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Sample records for 5-hole pressure probe

  1. Calibration and Flight Results for the Ares I-X 5-Hole Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Joel F.; Brandon, Jay M.

    2011-01-01

    Flight and calibration results are presented for the Ares I-X 5-hole probe. The probe is calibrated by using a combination of wind tunnel, CFD, and other numerical modeling techniques. This is then applied to the probe flight data and comparisons are made between the vanes and 5-hole probe. Using this and other data it is shown the probe was corrupted by water rendering that measurement unreliable.

  2. Water cooled static pressure probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagen, Nicholas T. (Inventor); Eves, John W. (Inventor); Reece, Garland D. (Inventor); Geissinger, Steve L. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An improved static pressure probe containing a water cooling mechanism is disclosed. This probe has a hollow interior containing a central coolant tube and multiple individual pressure measurement tubes connected to holes placed on the exterior. Coolant from the central tube symmetrically immerses the interior of the probe, allowing it to sustain high temperature (in the region of 2500 F) supersonic jet flow indefinitely, while still recording accurate pressure data. The coolant exits the probe body by way of a reservoir attached to the aft of the probe. The pressure measurement tubes are joined to a single, larger manifold in the reservoir. This manifold is attached to a pressure transducer that records the average static pressure.

  3. Fixture For Calibrating Pressure Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, George C., Jr.; Vasquez, Peter; Horsley, Lewis A.; Bowman, John T.; Zumbrun, Henry N.; Eves, John W.

    1994-01-01

    Fixture in form of specially designed clamshell housing enables in situ calibration of pressure transducer mounted in body of pressure probe in wind tunnel. Includes two metal half shells machined with necks and matching cavities, when put together, define larger neck and cavity accommodating probe. Probe secured to bottom half shell by use of clamp before installing top half shell: necessary to follow sequence to protect probe during assembly. Clamshell calibration fixture attached to pressure probe in few minutes, making it possible to calibrate pressure transducer at convenient times. Calibrations performed before and after wind-tunnel runs each day, between runs in event of delays or suspected malfunctions, and essentially any other time, without having to remove probe from wind tunnel.

  4. Miniature, Cooled Pressure-Measuring Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, George C., Jr.; Eves, John W.; White, David R.

    1994-01-01

    Probe designed to reduce settling time dramatically. Pressure-sensing transducer mounted in probe and connected to tip by short tube having cross-sectional area substantially smaller than conventional connecting tubes. Probe includes stainless-steel cylindrical exterior housing holding closed pressure chamber in which piezoelectric pressure transducer mounted. Open connecting tube passes portion of high-velocity, high-temperature fluid stream into closed pressure chamber. Any change of pressure in sampled stream propagates into closed pressure chamber with settling time inversely proportional to cross-sectional area of connecting tube. Cooling chamber formed around pressure chamber connected to source of water or other cooling fluid via inlet and outlet tubes.

  5. Pressure probe compensates for dimensional tolerance variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birner, R. A.

    1966-01-01

    Flexible, compressible spring-loaded pressure probe measures the static pressure between the rotor stages on an axial-flow fuel pump. This probe is used in installation where a drilled static pressure tap or a rigid impulse tube cannot be used. Its parameters must be specially determined for each installation.

  6. A piezo-bar pressure probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friend, W. H.; Murphy, C. L.; Shanfield, I.

    1967-01-01

    Piezo-bar pressure type probe measures the impact velocity or pressure of a moving debris cloud. It measures pressures up to 200,000 psi and peak pressures may be recorded with a total pulse duration between 5 and 65 musec.

  7. High pressure optical combustion probe

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, S.D.; Richards, G.A.

    1995-06-01

    The Department of Energy`s Morgantown Energy Technology Center has developed a combustion probe for monitoring flame presence and heat release. The technology involved is a compact optical detector of the OH radical`s UV fluorescence. The OH Monitor/Probe is designed to determine the flame presence and provide a qualitative signal proportional to the flame intensity. The probe can be adjusted to monitor a specific volume in the combustion zone to track spatial fluctuations in the flame. The probe is capable of nanosecond time response and is usually slowed electronically to fit the flame characteristics. The probe is a sapphire rod in a stainless steel tube which may be inserted into the combustion chamber and pointed at the flame zone. The end of the sapphire rod is retracted into the SS tube to define a narrow optical collection cone. The collection cone may be adjusted to fit the experiment. The fluorescence signal is collected by the sapphire rod and transmitted through a UV transmitting, fused silica, fiber optic to the detector assembly. The detector is a side window photomultiplier (PMT) with a 310 run line filter. A Hamamatsu photomultiplier base combined with a integral high voltage power supply permits this to be a low voltage device. Electronic connections include: a power lead from a modular DC power supply for 15 VDC; a control lead for 0-1 volts to control the high voltage level (and therefore gain); and a lead out for the actual signal. All low voltage connections make this a safe and easy to use device while still delivering the sensitivity required.

  8. High pressure luminescence probes in polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Drickamer, H.G.

    1980-01-01

    High pressure luminescence has proved to be a very powerful tool for characterizing crystalline solids and liquids. Two problems involving glassy polymers are analyzed. In the first problem the excited states of azulene and its derivatives are used to probe intermolecular interactions in PMMA and PS. In the second problem the change in emission intensity with pressure from two excimer states of polyvinylcarbazole as a pure polymer and in dilute solution in polystyrene (PS), polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and polyisoliutylene (PIB) is studied. The relative emission from the two states depends strongly on the possibility for motion of polymer segments. The observations are related to the proximity to the glass transition.

  9. A short static-pressure probe design for supersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinckney, S. Z.

    1975-01-01

    A static-pressure probe design concept was developed which has the static holes located close to the probe tip and is relatively insensitive to probe angle of attack and circumferential static hole location. Probes were constructed with 10 and 20 deg half-angle cone tips followed by a tangent conic curve section and a tangent cone section of 2, 3, or 3.5 deg, and were tested at Mach numbers of 2.5 and 4.0 and angles of attack up to 12 deg. Experimental results indicate that for stream Mach numbers of 2.5 and 4.0 and probe angle of attack within + or - 10 deg, values of stream static pressure can be determined from probe calibration to within about + or - 4 percent. If the probe is aligned within about 7 deg of the flow experimental results indicated, the stream static pressures can be determined to within 2 percent from probe calibration.

  10. Sensor failure detection and management scheme for pressure probes using Kalman filtering technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, N. Shantha

    1995-06-01

    For high performance, high angle of attack fighter aircraft, accurate and high fidelity airdata parameters are crucial for the flight control system. At high angle of attack, where small changes in angle of attack can greatly influence aerodynamic properties of the aircraft, the problem of flight control augmentation is extremely complicated. In this flight regime, it is critical that accurate measurements of airdata parameters including angle of attack, angle of sideslip and dynamic pressure are made available for use by the flight augmentation system. But at high angle of attack, it is difficult to measure airdata accurately using conventional intrusive sensing devices, because of upstream vortices and flow separation. To overcome this difficulty, a non-intrusive Flush Airdata Sensing system (FADS) has been developed. The FADS is a simple hardware item with the basic fixture being a hemispherical or conical cap mounted at the nose of the fuselage. A number of small holes are drilled around the cap in annular rings. The pressure at each hole is measured by pressure transducers and related to airdata parameters by a non-linear aerodynamic model derived from potential flow. A 7-hole pressure probe, proposed by the DLR for implementation on an advanced experimental fighter aircraft for airdata measurements at high angle of attack, has redundant measurements in angle of attack, angle of side slip and dynamic pressure to ensure control system augmentation at high angle of attack, in spite of some pressure sensor failure or malfunctioning. Such a system requires an algorithm which detects pressure sensor failure and performs fault management in real time. In this report, a concept for an algorithm using a recursive Kalman filtering technique has been proposed and developed. The algorithm is tested on a 5 hole pressure probe which is used in experimental flights of C-160 Transall aircraft.

  11. A stagnation pressure probe for droplet-laden air flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, S. N. B.; Leonardo, M.; Ehresman, C. M.

    1985-01-01

    It is often of interest in a droplet-laden gas flow to obtain the stagnation pressure of both the gas phase and the mixture. A flow-decelerating probe (TPF), with separate, purged ports for the gas phase and the mixture and with a bleed for accumulating liquid at the closed end, has been developed. Measurements obtained utilizing the TPF in a nearly isothermal air-water droplet mixture flow in a smooth circular pipe under various conditions of flow velocity, pressure, liquid concentration and droplet size are presented and compared with data obtained under identical conditions with a conventional, gas phase stagnation pressure probe (CSP). The data obtained with the CSP and TPF probes are analyzed to determine the applicability of the two probes in relation to the multi-phase characteristics of the flow and the geometry of the probe.

  12. Miniature Flow-Direction/Pitot-Static Pressure Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, George C., Jr.; Coombs, David S.; Eves, John W.; Price, Howard E.; Vasquez, Peter

    1989-01-01

    Precision flow-direction/pitot-static pressure probes, ranging from 0.035 to 0.090 inch (0.89 to 2.29 mm) in outside diameter, successfully fabricated and calibrated for use in Langley 20-inch Mach 6 Tunnel. Probes simultaneously measure flow direction and static and pitot pressures in flow fields about configurations in hypersonic flow at temperatures up to 500 degree F (260 degree C).

  13. Pressure probe and isopiestic psychrometer measure similar turgor

    SciTech Connect

    Nonami, H.; Boyer, J.S.; Steudle, E.

    1987-03-01

    Turgor measured with a miniature pressure probe was compared to that measured with an isopiestic thermocouple psychrometer in mature regions of soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) stems. The probe measured turgor directly in cells of intact stems whereas the psychrometer measured the water potential and osmotic potential of excised stem segments and turgor was calculated by difference. When care was taken to prevent dehydration when working with the pressure probe, and diffusive resistance and dilution errors with the psychrometer, both methods gave similar values of turgor whether the plants were dehydrating or rehydrating. This finding, together with the previously demonstrated similarity in turgor measured with the isopiestic psychrometer and a pressure chamber, indicates that the pressure probe provides accurate measurements of turgor despite the need to penetrate the cell. On the other hand, it suggest that as long as precautions are taken to obtain accurate values for the water potential and osmotic potential, turgor can be determined by isopiestic psychrometry in tissues not accessible to the pressure probe for physical reasons.

  14. Pressure probe and isopiestic psychrometer measure similar turgor.

    PubMed

    Nonami, H; Boyer, J S; Steudle, E

    1987-03-01

    Turgor measured with a miniature pressure probe was compared to that measured with an isopiestic thermocouple psychrometer in mature regions of soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) stems. The probe measured turgor directly in cells of intact stems whereas the psychrometer measured the water potential and osmotic potential of excised stem segments and turgor was calculated by difference. When care was taken to prevent dehydration when working with the pressure probe, and diffusive resistance and dilution errors with the psychrometer, both methods gave similar values of turgor whether the plants were dehydrating or rehydrating. This finding, together with the previously demonstrated similarity in turgor measured with the isopiestic psychrometer and a pressure chamber, indicates that the pressure probe provides accurate measurements of turgor despite the need to penetrate the cell. On the other hand, it suggests that as long as precautions are taken to obtain accurate values for the water potential and osmotic potential, turgor can be determined by isopiestic psychrometry in tissues not accessible to the pressure probe for physical reasons.

  15. Pressure probe and hot-film probe rsponses to acoustic excitation in mean flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrott, T. L.; Jones, M. G.

    1986-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to compare the relative responses of a hot-film probe and a pressure probe positioned in a flow duct carrying mean flow and progressive acoustic waves. The response of each probe was compared with that of a condenser-type microphone flush mounted in the duct wall for flow Mach numbers up to about 0.5. The response of the pressure probe was less than that of the flush-mounted microphone by not more than about 2.1 dB at the highest centerline Mach number. This decreased response of the probe can likely be attributed to flow-induced impedance changes at the probe sensor orifices. The response of the hot-film probe, expressed in terms of fluctuating pressure, was greater than that of the flush-mounted microphone by as much as 6.0 dB at the two higher centerline Mach numbers. Removal of the contribution from fluctuating temperature in the hot-film analytical model greatly improved the agreement between the two transducer responses.

  16. Stagnation pressure probe. [for measuring pressure of supersonic gas streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodyer, M. J. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A method and apparatus for measuring the stagnation pressure of supersonic velocity gas streams without the generation of shock waves which interfere with such measurements are given. The technique is insensitive to the type of gas and Mach number and is therefore particularly useful in the study of jet engine exhausts.

  17. Acoustics of the piezo-electric pressure probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutt, G. S.

    1974-01-01

    Acoustical properties of a piezoelectric device are reported for measuring the pressure in the plasma flow from an MPD arc. A description and analysis of the acoustical behavior in a piezoelectric probe is presented for impedance matching and damping. The experimental results are presented in a set of oscillographic records.

  18. To guide a lunar probe with light pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Liu

    2001-07-01

    In the dynamical model of the circular restricted three-body problem and for launching a lunar probe from parking orbit, the minimum initial velocity should satisfy the condition that the Jacobian constant C is smaller than C2 (in the Earth-Moon system, C2 = 3.20034491). Then the probe may be accelerated to a speed of νv p > 10.8746 km/s at perigee (some 200 km high). However, this is only the necessary condition for the probe to fly to the moon and the voyage time is too long. If a Hohmann transfer orbit is adopted, a more impulse for the orbit transfer will be required, and in a sense more power will be consumed. If it is needed to carefully explore the environment of the Earth-Moon space and not to fly to the moon so quickly, then to the base of the above minimum velocity the probe can be guided faster to the moon with light pressure. For this reason, a large solar energy sail with a special normal needs to be installed on the probe. In this way, the purpose of exploring the Earth-Moon space can be attained and the flight will not spend a very long time. The results of computations show that the above-stated plan is effective. If the section area of the solar energy sail is large enough (provided that it can be implemented by techniques), then without any power the probe can be guided to the moon with light pressure just like a space sailboat.

  19. To guide a probe to the Moon with light pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.

    2001-02-01

    In the dynamical model of circular restricted three-body problem and for launching a lunar probe from parking orbit, the minimum initial velocity should satisfy the condition that the Jacobian constant C is smaller than C2 (in the Earth-Moon system, C2=3.20034491). Then the probe may be accelerated to a speed of Vp>10.8746 km/s at perigee (some 200 km high). However, this is only the necessary condition for the probe to fly to the moon and the voyage time is too long. If a Hohmann transfer orbit is adopted, a more impulse for the orbit transfer will be required, and in a sense more power will be consumed. If it is needed to carefully explore the environment of the Earth-Moon space and not to fly to the moon so quickly, then to the base of the above minimum velocity the probe can be guided faster to the moon with light pressure. For this reason, a large solar energy sail with a special normal needs to be installed on the probe. In this way, the purpose of exploring the Earth-Moon space can be attained and the flight will not spend a very long time. The results of computations show that the above-stated plan is effective. If the section area of the solar energy sail is large enough (provided that it can be implemented by techniques), then without any power the probe can be guided to the moon with light pressure just like a space sailboat.

  20. Probing matter at extreme Gbar pressures at the NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Kritcher, A. L.; Doeppner, T.; Swift, D.; Hawreliak, J.; Collins, G.; Nilsen, J.; Bachmann, B.; Dewald, E.; Strozzi, D.; Felker, S.; Landen, O. L.; Jones, O.; Thomas, C.; Hammer, J.; Keane, C.; Lee, H. J.; Glenzer, S. H.; Rothman, S.; Chapman, D.; Kraus, D.; Neumayer, P.; Falcone, R. W.

    2013-12-04

    Here we describe a platform to measure the material properties, specifically the equation of state and electron temperature, at pressures of 100 Mbar to a Gbar at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). In our experiments we launch spherically convergent shock waves into solid CH, CD, or diamond samples using a hohlraum radiation drive, in an indirect drive laser geometry. X-ray radiography is applied to measure the shock speed and infer the mass density profile, enabling determination of the material pressure and Hugoniot equation of state. X-ray scattering is applied to measure the electron temperature through probing of the electron velocity distribution via Doppler broadening.

  1. Toroid cavities as NMR detectors in high pressure probes

    SciTech Connect

    Woelk, K.; Rathke, J.W.; Klingler, R.J.

    1993-03-01

    A cylindrical toroid cavity has been developed for application as an NMR detector for high sensitivity and high resolution spectroscopy in metal vessel probes. Those probes are used for in situ investigations at high temperature and pressure. Since the transmitted r.f. field is completely confined within the torus, the cavity can be placed inside the pressurized system without magnetic coupling to the metal vessel. Resonance frequencies up to 400 MHz make the toroid cavity detector especially suited for use in {sup 1}H and {sup 19}F spectroscopy. Typically achieved static {sup 1}H linewidths, measured on CHCl{sub 3} using cavities in Be-Cu pressure vessels, are 2.0 Hz. On the basis of theoretical considerations that include the radial dependence of the r.f. field within cylindrical or circular toroid detectors, equations were evolved to predict the signal intensity as a function of the pulse width. The equations precisely describe the deviations from the sinusoidal approximation, which is generally used for signal intensities derived from Helmholtz or solenoid coils.

  2. Compact cantilever force probe for plasma pressure measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Nedzelskiy, I. S.; Silva, C.; Fernandes, H.; Duarte, P.; Varandas, C. A. F.

    2007-12-15

    A simple, compact cantilever force probe (CFP) has been developed for plasma pressure measurements. It is based on the pull-in phenomenon well known in microelectromechanical-system electrostatic actuators. The probe consists of a thin (25 {mu}m) titanium foil cantilever (38 mm of length and 14 mm of width) and a fixed electrode separated by a 0.75 mm gap. The probe is shielded by brass box and enclosed into boron nitride housing with a 9 mm diameter window for exposing part of cantilever surface to the plasma. When the voltage is applied between the cantilever and the electrode, an attractive electrostatic force is counterbalanced by cantilever restoring spring force. At some threshold (pull-in) voltage the system becomes unstable and the cantilever abruptly pulls toward the fixed electrode until breakdown occurs between them. The threshold voltage is sensitive to an additional externally applied force, while a simple detection of breakdown occurrence can be used to measure that threshold voltage value. The sensitivity to externally applied forces obtained during calibration is 0.28 V/{mu}N (17.8 V/Pa for pressure). However, the resolution of the measurements is {+-}0.014 mN ({+-}0.22 Pa) due to the statistical scattering in measured pull-in voltages. The diagnostic temporal resolution is {approx}10 ms, being determined by the dynamics of pull-in process. The probe has been tested in the tokamak ISTTOK edge plasma, and a plasma force of {approx}0.07 mN (plasma pressure {approx}1.1 Pa) has been obtained near the leading edge of the limiter. This value is in a reasonable agreement with the estimations using local plasma parameters measured by electrical probes. The use of the described CFP is limited by a heat flux of Q{approx}10{sup 6} W/m{sup 2} due to uncontrollable rise of the cantilever temperature ({delta}T{approx}20 deg. C) during CFP response time.

  3. Probing matter at extreme Gbar pressures at the NIF

    DOE PAGES

    Kritcher, A. L.; Doeppner, T.; Swift, D.; Hawreliak, J.; Collins, G.; Nilsen, J.; Bachmann, B.; Dewald, E.; Strozzi, D.; Felker, S.; et al

    2013-12-04

    Here we describe a platform to measure the material properties, specifically the equation of state and electron temperature, at pressures of 100 Mbar to a Gbar at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). In our experiments we launch spherically convergent shock waves into solid CH, CD, or diamond samples using a hohlraum radiation drive, in an indirect drive laser geometry. X-ray radiography is applied to measure the shock speed and infer the mass density profile, enabling determination of the material pressure and Hugoniot equation of state. X-ray scattering is applied to measure the electron temperature through probing of the electron velocitymore » distribution via Doppler broadening.« less

  4. Low pressure characteristics of the multipole resonance probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinkmann, Ralf Peter; Oberrath, Jens

    2014-10-01

    The term ``Active plasma resonance spectroscopy'' (APRS) denotes a class of related techniques which utilize, for diagnostic purposes, the natural ability of plasmas to resonate on or near the electron plasma frequency ωpe. The basic idea dates back to the early days of discharge physics but has recently found renewed interest as an approach to industry-compatible plasma diagnostics: A radio frequent signal (in the GHz range) is coupled into the plasma via an antenna or probe, the spectral response is recorded (with the same or another antenna or probe), and a mathematical model is used to determine plasma parameters like the electron density or the electron temperature. When the method is applied to low pressure plasmas (of a few Pa and lower), kinetic effects must be accounted for in the mathematical model. This contribution studies a particular realization of the APRS scheme, the geometrically and electrically symmetric Multipole Resonance Probe (MRP). It is shown that the resonances of the MRP exhibit a residual damping in the limit p --> 0 which cannot be explained by Ohmic dissipation but only by kinetic effects. Supported by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) in the framework of the PluTO project.

  5. Comparison of plant cell turgor pressure measurement by pressure probe and micromanipulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lan; Hukin, David; Pritchard, Jeremy; Thomas, Colin

    2006-08-01

    The conventional method of measuring plant cell turgor pressure is the pressure probe but applying this method to single cells in suspension culture is technically difficult and requires puncture of the cell wall. Conversely, compression testing by micromanipulation is particularly suited to studies on single cells, and can be used to characterise cell wall mechanical properties, but has not been used to measure turgor pressure. In order to demonstrate that the micromanipulation method can do this, pressure measurements by both methods were compared on single suspension-cultured tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum vf36) cells and generally were in good agreement. This validates further the micromanipulation method and demonstrates its capability to measure turgor pressure during water loss. It also suggests that it might eventually be used to estimate plant cell hydraulic conductivity.

  6. Probing and Modeling of Pressure-induced Structural Transformation in Oxide Melts at High Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cody, G.; Lee, S.; Mysen, B.; Fei, Y.; Eng, P.

    2008-12-01

    Pressure-induced bonding transitions in oxide melts give improved prospects for the non-linear pressure dependence of their macroscopic transport properties in the earth's interior. The inherent difficulties of current experimental technologies, however, pose major challenges for probing structural changes of prototypical model oxide melts at high pressure, making it one of the unsolved problems in geophysics. Recent advances in element specific experimental probe of local structures, such as high resolution solid- state NMR and x-ray Raman scattering unveils new structural insights into the pressure-induced changes in the bonding nature (either gradual or abrupt) of the archetypal oxides melts (e.g. Lee SK et al. Proc. Nat. Aca. Sci. 2008, 105, 7925; Lee SK et al. J. Phys. Chem. B. 2008 in press). Here, we report recent progress that we have made using these techniques. Non-random spatial distribution of aluminum in oxide glasses were for the first time revealed via through-space correlation NMR spectroscopy: four, five, six coordinated aluminums have differential proximity among each other but favoring the formation of clusters mainly composed of six coordinated Al. While silicate glasses studied here exhibit a general trend of decreasing non-bridging oxygen fraction with pressure, the details of their pressure dependence is significantly affected by the composition of melts, such as Na/Si, Si/Al ratio as well as types of network modifying cations. We account for these differences with a conceptual model that utilizes pressure flexibility (the resistance to structural changes with increased pressurization). An oxide melts with a large pressure flexibility, thus, may undergo a gradual structural transformation. In contrast, a melts with the opposite behavior undergoes an abrupt coordination transformation. The observed information of connectivity among network forming cations was used to calculate the crystal-melt partitioning coefficient and activity of silica in

  7. Electric probe investigations of microwave generated, atmospheric pressure, plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Porteanu, H. E.; Kuehn, S.; Gesche, R.

    2010-07-15

    We examine the applicability of the Langmuir-type of characterization for atmospheric pressure plasma jets generated in a millimeter-size cavity microwave resonator at 2.45 GHz. Wide range I-V characteristics of helium, argon, nitrogen, air and oxygen are presented for different gas fluxes, distances probe-resonator, and microwave powers. A detailed analysis is performed for the fine variation in the current around the floating potential. A simplified theory specially developed for this case is presented, considering the ionic and electronic saturation currents and the floating potential. Based on this theory, we conclude that, while the charge carrier density depends on gas flow, distance to plasma source, and microwave absorbed power, the electron temperature is quite independent of these parameters. The resulting plasma parameters for helium, argon, and nitrogen are presented.

  8. Multi-hole pressure probes to air data system for subsonic small-scale air vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevchenko, A. M.; Berezin, D. R.; Puzirev, L. N.; Tarasov, A. Z.; Kharitonov, A. M.; Shmakov, A. S.

    2016-10-01

    A brief review of research performed to develop multi-hole probes to measure of aerodynamic angles, dynamic head, and static pressure of a flying vehicle. The basis of these works is the application a well-known classical multi-hole pressure probe technique of measuring of a 3D flow to use in the air data system. Two multi-hole pressure probes with spherical and hemispherical head to air-data system for subsonic small-scale vehicles have been developed. A simple analytical probe model with separation of variables is proposed. The probes were calibrated in the wind tunnel, one of them is in-flight tested.

  9. Hot-film static-pressure probe for surveying flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, G. C., Jr.; Weinstein, L. M.

    1981-01-01

    A static pressure probe employing hot-film sensors has been developed for the rapid measurement of the static pressure fields surrounding analytic shapes in hypersonic flows. The hot-film probe is a modification of the standard static pressure probe, consisting of a front hot-film sensor operated as a resistance thermometer, a rear sensor operated at an overheat ratio of 1.5 to 1.8 and a small sonic orifice installed inside the tubing of a conventional device. The probe has been calibrated in helium and air over a range of temperatures and pressures in a bell jar apparatus, with a repeatability of the data to within + or - 0.015 mm Hg. Comparative tests of the hot-film and conventional static pressure probes in a hypersonic helium wind tunnel at Mach 20 and various Reynolds numbers have indicated the settling time of the hot-film probe to be on the order of milliseconds, as compared with 30 sec for the conventional probe. The pressures measured by the two probes were found to be within 10% of each other. Although the hot-film probe makes flow-field static pressure surveys more practical in blowdown hypersonic wind tunnels, viscous and flow angle effects still must be assessed under the conditions of use.

  10. Pressure Probe Designs for Dynamic Pressure Measurements in a Supersonic Flow Field. [conducted in the Glenn Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porro, A. Robert

    2001-01-01

    A series of dynamic flow field pressure probes were developed for use in large-scale supersonic wind tunnels at NASA Glenn Research Center. These flow field probes include pitot, static, and five-hole conical pressure probes that are capable of capturing fast acting flow field pressure transients that occur on a millisecond time scale. The pitot and static probes can be used to determine local Mach number time histories during a transient event. The five-hole conical pressure probes are used primarily to determine local flow angularity, but can also determine local Mach number. These probes were designed, developed, and tested at the NASA Glenn Research Center. They were also used in a NASA Glenn 10- by 10-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT) test program where they successfully acquired flow field pressure data in the vicinity of a propulsion system during an engine compressor stall and inlet unstart transient event. Details of the design, development, and subsequent use of these probes are discussed in this report.

  11. Application of Langmuir Probe Method to the Atmospheric Pressure Discharge Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuura, Hiroto; Matsumura, Yasuhiro; Nakano, Ken

    2008-12-31

    The heat balance model in the probe tip applied to atmospheric pressure plasma is constructed. Considering the natural convective heat loss, the limitation of plasma density for probe application to such a plasma is estimated. The rough limit is about n{sub e} = 10{sup 18} m{sup -3}. Four kind of materials (Cu, SUS, W, Al) are used for probe tips, and are tested in DC atmospheric pressure discharge. Heat conductivity is found to be a more important property than melting point in design of probes in high pressure discharge. DC atmospheric pressure discharge plasma parameters are obtained with our test probes. Obtained density is the order of 10{sup 17} m{sup -3} and does not contradict with the above density limitation. Change of space potential in air/Ar plasma is also confirmed.

  12. Numerical model of operation of the Langmuir probe under intermediate pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Dudin, S.V.

    1996-12-31

    The technique of a Langmuir probe is known reasonably well. However, despite plenty of work devoted to calculation of currents on the probe inserted into plasma, a theory does not at present exist which would allow calculation of plasma parameters at any size of the probe and pressure of the working gas. While the theory of a probe in absence of collisions is developed rather in detail by Bernstain and Rabinovich, Laframboise, Allen, and others, there is no rigorous theory which describes a probe under high pressure of a gas. As for intermediate pressure, the theories are absent. Solution of the problem is in this case considerably complicated because of non-local dependence of density of charged particles on potential or electric field strength that means unusability of hydrodynamic approach and necessity of application of the kinetic theory. To fill in this gap the author has developed a numerical model of ion kinetics in a near-boundary layer of a Langmuir probe, inserted into a weakly-ionized gas-discharge plasma, in a range of intermediate pressure of a neutral gas as well as at any ratio between thickness of the layer of space charge and radius of the probe. On the base of results of modeling, practical technique of processing of pore characteristics at intermediate pressure is developed: (i) a technique of calculation of density of ions; (2) a technique of division of a probe current on electron and ion part.

  13. Properties of contact pressure induced by manually operated fiber-optic probes.

    PubMed

    Bregar, Maksimilijan; Cugmas, Blaž; Naglic, Peter; Hartmann, Daniela; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan; Bürmen, Miran

    2015-01-01

    We assess the properties of contact pressure applied by manually operated fiber-optic probes as a function of the operator, probe contact area, and sample stiffness. First, the mechanical properties of human skin sites with different skin structures, thicknesses, and underlying tissues were studied by in vivo indentation tests. According to the obtained results, three different homogeneous silicone skin phantoms were created to encompass the observed range of mechanical properties. The silicon phantoms were subsequently used to characterize the properties of the contact pressure by 10 experienced probe operators employing fiber-optic probes with different contact areas. A custom measurement system was used to collect the time-lapse of diffuse reflectance and applied contact pressure. The measurements were characterized by a set of features describing the transient and steady-state properties of the contact pressure and diffuse reflectance in terms of rise time, optical coupling, average value, and variability. The average applied contact pressure and contact pressure variability were found to significantly depend on the probe operator, probe contact area, and surprisingly also on the sample stiffness. Based on the presented results, we propose a set of practical guidelines for operators of manual probes.

  14. Properties of contact pressure induced by manually operated fiber-optic probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bregar, Maksimilijan; Cugmas, Blaž; Naglič, Peter; Hartmann, Daniela; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan; Bürmen, Miran

    2015-12-01

    We assess the properties of contact pressure applied by manually operated fiber-optic probes as a function of the operator, probe contact area, and sample stiffness. First, the mechanical properties of human skin sites with different skin structures, thicknesses, and underlying tissues were studied by in vivo indentation tests. According to the obtained results, three different homogeneous silicone skin phantoms were created to encompass the observed range of mechanical properties. The silicon phantoms were subsequently used to characterize the properties of the contact pressure by 10 experienced probe operators employing fiber-optic probes with different contact areas. A custom measurement system was used to collect the time-lapse of diffuse reflectance and applied contact pressure. The measurements were characterized by a set of features describing the transient and steady-state properties of the contact pressure and diffuse reflectance in terms of rise time, optical coupling, average value, and variability. The average applied contact pressure and contact pressure variability were found to significantly depend on the probe operator, probe contact area, and surprisingly also on the sample stiffness. Based on the presented results, we propose a set of practical guidelines for operators of manual probes.

  15. Evaluation of water cooled supersonic temperature and pressure probes for application to 1366 K flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagen, Nicholas; Seiner, John M.

    1990-01-01

    Water cooled supersonic probes are developed to investigate total pressure, static pressure, and total temperature in high-temperature jet plumes and thereby determine the mean flow properties. Two probe concepts, designed for operation at up to 1366 K in a Mach 2 flow, are tested on a water cooled nozzle. The two probe designs - the unsymmetric four-tube cooling configuration and the symmetric annular cooling design - take measurements at 755, 1089, and 1366 K of the three parameters. The cooled total and static pressure readings are found to agree with previous test results with uncooled configurations. The total-temperature probe, however, is affected by the introduction of water coolant, and effect which is explained by the increased heat transfer across the thermocouple-bead surface. Further investigation of the effect of coolant on the temperature probe is proposed to mitigate the effect and calculate more accurate temperatures in jet plumes.

  16. Pressure as a Probe of the Physics of Relaxor Ferroelectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Samara, George A.

    1999-08-09

    Pressure studies have provided new insights into the physics of compositionally-disordered ABO{sub 3} oxide relaxors. Specifically results are presented and discussed on a pressure-induced ferroelectric-to-relaxor crossover phenomenon, the continuous evolution of the energetics and dynamics of the relaxation process, and the interplay between pressure and electric field in determining the dielectric response.

  17. Probe systems for measuring static pressure and turbulence intensity in fluid streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, Vernon J. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A method and an apparatus for measuring time-averaged static or ambient pressure and turbulence intensity in a turbulent stream are discussed. The procedure involves placing a plurality of probes in the stream. Each probe responds in a different manner to characteristics of the fluid stream, preferably as a result of having varying cross sections. The responses from the probes are used to eliminate unwanted components in the measured quantities for accurate determination of selected characteristics.

  18. Modelling, calibration, and error analysis of seven-hole pressure probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zillac, G. G.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes the calibration of a nonnulling, conical, seven-hole pressure probe over a large range of flow onset angles. The calibration procedure is based on the use of differential pressures to determine the three components of velocity. The method allows determination of the flow angle and velocity magnitude to within an average error of 1.0 deg and 1.0 percent, respectively. Greater accuracy can be achieved by using high-quality pressure transducers. Also included is an examination of the factors which limit the use of the probe, a description of the measurement chain, an error analysis, and a typical experimental result. In addition, a new general analytical model of pressure probe behavior is described, and the validity of the model is demonstrated by comparing it with experimentally measured calibration data for a three-hole yaw meter and a seven-hole probe.

  19. Development of Dynamic Flow Field Pressure Probes Suitable for Use in Large Scale Supersonic Wind Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porro, A. Robert

    2000-01-01

    A series of dynamic flow field pressure probes were developed for use in large-scale supersonic wind tunnels at NASA Glenn Research Center. These flow field probes include pitot, static, and five-hole conical pressure probes that are capable of capturing fast acting flow field pressure transients that occur on a millisecond time scale. The pitot and static probes can be used to determine local Mach number time histories during a transient event. The five-hole conical pressure probes are used primarily to determine local flow angularity, but can also determine local Mach number. These probes were designed, developed, and tested at the NASA Glenn Research Center. They were also used in a NASA Glenn 10-by 10-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT) test program where they successfully acquired flow field pressure data in the vicinity of a propulsion system during an engine compressor staff and inlet unstart transient event. Details of the design, development, and subsequent use of these probes are discussed in this report.

  20. Probe pressure effects on human skin diffuse reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopy measurements.

    PubMed

    Lim, Liang; Nichols, Brandon; Rajaram, Narasimhan; Tunnell, James W

    2011-01-01

    Diffuse reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopy are popular research techniques for noninvasive disease diagnostics. Most systems include an optical fiber probe that transmits and collects optical spectra in contact with the suspected lesion. The purpose of this study is to investigate probe pressure effects on human skin spectroscopic measurements. We conduct an in-vivo experiment on human skin tissue to study the short-term (<2 s) and long-term (>30 s) effects of probe pressure on diffuse reflectance and fluorescence measurements. Short-term light probe pressure (P0<9 mN∕mm2) effects are within 0 ± 10% on all physiological properties extracted from diffuse reflectance and fluorescence measurements, and less than 0±5% for diagnostically significant physiological properties. Absorption decreases with site-specific variations due to blood being compressed out of the sampled volume. Reduced scattering coefficient variation is site specific. Intrinsic fluorescence shows a large standard error, although no specific pressure-related trend is observed. Differences in tissue structure and morphology contribute to site-specific probe pressure effects. Therefore, the effects of pressure can be minimized when the pressure is small and applied for a short amount of time; however, long-term and large pressures induce significant distortions in measured spectra. PMID:21280899

  1. Probe pressure effects on human skin diffuse reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopy measurements

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Liang; Nichols, Brandon; Rajaram, Narasimhan; Tunnell, James W.

    2011-01-01

    Diffuse reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopy are popular research techniques for noninvasive disease diagnostics. Most systems include an optical fiber probe that transmits and collects optical spectra in contact with the suspected lesion. The purpose of this study is to investigate probe pressure effects on human skin spectroscopic measurements. We conduct an in-vivo experiment on human skin tissue to study the short-term (<2 s) and long-term (>30 s) effects of probe pressure on diffuse reflectance and fluorescence measurements. Short-term light probe pressure (P0 < 9 mN∕mm2) effects are within 0 ± 10% on all physiological properties extracted from diffuse reflectance and fluorescence measurements, and less than 0 ± 5% for diagnostically significant physiological properties. Absorption decreases with site-specific variations due to blood being compressed out of the sampled volume. Reduced scattering coefficient variation is site specific. Intrinsic fluorescence shows a large standard error, although no specific pressure-related trend is observed. Differences in tissue structure and morphology contribute to site-specific probe pressure effects. Therefore, the effects of pressure can be minimized when the pressure is small and applied for a short amount of time; however, long-term and large pressures induce significant distortions in measured spectra. PMID:21280899

  2. Mach-Number Measurement with Laser and Pressure Probes in Humid Supersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, G. C.

    2008-01-01

    Mach-number measurements using a nonintrusive optical technique, laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA), are compared to pressure probes in humid supersonic airflow. The two techniques agree well in dry flow (-35 C dew point), but LITA measurements show about five times larger fractional change in Mach number than that of the pressure-probe when water is purposefully introduced into the flow. Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed.

  3. Rugged, no-moving-parts windspeed and static pressure probe designs for measurements in planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bedard, A. J., Jr.; Nishiyama, R. T.

    1993-01-01

    Instruments developed for making meteorological observations under adverse conditions on Earth can be applied to systems designed for other planetary atmospheres. Specifically, a wind sensor developed for making measurements within tornados is capable of detecting induced pressure differences proportional to wind speed. Adding strain gauges to the sensor would provide wind direction. The device can be constructed in a rugged form for measuring high wind speeds in the presence of blowing dust that would clog bearings and plug passages of conventional wind speed sensors. Sensing static pressure in the lower boundary layer required development of an omnidirectional, tilt-insensitive static pressure probe. The probe provides pressure inputs to a sensor with minimum error and is inherently weather-protected. The wind sensor and static pressure probes have been used in a variety of field programs and can be adapted for use in different planetary atmospheres.

  4. Evaluation of water cooled supersonic temperature and pressure probes for application to 2000 F flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagen, Nicholas T.; Seiner, John M.

    1990-01-01

    The development of water cooled supersonic probes used to study high temperature jet plumes is addressed. These probes are: total pressure, static pressure, and total temperature. The motivation for these experiments is the determination of high temperature supersonic jet mean flow properties. A 3.54 inch exit diameter water cooled nozzle was used in the tests. It is designed for exit Mach 2 at 2000 F exit total temperature. Tests were conducted using water cooled probes capable of operating in Mach 2 flow, up to 2000 F total temperature. Of the two designs tested, an annular cooling method was chosen as superior. Data at the jet exit planes, and along the jet centerline, were obtained for total temperatures of 900 F, 1500 F, and 2000 F, for each of the probes. The data obtained from the total and static pressure probes are consistent with prior low temperature results. However, the data obtained from the total temperature probe was affected by the water coolant. The total temperature probe was tested up to 2000 F with, and without, the cooling system turned on to better understand the heat transfer process at the thermocouple bead. The rate of heat transfer across the thermocouple bead was greater when the coolant was turned on than when the coolant was turned off. This accounted for the lower temperature measurement by the cooled probe. The velocity and Mach number at the exit plane and centerline locations were determined from the Rayleigh-Pitot tube formula.

  5. Calibration of seven-hole pressure probes for use in fluid flows with large angularity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zilliac, Gregory G.

    1989-01-01

    Described here is the calibration of a non-nulling, conical, seven-hole pressure probe over a large range of flow onset angles. The calibration procedure is based on the use of differential pressures to determine the three components of velocity. The method allows determination of the flow angle to within 0.5 deg and velocity magnitude to approximately 1.0 percent. Also included is an examination of the factors which limit the use of the probe, a description of the measurement chain, an error analysis, and a typical experimental result. In addition, a new general analytical model of pressure probe behavior is described and the validity of the model is demonstrated by comparing it with experimentally measured calibration data for a three-hole yaw meter and a seven-hole probe.

  6. Characterization of laser-driven shock waves in solids using a fiber optic pressure probe

    DOE PAGES

    Cranch, Geoffrey A.; Lunsford, Robert; Grun, Jacob; Weaver, James; Compton, Steve; May, Mark; Kostinski, Natalie

    2013-11-08

    Measurement of laser-driven shock wave pressure in solid blocks of polymethyl methacrylate is demonstrated using fiber optic pressure probes. Three probes based on a fiber Fabry–Perot, fiber Bragg grating, and interferometric fiber tip sensor are tested and compared. Shock waves are generated using a high-power laser focused onto a thin foil target placed in close proximity to the test blocks. The fiber Fabry–Perot sensor appears capable of resolving the shock front with a rise time of 91 ns. As a result, the peak pressure is estimated, using a separate shadowgraphy measurement, to be 3.4 GPa.

  7. A non-invasive probe for online-monitoring of turgor pressure changes under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Westhoff, M; Reuss, R; Zimmermann, D; Netzer, Y; Gessner, A; Gessner, P; Zimmermann, G; Wegner, L H; Bamberg, E; Schwartz, A; Zimmermann, U

    2009-09-01

    An advanced non-invasive, field-suitable and inexpensive leaf patch clamp pressure probe for online-monitoring of the water relations of intact leaves is described. The probe measures the attenuated output patch clamp pressure, P(p), of a clamped leaf in response to an externally applied input pressure, P(clamp). P(clamp) is generated magnetically. P(p) is sensed by a pressure sensor integrated into the magnetic clamp. The magnitude of P(p) depends on the transfer function, T(f), of the leaf cells. T(f) consists of a turgor pressure-independent (related to the compression of the cuticle, cell walls and other structural elements) and a turgor pressure-dependent term. T(f) is dimensionless and assumes values between 0 and 1. Theory shows that T(f) is a power function of cell turgor pressure P(c). Concomitant P(p) and P(c) measurements on grapevines confirmed the relationship between T(f) and P(c). P(p) peaked if P(c) approached zero and assumed low values if P(c) reached maximum values. The novel probe was successfully tested on leaves of irrigated and non-irrigated grapevines under field conditions. Data show that slight changes in the microclimate and/or water supply (by irrigation or rain) are reflected very sensitively in P(p).

  8. An Experimental Evaluation of the Performance of Two Combination Pitot Pressure Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arend, David J.; Saunders, John D.

    2009-01-01

    Experimental tests have been completed which recorded the ability of two combination steady state and high response time varying Pitot probe designs to accurately measure steady stagnation pressure at a single location in a flow field. Tests were conducted of double-barreled and coannular Prati probes in a 3.5 in. diameter free jet probe calibration facility from Mach 0.1 to 0.9. Geometric symmetry and pitch (-40 deg to 40 deg) and yaw (0 deg to 40 deg) angle actuation were used to fully evaluate the probes. These tests revealed that the double-barreled configuration induced error in its steady state measurement at zero incidence that increased consistently with jet Mach number to 1.1 percent at Mach 0.9. For all Mach numbers, the double-barreled probe nulled at a pitch angle of approximately 7.0 deg and provided inconsistent measurements when yawed. The double-barreled probe provided adequate measurements via both its steady state and high response tubes (within +/- 0.15 percent accuracy) over unacceptable ranges of biased pitch and inconsistent yaw angles which varied with Mach number. By comparison, the coannular probe provided accurate measurements (at zero incidence) for all jet Mach numbers as well as over a flow angularity range which varied from +/- 26.0 deg at Mach 0.3 deg to +/- 14.0 deg at Mach 0.9. Based on these results, the Prati probe is established as the preferred design. Further experimental tests are recommended to document the frequency response characteristics of the Prati probe.

  9. Effect on glucose monitoring of pressure exerted by fiber-optic probe: skin model and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chenxi; Zhao, Huijuan; Shi, Zhenzhi; Xu, Kexin

    2012-03-01

    In the research of optical diagnosis, such as noninvasive measurement of blood glucose by near-infrared diffuse-reflectance spectroscopy, the fiber-optic probe are widely used to deliver light to the interested tissue site and collect the light from the tissue. In order to minimize motion artifacts and specula reflectance, the fiber-optic probe contact to tissue site with certain pressure. The spacing between tissue components decreased due to water displacement, while the volumes of cells and elastic fibers are reduced which in turn increase the concentration of the scatter and absorber inside the tissue. In our research a three-layer skin model is established and the Finite Element Method is employed to simulate the deformation of skin tissue caused by fiber-optic probe with different pressure. The change of water volume inside the tissue as well as the concentration and scattering cross section of scatters are considered. The Monte Carlo simulation is utilized to establish the diffuse-reflectance spectroscopy of three-layer skin model before and after compression. The result indicated that the pressure of fiber-optics probe should be controlled less the 50kpa to reduce the influence on measurement.

  10. A multi-probe thermophoretic soot sampling system for high-pressure diffusion flames.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Alex M; Gülder, Ömer L

    2016-05-01

    Optical diagnostics and physical probing of the soot processes in high pressure combustion pose challenges that are not faced in atmospheric flames. One of the preferred methods of studying soot in atmospheric flames is in situ thermophoretic sampling followed by transmission electron microscopy imaging and analysis for soot sizing and morphology. The application of this method of sampling to high pressures has been held back by various operational and mechanical problems. In this work, we describe a rotating disk multi-probe thermophoretic soot sampling system, driven by a microstepping stepper motor, fitted into a high-pressure chamber capable of producing sooting laminar diffusion flames up to 100 atm. Innovative aspects of the sampling system design include an easy and precise control of the sampling time down to 2.6 ms, avoidance of the drawbacks of the pneumatic drivers used in conventional thermophoretic sampling systems, and the capability to collect ten consecutive samples in a single experimental run. Proof of principle experiments were performed using this system in a laminar diffusion flame of methane, and primary soot diameter distributions at various pressures up to 10 atm were determined. High-speed images of the flame during thermophoretic sampling were recorded to assess the influence of probe intrusion on the flow field of the flame.

  11. A multi-probe thermophoretic soot sampling system for high-pressure diffusion flames.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Alex M; Gülder, Ömer L

    2016-05-01

    Optical diagnostics and physical probing of the soot processes in high pressure combustion pose challenges that are not faced in atmospheric flames. One of the preferred methods of studying soot in atmospheric flames is in situ thermophoretic sampling followed by transmission electron microscopy imaging and analysis for soot sizing and morphology. The application of this method of sampling to high pressures has been held back by various operational and mechanical problems. In this work, we describe a rotating disk multi-probe thermophoretic soot sampling system, driven by a microstepping stepper motor, fitted into a high-pressure chamber capable of producing sooting laminar diffusion flames up to 100 atm. Innovative aspects of the sampling system design include an easy and precise control of the sampling time down to 2.6 ms, avoidance of the drawbacks of the pneumatic drivers used in conventional thermophoretic sampling systems, and the capability to collect ten consecutive samples in a single experimental run. Proof of principle experiments were performed using this system in a laminar diffusion flame of methane, and primary soot diameter distributions at various pressures up to 10 atm were determined. High-speed images of the flame during thermophoretic sampling were recorded to assess the influence of probe intrusion on the flow field of the flame. PMID:27250464

  12. A multi-probe thermophoretic soot sampling system for high-pressure diffusion flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, Alex M.; Gülder, Ömer L.

    2016-05-01

    Optical diagnostics and physical probing of the soot processes in high pressure combustion pose challenges that are not faced in atmospheric flames. One of the preferred methods of studying soot in atmospheric flames is in situ thermophoretic sampling followed by transmission electron microscopy imaging and analysis for soot sizing and morphology. The application of this method of sampling to high pressures has been held back by various operational and mechanical problems. In this work, we describe a rotating disk multi-probe thermophoretic soot sampling system, driven by a microstepping stepper motor, fitted into a high-pressure chamber capable of producing sooting laminar diffusion flames up to 100 atm. Innovative aspects of the sampling system design include an easy and precise control of the sampling time down to 2.6 ms, avoidance of the drawbacks of the pneumatic drivers used in conventional thermophoretic sampling systems, and the capability to collect ten consecutive samples in a single experimental run. Proof of principle experiments were performed using this system in a laminar diffusion flame of methane, and primary soot diameter distributions at various pressures up to 10 atm were determined. High-speed images of the flame during thermophoretic sampling were recorded to assess the influence of probe intrusion on the flow field of the flame.

  13. Transonic Wind-Tunnel Tests of an Error-Compensated Static-Pressure Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capone, Francis J.

    1961-01-01

    An investigation of the pressure-sensing characteristics of an error-compensated static-pressure probe mounted on the nose section of a missile body has been conducted in the Langley 16-foot transonic tunnel. The probe was free to rotate about its roll axis and was equipped with a vane so that the crossflow velocity component due to angles of attack or sideslip was always alined with the probe's vertical plane of symmetry. The probe was tested in five axial positions with respect to the missile nose at Mach numbers from 0.30 to 1.08 and at angles of attack from -2.7 to 15.3 deg. The test Reynolds number per foot varied from 1.79 x 10(exp 6) to 4.05 x 10(exp 6). Results showed that at a Mach number of 1.00 the static-pressure error decreased from 3.5 percent to 0.8 percent of the free-stream static pressure, as a result of a change in orifice location from 0.15 maximum missile diameter to 0.20 maximum missile diameter forward of the missile nose. Although compensation for pressure-sensing errors due to angles of attack up to 15.3 was maintained at Mach numbers from M = 0.30 to M = 0.50, there was an increase in error with an increase in angle of attack for Mach numbers between M 0.50 and M = 1.08.

  14. Automated pressure probe for measurement of water transport properties of higher plant cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosgrove, Daniel J.; Durachko, Daniel M.

    1986-10-01

    A computer-assisted instrument was constructed to measure the fundamental physical properties that regulate water transport at the cell level in plants. With this automated pressure probe, we measure a cell's hydrostatic pressure by inserting an oil-filled glass capillary into the cell. The capillary is connected to a pressure sensor and to a plunger controlled by a stepper motor. At the capillary tip an interface forms between the cell sap and oil. The image of this interface is directed through a microscope to a video camera. The interface position is detected by a video processor sampling at 60 Hz and is regulated by a microcomputer which advances or retracts the plunger at rates up to 280 steps per second. To determine the hydraulic conductance of cell membranes, the computer carries out pressure-relaxation and pressure-clamp experiments. Pressure is recorded with a resolution of 0.02 bar and is regulated in pressure-clamp experiments at ±0.02 bar. The instrument measures the cell volumetric elastic modulus by injecting or removing small volumes from the cell while simultaneously measuring cell turgor pressure. This system was tested on the cells of pea seedlings and proved superior to the previous techniques, especially for pressure-clamp experiments and volumetric elastic modulus determinations.

  15. Development of a scanning nanopipette probe microscope for fine processing using atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimatsu, Daisuke; Sugimoto, Hiromitsu; Nakamura, Atsushi; Ogino, Akihisa; Nagatsu, Masaaki; Iwata, Futoshi

    2016-08-01

    We developed a novel technique for fine material processing based on a localized atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (APPJ) using a scanning probe microscope equipped with a nanopipette. Using a nanopipette — a tapered glass capillary with an aperture of sub-micrometer diameter — as a nozzle makes it possible to localize the discharge area of the APPJ for fine surface processing. The nanopipette can also be used as a probe for a scanning probe microscope operated with shear-force feedback control, which is capable of positioning the pipette edge in the vicinity of material surfaces for APPJ processing and imaging of the processed surface. Sub-micrometer holes and line patterns were successfully processed on a photoresist film. It was possible to control the size of the processed patterns by varying the applied pulse voltage and the distance between the pipette and the surface.

  16. Experimental radial motion to orbital motion transition in cylindrical Langmuir probes in low pressure plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Cabrera, J. M.; Ballesteros, J.; Fernández Palop, J. I.; Tejero-del-Caz, A.

    2015-04-01

    This article shows a transition in the behavior of the positive ions movement around a cylindrical Langmuir probe which we have experimentally observed in a low pressure plasma. In the case of helium plasma, depending on the plasma conditions, the ion current collected by the probe behaves as predicted by a radial motion theory, by an orbital motion theory, or by none of them when the transition between the two behaviors takes place. In the case of argon and neon plasmas, the ion current is well described by radial motion theories. The knowledge of the positive ions behavior is essential to diagnose the plasma parameters by using the ion saturation zone of the current-voltage characteristic curve. The use of this zone is one of the less intrusive in probe plasma diagnostics methods providing local information about the plasma parameters, since the charge drained from the plasma is very low.

  17. Pressure-Induced Glass Transition Probed via the Mobility of Coumarin 1 Fluorescent Molecule.

    PubMed

    Bonetti, Marco

    2016-05-12

    The route to form a glass is generally achieved upon cooling where the slowing down might be interpreted as the trapping of molecules in potential wells. On the other hand, isothermal compression induces a glassy state by modifying the molecular packing ending in jamming. Here, we focus on how isothermal compression perturbs the mobility of a probe molecule in three different host liquids up to the pressure-induced glass transition. By use of the fluorescence recovery technique, the diffusion of the fluorescent molecule Coumarin 1 (C1) is measured in poly(propylene glycol) (PPG-1000M and -2700M), in the fragile van der Waals propylene carbonate (PC), and in hydrogen-bonded methanol and ethanol. High pressures up to 6 GPa are obtained with a diamond anvil cell. In PC at a pressure ∼1.3 GPa close to the glass-transition pressure, the diffusion coefficient of C1 follows an Arrhenius behavior with an ∼5 orders of magnitude increase of the diffusive time. No decoupling from the Stokes-Einstein equation is noticed. A similar exponential behavior is measured in ethanol and methanol but extended to different pressure ranges up to 2.5 and 6.2 GPa, respectively. In PPG-1000M a decoupling from the Stokes-Einstein relation is observed between 0.3 and 0.8 GPa that could be related to a modification of the interaction between polymer segments and the probe molecule. These results might indicate that interaction between probe and dynamic heterogeneities become less important under applied pressure, unlike in the temperature-induced glass transition. PMID:27110923

  18. Temperature and pressure effects on capacitance probe cryogenic liquid level measurement accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Lawrence G.; Haberbusch, Mark

    1993-01-01

    The inaccuracies of liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen level measurements by use of a coaxial capacitance probe were investigated as a function of fluid temperatures and pressures. Significant liquid level measurement errors were found to occur due to the changes in the fluids dielectric constants which develop over the operating temperature and pressure ranges of the cryogenic storage tanks. The level measurement inaccuracies can be reduced by using fluid dielectric correction factors based on measured fluid temperatures and pressures. The errors in the corrected liquid level measurements were estimated based on the reported calibration errors of the temperature and pressure measurement systems. Experimental liquid nitrogen (LN2) and liquid hydrogen (LH2) level measurements were obtained using the calibrated capacitance probe equations and also by the dielectric constant correction factor method. The liquid levels obtained by the capacitance probe for the two methods were compared with the liquid level estimated from the fluid temperature profiles. Results show that the dielectric constant corrected liquid levels agreed within 0.5 percent of the temperature profile estimated liquid level. The uncorrected dielectric constant capacitance liquid level measurements deviated from the temperature profile level by more than 5 percent. This paper identifies the magnitude of liquid level measurement error that can occur for LN2 and LH2 fluids due to temperature and pressure effects on the dielectric constants over the tank storage conditions from 5 to 40 psia. A method of reducing the level measurement errors by using dielectric constant correction factors based on fluid temperature and pressure measurements is derived. The improved accuracy by use of the correction factors is experimentally verified by comparing liquid levels derived from fluid temperature profiles.

  19. Could Nano-Structured Materials Enable the Improved Pressure Vessels for Deep Atmospheric Probes?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, D.; Fuentes, A.; Bienstock, B.; Arnold, J. O.

    2005-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the use of Nano-Structured Materials to enable pressure vessel structures for deep atmospheric probes is shown. The topics include: 1) High Temperature/Pressure in Key X-Environments; 2) The Case for Use of Nano-Structured Materials Pressure Vessel Design; 3) Carbon based Nanomaterials; 4) Nanotube production & purification; 5) Nanomechanics of Carbon Nanotubes; 6) CNT-composites: Example (Polymer); 7) Effect of Loading sequence on Composite with 8% by volume; 8) Models for Particulate Reinforced Composites; 9) Fullerene/Ti Composite for High Strength-Insulating Layer; 10) Fullerene/Epoxy Composite for High Strength-Insulating Layer; 11) Models for Continuous Fiber Reinforced Composites; 12) Tensile Strength for Discontinuous Fiber Composite; 13) Ti + SWNT Composites: Thermal/Mechanical; 14) Ti + SWNT Composites: Tensile Strength; and 15) Nano-structured Shell for Pressure Vessels.

  20. Embedded optical probes for simultaneous pressure and temperature measurement of materials in extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandberg, Richard; Rodriguez, George; Gibson, Lee; Dattelbaum, Dana; Udd, Eric

    2013-06-01

    We present a new technique for simultaneous, in situ pressure and temperature measurements under dynamic conditions by using an all-optical fiber-based approach. While similar tests have been done previously in deflagration-to-detonation tests (DDT), where pressure and temperature were measured to 82 kbar and 400 °C simultaneously, here we demonstrate the use of embedded fiber grating sensors to obtain high temporal resolution in situ pressure measurements in inert materials under precise shock loading from a gas-gun driven plate impact. The system capitalizes on existing telecom components and fast transient digitizing recording technology. It operates as a relatively inexpensive embedded probe (single-mode 1550 nm fiber-based Bragg grating - FBG) that provides a continuous fast pressure record during shock and/or detonation. Fiber Bragg grating sensors have predictable thermal and mechanical response properties with pressure spectrally shifting the reflectance peak at λ = 1550 nm to the blue and temperature shifting the peak to the red. By applying well-controlled steady shock wave pressure profiles to soft materials such as PMMA, we study the dynamic pressure response of embedded fiber Bragg gratings to extract pressure amplitude of the shock wave and compare our results with in situ particle velocity wave profiles measured simultaneously.

  1. Embedded optical probes for simultaneous pressure and temperature measurement of materials in extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandberg, R. L.; Rodriguez, G.; Gibson, L. L.; Dattelbaum, D. M.; Stevens, G. D.; Grover, M.; Lalone, B. M.; Udd, E.

    2014-05-01

    We present recent efforts at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to develop sensors for simultaneous, in situ pressure and temperature measurements under dynamic conditions by using an all-optical fiber-based approach. While similar tests have been done previously in deflagration-to-detonation tests (DDT), where pressure and temperature were measured to 82 kbar and 400°C simultaneously, here we demonstrate the use of embedded fiber grating sensors to obtain high temporal resolution, in situ pressure measurements in inert materials. We present two experimental demonstrations of pressure measurements: (1) under precise shock loading from a gas-gun driven plate impact and (2) under high explosive driven shock in a water filled vessel. The system capitalizes on existing telecom components and fast transient digitizing recording technology. It operates as a relatively inexpensive embedded probe (single-mode 1550 nm fiber-based Bragg grating) that provides a continuous fast pressure record during shock and/or detonation. By applying well-controlled shock wave pressure profiles to these inert materials, we study the dynamic pressure response of embedded fiber Bragg gratings to extract pressure amplitude of the shock wave and compare our results with particle velocity wave profiles measured simultaneously.

  2. Signal Analysis and Waveform Reconstruction of Shock Waves Generated by Underwater Electrical Wire Explosions with Piezoelectric Pressure Probes

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Haibin; Zhang, Yongmin; Han, Ruoyu; Jing, Yan; Wu, Jiawei; Liu, Qiaojue; Ding, Weidong; Qiu, Aici

    2016-01-01

    Underwater shock waves (SWs) generated by underwater electrical wire explosions (UEWEs) have been widely studied and applied. Precise measurement of this kind of SWs is important, but very difficult to accomplish due to their high peak pressure, steep rising edge and very short pulse width (on the order of tens of μs). This paper aims to analyze the signals obtained by two kinds of commercial piezoelectric pressure probes, and reconstruct the correct pressure waveform from the distorted one measured by the pressure probes. It is found that both PCB138 and Müller-plate probes can be used to measure the relative SW pressure value because of their good uniformities and linearities, but none of them can obtain precise SW waveforms. In order to approach to the real SW signal better, we propose a new multi-exponential pressure waveform model, which has considered the faster pressure decay at the early stage and the slower pressure decay in longer times. Based on this model and the energy conservation law, the pressure waveform obtained by the PCB138 probe has been reconstructed, and the reconstruction accuracy has been verified by the signals obtained by the Müller-plate probe. Reconstruction results show that the measured SW peak pressures are smaller than the real signal. The waveform reconstruction method is both reasonable and reliable. PMID:27110789

  3. Signal Analysis and Waveform Reconstruction of Shock Waves Generated by Underwater Electrical Wire Explosions with Piezoelectric Pressure Probes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Haibin; Zhang, Yongmin; Han, Ruoyu; Jing, Yan; Wu, Jiawei; Liu, Qiaojue; Ding, Weidong; Qiu, Aici

    2016-01-01

    Underwater shock waves (SWs) generated by underwater electrical wire explosions (UEWEs) have been widely studied and applied. Precise measurement of this kind of SWs is important, but very difficult to accomplish due to their high peak pressure, steep rising edge and very short pulse width (on the order of tens of μs). This paper aims to analyze the signals obtained by two kinds of commercial piezoelectric pressure probes, and reconstruct the correct pressure waveform from the distorted one measured by the pressure probes. It is found that both PCB138 and Müller-plate probes can be used to measure the relative SW pressure value because of their good uniformities and linearities, but none of them can obtain precise SW waveforms. In order to approach to the real SW signal better, we propose a new multi-exponential pressure waveform model, which has considered the faster pressure decay at the early stage and the slower pressure decay in longer times. Based on this model and the energy conservation law, the pressure waveform obtained by the PCB138 probe has been reconstructed, and the reconstruction accuracy has been verified by the signals obtained by the Müller-plate probe. Reconstruction results show that the measured SW peak pressures are smaller than the real signal. The waveform reconstruction method is both reasonable and reliable. PMID:27110789

  4. Langmuir probe diagnostics of an atmospheric pressure, vortex-stabilized nitrogen plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Prevosto, L.; Mancinelli, B. R.; Kelly, H.

    2012-09-15

    Langmuir probe measurements in an atmospheric pressure direct current (dc) plasma jet are reported. Sweeping probes were used. The experiment was carried out using a dc non-transferred arc torch with a rod-type cathode and an anode of 5 mm diameter. The torch was operated at a nominal power level of 15 kW with a nitrogen flow rate of 25 Nl min{sup -1}. A flat ion saturation region was found in the current-voltage curve of the probe. The ion saturation current to a cylindrical probe in a high-pressure non local thermal equilibrium (LTE) plasma was modeled. Thermal effects and ionization/recombination processes inside the probe perturbed region were taken into account. Averaged radial profiles of the electron and heavy particle temperatures as well as the electron density were obtained. An electron temperature around 11 000 K, a heavy particle temperature around 9500 K and an electron density of about 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 22} m{sup -3}, were found at the jet centre at 3.5 mm downstream from the torch exit. Large deviations from kinetic equilibrium were found throughout the plasma jet. The electron and heavy particle temperature profiles showed good agreement with those reported in the literature by using spectroscopic techniques. It was also found that the temperature radial profile based on LTE was very close to that of the electrons. The calculations have shown that this method is particularly useful for studying spraying-type plasma jets characterized by electron temperatures in the range 9000-14 000 K.

  5. Effects of environmental parameters and irrigation on the turgor pressure of banana plants measured using the non-invasive, online monitoring leaf patch clamp pressure probe.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, U; Rüger, S; Shapira, O; Westhoff, M; Wegner, L H; Reuss, R; Gessner, P; Zimmermann, G; Israeli, Y; Zhou, A; Schwartz, A; Bamberg, E; Zimmermann, D

    2010-05-01

    Turgor pressure provides a sensitive indicator for irrigation scheduling. Leaf turgor pressure of Musa acuminate was measured by using the so-called leaf patch clamp pressure probe, i.e. by application of an external, magnetically generated and constantly retained clamp pressure to a leaf patch and determination of the attenuated output pressure P(p) that is highly correlated with the turgor pressure. Real-time recording of P(p) values was made using wireless telemetric transmitters, which send the data to a receiver base station where data are logged and transferred to a GPRS modem linked to an Internet server. Probes functioned over several months under field and laboratory conditions without damage to the leaf patch. Measurements showed that the magnetic-based probe could monitor very sensitively changes in turgor pressure induced by changes in microclimate (temperature, relative humidity, irradiation and wind) and irrigation. Irrigation effects could clearly be distinguished from environmental effects. Interestingly, oscillations in stomatal aperture, which occurred frequently below turgor pressures of 100 kPa towards noon at high transpiration or at high wind speed, were reflected in the P(p) values. The period of pressure oscillations was comparable with the period of oscillations in transpiration and photosynthesis. Multiple probe readings on individual leaves and/or on several leaves over the entire height of the plants further emphasised the great impact of this non-invasive turgor pressure sensor system for elucidating the dynamics of short- and long-distance water transport in higher plants.

  6. Theoretical derivation and calibration technique of a hemispherical-tipped, five-hole probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kjelgaard, Scott O.

    1988-01-01

    A technique is presented for the calibration of a hemispherical tipped 0.125 inch diameter 5-hole probe. The derivation of equations from the potential flow over a sphere relating the flow angle and velocity to pressure differentials measured by the probe is presented. The technique for acquiring the calibration data and the technique used to calculate the calibration coefficients are presented. The accuracy of the probe in both the uniform calibration flow field and the nonuniform flow field over a 75 degree swept delta wing is discussed.

  7. Effect of probe contact pressure on the photoplethysmographic assessment of conduit artery stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabovskis, Andris; Marcinkevics, Zbignevs; Rubins, Uldis; Kviesis-Kipge, Edgars

    2013-02-01

    Currently, photoplethysmography (PPG) is a frequently studied optical blood pulsation detection technique among biophotonic and biomedical researchers due to the fact that it shows high potential for estimating the arterial stiffness (AS). The extraction of diagnostically useful information requires standardized measurement procedure with good repeatability. However, the effects of a crucially important factor-the optimal contact pressure (CP) of the probe-are often ignored. Also, CP values are not reported to evaluate those effects. It is hypothesized that AS estimated from PPG pulse wave 2nd derivative parameter b/a is strongly inconsistent when recorded at nonoptimal probe CP. Our pilot study confirmed this during in vivo PPG recordings from conduit artery sites on five healthy subjects at variable probe CP (0 to 15 kPa) by using 880 nm reflectance type sensor, force transducer, and PPG alternating current (AC) signal pulse area derived optimal CP criterion. The b/a values, calculated from PPG with variable CP, showed variation >300 percent. In contrast, at the optimal CP, the b/a showed high repeatability (coefficient of variability <5 percent). The effect has been explained with exponential pulse pressure-volume relationship model which indicates the optimal CP range.

  8. Leaf patch clamp pressure probe measurements on olive leaves in a nearly turgorless state.

    PubMed

    Ehrenberger, W; Rüger, S; Rodríguez-Domínguez, C M; Díaz-Espejo, A; Fernández, J E; Moreno, J; Zimmermann, D; Sukhorukov, V L; Zimmermann, U

    2012-07-01

    The non-invasive leaf patch clamp pressure (LPCP) probe measures the attenuated pressure of a leaf patch, P(p) , in response to an externally applied magnetic force. P(p) is inversely coupled with leaf turgor pressure, P(c) , i.e. at high P(c) values the P(p) values are small and at low P(c) values the P(p) values are high. This relationship between P(c) and P(p) could also be verified for 2-m tall olive trees under laboratory conditions using the cell turgor pressure probe. When the laboratory plants were subjected to severe water stress (P(c) dropped below ca. 50 kPa), P(p) curves show reverse diurnal changes, i.e. during the light regime (high transpiration) a minimum P(p) value, and during darkness a peak P(p) value is recorded. This reversal of the P(p) curves was completely reversible. Upon watering, the original diurnal P(p) changes were re-established within 2-3 days. Olive trees in the field showed a similar turnover of the shape of the P(p) curves upon drought, despite pronounced fluctuations in microclimate. The reversal of the P(p) curves is most likely due to accumulation of air in the leaves. This assumption was supported with cross-sections through leaves subjected to prolonged drought. In contrast to well-watered leaves, microscopic inspection of leaves exhibiting inverse diurnal P(p) curves revealed large air-filled areas in parenchyma tissue. Significantly larger amounts of air could also be extracted from water-stressed leaves than from well-watered leaves using the cell turgor pressure probe. Furthermore, theoretical analysis of the experimental P(p) curves shows that the propagation of pressure through the nearly turgorless leaf must be exclusively dictated by air. Equations are derived that provide valuable information about the water status of olive leaves close to zero P(c) .

  9. High sensitivity nuclear magnetic resonance probe for anvil cell pressure experiments.

    PubMed

    Haase, Jürgen; Goh, Swee K; Meissner, Thomas; Alireza, Patricia L; Rybicki, Damian

    2009-07-01

    While the highest pressures can be achieved with diamond anvil cells, limited sample size and anvil geometry have hampered their application in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments due to weak signal-to-noise. Here we report a new probe design that is based on having the resonant radio frequency coil that encloses the sample within the anvil cell inside the gasket hole. This increases the filling factor tremendously and results in greatly enhanced NMR sensitivity. The setup is described together with room temperature Na and Al NMR experiments. PMID:19655963

  10. Pressure probe study of the water relations of Phycomyces blakesleeanus sporangiophores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. J.; Ortega, J. K.; Shropshire, W. Jr

    1987-01-01

    The physical characteristics which govern the water relations of the giant-celled sporangiophore of Phycomyces blakesleeanus were measured with the pressure probe technique and with nanoliter osmometry. These properties are important because they govern water uptake associated with cell growth and because they may influence expansion of the sporangiophore wall. Turgor pressure ranged from 1.1 to 6.6 bars (mean = 4.1 bars), and was the same for stage I and stage IV sporangiophores. Sporangiophore osmotic pressure averaged 11.5 bars. From the difference between cell osmotic pressure and turgor pressure, the average water potential of the sporangiophore was calculated to be about -7.4 bars. When sporangiophores were submerged under water, turgor remained nearly constant. We propose that the low cell turgor pressure is due to solutes in the cell wall solution, i.e., between the cuticle and the plasma membrane. Membrane hydraulic conductivity averaged 4.6 x 10(-6) cm s-1 bar-1, and was significantly greater in stage I sporangiophores than in stage IV sporangiophores. Contrary to previous reports, the sporangiophore is separated from the supporting mycelium by septa which prevent bulk volume flow between the two regions. The presence of a wall compartment between the cuticle and the plasma membrane results in anomalous osmosis during pressure clamp measurements. This behavior arises because of changes in solute concentration as water moves into or out of the wall compartment surrounding the sporangiophore. Theoretical analysis shows how the equations governing transient water flow are altered by the characteristics of the cell wall compartment.

  11. Adsorption of 2-propanol on ice probed by ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Newberg, John T.; Bluhm, Hendrik

    2015-08-18

    The interaction of 2-propanol with ice was examined via ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS), a surface sensitive technique that probes the adsorbed 2-propanol directly with submonolayer resolution. Isothermal uptake experiments were performed on vapor deposited ice at 227 K in the presence of the equilibrium water vapor pressure of 0.05 Torr and 2-propanol partial pressures ranging from 5 × 10-5 to 2 × 10-3 Torr. The C 1s APXPS spectra of adsorbed 2-propanol showed two characteristic peaks associated with the COH alcohol group and CMe methyl groups in a 1 : 2 ratio, respectively. Coverage increased with 2-propanol partialmore » pressure and followed first order Langmuir kinetics with a Langmuir constant of K = 6.3 × 103 Torr-1. The 1 : 2 ratio of COH : CMe remained constant with increasing coverage, indicating there is no chemical reaction upon adsorption. The observed Langmuir kinetics using APXPS is consistent with previous observations of other small chain alcohols via indirect adsorption methods using, e.g., Knudsen cell and coated wall flow tube reactors.« less

  12. Adsorption of 2-propanol on ice probed by ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Newberg, John T.; Bluhm, Hendrik

    2015-08-18

    The interaction of 2-propanol with ice was examined via ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS), a surface sensitive technique that probes the adsorbed 2-propanol directly with submonolayer resolution. Isothermal uptake experiments were performed on vapor deposited ice at 227 K in the presence of the equilibrium water vapor pressure of 0.05 Torr and 2-propanol partial pressures ranging from 5 × 10-5 to 2 × 10-3 Torr. The C 1s APXPS spectra of adsorbed 2-propanol showed two characteristic peaks associated with the COH alcohol group and CMe methyl groups in a 1 : 2 ratio, respectively. Coverage increased with 2-propanol partial pressure and followed first order Langmuir kinetics with a Langmuir constant of K = 6.3 × 103 Torr-1. The 1 : 2 ratio of COH : CMe remained constant with increasing coverage, indicating there is no chemical reaction upon adsorption. The observed Langmuir kinetics using APXPS is consistent with previous observations of other small chain alcohols via indirect adsorption methods using, e.g., Knudsen cell and coated wall flow tube reactors.

  13. Adsorption of 2-propanol on ice probed by ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Newberg, John T; Bluhm, Hendrik

    2015-09-28

    The interaction of 2-propanol with ice was examined via ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS), a surface sensitive technique that probes the adsorbed 2-propanol directly with submonolayer resolution. Isothermal uptake experiments were performed on vapor deposited ice at 227 K in the presence of the equilibrium water vapor pressure of 0.05 Torr and 2-propanol partial pressures ranging from 5 × 10(-5) to 2 × 10(-3) Torr. The C 1s APXPS spectra of adsorbed 2-propanol showed two characteristic peaks associated with the COH alcohol group and CMe methyl groups in a 1 : 2 ratio, respectively. Coverage increased with 2-propanol partial pressure and followed first order Langmuir kinetics with a Langmuir constant of K = 6.3 × 10(3) Torr(-1). The 1 : 2 ratio of COH : CMe remained constant with increasing coverage, indicating there is no chemical reaction upon adsorption. The observed Langmuir kinetics using APXPS is consistent with previous observations of other small chain alcohols via indirect adsorption methods using, e.g., Knudsen cell and coated wall flow tube reactors. PMID:26299301

  14. Predicting physical stability in pressurized metered dose inhalers via dwell and instantaneous force colloidal probe microscopy.

    PubMed

    D'Sa, Dexter; Chan, Hak-Kim; Chrzanowski, Wojciech

    2014-09-01

    Colloidal probe microscopy (CPM) is a quantitative predictive tool, which can offer insight into particle behavior in suspension pressurized metered dose inhalers (pMDIs). Although CPM instantaneous force measurements, which involve immediate retraction of the probe upon sample contact, can provide information on inter-particle attractive forces, they lack the ability to appropriately imitate all critical particle pMDI interactions (e.g., particle re-dispersion after prolonged pMDI storage). In this paper, two novel dwell force techniques - indentation and deflection dwell - were employed to mimic long-term particle interactions present in pMDIs, using particles of various internal structures and a model liquid propellant (2H,3H perfluoropentane) as a model system. Dwell measurements involve particle contact for an extended period of time. In deflection dwell mode the probe is held at a specific position, while in indentation dwell mode the probe is forced into the sample with a constant force for the entirety of the contact time. To evaluate the applicability of CPM to predict actual pMDI physical stability, inter-particle force measurements were compared with qualitative and quantitative bulk pMDI measurement techniques (visual quality and light scattering). Measured instantaneous attractive (snap-in) and adhesive (max-pull) forces decreased as a function of increasing surface area, while adhesive forces measured by indentation dwell decreased as a function of dwell contact time for particles containing voids. Instantaneous force measurements provided information on the likelihood of floccule formation, which was predictive of partitioning rates, while indentation dwell force measurements were predictive of formulation re-dispersibility after prolonged storage. Dwell force measurements provide additional information on particle behavior within a pMDI not obtainable via instantaneous measurements. PMID:25058596

  15. Parallel pathways and free-energy landscapes for enzymatic hydride transfer probed by hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Pudney, Christopher R; McGrory, Tom; Lafite, Pierre; Pang, Jiayun; Hay, Sam; Leys, David; Sutcliffe, Michael J; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2009-05-25

    arising from multiple conformational states of the enzyme-coenzyme complex. Hydrostatic pressure is a powerful and general probe of multidimensional energy landscapes that can be used to analyse experimentally parallel pathways for enzyme-catalysed reactions. We suggest that this is especially the case following directed mutation of a protein, which can lead to increased population of reactant states that are essentially inaccessible in the free-energy landscape of wild-type enzyme.

  16. Development of an improved-contact liquid-level probe for pressurized reactor vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsey, P.V. Jr.

    1982-09-01

    Electrical-conductivity-based probes for liquid level sensing show promise for pressurized water reactor environments, but have exhibited frequent bond failures at the ceramic/metal interfaces. A program to characterize and improve the interface behavior has been completed successfully, and has provided data for optimizing fabrication parameters, as well as general information on glass-to-metal bonding in a superalloy/silicate-glass system. The materials studied were Inconel X-750 and a barium silicate glass containing minor amounts of TiO/sub 2/, CeO/sub 2/, As/sub 2/O/sub 3/, Bi/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/.

  17. Problems affecting the fidelity of pressure measuring instruments for planetary probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, J. B.

    1972-01-01

    Determination is made of the nature and magnitude of surface-related effects that cause errors in pressure measuring instruments, with special reference being made to instruments intended for use in planetary probes. The interaction of gases with clean surfaces of metals likely to be used as gage construction materials was studied. Special emphasis was placed on the adsorption, chemical reaction, and electron-induced desorption processes. The results indicated that all metals tested were subject to surface processes which would degrade gage fidelity. It was also found, however, that the formation of inert adsorbed layers on these metal surfaces, such as carbon on platinum, greatly reduced or eliminated these effects. This process, combined with a system design which avoids contact between reactive gases and hot filaments, appears to offer the most promising solution to the gage fidelity problem.

  18. Calibration in a potential water jet of a five-hole pressure probe with embedded sensors for unsteady flow measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duquesne, P.; Desch"nes, C.; Iliescu, M.; Ciocan, G. D.

    2010-03-01

    Investigations of the flow behavior are currently carried out experimentally on models of hydraulic turbines. Quantities such as unsteady velocity can be acquired using PIV or LDV techniques, static wall pressure using steady or unsteady pressure transducers and wall shear stress using hot-film anemometry. More rarely acquired however, the unsteady total pressure at different locations in the flowstream would give more information on the flow dynamics and would be a key component for setting boundary conditions for CFD simulations. Following the example of classical Pitot tubes, which can only give averaged pressure values though, we have developed a five-hole pressure probe with embedded sensors that can measure unsteady values of total pressure, local flow velocity and direction. The probe head is designed to have a minimum impact on the flowstream, and the miniature sensors are placed in a cross configuration compared to the probe's support axis. This paper focuses on the utilization of normalized calibration coefficients and their use for unsteady values, and on the justification for using our cross sensor repartition. The calibration setup is presented briefly, including a water potential jet that requires the calculation of specific calibration coefficients. Different phenomena were observed during experimentation. Their impact on the accuracy of the probe is analyzed. The probe's operation range for this particular calibration setup is discussed. Finally, we focus on the influence of the sensors repartition on the tridimensional shape of the calibration coefficients, and we provide a way to calculate the first approximate solution for the reverse calculus while the sensors are not aligned with the probe's arm.

  19. Calibration in a potential water jet of a five-hole pressure probe with embedded sensors for unsteady flow measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duquesne, P.; Deschênes, C.; Iliescu, M.; Ciocan, G. D.

    2009-12-01

    Investigations of the flow behavior are currently carried out experimentally on models of hydraulic turbines. Quantities such as unsteady velocity can be acquired using PIV or LDV techniques, static wall pressure using steady or unsteady pressure transducers and wall shear stress using hot-film anemometry. More rarely acquired however, the unsteady total pressure at different locations in the flowstream would give more information on the flow dynamics and would be a key component for setting boundary conditions for CFD simulations. Following the example of classical Pitot tubes, which can only give averaged pressure values though, we have developed a five-hole pressure probe with embedded sensors that can measure unsteady values of total pressure, local flow velocity and direction. The probe head is designed to have a minimum impact on the flowstream, and the miniature sensors are placed in a cross configuration compared to the probe's support axis. This paper focuses on the utilization of normalized calibration coefficients and their use for unsteady values, and on the justification for using our cross sensor repartition. The calibration setup is presented briefly, including a water potential jet that requires the calculation of specific calibration coefficients. Different phenomena were observed during experimentation. Their impact on the accuracy of the probe is analyzed. The probe's operation range for this particular calibration setup is discussed. Finally, we focus on the influence of the sensors repartition on the tridimensional shape of the calibration coefficients, and we provide a way to calculate the first approximate solution for the reverse calculus while the sensors are not aligned with the probe's arm.

  20. Coaxial probe and apparatus for measuring the dielectric spectra of high pressure liquids and supercritical fluid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung B.; Smith, Richard L.; Inomata, Hiroshi; Arai, Kunio

    2000-11-01

    A probe and apparatus were developed for measuring the dielectric spectra (complex permittivity) of high pressure liquids and supercritical fluid mixtures. The probe consisted a 2.2 mm semirigid coaxial cable that was cut off flat and mounted into a high pressure tube. The apparatus for measuring complex permittivity consisted of the dielectric probe, cell, densimeter, piston for varying the system density at constant composition, and magnetic pump for agitation and recirculation, all of which were housed in a constant temperature air bath. The probe is simple, robust, inexpensive, and further, its design allows for quick connection to high pressure systems. Probe accuracy is estimated to be ±0.5 in ɛ' and ±0.5 in ɛ″ from 200 MHz to 18 GHz based on replicate measurements of calibration and 2σ deviations over the interval. Dielectric spectra were measured over the 200 MHz-20 GHz range for methanol+carbon dioxide mixture at 323.2 K and a pressures up to 18 MPa.

  1. Safety profile and probe placement accuracy of intraspinal pressure monitoring for traumatic spinal cord injury: Injured Spinal Cord Pressure Evaluation study.

    PubMed

    Phang, Isaac; Zoumprouli, Argyro; Saadoun, Samira; Papadopoulos, Marios C

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE A novel technique for monitoring intraspinal pressure and spinal cord perfusion pressure in patients with traumatic spinal cord injury was recently described. This is analogous to monitoring intracranial pressure and cerebral perfusion pressure in patients with traumatic brain injury. Because intraspinal pressure monitoring is a new technique, its safety profile and impact on early patient care and long-term outcome after traumatic spinal cord injury are unknown. The object of this study is to review all patients who had intraspinal pressure monitoring to date at the authors' institution in order to define the accuracy of intraspinal pressure probe placement and the safety of the technique. METHODS At the end of surgery to fix spinal fractures, a pressure probe was inserted intradurally to monitor intraspinal pressure at the injury site. Postoperatively, CT scanning was performed within 48 hours and MRI at 2 weeks and 6 months. Neurointensive care management and complications were reviewed. The American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) grade was determined on admission and at 2 to 4 weeks and 12 to 18 months postoperation. RESULTS To date, 42 patients with severe traumatic spinal cord injuries (AIS Grades A-C) had undergone intraspinal pressure monitoring. Monitoring started within 72 hours of injury and continued for up to a week. Based on postoperative CT and MRI, the probe position was acceptable in all patients, i.e., the probe was located at the site of maximum spinal cord swelling. Complications were probe displacement in 1 of 42 patients (2.4%), CSF leakage that required wound resuturing in 3 of 42 patients (7.1%), and asymptomatic pseudomeningocele that was diagnosed in 8 of 42 patients (19.0%). Pseudomeningocele was diagnosed on MRI and resolved within 6 months in all patients. Based on the MRI and neurological examination results, there were no serious probe-related complications such as meningitis, wound infection, hematoma

  2. Probing the Hydrogen Sublattice of FeHx with High-Pressure Neutron Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, C. A.; Guthrie, M.; Boehler, R.; Somayazulu, M.; Fei, Y.; Molaison, J.; dos Santos, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    The combination of seismic, cosmochemical, and mineral physics observations have revealed that Earth's iron-rich core must contain some light elements, such as hydrogen, carbon, oxygen, silicon, and/or sulfur. Therefore, understanding the influence of these light elements on the structural, thermoelastic, and electronic properties of iron is important for constraining the composition of this remote layer of the Earth and, in turn, providing constraints on planetary differentiation and core formation models. The high-pressure structural and magnetic properties of iron hydride (FeHx) have previously been studied using synchrotron x-ray diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Such experiments revealed that the double hexagonal close-packed (dhcp) structure of FeHx is stable above a pressure of ~5 GPa and up to at least 80 GPa at 300 K [1]. In addition, dhcp-FeHx is ferromagnetic at low-pressures, but undergoes a magnetic collapse around 22 GPa [2]. X-ray experiments provide valuable insight into the properties of FeHx, but such techniques are largely sensitive to the iron component because it is difficult to detect the hydrogen sublattice with x-rays. Therefore, neutron diffraction has been used to investigate metastable FeHx, which is formed by quenching the high-pressure phase to liquid nitrogen temperatures and probing the sample at ambient pressure [3]. However, such neutron experiments have been limited to formation pressures below 10 GPa, and cannot be performed at ambient temperature. Here we present the first in-situ investigation of FeHx at 300 K using high-pressure neutron diffraction experiments performed at the Spallation Neutrons and Pressure Diffractometer (SNAP) instrument at the Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. In order to achieve pressures of ~50 GPa, we loaded iron samples with a hydrogen gas pressure medium into newly designed large-volume panoramic diamond-anvil cells (DACs) for neutron diffraction experiments [4; 5]. We

  3. Intra-Tissue Pressure Measurement in Ex Vivo Liver Undergoing Laser Ablation with Fiber-Optic Fabry-Perot Probe

    PubMed Central

    Tosi, Daniele; Saccomandi, Paola; Schena, Emiliano; Duraibabu, Dinesh Babu; Poeggel, Sven; Leen, Gabriel; Lewis, Elfed

    2016-01-01

    We report the first-ever intra-tissue pressure measurement performed during 1064 nm laser ablation (LA) of an ex vivo porcine liver. Pressure detection has been performed with a biocompatible, all-glass, temperature-insensitive Extrinsic Fabry-Perot Interferometry (EFPI) miniature probe; the proposed methodology mimics in-vivo treatment. Four experiments have been performed, positioning the probe at different positions from the laser applicator tip (from 0.5 mm to 5 mm). Pressure levels increase during ablation time, and decrease with distance from applicator tip: the recorded peak parenchymal pressure levels range from 1.9 kPa to 71.6 kPa. Different pressure evolutions have been recorded, as pressure rises earlier in proximity of the tip. The present study is the first investigation of parenchymal pressure detection in liver undergoing LA: the successful detection of intra-tissue pressure may be a key asset for improving LA, as pressure levels have been correlated to scattered recurrences of tumors by different studies. PMID:27092504

  4. Intra-Tissue Pressure Measurement in Ex Vivo Liver Undergoing Laser Ablation with Fiber-Optic Fabry-Perot Probe.

    PubMed

    Tosi, Daniele; Saccomandi, Paola; Schena, Emiliano; Duraibabu, Dinesh Babu; Poeggel, Sven; Leen, Gabriel; Lewis, Elfed

    2016-04-15

    We report the first-ever intra-tissue pressure measurement performed during 1064 nm laser ablation (LA) of an ex vivo porcine liver. Pressure detection has been performed with a biocompatible, all-glass, temperature-insensitive Extrinsic Fabry-Perot Interferometry (EFPI) miniature probe; the proposed methodology mimics in-vivo treatment. Four experiments have been performed, positioning the probe at different positions from the laser applicator tip (from 0.5 mm to 5 mm). Pressure levels increase during ablation time, and decrease with distance from applicator tip: the recorded peak parenchymal pressure levels range from 1.9 kPa to 71.6 kPa. Different pressure evolutions have been recorded, as pressure rises earlier in proximity of the tip. The present study is the first investigation of parenchymal pressure detection in liver undergoing LA: the successful detection of intra-tissue pressure may be a key asset for improving LA, as pressure levels have been correlated to scattered recurrences of tumors by different studies.

  5. Intra-Tissue Pressure Measurement in Ex Vivo Liver Undergoing Laser Ablation with Fiber-Optic Fabry-Perot Probe.

    PubMed

    Tosi, Daniele; Saccomandi, Paola; Schena, Emiliano; Duraibabu, Dinesh Babu; Poeggel, Sven; Leen, Gabriel; Lewis, Elfed

    2016-01-01

    We report the first-ever intra-tissue pressure measurement performed during 1064 nm laser ablation (LA) of an ex vivo porcine liver. Pressure detection has been performed with a biocompatible, all-glass, temperature-insensitive Extrinsic Fabry-Perot Interferometry (EFPI) miniature probe; the proposed methodology mimics in-vivo treatment. Four experiments have been performed, positioning the probe at different positions from the laser applicator tip (from 0.5 mm to 5 mm). Pressure levels increase during ablation time, and decrease with distance from applicator tip: the recorded peak parenchymal pressure levels range from 1.9 kPa to 71.6 kPa. Different pressure evolutions have been recorded, as pressure rises earlier in proximity of the tip. The present study is the first investigation of parenchymal pressure detection in liver undergoing LA: the successful detection of intra-tissue pressure may be a key asset for improving LA, as pressure levels have been correlated to scattered recurrences of tumors by different studies. PMID:27092504

  6. Laser-Doppler acoustic probing of granular media with in-depth property gradient and varying pore pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Bodet, L.; Dhemaied, A.; Mourgues, R.; Tournat, V.; Rejiba, F.

    2012-05-24

    Non-contacting ultrasonic techniques recently proved to be efficient in the physical modeling of seismic-wave propagation at various application scales, as for instance in the context of geological analogue and seismic modeling. An innovative experimental set-up is proposed here to perform laser-Doppler acoustic probing of unconsolidated granular media with varying pore pressures. The preliminary experiments presented here provide reproducible results and exploitable data, thus validating both the proposed medium preparation and pressure gradient generation procedure.

  7. Measurement of effective sheath width around cutoff probe in low-pressure plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, D. W.; Oh, W. Y.; You, S. J. Kim, J. H.; Chang, H. Y.

    2014-05-15

    Previous studies indicated that the measurement results of microwave probes can be improved by applying the adequate sheath width to their measurement models, and consequently the sheath width around the microwave probe tips has become very important information for microwave probe diagnostics. In this paper, we propose a method for measuring the argon plasma sheath width around the cutoff probe tips by applying the circuit model to the cutoff probe phase spectrum. The measured sheath width of the cutoff probe was found to be in good agreement with the floated sheath width calculated from the Child-Langmuir sheath law. The physical reasons for a discrepancy between the two measurements are also discussed.

  8. Does Rebound Tonometry Probe Misalignment Modify Intraocular Pressure Measurements in Human Eyes?

    PubMed Central

    Beasley, Ian G.; Laughton, Deborah S.; Coldrick, Benjamin J.; Drew, Thomas E.; Sallah, Marium; Davies, Leon N.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To examine the influence of positional misalignments on intraocular pressure (IOP) measurement with a rebound tonometer. Methods. Using the iCare rebound tonometer, IOP readings were taken from the right eye of 36 healthy subjects at the central corneal apex (CC) and compared to IOP measures using the Goldmann applanation tonometer (GAT). Using a bespoke rig, iCare IOP readings were also taken 2 mm laterally from CC, both nasally and temporally, along with angular deviations of 5 and 10 degrees, both nasally and temporally to the visual axis. Results. Mean IOP ± SD, as measured by GAT, was 14.7 ± 2.5 mmHg versus iCare tonometer readings of 17.4 ± 3.6 mmHg at CC, representing an iCare IOP overestimation of 2.7 ± 2.8 mmHg (P < 0.001), which increased at higher average IOPs. IOP at CC using the iCare tonometer was not significantly different to values at lateral displacements. IOP was marginally underestimated with angular deviation of the probe but only reaching significance at 10 degrees nasally. Conclusions. As shown previously, the iCare tonometer overestimates IOP compared to GAT. However, IOP measurement in normal, healthy subjects using the iCare rebound tonometer appears insensitive to misalignments. An IOP underestimation of <1 mmHg with the probe deviated 10 degrees nasally reached statistical but not clinical significance levels. PMID:24073330

  9. Analysis of solids, liquids, and biological tissues using solids probe introduction at atmospheric pressure on commercial LC/MS instruments.

    PubMed

    McEwen, Charles N; McKay, Richard G; Larsen, Barbara S

    2005-12-01

    Direct analysis of samples using atmospheric pressure ionization (API) provides a more rapid method for analysis of volatile and semivolatile compounds than vacuum solids probe methods and can be accomplished on commercial API mass spectrometers. With only a simple modification to either an electrospray (ESI) or atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source, solid as well as liquid samples can be analyzed in seconds. The method acts as a fast solids/liquid probe introduction as well as an alternative to the new direct analysis in real time (DART) and desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) methods for many compound types. Vaporization of materials occurs in the hot nitrogen gas stream flowing from an ESI or APCI probe. Ionization of the thermally induced vapors occurs by corona discharge under standard APCI conditions. Accurate mass and mass-selected fragmentation are demonstrated as is the ability to obtain ions from biological tissue, currency, and other objects placed in the path of the hot nitrogen stream.

  10. A fast-response aspirating probe for measurements of total temperature and pressure in transonic cryogenic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, W.-F.; Rosson, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    A newly developed, 3-mm-diam, dual hot-wire aspirating probe was used to measure the time-resolved stagnation temperature and pressure in a transonic cryogenic wind tunnel. The probe consists of two coplanar constant temperature hot wires at different overheat ratios operating in a 1.5-mm-diam channel with a choked exit. Thus, the constant Mach number flow by the wires is influenced only by free-stream stagnation temperature and pressure. Diffusion of the free-stream Mach number to a lower value in the channel reduces the dynamic drag on the hot-wire. Frequency response of the present design is dc to 20 kHz. The probe was used to measure the unsteady wake shed from an oscillating airfoil tested in the 0.3-m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel at NASA-Langley Research Center. The hot-wire lasted for more than ten hours before breaking, proving the ruggedness of the probe and the usefulness of the technique in a high dynamic pressure, transonic cryogenic wind tunnel. Typical data obtained from the experiment are presented after reduction to stagnation pressure and temperature.

  11. Probing the energy levels of perovskite solar cells via Kelvin probe and UV ambient pressure photoemission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Harwell, J R; Baikie, T K; Baikie, I D; Payne, J L; Ni, C; Irvine, J T S; Turnbull, G A; Samuel, I D W

    2016-07-20

    The field of organo-lead halide perovskite solar cells has been rapidly growing since their discovery in 2009. State of the art devices are now achieving efficiencies comparable to much older technologies like silicon, while utilising simple manufacturing processes and starting materials. A key parameter to consider when optimising solar cell devices or when designing new materials is the position and effects of the energy levels in the materials. We present here a comprehensive study of the energy levels present in a common structure of perovskite solar cell using an advanced macroscopic Kelvin probe and UV air photoemission setup. By constructing a detailed map of the energy levels in the system we are able to predict the importance of each layer to the open circuit voltage of the solar cell, which we then back up through measurements of the surface photovoltage of the cell under white illumination. Our results demonstrate the effectiveness of air photoemission and Kelvin probe contact potential difference measurements as a method of identifying the factors contributing to the open circuit voltage in a solar cell, as well as being an excellent way of probing the physics of new materials.

  12. Probing the energy levels of perovskite solar cells via Kelvin probe and UV ambient pressure photoemission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Harwell, J R; Baikie, T K; Baikie, I D; Payne, J L; Ni, C; Irvine, J T S; Turnbull, G A; Samuel, I D W

    2016-07-20

    The field of organo-lead halide perovskite solar cells has been rapidly growing since their discovery in 2009. State of the art devices are now achieving efficiencies comparable to much older technologies like silicon, while utilising simple manufacturing processes and starting materials. A key parameter to consider when optimising solar cell devices or when designing new materials is the position and effects of the energy levels in the materials. We present here a comprehensive study of the energy levels present in a common structure of perovskite solar cell using an advanced macroscopic Kelvin probe and UV air photoemission setup. By constructing a detailed map of the energy levels in the system we are able to predict the importance of each layer to the open circuit voltage of the solar cell, which we then back up through measurements of the surface photovoltage of the cell under white illumination. Our results demonstrate the effectiveness of air photoemission and Kelvin probe contact potential difference measurements as a method of identifying the factors contributing to the open circuit voltage in a solar cell, as well as being an excellent way of probing the physics of new materials. PMID:27384817

  13. Potential, Pressure and Density Fluctuation Measurements on the Rentor Tokamak Using AN Ion Beam Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saravia, Eduardo

    A Heavy Ion Beam Probe Diagnostic System with dual energy analyzers was used to measure potential, pressure and density fluctuations in RENTOR. The main advantage of the system is the capability to measure directly the correlation length of the fluctuations by varying the primary beam injection conditions. Broadband density and potential spectra obtained in these experiments are characteristics of turbulent plasmas, with most of the power concentrated in the low part of the spectrum, below 100 kHz. The spectra fall off as f^{rm -n}, where the power-index n is approximately 3.5. The density fluctuation levels n/n are about 10% and they are independent of the plasma radius. Pressure and density fluctuations in RENTOR scale approximately like 3rho_ {rm s}/L_{rm p}~ 0.06, except for points near the plasma center. This is in agreement with the scaling observed in other small and medium tokamak experiments. Strong potential fluctuations were measured all across the plasma with levels nearly ten times larger than the corresponding n/n values. These results agree with the prediction that e~{phi }/k_{rm B}T _{rm e} > n/n in the resistive-MHD rippling mode theory developed by Thayer and Diamond. An rms value for the poloidal correlation length l_{rm c} ~sigma_{rm k}^ {-1} of about 5 mm is obtained for sample points in the plasma interior. The total particle flux across the field lines due to electrostatic fluctuations was estimated at 3 times 10 ^{19} particles/sec, which yields an estimate for the particle confinement time of tau_{rm p}~ 2 ms. Similarly, the total heat loss rate due to fluctuations was estimated at 12 times 10 ^{20} eV/sec, which gives an energy confinement time of tau_{rm E}~ 1 ms. The results clearly indicate that the particle and energy losses in RENTOR due to electrostatic fluctuations of the plasma account for a very significant part of the limited plasma confinement. The results of the experiments performed in this thesis have demonstrated the

  14. High Reynolds Number Effects on Multi-Hole Probes and Hot Wire Anemometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.; Smith, A.; Gerry, G.; Kauffman, W.

    1995-01-01

    The paper reports on the results from an experimental investigation of the response of multi-hole and hot wire probes at high flow Reynolds numbers (Re approx. 10(exp 6)). The limited results available in literature for 5-hole probes are restricted to Re approx. 10(exp 4). The experiment aims to investigate the probe response (in terms of dimensionless pressure ratios, characterizing pitch, and yaw angles and the total and static pressures) at high Re values and to gauge their effect on the calculated velocity vector. Hot wire calibrations were also undertaken with a parametric variation of the flow pressure, velocity and temperature. Different correction and calibration schemes are sought to be tested against the acquired data set. The data is in the analysis stage at the present time. The test provided good benchmark quality data that can be used to test future calibration and testing methods.

  15. Pilot model expansion tunnel test flow properties obtained from velocity, pressure, and probe measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friesen, W. J.; Moore, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    Velocity-profile, pitot-pressure, and supplemental probe measurements were made at the nozzle exist of an expansion tunnel (a modification to the Langley pilot model expansion tube) for a nozzle net condition of a nitrogen test sample with a velocity of 4.5 km/sec and a density 0.005 times the density of nitrogen at standard conditions, both with the nozzle initially immersed in a helium atmosphere and with the nozzle initially evacuated. The purpose of the report is to present the results of these measurements and some of the physical properties of the nitrogen test sample which can be inferred from the measured results. The main conclusions reached are that: the velocity profiles differ for two nozzle conditions; regions of the flow field can be found where the velocity is uniform to within 5 percent and constant for several hundred microseconds; the velocity of the nitrogen test sample is reduced due to passage through the nozzle; and the velocity profiles do not significantly reflect the large variations which occur in the inferred density profiles.

  16. Van Allen Probes observations of EMIC events triggered by solar wind dynamic pressure enhancements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D. Y.; Cho, J.; Roh, S. J.; Shin, D. K.; Hwang, J.; Kim, K. C.; Choi, C.; Kletzing, C.; Wygant, J. R.; Thaller, S. A.; Larsen, B.; Skoug, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are one of the key plasma waves that can affect charged particle dynamics in the Earth's inner magnetosphere. One of the generation mechanisms of EMIC waves has long been known to be due to magnetospheric compression due to impact by enhanced solar wind dynamic pressure Pdyn. With the Van Allen Probes observations, we have identified 4 EMIC wave events that are triggered by Pdyn enhancements under northward IMF, prolonged quiet time conditions. We find the following features of the EMIC events. (1) They are triggered immediately at the Pdyn impact and remain active during the same period as the enhanced Pdyn duration. (2) They occur in either H band or He band or both. (3) Two events occur inside the plasmasphere and the other two outside the plasmasphere. (4) The wave polarization, either R or L, are highly elliptical, being close to be linear. (5) The wave normal angles are quite large, well away from being field-aligned. (6) About 10 - 50 keV proton fluxes indicate enhanced flux state with ~90 deg-peaked anisotropy in velocity distribution after the Pdyn impact. (7) From low altitude NOAA POES satellite observations of particles we find no obvious evidence for relativistic electron precipitation due to these Pdyn-triggered EMIC events. We will discuss implications of these observations on wave generation mechanism and interaction with radiation belt electrons.

  17. Thin-layer chromatography and mass spectrometry coupled using proximal probe thermal desorption with electrospray or atmospheric pressure chemica lionization

    SciTech Connect

    Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2010-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure proximal probe thermal desorption sampling method coupled with secondary ionization by electrospray or atmospheric pressure chemical ionization was demonstrated for the mass spectrometric analysis of a diverse set of compounds (dyestuffs, pharmaceuticals, explosives and pesticides) separated on various high-performance thin-layer chromatography plates. Line scans along or through development lanes on the plates were carried out by moving the plate relative to a stationary heated probe positioned close to or just touching the stationary phase surface. Vapors of the compounds thermally desorbed from the surface were drawn into the ionization region of a combined electrospray ionization/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source where they merged with reagent ions and/or charged droplets from a corona discharge or an electrospray emitter and were ionized. The ionized components were then drawn through the atmospheric pressure sampling orifice into the vacuum region of a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer and detected using full scan, single ion monitoring, or selected reaction monitoring mode. Studies of variable parameters and performance metrics including the proximal probe temperature, gas flow rate into the ionization region, surface scan speed, read-out resolution, detection limits, and surface type are discussed.

  18. Comparison between Langmuir probe and microwave autointerferometry measurements at intermediate pressure in an argon surface wave discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Rousseau, A.; Teboul, E.; Bechu, S.

    2005-10-15

    This paper is devoted to the validation of Langmuir probe technique by microwave autointerferometry in a surface wave discharge at medium pressure (from 0.1 up to 10 Torr). Temperatures of neutrals, obtained from Rayleigh scattering, and electrons, given by double probe measurements, have been used to estimate the mean free path and the sheath length. Hence, the number of collisions in the sheath has been obtained. We have verified that two different phenomena occur in the sheath, while the pressure increases. These phenomena are depicted, in literature, as two different coefficients used to modify the value of the noncollisional current of Laframboise. Coefficients given by various authors have been investigated with accuracy knowing the number of collisions in the sheath. Very good agreements are obtained between Zakrzewski and Kopiczynski theory and autointerferometry measurements which are unaffected by collisional phenomena.

  19. White-light continuum probed femtosecond time-resolved absorption spectroscopic measurement of β-carotene under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei-Long; Zheng, Zhi-Ren; Zhang, Jian-Ping; Wu, Wen-Zhi; Li, Ai-Hua; Zhang, Wei; Huo, Ming-Ming; Liu, Zhi-Guo; Zhu, Rui-Bin; Zhao, Lian-Cheng; Su, Wen-Hui

    2012-04-01

    We have performed a femtosecond time-resolved absorption spectroscopic experiment of β-carotene in n-hexane solution under high pressure up to ˜1.0 GPa. Using white-light continuum in the visible spectral region as probe light, we found that the energy level of S1 state descends, whereas its lifetime becomes longer with the rising pressure. We ascribe this tendency deviating from the energy gap law to the viscosity effects on the Cdbnd C stretching vibrations, which is fully consistent with the microviscosity theory. This Letter may provide some insights on the light harvesting and photoprotection functions of carotenoids in photosynthetic organisms.

  20. Pressure as a probe of the physics of ABO{sub 3} relaxor ferroelectrics

    SciTech Connect

    SAMARA,GEORGE A.

    2000-02-14

    Results on a variety of mixed ABO{sub 3} oxides have revealed a pressure-induced ferroelectric-to-relaxor crossover and the continuous evolution of the energetics and dynamics of the relaxation process with increasing pressure. These common features have suggested a mechanism for the crossover phenomenon in terms of a large decrease in the correlation length for dipolar interactions with pressure--a unique property of soft mode or highly polarizable host lattices. The pressure effects as well as the interplay between pressure and dc biasing fields are illustrated for some recent results on PZN-9.5 PT,PMN and PLZT 6/65/35.

  1. Radial Turgor and Osmotic Pressure Profiles in Intact and Excised Roots of Aster tripolium: Pressure Probe Measurements and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance-Imaging Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, U; Rygol, J; Balling, A; Klöck, G; Metzler, A; Haase, A

    1992-05-01

    High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance images (using very short spin-echo times of 3.8 milliseconds) of cross-sections of excised roots of the halophyte Aster tripolium showed radial cell strands separated by air-filled spaces. Radial insertion of the pressure probe (along the cell strands) into roots of intact plants revealed a marked increase of the turgor pressure from the outermost to the sixth cortical layer (from about 0.1-0.6 megapascals). Corresponding measurements of intracellular osmotic pressure in individual cortical cells (by means of a nanoliter osmometer) showed an osmotic pressure gradient of equal magnitude to the turgor pressure. Neither gradient changed significantly when the plants were grown in, or exposed for 1 hour to, media of high salinity. Differences were recorded in the ability of salts and nonelectrolytes to penetrate the apoplast in the root. The reflection coefficients of the cortical cells were approximately 1 for all the solutes tested. Excision of the root from the stem resulted in a collapse of the turgor and osmotic pressure gradients. After about 15 to 30 minutes, the turgor pressure throughout the cortex attained an intermediate (quasistationary) level of about 0.3 megapascals. This value agreed well with the osmotic value deduced from plasmolysis experiments on excised root segments. These and other data provided conclusions about the driving forces for water and solute transport in the roots and about the function of the air-filled radial spaces in water transport. They also showed that excised roots may be artifactual systems.

  2. Pressure-induced amorphizations of silica analogues: A probe of the relationship between order and disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Hammack, W.S.

    1993-02-01

    Purpose of these of high pressure investigations is to determine the relationship between order and disorder in amorphous materials using high pressure techniques were used. High pressure x-ray diffraction, electron transmission microscopy, and Raman scattering. Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS) at Ithaca was used to measure x-ray diffraction patterns using Energy-Dispersive X-ray Diffraction. It was shown that the structural ordering in pressure-amorphized solids can be described as defects in curved-space. High-resolution transmissions electron microscopy showed that pressure-amorphized alpha-quartz lacks periodicity at the atomic level. Study of a silicate mineral shows that pressure-induced amorphizations occur because of an impeded phase transition.

  3. Probing microscopic material properties inside simulated membranes through spatially resolved three-dimensional local pressure fields and surface tensions

    PubMed Central

    Kasson, Peter M.; Hess, Berk; Lindahl, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Cellular lipid membranes are spatially inhomogeneous soft materials. Materials properties such as pressure and surface tension thus show important microscopic-scale variation that is critical to many biological functions. We present a means to calculate pressure and surface tension in a 3D-resolved manner within molecular-dynamics simulations and show how such measurements can yield important insight. We also present the first corrections to local virial and pressure fields to account for the constraints typically used in lipid simulations that otherwise cause problems in highly oriented systems such as bilayers. Based on simulations of an asymmetric bacterial ion channel in a POPC bilayer, we demonstrate how 3D-resolved pressure can probe for both short-range and long-range effects from the protein on the membrane environment. We also show how surface tension is a sensitive metric for inter-leaflet equilibrium and can be used to detect even subtle imbalances between bilayer leaflets in a membrane-protein simulation. Since surface tension is known to modulate the function of many proteins, this effect is an important consideration for predictions of ion channel function. We outline a strategy by which our local pressure measurements, which we make available within a version of the GROMACS simulation package, may be used to design optimally equilibrated membrane-protein simulations. PMID:23318532

  4. Langmuir probe study of a magnetically enhanced RF plasma source at pressures below 0.1 Pa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kousal, Jaroslav; Tichý, Milan; Šebek, Ondřej; Čechvala, Juraj; Biederman, Hynek

    2011-08-01

    The majority of plasma polymerization sources operate at pressures higher than 1 Pa. At these pressures most common deposition methods do not show significant directionality. One way of enhancing the directional effects is to decrease the working pressure to increase the mean free path of the reactive molecules. The plasma source used in this work was designed to study the plasma polymerization process at pressures below 0.1 Pa. The source consists of the classical radio frequency (RF) (13.56 MHz, capacitive coupled) tubular reactor enhanced by an external magnetic circuit. The working gas is introduced into the discharge by a capillary. This forms a relatively localized zone of higher pressure where the monomer is activated. Due to the magnetic field, the plasma is constricted near the axis of the reactor with nearly collisionless gas flow. The plasma parameters were obtained using a double Langmuir probe. Plasma density in the range ni = 1013-1016 m-3 was obtained in various parts of the discharge under typical conditions. The presence of the magnetic field led to the presence of relatively strong electric fields (103 V m-1) and relatively high electron energies up to several tens of eV in the plasma.

  5. Site-specific modification of rabbit muscle creatine kinase with sulfhydryl-specific fluorescence probe by use of hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, N; Tonai, T; Kunugi, S

    1997-05-23

    We investigated the effect of pressure on the reactivity of cysteine residues of rabbit muscle creatine kinase (CK). Performing the fluorescent modification under high pressure, a unique sulfhydryl group (Cys-253) of CK was labeled, in addition to Cys-282, which is known as a single reactive sulfhydryl under ambient conditions. CK is composed of two identical subunits, containing four cysteine residues in each subunit. Cys-282 plays an important role in enzymatic activity. In the pressure range from 0.1 MPa to 300 MPa, only one sulfhydryl group for each subunit of CK reacted with the reagents. However, at 400 MPa 2 sulfhydryl groups were modified. The 2-nitro-5-thiocyanobenzoic acid (NTCB) cleavage method revealed that both Cys-282 and Cys-253 were modified at 400 MPa. The chemical modification of Cys-282 induced a loss of enzymatic activity. By taking advantage of the modification under high pressure, selective modification of Cys-253 with 5-[N-(iodoacetamidoethyl)amino]-naphthalene-1-sulfonate (IAEDANS) was performed. A reversible blocking of Cys-282 at atmospheric pressure was followed by the reaction of Cys-253 with the fluorescent probe at 400 MPa. After the decompression, Cys-282 was unblocked, and obtained Cys-253-modified CK retained up to 64% of the catalytic activity of the intact CK. The fluorescent properties of IAEDANS covalently bound at Cys-253 were not significantly different from those of IAEDANS covalently bound at Cys-282.

  6. High pressure reactivity of solid furan probed by infrared and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceppatelli, Matteo; Santoro, Mario; Bini, Robert; Schettino, Vincenzo

    2003-01-01

    The behavior of crystalline furan has been investigated, at room temperature, along the 0-47-0 GPa pressure cycle by using IR and Raman spectroscopy. These data, joint to high pressure low temperature IR data, allow the identification of two solid phases in the 1.2-12 GPa pressure range: the low-pressure orientationally disordered phase IV and the high-pressure ordered phase III. Above 10-12 GPa solid furan starts to chemically transform. The threshold pressure for the transformation is much lower than in benzene, as expected according to the minor stability of the heteroaromatic ring. The reaction proceeds continuously along the compression path, but it becomes complete only with releasing pressure, and a yellow-brownish sample is recovered. This compound was identified as an amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) containing alkylpolyether type segments, alcoholic functions, and C=O bonds. The presence of these new chemical species attests to the opening of the original furan rings and to the transfer of hydrogen atoms. The reaction seems to be very similar to that induced in crystalline benzene. This comparison indicates a general behavior for the reactivity under ultrahigh pressures of the whole class of aromatic compounds.

  7. Entropy and volume change of dissociation in tobacco mosaic virus probed by high pressure.

    PubMed

    Bispo, Jose A C; Bonafe, Carlos F S; Joekes, Ines; Martinez, Ernesto A; Carvalho, Giovani B M; Norberto, Douglas R

    2012-12-27

    Virus dissociation and inactivation by high pressure have been extensively studied in recent decades. Pressure-induced dissociation of viral particles involves a reduction in the Gibbs free energy of dissociation and a negative change in volume. In this work, we investigated the combined effect of high pressure and temperature on the dissociation of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). We assumed the presence of two states of TMV with different tendencies to dissociate. Thus one form presents a low tendency (L) and the other a high tendency (H) to dissociate. Based on the model described here, the L-H transition was favored by an increase in pressure and a decrease in temperature. The volume change of dissociation was pressure- and temperature-dependent, with a highly negative value of -80 mL/mol being recorded at 0 °C and atmospheric pressure. The entropy and enthalpy of dissociation were very temperature- and pressure-dependent, with values of entropy of 450 to -1300 kJ/mol and values of enthalpy of 5.5 × 10(4) to 2.4 × 10(4) kJ/mol. The dissociation of TMV was enthalpy-driven at all temperatures and pressures investigated. Based on these findings, we conclude that the model presented allows accurate predictions of viral dissociation behavior in different experimental conditions. PMID:23205955

  8. Pressure Dependence of Hydrogen-Bond Dynamics in Liquid Water Probed by Ultrafast Infrared Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lapini, Andrea; Pagliai, Marco; Fanetti, Samuele; Citroni, Margherita; Scandolo, Sandro; Bini, Roberto; Righini, Roberto

    2016-09-15

    Clarifying the structure/dynamics relation of water hydrogen-bond network has been the aim of extensive research over many decades. By joining anvil cell high-pressure technology, femtosecond 2D infrared spectroscopy, and molecular dynamics simulations, we studied, for the first time, the spectral diffusion of the stretching frequency of an HOD impurity in liquid water as a function of pressure. Our experimental and simulation results concordantly demonstrate that the rate of spectral diffusion is almost insensitive to the applied pressure. This behavior is in contrast with the previously reported pressure-induced speed up of the orientational dynamics, which can be rationalized in terms of large angular jumps involving sudden switching between two hydrogen-bonded configurations. The different trend of the spectral diffusion can be, instead, inferred considering that the first solvation shell preserves the tetrahedral structure with pressure and the OD stretching frequency is only slight perturbed. PMID:27560355

  9. The Unique High-Pressure Behavior of Curium Probed Further Using Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Heathman, S.; Haire, Richard {Dick} G; LeBihan, T.; Ahuja, R.; Li, S.; Luo, W.; Johansson, B.

    2007-01-01

    The changing role of the 5f electrons across the actinide series has been of prime interest for many years. The remarkable behavior of americium's 5f electrons under pressure was determined experimentally a few years ago and it precipitated a strong interest in the heavy element community. Theoretical treatments of americium's behavior under pressure followed and continue today. Experimental and theoretical findings regarding curium's behavior under pressure have shown that the pressure behavior of curium was not a mirror image of that for americium. Rather, one of the five crystallographic phases observed with curium (versus four for americium) was a unique monoclinic structure whose existence is due to a spin stabilization effect by curium's 5f{sup 7} electronic configuration and its half-filled 5f-shell. We review briefly the behavior of pure curium under pressure but focus on the pressure behaviors of three curium alloys with the intent of comparing them with pure curium. An important experimental finding confirmed by theoretical computations, is that dilution of curium with its near neighbors is sufficient to prevent the formation of the unique C2/c phase that appears in pure Cm metal under pressure. As this unique C2/c phase is very sensitive to having a 5f{sup 7} configuration to maximize the magnetic spin polarization, dilution of this state with adjacent actinide neighbors reduces its stability.

  10. Probing Spin-Orbit Coupling and Interlayer Coupling in Atomically Thin Molybdenum Disulfide Using Hydrostatic Pressure.

    PubMed

    Dou, Xiuming; Ding, Kun; Jiang, Desheng; Fan, Xiaofeng; Sun, Baoquan

    2016-01-26

    In two-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenides, both spin-orbit coupling and interlayer coupling play critical roles in the electronic band structure and are desirable for the potential applications in spin electronics. Here, we demonstrate the pressure characteristics of the exciton absorption peaks (so-called excitons A, B and C) in monolayer, bilayer, and trilayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) by studying the reflectance spectra under hydrostatic pressure and performing the electronic band structure calculations based on density functional theory to account for the experimental observations. We find that the valence band maximum splitting at the K point in monolayer MoS2, induced by spin-orbit coupling, remains almost unchanged with increasing pressure applied up to 3.98 GPa, indicating that the spin-orbit coupling is insensitive to the pressure. For bilayer and trilayer MoS2, however, the splitting shows an increase with increasing pressure due to the pressure-induced strengthening of the interlayer coupling. The experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical calculations. Moreover, the exciton C is identified to be the interband transition related to the van Hove singularity located at a special point which is approximately 1/4 of the total length of Γ-K away from the Γ point in the Brillouin zone. PMID:26745440

  11. Laser-driven phase transitions in aqueous colloidal gold nanoparticles under high pressure: picosecond pump-probe study.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Shuichi; Katayama, Tetsuro; Setoura, Kenji; Strasser, Michael; Uwada, Takayuki; Miyasaka, Hiroshi

    2016-02-14

    Pump-probe transient extinction spectroscopy was used to analyze 355 nm picosecond laser heating-induced phenomena in 60 nm-diameter aqueous gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) under a high pressure of 60 MPa. Kinetic spectroscopy revealed that a supercritical layer surrounding the AuNP nucleated with a lifetime of approximately 1 ns during its dynamic expansion and decay for a fluence of 19.6 mJ cm(-2). Moreover, in the post-mortem transmission electron micrographs we observed a number of fragments, a small percentage of size-reduced cores, and erupted particles among the intact particles after 60 shots, suggesting that evaporation occurred under laser illumination. The particle temperature calculation indicated that evaporation begins with a liquid droplet AuNP surrounded by a supercritical layer at temperatures below the boiling point of gold. By applying high pressure, we obtained a clear picture of the evaporation event, which was not possible at ambient pressure because bubble formation caused particle temperatures to rise uncontrollably. In this study, we shed light on the critical role of the supercritical layer formed around the AuNP under high pressure during laser-induced evaporation. PMID:26812175

  12. Full bandwidth calibration procedure for acoustic probes containing a pressure and particle velocity sensor.

    PubMed

    Basten, Tom G H; de Bree, Hans-Elias

    2010-01-01

    Calibration of acoustic particle velocity sensors is still difficult due to the lack of standardized sensors to compare with. Recently it is shown by Jacobsen and Jaud [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 120, 830-837 (2006)] that it is possible to calibrate a sound pressure and particle velocity sensor in free field conditions at higher frequencies. This is done by using the known acoustic impedance at a certain distance of a spherical loudspeaker. When the sound pressure is measured with a calibrated reference microphone, the particle velocity can be calculated from the known impedance and the measured pressure. At lower frequencies, this approach gives unreliable results. The method is now extended to lower frequencies by measuring the acoustic pressure inside the spherical source. At lower frequencies, the sound pressure inside the sphere is proportional to the movement of the loudspeaker membrane. If the movement is known, the particle velocity in front of the loudspeaker can be derived. This low frequency approach is combined with the high frequency approach giving a full bandwidth calibration procedure which can be used in free field conditions using a single calibration setup. The calibration results are compared with results obtained with a standing wave tube.

  13. Evidence of pressure enhanced CO2 storage in ZIF-8 probed by FTIR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yue; Liu, Zhenxian; Xu, Jun; Huang, Yining; Song, Yang

    2013-06-26

    Due to the large porosity and unique framework stability, ZIF-8, a representative zeolitic imidazolate based member of metal-organic framework (MOF) family exhibited excellent adsorption capacities for a wide range of gases, including greenhouse gases. Using in situ FTIR spectroscopy, ZIF-8 framework was investigated when loaded with CO2 in a diamond anvil cell at high pressures far beyond the conventional gas adsorption pressure. The IR profile of CO2 as well as the ZIF-8 shows direct evidence of the interactions between CO2 and ZIF-8, indicating enhanced storage of CO2 in the framework. In addition, the storage behavior was found to be strongly pressure dependent, and the interaction mechanism was explored. These findings demonstrated great potential in the greenhouse gases storage applications using MOF based materials.

  14. A probe for measuring temperature and pressure at the same points in a gas stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, L. N.; Glawe, G. E.; Dudzinski, T. J.

    1972-01-01

    Design features and characteristics of a means for measuring total temperature and total pressure at a single point in a gas stream are presented. A rake that provides five such combination measurements is described. Experimental data are included for the aerodynamic recovery and time response of the temperature sensor and for the flow-angle sensitivity of both the temperature and pressure sensors. Data were obtained over a subsonic Mach number range of 0.3 to 0.9 as well as at a Mach number of 1.4.

  15. Pressure as a probe of the glassy state of ferroelectrics with random site disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Samara, G.A.; Hansen, L.V.

    1998-03-10

    Results on lanthanum-modified lead zirconate-titanates (PLZTs) have revealed a pressure-induced crossover from a normal ferroelectric to a relaxor state and the continuous evolution of the dynamics and energetics of the relaxation process. This crossover appears to be a general feature of soft mode ferroelectrics with random site dipolar impurities or polar nanodomains and results from a large decrease in the correlation radius among polar nanodomains -- a unique property of soft mode ferroelectrics.

  16. pH dependence of the dissociation of multimeric hemoglobin probed by high hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Bispo, Jose A C; Santos, Jose L R; Landini, Gustavo F; Goncalves, Juliana M; Bonafe, Carlos F S

    2007-02-01

    We investigated the thermodynamic features of the classic alkaline dissociation of multimeric hemoglobin (3.1 MDa) from Glossoscolex paulistus (Annelidea) using high hydrostatic pressure. Light scattering measurements up to microscopic thermodynamic equilibrium indicated a high pH dependency of dissociation and association. Electron microscopy and gel filtration corroborated these findings. The volume change of dissociation decreased in absolute values from -48.0 mL/mol of subunit at pH 6.0 to -19.2 mL/mol at pH 9.0, suggesting a lack of protein interactions under alkaline conditions. Concomitantly, an increase in pH reduced the Gibbs free energy of dissociation from 37.7 to 27.5 kJ/mol of subunit. The stoichiometry of proton release calculated from the pressure-induced dissociation curves was +0.602 mol of H(+)/mol of subunit. These results provide a direct quantification of proton participation in stabilizing the aggregated state of the hemoglobin, and contribute to our understanding of protein-protein interactions and of the surrounding conditions that modulate the process of aggregation. PMID:17046147

  17. pH dependence of the dissociation of multimeric hemoglobin probed by high hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Bispo, Jose A C; Santos, Jose L R; Landini, Gustavo F; Goncalves, Juliana M; Bonafe, Carlos F S

    2007-02-01

    We investigated the thermodynamic features of the classic alkaline dissociation of multimeric hemoglobin (3.1 MDa) from Glossoscolex paulistus (Annelidea) using high hydrostatic pressure. Light scattering measurements up to microscopic thermodynamic equilibrium indicated a high pH dependency of dissociation and association. Electron microscopy and gel filtration corroborated these findings. The volume change of dissociation decreased in absolute values from -48.0 mL/mol of subunit at pH 6.0 to -19.2 mL/mol at pH 9.0, suggesting a lack of protein interactions under alkaline conditions. Concomitantly, an increase in pH reduced the Gibbs free energy of dissociation from 37.7 to 27.5 kJ/mol of subunit. The stoichiometry of proton release calculated from the pressure-induced dissociation curves was +0.602 mol of H(+)/mol of subunit. These results provide a direct quantification of proton participation in stabilizing the aggregated state of the hemoglobin, and contribute to our understanding of protein-protein interactions and of the surrounding conditions that modulate the process of aggregation.

  18. Optical Probes of MEH-PPV films at High Hydrostatic Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olejnik, E.; Singh, S.; Pandit, B.; Morandi, V.; Holt, J.; Sheng, C.-X.; Vardeny, Z. V.

    2010-03-01

    We investigate the primary and long-lived photoexcitations in π-conjugated polymer films with increased interchain coupling by studying the photophysics of substituted PPV derivative thin films, namely 2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethylhexyloxy) [MEH-PPV] at high hydrostatic pressure, P up to 120 kbar in a diamond anvil cell, using both ultrafast transient mid- and near-IR spectroscopies with 0.1 ps resolution, and cw optical techniques (photo induced absorption (PA) and photoluminescence (PL) in a broad spectral range from 0.2 to 2.2 eV). With increasing P the cw PL band weakens, broadens, and red-shifts by ˜ 2 meV/kbar; whereas the triplet PA red shifts to a lesser extent. The ultrafast PA band of the singlet exciton at ˜ 0.95 eV at ambient splits, blue shifts and acquires a much longer decay component. A second, weak PA band at ˜ 0.33 eV at ambient, dramatically blue-shifts (˜ 3 meV/kbar) and substantially intensifies with P. These pressure-induced effects are discussed considering the interplay of two phases in the MEH-PPV film: a disordered phase with large PL efficiency, and PA that does not change much with P; and a less emissive ordered phase that increases with P, where the interchain coupling substantially increases with P.

  19. Effect of pressure on interactions of anti-fluorescent probe monoclonal antibody with a ligand and inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimoto, M.; Goto, M.; Tamai, N.; Nagamune, H.; Kaneshina, S.; Matsuki, H.

    2010-03-01

    Interactions of anti-fluorescent probe monoclonal antibody (immunoglobulin G (IgG)-49) with a ligand (fluorescein (FL)) and three kinds of inhibitors (1-tetradecanol (C14OH), 1-tetradecanoic acid (C13COOH) and 5-aminofluorescein (5-FLNH2)) under high pressure were examined by methods of fluorescence spectroscopy. Pressure promoted the dissociation between FL and IgG-49 from the complex. The standard volume changes of the dissociation became negative, hence, the binding of FL to IgG-49 expands the volume of the complex. The volume expansion may be closely related to the large hydrophobicity around binding sites of FL in the IgG-49 molecule. Further, the standard volume changes of IgG-49 for the inhibitor binding, which were calculated from the Johnson-Eyring plots, became all negative. The volume change for 5-FLNH2 was smaller than those for C14OH and C13COOH. This means that the volume of IgG-49 shrinks by the addition of the inhibitors in contrast with the FL binding. The differences among inhibitors are attributable to the differences in interaction modes to IgG-49 among them.

  20. Pressure/temperature fluid cell apparatus for the neutron powder diffractometer instrument: Probing atomic structure in situ

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Hsiu -Wen; Fanelli, Victor R.; Reiche, Helmut M.; Larson, Eric; Taylor, Mark A.; Xu, Hongwu; Zhu, Jinlong; Siewenie, Joan; Page, Katharine

    2014-12-24

    This contribution describes a new local structure compatible gas/liquid cell apparatus for probing disordered materials at high pressures and variable temperatures in the Neutron Powder Diffraction instrument at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory. The new sample environment offers choices for sample canister thickness and canister material type. Finite element modeling is utilized to establish maximum allowable working pressures of 414 MPa at 15 K and 121 MPa at 600 K. High quality atomic pair distribution function data extraction and modeling have been demonstrated for a calibration standard (Si powder) and for supercritical and subcritical CO2measurements. Asmore » a result, the new sample environment was designed to specifically target experimental studies of the local atomic structures involved in geologic CO2 sequestration, but will be equally applicable to a wide variety of energy applications, including sorption of fluids on nano/meso-porous solids, clathrate hydrate formation, catalysis, carbon capture, and H2 and natural gas uptake/storage.« less

  1. Onset of condensation effects as detected by total pressure probes in the Langley 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, R. M.

    1979-01-01

    Total pressure probes mounted in the test section of a 0.3 meter transonic cryogenic tunnel were used to detect the onset of condensation effects for free stream Mach numbers of 0.50, 0.75, 0.85, and 0.95 and for total pressure between one and five atmospheres. The amount of supercooling was found to be about 3 K and suggests that condensation was occurring on pre-existing liquid nitrogen droplets resulting from incomplete evaporation of the liquid nitrogen injected to cool the tunnel. The liquid nitrogen injection process presently being used for the 0.3 m tunnel was found to result in a wide spectrum of droplet sizes being injected into the flow. Since the relatively larger droplets took much more time to evaporate than the more numerous smaller droplets, the larger ones reached the test section first as the tunnel operating temperature was reduced. However, condensation effects in the test section were not immediately measurable because there was not a sufficient number of the larger droplets to have an influence on the thermodynamics of the flow.

  2. Pressure/temperature fluid cell apparatus for the neutron powder diffractometer instrument: Probing atomic structure in situ

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hsiu-Wen; Fanelli, Victor R.; Reiche, Helmut M.; Larson, Eric; Taylor, Mark A.; Siewenie, Joan; Xu, Hongwu; Zhu, Jinlong; Page, Katharine

    2014-12-15

    This contribution describes a new local structure compatible gas/liquid cell apparatus for probing disordered materials at high pressures and variable temperatures in the Neutron Powder Diffraction instrument at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory. The new sample environment offers choices for sample canister thickness and canister material type. Finite element modeling is utilized to establish maximum allowable working pressures of 414 MPa at 15 K and 121 MPa at 600 K. High quality atomic pair distribution function data extraction and modeling have been demonstrated for a calibration standard (Si powder) and for supercritical and subcritical CO{sub 2} measurements. The new sample environment was designed to specifically target experimental studies of the local atomic structures involved in geologic CO{sub 2} sequestration, but will be equally applicable to a wide variety of energy applications, including sorption of fluids on nano/meso-porous solids, clathrate hydrate formation, catalysis, carbon capture, and H{sub 2} and natural gas uptake/storage.

  3. A generalized model for probing frictional characteristics of pressure-driven liquid microflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Suman; Das, Tamal; Chattoraj, Shubhasish

    2007-11-01

    In this article, a fundamental model was postulated to capture the influences of microfabrication characteristics on the frictional behavior of pressure-driven liquid microflows through a detailed analysis of the underlined surface effects that effectively link up these two strongly correlated aspects. For theoretical analysis, a continuum-based generalized formalism was derived for critically assessing the competing aspects of the stick-slip influences of the surface roughness elements, the randomness related to the spontaneous production, size distribution and coverage of the nanobubble layers, and the consequent apparent slip mechanisms due to hydrophobic interactions. Uncertainties pertaining to surface texture were accounted for by employing a stochastic version of the Navier-Stokes equation. The theoretical formulation was simultaneously validated with the data obtained from indigenous experiments and other benchmark studies reported in the literature and excellent quantitative trends in this regard were obtained for all cases.

  4. Cell water potential, osmotic potential, and turgor in the epidermis and mesophyll of transpiring leaves : Combined measurements with the cell pressure probe and nanoliter osmometer.

    PubMed

    Nonami, H; Schulze, E D

    1989-01-01

    Water potential, osmotic potential and turgor measurements obtained by using a cell pressure probe together with a nanoliter osmometer were compared with measurements obtained with an isopiestic psychrometer. Both types of measurements were conducted in the mature region of Tradescantia virginiana L. leaves under non-transpiring conditions in the dark, and gave similar values of all potentials. This finding indicates that the pressure probe and the osmometer provide accurate measurements of turgor, osmotic potentials and water potentials. Because the pressure probe does not require long equilibration times and can measure turgor of single cells in intact plants, the pressure probe together with the osmometer was used to determine in-situ cell water potentials, osmotic potentials and turgor of epidermal and mesophyll cells of transpiring leaves as functions of stomatal aperture and xylem water potential. When the xylem water potential was-0.1 MPa, the stomatal aperture was at its maximum, but turgor of both epidermal and mesophyll cells was relatively low. As the xylem water potential decreased, the stomatal aperture became gradually smaller, whereas turgor of both epidermal and mesophyll cells first increased and afterward decreased. Water potentials of the mesophyll cells were always lower than those of the epidermal cells. These findings indicate that evaporation of water is mainly occurring from mesophyll cells and that peristomatal transpiration could be less important than it has been proposed previously, although peristomatal transpiration may be directly related to regulation of turgor in the guard cells.

  5. Multiplying probe for accurate power measurements on an RF driven atmospheric pressure plasma jet applied to the COST reference microplasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beijer, P. A. C.; Sobota, A.; van Veldhuizen, E. M.; Kroesen, G. M. W.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper a new multiplying probe for measuring the power dissipated in a miniature capacitively coupled, RF driven, atmospheric pressure plasma jet (μAPPJ—COST Reference Microplasma Jet—COST RMJ) is presented. The approach aims for substantially higher accuracy than provided by traditionally applied methods using bi-directional power meters or commercially available voltage and current probes in conjunction with digitizing oscilloscopes. The probe is placed on a miniature PCB and designed to minimize losses, influence of unknown elements, crosstalk and variations in temperature. The probe is designed to measure powers of the order of magnitude of 0.1-10 W. It is estimated that it measures power with less than 2% deviation from the real value in the tested power range. The design was applied to measure power dissipated in COST-RMJ running in helium with a small addition of oxygen.

  6. Characterization of low-pressure microwave and radio frequency discharges in oxygen applying optical emission spectroscopy and multipole resonance probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steves, Simon; Styrnoll, Tim; Mitschker, Felix; Bienholz, Stefan; Nikita, Bibinov; Awakowicz, Peter

    2013-11-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and multipole resonance probe (MRP) are adopted to characterize low-pressure microwave (MW) and radio frequency (RF) discharges in oxygen. In this context, both discharges are usually applied for the deposition of permeation barrier SiOx films on plastic foils or the inner surface of plastic bottles. For technological reasons the MW excitation is modulated and a continuous wave (cw) RF bias is used. The RF voltage produces a stationary low-density plasma, whereas the high-density MW discharge is pulsed. For the optimization of deposition process and the quality of the deposited barrier films, plasma conditions are characterized using OES and MRP. To simplify the comparison of applied diagnostics, both MW and RF discharges are studied separately in cw mode. The OES and MRP diagnostic methods complement each other and provide reliable information about electron density and electron temperature. In the MW case, electron density amounts to ne = (1.25 ± 0.26) × 1017 m-3, and kTe to 1.93 ± 0.20 eV, in the RF case ne = (6.8 ± 1.8)×1015 m-3 and kTe = 2.6 ± 0.35 eV. The corresponding gas temperatures are 760±40 K and 440±20 K.

  7. Evaluation of diel patterns of relative changes in cell turgor of tomato plants using leaf patch clamp pressure probes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang M; Driever, Steven M; Heuvelink, Ep; Rüger, Simon; Zimmermann, Ulrich; de Gelder, Arie; Marcelis, Leo F M

    2012-12-01

    Relative changes in cell turgor of leaves of well-watered tomato plants were evaluated using the leaf patch clamp pressure probe (LPCP) under dynamic greenhouse climate conditions. LPCP changes, a measure for relative changes in cell turgor, were monitored at three different heights of transpiring and non-transpiring leaves of tomato plants on sunny and cloudy days simultaneously with whole plant water uptake. Clear diel patterns were observed for relative changes of cell turgor of both transpiring and non-transpiring leaves, which were stronger on sunny days than on cloudy days. A clear effect of canopy height was also observed. Non-transpiring leaves showed relative changes in cell turgor that closely followed plant water uptake throughout the day. However, in the afternoon the relative changes of cell turgor of the transpiring leaves displayed a delayed response in comparison to plant water uptake. Subsequent recovery of cell turgor loss of transpiring leaves during the following night appeared insufficient, as the pre-dawn turgescent state similar to the previous night was not attained.

  8. Combined single crystal polarized XAFS and XRD at high pressure: probing the interplay between lattice distortions and electronic order at multiple length scales in high T c cuprates

    DOE PAGES

    Fabbris, G.; Hücker, M.; Gu, G. D.; Tranquada, J. M.; Haskel, D.

    2016-07-14

    Some of the most exotic material properties derive from electronic states with short correlation length (~10-500 Å), suggesting that the local structural symmetry may play a relevant role in their behavior. In this study, we discuss the combined use of polarized x-ray absorption fine structure and x-ray diffraction at high pressure as a powerful method to tune and probe structural and electronic orders at multiple length scales. Besides addressing some of the technical challenges associated with such experiments, we illustrate this approach with results obtained in the cuprate La1.875Ba0.125CuO4, in which the response of electronic order to pressure can onlymore » be understood by probing the structure at the relevant length scales.« less

  9. Non-invasive probe diagnostic method for electron temperature and ion current density in atmospheric pressure plasma jet source

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young-Cheol; Kim, Yu-Sin; Lee, Hyo-Chang; Moon, Jun-Hyeon; Chung, Chin-Wook; Kim, Yunjung; Cho, Guangsup

    2015-08-15

    The electrical probe diagnostics are very hard to be applied to atmospheric plasmas due to severe perturbation by the electrical probes. To overcome this, the probe for measuring electron temperature and ion current density is indirectly contacted with an atmospheric jet source. The plasma parameters are obtained by using floating harmonic analysis. The probe is mounted on the quartz tube that surrounds plasma. When a sinusoidal voltage is applied to a probe contacting on a quartz tube, the electrons near the sheath at dielectric tube are collected and the probe current has harmonic components due to probe sheath nonlinearity. From the relation of the harmonic currents and amplitude of the sheath voltage, the electron temperature near the wall can be obtained with collisional sheath model. The electron temperatures and ion current densities measured at the discharge region are in the ranges of 2.7–3.4 eV and 1.7–5.2 mA/cm{sup 2} at various flow rates and input powers.

  10. Stomatal action directly feeds back on leaf turgor: new insights into the regulation of the plant water status from non-invasive pressure probe measurements.

    PubMed

    Ache, Peter; Bauer, Hubert; Kollist, Hannes; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A S; Lautner, Silke; Hartung, Wolfram; Hedrich, Rainer

    2010-06-01

    Uptake of CO(2) by the leaf is associated with loss of water. Control of stomatal aperture by volume changes of guard cell pairs optimizes the efficiency of water use. Under water stress, the protein kinase OPEN STOMATA 1 (OST1) activates the guard-cell anion release channel SLOW ANION CHANNEL-ASSOCIATED 1 (SLAC1), and thereby triggers stomatal closure. Plants with mutated OST1 and SLAC1 are defective in guard-cell turgor regulation. To study the effect of stomatal movement on leaf turgor using intact leaves of Arabidopsis, we used a new pressure probe to monitor transpiration and turgor pressure simultaneously and non-invasively. This probe permits routine easy access to parameters related to water status and stomatal conductance under physiological conditions using the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Long-term leaf turgor pressure recordings over several weeks showed a drop in turgor during the day and recovery at night. Thus pressure changes directly correlated with the degree of plant transpiration. Leaf turgor of wild-type plants responded to CO(2), light, humidity, ozone and abscisic acid (ABA) in a guard cell-specific manner. Pressure probe measurements of mutants lacking OST1 and SLAC1 function indicated impairment in stomatal responses to light and humidity. In contrast to wild-type plants, leaves from well-watered ost1 plants exposed to a dry atmosphere wilted after light-induced stomatal opening. Experiments with open stomata mutants indicated that the hydraulic conductance of leaf stomata is higher than that of the root-shoot continuum. Thus leaf turgor appears to rely to a large extent on the anion channel activity of autonomously regulated stomatal guard cells. PMID:20345603

  11. Stomatal action directly feeds back on leaf turgor: new insights into the regulation of the plant water status from non-invasive pressure probe measurements.

    PubMed

    Ache, Peter; Bauer, Hubert; Kollist, Hannes; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A S; Lautner, Silke; Hartung, Wolfram; Hedrich, Rainer

    2010-06-01

    Uptake of CO(2) by the leaf is associated with loss of water. Control of stomatal aperture by volume changes of guard cell pairs optimizes the efficiency of water use. Under water stress, the protein kinase OPEN STOMATA 1 (OST1) activates the guard-cell anion release channel SLOW ANION CHANNEL-ASSOCIATED 1 (SLAC1), and thereby triggers stomatal closure. Plants with mutated OST1 and SLAC1 are defective in guard-cell turgor regulation. To study the effect of stomatal movement on leaf turgor using intact leaves of Arabidopsis, we used a new pressure probe to monitor transpiration and turgor pressure simultaneously and non-invasively. This probe permits routine easy access to parameters related to water status and stomatal conductance under physiological conditions using the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Long-term leaf turgor pressure recordings over several weeks showed a drop in turgor during the day and recovery at night. Thus pressure changes directly correlated with the degree of plant transpiration. Leaf turgor of wild-type plants responded to CO(2), light, humidity, ozone and abscisic acid (ABA) in a guard cell-specific manner. Pressure probe measurements of mutants lacking OST1 and SLAC1 function indicated impairment in stomatal responses to light and humidity. In contrast to wild-type plants, leaves from well-watered ost1 plants exposed to a dry atmosphere wilted after light-induced stomatal opening. Experiments with open stomata mutants indicated that the hydraulic conductance of leaf stomata is higher than that of the root-shoot continuum. Thus leaf turgor appears to rely to a large extent on the anion channel activity of autonomously regulated stomatal guard cells.

  12. Atom probe tomography characterization of neutron irradiated surveillance samples from the R. E. Ginna reactor pressure vessel

    DOE PAGES

    Edmondson, Philip D.; Miller, Michael K.; Powers, Kathy A.; Nanstad, Randy K.

    2015-12-29

    Surveillance samples of a low copper (nominally 0.05 wt.% Cu) forging and a higher copper (0.23 wt.% Cu) submerged arc weld from the R. E. Ginna reactor pressure vessel have been characterized by atom probe tomography (APT) after exposure to three levels of neutron irradiation, i.e., fluences of 1.7, 3.6 and 5.8 × 1023 n.m–2 (E > 1 MeV), and inlet temperatures of ~289 °C (~552 °F). As no copper-enriched precipitates were observed in the low copper forging, and the measured copper content in the ferrite matrix was 0.04± <0.01 at.% Cu, after neutron irradiation to a fluence of 1.7more » × 1023 n.m–3, this copper level was below the solubility limit. A number density of 2 × 1022 m–3 of Ni–, Mn– Si-enriched precipitates with an equivalent radius of gyration of 1.7 ± 0.4 nm were detected in the sample. However, Cu-, Ni-, Mn-enriched precipitates were observed in specimens cut from different surveillance specimens from the same forging material in which the overall measured copper level was 0.08± <0.01 at.% (fluence of 3.6 × 1023 n.m–3) and 0.09± <0.01 at.% Cu (fluence of 5.8 × 1023 n.m–3). Therefore, these slightly higher copper contents were above the solubility limit of Cu under these irradiation conditions. A best fit of all the composition data indicated that the size and number density of the Cu-enriched precipitates increased slightly in both size and number density by additional exposure to neutron irradiation. High number densities of Cu-enriched precipitates were observed in the higher Cu submerged arc weld for all irradiated conditions. The size and number density of the precipitates in the welds were higher than in the same fluence forgings. Some Cu-enriched precipitates were found to have Ni-, Mn- Si-, and P-enriched regions on their surfaces suggesting a preferential nucleation site. Furthermore, atom maps revealed P, Ni, and Mn segregation to, and preferential precipitation of, Cu-enriched precipitates over the surface of a grain

  13. Atom probe tomography characterization of neutron irradiated surveillance samples from the R. E. Ginna reactor pressure vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Edmondson, Philip D.; Miller, Michael K.; Powers, Kathy A.; Nanstad, Randy K.

    2015-12-29

    Surveillance samples of a low copper (nominally 0.05 wt.% Cu) forging and a higher copper (0.23 wt.% Cu) submerged arc weld from the R. E. Ginna reactor pressure vessel have been characterized by atom probe tomography (APT) after exposure to three levels of neutron irradiation, i.e., fluences of 1.7, 3.6 and 5.8 × 1023 n.m–2 (E > 1 MeV), and inlet temperatures of ~289 °C (~552 °F). As no copper-enriched precipitates were observed in the low copper forging, and the measured copper content in the ferrite matrix was 0.04± <0.01 at.% Cu, after neutron irradiation to a fluence of 1.7 × 1023 n.m–3, this copper level was below the solubility limit. A number density of 2 × 1022 m–3 of Ni–, Mn– Si-enriched precipitates with an equivalent radius of gyration of 1.7 ± 0.4 nm were detected in the sample. However, Cu-, Ni-, Mn-enriched precipitates were observed in specimens cut from different surveillance specimens from the same forging material in which the overall measured copper level was 0.08± <0.01 at.% (fluence of 3.6 × 1023 n.m–3) and 0.09± <0.01 at.% Cu (fluence of 5.8 × 1023 n.m–3). Therefore, these slightly higher copper contents were above the solubility limit of Cu under these irradiation conditions. A best fit of all the composition data indicated that the size and number density of the Cu-enriched precipitates increased slightly in both size and number density by additional exposure to neutron irradiation. High number densities of Cu-enriched precipitates were observed in the higher Cu submerged arc weld for all irradiated conditions. The size and number density of the precipitates in the welds were higher than in the same fluence forgings. Some Cu-enriched precipitates were found to have Ni-, Mn- Si-, and P-enriched regions on their surfaces suggesting a preferential nucleation site. Furthermore, atom maps revealed P, Ni, and Mn

  14. Atom probe tomography characterization of neutron irradiated surveillance samples from the R. E. Ginna reactor pressure vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmondson, P. D.; Miller, M. K.; Powers, K. A.; Nanstad, R. K.

    2016-03-01

    Surveillance samples of a low copper (nominally 0.05 wt.% Cu) forging and a higher copper (0.23 wt.% Cu) submerged arc weld from the R. E. Ginna reactor pressure vessel have been characterized by atom probe tomography (APT) after exposure to three levels of neutron irradiation, i.e., fluences of 1.7, 3.6 and 5.8 × 1023 n.m-2 (E > 1 MeV), and inlet temperatures of ∼289 °C (∼552 °F). As no copper-enriched precipitates were observed in the low copper forging, and the measured copper content in the ferrite matrix was 0.04± <0.01 at.% Cu, after neutron irradiation to a fluence of 1.7 × 1023 n.m-3, this copper level was below the solubility limit. A number density of 2 × 1022 m-3 of Ni-, Mn- Si-enriched precipitates with an equivalent radius of gyration of 1.7 ± 0.4 nm were detected in the sample. However, Cu-, Ni-, Mn-enriched precipitates were observed in specimens cut from different surveillance specimens from the same forging material in which the overall measured copper level was 0.08± <0.01 at.% (fluence of 3.6 × 1023 n.m-3) and 0.09± <0.01 at.% Cu (fluence of 5.8 × 1023 n.m-3). Therefore, these slightly higher copper contents were above the solubility limit of Cu under these irradiation conditions. A best fit of all the composition data indicated that the size and number density of the Cu-enriched precipitates increased slightly in both size and number density by additional exposure to neutron irradiation. High number densities of Cu-enriched precipitates were observed in the higher Cu submerged arc weld for all irradiated conditions. The size and number density of the precipitates in the welds were higher than in the same fluence forgings. Some Cu-enriched precipitates were found to have Ni-, Mn- Si-, and P-enriched regions on their surfaces suggesting a preferential nucleation site. Atom maps revealed P, Ni, and Mn segregation to, and preferential precipitation of, Cu-enriched precipitates over the surface of a grain boundary in the low fluence

  15. Probing of bonding changes in B[subscript 2]O[subscript 3] glasses at high pressure with inelastic X-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sung Kuen; Eng, Peter J.; Mao, Ho-Kwang; Meng, Yue; Newville, Matthew; Hu, Michael Y.; Shu, Jinfu

    2010-07-19

    Full understanding of atomic arrangement in amorphous oxides both at ambient and high pressure is an ongoing fundamental puzzle. Whereas the structures of archetypal oxide glasses such as v-B{sub 2}O{sub 3} at high pressure are essential to elucidate origins of anomalous macroscopic properties of more complex melts, knowledge of the high-pressure structure and pressure-induced coordination changes of these glasses has remained elusive due to lack of suitable in situ experimental probes. Here, we report synchrotron inelastic X-ray scattering results for v-{sub 2}O{sub 3} at pressures up to 22.5 GPa, revealing the nature of pressure-induced bonding changes and the structure. Direct in situ measurements show a continuous transformation from tri-coordinated to tetra-coordinated boron beginning at 4-7 GPa with most of the boron tetra-coordinated above 20 GPa, forming dense tetrahedral v-B{sub 2}O{sub 3}. After decompression from high pressure the bonding reverts back to tri-coordinated boron but with the data suggesting a permanent densification.

  16. Pollution Probe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chant, Donald A.

    This book is written as a statement of concern about pollution by members of Pollution Probe, a citizens' anti-pollution group in Canada. Its purpose is to create public awareness and pressure for the eventual solution to pollution problems. The need for effective government policies to control the population explosion, conserve natural resources,…

  17. Using “Tender” x-ray ambient pressure x-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy as a direct probe of solid-liquid interface

    SciTech Connect

    Axnanda, Stephanus; Crumlin, Ethan J.; Mao, Baohua; Rani, Sana; Chang, Rui; Karlsson, Patrik G.; Edwards, Mårten O. M.; Lundqvist, Måns; Moberg, Robert; Ross, Phil; Hussain, Zahid; Liu, Zhi

    2015-05-07

    We report a new method to probe the solid-liquid interface through the use of a thin liquid layer on a solid surface. An ambient pressure XPS (AP-XPS) endstation that is capable of detecting high kinetic energy photoelectrons (7 keV) at a pressure up to 110 Torr has been constructed and commissioned. Additionally, we have deployed a “dip & pull” method to create a stable nanometers-thick aqueous electrolyte on platinum working electrode surface. Combining the newly constructed AP-XPS system, “dip & pull” approach, with a “tender” X-ray synchrotron source (2 keV–7 keV), we are able to access the interface between liquid and solid dense phases with photoelectrons and directly probe important phenomena occurring at the narrow solid-liquid interface region in an electrochemical system. Using this approach, we have performed electrochemical oxidation of the Pt electrode at an oxygen evolution reaction (OER) potential. Under this potential, we observe the formation of both Pt²⁺ and Pt⁴⁺ interfacial species on the Pt working electrode in situ. We believe this thin-film approach and the use of “tender” AP-XPS highlighted in this study is an innovative new approach to probe this key solid-liquid interface region of electrochemistry.

  18. Using “Tender” X-ray Ambient Pressure X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy as A Direct Probe of Solid-Liquid Interface

    PubMed Central

    Axnanda, Stephanus; Crumlin, Ethan J.; Mao, Baohua; Rani, Sana; Chang, Rui; Karlsson, Patrik G.; Edwards, Mårten O. M.; Lundqvist, Måns; Moberg, Robert; Ross, Phil; Hussain, Zahid; Liu, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    We report a new method to probe the solid-liquid interface through the use of a thin liquid layer on a solid surface. An ambient pressure XPS (AP-XPS) endstation that is capable of detecting high kinetic energy photoelectrons (7 keV) at a pressure up to 110 Torr has been constructed and commissioned. Additionally, we have deployed a “dip & pull” method to create a stable nanometers-thick aqueous electrolyte on platinum working electrode surface. Combining the newly constructed AP-XPS system, “dip & pull” approach, with a “tender” X-ray synchrotron source (2 keV–7 keV), we are able to access the interface between liquid and solid dense phases with photoelectrons and directly probe important phenomena occurring at the narrow solid-liquid interface region in an electrochemical system. Using this approach, we have performed electrochemical oxidation of the Pt electrode at an oxygen evolution reaction (OER) potential. Under this potential, we observe the formation of both Pt2+ and Pt4+ interfacial species on the Pt working electrode in situ. We believe this thin-film approach and the use of “tender” AP-XPS highlighted in this study is an innovative new approach to probe this key solid-liquid interface region of electrochemistry. PMID:25950241

  19. Using “Tender” x-ray ambient pressure x-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy as a direct probe of solid-liquid interface

    DOE PAGES

    Axnanda, Stephanus; Crumlin, Ethan J.; Mao, Baohua; Rani, Sana; Chang, Rui; Karlsson, Patrik G.; Edwards, Mårten O. M.; Lundqvist, Måns; Moberg, Robert; Ross, Phil; et al

    2015-05-07

    We report a new method to probe the solid-liquid interface through the use of a thin liquid layer on a solid surface. An ambient pressure XPS (AP-XPS) endstation that is capable of detecting high kinetic energy photoelectrons (7 keV) at a pressure up to 110 Torr has been constructed and commissioned. Additionally, we have deployed a “dip & pull” method to create a stable nanometers-thick aqueous electrolyte on platinum working electrode surface. Combining the newly constructed AP-XPS system, “dip & pull” approach, with a “tender” X-ray synchrotron source (2 keV–7 keV), we are able to access the interface between liquidmore » and solid dense phases with photoelectrons and directly probe important phenomena occurring at the narrow solid-liquid interface region in an electrochemical system. Using this approach, we have performed electrochemical oxidation of the Pt electrode at an oxygen evolution reaction (OER) potential. Under this potential, we observe the formation of both Pt²⁺ and Pt⁴⁺ interfacial species on the Pt working electrode in situ. We believe this thin-film approach and the use of “tender” AP-XPS highlighted in this study is an innovative new approach to probe this key solid-liquid interface region of electrochemistry.« less

  20. The dependence on geomagnetic conditions and solar wind dynamic pressure of the spatial distributions of EMIC waves observed by the Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikin, A. A.; Zhang, J.-C.; Smith, C. W.; Spence, H. E.; Torbert, R. B.; Kletzing, C. A.

    2016-05-01

    A statistical examination on the spatial distributions of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves observed by the Van Allen Probes against varying levels of geomagnetic activity (i.e., AE and SYM-H) and dynamic pressure has been performed. Measurements taken by the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science for the first full magnetic local time (MLT) precession of the Van Allen Probes (September 2012-June 2014) are used to identify over 700 EMIC wave events. Spatial distributions of EMIC waves are found to vary depending on the level of geomagnetic activity and solar wind dynamic pressure. EMIC wave events were observed under quiet (AE ≤ 100 nT, 325 wave events), moderate (100 nT < AE ≤ 300 nT, 218 wave events), and disturbed (AE > 300 nT, 228 wave events) geomagnetic conditions and are primarily observed in the prenoon sector (~800 < MLT ≤ ~1100) at L ≈ 5.5 during quiet activity times. As AE increases to disturbed levels, the peak occurrence rates shift to the afternoon sector (1200 < MLT ≤ 1800) between L = 4 and L = 6. A majority of EMIC wave events (~56%) were observed during nonstorm times (defined by SYM-H). Consistent with the quiet AE levels, nonstorm EMIC waves are observed in the prenoon sector. EMIC waves observed through the duration of a geomagnetic storm are primarily located in the afternoon sector. High solar wind pressure (Pdyn > 3 nPa) correlates to mostly afternoon EMIC wave observations.

  1. High-Sensitivity Nuclear Magnetic Resonance at Giga-Pascal Pressures: A New Tool for Probing Electronic and Chemical Properties of Condensed Matter under Extreme Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Thomas; Haase, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is one of the most important techniques for the study of condensed matter systems, their chemical structure, and their electronic properties. The application of high pressure enables one to synthesize new materials, but the response of known materials to high pressure is a very useful tool for studying their electronic structure and developing theories. For example, high-pressure synthesis might be at the origin of life; and understanding the behavior of small molecules under extreme pressure will tell us more about fundamental processes in our universe. It is no wonder that there has always been great interest in having NMR available at high pressures. Unfortunately, the desired pressures are often well into the Giga-Pascal (GPa) range and require special anvil cell devices where only very small, secluded volumes are available. This has restricted the use of NMR almost entirely in the past, and only recently, a new approach to high-sensitivity GPa NMR, which has a resonating micro-coil inside the sample chamber, was put forward. This approach enables us to achieve high sensitivity with experiments that bring the power of NMR to Giga-Pascal pressure condensed matter research. First applications, the detection of a topological electronic transition in ordinary aluminum metal and the closing of the pseudo-gap in high-temperature superconductivity, show the power of such an approach. Meanwhile, the range of achievable pressures was increased tremendously with a new generation of anvil cells (up to 10.1 GPa), that fit standard-bore NMR magnets. This approach might become a new, important tool for the investigation of many condensed matter systems, in chemistry, geochemistry, and in physics, since we can now watch structural changes with the eyes of a very versatile probe. PMID:25350694

  2. High-sensitivity nuclear magnetic resonance at Giga-Pascal pressures: a new tool for probing electronic and chemical properties of condensed matter under extreme conditions.

    PubMed

    Meier, Thomas; Haase, Jürgen

    2014-10-10

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is one of the most important techniques for the study of condensed matter systems, their chemical structure, and their electronic properties. The application of high pressure enables one to synthesize new materials, but the response of known materials to high pressure is a very useful tool for studying their electronic structure and developing theories. For example, high-pressure synthesis might be at the origin of life; and understanding the behavior of small molecules under extreme pressure will tell us more about fundamental processes in our universe. It is no wonder that there has always been great interest in having NMR available at high pressures. Unfortunately, the desired pressures are often well into the Giga-Pascal (GPa) range and require special anvil cell devices where only very small, secluded volumes are available. This has restricted the use of NMR almost entirely in the past, and only recently, a new approach to high-sensitivity GPa NMR, which has a resonating micro-coil inside the sample chamber, was put forward. This approach enables us to achieve high sensitivity with experiments that bring the power of NMR to Giga-Pascal pressure condensed matter research. First applications, the detection of a topological electronic transition in ordinary aluminum metal and the closing of the pseudo-gap in high-temperature superconductivity, show the power of such an approach. Meanwhile, the range of achievable pressures was increased tremendously with a new generation of anvil cells (up to 10.1 GPa), that fit standard-bore NMR magnets. This approach might become a new, important tool for the investigation of many condensed matter systems, in chemistry, geochemistry, and in physics, since we can now watch structural changes with the eyes of a very versatile probe.

  3. High-sensitivity nuclear magnetic resonance at Giga-Pascal pressures: a new tool for probing electronic and chemical properties of condensed matter under extreme conditions.

    PubMed

    Meier, Thomas; Haase, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is one of the most important techniques for the study of condensed matter systems, their chemical structure, and their electronic properties. The application of high pressure enables one to synthesize new materials, but the response of known materials to high pressure is a very useful tool for studying their electronic structure and developing theories. For example, high-pressure synthesis might be at the origin of life; and understanding the behavior of small molecules under extreme pressure will tell us more about fundamental processes in our universe. It is no wonder that there has always been great interest in having NMR available at high pressures. Unfortunately, the desired pressures are often well into the Giga-Pascal (GPa) range and require special anvil cell devices where only very small, secluded volumes are available. This has restricted the use of NMR almost entirely in the past, and only recently, a new approach to high-sensitivity GPa NMR, which has a resonating micro-coil inside the sample chamber, was put forward. This approach enables us to achieve high sensitivity with experiments that bring the power of NMR to Giga-Pascal pressure condensed matter research. First applications, the detection of a topological electronic transition in ordinary aluminum metal and the closing of the pseudo-gap in high-temperature superconductivity, show the power of such an approach. Meanwhile, the range of achievable pressures was increased tremendously with a new generation of anvil cells (up to 10.1 GPa), that fit standard-bore NMR magnets. This approach might become a new, important tool for the investigation of many condensed matter systems, in chemistry, geochemistry, and in physics, since we can now watch structural changes with the eyes of a very versatile probe. PMID:25350694

  4. On-probe atmospheric pressure thermal desorption-ESI-MS for the analysis of volatile analytes or volatile pryolysis products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An on-probe pyrolyzer has been constructed and interfaced with desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) mass spectrometry (MS) for the rapid analysis of non-volatile pyrolysis products. The detection and analysis of non-volatile pyrolysis products of peptides, proteins and the synthetic polymer pol...

  5. Probing and modeling of pressure-induced coordination transformation in borate glasses: Inelastic x-ray scattering study at high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sung Keun; Eng, Peter J.; Mao, Ho-kwang; Shu, Jinfu

    2009-01-15

    Here, we report on the in situ synchrotron inelastic x-ray scattering spectra of Na-borate glasses at high pressure up to 25 GPa. The pressure-induced boron coordination transformation from {sup [3]}B to {sup [4]}B is linear with pressure characterized by a single value of ({partial_derivative}{sup [3]}B/{partial_derivative}P){sub T}. Previous studies of Li-borate and pure-borate glasses show a nonlinear transformation with multiple ({partial_derivative}{sup [3]}B/{partial_derivative}P){sub T} values for different pressure ranges, revealing the important role cation field strength plays in densification and pressure-induced structural changes. Considering the distribution of the energy difference beween low- and high-pressure states ({Delta}{var_epsilon}) in the energy landscape and the variance of the ratio {Delta}{var_epsilon} to its pressure gradient ({partial_derivative}{Delta}{var_epsilon}/{partial_derivative}P){sub T} as a measure of network flexibility with pressure, an amorphous system with a large variance in {Delta}{var_epsilon} at 1 atm and/or a small ({partial_derivative}{Delta}{var_epsilon}/{partial_derivative}P){sub T} may undergo a gradual coordination transformation (e.g., Na borates). In contrast, a system with the opposite behavior (e.g., Li borates) undergoes an abrupt coordination transformation. The results and concepts of this study thus can shed light on opportunities to study the effect of composition on the nature of densification in low-z oxide and other archetypal glasses and melts.

  6. Boundary layer chemistry probed by in situ infrared spectroscopy during SiO2 deposition at atmospheric pressure from tetraethylorthosilicate and ozone.

    PubMed

    Flores, Lucio D; Crowell, John E

    2005-09-01

    The deposition of silicon dioxide films at 450 degrees C was studied in quasi real time by probing the thermally activated boundary layer region near the growing surface during atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD). Potential tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS)/O(3) reaction products have been investigated in an attempt to clarify the reaction mechanism leading to the observed silanol deposition intermediates and delineate the film formation process. The organic products formed during the TEOS/O(3) reaction are acetic acid, formic acid, formaldehyde, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and water. Quantitative methods are developed using FT-IR (Fourier transform infrared) spectroscopy during ozonation of TEOS at elevated temperatures. The measurement of gaseous alcohols of silicon alkoxides by FT-IR is demonstrated by application of an in situ methodology that probes the high-temperature region within the CVD environment. Partial least squares (PLS) Beer's law absorption models are used in determining relative TEOS, ozone, and ethoxysilanol levels during the reaction. The reaction order in TEOS is measured at 1.65 +/- 0.02 over a 0.9 Torr pressure range. Similarly, the ratio of ethoxysilanol formed versus the amount of ozone consumed is ca. 1:3. A radical chain oxidative mechanism involving direct reaction of TEOS and ozone is proposed for formation of highly reactive silanol film growth intermediates.

  7. A revised and unified pressure-clamp/relaxation theory for studying plant cell water relations with pressure probes: in-situ determination of cell volume for calculation of volumetric elastic modulus and hydraulic conductivity.

    PubMed

    Knipfer, T; Fei, J; Gambetta, G A; Shackel, K A; Matthews, M A

    2014-10-21

    The cell-pressure-probe is a unique tool to study plant water relations in-situ. Inaccuracy in the estimation of cell volume (νo) is the major source of error in the calculation of both cell volumetric elastic modulus (ε) and cell hydraulic conductivity (Lp). Estimates of νo and Lp can be obtained with the pressure-clamp (PC) and pressure-relaxation (PR) methods. In theory, both methods should result in comparable νo and Lp estimates, but this has not been the case. In this study, the existing νo-theories for PC and PR methods were reviewed and clarified. A revised νo-theory was developed that is equally valid for the PC and PR methods. The revised theory was used to determine νo for two extreme scenarios of solute mixing between the experimental cell and sap in the pressure probe microcapillary. Using a fully automated cell-pressure-probe (ACPP) on leaf epidermal cells of Tradescantia virginiana, the validity of the revised theory was tested with experimental data. Calculated νo values from both methods were in the range of optically determined νo (=1.1-5.0nL) for T. virginiana. However, the PC method produced a systematically lower (21%) calculated νo compared to the PR method. Effects of solute mixing could only explain a potential error in calculated νo of <3%. For both methods, this discrepancy in νo was almost identical to the discrepancy in the measured ratio of ΔV/ΔP (total change in microcapillary sap volume versus corresponding change in cell turgor) of 19%, which is a fundamental parameter in calculating νo. It followed from the revised theory that the ratio of ΔV/ΔP was inversely related to the solute reflection coefficient. This highlighted that treating the experimental cell as an ideal osmometer in both methods is potentially not correct. Effects of non-ideal osmotic behavior by transmembrane solute movement may be minimized in the PR as compared to the PC method.

  8. Pressure and temperature response of Poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) in aqueous solution probed with Raman microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cariker, Coleman; Schulte, Alfons

    2015-03-01

    Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) is a thermo-responsive hydrogel that exists in a hydrated state beneath its lower critical solution temperature (LCST) near 305 K. Above this temperature water is expelled by the polymer as it undergoes a coil to globule collapse. High pressure is an important variable as it influences the strength of hydrogen bonding and can destabilize hydrophic contacts. We present results from optical imaging on a micron scale and Raman spectroscopic measurements as a function of temperature (295 - 315 K) and hydrostatic pressure (0.1 - 400 MPa). Samples consisted of 25% PNIPAM in aqueous solution in micro-capillaries with 100 micron cross section. Our experiments reveal differences in the spatial evolution of the phase change across the temperature and pressure transitions. These are corroborated by bond specific and hydration changes observed in the Raman spectra.

  9. The role of small-scale ion injections in the buildup of Earth's ring current pressure: Van Allen Probes observations of the 17 March 2013 storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkioulidou, Matina; Ukhorskiy, A. Y.; Mitchell, D. G.; Sotirelis, T.; Mauk, B. H.; Lanzerotti, L. J.

    2014-09-01

    Energetic particle transport into the inner magnetosphere during geomagnetic storms is responsible for significant plasma pressure enhancement, which is the driver of large-scale currents that control the global electrodynamics within the magnetosphere-ionosphere system. Therefore, understanding the transport of plasma from the tail deep into the near-Earth magnetosphere, as well as the energization processes associated with this transport, is essential for a comprehensive knowledge of the near-Earth space environment. During the main phase of a geomagnetic storm on 17 March 2013 (minimum Dst ~ -137 nT), the Radiation Belt Storm Probes Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE) instrument on the Van Allen Probes observed frequent, small-scale proton injections deep into the inner nightside magnetosphere in the region L ~ 4 - 6. Although isolated injections have been previously reported inside geosynchronous orbit, the large number of small-scale injections observed in this event suggests that, during geomagnetic storms injections provide a robust mechanism for transporting energetic ions deep into the inner magnetosphere. In order to understand the role that these injections play in the ring current dynamics, we determine the following properties for each injection: (i) associated pressure enhancement, (ii) the time duration of this enhancement, and (iii) the lowest and highest energy channels exhibiting a sharp increase in their intensities. Based on these properties, we estimate the effect of these small-scale injections on the pressure buildup during the storm. We find that this mode of transport could make a substantial contribution to the total energy gain in the storm time inner magnetosphere.

  10. Atom Probe Tomography Characterization of the Solute Distributions in a Neutron-Irradiated and Annealed Pressure Vessel Steel Weld

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.K.

    2001-01-30

    A combined atom probe tomography and atom probe field ion microscopy study has been performed on a submerged arc weld irradiated to high fluence in the Heavy-Section Steel irradiation (HSSI) fifth irradiation series (Weld 73W). The composition of this weld is Fe - 0.27 at. % Cu, 1.58% Mn, 0.57% Ni, 0.34% MO, 0.27% Cr, 0.58% Si, 0.003% V, 0.45% C, 0.009% P, and 0.009% S. The material was examined after five conditions: after a typical stress relief treatment of 40 h at 607 C, after neutron irradiation to a fluence of 2 x 10{sup 23} n m{sup {minus}2} (E > 1 MeV), and after irradiation and isothermal anneals of 0.5, 1, and 168 h at 454 C. This report describes the matrix composition and the size, composition, and number density of the ultrafine copper-enriched precipitates that formed under neutron irradiation and the change in these parameters with post-irradiation annealing treatments.

  11. Ring Current Pressure Estimation withRAM-SCB using Data Assimilation and VanAllen Probe Flux Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godinez, H. C.; Yu, Y.; Henderson, M. G.; Larsen, B.; Jordanova, V.

    2015-12-01

    Capturing and subsequently modeling the influence of tail plasma injections on the inner magnetosphere is particularly important for understanding the formation and evolution of Earth's ring current. In this study, the ring current distribution is estimated with the Ring Current-Atmosphere Interactions Model with Self-Consistent Magnetic field (RAM-SCB) using, for the first time, data assimilation techniques and particle flux data from the Van Allen Probes. The state of the ring current within the RAM-SCB is corrected via an ensemble based data assimilation technique by using proton flux from one of the Van Allen Probes, to capture the enhancement of ring current following an isolated substorm event on July 18 2013. The results show significant improvement in the estimation of the ring current particle distributions in the RAM-SCB model, leading to better agreement with observations. This newly implemented data assimilation technique in the global modeling of the ring current thus provides a promising tool to better characterize the effect of substorm injections in the near-Earth regions. The work is part of the Space Hazards Induced near Earth by Large, Dynamic Storms (SHIELDS) project in Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  12. Using AFM to probe the complexation of DNA with anionic lipids mediated by Ca(2+): the role of surface pressure.

    PubMed

    Luque-Caballero, Germán; Martín-Molina, Alberto; Sánchez-Treviño, Alda Yadira; Rodríguez-Valverde, Miguel A; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, Miguel A; Maldonado-Valderrama, Julia

    2014-04-28

    Complexation of DNA with lipids is currently being developed as an alternative to classical vectors based on viruses. Most of the research to date focuses on cationic lipids owing to their spontaneous complexation with DNA. Nonetheless, recent investigations have revealed that cationic lipids induce a large number of adverse effects on DNA delivery. Precisely, the lower cytotoxicity of anionic lipids accounts for their use as a promising alternative. However, the complexation of DNA with anionic lipids (mediated by cations) is still in early stages and is not yet well understood. In order to explore the molecular mechanisms underlying the complexation of anionic lipids and DNA we proposed a combined methodology based on the surface pressure-area isotherms, Gibbs elasticity and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). These techniques allow elucidation of the role of the surface pressure in the complexation and visualization of the interfacial aggregates for the first time. We demonstrate that the DNA complexes with negatively charged model monolayers (DPPC/DPPS 4 : 1) only in the presence of Ca(2+), but is expelled at very high surface pressures. Also, according to the Gibbs elasticity plot, the complexation of lipids and DNA implies a whole fluidisation of the monolayer and a completely different phase transition map in the presence of DNA and Ca(2+). AFM imaging allows identification for the first time of specific morphologies associated with different packing densities. At low surface coverage, a branched net like structure is observed whereas at high surface pressure fibers formed of interfacial aggregates appear. In summary, Ca(2+) mediates the interaction between DNA and negatively charged lipids and also the conformation of the ternary system depends on the surface pressure. Such observations are important new generic features of the interaction between DNA and anionic lipids. PMID:24668321

  13. Revealing substructures of H4 and H5 hole traps in p-type InP using Laplace deep-level transient spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Darwich, R.; Mani, A. A.

    2010-08-15

    New substructures of H4 and H5 hole traps have been revealed using Laplace deep-level transient spectroscopy. Our measurements show that the hole traps H4 and H5 can have at least three components for each. Moreover, the activation energies are deduced and the microscopic nature of these substructures is discussed.

  14. Probing volumetric properties of biomolecular systems by pressure perturbation calorimetry (PPC)--the effects of hydration, cosolvents and crowding.

    PubMed

    Suladze, Saba; Kahse, Marie; Erwin, Nelli; Tomazic, Daniel; Winter, Roland

    2015-04-01

    Pressure perturbation calorimetry (PPC) is an efficient technique to study the volumetric properties of biomolecules in solution. In PPC, the coefficient of thermal expansion of the partial volume of the biomolecule is deduced from the heat consumed or produced after small isothermal pressure-jumps. The expansion coefficient strongly depends on the interaction of the biomolecule with the solvent or cosolvent as well as on its packing and internal dynamic properties. This technique, complemented with molecular acoustics and densimetry, provides valuable insights into the basic thermodynamic properties of solvation and volume effects accompanying interactions, reactions and phase transitions of biomolecular systems. After outlining the principles of the technique, we present representative examples on protein folding, including effects of cosolvents and crowding, together with a discussion of the interpretation, and further applications.

  15. Inflatable traversing probe seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trimarchi, Paul A.

    1991-01-01

    An inflatable seal acts as a pressure-tight zipper to provide traversing capability for instrumentation rakes and probes. A specially designed probe segment with a teardrop cross-section in the vicinity of the inflatable seal minimizes leakage at the interface. The probe is able to travel through a lengthwise slot in a pressure vessel or wind tunnel section, while still maintaining pressure integrity. The design uses two commercially available inflatable seals, opposing each other, to cover the probe slot in a wind tunnel wall. Proof-of-concept tests were conducted at vessel pressures up to 30 psig, with seals inflated to 50 psig, showing no measurable leakage along the seal's length or around the probe teardrop cross-section. This seal concept can replace the existing technology of sliding face plate/O-ring systems in applications where lengthwise space is limited.

  16. A measurement system analysis with design of experiments: Investigation of the adhesion performance of a pressure sensitive adhesive with the probe tack test.

    PubMed

    Michaelis, Marc; Leopold, Claudia S

    2015-12-30

    The tack of a pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) is not an inherent material property and strongly depends on the measurement conditions. Following the concept of a measurement system analysis (MSA), influencing factors of the probe tack test were investigated by a design of experiments (DoE) approach. A response surface design with 38 runs was built to evaluate the influence of detachment speed, dwell time, contact force, adhesive film thickness and API content on tack, determined as the maximum of the stress strain curve (σmax). It could be shown that all investigated factors have a significant effect on the response and that the DoE approach allowed to detect two-factorial interactions between the dwell time, the contact force, the adhesive film thickness and the API content. Surprisingly, it was found that tack increases with decreasing and not with increasing adhesive film thickness. PMID:26428630

  17. A measurement system analysis with design of experiments: Investigation of the adhesion performance of a pressure sensitive adhesive with the probe tack test.

    PubMed

    Michaelis, Marc; Leopold, Claudia S

    2015-12-30

    The tack of a pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) is not an inherent material property and strongly depends on the measurement conditions. Following the concept of a measurement system analysis (MSA), influencing factors of the probe tack test were investigated by a design of experiments (DoE) approach. A response surface design with 38 runs was built to evaluate the influence of detachment speed, dwell time, contact force, adhesive film thickness and API content on tack, determined as the maximum of the stress strain curve (σmax). It could be shown that all investigated factors have a significant effect on the response and that the DoE approach allowed to detect two-factorial interactions between the dwell time, the contact force, the adhesive film thickness and the API content. Surprisingly, it was found that tack increases with decreasing and not with increasing adhesive film thickness.

  18. Influence of long-term thermal aging on the microstructural evolution of nuclear reactor pressure vessel materials: An atom probe study

    SciTech Connect

    Pareige, P.; Russell, K.F.; Stoller, R.E.; Miller, M.K.

    1998-03-01

    Atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM) investigations of the microstructure of unaged (as-fabricated) and long-term thermally aged ({approximately} 100,000 h at 280 C) surveillance materials from commercial reactor pressure vessel steels were performed. This combination of materials and conditions permitted the investigation of potential thermal-aging effects. This microstructural study focused on the quantification of the compositions of the matrix and carbides. The APFIM results indicate that there was no significant microstructural evolution after a long-term thermal exposure in weld, plate, or forging materials. The matrix depletion of copper that was observed in weld materials was consistent with the copper concentration in the matrix after the stress-relief heat treatment. The compositions of cementite carbides aged for 100,000 h were compared with the Thermocalc{trademark} prediction. The APFIM comparisons of materials under these conditions are consistent with the measured change in mechanical properties such as the Charpy transition temperature.

  19. Indoor seismology by probing the Earth interior by using sound velocity measurements at high pressures and temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Li,B.; Liebermann, R.

    2007-01-01

    The adiabatic bulk (K S) and shear (G) moduli of mantle materials at high pressure and temperature can be obtained directly by measuring compressional and shear wave velocities in the laboratory with experimental techniques based on physical acoustics. We present the application of the current state-of-the-art experimental techniques by using ultrasonic interferometry in conjunction with synchrotron x radiation to study the elasticity of olivine and pyroxenes and their high-pressure phases. By using these updated thermoelasticity data for these phases, velocity and density profiles for a pyrolite model are constructed and compared with radial seismic models. We conclude that pyrolite provides an adequate explanation of the major seismic discontinuities at 410- and 660-km depths, the gradient in the transition zone, as well as the velocities in the lower mantle, if the uncertainties in the modeling and the variations in different seismic models are considered. The characteristics of the seismic scaling factors in response to thermal anomalies suggest that anticorrelations between bulk sound and shear wave velocities, as well as the large positive density anomalies observed in the lower mantle, cannot be explained fully without invoking chemical variations.

  20. Indoor seismology by probing the Earth's interior by using sound velocity measurements at high pressures and temperatures.

    PubMed

    Li, Baosheng; Liebermann, Robert C

    2007-05-29

    The adiabatic bulk (K(S)) and shear (G) moduli of mantle materials at high pressure and temperature can be obtained directly by measuring compressional and shear wave velocities in the laboratory with experimental techniques based on physical acoustics. We present the application of the current state-of-the-art experimental techniques by using ultrasonic interferometry in conjunction with synchrotron x radiation to study the elasticity of olivine and pyroxenes and their high-pressure phases. By using these updated thermoelasticity data for these phases, velocity and density profiles for a pyrolite model are constructed and compared with radial seismic models. We conclude that pyrolite provides an adequate explanation of the major seismic discontinuities at 410- and 660-km depths, the gradient in the transition zone, as well as the velocities in the lower mantle, if the uncertainties in the modeling and the variations in different seismic models are considered. The characteristics of the seismic scaling factors in response to thermal anomalies suggest that anticorrelations between bulk sound and shear wave velocities, as well as the large positive density anomalies observed in the lower mantle, cannot be explained fully without invoking chemical variations.

  1. Different urea stoichiometries between the dissociation and denaturation of tobacco mosaic virus as probed by hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Santos, Jose L R; Aparicio, Ricardo; Joekes, Inés; Silva, Jerson L; Bispo, Jose A C; Bonafe, Carlos F S

    2008-05-01

    Viruses are very efficient self-assembly structures, but little is understood about the thermodynamics governing their directed assembly. At higher levels of pressure or when pressure is combined with urea, denaturation occurs. For a better understanding of such processes, we investigated the apparent thermodynamic parameters of dissociation and denaturation by assuming a steady-state condition. These processes can be measured considering the decrease of light scattering of a viral solution due to the dissociation process, and the red shift of the fluorescence emission spectra, that occurs with the denaturation process. We determined the apparent urea stoichiometry considering the equilibrium reaction of TMV dissociation and subunit denaturation, which furnished, respectively, 1.53 and 11.1 mol of urea/mol of TMV subunit. The denaturation and dissociation conditions were arrived in a near reversible pathway, allowing the determination of thermodynamic parameters. Gel filtration HPLC, electron microscopy and circular dichroism confirmed the dissociation and denaturation processes. Based on spectroscopic results from earlier papers, the calculation of the apparent urea stoichiometry of dissociation and denaturation of several other viruses resulted in similar values, suggesting a similar virus-urea interaction among these systems. PMID:18367310

  2. Different urea stoichiometries between the dissociation and denaturation of tobacco mosaic virus as probed by hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Santos, Jose L R; Aparicio, Ricardo; Joekes, Inés; Silva, Jerson L; Bispo, Jose A C; Bonafe, Carlos F S

    2008-05-01

    Viruses are very efficient self-assembly structures, but little is understood about the thermodynamics governing their directed assembly. At higher levels of pressure or when pressure is combined with urea, denaturation occurs. For a better understanding of such processes, we investigated the apparent thermodynamic parameters of dissociation and denaturation by assuming a steady-state condition. These processes can be measured considering the decrease of light scattering of a viral solution due to the dissociation process, and the red shift of the fluorescence emission spectra, that occurs with the denaturation process. We determined the apparent urea stoichiometry considering the equilibrium reaction of TMV dissociation and subunit denaturation, which furnished, respectively, 1.53 and 11.1 mol of urea/mol of TMV subunit. The denaturation and dissociation conditions were arrived in a near reversible pathway, allowing the determination of thermodynamic parameters. Gel filtration HPLC, electron microscopy and circular dichroism confirmed the dissociation and denaturation processes. Based on spectroscopic results from earlier papers, the calculation of the apparent urea stoichiometry of dissociation and denaturation of several other viruses resulted in similar values, suggesting a similar virus-urea interaction among these systems.

  3. Pressure/temperature fluid cell apparatus for the neutron powder diffractometer instrument: Probing atomic structure in situ

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hsiu -Wen; Fanelli, Victor R.; Reiche, Helmut M.; Larson, Eric; Taylor, Mark A.; Xu, Hongwu; Zhu, Jinlong; Siewenie, Joan; Page, Katharine

    2014-12-24

    This contribution describes a new local structure compatible gas/liquid cell apparatus for probing disordered materials at high pressures and variable temperatures in the Neutron Powder Diffraction instrument at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory. The new sample environment offers choices for sample canister thickness and canister material type. Finite element modeling is utilized to establish maximum allowable working pressures of 414 MPa at 15 K and 121 MPa at 600 K. High quality atomic pair distribution function data extraction and modeling have been demonstrated for a calibration standard (Si powder) and for supercritical and subcritical CO2measurements. As a result, the new sample environment was designed to specifically target experimental studies of the local atomic structures involved in geologic CO2 sequestration, but will be equally applicable to a wide variety of energy applications, including sorption of fluids on nano/meso-porous solids, clathrate hydrate formation, catalysis, carbon capture, and H2 and natural gas uptake/storage.

  4. A re-examination of the minor role of unstirred layers during the measurement of transport coefficients of Chara corallina internodes with the cell pressure probe.

    PubMed

    Ye, Qing; Kim, Yangmin; Steudle, Ernst

    2006-05-01

    The impact of unstirred layers (USLs) during cell pressure probe experiments with Chara corallina internodes has been quantified. The results show that the hydraulic conductivity (Lp) measured in hydrostatic relaxations was not significantly affected by USLs even in the presence of high water flow intensities ('sweep-away effect'). During pressure clamp, there was a reversible reduction in Lp by 20%, which was explained by the constriction of water to aquaporins (AQPs) in the C. corallina membrane and a rapid diffusional equilibration of solutes in arrays where water protruded across AQPs. In osmotic experiments, Lp, and permeability (Ps) and reflection (sigma s) coefficients increased as external flow rate of medium increased, indicating some effects of external USLs. However, the effect was levelling off at 'usual' flow rates of 0.20-0.30 m s(-1) and in the presence of vigorous stirring by air bubbles, suggesting a maximum thickness of external USLs of around 30 microm including the cell wall. Because the diameters of internodes were around 1 mm, internal USLs could have played a significant or even a dominating role, at least in the presence of the rapidly permeating solutes used [acetone, 2-propanol and dimethylformamide (DMF)]. A comparison of calculated (diffusion kinetics) and of measured permeabilities indicated an upper limit of the contribution of USLs for the rapidly moving solute acetone of 29%, and of 15% for the less rapidly permeating DME The results throw some doubt on recent claims that in C. corallina, USLs rather than the cell membrane dominate solute uptake, at least for the most rapidly moving solute acetone.

  5. Study of electrical conductivity response upon formation of ice and gas hydrates from salt solutions by a second generation high pressure electrical conductivity probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowa, Barbara; Zhang, Xue Hua; Kozielski, Karen A.; Dunstan, Dave E.; Hartley, Patrick G.; Maeda, Nobuo

    2014-11-01

    We recently reported the development of a high pressure electrical conductivity probe (HP-ECP) for experimental studies of formation of gas hydrates from electrolytes. The onset of the formation of methane-propane mixed gas hydrate from salt solutions was marked by a temporary upward spike in the electrical conductivity. To further understand hydrate formation a second generation of window-less HP-ECP (MkII), which has a much smaller heat capacity than the earlier version and allows access to faster cooling rates, has been constructed. Using the HP-ECP (MkII) the electrical conductivity signal responses of NaCl solutions upon the formation of ice, tetrahydrofuran hydrates, and methane-propane mixed gas hydrate has been measured. The concentration range of the NaCl solutions was from 1 mM to 3M and the driving AC frequency range was from 25 Hz to 5 kHz. This data has been used to construct an "electrical conductivity response phase diagrams" that summarize the electrical conductivity response signal upon solid formation in these systems. The general trend is that gas hydrate formation is marked by an upward spike in the conductivity at high concentrations and by a drop at low concentrations. This work shows that HP-ECP can be applied in automated measurements of hydrate formation probability distributions of optically opaque samples using the conductivity response signals as a trigger.

  6. Study of electrical conductivity response upon formation of ice and gas hydrates from salt solutions by a second generation high pressure electrical conductivity probe.

    PubMed

    Sowa, Barbara; Zhang, Xue Hua; Kozielski, Karen A; Dunstan, Dave E; Hartley, Patrick G; Maeda, Nobuo

    2014-11-01

    We recently reported the development of a high pressure electrical conductivity probe (HP-ECP) for experimental studies of formation of gas hydrates from electrolytes. The onset of the formation of methane-propane mixed gas hydrate from salt solutions was marked by a temporary upward spike in the electrical conductivity. To further understand hydrate formation a second generation of window-less HP-ECP (MkII), which has a much smaller heat capacity than the earlier version and allows access to faster cooling rates, has been constructed. Using the HP-ECP (MkII) the electrical conductivity signal responses of NaCl solutions upon the formation of ice, tetrahydrofuran hydrates, and methane-propane mixed gas hydrate has been measured. The concentration range of the NaCl solutions was from 1 mM to 3M and the driving AC frequency range was from 25 Hz to 5 kHz. This data has been used to construct an "electrical conductivity response phase diagrams" that summarize the electrical conductivity response signal upon solid formation in these systems. The general trend is that gas hydrate formation is marked by an upward spike in the conductivity at high concentrations and by a drop at low concentrations. This work shows that HP-ECP can be applied in automated measurements of hydrate formation probability distributions of optically opaque samples using the conductivity response signals as a trigger.

  7. Transient enthalpy probe development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Brian K.

    A reliable diagnostic probe has been developed to measure the local enthalpy in high-pressure, arc heated test streams that simulate atmospheric reentry conditions. The probe employs the double sonic-throat technique and is designed for the sweep (transient) mode to survive the severe heating environment. Tests in the high-pressure arc heater facilities show that, under certain conditions, the enthalpy probe measurements are in good agreement with enthalpy profiles inferred from heat flux measurements using the theory of Fay and Riddell (1958).

  8. Modular Rake of Pitot Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunlap, Timothy A.; Henry, Michael W.; Homyk, Raymond P.

    2004-01-01

    The figure presents selected views of a modular rake of 17 pitot probes for measuring both transient and steady-state pressures in a supersonic wind tunnel. In addition to pitot tubes visible in the figure, the probe modules contain (1) high-frequency dynamic-pressure transducers connected through wires to remote monitoring circuitry and (2) flow passages that lead to tubes that, in turn, lead to remote steady-state pressure transducers. Prior pitot-probe rakes were fabricated as unitary structures, into which the individual pitot probes were brazed. Repair or replacement of individual probes was difficult, costly, and time-consuming because (1) it was necessary to remove entire rakes in order to unbraze individual malfunctioning probes and (2) the heat of unbrazing a failed probe and of brazing a new probe in place could damage adjacent probes. In contrast, the modules in the present probe are designed to be relatively quickly and easily replaceable with no heating and, in many cases, without need for removal of the entire rake from the wind tunnel. To remove a malfunctioning probe, one first removes a screw-mounted V-cross-section cover that holds the probe and adjacent probes in place. Then one removes a screw-mounted cover plate to gain access to the steady-state pressure tubes and dynamicpressure wires. Next, one disconnects the tube and wires of the affected probe. Finally, one installs a new probe in the reverse of the aforementioned sequence. The wire connections can be made by soldering, but to facilitate removal and installation, they can be made via miniature plugs and sockets. The connections between the probe flow passages and the tubes leading to the remote pressure sensors can be made by use of any of a variety of readily available flexible tubes that can be easily pulled off and slid back on for removal and installation, respectively.

  9. On the use of the double floating probe method to infer the difference between the electron and the heavy particles temperatures in an atmospheric pressure, vortex-stabilized nitrogen plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Prevosto, L. Mancinelli, B. R.; Kelly, H.

    2014-05-15

    Sweeping double probe measurements in an atmospheric pressure direct current vortex-stabilized plasma jet are reported (plasma conditions: 100 A discharge current, N{sub 2} gas flow rate of 25 Nl/min, thoriated tungsten rod-type cathode, copper anode with 5 mm inner diameter). The interpretation of the double probe characteristic was based on a generalization of the standard double floating probe formulae for non-uniform plasmas coupled to a non-equilibrium plasma composition model. Perturbations caused by the current to the probe together with collisional and thermal processes inside the probe perturbed region were taken into account. Radial values of the average electron and heavy particle temperatures as well as the electron density were obtained. The calculation of the temperature values did not require any specific assumption about a temperature relationship between different particle species. An electron temperature of 10 900 ± 900 K, a heavy particle temperature of 9300 ± 900 K, and an electron density of about 3.5 × 10{sup 22} m{sup −3} were found at the jet centre at 3.5 mm downstream from the torch exit. Large deviations from kinetic equilibrium were found toward the outer border of the plasma jet. These results showed good agreement with those previously reported by the authors by using a single probe technique. The calculations have shown that this method is particularly useful for studying spraying-type plasma torches operated at power levels of about 15 kW.

  10. High temperature probe

    DOEpatents

    Swan, Raymond A.

    1994-01-01

    A high temperature probe for sampling, for example, smokestack fumes, and is able to withstand temperatures of 3000.degree. F. The probe is constructed so as to prevent leakage via the seal by placing the seal inside the water jacket whereby the seal is not exposed to high temperature, which destroys the seal. The sample inlet of the probe is also provided with cooling fins about the area of the seal to provide additional cooling to prevent the seal from being destroyed. Also, a heated jacket is provided for maintaining the temperature of the gas being tested as it passes through the probe. The probe includes pressure sensing means for determining the flow velocity of an efficient being sampled. In addition, thermocouples are located in various places on the probe to monitor the temperature of the gas passing there through.

  11. Improved dewpoint-probe calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephenson, J. G.; Theodore, E. A.

    1978-01-01

    Relatively-simple pressure-control apparatus calibrates dewpoint probes considerably faster than conventional methods, with no loss of accuracy. Technique requires only pressure measurement at each calibration point and single absolute-humidity measurement at beginning of run. Several probes can be calibrated simultaneously and points can be checked above room temperature.

  12. Single-Cell Metabolite Profiling of Stalk and Glandular Cells of Intact Trichomes with Internal Electrode Capillary Pressure Probe Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Taiken; Wada, Hiroshi; Morita, Satoshi; Erra-Balsells, Rosa; Hiraoka, Kenzo; Nonami, Hiroshi

    2016-03-15

    In this report, we developed the pressure probe electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry with internal electrode capillary (IEC-PPESI-MS) which enables high spatial-resolution cell sampling, precise postsampling manipulation, and high detection sensitivity. Using this technique, a comparative in situ single-cell metabolite profiling of stalk and glandular cells, the two adjacent cell types comprising a trichome unit in tomato plants (Solanum lycopersicum L.), were performed to clarify the extent of metabolic differentiation between two cell types as well as among different types of trichomes. Owing to high sensitivity of the system, less than a picoliter cell sap from a single stalk cell sufficiently yielded a number of peaks of amino acids, organic acids, carbohydrates, and flavonoids. The minimal cell sap removal from a stalk cell without severe disturbance of trichome structure enabled sequential analysis of adjacent glandular cell on the same trichome, which showed the presence of striking differences in metabolite compositions between two adjacent cell types. Comparison among different types of trichome also revealed significant variations in metabolite profiles, particularly in flavonoids and acyl sugars compositions. Some metabolites were found only in specific cell types or particular trichome types. Although extensive metabolomics analysis of glandular cells of tomato trichomes has been previously documented, this is the first report describing cell-to-cell variations in metabolite compositions of stalk and glandular cells as well as in different trichome types. Further application of this technique may provide new insights into distinct metabolism in plant cells displaying variations in shape, size, function and physicochemical properties. PMID:26845634

  13. Single-Cell Metabolite Profiling of Stalk and Glandular Cells of Intact Trichomes with Internal Electrode Capillary Pressure Probe Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Taiken; Wada, Hiroshi; Morita, Satoshi; Erra-Balsells, Rosa; Hiraoka, Kenzo; Nonami, Hiroshi

    2016-03-15

    In this report, we developed the pressure probe electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry with internal electrode capillary (IEC-PPESI-MS) which enables high spatial-resolution cell sampling, precise postsampling manipulation, and high detection sensitivity. Using this technique, a comparative in situ single-cell metabolite profiling of stalk and glandular cells, the two adjacent cell types comprising a trichome unit in tomato plants (Solanum lycopersicum L.), were performed to clarify the extent of metabolic differentiation between two cell types as well as among different types of trichomes. Owing to high sensitivity of the system, less than a picoliter cell sap from a single stalk cell sufficiently yielded a number of peaks of amino acids, organic acids, carbohydrates, and flavonoids. The minimal cell sap removal from a stalk cell without severe disturbance of trichome structure enabled sequential analysis of adjacent glandular cell on the same trichome, which showed the presence of striking differences in metabolite compositions between two adjacent cell types. Comparison among different types of trichome also revealed significant variations in metabolite profiles, particularly in flavonoids and acyl sugars compositions. Some metabolites were found only in specific cell types or particular trichome types. Although extensive metabolomics analysis of glandular cells of tomato trichomes has been previously documented, this is the first report describing cell-to-cell variations in metabolite compositions of stalk and glandular cells as well as in different trichome types. Further application of this technique may provide new insights into distinct metabolism in plant cells displaying variations in shape, size, function and physicochemical properties.

  14. Infrared absorption by molecular gases as a probe of nanoporous silica xerogel and molecule-surface collisions: Low-pressure results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vander Auwera, J.; Ngo, N. H.; El Hamzaoui, H.; Capoen, B.; Bouazaoui, M.; Ausset, P.; Boulet, C.; Hartmann, J.-M.

    2013-10-01

    Transmission spectra of gases confined (but not adsorbed) within the pores of a 1.4-cm-thick silica xerogel sample have been recorded between 2.5 and 5 μm using a high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometer. This was done for pure CO, CO2, N2O, H2O, and CH4 at room temperature and pressures of a few hectopascals. Least-squares fits of measured absorption lines provide the optical-path lengths within the confined (LC) and free (LF) gas inside the absorption cell and the half width at half maximum ΓC of the lines of the confined gases. The values of LC and LF retrieved using numerous transitions of all studied species are very consistent. Furthermore, LC is in satisfactory agreement with values obtained from independent measurements, thus showing that reliable information on the open porosity volume can be retrieved from an optical experiment. The values of ΓC, here resulting from collisions of the molecules with the inner surfaces of the xerogel pores, are practically independent of the line for each gas and inversely proportional to the square root of the probed-molecule molar mass. This is a strong indication that, for the studied transitions, a single collision of a molecule with a pore surface is sufficient to change its rotational state. A previously proposed simple model, used for the prediction of the line shape, leads to satisfactory agreement with the observations. It also enables a determination of the average pore size, bringing information complementary to that obtained from nitrogen adsorption porosimetry.

  15. Probing properties of cold radiofrequency plasma with polymer probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bormashenko, E.; Chaniel, G.; Multanen, V.

    2015-01-01

    The probe intended for the characterization of cold plasma is introduced. The probe allows the estimation of Debye length of cold plasma. The probe is based on the pronounced modification of surface properties (wettability) of polymer films by cold plasmas. The probe was tested with the cold radiofrequency inductive air plasma discharge. The Debye length and the concentration of charge carriers were estimated for various gas pressures. The reported results coincide reasonably with the corresponding values established by other methods. The probe makes possible measurement of characteristics of cold plasmas in closed chambers.

  16. Spectrophotometric probe

    DOEpatents

    Prather, William S.; O'Rourke, Patrick E.

    1994-01-01

    A support structure bearing at least one probe for making spectrophotometric measurements of a fluid using a source of light and a spectrophotometer. The probe includes a housing with two optical fibers and a planoconvex lens. A sleeve bearing a mirror surrounds the housing. The lens is separated from the mirror by a fixed distance, defining an interior space for receiving a volume of the fluid sample. A plurality of throughholes extending through the sleeve communicate between the sample volume and the exterior of the probe, all but one hole bearing a screen. A protective jacket surrounds the probe. A hollow conduit bearing a tube is formed in the wall of the probe for venting any air in the interior space when fluid enters. The probe is held at an acute angle so the optic fibers carrying the light to and from the probe are not bent severely on emergence from the probe.

  17. Spectrophotometric probe

    DOEpatents

    Prather, W.S.; O'Rourke, P.E.

    1994-08-02

    A support structure is described bearing at least one probe for making spectrophotometric measurements of a fluid using a source of light and a spectrophotometer. The probe includes a housing with two optical fibers and a planoconvex lens. A sleeve bearing a mirror surrounds the housing. The lens is separated from the mirror by a fixed distance, defining an interior space for receiving a volume of the fluid sample. A plurality of throughholes extending through the sleeve communicate between the sample volume and the exterior of the probe, all but one hole bearing a screen. A protective jacket surrounds the probe. A hollow conduit bearing a tube is formed in the wall of the probe for venting any air in the interior space when fluid enters. The probe is held at an acute angle so the optic fibers carrying the light to and from the probe are not bent severely on emergence from the probe. 3 figs.

  18. Pressure-induced amorphizations of silica analogues: A probe of the relationship between order and disorder. Progress report, August 1, 1992--July 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Hammack, W.S.

    1993-02-01

    Purpose of these of high pressure investigations is to determine the relationship between order and disorder in amorphous materials using high pressure techniques were used. High pressure x-ray diffraction, electron transmission microscopy, and Raman scattering. Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS) at Ithaca was used to measure x-ray diffraction patterns using Energy-Dispersive X-ray Diffraction. It was shown that the structural ordering in pressure-amorphized solids can be described as defects in curved-space. High-resolution transmissions electron microscopy showed that pressure-amorphized alpha-quartz lacks periodicity at the atomic level. Study of a silicate mineral shows that pressure-induced amorphizations occur because of an impeded phase transition.

  19. Probing the Structural Stability of and Enhanced CO2 Storage in MOF MIL-68(In) under High Pressures by FTIR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yue; Lin, Bin; He, Peng; Li, Youyong; Huang, Yining; Song, Yang

    2015-12-14

    The unique structural topology of metal-organic framework (MOF) MIL-68, featuring two types of channels with distinct pore sizes, makes it a promising candidate for application in gas storage and separation. In this study, the behavior of as-made and activated MIL-68(In) was investigated in a diamond-anvil cell under high pressure by in situ IR spectroscopy. The framework exhibits high stability under compression up to 9 GPa, whereas the bridging OH groups appear to be very sensitive to compression. Pressure-induced structural modifications were found to be completely reversible for as-made MIL-68(In) but irreversible for the activated framework. Moreover, the addition of Nujol as pressure-transmitting medium makes the framework more resilient to pressure. Finally, when loaded with CO2, the framework exhibited interesting differential binding affinities with CO2 in the hexagonal and triangular pores at different pressures. The pressure-enhanced CO2 storage behavior and the guest-host interaction mechanism between CO2 and the MOF framework were explored with the aid of Monte Carlo simulations. These studies demonstrated great potential for MIL-68(In) in gas-storage applications that require extreme loading pressures.

  20. Compression and Probing C−H···I Hydrogen Bonds of Iodoform under High Pressure by X-ray Diffraction and Raman Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Dan; Lei, Weiwei; Wang, Kai; Bao, Gang; Li, Fangfei; Hao, Jian; Liu, Bingbing; Cui, Tian; Cui, Qiliang; Zou, Guangtian

    2009-06-30

    High-pressure methods were applied to investigate the structural stability and hydrogen bonding of polar molecules of iodoform by synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction and Raman spectra measurements, respectively. Up to a pressure of 40 GPa, no phase transitions were observed. The discontinuous frequency shift of the C-H stretching band is believed to be related to the enhancement of the C-H{hor_ellipsis}I weak hydrogen bonds under high pressures. Ab initio calculations were performed, and the results predict the frequency shift of the C-H stretching vibration as C-H{hor_ellipsis}I interacts via hydrogen bonding. The bulk modulus is 17.3 {+-} 0.8 GPa, with a pressure derivative of 5.2.

  1. High hydrostatic pressure can probe the effects of functionally related ligands on the quaternary structures of the chaperonins GroEL and GroES.

    PubMed

    Panda, M; Ybarra, J; Horowitz, P M

    2001-03-01

    We investigated the effects of high hydrostatic pressure in the range of 1--3 kilobars on tetradecameric GroEL, heptameric GroES, and the GroEL-GroES complex. Unlike GroEL monomers formed by urea dissociation, which can be reassembled back to the tetradecamer, the pressure-dissociated monomers do not reassemble readily. This indicates an alteration of their native structures, an example of conformational drift. Pressure versus time profiles and kinetics of the dissociation of both GroEL and GroES at fixed pressures were monitored by light scattering. Unlike GroEL, GroES monomers do reassociate readily. Reaction conditions were varied by adding ATP, Mg(2+), ADP, AMP-PNP, and KCl. At any individual pressure, the dissociation process is governed by both thermodynamics and kinetics. This leads to the decrease in the yield of monomers at lower pressures. In the presence of Mg(2+) and KCl, GroEL is stable up to 3 kilobars. The presence of either ATP or ADP but not AMP-PNP leads to GroEL dissociation at lower pressures. Interestingly, the GroEL-GroES complex is very stable in the range of 1--2.5 kilobars. However, the addition of ADP destabilizes the complex, which dissociates completely at 1.5 kilobars. The results are rationalized in terms of different degrees of cooperativity between individual monomers and heptameric rings in the GroEL tetradecamer. Such allosteric interactions leading to the alteration of quaternary structure of GroEL in the absence of chemical denaturants are important in understanding the mechanism of chaperonin-assisted protein folding by the GroEL-GroES system. PMID:11085994

  2. High Pressure Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Studies of AdsorbateStructure and Mobility during Catalytic Reactions: Novel Design of anUltra High Pressure, High Temperature Scanning Tunneling MicroscopeSystem for Probing Catalytic Conversions

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, David Chi-Wai

    2005-05-16

    The aim of the work presented therein is to take advantage of scanning tunneling microscope’s (STM) capability for operation under a variety of environments under real time and at atomic resolution to monitor adsorbate structures and mobility under high pressures, as well as to design a new generation of STM systems that allow imaging in situ at both higher pressures (35 atm) and temperatures (350 °C).

  3. Optical probe

    DOEpatents

    Hencken, Kenneth; Flower, William L.

    1999-01-01

    A compact optical probe is disclosed particularly useful for analysis of emissions in industrial environments. The instant invention provides a geometry for optically-based measurements that allows all optical components (source, detector, rely optics, etc.) to be located in proximity to one another. The geometry of the probe disclosed herein provides a means for making optical measurements in environments where it is difficult and/or expensive to gain access to the vicinity of a flow stream to be measured. Significantly, the lens geometry of the optical probe allows the analysis location within a flow stream being monitored to be moved while maintaining optical alignment of all components even when the optical probe is focused on a plurality of different analysis points within the flow stream.

  4. Conductivity Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) for NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander took measurements in Martian soil and in the air.

    The needles on the end of the instrument were inserted into the Martian soil, allowing TECP to measure the propagation of both thermal and electrical energy. TECP also measured the humidity in the surrounding air.

    The needles on the probe are 15 millimeters (0.6 inch) long.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  5. Ice-Borehole Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behar, Alberto; Carsey, Frank; Lane, Arthur; Engelhardt, Herman

    2006-01-01

    An instrumentation system has been developed for studying interactions between a glacier or ice sheet and the underlying rock and/or soil. Prior borehole imaging systems have been used in well-drilling and mineral-exploration applications and for studying relatively thin valley glaciers, but have not been used for studying thick ice sheets like those of Antarctica. The system includes a cylindrical imaging probe that is lowered into a hole that has been bored through the ice to the ice/bedrock interface by use of an established hot-water-jet technique. The images acquired by the cameras yield information on the movement of the ice relative to the bedrock and on visible features of the lower structure of the ice sheet, including ice layers formed at different times, bubbles, and mineralogical inclusions. At the time of reporting the information for this article, the system was just deployed in two boreholes on the Amery ice shelf in East Antarctica and after successful 2000 2001 deployments in 4 boreholes at Ice Stream C, West Antarctica, and in 2002 at Black Rapids Glacier, Alaska. The probe is designed to operate at temperatures from 40 to +40 C and to withstand the cold, wet, high-pressure [130-atm (13.20-MPa)] environment at the bottom of a water-filled borehole in ice as deep as 1.6 km. A current version is being outfitted to service 2.4-km-deep boreholes at the Rutford Ice Stream in West Antarctica. The probe (see figure) contains a sidelooking charge-coupled-device (CCD) camera that generates both a real-time analog video signal and a sequence of still-image data, and contains a digital videotape recorder. The probe also contains a downward-looking CCD analog video camera, plus halogen lamps to illuminate the fields of view of both cameras. The analog video outputs of the cameras are converted to optical signals that are transmitted to a surface station via optical fibers in a cable. Electric power is supplied to the probe through wires in the cable at a

  6. High-temperature superconducting radiofrequency probe for magnetic resonance imaging applications operated below ambient pressure in a simple liquid-nitrogen cryostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Simon; Ginefri, Jean-Christophe; Poirier-Quinot, Marie; Darrasse, Luc

    2013-05-01

    The present work investigates the joined effects of temperature and static magnetic field on the electrical properties of a 64 MHz planar high-temperature superconducting (HTS) coil, in order to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) applications with a moderate decrease of the HTS coil temperature (THTS). Temperature control is provided with accuracy better than 0.1 K from 80 to 66 K by regulating the pressure of the liquid nitrogen bath of a dedicated cryostat. The actual temperature of the HTS coil is obtained using a straightforward wireless method that eliminates the risks of coupling electromagnetic interference to the HTS coil and of disturbing the static magnetic field by DC currents near the region of interest. The resonance frequency ( f0) and the quality factor (Q) of the HTS coil are measured as a function of temperature in the 0-4.7 T field range with parallel and orthogonal orientations relative to the coil plane. The intrinsic HTS coil sensitivity and the detuning effect are then analyzed from the Q and f0 data. In the presence of the static magnetic field, the initial value of f0 in Earth's field could be entirely recovered by decreasing THTS, except for the orthogonal orientation above 1 T. The improvement of Q by lowering THTS was substantial. From 80 to 66 K, Q was multiplied by a factor of 6 at 1.5 T in orthogonal orientation. In parallel orientation, the maximum measured improvement of Q from 80 K to 66 K was a factor of 2. From 80 to 66 K, the improvement of the RF sensitivity relative to the initial value at the Earth's field and ambient pressure was up to 4.4 dB in parallel orientation. It was even more important in orthogonal orientation and continued to increase, up to 8.4 dB, at the maximum explored field of 1.5 T. Assuming that the noise contributions from the RF receiver are negligible, the SNR improvement using enhanced HTS coil cooling in NMR experiments was extracted from Q measurements either

  7. Polystyrene as a model system to probe the impact of ambient gas chemistry on polymer surface modifications using remote atmospheric pressure plasma under well-controlled conditions.

    PubMed

    Bartis, Elliot A J; Luan, Pingshan; Knoll, Andrew J; Hart, Connor; Seog, Joonil; Oehrlein, Gottlieb S

    2015-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) was used to treat polystyrene (PS) films under remote conditions where neither the plume nor visible afterglow interacts with the film surface. Carefully controlled conditions were achieved by mounting the APPJ inside a vacuum chamber interfaced to a UHV surface analysis system. PS was chosen as a model system as it contains neither oxygen nor nitrogen, has been extensively studied, and provides insight into how the aromatic structures widespread in biological systems are modified by atmospheric plasma. These remote treatments cause negligible etching and surface roughening, which is promising for treatment of sensitive materials. The surface chemistry was measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to evaluate how ambient chemistry, feed gas chemistry, and plasma-ambient interaction impact the formation of specific moieties. A variety of oxidized carbon species and low concentrations of NOx species were measured after APPJ treatment. In the remote conditions used in this work, modifications are not attributed to short-lived species, e.g., O atoms. It was found that O3 does not correlate with modifications, suggesting that other long-lived species such as singlet delta oxygen or NOx are important. Indeed, surface-bound NO3 was observed after treatment, which must originate from gas phase NOx as neither N nor O are found in the pristine film. By varying the ambient and feed gas chemistry to produce O-rich and O-poor conditions, a possible correlation between the oxygen and nitrogen composition was established. When oxygen is present in the feed gas or ambient, high levels of oxidation with low concentrations of NO3 on the surface were observed. For O-poor conditions, NO and NO2 were measured, suggesting that these species contribute to the oxidation process, but are easily oxidized when oxygen is present. That is, surface oxidation limits and competes with surface nitridation. Overall, surface oxidation takes place easily

  8. Effect of changes in intra-abdominal pressure on diameter, cross-sectional area, and distensibility of the lower esophageal sphincter of healthy dogs as determined by use of an endoscopic functional luminal imaging probe.

    PubMed

    Mayhew, Philipp D; Pitt, Kathryn A; Steffey, Michele A; Culp, William T N; Kass, Philip H; Marks, Stanley L

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effect of intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) on morphology and compliance of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) by use of impedance planimetry in healthy dogs and to quantify the effect of changes in IAP. ANIMALS 7 healthy, purpose-bred sexually intact male hound-cross dogs. PROCEDURES Dogs were anesthetized, and cross-sectional area (CSA), minimal diameter (MD), LES length, LES volume, and distensibility index (DI) of the LES were evaluated by use of an endoscopic functional luminal imaging probe. For each dog, measurements were obtained before (baseline) and after creation of a pneumoperitoneum at an IAP of 4, 8, and 15 mm Hg. Order of the IAPs was determined by use of a randomization software program. RESULTS CSA and MD at 4 and 8 mm Hg were not significantly different from baseline measurements; however, CSA and MD at 15 mm Hg were both significantly greater than baseline measurements. The LES length and LES volume did not differ significantly from baseline measurements at any IAP. The DI differed inconsistently from the baseline measurement but was not substantially affected by IAP. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Pneumoperitoneum created with an IAP of 4 or 8 mm Hg did not significantly alter LES morphology in healthy dogs. Pneumoperitoneum at an IAP of 15 mm Hg caused a significant increase in CSA and MD of the LES. Compliance of the LES as measured by the DI was not greatly altered by pneumoperitoneum at an IAP of up to 15 mm Hg. PMID:27463542

  9. Study of alternative probe technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A number of implied technologies for a deep probe mission was examined; i.e., one that would provide the capability to scientifically examine planetary atmospheres at the 1000 bar level. Conditions imposed by current Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus atmospheric models were considered. The major thrust of the measurements was to determine lower atmosphere composition, even to trace constituents of one part per billion. Two types of instruments having the necessary accuracy to meet the science objectives were considered and integrated into a deep probe configuration. One deep probe option that resulted was identified as a Minimum Technology Development approach. The significant feature of this option is that only three technology developments are required to enable the mission, i.e., (1) science instrument development, (2) advanced data processing, and (3) external high pressure/thermal insulation. It is concluded that a probe designed for a Jupiter mission could, with minor changes, be used for a Saturn or Uranus mission.

  10. Water-Cooled Total-Temperature Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagen, Nicholas T.; Reece, Garland D.

    1992-01-01

    Water-cooled supersonic total-pressure, static-pressure, and total-temperature probes developed to study high-temperature jet plumes. Total-temperature probe tested up to 2,000 degrees F incorporates annular cooling system up to thermocouple lead. Lead extends into test chamber to sense temperature of supersonic external flow. Design novel and significant. Applicable in development of jet engines and in research on fast flows of hot gases.

  11. Small rocket tornado probe

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, S.A.

    1982-01-01

    A (less than 1 lb.) paper rock tornado probe was developed and deployed in an attempt to measure the pressure, temperature, ionization, and electric field variations along a trajectory penetrating a tornado funnel. The requirements of weight and materials were set by federal regulations and a one-meter resolution at a penetration velocity of close to Mach 1 was desired. These requirements were achieved by telemetering a strain gage transducer for pressure, micro size thermister and electric field, and ionization sensors via a pulse time telemetry to a receiver on board an aircraft that digitizes a signal and presents it to a Z80 microcomputer for recording on mini-floppy disk. Recording rate was 2 ms for 8 channels of information that also includes telemetry rf field strength, magnetic field for orientation on the rocket, zero reference voltage for the sensor op amps as well as the previously mentioned items also. The absolute pressure was recorded. Tactically, over 120 h were flown in a Cessna 210 in April and May 1981, and one tornado was encountered. Four rockets were fired at this tornado, missed, and there were many equipment problems. The equipment needs to be hardened and engineered to a significant degree, but it is believed that the feasibility of the probe, tactics, and launch platform for future tornado work has been proven. The logistics of thunderstorm chasing from a remote base in New Mexico is a major difficulty and reliability of the equipment another. Over 50 dummy rockets have been fired to prove trajectories, stability, and photographic capability. Over 25 electronically equipped rockets have been fired to prove sensors transmission, breakaway connections, etc. The pressure recovery factor was calibrated in the Air Force Academy blow-down tunnel. There is a need for more refined engineering and more logistic support.

  12. Preston Probe Calibrations at High Reynolds Number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smits, Alexander J.

    1998-01-01

    The overall goal of the research effort is to study the performance of two Preston probes designed by NASA Langley Research Center across an unprecedented range of Reynolds number (based on friction velocity and probe diameter), and perform an accurate calibration over the same Reynolds number range. Using the Superpipe facility in Princeton, two rounds of experiments were performed. In each round of experiments for each Reynolds number, the pressure gradient, static pressure from the Preston probes and the total pressure from the Preston probes were measured. In the first round, 3 Preston probes having outer diameters of 0.058 inches, 0.083 inches and 0.203 inches were tested over a large range of pipe Reynolds numbers. Two data reduction methods were employed: first, the static pressure measured on the Preston probe was used to calculate P (modified Preston probe configuration), and secondly, the static pressure measured at the reference pressure tap was used to calculate P (un-modified Preston probe configuration). For both methods, the static pressure was adjusted to correspond with the static pressure at the Preston probe tip using the pressure gradient. The measurements for Preston probes with diameters of 0.058 inches, and 0.083 inches respectively were performed in the test pipe before it was polished a second time. Therefore, the measurements at high pipe Reynolds numbers may have been affected by roughness. In the second round of experiments the 0.058 inches and 0.083 inches diameter, un-modified probes were tested after the pipe was polished and prepared to ensure that the surface was smooth. The average velocity was estimated by assuming that the connection between the centerline velocity and the average velocity was known, and by using a Pitot tube to measure the centerline velocity. A preliminary error estimate suggests that it is possible to introduce a 1% to 2% error in estimating the average velocity using this approach. The evidence on the errors

  13. A calorimetric probe for plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Stahl, Marc; Trottenberg, Thomas; Kersten, Holger

    2010-02-15

    A calorimetric probe for plasma diagnostics is presented, which allows measurements of the power taken by a test substrate. The substrate can be biased and used as an electric probe in order to obtain information about the composition of the total heating power. A new calibration technique for calorimetric probes, which uses monoenergetic electrons at low pressure, has been developed for an improved accuracy. The use of the probe is exemplified with an experiment where both energetic neutral atoms and ions heat the test substrate.

  14. Temperature Correction in Probe Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutsev, S. A.

    2015-09-01

    This work is devoted to experimental investigations of a decaying plasma using Langmuir probes. The gas pressure, the discharge current, and the moment of afterglow were selected to obtain probe characteristics in collisionless, intermediate, and drifting regimes of motion of charged particles. The manner in which the shape of the volt- ampere characteristics changes on passage from the collisionless motion to diffusion motion has been shown. A detailed analysis has been made of the source of errors arising when orbital-motion formulas or the logarithmic-operation method are applied to processing of the probe curves. It has been shown that neglect of collisions of charged particles in the probe layer leads to an ion-density value overstated more than three times, an electron-temperature value overstated two times, and an ion temperature overstated three to nine times. A model of interaction of charged particles in the probe layer has been proposed for correction of the procedure of determining temperature. Such an approach makes it possible to determine the space-charge layer in the probe, and also the value of the self-consistent field. The use of the developed procedures gives good agreement between experimental and theoretical results.

  15. Note: Refined possibilities for plasma probe diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Masherov, P E; Riaby, V A; Abgaryan, V K

    2016-08-01

    In an earlier publication, the ion mass determination technique was proposed using the Langmuir probe measurement results for low-pressure Maxwellian plasmas and their analysis, based on the Bohm effect and the Child-Boguslavsky-Langmuir (CBL) probe sheath model, allowing for probe sheath thickness and ion mass evaluations after the Bohm coefficient CBCyl ≈ 1.13 for cylindrical probes had been determined. In the present study, the step-front sheath model, being physically closer to the reality of gas discharge plasmas, was considered in order to correct the CBL sheath model results. At this stage, more real Bohm coefficient (CBCyl ≈ 1.23) for cylindrical probes was found to provide a more reliable method of probe sheath thickness and ion mass determination. PMID:27587177

  16. Note: Refined possibilities for plasma probe diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masherov, P. E.; Riaby, V. A.; Abgaryan, V. K.

    2016-08-01

    In an earlier publication, the ion mass determination technique was proposed using the Langmuir probe measurement results for low-pressure Maxwellian plasmas and their analysis, based on the Bohm effect and the Child-Boguslavsky-Langmuir (CBL) probe sheath model, allowing for probe sheath thickness and ion mass evaluations after the Bohm coefficient CBCyl ≈ 1.13 for cylindrical probes had been determined. In the present study, the step-front sheath model, being physically closer to the reality of gas discharge plasmas, was considered in order to correct the CBL sheath model results. At this stage, more real Bohm coefficient (CBCyl ≈ 1.23) for cylindrical probes was found to provide a more reliable method of probe sheath thickness and ion mass determination.

  17. Note: Refined possibilities for plasma probe diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Masherov, P E; Riaby, V A; Abgaryan, V K

    2016-08-01

    In an earlier publication, the ion mass determination technique was proposed using the Langmuir probe measurement results for low-pressure Maxwellian plasmas and their analysis, based on the Bohm effect and the Child-Boguslavsky-Langmuir (CBL) probe sheath model, allowing for probe sheath thickness and ion mass evaluations after the Bohm coefficient CBCyl ≈ 1.13 for cylindrical probes had been determined. In the present study, the step-front sheath model, being physically closer to the reality of gas discharge plasmas, was considered in order to correct the CBL sheath model results. At this stage, more real Bohm coefficient (CBCyl ≈ 1.23) for cylindrical probes was found to provide a more reliable method of probe sheath thickness and ion mass determination.

  18. Long duration ash probe

    DOEpatents

    Hurley, J.P.; McCollor, D.P.; Selle, S.J.

    1994-07-26

    A long duration ash probe includes a pressure shell connected to a port in a combustor with a sample coupon mounted on a retractable carriage so as to retract the sample coupon within the pressure shell during soot blowing operation of the combustor. A valve mounted at the forward end of the pressure shell is selectively closeable to seal the sample coupon within the shell, and a heating element in the shell is operable to maintain the desired temperature of the sample coupon while retracted within the shell. The carriage is operably mounted on a pair of rails within the shell for longitudinal movement within the shell. A hollow carrier tube connects the hollow cylindrical sample coupon to the carriage, and extends through the carriage and out the rearward end thereof. Air lines are connected to the rearward end of the carrier tube and are operable to permit coolant to pass through the air lines and thence through the carrier tube to the sample coupon so as to cool the sample coupon. 8 figs.

  19. Long duration ash probe

    DOEpatents

    Hurley, John P.; McCollor, Don P.; Selle, Stanley J.

    1994-01-01

    A long duration ash probe includes a pressure shell connected to a port in a combustor with a sample coupon mounted on a retractable carriage so as to retract the sample coupon within the pressure shell during sootblowing operation of the combustor. A valve mounted at the forward end of the pressure shell is selectively closeable to seal the sample coupon within the shell, and a heating element in the shell is operable to maintain the desired temperature of the sample coupon while retracted within the shell. The carriage is operably mounted on a pair of rails within the shell for longitudinal movement within the shell. A hollow carrier tube connects the hollow cylindrical sample coupon to the carriage, and extends through the carriage and out the rearward end thereof. Air lines are connected to the rearward end of the carrier tube and are operable to permit coolant to pass through the air lines and thence through the carrier tube to the sample coupon so as to cool the sample coupon.

  20. Single molecule probes of membrane structure: orientation of BODIPY probes in DPPC as a function of probe structure.

    PubMed

    Armendariz, Kevin P; Huckabay, Heath A; Livanec, Philip W; Dunn, Robert C

    2012-03-21

    Single molecule fluorescence measurements have recently been used to probe the orientation of fluorescent lipid analogs doped into lipid films at trace levels. Using defocused polarized total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (PTIRF-M), these studies have shown that fluorophore orientation responds to changes in membrane surface pressure and composition, providing a molecular level marker of membrane structure. Here we extend those studies by characterizing the single molecule orientations of six related BODIPY probes doped into monolayers of DPPC. Langmuir-Blodgett monolayers transferred at various surface pressures are used to compare the response from fluorescent lipid analogs in which the location of the BODIPY probe is varied along the length of the acyl chain. For each BODIPY probe location along the chain, comparisons are made between analogs containing phosphocholine and smaller fatty acid headgroups. Together these studies show a general propensity of the BODIPY analogs to insert into membranes with the BODIPY probe aligned along the acyl chains or looped back to interact with the headgroups. For all BODIPY probes studied, a bimodal orientation distribution is observed which is sensitive to surface pressure, with the population of BODIPY probes aligned along the acyl chains increasing with elevated surface pressure. Trends in the single molecule orientations for the six analogs reveal a configuration where optimal placement of the BODIPY probe within the acyl chain maximizes its sensitivity to the surrounding membrane structure. These results are discussed in terms of balancing the effects of headgroup association with acyl chain length in designing the optimal placement of the BODIPY probe.

  1. Calibration of hemispherical-head flow angularity probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Edward L.; Henfling, John F.; Aeschliman, Daniel P.

    1992-01-01

    The hemisphere-cylinder flow angularity probes were calibrated over a Mach number range of 0.5 to 2.0 at pitch and yaw angles of -5 to +5 deg. Each probe had five pressure orifices in the hemispherical head - one on the axis and four located 45 deg from the axis and equally spaced circumferentially. The probes were identical within fabrication tolerances. Details of probe design, test procedures and data analysis are described and selected test results are presented.

  2. Ion orbits in a cylindrical Langmuir probe

    SciTech Connect

    Taccogna, Francesco; Longo, Savino; Capitelli, Mario

    2006-04-15

    It has been suggested that in weakly collisional sheaths, potential wells and barriers could appear due to ion-neutral momentum and charge transfer collisions. These can cause the presence of repulsed and trapped ions in the region surrounding a negatively biased Langmuir probe, invalidating the commonly used orbital-motion-limited theory of ion current. This is still an open question concerning also the charging and shielding of dust grains, and at present, no fully self-consistent treatment exists. For this reason, a particle-in-cell/test-particle Monte Carlo simulation of the dynamics of an argon plasma in the region surrounding an attracting cylindrical probe at medium gas pressure has been developed. The results of the present simulation for different probe potentials and discharge pressures demonstrate the complex structure of electric potential around the probe and the failure of collisionless theories.

  3. Hydrodynamic ultrasonic probe

    DOEpatents

    Day, Robert A.; Conti, Armond E.

    1980-01-01

    An improved probe for in-service ultrasonic inspection of long lengths of a workpiece, such as small diameter tubing from the interior. The improved probe utilizes a conventional transducer or transducers configured to inspect the tubing for flaws and/or wall thickness variations. The probe utilizes a hydraulic technique, in place of the conventional mechanical guides or bushings, which allows the probe to move rectilinearly or rotationally while preventing cocking thereof in the tube and provides damping vibration of the probe. The probe thus has lower friction and higher inspection speed than presently known probes.

  4. Atmospheric Probe Model: Construction and Wind Tunnel Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogel, Jerald M.

    1998-01-01

    The material contained in this document represents a summary of the results of a low speed wind tunnel test program to determine the performance of an atmospheric probe at low speed. The probe configuration tested consists of a 2/3 scale model constructed from a combination of hard maple wood and aluminum stock. The model design includes approximately 130 surface static pressure taps. Additional hardware incorporated in the baseline model provides a mechanism for simulating external and internal trailing edge split flaps for probe flow control. Test matrix parameters include probe side slip angle, external/internal split flap deflection angle, and trip strip applications. Test output database includes surface pressure distributions on both inner and outer annular wings and probe center line velocity distributions from forward probe to aft probe locations.

  5. Results of the Galileo probe nephelometer experiment.

    PubMed

    Ragent, B; Colburn, D S; Avrin, P; Rages, K A

    1996-05-10

    The nephelometer experiment carried on the Galileo probe was designed to measure the jovian cloud structure and its microphysical characteristics from entry down to atmospheric pressure levels greater than 10 bars. Before this mission there was no direct evidence for the existence of the clouds below the uppermost cloud layer, and only theoretical models derived from remote sensing observations were available for describing such clouds. Only one significant cloud structure with a base at about 1.55 bars was found along the probe descent trajectory below an ambient pressure of about 0.4 bar, although many indications of small densities of particle concentrations were noted during much of the descent.

  6. Lessons learned from planetary entry probe missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemann, Hasso; Atreya, Sushil K.; Kasprzak, Wayne

    Probing the atmospheres and surfaces of the planets and their moons with fast moving entry probes has been a very useful and essential technique to obtain in situ or quasi in situ scientific data (ground truth) which could not otherwise be obtained from fly by or orbiter only missions and where balloon, aircraft or lander missions are too complex and too costly. Planetary entry probe missions have been conducted successfully on Venus, Mars, Jupiter and Titan after having been first demonstrated in the Earth's atmosphere. Future planetary missions should also include more entry probe missions back to Venus and to the outer planets. The success of and science returns from past missions, the need for more and unique data, and a continuously advancing technology generate confidence that future missions will be even more successful with respect to science return and technical performance. There are, however, unique challenges associated with entry probe missions and with building instruments for an entry probe, as compared to orbiters, landers, or rovers. Conditions during atmospheric entry are extreme. There are operating time constraints due to the usually short duration of the probe descent, and the instruments experience rapid environmental changes in temperature and pressure. In addition, there are resource limitations, i.e. mass, power, size and bandwidth. Because of the protective heat shield and the high acceleration the probe experiences during entry, the ratio of payload to total probe mass is usually much smaller than in other missions. Finally, the demands on the instrument design are determined in large part by conditions (pressure, temperature, composition) unique to the particular body under study, and as a result, there is no one-size-fits-all instrument for an atmospheric probe. Many of these requirements are more easily met by miniaturizing the probe instrumentation and consequently reducing the required size of the probe. Improved heat shield

  7. Improved Probe for Evaluating Compaction of Mold Sand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Overfelt, Ruel A.; Bakhtiyarov, Sayavur I.

    2008-01-01

    A nominally stationary tubular probe denoted a telescopic probe has been developed as an improved alternative to a prior movable probe used to evaluate the local degree of compaction of mold sand. The probe is inserted vertically to a desired depth in a sand-filled molding flask and the back pressure at the given rate of flow of air is recorded as a measure of the degree of partial impermeability and, hence, of the degree of compaction of sand in the vicinity of the probe tip.

  8. NASA SMART Probe: Breast Cancer Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mah, Robert W.; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    There is evidence in breast cancer and other malignancies that the physiologic environment within a tumor correlates with clinical outcome. We are developing a unique percutaneous Smart Probe to be used at the time of needle biopsy of the breast. The Smart Probe will simultaneously measure multiple physiologic parameters within a breast tumor. Direct and indirect measurements of tissue oxygen levels, blood flow, pH, and tissue fluid pressure will be analyzed in real-time. These parameters will be interpreted individually and collectively by innovative neural network techniques using advanced intelligent software. The goals are 1) develop a pecutaneous Smart Probe with multiple sensor modalities and applying advanced Information Technologies to provide real time diagnostic information of the tissue at tip of the probe, 2) test the percutaneous Smart Probe in women with benign and malignant breast masses who will be undergoing surgical biopsy, 3) correlate probe sensor data with benign and malignant status of breast masses, 4) determine whether the probe can detect physiologic differences within a breast tumor, and its margins, and in adjacent normal breast tissue, 5) correlate probe sensor data with known prognostic factors for breast caner, including tumor size, tumor grade, axillary lymph node metastases, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor status.

  9. Tensiometer, drive probe for use with environmental testing equipment, and methods of inserting environmental testing equipment into a sample

    DOEpatents

    Hubbell, Joel M.; Sisson, James B.

    2005-07-26

    A method of inserting a tensiometer into a sample, comprises providing a drive probe configured to be engaged by direct push equipment; supporting a porous member from the drive probe; and driving the drive probe into the sample using a cone penetrometer. A tensiometer comprises a drive probe configured to be engaged by direct push equipment or a cone penetrometer; a porous member supported by the drive probe; and a pressure sensor in pressure sensing relation to the porous member.

  10. Galileo Probe Battery System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dagarin, B. P.; Taenaka, R. K.; Stofel, E. J.

    1997-01-01

    The conclusions of the Galileo probe battery system are: the battery performance met mission requirements with margin; extensive ground-based and flight tests of batteries prior to probe separation from orbiter provided good prediction of actual entry performance at Jupiter; and the Li-SO2 battery was an important choice for the probe's main power.

  11. Neptune Polar Orbiter with Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bienstock, Bernard; Atkinson, David; Baines, Kevin; Mahaffy, Paul; Steffes, Paul; Atreya, Sushil; Stern, Alan; Wright, Michael; Willenberg, Harvey; Smith, David; Frampton, Robert; Sichi, Steve; Peltz, Leora; Masciarelli, James; VanCleve, Jeffey

    2005-01-01

    The giant planets of the outer solar system divide into two distinct classes: the gas giants Jupiter and Saturn, which consist mainly of hydrogen and helium; and the ice giants Uranus and Neptune, which are believed to contain significant amounts of the heavier elements oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon and sulfur. Detailed comparisons of the internal structures and compositions of the gas giants with those of the ice giants will yield valuable insights into the processes that formed the solar system and, perhaps, other planetary systems. By 2012, Galileo, Cassini and possibly a Jupiter Orbiter mission with microwave radiometers, Juno, in the New Frontiers program, will have yielded significant information on the chemical and physical properties of Jupiter and Saturn. A Neptune Orbiter with Probes (NOP) mission would deliver the corresponding key data for an ice giant planet. Such a mission would ideally study the deep Neptune atmosphere to pressures approaching and possibly exceeding 1000 bars, as well as the rings, Triton, Nereid, and Neptune s other icy satellites. A potential source of power would be nuclear electric propulsion (NEP). Such an ambitious mission requires that a number of technical issues be investigated, however, including: (1) atmospheric entry probe thermal protection system (TPS) design, (2) probe structural design including seals, windows, penetrations and pressure vessel, (3) digital, RF subsystem, and overall communication link design for long term operation in the very extreme environment of Neptune's deep atmosphere, (4) trajectory design allowing probe release on a trajectory to impact Neptune while allowing the spacecraft to achieve a polar orbit of Neptune, (5) and finally the suite of science instruments enabled by the probe technology to explore the depths of the Neptune atmosphere. Another driving factor in the design of the Orbiter and Probes is the necessity to maintain a fully operational flight system during the lengthy transit time

  12. Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Shimon; Chemla, Daniel S.; Ogletree, D. Frank; Botkin, David

    1995-01-01

    An ultrafast scanning probe microscopy method for achieving subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of an observation sample. In one embodiment of the present claimed invention, a single short optical pulse is generated and is split into first and second pulses. One of the pulses is delayed using variable time delay means. The first pulse is then directed at an observation sample located proximate to the probe of a scanning probe microscope. The scanning probe microscope produces probe-sample signals indicative of the response of the probe to characteristics of the sample. The second pulse is used to modulate the probe of the scanning probe microscope. The time delay between the first and second pulses is then varied. The probe-sample response signal is recorded at each of the various time delays created between the first and second pulses. The probe-sample response signal is then plotted as a function of time delay to produce a cross-correlation of the probe sample response. In so doing, the present invention provides simultaneous subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of the sample.

  13. Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, S.; Chemla, D.S.; Ogletree, D.F.; Botkin, D.

    1995-05-16

    An ultrafast scanning probe microscopy method is described for achieving subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of an observation sample. In one embodiment of the present claimed invention, a single short optical pulse is generated and is split into first and second pulses. One of the pulses is delayed using variable time delay means. The first pulse is then directed at an observation sample located proximate to the probe of a scanning probe microscope. The scanning probe microscope produces probe-sample signals indicative of the response of the probe to characteristics of the sample. The second pulse is used to modulate the probe of the scanning probe microscope. The time delay between the first and second pulses is then varied. The probe-sample response signal is recorded at each of the various time delays created between the first and second pulses. The probe-sample response signal is then plotted as a function of time delay to produce a cross-correlation of the probe sample response. In so doing, the present invention provides simultaneous subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of the sample. 6 Figs.

  14. Traversing probe system

    DOEpatents

    Mashburn, Douglas N.; Stevens, Richard H.; Woodall, Harold C.

    1977-01-01

    This invention comprises a rotatable annular probe-positioner which carries at least one radially disposed sensing probe, such as a Pitot tube having a right-angled tip. The positioner can be coaxially and rotatably mounted within a compressor casing or the like and then actuated to orient the sensing probe as required to make measurements at selected stations in the annulus between the positioner and compressor casing. The positioner can be actuated to (a) selectively move the probe along its own axis, (b) adjust the yaw angle of the right-angled probe tip, and (c) revolve the probe about the axis common to the positioner and casing. A cam plate engages a cam-follower portion of the probe and normally rotates with the positioner. The positioner includes a first-motor-driven ring gear which effects slidable movement of the probe by rotating the positioner at a time when an external pneumatic cylinder is actuated to engage the cam plate and hold it stationary. When the pneumatic cylinder is not actuated, this ring gear can be driven to revolve the positioner and thus the probe to a desired circumferential location about the above-mentioned common axis. A second motor-driven ring gear included in the positioner can be driven to rotate the probe about its axis, thus adjusting the yaw angle of the probe tip. The positioner can be used in highly corrosive atmosphere, such as gaseous uranium hexafluoride.

  15. Electrical resistivity probes

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Ki Ha; Becker, Alex; Faybishenko, Boris A.; Solbau, Ray D.

    2003-10-21

    A miniaturized electrical resistivity (ER) probe based on a known current-voltage (I-V) electrode structure, the Wenner array, is designed for local (point) measurement. A pair of voltage measuring electrodes are positioned between a pair of current carrying electrodes. The electrodes are typically about 1 cm long, separated by 1 cm, so the probe is only about 1 inch long. The electrodes are mounted to a rigid tube with electrical wires in the tube and a sand bag may be placed around the electrodes to protect the electrodes. The probes can be positioned in a borehole or on the surface. The electrodes make contact with the surrounding medium. In a dual mode system, individual probes of a plurality of spaced probes can be used to measure local resistance, i.e. point measurements, but the system can select different probes to make interval measurements between probes and between boreholes.

  16. Blood pressure

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... called diastole. Normal blood pressure is considered to be a systolic blood pressure of 115 millimeters of ... pressure reading of 140 over 90, he would be evaluated for having high blood pressure. If left ...

  17. Measuring Intracranial Pressure And Volume Noninvasively

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Yost, William T.

    1994-01-01

    Ultrasonic technique eliminates need to drill into brain cavity. Intracranial dynamics instrument probes cranium ultrasonically to obtain data for determination of intracranial pressure (ICP) and pressure-volume index (PVI). Instrument determines sensitivity of skull to changes in pressure and by use of mechanical device to exert external calibrated pressure on skull. By monitoring volume of blood flowing into jugular vein, one determines change of volume of blood in cranial system. By measuring response of skull to increasing pressure (where pressure increased by tilting patient known amount) and by using cranial blood pressure, one determines intial pressure in cerebrospinal fluid. Once PVI determined, ICP determined.

  18. Measurements of plasma potential in high-pressure microwave plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasova, A. V.; Podder, N. K.; Clothiaux, E. J.

    2009-04-15

    Plasma potential of a high-pressure ({approx}1 Torr) microwave-generated argon plasma is measured using a Langmuir probe and a cold emissive probe. The operation of a hot emissive probe in a high-pressure plasma has been very difficult due to frequent burn-outs and significantly reduced lifetime of the probe filament, which, in turn, limits the possibility of collecting a wide range of data. The I-V characteristics from both Langmuir and emissive probes are interpreted using the collisionless probe theory since the collision correction factor is not very significant. The plasma potential determined from both Langmuir and cold emissive probe characteristics agrees well with one another and is observed to be dependent on the operating gas pressure but relatively unchanged as a function of the microwave power. An average plasma potential determined over the operating range of microwave powers varies nonlinearly with the gas pressure.

  19. Measurements of plasma potential in high-pressure microwave plasmas.

    PubMed

    Tarasova, A V; Podder, N K; Clothiaux, E J

    2009-04-01

    Plasma potential of a high-pressure ( approximately 1 Torr) microwave-generated argon plasma is measured using a Langmuir probe and a cold emissive probe. The operation of a hot emissive probe in a high-pressure plasma has been very difficult due to frequent burn-outs and significantly reduced lifetime of the probe filament, which, in turn, limits the possibility of collecting a wide range of data. The I-V characteristics from both Langmuir and emissive probes are interpreted using the collisionless probe theory since the collision correction factor is not very significant. The plasma potential determined from both Langmuir and cold emissive probe characteristics agrees well with one another and is observed to be dependent on the operating gas pressure but relatively unchanged as a function of the microwave power. An average plasma potential determined over the operating range of microwave powers varies nonlinearly with the gas pressure.

  20. Galileo Space Probe News Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-01-01

    This NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) video release presents Part 1 of a press conference regarding the successful entry of the Galileo Space Probe into Jupiter's atmosphere. The press conference panel is comprised of twelve principal investigators and project scientists that oversee the Galileo mission. Among these panelists, William J. O'Neil (Jet Propulsion Lab.) begins the video praising all of the scientists that worked on the orbiter mission. He then presents a visual overview of Galileo's overall mission trajectory and schedule. Marcie Smith (NASA Ames Research Center) then describes the Galileo Probe mission and the overall engineering and data acquisition aspects of the Probe's Jupiter atmospheric entry. Dr. Richard Young (NASA Ames Research Center) follows with a brief scientific overview, describing the measurements of the atmospheric composition as well as the instruments that were used to gather the data. Atmospheric pressure, temperature, density, and radiation levels of Jupiter were among the most important parameters measured. It is explained that these measurements would be helpful in determining among other things, the overall dynamic meteorology of Jupiter. A question and answer period follows the individual presentations. Atmospheric thermal structure, water abundances, wind profiles, radiation, cloud structure, chemical composition, and electricity are among the topics discussed. Parts 2 and 3 of the press conference can be found in document numbers NONP-NASA-VT-2000001074, and NONP-NASA-VT-2000001075.

  1. A modified Katsumata probe--Ion sensitive probe for measurement in non-magnetized plasmas.

    PubMed

    Čada, M; Hubička, Z; Adámek, P; Olejníček, J; Kment, Š; Adámek, J; Stöckel, J

    2015-07-01

    A modified Katsumata probe has been developed for measurement of ion velocity distribution function (IVDF) in technological non-magnetized plasmas. A simple construction of the modified Katsumata probe consists of adding a pair of permanent Sm-Co magnets in front of Katsumata probe. A comparative study regarding IVDF measurement in a high power impulse magnetron sputtering system operating in pure argon atmosphere by means of developed modified Katsumata probe and commercially available gridded retarding field analyzer (RFA) has been carried out. A time-resolved measurement of IVDF for two different pressures whilst other plasma conditions have been kept unchanged has revealed that the main advantage of the modified Katsumata probe compared to the RFA consists in significantly smaller angular aperture of entrance orifice of modified Katsumata probe being approximately 15° in comparison with a commercial RFA having angular aperture more than 160°. It leads in much better velocity resolution in measured IVDF since the transversal part of velocity vector is much more suppressed compared to RFA. Furthermore, the modified Katsumata probe less suffers from collisions of ions in the space charge sheath in front or inside of the probe compared to the RFA.

  2. An ultrafast reciprocating probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenbin; Tan, Yi; Wang, Wenhao; Gao, Zhe

    2016-11-01

    For tokamak plasma diagnostics, an ultrafast reciprocating probe system driven by magnetic field coils, achieving a maximum velocity of 21 m/s, is introduced. The probes are attached with a driving hoop made of carbon steel and accelerated by three acceleration coils in series, then decelerated by two deceleration coils and buffer springs and return slowly. The coils with a current of about 1 kA generate a magnetic field of about 1 T. This probe system has been tested on the SUNIST (Sino-UNIted Spherical Tokamak) spherical tokamak. Radial profiles of the floating potential and other plasma parameters measured by this probe system are given.

  3. Atom probe tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.K.; Forbes, R.G.

    2009-06-15

    This introductory tutorial describes the technique of atom probe tomography for materials characterization at the atomic level. The evolution of the technique from the initial atom probe field ion microscope to today's state-of-the-art three dimensional atom probe is outlined. An introduction is presented on the basic physics behind the technique, the operation of the instrument, and the reconstruction of the three-dimensional data. The common methods for analyzing the three-dimensional atom probe data, including atom maps, isoconcentration surfaces, proximity histograms, maximum separation methods, and concentration frequency distributions, are described.

  4. Probing the pairing symmetry in the over-doped Fe-based superconductor Ba0.35Rb0.65Fe2As2 as a function of hydrostatic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guguchia, Z.; Khasanov, R.; Bukowski, Z.; von Rohr, F.; Medarde, M.; Biswas, P. K.; Luetkens, H.; Amato, A.; Morenzoni, E.

    2016-03-01

    We report muon spin rotation experiments on the magnetic penetration depth λ and the temperature dependence of λ-2 in the over-doped Fe-based high-temperature superconductor (Fe-HTS) Ba1 -xRbxFe2As2 (x = 0.65) studied at ambient and under hydrostatic pressures up to p =2.3 GPa. We find that in this system λ-2(T ) is best described by d -wave scenario. This is in contrast to the case of the optimally doped x =0.35 system which is known to be a nodeless s+--wave superconductor. This suggests that the doping induces the change of the pairing symmetry from s+- to d wave in Ba1 -xRbxFe2As2 . In addition, we find that the d -wave order parameter is robust against pressure, suggesting that d is the common and dominant pairing symmetry in over-doped Ba1 -xRbxFe2As2 . Application of pressure of p =2.3 GPa causes a decrease of λ (0) by less than 5 % , while at optimal doping x =0.35 a significant decrease of λ (0) was reported. The superconducting transition temperature Tc as well as the gap to Tc ratio 2 Δ /kBTc show only a modest decrease with pressure. By combining the present data with those previously obtained for optimally doped system x =0.35 and for the end member x = 1, we conclude that the SC gap symmetry as well as the pressure effects on the SC quantities strongly depend on the Rb doping level. These results are discussed in the light of the putative Lifshitz transition, i.e., a disappearance of the electron pockets in the Fermi surface of Ba1 -xRbxFe2As2 upon hole doping.

  5. Radio frequency-compensated Langmuir probe with auxiliary double probes

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Se-Jin; Oh, Seung-Ju; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2010-09-15

    A radio frequency (rf) compensation design using auxiliary double probes connected in parallel with a main measurement probe was developed for Langmuir probe diagnostics. This probe structure can reduce the sheath impedance of the main probe. In our probe design, the sheath capacitance of the probe can be increased and its sheath resistance can be decreased with increasing dc bias differential voltage between the auxiliary double probes. The I-V characteristic curve and electron energy distribution functions measured by our probe system had sufficient rf compensation performance in inductively coupled plasmas.

  6. Radio frequency-compensated Langmuir probe with auxiliary double probes.

    PubMed

    Oh, Se-Jin; Oh, Seung-Ju; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2010-09-01

    A radio frequency (rf) compensation design using auxiliary double probes connected in parallel with a main measurement probe was developed for Langmuir probe diagnostics. This probe structure can reduce the sheath impedance of the main probe. In our probe design, the sheath capacitance of the probe can be increased and its sheath resistance can be decreased with increasing dc bias differential voltage between the auxiliary double probes. The I-V characteristic curve and electron energy distribution functions measured by our probe system had sufficient rf compensation performance in inductively coupled plasmas.

  7. Design and development of diaphragm-based EFPI pressure sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anish, P. P.; Linesh, J.; Libish, T. M.; Mathew, S.; Radhakrishnan, P.

    2011-08-01

    An extrinsic fabry-perot interferometric pressure sensor is fabricated using a cavity formed by a metal diaphragm and a single mode optical fiber. The compact sensor probe has been tested for static pressure response using diaphragms of different metals.

  8. Design and development of diaphragm-based EFPI pressure sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anish, P. P.; Linesh, J.; Libish, T. M.; Mathew, S.; Radhakrishnan, P.

    2010-12-01

    An extrinsic fabry-perot interferometric pressure sensor is fabricated using a cavity formed by a metal diaphragm and a single mode optical fiber. The compact sensor probe has been tested for static pressure response using diaphragms of different metals.

  9. F-16XL Basic Airplane Model in the BART

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    4% F-16XL model in BART. Model configuration is the basic airplane, with air dams and missiles. Tests in the tunnel included surface pressures, 5 hole probe, and on and off surface flow visualization.

  10. Note: The expansion of possibilities for plasma probe diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masherov, P. E.; Riaby, V. A.; Abgaryan, V. K.

    2016-05-01

    The determination of ion mass for low-pressure Maxwellian plasmas has been proposed. It can be done using Langmuir probe measurements and the Bohm formula for the ion current density to a floating probe, due to this formula's reliance on ion mass. This goal was achieved by accurate measurements of xenon plasma parameters in the inductive discharge at pressure p = 2 ṡ 10-3 Torr using the Plasma Sensors VGPS-12 probe station with the cylindrical Langmuir probes. The analysis of measurement data showed that in these conditions, the Bohm effect was valid with engineering-level precision, resulting in the experimental Bohm coefficient CBCyl ≈ 1.13 for cylindrical probes.

  11. Note: The expansion of possibilities for plasma probe diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Masherov, P E; Riaby, V A; Abgaryan, V K

    2016-05-01

    The determination of ion mass for low-pressure Maxwellian plasmas has been proposed. It can be done using Langmuir probe measurements and the Bohm formula for the ion current density to a floating probe, due to this formula's reliance on ion mass. This goal was achieved by accurate measurements of xenon plasma parameters in the inductive discharge at pressure p = 2 ⋅ 10(-3) Torr using the Plasma Sensors VGPS-12 probe station with the cylindrical Langmuir probes. The analysis of measurement data showed that in these conditions, the Bohm effect was valid with engineering-level precision, resulting in the experimental Bohm coefficient CBCyl ≈ 1.13 for cylindrical probes. PMID:27250479

  12. Note: The expansion of possibilities for plasma probe diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Masherov, P E; Riaby, V A; Abgaryan, V K

    2016-05-01

    The determination of ion mass for low-pressure Maxwellian plasmas has been proposed. It can be done using Langmuir probe measurements and the Bohm formula for the ion current density to a floating probe, due to this formula's reliance on ion mass. This goal was achieved by accurate measurements of xenon plasma parameters in the inductive discharge at pressure p = 2 ⋅ 10(-3) Torr using the Plasma Sensors VGPS-12 probe station with the cylindrical Langmuir probes. The analysis of measurement data showed that in these conditions, the Bohm effect was valid with engineering-level precision, resulting in the experimental Bohm coefficient CBCyl ≈ 1.13 for cylindrical probes.

  13. Probe Measures Fouling As In Heat Exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marner, Wilbur J.; Macdavid, Kenton S.

    1990-01-01

    Combustion deposits reduce transfer of heat. Instrument measures fouling like that on gas side of heat exchanger in direct-fired boiler or heat-recovery system. Heat-flux probe includes tube with embedded meter in outer shell. Combustion gases flow over probe, and fouling accumulates on it, just as fouling would on heat exchanger. Embedded heat-flow meter is sandwich structure in which thin Chromel layers and middle alloy form thermopile. Users determine when fouling approaches unacceptable levels so they schedule cleaning and avoid decreased transfer of heat and increased drop in pressure fouling causes. Avoids cost of premature, unnecessary maintenance.

  14. Langmuir probe surveys of an arcjet exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zana, Lynnette M.

    1987-01-01

    Electrostatic (Langmuir) probes of both spherical and cylindrical geometry have been used to obtain electron number density and temperature in the exhaust of a laboratory arcjet. The arcjet thruster operated on nitrogen and hydrogen mixtures to simulate fully decomposed hydrazine in a vacuum environment with background pressures less than 0.05 Pa. The exhaust appears to be only slightly ionized (less than 1 percent) with local plasma potentials near facility ground. The current-voltage characteristics of the probes indicate a Maxwellian temperature distribution. Plume data are presented as a function of arcjet operating conditions and also position in the exhaust.

  15. Probe measurements of magnetron discharge parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karzin, V.; Smirnov, V.

    2016-07-01

    Langmuir probe measurements have been carried out in a positive column discharge of a planar magnetron with a titanium target. In this work concentration and temperature of electrons is measured in positive column of magnetron discharge with Langmuir probe. Concentration of electrons is found to be on the level of 1016 m-3 at a notable distance (over 200 mm). Two groups of electrons exist: «cold» and «hot» with average temperature of 16 000 and 41 000 K respectively. Dependence of discharge parameters on working gas pressure is measured.

  16. Probe studies in a modified penning discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, C.

    1976-01-01

    The axial and radial floating potential distribution in a modified Penning discharge were studied at different values of the background pressure, discharge voltage, and magnetic field. An array of small disc probes arranged radially with their planes perpendicular to the magnetic field and movable along the axial direction was inserted in the plasma through one open end of the magnetic mirror system. Results show that depending on the operating conditions, the discharge can undergo different mode transitions in which the plasma can sustain different floating potentials in the radial as well as in the axial directions. Preliminary results of measurement, using RF probes in the modified Penning discharge plasma are also discussed.

  17. Fiber optic probe for light scattering measurements

    DOEpatents

    Nave, Stanley E.; Livingston, Ronald R.; Prather, William S.

    1995-01-01

    A fiber optic probe and a method for using the probe for light scattering analyses of a sample. The probe includes a probe body with an inlet for admitting a sample into an interior sample chamber, a first optical fiber for transmitting light from a source into the chamber, and a second optical fiber for transmitting light to a detector such as a spectrophotometer. The interior surface of the probe carries a coating that substantially prevents non-scattered light from reaching the second fiber. The probe is placed in a region where the presence and concentration of an analyte of interest are to be detected, and a sample is admitted into the chamber. Exciting light is transmitted into the sample chamber by the first fiber, where the light interacts with the sample to produce Raman-scattered light. At least some of the Raman-scattered light is received by the second fiber and transmitted to the detector for analysis. Two Raman spectra are measured, at different pressures. The first spectrum is subtracted from the second to remove background effects, and the resulting sample Raman spectrum is compared to a set of stored library spectra to determine the presence and concentration of the analyte.

  18. Fiber optic probe for light scattering measurements

    DOEpatents

    Nave, S.E.; Livingston, R.R.; Prather, W.S.

    1993-01-01

    This invention is comprised of a fiber optic probe and a method for using the probe for light scattering analyses of a sample. The probe includes a probe body with an inlet for admitting a sample into an interior sample chamber, a first optical fiber for transmitting light from a source into the chamber, and a second optical fiber for transmitting light to a detector such as a spectrophotometer. The interior surface of the probe carries a coating that substantially prevents non-scattered light from reaching the second fiber. The probe is placed in a region where the presence and concentration of an analyte of interest are to be detected, and a sample is admitted into the chamber. Exciting light is transmitted into the sample chamber by the first fiber, where the light interacts with the sample to produce Raman-scattered light. At least some of the Raman- scattered light is received by the second fiber and transmitted to the detector for analysis. Two Raman spectra are measured, at different pressures. The first spectrum is subtracted from the second to remove background effects, and the resulting sample Raman spectrum is compared to a set of stored library spectra to determine the presence and concentration of the analyte.

  19. Formative Assessment Probes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eberle, Francis; Keeley, Page

    2008-01-01

    Formative assessment probes can be effective tools to help teachers build a bridge between students' initial ideas and scientific ones. In this article, the authors describe how using two formative assessment probes can help teachers determine the extent to which students make similar connections between developing a concept of matter and a…

  20. Contact pressure-aided spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bregar, Maksimilijan; Bürmen, Miran; Aljancic, Uroš; Cugmas, Blaž; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan

    2014-02-01

    Contact pressure induced by manually operated fiber optic probes can significantly affect the optical properties of the studied tissue. If the contact pressure and the changes in optical properties are measured properly, then the complementary information can be used to obtain additional insight into the tissue physiology. However, as reliable assessment of the contact pressure in the existing diffuse reflectance setups is difficult, the impact of contact pressure is usually neglected or considered as a source of errors. We introduce a measurement system for controlled application of contact pressure and for the acquisition of diffuse reflectance spectra, which is suitable for in vivo studies and for overcoming the limitations of the existing measurement setups. A spectral-contact-pressure plane is proposed to present the combined information, highlighting the unique tissue response to the applied pressure.

  1. PDV Probe Alignment Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Whitworth, T L; May, C M; Strand, O T

    2007-10-26

    This alignment technique was developed while performing heterodyne velocimetry measurements at LLNL. There are a few minor items needed, such as a white card with aperture in center, visible alignment laser, IR back reflection meter, and a microscope to view the bridge surface. The work was performed on KCP flyers that were 6 and 8 mils wide. The probes used were Oz Optics manufactured with focal distances of 42mm and 26mm. Both probes provide a spot size of approximately 80?m at 1550nm. The 42mm probes were specified to provide an internal back reflection of -35 to -40dB, and the probe back reflections were measured to be -37dB and -33dB. The 26mm probes were specified as -30dB and both measured -30.5dB. The probe is initially aligned normal to the flyer/bridge surface. This provides a very high return signal, up to -2dB, due to the bridge reflectivity. A white card with a hole in the center as an aperture can be used to check the reflected beam position relative to the probe and launch beam, and the alignment laser spot centered on the bridge, see Figure 1 and Figure 2. The IR back reflection meter is used to measure the dB return from the probe and surface, and a white card or similar object is inserted between the probe and surface to block surface reflection. It may take several iterations between the visible alignment laser and the IR back reflection meter to complete this alignment procedure. Once aligned normal to the surface, the probe should be tilted to position the visible alignment beam as shown in Figure 3, and the flyer should be translated in the X and Y axis to reposition the alignment beam onto the flyer as shown in Figure 4. This tilting of the probe minimizes the amount of light from the bridge reflection into the fiber within the probe while maintaining the alignment as near normal to the flyer surface as possible. When the back reflection is measured after the tilt adjustment, the level should be about -3dB to -6dB higher than the probes

  2. Probe shapes that measure time-averaged streamwise momentum and cross-stream turbulence intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, Vernon J. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus for directly measuring the time-averaged streamwise momentum in a turbulent stream use a probe which has total head response which varies as the cosine-squared of the angle of incidence. The probe has a nose with a slight indentation on its front face for providing the desired response. The method of making the probe incorporates unique design features. Another probe may be positioned in a side-by-side relationship to the first probe to provide a direct measurement of the total pressure. The difference between the two pressures yields the sum of the squares of the cross-stream components of the turbulence level.

  3. Measurement of electron density using reactance cutoff probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, K. H.; You, S. J.; Kim, D. W.; Na, B. K.; Seo, B. H.; Kim, J. H.; Seong, D. J.; Chang, H. Y.

    2016-05-01

    This paper proposes a new measurement method of electron density using the reactance spectrum of the plasma in the cutoff probe system instead of the transmission spectrum. The highly accurate reactance spectrum of the plasma-cutoff probe system, as expected from previous circuit simulations [Kim et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 99, 131502 (2011)], was measured using the full two-port error correction and automatic port extension methods of the network analyzer. The electron density can be obtained from the analysis of the measured reactance spectrum, based on circuit modeling. According to the circuit simulation results, the reactance cutoff probe can measure the electron density more precisely than the previous cutoff probe at low densities or at higher pressure. The obtained results for the electron density are presented and discussed for a wide range of experimental conditions, and this method is compared with previous methods (a cutoff probe using the transmission spectrum and a single Langmuir probe).

  4. ALEX neutral beam probe

    SciTech Connect

    Pourrezaei, K.

    1982-01-01

    A neutral beam probe capable of measuring plasma space potential in a fully 3-dimensional magnetic field geometry has been developed. This neutral beam was successfully used to measure an arc target plasma contained within the ALEX baseball magnetic coil. A computer simulation of the experiment was performed to refine the experimental design and to develop a numerical model for scaling the ALEX neutral beam probe to other cases of fully 3-dimensional magnetic field. Based on this scaling a 30 to 50 keV neutral cesium beam probe capable of measuring space potential in the thermal barrier region of TMX Upgrade was designed.

  5. BEAM CONTROL PROBE

    DOEpatents

    Chesterman, A.W.

    1959-03-17

    A probe is described for intercepting a desired portion of a beam of charged particles and for indicating the spatial disposition of the beam. The disclosed probe assembly includes a pair of pivotally mounted vanes moveable into a single plane with adjacent edges joining and a calibrated mechanical arrangement for pivoting the vancs apart. When the probe is disposed in the path of a charged particle beam, the vanes may be adjusted according to the beam current received in each vane to ascertain the dimension of the beam.

  6. Focus: DNA probes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-11-01

    Progress in the development of DNA probes for the identification and quantitation of specific genetic sequences in biological samples is reviewed. Current research efforts in the development of DNA probes for the diagnosis of a wide variety of bacterial, viral, and other infectious diseases, such as herpes simplex and cytomegalovirus, and inherited genetic diseases such as cystic fibrosis and sickle cell anemia are discussed. Progress in development of DNA probe assays for cancer diagnosis, detection of Salmonella food poisoning, tissue typing (detection of histocompatibility antigens), mutagen screening, and animal diseases, among other applications is included.

  7. Foldable polymers as probes

    DOEpatents

    Li, Alexander D. Q.; Wang, Wei

    2007-07-03

    Disclosed herein are novel probes, which can be used to detect and identify target molecules of interest in a sample. The disclosed probes can be used to monitor conformational changes induced by molecular recognition events in addition to providing signaling the presence and/or identity of a target molecule. Methods, including solid phase synthesis techniques, for making probe molecules that exhibit changes in their optical properties upon target molecule binding are described in the disclosure. Also disclosed herein are novel chromophore moieties, which have tailored fluorescent emission spectra.

  8. Foldable polymers as probes

    DOEpatents

    Li, Alexander D. Q.; Wang, Wei

    2009-07-07

    Disclosed herein are novel probes, which can be used to detect and identify target molecules of interest in a sample. The disclosed probes can be used to monitor conformational changes induced by molecular recognition events in addition to providing signaling the presence and/or identity of a target molecule. Methods, including solid phase synthesis techniques, for making probe molecules that exhibit changes in their optical properties upon target molecule binding are described in the disclosure. Also disclosed herein are novel chromophore moieties, which have tailored fluorescent emission spectra.

  9. Chemical sensing flow probe

    DOEpatents

    Laguna, George R.; Peter, Frank J.; Butler, Michael A.

    1999-01-01

    A new chemical probe determines the properties of an analyte using the light absorption of the products of a reagent/analyte reaction. The probe places a small reaction volume in contact with a large analyte volume. Analyte diffuses into the reaction volume. Reagent is selectively supplied to the reaction volume. The light absorption of the reaction in the reaction volume indicates properties of the original analyte. The probe is suitable for repeated use in remote or hostile environments. It does not require physical sampling of the analyte or result in significant regent contamination of the analyte reservoir.

  10. Chemical sensing flow probe

    DOEpatents

    Laguna, G.R.; Peter, F.J.; Butler, M.A.

    1999-02-16

    A new chemical probe determines the properties of an analyte using the light absorption of the products of a reagent/analyte reaction. The probe places a small reaction volume in contact with a large analyte volume. Analyte diffuses into the reaction volume. Reagent is selectively supplied to the reaction volume. The light absorption of the reaction in the reaction volume indicates properties of the original analyte. The probe is suitable for repeated use in remote or hostile environments. It does not require physical sampling of the analyte or result in significant regent contamination of the analyte reservoir. 7 figs.

  11. Technology for Entry Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutts, James A.; Arnold, James; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Kolawa, Elizabeth; Munk, Michelle; Wercinski, Paul; Laub, Bernard

    2005-01-01

    A viewgraph describing technologies for entry probes is presented. The topics include: 1) Entry Phase; 2) Descent Phase; 3) Long duration atmospheric observations; 4) Survivability at high temperatures; and 5) Summary.

  12. An Ultrasonographic Periodontal Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoncini, C. A.; Hinders, M. K.

    2010-02-01

    Periodontal disease, commonly known as gum disease, affects millions of people. The current method of detecting periodontal pocket depth is painful, invasive, and inaccurate. As an alternative to manual probing, an ultrasonographic periodontal probe is being developed to use ultrasound echo waveforms to measure periodontal pocket depth, which is the main measure of periodontal disease. Wavelet transforms and pattern classification techniques are implemented in artificial intelligence routines that can automatically detect pocket depth. The main pattern classification technique used here, called a binary classification algorithm, compares test objects with only two possible pocket depth measurements at a time and relies on dimensionality reduction for the final determination. This method correctly identifies up to 90% of the ultrasonographic probe measurements within the manual probe's tolerance.

  13. Particle pressures in fluidized beds

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, C.S.; Rahman, K.; Hu, X.; Jin, C.; Potapov, A.V.

    1992-01-01

    This is an experimental project to make detailed measurements of the particle pressures generated in fluidized beds. The focus lies in two principle areas: (1) the particle pressure distribution around single bubbles rising in a two-dimensional gas-fluidized bed and (2) the particle pressures measured in liquid-fluidized beds. This first year has largely been to constructing the experiments The design of the particle pressure probe has been improved and tested. A two-dimensional gas-fluidized bed has been constructed in order to measure the particle pressure generated around injected bubbles. The probe is also being adapted to work in a liquid fluidized bed. Finally, a two-dimensional liquid fluidized bed is also under construction. Preliminary measurements show that the majority of the particle pressures are generated in the wake of a bubble. However, the particle pressures generated in the liquid bed appear to be extremely small. Finally, while not directly associated with the particle pressure studies, some NERSC supercomputer time was granted alongside this project. This is being used to make large scale computer simulation of the flow of granular materials in hoppers.

  14. Cometary Plasma Probed by Rosetta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galand, Marina; Vigren, Erik; Raghuram, Susarla; Schwartz, Steve; Eriksson, Anders; Edberg, Niklas; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre; Henri, Pierre; Burch, Jim; Fuselier, Stephen; Haessig, Myrtha; Mandt, Kathy; Altwegg, Kathrin; Tzou, Chia-You

    2015-04-01

    In Fall 2014, comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, the main target of the Rosetta mission, was at 3 AU from the Sun. Its outgassing rate was only of the order of 5×1025 s-1 based on Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis (ROSINA) / Cometary Pressure Sensor (COPS). Despite such a thin coma, a plasma of cometary origin has been detected by Rosetta Plasma Consortium (RPC) sensors and ROSINA/ Double Focusing Mass Spectrometer (DFMS). Close to the comet they have revealed the presence of a cometary ionosphere, with a hot electron population, consistent with the deposition of Extreme UltraViolet (EUV) solar radiation. We will present a comparison between RPC sensors and an energy deposition model in terms of suprathermal electron intensities [RPC/ Ion and Electron Sensor (IES)] and electron temperature and density [RPC/ LAngmuir Probe (LAP) and RPC/ Mutual Impedance Probe (MIP)]. We will also compare ion composition among the main species, between our ionospheric model and ROSINA/DFMS. We will discuss effects of the space environment on the cometary plasma. Finally, we will highlight any evolution in the cometary plasma as the comet is getting closer to perihelion.

  15. Laser probes of natural gas ignition chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosley, David R.; Golden, David M.; Smith, Gregory

    1992-03-01

    The research, funded by the Physical Sciences Department of the Gas Research Institute, is aimed at developing and using laser-induced fluorescence of various hydrocarbon species as a probe in natural gas combustion research and at developing an understanding of the chemical mechanisms of ignition and burning of natural gas. Studies were made of infrared degenerate four-wave mixing, flow patterns in a low-pressure burner, and the OH + CO and OH + CH3 reactions. Thermodynamic data and the pressure dependence of rate constants important in the PSST natural gas mechanism collaboration were evaluated.

  16. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Sheldon H. D.

    1992-01-01

    A regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC exhaust gases.

  17. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    DOEpatents

    Lee, S.H.D.

    1992-12-22

    A regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC exhaust gases. 6 figs.

  18. Pneumatic Proboscis Heat-Flow Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zacny, Kris; Hedlund, Magnus; Mumm, Eric; Shasho, Jeffrey; Chu, Philip; Kumar, Nishant

    2013-01-01

    Heat flow is a fundamental property of a planet, and provides significant constraints on the abundance of radiogenic isotopes, the thermal evolution and differentiation history, and the mechanical properties of the lithosphere. Heat-flow measurements are also essential in achieving at least four of the goals set out by the National Research Council for future lunar exploration. The heat-flow probe therefore directly addresses the goal of the Lunar Geophysical Network, which is to understand the interior structure and composition of the Moon. A key challenge for heat flow measurement is to install thermal sensors to the depths approximately equal to 3 m that are not influenced by the diurnal, annual, and longer-term fluctuations of the surface thermal environment. In addition, once deployed, the heat flow probe should cause little disturbance to the thermal regime of the surrounding regolith. A heat-flow probe system was developed that has two novel features: (1) it utilizes a pneumatic (gas) approach, excavates a hole by lofting the lunar soil out of the hole, and (2) deploys the heat flow probe, which utilizes a coiled up tape as a thermal probe to reach greater than 3-meter depth. The system is a game-changer for small lunar landers as it exhibits extremely low mass, volume, and simple deployment. The pneumatic system takes advantage of the helium gas used for pressurizing liquid propellant of the lander. Normally, helium is vented once the lander is on the surface, but it can be utilized for powering pneumatic systems. Should sufficient helium not be available, a simple gas delivery system may be taken specifically for the heat flow probe. Either way, the pneumatic heat flow probe system would be much lighter than other systems that entirely rely on the electrical power of the lander.

  19. Piezometer-probe technology for geotechnical investigations in coastal and deep-ocean environments

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, R.H.; Burns, J.T.; Lipkin, J.; Percival, C.M.

    1983-01-01

    Three multisensor piezometer probes were developed and field tested for use in coastal (shallow water) fine-grained Marine soils. Offshore sites were investigated in the Mississippi Delta. Pore water pressure measurements were determined at several depths below the sea floor using both absolute and differential pressure sensors placed in a four inch diameter probe. Pressure sensors were hard-wired to nearby platforms where signals were conditioned and analog recording devices monitored pore water pressure changes in the marine soils. Pore water pressures were monitored for several months. Two single sensor piezometer probes, eight millimeters in diameter, were developed for deep-ocean investigations. These probes use differential pressure sensors and were tested in a hyperbaric chamber pressurized to 55 MPa (8000 psi). Testing was performed for a period of five weeks under high hydrostatic pressure with the probes inserted in reconstituted illitic marine soil. Small differential pore water pressures responded to both mechanically and thermally generated forcing functions. During shallow water investigations and simulated deep-ocean pressure tests, the sensors exhibited excellent sensitivity and stability. These developments in piezometer probe technology provide a means of assessing important geotechnical parameters of fine-grained seabed deposits.

  20. Pressure Sores

    MedlinePlus

    Pressure sores are areas of damaged skin caused by staying in one position for too long. They ... wheelchair, or are unable to change your position. Pressure sores can cause serious infections, some of which ...

  1. Model for resonant plasma probe.

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Johnson, William Arthur; Hebner, Gregory Albert; Jorgenson, Roy E.; Coats, Rebecca Sue

    2007-04-01

    This report constructs simple circuit models for a hairpin shaped resonant plasma probe. Effects of the plasma sheath region surrounding the wires making up the probe are determined. Electromagnetic simulations of the probe are compared to the circuit model results. The perturbing effects of the disc cavity in which the probe operates are also found.

  2. Particle Probe Investigations on the Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Justin; James, R. W.; Lopez, M.; Nolan, S.; Page, E. L.; Schlank, C.; Stutzman, B. S.; Zuniga, J.

    2012-10-01

    A small Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX) has been constructed at the Coast Guard Academy Plasma Lab (CGAPL) to utilize the reputed high densities at low pressure (.01 T) [1], in high temperature and density diagnostic development for future laboratory investigations. With the initial construction phase complete, HPX has produced its first plasmas. Efforts to develop and enhance the high temperature and density (10^13 cm-3 and higher) helicon plasmas at low pressures (.01 T) reported by Toki, Shinohara, et. al. continue. Currently, particle probes to measure plasmas' temperatures and densities, necessary to discern the plasma mode transitions, are in development. Construction of independent mach and triple probes for single point surface investigations are underway and once installed, they will be followed by a triple probe array to produce a more comprehensive density and surface view. Progress on the construction and findings of these probes on HPX will be reported.

  3. Barometric pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billings, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    The effects of alterations in barometric pressure on human beings are described. Human tolerances for gaseous environments and low and high barometric pressure are discussed, including effects on specific areas, such as the ear, lungs, teeth, and sinuses. Problems due to trapped gas within the body, high dynamic pressures on the body, and blasts are also considered.

  4. Surgical force detection probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tcheng, Ping; Roberts, Paul; Scott, Charles; Prass, Richard

    1991-01-01

    The development progress of a precision electro-mechanical instrument which allows the detection and documentation of the forces and moment applied to human tissue during surgery (under actual operation room conditions), is reported. The pen-shaped prototype probe which measures 1/2 inch in diameter and 7 inches in length was fabricated using an aerodynamic balance. The aerodynamic balance, a standard wind tunnel force and moment sensing transducer, measures the forces and the moments transmitted through the surgeon's hand to the human tissue during surgery. The prototype probe which was fabricated as a development tool was tested successfully. The final version of the surgical force detection probe will be designed based on additional laboratory tests in order to establish the full scale loads. It is expected that the final product will require a simplified aerodynamic balance with two or three force components and one moment component with lighter full scale loads. A signal conditioner was fabricated to process and display the outputs from the prototype probe. This unit will be interfaced with a PC-based data system to provide automatic data acquisition, data processing, and graphics display. The expected overall accuracy of the probe is better than one percent full scale.

  5. Convective heat flow probe

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, James C.; Hardee, Harry C.; Striker, Richard P.

    1985-01-01

    A convective heat flow probe device is provided which measures heat flow and fluid flow magnitude in the formation surrounding a borehole. The probe comprises an elongate housing adapted to be lowered down into the borehole; a plurality of heaters extending along the probe for heating the formation surrounding the borehole; a plurality of temperature sensors arranged around the periphery of the probe for measuring the temperature of the surrounding formation after heating thereof by the heater elements. The temperature sensors and heater elements are mounted in a plurality of separate heater pads which are supported by the housing and which are adapted to be radially expanded into firm engagement with the walls of the borehole. The heat supplied by the heater elements and the temperatures measured by the temperature sensors are monitored and used in providing the desired measurements. The outer peripheral surfaces of the heater pads are configured as segments of a cylinder and form a full cylinder when taken together. A plurality of temperature sensors are located on each pad so as to extend along the length and across the width thereof, with a heating element being located in each pad beneath the temperature sensors. An expansion mechanism driven by a clamping motor provides expansion and retraction of the heater pads and expandable packer-type seals are provided along the probe above and below the heater pads.

  6. Convective heat flow probe

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, J.C.; Hardee, H.C.; Striker, R.P.

    1984-01-09

    A convective heat flow probe device is provided which measures heat flow and fluid flow magnitude in the formation surrounding a borehole. The probe comprises an elongate housing adapted to be lowered down into the borehole; a plurality of heaters extending along the probe for heating the formation surrounding the borehole; a plurality of temperature sensors arranged around the periphery of the probe for measuring the temperature of the surrounding formation after heating thereof by the heater elements. The temperature sensors and heater elements are mounted in a plurality of separate heater pads which are supported by the housing and which are adapted to be radially expanded into firm engagement with the walls of the borehole. The heat supplied by the heater elements and the temperatures measured by the temperature sensors are monitored and used in providing the desired measurements. The outer peripheral surfaces of the heater pads are configured as segments of a cylinder and form a full cylinder when taken together. A plurality of temperature sensors are located on each pad so as to extend along the length and across the width thereof, with a heating element being located in each pad beneath the temperature sensors. An expansion mechanism driven by a clamping motor provides expansion and retraction of the heater pads and expandable packet-type seals are provided along the probe above and below the heater pads.

  7. Effectiveness of a Wedge Probe to Measure Sonic Boom Signatures in a Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Floyd J., Jr.; Elmiligui, Alaa A.

    2013-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation was conducted in the Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT) to determine the effectiveness of a wedge probe to measure sonic boom pressure signatures compared to a slender conical probe. A generic business jet model at a constant angle of attack and at a single model to probe separation distance was used to generate a sonic boom signature. Pressure signature data were acquired with both the wedge probe and a slender conical probe for comparison. The test was conducted at a Mach number of 2.0 and a free-stream unit Reynolds number of 2 million per foot. The results showed that the wedge probe was not effective in measuring the sonic boom pressure signature of the aircraft model in the supersonic wind tunnel. Data plots and a discussion of the results are presented. No tabulated data or flow visualization photographs are included.

  8. Measurement of Air Flow Characteristics Using Seven-Hole Cone Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Timothy T.

    1997-01-01

    The motivation for this work has been the development of a wake survey system. A seven-hole probe can measure the distribution of static pressure, total pressure, and flow angularity in a wind tunnel environment. The author describes the development of a simple, very efficient algorithm to compute flow properties from probe tip pressures. Its accuracy and applicability to unsteady, turbulent flow are discussed.

  9. Effects of a Rotating Aerodynamic Probe on the Flow Field of a Compressor Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, Jan

    2008-01-01

    An investigation of distortions of the rotor exit flow field caused by an aerodynamic probe mounted in the rotor is described in this paper. A rotor total pressure Kiel probe, mounted on the rotor hub and extending up to the mid-span radius of a rotor blade channel, generates a wake that forms additional flow blockage. Three types of high-response aerodynamic probes were used to investigate the distorted flow field behind the rotor. These probes were: a split-fiber thermo-anemometric probe to measure velocity and flow direction, a total pressure probe, and a disk probe for in-flow static pressure measurement. The signals acquired from these high-response probes were reduced using an ensemble averaging method based on a once per rotor revolution signal. The rotor ensemble averages were combined to construct contour plots for each rotor channel of the rotor tested. In order to quantify the rotor probe effects, the contour plots for each individual rotor blade passage were averaged into a single value. The distribution of these average values along the rotor circumference is a measure of changes in the rotor exit flow field due to the presence of a probe in the rotor. These distributions were generated for axial flow velocity and for static pressure.

  10. A miniature high frequency sphere probe. [for transonic blowdown compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerrebrock, J. L.; Epstein, A. H.; Thompkins, W. T., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A spherical probe having five surface mounted silicon pressure sensors is described. The probe is 0.2 inches in diameter yielding a frequency response above 30 kHz. A scheme is described for retrieving from the five pressure signals the stagnation and static pressures, Mach number and flow angles in two planes. The calibrations forming the base for this procedure, obtained from steady state tests, are given in the form of polynomials in the two flow angles. A method for compensating the silicon pressure sensors for thermal effects is given. Typical data obtained in the MIT Blowdown Compressor are presented in raw form and after reduction to flow angles, Mach number and stagnation pressure.

  11. Probing of Elastic Properties and Texture of Transparent Solids with sub-μm and μm-Resolution at Mbar Pressures Using Picosecond Laser Ultrasonic Interferometry: H2O Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerr, A.; Nikitin, S. M.; Chigarev, N.; Raetz, S.; Kuriakose, M.; Tournat, V.; Bulou, A.; Gasteau, D.; Castagnede, B.; Gusev, V. E.; Lomonosov, A.

    2015-12-01

    Elastic properties of silicates, oxides and other transparent materials, especially their single crystal elastic moduli, texture and its evolution upon compression at Mbar pressures is a subject of continuous interest in geo- and planetary sciences. Picosecond laser ultrasonic technique was earlier proposed to measure elastic moduli of materials compressed in a diamond anvil cell (DAC) [1]. Recently the applications of picosecond laser ultrasonic interferometry have been extended to evaluation of spatially inhomogeneous samples |2]. In this communication we report characterization by this technique of a transparent polycrystalline sample (H2O ice) compressed in a DAC to ~1 Mbar. The method is suitable for measurements in multi-Mbar region due to a high in-depth resolution approaching 300 nm and limited by the used signal processing. In an inhomogeneous medium the transient reflectivity signal obtained by this technique contains at each time instance the information on the parameters of the medium in the spatial position of laser-generated picosecond acoustic pulse corresponding to this moment of time. The lateral resolution is defined by focusing of the laser radiation which can approach ≤1 μm if advanced focusing methods are applied. Here we present results of examination of characteristic features of micro-crystallinity of H2O ice at P up to 840 kbar by two-dimensional imaging based on this technique which provides, in addition, for each spatial position the value of elastic modulus of the sample material along the DAC axis [2]. A significant elastic anisotropy of H2O ice was recognised, its degree evaluated, and compared with the earlier experimental and theoretical data. Feasibility of extension to a three-dimensional imaging of texture (including information on orientation of crystallites or their groups) as well as its evolution upon further compression in a DAC is discussed. The method can be applied to any transparent compounds (silicates, oxides) or

  12. Multispectral imaging probe

    DOEpatents

    Sandison, David R.; Platzbecker, Mark R.; Descour, Michael R.; Armour, David L.; Craig, Marcus J.; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    1999-01-01

    A multispectral imaging probe delivers a range of wavelengths of excitation light to a target and collects a range of expressed light wavelengths. The multispectral imaging probe is adapted for mobile use and use in confined spaces, and is sealed against the effects of hostile environments. The multispectral imaging probe comprises a housing that defines a sealed volume that is substantially sealed from the surrounding environment. A beam splitting device mounts within the sealed volume. Excitation light is directed to the beam splitting device, which directs the excitation light to a target. Expressed light from the target reaches the beam splitting device along a path coaxial with the path traveled by the excitation light from the beam splitting device to the target. The beam splitting device directs expressed light to a collection subsystem for delivery to a detector.

  13. Multispectral imaging probe

    DOEpatents

    Sandison, D.R.; Platzbecker, M.R.; Descour, M.R.; Armour, D.L.; Craig, M.J.; Richards-Kortum, R.

    1999-07-27

    A multispectral imaging probe delivers a range of wavelengths of excitation light to a target and collects a range of expressed light wavelengths. The multispectral imaging probe is adapted for mobile use and use in confined spaces, and is sealed against the effects of hostile environments. The multispectral imaging probe comprises a housing that defines a sealed volume that is substantially sealed from the surrounding environment. A beam splitting device mounts within the sealed volume. Excitation light is directed to the beam splitting device, which directs the excitation light to a target. Expressed light from the target reaches the beam splitting device along a path coaxial with the path traveled by the excitation light from the beam splitting device to the target. The beam splitting device directs expressed light to a collection subsystem for delivery to a detector. 8 figs.

  14. A helium gas probe for use in cryosurgery.

    PubMed

    Bald, W B

    1984-10-01

    The design and testing of a prototype cryosurgical probe utilizing helium gas precooled with liquid nitrogen are described. An 8-mm-diameter probe produced an ice ball with a diameter of 28 mm after 10 min freezing using a helium gas flow rate of 42 liter/min. This indicated a surface heat transfer coefficient of 0.34 W/cm2 degrees K and temperature of -138 degrees C at the probe tip. Improved performance figures can be achieved using higher gas pressures and flow rates. A helium gas flow system schematic for use with this new type of cryoprobe is also presented. It is claimed that this system will overcome the problems of developing both multiple-tipped probes and small-diameter needle probes for use in cryoanalgesia. PMID:6499503

  15. A curved vitrectomy probe.

    PubMed

    Chalam, K V; Shah, Vinay A; Tripathi, Ramesh C

    2004-01-01

    A curved vitrectomy probe for better accessibility of the peripheral retina in phakic eyes is described. The specially designed curved vitrectomy probe has a 20-gauge pneumatic cutter. The radius of curvature at the shaft is 19.4 mm and it is 25 mm long. The ora serrata is accessed through a 3.0- or 4.0-mm sclerotomy in phakic eyes without touching the crystalline lens. Use of this instrument avoids inadvertent trauma to the clear lens in phakic eyes requiring vitreous base excision. This curved vitrectomy instrument complements wide-angle viewing systems and endoscopes for safe surgical treatment of peripheral retinal pathology in phakic eyes. PMID:15185799

  16. A Shallow Entry Probe Mission to Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, D. H.; Spilker, T. R.; Lunine, J.; Simon-Miller, A.; Atreya, S. K.; Brinckerhoff, W.; Colaprete, A.; Coustenis, A.; Guillot, T.; Mahaffy, P.; Reh, K.; Spilker, L.

    2012-04-01

    composition and structure of Saturn's upper troposphere, and ultrastable oscillators on the probe and carrier relay spacecraft to provide measurements of Saturn's atmospheric dynamics by Doppler tracking of the probe. No new technologies are needed to conduct a Saturn entry probe mission. Although significantly less demanding than the Galileo Jupiter entry environment, Saturn entry requires a Thermal Protection System similar to that used for the Galileo probe. The pressure, temperature, and radiation environments at the locations of interest at Saturn are relatively benign and require no extreme environment technology development. Since Saturn does not have a Jupiter-like synchrotron noise environment, and the microwave opacity of Saturn's atmosphere increases approximately as frequency squared, a Saturn probe mission can use lower telecom frequencies to reduce attenuation with data rates that surpass the Galileo probe data rate. Additionally, the Decadal Survey noted significant flexibility in Saturn probe delivery trajectories. Maintaining a disciplined approach to the payload could enable a probe equal to or smaller than the Galileo Probe. This research was carried out in part at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with NASA. Copyright 2012 California Institute of Technology. Government sponsorship acknowledged.

  17. A new probe for on-line corrosion monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, M.J.; Quale, J.C.; Richardson, J.A.; Strutt, J.E.

    1984-05-01

    A new design of corrosion probe, suitable for use with all types of electrochemical techniques, is described. Annular flush mounted electrodes have been used to avoid disadvantages inherent in other designs. Characteristic flow conditions were established readily at the electrode surface. In addition, corrosion rates in two phase flows may be more reliably monitored. The probe incorporated a reference electrode limb which allowed potential measurements to be made at typical plant operating temperatures and pressures. The techniques used for plant corrosion measurements are described, and the problem areas in probe manufacture are discussed.

  18. Visual probes and methods for placing visual probes into subsurface areas

    DOEpatents

    Clark, Don T.; Erickson, Eugene E.; Casper, William L.; Everett, David M.

    2004-11-23

    Visual probes and methods for placing visual probes into subsurface areas in either contaminated or non-contaminated sites are described. In one implementation, the method includes driving at least a portion of a visual probe into the ground using direct push, sonic drilling, or a combination of direct push and sonic drilling. Such is accomplished without providing an open pathway for contaminants or fugitive gases to reach the surface. According to one implementation, the invention includes an entry segment configured for insertion into the ground or through difficult materials (e.g., concrete, steel, asphalt, metals, or items associated with waste), at least one extension segment configured to selectively couple with the entry segment, at least one push rod, and a pressure cap. Additional implementations are contemplated.

  19. Floating probe for electron temperature and ion density measurement applicable to processing plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Min-Hyong; Jang, Sung-Ho; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2007-02-01

    A floating-type probe and its driving circuit using the nonlinear characteristics of the probe sheath was developed and the electron temperature and the plasma density which is found from the ion part of the probe characteristic (ion density) were measured in inductively coupled plasmas. The floating-type probe was compared with a single Langmuir probe and it turned out that the floating-type probe agrees closely with the single probe at various rf powers and pressures. The ion density and electron temperature by the floating-type probe were measured with a film on the probe tip coated in CF{sub 4} plasma. It is found that the ion density and electron temperature by the floating-type probe were almost the same regardless of the coating on the probe tip while a single Langmuir probe does not work. Because the floating-type probe is hardly affected by the deposition on the probe tip, it is expected to be applied to plasma diagnostics for plasma processing such as deposition or etching.

  20. Neurochemistry and electroanalytical probes.

    PubMed

    Troyer, Kevin P; Heien, Michael L A V; Venton, B Jill; Wightman, R Mark

    2002-10-01

    Electroanalytical techniques have been applied to monitoring chemical events including neurotransmitter release during rodent behaviour and the release of zeptomoles of molecules from single cells. Transgenic mice models have been developed and studied to identify specific cell types in vitro. Characterization and surface modification of electroanalytical probes has enhanced the selectivity and sensitivity of measurements.

  1. Cervical Neoplasia Probe Control

    1997-01-24

    This software, which consists of a main executive and several subroutines, performs control of the optics, image acquisition, and Digital Signal Processing (DSP) of this image, of an optical based medical instrument that performs fluoresence detection of precancerous lesions (neoplasia) of the human cervix. The hardware portion of this medical instrument is known by the same name Cervical Neoplasia Probe (CNP)

  2. The Phoenix Pluto Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunning, George R.; Spapperi, Jeff; Wilkinson, Jeffrey P.; Eldred, Jim; Labij, Dennis; Strinni, Meredith

    1990-01-01

    A design proposal for an unmanned probe to Pluto is presented. The topics covered include: (1) scientific instrumentation; (2) mission management, planning, and costing; (3) power and propulsion system; (4) structural subsystem; (5) command, control, and communication; and (6) attitude and articulation control.

  3. Ultrasonic search wheel probe

    DOEpatents

    Mikesell, Charles R.

    1978-01-01

    A device is provided for reducing internal reflections from the tire of an ultrasonic search wheel probe or from within the material being examined. The device includes a liner with an anechoic chamber within which is an ultrasonic transducer. The liner is positioned within the wheel and includes an aperture through which the ultrasonic sound from the transducer is directed.

  4. Endocavity Ultrasound Probe Manipulators

    PubMed Central

    Stoianovici, Dan; Kim, Chunwoo; Schäfer, Felix; Huang, Chien-Ming; Zuo, Yihe; Petrisor, Doru; Han, Misop

    2014-01-01

    We developed two similar structure manipulators for medical endocavity ultrasound probes with 3 and 4 degrees of freedom (DoF). These robots allow scanning with ultrasound for 3-D imaging and enable robot-assisted image-guided procedures. Both robots use remote center of motion kinematics, characteristic of medical robots. The 4-DoF robot provides unrestricted manipulation of the endocavity probe. With the 3-DoF robot the insertion motion of the probe must be adjusted manually, but the device is simpler and may also be used to manipulate external-body probes. The robots enabled a novel surgical approach of using intraoperative image-based navigation during robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP), performed with concurrent use of two robotic systems (Tandem, T-RALP). Thus far, a clinical trial for evaluation of safety and feasibility has been performed successfully on 46 patients. This paper describes the architecture and design of the robots, the two prototypes, control features related to safety, preclinical experiments, and the T-RALP procedure. PMID:24795525

  5. Experimenting with Temperature Probes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Wolff-Michael

    1989-01-01

    Presented are four activities which are designed to familiarize children with the multiple uses of computers and help them learn about heat and temperature using temperature probes. Included are the tempering effect of water, heat capacity, caloric content of foods, and weather. Hardware and software are discussed. (CW)

  6. Probing the Solar System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, John

    2013-01-01

    Humans have always had the vision to one day live on other planets. This vision existed even before the first person was put into orbit. Since the early space missions of putting humans into orbit around Earth, many advances have been made in space technology. We have now sent many space probes deep into the Solar system to explore the planets and…

  7. Laboratory plasma probe studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heikkila, W. J.

    1975-01-01

    Diagnostic experiments performed in a collisionless plasma using CO2 as the working gas are described. In particular, simultaneous measurements that have been performed by means of Langmuir- and RF-probes are presented. A resonance occurring above the parallel resonance in the frequency characteristic of a two electrode system is interpreted as being due to the resonant excitation of electroacoustic waves.

  8. Atmospheric pressure solid analysis probe coupled to quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry as a tool for screening and semi-quantitative approach of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and oxo-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in complex matrices.

    PubMed

    Carrizo, Daniel; Domeño, Celia; Nerín, Isabel; Alfaro, Pilar; Nerín, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    A new screening and semi-quantitative approach has been developed for direct analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their nitro and oxo derivatives in environmental and biological matrices using atmospheric pressure solid analysis probe (ASAP) quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry (Q-TOF-MS). The instrumental parameters were optimized for the analysis of all these compounds, without previous sample treatment, in soil, motor oil, atmospheric particles (ashes) and biological samples such as urine and saliva of smokers and non-smokers. Ion source parameters in the MS were found to be the key parameters, with little variation within PAHs families. The optimized corona current was 4 µA, sample cone voltage 80 V for PAHs, nitro-PAHs and oxo-PAHs, while the desolvation temperatures varied from 300°C to 500°C. The analytical method performance was checked using a certified reference material. Two deuterated compounds were used as internal standards for semi-quantitative purposes together with the pure individual standard for each compound and the corresponding calibration plot. The compounds nitro PAH 9-nitroanthracene and oxo-PAH 1,4-naphthalenedione, were found in saliva and urine in a range below 1 µg/g while the range of PAHs in these samples was below 2 µg/g. Environmental samples provided higher concentration of all pollutants than urine and saliva.

  9. Electromagnetic treatment of the multipole resonance probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapke, Martin; Mussenbrock, Thomas; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter

    2009-10-01

    We present an electromagnetic model of the ``multipole resonance probe'' (MRP)-- a diagnostic concept which enables the simultaneous determination of plasma density, electron temperature, and collision rate in low-pressure gas discharges. The MRP is a radio-frequency driven probe of particular spherical design. In an idealized version the probe consists of two dielectrically shielded, conducting hemispheres. Driven by a radio-frequency source, the hemispheres are powered symmetrically. An analysis of the absorption spectrum shows a multitude of resonances, which allows for an analytical evaluation of the measured signal. The signal provides information on the distribution of the plasma in the probe's vicinity, from which the values of electron density, electron temperature and collision rate can be inferred. In this contribution the MRP will be modeled electromagnetically. Based on a comparision between full electromagnetic and electrostatic treatment, we show that a previously presented electrostatic treatment [1] was well justified.[4pt] [1] M.Lapke et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 93, 051502 (2008)

  10. Calibration Fixture For Anemometer Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Charles R.; Nagel, Robert T.

    1993-01-01

    Fixture facilitates calibration of three-dimensional sideflow thermal anemometer probes. With fixture, probe oriented at number of angles throughout its design range. Readings calibrated as function of orientation in airflow. Calibration repeatable and verifiable.

  11. Heavy ion beam probing

    SciTech Connect

    Hickok, R L

    1980-07-01

    This report consists of the notes distributed to the participants at the IEEE Mini-Course on Modern Plasma Diagnostics that was held in Madison, Wisconsin in May 1980. It presents an overview of Heavy Ion Beam Probing that briefly describes the principles and discuss the types of measurements that can be made. The problems associated with implementing beam probes are noted, possible variations are described, estimated costs of present day systems, and the scaling requirements for large plasma devices are presented. The final chapter illustrates typical results that have been obtained on a variety of plasma devices. No detailed calculations are included in the report, but a list of references that will provide more detailed information is included.

  12. Probing Massive Star Cluster Formation with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Kelsey

    2015-08-01

    Observationally constraining the physical conditions that give rise to massive star clusters has been a long-standing challenge. Now with the ALMA Observatory coming on-line, we can finally begin to probe the birth environments of massive clusters in a variety of galaxies with sufficient angular resolution. In this talk I will give an overview of ALMA observations of galaxies in which candidate proto-super star cluster molecular clouds have been identified. These new data probe the physical conditions that give rise to super star clusters, providing information on their densities, pressures, and temperatures. In particular, the observations indicate that these clouds may be subject to external pressures of P/k > 108 K cm-3, which is consistent with the prevalence of optically observed adolescent super star clusters in interacting galaxy systems and other high pressure environments. ALMA observations also enable an assessement of the molecular cloud chemical abundances in the regions surrounding super star clusters. Molecular clouds associated with existing super star clusters are strongly correlated with HCO+ emission, but appear to have relatively low ratio of CO/HCO+ emission compared to other clouds, indicating that the super star clusters are impacting the molecular abundances in their vicinity.

  13. Gravity Probe B Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The space vehicle Gravity Probe B (GP-B) is the relativity experiment developed at Stanford University to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. The experiment will measure, very precisely, the expected tiny changes in the direction of the spin axes of four gyroscopes contained in an Earth-orbiting satellite at a 400-mile altitude. So free are the gyroscopes from disturbance that they will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. They will measure how space and time are very slightly warped by the presence of the Earth, and, more profoundly, how the Earth's rotation very slightly drags space-time around with it. These effects, though small for the Earth, have far-reaching implications for the nature of matter and the structure of the Universe. GP-B is among the most thoroughly researched programs ever undertaken by NASA. This is the story of a scientific quest in which physicists and engineers have collaborated closely over many years. Inspired by their quest, they have invented a whole range of technologies that are already enlivening other branches of science and engineering. In this photograph, engineer Gary Reynolds is inspecting the inside of the probe neck during probe thermal repairs. GP-B is scheduled for launch in April 2004 and managed for NASA by the Marshall Space Flight Center. Development of the GP-B is the responsibility of Stanford University along with major subcontractor Lockheed Martin Corporation. (Image credit to Russ Leese, Gravity Probe B, Stanford University)

  14. Space Probe Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Managed by Marshall Space Flight Center, the Space Tug was a reusable multipurpose space vehicle designed to transport payloads to different orbital inclinations. Utilizing mission-specific combinations of its three primary modules (crew, propulsion, and cargo) and a variety of supplementary kits, the Space Tug was capable of numerous space applications. This 1970 artist's concept depicts the Tug's propulsion module launching a space probe into lunar orbit.

  15. Icing Sensor Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, Edward; Kok, Gregory L.

    2002-01-01

    Aircraft icing is a serious safety problem for the general aviation and some commuter transport airplanes. There has been tremendous growth in the commuter aviation industry in the last few years, Since these type of aircraft generally operate at lower altitudes they consequently spend a far greater proportion of their time operating in icing conditions. For the past thirty years airborne and ground based facilities have relied primarily on two types of cloud physics instrumentation to measure the characteristics of icing clouds: hot wire liquid water content probes and laser based particle sizing probes for the measurement of water droplet size. The instrumentation is severely limited by the technology that was developed during the 1970's and is quite large in size. The goal of this research is to develop one instrument with a wide bandwidth, better response time, higher resolution, user selectability, and small and lightweight. NASA Glenn Research Center, Droplet Measurement Technology, and Meteorology Society of Canada have developed a collaborative effort to develop such an instrument. This paper describes the development and test results of the prototype Icing Sensor Probe.

  16. Einstein Inflationary Probe (EIP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinshaw, Gary

    2004-01-01

    I will discuss plans to develop a concept for the Einstein Inflation Probe: a mission to detect gravity waves from inflation via the unique signature they impart to the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization. A sensitive CMB polarization satellite may be the only way to probe physics at the grand-unified theory (GUT) scale, exceeding by 12 orders of magnitude the energies studied at the Large Hadron Collider. A detection of gravity waves would represent a remarkable confirmation of the inflationary paradigm and set the energy scale at which inflation occurred when the universe was a fraction of a second old. Even a strong upper limit to the gravity wave amplitude would be significant, ruling out many common models of inflation, and pointing to inflation occurring at much lower energy, if at all. Measuring gravity waves via the CMB polarization will be challenging. We will undertake a comprehensive study to identify the critical scientific requirements for the mission and their derived instrumental performance requirements. At the core of the study will be an assessment of what is scientifically and experimentally optimal within the scope and purpose of the Einstein Inflation Probe.

  17. Nanoscale thermal probing

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Yanan; Wang, Xinwei

    2012-01-01

    Nanoscale novel devices have raised the demand for nanoscale thermal characterization that is critical for evaluating the device performance and durability. Achieving nanoscale spatial resolution and high accuracy in temperature measurement is very challenging due to the limitation of measurement pathways. In this review, we discuss four methodologies currently developed in nanoscale surface imaging and temperature measurement. To overcome the restriction of the conventional methods, the scanning thermal microscopy technique is widely used. From the perspective of measuring target, the optical feature size method can be applied by using either Raman or fluorescence thermometry. The near-field optical method that measures nanoscale temperature by focusing the optical field to a nano-sized region provides a non-contact and non-destructive way for nanoscale thermal probing. Although the resistance thermometry based on nano-sized thermal sensors is possible for nanoscale thermal probing, significant effort is still needed to reduce the size of the current sensors by using advanced fabrication techniques. At the same time, the development of nanoscale imaging techniques, such as fluorescence imaging, provides a great potential solution to resolve the nanoscale thermal probing problem. PMID:22419968

  18. Kinetic Description of the Impedance Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberrath, Jens; Lapke, Martin; Mussenbrock, Thomas; Brinkmann, Ralf

    2011-10-01

    Active plasma resonance spectroscopy is a well known diagnostic method. Many concepts of this method are theoretically investigated and realized as a diagnostic tool, one of which is the impedance probe (IP). The application of such a probe in plasmas with pressures of a few Pa raises the question whether kinetic effects have to be taken into account or not. To address this question a kinetic model is necessary. A general kinetic model for an electrostatic concept of active plasma spectroscopy was presented by R.P. Brinkmann and can be used to describe the multipole resonance probe (MRP). In principle the IP is interpretable as a special case of the MRP in lower order. Thus, we are able to describe the IP by the kinetic model of the MRP. Based on this model we derive a solution to investigate the influence of kinetic effects to the resonance behavior of the IP. Active plasma resonance spectroscopy is a well known diagnostic method. Many concepts of this method are theoretically investigated and realized as a diagnostic tool, one of which is the impedance probe (IP). The application of such a probe in plasmas with pressures of a few Pa raises the question whether kinetic effects have to be taken into account or not. To address this question a kinetic model is necessary. A general kinetic model for an electrostatic concept of active plasma spectroscopy was presented by R.P. Brinkmann and can be used to describe the multipole resonance probe (MRP). In principle the IP is interpretable as a special case of the MRP in lower order. Thus, we are able to describe the IP by the kinetic model of the MRP. Based on this model we derive a solution to investigate the influence of kinetic effects to the resonance behavior of the IP. The authors acknowledge the support by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) via the Ruhr University Research School and the Federal Ministry of Education and Research in frame of the PluTO project.

  19. Probing cell mechanical properties with microfluidic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowat, Amy

    2012-02-01

    Exploiting flow on the micron-scale is emerging as a method to probe cell mechanical properties with 10-1000x advances in throughput over existing technologies. The mechanical properties of cells and the cell nucleus are implicated in a wide range of biological contexts: for example, the ability of white blood cells to deform is central to immune response; and malignant cells show decreased stiffness compared to benign cells. We recently developed a microfluidic device to probe cell and nucleus mechanical properties: cells are forced to deform through a narrow constrictions in response to an applied pressure; flowing cells through a series of constrictions enables us to probe the ability of hundreds of cells to deform and relax during flow. By tuning the constriction width so it is narrower than the width of the cell nucleus, we can specifically probe the effects of nuclear physical properties on whole cell deformability. We show that the nucleus is the rate-limiting step in cell passage: inducing a change in its shape to a multilobed structure results in cells that transit more quickly; increased levels of lamin A, a nuclear protein that is key for nuclear shape and mechanical stability, impairs the passage of cells through constrictions. We are currently developing a new class of microfluidic devices to simultaneously probe the deformability of hundreds of cell samples in parallel. Using the same soft lithography techniques, membranes are fabricated to have well-defined pore distribution, width, length, and tortuosity. We design the membranes to interface with a multiwell plate, enabling simultaneous measurement of hundreds of different samples. Given the wide spectrum of diseases where altered cell and nucleus mechanical properties are implicated, such a platform has great potential, for example, to screen cells based on their mechanical phenotype against a library of drugs.

  20. Nine New Fluorescent Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tsung-I.; Jovanovic, Misa V.; Dowben, Robert M.

    1989-06-01

    Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic studies are reported here for nine new fluorescent probes recently synthesized in our laboratories: four pyrene derivatives with substituents of (i) 1,3-diacetoxy-6,8-dichlorosulfonyl, (ii) 1,3-dihydroxy-6,8-disodiumsulfonate, (iii) 1,3-disodiumsulfonate, and (iv) l-ethoxy-3,6,8-trisodiumsulfonate groups, and five [7-julolidino] coumarin derivatives with substituents of (v) 3-carboxylate-4-methyl, (vi) 3- methylcarboxylate, (vii) 3-acetate-4-methyl, (viii) 3-propionate-4-methyl, and (ix) 3-sulfonate-4-methyl groups. Pyrene compounds i and ii and coumarin compounds v and vi exhibit interesting absorbance and fluorescence properties: their absorption maxima are red shifted compared to the parent compound to the blue-green region, and the band width broadens considerably. All four blue-absorbing dyes fluoresce intensely in the green region, and the two pyrene compounds emit at such long wavelengths without formation of excimers. The fluorescence properties of these compounds are quite environment-sensitive: considerable spectral shifts and fluorescence intensity changes have been observed in the pH range from 3 to 10 and in a wide variety of polar and hydrophobic solvents with vastly different dielectric constants. The high extinction and fluorescence quantum yield of these probes make them ideal fluorescent labeling reagents for proteins, antibodies, nucleic acids, and cellular organelles. The pH and hydrophobicity-dependent fluorescence changes can be utilized as optical pH and/or hydrophobicity indicators for mapping environmental difference in various cellular components in a single cell. Since all nine probes absorb in the UV, but emit at different wavelengths in the visible, these two groups of compounds offer an advantage of utilizing a single monochromatic light source (e.g., a nitrogen laser) to achieve multi-wavelength detection for flow cytometry application. As a first step to explore potential application in

  1. Comparative evaluation of probing depth and clinical attachment level using a manual probe and Florida probe

    PubMed Central

    Kour, Amandeep; Kumar, Ashish; Puri, Komal; Khatri, Manish; Bansal, Mansi; Gupta, Geeti

    2016-01-01

    Background: To compare and evaluate the intra- and inter-examiner efficacy and reproducibility of the first-generation manual (Williams) probe and the third-generation Florida probe in terms of measuring pocket probing depth (PD) and clinical attachment level (CAL). Materials and Methods: Forty subjects/4000 sites were included in this comparative, cross-sectional study. Group- and site-wise categorizations were done. Based on gingival index, PD, and CAL, patients were divided into four groups, i.e., periodontally healthy, gingivitis, mild to moderate periodontitis, and severe periodontitis. Further, based on these parameters, a total of 4000 sites, with 1000 sites in each category randomly selected from these 40 patients, were taken. Full mouth PD and CAL measurements were recorded with two probes, by Examiner 1 and on Ramfjord teeth by Examiner 2. Results: Full mouth and Ramfjord teeth group- and site-wise PD obtained with the manual probe by both the examiners were statistically significantly deeper than that obtained with the Florida probe. The full mouth and Ramfjord teeth mean CAL measurement by Florida probe was higher as compared to manual probe in mild to moderate periodontitis group and sites, whereas in severe periodontitis group and sites, manual probe recorded higher CAL as compared to Florida probe. Conclusion: Mean PD and CAL measurements were deeper with the manual probe as compared to the Florida probe in all the groups and sites, except for the mild-moderate periodontitis group and sites where the CAL measurements with the manual probe were less than the Florida probe. Manual probe was more reproducible and showed less interexaminer variability as compared to the Florida probe. PMID:27563204

  2. COTS MEMS Flow-Measurement Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redding, Chip; Smith, Floyd A.; Blank, Greg; Cruzan, Charles

    2004-01-01

    As an alternative to conventional tubing instrumentation for measuring airflow, designers and technicians at Glenn Research Center have been fabricating packaging components and assembling a set of unique probes that contain commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) sensor chips. MEMS sensor chips offer some compelling advantages over standard macroscopic measurement devices. MEMS sensor technology has matured through mass production and use in the automotive and aircraft industries. At present, MEMS are the devices of choice for sensors in such applications as tire-pressure monitors, altimeters, pneumatic controls, cable leak detectors, and consumer appliances. Compactness, minimality of power demand, rugged construction, and moderate cost all contribute to making MEMS sensors attractive for instrumentation for future research. Conventional macroscopic flow-measurement instrumentation includes tubes buried beneath the aerodynamic surfaces of wind-tunnel models or in wind-tunnel walls. Pressure is introduced at the opening of each such tube. The pressure must then travel along the tube before reaching a transducer that generates an electronic signal. The lengths of such tubes typically range from 20 ft (approx.= 6 m) to hundreds of feet (of the order of 100 m). The propagation of pressure signals in the tubes damps the signals considerably and makes it necessary to delay measurements until after test rigs have reached steady-state operation. In contrast, a MEMS pressure sensor that generates electronic output can take readings continuously under dynamic conditions in nearly real time. In order to use stainless-steel tubing for pressure measurements, it is necessary to clean many tubes, cut them to length, carefully install them, delicately deburr them, and splice them. A cluster of a few hundred 1/16-in.- (approx.=1.6-mm-) diameter tubes (such clusters are common in research testing facilities) can be several inches (of the order of 10

  3. Carbon granule probe microphone for leak detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthasarathy, S. P.

    1985-02-01

    A microphone which is not subject to corrosion is provided by employing carbon granules to sense sound waves. The granules are packed into a ceramic tube and no diaphragm is used. A pair of electrodes is located in the tube adjacent the carbon granules and are coupled to a sensing circuit. Sound waves cause pressure changes on the carbon granules which results in a change in resistance in the electrical path between the electrodes. This change in resistance is detected by the sensing circuit. The microphone is suitable for use as a leak detection probe in recovery boilers, where it provides reliable operation without corrosion problems associated with conventional microphones.

  4. Pressure sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Mee, David K.; Ripley, Edward B.; Nienstedt, Zachary C.; Nienstedt, Alex W.; Howell, Jr., Layton N.

    2015-09-29

    Disclosed is a passive, in-situ pressure sensor. The sensor includes a sensing element having a ferromagnetic metal and a tension inducing mechanism coupled to the ferromagnetic metal. The tension inducing mechanism is operable to change a tensile stress upon the ferromagnetic metal based on a change in pressure in the sensing element. Changes in pressure are detected based on changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal when subjected to an alternating magnetic field caused by the change in the tensile stress. The sensing element is embeddable in a closed system for detecting pressure changes without the need for any penetrations of the system for power or data acquisition by detecting changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal caused by the tensile stress.

  5. Peer Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... and behaviors. This is often positive — it's human nature to listen to and learn from other people ... Responding to peer pressure is part of human nature — but some people are more likely to give ...

  6. Pressure Drop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Mike

    2010-01-01

    Mike Lawson briefly discussed pressure drop for aerospace applications and presented short stories about adventures experienced while working at NASA and General Dynamics, including exposure to technologies like the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) cart and the SWME.

  7. Pressure and Magnetics Measurements of Single and Merged Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messer, S.; Case, A.; Brockington, S.; Bomgardner, R.; Witherspoon, F. D.

    2010-11-01

    We present pressure and magnetic data from both a single full scale coaxial gun and from the merging of jets from several minirailguns. The magnetic probes measure all three components of field, and include an array of probes inside the coaxial gun. Magnetic measurements beyond the muzzle of the gun show the scale of currents trapped in the plasma plume. The pressure probe measures adiabatic stagnation pressure and shows how this quantity decreases with distance from the gun as well as the changes in stagnation pressure through the merge process. Stagnation pressure is influenced by density, temperature, and velocity, and serves as a check on spectroscopic and interferometer measurements. Unlike optical measurements, stagnation pressure is taken at a definite location. These guns are early prototypes of guns to be installed on the Plasma Liner eXperiment at LANL. The jet-merging results are reviewed in the context of what is expected for PLX.

  8. Probabilistic and Other Neural Nets in Multi-Hole Probe Calibration and Flow Angularity Pattern Recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baskaran, Subbiah; Ramachandran, Narayanan; Noever, David

    1998-01-01

    The use of probabilistic (PNN) and multilayer feed forward (MLFNN) neural networks are investigated for calibration of multi-hole pressure probes and the prediction of associated flow angularity patterns in test flow fields. Both types of networks are studied in detail for their calibration and prediction characteristics. The current formalism can be applied to any multi-hole probe, however the test results for the most commonly used five-hole Cone and Prism probe types alone are reported in this article.

  9. Test of a new tip material for Langmuir probe diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naz, M. Y.; Shukrullah, S.; Ghaffar, A.; Rehman, N. U.; Khan, Y.

    2016-03-01

    The objective of the work is to test a nickel-chrome alloy as a probe tip material for characterization of discharge plasmas. In order to meet the objective, a symmetric triple Langmuir probe diagnostic system and an associated driving circuit are designed and tested in an inductively coupled plasma generated by a 13.56-MHz radio frequency source coupled with an automated impedance match network. This probe is used to measure the electron temperature, electron number density, and ion saturation current as functions of the input power of the radio frequency source and the filling gas pressure. An increasing trend is noticed in the electron temperature and electron number density with an increase in the input power, whilst a decreasing trend is evident in these parameters with an increase in the nitrogen gas pressure. The overall inaccuracies in electron temperature and electron number density measurements are 5-12% and 3-13%, respectively.

  10. Science Rationale for Jupiter Entry Probe as Part of JIMO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, R. E.; Spilker, T. R.

    2003-01-01

    A Jupiter atmospheric entry probe as part of JIMO is a cost effective way to address fundamental science questions identified in the National Research Council Solar System Exploration Decadal Survey (SSEDS): New Frontiers in the Solar System, An Integrated Ex- ploration Strategy. Compared to either the cost of an entirely separate Jupiter mission, or the cost of JIMO itself, inclusion of such a probe on JIMO would be cost advantageous. The probe itself could be relatively simple, and could build on the Galileo Probe heritage. The SSEDS specifically identified the distribution of water across the Solar System as a Key Scientific Question. Correspondingly, knowing the water abun dance on Jupiter is fundamental to understanding almost every aspect of the evolution of the early solar nebula. The Galileo Probe obtained the abundance of several key elements in Jupiter's atmosphere, which data have already caused major rethinking of theories of how Jupiter formed and how the early solar nebula evolved. However, because of a combination of circumstances, the global abundance of the key element oxygen, in the form of water, was not obtained. Without knowledge of the jovian water abundance, further progress in understanding Solar System evolution and planet formation will be greatly inhibited. Therefore, quantifying jovian water abundance should be a goal of the very next mission to the jovian system. Such a measurement would be impossible via remote sensing from the JIMO orbiter because of the large distances the JIMO orbiter maintains from Jupiter. A Jupiter atmospheric entry probe as part of JIMO could achieve the fundamental water measurement. In order that a probe avoid repeating the Galileo probe's experience of failing to obtain the jovian water abundance, the probe should go deep, to at least 100 bars pressure. Probes to 100 bars have been accomplished many times in descending to the surface of Venus, and at 100 bars the temperature of the jovian atmosphere is 60

  11. PRESSURE TRANSDUCER

    DOEpatents

    Sander, H.H.

    1959-10-01

    A pressure or mechanical force transducer particularly adaptable to miniature telemetering systems is described. Basically the device consists of a transistor located within a magnetic field adapted to change in response to mechanical force. The conduction characteristics of the transistor in turn vary proportionally with changes in the magnetic flux across the transistor such that the output (either frequency of amplitude) of the transistor circuit is proportional to mechanical force or pressure.

  12. Pressure regulator

    DOEpatents

    Ebeling, Jr., Robert W.; Weaver, Robert B.

    1979-01-01

    The pressure within a pressurized flow reactor operated under harsh environmental conditions is controlled by establishing and maintaining a fluidized bed of uniformly sized granular material of selected density by passing the gas from the reactor upwardly therethrough at a rate sufficient to fluidize the bed and varying the height of the bed by adding granular material thereto or removing granular material therefrom to adjust the backpressure on the flow reactor.

  13. Embrittlement of RPV steels; An atom probe tomography perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Michael K; Russell, Kaye F

    2007-01-01

    Atom probe tomography has played a key role in the understanding of the embrittlement of neutron irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels through the atomic level characterization of the microstructure. Atom probe tomography has been used to demonstrate the importance of the post weld stress relief treatment in reducing the matrix copper content in high copper alloys, the formation of {approx}-nm-diameter copper-, nickel-, manganese- and silicon-enriched precipitates during neutron irradiation in copper containing RPV steels, and the coarsening of these precipitates during post irradiation heat treatments. Atom probe tomography has been used to detect {approx}2-nm-diameter nickel-, silicon- and manganese-enriched clusters in neutron irradiated low copper and copper free alloys. Atom probe tomography has also been used to quantify solute segregation to, and precipitation on, dislocations and grain boundaries.

  14. Flexible high-temperature pH probe

    DOEpatents

    Bielawski, John C.; Outwater, John O.; Halbfinger, George P.

    2003-04-22

    A flexible pH probe device is provided for use in hot water and other high temperature environments up to about 590.degree. F. The pH probe includes a flexible, inert tubular probe member, an oxygen anion conducting, solid state electrolyte plug located at the distal end of the tubular member, oxide powder disposed at the distal end of the tubular member; a metal wire extending along the tubular member and having a distal end in contact with the oxide powder so as to form therewith an internal reference electrode; and a compression fitting forming a pressure boundary seal around a portion of the tubular member remote from the distal end thereof. Preferably, the tubular member is made of polytetrafluoroethylene, and the solid state electrolyte plug is made of stabilized zirconia. The flexibility of the probe member enables placement of the electrode into the area of interest, including around corners, into confined areas and the like.

  15. Metrological scanning probe microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorozhovets, N.; Hausotte, T.; Manske, E.; Jäger, G.; Hofmann, N.

    2006-04-01

    Today's technological progress calls for metrologically accurate object measurement, positioning and scanning with nanometre precision and over large measuring ranges. In order to meet that requirement a nanopositioning and nanomeasuring machine (NPM machine) was developed at the Institute of Process Measurement and Sensor Technology of the Technische Universitaet Ilmenau. This device is capable of highly exact long-range positioning and measurement of objects with a resolution of less than 0.1 nm. Due to the structure of the machine many different probe systems can be installed, including scanning probe microscopes (SPMs). A few SPMs have outstanding metrological characteristics and many commercial microscopes only perform as image acquisition tools. Commercial SPMs use piezoelectric actuators in order to move either the sample or the probe. The position measurement sometimes results from the applied voltage to the piezoelectric actuators or from the strain gauge or capacitive displacement sensor data. This means that they suffer from hysteresis, creep, nonlinear characteristics and Abbe offsets. For an accurate measurement the position of the cantilever must be measured in addition to the torsion and bending. The best solution is a combined detection system with a single laser beam. This system has been realized with a special interferometer system, in which the measuring beam is focused on the cantilever backside using a lens. The reflected beam is split with a part being detected by a quadrant photo-diode and the other part being fed back into the interferometer for position measurement. The quadrant photo-diode is used to detect the cantilever torsion and bending.

  16. Vacuum probe surface sampler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahlava, B. A. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A vacuum probe surface sampler is described for rapidly sampling relatively large surface areas which possess relatively light loading densities of micro-organism, drug particles or the like. A vacuum head with a hollow handle connected to a suitable vacuum source is frictionally attached to a cone assembly terminating in a flared tip adapted to be passed over the surface to be sampled. A fine mesh screen carried by the vacuum head provides support for a membrane filter which collects the microorganisms or other particles. The head assembly is easily removed from the cone assembly without contacting the cone assembly with human hands.

  17. Experimental probes of axions

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Aaron S.; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    Experimental searches for axions or axion-like particles rely on semiclassical phenomena resulting from the postulated coupling of the axion to two photons. Sensitive probes of the extremely small coupling constant can be made by exploiting familiar, coherent electromagnetic laboratory techniques, including resonant enhancement of transitions using microwave and optical cavities, Bragg scattering, and coherent photon-axion oscillations. The axion beam may either be astrophysical in origin as in the case of dark matter axion searches and solar axion searches, or created in the laboratory from laser interactions with magnetic fields. This note is meant to be a sampling of recent experimental results.

  18. Atom Probe Tomography 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Thomas F.; Larson, David J.

    2012-08-01

    In the world of tomographic imaging, atom probe tomography (APT) occupies the high-spatial-resolution end of the spectrum. It is highly complementary to electron tomography and is applicable to a wide range of materials. The current state of APT is reviewed. Emphasis is placed on applications and data analysis as they apply to many fields of research and development including metals, semiconductors, ceramics, and organic materials. We also provide a brief review of the history and the instrumentation associated with APT and an assessment of the existing challenges in the field.

  19. A new algorithm for five-hole probe calibration, data reduction, and uncertainty analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichert, Bruce A.; Wendt, Bruce J.

    1994-01-01

    A new algorithm for five-hole probe calibration and data reduction using a non-nulling method is developed. The significant features of the algorithm are: (1) two components of the unit vector in the flow direction replace pitch and yaw angles as flow direction variables; and (2) symmetry rules are developed that greatly simplify Taylor's series representations of the calibration data. In data reduction, four pressure coefficients allow total pressure, static pressure, and flow direction to be calculated directly. The new algorithm's simplicity permits an analytical treatment of the propagation of uncertainty in five-hole probe measurement. The objectives of the uncertainty analysis are to quantify uncertainty of five-hole results (e.g., total pressure, static pressure, and flow direction) and determine the dependence of the result uncertainty on the uncertainty of all underlying experimental and calibration measurands. This study outlines a general procedure that other researchers may use to determine five-hole probe result uncertainty and provides guidance to improve measurement technique. The new algorithm is applied to calibrate and reduce data from a rake of five-hole probes. Here, ten individual probes are mounted on a single probe shaft and used simultaneously. Use of this probe is made practical by the simplicity afforded by this algorithm.

  20. Flight calibration of compensated and uncompensated pitot-static airspeed probes and application of the probes to supersonic cruise vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, L. D.; Washington, H. P.

    1972-01-01

    Static pressure position error calibrations for a compensated and an uncompensated XB-70 nose boom pitot static probe were obtained in flight. The methods (Pacer, acceleration-deceleration, and total temperature) used to obtain the position errors over a Mach number range from 0.5 to 3.0 and an altitude range from 25,000 feet to 70,000 feet are discussed. The error calibrations are compared with the position error determined from wind tunnel tests, theoretical analysis, and a standard NACA pitot static probe. Factors which influence position errors, such as angle of attack, Reynolds number, probe tip geometry, static orifice location, and probe shape, are discussed. Also included are examples showing how the uncertainties caused by position errors can affect the inlet controls and vertical altitude separation of a supersonic transport.

  1. Dust Particle Probes in a Complex Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglass, Angela; Hyde, Truell; Matthews, Lorin; Pope, Michael; Smith, Bernard

    2009-11-01

    In dusty plasma experiments within a GEC rf reference cell, the confining potential is generally assumed to be parabolic. The validity of this assumption can be tested in a number of ways. One noninvasive method is to utilize the particles themselves as system probes. In this experiment a cw laser (0.1-5W, 532nm) was used to apply a radiation pressure force on a single MF particle. The particle's trajectory while the laser was on and off was recorded and the confining potential calculated. System power, pressure, DC bias, and cutout size of the plate placed on the powered electrode were varied in order to better understand their effects on the shape of the confining potential.

  2. Fiber optic current probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyntjes, G.; Fox, R.

    1984-02-01

    This report documents the results of Phase 1 research into a new type of Fiber Optic Current probe, suitable for high voltage, high current applications. The probe uses a stabilized two frequency HeNe laser to read the magnitude and sign of magnetic field induced circular birefringence in an optical fiber wound around a conductor. Measurements of both alternating and direct currents were demonstrated with a breadboard system. The system was tested at low voltages with currents of up to 4500 amperes peak and with up to 28 turns of optical fiber around the conductor. The response was found to increase linearly with the number of fiber turns. Experimental determinations of the system's frequency response and dynamic range were not possible due to our inability to generate large, fast current transients. The predicted frequency response is 100 kHz with an ability to read transient amplitudes of 300 times the nominal line current. Several single-mode fibers were used to form transducers, and the optimum fiber for further development was identified. The 2-frequency interrogation technique described worked entirely as predicted, and should be applicable to magnetic field measurements in general (i.e., charged particle beams, Tokamaks, antenna patterns, EMP testing, etc.).

  3. Galileo Space Probe News Conference. Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) video release presents Part 1 of a press conference regarding the successful entry of the Galileo Space Probe into Jupiter's atmosphere. The press conference panel is comprised of twelve principal investigators and project scientists that oversee the Galileo mission. Among these panelists, William J. O'Neil (Jet Propulsion Lab.) begins the video praising all of the scientists that worked on the orbiter mission. He then presents a visual overview of Galileo's overall mission trajectory and schedule. Marcie Smith (NASA Ames Research Center) then describes the Galileo Probe mission and the overall engineering and data acquisition aspects of the Probe's Jupiter atmospheric entry. Dr. Richard Young (NASA Ames Research Center) follows with a brief scientific overview, describing the measurements of the atmospheric composition as well as the instruments that were used to gather the data. Atmospheric pressure, temperature, density, and radiation levels of Jupiter were among the most important parameters measured. It is explained that these measurements would be helpful in determining among other things, the overall dynamic meteorology of Jupiter. A question and answer period follows the individual presentations. Atmospheric thermal structure, water abundances, wind profiles, radiation, cloud structure, chemical composition, and electricity are among the topics discussed. Parts 2 and 3 of the press conference can be found in document numbers NONP-NASA-VT-2000001074, and NONP-NASA-VT-2000001075.

  4. Monitoring the impact of pressure on the assessment of skin perfusion and oxygenation using a novel pressure device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.; Ho, Thuan; Le, Du; Ghassemi, Pejhman; Nguyen, Thu; Lichy, Alison; Groah, Suzanne

    2013-03-01

    Skin perfusion and oxygenation is easily disrupted by imposed pressure. Fiber optics probes, particularly those spectroscopy or Doppler based, may relay misleading information about tissue microcirculation dynamics depending on external forces on the sensor. Such forces could be caused by something as simple as tape used to secure the fiber probe to the test subject, or as in our studies by the full weight of a patient with spinal cord injury (SCI) sitting on the probe. We are conducting a study on patients with SCI conducting pressure relief maneuvers in their wheelchairs. This study aims to provide experimental evidence of the optimal timing between pressure relief maneuvers. We have devised a wireless pressure-controlling device; a pressure sensor positioned on a compression aluminum plate reads the imposed pressure in real time and sends the information to a feedback system controlling two position actuators. The actuators move accordingly to maintain a preset value of pressure onto the sample. This apparatus was used to monitor the effect of increasing values of pressure on spectroscopic fiber probes built to monitor tissue oxygenation and Doppler probes used to assess tissue perfusion.

  5. High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... version High Blood Pressure Overview What is blood pressure? Blood pressure is the amount of force that your ... called your blood pressure. What is high blood pressure? High blood pressure (also called hypertension) occurs when your blood ...

  6. Pressure-Measuring Diaphragm Transmits Optical Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Arthur J.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed sapphire diaphragm performs two functions in instrumented research engine or pressure vessel. Serves both as pressure sensor and as window for observation, optical probing, or optical transmission of other measurements. Deflections of sapphire diaphragm alters resistances of strain gauges mounted around its periphery. At same time, transparent material enables optical measurements of conditions in chamber. Additional information obtained about conditions in chamber without need for additional sensor mounts.

  7. Development and application of multiple-probe scanning probe microscopes.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Tomonobu; Kubo, Osamu; Shingaya, Yoshitaka; Higuchi, Seiji; Hasegawa, Tsuyoshi; Jiang, Chun-Sheng; Okuda, Taichi; Kuwahara, Yuji; Takami, Kazuhiro; Aono, Masakazu

    2012-04-01

    In the research of advanced materials based on nanoscience and nanotechnology, it is often desirable to measure nanoscale local electrical conductivity at a designated position of a given sample. For this purpose, multiple-probe scanning probe microscopes (MP-SPMs), in which two, three or four scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or atomic force microscope (AFM) probes are operated independently, have been developed. Each probe in an MP-SPM is used not only for observing high-resolution STM or AFM images but also for forming an electrical contact enabling nanoscale local electrical conductivity measurement. The world's first double-probe STM (DP-STM) developed by the authors, which was subsequently modified to a triple-probe STM (TP-STM), has been used to measure the conductivities of one-dimensional metal nanowires and carbon nanotubes and also two-dimensional molecular films. A quadruple-probe STM (QP-STM) has also been developed and used to measure the conductivity of two-dimensional molecular films without the ambiguity of contact resistance between the probe and sample. Moreover, a quadruple-probe AFM (QP-AFM) with four conductive tuning-fork-type self-detection force sensing probes has been developed to measure the conductivity of a nanostructure on an insulating substrate. A general-purpose computer software to control four probes at the same time has also been developed and used in the operation of the QP-AFM. These developments and applications of MP-SPMs are reviewed in this paper.

  8. Development and Application of Multiple-Probe Scanning Probe Microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, T.; Kubo, O.; Shingaya, Y.; Higuchi, S.; Hasegawa, T.; Jiang, C. S.; Okuda, T.; Kuwahara, Y.; Takami, K.; Aono, M.

    2012-04-03

    the research of advanced materials based on nanoscience and nanotechnology, it is often desirable to measure nanoscale local electrical conductivity at a designated position of a given sample. For this purpose, multiple-probe scanning probe microscopes (MP-SPMs), in which two, three or four scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or atomic force microscope (AFM) probes are operated independently, have been developed. Each probe in an MP-SPM is used not only for observing high-resolution STM or AFM images but also for forming an electrical contact enabling nanoscale local electrical conductivity measurement. The world's first double-probe STM (DP-STM) developed by the authors, which was subsequently modified to a triple-probe STM (TP-STM), has been used to measure the conductivities of one-dimensional metal nanowires and carbon nanotubes and also two-dimensional molecular films. A quadruple-probe STM (QP-STM) has also been developed and used to measure the conductivity of two-dimensional molecular films without the ambiguity of contact resistance between the probe and sample. Moreover, a quadruple-probe AFM (QP-AFM) with four conductive tuning-fork-type self-detection force sensing probes has been developed to measure the conductivity of a nanostructure on an insulating substrate. A general-purpose computer software to control four probes at the same time has also been developed and used in the operation of the QP-AFM. These developments and applications of MP-SPMs are reviewed in this paper.

  9. HERA: an atmospheric probe to unveil the depths of Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousis, Olivier; Atkinson, David H.; Amato, Michael; Aslam, Shahid; Atreya, Sushil K.; Blanc, Michel; Bolton, Scott J.; Brugger, Bastien; Calcutt, Simon; Cavalié, Thibault; Charnoz, Sébastien; Coustenis, Athena; DELEUIL, Magali; Ferri, Francesca; Fletcher, Leigh N.; Guillot, Tristan; Hartogh, Paul; Holland, Andrew; Hueso, Ricardo; Keller, Christoph; Kessler, Ernst; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre; leese, Mark; Lellouch, Emmanuel; Levacher, Patrick; Marty, Bernard; Morse, Andrew; Nixon, Conor; Reh, Kim R.; Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Sanchez-Lavega, Agustin; Schmider, François-Xavier; Sheridan, Simon; Simon, Amy A.; Snik, Frans; Spilker, Thomas R.; Stam, Daphne M.; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Vernazza, Pierre; Waite, J. Hunter; Wurz, Peter

    2016-10-01

    The Hera Saturn entry probe mission is proposed as an M-class mission led by ESA with a significant collaboration with NASA. It consists of a Saturn atmospheric probe and a Carrier-Relay spacecraft. Hera will perform in situ measurements of the chemical and isotopic compositions as well as the dynamics of Saturn's atmosphere, with the goal of improving our understanding of the origin, formation, and evolution of Saturn, the giant planets and their satellite systems, with extrapolation to extrasolar planets.The primary science objectives will be addressed by an atmospheric entry probe that would descend under parachute and carry out in situ measurements beginning in the stratosphere to help characterize the location and properties of the tropopause, and continue into the troposphere to pressures of at least 10 bars. All of the science objectives, except for the abundance of oxygen, which may be only addressed indirectly via observations of species whose abundances are tied to the abundance of water, can be achieved by reaching 10 bars. As in previous highly successful collaborative efforts between ESA and NASA, the proposed mission has a baseline concept based on a NASA-provided carrier/data relay spacecraft that would deliver the ESA-provided atmospheric probe to the desired atmospheric entry point at Saturn. ESA's proposed contribution should fit well into the M5 Cosmic Vision ESA call cost envelope.A nominal mission configuration would consist of a probe that detaches from the carrier one to several months prior to probe entry. Subsequent to probe release, the carrier trajectory would be deflected to optimize the over-flight phasing of the probe descent location for both probe data relay as well as performing carrier approach and flyby science, and would allow multiple retransmissions of the probe data for redundancy. The Saturn atmospheric entry probe would in many respects resemble the Jupiter Galileo probe. It is anticipated that the probe architecture for

  10. Variable path length spectrophotometric probe

    DOEpatents

    O'Rourke, Patrick E.; McCarty, Jerry E.; Haggard, Ricky A.

    1992-01-01

    A compact, variable pathlength, fiber optic probe for spectrophotometric measurements of fluids in situ. The probe comprises a probe body with a shaft having a polished end penetrating one side of the probe, a pair of optic fibers, parallel and coterminous, entering the probe opposite the reflecting shaft, and a collimating lens to direct light from one of the fibers to the reflecting surface of the shaft and to direct the reflected light to the second optic fiber. The probe body has an inlet and an outlet port to allow the liquid to enter the probe body and pass between the lens and the reflecting surface of the shaft. A linear stepper motor is connected to the shaft to cause the shaft to advance toward or away from the lens in increments so that absorption measurements can be made at each of the incremental steps. The shaft is sealed to the probe body by a bellows seal to allow freedom of movement of the shaft and yet avoid leakage from the interior of the probe.

  11. Theory and calibration of non-nulling seven-hole cone probes for use in complex flow measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everett, K. N.; Durston, D. A.; Gerner, A. A.

    1982-01-01

    A seven-hole conical pressure probe capable of measuring flow conditions at angles up to 75 deg relative to its axis is described. The theoretical rationale of the seven-hole probe is developed and the calibration procedure outlined. Three-variable third order polynomials are used to represent local values of total pressure, static pressure, Mach number and relative flow angles. These flow conditions can be determined explicitly from measured probe pressures. Flow angles may be determined within 2.5 deg and Mach number within 0.05 with 95% certainty. The probe was calibrated in subsonic compressible and incompressible flows. Results of a calibration of four seven-hole probes are presented.

  12. Understanding of Jupiter's Atmosphere after the Galileo Probe Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fonda, Mark (Technical Monitor); Young, Richard E.

    2003-01-01

    Instruments on the Galileo probe measured composition, cloud properties, thermal structure, winds, radiative energy balance, and electrical properties of the Jovian atmosphere. As expected the probe results confirm some expectations about Jupiter's atmosphere, refute others, and raise new questions which still remain unanswered. This talk will concentrate on those aspects of the probe observations which either raised new questions or remain unresolved. The Galileo probe observations of composition and clouds provided some of the biggest surprises of the mission. Helium abundance measured by the probe differed significantly from the remote sensing derivations from Voyager. Discrepancy between the Voyager helium abundance determinations for Jupiter and the Galileo probe value have now led to a considerably increased helium determination for Saturn. Global abundance of N in the form of ammonia was observed to be super-solar by approximately the same factor as carbon, in contrast to expectations that C/N would be significantly larger than solar. This has implications for the formation and evolution of Jupiter. The cloud structure was not what was generally anticipated, even though most previous remote sensing results below the uppermost cloud referred to 5 micron hot spots, local regions with reduced cloud opacity. The Galileo probe descended in one of these hot spots. Only a tenuous, presumed ammomium hydrosulfide, cloud was detected, and no significant water cloud or super-solar water abundance was measured. The mixing ratios as a function of depth for the condensibles ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, and water, exhibited no apparent correlation with either condensation levels or with each other, an observation that is still a puzzle, although there are now dynamical models of hot spots which show promise in being able to explain such behavior. Probe tracked zonal winds show that wind magnitude increases with depth to pressures of about 4 bars, with the winds extending to

  13. Understanding of Jupiter's Atmosphere After the Galileo Probe Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Richard E.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Instruments on the Galileo probe measured composition, cloud properties, thermal structure. winds, radiative energy balance, and electrical properties of the Jovian atmosphere. As expected the probe results confirm some expectations about Jupiter's atmosphere, refute others, and raise new questions which still remain unanswered. This talk will concentrate on those aspects of the probe observations which either raised new questions or remain unresolved. The Galileo probe observations of composition and clouds provided some of the biggest surprises of the mission. Helium abundance measured by the probe differed significantly from the remote sensing derivations from Voyager. discrepancy between the Voyager helium abundance determinations for Jupiter and the Galileo probe value have now led to a considerably increased helium determination for Saturn. Global abundance of N in the form of ammonia was observed to be supersolar by approximately the same factor as carbon, in contrast to expectations that C/N would be significantly larger than solar. This has implications for the formation and evolution of Jupiter. The cloud structure was not what was generally anticipated, even though most previous remote sensing results below the uppermost cloud referred to 5 micron hot spots, local regions with reduced cloud opacity. The Galileo probe descended in one of these hot spots. Only a tenuous, presumed ammonium hydrosulfide, cloud was detected, and no significant water cloud or super-solar water abundance was measured. The mixing ratios as a function of depth for the condensibles ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, and water, exhibited no apparent correlation with either condensation levels or with each other, an observation that is still a puzzle, although there are now dynamical models of hot spots which show promise in being able to explain such behavior. Probe tracked zonal winds show that wind magnitude increases with depth to pressures of about 4 bars, with the winds extending to

  14. Analysis of cylindrical Langmuir probe using experiment and different theories

    SciTech Connect

    Hassouba, M. A.; Galaly, A. R.; Rashed, U. M.

    2013-03-15

    Cylindrical probe data have been analyzed using different theories in order to determine some plasma parameters (electron temperature and electron and ion densities). Langmuir probe data are obtained in a cylindrical DC glow discharge in the positive column plasma at argon gas pressures varied from 0.5 to 6 Torr and at constant discharge current equal to 10 mA. The electron density has calculated from the electron current at the space potential and from Orbital Motion Limited (OML) collisionless theory. Ion density has obtained from the OML analysis of the ion saturation currents. In addition, the electron temperature has measured by three different methods using probe and electrons currents. The electron temperature T{sub e}, plasma density n{sub e}, and space potential V{sub s}, have been obtained from the measured single cylindrical probe I-V characteristic curves. The radial distribution of the electron temperature and plasma density along the glow discharge are measured and discussed. Using the collisionless theories by Langmuir cylindrical probe and up to several Torr argon gas pressures the differences between the values of electron temperature and electron and ion densities stay within reasonable error limits.

  15. Pump and probe spectroscopy with continuous wave quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkbride, James M. R.; Causier, Sarah K.; Dalton, Andrew R.; Ritchie, Grant A. D.; Weidmann, Damien

    2014-02-07

    This paper details infra-red pump and probe studies on nitric oxide conducted with two continuous wave quantum cascade lasers both operating around 5 μm. The pump laser prepares a velocity selected population in a chosen rotational quantum state of the v = 1 level which is subsequently probed using a second laser tuned to a rotational transition within the v = 2 ← v = 1 hot band. The rapid frequency scan of the probe (with respect to the molecular collision rate) in combination with the velocity selective pumping allows observation of marked rapid passage signatures in the transient absorption profiles from the polarized vibrationally excited sample. These coherent transient signals are influenced by the underlying hyperfine structure of the pump and probe transitions, the sample pressure, and the coherent properties of the lasers. Pulsed pump and probe studies show that the transient absorption signals decay within 1 μs at 50 mTorr total pressure, reflecting both the polarization and population dephasing times of the vibrationally excited sample. The experimental observations are supported by simulation based upon solving the optical Bloch equations for a two level system.

  16. Pump and probe spectroscopy with continuous wave quantum cascade lasers.

    PubMed

    Kirkbride, James M R; Causier, Sarah K; Dalton, Andrew R; Weidmann, Damien; Ritchie, Grant A D

    2014-02-01

    This paper details infra-red pump and probe studies on nitric oxide conducted with two continuous wave quantum cascade lasers both operating around 5 μm. The pump laser prepares a velocity selected population in a chosen rotational quantum state of the v = 1 level which is subsequently probed using a second laser tuned to a rotational transition within the v = 2 ← v = 1 hot band. The rapid frequency scan of the probe (with respect to the molecular collision rate) in combination with the velocity selective pumping allows observation of marked rapid passage signatures in the transient absorption profiles from the polarized vibrationally excited sample. These coherent transient signals are influenced by the underlying hyperfine structure of the pump and probe transitions, the sample pressure, and the coherent properties of the lasers. Pulsed pump and probe studies show that the transient absorption signals decay within 1 μs at 50 mTorr total pressure, reflecting both the polarization and population dephasing times of the vibrationally excited sample. The experimental observations are supported by simulation based upon solving the optical Bloch equations for a two level system.

  17. New probe of naturalness.

    PubMed

    Craig, Nathaniel; Englert, Christoph; McCullough, Matthew

    2013-09-20

    Any new scalar fields that perturbatively solve the hierarchy problem by stabilizing the Higgs boson mass also generate new contributions to the Higgs boson field-strength renormalization, irrespective of their gauge representation. These new contributions are physical, and in explicit models their magnitude can be inferred from the requirement of quadratic divergence cancellation; hence, they are directly related to the resolution of the hierarchy problem. Upon canonically normalizing the Higgs field, these new contributions lead to modifications of Higgs couplings that are typically great enough that the hierarchy problem and the concept of electroweak naturalness can be probed thoroughly within a precision Higgs boson program. Specifically, at a lepton collider this can be achieved through precision measurements of the Higgs boson associated production cross section. This would lead to indirect constraints on perturbative solutions to the hierarchy problem in the broadest sense, even if the relevant new fields are gauge singlets.

  18. Heat transfer probe

    DOEpatents

    Frank, Jeffrey I.; Rosengart, Axel J.; Kasza, Ken; Yu, Wenhua; Chien, Tai-Hsin; Franklin, Jeff

    2006-10-10

    Apparatuses, systems, methods, and computer code for, among other things, monitoring the health of samples such as the brain while providing local cooling or heating. A representative device is a heat transfer probe, which includes an inner channel, a tip, a concentric outer channel, a first temperature sensor, and a second temperature sensor. The inner channel is configured to transport working fluid from an inner inlet to an inner outlet. The tip is configured to receive at least a portion of the working fluid from the inner outlet. The concentric outer channel is configured to transport the working fluid from the inner outlet to an outer outlet. The first temperature sensor is coupled to the tip, and the second temperature sensor spaced apart from the first temperature sensor.

  19. Advanced Langmuir Probe (LP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voronka, N. R.; Block, B. P.; Carignan, G. R.

    1991-01-01

    The dynamic response of the MK-2 version of the Langmuir probe amplifier was studied. The settling time of the step response is increased by: (1) stray node-to-ground capacitance at series connections between high value feedback resistors; and (2) input capacitance due to the input cable, FET switches, and input source follower. The stray node-to-ground capacitances can be reduced to tolerable levels by elevating the string of feedback resistors above the printing board. A new feedback network was considered, with promising results. The design uses resistances having much lower nominal values, thereby minimizing the effect of stray capacitances. Faster settling times can be achieved by using an operational amplifier having a higher gain-bandwidth product.

  20. Trapping and Probing Antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    2013-03-27

    Precision spectroscopy of antihydrogen is a promising path to sensitive tests of CPT symmetry. The most direct route to achieve this goal is to create and probe antihydrogen in a magnetic minimum trap. Antihydrogen has been synthesized and trapped for 1000s at CERN by the ALPHA Collaboration. Some of the challenges associated with achieving these milestones will be discussed, including mixing cryogenic positron and antiproton plasmas to synthesize antihydrogen with kinetic energy less than the trap potential of .5K. Recent experiments in which hyperfine transitions were resonantly induced with microwaves will be presented. The opportunity for gravitational measurements in traps based on detailed studies of antihydrogen dynamics will be described. The talk will conclude with a discussion future antihydrogen research that will use a new experimental apparatus, ALPHA-I.

  1. Work on Planetary Atmospheres and Planetary Atmosphere Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lester, Peter

    1999-01-01

    A summary final report of work accomplished is presented. Work was performed in the following areas: (1) Galileo Probe science analysis, (2) Galileo probe Atmosphere Structure Instrument, (3) Mars Pathfinder Atmosphere Structure/Meteorology instrument, (4) Mars Pathfinder data analysis, (5) Science Definition for future Mars missions, (6) Viking Lander data analysis, (7) winds in Mars atmosphere Venus atmospheric dynamics, (8) Pioneer Venus Probe data analysis, (9) Pioneer Venus anomaly analysis, (10) Discovery Venus Probe Titan probe instrument design, and (11) laboratory studies of Titan probe impact phenomena. The work has resulted in more than 10 articles published in archive journals, 2 encyclopedia articles, and many working papers. This final report is organized around the four planets on which there was activity, Jupiter, Mars, Venus, and Titan, with a closing section on Miscellaneous Activities. A major objective was to complete the fabrication, test, and evaluation of the atmosphere structure experiment on the Galileo probe, and to receive, analyze and interpret data received from the spacecraft. The instrument was launched on April 14, 1989. Calibration data were taken for all experiment sensors. The data were analyzed, fitted with algorithms, and summarized in a calibration report for use in analyzing and interpreting data returned from Jupiter's atmosphere. The sensors included were the primary science pressure, temperature and acceleration sensors, and the supporting engineering temperature sensors. Computer programs were written to decode the Experiment Data Record and convert the digital numbers to physical quantities, i.e., temperatures, pressures, and accelerations. The project office agreed to obtain telemetry of checkout data from the probe. Work to extend programs written for use on the Pioneer Venus project included: (1) massive heat shield ablation leading to important mass loss during entry; and (2) rapid planet rotation, which introduced

  2. Development of simple designs of multitip probe diagnostic systems for RF plasma characterization.

    PubMed

    Naz, M Y; Shukrullah, S; Ghaffar, A; Rehman, N U

    2014-01-01

    Multitip probes are very useful diagnostics for analyzing and controlling the physical phenomena occurring in low temperature discharge plasmas. However, DC biased probes often fail to perform well in processing plasmas. The objective of the work was to deduce simple designs of DC biased multitip probes for parametric study of radio frequency plasmas. For this purpose, symmetric double probe, asymmetric double probe, and symmetric triple probe diagnostic systems and their driving circuits were designed and tested in an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) generated by a 13.56 MHz radio frequency (RF) source. Using I-V characteristics of these probes, electron temperature, electron number density, and ion saturation current was measured as a function of input power and filling gas pressure. An increasing trend was noticed in electron temperature and electron number density for increasing input RF power whilst a decreasing trend was evident in these parameters when measured against filling gas pressure. In addition, the electron energy probability function (EEPF) was also studied by using an asymmetric double probe. These studies confirmed the non-Maxwellian nature of the EEPF and the presence of two groups of the energetic electrons at low filling gas pressures.

  3. Development of Simple Designs of Multitip Probe Diagnostic Systems for RF Plasma Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Naz, M. Y.; Shukrullah, S.; Ghaffar, A.; Rehman, N. U.

    2014-01-01

    Multitip probes are very useful diagnostics for analyzing and controlling the physical phenomena occurring in low temperature discharge plasmas. However, DC biased probes often fail to perform well in processing plasmas. The objective of the work was to deduce simple designs of DC biased multitip probes for parametric study of radio frequency plasmas. For this purpose, symmetric double probe, asymmetric double probe, and symmetric triple probe diagnostic systems and their driving circuits were designed and tested in an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) generated by a 13.56 MHz radio frequency (RF) source. Using I-V characteristics of these probes, electron temperature, electron number density, and ion saturation current was measured as a function of input power and filling gas pressure. An increasing trend was noticed in electron temperature and electron number density for increasing input RF power whilst a decreasing trend was evident in these parameters when measured against filling gas pressure. In addition, the electron energy probability function (EEPF) was also studied by using an asymmetric double probe. These studies confirmed the non-Maxwellian nature of the EEPF and the presence of two groups of the energetic electrons at low filling gas pressures. PMID:24683326

  4. Characterization of Pressure Distribution in Penetrating Traumatic Brain Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Davidsson, Johan; Risling, Mårten

    2015-01-01

    Severe impacts to the head commonly lead to localized brain damage. Such impacts may also give rise to temporary pressure changes that produce secondary injuries in brain volumes distal to the impact site. Monitoring pressure changes in a clinical setting is difficult; detailed studies into the effect of pressure changes in the brain call for the development and use of animal models. The aim of this study is to characterize the pressure distribution in an animal model of penetrating traumatic brain injuries (pTBI). This data may be used to validate mathematical models of the animal model and to facilitate correlation studies between pressure changes and pathology. Pressure changes were measured in rat brains while subjected to pTBI for a variety of different probe velocities and shapes; pointy, blunt, and flat. Experiments on ballistic gel samples were carried out to study the formation of any temporary cavities. In addition, pressure recordings from the gel experiments were compared to values recorded in the animal experiments. The pTBI generated short lasting pressure changes in the brain tissue; the pressure in the contralateral ventricle (CLV) increased to 8 bar followed by a drop to 0.4 bar when applying flat probes. The pressure changes in the periphery of the probe, in the Cisterna Magna, and the spinal canal, were significantly less than those recorded in the CLV or the vicinity of the skull base. High-speed videos of the gel samples revealed the formation of spherically shaped cavities when flat and spherical probes were applied. Pressure changes in the gel were similar to those recorded in the animals, although amplitudes were lower in the gel samples. We concluded cavity expansion rate rather than cavity size correlated with pressure changes in the gel or brain secondary to probe impact. The new data can serve as validation data for finite element models of the trauma model and the animal and to correlate physical measurements with secondary injuries

  5. How does a probe inserted into the discharge influence the plasma structure?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yordanov, D.; Lishev, St.; Shivarova, A.

    2016-05-01

    Shielding the bias applied to the probe by the sheath formed around it and determination of parameters of unperturbed plasmas are in the basis of the probe diagnostics. The results from a two-dimensional model of a discharge with a probe inserted in it show that the probe influences the spatial distribution of the plasma parameters in the entire discharge. The increase (although slight) in the electron temperature, due to the increased losses of charged particles on the additional wall in the discharge (mainly the probe holder), leads to redistribution of the plasma density and plasma potential, as shown by the results obtained at the floating potential of the probe. The deviations due to the bias applied to the probe tip are stronger in the ion saturation region of the probe characteristics. The pattern of the spatial redistribution of the plasma parameters advances together with the movement of the probe deeper in the discharge. Although probe sheaths and probe characteristics resulting from the model are shown, the study does not aim at discussions on the theories for determination of the plasma density from the ion saturation current. Regardless of the modifications in the plasma behavior in the entire discharge, the deviations of the plasma parameters at the position of the probe tip and, respectively, the uncertainty which should be added as an error when the accuracy of the probe diagnostics is estimated do not exceed 10%. Consequently, the electron density and temperature obtained, respectively, at the position of the plasma potential on the probe characteristics and from its transition region are in reasonable agreement with the results from the model of the discharge without a probe. Being in the scope of research on a source of negative hydrogen ions with the design of a matrix of small radius inductive discharges, the model is specified for a low-pressure hydrogen discharge sustained in a small-radius tube.

  6. Analyses of Different Techniques for the Plasma Probe Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godyak, Valery; Alexandrovich, Benjamin

    2015-09-01

    The subject of this publication is comparison of the plasma parameters inferred from classical Langmuir probe procedure, from different theories of the ion current to the probe, and from measured EEDF using double differentiation of the probe characteristic We concluded that the plasma parameters inferred by the classical Langmuir procedure are subjected to significant inaccuracy due to non-Maxwellian EEDF, uncertainty of locating the plasma potential and arbitrariness in approximation of the ion current. The plasma density inferred from the ion part of the probe characteristic was found to diverge by as much as an order of magnitude from the density calculated as the EEDF integral, while the electron temperature is derived with significant uncertainty. Such inaccuracy is attributed to deficiencies in the ion current theories, i.e. unrealistic assumptions about Maxwellian-shaped EEDFs, underestimation of the ion collisions and the ion ambipolar drift, and some others. We concluded that for highly non-equilibrium gas discharge plasmas at low gas pressure the probe measurements based on EEDF diagnostics is single reliable tool of for the basic research and industrial applications. Examples of EEDF measurements reiterate significance of the instrument technical characteristics, such as high energy resolution and wide dynamic range and importance of displaying the probe current derivatives in real time.

  7. Total pressure averaging in pulsating flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, L. N.; Dudzinski, T. J.; Johnson, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    A number of total-pressure tubes were tested in a non-steady flow generator in which the fraction of period that pressure is a maximum is approximately 0.8, thereby simulating turbomachine-type flow conditions. Most of the tubes indicated a pressure which was higher than the true average. Organ-pipe resonance which further increased the indicated pressure was encountered within the tubes at discrete frequencies. There was no obvious combination of tube diameter, length, and/or geometry variation used in the tests which resulted in negligible averaging error. A pneumatic-type probe was found to measure true average pressure, and is suggested as a comparison instrument to determine whether nonlinear averaging effects are serious in unknown pulsation profiles. The experiments were performed at a pressure level of 1 bar, for Mach number up to near 1, and frequencies up to 3 kHz.

  8. Bacteraemia caused by periodontal probing.

    PubMed

    Daly, C; Mitchell, D; Grossberg, D; Highfield, J; Stewart, D

    1997-04-01

    Bacteraemia of oral origin may result in infective endocarditis in susceptible individuals. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the occurrence of bacteraemia due to periodontal probing. Thirty patients (15 male, 15 female; mean age 42.7 years) with untreated periodontitis were investigated. All were free of significant medical disorders and none had taken antibiotics in the previous month. Prior to and immediately following periodontal probing, 20 mL of venous blood were obtained from each patient and inoculated into aerobic and anaerobic blood culture bottles and incubated. Negative bottles were monitored continuously for three weeks before being discarded. Periodontal probing consisted of measuring pockets at six points around each tooth and recording the presence or absence of bleeding. A positive bacteraemia was recorded for three of the patients prior to probing. One patient exhibited Prevotella species whilst two exhibited skin commensals. Following probing, 13 patients (43 per cent) exhibited bacteraemia of oral origin. Viridans streptococci were the most common isolates (45 per cent). No significant correlations were found between bacteraemia and the severity of periodontitis or extent of bleeding on probing. The results indicate that periodontal probing can cause bacteraemia in patients with periodontitis. It would be advisable for patients considered at risk of developing infective endocarditis to receive antibiotic prophylaxis for periodontal probing if they have radiographic evidence of periodontitis.

  9. Pressurized hopper

    SciTech Connect

    Densley, P.J.; Goldmann, L.H. Jr.

    1980-04-01

    A Secure Automated Fuel Fabrication Line is being developed to reduce personnel exposure and to improve safeguards. Fertile and fissile fuel powders are blended in the line for making fuel pellets. A pressurized hopper was developed for use not only as a blender, but also as a storage and feeding device. It works with or without injection tubes to produce a well-blended powder with reduced agglomerate population. Results of blending experiments using dry Kaolin clay and Tempra pigment are given. (DLC)

  10. Pressure transducer

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, T.T.; Roop, C.J.; Schmidt, K.J.; Gunchin, E.R.

    1987-02-13

    A pressure transducer suitable for use in high temperature environments includes two pairs of induction coils, each pair being bifilarly wound together, and each pair of coils connected as opposite arms of a four arm circuit; an electrically conductive target moveably positioned between the coil pairs and connected to a diaphragm such that deflection of the diaphragm causes axial movement of the target and an unbalance in the bridge output. 7 figs.

  11. Pressure transducer

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Thomas T.; Roop, Conard J.; Schmidt, Kenneth J.; Gunchin, Elmer R.

    1989-01-01

    A pressure transducer suitable for use in high temperature environments includes two pairs of induction coils, each pair being bifilarly wound together, and each pair of coils connected as opposite arms of a four arm circuit; an electrically conductive target moveably positioned between the coil pairs and connected to a diaphragm such that deflection of the diaphragm causes axial movement of the target and an unbalance in the bridge output.

  12. Time-resolved measurement of plasma parameters by means of triple probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qayyum, A.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmad, S.; Deeba, Farah; Ali, Rafaqat; Hussain, S.

    2013-12-01

    Triple Langmuir probe (TLP) diagnostic system with its necessary driving circuit is developed and successfully applies for time-resolved measurement of plasma parameters in the negative glow region of pulsating-dc discharge. This technique allows the instantaneous measurement of electron temperature [T-], electron number density [n-] as well as plasma fluctuations without any voltage or frequency sweep. In TLP configuration two probes are differentially biased and serve as a floating symmetric double probe whereas the third probe is simply floating into plasma to measure floating potential as a function of time and thus incorporates the effect of plasma fluctuations. As an example of the application to time-dependent plasmas, basic plasma parameters such as floating potential, electron temperature, and electron number density in low pressure air discharge are determined as a function of time for different fill pressure. The results demonstrate temporal evolution of plasma parameters and thus plasma generation progression for different fill pressures.

  13. Time-resolved measurement of plasma parameters by means of triple probe.

    PubMed

    Qayyum, A; Ahmad, N; Ahmad, S; Deeba, Farah; Ali, Rafaqat; Hussain, S

    2013-12-01

    Triple Langmuir probe (TLP) diagnostic system with its necessary driving circuit is developed and successfully applies for time-resolved measurement of plasma parameters in the negative glow region of pulsating-dc discharge. This technique allows the instantaneous measurement of electron temperature [T_], electron number density [n_] as well as plasma fluctuations without any voltage or frequency sweep. In TLP configuration two probes are differentially biased and serve as a floating symmetric double probe whereas the third probe is simply floating into plasma to measure floating potential as a function of time and thus incorporates the effect of plasma fluctuations. As an example of the application to time-dependent plasmas, basic plasma parameters such as floating potential, electron temperature, and electron number density in low pressure air discharge are determined as a function of time for different fill pressure. The results demonstrate temporal evolution of plasma parameters and thus plasma generation progression for different fill pressures.

  14. Electrophoresis-mass spectrometry probe

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, Brian D.; Fought, Eric R.

    1987-01-01

    The invention involves a new technique for the separation of complex mixtures of chemicals, which utilizes a unique interface probe for conventional mass spectrometers which allows the electrophoretically separated compounds to be analyzed in real-time by a mass spectrometer. This new chemical analysis interface, which couples electrophoresis with mass spectrometry, allows complex mixtures to be analyzed very rapidly, with much greater specificity, and with greater sensitivity. The interface or probe provides a means whereby large and/or polar molecules in complex mixtures to be completely characterized. The preferred embodiment of the probe utilizes a double capillary tip which allows the probe tip to be continually wetted by the buffer, which provides for increased heat dissipation, and results in a continually operating interface which is more durable and electronically stable than the illustrated single capillary tip probe interface.

  15. Thiol Reactive Probes and Chemosensors

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hanjing; Chen, Weixuan; Cheng, Yunfeng; Hakuna, Lovemore; Strongin, Robert; Wang, Binghe

    2012-01-01

    Thiols are important molecules in the environment and in biological processes. Cysteine (Cys), homocysteine (Hcy), glutathione (GSH) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) play critical roles in a variety of physiological and pathological processes. The selective detection of thiols using reaction-based probes and sensors is very important in basic research and in disease diagnosis. This review focuses on the design of fluorescent and colorimetric probes and sensors for thiol detection. Thiol detection methods include probes and labeling agents based on nucleophilic addition and substitution, Michael addition, disulfide bond or Se-N bond cleavage, metal-sulfur interactions and more. Probes for H2S are based on nucleophilic cyclization, reduction and metal sulfide formation. Thiol probe and chemosensor design strategies and mechanism of action are discussed in this review. PMID:23202239

  16. Rotating concave eddy current probe

    DOEpatents

    Roach, Dennis P.; Walkington, Phil; Rackow, Kirk A.; Hohman, Ed

    2008-04-01

    A rotating concave eddy current probe for detecting fatigue cracks hidden from view underneath the head of a raised head fastener, such as a buttonhead-type rivet, used to join together structural skins, such as aluminum aircraft skins. The probe has a recessed concave dimple in its bottom surface that closely conforms to the shape of the raised head. The concave dimple holds the probe in good alignment on top of the rivet while the probe is rotated around the rivet's centerline. One or more magnetic coils are rigidly embedded within the probe's cylindrical body, which is made of a non-conducting material. This design overcomes the inspection impediment associated with widely varying conductivity in fastened joints.

  17. Electrophoresis-mass spectrometry probe

    DOEpatents

    Andresen, B.D.; Fought, E.R.

    1987-11-10

    The invention involves a new technique for the separation of complex mixtures of chemicals, which utilizes a unique interface probe for conventional mass spectrometers which allows the electrophoretically separated compounds to be analyzed in real-time by a mass spectrometer. This new chemical analysis interface, which couples electrophoresis with mass spectrometry, allows complex mixtures to be analyzed very rapidly, with much greater specificity, and with greater sensitivity. The interface or probe provides a means whereby large and/or polar molecules in complex mixtures to be completely characterized. The preferred embodiment of the probe utilizes a double capillary tip which allows the probe tip to be continually wetted by the buffer, which provides for increased heat dissipation, and results in a continually operating interface which is more durable and electronically stable than the illustrated single capillary tip probe interface. 8 figs.

  18. FRET study of G-quadruplex forming fluorescent oligonucleotide probes at the lipid monolayer interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swiatkowska, Angelika; Kosman, Joanna; Juskowiak, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Spectral properties and G-quadruplex folding ability of fluorescent oligonucleotide probes at the cationic dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide (DODAB) monolayer interface are reported. Two oligonucleotides, a 19-mer bearing thrombin binding aptamer sequence and a 21-mer with human telomeric sequence, were end-labeled with fluorescent groups (FAM and TAMRA) to give FRET probes F19T and F21T, respectively. The probes exhibited abilities to fold into a quadruplex structure and to bind metal cations (Na+ and K+). Fluorescence spectra of G-quadruplex FRET probes at the monolayer interface are reported for the first time. Investigations included film balance measurements (π-A isotherms) and fluorescence spectra recording using a fiber optic accessory interfaced with a spectrofluorimeter. The effect of the presence of DODAB monolayer, metal cations and the surface pressure of monolayer on spectral behavior of FRET probes were examined. Adsorption of probe at the cationic monolayer interface resulted in the FRET signal enhancement even in the absence of metal cations. Variation in the monolayer surface pressure exerted rather modest effect on the spectral properties of probes. The fluorescence energy transfer efficiency of monolayer adsorbed probes increased significantly in the presence of sodium or potassium ion in subphase, which indicated that the probes retained their cation binding properties when adsorbed at the monolayer interface.

  19. Nanoscale Hot-Wire Probes for Boundary-Layer Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedjojuwono, Ken T.; Herring, Gregory C.

    2003-01-01

    Hot-wire probes having dimensions of the order of nanometers have been proposed for measuring temperatures (and possibly velocities) in boundary-layer flows at spatial resolutions much finer and distances from walls much smaller than have been possible heretofore. The achievable resolutions and minimum distances are expected to be of the order of tens of nanometers much less than a typical mean free path of a molecule and much less than the thickness of a typical flow boundary layer in air at standard temperature and pressure. An additional benefit of the small scale of these probes is that they would perturb the measured flows less than do larger probes. The hot-wire components of the probes would likely be made from semiconducting carbon nanotubes or ropes of such nanotubes. According to one design concept, a probe would comprise a single nanotube or rope of nanotubes laid out on the surface of an insulating substrate between two metallic wires. According to another design concept, a nanotube or rope of nanotubes would be electrically connected and held a short distance away from the substrate surface by stringing it between two metal electrodes. According to a third concept, a semiconducting nanotube or rope of nanotubes would be strung between the tips of two protruding electrodes made of fully conducting nanotubes or ropes of nanotubes. The figure depicts an array of such probes that could be used to gather data at several distances from a wall. It will be necessary to develop techniques for fabricating the probes. It will also be necessary to determine whether the probes will be strong enough to withstand the aerodynamic forces and impacts of micron-sized particles entrained in typical flows of interest.

  20. Gravity Probe B Encapsulated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    In this photo, the Gravity Probe B (GP-B) space vehicle is being encapsulated atop the Delta II launch vehicle. The GP-B is the relativity experiment developed at Stanford University to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. The experiment will measure, very precisely, the expected tiny changes in the direction of the spin axes of four gyroscopes contained in an Earth-orbiting satellite at a 400-mile altitude. So free are the gyroscopes from disturbance that they will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. They will measure how space and time are very slightly warped by the presence of the Earth, and, more profoundly, how the Earth's rotation very slightly drags space-time around with it. These effects, though small for the Earth, have far-reaching implications for the nature of matter and the structure of the Universe. GP-B is among the most thoroughly researched programs ever undertaken by NASA. This is the story of a scientific quest in which physicists and engineers have collaborated closely over many years. Inspired by their quest, they have invented a whole range of technologies that are already enlivening other branches of science and engineering. Launched April 20, 2004 , the GP-B program was managed for NASA by the Marshall Space Flight Center. Development of the GP-B is the responsibility of Stanford University along with major subcontractor Lockheed Martin Corporation. (Image credit to Russ Underwood, Lockheed Martin Corporation).

  1. Probing interfaces involving liquids.

    PubMed

    Robinson, A L

    1987-04-10

    Last month in Washington, D.C., the National Academy of Sciences held the first of what it hopes will be a series of seminars in forefront fields of science, technology, and medicine. The idea is to bring the academy closer to the frontlines of research and to help spread the word to federal science policy-makers. The subject of the 23 and 24 March seminar was interfaces and thin films, and the talks, though tutorial in nature, contained a pleasantly large number of still unpublished results. Interfaces, such as the surface of a solid exposed to a liquid or gas, and thin films, whose properties are heavily influenced by interfaces, have long been of considerable technological importance and have always been so in biological processes, but researchers are now getting access to the experimental and theoretical tools needed to explore these complex physical systems that are neither ideally two-dimensional nor fully three-dimensional. The briefings that follow give a peek at three ways to probe interfaces involving liquids.

  2. Five-Hole Flow Angle Probe Calibration for the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonsalez, Jose C.; Arrington, E. Allen

    1999-01-01

    A spring 1997 test section calibration program is scheduled for the NASA Glenn Research Center Icing Research Tunnel following the installation of new water injecting spray bars. A set of new five-hole flow angle pressure probes was fabricated to properly calibrate the test section for total pressure, static pressure, and flow angle. The probes have nine pressure ports: five total pressure ports on a hemispherical head and four static pressure ports located 14.7 diameters downstream of the head. The probes were calibrated in the NASA Glenn 3.5-in.-diameter free-jet calibration facility. After completing calibration data acquisition for two probes, two data prediction models were evaluated. Prediction errors from a linear discrete model proved to be no worse than those from a full third-order multiple regression model. The linear discrete model only required calibration data acquisition according to an abridged test matrix, thus saving considerable time and financial resources over the multiple regression model that required calibration data acquisition according to a more extensive test matrix. Uncertainties in calibration coefficients and predicted values of flow angle, total pressure, static pressure. Mach number. and velocity were examined. These uncertainties consider the instrumentation that will be available in the Icing Research Tunnel for future test section calibration testing.

  3. Blood pressure measurement

    MedlinePlus

    Diastolic blood pressure; Systolic blood pressure; Blood pressure reading; Measuring blood pressure ... your health care provider will wrap the blood pressure cuff snugly around your upper arm. The lower ...

  4. Blood Pressure Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Feature: High Blood Pressure Blood Pressure Quiz Past Issues / Fall 2011 Table of Contents ... About High Blood Pressure / Treatment: Types of Blood Pressure Medications / Blood Pressure Quiz Fall 2011 Issue: Volume 6 Number ...

  5. Understanding Blood Pressure Readings

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Understanding Blood Pressure Readings Updated:Aug 17,2016 Blood pressure is typically ... Your doctor should evaluate unusually low blood pressure readings. How is high blood pressure diagnosed? Your healthcare ...

  6. Automated robotic equipment for ultrasonic inspection of pressurizer heater wells

    SciTech Connect

    Nachbar, H.D.; DeRossi, R.S.; Mullins, L.E.

    1991-12-31

    A robotic device for remotely inspecting pressurizer heater wells is provided which has the advantages of quickly, precisely, and reliably acquiring data at reasonable cost while also reducing radiation exposure of an operator. The device comprises a probe assembly including a probe which enters a heater well, gathers data regarding the condition of the heater well and transmits a signal carrying that data; a mounting device for mounting the probe assembly at the opening of the heater well so that the probe can enter the heater well; a first motor mounted on the mounting device for providing movement of the probe assembly in an axial direction; and a second motor mounted on the mounting device for providing rotation of the probe assembly. This arrangement enables full inspection of the heater well to be carried out.

  7. Stellar Occultation Probe of Triton's Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliot, James L.

    1998-01-01

    The goals of this research were (i) to better characterize Triton's atmospheric structure by probing a region not well investigated by Voyager and (ii) to begin acquiring baseline data for an investigation of the time evolution of the atmosphere which will set limits on the thermal conductivity of the surface and the total mass of N2 in the atmosphere. Our approach was to use observations (with the Kuiper Airborne Observatory) of a stellar occultation by Triton that was predicted to occur on 1993 July 10. As described in the attached reprint, we achieved these objectives through observation of this occultation and a subsequent one with the KAO in 1995. We found new results about Triton's atmospheric structure from the analysis of the two occultations observed with the KAO and ground-based data. These stellar occultation observations made both in the visible and infrared, have good spatial coverage of Triton including the first Triton central-flash observations, and are the first data to probe the 20-100 km altitude level on Triton. The small-planet light curve model of Elliot and Young (AJ 103, 991-1015) was generalized to include stellar flux refracted by the far limb, and then fitted to the data. Values of the pressure, derived from separate immersion and emersion chords, show no significant trends with latitude indicating that Triton's atmosphere is spherically symmetric at approximately 50 km altitude to within the error of the measurements. However, asymmetry observed in the central flash indicates the atmosphere is not homogeneous at the lowest levels probed (approximately 20 km altitude). From the average of the 1995 occultation data, the equivalent-isothermal temperature of the atmosphere is 47 +/- 1 K and the atmospheric pressure at 1400 km radius (approximately 50 km altitude) is 1.4 +/- 0.1 microbar. Both of these are not consistent with a model based on Voyager UVS and RSS observations in 1989 (Strobel et al, Icarus 120, 266-289). The atmospheric

  8. Multiple-measurement beam probe

    SciTech Connect

    Gilpatrick, J.D.; Grant, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    Particle accelerators are becoming smaller and are producing more intense beams; therefore, it is critical that beam-diagnostic instrumentation provide accelerator operators and automated control systems with a complete set of beam information. Traditionally, these beam data were collected and processed using limited-bandwidth interceptive techniques. For the new-generation accelerators, we are developing a multiple-measurement microstrip probe to obtain broadband beam data from inside a drift tube without perturbing the beam. The cylindrical probe's dimensions are 6-cm OD by 1.0 m long, and the probe is mounted inside a drift tube. The probe (and its associated electronics) monitors bunched-beam current, energy, and transverse position by sensing the beam's electromagnetic fields through the annular opening in the drift tube. The electrical impedance is tightly controlled through the full length of the probe and transmission lines to maintain beam-induced signal fidelity. The probe's small, cylindrical structure is matched to beam-bunch characteristics at specific beamline locations so that signal-to-noise ratios are optimized. Surrounding the probe, a mechanical structure attaches to the drift-tube interior and the quadrupole magnets; thus, the entire assembly's mechanical and electrical centers can be aligned and calibrated with respect to the rest of the linac.

  9. Possible concepts for an in situ Saturn probe mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coustenis, Athena; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre; Mousis, Olivier; Atkinson, David H.; Lunine, Jonathan I.; Reh, Kim R.; Fletcher, Leigh N.; Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Atreya, Sushil; Brinckerhoff, William B.; Cavalie, Thibault; Colaprete, Anthony; Gautier, Daniel; Guillot, Tristan; Mahaffy, Paul R.; Marty, Bernard; Morse, Andy; Sims, Jon; Spilker, Tom; Spilker, Linda

    2014-05-01

    In situ exploration of Saturn's atmosphere would bring insights in two broad themes: the formation history of our solar system and the processes at play in planetary atmospheres. The science case for in situ measurements at Saturn are developed in [1] and two companion abstracts (see Mousis et al., and Atkinson et al.). They are summarized here. Measurements of Saturn's bulk chemical and isotopic composition would place important constraints on the volatile reservoirs in the protosolar nebula and hence on the formation mechanisms. An in situ probe, penetrating from the upper atmosphere (μbar level) into the convective weather layer to a minimum depth of 10 bar, would also contribute to our knowledge of Saturn's atmospheric structure, dynamics, composition, chemistry and cloud-forming processes. Different mission architectures are envisaged, all based on an entry probe that would descend through Saturn's stratosphere and troposphere under parachute down to a minimum of 10 bars [1]. Future studies will focus on the trade-offs between science return and the added design complexity of a probe that could operate at pressures larger than 10 bars. Accelerometry measurements may also be performed during the entry phase in the higher part of the stratosphere prior to starting measurements under parachute. A carrier system would be required to deliver the probe along its interplanetary trajectory to the desired atmospheric entry point at Saturn. The entry site would be carefully selected. Three possible mission configurations are currently under study (with different risk/cost trades): • Configuration 1: Probe + Carrier. After probe delivery, the carrier would follow its path and be destroyed during atmospheric entry, but could perform pre-entry science. The carrier would not be used as a radio relay, but the probe would transmit its data to the ground system via a direct-to-Earth (DTE) RF link; • Configuration 2: Probe + Carrier/Relay. The probe would detach from the

  10. Micro-Particles as Electrostatic Probes for Plasma Sheath Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Wolter, Matthias; Haass, Moritz; Ockenga, Taalke; Kersten, Holger; Blazec, Joseph; Basner, Ralf

    2008-09-07

    An interesting aspect in the research of complex (dusty) plasmas is the experimental study of the interaction of micro-particles of different sizes with the surrounding plasma for diagnostic purpose. In the plasma micro-disperse particles are negatively charged and confined in the sheath. The particles are trapped by an equilibrium of gravity, electric field force and ion drag force. From the behavior, local electric fields can be determined, e.g. particles are used as electrostatic probes. In combination with additional measurements of the plasma parameters with Langmuir probes and thermal probes as well as by comparison with an analytical sheath model, the structure of the sheath can be described. In the present work we focus on the behavior of micro-particles of different sizes and several plasma parameters e.g. the gas pressure and the rf-power.

  11. Galileo probe forebody thermal protection - Benchmark heating environment calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakrishnan, A.; Nicolet, W. E.

    1981-01-01

    Solutions are presented for the aerothermal heating environment for the forebody heatshield of candidate Galileo probe. Entry into both the nominal and cool-heavy model atmospheres were considered. Solutions were obtained for the candidate heavy probe with a weight of 310 kg and a lighter probe with a weight of 290 kg. In the flowfield analysis, a finite difference procedure was employed to obtain benchmark predictions of pressure, radiative and convective heating rates, and the steady-state wall blowing rates. Calculated heating rates for entry into the cool-heavy model atmosphere were about 60 percent higher than those predicted for the entry into the nominal atmosphere. The total mass lost for entry into the cool-heavy model atmosphere was about 146 kg and the mass lost for entry into the nominal model atmosphere was about 101 kg.

  12. Application of dust grains and Langmuir probe for plasma diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ussenov, Y. A.; Ramazanov, T. S.; Dzhumagulova, K. N.; Dosbolayev, M. K.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the analysis of the experimentally measured width of the dust-free region around a single electric probe in a dusty plasma of glow discharge. The experimental results were compared with the data of a theoretical study on the basis of the balance equation of the dust particles thermal energy and their electrostatic interaction energy with the probe. An alternative method for the determination of the buffer plasma parameters was developed by measuring the dust-free region area around the probe. Using this method the temperature and the concentration of electrons in an argon glow discharge plasma in the pressure range from P= 0.6 to P= 0.8\\ \\text{torr} were determined.

  13. Iterative Calculation of Plasma Density from a Cylindrical Probe Characteristic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhenfeng; Lu, Wenqi

    2013-08-01

    A novel method is proposed for treating cylindrical probe characteristics to obtain plasma density. The method consists of exponential extrapolation of the transitional part of the I-V curve to the floating potential for the ion saturation current, other than the existing theories which use the ion branch, and an iterative sheath thickness correction procedure for improved accuracy. The method was tested by treating Langmuir probe I-V characteristics obtained from inductively coupled Ar discharges at various pressures, and comparing the present results with those deduced by existing theories. It was shown that the plasma densities obtained by the present method are in good agreement with those calculated by the Allen-Boyd-Reynolds (ABR) theory, suggesting the effectiveness of the proposed method. Without need of manual setting and adjustment of fitting parameters, the method may be suitable for automatic and real time processing of probe characteristics.

  14. Ways of probing situated concepts.

    PubMed

    Morais, Ana Sofia; Olsson, Henrik; Schooler, Lael J

    2010-02-01

    Two ways of eliciting conceptual content have been to instruct participants to list the intrinsic properties that concept exemplars possess or to report any thoughts that come to mind about the concept. It has been argued that the open, unconstrained probe is better able to elicit the situational information that concepts contain. We evaluated this proposal in two experiments comparing the two probes with regard to the content that they yield for object concepts at the superordinate and basic levels. The results showed that the open probe was better able to elicit situated conceptual knowledge and point out differences in the representations of superordinate and basic concepts.

  15. A subcutaneous Raman needle probe.

    PubMed

    Day, John C C; Stone, Nicholas

    2013-03-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful tool for studying the biochemical composition of tissues and cells in the human body. We describe the initial results of a feasibility study to design and build a miniature, fiber optic probe incorporated into a standard hypodermic needle. This probe is intended for use in optical biopsies of solid tissues to provide valuable information of disease type, such as in the lymphatic system, breast, or prostate, or of such tissue types as muscle, fat, or spinal, when identifying a critical injection site. The optical design and fabrication of this probe is described, and example spectra of various ex vivo samples are shown. PMID:23452501

  16. Saturn orbiter dual probe mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudd, R. P.

    1978-01-01

    The described Saturn orbiter dual probe mission and spacecraft combines three systems into a multi-purpose Saturn exploration package. The spacecraft consists of: (1) Saturn orbiter; (2) Saturn probe; and (3) Titan probe or lander. This single spacecraft provides the capability to conduct in situ measurements of the Saturn and Titan atmospheres, and, possibly the Titan surface, as well as a variety of remote sensing measurements. The remote sensing capabilities will be used to study the surfaces, interiors and environments of Saturn's satellites, the rings of Saturn, Saturn's magnetosphere, and synoptic properties of Saturn's atmosphere.

  17. ESA Venus Entry Probe Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vandenBerg, M. L.; Falkner, P.; Phipps, A.; Underwood, J. C.; Lingard, J. S.; Moorhouse, J.; Kraft, S.; Peacock, A.

    2005-01-01

    The Venus Entry Probe is one of ESA s Technology Reference Studies (TRS). The purpose of the Technology Reference Studies is to provide a focus for the development of strategically important technologies that are of likely relevance for future scientific missions. The aim of the Venus Entry Probe TRS is to study approaches for low cost in-situ exploration of Venus and other planetary bodies with a significant atmosphere. In this paper, the mission objectives and an outline of the mission concept of the Venus Entry Probe TRS are presented.

  18. The Huygens Probe System Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausen, K. C.; Hassan, H.; Verdant, M.; Couzin, P.; Huttin, G.; Brisson, M.; Sollazzo, C.; Lebreton, J.-P.

    2002-07-01

    The Huygens Probe is the ESA-provided element of the joint NASA/ESA Cassini/Huygens mission to Saturn and its largest moon Titan. Huygens is an entry probe designed to enter Titan's atmosphere and descend under parachute down to the surface. The Probe is carried to Titan on board the Cassini Saturn Orbiter. Huygens is dormant for 7.2 years, during the interplanetary journey and during the first 6 months around Saturn. It is activated about every 6 months for an in-flight checkout to verify and monitor its health and to perform a periodic maintenance and calibration of the payload instruments. The Probe will be targeted to Titan and released from the Orbiter about 3 weeks before the Titan encounter on the third Orbit around Saturn. During the 3-week coast phase the Probe is ‘OFF’, except a timer unit that has the task to awaken Huygens before it enters Titan's atmosphere. The Probe's aeroshell will decelerate it in less than 2 minutes from the entry speed of about 6 km s-1 to 400 m s-1 (Mach 1.5) at an altitude of 150 180 km. From that point onwards, a pre-programmed sequence will trigger the parachute deployment and the heat-shield ejection. The main part of the scientific mission will then start, lasting for a descent of 2 21/2 hours. The Orbiter will listen to the Probe for a total duration of at least 3 hours, which includes time to receive data from the surface, should the Probe continue to transmit data after touchdown. Huygens' transmissions are received and stored aboard the Orbiter for later retransmission to the Earth. This paper presents a technical description of the elements of the Huygens Probe System. The reader is invited to refer to the companion paper (Lebreton and Matson, 2002) for further background information about the Huygens mission, and the payload. The early in-flight performance of the Probe is briefly discussed. During in-flight testing in 2000, a technical anomaly was found with the Probe-to-Orbiter telecommunication system that

  19. Floating Potential Probe Langmuir Probe Data Reduction Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morton, Thomas L.; Minow, Joseph I.

    2002-01-01

    During its first five months of operations, the Langmuir Probe on the Floating Potential Probe (FPP) obtained data on ionospheric electron densities and temperatures in the ISS orbit. In this paper, the algorithms for data reduction are presented, and comparisons are made of FPP data with ground-based ionosonde and Incoherent Scattering Radar (ISR) results. Implications for ISS operations are detailed, and the need for a permanent FPP on ISS is examined.

  20. Method and apparatus for simultaneously measuring temperature and pressure

    DOEpatents

    Hirschfeld, Tomas B.; Haugen, Gilbert R.

    1988-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for simultaneously measuring temperature and pressure in a class of crystalline materials having anisotropic thermal coefficients and having a coefficient of linear compression along the crystalline c-axis substantially the same as those perpendicular thereto. Temperature is determined by monitoring the fluorescence half life of a probe of such crystalline material, e.g., ruby. Pressure is determined by monitoring at least one other fluorescent property of the probe that depends on pressure and/or temperature, e.g., absolute fluorescent intensity or frequency shifts of fluorescent emission lines.

  1. Gravity Probe B Assembled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    In this photo, the Gravity Probe B (GP-B) space vehicle is being assembled at the Sunnyvale, California location of the Lockheed Martin Corporation. The GP-B is the relativity experiment developed at Stanford University to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. The experiment will measure, very precisely, the expected tiny changes in the direction of the spin axes of four gyroscopes contained in an Earth-orbiting satellite at a 400-mile altitude. So free are the gyroscopes from disturbance that they will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. They will measure how space and time are very slightly warped by the presence of the Earth, and, more profoundly, how the Earth's rotation very slightly drags space-time around with it. These effects, though small for the Earth, have far-reaching implications for the nature of matter and the structure of the Universe. GP-B is among the most thoroughly researched programs ever undertaken by NASA. This is the story of a scientific quest in which physicists and engineers have collaborated closely over many years. Inspired by their quest, they have invented a whole range of technologies that are already enlivening other branches of science and engineering. Launched April 20, 2004 , the GP-B program was managed for NASA by the Marshall Space Flight Center. Development of the GP-B is the responsibility of Stanford University along with major subcontractor Lockheed Martin Corporation. (Image credit to Russ Underwood, Lockheed Martin Corporation).

  2. Integrated microfluidic probe station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrault, C. M.; Qasaimeh, M. A.; Brastaviceanu, T.; Anderson, K.; Kabakibo, Y.; Juncker, D.

    2010-11-01

    The microfluidic probe (MFP) consists of a flat, blunt tip with two apertures for the injection and reaspiration of a microjet into a solution—thus hydrodynamically confining the microjet—and is operated atop an inverted microscope that enables live imaging. By scanning across a surface, the microjet can be used for surface processing with the capability of both depositing and removing material; as it operates under immersed conditions, sensitive biological materials and living cells can be processed. During scanning, the MFP is kept immobile and centered over the objective of the inverted microscope, a few micrometers above a substrate that is displaced by moving the microscope stage and that is flushed continuously with the microjet. For consistent and reproducible surface processing, the gap between the MFP and the substrate, the MFP's alignment, the scanning speed, the injection and aspiration flow rates, and the image capture need all to be controlled and synchronized. Here, we present an automated MFP station that integrates all of these functionalities and automates the key operational parameters. A custom software program is used to control an independent motorized Z stage for adjusting the gap, a motorized microscope stage for scanning the substrate, up to 16 syringe pumps for injecting and aspirating fluids, and an inverted fluorescence microscope equipped with a charge-coupled device camera. The parallelism between the MFP and the substrate is adjusted using manual goniometer at the beginning of the experiment. The alignment of the injection and aspiration apertures along the scanning axis is performed using a newly designed MFP screw holder. We illustrate the integrated MFP station by the programmed, automated patterning of fluorescently labeled biotin on a streptavidin-coated surface.

  3. Fiberoptic probe and system for spectral measurements

    DOEpatents

    Dai, S.; Young, J.P.

    1998-10-13

    A fused fiberoptic probe, a system, method and embodiments thereof for conducting spectral measurements are disclosed. The fused fiberoptic probe comprises a probe tip having a specific geometrical configuration, an exciting optical fiber and at least one collection optical fiber fused within a housing, preferably silica. The specific geometrical configurations in which the probe tip can be shaped include a slanted probe tip with an angle greater than 0{degree}, an inverted cone-shaped probe tip, and a lens head. 12 figs.

  4. Fiberoptic probe and system for spectral measurements

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Sheng; Young, Jack P.

    1998-01-01

    A fused fiberoptic probe, a system, method and embodiments thereof for conducting spectral measurements are disclosed. The fused fiberoptic probe comprises a probe tip having a specific geometrical configuration, an exciting optical fiber and at least one collection optical fiber fused within a housing, preferrably silica. The specific geometrical configurations in which the probe tip can be shaped include a slanted probe tip with an angle greater than 0.degree., an inverted cone-shaped probe tip, and a lens head.

  5. Evaluation of a flow direction probe and a pitot-static probe on the F-14 airplane at high angles of attack and sideslip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, T. J.

    1984-01-01

    The measurement performance of a hemispherical flow-angularity probe and a fuselage-mounted pitot-static probe was evaluated at high flow angles as part of a test program on an F-14 airplane. These evaluations were performed using a calibrated pitot-static noseboom equipped with vanes for reference flow direction measurements, and another probe incorporating vanes but mounted on a pod under the fuselage nose. Data are presented for angles of attack up to 63, angles of sideslip from -22 deg to 22 deg, and for Mach numbers from approximately 0.3 to 1.3. During maneuvering flight, the hemispherical flow-angularity probe exhibited flow angle errors that exceeded 2 deg. Pressure measurements with the pitot-static probe resulted in very inaccurate data above a Mach number of 0.87 and exhibited large sensitivities with flow angle.

  6. Minimally invasive prostate cancer detection test using FISH probes

    PubMed Central

    Tinawi-Aljundi, Rima; Knuth, Shannon T; Gildea, Michael; Khal, Joshua; Hafron, Jason; Kernen, Kenneth; Di Loreto, Robert; Aurich-Costa, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The ability to test for and detect prostate cancer with minimal invasiveness has the potential to reduce unnecessary prostate biopsies. This study was conducted as part of a clinical investigation for the development of an OligoFISH® probe panel for more accurate detection of prostate cancer. Materials and methods One hundred eligible male patients undergoing transrectal ultrasound biopsies were enrolled in the study. After undergoing digital rectal examination with pressure, voided urine was collected in sufficient volume to prepare at least two slides using ThinPrep. Probe panels were tested on the slides, and 500 cells were scored when possible. From the 100 patients recruited, 85 had more than 300 cells scored and were included in the clinical performance calculations. Results Chromosomes Y, 7, 10, 20, 6, 8, 16, and 18 were polysomic in most prostate carcinoma cases. Of these eight chromosomes, chromosomes 7, 16, 18, and 20 were identified as having the highest clinical performance as a fluorescence in situ hybridization test and used to manufacture the fluorescence in situ hybridization probe panels. The OligoFISH® probes performed with 100% analytical specificity. When the OligoFISH® probes were compared with the biopsy results for each individual, the test results highly correlated with positive and negative prostate biopsy pathology findings, supporting their high specificity and accuracy. Probes for chromosomes 7, 16, 18, and 20 showed in the receiver operator characteristics analysis an area under the curve of 0.83, with an accuracy of 81% in predicting the biopsy result. Conclusion This investigation demonstrates the ease of use with high specificity, high predictive value, and accuracy in identifying prostate cancer in voided urine after digital rectal examination with pressure. The test is likely to have positive impact on clinical practice and advance approaches to the detection of prostate cancer. Further evaluation is warranted. PMID

  7. Mass Spectrometry for Planetary Probes: Past, Present and Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niemann, Hasso B.; Harpold, Dan N.; Jamieson, Brian G.; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2005-01-01

    Atmospheric entry probes present a unique opportunity for performing quantitative analysis of extra-terrestrial atmospheres in cases where remote sensing alone may not be sufficient and measurements with balloons or aircraft is not practical. An entry probe can provide a complete vertical profile of atmospheric parameters including chemical composition, which cannot be obtained with most other techniques. There are, however, unique challenges associated with building instruments for an entry probe, as compared to orbiters, landers, or rovers. Conditions during atmospheric entry are extreme, there are inherent time constraints due to the short duration of the experiment, and the instrument experiences rapid environmental changes in temperature and pressure as it descends. In addition, there are resource limitations, i.e. mass, power, size and bandwidth. Finally, the demands on the instrument design are determined in large part by conditions (pressure, temperature, composition) unique to the particular body under study, and as a result there is no one-size-fits-all instrument for an atmospheric probe. Many of these requirements can be more easily met by miniaturizing the probe instrument. Our experience building mass spectrometers for atmospheric entry probes leads us to believe that the time is right for a fundamental change in the way spaceflight mass spectrometers are built. The emergence over the past twenty years of Micro-electro- mechanical Systems (MEMS), utilizing lithographic semiconductor fabrication techniques to produce instrument systems in miniature, holds great promise for application to spaceflight mass spectrometry. A highly miniaturized, high performance and low-power mass spectrometer would be an enormous benefit to future entry probe missions, allowing, for example, parallel measurements (e.g., multiple simultaneous gas chromatographic analyses and direct atmospheric leaks.) Such an instrument would also enable mass spectrometry on board small

  8. Transpiring purging access probe for particulate laden or hazardous environments

    SciTech Connect

    VanOsdol, John G

    2013-12-03

    An access probe for remote-sensing access through a viewing port, viewing volume, and access port into a vessel. The physical boundary around the viewing volume is partially formed by a porous sleeve lying between the viewing volume and a fluid conduit. In a first mode of operation, a fluid supplied to the fluid conduit encounters the porous sleeve and flows through the porous material to maintain the viewing volume free of ash or other matter. When additional fluid force is needed to clear the viewing volume, the pressure of the fluid flow is increased sufficiently to slidably translate the porous sleeve, greatly increasing the flow into the viewing volume. The porous sleeve is returned to position by an actuating spring. The access probe thereby provides for alternate modes of operation based on the pressure of an actuating fluid.

  9. The Radiation Belt Storm Probes

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Radiation Belt Storm Probe mission (RBSP) will explore the Van Allen Radiation Belts in the Earth's magnetosphere. The charge particles in these regions can be hazardous to both spacecraft and ...

  10. A three dimensional probe positionera)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intrator, T.; Sun, X.; Dorf, L.; Furno, I.; Lapenta, G.

    2008-10-01

    In order to sort out the physics that is important in many plasma experiments, data in three dimensions (3D) are becoming necessary. Access to the usual cylindrical vacuum vessel is typically restricted to radially or axially insertable probes that can pivot. The space that can be explored usually has significant restrictions either because probe travel must be along a travel path, or a "wobbly" probe positioner requires one to map between a moveable coordinate system and a preferred laboratory coordinate system. This could for example introduce errors in measurements of vector quantities such as magnetic field or flow. We describe the design and implementation of a 3D probe positioner that slides in two dimensions on a double O-ring seal and radially inserts along the third dimension. The net result is that a 3D space can be explored in a laboratory Cartesian reference frame.

  11. A three dimensional probe positioner.

    PubMed

    Intrator, T; Sun, X; Dorf, L; Furno, I; Lapenta, G

    2008-10-01

    In order to sort out the physics that is important in many plasma experiments, data in three dimensions (3D) are becoming necessary. Access to the usual cylindrical vacuum vessel is typically restricted to radially or axially insertable probes that can pivot. The space that can be explored usually has significant restrictions either because probe travel must be along a travel path, or a "wobbly" probe positioner requires one to map between a moveable coordinate system and a preferred laboratory coordinate system. This could for example introduce errors in measurements of vector quantities such as magnetic field or flow. We describe the design and implementation of a 3D probe positioner that slides in two dimensions on a double O-ring seal and radially inserts along the third dimension. The net result is that a 3D space can be explored in a laboratory Cartesian reference frame.

  12. Micromachined probes for laboratory plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Franklin Changta

    As we begin to find more applications for plasmas in our everyday lives, the ability to characterize and understand their inner workings becomes increasingly important. Much of our current understanding of plasma physics comes from investigations conducted in diffuse, outer space plasmas where experimenters have no control over the environment or experimental conditions and one measures interesting phenomena only by chance when the spacecraft or satellite passes through them. Ideally, experiments should be performed in a controlled environment, where plasma events can be deliberately and reliably created when wanted and probes placed precisely within the plasma. Unfortunately, often due to their size, probes used in outer space are unsuitable for use in high-density laboratory plasmas, and constructing probes that can be used in terrestrial plasmas is a considerable challenge. This dissertation presents the development, implementation, and experimental results of three micromachined probes capable of measuring voltage and electric field, ion energies, and changing magnetic fields (B-dot) in laboratory plasmas.

  13. Monitoring probe for groundwater flow

    DOEpatents

    Looney, B.B.; Ballard, S.

    1994-08-23

    A monitoring probe for detecting groundwater migration is disclosed. The monitor features a cylinder made of a permeable membrane carrying an array of electrical conductivity sensors on its outer surface. The cylinder is filled with a fluid that has a conductivity different than the groundwater. The probe is placed in the ground at an area of interest to be monitored. The fluid, typically saltwater, diffuses through the permeable membrane into the groundwater. The flow of groundwater passing around the permeable membrane walls of the cylinder carries the conductive fluid in the same general direction and distorts the conductivity field measured by the sensors. The degree of distortion from top to bottom and around the probe is precisely related to the vertical and horizontal flow rates, respectively. The electrical conductivities measured by the sensors about the outer surface of the probe are analyzed to determine the rate and direction of the groundwater flow. 4 figs.

  14. Monitoring probe for groundwater flow

    DOEpatents

    Looney, Brian B.; Ballard, Sanford

    1994-01-01

    A monitoring probe for detecting groundwater migration. The monitor features a cylinder made of a permeable membrane carrying an array of electrical conductivity sensors on its outer surface. The cylinder is filled with a fluid that has a conductivity different than the groundwater. The probe is placed in the ground at an area of interest to be monitored. The fluid, typically saltwater, diffuses through the permeable membrane into the groundwater. The flow of groundwater passing around the permeable membrane walls of the cylinder carries the conductive fluid in the same general direction and distorts the conductivity field measured by the sensors. The degree of distortion from top to bottom and around the probe is precisely related to the vertical and horizontal flow rates, respectively. The electrical conductivities measured by the sensors about the outer surface of the probe are analyzed to determine the rate and direction of the groundwater flow.

  15. A three dimensional probe positioner

    SciTech Connect

    Intrator, T.; Sun, X.; Furno, I.; Dorf, L.; Lapenta, G.

    2008-10-15

    In order to sort out the physics that is important in many plasma experiments, data in three dimensions (3D) are becoming necessary. Access to the usual cylindrical vacuum vessel is typically restricted to radially or axially insertable probes that can pivot. The space that can be explored usually has significant restrictions either because probe travel must be along a travel path, or a 'wobbly' probe positioner requires one to map between a moveable coordinate system and a preferred laboratory coordinate system. This could for example introduce errors in measurements of vector quantities such as magnetic field or flow. We describe the design and implementation of a 3D probe positioner that slides in two dimensions on a double O-ring seal and radially inserts along the third dimension. The net result is that a 3D space can be explored in a laboratory Cartesian reference frame.

  16. Using A Wireless In Situ Probe To Monitor Subglacial Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, J. K.; Martinez, K.

    2010-12-01

    The Glacsweb system (http://envisense.org/glacsweb/) has been installed in two glaciers; Briksdalsbreen, Norway and Skalafellsjökull, Iceland. These are valley glaciers which show evidence of subglacial deformation in the foreland, with flutes and push moraines. Briksdalsbreen was calving into a glacial lake. This advanced 390m between 1987-1996 and then retreated over 460m between 1996 and 2008. Skalafellsjökull is landbased with a similar (but smaller scale) pattern of recent glacier marginal. Micro-sensors housed within the Glacsweb probes (0.16m long) measured water pressure, probe deformation, resistance, tilt and probe temperature within the ice or till. These data were recorded at a number of times during the day, and transmitted to a base station located on the glacier surface. Probe and meteorological data were sent once a day to a local mains powered computer, where it was forwarded to a web server in the UK. At Briksdalsbreen this operated from August 2004 to August 2006, and at Skalafellsjökull, it operated from August 2008 onwards (with periods when the system was disconnected). We compare the subglacial processes recorded throughout the year at the two sites. In particular, changes in water pressure, case stress, till water contents and till temperatures.

  17. DNA probe for lactobacillus delbrueckii

    SciTech Connect

    Delley, M.; Mollet, B.; Hottinger, H. )

    1990-06-01

    From a genomic DNA library of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, a clone was isolated which complements a leucine auxotrophy of an Escherichia coli strain (GE891). Subsequent analysis of the clone indicated that it could serve as a specific DNA probe. Dot-blot hybridizations with over 40 different Lactobacillus strains showed that this clone specifically recognized L. delbrueckii subsp. delbrueckii, bulgaricus, and lactis. The sensitivity of the method was tested by using an {alpha}-{sup 32}P-labeled probe.

  18. The navigation of space probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fliegel, H. F.; Ohandley, D. A.; Zielenbach, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    A new navigational method combining electronic measurement procedures and celestial mechanics makes it possible to conduct a space probe very close to a desired point in the neighborhood of a remote planet. Approaches for the determination of the position of the space probe in space are discussed, giving attention to the effects of errors in the employed data. The application of the navigational methods in a number of space missions is also considered.

  19. Optoacoustic probe for prostate cancer diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Valeriy G.; Karabutov, Alexander A.; Oraevsky, Alexander

    2002-11-01

    The optoacoustic probe for prostate cancer detection was developed and tested. The 10-ns pulses of the YAG:Nd laser were delivered by an optical fiber with a turning mirror at its tip. A fiber tip was placed above an ultrasonic array which was employed for the detection of acoustic transients excited inside prostate tissue. The increased infrared light absorption inside prostate tumors resulted in acoustic pulses with enhanced peak pressure providing 200%-300% optoacoustic contrast. The transducer array and the optical fiber were wrapped inside a 20-mm diameter thin cylindrical shell filled with ultrasonic gel transparent for infrared radiation. Each acoustic transducer was made of 0.05-mm thick PVDF film with dimensions of 1 mm x12 mm. The frequency bandwidth of transducer array provided 0.3-mm axial in-depth resolution. The lateral resolution is defined by the array length and was estimated as 0.8-mm for 32-element array with 1-mm gap between transducers. Transducer sensitivity of 0.05 mV/Pa allowed the detection of 2-mm tumor located at 50 mm depth. The optoacoustic probe performance was evaluated via the acquisition of two-dimensional optoacoustic images of small absorbing spheres in prostate-tissue phantoms. [Work supported by NIH and FIRCA grants.

  20. Apparatus for Leak Testing Pressurized Hoses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underwood, Steve D. (Inventor); Garrison, Steve G. (Inventor); Gant, Bobby D. (Inventor); Palmer, John R. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A hose-attaching apparatus for leak-testing a pressurized hose may include a hose-attaching member. A bore may extend through the hose-attaching member. An internal annular cavity may extend coaxially around the bore. At least one of a detector probe hole and a detector probe may be connected to the internal annular cavity. At least a portion of the bore may have a diameter which is at least one of substantially equal to and less than a diameter of a hose to be leak-tested.

  1. Apparatus Translates Crossed-Laser-Beam Probe Volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, Gregory C.; South, Bruce W.; Exton, Reginald J.

    1994-01-01

    Optomechanical apparatus translates probe volume of crossed-beam laser velocimeter or similar instrument while maintaining optical alignment of beams. Measures velocity, pressure, and temperature of flowing gas at several locations. Repeated tedious realignments no longer necessary. Designed to accommodate stimulated-Raman-gain spectrometer for noninvasive measurement of local conditions in flowing gas in supersonic wind tunnel. Applicable to other techniques like coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy involving use of laser beams crossed at small angles (10 degrees or less).

  2. Computational technique for plasma parameters determination using Langmuir probe data

    SciTech Connect

    Negrea, C.; Manea, V.; Covlea, V.; Jipa, A.

    2011-05-15

    In the present work, we consider a new numerical method for processing the experimental information on the electron energy distribution function obtained with a Langmuir probe in a low-pressure plasma. This method offers the possibility to establish the temperature and concentration of the electrons for different forms of the distribution function. Some specific difficulties of the previous methods used to do such estimations are surpassed using the method proposed in this work.

  3. Waveguide Calibrator for Multi-Element Probe Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sommerfeldt, Scott D.; Blotter, Jonathan D.

    2007-01-01

    A calibrator, referred to as the spider design, can be used to calibrate probes incorporating multiple acoustic sensing elements. The application is an acoustic energy density probe, although the calibrator can be used for other types of acoustic probes. The calibrator relies on the use of acoustic waveguide technology to produce the same acoustic field at each of the sensing elements. As a result, the sensing elements can be separated from each other, but still calibrated through use of the acoustic waveguides. Standard calibration techniques involve placement of an individual microphone into a small cavity with a known, uniform pressure to perform the calibration. If a cavity is manufactured with sufficient size to insert the energy density probe, it has been found that a uniform pressure field can only be created at very low frequencies, due to the size of the probe. The size of the energy density probe prevents one from having the same pressure at each microphone in a cavity, due to the wave effects. The "spider" design probe is effective in calibrating multiple microphones separated from each other. The spider design ensures that the same wave effects exist for each microphone, each with an indivdual sound path. The calibrator s speaker is mounted at one end of a 14-cm-long and 4.1-cm diameter small plane-wave tube. This length was chosen so that the first evanescent cross mode of the plane-wave tube would be attenuated by about 90 dB, thus leaving just the plane wave at the termination plane of the tube. The tube terminates with a small, acrylic plate with five holes placed symmetrically about the axis of the speaker. Four ports are included for the four microphones on the probe. The fifth port is included for the pre-calibrated reference microphone. The ports in the acrylic plate are in turn connected to the probe sensing elements via flexible PVC tubes. These five tubes are the same length, so the acoustic wave effects are the same in each tube. The

  4. Pressure Monitoring Using Hybrid fs/ps Rotational CARS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kearney, Sean P.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the feasibility of gas-phase pressure measurements at kHz-rates using fs/ps rotational CARS. Femtosecond pump and Stokes pulses impulsively prepare a rotational Raman coherence, which is then probed by a high-energy 6-ps pulse introduced at a time delay from the Raman preparation. Rotational CARS spectra were recorded in N2 contained in a room-temperature gas cell for pressures from 0.1 to 3 atm and probe delays ranging from 10-330 ps. Using published self-broadened collisional linewidth data for N2, both the spectrally integrated coherence decay rate and the spectrally resolved decay were investigated as means for detecting pressure. Shot-averaged and single-laser-shot spectra were interrogated for pressure and the accuracy and precision as a function of probe delay and cell pressure are discussed. Single-shot measurement accuracies were within 0.1 to 6.5% when compared to a transducer values, while the precision was generally between 1% and 6% of measured pressure for probe delays of 200 ps or more, and better than 2% as the delay approached 300 ps. A byproduct of the pressure measurement is an independent but simultaneous measurement of the gas temperature.

  5. Day-night variations in malate concentration, osmotic pressure, and hydrostatic pressure in Cereus validus

    SciTech Connect

    Luettge, U.; Nobel, P.S.

    1984-07-01

    Malate concentration and stem osmotic pressure concomitantly increase during nighttime CO/sub 2/ fixation and then decrease during the daytime in the obligate Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plant, Cereus validus (Cactaceae). Changes in malate osmotic pressure calculated using the Van't Hoff relation match the changes in stem osmotic pressure, indicating that changes in malate level affected the water relations of the succulent stems. In contrast to stem osmotic pressure, stem water potential showed little day-night changes, suggesting that changes in cellular hydrostatic pressure occurred. This was corroborated by direct measurements of hydrostatic pressure using the Juelich pressure probe where a small oil-filled micropipette is inserted directly into chlorenchyma cells, which indicated a 4-fold increase in hydrostatic pressure from dusk to dawn. A transient increase of hydrostatic pressure at the beginning of the dark period was correlated with a short period of stomatal closing between afternoon and nighttime CO/sub 2/ fixation, suggesting that the rather complex hydrostatic pressure patterns could be explained by an interplay between the effects of transpiration and malate levels. A second CAM plant, Agave deserti, showed similar day-night changes in hydrostatic pressure in its succulent leaves. It is concluded that, in addition to the inverted stomatal rhythm, the oscillations of malate markedly affect osmotic pressures and hence water relations of CAM plants. 13 references, 4 figures.

  6. Work on Planetary Atmospheres and Planetary Atmosphere Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lester, Peter

    1999-01-01

    A summary final report of work accomplished is presented. Work was performed in the following areas: (1) Galileo Probe science analysis, (2) Galileo probe Atmosphere Structure Instrument, (3) Mars Pathfinder Atmosphere Structure/Meteorology instrument, (4) Mars Pathfinder data analysis, (5) Science Definition for future Mars missions, (6) Viking Lander data analysis, (7) winds in Mars atmosphere Venus atmospheric dynamics, (8) Pioneer Venus Probe data analysis, (9) Pioneer Venus anomaly analysis, (10) Discovery Venus Probe Titan probe instrument design, and (11) laboratory studies of Titan probe impact phenomena. The work has resulted in more than 10 articles published in archive journals, 2 encyclopedia articles, and many working papers. This final report is organized around the four planets on which there was activity, Jupiter, Mars, Venus, and Titan, with a closing section on Miscellaneous Activities. A major objective was to complete the fabrication, test, and evaluation of the atmosphere structure experiment on the Galileo probe, and to receive, analyze and interpret data received from the spacecraft. The instrument was launched on April 14, 1989. Calibration data were taken for all experiment sensors. The data were analyzed, fitted with algorithms, and summarized in a calibration report for use in analyzing and interpreting data returned from Jupiter's atmosphere. The sensors included were the primary science pressure, temperature and acceleration sensors, and the supporting engineering temperature sensors. Computer programs were written to decode the Experiment Data Record and convert the digital numbers to physical quantities, i.e., temperatures, pressures, and accelerations. The project office agreed to obtain telemetry of checkout data from the probe. Work to extend programs written for use on the Pioneer Venus project included: (1) massive heat shield ablation leading to important mass loss during entry; and (2) rapid planet rotation, which introduced

  7. Particle Probe Investigations on the Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Justin; James, R. W.; Nolan, S.; Page, E. J.; Romano, B.; Zuniga, J.; Schlank, C.; Lopez, M.; Karama, J.; Duke-Tinson, O.; Stutzman, B. S.

    2013-10-01

    Coast Guard Academy Plasma Lab(CGAPL) has constructed a Helicon Plasma Experiment. Plasmas will be used in high-temperature and -density diagnostic development for future lab investigations of fusion-grade plasma. Efforts to develop and enhance high temperature and density (1013cm-3 and up) helicon plasmas at low pressures (.01T) reported by Toki et al., continue. HPX will integrate a 32-channel National Instruments DAQ(Data Acquisition) board, designed to digitize data from tests. With LabView as the programing language, CGAPL will take samples at 12bits of precision at 2MS/s to create a Graphical User Interface (GUI). The GUI will control experimental variables (one or several concurrent tests) and monitor systems during data collection. Data collection will be conducted with particle probes, currently under construction. Probes, used to discern the plasma mode transitions, will measure plasma particle velocity, temperature, density and floating potential at different regimes. Once independent triple and mach probes for surface point investigations are installed, a triple probe array to produce a more comprehensive density and surface view will follow. Progress on development of GUI and construction of probes will be reported. Supported by U.S. DEPS Grant [HEL-JTO] PRWJFY12.

  8. Response of the Patterson probe in the transition flow regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabe, Martin

    2012-11-01

    The free-molecular impact pressure probe, also known as Patterson probe, is known and applied for more than half a century now to deduce the number flux of a single species in highly rarefied inert flow. While the working principle is conceptually simple, interpretation of the gauge readings may not be, but approximate formulas for evaluation exist. In the context of cold-gas plume flow and interaction experiments with the obvious large variations in Mach and Knudsen numbers, it may not be clear initially, whether the signals measured with the Patterson probe are obtained in free-molecular flow environment, and hence, whether the mentioned evaluation techniques may be employed. A series of numerical experiments have been conducted using the Direct Simulation Monte-Carlo method, to study the response of the Patterson probe to prescribed free-stream conditions in the transitional flow regime. From the computational results we infer analytical expressions that describe the probe response in transitional regime at zero angle of attack.

  9. Low Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Low Blood Pressure Updated:Aug 30,2016 To know if you ... to learn more about blood pressure . If my blood pressure stays around 85/55, do I have a ...

  10. Probing the Probes: Fitness Factors For Small Molecule Tools

    PubMed Central

    Workman, Paul; Collins, Ian

    2010-01-01

    Chemical probes for interrogating biological processes are of considerable current interest. Cell permeable small molecule tools have a major role in facilitating the functional annotation of the human genome, understanding both physiological and pathological processes, and validating new molecular targets. To be valuable, chemical tools must satisfy necessary criteria and recent publications have suggested objective guidelines for what makes a useful chemical probe. Although recognizing that such guidelines may be valuable, we caution against overly restrictive rules that may stifle innovation in favor of a “fit-for-purpose” approach. Reviewing the literature and providing examples from the cancer field, we recommend a series of “fitness factors” to be considered when assessing chemical probes. We hope this will encourage innovative chemical biology research while minimizing the generation of poor quality and misleading biological data, thus increasing understanding of the particular biological area, to the benefit of basic research and drug discovery. PMID:20609406

  11. Multiple-probe scanning probe microscopes for nanoarchitectonic materials science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Tomonobu; Shingaya, Yoshitaka; Aono, Masakazu

    2016-11-01

    Nanoarchitectonic systems are of interest for utilizing a vast range of nanoscale materials for future applications requiring a huge number of elemental nanocomponents. To explore the science and technology of nanoarchitectonics, advanced characterization tools that can deal with both nanoscale objects and macroscopically extended nanosystems are demanded. Multiple-probe scanning probe microscopes (MP-SPMs) are powerful tools that meet this demand because they take the advantages of conventional scanning probe microscopes and realize atomically precise electrical measurements, which cannot be done with conventional microprobing systems widely used in characterizing materials and devices. Furthermore, an MP-SPM can be used to operate some nanoarchitectonic systems. In this review, we overview the indispensable features of MP-SPMs together with the past, present and future of MP-SPM technology.

  12. Using electrical resistance probes for moisture determination in switchgrass windrows

    SciTech Connect

    Chesser Jr., G. D.; Davis, J. D.; Purswell, J. L.; Lemus, R.

    2011-08-01

    Determining moisture levels in windrowed biomass is important for both forage producers and researchers. Energy crops such as switchgrass have been troublesome when using the standard methods set for electrical resistance meters. The objectives of this study were to i) develop the methodologies needed to measure MC in switchgrass using electrical resistance meters, ii) to determine the effects of pressure and probe orientation on MC measurement and iii) to generate MC calibration equations for electrical resistance meters using switchgrass in the senescence growth stage. Two meters (Meter 1, Farmex HT-PRO; Meter 2, Delmhorst F-2000) were selected based on commercial availability. A forage compression apparatus was designed and constructed with on-farm materials and methods to provide a simple system of applying pressure achievable by any forage producer or researcher in the field. Two trials were performed to test four levels of moisture contents (10, 20, 30, and 40%), five pressures (0, 1.68, 3.11, 4.55, 6.22 kN/m 2; 0, 35, 65, 95, 130 lb/ft 2), and two probe orientations (axial and transverse) in a 4x5x2 factorial design. Results indicated that meter accuracy increased as pressure increased. Regression models accounted for 91% and 81% of the variation for Meter 1 and Meter 2 at a pressure of 4.55 kN/m 2 (95 lb/ft 2) and a transverse probe orientation. Calibration equations were developed for both meters to improve moisture measurement accuracy for farmers and researchers in the field.

  13. Data analysis of P sub T/P sub S noseboom probe testing on F100 engine P680072 at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foote, C. H.

    1980-01-01

    Results from the altitude testing of a P sub T/P sub S noseboom probe on the F100 engine are discused. The results are consistent with sea level test results. The F100 engine altitude test verified automatic downmatch with the engine pressure ratio control, and backup control inlet case static pressure demonstrated sufficient accuracy for backup control fuel flow scheduling. The production P6 probe measured Station 6 pressures accurately for both undistorted and distorted inlet airflows.

  14. Miniature probes for use in gas turbine testing. [component reliability measuring instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glawe, G. E.; Krause, L. N.

    1974-01-01

    Several examples of miniature probes (null type as well as fixed position) are presented which have proved useful in aircraft and space power systems component testing and are applicable to automotive gas turbine testing. These probes are used to determine component or system performance from the measurement of gas temperature as well as total and static pressure, and flow direction. Detailed drawings of the sensors are presented along with experimental data covering the flow characteristics over the range of intended use.

  15. Hand-held survey probe

    DOEpatents

    Young, Kevin L [Idaho Falls, ID; Hungate, Kevin E [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-02-23

    A system for providing operational feedback to a user of a detection probe may include an optical sensor to generate data corresponding to a position of the detection probe with respect to a surface; a microprocessor to receive the data; a software medium having code to process the data with the microprocessor and pre-programmed parameters, and making a comparison of the data to the parameters; and an indicator device to indicate results of the comparison. A method of providing operational feedback to a user of a detection probe may include generating output data with an optical sensor corresponding to the relative position with respect to a surface; processing the output data, including comparing the output data to pre-programmed parameters; and indicating results of the comparison.

  16. Application of electrostatic Langmuir probe to atmospheric arc plasmas producing nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Shashurin, A.; Li, J.; Zhuang, T.; Keidar, M.; Beilis, I. I.

    2011-07-15

    The temporal evolution of a high pressure He arc producing nanotubes was considered and the Langmuir probe technique was applied for plasma parameter measurements. Two modes of arc were observed: cathodic arc where discharge is supported by erosion of cathode material and anodic arc which is supported by ablation of the anode packed with carbon and metallic catalysts in which carbon nanotubes are synthesized. Voltage-current (V-I) characteristics of single probes were measured and unusually low ratio of saturation current on positively biased probe to that on negatively biased of about 1-4 was observed. This effect was explained by increase of measured current at the negatively biased probe above the level of ion saturation current due to secondary electron emission from the probe surface. Since utilization of standard collisionless approach to determine plasma parameters from the measured V-I characteristic is not correct, the electron saturation current was used to estimate the plasma density.

  17. Quantum Dots as Cellular Probes

    SciTech Connect

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Gu, Weiwei; Larabell, Carolyn

    2004-09-16

    Robust and bright light emitters, semiconductor nanocrystals[quantum dots (QDs)] have been adopted as a new class of fluorescent labels. Six years after the first experiments of their uses in biological applications, there have been dramatic improvements in understanding surface chemistry, biocompatibility, and targeting specificity. Many studies have shown the great potential of using quantum dots as new probes in vitro and in vivo. This review summarizes the recent advances of quantum dot usage at the cellular level, including immunolabeling, cell tracking, in situ hybridization, FRET, in vivo imaging, and other related technologies. Limitations and potential future uses of quantum dot probes are also discussed.

  18. Probe Project Status and Accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    Burris, RD

    2001-05-07

    The Probe project has completed its first full year of operation. In this document we will describe the status of the project as of December 31, 2000. We will describe the equipment configuration, then give brief descriptions of the various projects undertaken to date. We will mention first those projects performed for outside entities and then those performed for the benefit of one of the Probe sites. We will then describe projects that are under consideration, including some for which initial actions have been taken and others which are somewhat longer-term.

  19. In-flight comparisons of boundary-layer and wake measurement probes for incompressible flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mertaugh, L. J., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The results are presented of in-flight comparisons of a number of boundary-layer and wake measurement probes suitable for low-speed flight-test investigations. The tested boundary-layer probes included a traversing total-pressure probe and a hot-film probe mounted on an internally-mounted drive mechanism, a curved and a straight boundary-layer rake, and a traversing hot-film probe with an externally-mounted drive mechanism. The wake measuring devices included a traversing, self-aligning probe, a wake rake, and an integrating wake rate. The boundary-layer data are compared with a common reference velocity profile and comments given regarding the accuracy of the static-pressure and total-pressure measurements. Discussions on the various calibration presentations used with hot-wire and hot-film sensors and various aspects of improving the accuracy of hot-film sensor results are given in the appendix of this report.

  20. Automated robotic equipment for ultrasonic inspection of pressurizer heater wells

    SciTech Connect

    Nachbar, Henry D.; DeRossi, Raymond S.; Mullins, Lawrence E.

    1993-01-01

    A robotic device for remotely inspecting pressurizer heater wells is provided which has the advantages of quickly, precisely, and reliably acquiring data at reasonable cost while also reducing radiation exposure of an operator. The device comprises a prober assembly including a probe which enters a heater well, gathers data regarding the condition of the heater well and transmits a signal carrying that data; a mounting device for mounting the probe assembly at the opening of the heater well so that the probe can enter the heater well; a first motor mounted on the mounting device for providing movement of the probe assembly in an axial direction; and a second motor mounted on the mounting device for providing rotation of the probe assembly. This arrangement enables full inspection of the heater well to be carried out.

  1. F-18 SRA closeup of nose cap showing Advanced L-Probe Air Data Integration experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This L-shaped probe mounted on the forward fuselage of a modified F-18 Systems Research Aircraft was the focus of an air data collection experiment flown at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The Advanced L-Probe Air Data Integration (ALADIN) experiment focused on providing pilots with angle-of-attack and angle-of-sideslip information as well as traditional airspeed and altitude data from a single system. For the experiment, the probes--one mounted on either side of the F-18's forward fuselage--were hooked to a series of four transducers, which relayed pressure measurements to an on-board research computer.

  2. Sagnac interferometry as a probe to the commutation relation of a macroscopic quantum mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Ran; Gong Xuefei; Pei Shouyong; Luo Ziren; Lau, Y. K.

    2010-09-15

    Single photon Sagnac interferometry as a probe to macroscopic quantum mechanics is considered at the theoretical level. For a freely moving macroscopic quantum mirror susceptible to radiation pressure force inside a Sagnac interferometer, a careful analysis of the input-output relation reveals that the particle spectrum readout at the bright and dark ports encode information concerning the noncommutativity of position and momentum of the macroscopic mirror. A feasible experimental scheme to probe the commutation relation of a macroscopic quantum mirror is outlined to explore the possible frontier between classical and quantum regimes. In the Appendix, the case of Michelson interferometry as a feasible probe is also sketched.

  3. Pancreas tumor interstitial pressure catheter measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieskoski, Michael D.; Gunn, Jason; Marra, Kayla; Trembly, B. Stuart; Pogue, Brian W.

    2016-03-01

    This paper highlights the methodology in measuring interstitial pressure in pancreatic adenocarcinoma tumors. A Millar Mikrotip pressure catheter (SPR-671) was used in this study and a system was built to amplify and filter the output signal for data collection. The Millar pressure catheter was calibrated prior to each experiment in a water column at 37°C, range of 0 to 60 inH2O (112 mmHg), resulting in a calibration factor of 33 mV / 1 inH2O. The interstitial pressures measured in two orthotopically grown pancreatic adenocarcinoma tumor were 57 mmHg and 48 mmHg, respectively. Verteporfin uptake into the pancreatic adenocarcinoma tumor was measured using a probe-based experimental dosimeter.

  4. Evaluation of ion collection area in Faraday probes

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Daniel L.; Gallimore, Alec D.

    2010-06-15

    A Faraday probe with three concentric rings was designed and fabricated to assess the effect of gap width and collector diameter in a systematic study of the diagnostic ion collection area. The nested Faraday probe consisted of two concentric collector rings and an outer guard ring, which enabled simultaneous current density measurements on the inner and outer collectors. Two versions of the outer collector were fabricated to create gaps of 0.5 and 1.5 mm between the rings. Distribution of current density in the plume of a low-power Hall thruster ion source was measured in azimuthal sweeps at constant radius from 8 to 20 thruster diameters downstream of the exit plane with variation in facility background pressure. A new analytical technique is proposed to account for ions collected in the gap between the Faraday probe collector and guard ring. This method is shown to exhibit excellent agreement between all nested Faraday probe configurations, and to reduce the magnitude of integrated ion beam current to levels consistent with Hall thruster performance analyses. The technique is further studied by varying the guard ring bias potential with a fixed collector bias potential, thereby controlling ion collection in the gap. Results are in agreement with predictions based on the proposed analytical technique. The method is applied to a past study comparing the measured ion current density profiles of two Faraday probe designs. These findings provide new insight into the nature of ion collection in Faraday probe diagnostics, and lead to improved accuracy with a significant reduction in measurement uncertainty.

  5. A fluorescent probe for ecstasy.

    PubMed

    Masseroni, D; Biavardi, E; Genovese, D; Rampazzo, E; Prodi, L; Dalcanale, E

    2015-08-18

    A nanostructure formed by the insertion in silica nanoparticles of a pyrene-derivatized cavitand, which is able to specifically recognize ecstasy in water, is presented. The absence of effects from interferents and an efficient electron transfer process occurring after complexation of ecstasy, makes this system an efficient fluorescent probe for this popular drug.

  6. Samara Probe For Remote Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, James D.

    1989-01-01

    Imaging probe descends through atmosphere of planet, obtaining images of ground surface as it travels. Released from aircraft over Earth or from spacecraft over another planet. Body and single wing shaped like samara - winged seed like those of maple trees. Rotates as descends, providing panoramic view of terrain below. Radio image obtained by video camera to aircraft or spacecraft overhead.

  7. SUB-SLAB PROBE INSTALLATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sub-slab sampling has become an integral part of vapor intrusion investigations. It is now recommended in guidance documents developed by EPA and most states. A method for sub-slab probe installation was devised in 2002, presented at conferences through 2005, and finally docume...

  8. Health. CEM Probe, January 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Billington, Roy

    The importance of health and its relationship to personal and community life are explored in this issue of PROBE. Designed to acquaint British secondary school youth with topical problems, the series contains discussion and case studies of national and world issues, followed by questions for student discussion and research. Nine chapters comprise…

  9. Galileo Space Probe News Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-01-01

    This NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) video release presents Part 3 of a press conference from Ames Research Center (ARC) regarding the successful entry of the Galileo Space Probe into Jupiter's atmosphere. The press conference panel is comprised of twelve principal investigators and project scientists that oversee the Galileo mission. The press conference question and answer period is continued from Part 2. Atmospheric thermal structure, water abundances, wind profiles, radiation, cloud structure, chemical composition, and electricity are among the topics discussed. The question and answer period is followed by a presentation in which all of the visuals that are shown during the press conference are reviewed. The video ends with several animations depicting the entry of the probe, descent, and the first measurements of the Jovian atmosphere, historical footage of the building of the probe, and a short interview with Dr. Richard Young (Galileo Probe Scientist, ARC). Parts 1 and 2 of the press conference can be found in document numbers NONP-NASA-VT-2000001073, and NONP-NASA-VT-2000001074.

  10. OCR Pace on Probes Quickens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Lesli A.

    2011-01-01

    In the 21 months since U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan stood on an iconic bridge in Selma, Alabama, and pledged to aggressively combat discrimination in the nation's schools, federal education officials have launched dozens of new probes in school districts and states that reach into civil rights issues that previously received little, if…

  11. NASA Smart Surgical Probe Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mah, Robert W.; Andrews, Russell J.; Jeffrey, Stefanie S.; Guerrero, Michael; Papasin, Richard; Koga, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Information Technologies being developed by NASA to assist astronaut-physician in responding to medical emergencies during long space flights are being employed for the improvement of women's health in the form of "smart surgical probe". This technology, initially developed for neurosurgery applications, not only has enormous potential for the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer, but broad applicability to a wide range of medical challenges. For the breast cancer application, the smart surgical probe is being designed to "see" a suspicious lump, determine by its features if it is cancerous, and ultimately predict how the disease may progress. A revolutionary early breast cancer detection tool based on this technology has been developed by a commercial company and is being tested in human clinical trials at the University of California at Davis, School of Medicine. The smart surgical probe technology makes use of adaptive intelligent software (hybrid neural networks/fuzzy logic algorithms) with the most advanced physiologic sensors to provide real-time in vivo tissue characterization for the detection, diagnosis and treatment of tumors, including determination of tumor microenvironment and evaluation of tumor margins. The software solutions and tools from these medical applications will lead to the development of better real-time minimally-invasive smart surgical probes for emergency medical care and treatment of astronauts on long space flights.

  12. Nucleic acid probes in diagnostic medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberry, Phillip A.

    1991-01-01

    The need for improved diagnostic procedures is outlined and variations in probe technology are briefly reviewed. A discussion of the application of probe technology to the diagnosis of disease in animals and humans is presented. A comparison of probe versus nonprobe diagnostics and isotopic versus nonisotopic probes is made and the current state of sequence amplification is described. The current market status of nucleic acid probes is reviewed with respect to their diagnostic application in human and veterinary medicine. Representative product examples are described and information on probes being developed that offer promise as future products is discussed.

  13. Trityl-based EPR probe with enhanced sensitivity to oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Bobko, Andrey A.; Dhimitruka, Ilirian; Eubank, Timothy D.; Marsh, Clay B.; Zweier, Jay L.; Khramtsov, Valery V.

    2009-01-01

    An asymmetric derivative of triarylmethyl radical, TAM-H, containing one aldehyde and two carboxyl groups was synthesized. The electron paramagnetic resonance, EPR, spectrum of TAM-H is characterized by a doublet of narrow lines with linewidth of 105 mG in anoxic conditions and hyperfine interaction constant 245 mG. The partial overlap of the components of the doublet results in enhanced sensitivity of the spectral amplitudes ratio to oxygen compared with oxygen-induced linewidth broadening of a single line. Application of the TAM-H probe allows for EPR measurements in an extended range of oxygen pressures from atmospheric to 1 mmHg whereas the EPR spectrum linewidth of the popular TAM-based oxygen sensor, Oxo63, is practically insensitive to oxygen partial pressures below 20 mmHg. Enhanced sensitivity of TAM-H probe relative to Oxo63 was demonstrated in detection of oxygen consumption by Met-1 cancer cells. The TAM-H probe allowed prolonged measurements of oxygen depletion during the hypoxia stage and down to true anoxia (≤ 1.5 mmHg). PMID:19523513

  14. Continuous-wave far-infrared ESR spectrometer for high-pressure measurements.

    PubMed

    Náfrádi, Bálint; Gaál, Richárd; Sienkiewicz, Andrzej; Fehér, Titusz; Forró, László

    2008-12-01

    We present a newly-developed microwave probe for performing sensitive high-field/multi-frequency electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements under high hydrostatic pressures. The system consists of a BeCu-made pressure-resistant vessel, which accommodates the investigated sample and a diamond microwave coupling window. The probe's interior is completely filled with a pressure-transmitting fluid. The setup operates in reflection mode and can easily be assembled with a standard oversized microwave circuitry. The probe-head withstands hydrostatic pressures up to 1.6 GPa and interfaces with our home-built quasi-optical high-field ESR facility, operating in a millimeter/submillimeter frequency range of 105-420 GHz and in magnetic fields up to 16 T. The overall performance of the probe was tested, while studying the pressure-induced changes in the spin-relaxation mechanisms of a quasi-1D conducting polymer, KC(60). The preliminary measurements revealed that the probe yields similar signal-to-noise ratio to that of commercially available low-frequency ESR spectrometers. Moreover, by observing the conduction electron spin resonance (CESR) linewidth broadening for KC(60) in an unprecedented microwave frequency range of 210-420 GHz and in the pressure range of up to 1.6 GPa, we demonstrate that a combination of high-pressure ESR probe and high-field/multi-frequency spectrometer allows us to measure the spin relaxation rates in conducting spin systems, like the quasi-1D conductor, KC(60).

  15. Piston cylinder cell for high pressure ultrasonic pulse echo measurements.

    PubMed

    Kepa, M W; Ridley, C J; Kamenev, K V; Huxley, A D

    2016-08-01

    Ultrasonic techniques such as pulse echo, vibrating reed, or resonant ultrasound spectroscopy are powerful probes not only for studying elasticity but also for investigating electronic and magnetic properties. Here, we report on the design of a high pressure ultrasonic pulse echo apparatus, based on a piston cylinder cell, with a simplified electronic setup that operates with a single coaxial cable and requires sample lengths of mm only. The design allows simultaneous measurements of ultrasonic velocities and attenuation coefficients up to a pressure of 1.5 GPa. We illustrate the performance of the cell by probing the phase diagram of a single crystal of the ferromagnetic superconductor UGe2. PMID:27587156

  16. Piston cylinder cell for high pressure ultrasonic pulse echo measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepa, M. W.; Ridley, C. J.; Kamenev, K. V.; Huxley, A. D.

    2016-08-01

    Ultrasonic techniques such as pulse echo, vibrating reed, or resonant ultrasound spectroscopy are powerful probes not only for studying elasticity but also for investigating electronic and magnetic properties. Here, we report on the design of a high pressure ultrasonic pulse echo apparatus, based on a piston cylinder cell, with a simplified electronic setup that operates with a single coaxial cable and requires sample lengths of mm only. The design allows simultaneous measurements of ultrasonic velocities and attenuation coefficients up to a pressure of 1.5 GPa. We illustrate the performance of the cell by probing the phase diagram of a single crystal of the ferromagnetic superconductor UGe2.

  17. Flexible Cryogenic Temperature and Liquid-Level Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haberbusch, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Lightweight, flexible probes have been developed for measuring temperatures at multiple locations in tanks that contain possibly pressurized cryogenic fluids. If the fluid in a given tank is subcritical (that is, if it consists of a liquid and its vapor), then in one of two modes of operation, the temperature measurements made by a probe of this type can be used to deduce the approximate level of the liquid. The temperature sensors are silicon diodes located at intervals along a probe. If the probe is to be used to measure a temperature gradient along a given axis in the tank, then the probe must be mounted along that axis. In the temperature-measurement mode, a constant small electric current is applied to each diode and the voltage across the diode a known function of the current and temperature is measured as an indication of its temperature. For the purpose of this measurement, small electric current signifies a current that is not large enough to cause a significant increase in the measured temperature. More specifically, the probe design calls for a current of 10 A, which, in the cryogenic temperature range of interest, generates heat at a rate of only about 0.01 mW per diode. In the liquid-level-sensing mode, one applies a larger current (30 mA) to each diode so as to heat each diode appreciably (with a power of about 36 mW in the temperature range of interest). Because the liquid cools the diode faster than does the vapor, the temperature of the diode is less when the diode is immersed in the liquid than when it is above the surface of the liquid. Thus, the temperature (voltage) reading from each diode can be used to determine whether the liquid level is above or below the diode, and one can deduce that the liquid level lies between two adjacent diodes, the lower one of which reads a significantly lower temperature. The aforementioned techniques for measuring temperature and deducing liquid level are not new. What is new here are the designs of the probes

  18. Flexible Cryogenic Temperature and Liquid-Level Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haberbusch, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Lightweight, flexible probes have been developed for measuring temperatures at multiple locations in tanks that contain possibly pressurized cryogenic fluids. If the fluid in a given tank is subcritical (that is, if it consists of a liquid and its vapor), then in one of two modes of operation, the temperature measurements made by a probe of this type can be used to deduce the approximate level of the liquid. The temperature sensors are silicon diodes located at intervals along a probe. If the probe is to be used to measure a temperature gradient along a given axis in the tank, then the probe must be mounted along that axis. In the non-liquid-level-sensing temperature-measurement mode, a constant small electric current is applied to each diode and the voltage across the diode . a known function of the current and temperature . is measured as an indication of its temperature. For the purpose of this measurement, "small electric current" signifies a current that is not large enough to cause a significant increase in the measured temperature. More specifically, the probe design calls for a current of 10 A, which, in the cryogenic temperature range of interest, generates heat at a rate of only about 0.01 mW per diode. In the liquid-level-sensing mode, one applies a larger current (30 mA) to each diode so as to heat each diode appreciably (with a power of about 36 mW in the temperature range of interest). Because the liquid cools the diode faster than does the vapor, the temperature of the diode is less when diode is immersed in the liquid than when it is above the surface of the liquid. Thus, the temperature (voltage) reading from each diode can be used to determine whether the liquid level is above or below the diode, and one can deduce that the liquid level lies between two adjacent diodes, the lower one of which reads a significantly lower temperature. The aforementioned techniques for measuring temperature and deducing liquid level are not new. What is new here are

  19. Synergy Between Entry Probes and Orbiters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Richard E.

    2005-01-01

    We identify two catagories of probe-orbiter interactions which benefit the science return from a particular mission. The first category is termed "Mission Design Aspects". This category is meant to describe those aspects of the mission design involving the orbiter that affect the science return from the probe(s). The second category of probe-orbiter interaction is termed "Orbiter-Probe Science Interactions", and is meant to include interactions between oribter and probe(s) that directly involve science measurements made from each platform. Two mission related aspects of probe-orbiter interactions are delivery of a probe(s) to the entry site(s) by an orbiter, and communication between each probe and the orbiter. We consider four general probe-orbiter science interactions that greatly enhance, or in certain cases are essential for, the mission science return. The four topics are, global context of the probe entry site(s), ground truth for remote sensing observations of an orbiter, atmospheric composition measurements, and wind measurements.

  20. Optical Pressure-Temperature Sensor for a Combustion Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiley, John; Korman, Valentin; Gregory, Don

    2008-01-01

    A compact sensor for measuring temperature and pressure in a combusti on chamber has been proposed. The proposed sensor would include two optically birefringent, transmissive crystalline wedges: one of sapph ire (Al2O3) and one of magnesium oxide (MgO), the optical properties of both of which vary with temperature and pressure. The wedges wou ld be separated by a vapor-deposited thin-film transducer, which wou ld be primarily temperaturesensitive (in contradistinction to pressur e- sensitive) when attached to a crystalline substrate. The sensor w ould be housed in a rugged probe to survive the extreme temperatures and pressures in a combustion chamber.

  1. Ultra-light flexible temperature and liquid level sensing probe for cryogenic propellant mass gauging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberbusch, Mark S.

    2002-05-01

    The Cryo-Tracker™, a patent pending, ultra-light, flexible sensing probe for measuring fluid temperature gradients and liquid level has been created for launch vehicle mass gauging systems for cryogenic propellant tanks. The unique one-piece, polyimide mechanically-flexible sensing probe integrates multiple dual-use silicon diode sensing elements within the probe substrate. The Cryo-Tracker has several features including: flexibility, lightweight, high strength, solderless connections, and one-piece construction. The easy-to-install flexible sensing probe measures temperature between 576 °R (320 °K) down to 2.5 °R (1.4 °K). The Cryo-Tracker™ can be integrated into existing standard tank designs or into vehicles that have irregular shaped tank geometries that conform to the aerodynamic shape of the vehicle. The Cryo-Tracker™ probe technology was selected by the NASA 2nd Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle Program to provide accurate stratified propellant mass gauging on future launch vehicles that utilize densified cryogenic propellants. Prototype probes were constructed with one and two sensing elements per probe and tested in liquid nitrogen and liquid oxygen. Several Cryo-Tracker test programs are in progress including a liquid hydrogen test and a high-pressure liquid oxygen test. The objective of this paper is to report test results demonstrating the capabilities of the new probe technology and to provide an update on the current test programs.

  2. CTU Optical probes for liquid phase detection in the 1000 MW steam turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolovratník, Michal; Bartoš, Ondřej

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to introduce the measurement capacity of a new generation of CTU's optical probes to determine the liquid phase distribution in steam turbines and other energy systems. At the same time the paper presents the first part of the results concerning output wetness achieved through the use of experimental research performed with the probes in a new low pressure (LP) part of the steam turbine 1000MW in the Temelin nuclear power plant (ETE). Two different probes were used. A small size extinction probe with a diameter of 25mm which was developed for measuring in a wider range of turbines in comparison with the previous generation with a diameter of 50mm. The second probe used was a photogrammetric probe developed to observe the coarse droplets. This probe is still under development and this measurement was focused on verifying the capabilities of the probe. The data processing technique is presented together with yielded examples of the wetness distribution along the last blade of the 1000MW steam turbine. The experimental measurement was done in cooperation with Doosan Škoda Power s.r.o. (DSP).

  3. Effect of Reynolds Number and Mach Number on flow angularity probe sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, L. A.; Adcock, J. B.

    1986-01-01

    Preliminary calibrations were performed on nine flow angularity probes in the Langley 7- by 10-Foot High-Speed Tunnel (7 x 10 HST) and the Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (0.3-m TCT). These probes will be used in surveying the test section flows of the National Transonic Facility (NTF). The probes used in this study have a pyramid head with five pressure orifices. The calibrations consisted of both isolated probe measurements and rake-mounted multiprobe measurements that covered a range of subsonic Mach numbers up to 0.90 and Reynolds numbers per foot up to 40 X 10 to the 6th power. The preliminary calibration in the 7 x 10 HST included testing the probes both individually and in a rake. The 0.3-m TCT calibration tested two probes singly at varying Reynolds numbers. The results from these tests include Mach number, Reynolds number, and rake-mounting effects. The results of these tests showed probe sensitivity to be slightly affected by Mach number. At Reynolds numbers per foot above 10 x 10 to the 6th power, the probe did not exhibit a Reynolds number sensitivity.

  4. Free-stream static pressure measurements in the Longshot hypersonic wind tunnel and sensitivity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossir, Guillaume; Van Hove, Bart; Paris, Sébastien; Rambaud, Patrick; Chazot, Olivier

    2016-05-01

    The performance of fast-response slender static pressure probes is evaluated in the short-duration, cold-gas, VKI Longshot hypersonic wind tunnel. Free-stream Mach numbers range between 9.5 and 12, and unit Reynolds numbers are within 3-10 × 106/m. Absolute pressure sensors are fitted within the probes, and an inexpensive calibration method, suited to low static pressure environments (200-1000 Pa), is described. Transfer functions relating the probe measurements p w to the free-stream static pressure p ∞ are established for the Longshot flow conditions based on numerical simulations. The pressure ratios p w / p ∞ are found to be close to unity for both laminar and turbulent boundary layers. Weak viscous effects characterized by small viscous interaction parameters {bar{χ }}<1.5 are confirmed experimentally for probe aspect ratios of L/ D > 16.5 by installing multiple pressure sensors in a single probe. The effect of pressure orifice geometry is also evaluated experimentally and found to be negligible for either straight or chamfered holes, 0.6-1 mm in diameter. No sensitivity to probe angle of attack could be evidenced for α < 0.33°. Pressure measurements are compared to theoretical predictions assuming an isentropic nozzle flow expansion. Significant deviations from this ideal case and the Mach 14 contoured nozzle design are uncovered. Validation of the static pressure measurements is obtained by comparing shock wave locations on Schlieren photographs to numerical predictions using free-stream properties derived from the static pressure probes. While these results apply to the Longshot wind tunnel, the present methodology and sensitivity analysis can guide similar investigations for other hypersonic test facilities.

  5. Labeling proteins via hole burning of their aromatic amino acids: pressure tuning spectroscopy of BPTI.

    PubMed Central

    Stübner, Markus; Hecht, Christoph; Friedrich, Josef

    2002-01-01

    We demonstrate hole burning on a protein by using an intrinsic aromatic amino acid as a probe. The protein is bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI), the labeled amino acid is tyrosine. Only one of the four tyrosines could be burned. As an application we present pressure tuning experiments from which the local compressibility around the burned tyrosine probe is determined. PMID:12496122

  6. Intracranial pressure monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    ICP monitoring; CSF pressure monitoring ... There are 3 ways to monitor pressure in the skull (intracranial pressure). INTRAVENTRICULAR CATHETER The intraventricular catheter is the most accurate monitoring method. To insert an intraventricular catheter, a ...

  7. Dealing with Peer Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Dealing With Peer Pressure KidsHealth > For Kids > Dealing With Peer Pressure ... Let's talk about how to handle it. Defining Peer Pressure Peers influence your life, even if you ...

  8. Skin (Pressure) Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Skin dryness Next Topic Sleep problems Skin (pressure) sores A skin or pressure sore develops when the blood supply to an ... is bedridden or always in a wheelchair puts pressure on the same places much of the time. ...

  9. High blood pressure medicines

    MedlinePlus

    Hypertension - medicines ... blood vessel diseases. You may need to take medicines to lower your blood pressure if lifestyle changes ... blood pressure to the target level. WHEN ARE MEDICINES FOR HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE USED Most of the ...

  10. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Print Page Text Size: A A A Listen High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) Nearly 1 in 3 American adults has high ... weight. How Will I Know if I Have High Blood Pressure? High blood pressure is a silent problem — you ...

  11. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Jesse D; Sulchek, Todd A; Feigin, Stuart C

    2014-04-29

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  12. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Jesse D; Sulchek, Todd A; Feigin, Stuart C

    2013-04-30

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  13. Overview of Probe-based Storage Technologies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Yang, Ci Hui; Wen, Jing; Gong, Si Di; Peng, Yuan Xiu

    2016-12-01

    The current world is in the age of big data where the total amount of global digital data is growing up at an incredible rate. This indeed necessitates a drastic enhancement on the capacity of conventional data storage devices that are, however, suffering from their respective physical drawbacks. Under this circumstance, it is essential to aggressively explore and develop alternative promising mass storage devices, leading to the presence of probe-based storage devices. In this paper, the physical principles and the current status of several different probe storage devices, including thermo-mechanical probe memory, magnetic probe memory, ferroelectric probe memory, and phase-change probe memory, are reviewed in details, as well as their respective merits and weakness. This paper provides an overview of the emerging probe memories potentially for next generation storage device so as to motivate the exploration of more innovative technologies to push forward the development of the probe storage devices. PMID:27456500

  14. Overview of Probe-based Storage Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Yang, Ci Hui; Wen, Jing; Gong, Si Di; Peng, Yuan Xiu

    2016-07-01

    The current world is in the age of big data where the total amount of global digital data is growing up at an incredible rate. This indeed necessitates a drastic enhancement on the capacity of conventional data storage devices that are, however, suffering from their respective physical drawbacks. Under this circumstance, it is essential to aggressively explore and develop alternative promising mass storage devices, leading to the presence of probe-based storage devices. In this paper, the physical principles and the current status of several different probe storage devices, including thermo-mechanical probe memory, magnetic probe memory, ferroelectric probe memory, and phase-change probe memory, are reviewed in details, as well as their respective merits and weakness. This paper provides an overview of the emerging probe memories potentially for next generation storage device so as to motivate the exploration of more innovative technologies to push forward the development of the probe storage devices.

  15. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Jesse D.; Sulchek, Todd A.; Feigin, Stuart C.

    2010-04-06

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  16. Further capacitive imaging experiments using modified probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xiaokang; Li, Zhen; Yan, An; Li, Wei; Chen, Guoming; Hutchins, David A.

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, capacitive imaging (CI) is growing in popularity within the NDE communities, as it has the potential to test materials and structures for defects that are not easily tested by other techniques. In previous work, The CI technique has been successfully used on a various types of materials, including concrete, glass/carbon fibre composite, steel, etc. In such CI experiments, the probes are normally with symmetric or concentric electrodes etched onto PCBs. In addition to these conventional coplanar PCB probes, modified geometries can be made and they can lead to different applications. A brief overview of these modified probes, including high resolution surface imaging probe, combined CI/eddy current probe, and CI probe using an oscilloscope probe as the sensing electrode, is presented in this work. The potential applications brought by these probes are also discussed.

  17. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Jesse D.; Sulchek, Todd A.; Feigin, Stuart C.

    2012-07-10

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  18. Flush-mounted probe diagnostics for argon glow discharge plasma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liang; Cao, Jinxiang; Liu, Yu; Wang, Jian; Du, Yinchang; Zheng, Zhe; Zhang, Xiao; Wang, Pi; Zhang, Jin; Li, Xiao; Qin, Yongqiang; Zhao, Liang

    2014-09-01

    A comparison is made between plasma parameters measured by a flush-mounted probe (FP) and a cylindrical probe (CP) in argon glow discharge plasma. Parameters compared include the space potential, the plasma density, and the effective electron temperature. It is found that the ion density determined by the FP agrees well with the electron density determined by the CP in the quasi-neutral plasma to better than 10%. Moreover, the space potential and effective electron temperature calculated from electron energy distribution function measured by the FP is consistent with that measured by the CP over the operated discharge current and pressure ranges. These results present the FP can be used as a reliable diagnostic tool in the stable laboratory plasma and also be anticipated to be applied in other complicated plasmas, such as tokamaks, the region of boundary-layer, and so on.

  19. Flush-mounted probe diagnostics for argon glow discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Liang Cao, Jinxiang; Liu, Yu; Wang, Jian; Du, Yinchang; Zheng, Zhe; Zhang, Xiao; Wang, Pi; Zhang, Jin; Li, Xiao; Qin, Yongqiang; Zhao, Liang

    2014-09-15

    A comparison is made between plasma parameters measured by a flush-mounted probe (FP) and a cylindrical probe (CP) in argon glow discharge plasma. Parameters compared include the space potential, the plasma density, and the effective electron temperature. It is found that the ion density determined by the FP agrees well with the electron density determined by the CP in the quasi-neutral plasma to better than 10%. Moreover, the space potential and effective electron temperature calculated from electron energy distribution function measured by the FP is consistent with that measured by the CP over the operated discharge current and pressure ranges. These results present the FP can be used as a reliable diagnostic tool in the stable laboratory plasma and also be anticipated to be applied in other complicated plasmas, such as tokamaks, the region of boundary-layer, and so on.

  20. Optically Levitated Microspheres as a Probe for New Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rider, Alexander; Moore, David; Blakemore, Charles; Lu, Marie; Gratta, Giorgio

    2016-03-01

    We are developing novel techniques to probe new interactions at micron distances using optically levitated dielectric microspheres. Levitated microspheres are an ideal probe for short-range interactions because they are suspended using the radiation pressure at the focus of a laser beam, which means that the microspheres can be precisely manipulated and isolated from the surrounding environment at high vacuum. We have performed a search for unknown charged particles bound within the bulk of the microspheres. Currently, we are searching for the presence of a Chameleon field postulated to explain the presence of dark energy in the universe. In the future we plan to use optically levitated microspheres to search for micron length-scale gravity like interactions that could couple between a microsphere and another mass. We will present resent results from these experiments and plans for future searches for new interactions.

  1. Dynamics of a thin liquid film interacting with an oscillating nano-probe.

    PubMed

    Ledesma-Alonso, René; Tordjeman, Philippe; Legendre, Dominique

    2014-10-21

    The dynamic interaction between a local probe and a viscous liquid film, which provokes the deformation of the latter, has been studied. The pressure difference across the air-liquid interface is calculated with a modified Young-Laplace equation, which takes into account the effects of gravity, surface tension, and liquid film-substrate and probe-liquid attractive interaction potentials. This pressure difference is injected into the lubrication approximation equation, in order to depict the evolution of a viscous thin-film. Additionally, a simple periodic function is added to an average separation distance, in order to define the probe motion. The aforementioned coupled equations, which describe the liquid film dynamics, were analysed and numerically solved. The liquid surface undergoes a periodic motion: the approaching probe provides an input energy to the film, which is stored by the latter by increasing its surface deformation; afterwards, when the probe moves away, an energy dissipation process occurs as the surface attempts to recover its original flat shape. Asymptotic regimes of the film surface oscillation are discerned, for extreme probe oscillation frequencies, and several length, wavenumber and time scales are yielded from our analysis, which is based on the Hankel transform. For a given probe-liquid-substrate system, with well-known physical and geometric parameters, a periodic stationary regime and instantaneous and delayed probe wetting events are discerned from the numerical results, depending on the combination of oscillation parameters. Our results provide an interpretation of the probe-liquid film coupling phenomenon, which occurs whenever an AFM test is performed over a liquid sample. PMID:25142053

  2. Where do pulse oximeter probes break?

    PubMed

    Crede, S; Van der Merwe, G; Hutchinson, J; Woods, D; Karlen, W; Lawn, J

    2014-06-01

    Pulse oximetry, a non-invasive method for accurate assessment of blood oxygen saturation (SPO2), is an important monitoring tool in health care facilities. However, it is often not available in many low-resource settings, due to expense, overly sophisticated design, a lack of organised procurement systems and inadequate medical device management and maintenance structures. Furthermore medical devices are often fragile and not designed to withstand the conditions of low-resource settings. In order to design a probe, better suited to the needs of health care facilities in low-resource settings this study aimed to document the site and nature of pulse oximeter probe breakages in a range of different probe designs in a low to middle income country. A retrospective review of job cards relating to the assessment and repair of damaged or faulty pulse oximeter probes was conducted at a medical device repair company based in Cape Town, South Africa, specializing in pulse oximeter probe repairs. 1,840 job cards relating to the assessment and repair of pulse oximeter probes were reviewed. 60.2 % of probes sent for assessment were finger-clip probes. For all probes, excluding the neonatal wrap probes, the most common point of failure was the probe wiring (>50 %). The neonatal wrap most commonly failed at the strap (51.5 %). The total cost for quoting on the broken pulse oximeter probes and for the subsequent repair of devices, excluding replacement components, amounted to an estimated ZAR 738,810 (USD $98,508). Improving the probe wiring would increase the life span of pulse oximeter probes. Increasing the life span of probes will make pulse oximetry more affordable and accessible. This is of high priority in low-resource settings where frequent repair or replacement of probes is unaffordable or impossible.

  3. Particle pressures in fluidized beds. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, C.S.; Rahman, K.; Jin, C.

    1996-09-01

    This project studies the particle pressure, which may be thought of as the force exerted by the particulate phase of a multiphase mixture, independently of that exerted by other phases. The project is divided into two parts, one concerning gas and the other liquid fluidized beds. Previous work on gas fluidized beds had suggested that the particle pressures are generated by bubbling action. Thus, for these gas fluidized bed studies, the particle pressure is measured around single bubbles generated in 2-D fluidized beds, using special probes developed especially for this purpose. Liquid beds are immune from bubbling and the particle pressures proved too small to measure directly. However, the major interest in particle pressures in liquid beds lies in their stabilizing effect that arises from the effective elasticity (the derivative of the particle pressure with respect to the void fraction), they impart to the bed. So rather than directly measure the particle pressure, the authors inferred the values of the elasticity from measurements of instability growth in liquid beds; the inference was made by first developing a generic stability model (one with all the normally modeled coefficients left undetermined) and then working backwards to determine the unknown coefficients, including the elasticity.

  4. Particle Pressures in Fluidized Beds. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, C.S.; Rahman, K.; Jin, C.

    1996-09-01

    This project studies the particle pressure, which may be thought of as the force exerted by the particulate phase of a multiphase mixture, independently of that exerted by other phases. The project is divided into two parts, one concerning gas and the other liquid fluidized beds. Previous work on gas fluidized beds had suggested that the particle pressures are generated by bubbling action. Thus, for these gas fluidized bed studies, the particle pressure is measured around single bubbles generated in 2-D fluidized beds, using special probes developed especially for this purpose. Liquid beds are immune from bubbling and the particle pressures proved too small to measure directly. However, the major interest in particle pressures in liquid beds lies in their stabilizing effect that arises from the effective elasticity (the derivative of the particle pressure with respect to the void fraction): they impart to the bed. So rather than directly measure the particle pressure, we inferred the values of the elasticity from measurements of instability growth in liquid beds the inference was made by first developing a generic stability model (one with all the normally modeled coefficients left undetermined)and then working backwards to determine the unknown coefficients, including the elasticity.

  5. Metalloprotein-based MRI probes

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Yuri; Jasanoff, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Metalloproteins have long been recognized as key determinants of endogenous contrast in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of biological subjects. More recently, both natural and engineered metalloproteins have been harnessed as biotechnological tools to probe gene expression, enzyme activity, and analyte concentrations by MRI. Metalloprotein MRI probes are paramagnetic and function by analogous mechanisms to conventional gadolinium or iron oxide-based MRI contrast agents. Compared with synthetic agents, metalloproteins typically offer worse sensitivity, but the possibilities of using protein engineering and targeted gene expression approaches in conjunction with metalloprotein contrast agents are powerful and sometimes definitive strengths. This review summarizes theoretical and practical aspects of metalloprotein-based contrast agents, and discusses progress in the exploitation of these proteins for molecular imaging applications. PMID:23376346

  6. Metalloprotein-based MRI probes.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Yuri; Jasanoff, Alan

    2013-04-17

    Metalloproteins have long been recognized as key determinants of endogenous contrast in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of biological subjects. More recently, both natural and engineered metalloproteins have been harnessed as biotechnological tools to probe gene expression, enzyme activity, and analyte concentrations by MRI. Metalloprotein MRI probes are paramagnetic and function by analogous mechanisms to conventional gadolinium or iron oxide-based MRI contrast agents. Compared with synthetic agents, metalloproteins typically offer worse sensitivity, but the possibilities of using protein engineering and targeted gene expression approaches in conjunction with metalloprotein contrast agents are powerful and sometimes definitive strengths. This review summarizes theoretical and practical aspects of metalloprotein-based contrast agents, and discusses progress in the exploitation of these proteins for molecular imaging applications.

  7. Probing zeolites by vibrational spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Bordiga, Silvia; Lamberti, Carlo; Bonino, Francesca; Travert, Arnaud; Thibault-Starzyk, Frédéric

    2015-10-21

    This review addresses the most relevant aspects of vibrational spectroscopies (IR, Raman and INS) applied to zeolites and zeotype materials. Surface Brønsted and Lewis acidity and surface basicity are treated in detail. The role of probe molecules and the relevance of tuning both the proton affinity and the steric hindrance of the probe to fully understand and map the complex site population present inside microporous materials are critically discussed. A detailed description of the methods needed to precisely determine the IR absorption coefficients is given, making IR a quantitative technique. The thermodynamic parameters of the adsorption process that can be extracted from a variable-temperature IR study are described. Finally, cutting-edge space- and time-resolved experiments are reviewed. All aspects are discussed by reporting relevant examples. When available, the theoretical literature related to the reviewed experimental results is reported to support the interpretation of the vibrational spectra on an atomic level.

  8. Fibre Optic Probes For Ophthalmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    1986-09-01

    One of the most interesting fields of application of optical fibre technology is the medicine. Among other medical disciplines the field of ophthalmology is very interesting for these applications because of optical character of the organ of vision. After some remarks of a general nature, and concerning the needs of modern ophthalmology, we will review here our trials to apply optical fibre devices for the optical surgery, therapy and diagnosis in the ophthalmology. The devices include: optical fibre illuminators for the applications with operational probes (crioprobes, termal probes, a vitrotom etc.) and some of the diagnostic equipment (like Goldman lens etc.), optical fibre gradient microoptics for delivering of a laser beam to the appropriate internal structures of the eyeglobe, optical fibre lacrimaloscope for the screening of the lacrimal ducts and another one for the orbit. A general conception of the multitask fibre optic microprobe fcr ophthalmological applications - operations and diagnosis/1/ - concludes the work.

  9. Ion beam probe diagnostic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickok, R. L.; Jennings, W. C.; Woo, J. T.; Connor, K. A.

    1980-07-01

    Tokomak plasmas suitable for diagnostic development were produced in RENTOR following technological improvements in the vacuum chamber and discharge cleaning systems. Secondary ion signals were obtained from the heavy ion beam probe on RENTOR leading to initial estimates of the plasma space potential, which appears to vary by several hundred volts during the plasma pulse. The principle of measuring space potential in a minimum-B geometry was established using an ion gun mounted at the center of the ALEX baseball coil. The neutral beam probe was installed for measuring the space potential using actual secondary ion signals from a hollow cathode arc in ALEX and preliminary tests have begun. The ion beam test stand was significantly altered to allow more flexibility in testing energy analyzers, ion guns, and ion focusing concepts.

  10. Fabrication of molecular tension probes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Bae; Fujii, Rika

    2016-01-01

    A unique bioluminescent imaging probe is introduced for illuminating molecular tension appended by protein-protein interactions (PPIs) of interest. A full-length luciferase is sandwiched between two proteins of interest via minimal flexible linkers. The ligand-activated PPIs append intramolecular tension to the sandwiched luciferase, boosting or dropping the enzymatic activity in a quantitative manner. This method guides construction of a new lineage of bioassays for determining molecular tension appended by ligand-activated PPIs. The summary of the method is: •Molecular tension appended by protein-protein interactions (PPI) is visualized with a luciferase.•Estrogen activities are quantitatively illuminated with the molecular tension probes.•Full-length Renilla luciferase enhances the optical intensities after bending by PPI.

  11. Fabrication of molecular tension probes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Bae; Fujii, Rika

    2016-01-01

    A unique bioluminescent imaging probe is introduced for illuminating molecular tension appended by protein–protein interactions (PPIs) of interest. A full-length luciferase is sandwiched between two proteins of interest via minimal flexible linkers. The ligand-activated PPIs append intramolecular tension to the sandwiched luciferase, boosting or dropping the enzymatic activity in a quantitative manner. This method guides construction of a new lineage of bioassays for determining molecular tension appended by ligand-activated PPIs. The summary of the method is: • Molecular tension appended by protein–protein interactions (PPI) is visualized with a luciferase. • Estrogen activities are quantitatively illuminated with the molecular tension probes. • Full-length Renilla luciferase enhances the optical intensities after bending by PPI. PMID:27222821

  12. Improved double planar probe data analysis technique

    SciTech Connect

    Ghim, Young-chul; Hershkowitz, Noah

    2009-03-15

    Plasma electron number density and ion number density in a dc multidipole weakly collisional Ar plasma are measured with a single planar Langmuir probe and a double planar probe, respectively. A factor of two discrepancy between the two density measurements is resolved by applying Sheridan's empirical formula [T. E. Sheridan, Phys. Plasmas 7, 3084 (2000)] for sheath expansion to the double probe data.

  13. Pioneer Venus Sounder Probe Neutral Gas Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, J. H.; Hodges, R. R., Jr.; Wright, W. W.; Blevins, V. A.; Duerksen, K. D.; Brooks, L. D.

    1980-01-01

    A neutral gas mass spectrometer was flown to Venus as part of the Pioneer Venus Multiprobe to measure the composition of its lower atmosphere. The instrument, mounted in the Sounder Probe, was activated after the probe entered the top of the atmosphere, and it obtained data during the descent from 62 km to the surface. Atmospheric gases were sampled through a pair of microleaks, the effluent from which was pumped by a combination of ion and getter pumping. A pneumatically operated valve, controlled by the ambient atmospheric pressure, maintained the ion source pressure at a nearly constant value during descent while the atmospheric pressure varied by three orders of magnitude. A single focusing magnetic sector field mass spectrometer with mass resolution sufficient to reasonably separate argon from C3H4 at 40 amu provided the mass analysis and relative abundance measurements. A microprocessor controlled the operation of the mass spectrometer through a highly efficient peak-tip stepping routine and data compression algorithm that effected a scan of the mass spectrum from 1 to 208 amu in 64 sec while requiring an information rate of only 40 bits/sec to return the data to earth. A subscale height altitude resolution was thus obtained. Weight, size, and power requirements were minimized to be consistent with interplanetary flight contraints.

  14. Optical probe with reference fiber

    DOEpatents

    Da Silva, Luiz B.; Chase, Charles L.

    2006-03-14

    A system for characterizing tissue includes the steps of generating an emission signal, generating a reference signal, directing the emission signal to and from the tissue, directing the reference signal in a predetermined manner relative to the emission signal, and using the reference signal to compensate the emission signal. In one embodiment compensation is provided for fluctuations in light delivery to the tip of the probe due to cable motion.

  15. Distance Probes of Dark Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, A. G.; Padmanabhan, N.; Aldering, G.; Allen, S. W.; Baltay, C.; Cahn, R. N.; D' Andrea, C. B.; Dalal, N.; Dawson, K. S.; Denney, K. D.; Eisenstein, D. J.; Finley, D. A.; Freedman, W. L.; Ho, S.; Holz, D. E.; Kasen, D.; Kent, S. M.; Kessler, R.; Kuhlmann, S.; Linder, E. V.; Martini, P.; Nugent, P. E.; Perlmutter, S.; Peterson, B. M.; Riess, A. G.; Rubin, D.; Sako, M.; Suntzeff, N. V.; Suzuki, N.; Thomas, R. C.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Woosely, S. E.

    2015-03-15

    We present the results from the Distances subgroup of the Cosmic Frontier Community Planning Study (Snowmass 2013). This document summarizes the current state of the field as well as future prospects and challenges. In addition to the established probes using Type Ia supernovae and baryon acoustic oscillations, we also consider prospective methods based on clusters, active galactic nuclei, gravitational wave sirens and strong lensing time delays.

  16. Intron-Specific Neuropeptide Probes

    PubMed Central

    Gainer, Harold; Ponzio, Todd A.; Yue, Chunmei; Kawasaki, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of changes in pre-mRNA levels by intron-specific probes are generally accepted as more closely reflecting changes in gene transcription rates than are measurements of mRNA levels by exonic probes. This is, in part, because the pre-mRNAs, which include the primary transcript and various splicing intermediates located in the nucleus (also referred to as heteronuclear RNAs, or hnRNAs), are processed rapidly (with half-lives <60 min) as compared to neuropeptide mRNAs, which are then transferred to the cytoplasm and which have much longer half-lives (often over days). In this chapter, we describe the use of exon-and intron-specific probes to evaluate oxytocin (OT) and vasopressin (VP) neuropeptide gene expression by analyses of their mRNAs and hnRNAs by quantitative in situ hybridization (qISH) and also by using specific PCR primers in quantitative, real-time PCR (qPCR) procedures. PMID:21922402

  17. System design of the Pioneer Venus spacecraft. Volume 5: Probe vehicle studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nolte, L. J.; Stephenson, D. S.

    1973-01-01

    A summary of the key issues and studies conducted for the Pioneer Venus spacecraft and the resulting probe designs are presented. The key deceleration module issues are aerodynamic configuration and heat shield material selection. The design and development of the pressure vessel module are explained. Thermal control and science integration of the pressure vessel module are explained. The deceleration module heat shield, parachute and separation/despin are reported. The Thor/Delta and Atlas/Centaur baseline descriptions are provided.

  18. Instrument for near infrared emission spectroscopic probing of human fingertips in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaiken, J.; Deng, Bin; Bussjager, Rebecca J.; Shaheen, George; Rice, David; Stehlik, Dave; Fayos, John

    2010-03-01

    We present instrumentation for probing of volar side fingertip capillary beds with free space coupled near infrared light while collecting Raman, Rayleigh, and Mie scattered light as well as fluorescence. Fingertip skin capillary beds are highly vascularized relative to other tissues and present a desirable target for noninvasive probing of blood. But human hands and fingers in particular are also highly idiosyncratic body parts requiring specific apparatus to allow careful and methodical spectoscopic probing. The apparatus includes means for precise and reproducible placement of the tissues relative to the optical aperture. Appropriate means are provided for applying and maintaining pressure to keep surface tissues immobile during experiments while obtaining the desired blood content and flow. Soft matter, e.g., skin, extrudes into the aperture in response to any applied pressure, e.g., to keep the tissue in registration with the optical system, so the position, contact area, pressure, and force are continuously measured and recorded to produce feedback for an actuator applying force and to discern the compliance of the test subject. The compliance strongly affects the reliability of the measurement and human factors must be adequately managed in the case of in vivo probing. The apparatus produces reproducible observations and measurements that allow consistent probing of the tissues of a wide range of skin types.

  19. Cone-Probe Rake Design and Calibration for Supersonic Wind Tunnel Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Won, Mark J.

    1999-01-01

    A series of experimental investigations were conducted at the NASA Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT) to calibrate cone-probe rakes designed to measure the flow field on 1-2% scale, high-speed wind tunnel models from Mach 2.15 to 2.4. The rakes were developed from a previous design that exhibited unfavorable measurement characteristics caused by a high probe spatial density and flow blockage from the rake body. Calibration parameters included Mach number, total pressure recovery, and flow angularity. Reference conditions were determined from a localized UPWT test section flow survey using a 10deg supersonic wedge probe. Test section Mach number and total pressure were determined using a novel iterative technique that accounted for boundary layer effects on the wedge surface. Cone-probe measurements were correlated to the surveyed flow conditions using analytical functions and recursive algorithms that resolved Mach number, pressure recovery, and flow angle to within +/-0.01, +/-1% and +/-0.1deg , respectively, for angles of attack and sideslip between +/-8deg. Uncertainty estimates indicated the overall cone-probe calibration accuracy was strongly influenced by the propagation of measurement error into the calculated results.

  20. Research on the Sensing Performance of the Tuning Fork-Probe as a Micro Interaction Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Fengli; Li, Xide

    2015-01-01

    The shear force position system has been widely used in scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) and recently extended into the force sensing area. The dynamic properties of a tuning fork (TF), the core component of this system, directly determine the sensing performance of the shear positioning system. Here, we combine experimental results and finite element method (FEM) analysis to investigate the dynamic behavior of the TF probe assembled structure (TF-probe). Results from experiments under varying atmospheric pressures illustrate that the oscillation amplitude of the TF-probe is linearly related to the quality factor, suggesting that decreasing the pressure will dramatically increase the quality factor. The results from FEM analysis reveal the influences of various parameters on the resonant performance of the TF-probe. We compared numerical results of the frequency spectrum with the experimental data collected by our recently developed laser Doppler vibrometer system. Then, we investigated the parameters affecting spatial resolution of the SNOM and the dynamic response of the TF-probe under longitudinal and transverse interactions. It is found that the interactions in transverse direction is much more sensitive than that in the longitudinal direction. Finally, the TF-probe was used to measure the friction coefficient of a silica–silica interface. PMID:26404310

  1. Probe measurements of the space potential in a radio frequency discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godyak, V. A.; Piejak, R. B.

    1990-10-01

    The dc and radio frequency (rf) components (and harmonics) of the probe potential have been measured in the midplane of a 13.56-MHz parallel-plane rf discharge in argon over a wide range of discharge voltages and at gas pressures between 10 mTorr and 1.0 Torr. rf potential measurements were made with different input capacitances to determine the true magnitude of the rf plasma potential and the probe capacitance. For a symmetrically driven rf discharge, the rf plasma potential Vrf is mainly composed of the second harmonic of the driving voltage Vdr over a wide range of gas pressures. For high values of Vdr, Vrf ≊0.1 Vdr while the dc probe potential Vdc is about 0.4 Vdr. These results are in good agreement with corresponding theoretical predictions found in the literature. For an asymmetrically driven rf discharge with equal electrode area, the rf plasma potential has an additional fundamental harmonic component equal to half the rf driving voltage. Values of rf plasma potential and probe capacitance given here allow us to specify the requirements on probe circuitry for different kinds of probe measurements in rf discharges.

  2. Research on the Sensing Performance of the Tuning Fork-Probe as a Micro Interaction Sensor.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fengli; Li, Xide

    2015-01-01

    The shear force position system has been widely used in scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) and recently extended into the force sensing area. The dynamic properties of a tuning fork (TF), the core component of this system, directly determine the sensing performance of the shear positioning system. Here, we combine experimental results and finite element method (FEM) analysis to investigate the dynamic behavior of the TF probe assembled structure (TF-probe). Results from experiments under varying atmospheric pressures illustrate that the oscillation amplitude of the TF-probe is linearly related to the quality factor, suggesting that decreasing the pressure will dramatically increase the quality factor. The results from FEM analysis reveal the influences of various parameters on the resonant performance of the TF-probe. We compared numerical results of the frequency spectrum with the experimental data collected by our recently developed laser Doppler vibrometer system. Then, we investigated the parameters affecting spatial resolution of the SNOM and the dynamic response of the TF-probe under longitudinal and transverse interactions. It is found that the interactions in transverse direction is much more sensitive than that in the longitudinal direction. Finally, the TF-probe was used to measure the friction coefficient of a silica-silica interface. PMID:26404310

  3. Pressure and Temperature Sensitive Paint Measurements on Rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, John

    1999-01-01

    Luminescent molecular probes imbedded in a polymer binder form a temperature or pressure paint. On excitation by light of the proper wavelength, the luminescence, which is quenched either thermally or by oxygen, is detected by a camera or photodetector. From the detected luminescent intensity, temperature and pressure can be determined. The basic photophysics, calibration, accuracy and time response of luminescent paints is described followed by applications in wind tunnels and in rotating machinery.

  4. Atmospheric entry probes for outer planet exploration. Outer planet entry probe technical summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The use of unmanned space probes for investigating the conditions existing on and around the outer planets of the solar system is discussed. The subjects included in the report are: (1) the design of a common entry probe for outer planet missions, (2) the significant trades related to the development of a common probe design, (3) the impact of bus selection on probe design, (4) the impact of probe requirements on bus modifications, and (5) the key technology elements recommended for advanced development. Drawings and illustrations of typical probes are included to show the components and systems used in the space probes.

  5. Energy-Based Tetrahedron Sensor for High-Temperature, High-Pressure Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gee, Kent L.; Sommerfeldt, Scott D.; Blotter, Jonathan D.

    2012-01-01

    An acoustic energy-based probe has been developed that incorporates multiple acoustic sensing elements in order to obtain the acoustic pressure and three-dimensional acoustic particle velocity. With these quantities, the user can obtain various energy-based quantities, including acoustic energy density, acoustic intensity, and acoustic impedance. In this specific development, the probe has been designed to operate in an environment characterized by high temperatures and high pressures as is found in the close vicinity of rocket plumes. Given these capabilities, the probe is designed to be used to investigate the acoustic conditions within the plume of a rocket engine or jet engine to facilitate greater understanding of the noise generation mechanisms in those plumes. The probe features sensors mounted inside a solid sphere. The associated electronics for the probe are contained within the sphere and the associated handle for the probe. More importantly, the design of the probe has desirable properties that reduce the bias errors associated with determining the acoustic pressure and velocity using finite sum and difference techniques. The diameter of the probe dictates the lower and upper operating frequencies for the probe, where accurate measurements can be acquired. The current probe design implements a sphere diameter of 1 in. (2.5 cm), which limits the upper operating frequency to about 4.5 kHz. The sensors are operational up to much higher frequencies, and could be used to acquire pressure data at higher frequencies, but the energy-based measurements are limited to that upper frequency. Larger or smaller spherical probes could be designed to go to lower or higher frequency range

  6. Project Prometheus and Future Entry Probe Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spilker, Thomas R.

    2005-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on project Prometheus and future entry probe missions is shown. The topics include: 1) What Is Project Prometheus?; 2) What Capabilities Can Project Prometheus Offer? What Mission Types Are Being Considered?; 3) Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO); 4) How Are Mission Opportunities Changing?; 5) Missions Of Interest a Year Ago; 6) Missions Now Being Considered For Further Study; 7) Galileo-Style (Conventional) Probe Delivery; 8) Galileo-Style Probe Support; 9) Conventional Delivery and Support of Multiple Probes; 10) How Entry Probe Delivery From an NEP Vehicle Is Different; and 11) Concluding Remarks.

  7. Metallized Capillaries as Probes for Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelletier, Michael

    2003-01-01

    A class of miniature probes has been proposed to supplant the fiber-optic probes used heretofore in some Raman and fluorescence spectroscopic systems. A probe according to the proposal would include a capillary tube coated with metal on its inside to make it reflective. A microlens would be hermetically sealed onto one end of the tube. A spectroscopic probe head would contain a single such probe, which would both deliver laser light to a sample and collect Raman or fluorescent light emitted by the sample.

  8. pH Meter probe assembly

    DOEpatents

    Hale, C.J.

    1983-11-15

    An assembly for mounting a pH probe in a flowing solution, such as a sanitary sewer line, which prevents the sensitive glass portion of the probe from becoming coated with grease, oil, and other contaminants, whereby the probe gives reliable pH indication over an extended period of time. The pH probe assembly utilizes a special filter media and a timed back-rinse feature for flushing clear surface contaminants of the filter. The flushing liquid is of a known pH and is utilized to check performance of the probe. 1 fig.

  9. pH Meter probe assembly

    DOEpatents

    Hale, Charles J.

    1983-01-01

    An assembly for mounting a pH probe in a flowing solution, such as a sanitary sewer line, which prevents the sensitive glass portion of the probe from becoming coated with grease, oil, and other contaminants, whereby the probe gives reliable pH indication over an extended period of time. The pH probe assembly utilizes a special filter media and a timed back-rinse feature for flushing clear surface contaminants of the filter. The flushing liquid is of a known pH and is utilized to check performance of the probe.

  10. Current to a moving cylindrical electrostatic probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoegy, W. R.; Wharton, L. E.

    1972-01-01

    The current collection characteristics of a moving cylindrical Langmuir probe are evaluated for a range of probe speeds and potentials which are applicable to earth and planetary measurements. The current expressions derived include the cases of the general accelerated current, sheath area limited current, orbital motion limited current, and retarded current. For the orbital motion limited current, a simple algebraic expression is obtained which includes and generalizes the Mott-Smith and Langmuir expressions for both a stationary probe and a rapidly moving probe. For a rapidly moving probe a single formula adequately represents both the accelerated and the retarded current.

  11. [HPV contamination of endocavity vaginal ultrasound probes].

    PubMed

    Heard, I; Favre, M

    2015-02-01

    While the use of endovaginal ultrasound probes is increasing, the risk of contamination of women with endocavity vaginal probes was not assessed. In particular, the clinical significance of detection of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, the most common sexually transmitted viral infection, on endovaginal ultrasound probes is uncertain. The recommendations of good practice for decontamination of these probes developed by the High Council for Public Health and the Academy of Medicine have not been evaluated. The objective of this article was to review recent publications concluding to the detection of HPV and human cellular DNA after gynecological examination and disinfection of vaginal ultrasound probes.

  12. Probing adsorption sites for CO on ceria.

    PubMed

    Mudiyanselage, Kumudu; Kim, Hyun You; Senanayake, Sanjaya D; Baber, Ashleigh E; Liu, Ping; Stacchiola, Dario

    2013-10-14

    Ceria based catalysts show remarkable activity for CO conversion reactions such as CO oxidation and the water-gas shift reaction. The identification of adsorption sites on the catalyst surfaces is essential to understand the reaction mechanisms of these reactions, but the complexity of heterogeneous powder catalysts and the propensity of ceria to easily change oxidation states in the presence of small concentrations of either oxidizing or reducing agents make the process difficult. In this study, the adsorption of CO on CuOx/Cu(111) and CeOx/Cu(111) systems has been studied using infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. IR peaks for the adsorbed CO on O/Cu(111) with only chemisorbed oxygen, well-ordered Cu2O/Cu(111) and disordered copper oxide [CuOx/Cu(111)] were observed at 2070-2072, 2097-2098 and 2101-2111 cm(-1), respectively. On CeOx/Cu(111) systems CO chemisorbs at 90 K only on Cu sites under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions, whereas at elevated CO pressures and low temperatures adsorption of CO on Ce(3+) is observed, with a corresponding IR peak at 2162 cm(-1). These experimental results are further supported by DFT calculations, and help to unequivocally distinguish the presence of Ce(3+) cations on catalyst samples by using CO as a probe molecule. PMID:23942870

  13. Carbon granule probe microphone for leak detection. [recovery boilers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parthasarathy, S. P. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A microphone which is not subject to corrosion is provided by employing carbon granules to sense sound waves. The granules are packed into a ceramic tube and no diaphragm is used. A pair of electrodes is located in the tube adjacent the carbon granules and are coupled to a sensing circuit. Sound waves cause pressure changes on the carbon granules which results in a change in resistance in the electrical path between the electrodes. This change in resistance is detected by the sensing circuit. The microphone is suitable for use as a leak detection probe in recovery boilers, where it provides reliable operation without corrosion problems associated with conventional microphones.

  14. Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus Information Page Synonym(s): Hydrocephalus - Normal Pressure Table ... Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus? Normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) is an abnormal ...

  15. High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. High Blood Pressure What Is High Blood Pressure? High blood pressure is a common disease in ... the heart, kidneys, brain, and eyes. Types of High Blood Pressure There are two main types of high blood ...

  16. High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Description of High Blood Pressure Español High blood pressure is a common disease ... defines high blood pressure severity levels. Stages of High Blood Pressure in Adults Stages Systolic (top number) Diastolic (bottom ...

  17. Hollow Cathode and Keeper-region Plasma Measurements Using Ultra-fast Miniature Scanning Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, Dan M.; Jameson, Kristina K.; Watkins, Ron M.; Katz, Ira

    2004-01-01

    In order to support the development of comprehensive performance and life models for future deep space missions that will utilize ion thrusters, we have undertaken a study of the plasma structure in hollow cathodes using an new pneumatic scanning probe diagnostic. This device is designed to insert a miniature probe directly into the hollow cathode orifice from either the upstream insert region in the interior of the hollow cathode, or from the downstream keeper-plasma region at the exit of the hollow cathode, to provide complete axial profiles of the discharge plasma parameters. Previous attempts to diagnose this region with probes was Limited by the melting of small probes in the intense discharge near the orifice, or caused significant perturbation of the plasma by probes large enough to survive. Our new probe is extremely compact, and when configured as a single Langmuir probe, the ceramic tube insulator is only 0.5mm in diameter and the current collecting conductor has a total area of 0.002 cm2. A series of current-voltage characteristics are obtained by applying a rapid sawtooth voltage waveform to the probe as it is scanned by the pneumatic actuator into and out of the plasma region, The bellow-sealed pneumatic drive scans the probe 4 cm in the cathode insert region and 10 cm in the anode/keeper plasmas region at average speeds of about 1 mm/msec, and the residence time at the end of the insertion stroke in the densest part of the plasma near the orifice is measured to be only 10 msec. Since the voltage sweep time is fast compared to the motion of the probe, axial profiles of the plasma density, temperature and potential with reasonable spatial resolution are obtained. Measurements of the internal cathode pressures and the axial plasma-parameter profiles for a hollow cathode operating at discharge currents of up to 35 A in xenon will be presented.

  18. Pressure measurements using hybrid femtosecond/picosecond rotational coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Kearney, Sean P; Danehy, Paul M

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the feasibility of gas-phase pressure measurements using fs/ps rotational CARS. Femtosecond pump and Stokes pulses impulsively prepare a rotational Raman coherence, which is probed by a high-energy 5-ps pulse introduced at a time delay from the Raman preparation. These ultrafast laser pulses are shorter than collisional-dephasing time scales, enabling a new hybrid time- and frequency-domain detection scheme for pressure. Single-laser-shot rotational CARS spectra were recorded from N2 contained in a room-temperature gas cell for pressures from 0.4 to 3 atm and probe delays ranging from 16 to 298 ps. Sensitivity of the accuracy and precision of the pressure data to probe delay was investigated. The technique exhibits superior precision and comparable accuracy to previous laser-diagnostic pressure measurements.

  19. Thermal contrast in the atmosphere of venus: initial appraisal from pioneer venus probe data.

    PubMed

    Seiff, A; Kirk, D B; Young, R E; Sommer, S C; Blanchard, R C; Findlay, J T; Kelly, G M

    1979-07-01

    The altitude profiles of temperature and pressure measured during the descent of the four Pioneer Venus probes show small contrast below the clouds but significant differences within the clouds at altitudes from 45 to 61 kilometers. At 60 kilometers, the probe which entered at 59.3 degrees north latitude sensed temperatures 25 K below those of the lower latitude probes, and a sizable difference persisted down to and slightly below the cloud base. It also sensed pressure below those of the other probes by as much as 49 millibars at a mean pressure of 200 millibars. The measured pressure differences are consistent with cyclostrophic balance of zonal winds ranging from 130 +/- 20 meters per second at 60 kilometers to 60 +/- 17 meters per second at 40 kilometers, with evidence in addition of a nonaxisymmetric component of the winds. The clouds were found to be 10 to 20 K warmer than the extended profiles of the lower atmosphere, and the middle cloud is convectively unstable. Both phenomena are attributed to the absorption of thermal radiation from below. Above the clouds, in the lower stratosphere, the lapse rate decreases abruptly to 3.5 K per kilometer, and a superimposed wave is evident. At 100 kilometers, the temperature is minimum, with a mean value of about 170 K.

  20. Experimental validation of an 8 element EMAT phased array probe for longitudinal wave generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bourdais, Florian; Marchand, Benoit

    2015-03-01

    Sodium cooled Fast Reactors (SFR) use liquid sodium as a coolant. Liquid sodium being opaque, optical techniques cannot be applied to reactor vessel inspection. This makes it necessary to develop alternative ways of assessing the state of the structures immersed in the medium. Ultrasonic pressure waves are well suited for inspection tasks in this environment, especially using pulsed electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMAT) that generate the ultrasound directly in the liquid sodium. The work carried out at CEA LIST is aimed at developing phased array EMAT probes conditioned for reactor use. The present work focuses on the experimental validation of a newly manufactured 8 element probe which was designed for beam forming imaging in a liquid sodium environment. A parametric study is carried out to determine the optimal setup of the magnetic assembly used in this probe. First laboratory tests on an aluminium block show that the probe has the required beam steering capabilities.