.6%) and 3 patients (5.1%), respectively. The possibility of radical resection was influenced by tumor response to chemoradiation (PD/NC: 7/33; PR/CR: 14/26; p = 0.009). Thirty-three patients received adjuvant chemotherapy, which was completed in 30 (50.8%). At

  13. Effectiveness of Chemoradiation for Head and Neck Cancer in an Older Patient Population

    SciTech Connect

    VanderWalde, Noam A.; Meyer, Anne Marie; Deal, Allison M.; Layton, J. Bradley; Liu, Huan; Carpenter, William R.; Weissler, Mark C.; Fleming, Mary E.; and others

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare chemoradiation therapy (CRT) with radiation therapy (RT) only in an older patient population with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database (1992-2007), we identified a retrospective cohort of nonmetastatic HNSCC patients and divided them into treatment groups. Comparisons were made between CRT and RT cohorts. Propensity scores for CRT were estimated from covariates associated with receipt of treatment using multivariable logistic regression. Standardized mortality ratio weights (SMRW) were created from the propensity scores and used to balance groups on measured confounders. Multivariable and SMR-weighted Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) of death for receipt of CRT versus RT among the whole group and for separate patient and tumor categories. Results: The final cohort of 10,599 patients was 68% male and 89% white. Median age was 74 years. Seventy-four percent were treated with RT, 26% were treated with CRT. Median follow-up points for CRT and RT survivors were 4.6 and 6.3 years, respectively. On multivariable analysis, HR for death with CRT was 1.13 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.07-1.20; P<.01). Using the SMRW model, the HR for death with CRT was 1.08 (95% CI: 1.02-1.15; P=.01). Conclusions: Although the addition of chemotherapy to radiation has proven efficacious in many randomized controlled trials, it may be less effective in an older patient population treated outside of a controlled trial setting.

  14. Outcome With Neck Dissection After Chemoradiation for N3 Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Igidbashian, Levon; Fortin, Bernard; Guertin, Louis; Soulieres, Denis; Coulombe, Genevieve; Belair, Manon; Charpentier, Danielle; Tabet, Jean-Claude; Nguyen-Tan, Phuc Felix

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of neck dissection (ND) after chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) with N3 disease. Methods and Materials: From March 1998 to September 2006, 70 patients with HNSCC and N3 neck disease were treated with concomitant CRT as primary therapy. Response to treatment was assessed using clinical examination and computed tomography 6 to 8 weeks posttreatment. Neck dissection was not routinely performed and considered for those with less than complete response. Of the patients, 26 (37.1%) achieved clinical complete response (cCR) after CRT. A total of 31 (44.3%) underwent ND after partial response (cPR-ND). Thirteen patients (29.5%) did not achieve cCR and did not undergo ND for the following reasons: incomplete response/progression at primary site, refusal/contraindication to surgery, metastatic progression, or death. These patients were excluded from the analysis. Outcomes were computed using Kaplan-Meier curves and were compared with log rank tests. Results: Comparing the cCR and cPR-ND groups at 2 years, the disease-free survival was respectively 62.7% and 84.9% (p = 0.048); overall survival was 63.0% and 79.4% (p = 0.26), regional relapse-free survival was 87.8% and 96.0% (p = 0.21); and distant disease-free survival was 67.1% and 92.6% (p = 0.059). In the cPR-ND group, 71.0% had no pathologic evidence of disease (PPV of 29.0%). Conclusions: Patients with N3 disease achieving regional cPR and primary cCR who underwent ND seemed to have better outcomes than patients achieving global cCR without ND. Clinical assessment with computed tomography is not adequate for evaluating response to treatment. Because of the inherent limitations of our study, further confirmatory studies are warranted.

  15. Alterations in Hormone Levels After Adjuvant Chemoradiation in Male Rectal Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Frederick H.; Perera, Francisco Fisher, Barbara; Stitt, Larry

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), and testosterone levels after postoperative chemoradiation in men with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty-three men with rectal cancer had baseline and postchemoradiation FSH, LH, and testosterone measured. Adjuvant chemoradiation consisted of two 5-day cycles of bolus 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) every 4 weeks at a dose of 500 mg/m{sup 2}/d followed by concurrent chemoradiation followed by two additional 5-day cycles of 5-FU at a dose of 450 mg/m{sup 2}/d. Continuous-infusion 5-FU at 225 mg/m{sup 2}/d was given during radiation. Pelvic radiation consisted of a three- or four-field technique with a median dose of 54.0 Gy in 30 fractions. Results: Median follow-up was 6.1 years. Mean baseline FSH levels increased from 5.3 to a peak of 23.9 IU/L (p < 0.001) 13-24 months after chemoradiation. Mean baseline LH levels increased from 4.3 to a peak of 8.5 IU/L (p < 0.001) within 6 months after chemoradiation. Mean testosterone levels decreased from 15.4 nmol/L at baseline to 8.0 nmol/L more than 4 years after chemoradiation. Mean testosterone to mean LH ratio decreased from 4.4 at baseline to 1.1 after 48 months posttreatment, suggesting a continued decrease in Leydig cell function with time. Testicular dose was measured in 5 patients. Median dose was 4 Gy (range, 1.5-8.9 Gy). Conclusions: Chemoradiation in men with rectal cancer causes persistent increases in FSH and LH levels and decreases in testosterone levels.

  16. The influence of number of high risk factors on clinical outcomes in patients with early-stage cervical cancer after radical hysterectomy and adjuvant chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Soyi; Lee, Seok-Ho; Park, Chan-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prognosis according to the number of high risk factors in patients with high risk factors after radical hysterectomy and adjuvant chemoradiation therapy for early stage cervical cancer. Methods Clinicopathological variables and clinical outcomes of patients with FIGO (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics) stage IB1 to IIA cervical cancer who had one or more high risk factors after radical hysterectomy and adjuvant chemoradiation therapy were retrospectively analyzed. Patients were divided into two groups according to the number of high risk factors (group 1, single high risk factor; group 2, two or more high risk factors). Results A total of 93 patients were enrolled in the present study. Forty nine out of 93 (52.7%) patients had a single high risk factor, and 44 (47.3%) had two or more high risk factors. Statistically significant differences in stage and stromal invasion were observed between group 1 and group 2. However, age, histology, tumor size, and lymphovascular space invasion did not differ significantly between the groups. Distant recurrence occurred more frequently in group 2, and the probability of recurrence and death was higher in group 2. Conclusion Patients with two or more high risk factors had worse prognosis in early stage cervical cancer. For these patients, consideration of new strategies to improve survival may be worthwhile. Conduct of further clinical trials is warranted for development of adjuvant treatment strategies individualized to each risk group. PMID:27200308

  17. Expression of Nuclear Transcription Factor Kappa B in Locally Advanced Human Cervical Cancer Treated With Definitive Chemoradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, Amit K.; Jhingran, Anuja; Klopp, Ann H.; Aggarwal, Bharat B.; Kunnumakkara, Ajai B.; Broadus, Russell R.; Eifel, Patricia J.; Buchholz, Thomas A.

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B), a transcriptional factor that has been shown to be constitutively active in cervical cancer, is part of an important pathway leading to treatment resistance in many tumor types. The purpose of our study was to determine whether expression of NF-{kappa}B in pretreatment specimens and specimens taken shortly after treatment initiation correlated with outcome in cervical cancer patients treated with definitive chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: Eighteen patients with locally advanced cervical cancer were enrolled in a study in which cervical biopsy specimens were obtained before radiation therapy and 48 h after treatment initiation. Matched biopsy specimens from 16 of these patients were available and evaluated for the nuclear expression of NF-{kappa}B protein by immunohistochemical staining. Results: After a median follow-up of 43 months, there were 9 total treatment failures. Nuclear staining for NF-{kappa}B was positive in 3 of 16 pretreatment biopsy specimens (19%) and 5 of 16 postradiation biopsy specimens (31%). Pretreatment expression of NF-{kappa}B nuclear staining correlated with increased rates of local-regional failure (100% vs. 23%, p = 0.01), distant failure (100% vs. 38%, p = 0.055), disease-specific mortality (100% vs. 31%, p = 0.03), and overall mortality (100% vs. 38%, p = 0.055). Conclusions: Our data suggest that pretreatment nuclear expression of NF-{kappa}B may be associated with a poor outcome for cervical cancer patients treated with chemoradiation. Although these data require validation in a larger group of patients, the results support the continued study of the relationship between NF-{kappa}B and outcome in patients treated for carcinoma of the cervix.

  18. Prevalence of swallowing and speech problems in daily life after chemoradiation for head and neck cancer based on cut-off scores of the patient-reported outcome measures SWAL-QOL and SHI.

    PubMed

    Rinkel, Rico N; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M; Doornaert, Patricia; Buter, Jan; de Bree, Remco; Langendijk, Johannes A; Aaronson, Neil K; Leemans, C René

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study is to assess swallowing and speech outcome after chemoradiation therapy for head and neck cancer, based on the patient-reported outcome measures Swallowing Quality of Life Questionnaire (SWAL-QOL) and Speech Handicap Index (SHI), both provided with cut-off scores. This is a cross-sectional study. Department of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery of a University Medical Center. Sixty patients, 6 months to 5 years after chemoradiation for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Swallowing Quality of Life Questionnaire (SWAL-QOL) and SHI, both validated in Dutch and provided with cut-off scores. Associations were tested between the outcome measures and independent variables (age, gender, tumor stage and site, and radiotherapy technique, time since treatment, comorbidity and food intake). Fifty-two patients returned the SWAL-QOL and 47 the SHI (response rate 87 and 78 %, respectively). Swallowing and speech problems were present in 79 and 55 %, respectively. Normal food intake was noticed in 45, 35 % had a soft diet and 20 % tube feeding. Patients with soft diet and tube feeding reported more swallowing problems compared to patients with normal oral intake. Tumor subsite was significantly associated with swallowing outcome (less problems in larynx/hypopharynx compared to oral/oropharynx). Radiation technique was significantly associated with psychosocial speech problems (less problems in patients treated with IMRT). Swallowing and (to a lesser extent) speech problems in daily life are frequently present after chemoradiation therapy for head and neck cancer. Future prospective studies will give more insight into the course of speech and swallowing problems after chemoradiation and into efficacy of new radiation techniques and swallowing and speech rehabilitation programs. PMID:26071622

  19. A Phase II Study of Fixed-Dose Rate Gemcitabine Plus Low-Dose Cisplatin Followed by Consolidative Chemoradiation for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Andrew H.; Venook, Alan P.

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: The optimal strategy for treating locally advanced pancreatic cancer remains controversial, including the respective roles and timing of chemotherapy and radiation. We conducted a Phase II nonrandomized trial to evaluate sequential chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation in this patient population. Methods and Materials: Chemotherapy naive patients with locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma were treated with fixed-dose rate gemcitabine (1,000 mg/m{sup 2} at 10 mg/m{sup 2}/min) plus cisplatin 20 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1 and 15 of a 28-day cycle. Those without evidence of extrapancreatic metastases after six cycles of chemotherapy received radiation (5,040 cGy over 28 fractions) with concurrent capecitabine (800 mg/m{sup 2} orally twice daily on the day of radiation) as a radiosensitizer. Results: A total of 25 patients were enrolled with a median follow-up time of 656 days. Twelve patients (48%) successfully received all six cycles of chemotherapy plus chemoradiation. Eight patients (32%) progressed during chemotherapy, including 7 with extrapancreatic metastases. Grade 3/4 hematologic toxicities were uncommon. Two patients sustained myocardial infarctions during chemotherapy, and 4 were hospitalized for infectious complications, although none in the setting of neutropenia. Median time to progression was 10.5 months and median survival was 13.5 months, with an estimated 1-year survival rate of 62%. Patients receiving all components of therapy had a median survival of 17.0 months. Conclusions: A strategy of initial fixed-dose rate gemcitabine-based chemotherapy, followed by chemoradiation, shows promising efficacy for treatment of locally advanced disease. A substantial proportion of patients will be identified early on as having extrapancreatic disease and spared the potential toxicities associated with radiation.

  20. Multi-institutional Pooled Analysis on Adjuvant Chemoradiation in Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Morganti, Alessio G.; Falconi, Massimo; Stiphout, Ruud G.P.M. van; Mattiucci, Gian-Carlo; Alfieri, Sergio; Calvo, Felipe A.; Dubois, Jean-Bernard; Fastner, Gerd; Herman, Joseph M.; Maidment, Bert W.; Miller, Robert C.; Regine, William F.; Reni, Michele; Sharma, Navesh K.; Ippolito, Edy; and others

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: To determine the impact of chemoradiation therapy (CRT) on overall survival (OS) after resection of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: A multicenter retrospective review of 955 consecutive patients who underwent complete resection with macroscopically negative margins (R0-1) for invasive carcinoma (T1-4; N0-1; M0) of the pancreas was performed. Exclusion criteria included metastatic or unresectable disease at surgery, macroscopic residual disease (R2), treatment with intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT), and a histological diagnosis of no ductal carcinoma, or postoperative death (within 60 days of surgery). In all, 623 patients received postoperative radiation therapy (RT), 575 patients received concurrent chemotherapy (CT), and 462 patients received adjuvant CT. Results: Median follow-up was 21.0 months. Median OS after adjuvant CRT was 39.9 versus 24.8 months after no adjuvant CRT (P<.001) and 27.8 months after CT alone (P<.001). Five-year OS was 41.2% versus 24.8% with and without postoperative CRT, respectively. The positive impact of CRT was confirmed by multivariate analysis (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.72; confidence interval [CI], 0.60-0.87; P=.001). Adverse prognostic factors identified by multivariate analysis included the following: R1 resection (HR = 1.17; CI = 1.07-1.28; P<.001), higher pT stage (HR = 1.23; CI = 1.11-1.37; P<.001), positive lymph nodes (HR = 1.27; CI = 1.15-1.41; P<.001), and tumor diameter >20 mm (HR = 1.14; CI = 1.05-1.23; P=.002). Multivariate analysis also showed a better prognosis in patients treated in centers with >10 pancreatic resections per year (HR = 0.87; CI = 0.78-0.97; P=.014) Conclusion: This study represents the largest comparative study on adjuvant therapy in patients after resection of carcinoma of the pancreas. Overall survival was better in patients who received adjuvant CRT.

  1. Clinical value of routine serum squamous cell carcinoma antigen in follow-up of patients with locally advanced cervical cancer treated with radiation or chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jinju; Lee, Hyun Joo; Lee, Tae Sung; Kim, Ju Hyun; Koh, Suk Bong

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical benefits of routine squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC-Ag) monitoring of patients with locally advanced cervical squamous cell carcinoma treated with radiation or chemoradiation. Methods A total of 53 patients with recurrent cervical squamous cell carcinoma treated with radiotherapy or chemoradiation were enrolled in this study. A retrospective review of medical records was conducted. The role of routine monitoring of serum SCC-Ag was evaluated in terms of cost effectiveness and effect on survival after diagnosis of recurrence. Results Serum SCC-Ag abnormality (≥2.5 ng/mL) was observed in 62.3% of patients when recurrent disease was diagnosed. The first indicator of relapse was abnormal serum SCC-Ag level in 21 patients (39.6%), 10 of whom had asymptomatic recurrent disease amenable to salvage therapy. Adding SCC-Ag measurement to the basic follow up protocol improved the sensitivity for detecting recurrence (The sensitivity of the basic protocol vs. addition of SCC-Ag: 49.1% vs. 88.7%, P<0.001). Twenty-three patients who were candidates for salvage therapy with curative intent showed better survival compared with those who were not candidates for therapy (5-year survival: 36.6% vs. 0%, P=0.012). Conclusion Surveillance with routine serum SCC-Ag monitoring can better detect asymptomatic recurrent disease that is potentially amenable to salvage therapy with curative intent. Early diagnosis of recurrent disease that can be treated with salvage therapy may lead to better survival. PMID:27462593

  2. Prognostic value of pretherapy platelet elevation in oropharyngeal cancer patients treated with chemoradiation.

    PubMed

    Shoultz-Henley, Sara; Garden, Adam S; Mohamed, Abdallah S R; Sheu, Tommy; Kroll, Michael H; Rosenthal, David I; Gunn, G Brandon; Hayes, Amos J; French, Chloe; Eichelberger, Hillary; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Smith, Blaine D; Phan, Jack; Ayoub, Zeina; Lai, Stephen Y; Pham, Brian; Kies, Merrill; Gold, Kathryn A; Sturgis, Erich; Fuller, Clifton D

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate potential associations between increased platelets and oncologic outcomes in oropharyngeal cancer patients receiving concurrent chemoradiation. A total of 433 oropharyngeal cancer patients (OPC) treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with concurrent chemotherapy between 2002 and 2012 were included under an approved IRB protocol. Complete blood count (CBC) data were extracted. Platelet and hemoglobin from the last phlebotomy (PLTpre-chemoRT, Hgbpre-chemoRT ) before start of treatment were identified. Patients were risk-stratified using Dahlstrom-Sturgis criteria and were tested for association with survival and disease-control outcomes. Locoregional control (LRC), freedom from distant metastasis (FDM) and overall survival (OS) were decreased (p < 0.03, p < 0.04 and p < 0.0001, respectively) for patients with PLTpre-chemoRT value of ≥350 × 10(9) /L. Actuarial 5-year locoregional control (LRC) and FDM were 83 and 85% for non-thrombocythemic patients while patient with high platelets had 5-year LRC and FDM of 73 and 74%, respectively. Likewise, 5-year OS was better for patients with normal platelet counts by comparison (76 vs. 57%; p < 0.0001). Comparison of univariate parametric models demonstrated that PLTpre-chemoRT was better among tested models. Multivariate assessment demonstrated improved performance of models which included pretherapy platelet indices. On Bayesian information criteria analysis, the optimal prognostic model was then used to develop nomograms predicting 3-, 5- and 10-year OS. In conclusion, pretreatment platelet elevation is a promising predictor of prognosis, and further work should be done to elucidate the utility of antiplatelets in modifying risk in OPC patients. PMID:26414107

  3. Phase II Study of Consolidation Chemotherapy After Concurrent Chemoradiation in Cervical Cancer: Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Chel Hun; Lee, Jeong-Won; Kim, Tae-Joong; Kim, Woo Young; Nam, Hee Rim; Kim, Byoung-Gie . E-mail: huna0@naver.com; Huh, Seung Jae; Lee, Je-Ho; Bae, Duk-Soo

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: Our aim was to determine the efficacy of consolidation chemotherapy after concurrent chemoradiation (CCRT) using high-dose-rate brachytherapy in patients with locally advanced cervical carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Patients with cervical carcinoma (FIGO stage IB2-IVA) were treated with external beam radiation therapy to the whole pelvis (50.4 Gy) and high-dose-rate brachytherapy (24 Gy to point A). Cisplatin 60 mg/m{sup 2} (Day 1) and 5-fluorouracil 1000 mg/m{sup 2} (Days 1-5) were given every 3 weeks starting concurrently with the radiation and followed by 3 more cycles of consolidation for a total of 6 cycles. Results: Thirty patients (94%) received 3 more cycles of post-CCRT consolidation chemotherapy and were evaluable for the toxicity and efficacy of consolidation. The most common toxicities of Grade 2 or higher were nausea or vomiting (47%) and anemia (33%). Late complications of the rectum and bladder occurred in 13% and 6% of the patients, respectively. The clinical complete response rate was 87% (95% CI, 75%-99%). During a median follow-up of 27 months (range, 6-58 months), 5 patients (17%) had recurrence; the sites of failure were 3 (10%) inside the radiation field and 2 (7%) outside the radiation field. The estimated 3-year progression-free survival rate was 83% (95% CI, 67%-99%) and overall survival rate was 91% (95% CI, 79%-100%). Conclusions: Consolidation chemotherapy after CCRT is well tolerated and effective in patients with locally advanced cervical carcinoma. A prospective randomized trial to compare this treatment strategy with standard CCRT seems to be worthwhile.

  4. Definitive chemoradiation for primary oral cavity carcinoma: A single institution experience

    PubMed Central

    Scher, Eli D.; Romesser, Paul B.; Chen, Christine; Ho, Felix; Wuu, Yen; Sherman, Eric J.; Fury, Matthew G.; Wong, Richard J.; McBride, Sean; Lee, Nancy Y.; Riaz, Nadeem

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objectives While surgery with or without adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) is the standard of care for oral cavity cancer (OCC), a select group requires nonsurgical treatment. We provide a single-institution experience using definitive chemotherapy and RT for primary OCC. Materials and methods We examined 73 patients with previously untreated, non-metastatic primary OCC treated definitively from 1990 to 2011. There were 39 male and 34 female, with a median age of 63 years (range, 35–89). The disease distribution was Stage I and II (7% each), Stage III (14%), and Stage IV (73%). Oral tongue was the most common (48%), followed by floor of mouth (19%), retromolar trigone (13.7%), and others (8.2%). Median tumor dose was 70 Gy. Sixty-two percent of patients (n = 45) were treated with concurrent chemotherapy, predominantly platinum-based. Results Median follow-up among surviving patients was 73.1 months (interquartile range 14.2– 81.4 months). Actuarial 5-year overall survival was 15%. Incidences of locoregional and distant failures were 41.1% and 20.5%, respectively. Kaplan-Meier estimated 5-year rates of locoregional control and freedom from distant metastasis were 37% and 70%, respectively. Mucositis was the most common ≥ Grade 3 acute toxicity (49%). Incidences of Grade 3 late dysphagia and trismus were 15% and 13%, respectively. Conclusion This study demonstrates over 20 years of experience using definitive chemoradiation for OCC at our institution. Our results illustrate the challenges in treating patients with advanced disease who are not surgical candidates, and the need for adequate and early treatment to prevent distant disease and improve survival outcomes. PMID:25958830

  5. Chemoradiation with capecitabine and mitomycin-C for stage I-III anal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Standard therapy for patients with stage I-III squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the anal canal is chemo-radiotherapy with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and mitomycin C (MMC). While there is limited published evidence to substitute capecitabine (CAP) for 5-FU, the objectives of the study were to describe the toxicity, dose intensity and outcomes of a sequential cohort of patients treated with chemo-radiotherapy with CAP and MCC in a population-based setting. Methods Patients with stage I-III malignancies of the anal canal referred between February 2010 and March 2012 were included. Dose intensity was calculated by comparing delivered versus planned radiation and chemotherapy treatments and toxicity was retrospectively graded according to standard protocol-specified criteria. Results Among 66 eligible patients, median planned dose of radiation was 51.9 Gy over 5.5 weeks, range 25.0 to 63 Gy, and dose intensity was 98%. Median delivered dose of MCC delivered was 12 mg/m2 on day one, week one while median CAP dose was 825 mg/m2 twice daily on radiation days. CAP dose reductions due to toxicity were recorded for 13 patients (20%). Median follow-up was 20 months and 94% of patients with squamous cell histology had no evidence of relapse. Conclusions Chemo-radiation with CAP plus MMC is well tolerated and may be a reasonable consideration for patients with stage I-III SCC of the anal canal. A range of planned radiation dose was observed and longer follow-up is necessary to ensure that patients who received lower doses of radiation have similar outcomes to those who received larger doses. PMID:24885554

  6. Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation for Distal Rectal Cancer: 5-Year Updated Results of a Randomized Phase 2 Study of Neoadjuvant Combined Modality Chemoradiation for Distal Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Paulus, Rebecca; Mitchell, Edith; Hanna, Nader; Yuen, Albert; Nichols, Romaine; Yalavarthi, Salochna; Hayostek, Cherie; Willett, Christopher

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of 2 different approaches to neoadjuvant chemoradiation for distal rectal cancers. Methods and Materials: One hundred six patients with T3/T4 distal rectal cancers were randomized in a phase 2 study. Patients received either continuous venous infusion (CVI) of 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU), 225 mg/m{sup 2} per day, 7 days per week plus pelvic hyperfractionated radiation (HRT), 45.6 Gy at 1.2 Gy twice daily plus a boost of 9.6 to 14.4 Gy for T3 or T4 cancers (Arm 1), or CVI of 5-FU, 225 mg/m{sup 2} per day, Monday to Friday, plus irinotecan, 50 mg/m{sup 2} once weekly × 4, plus pelvic radiation therapy (RT), 45 Gy at 1.8 Gy per day and a boost of 5.4 Gy for T3 and 9 Gy for T4 cancers (Arm 2). Surgery was performed 4 to 10 weeks later. Results: All eligible patients (n=103) are included in this analysis; 2 ineligible patients were excluded, and 1 patient withdrew consent. Ninety-eight of 103 patients (95%) underwent resection. Four patients did not undergo surgery for either disease progression or patient refusal, and 1 patient died during induction chemotherapy. The median time of follow-up was 6.4 years in Arm 1 and 7.0 years in Arm 2. The pathological complete response (pCR) rates were 30% in Arm 1 and 26% in Arm 2. Locoregional recurrence rates were 16% in Arm 1 and 17% in Arm 2. Five-year survival rates were 61% and 75% and Disease-specific survival rates were 78% and 85% for Arm1 and Arm 2, respectively. Five second primaries occurred in patients on Arm 1, and 1 second primary occurred in Arm 2. Conclusions: High rates of disease-specific survival were seen in each arm. Overall survival appears affected by the development of unrelated second cancers. The high pCR rates with 5-FU and higher dose radiation in T4 cancers provide opportunity for increased R0 resections and improved survival.

  7. Radiation-Related Predictors of Hematologic Toxicity After Concurrent Chemoradiation for Cervical Cancer and Implications for Bone Marrow-Sparing Pelvic IMRT

    SciTech Connect

    Albuquerque, Kevin; Giangreco, David; Morrison, Courtney; Siddiqui, Mohammed; Sinacore, Jim; Potkul, Ronald; Roeske, John

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To determine factors predictive for hematologic toxicity (HT) associated with concurrent chemoradiation for Stage II through IV cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: The medical records of 40 women receiving concurrent chemoradiation for cervical cancer were reviewed. Hematologic toxicity was defined by use of Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (version 3.0). Variables predicting for HT including age, body mass index, transfusions, and bone marrow volumes irradiated were included in the data analysis. Results: Of the patients, 13 (32.5%) had Grade 0 or 1 HT and 27 (67.5%) had Grade 2 through 4 HT (HT2+). Multiple logistic regression analysis of potential predictors showed that only the volume of bone receiving 20 Gy (V20) for whole pelvic bone tended toward significance for predicting HT2+. A strong correlation was noted between HT2+ and V20 (r = 0.8, p < 0.0001). A partitioning analysis to predict HT2+ showed a cutoff value of 79.42% (approximately 80%) for V20 of whole pelvic bone. That is, if the V20 of the whole pelvis exceeds 80%, the risk of HT2+ developing increases by a factor (odds ratio) of 4.5 (95%, confidence interval, 1.08-18.69) (p < 0.05). Conclusions: We have shown a correlation between bone marrow volume radiated and development of HT. This has implications for use of pelvic intensity-modulated radiation therapy, which can potentially decrease the volume of bone marrow radiated.

  8. Outcomes of Adjuvant Chemoradiation After Pancreaticoduodenectomy With Mesenterico-Portal Vein Resection for Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Hristov, Boris; Reddy, Sushanth; Lin, Steven H.; Cameron, John L.; Pawlik, Timothy M.; Hruban, Ralph H.; Swartz, Michael J.; Edil, Barish H.; Kemp, Clinton; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Herman, Joseph M.

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: Surgery followed by chemotherapy and radiation (CRT) offers patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma a chance for extended survival. In some patients, however, resection is difficult because of vascular involvement by the carcinoma, necessitating resection and grafting of the mesenterico-portal vessels. The purpose of this study was to compare outcomes between pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) with and without mesenterico-portal vein resection (VR) in patients receiving adjuvant CRT for pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: Between 1993 and 2005, 160 patients underwent PD with 5-FU-based adjuvant CRT followed by maintenance chemotherapy at the Johns Hopkins Hospital; 20 (12.5%) of the 160 underwent VR. Clinical outcomes, including median survival, overall survival, and complication rates were assessed for both groups. Results: Patients who underwent VR had significantly longer operative times (p = 0.009), greater intraoperative blood loss (p = 0.01), and longer postoperative lengths of stay (p = 0.03). However, postoperative morbidity, median survival, and overall survival rates were similar between the two groups. Most patients (70%) from both groups were able to complete CRT, and a subgroup analysis demonstrated no appreciable differences in terms of complications. None of the VR patients who received adjuvant CRT developed veno-occlusive disease or graft failure/leakage. Conclusion: In a cohort of patients treated with adjuvant 5-FU-based CRT at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, having a VR at the time of PD resulted in similar complication rates and survival. These data support the feasibility and safety of adjuvant CRT in patients undergoing VR at the time of PD.

  9. Molecular Genetic Changes Associated With Colorectal Carcinogenesis Are Not Prognostic for Tumor Regression Following Preoperative Chemoradiation of Rectal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zauber, N. Peter Marotta, Steven P.; Berman, Errol; Grann, Alison; Rao, Maithili; Komati, Naga; Ribiero, Kezia; Bishop, D. Timothy

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: Preoperative chemotherapy and radiation has become the standard of care for many patients with rectal cancer. The therapy may have toxicity and delays definitive surgery. It would therefore be desirable to identify those cancers that will not regress with preoperative therapy. We assessed a series of rectal cancers for the molecular changes of loss of heterozygosity of the APC and DCC genes, K-ras mutations, and microsatellite instability, changes that have clearly been associated with rectal carcinogenesis. Methods and Materials: Diagnostic colonoscopic biopsies from 53 patients who received preoperative chemotherapy and radiation were assayed using polymerase chain reaction techniques followed by single-stranded conformation polymorphism and DNA sequencing. Regression of the primary tumor was evaluated using the surgically removed specimen. Results: Twenty-three lesions (45%) were found to have a high degree of regression. None of the molecular changes were useful as indicators of regression. Conclusions: Recognized molecular changes critical for rectal carcinogenesis including APC and DCC loss of heterozygosity, K-ras mutations, and microsatellite instability are not useful as indicators of tumor regression following chemoradiation for rectal carcinoma.

  10. Relationship Between Low Hemoglobin Levels and Outcomes After Treatment With Radiation or Chemoradiation in Patients With Cervical Cancer: Has the Impact of Anemia Been Overstated?

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, Andrew J.; Allen, Pamela K.; Klopp, Ann H.; Meyer, Larissa A.; Eifel, Patricia J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Previous reports have suggested that anemia increases rates of recurrence after radiation therapy for cervical cancer. However, these studies may not have fully corrected for confounding risk factors. Using a well-characterized cohort of cervical cancer patients, we examined the association between anemia and outcomes before and after the introduction of chemoradiation as standard of care. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the records of 2454 patients who underwent definitive radiation therapy from 1980 through 2011. Minimum hemoglobin level (Hgb{sub min}) was recorded for 2359 patients (96%). Endpoints included freedom from central recurrence (FFCR), freedom from distant metastasis (FFDM), and disease-specific survival (DSS). Results: For the entire cohort, hemoglobin concentrations of 9, 10, and 12 g/dL before and during radiation were all significantly associated with FFCR, FFDM, and DSS (all P<.001) on univariate analysis. However, on multivariate analysis, only Hgb{sub min} less than 10 g/dL during RT (RT-Hgb{sub <10}) remained significant, and it was correlated with lower DSS (P=.02, hazard ratio [HR] = 1.28) and FFDM (P=.03, HR = 1.33) but not with FFCR. In a subset analysis of patients receiving chemoradiation (n=678), RT-Hgb{sub <10} was associated only with DSS (P=.008, HR = 1.49), not with FFCR or FFDM. In this subgroup, despite an association between RT-Hgb{sub <10} and DSS, the use of transfusion was not correlated with benefit. Conclusions: No evidence was found supporting anemia as an independent predictor of central recurrence in patients treated with definitive radiation therapy with or without chemotherapy. Less emphasis on correcting anemia in cervical cancer patients may be warranted.

  11. Phase 2 Study of Erlotinib Combined With Adjuvant Chemoradiation and Chemotherapy in Patients With Resectable Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, Joseph M.; Fan, Katherine Y.; Wild, Aaron T.; Hacker-Prietz, Amy; Wood, Laura D.; Blackford, Amanda L.; Ellsworth, Susannah; Zheng, Lei; Le, Dung T.; De Jesus-Acosta, Ana; Hidalgo, Manuel; Donehower, Ross C.; Schulick, Richard D.; Edil, Barish H.; Choti, Michael A.; Hruban, Ralph H.; and others

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: Long-term survival rates for patients with resected pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) have stagnated at 20% for more than a decade, demonstrating the need to develop novel adjuvant therapies. Gemcitabine-erlotinib therapy has demonstrated a survival benefit for patients with metastatic PDAC. Here we report the first phase 2 study of erlotinib in combination with adjuvant chemoradiation and chemotherapy for resected PDAC. Methods and Materials: Forty-eight patients with resected PDAC received adjuvant erlotinib (100 mg daily) and capecitabine (800 mg/m{sup 2} twice daily Monday-Friday) concurrently with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), 50.4 Gy over 28 fractions followed by 4 cycles of gemcitabine (1000 mg/m{sup 2} on days 1, 8, and 15 every 28 days) and erlotinib (100 mg daily). The primary endpoint was recurrence-free survival (RFS). Results: The median follow-up time was 18.2 months (interquartile range, 13.8-27.1). Lymph nodes were positive in 85% of patients, and margins were positive in 17%. The median RFS was 15.6 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 13.4-17.9), and the median overall survival (OS) was 24.4 months (95% CI, 18.9-29.7). Multivariate analysis with adjustment for known prognostic factors showed that tumor diameter >3 cm was predictive for inferior RFS (hazard ratio, 4.01; P=.001) and OS (HR, 4.98; P=.02), and the development of dermatitis was associated with improved RFS (HR, 0.27; P=.009). During CRT and post-CRT chemotherapy, the rates of grade 3/4 toxicity were 31%/2% and 35%/8%, respectively. Conclusion: Erlotinib can be safely administered with adjuvant IMRT-based CRT and chemotherapy. The efficacy of this regimen appears comparable to that of existing adjuvant regimens. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0848 will ultimately determine whether erlotinib produces a survival benefit in patients with resected pancreatic cancer.

  12. Treatment of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: The Role of Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Johung, Kimberly; Saif, Muhammad Wasif; Chang, Bryan W.

    2012-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains associated with an extremely poor prognosis. Surgical resection can be curative, but the majority of patients present with locally advanced or metastatic disease. Treatment for patients with locally advanced disease is controversial. Therapeutic options include systemic therapy alone, concurrent chemoradiation, or induction chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation. We review the evidence to date regarding the treatment of locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), as well as evolving strategies including the emerging role of targeted therapies. We propose that if radiation is used for patients with LAPC, it should be delivered with concurrent chemotherapy and following a period of induction chemotherapy.

  13. Primary resection versus neoadjuvant chemoradiation followed by resection for locally resectable or potentially resectable pancreatic carcinoma without distant metastasis. A multi-centre prospectively randomised phase II-study of the Interdisciplinary Working Group Gastrointestinal Tumours (AIO, ARO, and CAO)

    PubMed Central

    Brunner, Thomas B; Grabenbauer, Gerhard G; Meyer, Thomas; Golcher, Henriette; Sauer, Rolf; Hohenberger, Werner

    2007-01-01

    Background The disappointing results of surgical therapy alone of ductal pancreatic cancer can only be improved using multimodal approaches. In contrast to adjuvant therapy, neoadjuvant chemoradiation is able to facilitate resectability with free margins and to lower lymphatic spread. Another advantage is better tolerability which consecutively allows applying multimodal treatment in a higher number of patients. Furthermore, the synopsis of the overall survival results of neoadjuvant trials suggests a higher rate compared to adjuvant trials. Methods/Design As there are no prospectively randomised studies for neoadjuvant therapy, the Interdisciplinary Study Group of Gastrointestinal Tumours of the German Cancer Aid has started such a trial. The study investigates the effect of neoadjuvant chemoradiation in locally resectable or probably resectable cancer of the pancreatic head without distant metastasis on median overall survival time compared to primary surgery. Adjuvant chemotherapy is integrated into both arms. Discussion The protocol of the study is presented in condensed form after an introducing survey on adjuvant and neoadjuvant therapy in pancreatic cancer. PMID:17338829

  14. Small Bowel Dose Parameters Predicting Grade ≥3 Acute Toxicity in Rectal Cancer Patients Treated With Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation: An Independent Validation Study Comparing Peritoneal Space Versus Small Bowel Loop Contouring Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Robyn; Chakraborty, Santam; Nygren, Ian; Sinha, Richie

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To determine whether volumes based on contours of the peritoneal space can be used instead of individual small bowel loops to predict for grade ≥3 acute small bowel toxicity in patients with rectal cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A standardized contouring method was developed for the peritoneal space and retrospectively applied to the radiation treatment plans of 67 patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy for rectal cancer. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) data were extracted and analyzed against patient toxicity. Receiver operating characteristic analysis and logistic regression were carried out for both contouring methods. Results: Grade ≥3 small bowel toxicity occurred in 16% (11/67) of patients in the study. A highly significant dose-volume relationship between small bowel irradiation and acute small bowel toxicity was supported by the use of both small bowel loop and peritoneal space contouring techniques. Receiver operating characteristic analysis demonstrated that, for both contouring methods, the greatest sensitivity for predicting toxicity was associated with the volume receiving between 15 and 25 Gy. Conclusion: DVH analysis of peritoneal space volumes accurately predicts grade ≥3 small bowel toxicity in patients with rectal cancer receiving neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy, suggesting that the contours of the peritoneal space provide a reasonable surrogate for the contours of individual small bowel loops. The study finds that a small bowel V15 less than 275 cc and a peritoneal space V15 less than 830 cc are associated with a less than 10% risk of grade ≥3 acute toxicity.

  15. In Vitro and In Vivo Enhancement of Chemoradiation Using the Oral PARP Inhibitor ABT-888 in Colorectal Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shelton, Joseph W.; Waxweiler, Timothy V.; Landry, Jerome; Gao, Huiying; Xu, Yanbo; Wang, Lanfang; El-Rayes, Bassel; Shu, Hui-Kuo G.

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase plays a critical role in the recognition and repair of DNA single-strand breaks and double-strand breaks (DSBs). ABT-888 is an orally available inhibitor of this enzyme. This study seeks to evaluate the use of ABT-888 combined with chemotherapy and radiation therapy (RT) in colorectal carcinoma models. Methods and Materials: RT clonogenic assays were performed on HCT116 and HT29 cells treated with 5-fluorouracil, irinotecan, or oxaliplatin with or without ABT. The surviving fraction at 2 Gy and dose-modifying factor at 10% survival were analyzed. Synergism was assessed by isobologram analysis for combination therapies. γH2AX and neutral comet assays were performed to assess the effect of therapy on DSB formation/repair. In vivo assessments were made by use of HCT116 cells in a xenograft mouse model. Tumor growth delay was measured at a volume of 500 mm{sup 3}. Results: Both lines were radiosensitized by ABT alone, and ABT further increased chemotherapy dose-modifying factors to the 1.6 to 1.8 range. All combinations were synergistic (combination indices <0.9). ABT treatment significantly increased DSB after RT (γH2AX, 69% vs 43%; P=.017) and delayed repair. We found tumor growth delays of 7.22 days for RT; 11.90 days for RT and ABT; 13.5 days for oxaliplatin, RT, and ABT; 14.17 days for 5-fluorouracil, RT, and ABT; and 23.81 days for irinotecan, RT, and ABT. Conclusion: ABT-888 radiosensitizes at similar or higher levels compared with classic chemotherapies and acts synergistically with these chemotherapies to enhance RT effects. In vivo confirmation of these results indicates a potential role for combining its use with existing chemoradiation regimens.

  16. The role of surgery in locally advanced carcinoma of cervix after sub-optimal chemoradiation: Indian scenario

    PubMed Central

    Kundargi, Rajshekar S.; Guruprasad, B.; Hanumantappa, Nikesh; Rathod, Praveen Shankar; Devi, Uma K.; Bafna, U. D.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Standard treatment of advanced cervical cancer is concurrent chemoradiation. Radical radiotherapy for carcinoma cervix includes pelvic external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) with the concomitant platinum based chemotherapy followed by intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) to boost central disease. Management of patients who are suboptimally treated, especially, after unsuccessful ICBT insertion is not well-defined. This study explores the role of hysterectomy in these patients. Materials and Methods: From January 2006 to December 2011, 38 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, in whom ICBT insertion was unsuccessful, were analyzed retrospectively. Operable patients with no parametrial involvement underwent hysterectomy and outcomes (recurrence free and overall survival) were noted. Results: The major complications in post operative period were wound infection, paralytic ileus and bladder atony all of which were conservatively managed with no mortality. At median follow-up of 36 months (range 12-60 months) there was no recurrence in patients with stage 1B2 and stage IIA, 25 out of 38 (65.8%) were event free and the overall survival was 71%. Conclusion: Many patients in Indian scenario receive suboptimal therapy in locally advanced cervical cancer. EBRT with chemotherapy followed by type 1 extra-fascial hysterectomy can be a good alternative for these patients. PMID:24455590

  17. Concurrent Chemoradiation With Carboplatin-5-Fluorouracil Versus Cisplatin in Locally Advanced Oropharyngeal Cancers: Is More Always Better?

    SciTech Connect

    Barkati, Maroie; Fortin, Bernard; Soulieres, Denis; Clavel, Sebastien; Despres, Phillipe; Charpentier, Danielle; Tabet, Jean-Claude; Guertin, Louis; Olivier, Marie-Jo; Coulombe, Genevieve; Donath, David; Nguyen-Tan, Phuc Felix

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: The optimal chemotherapy regimen remains undefined in the treatment of locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer by concomitant chemoradiation. This article compares two platinum-based chemotherapy regimens. Methods and Materials: In this retrospective study, we reviewed all consecutive patients treated for Stage III or IVA-B oropharyngeal cancer using either a combination of carboplatin and 5-fluorouracil (5FU) every 3 weeks or high-dose cisplatin every 3 weeks concomitant with definitive radiation therapy. Results: A total of 200 patients were treated with carboplatin-5FU and 53 patients with cisplatin. Median potential follow-up was 43 months. The 3-year overall survival rates for carboplatin-5FU and cisplatin respectively were 79.1% and 74.9% (p = 0.628), the 3-year disease-free survival rates were 76.0% and 71.3% (p = 0.799), and the 3-year locoregional control rates were 88.4% and 94.2% (p = 0.244). Conclusions: We could not demonstrate differences between these two regimens, which both proved efficacious. Polychemotherapy and monochemotherapy therefore seem comparable in this retrospective analysis.

  18. Clinically Meaningful Differences in Patient-Reported Outcomes With Amifostine in Combination With Chemoradiation for Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: An Analysis of RTOG 9801

    SciTech Connect

    Sarna, Linda Swann, Suzanne; Langer, Corey; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Nicolaou, Nicos; Komaki, Ritsuko; Machtay, Mitchell; Byhardt, Roger; Wasserman, Todd; Movsas, Benjamin

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to analyze changes in quality of life (QOL) and symptoms from pretreatment to 6 weeks posttreatment in a Phase III randomized study (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9801) of amifostine (AM) vs. no AM in patients with Stages II-III non-small-cell lung cancer receiving paclitaxel and carboplatin as induction and then concurrently with hyperfractionated radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: One hundred thirty-eight patients with baseline and 6-week posttreatment QOL data were analyzed. There were no significant differences in baseline demographics between those who did and did not have QOL data. The QOL and symptoms were assessed by using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Global QOL and Pain subscales and the EORTC-Lung Cancer-13 symptom tool. Clinically relevant changes in QOL were characterized by 10-point differences in individual scores pre/post treatment. A daily diary of patient-rated difficulty swallowing and a weekly physician-rated dysphagia log (using National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria) were completed during treatment. Weight loss was monitored. Differences in outcomes were examined according to smoking status, alcohol use, and sex. Results: Patients receiving AM reported significantly greater pain reduction after chemoradiation (34% vs. no AM, 21%), less difficulty swallowing during chemoradiation, and less weight loss than patients not receiving AM. However, physician-rated assessments of dysphagia were not significantly different by treatment arm. There were no other significant changes in QOL or symptoms according to treatment arm, smoking status, alcohol use, or sex. Conclusions: Patient evaluations of difficulty swallowing and pain suggest benefits from AM use that are distinct from clinician-rated assessments.

  19. The integration of oral capecitabine into chemoradiation regimens for locally advanced rectal cancer: how successful have we been?

    PubMed

    Glynne-Jones, R; Dunst, J; Sebag-Montefiore, D

    2006-03-01

    The aim was to review available literature on capecitabine-based chemoradiation regimens for the preoperative treatment of patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) and determine efficacy and safety data for capecitabine in this setting. Medical literature databases (Pubmed, Medline) and abstracts/posters presented at recent scientific congresses (ASCO, ASTRO, ESTRO and ECCO) were screened and critically analysed to identify relevant data. A number of phase I/II studies have demonstrated that capecitabine is effective and well tolerated in combination with preoperative radiotherapy in patients with LARC. Phase III studies are ongoing. Continuous oral administration of capecitabine (825 mg/m(2) twice daily for 7 days/week) is an effective regimen and has similar tolerability to the less dose-intensive intermittent regimens of capecitabine given 5 days/week followed by 2 day's rest or 14 days followed by 7 day's rest as used in systemic chemotherapy for patients with colorectal or breast cancer. Capecitabine chemoradiation is associated with a relatively low rate of grade 3/4 adverse events. Capecitabine simplifies chemoradiation and provides a convenient treatment option for both patients and health care professionals. Combining capecitabine with cytotoxic agents such as oxaliplatin and irinotecan has the potential to further improve antitumour efficacy in patients receiving preoperative chemoradiation. Data from phase I/II single-agent and combination capecitabine chemoradiation studies provide a clear rationale for replacing infusional 5-FU with oral capecitabine as part of chemoradiation for patients with LARC. PMID:16500912

  20. [Long-term sequelae after chemoradiation in head neck tumors].

    PubMed

    Schoch, Manuel; Broglie Däppen, Martina; Henke, Guido; Stöckli, Sandro

    2016-01-01

    The most common type of head and neck tumors are squamous cell cancer of the pharynx, the oral cavity and the larynx. These tumors can be treated by primary radio(chemo)therapy or surgery as well as a combination of both modalities depending on the site and extent of disease. This article will outline the recent developments in radiation therapy and give an overview of the potential long-term sequelae and their influencing factors. PMID:27132643

  1. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy prior to preoperative chemoradiation or radiation in rectal cancer: should we be more cautious?

    PubMed Central

    Glynne-Jones, R; Grainger, J; Harrison, M; Ostler, P; Makris, A

    2006-01-01

    before surgical resection. In contrast, the data in favour of NACT before radiation or chemoradiation (CRT) is inconclusive, despite the suggestion that response to induction chemotherapy can predict response to subsequent radiotherapy. The observation that spectacular responses to chemotherapy before radical radiotherapy did not result in improved survival, was noted 25 years ago. However, multiple trials in head and neck cancer, nasopharyngeal cancer, non-small-cell lung cancer, small-cell lung cancer and cervical cancer do not support the routine use of NACT either as an alternative, or as additional benefit to CRT. The addition of NACT does not appear to enhance local control over concurrent CRT or radiotherapy alone. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy before CRT or radiation should be used with caution, and only in the context of clinical trials. The evidence base suggests that concurrent CRT with early positioning of radiotherapy appears the best option for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer and in all disease sites where radiation is the primary local therapy. PMID:16465172

  2. Cardiovascular Morbidity After Radiotherapy or Chemoradiation in Patients With Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Maduro, John H.; Dekker, Helena A. den; Pras, Elisabeth; Vries, Elisabeth G. de; Zee, Ate G. van der; Klokman, Willem J.; Reyners, Anna K.; Leeuwen, Flora E. van; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Bock, Geertruida H. de; Gietema, Jourik A.

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the risk of cardiovascular events (CVE) in patients with cervical cancer treated with radiotherapy or chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: The incidence of CVE in patients treated between 1989 and 2002 by radiotherapy or chemoradiation was compared with a Dutch reference population. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for myocardial infarction (MI), angina pectoris (AP), congestive heart failure (CHF), cerebrovascular accident (CVA) separately and for any cardiac event combined (MI, AP, and CHF). Results: In 277 patients with a median follow-up of 4.5 years (range, 0.1-17 years) and a median survival of 9.2 years, 27 cardiac events occurred. The 5-, 10-, and 15-year actuarial incidence of any cardiac event were 9, 14, and 16%, respectively. For the whole population, the SIR for MI was elevated (2.05, 95% CI: 1.12-3.43). The radiotherapy group (n = 132) was older and had more cardiovascular risk factors than the chemoradiation group (n = 145). The SIR for MI in the radiotherapy group was 2.88 (95% CI: 1.44-5.15) and in the chemoradiation group 1.00 (95% CI: 0.21-7.47). In multivariate analyses, there was no relation between treatment modality and the risk for MI. Conclusions: In this cohort of cervical cancer patients, an increased risk for developing a MI was observed. This increased risk of MI, in combination with the high prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors in cervical cancer patients, urges the need to explore strategies to reduce their risk for cardiovascular morbidity.

  3. The role of targeted agents in preoperative chemoradiation for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Wadlow, Raymond C; Ryan, David P

    2010-08-01

    In the United States, randomized trials have established preoperative chemoradiation as the standard of care for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Pathologic complete response (pCR) rates occur in 10% to 16% of patients and have been shown to be correlated with both disease-free and overall survival. Therefore, recent efforts incorporating newer cytotoxic and molecularly targeted agents into chemoradiotherapy regimens have reported the pCR rate to be a surrogate marker of clinical outcomes. Substitution of oral fluoropyrimidines, including capecitabine, for infusional 5-fluorouracil reportedly generated pCR rates of up to 32% in phase 2 studies, but definitive evaluation awaits results from the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP) R-04 trial. Similarly, regimens incorporating irinotecan generated pCR rates as high as 38%, but to the authors' knowledge have not been evaluated in randomized trials. In contrast, 2 large randomized trials reported that the addition of weekly oxaliplatin to fluoropyrimidine-based chemoradiation led to an increase in grade 3/4 toxicity but no difference in pCR rates. Early phase trials evaluating the anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibody cetuximab in combination with chemoradiation reported modest pCR rates of 5% to 12%, and efforts have focused on identifying biomarkers of response including EGFR copy number, k-ras mutational status, and both serum and tumor-specific expression of EGFR ligands. Finally, incorporation of the anti-vascular endothelial growth factor antibody bevacizumab into chemoradiation appears to be safe and feasible, with initial studies reporting a beneficial effect on vascular normalization and correlations between circulating biomarkers of angiogenesis and pathologic response. Future efforts should include prospective studies of these agents in biomarker-defined subpopulations, as well as studies of novel agents that target angiogenesis, tumor-stromal interaction

  4. Focal adhesion kinase: predictor of tumour response and risk factor for recurrence after neoadjuvant chemoradiation in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Gómez Del Pulgar, Teresa; Cebrián, Arancha; Fernández-Aceñero, Maria Jesús; Borrero-Palacios, Aurea; Del Puerto-Nevado, Laura; Martínez-Useros, Javier; Marín-Arango, Juan Pablo; Caramés, Cristina; Vega-Bravo, Ricardo; Rodríguez-Remírez, María; Cruz-Ramos, Marlid; Manzarbeitia, Félix; García-Foncillas, Jesús

    2016-09-01

    Rectal cancer represents about 30% of colorectal cancers, being around 50% locally advanced at presentation. Chemoradiation (CRT) followed by total mesorectal excision is the standard of care for these locally advanced stages. However, it is not free of adverse effects and toxicity and the complete pathologic response rate is between 10% and 30%. This makes it extremely important to define factors that can predict response to this therapy. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) expression has been correlated with worse prognosis in several tumours and its possible involvement in cancer radio- and chemosensitivity has been suggested; however, its role in rectal cancer has not been analysed yet. To analyse the association of FAK expression with tumour response to CRT in locally advanced rectal cancer. This study includes 73 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer receiving standard neoadjuvant CRT followed by total mesorectal excision. Focal adhesion kinase protein levels were immunohistochemically analysed in the pre-treatment biopsies of these patients and correlated with tumour response to CRT and patients survival. Low FAK expression was significantly correlated with local and distant recurrence (P = 0.013). Low FAK expression was found to be a predictive marker of tumour response to neoadjuvant therapy (P = 0.007) and patients whose tumours did not express FAK showed a strong association with lower disease-free survival (P = 0.01). Focal adhesion kinase expression predicts neoadjuvant CRT response in rectal cancer patients and it is a clinically relevant risk factor for local and distant recurrence. PMID:27171907

  5. Phase 2 Trial of Induction Gemcitabine, Oxaliplatin, and Cetuximab Followed by Selective Capecitabine-Based Chemoradiation in Patients With Borderline Resectable or Unresectable Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Esnaola, Nestor F.; Chaudhary, Uzair B.; O'Brien, Paul; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Camp, E. Ramsay; Thomas, Melanie B.; Cole, David J.; Montero, Alberto J.; Hoffman, Brenda J.; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Orwat, Kelly P.; Marshall, David T.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate, in a phase 2 study, the safety and efficacy of induction gemcitabine, oxaliplatin, and cetuximab followed by selective capecitabine-based chemoradiation in patients with borderline resectable or unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer (BRPC or LAPC, respectively). Methods and Materials: Patients received gemcitabine and oxaliplatin chemotherapy repeated every 14 days for 6 cycles, combined with weekly cetuximab. Patients were then restaged; “downstaged” patients with resectable disease underwent attempted resection. Remaining patients were treated with chemoradiation consisting of intensity modulated radiation therapy (54 Gy) and concurrent capecitabine; patients with borderline resectable disease or better at restaging underwent attempted resection. Results: A total of 39 patients were enrolled, of whom 37 were evaluable. Protocol treatment was generally well tolerated. Median follow-up for all patients was 11.9 months. Overall, 29.7% of patients underwent R0 surgical resection (69.2% of patients with BRPC; 8.3% of patients with LAPC). Overall 6-month progression-free survival (PFS) was 62%, and median PFS was 10.4 months. Median overall survival (OS) was 11.8 months. In patients with LAPC, median OS was 9.3 months; in patients with BRPC, median OS was 24.1 months. In the group of patients who underwent R0 resection (all of which were R0 resections), median survival had not yet been reached at the time of analysis. Conclusions: This regimen was well tolerated in patients with BRPC or LAPC, and almost one-third of patients underwent R0 resection. Although OS for the entire cohort was comparable to that in historical controls, PFS and OS in patients with BRPC and/or who underwent R0 resection was markedly improved.

  6. Chemoradiation With Paclitaxel and Carboplatin in High-Risk Cervical Cancer Patients After Radical Hysterectomy: A Korean Gynecologic Oncology Group Study

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Taek Sang; Kang, Soon Beom; Kim, Young Tak; Park, Byung Joo; Kim, Yong Man; Lee, Jong Min; Kim, Seok Mo; Kim, Young Tae; Kim, Jae Hoon; Kim, Kyung Tai

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of concurrent chemoradiation with paclitaxel and carboplatin in patients with high-risk cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients after radical hysterectomy for cervical cancer, with at least 1 high-risk characteristic, were administered paclitaxel 135 mg/m{sup 2}, carboplatin area under the curve = 5 every 3 weeks for 3 cycles concomitant with radiation therapy as adjuvant treatment. Results: This prospective study enrolled 71 consecutive patients. Sixty-six patients (93%) completed the planned treatment. The majority of grade 3/4 neutropenia or nonhematologic toxicities were usually self-limited. Diarrhea grades 3/4 were observed in 4 patients (5.6%). One patient developed anaphylactic shock after infusion of paclitaxel. With a median follow-up of 57 months, recurrences occurred in 16 patients. Multivariable analysis indicated that common iliac lymph node involvement is an independent risk factor for disease recurrence (odds ratio 13.48; 95% confidence interval 2.93-62.03). In the intent-to-treat population (n=71), the estimated 5-year disease-free survival and overall survival rates were 77.3% and 80.3% respectively. In the per-protocol population (n=62), disease-free survival was 78.9% and overall survival was 83.9%. Conclusions: Concurrent chemoradiation with paclitaxel/carboplatin is well tolerated and seems to be effective for patients who undergo radical hysterectomy. Therefore, a prospective, randomized controlled study should be designed to evaluate efficacy of this approach for patients with high-risk cervical cancer.

  7. Adjuvant Chemoradiation for Gastric Cancer Using Epirubicin, Cisplatin, and 5-Fluorouracil Before and After Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy With Concurrent Infusional 5-Fluorouracil: A Multicenter Study of the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group

    SciTech Connect

    Leong, Trevor; Joon, Daryl Lim; Willis, David; Jayamoham, Jayasingham; Spry, Nigel; Harvey, Jennifer; Di Iulio, Juliana; Milner, Alvin; Mann, G. Bruce; Michael, Michael

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: The INT0116 study has established postoperative chemoradiotherapy as the standard of care for completely resected gastric adenocarcinoma. However, the optimal chemoradiation regimen remains to be defined. We conducted a prospective, multicenter study to evaluate an alternative chemoradiation regimen that combines more current systemic treatment with modern techniques of radiotherapy delivery. Methods and Materials: Patients with adenocarcinoma of the stomach who had undergone an R0 resection were eligible. Adjuvant therapy consisted of one cycle of epirubicin, cisplatin, and 5-FU (ECF), followed by radiotherapy with concurrent infusional 5-FU, and then two additional cycles of ECF. Radiotherapy was delivered using precisely defined, multiple-field, three-dimensional conformal techniques. Results: A total of 54 assessable patients were enrolled from 19 institutions. The proportion of patients commencing Cycles 1, 2, and 3 of ECF chemotherapy were 100%, 81%, and 67% respectively. In all, 94% of patients who received radiotherapy completed treatment as planned. Grade 3/4 neutropenia occurred in 66% of patients with 7.4% developing febrile neutropenia. Most neutropenic episodes (83%) occurred in the post-radiotherapy period during cycles 2 and 3 of ECF. Grade 3/4 gastrointestinal toxicity occurred in 28% of patients. In all, 35% of radiotherapy treatment plans contained protocol deviations that were satisfactorily amended before commencement of treatment. At median follow-up of 36 months, the 3-year overall survival rate was estimated at 61.6%. Conclusions: This adjuvant regimen using ECF before and after three-dimensional conformal chemoradiation is feasible and can be safely delivered in a cooperative group setting. A regimen similar to this is currently being compared with the INT0116 regimen in a National Cancer Institute-sponsored, randomized Phase III trial.

  8. Chemoradiation Therapy and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-24

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  9. Neoadjuvant chemoradiation versus perioperative chemotherapy followed by surgery in resectable adenocarcinomas of the esophagogastric junction: A retrospective single center analysis

    PubMed Central

    SCHULZE, BJÖRN; BERGIS, DOMINIK; BALERMPAS, PANAGIOTIS; TROJAN, JÖRG; WOESTE, GUIDO; BECHSTEIN, WOLF OTTO; RÖDEL, CLAUS; WEISS, CHRISTIAN

    2014-01-01

    The current study presents a retrospective comparison, performed at a single academic center, of preoperative chemoradiation (CRT) and perioperative chemotherapy (CT) in addition to surgery in locally advanced but resectable adenocarcinoma of the esophagogastric junction (AEG). A total of 29 consecutive patients with locally advanced AEGs were retrospectively analyzed. Treatment consisted of preoperative CRT (mean dose, 45.0 Gy) plus two cycles of CT with cisplatin and 5-FU or perioperative CT with epirubicin, cisplatin and capecitabine (three cycles preoperatively and postoperatively). Within four to six weeks following preoperative treatment, surgical therapy was performed. Median overall survival was 21.0 months in the perioperative CT group versus 41.7 months in the CRT group [P=0.36; hazard ratio (HR), 1.50; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.58–3.84]. Three-year survival rates were 55 and 38%, respectively, in favor of the CRT group, and progression-free survival was 20.0 months in the CT group compared with 24.1 months in the CRT group (P=0.71; HR, 1.19; 95% CI, 0.46–3.05). The total number of major surgical complications was almost equal in the two groups. Margin-free resections were achieved in all patients of the CRT group, but only 76.9% of the CT group (P=0.05). In addition, significantly higher R0 resection rates and an increased number of pathological complete remissions were demonstrated in the CRT group compared with those of the CT group. These results appear to indicate a trend for improved progression-free and overall survival for the CRT group. As postoperative morbidity and mortality rates were similar in the two groups, the results support the use of CRT for patients with advanced AEG tumors. PMID:24396483

  10. Long-Term Regional Control in the Observed Neck Following Definitive Chemoradiation for Node-Positive Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Goenka, Anuj; Morris, Luc G.T.; Rao, Shyam S.; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Wong, Richard J.; Kraus, Dennis H.; Ohri, Nisha; Setton, Jeremy; Lok, Benjamin H.; Riaz, Nadeem; Mychalczak, Borys R.; Schoder, Heiko; Ganly, Ian; Shah, Jatin P.; Pfister, David G.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Lee, Nancy Y.

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, patients treated with chemoradiotherapy for node-positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (N+ OPSCC) have undergone a planned neck dissection (ND) after treatment. Recently, negative post-treatment positron-emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) imaging has been found to have a high negative predictive value for the presence of residual disease in the neck. Here we present the first comprehensive analysis of a large, uniform cohort of N+ OPSCC patients achieving a PET/CT-based complete response (CR) after chemoradiotherapy, and undergoing observation, rather than ND. From 2002 to 2009, 302 patients with N+ OPSCC treated with 70 Gy intensity-modulated radiation therapy and concurrent chemotherapy underwent post-treatment clinical assessment including PET/CT. CR was defined as no evidence of disease on clinical examination and post-treatment PET/CT. ND was reserved for patients with chemoradiation, based on clinical and PET/CT assessment, have a high probability of regional control, with a 2.3% regional failure rate, and may be safely observed without planned ND. PMID:23436584

  11. Neoadjuvant chemoradiation followed by orthotopic liver transplantation in cholangiocarcinomas: the emory experience

    PubMed Central

    Landry, Jerome C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a bile duct tumor with a grim prognosis. The median survival after radiotherapy of unresectable disease is 9-12 months. The following is a review of our experience with neoadjuvant (NEO) chemoradiation followed by orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) for CCA. Methods Ten patients with CCAs were selected as candidates for NEO-OLT between 2008-2011. Patients with unresectable CCA above the cystic duct without intra or extrahepatic metastases were eligible. Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) patients were included due to their poor resection response. Patients initially received external-beam radiation [via conventional fields or volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT)] plus capecitabine (XEL) or 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), followed by either Iridium192 (Ir192) brachytherapy high dose rate (HDR) or external boost. 5-FU or XEL was administered until OLT. Patients underwent periodic surveillance computed tomography (CT)/MRIs after OLT. Primary endpoints included actuarial rates (AR)/crude rates (CR) of overall survival (OS), and local control (LC) at 6, 12, and 24 months. Results Five males and five females were identified. Mean age was 58.3 years (range, 38-71 years). Mean composite radiation dose delivered was 59.0 Gy (range, 54-71.4 Gy). Forty percent of patients had an HDR boost. Fifty percent of patients received XEL during NEO. Two patients were excluded from the analysis as they did not go on to OLT due to metastases (n=1) and death due to GI bleed (n=1). Thirty-eight percent of the OLT patients had a pathological complete response (pCR) after NEO, while 25% required a Whipple due to positive margins. Median follow-up for the OLT group was 23 months (range, 6.5-37 months). Six, twelve, and twenty-four months LC AR was 100%. LC CR was 100% at longest interval (30 months). Six, twelve, and twenty-four months OS AR was 100%, 87.5%, and 87.5%, respectively. Mean OS AR was 30.2 months (95% CI: 22.8-37.7). OS CR was 75% at longest

  12. Chemoradiation With Concomitant Boosts Followed by Radical Surgery in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer: Long-term Results of the ROMA-2 Prospective Phase 2 Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrandina, Gabriella; Gambacorta, Antonietta; Gallotta, Valerio; Smaniotto, Daniela; Fagotti, Anna; Tagliaferri, Luca; Foti, Elvira; Fanfani, Francesco; Autorino, Rosa; Scambia, Giovanni; Valentini, Vincenzo

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: This prospective, phase 2 study aimed at assessing the efficacy of accelerated fractionation radiation therapy by concomitant boosts (CBs) associated with chemoradiation therapy (CRT) of the whole pelvis, in improving the rate of pathological complete response (pCR) to treatment in patients with International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IB2-IVA locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Neoadjuvant CRT included conformal irradiation of the whole pelvis with a total dose of 39.6 Gy (1.8 cGy/fraction, 22 fractions), plus additional irradiation of primary tumor and parametria with 10.8 Gy administered with CBs (0.9 cGy/fraction, 12 fractions, every other day). Concomitant chemotherapy included cisplatin (20 mg/m{sup 2}, days 1-4 and 26-30 of treatment), and capecitabine (1300 mg/m{sup 2}/daily, orally) during the first 2 and the last 2 weeks of treatment. Radical hysterectomy plus pelvic with or without aortic lymphadenectomy was performed within 6 to 8 weeks from CRT. Toxicity was recorded according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group toxicity criteria and Chassagne grading system. Based on the Simon design, 103 cases were required, and the regimen would be considered active if >45 pCR were registered (α error = 0.05; β error = 0.1). Results: pCR was documented in 51 cases (50.5%), and the regimen was considered active, according to the planned statistical assumptions. At median follow-up of 36 months (range: 7-85 months), the 3-year local failure rate was 7%, whereas the 3-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 73.0% and 86.1%, respectively. Grade 3 leukopenia and neutropenia were reported in only 1 and 2 cases, respectively. Gastrointestinal toxicity was always grade 1 or 2. Conclusions: Addition of CBs in the accelerated fractionation modality to the whole pelvis chemoradiation followed by radical surgery results in a high rate of pathologically assessed complete response to CRT and a very

  13. Cervix Regression and Motion During the Course of External Beam Chemoradiation for Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Beadle, Beth M.; Jhingran, Anuja; Salehpour, Mohammad; Sam, Marianne; Iyer, Revathy B.; Eifel, Patricia J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the magnitude of cervix regression and motion during external beam chemoradiation for cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Sixteen patients with cervical cancer underwent computed tomography scanning before, weekly during, and after conventional chemoradiation. Cervix volumes were calculated to determine the extent of cervix regression. Changes in the center of mass and perimeter of the cervix between scans were used to determine the magnitude of cervix motion. Maximum cervix position changes were calculated for each patient, and mean maximum changes were calculated for the group. Results: Mean cervical volumes before and after 45 Gy of external beam irradiation were 97.0 and 31.9 cc, respectively; mean volume reduction was 62.3%. Mean maximum changes in the center of mass of the cervix were 2.1, 1.6, and 0.82 cm in the superior-inferior, anterior-posterior, and right-left lateral dimensions, respectively. Mean maximum changes in the perimeter of the cervix were 2.3 and 1.3 cm in the superior and inferior, 1.7 and 1.8 cm in the anterior and posterior, and 0.76 and 0.94 cm in the right and left lateral directions, respectively. Conclusions: Cervix regression and internal organ motion contribute to marked interfraction variations in the intrapelvic position of the cervical target in patients receiving chemoradiation for cervical cancer. Failure to take these variations into account during the application of highly conformal external beam radiation techniques poses a theoretical risk of underdosing the target or overdosing adjacent critical structures.

  14. Combined chemoradiation for the management of nasal natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphoma: elucidating the significance of systemic chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ye; Lu, Jiade J; Ma, Xuejun; Wang, Biyun; Hong, Xiaonan; Li, Xiaoqiu; Li, Jin

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this analysis was to evaluate the efficacy and treatment outcome of CHOP and CHOP combined with nitrosourea chemotherapy in natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphoma of the nasal cavity. Sixty-three patients with NK/T-cell lymphoma of the nasal cavity were treated with CHOP or CHOP combined with oral nitrosourea chemotherapy between January 1997 and June 2005. By the Ann Arbor Lymphoma Staging Classification, 57 patients (90%) had Stage IE or IIE disease and six patients (10%) had Stage III or IV disease. All patients with Stage IE or IIE disease were intended to be treated curatively with combined chemoradiation; and patients who had Stage III or IV disease were treated with chemotherapy alone with curative intention. Chemotherapy consisted of: (1) up to six cycles of the standard CHOP based regimen, or (2) up to six cycles of the standard CHOP based regimen with oral Semustine dosed at 120 mg (or Lomustine dosed at 100mg) on day 1 of each chemotherapy cycle. External beam radiation therapy was delivered by daily conventional fractionation by Co-60 or 6MVx linear accelerator for patients with Stage IE or IIE disease. The radiation dose to the tumor bed was between 36 and 50 Gy with a median dose of 45 Gy. Fifty-three patients received chemotherapy prior to radiation, and four patients were treated with involved field radiation before chemotherapy. The median follow up for all 44 surviving patients was 31 months (range: 6-104 months). The 2-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were 60% and 70%, respectively. The PFS and OS of patients who were treated with or without oral nitrosourea in addition to CHOP were 73% vs. 44% (P=0.035) and 75% vs. 64% (P=0.276), respectively. Nine patients with Stage IE or IIE diseases developed disease progression during their planned treatment and died within 10 months after the initiation of treatment; Six patients who achieved complete response (CR) after planned chemoradiation developed

  15. Restaging after neoadjuvant chemoradiation in rectal cancers: is histology the key in patient selection?

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Nitin; Vallam, Karthik; Engineer, Reena; Ostwal, Vikas; Arya, Supreeta

    2016-01-01

    Background Neoadjuvant chemoradiation is the standard of care for locally advanced rectal cancer. However, there is no clarity regarding the necessity for restaging scans to rule out systemic progression of disease post chemoradiation with existing literature being divided on the need for the same. Methods Data from a prospectively maintained database was retrospectively analysed. All locally advanced rectal cancers (node positive/T4/T3 with threatened or involved CRM) were included. Biopsy proof of adenocarcinoma and CT scan of abdomen and chest were mandatory. Grade of tumor and response to CTRT on restaging magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were documented. Results Out of 119 patients subjected to CTRT, 72 underwent definitive total mesorectal excision while 13 patients progressed locoregionally on restaging MR pelvis and 15 other patients progressed systemically while the rest defaulted. Patients with poorly differentiated (PD) cancers were compared to those with well/moderately differentiated (WMD) tumors. PD tumors had a significantly higher rate of local progression (32.1% vs. 5.6% %, P=0.0011) and systemic progression (35.7% vs. 6.9%, P=0.0008) as compared to WMD tumors. Only one-third (9/28) of PD patients underwent TME while the rest progressed. Conclusions Selecting poorly differentiated tumors alone for restaging CECT abdomen and thorax will be a cost effective strategy as the rate of progression is very high. Also patients with PD tumors need to be consulted about the high probability of progression of disease. PMID:27284467

  16. Identification of Predictive Markers for Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation in Rectal Carcinomas by Proteomic Isotope Coded Protein Label (ICPL) Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Croner, Roland S.; Sevim, Müzeyyen; Metodiev, Metodi V.; Jo, Peter; Ghadimi, Michael; Schellerer, Vera; Brunner, Maximillian; Geppert, Carol; Rau, Tilman; Stürzl, Michael; Naschberger, Elisabeth; Matzel, Klaus E.; Hohenberger, Werner; Lottspeich, Friedrich; Kellermann, Josef

    2016-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiation (nCRT) is an established procedure in stage union internationale contre le cancer (UICC) II/III rectal carcinomas. Around 53% of the tumours present with good tumor regression after nCRT, and 8%–15% are complete responders. Reliable selection markers would allow the identification of poor or non-responders prior to therapy. Tumor biopsies were harvested from 20 patients with rectal carcinomas, and stored in liquid nitrogen prior to therapy after obtaining patients’ informed consent (Erlangen-No.3784). Patients received standardized nCRT with 5-Fluoruracil (nCRT I) or 5-Fluoruracil ± Oxaliplatin (nCRT II) according to the CAO/ARO/AIO-04 protocol. After surgery, regression grading (Dworak) of the tumors was performed during histopathological examination of the specimens. Tumors were classified as poor (Dworak 1 + 2) or good (Dworak 3 + 4) responders. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) for tumor enrichment was performed on preoperative biopsies. Differences in expressed proteins between poor and good responders to nCRT I and II were identified by proteomic analysis (Isotope Coded Protein Label, ICPL™) and selected markers were validated by immunohistochemistry. Tumors of 10 patients were classified as histopathologically poor (Dworak 1 or 2) and the other 10 tumor samples as histopathologically good (Dworak 3 or 4) responders to nCRT after surgery. Sufficient material in good quality was harvested for ICPL analysis by LCM from all biopsies. We identified 140 differentially regulated proteins regarding the selection criteria and the response to nCRT. Fourteen of these proteins were synchronously up-regulated at least 1.5-fold after nCRT I or nCRT II (e.g., FLNB, TKT, PKM2, SERINB1, IGHG2). Thirty-five proteins showed a complete reciprocal regulation (up or down) after nCRT I or nCRT II and the rest was regulated either according to nCRT I or II. The protein expression of regulated proteins such as PLEC1, TKT, HADHA and TAGLN was

  17. Autophagy in 5-Fluorouracil Therapy in Gastrointestinal Cancer: Trends and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jia-Cheng; Feng, Yi-Li; Liang, Xiao; Cai, Xiu-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Objective: 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU)-based combination therapies are standard treatments for gastrointestinal cancer, where the modulation of autophagy is becoming increasingly important in offering effective treatment for patients in clinical practice. This review focuses on the role of autophagy in 5-FU-induced tumor suppression and cancer therapy in the digestive system. Data Sources: All articles published in English from 1996 to date those assess the synergistic effect of autophagy and 5-FU in gastrointestinal cancer therapy were identified through a systematic online search by use of PubMed. The search terms were “autophagy” and “5-FU” and (“colorectal cancer” or “hepatocellular carcinoma” or “pancreatic adenocarcinoma” or “esophageal cancer” or “gallbladder carcinoma” or “gastric cancer”). Study Selection: Critical reviews on relevant aspects and original articles reporting in vitro and/or in vivo results regarding the efficiency of autophagy and 5-FU in gastrointestinal cancer therapy were reviewed, analyzed, and summarized. The exclusion criteria for the articles were as follows: (1) new materials (e.g., nanomaterial)-induced autophagy; (2) clinical and experimental studies on diagnostic and/or prognostic biomarkers in digestive system cancers; and (3) immunogenic cell death for anticancer chemotherapy. Results: Most cell and animal experiments showed inhibition of autophagy by either pharmacological approaches or via genetic silencing of autophagy regulatory gene, resulting in a promotion of 5-FU-induced cancer cells death. Meanwhile, autophagy also plays a pro-death role and may mediate cell death in certain cancer cells where apoptosis is defective or difficult to induce. The dual role of autophagy complicates the use of autophagy inhibitor or inducer in cancer chemotherapy and generates inconsistency to an extent in clinic trials. Conclusion: Autophagy might be a therapeutic target that sensitizes the 5-FU treatment in

  18. Gene Expression Changes in Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma After Initiation of Chemoradiation and Correlation With Clinical Outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Klopp, Ann H.; Jhingran, Anuja Ramdas, Latha; Story, Michael D.; Broadus, Russell R.; Lu, Karen H.; Eifel, Patricia J.; Buchholz, Thomas A.

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate early gene expression changes after chemoradiation in a human solid tumor, allowing identification of chemoradiation-induced gene expression changes in the tumor as well as the tumor microenvironment. In addition we aimed to identify a gene expression profile that was associated with clinical outcome. Methods and Materials: Microarray experiments were performed on cervical cancer specimens obtained before and 48 h after chemoradiation from 12 patients with Stage IB2 to IIIB squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix treated between April 2001 and August 2002. Results: A total of 262 genes were identified that were significantly changed after chemoradiation. Genes involved in DNA repair were identified including DDB2, ERCC4, GADD45A, and XPC. In addition, significantly regulated cell-to-cell signaling pathways included insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), interferon, and vascular endothelial growth factor signaling. At a median follow-up of 41 months, 5 of 12 patients had experienced either local or distant failure. Supervised clustering analysis identified a 58-gene set from the pretreatment samples that were differentially expressed between patients with and without recurrence. Genes involved in integrin signaling and apoptosis pathways were identified in this gene set. Immortalization-upregulated protein (IMUP), IGF-2, and ARHD had particularly marked differences in expression between patients with and without recurrence. Conclusions: Genetic profiling identified genes regulated by chemoradiation including DNA damage and cell-to-cell signaling pathways. Genes associated with recurrence were identified that will require validation in an independent patient data set to determine whether the 58-gene set associated with clinical outcome could be useful as a prognostic assay.

  19. [Platinum compounds in cancer therapy--past, present, and future].

    PubMed

    Akaza, H; Saijo, N; Aiba, K; Isonishi, S; Ohashi, Y; Kawai, K; Konishi, T; Saeki, T; Sone, S; Tsukagoshi, S; Tsuruo, T; Noguchi, S; Miki, T; Mikami, O; Smith, M; Hoctin-Boes, G; Stribling, D

    2001-05-01

    Platinum cytotoxics play an important role globally in the management of solid tumours. Cisplatin sets the standard for efficacy in both regions with careful administration to reduce nephrotoxicity. Carboplatin is associated with neurotoxicity, but has become the leading product in the US due largely to the easier to manage toxicity profile. Both agents have been widely used in both registered and non registered indications and are frequently combined with other cytotoxics. In Japan, cisplatin has been used successfully at low doses in combination with 5-FU based regimens and appears to achieve a synergistic effect, but controlled data are not yet available. More recently oxaliplatin (Europe) and nedaplatin (in Japan) have been introduced, but their clinical roles in therapy have yet to be established. One of the limiting features of the first generation of platinum compounds is that a significant proportion of tumours develop cross resistance to platins due to either changes in uptake or excretion, intracellular detoxification or accelerated DNA repair. The forum discussed the possibility for the development of better new platinum compounds, A new platin agent which had lower toxicity and higher efficacy across a wide range of cancers without the development of resistance would be a significant step forward. If the tolerability profile was suitable, an oral formulation may improve the quality of life for patients but this must not be at the expense of efficacy. Even after the introduction of new target based drugs, platinum cytotoxics are likely to be used to reduce the tumour mass and in some cases can be expected to potentiate the effects of the new agents. In preclinical studies, ZD0473 has been shown to by-pass some major mechanisms of resistance and has the potential to achieve these objectives and is now being evaluated in clinical studies in both Japan and the West. PMID:11383210

  20. Botanical Therapy in Treating Mucositis in Patients With Head and Neck Cancer Who Have Undergone Chemoradiation Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-14

    Mucositis; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  1. Survival Benefits and Trends in Use of Adjuvant Therapy Among Elderly Stage II and III Rectal Cancer Patients in the General Population

    PubMed Central

    Dobie, Sharon A.; Warren, Joan L.; Matthews, Barbara; Schwartz, David; Baldwin, Laura-Mae; Billingsley, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND This study examined elderly stage II and III rectal cancer patients’ adjuvant chemoradiation therapy adherence, trends in adherence over time, and the relation of levels of adherence to mortality. METHODS The authors studied 2886 stage II and III rectal cancer patients who had surgical resection and who appeared in 1992–1999 linked SEER-Medicare claims data. The authors compared measures of adjuvant radiation and chemotherapy receipt and completion between stage II and III patients. Adjusted risk of cancer-related 5-year mortality was calculated by multivariate logistic regression for different levels of chemoradiation adherence among stage II and III patients. RESULTS Of the 2886 patients, 45.4% received both adjuvant radiation and chemotherapy. Stage III patients were more likely to receive chemoradiation than stage II patients. The receipt of chemoradiation by stage II patients increased significantly from 1992 to 1999. Stage III patients were more likely to complete radiation therapy (96.6%), chemotherapy (68.2%), and both modalities (67.5%) than stage II patients (91.5%, 49.8%, 47.6%, respectively). Only a complete course of both radiation and chemotherapy for both stage II (relative risk [RR] 0.74; 95% CI, 0.54, 0.97) and III (RR 0.80; 95% CI, 0.65, 0.96) decreased the adjusted 5-year cancer mortality risk compared with counterparts with no adjuvant therapy. CONCLUSIONS Even though stage II rectal cancer patients were less likely than stage III patients to receive and complete adjuvant chemoradiation, both patient groups in the general population had lower cancer-related mortality if they completed chemoradiation. These patients deserve support and encouragement to complete treatment. PMID:18189291

  2. Prognostic significance of SUV on PET/CT in patients with localised oesophagogastric junction cancer receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy/chemoradiation: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, W; Xing, L; Yue, J; Sun, X; Sun, X; Zhao, H; Yu, J

    2012-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to comprehensively review the evidence for use of pre-treatment, post-treatment and changes in tumour glucose uptake that were assessed by 18-fludeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) early, during or immediately after neoadjuvant chemotherapy/chemoradiation to predict prognosis of localised oesophagogastric junction (AEG) cancer. Methods We searched for articles published in English; limited to AEG; 18F-FDG uptake on PET performed on a dedicated device; dealt with the impact of standard uptake value (SUV) on survival. We extracted an estimate of the log hazard ratios (HRs) and their variances and performed meta-analysis. Results 798 patients with AEG were included. And the scan time for 18F-FDG-PET was as follows: prior to therapy (PET1, n=646), exactly 2 weeks after initiation of neoadjuvant therapy (PET2, n=245), and pre-operatively (PET3, n=278). In the two meta-analyses for overall survival, including the studies that dealt with reduction of tumour maximum SUV (SUVmax) (from PET1 to PET2/PET3 and from PET1 to PET2), the results were similar, with the overall HR for non-responders being 1.83 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.41–2.36] and 2.62 (95% CI, 1.61–4.26), respectively; as for disease-free survival, the combined HR was 2.92 (95% CI, 2.08–4.10) and 2.39 (95% CI, 1.57–3.64), respectively. The meta-analyses did not attribute significant prognostic values to SUVmax before and during therapy in localised AEG. Conclusion Relative changes in FDG-uptake of AEG are better prognosticators. Early metabolic changes from PET1 to PET2 may provide the same accuracy for prediction of treatment outcome as late changes from PET1 to PET3. PMID:22337686

  3. A Phase II Multi-institutional Trial of Chemoradiation Using Weekly Docetaxel and Erythropoietin for High-Risk Postoperative Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Willey, Christopher D.; Murphy, Barbara A.; Netterville, James L.; Burkey, Brian B.; Shyr, Yu; Shakhtour, Bashar; Kish, Bonnie; Raben, David; Chen Changhu; Song, John I.; Kane, Madeleine A.; Cmelak, Anthony J. . E-mail: anthony.cmelak@vanderbilt.edu

    2007-04-01

    Purpose: To determine efficacy and toxicities of postoperative concurrent chemoradiation using docetaxel in high-risk head and neck cancer. Methods and Materials: High-risk patients were enrolled 2-8 weeks after surgery. Treatment included 60 Gy for 6 weeks with weekly docetaxel 25 mg/m{sup 2} and erythropoietin alpha 40,000 U for hemoglobin {<=}12 g/dL. Primary endpoints included locoregional control (LC), disease-free survival (DFS), and patterns of failure (POF). Secondary endpoints were toxicity and quality of life. Results: Eighteen patients were enrolled (14 male, 4 female), aged 24-70 years (median, 55 years). Primary site included oropharynx = 7, oral cavity 8, hypopharynx = 1, and larynx = 2. Pathologic American Joint Committee on Cancer Stage was III = 3 patients, IV = 15 patients. High-risk eligibility included {>=}2 positive lymph nodes = 13, extracapsular extension = 10, positive margins = 8 (11 patients with two or more risk factors). Docetaxel was reduced to 20 mg/m{sup 2}/week after 5 patients had prolonged Grade 3 or higher mucositis. Overall, number of doses delivered was 2 of 6 = 1, 3 of 6 2, 4 of 6 = 2, 5 of 6 = 4, 6 of 6 = 9 patients. With median follow-up of 30 months (range, 5-66), 10 (56%) patients are alive and have no evidence of disease (NED); POF: three local recurrences (two with distant) and 1 distant only. One-year survival was 76%, median PFS and DFS had not been reached. Three-year LC was 82%. No Grade 3 or higher late toxicities were observed, although a few cases of prolonged mucositis and taste loss (>3 months) were seen, particularly at 25 mg/m{sup 2}/week. Conclusion: Postoperative radiation therapy with weekly docetaxel 20 or 25 mg/m{sup 2}/week for high-risk postoperative head and neck cancer caused intolerable mucosal toxicity, prompting early study termination. Further studies should consider 15 mg/m{sup 2}. Actuarial 3-year LC is 82%, similar to cisplatin-based chemoradiation regimens. Distant metastasis remains an

  4. Evaluating Mesorectal Lymph Nodes in Rectal Cancer Before and After Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Using Thin-Section T2-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Koh, Dow-Mu Chau, Ian; Tait, Diana; Wotherspoon, Andrew; Cunningham, David; Brown, Gina

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: To apply thin-section T2-weighted magnetic resoance imaging (MRI) to evaluate the number, size, distribution, and morphology of benign and malignant mesorectal lymph nodes before and after chemoradiation treatment compared with histopathologic findings. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five patients with poor-risk adenocarcinoma of the rectum treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation were evaluated prospectively. Thin-section T2-weighted MR images obtained before and after chemoradiation treatment were independently reviewed in consensus by 2 expert radiologists to determine the tumor stage, nodal size, nodal distribution, and nodal stage. Total mesorectal excision surgery after chemoradiation allowed MR nodal stage to be compared with histopathology using {kappa} statistics. Nodal downstaging was compared using the Chi-square test. Results: Before chemoradiation, 152 mesorectal nodes were visible (mean, 6.2 mm; 100 benign, 52 malignant) and 4 of 52 malignant nodes were in contact with the mesorectal fascia. The nodal staging was 7/25 N0, 10/25 N1, and 7/25 N2. After chemoradiation, only 29 nodes (mean, 4.1 mm; 24 benign, 5 malignant) were visible, and none were in contact with the mesorectal fascia. Nodal downstaging was observed: 20/25 N0 and 5/25 N1 (p < 0.01, Chi-square test). There was good agreement between MRI and pathologic T-staging ({kappa} = 0.64) and N-staging ({kappa} = 0.65) after chemoradiation. Conclusions: Neoadjuvant chemoradiation treatment resulted in a decrease in size and number of malignant- and benign-appearing mesorectal nodes on MRI. Nodal downstaging and nodal regression from the mesorectal fascia were observed after treatment. MRI is a useful tool for assessing nodal response to neoadjuvant treatment.

  5. Preclinical and Pilot Clinical Studies of Docetaxel Chemoradiation for Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Yuhchyau; Pandya, Kishan J.; Hyrien, Ollivier; Keng, Peter C.; Smudzin, Therese; Anderson, Joy; Qazi, Raman; Smith, Brian; Watson, Thomas J.; Feins, Richard H.; Johnstone, David W.

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: Local and distant failure rates remain high despite aggressive chemoradiation (CRT) treatment for Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer. We conducted preclinical studies of docetaxel's cytotoxic and radiosensitizing effects on lung cancer cell lines and designed a pilot study to target distant micrometastasis upfront with one-cycle induction chemotherapy, followed by low-dose radiosensitizing docetaxel CRT. Methods and Materials: A preclinical study was conducted in human lung cancer cell lines NCI 520 and A549. Cells were treated with two concentrations of docetaxel for 3 h and then irradiated immediately or after a 24-h delay. A clonogenic survival assay was conducted and analyzed for cytotoxic effects vs. radiosensitizing effects of docetaxel. A pilot clinical study was designed based on preclinical study findings. Twenty-two patients were enrolled with a median follow-up of 4 years. Induction chemotherapy consisted of 75 mg/m{sup 2} of docetaxel and 75 mg/m{sup 2} of cisplatin on Day 1 and 150 mg/m{sup 2} of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on Days 2 through 10. Concurrent CRT was started 3 to 6 weeks later with twice-weekly docetaxel at 10 to 12 mg/m{sup 2} and daily delayed radiation in 1.8-Gy fractions to 64.5 Gy for gross disease. Results: The preclinical study showed potent cytotoxic effects of docetaxel and subadditive radiosensitizing effects. Delaying radiation resulted in more cancer cell death. The pilot clinical study resulted in a median survival of 32.6 months for the entire cohort, with 3- and 5-year survival rates of 50% and 19%, respectively, and a distant metastasis-free survival rate of 61% for both 3 and 5 years. A pattern-of-failure analysis showed 75% chest failures and 36% all-distant failures. Therapy was well tolerated with Grade 3 esophagitis observed in 23% of patients. Conclusions: One-cycle full-dose docetaxel/cisplatin induction chemotherapy with recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor

  6. The Influence of Total Nodes Examined, Number of Positive Nodes, and Lymph Node Ratio on Survival After Surgical Resection and Adjuvant Chemoradiation for Pancreatic Cancer: A Secondary Analysis of RTOG 9704

    SciTech Connect

    Showalter, Timothy N.; Winter, Kathryn A.; Berger, Adam C.; Regine, William F.; Abrams, Ross A.; Safran, Howard; Hoffman, John P.; Benson, Al B.; MacDonald, John S.; Willett, Christopher G.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Lymph node status is an important predictor of survival in pancreatic cancer. We performed a secondary analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 9704, an adjuvant chemotherapy and chemoradiation trial, to determine the influence of lymph node factors-number of positive nodes (NPN), total nodes examined (TNE), and lymph node ratio (LNR ratio of NPN to TNE)-on OS and disease-free survival (DFS). Patient and Methods: Eligible patients from RTOG 9704 form the basis of this secondary analysis of lymph node parameters. Actuarial estimates for OS and DFS were calculated using Kaplan-Meier methods. Cox proportional hazards models were performed to evaluate associations of NPN, TNE, and LNR with OS and DFS. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were also performed. Results: There were 538 patients enrolled in the RTOG 9704 trial. Of these, 445 patients were eligible with lymph nodes removed. Overall median NPN was 1 (min-max, 0-18). Increased NPN was associated with worse OS (HR = 1.06, p = 0.001) and DFS (HR = 1.05, p = 0.01). In multivariate analyses, both NPN and TNE were associated with OS and DFS. TNE > 12, and >15 were associated with increased OS for all patients, but not for node-negative patients (n = 142). Increased LNR was associated with worse OS (HR = 1.01, p < 0.0001) and DFS (HR = 1.006, p = 0.002). Conclusion: In patients who undergo surgical resection followed by adjuvant chemoradiation, TNE, NPN, and LNR are associated with OS and DFS. This secondary analysis of a prospective, cooperative group trial supports the influence of these lymph node parameters on outcomes after surgery and adjuvant therapy using contemporary techniques.

  7. EPO-R expression patterns in resected gastric adenocarcinoma followed by adjuvant chemoradiation treatment.

    PubMed

    Sereno, Maria; De Castro, Javier; Belda-Iniesta, Cristóbal; Garcia-Cabezas, Miguel Angel; Cejas, Paloma; Casado, Enrique; Barriuso, Jorge; Feliu, Jaime; Larrauri, Javier

    2009-03-01

    The primary aim was to determine whether Epo-R immunohistochemical expression is related to disease free survival (DFS) in specimens of GC from patients who underwent adjuvant chemoradiation. Specimens of gastric adenocarcinomas obtained from 44 patients who had undergone curative gastrectomy and adjuvant treatment were investigated immunohistochemically expression of Epo-R. Three patterns for Epo-R staining were defined: Pattern A (secretory cells-like staining), Pattern B (parietal-like staining) and Pattern C (chief-like staining). Median DFS was 38 months (CI 95%: 33-43) and 15 months (IC 95%: 3-27) in the pattern B and C, respectively, but it was not reached in the pattern A (p = 0.06). Our findings suggest that there may be a relationship between Epo-R expression and DFS in the patients with GC resected. PMID:19002606

  8. Late Prevertebral and Spinal Abscess following Chemoradiation for Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hindy, Jawad; Shelef, Ilan; Slovik, Yuval; Joshua, Ben-Zion

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Advanced primary supraglottic tumors (i.e., T3 or T4) have traditionally been treated surgically and postoperative radiotherapy. In the last 2 decades, some patients were treated with chemoradiation avoiding surgery. Case Report. We describe a 55-year old female who presented with respiratory distress and paraplegia seven years after treatment for a T3N0M0 supraglottic squamous cell carcinoma. CT scan showed prevertebral and intraspinal air descending from C4 to D3 vertebras. Epidural and prevertebral abscesses were confirmed by neck exploration. Necrosis was observed in the retropharyngeal, prevertebral, and vertebral tissues. Conclusion. Prevertebral and spinal abscess may result from chemotherapy and radiotherapy to the head and neck. Physicians caring for head and neck cancer patients treated with chemotherapy and radiation should be aware of this rare severe complication. PMID:24716067

  9. [Radiation therapy of pancreatic cancer].

    PubMed

    Huguet, F; Mornex, F; Orthuon, A

    2016-09-01

    Currently, the use of radiation therapy for patients with pancreatic cancer is subject to discussion. In adjuvant setting, the standard treatment is 6 months of chemotherapy with gemcitabine and capecitabine. Chemoradiation (CRT) may improve the survival of patients with incompletely resected tumors (R1). This should be confirmed by a prospective trial. Neoadjuvant CRT is a promising treatment especially for patients with borderline resectable tumors. For patients with locally advanced tumors, there is no a standard. An induction chemotherapy followed by CRT for non-progressive patients reduces the rate of local relapse. Whereas in the first trials of CRT large fields were used, the treated volumes have been reduced to improve tolerance. Tumor movements induced by breathing should be taken in account. Intensity modulated radiation therapy allows a reduction of doses to the organs at risk. Whereas widely used, this technique is not recommended. PMID:27523418

  10. Results of curative surgery and postoperative chemoradiation for rectal adenocarcinoma in British Columbia, 1985 to 1994

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Roy; Phang, P. Terry

    2001-01-01

    Objective To assess factors affecting survival and pelvic recurrence after surgery and postoperative chemoradiation for rectal cancer in order to design improved management strategies. Design A chart review. Setting The British Columbia Cancer Agency. Patients One hundred and ninety-one consecutive patients who had rectal cancer treated between 1985 and 1994. Median follow-up was 39 months. Interventions Surgical excision of the cancer with intent to cure followed by chemoradiation. Outcome measures Multivariate analysis, to determine whether survival and pelvic recurrence were affected by tumour stage, nodal status, type of surgical procedure and presence of residual disease, and the quality of pathology reporting with respect to evaluation of radial resection margins and number of lymph nodes examined. Results Overall 5-year disease-specific survival was 60% and pelvic recurrence was 25%. Survival was affected by tumour stage (p < 0.02), nodal status (p < 0.001), type of surgical procedure (p < 0.04), presence of residual disease (p < 0.02) and pelvic recurrence (p < 0.0001). Pelvic recurrence was affected by the presence of residual disease (p < 0.001) but not by tumour stage (p < 0.14), nodal status (p < 0.37) or type of surgcial procedure (p < 0.20). Radial margins were evaluated in 44% of pathology reports and the median number of lymph nodes assessed was 6. Conclusions Survival was most significantly affected by pelvic recurrence. Strategies to minimize pelvic recurrence including pre-operative radiation and the principle of careful mesorectal excision to maximize the achievement of negative radial resection margins and negative residual disease are recommended. Also needed are standards for evaluating radial margins and lymph nodes to improved pathology reports. PMID:11603752

  11. The effect of honey on mucositis induced by chemoradiation in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Pradip Kumar; Ray, Amitabh; Mitra, Tarak Nath; Jana, Utpal; Bhattacharya, Jibak; Ganguly, Subir

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of pure natural honey on radiation-induced mucositis. Fifty-five patients diagnosed with head and neck cancer requiring radiation to the oropharyngeal mucosal area were divided into two groups (study arm-28 and control arm-27) to receive either chemoradiation or chemoradiation plus topical application of honey. Patients were treated using a telecobalt machine at 2 Gy per day, five times a week up to a total dose of 66 Gy. in the study arm, patients were advised to take 20 ml of honey 15 minutes before, 15 minutes after and similar amount at bed time. Patients were evaluated every week for the development of radiation mucositis using the WHO grading system. There was significant reduction in the symptomatic grades 3 and 4 mucositis in honey-treated patients compared to controls ie, 18% versus 41% for grade 3 and 4% versus 22% for grade 4 mucositis. Seventy-one per cent of patients treated with topical honey showed no change or a positive gain in body weight. In the control group also 22% had no weight loss, though none showed weight gain. Furthermore, it didn't affect blood sugar level when initial fasting blood sugar level was < 150 mg%. Honey is a cheap, simple, easily available and effective agent in reducing radiation-induced mucositis. Within the limits of this study the results showed the application of natural honey is effective in managing radiation induced mucositis, which warrants further multicentric randomised trials to validate the findings. PMID:23520669

  12. Trends in Chemoradiation Use in Elderly Patients with Head and Neck Cancer: Changing treatment patterns with cetuximab

    PubMed Central

    Baxi, Shrujal S.; O’Neill, Caitriona; Sherman, Eric J.; Atoria, Coral L.; Lee, Nancy Y.; Pfister, David G.; Elkin, Elena B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cetuximab was approved for use in chemoradiation (CTRT) for locally-advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) in 2006. Methods Among 3,705 patients with locally-advanced HNSCC identified in the linked Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER)-Medicare database, we assessed treatment trends including surgery, RT, CTRT and specific agents used in CTRT. We examined the influence of demographic and clinical characteristics on the likelihood of receiving CTRT before and after 2006. Results Chemoradiation use increased from 29% of patients diagnosed in 2001 to 61% in 2009 (p<0.0001). Compared to prior to 2006, neither age nor comorbidity score was associated with receipt of CTRT after 2006. Platinum combinations were the most commonly used concurrent chemotherapies before 2006, but since then cetuximab has become the most commonly used agent. Conclusions The use of CTRT has increased substantially and cetuximab may have increased CTRT use, especially in older and sicker patients. PMID:25535104

  13. Acute effects of chemoradiation on cardiac function in oesophageal cancer: a MUGA scan and echo-based study

    PubMed Central

    Miriyala, Raviteja; Kapoor, Rakesh; Bahl, Amit; Bhattacharya, Anish; Bahl, Ajay; Tomar, Parsee

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the acute effects of concurrent chemoradiation on global and regional cardiac contractility and correlate with radiation dose. Methods 16 patients of locally advanced oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma were serially followed up with multiple-gated acquisition (MUGA) scans and echocardiograms during the course of concurrent chemoradiation to evaluate the ejection fractions (EFs) and pericardial status, respectively. Changes in cardiac contractility were correlated with the doses received by the heart. Results Concurrent chemoradiation resulted in a significant reduction in the contractility of both left ventricle (LV) and right ventricle (RV), with a mean reduction of LVEF by 5.6% and RVEF by 6.5% over the course of treatment, which had a significant correlation with the radiation doses received by the ventricles (p=0.001). On further analysis, correlation between radiation dose and decrease in contractility was more significant in the boost phase (16 Gy in 8 fractions over one and a half weeks; p=0.001 for LV and p=0.008 for RV) compared with the initial phase (40 Gy in 20 fractions over 4 weeks; p=0.184 for LV and p=0.269 for RV). One out of 16 patients developed mild acute pericarditis. Conclusions Concurrent chemoradiation resulted in acute decrease in EF of both ventricles in a dose-dependent manner. Correlation between cardiac doses and decrease in EF was more marked in the boost phase, suggesting a possible threshold of 40 Gy for this impairment. Nevertheless, conclusions regarding this possible threshold need to be interpreted with caution given the small sample size.

  14. Surgical treatment for locally advanced lower third rectal cancer after neoadjuvent chemoradiation with capecitabine: prospective phase II trial

    PubMed Central

    Elwanis, Mostafa Abd; Maximous, Doaa W; Elsayed, Mohamed Ibrahim; Mikhail, Nabiel NH

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Treatment of rectal cancer requires a multidisciplinary approach with standardized surgical, pathological and radiotherapeutic procedures. Sphincter preserving surgery for cancer of the lower rectum needs a long-course of neoadjuvant treatments to reduce tumor volume, to induce down-staging that increases circumferential resection margin, and to facilitate surgery. Aim To evaluate the rate of anal sphincter preservation in low lying, resectable, locally advanced rectal cancer and the resectability rate in unresectable cases after neoadjuvent chemoradiation by oral Capecitabine. Patients and methods This trial included 43 patients with low lying (4–7 cm from anal verge) locally advanced rectal cancer, of which 33 were resectable. All patients received preoperative concurrent chemoradiation (45 Gy/25 fractions over 5 weeks with oral capecitabine 825 mg/m2 twice daily on radiotherapy days), followed after 4–6 weeks by total mesorectal excision technique. Results Preoperative chemoradiation resulted in a complete pathologic response in 4 patients (9.3%; 95% CI 3–23.1) and an overall downstaging in 32 patients (74.4%; 95% CI 58.5–85). Sphincter sparing surgical procedures were done in 20 out of 43 patients (46.5%; 95% CI 31.5–62.2). The majority (75%) were of clinical T3 disease. Toxicity was moderate and required no treatment interruption. Grade II anemia occurred in 4 patients (9.3%, 95% CI 3–23.1), leucopenia in 2 patients (4.7%, 95% CI 0.8–17) and radiation dermatitis in 4 patients (9.3%, 95% CI 3–23.1) respectively. Conclusion In patients with low lying, locally advanced rectal cancer, preoperative chemoradiation using oral capecitabine 825 mg/m2, twice a day on radiotherapy days, was tolerable and effective in downstaging and resulted in 46.5% anal sphincter preservation rate. PMID:19508705

  15. Second primary cancer in survivors following concurrent chemoradiation for locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Takigawa, N; Kiura, K; Segawa, Y; Watanabe, Y; Kamei, H; Moritaka, T; Shibayama, T; Ueoka, H; Gemba, K; Yonei, T; Tabata, M; Shinkai, T; Hiraki, S; Takemoto, M; Kanazawa, S; Matsuo, K; Tanimoto, M

    2006-01-01

    Long-term cancer survivors risk development of second primary cancers (SPC). Vigilant follow-up may be required. We report outcomes of 92 patients who underwent chemoradiation for unresectable stage III non-small-cell lung cancer, with a median follow-up of 8.9 years. The incidence of SPC was 2.4 per 100 patient-years (95% confidence interval: 1.0–4.9). PMID:17031394

  16. Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation With Paclitaxel/Carboplatin for Selected Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Long-Term Results of a Trimodality Phase II Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Hehr, Thomas; Friedel, Godehard; Steger, Volker; Spengler, Werner; Eschmann, Susanne M.; Bamberg, Michael; Budach, Wilfried

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To evaluate, in a Phase II trial conducted August 1998 through January 2001, the efficacy of neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by chemoradiotherapy and definitive surgery in patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC), Stages IIIA bulky and selected Stage IIIB. Patients and Methods: Staging of LA-NSCLC included computed tomography of cranium, thorax, and abdomen, whole-body positron emission tomography, and video mediastinoscopy. Induction chemotherapy with weekly paclitaxel and carboplatin was followed by hyperfractionated accelerated thoracic radiotherapy (45 Gy) with simultaneous weekly paclitaxel and carboplatin. Four to six weeks after completion of induction therapy, restaging and resection of primary tumor and lymph nodes was intended. Results: A total of 59 consecutive patients were enrolled, 25% with Stage IIIA bulky disease, 65% with Stage IIIB, and 10% with Stage IV (excluded from further analysis). Forty-one patients completed induction therapy; in 52.4% a functional (positron emission tomography) downstaging was proven. Thirty-two patients (59.3%) underwent complete tumor resection, and 5 patients had an exploratory thoracotomy only. Histopathologic downstaging was proven in 59.4% and complete response in 21.9%. Hospital mortality was 5.4%. Median duration of follow-up for living patients was 62.1 months. Overall median survival was 22.6 months, 58.2 months for completely resected patients. During induction chemotherapy, Grade 3/4 granulocytopenia occurred in 8% of patients; the most common Grade 3/4 toxicity of chemoradiation was esophagitis, in 26.4% of patients. Conclusions: Induction paclitaxel/carboplatin with hyperfractionated accelerated chemoradiotherapy followed by complete tumor resection demonstrates high efficacy in LA-NSCLC and offers a promising chance of long-term survival.

  17. Predictors of Postoperative Complications After Trimodality Therapy for Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jingya; Wei, Caimiao; Tucker, Susan L.; Myles, Bevan; Palmer, Matthew; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Swisher, Stephen G.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao, Zhongxing; Lin, Steven H.

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: While trimodality therapy for esophageal cancer has improved patient outcomes, surgical complication rates remain high. The goal of this study was to identify modifiable factors associated with postoperative complications after neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: From 1998 to 2011, 444 patients were treated at our institution with surgical resection after chemoradiation. Postoperative (pulmonary, gastrointestinal [GI], cardiac, wound healing) complications were recorded up to 30 days postoperatively. Kruskal-Wallis tests and χ{sup 2} or Fisher exact tests were used to assess associations between continuous and categorical variables. Multivariate logistic regression tested the association between perioperative complications and patient or treatment factors that were significant on univariate analysis. Results: The most frequent postoperative complications after trimodality therapy were pulmonary (25%) and GI (23%). Lung capacity and the type of radiation modality used were independent predictors of pulmonary and GI complications. After adjusting for confounding factors, pulmonary and GI complications were increased in patients treated with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) versus intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT; odds ratio [OR], 2.018; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.104-3.688; OR, 1.704; 95% CI, 1.03-2.82, respectively) and for patients treated with 3D-CRT versus proton beam therapy (PBT; OR, 3.154; 95% CI, 1.365-7.289; OR, 1.55; 95% CI, 0.78-3.08, respectively). Mean lung radiation dose (MLD) was strongly associated with pulmonary complications, and the differences in toxicities seen for the radiation modalities could be fully accounted for by the MLD delivered by each of the modalities. Conclusions: The radiation modality used can be a strong mitigating factor of postoperative complications after neoadjuvant chemoradiation.

  18. Efficacy and Safety of Low-Dose-Rate Endorectal Brachytherapy as a Boost to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation in the Treatment of Locally Advanced Distal Rectal Cancer: A Phase-II Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Omidvari, Shapour; Zohourinia, Shadi; Ansari, Mansour; Ghahramani, Leila; Zare-Bandamiri, Mohammad; Mosalaei, Ahmad; Ahmadloo, Niloofar; Pourahmad, Saeedeh; Nasrolahi, Hamid; Hamedi, Sayed Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Despite advances in rectal cancer treatment over the last decade, local control and risk of late side effects due to external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) remain as concerns. The present study aimed to investigate the efficacy and the safety of low-dose-rate endorectal brachytherapy (LDRBT) as a boost to neoadjuvant chemoradiation for use in treating locally advanced distal rectal adenocarcinomas. Methods This phase-II clinical trial included 34 patients (as the study arm) with newly diagnosed, locally advanced (clinical T3-T4 and/or N1/N2, M0) lower rectal cancer. For comparative analysis, 102 matched patients (as the historical control arm) with rectal cancer were also selected. All the patients were treated with LDRBT (15 Gy in 3 fractions) and concurrent chemoradiation (45-50.4 Gy). Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of oxaliplatin 130 mg/m2 intravenously on day 1 plus oral capecitabine 825 mg/m2 twice daily during LDRBT and EBRT. Results The study results revealed a significant differences between the study arm and the control arm in terms in the pathologic tumor size (2.1 cm vs. 3.6 cm, P = 0.001), the pathologic tumor stage (35% T3-4 vs. 65% T3-4, P = 0.003), and the pathologic complete response (29.4% vs. 11.7%, P < 0.028). Moreover, a significantly higher dose of EBRT (P = 0.041) was found in the control arm, and a longer time to surgery was observed in the study arm (P < 0.001). The higher rate of treatment-related toxicities, such as mild proctitis and anemia, in the study arm was tolerable and easily manageable. Conclusion A boost of LDRBT can optimize the pathologic complete response, with acceptable toxicities, in patients with distal rectal cancer. PMID:26361613

  19. P17.57COMBINED CHEMORADIATION IN ELDERLY PATIENTS WITH GLIOBLASTOMA: COMPARISON OF TWO RADIATION SCHEDULES

    PubMed Central

    Minniti, G.; Scaringi, C.; Falco, T.; Lanzetta, G.; De Sanctis, V.; Enrici, R. Maurizi

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Current treatment of glioblastoma (GBM) in the elderly population includes surgery, radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy, however the optimal management of disease remains a matter of debate. Both standard and hypofractionated RT in combination with temozolomide (TMZ) have been employed with reported survival benefit; however, aggressive treatments in this population may be associated with high risks of neurological toxicity. We have compared the efficacy of concomitant and adjuvant TMZ in combination with standard RT (60 Gy in 30 fractions) or short-term RT (40 Gy in 15 fractions) in patients aged 70 years and older with a newly diagnosed GBM. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Ninety-five consecutive patients ≥ 70 years old with a newly diagnosed GBM were treated with standard RT plus TMZ at the dose of 75 mg/m2 per day followed by adjuvant TMZ (150-200 mg/m2 for 5 days during each 28-day cycle) up to 12 cycles. Overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS) and toxicity were evaluated and compared with the results observed in a prospective trial of elderly patients with GBM treated with an abbreviated course of RT. RESULTS: Median OS was 12 months in patients treated with standard chemoradiation and 12.4 months in those treated with short-term RT plus TMZ (p= 0.2), and respective 1-year survival rates were 50% and 58%. The median and 1-year PFS rates were 6 months and 23% in standard RT plus TMZ group and 6 months and 20% in short-term RT plus TMZ group, respectively. Grade 3 or 4 hemathological toxicity was similar in both groups. Neurological grade 2/3 toxicity occurred in 35% of patients treated with standard RT/TMZ and 10% of those treated with short-term RT/TMZ. MGMT promoter methylation was associated with longer survival in both groups. CONCLUSIONS: A combination of an abbreviated course of RT plus concomitant and adjuvant TMZ is associated with similar survival benefit as for standard chemoradiation, although with potential lower risks of

  20. Neural stem cell therapy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Bagó, Juli Rodriguez; Sheets, Kevin T; Hingtgen, Shawn D

    2016-04-15

    Cancers of the brain remain one of the greatest medical challenges. Traditional surgery and chemo-radiation therapy are unable to eradicate diffuse cancer cells and tumor recurrence is nearly inevitable. In contrast to traditional regenerative medicine applications, engineered neural stem cells (NSCs) are emerging as a promising new therapeutic strategy for cancer therapy. The tumor-homing properties allow NSCs to access both primary and invasive tumor foci, creating a novel delivery platform. NSCs engineered with a wide array of cytotoxic agents have been found to significantly reduce tumor volumes and markedly extend survival in preclinical models. With the recent launch of new clinical trials, the potential to successfully manage cancer in human patients with cytotoxic NSC therapy is moving closer to becoming a reality. PMID:26314280

  1. Prognostic Value of Baseline Lymphocyte Count in Cervical Carcinoma Treated With Concurrent Chemoradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Chel Hun; Kang, Heeseok; Kim, Woo Young; Kim, Tae-Joong; Lee, Jeong-Won; Huh, Seung Jae; Lee, Je-Ho; Kim, Byoung-Gie; Bae, Duk-Soo

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: This study examined factors predicting tumor response and progression-free survival in patients with locally advanced cervical carcinoma treated with concurrent chemoradiation (CCRT). Methods and Materials: Medical records of 143 patients with locally advanced cervical carcinoma (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Stage IB2 to IVA) treated with CCRT were reviewed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to retrospectively evaluate prognostic factors, including baseline lymphocyte count, that affect tumor response and progression-free survival. Results: Of the variables evaluated, greater baseline lymphocyte count was the factor most predictive of a complete clinical response, followed by smaller tumor size (p = 0.003 and p = 0.007, respectively). Multivariate analysis showed baseline lymphocyte count, which was treated as a continuous variable with every 1 x 10{sup 9} lymphocytes/L, to remain a prognostic factor with an odds ratio of 3.08 (95% confidence interval, 1.31-7.23). In addition, a statistically significant association (p = 0.023) was found between baseline lymphocyte count and progression-free survival, with a hazard ratio of 0.42 (95% confidence interval, 0.20-0.89) in the Cox proportional hazards model. Conclusions: Despite the small number of patients and possible biologic variation existing in lymphocyte subset number and activity, these findings highlight the strong prognostic value of baseline lymphocyte count in patients with locally advanced cervical carcinoma treated with CCRT. Therefore, a larger number of patients and analysis of lymphocyte subsets are needed.

  2. Primary Vaginal Cancer Treated With Concurrent Chemoradiation Using Cis-Platinum

    SciTech Connect

    Samant, Rajiv Lau, Bedy; E, Choan; Le, Tien; Tam, Tiffany

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of concurrent weekly Cis-platinum chemoradiation (CRT) in the curative treatment of primary vaginal cancer. Methods: A retrospective review was performed of all primary vaginal cancer patients treated with curative intent at the Ottawa Hospital Regional Cancer Centre between 1999 and 2004 using concurrent Cis-platinum CRT. Results: Twelve patients were treated with concurrent weekly CRT. The median age at diagnosis was 56 years (range, 34-69 years), and the median follow-up was 50 months (range, 11-75 months). Ten patients (83%) were diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma and 2 patients (17%) with adenocarcinoma. The distribution according to stage was as follows: 6 (50%) Stage II, 4 (33%) Stage III, and 2 (17%) Stage IVA. All patients received pelvic external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) concurrently with weekly intravenous Cis-platinum chemotherapy (40 mg/m{sup 2}) followed by brachytherapy (BT). The median dose of EBRT was 4500 cGy given in 25 fractions over 5 weeks. Ten patients received interstitial BT, and 2 patients received intracavitary BT, with the median dose being 3000 cGy. The 5-year overall survival, progression-free survival, and locoregional progression-free survival rates were 66%, 75%, and 92%, respectively. Late toxicity requiring surgery occurred in 2 patients (17%). Conclusions: For the treatment of primary vaginal cancer, it is feasible to deliver concurrent weekly Cis-platinum chemotherapy with high-dose radiation, leading to excellent local control and an acceptable toxicity profile.

  3. A Phase II study of acute toxicity for Celebrex{sup TM} (celecoxib) and chemoradiation in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer: Primary endpoint analysis of RTOG 0128

    SciTech Connect

    Gaffney, David K. . E-mail: david.gaffney@hci.utah.edu; Winter, Kathryn M.S.; Dicker, Adam P.; Miller, Brigitte; Eifel, Patricia J.; Ryu, Janice; Avizonis, Vilija; Fromm, Mitch; Greven, Kathryn

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To determine treatment-related acute toxicity rates in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer treated by oral celecoxib, i.v. cisplatin and 5-FU, and concurrent pelvic radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients on this RTOG Phase I-II study for advanced cervix cancer included FIGO Stage IIB-IVA or patients with FIGO Stage IB through IIA with biopsy proven pelvic node metastases or tumor size {>=}5 cm. Patients were treated with pelvic radiotherapy and brachytherapy. Celecoxib was prescribed at 400 mg twice daily beginning on day 1 for 1 year. Cisplatin (75 mg/m2) and 5-FU (1g/m2 for 4 days) were administered every 3 weeks times 3. The primary end point of the study was treatment related toxicity. Results: Between August 2001 and March 2004, 84 patients were accrued to the study and 77 patients were evaluable for toxicity. Regarding the primary end point, toxicities were observed in the following areas: blood/bone marrow (16), gastrointestinal (14), pain (7), renal/genitourinary (6), cardiovascular (3), hemorrhage (1), and neurologic (1). For the first 75 evaluable patients, a toxicity failure was identified in 36 patients for a rate of 48%. Conclusions: Celecoxib at 400 mg twice daily together with concurrent cisplatin and 5-FU and pelvic radiotherapy has a high incidence of acute toxicities. The most frequent toxicities were hematologic. Albeit, the toxicity was deemed excessive in this trial, the rate of toxicities was not too different compared to other recent experiences with concurrent chemoradiation for advanced cervix cancer.

  4. Optimal Timing for Assessment of Tumor Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation in Patients With Rectal Cancer: Do All Patients Benefit From Waiting Longer Than 6 Weeks?

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, Rodrigo O.; Habr-Gama, Angelita; Sao Juliao, Guilherme P.; Gama-Rodrigues, Joaquim; Sousa, Afonso H.S.; Campos, Fabio Guilherme; Imperiale, Antonio R.; Lynn, Patricio B.; Proscurshim, Igor; Nahas, Sergio Carlos; Ono, Carla Rachel; Buchpiguel, Carlos Alberto

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To estimate the metabolic activity of rectal cancers at 6 and 12 weeks after completion of chemoradiation therapy (CRT) by 2-[fluorine-18] fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-labeled positron emission tomography/computed tomography ([{sup 18}FDG]PET/CT) imaging and correlate with response to CRT. Methods and Materials: Patients with cT2-4N0-2M0 distal rectal adenocarcinoma treated with long-course neoadjuvant CRT (54 Gy, 5-fluouracil-based) were prospectively studied ( (ClinicalTrials.org) identifier (NCT00254683)). All patients underwent 3 PET/CT studies (at baseline and 6 and 12 weeks from CRT completion). Clinical assessment was at 12 weeks. Maximal standard uptake value (SUVmax) of the primary tumor was measured and recorded at each PET/CT study after 1 h (early) and 3 h (late) from {sup 18}FDG injection. Patients with an increase in early SUVmax between 6 and 12 weeks were considered 'bad' responders and the others as 'good' responders. Results: Ninety-one patients were included; 46 patients (51%) were 'bad' responders, whereas 45 (49%) patients were 'good' responders. 'Bad' responders were less likely to develop complete clinical response (6.5% vs. 37.8%, respectively; P=.001), less likely to develop significant histological tumor regression (complete or near-complete pathological response; 16% vs. 45%, respectively; P=.008) and exhibited greater final tumor dimension (4.3 cm vs. 3.3 cm; P=.03). Decrease between early (1 h) and late (3 h) SUVmax at 6-week PET/CT was a significant predictor of 'good' response (accuracy of 67%). Conclusions: Patients who developed an increase in SUVmax after 6 weeks were less likely to develop significant tumor downstaging. Early-late SUVmax variation at 6-week PET/CT may help identify these patients and allow tailored selection of CRT-surgery intervals for individual patients.

  5. A prospective phase II study of chemoradiation followed by adjuvant chemotherapy for FIGO stage I-IIIa (1988) uterine papillary serous carcinoma of the endometrium

    PubMed Central

    Jhingran, Anuja; Ramondetta, Lois M.; Bodurka, Diane C.; Slomovitz, Brian M.; Brown, Jubilee; Levy, Lawrence B.; Garcia, Michael E.; Eifel, Patricia J.; Lu, Karen H.; Burke, Thomas W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To prospectively evaluate tumor control, survival, and toxic effects in patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (1988) stage I-IIIA papillary serous carcinoma of the endometrium treated with concurrent chemoradiation and adjuvant chemotherapy. Methods Thirty-two patients were enrolled from October 2001 through July 2009. Patients underwent full surgical disease staging and postoperative concurrent weekly paclitaxel (50 mg/m2) and pelvic RT to 45 Gy plus a vaginal cuff boost followed by 4 cycles of adjuvant paclitaxel (135 mg/m2). Results Thirty patients (94%) were evaluable (3 with stage IA disease, 11 IB, 3 IC, 1 IIB, and 12 IIIA). Eighteen patients (60%) received all 5 planned courses of concurrent chemotherapy, 10 (33%) received 4 courses, and 2 (7%) received 3 courses. All 30 patients received RT; 27 (90%) received the full dose, 2 received 43.2 Gy, and 1 received 39.6 Gy owing to toxic effects. Twenty-three patients (77%) completed all 4 cycles of adjuvant paclitaxel, 3 (10%) completed 3 cycles, 2 (7%) completed 2 cycles, and 2 received no adjuvant therapy. Overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), and local control rates for all patients were 93%, 87%, and 87%, respectively, at 2 years and 85%, 83%, and 87%, respectively, at 5 years. Six patients developed (20%) grade 3/4 toxcities from the treatment. Four patients (13%) had grade 3 or more severe bowel complications and two patients developed symptomatic pelvic fractures. Conclusions Treatment with concurrent paclitaxel and pelvic RT followed by 4 courses of systemic paclitaxel produced favorable results in patients with surgically staged I-III UPSC. PMID:23385150

  6. Concurrent Chemo-Radiation With or Without Induction Gemcitabine, Carboplatin, and Paclitaxel: A Randomized, Phase 2/3 Trial in Locally Advanced Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Terence; Lim, Wan-Teck; Fong, Kam-Weng; Cheah, Shie-Lee; Soong, Yoke-Lim; Ang, Mei-Kim; Ng, Quan-Sing; Tan, Daniel; Ong, Whee-Sze; Tan, Sze-Huey; Yip, Connie; Quah, Daniel; Soo, Khee-Chee; Wee, Joseph

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: To compare survival, tumor control, toxicities, and quality of life of patients with locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) treated with induction chemotherapy and concurrent chemo-radiation (CCRT), against CCRT alone. Patients and Methods: Patients were stratified by N stage and randomized to induction GCP (3 cycles of gemcitabine 1000 mg/m{sup 2}, carboplatin area under the concentration-time-curve 2.5, and paclitaxel 70 mg/m{sup 2} given days 1 and 8 every 21 days) followed by CCRT (radiation therapy 69.96 Gy with weekly cisplatin 40 mg/m{sup 2}), or CCRT alone. The accrual of 172 was planned to detect a 15% difference in 5-year overall survival (OS) with a 5% significance level and 80% power. Results: Between September 2004 and August 2012, 180 patients were accrued, and 172 (GCP 86, control 86) were analyzed by intention to treat. There was no significant difference in OS (3-year OS 94.3% [GCP] vs 92.3% [control]; hazard ratio 1.05; 1-sided P=.494]), disease-free survival (hazard ratio 0.77, 95% confidence interval 0.44-1.35, P=.362), and distant metastases–free survival (hazard ratio 0.80, 95% confidence interval 0.38-1.67, P=.547) between the 2 arms. Treatment compliance in the induction phase was good, but the relative dose intensity for concurrent cisplatin was significantly lower in the GCP arm. Overall, the GCP arm had higher rates of grades 3 and 4 leukopenia (52% vs 37%) and neutropenia (24% vs 12%), but grade 3 and 4 acute radiation toxicities were not statistically different between the 2 arms. The global quality of life scores were comparable in both arms. Conclusion: Induction chemotherapy with GCP before concurrent chemo-irradiation did not improve survival in locally advanced NPC.

  7. Effect of adding mFOLFOX6 after neoadjuvant chemoradiation in locally advanced rectal cancer: a multicentre, phase 2 trial

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Aguilar, Julio; Chow, Oliver S; Smith, David D; Marcet, Jorge E; Cataldo, Peter A; Varma, Madhulika G; Kumar, Anjali S; Oommen, Samuel; Coutsoftides, Theodore; Hunt, Steven R; Stamos, Michael J; Ternent, Charles A; Herzig, Daniel O; Fichera, Alessandro; Polite, Blase N; Dietz, David W; Patil, Sujata; Avila, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who achieve a pathological complete response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation have an improved prognosis. The need for surgery in these patients has been questioned, but the proportion of patients achieving a pathological complete response is small. We aimed to assess whether adding cycles of mFOLFOX6 between chemoradiation and surgery increased the proportion of patients achieving a pathological complete response. Methods We did a phase 2, non-randomised trial consisting of four sequential study groups of patients with stage II–III locally advanced rectal cancer at 17 institutions in the USA and Canada. All patients received chemoradiation (fluorouracil 225 mg/m2 per day by continuous infusion throughout radiotherapy, and 45.0 Gy in 25 fractions, 5 days per week for 5 weeks, followed by a minimum boost of 5.4 Gy). Patients in group 1 had total mesorectal excision 6–8 weeks after chemoradiation. Patients in groups 2–4 received two, four, or six cycles of mFOLFOX6, respectively, between chemoradiation and total mesorectal excision. Each cycle of mFOLFOX6 consisted of racemic leucovorin 200 mg/m2 or 400 mg/m2, according to the discretion of the treating investigator, oxaliplatin 85 mg/m2 in a 2-h infusion, bolus fluorouracil 400 mg/m2 on day 1, and a 46-h infusion of fluorouracil 2400 mg/m2. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients who achieved a pathological complete response, analysed by intention to treat. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00335816. Findings Between March 24, 2004, and Nov 16, 2012, 292 patients were registered, 259 of whom (60 in group 1, 67 in group 2, 67 in group 3, and 65 in group 4) met criteria for analysis. 11 (18%, 95% CI 10–30) of 60 patients in group 1, 17 (25%, 16–37) of 67 in group 2, 20 (30%, 19–42) of 67 in group 3, and 25 (38%, 27–51) of 65 in group 4 achieved a pathological complete response (p=0.0036). Study group was

  8. Preoperative Chemoradiation With Cetuximab, Irinotecan, and Capecitabine in Patients With Locally Advanced Resectable Rectal Cancer: A Multicenter Phase II Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sun Young; Hong, Yong Sang; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Tae Won; Kim, Jee Hyun; Im, Seok Ah; Lee, Keun Seok; Yun, Tak; Jeong, Seung-Yong; Choi, Hyo Seong; Lim, Seok-Byung; Chang, Hee Jin; Jung, Kyung Hae

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of preoperative chemoradiation with cetuximab, irinotecan, and capecitabine in patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty patients with locally advanced, nonmetastatic, and mid- to lower rectal cancer were enrolled. Radiotherapy was delivered at a dose of 50.4 Gy/28 fractions. Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of an initial dose of cetuximab of 400 mg/m{sup 2} 1 week before radiotherapy, and then cetuximab 250 mg/m{sup 2}/week, irinotecan 40 mg/m{sup 2}/week for 5 consecutive weeks and capecitabine 1,650 mg/m{sup 2}/day for 5 days a week (weekdays only) from the first day during radiotherapy. Total mesorectal excision was performed within 6 {+-} 2 weeks. The pathologic responses and survival outcomes were evaluated as study endpoints, and an additional KRAS mutation analysis was performed. Results: In total, 39 patients completed their planned preoperative chemoradiation and underwent R0 resection. The pathologic complete response rate was 23.1% (9/39), and 3 patients (7.7%) showed near total regression of tumor. The 3-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 80.0% and 94.7%, respectively. Grade 3/4 toxicities included leukopenia (4, 10.3%), neutropenia (2, 5.1%), anemia (1, 2.6%), diarrhea (2, 5.1%), fatigue (1, 2.6%), skin rash (1, 2.6%), and ileus (1, 2.6%). KRAS mutations were found in 5 (13.2%) of 38 patients who had available tissue for testing. Clinical outcomes were not significantly correlated with KRAS mutation status. Conclusions: Preoperative chemoradiation with cetuximab, irinotecan, and capecitabine was active and well tolerated. KRAS mutation status was not a predictive factor for pathologic response in this study.

  9. Comparison of three different concurrent chemoradiation regimens for treatment of laryngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Aydil, Utku; Akmansu, Müge; Gumusay, Özge; Bakkal, Faruk Kadri; Yazıcı, Ömer; Kızıl, Yusuf; Köybaşıoğlu, Ahmet; Yıldız, Ramazan; Büyükberber, Süleyman; İnal, Erdoğan

    2016-09-01

    During last decades, laryngeal organ preservation strategies have emerged. The data about the oncological outcomes mainly come from multi-institutional prospective studies. In this study, we aimed to determine the oncological outcomes of different organ preservation regimens applied in routine practice. Patients who had definitive concurrent chemoradiation (CRT) for treatment of laryngeal cancer between January 2001 and June 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. There were 139 subjects who met the inclusion criteria. Three groups were defined: group A (n = 59) consisted of subjects who had concurrent cisplatin and radiotherapy (RT), group B (n = 47) consisted of subjects who had cisplatin/docetaxel-based concurrent CRT, and group C (n = 33) had induction chemotherapy before concurrent cisplatin and RT. The Kaplan-Meier estimated 5-year overall survival, disease-specific survival, disease-free survival, and local recurrence-free survival (LRFS) rates for the whole study group were 66.5, 69.2, 69.6, and 88.9 %, respectively. None of these survival rates were statistically different when the treatment arms were compared. The 3- and 5-year LRFS rates were significantly lower in subjects with a T4a tumor (p = 0.030). According to our results, the oncological outcomes of three different platinum-based concurrent chemotherapy schemes were similar and high local control rates could be achieved with the use of these protocols. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy before concurrent CRT was not superior to conventional concurrent treatment. PMID:26683470

  10. Patterns and Timing of Recurrence After Temozolomide-Based Chemoradiation for Glioblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Milano, Michael T.; Okunieff, Paul; Donatello, Rosemary S.; Mohile, Nimish A.; Sul, Joohee; Walter, Kevin A.; Korones, David N.

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: To determine recurrence patterns of glioblastoma treated with temozolomide-based chemoradiation. Methods: Pretreatment and serial posttreatment magnetic resonance imaging scans of 54 patients were retrospectively evaluated. Central recurrence (i.e., local progression) and the development of new (i.e., interval appearance of discrete enhancing lesion) in-field, marginal, and distant recurrences were assessed, with the pattern of recurrence of individual lesions defined relative to the 95% isodose line (D{sub 95}). Distant recurrences were defined as lesions completely outside D{sub 95}, marginal recurrences crossed D{sub 95}, and in-field recurrences were completely inside D{sub 95}. Results: At a median follow-up of 17 months, 39 of 54 (72%) patients developed recurrent glioblastoma. Among these 39 patients, central recurrence occurred in 80% (at a median of 7 months from diagnosis); new in-field recurrence developed in 33% (at a median of 14 months); marginal recurrences developed in 15% (at a median of 18 months); and distant recurrences developed in 20% (at a median of 11 months). The actuarial rates of central, new in-field, marginal, distant, and any new recurrences at 1-year were 46%, 15%, 3%, 14%, and 25% respectively, whereas at 2 years, the rates were 68%, 60%, 32%, 28%, and 66%, reflecting an increasing probability of new lesions developing at later time points. Ten patients developed subependymal recurrences, of whom 7 developed multiple subependymal lesions. Conclusions: Whereas central recurrence of glioblastoma treated with radiation and temozolomide predominates and persists over time, new in-field, marginal, and distant recurrences commonly develop, particularly at later time points in patients with longer survival.

  11. Fractures of the Sacrum After Chemoradiation for Rectal Carcinoma: Incidence, Risk Factors, and Radiographic Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Han Jo; Boland, Patrick J.; Meredith, Dennis S.; Lis, Eric; Zhang Zhigang; Shi Weiji; Yamada, Yoshiya J.; Goodman, Karyn A.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Sacral insufficiency fractures after adjuvant radiation for rectal carcinoma can present similarly to recurrent disease. As a complication associated with pelvic radiation, it is important to be aware of the incidence and risk factors associated with sacral fractures in the clinical assessment of these patients. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2007, a total of 582 patients with locally advanced rectal carcinoma received adjuvant chemoradiation and surgical excision. Of these, 492 patients had imaging studies available for review. Hospital records and imaging studies from all 492 patients were retrospectively evaluated to identify risk factors associated with developing a sacral insufficiency fracture. Results: With a median follow-up time of 3.5 years, the incidence of sacral fractures was 7.1% (35/492). The 4-year sacral fracture free rate was 0.91. Univariate analysis showed that increasing age ({>=}60 vs. <60 years), female sex, and history of osteoporosis were significantly associated with shorter time to sacral fracture (P=.01, P=.004, P=.001, respectively). There was no significant difference in the time to sacral fracture for patients based on stage, radiotherapy dose, or chemotherapy regimen. Multivariate analysis showed increasing age ({>=}60 vs. <60 years, hazard ratio [HR] = 2.50, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.22-5.13, P=.01), female sex (HR = 2.64, CI = 1.29-5.38, P=.008), and history of osteoporosis (HR = 3.23, CI = 1.23-8.50, P=.02) were independent risk factors associated with sacral fracture. Conclusions: Sacral insufficiency fractures after pelvic radiation for rectal carcinoma occur more commonly than previously described. Independent risk factors associated with fracture were osteoporosis, female sex, and age greater than 60 years.

  12. Twenty-Five-Year Experience With Radical Chemoradiation for Anal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Tomaszewski, Jonathan M.; Link, Emma; Leong, Trevor; Heriot, Alexander; Vazquez, Melisa; Chander, Sarat; Chu, Julie; Foo, Marcus; Lee, Mark T.; Lynch, Craig A.; Mackay, John; Michael, Michael; Tran, Phillip; Ngan, Samuel Y.

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic factors, patterns of failure, and late toxicity in patients treated with chemoradiation (CRT) for anal cancer. Methods and Materials: Consecutive patients with nonmetastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the anus treated by CRT with curative intent between February 1983 and March 2008 were identified through the institutional database. Chart review and telephone follow-up were undertaken to collect demographic data and outcome. Results: Two hundred eighty-four patients (34% male; median age 62 years) were identified. The stages at diagnosis were 23% Stage I, 48% Stage II, 10% Stage IIIA, and 18% Stage IIIB. The median radiotherapy dose to the primary site was 54 Gy. A complete clinical response to CRT was achieved in 89% of patients. With a median follow-up time of 5.3 years, the 5-year rates of locoregional control, distant control, colostomy-free survival, and overall survival were 83% (95% confidence interval [CI] 78-88), 92% (95% CI, 89-96), 73% (95% CI, 68-79), and 82% (95% CI, 77-87), respectively. Higher T stage and male sex predicted for locoregional failure, and higher N stage predicted for distant metastases. Locoregional failure occurred most commonly at the primary site. Omission of elective inguinal irradiation resulted in inguinal failure rates of 1.9% and 12.5% in T1N0 and T2N0 patients, respectively. Pelvic nodal failures were very uncommon. Late vaginal and bone toxicity was observed in addition to gastrointestinal toxicity. Conclusions: CRT is a highly effective approach in anal cancer. However, subgroups of patients fare relatively poorly, and novel approaches are needed. Elective inguinal irradiation can be safely omitted only in patients with Stage I disease. Vaginal toxicity and insufficiency fractures of the hip and pelvis are important late effects that require prospective evaluation.

  13. Optimal time interval between capecitabine intake and radiotherapy in preoperative chemoradiation for locally advanced rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Chang Sik; Kim, Tae Won; Kim, Jong Hoon . E-mail: jhkim2@amc.seoul.kr; Choi, Won Sik; Kim, Hee Cheol; Chang, Heung Moon; Ryu, Min Hee; Jang, Se Jin; Ahn, Seung Do; Lee, Sang-wook; Shin, Seong Soo; Choi, Eun Kyung; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: Capecitabine and its metabolites reach peak plasma concentrations 1 to 2 hours after a single oral administration, and concentrations rapidly decrease thereafter. We performed a retrospective analysis to find the optimal time interval between capecitabine administration and radiotherapy for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: The time interval between capecitabine intake and radiotherapy was measured in patients who were treated with preoperative radiotherapy and concurrent capecitabine for rectal cancer. Patients were classified into the following groups. Group A1 included patients who took capecitabine 1 hour before radiotherapy, and Group B1 included all other patients. Group B1 was then subdivided into Group A2 (patients who took capecitabine 2 hours before radiotherapy) and Group B2. Group B2 was further divided into Group A3 and Group B3 with the same method. Total mesorectal excision was performed 6 weeks after completion of chemoradiation and the pathologic response was evaluated. Results: A total of 200 patients were enrolled in this study. Pathologic examination showed that Group A1 had higher rates of complete regression of primary tumors in the rectum (23.5% vs. 9.6%, p = 0.01), good response (44.7% vs. 25.2%, p = 0.006), and lower T stages (p = 0.021) compared with Group B1; however, Groups A2 and A3 did not show any improvement compared with Groups B2 and B3. Multivariate analysis showed that increases in primary tumors in the rectum and good response were only significant when capecitabine was administered 1 hour before radiotherapy. Conclusion: In preoperative chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer, the pathologic response could be improved by administering capecitabine 1 hour before radiotherapy.

  14. Adjuvant chemotherapy in rectal cancer: defining subgroups who may benefit after neoadjuvant chemoradiation and resection

    PubMed Central

    Maas, Monique; Nelemans, Patty J; Valentini, Vincenzo; Crane, Christopher H; Capirci, Carlo; Rödel, Claus; Nash, Garrett M; Kuo, Li-Jen; Glynne-Jones, Rob; García-Aguilar, Julio; Suárez, Javier; Calvo, Felipe A; Pucciarelli, Salvatore; Biondo, Sebastiano; Theodoropoulos, George; Lambregts, Doenja MJ; Beets-Tan, Regina GH; Beets, Geerard L

    2016-01-01

    Recent literature suggests that the benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy (aCT) for rectal cancer patients might depend on the response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation (CRT). Aim was to evaluate whether the effect of aCT in rectal cancer is modified by response to CRT and to identify which patients benefit from aCT after CRT, by means of a pooled analysis of individual patient data from 13 datasets. Patients were categorised into 3 groups: pCR (ypT0N0), ypT1-2 tumour and ypT3-4 tumour. Hazard ratios for the effect of aCT were derived from multivariable Cox regression analyses. Primary outcome measure was recurrence-free survival (RFS). 1723(52%) of 3313 included patients received aCT. 898 patients had a pCR, 966 had a ypT1-2 tumour and 1302 had a ypT3-4 tumour. For 122 patients response category was missing and 25 patients had ypT0N+. Median follow-up for all patients was 51 (0-219) months. Hazard ratios for RFS with 95%CI for patients treated with aCT were 1.25(0.68-2.29), 0.58(0.37-0.89) and 0.83(0.66-1.10) for patients with pCR, ypT1-2 and ypT3-4 tumours, respectively. The effect of aCT in rectal cancer patients treated with CRT differs between subgroups. Patients with a pCR after CRT may not benefit from aCT, whereas patients with residual tumour had superior outcomes when aCT was administered. The test for interaction did not reach statistical significance, but the results support further investigation of a more individualized approach to administer aCT after CRT and surgery based on pathologic staging. PMID:25418551

  15. [Certain aspects of neoadjuvant therapy of locally advanced breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Voznyĭ, E K; Gurov, S N; Dobrovol'skaia, N Iu

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents the results of a complex investigation of patients with locally-advanced breast cancer who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy or chemoradiation at initial stage. The clinical and pathomorphological effects, nature of neoadjuvant therapy and number of courses were followed up for 5- and 10-year periods. A direct correlation was found between number of courses for chemotherapy-sensitive patients, on the one hand, and greater effect, more intensive medicinal pathomorphism and longer recurrence-free survival, particularly, at later stages, on the other. PMID:11826490

  16. Living Donor Liver Transplantation for Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Portal Vein Tumor Thrombosis after Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Han, Dai Hoon; Joo, Dong Jin; Kim, Myoung Soo; Choi, Gi Hong; Choi, Jin Sub; Park, Young Nyun; Seong, Jinsil; Han, Kwang Hyub; Kim, Soon Il

    2016-09-01

    Locally advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with portal vein thrombosis carries a 1-year survival rate <10%. Localized concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT), followed by hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC), was recently introduced in this setting. Here, we report our early experience with living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) in such patients after successful down-staging of HCC through CCRT and HAIC. Between December 2011 and September 2012, eight patients with locally advanced HCC at initial diagnosis were given CCRT, followed by HAIC, and underwent LDLT at the Severance Hospital, Seoul, Korea. CCRT [45 Gy over 5 weeks with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) as HAIC] was followed by HAIC (5-FU/cisplatin combination every 4 weeks for 3-12 months), adjusted for tumor response. Down-staging succeeded in all eight patients, leaving no viable tumor thrombi in major vessels, although three patients first underwent hepatic resections. Due to deteriorating liver function, transplantation was the sole therapeutic option and offered a chance for cure. The 1-year disease-free survival rate was 87.5%. There were three instances of post-transplantation tumor recurrence during follow-up monitoring (median, 17 months; range, 10-22 months), but no deaths occurred. Median survival time from initial diagnosis was 33 months. Four postoperative complications recorded in three patients (anastomotic strictures: portal vein, 2; bile duct, 2) were resolved through radiologic interventions. Using an intensive tumor down-staging protocol of CCRT followed by HAIC, LDLT may be a therapeutic option for selected patients with locally advanced HCC and portal vein tumor thrombosis. PMID:27401662

  17. Living Donor Liver Transplantation for Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Portal Vein Tumor Thrombosis after Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Han, Dai Hoon; Joo, Dong Jin; Kim, Myoung Soo; Choi, Gi Hong; Choi, Jin Sub; Park, Young Nyun; Seong, Jinsil

    2016-01-01

    Locally advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with portal vein thrombosis carries a 1-year survival rate <10%. Localized concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT), followed by hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC), was recently introduced in this setting. Here, we report our early experience with living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) in such patients after successful down-staging of HCC through CCRT and HAIC. Between December 2011 and September 2012, eight patients with locally advanced HCC at initial diagnosis were given CCRT, followed by HAIC, and underwent LDLT at the Severance Hospital, Seoul, Korea. CCRT [45 Gy over 5 weeks with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) as HAIC] was followed by HAIC (5-FU/cisplatin combination every 4 weeks for 3–12 months), adjusted for tumor response. Down-staging succeeded in all eight patients, leaving no viable tumor thrombi in major vessels, although three patients first underwent hepatic resections. Due to deteriorating liver function, transplantation was the sole therapeutic option and offered a chance for cure. The 1-year disease-free survival rate was 87.5%. There were three instances of post-transplantation tumor recurrence during follow-up monitoring (median, 17 months; range, 10–22 months), but no deaths occurred. Median survival time from initial diagnosis was 33 months. Four postoperative complications recorded in three patients (anastomotic strictures: portal vein, 2; bile duct, 2) were resolved through radiologic interventions. Using an intensive tumor down-staging protocol of CCRT followed by HAIC, LDLT may be a therapeutic option for selected patients with locally advanced HCC and portal vein tumor thrombosis. PMID:27401662

  18. Changes in Cervical Cancer FDG Uptake During Chemoradiation and Association With Response

    SciTech Connect

    Kidd, Elizabeth A.; Thomas, Maria; Siegel, Barry A.; Dehdashti, Farrokh; Division of Nuclear Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri ; Grigsby, Perry W.; Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, St. Louis, Missouri; Division of Nuclear Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri; Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Previous research showed that pretreatment uptake of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), as assessed by the maximal standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) and the variability of uptake (FDG{sub hetero}), predicted for posttreatment response in cervical cancer. In this pilot study, we evaluated the changes in SUV{sub max} and FDG{sub hetero} during concurrent chemoradiation for cervical cancer and their association with post-treatment response. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five patients with stage Ib1-IVa cervical cancer were enrolled. SUV{sub max}, FDG{sub hetero}, and metabolic tumor volume (MTV) were recorded from FDG-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) scans performed pretreatment and during weeks 2 and 4 of treatment and were evaluated for changes and association with response assessed on 3-month post-treatment FDG-PET/CT. Results: For all patients, the average pretreatment SUV{sub max} was 17.8, MTV was 55.4 cm{sup 3}, and FDG{sub hetero} was -1.33. A similar decline in SUV{sub max} was seen at week 2 compared with baseline and week 4 compared with week 2 (34%). The areas of highest FDG uptake in the tumor remained relatively consistent on serial scans. Mean FDG{sub hetero} decreased during treatment. For all patients, MTV decreased more from week 2 to week 4 than from pretreatment to week 2. By week 4, the average SUV{sub max} had decreased by 57% and the MTV had decreased by 30%. Five patients showed persistent or new disease on 3-month post-treatment PET. These poor responders showed a higher average SUV{sub max}, larger MTV, and greater heterogeneity at all 3 times. Week 4 SUV{sub max} (P=.037), week 4 FDG{sub hetero} (P=.005), pretreatment MTV (P=.008), and pretreatment FDG{sub hetero} (P=.008) were all significantly associated with post-treatment PET response. Conclusions: SUV{sub max} shows a consistent rate of decline during treatment and declines at a faster rate than MTV regresses. Based on this pilot study

  19. Toxicity profile and clinical outcomes in locally advanced head and neck cancer patients treated with induction chemotherapy prior to concurrent chemoradiation.

    PubMed

    Ko, Eric C; Genden, Eric M; Misiukiewicz, Krzysztof; Som, Peter M; Kostakoglu, Lale; Chen, Chien-Ting; Packer, Stuart; Kao, Johnny

    2012-02-01

    The use of induction chemotherapy prior to chemoradiation for locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (LA-HNSCC) remains controversial. We explored whether toxicity from induction chemotherapy influenced the delivery of concurrent chemoradiation. Among 171 consecutive previously unirradiated patients with HNSCC treated with combined chemotherapy and radiation, we identified 66 patients with stage III-IVB head and neck carcinoma who were treated with induction chemotherapy prior to planned chemoradiation. The most common induction regimen was docetaxel, cisplatin and 5-FU (TPF; 80%) for 2 to 3 cycles. Mean radiation dose was 72 Gy (range, 36-75 Gy). Concurrent chemotherapy regimens included cisplatin (26%), cetuximab (5%) and 5-fluorouracil/hydroxyurea (65%)-based regimens. At a median follow-up of 27 months (range, 9-56 months), the 2-year locoregional control and distant control rates were 85 and 86%, respectively. The 2-year disease-free survival and overall survival rates were 74 and 80%, respectively. Although there were no grade 5 toxicities during induction chemotherapy, 26% of patients required hospitalization for adverse events, including 5% needing intensive care. The most common high grade adverse events were grade 4 neutropenia (21%) and neutropenic fever (17%). Six percent of patients were unable to tolerate concurrent chemotherapy. The 2-year disease-free survival was significantly higher in patients able to complete induction and concurrent chemoradiation as planned (83 vs. 27%, p<0.001). Induction chemotherapy followed by concurrent chemoradiation results in promising survival rates in our cohort of advanced head and neck carcinoma patients. Due to severe toxicities in a subset of patients, this strategy is only recommended in selected high-risk patients who are carefully followed by an experienced multidisciplinary team. PMID:22020564

  20. Effects of Change in Tongue Pressure and Salivary Flow Rate on Swallow Efficiency Following Chemoradiation Treatment for Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rogus-Pulia, Nicole M; Larson, Charles; Mittal, Bharat B; Pierce, Marge; Zecker, Steven; Kennelty, Korey; Kind, Amy; Connor, Nadine P

    2016-10-01

    Patients treated with chemoradiation for head and neck cancer frequently develop dysphagia. Tissue damage to the oral tongue causing weakness along with decreases in saliva production may contribute to dysphagia. Yet, effects of these variables on swallowing-related measures are unclear. The purpose of this study was (1) to determine effects of chemoradiation on tongue pressures, as a surrogate for strength, and salivary flow rates and (2) to elucidate relationships among tongue pressures, saliva production, and swallowing efficiency by bolus type. Twenty-one patients with head and neck cancer treated with chemoradiation were assessed before and after treatment and matched with 21 healthy control participants who did not receive chemoradiation. Each participant was given a questionnaire to rate dysphagia symptoms. Videofluoroscopic Evaluation of Swallowing (VFES) was used to determine swallowing efficiency; the Saxon test measured salivary flow rate; and the Iowa Oral Performance Instrument (IOPI) was used for oral tongue maximum and endurance measures. Results revealed significantly lower tongue endurance measures for patients post-treatment as compared to controls (p = .012). Salivary flow rates also were lower compared to pre-treatment (p = .000) and controls (p = .000). Simple linear regression analyses showed that change in salivary flow rate was predictive of change in swallow efficiency measures from pre- to post-treatment for 1 mL thin liquid (p = .017), 3 mL nectar-thick liquid (p = .026), and 3 mL standard barium pudding (p = .011) boluses. Based on these findings, it appears that chemoradiation treatment affects tongue endurance and salivary flow rate, and these changes may impact swallow efficiency. These factors should be considered when planning treatment for dysphagia. PMID:27492408

  1. TARGETED THERAPIES FOR PANCREATIC CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Danovi, S A; Wong, H H; Lemoine, N R

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Pancreatic cancer is a devastating malignancy and a leading cause of cancer mortality. Furthermore, early diagnosis represents a serious hurdle for clinicians as symptoms are non-specific and usually manifest in advanced, treatment-resistant stages of the disease. Sources of data Here, we review the rationale and progress of targeted therapies currently under investigation. Areas of agreement At present, chemoradiation regimes are administered palliatively, and produce only marginal survival benefits, underscoring a desperate need for more effective treatment modalities. Areas of controversy Questions have been raised as to whether erlotinib, the only targeted therapy to attain a statistically significant increase in median survival, is cost-effective. Growing points The last decade of research has provided us with a wealth of information regarding the molecular nature of pancreatic cancer, leading to the identification of signalling pathways and their respective components which are critical for the maintenance of the malignant phenotype. Areas timely for developing research These proteins thus represent ideal targets for novel molecular therapies which embody an urgently needed novel treatment strategy. PMID:18753179

  2. Pancreatic Cancer: Progress in Systemic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Perkhofer, Lukas; Ettrich, Thomas J.; Seufferlein, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Background Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the Western world. Due to lack of specific symptoms and no accessible precursor lesions, primary diagnosis is commonly delayed, resulting in the identification of only 15-20% of patients with potentially curable disease. The major limiting factor is an already locally advanced or metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis. Consequently, systemic therapy forms the backbone of treatment strategy for the majority of patients. Summary A deeper understanding of the molecular characteristics of pancreatic cancer has led to the identification of several potential therapeutic targets. A variety of targeted therapies are currently under clinical evaluation as single agents or in combination with chemotherapy for PDAC. This review highlights the current state of chemotherapy in pancreatic cancer and provides an outlook on its future perspectives. Key Message This review focuses on the current chemotherapy regimens for the systemic treatment of PDAC. Practical Implications Various neoadjuvant approaches have been explored, including chemoradiation, chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation or intensified chemotherapy without defining a standard of care so far. The standard of care is gemcitabine or 5-fluorouracil. The oral fluoropyrimidine S-1 may be a promising new agent in this setting. For first-line treatment of metastatic pancreatic cancer, no targeted therapy has yet demonstrated clinical benefit apart from the combination of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib plus gemcitabine. Recently, novel chemotherapeutic regimens such as FOLFIRINOX and gemcitabine plus nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel have been introduced. Both combinations have proved to be superior to the standard gemcitabine regimen. For second-line treatment the combination of 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin and oxaliplatin yields improved results compared to best supportive care. PMID:26672477

  3. Chemoradiation for Advanced Head and Neck Cancer: Potential for Improving Results to Match Those of Current Treatment Modalities for Early-Stage Tumors-Long-Term Results of Hyperfractionated Chemoradiation With Carbogen Breathing and Anemia Correction With Erythropoietin

    SciTech Connect

    Villar, Alfonso Martinez, Jose Carlos; Serdio, Jose Luis de

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: To attempt to improve results of chemoradiation for head and neck cancer. Methods and Materials: From March 1996 to April 2007, 98 patients with head and neck cancer (15 Stage III and 83 Stage IV) were treated with a twice-daily hyperfractionated schedule. Eleven patients presented with N0, 11 with N1, 13 with N2A, 17 with N2B, 24 with N2C, and 22 with N3. Each fraction of treatment consisted of 5 mg/m{sup 2} of carboplatin plus 115 cGy with carbogen breathing. Treatment was given 5 days per week up to total doses of 350 mg/m{sup 2} of carboplatin plus 8050 cGy in 7 weeks. Anemia was corrected with erythropoietin. Results: Ninety-six patients tolerated the treatment as scheduled. All patients tolerated the planned radiation dose. Local toxicity remained at the level expected with irradiation alone. Chemotherapy toxicity was moderate. Ninety-seven complete responses were achieved. After 11 years of follow-up (median, 81 months), actuarial locoregional control, cause-specific survival, overall survival, and nodal control rates at 5 and 10 years were, respectively, 83% and 83%, 68% and 68%, 57% and 55%, and 100% and 100%. Median follow-up of disease-free survivors was 80 months. No significant differences in survival were observed between the different subsites or between the pretreatment node status groups (N0 vs. N+, N0 vs. N1, N0 vs. N2A, N0 vs. N2B, N0 vs. N2C, and N0 vs. N3). Conclusions: Improving results of chemoradiation for advanced head and neck cancer up to the level obtained with current treatments for early-stage tumors is a potentially reachable goal.

  4. The relative prognostic utility of standardized uptake value, gross tumor volume, and metabolic tumor volume in oropharyngeal cancer patients treated with platinum based concurrent chemoradiation with a pre-treatment [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography scan

    PubMed Central

    Romesser, Paul B.; Lim, Remy; Spratt, Daniel E.; Setton, Jeremy; Riaz, Nadeem; Lok, Benjamin; Rao, Shyam; Sherman, Eric J.; Schöder, Heiko; Lee, Nancy Y.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study compared the relative prognostic utility of the gross tumor volume (GTV), maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), and metabolic tumor volume (MTV) in a uniform cohort of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) patients treated with platinum-based concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT). Methods and Materials One-hundred OPSCC with a pretreatment [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography positron-emission tomography computed-tomography (PET-CT) were treated with CCRT. Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox proportional hazard models were generated. Results When dichotomized by the median, a smaller MTV correlated with improved 5-year locoregional control (LRC) (98.0% versus 87.0%, p = .049), freedom from distant metastasis (FDM) (91.7% versus 65.0%, p = .005), progression-free survival (PFS) (80.3% versus 56.7%, p = .015), and overall survival (OS) (84.1% versus 57.8%, p = .008), whereas a smaller GTV correlated with improved PFS (80.3% versus 57.4%, p = .040) and OS (82.1% versus 60.1%, p = .025). SUVmax failed to correlate with any outcome. On multivariate analysis, when adjusted for GTV, T-stage, and N-stage a smaller MTV remained independently correlated with improved FDM, PFS, and OS. GTV failed to reach significance in the multivariate model. Conclusions A smaller MTV correlates with improved LRC, FDM, PFS, and OS in OPSCC patients undergoing platinum-based CCRT. PMID:25043882

  5. [Combined modality therapy for a patient with primary adrenal lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Matsuno, Teppei; Kuroda, Hiroyuki; Jomen, Wataru; Yoshida, Masahiro; Yamada, Michiko; Sato, Masanori; Abe, Tomoyuki; Sakurai, Tamaki; Fujii, Shigeyuki; Maeda, Masahiro; Fujita, Miri; Nagashima, Kazuo; Nojiri, Shuichi; Arihara, Yohei; Kato, Junji

    2014-04-01

    A 71-year-old man with malaise, anorexia, and weight loss was referred to our hospital from a clinic. Abdominal computed tomography(CT)revealed bilateral adrenal masses. An ultrasound-guided percutaneous needle biopsy of the adrenal grand indicated diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. A rapid adrenocorticotropic hormone(ACTH)test revealed primary adrenal failure. Rituximab-cyclophosphamide/doxorubicin/vincristine/prednisolone(common name, R-CHOP)therapy accompanied by intrathecal treatment was initiated along with steroid replacement therapy. After the fourth courses, a CT scan showed a reduction of the adrenal masses, and there was no[18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose(FDG)uptake in the adrenal masses. The patient has remained in metabolic complete remission. Subsequently, both adrenal lymphomas were irradiated. The patient has been disease-free for 6 months after the diagnosis of primary adrenal lymphoma. The combined modality of chemoradiation therapy plus intrathecal treatment could be effective for primary adrenal lymphoma with a poor prognosis. PMID:24743371

  6. Concurrent therapy to enhance radiotherapeutic outcomes in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma is one of the most fatal and incurable human cancers characterized by nuclear atypia, mitotic activity, intense microvascular proliferation and necrosis. The current standard of care includes maximal safe surgical resection followed by radiation therapy (RT) with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ). The prognosis remains poor with median survival of 14.6 months with RT plus TMZ. Majority will have a recurrence within 2 years from diagnosis despite adequate treatment. Radiosensitizers, radiotherapy dose escalation and altered fractionation have failed to improve outcome. The molecular biology of glioblastoma is complex and poses treatment challenges. High rate of mutation, genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity, rapid development of resistance, existence of blood-brain barrier (BBB), multiple intracellular and intercellular signalling pathways, over-expression of growth factor receptors, angiogenesis and antigenic diversity renders the tumor cells differentially susceptible to various treatment modalities. Thus, the treatment strategies require personalised or individualized approach based on the characteristics of tumor. Several targeted agents have been evaluated in clinical trials but the results have been modest despite these advancements. This review summarizes the current standard of care, results of concurrent chemoradiation trials, evolving innovative treatments that use targeted therapy with standard chemoradiation or RT alone, outcome of various recent trials and future outlook. PMID:26904576

  7. Chemoradiation May Help Some Patients with Bladder Cancer Avoid Radical Surgery

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers in the United Kingdom have found that adding chemotherapy to radiation therapy as a treatment for bladder cancer may reduce the risk of a recurrence more than radiation alone, without causing a substantial increase in side effects.

  8. Genomic copy number changes affecting the thymidylate synthase (TYMS) gene in cancer: a model for patient classification to aid fluoropyrimidine therapy.

    PubMed

    Brody, Jonathan R; Hucl, Tomas; Gallmeier, Eike; Winter, Jordan M; Kern, Scott E; Murphy, Kathleen M

    2006-10-01

    Thymidylate synthase (TS) is an important target for 5-fluorouracil (5FU)-based therapy. The TS polymorphic 5'-untranslated region tandem repeat sequence is under investigation to guide 5FU treatment, yet current protocols omit consideration of copy number changes at the TS locus. We surveyed the TS tandem repeat sequence and found copy number changes in gastrointestinal cancers. Ten of 12 informative cases had loss of heterozygosity (LOH), whereas two others and an additional cell line had a novel TS genotype, allelic imbalance at the TS locus due to polysomy. Experimentally, we studied a diploid colorectal cancer line heterozygous at TS to mimic three common TS genotypes of cancers. Using genetic engineering, we deleted the short tandem repeat (two repeats) allele and retained the long (three repeats) allele to produce artificial LOH at the TS gene; the TS(+/-) line had a reduced TS protein expression and was hypersensitive to 5FU and 5-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine in vitro as compared with syngeneic control lines. We linked this sensitivity directly to the reduced TS expression by introducing exogenous TS cDNA expression into the TS(+/-) line (i.e., increased TS copies). Our model predicts that the 5FU sensitivity of a tumor is modified by aneuploidy producing copy number changes of TS alleles by one or more of the following: LOH, amplification, and, as presented here, copy number changes due to polysomy. The data suggest that TS copy number in a patient's tumor may be a dominating variable affecting 5FU responsiveness. PMID:17018589

  9. Functional Promoter Variant rs2868371 of HSPB1 Is Associated With Risk of Radiation Pneumonitis After Chemoradiation for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, Qingsong; Wei, Qingyi; Xu, Ting; Yuan, Xianglin; Lopez Guerra, Jose Luis; Levy, Lawrence B.; Liu, Zhensheng; Gomez, Daniel R.; Zhuang, Yan; Wang, Li-E.; Mohan, Radhe; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao, Zhongxing

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To date, no biomarkers have been found to predict, before treatment, which patients will develop radiation pneumonitis (RP), a potentially fatal toxicity, after chemoradiation for lung cancer. We investigated potential associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in HSPB1 and risk of RP after chemoradiation for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Subjects were patients with NSCLC treated with chemoradiation at 1 institution. The training data set comprised 146 patients treated from 1999 to July 2004; the validation data set was 125 patients treated from August 2004 to March 2010. We genotyped 2 functional SNPs of HSPB1 (rs2868370 and rs2868371) from all patients. We used Kaplan-Meier analysis to assess the risk of grade ≥2 or ≥3 RP in both data sets and a parametric log-logistic survival model to evaluate the association of HSPB1 genotypes with that risk. Results: Grade ≥3 RP was experienced by 13% of those with CG/GG and 29% of those with CC genotype of HSPB1 rs2868371 in the training data set (P=.028); corresponding rates in the validation data set were 2% CG/GG and 14% CC (P=.02). Univariate and multivariate analysis confirmed the association of CC of HSPB1 rs2868371 with higher risk of grade ≥3 RP than CG/GG after adjustment for sex, age, performance status, and lung mean dose. This association was validated both in the validation data set and with Harrell's C statistic. Conclusions: The CC genotype of HSPB1 rs2868371 was associated with severe RP after chemoradiation for NSCLC.

  10. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy or chemotherapy followed by surgery is superior to that followed by definitive chemoradiation or radiotherapy in stage IIIA (N2) nonsmall-cell lung cancer: a meta-analysis and system review

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiao-Ling; Dan, Li; Chen, Wei; Zhu, Shuang-Mei; Mao, Wei-Min

    2016-01-01

    Background Approximately 30% of all cases of nonsmall-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are of a locally advanced (IIIA or IIIB) stage. However, surgical therapy for patients with stage IIIA (N2) NSCLC is associated with a disappointing 5-year survival rate. The optimal treatment for stage IIIA (N2) NSCLC is still in dispute. Methods A literature search was performed in the PubMed, Embase, and MEDLINE databases (last search updated in March 2015), and a meta-analysis of the available data was conducted. Two authors independently extracted data from each eligible study. Results A total of nine studies, including five randomized controlled trials and four retrospective studies, were enrolled in this meta-analysis. Significant homogeneity (χ2=49.62, P=0.000, I2=81.9%) was detected between four of the studies, including a total of 11,948 selected cases. Among the nine studies that investigated overall survival, the pooled hazard ratio (HR) was 0.70 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.56–0.87; P=0.000). Subgroup analyses were performed according to the study design and the extent of resection. We observed a statistically significant better outcome after lobectomy (pooled HR: 0.52; 95% CI: 0.47–0.58; P=0.000) than after pneumonectomy (pooled HR: 0.82; 95% CI: 0.69–0.98; P=0.028). Unfortunately, there was no significant difference between the randomized controlled studies, as the pooled HR was 0.94 (95% CI: 0.81–1.09; P=0.440). Conclusion Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy or chemotherapy followed by surgery (particularly lobectomy) is superior to following these therapies with definitive chemoradiation or radiotherapy, particularly in patients undergoing lobectomy. PMID:26955282

  11. CD200 is related to cancer-stem-cell features and modulates response to chemoradiation in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yuh-S.; Vermeer, Paola D.; Vermeer, Daniel W.; Lee, Sang-Jin; Goh, Ah Ra; Ahn, Hyun-Joo; Lee, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Background We sought to characterize the expression of CD200, a membrane protein that functions in immune evasion, to examine its correlations with cancer stem cell-like features and analyze its response to chemotherapy and radiation, in human papillomavirus (HPV) positive and negative head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs). Methods CD200 expression was analyzed in several HNSCC cell lines. CD200 was over-expressed in HPV(+) murine tonsil epithelial cells, its effects on Shh and Bmi-1 examined in vitro, and tumor growth and response to chemoradiation analyzed in vitro and in vivo. Results CD200 was diversely expressed, consistently associated with expression of Bmi-1 and Shh. Overexpression of CD200 induced Bmi-1 and Shh. Tumor grew similarly between C57BL/6 and Rag1−/− C57BL6 mice. ,. CD200 expression enhanced the resistance to chemoradiation only in vivo. Conclusions CD200 was related to cancer-stem-cell features and modulates response to chemoradiation in vivo. Attenuating this might be a potential therapeutic strategy. PMID:24700450

  12. Tracheo-parenchymal fistula following concurrent chemo-radiation for stage III NSCLC.

    PubMed

    Alzghoul, Bashar; Meena, Nikhil

    2016-01-01

    Non-Small Cell Cancer (NSCLC) are frequently diagnosed at a later stage [1]. Treatment involves chemotherapy and radiation, either sequentially or concurrently [2]. Concurrent therapy is more efficacious but also associated with more complications [4-6]. We present a rare care of trachea-pulmonary fistula formation after concurrent chemo and radiation in a patient with Squamous Cell Cancer (SCC). PMID:27144112

  13. Radiation Therapy in the Management of Head-and-Neck Cancer of Unknown Primary Origin: How Does the Addition of Concurrent Chemotherapy Affect the Therapeutic Ratio?

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M.; Farwell, D. Gregory; Lau, Derick H.; Li Baoqing; Luu, Quang; Donald, Paul J.

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To determine how the addition of cisplatin-based concurrent chemotherapy to radiation therapy influences outcomes among a cohort of patients treated for head-and-neck cancer of unknown primary origin. Methods and Materials: The medical records of 60 consecutive patients treated by radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck presenting as cervical lymph node metastasis of occult primary origin were reviewed. Thirty-two patients (53%) were treated by concurrent chemoradiation, and 28 patients (47%) were treated by radiation therapy alone. Forty-five patients (75%) received radiation therapy after surgical resection, and 15 patients (25%) received primary radiation therapy. Thirty-five patients (58%) were treated by intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Results: The 2-year estimates of overall survival, local-regional control, and progression-free survival were 89%, 89%, and 79%, respectively, among patients treated by chemoradiation, compared to 90%, 92%, and 83%, respectively, among patients treated by radiation therapy alone (p > 0.05, for all). Exploratory analysis failed to identify any subset of patients who benefited from the addition of concurrent chemotherapy to radiation therapy. The use of concurrent chemotherapy was associated with a significantly increased incidence of Grade 3+ acute and late toxicity (p < 0.001, for both). Conclusions: Concurrent chemoradiation is associated with significant toxicity without a clear advantage to overall survival, local-regional control, and progression-free survival in the treatment of head-and-neck cancer of unknown primary origin. Although selection bias cannot be ignored, prospective data are needed to further address this question.

  14. Post-radiotherapy neck dissection improves control at non-regional disease sites after definitive chemoradiation for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    PubMed Central

    Ranck, Mark C.; Abundo, Rainier; Jefferson, Gina; Kolokythas, Antonia; Wenig, Barry L.; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.; Spiotto, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Importance After chemoradiation for head and neck cancer, over ninety percent of patients who achieved a complete response by imaging were regionally controlled without post-radiotherapy neck dissections (PRND). Since several groups have reported that lymph node involvement also predicted failure at both primary and distant sites, it remains unclear the extent to which PRND impacts non-regional sites of disease. Objective Here, we evaluated how PRND impacted local and distant control in patients who achieved a clinical complete response. Design We retrospectively reviewed patients treated for stage III/IV disease with definitive chemoradiation between 1990 to 2012. Setting University of Illinois at Chicago. Participants 287 patients were treated with definitive CRT, of whom seventy-four underwent PRND. Median follow up was 25.4 months. Interventions Chemoradiation followed by lymph node dissection or observation. Main Outcomes and Measures Endpoints evaluated included local control (LC), regional control (RC), freedom from distant metastasis (FFDM), progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) using first-failure analysis. Results Patients with advanced nodal disease (≥N2b; n=176) had improved PFS (74.6% vs. 39.1%; P<.001) while patients with lesser nodal disease had similar PFS. For patients with advanced nodal disease, PRND improved 2-year LC (85.5 vs. 53.5%; p<.001), locoregional control with PRND (78.9% vs. 45.7%; P<.001), FFDM (79.5% vs. 67.5%%; P=.03) and OS (84.5% vs. 61.7%; P=.004) but not RC (96.9% vs. 90.1%; P=.21) The benefit in LC (87.4% vs. 66.2%; P=.02) and PFS (80.7% vs. 53.4%; P=.01) persisted for those with negative post-treatment imaging who underwent PRND. On univariate analysis, PRND, alcohol use, nodal stage and chemoradiation significantly impacted 2 year LC and/or PFS. On multivariate analysis, PRND remained strongly prognostic for 2 year LC (HR 0.22; P=.0007) and PFS (HR 0.42; P=.002). Conclusions and Relevance PRND improved

  15. A phase II study of adjuvant gemcitabine plus docetaxel followed by concurrent chemoradation in resected pancreaticobiliary carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cho, May; Wang-Gillam, Andrea; Myerson, Robert; Gao, Feng; Strasberg, Steven; Picus, Joel; Sorscher, Steven; Fournier, Chloe; Nagaraj, Gayathri; Parikh, Parag; Suresh, Rama; Linehan, David; Tan, Benjamin R

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Adjuvant gemcitabine with or without chemoradiation is a standard therapeutic option for patients with resected pancreatic cancer. The feasibility and toxicity of gemcitabine with docetaxel before and after 5-fluorouracil (5FU)-based chemoradiation in the adjuvant pancreatic and biliary cancer setting were investigated. Methods After a curative-intent resection, eligible patients with pancreaticobiliary cancers were treated with two cycles of gemcitabine and docetaxel followed by 5FU-based chemoradiation. Four weeks after completing chemoradiation, two cycles of gemcitabine and docetaxel were administered. The primary endpoint was the incidence of severe toxicities. Secondary endpoints included disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Results Fifty patients with pancreaticobiliary cancers were enrolled. Twenty-nine patients had pancreatic cancer whereas 21 patients had biliary tract or ampullary cancers. There was one death as a result of pneumonia, and 15% of patients experienced grade 3 or greater non-haematological toxicities. The median DFS and OS for patients with pancreatic cancer were 9.6 and 17 months, respectively, and for those with resected biliary tract cancer were 12 and 23 months, respectively. Conclusions This combination of gemcitabine and docetaxel with chemoradiation is feasible and tolerable in the adjuvant setting. Future studies utilizing a different gemcitabine/taxane combination and schedule may be appropriate in the adjuvant treatment of both pancreatic cancer and biliary tumours. PMID:25800066

  16. (Neo)-adjuvant chemo(-radio) therapy for adenocarcinomas of the gastroesophageal junction and the stomach in the West.

    PubMed

    Wilke, Hansjochen; Lordick, Florian; Meyer, Hans-Joachim; Stahl, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Worldwide, the treatment of adenocarcinomas of the gastroesophageal junction and stomach has changed over the past decades. It is no longer surgery alone. Nowadays, most patients undergo surgery plus pre- and/or postoperative therapies. However, there are still marked differences in surgical procedures between the East and the West which might influence the surgical prognosis and thereby also the choice of perioperative treatment strategies. In the East, with its more extended surgical procedures, including standard D2 dissections, the current treatment philosophy is primary surgery followed by adjuvant chemotherapy. Neoadjuvant approaches are restricted to really advanced tumors, and perioperative chemoradiation is not routinely used (at least to date). This clearly differs from treatment strategies currently recommended in Western countries. In Europe and North America, pre- plus postoperative chemotherapy has become the recommended treatment for locally more advanced tumors, and preoperative chemoradiation is increasingly administered to patients with adenocarcinomas of the gastroesophageal junction (Siewert type I/II). However, the role of postoperative chemotherapy (despite its increasing use) is still under discussion in the West (especially Europe) and not generally recommended/accepted as a standard treatment. Postoperative chemoradiation, which is one standard treatment in North America, is only regarded as a treatment option for patients after 'inadequate surgery' (i.e.

  17. A Comparative Study of Survival Rate in High Grade Glioma Tumors Being Treated by Radiotherapy Alone Versus Chemoradiation With Nitrosourea

    PubMed Central

    Houshyari, Mohammad; Hajalikhani, Farzaneh; Rakhsha, Afshin; Hajian, Parastoo

    2015-01-01

    Background: In adults, malignant glioma (high-grade glioma) is one of the most common brain tumors. In spite of different types of treatment, the outcome is still not likely to be favorable. The aim of this study was to determine the difference between survival rate in adult patients with high grade glioma treated by radiotherapy only and those treated by a combination of radiotherapy and nitrosurea-based chemotherapy. Methods: This study was conducted using the records of 48 patients with grade 3 or 4 of glial brain tumor referred to the radiation-oncology ward of Shohada-e-Tajrish Hospital in Tehran, Iran from 2005 to 2012. The patients had undergone radiotherapy alone or adjuvant chemoradiation with nitrosourea. The median survival of patients after receiving the different types of treatment were evaluated using the Kaplan –Meier method and the log –rank exam. Data were analyzed using univariate analysis for median survival regarding to the patients’ age, gender, extent of surgery, Karnofsky performance status (KPS) with the Kaplan-Meier method, and the log-rank exam. We used the Cox-model for multivariate analysis. Results: Records of 48 patients were studied (34 men and 14 women). The mean survival were 18 months for men and 15.2 months for women (P = 0.05). Around 58% (28 patients) were more than 50 years old, and 42% (20 patients) were less than 50, and mean survival for the two age groups were 13 and 20 months, respectively (P < 0.001). Then, the patients were divided into three groups according to the extent of surgery, i.e., excisional biopsy (11 patients), stereotactic biopsy (22 patients), and resection (15 patients), and the mean survival for the three groups were 14.7, 17.3, and 18.8 months, respectively. There was no significant statistical difference for mean survival between the three groups (P = 0.23). The KPS was greater than 70% in 23 patients and less than 70% in 21 patients, and the mean survival for the former and latter groups were 17

  18. Pathological complete response after neoadjuvant therapy for rectal cancer and the role of adjuvant therapy.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Valerie M; Benson, Al B

    2013-04-01

    Both the addition of neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy and improvements in surgical techniques have improved local control and overall survival for locally advanced rectal cancer patients over the past few decades. The addition of adjuvant chemotherapy has likely improved outcomes as well, though the contribution has been more difficult to quantify. At present, the majority of resected locally advanced rectal cancer patients receive adjuvant chemotherapy, though there is great variability in this practice based on both patient and institution characteristics. Recently, questions have been raised regarding which sub-groups of patients benefit most from adjuvant chemotherapy. As pathologic complete response (pCR) is increasingly found to be a reasonable surrogate for long-term favorable outcomes, some have questioned the need for adjuvant therapy in this select group of patients. Multiple retrospective analyses have shown minimal to no benefit for adjuvant chemotherapy in this group. Indeed, the patients most consistently shown to benefit from adjuvant therapy both in terms of disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) are those who achieve an intermediate pathologic response to neoadjuvant treatment. Tumors that have high expression of thymidylate synthetase have also shown to benefit from adjuvant therapy. More study is needed into clinical and molecular features that predict patient benefit from adjuvant therapy. PMID:23381584

  19. Up-front neck dissection followed by concurrent chemoradiation in patients with regionally advanced head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Paximadis, Peter A.; Christensen, Michael E.; Dyson, Greg; Kamdar, Dev P.; Sukari, Ammar; Lin, Ho-Sheng; Yoo, George H.; Kim, Harold E.

    2013-01-01

    Background The appropriate management of the neck in patients with regionally advanced head and neck cancer remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively analyze our institutional experience with up-front neck dissection followed by definitive chemoradiotherapy. Methods Fifty-five patients with radiographic evidence of large or necrotic lymph nodes underwent up-front neck dissection followed by definitive chemoradiation. Results The 5-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) rates were estimated at 71.3% and 64.7%, respectively. There were 2 failures in the dissected neck, for a control rate of 96.7%. There were 7 locoregional failures and 12 distant failures, for locoregional and distant control rates of 87.3% and 78.2%, respectively. Conclusion Up-front neck dissection followed by chemoradiotherapy resulted in excellent locoregional control, OS, and PFS. Utilization of this strategy should be considered in carefully selected patients with regionally advanced head and neck cancer. PMID:22307819

  20. High-Grade Cervical Dysplasia following Radiation Therapy for Invasive Cervical Cancer: A Report of Four Cases

    PubMed Central

    Salcedo, Mila Pontremoli; Milbourne, Andrea M.; Jhingran, Anuja; Eifel, Patricia J.; Ramirez, Pedro T.; Schmeler, Kathleen M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The standard treatment for locally advanced cervical cancer is chemoradiation, with the majority of patients having a complete response to the therapy. The current surveillance recommendations from the Society of Gynecologic Oncology include annual cytology, with a small proportion of patients subsequently diagnosed with high-grade cervical dysplasia (CIN 2/3). To date, there is limited information regarding the optimal treatment and outcome for patients diagnosed with CIN 2/3. The current report describes the diagnosis, management and outcome of 4 patients diagnosed with CIN 2/3 following chemoradiation. Case Description We describe 4 patients who developed CIN 2/3 seven months to 8 years following radiation therapy for locally advanced cervical cancer. All 4 patients were asymptomatic and the abnormalities were first detected by a Pap test. Three of the patients were managed conservatively with observation, and the CIN 2/3 resolved without intervention. One patient underwent 2 cervical conizations followed by a hysterectomy with no residual dysplasia noted on the hysterectomy specimen. Conclusion The majority of patients with recurrent cervical cancer after chemoradiation are symptomatic, and most cases are detected by a physical examination. The role of cytology, colposcopy and biopsies may be of limited value. Furthermore, the significance of the diagnosis of CIN 2/3 in patients previously treated with radiation therapy was not associated with recurrent disease in the 4 patients described. Our results suggest that cytology may be of limited value in detecting recurrence in patients following radiation therapy, even when CIN 2/3 is detected. PMID:26078740

  1. Maintenance therapy with capecitabine in patients with locally advanced unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Saif, Muhammad Wasif; Ledbetter, Leslie; Kaley, Kristin; Garcon, Marie Carmel; Rodriguez, Teresa; Syrigos, Kostas N

    2014-09-01

    Therapeutic options for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) include concurrent chemoradiation, induction chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation or systemic therapy alone. The original Gastro-Intestinal Study Group and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group studies defined fluorouracil (5-FU) with concurrent radiation therapy followed by maintenance 5-FU until progression, as the standard therapy for this subset of patients. Although this combined therapy has been demonstrated to increase local control and median survival from 8 to 12 months, almost all patients succumb to the disease secondary to either local or distant recurrence. Our earlier studies provided a strong rationale for the use of capecitabine in combination with concurrent radiation followed by maintenance capecitabine therapy. To report our clinical experience, we retrospectively evaluated our patients who were treated with maintenance capecitabine. We reviewed the medical records of patients with LAPC who received treatment with capecitabine and radiation, followed by a 4-week rest, then capecitabine alone 1,000 mg twice daily (ECOG performance status 2 or age >70 years) or 1,500 mg twice daily for 14 days every 3 weeks until progressive disease. We treated 43 patients between September 2004 and September 2012. The population consisted of 16 females and 25 males, with a median age of 64 years (range, 38-80 years). Patients received maintenance capecitabine for median duration of 9 months (range, 3-18 months). The median overall survival (OS) for these patients was 17 months, with two patients still living and receiving therapy. The 6-month survival rate was 91% (39/43), 1-year survival rate was 72% (31/43) and 2-year OS rate was 26% (11/43). Grade 3 or 4 toxicity was observed rarely: Hand-foot syndrome (HFS) in two patients, diarrhea in one patient and peripheral neuropathy in one patient, and there was no mortality directly related to treatment. Capecitabine maintenance therapy following

  2. SNAI2 modulates colorectal cancer 5-fluorouracil sensitivity through miR145 repression.

    PubMed

    Findlay, Victoria J; Wang, Cindy; Nogueira, Lourdes M; Hurst, Katie; Quirk, Daniel; Ethier, Stephen P; Staveley O'Carroll, Kevin F; Watson, Dennis K; Camp, E Ramsay

    2014-11-01

    Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) has been associated with poor treatment outcomes in various malignancies and is inversely associated with miRNA145 expression. Therefore, we hypothesized that SNAI2 (Slug) may mediate 5-fluorouracil (5FU) chemotherapy resistance through inhibition of miR145 in colorectal cancer and thus represents a novel therapeutic target to enhance current colorectal cancer treatment strategies. Compared with parental DLD1 colon cancer cells, 5FU-resistant (5FUr) DLD1 cells demonstrated features of EMT, including >2-fold enhanced invasion (P < 0.001) and migration, suppressed E-cadherin expression, and 2-fold increased SNAI2 expression. DLD1 and HCT116 cells with stable expression of SNAI2 (DLD1/SNAI2; HCT116/SNAI2) also demonstrated EMT features such as the decreased E-cadherin as well as significantly decreased miR145 expression, as compared with control empty vector cells. On the basis of an miR145 luciferase promoter assay, we demonstrated that SNAI2 repressed activity of the miR145 promoter in the DLD1 and HCT116 cells. In addition, the ectopic expressing SNAI2 cell lines demonstrated decreased 5FU sensitivity, and, conversely, miR145 replacement significantly enhanced 5FU sensitivity. In the parental SW620 colon cancer cell line with high SNAI2 and low miR145 levels, inhibition of SNAI2 directly with short hairpin sequence for SNAI2 and miR145 replacement therapy both decreased vimentin expression and increased in vitro 5FU sensitivity. In pretreatment rectal cancer patient biopsy samples, low miR145 expression levels correlated with poor response to neoadjuvant 5FU-based chemoradiation. These results suggested that the SNAI2:miR145 pathway may represent a novel clinical therapeutic target in colorectal cancer and may serve as a response predictor to chemoradiation therapy. PMID:25249558

  3. SNAI2 modulates colorectal cancer 5-fluorouracil sensitivity through miR145 repression

    PubMed Central

    Findlay, Victoria J.; Wang, Cindy; Nogueira, Lourdes M.; Hurst, Katie; Quirk, Daniel; Ethier, Stephen P.; Staveley O'Carroll, Kevin F.; Watson, Dennis K.; Camp, E. Ramsay

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) has been associated with poor treatment outcomes in various malignancies and is inversely associated with miRNA-145 expression. Therefore, we hypothesized that SNAI2 (Slug) may mediate 5FU chemotherapy resistance through inhibition of miR-145 in colorectal cancer (CRC) and thus, represents a novel therapeutic target to enhance current CRC treatment strategies. Compared to parental DLD1 colon cancer cells, 5FU-resistant (5FUr) DLD1 cells demonstrated features of EMT, including >2-fold enhanced invasion (p<0.001) and migration, suppressed E-Cadherin expression, and 2-fold increased SNAI2 expression. DLD1 and HCT116 cells with stable expression of SNAI2 (DLD1/SNAI2; HCT116/SNAI2) also demonstrated EMT features such as the decreased E-Cadherin, as well as significantly decreased miR-145 expression, as compared to control empty vector cells. Based on a miR-145 luciferase promoter assay, we demonstrated that SNAI2 repressed activity of the miR-145 promoter in the DLD1 and HCT116 cells. In addition, the ectopic expressing SNAI2 cell lines demonstrated decreased 5FU sensitivity and conversely, miR-145 replacement significantly enhanced 5FU sensitivity. In the parental SW620 colon cancer cell line with high SNAI2 and low miR-145 levels, inhibition of SNAI2 directly with short hairpin sequence for SNAI2 and miR-145 replacement therapy both decreased Vimentin expression and increased in vitro 5FU sensitivity. In pre-treatment rectal cancer patient biopsy samples, low miR-145 expression levels correlated with poor response to neoadjuvant 5FU based chemoradiation. These results suggested that the SNAI2:miR-145 pathway may represent a novel clinical therapeutic target in CRC and may serve as a response predictor to chemoradiation therapy. PMID:25249558

  4. Associations of ATM Polymorphisms With Survival in Advanced Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Patients Receiving Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Zhongli; Zhang, Wencheng; Zhou, Yuling; Yu, Dianke; Chen, Xiabin; Chang, Jiang; Qiao, Yan; Zhang, Meng; Huang, Ying; Wu, Chen; Xiao, Zefen; Tan, Wen; and others

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene are associated with survival in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) receiving radiation therapy or chemoradiation therapy or surgery only. Methods and Materials: Four tagSNPs of ATM were genotyped in 412 individuals with clinical stage III or IV ESCC receiving radiation therapy or chemoradiation therapy, and in 388 individuals with stage I, II, or III ESCC treated with surgery only. Overall survival time of ESCC among different genotypes was estimated by Kaplan-Meier plot, and the significance was examined by log-rank test. The hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for death from ESCC among different genotypes were computed by a Cox proportional regression model. Results: We found 2 SNPs, rs664143 and rs664677, associated with survival time of ESCC patients receiving radiation therapy. Individuals with the rs664143A allele had poorer median survival time compared with the rs664143G allele (14.0 vs 20.0 months), with the HR for death being 1.45 (95% CI 1.12-1.89). Individuals with the rs664677C allele also had worse median survival time than those with the rs664677T allele (14.0 vs 23.5 months), with the HR of 1.57 (95% CI 1.18-2.08). Stratified analysis showed that these associations were present in both stage III and IV cancer and different radiation therapy techniques. Significant associations were also found between the SNPs and locosregional progression or progression-free survival. No association between these SNPs and survival time was detected in ESCC patients treated with surgery only. Conclusion: These results suggest that the ATM polymorphisms might serve as independent biomarkers for predicting prognosis in ESCC patients receiving radiation therapy.

  5. Importance of Surveillance and Success of Salvage Strategies After Definitive Chemoradiation in Patients With Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sudo, Kazuki; Xiao, Lianchun; Wadhwa, Roopma; Shiozaki, Hironori; Elimova, Elena; Taketa, Takashi; Blum, Mariela A.; Lee, Jeffrey H.; Bhutani, Manoop S.; Weston, Brian; Ross, William A.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Rice, David C.; Swisher, Stephen G.; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Maru, Dipen M.; Skinner, Heath D.; Ajani, Jaffer A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Patients with esophageal carcinoma (EC) who are treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy (bimodality therapy [BMT]) experience frequent relapses. In a large cohort, we assessed the timing, frequency, and types of relapses during an aggressive surveillance program and the value of the salvage strategies. Patients and Methods Patients with EC (N = 276) who received BMT were analyzed. Patients who had surgery within 6 months of chemoradiotherapy were excluded to reduce bias. We focused on local relapse (LR) and distant metastases (DM) and the salvage treatment of patients with LR only. Standard statistical methods were applied. Results The median follow-up time was 54.3 months (95% CI, 48.4 to 62.4). First relapses included LR only in 23.2% (n = 64), DM with or without LR in 43.5% (n = 120), and no relapses in 33.3% (n = 92) of patients. Final relapses included no relapses in 33.3%, LR only in 14.5%, DM only in 15.9%, and DM plus LR in 36.2% of patients. Ninety-one percent of LRs occurred within 2 years and 98% occurred within 3 years of BMT. Twenty-three (36%) of 64 patients with LR only underwent salvage surgery, and their median overall survival was 58.6 months (95% CI, 28.8 to not reached) compared with those patients with LR only who were unable to undergo surgery (9.5 months; 95% CI, 7.8 to 13.3). Conclusion Unlike in patients undergoing trimodality therapy, for whom surveillance/salvage treatment plays a lesser role,1 in the BMT population, approximately 8% of all patients (or 36% of patients with LR only) with LRs occurring more than 6 months after chemoradiotherapy can undergo salvage treatment, and their survival is excellent. Our data support vigilant surveillance, at least in the first 24 months after chemotherapy, in these patients. PMID:25225435

  6. Selective Changes in the Immune Profile of Tumor-Draining Lymph Nodes After Different Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Regimens for Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Battaglia, Alessandra; Buzzonetti, Alexia; Martinelli, Enrica; Fanelli, Mara; Petrillo, Marco; Ferrandina, Gabriella; Scambia, Giovanni; Fattorossi, Andrea

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To assess how neoadjuvant chemoradiation regimens modulate the immune system state in tumor-draining lymph nodes (TDLN), in the setting of advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Tumor-draining lymph nodes of patients undergoing chemotherapy only (nonirradiated, NI-TDLN) and chemoradiation with lower-dose (39.6 Gy, LD-TDLN) and higher-dose radiation (50 Gy, HD-TDLN) were analyzed by multicolor flow cytometry. Results: Enlarging our previous data, LD-TDLN showed features overall indicative of an enhanced antitumor response as compared with NI-TDLN, namely a significant Th1 and Tc1 polarization and a lower amount of the potent CD4{sup +}Foxp3{sup +}CD25{sup high} regulatory T cell (Treg) subset identified by neuropilin-1 expression. Conversely, compared with NI-TDLN, HD-TDLN showed features overall indicative of an impaired antitumor response, namely a significantly inverted CD4/CD8 cell ratio, a higher Nrp1{sup +}Treg frequency, and a higher frequency of CCR4{sup +}Treg, a Treg subset facilitated in migrating out from TDLN to suppress the immune response against distant cancer cells. Moreover, the Th1 and Tc1 polarization induced by LD radiation was lost, and there was an unfavorable tolerogenic/immunogenic dendritic cell ratio compared with LD-TDLN. Conclusions: Even minor differences in radiation dose in neoadjuvant regimens for locally advanced cervical cancer are crucial for determining the balance between a tolerogenic and an efficacious antitumor immune response in TDLN. Because most of the anticancer immune response takes place in TDLN, the present findings also emphasize the importance of chemoradiation protocols in the context of immunotherapeutic trials.

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Assessment of Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Anal Canal Before and After Chemoradiation: Can MRI Predict for Eventual Clinical Outcome?

    SciTech Connect

    Goh, Vicky; Gollub, Frank K.; Liaw, Jonathan; Wellsted, David; Przybytniak, Izabela; Padhani, Anwar R.; Glynne-Jones, Rob

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To describe the MRI appearances of squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal before and after chemoradiation and to assess whether MRI features predict for clinical outcome. Methods and Materials: Thirty-five patients (15 male, 20 female; mean age 60.8 years) with histologically proven squamous cell cancer of the anal canal underwent MRI before and 6-8 weeks after definitive chemoradiation. Images were reviewed retrospectively by two radiologists in consensus blinded to clinical outcome: tumor size, signal intensity, extent, and TNM stage were recorded. Following treatment, patients were defined as responders by T and N downstaging and Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST). Final clinical outcome was determined by imaging and case note review: patients were divided into (1) disease-free and (2) with relapse and compared using appropriate univariate methods to identify imaging predictors; statistical significance was at 5%. Results: The majority of tumors were {<=}T2 (23/35; 65.7%) and N0 (21/35; 60%), mean size 3.75cm, and hyperintense (++ to +++, 24/35 patients; 68%). Following chemoradiation, there was a size reduction in all cases (mean 73.3%) and a reduction in signal intensity in 26/35 patients (74.2%). The majority of patients were classified as responders (26/35 (74.2%) patients by T and N downstaging; and 30/35 (85.7%) patients by RECIST). At a median follow-up of 33.5 months, 25 patients (71.4%) remained disease-free; 10 patients (28.6%) had locoregional or metastatic disease. Univariate analysis showed that no individual MRI features were predictive of eventual outcome. Conclusion: Early assessment of response by MRI at 6-8 weeks is unhelpful in predicting future clinical outcome.

  8. A Matched-Case Comparison to Explore the Role of Consolidation Chemotherapy After Concurrent Chemoradiation in Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Chel Hun; Lee, Yoo-Young; Kim, Min Kyu; Kim, Tae-Joong; Lee, Jeong-Won; Nam, Hee Rim; Huh, Seung Jae; Lee, Je-Ho; Bae, Duk-Soo; Kim, Byoung-Gie

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and toxicity of consolidation chemotherapy after concurrent chemoradiation (CCRT) and CCRT alone in patients with locally advanced cervical carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Using medical records from January 2001 to December 2007, 39 patients treated with consolidation chemotherapy after CCRT (Group 1) were matched to 39 patients treated with CCRT alone (Group 2). Consolidation chemotherapy consisted of three additional cycles of chemotherapy with cisplatin 60 mg/m{sup 2} (Day 1) and 5-fluorouracil 1,000 mg/m{sup 2} per day (Days 1-5) given every 3 weeks. The primary endpoint was overall survival. Results: During a median follow-up period of 35 months (range, 8-96 months), 10 (25.6%) and 16 (41.0%) patients showed disease progression in Groups 1 and 2, respectively. Distant recurrence with or without locoregional/lymphogenous recurrence occurred more frequently in Group 2 than in Group 1 (23.1% vs. 7.7%, p = 0.06). By contreast, there was no difference in locoregional or lymphogenous recurrence between the two groups. The rate of overall survival was higher in Group 1 than in Group 2 (92.7% vs. 69.9%, p = 0.042), whereas the difference in progression-free survival between the groups was not statistically significant (70.1% vs. 55.1%, p = 0.079). Although the difference was not statistically significant, neutropenia was more common in Group 1 than in Group 2 (10.9% vs. 4.7%, p = 0.07). Conclusions: Consolidation chemotherapy after CCRT may improve survival and reduce distant recurrence without additional toxicity compared to CCRT alone in patients with locally advanced cervical carcinoma.

  9. Effects of selenomethionine on acute toxicities from concurrent chemoradiation for inoperable stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mix, Michael; Ramnath, Nithya; Gomez, Jorge; de Groot, Charles; Rajan, Saju; Dibaj, Shiva; Tan, Wei; Rustum, Youcef; Jameson, Michael B; Singh, Anurag K

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To prospectively determine the safety and tolerability of oral L-selenomethionine (SLM) with concurrent chemoradiation (CCRT) for Stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and estimate if the incidence and/or severity of adverse events could be reduced by its use. METHODS: Sixteen patients with stage III NSCLC were accrued to this single arm, phase II study. CCRT consisted of radiation given at 2 Gy per fraction for 30-33 fractions, 5 d per week with concurrent weekly IV paclitaxel 50 mg/m2 followed by carboplatin dosed at an area under the time-concentration curve of 2. SLM was dosed in a loading phase at 4800 μg twice daily for one week prior to CCRT followed by once daily dosing during treatment. RESULTS: No selenium-related toxicity was observed. Analysis revealed grade 3 or higher esophagitis in 3 of 16 patients (19%), pneumonitis in 0, leukopenia in 2 (12.5%), and anemia in 1 (6%); the latter two were significantly reduced when compared to the protocol-stated expected rate of 35% (P = 0.045 for leukopenia, and P < 0.01 for anemia). Median overall survival was 14.9 mo and median failure-free survival was 9 mo (95%CI: 3.3-21.5). CONCLUSION: There may be some protective benefit of selenium in the setting of CCRT for inoperable NSCLC. The data suggests decreased rates of myelosuppression when compared to similarly-treated historical and contemporary controls. Further evaluation of selenium in this setting may be warranted. PMID:26468452

  10. Anemia During Sequential Induction Chemotherapy and Chemoradiation for Head and Neck Cancer: The Impact of Blood Transfusion on Treatment Outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Bhide, Shreerang A.; Ahmed, Merina; Rengarajan, Vijayan; Powell, Ceri; Miah, Aisha; Newbold, Kate; Nutting, Christopher M.; Harrington, Kevin J.

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: Sequential treatment (chemotherapy followed by concomitant chemoradiation; CCRT) is increasingly being used for radical treatment of squamous cell cancer of the head and neck (SCCHN), which results in increased myelosuppression. In this study, we review the incidence of anemia and the effect of a policy of hemoglobin (Hb) maintenance by blood transfusion on disease outcomes in these patients. Methods and Materials: Retrospective review of the records of patients with SCCHN treated with sequential CCRT formed the basis of this study. The incidence of anemia and statistics on blood transfusion were documented. For the purpose of outcome analyses, patients were divided into four categories by (1) transfusion status, (2) nadir Hb concentration, (3) number of transfusion episodes, and (4) number of units of blood transfused (NOUT). Data on 3-year locoregional control (LRC), relapse-free survival (RFS), disease-specific survival (DSS), and overall survival (OS) were analyzed. Results: One hundred and sixty-nine patients were identified. The median follow-up was 23.6 months. The RFS (52% vs. 41%, p = 0.03), DSS (71% vs. 66%, p = 0.02), and OS (58% vs. 42% p = 0.005) were significantly better for patients who did not have a transfusion vs. those who did. The LRC, RFS, DSS, and OS were also significantly better for patients with nadir Hb level >12 vs. <12 g/dL and NOUT 1-4 vs. >4. Conclusion: Our study seems to suggest that blood transfusion during radical treatment for SCCHN might be detrimental. Further research should be undertaken into the complex interactions among tumor hypoxia, anemia, and the treatment of anemia before making treatment recommendations.

  11. The Impact of Tumor Expression of Erythropoietin Receptors and Erythropoietin on Clinical Outcome of Esophageal Cancer Patients Treated With Chemoradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk Golke, Helmut; Schild, Steven E.; Kilic, Ergin

    2008-05-01

    Background: To investigate the impact of tumor erythropoietin receptors (Epo-R) and erythropoietin (Epo) expression in 64 patients with Stage III esophageal cancer receiving or not receiving erythropoietin during chemoradiation. Materials and Methods: The impact of tumor Epo-R expression, Epo expression, and 10 additional factors (age, Karnofsky-Performance-Score [KPS], tumor length, T and N stage, histology and grading, hemoglobin during radiotherapy, erythropoietin administration, surgery) on overall survival (OS) and locoregional control (LC) was evaluated. Results: Improved OS was associated with low ({<=}20%) Epo expression (p = 0.049), KPS >80 (p 0.008), T3 stage (p = 0.010), hemoglobin {>=}12 g/dL (p < 0.001), and surgery (p = 0.010). Erythropoietin receptor expression showed a trend (p = 0.09). Locoregional control was associated with T stage (p = 0.005) and hemoglobin (p < 0.001), almost with erythropoietin administration (p = 0.06). On multivariate analyses, OS was associated with KPS (p = 0.045) and hemoglobin (p = 0.032), LC with hemoglobin (p < 0.001). Patients having low expression of both Epo-R and Epo had better OS (p = 0.003) and LC (p = 0.043) than others. Two-year OS was nonsignificantly better (p = 0.25) in patients with low Epo-R expression receiving erythropoietin (50%) than in those with higher Epo-R expression receiving erythropoietin (21%), low Epo-R expression/no erythropoietin administration (29%), or higher Epo-R expression/no erythropoietin administration (18%). Two-year LC rates were, respectively, 65%, 31%, 26%, and 29% (p = 0.20). Results for Epo expression were similar. Conclusions: Higher Epo-R expression or Epo expression seemed to be associated with poorer outcomes. Patients with low expression levels receiving erythropoietin seemed to do better than patients with higher expression levels or not receiving erythropoietin. The data need to be confirmed in a larger series of patients.

  12. Epoetin alfa improves survival after chemoradiation for Stage III esophageal cancer: Final results of a prospective observational study

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk . E-mail: Rades.Dirk@gmx.net; Tribius, Silke; Yekebas, Emre F.; Bahrehmand, Roia; Wildfang, Ingeborg; Kilic, Ergin; Muellerleile, Ulrich; Gross, Eberhard; Schild, Steven E.; Alberti, Winfried

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: This prospective, nonrandomized study evaluates the effectiveness of epoetin alfa to maintain the hemoglobin levels at 12 to14 g/dL (optimal range for tumor oxygenation) during chemoradiation for Stage III esophageal cancer and its impact on overall survival (OS), metastatic-free survival (MFS), and locoregional control (LC). Methods and Materials: Ninety-six patients were included. Forty-two patients received epoetin alfa (150 IU/kg, 3 times a week) during radiotherapy, which was started at hemoglobin less than 13 g/dL and stopped at 14 g/dL or higher. Hemoglobin levels were measured weekly during RT. Results: Both groups were balanced for age, sex, performance status, tumor length/location, histology, grading, T-stage/N-stage, chemotherapy, treatment schedule, and hemoglobin before RT. Median change of hemoglobin was +0.3 g/dL/wk with epoetin alfa and -0.5 g/dL/wk without epoetin alfa. At least 60% of hemoglobin levels were 12 to 14 g/dL in 64% and 17% of the patients, respectively (p < 0.001). Patients who received epoetin alfa had better OS (32% vs. 8% at 2 years, p = 0.009) and LC (67% vs. 15% at 2 years, p = 0.001). MFS was not significantly different (42% vs. 18% at 2 years, p = 0.09). Conclusions: The findings suggest that epoetin alfa when used to maintain the hemoglobin levels at 12 to 14 g/dL can improve OS and LC of Stage III esophageal cancer patients.

  13. Phase I Study of Preoperative Chemoradiation With S-1 and Oxaliplatin in Patients With Locally Advanced Resectable Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Yong Sang; Lee, Jae-Lyun; Park, Jin Hong; Kim, Jong Hoon; Yoon, Sang Nam; Lim, Seok-Byung; Yu, Chang Sik; Kim, Mi-Jung; Jang, Se-Jin; Lee, Jung Shin; Kim, Jin Cheon; Kim, Tae Won

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To perform a Phase I study of preoperative chemoradiation (CRT) with S-1, a novel oral fluoropyrimidine, plus oxaliplatin in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer, to determine the maximum tolerated dose and the recommended dose. Methods and Materials: Radiotherapy was delivered to a total of 45 Gy in 25 fractions and followed by a coned-down boost of 5.4 Gy in 3 fractions. Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of a fixed dose of oxaliplatin (50 mg/m{sup 2}/week) on Days 1, 8, 22, and 29 and escalated doses of S-1 on Days 1-14 and 22-35. The initial dose of S-1 was 50 mg/m{sup 2}/day, gradually increasing to 60, 70, and 80 mg/m{sup 2}/day. Surgery was performed within 6 {+-} 2 weeks. Results: Twelve patients were enrolled and tolerated up to Dose Level 4 (3 patients at each dose level) without dose-limiting toxicity. An additional 3 patients were enrolled at Dose Level 4, with 1 experiencing a dose-limiting toxicity of Grade 3 diarrhea. Although maximum tolerated dose was not attained, Dose Level 4 (S-1 80 mg/m{sup 2}/day) was chosen as the recommended dose for further Phase II studies. No Grade 4 toxicity was observed, and Grade 3 toxicities of leukopenia and diarrhea occurred in the same patient (1 of 15, 6.7%). Pathologic complete responses were observed in 2 of 15 patients (13.3%). Conclusions: The recommended dose of S-1 was determined to be 80 mg/m{sup 2}/day when combined with oxaliplatin in preoperative CRT, and a Phase II trial is now ongoing.

  14. Whole-Pelvis or Bladder-Only Chemoradiation for Lymph Node-Negative Invasive Bladder Cancer: Single-Institution Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Tunio, Mutahir A.; Hashmi, Altaf; Qayyum, Abdul; Mohsin, Rehan; Zaeem, Ahmed

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Whole-pelvis (WP) concurrent chemoradiation (CCRT) is the standard bladder preserving option for patients with invasive bladder cancer. The standard practice is to treat elective pelvic lymph nodes, so our aim was to evaluate whether bladder-only (BO) CCRT leads to results similar to those obtained by standard WP-CCRT. Methods and Materials: Patient eligibility included histopathologically proven muscle-invasive bladder cancer, lymph nodes negative (T2-T4, N-) by radiology, and maximal transurethral resection of bladder tumor with normal hematologic, renal, and liver functions. Between March 2005 and May 2006, 230 patients were accrued. Patients were randomly assigned to WP-CCRT (120 patients) and BO-CCRT (110 patients). Data regarding the toxicity profile, compliance, initial complete response rates at 3 months, and occurrence of locoregional or distant failure were recorded. Results: With a median follow-up time of 5 years (range, 3-6), WP-CCRT was associated with a 5-year disease-free survival of 47.1% compared with 46.9% in patients treated with BO-CCRT (p = 0.5). The bladder preservation rates were 58.9% and 57.1% in WP-CCRT and BO-CCRT, respectively (p = 0.8), and the 5-year overall survival rates were 52.9% for WP-CCRT and 51% for BO-CCRT (p = 0.8). Conclusion: BO-CCRT showed similar rates of bladder preservation, disease-free survival, and overall survival rates as those of WP-CCRT. Smaller field sizes including bladder with 2-cm margins can be used as bladder preservation protocol for patients with muscle-invasive lymph node-negative bladder cancer to minimize the side effects of CCRT.

  15. Dose-Painted Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Anal Cancer: A Multi-Institutional Report of Acute Toxicity and Response to Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kachnic, Lisa A.; Tsai, Henry K.; Coen, John J.; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S.; Hartshorn, Kevan; Kwak, Eunice L.; Willins, John D.; Ryan, David P.; Hong, Theodore S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Chemoradiation for anal cancer yields effective tumor control, but is associated with significant acute toxicity. We report our multi-institutional experience using dose-painted IMRT (DP-IMRT). Patients and Methods: Between August 2005 and May 2009, 43 patients were treated with DP-IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy for biopsy-proven, squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal at two academic medical centers. DP-IMRT was prescribed as follows: T2N0: 42 Gy, 1.5 Gy/fraction (fx) to elective nodal planning target volume (PTV) and 50.4 Gy, 1.8 Gy/fx to anal tumor PTV; T3-4N0-3: 45 Gy, 1.5 Gy/fx to elective nodal PTV, and 54 Gy, 1.8 Gy/fx to the anal tumor and metastatic nodal PTV >3 cm with 50.4 Gy, 1.68 Gy/fx to nodal PTVs {<=}3 cm in size. Acute and late toxicity was reported by the treating physician. Actuarial analysis was performed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Median age was 58 years; 67% female; 16% Stage I, 37% II; 42% III; 5% IV. Fourteen patients were immunocompromised: 21% HIV-positive and 12% on chronic immunosuppression. Median follow-up was 24 months (range, 0.6-43.5 months). Sixty percent completed chemoradiation without treatment interruption; median duration of treatment interruption was 2 days (range, 2-24 days). Acute Grade 3+ toxicity included: hematologic 51%, dermatologic 10%, gastrointestinal 7%, and genitourinary 7%. Two-year local control, overall survival, colostomy-free survival, and metastasis-free survival were 95%, 94%, 90%, and 92%, respectively. Conclusions: Dose-painted IMRT appears effective and well-tolerated as part of a chemoradiation therapy regimen for the treatment of anal canal cancer.

  16. Adjuvant therapy for pancreas cancer in an era of value based cancer care

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Daniel H.; Williams, Terence M.; Goldstein, Daniel A.; El-Rayes, Bassel; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios

    2016-01-01

    In resected pancreas cancer, adjuvant therapy improves outcomes and is considered the standard of care for patients who recover sufficiently post operatively. Chemotherapy or combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy (chemoradiation; CRT) are strategies used in the adjuvant setting. However, there is a lack of evidence to suggest whether the addition of RT to chemotherapy translates to an improvement in clinical outcomes. This is true even when accounting for the subset of patients with a higher risk for recurrence, such as those with R1 and lymph node positive disease. When considering the direct and indirect costs, impact on quality of life and questionable added clinical benefit, the true “net health benefit” from added RT to chemotherapy becomes more uncertain. Future directions, including the utilization of modern RT, integration of novel therapies, and intensifying chemotherapy regimens may improve outcomes in resected pancreas cancer. PMID:26620819

  17. Adjuvant therapy for pancreas cancer in an era of value based cancer care.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Daniel H; Williams, Terence M; Goldstein, Daniel A; El-Rayes, Bassel; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios

    2016-01-01

    In resected pancreas cancer, adjuvant therapy improves outcomes and is considered the standard of care for patients who recover sufficiently post operatively. Chemotherapy or combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy (chemoradiation; CRT) are strategies used in the adjuvant setting. However, there is a lack of evidence to suggest whether the addition of RT to chemotherapy translates to an improvement in clinical outcomes. This is true even when accounting for the subset of patients with a higher risk for recurrence, such as those with R1 and lymph node positive disease. When considering the direct and indirect costs, impact on quality of life and questionable added clinical benefit, the true "net health benefit" from added RT to chemotherapy becomes more uncertain. Future directions, including the utilization of modern RT, integration of novel therapies, and intensifying chemotherapy regimens may improve outcomes in resected pancreas cancer. PMID:26620819

  18. Management of Normal Tissue Toxicity Associated With Chemoradiation (Primary Skin, Esophagus, and Lung)

    PubMed Central

    Yazbeck, Victor Y.; Villaruz, Liza; Haley, Marsha; Socinski, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Nearly one quarter of patients with lung cancer present with locally advanced disease where concurrent chemoradiotherapy is the current standard of care for patients with good performance status. Cisplatin-based concurrent chemoradiotherapy consistently showed an improvement in survival compared with sequential chemoradiotherapy, at the expense of an increase in the toxicity profile. Over the past decades, several encouraging biomarkers such as transforming growth factor-beta and radioprotective agents such as amifostine were studied but without reaching approval for patient care. We reviewed the prevalence and risk factors for different adverse effects associated with the combined chemoradiotherapy modality, especially dermatitis, mucositis, esophagitis, and pneumonitis. These adverse effects can further be divided into acute, subacute, and chronic. Dermatitis is usually rare and responds well to topical steroids and usual skin care. Acute esophagitis occurs in 30% of patients and is treated with proton pump inhibitors, promotility agents, local anesthetic, and dietary changes. Radiation pneumonitis is a subacute complication seen in 15% of patients and is usually managed with steroids. Chronic adverse effects such as radiation fibrosis and esophageal stricture occur approximately 6 months after completion of radiation therapy and are usually permanent. In this review, complications of chemoradiotherapy for patients with locally advanced lung cancer are delineated, and approaches to their management are described. Given that treatment interruption is associated with a worse outcome, patients are aggressively treated with a curative intent. Therefore, planning for treatment adverse effects improves patient tolerance, compliance, and outcome. PMID:23708070

  19. Chemoradiation for anaplastic oligodendrogliomas: clinical outcomes and prognostic value of molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Minniti, Giuseppe; Arcella, Antonella; Scaringi, Claudia; Lanzetta, Gaetano; Di Stefano, Domenica; Scarpino, Stefania; Pace, Andrea; Giangaspero, Felice; Osti, Mattia Falchetto; Enrici, Riccardo Maurizi

    2014-01-01

    Combination of procarbazine, lomustine and vincristine (PCV) with radiation therapy (RT) has been associated with longer survival in patients with anaplastic oligodendroglioma (AO) and anaplastic oligoastrocytoma (AOA), especially in those with chromosome 1p/19q codeletion. We report a multicenter retrospective study of 84 consecutive adult patients with AO and AOA treated with RT plus concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ) between February 2004 and January 2011. Correlations between chromosome 1p/19q codeletion, isocitrate dehydrogenase1 (IDH1) mutation, and O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation with survival outcomes have been analyzed. For all 84 patients the median overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival rates were 55.6 and 45.2 months, respectively. Grade 3 or 4 hematological toxicity occurred in 17 % of patients. Chromosome 1p/19q codeletion was detected in 57 %, IDH1 mutation in 63 %, and MGMT promoter methylation in 74 % of evaluable patients. In multivariate analysis the presence of chromosome 1p/19q codeletion was associated with significant survival benefit (median OS 34 months in noncodeleted tumors and not reached in codeleted tumors; HR 0.16, 95 % CI 0.03-0.45; P = 0.005). IDH1 mutation was also of prognostic significance for longer survival (P = 0.001; HR 0.20, 95 % 0.06-0.41), whereas MGMT promoter methylation was only of borderline significance. The study indicates that RT with concomitant and adjuvant TMZ is a relatively safe treatment associated with longer survival in patients with 1p/19q codeleted and IDH1 mutated tumors. Results from ongoing randomized studies will be essential to clarify if RT plus TMZ may provide survival as good as or better than RT combined with PCV for patients with AO and AOA. PMID:24162810

  20. Squamous cell carcinoma of the prostate: long-term survival after combined chemo-radiation

    PubMed Central

    Munoz, Fernando; Franco, Pierfrancesco; Ciammella, Patrizia; Clerico, Mario; Giudici, Mauro; Filippi, Andrea Riccardo; Ricardi, Umberto

    2007-01-01

    Background Carcinoma of the prostate gland is the most frequent malignant tumour affecting male population. While the large majority of tumours is represented by adenocarcinoma, pure squamous cell carcinoma comprises only 0,5–1% of all prostate neoplastic lesions. It is characterised by a high degree of malignancy, commonly metastasising to the bone (mainly with osteolytic lesions), liver and lungs with a median survival time of 14 months. Several therapeutic approaches have been employed in the effort to treat prostate pure squamous cell carcinoma, including radical surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy and hormonal therapy. All of them mostly failed to gain a significant survival benefit. Case report We herein report on a case of pure squamous cell carcinoma of the prostate approached with combined-modality treatment, with the administration of 3 courses of cisplatin 75 mg/m2 on day 1 and continous infusion 5-fluorouracil 750 mg/m2 on day 1 to 5 and, subsequently, radiotherapy, with the delivery of a total dose of 46 Gy to the whole pelvis, with additional boost doses of 20 Gy to the prostatic bed and adjunctive 6 Gy to the prostate gland (72 Gy in total). The patient remained free of disease for 5 years, finally experiencing local relapse and, subsequently, dying of acute renal failure due to bilateral uretero-hydro-nephrosis. In addition, we provide a complete overview of all reported cases available within the medical literature. Conclusion Since it remains questionable which should be the most appropriate therapeutic approach towards prostate pure squamous cell carcinoma, our report demonstrates that a prolonged disease control, with a consistent survival time, may be achieved by the combination of an effective local treatment such as radiotherapy with systemic infusion of chemotherapeutic drugs. PMID:17407588

  1. Retrospective Analysis of Outcome Differences in Preoperative Concurrent Chemoradiation With or Without Elective Nodal Irradiation for Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Feng-Ming; Lee, Jang-Ming; Huang, Pei-Ming; Lin, Chia-Chi; Hsu, Chih-Hung; Tsai, Yu-Chieh; Lee, Yung-Chie; Chia-Hsien Cheng, Jason

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and patterns of failure of elective nodal irradiation (ENI) in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) undergoing preoperative concurrent chemoradiation (CCRT) followed by radical surgery. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively studied 118 patients with AJCC Stage II to III esophageal SCC undergoing preoperative CCRT (median, 36 Gy), followed by radical esophagectomy. Of them, 73 patients (62%) had ENI and 45 patients (38%) had no ENI. Patients with ENI received radiotherapy to either supraclavicular (n = 54) or celiac (n = 19) lymphatics. Fifty-six patients (57%) received chemotherapy with paclitaxel plus cisplatin. The 3-year progression-free survival, overall survival, and patterns of failure were analyzed. Distant nodal recurrence was classified into M1a and M1b regions. A separate analysis using matched cases was conducted. Results: The median follow-up was 38 months. There were no differences in pathological complete response rate (p = 0.12), perioperative mortality rate (p = 0.48), or delayed Grade 3 or greater cardiopulmonary toxicities (p = 0.44), between the groups. More patients in the non-ENI group had M1a failure than in the ENI group, with 3-year rates of 11% and 3%, respectively (p = 0.05). However, the 3-year isolated distant nodal (M1a + M1b) failure rates were not different (ENI, 10%; non-ENI, 14%; p = 0.29). In multivariate analysis, pathological nodal status was the only independent prognostic factor associated with overall survival (hazard ratio = 1.78, p = 0.045). The 3-year overall survival and progression-free survival were 45% and 45%, respectively, in the ENI group, and 52% and 43%, respectively, in the non-ENI group (p = 0.31 and 0.89, respectively). Matched cases analysis did not show a statistical difference in outcomes between the groups. Conclusions: ENI reduced the M1a failure rate but was not associated with improved outcomes in patients undergoing preoperative CCRT for esophageal

  2. Trimodality Therapy for an Advanced Thymic Carcinoma With Both Aorta and Vena Cava Invasion.

    PubMed

    Momozane, Tohru; Inoue, Masayoshi; Shintani, Yasushi; Funaki, Soichiro; Kawamura, Tomohiro; Minami, Masato; Shirakawa, Yukitoshi; Kuratani, Toru; Sawa, Yoshiki; Okumura, Meinoshin

    2016-08-01

    A case of locally advanced thymic carcinoma that was successfully resected with the great vessels after chemoradiation therapy is reported. A 57-year-old man with Masaoka stage III thymic carcinoma received two cycles of cisplatin/docetaxel and 60 Gy irradiation. The response was stable disease with 19% size reduction, and a radical resection with the ascending aorta and superior vena cava with the patient under circulatory arrest with the use of cardiopulmonary bypass was performed. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient has been free of disease for 28 months. Trimodality therapy with use of a cardiovascular surgical procedure might be a valuable option in locally advanced thymic carcinoma. PMID:27449450

  3. Significance of ERBB2 Overexpression in Therapeutic Resistance and Cancer-Specific Survival in Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer Patients Treated With Chemoradiation-Based Selective Bladder-Sparing Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Masaharu; Koga, Fumitaka; Yoshida, Soichiro; Tamura, Tomoki; Fujii, Yasuhisa; Ito, Eisaku; Kihara, Kazunori

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: To investigate the associations of ERBB 2 overexpression with chemoradiation therapy (CRT) resistance and cancer-specific survival (CSS) in muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) patients treated with the CRT-based bladder-sparing protocol. Methods and Materials: From 1997 to 2012, 201 patients with cT2-4aN0M0 bladder cancer were treated with CRT (40 Gy with concurrent cisplatin) following transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT). Basically, patients with tumors that showed good CRT response and were amenable to segmental resection underwent partial cystectomy (PC) with pelvic lymph node dissection for bladder preservation; otherwise, radical cystectomy (RC) was recommended. Included in this study were 119 patients in whom TURBT specimens were available for immunohistochemical analysis of ERBB 2 expression. Following CRT, 30 and 65 patients underwent PC or RC, respectively; the remaining 24 patients did not undergo cystectomy. Tumors were defined as CRT-resistant when patients did not achieve complete response after CRT. Associations of ERBB 2 overexpression with CRT resistance and CSS were evaluated. Results: CRT resistance was observed clinically in 56% (67 of 119 patients) and pathologically (in cystectomy specimens) in 55% (52 of 95 patients). ERBB 2 overexpression was observed in 45 patients (38%). On multivariate analysis, ERBB 2 overexpression was an independent predictor for CRT resistance clinically (odds ratio, 3.6; P=.002) and pathologically (odds ratio, 2.9; P=.031). ERBB 2 overexpression was associated with shorter CSS (5-year CSS rates, 56% vs 87% for the ERBB 2 overexpression group vs the others; P=.001). ERBB 2 overexpression was also an independent risk factor for bladder cancer death at all time points of our bladder-sparing protocol (pre-CRT, post-CRT, and post-cystectomy). Conclusions: ERBB 2 overexpression appears relevant to CRT resistance and unfavorable CSS in MIBC patients treated with the CRT-based bladder

  4. Influence of Preoperative Radiation Field on Postoperative Leak Rates in Esophageal Cancer Patients after Trimodality Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Juloori, Aditya; Tucker, Susan L.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao, Zhongxing; Correa, Arlene M.; Swisher, Stephen G.; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Lin, Steven H.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Postoperative morbidities, such as anastomotic leaks, are common after trimodality therapy (chemoradiation followed by surgery) for esophageal cancer. We investigated for factors associated with an increased incidence of anastomotic leaks. Methods Data from 285 esophageal cancer patients treated from 2000–2011 with trimodality therapy was analyzed. Anastomotic location relative to preoperative radiation field was assessed using postoperative computed tomographic imaging. Logistic regression was used to evaluate for factors associated with any or clinically relevant (CR) (≥ grade 2) leaks. Results Overall anastomotic leak rate was 11% (31/285), and CR leak rate was 6% (17/285). Multivariable analysis identified body mass index (BMI) (OR 1.09, 95%CI 1.00–1.17; OR 1.11, 95%CI 1.01–1.22), three-field surgery (OR 10.01, 95%CI 3.83–26.21; OR 4.83, 95%CI 1.39–16.71), and within radiation field (“in-field”) anastomosis (OR 5.37, 95%CI 2.21–13.04; OR 8.63, 95%CI 2.90–25.65) as independent predictors of both all grade and CR leaks, respectively. While patients with distal esophageal tumors and Ivor-Lewis surgery had the lowest incidence of all grade (6.5%) and CR leaks (4.2%), most of the leaks were associated with the anastomosis constructed within the field of radiation (in-field: 39% and 30% versus out-of-field: 2.6% and 1.0%, respectively, for total and CR leaks, p<0.0001, Fisher’s Exact test). Conclusions Esophagogastric anastomosis placed within the preoperative radiation field was a very strong predictor for anastomotic leaks in esophageal cancer patients treated with trimodality therapy, among other factors. Surgical planning should include a critical evaluation of the preoperative radiation fields to ensure proper anastomotic placement after chemoradiation therapy. PMID:24736077

  5. Who Benefits From Adjuvant Radiation Therapy for Gastric Cancer? A Meta-Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ohri, Nitin; Garg, Madhur K.; Aparo, Santiago; Kaubisch, Andreas; Tome, Wolfgang; Kennedy, Timothy J.; Kalnicki, Shalom; Guha, Chandan

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: Large randomized trials have demonstrated significant survival benefits with the use of adjuvant chemotherapy or chemoradiation therapy for gastric cancer. The importance of adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) remains unclear. We performed an up-to-date meta-analysis of randomized trials testing the use of RT for resectable gastric cancer. Methods and Materials: We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials for randomized trials testing adjuvant (including neoadjuvant) RT for resectable gastric cancer. Hazard ratios describing the impact of adjuvant RT on overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were extracted directly from the original studies or calculated from survival curves. Pooled estimates were obtained using the inverse variance method. Subgroup analyses were performed to determine whether the efficacy of RT varies with chemotherapy use, RT timing, geographic region, type of nodal dissection performed, or lymph node status. Results: Thirteen studies met all inclusion criteria and were used for this analysis. Adjuvant RT was associated with a significant improvement in both OS (HR = 0.78, 95% CI: 0.70-0.86, P<.001) and DFS (HR = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.63-0.80, P<.001). In the 5 studies that tested adjuvant chemoradiation therapy against adjuvant chemotherapy, similar effects were seen for OS (HR = 0.83, 95% CI: 0.67-1.03, P=.087) and DFS (HR = 0.77, 95% CI: 0.91-0.65, P=.002). Available data did not reveal any subgroup of patients that does not benefit from adjuvant RT. Conclusion: In randomized trials for resectable gastric cancer, adjuvant RT provides an approximately 20% improvement in both DFS and OS. Available data do not reveal a subgroup of patients that does not benefit from adjuvant RT. Further study is required to optimize the implementation of adjuvant RT for gastric cancer with regard to patient selection and integration with systemic therapy.

  6. Novel therapies in small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Induru, Raghava; Jalal, Shadia I.

    2015-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive neuroendocrine tumor of the lung with a tendency to metastasize widely early in the course of the disease. The VA staging system classifies the disease into limited stage (LS) which is confined to one hemithorax and can be included into one radiation field or extensive stage (ES) which extends beyond one hemithorax. Current standard of care is concurrent chemoradiation for LS disease and chemotherapy alone for ES disease. Only a quarter of patients with LS disease will be cured with current standard treatments and majority of the patients ultimately succumb to their disease. A very complex genetic landscape of SCLC accounts for its resistance to conventional therapy and a high recurrence rate, however, at the same time this complexity can form the basis for effective targeted therapy for the disease. In recent years, several different therapeutic strategies and targeted agents have been under investigation for their potential role in SCLC. Several of them including EGFR TKIs, BCR-ABL TKIs, mTOR inhibitors, and VEGF inhibitors have been unsuccessful in showing a survival advantage in this disease. Several others including DNA repair inhibitors, cellular developmental pathway inhibitors, antibody drug conjugates (ADCs), as well as immune therapy with vaccines, immunomodulators, and immune checkpoint inhibitors are being tested. So far, none of these agents are approved for use in SCLC and the majority are in phase I/II clinical trials, with immune checkpoint inhibitors being the most promising therapeutic strategy. In this article, we will discuss these novel therapeutic agents and currently available data in SCLC. PMID:26629422

  7. Robotic versus laparoscopic surgery for mid or low rectal cancer in male patients after neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy: comparison of short-term outcomes.

    PubMed

    Serin, Kursat Rahmi; Gultekin, Fatma Ayca; Batman, Burçin; Ay, Serden; Kapran, Yersu; Saglam, Sezer; Asoglu, Oktar

    2015-09-01

    The aim of our study was to compare short-term outcomes of robotic and laparoscopic sphincter-saving total mesorectal excision (TME) in male patients with mid-low rectal cancer (RC) after neadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (NCRT). The study was conducted as a retrospective review of a prospectively maintained database, and we analyzed 14 robotic and 65 laparoscopic sphincter saving TME (R-TME and L-TME, respectively) performed by one surgeon between 2005 and 2013. Patient characteristics, perioperative recovery, postoperative complications and and pathology results were compared between the two groups. The patient characteristics did not differ significantly between the two groups. Median operating time was longer in the R-TME than in the L-TME group (182 min versus 140 min). Only two conversions occurred in the L-TME group. No difference was found between groups regarding perioperative recovery and postoperative complication rates. The median number of harvested lymph nodes was higher in the RTME than in the L-TME group (32 versus 23, p = 0.008). The median circumferential margin (CRM) was 10 mm in the R-TME group, 6.5 mm in the L-TME group (p = 0.047. The median distal resection margin (DRM) was 27.5 mm in the R-TME, 15 mm in the L-TME group (p = 0.014). Macroscopic grading of the specimen in the R-TME group was complete in all patients. In the L-TME group, grading was complete in 52 (80%) and incomplete in 13 (20%) cases (p = 0.109). R-TME is a safe and feasible procedure that facilitates performing of TME in male patients with mid-low RC after NCRT. PMID:26531198

  8. Radiation therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001918.htm Radiation therapy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Radiation therapy uses high-powered x-rays, particles, or ...

  9. Alternative Therapies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Late Effects of Poliomyelitis for Physicians and Survivors © Alternative Therapies Alternative therapies, also called complementary, can support ... of motion, pain, and fatigue are often reported. Energy work includes acupuncture and acupressure, traditional Chinese medicine ...

  10. Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    Radiation therapy is a cancer treatment. It uses high doses of radiation to kill cancer cells and stop them ... places inside your body. The type of radiation therapy you receive depends on many factors, including The ...

  11. Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... people who have radiation therapy may feel more tired than usual, not feel hungry, or lose their ... of radiation therapy include: Fatigue. Fatigue, or feeling tired, is the most common side effect of radiation ...

  12. Feasibility of Using Bevacizumab With Radiation Therapy and Temozolomide in Newly Diagnosed High-Grade Glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Narayana, Ashwatha Golfinos, John G.; Fischer, Ingeborg; Raza, Shahzad; Kelly, Patrick M.D.; Parker, Erik; Knopp, Edmond A.; Medabalmi, Praveen; Zagzag, David; Eagan, Patricia; Gruber, Michael L.

    2008-10-01

    Introduction: Bevacizumab, a monoclonal antibody against vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), has shown promise in the treatment of patients with recurrent high-grade glioma. The purpose of this study is to test the feasibility of using bevacizumab with chemoradiation in the primary management of high-grade glioma. Methods and Materials: Fifteen patients with high-grade glioma were treated with involved field radiation therapy to a dose of 59.4 Gy at 1.8 Gy/fraction with bevacizumab 10 mg/kg on Days 14 and 28 and temozolomide 75 mg/m{sup 2}. Subsequently, bevacizumab 10 mg/kg was continued every 2 weeks with temozolomide 150 mg/m{sup 2} for 12 months. Changes in relative cerebral blood volume, perfusion-permeability index, and tumor volume measurement were measured to assess the therapeutic response. Immunohistochemistry for phosphorylated VEGF receptor 2 (pVEGFR2) was performed. Results: Thirteen patients (86.6%) completed the planned bevacizumab and chemoradiation therapy. Four Grade III/IV nonhematologic toxicities were seen. Radiographic responses were noted in 13 of 14 assessable patients (92.8%). The pVEGFR2 staining was seen in 7 of 8 patients (87.5%) at the time of initial diagnosis. Six patients have experienced relapse, 3 at the primary site and 3 as diffuse disease. One patient showed loss of pVEGFR2 expression at relapse. One-year progression-free survival and overall survival rates were 59.3% and 86.7%, respectively. Conclusion: Use of antiangiogenic therapy with radiation and temozolomide in the primary management of high-grade glioma is feasible. Perfusion imaging with relative cerebral blood volume, perfusion-permeability index, and pVEGFR2 expression may be used as a potential predictor of therapeutic response. Toxicities and patterns of relapse need to be monitored closely.

  13. Feminist Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laidlaw, Toni; Malmo, Cheryl

    1991-01-01

    Traces roots of feminist therapy and its independence from traditional and prevalent theories and therapy practices. Asserts that Freudian theory and humanistic assumptions are sexist and contribute to powerlessness of women. In contrast, feminist therapy is seen as dealing directly with client-counselor relationships, trust, advocacy, and…

  14. Neoadjuvant therapy before surgical treatment

    PubMed Central

    Glynne-Jones, Rob; Chau, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Neoadjuvant treatment in terms of preoperative radiotherapy reduces local recurrence in rectal cancer, but this improvement has little if any impact on overall survival. Currently performed optimal quality-controlled total mesorectal excision (TME) surgery for patients in the trial setting can be associated with very low local recurrence rates of less than 10% whether the patients receive radiotherapy or not. Hence metastatic disease is now the predominant issue. The concept of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) is a potentially attractive additional or alternative strategy to radiotherapy to deal with metastases. However, randomised phase III trials, evaluating the addition of oxaliplatin at low doses plus preoperative fluoropyrimidine-based chemoradiotherapy (CRT), have in the main failed to show a significant improvement on early pathological response, with the exception of the German CAO/ARO/AIO-04 study. The integration of biologically targeted agents into preoperative CRT has also not fulfilled expectations. The addition of cetuximab appears to achieve relatively low rates of pathological complete responses, and the addition of bevacizumab has raised concerns for excess surgical morbidity. As an alternative to concurrent chemoradiation (which delivers only 5–6 weeks of chemotherapy), potential options include an induction component of 6–12 weeks of NACT prior to radiotherapy or chemoradiation, or the addition of chemotherapy after short-course preoperative radiotherapy (SCPRT) or chemoradiation (defined as consolidation chemotherapy) which utilises the “dead space” of the interval between the end of chemoradiation and surgery, or delivering chemotherapy alone without any radiotherapy. PMID:26217113

  15. Eradication of breast cancer with bone metastasis by autologous formalin-fixed tumor vaccine (AFTV) combined with palliative radiation therapy and adjuvant chemotherapy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kuranishi, Fumito; Ohno, Tadao

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal metastasis of breast carcinoma is refractory to intensive chemo-radiation therapy and therefore is assumed impossible to cure. Here, we report an advanced case of breast cancer with vertebra-Th7 metastasis that showed complete response to combined treatments with formalin-fixed autologous tumor vaccine (AFTV), palliative radiation therapy with 36 Gy, and adjuvant chemotherapy with standardized CEF (cyclophosphamide, epirubicin, and 5FU), zoledronic acid, and aromatase inhibitors following mastectomy for the breast tumor. The patient has been disease-free for more than 4 years after the mammary surgery and remains well with no evidence of metastasis or local recurrence. Thus, a combination of AFTV, palliative radiation therapy, and adjuvant chemotherapy may be an effective treatment for this devastating disease. PMID:23734861

  16. Response to Therapy and Outcomes in Oropharyngeal Cancer Are Associated With Biomarkers Including Human Papillomavirus, Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor, Gender, and Smoking

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Bhavna; Cordell, Kitrina G.; Lee, Julia S.; Prince, Mark E.; Tran, Huong H.; Wolf, Gregory T.; Urba, Susan G.; Worden, Francis P.; Chepeha, Douglas B.; Teknos, Theodoros N.; Eisbruch, Avraham; Tsien, Christina I.; Taylor, Jeremy; D'Silva, Nisha J.; Yang, Kun; Kurnit, David M.; Bradford, Carol R.

    2007-10-01

    Induction chemotherapy and concurrent chemoradiation for responders or immediate surgery for non-responders is an effective treatment strategy head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) of the larynx and oropharynx. Biomarkers that predict outcome would be valuable in selecting patients for therapy. In this study, the presence and titer of high risk human papilloma virus (HPV) and expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in pre-treatment biopsies, as well as smoking and gender were examined in oropharynx cancer patients enrolled in an organ sparing trial. HPV16 copy number was positively associated with response to therapy and with overall and disease specific survival, whereas EGFR expression, current or former smoking behavior, and female gender (in this cohort) were associated with poor response and poor survival in multivariate analysis. Smoking cessation and strategies to target EGFR may be useful adjuncts for therapy to improve outcome in the cases with the poorest biomarker profile.

  17. Impact of metformin use on survival in locally-advanced, inoperable non-small cell lung cancer treated with definitive chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Inaya; Ferro, Adam; Cohler, Alan; Langenfeld, John; Surakanti, Sujani G.; Aisner, Joseph; Zou, Wei; Haffty, Bruce G.

    2015-01-01

    Background We investigated survival outcomes in diabetic patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with concurrent metformin and definitive chemoradiation. Methods This single-institution, retrospective cohort study included 166 patients with NSCLC who were treated definitively with chemoradiation between 1999 and 2013. Of 40 patients who had type II diabetes, 20 (50%) were on metformin, and 20 (50%) were not on metformin. The primary outcome was overall survival (OS), and secondary outcomes included progression-free survival (PFS), locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRRFS) and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS). Kaplan Meier method and log-rank test were performed in survival analysis. Cox regression was utilized in univariate analysis of potential confounders. Results Median follow-up was 17.0 months. Compared with non-diabetic patients, diabetic patients on metformin demonstrated similar OS (16.3 vs. 14.3 mo, P=0.23), PFS (11.6 vs. 9.7 mo, P=0.26), LRRFS (14.1 vs. 11.9 mo, P=0.78), and DMFS (13.4 vs. 10.0 mo, P=0.69). Compared with diabetic patients not on metformin, diabetic patients on metformin also exhibited similar OS (14.3 vs. 19.2 mo, P=0.18), PFS (19.7 vs. 10.1 mo, P=0.38), LRRFS (11.9 vs. 15.5 mo, P=0.69), and DMFS (10.0 vs. 17.4 mo, P=0.12). Identified negative prognostic factors on included squamous cell histology, lower performance status, higher T stage, and non-caucasian ethnicity. Conclusions No statistically significant differences in survival or patterns of failure were found among the three cohorts in this small set of patients. No statistically significant differences in survival or patterns of failure were found between the three cohorts in this small set of patients. Though it is possible that metformin use may in fact have no effect on survival in NSCLC patients treated with definitive RT, larger-scale retrospective and prospective studies are implicated for clarification. PMID:25922712

  18. Toxicity Profile and Pharmacokinetic Study of A Phase I Low-Dose Schedule-Dependent Radiosensitizing Paclitaxel Chemoradiation Regimen for Inoperable Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yuhchyau Pandya, Kishan J.; Feins, Richard; Johnstone, David W.; Watson, Thomas; Smudzin, Therese; Keng, Peter C.

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: We report the toxicity profile and pharmacokinetic data of a schedule-dependent chemoradiation regimen using pulsed low-dose paclitaxel for radiosensitization in a Phase I study for inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Paclitaxel at escalating doses of 15 mg/m{sup 2}, 20 mg/m{sup 2}, and 25 mg/m{sup 2} were infused on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday with daily chest radiation in cohorts of 6 patients. Daily radiation was delayed for maximal G2/M arrest and apoptotic effect, an observation from preclinical investigations. Plasma paclitaxel concentration was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Results: Dose-limiting toxicities included 3 of 18 patients with Grade 3 pneumonitis and 3 of 18 patients with Grade 3 esophagitis. There was no Grade 4 or 5 pneumonitis or esophagitis. There was also no Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, anemia or neuropathy. For Dose Levels I (15 mg/m{sup 2}), II (20 mg/m{sup 2}), and III (25 mg/m{sup 2}), the mean peak plasma level was 0.23 {+-} 0.06 {mu}mol/l, 0.32 {+-} 0.05 {mu}mol/l, and 0.52 {+-} 0.14 {mu}mol/l, respectively; AUC was 0.44 {+-} 0.09 {mu}mol/l, 0.61 {+-} 0.1 {mu}mol/l, and 0.96 {+-} 0.23 {mu}mol/l, respectively; and duration of drug concentration >0.05 {mu}mol/l (t > 0.05 {mu}mol/l) was 1.6 {+-} 0.3 h, 1.9 {+-} 0.2 h, and 3.0 {+-} 0.9 h, respectively. Conclusion: Pulsed low-dose paclitaxel chemoradiation is associated with low toxicity. Pharmacokinetic data showed that plasma paclitaxel concentration >0.05 {mu}mol/l for a minimum of 1.6 h was sufficient for effective radiosensitization.

  19. Prognostic biomarkers in phase II trial of cetuximab-containing induction and chemoradiation in resectable HNSCC: Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group E2303

    PubMed Central

    Psyrri, Amanda; Lee, Ju-Whei; Pectasides, Eirini; Vassilakopoulou, Maria; Kosmidis, Efstratios K.; Burtness, Barbara A.; Rimm, David L.; Wanebo, Harold J.; Forastiere, Arlene A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We sought to evaluate correlation between tissue biomarker expression (using standardized, quantitative immunofluorescence) and clinical outcome in E2303 trial. Experimental Design Sixty-three eligible patients with operable stage III/IV HNSCC participated in ECOG 2303, phase II trial of induction chemotherapy with weekly cetuximab, paclitaxel and carboplatin followed by chemoradiation with same regimen. A tissue microarray (TMA) was constructed and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), ERK1/2, Met, Akt, STAT3, β-catenin, E-cadherin, EGFR Variant III, insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor, NF-kappa b, p53, PI3Kp85, PI3Kp110a, PTEN, NRAS, and pRb protein expression levels were assessed using automated quantitative protein analysis (AQUA). For each dichotomized biomarker, overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS) and event-free survival (EFS) were estimated by Kaplan-Meier method and compared using log-rank tests. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and test for significance. Results Forty-two of 63 patients with TMA data on at least one biomarker were included in the biomarker analysis. Tumor ERK1/2 levels were significantly associated with PFS (HR (low/high)=3.29, p=0.026) and OS (HR (low/high)=4.34, p=0.008). On multivariable Cox regression analysis, ERK1/2 remained significantly associated with OS (p=0.024) and PFS (p=0.022) after controlling for primary site (oropharynx vs. non-oropharynx) and disease stage (III vs. IV), respectively. Clustering analysis revealed that clusters indicative of activated RAS/MAPK/ERK and/or PI3K/Akt pathways were associated with inferior OS and/or PFS and maintained significance in multivariable analysis. Conclusions These results implicate PI3K/Akt and RAS/MAPK/ERK pathways in resistance to cetuximab-containing chemoradiation in HNSCC. Large prospective studies are required to validate these results. PMID:24700741

  20. c-Met Expression Is a Marker of Poor Prognosis in Patients With Locally Advanced Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Treated With Chemoradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Baschnagel, Andrew M.; Williams, Lindsay; Hanna, Alaa; Chen, Peter Y.; Krauss, Daniel J.; Pruetz, Barbara L.; Akervall, Jan; Wilson, George D.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To examine the prognostic significance of c-Met expression in relation to p16 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) treated with definitive concurrent chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: Archival tissue from 107 HNSCC patients treated with chemoradiation was retrieved, and a tissue microarray was assembled. Immunohistochemical staining of c-Met, p16, and EGFR was performed. c-Met expression was correlated with p16, EGFR, clinical characteristics, and clinical endpoints including locoregional control (LRC), distant metastasis (DM), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS). Results: Fifty-one percent of patients were positive for p16, and 53% were positive for EGFR. Both p16-negative (P≤.001) and EGFR-positive (P=.019) status predicted for worse DFS. Ninety-three percent of patients stained positive for c-Met. Patients were divided into low (0, 1, or 2+ intensity) or high (3+ intensity) c-Met expression. On univariate analysis, high c-Met expression predicted for worse LRC (hazard ratio [HR] 2.27; 95% CI, 1.08-4.77; P=.031), DM (HR 4.41; 95% CI, 1.56-12.45; P=.005), DFS (HR 3.00; 95% CI, 1.68-5.38; P<.001), and OS (HR 4.35; 95% CI, 2.13-8.88; P<.001). On multivariate analysis, after adjustment for site, T stage, smoking history, and EGFR status, only high c-Met expression (P=.011) and negative p16 status (P=.003) predicted for worse DFS. High c-Met expression was predictive of worse DFS in both EGFR-positive (P=.032) and -negative (P=.008) patients. In the p16-negative patients, those with high c-Met expression had worse DFS (P=.036) than did those with low c-Met expression. c-Met expression was not associated with any outcome in the p16-positive patients. Conclusions: c-Met is expressed in the majority of locally advanced HNSCC cases, and high c-Met expression predicts for worse clinical outcomes. High c-Met expression predicted for worse DFS in p16

  1. Predictors of Long-Term Opioid Treatment Among Patients Who Receive Chemoradiation for Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Jung Hye; Hui, David; Chisholm, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. The factors associated with successful opioid discontinuation after cancer treatment are not well-known. We determined the proportion of patients with advanced head and neck cancer who continued using opioids 3 months after the completion of radiation therapy with or without chemotherapy. Methods. We included 70 patients with head and neck cancer referred to our institution's supportive care center between January 1, 2008, and December 31, 2010. Patients who no longer used opioids 3 months after the completion of radiation therapy were classified as stoppers; patients who continued using opioids were considered nonstoppers. We compared demographics, cancer-related characteristics, alcoholism, substance abuse history, use of psychoactive drugs, and opioid-related factors between stoppers and nonstoppers. Results. In all, 44 of 70 patients (63%) and 23 of 70 patients (33%) continued opioids 3 months and 6 months after the completion of radiation therapy, respectively. A total of 18 of 44 nonstoppers (41%) and 3 of 26 stoppers (12%) were positive for alcoholism based on the CAGE questionnaire (i.e., Cut down, Annoying, Guilty, Eye opener; odds ratio: 5.3). Demographic and clinical characteristics did not differ between stoppers and nonstoppers. The median duration of any type of opioid use of CAGE-positive patients was significantly longer than that of CAGE-negative patients (median: 261 days vs. 93 days; hazard ratio: 2.5). Conclusion. CAGE positivity is a risk factor for opioid use beyond 3 months after the completion of radiation therapy and for duration of opioid treatment. Routine CAGE screening and meticulous follow-up are needed for these patients. PMID:23723332

  2. Adjuvant Radiation Therapy Treatment Time Impacts Overall Survival in Gastric Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, Matthew T.; Ojerholm, Eric; Roses, Robert E.; Plastaras, John P.; Metz, James M.; Mamtani, Ronac; Stripp, Diana; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Datta, Jashodeep

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: Prolonged radiation therapy treatment time (RTT) is associated with worse survival in several tumor types. This study investigated whether delays during adjuvant radiation therapy impact overall survival (OS) in gastric cancer. Methods and Materials: The National Cancer Data Base was queried for patients with resected gastric cancer who received adjuvant radiation therapy with National Comprehensive Cancer Network–recommended doses (45 or 50.4 Gy) between 1998 and 2006. RTT was classified as standard (45 Gy: 33-36 days, 50.4 Gy: 38-41 days) or prolonged (45 Gy: >36 days, 50.4 Gy: >41 days). Cox proportional hazards models evaluated the association between the following factors and OS: RTT, interval from surgery to radiation therapy initiation, interval from surgery to radiation therapy completion, radiation therapy dose, demographic/pathologic and operative factors, and other elements of adjuvant multimodality therapy. Results: Of 1591 patients, RTT was delayed in 732 (46%). Factors associated with prolonged RTT were non-private health insurance (OR 1.3, P=.005) and treatment at non-academic facilities (OR 1.2, P=.045). Median OS and 5-year actuarial survival were significantly worse in patients with prolonged RTT compared with standard RTT (36 vs 51 months, P=.001; 39 vs 47%, P=.005); OS worsened with each cumulative week of delay (P<.0004). On multivariable analysis, prolonged RTT was associated with inferior OS (hazard ratio 1.2, P=.002); the intervals from surgery to radiation therapy initiation or completion were not. Prolonged RTT was particularly detrimental in patients with node positivity, inadequate nodal staging (<15 nodes examined), and those undergoing a cycle of chemotherapy before chemoradiation therapy. Conclusions: Delays during adjuvant radiation therapy appear to negatively impact survival in gastric cancer. Efforts to minimize cumulative interruptions to <7 days should be considered.

  3. Volumetric modulated arc therapy planning for distal oesophageal malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, M A; Bedford, J L; Warrington, A P; Tait, D M

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is a novel form of intensity-modulated radiation therapy that allows the radiation dose to be delivered in a single gantry rotation using conformal or modulated fields. The capability of VMAT to reduce heart and cord dose, while maintaining lung receiving 20 Gy <20%, was evaluated for chemoradiation for oesophageal cancer. Methods An optimised forward-planned four-field arrangement was compared with inverse-planned coplanar VMAT arcs with 35 control points for 10 patients with lower gastro-oesophageal tumours prescribed 54 Gy in 30 fractions. Conformal (cARC) and intensity-modulated (VMATi) arcs were considered. Plans were assessed and compared using the planning target volume (PTV) irradiated to 95% of the prescription dose (V95), volumes of lung irradiated to 20 Gy (V20), heart irradiated to 30 Gy (V30), spinal cord maximum dose and van't Riet conformation number (CN). The monitor units per fraction and delivery time were recorded for a single representative plan. Results VMATi provided a significant reduction in the heart V30 (31% vs 55%; p=0.02) with better CN (0.72 vs 0.65; p=0.01) than the conformal plan. The treatment delivery was 1 min 28 s for VMAT compared with 3 min 15 s. Conclusion For similar PTV coverage, VMATi delivers a lower dose to organs at risk than conformal plans in a shorter time, and this has warranted clinical implementation. PMID:21427179

  4. Randomized phase II trial of selenomethionine as a modulator of efficacy and toxicity of chemoradiation in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    PubMed Central

    Mix, Michael; Singh, Anurag K; Tills, Michael; Dibaj, Shiva; Groman, Adrienne; Jaggernauth, Wainwright; Rustum, Youcef; Jameson, Michael B

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether selenomethionine (SLM) reduces mucositis incidence in patients with head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) undergoing concurrent chemoradiation (CRT). METHODS: In this multi-institutional, randomized, double-blind phase II trial, patients with Stage III or IV HNSCC received SLM 3600 μg/m2 or placebo twice daily for 7 d prior to CRT, once daily during CRT, and daily for 3 wk following CRT. CRT consisted of 70 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction with cisplatin 100 mg/m2 IV on days 1, 22, and 43. RESULTS: Eighteen patients were randomized, 10 received SLM, and there were no differences in baseline factors. There was no difference in mucositis or patient-reported side effects between groups. There was no difference in overall or relapse-free survival at 12 mo. CONCLUSION: Addition of SLM to CRT for HNSCC was well-tolerated but did not lower the incidence of severe mucositis or improve quality of life or survival outcomes. PMID:26468453

  5. Improved outcomes for rectal cancer in the era of preoperative chemoradiation and tailored mesorectal excision: a series of 338 consecutive cases.

    PubMed

    Pacelli, Fabio; Sanchez, Alejandro M; Covino, Marcello; Tortorelli, Antonio P; Bossola, Maurizio; Valentini, Vincenzo; Gambacorta, Maria A; Doglietto, Giovanni B

    2013-02-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiation (CRT), tailored mesorectal excision, and intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) have become the leading measures for rectal cancer treatment. The objective of this study was to evaluate early and long-term results of a multimodal treatment model for rectal cancer followed by curative surgery. Prospectively collected hospital records of 338 patients surgically treated for rectal cancer between January 1998 and December 2008 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients with high rectum level cancers and those with middle and low rectum cancers with clinical stage T1 to T2 underwent surgery, whereas those with T3 to T4 and N+ disease at the middle and low rectum received neoadjuvant CRT in 96.2 per cent of cases. Short-course neoadjuvant radiotherapy was not considered for neoadjuvant treatment. Postoperative major complications and mortality rates were 12.7 and 2.3 per cent, respectively. Overall 5-year disease-specific and disease-free survival were 80 and 73.1 per cent, respectively, whereas local recurrence rate was 6.1 per cent. At multivariate analysis, nodal status and circumferential margin status were independently associated with poor survival; local recurrence rates were independently affected by nodal and marginal status and tumor stage. The extent of mesorectal excision should be tailored depending on tumor location and the use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy, combined with IORT in advanced middle and low rectal cancer, leading to remarkable tumor downstaging with excellent prognosis in responding patients. PMID:23336654

  6. Malignant tracheal-mediastinal-parenchymal-pleural fistula after chemoradiation plus bevacizumab: management with a Y-silicone stent inside a metallic covered stent.

    PubMed

    Machuzak, Michael S; Santacruz, Jose F; Jaber, Wissam; Gildea, Thomas R

    2015-01-01

    Tracheal or bronchial-mediastinal fistulas are a rare entity associated to high mortality. We report a case of a 58-year-old man with an unresectable non-small cell carcinoma of the lung, treated with chemoradiation followed by bevacizumab. Approximately, 6 weeks after starting bevacizumab he developed a severe cough with copious secretions He could not lie supine due to the feeling of drowning. Investigations revealed a large tracheo-mediastinal-parenchymal-pleural fistula. Palliative management was offered with interventional bronchoscopic techniques. He was found to have a large central airway defect that obliterated almost 40% of the trachea. Under general anesthesia and positive pressure ventilation, a unique approach was used to rebuild an eroded tracheal and right main stem bronchial wall. A self-expanding metallic stent (SEMS) was placed to provide a scaffold of support, whereas a Dumon Y-stent was placed inside the SEMS. This combination allowed for a patent, stable airway; recreating the normal anatomy in a minimally invasive manner walling off the fistula. The patient was discharged 2 days after the bronchoscopic intervention, with significant palliation of his symptomatology. Eighteen months later, the upper lobe cavity persists with a stable airway and stents perfectly positioned with clinically insignificant evidence of stent related granulation in the upper trachea. PMID:25590491

  7. Circulating mRNA Profiling in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Identifies FAM84B As A Biomarker In Predicting Pathological Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Feng-Ming; Chia-Hsien Cheng, Jason; Chang, Yih-Leong; Lee, Jang-Ming; Koong, Albert C.; Chuang, Eric Y.

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal cancer patients with pathological complete response (pCR) to neoadjuvant chemoradiation (CRT) have favorable outcomes. Currently, there was no reliable biomarker predicting the response to CRT. Perioperative circulating mRNA may be associated with prognosis, but its application for predicting treatment response is unclear. We prospectively assessed the value of circulating messenger RNA (mRNA) profiling in predicting pCR for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Patients with ESCC completing CRT followed by surgery were enrolled for analysis. Venous peripheral blood was obtained before and after CRT, and total RNA was extracted for hybridization-based whole genome expression analysis and quantitative RT-PCR. We found circulating expression profiling was significantly altered after CRT. Altered FAM84B expression was significantly predictive of pCR. The decrease of serum FAM84B protein level after CRT was also associated with pCR. Immunohistochemistry and western blot confirmed that FAM84B protein was overexpressed in the majority of patients and ESCC cell lines. Furthermore, knockdown of FAM84B delayed tumor growth in ectopic xenografts. We demonstrated the decreased of circulating FAM84B mRNA and protein after neoadjuvant CRT may predict pCR, and FAM84B protein is overexpressed in ESCC. The potential of FAM84B as a novel predictive biomarker, and its biological functions deserve further investigation. PMID:25980316

  8. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 02-29: A Phase II Trial of Neoadjuvant Therapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy and Full-Dose Radiation Therapy Followed by Surgical Resection and Consolidative Therapy for Locally Advanced Non-small Cell Carcinoma of the Lung

    SciTech Connect

    Suntharalingam, Mohan; Paulus, Rebecca; Edelman, Martin J.; Krasna, Mark; Burrows, Whitney; Gore, Elizabeth; Wilson, Lynn D.; Choy, Hak

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate mediastinal nodal clearance (MNC) rates after induction chemotherapy and concurrent, full-dose radiation therapy (RT) in a phase II trimodality trial (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 0229). Patients and Methods: Patients (n=57) with stage III non-small cell lung cancer (pathologically proven N2 or N3) were eligible. Induction chemotherapy consisted of weekly carboplatin (AUC = 2.0) and paclitaxel 50 mg/m{sup 2}. Concurrent RT was prescribed, with 50.4 Gy to the mediastinum and primary tumor and a boost of 10.8 Gy to all gross disease. The mediastinum was pathologically reassessed after completion of chemoradiation. The primary endpoint of the study was MNC, with secondary endpoints of 2-year overall survival and postoperative morbidity/mortality. Results: The grade 3/4 toxicities included hematologic 35%, gastrointestinal 14%, and pulmonary 23%. Forty-three patients (75%) were evaluable for the primary endpoint. Twenty-seven patients achieved the primary endpoint of MNC (63%). Thirty-seven patients underwent resection. There was a 14% incidence of grade 3 postoperative pulmonary complications and 1 30-day, postoperative grade 5 toxicity (3%). With a median follow-up of 24 months for all patients, the 2-year overall survival rate was 54%, and the 2-year progression-free survival rate was 33%. The 2-year overall survival rate was 75% for those who achieved nodal clearance, 52% for those with residual nodal disease, and 23% for those who were not evaluable for the primary endpoint (P=.0002). Conclusions: This multi-institutional trial confirms the ability of neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiation with full-dose RT to sterilize known mediastinal nodal disease.

  9. Carcinoma of the anal canal: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) versus three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT)

    SciTech Connect

    Sale, Charlotte; Moloney, Phillip; Mathlum, Maitham

    2013-12-15

    Patients with anal canal carcinoma treated with standard conformal radiotherapy frequently experience severe acute and late toxicity reactions to the treatment area. Roohipour et al. (Dis Colon Rectum 2008; 51: 147–53) stated a patient's tolerance of chemoradiation to be an important prediction of treatment success. A new intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) technique for anal carcinoma cases has been developed at the Andrew Love Cancer Centre aimed at reducing radiation to surrounding healthy tissue. A same-subject repeated measures design was used for this study, where five anal carcinoma cases at the Andrew Love Cancer Centre were selected. Conformal and IMRT plans were generated and dosimetric evaluations were performed. Each plan was prescribed a total of 54 Gray (Gy) over a course of 30 fractions to the primary site. The IMRT plans resulted in improved dosimetry to the planning target volume (PTV) and reduction in radiation to the critical structures (bladder, external genitalia and femoral heads). Statistically there was no difference between the IMRT and conformal plans in the dose to the small and large bowel; however, the bowel IMRT dose–volume histogram (DVH) doses were consistently lower. The IMRT plans were superior to the conformal plans with improved dose conformity and reduced radiation to the surrounding healthy tissue. Anecdotally it was found that patients tolerated the IMRT treatment better than the three-dimensional (3D) conformal radiation therapy. This study describes and compares the planning techniques.

  10. Sweat Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colmant, Stephen A.; Merta, Rod J.

    2000-01-01

    A study combined group sweating and group counseling. Four adolescent boys with disruptive behavior disorders participated in 12 sweat therapy sessions. They reported the sessions useful for sharing personal concerns and receiving assistance with problem solving. Three boys showed improvement in self-esteem. Advantages of sweat therapy over other…

  11. Poetry Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Ronald V.

    Poetry therapy is the method of therapy based on the principle that a poem is a special medium for expressing emotions and that this expression can have psychotherapeutic value. A survey taken in 1973 showed there were over 400 therapists treating 3,500 drug addicts, alcoholics, and mental retardates around the country. Poetry therapists…

  12. Intravenous Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galliart, Barbara

    Intended for teaching licensed practical nurses, this curriculum guide provides information related to the equipment and skills required for nursing care of patients needing intravenous (IV) therapy. It also explains the roles and responsibilities of the licensed practical nurse with regard to intravenous therapy. Each of the 15 instructional…

  13. Sex Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogan, Douglas

    1977-01-01

    Notes that no single theory of psychotherapy dominates the field of sex therapy. On one hand, sex therapy is not subject to the rigid dogmas of many areas of psychotherapy. But on the other hand, many techniques are invented at the whim of clinicians with no basis in theory. (Author/AM)

  14. Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Baum, Bruce J

    2014-01-01

    Applications of gene therapy have been evaluated in virtually every oral tissue, and many of these have proved successful at least in animal models. While gene therapy will not be used routinely in the next decade, practitioners of oral medicine should be aware of the potential of this novel type of treatment that doubtless will benefit many patients with oral diseases. PMID:24372817

  15. Phase I Study of Preoperative Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Infusional 5-Fluorouracil and Oxaliplatin Followed by Surgery and Postoperative 5-Fluorouracil Plus Leucovorin for T3/T4 Rectal Adenocarcinoma: ECOG E1297

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, David I. Catalano, Paul J.; Haller, Daniel G.; Landry, Jerome C.; Sigurdson, Elin R.; Spitz, Francis R.; Benson, Al B.

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: Oxaliplatin is a platinum analog and radiosensitizer active in colorectal cancer. We performed a Phase I trial to test the safety and preliminary efficacy of adding oxaliplatin to standard preoperative chemoradiation therapy for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had T3 to T4 rectal adenocarcinoma. Patients received standard-dose radiation (50.4 Gy for 5.5 weeks) with concurrent infused 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) at 200 mg/m{sup 2} per day, 7 days per week. Oxaliplatin was given three times at 14-day intervals at 55, 70, or 85 mg/m{sup 2} during the 5.5-week radiation period, before resection. Adjuvant therapy consisted of four cycles of 5-FU (500 mg/m{sup 2} per week) with leucovorin (500 mg/m{sup 2} per week) given every 6 weeks. The main goals were to identify the maximum tolerated dose of oxaliplatin and the dose-limiting toxicities when given with 5-FU and RT. Secondary goals were to determine resectability, pathologic response, sphincter preservation, and overall survival rates. Results: Twenty-one patients were enrolled, 5 at the 55 mg/m{sup 2} oxaliplatin dose level, 5 at 70 mg/m{sup 2}, and 11 at 85 mg/m{sup 2}. All patients were able to complete the preoperative chemoradiation regimen with no dose adjustments. No dose-limiting toxicities or differences in the type or extent of toxicity were noted among the groups. Nineteen patients underwent surgery (three abdominopelvic resections and 16 low anterior resections), for an 84% sphincter preservation rate. The pathologic complete response rate was 26% (5 patients), and minimal microscopic residual tumor was found in 21% (4 additional patients). Conclusions: Oxaliplatin was well tolerated at 85 mg/m{sup 2} given every 2 weeks in combination with standard preoperative chemoradiation for rectal cancer. The rates of major pathologic response and sphincter preservation are promising.

  16. Precision Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy in Poor Performing Patients With Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Phase 1 Dose Escalation Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Westover, Kenneth D.; Loo, Billy W.; Gerber, David E.; Iyengar, Puneeth; Choy, Hak; Diehn, Maximilian; Hughes, Randy; Schiller, Joan; Dowell, Jonathan; Wardak, Zabi; Sher, David; Christie, Alana; Xie, Xian-Jin; Corona, Irma; Sharma, Akanksha; Wadsworth, Margaret E.; Timmerman, Robert

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: Treatment regimens for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) give suboptimal clinical outcomes. Technological advancements such as radiation therapy, the backbone of most treatment regimens, may enable more potent and effective therapies. The objective of this study was to escalate radiation therapy to a tumoricidal hypofractionated dose without exceeding the maximally tolerated dose (MTD) in patients with locally advanced NSCLC. Methods and Materials: Patients with stage II to IV or recurrent NSCLC and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 2 or greater and not candidates for surgical resection, stereotactic radiation, or concurrent chemoradiation were eligible. Highly conformal radiation therapy was given to treat intrathoracic disease in 15 fractions to a total of 50, 55, or 60 Gy. Results: Fifty-five patients were enrolled: 15 at the 50-Gy, 21 at the 55-Gy, and 19 at the 60-Gy dose levels. A 90-day follow-up was completed in each group without exceeding the MTD. With a median follow-up of 12.5 months, there were 93 grade ≥3 adverse events (AEs), including 39 deaths, although most AEs were considered related to factors other than radiation therapy. One patient from the 55- and 60-Gy dose groups developed grade ≥3 esophagitis, and 5, 4, and 4 patients in the respective dose groups experienced grade ≥3 dyspnea, but only 2 of these AEs were considered likely related to therapy. There was no association between fraction size and toxicity (P=.24). The median overall survival was 6 months with no significant differences between dose levels (P=.59). Conclusions: Precision hypofractionated radiation therapy consisting of 60 Gy in 15 fractions for locally advanced NSCLC is generally well tolerated. This treatment regimen could provide patients with poor performance status a potent alternative to chemoradiation. This study has implications for the cost effectiveness of lung cancer therapy. Additional studies of long

  17. Potential role of chemo-radiation with oral capecitabine in a breast cancer patient with central nervous system relapse.

    PubMed

    Hikino, Hajime; Yamada, Takako; Johbara, Kanta; Obayashi, Nobuhiko; Ozaki, Nobuhiro

    2006-02-01

    A 54-year-old woman underwent mastectomy and axillary lymph node dissection for infiltrating ductal carcinoma with multiple lymph node involvement. The patient received adriamycin 60 mg/m(2) and cyclophosphamide 600 mg/m(2) (AC) followed by weekly paclitaxel 80 mg/m(2) and external irradiation to the local lymph node regions as adjuvant treatment. After 1 year and 5 months, the patient suffered her first recurrence, developing multiple brain and meningeal metastases. CNS involvement was well controlled by oral capecitabine (2400 mg twice daily, on days 1-21 of a 28-day cycle) and external whole brain irradiation of 50 Gy with minimal toxicity. We suggest that capecitabine contributed to the favorable clinical course in this patient and believe that, as an oral agent, this drug may benefit patients with CNS metastases of breast cancer by allowing home-based therapy. PMID:16005228

  18. Chemoradiation of Hepatic Malignancies: Prospective, Phase 1 Study of Full-Dose Capecitabine With Escalating Doses of Yttrium-90 Radioembolization

    SciTech Connect

    Hickey, Ryan; Mulcahy, Mary F.; Lewandowski, Robert J.; Gates, Vanessa L.; Vouche, Michael; Habib, Ali; Kircher, Sheetal; Newman, Steven; Nimeiri, Halla; Benson, Al B.; Salem, Riad

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: Radiosensitizing chemotherapy improves the outcomes in comparison with radiation alone for gastrointestinal cancers. The delivery of radiation therapy with yttrium90 ({sup 90}Y) radioembolization, in combination with the radiosensitizing chemotherapeutic agent capecitabine, provides the opportunity to enhance the effects of radiation on hepatic malignancies. This phase 1 study sought to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of {sup 90}Y plus capecitabine in patients with cholangiocarcinoma or liver metastases confined to the liver. Methods and Materials: Patients were given initial treatment at full-dose capecitabine during days 1 to 14 of a 21-day cycle. At days 1 to 7 of the second cycle, whole-liver {sup 90}Y was given at the test dose, after which time capecitabine was continued. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was determined 6 weeks after {sup 90}Y infusion. If a DLT was not observed, the {sup 90}Y dose was escalated. The planned dose cohorts were 110, 130, 150, and 170 Gy. The primary endpoint was to determine the MTD of {sup 90}Y with full-dose capecitabine. Results: Sixteen patients were treated according to the study protocol. Two patients experienced DLTs. Nine patients required capecitabine dose reduction as a result of toxicities attributable to capecitabine alone. The criteria for establishing {sup 90}Y MTD were not met, indicating an MTD of >170 Gy. Conclusion: The MTD of {sup 90}Y delivered in conjunction with capecitabine in the setting of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma or metastatic disease confined to the liver exceeds 170 Gy. This is the highest {sup 90}Y dose reported to date and has important implications on combined therapy with the radiosensitizing oral chemotherapeutic capecitabine. Further studies are under way.

  19. Antiparasitic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kappagoda, Shanthi; Singh, Upinder; Blackburn, Brian G.

    2011-01-01

    Parasitic diseases affect more than 2 billion people globally and cause substantial morbidity and mortality, particularly among the world's poorest people. This overview focuses on the treatment of the major protozoan and helminth infections in humans. Recent developments in antiparasitic therapy include the expansion of artemisinin-based therapies for malaria, new drugs for soil-transmitted helminths and intestinal protozoa, expansion of the indications for antiparasitic drug treatment in patients with Chagas disease, and the use of combination therapy for leishmaniasis and human African trypanosomiasis. PMID:21628620

  20. Clinical Utility of Multimodality Imaging with Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI, Diffusion-Weighted MRI, and 18F-FDG PET/CT for the Prediction of Neck Control in Oropharyngeal or Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Treated with Chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Sheng-Chieh; Lin, Yu-Chun; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Liao, Chun-Ta; Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh; Ko, Sheung-Fat; Wang, Hung- Ming; Chang, Chee-Jen; Wang, Jiun-Jie

    2014-01-01

    The clinical usefulness of pretreatment imaging techniques for predicting neck control in patients with oropharyngeal or hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OHSCC) treated with chemoradiation remains unclear. In this prospective study, we investigated the role of pretreatment dynamic contrast-enhanced perfusion MR imaging (DCE-PWI), diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI), and [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET)/CT derived imaging markers for the prediction of neck control in OHSCC patients treated with chemoradiation. Patients with untreated OHSCC scheduled for chemoradiation between August, 2010 and July, 2012 were eligible for the study. Clinical variables and the following imaging parameters of metastatic neck lymph nodes were examined in relation to neck control: transfer constant, volume of blood plasma, and volume of extracellular extravascular space (Ve) on DCE-PWI; apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) on DWI; maximum standardized uptake value, metabolic tumor volume, and total lesion glycolysis on 18F-FDG PET/CT. There were 69 patients (37 with oropharynx SCC and 32 with hypopharynx SCC) with successful pretreatment DCE-PWI and DWI available for analysis. After a median follow-up of 31 months, 25 (36.2%) participants had neck failure. Multivariate analysis identified hemoglobin level <14.3 g/dL (P = 0.019), Ve <0.23 (P = 0.040), and ADC >1.14×10−3 mm2/s (P = 0.003) as independent prognostic factors for 3-year neck control. A prognostic scoring system was formulated by summing up the three significant predictors of neck control. Patients with scores of 2–3 had significantly poorer neck control and overall survival rates than patients with scores of 0–1. We conclude that hemoglobin levels, Ve, and ADC are independent pretreatment prognostic factors for neck control in OHSCC treated with chemoradiation. Their combination may identify a subgroup of patients at high risk of developing neck failure. PMID:25531391

  1. Oxygen Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    Oxygen therapy is a treatment that provides you with extra oxygen. Oxygen is a gas that your body needs to function. Normally, your lungs absorb oxygen from the air you breathe. But some conditions ...

  2. Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    Radiation therapy is a cancer treatment. It uses high doses of radiation to kill cancer cells and stop them from ... half of all cancer patients receive it. The radiation may be external, from special machines, or internal, ...

  3. Radiation therapy

    MedlinePlus

    Radiation therapy uses high-powered x-rays, particles, or radioactive seeds to kill cancer cells. ... faster than normal cells in the body. Because radiation is most harmful to quickly growing cells, radiation ...

  4. Electroconvulsive therapy

    MedlinePlus

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) uses an electric current to treat depression and some other mental illnesses. ... During ECT, the electric current triggers a seizure in the brain. Doctors believe that the seizure activity may help the brain "rewire" itself, which ...

  5. Electroconvulsive therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... please enable JavaScript. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) uses an electric current to treat depression and some other mental illnesses. Description During ECT, the electric current triggers a seizure in the brain. Doctors believe ...

  6. Proton Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... nucleus is surrounded by electrons. In proton therapy, beams of fast-moving protons are used to destroy ... atoms to release proton, neutron, and helium ion beams. In this highly specialized form of radiosurgery , proton ...

  7. Hug Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Sally; Franke, Sue

    1997-01-01

    Describes Hug Therapy as used at the Allegheny County Head Start centers in Pennsylvania. Discusses the value of appropriate touch for healthy physical and emotional development. Addresses barriers to therapeutic touching and benefits to children and parents. (KB)

  8. Oxygen Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... therapy works, it helps to understand how your respiratory system works. This system is a group of organs and tissues that help you breathe. The respiratory system includes the airways and lungs. The airways carry ...

  9. Proton Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... in a much more confined way than conventional photon therapy thus allowing the radiation oncologist to use ... charge. Just as x-rays (also known as photons) are used to treat both benign and malignant ...

  10. Dose to specific subregions of pelvic bone marrow defined with FDG-PET as a predictor of hematologic nadirs during concomitant chemoradiation in anal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Franco, Pierfrancesco; Arcadipane, Francesca; Ragona, Riccardo; Lesca, Adriana; Gallio, Elena; Mistrangelo, Massimiliano; Cassoni, Paola; Arena, Vincenzo; Bustreo, Sara; Faletti, Riccardo; Rondi, Nadia; Morino, Mario; Ricardi, Umberto

    2016-07-01

    To test the hypothesis that irradiated volume of specific subregions of pelvic active bone marrow as detected by (18)FDG-PET may be a predictor of decreased blood cells nadirs in anal cancer patients undergoing concurrent chemoradiation, we analyzed 44 patients submitted to IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy. Several bony structures were defined: pelvic and lumbar-sacral (LSBM), lower pelvis (LPBM) and iliac (IBM) bone marrow. Active BM was characterized employing (18)FDG-PET and characterized in all subregions as the volume having standard uptake values (SUVs) higher than SUVmean. All other regions were defined as inactive BM. On dose-volume histograms, dosimetric parameters were taken. Endpoints included white blood cell count (WBC), absolute neutrophil count (ANC), hemoglobin (Hb) and platelet (Plt) nadirs. Generalized linear modeling was used to find correlations between dosimetric variables and blood cells nadirs. WBC nadir was significantly correlated with LSBM mean dose (β = -1.852; 95 % CI -3.205/-0.500; p = 0.009), V10 (β = -2.153; 95 % CI -4.263/-0.721; p = 0.002), V20 (β = -2.081; 95 % CI -4.880/-0.112; p = 0.003), V30 (β = -1.971; 95 % CI -4.748/-0.090; p = 0.023) and IBM V10 (β = -0.073; 95 % CI -0.106/-0.023; p = 0.016). ANC nadir found to be significantly associated with LSBM V10 (β = -1.878; 95 % CI -4.799/-0.643; p = 0.025), V20 (β = -1.765; 95 % CI -4.050/-0.613; p = 0.030) and IBM V10 (β = -0.039; 95 % CI -0.066/-0.010; p = 0.027). Borderline significance was found for correlation between Plt nadir and LSBM V30 (β = -0.056; 95 % CI -2.748/-0.187; p = 0.060), V40 (β = -0.059; 95 % CI -3.112/-0.150; p = 0.060) and IBM V30 (β = -0.028; 95 % CI -0.074/-0.023; p = 0.056). No inactive BM subsites were found to be correlated with any blood cell nadir. (18)FDG-PET is able to define active bone marrow within pelvic osseous structures. LSBM is the strongest predictor of decreased blood cells

  11. Radionuclide Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalutsky, M. R.

    Radionuclide therapy utilizes unsealed sources of radionuclides as a treatment for cancer or other pathological conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis. Radionuclides that decay by the emission of β and α particles, as well as those that emit Auger electrons, have been used for this purpose. In this chapter, radiochemical aspects of radionuclide therapy, including criteria for radionuclide selection, radionuclide production, radiolabeling chemistry, and radiation dosimetry are discussed.

  12. EXTRA-A Multicenter Phase II Study of Chemoradiation Using a 5 Day per Week Oral Regimen of Capecitabine and Intravenous Mitomycin C in Anal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Glynne-Jones, Rob Meadows, Helen; Wan, Susan; Gollins, Simon; Leslie, Martin; Levine, Ed; McDonald, Alec C.; Myint, Sun; Samuel, Les; Sebag-Montefiore, David

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) + mitomycin C (MMC)-based chemoradiotherapy is standard treatment for patients with epidermoid anal carcinoma. Clinical trials in other cancers have confirmed 5-FU can successfully be replaced by the oral fluoropyrimidine capecitabine. This phase II trial aimed to determine the feasibility, toxicity, and efficacy of capecitabine, MMC and radiotherapy (RT) in anal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Radiotherapy comprised the schedule of the UK Anal Cancer Trial (ACT) II trial (50.4 Gy in 28 fractions of 1.8 Gy). With MMC (12 mg/m{sup 2}) on Day 1 and capecitabine on each RT treatment day in two divided doses (825 mg/m{sup 2} b.i.d). The endpoints were complete response at 4 weeks, local control at 6 months and toxicity. Results: Thirty-one patients entered the trial. The median age was 61 years (range 45-86) with 14 males and 17 females. Compliance with chemotherapy with no dose interruptions or delays was 68%, and with RT was 81%. Eighteen (58%) patients completed both modalities of treatment as planned. Dose-limiting Grade 3 or 4 diarrhea was seen in 1 of 31 patients. Three patients experienced Grade 3 neutropenia. There were no treatment-related deaths. Four weeks following completion of chemoradiation, 24 patients (77%) had a complete clinical response, and 4 (16%) a partial response. With a median follow-up of 14 months, three locoregional relapses occurred. Conclusions: Capecitabine with MMC and RT in with patients anal carcinoma is well tolerated, with minimal toxicity and acceptable compliance. We recommend testing this schedule in future national Phase III studies in anal cancer.

  13. Prognosis of Cervical Cancer in the Era of Concurrent Chemoradiation from National Database in Korea: A Comparison between Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Yun; Kim, Young Tae; Kim, Sunghoon; Lee, Boram; Lim, Myong Cheol; Kim, Jae-Weon; Won, Young-Joo

    2015-01-01

    In 1999, the National Cancer Institute issued a clinical advisory strongly touting the advantage of cisplatin-based chemoradiation (CCRT) for cervical cancer patients requiring radiation for their treatment. This study aimed to compare survival outcomes of cervical squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma before and after the advent of CCRT. Data were obtained from the Korea National Cancer Incidence Database for patients who were diagnosed with cervical cancers between 1993 and 2012. We compared survival according to histologic subtypes in cervical cancer patients diagnosed before (1993–1997), during (1998–2002), and after (2003–2012) the introduction of CCRT. A total of 80,766 patients were identified, including 64,531 (79.9%) women with squamous cell carcinomas and 7,265 (9.0%) with adenocarcinoma. With the introduction of CCRT, survival trends gradually increased in patients of both histologic subtypes with regional tumors. However, survival was significantly higher in squamous cell carcinoma than in adenocarcinoma patients regardless of treatment modalities (surgery alone, P < 0.001; surgery followed by CCRT, P < 0.001; or primary CCRT, P = 0.003). Multivariate analysis showed that adenocarcinoma was an independent negative prognostic factor for survival regardless of the time period (before CCRT, hazard ratio (HR) = 1.49; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.37–1.62; after introduction of CCRT, HR = 1.40; 95% CI, 1.30–1.50). Although the survival of adenocarcinoma has improved after the introduction of CCRT, adenocarcinoma is still associated with worse overall survival compared to squamous cell carcinoma in the era of CCRT. PMID:26660311

  14. Outcome Prediction After Surgery and Chemoradiation of Squamous Cell Carcinoma in the Oral Cavity, Oropharynx, and Hypopharynx: Use of Baseline Perfusion CT Microcirculatory Parameters vs. Tumor Volume

    SciTech Connect

    Bisdas, Sotirios; Nguyen, Shaun A.; Anand, Sharma K.; Glavina, Gordana; Day, Terry; Rumboldt, Zoran

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: To assess whether pretreatment perfusion computed tomography (PCT) may predict outcome in chemoradiated patients with oral cavity, oropharynx, and hypopharynx squamous cell carcinoma (SCCA) after surgical excision. Materials and Methods: Twenty-one patients with SCCA were examined before treatment. The primary site was oral cavity in 6, oropharynx in 7, and hypopharynx in 8 patients; there were 11 T2, 6 T3, and 4 T4 tumors. PCT was performed at the level of largest tumor diameter based on standard neck CT. The data were processed to obtain blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), mean transit time (MTT), and permeability surface area product (PS). Regions of interest were free-hand positioned on the lesions to obtain PCT measurements. Tumor volume was also calculated. Follow-up was performed with positron emission tomography (PET)/CT and endoscopy. Pearson correlation coefficient was used for comparison between the subgroups. A regression model was constructed to predict recurrence based on the following predictors: age, gender, tumor (T) and nodal (N) stage, tumor volume, and PCT parameters. Results: BF{sub mean}, BF{sub max}, BV{sub mean}, BV{sub max}, MTT{sub mean}, PS{sub mean}, and PS{sub max} were significantly different between patients with and without tumor recurrence (0.0001, p < 0.04). T stage, tumor volume, N stage, BF{sub max}, BV{sub max}, MTT{sub mean}, and radiation dose (p < 0.001) were independent predictors for recurrence. Cox proportional hazards model for tumor recurrence revealed significantly increased risk with high tumor volume (p = 0.00001, relative risk [RR] 7.4), low PS{sub mean} (p = 0.0001, RR 14.3), and low BF{sub max} (p = 0.002, RR 5.9). Conclusions: Our data suggest that PCT parameters have a prognostic role in patients with SCCA.

  15. RTOG 0417: Efficacy of Bevacizumab in Combination With Definitive Radiation Therapy and Cisplatin Chemotherapy in Untreated Patients With Locally Advanced Cervical Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Schefter, Tracey; Winter, Kathryn; Kwon, Janice S.; Stuhr, Kelly; Balaraj, Khalid; Yaremko, Brian Patrick; Small, William; Sause, William; Gaffney, David

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0417 was a phase II study that explored the safety and efficacy of the addition of bevacizumab to chemoradiation therapy. The safety results have been previously reported. Herein we report the secondary efficacy endpoints of overall survival (OS), locoregional failure (LRF), para-aortic nodal failure (PAF), distant failure (DF), and disease-free survival (DFS). Methods and Materials: Eligible patients with bulky Stage IB-IIIB disease were treated with once-weekly cisplatin (40 mg/m{sup 2}) chemotherapy and standard pelvic radiation therapy and brachytherapy. Bevacizumab was administered at 10 mg/kg intravenously every 2 weeks for 3 cycles during chemoradiation. For OS, failure was defined as death of any cause and was measured from study entry to date of death. LRF was defined as any failure in the pelvis. PAF was defined as any para-aortic nodal failure. DF was analyzed both including and excluding PAF. DFS was measured from study entry to date of first LRF. DF was measured with or without PAF or death. OS and DFS were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method, and LRF and DF rates were estimated by the cumulative incidence method. Results: 49 eligible patients from 28 institutions were enrolled between 2006 and 2009. The median follow-up time was 3.8 years (range, 0.8-6.0 years). The surviving patients had a median follow-up time of 3.9 years (range, 2.1-6.0 years). Most patients had tumors of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Stage IIB (63%), and 80% were squamous. The 3-year OS, DFS, and LRF were 81.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], 67.2%-89.8%), 68.7% (95% CI, 53.5%-79.8%), and 23.2% (95% CI, 11%-35.4%), respectively. The PAF, DF without PAF, and DF with PAF at 3 years were 8.4% (95% CI, 0.4%-16.3%), 14.7% (95% CI, 4.5%-24.9%), and 23.1% (95% CI 11.0%-35.2%), respectively. Conclusion: In this study, bevacizumab in combination with standard pelvic chemoradiation therapy for locally advanced cervical

  16. A Phase 2 Trial of Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Paclitaxel Chemotherapy After Surgery in Patients With High-Risk Endometrial Cancer: A Korean Gynecologic Oncologic Group Study

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Hanbyoul; Nam, Byung-Ho; Kim, Seok Mo; Cho, Chi-Heum; Kim, Byoung Gie; Ryu, Hee-Sug; Kang, Soon Beom; Kim, Jae-Hoon

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: A phase 2 study was completed by the Korean Gynecologic Oncologic Group to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of concurrent chemoradiation with weekly paclitaxel in patients with high-risk endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: Pathologic requirements included endometrial endometrioid adenocarcinoma stages III and IV. Radiation therapy consisted of a total dose of 4500 to 5040 cGy in 5 fractions per week for 6 weeks. Paclitaxel 60 mg/m{sup 2} was administered once weekly for 5 weeks during radiation therapy. Results: Fifty-seven patients were enrolled between January 2006 and March 2008. The median follow-up time was 60.0 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 51.0-58.2). All grade 3/4 toxicities were hematologic and usually self-limited. There was no life-threatening toxicity. The cumulative incidence of intrapelvic recurrence sites was 1.9% (1/52), and the cumulative incidence of extrapelvic recurrence sites was 34.6% (18/52). The estimated 5-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 63.5% (95% CI, 50.4-76.5) and 82.7% (95% CI, 72.4-92.9), respectively. Conclusions: Concurrent chemoradiation with weekly paclitaxel is well tolerated and seems to be effective for high-risk endometrioid endometrial cancers. This approach appears reasonable to be tested for efficacy in a prospective, randomized controlled study.

  17. Do Elderly Patients Experience Increased Perioperative or Postoperative Morbidity or Mortality When Given Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Before Esophagectomy?

    SciTech Connect

    Fogh, Shannon E.; Yu, Anthony; Kubicek, Gregory J.; Scott, Walter; Mitchell, Edith; Rosato, Ernest L.; Berger, Adam C.

    2011-08-01

    Background: The use of induction chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery has been widely used for the treatment of esophageal cancer. The presumed risk of increased postoperative morbidity and mortality with this regimen has led to reluctance to offer this therapy to elderly patients. We compared the perioperative morbidity and mortality of patients 70 years old and older with those of patients younger than 70 who received CRT followed by esophagectomy and sought to identify preoperative risk factors that may predict higher risk of postoperative death or complications. Methods and Materials: We identified 260 patients who underwent preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by esophagectomy. The association of age with postoperative death and complications was evaluated. The Charlson index, prior cardiac history, and diabetes were identified as preoperative risk factors and were evaluated as potential confounders or effect modifiers. Results: Cardiac disease and the Charlson index were potential modifiers of the effect of age on length of hospital stay (p = 0.08 and p = 0.07, respectively) and postoperative complications (p = 0.1 and p = 0.2) but were not statistically significant. There was a slight nonsignificant decrease in the risk of death in elderly patients after adjustment for the Charlson index (p = 0.2). Conclusion: No significant differences were detected with respect to morbidity and mortality in elderly patients. The presence of cardiac disease, higher scores on the Charlson index, or diabetes did not significantly influence length of stay, postoperative complications, or postoperative death. Given the potential to improve outcomes, this regimen should not be discounted in elderly patients.

  18. Photodynamic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, Thomas J.; Gomer, Charles J.; Henderson, Barbara W.; Jori, Giulio; Kessel, David; Korbelik, Mladen; Moan, Johan; Peng, Qian

    2015-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy involves administration of a tumor-localizing photosensitizing agent, which may require metabolic synthesis (i.e., a prodrug), followed by activation of the agent by light of a specific wavelength. This therapy results in a sequence of photochemical and photobiologic processes that cause irreversible photodamage to tumor tissues. Results from preclinical and clinical studies conducted worldwide over a 25-year period have established photodynamic therapy as a useful treatment approach for some cancers. Since 1993, regulatory approval for photodynamic therapy involving use of a partially purified, commercially available hematoporphyrin derivative compound (Photofrin®) in patients with early and advanced stage cancer of the lung, digestive tract, and genitourinary tract has been obtained in Canada, The Netherlands, France, Germany, Japan, and the United States. We have attempted to conduct and present a comprehensive review of this rapidly expanding field. Mechanisms of subcellular and tumor localization of photosensitizing agents, as well as of molecular, cellular, and tumor responses associated with photodynamic therapy, are discussed. Technical issues regarding light dosimetry are also considered. PMID:9637138

  19. ZD9331 as second- or third-line therapy in patients with advanced colorectal cancer: a phase II multicenter trial.

    PubMed

    Schulz, J; Keller, A; Canfield, V; Parker, G; Douglass, E

    2004-08-01

    This study investigated the efficacy and tolerability of ZD9331 as second- or third-line treatment for patients with advanced colorectal cancer (aCRC). One hundred patients were recruited to the study: 45 in group 1 (failed first-line 5-FU-based regimen) and 55 in group 2 (failed first-line 5-FU-based regimen and second-line irinotecan). Patients received ZD9331 as a 30-minute intravenous infusion on days 1 and 8 of a 3-week cycle, and treatment continued until disease progression (PD) or withdrawal. After a median of 4 cycles of treatment, there were no objective responses in group 1 (N = 37), 25 (67.6%) patients had a best overall response of stable disease (SD), and 12 (32.4%) had PD. After a median of 3 cycles of treatment, there were 2 (4.5%) partial responses in group 2 (N = 44), 21 (47.7%) patients had a best overall response of SD, 20 (45.4%) had PD, and 1 (2.3%) had clinical progression. At data cut-off, 59.5% and 77.3% of patients in groups 1 and 2, respectively, had PD. The main adverse events were neutropenia (69%), fatigue (53%), nausea (46%), and diarrhea (40%), and most (72.3%) were grade I/II. ZD9331 demonstrated minimal antitumor activity, and manageable toxicity, in the second- or third-line treatment of aCRC. PMID:15289725

  20. [Testosterone therapy].

    PubMed

    Diemer, T; Hauptmann, A; Wagenlehner, F M E

    2016-04-01

    Hormone replacement therapy with testosterone has become well-established over the course of time. The initial substantial concerns with respect to complications and potential adverse events, particularly in older patients, were proven to be unfounded over time. Testosterone therapy has therefore gradually become a regular treatment modality in urological practice. It has also been shown to represent a valuable tool as supportive treatment for patients with erectile dysfunction and hypogonadism. A variety of testosterone preparations are available for treatment. Recent pharmaceutical developments have greatly improved the practicability and ease of administration for patients. Several guidelines have been developed that provide clearly formulated standards and instructions for indications, contraindications, application, risk factors and monitoring of testosterone therapy. Adverse events affecting the cardiovascular system and especially diseases of the prostate gland are of great importance, thus making the urologist the primary partner in the treatment of patients with testosterone deficiency. PMID:27067659

  1. MGMT testing allows for personalised therapy in the temozolomide era.

    PubMed

    Dullea, A; Marignol, L

    2016-01-01

    Adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ)-based chemoradiation is the standard of care for most glioblastoma patients (GBMs); however, a large proportion of these patients do not respond to TMZ. Silencing of the O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter is thought to induce chemosensitivity, and testing for methylation may allow for patient stratification; however, this has yet to become routine clinical practice despite an abundance of literature on the subject. The databases PubMed, Embase, The Cochrane Library, Science Direct and Medline were searched for relevant articles published between 1999 and 2015. Articles utilising MGMT testing in glioblastomas, and treatment of glioblastomas with temozolomide were assessed. Immunohistochemistry, methylation-specific PCR (MSP), reverse transcriptase PCR, pyrosequencing and bisulphite sequencing were the main testing methods identified. Nested-MSP techniques produced poor correlation with survival, whilst bisulphite sequencing showed no evident benefit over MSP. Testing is limited by sample quality and contamination; however, efforts are made to minimise this. Strong evidence for MGMT-based personalised therapy was presented in the elderly but remains controversial in the entire GBM population. MGMT testing presents many obstacles yet to be overcome, and these warrant attention prior to the routine implementation of MGMT testing to aid decision making in GBMs. However, there is evidence to support its use, particularly in the elderly. PMID:26518768

  2. What Is Music Therapy?

    MedlinePlus

    American Music Therapy Association Home Contact News Help/FAQ Members Only Login About Music Therapy & AMTA What is Music Therapy? Definition and Quotes ... is Music Therapy? Print Email Share What is Music Therapy What is Music Therapy? Music Therapy is the ...

  3. [Auricle therapy].

    PubMed

    Masip Sales, Mireia

    2005-05-01

    Auricle therapy is the method which diagnoses and treats the human body via the external ear. The author describes its simple application as its principal characteristics and contrasts these with the efficiency of its results. Furthermore, the author provides a wide range of therapeutic possibilities. PMID:15981969

  4. Proton therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... skin redness in the radiation area, and temporary hair loss. AFTER THE PROCEDURE Following proton therapy, you should be able to resume your normal activities. You will likely see your doctor every 3 to 4 months for a follow-up exam.

  5. Multimodal Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazarus, Arnold A.

    The multimodal therapy (MMT) approach provides a framework that facilitates systematic treatment selection in a broad-based, comprehensive and yet highly focused manner. It respects science, and data driven findings, and endeavors to use empirically supported methods when possible. Nevertheless, it recognizes that many issues still fall into the…

  6. Dance Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leventhal, Marcia B.

    1980-01-01

    Dance therapy deals with personal growth via body-mind interaction. A change in movement expression is believed to result in a personality or behavior change. The therapist is trained to become sensitive to movement expression as it relates to the psychological, motor, and cognitive development of the child. (JN)

  7. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) with endoscopic ultrasound for the treatment of esophageal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodward, Timothy A.; Wolfsen, Herbert C.

    2000-05-01

    In 1995, PDT was approved for palliative use in patients with esophageal cancer. We report our experience using PDT to treat esophageal cancer patients previously treated with combination chemotherapy and radiation therapy. In our series, nine patients referred for PDT with persistent esophageal cancer after chemo-radiation therapy. We found: (1) All patients were men with a mean age of 63 years and eight out of nine had adenocarcinoma with Barrett's esophagus; (2) All patients required endoscopic dilation after PDT; (3) At a mean follow up of 4 months, two T2N0 patients had no demonstrable tumor and all three T3N0 patients had greater than 50% tumor reduction (the partially responsive T3N0 patients will be offered repeat PDT); (4) Patients with metastatic disease (T3N1 or M1) had effective dysphagia palliation. Thus, PDT is safe and effective in ablating all or most tumor in patients with persistent esophageal cancer after chemotherapy and radiation therapy.

  8. Neoadjuvant Therapy in Patients with Pancreatic Cancer: A Disappointing Therapeutic Approach?

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Carolin; Folprecht, Gunnar; Zips, Daniel; Pilarsky, Christian; Saeger, Hans Detlev; Grutzmann, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a devastating disease. It is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in Germany. The incidence in 2003/2004 was 16 cases per 100.000 inhabitants. Of all carcinomas, pancreatic cancer has the highest mortality rate, with one- and five-year survival rates of 25% and less than 5%, respectively, regardless of the stage at diagnosis. These low survival rates demonstrate the poor prognosis of this carcinoma. Previous therapeutic approaches including surgical resection combined with adjuvant therapy or palliative chemoradiation have not achieved satisfactory results with respect to overall survival. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate new therapeutic approaches. Neoadjuvant therapy is an interesting therapeutic option for patients with pancreatic cancer. For selected patients with borderline or unresectable disease, neoadjuvant therapy offers the potential for tumor downstaging, increasing the probability of a margin-negative resection and decreasing the occurrence of lymph node metastasis. Currently, there is no universally accepted approach for treating patients with pancreatic cancer in the neoadjuvant setting. In this review, the most common neoadjuvant strategies will be described, compared and discussed. PMID:24212810

  9. Impact of Gemcitabine Chemotherapy and 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy/5-Fluorouracil on Quality of Life of Patients Managed for Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Short, Michala; Halkett, Georgia; Borg, Martin; Zissiadis, Yvonne; Kneebone, Andrew; Spry, Nigel

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To report quality of life (QOL) results for patients receiving chemoradiation therapy for pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients (n=41 locally advanced, n=22 postsurgery) entered the B9E-AY-S168 study and received 1 cycle of induction gemcitabine (1000 mg/m{sup 2} weekly Multiplication-Sign 3 with 1-week break) followed by 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (RT) (54 Gy locally advanced and 45 Gy postsurgery) and concomitant continuous-infusion 5-fluorouracil (5FU) (200 mg/m{sup 2}/d throughout RT). After 4 weeks, patients received an additional 3 cycles of consolidation gemcitabine chemotherapy. Patients completed the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30 and QLQ-PAN26 questionnaires at baseline, before RT/5FU, at end of RT/5FU, before consolidation gemcitabine, and at treatment completion. Results: The patterns of change in global QOL scores differed between groups. In the locally advanced group global QOL scores were +13, +8, +3, and +1 compared with baseline before RT/5FU (P=.008), at end of RT/5FU, before consolidation gemcitabine, and at treatment completion, respectively. In the postsurgery group, global QOL scores were -3, +4, +15, and +17 compared with baseline at the same time points, with a significant improvement in global QOL before consolidation gemcitabine (P=.03). No significant declines in global QOL were reported by either cohort. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that global QOL and associated function and symptom profiles for pancreatic chemoradiation therapy differ between locally advanced and postsurgery patients, likely owing to differences in underlying disease status. For both groups, the treatment protocol was well tolerated and did not have a negative impact on patients' global QOL.

  10. Anecdotal therapies.

    PubMed

    Millikan, L E

    1999-01-01

    Traditionally, many advances in medicine have been serendipitous. Are serendipitous and anecdotal synonymous? Many of our materia medica today relate to initial probes and anecdotal reports that matured to full investigation and therapeutic indications. The recent situation regarding Skin Cap is one that highlights the downside of this scenario. Several drugs in the US continue usage largely related to anecdotal indications, and anecdotal extension of legend indications is a standard for American Dermatology. The situation with systemic drugs, such as Trental, zinc preparations, imidazoles for extended indications, lysine and melatonin, all will be discussed. Topical preparations such as skin cap, cantharone, Vioform, all also are included in this category. It is important to place this topic in perspective in regards to geographic variation and therapeutic need. Many diseases lacking specific therapy are important targets for anecdotal therapy, and this will foster continued approaches in this area. The growing standardization of medicine and pharmaceutical regulation, threatens the anecdotal approach, but it provides still an important link to the future for some forms of therapy in diseases that are difficult to treat. Traditionally, the anecdote has been the first step in the therapeutic chain. Withering discovery of the benefits of the common fox glove in dropsy, was followed by many other anecdotes arriving via folk-medicine in the New World. This approach of utilizing folk medicine has now reached new heights, with very active searches by major pharmaceutical companies throughout the third world for remedies that may have potential. Couched with this is the history of anecdotal "snake-oil" remedies, that clearly had no benefit to anyone except the huckster marketing same. The excesses in this area of unproven and false therapies, led to the gradual organization of therapeutic trials and the Food and Drug Administration in the US as we know it today. The

  11. Particle therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Raju, M.R.

    1993-09-01

    Particle therapy has a long history. The experimentation with particles for their therapeutic application got started soon after they were produced in the laboratory. Physicists played a major role in proposing the potential applications in radiotherapy as well as in the development of particle therapy. A brief review of the current status of particle radiotherapy with some historical perspective is presented and specific contributions made by physicists will be pointed out wherever appropriate. The rationale of using particles in cancer treatment is to reduce the treatment volume to the target volume by using precise dose distributions in three dimensions by using particles such as protons and to improve the differential effects on tumors compared to normal tissues by using high-LET radiations such as neutrons. Pions and heavy ions combine the above two characteristics.

  12. Radiation Therapy (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Radiation Therapy KidsHealth > For Parents > Radiation Therapy Print A A ... many questions and concerns about it. About Radiation Therapy In radiation therapy, high-energy radiation from X- ...

  13. Esophagus Cancer: Palliative Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... your doctor about cancer of the esophagus? Palliative therapy for cancer of the esophagus Palliative therapy is ... therapy Electrocoagulation Laser ablation Argon plasma coagulation Radiation therapy External-beam radiation can often help relieve some ...

  14. Music Therapy: A Career in Music Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    About Music Therapy & Music Therapy Training M usic therapy is a healthcare profession that uses music to help individuals of all ages improve physical, ... grateful I chose a career as rewarding as music therapy. I love what I do each day!” Where ...

  15. Feasibility of preoperative combined radiation therapy and chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin in potentially resectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma: The French SFRO-FFCD 97-04 Phase II trial

    SciTech Connect

    Mornex, Francoise . E-mail: francoise.mornex@chu-lyon.fr; Girard, Nicolas; Scoazec, Jean-Yves; Bossard, Nadine; Ychou, Marc; Smith, Denis; Seitz, Jean-Francois; Valette, Pierre-Jean; Roy, Pascal; Rouanet, Philippe; Ducreux, Michel; Partensky, Christian

    2006-08-01

    Purpose More than 80% of patients who undergo a potentially curative resection for pancreatic cancer develop local or distant recurrence. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy might offer potential benefits regarding local and systemic control and survival. This multi-institutional Phase II trial explored the feasibility of preoperative chemoradiation in this situation. Methods and Materials Treatment consisted of concurrent radiotherapy (50 Gy within 5 weeks), and chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil (300 mg/m{sup 2}/day, 5 days/week, 5 consecutive weeks) and cisplatin (20 mg/m{sup 2}/day, Days 1-5 and 29-33), followed by surgical resection of the pancreatic tumor in patients without progression. Results A total of 41 patients were enrolled. Of these, 38 (93%) received {>=}47 Gy; 30 patients (73%) received {>=}75% of the prescribed doses of chemotherapy. Surgical resection was performed in 26 patients (63%). Because of local or metastatic progression, 5 patients (12%) did not undergo surgery and 10 underwent surgery without resection of the pancreatic tumor. Operative mortality was 2.8%. Among 40 evaluable patients, 27 were successfully treated (67.5%; 95% CI, 50.9-81.4%). Conclusions Pancreatic cancer is chemo-radiosensitive. The proposed pre-operative scheme is feasible, does not prevent successful surgery, and must be tested on a Phase III setting. Yet, the large proportion of tumor progression during and after chemoradiation justifies the use of more efficient drugs such as Gemcitabine, and optimized radiotherapy including new techniques such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

  16. Nomograms Predicting Response to Therapy and Outcomes After Bladder-Preserving Trimodality Therapy for Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Coen, John J.; Paly, Jonathan J.; Niemierko, Andrzej; Kaufman, Donald S.; Heney, Niall M.; Spiegel, Daphne Y.; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Zietman, Anthony L.; Shipley, William U.

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: Selective bladder preservation by use of trimodality therapy is an established management strategy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Individual disease features have been associated with response to therapy, likelihood of bladder preservation, and disease-free survival. We developed prognostic nomograms to predict the complete response rate, disease-specific survival, and likelihood of remaining free of recurrent bladder cancer or cystectomy. Methods and Materials: From 1986 to 2009, 325 patients were managed with selective bladder preservation at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and had complete data adequate for nomogram development. Treatment consisted of a transurethral resection of bladder tumor followed by split-course chemoradiation. Patients with a complete response at midtreatment cystoscopic assessment completed radiation, whereas those with a lesser response underwent a prompt cystectomy. Prognostic nomograms were constructed predicting complete response (CR), disease-specific survival (DSS), and bladder-intact disease-free survival (BI-DFS). BI-DFS was defined as the absence of local invasive or regional recurrence, distant metastasis, bladder cancer-related death, or radical cystectomy. Results: The final nomograms included information on clinical T stage, presence of hydronephrosis, whether a visibly complete transurethral resection of bladder tumor was performed, age, sex, and tumor grade. The predictive accuracy of these nomograms was assessed. For complete response, the area under the receiving operating characteristic curve was 0.69. The Harrell concordance index was 0.61 for both DSS and BI-DFS. Conclusions: Our nomograms allow individualized estimates of complete response, DSS, and BI-DFS. They may assist patients and clinicians making important treatment decisions.

  17. Cancer Therapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The patient shown is undergoing cancer radiation treatment in a hospital-like atmosphere but he is not in a hospital. The treatment room is at NASA's Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio. It is a converted portion of the Center's cyclotron facility, originally designed for radiation studies related to nuclear propulsion for aircraft and spacecraft. Under an agreement between the Center and the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, the 50 million volt cyclotron is now being used to evaluate the effectiveness of "fast neutron" therapy in the treatment of cancerous tumors.

  18. The Future of Glioblastoma Therapy: Synergism of Standard of Care and Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Mira A.; Kim, Jennifer E.; Ruzevick, Jacob; Li, Gordon; Lim, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The current standard of care for glioblastoma (GBM) is maximal surgical resection with adjuvant radiotherapy and temozolomide (TMZ). As the 5-year survival with GBM remains at a dismal <10%, novel therapies are needed. Immunotherapies such as the dendritic cell (DC) vaccine, heat shock protein vaccines, and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFRvIII) vaccines have shown encouraging results in clinical trials, and have demonstrated synergistic effects with conventional therapeutics resulting in ongoing phase III trials. Chemoradiation has been shown to have synergistic effects when used in combination with immunotherapy. Cytotoxic ionizing radiation is known to trigger pro-inflammatory signaling cascades and immune activation secondary to cell death, which can then be exploited by immunotherapies. The future of GBM therapeutics will involve finding the place for immunotherapy in the current treatment regimen with a focus on developing strategies. Here, we review current GBM therapy and the evidence for combination of immune checkpoint inhibitors, DC and peptide vaccines with the current standard of care. PMID:25268164

  19. Nucleic acid targeting: towards personalized therapy for head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Parsel, S M; Grandis, J R; Thomas, S M

    2016-06-23

    In light of a detailed characterization of genetic aberrations in cancer, nucleic acid targeting represents an attractive therapeutic approach with significant translational potential. Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is a leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide with stagnant 5-year survival rates. Advances in conventional treatment have done little to improve survival and combined chemoradiation is associated with significant adverse effects. Recent reports have characterized the genetic alterations in HNSCC and demonstrated that mutations confer resistance to conventional and molecular targeted therapies. The ability to use specific nucleic acid sequences to inhibit cancer-associated genes including non-druggable targets facilitates personalized medicine approaches with less adverse effects. Additionally, advances in drug delivery mechanisms have increased the transfection efficiency aiding in greater therapeutic responses. Given these advances, the stage has been set to translate the information garnered from genomic studies into personalized treatment strategies. Genes involved in the tumor protein 53 and epidermal growth factor receptor pathways have been extensively investigated and many promising preclinical studies have shown tumor inhibition through genetic modulation. We, and others, have demonstrated that targeting oncogene expression with gene therapy approaches is feasible in patients. Other methods such as RNA interference have proven to be effective and are potential candidates for clinical studies. This review summarizes the major advances in sequence-specific gene modulation in the preclinical setting and in clinical trials in head and neck cancer patients. PMID:26592450

  20. Nucleic Acid Targeting: Towards Personalized Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Parsel, Sean M; Grandis, Jennifer R; Thomas, Sufi M

    2015-01-01

    In light of a detailed characterization of genetic aberrations in cancer, nucleic acid targeting represents an attractive therapeutic approach with significant translational potential. Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is a leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide with stagnant 5-year survival rates. Advances in conventional treatment have done little to improve survival and combined chemoradiation is associated with significant adverse effects. Recent reports have characterized the genetic alterations in HNSCC and demonstrated that mutations confer resistance to conventional and molecular targeted therapies. The ability to use specific nucleic acid sequences to inhibit cancer-associated genes including non-druggable targets facilitates personalized medicine approaches with less adverse effects. Additionally, advances in drug delivery mechanisms have increased the transfection efficiency aiding in greater therapeutic responses. Given these advances, the stage has been set to translate the information garnered from genomic studies into personalized treatment strategies. Genes involved in the tumor protein 53 (TP53) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathways have been extensively investigated and many promising preclinical studies have shown tumor inhibition through genetic modulation. We, and others, have demonstrated that targeting oncogene expression with gene therapy approaches is feasible in patients. Other methods such as RNA interference have proven to be effective and are potential candidates for clinical studies. This review summarizes the major advances in sequence-specific gene modulation in the preclinical setting and in clinical trials in head and neck cancer patients. PMID:26592450

  1. Phase I/II study of neoadjuvant bevacizumab, erlotinib and 5-fluorouracil with concurrent external beam radiation therapy in locally advanced rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Blaszkowsky, L. S.; Ryan, D. P.; Szymonifka, J.; Borger, D. R.; Zhu, A. X.; Clark, J. W.; Kwak, E. L.; Mamon, H. J.; Allen, J. N.; Vasudev, E.; Shellito, P. C.; Cusack, J. C.; Berger, D. L.; Hong, T. S.

    2014-01-01

    Background To determine the maximal tolerated dose of erlotinib when added to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) chemoradiation and bevacizumab and safety and efficacy of this combination in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. Patients and methods Patients with Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or ultrasound defined T3 or T4 adenocarcinoma of the rectum and without evidence of metastatic disease were enrolled. Patients received infusional 5-FU 225 mg/M2/day continuously, along with bevacizumab 5 mg/kg days 14, 1, 15 and 29. Standard radiotherapy was administered to 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions. Erlotinib started at a dose of 50 mg orally daily and advanced by 50 mg increments in the subsequent cohort. Open total mesorectal excision was carried out 6–9 weeks following the completion of chemoradiation. Results Thirty-two patients received one of three dose levels of erlotinib. Erlotinib dose level of 100 mg was determined to be the maximally tolerated dose. Thirty-one patients underwent resection of the primary tumor, one refused resection. Twenty-seven patients completed study therapy, all of whom underwent resection. At least one grade 3–4 toxicity occurred in 46.9% of patients. Grade 3–4 diarrhea occurred in 18.8%. The pathologic complete response (pCR) for all patients completing study therapy was 33%. With a median follow-up of 2.9 years, there are no documented local recurrences. Disease-free survival at 3 years is 75.5% (confidence interval: 55.1–87.6%). Conclusions Erlotinib added to infusional 5-FU, bevacizumab and radiation in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer is relatively well tolerated and associated with an encouraging pCR. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00307736. PMID:24356623

  2. Robotic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Krebs, H. I.; Hogan, N.

    2012-01-01

    The last two decades have seen a remarkable shift in the neuro-rehabilitation paradigm. Neuroscientists and clinicians moved away from the perception that the brain is static and hardwired, to a new dynamic understanding that plasticity is a fundamental property of the adult human brain and might be harnessed to remap or create new neural pathways. Capitalizing on this innovative understanding, we introduced a paradigm shift in the clinical practice in 1989 when we initiated the development of the MIT-Manus robot for neuro-rehabilitation and deployed it in the clinic in 1994 10. Since then, we and others have developed and tested a multitude of robotic devices for stroke, spinal cord injury, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson’s disease. Here we discuss whether robotic therapy has achieved a level of maturity to justify its broad adoption in the clinical realm as a tool for motor recovery. PMID:23080044

  3. Intrapleural therapy.

    PubMed

    Huggins, J Terrill; Doelken, Peter; Sahn, Steven A

    2011-08-01

    Numerous intrapleural therapies have been adopted to treat a vast array of pleural diseases. The first intrapleural therapies proposed focused on the use of fibrinolytics and DNase to promote fluid drainage in empyema. Numerous case series and five randomized controlled trials have been published to determine the outcomes of fibrinolytics in empyema treatment. In the largest randomized trial, the use of streptokinase had no reduction in mortality, decortication rates or hospital days compared with placebo in the treatment of empyema. Criticism over study design and patient selection may have potentially affected the outcomes in this study. The development of dyspnoea is common in the setting of malignant pleural effusions. Pleural fluid evacuation followed by pleurodesis is often attempted. Numerous sclerosing agents have been studied, with talc emerging as the most effective agent. Small particle size of talc should be avoided because of increased systemic absorption potentiating toxicity, such as acute lung injury. Over the past several years, the use of chronic indwelling pleural catheters have emerged as the preferred modality in the treating a symptomatic malignant pleural effusion. For patients with malignant-related lung entrapment, pleurodesis often fails due to the presence of visceral pleural restriction; however, chronic indwelling pleural catheters are effective in palliation of dyspnoea. Finally, the use of staphylococcal superantigens has been proposed as a therapeutic model for the treatment of non-small lung cancer. Intrapleural instillation of staphylococcal superantigens increased median survival by 5 months in patients with non-small cell lung cancer with a malignant pleural effusion. PMID:21672085

  4. Optimizing Collimator Margins for Isotoxically Dose-Escalated Conformal Radiation Therapy of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Samantha; Panettieri, Vanessa; Panakis, Niki; Bates, Nicholas; Lester, Jason F.; Jain, Pooja; Landau, David B.; Nahum, Alan E.; Mayles, W. Philip M.; Fenwick, John D.

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: Isotoxic dose escalation schedules such as IDEAL-CRT [isotoxic dose escalation and acceleration in lung cancer chemoradiation therapy] (ISRCTN12155469) individualize doses prescribed to lung tumors, generating a fixed modeled risk of radiation pneumonitis. Because the beam penumbra is broadened in lung, the choice of collimator margin is an important element of the optimization of isotoxic conformal radiation therapy for lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients with stage I-III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were replanned retrospectively using a range of collimator margins. For each plan, the prescribed dose was calculated according to the IDEAL-CRT isotoxic prescription method, and the absolute dose (D{sub 99}) delivered to 99% of the planning target volume (PTV) was determined. Results: Reducing the multileaf collimator margin from the widely used 7 mm to a value of 2 mm produced gains of 2.1 to 15.6 Gy in absolute PTV D{sub 99}, with a mean gain ± 1 standard error of the mean of 6.2 ± 1.1 Gy (2-sided P<.001). Conclusions: For NSCLC patients treated with conformal radiation therapy and an isotoxic dose prescription, absolute doses in the PTV may be increased by using smaller collimator margins, reductions in relative coverage being offset by increases in prescribed dose.

  5. Laser therapy for cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000905.htm Laser therapy for cancer To use the sharing features ... Lasers are also used on the skin. How Laser Therapy is Used Laser therapy can be used ...

  6. Living with Oxygen Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Oxygen Therapy Oxygen therapy helps many people function better and be ... chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) Although you may need oxygen therapy continuously or for long periods, it doesn' ...

  7. Targeted therapies for cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000902.htm Targeted therapies for cancer To use the sharing features on ... cells so they cannot spread. How Does Targeted Therapy Work? Targeted therapy drugs work in a few ...

  8. American Music Therapy Association

    MedlinePlus

    American Music Therapy Association Home Contact News Help/FAQ Members Only Login Quick Links Facts About Music Therapy Qualifications ... with AMTA Sponsor AMTA Events Social Networking Support Music Therapy When you shop at AmazonSmile, Amazon will ...

  9. American Art Therapy Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Educational Standards Approved Art Therapy Master’s Programs Professional Development Job Board ...Read more Approved Art Therapy Master’s ... Public Policy Insurance Reimbursement Licensure Public Policy Professional Development Annual Conference Approved Art Therapy Master's Programs Awards & ...

  10. External Beam Therapy (EBT)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z External Beam Therapy (EBT) External beam therapy (EBT) is a ... follow-up should I expect? What is external beam therapy and how is it used? External beam ...

  11. Concomitant intraarterial cisplatin, intravenous 5-flourouracil, and split-course radiation therapy for locally advanced unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma: a phase II study of the Puget Sound Oncology Consortium (PSOC-703).

    PubMed

    Thomas, C R; Weiden, P L; Traverso, L W; Thompson, T

    1997-04-01

    A Gastrointestinal Tumor Study Group (GITSG) protocol showed a survival benefit for patients with locally advanced unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma when treated with split-course radiation therapy and bolus intravenous (i.v.) 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) as compared with survival achieved with radiation alone. In an attempt to improve these results, a phase II trial using intraarterial (i.a.) cisplatin, systemic-infusional 5-FU, and concomitant split-course radiation therapy was conducted. Sixteen previously untreated patients with unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma (5 with American Joint Committee on Cancer [AJCC] stage I-II, 11 with stage III) disease were treated with i.a. cisplatin 100 mg/m2 by selective celiac arteriography followed by i.v. infusional 5-FU 1,000 mg/m2/day for 4 days, and concomitant split-course external beam photon radiation therapy at 2.0 Gy for 10 days in a 12-day period. After a planned 14-day interval, the identical chemoradiation treatment was repeated; finally, after a second 2-week interval, a third cycle of chemotherapy with a final 10 Gy radiation was administered. All 16 patients were evaluable for response; there were two partial responses (PR: 12%) and five minor responses (31%). Median follow-up period was 77 months. Median time to progression was 6 months (range 1-12 months), and median survival was 9 months (range 4-94 months). Nausea/vomiting was the major toxicity. There were no treatment-related fatalities. This regimen of concomitant i.a. cisplatin, i.v. infusional 5-FU, and split-course external beam photon radiation is well tolerated but has minimal activity in the treatment of locally advanced unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Future combined-modality protocols for this disease should explore alternative chemoradiation schemes. PMID:9124192

  12. Controversial therapies.

    PubMed

    Silver, L B

    1995-01-01

    Parents of children or adolescents with disabilities want the best treatment. They are vulnerable to any person who reports having a quick solution and possibly a cure. It is important that professionals be informed of these controversial therapies so that they can educate parents on what is known about these treatments. There is a relationship between brain function and nutrition, as well as between brain function and allergic reactions. These relations appear to be true for children with learning disabilities, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and other neurologic disorders. At this time, however, we do not understand these relationships and there are no known treatments based on these relationships that have been shown to be clinically successful. Professionals must educate parents on proposed new treatments. Parents need to ask themselves why this amazing approach is not used by everyone. If the person proposing the treatment tells them that "most professionals are biased and do not believe the findings because they are different from the traditional treatments," they should feel free to ask to see the data supporting the concept and the treatment. They should not accept without question popular books published by the person proposing the treatment or information provided in a flyer or on a television show by the person proposing the treatment. They should not put their son or daughter through something unproved and unlikely to help. PMID:7751563

  13. Cryoprecipitate therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, B.; Goodnough, L. T.; Levy, J. H.

    2014-01-01

    Cryoprecipitate, originally developed as a therapy for patients with antihaemophilic factor deficiency, or haemophilia A, has been in use for almost 50 yr. However, cryoprecipitate is no longer administered according to its original purpose, and is now most commonly used to replenish fibrinogen levels in patients with acquired coagulopathy, such as in clinical settings with haemorrhage including cardiac surgery, trauma, liver transplantation (LT), or obstetric haemorrhage. Cryoprecipitate is a pooled product that does not undergo pathogen inactivation, and its administration has been associated with a number of adverse events, particularly transmission of blood-borne pathogens and transfusion-related acute lung injury. As a result of these safety concerns, along with emerging availability of alternative fibrinogen preparations, cryoprecipitate has been withdrawn from use in a number of European countries. Compared with the plasma from which it is prepared, cryoprecipitate contains a high concentration of coagulation factor VIII, coagulation factor XIII, and fibrinogen. Cryoprecipitate is usually licensed by regulatory authorities for the treatment of hypofibrinogenaemia, and recommended for supplementation when plasma fibrinogen levels decrease below 1 g litre−1; however, this threshold is empiric and is not based on solid clinical evidence. Consequently, there is uncertainty over the appropriate dosing and optimal administration of cryoprecipitate, with some guidelines from professional societies to guide clinical practice. Randomized, controlled trials are needed to determine the clinical efficacy of cryoprecipitate, compared with the efficacy of alternative preparations. These trials will allow the development of evidence-based guidelines in order to inform physicians and guide clinical practice. PMID:24972790

  14. A Multicenter Phase II Trial of S-1 With Concurrent Radiation Therapy for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Masafumi; Ioka, Tatsuya; Ito, Yoshinori; Yonemoto, Naohiro; Nagase, Michitaka; Yamao, Kenji; Miyakawa, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Hiroshi; Furuse, Junji; Sato, Keiko; Sato, Tosiya; Okusaka, Takuji

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this trial was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of S-1 and concurrent radiation therapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (PC). Methods and Materials: Locally advanced PC patients with histologically or cytologically confirmed adenocarcinoma or adenosquamous carcinoma, who had no previous therapy were enrolled. Radiation therapy was delivered through 3 or more fields at a total dose of 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions over 5.5 weeks. S-1 was administered orally at a dose of 80 mg/m{sup 2} twice daily on the day of irradiation during radiation therapy. After a 2- to 8-week break, patients received a maintenance dose of S-1 (80 mg/m{sup 2}/day for 28 consecutive days, followed by a 14-day rest period) was then administered until the appearance of disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. The primary efficacy endpoint was survival, and the secondary efficacy endpoints were progression-free survival, response rate, and serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) response; the safety endpoint was toxicity. Results: Of the 60 evaluable patients, 16 patients achieved a partial response (27%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 16%-40%). The median progression-free survival period, overall survival period, and 1-year survival rate of the evaluable patients were 9.7 months (95% CI, 6.9-11.6 months), 16.2 months (95% CI, 13.5-21.3 months), and 72% (95%CI, 59%-82%), respectively. Of the 42 patients with a pretreatment serum CA19-9 level of {>=}100 U/ml, 34 (81%) patients showed a decrease of greater than 50%. Leukopenia (6 patients, 10%) and anorexia (4 patients, 7%) were the major grade 3-4 toxicities with chemoradiation therapy. Conclusions: The effect of S-1 with concurrent radiation therapy in patients with locally advanced PC was found to be very favorable, with only mild toxicity.

  15. Family Play Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ariel, Shlomo

    This paper examines a case study of family play therapy in Israel. The unique contributions of play therapy are evaluated including the therapy's accessibility to young children, its richness and flexibility, its exposure of covert patterns, its wealth of therapeutic means, and its therapeutic economy. The systematization of the therapy attempts…

  16. Vision Therapy News Backgrounder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Optometric Association, St. Louis, MO.

    The booklet provides an overview on vision therapy to aid writers, editors, and broadcasters help parents, teachers, older adults, and all consumers learn more about vision therapy. Following a description of vision therapy or vision training, information is provided on how and why vision therapy works. Additional sections address providers of…

  17. Art Therapy Verses Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Del Giacco, Maureen

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of my paper is to identify the difference between psychotherapy and art therapy. Then to introduce a technique within the field of art therapy that is relevant to neuro-plasticity Del Giacco Neuro Art Therapy. The paper identifies the importance of the amygdala and the hippocampus within the role of art therapy. Supporting…

  18. Enteral nutrition during multimodality therapy in upper gastrointestinal cancer patients.

    PubMed Central

    Daly, J M; Weintraub, F N; Shou, J; Rosato, E F; Lucia, M

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to evaluate long-term enteral nutrition support in postoperative cancer patients. BACKGROUND: Multimodality therapy for surgical patients with upper gastrointestinal malignancies may improve survival, but often results in substantial malnutrition, immunosuppression, and morbidity. The benefits of combined inpatient and outpatient enteral feeding with standard diets or diets supplemented with arginine, RNA + omega-3 fatty acids are unclear. METHODS: Sixty adult patients with esophageal (22), gastric (16), and pancreatic (22) lesions were stratified by disease site and percent usual weight and randomized to receive supplemental or standard diet via jejunostomy beginning on the first postoperative day (goal = 25 kcal/kg/day) until hospital discharge. Patients also were randomized to receive (n = 37) or not receive (n = 23) enteral jejunostomy feedings (1000 kcal/day overnight) for the 12- to 16-week recovery and radiation/chemotherapy periods. Plasma and peripheral white blood cells were obtained for fatty acid levels and PGE2 production measurements. RESULTS: Mean plasma and cellular omega 3/omega 6 fatty acid levels (percent composition) increased significantly (p < 0.05) in the arginine + omega-3 fatty acid group by postoperative day 7 (0.30 vs. 0.13) and (0.29 vs. 0.14) and continued to increase over time. Mean PGE2 production decreased significantly (p < 0.05) from 2760 to 1600 ng/10(6) cells/mL at day 7 in the arginine + omega-3 fatty acid group, whereas no significant change over time was noted in the standard group. Infectious/wound complications occurred in 10% of the supplemented group compared with 43% of the standard group (p < 0.05); mean length of hospital stay was 16 vs. 22 (p < 0.05) days, respectively. Of the patients who received postoperative chemoradiation therapy, only 1 (6%) of the 18 patients randomized to receive tube feeding did not continue, whereas 8 (61%) of the 13 patients not randomized to tube

  19. Preoperative Concurrent Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy for Bulky Stage IB2, IIA, and IIB Carcinoma of the Uterine Cervix With Proximal Parametrial Invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Huguet, Florence; Cojocariu, Oana-Maria; Levy, Pierre; Lefranc, Jean-Pierre; Darai, Emile; Jannet, Denis; Ansquer, Yan; Lhuillier, Pierre-Eugene; Benifla, Jean-Louis; Seince, Nathalie; Touboul, Emmanuel

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate toxicity, local tumor control, and survival after preoperative chemoradiation for operable bulky cervical carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Between December 1991 and July 2006, 92 patients with operable bulky stage IB2, IIA, and IIB cervical carcinoma without pelvic or para-aortic nodes on pretreatment imaging were treated. Treatment consisted of preoperative external beam pelvic radiation therapy (EBRT) and concomitant chemotherapy (CT) during the first and fourth weeks of radiation combining 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin. The pelvic radiation dose was 40.5 Gy over 4.5 weeks. EBRT was followed by low-dose rate uterovaginal brachytherapy with a total dose of 20 Gy in 62 patients. After a median rest period of 44 days, all patients underwent Class II modified radical hysterectomy with bilateral pelvic lymphadenectomy. Thirty patients who had not received preoperative uterovaginal brachytherapy underwent postoperative low-dose-rate vaginal brachytherapy at a dose of 20 Gy. The mean follow-up was 46 months. Results: Pathologic residual tumor was observed in 43 patients. After multivariate analysis, additional preoperative uterovaginal brachytherapy was the single significant predictive factor for pathologic complete response rate (p = 0.019). The 2- and 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rates were 80.4% and 72.2%, respectively. Pathologic residual cervical tumor was the single independent factor decreasing the probability of DFS (p = 0.020). Acute toxicities were moderate. Two severe ureteral complications requiring surgical intervention were observed. Conclusions: Concomitant chemoradiation followed by surgery for operable bulky stage I-II cervical carcinoma without clinical lymph node involvement can be used with acceptable toxicity. Pathologic complete response increases the probability of DFS.

  20. Effect of Brain Stem and Dorsal Vagus Complex Dosimetry on Nausea and Vomiting in Head and Neck Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ciura, Katherine; McBurney, Michelle; Nguyen, Baongoc; Pham, Mary; Rebueno, Neal; Fuller, Clifton D.; Guha-Thakurta, Nandita; Rosenthal, David I.

    2011-04-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is becoming the treatment of choice for many head and neck cancer patients. IMRT reduces some toxicities by reducing radiation dose to uninvolved normal tissue near tumor targets; however, other tissues not irradiated using previous 3D techniques may receive clinically significant doses, causing undesirable side effects including nausea and vomiting (NV). Irradiation of the brainstem, and more specifically, the area postrema and dorsal vagal complex (DVC), has been linked to NV. We previously reported preliminary hypothesis-generating dose effects associated with NV in IMRT patients. The goal of this study is to relate brainstem dose to NV symptoms. We retrospectively studied 100 consecutive patients that were treated for oropharyngeal cancer with IMRT. We contoured the brainstem, area postrema, and DVC with the assistance of an expert diagnostic neuroradiologist. We correlated dosimetry for the 3 areas contoured with weekly NV rates during IMRT. NV rates were significantly higher for patients who received concurrent chemotherapy. Post hoc analysis demonstrated that chemoradiation cases exhibited a trend towards the same dose-response relationship with both brainstem mean dose (p = 0.0025) and area postrema mean dose (p = 0.004); however, both failed to meet statistical significance at the p {<=} 0.002 level. Duration of toxicity was also greater for chemoradiation patients, who averaged 3.3 weeks with reported Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTC-AE), compared with an average of 2 weeks for definitive RT patients (p = 0.002). For definitive RT cases, no dose-response trend could be ascertained. The mean brainstem dose emerged as a key parameter of interest; however, no one dose parameter (mean/median/EUD) best correlated with NV. This study does not address extraneous factors that would affect NV incidence, including the use of antiemetics, nor chemotherapy dose schedule specifics before and during RT. A

  1. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of radiation therapy-induced microcirculation changes in rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lussanet, Quido G. de . E-mail: qdlu@rdia.azm.nl; Backes, Walter H.; Griffioen, Arjan W.; Padhani, Anwar R.; Baeten, Coen I.; Baardwijk, Angela van; Lambin, Philippe; Beets, Geerard L.; Engelshoven, Jos van; Beets-Tan, Regina G.H.

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: Dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) allows noninvasive evaluation of tumor microvasculature characteristics. This study evaluated radiation therapy related microvascular changes in locally advanced rectal cancer by DCE-MRI and histology. Methods and Materials: Dynamic contrast-enhanced-MRI was performed in 17 patients with primary rectal cancer. Seven patients underwent 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy radiation therapy (RT) (long RT) before DCE-MRI and 10 did not. Of these 10, 3 patients underwent five fractions of 5 Gy RT (short RT) in the week before surgery. The RT treated and nontreated groups were compared in terms of endothelial transfer coefficient (K{sup PS}, measured by DCE-MRI), microvessel density (MVD) (scored by immunoreactivity to CD31 and CD34), and tumor cell and endothelial cell proliferation (scored by immunoreactivity to Ki67). Results: Tumor K{sup PS} was 77% (p = 0.03) lower in the RT-treated group. Histogram analyses showed that RT reduced both magnitude and intratumor heterogeneity of K{sup PS} (p = 0.01). MVD was significantly lower (37%, p 0.03) in tumors treated with long RT than in nonirradiated tumors, but this was not the case with short RT. Endothelial cell proliferation was reduced with short RT (81%, p = 0.02) just before surgery, but not with long RT (p > 0.8). Tumor cell proliferation was reduced with both long (57%, p < 0.001) and short RT (52%, p = 0.002). Conclusion: Dynamic contrast-enhanced-MRI-derived K{sup PS} values showed significant radiation therapy related reductions in microvessel blood flow in locally advanced rectal cancer. These findings may be useful in evaluating effects of radiation combination therapies (e.g., chemoradiation or RT combined with antiangiogenesis therapy), to account for effects of RT alone.

  2. Impact of Concomitant Chemotherapy on Outcomes of Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer: A Population-Based Study

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Shlok; Kong, Weidong; Booth, Christopher M.; Mackillop, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Clinical trials have shown that the addition of chemotherapy to radiation therapy (RT) improves survival in advanced head-and-neck cancer. The objective of this study was to describe the effectiveness of concomitant chemoradiation therapy (C-CRT) in routine practice. Methods and Materials: This was a population-based cohort study. Electronic records of treatment from all provincial cancer centers were linked to a population--based cancer registry to describe the adoption of C-CRT for head-and-neck cancer patients in Ontario, Canada. The study population was then divided into pre- and postadoption cohorts, and their outcomes were compared. Results: Between 1992 and 2008, 18,867 patients had diagnoses of head-and-neck cancer in Ontario, of whom 7866 (41.7%) were treated with primary RT. The proportion of primary RT cases that received C-CRT increased from 2.2% in the preadoption cohort (1992-1998) to 39.3% in the postadoption cohort (2003-2008). Five-year survival among all primary RT cases increased from 43.6% in the preadoption cohort to 51.8% in the postadoption cohort (P<.001). Over the same period, treatment-related hospital admissions increased significantly, but there was no significant increase in treatment-related deaths. Conclusions: C-CRT was widely adopted in Ontario after 2003, and its adoption was temporally associated with an improvement in survival.

  3. Acute Esophagus Toxicity in Lung Cancer Patients After Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kwint, Margriet; Uyterlinde, Wilma; Nijkamp, Jasper; Chen, Chun; Bois, Josien de; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Heuvel, Michel van den; Knegjens, Joost; Herk, Marcel van; Belderbos, Jose

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the dose-effect relation between acute esophageal toxicity (AET) and the dose-volume parameters of the esophagus after intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods: One hundred thirty-nine patients with inoperable NSCLC treated with IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy were prospectively analyzed. The fractionation scheme was 66 Gy in 24 fractions. All patients received concurrently a daily dose of cisplatin (6 mg/m Superscript-Two ). Maximum AET was scored according to Common Toxicity Criteria 3.0. Dose-volume parameters V5 to V70, D{sub mean} and D{sub max} of the esophagus were calculated. A logistic regression analysis was performed to analyze the dose-effect relation between these parameters and grade {>=}2 and grade {>=}3 AET. The outcome was compared with the clinically used esophagus V35 prediction model for grade {>=}2 after radical 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) treatment. Results: In our patient group, 9% did not experience AET, and 31% experienced grade 1 AET, 38% grade 2 AET, and 22% grade 3 AET. The incidence of grade 2 and grade 3 AET was not different from that in patients treated with CCRT using 3DCRT. The V50 turned out to be the most significant dosimetric predictor for grade {>=}3 AET (P=.012). The derived V50 model was shown to predict grade {>=}2 AET significantly better than the clinical V35 model (P<.001). Conclusions: For NSCLC patients treated with IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy, the V50 was identified as most accurate predictor of grade {>=}3 AET. There was no difference in the incidence of grade {>=}2 AET between 3DCRT and IMRT in patients treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy.

  4. Evaluation of High Ipsilateral Subventricular Zone Radiation Therapy Dose in Glioblastoma: A Pooled Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Percy; Eppinga, Wietse; Lagerwaard, Frank; Cloughesy, Timothy; Slotman, Benjamin; Nghiemphu, Phioanh L.; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Kupelian, Patrick; Agazaryan, Nzhde; Demarco, John; Selch, Michael T.; Steinberg, Michael; Kang, Jung Julie

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: Cancer stem cells (CSCs) may play a role in the recurrence of glioblastoma. They are believed to originate from neural stem cells in the subventricular zone (SVZ). Because of their radioresistance, we hypothesized that high doses of radiation (>59.4 Gy) to the SVZ are necessary to control CSCs and improve progression-free survival (PFS) or overall survival (OS) in glioblastoma. Methods and Materials: 173 patients with glioblastoma pooled from 2 academic centers were treated with resection followed by chemoradiation therapy. The SVZ was segmented on computed tomography to calculate radiation doses delivered to the presumptive CSC niches. The relationships between high SVZ doses and PFS and OS were examined using Cox proportional hazards models. Five covariates were included to estimate their impact on PFS or OS: ipsilateral and contralateral SVZ doses, clinical target volume dose, age, and extent of resection. Results: Median PFS and OS were 10.4 and 19.6 months for the cohort. The mean ipsilateral SVZ, contralateral SVZ, and clinical target volume doses were 49.2, 35.2, and 60.1 Gy, respectively. Twenty-one patients who received high ipsilateral SVZ dose (>59.4 Gy) had significantly longer median PFS (12.6 vs 9.9 months, P=.042) and longer OS (25.8 vs 19.2 months, P=.173). On multivariate analysis, high radiation therapy doses to ipsilateral SVZ remained a statistically significant independent predictor of improved PFS but not of OS. The extent of surgery affected both PFS and OS on multivariate analysis. Conclusion: High radiation therapy doses to ipsilateral CSC niches are associated with improved PFS in glioblastoma.

  5. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) combined with chemotherapy for unresected pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gurka, Marie K.; Kim, Christine; He, Ruth; Charabaty, Aline; Haddad, Nadim; Johnson, Lynt; Jackson, Patrick; Weiner, Louis; Marshall, John L; Collins, Sean P.; Pishvaian, Michael J.; Unger, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The role of conventionally fractionated radiation therapy in the management of unresectable pancreatic cancer is controversial. One concern about concurrent chemoradiation relates to the timing of chemotherapy. In contrast to conventional radiation therapy, SBRT delivers high doses in a shorter duration resulting in minimal disruption in chemotherapy. Here we report our results of patients treated with SBRT and chemotherapy for inoperable pancreatic cancer. Methods Thirty-eight consecutive patients treated with SBRT and chemotherapy for locally advanced, borderline resectable, and medically inoperable at our institution from January 2008 to December 2012 were included in this retrospective analysis. Treatment was delivered in 5 fractions of 5 or 6 Gy per fraction over five days. Median time from diagnosis to SBRT was 1.9 months. Toxicities were scored using the CTCAE v.3. Survival was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results The median age was 70 years (range 45 – 90). ECOG performance status ranged from 0 – 3. Thirty-four patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Four other patients received sequential chemotherapy. Median OS was 14.3 months and median PFS was 9.2 months from diagnosis. From radiation, OS and PFS were 12.3 months and 6.8 months, respectively. The overall local control rate was 79%. Acute toxicity was minimal. Severe late SBRT-related toxicities included one grade 3 gastric outlet obstruction, one grade 4 biliary stricture and a grade 5 gastric hemorrhage. Conclusions SBRT combined with chemotherapy for unresectable pancreatic cancer is convenient, feasible and generally well tolerated. The outcomes of SBRT combined with chemotherapy compare favorably to the results of treatment with chemotherapy and conventional radiation therapy. PMID:25171298

  6. Surgery is an essential component of multimodality therapy for patients with locally advanced esophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Caitlin C.; Correa, Arlene M.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Komaki, Ritsuko U.; Welsh, James W.; Swisher, Stephen G.; Hofstetter, Wayne L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Experience with neoadjuvant chemoradiation (CXRT) has raised questions regarding the additional benefit of surgery after locally advanced esophageal adenocarcinoma patients achieve a clinical response to CXRT. We sought to quantify the value of surgery by comparing the overall (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) of trimodality eligible patients treated with definitive CXRT versus CXRT followed by esophagectomy. Methods We identified 143 clinical stage III esophageal adenocarcinoma patients that were eligible for trimodality therapy. All patients successfully completed neoadjuvant CXRT and were considered appropriate candidates for resection. Patients that were medically inoperable were excluded. Cox regression models were used to identify significant predictors of survival. Results Among the 143 patients eligible for surgery after completing CXRT, 114 underwent resection and 29 did not. Poorly differentiated tumors (HR=2.041, 95% CI 1.235–3.373) and surgical resection (HR=0.504, 95% CI 0.283–0.899) were the only independent predictors of OS. Patients treated with surgery had a 50% and 54% risk reduction in overall and cancer-specific mortality, respectively. Median OS (41.2 months vs. 20.3 months, p=0.012) and DFS (21.5 months vs. 11.4 months, p=0.007) were significantly improved with the addition of surgery compared to definitive CXRT. Conclusions Surgery provides a significant survival benefit to trimodality-eligible esophageal adenocarcinoma patients with locally advanced disease. PMID:23715646

  7. The association of adjuvant therapy with survival at the population level following pancreatic adenocarcinoma resection

    PubMed Central

    Kagedan, Daniel J.; Raju, Ravish S.; Dixon, Matthew E.; Shin, Elizabeth; Li, Qing; Liu, Ning; Elmi, Maryam; El-Sedfy, Abraham; Paszat, Lawrence; Kiss, Alexander; Earle, Craig C.; Mittmann, Nicole; Coburn, Natalie G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Using a retrospective observational cohort approach, the overall survival (OS) following curative-intent resection of pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PC) was defined at the population level according to adjuvant treatment, and predictors of OS were identified. Methods Patients undergoing resection of PC in the province of Ontario between 2005 and 2010 were identified using the provincial cancer registry, and linked to databases that include all treatments received and outcomes experienced in the province. Pathology reports were abstracted for staging and margin status. Patients were identified as having received chemotherapy (CT), chemoradiation therapy (CRT), or no adjuvant treatment (NAT). Kaplan–Meier survival analysis of patients surviving ≥6 months was performed, and predictors of OS identified by log-rank test. Cox multivariable analysis was used to define independent predictors of OS. Results Among the 473 patients undergoing PC resection, the median survival was 17.8 months; for the 397 who survived ≥6 months following surgery, the 5-year OS for the CT, CRT, and NAT groups was 21%, 16%, and 17%, respectively (p = 0.584). Lymph node-negative patients demonstrated improved OS associated with chemotherapy on multivariable analysis (HR = 2.20, 95% CI = 1.25–3.83 for NAT vs. CT). Conclusions Following PC resection, only patients with negative lymph nodes demonstrated improved OS associated with adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:27037203

  8. Temporal Nodal Regression and Regional Control After Primary Radiation Therapy for N2-N3 Head-and-Neck Cancer Stratified by HPV Status

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Shao Hui; O'Sullivan, Brian; Ringash, Jolie; Hope, Andrew; Gilbert, Ralph; Irish, Jonathan; Perez-Ordonez, Bayardo; Weinreb, Ilan; Waldron, John

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To compare the temporal lymph node (LN) regression and regional control (RC) after primary chemoradiation therapy/radiation therapy in human papillomavirus-related [HPV(+)] versus human papillomavirus-unrelated [HPV(−)] head-and-neck cancer (HNC). Methods and Materials: All cases of N2-N3 HNC treated with radiation therapy/chemoradiation therapy between 2003 and 2009 were reviewed. Human papillomavirus status was ascertained by p16 staining on all available oropharyngeal cancers. Larynx/hypopharynx cancers were considered HPV(−). Initial radiologic complete nodal response (CR) (≤1.0 cm 8-12 weeks after treatment), ultimate LN resolution, and RC were compared between HPV(+) and HPV(−) HNC. Multivariate analysis identified outcome predictors. Results: A total of 257 HPV(+) and 236 HPV(−) HNCs were identified. The initial LN size was larger (mean, 2.9 cm vs 2.5 cm; P<.01) with a higher proportion of cystic LNs (38% vs 6%, P<.01) in HPV(+) versus HPV(−) HNC. CR was achieved is 125 HPV(+) HNCs (49%) and 129 HPV(−) HNCs (55%) (P=.18). The mean post treatment largest LN was 36% of the original size in the HPV(+) group and 41% in the HPV(−) group (P<.01). The actuarial LN resolution was similar in the HPV(+) and HPV(−) groups at 12 weeks (42% and 43%, respectively), but it was higher in the HPV(+) group than in the HPV(−) group at 36 weeks (90% vs 77%, P<.01). The median follow-up period was 3.6 years. The 3-year RC rate was higher in the HPV(−) CR cases versus non-CR cases (92% vs 63%, P<.01) but was not different in the HPV(+) CR cases versus non-CR cases (98% vs 92%, P=.14). On multivariate analysis, HPV(+) status predicted ultimate LN resolution (odds ratio, 1.4 [95% confidence interval, 1.1-1.7]; P<.01) and RC (hazard ratio, 0.3 [95% confidence interval 0.2-0.6]; P<.01). Conclusions: HPV(+) LNs involute more quickly than HPV(−) LNs but undergo a more prolonged process to eventual CR beyond the time of initial assessment at 8 to 12

  9. Nintedanib Compared With Placebo in Treating Against Radiation-Induced Pneumonitis in Patients With Non-small Cell Lung Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery and Are Undergoing Chemoradiation Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-27

    Radiation-Induced Pneumonitis; Stage IIA Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIB Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  10. Hormone therapy for prostate cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Androgen deprivation therapy; ADT; Androgen suppression therapy; Combined androgen blockade ... Androgens cause prostate cancer cells to grow. Hormone therapy for prostate cancer lowers the effect level of ...

  11. Genes and Gene Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... a child can have a genetic disorder. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses genes to ... prevent disease. The most common form of gene therapy involves inserting a normal gene to replace an ...

  12. Hormone Replacement Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... before and during menopause, the levels of female hormones can go up and down. This can cause ... hot flashes and vaginal dryness. Some women take hormone replacement therapy (HRT), also called menopausal hormone therapy, ...

  13. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002375.htm Hyperbaric oxygen therapy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy uses a special pressure chamber to increase ...

  14. Radiation Therapy for Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... What is radiation therapy? Radiation therapy uses high-energy radiation to shrink tumors and kill cancer cells ( ... is a measure of the amount of radiation energy absorbed by 1 kilogram of human tissue. Different ...

  15. Adlerian Play Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kottman, Terry; Warlick, Jayne

    1990-01-01

    Describes Adlerian method of play therapy. Claims Adlerian therapy represents an integration of the concepts and techniques of individual psychology into a method of using play to help troubled children. (Author/ABL)

  16. Genes and Gene Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... correctly, a child can have a genetic disorder. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses genes to ... or prevent disease. The most common form of gene therapy involves inserting a normal gene to replace an ...

  17. Laser therapy for cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Laser therapy uses a very narrow, focused beam of light to shrink or destroy cancer cells. It can ... to cut out tumors without damaging other tissue. Laser therapy is often given through a thin, lighted tube ...

  18. Resection of borderline resectable pancreatic cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiation does not depend on improved radiographic appearance of tumor–vessel relationships

    PubMed Central

    Wild, Aaron T.; Raman, Siva P.; Wood, Laura D.; Huang, Peng; Laheru, Daniel A.; Zheng, Lei; De Jesus-Acosta, Ana; Le, Dung T.; Schulick, Richard; Edil, Barish; Ellsworth, Susannah; Pawlik, Timothy M.; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A.; Hruban, Ralph H.; Cameron, John L.; Fishman, Elliot K.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Herman, Joseph M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Neoadjuvant therapy increases rates of margin-negative resection of borderline resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (BL-PDAC). Criteria for BL-PDAC resection following neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiation therapy (NCRT) have not been clearly defined. Methods Fifty consecutive patients with BL-PDAC who received NCRT from 2007 to 2012 were identified. Computed tomography (CT) scans pre- and post-treatment were centrally reviewed. Results Twenty-nine patients (58 %) underwent resection following NCRT, while 21 (42 %) remained unresected. Patients selected for and successfully undergoing resection were more likely to have better performance status and absence of the following features on pre- and post-treatment CT: superior mesenteric vein/portal vein encasement, superior mesenteric artery involvement, tumor involvement of two or more vessels, and questionable/overt metastases (all p <0.05). Tumor volume and degree of tumor–vessel involvement did not significantly change in both groups after NCRT (all p > 0.05). The median overall survival was 22.9 months in resected versus 13.0 months in unresected patients (p < 0.001). Of patients undergoing resection, 93 % were margin-negative, 72 % were node-negative, and 54 % demonstrated moderate pathologic response to NCRT. Conclusion Apparent radiographic extent of vascular involvement does not change significantly after NCRT. Patients without metastatic disease should be chosen for surgical exploration based on adequate performance status and lack of disease progression. PMID:25755849

  19. Behavior Therapy of Impotence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dengrove, Edward

    1971-01-01

    Behavior therapy approaches to the treatment of male sexual impotence, specifically premature ejaculation and erective impotence, are discussed. Included in the behavioral therapies are systematic desensitization, active graded therapy, assertive techniques, sexual responses, operant approaches and others. Often marriage counseling is also…

  20. Aquatic Therapy for Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kucher, Greta; Moore, Kelsey; Rodia, Rachel; Moser, Christy Szczech

    2015-01-01

    Aquatic therapy has long been highlighted in the literature as a potentially powerful therapeutic intervention. This review will highlight basic definitions of aquatic therapy, review salient research, and identify specific diagnoses that may benefit from aquatic therapy. Online resources, blogs, and books that occupational therapists may find…

  1. Play Therapy: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Maggie L.; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Jessee, Peggy

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses the current issues in play therapy and its implications for play therapists. A brief history of play therapy is provided along with the current play therapy approaches and techniques. This article also touches on current issues or problems that play therapists may face, such as interpreting children's play, implementing…

  2. Neutron therapy of cancer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frigerio, N. A.; Nellans, H. N.; Shaw, M. J.

    1969-01-01

    Reports relate applications of neutrons to the problem of cancer therapy. The biochemical and biophysical aspects of fast-neutron therapy, neutron-capture and neutron-conversion therapy with intermediate-range neutrons are presented. Also included is a computer program for neutron-gamma radiobiology.

  3. Filial Therapy. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuman, Brandy

    Filial therapy is an alternative method for treating emotionally disturbed children in which the parent is used as an ally in the therapeutic process. Filial therapy teaches the parent a new way of interacting with their child, thus improving the parent-child relationship. Additionally, filial therapy provides focused attention to the child from a…

  4. Analysis of Local Control in Patients Receiving IMRT for Resected Pancreatic Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Yovino, Susannah; Maidment, Bert W.; Herman, Joseph M.; Pandya, Naimish; Goloubeva, Olga; Wolfgang, Chris; Schulick, Richard; Laheru, Daniel; Hanna, Nader; Alexander, Richard; Regine, William F.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is increasingly incorporated into therapy for pancreatic cancer. A concern regarding this technique is the potential for geographic miss and decreased local control. We analyzed patterns of first failure among patients treated with IMRT for resected pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Seventy-one patients who underwent resection and adjuvant chemoradiation for pancreas cancer are included in this report. IMRT was used for all to a median dose of 50.4 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy was 5-FU-based in 72% of patients and gemcitabine-based in 28%. Results: At median follow-up of 24 months, 49/71 patients (69%) had failed. The predominant failure pattern was distant metastases in 35/71 patients (49%). The most common site of metastases was the liver. Fourteen patients (19%) developed locoregional failure in the tumor bed alone in 5 patients, regional nodes in 4 patients, and concurrently with metastases in 5 patients. Median overall survival (OS) was 25 months. On univariate analysis, nodal status, margin status, postoperative CA 19-9 level, and weight loss during treatment were predictive for OS. On multivariate analysis, higher postoperative CA19-9 levels predicted for worse OS on a continuous basis (p < 0.01). A trend to worse OS was seen among patients with more weight loss during therapy (p = 0.06). Patients with positive nodes and positive margins also had significantly worse OS (HR for death 2.8, 95% CI 1.1-7.5; HR for death 2.6, 95% CI 1.1-6.2, respectively). Grade 3-4 nausea and vomiting was seen in 8% of patients. Late complication of small bowel obstruction occurred in 4 (6%) patients. Conclusions: This is the first comprehensive report of patterns of failure among patients treated with adjuvant IMRT for pancreas cancer. IMRT was not associated with an increase in local recurrences in our cohort. These data support the use of IMRT in the recently activated EORTC/US Intergroup/RTOG 0848 adjuvant pancreas

  5. Radiation Therapy: Additional Treatment Options

    MedlinePlus

    ... This is refered to as immunotherapy . Intraoperative Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy given during surgery is called intraoperative ... external beam therapy or as brachytherapy . Novel Targeted Therapies Cancer doctors now know much more about how ...

  6. Behavior therapy: an overview.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, G W; Gardner, R

    1983-08-01

    The authors examine the broad field of behavior therapy, the theories underlying its development, and the techniques that are used to change behavior. They review recent developments in behavior therapy as they relate to behavioral medicine and to treatment of psychiatric disorders, and briefly describe the use of cognitive behavior therapy in the treatment of depression and other problems. They discuss methods of behavioral assessment and the application of behavior therapy in large populations, as well as new uses of behavioral techniques in business and industry, gerontology, and marital therapy. PMID:6137450

  7. Topical Therapies for Pruritus

    PubMed Central

    Elmariah, Sarina B.; Lerner, Ethan A.

    2011-01-01

    Itch, or pruritus, is the predominant symptom associated with acute and chronic cutaneous disease and in some cases, may be debilitating. To date, there is no single universally effective anti-itch treatment. As the pathophysiology of itch in most cutaneous or systemic disorders remains unclear, anti-pruritic therapy is often directed against a variety of targets, including the epidermal barrier, immune system, or the nervous system. Topical therapy is the mainstay of dermatologic management of acute or localized itch or in patients with contraindications to systemic therapies. This review will summarize current topical therapies to treat pruritus and discuss potential future therapies. PMID:21767774

  8. Neoadjuvant Sandwich Treatment With Oxaliplatin and Capecitabine Administered Prior to, Concurrently With, and Following Radiation Therapy in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: A Prospective Phase 2 Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Yuan-Hong; Lin, Jun-Zhong; An, Xin; Luo, Jie-Lin; Cai, Mu-Yan; Cai, Pei-Qiang; Kong, Ling-Heng; Liu, Guo-Chen; Tang, Jing-Hua; Chen, Gong; Pan, Zhi-Zhong; Ding, Pei-Rong

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: Systemic failure remains the major challenge in management of locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). To optimize the timing of neoadjuvant treatment and enhance systemic control, we initiated a phase 2 trial to evaluate a new strategy of neoadjuvant sandwich treatment, integrating induction chemotherapy, concurrent chemoradiation therapy, and consolidation chemotherapy. Here, we present preliminary results of this trial, reporting the tumor response, toxicities, and surgical complications. Methods and Materials: Fifty-one patients with LARC were enrolled, among which were two patients who were ineligible because of distant metastases before treatment. Patients were treated first with one cycle of induction chemotherapy consisting of oxaliplatin, 130 mg/m² on day 1, with capecitabine, 1000 mg/m² twice daily for 14 days every 3 weeks (the XELOX regimen), followed by chemoradiation therapy, 50 Gy over 5 weeks, with the modified XELOX regimen (oxaliplatin 100 mg/m²), and then with another cycle of consolidation chemotherapy with the XELOX regimen. Surgery was performed 6 to 8 weeks after completion of radiation therapy. Tumor responses, toxicities, and surgical complications were recorded. Results: All but one patent completed the planned schedule of neoadjuvant sandwich treatment. Neither life-threatening blood count decrease nor febrile neutropenia were observed. Forty-five patents underwent optimal surgery with total mesorectal excision (TME). Four patients refused surgery because of clinically complete response. There was no perioperative mortality in this cohort. Five patients (11.1%) developed postoperative complications. Among the 45 patients who underwent TME, pathologic complete response (pCR), pCR or major regression, and at least moderate regression were achieved in 19 (42.2%), 37 (82.2%), and 44 patients (97.8%), respectively. Conclusions: Preliminary results suggest that the strategy of neoadjuvant sandwich treatment using XELOX regimen

  9. HIV-Associated Lung Cancer in the Era of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART)

    PubMed Central

    Pakkala, Suchita; Chen, Zhengjia; Rimland, David; Owonikoko, Taofeek K.; Gunthel, Clifford; Brandes, Johann R.; Saba, Nabil R.; Shin, Dong M.; Curran, Walter J.; Khuri, Fadlo R.; Ramalingam, Suresh S.

    2011-01-01

    Background Lung cancer is the leading cause of death among non-acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) defining malignancies. Since highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) has improved survival for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients, we evaluated lung cancer outcomes in the HAART era. Methods HIV-positive patients diagnosed with lung cancer in our institution during the HAART era (1995-2008) were analyzed. Patient charts were reviewed for clinical and laboratory data. CD4 count at diagnosis was treated as a continuous variable and subcategorized into distinct variables with 3 cut-off points (50, 200, & 500 μl). Pearson’s correlation coefficients were estimated for each covariate studied. Survival was determined by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results Out of 80 patients, 73 had non-small cell lung cancer. Baseline characteristics were: median age-52 yrs; male-80%; African American-84%; injection drug use-25%; smokers-100%; and prior exposure to antiretroviral agents-55%. Mean CD4 count and viral load were 304 μL and 82,420 copies/ml, respectively at cancer diagnosis. The latency between diagnosis of HIV and lung cancer was significantly shorter in women (4.1 yrs vs. 7.7 yrs, P=0.02) and 71% of the patients received anti-cancer therapy. The 1- and 3-year survival rates were 31% and 4% overall. Grade 3/4 toxicities occurred in 60% with chemo-radiation vs. 36% with chemotherapy. Cancer-related survival was better for patients with CD4 count >200 (P=0.0298) and >500 (P=0.0076). Conclusions The latency from diagnosis of HIV to lung cancer was significantly shorter for women. Although outcomes for lung cancer patients with HIV remain poor, high CD4 count is associated with an improved lung cancer-related survival. PMID:21713759

  10. Genes Involved in Radiation Therapy Response in Head and Neck Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Dumur, Catherine I.; Ladd, Amy C.; Wright, Harry V.; Penberthy, Lynne T.; Wilkinson, David S.; Powers, Celeste N.; Garrett, Carleton T.; DiNardo, Laurence J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This is a pilot study designed to identify gene expression profiles able to stratify head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) tumors that may or may not respond to chemoradiation or radiation therapy. Study Design We prospectively evaluated 14 HNSCC specimens, arising from patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy or radiotherapy alone with curative intent. A complete response was assessed by clinical evaluation with no evidence of gross tumor after a 2-year follow-up period. Methods Residual biopsy samples from eight complete responders (CR) and six nonresponders (NR) were evaluated by genome-wide gene expression profiling using HG-U133A 2.0 arrays. Univariate parametric t-tests with proportion of false discoveries controlled by multivariate permutation tests were used to identify genes with significantly different gene expression levels between CR and NR cases. Six different prediction algorithms were used to build gene predictor lists. Three representative genes showing 100% crossvalidation support after leave-one-out crossvalidation (LOOCV) were further validated using real-time QRT-PCR. Results We identified 167 significant probe sets that discriminate between the two classes, which were used to build gene predictor lists. Thus, 142 probe sets showed an accuracy of prediction ranging from 93% to 100% across all six prediction algorithms. The genes represented by these 142 probe sets were further classified into different functional networks that included cellular development, cellular movement, and cancer. Conclusions The results presented herein offer encouraging preliminary data that may provide a basis for a more precise prognosis of HNSCC, as well as a molecular-based therapy decision for the management of these cancers. PMID:19117295

  11. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Significantly Improves Acute Gastrointestinal Toxicity in Pancreatic and Ampullary Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Yovino, Susannah; Poppe, Matthew; Jabbour, Salma; David, Vera; Garofalo, Michael; Pandya, Naimesh; Alexander, Richard; Hanna, Nader; Regine, William F.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Among patients with upper abdominal malignancies, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) can improve dose distributions to critical dose-limiting structures near the target. Whether these improved dose distributions are associated with decreased toxicity when compared with conventional three-dimensional treatment remains a subject of investigation. Methods and Materials: 46 patients with pancreatic/ampullary cancer were treated with concurrent chemoradiation (CRT) using inverse-planned IMRT. All patients received CRT based on 5-fluorouracil in a schema similar to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 97-04. Rates of acute gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity for this series of IMRT-treated patients were compared with those from RTOG 97-04, where all patients were treated with three-dimensional conformal techniques. Chi-square analysis was used to determine if there was a statistically different incidence in acute GI toxicity between these two groups of patients. Results: The overall incidence of Grade 3-4 acute GI toxicity was low in patients receiving IMRT-based CRT. When compared with patients who had three-dimensional treatment planning (RTOG 97-04), IMRT significantly reduced the incidence of Grade 3-4 nausea and vomiting (0% vs. 11%, p = 0.024) and diarrhea (3% vs. 18%, p = 0.017). There was no significant difference in the incidence of Grade 3-4 weight loss between the two groups of patients. Conclusions: IMRT is associated with a statistically significant decrease in acute upper and lower GI toxicity among patients treated with CRT for pancreatic/ampullary cancers. Future clinical trials plan to incorporate the use of IMRT, given that it remains a subject of active investigation.

  12. A single-institution comparison of cetuximab, carboplatin, and paclitaxel induction chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation (CRT) versus CRT for locally-advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (LA-SCCHN)

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Surbhi; Mitra, Nandita; Wan, Fei; Lukens, J. Nicholas; Sharma, Sonam; Bauman, Jessica; Masroor, Farzad; Cohen, Roger B.; Desai, Arati; Algazy, Kenneth; Alonso-Basanta, Michelle; Ahn, Peter; Teo, Boon-Keng Kevin; Chalian, Ara; Weinstein, Gregory S.; O’Malley, Bert W.; Lin, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Comparisons of induction chemotherapy (IC) against upfront chemoradiation (CRT) for locally advanced head and neck cancer (LA-HNSCC) have demonstrated no differences except greater toxicity with IC. Effective induction regimens that are less toxic are therefore warranted. To inform future efforts with IC, we present our institutional experience comparing a less toxic IC regimen to CRT. Methods We included patients with LA-HNSCC treated with organ-preservation CRT (+/− induction) between 2008–2011. Patients were age >18, ECOG performance status 0–1, and minimum 6 months follow-up. IC consisted of 8 weekly cycles of cetuximab, carboplatin, and paclitaxel followed by CRT. The CRT regimen was platinum-based, with cetuximab reserved for patients contraindicated to receive platinum. Results Of 118 patients, 24 (20%) received IC and 94 (80%) received CRT. Median follow-up was 17 (IC) and 19 (CRT) months (p=0.05). There were no differences in toxicity between the groups. IC patients were more likely male, with more advanced tumor and nodal stage. Even when controlling for these factors, IC was still associated with worse locoregional control (LRC) (HR 3.6 p=0.02), distant-metastasis free survival (HR 5.3, p=0.02), and overall survival (OS) (HR 5.1. p < 0.01). Conclusions IC patients had greater disease burden than those receiving CRT. IC was well-tolerated, but with significant rates of locoregional and systemic failures. Given the retrospective nature of the study, our findings are not meant to be definitive or conclusive, but rather suggestive in directing future efforts with IC. For now, we favor CRT as the standard option for treatment of inoperable LA-HNSCC. PMID:27441910

  13. Can All Centers Plan Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) Effectively? An External Audit of Dosimetric Comparisons Between Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy and IMRT for Adjuvant Chemoradiation for Gastric Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Hans T. Lee, Brian; Park, Eileen; Lu, Jiade J.; Xia Ping

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: To compare dosimetric endpoints between three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) at our center with limited IMRT experience, and to perform an external audit of the IMRT plans. Methods and Materials: Ten patients, who received adjuvant chemoradiation for gastric cancer, formed the study cohort. For standardization, the planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk were recontoured with the assistance of a study protocol radiologic atlas. The cohort was replanned with CMS Xio to generate coplanar 3D-CRT and IMRT plans. All 10 datasets, including volumes but without the plans (i.e., blinded), were transmitted to an experienced center where IMRT plans were designed using Nomos Corvus (IMRT-C) and ADAC Pinnacle (IMRT-P). All IMRT plans were normalized to D95% receiving 45 Gy. Results: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy yielded higher PTV V45 (volume that receives {>=}45 Gy) (p < 0.001) than 3D-CRT. No difference in V20 was seen in the right (p = 0.9) and left (p 0.3) kidneys, but the liver mean dose (p < 0.001) was superior with IMRT. For the external audit, IMRT-C (p = 0.002) and IMRT-P (p < 0.001) achieved significantly lower left kidney V20 than IMRT, and IMRT-P (p < 0.001) achieved lower right kidney V20 than IMRT. The IMRT-C (p = 0.003) but not IMRT-P (p = 0.6) had lower liver mean doses than IMRT. Conclusions: At our institution with early IMRT experience, IMRT improved PTV dose coverage and liver doses but not kidney doses. An external audit of IMRT plans showed that an experienced center can yield superior IMRT plans.

  14. Adding Erlotinib to Chemoradiation Improves Overall Survival but Not Progression-Free Survival in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Komaki, Ritsuko; Allen, Pamela K.; Wei, Xiong; Blumenschein, George R.; Tang, Ximing; Lee, J. Jack; Welsh, James W.; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Liu, Diane D.; Hong, Waun Ki

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: To test, in a single-arm, prospective, phase 2 trial, whether adding the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib to concurrent chemoradiotherapy for previously untreated, locally advanced, inoperable non-small cell lung cancer would improve survival and disease control without increasing toxicity. Methods and Materials: Forty-eight patients with previously untreated non-small cell lung cancer received intensity modulated radiation therapy (63 Gy/35 fractions) on Monday through Friday, with chemotherapy (paclitaxel 45 mg/m², carboplatin area under the curve [AUC] = 2) on Mondays, for 7 weeks. All patients also received the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib (150 mg orally 1/d) on Tuesday-Sunday for 7 weeks, followed by consolidation paclitaxel–carboplatin. The primary endpoint was time to progression; secondary endpoints were overall survival (OS), toxicity, response, and disease control and whether any endpoint differed by EGFR mutation status. Results: Of 46 patients evaluable for response, 40 were former or never-smokers, and 41 were evaluable for EGFR mutations (37 wild-type [WT] and 4 mutated [all adenocarcinoma]). Median time to progression was 14.0 months and did not differ by EGFR status. Toxicity was acceptable (no grade 5, 1 grade 4, 11 grade 3). Twelve patients (26%) had complete responses (10 WT, 2 mutated), 27 (59%) partial (21 WT, 2 mutated, 4 unknown), and 7 (15%) none (6 WT, 2 mutated, 1 unknown) (P=.610). At 37.0 months' follow-up (range, 3.6-76.5 months) for all patients, median OS time was 36.5 months, and 1-, 2-, and 5-year OS rates were 82.6%, 67.4%, and 35.9%, respectively; none differed by mutation status. Twelve patients had no progression, and 34 had local and/or distant failure. Eleven of 27 distant failures were in the brain (7 WT, 3 mutated, 1 unknown). Conclusions: Toxicity and OS were promising, but time to progression did not meet expectations. The prevalence of distant

  15. Targeted Therapies Combined With Immune Checkpoint Therapy.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Peter A; Reuben, Alexandre; Cooper, Zachary A; Wargo, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    The age of personalized medicine continues to evolve within clinical oncology with the arsenal available to clinicians in a variety of malignancies expanding at an exponential rate. The development and advancement of molecular treatment modalities, including targeted therapy and immune checkpoint blockade, continue to flourish. Treatment with targeted therapy (BRAF, MEK, and other small molecule inhibitors) can be associated with swift disease control and high response rates, but limited durability when used as monotherapy. Conversely, treatment with immune checkpoint blockade monotherapy regimens (anti-cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 and anti-programmed cell death protein 1/programmed cell death protein 1 ligand) tends to have lower response rates than that observed with BRAF-targeted therapy, although these treatments may offer long-term durable disease control. With the advent of these forms of therapy, there was interest early on in empirically combining targeted therapy with immune checkpoint blockade with the hopes of preserving high response rates and adding durability; however, there is now strong scientific rationale for combining these forms of therapy-and early evidence of synergy in preclinical models of melanoma. Clinical trials combining these strategies are ongoing, and mature data regarding response rates and durability are not yet available. Synergy may ultimately be apparent; however, it has also become clear that complexities exist regarding toxicity when combining these therapies. Nonetheless, this increased appreciation of the complex interplay between oncogenic mutations and antitumor immunity has opened up tremendous opportunities for studying targeted agents and immunotherapy in combination, which extends far beyond melanoma to other solid tumors and also to hematologic malignancies. PMID:27111910

  16. Rigosertib Is a More Effective Radiosensitizer Than Cisplatin in Concurrent Chemoradiation Treatment of Cervical Carcinoma, In Vitro and In Vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Agoni, Lorenzo; Basu, Indranil; Gupta, Seema; Alfieri, Alan; Gambino, Angela; Goldberg, Gary L.; Reddy, E. Premkumar; Guha, Chandan

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: To compare rigosertib versus cisplatin as an effective radiosensitizing agent for cervical malignancies. Methods and Materials: Rigosertib and cisplatin were tested in cervical cancer cell lines, HeLa and C33A. A 24-hour incubation with rigosertib and cisplatin, before irradiation (2-8 Gy), was used for clonogenic survival assays. Cell cycle analysis (propidium iodide staining) and DNA damage (γ-H2AX expression) were evaluated by fluorescence-activated cell sorter cytometry. Rigosertib was also tested in vivo in tumor growth experiments on cervical cancer xenografts. Results: Rigosertib was demonstrated to induce a G{sub 2}/M block in cancer cells. Survival curve comparison revealed a dose modification factor, as index of radiosensitization effect, of 1.1-1.3 for cisplatin and 1.4-2.2 for rigosertib. With 6-Gy irradiation, an increase in DNA damage of 15%-25% was achieved in both HeLa and C33A cells with cisplatin pretreatment, and a 71-108% increase with rigosertib pretreatment. In vivo tumor growth studies demonstrated higher performance of rigosertib when compared with cisplatin, with 53% longer tumor growth delay. Conclusions: Rigosertib was more effective than cisplatin when combined with radiation and caused minimal toxicity. These data support the need for clinical trials with rigosertib in combination therapy for patients with cervical carcinoma.

  17. Unproven (questionable) cancer therapies.

    PubMed Central

    Brigden, M L

    1995-01-01

    More than half of all cancer patients use some form of alternative treatment during the course of their illness. Alternative therapies are often started early in patients' illness, and their use is frequently not acknowledged to health care professionals. Some alternative therapies are harmful, and their promoters may be fraudulent. Persons who try alternative cancer therapies may not be poorly educated but may ultimately abandon conventional treatment. Recent attention has focused on aspects of questionable therapies that make these treatments attractive to patients and that may be perceived as being deficient in the practice of conventional health care professionals. Physicians with patients with cancer should always make sure that unproven therapies are discussed early in the therapeutic relationship. They should also attempt to be aware of alternative therapies that are in vogue in their particular geographic area. PMID:8533410

  18. Multifield Optimization Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy for Head and Neck Tumors: A Translation to Practice

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, Steven J.; Cox, James D.; Gillin, Michael; Mohan, Radhe; Garden, Adam S.; Rosenthal, David I.; Gunn, G. Brandon; Weber, Randal S.; Kies, Merrill S.; Lewin, Jan S.; Munsell, Mark F.; Palmer, Matthew B.; Sahoo, Narayan; Zhang, Xiaodong; Liu, Wei; Zhu, X. Ronald

    2014-07-15

    Background: We report the first clinical experience and toxicity of multifield optimization (MFO) intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for patients with head and neck tumors. Methods and Materials: Fifteen consecutive patients with head and neck cancer underwent MFO-IMPT with active scanning beam proton therapy. Patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) had comprehensive treatment extending from the base of the skull to the clavicle. The doses for chemoradiation therapy and radiation therapy alone were 70 Gy and 66 Gy, respectively. The robustness of each treatment plan was also analyzed to evaluate sensitivity to uncertainties associated with variations in patient setup and the effect of uncertainties with proton beam range in patients. Proton beam energies during treatment ranged from 72.5 to 221.8 MeV. Spot sizes varied depending on the beam energy and depth of the target, and the scanning nozzle delivered the spot scanning treatment “spot by spot” and “layer by layer.” Results: Ten patients presented with SCC and 5 with adenoid cystic carcinoma. All 15 patients were able to complete treatment with MFO-IMPT, with no need for treatment breaks and no hospitalizations. There were no treatment-related deaths, and with a median follow-up time of 28 months (range, 20-35 months), the overall clinical complete response rate was 93.3% (95% confidence interval, 68.1%-99.8%). Xerostomia occurred in all 15 patients as follows: grade 1 in 10 patients, grade 2 in 4 patients, and grade 3 in 1 patient. Mucositis within the planning target volumes was seen during the treatment of all patients: grade 1 in 1 patient, grade 2 in 8 patients, and grade 3 in 6 patients. No patient experienced grade 2 or higher anterior oral mucositis. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first clinical report of MFO-IMPT for head and neck tumors. Early clinical outcomes are encouraging and warrant further investigation of proton therapy in prospective clinical trials.

  19. Therapy and Counseling

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the following areas among others: psychiatry, clinical psychology, mental health counseling, clinical social work, marriage and family ... Cognitive Therapy for Depression by SJ Rupke, M.D., ...

  20. [Morita therapy over history].

    PubMed

    Usa, Shinichi

    2003-01-01

    At Sansei Hospital in Kyoto we performed Morita Therapy not only for Japanese clients but also foreign clients from several countries, like Germany, Switzerland, U.S.A., China, Korea, India and Indonesia. We could treat those foreign clients using Morita Therapy with good success although they came from various cultural backgrounds. One of the characteristic Approaches of Morita Therapy was that it avoided the conceptualization of self-consciousness and self image as a subjective fiction established by abstract and logical thinking. Secondary Morita Therapy moves clients to deal with activities in real life. These 2 approaches help clients not to be involved in symptom development or fixation mechanisms and break through self-centeredness. At the first stage of Morita Therapy, namely in the bed rest period clients can experience his psychic state as if he were a just born baby. The founder of Gestalt Therapy, Frederick S. Perls experienced by himself Morita Therapy. During bed rest therapy he behaved as if he were a baby. This behavior came out not from conscious abstract and logical thinking but from spontaneous "pre-conscious" state of mind. Morita called this "Jun-na-kokoro" (Pure mind). Morita knew that neurotic symptoms come out from those abstract and logical thinking which could lead to fixation of symptoms so that therapy principle might be the de-centralization of self and the pure mind experience which is found in our daily life and also in daily life of foreign people from various cultural backgrounds. PMID:12875225

  1. Prognostic Impact of Radiation Therapy to the Primary Tumor in Patients With Non-small Cell Lung Cancer and Oligometastasis at Diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez Guerra, Jose Luis; Zhuang, Yan; Hong, David S.; Heymach, John V.; Swisher, Stephen G.; Lin, Steven H.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Liao Zhongxing

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: We investigated prognostic factors associated with survival in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and oligometastatic disease at diagnosis, particularly the influence of local treatment to the primary site on prognosis. Methods and Materials: From January 2000 through June 2011, 78 consecutive patients with oligometastatic NSCLC (<5 metastases) at diagnosis underwent definitive chemoradiation therapy ({>=}45 Gy) to the primary site. Forty-four of these patients also received definitive local treatment for the oligometastases. Survival outcomes were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method, and risk factors were identified by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: Univariate Cox proportional hazard analysis revealed better overall survival (OS) for those patients who received at least 63 Gy of radiation to the primary site (P=.002), received definitive local treatment for oligometastasis (P=.041), had a Karnofsky performance status (KPS) score >80 (P=.007), had a gross tumor volume {<=}124 cm{sup 3} (P=.002), had adenocarcinoma histology (P=.002), or had no history of respiratory disease (P=.016). On multivariate analysis, radiation dose, performance status, and tumor volume retained significance (P=.004, P=.006, and P<.001, respectively). The radiation dose also maintained significance when patients with and without brain metastases were analyzed separately. Conclusions: Tumor volume, KPS, and receipt of at least 63 Gy to the primary tumor are associated with improved OS in patients with oligometastatic NSCLC at diagnosis. Our results suggest that a subset of such patients may benefit from definitive local therapy.

  2. IMRT may increase pneumonitis risk relative to 3D-CRT in patients receiving combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy: a modeling study of dose dumping

    PubMed Central

    Vogelius, Ivan S.; Westerly, David C.; Cannon, George M.; Mackie, Thomas R.; Mehta, Minesh P.; Sugie, Chikao; Bentzen, Søren M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To model the possible interaction between cytotoxic chemotherapy and radiation dose distribution with respect to the risk of radiation pneumonitis (RP). Methods and materials Eighteen non-small cell lung cancer patients previously treated with helical tomotherapy at the University of Wisconsin were selected for this modeling study. Three treatment plans were considered in the study: (1) the delivered tomotherapy plans; (2) a 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) plan; and (3) a fixed field intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plan. The IMRT and 3D-CRT plans were generated specifically for this study. Plans were optimized without adjusting for the chemotherapy effect. The effect of chemotherapy was modeled as an independent cell killing process by considering a uniform chemotherapy equivalent radiation dose (CERD) added to all voxels of the organ at risk. Risk of radiation pneumonitis was estimated for all plans using the Lyman and the Critical Volume models. Results For radiation therapy alone, the Critical Volume model predicts that the two IMRT plans are associated with a lower risk of RP than the 3D-CRT plan. However, when the CERD exceeds a certain threshold, the RP risk after IMRT is higher than after 3D-CRT. This threshold dose is in the range estimated from clinical chemo-radiation data sets. Conclusions Cytotoxic chemotherapy may affect the relative merit of competing radiation therapy plans. More work is needed to improve our understanding of the interaction between chemotherapy and radiation dose distribution in clinical settings. PMID:21477946

  3. Prospective Assessment of Patterns of Failure After High-Precision Definitive (Chemo)Radiation in Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Tejpal

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: To prospectively analyze patterns of failure in patients with head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma treated with definitive high-precision radiotherapy with a focus on location of failure relative to target volume coverage. Methods and Materials: Sixty patients treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy or intensity-modulated radiation therapy were included. Locoregional failure volume was defined on the planning data set at relapse, and dose received was analyzed by use of dose-volume histograms. Results: Thirteen patients were deemed to have had locoregional failures, of which two did not have any viable tumor on salvage neck dissection, leaving eleven patients with proven persistent or recurrent locoregional disease. Of these, 9 patients had in-field failure, 1 marginal failure, and 1 both in-field and marginal failures. Overall, only 2 of 11 patients (18%) with relapse had any marginal failure. Of the 20 sites of locoregional failure, 15 (75%) were in-field and 5 (25%) marginal. Distant metastases were detected in 3 patients, whereas a second new primary developed in 3 others. With a median follow-up of 26 months (interquartile range, 18-31 months) for surviving patients, the 3-year local control, locoregional control, disease-free survival, and overall survival rates were 75.3%, 74%, 67.2%, and 60.5%, respectively. Conclusions: Locoregional relapse remains the predominant pattern of failure in head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma treated with high-precision definitive radiotherapy with the majority of failures occurring 'in-field' within the high-dose volume. Marginal failures can occur, particularly in the vicinity of the spared parotid gland. The therapeutic index of high-precision conformal radiotherapy is largely dependent on adequate selection and delineation of target volumes and organs at risk.

  4. The use of personalized biomarkers and liquid biopsies to monitor treatment response and disease recurrence in locally advanced rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Carpinetti, Paola; Donnard, Elisa; Bettoni, Fabiana; Asprino, Paula; Koyama, Fernanda; Rozanski, Andrei; Sabbaga, Jorge; Habr-Gama, Angelita; Parmigiani, Raphael B.; Galante, Pedro A.F.; Perez, Rodrigo O.; Camargo, Anamaria A.

    2015-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (nCRT) followed by surgery is the mainstay treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. Variable degrees of tumor regression are observed after nCRT and alternative treatment strategies, including close surveillance without immediate surgery, have been investigated to spare patients with complete tumor regression from potentially adverse outcomes of radical surgery. However, clinical and radiological assessment of response does not allow accurate identification of patients with complete response. In addition, surveillance for recurrence is similarly important for these patients, as early detection of recurrence allows salvage resections and adjuvant interventions. We report the use of liquid biopsies and personalized biomarkers for monitoring treatment response to nCRT and detecting residual disease and recurrence in patients with rectal cancer. We sequenced the whole-genome of four rectal tumors to identify patient-specific chromosomal rearrangements that were used to monitor circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in liquid biopsies collected at diagnosis and during nCRT and follow-up. We compared ctDNA levels to clinical, radiological and pathological response to nCRT. Our results indicate that personalized biomarkers and liquid biopsies may not be sensitive for the detection of microscopic residual disease. However, it can be efficiently used to monitor treatment response to nCRT and detect disease recurrence, preceding increases in CEA levels and radiological diagnosis. Similar good results were observed when assessing tumor response to systemic therapy and disease progression. Our study supports the use of personalized biomarkers and liquid biopsies to tailor the management of rectal cancer patients, however, replication in a larger cohort is necessary to introduce this strategy into clinical practice. PMID:26451609

  5. Long-term quality of life after intensified multi-modality treatment of oral cancer including intra-arterial induction chemotherapy and adjuvant chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Kovács, Adorján F.; Stefenelli, Ulrich; Thorn, Gerrit

    2015-01-01

    Background: Quality of life (QoL) studies are well established when accompanying trials in head and neck cancer, but studies on long-term survivors are rare. Aims: The aim was to evaluate long-term follow-up patients treated with an intensified multi-modality therapy. Setting and Design: Cross-sectional study, tertiary care center. Patients and Methods: A total of 135 oral/oropharyngeal cancer survivors having been treated with an effective four modality treatment (intra-arterial induction chemotherapy, radical surgery, adjuvant radiation, concurrent systemic chemotherapy) filled European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30 and HN35 questionnaires. Mean distance to treatment was 6.1 (1.3–16.6) years. Results were compared with a reference patient population (EORTC reference manual). In-study group comparison was also carried out. Statistical Analysis: One-sample t-test, Mann–Whitney-test, Kruskal–Wallis analysis. Results: QoL scores of both populations were well comparable. Global health status, cognitive and social functioning, fatigue, social eating, status of teeth, mouth opening and dryness, and sticky saliva were significantly worse in the study population; pain and need for pain killers, cough, need for nutritional support, problems with weight loss and gain were judged to be significantly less. Patients 1-year posttreatment had generally worse scores as compared to patients with two or more years distance to treatment. Complex reconstructive measures and adjuvant (chemo) radiation were main reasons for significant impairment of QoL. Conclusion Subjective disease status of patients following a maximized multi-modality treatment showed an expectable high degree of limitations, but was generally comparable to a reference group treated less intensively, suggesting that the administration of an intensified multi-modality treatment is feasible in terms of QoL/effectivity ratio. PMID:26389030

  6. Indirect radio-chemo-beta therapy: a targeted approach to increase biological efficiency of x-rays based on energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oktaria, Sianne; Corde, Stéphanie; Lerch, Michael L. F.; Konstantinov, Konstantin; Rosenfeld, Anatoly B.; Tehei, Moeava

    2015-10-01

    Despite the use of multimodal treatments incorporating surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy, local control of gliomas remains a major challenge. The potential of a new treatment approach called indirect radio-chemo-beta therapy using the synergy created by combining methotrexate (MTX) with bromodeoxyuridine (BrUdR) under optimum energy x-ray irradiation is assessed. 9L rat gliosarcoma cells pre-treated with 0.01 μM MTX and/or 10 μM BrUdR were irradiated in vitro with 50 kVp, 125 kVp, 250 kVp, 6 MV and 10 MV x-rays. The cytotoxicity was assessed using clonogenic survival as the radiobiological endpoint. The photon energy with maximum effect was determined using radiation sensitization enhancement factors at 10% clonogenic survival (SER10%). The cell cycle distribution was investigated using flow cytometric analysis with propidium iodide staining. Incorporation of BrUdR in the DNA was detected by the fluorescence of labelled anti-BrUdR antibodies. The radiation sensitization enhancement exhibits energy dependence with a maximum of 2.3 at 125 kVp for the combined drug treated cells. At this energy, the shape of the clonogenic survival curve of the pharmacological agents treated cells changes substantially. This change is interpreted as an increased lethality of the local radiation environment and is attributed to supplemented inhibition of DNA repair. Radiation induced chemo-beta therapy was demonstrated in vitro by the targeted activation of combined pharmacological agents with optimized energy tuning of x-ray beams on 9 L cells. Our results show that this is a highly effective form of chemo-radiation therapy.

  7. Tumor vascularity evaluated by transrectal color Doppler US in predicting therapy outcome for low-lying rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Barbaro, Brunella . E-mail: a.leonemd@tiscalinet.it; Valentini, Vincenzo; Coco, Claudio; Mancini, Anna Paola; Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta; Vecchio, Fabio Maria; Bonomo, Lorenzo

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact on T downstaging of the vasculature supplying blood flow to rectal cancer evaluated by color Doppler ultrasound. Methods and Materials: Color Doppler images were graded in 29 T3-staged rectal carcinoma patients sonographically just before chemoradiation. Any arterial vessels detected in rectal masses were assigned one of two grades: vascularity was considered as grade 1 for vessels feeding the periphery and as grade 2 for vessels coursing in all rectal masses within its peripheral and central portions. The pulsatility indices (PI = peak systolic velocity - end-diastolic velocity/time-averaged maximum velocity) were calculated in the central and peripheral portions. Results: The pathologic observations showed a change in stage in 15 of the 23 patients graded 2, positive predictive value 65.2% (p = 0.047), and in one of the six rectal cancers graded 1 (negative predictive value, 83.3%). The minimal peripheral PI values in rectal cancer graded 2 were higher in nonresponding (2.2 {+-} 1.3) than in responding lesions (1.6 {+-} 0.7) p = 0.01. Conclusion: Vascularity graded 2 associated with low peripheral PI values are indicators of therapy outcome. Vascularity graded 1 and high peripheral PI values in graded 2 have negative predictive value.

  8. Randomized Noninferiority Trial of Reduced High-Dose Volume Versus Standard Volume Radiation Therapy for Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: Results of the BC2001 Trial (CRUK/01/004)

    SciTech Connect

    Huddart, Robert A.; Hall, Emma; Hussain, Syed A.; Jenkins, Peter; Rawlings, Christine; Tremlett, Jean; Crundwell, Malcolm; Adab, Fawzi A.; Sheehan, Denise; Syndikus, Isabel; Hendron, Carey; Lewis, Rebecca; Waters, Rachel; James, Nicholas D.

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: To test whether reducing radiation dose to uninvolved bladder while maintaining dose to the tumor would reduce side effects without impairing local control in the treatment of muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: In this phase III multicenter trial, 219 patients were randomized to standard whole-bladder radiation therapy (sRT) or reduced high-dose volume radiation therapy (RHDVRT) that aimed to deliver full radiation dose to the tumor and 80% of maximum dose to the uninvolved bladder. Participants were also randomly assigned to receive radiation therapy alone or radiation therapy plus chemotherapy in a partial 2 × 2 factorial design. The primary endpoints for the radiation therapy volume comparison were late toxicity and time to locoregional recurrence (with a noninferiority margin of 10% at 2 years). Results: Overall incidence of late toxicity was less than predicted, with a cumulative 2-year Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade 3/4 toxicity rate of 13% (95% confidence interval 8%, 20%) and no statistically significant differences between groups. The difference in 2-year locoregional recurrence free rate (RHDVRT − sRT) was 6.4% (95% confidence interval −7.3%, 16.8%) under an intention to treat analysis and 2.6% (−12.8%, 14.6%) in the “per-protocol” population. Conclusions: In this study RHDVRT did not result in a statistically significant reduction in late side effects compared with sRT, and noninferiority of locoregional control could not be concluded formally. However, overall low rates of clinically significant toxicity combined with low rates of invasive bladder cancer relapse confirm that (chemo)radiation therapy is a valid option for the treatment of muscle-invasive bladder cancer.

  9. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Motivational Enhancement Therapy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sarah S; Schoenfelder, Erin; Hsiao, Ray Chih-Jui

    2016-10-01

    Although cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is widely recognized as the preferred treatment of psychiatric disorders, less is known about the application of CBT to substance use disorders, particularly in adolescence. This article discusses how CBT conceptualizes substance use and how it is implemented as a treatment of adolescent substance abuse. The article draws on several manuals for CBT that implement it as a standalone treatment or in combination with motivational enhancement therapies. Also reviewed are several studies that examined the efficacy of CBT. Finally, the implications are discussed. Numerous starting resources are provided to help a clinician implement CBT. PMID:27613342

  10. Pediatric Music Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lathom-Radocy, Wanda B.

    This book on music therapy includes relevant medical, psychological, and developmental information to help service providers, particularly music therapists, and parents to understand children with disabilities. The first two chapters describe the process of assessment and delineation of goals in music therapy that leads to the design of the music…

  11. Antiaging therapy: an overview.

    PubMed

    Vojta, C L; Fraga, P D; Forciea, M A; Lavizzo-Mourey, R

    2001-06-15

    Today's researchers are exploring caloric restriction, cell-based therapies, hormonal therapies, and genetic manipulations. So far, caloric restriction has the soundest basis, and estrogen replacement is among the interventions most widely used. As the human genome is studied, treatments with genetic mechanisms move all the closer to becoming reality. PMID:11419535

  12. Social Action Art Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golub, Deborah

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores intersections among art, action, and community. It describes sociopolitical aspects of the author's art therapy work with survivors of repressive regimes living in Brazil, China, and Denmark and considers ways that unique historical and social processes influenced her conceptualization and practice of social action art therapy.

  13. History of gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Wirth, Thomas; Parker, Nigel; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2013-08-10

    Two decades after the initial gene therapy trials and more than 1700 approved clinical trials worldwide we not only have gained much new information and knowledge regarding gene therapy in general, but also learned to understand the concern that has persisted in society. Despite the setbacks gene therapy has faced, success stories have increasingly emerged. Examples for these are the positive recommendation for a gene therapy product (Glybera) by the EMA for approval in the European Union and the positive trials for the treatment of ADA deficiency, SCID-X1 and adrenoleukodystrophy. Nevertheless, our knowledge continues to grow and during the course of time more safety data has become available that helps us to develop better gene therapy approaches. Also, with the increased understanding of molecular medicine, we have been able to develop more specific and efficient gene transfer vectors which are now producing clinical results. In this review, we will take a historical view and highlight some of the milestones that had an important impact on the development of gene therapy. We will also discuss briefly the safety and ethical aspects of gene therapy and address some concerns that have been connected with gene therapy as an important therapeutic modality. PMID:23618815

  14. Poetry Therapy: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinstock, Donald J., Comp.

    The 84 entries contained in this bibliography are arranged under three headings: poetry therapy, bibliotherapy, and relevant related items. Representing books, educational journals, popular magazines, and research studies, the titles span a variety of topics, including the following: poetry therapy in psychiatric nursing, poetry programs in mental…

  15. What Is Wilderness Therapy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Keith C.

    2001-01-01

    Based on the literature and recent research, an integrated, consistent definition of wilderness therapy is presented to differentiate it from other outdoor adventure programs and guide program design and research efforts. Trends in the outdoor industry are explored that suggest that wilderness therapy programs are searching for recognition by…

  16. [Dance/Movement Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenichel, Emily, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue focuses on dance, play, and movement therapy for infants and toddlers with disabilities. Individual articles are: "Join My Dance: The Unique Movement Style of Each Infant and Toddler Can Invite Communication, Expression and Intervention" (Suzi Tortora); "Dynamic Play Therapy: An Integrated Expressive Arts Approach to…

  17. Therapy in Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costonis, Maureen Needham, Ed.

    This book contains a collection of articles on the subject of movement therapy. It can be used as a set of supplementary readings for an academic course in dance therapy or a psychiatric residency program. It includes an exhaustive bibliography on this field for students and practioners in this field. Four principal themes have been selected as a…

  18. Electroconvulsive Therapy and Suicide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanney, Bryan L.

    1986-01-01

    When the effectiveness and mortality-morbidity of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) are compared with those of drug therapies, it appears that ECT is an effective and preferred treatment strategy. It remains underutilized as a modality of suicide prevention. Addresses controversies that presently limit the use of this treatment. (Author/ABB)

  19. Art Therapy: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gantt, Linda, Comp.; Schmal, Marilyn Strauss, Comp.

    The bibliography on art therapy presents 1175 citations (1940-1973) drawn from searches of the medical indexes, computer systems of the National Library of Medicine and the National Institute of Mental Health, other bibliographies, Centre International de Documentation Concernant les Expressions Plastiques, and the American Journal of Art Therapy.…

  20. Therapy of Lies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Sean

    2012-01-01

    Conversion therapy comes in many forms, ranging from informal chats with counselors to aggressive physical coercion, but all are based on the belief that a gay male or a lesbian can be changed "back" to heterosexual behavior. It is not just alarmed parents who turn to this therapy. Many LGBT individuals seek out such treatment in an effort to…

  1. Massage Therapy Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Tiffany; Diego, Miguel; Hernandez-Reif, Maria

    2007-01-01

    Massage therapy has been notably effective in preventing prematurity, enhancing growth of infants, increasing attentiveness, decreasing depression and aggression, alleviating motor problems, reducing pain, and enhancing immune function. This review covers massage therapy research from the last decade, as an update to the American Psychologist 1998…

  2. Occupational Therapy Assistant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of occupational therapy assistant, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 16 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general as well as those specific to the occupation of occupational therapy assistant. The…

  3. Accelerators for Cancer Therapy

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Lennox, Arlene J.

    2000-05-30

    The vast majority of radiation treatments for cancerous tumors are given using electron linacs that provide both electrons and photons at several energies. Design and construction of these linacs are based on mature technology that is rapidly becoming more and more standardized and sophisticated. The use of hadrons such as neutrons, protons, alphas, or carbon, oxygen and neon ions is relatively new. Accelerators for hadron therapy are far from standardized, but the use of hadron therapy as an alternative to conventional radiation has led to significant improvements and refinements in conventional treatment techniques. This paper presents the rationale for radiation therapy, describes the accelerators used in conventional and hadron therapy, and outlines the issues that must still be resolved in the emerging field of hadron therapy.

  4. Immune Therapies for Neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Navid, Fariba; Armstrong, Michael; Barfield, Raymond C.

    2009-01-01

    Neuroblastoma, a solid tumor arising from developing cells of the sympathetic nervous system, is the most common extracranial tumor in children. The prognosis for high-risk neuroblastoma remains poor with conventional treatment, and new approaches are therefore being explored to treat this disease. One such alternative therapy that holds promise is immune therapy. We review here the recent advances in 4 types of immune therapy – cytokine, vaccine, antibody, and cellular therapy – to treat neuroblastoma. We present preclinical research and clinical trials on several promising candidates such as IL-12, dendritic cell vaccines, anti-GD2 antibodies, and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant. An optimal treatment plan for neuroblastoma will most likely involve multimodal approaches and combinations of immune therapies. PMID:19342881

  5. Psychobehavioral therapy for epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Tang, Venus; Michaelis, Rosa; Kwan, Patrick

    2014-03-01

    Growing evidence suggests a bidirectional interaction between epileptic seizures and psychological states, fuelling the interest in the development and application of psychobehavioral therapy for people with epilepsy (PWE). The objective of this article is to review the various psychobehavioral therapies in regard to their application, hypothesized mechanisms, and effectiveness. Most psychobehavioral therapy aims at improving psychological well-being and seizure control. Behavioral approaches, cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), and mind-body interventions are the most widely applied approaches for PWE. Cognitive-behavioral therapy, mind-body approaches, and multimodel educative interventions have consistently demonstrated positive effects on enhancing well-being. Nevertheless, the effects on seizure control remain inconsistent, partly attributable to small clinical trials and inadequate control groups. Assessor-blinded randomized controlled trials with sufficient power and carefully defined therapeutic components corresponding with objective and subjective outcome measures are recommended for future trial designs. PMID:24418662

  6. Activity Therapy: An Alternative Therapy for Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kottman, Terry T.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the benefits of activity therapy for preteens and adolescents, where the client is engaged in nonverbal modes of relationship--games, free play, movement, drama, music, art or other activities, as the chief therapeutic media in which conflicts are resolved and intellectual and emotional energies freed. Reviews the literature, describes…

  7. Model Occupational Therapy Practice Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 1975

    1975-01-01

    The Model Occupational Therapy Practice Act has been assembled by the Government Affairs Department, American Occupational Therapy Association, for use as a guide for affiliate organizations concerned with developing legislation to regulate the practice of occupational therapy. (Author/JA)

  8. Massage therapy research review.

    PubMed

    Field, Tiffany

    2016-08-01

    In this review, massage therapy has been shown to have beneficial effects on varying conditions including prenatal depression, preterm infants, full-term infants, autism, skin conditions, pain syndromes including arthritis and fibromyalgia, hypertension, autoimmune conditions including asthma and multiple sclerosis, immune conditions including HIV and breast cancer and aging problems including Parkinson's and dementia. Although many of the studies have involved comparisons between massage therapy and standard treatment control groups, several have compared different forms of massage (e.g. Swedish versus Thai massage), and different active therapies such as massage versus exercise. Typically, the massage therapy groups have experienced more positive effects than the control or comparison groups. This may relate to the massage therapy providing more stimulation of pressure receptors, in turn enhancing vagal activity and reducing cortisol levels. Some of the researchers have assessed physical, physiological and biochemical effects, although most have relied exclusively on self-report measures. Despite these methodological problems and the dearth of research from the U.S., the massage therapy profession has grown significantly and massage therapy is increasingly practiced in traditional medical settings, highlighting the need for more rigorous research. PMID:27502797

  9. The oxygen therapy.

    PubMed

    Corsonello, A; Pedone, C; Scarlata, S; Zito, A; Laino, I; Antonelli-Incalzi, R

    2013-01-01

    Oxygen (O(2)) is a vital element. Shortage of O(2) results in deranged metabolism and important changes in vascular tone with opposite effects on the systemic and pulmonary circulation. During hypoxemia, oxidative stress exposes the organism to a sort of accelerated senescence as well as to several acute untoward effects. Thus, hypoxemia should be promptly recognized and treated, hopefully by measures tailored to the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying hypoxemia. However, O(2) therapy remains the most common therapy of hypoxemia, but it must be carefully tailored to relieve hypoxemia without provoking hyperoxia or hypercarbia. Then, the individual response to O(2) as well as changing needs of O(2) during sleep or exercise must be evaluated to provide the best O(2) therapy. Hyperoxia, the effect of overcorrection of hypoxia, can dramatically impact the health status and threaten the survival of the newborn and, through different mechanisms and effects, the adult. A thorough knowledge of the pathophysiological bases of hypoxemia and O(2) storage and delivery devices is then mandatory to administer O(2) therapy guaranteeing for optimal correction of hypoxemia and minimizing the risk of hyperoxia. Consistent with this aim also is a careful scrutiny of instruments and procedures for monitoring the individual response to O(2) over time. Thus, at variance from classical pharmacological therapy, performing O(2) therapy requires a vast array of clinical and technical competences. The optimal integration of these competences is needed to optimize O(2) therapy on individual bases. PMID:23317164

  10. [Cortisone therapy today].

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Hanns

    2003-01-31

    Five decades of experimental and clinical experience have changed corticoid therapy thoroughly. Corticoides have two modes of action. The first is a genomic effect through which anti-inflammatory proteins are formed which inhibit pro-inflammatory cytokines. This effect is initiated even by small doses, but is of late onset. The use of high doses initiates non-genomic effects through alterations of the cell membrane; these effects are found early after initiation of treatment. The risk of adverse corticoid effects are extremely rare when modern application forms and therapy regimens are used: Very high doses for a short time in case of acute states of illness, very low doses in long-term therapy of chronic illnesses, and the use of topical substances wherever this is possible. As for the dose regimen, one should start with an initial dose which suffices to treat the acute state, and subsequently reduce the dosage after the first positive results are obtained. In long-term therapy a daily dose of 5 mg prednisolone should not be exceeded; usually even lower doses are sufficient. These very low doses can only be reached by reducing in steps of one half to one milligram over very long periods of time. During long-term therapy osteoporosis prophylaxis is mandatory. Due to these new therapeutic concepts treatment of rheumatoid arthritis with corticoids is experiencing a revival. Low-dose corticoid therapy is of lower risk than nonsteroidal antirheumatic treatment and slows down disease progression, i.e. joint destruction is significantly inhibited. Corticoids have also undergone a new development in the treatment of asthma. Previously used only in acute systemic therapy, they have now been established in basic therapy, i.e. long term therapy using special topic applications. PMID:12658905

  11. Prevalence and Predictors of Neoadjuvant Therapy for Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer in the National Cancer Database: Importance of Socioeconomic Status and Treating Institution

    SciTech Connect

    Sher, David J.; Liptay, Michael J.; Fidler, Mary Jo

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The optimal locoregional therapy for stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is controversial, with definitive chemoradiation therapy (CRT) and neoadjuvant therapy followed by surgery (NT-S) serving as competing strategies. In this study, we used the National Cancer Database to determine the prevalence and predictors of NT in a large, modern cohort of patients. Methods and Materials: Patients with stage IIIA NSCLC treated with CRT or NT-S between 2003 and 2010 at programs accredited by the Commission on Cancer were included. Predictors were categorized as clinical, time/geographic, socioeconomic, and institutional. In accord with the National Cancer Database, institutions were classified as academic/research program and as comprehensive and noncomprehensive community cancer centers. Logistic regression and random effects multilevel logistic regression were performed for univariable and multivariable analyses, respectively. Results: The cohort consisted of 18,581 patients, 3,087 (16.6%) of whom underwent NT-S (10.6% induction CRT, 6% induction chemotherapy). The prevalence of NT-S was constant over time, but there were significant relative 31% and 30% decreases in pneumonectomy and right-sided pneumonectomy, respectively, over time (P trend <.02). In addition to younger age, lower T stage, and favorable comorbidity score, indicators of higher socioeconomic status were strong independent predictors of NT-S, including white race, higher income, and private/managed insurance. The type of institution (academic/research program vs comprehensive or noncomprehensive community cancer centers, odds ratio 1.54 and 2.08, respectively) strongly predicted NT-S, but treatment volume did not. Conclusions: Neoadjuvant therapy followed by surgery was an uncommon treatment approach in Commission on Cancer programs, and the prevalence of postinduction pneumonectomy decreased over time. Higher socioeconomic status and treatment at academic institutions were significant

  12. Propensity Score–Matched Analysis of Comprehensive Local Therapy for Oligometastatic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer That Did Not Progress After Front-Line Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sheu, Tommy; Heymach, John V.; Swisher, Stephen G.; Rao, Ganesh; Weinberg, Jeffrey S.; Mehran, Reza; McAleer, Mary Frances; Liao, Zhongxing; Aloia, Thomas A.; Gomez, Daniel R.

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively analyze factors influencing survival in patients with non-small cell lung cancer presenting with ≤3 synchronous metastatic lesions. Methods and Materials: We identified 90 patients presenting between 1998 and 2012 with non-small cell lung cancer and ≤3 metastatic lesions who had received at least 2 cycles of chemotherapy followed by surgery or radiation therapy before disease progression. The median number of chemotherapy cycles before comprehensive local therapy (CLT) (including concurrent chemoradiation as first-line therapy) was 6. Factors potentially affecting overall (OS) or progression-free survival (PFS) were evaluated with Cox proportional hazards regression. Propensity score matching was used to assess the efficacy of CLT. Results: Median follow-up time was 46.6 months. Benefits in OS (27.1 vs 13.1 months) and PFS (11.3 months vs 8.0 months) were found with CLT, and the differences were statistically significant when propensity score matching was used (P ≤ .01). On adjusted analysis, CLT had a statistically significant benefit in terms of OS (hazard ratio, 0.37; 95% confidence interval, 0.20-0.70; P ≤ .01) but not PFS (P=.10). In an adjusted subgroup analysis of patients receiving CLT, favorable performance status (hazard ratio, 0.43; 95% confidence interval, 0.22-0.84; P=.01) was found to predict improved OS. Conclusions: Comprehensive local therapy was associated with improved OS in an adjusted analysis and seemed to favorably influence OS and PFS when factors such as N status, number of metastatic lesions, and disease sites were controlled for with propensity score–matched analysis. Patients with favorable performance status had improved outcomes with CLT. Ultimately, prospective, randomized trials are needed to provide definitive evidence as to the optimal treatment approach for this patient population.

  13. Cosmology and therapy.

    PubMed

    Hall, C M

    1986-12-01

    Sociological concepts are used to demonstrate applications of views of the cosmos to everyday living. Optimal recovery in therapy is defined as increased participation and increased life-satisfaction in family and society, with meaningful motivation and orientation to the universe.Cosmology and therapy concepts are applied to five different kinds of marital relationships in order to clarify possibilities and define contrasts. Family processes which evolve as shifts in views of the cosmos, beliefs, and behavior occur are described. Strengths and weaknesses of this therapy are discussed, and attention is paid to ways in which beliefs provide motivation, meaning, and direction for behavior. PMID:24301690

  14. Vitamin therapy in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Hoffer, Leonard John

    2008-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a devastating and poorly understood disease for which the only accepted therapy is nonspecific antipsychotic and anti-seizure medication. This article summarizes the evidence that certain vitamin deficiencies likely worsen the symptoms of schizophrenia, and the evidence that large doses of certain vitamins could improve the core metabolic abnormalities that predispose some people to develop it; it recounts the history of a controversial vitamin-based therapy for schizophrenia called orthomolecular psychiatry; and it concludes by advocating a process for discovering promising new schizophrenia therapies that involves small, carefully conducted clinical trials of nutrient combinations in appropriately selected patients. PMID:18587164

  15. An Ontology of Therapies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eccher, Claudio; Ferro, Antonella; Pisanelli, Domenico M.

    Ontologies are the essential glue to build interoperable systems and the talk of the day in the medical community. In this paper we present the ontology of medical therapies developed in the course of the Oncocure project, aimed at building a guideline based decision support integrated with a legacy Electronic Patient Record (EPR). The therapy ontology is based upon the DOLCE top level ontology. It is our opinion that our ontology, besides constituting a model capturing the precise meaning of therapy-related concepts, can serve for several practical purposes: interfacing automatic support systems with a legacy EPR, allowing the automatic data analysis, and controlling possible medical errors made during EPR data input.

  16. Intradiscal electrothermal therapy (IDET).

    PubMed

    Wong, W

    2003-01-01

    The indications of discography include situations in which there is inconsistency between the imaging and physical findings. Discography may also be performed prior to planned disc therapy such as percutaneous diskectomy or IDET. The diagnostic goal of the diskcogram is to reproduce the patient's original pain pattern by injection of the disc. If it is determined that the origin of the patient's back pain is diskcogenic, disc therapy can be provided by either surgical or non-surgical means. The non-surgical disc therapy includes steroid injections, IDET, or even percutaneous diskectomy. PMID:14651088

  17. Drug therapies in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Aslam, Arif; Griffiths, Christopher E M

    2014-02-01

    This article explores the current and emerging therapies for skin disease, with a particular focus on chronic plaque psoriasis and metastatic malignant melanoma. We discuss the current biological therapies used for psoriasis and those on the horizon, including small molecules and biosimilars. We also summarise the recent advances in the use of novel therapeutic agents in other dermatological diseases and outline the promise of translational research and stratified medicine approaches in dermatology. Better matching of patients with therapies is anticipated to have a major effect on both clinical practice and the development of new drugs and diagnostics. PMID:24532745

  18. Fluid therapy in calves.

    PubMed

    Smith, Geof W; Berchtold, Joachim

    2014-07-01

    Early and aggressive fluid therapy is critical in correcting the metabolic complications associated with calf diarrhea. Oral electrolyte therapy can be used with success in calves, but careful consideration should be given to the type of oral electrolyte used. Electrolyte solutions with high osmolalities can significantly slow abomasal emptying and can be a risk factor for abomasal bloat in calves. Milk should not be withheld from calves with diarrhea for more than 12 to 24 hours. Hypertonic saline and hypertonic sodium bicarbonate can be used effectively for intravenous fluid therapy on farms when intravenous catheterization is not possible. PMID:24980729

  19. Long-Term Follow-Up of Preoperative Pelvic Radiation Therapy and Concomitant Boost Irradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Patients: A Multi-Institutional Phase II Study (KROG 04-01)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jong Hoon; Kim, Dae Yong; Nam, Taek-Keun; Yoon, Sei-Chul; Lee, Doo Seok; Park, Ji Won; Oh, Jae Hwan; Chang, Hee Jin; Yoon, Mee Sun; Jeong, Jae-Uk; Jang, Hong Seok

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To perform a prospective phase II study to investigate the efficacy and safety of preoperative pelvic radiation therapy and concomitant small-field boost irradiation with 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin for 5 weeks in locally advanced rectal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Sixty-nine patients with locally advanced, nonmetastatic, mid-to-lower rectal cancer were prospectively enrolled. They had received preoperative chemoradiation therapy and total mesorectal excision. Pelvic radiation therapy of 43.2 Gy in 24 fractions plus concomitant boost radiation therapy of 7.2 Gy in 12 fractions was delivered to the pelvis and tumor bed for 5 weeks. Two cycles of 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin were administered for 3 days in the first and fifth week of radiation therapy. The pathologic response, survival outcome, and treatment toxicity were evaluated for the study endpoints. Results: Of 69 patients, 8 (11.6%) had a pathologically complete response. Downstaging rates were 40.5% for T classification and 68.1% for N classification. At the median follow-up of 69 months, 36 patients have been followed up for more than 5 years. The 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival rates were 66.0% and 75.3%, respectively. Higher pathologic T (P = .045) and N (P = .032) classification were significant adverse prognostic factors for DFS, and high-grade histology was an adverse prognostic factor for both DFS (P = .025) and overall survival (P = .031) on the multivariate analysis. Fifteen patients (21.7%) experienced grade 3 or 4 acute toxicity, and 7 patients (10.1%) had long-term toxicity. Conclusion: Preoperative pelvic radiation therapy with concomitant boost irradiation with 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin for 5 weeks showed acceptable acute and long-term toxicities. However, the benefit of concomitant small-field boost irradiation for 5 weeks in rectal cancer patients was not demonstrated beyond conventional irradiation for 6 weeks in terms of tumor response and

  20. Radiation therapy - skin care

    MedlinePlus

    ... red, peel, or itch. You should treat your skin with care while receiving radiation therapy. ... When you have radiation treatment, a health care provider draws ... they come off, do not redraw them. Tell your provider instead. ...

  1. Nicotine replacement therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... If wearing the patch at night causes odd dreams, try sleeping without the patch. People who smoke ... cessation - nicotine replacement; Tobacco - nicotine replacement therapy References American Cancer Society. Guide to quitting smoking. Last revised ...

  2. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy

    MedlinePlus

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy uses a special pressure chamber to increase the amount of oxygen in the blood. ... outpatient centers. The air pressure inside a hyperbaric oxygen chamber is about two and a half times ...

  3. Drug therapy smartens up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Christian

    2015-11-01

    The submission of the first 'smart pill' for market approval, combined with progress in the European nanomedicine landscape, illustrates the positive outlook for drug therapy and health monitoring, explains Christian Martin.

  4. Alternative and Complementary Therapies

    MedlinePlus

    ... always designed to treat a particular illness: Some alternative therapies treat the whole person, not an illness. They might restore harmony, balance, or normal energy flow. Acupuncturists, for example, use the pulse to ...

  5. [Anti DIC therapy].

    PubMed

    Yahata, Mayuko; Sakamoto, Yuichiro

    2016-02-01

    A variety of disorders erratically activate coagulation cascades. The disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is caused by unbalanced activation between coagulation and fibrinolysis. Some of auxiliary treatments for DIC on top of main therapy against causative disease are beneficial in terms of better outcome. The anticoagulation therapy is indicated when an activation of coagulation dominates in DIC caused by sepsis. Whereas in DIC associated with trauma, since balance between coagulation and fibrinolysis collapses drastically in a short period, both anticoagulantion therapy and antifibrinolytic therapy can be utilized depending on clinical conditions. There are quite a few of anti DIC agents in Japan. It is imperative to choose appropriate agents to treat DIC taking their pharmacological properties into account. PMID:26915249

  6. Antisense Therapy in Neurology

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joshua J.A.; Yokota, Toshifumi

    2013-01-01

    Antisense therapy is an approach to fighting diseases using short DNA-like molecules called antisense oligonucleotides. Recently, antisense therapy has emerged as an exciting and promising strategy for the treatment of various neurodegenerative and neuromuscular disorders. Previous and ongoing pre-clinical and clinical trials have provided encouraging early results. Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), Huntington’s disease (HD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD), dysferlinopathy (including limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2B; LGMD2B, Miyoshi myopathy; MM, and distal myopathy with anterior tibial onset; DMAT), and myotonic dystrophy (DM) are all reported to be promising targets for antisense therapy. This paper focuses on the current progress of antisense therapies in neurology. PMID:25562650

  7. Complementary and Integrative Therapies

    MedlinePlus

    ... correctly • Supplement is free of harmful contents like pesticides and heavy metals (such as lead, arsenic or ... 1-888-644-6226 http://nccam.nih.gov Natural Medicines Information on complementary therapies http://naturaldatabase.therapeuticresearch. ...

  8. Therapy of Pruritus

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Tejesh; Yosipovitch, Gil

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Pruritus is the predominant symptom of skin disease. Due to the poorly understood pathophysiology, the development of effective treatment modalities for pruritus has proven to be particularly difficult. At present, there is no universally accepted therapy for itch. The purpose of this review is to provide an update on the treatment of pruritus. Areas covered in this review An overview of current, emerging and possible future therapies for pruritus is provided. What the reader will gain Insights into possible treatment regimes for pruritus in different clinical scenarios. Take home message The therapy of pruritus is challenging and currently takes on an individualistic approach. Recent advancements in the mechanisms that underlie this distressing symptom have identified novel targets for future therapy PMID:20426711

  9. Photodynamic therapy for cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Photoradiation therapy; Cancer of the esophagus-photodynamic; Esophageal cancer-photodynamic; Lung cancer-photodynamic ... the light at the cancer cells. PDT treats cancer in the: Lungs, using a bronchoscope Esophagus, using upper endoscopy Doctors ...

  10. Cancer Alternative Therapies

    MedlinePlus

    ... be thinking about is complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). CAM is the term for medical products and practices ... are not part of standard care. Examples of CAM therapies are acupuncture, chiropractic, and herbal medicines. People ...

  11. Magnetic therapy in physics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, Gail S.

    2000-03-01

    A critical thinking activity focused on students' understanding of magnets is described. The activity includes a short written paper about the validity of advertisements for alternative medical therapy devices based on magnets. It includes also self assessment through peer interaction.