Science.gov

Sample records for 5-grass-pollen sublingual immunotherapy

  1. Pharmacoeconomics of sublingual immunotherapy with the 5-grass pollen tablets for seasonal allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Carlo; Melli, Valerie; Incorvaia, Cristoforo; Ridolo, Erminia

    2017-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis has a very high burden regarding both direct and indirect costs. This makes essential in the management of AR to reduce the clinical severity of the disease and thus to lessen its costs. This particularly concerns allergen immunotherapy (AIT), that, based on its immunological action on the causes of allergy, extends its benefit also after discontinuation of the treatment. From the pharmacoeconomic point of view, any treatment must be evaluated according to its cost-effectiveness, that is, the ratio between the cost of the intervention and its effect. A favorable cost-benefit ratio for AIT was defined, starting from the first studies in the 1990s on subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) in AR patients, that highlighted a clear advantage on costs over the treatment with symptomatic drugs. Such outcome was confirmed also for sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT), that has also the advantage on SCIT to be free of the cost of the injections. Here we review the available literature on pharmacoeconomic data for SLIT with the 5-grass pollen tablets.

  2. Mechanisms of sublingual immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Scadding, Guy; Durham, Stephen R

    2011-05-01

    Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) has been shown to be effective in the treatment of seasonal allergic rhinoconjunctivitis. Despite comparable clinical efficacy to traditional subcutaneous immunotherapy, the mechanisms of SLIT have yet to be fully established. This article considers the role of the local oral mucosa and regional lymphoid tissues in the processing of allergen during SLIT and the subsequent effects on T-cell and B-cell immune compartments and at mucosal sites. The likely time course of events and the evidence for long-lasting tolerance following SLIT are discussed.

  3. Sublingual immunotherapy in allergic rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Han, Doo Hee

    2011-01-01

    Current treatment options for allergic rhinitis (AR) include allergen avoidance and environmental control, pharmacotherapy, nasal surgery and immunotherapy. Among these, immunotherapy is the only therapeutic option that modifies fundamental immunologic mechanism by inducing desensitization. Specific allergen immunotherapy has been used for 1 century since 1911 and subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) has been demonstrated to be effective in asthma and AR. However, SCIT has several disadvantages such as inconvenience, invasiveness and potentially severe systemic reactions. Thus, sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) has recently received much attention around the world as a treatment for AR and is now widely used to replace the subcutaneous route. SLIT has recently been introduced in Korea and is now available for AR treatment in the Asia-Pacific region. This review offers better understanding of SLIT for AR by summarizing published articles and our previous works regarding proposed mechanisms, indication and efficacy, safety and adverse events, and compliance. PMID:22053308

  4. Immune mechanisms of sublingual immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jay, David C; Nadeau, Kari C

    2014-11-01

    Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) is a well-established allergen-specific immunotherapy and a safe and effective strategy to reorient inappropriate immune responses in allergic patients. SLIT takes advantage of the tolerogenic environment of the oral mucosa to promote tolerance to the allergen. Several clinical studies have investigated the complex interplay of innate and adaptive immune responses that SLIT exploits. The oral immune system is composed of tolerogenic dendritic cells that, following uptake of allergen during SLIT, support the differentiation of T helper cell type 1 (Th1) and the induction of IL-10-producing regulatory T cells. Following SLIT, allergic disease-promoting T helper cell type 2 (Th2) responses shift to a Th1 inflammatory response, and IL-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β production by regulatory T cells and tolerogenic dendritic cells suppress allergen-specific T cell responses. These immune changes occur both in the sublingual mucosa and in the periphery of a patient following SLIT. SLIT also promotes the synthesis of allergen-specific IgG and IgA antibodies that block allergen-IgE complex formation and binding to inflammatory cells, thus encouraging an anti-inflammatory environment. Several of these revealing findings have also paved the way for the identification of biomarkers of the clinical efficacy of SLIT. This review presents the emerging elucidation of the immune mechanisms mediated by SLIT.

  5. Sublingual Immunotherapy for Allergic Fungal Sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Melzer, Jonathan M; Driskill, Brent R; Clenney, Timothy L; Gessler, Eric M

    2015-10-01

    Allergic fungal sinusitis (AFS) is a condition that has an allergic basis caused by exposure to fungi in the sinonasal tract leading to chronic inflammation. Despite standard treatment modalities, which typically include surgery and medical management of allergies, patients still have a high rate of recurrence. Subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) has been used as adjuvant treatment for AFS. Evidence exists to support the use of sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) as a safe and efficacious method of treating allergies, but no studies have assessed the utility of SLIT in the management of allergic fungal sinusitis. A record review of cases of AFS that are currently or previously treated with sublingual immunotherapy from 2007 to 2011 was performed. Parameters of interest included serum IgE levels, changes in symptoms, Lund-McKay scores, decreased sensitization to fungal allergens associated with AFS, and serum IgE levels. Ten patients with diagnosed AFS were treated with SLIT. No adverse effects related to the use of SLIT therapy were identified. Decreases in subjective complaints, exam findings, Lund-McKay scores, and serum IgE levels were observed. Thus, sublingual immunotherapy appears to be a safe adjunct to the management of AFS that may improve patient outcomes.

  6. Sublingual or subcutaneous immunotherapy for allergic rhinitis?

    PubMed

    Durham, Stephen R; Penagos, Martin

    2016-02-01

    Allergen immunotherapy is effective in patients with allergic rhinitis (AR) and, unlike antiallergic drugs, has been shown to modify the underlying cause of the disease, with proved long-term benefits. Subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) has been the gold standard, whereas sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) has emerged as an effective and safe alternative. Previous Cochrane systematic reviews and meta-analyses have confirmed that both SLIT and SCIT are effective in patients with seasonal AR, whereas evidence for their efficacy in patients with perennial disease has been less convincing. Recent large, adequately powered trials have demonstrated reductions in both symptoms and use of rescue medication in patients with seasonal and those with perennial AR. Here we appraise evidence for SCIT versus SLIT based on indirect evidence from Cochrane reviews and recent well-powered double-blind, randomized controlled trials versus placebo and the limited direct evidence available from randomized blind head-to-head comparisons. At present, based on an overall balance of efficacy and side effects, the patient is in equipoise. Pending definitive comparative trials, choice might be determined largely by the local availability of SCIT and SLIT products of proved value and personal (patient) preference.

  7. Sublingual vs Oral Immunotherapy for Food Allergy

    PubMed Central

    Narisety, Satya D.; Keet, Corinne A.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of food allergy in developed countries has increased in recent years, escalating the need to find a suitable form of treatment as an alternative to current management, which includes strict avoidance and ready availability of injectable epinephrine (adrenaline). Allergen immunotherapy is currently being studied for use in the treatment of IgE-mediated food allergy to the most common foods, including peanut, tree nut, milk and egg. Two modalities, oral immunotherapy (OIT) and sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT), have shown great promise. Both OIT and SLIT have been able to desensitize subjects to varying degrees, but the two treatment methods differ in doses that can be achieved, duration of treatment, safety profile and ease of use outside the research setting, among other aspects. More research is needed to conclude which mode of treatment is more effective in inducing long-term tolerance with the least amount of serious adverse reactions. However, OIT and SLIT show great promise, and a widespread treatment for food allergy may be within reach. PMID:23009174

  8. Sublingual immunotherapy in southern Africa: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Potter, Paul

    2013-07-01

    Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) is recommended in South Africa for the treatment of allergic rhinitis (with or without asthma) to house dust mites or grass pollens. Recent local studies have confirmed efficacy and safety but have also shown heterogeneity in clinical responses to the European SLIT vaccines used in the region. It has been found that regular follow-up with standardized rhinitis quality-of-life questionnaires improves compliance and encourages the patients to complete the 3-year SLIT course. Patients who discontinue usually do so in the first year because of logistic and financial reasons rather than adverse side effects. Further studies are in progress at the Allergy Diagnostic & Clinical Research Unit to identify immunologic markers of the SLIT responder phenotype.

  9. Sublingual immunotherapy: World Allergy Organization position paper 2013 update

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We have prepared this document, “Sublingual Immunotherapy: World Allergy Organization Position Paper 2013 Update”, according to the evidence-based criteria, revising and updating chapters of the originally published paper, “Sublingual Immunotherapy: World Allergy Organization Position Paper 2009”, available at http://www.waojournal.org. Namely, these comprise: “Mechanisms of sublingual immunotherapy;” “Clinical efficacy of sublingual immunotherapy” – reporting all the data of all controlled trials published after 2009; “Safety of sublingual immunotherapy” – with the recently published Grading System for adverse reactions; “Impact of sublingual immunotherapy on the natural history of respiratory allergy” – with the relevant evidences published since 2009; “Efficacy of SLIT in children” – with detailed analysis of all the studies; “Definition of SLIT patient selection” – reporting the criteria for eligibility to sublingual immunotherapy; “The future of immunotherapy in the community care setting”; “Methodology of clinical trials according to the current scientific and regulatory standards”; and “Guideline development: from evidence-based medicine to patients' views” – including the evolution of the methods to make clinical recommendations. Additionally, we have added new chapters to cover a few emerging crucial topics: “Practical aspects of schedules and dosages and counseling for adherence” – which is crucial in clinical practice for all treatments; “Perspectives and new approaches” – including recombinant allergens, adjuvants, modified allergens, and the concept of validity of the single products. Furthermore, “Raising public awareness about sublingual immunotherapy”, as a need for our patients, and strategies to increase awareness of allergen immunotherapy (AIT) among patients, the medical community, all healthcare stakeholders, and public opinion, are also reported in detail. PMID:24679069

  10. Sublingual Immunotherapy: A Useful Tool for the Allergist in Private Practice

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This is a review of the author's experience with Sublingual Immunotherapy in a private office setting. Sublingual Immunotherapy should be considered by any allergy practitioner as a useful tool. Sublingual Immunotherapy is safe while at the same time it is effective. It enables the practitioner to treat asthmatics and young children without the concerns implicit with allergy injections. PMID:27340673

  11. [Sublingual immunotherapy with cat epithelial extract. Personal experience].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Palacios, A; Schamann, F; García, J A

    2001-01-01

    Because cats are a common pet in many houses and tourist complexes in the Canary Islands, sensitization to cat epithelium is a frequent problem. A total of 19.2% of patients with intrinsic asthma are sensitized to cat epithelium. In the Canary Islands, the percentage of sensitization among patients with a household cat is 18.1%, which higher is higher than in the rest of Spain (11.9). Many patients with extrinsic asthma sensitized to house dust mites undergo conventional subcutaneous immunotherapy but evolution is unsatisfactory due to sensitization to cat epithelium (whether a cat is present or not). The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of sublingual immunotherapy with extract of cat epithelium in monosensitized patients with perennial allergic rhinitis and/or bronchial asthma. Forty patients monosensitized to cat epithelium were selected. Of these, 20 were administered sublingual immunotherapy and another 20 received placebo. The following evaluation was carried out in both groups: in vivo and in vitro: symptom score, skin tests, nasal challenge with cat epithelium, specific IgE determination, specific IgG4 and eosinophilic cationic protein. After 1 year of treatment the cumulative dose was 3.6 micrograms of Fe ld I, equivalent to 10 ng/drop. Duration of treatment was 365 days. Our conclusions, based on our patients in the Canary Islands, were the following: 1. Sublingual Fel d I therapy is effective after 1 year of treatment. 2. There were no modifications in IgE, eosinophilic cationic protein or skin tests. 3. An increase in IgG4 occurred which was related to clinical improvement. 4. In general, tolerance was good, except in one patient who presented urticaria and sublingual pruritus. 5. In polysensitized patients, sublingual immunotherapy to cat epithelium is complementary to immunotherapy to dermatophagoides.

  12. Sublingual (SLIT) Versus Oral Immunotherapy (OIT) for Food Allergy

    PubMed Central

    McGowan, Emily C.

    2016-01-01

    Food allergy is a common condition for which the only currently approved treatments are avoidance of the allergenic food and the administration of emergency medications upon accidental exposure. Over the past 10 years, significant advances have been made in the field of food immunotherapy, with efforts focusing on allergen exposure via the oral mucosa. Oral immunotherapy (OIT) and sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) are the two modalities that have been most extensively studied, and this article will review recent advances in our knowledge of the efficacy and safety of these treatments. PMID:25297805

  13. Five-grass-pollen sublingual immunotherapy tablet for the treatment of grass-pollen-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis: 5 years of experience.

    PubMed

    Didier, Alain; Wahn, Ulrich; Horak, Friedrich; Cox, Linda S

    2014-10-01

    Oralair(®) (OA) (Stallergenes, Antony, France) is a unique pre- and co-seasonal 5-grass-pollen sublingual immunotherapy tablet launched in 2008, and now approved in 31 countries worldwide for the treatment of grass-pollen allergic rhinitis and rhinoconjunctivitis. OA is the first oral treatment with a consistent, well-balanced allergen extract that mimics natural exposure and sensitization. A wealth of data exists from over 5 years of clinical and real-world experience demonstrating the efficacy and safety of OA for grass-pollen-allergy treatment. OA is highly effective from the first pollen season in all patient subgroups, including children and those with comorbid mild asthma, irrespective of sensitization status and symptom severity. OA also has sustained long-term benefits for symptom control and quality of life. This article provides an overview of the pharmacodynamics and pharmacology of OA; its efficacy, safety, tolerability and cost-effectiveness for the treatment of allergic rhinitis and rhinoconjunctivitis and its role in clinical practice.

  14. Subcutaneous Immunotherapy and Sublingual Immunotherapy: Comparative Efficacy, Current and Potential Indications, and Warnings--United States Versus Europe.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Harold S; Makatsori, Melina; Calderon, Moises A

    2016-02-01

    Subcutaneous immunotherapy and sublingual immunotherapy are effective for allergic rhinitis and allergic asthma and with some support for use in selected patients with atopic dermatitis. The sequence of immunologic responses is the same, irrespective of the route of administration, and similar disease modification has been demonstrated. However, there are differences between the two approaches. The most important is the greatly reduced likelihood of sublingual immunotherapy producing systemic reactions. There are major drawbacks for sublingual immunotherapy in regard to dosing. Finally, there is the question of relative clinical efficacy, with the currently available data favoring subcutaneous immunotherapy.

  15. Dropouts in sublingual allergen immunotherapy trials - a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Makatsori, M; Scadding, G W; Lombardo, C; Bisoffi, G; Ridolo, E; Durham, S R; Senna, G

    2014-05-01

    Participant dropouts can reduce the power of allergen immunotherapy clinical trials. Evaluation of the dropout rate and reasons for dropout are important not only in the planning of clinical studies but are also relevant for adherence to immunotherapy in daily clinical practice. A systematic review was carried out in order to establish the overall dropout rate among published double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized clinical trials of sublingual immunotherapy for respiratory allergic diseases. Dropouts were analysed in regards to allergen, formulation, treatment schedule, participant age, study size, number of centres and type of allergic disease. Relative dropout rates in placebo and active groups as well as reasons for dropout were also assessed. A total of 81 studies, comprising 9998 patients, were included. Dropout rates in sublingual immunotherapy controlled studies do not appear to be a major problem with a composite dropout percentage of 14% (95% CI:11.9-16). Furthermore, they are not different for active compared to placebo-treated participants. This lends support to the positive clinical outcomes seen in meta-analyses of these trials.

  16. Efficacy of sublingual immunotherapy versus subcutaneous injection immunotherapy in allergic patients.

    PubMed

    Saporta, Diego

    2012-01-01

    While it is generally accepted that Subcutaneous Injection Immunotherapy (SCIT) and Sublingual Immunotherapy (SLIT) are both efficacious, there is not yet a significant amount of information regarding their comparative efficacy. In this paper, we performed a retrospective chart review and compared treatment results in two groups of patients (both with nasal allergies with or without asthma) that were treated either with SCIT or SLIT. Both treatment modalities were found to be of similar efficacy.

  17. Sublingual immunotherapy for allergic rhinitis: where are we now?

    PubMed

    Incorvaia, Cristoforo; Mauro, Marina; Ridolo, Erminia

    2015-01-01

    Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) was introduced in the 1980s as a safer option to subcutaneous immunotherapy and in the latest decade achieved significant advances. Its efficacy in allergic rhinitis is supported by a number of meta-analyses. The development of SLIT preparations in tablets to fulfill the requirements of regulatory agencies for quality of allergen extracts made available optimal products for grass-pollen-induced allergic rhinitis. Preparations of other allergens based on the same production methods are currently in progress. A notable outcome of SLIT, that is shared with subcutaneous immunotherapy, is the evident cost-effectiveness, showing significant cost savings as early as 3 months from starting the treatment, that become as high as 80% compared with drug treatment in the ensuing years.

  18. Immune mechanisms of allergen-specific sublingual immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Moingeon, P; Batard, T; Fadel, R; Frati, F; Sieber, J; Van Overtvelt, L

    2006-02-01

    Sublingual immunotherapy has been shown in some clinical studies to modulate allergen-specific antibody responses [with a decrease in the immunoglobulin E/immunoglobulin G4 (IgE/IgG4) ratio] and to reduce the recruitment and activation of proinflammatory cells in target mucosa. Whereas a central paradigm for successful immunotherapy has been to reorient the pattern of allergen-specific T-cell responses in atopic patients from a T helper (Th)2 to Th1 profile, there is currently a growing interest in eliciting regulatory T cells, capable of downregulating both Th1 and Th2 responses through the production of interleukin (IL)-10 and/or transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta. We discuss herein immune mechanisms involved during allergen-specific sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT), in comparison with subcutaneous immunotherapy. During SLIT, the allergen is captured within the oral mucosa by Langerhans-like dendritic cells expressing high-affinity IgE receptors, producing IL-10 and TGF-beta, and upregulating indoleamine dioxygenase (IDO), suggesting that such cells are prone to induce tolerance. The oral mucosa contains limited number of proinflammatory cells, such as mast cells, thereby explaining the well-established safety profile of SLIT. In this context, second-generation vaccines based on recombinant allergens in a native conformation formulated with adjuvants are designed to target Langerhans-like cells in the sublingual mucosa, with the aim to induce allergen-specific regulatory T cells. Importantly, such recombinant vaccines should facilitate the identification of biological markers of SLIT efficacy in humans.

  19. [Sublingual immunotherapy in children. Immunotherapy Committee of the Spanish Society for Clinical Immunology and Pediatric Allergology].

    PubMed

    Lleonart, R; Muñoz, F; Eseverri, J L; Martínez-Cañabate, A; Tabar, A I; Pedemonte, C

    2003-01-01

    Sublingual immunotherapy is currently attracting growing interest because of its ease of administration and, according to previous studies, its infrequent and mild adverse effects. However, at least in children, the efficacy of this therapy has not been completely demonstrated. In addition, the mechanisms of action remain to be elucidated since few studies have been published and the results have been contradictory and sometimes inconclusive. For this reason, we performed a literature review through the MEDLINE database, selecting double-blind studies carried out in children. Only 10 studies meeting these requirements were retrieved. All the studies were performed by European researchers and nine were published in European journals. Efficacy was evaluated by clinical parameters and by reduction in medication use. The results on efficacy are not homogeneous, although most support the utility of this route of administration. Moreover, reports of allergens other than those used in these studies dust mites and grass pollens are lacking. In conclusion, further studies evaluating the efficacy of this therapy in children are required. Among the general population, if the efficacy of sublingual immunotherapy in the treatment of sensitization to hymenoptera venoms were demonstrated, as has been the case with subcutaneous immunotherapy, the utility of this route of administration would be definitively confirmed. Finally, sublingual immunotherapy could be used in children who have shown systemic reactions to subcutaneous immunotherapy or who refuse to undergo injections.

  20. Selection of patients for sublingual versus subcutaneous immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Larenas Linnemann, Désirée E S; Blaiss, Michael S

    2014-01-01

    Allergen immunotherapy is the sole treatment for IgE-mediated allergic diseases directed at the underlying mechanism. The two widely accepted administration routes are sublingual (SLIT) and subcutaneous (SCIT). We reviewed how patients should best be selected for immunotherapy and how the optimal administration route can be defined. Before deciding SCIT or SLIT, appropriate selection of patients for allergen immunotherapy (AIT) is mandatory. To be eligible for AIT, subjects must have a clear medical history of allergic disease, with exacerbation of symptoms on exposure to one or more allergens and a corresponding positive skin or in vitro test. Then the route of administration should be based on: published evidence of clinical and immunologic efficacy (which varies per allergic disease and per allergen); mono- or multi-allergen immunotherapy, for SLIT multi-allergen immunotherapy was not effective; safety: adverse events with SLIT are more frequent, but less severe; and, costs and patient preferences, closely related to adherence issues. All these are discussed in the article.

  1. Is Sublingual Immunotherapy the Final Answer? Implications for the Allergist

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) is now accepted as a viable alternative to the traditional injection route based on more than 40 clinical trials and several meta-analyses of efficacy. In addition, the safety profile is very favorable, also in younger children. Although some aspects need to be further clarified (eg, optimal doses, patient selection, and mechanisms of action), SLIT can be currently regarded as an additional therapeutic option that allergists have available. The main distinctive feature of SLIT is certainly its tolerability, safety, and convenience for the patient. Nonetheless, as happens with injection immunotherapy, it is mandatory that the prescription of SLIT is made by a trained specialist, and that a detailed diagnosis is made before prescribing it. PMID:23283394

  2. Serum IL-9 levels and sublingual immunotherapy: preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Ciprandi, G; De Amici, M; Marseglia, G L

    2011-01-01

    Th9 is a new T cell subset characterized by IL-9 production. It has been reported that serum IL-9 levels are related with symptom severity in patients with allergic rhinitis (AR). This study is aimed at investigating whether serum IL-9 may be modulated by sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) in patients with persistent AR due to Parietaria allergy. Twenty-one AR patients (9 males, median age 41 years) successfully treated with SLIT and 52 AR patients (25 males, median age 34 years) treated only with drugs were evaluated during the pollen season. Serum IL-9 was dosed in all patients. SLIT-treated patients showed significantly lower serum IL-9 levels than untreated AR patients (p <0.0001). In conclusion, this preliminary study shows that a single pre-seasonal SLIT course might modulate serum IL-9.

  3. Immune response to sublingual immunotherapy in children allergic to mites.

    PubMed

    Barberi, S; Villa, M P; Pajno, G B; La Penna, F; Barreto, M; Cardelli, P; Amodeo, R; Tabacco, F; Caminiti, L; Ciprandi, G

    2011-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) is characterized by Th2 polarized immune response. Specific immunotherapy modifies this arrangement restoring a physiologic Th1 profile. Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) is widely prescribed, but there is no early marker of response. The aim of this study is to investigate possible marker of SLIT effectiveness. Thirty children with mite allergy were studied: 15 were treated with drugs alone, 15 with SLIT and drugs on demand. The study lasted 2 years. Visual analogue scale (VAS) for symptoms and medication score were evaluated. Serum cytokines (IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IFN-gamma, MCP-1, and TNF-alpha) were assessed by ELISA before and after 1 and 2 year SLIT. SLIT-treated children obtained a significant improvement of symptoms and a reduction of drug use, whereas children treated with a drug alone did not obtained any change. IL-10 significantly increased, whereas Th2-dependent and pro-inflammatory cytokines significantly decreased. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that 2-year SLIT is capable of inducing immunologic hyporeactivity to mites.

  4. Adherence issues related to sublingual immunotherapy as perceived by allergists

    PubMed Central

    Scurati, Silvia; Frati, Franco; Passalacqua, Gianni; Puccinelli, Paola; Hilaire, Cecile; Incorvaia, Cristoforo

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) is a viable alternative to subcutaneous immunotherapy to treat allergic rhinitis and asthma, and is widely used in clinical practice in many European countries. The clinical efficacy of SLIT has been established in a number of clinical trials and meta-analyses. However, because SLIT is self-administered by patients without medical supervision, the degree of patient adherence with treatment is still a concern. The objective of this study was to evaluate the perception by allergists of issues related to SLIT adherence. Methods: We performed a questionnaire-based survey of 296 Italian allergists, based on the adherence issues known from previous studies. The perception of importance of each item was assessed by a VAS scale ranging from 0 to 10. Results: Patient perception of clinical efficacy was considered the most important factor (ranked 1 by 54% of allergists), followed by the possibility of reimbursement (ranked 1 by 34%), and by the absence of side effects (ranked 1 by 21%). Patient education, regular follow-up, and ease of use of SLIT were ranked first by less than 20% of allergists. Conclusion: These findings indicate that clinical efficacy, cost, and side effects are perceived as the major issues influencing patient adherence to SLIT, and that further improvement of adherence is likely to be achieved by improving the patient information provided by prescribers. PMID:20622914

  5. Importance of Quality of Life for Adherence to Sublingual Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Eberle, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background. Nonperception of efficacy ranks among the most commonly cited causes for nonadherence to sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT). Quality of life (QoL) in patients is a determining factor influencing adherence. We investigated QoL and adherence separately in SLIT patients at one pediatric practice in Germany. Methods. We conducted a noninterventional, cross-sectional, retrospective, quality-of-life survey among pediatric patients treated with SLIT. QoL was assessed using the generic SF-12 health survey in German. The items contained in the SF-12 health survey are weighted, added up, and converted to obtain a physical component score (PCS) and a mental component score (MCS). Each component score ranges from 0 to 100; the higher the score, the better the QoL perceived. Results. 201 surveyed patients who had undergone SLIT showed PCS-12 of 49.3 (± 7.0) and MCS-12 of 52.6 (± 7.2). These figures correlate strongly with those reported for the German general population (n = 2453): PCS-12 of 49.6 (± 8.7) and MCS-12 of 52.3 (± 8.0). 70.2% (73) of 104 patients were adherent at this practice. Conclusions. QoL in the SLIT patients surveyed here appears as good as that of the general population. Adherence to SLIT at this practice was remarkably better than that reported elsewhere. PMID:27504453

  6. Rare adverse events due to house dust mite sublingual immunotherapy in pediatric practice: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Galip, Nilufer; Bahceciler, Nerin

    2015-01-01

    Sublingual route, a noninjective way of allergen administration appears to be associated with a lower incidence of severe systemic reactions compared with the subcutaneous route. Local adverse reactions are reported which resolve spontaneously within a few days without need for discontinuation of treatment. Hereby, we report two pediatric cases, one with persistent asthma and the other one with persistent allergic rhinitis. Both were treated by house dust mite sublingual immunotherapy, one of whom developed severe wheezing (grade 2 systemic reaction based on World Allergy Organization subcutaneous systemic reaction grading system) and the other intractable vomiting (grade 3 local reaction based on World Allergy Organization sublingual immunotherapy local adverse events grading system) at the end of the build-up phase which repeated on re-administration of the same dose. Both of those two cases completed their 3-year immunotherapy successfully by patient-based adjustment of the highest tolerated dose of the maintenance.

  7. Short review on sublingual immunotherapy for patients with allergic rhinitis: from bench to bedside.

    PubMed

    Kawauchi, Hideyuki; Goda, Kaoru; Tongu, Miki; Yamada, Takaya; Aoi, Noriaki; Morikura, Ichiro; Fuchiwaki, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Sublingual immunotherapy has been considered to be a painless and effective therapeutic treatment for allergic rhinitis, and is known as type 1 allergy of the nasal mucosa. So far, its mechanism of action has been elucidated employing peripheral blood serum and lymphocytes in an antigen-specific fashion. Because of the limitations in sampling human materials, there is still controversy among many reports between clinical efficacy and laboratory data. Therefore, its mechanism of action needs to be investigated further by using promising animal models such as rodents and monkeys. Bearing this in mind, in our present study, we successfully constructed an effective murine model for sublingual immunotherapy in allergic rhinitis in which mice were administered ovalbumin (OVA) sublingually followed by intraperitoneal sensitization and nasal challenge.

  8. Subcutaneous and sublingual immunotherapy for allergic rhinitis: What is the evidence?

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Sarah K.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Increasing interest in sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) among practitioners and patients has resulted in numerous publications and clinical trials in recent years. With the clinical growth of SLIT, discussions of its efficacy, safety, and immunologic effects have intensified, as have comparisons to subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT). In the United States, SCIT has been the traditional form of immunotherapy for inhalant allergy and is the only immunotherapy method approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration at this time. The similarities and differences between SLIT and SCIT are often discussed, yet clinical studies directly comparing these immunotherapy methods are scarce. Methods: A literature review of specific issues and controversies between SLIT and SCIT for allergic rhinitis was conducted. Results: Safety, efficacy, and immunologic effects of these two immunotherapy techniques are reviewed. Conclusion: Unanswered questions relating to SLIT are examined. PMID:22391071

  9. Adverse reactions and tolerability of high-dose sublingual allergen immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Moral, Angel; Moreno, Victoria; Girón, Francisco; El-Qutob, David; Moure, José D; Alcántara, Manuel; Padial, Antonia; Oehling, Alberto G; Millán, Carmen; de la Torre, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Background Sublingual allergen immunotherapy is an effective treatment against allergic respiratory disease. Many studies have shown the safety of this type of therapy, although the factors that might affect the tolerability of high-dose sublingual immunotherapy have not been well established. The aim of this study was to determine the factors that affect the tolerability of sublingual allergen immunotherapy. Patients and methods A total of 183 subjects aged ≥5 years, diagnosed with allergic rhinitis with/without mild to moderate asthma due to sensitization to grass, olive pollen, or mites, were included in this open, retrospective, multicentric, noninterventional study. Sublingual immunotherapy was administered for at least 3 months. Results The most frequent adverse reaction was oral pruritus (13.7% of the patients). Most of the reactions were local (84.7%) and immediate (93.5%) and occurred during the initiation phase (60.6%). All reactions were mild to moderate in severity. No serious adverse reactions were registered. When comparing factors with potential influence on the occurrence of adverse reactions, the results between the groups of subjects with and without adverse reactions showed no statistically significant differences in sex (P=0.6417), age (P=0.1801), years since the disease was first diagnosed (P=0.3800), treatment composition (P=0.6946), polysensitization (P=0.1730), or clinical diagnosis (P=0.3354). However, it was found that treatment duration had a statistically significant influence (3 months, >3 months: P=0.0442) and the presence of asthma was close to statistical significance (P=0.0847). Conclusion In our study, treatment duration is significantly associated with the occurrence of adverse reactions after the administration of high doses of sublingual allergen immunotherapy. PMID:27418842

  10. Adult and pediatric clinical trials of sublingual immunotherapy in the USA.

    PubMed

    Park, Dai; Daher, Nora; Blaiss, Michael S

    2012-08-01

    Specific allergen immunotherapy has been practiced for allergic rhinoconjunctivitis for over 100 years and is the only treatment option that is disease modifying. In the USA, immunotherapy is usually administered via subcutaneous injection; this is the only route with a US FDA-approved formulation. There is growing interest in developing US-standardized formulations for the sublingual route, but up until recently there have been few US trials. Most of the experience with sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) comes from Europe, where it is widely used and there is a large body of literature supporting its use. The purpose of this review is to summarize recent adult and pediatric clinical trials of SLIT in the USA. Most of the trials are for inhalant allergies, but there is some early work on SLIT as a novel therapy for food allergies.

  11. Sublingual allergen immunotherapy: immunological mechanisms and prospects for refined vaccine preparation.

    PubMed

    O'Hehir, R E; Sandrini, A; Anderson, G P; Rolland, J M

    2007-01-01

    Allergic diseases constitute a major health issue worldwide. Mainstay treatment constitutes allergen avoidance and pharmacotherapy for symptom relief, but allergen immunotherapy offers advantages of specific treatment with long lasting efficacy, and being able to modify the course of the disease. Conventional immunotherapy involves the subcutaneous injection of gradually increasing amounts of allergen extract but the use of current whole allergen extracts is restricted by the risk of adverse IgE-mediated events especially for potent allergens such as peanut and latex and for asthmatics. This has lead to interest in alternative routes of immunotherapy. Oral tolerance is a well-documented immune process and the sublingual route of administration of allergen immunotherapy is attracting interest. Recent meta-analyses show that sublingual allergen immunotherapy for grass pollen and house dust mite allergy is clinically effective and safer than injection immunotherapy. Some studies show SLIT induces changes of T cell anergy, immune deviation, blocking antibodies, and induction of regulatory T cells, as described for injection immunotherapy pointing to the need to target allergen-specific T cells, there is emergent evidence that the oral mucosa presents distinct regulatory features. Evidence suggests that oral dendritic cells play a key role in inducing tolerance especially when allergen is taken up via Fc receptor bound IgE. This suggests that although both would target allergen-specific T cells, allergen formulations may differ with respect to IgE epitopes for optimal SLIT compared with SCIT. Identification of the molecular nature of the allergen-DC receptor interaction is required to determine whether short peptides or recombinant allergen preparations and of suitable adjuvants specifically tailored for the sublingual route will allow the development of improved allergen formulations and delivery strategies for efficacy of treatment whilst decreasing Ig

  12. Lung-derived innate cytokines: new epigenetic targets of allergen-specific sublingual immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Pishdadian, Abbas; Varasteh, Abdolreza; Gholamin, Mehran; Nasiraie, Leila Roozbeh; Hosseinpour, Mitra; Moghadam, Malihe; Sankian, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Sublingual allergen-specific immunotherapy is a safe and effective method for treatment of IgE-mediated respiratory allergies; however, the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. This study was planned to test whether sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) can exert epigenetic mechanisms through which the airway allergic responses can be extinguished. Materials and Methods: BALB/c mice were sensitized intraperitoneally and challenged intranasally. Then, they received sublingual treatment with recombinant Che a 2 (rChe a 2), a major allergen of Chenopodium album. After SLIT, allergen-specific antibodies in sera, cytokine profiles of spleen cell cultures, mRNA and protein expression of lung-derived IL-33, IL-25, and TSLP (thymic stromal lymphopoietin), and histone modifications of these three genes were assessed. Results: Following Immunotherapy, systemic immune responses shifted from Th2 to Th1 profile as demonstrated by significant decrease in IgE and IL-4 and substantial increase in IgG2a and IFN-γ. At local site, mRNA and protein levels of lung-derived pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-33 and TSLP were markedly down-regulated following SLIT that was associated with marked enrichment of trimethylated lysine 27 of histone H3 at promoter regions of these two cytokines. Conclusion: In our study, sublingual immunotherapy with recombinant allergen effectively attenuated allergic immune responses, at least partly, by induction of distinct histone modifications at specific loci. Additionally, the lung-derived pro-allergic cytokines IL-33 and TSLP could be promising mucosal candidates for either monitoring allergic conditions or therapeutic approaches. PMID:27096066

  13. [Successful desensitization to latex by sublingual immunotherapy in a health worker].

    PubMed

    Bueno-De Sá, Adriano; Gaspar, Angela; Solé, Dirceu; Morais-Almeida, Mário

    2014-01-01

    Latex allergy is still a public health problem responsible for some occupational diseases tough to be treated without removing the patient from his/her workspace. For patients allergic to latex, sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) for latex is a tool that can be very useful. We report the case of a nurse with latex allergy who underwent successful desensitization to latex by SLIT, and discuss about possible causes of the success of this therapy.

  14. Sublingual immunotherapy for peanut allergy: clinical and immunologic evidence of desensitization

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Edwin H.; Bird, J. Andrew; Kulis, Michael; Laubach, Susan; Pons, Laurent; Shreffler, Wayne; Steele, Pamela; Kamilaris, Janet; Vickery, Brian; Burks, A. Wesley

    2011-01-01

    Background There are no treatments currently available for peanut allergy. Sublingual immunotherapy is a novel approach to the treatment of peanut allergy. Objective To investigate the safety, clinical effectiveness and immunologic changes with sublingual immunotherapy in peanut-allergic children. Methods In this double-blind, placebo-controlled study, subjects underwent 6 months of dose escalation and 6 months of maintenance dosing followed by a double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge. Results Eighteen children ages 1 to 11 years completed 12 months of dosing and the food challenge. Dosing side effects were primarily oropharyngeal and uncommonly required treatment. During the double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge, the treatment group safely ingested 20 times more peanut protein than the placebo group (median 1710 mg vs. 85 mg, p=0.011). Mechanistic studies demonstrated a decrease in prick skin test wheal size (p=0.020) and decreased basophil responsiveness after stimulation with 10−2 mcg/ml (p=0.009) and 10−3 mcg/ml (p=0.009) of peanut. Peanut-specific IgE increased over the initial 4 months (p=0.002) then steadily decreased over the remaining 8 months (p=0.003) while peanut-specific IgG4 increased during the 12 months (p=0.014). Lastly, IL-5 levels decreased after 12 months (p=0.015). No statistically significant changes were found in IL-13 levels, the percent of T regulatory cells, or IL-10 and IFN-gamma production. Conclusion Peanut sublingual immunotherapy is able to safely induce clinical desensitization in peanut allergic children with evidence of immunologic changes suggesting a significant change in the allergic response. Further study is required to determine if continued peanut sublingual immunotherapy is able to induce long-term immune tolerance. PMID:21281959

  15. State of the art on food allergen immunotherapy: oral, sublingual, and epicutaneous.

    PubMed

    Jones, Stacie M; Burks, A Wesley; Dupont, Christophe

    2014-02-01

    IgE-mediated food allergy is a global health problem that affects millions of persons and affects every aspect of life for the patient. Developing effective treatment strategies to augment current practice standards of strict dietary avoidance of antigens and availability of self-injectable epinephrine has been a major focus of research teams, advocacy groups, funding agencies, and patients and their families. Significant progress has been made through the development of allergen-specific immunotherapy encompassing 3 major forms of treatment: oral, sublingual, and epicutaneous immunotherapy. These therapies are in various stages of clinical investigation, with some successes noted in clinical outcomes and modulation of immune mechanisms toward effective therapy. Here we review recent progress and areas of concern for the role of these forms of immunotherapy as an emerging treatment for food allergy.

  16. An extract of Timothy-grass pollen used as sublingual immunotherapy for summer hay fever.

    PubMed

    Kay, A B

    2007-12-01

    Grazax is a lyophilisate of an extract of Timothy-grass pollen (Phleum pratense) administered by the sublingual route to induce desensitization (or hyposensitization) to grass pollen in subjects with hay fever. Since allergen avoidance measures are limited in hay fever sufferers, present treatment, at least in the United Kingdom, is almost always by symptomatic medication. The effectiveness of symptomatic treatment in hay fever is variable and depends on patient compliance and the judicious prescribing of antihistamines and anti-inflammatory preparations either alone or in combination. Desensitization (hyposensitization or specific immunotherapy) by subcutaneous injection has been shown to be very efficacious and is used for patients who do not adequately respond to drug treatment. A rare side effect of desensitizing injections is anaphylaxis, and so use is limited to specialized centers. For these reasons there has been considerable interest in specific immunotherapy by the sublingual route. Grazax has recently been approved in the United Kingdom. It is commenced at least four months prior to the expected start of the grass pollen season and in line with injection immunotherapy treatment will be recommended for a period of three years with annual reviews to assess patient outcomes. Grazax grass allergen tablets are well tolerated in patients with grass pollen allergy with most adverse events being mild local reactions. There have been no instances of anaphylaxis. In randomized double-blind placebo controlled trials Grazax reduces symptoms and medication scores in adults with hay fever. The long-term effects of Grazax are currently being investigated.

  17. Adverse Events During Immunotherapy Against Grass Pollen-Induced Allergic Rhinitis - Differences Between Subcutaneous and Sublingual Treatment.

    PubMed

    Aasbjerg, Kristian; Dalhoff, Kim Peder; Backer, Vibeke

    2015-08-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) triggered by grass pollen is a common disease, affecting millions of people worldwide. Treatment consists of symptom-alleviating drugs, such as topical corticosteroids or antihistamines. Another option is potentially curative immunotherapy, currently available as sublingual and subcutaneous treatment. We investigated the potential differences in the prevalence and severity of adverse events related to subcutaneous and sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) against grass pollen-induced AR. A thorough literature search was performed with PubMed and EMBASE. The findings were compared with the available summaries of product characteristics (SPC) and with commercial pharmacology databases (Micromedex). The majority of available safety data originate from registered products of standardized allergens. A surprisingly large percentage of drugs, especially those used in the United States, have no systematically collected safety data. No sufficiently powered randomized trials comparing sublingual and subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) were available, but general safety assessments indicate that sublingual tablet treatment is safer than subcutaneous treatment. Not all commonly used immunotherapy drugs are officially registered, and not all have systematically collected safety data. This is especially true for older drugs used in the United States. In contrast, newer drugs that have undergone extensive clinical testing have better documentation, but unified collection of safety data is still lacking. Considering the evidence available, most drugs elicit similar side effects from the same organ systems, and symptoms from the sublingual drug classes are probably less severe. However, a head-to-head comparison of safety and efficacy is lacking.

  18. Early cytokine modulation after the rapid induction phase of sublingual immunotherapy with mite monomeric allergoids.

    PubMed

    Di Gioacchino, M; Perrone, A; Petrarca, C; Di Claudio, F; Mistrello, G; Falagiani, P; Dadorante, V; Verna, N; Braga, M; Ballone, E; Cavallucci, E

    2008-01-01

    The influence of different treatment schedules of sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) in activating IL-10-producing T-cells, crucial in inducing allergen-specific tolerance, is not completely understood. The present work was designed to evaluate allergen driven interleukin release by mononuclear cells in the early phase of SLIT, after application of different induction schemes. Twenty mite-allergic patients were enrolled, 10 (group A) treated with a traditional 98 day induction scheme and 10 (group B) with a 16 day scheme with monomeric allergoid vaccine. At the end of the induction phase, the cumulative doses taken by group A and group B patients were equivalent to 50.5 and 50.3 microg of mite group 1 allergens, respectively. The release of Th1-, Th2- and Treg-related interleukins was assessed in culture supernatants of 5 microg/ml Der-p1-stimulated mononuclear cells, isolated before and after the induction phases. No relevant treatment-related side effects were observed. Interleukin release was similar in the two groups at the enrolment. Non-stimulated and Der p 1 stimulated release of studied cytokines was similar in the two groups at enrolment. Der p 1 stimulation significantly increased IL-10 release (p<0.0002) after treatment in group B patients, and this effect was higher (p=0.05) compared to group A patients. Furthermore, at the end of SLIT induction TNF-alpha, IL-4 and IFN-gamma production were reduced in group B patients (p<0.05, p=0.062 and p=0.060, respectively). The rapid induction scheme of sublingual immunotherapy induces an early immune suppression more effectively than the slower one. The rapid induction scheme should be the preferential way to start sublingual immunotherapy, particularly when monomeric allergoids are utilized.

  19. Effect of sublingual immunotherapy on level of cytokines in PBMCs of patients with allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhongxi; Li, Wenjing; Chen, Huan; Zhang, Wei

    2011-06-01

    This study examined the possible mechanism of sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) in the treatment of allergic asthma. Forty asthma patients allergic to dust mite were enrolled. They received SLIT with dermatophagoides farinae (Der. f) drops for one year. Thirty healthy subjects served as controls. The levels of IL-4 and IFN-γ of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were determined in allergic asthma patients before and after the SLIT as well as the healthy subjects. The results showed that the level of IL-4 was substantially increased and that of IFN-γ remarkably decreased in the patients before the SLIT as compared with those in the healthy subjects (P<0.05). After the SLIT, the level of IL-4 was significantly reduced and that of IFN-γ elevated in these allergic asthma patients. It was concluded that sublingual immunotherapy is effective for patients with allergic asthma. And it may work by regulating the balance of Th1/Th2 through changing the expression of IL-4 and IFN-γ in PBMCs.

  20. Safety evaluation of standardized allergen extract of Japanese cedar pollen for sublingual immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mitobe, Yuko; Yokomoto, Yasuki; Ohashi-Doi, Katsuyo

    2015-04-01

    Japanese cedar (JC) pollinosis is caused by Japanese cedar pollen (JCP) and most common seasonal allergic disease in Japan. Subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) with allergen extract of JCP (JCP-allergen extract) is well established for JC pollinosis treatment with improvement of symptoms. However, major drawbacks for SCIT are repeated painful injections, frequent hospital visits and anaphylactic risk. Currently, sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) has received much attention as an advanced alternative application with lower incidence of systemic reactions because the liquid or tablet form of allergen is placed under the tongue. The aim of this study was safety evaluation of standardized JCP-allergen extract currently developed for SLIT in JC pollinosis. JCP-allergen extract showed no potential genotoxicity. No systemic effects were observed in rats administered JCP-allergen extract orally for 26 weeks followed by 4-week recovery period. Mild local reactions such as hyperplasia and increased globule leukocytes resulting from vehicle (glycerin)-induced irritation were observed in stomach. No-observed-adverse-effect level was greater than 10,000 JAU/kg/day for systemic toxicity, equivalent to 300-fold the human dose. No local irritation was found in rabbits oral mucosae by 7-day sublingual administration. These results demonstrate the safe profile of standardized JCP-allergen extract, suggesting it is suitable for SLIT in JC pollinosis.

  1. Specific sublingual immunotherapy with peach LTP (Pru p 3). One year treatment: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Bartolomé, Borja; Asturias, Juan Andrés; Ibarrola, Iñaki; Tavares, Beatriz; Loureiro, Graça; Machado, Daniel; Chieira, Celso

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Food allergy is an increasing problem with limited therapeutic approaches apart from to the eviction diet. Case presentation A 40-year-old female patient with food allergy symptoms was polysensitized to almost all vegetable food since the age of 36; the onset of symptoms was during pregnancy. The allergological study demonstrated positive skin prick tests (SPT) to nuts, legumes, cereals, spices, several fresh fruits including peach, and other groups of vegetable foods however, it was negative to common aeroallergens. Serum specific IgE levels were negative (<0.35 kU/L) to profilin and carbohydrate determinants, but positive to Pru p 3 (3.5 kU/L). Positive double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge to peach confirmed the allergic disease. She received specific sublingual immunotherapy with native Pru p 3 at a concentration of 40 μg/ml with 5 administrations per week and a cumulative dose of 200 μg of nPru p 3 per month. After an ultra-rush build-up phase concluded in one day she continued therapy during a year with 5 administrations per week. The clinical evolution and laboratory studies demonstrated an early reduction on SPT reactions with no relevant changes on serum specific IgE, IgG, IgG1 and IgG4 to Pru p 3 during the immunotherapy period. The challenge test was negative 4 months after the beginning of the SLIT. Regarding clinical response she markedly improved after the first month of treatment, and by the 3th month she had no major vegetable dietary restrictions, except for nuts and pepper. Conclusion These results demonstrate the excellent efficacy and safety of sublingual specific protein immunotherapy developed according to the patient specific sensitivity profile to Pru p3. PMID:19829825

  2. New product development with the innovative biomolecular sublingual immunotherapy formulations for the management of allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Frati, Franco; Cecchi, Lorenzo; Scala, Enrico; Ridolo, Erminia; Dell'Albani, Ilaria; Makrì, Eleni; Pajno, Giovanni; Incorvaia, Cristoforo

    2014-01-01

    The molecular allergy technique, currently defined as component-resolved diagnosis, significantly improved the diagnosis of allergy, allowing for differentiation between molecules actually responsible for clinical symptoms (genuine sensitizers) and those simply cross-reacting or shared by several sources (panallergens), thus influencing the appropriate management of a patient's allergy. This also concerns allergen immunotherapy (AIT), which may be prescribed more precisely based on the component-resolved diagnosis results. However, the advance in diagnosis needs to be mirrored in AIT. According to consensus documents and to expectations of specialists, therapy should be based on standardized extracts containing measured amounts of the clinically relevant molecules, ie, the major allergens. The new generation of extracts for sublingual immunotherapy fulfills these requirements and are thus defined as biomolecular (BM). BM refers to natural extracts with a defined content of major allergens in micrograms. All Staloral BM products are indicated for the treatment of allergic rhinitis with or without asthma. The effectiveness of AIT is related to its ability to modify the immunological response of allergic subjects. The 5-grass and house dust mite extracts were evaluated addressing the T helper 1, T helper 2, and T helper 3 cells by polymerase chain reaction array on mRNA extracted from Waldeyer's ring tissue (adenoids). Sublingual immunotherapy with a defined content of major allergens in micrograms induced a strong downregulation of genes involved in T helper 2 and T helper 1 activation and function, allowing the definition of the immunologic effect as "bio-homeostatic". This clinical and immunological model must be implemented with respect to other allergens, thus expanding the application of a treatment with a unique disease-modifying capacity.

  3. Ranking in importance of allergen extract characteristics for sublingual immunotherapy by Italian specialists.

    PubMed

    Canonica, Giorgio Walter; Passalacqua, Giovanni; Incorvaia, Cristoforo; Cadario, Gianni; Fiocchi, Alessandro; Senna, Gianenrico; Rossi, Oliviero; Romano, Antonino; Scala, Enrico; Romano, Catello; Ingrassia, Antonino; Zambito, Marcello; Dell'Albani, Ilaria; Frati, Franco

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of allergen immunotherapy (AIT) is well supported by evidence from trials and meta-analyses. However, its actual performance in daily practice may be diminished by several pitfalls, including inappropriate patient selection, and, especially, the use of allergen extracts of insufficient quality. We performed a survey, the Allergen Immunotherapy Decision Analysis, to evaluate which criteria specialists use to choose products for sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) in adult patients suffering from allergic respiratory disease. We surveyed a total of 169 Italian allergists randomly chosen from a database belonging to a market research company (Lexis Ricerche, Milan, Italy). The survey was performed between October and November 2012 under the aegis of the European Center for Allergy Research Foundation and consisted of a questionnaire-based electronic survey prepared by a scientific board of 12 AIT experts. The questionnaire comprised two parts, the first of which contained 14 items to be ranked by each participant according to the importance assigned to each when choosing SLIT products. The physicians' rankings assigned major importance to the level of evidence-based validation of efficacy and safety, standardization of the product, efficacy based on personal experience, and defined content(s) of the major allergen(s) in micrograms. The results of this survey show that Italian allergists rank the quality-related characteristics of allergen extracts as highly important when choosing products for AIT. The allergists' preference for high-quality products should be addressed by regulatory agencies and by producers.

  4. Safety of Grass Pollen Sublingual Immunotherapy for Allergic Rhinitis in Concomitant Asthma.

    PubMed

    Sahadevan, A; Cusack, R; Lane, S J

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal allergic rhinitis (AR) occurs predominantly as a result of grass pollen allergy. Grass pollen sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) has been proven effective in treating AR1. SLIT is currently licensed for use in AR with concomitant stable mild asthma. There is evidence that SLIT improves asthma control when primarily used to treat AR2. The aim was to assess the safety of SLIT in patients with severe seasonal allergic rhinitis who have co-existing stable mild asthma. The secondary aim was to determine whether asthma control improved post SLIT. There was no deterioration in asthma control after 6-36 months of SLIT. 27/30 (90%) patients' asthma control remained stable or indeed improved (p < 0.021). Of this 15 (50%) patients' asthma improved. There was no statistically significant change in their asthma pharmacotherapy after SLIT (p = 0.059). In conclusion, grass pollen SLIT is safe and can potentially treat dual allergic rhinitis- mild asthmatic patients.

  5. Clinical and immunological correlates of pre-co-seasonal sublingual immunotherapy with birch monomeric allergoid in patients with allergic rhinoconjunctivitis.

    PubMed

    Burastero, S E; Mistrello, G; Paolucci, C; Breda, D; Roncarolo, D; Zanotta, S; Falagiani, P

    2009-01-01

    Sublingual immunotherapy is safe and efficacious in the treatment of patients with allergic rhinitis. The clinical and biological efficacy of modified allergens (allergoids) has not been fully clarified. We investigated in birch allergic patients the effect of a pre-co-seasonal sublingual immunotherapy regimen with a modified allergen extract on clinical parameters and on T cell proliferation and regulatory cytokine production (IL-10, TGF-beta). We found that during the birch pollen season symptoms and drug usage scores were 30 and 40 percent improved, respectively, in treated versus control subjects (p<0.0001 for both comparisons) whereas well days were 23.5 (33 percent) versus 16.9 (23 percent) (p=0.0024), respectively. Bet v 1 allergen specific proliferation decreased (p = 0.0010), whereas IL-10 transcription increased (p=0.0010) in treated, but not in control patients. Moreover, TGF-beta transcription was increased, although not significantly (p=0.066), following immunotherapy. Thus, sublingual immunotherapy with modified allergen in birch-allergic subjects was safe, clinically efficacious and associated with the reduction of allergen-specific proliferation and with the increased production of the IL-10 regulatory cytokine.

  6. Sublingual immunotherapy mechanisms of action: the role of Th1 response.

    PubMed

    Ciprandi, G; Tosca, M A; Marseglia, G L

    2009-01-01

    Specific immunotherapy (SIT) is the only treatment able to modify the natural history of allergic subjects. Several aspects of the immunopathological response modified by sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT), which is an alternative route of administration for SIT, have been investigated. A shift from Th2-polarized immune response toward Th1-oriented pattern has been reported after SLIT. More recently, a crucial role for a subpopulation of T cells has been evidenced: T regulatory cells (Treg). Allergic patients have a defect of Tregs, and SLIT should be able to induce a specific Treg response. This issue is very relevant as the Treg-dependent cytokines, namely IL-10 and TGF-beta, are involved in the regulation of IgG and IgA antibodies production. Recent evidence shows that SLIT is also able of inducing a Treg response as detected by IL-10 production. IFNgamma is a typical Th1-dependent cytokine. SLIT may induce a significantly increased production of this cytokine and it may be considered as an early marker of SLIT response. Therefore, also SLIT is able of exerting the effects on immune response as well as the subcutaneous route.

  7. Subcutaneous and Sublingual Immunotherapy in a Mouse Model of Allergic Asthma.

    PubMed

    Hesse, Laura; Nawijn, Martijn C

    2017-01-01

    Allergic asthma, caused by inhaled allergens such as house dust mite or grass pollen, is characterized by reversible airway obstruction, associated with an eosinophilic inflammation of the airways, as well as airway hyper responsiveness and remodeling. The inhaled allergens trigger a type-2 inflammatory response with involvement of innate lymphoid cells (ILC2) and Th2 cells, resulting in high production of immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies. Consequently, renewed allergen exposure results in a classic allergic response with a distinct early and late phase, both resulting in bronchoconstriction and shortness of breath. Allergen specific immunotherapy (AIT) is the only treatment that is capable of modifying the immunological process underlying allergic responses including allergic asthma and both subcutaneous AIT (SCIT) as well as sublingual AIT (SLIT) have proven clinical efficacy in long term suppression of the allergic response. Although these treatments are very successful for rhinitis, application of AIT in asthma is hampered by variable efficacy, long duration of treatment, and the risk of severe side-effects. A more profound understanding of the mechanisms by which AIT achieves tolerance to allergens in sensitized individuals is needed to improve its efficacy. Mouse models have been very valuable as a preclinical model to characterize the mechanisms of desensitization in AIT and to evaluate novel approaches for improved efficacy. Here, we present a rapid and reproducible mouse model for allergen-specific immunotherapy. In this model, mice are sensitized with two injections of allergen absorbed to aluminum hydroxide to induce allergic sensitization, followed by subcutaneous injections (SCIT) or sublingual administrations (SLIT) of the allergen as immunotherapy treatment. Finally, mice are challenged by three intranasal allergen administrations. We will describe the protocols as well as the most important read-out parameters including measurement of invasive lung

  8. "The value of pre- and co-seasonal sublingual immunotherapy in pollen-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis".

    PubMed

    Demoly, Pascal; Calderon, Moises A; Casale, Thomas B; Malling, Hans-Jørgen; Wahn, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) is a guidelines-approved, disease-modifying treatment option for respiratory allergies, including allergic rhinitis (AR) induced by pollen. The various AIT regimens employed to date in pollen-induced AR can be classified as continuous (i.e. year-round) or discontinuous (i.e. pre-seasonal alone, co-seasonal alone or pre- and co-seasonal). Pre-and co-seasonal regimens are typically used for sublingual allergen immunotherapy (SLIT) and have economic and compliance advantages over perennial (year-round) regimens. However, these advantages must not come at the expensive of poor efficacy or safety. The results of recent double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trials show that pre- and co-seasonal SLIT is safe and effective in patients with AR induced by grass pollen (treated with a tablet formulation) or by birch pollen (treated with a liquid formulation). Progress in SLIT has been made in defining the optimal dose of major allergen, the administration frequency (daily), the duration of pre-seasonal treatment (four months) and the number of treatment seasons (at least three). Post-marketing, "real-life" trials of pre- and co-seasonal birch or grass pollen SLIT regimens have confirmed the efficacy and safety observed in the clinical trials. In the treatment of pollen-induced AR, pre- and co-seasonal SLIT regimens appear to be at least as effective and safe as perennial SLIT regimens, and are associated with lower costs and good compliance. Good compliance may mean that pre- and co-seasonal SLIT regimens are inherently more effective and safer than perennial SLIT regimens. When considering the pre- and co-seasonal discontinuous regimen in particular, a 300 IR five-grass-pollen formulation is the only SLIT tablet with a clinical development programme having provided evidence of short-term, sustained and post-treatment efficacy.

  9. Sublingual versus subcutaneous immunotherapy: patient adherence at a large German allergy center

    PubMed Central

    Lemberg, Marie-Luise; Berk, Till; Shah-Hosseini, Kija; Kasche, Elena-Manja; Mösges, Ralph

    2017-01-01

    Background Many placebo-controlled studies have demonstrated that allergen immunotherapy (AIT) is an effective therapy for treating allergies. Both commonly used routes, subcutaneous (SCIT) and sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT), require high patient adherence to be successful. In the literature, numbers describing adherence vary widely; this investigation compares these two routes of therapy directly. Methods All data were retrieved from the patient data management system of a center for dermatology, specific allergology, and environmental medicine in Germany. All 330 patients (aged 13–89 years) included in this study had commenced AIT between 2003 and 2011, thus allowing a full 3-year AIT cycle to be considered for each investigated patient. Results In this specific center, SCIT was prescribed to 62.7% and SLIT to 37.3% of all included patients. The total dropout rate of the whole patient cohort was 34.8%. Overall, SLIT patients showed a higher dropout rate (39.0%) than did SCIT patients (32.4%); however, the difference between these groups was not significant. Also, no significant difference between the overall dropout rates for men and for women was observed. A Kaplan–Meier curve of the patient collective showed a remarkably high dropout rate for the first year of therapy. Conclusion The analysis presented in this single-center study shows that most patients who discontinue AIT do so during the first year of therapy. Patients seem likely to finish the 3-year therapy cycle if they manage to adhere to treatment throughout the first year. Strategies for preventing nonadherence in AIT, therefore, need to be developed and standardized in future investigations. PMID:28115832

  10. Innate and lymphocytic response of birch-allergic patients before and after sublingual immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Guida, Giuseppe; Boita, Monica; Scirelli, Tiziana; Bommarito, Luisa; Heffler, Enrico; Badiu, Iuliana; Bellone, Graziella; Mietta, Sabrina; Mistrello, Gianni; Rolla, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Functional imbalance in Th1/Th2 cell response toward allergens is a recognized hallmark of allergic patients and a major role of dendritic cells (DCs) in redirecting T-cell phenotypes after specific immunotherapy has been suggested. This study investigates the proliferative and cytokine responses of T cells cocultured with monocyte-derived DCs (MoDCs) after allergen stimulation in birch-allergic patients compared with controls and investigates whether sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) could change the DC-driven immune response. T cells were stimulated with the major birch pollen allergen (nBet v1) and MoDCs from eight birch-allergic patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis and eight nonallergic controls. Proliferation and cytokine production were measured before and after one course of SLIT with birch allergoid. Significantly lower levels of proinflammatory (IL-1beta, p = 0.027; IL-6, p = 0.030; TNF-alpha, p = 0.019) and Th1 (interferon gamma, p = 0.032; IL-12, p = 0.05) cytokines were measured in supernatants of T cells and MoDCs cultures from allergic patients compared with nonallergic controls. After SLIT, significant increase in IL-12 (p = 0.039), IL-1beta (p = 0.040), IL-6 (p = 0.041), TNF-α (p = 0.048), and IL-10 (p = 0.048) and significant decrease in IL-13 (p = 0.001) were observed. MoDCs/T-cell cocultures, pulsed with the specific allergen, produced lower quantities of proinflammatory and Th1 cytokines in allergic patients compared with healthy subjects, suggesting an allergen-specific impairment of natural immunity and Th1 immune response. A single course of SLIT was able to enhance allergen-specific innate immunity and to modify lymphocyte response, promoting Th1 and T-cell regulatory activity.

  11. Psychological stress affects response to sublingual immunotherapy in asthmatic children allergic to house dust mite.

    PubMed

    Ippoliti, Flora; De Santis, Wladimiro; Volterrani, Anna; Canitano, Nicoletta; Frattolillo, Daniele; Lucarelli, Sandra; Frediani, Simone; Frediani, Tullio

    2006-08-01

    While the clinical and immunologic efficacy of sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) in allergic diseases has been extensively demonstrated, some patients display a poor clinical response. Psychological stress has been shown to play a role in atopy and also to affect response to immunomodulating therapies such as vaccination with microbial antigens. This study addresses the possibility of response to SLIT being affected by psychological stress. Forty children with mild asthma caused by allergy to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and farinae were subjected to SLIT and then divided after 6 months into two groups based on the results of the stress integrated measure (SIM) test: group 1 (24 stressed patients, mean SIM value of 60.1) and group 2 (16 non-stressed patients, mean SIM value of 7.6). There was also a higher prevalence of psychosocial stressing factors (divorced/absent parents, low income households, non-working parents) among stressed patients. The symptom score, peak expiratory flow (PEF), forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)) and serum eosinophie cationic protein (ECP) concentration were evaluated at both times. The serum concentration of neuroendocrine parameters [prolactin, cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)] was also measured after 6 months of therapy. While all the clinical parameters and ECP concentration improved after SLIT, symptom score, PEF and ECP showed a significantly greater improvement in non-stressed patients. The concentration of neuroendocrine parameters was significantly increased in stressed patients. Our findings show that psychological stress can affect response to SLIT also in allergic subjects and are consistent with data recently reported showing a correlation between stress and poor response to antimicrobial vaccines. Our data also suggest that stress evaluation may become a useful prognostic factor in immunotherapy.

  12. Modulation of dendritic cell innate and adaptive immune functions by oral and sublingual immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Frischmeyer-Guerrerio, Pamela A; Keet, Corinne A; Guerrerio, Anthony L; Chichester, Kristin L; Bieneman, Anja P; Hamilton, Robert G; Wood, Robert A; Schroeder, John T

    2014-11-01

    Sublingual (SLIT) and oral immunotherapy (OIT) are promising treatments for food allergy, but underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Dendritic cells (DCs) induce and maintain Th2-type allergen-specific T cells, and also regulate innate immunity through their expression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs). We examined how SLIT and OIT influenced DC innate and adaptive immune responses in children with IgE-mediated cow's milk (CM) allergy. SLIT, but not OIT, decreased TLR-induced IL-6 secretion by myeloid DCs (mDCs). SLIT and OIT altered mDC IL-10 secretion, a potent inhibitor of FcεRI-dependent pro-inflammatory responses. OIT uniquely augmented IFN-α and decreased IL-6 secretion by plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs), which was associated with reduced TLR-induced IL-13 release in pDC-T cell co-cultures. Both SLIT and OIT decreased Th2 cytokine secretion to CM in pDC-T, but not mDC-T, co-cultures. Therefore, SLIT and OIT exert unique effects on DC-driven innate and adaptive immune responses, which may inhibit allergic inflammation and promote tolerance.

  13. Dose-dependent clinical and immunological efficacy of sublingual immunotherapy with mite monomeric allergoid.

    PubMed

    Di Gioacchino, M; Cavallucci, E; Ballone, E; Cervone, M; Di Rocco, P; Piunti, E; Filardo, G S; Turi, M C; Mangifesta, R; Quecchia, C; Mistrello, G; Braga, M; Petrarca, C

    2012-01-01

    Sublingual immunotherapy with monomeric carbamylated allergoid (LAIS) is an effective and well tolerated treatment of respiratory allergy. The aim of the present study was to correlate the efficacy of two maintenance doses (1000 AU vs 3000 AU) of LAIS with the immunological modulation of allergen-driven Th1, Th2 and T regulatory cytokines produced in vitro by PBMCs, in patients suffering from mite allergic rhinitis. Forty-eight consecutive patients with mite allergic rhinitis were recruited. Patients were randomly assigned to group A (n=24) or group B (n=24), respectively receiving 1000 AU or 3000 AU weekly during one-year maintenance phase. Each patient was evaluated for rhinitis severity (ARIA protocol), and for drug consumption at the time of the inclusion and after 6 and 12 months of treatment. Patients were also asked to report the perceived severity of the disease and the tolerability of the treatment in a visual analogical scale (VAS). Before and at the end of the treatment allergen-driven release of cytokines by PBMCs in vitro was measured. After 1-year treatment, a statistically significant reduction of all clinical parameters was observed in all patients, associated with reduction of IL-4 and increase of INF-γ secreted in vitro by mite-challenged PBMCs. Notably, the group treated with the higher dose showed significantly better clinical and immunological results. The efficacy of LAIS is correlated to the immune modulation in a clear dose-dependent effect.

  14. Balancing efficacy against safety in sublingual immunotherapy with inhalant allergens: what is the best approach?

    PubMed

    Caminati, Marco; Dama, Annarita; Schiappoli, Michele; Senna, Gianenrico

    2013-10-01

    Over the last 20 years, studies and clinical trials have demonstrated efficacy, safety and cost-effectiveness of sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) for respiratory allergic diseases. Nevertheless, it seems to be mostly used as a second-line therapeutic option, and adherence to treatment is not always optimal. Selective literature research was done in Medline and PubMed, including guidelines, position papers and Cochrane meta-analyses concerning SLIT in adult patients. The most recent reviews confirm SLIT as viable and efficacious treatment especially for allergic rhinitis, even if the optimal dosage, duration, schedule are not clearly established for most of the products. Despite an optimal safety profile, tolerability and patient-reported outcomes concerning SLIT have received poor attention until now. Recently, new tools have been specifically developed in order to investigate these aspects. Regular assessment of tolerability profile and SLIT-related patient-reported outcomes will allow balancing efficacy with tolerability and all the other patient-related variables that may affect treatment effectiveness beyond its efficacy.

  15. Effectiveness of Specific Sublingual Immunotherapy in Korean Patients with Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    You, Hyang-Suk; Yang, Min-Young; Kim, Gun-Wook; Cho, Hyun-Ho; Kim, Won-Jeong; Mun, Je-Ho; Song, Margaret; Kim, Hoon-Soo; Ko, Hyun-Chang; Kim, Moon-Bum

    2017-01-01

    Background Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) with house dust mites (HDM) preparation has recently been proven to be beneficial for treating allergic rhinitis and asthma. However, there has been no report regarding the efficacy and safety of SLIT in Korean patients with atopic dermatitis (AD). Objective We intended to investigate the efficacy and safety of SLIT in Korean patients with AD. Methods A total of 34 patients with AD and immunoglobulin E (IgE)-proven HDM sensitization (Class ≥3) were recruited. Eczema area and severity index (EASI) score, total serum IgE level, specific IgE assays to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, D. farinae, and adverse effects were recorded during follow-up. "Responder" was defined as a patient with ≥30% improvement in EASI score after SLIT. Results Twenty-three patients continued SLIT for 12 months or more, whereas 3 patients (8.8%) dropped out because of exacerbation of dermatitis, and 8 patients (23.5%) were lost to follow-up. The average duration of SLIT treatment was 22.4 months (range, 12~32 months). EASI scores reduced significantly after 6 months of treatment (p<0.05) compared with those at baseline. A total of 18 patients were determined to be responders to SLIT after 6 months. Total and specific IgE serum levels did not significantly reduce after SLIT. No patients experienced serious adverse events, with the exception of two patients who developed transient lip and tongue swelling. Conclusion Our study demonstrated that SLIT with HDM extracts is effective and tolerable in Korean patients with AD. Further controlled long-term trials are required to reinforce the current results. PMID:28223739

  16. Choosing the optimal dose in sublingual immunotherapy: Rationale for the 300 index of reactivity dose.

    PubMed

    Demoly, Pascal; Passalacqua, Gianni; Calderon, Moises A; Yalaoui, Tarik

    2015-01-01

    Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) is an effective and well-tolerated method of treating allergic respiratory diseases associated with seasonal and perennial allergens. In contrast to the subcutaneous route, SLIT requires a much greater amount of antigen to achieve a clinical effect. Many studies have shown that SLIT involves a dose-response relationship, and therefore it is important to use a proven clinically effective dose from the onset of treatment, because low doses are ineffective and very high doses may increase the risk of side effects. A well-defined standardization of allergen content is also crucial to ensure consistent quality, potency and appropriate immunomodulatory action of the SLIT product. Several methods of measuring antigenicity are used by manufacturers of SLIT products, including the index of reactivity (IR), standardized quality tablet unit, and bioequivalent allergy unit. A large body of evidence has established the 300 IR dose of SLIT as offering optimal efficacy and tolerability for allergic rhinitis due to grass and birch pollen and HDM, and HDM-induced moderate, persistent allergic asthma. The 300 IR dose also offers consistency of dosing across a variety of different allergens, and is associated with higher rates of adherence and patient satisfaction. Studies in patients with grass pollen allergies showed that the 300 IR dose has a rapid onset of action, is effective in both adults and children in the short term and, when administered pre-coseasonally in the long term, and maintains the clinical benefit, even after cessation of treatment. In patients with HDM-associated AR and/or asthma, the 300 IR dose also demonstrated significant improvements in symptoms and quality of life, and significantly decreased use of symptomatic medication. The 300 IR dose is well tolerated, with adverse events generally being of mild or moderate severity, declining in frequency and severity over time and in the subsequent courses. We discuss herein the most

  17. Oral macrophage-like cells play a key role in tolerance induction following sublingual immunotherapy of asthmatic mice.

    PubMed

    Mascarell, L; Saint-Lu, N; Moussu, H; Zimmer, A; Louise, A; Lone, Y; Ladant, D; Leclerc, C; Tourdot, S; Van Overtvelt, L; Moingeon, P

    2011-11-01

    Sublingual allergen-specific immunotherapy (SLIT) is a safe and efficacious treatment for type 1 respiratory allergies. Herein, we investigated the key subset(s) of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) involved in antigen/allergen capture and tolerance induction during SLIT. Following sublingual administration, fluorochrome-labeled ovalbumin (OVA) is predominantly captured by oral CD11b⁺CD11c⁻ cells that migrate to cervical lymph nodes (CLNs) and present the antigen to naive CD4⁺ T cells. Conditional depletion with diphtheria toxin of CD11b⁺, but not CD11c⁺ cells, in oral tissues impairs CD4⁺ T-cell priming in CLNs. In mice with established asthma to OVA, specific targeting of the antigen to oral CD11b⁺ cells using the adenylate cyclase vector system reduces airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), eosinophil recruitment in bronchoalveolar lavages (BALs), and specific Th2 responses in CLNs and lungs. Oral CD11b⁺CD11c⁻ cells resemble tolerogenic macrophages found in the lamina propria (LP) of the small intestine in that they express the mannose receptor CD206, as well as class-2 retinaldehyde dehydrogenase (RALDH2), and they support the differentiation of interferon-γ/interleukin-10 (IFNγ/IL-10)-producing Foxp3⁺ CD4⁺ regulatory T cells. Thus, among the various APC subsets present in oral tissues of mice, macrophage-like cells play a key role in tolerance induction following SLIT.

  18. Shorter dosing intervals of sublingual immunotherapy lead to more efficacious treatment in a mouse model of allergic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Rask, C; Brimnes, J; Lund, K

    2010-06-01

    Current day practice of sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) includes varying modalities of treatment that differ with regard to formulation, dosing and administration regimens. The aim of this study was to explore the importance of the dosing intervals in SLIT. The immunological effect of increased SLIT dosing frequency was tested in a mouse model of allergic inflammation. Mice sensitized to Phleum pratense (Phl p) were SLIT-treated with the same weekly cumulative dose administered with different administration frequencies. A SLIT sham-treated group was also included. All mice were challenged intra-nasally with Phl p extract following SLIT. Local and systemic cytokine production, eosinophil infiltration into airways and the development of Phl p-specific antibody responses were determined. Higher frequency of sublingual administration of allergen extract has a profound positive impact on the effect of SLIT, measured as induction of IgG and IgA antibodies. The once daily SLIT was the only treatment regimen being able to reduce all systemic Th2 cytokines and systemic IgE antibody responses when compared to sham-treated mice after the intra-nasal challenge period. The group receiving SLIT with the highest frequency of administration had the most pronounced effect of the treatment. In the same group, there was also a higher degree of protection against increase in IgE antibody levels after intra-nasal challenge with the allergen, our data demonstrate that a once daily regimen is more efficacious than regimens where SLIT, with the same weekly cumulative allergen dose, is administered with longer intervals but higher doses.

  19. A comparative analysis of symptom and medication scoring methods used in clinical trials of sublingual immunotherapy for seasonal allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Calderon, M A; Bernstein, D I; Blaiss, M; Andersen, J S; Nolte, H

    2014-10-01

    Symptom and medication use are the key outcomes for assessing the efficacy of subcutaneous (SCIT) and sublingual allergen immunotherapy (SLIT). Our objective was to explore the similarities and differences between existing scoring mechanisms used in clinical trials of SLIT for seasonal allergens and characterize the impact that such differences may have on efficacy reporting. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials investigating the efficacy of SLIT for seasonal allergic rhinitis (2009-2013) were selected for review. Simulated and published data were used to demonstrate differences in scoring methods. Symptom and medication scoring methods across trials, although all designed to achieve the same objective, included important differences. The maximum daily symptom score (DSS) can vary widely depending on the number of symptoms assessed, and terminology of symptoms is not consistent. Similarly, daily medication scoring (DMS) methods differ greatly among studies and are dependent on medications allowed and weighting of scores assigned to each medication. When published DSS and DMS scores were used to calculate simulated daily combined scores (DCSs) based on various published methods, changes from placebo ranged from 19% to 29% when assuming all variables other than the DSS and DMS methods were equal. Variations in trial design, analysis, and seasonal characteristics also have effects on symptom and medication scoring outcomes. We identified multiple differences in trial scoring methods and design that make comparison among trials difficult. Symptom, medication, or combined scores cannot be indirectly compared among trials without taking the methods of scoring and other trial differences into account.

  20. Clinical validation of sublingual formulations of Immunoxel (Dzherelo) as an adjuvant immunotherapy in treatment of TB patients.

    PubMed

    Efremenko, Yuri V; Arjanova, Olga V; Prihoda, Natalia D; Yurchenko, Larisa V; Sokolenko, Nina I; Mospan, Igor V; Pylypchuk, Volodymyr S; Rowe, John; Jirathitikal, Vichai; Bourinbaiar, Aldar S; Kutsyna, Galyna A

    2012-03-01

    Immunoxel (Dzherelo) is a water-alcohol extract of medicinal plants used in Ukraine as an adjunct immunotherapy to TB and HIV therapy. Four types of solid sublingual formulations of Immunoxel were made: sugar dragées, sugar-coated pills, gelatin pastilles and dried-honey lozenges. They were administered once-daily along with TB drugs. After 1 month, 84.1% of TB patients became sputum-negative with rates in individual groups of 89.5, 70, 76.9 and 100%, respectively. The conversion rate was independent of bodyweight, age, gender, differences in chemotherapy regimens or whether subjects had newly diagnosed TB, re-treated TB, multidrug-resistant TB or TB with HIV coinfection. Patients experienced earlier clinical improvement, faster defervescence, weight gain, a higher hemoglobin content and reduced inflammation as evidenced by lower leukocyte counts and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. By contrast, in the placebo group, only 19% of patients had converted. These findings imply that mucosal delivery of solid Immunoxel is equivalent to the original liquid formula given per os twice-daily for 2-4 months.

  1. Hot Topics in Primary Care: Sublingual Immunotherapy: A Guide for Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Meltzer, Eli O

    2017-04-01

    Allergen immunotherapy (AIT), the only potential disease-modifying treatment for allergic disease, has been used for more than a century. Hankin et al showed significant reduction in pharmacy, outpatient, and inpatient resources in the 6 months following vs the 6 months preceding AIT in Medicaid-enrolled children with allergic rhinitis (AR). A 2013 analysis showed sustained cost reduction over 18 months in patients with AR treated with AIT compared with matched control subjects not treated with AIT.

  2. Immunological effects of sublingual immunotherapy: clinical efficacy is associated with modulation of programmed cell death ligand 1, IL-10, and IgG4.

    PubMed

    Piconi, Stefania; Trabattoni, Daria; Rainone, Veronica; Borgonovo, Linda; Passerini, Simone; Rizzardini, Giuliano; Frati, Franco; Iemoli, Enrico; Clerici, Mario

    2010-12-15

    Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) is an alternate route of administration of allergen-specific immunotherapy with an improved safety profile; to clarify the immune mechanisms elicited by this therapy, we analyzed the clinical and immunologic effects of SLIT in patients with a clinical history of ragweed sensitization. To analyze possible difference among immunotherapeutic protocols, we also compared patients receiving preseasonal, seasonal, or prolonged sublingual therapy (≥ 3 y); patients receiving symptomatic therapy alone were enrolled as well in the study. Clinical and immunological parameters were measured twice in and out of the pollination period. Clinical benefits, as measured by the visual analog scale for symptoms and for use of drugs, were evident in all three groups of individuals receiving immunotherapy, but were significantly better in patients undergoing prolonged SLIT. Immunologically, SLIT resulted in increased IL-10 production, programmed cell death ligand 1 expression, and concentration of allergen-specific IgG4, as well as in the reduction of CD80 and CD86 expression and IL-4 production. SLIT, thus, is associated with modulation of programmed cell death ligand 1 expression and IL-10 synthesis and favors the production of allergen-specific IgG4. These effects are evident from the first pollen season, independently from therapeutic regimen (preseasonal or seasonal) even if a prolonged treatment is necessary to obtain full clinical efficacy. A more detailed understanding of the interaction of allergen and APCs within the oral mucosa will allow improved targeting of allergy vaccine.

  3. Evaluation of a sublingual immunotherapy solution in olive-induced respiratory allergy in Jordan: a retrospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Asad, Khaled; Al-Nazer, Sayed; Al-Faqih, Anan; Hashem, Mohammad Jamil

    2017-01-01

    Background Olive pollen is an important cause of respiratory allergy in the Middle East. In this study, the clinical characteristics of adults and children with confirmed allergic rhinitis (AR; with or without asthma) in Jordan were described, and the use of sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) in a real-life clinical setting was assessed. Methods This retrospective observational study evaluated the clinical features of olive-induced allergy and the use of an SLIT solution of standardized extracts toward Ole e 1 given in a pre- and coseasonal scheme with a daily dose of 300 index of reactivity for two consecutive seasons. Inclusion criteria were as follows: ≥5 years of age, AR, proven olive sensitization, and at least 2 years follow-up after SLIT initiation. The following data were recorded at SLIT initiation: clinical characteristics, rhinitis and asthma symptom scores, and concomitant symptomatic medications. During follow-up and at the end of each season, the following data were recorded: symptom progression/scores, any changes to symptomatic medications, and treatment compliance. The secondary objective was to determine any effect on quality of life, use of concomitant AR medications, and treatment compliance. Results Eighty-six patients with seasonal AR were included in this analysis (52.3% with coexisting asthma). Between the initiation of treatment and the end of second pollen season, symptoms of AR and asthma were decreased by 79.5% and 41.7%, respectively, with an improvement in quality of life score in 71.5% of the patients (P<0.0001 for all). Physicians reported that after 2 years of SLIT, there was an improvement in the symptoms of both AR (95.2%) and asthma (93.3%), with 98.8% of the patients showing good treatment compliance. A reduction in symptomatic medications was also found. SLIT was well tolerated with no systemic reactions being reported. Conclusion In children and adults with olive-associated respiratory allergy in Jordan, the use of a pre- and

  4. A meta-analysis of sublingual allergen immunotherapy and pharmacotherapy in pollen-induced seasonal allergic rhinoconjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The capacity of sublingual allergen immunotherapy (SLIT) to provide effective symptom relief in pollen-induced seasonal allergic rhinitis is often questioned, despite evidence of clinical efficacy from meta-analyses and well-powered, double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized clinical trials. In the absence of direct, head-to-head, comparative trials of SLIT and symptomatic medication, only indirect comparisons are possible. Methods We performed a meta-analysis of classes of products (second-generation H1-antihistamines, nasal corticosteroids and grass pollen SLIT tablet formulations) and single products (the azelastine-fluticasone combination MP29-02, and the leukotriene receptor antagonist montelukast) for the treatment of seasonal allergic rhinitis in adults, adolescents and/or children. We searched the literature for large (n >100 in the smallest treatment arm) double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized clinical trials. For each drug or drug class, we performed a meta-analysis of the effect on symptom scores. For each selected trial, we calculated the relative clinical impact (according to a previously published method) on the basis of the reported post-treatment or season-long nasal or total symptom scores: 100 × (scorePlacebo - scoreActive)/scorePlacebo. Results Twenty-eight publications on symptomatic medication trials and ten on SLIT trials met our selection criteria (total number of patients: n = 21,223). The Hedges' g values from the meta-analyses confirmed the presence of a treatment effect for all drug classes. In an indirect comparison, the weighted mean (range) relative clinical impacts were -29.6% (-23% to -37%) for five-grass pollen SLIT tablets, -19.2% (-6% to -29%) for timothy pollen SLIT tablets, -23.5% (-7% to -54%) for nasal corticosteroids, -17.1% (-15% to -20%) for MP29-02, -15.0% (-3% to -26%) for H1-antihistamines and -6.5% (-3% to -10%) for montelukast. Conclusions In an indirect comparison, grass pollen SLIT tablets had

  5. Efficacy of sublingual immunotherapy in children with asthma and rhinitis: a double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Bahçeciler, N N; Işik, U; Barlan, I B; Başaran, M M

    2001-07-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of specific sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT), we enrolled 15 children with asthma and rhinitis (7 girls, 8 boys, mean +/- SD age of 11.7 +/- 3.3) allergic to house dust mite (HDM) into a double-blind, placebo-controlled study. After a run-in period, patients were randomized to receive either placebo (n = 7) or SLIT (n = 8) with a standardized Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (D. pteronyssinus) + Dermatophagoides farinea (D. farinea) 50/50 extract. They received increasing doses up to 100 index units of reactivity (IR) every day for 4 weeks, then 100 IR/day for another 4 weeks, followed by maintenance therapy consisting of 20 drops 2 times a week for 4 months. Efficacy was assessed at the end of 6 months of therapy according to symptom and medication scores, serum total IgE levels, results of lung function tests, methacholine provocation tests, and skin prick tests. Daily means for the asthma score and use of inhaled beta-2-mimetics decreased significantly in the SLIT group (P = 0.05, P = 0.028, respectively), whereas no such difference was observed in the placebo group. At the end of follow-up, mean daily doses of intranasal steroids needed for control of rhinitis symptoms decreased significantly in the SLIT group (P = 0.04). Baseline skin sensitivity to D. pteronyssinus and D. farinea was not significantly different between in the two groups, whereas end-point wheal diameter obtained with D. pteronyssinus extract was significantly less in the SLIT vs. the placebo group (P = 0.026). At the end of 6 months, peak expiratory flow (PEF) values in the placebo group was significantly lower than in the SLIT group (P = 0.049). Throughout the treatment period, the SLIT group was found to have less asthma exacerbations than the placebo group (P = 0.007). The provocation concentration causing a 20% drop in forced expired volume in 1 sec did not change throughout the treatment period in either groups. None of the patients reported local or systemic side

  6. Immunotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... boost your immune system to work better against cancer. Immunotherapy Can Cause Side Effects Immunotherapy can cause side ... work. Related Resources Targeted Therapy Biological Therapies for Cancer Immunotherapy: Using the Immune System to Treat Cancer Posted: ...

  7. Two year follow-up of immunological response in mite-allergic children treated with sublingual immunotherapy. Comparison with subcutaneous administration.

    PubMed

    Antúnez, Cristina; Mayorga, Cristobalina; Corzo, José Luis; Jurado, Antonio; Torres, María José

    2008-05-01

    Although the efficacy of allergen-specific sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) is now accepted, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Such mechanisms are better documented in the case of subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT). In order to understand the T-lymphocyte response in patients receiving SLIT, we compared children with respiratory disease monosensitized to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus receiving SLIT or SCIT over a 2-yr period. Peripheral blood was obtained before beginning immunotherapy, and after 3 months, 1 yr and 2 yr. Total IgE, specific IgE and IgG4 to D. pteronyssinus were determined in serum. T-cell markers (CD3, CD4, CD8, CD25) and intracellular cytokine production (TNF-alpha, IL-2, IL-4 and IFN-gamma) were determined in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) by flow cytometry. No differences between SCIT and SLIT were detected in the clinical variables or in the subjective evaluation. Although an increase in specific IgE and IgG4 was only detected in SCIT, a significant decrease in the specific IgE/IgG4 ratio was found in both groups. SCIT and SLIT experienced an increase in the CD4/CD8 ratio over time, but an increase in the CD4(+)CD25(+) and a decrease in the CD8(+)CD25(+) subsets were only found with SCIT. A slight shift from a Th2 to a Th1 pattern, measured by the IFN-gamma/IL-4 ratio, was only detected in the CD4 T cells with SCIT. A decrease in both groups was found in TNF-alpha and IL-2 production over time. Children with respiratory allergic diseases receiving SCIT or SLIT had a different immunologic response in peripheral blood during treatment, though the clinical improvement was similar. Whether SLIT induces a mucosal protective response should be studied.

  8. Long-term sublingual immunotherapy for Japanese cedar pollinosis and the levels of IL-17A and complement components 3a and 5a.

    PubMed

    Sakashita, Masafumi; Yamada, Takechiyo; Imoto, Yoshimasa; Hirota, Tomomitsu; Tamari, Mayumi; Ito, Yumi; Kubo, Seita; Osawa, Yoko; Takahashi, Noboru; Fujieda, Shigeharu

    2015-09-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy is the only treatment that can alter the natural course of allergic disease. We performed long-term sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) for patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis caused by Japanese cedar pollen (SAR-JCP), screened molecules as candidate biomarkers, and investigated serum IL-17A and complement components 3a (C3a) and C5a in order to evaluate whether these molecules show changes correlated to symptom scores. In this study, we found that the long-term SLIT reduced the serum levels of IL-17A and C3a and C5a. The levels of C3a in the patients significantly decreased from year 1 compared with those at the baseline, and their levels of IL-17A significantly decreased from year 2 compared with those at baseline. The levels of IL-17A, C3a, and C5a at year 4 of SLIT were significantly lower than not only those at baseline, but also those at year 1. A significant positive correlation was found between the symptom medication scores and the levels of IL-17A at year 4. The symptom medication scores in the group in which IL-17A levels decreased at year 4 were significantly lower than those in the group without such a decrease. The serum level of IL-17A might prove useful as a biological parameter to ascertain the effectiveness of SLIT for patients with SAR-JCP. It is necessary to produce new therapeutics for non-responders in whom serum IL-17A levels are still higher against long-term SLIT.

  9. Sublingual Immunotherapy with a Five-Grass Pollen Tablet in Adult Patients with Allergic Rhinitis: An Open, Prospective, Noninterventional, Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Pfaar, Oliver; Richter, Heinz-Gerd; Klimek, Ludger; Sieber, Jochen; Hadler, Meike; Karagiannis, Efstrathios

    2015-01-01

    Background. Although the safety and efficacy of sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) with a five-grass pollen tablet have been demonstrated in randomized clinical trials (RCTs), these outcomes must always be evaluated in real-life medical practice. Methods. In a prospective, open-label, noninterventional, “real-life” study in Germany, we evaluated the safety, tolerability, and effectiveness of SLIT with a five-grass pollen tablet in adults with grass-pollen-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis. Results. 808 adults were enrolled between September 2008 and December 2009. 35.3% of the participants experienced at least one adverse drug reaction (ADR), the most common of which were mild-to-moderate gastrointestinal and respiratory disorders. Serious ADRs considered causally related to SLIT treatment occurred in four patients. Overall, the five-grass pollen tablet was considered to have good or very good tolerability by most investigators and patients. Treatment was associated with the relief of nasal, ocular, and bronchial symptoms and decreased symptomatic medication use. However, interpretation of clinical improvements was limited by lower atmospheric grass pollen levels during the study season (relative to the preceding season). Conclusions. In a large population of patients treated in real-life medical practice, SLIT with a five-grass pollen tablet was safe and well tolerated. The patient-reported symptom relief suggests that SLIT was associated with clinical benefits. PMID:26351635

  10. 60 Tear IFN-G is Increased After Sublingual Immunotherapy in Allergic Conjunctivitis Patients and Correlates With Clinical Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar-Velazquez, Gustavo; Santacruz, Concepcion; Hernandez, Pedro M.; Chavez, Raul; Ayala-Balboa, Julio; Estrada-Parra, Sergio; Perez-Tapia, Mayra; Jiménez-Martínez, Maria C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite success of sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) in the treatment of allergy diseases, more research is needed related to ocular allergy. Thus, the aim of this work was to analyze the ocular microenvironment provided by tear cytokines in allergic conjunctivitis (AC) patients treated with SLIT and to correlate tear and serum cytokines with ocular findings. Methods 19 AC-patients were included in this study. AC diagnosis was based on a clinical history and full ophthalmologic examination according to the diagnosis standards of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. Routine immunological studies were performed to corroborate allergic status Negative coproparasitoscopic results were documented. This study was approved by Scientific and Ethics Committees if Institute of Ophthalmology “Conde de la Valenciana,” Mexico City an all subjects gave their informed consent to obtain samples. Tear and serum samples were collected to determine cytokines IL2, IL-4, IL-5, IFN-g, TNF-a, IL-10 by cytometric bead arrays (CBA), following manufacturer's instructions. Results After 6 months of treatment with SLIT we observed significant higher IFN-g concentration, without significant changes in IL2, IL4, IL5, TNFa or IL10. We observed significant clinical improvement since 3 months of treatment and it was maintained until the end of 6 months. Clinical improvement correlated with IFN-g concentration. Conclusions Clinical outcome in AC-patients treated with SLIT could be tear IFN-g dependent.

  11. Evaluation of stability of allergen extracts for sublingual immunotherapy during transport under unfavourable temperature conditions with an innovative thermal insulating packaging.

    PubMed

    Puccinelli, P; Natoli, V; Dell'albani, I; Scurati, S; Incorvaia, C; Barbieri, S; Masieri, S; Frati, F

    2013-10-01

    Many pharmaceutical and biotechnological products are temperature-sensitive and should normally be kept at a controlled temperature, particularly during transport, in order to prevent the loss of their stability and activity. Therefore, stability studies should be performed for temperature-sensitive products, considering product characteristics, typical environmental conditions, and anticipating environmental extremes that may occur during product transport in a specific country. Staloral products for sublingual immunotherapy are temperature sensitive and are labelled for maintenance under refrigerated conditions (2-8°C). Given the peculiar climatic context of Italy and the great temperature fluctuations that may occur during transport, this study was aimed at evaluating the impact of a new engineered thermal insulating packaging for Staloral. In particular, the purpose was to assess whether the new packaging could create a container condition able to preserve the stability and immunological activity of the product during the transport phase throughout Italy. The results showed that the range of temperatures that can affect the product, in the area surrounding the product packaging, may reach a peak of 63°C during transport under the most unfavourable climatic conditions, i.e. in a non-refrigerated van during the summer season, from the site of production in France to the patient's house in Catania, the city with the highest temperatures in Italy. However, the highest temperature reached inside the vaccine did not exceed 45°C over a period of about 2 h. The ELISA inhibition test on samples subjected to the extreme temperature conditions previously defined (45°C) showed an immunological activity higher than 75% of that initially measured and was comparable to those obtained with samples stored at controlled temperature (5°C). This means that, even in the worst case scenario, the structure of the allergen extracts is not influenced and the vaccine potency is

  12. Clinical outcome and IL-17, IL-23, IL-27 and FOXP3 expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of pollen-allergic children during sublingual immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, Kaisa; Valovirta, Erkka; Savolainen, Johannes

    2010-02-01

    Induction of allergen-specific, tolerogenic, IL-10 and/or TGF-β-producing T-regulatory (Treg) cells that express transcription factor FOXP3 is considered as one of the key mechanisms of allergen-specific immunotherapy. However, little is known of the induction of FOXP3 expression in children during sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT). Recently, also, a novel subgroup of T-helper (Th) cells, the Th17 cells, secreting predominantly IL-17 (IL-17A), was identified. The expressions of IL-17 or the Th17-regulating cytokines IL-23 and IL-27 during SLIT are currently completely unexplored. This randomized, placebo-controlled dose-response study was performed to analyze the effects of SLIT on FOXP3, IL-17, IL-23, and IL-27 expressions in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of children with allergic rhinitis and their associations with clinical outcome. Thirty children were included: ten received SLIT with a glycerinated mixture of birch, hazel and alder with a cumulative weekly dose of 24,000 SQ-U, 10 with dose 200,000 SQ-U/wk, and ten received placebo. Cytokine and FOXP3 mRNA expressions in allergen-, purified protein derivative-stimulated and non-stimulated PBMC were determined at 0, 1 and 2 yr of SLIT by real-time RT-PCR (TaqMan). Symptoms and medications were recorded using diary cards. Allergen-induced IL-17 mRNA expression was significantly increased in the study subjects with elevated combined Symptom Medication Score (SMS) after 2 yr. There was also a significant positive correlation between the allergen-induced IL-17 and SMS in whole study group (r = 0.38, p = 0.039) and especially the 200,000 SQ-U dose-treated group (r = 0.74, p = 0.027) at 2 yr. Allergen-induced FOXP3 mRNA expression was significantly increased in the 200,000 SQ-U dose-treated children after two study years as compared with baseline (p = 0.016) and placebo-treated children (p = 0.028). The changes in FOXP3 mRNA expression positively correlated with IL-10 and TGF-β mRNAs during SLIT in whole

  13. FoxP3 Tregs Response to Sublingual Allergen Specific Immunotherapy in Children Depends on the Manifestation of Allergy.

    PubMed

    Stelmaszczyk-Emmel, Anna; Zawadzka-Krajewska, Anna; Głodkowska-Mrówka, Eliza; Demkow, Urszula

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decades allergic diseases has become a major health problem worldwide. The only specific treatment to date is allergen specific immunotherapy (ASIT). Although it was shown that ASIT generates allergen-tolerant T cells, detailed mechanism underlying its activity is still unclear and there is no reliable method to monitor its effectiveness. The aim of our study was to evaluate ASIT influence on the frequency of forkhead box P3 (FoxP3) Tregs in allergic children with various clinical manifestations. The relative number of FoxP3 Tregs in 32 blood samples from allergic children at baseline and/or after 1 year of ASIT was assessed by flow cytometry. In the entire studied group, the percentage of FoxP3 Tregs did not increase 1 year after ASIT. Nevertheless, the percentage of FoxP3 Tregs after ASIT significantly increased in children with respiratory allergy (conjunctivitis, asthma, and rhinitis) coexisting with nonrespiratory manifestations (food allergy and/or atopic dermatitis), whereas, in patients with respiratory allergy only, the percentage of FoxP3 Tregs decreased. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report showing various differential FoxP3 Tregs response to ASIT in allergic children. FoxP3 Tregs number could be useful in treatment monitoring. Further studies are warranted to confirm these observations.

  14. Sublingual vaccines based on wild-type recombinant allergens.

    PubMed

    Van Overtvelt, L; Razafindratsita, A; St-Lu, N; Didierlaurent, A; Batard, Th; Lombardi, V; Martin, E; Moingeon, Ph

    2006-09-01

    Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) represents a non invasive alternative to subcutaneous immunotherapy in order to treat type I allergies. Vaccines based on recombinant allergens expressed in a native (i.e. wild-type) configuration, formulated with ad hoc adjuvants designed to target Langerhans cells in the sublingual mucosa should allow to induce allergen-specific regulatory T cells. In this context, we have developed animal and human preclinical models to test the capacity of candidate vaccines to modulate selectively allergen-specific T helper lymphocyte polarization following sublingual vaccination.

  15. Increase of regulatory T cells and the ratio of specific IgE to total IgE are candidates for response monitoring or prognostic biomarkers in 2-year sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) for Japanese cedar pollinosis.

    PubMed

    Fujimura, Takashi; Yonekura, Syuji; Horiguchi, Shigetoshi; Taniguchi, Yuriko; Saito, Akemi; Yasueda, Hiroshi; Inamine, Ayako; Nakayama, Toshinori; Takemori, Toshitada; Taniguchi, Masaru; Sakaguchi, Masahiro; Okamoto, Yoshitaka

    2011-04-01

    The aims of this study were to examine the therapeutic effects of sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) and to identify potential biomarkers that would predict the therapeutic response in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. The trial was carried out over two pollinosis seasons in 2007 and 2008. Carry-over therapeutic effects were analyzed in 2009. SLIT significantly ameliorated the symptoms of pollinosis during the 2008 and 2009 pollen seasons. Cry j 1-specific cytokine production in a subgroup of patients with mild disease in the SLIT group was significantly attenuated. The ratio of specific IgE to total IgE before treatment correlated with the symptom-medication score in the SLIT group in 2008. Patients with increased Cry j 1-iTreg in the SLIT group had significantly improved QOL and QOL-symptom scores. In summary, the specific IgE to total IgE ratio and upregulation of Cry j 1-iTreg are candidates for biomarker of the clinical response to SLIT.

  16. Oral lyophilisate and food immunotherapy: from research to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Tabar, A I

    2008-01-01

    Thanks to its excellent safety profile, sublingual immunotherapy has served as a basis for launching two important lines of research in current allergology: sublingual immunotherapy with pharmaceutical registry (oral lyophilizates or tablets), and sublingual immunotherapy with food. At present, clinical trials are being conducted which use rapid dissolution oral lyophilizates. The results of the clinical trials carried out in large patient groups and based on a double-blind methodological design have allowed pharmaceutical registry of this form of treatment, with the therapeutic indications of rhinitis and allergy to grasses. Phleum lyophilizate indicated for the treatment of rhinoconjunctivitis will be marketed in Spain in the coming months. In parallel to development of the sublingual route, advances in our knowledge of pollen allergy and its relationship to plant food allergies have facilitated the conducting of studies involving sublingual immunotherapy for allergy to kiwifruit, hazelnut and peach - thus giving rise to promising future perspectives for affected patients.

  17. Sublingual drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Tarun; Jasti, Bhaskara; Li, Xiaoling

    2008-01-01

    The sublingual route is one of the early modes of administration for systemic drug delivery. This route avoids first-pass metabolism and affords quick drug entry into the systemic circulation. Attempts have been made to deliver various pharmacologically active agents, such as cardiovascular drugs, analgesics, and peptides, across the sublingual mucosa. In this review, the anatomical structure, blood supply, biochemical composition, transport pathways, permeation enhancement strategies, in vitro/in vivo models, and clinical investigations for the sublingual route of drug delivery is discussed.

  18. Lactic acid bacteria as adjuvants for sublingual allergy vaccines.

    PubMed

    Van Overtvelt, Laurence; Moussu, Helene; Horiot, Stéphane; Samson, Sandrine; Lombardi, Vincent; Mascarell, Laurent; van de Moer, Ariane; Bourdet-Sicard, Raphaëlle; Moingeon, Philippe

    2010-04-09

    We compared immunomodulatory properties of 11 strains of lactic acid bacteria as well as their capacity to enhance sublingual immunotherapy efficacy in a murine asthma model. Two types of bacterial strains were identified, including: (i) potent inducers of IL-12p70 and IL-10 in dendritic cells, supporting IFN-gamma and IL-10 production in CD4+ T cells such as Lactobacillus helveticus; (ii) pure Th1 inducers such as L. casei. Sublingual administration in ovalbumin-sensitized mice of L. helveticus, but not L. casei, reduced airways hyperresponsiveness, bronchial inflammation and proliferation of specific T cells in cervical lymph nodes. Thus, probiotics acting as a Th1/possibly Treg, but not Th1 adjuvant, potentiate tolerance induction via the sublingual route.

  19. Grass pollen immunotherapy: where are we now.

    PubMed

    Würtzen, Peter A; Gupta, Shashank; Brand, Stephanie; Andersen, Peter S

    2016-01-01

    During allergen immunotherapy (AIT), the allergic patient is exposed to the disease-inducing antigens (allergens) in order to induce clinical and immunological tolerance and obtain disease modification. Large trials of grass AIT with highly standardized subcutaneous and sublingual tablet vaccines have been conducted to document the clinical effect. Induction of blocking antibodies as well as changes in the balance between T-cell phenotypes, including induction of regulatory T-cell subtypes, have been demonstrated for both treatment types. These observations increase the understanding of the immunological mechanism behind the clinical effect and may make it possible to use the immunological changes as biomarkers of clinical effect. The current review describes the recent mechanistic findings for subcutaneous immunotherapy and sublingual immunotherapy/tablet treatment and discusses how the observed immunological changes translate into a scientific foundation for the observed clinical effects of grass pollen immunotherapy and lead to new treatment strategies for grass AIT.

  20. Requirements for acquiring a high-quality house dust mite extract for allergen immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Frati, Franco; Incorvaia, Cristoforo; David, Marie; Scurati, Silvia; Seta, Simona; Padua, Guglielmo; Cattaneo, Eleonora; Cavaliere, Carlo; Di Rienzo, Alessia; Dell’Albani, Ilaria; Puccinelli, Paola

    2012-01-01

    The house dust mite is a major cause of respiratory allergy worldwide. The management of mite allergy is based on avoidance measures, drug treatment, and allergen immunotherapy, but only allergen immunotherapy is able to modify the natural history of the disease. Injectable subcutaneous immunotherapy was introduced a century ago, while sublingual immunotherapy was proposed in the 1980s and emerged in the ensuing years as an effective and safe option to subcutaneous immunotherapy. However, the quality of the extracts to be used in allergen immunotherapy is crucial for the success of treatment. The mite extract for sublingual immunotherapy known as Staloral 300 was developed to offer optimal characteristics concerning the mite culture medium, standardization, and allergen dose. Double-blind, placebo-controlled trials with Staloral 300 have provided a substantial part of the clinical evidence analyzed in a meta-analysis of the efficacy of allergen immunotherapy in mite-induced rhinitis and asthma. Safety and tolerability are very good, mild local reactions in the mouth being the most common side effect. This makes it feasible to carry out sublingual immunotherapy for the 3–5-year duration needed to achieve long-lasting tolerance to the specific allergen. The performance of Staloral 300 may provide optimal conditions for an effective and safe sublingual immunotherapy in patients with mite-induced respiratory allergy. PMID:22654506

  1. Allergy immunotherapy: the future of allergy treatment.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Jørgen Nedergaard; Broge, Louise; Jacobi, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Allergic respiratory disease represents a significant and expanding health problem worldwide. Allergic symptoms, such as asthma and hay fever, cause sleep impairment and reduce school and work performance. The cost to society is substantial. Allergen avoidance and pharmacotherapy cannot control the disease. Only allergy immunotherapy has disease-modifying potential and should be included in optimal treatment strategies. Allergy immunotherapy was first administered as subcutaneous injections and has been practiced for the past 100 years or so. Recently, tablet-based sublingual allergy immunotherapy (SLIT) was introduced with comprehensive clinical documentation. SLIT tablets represent a more patient-friendly concept because they can be used for self-treatment at home.

  2. Immunotherapy for food allergies: a myth or a reality?

    PubMed

    Praticò, Andrea D; Leonardi, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    Food allergy is a worldwide issue, with an estimated prevalence of 2-10%. An effective treatment is not available for people affected and the only management is the avoidance of the allergen. Oral immunotherapy and sublingual immunotherapy have been tested by several authors, in particular for milk, egg and peanuts allergy, with significant results in term of desensitization induction. The achievement of tolerance is by the contrary doubtful, with different results obtained. In this review, we reviewed protocols of oral and sublingual immunotherapy for food allergy published in literature, mainly against milk, egg and peanut. At present, immunotherapy does not represent the gold standard in the treatment of food allergy, even if it can desensitize patients.

  3. Immunotherapy in asthma.

    PubMed

    Warrington, Richard

    2010-09-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways in which many cells and cellular elements play a role. Chronic inflammation is associated with airway hyper-responsiveness that leads to recurrent episodes of wheezing, breathlessness, chest tightness and coughing, as well as variable airflow obstruction within the lung. With time, such airflow obstruction may become permanent due to remodeling. It has been treated for more than 100 years by subcutaneous immunotherapy with allergen extracts but in recent years, other forms and types of immunotherapy have been introduced. Perhaps the most successful of these to date, is sublingual immunotherapy, which has attained significant usage in European countries but has yet to make inroads into clinical practice in North America. Other mechanisms to modify the inflammatory responses of asthma have included immunotherapy with recombinant allergens, the use of allergen peptides targeting antigen-specific T cells and the administration of Toll-like receptor agonists coupled to allergen proteins. As the inflammatory responses in asthma frequently involve IgE, a modified monoclonal antibody to IgE and interfering with its binding to the IgE receptor have gained acceptance for treating severe allergic asthma. Other monoclonal antibodies or recombinant receptor antagonists are being assessed for their ability to block other contributors to the inflammatory response. Finally, attempts have been made to generate autoantibody responses to cytokines implicated in asthma. Most of these therapies aim to modify or inhibit the so-called Th 2 immune response, which is implicated in many forms of asthma, or to inhibit cytokines involved in these responses. However, an added benefit of classical immunotherapy seems to be the ability to prevent the allergic progression to new sensitivities and new forms of allergic disease.

  4. Specific immunotherapy in children.

    PubMed

    Bufe, A; Roberts, G

    2011-09-01

    Subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) with allergen extracts in children with allergic rhinitis, with or without co-seasonal asthma, has developed into a routine treatment although the scientific evidence for its efficacy is not as strong as for adults. In the hands of experienced allergists, this treatment has been proven to be safe. The development of allergen tablets for sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) may open a new age of more convenient, safer SIT. In children, in particular, the evidence for the long-term efficacy of SLIT, its ability to prevent the development of asthma and polysensitization and its comparability to SCIT will be required before it will replace the traditional subcutaneous route. Issues of compliance represent an important drawback of SLIT. We need ways of improving this. Treatment of asthma by immunotherapy is still restricted to clearly defined patients with mild to moderate asthma with symptoms that are related to the specific allergen sensitization. In these patients, symptoms and use of anti-inflammatory therapy can be reduced by SIT.

  5. Induction of tolerance via the sublingual route: mechanisms and applications.

    PubMed

    Moingeon, Philippe; Mascarell, Laurent

    2012-01-01

    The clinical efficacy of sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) with natural allergen extracts has been established in IgE-dependent respiratory allergies to grass or tree pollens, as well as house dust mites. Sublingual vaccines have an excellent safety record, documented with approximately 2 billion doses administered, as of today, in humans. The oral immune system comprises various antigen-presenting cells, including Langerhans cells, as well as myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (DCs) with a distinct localisation in the mucosa, along the lamina propria and in subepithelial tissues, respectively. In the absence of danger signals, all these DC subsets are tolerogenic in that they support the differentiation of Th1- and IL10-producing regulatory CD4(+) T cells. Oral tissues contain limited numbers of mast cells and eosinophils, mostly located in submucosal areas, thereby explaining the good safety profile of SLIT. Resident oral Th1, Th2, and Th17 CD4(+) T cells are located along the lamina propria, likely representing a defence mechanism against infectious pathogens. Second-generation sublingual vaccines are being developed, based upon recombinant allergens expressed in a native conformation, possibly formulated with Th1/T reg adjuvants and/or mucoadhesive particulate vector systems specifically designed to target oral dendritic cells.

  6. Induction of Tolerance via the Sublingual Route: Mechanisms and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Moingeon, Philippe; Mascarell, Laurent

    2012-01-01

    The clinical efficacy of sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) with natural allergen extracts has been established in IgE-dependent respiratory allergies to grass or tree pollens, as well as house dust mites. Sublingual vaccines have an excellent safety record, documented with approximately 2 billion doses administered, as of today, in humans. The oral immune system comprises various antigen-presenting cells, including Langerhans cells, as well as myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (DCs) with a distinct localisation in the mucosa, along the lamina propria and in subepithelial tissues, respectively. In the absence of danger signals, all these DC subsets are tolerogenic in that they support the differentiation of Th1- and IL10-producing regulatory CD4+ T cells. Oral tissues contain limited numbers of mast cells and eosinophils, mostly located in submucosal areas, thereby explaining the good safety profile of SLIT. Resident oral Th1, Th2, and Th17 CD4+ T cells are located along the lamina propria, likely representing a defence mechanism against infectious pathogens. Second-generation sublingual vaccines are being developed, based upon recombinant allergens expressed in a native conformation, possibly formulated with Th1/T reg adjuvants and/or mucoadhesive particulate vector systems specifically designed to target oral dendritic cells. PMID:22110534

  7. Allergen immunotherapy for allergic respiratory diseases.

    PubMed

    Cappella, Antonio; Durham, Stephen R

    2012-10-01

    Allergen specific immunotherapy involves the repeated administration of allergen products in order to induce clinical and immunologic tolerance to the offending allergen. Immunotherapy is the only etiology-based treatment that has the potential for disease modification, as reflected by longterm remission following its discontinuation and possibly prevention of disease progression and onset of new allergic sensitizations. Whereas subcutaneous immunotherapy is of proven value in allergic rhinitis and asthma there is a risk of untoward side effects including rarely anaphylaxis. Recently the sublingual route has emerged as an effective and safer alternative. Whereas the efficacy of SLIT in seasonal allergy is now well-documented in adults and children, the available data for perennial allergies and asthma is less reliable and particularly lacking in children. This review evaluates the efficacy, safety and longterm benefits of SCIT and SLIT and highlights new findings regarding mechanisms, potential biomarkers and recent novel approaches for allergen immunotherapy.

  8. Allergen immunotherapy for allergic respiratory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cappella, Antonio; Durham, Stephen R.

    2012-01-01

    Allergen specific immunotherapy involves the repeated administration of allergen products in order to induce clinical and immunologic tolerance to the offending allergen. Immunotherapy is the only etiology-based treatment that has the potential for disease modification, as reflected by longterm remission following its discontinuation and possibly prevention of disease progression and onset of new allergic sensitizations. Whereas subcutaneous immunotherapy is of proven value in allergic rhinitis and asthma there is a risk of untoward side effects including rarely anaphylaxis. Recently the sublingual route has emerged as an effective and safer alternative. Whereas the efficacy of SLIT in seasonal allergy is now well-documented in adults and children, the available data for perennial allergies and asthma is less reliable and particularly lacking in children. This review evaluates the efficacy, safety and longterm benefits of SCIT and SLIT and highlights new findings regarding mechanisms, potential biomarkers and recent novel approaches for allergen immunotherapy. PMID:23095870

  9. Allergen immunotherapy and allergic rhinitis: false beliefs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Over the last 100 years, several persistent misconceptions or ‘false beliefs’ have built up around allergen immunotherapy and its use in allergic rhinitis. This is perhaps because enthusiastic physicians administered complex allergen extracts to a diverse population of patients suffering from heterogeneous atopic conditions. Here, we review evidence that counters seven of these ‘false beliefs.’ Discussion 1. The symptoms of allergic rhinitis can be more heterogeneous, more severe and more troublesome in everyday life than many physicians believe. Large-scale epidemiological surveys show that the majority of allergic rhinitis patients have at least one symptom severe enough to interfere with sleep quality, productivity and/or well-being. 2. Allergen immunotherapy is not necessarily suitable for all allergic rhinitis patients (notably those with mild symptoms). Recent evidence from double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trials suggests that the more severe the disease, the greater the treatment effect. 3. Allergen immunotherapy is often accused of lack of efficacy (relative to pharmacotherapy, for example). However, there are now many meta-analyses, systematic reviews and high-quality clinical trials that find overwhelmingly in favor of the efficacy of allergen immunotherapy (including sublingual formulations) in allergic rhinitis induced by pollen and, increasingly, other allergens. 4. Natural-exposure and challenge-chamber trials have shown that symptom relief may become apparent within months or even weeks of the initiation of allergen immunotherapy. 5. In pollen-induced allergic rhinitis, several years of subcutaneous or sublingual allergen immunotherapy are associated with sustained clinical efficacy after subsequent treatment cessation – confirming the disease-modifying nature of this therapy. 6. Most patients seeking treatment for allergic rhinitis are polysensitized, and allergen immunotherapy has proven efficacy in large

  10. A practical view of immunotherapy for food allergy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Food allergy is common and sometimes life threatening for Korean children. The current standard treatment of allergen avoidance and self-injectable epinephrine does not change the natural course of food allergy. Recently, oral, sublingual, and epicutaneous immunotherapies have been studied for their effectiveness against food allergy. While various rates of desensitization (36% to 100%) and tolerance (28% to 75%) have been induced by immunotherapies for food allergy, no single established protocol has been shown to be both effective and safe. In some studies, immunologic changes after immunotherapy for food allergy have been revealed. Adverse reactions to these immunotherapies have usually been localized, but severe systemic reactions have been observed in some cases. Although immunotherapy cannot be recommended for routine practice yet, results from recent studies demonstrate that immunotherapies are promising for the treatment of food allergy. PMID:26958062

  11. Cancer Immunotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    Immunotherapy is a cancer treatment that helps your immune system fight cancer. It is a type of biological therapy. Biological therapy uses substances ... t yet use immunotherapy as often as other cancer treatments, such as surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy. ...

  12. Novel routes for allergen immunotherapy: safety, efficacy and mode of action.

    PubMed

    Moingeon, Philippe; Mascarell, Laurent

    2012-02-01

    Allergen immunotherapy is the only curative treatment of IgE-mediated type I respiratory allergies. Subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) is used as a reference therapy and has transformed allergic treatments; it improves symptoms (asthma and rhinitis) as well as the quality of life of patients. SCIT requires repetitive administration and carries the risk of severe systemic adverse effects, including anaphylaxis. Sublingual immunotherapy is now a valid noninvasive alternative to SCIT, as a safe and efficacious treatment for respiratory allergies. In this article, we compare various routes of allergen immunotherapy, including SCIT and sublingual immunotherapy, as well as more exploratory routes currently under investigation (i.e., intralymphatic, epicutaneous, intranasal and oral). We discuss their respective advantages, as well as their foreseen modes of action.

  13. A European perspective on immunotherapy for food allergies.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Kirsten

    2012-05-01

    Food allergies are common, and frequently, the only treatment option is strict avoidance. Unfortunately, many patients accidentally ingest allergenic foods, which can result in severe anaphylactic reactions. Several immunotherapies are being developed for food allergies; these involve oral, sublingual, epicutaneous, or subcutaneous administration of small amounts of native or modified allergens to induce immune tolerance. Oral immunotherapy seems to be the most promising approach based on results from small uncontrolled and controlled studies. However, it is a challenge to compare results among immunotherapy trials because of differences in protocols. Studies conducted thus far have tested the most prevalent food allergens: it is not clear whether their results can be extended to other allergens. Sublingual administration of immunotherapy has shown some efficacy and fewer side effects than oral administration in some trials, yet neither approach can be recommended for routine practice. Controlled studies with larger numbers of subjects are needed to determine short- and long-term efficacy and side effects. In Europe immunotherapy trials for food allergies face many ethical and regulatory issues. Guidelines from the European Medicine Agency on the clinical development of products for specific immunotherapy of allergic diseases do not adequately address immunotherapy for food allergies, especially for therapies that orally administer native food or that include pediatric patients.

  14. What Is Cancer Immunotherapy?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Side Effects Treatment Types Immunotherapy What is cancer immunotherapy? Immunotherapy is treatment that uses certain parts of ... so that it will destroy them. Types of cancer immunotherapy The main types of immunotherapy now being used ...

  15. Immunologic evaluation of 24 month course of sublingual immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tari, M G; Mancino, M; Madonna, F; Buzzoni, L; Parmiani, S

    1994-01-01

    58 patients under 12 years of age, positive to mites (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and D. farinae) according to prick, in vitro specific IgE and challenge tests, suffering from asthma and rhinitis, have been randomly assigned on a double blind basis to receive per os either a biologically standardized extract of mites (active therapy TA = 30 patients) or a saline buffered solution (placebo TP = 28 patients). The serologic results are interesting. The specific IgE level differences of significance are, in comparison with the placebo group. In particular, we did observe the increase of the specific IgE level in the placebo group during the autumn, whereas after 12 months and after 24 months of active treatment there was a clear (p < 0.01) decline in serum specific IgE antibody. In the active group, there was a significant increase in IgG antibodies level after 12 and 24 months and a significant increase in IgG4 level after 24 months. In the placebo group, the level of IgG antibodies was unchanged. In the actively treated patients, a significant increase of CD8+ values and a significant reduction of the ratio CD4+/CD8+ was observed.

  16. Immunotherapy for food allergies in children.

    PubMed

    Martinolli, Francesco; Carraro, Silvia; Berardi, Mariangela; Ferraro, Valentina; Baraldi, Eugenio; Zanconato, Stefania

    2014-01-01

    Food allergy is an increasingly prevalent problem all over the world and especially in westernized countries, and there is an unmet medical need for an effective form of therapy. During childhood natural tolerance development is frequent, but some children with cow's milk or hen's egg allergy and the majority of children with peanut allergy will remain allergic until adulthood, limiting not only the diet of patients but also their quality of life. Within the last several years, the usefulness of immunotherapy for food allergies has been investigated in food allergic patients. Several food immunotherapies are being developed; these involve oral, sublingual, epicutaneous, or subcutaneous administration of small amounts of native or modified allergens to induce immune tolerance. The approach generally follows the same principles as immunotherapy of other allergic disorders and involves administering small increasing doses of food during an induction phase followed by a maintenance phase with regular intake of a maximum tolerated amount of food. Oral immunotherapy seems to be a promising approach for food allergic patients based on results from small uncontrolled and controlled studies. Diet containing heated milk and egg may represent an alternative approach to oral immunomodulation for cow's milk and egg allergic subjects. However, oral food immunotherapy remains an investigational treatment to be further studied before advancing into clinical practice. Additional bigger, multicentric and hopefully randomized-controlled studies must answer multiple questions including optimal dose, ideal duration of immunotherapy, degree of protection, efficacy for different ages, severity and type of food allergy responsive to treatment.

  17. A review of allergoid immunotherapy: is cat allergy a suitable target?

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Nhung T; Raskopf, Esther; Shah-Hosseini, Kija; Zadoyan, Gregor; Mösges, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    To modify the course of allergy, different types of specific allergen immunotherapy have been developed such as sublingual immunotherapy and subcutaneous immunotherapy with native allergens or subcutaneous immunotherapy with polymerized allergoids. However, the optimal specific immunotherapy, especially for cat allergy, remains undetermined. Few studies investigating immunotherapy in cat allergy have been published, and the risk of serious adverse reactions and systemic reactions has often been an important issue. Monomeric allergoids have lower allergenic potential while their immunogenicity remains constant, resulting in excellent safety with notable efficacy. Specific immunotherapy with monomeric allergoids could, therefore, be of high value, especially in cat allergy as well as other types of allergy, and bring relief to a great community of patients.

  18. Cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Manjili, Masoud H.; Payne, Kyle K.

    2012-01-01

    Cancers utilize multiple mechanisms to overcome immune responses. Emerging evidence suggest that immunotherapy of cancer should focus on inducing and re-programming cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems rather than focusing solely on T cells. Recently, we have shown that such a multifaceted approach can improve immunotherapy of breast cancer. PMID:22720242

  19. [Transoral approach for sublingual-plunging ranula].

    PubMed

    Schiel, S; Mayer, P; Ehrenfeld, M; Probst, F A

    2013-07-01

    The case of a 7-year-old boy suffering from progressive submental/submandibular swelling is reported. Following clinical and imaging diagnostics (MRI), the suspected diagnosis of a sublingual-plunging ranula was made. Surgery was performed with transoral excision of the sublingual gland in combination with excision of the ranula. Additional submandibular gland excision should be avoided.

  20. Cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Philip J

    2010-05-01

    The veterinary oncology profession is uniquely able to contribute to the many advances that are imminent in immunotherapy. However, what works in a mouse will often not reflect the outcome in human patients with cancer. Therefore, comparative immunotherapy studies using veterinary patients may be better able to bridge murine and human studies. Many cancers in dogs and cats seem to be stronger models for their counterpart human tumors than presently available murine model systems. This author looks forward to the time when immunotherapy plays a significant role in the treatment and/or prevention of cancer in human and veterinary patients.

  1. Treatment of respiratory allergy with allergy immunotherapy tablets.

    PubMed

    Bachert, C

    2011-07-01

    Allergy immunotherapy tablets (AIT) have expanded the treatment options for patients suffering from respiratory allergies. Efficacy is established in adults and children for two different commercially available grass AITs. The ALK grass AIT has an efficacy comparable to subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT), with a proven disease-modifying effect after treatment completion. Safety profiles favour AIT over SCIT. Studies suggest that tablets in all aspects are superior to sublingual drops. AITs for other allergies including house dust mite and birch and ragweed pollen are in development.

  2. Effect of neonatal sublingual vaccination with native or denatured ovalbumin and adjuvant CpG or cholera toxin on systemic and mucosal immunity in mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, C-F; Wu, T-C; Chu, Y-H; Hwang, K-S; Wang, C-C; Peng, H-J

    2008-11-01

    Sublingual immunotherapy has been applied for allergic diseases, but whether sublingual immunization in neonates can prevent sensitization has not been studied. In this study, we evaluate the effect of neonatal sublingual vaccination with native or denatured allergens alone or plus adjuvant on allergy prevention. Newborn BALB/c mice were sublingually vaccinated daily for the first 3 days with native or denatured ovalbumin (OVA) only, or combined adjuvant CpG or cholera toxin (CT). They were sensitized with OVA adsorbed onto alum 7 weeks after the last vaccination. Specific secretory IgA antibody responses were readily induced by neonatal vaccination with antigen plus CpG or CT, but not with antigen alone. Whereas vaccination with denatured OVA plus CpG markedly enhanced T helper 1 (Th1) responses and inhibited IgE production, vaccination with denatured OVA plus CT increased cervical lymph node cell production of interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-5, IL-6, and serum IgG1 responses. These data demonstrate that neonatal sublingual vaccination with denatured OVA and CpG not only preferentially induces systemic Th1 responses and mucosal immunity, but also simultaneously abrogates IgE production. Neonatal sublingual vaccines may play a role for the strategy of allergy prevention.

  3. Allergen Immunotherapy in Allergic Respiratory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Ravi K.

    2012-01-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) involves the repeated administration of allergenic extracts to atopic individuals over a period of 3 to 5 years either subcutaneously (SCIT) or sublingually (SLIT) for the treatment of allergic respiratory diseases, including asthma and allergic rhinitis (AR). In studies, SCIT and SLIT have been shown to improve existing symptoms of asthma and AR and to also have the capability to cause disease-modifying changes of the underlying atopic condition so as to prevent new allergic sensitization as well as arrest progression of AR to asthma. Recent evidence suggests that immunotherapy brings about these effects through actions that use T-regulatory cells and blocking antibodies such as IgG4 and IgA2, which can then result in an “immune deviation” from a T-helper (Th) 2 cell pattern to a Th1 cell pattern. Numerous meta-analyses and studies have been performed to evaluate the existing data among these studies, with the consensus recommendation favoring the use of immunotherapy because of its potential to modify existing diseases. Significant adverse reactions can occur with immunotherapy, including anaphylaxis and, very rarely, death. A primary factor in considering SIT is its potential to provide long-lasting effects that are able to be sustained well after its discontinuation. Given the significant burden these allergic diseases impose on the health-care system, SIT appears to be a cost-effective adjunctive treatment in modifying the existing disease state. PMID:22553263

  4. Sublingual apomorphine as a neuroendocrine probe.

    PubMed

    Brunerova, Ludmila; Potockova, Jana; Horacek, Jiri; Koprivova, Helena; Rehula, Milan; Andel, Michal

    2012-07-30

    Subcutaneous apomorphine, a dopaminergic agonist, is used as a neuroendocrine probe for assessing central dopaminergic activity. The aim of our study was to test sublingual apomorphine for the same purpose. We administered sublingual apomorphine in a weight-dependent dose (0.033 mg/kg) to 42 healthy men. Prolactin and growth hormone levels were measured before and after the administration at 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, 90, 120, 150 and 180 min. Subjects filled in Zung's self-assessment scores of anxiety (SAS) and depression (SDS) questionnaires before and after the test. Areas under the curve for prolactin and growth hormone levels were calculated using the trapezoidal rule. All subjects showed decreased prolactin, and 40/42 subjects showed increased growth hormone, in response to sublingual apomorphine. Average peak value for prolactin was -4.6±1.8 μg/l. Average peak value for growth hormone was 8.1±8.5 ng/ml for the whole group, and 9.6±8.1 ng/ml after exclusion of two negative growth hormone responders. Sublingual apomorphine produced no major side effects. Significant decreases in SAS (21.5±5.7 vs. 20.6±5.5) and SDS (9.7±7.8 vs. 7.8±6.8) scores were observed after the test. Sublingually administered apomorphine appears to be well tolerated and useful as a neuroendocrine marker of central dopaminergic activity.

  5. [The effectiveness of specific immunotherapy of allergic diseases of respiratory organs from the standpoint of evidence-based medicine. The results of a 5-year retrospective study].

    PubMed

    Zabolotnyĭ, D I; Gogunskaia, I V; Zabolotnaia, D D; Zaritskaia, I S

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this first Ukrainian 5-year retrospective study was to subjectively evaluate the effectiveness of specific immunotherapy (sublingual and injection) of the upper respiratory tract in the patients presenting with seasonal allergic rhinitis (SAR), perennial allergic rhinitis (PAR), SAR and PAR with polyvalent sensitization. The analysis of the results of sublingual, injection, and combined specific immunotherapy given to 750 patients allowed to describe them as "excellent" and "good" in the groups with PAR (83% of the total number), SAR (93%), SAR and PAR with polyvalent sensitization (84%).

  6. Novel ways for immune intervention in immunotherapy: mucosal allergy vaccines.

    PubMed

    Mascarell, Laurent; Van Overtvelt, Laurence; Moingeon, Philippe

    2006-05-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy is currently the only curative treatment for allergy. Subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) has been successfully used to treat patients who are allergic to insect venom, house dust mites, or tree or grass pollens. In the context of potentially severe, albeit infrequent, side effects associated with SCIT, mucosal routes of administration are being investigated to conduct allergenic desensitization. This article reviews recent developments in the field of nasal, oral, and sublingual immunotherapy as they relate to safety, clinical efficacy, and immune mechanisms of action. Implications for the design and development of improved allergy vaccines that could be used through such nonparenteral routes are discussed. Specifically, allergen presentation platforms and adjuvants facilitating the targeting of immune cells at mucosal surfaces to promote tolerance induction are reviewed.

  7. Cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Philip J

    2009-08-01

    The immune system is generally divided into 2 primary components: the innate immune response, and the highly specific but more slowly developing adaptive or acquired immune response. Immune responses can be further separated by whether they are induced by exposure to a foreign antigen (an "active" response) or whether they are transferred through serum or lymphocytes from an immunized individual (a "passive" response). The ideal cancer immunotherapy agent should be able to discriminate between cancer and normal cells (ie, specificity), be potent enough to kill small or large numbers of tumor cells (ie, sensitivity), and lastly be able to prevent recurrence of the tumor (ie, durability). Tumor immunology and immunotherapy is one of the most exciting and rapidly expanding fields at present.

  8. T cell responses induced by allergen-specific immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Maggi, E

    2010-01-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy is recognized as a highly effective practice in the treatment of patients with severe allergic rhinitis and/or asthma and is recommended by World Health Organization as an integrated part of allergy management strategy. Several studies have shown that allergen-specific immunotherapy, based on the administration of increasing doses of allergen, achieves a hyposensitization and reduces both early and late responses occurring during the natural exposure to the allergen itself. This is the unique antigen-specific immunomodulatory treatment in current use for human diseases. Successful immunotherapy is associated with reductions in symptoms and medication scores and improved quality of life. After interruption it usually confers long-term remission of symptoms and prevents the onset of new sensitizations in children up to a number of years. Subcutaneous immunotherapy usually suppresses the allergen-induced late response in target organs, likely due to the reduction of the infiltration of T cells, eosinophils, basophils, mast cells and neutrophils. In addition to the reduction of cells of allergic inflammation, immunotherapy also decreases inflammatory mediators at the site of allergen exposure. This review provides an update on the immunological T cell responses induced by conventional subcutaneous and sublingual immunotherapy, and gives a unifying view to reconciling the old dualism between immunoredirecting and immunoregulating mechanisms. PMID:20408857

  9. Sublingual epidermoid cyst in a neonate

    PubMed Central

    Oginni, Fadekemi Olufunmilayo; Oladejo, Taoreed; Braimah, Ramat Oyebunmi; Adenekan, Anthony Taiwo

    2014-01-01

    Epidermoid cysts (EC) in the head and neck region could be considered a rare condition representing only 6.9% of all ECs occurring in the body. They occur rarely in children and neonates. We present a case of sublingual EC in a Nigerian neonate. PMID:24987608

  10. Feline immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Trimmer, Ann M; Griffin, Craig E; Rosenkrantz, Wayne S

    2006-08-01

    Feline allergen specific immunotherapy (ASIT) is considered to be a safe and effective treatment for feline atopy. ASIT is defined as the practice of administering gradually increasing quantities of an allergen extract to an allergic subject. The purpose of which is to reduce or eliminate the symptoms associated with subsequent exposures to the causative allergen. ASIT offers an effective and safe treatment option for cats. Reported success rates range for 60 to 78% in feline atopic patients. Additionally, the reported incidence of side effects in feline atopic patients undergoing ASIT is very low and mainly anecdotal.

  11. Progress in the development of specific immunotherapies for house dust mite allergies.

    PubMed

    Moingeon, Philippe

    2014-12-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy is used to treat patients exposed and co-sensitized to the two common house dust mites, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and Dermatophagoides farinae. Based on seroepidemiological studies and a detailed characterization of mite allergens, an optimal immunotherapeutic product should associate extracts from the two Dermatophagoides species, and include both bodies and fecal particles. Both subcutaneous and sublingual immunotherapies performed with aqueous mite extracts are safe and efficacious in children and adults with mite-induced rhinitis and/or asthma. Double-blind placebo-controlled studies are conducted to further document the efficacy of immunotherapeutic products, with promising results that were obtained already with sublingual tablets. Current developments of second-generation products relying upon recombinant allergens and peptides are reviewed.

  12. Multiallergen-specific immunotherapy in polysensitized patients: where are we?

    PubMed

    Bahceciler, Nerin Nadir; Galip, Nilufer; Cobanoglu, Nazan

    2013-02-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy administered by the subcutaneous route was introduced a century ago and has been shown to be effective in the management of allergic rhinitis and asthma. More recently, the sublingual administration of allergen extracts has become popular, especially in European countries, and has also demonstrated efficacy in respiratory allergic diseases. Both modes of allergen administration during immunotherapy have been shown not only to reduce symptoms and the need for medication, but also to prevent the development of additional sensitivities in monosensitized patients, as well as asthma development in patients with allergic rhinitis, with a long-lasting effect after the completion of several years of treatment. Almost all of the well-designed and double-blinded, placebo-controlled studies evaluated treatment with single-allergen extracts. Therefore, most meta-analyses published to date evaluated immunotherapy with single allergen or extracts containing several cross-reactive allergens. As a result, in general, multiallergen immunotherapy in polysensitized patients (mixture of noncross-reactive allergens) is not recommended owing to lack of evidence. Although some guidelines have recommended against the use of multiallergen mixtures, allergists commonly use mixtures to which the patient is sensitive with the rationale that effective immunotherapy should include all major sensitivities. Literature on this subject is scarce in spite of the widespread use worldwide. Here, this issue will be extensively discussed based on currently available literature and future perspectives will also be explored.

  13. Peptide-based allergen specific immunotherapy for the treatment of allergic disorders.

    PubMed

    El-Qutob, David; Reche, Pedro; Subiza, José L; Fernández-Caldas, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Allergen specific immunotherapy (ASIT) and environmental control are the only etiologic treatments of allergic rhino-conjunctivitis, asthma and atopic dermatitis. The clinical benefit of ASIT relies on the selection of the patients and the identification and administration of the allergen, or allergens. Different routes of administration have been investigated, including subcutaneous, intradermal, epicutaneous, sublingual, inhaled, or intra-lymphatic. While subcutaneous and sublingual allergen specific immunotherapy may require from 3 to 5 years of treatment, clinical efficacy with intra-lymphatic treatment can be achieved after 3 injections. The most severe side effect of ASIT is anaphylaxis. Novel approaches are being investigated to reduce the allergenicity of immunotherapy vaccines, maintaining immunogenicity. Peptide immunotherapy has been directed mostly against autoimmune diseases, but the use of synthetic peptides for ASIT is a promising field in basic science, applied immunology and in clinical development. Short synthetic peptides bear allergen-specific CD4 T-cell epitopes which induce tolerance by stimulating regulatory (Treg) and Th1 cells. In the present patent review, we describe new trends in allergen immunotherapy using peptides, which, from a clinical point of view, are promising.

  14. Recombinant Mal d 1 facilitates sublingual challenge tests of birch pollen-allergic patients with apple allergy.

    PubMed

    Kinaciyan, T; Nagl, B; Faustmann, S; Kopp, S; Wolkersdorfer, M; Bohle, B

    2016-02-01

    It is still unclear whether allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) with birch pollen improves birch pollen-related food allergy. One reason for this may be the lack of standardized tests to assess clinical reactions to birch pollen-related foods, for example apple. We tested the applicability of recombinant (r) Mal d 1, the Bet v 1-homolog in apple, for oral challenge tests. Increasing concentrations of rMal d 1 in 0.9% NaCl were sublingually administered to 72 birch pollen-allergic patients with apple allergy. The dose of 1.6 μg induced oral allergy syndromes in 26.4%, 3.2 μg in 15.3%, 6.3 μg in 27.8%, 12.5 μg in 8.3%, 25 μg in 11.1%, and 50 μg in 4.2% of the patients. No severe reactions occurred. None of the patients reacted to 0.9% NaCl alone. Sublingual administration of 50 μg of rMal d 1 induced no reactions in three nonallergic individuals. Our approach allows straight forward, dose-defined sublingual challenge tests in a high number of birch pollen-allergic patients that inter alia can be applied to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of birch pollen AIT on birch pollen-related food allergy.

  15. Down-regulation of Th2 immune responses by sublingual administration of poly (lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA)-encapsulated allergen in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Salari, Farhad; Varasteh, Abdol-Reza; Vahedi, Fatemeh; Hashemi, Maryam; Sankian, Mojtaba

    2015-12-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate whether poly (lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) nanoparticles could enhance sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) efficacy. BALB/c mice sensitized to rChe a 3 were treated sublingually either with soluble rChe a 3 (100μg/dose) or PLGA-encapsulated rChe a 3 (5, 25, or 50μg/dose). SLIT with PLGA-encapsulated rChe a 3 (equivalent to 25 and 50μg rChe a 3 per dose) led to significantly increased antigen-specific IgG2a, along with no effect on allergen-specific IgE and IgG1 antibody levels. In addition, interleukin 4 (IL-4) levels in restimulated splenocytes were significantly less, while interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin-10 (IL-10), and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) levels, as well as Foxp3 expression, were significantly greater than in the control groups. Our findings suggest that PLGA nanoparticle-based vaccination may help rational development of sublingual immunotherapy through reduction of the needed allergen doses and also significantly enhanced systemic T regulatory (Treg) and T helper 1 (Th1) immune responses.

  16. Chapter 3: Allergen immunotherapy: definition, indication, and reactions.

    PubMed

    Georgy, Mary S; Saltoun, Carol A

    2012-01-01

    Specific allergen immunotherapy is the administration of increasing amounts of specific allergens to which the patient has type I immediate hypersensitivity. It is a disease modifying therapy, indicated for the treatment of allergic rhinitis, allergic asthma, and hymenoptera hypersensitivity. Specific IgE antibodies for appropriate allergens for immunotherapy must be documented. Indications for allergen immunotherapy include (1) inadequate symptom control despite pharmacotherapy and avoidance measures, (2) a desire to reduce the morbidity from allergic rhinitis and/or asthma or reduce the risk of anaphylaxis from a future insect sting, (3) when the patient experiences undesirable side effects from pharmacotherapy, and (4) when avoidance is not possible. Furthermore, patients may seek to benefit from economic savings of allergen immunotherapy compared with pharmacotherapy over time. Several studies have reported that immunotherapy in children with allergic rhinitis appears to prevent the development of new allergic sensitizations and/or new-onset asthma. Humoral, cellular, and tissue level changes occur with allergen immunotherapy including large increases in antiallergen IgG(4) antibodies, a decrease in the postseasonal rise of antiallergen IgE antibodies, reduced numbers of nasal mucosal mast cells and eosinophils, induction of Treg cells, and suppression of Th2 more than Th1 lymphocytes. There is a corresponding increase in IL-10 and transforming growth factor beta. In the United States, allergen immunotherapy is administered by the subcutaneous route in the physician's office, whereas primarily in some countries in Europe, it is administered for allergic rhinitis and asthma by the sublingual route by the patient at home.

  17. Sublingual vein extraction algorithm based on hyperspectral tongue imaging technology.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingli; Wang, Yiting; Liu, Hongying; Guan, Yana; Xu, Liang

    2011-04-01

    Among the parts of the human tongue surface, the sublingual vein is one of the most important ones which may have pathological relationship with some diseases. To analyze this information quantitatively, one primitive work is to extract sublingual veins accurately from tongue body. In this paper, a hyperspectral tongue imaging system instead of a digital camera is used to capture sublingual images. A hidden Markov model approach is presented to extract the sublingual veins from the hyperspectral sublingual images. This approach characterizes the spectral correlation and the band-to-band variability using a hidden Markov process, where the model parameters are estimated by the spectra of the pixel vectors forming the observation sequences. The proposed algorithm, the pixel-based sublingual vein segmentation algorithm, and the spectral angle mapper algorithm are tested on a total of 150 scenes of hyperspectral sublingual veins images to evaluate the performance of the new method. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can extract the sublingual veins more accurately than the traditional algorithms and can perform well even in a noisy environment.

  18. An update on immunotherapy for food allergy

    PubMed Central

    Scurlock, Amy M.; Jones, Stacie M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of the review Recent investigation has resulted in significant advances toward definitive therapeutic options for food allergy. In this review, we will explore novel immunotherapeutic interventions for the active treatment of food allergy. Recent findings Because the injection route for allergen immunotherapy to foods has been associated with an unacceptable risk of severe anaphylactic reactions, use of mucosally targeted therapeutic strategies is of significant interest for food allergy. Allergen-specific immunotherapeutic approaches such as oral, sublingual, epicutaneous, and peptide immunotherapy have demonstrated efficacy in increasing threshold dose and inducing immunologic changes associated with both desensitization and oral tolerance in animal and human trials. More global immunomodulatory strategies, such as Traditional Chinese Medicine and anti-IgE therapy have been shown to effectively target the allergic response, and clinical trials are ongoing to determine the efficacy and safety in human food allergy. Summary The advent of therapies that target the mucosal immune response to promote oral tolerance have shown great promise in the treatment of food hypersensitivity. However, there is still significant risk of adverse reactions associated with these therapeutic strategies and further study is needed to carefully advance these therapeutic modalities toward general clinical implementation. PMID:20856110

  19. Immunotherapy for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Steven, Antonius; Fisher, Scott A; Robinson, Bruce W

    2016-07-01

    Treatment of lung cancer remains a challenge, and lung cancer is still the leading cause of cancer-related mortality. Immunotherapy has previously failed in lung cancer but has recently emerged as a very effective new therapy, and there is now growing worldwide enthusiasm in cancer immunotherapy. We summarize why immune checkpoint blockade therapies have generated efficacious and durable responses in clinical trials and why this has reignited interest in this field. Cancer vaccines have also been explored in the past with marginal success. Identification of optimal candidate neoantigens may improve cancer vaccine efficacy and may pave the way to personalized immunotherapy, alone or in combination with other immunotherapy such as immune checkpoint blockade. Understanding the steps in immune recognition and eradication of cancer cells is vital to understanding why previous immunotherapies failed and how current therapies can be used optimally. We hold an optimistic view for the future prospect in lung cancer immunotherapy.

  20. Non-Specific Immunotherapies and Adjuvants

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Side Effects Treatment Types Immunotherapy Non-specific cancer immunotherapies and adjuvants Non-specific immunotherapies don’t target ... This makes BCG useful as a form of cancer immunotherapy. BCG was one of the earliest immunotherapies used ...

  1. Immunotherapy for mold allergy.

    PubMed

    Coop, Christopher A

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this article is to review the available studies regarding mold immunotherapy. A literature search was conducted in MEDLINE to identify peer-reviewed articles related to mold immunotherapy using the following keywords: mold, allergy, asthma, and immunotherapy. In addition, references cited within these articles were also reviewed. Articles were selected based on their relevance to the topic. Allergic responses to inhaled mold antigens are a recognized factor in allergic rhinitis and asthma. There are significant problems with respect to the production of relevant allergen material for the diagnosis and treatment of mold allergy with immunotherapy. Mold allergens contain proteases and should not be mixed with other allergens for immunotherapy. Most of the immunotherapy studies focus on two molds, Alternaria and Cladosporium. There is a lack of randomized placebo-controlled trials when evaluating the efficacy of mold immunotherapy with trials only focusing on immunotherapy to Alternaria and Cladosporium. Additional studies are needed regarding mold allergy and immunotherapy focusing on which molds are important for causing allergic disease.

  2. Microscopy of the echidna sublingual glands.

    PubMed

    Krause, William J

    2011-10-01

    The secretory units and duct system of the echidna sublingual glands exhibit subtle architectural modifications to accommodate the viscous secretion produced by these glands. The glands are compound tubular glands, the secretory units of which are elongate with open lumina and consist only of mucous cells. Closely packed spindle-shaped myoepithelial cells invest the secretory units, but are absent around the ducts. The branched secretory tubules open into an abbreviated duct system characterized by wide lumina. Striated ducts normally associated with the second portion of the intralobular duct system are absent. The duct system shows the most obvious modification of general salivary gland architecture presumably to accommodate the viscous secretion propelled from the secretory units by surrounding myoepithelial cells.

  3. Factors influencing the prescription of allergen immunotherapy: the allergen immunotherapy decision analysis (AIDA) study.

    PubMed

    Frati, F; Incorvaia, C; Cadario, G; Fiocchi, A; Senna, G E; Rossi, O; Romano, A; Scala, E; Romano, C; Ingrassia, A; Zambito, M; Dell'albani, I; Scurati, S; Passalacqua, G; Canonica, G W

    2013-10-01

    The evidence of efficacy of allergen immunotherapy (AIT) for respiratory allergy has been demonstrated by a number of meta-analyses. However, the daily practice of AIT is quite different from controlled trials, facing challenges in terms of selection of patients, practical performance, and, of particular importance, use of allergen extracts of inadequate quality. We here performed a survey, named the Allergen Immunotherapy Decision Analysis (AIDA), to evaluate which criteria are used by specialists to choose a product for sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) in patients with respiratory allergy. A questionnaire composed of 14 items to be ranked by each participant according to the importance attributed when choosing SLIT products was submitted to 444 Italian specialists. The responses of the 169 (38.1%) physicians, who answered all questions, were analysed. Most of the respondents were allergists (79%), followed by pulmonologists (10.8%), both allergists and pulmonologists (4.8%), and otorhinolaryngologists (3%); 59.8% of the respondents were males and 40.2% were females. The age distribution showed that 89.9% of the respondents were aged between 35 and 64 years. All respondents usually prescribed AIT products in their clinical practice: 31.4% used only SLIT, whereas 69.2% used both subcutaneous and sublingual administration. The rankings, expressed as means, attributed by physicians for each of the 14 items were as follows: level of evidence-based medicine (EBM ) validation of efficacy (3.44), level of EBM validation of safety (4.30), standardization of the product (5.37), efficacy based on personal experience (5.82), defined content(s) of the major allergen(s) in micrograms (5.96), scientific evidence for each single allergen (6.17), safety based on personal experience (6.32), ease of administration protocol (8.08), cost and terms of payment (e.g. instalments) (9.17), dose personalization (9.24), patient preference (9.25), ease of product storage (9.93), reimbursement

  4. [Immunotherapy of melanoma].

    PubMed

    Dréno, Brigitte

    2010-10-01

    This article describes current concepts and future challenges in non specific immunotherapy, vaccination, and antigen-specific adoptive immunotherapy of melanoma. If these treatments are to realize their full potential, it will be essential to understand how the tumor induces immune tolerance.

  5. Single-dose fentanyl sublingual spray for breakthrough cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Donald R

    2013-01-01

    Breakthrough cancer pain (BTCP) is defined as a transient exacerbation of pain that arises in patients with otherwise controlled persistent pain. BTCP typically has a rapid onset and relatively short duration, but it causes a significant amount of physical and psychological distress for patients. Several rapid-onset fentanyl formulations have been introduced in the USA to replace traditional oral opioids for the treatment of BTCP: a transmucosal lozenge, a sublingual orally disintegrating tablet, a buccal tablet, a buccal soluble film, a pectin nasal spray and, the newest formulation to enter the market, a sublingual spray. This article reviews the six rapid-onset formulations of fentanyl approved in the USA for the management of BTCP with emphasis on describing the published literature on fentanyl sublingual spray. The different fentanyl formulations vary in pharmacokinetic properties and ease of use, but all have a rapid onset and a relatively short duration of analgesia. Fentanyl sublingual spray has demonstrated absorption within 5 minutes of administration, with fentanyl plasma concentrations increasing over the first 30 minutes and remaining elevated for 60-90 minutes in pharmacokinetic studies in healthy subjects. Fentanyl sublingual spray shows linear dose proportionality, and changes in the temperature or acidity of the oral cavity do not alter its pharmacokinetic properties. In patients with BTCP, statistically significant pain relief is measurable at 5 minutes after administration of fentanyl sublingual spray, when compared with placebo, with significant pain relief lasting at least 60 minutes after administration. Adverse events are typical of opioid treatment and are considered mild to moderate in intensity. In summary, fentanyl sublingual spray provides rapid onset of analgesia and is a tolerable and effective treatment for BTCP.

  6. Immunotherapy for Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Gouras, Gunnar K

    2009-01-01

    Immunotherapy approaches for Alzheimer disease currently are among the leading therapeutic directions for the disease. Active and passive immunotherapy against the beta-amyloid peptides that aggregate and accumulate in the brain of those afflicted by the disease have been shown by numerous groups to reduce plaque pathology and improve behavior in transgenic mouse models of the disease. Several ongoing immunotherapy clinical trials for Alzheimer disease are in progress. The background and ongoing challenges for these immunological approaches for the treatment of Alzheimer disease are discussed.

  7. 78 FR 34108 - Determination That SUBOXONE (Buprenorphine Hydrochloride and Naloxone Hydrochloride) Sublingual...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-06

    ... (buprenorphine hydrochloride (HCl) and naloxone HCl) sublingual tablets, 2 milligrams (mg)/0.5 mg and 8 mg/2 mg... sublingual tablets, 2 mg/0.5 mg and 8 mg/2 mg, if all other legal and regulatory requirements are met. FOR... (buprenorphine HCl and naloxone HCl) sublingual tablets, 2 mg/0.5 mg and 8 mg/2 mg,......

  8. Immunotherapy for allergies and asthma: present and future.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, Shyam S; Qazi, Momina; Hellermann, Gary

    2010-06-01

    Allergen immunotherapy (IT) is a proven approach for treating allergic rhinitis and allergic asthma that has been practiced since 1911 and has undergone significant development in the past two decades. As currently practiced, IT involves subcutaneous or sublingual administration of allergens, both methods of which have been extensively investigated. In addition to allergen IT, a number of additional nonspecific IT approaches are being used or are in phase II/phase III clinical trials, which may be available in clinics within the next one to three years. Such therapies include anti-IgE antibodies and the soluble IL-4 receptor. Other experimental IT approaches are at the preclinical research stage and may proceed to clinical trials and the clinic within the next five to ten years. This review discusses the pros and cons of recent developments in both currently practiced and experimental IT approaches.

  9. Cancer immunotherapy in children

    Cancer.gov

    More often than not, cancer immunotherapies that work in adults are used in modified ways in children. Seldom are new therapies developed just for children, primarily because of the small number of pediatric patients relative to the adult cancer patient

  10. Immunotherapy for Cervical Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In an early phase NCI clinical trial, two patients with metastatic cervical cancer had a complete disappearance of their tumors after receiving treatment with a form of immunotherapy called adoptive cell transfer.

  11. Immunotherapy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Streilein, J W

    1978-11-01

    It seems nonetheless reasonable to take a skeptical view of immunotherapy for cancer. If the immunologic response can be brought to bear meaningfully and effectively upon the tumorhost relationship so that the host is spared, then let it be proved by appropriate clinical trials. Without unrealistic expectations, it may be easier to tolerance the gradual realization that immunotherapy may be only peripherally important in the control of malignant disease.

  12. IMMUNOTHERAPY IN ACUTE LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Wing

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in immunotherapy of cancer may represent a successful example in translational research, in which progress in knowledge and technology in immunology has lead to new strategies of immunotherapy, and even past failure in many clinical trials have led to a better understanding of basic cancer immunobiology. This article reviews the latest concepts in antitumor immunology and its application in the treatment of cancer, with particular focus on acute leukemia. PMID:19100371

  13. Advances in upper airway diseases and allergen immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Harold S

    2004-04-01

    Evidence for one airway continues to accumulate. Nasal allergen challenges increase lower airway inflammation, and nasal corticosteroid treatment reduces lower airway inflammation. Allergic respiratory inflammation might even spread systemically to involve nonrespiratory organs. Eosinophilic enteritis and eosinophilic esophagitis are reported during pollen seasons in patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis. Chronic hypertrophic sinusitis (CHS) is found in the majority of patients with asthma. Like asthma, the histology of CHS is characterized by epithelial damage, basement membrane thickening, and eosinophilic inflammation. The damaged epithelium might explain the acute bacterial exacerbations seen in patients with CHS. Studies have extended evidence of the safety and efficacy of the second- and third-generation antihistamines to younger children and to patients with perennial rhinitis but continue to show improvement of symptom scores over that seen with placebo of less than 20%. Studies on antihistamine use in the first trimester in nearly 500 women (65% taking loratadine) revealed no increase in the complications of pregnancy or congenital anomalies. Positive skin prick test responses to birch in asymptomatic young adults predicted later development of clinical allergic rhinitis. A dose response was demonstrated for immunotherapy with cat dander extract. The best results were in subjects receiving a dose containing 15 microg of the major cat allergen Fel d 1 (equivalent to approximately 2500 bioequivalent allergen units). Both topical intranasal immunotherapy and high-dose sublingual immunotherapy have been repeatedly proved to be safe and effective in double-blind, placebo-controlled studies. CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells secreting IL-10, TGF-beta, or both appear important in normal individuals and in patients treated with allergen immunotherapy in maintaining or restoring normal T(H)1/T(H)2 balance and overall suppression of both phenotypes.

  14. Immunotherapy in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Matsueda, Satoko; Graham, David Y

    2014-02-21

    Gastric cancer is the second most common of cancer-related deaths worldwide. In the majority of cases gastric cancer is advanced at diagnosis and although medical and surgical treatments have improved, survival rates remain poor. Cancer immunotherapy has emerged as a powerful and promising clinical approach for treatment of cancer and has shown major success in breast cancer, prostate cancer and melanoma. Here, we provide an overview of concepts of modern cancer immunotherapy including the theory, current approaches, remaining hurdles to be overcome, and the future prospect of cancer immunotherapy in the treatment of gastric cancer. Adaptive cell therapies, cancer vaccines, gene therapies, monoclonal antibody therapies have all been used with some initial successes in gastric cancer. However, to date the results in gastric cancer have been disappointing as current approaches often do not stimulate immunity efficiently allowing tumors continue to grow despite the presence of a measurable immune response. Here, we discuss the identification of targets for immunotherapy and the role of biomarkers in prospectively identifying appropriate subjects or immunotherapy. We also discuss the molecular mechanisms by which tumor cells escape host immunosurveillance and produce an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. We show how advances have provided tools for overcoming the mechanisms of immunosuppression including the use of monoclonal antibodies to block negative regulators normally expressed on the surface of T cells which limit activation and proliferation of cytotoxic T cells. Immunotherapy has greatly improved and is becoming an important factor in such fields as medical care and welfare for human being. Progress has been rapid ensuring that the future of immunotherapy for gastric cancer is bright.

  15. Sublingual vaccine with GroEL attenuates atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, M; Kurita-Ochiai, T; Kobayashi, R; Hashizume-Takizawa, T; Yamazaki, K; Yamamoto, M

    2014-04-01

    Autoimmune responses to heat-shock protein 60 (HSP60) contribute to the progression of atherosclerosis, whereas immunization with HSP60 may induce atheroprotective responses. We assessed the capacity of an atheroprotective vaccine that targeted a recombinant HSP60 from Porphyromonas gingivalis (rGroEL) to induce a protective mucosal immune response. Female apolipoprotein E-deficient spontaneously hyperlipidemic (Apoe(shl)) mice received sublingual delivery of rGroEL prior to P. gingivalis 381 injection. The animals were euthanized 16 weeks later. Sublingual immunization with rGroEL induced significant rGroEL-specific serum IgG responses. Antigen-specific cells isolated from spleen produced significantly high levels of IL-10 and IFN-γ after antigen re-stimulation in vitro. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that the frequencies of both IL-10(+) and IFN-γ(+) CD4(+) Foxp3(+) cells increased significantly in submandibular glands (SMG). Furthermore, sublingual immunization with rGroEL significantly reduced atherosclerosis lesion formation in the aortic sinus and decreased serum CRP, MCP-1, and ox-LDL levels. These findings suggest that sublingual immunization with rGroEL is associated with the increase of IFNγ(+) or IL-10(+) Foxp3(+) cells in SMG and a systemic humoral response, which could be an effective strategy for the prevention of naturally occurring or P. gingivalis-accelerated atherosclerosis.

  16. Immunotherapy for Gastroesophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Goode, Emily F.; Smyth, Elizabeth C.

    2016-01-01

    Survival for patients with advanced oesophageal and stomach cancer is poor; together these cancers are responsible for more than a million deaths per year globally. As chemotherapy and targeted therapies such as trastuzumab and ramucirumab result in modest improvements in survival but not long-term cure for such patients, development of alternative treatment approaches is warranted. Novel immunotherapy drugs such as checkpoint inhibitors have been paradigm changing in melanoma, non-small cell lung cancer and urothelial cancers. In this review, we assess the early evidence for efficacy of immunotherapy in patients with gastroesophageal cancer in addition to considering biomarkers associated with response to these treatments. Early results of Anti- Programmed Cell Death Protein-1 (anti-PD-1), anti-PD-L1 and anti-Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte assosciated protein-4 (anti-CTLA4) trials are examined, and we conclude with a discussion on the future direction for immunotherapy for gastroesophageal cancer patients. PMID:27669318

  17. Immunotherapy in veterinary oncology.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Philip J

    2014-09-01

    Tumor immunology and immunotherapy is one of the most exciting and rapidly expanding fields. The immune system is divided into 2 primary components: the innate immune response and the highly specific, but more slowly developing, adaptive or acquired immune response. Immune responses are separated by whether they are induced by exposure to a foreign antigen (active response) or transferred through serum or lymphocytes from an immunized individual (passive response). The ideal cancer immunotherapy agent should discriminate between cancer and normal cells (specificity), be potent enough to kill small or large numbers of tumor cells (sensitivity), and prevent recurrence of a tumor (durability).

  18. Allergen-specific immunotherapy in pediatric allergic asthma

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) is the only curative way that can change the immunologic response to allergens and thus can modify the natural progression of allergic diseases. There are some important criteria which contributes significantly on efficacy of AIT, such as the allergen extract used for treatment, the dose and protocol, patient selection in addition to the severity and control of asthma. The initiation of AIT in allergic asthma should be considered in intermittent, mild and moderate cases which coexisting with other allergic diseases such as allergic rhinitis, and in case of unacceptable adverse effects of medications. Two important impact of AIT; steroid sparing effect and preventing from progression to asthma should be taken into account in pediatric asthma when making a decision on starting of AIT. Uncontrolled asthma remains a significant risk factor for adverse events and asthma should be controlled both before and during administration of AIT. The evidence concerning the efficacy of subcutaneous (SCIT) and sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) for treatment of pediatric asthma suggested that SCIT decreases asthma symptoms and medication scores, whereas SLIT can ameliorate asthma symptoms. Although the effectiveness of SCIT has been shown for both seasonal and perennial allergens, the data for SLIT is less convincing for perennial allergies in pediatric asthma. PMID:27489785

  19. Stinging insect allergy: current perspectives on venom immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ludman, Sian W; Boyle, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    Systemic allergic reactions to insect stings affect up to 5% of the population during their lifetime, and up to 32% of beekeepers. Such reactions can be fatal, albeit very rarely, and fear of a further systemic reaction (SR) can lead to significant anxiety and quality of life impairment. A recent Cochrane systematic review confirmed that venom immunotherapy (VIT) is an effective treatment for people who have had a systemic allergic reaction to an insect sting. VIT reduces risk of a further SR (relative risk 0.10, 95% confidence interval 0.03–0.28), but VIT also reduces risk of a future large local reaction, and significantly improves disease-specific quality of life. However, health economic analysis showed that VIT is generally not cost effective for preventing future SRs; most people are stung infrequently, most SRs resolve without long-term consequences, and a fatal outcome is extremely rare. VIT only becomes cost effective if one is stung frequently (eg, beekeepers) or if quality of life improvement is considered. Thus, for most people with insect sting allergy, anxiety and quality of life impairment should be the overriding consideration when making treatment decisions, highlighting the importance of a patient-centered approach. Areas which need to be explored in future research include efforts to improve the safety and convenience of VIT such as the use of sublingual immunotherapy; quality of life effects of venom allergy in children and adolescents as well as their parents; and the optimal duration of treatment. PMID:26229493

  20. Clinical contraindications to allergen immunotherapy: an EAACI position paper.

    PubMed

    Pitsios, C; Demoly, P; Bilò, M B; Gerth van Wijk, R; Pfaar, O; Sturm, G J; Rodriguez del Rio, P; Tsoumani, M; Gawlik, R; Paraskevopoulos, G; Ruëff, F; Valovirta, E; Papadopoulos, N G; Calderón, M A

    2015-08-01

    Clinical indications for allergen immunotherapy (AIT) in respiratory and Hymenoptera venom allergy are well established; however, clinical contraindications to AIT are not always well documented. There are some discrepancies when classifying clinical contraindications for different forms of AIT as 'absolute' or 'relative'. EAACI Task Force on 'Contraindications to AIT' was created to evaluate and review current literature on clinical contraindications, and to update recommendations for both sublingual and subcutaneous AIT for respiratory and venom immunotherapy. An extensive review of the literature was performed on the use of AIT in asthma, autoimmune disorders, malignant neoplasias, cardiovascular diseases, acquired immunodeficiencies and other chronic diseases (including mental disorders), in patients treated with β-blockers, ACE inhibitors or monoamine oxidase inhibitors, in children under 5 years of age, during pregnancy and in patients with poor compliance. Each topic was addressed by the following three questions: (1) Are there any negative effects of AIT on this concomitant condition/disease? (2) Are more frequent or more severe AIT-related side-effects expected? and (3) Is AIT expected to be less efficacious? The evidence, for the evaluation of these clinical conditions as contraindications, was limited, and most of the conclusions were based on case reports. Based on an extended literature research, recommendations for each medical condition assessed are provided. The final decision on the administration of AIT should be based on individual evaluation of any medical condition and a risk/benefit assessment for each patient.

  1. The future of immunotherapy for canine atopic dermatitis: a review.

    PubMed

    DeBoer, Douglas J

    2017-02-01

    Allergen specific immunotherapy (ASIT) is a foundation treatment for canine atopic dermatitis (CAD), though few critical studies have documented its effectiveness as a disease-modifying treatment in dogs. The mechanisms by which ASIT works in dogs have not been elucidated, although they are likely to parallel those known for humans. Current ASIT approaches in CAD focus on either subcutaneous or sublingual administration. Greater knowledge of major allergens in dogs, ideal dosage regimes and details of allergen admixture are likely to lead to better efficacy in CAD. Evaluation of biomarkers for successful therapy may also be of benefit. Potentially important advances in human medicine, that have yet to be explored in dogs, include use of modified allergen preparations such as allergoids, recombinant major allergens or allergen peptides; modification with adjuvants; or packaging of the above in virus-like particles. Co-administration of immunomodulators such as CpG oligodeoxynucleotides or specific monoclonal antibodies might direct the immune response in the desired direction while calming the "cytokine storm" of active disease. Initial trials of alternative routes of administration such as intralymphatic immunotherapy have yielded exciting results in humans, and continuing study in dogs is underway. Progress in ASIT of human food allergy may provide clues that will assist with improved diagnosis and patient management of CAD. Importantly, further study must be undertaken to clarify the conditions under which ASIT is a valuable treatment modality for dogs.

  2. Active Immunotherapy of Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chodon, Thinle; Koya, Richard C; Odunsi, Kunle

    2015-01-01

    Clinical progress in the field of cancer immunotherapy has been slow for many years but within the last 5 years, breakthrough successes have brought immunotherapy to the forefront in cancer therapy. Promising results have been observed in a variety of cancers including solid tumors and hematological malignancies with adoptive cell therapy using natural host tumor infiltrating lymphocytes, host cells that have been genetically engineered with antitumor T-cell receptors or chimeric antigen receptors, immune checkpoint inhibitors like anti-CTLA-4, anti-PD-1 or PD-L1 monoclonal antibodies and oncolytic virus-based immunotherapy. However, most treatment modalities have shown limited efficacy with single therapy. The complex nature of cancer with intra- and inter-tumor antigen and genomic heterogeneity coupled with the immune suppressive microenvironment emphasizes the prospect of personalized targeted immunotherapy to manipulate the patient's own immune system against cancer. For successful, robust and long-lasting cure of cancer, a multi-modal approach is essential, combining anti-tumor cell therapy with manipulation of multiple pathways in the tumor microenvironment to ameliorate tumor-induced immunosuppression.

  3. Immunotherapy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Leong, S P

    1993-10-01

    The study of the immune system on the cellular and molecular level has made significant strides over the past several decades. The role of immune system against infection is self-evident. Although the role of the immune system in the immune surveillance of cancer has not been proven, the immune system is believed to play an interactive role in the regulation of tumor growth. Immunotherapy is the application of the immune system to fight against the tumor. Although immunotherapeutic approaches have been tried in many types of cancer, both malignant melanoma and renal cell carcinoma seem to show occasional, but definitive response to immunotherapy. The fact that immune eradication of tumor is most efficient when the tumor burden is minimal speaks for the fact that immunotherapy may be most effective for control of microscopic disease. Therefore, to maximize the effect of immunotherapy, the tumor burden needs to be reduced, hopefully to microscopic level either by surgery or in combination with chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Also, new strategies are needed to develop more potent vaccines and stimulate effector cells to eradicate tumor cells under the most optimal conditions.

  4. Basics of cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Yuki; Nishikawa, Hiroyoshi

    The immune system is the body's defense against infectious organisms and other invaders including cancer cells. Cancer immunotherapy, which employs our own immune systems to attack cancer cells, is now emerging as a promising modality of cancer treatment based upon the clinical successes of immune checkpoint blockade and adoptive T cell transfer. In hematologic malignancies, clinical application of anti-PD-1 mAb and CAR (chimeric antigen receptor) T therapy is now being extensively tested in Hodgkin's disease, multiple myeloma, and CD19(+) acute lymphocytic leukemia. In sharp contrast to conventional anti-cancer reagents which directly kill cancer cells, cancer immunotherapy activates various types of immune effector cells to attack cancer cells. However, more than half of the treated patients showed no activation of anti-tumor CD8(+) killer T cells and CD4(+) helper T cells and failed to respond to immune therapies such as immune checkpoint blockade, even when administered in combination regimens. Thus, development of novel immunotherapies to achieve more effective activation of anti-cancer immunity and immuno-monitoring of biomarkers, allowing proper evaluation of immune responses in cancer patients in order to detect responders, are urgent issues. Additionally, we must pay attention to characteristic immunological side effects not observed following treatment with conventional anti-cancer reagents. Herein, we present a summary outline and discuss the future direction of cancer immunotherapy.

  5. [Immunotherapies for drug addictions].

    PubMed

    Montoya, Ivan

    2008-01-01

    Immunotherapies in the form of vaccines (active immunization) or monoclonal antibodies (passive immunization) appear safe and a promising treatment approaches for some substance-related disorders. The mechanism of action of the antibody therapy is by preventing the rapid entry of drugs of abuse into the central nervous system. In theory, immunotherapies could have several clinical applications. Monoclonal antibodies may be useful to treat drug overdoses and prevent the neurotoxic effects of drugs by blocking the access of drugs to the brain. Vaccines may help to prevent the development of addiction, initiate drug abstinence in those already addicted to drugs, or prevent drug use relapse by reducing the pharmacological effects and rewarding properties of the drugs of abuse on the brain. Passive immunization with monoclonal antibodies has been investigated for cocaine, methamphetamine, nicotine, and phencyclidine (PCP). Active immunization with vaccines has been studied for cocaine, heroin, methamphetamine, and nicotine. These immunotherapies seem promising therapeutic tools and are at different stages in their development before they can be approved by regulatory agencies for the treatment of substance-related disorders. The purpose of this article is to review the current immunotherapy approaches with emphasis on the risks and benefits for the treatment of these disorders.

  6. Allergen-Specific Immunotherapy in Patients 55 Years and Older: Results and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Baptistella, Eduardo; Maniglia, Sergio; Malucelli, Diego Augusto; Rispoli, Daniel; Pruner de Silva, Thanara; Tsuru, Fernanda Miyoko; Becker, Renata Vecentin; Bernardi, Gustavo; Dranka, Daniela; Ferraz, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Over the years the immune system suffers many morphologic and functional alterations, which result in a peak of function in puberty and a gradual decrease in the elderly. Aim Treat patients 55 years or older with allergic rhinitis with immunotherapy and then analyze the response to allergens. Materials and Methods From June 2009 to July 2010, 104 charts of patients 55 years or older with allergic complaints were evaluated. The patients were selected by anamnesis, physical examination, and otorhinolaryngologic exam. The patients had cutaneous test for mites before and after 1 year of sublingual specific immunotherapy. The cutaneous response was classified as negative (absent), light, moderate, or severe. Results Before vaccination, 42 (40.4%) patients were classified as having a severe form of allergy and 62 (59.6%) as having a moderate allergy. After the specific therapy, 40 (38.4%) patients were classified as negative (absent), 37 (35.6%) as light, 19 (18.3%) as moderate, and 8 (7.7%) as severe responses. Conclusion Immunotherapy, a desensitization technique, is indicated in cases which patients cannot avoid the exposure to allergens and in situations where pharmacologic therapy is not ideal. Specific immunotherapy to treat the allergic rhinitis in elderly patients was efficient and had no collateral effects, and in addition to the clinical benefit, improvement in the cutaneous test could also be observed. PMID:25992039

  7. Epitope peptides and immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Soichi

    2007-02-01

    Allergic diseases affect atopic individuals, who synthesize specific Immunoglobulins E (IgE) to environmental allergens, usually proteins or glycoproteins. These allergens include grass and tree pollens, indoor allergens such as house dust mites and animal dander, and various foods. Because allergen-specific IgE antibodies are the main effector molecules in the immune response to allergens, many studies have focused on the identification of IgE-binding epitopes (called B cell epitopes), specific and minimum regions of allergen molecules that binds to IgE. Our initial studies have provided evidence that only four to five amino acid residues are enough to comprise an epitope, since pentapeptide QQQPP in wheat glutenin is minimally required for IgE binding. Afterwards, various kinds of B cell epitope structures have been clarified. Such information contributes greatly not only to the elucidation of the etiology of allergy, but also to the development of strategies for the treatment and prevention of allergy. Allergen-specific T cells also play an important role in allergy and are obvious targets for intervention in the disease. Currently, the principle approach is to modify B cell epitopes to prevent IgE binding while preserving T cell epitopes to retain the capacity for immunotherapy. There is mounting evidence that the administration of peptide(s) containing immunodominant T cell epitopes from an allergen can induce T cell nonresponsiveness (immunotherapy). There have been clinical studies of peptide immunotherapy performed, the most promising being for bee venom sensitivity. Clinical trials of immunotherapy for cat allergen peptide have also received attention. An alternative strategy for the generation of an effective but hypoallergenic preparation for immunotherapy is to modify T cell epitope peptides by, for example, single amino acid substitution. In this article, I will present an overview of epitopes related to allergic disease, particularly stress on

  8. Characterization of captopril sublingual permeation: determination of preferred routes and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Chetty, D J; Chen, L L; Chien, Y W

    2001-11-01

    Although sublingual captopril has been used clinically to treat hypertensive emergencies, a mechanistic understanding of sublingual permeation will facilitate the optimization of drug delivery. A correlation of sublingual steady-state flux with donor captopril concentration in a porcine model showed the absence of saturability and suggested a passive diffusion permeation mechanism. A simultaneous evaluation of permeability and partition coefficient demonstrated that the paracellular route is the predominant pathway for sublingual permeation. The enhancement factors of specific ion permeabilities in the presence of tight junction perturbants indicated that although the paracellular pathway is preferred by the ionized species of captopril, the lipophilic transcellular pathway is preferred by the neutral, un-ionized species.

  9. Sublingual Epidermoid Cyst Presenting with Distinctive Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Naohiro; Kodama, Kozue; Iino, Yukiko

    2014-01-01

    A case of sublingual epidermoid cyst presenting distinctive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings is described. A 39-year-old man presented to our hospital with a three months progressive left submandibular swelling, difficulty moving his tongue, and snoring. Preoperative evaluation with MRI and fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) revealed that the heterogeneous cystic lesion contained the squamous cells, which is compatible with ectodermal tissue. The mass was located above the mylohyoid muscle and spread to the pharyngeal space. By considering the size, infection history, patient age, and location, the cyst was completely resected under general anesthesia via cervical approach without any complication. Histopathologically, the cyst wall was lined by stratified squamous epithelium with no skin appendage, suggesting an epidermoid cyst. Ultrasound (US), MRI and FNAC were very useful of the preoperative diagnosis for oral and sublingual lesion. The postoperative course was uneventful and without recurrence after 24 months. This case showed that epidermoid cysts formed the rarely heterogeneous cystic tumor and it underlined usefulness of preoperative diagnosis, such as US, MRI and FNAC for oral and sublingual tumor. PMID:25332766

  10. Preparation and evaluation of sublingual tablets of zolmitriptan

    PubMed Central

    Prajapati, Shailesh T; Patel, Manoj V; Patel, Chhaganbhai N

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Zolmitriptan is a 5-HT receptor agonist (1B/1D). It is used in the acute treatment of migraine having low bioavailability about 40% orally due to hepatic first pass metabolism. The purpose of the present research was to formulate fast acting sublingual tablets of zolmitriptan. Materials and Methods: Sublingual tablets were prepared using ispaghula husk powder, gellan gum, sodium alginate as super disintegrating polymers and citric acid, tartaric acid and camphor as permeation enhancers by direct compressible technique and evaluated for weight variation, thickness, friability, content uniformity, hardness, disintegration time, wetting time, in-vitro drug release, in-vitro and ex-vivo permeation study. Stability study of optimized formulation was performed as per ICH (International Conference on Harmonisation) guideline. Results: The in-vitro disintegration time of the optimized formulation (D5) was 9 ± 2 s and all formulations showed 100% of dissolution within 6 ± 2 min. Formulation containing 4% of gellan gum (D5) showed highest disintegration and 2% of citric acid formulation (P3) showed highest permeation 88% within 30 min and ex-vivo permeation was 52% within 30 min. Optimized formulation was stable for 1 month during stability study as per ICH guideline. Conclusion: The sublingual tablet formulation gives better results using natural super disintegrant for fast onset of action. PMID:24678459

  11. Insulin-loaded alginic acid nanoparticles for sublingual delivery.

    PubMed

    Patil, Nilam H; Devarajan, Padma V

    2016-01-01

    Alginic acid nanoparticles (NPs) containing insulin, with nicotinamide as permeation enhancer were developed for sublingual delivery. The lower concentration of proteolytic enzymes, lower thickness and enhanced retention due to bioadhesive property, were relied on for enhanced insulin absorption. Insulin-loaded NPs were prepared by mild and aqueous based nanoprecipitation process. NPs were negatively charged and had a mean size of ∼200 nm with low dispersity index. Insulin loading capacities of >95% suggested a high association of insulin with alginic acid. Fourier Transform Infra-Red Spectroscopy (FTIR) spectra and DSC (Differential Scanning Calorimetry) thermogram of insulin-loaded NPs revealed the association of insulin with alginic acid. Circular dichroism (CD) spectra confirmed conformational stability, while HPLC analysis confirmed chemical stability of insulin in the NPs. Sublingually delivered NPs with nicotinamide exhibited high pharmacological availability (>100%) and bioavailability (>80%) at a dose of 5 IU/kg. The high absolute pharmacological availability of 20.2% and bioavailability of 24.1% in comparison with subcutaneous injection at 1 IU/kg, in the streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat model, suggest the insulin-loaded alginic acid NPs as a promising sublingual delivery system of insulin.

  12. Formulation and Evaluation of New Glimepiride Sublingual Tablets.

    PubMed

    Al-Madhagi, Wafa; Abdulbari Albarakani, Ahmed; Khaled Alhag, Abobakr; Ahmed Saeed, Zakaria; Mansour Noman, Nahlah; Mohamed, Khaldon

    2017-01-01

    Oral mucosal delivery of drugs promotes rapid absorption and high bioavailability, with a subsequent immediate onset of pharmacological effect. However, many oral mucosal deliveries are compromised by the possibility of the patient swallowing the active substance before it has been released and absorbed locally into the systemic circulation. The aim of this research was to introduce a new glimepiride formula for sublingual administration and rapid drug absorption that can be used in an emergency. The new sublingual formulation was prepared after five trials to prepare the suitable formulation. Two accepted formulations of the new sublingual product were prepared, but one of them with disintegration time of 1.45 min and searching for preferred formulation, the binder, is changed with Flulac and starch slurry to prepare formula with disintegration time of 21 seconds that supports the aim of research to be used in an emergency. The five formulations were done, after adjusting to the binder as Flulac and aerosil with disintegration time of 21 seconds and accepted hardness as well as the weight variation. The assay of a new product (subglimepiride) is 103% which is a promising result, confirming that the formula succeeded. The new product (subglimepiride) is accepted in most quality control tests and it is ready for marketing.

  13. Normal sublingual microcirculation during painful crisis in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    van Beers, Eduard J; Goedhart, Peter T; Unger, Michiel; Biemond, Bart J; Ince, Can

    2008-05-01

    Obstruction of the microcirculation is the most important cause of painful crisis in sickle cell disease (SCD). Extensive microvascular obstruction has been observed in mouse models of SCD. A technique to determine the extent of the microcirculatory obstructions in humans may be helpful in the clinical setting and for research purposes. Therefore, we measured sublingual microcirculation longitudinally in patients with SCD admitted with painful crisis. Sublingual microcirculation was recorded with side-stream darkfield (SDF) imaging and semi-quantified with a microvascular flow index (MFI) on a range from 0 to 4 (arbitrary units; from 0 (no flow) to 4 (hyperdynamic flow)). Thirteen consecutive adult sickle cell patients admitted with painful crises were included and provided 47 measurements of MFI in 14 episodes of painful crisis. Seven patients provided baseline measurements and seven healthy controls were studied. The mean (+/-standard error of the mean) MFI during painful crisis was 2.6+/-0.1 and did not change during the painful crisis. The mean MFI of patients with SCD during steady state (2.7+/-0.1) and the mean MFI of the controls (2.7+/-0.1) were not different from the mean MFI during painful crisis. During painful crisis irregular microvascular perfusion, expressed by the distribution width of the microvascular blood flow velocity, correlated negatively (r=-0.484; P=0.002) with hemoglobin concentration. We conclude that sublingual microcirculatory blood flow velocity is not disturbed in sickle cell patients during painful crisis.

  14. Formulation and Evaluation of New Glimepiride Sublingual Tablets

    PubMed Central

    Abdulbari Albarakani, Ahmed; Khaled Alhag, Abobakr; Ahmed Saeed, Zakaria; Mansour Noman, Nahlah; Mohamed, Khaldon

    2017-01-01

    Oral mucosal delivery of drugs promotes rapid absorption and high bioavailability, with a subsequent immediate onset of pharmacological effect. However, many oral mucosal deliveries are compromised by the possibility of the patient swallowing the active substance before it has been released and absorbed locally into the systemic circulation. The aim of this research was to introduce a new glimepiride formula for sublingual administration and rapid drug absorption that can be used in an emergency. The new sublingual formulation was prepared after five trials to prepare the suitable formulation. Two accepted formulations of the new sublingual product were prepared, but one of them with disintegration time of 1.45 min and searching for preferred formulation, the binder, is changed with Flulac and starch slurry to prepare formula with disintegration time of 21 seconds that supports the aim of research to be used in an emergency. The five formulations were done, after adjusting to the binder as Flulac and aerosil with disintegration time of 21 seconds and accepted hardness as well as the weight variation. The assay of a new product (subglimepiride) is 103% which is a promising result, confirming that the formula succeeded. The new product (subglimepiride) is accepted in most quality control tests and it is ready for marketing. PMID:28261517

  15. Nanoparticulate immunotherapy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Chintan H; Perry, Jillian L; Tian, Shaomin; Luft, J Christopher; DeSimone, Joseph M

    2015-12-10

    Although surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy have significantly improved as treatments for cancer, they can rarely control metastatic disease and cures remain scarce. Promising recent developments suggest that cancer immunotherapy may become a powerful new therapy that clinicians can offer cancer patients. The opportunity to orchestrate the body's own immune system to target, fight, and eradicate cancer cells without destroying healthy cells makes this an extremely attractive treatment modality. Our increased knowledge in anti-tumor immunity and the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment (TME) has provided many therapeutic strategies to battle cancer. That combined with advancements in the field of particulate delivery systems provide a mechanism to deliver these immunotherapeutics to their specific targeted cells and the TME. In this review we will focus on the current status of immunotherapy and the potential advantages of utilizing nanocarriers within the field.

  16. Immunotherapy in food allergy.

    PubMed

    Kamdar, Toral; Bryce, Paul J

    2010-05-01

    Food allergies are caused by immune responses to food proteins and represent a breakdown of oral tolerance. They can range from mild pruritus to life-threatening anaphylaxis. The only current consensus for treatment is food avoidance, which is fraught with compliance issues. For this reason, there has been recent interest in immunotherapy, which may induce desensitization and possibly even tolerance. Through these effects, immunotherapy may decrease the potential for adverse serious reactions with accidental ingestions while potentially leading to an overall health benefit. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms of food allergy and give an overview of the various immunotherapeutic options and current supporting evidence, as well as look towards the future of potential novel therapeutic modalities.

  17. Immunotherapy in food allergy

    PubMed Central

    Kamdar, Toral; Bryce, Paul J

    2010-01-01

    Food allergies are caused by immune responses to food proteins and represent a breakdown of oral tolerance. They can range from mild pruritis to life-threatening anaphylaxis. The only current consensus for treatment is food avoidance, which is fraught with compliance issues. For this reason, there has been recent interest in immunotherapy, which may induce desensitization and possibly even tolerance. Through these effects, immunotherapy may decrease the potential for adverse serious reactions with accidental ingestions while potentially leading to an overall health benefit. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms of food allergy and give an overview of the various immunotherapeutic options and current supporting evidence, as well as look towards the future of potential novel therapeutic modalities. PMID:20543886

  18. Integrated Immunotherapy for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    2 AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0366 TITLE: Integrated Immunotherapy for Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL...31Aug2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Integrated Immunotherapy for Breast Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0366 5c. PROGRAM... immunotherapy , tumor microenvironment, dendritic cells, metastasis, cancer stroma. 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18

  19. Immunotherapy of cancer in 2012.

    PubMed

    Kirkwood, John M; Butterfield, Lisa H; Tarhini, Ahmad A; Zarour, Hassane; Kalinski, Pawel; Ferrone, Soldano

    2012-01-01

    The immunotherapy of cancer has made significant strides in the past few years due to improved understanding of the underlying principles of tumor biology and immunology. These principles have been critical in the development of immunotherapy in the laboratory and in the implementation of immunotherapy in the clinic. This improved understanding of immunotherapy, enhanced by increased insights into the mechanism of tumor immune response and its evasion by tumors, now permits manipulation of this interaction and elucidates the therapeutic role of immunity in cancer. Also important, this improved understanding of immunotherapy and the mechanisms underlying immunity in cancer has fueled an expanding array of new therapeutic agents for a variety of cancers. Pegylated interferon-α2b as an adjuvant therapy and ipilimumab as therapy for advanced disease, both of which were approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for melanoma in March 2011, are 2 prime examples of how an increased understanding of the principles of tumor biology and immunology have been translated successfully from the laboratory to the clinical setting. Principles that guide the development and application of immunotherapy include antibodies, cytokines, vaccines, and cellular therapies. The identification and further elucidation of the role of immunotherapy in different tumor types, and the development of strategies for combining immunotherapy with cytotoxic and molecularly targeted agents for future multimodal therapy for cancer will enable even greater progress and ultimately lead to improved outcomes for patients receiving cancer immunotherapy.

  20. Immunotherapy of Cancer in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Kirkwood, John M.; Butterfield, Lisa H.; Tarhini, Ahmad A.; Zarour, Hassane; Kalinski, Pawel; Ferrone, Soldano

    2012-01-01

    The immunotherapy of cancer has made significant strides in the past few years due to improved understanding of the underlying principles of tumor biology and immunology. These principles have been critical in the development of immunotherapy in the laboratory and in the implementation of immunotherapy in the clinic. This improved understanding of immunotherapy, enhanced by increased insights into the mechanism of tumor immune response and its evasion by tumors, now permits manipulation of this interaction and elucidates the therapeutic role of immunity in cancer. Also important, this improved understanding of immunotherapy and the mechanisms underlying immunity in cancer has fueled an expanding array of new therapeutic agents for a variety of cancers. Pegylated interferon-α2b as an adjuvant therapy and ipilimumab as therapy for advanced disease, both of which were approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for melanoma in March 2011, are 2 prime examples of how an increased understanding of the principles of tumor biology and immunology have been translated successfully from the laboratory to the clinical setting. Principles that guide the development and application of immunotherapy include antibodies, cytokines, vaccines, and cellular therapies. The identification and further elucidation of the role of immunotherapy in different tumor types, and the development of strategies for combining immunotherapy with cytotoxic and molecularly targeted agents for future multimodal therapy for cancer will enable even greater progress and ultimately lead to improved outcomes for patients receiving cancer immunotherapy. PMID:22576456

  1. Immunotherapy of Fungal Infections.

    PubMed

    Datta, Kausik; Hamad, Mawieh

    2015-01-01

    Fungal organisms are ubiquitous in the environment. Pathogenic fungi, although relatively few in the whole gamut of microbial pathogens, are able to cause disease with varying degrees of severity in individuals with normal or impaired immunity. The disease state is an outcome of the fungal pathogen's interactions with the host immunity, and therefore, it stands to reason that deep/invasive fungal diseases be amenable to immunotherapy. Therefore, antifungal immunotherapy continues to be attractive as an adjunct to the currently available antifungal chemotherapy options for a number of reasons, including the fact that existing antifungal drugs, albeit largely effective, are not without limitations, and that morbidity and mortality associated with invasive mycoses are still unacceptably high. For several decades, intense basic research efforts have been directed at development of fungal immunotherapies. Nevertheless, this approach suffers from a severe bench-bedside disconnect owing to several reasons: the chemical and biological peculiarities of the fungal antigens, the complexities of host-pathogen interactions, an under-appreciation of the fungal disease landscape, the requirement of considerable financial investment to bring these therapies to clinical use, as well as practical problems associated with immunizations. In this general, non-exhaustive review, we summarize the features of ongoing research efforts directed towards devising safe and effective immunotherapeutic options for mycotic diseases, encompassing work on antifungal vaccines, adoptive cell transfers, cytokines, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), and other agents.

  2. Immunotherapy of melanoma.

    PubMed

    Kee, D; McArthur, G

    2017-03-01

    Immunotherapy for advanced melanoma has progressed dramatically in the last five years with the approval of immune checkpoint inhibitors targeting cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1). Inhibition of these targets can break cancer-immune tolerance and result in durable objective responses with significantly improved tolerability over cytokine-based immunotherapy. Ipilimumab is an inhibitor of CTLA-4 and the first-in-class immune checkpoint inhibitor to demonstrate an improvement in overall survival in melanoma. Pembrolizumab and nivolumab target PD-1 and have improved single agent activity and tolerability in comparison to ipilimumab. The combination of nivolumab and ipilimumab results in even better response rates, reductions in tumor volume and progression free survival but at the expense of considerable autoimmune effects. Autoimmune side-effects and non-standard response kinetics represent a new challenge associated with cancer therapies that practitioners will have to become more familiar with as checkpoint inhibitors increasingly become part of mainstream oncological practice. Ongoing areas of investigation include drug development against novel immune targets; alternative treatment modalities, such as genetically modified oncolytic viruses; optimization of immunotherapy combination strategies; and the identification of reliable biomarkers to better guide treatment selection.

  3. Immunotherapy of pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Märten, Angela

    2008-05-01

    Patients with carcinoma of the exocrine pancreas have especially poor prognosis with a five-year survival rate of <1% and a median survival of 4-6 months. Pancreatic carcinoma is a systemic disease, insensitive to radiotherapy and mostly to chemotherapy. Accordingly, new treatment modalities are worth being investigated. One of the promising approaches is immunotherapy. Several phase I/II trials that have been published show interesting results, whereupon antibody-based strategies seem to fail and unspecific stimulation or vaccination with peptides look encouraging. Furthermore, phase II trials dealing with combination therapies are highly promising. One of them, a combination of chemoradiotherapy plus interferon-alpha is currently tested in a randomized phase III trial. As most of the trials had enrolled only limited numbers of patients and most of the trials were not conducted and/or reported according to the new standards it is difficult to draw final conclusions from the discussed trials. Immuno-monitoring was performed only in 40% of the discussed publications. In all cases immune responses were observed and correlation with the clinical outcome is discussed. Immunotherapy of pancreatic adenocarcinoma and especially combination therapies including immunotherapy is an up-and-coming approach and needs to be investigated in well conducted phase III randomized controlled trials accompanied by appropriate immuno-monitoring.

  4. [Immunotherapy in uropathology].

    PubMed

    Verkarre, Virginie; Roussel, Hélène; Granier, Clémence; Tartour, Eric; Allory, Yves

    2017-02-01

    The algorithms for treatment of metastatic cancers are evolving due to positive results obtained with immunotherapy. Therapeutics approaches to stimulate the immune system have already been used in the treatment of kidney and bladder cancer, such as the administration of cytokines and BCG therapy, confirming the immunogenicity of these tumors. The aim of immunotherapies is not only to activate the immune system against tumor cells, but also to take into account the tumor-induced suppressive microenvironment, in particular by removing the anergy of T-cell lymphocytes, and by targeting the co-stimulation inhibitors molecules. Among the genito-urinary cancers, second-line clinical trials have clearly shown that kidney and bladder cancers are sensitive to the inhibition of PD-1/PD-L1 axis and have already achieved FDA approvals for some molecules. Numerous other clinical trials are underway, particularly in first-line treatment in bladder and renal cancers. Refractory testicular cancer could also benefit from these treatments. Other approaches using vaccine therapy especially in castration-resistant prostate cancer are also of interest. We will see, in this chapter dedicated to the urogenital cancers, the benefit of the immunotherapy by resituating it in the genetic and immunological context of each organ. We will also present briefly the therapeutic outlines and the place of biomarkers.

  5. Oral mucosal immunotherapy for allergic rhinitis: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Suurna, Maria V.; Rochlin, Kate; Bremberg, Maria G.; Tropper, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Background: The sublingual mucosa has been used for many years to apply allergenic extracts for the purpose of specific immunotherapy (IT). Although sublingual IT (SLIT) is both safe and efficacious, the density of antigen-presenting cells is higher in other regions of the oral cavity and vestibule, which make them a potentially desirable target for IT. Objective: To present the concept of oral mucosal IT (OMIT) and to provide pilot data for this extended application of SLIT. Methods: An open-label, 12-month, prospective study was undertaken as a preliminary step before a full-scale clinical investigation. Twenty-four individuals with allergic rhinitis received IT by applying allergenic extracts daily to either the oral vestibule plus oral cavity mucosa by using a glycerin-based toothpaste or to the sublingual mucosa by using 50% glycerin liquid drops. Adverse events, adherence rates, total combined scores, rhinoconjunctivitis quality-of-life questionnaire scores, changes in skin reactivity, and changes in serum antibody levels were measured for each participant. Results: No severe adverse events occurred in either group. The adherence rate was 80% for the OMIT group and 62% for the SLIT group (p = 0.61). Decreased total combined scores were demonstrated for both the OMIT group (15.6%) and the SLIT group (22.3%), although this decrease did not reach statistical significance in either group. Both groups achieved a meaningful clinical improvement of at least 0.5 points on rhinoconjunctivitis quality-of-life questionnaire. A statistically significant rise in specific immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4) was seen in both groups over the first 6 months of treatment. Conclusion: OMIT and SLIT demonstrated similar safety profiles and adherence rates. Measurements of clinical efficacy improved for both groups, but only changes in IgG4 achieved statistical significance. These pilot data provide enough evidence to proceed with a full-scale investigation to explore the role of OMIT in

  6. Effectiveness and safety of orally administered immunotherapy for food allergies: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Nurmatov, Ulugbek; Devereux, Graham; Worth, Allison; Healy, Laura; Sheikh, Aziz

    2014-01-14

    The aim of using oral and sublingual immunotherapy with food allergies is to enable the safe consumption of foods containing these allergens in patients with food allergies. In the present study, a systematic review of intervention studies was undertaken; this involved the searching of eleven international databases for controlled clinical trials. We identified 1152 potentially relevant papers, from which we selected twenty-two reports of twenty-one eligible trials (i.e. eighteen randomised controlled trials and three controlled clinical trials). The meta-analysis revealed a substantially lower risk of reactions to the relevant food allergen in those receiving orally administered immunotherapy (risk ratios (RR) 0·21, 95 % CI 0·12, 0·38). The meta-analysis of immunological data demonstrated that skin prick test responses to the relevant food allergen significantly decreased with immunotherapy (mean difference - 2·96 mm, 95 % CI - 4·48, - 1·45), while allergen-specific IgG4 levels increased by an average of 19·9 (95 % CI 17·1, 22·6) μg/ml. Sensitivity analyses excluding studies at the highest risk of bias and subgroup analyses in relation to specific food allergens and treatment approaches generated comparable summary estimates of effectiveness and immunological changes. Pooling of the safety data revealed an increased risk of local (i.e. minor oropharyngeal/gastrointestinal) adverse reactions with immunotherapy (RR 1·47, 95 % CI 1·11, 1·95); there was a non-significant increased average risk of systemic adverse reactions with immunotherapy (RR 1·08, 95 % CI 0·97, 1·19). There is strong evidence that orally administered immunotherapy can induce immunomodulatory changes and thereby promote desensitisation to a range of foods. However, given the paucity of evidence on longer-term safety, effectiveness and cost-effectiveness, orally administered immunotherapy should not be used outside experimental conditions presently.

  7. Autoimmune Cardiotoxicity of Cancer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Feixiong; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2017-02-01

    Contemporary immunotherapies (e.g., immune checkpoint inhibitors), which enhance the immune response to cancer cells, improve clinical outcomes in several malignancies. A recent study reported the cases of two patients with metastatic melanoma who developed fatal myocarditis during ipilimumab and nivolumab combination immunotherapy; these examples highlight the risk of unbridled activation of the immune system.

  8. Exosome-based immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Chaput, Nathalie; Taïeb, Julien; Schartz, Noël E C; André, Fabrice; Angevin, Eric; Zitvogel, Laurence

    2004-03-01

    Exosomes are small membrane vesicles originating from late endosomes and secreted by hematopoietic and epithelial cells in culture. Exosome proteic and lipid composition is unique and might shed some light into exosome biogenesis and function. Exosomes secreted from professional antigen-presenting cells (i.e., B lymphocytes and dendritic cells) are enriched in MHC class I and II complexes, costimulatory molecules, and hsp70-90 chaperones, and have therefore been more extensively studied for their immunomodulatory capacities in vitro and in vivo. This review will present the main biological features pertaining to tumor or DC-derived exosomes, will emphasize their immunostimulatory function, and will discuss their implementation in cancer immunotherapy.

  9. Adoptive immunotherapy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Ruella, Marco; Kalos, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Recent clinical success has underscored the potential for immunotherapy based on the adoptive cell transfer (ACT) of engineered T lymphocytes to mediate dramatic, potent, and durable clinical responses. This success has led to the broader evaluation of engineered T-lymphocyte-based adoptive cell therapy to treat a broad range of malignancies. In this review, we summarize concepts, successes, and challenges for the broader development of this promising field, focusing principally on lessons gleaned from immunological principles and clinical thought. We present ACT in the context of integrating T-cell and tumor biology and the broader systemic immune response.

  10. Enhanced insulin absorption from sublingual microemulsions: effect of permeation enhancers.

    PubMed

    Patil, Nilam H; Devarajan, Padma V

    2014-12-01

    Microemulsions of insulin (50 IU/mL) comprising permeation enhancers were formulated for sublingual delivery. Circular dichroism (CD) spectra indicated conformational stability, while chemical stability was confirmed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). CD spectra of insulin in combination with permeation enhancers revealed attenuation of molar ellipticity at 274 nm in the order TCTP > TC-AOT > TC > TC-NMT > Sol P > insulin solution. The molar ellipticity ratios at 208/222 nm confirmed dissociation of insulin in the microemulsions with the same rank order. Matrix-assisted laser diffraction ionization mass spectra (MALDI) revealed a significant shift in intensity signals towards monomer and dimers with a substantially high ratio of monomers, especially in the presence of the TCTP and TC-AOT. Permeation through porcine sublingual mucosa correlated with the dissociation data. A high correlation between the ratio of molar ellipticity at 208/222 nm and serum glucose levels (r (2) > 0.958) and serum insulin levels (r (2) > 0.952) strongly suggests the role of dissociation of insulin on enhanced absorption. While all microemulsions revealed a reduction in serum glucose levels and increase in serum insulin levels, significant differences were observed with the TCTP and TC-AOT microemulsions. High pharmacological availability >60 % and bioavailability >55 % compared to subcutaneous insulin at a low dose of 2 IU/kg appears highly promising. The data clearly suggests the additional role of the permeation enhancers on dissociation of insulin on enhanced sublingual absorption from the microemulsions.

  11. Mouse Models of Tumor Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ngiow, Shin Foong; Loi, Sherene; Thomas, David; Smyth, Mark J

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy is now evolving into a major therapeutic option for cancer patients. Such clinical advances also promote massive interest in the search for novel immunotherapy targets, and to understand the mechanism of action of current drugs. It is projected that a series of novel immunotherapy agents will be developed and assessed for their therapeutic activity. In light of this, in vivo experimental mouse models that recapitulate human malignancies serve as valuable tools to validate the efficacy and safety profile of immunotherapy agents, before their transition into clinical trials. In this review, we will discuss the major classes of experimental mouse models of cancer commonly used for immunotherapy assessment and provide examples to guide the selection of appropriate models. We present some new data concerning the utility of a carcinogen-induced tumor model for comparing immunotherapies and combining immunotherapy with chemotherapy. We will also highlight some recent advances in experimental modeling of human malignancies in mice that are leading towards personalized therapy in patients.

  12. Modified immunotherapy for alopecia areata.

    PubMed

    Yoshimasu, Takashi; Furukawa, Fukumi

    2016-07-01

    Squaric acid dibutylester (SADBE) is a commonly used contact sensitizer in immunotherapy for alopecia areata (AA). Severe contact dermatitis is induced by the currently high recommended sensitization dose of 1%-2% SADBE, often decreasing patient compliance. We assessed a modified immunotherapy for AA using SADBE at a starting concentration of 0.01% without sensitization. After one or two weeks of initial 0.01% SADBE application, the concentration of SADBE was increased gradually to 0.025%, 0.05%, 0.1%, 0.25%, 0.5%, 1% and 2% until the patients felt itching or erythema at the AA lesion site. The modified immunotherapy showed a response rate of 69.4% (25/36), equivalent to conventional immunotherapy using SADBE starting at 1%-2% sensitization. Furthermore, we investigated the combination therapy of SADBE and multiple courses of steroid pulses for AA. The response rate for combination therapy was 73.7% (28/38); however, the group receiving combination therapy showed a significant prevalence of severe AA compared with the group receiving modified immunotherapy only. We reviewed the efficacy and safety of modified immunotherapy without initial sensitization and combination therapy with immunotherapy and multiple courses of pulses for AA.

  13. Immunologic Suppression To Peanut During Immunotherapy Is Often Transient

    PubMed Central

    Gorelik, M.; Narisety, S.D.; Guerrerio, A.L.; Chichester, K.; Keet, C.A.; Bieneman, A.P.; Hamilton, R. G.; Wood, R.A; Schroeder, J.T.; Frischmeyer-Guerrerio, P.A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Studies suggest that oral (OIT) and sublingual (SLIT) immunotherapy for food allergy hold promise; however, the immunologic mechanisms underlying these therapies are not well understood. Objective To generate insights into the mechanisms and duration of immunologic suppression to peanut during immunotherapy (IT). Methods Blood was obtained from subjects at baseline and at multiple timepoints during a placebo-controlled trial of peanut OIT and SLIT. Immunologic outcomes included spontaneous and stimulated basophil activity by automated fluorometry (histamine) and flow cytometry (activation markers, IL-4), allergen-induced cytokine expression in dendritic cell (DC)-T cell co-cultures by multiplexing technology, and expression of MHC II and costimulatory molecules on DCs by flow cytometry. Results Spontaneous and allergen-induced basophil reactivity (histamine release, CD63 expression, and IL-4 production) were suppressed during dose escalation and after 6 months of maintenance dosing. Peanut- and dust mite-induced expression of TH2 cytokines was reduced in DC-T cell co-cultures during IT. This was associated with decreased levels of CD40, HLA-DR, and CD86 expression on DCs, and increased expression of CD80. These effects were most striking in myeloid DC-T cell co-cultures from subjects receiving OIT. Many markers of immunologic suppression reversed following withdrawal from IT, and in some cases during ongoing maintenance therapy. Conclusion OIT and SLIT for peanut allergy induce rapid suppression of basophil effector functions, dendritic cell activation, and Th2 cytokine responses during the initial phases of IT in an antigen non-specific manner. While there was some inter-individual variation, in many patients, suppression appeared to be temporary. PMID:25542883

  14. Fentanyl sublingual: in breakthrough pain in opioid-tolerant adults with cancer.

    PubMed

    Chwieduk, Claudine M; McKeage, Kate

    2010-12-03

    Fentanyl is a potent opioid with a short duration of action. Fentanyl sublingual has been formulated as a rapidly disintegrating tablet that is quickly absorbed, producing a fast onset of analgesia. In two randomized, double-blind clinical trials, fentanyl sublingual as single fixed or titrated doses reduced pain intensity during breakthrough pain episodes to a significantly greater extent than placebo in opioid-tolerant cancer patients. In a fixed-dose phase II trial and a titrated-dose phase III trial, fentanyl sublingual (as a single 400 μg dose and as titrated doses) reduced mean pain intensity difference (PID) to a significantly greater extent than placebo over the entire treatment period (up to 60 minutes), reaching statistical significance 15 minutes post-dose. In the titrated-dose study, the mean sum of PID (area under the PID vs time curve) at 30 minutes post-dose was significantly greater with fentanyl sublingual than placebo, with significant improvements in PID seen at 10 minutes maintained at 60 minutes post-dose. In the phase III study, patients receiving fentanyl sublingual were more satisfied with their treatment than patients receiving placebo (measured using the Patient Global Evaluation of Medication score), and almost half of all fentanyl sublingual recipients were satisfied or very satisfied with their treatment. Fentanyl sublingual was generally well tolerated in the two trials and most adverse events were mild to moderate in intensity.

  15. Sublingual vein parameters, AFP, AFP-L3, and GP73 in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhao, J; Guo, L-Y; Yang, J-M; Jia, J-W

    2015-06-26

    This study evaluated the diagnostic value of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), AFP heterogeneity 3 (AFP-L3), Golgi protein 73 (GP73), and sublingual vein parameters in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Levels of serum AFP, AFP-L3, GP73, and sublingual vein scores were measured in 34 patients with chronic hepatitis, 65 patients with post-hepatitis B cirrhosis, 71 patients with HCC, and 6 healthy controls. Logistic regression analysis was used to explore potential correlations. Sublingual vein grades in patients with HCC were higher than those in the other three groups; sublingual vein scores were also different between groups; combined diagnosis using AFP, GP73, and sublingual vein grade was superior to the individual parameters alone or when only two were used in different combinations. Thus, sublingual vein grade can be considered as an independent risk factor for diagnosis of HCC. Furthermore, combined detection with AFP, GP73, and sublingual vein grade is simple, inexpensive, and effective. It may therefore be suitable for screening high-risk populations for early diagnosis of HCC.

  16. Unusually Giant Sublingual Epidermoid Cyst: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Nishar, Chintan-C; Ambulgekar, Vijayalaxmi-K.; Gujrathi, Atish-B.; Chavan, Pravin-T.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Epidermoid cysts are rare, slow‑growing, benign, developmental cysts, which are derived from abnormally situated ectodermal tissue. Epidermoid cysts of the floor of the mouth represent <0.01% of all oral cysts. So far, only a few cases have been reported. Case Report: Hereby, we present a case of a giant sublingual epidermoid cyst, which was completely asymptomatic upon presentation. However, due to its large size, it pushed the epiglottis posteriorly and created difficulty during intubation. The patient developed respiratory distress after its surgical excision and extubation, requiring tracheostomy post operatively. The patient recovered well and a successful weaning of tracheostomy was performed, giving the patient a healthy life. Conclusion: Epidermoid cyst is a rare differential diagnosis of sublingual swelling that should be kept in mind for large asymptomatic swellings in this region. The only symptom it can cause might be respiratory distress due to its large size. This can happen not only pre-operatively but also post-operatively and the surgeon should be ready for immediate tracheostomy. PMID:27602342

  17. Evaluation of sublingual microcirculation in children with dengue shock

    PubMed Central

    da Luz Caixeta, Daniella Mancino; Fialho, Fernanda Moraes Daniel; Azevedo, Zina Maria Almeida; Collett-Solberg, Paulo Ferrez; Villela, Nivaldo Ribeiro; Bouskela, Eliete

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To report the sublingual microcirculation observed using Sidestream Dark Field imaging in two children with dengue shock. METHOD: Two children, aged 9 and 10 years, were admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit with dengue shock and multiple organ dysfunction. Sublingual microcirculation was assessed in each patient on the first and second days of shock and was assessed a final time when the patients were no longer in shock (on the day prior to extubation) using Sidestream Dark Field technology. The De Backer score and microvascular flow index were used for the analyses. RESULTS: Both patients had reduced perfused small vessel density in the first two days and showed predominantly intermittent or no microcirculation flow, as demonstrated by a low microvascular flow index. The blood flow in the large vessels was not affected. Prior to the extubation, the microvascular flow index had increased, although the perfused small vessel density remained diminished, suggesting persistent endothelial dysfunction. CONCLUSIONS: Severe microcirculation changes may be involved in the pathophysiological mechanisms that lead to the final stages of dengue shock, which is frequently irreversible and associated with high mortality rates. Microcirculatory monitoring may help elucidate the physiopathology of dengue shock and prove useful as a prognostic tool or therapeutic target. PMID:23917674

  18. Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of Sublingual Salivary Gland Obstructing the Submandibular Salivary Gland Duct

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Venkata Suneel; Prathi, Venkata Sarath; Manne, Rakesh Kumar; Beeraka, Swapna; Natarajan, Kannan

    2013-01-01

    Sublingual salivary gland malignancies are extremely rare and account for only 0.3-1% of all epithelial salivary gland tumors. Here, we report a case of adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) of the sublingual salivary gland that presented as a swelling in the right anterior floor of the mouth obstructing the submandibular duct. Sublingual salivary gland ACC obstructing the submandibular duct is rare and only three cases have been reported in the literature until date. We discuss the different patterns of ACC seen during the pathologic investigations and its radiologic features. PMID:24516773

  19. Two cases of sublingual hematoma as a manifestation of child abuse.

    PubMed

    Mehra, Muneesh; Chiesa, Antonia E; Sirotnak, Andrew P

    2015-12-01

    Common intraoral manifestations of child abuse include tears of the frenula, burns, and pharyngeal perforations. Sublingual hematomas can also occur as a result of trauma, but to the best of our knowledge, only 1 case has been previously described in the context of child abuse. We report 2 new cases of sublingual hematoma in infants that were the result of physical abuse. Cases of sublingual hematoma in infants and children without a clear and legitimate explanation of the cause should prompt consideration of child abuse.

  20. Genetic immunotherapy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Elmslie, R E; Dow, S W

    1997-08-01

    The application of gene therapy to the treatment of human and veterinary diseases offers an innovative addition to the clinician's treatment options. Gene therapy can potentially be used to (1) replace defective or missing genes, (2) treat cancer, and (3) deliver drugs. The focus of this paper is the use of gene therapy in the treatment of cancer. To be effective, genes must be delivered to target cells which can then serve as the factory to produce the gene product. Delivery systems include retroviral vectors, adenoviral vectors, and direct introduction of plasmid DNA into cells. In the case of cancer immunotherapy, introduced genes produce products that enhance tumor immunosurveillance and tumor cell killing by immune mechanisms.

  1. Mutanome directed cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Vormehr, Mathias; Diken, Mustafa; Boegel, Sebastian; Kreiter, Sebastian; Türeci, Özlem; Sahin, Ugur

    2016-04-01

    Somatic mutations are important drivers of cancer development. Accumulating evidence suggests that a significant subset of mutations result in neo-epitopes recognized by autologous T cells and thus may constitute the Achilles' heel of tumor cells. T cells directed against mutations have been shown to have a key role in clinical efficacy of potent cancer immunotherapy modalities, such as adoptive transfer of autologous tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and immune checkpoint inhibitors. Whereas these findings strengthen the idea of a prominent role of neo-epitopes in tumor rejection, the systematic therapeutic exploitation of mutations was hampered until recently by the uniqueness of the repertoire of mutations ('the mutanome') in every patient's tumor. This review highlights insights into immune recognition of neo-epitopes and novel concepts for comprehensive identification and immunotherapeutic exploitation of individual mutations.

  2. Immunotherapy in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Castellanos, Emily H; Horn, Leora

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer has not traditionally been viewed as an immune-responsive tumor. However, it is becoming evident that tumor-induced immune suppression is vital to malignant progression. Immunotherapies act by enhancing the patient's innate immune response and hold promise for inducing long-term responses in select patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Immune checkpoint inhibitors, in particular, inhibitors to cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed death 1 (PD-1) and programmed death receptor ligand 1 (PD-L1) have shown promise in early studies and are currently in clinical trials in both small cell lung cancer and non-small cell lung cancer patients. Two large randomized phase III trials recently demonstrated superior overall survival (OS) in patients treated with anti-PD-1 therapy compared to chemotherapy in the second-line setting.

  3. Immunotherapy in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Du, Lingling; Herbst, Roy S; Morgensztern, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    The treatment of patients with good performance status and advanced stage non-small cell lung cancer has been based on the use of first-line platinum-based doublet and second-line docetaxel. Immunotherapy represents a new therapeutic approach with the potential for prolonged benefit. Although the vaccines studied have not shown benefit in patients with non-small cell lung cancer, immune checkpoint inhibitors against the PD-1/PD-L1 axis showed increased overall survival compared with docetaxel in randomized clinical trials, which led to the approval of nivolumab and pembrolizumab. Because only a minority of patients benefit from this class of drugs, there has been an intense search for biomarkers.

  4. Immunotherapy of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pardee, Angela D.; Butterfield, Lisa H.

    2012-01-01

    Current therapies for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are marginally effective and exacerbate underlying liver disease. The ability of immunotherapy to elicit nontoxic, systemic, long-lived anti-tumor activity makes it particularly well-suited for use in the setting of HCC. While therapeutic benefit has been achieved in early clinical trials, the efficacy of immune-based therapies is limited by several unique properties of HCC, most notably the inherently tolerogenic character of the liver in both healthy and diseased (chronically-infected or tumor-bearing) states. Therapeutic regimens that both counteract these immunosuppressive mechanisms and amplify tumor-specific immunity are expected to profoundly improve clinical outcomes for HCC patients. PMID:22720211

  5. Imaging Biomarkers in Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Juergens, Rosalyn A.; Zukotynski, Katherine A.; Singnurkar, Amit; Snider, Denis P.; Valliant, John F.; Gulenchyn, Karen Y.

    2016-01-01

    Immune-based therapies have been in use for decades but recent work with immune checkpoint inhibitors has now changed the landscape of cancer treatment as a whole. While these advances are encouraging, clinicians still do not have a consistent biomarker they can rely on that can accurately select patients or monitor response. Molecular imaging technology provides a noninvasive mechanism to evaluate tumors and may be an ideal candidate for these purposes. This review provides an overview of the mechanism of action of varied immunotherapies and the current strategies for monitoring patients with imaging. We then describe some of the key researches in the preclinical and clinical literature on the current uses of molecular imaging of the immune system and cancer. PMID:26949344

  6. Cancer immunotherapy products

    PubMed Central

    Camarero, Jorge; Ruiz, Sol

    2012-01-01

    Active immunotherapy products (widely known as “cancer vaccines”) are products intended to stimulate an immune response to mediate tumor destruction or reduce the progression of disease in patients where cancer has been diagnosed. Some quality attributes of these products are very difficult to characterize or present a high variability (especially if they are for autologous use), further complicating the interpretation of some of the clinical data. Furthermore, questions arise in the evaluation of efficacy and safety data in comparison with current chemical or biological treatments for the same indications. Some of these aspects are discussed in this paper in relationship with the regulatory requirements in the European Union and as applied to two recently assessed medicinal products, Oncophage and Provenge, both considered therapeutic “cancer vaccines” for renal cell carcinoma and prostate cancer, respectively. PMID:22863755

  7. Immunotherapy of Congenital SIV Infection.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-10-01

    TITLE: Immunotherapy of Congenital SIV Infection PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ruth M. Ruprecht, M.D., Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Dana-Farber Cancer...SUBTITLE Immunotherapy of Congenital SIV 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Infection DAMD17-94-J-4431 6. AUTHOR(S) Ruth M. Ruprecht. M.D-. Ph.D 7. PERFORMING...period of several weeks, this strategy was adopted to avoid potential bias because of season or other factors. Because the staff at the Yerkes Regional

  8. Gold Nanoparticle Mediated Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Joao Paulo Mattos; Figueroa, Elizabeth Raquel; Drezek, Rebekah Anna

    2013-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in the field of cancer immunotherapy, where the goal is to activate or modulate the body’s immune response against cancer. However, current immunotherapy approaches exhibit limitations of safety and efficacy due to systemic delivery. In this context, the use of nanotechnology for the delivery of cancer vaccines and immune adjuvants presents a number of advantages such as targeted delivery to immune cells, enhanced therapeutic effect, and reduced adverse outcomes. Recently, gold nanoparticles (AuNP) have been explored as immunotherapy carriers, creating new AuNP applications that merit a critical overview. This review highlights recent advances in the development of AuNP mediated immunotherapies that harness AuNP biodistribution, optical properties and their ability to deliver macromolecules such as peptides and oligonucleotides. It has been demonstrated that the use of AuNP carriers can improve the delivery and safety of immunotherapy agents, and that AuNP immunotherapies are well suited for synergistic combination therapy with existing cancer therapies like photothermal ablation. PMID:24103304

  9. Immunotherapy of allergic contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Spiewak, Radoslaw

    2011-08-01

    The term 'immunotherapy' refers to treating diseases by inducing, enhancing or suppressing immune responses. As allergy is an excessive, detrimental immune reaction to otherwise harmless environmental substances, immunotherapy of allergic disease is aimed at the induction of tolerance toward sensitizing antigens. This article focuses on the historical developments, present state and future outlook for immunotherapy with haptens as a therapeutic modality for allergic contact dermatitis. Inspired by the effectiveness of immunotherapy in respiratory allergies, attempts were undertaken at curing allergic contact dermatitis by means of controlled administration of the sensitizing haptens. Animal and human experiments confirmed that tolerance to haptens can be induced most effectively when the induction of tolerance precedes attempted sensitization. In real life, however, therapy is sought by people who are already sensitized and an effective reversal of hypersensitivity seems more difficult to achieve. Decades of research on Rhus hypersensitivity led to a conclusion that immunotherapy can suppress Rhus dermatitis, however, only to a limited degree, for a short period of time, and at a high risk of side effects, which makes this method therapeutically unprofitable. Methodological problems with most available studies of immunotherapy of contact allergy to nickel make any definite conclusions impossible at this stage.

  10. The effect of the transplanted pineal gland on the sympathetic innervation of the rat sublingual gland.

    PubMed

    Chanthaphavong, R S; Murphy, S M; Anderson, C R

    2004-08-01

    We investigated the effect of the pineal on sympathetic neurons that normally innervate the sublingual gland of the rat. When the pineal gland was transplanted into the sublingual gland, it remained as a distinct mass that was innervated by sympathetic axons. Injection of the retrograde tracer, Fast Blue, into the sublingual gland labelled sympathetic neurons in the ipsilateral superior cervical ganglion (SCG). Thirty per cent of all neurons labelled retrogradely by Fast Blue injection into transplanted pineal glands were immunoreactive for both neuropeptide Y (NPY) and calbindin. This combination is characteristic of sympathetic neurons innervating the pineal gland in its normal location, but not the sympathetic vasoconstrictor neurons normally innervating the sublingual gland. This, and our previous study in which the pineal gland was shown to similarly influence the phenotype of salivary secretomotor neurons, suggests that a range of different functional classes of sympathetic neuron are able to change their phenotype in response to signals released by the pineal gland.

  11. Dual ectopic thyroid gland: sonography and scintigraphy of lingual and sublingual thyroid.

    PubMed

    Marković, Vinko; Glavina, Gordana; Eterović, Davor; Punda, Ante; Brdar, Dubravka

    2014-06-01

    Dual ectopic lingual and sublingual thyroid gland is an extraordinarily rare condition. We present 1 patient with subclinical hypothyroidism. The clinical examination revealed that the thyroid gland was not palpable in its usual cervical location, whereas ultrasonography confirmed an empty thyroid bed without any ectopic thyroid tissue in the rest of the neck. The final diagnosis of dual ectopic lingual and sublingual thyroid was established by ultrasound examination through the mouth floor and confirmed by scintigraphy and CT thereafter.

  12. Sublingual ranula: a closer look to its surgical management.

    PubMed

    Mortellaro, Carmen; Dall'Oca, Susanna; Lucchina, Alberta Greco; Castiglia, Antonino; Farronato, Gianpietro; Fenini, Emanuele; Marenzi, Gaetano; Trosino, Oreste; Cafiero, Carlo; Sammartino, Gilberto

    2008-01-01

    Ranulas have been managed by various surgical methods, and the optimal treatment is still controversial. The aim of this study was to analyze a group of 124 surgically treated patients with intraoral ranula to assess 3 different methods: sublingual gland removal combined with the ranula excision, conventional marsupialization, and a variant of the marsupialization technique usually performed in our departments. Recurrence rate was 0% after radical treatment, 25.8% after marsupialization, and 12% after modified marsupialization. We suggest that conservative methods should always be considered as treatment of superficial oral ranulas. The modification of the conventional marsupialization by suturing the edges of the pseudocyst before unroofing of the lesion was demonstrated to be a useful technical strategy that simplifies and accelerates the surgical procedures and probably contributed to preventing recurrences.

  13. Adenoid cystic carcinoma of the sublingual gland: A case report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) of the sublingual gland is an extremely rare neoplasm. The clinicopathological characteristics of ACC are slow-growing swelling with or without ulceration, perineural spread, local recurrence, and distant metastasis. This report describes a 58-year-old male who had a slowly growing swelling without ulceration on the right side of the mouth floor that had been present for 1 month. In a radiological examination, the mass showed multilocular cystic features and no bony or tongue muscle invasion. No enlarged cervical lymph nodes were detected. Excisional biopsy and histological analysis showed that the lesion was ACC. In addition to reporting a rare case of ACC, this report also discusses the differential diagnosis and treatment of ACC with a review of the relevant literature. PMID:28035309

  14. Sublingual atropine drops for the treatment of pediatric sialorrhea.

    PubMed

    Rapoport, Adam

    2010-11-01

    Excess oral secretions or sialorrhea is a common problem affecting children and adults with neurological disorders, as well as those approaching the end of life because of a variety of underlying illnesses. Systemic anticholinergic medications are often prescribed in an attempt to improve quality of life and reduce complications; yet, response rates are variable, and a sizable proportion of patients discontinue these drugs as a result of intolerable side effects. This report describes the successful use of a local treatment, sublingually delivered ophthalmic atropine drops, to reduce sialorrhea in a child receiving palliative care. In addition, medical evidence for the safety and efficacy of traditionally prescribed systemic medications for the treatment of pediatric sialorrhea is reviewed.

  15. Formulation and evaluation of sublingual tablets containing Sumatriptan succinate

    PubMed Central

    Prajapati, Shailesh T; Patel, Parth B; Patel, Chhagan N

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Sumatriptan succinate is a selective 5-hydroxytryptamine-1 receptor agonist effective in the acute treatment of migraine headaches, having low bioavailability of about 15% orally due to first-pass metabolism. The purpose of this research was to mask the intensely bitter taste of Sumatriptan succinate and to formulate fast-acting, taste-masked sublingual tablet formulation. Materials and Methods: Taste masking was performed by solid dispersion method with mannitol and ion exchange with Kyron T 114 because it releases the drug in salivary pH. The resultant batches were evaluated for in-vivo taste masking as well compatability study (Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC)). For a better feel in the mouth, menthol and sweetener Na saccharine were added to the tablet formulation. The tablets were prepared by direct compression and evaluated for weight variation, thickness, friability, drug content, hardness, disintegration time, wetting time, in vitro drug release, and in vitro permeation study. Results and Discussion: Optimized batches disintegrated in vitro within 28-34 s. Maximum drug release could be achieved with in 10 min for the solid dispersion batches and 14-15 min for the ion-exchange batches with Kyron T 114. The optimized tablet formulation showed better taste and the formulated sublingual tablets may act as a potential alternate for the Sumatriptan succinate oral tablet. Conclusion: Sumatriptan succinate can be successfully taste-masked by both the solid dispersion method using mannitol by the melting method and Ion exchange resin with Kyron T114. It was also concluded that prepared formulation improve bioavailability by prevention of first pass metabolism. PMID:23373008

  16. Alteration of the sublingual microvascular glycocalyx in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Donati, Abele; Damiani, Elisa; Domizi, Roberta; Romano, Rocco; Adrario, Erica; Pelaia, Paolo; Ince, Can; Singer, Mervyn

    2013-11-01

    Glycocalyx degradation may contribute to microvascular dysfunction and tissue hypoperfusion during systemic inflammation and sepsis. In this observational study we evaluated the alteration of the sublingual microvascular glycocalyx in 16 healthy volunteers and 50 critically ill patients. Sidestream Dark Field images of the sublingual microcirculation were automatically analyzed by dedicated software. The Perfused Boundary Region (PBR) was calculated as the dimensions of the permeable part of the glycocalyx allowing the penetration of circulating red blood cells, providing an index of glycocalyx damage. The PBR was increased in ICU patients compared to healthy controls (2.7 [2.59-2.88] vs. 2.46 [2.37-2.59]μm, p<0.0001) and tended to be higher in the 32 septic patients compared to non-septics (2.77 [2.62-2.93] vs. 2.67 [2.55-2.75]μm, p=0.05), suggesting more severe glycocalyx alterations. A PBR of 2.76 showed the best discriminative ability towards the presence of sepsis (sensitivity: 50%, specificity: 83%; area under the receiver operating characteristic curve: 0.67, 95% CI 0.52-0.82, p=0.05). A weak positive correlation was found between PBR and heart rate (r=0.3, p=0.03). In 17 septic patients, a correlation was found between PBR and number of rolling leukocytes in post-capillary venules (RL/venule) (r=0.55, p=0.02), confirming that glycocalyx shedding enhances leukocyte-endothelium interaction.

  17. Effect of protein release rates from tablet formulations on the immune response after sublingual immunization.

    PubMed

    Borde, Annika; Ekman, Annelie; Holmgren, Jan; Larsson, Anette

    2012-11-20

    Dry vaccine formulations for sublingual administration would provide great advantages for public health use, especially in developing countries, since they are easy to administer and might also have improved stability properties. This study investigates the influence of protein release rate from mucoadhesive two-layer tablets on the elicited antibody responses after sublingual immunization. Two fast release tablets, one based on a mixture of lactose and microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) and one protein coated ethylcellulose (EC) tablet, and three hydrophilic matrix tablets with extended release (ER) properties based on HPMC 90 SH 100000 or Carbopol® 974-P NF were tested. The in vitro release profiles of the model protein ovalbumin (OVA) from these tablets were characterized and correlated to the in vivo potential of the tablets to induce an immune response after sublingual immunization in BALB/c mice. It could be concluded that a tablet with fast protein release elicits antibody titres not significantly different from titres obtained with OVA in solution, whereas low immune responses were observed with a slow release of OVA from the ER formulations. Thus, an ER tablet seems not favorable for vaccine delivery to the sublingual mucosa. Thus, we can present a fast releasing tablet formulation with attractive features for sublingual immunization, whereas the use of ER formulations for sublingual vaccination has to be investigated more in detail.

  18. Haemodynamics and plasma concentrations following sublingual GTN and intravenous, or inhaled, isosorbide dinitrate.

    PubMed Central

    Culling, W; Singh, H; Bashir, A; Griffiths, B E; Dalal, J J; Sheridan, D J

    1984-01-01

    We measured plasma nitrate levels and haemodynamics following sublingual glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) (0.5 mg), or isosorbide dinitrate (ISDN) administered intravenously (0.5 mg) or by inhalation (1.25 mg) in 23 patients undergoing cardiac catheterisation for investigation of chest pain. Peak levels were detected at 90 s and 5 min following intravenous and inhaled ISDN respectively and at 3 min following sublingual GTN. Intravenous and inhaled ISDN produced similar plasma levels at 30 s and both were significantly greater than following sublingual GTN. Plasma levels were maintained for longer following inhaled ISDN than intravenous ISDN or sublingual GTN. Haemodynamic responses were qualitatively similar following each treatment; reduction in pulmonary vascular resistance and pressure and left ventricular end diastolic pressure occurred in each group. Heart rate, cardiac output and LV dP/dt.P-1 remained unchanged. Maximal haemodynamic responses were greater following ISDN than GTN, with little difference between the two preparations of ISDN. Haemodynamic responses were more sustained following inhaled ISDN than following sublingual GTN or intravenous ISDN, the latter two being similar in this respect. These findings suggest that inhaled ISDN may provide more rapid and sustained relief from angina than sublingual GTN. PMID:6422972

  19. Immunotherapy: Disrupting the Cancer Treatment World

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Immunotherapy Treatment Immunotherapy: Disrupting the Cancer Treatment World Jun 16, 2014 This story is part of ... Research We Conduct Back To Top Imagine a world free from cancer. Help make it a reality. ...

  20. Biologic Therapy (Immunotherapy) for Kidney Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stage for Kidney Cancer Kidney Cancer Treating Kidney Cancer Biologic Therapy (Immunotherapy) for Kidney Cancer The goal of biologic therapy ... Therapy for Kidney Cancer Targeted Therapies for Kidney Cancer Biologic Therapy (Immunotherapy) for Kidney Cancer Chemotherapy for Kidney Cancer Pain ...

  1. HTLV-1-targeted immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Suehiro, Youko

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) is a HTLV-1 induced T-cell malignancy with an extremely poor prognosis. There is a long latency period between HTLV-1 infection and the onset of ATL, which indicates the existence of multistep mechanisms of leukemogenesis in the infected cells. Tax, which is encoded by the HTLV-1 pX region, plays a crucial role in HTLV-1 leukemogenesis and is a major target of CTL. We developed an anti-ATL therapeutic vaccine consisting of autologous dendritic cells that is pulsed with Tax peptides (Tax-DC). The vaccination protocol was completed with three injections at a 2-week interval, within one month. Good quality of life and long-term treatment-free survival were observed for more than 3 years in two of the three patients enrolled in the pilot study. Furthermore, the proviral load remained mostly around the carrier level, with minor fluctuation, after vaccination. Tax-specific proliferative CTL responses were observed in all cases and sporadically augmented responses were also subsequently detected. The Tax-DC vaccine might be a well-tolerated and long-lasting maintenance therapy that is acceptable even for elderly patients. Based on the encouraging results, we are now conducting a clinical trial of Tax-DC vaccine combined with anti-CCR4 antibody to enhance the efficacy of the vaccine as next-generation immunotherapy.

  2. Lymphoma Immunotherapy: Current Status

    PubMed Central

    Zappasodi, Roberta; de Braud, Filippo; Di Nicola, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    The rationale to treat lymphomas with immunotherapy comes from long-standing evidence on their distinctive immune responsiveness. Indolent B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas, in particular, establish key interactions with the immune microenvironment to ensure prosurvival signals and prevent antitumor immune activation. However, reports of spontaneous regressions indicate that, under certain circumstances, patients develop therapeutic antitumor immunity. Several immunotherapeutic approaches have been thus developed to boost these effects in all patients. To date, targeting CD20 on malignant B cells with the antibody rituximab has been the most clinically effective strategy. However, relapse and resistance prevent to cure approximately half of B-NHL patients, underscoring the need of more effective therapies. The recognition of B-cell receptor variable regions as B-NHL unique antigens promoted the development of specific vaccines to immunize patients against their own tumor. Despite initial promising results, this strategy has not yet demonstrated a sufficient clinical benefit to reach the regulatory approval. Several novel agents are now available to stimulate immune effector functions or counteract immunosuppressive mechanisms, such as engineered antitumor T cells, co-stimulatory receptor agonist, and immune checkpoint-blocking antibodies. Thus, multiple elements can now be exploited in more effective combinations to break the barriers for the induction of anti-lymphoma immunity. PMID:26388871

  3. Clinical benefits of treatment with SQ house dust mite sublingual tablet in house dust mite allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Kristian Funding; Demoly, Pascal; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Rehm, Dorte

    2017-03-08

    Treatment with SQ house dust mite sublingual tablet for 1 year resulted in a decreased probability of having an allergic rhinitis exacerbation day (from 11% (placebo) to 5% (SQ house dust mite sublingual tablet)) and an increased probability of having a mild allergic rhinitis day (from 16% (placebo) to 34% (SQ house dust mite sublingual tablet)). This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Innovative Strategies for Breast Cancer Immunotherapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0223 TITLE: Innovative Strategies for Breast Cancer Immunotherapy ...studies (2). A promising approach in cancer treatment is adoptive immunotherapy using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered T cells to redirect...multiple tissues. DISCUSSION Adoptive immunotherapy is a promising approach for the treatment of cancer , and observations from preclinical and

  5. Immunotherapy and mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Carlos, A G; Carlos, M L; Santos, M A; Pedro, E; Santos, S; Lopes-Pregal, A

    1998-10-01

    Tryptase is the more specific markers for mast cell activation and mediators release and can be used as an index of mast cell activation after challenge. Nasal provocation tests have been done in patients allergic to the pollen of Parietaria (pellitory wall) before and after specific systemic immunotherapy and tryptase release evaluated in nasal lavage fluid. After specific immunotherapy the concentration of tryptase in nasal lavage was significantly decreased to all the concentrations used in challenge and the peack of tryptase release was delayed. These results confirm that assays of tryptase in nasal fluid after nasal provocation are a reliable markers of mast cell activation. Immunotherapy with specific allergen decreases mast cell reactivity to the same allergen.

  6. Emerging nanotechnologies for cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Steinmetz, Nicole F

    2016-01-01

    Founded on the growing insight into the complex cancer-immune system interactions, adjuvant immunotherapies are rapidly emerging and being adapted for the treatment of various human malignancies. Immune checkpoint inhibitors, for example, have already shown clinical success. Nevertheless, many approaches are not optimized, require frequent administration, are associated with systemic toxicities and only show modest efficacy as monotherapies. Nanotechnology can potentially enhance the efficacy of such immunotherapies by improving the delivery, retention and release of immunostimulatory agents and biologicals in targeted cell populations and tissues. This review presents the current status and emerging trends in such nanotechnology-based cancer immunotherapies including the role of nanoparticles as carriers of immunomodulators, nanoparticles-based cancer vaccines, and depots for sustained immunostimulation. Also highlighted are key translational challenges and opportunities in this rapidly growing field. PMID:27190253

  7. Immunotherapy for Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wisniewski, Thomas; Goni, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia worldwide. In AD the normal soluble amyloid β (sAβ) peptide is converted into oligomeric/fibrillar Aβ. The oligomeric forms of Aβ are thought to be the most toxic, while fibrillar Aβ becomes deposited as amyloid plaques and congophilic angiopathy, which serve as neuropathological markers of the disease. In addition the accumulation of abnormally phosphorylated tau as soluble toxic oligomers and as neurofibrillary tangles is a critical part of the pathology. Numerous therapeutic interventions are under investigation to prevent and treat AD. Among the more exciting and advanced of these approaches is vaccination. Active and passive Immunotherapy targeting only Aβ has been successful in many AD model animal trials; however, the more limited human data has shown much less benefit so far, with encephalitis occurring in a minority of patients treated with active immunization and vasogenic edema or amyloid-related imaging abnormalities (ARIA) being a complication in some passive immunization trials. Therapeutic intervention targeting only tau has been tested only in mouse models; and no approaches targeting both pathologies concurrently has been attempted, until very recently. The immune approaches tried so far were targeting a self-protein, albeit in an abnormal conformation; however, effective enhanced clearance of the disease associated conformer has to be balanced with the potential risk of stimulating excessive toxic inflammation. The design of future more effective immunomodulatory approaches will need to target all aspects of AD pathology, as well as specifically targeting pathological oligomeric conformers, without the use of any self-antigen. PMID:24412277

  8. Immunotherapy of Childhood Sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Stephen S.; Chou, Alexander J.; Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric sarcomas are a heterogeneous group of malignant tumors of bone and soft tissue origin. Although more than 100 different histologic subtypes have been described, the majority of pediatric cases belong to the Ewing’s family of tumors, rhabdomyosarcoma and osteosarcoma. Most patients that present with localized stage are curable with surgery and/or chemotherapy; however, those with metastatic disease at diagnosis or those who experience a relapse continue to have a very poor prognosis. New therapies for these patients are urgently needed. Immunotherapy is an established treatment modality for both liquid and solid tumors, and in pediatrics, most notably for neuroblastoma and osteosarcoma. In the past, immunomodulatory agents such as interferon, interleukin-2, and liposomal-muramyl tripeptide phosphatidyl-ethanolamine have been tried, with some activity seen in subsets of patients; additionally, various cancer vaccines have been studied with possible benefit. Monoclonal antibody therapies against tumor antigens such as disialoganglioside GD2 or immune checkpoint targets such as CTLA-4 and PD-1 are being actively explored in pediatric sarcomas. Building on the success of adoptive T cell therapy for EBV-related lymphoma, strategies to redirect T cells using chimeric antigen receptors and bispecific antibodies are rapidly evolving with potential for the treatment of sarcomas. This review will focus on recent preclinical and clinical developments in targeted agents for pediatric sarcomas with emphasis on the immunobiology of immune checkpoints, immunoediting, tumor microenvironment, antibody engineering, cell engineering, and tumor vaccines. The future integration of antibody-based and cell-based therapies into an overall treatment strategy of sarcoma will be discussed. PMID:26301204

  9. Cancer immunotherapy using tumor cryoablation.

    PubMed

    Sidana, Abhinav

    2014-01-01

    Cryoablation is increasingly being used as a primary treatment for localized cancers and as a salvage therapy for metastatic cancers. Anecdotal clinical reports and animal experiments have confirmed an induction of systemic antitumor immune response by tumor cryoablation. To capitalize on the stimulatory effects of cryoablation for cancer immunotherapy, this response must be intensified using other immunomodulatory agents. This article reviews the preclinical and clinical evidence and discusses the mechanism of the antitumor immune response generated by cryoablation. The rationale and evidence behind several immunotherapy approaches that can be combined with cryoablation to devise a cryoimmunotherapeutic strategy with a potential to impact the progression of metastatic disease are described.

  10. Sublingual glyceryl trinitrate during colonoscopy and terminal ileal intubation: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Hill, Patsy-Anne; Panteleimonitis, Sofoklis; McKay, Graham; Watson, Carol; Prach, Andre; Macdonald, Angus

    2017-02-01

    Background and aims Sublingual glyceryl trinitrate has been used as an aid to cannulate the Sphincter of Oddi during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Its role in terminal ileal intubation during colonoscopy is unknown. This study examines the role of sublingual glyceryl trinitrate in terminal ileal intubation during colonoscopy. Methods A triple-blind randomized controlled trial comparing sublingual glyceryl trinitrate (800 µg) vs. placebo (saline) in relation to terminal ileal intubation during colonoscopy was performed. Following caecal intubation, participants received sublingual glyceryl trinitrate/placebo followed by a 2-min observation period before intubation was attempted. Data on time to intubate the terminal ileum and intubation rate were collected. Results A total of 110 patients (age: 58 years (18-75)) were recruited and randomised as per protocol: 54 received sublingual glyceryl trinitrate. Terminal ileal intubation was successful in all patients receiving sublingual glyceryl trinitrate and in 53 (94.6%) of those receiving saline ( p = 0.243: Fischer's exact). The median time taken for ileal intubation after application of spray was 72.5 (7-900) s in the glyceryl trinitrate group compared with 125 (5-900) s in the placebo group ( p = 0.150: Mann-Whitney). There were no major adverse events reported in either group. Conclusions Terminal ileal intubation rates and timing were very good in both groups. Routine sublingual glyceryl trinitrate was not proven to be beneficial in improving terminal ileal intubation or intubation success rates in the hands of experienced colonoscopists. However, trends in this small study might suggest that glyceryl trinitrate could be useful in the hands of less experienced colonoscopists or in difficult terminal ileal intubation cases.

  11. Immunotherapy and gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Elizabeth

    2004-02-01

    The Immunotherapy and Gene Therapy meeting of the Academy of Medical Sciences reviewed the state-of-the-art and translational prospects for therapeutic interventions aimed at killing tumor cells, correcting genetic defects and developing vaccines for chronic infections. Crucial basic science concepts and information about dendritic cells, the structure and function of T-cell receptors, and manipulation of the immune response by cytokine antagonists and peptides were presented. This information underpins vaccine design and delivery, as well as attempts to immunomodulate autoimmune disease. Results from studies using anticancer DNA vaccines, which include appropriate signals for both the innate and adaptive immune response, were presented in several talks. The vaccines incorporated helper epitopes and cancer target epitopes such as immunoglobulin idiotypes (for lymphomas and myelomas), melanoma-associated antigens (for melanoma and other solid tumors) and minor histocompatibility antigens (for leukemia). The results of using vaccines employing similar principles and designed to reduce viral load in HIV/AIDS patients were also presented. The introduction of suicide genes incorporating the bacterial enzyme nitroreductase gene (ntr) targeted at tumor cells prior to administration of the prodrug CB-1954, converted by ntr into a toxic alkylating agent, was discussed against the background of clinical trials and improved suicide gene design. The introduction into hematopoietic stem cells of missing genes for the common gamma-chain, deficiency of which causes severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), used similar retroviral transduction. The outcome of treating six SCID patients in the UK, and ten in France was successful immune reconstitution in the majority of patients, but in two of the French cases a complication of lymphoproliferative disease due to insertional mutagenesis was observed. The adoptive transfer of T-cells specific for minor histocompatibility antigens (for

  12. Update on Allergy Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    This article summarizes and provides commentary regarding guidelines on the administration of immunotherapy (IT) for allergic airway disease. Recent investigations have provided important insights into the immunologic mechanism of IT and the prominent role of interleukin-10-producing regulatory T lymphocytes. The most important aspect of successful IT is the administration of an appropriate dose of an extract containing a sufficient concentration of the relevant allergen. This is largely possible now only with standardized extracts. When the major allergen content of successful IT extracts was quantified, efficacy was demonstrated across a surprisingly narrow concentration range (approximately 5-24 μg per injection), irrespective of the extract. This presumably reflects the concentration of an antigen that drives an immune response toward tolerance. It may be predicted that as major allergen content is quantified in currently nonstandardized extracts, effective IT will also be achieved by administering a dose in this range, in contrast to current practices involving fairly arbitrary dosing decisions. With the availability of nonsedating antihistamines, intranasal corticosteroids, and the leukotriene modifiers, inadequate pharmacologic response or intolerable side effects are less commonly the major indications for starting IT for allergic rhinitis (AR). However, with the recognition that a relatively short course (3-5 years) of IT can provide long-term immunomodulation and clinical benefit, a desire to avoid long-term pharmacotherapy and the associated high costs may be the primary indication for IT in AR cases. While evidence overwhelmingly supports the beneficial influences of IT in asthma cases, the positioning of IT for this disorder is not established. The observed prevention of asthma in children who have AR is intriguing, but further studies are required to assess the extent to which the prevalence and severity of chronic asthma will be reduced when these

  13. Engineering opportunities in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jeanbart, Laura; Swartz, Melody A

    2015-11-24

    Immunotherapy has great potential to treat cancer and prevent future relapse by activating the immune system to recognize and kill cancer cells. A variety of strategies are continuing to evolve in the laboratory and in the clinic, including therapeutic noncellular (vector-based or subunit) cancer vaccines, dendritic cell vaccines, engineered T cells, and immune checkpoint blockade. Despite their promise, much more research is needed to understand how and why certain cancers fail to respond to immunotherapy and to predict which therapeutic strategies, or combinations thereof, are most appropriate for each patient. Underlying these challenges are technological needs, including methods to rapidly and thoroughly characterize the immune microenvironment of tumors, predictive tools to screen potential therapies in patient-specific ways, and sensitive, information-rich assays that allow patient monitoring of immune responses, tumor regression, and tumor dissemination during and after therapy. The newly emerging field of immunoengineering is addressing some of these challenges, and there is ample opportunity for engineers to contribute their approaches and tools to further facilitate the clinical translation of immunotherapy. Here we highlight recent technological advances in the diagnosis, therapy, and monitoring of cancer in the context of immunotherapy, as well as ongoing challenges.

  14. Future perspectives in cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Mountzios, Giannis; Curigliano, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The advent of immunotherapy has transformed the treatment paradigm of several solid tumors and is expected to influence the therapeutic algorithm even more in the future following the results of numerous ongoing clinical trials in a wide range of malignancies. Exploiting the anti-cancer effect of the immune system with the use of vaccines, viral vectors, and more lately with immune check-point inhibitors and chimeric antigen receptor modification, has been proven a successful therapeutic strategy in a broad spectrum of tumors. In particular, immune check-point inhibition in melanoma, non-small-cell lung cancer and renal cancer, peptide vaccination in prostate cancer and glioblastoma, and oncolytic immunotherapy in melanoma are well-established therapeutic modalities that have obtained approval by regulatory authorities and are already in clinical use. A large number of ongoing clinical trials involving thousands of patients are currently seeking to define the appropriate tumor type, therapeutic setting, treatment combination and patient populations in order to maximize clinical benefit from immunotherapeutic agents. In this context, identification of the patients whose tumors are most likely to respond to immunotherapy by the use of appropriate biomarkers will be crucial for the optimal implementation of immunotherapy into the therapeutic armamentarium. PMID:27563660

  15. Engineering opportunities in cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Jeanbart, Laura; Swartz, Melody A.

    2015-01-01

    Immunotherapy has great potential to treat cancer and prevent future relapse by activating the immune system to recognize and kill cancer cells. A variety of strategies are continuing to evolve in the laboratory and in the clinic, including therapeutic noncellular (vector-based or subunit) cancer vaccines, dendritic cell vaccines, engineered T cells, and immune checkpoint blockade. Despite their promise, much more research is needed to understand how and why certain cancers fail to respond to immunotherapy and to predict which therapeutic strategies, or combinations thereof, are most appropriate for each patient. Underlying these challenges are technological needs, including methods to rapidly and thoroughly characterize the immune microenvironment of tumors, predictive tools to screen potential therapies in patient-specific ways, and sensitive, information-rich assays that allow patient monitoring of immune responses, tumor regression, and tumor dissemination during and after therapy. The newly emerging field of immunoengineering is addressing some of these challenges, and there is ample opportunity for engineers to contribute their approaches and tools to further facilitate the clinical translation of immunotherapy. Here we highlight recent technological advances in the diagnosis, therapy, and monitoring of cancer in the context of immunotherapy, as well as ongoing challenges. PMID:26598681

  16. Classification of current anticancer immunotherapies.

    PubMed

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Vacchelli, Erika; Bravo-San Pedro, José-Manuel; Buqué, Aitziber; Senovilla, Laura; Baracco, Elisa Elena; Bloy, Norma; Castoldi, Francesca; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Agostinis, Patrizia; Apte, Ron N; Aranda, Fernando; Ayyoub, Maha; Beckhove, Philipp; Blay, Jean-Yves; Bracci, Laura; Caignard, Anne; Castelli, Chiara; Cavallo, Federica; Celis, Estaban; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Clayton, Aled; Colombo, Mario P; Coussens, Lisa; Dhodapkar, Madhav V; Eggermont, Alexander M; Fearon, Douglas T; Fridman, Wolf H; Fučíková, Jitka; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I; Galon, Jérôme; Garg, Abhishek; Ghiringhelli, François; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Gilboa, Eli; Gnjatic, Sacha; Hoos, Axel; Hosmalin, Anne; Jäger, Dirk; Kalinski, Pawel; Kärre, Klas; Kepp, Oliver; Kiessling, Rolf; Kirkwood, John M; Klein, Eva; Knuth, Alexander; Lewis, Claire E; Liblau, Roland; Lotze, Michael T; Lugli, Enrico; Mach, Jean-Pierre; Mattei, Fabrizio; Mavilio, Domenico; Melero, Ignacio; Melief, Cornelis J; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A; Moretta, Lorenzo; Odunsi, Adekunke; Okada, Hideho; Palucka, Anna Karolina; Peter, Marcus E; Pienta, Kenneth J; Porgador, Angel; Prendergast, George C; Rabinovich, Gabriel A; Restifo, Nicholas P; Rizvi, Naiyer; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Schreiber, Hans; Seliger, Barbara; Shiku, Hiroshi; Silva-Santos, Bruno; Smyth, Mark J; Speiser, Daniel E; Spisek, Radek; Srivastava, Pramod K; Talmadge, James E; Tartour, Eric; Van Der Burg, Sjoerd H; Van Den Eynde, Benoît J; Vile, Richard; Wagner, Hermann; Weber, Jeffrey S; Whiteside, Theresa L; Wolchok, Jedd D; Zitvogel, Laurence; Zou, Weiping; Kroemer, Guido

    2014-12-30

    During the past decades, anticancer immunotherapy has evolved from a promising therapeutic option to a robust clinical reality. Many immunotherapeutic regimens are now approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency for use in cancer patients, and many others are being investigated as standalone therapeutic interventions or combined with conventional treatments in clinical studies. Immunotherapies may be subdivided into "passive" and "active" based on their ability to engage the host immune system against cancer. Since the anticancer activity of most passive immunotherapeutics (including tumor-targeting monoclonal antibodies) also relies on the host immune system, this classification does not properly reflect the complexity of the drug-host-tumor interaction. Alternatively, anticancer immunotherapeutics can be classified according to their antigen specificity. While some immunotherapies specifically target one (or a few) defined tumor-associated antigen(s), others operate in a relatively non-specific manner and boost natural or therapy-elicited anticancer immune responses of unknown and often broad specificity. Here, we propose a critical, integrated classification of anticancer immunotherapies and discuss the clinical relevance of these approaches.

  17. Classification of current anticancer immunotherapies

    PubMed Central

    Vacchelli, Erika; Pedro, José-Manuel Bravo-San; Buqué, Aitziber; Senovilla, Laura; Baracco, Elisa Elena; Bloy, Norma; Castoldi, Francesca; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Agostinis, Patrizia; Apte, Ron N.; Aranda, Fernando; Ayyoub, Maha; Beckhove, Philipp; Blay, Jean-Yves; Bracci, Laura; Caignard, Anne; Castelli, Chiara; Cavallo, Federica; Celis, Estaban; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Clayton, Aled; Colombo, Mario P.; Coussens, Lisa; Dhodapkar, Madhav V.; Eggermont, Alexander M.; Fearon, Douglas T.; Fridman, Wolf H.; Fučíková, Jitka; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.; Galon, Jérôme; Garg, Abhishek; Ghiringhelli, François; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Gilboa, Eli; Gnjatic, Sacha; Hoos, Axel; Hosmalin, Anne; Jäger, Dirk; Kalinski, Pawel; Kärre, Klas; Kepp, Oliver; Kiessling, Rolf; Kirkwood, John M.; Klein, Eva; Knuth, Alexander; Lewis, Claire E.; Liblau, Roland; Lotze, Michael T.; Lugli, Enrico; Mach, Jean-Pierre; Mattei, Fabrizio; Mavilio, Domenico; Melero, Ignacio; Melief, Cornelis J.; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A.; Moretta, Lorenzo; Odunsi, Adekunke; Okada, Hideho; Palucka, Anna Karolina; Peter, Marcus E.; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Porgador, Angel; Prendergast, George C.; Rabinovich, Gabriel A.; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Rizvi, Naiyer; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Schreiber, Hans; Seliger, Barbara; Shiku, Hiroshi; Silva-Santos, Bruno; Smyth, Mark J.; Speiser, Daniel E.; Spisek, Radek; Srivastava, Pramod K.; Talmadge, James E.; Tartour, Eric; Van Der Burg, Sjoerd H.; Van Den Eynde, Benoît J.; Vile, Richard; Wagner, Hermann; Weber, Jeffrey S.; Whiteside, Theresa L.; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Zitvogel, Laurence; Zou, Weiping

    2014-01-01

    During the past decades, anticancer immunotherapy has evolved from a promising therapeutic option to a robust clinical reality. Many immunotherapeutic regimens are now approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency for use in cancer patients, and many others are being investigated as standalone therapeutic interventions or combined with conventional treatments in clinical studies. Immunotherapies may be subdivided into “passive” and “active” based on their ability to engage the host immune system against cancer. Since the anticancer activity of most passive immunotherapeutics (including tumor-targeting monoclonal antibodies) also relies on the host immune system, this classification does not properly reflect the complexity of the drug-host-tumor interaction. Alternatively, anticancer immunotherapeutics can be classified according to their antigen specificity. While some immunotherapies specifically target one (or a few) defined tumor-associated antigen(s), others operate in a relatively non-specific manner and boost natural or therapy-elicited anticancer immune responses of unknown and often broad specificity. Here, we propose a critical, integrated classification of anticancer immunotherapies and discuss the clinical relevance of these approaches. PMID:25537519

  18. Sublingual-plunging ranula as a complication of supraomohyoid neck dissection.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Eva-Maria; Vasilios, Banikas; Maria, Lazaridou; Styliani, Papaemmanouil; Konstantinos, Antoniades

    2011-01-01

    Ranulas are rare cystic lesions resulting from damage or rupture of one or more of the ducts of the sublingual gland, that lead to mucus extravasation or dilatation of the gland's duct. Extravasation cysts are more common than retention cysts. We present a case of a 45-year-old male with a squamous cell carcinoma of the ventral surface of the tongue that was treated with excision of the oral lesion and bilateral supraomohyoid neck dissection without supplementary radiotherapy. A left myocutaneous platysma flap was raised for defect closure. Ten months postoperatively he presented complaining of swelling of the right submandibular region. The diagnosis, based on his medical anamnesis and the CT imaging, was a sublingual-plunging ranula. It is postulated that the ranula resulted from damage to the ducts of the sublingual gland during selective neck dissection. One year postoperatively there are no signs of recurrence either of the ranula or of the cancer. We suggest that sublingual gland excision and intraoral cyst marsupialization is a logical treatment for sublingual-plunging ranulas.

  19. The effect of sublingual captopril versus intravenous enalaprilat on angiotensin II plasma levels.

    PubMed

    van Onzenoort, Hein A; Bussink, Michiel; Menheere, Paul P; van Mook, Walther N; van der Kuy, Paul-Hugo M

    2006-06-01

    A 44-year-old woman, with a history of familial adenomatous polyposis, complicated by carcinoma of the colon, for which a proctocolectomy had been performed, now presented with metastasis located in the pancreas. Treatment consisted of chemotherapy followed by a partial pancreaticoduodenectomy. Due to ischemia, resection of the small intestines was performed the same day. After admission, a transesophageal echocardiography showed an ejection fraction of 40%. Because enteral administration of drugs was impossible, intravenous enalaprilat 2 mg once a day for 1 day followed by sublingual captopril 25 mg twice a day were started. Blood samples were taken before and after administration. After 1 day of sublingual captopril treatment the angiotensin II level decreased with more than 50%, comparable to the decrease seen after intravenous administration of enalaprilat. Sublingual captopril has been used in the treatment of hypertensive crisis and heart failure. Although frequently reported, no study has investigated the effect on angiotensin II levels after sublingual administration in heart failure patients. This case-report demonstrated that sublingual administration of 25 mg captopril twice a day yielded a considerable decrease in angiotensin II plasma levels which was comparable to the effect seen after an intravenous administration of 2 mg enalaprilat.

  20. Sublingual vaccination induces mucosal and systemic adaptive immunity for protection against lung tumor challenge.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shailbala; Yang, Guojun; Schluns, Kimberly S; Anthony, Scott M; Sastry, K Jagannadha

    2014-01-01

    Sublingual route offers a safer and more practical approach for delivering vaccines relative to other systemic and mucosal immunization strategies. Here we present evidence demonstrating protection against ovalbumin expressing B16 (B16-OVA) metastatic melanoma lung tumor formation by sublingual vaccination with the model tumor antigen OVA plus synthetic glycolipid alpha-galactosylceramide (aGalCer) for harnessing the adjuvant potential of natural killer T (NKT) cells, which effectively bridge innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. The protective efficacy of immunization with OVA plus aGalCer was antigen-specific as immunized mice challenged with parental B16 tumors lacking OVA expression were not protected. Multiple sublingual immunizations in the presence, but not in the absence of aGalCer, resulted in repeated activation of NKT cells in the draining lymph nodes, spleens, and lungs of immunized animals concurrent with progressively increasing OVA-specific CD8+ T cell responses as well as serum IgG and vaginal IgA levels. Furthermore, sublingual administration of the antigen only in the presence of the aGalCer adjuvant effectively boosted the OVA-specific immune responses. These results support potential clinical utility of sublingual route of vaccination with aGalCer-for prevention of pulmonary metastases.

  1. COMPARISON BETWEEN SUBLINGUAL AND VAGINAL ROUTE OF MISOPROSTOL IN MANAGEMENT OF FIRST TRIMESTER MISCARRIAGE MISSING

    PubMed Central

    Dehbashi, Zahra; Moosazadeh, Mahmood; Afshari, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Each year, more than forty million abortions are occurred whole of the world. Misoprostol is a prostaglandin analogue with a strong uterotonic effect. The present study aimed to compare the efficacy of Misoprostol in first trimester abortion through two sublingual and vaginal routes of administration. Methods: This randomized clinical trial was conducted on 52 consecutive women in first trimester candidate for pregnancy termination because of fetal IUFD or missed abortion in sonography reports. The patients were hospitalized and then randomly assigned to receive sublingual Misoprostol (400 µg, n 27) or vaginal Misoprostol (400 µg placed in posterior fornix, n = 25). Findings: None of the pregnant in the sublingual group developed complete abortion at the end of follow-up time, while 36% of women inducted with vaginal misoprostol experienced complete abortion indicating a intergroup significant difference (p = 0.001). Compared with vaginal group, those women in sublingual group experienced more complications including diarrhea (22.2% versus 20.0%), nausea and vomiting (22.2% versus 0.0%), and abdominal pain (3.7% versus 0.0%). Conclusion: The use of Misoprostol in vaginal route results in more abortion completeness as well as lower complication rate as compared to sublingual prescription of the drug. PMID:27698600

  2. Allergen immunotherapy: clinical and practical education of Italian trainees in allergy and clinical immunology schools.

    PubMed

    Ridolo, E; Incorvaia, C; Senna, G E; Montagni, M; Olivieri, E; Canonica, G W

    2013-10-01

    We performed a survey, based on a questionnaire including 20 items, submitted anonymously to Italian trainees in Allergology and Clinical Immunology, in order to obtain information about their specific allergen immunotherapy (AIT) practices. The questionnaire was sent to 40 trainees, who had attended the last two years of the training course. Thirty-four subjects (mean age: 27 years, 65% females) adequately completed the survey. The answers to the questionnaire showed that only 60% of the training programs included lectures on AIT. Among the trainees using AIT, only 40% declared being able to prescribe it independently, while 60% were guided by a tutor. Of the trainees who were able to prescribe AIT autonomously, 60% were familiar with both routes of administration, i.e. subcutaneous (SCIT) and sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT), while 25% of these used only SLIT. In 80% of the training institutions involved, the trainees could attend a dedicated AIT outpatient ward for SCIT administration; only 40% administered AIT personally, and in half of these cases, they were guided by a tutor. Only 70% of trainees had experience in the follow-up of patients still under treatment and of patients who had completed treatment. Analysis of the answers obtained for questions on venom immunotherapy (VIT) showed that, in 90% of cases, the trainees attended a dedicated outpatients ward where VIT is administered, but with a role limited to observation/cooperation. Only 30% were involved in the follow-up of patients who were under treatment or who had completed VIT. Only 20% of the trainees felt confident enough about VIT to prescribe this treatment independently, 80% knew there were several administration protocols, and the majority prescribed products from three different manufacturers. These findings suggest that there is significant room for improving the instructions provided regarding allergology and clinical immunology to trainees in Italy with respect to AIT.

  3. Improving the safety of oral immunotherapy for food allergy.

    PubMed

    Vazquez-Ortiz, Marta; Turner, Paul J

    2016-03-01

    Food allergy is a major public health problem in children, impacting upon the affected individual, their families and others charged with their care, for example educational establishments, and the food industry. In contrast to most other paediatric diseases, there is no established cure: current management is based upon dietary avoidance and the provision of rescue medication in the event of accidental reactions, which are common. This strategy has significant limitations and impacts adversely on health-related quality of life. In the last decade, research into disease-modifying treatments for food allergy has emerged, predominantly for peanut, egg and cow's milk. Most studies have used the oral route (oral immunotherapy, OIT), in which increasing amounts of allergen are given over weeks-months. OIT has proven effective to induce immune modulation and 'desensitization' - that is, an increase in the amount of food allergen that can be consumed, so long as regular (typically daily) doses are continued. However, its ability to induce permanent tolerance once ongoing exposure has stopped seems limited. Additionally, the short- and long-term safety of OIT is often poorly reported, raising concerns about its implementation in routine practice. Most patients experience allergic reactions and, although generally mild, severe reactions have occurred. Long-term adherence is unclear, which rises concerns given the low rates of long-term tolerance induction. Current research focuses on improving current limitations, especially safety. Strategies include alternative routes (sublingual, epicutaneous), modified hypoallergenic products and adjuvants (anti-IgE, pre-/probiotics). Biomarkers of safe/successful OIT are also under investigation.

  4. Biomarkers for Monitoring Clinical Efficacy of Allergen Immunotherapy for Allergic Rhinoconjunctivitis and Allergic Asthma: an EAACI Position Paper.

    PubMed

    Shamji, M H; Kappen, J H; Akdis, M; Jensen-Jarolim, E; Knol, E F; Kleine-Tebbe, J; Bohle, B; Chaker, A M; Till, S J; Valenta, R; Poulsen, L K; Calderon, M A; Demoly, P; Pfaar, O; Jacobsen, L; Durham, S R; Schmidt-Weber, C B

    2017-02-02

    Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) is an effective treatment for allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (AR) with or without asthma (1-12). AIT has disease modifying properties and confers long-term clinical benefit after cessation of treatment (6, 7, 13-17). AIT is routinely used in daily practice and can be administered either subcutaneously (SCIT) or sublingually (SLIT) (3-12). Although AIT is effective, the degree of remission strongly varies depending on the complex interaction between patient, allergy, symptomatology and vaccines used for AIT (3-9). Clinical management of patients receiving AIT and efficacy in randomised controlled trials for drug development could be significantly enhanced if there were means to identify those who are most likely to respond, when to stop treatment, how to predict relapse and when to perform booster AIT. Furthermore, biomarkers in AIT can play a central role in personalized medicine (18). This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Accidental displacement of a dental implant into the sublingual space: A Case report

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Solís, José; Marín-Fernández, Ana-Belén; Valencia-Laseca, Alfredo; Monsalve-Iglesias, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Dental implant surgery is continuously expanding. In fact, every day more and more surgeons are choosing dental implants for allowing great results in the field of oral rehabilitation. However, these procedures are not exempt from complications. This report presents the case of a 66 years old man underwent implant surgery by a specialized dentist. No problems were reported during implant placement. Despite this, three months later, it was displaced into the sublingual space at the time of uncovering. Against this backdrop, the patient was referred to an expert maxillofacial surgeon. Next day, the implant was removed using an intraoral approach to reach the sublingual space. According with our knowledge, there are no cases reported in the literature that describe this complication. Key words:Dental implant, sublingual space, bone atrophy, complications of oral surgery. PMID:27703616

  6. [Cancer immunotherapy by immuno-checkpoint blockade].

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Yutaka

    2015-10-01

    As cancer immunotherapies utilizing anti-tumor T-cell responses, immuno-checkpoint blockade and adoptive T-cell immunotherapy have recently achieved durable responses even in advanced cancer patients with metastases. Administration of antibodies on the T-cell surface, CTLA-4 and PD-1 (or PD-1 ligand PD-L1), resulted in tumor regression of not only melanoma and renal cell cancer which were known to be relatively sensitive to immunotherapy, but also various malignancies including lung, bladder, ovarian, gastric, and head and neck cancers, as well as hematological malignancies such as Hodgkin and B-cell malignant lymphomas. These findings have changed the status of immunotherapy in the development of cancer treatments. Currently, development of combinations employing cancer immunotherapy with immuno-checkpoint blockade, as well as personalized cancer immunotherapy based on the evaluation of pretreatment immune status, are in progress.

  7. Lentiviral vectors in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Oldham, Robyn Aa; Berinstein, Elliot M; Medin, Jeffrey A

    2015-01-01

    Basic science advances in cancer immunotherapy have resulted in various treatments that have recently shown success in the clinic. Many of these therapies require the insertion of genes into cells to directly kill them or to redirect the host's cells to induce potent immune responses. Other analogous therapies work by modifying effector cells for improved targeting and enhanced killing of tumor cells. Initial studies done using γ-retroviruses were promising, but safety concerns centered on the potential for insertional mutagenesis have highlighted the desire to develop other options for gene delivery. Lentiviral vectors (LVs) have been identified as potentially more effective and safer alternative delivery vehicles. LVs are now in use in clinical trials for many different types of inherited and acquired disorders, including cancer. This review will discuss current knowledge of LVs and the applications of this viral vector-based delivery vehicle to cancer immunotherapy.

  8. New checkpoints in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ni, Ling; Dong, Chen

    2017-03-01

    Immune responses must be fine-tuned to allow effective clearance of invading pathogens, while maintain tolerance to self-antigens. T cells are the major effector cells for fighting and killing tumor cells. Immune checkpoints play a pivotal role in T cell activation, and determine the functional outcome of T cell receptor (TCR) signaling. The blockade of immune checkpoints CTLA-4 and PD-1 has already been one of the most successful cancer immunotherapies. In this review, we will focus on three novel inhibitory B7 family checkpoint molecules, B7-H3, B7S1 and VISTA. The aim of this article is to summarize their expressions in tumors as well as their roles in controlling and suppressing T cell immune responses and anti-tumor immunity. These pathways may be explored in future cancer immunotherapy.

  9. Multifunctional nanoparticles for cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Tayebeh; Shojaosadati, Seyed Abbas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT During the last decades significant progress has been made in the field of cancer immunotherapy. However, cancer vaccines have not been successful in clinical trials due to poor immunogenicity of antigen, limitations of safety associated with traditional systemic delivery as well as the complex regulation of the immune system in tumor microenvironment. In recent years, nanotechnology-based delivery systems have attracted great interest in the field of immunotherapy since they provide new opportunities to fight the cancer. In particular, for delivery of cancer vaccines, multifunctional nanoparticles present many advantages such as targeted delivery to immune cells, co-delivery of therapeutic agents, reduced adverse outcomes, blocked immune checkpoint molecules, and amplify immune activation via the use of stimuli-responsive or immunostimulatory materials. In this review article, we highlight recent progress and future promise of multifunctional nanoparticles that have been applied to enhance the efficiency of cancer vaccines. PMID:26901287

  10. Advances in personalized cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kakimi, Kazuhiro; Karasaki, Takahiro; Matsushita, Hirokazu; Sugie, Tomoharu

    2017-01-01

    There are currently three major approaches to T cell-based cancer immunotherapy, namely, active vaccination, adoptive cell transfer therapy and immune checkpoint blockade. Recently, this latter approach has demonstrated remarkable clinical benefits, putting cancer immunotherapy under the spotlight. Better understanding of the dynamics of anti-tumor immune responses (the "Cancer-Immunity Cycle") is crucial for the further development of this form of treatment. Tumors employ multiple strategies to escape from anti-tumor immunity, some of which result from the selection of cancer cells with immunosuppressive activity by the process of cancer immunoediting. Apart from this selective process, anti-tumor immune responses can also be inhibited in multiple different ways which vary from patient to patient. This implies that cancer immunotherapy must be personalized to (1) identify the rate-limiting steps in any given patient, (2) identify and combine strategies to overcome these hurdles, and (3) proceed with the next round of the "Cancer-Immunity Cycle". Cancer cells have genetic alterations which can provide the immune system with targets by which to recognize and eradicate the tumor. Mutated proteins expressed exclusively in cancer cells and recognizable by the immune system are known as neoantigens. The development of next-generation sequencing technology has made it possible to determine the genetic landscape of human cancer and facilitated the utilization of genomic information to identify such candidate neoantigens in individual cancers. Future immunotherapies will need to be personalized in terms of the identification of both patient-specific immunosuppressive mechanisms and target neoantigens.

  11. Radiation and immunotherapy: a synergistic combination

    PubMed Central

    Kalbasi, Anusha; June, Carl H.; Haas, Naomi; Vapiwala, Neha

    2013-01-01

    Immunotherapy can be an effective treatment for metastatic cancer, but a significant subpopulation will not respond, likely due to the lack of antigenic mutations or the immune-evasive properties of cancer. Likewise, radiation therapy (RT) is an established cancer treatment, but local failures still occur. Clinical observations suggest that RT may expand the therapeutic reach of immunotherapy. We examine the immunobiologic and clinical rationale for combining RT and immunotherapy, two modalities yet to be used in combination in routine practice. Preclinical data indicate that RT can potentiate the systemic efficacy of immunotherapy, while activation of the innate and adaptive immune system can enhance the local efficacy of RT. PMID:23863633

  12. Novel immunotherapies in lymphoid malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Batlevi, Connie Lee; Matsuki, Eri; Brentjens, Renier J.; Younes, Anas

    2016-01-01

    The success of the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab in the treatment of lymphoid malignancies provided proof-of-principle for exploiting the immune system therapeutically. Since the FDA approval of rituximab in 1997, several novel strategies that harness the ability of T cells to target cancer cells have emerged. Reflecting on the promising clinical efficacy of these novel immunotherapy approaches, the FDA has recently granted ‘breakthrough’ designation to three novel treatments with distinct mechanisms. First, chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-T-cell therapy is promising for the treatment of adult and paediatric relapsed and/or refractory acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Second, blinatumomab, a bispecific T-cell engager (BiTE®) antibody, is now approved for the treatment of adults with Philadelphia-chromosome-negative relapsed and/or refractory B-precursor ALL. Finally, the monoclonal antibody nivolumab, which targets the PD-1 immune-checkpoint receptor with high affinity, is used for the treatment of Hodgkin lymphoma following treatment failure with autologous-stem-cell transplantation and brentuximab vedotin. Herein, we review the background and development of these three distinct immunotherapy platforms, address the scientific advances in understanding the mechanism of action of each therapy, and assess the current clinical knowledge of their efficacy and safety. We also discuss future strategies to improve these immunotherapies through enhanced engineering, biomarker selection, and mechanism-based combination regimens. PMID:26525683

  13. Immunotherapy for Acute Myelogenous Leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Powles, R. L.; Crowther, D.; Bateman, C. J. T.; Beard, M. E. J.; McElwain, T. J.; Russell, J.; Lister, T. A.; Whitehouse, J. M. A.; Wrigley, P. F. M.; Pike, M.; Alexander, P.; Fairley, G. Hamilton

    1973-01-01

    One hundred and seven untreated patients with acute myelogenous leukaemia (AML) were admitted to St Bartholomew's Hospital between 10 October 1970 and 31 January 1973. Before receiving drugs to induce remission they were allocated alternatively into 2 groups to decide their remission treatment—a group to receive chemotherapy alone and a group to receive the same chemotherapy with immunotherapy. The patients were then given induction chemotherapy and 45 of them attained complete remission. All patients in remission then received chemotherapy consisting of 5 days treatment every 28 days. Patients receiving immunotherapy were also given multiple weekly intradermal injections of irradiated stored AML cells and Glaxo B.C.G. using a Heaf gun. There were 19 patients in the group which received only chemotherapy during remission; 7 of these patients remain alive (median survival after attaining remission 303 days) and only 5 are still in their first remission (median remission length 188 days). Twenty-three patients were allocated to receive immunotherapy during remission in addition to chemotherapy and 16 remain alive (median 545 days) and 8 are in their first remission (median 312 days). The difference in survival of the two groups is significant with a P value of 0·003. PMID:4271320

  14. [Melanoma immunotherapy: dendritic cell vaccines].

    PubMed

    Lozada-Requena, Ivan; Núñez, César; Aguilar, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    This is a narrative review that shows accessible information to the scientific community about melanoma and immunotherapy. Dendritic cells have the ability to participate in innate and adaptive immunity, but are not unfamiliar to the immune evasion of tumors. Knowing the biology and role has led to generate in vitro several prospects of autologous cell vaccines against diverse types of cancer in humans and animal models. However, given the low efficiency they have shown, we must implement strategies to enhance their natural capacity either through the coexpression of key molecules to activate or reactivate the immune system, in combination with biosimilars or chemotherapeutic drugs. The action of natural products as alternative or adjuvant immunostimulant should not be ruled out. All types of immunotherapy should measure the impact of myeloid suppressor cells, which can attack the immune system and help tumor progression, respectively. This can reduce the activity of cellular vaccines and/or their combinations, that could be the difference between success or not of the immunotherapy. Although for melanoma there exist biosimilars approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), not all have the expected success. Therefore it is necessary to evaluate other strategies including cellular vaccines loaded with tumor antigenic peptides expressed exclusively or antigens from tumor extracts and their respective adjuvants.

  15. Efficacy of Buprenorphine/Naloxone Rapidly Dissolving Sublingual Tablets (BNX-RDT) After Switching From BNX Sublingual Film

    PubMed Central

    Gunderson, Erik W.; Sumner, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to evaluate treatment retention, efficacy, and preference ratings among opioid-dependent patients transitioning between a buprenorphine/naloxone rapidly dissolving sublingual tablet formulation (BNX-RDT) and BNX film. Methods: After a 2-day, blinded, fixed-dose induction with BNX-RDT (5.7/1.4 mg and 5.7/1.4 or 11.4/2.8 mg, respectively) or buprenorphine (8 mg and 8 or 16 mg, respectively), patients received open-label titrated doses of BNX-RDT or BNX film (generic buprenorphine induction group) during days 3 to 14. On day 15, patients switched treatment (using a conversion ratio of 5.7–8 mg) and continued switched treatment through day 22. Assessments included treatment retention, opioid withdrawal (Clinical and Subjective Opiate Withdrawal scales), opioid cravings (0–100 visual analog scale [VAS]), and preference ratings. Results: Of the 287 patients who switched from BNX-RDT to BNX film and 279 patients who switched from BNX film to BNX-RDT at day 15, 8.7% and 6.1% withdrew, respectively. Reductions in opioid withdrawal and cravings were similar with both formulations through day 15; after switching treatment, reductions were maintained through day 22 in both groups. Preference ratings at day 22 (patients had received both formulations) favored BNX-RDT for taste, mouthfeel, ease of administration, and overall preference (all P < 0.0001). Conclusions: In both patient groups who switched treatment at day 15, more than 90% were retained in treatment, and reductions in opioid withdrawal and cravings were sustained. A significant majority of patients preferred BNX-RDT over BNX film, the clinical impact of which requires further study. PMID:26918662

  16. Isolated Langerhans cell histiocytosis of the sublingual gland in an adult

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shaodong; Chen, Xinming; Zhang, Jiali; Fang, Qiong

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare disorder characterized by the proliferation of pathologic Langerhans cells. Its clinical presentation is highly variable, that range from single-system, limited disease to severe, multi-organ disease with high mortality. LCH usually affects children and young adults. The most frequent sites for LCH are the bone, skin, lung, pituitary gland, and lymph nodes. Salivary gland involvement by LCH is extremely rare, and only a few cases of LHC involving the parotid glands have been reported in the English literature. To our knowledge, the involvement of the sublingual gland as a part of single or multisystem LCH has not been previously described. Herein we reported the first case of primary LCH of the sublingual gland. A 40-year-old woman presented with a 2-month history of a painless mass on the right sublingual area. Excision of the lesion including the right sublingual gland was performed. Histopathological diagnosis of LCH was rendered. The patient remains free of symptoms 17 months after surgery. PMID:26722591

  17. Comparison of oral versus sublingual piroxicam during postoperative pain management after lower third molar extraction.

    PubMed

    Trindade, P A K; Giglio, F P M; Colombini-Ishikiriama, B L; Calvo, A M; Modena, K C S; Ribeiro, D A; Dionísio, T J; Brozoski, D T; Lauris, J R P; Faria, F A C; Santos, C F

    2011-03-01

    In this study, 53 patients received piroxicam, administered orally or sublingually, after undergoing removal of symmetrically positioned lower third molars, during two separate appointments. This study used a randomized, blind, cross-over protocol. Objective and subjective parameters were recorded for comparison of postoperative results for 7 days after surgery. Patients treated with oral or sublingual piroxicam reported low postoperative pain scores. The patients who received piroxicam orally took a similar average amount of analgesic rescue medication compared with patients who received piroxicam sublingually (p>0.05). Patients exhibited similar values for mouth opening measured just before surgery and immediately following suture removal 7 days later (p>0.05), and showed no significant differences between routes of piroxicam administration for swelling control during the second or seventh postoperative days (p>0.05). In summary, pain, trismus and swelling after lower third molar extraction, independent of surgical difficulty, could be controlled by piroxicam 20mg administered orally or sublingually and no significant differences were observed between the route of delivery used in this study.

  18. Neutrophils negatively regulate induction of mucosal IgA responses after sublingual immunization.

    PubMed

    Jee, J; Bonnegarde-Bernard, A; Duverger, A; Iwakura, Y; Cormet-Boyaka, E; Martin, T L; Steiner, H E; Bachman, R C; Boyaka, P N

    2015-07-01

    Induction of mucosal immunoglobulin-A (IgA) capable of providing a first line of defense against bacterial and viral pathogens remains a major goal of needle-free vaccines given via mucosal routes. Innate immune cells are known to play a central role in induction of IgA responses by mucosal vaccines, but the relative contribution of myeloid cell subsets to these responses has not firmly been established. Using an in vivo model of sublingual vaccination with Bacillus anthracis edema toxin (EdTx) as adjuvant, we examined the role of myeloid cell subsets for mucosal secretory IgA responses. Sublingual immunization of wild-type mice resulted in a transient increase of neutrophils in sublingual tissues and cervical lymph nodes. These mice later developed Ag-specific serum IgG responses, but not serum or mucosal IgA. Interestingly, EdTx failed to increase neutrophils in sublingual tissues and cervical lymph nodes of IKKβ(ΔMye) mice, and these mice developed IgA responses. Partial depletion of neutrophils before immunization of wild-type mice allowed the development of both mucosal and serum IgA responses. Finally, co-culture of B cells with neutrophils from either wild-type or IKKβ(ΔMye) mice suppressed secretion of IgA, but not IgM or IgG. These results identify a new role for neutrophils as negative regulators of IgA responses.

  19. Isolated Langerhans cell histiocytosis of the sublingual gland in an adult.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shaodong; Chen, Xinming; Zhang, Jiali; Fang, Qiong

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare disorder characterized by the proliferation of pathologic Langerhans cells. Its clinical presentation is highly variable, that range from single-system, limited disease to severe, multi-organ disease with high mortality. LCH usually affects children and young adults. The most frequent sites for LCH are the bone, skin, lung, pituitary gland, and lymph nodes. Salivary gland involvement by LCH is extremely rare, and only a few cases of LHC involving the parotid glands have been reported in the English literature. To our knowledge, the involvement of the sublingual gland as a part of single or multisystem LCH has not been previously described. Herein we reported the first case of primary LCH of the sublingual gland. A 40-year-old woman presented with a 2-month history of a painless mass on the right sublingual area. Excision of the lesion including the right sublingual gland was performed. Histopathological diagnosis of LCH was rendered. The patient remains free of symptoms 17 months after surgery.

  20. Revised Dose Schema of Sublingual Buprenorphine in the Treatment of the Neonatal Opioid Abstinence Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, Walter K.; Dysart, Kevin; Greenspan, Jay S.; Gibson, Eric; Kaltenbach, Karol; Ehrlich, Michelle E.

    2010-01-01

    AIMS Over half of infants exposed to opioids in utero develop neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) of severity to require pharmacologic therapy. Current treatments are associated with prolonged hospitalization. We sought to optimize the dose of sublingual buprenorphine in the treatment of NAS. DESIGN Randomized, phase 1, open-label, active-control clinical trial comparing sublingual buprenorphine to oral morphine. SETTING Large, urban, tertiary care hospital. PARTICIPANTS Twenty-four term infants requiring pharmacological treatment for NAS. MEASUREMENTS Outcomes were neonatal safety, length of treatment, and length of hospitalization. FINDINGS Sublingual buprenorphine was safe and effective. Infants treated with buprenorphine had a 23-day length of treatment compared to 38 days for those treated with morphine (p=0.01), representing a 40% reduction. Length of hospital stay in the buprenorphine group was reduced 24%, from 42 to 32 days (p=0.05). CONCLUSIONS Sublingual buprenorphine was safe in NAS, with a substantial efficacy advantage over standard of care therapy with oral morphine. PMID:20925688

  1. Carvedilol-loaded nanocapsules: Mucoadhesive properties and permeability across the sublingual mucosa.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Paula Dos Santos; Ourique, Aline Ferreira; Frank, Luiza Abrahão; Pohlmann, Adriana Raffin; Guterres, Sílvia Stanisçuaski; Beck, Ruy Carlos Ruver

    2017-05-01

    Carvedilol is a drug used to treat heart failure, hypertension, and coronary artery diseases . However, it has low oral bioavailability (25-35%) due to its high first-pass hepatic metabolism. The objective of this study was to develop carvedilol-loaded mucoadhesive nanocapsules as delivery systems for the sublingual administration of the drug. Nanocapsules were prepared using poly(ε-caprolactone) (CAR-LNC) and Eudragit® RS 100 (CAR-NC) as polymeric wall. In vitro interaction of formulations with mucin was performed to predict their mucoadhesion capacity. The permeability and washability profiles of carvedilol were evaluated using porcine sublingual mucosa. The mean diameter of particles in formulations was in the nanometric range, and particles had low polydispersity and slightly acidic pH. Zeta potential values were positive for CAR-NC and negative for CAR-LNC. Encapsulation efficiency was higher than 87% and 99% for CAR-NC and CAR-LNC, respectively. Both formulations presented controlled drug release profiles and mucoadhesive properties. Carvedilol was able to permeate through the sublingual mucosa. Nanoencapsulation improved retention time on the mucosa and permeation in presence of simulated salivary flux. This study highlighted the suitability of using CAR-loaded nanocapsules in the development of innovative sublingual dosage forms.

  2. Sublingual fast dissolving niosomal films for enhanced bioavailability and prolonged effect of metoprolol tartrate

    PubMed Central

    Allam, Ayat; Fetih, Gihan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to prepare and evaluate sublingual fast dissolving films containing metoprolol tartrate-loaded niosomes. Niosomes were utilized to allow for prolonged release of the drug, whereas the films were used to increase the drug’s bioavailability via the sublingual route. Niosomes were prepared using span 60 and cholesterol at different drug to surfactant ratios. The niosomes were characterized for size, zeta-potential, and entrapment efficiency. The selected niosomal formulation was incorporated into polymeric films using hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose E15 and methyl cellulose as film-forming polymers and Avicel as superdisintegrant. The physical characteristics (appearance, texture, pH, uniformity of weight and thickness, disintegration time, and palatability) of the prepared films were studied, in addition to evaluating the in vitro drug release, stability, and in vivo pharmacokinetics in rabbits. The release of the drug from the medicated film was fast (99.9% of the drug was released within 30 minutes), while the drug loaded into the niosomes, either incorporated into the film or not, showed only 22.85% drug release within the same time. The selected sublingual film showed significantly higher rate of drug absorption and higher drug plasma levels compared with that of commercial oral tablet. The plasma levels remained detectable for 24 hours following sublingual administration, compared with only 12 hours after administration of the oral tablet. In addition, the absolute bioavailability of the drug (ie, relative to intravenous administration) following sublingual administration was found to be significantly higher (91.06%±13.28%), as compared with that after oral tablet administration (39.37%±11.4%). These results indicate that the fast dissolving niosomal film could be a promising delivery system to enhance the bioavailability and prolong the therapeutic effect of metoprolol tartrate. PMID:27536063

  3. Modular virus-like particles for sublingual vaccination against group A streptococcus.

    PubMed

    Seth, Arjun; Kong, Il Gyu; Lee, Su-Hyun; Yang, Jin-Young; Lee, Yong-Soo; Kim, Yeji; Wibowo, Nani; Middelberg, Anton P J; Lua, Linda H L; Kweon, Mi-Na

    2016-12-12

    Infection with Group A streptococcus (GAS)-an oropharyngeal pathogen-leads to mortality and morbidity, primarily among developing countries and indigenous populations in developed countries. The development of safe and affordable GAS vaccines is challenging, due to the presence of various unique GAS serotypes, antigenic variation within the same serotype, and potential auto-immune responses. In the present study, we evaluated the use of a sublingual freeze-dried (FD) formulation based on immunogenic modular virus-like particles (VLPs) carrying the J8 peptide (J8-VLPs) as a potential safe and cost-effective GAS vaccine for inducing protective systemic and mucosal immunity. By using in vivo tracing of the sublingual J8-VLPs, we visualized the draining of J8-VLPs into the submandibular lymph nodes, in parallel with its rapid absorption into the systemic circulation, which support the induction of effective immune responses in both systemic and mucosal compartments. The sublingual administration of J8-VLPs resulted in a high serum IgG antibody level, with a good balance of Th1 and Th2 immune responses. Of note, sublingual vaccination with J8-VLPs elicited high levels of IgA antibody in the saliva. The co-administration of mucosal adjuvant cholera toxin (CT) further enhanced the increase in salivary IgA antibody levels induced by the J8-VLPs formulation. Moreover, the levels of salivary IgA and serum IgG observed following the administration of the CT-adjuvanted FD formulation of J8-VLPs (FD-J8-VLPs) and non-FD formulation of J8-VLPs were comparable. In fact, the saliva isolated from mice immunized with J8-VLPs and FD-J8-VLPs with CT demonstrated opsonizing activity against GAS in vitro. Thus, we observed that the sublingually delivered FD formulation of microbially produced modular VLPs could prevent and control GAS diseases in endemic areas in a cost-effective manner.

  4. Sublingual fast dissolving niosomal films for enhanced bioavailability and prolonged effect of metoprolol tartrate.

    PubMed

    Allam, Ayat; Fetih, Gihan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to prepare and evaluate sublingual fast dissolving films containing metoprolol tartrate-loaded niosomes. Niosomes were utilized to allow for prolonged release of the drug, whereas the films were used to increase the drug's bioavailability via the sublingual route. Niosomes were prepared using span 60 and cholesterol at different drug to surfactant ratios. The niosomes were characterized for size, zeta-potential, and entrapment efficiency. The selected niosomal formulation was incorporated into polymeric films using hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose E15 and methyl cellulose as film-forming polymers and Avicel as superdisintegrant. The physical characteristics (appearance, texture, pH, uniformity of weight and thickness, disintegration time, and palatability) of the prepared films were studied, in addition to evaluating the in vitro drug release, stability, and in vivo pharmacokinetics in rabbits. The release of the drug from the medicated film was fast (99.9% of the drug was released within 30 minutes), while the drug loaded into the niosomes, either incorporated into the film or not, showed only 22.85% drug release within the same time. The selected sublingual film showed significantly higher rate of drug absorption and higher drug plasma levels compared with that of commercial oral tablet. The plasma levels remained detectable for 24 hours following sublingual administration, compared with only 12 hours after administration of the oral tablet. In addition, the absolute bioavailability of the drug (ie, relative to intravenous administration) following sublingual administration was found to be significantly higher (91.06%±13.28%), as compared with that after oral tablet administration (39.37%±11.4%). These results indicate that the fast dissolving niosomal film could be a promising delivery system to enhance the bioavailability and prolong the therapeutic effect of metoprolol tartrate.

  5. Morphology and morphometry of the human sublingual glands in mouth floor enlargements of edentulous patients

    PubMed Central

    de SÁ, Josiane Costa Rodrigues; TOLENTINO, Elen de Souza; AZEVEDO-ALANIS, Luciana Reis; IWAKI FILHO, Liogi; LARA, Vanessa Soares; DAMANTE, José Humberto

    2013-01-01

    Asymptomatic mouth floor enlargements may be observed in edentulous patients. These masses, which protrude from the mouth floor, may complicate the fitting of dentures and require surgery. Whether this "entity" may be considered an anatomical variation of the mouth floor or represent specific alterations in the sublingual gland is not known. Objective The aim of this work is to investigate the morphological and morphometric aspects of the sublingual glands of edentulous patients with mouth floor enlargements and compare the glands of these patients with the sublingual glands of human cadavers. Material and Methods Microscopic evaluation was performed on human sublingual glands from edentulous patients with mouth floor enlargements (n=20) and edentulous cadavers (n=20). The patients and cadavers were of similar ages. The data were compared using Mann-Whitney U, Fisher's exact and Student's t tests (p<0.05). Results Acinar atrophy, duct-like structures, mononuclear infiltrates, replacement of parenchyma with fibrous/adipose tissue, mucous extravasation and oncocytosis were similar between the groups (p>0.05). Only the variables "autolysis" and "congested blood vessels" presented statistical difference between groups (p=0.014; p=0.043). The morphometric study revealed that the volume densities of acini, ducts, stroma and adipose tissue were similar between the groups (p>0.05). Conclusion The microscopic characteristics of the sublingual glands in mouth floor enlargements in edentulous patients correspond to characteristics associated with the normal aging process. The glands are not pathological and represent an age-related alteration that occurs with or without the presence of the mouth floor enlargements. PMID:24473720

  6. Molecular Imaging of Immunotherapy Targets in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ehlerding, Emily B.; England, Christopher G.; McNeel, Douglas G.

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy has emerged as a promising alternative in the arsenal against cancer by harnessing the power of the immune system to specifically target malignant tissues. As the field of immunotherapy continues to expand, researchers will require newer methods for studying the interactions between the immune system, tumor cells, and immunotherapy agents. Recently, several noninvasive imaging strategies have been used to map the biodistribution of immune checkpoint molecules, monitor the efficacy and potential toxicities of the treatments, and identify patients who are likely to benefit from immunotherapies. In this review, we outline the current applications of noninvasive techniques for the preclinical imaging of immunotherapy targets and suggest future pathways for molecular imaging to contribute to this developing field. PMID:27469363

  7. Neoantigen-based cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bobisse, Sara; Coukos, George; Harari, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Emerging clinical evidence on the role of the antitumor activity of the immune system has generated great interest in immunotherapy in all cancer types. Recent clinical data clearly demonstrated that human tumor cells express antigenic peptides (epitopes) that can be recognized by autologous tumor-specific T cells and that enhancement of such immune reactivity can potentially lead to cancer control and cancer regression in patients with advanced disease. However, in most cases, it is unclear which tumor antigens (Ags) mediated cancer regression. Mounting evidence indicates that numerous endogenous mutated cancer proteins, a hallmark of tumor cells, can be processed into peptides and presented on the surface of tumor cells, leading to their immune recognition in vivo as “non-self” or foreign. Massively parallel sequencing has now overcome the challenge of rapidly identifying the comprehensive mutational spectrum of individual tumors (i.e., the “mutanome”) and current technologies, as well as computational tools, have emerged that allow the identification of private epitopes derived from their mutanome and called neoantigens (neoAgs). On this basis, both CD4+ and CD8+ neoantigen-specific T cells have been identified in multiple human cancers and shown to be associated with a favorable clinical outcome. Notably, emerging data also indicate that neoantigen recognition represents a major factor in the activity of clinical immunotherapies. In the post-genome era, the mutanome holds promise as a long-awaited ‘gold mine’ for the discovery of unique cancer cell targets, which are exclusively tumor-specific and unlikely to drive immune tolerance, hence offering the chance for highly promising clinical programs of cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27563649

  8. Tau immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Jan Torleif; Sigurdsson, Einar M

    2015-06-01

    Targeting pathological tau protein in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and related tauopathies has shown great potential in animal models. Given that tau lesions correlate better with the degree of dementia than do amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques, their clearance may be clinically more efficacious than removing Aβ when cognitive deficits become evident in AD. Several complementary mechanisms of antibody-mediated removal of tau aggregates are likely to act in concert and the importance of each one may depend on antibody properties, the disease, and its stage. Clinical trials of tau immunotherapy are already underway and several more are likely to be initiated in the near future.

  9. Synthetic biology in cellular immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarti, Deboki; Wong, Wilson W.

    2015-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of genetically engineered T cells with cancer-targeting receptors has shown tremendous promise for eradicating tumors in clinical trials. This form of cellular immunotherapy presents a unique opportunity to incorporate advanced systems and synthetic biology approaches to create cancer therapeutics with novel functions. Here, we first review the development of synthetic receptors, switches, and circuits to control the location, duration, and strength of T cell activity against tumors. In addition, we discuss the cellular engineering and genome editing of host cells (or the chassis) to improve the efficacy of cell-based cancer therapeutics, and to reduce the time and cost of manufacturing. PMID:26088008

  10. A review of clinical efficacy, safety, new developments and adherence to allergen-specific immunotherapy in patients with allergic rhinitis caused by allergy to ragweed pollen (Ambrosia artemisiifolia).

    PubMed

    Turkalj, Mirjana; Banic, Ivana; Anzic, Srdjan Ante

    2017-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is a common health problem in both children and adults. The number of patients allergic to ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) is on the rise throughout Europe, having a significant negative impact on the patients' and their family's quality of life. Allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) has disease-modifying effects and can induce immune tolerance to allergens. Both subcutaneous immunotherapy and sublingual immunotherapy with ragweed extracts/preparations have clear positive clinical efficacy, especially over pharmacological treatment, even years after the treatment has ended. AIT also has very good safety profiles with extremely rare side effects, and the extracts/preparations used in AIT are commonly well tolerated by patients. However, patient adherence to treatment with AIT seems to be quite low, mostly due to the fact that treatment with AIT is relatively time-demanding and, moreover, due to patients not receiving adequate information and education about the treatment before it starts. AIT is undergoing innovations and improvements in clinical efficacy, safety and patient adherence, especially with new approaches using new adjuvants, recombinant or modified allergens, synthetic peptides, novel routes of administration (epidermal or intralymphatic), and new protocols, which might make AIT more acceptable for a wider range of patients and novel indications. Patient education and support (eg, recall systems) is one of the most important goals for AIT in the future, to further enhance treatment success.

  11. A review of clinical efficacy, safety, new developments and adherence to allergen-specific immunotherapy in patients with allergic rhinitis caused by allergy to ragweed pollen (Ambrosia artemisiifolia)

    PubMed Central

    Turkalj, Mirjana; Banic, Ivana; Anzic, Srdjan Ante

    2017-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is a common health problem in both children and adults. The number of patients allergic to ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) is on the rise throughout Europe, having a significant negative impact on the patients’ and their family’s quality of life. Allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) has disease-modifying effects and can induce immune tolerance to allergens. Both subcutaneous immunotherapy and sublingual immunotherapy with ragweed extracts/preparations have clear positive clinical efficacy, especially over pharmacological treatment, even years after the treatment has ended. AIT also has very good safety profiles with extremely rare side effects, and the extracts/preparations used in AIT are commonly well tolerated by patients. However, patient adherence to treatment with AIT seems to be quite low, mostly due to the fact that treatment with AIT is relatively time-demanding and, moreover, due to patients not receiving adequate information and education about the treatment before it starts. AIT is undergoing innovations and improvements in clinical efficacy, safety and patient adherence, especially with new approaches using new adjuvants, recombinant or modified allergens, synthetic peptides, novel routes of administration (epidermal or intralymphatic), and new protocols, which might make AIT more acceptable for a wider range of patients and novel indications. Patient education and support (eg, recall systems) is one of the most important goals for AIT in the future, to further enhance treatment success. PMID:28243068

  12. [Dendritic cells in cancer immunotherapy].

    PubMed

    Gato, M; Liechtenstein, T; Blanco-Luquín, I; Zudaire, M I; Kochan, G; Escors, D

    2015-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 20th century, biomedical scientists have tried to take advantage of the natural anti-cancer activities of the immune system. However, all the scientific and medical efforts dedicated to this have not resulted in the expected success. In fact, classical antineoplastic treatments such as surgery, radio and chemotherapy are still first line treatments. Even so, there is a quantity of experimental evidence demonstrating that cancer cells are immunogenic. However, the effective activation of anti-cancer T cell responses closely depends on an efficient antigen presentation carried out by professional antigen presenting cells such as DC. Although there are a number of strategies to strengthen antigen presentation by DC, anti-cancer immunotherapy is not as effective as we would expect according to preclinical data accumulated in recent decades. We do not aim to make an exhaustive review of DC immunotherapy here, which is an extensive research subject already dealt with in many specialised reviews. Instead, we present the experimental approaches undertaken by our group over the last decade, by modifying DC to improve their anti-tumour capacities.

  13. Novel Immunotherapies for Autoimmune Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Cassim, Shamir; Bilodeau, Marc; Vincent, Catherine; Lapierre, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a multifactorial autoimmune disease of unknown pathogenesis, characterized by a loss of immunological tolerance against liver autoantigens resulting in the progressive destruction of the hepatic parenchyma. Current treatments are based on non-specific immunosuppressive drugs. Although tremendous progress has been made using specific biological agents in other inflammatory diseases, progress has been slow to come for AIH patients. While current treatments are successful in the majority of patients, treatment discontinuation is difficult to achieve, and relapses are frequent. Lifelong immunosuppression is not without risks, especially in the pediatric population; 4% of patient with type 1 AIH will eventually develop hepatocellular carcinoma with a 2.9% probability after 10 years of treatment. Therefore, future treatments should aim to restore tolerance to hepatic autoantigens and induce long-term remission. Promising new immunotherapies have been tested in experimental models of AIH including T and B cell depletion and regulatory CD4+ T cells infusion. Clinical studies on limited numbers of patients have also shown encouraging results using B-cell-depleting (rituximab) and anti-TNF-α (infliximab) antibodies. A better understanding of key molecular targets in AIH combined with effective site-specific immunotherapies could lead to long-term remission without blanket immunosuppression and with minimal deleterious side effects. PMID:28184367

  14. The expanding role of immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Martin-Liberal, Juan; Ochoa de Olza, María; Hierro, Cinta; Gros, Alena; Rodon, Jordi; Tabernero, Josep

    2017-02-11

    The use of agents able to modulate the immune system to induce or potentiate its anti-tumour activity is not a new strategy in oncology. However, the development of new agents such as immune checkpoint inhibitors has achieved unprecedented efficacy results in a wide variety of tumours, dramatically changing the landscape of cancer treatment in recent years. Ipilimumab, nivolumab, pembrolizumab or atezolizumab are now standard of care options in several malignancies and new indications are being approved on a regular basis in different tumours. Moreover, there are many other novel immunotherapy strategies that are currently being assessed in clinical trials. Agonists of co-stimulatory signals, adoptive cell therapies, vaccines, virotherapy and others have raised interest as therapeutic options against cancer. In addition, many of these novel approaches are being developed both in monotherapy and as part of combinatory regimes in order to synergize their activity. The results from those studies will help to define the expanding role of immunotherapy in cancer treatment in a forthcoming future.

  15. Novel immunotherapies for hematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Michelle H.; Paulos, Chrystal M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The immune system is designed to discriminate between self and tumor tissue. Through genetic recombination, there is fundamentally no limit to the number of tumor antigens that immune cells can recognize. Yet, tumors use a variety of immunosuppressive mechanisms to evade immunity. Insight into how the immune system interacts with tumors is expanding rapidly and has accelerated the translation of immunotherapies into medical breakthroughs. Herein, we appraise the state of the art in immunotherapy with a focus on strategies that exploit the patient’s immune system to kill cancer. We review various forms of immune-based therapies, which have shown significant promise in patients with hematological malignancies, including (i) conventional monoclonal therapies like rituximab, (ii) engineered monoclonal antibodies called bispecific T cell engagers (BiTEs), (iii) monoclonal antibodies and pharmaceutical drugs that block inhibitory T-cell pathways (i.e. PD-1, CTLA-4 and IDO), and (iv) adoptive cell transfer (ACT) therapy with T cells engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) or T-cell receptors (TCRs). We also assess the idea of using these therapies in combination and conclude by suggesting multi-prong approaches to improve treatment outcomes and curative responses in patients. PMID:25510273

  16. Novel approaches in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Deepa S; Liu, Stephen V; Giaccone, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    Our understanding of tumor immunology has exploded in the past 3 decades. The complex relationships between tumor cells, the tumor microenvironment and the immune system cells, especially the cytotoxic and helper T cells and the regulatory T cells are beginning to be elucidated. In this review, we will attempt to provide a brief primer of tumor immunology. Cytokine therapy has historically been the mainstay of immunotherapy in cancers such as melanoma and kidney cancer. We will review some of the advances made with cancer vaccines, with a focus on peptide vaccines, tumor cell vaccines and immune cell vaccines. The pros and cons of nucleic acid-based vaccines including DNA and RNA vaccines will be discussed. Adoptive cell therapy has made significant progress utilizing chimeric antigen-receptor transduced T cells, especially in hematologic malignancies. We will also consider the key targets in checkpoint inhibition, and summarize some of the preclinical and clinical data with respect to checkpoint inhibition. Progress made in the novel immunotherapeutic approach of oncolytic viral therapy will be analyzed. PDL-1 expression by tumor cells and tumor infiltrating lymphocytes has been looked at as a biomarker in clinical trials. Limitations to such an approach and potential candidates for future predictive biomarkers of response to immunotherapy and biomarkers of autoimmunity and adverse reactions will be considered.

  17. Novel Immunotherapies for Autoimmune Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Cassim, Shamir; Bilodeau, Marc; Vincent, Catherine; Lapierre, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a multifactorial autoimmune disease of unknown pathogenesis, characterized by a loss of immunological tolerance against liver autoantigens resulting in the progressive destruction of the hepatic parenchyma. Current treatments are based on non-specific immunosuppressive drugs. Although tremendous progress has been made using specific biological agents in other inflammatory diseases, progress has been slow to come for AIH patients. While current treatments are successful in the majority of patients, treatment discontinuation is difficult to achieve, and relapses are frequent. Lifelong immunosuppression is not without risks, especially in the pediatric population; 4% of patient with type 1 AIH will eventually develop hepatocellular carcinoma with a 2.9% probability after 10 years of treatment. Therefore, future treatments should aim to restore tolerance to hepatic autoantigens and induce long-term remission. Promising new immunotherapies have been tested in experimental models of AIH including T and B cell depletion and regulatory CD4(+) T cells infusion. Clinical studies on limited numbers of patients have also shown encouraging results using B-cell-depleting (rituximab) and anti-TNF-α (infliximab) antibodies. A better understanding of key molecular targets in AIH combined with effective site-specific immunotherapies could lead to long-term remission without blanket immunosuppression and with minimal deleterious side effects.

  18. Fluid resuscitation guided by sublingual partial pressure of carbon dioxide during hemorrhagic shock in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiefeng; Ma, Linhao; Sun, Shijie; Lu, Xiaoye; Wu, Xiaobo; Li, Zilong; Tang, Wanchun

    2013-04-01

    To avoid aggressive fluid resuscitation during hemorrhagic shock, fluid resuscitation is best guided by a specific measurement of tissue perfusion. We investigated whether fluid resuscitation guided by sublingual PCO2 would reduce the amount of resuscitation fluid without compromising the outcomes of hemorrhagic shock. Ten male domestic pigs weighing between 34 and 37 kg were used. Forty-five percent of estimated blood volume was removed during an interval of 1 h. The animals were then randomized to receive fluid resuscitation based on either sublingual PCO2 or blood pressure (BP). In the sublingual PCO2-guided group, resuscitation was initiated when sublingual PCO2 exceeded 70 Torr and stopped when it decreased to 50 Torr. In the BP-guided group, resuscitation was initiated when mean aortic pressure decreased to 60 mmHg and stopped when it increased to 90 mmHg. First, Ringer's lactate solution (RLS) of 30 mL kg was administered; subsequently, the shed blood was transfused if sublingual PCO2 remained greater than 50 Torr in the sublingual PCO2-guided group or mean aortic pressure was less than 90 mmHg in the BP-guided group. All the animals were monitored for 4 h and observed for an additional 68 h. In the sublingual PCO2-guided group, fluid resuscitation was required in only 40% of the animals. In addition, a significantly lower volume of RLS (170 ± 239 mL, P = 0.005 vs. BP-guided group) was administered without the need for blood infusion in this group. However, in the BP-guided group, all the animals required a significantly larger volume of fluid (955 ± 381 mL), including both RLS and blood. There were no differences in postresuscitation tissue microcirculation, myocardial and neurologic function, and 72-h survival between groups. During hemorrhagic shock, fluid resuscitation guided by sublingual PCO2 significantly reduced the amount of resuscitation fluid without compromising the outcomes of hemorrhagic shock.

  19. From "magic bullets" to specific cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Riether, Carsten; Schürch, Christian; Ochsenbein, Adrian F

    2013-01-23

    The immune system is able to specifically target antigen-expressing cancer cells. The promise of immunotherapy was to eliminate cancer cells without harming normal tissue and, therefore, with no or very few side effects. Immunotherapy approaches have, for several decades, been tested against several tumours, most often against malignant melanoma. However, although detectable immune responses have regularly been induced, the clinical outcome has often been disappointing. The development of molecular methods and an improved understanding of tumour immunosurveillance led to novel immunotherapy approaches in the last few years. First randomised phase III trials proved that immunotherapy can prolong survival of patients with metastatic melanoma or prostate cancer. The development in the field is very rapid and various molecules (mainly monoclonal antibodies) that activate the immune system are currently being tested in clinical trials and will possibly change our treatment of cancer. The ultimate goal of any cancer therapy and also immunotherapy is to cure cancer. However, this depends on the elimination of the disease originating cancer stem cells. Unfortunately, cancer stem cells seem resistant to most available treatment options. Recent developments in immunotherapy may allow targeting these cancer stem cells specifically in the future. In this review, we summarise the current state of immunotherapy in clinical routine and the expected developments in the near future.

  20. Potentiality of immunotherapy against hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Nobuhiro; Sawada, Yu; Endo, Itaru; Uemura, Yasushi; Nakatsura, Tetsuya

    2015-09-28

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the predominant form of primary liver cancer, is the fifth most common cancer worldwide and the second leading cause of cancer-related death. Despite the high incidence, treatment options remain limited for advanced HCC, and as a result prognosis continues to be poor. Current therapeutic options, surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy, have only modest efficacy. New treatment modalities to prolong survival and to minimize the risk of adverse response are desperately needed for patients with advanced HCC. Tumor immunotherapy is a promising, novel treatment strategy that may lead to improvements in both treatment-associated toxicity and outcome. The strategies have developed in part through genomic studies that have yielded candidate target molecules and in part through basic biology studies that have defined the pathways and cell types regulating immune response. Here, we summarize the various types of HCC immunotherapy and argue that the new-found field of HCC immunotherapy might provide critical advantages in the effort to improve prognosis of patients with advanced HCC. Already several immunotherapies, such as tumor-associated antigen therapy, immune checkpoint inhibitors and cell transfer immunotherapy, have demonstrated safety and feasibility in HCC patients. Unfortunately, immunotherapy currently has low efficacy in advanced stage HCC patients; overcoming this challenge will place immunotherapy at the forefront of HCC treatment, possibly in the near future.

  1. A rabbit model for sublingual drug delivery: comparison with human pharmacokinetic studies of propranolol, verapamil and captopril.

    PubMed

    Dali, Manisha M; Moench, Paul A; Mathias, Neil R; Stetsko, Paul I; Heran, Christopher L; Smith, Ronald L

    2006-01-01

    A rabbit model for investigating sublingual drug absorption was established yielding results consistent with clinical data reported in the literature. Using propranolol as a model compound the effect of formulation and dosing variables was explored as a means to characterize the limiting parameters of this model. In addition, verapamil and captopril were selected as reference compounds to compare this model to sublingual absorption in humans. Rabbits were dosed sublingually and systemic absorption was measured over time. Sublingual absorption of propranolol was dependent on dosing solution pH and volume. Intra-oral spray device did not affect the overall exposure compared to instillation using a syringe. Despite species and dosing regimen differences the relative bioavailabilities of propranolol and verapamil were very similar in rabbits and humans. In contrast, captopril absorption from the sublingual cavity of rabbits was low and did not agree with that observed in man. Here we report a sublingual rabbit model of drug delivery and its potential utility in preclinical development of intra-oral dosage forms.

  2. Debates in allergy medicine: specific immunotherapy efficiency in children with atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Slavyanakaya, Tatiana A; Derkach, Vladislava V; Sepiashvili, Revaz I

    2016-01-01

    Allergen specific immunotherapy (AIT) has been the only pathogenetically relevant treatment of IgE-mediated allergic diseases (ADs) for many years. The use of AIT for atopic dermatitis (AD) treatment is dubious and has both followers and opponents. The improvement of subcutaneous AIT (SCIT) and introduction of Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) gives prospects of their application both for adults and children suffering from AD. This review presents results of scientific research, system and meta-analyses that confirm the clinical efficacy of AIT for children with AD who has the sensitization to allergens of house dust mite, grass and plant pollen suffering from co-occurring respiratory ADs and with moderate and severe course of allergic AD. There have been analyzed the most advanced achievements in AIT studies as well as there have been specified the unmet needs in AD. The preliminary diagnostics of IgE-mediated AD and pathophysiological disorders, including immune ones, will allow a doctor to develop appropriate comprehensive treatment algorithm for children's AD aimed at its correction. The including of AIT to the children's comprehensive therapy program is reasonable only if AD has the allergic form. It is necessary better to design the randomized research studies and to acquire extended clinical practice in children with AD. Use of the successes of molecular-based allergy diagnostics will help to optimize and personalize the process of selecting the necessary allergens to determine the most appropriate vaccines for children considering the results of the allergen component diagnostics. The strategy of treatment of children with AD in future will be based on individual target therapy.

  3. Clinical practice recommendations for allergen-specific immunotherapy in children: the Italian consensus report.

    PubMed

    Pajno, Giovanni Battista; Bernardini, Roberto; Peroni, Diego; Arasi, Stefania; Martelli, Alberto; Landi, Massimo; Passalacqua, Giovanni; Muraro, Antonella; La Grutta, Stefania; Fiocchi, Alessandro; Indinnimeo, Luciana; Caffarelli, Carlo; Calamelli, Elisabetta; Comberiati, Pasquale; Duse, Marzia

    2017-01-23

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) is currently recognized as a clinically effective treatment for allergic diseases, with a unique disease-modifying effect. AIT was introduced in clinical practice one century ago, and performed in the early years with allergenic extracts of poor quality and definition. After the mechanism of allergic reaction were recognized, the practice of AIT was refined, leading to remarkable improvement in the efficacy and safety profile of the treatment. Currently AIT is accepted and routinely prescribed worldwide for respiratory allergies and hymenoptera venom allergy. Both the subcutaneous (SCIT) and sublingual (SLIT) routes of administration are used in the pediatric population.AIT is recommended in allergic rhinitis/conjunctivitis with/without allergic asthma, with an evidence of specific IgE-sensitization towards clinically relevant inhalant allergens. Long-term studies provided evidence that AIT can also prevent the onset of asthma and of new sensitizations. The favorable response to AIT is strictly linked to adherence to treatment, that lasts 3-5 years. Therefore, several factors should be carefully evaluated before starting this intervention, including the severity of symptoms, pharmacotherapy requirements and children and caregivers' preference and compliance.In recent years, there have been increasing interest in the role of AIT for the treatment of IgE-associated food allergy and extrinsic atopic dermatitis. A growing body of evidence shows that oral immunotherapy represents a promising treatment option for IgE-associated food allergy. On the contrary, there are still controversies on the effectiveness of AIT for patients with atopic dermatitis.This consensus document was promoted by the Italian Society of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology (SIAIP) to provide evidence-based recommendations on AIT in order to implement and optimize current prescription practices of this treatment for allergic children.

  4. New Immunotherapy Strategies in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lin-Yu; Tang, Jie; Zhang, Cong-Min; Zeng, Wen-Jing; Yan, Han; Li, Mu-Peng; Chen, Xiao-Ping

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among women. Therapeutic treatments for breast cancer generally include surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, endocrinotherapy and molecular targeted therapy. With the development of molecular biology, immunology and pharmacogenomics, immunotherapy becomes a promising new field in breast cancer therapies. In this review, we discussed recent progress in breast cancer immunotherapy, including cancer vaccines, bispecific antibodies, and immune checkpoint inhibitors. Several additional immunotherapy modalities in early stages of development are also highlighted. It is believed that these new immunotherapeutic strategies will ultimately change the current status of breast cancer therapies. PMID:28085094

  5. Rationale for combining immunotherapy with chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dalgleish, Angus G

    2015-01-01

    Immunotherapy has usually been considered as an alternative to more traditional modalities. Moreover, it has previously been felt that chemotherapy is inherently immunosuppressive and not suitable for combining with immunotherapy. In this review, the concept of combining different modalities that result in cell death, such as radiotherapy and chemotherapy, with immunotherapy is explored. Tumors actively cause immune suppression which can be reversed by their removal but when this is not possible, enhancing the immune response with nonspecific immune stimulation can enhance the response to other modalities, such as radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Additionally, several chemotherapy agents at low doses selectively inhibit regulatory and suppressor cells.

  6. New Immunotherapy Strategies in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lin-Yu; Tang, Jie; Zhang, Cong-Min; Zeng, Wen-Jing; Yan, Han; Li, Mu-Peng; Chen, Xiao-Ping

    2017-01-12

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among women. Therapeutic treatments for breast cancer generally include surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, endocrinotherapy and molecular targeted therapy. With the development of molecular biology, immunology and pharmacogenomics, immunotherapy becomes a promising new field in breast cancer therapies. In this review, we discussed recent progress in breast cancer immunotherapy, including cancer vaccines, bispecific antibodies, and immune checkpoint inhibitors. Several additional immunotherapy modalities in early stages of development are also highlighted. It is believed that these new immunotherapeutic strategies will ultimately change the current status of breast cancer therapies.

  7. Robust antigen-specific humoral immune responses to sublingually delivered adenoviral vectors encoding HIV-1 Env: association with mucoadhesion and efficient penetration of the sublingual barrier.

    PubMed

    Domm, William; Brooks, Lauren; Chung, Hung Li; Feng, Changyong; Bowers, William J; Watson, Gene; McGrath, James L; Dewhurst, Stephen

    2011-09-16

    The efficient induction of virus-specific mucosal antibodies is an important unmet objective in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 (HIV-1) vaccine research. One promising approach is sublingual (SL) immunization. We examined the effectiveness of SL delivery of two different viral vectors: (i) a recombinant adenovirus (rAd5), and (ii) a Herpes Simplex Virus Type-1 amplicon vector (HSV-1). Initial in vitro videomicroscopy experiments showed that rAd5 particles were trapped in saliva (i.e., that Ad5 was mucoadhesive) - unlike HSV-1 virions, which migrated freely in both saliva and water. In vivo imaging studies in mice revealed that only the rAd5 vector efficiently transduced the SL epithelium. Consistent with this, SL delivery of an rAd5 encoding HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) resulted in robust antigen-specific antibody responses in plasma and in vaginal washes, whereas SL delivery of a HSV-1 amplicon vector encoding HIV-1 Env failed to elicit Env-specific antibodies. In contrast, both vectors elicited equivalent humoral responses following intramuscular (IM) delivery. Finally, SL delivery of the rAd5:Env vector resulted in elevated levels of Env-specific serum IgA, and vaginal IgA and IgG, when compared to IM delivery of the same vector. These results findings shed light on vector properties (mucoadhesion, penetration of the sublingual barrier) which may be important for the induction of potent humoral immune responses following sublingual vector administration. Our data also show that SL delivery of an Env-encoding rAd5 vector can elicit a potent antigen-specific mucosal antibody response in the absence of adjuvant. Overall, these findings support the further exploration of the SL delivery route for HIV-1 vaccine delivery.

  8. Robust Antigen-Specific Humoral Immune Responses to Sublingually Delivered Adenoviral Vectors Encoding HIV-1 Env: Association with Mucoadhesion and Efficient Penetration of the Sublingual Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Domm, William; Brooks, Lauren; Chung, Hung Li; Feng, Changyong; Bowers, William J.; Watson, Gene; McGrath, James L.; Dewhurst, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    The efficient induction of virus-specific mucosal antibodies is an important unmet objective in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 (HIV-1) vaccine research. One promising approach is sublingual (SL) immunization. We examined the effectiveness of SL delivery of two different viral vectors: (i) a recombinant adenovirus (rAd5), and (ii) a Herpes Simplex Virus Type-1 amplicon vector (HSV-1). Initial in vitro videomicroscopy experiments showed that rAd5 particles were trapped in saliva (i.e., that Ad5 was mucoadhesive) - unlike HSV-1 virions, which migrated freely in both saliva and water. In vivo imaging studies in mice revealed that only the rAd5 vector efficiently transduced the SL epithelium. Consistent with this, SL delivery of an rAd5 encoding HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) resulted in robust antigen-specific antibody responses in plasma and in vaginal washes, whereas SL delivery of a HSV-1 amplicon vector encoding HIV-1 Env failed to elicit Env-specific antibodies. In contrast, both vectors elicited equivalent humoral responses following intramuscular (IM) delivery. Finally, SL delivery of the rAd5:Env vector resulted in elevated levels of Env-specific serum IgA, and vaginal IgA and IgG, when compared to IM delivery of the same vector. These results findings shed light on vector properties (mucoadhesion, penetration of the sublingual barrier) which may be important for the induction of potent humoral immune responses following sublingual vector administration. Our data also show that SL delivery of an Env-encoding rAd5 vector can elicit a potent antigen-specific mucosal antibody response in the absence of adjuvant. Overall, these findings support the further exploration of the SL delivery route for HIV-1 vaccine delivery. PMID:21801777

  9. Immunotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... CSF) Interleukin-2 (IL-2) Interferon Donor lymphocyte infusion Some blood cancer patients, especially those with chronic ... from an immune cell treatment called donor lymphocyte infusion. During this procedure, doctors transfer lymphocytes (a type ...

  10. Development and evaluation of a sublingual film of the antiemetic granisetron hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Kalia, Vani; Garg, Tarun; Rath, Gautam; Goyal, Amit Kumar

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to develop an oral transmucosal formulation of an antiemetic drug that can not only serve in the active form but also provide a controlled release profile. In this study, sublingual films based on the biodegradable and water-soluble polymers, that is HPMCK-4M and PVPK-30, were developed by the solvent casting method, and were loaded with the antiemetic drug granisetron hydrochloride (granisetron HCl). The entrapment efficiency of the developed formulation was found to be 86%. The in vitro profile showed an instant release of the drug from the sublingual film, in a pattern following the first order kinetics array. The in vivo studies showed that granisetron HCl was delivered in its active state and showed effective results, as compared to its activity in the marketed formulation.

  11. The Potential Role of Allergen Immunotherapy in Stepping Down Asthma Treatment.

    PubMed

    Demoly, Pascal; Makatsori, Melina; Casale, Thomas B; Calderon, Moises A

    2016-12-29

    For patients whose asthma is controlled and who have a low risk for future exacerbations, current guidelines recommend gradually stepping down pharmacotherapy to identify the lowest dose needed to maintain control. This review article will discuss the benefits and risks of step down in asthma management and the different strategies of achieving step down with particular focus on allergen immunotherapy (AIT). A literature search was conducted to identify studies that assessed the effect of AIT on asthma step down and evaluated this and asthma control as one of the outcomes. Six studies were identified: 2 subcutaneous and 4 sublingual AIT studies. Five studies assessed house dust mite-induced asthma, whereas 1 study focused on birch-induced seasonal asthma. Regarding house dust mite-induced asthma, the AIT studies reviewed suggest that individuals with moderate rather than mild asthma are the patients who are more likely to benefit from the addition of AIT for their asthma condition. The potential value of AIT is likely to be in enabling successful step down of the inhaled corticosteroid dose in Global Initiative for Asthma step 3 or 4. It is important to further explore this effect so that affected individuals can benefit from this treatment.

  12. Innovation in Bladder Cancer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Grossman, H Barton; Lamm, Donald L; Kamat, Ashish M; Keefe, Stephen; Taylor, John A; Ingersoll, Molly A

    2016-10-01

    Bladder cancer is understudied despite its high prevalence and its remarkable response to immunotherapy. Indeed, funding for studies to explore mechanisms of tumor immunity and novel new therapeutics is disproportionately lower for bladder cancer in comparison with malignancies of the breast, prostate, or lung. However, the recent successes of checkpoint blockade therapy suggest that new therapeutic strategies are on the horizon for bladder cancer. Here, we give a perspective into the evolution of bladder cancer therapy, focusing on strategies to treat high-risk nonmuscle invasive disease, followed by a discussion of recent advances in the treatment of muscle invasive bladder cancer and their potential applicability to lower stage disease. Finally, we explore immunotherapeutic strategies, which have been demonstrated to be successful in the treatment of other malignancies, for their potential to treat and cure patients with nonmuscle and muscle invasive bladder cancer.

  13. Topical Immunotherapy in Alopecia Areata

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Gurcharan; Lavanya, MS

    2010-01-01

    Alopecia Areata (AA) is a common non-scarring alopecia directed against the anagenic hair follicle. Various treatment modalities have been used for the treatment of severe AA. Topical immunotherapy is the best documented treatment so far for severe and refractory AA. Dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB), squaric acid dibutylester (SADBE), and diphencyprone (DPCP) are the contact allergens used for this purpose. DNCB has been found to be mutagenic by the Ames test and is largely replaced by DPCP and SADBE. DPCP and SADBE are both known to be non-mutagenic compounds and have comparable efficacy results and relapse rates. SADBE requires special solvents and additives to maintain its potency and is more expensive than the rest. DPCP has a response rate varying from 60% in severe Alopecia Areata to 17% in patients with alopecia totalis or universalis, and shows about 88 to 100% high response rate in patients with patchy Alopecia Areata. PMID:21188022

  14. Dissociation between sublingual and gut microcirculation in the response to a fluid challenge in postoperative patients with abdominal sepsis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study was performed to compare intestinal and sublingual microcirculation and their response to a fluid challenge. Methods Twenty-two septic patients in the first postoperative day of an intestinal surgery, in which an ostomy had been constructed, were evaluated both before and 20 min after a challenge of 10 mL/kg of 6% hydroxyethylstarch 130/0.4. We measured systemic hemodynamics and sublingual and intestinal microcirculation. Correlations between variables were determined through the Pearson test. Results Fluid administration increased the cardiac index (2.6 ± 0.5 vs. 3.3 ± 1.0 L/min/m2, P < 0.01) and mean arterial blood pressure (68 ± 11 vs. 82 ± 12 mm Hg, P < 0.0001). The sublingual but not the intestinal red blood cell (RBC) velocity increased (912 ± 270 vs. 1,064 ± 200 μm/s, P < 0.002 and 679 ± 379 vs. 747 ± 419 μm/s, P = 0.12, respectively). The sublingual and intestinal perfused vascular density (PVD) did not change significantly (15.2 ± 2.9 vs. 16.1 ± 1.2 mm/mm2 and 12.3 ± 6.7 vs. 13.0 ± 6.7 mm/mm2). We found no correlation between the basal sublingual and intestinal RBC velocities or between their changes in response to the fluid challenge. The individual changes in sublingual RBC velocity correlated with those in cardiac index and basal RBC velocity. Individual changes in intestinal RBC velocity did not correlate with either the cardiac index modifications or the basal RBC velocity. The same pattern was observed with the sublingual and the intestinal PVDs. The sublingual RBC velocities and PVDs were similar between survivors and nonsurvivors. But the intestinal RBC velocities and PVDs were lower in nonsurvivors. Conclusions In this series of postoperative septic patients, we found a dissociation between sublingual and intestinal microcirculation. The improvement in the sublingual microcirculation after fluid challenge was dependent on the basal state and the

  15. PROSTVAC® targeted immunotherapy candidate for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Shore, Neal D

    2014-01-01

    Targeted immunotherapies represent a valid strategy for the treatment of metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer. A randomized, double-blind, Phase II clinical trial of PROSTVAC® demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in overall survival and a large, global, Phase III trial with overall survival as the primary end point is ongoing. PROSTVAC immunotherapy contains the transgenes for prostate-specific antigen and three costimulatory molecules (designated TRICOM). Research suggests that PROSTVAC not only targets prostate-specific antigen, but also other tumor antigens via antigen cascade. PROSTVAC is well tolerated and has been safely combined with other cancer therapies, including hormonal therapy, radiotherapy, another immunotherapy and chemotherapy. Even greater benefits of PROSTVAC may be recognized in earlier-stage disease and low-disease burden settings where immunotherapy can trigger a long-lasting immune response.

  16. Who Will Benefit from Cancer Immunotherapy?

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers have identified a “genetic signature” in the tumors of patients with advanced melanoma who responded to a form of immunotherapy called checkpoint blockade. The results could be the basis for a test that identifies likely responders.

  17. Progressive Reduction in Central Blood Volume is not Detected by Sublingual Capnography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    redistribution of blood flow away from the sublingual mucosa can happen very early in the compensatory phase of hypovolemic shock . Our objective was to test the...method of detecting subclinical hypovolemic shock can be helpful to bedside providers. Some limitations exist for our study. Mesenteric flow, sub...in the continuum of hypovolemic shock . Importantly, early markers of tissue hypo- perfusion and dysoxia such as SmO2, which are abnormal long before

  18. MAGE-A Antigens and Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zajac, Paul; Schultz-Thater, Elke; Tornillo, Luigi; Sadowski, Charlotte; Trella, Emanuele; Mengus, Chantal; Iezzi, Giandomenica; Spagnoli, Giulio C.

    2017-01-01

    MAGE-A antigens are expressed in a variety of cancers of diverse histological origin and germinal cells. Due to their relatively high tumor specificity, they represent attractive targets for active specific and adoptive cancer immunotherapies. Here, we (i) review past and ongoing clinical studies targeting these antigens, (ii) analyze advantages and disadvantages of different therapeutic approaches, and (iii) discuss possible improvements in MAGE-A-specific immunotherapies. PMID:28337438

  19. Cancer Immunotherapy: A Treatment for the Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blattman, Joseph N.; Greenberg, Philip D.

    2004-07-01

    Cancer immunotherapy attempts to harness the exquisite power and specificity of the immune system for the treatment of malignancy. Although cancer cells are less immunogenic than pathogens, the immune system is clearly capable of recognizing and eliminating tumor cells. However, tumors frequently interfere with the development and function of immune responses. Thus, the challenge for immunotherapy is to use advances in cellular and molecular immunology to develop strategies that effectively and safely augment antitumor responses.

  20. Reiter's syndrome following intravesical BCG immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Hogarth, M; Thomas, S; Seifert, M; Tariq, S

    2000-01-01

    A 71 year old woman developed conjunctivitis, asymmetrical oligoarthritis, and cystitis (Reiter's syndrome) secondary to intravesical BCG treatment for transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. She received oral prednisolone, izoniazid, and pyridoxine and made a full recovery. Increasing use of BCG as immunotherapy will lead to an increase in the incidence of BCG associated reactive arthritis. Prompt recognition and early diagnosis will facilitate treatment and recovery.


Keywords: arthritis; BCG immunotherapy; Reiter's syndrome PMID:11085772

  1. Defining the critical hurdles in cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Scientific discoveries that provide strong evidence of antitumor effects in preclinical models often encounter significant delays before being tested in patients with cancer. While some of these delays have a scientific basis, others do not. We need to do better. Innovative strategies need to move into early stage clinical trials as quickly as it is safe, and if successful, these therapies should efficiently obtain regulatory approval and widespread clinical application. In late 2009 and 2010 the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC), convened an "Immunotherapy Summit" with representatives from immunotherapy organizations representing Europe, Japan, China and North America to discuss collaborations to improve development and delivery of cancer immunotherapy. One of the concepts raised by SITC and defined as critical by all parties was the need to identify hurdles that impede effective translation of cancer immunotherapy. With consensus on these hurdles, international working groups could be developed to make recommendations vetted by the participating organizations. These recommendations could then be considered by regulatory bodies, governmental and private funding agencies, pharmaceutical companies and academic institutions to facilitate changes necessary to accelerate clinical translation of novel immune-based cancer therapies. The critical hurdles identified by representatives of the collaborating organizations, now organized as the World Immunotherapy Council, are presented and discussed in this report. Some of the identified hurdles impede all investigators; others hinder investigators only in certain regions or institutions or are more relevant to specific types of immunotherapy or first-in-humans studies. Each of these hurdles can significantly delay clinical translation of promising advances in immunotherapy yet if overcome, have the potential to improve outcomes of patients with cancer. PMID:22168571

  2. Immunotherapy: Exploring the State of the Science
.

    PubMed

    Ginex, Pamela K; Brassil, Kelly; Ely, Beth

    2017-04-01

    Immunotherapy research provides opportunities for nurse scientists and researchers to be at the forefront of the changing landscape of cancer treatment. As these therapies continue to develop, current initiatives will seek to support nurses in clinical practice who must provide safe, evidence-based care and education to patients and their families. This article explores the current state of immunotherapy research and the ways in which continued research can help to advance nursing education and practice.

  3. A novel application of electrospinning technique in sublingual membrane: characterization, permeation and in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianting; Wang, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Wenji; Yu, Shihui; Fan, Jinwu; Cheng, Bingchao; Yang, Xinggang; Pan, Weisan

    2016-08-01

    Isosorbide dinitrate-polyvinylpyrrolidone (ISDN-PVP) electrospinning fibers were formulated and explored as potentially sublingual membrane. The addition of polyethylene glycol (PEG) to the formulation improved flexibility and reduced fluffiness of the fiber mat. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) demonstrated that the fibers tended to be cross-linking, and the crosslinking degree increased with the increase of PEG amount. The differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) indicated that ISDN existed in non-crystalline state in the fibers (except at the highest drug content). The infrared spectroscopy suggested that ISDN had better compatibility with the ingredients owing to the hydrogen bonding (or hydrophobic interactions). The fibers were highly favorable for the fabrication of sublingual membrane due to neutral pH, large folding endurance and rapid drug release (complete dissolution within 120 s). The permeation study of ISDN through both dialysis membrane (DM) and porcine sublingual mucosa (SM) were carried out. A significant relationship of drug permeation rate through DM and SM was built up, which indicated that DM could be used to partly simulate SM and assess formulation. The pharmacokinetic study in rats demonstrated that the electrospinning fiber membrane had a higher Cmax and lower Tmax compared to the reference preparation, and the relative bioavailability of the fiber membrane was 151.6%.

  4. Sublingual misoprostol to decrease blood loss after caesarean delivery: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Ugwu, I A; Enabor, O O; Adeyemi, A B; Lawal, O O; Oladokun, A; Olayemi, O

    2014-07-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the efficacy of sublingual misoprostol in addition to intravenous oxytocin, with oxytocin alone, in reducing blood loss during and following caesarean section. A total of 120 women undergoing caesarean delivery at the University College Hospital, Ibadan, were randomised into two equal groups. In Group A, 20 IU of intravenous oxytocin was given after umbilical cord clamping, while in Group B, the women received 400 μg misoprostol sublingually and 20 IU oxytocin intravenously. The outcome measures were blood loss, additional uterotonics, change in packed cell volume and side-effect profile. Associations between variables were determined by the χ(2) and Student's t-test. Relative risks were calculated for side-effects; the level of significance was p < 0.05. Intraoperative and postoperative blood loss were significantly lower in Group B (451.3 ml vs 551.2 ml, p = 0.007; 22.7 vs 42.2 ml, p < 0.001, respectively). In Group B, women were 7.4 (p < 0.001) and 9.0 (p = 0.008) times more likely to experience shivering and fever, respectively. The need for additional uterotonics was greater in the oxytocin group (66.7% vs 27.6%, p < 0.001). The addition of sublingual misoprostol to intravenous oxytocin reduces postpartum blood loss and the need for additional uterotonics. There is however, an increased risk of shivering and fever with this combination.

  5. A randomised controlled trial of sublingual misoprostol and intramuscular oxytocin for prevention of postpartum haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Al-Sawaf, A; El-Mazny, A; Shohayeb, A

    2013-04-01

    This study aims to evaluate the efficacy and side-effects of 200 μg sublingual misoprostol vs 5 IU i.m. oxytocin, administered immediately following cord clamping in normal non-augmented vaginal delivery, in prevention of postpartum haemorrhage (PPH). A total of 104 women were randomised into three groups: misoprostol group (28 patients); oxytocin group (37 patients) and control group (39 patients). Misoprostol and oxytocin significantly minimised the blood loss during the third stage of labour and reduced the need for additional treatments for PPH as compared with the control group. Oxytocin was more effective than misoprostol in minimising blood loss and the need for additional uterotonic treatments. However, a significant decrease in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, associated with tachycardia was observed in the oxytocin group. In conclusion, sublingual misoprostol appears to be less effective than i.m. oxytocin in the prevention of PPH; however, it has the potential advantages of being easily used, cost-effective and stable at room temperature. Therefore, sublingual misoprostol is still a feasible drug for routine management of third stage, especially in areas with limited medical facilities.

  6. Anterograde excision of a sublingual gland: new surgical technique for the treatment of ranulas.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhigang; Wang, Bin

    2016-02-01

    Wharton's duct is dissected in a retrograde direction from the orifice of the duct to the hilum of the submandibular gland when the gland is being excised conventionally. Here we describe an anterograde technique, in which Wharton's duct is dissected in an anterograde direction from the hilum of the submandibular gland to the orifice of the duct. This prospective clinical study included 50 consecutive patients with ranulas who had anterograde excision of the sublingual gland between May 2012 and January 2015. The intraoral incision was similar to that for conventional excision. Wharton's duct and other important anatomical structures located in the space behind the sublingual gland were all identified at the beginning of the procedure, followed by anterograde dissection of Wharton's duct. After the glandular tissue lateral to the duct had been incised completely, the duct was exposed and the gland cut into two parts. Finally, the two parts were removed, and the ranula ruptured. The patients were followed up from 6 months-2 years. There were no complications. Anterograde excision of the sublingual gland is based on the anatomy, and this reduces the risk of complications after removal of a ranula.

  7. Progressive reduction in central blood volume is not detected by sublingual capnography.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kevin K; Ryan, Kathy L; Rickards, Caroline A; Hinojosa-Laborde, Carmen; Pamplin, Jeremy C; Patel, Shimul S; Herold, Thomas S; Convertino, Victor A

    2012-06-01

    Early detection and management of shock are important in optimizing clinical outcomes. One regional marker, sublingual capnography (SLCO2), is particularly appealing as redistribution of blood flow away from the sublingual mucosa can happen very early in the compensatory phase of hypovolemic shock. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that SLCO2 would detect early hypovolemia in a human laboratory model of hemorrhage: progressive lower body negative pressure until onset of cardiovascular collapse. Eighteen healthy nonsmoking subjects (10 males, 8 females) with mean age of 28 (SD, 8) years, body weight of 72 (SD, 13) kg, and height of 172 (SD, 9) cm were recruited to participate, of whom 17 completed the experiment. Average time to presyncope was 1,579 ± 72 s (mean ± SE). At the time of cardiovascular collapse, lower body negative pressure altered (P < 0.001) systolic blood pressure (mean ± SE: 130 ± 3 vs. 98 ± 2 mm Hg), pulse pressure (mean ± SE: 58 ± 2 vs. 33 ± 2 mm Hg), and heart rate (mean ± SE: 63 ± 3 vs. 102 ± 6 beats/min) when compared with baseline, whereas SLCO2 did not change (49.1 ± 1.0 vs. 48.6 ± 1.5 mm Hg, P = 0.624). In a model of progressive central hypovolemia in humans, we did not detect metabolic derangements in the sublingual mucosa as measured by SLCO2.

  8. Oncolytic Immunotherapy for Treatment of Cancer.

    PubMed

    Tsun, A; Miao, X N; Wang, C M; Yu, D C

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy entails the treatment of disease by modulation of the immune system. As detailed in the previous chapters, the different modes of achieving immune modulation are many, including the use of small/large molecules, cellular therapy, and radiation. Oncolytic viruses that can specifically attack, replicate within, and destroy tumors represent one of the most promising classes of agents for cancer immunotherapy (recently termed as oncolytic immunotherapy). The notion of oncolytic immunotherapy is considered as the way in which virus-induced tumor cell death (known as immunogenic cancer cell death (ICD)) allows the immune system to recognize tumor cells and provide long-lasting antitumor immunity. Both immune responses toward the virus and ICD together contribute toward successful antitumor efficacy. What is now becoming increasingly clear is that monotherapies, through any of the modalities detailed in this book, are neither sufficient in eradicating tumors nor in providing long-lasting antitumor immune responses and that combination therapies may deliver enhanced efficacy. After the rise of the genetic engineering era, it has been possible to engineer viruses to harbor combination-like characteristics to enhance their potency in cancer immunotherapy. This chapter provides a historical background on oncolytic virotherapy and its future application in cancer immunotherapy, especially as a combination therapy with other treatment modalities.

  9. Developments in immunotherapy for gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Diaz, J L; Wanta, S M; Fishbein, T M; Kroemer, A

    2015-08-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) cancers are the most commonly occurring cancer worldwide. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second and third most commonly diagnosed cancer in women and men, respectively. Despite the advent of screening and the declining incidence of CRC overall, most patients are not diagnosed at an early, localized stage. Due to resistance to chemotherapy, recurrence, and metastatic disease, those diagnosed with advanced disease have only a 12% 5-year survival rate. Given the overwhelming global impact of CRC, the need for advanced therapy is crucial. Targeted immunotherapy in addition to surgical resection, traditional chemotherapy, and radiation therapy is on the rise. For the purpose of this review, we focused on the advances of immunotherapy, particularly in CRC, with mention of research pertaining to particular advances in immunotherapy for other aspects of the GI system. We review basic immunology and the microenvironment surrounding colorectal tumors that lead to immune system evasion and poor responses to chemotherapy. We also examined the way these obstacles are proving to be the targets of tumor specific immunotherapy. We will present current FDA approved immunotherapies such as monoclonal antibodies (mAb) targeting tumor specific antigens, as well as vaccines, adoptive cell therapy, cytokines, and check-point inhibitors. A summation of prior research, current clinical trials, and prospective therapies in murine models help delineate our current status and future strategies on CRC immunotherapy.

  10. Cancer immunotherapy out of the gate: the 22nd annual Cancer Research Institute International Immunotherapy Symposium.

    PubMed

    Tontonoz, Matthew; Gee, Connie E

    2015-05-01

    The 22nd annual Cancer Research Institute (CRI) International Immunotherapy Symposium was held from October 5-8, 2014, in New York City. Titled "Cancer Immunotherapy: Out of the Gate," the symposium began with a Cancer Immunotherapy Consortium satellite meeting focused on issues in immunotherapy drug development, followed by five speaker sessions and a poster session devoted to basic and clinical cancer immunology research. The second annual William B. Coley lecture was delivered by Lieping Chen, one of the four recipients of the 2014 William B. Coley Award for Distinguished Research in Tumor Immunology; the other three recipients were Gordon Freeman, Tasuku Honjo, and Arlene Sharpe. Prominent themes of the conference were the use of genomic technologies to identify neoantigens and the emergence of new immune modulatory molecules, beyond CTLA-4 and PD-1/PD-L1, as new therapeutic targets for immunotherapy.

  11. Sublingual vaccination with sonicated Salmonella proteins and mucosal adjuvant induces mucosal and systemic immunity and protects mice from lethal enteritis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ching-Feng; Wu, Tzee-Chung; Wu, Chia-Chao; Lee, Chin-Cheng; Lo, Wen-Tsung; Hwang, Kwei-Shuai; Hsu, Mu-Ling; Peng, Ho-Jen

    2011-07-01

    Salmonella enteritidis is one of the most common pathogens of enteritis. Most experimental vaccines against Salmonella infection have been applied through injections. This is a new trial to explore the effect of sublingual administration of Salmonella vaccines on systemic and mucosal immunity. Adult BALB/c mice were sublingually vaccinated with sonicated Salmonella proteins (SSP) alone, or plus adjuvant CpG DNA (CpG) or cholera toxin (CT). They were boosted 2 weeks later. Saliva specific secretory IgA (SIgA) antibody responses were significantly stimulated in the mice vaccinated with SSP only or together with CpG or CT. Whereas the mice sublingually vaccinated with SSP and CpG had higher spleen cell IFN-γ production and serum specific IgG2a antibody responses, those receiving SSP and CT showed enhanced spleen cell IL-4, IL-5 and IL-6 production, and serum specific IgG1 antibody responses. After oral challenge with live S. enteritidis, the same strain of the source of SSP, immune protection in those sublingually vaccinated with SSP and CpG or CT was found to prevent intestinal necrosis and to render a higher survival rate. In conclusion, sublingual vaccination together with mucosal adjuvant CpG or CT is a simple but effective way against enteric bacterial pathogens.

  12. Research on Immunotherapy: Using the Immune System to Treat Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells that suppress immune responses. These advances in cancer immunotherapy are the result of long-term investments in ... Engineering Patients’ Immune Cells to Treat Their Cancers Cancer immunotherapy in children: How does it differ from approaches ...

  13. Melanoma immunotherapy dominates the field

    PubMed Central

    Diamantopoulos, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of melanoma is increasing worldwide and despite early detection and intervention, the number of patients dying from metastatic disease continues to rise. The prognosis of advanced melanoma remains poor, with median survival between 6 and 9 months. Over the past 30 years and despite extensive clinical research, the treatment options for metastatic disease were limited and melanoma is still considered as one of the most therapy-resistant malignancies. Single-agent and combination chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, biochemotherapy, immunotherapy, targeted agent therapy and combination regimens failed to show a significant improvement in overall survival (OS). Recent advances and in-depth understanding of the biology of melanoma, have contributed to the development of new agents. Based on the molecular and immunological background of the disease, these new drugs have shown benefit in overall and progression-free survival (PFS). As the picture of the disease begins to change, oncologists need to alter their approach to melanoma treatment and consider disease biology together with targeted individualized treatment. In this review the authors attempt to offer an insight in the present and past melanoma treatment options, with a focus on the recently approved immunotherapeutic agents and the clinical perspectives of these new weapons against metastatic melanoma. PMID:27563656

  14. International consensus on allergy immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jutel, Marek; Agache, Ioana; Bonini, Sergio; Burks, A Wesley; Calderon, Moises; Canonica, Walter; Cox, Linda; Demoly, Pascal; Frew, Antony J; O'Hehir, Robin; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Muraro, Antonella; Lack, Gideon; Larenas, Désirée; Levin, Michael; Nelson, Harald; Pawankar, Ruby; Pfaar, Oliver; van Ree, Ronald; Sampson, Hugh; Santos, Alexandra F; Du Toit, George; Werfel, Thomas; Gerth van Wijk, Roy; Zhang, Luo; Akdis, Cezmi A

    2015-09-01

    Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) has been used to treat allergic disease since the early 1900s. Despite numerous clinical trials and meta-analyses proving AIT efficacious, it remains underused and is estimated to be used in less than 10% of patients with allergic rhinitis or asthma worldwide. In addition, there are large differences between regions, which are not only due to socioeconomic status. There is practically no controversy about the use of AIT in the treatment of allergic rhinitis and allergic asthma, but for atopic dermatitis or food allergy, the indications for AIT are not well defined. The elaboration of a wider consensus is of utmost importance because AIT is the only treatment that can change the course of allergic disease by preventing the development of asthma and new allergen sensitizations and by inducing allergen-specific immune tolerance. Safer and more effective AIT strategies are being continuously developed both through elaboration of new allergen preparations and adjuvants and alternate routes of administration. A number of guidelines, consensus documents, or both are available on both the international and national levels. The international community of allergy specialists recognizes the need to develop a comprehensive consensus report to harmonize, disseminate, and implement the best AIT practice. Consequently, the International Collaboration in Asthma, Allergy and Immunology, formed by the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology; the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology; the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology; and the World Allergy Organization, has decided to issue an international consensus on AIT.

  15. Open questions for Alzheimer's disease immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Golde, Todd E

    2014-01-01

    Perhaps more definitively than any other class of novel Alzheimer's disease (AD) therapy, pre-clinical studies in mouse models of amyloid β (Aβ) deposition have established the disease-modifying potential of anti-Aβ immunotherapy. Despite disappointing results to date from anti-Aβ immunotherapy therapeutic trials, there is continued hope that such immunotherapies, especially if used in the preclinical stages, could prove to be the first disease-modifying therapies available for AD. The general optimism that Aβ-targeting and emerging tau-targeting immunotherapies may prove to be disease modifying is tempered by many unanswered questions regarding these therapeutic approaches, including but not limited to i) lack of precise understanding of mechanisms of action, ii) the factors that regulate antibody exposure in the brain, iii) the optimal target epitope, and iv) the mechanisms underlying side effects. In this review I discuss how answering these and other questions could increase the likelihood of therapeutic success. As passive immunotherapies are also likely to be extremely expensive, I also raise questions relating to cost-benefit of biologic-based therapies for AD that could limit future impact of these therapies by limiting access due to economic constraints.

  16. Advances in the understanding of cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Shore, Neal D

    2015-09-01

    The principal role of the immune system is to prevent and eradicate pathogens and infections. The key characteristics or features of an effective immune response include specificity, trafficking, antigen spread and durability (memory). The immune system is recognised to have a critical role in controlling cancer through a dynamic relationship with tumour cells. Normally, at the early stages of tumour development, the immune system is capable of eliminating tumour cells or keeping tumour growth abated; however, tumour cells may evolve multiple pathways over time to evade immune control. Immunotherapy may be viewed as a treatment designed to boost or restore the ability of the immune system to fight cancer, infections and other diseases. Immunotherapy manifests differently from traditional cancer treatments, eliciting delayed response kinetics and thus may be more effective in patients with lower tumour burden, in whom disease progression may be less rapid, thereby allowing ample time for the immunotherapy to evolve. Because immunotherapies may have a different mechanism of action from traditional cytotoxic or targeted biological agents, immunotherapy techniques have the potential to combine synergistically with traditional therapies.

  17. The Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer consensus statement on immunotherapy for the treatment of prostate carcinoma.

    PubMed

    McNeel, Douglas G; Bander, Neil H; Beer, Tomasz M; Drake, Charles G; Fong, Lawrence; Harrelson, Stacey; Kantoff, Philip W; Madan, Ravi A; Oh, William K; Peace, David J; Petrylak, Daniel P; Porterfield, Hank; Sartor, Oliver; Shore, Neal D; Slovin, Susan F; Stein, Mark N; Vieweg, Johannes; Gulley, James L

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed malignancy and second leading cause of cancer death among men in the United States. In recent years, several new agents, including cancer immunotherapies, have been approved or are currently being investigated in late-stage clinical trials for the management of advanced prostate cancer. Therefore, the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC) convened a multidisciplinary panel, including physicians, nurses, and patient advocates, to develop consensus recommendations for the clinical application of immunotherapy for prostate cancer patients. To do so, a systematic literature search was performed to identify high-impact papers from 2006 until 2014 and was further supplemented with literature provided by the panel. Results from the consensus panel voting and discussion as well as the literature review were used to rate supporting evidence and generate recommendations for the use of immunotherapy in prostate cancer patients. Sipuleucel-T, an autologous dendritic cell vaccine, is the first and currently only immunotherapeutic agent approved for the clinical management of metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). The consensus panel utilized this model to discuss immunotherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer, issues related to patient selection, monitoring of patients during and post treatment, and sequence/combination with other anti-cancer treatments. Potential immunotherapies emerging from late-stage clinical trials are also discussed. As immunotherapy evolves as a therapeutic option for the treatment of prostate cancer, these recommendations will be updated accordingly.

  18. Sublingual administration of Lactobacillus rhamnosus affects respiratory immune responses and facilitates protection against influenza virus infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yu-Na; Youn, Ha-Na; Kwon, Jung-Hoon; Lee, Dong-Hun; Park, Jae-Keun; Yuk, Seong-Su; Erdene-Ochir, Tseren-Ochir; Kim, Ki-Taek; Lee, Joong-Bok; Park, Seung-Yong; Choi, In-Soo; Song, Chang-Seon

    2013-05-01

    The extensive morbidity and mortality caused by influenza A viruses worldwide prompts the need for a deeper understanding of the host immune response and novel therapeutic and/or prophylactic interventions. In this study, we assessed the sublingual route as an effective means of delivering probiotics against influenza virus in mice. In addition, IgA levels, NK cell activity, T cell activation, and cytokine profiles in the lungs were examined to understand the mechanism underlying this protective effect. Sublingual administration of Lactobacillus rhamnosus provided enhanced protection against influenza virus infection by enhancing mucosal secretory IgA production, and T and NK cell activity. Moreover, interleukin (IL)-12 levels in the lungs increased significantly. Conversely, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor alpha levels in the lungs decreased significantly. On the basis of these promising findings, we propose that the sublingual mucosal route is an attractive alternative to mucosal routes for administering probiotics against influenza virus.

  19. Effect of sublingual administration of interferon-alpha on the immune response to influenza vaccination in institutionalized elderly individuals.

    PubMed

    Launay, Odile; Grabar, Sophie; Bloch, Frédéric; Desaint, Corinne; Jegou, David; Lallemand, Christophe; Erickson, Robert; Lebon, Pierre; Tovey, Michael G

    2008-07-29

    A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study was conducted to determine the effect of sublingual administration of IFNalpha on the immune response to influenza vaccination in elderly institutionalized individuals. Sublingual administration of 10 million IU of IFNalpha immediately prior to vaccination, reduced the geometric mean haemagglutination inhibitory (HAI) and IgG2 circulating antibody titers, and the secretory IgA (sIgA) response in saliva, to the New York strain of influenza A virus, 21 days post-vaccination, without detectable drug-related local or systemic toxicity. IFN treatment did not inhibit the immune response to the other components of the vaccine; the New Caledonia strain of influenza A virus, or the Jiangsu strain of influenza B virus. At the dose tested sublingual administration of IFNalpha reduces the immune response to influenza vaccination in elderly institutionalized individuals.

  20. Potential for immunotherapy in soft tissue sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, William W; Somaiah, Neeta; Engleman, Edgar G

    2015-01-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas (STS) are rare, heterogeneous tumors of mesenchymal origin. Despite optimal treatment, a large proportion of patients will develop recurrent and metastatic disease. For these patients, current treatment options are quite limited. Significant progress has been made recently in the use of immunotherapy for the treatment of other solid tumors (e.g. prostate cancer, melanoma). There is a strong rationale for immunotherapy in STS, based on an understanding of disease biology. For example, STS frequently have chromosomal translocations which result in unique fusion proteins and specific subtypes have been shown to express cancer testis antigens. In this review, we discuss the current status of immunotherapy in STS, including data from human studies with cancer vaccines, adoptive cell therapy, and immune checkpoint blockade. Further research into STS immunology is needed to help design logical, subtype-specific immunotherapeutic strategies. PMID:25625925

  1. Immunotherapy in prostate cancer: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Masanori; Koga, Noriko; Moriya, Fukuko; Itoh, Kyogo

    2016-01-01

    Although treatment options for castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) have increased over the last decade, there remains a need for strategies that can provide durable disease control and long-term benefit. Recently, immunotherapy has emerged as a viable and attractive strategy for the treatment of CRPC. To date, there are multiple strategies to target the immune system, and several approaches including therapeutic cancer vaccines and immune checkpoint inhibitors have been most successful in clinical trials. With regard to this, we report the results of the most recent clinical trials investigating immunotherapy in CRPC and discuss the future development of immunotherapy for CRPC, as well as the potential importance of biomarkers in the future progress of this field.

  2. Nanomedicine approaches to improve cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Hui; Min, Yuanzeng; Rodgers, Zach; Zhang, Longzhen; Wang, Andrew Z

    2017-03-10

    Significant advances have been made in the field of cancer immunotherapy by orchestrating the body's immune system to eradicate cancer cells. However, safety and efficacy concerns stemming from the systemic delivery of immunomodulatory compounds limits cancer immunotherapies expansion and application. In this context, nanotechnology presents a number of advantages, such as targeted delivery to immune cells, enhanced clinical outcomes, and reduced adverse events, which may aid in the delivery of cancer vaccines and immunomodulatory agents. With this in mind, a diverse range of nanomaterials with different physicochemical characteristics have been developed to stimulate the immune system and battle cancer. In this review, we will focus on some recent developments and the potential advantages of utilizing nanotechnology within the field of cancer immunotherapy. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  3. Recent Advances in Immunotherapy in Metastatic NSCLC

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Pranshu; Osman, Diaa; Gan, Gregory N.; Simon, George R.; Boumber, Yanis

    2016-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is one of most common malignancies and the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Despite advances in targeted therapies, majority of NSCLC patients do not have targetable genomic alterations. Nevertheless, recent discovery that NSCLC is an immunogenic tumor type, and several breakthroughs in immunotherapies have led to rapid expansion of this new treatment modality in NSCLC with recent FDA approvals of programed death receptor-1 inhibitors, such as nivolumab and pembrolizumab. Here, we review promising immunotherapeutic approaches in metastatic NSCLC, including checkpoint inhibitors, agents with other mechanisms of action, and immunotherapy combinations with other drugs. With advent of immunotherapy, therapeutic options in metastatic NSCLC are rapidly expanding with the hope to further expand life expectancy in metastatic lung cancer. PMID:27896216

  4. [Immunotherapies and targeted therapies in medical oncology].

    PubMed

    Rousseau, Benoît; Champiat, Stéphane; Loirat, Delphine; Arrondeau, Jennifer; Lemoine, Nathalie; Soria, Jean-Charles

    2014-01-01

    New immunotherapies, also called "immune checkpoints", are promising and showed interesting antitumoral activities in particular in advanced setting of melanoma, clear cell renal cancer or non-small cell lung carcinoma. These treatments include ipilimumab, anti-PD-1 and anti-PD-L1. There is a strong rational for combination of immunotherapies and targeted therapies. This review is dedicated to expose the theorical issues and preclinical data of such combinations. This review examined the impact of immunotherapies on transduction pathways and modification of immunity related to targeted therapies. First clinical data form early drug development studies showed the difficulties observed with such combination and limitating toxicities. Finally, potential interesting combinations are overviewed with an emphasis on sequential treatments.

  5. Efficient Nanovaccine Delivery in Cancer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guizhi; Zhang, Fuwu; Ni, Qianqian; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2017-03-09

    Vaccines hold tremendous potential for cancer immunotherapy by treating the immune system. Subunit vaccines, including molecular adjuvants and cancer-associated antigens or cancer-specific neoantigens, can elicit potent antitumor immunity. However, subunit vaccines have shown limited clinical benefit in cancer patients, which is in part attributed to inefficient vaccine delivery. In this Perspective, we discuss vaccine delivery by synthetic nanoparticles or naturally derived nanoparticles for cancer immunotherapy. Nanovaccines can efficiently codeliver adjuvants and multiepitope antigens into lymphoid organs and into antigen-presenting cells, and the intracellular release of vaccine and cross-presentation of antigens can be fine-tuned via nanovaccine engineering. Aside from peptide antigens, antigen-encoding mRNA for cancer immunotherapy delivered by nanovaccine will also be discussed.

  6. Development of Novel Immunotherapies for Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hujaily, Ensaf M.; Oldham, Robyn A. A.; Hari, Parameswaran; Medin, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a disorder of terminally differentiated plasma cells characterized by clonal expansion in the bone marrow (BM). It is the second-most common hematologic malignancy. Despite significant advances in therapeutic strategies, MM remains a predominantly incurable disease emphasizing the need for the development of new treatment regimens. Immunotherapy is a promising treatment modality to circumvent challenges in the management of MM. Many novel immunotherapy strategies, such as adoptive cell therapy and monoclonal antibodies, are currently under investigation in clinical trials, with some already demonstrating a positive impact on patient survival. In this review, we will summarize the current standards of care and discuss major new approaches in immunotherapy for MM. PMID:27618026

  7. Practical recommendations for mixing allergy immunotherapy extracts

    PubMed Central

    Daigle, Barbara J.

    2015-01-01

    Critical aspects of formulating allergy immunotherapy vaccines include the selection, total number, and proportions of each allergen component in therapeutic mixtures. The immunotherapy prescription, determined by a medical provider, details the dosing and schedule for treatment as well as the specific composition of the treatment vials. Allergen extracts are composed of many components such as proteins, glycoproteins, and proteases. Some components in allergen extracts are cross-reactive, meaning that treatment with an extract from one species may confer partial protection against a triggering allergen from another species. Conversely, some allergen extracts are incompatible with other extracts when combined in a mixture for treatment, resulting in lowered therapeutic potential for the patient. Therefore, knowledge of allergen extract cross-reactivities and incompatibilities guides the preparation of subcutaneous immunotherapy prescriptions. In a clinical setting, an understanding of what can and can not be mixed is one critical element in improving treatment outcomes. PMID:25860164

  8. Combining Cancer Immunotherapy and Targeted Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ribas, Antoni; Wolchok, Jedd D.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to pharmacologically modulate key signaling pathways that drive tumor growth and progression, but do not negatively impact the function of lymphocytes, provides avenues for rational combinatorial approaches to improve the antitumor activity of tumor immunotherapies. Novel targeted agents can very specifically block oncogenic events in cancer cells, leading to a pro-apoptotic milieu and a potential increase in sensitivity to recognition and attack by cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Furthermore, targeted pathway modulation in lymphocytes may change their function and have activating effects in some instances. When tested together with recently developed powerful tumor immunotherapies, such combinations may exploit the highly specific targeting of oncogenes with small molecule inhibitors to lead to high frequency of tumor regressions, and merge this benefit with the durable responses achievable with effective tumor immunotherapies. PMID:23561594

  9. Changes in sublingual microcirculatory flow index and vessel density on ascent to altitude.

    PubMed

    Martin, Daniel S; Goedhart, Peter; Vercueil, Andre; Ince, Can; Levett, Denny Z H; Grocott, Mike P W

    2010-08-01

    We hypothesized that ascent to altitude would result in reduced sublingual microcirculatory flow index (MFI) and increased vessel density. Twenty-four subjects were studied using sidestream dark-field imaging, as they ascended to 5300 m; one cohort remained at this altitude (n = 10), while another ascended higher (maximum 8848 m; n = 14). The MFI, vessel density and grid crossings (GX; an alternative density measure) were calculated. Total study length was 71 days; images were recorded at sea level (SL), Namche Bazaar (3500 m), Everest base camp (5300 m), the Western Cwm (6400 m), South Col (7950 m) and departure from Everest base camp (5300 m; 5300 m-b). Peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2), heart rate and blood pressure were also recorded. Compared with SL, altitude resulted in reduced sublingual MFI in small (<25 microm; P < 0.0001) and medium vessels (26-50 microm; P = 0.006). The greatest reduction in MFI from SL was seen at 5300 m-b; from 2.8 to 2.5 in small vessels and from 2.9 to 2.4 in medium-sized vessels. The density of vessels <25 microm did not change during ascent, but those >25 microm rose from 1.68 (+/- 0.43) mm mm(-2) at SL to 2.27 (+/- 0.57) mm mm(-2) at 5300 m-b (P = 0.005); GX increased at all altitudes (P < 0.001). The reduction in MFI was greater in climbers than in those who remained at 5300 m in small and medium-sized vessels (P = 0.017 and P = 0.002, respectively). At 7950 m, administration of supplemental oxygen resulted in a further reduction of MFI and increase in vessel density. Thus, MFI was reduced whilst GX increased in the sublingual mucosa with prolonged exposure to hypoxia and was exaggerated in those exposed to extreme altitude.

  10. Sedation and mechanical hypoalgesia after sublingual administration of detomidine hydrochloride gel to donkeys.

    PubMed

    Lizarraga, Ignacio; Castillo-Alcala, Fernanda; Varner, Kelley M; Robinson, Lauren S

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare sedative and mechanical hypoalgesic effects of sublingual administration of 2 doses of detomidine gel to donkeys. DESIGN Randomized blinded controlled trial. ANIMALS 6 healthy castrated male donkeys. PROCEDURES In a crossover study design, donkeys received each of the following sublingual treatments 1 week apart in a randomly assigned order: 1 mL of molasses (D0) or detomidine hydrochloride gel at 20 μg/kg (9 μg/lb; D20) or 40 μg/kg (18 μg/lb; D40). Sedation score (SS), head height above the ground (HHAG), and mechanical nociceptive threshold (MNT) were assessed before and for 180 minutes after treatment. Areas under the effect change-versus-time curves (AUCs) from 0 to 30, 30 to 60, 60 to 120, and 120 to 180 minutes after administration were computed for SS, HHAG, and MNT and compared among treatments. RESULTS D20 and D40 resulted in greater SS AUCs from 60 to 120 minutes and smaller HHAG AUCs from 30 through 180 minutes than did D0. The D40 resulted in smaller HHAG AUCs from 60 to 120 minutes than did D20. Compared with D0 values, MNT AUCs from 60 to 120 minutes were higher for D20, whereas MNT AUCs from 30 through 180 minutes were higher for D40. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE D20 and D40 induced sedation and mechanical hypoalgesia in donkeys by > 30 minutes after administration, but only sedation was dose dependent. Sublingual administration of detomidine gel at 40 μg/kg may be useful for sedation of standing donkeys prior to potentially painful minor procedures.

  11. Adoptive immunotherapy for cancer or viruses.

    PubMed

    Maus, Marcela V; Fraietta, Joseph A; Levine, Bruce L; Kalos, Michael; Zhao, Yangbing; June, Carl H

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy, or the infusion of lymphocytes, is a promising approach for the treatment of cancer and certain chronic viral infections. The application of the principles of synthetic biology to enhance T cell function has resulted in substantial increases in clinical efficacy. The primary challenge to the field is to identify tumor-specific targets to avoid off-tumor, on-target toxicity. Given recent advances in efficacy in numerous pilot trials, the next steps in clinical development will require multicenter trials to establish adoptive immunotherapy as a mainstream technology.

  12. Improving cancer immunotherapy with DNA methyltransferase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Mohammad H; Wang, Lei; Goldberg, Michael S

    2016-07-01

    Immunotherapy confers durable clinical benefit to melanoma, lung, and kidney cancer patients. Challengingly, most other solid tumors, including ovarian carcinoma, are not particularly responsive to immunotherapy, so combination with a complementary therapy may be beneficial. Recent findings suggest that epigenetic modifying drugs can prime antitumor immunity by increasing expression of tumor-associated antigens, chemokines, and activating ligands by cancer cells as well as cytokines by immune cells. This review, drawing from both preclinical and clinical data, describes some of the mechanisms of action that enable DNA methyltransferase inhibitors to facilitate the establishment of antitumor immunity.

  13. Immunotherapy for advanced melanoma: future directions.

    PubMed

    Valpione, Sara; Campana, Luca G

    2016-02-01

    As calculated by the meta-analysis of Korn et al., the prognosis of metastatic melanoma in the pretarget and immunological therapy era was poor, with a median survival of 6.2 and a 1-year life expectancy of 25.5%. Nowadays, significant advances in melanoma treatment have been gained, and immunotherapy is one of the promising approaches to get to durable responses and survival improvement. The aim of the present review is to highlight the recent innovations in melanoma immunotherapy and to propose a critical perspective of the future directions of this enthralling oncology subspecialty.

  14. Adoptive Immunotherapy for Cancer or Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Maus, Marcela V.; Fraietta, Joseph A.; Levine, Bruce L.; Kalos, Michael; Zhao, Yangbing; June, Carl H.

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy, or the infusion of lymphocytes, is a promising approach for the treatment of cancer and certain chronic viral infections. The application of the principles of synthetic biology to enhance T cell function has resulted in substantial increases in clinical efficacy. The primary challenge to the field is to identify tumor-specific targets to avoid off-tissue, on-target toxicity. Given recent advances in efficacy in numerous pilot trials, the next steps in clinical development will require multicenter trials in order to establish adoptive immunotherapy as a mainstream technology. PMID:24423116

  15. A Rare Primary Neuroendocrine Tumor (Typical Carcinoid) of the Sublingual Gland

    PubMed Central

    Ohki, Kousuke; Uchida, Fumihiko; Kanno, Naomi; Hasegawa, Shogo; Yanagawa, Toru; Bukawa, Hiroki

    2016-01-01

    A typical carcinoid is extremely rare in the oral cavity. We here present a case of a typical carcinoid arising in the sublingual gland of a 62-year-old woman. The tumor was removed by primary excision with 10 mm surgical margins and submandibular dissection. Examination of the tumor showed medium-sized tumor cells that were positive for CD56 and chromogranin A, with no necrosis, and with a mitotic count less than 1/10 HPF. A pathological diagnosis of typical carcinoid was made from both morphological and immunological examinations. One year after excision surgery, there was no tumor recurrence or neck metastasis. PMID:27840746

  16. Novel insights into immunotherapy for hepatitis B patients.

    PubMed

    Akbar, Sheikh Mohammad Fazle; Al-Mahtab, Mamun; Jahan, Munira; Yoshida, Osamu; Hiasa, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    The possible use of immunotherapy for hepatitis B has emerged for two major reasons: (1) chronic hepatitis B (CHB) is an immune-mediated pathological condition, and (2) commercially available antiviral drugs are of limited efficacy. Although various immunomodulatory agents have been used to treat patients with CHB during the last three decades, there is currently no consensus among physicians and hepatologists regarding the suitability of immunotherapy for patients with CHB. However, new insights into immunotherapy for CHB have emerged; these may facilitate design of effective and tolerable immunotherapy regimens for these patients. This review provides a comprehensive overview of immunotherapy for CHB.

  17. Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer consensus statement on immunotherapy for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Rini, Brian I; McDermott, David F; Hammers, Hans; Bro, William; Bukowski, Ronald M; Faba, Bernard; Faba, Jo; Figlin, Robert A; Hutson, Thomas; Jonasch, Eric; Joseph, Richard W; Leibovich, Bradley C; Olencki, Thomas; Pantuck, Allan J; Quinn, David I; Seery, Virginia; Voss, Martin H; Wood, Christopher G; Wood, Laura S; Atkins, Michael B

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy has produced durable clinical benefit in patients with metastatic renal cell cancer (RCC). In the past, patients treated with interferon-alpha (IFN) and interleukin-2 (IL-2) have achieved complete responses, many of which have lasted for multiple decades. More recently, a large number of new agents have been approved for RCC, several of which attack tumor angiogenesis by inhibiting vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF) and VEGF receptors (VEGFR), as well as tumor metabolism, inhibiting the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Additionally, a new class of immunotherapy agents, immune checkpoint inhibitors, is emerging and will play a significant role in the treatment of patients with RCC. Therefore, the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC) convened a Task Force, which met to consider the current role of approved immunotherapy agents in RCC, to provide guidance to practicing clinicians by developing consensus recommendations and to set the stage for future immunotherapeutic developments in RCC.

  18. Immunity to TB and targets for immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Juarrero, Mercedes

    2012-02-01

    For centuries the treatment of TB has presented an enormous challenge to global health. In the 20th century, the treatment of TB patients with long-term multidrug therapy gave hope that TB could be controlled and cured; however, contrary to these expectations and coinciding with the emergence of AIDS, the world has witnessed a rampant increase in hard-to-treat cases of TB, along with the emergence of highly virulent and multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains. Unfortunately, these bacteria are now circulating around the world, and there are few effective drugs to treat them. As a result, the prospects for improved treatment and control of TB in the 21st century have worsened and we urgently need to identify new therapies that deal with this problem. The potential use of immunotherapy for TB is now of greater consideration than ever before, as immunotherapy could potentially overcome the problem of drug resistance. TB immunotherapy targets the already existing host anti-TB immune response and aims to enhance killing of the bacilli. For this purpose, several approaches have been used: the use of anti-Mycobacteria antibodies; enhancing the Th1 protective responses by using mycobacterial antigens or increasing Th1 cytokines; interfering with the inflammatory process and targeting of immunosuppressive pathways and targeting the cell activation/proliferation pathways. This article reviews our current understanding of TB immunity and targets for immunotherapy that could be used in combination with current TB chemotherapy.

  19. Therapeutic strategies in multiple sclerosis. I. Immunotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    Hohlfeld, R

    1999-01-01

    This review first addresses several general aspects of the immunotherapy of multiple sclerosis. Next, two approved immunomodulatory treatments, interferon-beta and copolymer-1 (glatiramer acetate), are reviewed in more detail. Finally, other immunosuppressive therapies and experimental strategies are briefly discussed. PMID:10603621

  20. Novel Approaches and Perspectives in Allergen Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Hans Jürgen; Valovirta, Erkka; Pfaar, Oliver; Moingeon, Philippe; Schmid, Johannes Martin; Skaarup, Søren Helbo; Cardell, Lars-Olaf; Simonsen, Kim; Larche, Mark; Durham, Stephen R; Sørensen, Poul

    2017-01-25

    In this review we report on relevant current topics in allergen immunotherapy (AIT) which were broadly discussed during the 1(st) Aarhus Immunotherapy Symposium (Aarhus, Denmark) in December, 2015 by leading clinicians, scientists and industry representatives in the field. The aim of this symposium was to highlight AIT-related aspects of public health, clinical efficacy evaluation, mechanisms, development of new biomarkers and an overview of novel therapeutic approaches. Allergy is a public health issue of high socioeconomic relevance, and development of evidence-based action plans to address allergy as a public health issue ought to be on national and regional agendae. The underlying mechanisms are in the focus of current research that lays the ground for innovative therapies. Standardization and harmonization of clinical endpoints in AIT trials as well as current knowledge about potential biomarkers have substantiated proof of effectiveness of this disease-modifying therapeutic option. Novel treatments like peptide immunotherapy, intralymphatic immunotherapy and use of recombinant allergens herald a new age in which AIT may address treatment of allergy as a public health issue by reaching a large fraction of patients. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Bioinformatics for cancer immunology and immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Charoentong, Pornpimol; Angelova, Mihaela; Efremova, Mirjana; Gallasch, Ralf; Hackl, Hubert; Galon, Jerome; Trajanoski, Zlatko

    2012-11-01

    Recent mechanistic insights obtained from preclinical studies and the approval of the first immunotherapies has motivated increasing number of academic investigators and pharmaceutical/biotech companies to further elucidate the role of immunity in tumor pathogenesis and to reconsider the role of immunotherapy. Additionally, technological advances (e.g., next-generation sequencing) are providing unprecedented opportunities to draw a comprehensive picture of the tumor genomics landscape and ultimately enable individualized treatment. However, the increasing complexity of the generated data and the plethora of bioinformatics methods and tools pose considerable challenges to both tumor immunologists and clinical oncologists. In this review, we describe current concepts and future challenges for the management and analysis of data for cancer immunology and immunotherapy. We first highlight publicly available databases with specific focus on cancer immunology including databases for somatic mutations and epitope databases. We then give an overview of the bioinformatics methods for the analysis of next-generation sequencing data (whole-genome and exome sequencing), epitope prediction tools as well as methods for integrative data analysis and network modeling. Mathematical models are powerful tools that can predict and explain important patterns in the genetic and clinical progression of cancer. Therefore, a survey of mathematical models for tumor evolution and tumor-immune cell interaction is included. Finally, we discuss future challenges for individualized immunotherapy and suggest how a combined computational/experimental approaches can lead to new insights into the molecular mechanisms of cancer, improved diagnosis, and prognosis of the disease and pinpoint novel therapeutic targets.

  2. Adapting conventional cancer treatment for immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Jian; Liu, Zhida; Fu, Yang-Xin

    2016-05-01

    The efficacy of directly killing tumors by conventional cancer therapies, such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy, has been for several decades well established. But, a suppressed immune response might become a lethal side effect after repeated cycles of intensive treatment. Recently, achievements in immune checkpoint inhibitors and adoptive T cell-mediated immunotherapies have resulted in changes in frontline management of advanced cancer diseases. However, accumulated evidence indicates that immunotherapeutic and conventional strategies alone are often ineffective to eradicate big tumors or metastasis. To improve the outcomes of treatment for advanced cancer diseases, the combination of conventional cancer treatment with various immunotherapeutic approaches has been attempted and has shown potential synergistic effects. Recent studies have unexpectedly demonstrated that some strategies of conventional cancer treatment can regulate the immune response positively, thus the understanding of how to adapt conventional treatment for immunotherapy is crucial to the design of effective combination therapy of conventional treatment with immunotherapy. Here, we review both experimental and clinical studies on the therapeutic effect and its mechanisms of combining conventional therapy with immunotherapy in treatment of cancer.

  3. Acinar autolysis and mucous extravasation in human sublingual glands: a microscopic postmortem study

    PubMed Central

    AZEVEDO-ALANIS, Luciana Reis; TOLENTINO, Elen de Souza; de ASSIS, Gerson Francisco; CESTARI, Tânia Mary; LARA, Vanessa Soares; DAMANTE, José Humberto

    2015-01-01

    Although some morphological investigations on aged human sublingual glands (HSG) found eventual phenomena identified as autolysis and mucous extravasation, the exact meaning of these findings has not been elucidated. Objective The aim of this work is to investigate whether acinar autolysis and mucous extravasation are related to the aging process in human sublingual glands. We also speculate if autolytic changes may assist forensic pathologists in determining time of death. Material and Methods 186 cadavers’ glands were allocated to age groups: I (0–30 years); II (31–60), and III (61–90). Time and mode of death were also recorded. Acinar autolysis and mucous extravasation were classified as present or absent. Ultrastructural analysis was performed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Data were compared using Mann-Whitney U, Spearman’s correlation coefficient, Kruskal-Wallis, and Dunn tests (p<0.05). Results There was correlation between age and acinar autolysis (r=0.38; p=0.0001). However, there was no correlation between autolysis and time of death. No differences were observed between genders. TEM showed mucous and serous cells presenting nuclear and membrane alterations and mucous cells were more susceptible to autolysis. Conclusion Acinar autolysis occurred in all age groups and increased with age while mucous extravasation was rarely found. Both findings are independent. Autolysis degrees in HSG could not be used to determine time of death. PMID:26537715

  4. The effect of sublingual misoprostol versus intravenous oxytocin in reducing bleeding after caesarean section.

    PubMed

    Eftekhari, N; Doroodian, M; Lashkarizadeh, R

    2009-10-01

    In this study, 100 singleton pregnant women underwent a caesarean delivery under general anaesthesia and were studied in terms of postpartum bleeding using oxytocin or misoprostol. Patients were randomly divided into two equal groups. One group received two tabs of misoprostol 200 microg sublingually and the second group took intravenous infusion of 20 units of oxytocin at the rate of 10 cc/min immediately after delivery until full contraction of the uterine. The amount of blood loss was lower in misoprostol group comparing with oxytocin group (608.91 ml vs 673.9 ml) (p = 0.048) and this difference was statistically significant. The need to give additional oxytocin therapy in oxytocin group (36%) was significantly higher than misoprostol group (14%) (p = 0.032). It seems that the efficacy of sublingual misoprostol is equivalent to that of low dose intravenous oxytocin in reducing postpartum haemorrhage at caesarean section. Misoprostol has some other advantages like long shelf -life, stability at room temperature and oral use.

  5. Sublingual mucosa: A new vaccination route for systemic and mucosal immunity.

    PubMed

    Kweon, Mi-Na

    2011-04-01

    Needle-free vaccine delivery has become a global priority, both to eliminate the risk of improper and unsafe needle use and to simplify vaccination procedures. In pursuit of greater ease of vaccination, a number of needle-free delivery routes have been explored, with mucosal routes being perhaps the most prominent. Since the vaccine administration route significantly affects immune responses, numerous researchers are attempting to develop alternative vaccine delivery methods including a mucosal route. My group's recent studies demonstrate the potential of the sublingual (s.l.) route for delivering vaccines capable of inducing mucosal as well as systemic immune responses. Sublingual administration conferred effective protection against a lethal challenge with influenza virus (H1N1) or genital papillomavirus. Moreover, CCR7-CCL19/CCL21-regulated dendritic cells are responsible for activation of T and B cells following s.l. administration. This review highlights current knowledge about the safety and effectiveness of s.l. vaccination and describes how s.l. vaccination can induce both systemic and mucosal immunity.

  6. Sublingual vaccination with influenza virus protects mice against lethal viral infection.

    PubMed

    Song, Joo-Hye; Nguyen, Huan H; Cuburu, Nicolas; Horimoto, Taisuke; Ko, Sung-Youl; Park, Se-Ho; Czerkinsky, Cecil; Kweon, Mi-Na

    2008-02-05

    We assessed whether the sublingual (s.l.) route would be an effective means of delivering vaccines against influenza virus in mice by using either formalin-inactivated or live influenza A/PR/8 virus (H1N1). Sublingual administration of inactivated influenza virus given on two occasions induced both systemic and mucosal antibody responses and conferred protection against a lethal intranasal (i.n.) challenge with influenza virus. Coadministration of a mucosal adjuvant (mCTA-LTB) enhanced these responses and resulted in complete protection against respiratory viral challenge. In addition, s.l. administration of formalin-inactivated A/PR/8 plus mCTA-LTB induced systemic expansion of IFN-gamma-secreting T cells and virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses. Importantly, a single s.l. administration of live A/PR/8 virus was not pathogenic and induced protection mediated by both acquired and innate immunity. Moreover, s.l. administration of live A/PR/8 virus conferred heterosubtypic protection against respiratory challenge with H3N2 virus. Unlike the i.n. route, the A/PR/8 virus, whether live or inactivated, did not migrate to or replicate in the CNS after s.l. administration. Based on these promising findings, we propose that the s.l. mucosal route offers an attractive alternative to mucosal routes for administering influenza vaccines.

  7. Fast-dissolving sublingual films of terbutaline sulfate: formulation and in vitro/in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Sayed, Soha; Ibrahim, Howida Kamal; Mohamed, Magdy Ibrahim; El-Milligi, Mohamed Farid

    2013-08-05

    Terbutaline sulfate fast dissolving sublingual films were prepared using seven drug compatible film formers in different combinations and proportions. The film polymers are maltodextrin, Na alginate, Carpabol 430, xanthan gum, HPMC E5, PVP K-25, and Na CMC. Propylene glycol and sorbitol were used as plasticizers and mannitol as filler. The optimum polymer concentrations and the plasticizer amount were selected on the basis of flexibility, tensile strength, and stickiness of the films. The prepared films were evaluated for their tensile strength, thickness uniformity, disintegration time (in vitro and in vivo), in vitro dissolution, and moisture content. Polymer type rather than total polymer concentration or plasticizer amount showed a significant effect on the tested film properties. A randomized, single dose, crossover study was conducted in four healthy volunteers to compare the pharmacokinetic profile of terbutaline sulfate from the prepared films and the conventional oral tablets. The film formula of choice gave a significantly faster drug absorption rate and recorded a relative bioavailability of 204.08%. Sublingual films could be promising as a convenient delivery system for terbutaline sulfate in patients with swallowing problems. The improved extent of absorption (higher AUC(0-24)) indicates success in improving drug bioavailability, and the faster absorption rate could be promising for the management of acute episodes of asthma.

  8. Development of mucoadhesive dosage forms of buprenorphine for sublingual drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Das, Nandita G; Das, Sudip K

    2004-01-01

    The development of mucoadhesive formulations of buprenorphine for intended sublingual usage in the treatment of drug addiction is described. The formulations include mucoadhesive polymer films, with or without plasticizers, and mucoadhesive polymer tablets, with or without excipients that enhance drug release and/or improve tablet compaction properties. The mucoadhesive polymers studied include carbomers such as Carbopol 934P, Carbopol 974P, and the polycarbophil Noveon AA-1, with excipients chosen from pregelatinized starch, lactose, glycerol, propylene glycol, and various molecular weights of polyethylene glycol. The development of plasticizer-containing mucoadhesive polymer films was feasible; however, these films failed to release their entire drug content within a reasonable period. Thus, they were not determined suitable for sublingual usage because of possible loss by ingestion during routine meal intakes. The mucoadhesive strength of tablet formulations containing Noveon AA-1 appears to be slightly superior to the Carbopol-containing tablets. However, the Carbopol 974P formulations exhibited superior drug dissolution profiles while providing adequate mucoadhesive strength. The tablet formulations containing Carbopol 974P as mucoadhesive polymer, lactose as drug release enhancer, and PEG 3350 as compaction enhancer exhibited the best results. Overall, the mucoadhesive tablet formulations exhibited superior results compared with the mucoadhesive film formulations.

  9. Effects of haemoglobin levels on the sublingual microcirculation in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Sharawy, Nivin; Hussein, Ahmed; Hossny, Osama; Refaa, Amera; Saka, Ahmed; Mukhtar, Ahmed; Whynot, Sara; George, Ron; Lehmann, Christian

    2016-11-25

    Anemia in pregnant women is associated with increased maternal and perinatal mortality and represents an important economic burden in many developing countries. Our goal was to evaluate the impact of anemia on the capillary network during pregnancy. Therefore, we compared microcirculatory parameters of anemic pregnant study participants to that of non-anemic pregnant women employing sublingual microcirculation video imaging technology and novel automated video analysis software.Non-anemic (n = 7) and anemic (n = 44) pregnant women were enrolled in the study at second and third trimesters. Video imaging was applied to the sublingual mucosal surface in five visual fields. The resultant videos were analyzed automatically, avoiding observer bias. Total vessel density (TVD), perfused vessel density (PVD) and proportion of perfused vessels (PPV) were calculated by the software. Both, mean TVD and PVD were significantly increased in the anemic pregnant group, while the PPV was not significantly different. Significant negative correlations were observed between haemoglobin (Hb) levels and both, TVD and PVD. Haemoglobin level seems to play an important determinant role in restructuring the capillary network. An effect that could compensate the impaired tissue oxygen delivery associated with anemia during pregnancy.

  10. Sublingual microcirculatory blood flow and vessel density in Sherpas at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Gilbert-Kawai, Edward T; Coppel, Jonny; Court, Jo; Van Der Kaaij, Jildou; Vercueil, Andre; Feelisch, Martin; Levett, Denny; Mythen, Monty; Grocott, Michael P; Martin, Daniel Stuart

    2017-01-26

    Anecdotal reports suggest that Sherpa highlanders demonstrate extraordinary tolerance to hypoxia at high altitude despite exhibiting a lower arterial oxygen content than acclimatised Lowlanders. This study tested the hypothesis that Sherpas exposed to hypobaric hypoxia on ascent to 5300m, develop increased microcirculatory blood flow as a means of maintaining normal tissue oxygen delivery. Images of the sublingual microcirculation were obtained from 64 Sherpas and 69 Lowlanders using incident dark field imaging. Serial measurements were obtained from participants undertaking an ascent from baseline testing (35m or 1300m) to Everest base camp (5300m), and following subsequent descent in Kathmandu (1300m). Microcirculatory flow index and heterogeneity index were used to provide indices of microcirculatory flow, whilst capillary density was assessed using small vessel density. Sherpas, when compared to Lowlanders, demonstrated significantly greater microcirculatory blood flow at Everest Base Camp, but not at baseline testing or on return in Kathmandu. Additionally, Sherpa blood flow exhibited greater homogeneity at 5300m and 1300m (descent) when compared to Lowlanders. Sublingual small vessel density was not different between the two cohorts at baseline testing or at 1300m, however at 5300m Sherpas capillary density was up to 30% greater. These data suggest that Sherpas have the ability to maintain a significantly greater microcirculatory flow per unit time, and flow per unit volume of tissue at high altitude, when compared to Lowlanders. These findings support the notion that peripheral vascular factors at the microcirculatory level may be important in the process of adaptation to hypoxia.

  11. Fast-disintegrating sublingual tablets: effect of epinephrine load on tablet characteristics.

    PubMed

    Rawas-Qalaji, Mutasem M; Simons, F Estelle R; Simons, Keith J

    2006-04-28

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of increasing epinephrine load on the characteristics of fast-disintegrating sublingual tablets for the potential emergency treatment of anaphylaxis. Four tablet formulations, A, B, C, and D, containing 0%, 6%, 12%, and 24% of epinephrine bitartrate, respectively, and microcrystalline cellulose:low-substituted hydroxypropyl cellulose (9:1), were prepared by direct compression, at a range of compression forces. Tablet weight variation, content uniformity, hardness, disintegration time, wetting time, and friability were measured for each formulation at each compression force. All 4 tablet formulations at each compression force were within the United States Pharmacopeia (USP) limits for weight variation and content uniformity. A linear increase in compression force resulted in an exponential increase in hardness for all formulations, a linear increase in disintegration and wetting times of A, and an exponential increase in disintegration and wetting times of B, C, and D. At a mean +/- SD hardness of > or = 2.3 +/- 0.2 kg, all tablet formulations passed the USP friability test. At a mean +/- SD hardness of < or = 3.1 +/- 0.2 kg, all tablet formulations resulted in disintegration and wetting times of <10 seconds and <30 seconds, respectively. Tablets with drug loads from 0% to 24% epinephrine can be formulated with hardness, disintegration times, and wetting times suitable for sublingual administration.

  12. Rapidly-disintegrating sublingual tablets of epinephrine: role of non-medicinal ingredients in formulation development.

    PubMed

    Rachid, Ousama; Rawas-Qalaji, Mutasem; Simons, F Estelle R; Simons, Keith J

    2012-11-01

    Epinephrine is the drug of choice in the management of anaphylaxis. For first-aid treatment in the community, epinephrine autoinjectors (E-autos) are commonly prescribed, but are underutilized. In our laboratory, we developed a series of first-generation rapidly-disintegrating sublingual tablets (RDSTs) containing 40mg of epinephrine. One RDST had similar bioavailability to epinephrine 0.3mg from an auto-injector, as confirmed in a validated rabbit model, while other formulations containing different non-medicinal ingredients (NMIs) and with similar in vitro characteristics demonstrated much lower bioavailability. Subsequently, we evaluated the effect of changing the grade and proportion of NMIs, specifically mannitol and microcrystalline cellulose (MCC), on the in vitro characteristics of second- and third-generation RDSTs. Weight variation, content uniformity, breaking force, and friability were tested using official USP methods. Novel validated methods that simulate ambient conditions of the sublingual cavity were developed to test disintegration time, wetting time, and dissolution. Using these methods, it was possible to measure the effects of making small changes in NMIs on the in vitro characteristics of the formulations. The RDST formulation that resulted in the best in vitro characteristics contained the optimum proportion of mannitol and a specific ratio of coarse and fine particle grades of MCC. Appropriate comparative testing resulted in the selection of the RDST with the optimum in vitro characteristics.

  13. High doses of oral folate and sublingual vitamin B12 in dialysis patients with hyperhomocysteinemia

    PubMed Central

    Naseri, Mitra; Sarvari, Gholam-Reza; Esmaeeli, Mohammad; Azarfar, Anoush; Rasouli, Zahra; Moeenolroayaa, Giti; Jahanshahi, Shohre; Farhadi, Simin; Heydari, Zohreh; Sagheb-Taghipoor, Narges

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Folic acid and vitamin B12, alone or in combination have been used to reduce homocysteine (Hcy) levels in dialysis patients. Objectives: We aimed to assess the efficacy of high doses of oral folate and vitamin B12 in reducing plasma Hcy levels after a 12-week treatment. Patients and Methods: Thirty-two dialysis patients aged 10-324 months screened for hyperhomocysteinuria. Then cases with hyperhomocysteinemia received oral folate 10 mg/day with sublingual methylcobalamin 1 mg/day for 12 weeks. In pre- and post-intervention phases plasma Hcy concentration, serum folate, and vitamin B12 levels were measured. Changes in plasma Hcy, serum folate, and vitamin B12 concentrations were analyzed by paired t tests, and P values < 0.05 were considered significant. Results: Eighteen (56.2%) patients had hyperhomocysteinuria. Vitamin B12 and folate levels were normal or high in all cases. Two patients were lost due to transplant or irregular drugs consumption. Plasma Hcy levels were reduced in all, and reached normal values in 50%. A statistically significant differences between first Hcy levels with levels after intervention was found (95% CI, 5.1–8.9, P = 0.0001). Conclusion: Oral folate 10 mg/day in combination with sublingual vitamin B12, 1 mg/day can be considered as a favorable treatment for hyperhomocysteinemia in dialysis patients. PMID:27689109

  14. Space Flight Effects on Intracellular Ions in Sublingual Cells of Non-Human Primates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnaud, Sara B.; Dotsenko, R.; Fung, P.; Navidi, M.; Silver, B.; Wade, Charles E. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    We have used a novel technique that quantifies minerals and electrolytes from smears of sublingual cells by x-ray microanalysis to monitor metabolic changes in bed rest subjects. Increases in intracellular calcium (Ca), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) were characteristic of subjects whose exercise regimen was inadequate to maintain calcium metabolism. To test the effects of space flight on intracellular ions, we analyzed cells from 2-4 kg Rhesus monkeys before and after 2 weeks in space or chair restraint (CR). There were increases in sublingual cell Ca, P and K after space flight which paralleled the clinical estimates of metabolic status of the animals and exceeded the levels found during CR on R+11. Increases after 2 weeks CR were 26% in Ca, 6% in P and 29% in K. Species similarity ill responses of intracellular ions to inactivity imposed by bed rest, restraint or microgravity suggest that this innovative non-invasive technique would be a useful in-flight monitor of exercise countermeasures directed toward maintaining calcium balance.

  15. Sublingual versus Vaginal Misoprostol for the Induction of Labor at Term: A Randomized, Triple-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Jahromi, Bahia Namavar; Poorgholam, Foroogh; Yousefi, Gholamhossein; Salarian, Leila

    2016-01-01

    Background: We sought to compare the effectiveness and safety of sublingual versus vaginal misoprostol for the termination of pregnancy with a live full-term fetus. Methods: This randomized, triple-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was performed on 200 primiparous women with normal, singleton, full-term pregnancies candidated for the induction of labor. Sublingual and vaginal tablets containing misoprostol (25 mcg) or placebo in similar shapes were administered every 4 hours until the Bishop score reached above 8. Maternal and neonatal complications and outcomes were compared. Results: There were 100 parturient women in each group. The mean maternal age, gestational age, and Bishop score at the commencement of misoprostol had no statistical differences between the sublingual and vaginal groups. The mean time interval between misoprostol commencement and delivery was 497.10±291.49 and 511.67±08.46 minutes for the sublingual and vaginal groups, correspondingly. Twenty-two women had Cesarean deliveries in the sublingual group versus 14 in the vaginal group. Meconium-stained amniotic fluid was seen in 12 women in the sublingual group and 4 in the vaginal group (P=0.03). Late fetal heart rate deceleration was observed in 8 women in the sublingual group and 4 in the vaginal group (P=0.22). The mean neonatal birth weight, blood gas value at birth, Apgar score, and length of admission time in the neonatal intensive care unit were not different between the 2 groups. Conclusion: Sublingual and vaginal misoprostol had similar effectiveness; however, meconium-stained liquor was observed considerably more frequently with sublingual misoprostol than with vaginal misoprostol. Trial Registration Number: IRCT201402096541N3 PMID:26989277

  16. Amyloid beta peptide immunotherapy in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Delrieu, J; Ousset, P J; Voisin, T; Vellas, B

    2014-12-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis have led to the development of numerous compounds that might modify the disease process. Amyloid β peptide represents an important molecular target for intervention in Alzheimer's disease. The main purpose of this work is to review immunotherapy studies in relation to the Alzheimer's disease. Several types of amyloid β peptide immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease are under investigation, active immunization and passive administration with monoclonal antibodies directed against amyloid β peptide. Although immunotherapy approaches resulted in clearance of amyloid plaques in patients with Alzheimer's disease, this clearance did not show significant cognitive effect for the moment. Currently, several amyloid β peptide immunotherapy approaches are under investigation but also against tau pathology. Results from amyloid-based immunotherapy studies in clinical trials indicate that intervention appears to be more effective in early stages of amyloid accumulation in particular solanezumab with a potential impact at mild Alzheimer's disease, highlighting the importance of diagnosing Alzheimer's disease as early as possible and undertaking clinical trials at this stage. In both phase III solanezumab and bapineuzumab trials, PET imaging revealed that about a quarter of patients lacked fibrillar amyloid pathology at baseline, suggesting that they did not have Alzheimer's disease in the first place. So a new third phase 3 clinical trial for solanezumab, called Expedition 3, in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease and evidence of amyloid burden has been started. Thus, currently, amyloid intervention is realized at early stage of the Alzheimer's disease in clinical trials, at prodromal Alzheimer's disease, or at asymptomatic subjects or at risk to develop Alzheimer's disease and or at asymptomatic subjects with autosomal dominant mutation.

  17. Emerging Opportunities and Challenges in Cancer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, Theresa L; Demaria, Sandra; Rodriguez-Ruiz, Maria E; Zarour, Hassane M; Melero, Ignacio

    2016-04-15

    Immunotherapy strategies against cancer are emerging as powerful weapons for treatment of this disease. The success of checkpoint inhibitors against metastatic melanoma and adoptive T-cell therapy with chimeric antigen receptor T cells against B-cell-derived leukemias and lymphomas are only two examples of developments that are changing the paradigms of clinical cancer management. These changes are a result of many years of intense research into complex and interrelated cellular and molecular mechanisms controling immune responses. Promising advances come from the discovery of cancer mutation-encoded neoantigens, improvements in vaccine development, progress in delivery of cellular therapies, and impressive achievements in biotechnology. As a result, radical transformation of cancer treatment is taking place in which conventional cancer treatments are being integrated with immunotherapeutic agents. Many clinical trials are in progress testing potential synergistic effects of treatments combining immunotherapy with other therapies. Much remains to be learned about the selection, delivery, and off-target effects of immunotherapy used alone or in combination. The existence of numerous escape mechanisms from the host immune system that human tumors have evolved still is a barrier to success. Efforts to understand the rules of immune cell dysfunction and of cancer-associated local and systemic immune suppression are providing new insights and fuel the enthusiasm for new therapeutic strategies. In the future, it might be possible to tailor immune therapy for each cancer patient. The use of new immune biomarkers and the ability to assess responses to therapy by noninvasive monitoring promise to improve early cancer diagnosis and prognosis. Personalized immunotherapy based on individual genetic, molecular, and immune profiling is a potentially achievable future goal. The current excitement for immunotherapy is justified in view of many existing opportunities for harnessing

  18. Systemic and Mucosal Immune Responses to Sublingual or Intramuscular Human Papilloma Virus Antigens in Healthy Female Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Giemza, Raphaela; Beddows, Simon; Oeser, Clarissa; Lewis, David J. M.

    2012-01-01

    The sublingual route has been proposed as a needle-free option to induce systemic and mucosal immune protection against viral infections. In a translational study of systemic and mucosal humoral immune responses to sublingual or systemically administered viral antigens, eighteen healthy female volunteers aged 19–31 years received three immunizations with a quadravalent Human Papilloma Virus vaccine at 0, 4 and 16 weeks as sublingual drops (SL, n = 12) or intramuscular injection (IM, n = 6). IM antigen delivery induced or boosted HPV-specific serum IgG and pseudovirus-neutralizing antibodies, HPV-specific cervical and vaginal IgG, and elicited circulating IgG and IgA antibody secreting cells. SL antigens induced ∼38-fold lower serum and ∼2-fold lower cervical/vaginal IgG than IM delivery, and induced or boosted serum virus neutralizing antibody in only 3/12 subjects. Neither route reproducibly induced HPV-specific mucosal IgA. Alternative delivery systems and adjuvants will be required to enhance and evaluate immune responses following sublingual immunization in humans. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00949572 PMID:22438987

  19. Awareness and understanding of cancer immunotherapy in Europe.

    PubMed

    Mellstedt, Håkan; Gaudernack, Gustav; Gerritsen, Winald R; Huber, Christoph; Melero, Ignacio; Parmiani, Giorgio; Scholl, Suzy; Thatcher, Nicholas; Wagstaff, John; Zielinski, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    The use of immunotherapy in the management of cancer is growing, and a range of new immunotherapeutic strategies is becoming available. It is important that people involved in the care of cancer understand how cancer immunotherapies differ from conventional chemotherapy and apply this knowledge to their clinical practice. Therefore, from August-September 2011 we undertook a survey of awareness, attitudes, and perceptions of cancer immunotherapy among 426 healthcare professionals (HCPs) in Europe with the aim of identifying and prioritizing educational needs. Nearly all (98%) HCPs were aware of cancer immunotherapy. While 68% of HCPs indicated a high level of interest in cancer immunotherapies, only 24% of the HCPs had direct experience with them. Overall perceptions of cancer immunotherapy among HCPs were largely positive (60%) and rarely negative (3%). The key advantages of cancer immunotherapy were perceived to be good safety and tolerability (75%), a targeted mechanism of action (61%) and good efficacy (48%). The leading barriers to use of immunotherapies were costs of treatment (58%), past clinical trial failures (45%), and access/formulary restrictions (44%). The results indicate that, among the respondents, awareness of cancer immunotherapy was high but that knowledge levels varied and direct experience with their use was limited. There appears to be a need for educational activities on cancer immunotherapy, as well as generation and communication of clinical data on long-term efficacy and safety.

  20. Evolution of end points for cancer immunotherapy trials.

    PubMed

    Hoos, A

    2012-09-01

    The effect of cancer immunotherapies is on the immune system and not directly on the tumour. The kinetics of immunotherapy are characterised by a cellular immune response followed by potential changes in tumour burden or patient survival. To adequately investigate immunotherapies in clinical trials, a new development paradigm including reconsideration of established end points addressing this biology is needed. Over the last 7 years, several initiatives across the cancer immunotherapy community were facilitated by the Cancer Research Institute Cancer Immunotherapy Consortium. They systematically evolved an immunotherapy-focused clinical development paradigm and proposed to redefine trial end points. On that basis, analysis of several large datasets generated throughout the immunotherapy community supports three novel end point proposals. First, results from T-cell immune response assays are highly variable and often nonreproducible. Harmonisation of assays can minimise this variability and support the investigation of the cellular immune response as a biomarker and testing it for clinical surrogacy. Secondly, immunotherapy induces novel patterns of the antitumour response not captured by World Health Organisation criteria or Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumours. New immune-related response criteria were defined which more comprehensively capture all response patterns. Thirdly, survival curves in randomised immunotherapy trials can show a delayed separation, which can impact study results. Altered statistical models are needed to describe the hazard ratios as a function of time, and differentiate them before and after separation of curves to improve planning of phase III trials. Taken together, these recommendations may improve our tools for cancer immunotherapy investigations.

  1. Workshop on immunotherapy combinations. Society for immunotherapy of cancer annual meeting Bethesda, November 3, 2011

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Although recent FDA approvals on ipilimumab and sipuleucel-T represent major milestones, the ultimate success of immunotherapy approaches will likely benefit from appropriate combinations with other immunotherapeutic and/or non-immunotherapeutic approaches. However, implementation of ideal combinations in the clinic may still face formidable challenges in regulatory, drug-availability and intellectual property aspects. The 2011 SITC annual meeting hosted a workshop on combination immunotherapy to discuss: 1) the most promising combinations found in the laboratory; 2) early success of combination immunotherapy in clinical trials; 3) industry perspectives on combination approaches, and 4) relevant regulatory issues. The integrated theme was how to accelerate the implementation of efficacious combined immunotherapies for cancer patients. Rodent animal models are providing many examples of synergistic combinations that typically include more than two agents. However, mouse and human immunology differ in a significant number of mechanisms and hence we might be missing opportunities peculiar to humans. Nonetheless, incisive animal experimentation with deep mechanistic insight remains the best compass that we can use to guide our paths in combinatorial immunotherapy. Combination immunotherapy clinical trials are already in progress and preliminary results are extremely promising. As a key to translate promising combinations into clinic, real and “perceived” business and regulatory hurdles were debated. A formidable step forward would be to be able to test combinations of investigational agents prior to individual approval. Taking together the FDA and the industrial perspective on combinatorial immunotherapy, the audience was left with the clear message that this is by no means an impossible task. The general perception is that the road ahead of us is full of combination clinical trials which hopefully will bring clinical benefit to our cancer patients at a fast pace

  2. 11 Efficacy and Tolerability of HDM Injective Immunotherapy With Monomeric Allergoid

    PubMed Central

    Compalati, Enrico; Atzeni, Isabella; Cabras, Sergio; Fancello, Paolo; Gaspardini, Giulio; Longo, Rocco; Patella, Vincenzo; Tore, Giorgio

    2012-01-01

    Background Subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) is an effective treatment of respiratory allergy and carbamylated monomeric allergoids (monoids), by virtue of their reduced IgE-binding activity, resulted clinically safe by sublingual administration. Purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy and tolerability of immunotherapy with house dust mites (HDM) monoid administered by injective route in patients with allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (AR). Methods A preparation of 0.70 mL of 10 BU/mL containing modified extract with 50% Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and 50% Dermatophagoides farinae (amount of major allergen: 4 μg of group 1 per milliliter) was delivered monthly for 12 months, following a 5-week build-up induction phase (0.10–0.20–0.30–0.50–0.70 mL), to 58 patients (60% males, mean age 25.1 ± 12.7) suffering from AR due to mites for at least 2 years, whereas 60 patients with similar baseline characteristics were observed as controls. All patients were allowed to assume traditional drug therapy for their condition. At the end of the study changes from baseline in symptoms scores, in number of days with drug assumption, in severity of AR (according to ARIA classification) were compared between the 2 groups; moreover an overall assessment of clinical efficacy and tolerability was based on patients' and physicians' judgements (unsatisfactory, mild, good, optimal). Results In respect to baseline both groups showed, after 1 year, an improvement in symptoms score (P < 0.001) with a significant difference in favour of SCIT group (P < 0.05). Days of drug intake were significantly lower in patients receiving SCIT (P < 0.05). The number of patients with severe AR decreased in the first group while no variation was observed in controls. The subjective clinical overall assessment was optimal in 31 cases and good in 24 according to physicians' and patients' judgements; similarly 38 patients judged tolerability as optimal and 18 as good, whereas according to

  3. Prospects for immunotherapy and vaccines against Cryptosporidium.

    PubMed

    Mead, Jan R

    2014-01-01

    Cryptosporidium spp is a ubiquitous parasite that has long been recognized as a frequent cause of protozoal diarrhea in humans. While infections in immunocompetent hosts are usually self-limiting, immunocompromised individuals can develop severe, chronic, and life-threatening illness. Vaccine development or immunotherapy that prevents disease or reduces the severity of infection is a relevant option since efficacious drug treatments are lacking. In particular, children in developing countries might benefit the most from a vaccine since cryptosporidiosis in early childhood has been reported to be associated with subsequent impairment in growth, physical fitness, and intellectual capacity. In this review, immunotherapies that have been used clinically are described as well as experimental vaccines and their evaluation in vivo.

  4. Mechanism of Anti-α-Synuclein Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jun Sung; Lee, Seung-Jae

    2016-01-01

    Immunization therapy targeting α-synuclein has emerged as a promising approach for Parkinson’s disease and perhaps for other synucleinopathies. Several antibodies have shown therapeutic effects in mouse models of synucleinopathies and have alleviated the pathological and behavioral phenotypes of these mice. The mechanisms through which the immunization therapy works were initially puzzling, especially given that α-synuclein is a typical cytosolic protein. Recent studies, however, suggested that extracellular α-synuclein is an important pathogenic entity, and hence, a target for immunotherapy. Here, we review the literature describing immunization therapy for synucleinopathies in mouse models and provide current thoughts on the potential mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effects of α-synuclein immunotherapy. PMID:26828212

  5. Molecular biomarkers for grass pollen immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Popescu, Florin-Dan

    2014-01-01

    Grass pollen allergy represents a significant cause of allergic morbidity worldwide. Component-resolved diagnosis biomarkers are increasingly used in allergy practice in order to evaluate the sensitization to grass pollen allergens, allowing the clinician to confirm genuine sensitization to the corresponding allergen plant sources and supporting an accurate prescription of allergy immunotherapy (AIT), an important approach in many regions of the world with great plant biodiversity and/or where pollen seasons may overlap. The search for candidate predictive biomarkers for grass pollen immunotherapy (tolerogenic dendritic cells and regulatory T cells biomarkers, serum blocking antibodies biomarkers, especially functional ones, immune activation and immune tolerance soluble biomarkers and apoptosis biomarkers) opens new opportunities for the early detection of clinical responders for AIT, for the follow-up of these patients and for the development of new allergy vaccines. PMID:25237628

  6. Adoptive T cell immunotherapy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Perica, Karlo; Varela, Juan Carlos; Oelke, Mathias; Schneck, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Harnessing the immune system to recognize and destroy tumor cells has been the central goal of anti-cancer immunotherapy. In recent years, there has been an increased interest in optimizing this technology in order to make it a clinically feasible treatment. One of the main treatment modalities within cancer immunotherapy has been adoptive T cell therapy (ACT). Using this approach, tumor-specific cytotoxic T cells are infused into cancer patients with the goal of recognizing, targeting, and destroying tumor cells. In the current review, we revisit some of the major successes of ACT, the major hurdles that have been overcome to optimize ACT, the remaining challenges, and future approaches to make ACT widely available.

  7. Coinhibitory Pathways in Immunotherapy for Cancer.

    PubMed

    Baumeister, Susanne H; Freeman, Gordon J; Dranoff, Glenn; Sharpe, Arlene H

    2016-05-20

    The immune system is capable of recognizing tumors and eliminates many early malignant cells. However, tumors evolve to evade immune attack, and the tumor microenvironment is immunosuppressive. Immune responses are regulated by a number of immunological checkpoints that promote protective immunity and maintain tolerance. T cell coinhibitory pathways restrict the strength and duration of immune responses, thereby limiting immune-mediated tissue damage, controlling resolution of inflammation, and maintaining tolerance to prevent autoimmunity. Tumors exploit these coinhibitory pathways to evade immune eradication. Blockade of the PD-1 and CTLA-4 checkpoints is proving to be an effective and durable cancer immunotherapy in a subset of patients with a variety of tumor types, and additional combinations are further improving response rates. In this review we discuss the immunoregulatory functions of coinhibitory pathways and their translation to effective immunotherapies for cancer.

  8. Immunotherapy for gastric premalignant lesions and cancer.

    PubMed

    Zorzetto, Valerio; Maddalo, Gemma; Basso, Daniela; Farinati, Fabio

    2012-06-01

    Chronic atrophic gastritis, a precancerous change for gastric cancer, shows a loss of appropriate glands, Helicobacter pylori infection and autoimmune gastritis being the two main etiologic factors. While H. pylori eradication is the mandatory treatment for the former, no etiologic treatment is available for the latter, in which a Th1-type response, modulated by Tregs and Th17 cells, is involved. H. pylori-related atrophic gastritis is a risk factor for gastric adenocarcinoma, while autoimmune atrophic gastritis is also linked to a substantial risk of gastric type I carcinoid, related to the chronic stimulus exerted by hypergastrinemia on enterochromaffin-like cells. Several studies have been published on gastric cancer treatment through an active specific immunotherapy, aimed at improving the immunoregulatory response and increasing the circulating tumor-specific T cells. No study on immunotherapy of carcinoids is available but, in our experience, the administration of an antigastrin 17 vaccine induced carcinoid regression in two out of three patients treated.

  9. Dendritic cell-based immunotherapy in mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Cornelissen, Robin; Lievense, Lysanne A; Heuvers, Marlies E; Maat, Alexander P; Hendriks, Rudi W; Hoogsteden, Henk C; Hegmans, Joost P; Aerts, Joachim G

    2012-10-01

    Mesothelioma is a rare thoracic malignancy with a dismal prognosis. Current treatment options are scarce and clinical outcomes are rather disappointing. Due to the immunogenic nature of mesothelioma, several studies have investigated immunotherapeutic strategies to improve the prognosis of patients with mesothelioma. In the last decade, progress in knowledge of the modulation of the immune system to attack the tumor has been remarkable, but the optimal strategy for immunotherapy has yet to be unraveled. Because of their potent antigen-presenting capacity, dendritic cells are acknowledged as a promising agent in immunotherapeutic approaches in a number of malignancies. This review gives an update and provides a future perspective in which immunotherapy may improve the outcome of mesothelioma therapy.

  10. Strategies and developments of immunotherapies in osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    WAN, JIA; ZHANG, XIANGHONG; LIU, TANG; ZHANG, XIANGSHENG

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is a frequently observed primary malignant tumor. Current therapy for osteosarcoma consists of comprehensive treatment. The long-term survival rate of patients exhibiting nonmetastatic OS varies between 65–70%. However, a number of OS cases have been observed to be resistant to currently used therapies, leading to disease recurrence and lung metastases, which are the primary reasons leading to patient mortality. In the present review, a number of pieces of evidence provide support for the potential uses of immunotherapy, including immunomodulation and vaccine therapy, for the eradication of tumors via upregulation of the immune response. Adoptive T-cell therapy and oncolytic virotherapy have been used to treat OS and resulted in objective responses. Immunologic checkpoint blockade and targeted therapy are also potentially promising therapeutic tools. Immunotherapy demonstrates significant promise with regard to improving the outcomes for patients exhibiting OS. PMID:26834853

  11. Immunological landscape and immunotherapy of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Jesús; Melero, Ignacio; Sangro, Bruno

    2015-12-01

    Advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a serious therapeutic challenge and targeted therapies only provide a modest benefit in terms of overall survival. Novel approaches are urgently needed for the treatment of this prevalent malignancy. Evidence demonstrating the antigenicity of tumour cells, the discovery that immune checkpoint molecules have an essential role in immune evasion of tumour cells, and the impressive clinical results achieved by blocking these inhibitory receptors, are revolutionizing cancer immunotherapy. Here, we review the data on HCC immunogenicity, the mechanisms for HCC immune subversion and the different immunotherapies that have been tested to treat HCC. Taking into account the multiplicity of hyperadditive immunosuppressive forces acting within the HCC microenvironment, a combinatorial approach is advised. Strategies include combinations of systemic immunomodulation and gene therapy, cell therapy or virotherapy.

  12. [Radiotherapy and targeted therapy/immunotherapy].

    PubMed

    Antoni, D; Bockel, S; Deutsch, E; Mornex, F

    2016-10-01

    Thanks to recent advances achieved in oncologic systemic and local ablative treatment, the treatments become more and more efficient in term of local control and overall survival. Thus, the targeted therapies, immunotherapy or stereotactic radiotherapy have modified the management of patients, especially in case of oligometastatic disease. Many questions are raised by these innovations, particularly the diagnosis and management of new side effects or that of the combination of these different treatments, depending on the type of primary tumor. Fundamental data are available, while clinical data are still limited. Ongoing trials should help to clarify the clinical management protocols. This manuscript is a review of the combination of radiotherapy and targeted therapy/immunotherapy.

  13. [Transcutaneous applications for vaccination and immunotherapy].

    PubMed

    Krämer, Isabel; Zabel, Franziska; Kündig, Thomas M; Johansen, Pål

    2014-10-15

    Although Edward Jenner applied the first vaccines by scratching cow pox material into the skin, the profound immunological properties of the skin have become evident through research and discoveries only in the last 20 years. The immunological cells in the epidermis and the dermis are suitable targets for transcutaneous vaccination and immunotherapy. However, as the skin represents a natural barrier for topically administered large molecules, novel methods to overcome this barrier function have been described. There are chemical, biochemical and physical methods, many of which are pain-free and therefore especially suitable for children. Also for adults non-invasive methods of vaccination and immunotherapy are attractive as self-administration is feasible. Future products are currently undergoing clinical tests which provide promising results.

  14. Immunotherapy: opportunities, risks and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    HILDEBRANDT, MARTIN; PEGGS, KARL; UHAREK, LUTZ; BOLLARD, CATHERINE M.; HESLOP, HELEN E.

    2014-01-01

    This review is intended to reflect upon the current status and perspectives of cell-based immunotherapy at a time when the promise of extensive pre-clinical research has been translated into encouraging clinical responses. However, some of these have also been complicated by significant adverse reactions. As the field moves towards definitive late stage trials, with a growing interest from pharmaceutical companies, we realize that novel cell therapy strategies pose questions that are familiar to traditional drug development, along with new considerations due to the potential of T cells to persist long term and to expand after adoptive transfer. These questions address the safety of the product, the efficacy, the mode of action, and the anticipation of risks. From different perspectives, we intend to address exciting opportunities and safety concerns in current concepts of cellular immunotherapy. PMID:24629797

  15. Cancer Immunotherapy for Gliomas: Overview and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    HASHIMOTO, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy has been highlighted because we have obtained much evidence, which includes theoretical backborn as well as favorable results from clinical trials. As immunotherapy gives an apparently different cytotoxic mechanism and a little adverse event, the promising results are getting a lot of attention. In this article, cancer immunotherapy for gliomas is reviewed thoroughly from the literature, focusing on the clinical trial results. PMID:27087194

  16. Prostate cancer immunotherapy: beyond immunity to curability.

    PubMed

    Simons, Jonathan W

    2014-11-01

    Metastatic prostate cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer in the United States. It is the first prevalent cancer in which overall survival in advanced disease is modestly, but objectively, improved with outpatient delivered dendritic cell-based immunotherapy. More prostate cancer patients have enrolled through Facebook and trusted-site Internet searches in clinical trials for prostate cancer vaccine-based immunotherapy than in immunotherapy trials for lung, breast, colon, pancreas, ovarian, and bladder cancer combined in the past 7 years. Exceptional responses to anti-CTLA-4 treatment have been documented in clinics, and prostate cancer neoantigen characterization and T-cell clonotyping are in their research ascendancy. The prostate is an accessory organ; it is not required for fertility, erectile function, or urinary continence. The true evolutionary advantage of having a prostate for male mammalian physiology is a topic of speculation in seminar rooms and on bar stools, but it remains unknown. Hundreds of prostate lineage-unique proteins (PLUP) exist among the >37,000 normal human prostate lineage-unique open reading frames that can be targeted for immunologic ablation of PLUP(+) prostate cancer cells by prostate-specific autoimmunity. This bioengineered graft-versus-prostate disease is a powerful strategy that can eliminate deaths from prostate cancer. Immunologic tolerance to prostate cancer can be overcome at every clinical stage of presentation. This Cancer Immunology at the Crossroads article aims to present advances in the past two decades of basic, translational, and clinical research in prostate cancer, including bioengineering B-cell and T-cell responses, and ongoing prostate cancer immunotherapy trials.

  17. Recent advances and future challenges in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Okuyama, Namiko; Tamada, Koji; Tamura, Hideto

    Remarkable advances have been made in cancer immunotherapy. Recent treatment strategies, especially chimeric antigen receptor-T (CAR-T) cell therapy and immune checkpoint inhibitors, reportedly achieve higher objective responses and better survival rates than previous immunotherapies for patients with treatment-resistant malignancies, creating a paradigm shift in cancer treatment. Several clinical trials of cancer immunotherapy for patients with various malignancies are ongoing. However, those with certain malignancies, such as low-immunogenic cancers, cannot be successfully treated with T-cell immunotherapy, and subsets of immunotherapy-treated patients relapse, meaning that more effective immunotherapeutic strategies are needed for such patients. Furthermore, the safety, convenience, and cost of cancer immunotherapy need to be improved in the near future. Herein, we discuss recent advances and future challenges in cancer immunotherapy, i.e., the identification of neoantigens for the development of individualized immunotherapies, the development of new CAR-T cell therapies, including so-called armored CAR-T cells that can induce greater clinical effects and thereby achieve longer survival, the development of off-the-shelf treatment regimens using non-self cells or cell lines, and effective cancer immunotherapy combinations.

  18. Current Status and Perspective of Immunotherapy in Gastrointestinal Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Hoon; Kim, Bum Jun; Kim, Hyeong Su; Kim, Jung Han

    2016-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy is at dawn of the Renaissance after the Medieval Dark Ages. Recent advances of understanding tumor immunology and molecular drug development are leading us to the epoch of cancer immunotherapy. Some types of immunotherapy have shown to provide survival benefit for patients with solid tumors such as malignant melanoma, renal cell carcinoma, or non-small cell lung cancer. Several studies have suggested that immune checkpoint inhibition might be effective in some patients with gastrointestinal cancers. However, the era of cancer immunotherapy in gastrointestinal cancers is still in an inchoate stage. Here we briefly review the current status and perspective of immunotherapeutic approaches in patients with gastrointestinal cancers. PMID:27698896

  19. Allergen immunotherapy, routes of administration and cytokine networks: an update.

    PubMed

    Cuppari, Caterina; Leonardi, Salvatore; Manti, Sara; Filippelli, Martina; Alterio, Tommaso; Spicuzza, Lucia; Rigoli, Luciana; Arrigo, Teresa; Lougaris, Vassilios; Salpietro, Carmelo

    2014-01-01

    Allergen immunotherapy is a disease-modifying therapy, effective for the treatment of allergic rhinitis, allergic asthma, conjunctivitis or stinging insect allergy. Allergen immunotherapy involves the administration of increasing doses of allergens with the aim of ameliorating the allergic response. Although precise underlying mechanisms of the induction of immune tolerance remain unclear, immunotherapy has been associated with the induction of distinct subsets of Tregs that eventually lead to peripheral tolerance by inducing a deviation from Th2 to Th1 immune responses. This review focuses on the current knowledge of the mechanisms of immunotherapy in relationship to different routes of administration and also provides a unifying view.

  20. Smart CARs Engineered for Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Priceman, Saul J.; Forman, Stephen J.; Brown, Christine E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) are synthetic immunoreceptors that can redirect T cells to selectively kill tumor cells, and as “living-drugs” have the potential to generate long-term anti-tumor immunity. Given their recent clinical successes for the treatment of refractory B-cell malignancies, there is a strong push toward advancing this immunotherapy to other hematological diseases and solid cancers. Here, we summarize the current state of the field, highlighting key variables for the optimal application of CAR T cells for cancer immunotherapy. Recent Findings Advances in CAR T cell therapy have highlighted intrinsic CAR design and T cell manufacturing methods as critical components for maximal therapeutic success. Similarly, addressing the unique extrinsic challenges of each tumor type, including overcoming the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment and tumor heterogeneity, as well as mitigating potential toxicity, will dominate the next wave of CAR T cell development. Summary CAR T cell therapeutic optimization, including intrinsic and extrinsic factors, is critical to developing effective CAR T cell therapies for cancer. The excitement of CAR T cell immunotherapy has just begun, and will continue with new insights revealed in laboratory research and in ongoing clinical investigations. PMID:26352543

  1. Immunotherapy for nasopharyngeal cancer-a review.

    PubMed

    Jain, Amit; Chia, Whay Kuang; Toh, Han Chong

    2016-04-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is associated with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and characterized by peritumoral immune infiltrate. Advanced NPC has high lethality. Immunotherapy directed against EBV antigen targets has been previously explored in clinical trials, and is likely to be validated as an important target in NPC as randomized data emerges in the future. Cancer vaccines and adoptive T cell therapy have been explored in the clinic, with the latter showing the greatest success. Recent advances in gene sequencing technology now allow personalized tumor epitope mapping, whilst the advent of immune checkpoint inhibitors targeting the PD-1/PD-L1 axis offers the opportunity to activate adaptive T cell response in vivo. Anti-PD1 antibodies have shown promising activity in early phase clinical trials, and randomized studies against chemotherapy are underway. As immunotherapy is incorporated into standard treatment paradigms, issues of optimal combinations with targeting agents, immune adjuvants, and sequence with chemotherapy and radiation therapy will need to be addressed. Effective strategies to increase tumor antigenicity, improve immunological memory and reduce immune escape, will need to be developed to improve treatment outcomes. Here we present a brief history of the evolution of immunotherapy in NPC, and highlight key concepts relevant to its further development in the clinic.

  2. Antibody-based immunotherapy for malignant glioma

    PubMed Central

    Gedeon, Patrick C.; Riccione, Katherine A.; Fecci, Peter E.; Sampson, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Conventional therapy for malignant glioma (MG) fails to specifically eliminate tumor cells, resulting in toxicity that limits therapeutic efficacy. In contrast, antibody-based immunotherapy utilizes the immune system to eliminate tumor cells with exquisite specificity. Increased understanding of the pathobiology of MG and the profound immunosuppression present among patients with MG has revealed several biologic targets amenable to antibody-based immunotherapy. Novel antibody engineering techniques allow for the production of fully human antibodies or antibody fragments with vastly reduced antigen-binding dissociation constants, increasing safety when used clinically as therapeutics. In this report, we summarize the use of antibody-based immunotherapy for MG. Approaches currently under investigation include the use of antibodies or antibody fragments to: 1) redirect immune effector cells to target tumor mutations, 2) inhibit immunosuppressive signals and thereby stimulate an immunological response against tumor cells, and 3) provide co-stimulatory signals to evoke immunologic targeting of tumor cells. These approaches demonstrate highly compelling safety and efficacy for the treatment of MG, providing a viable adjunct to current standard-of-care therapy for MG. PMID:25173142

  3. Laser immunotherapy of canine and feline neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, J. P.; Bartels, Kenneth E.; Davidson, Ellen B.; Ritchey, Jerry W.; Lehenbauer, Terry W.; Nordquist, Robert E.; Chen, Wei R.

    1998-07-01

    The major cause of treatment failure in human and veterinary cancer patients is tumor invasion and metastasis. The inability of local therapy (surgery, radiation, photodynamic therapy) to eradicate a metastatic cancer presents a challenge in the therapy of residual or micrometastatic disease. Because of its local therapy limitations, chromophore-enhanced selective photothermal laser treatment has been augmented with a superimposed laser-induced systemic photobiological reaction, laser immunotherapy. Laser immunotherapy is a novel cancer treatment consisting of: (1) a laser in the infrared wavelength range (i.e. 805 nm solid state laser); (2) a photosensitizer of the corresponding absorption peak [i.e. indocyanine green (ICG)]; and (3) an immunoadjuvant [i.e. glycated chitosan gel (GCG)]. The intratumor injection of the photosensitizer (ICG) and immunoadjuvant (GCG) solution is followed by noninvasive laser irradiation. The laser energy causes tumor cell destruction by photothermal interaction to reduce the tumor burden and at the same time exposes tumor antigens. The immunoadjuvant concomitantly stimulates the host to mount a systemic anti-tumor immune response against the remaining cells of the tumor and to induce a long-term, tumor-specific immunity. This study investigates the feasibility of utilizing laser immunotherapy as an adjunctive therapy for the control of feline fibrosarcoma in future.

  4. Immunotherapy with the storage mite lepidoglyphus destructor.

    PubMed

    Armentia-Medina, A; Tapias, J A; Martín, J F; Ventas, P; Fernández, A

    1995-01-01

    We carried out a double-blind clinical trial of immunotherapy on 35 patients sensitized to the storage mite Lepidoglyphus destructor (Ld). Before and after 12 months of specific hyposensitization (Abelló Lab., Spain) we performed in vivo (skin tests with Ld, methacholine and challenge tests), and in vitro tests (specific IgE, IgG, IgG1 and IgG4 to Ld and specific IgE, IgG, IgG1 and IgG4 to their major allergen Lep dI). We also monitored the efficacy and safety of the immunotherapy with clinical and analytical controls (symptoms and medication score, detection of immune complexes). After therapy we found a significant decrease in specific skin reactivity, dose of positive challenge tests, and hyperresponsiveness to methacholine. Sputum eosinophilia decreased. Specific IgE to Ld was increased and we also observed an increase in specific IgG1 and IgG4 to Ld and Lep DI. The placebo group showed no changes in these variables. There were no severe secondary reactions after treatment with the extract. Patients-self-evaluation was favourable and their labour absence decreased. No development of circulating immune complexes was associated with this immunotherapy.

  5. Metronomic chemotherapy and immunotherapy in cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Li; Chang, Ming-Cheng; Cheng, Wen-Fang

    2017-02-09

    Systemic chemotherapy given at maximum tolerated doses (MTD) has been the mainstay of cancer treatment for more than half a century. In some chemosensitive diseases such as hematologic malignancies and solid tumors, MTD has led to complete remission and even cure. The combination of maintenance therapy and standard MTD also can generate good disease control; however, resistance to chemotherapy and disease metastasis still remain major obstacles to successful cancer treatment in the majority of advanced tumors. Metronomic chemotherapy, defined as frequent administration of chemotherapeutic agents at a non-toxic dose without extended rest periods, was originally designed to overcome drug resistance by shifting the therapeutic target from tumor cells to tumor endothelial cells. Metronomic chemotherapy also exerts anti-tumor effects on the immune system (immunomodulation) and tumor cells. The goal of immunotherapy is to enhance host anti-tumor immunities. Adding immunomodulators such as metronomic chemotherapy to immunotherapy can improve the clinical outcomes in a synergistic manner. Here, we review the anti-tumor mechanisms of metronomic chemotherapy and the preliminary research addressing the combination of immunotherapy and metronomic chemotherapy for cancer treatment in animal models and in clinical setting.

  6. Immunotherapy for lung cancer: advances and prospects

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li; Wang, Liping; Zhang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer as well as the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. To date, surgery is the first choice treatment, but most clinically diagnosed cases are inoperable. While chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy are the next considered options for such cases, these treatment modalities have adverse effects and are sometimes lethal to patients. Thus, new effective strategies with minimal side effects are urgently needed. Cancer immunotherapy provides either active or passive immunity to target tumors. Multiple immunotherapy agents have been proposed and tested for potential therapeutic benefit against lung cancer, and some pose fewer side effects as compared to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. In this article, we discuss studies focusing on interactions between lung cancer and the immune system, and we place an emphasis on outcome evidence in order to create a knowledge base well-grounded in clinical reality. Overall, this review highlights the need for new lung cancer treatment options, with much ground to be paved for future advances in the field. We believe that immunotherapy agents alone or with other forms of treatment can be recognized as next modality of lung cancer treatment. PMID:27168951

  7. Alternative Abeta immunotherapy approaches for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Town, Terrence

    2009-04-01

    In a seminal report in 1999, Schenk and colleagues demonstrated that vaccination of a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) with amyloid-beta(1-42) peptide (Abeta(1-42)) and adjuvant resulted in striking mitigation of AD-like pathology - giving rise to the field of AD immunotherapy. Later studies confirmed this result in other mouse models of AD and additionally showed cognitive improvement after Abeta vaccination. Based on these results, early developmental clinical trials ensued to immunize AD patients with Abeta(1-42) plus adjuvant (so-called "active" Abeta immunotherapy; trade name AN-1792; Elan Pharmaceuticals, Dublin, Ireland). However, the phase IIa trial was halted after 6 % of patients developed aseptic meningoencephalitis. Despite occurrence of this adverse event, many individuals demonstrated high serum antibody titres to Abeta and histological evidence of clearance of the hallmark AD pathology, beta-amyloid plaques. While raising justifiable safety concerns, these important results nonetheless demonstrated the feasibility of the active Abeta immunotherapy approach. This review focuses on alternative approaches to active Abeta vaccination that are currently in various stages of development - from pre-clinical studies in animal models to current clinical trials. Specifically, the focus is on those strategies that target inflammatory and immune aspects of AD, and can therefore be classified as immunotherapeutic in a broad sense.

  8. Tumors of the sublingual gland: a national clinicopathologic study of 29 cases.

    PubMed

    Andreasen, Simon; Bjørndal, K; Agander, T K; Wessel, I; Homøe, P

    2016-11-01

    Tumors of the salivary glands are a heterogeneous group of diseases most often originating in the major salivary glands. Only a minor proportion of mainly malignant tumors arise in the sublingual gland. Due to the rarity of sublingual gland tumors (SGTs), little is known about the clinicopathologic characteristics, prognostic factors, and clinical course. We present a large national series of histopathologically revised SGTs from the past 35 years in Denmark with clinicopathologic correlation. Twenty nine cases were identified, of which 96.6 % were malignant and 16/28 (57.1 %) were adenoid cystic carcinomas (ACC). Patient demography was similar to salivary gland tumors in other locations. All fine needle aspiration cytologies (FNACs) interpreted as benign were from ACCs. Metastatic disease was found in 12.5 % of ACCs at diagnosis with one third of all ACC patients having metastases at the end of follow-up. Stage >II and T-stage >2 were significantly associated with shortened disease-specific survival (DSS) (p = 0.005 and <0.001, respectively), whereas perineural invasion and involved margins was not. No parameters were associated with disease-free survival. In conclusion, the majority of SGTs are malignant, most frequently ACC with a high rate of metastatic spread. The diagnostic value of FNAC in SGTs seems inferior to what is found for other major salivary glands. DSS is determined by stage and T-stage and not by histopathological parameters. International collaboration is warranted to confirm and elaborate these findings in larger materials.

  9. Comparison of sublingual therapeutic vaccine with antibiotics for the prophylaxis of recurrent urinary tract infections

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo-Gómez, María F.; Padilla-Fernández, Bárbara; García-Cenador, María B.; Virseda-Rodríguez, Álvaro J.; Martín-García, Isidoro; Sánchez-Escudero, Alfonso; Vicente-Arroyo, Manuel J.; Mirón-Canelo, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the clinical impact of a prophylactic treatment with sublingual immunostimulation in the prevention of recurrent urinary tract infections (rUTIs) with the use of antibiotics. Material and Methods: Retrospective cohort study evaluating the medical records of 669 women with rUTIs; 339 had a 6-month prophylaxis with antibiotics and 360 a 3-month prophylaxis with a sublingual bacterial preparation (MV 140-Uromune®). The time frame after the prophylaxis-period until the appearance of a new infection (assessed by uroculture) was scored and followed during 1 year. The absolute risk reduction (ARR) and number needed to treat (NNT) were also calculated. Results: All patients treated with antibiotics experienced a new UTI during the scoring period of 12 months, being 19 days the median number of days free of UTIs (range 5–300). In the group treated with the bacterial preparation, 35 (9.7%) patients experienced an UTI in the same period. Kaplan-Meier curves comparing the accumulated survival (disease-free time) between both groups were significant different (P < 0.0001). The absolute risk reduction (ARR) was 90.28% (87.18–93.38) and the number needed to treat (NNT) 1.1 (1.1–1.1). Conclusions: These results suggest that the treatment with this bacterial preparation significantly reduces the incidence of rUTIs, arising as an effective strategy to reduce the frequency of rUTIs. It reduces antibiotic consumption, matching the current recommendations due to the raise of antimicrobial resistance. Randomized, double-blind and placebo-controlled, clinical trials are needed to establish, more accurately, the clinical impact of this bacterial preparation in patients with rUTIs. PMID:26090341

  10. Fast-disintegrating sublingual epinephrine tablets: effect of tablet dimensions on tablet characteristics.

    PubMed

    Rawas-Qalaji, Mutasem M; Simons, F Estelle R; Simons, Keith J

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of changing dimensions on the hardness (H), disintegration time (DT), and wetting time (WT) of fast-disintegrating epinephrine tablets for sublingual administration as potential first aid treatment for anaphylaxis. Tablet formulations I and II, containing 0% and 10% epinephrine bitartrate, respectively, and weighing 150 mg were prepared by direct compression. Formulations were compressed at a range of forces using an 8/32'' die with concave punches (CP); a 10/32'' and an 11/32'' die with CP and flat punches (FP). Tablet weight variation, content uniformity, thickness, H, DT, and WT were measured. The 8/32'', 10/32'', and 11/32'' dies resulted in tablet thickness of ranges 0.25-0.19'', 0.17-0.1'', and 0.16-0.08'', respectively. The DT and WT using the 8/32'' die weresublingual administration, but H must be maintained<4 kg to ensure rapid DT and WT.

  11. FDG-PET scan shows increased cerebral blood flow in rat after sublingual glycine application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagosklonov, Oleg; Podoprigora, Guennady I.; Davani, Siamak; Nartsissov, Yaroslav R.; Comas, Laurent; Boulahdour, Hatem; Cardot, Jean-Claude

    2007-02-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) with [18F]-2-fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) is being increasingly used in research. Isotope studies may be of help in an assessment of vasoactive potential of newly developed therapeutic preparations, including natural metabolites, like glycine. As a medicine, glycine was recently shown to have a positive therapeutic effect in the treatment of patients with neurological disorders based on vascular disturbances. By previous direct biomicroscopic investigations of pial microvessels in laboratory rats, an expressed vasodilatory effect of topically applied glycine was proved. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of glycine on the rat cerebral blood flow (CBF) using FDG-PET scan. A baseline study was started immediately after intravenous injection of 19 MBq of FDG in anesthetized rat. The PET images were acquired twice, one by one during 20 min. Two hours later, after sublingual application of glycine and the second FDG injection, the pair of PET scan was performed during 20 min as well. Finally, 4 days after the first studies, we repeated the PET scans in the same conditions after sublingual application of glycine. The quantitative analysis of FDG volume concentration (Bq/ml) in the rat brain demonstrated that in both studies after glycine administration, the FDG uptake increased at least 1.5 times in comparison with the baseline data. Moreover, the peak of the concentration was coming in more rapidly. These results confirm the enhancing effect of glycine on the rat CBF possibly because of its vasodilatory effect on brain microvessels. Therefore, FDG-PET technique contributes to better understanding of glycine pharmacokinetics.

  12. Development and evaluation of fixed dose bi therapy sublingual tablets for treatment stress hypertension and anxiety

    PubMed Central

    El-Nabarawi, Mohamed A.; Tayel, Saadia A.; Soliman, Nadia A.; Abo Enin, Hadel A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: A stress induced rise in the blood pressure. Some believe that patients with hypertension are characterized by a generalized state of increased anxiety. Aim: The purpose of this study is to prepare a fixed dose bi therapy using bisoprolol hemifumarate (BH) as antihypertensive drug and buspirone hydrochloride (BuHCl) as anxiolytic drug, which can be used to treat both diseases concomitantly. Using sublingual tablets is hopeful to improve the BuHCl poor oral bioavailability and to facilitate administration to patients experiencing problems with swallowing. Materials and Methods: A total of 5mg BH and 10mg BuHCl were selected based on compatibility study. A 3×22 full factorial design was adopted for the optimization of the tablets prepared by direct compression method. The effects of the filler type, the binder molecular weight, and the binder type were studied. The prepared formulae were evaluated according to their physical characters as hardness, friability, disintegration time (new modified method and in vivo disintegration time) and wetting properties. In vitro drugs dissolute, permeation through the buccal mucosa and the effect of storage were analyzed by a new valid high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) method. Bioavailability study of the selected formula study was carried out and followed by the clinical. Results: The optimized tablet formulation showed accepted average weight, hardness, wetting time, friability, content uniformity, disintegration time (less than 3 min). Maximum drug release could be achieved with in 10 min. In addition enhancing drug permeation through the buccal mucosa and, the maximum concentration of the drug that reached the blood was in the first 10 min which means a rapid onset of action and improved the extent of both drug's absorption. Conclusion: The results revealed that sublingual (F6) tablets containing both drugs would maintain rapid onset of action, and increase bioavailability. BuHCl with BH can be attributed

  13. Nitroglycerin Sublingual

    MedlinePlus

    ... Talk to your pharmacist or contact your local garbage/recycling department to learn about take-back programs in your community. See the FDA's Safe Disposal of Medicines website (http://goo.gl/c4Rm4p) for ...

  14. Sublingual immunization with an HIV subunit vaccine induces antibodies and cytotoxic T cells in the mouse female genital tract.

    PubMed

    Hervouet, Catherine; Luci, Carmelo; Cuburu, Nicolas; Cremel, Magali; Bekri, Selma; Vimeux, Lene; Marañon, Concepcion; Czerkinsky, Cecil; Hosmalin, Anne; Anjuère, Fabienne

    2010-08-02

    A vaccine against heterosexual transmission by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) should generate cytotoxic and antibody responses in the female genital tract and in extra-genital organs. We report that sublingual immunization with HIV-1 gp41 and a reverse transcriptase polypeptide coupled to the cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) induced gp41-specific IgA antibodies and antibody-secreting cells, as well as reverse transcriptase-specific CD8 T cells in the genital mucosa, contrary to intradermal immunization. Conjugation of the reverse transcriptase peptide to CTB favored its cross-presentation by human dendritic cells to a T cell line from an HIV(+) patient. Sublingual vaccination could represent a promising vaccine strategy against heterosexual transmission of HIV-1.

  15. Stem cells and cancer immunotherapy: Arrowhead’s 2nd annual cancer immunotherapy conference

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Investigators from academia and industry gathered on April 4 and 5, 2013, in Washington DC at the Arrowhead’s 2nd Annual Cancer Immunotherapy Conference. Two complementary concepts were discussed: cancer “stem cells” as targets and therapeutic platforms based on stem cells.

  16. Idiopathic central diabetes insipidus presenting in a very low birth weight infant successfully managed with lyophilized sublingual desmopressin.

    PubMed

    Hanta, Deniz; Törer, Birgin; Temiz, Fatih; Kılıçdağ, Hasan; Gökçe, Mahmut; Erdoğan, Özlem

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal central diabetes insipidus (DI) is an extremely rare disorder that can cause severe morbidity and mortality. We have reported a very low birth weight infant with idiopathic central DI presenting in the first month of life who was successfully treated with sublingual desmopressin therapy. In this report, we emphasize that central DI should be kept in mind in an infant with unexplained hypernatremia and polyuria. Timely diagnosis and treatment with lyophilized desmopressin may prevent severe morbidity and mortality.

  17. Comparative Study Between Different Ready-Made Orally Disintegrating Platforms for the Formulation of Sumatriptan Succinate Sublingual Tablets.

    PubMed

    Tayel, Saadya A; El Nabarawi, Mohamed A; Amin, Maha M; AbouGhaly, Mohamed H H

    2017-02-01

    Sumatriptan succinate (SS) is a selective serotonin receptor agonist used for the treatment of migraine attacks, suffering from extensive first-pass metabolism and low oral bioavailability (∼14%). The aim of this work is to compare the performance of different ready-made co-processed platforms (Pharmaburst®, Prosolv ODT®, Starlac®, Pearlitol Flash®, or Ludiflash®) in the formulation of SS sublingual orodispersible tablets (ODTs) using direct compression technique. The prepared SS ODT formulae were evaluated regarding hardness, friability, simulated wetting time, and in vitro disintegration and dissolution tests. Different mucoadhesive polymers-HPMC K4M, Carbopol®, chitosan, or Polyox®-were tested aiming to increase the residence time in the sublingual area. A pharmacokinetic study on healthy human volunteers was performed, using LC/MS/MS assay, to compare the optimum sublingual formula (Ph25/HPMC) with the conventional oral tablet Imitrex®. Results showed that tablets prepared using Pharmaburst® had significantly (p < 0.05) the lowest simulated wetting and in vitro disintegration times of 17.17 and 23.50 s, respectively, with Q 5 min of 83.62%. HPMC showed a significant (p < 0.05) increase in the residence time from 48.44 to 183.76 s. The relative bioavailability was found to be equal to 132.34% relative to the oral tablet Imitrex®. In conclusion, Pharmaburst® was chosen as the optimum ready-made co-processed platform that can be successfully used in the preparation of SS sublingual tablets for the rapid relief of migraine attacks.

  18. Soy polysaccharide as a novel superdisintegrant in sildenafil citrate sublingual tablets: preparation, characterization, and in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Hosny, Khaled Mohamed; Mosli, Hisham Ahmed; Hassan, Ali Habiballah

    2015-01-01

    Sildenafil citrate (SC), a drug used to treat erectile dysfunction, is available in tablet form but has three major problems. First, the drug displays inadequate aqueous solubility, which delays the onset of its action. Second, the drug undergoes extensive first-pass metabolism, resulting in a low (40%) bioavailability. Third, the gastrointestinal effects of SC include dyspepsia and a burning sensation. The aim of this research was to prepare SC as a sublingual tablet utilizing soy polysaccharide as novel superdisintegrant to mitigate the abovementioned problems. The solubility of SC in various hydrophilic carrier solutions was estimated in order to prepare the drug as a coprecipitate. Sublingual tablets were prepared and evaluated for hardness, friability, drug content, wetting time, water absorption ratio, in vitro dispersion time, dissolution rate, and stability study. The pharmacokinetic study of the tablets was carried out on healthy volunteers. The results indicated that the co-precipitation of SC with polyvinylpyrollidone K30 enhanced the solubility of SC by more than eight folds. The tablet contained 8% soy polysaccharide as a superdisintegrant and provided a wetting time of 25 seconds, and in vitro dispersion times of 55 seconds. The drug release was found to be 95.6%. The prepared SC sublingual tablet also exhibited a rapid onset of action, and its bioavailability was enhanced 1.68-fold compared with that of the marketed tablets. It can be concluded that SC sublingual tablet is a promising formulation that results in higher solubility, faster dispersion and onset of action, higher release rate, and higher systemic bioavailability.

  19. Immunotherapy in urothelial carcinoma: fade or future standard?

    PubMed Central

    Breyer, Johannes; Burger, Maximilian

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy of non-muscle-invasive bladder carcinoma by Bacillus-Calmette-Guérin (BCG) instillation is a well-established treatment option since decades. Despite this fact, the immunocellular basis was first studied in recent years. New aspects of immunotherapy, also for progressed bladder carcinoma, might follow promising research on immunological targets. PMID:27785423

  20. Effect of sublingual triazolam on the success of inferior alveolar nerve block in patients with irreversible pulpitis.

    PubMed

    Lindemann, Matthew; Reader, Al; Nusstein, John; Drum, Melissa; Beck, Mike

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of this prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was to determine the effect of the administration of sublingual triazolam on the success of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) block in patients experiencing irreversible pulpitis. Fifty-eight emergency patients diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis of a mandibular posterior tooth randomly received, in a double-blind manner, an identical sublingual tablet of either 0.25 mg of triazolam or a placebo 30 minutes before administration of a conventional IAN block. Access was begun 15 minutes after completion of the IAN block, and all patients had profound lip numbness. Success was defined as no or mild pain (visual analog scale recordings) on access or initial instrumentation. The success rate for the IAN block was 43% with triazolam and 57% with the placebo, with no significant difference (P = .43) between the 2 groups. For mandibular posterior teeth, triazolam in a sublingual dose of 0.25 mg did not result in an increase in success of the IAN block in patients with irreversible pulpitis. Therefore, when using conscious sedation, profound local anesthesia is still required to eliminate the sensation of pain during endodontic treatment for patients with irreversible pulpitis.

  1. Specific immunotherapy in ovarian cancer: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Alipour, Soroush; Zoghi, Samaneh; Khalili, Nastaran; Hirbod-Mobarakeh, Armin; Emens, Leisha A; Rezaei, Nima

    2016-10-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the most lethal gynecological cancer. Several approaches of active and passive immunotherapy for EOC have been studied. The aim of this systematic review was to assess the clinical efficacy of specific immunotherapy in patients with EOC. We found 4524 references in seven databases and we included ten controlled clinical trials with 2285 patients with EOC reporting five active immunotherapeutic agents and three passive immunotherapies. Meta-analysis of six studies showed that overall there was not any significant difference in overall survival and recurrence-free survival between patients undergoing specific immunotherapy and those in control group. Most of the studies we evaluated reported a positive outcome from treatment with specific immunotherapy, although this was not significant.

  2. Immunobiology and immunotherapy in genitourinary malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Grivas, Petros

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy has traditionally been a critical component of the cancer treatment armamentarium in genitourinary (GU) cancers. It has an established role in the management of carefully selected patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) [e.g., high dose interleukin-2 (IL-2)] and non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) [e.g., intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG)]. In 2010, the sipuleucel-T vaccine was approved by the FDA for the management of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), based on a phase III trial showing overall survival (OS) benefit compared to placebo. The immune checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab (anti-PD-1) recently received FDA approval for the management of patients with advanced RCC patients previously treated with anti-angiogenic therapy, based on OS benefit compared to everolimus. Recently, large clinical trials demonstrated meaningful clinical benefit, including durable responses, as well as a good tolerability/safety profile with the use of immune checkpoint inhibitors in advanced RCC and chemotherapy-resistant advanced urothelial carcinoma (UC), while FDA just approved atezolizumab for platinum-treated advanced UC. Numerous interesting trials in different cancers are ongoing. Several combinations of immune checkpoint blockade with chemotherapeutics, vaccines, targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors & monoclonal antibodies, epigenetic modifiers, anti-angiogenic agents, tumor microenvironment & myeloid cell targeting therapies, metabolic modification strategies, radiation, and others, are being tested in clinical trials. Comprehensive understanding of the factors underlying antitumor immune responses in physiologically relevant animal models and humans will refine further the clinical benefit of immunotherapy. Discovery and validation of appropriate molecular biomarkers via coordinated translational research efforts, rational clinical trial designs with suitable endpoints and well-defined eligibility criteria

  3. [Immunotherapy: a therapeutic revolution against prostate cancer?].

    PubMed

    Pracht, Marc; Herrera, Fernanda; Tawadros, Thomas; Berthold, Dominik

    2013-05-22

    The interaction between the immune system and cancer was an area of research interest for several decades. The recent U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval of sipuleucel-T and ipilimumab stimulated broader interest in manipulating immunity to fight cancer. In the context of prostate cancer, the immunotherapy strategies under development are therapeutic vaccination strategies, such as sipuleucel-T and PROSTVAC-VF, or immune checkpoint blockade of CTLA-4. Improved understanding of the immune responses generated by the development of predictive biomarkers for patient selection will guide rational combinations of these treatments and provide new treatment options in prostate cancer.

  4. Adoptive immunotherapy for cancer: building on success.

    PubMed

    Gattinoni, Luca; Powell, Daniel J; Rosenberg, Steven A; Restifo, Nicholas P

    2006-05-01

    Adoptive cell transfer after host preconditioning by lymphodepletion represents an important advance in cancer immunotherapy. Here, we describe how a lymphopaenic environment enables tumour-reactive T cells to destroy large burdens of metastatic tumour and how the state of differentiation of the adoptively transferred T cells can affect the outcome of treatment. We also discuss how the translation of these new findings might further improve the efficacy of adoptive cell transfer through the use of vaccines, haematopoietic-stem-cell transplantation, modified preconditioning regimens, and alternative methods for the generation and selection of the T cells to be transferred.

  5. Fighting cancer with magnetic nanoparticles and immunotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, L.; Mejías, R.; Barber, D. F.; Veintemillas-Verdaguer, S.; Serna, C. J.; Lázaro, F. J.; Morales, M. P.

    2012-03-01

    IFN-γ-adsorbed DMSA-coated magnetite nanoparticles can be used as an efficient in vivo drug delivery system for tumor immunotherapy. Magnetic nanoparticles, with adsorbed interferon-γ, were targeted to the tumor site by application of an external magnetic field. A relevant therapeutic dosage of interferon in the tumor was detected and led to a notable reduction in tumor size. In general, only 10% of the total injected nanoparticles after multiple exposures were found in tissues by AC susceptibility measurements of the corresponding resected tissues. Magnetic nanoparticle biodistribution is affected by the application of an external magnetic field.

  6. Cancer immunotherapy: sipuleucel-T and beyond.

    PubMed

    Hammerstrom, Aimee E; Cauley, Diana H; Atkinson, Bradley J; Sharma, Padmanee

    2011-08-01

    In April 2010, sipuleucel-T became the first anticancer vaccine approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration. Different from the traditional chemotherapy agents that produce widespread cytotoxicity to kill tumor cells, anticancer vaccines and immunotherapies focus on empowering the immune system to overcome the tumor. The immune system consists of innate and adaptive components. The CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells are the most crucial components of the adaptive arm of the immune system that act to mediate antitumor responses. However, T-cell responses are regulated by intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms, which may interfere with effective antitumor responses. Many anticancer immunotherapies use tumor-associated antigens as vaccines in order to stimulate an immune response against tumor cells. Sipuleucel-T is composed of autologous mononuclear cells incubated with a fusion protein consisting of a common prostate cancer antigen (prostatic acid phosphatase) linked to an adjuvant (granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor). It is postulated that when the vaccine is infused into the patient, the activated antigen-presenting cells displaying the fusion protein will induce an immune response against the tumor antigen. In a recent randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase III clinical trial, sipuleucel-T significantly improved median overall survival by 4.1 months in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer compared with placebo. Although overall survival was improved, none of the three phase III clinical trials found a significant difference in time to disease progression. This, along with cost and logistic issues, has led to an active discussion. Although sipuleucel-T was studied in the metastatic setting, its ideal place in therapy is unknown, and clinical trials are being conducted in patients at different stages of disease and in combination with radiation therapy, antiandrogen therapy, and chemotherapy. Various other anticancer

  7. [Immunotherapy in radical surgery of colorectal carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Brivio, Fernando; Fumagalli, Luca; Chiarelli, Marco; Denova, Marianna; Bertolini, Aimone; Cetta, Marco; Nespoli, Angelo

    2007-01-01

    Cancer-associated immunodeficiency is seriously worsened by surgical trauma. Short-term preoperative interleukin-2 (IL-2) immunotherapy abolishes postoperative immunodeficiency and can induce immunological control of the growth of minimal residual disease. Growth factors play an important role in oncological practice in treating neutropenia (G-CSF) or associated anaemia during chemotherapy (erythropoietin). Unfortunately, lymphocytopenia is not considered a biological marker with regard to survival. On the other hand, the role of the immune response to surgical trauma has been emphasised by many surgeons, and to counteract it immune nutrition (omega 3 fatty acid, mRNA, arginine) or thymic hormone have been tried. We believe that the obvious method of counteracting postoperative lymphocytopenia is the administration of the specific growth factor for T lymphocytes, i.e. IL-2. The aim of this study was to report on our experience with IL-2 preoperative immunoactivation in colorectal cancer and the long-term outcome of patients treated in comparison with a control group operated on without immunotherapy. In order to obtain activated lymphocytosis at the time of operation administration of IL-2 (6 million I.U. twice daily subcutaneously) for 3 preoperative days is sufficient, starting 4 days before surgery. The inclusion/exclusion criteria were histologically documented colorectal cancer, elective surgery, laparotomic surgery, no second tumour, age 20-80 years, no cardiovascular, hepatic or renal failure. From June 1992 to December 2005, 67 patients were treated (Dukes B/C: 46/21) with IL-2 immunotherapy. The clinical and biological results were compared with those of a control group of 173 patients (Dukes B/C 114/59) operated on in the same period and recruited with the same criteria. Dukes stage-C patients in both groups underwent adjuvant chemotherapy plus radiotherapy for rectal cancer. Data were statistically analysed using Fisher's exact test, Student's T-test and

  8. Harnessing the Microbiome to Enhance Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Michelle H.; Diven, Marshall A.; Huff, Logan W.; Paulos, Chrystal M.

    2015-01-01

    The microbiota plays a key role in regulating the innate and adaptive immune system. Herein, we review the immunological aspects of the microbiota in tumor immunity in mice and man, with a focus on toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists, vaccines, checkpoint modulators, chemotherapy, and adoptive T cell transfer (ACT) therapies. We propose innovative treatments that may safely harness the microbiota to enhance T cell-based therapies in cancer patients. Finally, we highlight recent developments in tumor immunotherapy, particularly novel ways to modulate the microbiome and memory T cell responses to human malignancies. PMID:26101781

  9. Advances in Immunotherapy for Glioblastoma Multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Boyuan; Zhang, Hongbo; Ye, Bainxin

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common primary malignant brain tumor in adults. Patients with GBM have poor outcomes, even with the current gold-standard first-line treatment: maximal safe resection combined with radiotherapy and temozolomide chemotherapy. Accumulating evidence suggests that advances in antigen-specific cancer vaccines and immune checkpoint blockade in other advanced tumors may provide an appealing promise for immunotherapy in glioma. The future of therapy for GBM will likely incorporate a combinatorial, personalized approach, including current conventional treatments, active immunotherapeutics, plus agents targeting immunosuppressive checkpoints. PMID:28299344

  10. Allergen-Specific Immunotherapy in Food Anaphylaxis

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Specific immunotherapy (SIT) protocols for nutritional allergens have only recently been established with a focus on oral allergy syndrome because of pollen cross-reacting antibodies. For these patients, a substantial number of studies have been published suggesting benefits from SIT. The situation in true anaphylaxis to food allergens such as peanut allergy is more complex, and therapeutic strategies are based on individual protocols rather than controlled studies. However, in defined cases, SIT represents a promising approach for a durable protection from life-threatening risks after accidental ingestion. PMID:23283385

  11. Targetless T cells in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Thor Straten, Per; Garrido, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Attention has recently focused on new cancer immunotherapy protocols aiming to activate T cell mediated anti-tumor responses. To this end, administration of antibodies that target inhibitory molecules regulating T-cell cytotoxicity has achieved impressive clinical responses, as has adoptive cell transfer (ACT) using expanded tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) or genetically modified cytotoxic T cells. However, despite clear clinical responses, only a fraction of patients respond to treatment and there is an urgent call for characterization of predictive biomarkers. CD8 positive T cells can infiltrate tumor tissues and destroy HLA class I positive tumor cells expressing the specific antigen. In fact, current progress in the field of cancer immune therapy is based on the capacity of T cells to kill cancer cells that present tumor antigen in the context on an HLA class I molecule. However, it is also well established that cancer cells are often characterized by loss or down regulation of HLA class I molecules, documented in a variety of human tumors. Consequently, immune therapy building on CD8 T cells will be futile in patients harboring HLA class-I negative or deficient cancer cells. It is therefore mandatory to explore if these important molecules for T cell cytotoxicity are expressed by cancer target cells. We have indications that different types of immunotherapy can modify the tumor microenvironment and up-regulate reduced HLA class I expression in cancer cells but only if the associated molecular mechanisms is reversible (soft). However, in case of structural (hard) aberrations causing HLA class I loss, tumor cells will not be able to recover HLA class I expression and as a consequence will escape T-cell lysis and continue to growth. Characterization of the molecular mechanism underlying the lack or downregulation of HLA class I expression, seems to be a crucial step predicting clinical responses to T cell mediated immunotherapy, and possibly aid the

  12. Tecemotide: An antigen-specific cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wurz, Gregory T; Kao, Chiao-Jung; Wolf, Michael; DeGregorio, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    The identification of tumor-associated antigens (TAA) has made possible the development of antigen-specific cancer immunotherapies such as tecemotide. One of those is mucin 1 (MUC1), a cell membrane glycoprotein expressed on some epithelial tissues such as breast and lung. In cancer, MUC1 becomes overexpressed and aberrantly glycosylated, exposing the immunogenic tandem repeat units in the extracellular domain of MUC1. Designed to target tumor associated MUC1, tecemotide is being evaluated in Phase III clinical trials for treatment of unresectable stage IIIA/IIIB non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as maintenance therapy following chemoradiotherapy. Additional Phase II studies in other indications are ongoing. This review discusses the preclinical and clinical development of tecemotide, ongoing preclinical studies of tecemotide in human MUC1 transgenic mouse models of breast and lung cancer, and the potential application of these models for optimizing the timing of chemoradiotherapy and tecemotide immunotherapy to achieve the best treatment outcome for patients. PMID:25483673

  13. Immunotherapy and immunoescape in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mazzolini, Guillermo; Murillo, Oihana; Atorrasagasti, Catalina; Dubrot, Juan; Tirapu, Iñigo; Rizzo, Miguel; Arina, Ainhoa; Alfaro, Carlos; Azpilicueta, Arantza; Berasain, Carmen; Perez-Gracia, José L; Gonzalez, Alvaro; Melero, Ignacio

    2007-01-01

    Immunotherapy encompasses a variety of interventions and techniques with the common goal of eliciting tumor cell destructive immune responses. Colorectal carcinoma often presents as metastatic disease that impedes curative surgery. Novel strategies such as active immunization with dendritic cells (DCs), gene transfer of cytokines into tumor cells or administration of immunostimulatory monoclonal antibodies (such as anti-CD137 or anti-CTLA-4) have been assessed in preclinical studies and are at an early clinical development stage. Importantly, there is accumulating evidence that chemotherapy and immunotherapy can be combined in the treatment of some cases with colorectal cancer, with synergistic potentiation as a result of antigens cross-presented by dendritic cells and/or elimination of competitor or suppressive T lymphocyte populations (regulatory T-cells). However, genetic and epigenetic unstable carcinoma cells frequently evolve mechanisms of immunoevasion that are the result of either loss of antigen presentation, or an active expression of immunosuppressive substances. Some of these actively immunosuppressive mechanisms are inducible by cytokines that signify the arrival of an effector immune response. For example, induction of 2, 3 indoleamine dioxygenase (IDO) by IFNγ in colorectal carcinoma cells. Combinational and balanced strategies fostering antigen presentation, T-cell costimulation and interference with immune regulatory mechanisms will probably take the stage in translational research in the treatment of colorectal carcinoma. PMID:17990348

  14. [Development of specific immunotherapy for cancer].

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, S; Araki, K; Hamasato, S; Maeda, N; Noguchi, Y

    1992-09-01

    We developed CTL therapy against cancer as an cancer specific immunotherapy. The primary CTL therapy showed certain efficacy on advanced cancer patients. However, when ratio of monocyte population in peripheral blood lymphoid cells (PBL) of advanced cancer patients increases more than that of CD8+ T cell population, so that CD8+ T cell/M3 ratio is less than 1, CTL directed to cancer cannot be induced in PBL and the primary CTL therapy is not materialized for these patients. Monocyte-macrophages in these patients release a suppressive factor(s) capable of inhibiting CTL induction and proliferation at induction phase but not inhibiting cytotoxic activity in target cell lysis at effector phase. Furthermore, these monocytes expressed strong message of TGF beta. If most of increased monocytes of PBL from advanced cancer patients are removed by a nylon wool column method from the PBL, CTL directed to cancer cells can be induced even in PBL of advanced cancer patients with high frequency, this improved CTL therapy against cancer showed remarkable efficacy as the cancer specific immunotherapy in various advanced cancer patients without any side effects.

  15. Algenpantucel-L immunotherapy in pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Coveler, Andrew L; Rossi, Gabriela R; Vahanian, Nicholas N; Link, Charles; Chiorean, E Gabriela

    2016-02-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is the 4th leading cause of cancer death in the USA and the EU. A minority of patients presents with surgically resectable and potentially curable disease, but among these, 80% are destined to relapse and overall survival rates with adjuvant chemotherapy average 24 months. Immunotherapy is a promising therapeutic option and a potential paradigm shift in the treatment of patients with pancreatic cancer, and may be particularly effective when used early in the disease course to prevent metastatic spread. Algenpantucel-L (HyperAcute Pancreas, NewLink Genetics, Ames, IA, USA) is a whole-cell immunotherapy consisting of irradiated allogeneic pancreatic cancer cells genetically engineered to express the murine enzyme α-GT, which results in hyperacute rejection of the tumor cells with complement- and antibody-dependent cytotoxicity. Phase II clinical trial data has been encouraging, particularly for patients who demonstrated humoral immunologic responses. Here, we report preliminary results and biomarkers correlations with clinical activity of algenpantucel-L in pancreatic cancer.

  16. A Breakthrough: Macrophage-Directed Cancer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mills, Charles D; Lenz, Laurel L; Harris, Robert A

    2016-02-01

    Successful immunotherapy of cancer is becoming a reality aided by the realization that macrophages play an important role in the growth or regression of tumors. Specifically, M2/repair-type macrophages predominate in human cancers and produce growth-promoting molecules that actively stimulate tumor growth in much the same way they help wounds heal. However, modulating M2/repair-type macrophages to M1/kill-type can slow or stop cancer growth. The effects involve direct activity of M1 kill-type as well as the ability of M1-type macrophages to stimulate Th1-type cytotoxic T cells and other effector cells. Macrophage responses can also predict cancer susceptibility; individuals with a high M1/kill to M2/repair ratio are less prone. That macrophages/innate immunity can be modulated to play a central role in directly or indirectly combating cancer is a breakthrough that seems likely to finally make successful immunotherapy of cancer a reality.

  17. Advances in Cancer Immunotherapy in Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Smitha; Shin, Sarah; Dy, Grace

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy is heralded as one of the most important advances in oncology. Until recently, only limited immunotherapeutic options were available in selected immunogenic cancers like melanoma and renal cell carcinomas. Nowadays, there is an improved understanding that anti-tumor immunity is controlled by a delicate balance in the tumor microenvironment between immune stimulatory and immune inhibitory pathways. Either by blocking the inhibitory pathways or stimulating the activating pathways that regulate cytotoxic lymphocytes, anti-tumor immunity can be enhanced leading to durable anti-tumor responses. Drugs which block the immune regulatory checkpoints namely the PD-1/PDL1 and CTLA 4 pathway have shown tremendous promise in a wide spectrum of solid and hematological malignancies, significantly improving overall survival in newly diagnosed and heavily pretreated patients alike. Hence there is renewed enthusiasm in the field of immune oncology with current research focused on augmenting responses to checkpoint inhibitors by combination therapy as well as studies looking at other immune modulators and adoptive T cell therapy. In this article, we highlight the key clinical advances and concepts in immunotherapy with particular emphasis on checkpoint inhibition as well as the future direction in this field. PMID:27886124

  18. Personalized approaches to active immunotherapy in cancer.

    PubMed

    Ophir, Eran; Bobisse, Sara; Coukos, George; Harari, Alexandre; Kandalaft, Lana E

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy is emerging as a promising anti-cancer curative modality. However, in contrast to recent advances obtained employing checkpoint blockade agents and T cell therapies, clinical efficacy of therapeutic cancer vaccines is still limited. Most vaccination attempts in the clinic represent "off-the shelf" approaches since they target common "self" tumor antigens, shared among different patients. In contrast, personalized approaches of vaccination are tailor-made for each patient and in spite being laborious, hold great potential. Recent technical advancement enabled the first steps in the clinic of personalized vaccines that target patient-specific mutated neo-antigens. Such vaccines could induce enhanced tumor-specific immune response since neo-antigens are mutation-derived antigens that can be recognized by high affinity T cells, not limited by central tolerance. Alternatively, the use of personalized vaccines based on whole autologous tumor cells, overcome the need for the identification of specific tumor antigens. Whole autologous tumor cells could be administered alone, pulsed on dendritic cells as lysate, DNA, RNA or delivered to dendritic cells in-vivo through encapsulation in nanoparticle vehicles. Such vaccines may provide a source for the full repertoire of the patient-specific tumor antigens, including its private neo-antigens. Furthermore, combining next-generation personalized vaccination with other immunotherapy modalities might be the key for achieving significant therapeutic outcome.

  19. A stochastic model for immunotherapy of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Baar, Martina; Coquille, Loren; Mayer, Hannah; Hölzel, Michael; Rogava, Meri; Tüting, Thomas; Bovier, Anton

    2016-01-01

    We propose an extension of a standard stochastic individual-based model in population dynamics which broadens the range of biological applications. Our primary motivation is modelling of immunotherapy of malignant tumours. In this context the different actors, T-cells, cytokines or cancer cells, are modelled as single particles (individuals) in the stochastic system. The main expansions of the model are distinguishing cancer cells by phenotype and genotype, including environment-dependent phenotypic plasticity that does not affect the genotype, taking into account the effects of therapy and introducing a competition term which lowers the reproduction rate of an individual in addition to the usual term that increases its death rate. We illustrate the new setup by using it to model various phenomena arising in immunotherapy. Our aim is twofold: on the one hand, we show that the interplay of genetic mutations and phenotypic switches on different timescales as well as the occurrence of metastability phenomena raise new mathematical challenges. On the other hand, we argue why understanding purely stochastic events (which cannot be obtained with deterministic models) may help to understand the resistance of tumours to therapeutic approaches and may have non-trivial consequences on tumour treatment protocols. This is supported through numerical simulations. PMID:27063839

  20. Laser immunotherapy in treatment of metastatic prostate tumors in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei R.; Ritchey, Jerry W.; Bartles, Kenneth E.; Lucroy, Michael D.; Liu, Hong; Nordquist, Robert E.

    2002-07-01

    Laser immunotherapy is a special cancer treatment modality using an intratumor injection of a special formulation consisting of a novel immunoadjuvant and a laser-absorbing dye, followed by a non-invasive near-IR laser irradiation. Our early experiments using a metastatic mammary rat tumor model showed that laser immunotherapy could cause acute selective photothermal tumor destruction and induce a systemic, long-term specific anti-tumor immunity. In the current study, laser immunotherapy was used to treat metastatic prostate tumors in Copenhagen male rats. The transplantable tumors metastasize mainly to the lung and the lung cancer is usually the cause of death. Two experimental were performed in our study. The first was to study the effect of laser immunotherapy on the tumor burdens, both the primary and the metastasis in the lung. The second was to study the effect of laser immunotherapy on the long-term survival of the tumor-bearing rats. For comparison, some rat tumors were also treated by the laser-dye combination to study the photothermal effect. Tour results showed that both the photothermal effect and the laser immunotherapy could slow the growth of primary tumors and the metastatic tumors. The laser-dye-immunoadjuvant treatment resulted in more than 20 percent long-term survival rate in tumor-bearing rats. Our experimental results indicate that the laser immunotherapy has a great potential in treating metastatic tumors.

  1. Cancer immunotherapy: Strategies for personalization and combinatorial approaches.

    PubMed

    Sathyanarayanan, Vishwanath; Neelapu, Sattva S

    2015-12-01

    The results of recent clinical trials using novel immunotherapy strategies such as immune checkpoint blockade and adoptive T-cell therapy approaches including CAR T-cell therapy have clearly established immunotherapy as an important modality for the treatment of cancer besides the traditional approaches of surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy or targeted therapy. However, to date immunotherapy has been shown to induce durable clinical benefit in only a fraction of the patients. The use of combination strategies is likely to increase the number of patients that might benefit from immunotherapy. Indeed, over the last decade, the characterization of multiple immune resistance mechanisms used by the tumor to evade the immune system and the development of agents that target those mechanisms has generated a lot of enthusiasm for cancer immunotherapy. But a critical issue is to determine how best to combine such agents. This review will focus on novel immunotherapy agents currently in development and discuss strategies to develop and personalize combination cancer immunotherapy strategies.

  2. Special Conference on Tumor Immunology and Immunotherapy: A New Chapter

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Katelyn T.; Vonderheide, Robert H.; Jaffee, Elizabeth M.; Armstrong, Todd D.

    2015-01-01

    The overall objective of the fifth American Association for Cancer Research Special Conference on “Tumor Immunology and Immunotherapy: A New Chapter” organized by the Cancer Immunology Working Group was to highlight multidisciplinary approaches of immunotherapy and mechanisms related to the ability of immunotherapy to fight established tumors. With the FDA approval of sipuleucel-T, ipilimumab (anti-CTLA4; Bristol-Myers Squibb [BMS]), and the two anti-PD-1 antibodies, pembrolizumab (formerly MK-3475 or lambrolizumab; Merck) and nivolumab (BMS), immunotherapy has become a mainstream treatment option for some cancer. Many of the data presented at the conference and reviewed in this article showcase the progress made in determining the mechanistic reasons for the success of some treatments and the mechanisms associated with tolerance within the tumor microenvironment, both of which are potential targets for immunotherapy. In addition to combination and multimodal therapies, improvements in existing therapies will be needed to overcome the numerous ways that tumor-specific tolerance thwarts the immune system. This conference built upon the success of the 2012 conference, and focused on seven progressing and/or emerging areas that include: New combination therapies; Combination therapies and vaccine Improvement; Mechanisms of antibody therapy; Factors in the tumor microenvironment affecting the immune response; The microbiomes effect on cancer and immunotherapy; Metabolism in immunotherapy; and Adoptive T-cell therapy. PMID:25968457

  3. Special Conference on Tumor Immunology and Immunotherapy: A New Chapter.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Katelyn T; Vonderheide, Robert H; Jaffee, Elizabeth M; Armstrong, Todd D

    2015-05-12

    The overall objective of the fifth American Association for Cancer Research Special Conference, "Tumor Immunology and Immunotherapy: A New Chapter," organized by the Cancer Immunology Working Group, was to highlight multidisciplinary approaches of immunotherapy and mechanisms related to the ability of immunotherapy to fight established tumors. With the FDA approval of sipuleucel-T, ipilimumab (anti-CTLA-4; Bristol-Myers Squibb), and the two anti-PD-1 antibodies, pembrolizumab (formerly MK-3475 or lambrolizumab; Merck) and nivolumab (Bristol-Myers Squibb), immunotherapy has become a mainstream treatment option for some cancers. Many of the data presented at the conference and reviewed in this article showcase the progress made in determining the mechanistic reasons for the success of some treatments and the mechanisms associated with tolerance within the tumor microenvironment, both of which are potential targets for immunotherapy. In addition to combination and multimodal therapies, improvements in existing therapies will be needed to overcome the numerous ways that tumor-specific tolerance thwarts the immune system. This conference built upon the success of the 2012 conference and focused on seven progressing and/or emerging areas-new combination therapies, combination therapies and vaccine improvement, mechanisms of antibody therapy, factors in the tumor microenvironment affecting the immune response, the microbiomes effect on cancer and immunotherapy, metabolism in immunotherapy, and adoptive T-cell therapy. Cancer Immunol Res; 3(6); 1-8. ©2015 AACR.

  4. Differences in control of parasympathetic vasodilation between submandibular and sublingual glands in the rat.

    PubMed

    Sato, Toshiya; Ishii, Hisayoshi

    2015-12-01

    We examined blood flow in the submandibular gland (SMGBF) and sublingual gland (SLGBF) during electrical stimulation of the central cut end of the lingual nerve (LN) in the urethane-anesthetized rats using a laser speckle imaging flow meter. LN stimulation elicited intensity- and frequency-dependent SMGBF and SLGBF increases, and the magnitude of the SMGBF increase was higher than that of the SLGBF increase. The increase in both glands was significantly inhibited by intravenous administration of the autonomic cholinergic ganglion blocker hexamethonium. The antimuscarinic agent atropine markedly inhibited the SMGBF increase and partly inhibited the SLGBF increase. The atropine-resistant SLGBF increase was significantly inhibited by infusion of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) receptor antagonist, although administration of VIP receptor antagonist alone had no effect. The recovery time to the basal blood flow level was shorter after LN stimulation than after administration of VIP. However, the recovery time after LN stimulation was significantly delayed by administration of atropine in a dose-dependent manner to the same level as after administration of VIP. Our results indicate that 1) LN stimulation elicits both a parasympathetic SMGBF increase mainly evoked by cholinergic fibers and a parasympathetic SLGBF increase evoked by cholinergic and noncholinergic fibers, and 2) VIP-ergic mechanisms are involved in the noncholinergic SLGBF increase and are activated when muscarinic mechanisms are deactivated.

  5. Sumatriptan succinate sublingual fast dissolving thin films: formulation and in vitro/in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Tayel, Saadya A; El Nabarawi, Mohamed A; Amin, Maha M; Abou Ghaly, Mohamed H

    2016-01-01

    Sumatriptan succinate (SS) is a 5-HT1 receptor agonist used in the treatment of migraine having poor bioavailability (15%) due to its extensive first-pass effect. The aim of this work was to prepare SS sublingual fast dissolving thin films (SFDTFs) allowing the drug to directly enter the systemic circulation and bypassing the first-pass metabolism. Plain thin films were prepared using solvent casting technique adopting 2(3) × 3 factorial design to study the effect of polymer and plasticizer type and concentration on mechanical properties and in vitro disintegration time of the plain prepared films using Design-Expert®. Medicated films were prepared after addition of 35 mg SS to each of the two selected plain formulae (F6 and F7) having desirability values above 0.9 showing the values of: 0.038, 0.039 kgf/mm(2) and 156.24, 164.16% and 0.0248, 0.0240 kgf/mm(2) as tensile strength, percent elongation and elastic modulus, respectively. PVP K30 was efficient as crystallization inhibitor in retarding SS crystallization. Pharmacokinetic study of the optimum formula F7 (PVP K30:SS (1:1 w/w)) in healthy human volunteers using LC/MS/MS revealed a shorter tmax (0.25 h) compared to Imitrex® tablet 25 mg (2 h) which is considered promising especially for the rapid relief of acute migraine attacks.

  6. Expression and Localization of α-amylase in the Submandibular and Sublingual Glands of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, Ryoko; Wakayama, Tomohiko; Nakata, Hiroki; Adthapanyawanich, Kannika; Kumchantuek, Tewarat; Yamamoto, Miyuki; Iseki, Shoichi

    2014-01-01

    In the major salivary glands of mice, acinar cells in the parotid gland (PG) are known to be the main site for the production of the digestive enzyme α-amylase, whereas α-amylase production in the submandibular gland (SMG) and sublingual gland (SLG), as well as the cell types responsible for α-amylase production, has been less firmly established. To clarify this issue, we examined the expression and localization of both the mRNA and protein of α-amylase in the major salivary glands of male and female mice by quantitative and histochemical methods. α-amylase mRNA levels were higher in the order of PG, SMG, and SLG. No sexual difference was observed in α-amylase mRNA levels in the PG and SLG, whereas α-amylase mRNA levels in the female SMG were approximately 30% those in the male SMG. Using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry, signals for α-amylase mRNA and protein were found to be strongly positive in acinar cells of the PG, serous demilune cells of the SLG, and granular convoluted tubule (GCT) cells of the male SMG, weakly positive in seromucous acinar cells of the male and female SMG, and negative in mucous acinar cells of the SLG. These results clarified that α-amylase is produced mainly by GCT cells and partly by acinar cells in the SMG, whereas it is produced exclusively by serous demilune cells in the SLG of mice. PMID:25320406

  7. Methylglycol chitosan and a synthetic TLR4 agonist enhance immune responses to influenza vaccine administered sublingually

    PubMed Central

    Spinner, Justin L.; Oberoi, Hardeep S.; Yorgensen, Yvonne M.; Poirier, Danielle S.; Burkhart, David J.; Plante, Martin; Evans, Jay T.

    2015-01-01

    Influenza is a vaccine-preventable contagious respiratory illness caused by influenza (flu) viruses which can lead to hospitalization and sometimes even death. Current flu vaccines delivered intramuscularly (IM) or intradermally (ID) are less effective at eliciting protective mucosal immune responses and vaccines delivered intranasally (IN) possess potential safety concerns. Sublingual (SL) vaccination is a promising alternative route for vaccine delivery which has been indicated as safe and effective at inducing protective immune responses in both systemic and mucosal compartments. We evaluated the efficacy of methylglycol chitosan (MGC) and a synthetic toll-like receptor 4 agonist (CRX-601), alone or in combination, for improving systemic and mucosal immune responses to a monovalent detergent-split flu virus vaccine delivered SL. SL vaccination of mice with split-flu vaccine formulated with either MGC or CRX-601 resulted in specific serum IgG and mucosal IgA titers that were significantly greater than titers from non-adjuvanted vaccination and equivalent to or greater than titers in mice vaccinated IM. Our results demonstrate that SL vaccination utilizing MGC or CRX-601 as adjuvants is a viable alternative route of vaccination for flu which can elicit systemic immune responses equivalent to or greater than IM vaccination with the added benefit of stimulating a robust specific mucosal immune response. PMID:26392012

  8. Sublingual-oral rush desensitization to mixed cow and sheep milk: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nucera, E; Schiavino, D; Buonomo, A; Pollastrini, E; Altomonte, G; Pecora, V; Decinti, M; Lombardo, C; Patriarca, G

    2008-01-01

    We attempted an oral rush desensitization with mixed cow and sheep milk in a 6-year-old boy who had had adverse reactions to cow and goat milks. Skin prick tests and specific immunoglobulin (Ig) E to cow, sheep and goat milks were positive. The double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge with cow milk was positive too. He underwent a 12-day sublingual-oral desensitization treatment with mixed cow and sheep milk. Specific IgE and IgG4 were measured. Open oral challenges with cow milk, sheep milk and sheep cheeses were also performed after the desensitization. At the end of the desensitizing treatment our patient could tolerate 120 mL of mixed milk. Specific IgE levels did not vary, whereas an increase of specific IgG4 concentrations was observed. Open oral challenges with cow and sheep milks and sheep cheeses were negative. Oral rush desensitization may represent an alternative approach to the treatment of food allergy in children.

  9. New developments in the management of opioid dependence: focus on sublingual buprenorphine–naloxone

    PubMed Central

    Soyka, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Opioid maintenance therapy is a well-established first-line treatment approach in opioid dependence. Buprenorphine, a partial opioid agonist, has been found by numerous studies to be an effective and safe medication in the treatment of opioid dependence. At present, buprenorphine is available as a monodrug or in a fixed 4:1 ratio combination with naloxone. A diminished risk of diversion and abuse for the buprenorphine–naloxone combination is likely but not firmly established. Conventional formulations are given sublingually to avoid the hepatic first-pass effect. A novel film tablet is available only in the US and Australia. Other novel, sustained-release formulations (implant, depot) are currently being developed and tested. Recent studies, including a Cochrane meta-analysis, suggest that the retention with buprenorphine is lower than for methadone, but that buprenorphine may be associated with less drug use. Higher doses of buprenorphine are associated with better retention rates. Buprenorphine has a ceiling effect at the opioid receptor with regard to respiratory depression, and may cause fewer fatal intoxications than methadone. Possible antidepressant effects of buprenorphine and its use in comorbid psychiatric patients has not been studied in much detail. Clinical implications are discussed. PMID:25610012

  10. Fast-Acting Sublingual Zolpidem for Middle-of-the-Night Wakefulness

    PubMed Central

    Pergolizzi, Joseph V.; Taylor, Robert; Raffa, Robert B.; Chopra, Maninder

    2014-01-01

    Sleep disorders (somnipathies) are conditions characterized by disruptions of sleep quality or of sleep pattern. They can involve difficulty falling asleep (prolonged sleep onset latency), difficulty staying asleep (disturbance of sleep maintenance), sleep of poor quality (unrefreshing), or combinations of these and can lead to poor health and quality of life problems. A subtype of sleep-maintenance insomnia is middle-of-the-night wakefulness, a relatively common occurrence. Zolpidem, a nonbenzodiazepine benzodiazepine receptor agonist, allosterically modulates an ion channel and increases the influx of Cl−, thereby dampening the effect of excitatory (sleep disrupting) input. Recently, product label changes to some zolpidem containing products have been implemented by the FDA in order to reduce the risk associated with their morning after residual side effects. A new formulation of zolpidem tartrate (Intermezzo) sublingual tablet, an approved product indicated exclusively for the treatment of middle-of-the-night wakefulness and difficulty returning to sleep, did not have its label changed. We present a short summary of its basic science and clinical attributes in light of the recent regulatory changes for zolpidem products. PMID:24649369

  11. Methylglycol chitosan and a synthetic TLR4 agonist enhance immune responses to influenza vaccine administered sublingually.

    PubMed

    Spinner, Justin L; Oberoi, Hardeep S; Yorgensen, Yvonne M; Poirier, Danielle S; Burkhart, David J; Plante, Martin; Evans, Jay T

    2015-10-26

    Influenza is a vaccine-preventable contagious respiratory illness caused by influenza (flu) viruses which can lead to hospitalization and sometimes even death. Current flu vaccines delivered intramuscularly (IM) or intradermally (ID) are less effective at eliciting protective mucosal immune responses and vaccines delivered intranasally (IN) possess potential safety concerns. Sublingual (SL) vaccination is a promising alternative route for vaccine delivery which has been indicated as safe and effective at inducing protective immune responses in both systemic and mucosal compartments. We evaluated the efficacy of methylglycol chitosan (MGC) and a synthetic toll-like receptor 4 agonist (CRX-601), alone or in combination, for improving systemic and mucosal immune responses to a monovalent detergent-split flu virus vaccine delivered SL. SL vaccination of mice with split-flu vaccine formulated with either MGC or CRX-601 resulted in specific serum IgG and mucosal IgA titers that were significantly greater than titers from non-adjuvanted vaccination and equivalent to or greater than titers in mice vaccinated IM. Our results demonstrate that SL vaccination utilizing MGC or CRX-601 as adjuvants is a viable alternative route of vaccination for flu which can elicit systemic immune responses equivalent to or greater than IM vaccination with the added benefit of stimulating a robust specific mucosal immune response.

  12. Cellular immunotherapy in multiple myeloma: lessons from preclinical models.

    PubMed

    Binsfeld, M; Fostier, K; Muller, J; Baron, F; Schots, R; Beguin, Y; Heusschen, R; Caers, J

    2014-12-01

    The majority of multiple myeloma patients relapse with the current treatment strategies, raising the need for alternative therapeutic approaches. Cellular immunotherapy is a rapidly evolving field and currently being translated into clinical trials with encouraging results in several cancer types, including multiple myeloma. Murine multiple myeloma models are of critical importance for the development and refinement of cellular immunotherapy. In this review, we summarize the immune cell changes that occur in multiple myeloma patients and we discuss the cell-based immunotherapies that have been tested in multiple myeloma, with a focus on murine models.

  13. Primary, Adaptive, and Acquired Resistance to Cancer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Padmanee; Hu-Lieskovan, Siwen; Wargo, Jennifer A; Ribas, Antoni

    2017-02-09

    Cancer immunotherapy can induce long lasting responses in patients with metastatic cancers of a wide range of histologies. Broadening the clinical applicability of these treatments requires an improved understanding of the mechanisms limiting cancer immunotherapy. The interactions between the immune system and cancer cells are continuous, dynamic, and evolving from the initial establishment of a cancer cell to the development of metastatic disease, which is dependent on immune evasion. As the molecular mechanisms of resistance to immunotherapy are elucidated, actionable strategies to prevent or treat them may be derived to improve clinical outcomes for patients.

  14. Improving cancer immunotherapy by targeting the STATe of MDSCs

    PubMed Central

    de Haas, Nienke; de Koning, Coco; Spilgies, Lisanne; de Vries, I. Jolanda M.; Hato, Stanleyson V.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cancer immunotherapy is a promising therapeutic avenue; however, in practice its efficacy is hampered by an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment that consists of suppressive cell types like myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). Eradication or reprogramming of MDSCs could therefore enhance clinical responses to immunotherapy. Here, we review clinically available drugs that target MDSCs, often through inhibition of STAT signaling, which is essential for MDSC accumulation and suppressive functions. Interestingly, several drugs used for non-cancerous indications and natural compounds similarly inhibit MDSCs by STAT inhibition, but have fewer side effects than anticancer drugs. Therefore, they show great potential for combination strategies with immunotherapy. PMID:27622051

  15. An EAACI “European Survey on Adverse Systemic Reactions in Allergen Immunotherapy (EASSI)”: the methodology

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    At present, there is no European report on clinically relevant systemic reactions due to the regular use of allergen immunotherapy (AIT), administered either subcutaneously or sublingually (SCIT and SLIT, respectively) outside clinical trials. Using an electronic survey and a “harmonised terminology” according to MedDRA, we aimed to prospectively collect systemic adverse reactions due to AIT from real life clinical settings. Under the framework of the EAACI, a team of European specialists in AIT, pharmacovigilance, epidemiology and drugs regulation set up a web-based prospective pilot survey to be conducted in three European countries (France, Germany and Spain). A designated “national coordinator” was responsible for following ethics requirements relative to each country and to select at least 30 doctors per country. Patients were recruited the same day they received their first dose of either SCIT or SLIT. Patient inclusion criteria were: adults and children, with IgE mediated pollen, house dust mite, Alternaria, and/or animal dander respiratory allergies who will initiate AIT. A list of 31 symptoms terms were extracted from the MedDRA (Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities) dictionary to harmonize the reporting of all adverse systemic reactions in this survey. The SurveyMonkey® online instrument was used by participant doctors to submit information directly to a blinded central database. Three questionnaires were generated: i) the Doctor Questionnaire, ii) the Patient Questionnaire and iii) the Adverse Reaction Questionnaire. A handbook and a mistake report form were given to each doctor. In this paper, we describe the methodology followed. PMID:25075276

  16. Genetic engineering of allergens for immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bonura, Angela; Colombo, Paolo

    2009-06-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy was introduced into clinical practice at the beginning of the 20(th) century and its efficacy in the treatment of seasonal allergic rhinitis has been confirmed in many clinical studies which have shown that it can prevent the onset of new sensitizations to different allergens and reduces the development of asthma in patients with allergic rhinitis. Progress in molecular cloning and characterization of allergens have made it possible to produce single recombinant allergens whose immunological properties have been tested in vitro and in vivo and have demonstrated that they retain properties resembling their natural counterpart. Several rational approaches are being developed to improve the efficacy of SIT by reducing immunoglobulin IgE-mediated adverse reactions. Some of these molecules have been tested in the clinic, demonstrating the feasibility of using biotechnology-derived products as new standardized, improved and safer therapeutic compositions.

  17. GD2-targeted immunotherapy and radioimmunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Dobrenkov, Konstantin; Cheung, Nai-Kong

    2014-01-01

    Ganglioside GD2 is a tumor-associated surface antigen found in a broad spectrum of human cancers and stem cells. They include pediatric embryonal tumors (neuroblastoma, retinoblastoma, brain tumors, osteosarcoma, Ewing’s sarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma), as well as adult cancers (small cell lung cancer, melanoma, soft tissue sarcomas). Because of its restricted normal tissue distribution, GD2 has been proven safe for antibody targeting. Anti-GD2 antibody is now incorporated into the standard of care for the treatment of high risk metastatic neuroblastoma. Building on this experience, novel combinations of antibody, cytokines, cells and genetically engineered products all directed at GD2 are rapidly moving into the clinic. In the review, past and present immunotherapy trials directed at GD2 will be summarized, highlighting the lessons learned and the future directions. PMID:25440605

  18. Nanoparticle based-immunotherapy against allergy.

    PubMed

    Gamazo, Carlos; Gastaminza, Gabriel; Ferrer, Marta; Sanz, María L; Irache, Juan M

    2014-01-01

    Allergic diseases are one of the most prevalent diseases, reaching epidemic proportions in developed countries. An allergic reaction occurs after contact with an environmental protein, such as inhalants allergens (pollen, animal dander, house dust mites), or food proteins. This response is known as part of the type 2 immunity that is counterbalanced by Type 1 immunity and Tregs. Widely used allergen-specific immunotherapy (IT) is a long term treatment to induce such switch from Th2 to Th1 response. However, conventional IT requires multiple allergen injections over a long period of time and is not free of risk of producing allergic reactions. As a consequence, new safer and faster immunotherapeutic methods are required. This review deals with allergen IT using nanoparticles as allergen delivery system that will allow a different way of administration, reduce dose and diminish allergen exposure to IgE bound to mast cells or basophils.

  19. The Role of Immunotherapy in Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Kocoglu, Mehmet; Badros, Ashraf

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is the second most common hematologic malignancy. The treatment of this disease has changed considerably over the last two decades with the introduction to the clinical practice of novel agents such as proteasome inhibitors and immunomodulatory drugs. Basic research efforts towards better understanding of normal and missing immune surveillence in myeloma have led to development of new strategies and therapies that require the engagement of the immune system. Many of these treatments are under clinical development and have already started providing encouraging results. We, for the second time in the last two decades, are about to witness another shift of the paradigm in the management of this ailment. This review will summarize the major approaches in myeloma immunotherapies. PMID:26784207

  20. Biomarkers for Allergen Immunotherapy: A "Panoromic" View.

    PubMed

    Moingeon, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    Biomarkers (BMKs) are biological parameters that can be measured to predict or monitor disease severity or treatment efficacy. The induction of regulatory dendritic cells (DCs) concomitantly with a downregulation of proallergic DC2s (ie, DCs supporting the differentiation of T-helper lymphocyte type 2 cells) in the blood of patients allergic to grass pollen has been correlated with the early onset of allergen immunotherapy efficacy. The combined use of omics technologies to compare biological samples from clinical responders and nonresponders is being implemented in the context of nonhypothesis-driven approaches. Such comprehensive "panoromic" strategies help identify completely novel candidate BMKs, to be subsequently validated as companion diagnostics in large-scale clinical trials.

  1. Biological Response Modifier in Cancer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ronghua; Luo, Feifei; Liu, Xiaoming; Wang, Luman; Yang, Jiao; Deng, Yuting; Huang, Enyu; Qian, Jiawen; Lu, Zhou; Jiang, Xuechao; Zhang, Dan; Chu, Yiwei

    2016-01-01

    Biological response modifiers (BRMs) emerge as a lay of new compounds or approaches used in improving cancer immunotherapy. Evidences highlight that cytokines, Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, and noncoding RNAs are of crucial roles in modulating antitumor immune response and cancer-related chronic inflammation, and BRMs based on them have been explored. In particular, besides some cytokines like IFN-α and IL-2, several Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists like BCG, MPL, and imiquimod are also licensed to be used in patients with several malignancies nowadays, and the first artificial small noncoding RNA (microRNA) mimic, MXR34, has entered phase I clinical study against liver cancer, implying their potential application in cancer therapy. According to amounts of original data, this chapter will review the regulatory roles of TLR signaling, some noncoding RNAs, and several key cytokines in cancer and cancer-related immune response, as well as the clinical cases in cancer therapy based on them.

  2. Immunotherapy in breast cancer: An introduction.

    PubMed

    Disis, Mary L; Stanton, Sasha E

    2017-02-03

    The field of breast cancer immunology has progressed tremendously over the last decade. Twenty years ago immunotherapy was not considered for the treatment of breast cancers because breast cancer was not considered immunogenic. Today we know that most patients with breast cancer have some evidence of an adaptive immune response against their tumors, detectable either in the peripheral blood or in the tumor. Moreover, immunity to breast cancer begins at the earliest stages of the disease, in some patients prior to diagnosis. Recent evidence suggests that lymphocytes infiltrating breast cancers and found in the tumor stroma are strong prognostic indicators of a beneficial disease outcome. These observations now pave the way for the integration of immunomodulation into standard of care therapy for the treatment of breast cancer.

  3. Nanochemistry-based immunotherapy for HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Lori, F; Calarota, S A; Lisziewicz, J

    2007-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART), i.e. the combination of three or more drugs against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), has greatly improved the clinical outcome of HIV-1-infected individuals. However, HAART is unable to reconstitute HIV-specific immunity and eradicate the virus. Several observations in primate models and in humans support the notion that cell-mediated immunity can control viral replication and slow disease progression. Thus, besides drugs, an immunotherapy that induces long-lasting HIV-specific T-cell responses could play a role in the treatment of HIV/AIDS. To induce such immune responses, DermaVir Patch has been developed. DermaVir consists of an HIV-1 antigen-encoding plasmid DNA that is chemically formulated in a nanoparticle. DermaVir is administered under a patch after a skin preparation that supports the delivery of the nanoparticle to Langerhans cells (LC). Epidermal LC trap and transport the nanomedicine to draining lymph nodes. While in transit, LC mature into dendritic cells (DC), which can efficiently present the DNA-encoded antigens to naïve T-cells for the induction of cellular immunity. Pre-clinical studies and Phase I clinical testing of DermaVir in HIV-1-infected individuals have demonstrated the safety and tolerability of DermaVir Patch. To further modulate cellular immunity, molecular adjuvants might be added into the nanoparticle. DermaVir Patch represents a new nanomedicine platform for immunotherapy of HIV/AIDS. In this review, the antiviral activity of DermaVir-induced cellular immunity is discussed. Furthermore, the action of some cytokines currently being tested as adjuvants are highlighted and the adjuvant effect of cytokine plasmid DNA included in the DermaVir nanoparticle is reviewed.

  4. Immunotherapy against cancer-related viruses.

    PubMed

    Tashiro, Haruko; Brenner, Malcolm K

    2017-01-01

    Approximately 12% of all cancers worldwide are associated with viral infections. To date, eight viruses have been shown to contribute to the development of human cancers, including Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Hepatitis B and C viruses, and Human papilloma virus, among others. These DNA and RNA viruses produce oncogenic effects through distinct mechanisms. First, viruses may induce sustained disorders of host cell growth and survival through the genes they express, or may induce DNA damage response in host cells, which in turn increases host genome instability. Second, they may induce chronic inflammation and secondary tissue damage favoring the development of oncogenic processes in host cells. Viruses like HIV can create a more permissive environment for cancer development through immune inhibition, but we will focus on the previous two mechanisms in this review. Unlike traditional cancer therapies that cannot distinguish infected cells from non-infected cells, immunotherapies are uniquely equipped to target virus-associated malignancies. The targeting and functioning mechanisms associated with the immune response can be exploited to prevent viral infections by vaccination, and can also be used to treat infection before cancer establishment. Successes in using the immune system to eradicate established malignancy by selective recognition of virus-associated tumor cells are currently being reported. For example, numerous clinical trials of adoptive transfer of ex vivo generated virus-specific T cells have shown benefit even for established tumors in patients with EBV-associated malignancies. Additional studies in other virus-associated tumors have also been initiated and in this review we describe the current status of immunotherapy for virus-associated malignancies and discuss future prospects.

  5. Cancer immunotherapy: potential involvement of mediators

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Efraim, S.

    1997-01-01

    The description of a cell-free soluble anti-tumour factor by Carswell et al. in 1975 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA, 72: 3666–3670) was followed by a long series of experimental and clinical investigations into the role of cell-free mediators in cancer immunotherapy. These investigations included research on the effects of macrophage–derived eicosanoids (cycloxygenase and lipoxygenase derivates of arachidonic acid) and of monokines such as tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1 and granulocyte–monocyte–macrophage–colony stimulating factor) and of lymphocyte products: interleukins and interferons. The investigations yielded information on the effects of various factors on macrophage and T-cell activation in vitro, determination of direct anti-tumour properties on animal and human tumour cells in vitro and on therapeutic effectiveness in tumour-bearing individuals either alone or in combination with other therapeutic factors and their production by tumour cells. During recent years much effort has been dedicated towards the use of the tumour cells transfected with cytokine genes in the preparation of cancer vaccines. Cycloxygenase products (prostaglandins) were usually assumed to inhibit expression of anti-tumour activity by macrophages and an increase in their production in cancer patients was considered as a poor prognostic index. Lipoxygenase (leukotrienes) products were assumed to exhibit antitumour activity and to induce production of IL-1 by macrophages. Interleukins 2, 4, 6, 7, 12 and the interferons were extensively tested for their therapeutic effectiveness in experimental tumour models and in cancer clinical trials. The general conclusion on the use of cell-free mediators for cancer immunotherapy is that much still has to be done in order to assure effective and reproducible therapeutic effectiveness for routine use in the treatment of human neoplasia. PMID:18472817

  6. Brain tumor immunotherapy: an immunologist's perspective.

    PubMed

    Lampson, Lois A

    2003-01-01

    Key concepts in brain tumor immunotherapy are reviewed. "Immunotherapy" can refer to a fully-developed, tumor-specific immune response, or to its individual cellular or molecular mediators. The immune response is initiated most efficiently in organized lymphoid tissue. After initiation, antigen-specific T lymphocytes (T cells) survey the tissues--including the brain. If the T cells re-encounter their antigen at a tumor site, they can be triggered to carry out their effector functions. T cells can attack tumor in many ways, directly and indirectly, through cell-cell contact, secreted factors, and attraction and activation of other cells, endogenous or blood-borne. Recent work expands the list of candidate tumor antigens: they are not limited to cell surface proteins and need not be absolutely tumor-specific. Once identified, tumor antigens can be targeted immunologically, or in novel ways. The immune response is under complex regulatory control. Most current work aims to enhance initiation of the response (for example, with tumor vaccines), rather than enhancing the effector phase at the tumor site. The effector phase includes a rich, interactive set of cells and mediators; some that are not usually stressed are of particular interest against tumor in the brain. Within the brain, immune regulation varies from site to site, and local neurochemicals (such as substance P or glutamate) can contribute to local control. Given the complexity of a tumor, the brain, and the immune response, animal models are essential, but more emphasis should be given to their limitations and to step-by-step analysis, rather than animal "cures".

  7. Immunotherapy for small-cell lung cancer: emerging evidence.

    PubMed

    Reck, Martin; Heigener, David; Reinmuth, Niels

    2016-04-01

    Treatment for small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) has changed little over the past few decades; available therapies have failed to extend survival in advanced disease. In recent years, immunotherapy with treatments such as interferons, TNFs, vaccines and immune checkpoint inhibitors has advanced and shown promise in the treatment of several tumor types. Immune checkpoint inhibitors such as ipilimumab, nivolumab, pembrolizumab, durvalumab, tremelimumab and ulocuplumab are at the forefront of immunotherapy and have achieved approvals for certain cancer types, including melanoma (ipilimumab, nivolumab and pembrolizumab), non-SCLC (nivolumab and pembrolizumab) and renal cell carcinoma (nivolumab). Clinical trials are investigating different immunotherapies in patients with other solid and hematologic malignancies, including SCLC. We review emerging evidence supporting the use of immunotherapy in SCLC patients.

  8. Future directions in bladder cancer immunotherapy: towards adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sean G; Zaharoff, David A

    2016-01-01

    The clinical management of bladder cancer has not changed significantly in several decades. In particular, intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) immunotherapy has been a mainstay for high-risk nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer since the late 1970s/early 1980s. This is despite the fact that bladder cancer has the highest recurrence rates of any cancer and BCG immunotherapy has not been shown to induce a tumor-specific immune response. We and others have hypothesized that immunotherapies capable of inducing tumor-specific adaptive immunity are needed to impact bladder cancer morbidity and mortality. This article summarizes the preclinical and clinical development of bladder cancer immunotherapies with an emphasis on the last 5 years. Expected progress in the near future is also discussed.

  9. Brain Tumor Immunotherapy: What have We Learned so Far?

    PubMed Central

    Van Gool, Stefaan Willy

    2015-01-01

    High grade glioma is a rare brain cancer, incurable in spite of modern neurosurgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. Novel approaches are in research, and immunotherapy emerges as a promising strategy. Clinical experiences with active specific immunotherapy demonstrate feasibility, safety and most importantly, but incompletely understood, prolonged long-term survival in a fraction of the patients. In relapsed patients, we developed an immunotherapy schedule and we categorized patients into clinically defined risk profiles. We learned how to combine immunotherapy with standard multimodal treatment strategies for newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme patients. The developmental program allows further improvements related to newest scientific insights. Finally, we developed a mode of care within academic centers to organize cell-based therapies for experimental clinical trials in a large number of patients. PMID:26137448

  10. Optimizing Dendritic Cell-Based Approaches for Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Jashodeep; Terhune, Julia H.; Lowenfeld, Lea; Cintolo, Jessica A.; Xu, Shuwen; Roses, Robert E.; Czerniecki, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen-presenting cells uniquely suited for cancer immunotherapy. They induce primary immune responses, potentiate the effector functions of previously primed T-lymphocytes, and orchestrate communication between innate and adaptive immunity. The remarkable diversity of cytokine activation regimens, DC maturation states, and antigen-loading strategies employed in current DC-based vaccine design reflect an evolving, but incomplete, understanding of optimal DC immunobiology. In the clinical realm, existing DC-based cancer immunotherapy efforts have yielded encouraging but inconsistent results. Despite recent U.S. Federal and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of DC-based sipuleucel-T for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, clinically effective DC immunotherapy as monotherapy for a majority of tumors remains a distant goal. Recent work has identified strategies that may allow for more potent “next-generation” DC vaccines. Additionally, multimodality approaches incorporating DC-based immunotherapy may improve clinical outcomes. PMID:25506283

  11. Novel Immune-Modulating Cellular Vaccine for Prostate Cancer Immunotherapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0423 TITLE: Novel Immune-Modulating Cellular Vaccine for Prostate Cancer Immunotherapy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Smita...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0423 Novel Immune-Modulating Cellular Vaccine for Prostate Cancer Immunotherapy 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...immune modulation of CTLA4 and have generated a lead cellular therapy that will safely enhance vaccine -mediated immunity. This lead cellular

  12. LIGHT: A Novel Immunotherapy for Primary and Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    effects due to the loss of testosterone (including fatigue, decreased sexual desire, weight gain, loss of muscle mass and osteoporosis ) and the well...beyond the prostate, immunotherapy may be the only way to treat it [6, 7]. A majority of clinical trials for the immunotherapy of prostate cancer...Localized Prostate Cancer. J Sex Med, 2012. 5. Fitzpatrick, J.M., Management of localized prostate cancer in senior adults : the crucial role of comorbidity

  13. Immune targets and neoantigens for cancer immunotherapy and precision medicine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong-Fu; Wang, Helen Y

    2017-01-01

    Harnessing the immune system to eradicate malignant cells is becoming a most powerful new approach to cancer therapy. FDA approval of the immunotherapy-based drugs, sipuleucel-T (Provenge), ipilimumab (Yervoy, anti-CTLA-4), and more recently, the programmed cell death (PD)-1 antibody (pembrolizumab, Keytruda), for the treatment of multiple types of cancer has greatly advanced research and clinical studies in the field of cancer immunotherapy. Furthermore, recent clinical trials, using NY-ESO-1-specific T cell receptor (TCR) or CD19-chimeric antigen receptor (CAR), have shown promising clinical results for patients with metastatic cancer. Current success of cancer immunotherapy is built upon the work of cancer antigens and co-inhibitory signaling molecules identified 20 years ago. Among the large numbers of target antigens, CD19 is the best target for CAR T cell therapy for blood cancer, but CAR-engineered T cell immunotherapy does not yet work in solid cancer. NY-ESO-1 is one of the best targets for TCR-based immunotherapy in solid cancer. Despite the great success of checkpoint blockade therapy, more than 50% of cancer patients fail to respond to blockade therapy. The advent of new technologies such as next-generation sequencing has enhanced our ability to search for new immune targets in onco-immunology and accelerated the development of immunotherapy with potentially broader coverage of cancer patients. In this review, we will discuss the recent progresses of cancer immunotherapy and novel strategies in the identification of new immune targets and mutation-derived antigens (neoantigens) for cancer immunotherapy and immunoprecision medicine.

  14. Immunotherapy for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma: an overview of clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Paniccia, Alessandro; Merkow, Justin; Edil, Barish H.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death and current therapeutic strategies are often unsatisfactory. Identification and development of more efficacious therapies is urgently needed. Immunotherapy offered encouraging results in preclinical models during the last decades, and several clinical trials have explored its therapeutic application in PDAC. The aim of this review is to summarize the results of clinical trials conducted to evaluate the future perspective of immunotherapy in the treatment of PDAC. PMID:26361407

  15. Localization of FGF-6 and FGFR-4 during prenatal and early postnatal development of the mouse sublingual gland.

    PubMed

    Uehara, Toshitomo

    2006-03-01

    A number of fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) are involved in regulatory mechanisms of the salivary gland development. However, the role of FGF-6 unique in myogenic cells has not been elucidated in the developing sublingual gland. In the present study, temporo-spatial expression of FGF-6 and its receptor (FGFR)-4, in conjunction with some related histo-chemical properties, were investigated in the sublingual gland of the prenatal and early postnatal mice. The earliest expression of both FGF-6 and FGFR-4 was detected in immature acinar cells at gestational day 17 (GD17). The staining intensity increased gradually and some acinar cells showed a distinct staining at postnatal day 0 (PD0). The immunopositive cells had a relatively round profile and were assumed to be acinar cells. The positive staining decreased thereafter and disappeared completely by PD11. To confirm the identity of cells positive for FGF-6, double immunolabeling with anti-alphasmooth muscle actin (alphaSMA) and anti-FGF-6 antibodies was performed. The positive staining of alphaSMA, a marker of myoepithelial cells, was detected in the flattened cells surrounding the acini but not in the cells positive for FGF-6. The staining properties of secretory granules in acinar cells were also examined with periodic acid-Shiff (PAS) and alcian blue (AB). PAS-positive granules abundant in the late gestational stages (GD17 to PD0) began to be replaced with AB-positive mucous granules at early neonatal days (PD0-3), when the FGF-6/FGFR-4 expression was the strongest. These findings suggest that FGF-6/FGFR-4 might be involved in the changes of secretory granule content of acinar cells in the sublingual gland during the late gestational and early neonatal stages.

  16. New approaches for the management of bipolar disorder: role of sublingual asenapine in the treatment of mania

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Calvert G; Dubovsky, Steven L

    2013-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is a prevalent disorder that tends to become progressive without treatment and with inadequate treatment. Second generation (atypical) antipsychotic drugs have increasingly been used as adjunctive treatment or monotherapy for mania, but they have the potential for significant adverse effects and their role in maintenance treatment remains unclear. Asenapine is a new atypical antipsychotic medication formulated in a sublingual preparation that has been studied for mania but not maintenance therapy. Evidence indicating efficacy, adverse effects, and potential benefits and drawbacks of using asenapine in the treatment of bipolar disorder based on currently available published data are summarized. PMID:23785236

  17. Comparison of Intravenous Morphine with Sublingual Buprenorphine in Management of Postoperative Pain after Closed Reduction Orthopedic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Soltani, Ghasem; Khorsand, Mahmood; Shamloo, Alireza Sepehri; Jarahi, Lida; Zirak, Nahid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Postoperative pain is a common side effect following surgery that can significantly reduce surgical quality and patient’s satisfaction. Treatment options are morphine and buprenorphine. We aimed to compare the efficacy of a single dose of intravenous morphine with sublingual buprenorphine in postoperative pain control following closed reduction surgery. Methods: This triple blind clinical trial was conducted on 90 patients referred for closed reduction orthopedic surgery. They were older than 18 years and in classes I and II of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) with an operation time of 30-90 minutes. Patients were divided into two groups of buprenorphine (4.5µg/kg sublingually) and morphine (0.2mg/kg intravenously). Baseline characteristics, vital signs, pain score, level of sedation and pharmacological side effects were recorded in the recovery room (at 0 and 30 minutes), and in the ward (at 3, 6 and 12 hours). SPSS version 19 software was used for data analysis and the significance level was set at P<0.05. Results: Ninety patients were studied, 60 males and 30 females with a mean age of 37.7±16.2 years. There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of baseline characteristics. Pain score in the morphine group was significantly higher than the buprenorphine group with an average score of 2.5 (P<0.001). Postoperative mean heart rate in the buprenorphine group was four beats lower than the morphine group (P<0.001). Also, in the buprenorphine 48.6% and in the morphine group 86.7% of cases were conscious in recovery (P=0.001) with a higher rate of pruritus in the latter group (P=0.001). Conclusion: Sublingual buprenorphine administration before anesthesia induction in closed reduction surgery can lead to better postoperative pain control in comparison to intravenous morphine. Due to simple usage and longer postoperative sedation, sublingual buprenorphine is recommended as a suitable drug in closed reduction surgery

  18. Intraoral management of iatrogenically displaced lower third molar roots in the sublingual space: a report of 2 cases

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Sufeng; Huang, Zheng; Geng, Tengyu; Huang, Lanzhu

    2015-01-01

    Surgical removal of the mandibular third molars is one of the most common procedures performed by dentists, as well as by oral and maxillofacial surgeons. Accidental displacement of teeth or roots into the fascial spaces, during surgical removal of the mandibular third molars, is a rare, but serious complication. Herein, we present 2 cases of iatrogenically displaced mandibular third molar roots into the sublingual space, which were successfully removed under local anesthesia intraorally. In addition to methods to minimize the risk of accidental tooth or root displacement, the importance of recognizing this complication and the methods of retrieval are also discussed. PMID:26770616

  19. Development of new immunotherapy treatments in different cancer types.

    PubMed

    Stanculeanu, D L; Daniela, Zob; Lazescu, A; Bunghez, R; Anghel, R

    2016-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy involves the use of therapeutic modalities that determine a manipulation of the immune system by using immune agents such as cytokines, vaccines, cell therapies and humoral, transfection agents. Immunotherapy of cancer has to stimulate the host's anti-tumor response by increasing the effector cell number and the production of soluble mediators and decrease the host's suppressor mechanisms by inducing tumor killing environment and by modulating immune checkpoints. Immunotherapy seems to work better in more immunogenic tumors. Making a review of literature, the article presents the new immunologic treatments in cancers less presented in the latest conferences, cancers in which, immunotherapy is still under investigation. Bladder cancer was the first indication for which immunotherapy was used in 1970. A promising clinical research in bladder cancer is the use of immune checkpoint inhibitors. Although breast cancer is considered immunologically silent, several preclinical and clinical studies suggested that immunotherapy has the potential to improve the clinical outcomes for patients with breast cancer. Cervical cancer, brain cancer, head and neck cancer and colorectal and esophageal cancers are cancer types for which new immune-based cancer treatments are currently under development. Recent agents used in clinical trials will be described in before mentioned cancers.

  20. Development of new immunotherapy treatments in different cancer types

    PubMed Central

    Stanculeanu, DL; Daniela, Zob; Lazescu, A; Bunghez, R; Anghel, R

    2016-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy involves the use of therapeutic modalities that determine a manipulation of the immune system by using immune agents such as cytokines, vaccines, cell therapies and humoral, transfection agents. Immunotherapy of cancer has to stimulate the host’s anti-tumor response by increasing the effector cell number and the production of soluble mediators and decrease the host’s suppressor mechanisms by inducing tumor killing environment and by modulating immune checkpoints. Immunotherapy seems to work better in more immunogenic tumors. Making a review of literature, the article presents the new immunologic treatments in cancers less presented in the latest conferences, cancers in which, immunotherapy is still under investigation. Bladder cancer was the first indication for which immunotherapy was used in 1970. A promising clinical research in bladder cancer is the use of immune checkpoint inhibitors. Although breast cancer is considered immunologically silent, several preclinical and clinical studies suggested that immunotherapy has the potential to improve the clinical outcomes for patients with breast cancer. Cervical cancer, brain cancer, head and neck cancer and colorectal and esophageal cancers are cancer types for which new immune-based cancer treatments are currently under development. Recent agents used in clinical trials will be described in before mentioned cancers. PMID:27974927

  1. Recent advances in the field of anti-cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Neves, Henrique; Kwok, Hang Fai

    2015-01-01

    Background The main goal of anti-cancer therapy is to specifically inhibit the malignant activity of cancer cells, while leaving healthy cells unaffected. As such, for every proposed therapy, it is important to keep in mind the therapeutic index — the ratio of the toxic dose over the therapeutic dose. The use of immunotherapy has allowed a means to both specifically block protein–protein interaction and deliver cytotoxic events to a tumor-specific antigen. Review scope It is the objective of this review to give an overview on current immunotherapy treatment for cancers using monoclonal antibodies. We demonstrate three exciting targets for immunotherapy, TNF-α Converting Enzyme (TACE), Cathepsin S and Urokinase Plasmogen Activator and go over the advances made with one of the most used monoclonal antibodies in cancer therapy, Rituximab; as well as Herceptin, which is used for breast cancer therapy. Furthermore, we touch on other venues of immunotherapy, such as adaptive cell transfer, the use of nucleic acids and the use of dendritic cells. Finally, we summarize some ongoing studies that spell tentative advancements for anti-cancer immunotherapy. General significance Immunotherapy is at the forefront of anti-cancer therapies, allying both a high degree of specificity to general high effectiveness and fewer side-effects. PMID:26673349

  2. 3D printing of rat salivary glands: The submandibular-sublingual complex.

    PubMed

    Cecchini, M P; Parnigotto, M; Merigo, F; Marzola, P; Daducci, A; Tambalo, S; Boschi, F; Colombo, L; Sbarbati, A

    2014-06-01

    The morphology and the functionality of the murid glandular complex, composed of the submandibular and sublingual salivary glands (SSC), were the object of several studies conducted mainly using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Using a 4.7 T scanner and a manganese-based contrast agent, we improved the signal-to-noise ratio of the SSC relating to the surrounding anatomical structures allowing to obtain high-contrast 3D images of the SSC. In the last few years, the large development in resin melting techniques opened the way for printing 3D objects starting from a 3D stack of images. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of the 3D printing technique of soft tissues such as the SSC in the rat with the aim to improve the visualization of the organs. This approach is useful to preserve the real in vivo morphology of the SCC in living animals avoiding the anatomical shape changes due to the lack of relationships with the surrounding organs in case of extraction. It is also harmless, repeatable and can be applied to explore volumetric changes occurring during body growth, excretory duct obstruction, tumorigenesis and regeneration processes. 3D printing allows to obtain a solid object with the same shape of the organ of interest, which can be observed, freely rotated and manipulated. To increase the visibility of the details, it is possible to print the organs with a selected zoom factor, useful as in case of tiny organs in small mammalia. An immediate application of this technique is represented by educational classes.

  3. CCR7-CCL19/CCL21-regulated dendritic cells are responsible for effectiveness of sublingual vaccination.

    PubMed

    Song, Joo-Hye; Kim, Jung-Im; Kwon, Hyung-Joon; Shim, Doo-Hee; Parajuli, Nirmala; Cuburu, Nicolas; Czerkinsky, Cecil; Kweon, Mi-Na

    2009-06-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated the potential of the sublingual (s.l.) route for delivering vaccines capable of inducing mucosal as well as systemic immune responses. Those findings prompted us to attempt to identify possible inductive mechanism of s.l. vaccination for immune responses. Within 2 h after s.l. administration with cholera toxin (CT), significantly higher numbers of MHC class II(+) cells accumulated in the s.l. mucosa. Of note, there were brisk expression levels of both CCL19 and CCL21 in cervical lymph nodes (CLN) 24 h after s.l. vaccination with CT. In reconstitution experiments using OVA-specific CD4(+) or CD8(+) T cells, s.l. vaccination elicited strong Ag-specific T cell proliferation mainly in CLN. Interestingly, Ag-specific T cell proliferation completely disappeared in CD11c-depleted and CCR7(-/-) mice but not in Langerin-depleted, macrophage-depleted, and CCR6(-/-) mice. Similar to CD4(+) T cell responses, induction of Ag-specific IgG (systemic) and IgA (mucosal) Ab responses were significantly reduced in CD11c-depleted and CCR7(-/-) mice after s.l. vaccination with OVA plus CT. Although CD8alpha(-) dendritic cells ferried Ag from the s.l. mucosa, both migratory CD8alpha(-) and resident CD8alpha(+) dendritic cells were essential to prime CD4(+) T cells in the CLN. On the basis of these findings, we believe that CCR7 expressed CD8alpha(-)CD11c(+) cells ferry Ag in the s.l. mucosa, migrate into the CLN, and share the Ag with resident CD8alpha(+)CD11c(+) cells for the initiation of Ag-specific T and B cell responses following s.l. challenge. We propose that the s.l. mucosa is one of the effective mucosal inductive sites regulated by the CCR7-CCL19/CCL21 pathway.

  4. Post-operative Analgesia in Opioid Dependent Patients: Comparison of Intravenous Morphine and Sublingual Buprenorphine

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, Shaabanali; Mahmoudi, Ghafar Ali; Solhi, Hassan; Sadeghi-Sedeh, Bahman; Behzadi, Reza; Kazemifar, Amir Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute and chronic pain is prevalent in patients with opioid dependence. Lack of knowledge concerning the complex relationship between pain, opioid use, and withdrawal syndrome can account for the barriers encountered for pain management. This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of sublingual (SL) buprenorphine for post-operative analgesia, compared with intravenous (IV) morphine. Methods A total of 68 patients, aged 20-60 years were randomly selected from whom had been underwent laparotomy due to acute abdomen in a University Teaching Hospital in Arak, Iran, and were also opioid (opium or heroin) abuser according to their history. After end of the surgery and patients’ arousal, the patients were evaluated for abdominal pain and withdrawal syndrome by visual analog scale (VAS) and clinical opioid withdrawal score (COWS), respectively 1, 6, and 24 h after the surgery. They received either morphine 5 mg IV or buprenorphine 2 mg SL, 1 h after end of the surgery, and then every 6 h for 24 h. Findings VAS was 4.47 ± 0.73 and 2.67 ± 0.53 at h 6 and 24 in buprenorphine group, respectively. The corresponding score was 5.88 ± 0.69 and 4.59 ± 0.74 in morphine group. At the same time, patients in buprenorphine experienced less severe withdrawal syndrome. Conclusion The present study confirmed the efficacy of SL buprenorphine as a non-invasive, but effective method for management of post-operative pain in opioid dependent patients. Result of this study showed that physicians can rely on SL buprenorphine for post-operative analgesia. PMID:26322212

  5. Influence of food on pharmacokinetics of zolpidem from fast dissolving sublingual zolpidem tartrate tablets.

    PubMed

    Greenblatt, David J; Harmatz, Jerold S; Singh, Nikhilesh N; Roth, Thomas; Harris, Stephen C; Kapil, Ram P

    2013-11-01

    Ingesting food can impact the pharmacokinetics of sedative-hypnotic drugs. A buffered zolpidem sublingual tablet (ZST) recently became available for the treatment of middle-of-the-night awakening. In this randomized, open-label, single-site study, the pharmacokinetic profile of ZST was evaluated when administered while fasting and following a standard high-fat meal (fed state). Healthy adults aged 18-64 years received a single morning dose of 3.5 mg ZST in the fed or fasting state. From 20 min to 3 h post-dose, zolpidem plasma levels were lower in the fed state compared to the fasting state. After 4 h post-dose (corresponding to "morning wake time"), higher zolpidem plasma levels were evident in the fed state. Area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) values for the 0-8 h interval were 160 ng/mL h in the fed state and 203 ng/mL h in the fasting state (P < .001). In the fed versus fasting states, Cmax was 32.0 ng/mL versus 57.3 ng/mL (P < .001), respectively, and Tmax was 3.0 h versus 0.92 h (P < .001), respectively. Together these data suggest that administration of ZST in the fed state is not optimal for maximizing the likelihood of therapeutic benefit and minimizing the probability of residual sedation.

  6. Characterization of the human submandibular/sublingual saliva glycoproteome using lectin affinity chromatography coupled to multidimensional protein identification technology.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Begne, Mireya; Lu, Bingwen; Liao, Lujian; Xu, Tao; Bedi, Gurrinder; Melvin, James E; Yates, John R

    2011-11-04

    In-depth analysis of the salivary proteome is fundamental to understanding the functions of salivary proteins in the oral cavity and to reveal disease biomarkers involved in different pathophysiological conditions, with the ultimate goal of improving patient diagnosis and prognosis. Submandibular and sublingual glands contribute saliva rich in glycoproteins to the total saliva output, making them valuable sources for glycoproteomic analysis. Lectin-affinity chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry-based shotgun proteomics was used to explore the submandibular/sublingual (SM/SL) saliva glycoproteome. A total of 262 N- and O-linked glycoproteins were identified by multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT). Only 38 were previously described in SM and SL salivas from the human salivary N-linked glycoproteome, while 224 were unique. Further comparison analysis with SM/SL saliva of the human saliva proteome, revealed 125 glycoproteins not formerly reported in this secretion. KEGG pathway analyses demonstrated that many of these glycoproteins are involved in processes such as complement and coagulation cascades, cell communication, glycosphingolipid biosynthesis neo-lactoseries, O-glycan biosynthesis, glycan structures-biosynthesis 2, starch and sucrose metabolism, peptidoglycan biosynthesis or others pathways. In summary, lectin-affinity chromatography coupled to MudPIT mass spectrometry identified many novel glycoproteins in SM/SL saliva. These new additions to the salivary proteome may prove to be a critical step for providing reliable biomarkers in the diagnosis of a myriad of oral and systemic diseases.

  7. MOUTH FLOOR ENLARGEMENTS RELATED TO THE SUBLINGUAL GLANDS IN EDENTULOUS OR PARTIALLY EDENTULOUS PATIENTS. A MICROSCOPIC STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Iwaki, Liogi; Damante, José Humberto; Consolaro, Alberto; Bonachela, Wellington Cardoso; Damante, Carla Andreotti

    2006-01-01

    Mouth floor enlargements (MFE) are observed in edentulous and partially edentulous patients, impairing denture fitting, and have recently been described in the literature as hyperplasias of the sublingual glands. Objective: This study aims at describing the microscopic aspects of MFE that contribute to their final diagnosis. Methods: Twenty-four specimens were surgically removed from the enlarged mouth floor of 19 patients (15 females and 4 males). Patient age ranged from 48 to 74 years, with a mean of 57 years. The main surgical indication was to permit or improve the fitting of dentures. Six patients were completely edentulous and 13 were partially edentulous. The material was processed for microscopic examination and stained with hematoxylin-eosin, Mallory's trichrome and periodic-acid Schiff (PAS). Results and Conclusions: The epithelium of the mouth floor was normal in 17 cases, hyperplastic in 4 and atrophic in 3. Six of the 24 sublingual glands removed were microscopically normal, while the other specimens presented acinar atrophy with hyperplasia of duct-like structures. Interstitial fibrosis was observed in 18 cases and was accompanied by adipose tissue infiltration in 15. Decreased lymphoid tissue was observed in 16 samples and oncocytosis was present in 5 cases. We suggest that MFE in edentulous or partially edentulous patients should be considered as an entity for the text books. PMID:19089274

  8. Sublingual delivery of insulin: effects of enhancers on the mucosal lipid fluidity and protein conformation, transport, and in vivo hypoglycemic activity.

    PubMed

    Cui, Chun-Ying; Lu, Wan-Liang; Xiao, Lan; Zhang, Shuang-Qing; Huang, Yan-Bei; Li, Sheng-Lin; Zhang, Rui-Juan; Wang, Gui-Ling; Zhang, Xuan; Zhang, Qiang

    2005-12-01

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate effects of enhancers for sublingual delivering insulin on the mucosal lipid fluidity and protein conformation, transport, and in vivo hypoglycemic activity in normal rats. The effects on sublingual mucosa, and aggregation states of insulin were estimated using fluorescence polarization, and circular dichroism method, respectively. The human immortalized oral epithelial cell monolayer was used for evaluating transport of insulin. Hydroxylpropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HP-beta-CD), chitosan, polyethylene-polypropylene glycol, polyoxyethylene lauryl ether, polysorbate 80, egg lecithin, or oleic acid, was used as a penetration enhancer, respectively. The fluidity of sublingual mucosal lipid was markedly reduced by these enhancers excluding polysorbate 80, and the secondary structure of the mucosal proteins was also influenced by these enhancers. The hexamers of insulin were dissociated to monomers only by chitosan, polyoxyethylene lauryl ether, and egg lecithin. Nonetheless, plasma glucose levels in normal rats were significantly lowered after sublingual administration of insulin with an enhancer compared with those without an enhancer at the same time-point. The enhancing effects may be due to one or multiple factors: increasing the mucosal lipid fluidity, directly loosing the tight junction of epithelia, and dissociating the hexamers of insulin to monomers. Among these, the opened tight junction may correlate most with the enhancing effect in the mucosal permeability. Because the aggregates of insulin exist, the dissociation of the aggregates by an enhancer would benefit the permeability.

  9. Evaluation of the sublingual route for administration of influenza H5N1 virosomes in combination with the bacterial second messenger c-di-GMP.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Gabriel Kristian; Ebensen, Thomas; Gjeraker, Ingrid Hjetland; Svindland, Signe; Bredholt, Geir; Guzmán, Carlos Alberto; Cox, Rebecca Jane

    2011-01-01

    Avian influenza A H5N1 is a virus with pandemic potential. Mucosal vaccines are attractive as they have the potential to block viruses at the site of entry, thereby preventing both disease and further transmission. The intranasal route is safe for the administration of seasonal live-attenuated influenza vaccines, but may be less suitable for administration of pandemic vaccines. Research into novel mucosal routes is therefore needed. In this study, a murine model was used to compare sublingual administration with intranasal and intramuscular administration of influenza H5N1 virosomes (2 µg haemagglutinin; HA) in combination with the mucosal adjuvant (3',5')-cyclic dimeric guanylic acid (c-di-GMP). We found that sublingual immunisation effectively induced local and systemic H5N1-specific humoral and cellular immune responses but that the magnitude of response was lower than after intranasal administration. However, both the mucosal routes were superior to intramuscular immunisation for induction of local humoral and systemic cellular immune responses including high frequencies of splenic H5N1-specific multifunctional (IL-2+TNF-α+) CD4+ T cells. The c-di-GMP adjuvanted vaccine elicited systemic haemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibody responses (geometric mean titres ≥ 40) both when administered sublingually, intranasally and inramuscularly. In addition, salivary HI antibodies were elicited by mucosal, but not intramuscular vaccination. We conclude that the sublingual route is an attractive alternative for administration of pandemic influenza vaccines.

  10. Effects of N-acetylcysteine, oral glutathione (GSH) and a novel sublingual form of GSH on oxidative stress markers: A comparative crossover study.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Bernard; Vicenzi, Morgane; Garrel, Catherine; Denis, Frédéric M

    2015-12-01

    Glutathione (GSH) is critical to fight against oxidative stress. Its very low bioavailability limits the interest of a supplementation. The purpose of this study was to compare the bioavailability, the effect on oxidative stress markers and the safety of a new sublingual form of GSH with two commonly used dietary supplements, N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and oral GSH. The study was a three-week randomized crossover trial. 20 Volunteers with metabolic syndrome were enrolled. GSH levels and several oxidative stress markers were determined at different times during each 21-days period. Compared to oral GSH group, an increase of total and reduced GSH levels in plasma and a higher GSH/GSSG ratio (p=0.003) was observed in sublingual GSH group. After 3 weeks of administration, there was a significant increase of vitamin E level in plasma only in sublingual GSH group (0.83 µmol/g; p=0.04). Our results demonstrate the superiority of a new sublingual form of GSH over the oral GSH form and NAC in terms of GSH supplementation.

  11. Study Design of the Microcirculatory Shock Occurrence in Acutely Ill Patients (microSOAP): an International Multicenter Observational Study of Sublingual Microcirculatory Alterations in Intensive Care Patients

    PubMed Central

    Vellinga, Namkje A. R.; Boerma, E. Christiaan; Koopmans, Matty; Donati, Abele; Dubin, Arnaldo; Shapiro, Nathan I.; Pearse, Rupert M.; Bakker, Jan; Ince, Can

    2012-01-01

    Objective. Sublingual microcirculatory alterations are associated with an adverse prognosis in several critical illness subgroups. Up to now, single-center studies have reported on sublingual microcirculatory alterations in ICU patient subgroups, but an extensive evaluation of the prevalence of these alterations is lacking. We present the study design of an international multicenter observational study to investigate the prevalence of microcirculatory alterations in critically ill: the Microcirculatory Shock Occurrence in Acutely ill Patients (microSOAP). Methods. 36 ICU's worldwide have participated in this study aiming for inclusion of over 500 evaluable patients. To enable communication and data collection, a website, an Open Clinica 3.0 database, and image uploading software have been designed. A one-session assessment of the sublingual microcirculation using Sidestream Dark Field imaging and data collection on patient characteristics has been performed in every ICU patient >18 years, regardless of underlying disease. Statistical analysis will provide insight in the prevalence and severity of sublingual alterations, its relation to systemic hemodynamic variables, disease, therapy, and outcome. Conclusion. This study will be the largest microcirculation study ever performed. It is expected that this study will also establish a basis for future studies related to the microcirculation in critically ill. PMID:22666566

  12. Antigen-bearing dendritic cells from the sublingual mucosa recirculate to distant systemic lymphoid organs to prime mucosal CD8 T cells.

    PubMed

    Hervouet, C; Luci, C; Bekri, S; Juhel, T; Bihl, F; Braud, V M; Czerkinsky, C; Anjuère, F

    2014-03-01

    Effector T cells are described to be primed in the lymph nodes draining the site of immunization and to recirculate to effector sites. Sublingual immunization generates effector T cells able to disseminate to the genital tract. Herein, we report an alternative mechanism that involves the recirculation of antigen-bearing dendritic cells (DCs) in remote lymphoid organs to prime T cells. Sublingual immunization with a muco-adhesive model antigen unable to diffuse through lymphatic or blood vessels induced genital CD8 T cells. The sublingual draining lymph nodes were not mandatory to generate these lymphocytes, and antigen-bearing DCs from distant lymph nodes and spleen were able to prime specific CD8 T cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that antigen-bearing DCs originating from the site of immunization recirculate to distant lymphoid organs and provides insights into the mechanism of distant CD8 T-cell generation by sublingual immunization.

  13. Preparation and In Vitro/In Vivo Characterization of Porous Sublingual Tablets Containing Ternary Kneaded Solid System of Vinpocetine with β-Cyclodextrin and Hydroxy Acid

    PubMed Central

    Aburahma, Mona H.; El-Laithy, Hanan M.; Hamza, Yassin El-Said

    2010-01-01

    The demand for sublingual tablets has been growing during the previous decades especially for drugs with extensive hepatic first-pass metabolism. Vinpocetine, a widely used neurotropic agent, has low oral bioavailability due to its poor aqueous solubility and marked first-pass metabolism. Accordingly, the aim of this work was to develop tablets for the sublingual delivery of vinpocetine. Initially, the feasibility of improving vinpocetine’s poor aqueous solubility by preparing kneaded solid systems of the drug with β-Cyclodextrin and hydroxy acids (citric acid and tartaric acid) was assessed. The solid system with improved solubility and dissolution properties was incorporated into porous tablets that rapidly disintegrate permitting fast release of vinpocetine into the sublingual cavity. The pores were induced into these tablets by directly compressing the tablets’ excipients with a sublimable material, either camphor or menthol, which was eventually sublimated leaving pores. The obtained results demonstrated that the tablets prepared using camphor attained sufficient mechanical strength for practical use together with rapid disintegration and dissolution. In vivo absorption study performed in rabbits indicated that the sublingual administration of the proposed porous tablets containing vinpocetine solid system with β-Cyclodextrin and tartaric acid could be useful for therapeutic application. PMID:21179352

  14. Targeting lentiviral vectors for cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Arce, Frederick; Breckpot, Karine; Collins, Mary; Escors, David

    2012-01-01

    Delivery of tumour-associated antigens (TAA) in a way that induces effective, specific immunity is a challenge in anti-cancer vaccine design. Circumventing tumour-induced tolerogenic mechanisms in vivo is also critical for effective immunotherapy. Effective immune responses are induced by professional antigen presenting cells, in particular dendritic cells (DC). This requires presentation of the antigen to both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in the context of strong co-stimulatory signals. Lentiviral vectors have been tested as vehicles, for both ex vivo and in vivo delivery of TAA and/or activation signals to DC, and have been demonstrated to induce potent T cell mediated immune responses that can control tumour growth. This review will focus on the use of lentiviral vectors for in vivo gene delivery to DC, introducing strategies to target DC, either targeting cell entry or gene expression to improve safety of the lentiviral vaccine or targeting dendritic cell activation pathways to enhance performance of the lentiviral vaccine. In conclusion, this review highlights the potential of lentiviral vectors as a generally applicable ‘off-the-shelf’ anti-cancer immunotherapeutic. PMID:22983382

  15. Temperature control in interstitial laser cancer immunotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Pradip K.; Holmes, Kyland; Burnett, Corinthius; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2003-07-01

    Positive results of Laser-Assisted Cancer Immunotherapy (LACI) have been reported previously in the irradiation of superficial tumors. This paper reports the effect of LACI using laser interstitial therapy approach. We hypothesize that the maximum immuno response depends on laser induced tumor temperature. The measurement of tumor temperature is crucial to ensure necrosis by thermal damage and immuno response. Wister Furth female rats in this study were inoculated with 13762 MAT B III rat mammary adinocarcinoma. LACI started seven to ten days following inoculation. Contrary to surface irradation, we applied laser interstitial irradiation of tumor volume to maximize the energy deposition. A diode laser with a wavelength of 805 nm was used for tumor irradiation. The laser energy was delivered inside the tumor through a quartz fiber. Tumor temperature was measured with a micro thermocouple (interstitial), while the tumor surface temperature was controlled with an IR detector. The temperature feedback demonstrates that it is possible to maintain the average tumor temperature at the same level with reasonable accuracy in the desired range from 65°C-85°C. In some experiments we used microwave thermometry to control average temperature in deep tissue for considerable period of time, to cause maximum thermal damage to the tumor. The experimental set-up and the different temperature measurement techniques are reported in detail, including the advantages and disadvantages for each method.

  16. [Advances in cellular immunotherapy for malignant melanoma].

    PubMed

    López, Mercedes; Escobar, Alejandro; Alfaro, Jorge; Fodor, Miguel; Larrondo, Milton; Ferrada, Carlos; Salazar-Onfray, Flavio

    2004-09-01

    An alternative strategy for cancer treatment is the manipulation of the immune system, denominated cancer immunotherapy. The immunotherapeutical use of cells of the immune system, like dendritic cells (DC), is being explored in different clinical protocols. Recently, we finalized a clinical phase I protocol, for the treatment of malignant melanoma, using DCs loaded with tumor lysates. Our results indicate that the subcutaneous application of DCs do not produce adverse effects. We also observed an increase of tumor specific T lymphocytes precursors in the blood, associated to hypersensitivity reactions (DTH) in 60% of the treated patients. In most cases, an stability in the disease was observed, although without a significant association between vaccination and survival. Additionally, therapies based on Interleukin-2 (IL-2) have been used with relative success in the treatment of some kind of tumors since 1985. However, problems associated to the toxicity of IL-2 still restrict its massive use. Our direct experience with the use of IL-2, indicates that low doses and its subcutaneous application, maintains the beneficial effects for patients, eliminating the adverse effects. Based on the accumulated evidence during last the five years, we decided to implement an optimized clinical protocol, which alternatively combines dendritic cells vaccines with the use of low doses of IL-2 for the reinforcement of the immunological system.

  17. Immunotherapy for cancer: promoting innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Lotfi, Ramin; Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Lotze, Michael Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Development of tumor over many years leads to reciprocal alterations in the host immune response and the tumor, enabling tumor growth seemingly paradoxically in the setting of necrosis and inflammation. Innate immune cells, granulocytes - neutrophils, eosinophils, basophils - and mast cells belong to the first line of defense sensing pathogen and damage associated molecular pattern (PAMPs, DAMPs) signals, initiating and modulating the subsequent inflammatory response. Nontheless, the prevailing contemporary strategies of immunotherapy for cancer have focused on the second line of the immune response, the adaptive immune response. We have determined that most highly evolved tumors in adults undergo necrosis, releasing DAMPs, promoting reactive angiogenesis, stromagenesis and reparative epithelial proliferation of the tumor cell. Means to aerobically eliminate such DAMPs by peroxidases released by innate immune effectors allows us to consider novel strategies for limiting tumor progression. Summarized here is our current understanding of acute and chronic inflammation and its impact on tumor development, the pathophysiology of immunity in cancer, and the influence of granulocytes and mast cells in this setting.

  18. Inhibitory RNA molecules in immunotherapy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Mao, Chih-Ping; Wu, T-C

    2010-01-01

    Over the past few decades, our expanding knowledge of the mammalian immune system - how it is developed, activated, and regulated - has fostered hope that it may be harnessed in the future to successfully treat human cancer. The immune system activated by cancer vaccines may have the unique ability to selectively eradicate tumor cells at multiple sites in the body without inflicting damage on normal tissue. However, progress in the development of cancer vaccines that effectively capitalize on this ability has been limited and slow. The immune system is restrained by complex, negative feedback mechanisms that evolved to protect the host against autoimmunity and may also prevent antitumor immunity. In addition, tumor cells exploit a plethora of strategies to evade detection and elimination by the immune system. For these reasons, the field of cancer immunotherapy has suffered considerable setbacks in the past and faces great challenges at the present time. Some of these challenges may be overcome through the use of RNA interference, a process by which gene expression can be efficiently and specifically "knocked down" in cells. This chapter focuses on the current status and future prospects in the application of small interfering RNA and microRNA, two main forms of RNA interference, to treat cancer by curtailing mechanisms that attenuate the host immune response.

  19. siRNA and cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ghafouri-Fard, Soudeh; Ghafouri-Fard, Somayyeh

    2012-09-01

    Immunotherapeutic approaches have been gaining attention in the field of cancer treatment because of their possible ability to eradicate cancer cells as well as metastases by recruiting the host immune system. On the other hand, RNA-based therapeutics with the ability to silence expression of specific targets are currently under clinical investigation for various disorders including cancer. As the mechanisms of tumor evasion from the host immune system are versatile, different molecules have the capacity to be targeted by RNAi technology in order to enhance the immune response against tumors. This technology has been used to silence specific targets in tumor cells, as well as immune cells in cancer cell lines, animal models and clinical trials. siRNAs can also stimulate innate immune responses through activation of Toll-like receptors. Although currently clinical trials of the application of siRNA in cancer immunotherapy are few, it is predicted that in future this technology will be used broadly in cancer treatment.

  20. Effects of laser immunotherapy on tumor microenvironment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acquaviva, Joseph T.; Wood, Ethan W.; Hasanjee, Aamr; Chen, Wei R.; Vaughan, Melville B.

    2014-02-01

    The microenvironments of tumors are involved in a complex and reciprocal dialog with surrounding cancer cells. Any novel treatment must consider the impact of the therapy on the microenvironment. Recently, clinical trials with laser immunotherapy (LIT) have proven to effectively treat patients with late-stage, metastatic breast cancer and melanoma. LIT is the synergistic combination of phototherapy (laser irradiation) and immunological stimulation. One prominent cell type found in the tumor stroma is the fibroblast. Fibroblast cells can secrete different growth factors and extracellular matrix modifying molecules. Furthermore, fibroblast cells found in the tumor stroma often express alpha smooth muscle actin. These particular fibroblasts are coined cancer-associated fibroblast cells (CAFs). CAFs are known to facilitate the malignant progression of tumors. A collagen lattice assay with human fibroblast cells is used to elucidate the effects LIT has on the microenvironment of tumors. Changes in the contraction of the lattice, the differentiation of the fibroblast cells, as well as the proliferation of the fibroblast cells will be determined.

  1. Mechanisms of allergen-specific immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (allergen-SIT) is a potentially curative treatment approach in allergic diseases. It has been used for almost 100 years as a desensitizing therapy. The induction of peripheral T cell tolerance and promotion of the formation of regulatory T-cells are key mechanisms in allergen-SIT. Both FOXP3+CD4+CD25+ regulatory T (Treg) cells and inducible IL-10- and TGF-β-producing type 1 Treg (Tr1) cells may prevent the development of allergic diseases and play a role in successful allergen-SIT and healthy immune response via several mechanisms. The mechanisms of suppression of different pro-inflammatory cells, such as eosinophils, mast cells and basophils and the development of allergen tolerance also directly or indirectly involves Treg cells. Furthermore, the formation of non-inflammatory antibodies particularly IgG4 is induced by IL-10. Knowledge of these molecular basis is crucial in the understanding the regulation of immune responses and their possible therapeutic targets in allergic diseases. PMID:22409879

  2. Optimal vaccine scheduling in cancer immunotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccoli, B.; Castiglione, F.

    2006-10-01

    Cancer immunotherapy aims at stimulating the immune system to react against cancer stealth capabilities. It consists of repeatedly injecting small doses of a tumor-associated molecule one wants the immune system to recognize, until a consistent immune response directed against the tumor cells is observed. We have applied the theory of optimal control to the problem of finding the optimal schedule of injections of an immunotherapeutic agent against cancer. The method employed works for a general ODE system and can be applied to find the optimal protocol in a variety of clinical problems where the kinetics of the drug or treatment and its influence on the normal physiologic functions have been described by a mathematical model. We show that the choice of the cost function has dramatic effects on the kind of solution the optimization algorithm is able to find. This provides evidence that a careful ODE model and optimization schema must be designed by mathematicians and clinicians using their proper different perspectives.

  3. [The immunodiagnosis and immunotherapy of tumors].

    PubMed

    Kadagidze, Z G

    1999-01-01

    Recent studies into the immunology of tumors have allowed the oncological use of immunological methods to be substantially extended. This increases the potentialities of immunodiagnosis, primarily to identify a number of tumor-associated antigens, which has promoted early differential diagnosis and monitoring of the course of disease. On the other hand, diagnosis of immunodeficiencies in cancer patients has become better: a panel of monoclonal antibodies to differentiated immunocompetent cell antigens has been developed, their subpopulations revealed, the time course of whose quantitative composition correlates with the clinical course and prognosis of disease. Evidence for immunological disorders serves as a basis for using different immunotherapies in the complex treatment of cancer patients. Present-day oncological care uses a great variety of immunomodulators; however, preferable treatment includes cytokines (interferons, interleukins) whose application substantially enhances the efficiency of treatment in patients having certain tumors. Progress in biotechnology and gene engineering has contributed to the development of new trends in the therapy of tumors, namely the design of anticancer vaccines obtained by inserting the genes of cytokines and their receptors, tumor-associated antigens and other agents into the genome of a tumor cell. So far single clinical observations are yielding promising results.

  4. Multiple myeloma, immunotherapy and minimal residual disease.

    PubMed

    Kusenda, J; Kovarikova, A

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is an incurable heterogeneous hematological malignancy in which relapse is characterized by re-growth of residual tumor and immune suppression with a complex biology that affects many aspects of the disease and its response to treatment. The bone marrow microenvironment, including immune cells, plays a central role in MM pathogenesis, survival, and drug resistance. The advances in basic and translational research, introduction of novel agents, particularly combination therapies, improved indicators of quality of life and survival. Minimal residual disease (MRD) detection by multiparameter flow cytometry (MFC) has revolutionized monitoring of treatment response in MM. The importance of MFC methodology will be further strengthened by the ongoing international standardization efforts. Results of MRD testing provide unique and clinically important information and demonstrated the prognostic significance of MRD in patients, leading to regulate treatment intensity in many contemporary protocols. In this review, we will summarize the principal approaches in MM immunotherapy, focusing how new agents have potential in the treatment of MM and application of MRD detection by MFC as a surrogate endpoint would allow quicker evaluation of treatment outcomes and rapid identification of effective new therapies.

  5. Advances in cancer immunology and cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Voena, Claudia; Chiarle, Roberto

    2016-02-01

    After decades of setbacks, cancer immunology is living its Golden Age. Recent advances in cancer immunology have provided new therapeutic approaches to treat cancer. The objective clinical response observed in patients treated with antibodies that block the immune checkpoints, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed cell-death protein 1 (PD-1)/programmed cell-death 1 ligand 1 (PD-L1) pathways, has led to their FDA approval for the treatment of melanoma in 2011 and in 2014, respectively. The anti-PD-1 antibody nivolumab has received the FDA-approval in March 2015 for squamous lung cancer treatment. In addition, antibodies targeting PD-1 or PD-L1 have demonstrated their efficacy and safety in additional tumors, including non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), renal cell carcinoma (RCC), bladder cancer, and Hodgkin's lymphoma. Almost at the same time, the field of adoptive cell transfer has exploded. The chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T technology has provided strong evidence of efficacy in the treatment of B cell malignancies, and different T cell based treatments are currently under investigation for different types of tumors. In this review we will discuss the latest advances in cancer immunology and immunotherapy as well as new treatments now under development in the clinic and potential strategies that have shown promising results in preclinical models.

  6. Characteristics of candidates for allergen immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Incorvaia, Cristoforo; dell'Albani, Ilaria; Masieri, Simonetta; Cavaliere, Carmine; Puccinelli, Paola; Frati, Franco

    2013-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) may be cured by allergen immunotherapy (AIT). However, patient characteristics for prescribing AIT are not well defined. This study aimed at evaluating the patient's profile to be a candidate for AIT in a cohort of patients suffering from AR, evaluated in 20 Italian Allergy or Ear, Nose, and Throat Centers. The study has been performed on 198 patients (98 men; mean age, 26.8 years) with AR (assessed by Allergic Rhinitis and Its Impact on Asthma [ARIA] criteria). The kind and the number of prescribed allergen extracts, type of diagnosis, severity of symptoms, and patient's perception of symptoms and drug use were evaluated. Patients were subdivided in AIT-treated and without AIT (as controls) subgroups. Most of the patients (69.7%) had persistent AR with moderate–severe symptoms. The mean number of sensitization was 3.4. ARIA classification and sensitization number did not affect AIT choice, but the type of allergen was relevant. AIT-treated patients had milder symptoms than controls if assessed by doctors, but AIT patients perceived more severe symptoms and larger drug use than controls. This study shows that the choice of AIT is based on patient's perception and type of allergen, but number of sensitizations, symptom severity assessed by doctors, and ARIA classification are not relevant factors. The key message might be that it is always relevant to pay attention to the complaints referred by the patient. PMID:24124641

  7. Combining radiotherapy and immunotherapy: A revived partnership

    SciTech Connect

    Demaria, Sandra; Bhardwaj, Nina; McBride, William H.; Formenti, Silvia C. . E-mail: silvia.formenti@med.nyu.edu

    2005-11-01

    Ionizing radiation therapy (RT) is an important local modality for the treatment of cancer. The current rationale for its use is based largely on the ability of RT to kill the cancer cells by a direct cytotoxic effect. Nevertheless, considerable evidence indicates that RT effects extend beyond the mere elimination of the more radiosensitive fraction of cancer cells present within a tumor at the time of radiation exposure. For instance, a large body of evidence is accumulating on the ability of RT to modify the tumor microenvironment and generate inflammation. This might have far-reaching consequences regarding the response of a patient to treatment, especially if radiation-induced tumor cell kill were to translate into the generation of effective antitumor immunity. Although much remains to be learned about how radiation can impact tumor immunogenicity, data from preclinical studies provide the proof of principle that different immunotherapeutic strategies can be combined with RT to enhance antitumor effects. Conversely, RT could be a useful tool to combine with immunotherapy. This article will briefly summarize what is known about the impact of RT on tumor immunity, including tumor-associated antigens, antigen-presenting cells, and effector mechanisms. In addition, the experimental evidence supporting the contention that RT can be used as a tool to induce antitumor immunity is discussed, and a new approach to radioimmunotherapy of cancer is proposed.

  8. Hematopoietic stem cells for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gschweng, Eric; De Oliveira, Satiro; Kohn, Donald B

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) provide an attractive target for immunotherapy of cancer and leukemia by the introduction of genes encoding T-cell receptors (TCRs) or chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) directed against tumor-associated antigens. HSCs engraft for long-term blood cell production and could provide a continuous source of targeted anti-cancer effector cells to sustain remissions. T cells produced de novo from HSCs may continuously replenish anti-tumor T cells that have become anergic or exhausted from ex vivo expansion or exposure to the intratumoral microenvironment. In addition, transgenic T cells produced in vivo undergo allelic exclusion, preventing co-expression of an endogenous TCR that could mis-pair with the introduced TCR chains and blunt activity or even cause off-target reactivity. CAR-engineered HSCs may produce myeloid and natural killer cells in addition to T cells expressing the CAR, providing broader anti-tumor activity that arises quickly after transplant and does not solely require de novo thymopoiesis. Use of TCR- or CAR-engineered HSCs would likely require cytoreductive conditioning to achieve long-term engraftment, and this approach may be used in clinical settings where autologous HSC transplant is being performed to add a graft-versus-tumor effect. Results of experimental and preclinical studies performed to date are reviewed.

  9. Recent advances in immunotherapy for hepatocellular cancer.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Lisa H

    2007-02-10

    There is a continuing need for innovative, alternative therapies for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Immunotherapy of cancer is attractive because of the exquisite specificity of the immune response. Activation of an HCC-specific response can be accomplished by strategies targeting tumour-associated antigens (for example: alpha fetoprotein (AFP)) or viral antigens in those patients infected with hepatitis B or C. Uncharacterised and mutated antigens can also be targeted with whole tumour cell or tumour lysate-based immunisation strategies. Viral vectors coding for genes which make the patient's tumour immunogenic can allow the immune system to naturally evolve specificity against immunogenic target antigens. Strategies which have been tested in human clinical trials include adoptive transfer of lymphocytes, cytokine injections, autologous tumour-pulsed dendritic cells (DC) as well as AFP-derived peptides in adjuvant and pulsed onto autologous DC. These trials, testing novel immune-based interventions in HCC subjects, have resulted in immunological responses and some have impacted recurrence and survival of HCC subjects.

  10. Aptamers: A Feasible Technology in Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, H.; Pastor, F.

    2016-01-01

    Aptamers are single-chained RNA or DNA oligonucleotides (ODNs) with three-dimensional folding structures which allow them to bind to their targets with high specificity. Aptamers normally show affinities comparable to or higher than that of antibodies. They are chemically synthesized and therefore less expensive to manufacture and produce. A variety of aptamers described to date have been shown to be reliable in modulating immune responses against cancer by either blocking or activating immune receptors. Some of them have been conjugated to other molecules to target the immune system and reduce off-target side effects. Despite the success of first-line treatments against cancer, the elevated number of relapsing cases and the tremendous side effects shown by the commonly used agents hinder conventional treatments against cancer. The advantages provided by aptamers could enhance the therapeutic index of a given strategy and therefore enhance the antitumor effect. Here we recapitulate the provided benefits of aptamers with immunomodulatory activity described to date in cancer therapy and the benefits that aptamer-based immunotherapy could provide either alone or combined with first-line treatments in cancer therapy. PMID:27413756

  11. Immunotherapy for patients with advanced pancreatic carcinoma: a promising treatment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Lian, Zhouyang; Liang, Long; Chen, Wenbo; Luo, Xiaoning; Pei, Shufang; Mo, Xiaokai; Zhang, Lu; Huang, Wenhui; Ouyang, Fusheng; Guo, Baoliang; Liang, Changhong; Zhang, Shuixing

    2017-01-01

    There are limited data on the safety and efficacy of immunotherapy for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer (APC). A meta-analysis of single-arm trials is proposed to assess the efficacy and safety of immunotherapy for APC. Eighteen relevant studies involving 527 patients were identified. The pooled disease control rate (DCR), overall survival (OS), progression free survival (PFS), and 1-year survival rate were estimated as 59.32%, 7.90 months, 4.25 months, and 30.12%, respectively. Subgroup analysis showed that the pooled OS, PFS, and 1-year survival rate were significantly higher for autologous activated lymphocyte therapy compared with peptide-based vaccine therapy (OS: 8.28 months vs. 7.40 months; PFS: 6.04 months vs. 3.86 months; 1-year survival rate: 37.17% vs. 19.74%). Another subgroup analysis demonstrated that the pooled endpoints were estimated as obviously higher for immunotherapy plus chemotherapy compared with immunotherapy alone (DCR: 62.51% vs. 47.63%; OS: 8.67 months vs. 4.91 months; PFS: 4.91 months vs. 3.34 months; 1-year survival rate: 32.32% vs. 21.43%). Of the included trials, seven trials reported no treatment related adverse events , five trials reported (16.6 3.9) % grade 3 adverse events and no grade 4 adverse events. In conclusion, immunotherapy is safe and effective in the treatment of APC. PMID:27992378

  12. Changes in Peak Flow value during immunotherapy administration.

    PubMed

    Saporta, Diego

    2012-01-01

    Nasal allergies are prevalent affecting a large percentage of the population. Not only the upper respiratory tract but the whole body is involved. Allergies produce morbidity (and even occasional mortality) as they can lead to asthma development, and increased number of accidents. Immunotherapy results can be evaluated by following symptom scores, medication use, and objective measurements. Using a Peak Flow Meter (PFM) to evaluate immunotherapy results, it became evident that patients with and without asthma exhibited an improvement in the Peak Flow (PF) value, suggesting that lower airway involvement in allergic patients could be more prevalent than assumed. A consecutive chart review was performed including patients of any age with nasal allergies (with or without asthma) treated with immunotherapy for at least 6 months that had at least 2 complete evaluations. When immunotherapy was successful, most patients exhibited an increase in the PF value regardless of asthma status. A very significant finding was that most allergy sufferers may have lower airway inflammation. The use of the PF value to assess immunotherapy results and the potential failure to diagnose asthma in allergy sufferers are discussed. A better diagnosis of lower airway inflammation could be substantial in the management of these patients.

  13. Allergen Immunotherapy (AIT): a prototype of Precision Medicine.

    PubMed

    Canonica, G W; Bachert, C; Hellings, P; Ryan, D; Valovirta, E; Wickman, M; De Beaumont, O; Bousquet, J

    2015-01-01

    Precision medicine is a medical model aiming to deliver customised healthcare - with medical decisions, practices, and/or products tailored to the individual patient informed but not directed by guidelines. Allergen immunotherapy has unique immunological rationale, since the approach is tailored to the specific IgE spectrum of an individual and modifies the natural course of the disease as it has a persistent efficacy after completion of treatment. In this perspective Allergen Immunotherapy - AIT has to be presently considered a prototype of Precision Medicine. Precise information and biomarkers provided by systems medicine and network medicine will address the discovery of Allergen immunotherapy biomarkers for (i) identification of the causes, (ii) stratification of eligible patients for AIT and (iii) the assessment of AIT efficacy. This area of medical technology is evolving rapidly and, compelemented by e-health, will change the way we practice medicine. It will help to monitor patients' disease control and data for (i) patient stratification, (ii) clinical trials, (iii) monitoring the efficacy and safety of targeted therapies which are critical for reaching an appropriate reimbursement. Biomarkers associated with e-health combined with a clinical decision support system (CDSS) will change the scope of Allergen immunotherapy. The cost/effectiveness of Allergen immunotherapy is a key issue for successful implementation. It should include the long-term benefits in the pharmaco-economic evaluation, since no other allergy treatment has this specific characteristic. AIT is the prototype of current and future precision medicine.

  14. [Satisfaction with immunotherapy in patients with advanced cancer].

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Yoshiaki; Fujisawa, Fumika; Kotani, Junko; Ohnishi, Masayuki; Watanabe, Toru

    2015-04-01

    Patient satisfaction with cancer immunotherapy, which is not covered by health insurance in Japan, was evaluated among 65 patients with advanced cancer who had received immunotherapy in our hospital for 2 years. Satisfaction measures were based on patients' expectations for medical care, cost, and staff services, and involved a questionnaire consisting of 25 items. Results of the questionnaire analysis showed that most patients, who expected much of antigen-specific vaccination such as dendritic cells (DC) pulsed tumor-associated antigens, were dissatisfied with the high cost of private immunotherapy(i. e., not covered by medical insurance), and were unable to perceive the effectiveness of the treatment because there was no quantitative analysis of killer T cells induced by immunotherapy. Therefore, it is critically important for us to confirm the safety and efficiency of cancer immunotherapy, before introducing medical insurance for cancer patients in Japan. In addition, the quantitative measurement of killer T cells induced by DC peptide vaccines should be considered, to meet patients' expectations.

  15. Immunotherapy in colorectal cancer: What have we learned so far?

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Castañón, María; Er, Tze-Kiong; Bujanda, Luis; Herreros-Villanueva, Marta

    2016-09-01

    After decades of progress based on chemotherapy and targeted agents, patients with metastatic colorectal cancer still have low long-term survival, with more than 500,000 deaths occurring worldwide every year. Recent results showing clinical evidence of efficacy using immunotherapy in other types of tumors, such as melanoma and lung cancer, have also made this a viable therapy for evaluation in colorectal cancer in clinical trials. The development of cancer immunotherapies is progressing quickly, with a variety of technological approaches. This review summarizes the current status of clinical trials testing immunotherapy in colorectal cancer and discusses what has been learned based on previous results. Immunotherapy strategies, such as various models of vaccines, effector-cell therapy and checkpoint inhibitor antibodies, provide protection against progression for a limited subset of patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer. A better understanding of particular immune cell types and pathways in each patient is still needed. These findings will enable the development of novel biomarkers to select the appropriate subset of patients to be treated with a particular immunotherapy, and the tendencies determined from recent results can guide clinical practice for oncologists in this new therapeutic area and in the design of the next round of clinical trials.

  16. Amyloid-ß-directed immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Lannfelt, L; Relkin, N R; Siemers, E R

    2014-03-01

    Current treatment options for Alzheimer's disease (AD) are limited to medications that reduce dementia symptoms. Given the rapidly ageing populations in most areas of the world, new therapeutic interventions for AD are urgently needed. In recent years, a number of drug candidates targeting the amyloid-ß (Aß) peptide have advanced into clinical trials; however, most have failed because of safety issues or lack of efficacy. The Aß peptide is central to the pathogenesis, and immunotherapy against Aß has attracted considerable interest. It offers the possibility to reach the target with highly specific drugs. Active immunization and passive immunization have been the most widely studied approaches to immunotherapy of AD. A favourable aspect of active immunization is the capacity for a small number of vaccinations to generate a prolonged antibody response. A potential disadvantage is the variability in the antibody response across patients. The potential advantages of passive immunotherapy include the reproducible delivery of a known amount of therapeutic antibodies to the patient and rapid clearance of those antibodies if side effects develop. A disadvantage is the requirement for repeated infusions of antibodies over time. After more than a decade of research, anti-amyloid immunotherapy remains one of the most promising emerging strategies for developing disease-modifying treatments for AD. In this review, we examine the presently ongoing Aß-directed immunotherapies that have passed clinical development Phase IIa.

  17. Does allergen-specific immunotherapy induce contact allergy to aluminium?

    PubMed

    Netterlid, Eva; Hindsén, Monica; Siemund, Ingrid; Björk, Jonas; Werner, Sonja; Jacobsson, Helene; Güner, Nuray; Bruze, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    Persistent, itching nodules have been reported to appear at the injection site after allergen-specific immuno-therapy with aluminium-precipitated antigen extract, occasionally in conjunction with contact allergy to aluminium. This study aimed to quantify the development of contact allergy to aluminium during allergen-specific immunotherapy. A randomized, controlled, single-blind multicentre study of children and adults entering allergen-specific immunotherapy was performed using questionnaires and patch-testing. A total of 205 individuals completed the study. In the 3 study groups all subjects tested negative to aluminium before allergen-specific immunotherapy and 4 tested positive after therapy. In the control group 4 participants tested positive to aluminium. Six out of 8 who tested positive also had atopic dermatitis. Positive test results were found in 5/78 children and 3/127 adults. Allergen-specific immunotherapy was not shown to be a risk factor for contact allergy to aluminium. Among those who did develop aluminium allergy, children and those with atopic dermatitis were more highly represented.

  18. Recent advances and future of immunotherapy for glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Kamran, Neha; Calinescu, Alexandra; Candolfi, Marianela; Chandran, Mayuri; Mineharu, Yohei; Assad, Antonela S; Koschmann, Carl; Nunez, Felipe; Lowenstein, Pedro; Castro, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Outcome for glioma (GBM) remains dismal despite advances in therapeutic interventions including chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgical resection. The overall survival benefit observed with immunotherapies in cancers such as melanoma and prostate cancer has fuelled research into evaluating immunotherapies for GBM. Areas covered Preclinical studies have brought a wealth of information for improving the prognosis of GBM and multiple clinical studies are evaluating a wide array of immunotherapies for GBM patients. This review highlights advances in the development of immunotherapeutic approaches. We discuss the strategies and outcomes of active and passive immunotherapies for GBM including vaccination strategies, gene therapy, check point blockade and adoptive T cell therapies. We also focus on immunoediting and tumor neoantigens that can impact the efficacy of immunotherapies. Expert opinion Encouraging results have been observed with immunotherapeutic strategies; some clinical trials are reaching phase III. Significant progress has been made in unraveling the molecular and genetic heterogeneity of GBM and its implications to disease prognosis. There is now consensus related to the critical need to incorporate tumor heterogeneity into the design of therapeutic approaches. Recent data also indicates that an efficacious treatment strategy will need to be combinatorial and personalized to the tumor genetic signature. PMID:27411023

  19. Immunotherapy in human colorectal cancer: Challenges and prospective

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xuan; Suo, Jian; Yan, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Human colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most commonly diagnosed malignancies and the prognosis for patients with recurrent or metastatic disease is extremely poor. Although new chemotherapeutic regimen improves survival rates, therapy with better efficacy and less adverse effects is drastically needed. Immunotherapy has been investigated in human CRC for decades with limited success. However, recent developments of immunotherapy, particularly immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy, have achieved promising clinical benefits in many types of cancer and revived the hope for utilizing such therapy in human CRC. In this review, we will discuss important immunological landscape within the CRC microenvironment and introduce immunoscore system to better describe immunophenotyping in CRC. We will also discuss different immunotherapeutic approaches currently utilized in different phases of clinical trials. Some of those completed or ongoing trials are summarized. Finally, we provide a brief prospective on the future human CRC immunotherapy. PMID:27605872

  20. T-Cell-Based Immunotherapy for Osteosarcoma: Challenges and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhan; Li, Binghao; Ren, Yingqing; Ye, Zhaoming

    2016-01-01

    Even though combining surgery with chemotherapy has significantly improved the prognosis of osteosarcoma patients, advanced, metastatic, or recurrent osteosarcomas are often non-responsive to chemotherapy, making development of novel efficient therapeutic methods an urgent need. Adoptive immunotherapy has the potential to be a useful non-surgical modality for treatment of osteosarcoma. Recently, alternative strategies, including immunotherapies using naturally occurring or genetically modified T cells, have been found to hold promise in the treatment of hematologic malignancies and solid tumors. In this review, we will discuss possible T-cell-based therapies against osteosarcoma with a special emphasis on combination strategies to improve the effectiveness of adoptive T cell transfer and, thus, to provide a rationale for the clinical development of immunotherapies. PMID:27683579

  1. Strategies to genetically engineer T cells for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Spear, Timothy T; Nagato, Kaoru; Nishimura, Michael I

    2016-06-01

    Immunotherapy is one of the most promising and innovative approaches to treat cancer, viral infections, and other immune-modulated diseases. Adoptive immunotherapy using gene-modified T cells is an exciting and rapidly evolving field. Exploiting knowledge of basic T cell biology and immune cell receptor function has fostered innovative approaches to modify immune cell function. Highly translatable clinical technologies have been developed to redirect T cell specificity by introducing designed receptors. The ability to engineer T cells to manifest desired phenotypes and functions is now a thrilling reality. In this review, we focus on outlining different varieties of genetically engineered T cells, their respective advantages and disadvantages as tools for immunotherapy, and their promise and drawbacks in the clinic.

  2. Immunotherapy and lung cancer: current developments and novel targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Duarte; Turner, Alice; Silva, Maria Dília; Marques, Dânia Sofia; Mellidez, Juan Carlos; Wannesson, Luciano; Mountzios, Giannis; de Mello, Ramon Andrade

    2014-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a highly prevalent and aggressive disease. In the metastatic setting, major advances include the incorporation of immunotherapy and targeted therapies into the clinician's therapeutic armamentarium. Standard chemotherapeutic regimens have long been reported to interfere with the immune response to the tumor; conversely, antitumor immunity may add to the effects of those therapies. The aim of immunotherapy is to specifically enhance the immune response directed to the tumor. Recently, many trials addressed the role of such therapies for metastatic NSCLC treatment: ipilimumab, tremelimumab, nivolumab and lambrolizumab are immunotherapeutic agents of main interest in this field. In addition, anti-tumor vaccines, such as MAGE-A3, Tecetomide, TG4010, CIMAvax, ganglioside vaccines, tumor cell vaccines and dendritic cell vaccines, emerged as potent inducers of immune response against the tumor. The current work aims to address the most recent developments regarding these innovative immunotherapies and their implementation in the treatment of metastatic NSCLC.

  3. Past, present and future targets for immunotherapy in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Carlton L; English, Diana P; Roque, Dana M; Pasternak, Monica; Santin, Alessandro D

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from gynecologic malignancy in the US. Treatments have improved with conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy and advanced surgical techniques but disease recurrence is common and fatal in nearly all cases. Current evidence suggests that the immune system and its ability to recognize and eliminate microscopic disease is paramount in preventing recurrence. Ovarian cancer immunotherapy is targeting tumors through active, passive and adoptive approaches. The goal of immunotherapy is to balance the activation of the immune system against cancer while preventing the potential for tremendous toxicity elicited by immune modulation. In this paper we will review the different immunotherapies available for ovarian cancer as well as current ongoing studies and potential future directions.

  4. Cancer Immunotherapy: Selected Targets and Small-Molecule Modulators.

    PubMed

    Weinmann, Hilmar

    2016-03-04

    There is a significant amount of excitement in the scientific community around cancer immunotherapy, as this approach has renewed hope for many cancer patients owing to some recent successes in the clinic. Currently available immuno-oncology therapeutics under clinical development and on the market are mostly biologics (antibodies, proteins, engineered cells, and oncolytic viruses). However, modulation of the immune system with small molecules offers several advantages that may be complementary and potentially synergistic to the use of large biologicals. Therefore, the discovery and development of novel small-molecule modulators is a rapidly growing research area for medicinal chemists working in cancer immunotherapy. This review provides a brief introduction into recent trends related to selected targets and pathways for cancer immunotherapy and their small-molecule pharmacological modulators.

  5. Melanoma immunotherapy: historical precedents, recent successes and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Raaijmakers, Marieke I G; Rozati, Sima; Goldinger, Simone M; Widmer, Daniel S; Dummer, Reinhard; Levesque, Mitchell P

    2013-02-01

    The idea of cancer immunotherapy has been around for more than a century; however, the first immunotherapeutic ipilimumab, an anti-CTLA-4 antibody, has only recently been approved by the US FDA for melanoma. With an increasing understanding of the immune response, it is expected that more therapies will follow. This review aims to provide a general overview of immunotherapy in melanoma. We first explain the development of cancer immunotherapy more than a century ago and the general opinions about it over time. This is followed by a general overview of the immune reaction in order to give insight into the possible targets for therapy. Finally, we will discuss the current therapies for melanoma, their shortcomings and why it is important to develop patient stratification criteria. We conclude with an overview of recent discoveries and possible future therapies.

  6. Th1 cytokine-based immunotherapy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong-Mei

    2014-10-01

    Cytokine-based immunotherapy is executed by harnessing cytokines to activate the immune system to suppress tumors. Th1-type cytokines including IL-1, IL-2, IL-12 and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor are potent stimulators of Th1 differentiation and Th1-based antitumor response. Many preclinical studies demonstrated the antitumor effects of Th1 cytokines but their clinical efficacy is limited. Multiple factors influence the efficacy of immunotherapy for tumors. For instance immunosuppressive cells in the tumor microenvironment can produce inhibitory cytokines which suppress antitumor immune response. Most studies on cytokine immunotherapy focused on how to boost Th1 response; many studies combined cytokine-based therapy with other treatments to reverse immunosuppression in tumor microenvironment. In addition, cytokines have pleiotropic functions and some cytokines show paradoxical activities under different settings. Better understanding the physiological and pathological functions of cytokines helps clinicians to design Th1-based cancer therapy in clinical practice.

  7. Prostate cancer as a model for tumour immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Charles G.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in basic immunology have led to an improved understanding of the interactions between the immune system and tumours, generating renewed interest in approaches that aim to treat cancer immunologically. As clinical and preclinical studies of tumour immunotherapy illustrate several immunological principles, a review of these data is broadly instructive and is particularly timely now that several agents are beginning to show evidence of efficacy. This is especially relevant in the case of prostate cancer, as recent approval of sipuleucel-T by the US Food and Drug Administration marks the first antigen-specific immunotherapy approved for cancer treatment. Although this Review focuses on immunotherapy for prostate cancer, the principles discussed are applicable to many tumour types, and the approaches discussed are highlighted in that context. PMID:20651745

  8. Propionibacterium acnes in the pathogenesis and immunotherapy of acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pei-Feng; Hsieh, Yao-Dung; Lin, Ya-Ching; Two, Aimee; Shu, Chih-Wen; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Acne vulgaris, a multi-factorial disease, is one of the most common skin diseases, affecting an estimated 80% of Americans at some point during their lives. The gram-positive and anaerobic Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) bacterium has been implicated in acne inflammation and pathogenesis. Therapies for acne vulgaris using antibiotics generally lack bacterial specificity, promote the generation of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains, and cause adverse effects. Immunotherapy against P. acnes or its antigens (sialidase and CAMP factor) has been demonstrated to be effective in mice, attenuating P. acnes-induced inflammation; thus, this method may be applied to develop a potential vaccine targeting P. acnes for acne vulgaris treatment. This review summarizes reports describing the role of P. acnes in the pathogenesis of acne and various immunotherapy-based approaches targeting P. acnes, suggesting the potential effectiveness of immunotherapy for acne vulgaris as well as P. acnes-associated diseases.

  9. Combining Immunotherapy and Targeted Therapies in Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Vanneman, Matthew; Dranoff, Glenn

    2014-01-01

    Preface During the past two decades, the paradigm for cancer treatment has evolved from relatively non-specific cytotoxic agents to selective, mechanism-based therapeutics. Cancer chemotherapies were initially identified through screens for compounds that killed rapidly dividing cells. These drugs remain a backbone of current treatment, but are limited by a narrow therapeutic index, significant toxicities, and frequently acquired resistance. More recently, an improved understanding of cancer pathogenesis has given rise to new treatment options, including targeted agents and cancer immunotherapy. Targeted approaches aim to inhibit molecular pathways that are critical to tumor growth and maintenance, whereas immunotherapy endeavors to stimulate a host response that effectuates long-lived tumor destruction. Targeted therapies and cytotoxic agents also modulate immune responses, which raises the possibility that these treatment strategies might be effectively combined with immunotherapy to improve clinical outcomes. PMID:22437869

  10. Interleukin-13 Receptor Alpha 2-Targeted Glioblastoma Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Andrew C.

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most lethal primary brain tumor, and despite several refinements in its multimodal management, generally has very poor prognosis. Targeted immunotherapy is an emerging field of research that shows great promise in the treatment of GBM. One of the most extensively studied targets is the interleukin-13 receptor alpha chain variant 2 (IL13Rα2). Its selective expression on GBM, discovered almost two decades ago, has been a target for therapy ever since. Immunotherapeutic strategies have been developed targeting IL13Rα2, including monoclonal antibodies as well as cell-based strategies such as IL13Rα2-pulsed dendritic cells and IL13Rα2-targeted chimeric antigen receptor-expressing T cells. Advanced therapeutic development has led to the completion of several clinical trials with promising outcomes. In this review, we will discuss the recent advances in the IL13Rα2-targeted immunotherapy and evaluate the most promising strategy for targeted GBM immunotherapy. PMID:25247196

  11. Combined Cancer Immunotherapy Against Aurora Kinase A.

    PubMed

    Kaštánková, Iva; Poláková, Ingrid; Dušková, Martina; Šmahel, Michal

    2016-05-01

    Aurora kinase A (AURKA) is a centrosomal protein that is overexpressed in a number of human malignancies and can contribute to tumor progression. As we used this protein as a target of DNA immunization, we increased its immunogenicity by the addition of the PADRE helper epitope and decreased its potential oncogenicity by mutagenesis of the kinase domain. For in vitro analysis of induced immune responses in mice, we identified the Aurka(220-228) nonapeptide representing an H-2Kb epitope. As DNA vaccination against the Aurka self-antigen by a gene gun did not show any antitumor effect, we combined DNA immunization with anti-CD25 treatment that depletes mainly regulatory T cells. Whereas 1 anti-CD25 dose injected before DNA vaccination did not enhance the activation of Aurka-specific splenocytes, 3 doses administered on days of immunizations augmented about 10-fold immunity against Aurka. However, an opposite effect was found for antitumor immunity-only 1 anti-CD25 dose combined with DNA vaccination reduced tumor growth. Moreover, the administration of 3 doses of anti-CD25 antibody alone accelerated tumor growth. Analysis of tumor-infiltrating cells showed that 3 anti-CD25 doses not only efficiently depleted regulatory T cells but also activated helper T cells and CD3(-)CD25(+) cells. Next, we found that blockade of the PD-1 receptor initiated 1 week after the first immunization was necessary for significant inhibition of tumor growth with therapeutic DNA vaccination against Aurka combined with depletion of CD25 cells. Our results suggest that combined cancer immunotherapy should be carefully evaluated to achieve the optimal antitumor effect.

  12. Immunotherapy with Rituximab in Follicular Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    SAGUNA, Carmen; MUT, Ileana Delia; LUPU, Anca Roxana; TEVET, Mihaela; BUMBEA, Horia; DRAGAN, Cornel

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas (NHL) represent a recent and fascinating domain of hemato-oncology, in which remarkable progress has been made. The conventional treatments of indolent lymphomas do not extend the survival rate, nor do they cure. Recent directions are centered on using several new drugs that are capable of overcoming the mechanisms that are resistant to recovery. The initiation of immunotherapy (Rituximab in 1997) seems to have changed the natural evolution of follicular lymphomas (FL). It is possible that resistance to healing in follicular lymphomas may be neutralized with Rituximab by suppressing STAT-1 positive macrophages that are present in the cellular microenvironment.Thereinafter, the re-evaluation of recent models of prognostic and therapeutic paradigmas that were used in FL became compulsory. The purpose of the paper is to compare the evolution of patients with follicular lymphoma and the period of response, according to the treatments. Material and method: The study group consisted of the 71 patients diagnosed with follicular lymphoma, out of a total of 767 malignant lymphatic proliferations with B cells, for a period of 7 years (2002-2008), at the Hematology Department, Hospital Coltea, Bucharest and Hematology Department, Universitary Hospital, Bucharest Results and conclusions: Combining chemotherapy with Rituximab had better results compared to the same chemotherapy, administered alone, both in induction and in case of relapse. The overall response rate in our study group was 74.7%, out of which 42.3% complete remissions. The overall response rate was 84.61% in the Rituximab group, compared to 68.88% in patients without Rituximab. PMID:22205891

  13. Targeted alpha particle immunotherapy for myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jurcic, Joseph G; Larson, Steven M; Sgouros, George; McDevitt, Michael R; Finn, Ronald D; Divgi, Chaitanya R; Ballangrud, Ase M; Hamacher, Klaus A; Ma, Dangshe; Humm, John L; Brechbiel, Martin W; Molinet, Roger; Scheinberg, David A

    2002-08-15

    Unlike beta particle-emitting isotopes, alpha emitters can selectively kill individual cancer cells with a single atomic decay. HuM195, a humanized anti-CD33 monoclonal antibody, specifically targets myeloid leukemia cells and has activity against minimal disease. When labeled with the beta-emitters (131)I and (90)Y, HuM195 can eliminate large leukemic burdens in patients, but it produces prolonged myelosuppression requiring hematopoietic stem cell transplantation at high doses. To enhance the potency of native HuM195 yet avoid the nonspecific cytotoxicity of beta-emitting constructs, the alpha-emitting isotope (213)Bi was conjugated to HuM195. Eighteen patients with relapsed and refractory acute myelogenous leukemia or chronic myelomonocytic leukemia were treated with 10.36 to 37.0 MBq/kg (213)Bi-HuM195. No significant extramedullary toxicity was seen. All 17 evaluable patients developed myelosuppression, with a median time to recovery of 22 days. Nearly all the (213)Bi-HuM195 rapidly localized to and was retained in areas of leukemic involvement, including the bone marrow, liver, and spleen. Absorbed dose ratios between these sites and the whole body were 1000-fold greater than those seen with beta-emitting constructs in this antigen system and patient population. Fourteen (93%) of 15 evaluable patients had reductions in circulating blasts, and 14 (78%) of 18 patients had reductions in the percentage of bone marrow blasts. This study demonstrates the safety, feasibility, and antileukemic effects of (213)Bi-HuM195, and it is the first proof-of-concept for systemic targeted alpha particle immunotherapy in humans.

  14. Immunotherapy as treatment for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Hawkes, Cheryl A; McLaurin, Joanne

    2007-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that is characterized pathologically by the deposition of beta-amyloid (A beta)-containing extracellular neuritic plaques, intracellular neurofibrillary tangles and neuronal loss. Much evidence supports the hypothesis that A beta peptide aggregation contributes to AD pathogenesis, however, currently approved therapeutic treatments do nothing to stop or reverse A beta deposition. The success of active and passive anti-A beta immunotherapies in both preventing and clearing parenchymal amyloid in transgenic mouse models led to the initiation of an active anti-A beta vaccination (AN1792) trial in human patients with mild-to-moderate AD, but was prematurely halted when 6% of inoculated patients developed aseptic meningoencephalitis. Autopsy results from the brains of four individuals treated with AN1792 revealed decreased plaque burden in select brain areas, as well as T-cell lymphocytes in three of the patients. Furthermore, antibody responders showed some improvement in memory task measures. These findings indicated that anti-A beta therapy might still be a viable option for the treatment of AD, if potentially harmful proinflammatory processes can be avoided. Over the past 6 years, this target has led to the development of novel experimental immunization strategies, including selective A beta epitope targeting, antibody and adjuvant modifications, as well as alternative routes and mechanisms of vaccine delivery, to generate anti-A beta antibodies that selectively target and remove specific A beta species without evoking autoimmunity. Results from the passive vaccination AD clinical trials that are currently underway will provide invaluable information about both the effectiveness of newly improved anti-A beta vaccines in clinical treatment, as well as the role of the A beta peptide in the pathogenesis of the disease.

  15. Current Immunotherapies for Sarcoma: Clinical Trials and Rationale

    PubMed Central

    Mitsis, Demytra; Francescutti, Valerie

    2016-01-01

    Sarcoma tumors are rare and heterogeneous, yet they possess many characteristics that may facilitate immunotherapeutic responses. Both active strategies including vaccines and passive strategies involving cellular adoptive immunotherapy have been applied clinically. Results of these clinical trials indicate a distinct benefit for select patients. The recent breakthrough of immunologic checkpoint inhibition is being rapidly introduced to a variety of tumor types including sarcoma. It is anticipated that these emerging immunotherapies will exhibit clinical efficacy for a variety of sarcomas. The increasing ability to tailor immunologic therapies to sarcoma patients will undoubtedly generate further enthusiasm and clinical research for this treatment modality. PMID:27703409

  16. Immunotherapy in allergy and cellular tests: state of art.

    PubMed

    Chirumbolo, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    The basophil activation test (BAT) is an in vitro assay where the activation of basophils upon exposure to various IgE-challenging molecules is measured by flow cytometry. It is a cellular test able to investigate basophil behavior during allergy and allergy immunotherapy. A panoply of critical issues and suggestive advances have rendered this assay a promising yet puzzling tool to endeavor a full comprehension of innate immunity of allergy desensitization and manage allergen or monoclonal anti-IgE therapy. In this review a brief state of art of BAT in immunotherapy is described focusing onto the analytical issue pertaining BAT performance in allergy specific therapy.

  17. Immunogenic Targets for Specific Immunotherapy in Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lu; Götz, Marlies; Hofmann, Susanne; Greiner, Jochen

    2012-01-01

    Multiple myeloma remains an incurable disease although the prognosis has been improved by novel therapeutics and agents recently. Relapse occurs in the majority of patients and becomes fatal finally. Immunotherapy might be a powerful intervention to maintain a long-lasting control of minimal residual disease or to even eradicate disseminated tumor cells. Several tumor-associated antigens have been identified in patients with multiple myeloma. These antigens are expressed in a tumor-specific or tumor-restricted pattern, are able to elicit immune response, and thus could serve as targets for immunotherapy. This review discusses immunogenic antigens with therapeutic potential for multiple myeloma. PMID:22611422

  18. Vaccines versus immunotherapy: Overview of approaches in deciding between options

    PubMed Central

    Dalgleish, Angus G

    2015-01-01

    This review compares the optimal use of vaccines vs. other forms of immunotherapy, which includes cytokines, such as IL-2, monoclonal antibodies, such as the ‘checkpoint inhibitors’, against CTLA-4 and PD-1. The review includes both prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines using a variety of technologies. It is already established that vaccines can be enhanced by other immunotherapies, such as cytokines (IL-2) and there is scope for combining both of these with the ‘checkpoint’ antibodies. Moreover, both can be enhanced with other modalities, such as radiotherapy, ablative therapy and both high and low dose chemotherapies. PMID:25625932

  19. Variation in the response to ductal obstruction of feline submandibular and sublingual salivary glands and the importance of the innervation.

    PubMed

    Harrison, J D; Fouad, H M; Garrett, J R

    2001-01-01

    A variable response following ductal ligation of feline salivary glands corresponds to the human condition but contrasts with a predictable atrophy in obstructed salivary glands of rodents popularly used as a model for human salivary problems. The present investigation is concerned with a possible reason for the variable response, namely the preservation of the innervation. Ducts of feline submandibular and sublingual salivary glands were ligated with or without the inclusion of the chorda tympani. Inclusion led to a delayed initial response followed by progressive atrophy until the parenchyma was extremely atrophic, whereas avoidance of the chorda led to the variable response in which variable numbers of acini of a similar form to normal persisted. The results establish the atrophic effect of inclusion of the chorda tympani in ductal ligation and indicate the caution that should be exercised in the extrapolation of the rodent model to the human condition.

  20. Cancer immunotherapy: are we there yet?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The immune system is the built-in host defense mechanism against infectious agents as well as cancer. Protective immunity against cancer was convincingly demonstrated in the 1940s with syngeneic animal models (JNCI 18:769-778, 1976; Cancer Immun 1:6, 2001). Since then, the last century’s dream has been to effectively prevent and cure cancers by immunological means. This dream has slowly but surely become a reality (Nature 480:480-489, 2011). The successful examples of immunoprophylaxis and therapy against cancers include: (i) targeted therapy using monoclonal antibodies (Nat Rev Cancer 12:278-287, 2012); (ii) allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantion to elicit graft-versus-cancer effect against a variety of hematopoietic malignancies (Blood 112:4371-4383, 2008); (iii) vaccination for preventing cancers with clear viral etiology such as hepatocellular carcinoma and cervical cancer (Cancer J Clin 57:7-28, 2007; NEJM 336:1855-1859, 1997); (iv) T cell checkpoint blockade against inhibitory pathways including targeting CTLA-4 and PD-1 inhibitory molecules for the treatment of melanoma and other solid tumors (NEJM 363:711-723, 2010; NEJM 366:2443-2454, 2012; NEJM 369:122-133, 2013; NEJM 366:2455-2465, 2012); (v) antigen-pulsed autologous dendritic cell vaccination against prostate cancer (NEJM 363:411-422, 2010); and (vi) the transfer of T cells including those genetically engineered with chimeric antigen receptors allowing targeting of B cell neoplasms (NEJM 365:725-733, 2011; NEJM 368:1509-1518, 2013; Blood 118:4817-4828, 2013; Sci Transl Med 5:177ra138, 2013). This article provides an overview on the exciting and expanding immunological arsenals against cancer, and discusses critical remaining unanswered questions of cancer immunology. The inherent specificity and memory of the adaptive immune response towards cancer will undoubtedly propel cancer immunotherapy to the forefront of cancer treatment in the immediate near future. Study of the fundamental