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Sample records for 5-ht reuptake inhibitor

  1. 5-HT1A and 5-HT7 receptor crosstalk in the regulation of emotional memory: implications for effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Therese M; Holst, Sarah; Stan, Tiberiu L; Hager, Torben; Sjögren, Benita; Ogren, Sven Öve; Svenningsson, Per; Stiedl, Oliver

    2012-11-01

    This study utilized pharmacological manipulations to analyze the role of direct and indirect activation of 5-HT(7) receptors (5-HT(7)Rs) in passive avoidance learning by assessing emotional memory in male C57BL/6J mice. Additionally, 5-HT(7)R binding affinity and 5-HT(7)R-mediated protein phosphorylation of downstream signaling targets were determined. Elevation of 5-HT by the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluoxetine had no effect by itself, but facilitated emotional memory performance when combined with the 5-HT(1A)R antagonist NAD-299. This facilitation was blocked by the selective 5-HT(7)R antagonist SB269970, revealing excitatory effects of the SSRI via 5-HT(7)Rs. The enhanced memory retention by NAD-299 was blocked by SB269970, indicating that reduced activation of 5-HT(1A)Rs results in enhanced 5-HT stimulation of 5-HT(7)Rs. The putative 5-HT(7)R agonists LP-44 when administered systemically and AS19 when administered both systemically and into the dorsal hippocampus failed to facilitate memory. This finding is consistent with the low efficacy of LP-44 and AS19 to stimulate protein phosphorylation of 5-HT(7)R-activated signaling cascades. In contrast, increasing doses of the dual 5-HT(1A)R/5-HT(7)R agonist 8-OH-DPAT impaired memory, while co-administration with NAD-299 facilitated of emotional memory in a dose-dependent manner. This facilitation was blocked by SB269970 indicating 5-HT(7)R activation by 8-OH-DPAT. Dorsohippocampal infusion of 8-OH-DPAT impaired passive avoidance retention through hippocampal 5-HT(1A)R activation, while 5-HT(7)Rs appear to facilitate memory processes in a broader cortico-limbic network and not the hippocampus alone.

  2. Fluvoxamine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, and 5-HT2C receptor inactivation induce appetite-suppressing effects in mice via 5-HT1B receptors.

    PubMed

    Nonogaki, Katsunori; Nozue, Kana; Takahashi, Yukiko; Yamashita, Nobuyuki; Hiraoka, Shuichi; Kumano, Hiroaki; Kuboki, Tomifusa; Oka, Yohsitomo

    2007-10-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) 2C receptors and the downstream melanocortin pathway are suggested to mediate the appetite-suppressing effects of 5-HT drugs such as m-chlorophenylpiperazine (mCPP) and fenfluramine. Here, we report that fluvoxamine (3-30 mg/kg), a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), in the presence of SB 242084 (1-2 mg/kg), a selective 5-HT2C receptor antagonist, exerts appetite-suppressing effects while fluvoxamine or SB 242084 alone has no effect. The appetite-suppressing effects were attenuated in the presence of SB 224289 (5 mg/kg), a selective 5-HT1B receptor antagonist. Moreover, CP 94253 (5-10 mg/kg), a selective 5-HT1B receptor agonist, exerted appetite-suppressing effects and significantly increased hypothalamic pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) gene expression and decreased hypothalamic orexin gene expression. These results suggest that fluvoxamine and inactivation of 5-HT2C receptors exert feeding suppression through activation of 5-HT1B receptors, and that 5-HT1B receptors up-regulate hypothalamic POMC and CART gene expression and down-regulate hypothalamic orexin gene expression in mice.

  3. Biochemical profile of YM992, a novel selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor with 5-HT2A receptor antagonistic activity.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, K; Nomura, T; Hidaka, K; Takeuchi, H; Yatsugi, S; Fujii, M; Yamaguchi, T

    1996-01-01

    YM992, (S)-2-[[(7-fluoro-4-indanyl)oxy]methyl]morpholine monohydrochloride, exhibited the biochemical profile of a selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) with 5-HT2A receptor antagonistic activity. YM922 showed the same high affinity as fluoxetine against the 5-HT reuptake site (Ki = 21 nM) and a similar affinity to that of crazodone against the 5-HT2A receptor (Ki = 86 nM). In other receptor binding studies, an affinity for the adrenergic alpha 1 receptor (Ki = 200 nM) and 5-HT2C receptor (Ki = 680 nM) was observed. In a monoamine uptake study, YM992 showed a selective 5-HT uptake inhibition (IC50 = 0.15 microM), but only very weakly inhibited both noradrenaline (NA) and dopamine (DA) uptake (IC50 = 3.1 microM (NA), > 10 microM (DA)). YM992 was also found to potently inhibit the aggregation of human platelets (IC50 = 1.9 microM), revealing antagonistic activity for the 5-HT2A receptor in vitro. Enhanced serotonergic neurotransmission, in particular that mediated by the 5-HT1A receptor, has recently been reported to be important in the long-term treatment of depressive disorders with antidepressants. In addition, some 5-HT1A receptor-mediated responses are known to be potentiated by co-administration of 5-HT2A receptor antagonists. Thus, YM992, having both selective 5-HT reuptake inhibition and 5-HT2A antagonistic activity, might show potent therapeutic activity as a novel antidepressant in comparison with conventional SSRIs.

  4. 5-HT 1A/1B receptor-mediated effects of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, citalopram, on sleep: studies in 5-HT 1A and 5-HT 1B knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Monaca, Christelle; Boutrel, Benjamin; Hen, René; Hamon, Michel; Adrien, Joëlle

    2003-05-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are extensively used for the treatment of depression. Aside from their antidepressant properties, they provoke a deficit in paradoxical sleep (PS) that is most probably mediated by the transporter blockade-induced increase in serotonin concentration in the extracellular space. Such an effect can be accounted for by the action of serotonin at various types of serotonergic receptors involved in PS regulation, among which the 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(1B) types are the best candidates. According to this hypothesis, we examined the effects of citalopram, the most selective SSRI available to date, on sleep in the mouse after inactivation of 5-HT(1A) or 5-HT(1B) receptors, either by homologous recombination of their encoding genes, or pharmacological blockade with selective antagonists. For this purpose, sleep parameters of knockout mice that do not express these receptors and their wild-type counterparts were monitored during 8 h after injection of citalopram alone or in association with 5-HT(1A) or 5-HT(1B) receptor antagonists. Citalopram induced mainly a dose-dependent inhibition of PS during 2-6 h after injection, which was observed in wild-type and 5-HT(1B)-/- mice, but not in 5-HT(1A)-/- mutants. This PS inhibition was fully antagonized by pretreatment with the 5-HT(1A) antagonist WAY 100635, but only partially with the 5-HT(1B) antagonist GR 127935. These data indicate that the action of the SSRI citalopram on sleep in the mouse is essentially mediated by 5-HT(1A) receptors. Such a mechanism of action provides further support to the clinical strategy of antidepressant augmentation by 5-HT(1A) antagonists, because the latter would also counteract the direct sleep-inhibitory side-effects of SSRIs.

  5. Effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors on expression of 5-HT1AR and neurotransmitters in rats with vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Guo, K; Yin, G; Zi, X H; Zhu, H X; Pan, Q

    2016-12-02

    5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 1A (5-HT1AR) is closely associated with cognitive functions. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) can protect individuals from brain damage following ischemia/hypoxia. To investigate the function of SSRIs in vascular dementia (VD), we established a rat model of VD, and observed the effect of SSRIs on the expression of 5-HT1AR mRNA and neurotransmitters. Male SD rats (6 months) were randomly assigned into sham, model, and SSRI groups (N = 30). VD was achieved by permanent ligation of the bilateral common carotid artery. Escitalopram, a highly selective 5-HT reabsorption inhibitor, was ip injected into the rats for three consecutive weeks. The Morris water-maze was used to test learning and memory. H&E staining for neuronal injury was conducted on cortical and hippocampal tissues. HPLC was used to determine the levels of dopamine (DA), 5-HT, and norepinephrine (NE). RT-PCR was used to determine expression of 5-HT1AR mRNA. As compared to control rats, model animals demonstrated elongated escape latency, lower platform crossing times, and significant injuries to hippocampal CA1 neurons. This was accompanied by reductions in DA, 5-HT, and NE levels in hippocampal tissues, as well as reduced cortical 5-HT and decreased 5-HT1AR mRNA expression (P < 0.05). Escitalopram treatments reduced escape latency, elevated platform crossing times, improved CA1 neuronal damage, increased DA and 5-HT levels in hippocampal and cortical neurons, as well as elevated expression of 5-HT1AR mRNA (P < 0.05). Therefore, SSRIs may improve cognitive dysfunction of VD rats, possibly by stimulating expression of neurotransmitters and protecting neurons.

  6. Allosteric modulation of the effects of the 5-HT reuptake inhibitor escitalopram on the rat hippocampal synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Mnie-Filali, Ouissame; El Mansari, Mostafa; Espana, Agnès; Sànchez, Connie; Haddjeri, Nasser

    2006-02-27

    The present in vivo electrophysiological studies in anesthetized rat were undertaken to assess the effects of the selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) escitalopram alone or in combination with the R-citalopram (the S- and R-enantiomers of citalopram), on both long-term potentiation (LTP) in the CA(1) region of dorsal hippocampus and spontaneous firing activity of dorsal raphe (DR) 5-HT neurons. At the postsynaptic level, neither escitalopram (10 mg/kg, i.p.) nor R-citalopram (20 mg/kg, i.p.) modified basal synaptic transmission but only escitalopram impaired LTP expression. Importantly, R-citalopram counteracted significantly the escitalopram-induced decrease of LTP. At the pre-synaptic level, escitalopram (25-75 microg/kg, i.v.) dose-dependently suppressed the spontaneous firing activity of DR 5-HT neurons and this suppressant effect was significantly prevented by a prior injection of R-citalopram (10 mg/kg, i.p.). These results support a role of allosteric binding sites of 5-HT transporter in the regulation of long-lasting CA(1) synaptic plasticity and DR 5-HT neuronal firing activity.

  7. Investigation of the mechanisms underlying the hypophagic effects of the 5-HT and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor, sibutramine, in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Helen C; Bearham, M Clair; Hutchins, Lisa J; Mazurkiewicz, Sarah E; Needham, Andrew M; Heal, David J

    1997-01-01

    Sibutramine is a novel 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor (serotonin- noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor, SNRI) which is currently being developed as a treatment for obesity. Sibutramine has been shown to decrease food intake in the rat. In this study we have used a variety of monoamine receptor antagonists to examine the pharmacological mechanisms underlying sibutramine-induced hypophagia. Individually-housed male Sprague-Dawley rats were maintained on reversed phase lighting with free access to food and water. Drugs were administered at 09 h 00 min and food intake was monitored over the following 8 h dark period. Sibutramine (10 mg kg−1, p.o.) produced a significant decrease in food intake during the 8 h following drug administration. This hypophagic response was fully antagonized by the α1-adrenoceptor antagonist, prazosin (0.3 and 1 mg kg−1, i.p.), and partially antagonized by the β1-adrenoceptor antagonist, metoprolol (3 and 10 mg kg−1, i.p.) and the 5-HT receptor antagonists, metergoline (non-selective; 0.3 mg kg−1, i.p.); ritanserin (5-HT2A/2C; 0.1 and 0.5 mg kg−1, i.p.) and SB200646 (5-HT2B/2C; 20 and 40 mg kg−1, p.o.). By contrast, the α2-adrenoceptor antagonist, RX821002 (0.3 and 1 mg kg−1, i.p.) and the β2-adrenoceptor antagonist, ICI 118,551 (3 and 10 mg kg−1, i.p.) did not reduce the decrease in food intake induced by sibutramine. These results demonstrate that β1-adrenoceptors, 5-HT2A/2C-receptors and particularly α1-adrenoceptors, are involved in the effects of sibutramine on food intake and are consistent with the hypothesis that sibutramine-induced hypophagia is related to its ability to inhibit the reuptake of both noradrenaline and 5-HT, with the subsequent activation of a variety of noradrenaline and 5-HT receptor systems. PMID:9283694

  8. Blockade of the high-affinity noradrenaline transporter (NET) by the selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitor escitalopram: an in vivo microdialysis study in mice

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Hai T; Guiard, Bruno P; Bacq, Alexandre; David, Denis J; David, Indira; Quesseveur, Gaël; Gautron, Sophie; Sanchez, Connie; Gardier, Alain M

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Escitalopram, the S(+)-enantiomer of citalopram is the most selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitor approved. Although all 5-HT selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) increase extracellular levels of 5-HT ([5-HT]ext). some also enhance, to a lesser extent, extracellular levels of noradrenaline ([NA]ext). However, the mechanisms by which SSRIs activate noradrenergic transmission in the brain remain to be determined. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH This study examined the effects of escitalopram, on both [5-HT]ext and [NA]ext in the frontal cortex (FCx) of freely moving wild-type (WT) and mutant mice lacking the 5-HT transporter (SERT−/−) by using intracerebral microdialysis. We explored the possibilities that escitalopram enhances [NA]ext, either by a direct mechanism involving the inhibition of the low- or high-affinity noradrenaline transporters, or by an indirect mechanism promoted by [5-HT]ext elevation. The forced swim test (FST) was used to investigate whether enhancing cortical [5-HT]ext and/or [NA]ext affected the antidepressant-like activity of escitalopram. KEY RESULTS In WT mice, a single systemic administration of escitalopram produced a significant increase in cortical [5-HT]ext and [NA]ext. As expected, escitalopram failed to increase cortical [5-HT]ext in SERT−/− mice, whereas its neurochemical effects on [NA]ext persisted in these mutants. In WT mice subjected to the FST, escitalopram increased swimming parameters without affecting climbing behaviour. Finally, escitalopram, at relevant concentrations, failed to inhibit cortical noradrenaline and 5-HT uptake mediated by low-affinity monoamine transporters. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These experiments suggest that escitalopram enhances, although moderately, cortical [NA]extin vivo by a direct mechanism involving the inhibition of the high-affinity noradrenaline transporter (NET). PMID:22233336

  9. Antidepressant-Like Activity of YL-0919: A Novel Combined Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor and 5-HT1A Receptor Agonist

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li-ming; Xue, Rui; Xu, Xiao-dan; Zhao, Nan; Qiu, Zhi-kun; Wang, Xian-wang; Zhang, You-zhi; Yang, Ri-fang; Li, Yun-feng

    2013-01-01

    It has been suggested that drugs combining activities of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor and 5-HT1A receptor agonist may form a novel strategy for higher therapeutic efficacy of antidepressant. The present study aimed to examine the pharmacology of YL-0919, a novel synthetic compound with combined high affinity and selectivity for serotonin transporter and 5-HT1A receptors. We performed in vitro binding and function assays and in vivo behavioral tests to assess the pharmacological properties and antidepressant-like efficacy of YL-0919. YL-0919 displayed high affinity in vitro to both 5-HT1A receptor and 5-HT transporter prepared from rat cortical tissue. It exerted an inhibitory effect on forskolin-stimulated cAMP formation and potently inhibited 5-HT uptake in both rat cortical synaptosomes and recombinant cells. After acute p.o. administration, very low doses of YL-0919 reduced the immobility time in tail suspension test and forced swimming test in mice and rats, with no significant effect on locomotor activity in open field test. Furthermore, WAY-100635 (a selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist, 0.3 mg/kg) significantly blocked the effect of YL-0919 in tail suspension test and forced swimming test. In addition, chronic YL-0919 treatment significantly reversed the depressive-like behaviors in chronically stressed rats. These findings suggest that YL-0919, a novel structure compound, exerts dual effect on the serotonergic system, as both 5-HT1A receptor agonist and 5-HT uptake blocker, showing remarkable antidepressant effects in animal models. Therefore, YL-0919 may be used as a new option for the treatment of major depressive disorder. PMID:24367588

  10. Antidepressant-like activity of YL-0919: a novel combined selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor and 5-HT1A receptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-xia; Jin, Zeng-liang; Zhang, Li-ming; Xue, Rui; Xu, Xiao-dan; Zhao, Nan; Qiu, Zhi-kun; Wang, Xian-wang; Zhang, You-zhi; Yang, Ri-fang; Li, Yun-feng

    2013-01-01

    It has been suggested that drugs combining activities of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor and 5-HT1A receptor agonist may form a novel strategy for higher therapeutic efficacy of antidepressant. The present study aimed to examine the pharmacology of YL-0919, a novel synthetic compound with combined high affinity and selectivity for serotonin transporter and 5-HT1A receptors. We performed in vitro binding and function assays and in vivo behavioral tests to assess the pharmacological properties and antidepressant-like efficacy of YL-0919. YL-0919 displayed high affinity in vitro to both 5-HT1A receptor and 5-HT transporter prepared from rat cortical tissue. It exerted an inhibitory effect on forskolin-stimulated cAMP formation and potently inhibited 5-HT uptake in both rat cortical synaptosomes and recombinant cells. After acute p.o. administration, very low doses of YL-0919 reduced the immobility time in tail suspension test and forced swimming test in mice and rats, with no significant effect on locomotor activity in open field test. Furthermore, WAY-100635 (a selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist, 0.3 mg/kg) significantly blocked the effect of YL-0919 in tail suspension test and forced swimming test. In addition, chronic YL-0919 treatment significantly reversed the depressive-like behaviors in chronically stressed rats. These findings suggest that YL-0919, a novel structure compound, exerts dual effect on the serotonergic system, as both 5-HT1A receptor agonist and 5-HT uptake blocker, showing remarkable antidepressant effects in animal models. Therefore, YL-0919 may be used as a new option for the treatment of major depressive disorder.

  11. DSP-1053, a novel serotonin reuptake inhibitor with 5-HT1A partial agonistic activity, displays fast antidepressant effect with minimal undesirable effects in juvenile rats

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Taro; Matsumoto, Yuji; Yamamoto, Masanori; Matsumoto, Kenji; Baba, Satoko; Nakamichi, Keiko; Matsuda, Harumi; Nishimuta, Haruka; Yabuuchi, Kazuki

    2015-01-01

    Enhancement of serotonergic neurotransmission has been the main stream of treatment for patients with depression. However, delayed therapeutic onset and undesirable side effects are major drawbacks for conventional serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Here, we show that DSP-1053, a novel serotonin reuptake inhibitor with 5-HT1A partial agonistic activity, displays fast antidepressant efficacy with minimal undesirable effects, especially nausea and emesis in animal models. DSP-1053 bound human serotonin transporter and 5-HT1A receptor with the Ki values of 1.02 ± 0.06 and 5.05 ± 1.07 nmol/L, respectively. This compound inhibited the serotonin transporter with an IC50 value of 2.74 ± 0.41 nmol/L and had an intrinsic activity for 5-HT1A receptors of 70.0 ± 6.3%. In rat microdialysis, DSP-1053, given once at 3 and 10 mg kg−1, dose-dependently increased extracellular 5-HT levels. In the rat forced swimming test, 2-week administration of DSR-1053 (1 mg kg−1) significantly reduced rats immobility time after treatment, whereas paroxetine (3 and 10 mg kg−1) required 3-week administration to reduce rats immobility time. In olfactory bulbectomy model, 1- and 2-week administration of DSP-1053 reduced both of emotional scores and activity in the open field, whereas paroxetine required 2 weeks to show similar beneficial effects. Although single administration of DSP-1053-induced emesis and vomiting in the rat and Suncus murinus, multiple treatment with this compound, but not with paroxetine, decreased the number of vomiting episodes. These results highlight the important role of 5-HT1A receptors in both the efficacy and tolerability of DSP-1053 as a new therapeutic option for the treatment of depression. PMID:26171224

  12. DSP-1053, a novel serotonin reuptake inhibitor with 5-HT1A partial agonistic activity, displays fast antidepressant effect with minimal undesirable effects in juvenile rats.

    PubMed

    Kato, Taro; Matsumoto, Yuji; Yamamoto, Masanori; Matsumoto, Kenji; Baba, Satoko; Nakamichi, Keiko; Matsuda, Harumi; Nishimuta, Haruka; Yabuuchi, Kazuki

    2015-06-01

    Enhancement of serotonergic neurotransmission has been the main stream of treatment for patients with depression. However, delayed therapeutic onset and undesirable side effects are major drawbacks for conventional serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Here, we show that DSP-1053, a novel serotonin reuptake inhibitor with 5-HT1A partial agonistic activity, displays fast antidepressant efficacy with minimal undesirable effects, especially nausea and emesis in animal models. DSP-1053 bound human serotonin transporter and 5-HT1A receptor with the K i values of 1.02 ± 0.06 and 5.05 ± 1.07 nmol/L, respectively. This compound inhibited the serotonin transporter with an IC50 value of 2.74 ± 0.41 nmol/L and had an intrinsic activity for 5-HT1A receptors of 70.0 ± 6.3%. In rat microdialysis, DSP-1053, given once at 3 and 10 mg kg(-1), dose-dependently increased extracellular 5-HT levels. In the rat forced swimming test, 2-week administration of DSR-1053 (1 mg kg(-1)) significantly reduced rats immobility time after treatment, whereas paroxetine (3 and 10 mg kg(-1)) required 3-week administration to reduce rats immobility time. In olfactory bulbectomy model, 1- and 2-week administration of DSP-1053 reduced both of emotional scores and activity in the open field, whereas paroxetine required 2 weeks to show similar beneficial effects. Although single administration of DSP-1053-induced emesis and vomiting in the rat and Suncus murinus, multiple treatment with this compound, but not with paroxetine, decreased the number of vomiting episodes. These results highlight the important role of 5-HT1A receptors in both the efficacy and tolerability of DSP-1053 as a new therapeutic option for the treatment of depression.

  13. The role of activation of the 5-HT1A receptor and adenylate cyclase in the antidepressant-like effect of YL-0919, a dual 5-HT1A agonist and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Qin, Juan-Juan; Chen, Hong-Xia; Zhao, Nan; Yuan, Li; Zhang, You-Zhi; Yang, Ri-Fang; Zhang, Li-Ming; Li, Yun-Feng

    2014-10-17

    This study aimed to explore the possible mechanisms underlying the antidepressant-like effect of YL-0919, a novel antidepressant candidate with dual activity as a 5-HT1A receptor agonist and a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor. The animal models commonly used to evaluate potential antidepressants, i.e., tail suspension (TST) in mice and forced swimming test (FST) in mice were used to evaluate the antidepressant effect of YL-0919. The activity of adenylate cyclase (AC) on the synaptic membrane was determined by the homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) immunoassay. The results indicated that YL-0919 (1.25-2.5mg/kg, i.g.) significantly decreased the immobility time in both the tail suspension test and the forced swim test in a dose-dependent manner, demonstrating the antidepressant-like effect of YL-0919. Furthermore, this effect was completely antagonized by the co-administration of WAY-100635 (0.3mg/kg, s.c.), a 5-HT1A selective antagonist. YL-0919 (10(-9)-10(-5)mol/L) was also shown to activate AC in vitro in a dose-dependent manner in synaptic membranes extracted from the rat prefrontal cortex, and this effect (10(-7)-10(-5)mol/L) was antagonized by WAY-100635 (10(-7)mol/L). Finally, the antidepressant-like effect of YL-0919 (2.5mg/kg, i.g.) was also blocked by the co-administration of H-89 (3 μg/site, i.c.v.), a protein kinase A (PKA) selective inhibitor. These results indicate that the activation of 5-HT1A receptors and the subsequent activation of the AC-cAMP-PKA signaling pathway in the frontal cortex play a critical role in the antidepressant-like effect of YL-0919.

  14. N-desalkylquetiapine, a potent norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor and partial 5-HT1A agonist, as a putative mediator of quetiapine's antidepressant activity.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Niels H; Rodriguiz, Ramona M; Caron, Marc G; Wetsel, William C; Rothman, Richard B; Roth, Bryan L

    2008-09-01

    Quetiapine is an atypical antipsychotic drug that is also US FDA approved for treating bipolar depression, albeit by an unknown mechanism. To discover the potential mechanism for this apparently unique action, we screened quetiapine, its metabolite N-Desalkylquetiapine, and dibenzo[b,f][1,4]thiazepine-11(10-H)-one (DBTO) against a large panel of G-protein-coupled receptors, ion channels, and neurotransmitter transporters. DBTO was inactive at all tested molecular targets. N-Desalkylquetiapine had a high affinity (3.4 nM) for the histamine H(1) receptor and moderate affinities (10-100 nM) for the norepinephrine reuptake transporter (NET), the serotonin 5-HT(1A), 5-HT(1E), 5-HT(2A), 5-HT(2B), 5-HT(7) receptors, the alpha(1B)-adrenergic receptor, and the M(1), M(3), and M(5) muscarinic receptors. The compound had low affinities (100-1000 nM) for the 5-HT(1D), 5-HT(2C), 5-HT(3), 5-HT(5), 5-HT(6), alpha(1A), alpha(2A), alpha(2B), alpha(2C), H(2), M(2), M(4), and dopamine D(1), D(2), D(3), and D(4) receptors. N-Desalkylquetiapine potently inhibited human NE transporter with a K(i) of 12 nM, about 100-fold more potent than quetiapine itself. N-Desalkylquetiapine was also 10-fold more potent and more efficacious than quetiapine at the 5-HT(1A) receptor. N-Desalkylquetiapine was an antagonist at 5-HT(2A), 5-HT(2B), 5-HT(2C), alpha(1A), alpha(1D), alpha(2A), alpha(2C), H(1), M(1), M(3), and M(5) receptors. In the mouse tail suspension test, N-Desalkylquetiapine displayed potent antidepressant-like activity in VMAT2 heterozygous mice at doses as low as 0.1 mg/kg. These data strongly suggest that the antidepressant activity of quetiapine is mediated, at least in part, by its metabolite N-Desalkylquetiapine through NET inhibition and partial 5-HT(1A) agonism. Possible contributions of this metabolite to the side effects of quetiapine are discussed.

  15. Regulation of extrasynaptic 5-HT by serotonin reuptake transporter function in 5-HT-absorbing neurons underscores adaptation behavior in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Gholamali; Xie, Yusu; Kullyev, Andrey; Liang, Bin; Sze, Ji Ying

    2011-06-15

    Serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)]-absorbing neurons use serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT) to uptake 5-HT from extracellular space but do not synthesize it. While 5-HT-absorbing neurons have been identified in diverse organisms from Caenorhabditis elegans to humans, their function has not been elucidated. Here, we show that SERT in 5-HT-absorbing neurons controls behavioral response to food deprivation in C. elegans. The AIM and RIH interneurons uptake 5-HT released from chemosensory neurons and secretory neurons. Genetic analyses suggest that 5-HT secreted by both synaptic vesicles and dense core vesicles diffuse readily to the extrasynaptic space adjacent to the AIM and RIH neurons. Loss of mod-5/SERT function blocks the 5-HT absorption. mod-5/SERT mutants have been shown to exhibit exaggerated locomotor response to food deprivation. We found that transgenic expression of MOD-5/SERT in the 5-HT-absorbing neurons fully corrected the exaggerated behavior. Experiments of cell-specific inhibition of synaptic transmission suggest that the synaptic release of 5-HT from the 5-HT-absorbing neurons is not required for this behavioral modulation. Our data point to the role of 5-HT-absorbing neurons as temporal-spatial regulators of extrasynaptic 5-HT. Regulation of extrasynaptic 5-HT levels by 5-HT-absorbing neurons may represent a fundamental mechanism of 5-HT homeostasis, integrating the activity of 5-HT-producing neurons with distant targets in the neural circuits, and could be relevant to some actions of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in humans.

  16. Acute effects of Sceletium tortuosum (Zembrin), a dual 5-HT reuptake and PDE4 inhibitor, in the human amygdala and its connection to the hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Terburg, David; Syal, Supriya; Rosenberger, Lisa A; Heany, Sarah; Phillips, Nicole; Gericke, Nigel; Stein, Dan J; van Honk, Jack

    2013-12-01

    The South African endemic plant Sceletium tortuosum has a long history of traditional use as a masticatory and medicine by San and Khoikhoi people and subsequently by European colonial farmers as a psychotropic in tincture form. Over the past decade, the plant has attracted increasing attention for its possible applications in promoting a sense of wellbeing and relieving stress in healthy individuals and for treating clinical anxiety and depression. The pharmacological actions of a standardized extract of the plant (Zembrin) have been reported to be dual PDE4 inhibition and 5-HT reuptake inhibition, a combination that has been argued to offer potential therapeutic advantages. Here we tested the acute effects of Zembrin administration in a pharmaco-fMRI study focused on anxiety-related activity in the amygdala and its connected neurocircuitry. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over design, 16 healthy participants were scanned during performance in a perceptual-load and an emotion-matching task. Amygdala reactivity to fearful faces under low perceptual load conditions was attenuated after a single 25 mg dose of Zembrin. Follow-up connectivity analysis on the emotion-matching task showed that amygdala-hypothalamus coupling was also reduced. These results demonstrate, for the first time, the attenuating effects of S. tortuosum on the threat circuitry of the human brain and provide supporting evidence that the dual 5-HT reuptake inhibition and PDE4 inhibition of this extract might have anxiolytic potential by attenuating subcortical threat responsivity.

  17. Milnacipran, a serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor, suppresses long-term potentiation in the rat hippocampal CA1 field via 5-HT1A receptors and alpha 1-adrenoceptors.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Kaori; Matsumoto, Machiko; Togashi, Hiroko; Kojima, Taku; Morimoto, Yuji; Kemmotsu, Osamu; Yoshioka, Mitsuhiro

    2004-03-04

    Pharmacological characteristics of a serotonin (5-HT) and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor (SNRI), milnacipran, in modulation of the synaptic plasticity were investigated. Milnacipran (30 mg/kg, i.p.) suppressed the long-term potentiation (LTP) in the hippocampal CA1 field of anesthetized rats. Milnacipran-induced suppression was reversed by pretreatment with the selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY 100635 (0.1 mg/kg, i.v.) or the alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin (1 and 10 microg/rat, i.c.v.). The alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonist idazoxan (5 mg/kg, i.p.) did not influence the milnacipran-induced synaptic responses. These data suggest that the inhibitory effects of milnacipran on LTP induction are mediated via both 5-HT1A receptors and alpha1-adrenoceptors. In other words, functional interaction between the serotonergic and noradrenergic neuronal systems is involved in alteration of the hippocampal synaptic plasticity, which may be implicated in the SNRI-induced therapeutic effect on psychiatric disorders.

  18. Mice lacking the serotonin 5-HT2B receptor as an animal model of resistance to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Silvina Laura; Narboux-Nême, Nicolas; Boutourlinsky, Katia; Doly, Stéphane; Maroteaux, Luc

    2016-02-01

    Depressive disorders are among the most prevalent neuropsychiatric dysfunctions worldwide, with high rates of resistance to antidepressant treatment. Genetic factors clearly contribute to the manifestation of depression as well as to the response to antidepressants. Transgenic mouse models appear as seminal tools to disentangle this complex disorder. Here, we analyzed new key aspects of the phenotype of knock-out mice for the gene encoding the serotonin 2B receptor (Htr(2B)(-/-)), including basal phenotype, ability to develop a depressive-like phenotype upon chronic isolation, and effect of chronic exposure to fluoxetine on chronically stressed Htr(2B)(-/-) mice. We find, here, that Htr(2B)(-/-) mice display an antidepressant-like phenotype, which includes reduced latency to feed in the novelty suppressed feeding test, basal increase in hippocampal BDNF levels, no change in TrkB and p75 protein levels, and an increased preference for sucrose consumption compared to wild type (Htr(2B)(+/+)) mice. Nevertheless, we show that these mice can develop depressive-like behaviors when socially isolated during four weeks. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) have been previously shown to be ineffective in non-stressed Htr(2B)(-/-) mice. We evaluated, here, the effects of the SSRI fluoxetine in chronically stressed Htr(2B)(-/-) mice and similarly no behavioral or plastic effect was induced by this antidepressant. All together, these results highlight the suitability to study resistance to SSRI antidepressants of this mouse model displaying panoply of conditions among which behavioral, neurotrophic and plastic causative factors can be analyzed.

  19. Effects of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) reuptake inhibition plus 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonism on the firing activity of norepinephrine neurons.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Steven T; Blier, Pierre

    2002-09-01

    YM992 [(S)-2-[[(7-fluoro-4-indanyl)oxy]methyl]morpholine monohydrochloride] is a selective serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) and a potent 5-HT(2A) antagonist. The aim of the present study was to assess, using in vivo extracellular unitary recordings, the effect of acute and sustained administration of YM992 (40 mg kg(-1) day(-1) s.c., using osmotic minipumps) on the spontaneous firing activity of locus coeruleus (LC) norepinephrine (NE) neurons. Acute intravenous injection of YM992 (4 mg kg(-1)) significantly decreased NE neuron firing activity by 29% and blocked the inhibitory effect of a subsequent injection of the 5-HT(2) agonist DOI [1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane hydrochloride]. A 2-day treatment with YM992 decreased the firing rate of NE neurons by 66%, whereas a partial recovery was observed after a 7-day treatment and a complete one after a 21-day treatment. Following the injection of the alpha(2)-adrenoceptor antagonist idazoxan (1 mg kg(-1) i.v.), NE neuron firing was equalized in controls and 2-day YM992-treated rats. This put into evidence an increased degree of activation of alpha(2)-adrenergic autoreceptors in the treated rats. The suppressant effect of the alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonist clonidine was significantly decreased in long-term YM992-treated rats. The recovery of LC firing activity after long-term YM992 administration could thus be explained by a decreased sensitivity of alpha(2)-adrenergic autoreceptors. Sustained SSRI administration leads to a gradual reduction of the firing activity of NE neurons during long-term administration, whereas YM992 produced opposite effects. The exact basis for the increased synaptic availability of NE by YM992 remains to be elucidated. This NE activity, resulting from 5-HT reuptake inhibition plus 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonism, might confer additional benefits in affective and anxiety disorders.

  20. The effects of combining serotonin reuptake inhibition and 5-HT7 receptor blockade on circadian rhythm regulation in rodents.

    PubMed

    Westrich, Ligia; Sprouse, Jeffrey; Sánchez, Connie

    2013-02-17

    Disruption of circadian rhythms may lead to mood disorders. The present study investigated the potential therapeutic utility of combining a 5-HT7 antagonist with a selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), the standard of care in depression, on circadian rhythm regulation. In tissue explants of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) from PER2::LUC mice genetically modified to report changes in the expression of a key clock protein, the period length of PER2 bioluminescence was shortened in the presence of AS19, a 5-HT7 partial agonist. This reduction was blocked by SB269970, a selective 5-HT7 antagonist. The SSRI, escitalopram, had no effect alone on period length, but a combination with SB269970, yielded significant increases. Dosed in vivo, escitalopram had little impact on the occurrence of activity onsets in rats given access to running wheels, whether the drug was given acutely or sub-chronically. However, preceding the escitalopram treatment with a single acute dose of SB269970 produced robust phase delays, in keeping with the in vitro explant data. Taken together, these findings suggest that the combination of an SSRI and a 5-HT7 receptor antagonist has a greater impact on circadian rhythms than that observed with either agent alone, and that such a multimodal approach may be of therapeutic value in treating patients with poor clock function.

  1. Tramadol: Effects on sexual behavior in male rats are mainly caused by its 5-HT reuptake blocking effects.

    PubMed

    Olivier, Jocelien D A; Esquivel Franco, Diana C; Oosting, Ronald; Waldinger, Marcel; Sarnyai, Zoltan; Olivier, Berend

    2016-11-24

    Tramadol is a well-known and effective analgesic. Recently it was shown that tramadol is also effective in human premature ejaculation. The inhibitory effect of tramadol on the ejaculation latency is probably due to its mechanism of action as a μ-opioid receptor agonist and noradrenaline/serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitor. In order to test this speculation, we tested several doses of tramadol in a rat model of male sexual behavior and investigated two types of drugs interfering with the μ-opioid and the 5-HT system. First the μ-opioid receptor agonist properties of tramadol were tested with naloxone, a μ-opioid receptor antagonist. Second, the effects of WAY100,635, a 5-HT1A receptor antagonist, were tested on the behavioral effects of tramadol. Finally the effects of paroxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, combined with naloxone or WAY100,635 treatment, were compared to the effects of tramadol combined with these drugs. Results showed that naloxone, at a sexually inactive dose, could only partially antagonize the inhibitory effect of tramadol. Moreover, low and behaviorally inactive doses of WAY100,635, strongly decreased sexual behavior when combined with a behaviorally inactive dose of tramadol. Finally we showed that the effects of paroxetine on sexual behavior resembled the effects of tramadol, indicating that tramadol's inhibitory effects on sexual behavior are primarily and mainly caused by its SSRI properties and that its μ-opioid receptor agonistic activity only contributes marginally. These findings support the hypothesis that tramadol exerts inhibition of premature ejaculations in men by its 5-HT reuptake inhibiting properties.

  2. Aminoalkyl Derivatives of 8-Alkoxypurine-2,6-diones: Multifunctional 5-HT1A /5-HT7 Receptor Ligands and PDE Inhibitors with Antidepressant Activity.

    PubMed

    Chłoń-Rzepa, Grażyna; Zagórska, Agnieszka; Żmudzki, Paweł; Bucki, Adam; Kołaczkowski, Marcin; Partyka, Anna; Wesołowska, Anna; Kazek, Grzegorz; Głuch-Lutwin, Monika; Siwek, Agata; Starowicz, Gabriela; Pawłowski, Maciej

    2016-12-01

    In the search for potential psychotropic agents, a new series of 3,7-dimethyl- and 1,3-dimethyl-8-alkoxypurine-2,6-dione derivatives of arylpiperazines, perhydroisoquinolines, or tetrahydroisoquinolines with flexible alkylene spacers (5-16 and 21-32) were synthesized and evaluated for 5-HT1A /5-HT7 receptor affinities as well as PDE4B1 and PDE10A inhibitory properties. The 1-(4-(4-(2-hydroxyphenyl)piperazin-1-yl)butyl)-3,7-dimethyl-8-propoxypurine-2,6-dione (16) and 7-(2-hydroxyphenyl)piperazinylalkyl-1,3-dimethyl-8-ethoxypurine-2,6-diones (31 and 32) as potent dual 5-HT1A /5-HT7 receptor ligands with antagonistic activity produced an antidepressant-like effect in the forced swim test in mice. This effect was similar to that produced by citalopram. All the tested compounds were stronger phosphodiesterase isoenzyme inhibitors than theophylline and theobromine. The most potent compounds, 15 and 16, were characterized by 51 and 52% inhibition, respectively, of PDE4B1 activity at a concentration of 10(-5)  M. Concerning the above findings, it may be assumed that the inhibition of PDE4B1 may impact on the signal strength and specificity resulting from antagonism toward the 5-HT1 and 5-HT7 receptors, especially in the case of compounds 15 and 16. This dual receptor and enzyme binding mode was analyzed and explained via molecular modeling studies.

  3. Enhanced Responsiveness to Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors during Lactation

    PubMed Central

    Jury, Nicholas J.; McCormick, Betsy A.; Horseman, Nelson D.; Benoit, Stephen C.; Gregerson, Karen A.

    2015-01-01

    The physiology of mood regulation in the postpartum is poorly understood despite the fact that postpartum depression (PPD) is a common pathology. Serotonergic mechanisms and their dysfunction are widely presumed to be involved, which has led us to investigate whether lactation induces changes in central or peripheral serotonin (5-HT) systems and related affective behaviors. Brain sections from lactating (day 10 postpartum) and age-matched nulliparous (non-pregnant) C57BL/6J mice were processed for 5-HT immunohistochemistry. The total number of 5-HT immunostained cells and optical density were measured. Lactating mice exhibited lower immunoreactive 5-HT and intensity in the dorsal raphe nucleus when compared with nulliparous controls. Serum 5-HT was quantified from lactating and nulliparous mice using radioimmunoassay. Serum 5-HT concentrations were higher in lactating mice than in nulliparous controls. Affective behavior was assessed in lactating and non-lactating females ten days postpartum, as well as in nulliparous controls using the forced swim test (FST) and marble burying task (MBT). Animals were treated for the preceding five days with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI, citalopram, 5mg/kg/day) or vehicle. Lactating mice exhibited a lower baseline immobility time during the FST and buried fewer marbles during the MBT as compared to nulliparous controls. Citalopram treatment changed these behaviors in lactating mice with further reductions in immobility during the FST and decreased marble burying. In contrast, the same regimen of citalopram treatment had no effect on these behaviors in either non-lactating postpartum or nulliparous females. Our findings demonstrate changes in both central and peripheral 5-HT systems associated with lactation, independent of pregnancy. They also demonstrate a significant interaction of lactation and responsiveness to SSRI treatment, which has important implications in the treatment of PPD. Although recent evidence

  4. Enhanced responsiveness to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors during lactation.

    PubMed

    Jury, Nicholas J; McCormick, Betsy A; Horseman, Nelson D; Benoit, Stephen C; Gregerson, Karen A

    2015-01-01

    The physiology of mood regulation in the postpartum is poorly understood despite the fact that postpartum depression (PPD) is a common pathology. Serotonergic mechanisms and their dysfunction are widely presumed to be involved, which has led us to investigate whether lactation induces changes in central or peripheral serotonin (5-HT) systems and related affective behaviors. Brain sections from lactating (day 10 postpartum) and age-matched nulliparous (non-pregnant) C57BL/6J mice were processed for 5-HT immunohistochemistry. The total number of 5-HT immunostained cells and optical density were measured. Lactating mice exhibited lower immunoreactive 5-HT and intensity in the dorsal raphe nucleus when compared with nulliparous controls. Serum 5-HT was quantified from lactating and nulliparous mice using radioimmunoassay. Serum 5-HT concentrations were higher in lactating mice than in nulliparous controls. Affective behavior was assessed in lactating and non-lactating females ten days postpartum, as well as in nulliparous controls using the forced swim test (FST) and marble burying task (MBT). Animals were treated for the preceding five days with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI, citalopram, 5mg/kg/day) or vehicle. Lactating mice exhibited a lower baseline immobility time during the FST and buried fewer marbles during the MBT as compared to nulliparous controls. Citalopram treatment changed these behaviors in lactating mice with further reductions in immobility during the FST and decreased marble burying. In contrast, the same regimen of citalopram treatment had no effect on these behaviors in either non-lactating postpartum or nulliparous females. Our findings demonstrate changes in both central and peripheral 5-HT systems associated with lactation, independent of pregnancy. They also demonstrate a significant interaction of lactation and responsiveness to SSRI treatment, which has important implications in the treatment of PPD. Although recent evidence

  5. 5-HT system and cognition.

    PubMed

    Meneses, A

    1999-12-01

    The study of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) system has benefited from the identification, classification and cloning of multiple 5-HT receptors (5-HT1 to 5-HT7). Growing evidence suggests that 5-HT is important in learning and memory and all its receptors might be implicated in this. Actually, 5-HT pathways, 5-HT reuptake site/transporter complex and 5-HT receptors show regional distribution in brain areas implicated in learning and memory. Likewise, the stimulation or blockade of presynaptic 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT(2A/2C) and 5-HT3 receptors, postsynaptic 5-HT(2B/2C) and 5-HT4 receptors and 5-HT uptake/transporter sites modulate these processes. Available evidence strongly suggests that the 5-HT system may be important in normal function, the treatment and/or pathogenesis of cognitive disorders. Further investigation will help to specify the 5-HT system nature involvement in cognitive processes, pharmacotherapies, their mechanisms and action sites and to determine under which conditions they could operate. In this regard, it is probable that selective drugs with agonists, neutral antagonist, agonists or inverse agonist properties for 5-HT1A, 5-HT(1B/1D), 5-HT(2A/2B/2C), 5-HT4 and 5-HT7 receptors could constitute a new therapeutic opportunity for learning and memory alterations.

  6. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor exposure.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Kevin T; Bronstein, Alvin C

    2013-02-01

    Many antidepressants inhibit serotonin or norepinephrine reuptake or both to achieve their clinical effect. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor class of antidepressants (SSRIs) includes citalopram, escitalopram (active enantiomer of citalopram), fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, paroxetine, and sertraline. The SSRIs are as effective as tricyclic antidepressants in treatment of major depression with less significant side effects. As a result, they have become the largest class of medications prescribed to humans for depression. They are also used to treat obsessive-compulsive disorder, panic disorders, alcoholism, obesity, migraines, and chronic pain. An SSRI (fluoxetine) has been approved for veterinary use in treatment of canine separation anxiety. SSRIs act specifically on synaptic serotonin concentrations by blocking its reuptake in the presynapse and increasing levels in the presynaptic membrane. Clinical signs of SSRI overdose result from excessive amounts of serotonin in the central nervous system. These signs include nausea, vomiting, mydriasis, hypersalivation, and hyperthermia. Clinical signs are dose dependent and higher dosages may result in the serotonin syndrome that manifests itself as ataxia, tremors, muscle rigidity, hyperthermia, diarrhea, and seizures. Current studies reveal no increase in appearance of any specific clinical signs of serotonin toxicity with regard to any SSRI medication. In people, citalopram has been reported to have an increased risk of electrocardiographic abnormalities. Diagnosis of SSRI poisoning is based on history, clinical signs, and response to therapy. No single clinical test is currently available to confirm SSRI toxicosis. The goals of treatment in this intoxication are to support the animal, prevent further absorption of the drug, support the central nervous system, control hyperthermia, and halt any seizure activity. The relative safety of the SSRIs in overdose despite the occurrence of serotonin syndrome makes them

  7. 2,5-Disubstituted tetrahydrofurans as selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Voelker, Troy; Xia, Haiji; Fandrick, Keith; Johnson, Robert; Janowsky, Aaron; Cashman, John R

    2009-03-01

    Enhancement of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, serotonin) neurotransmission is a viable means of treating depression. On the basis of this observation, agents that inhibit re-uptake of 5-HT were prepared based on (-)-cocaine and aryltropanes as lead compounds because they are reasonably potent 5-HT re-uptake inhibitors. Molecular dissection of an aryltropane provided a series of 5- and 6-membered ring compounds. From among this library of compounds a series of disubstituted tetrahydrofurans bearing 2-alkyl aryl and 5-alkyl amino groups were identified as having highly potent and selective 5-HT re-uptake inhibition. The compounds were evaluated for their ability to compete with radiolabeled RTI-55 binding and to inhibit re-uptake of neurotransmitters at the human dopamine, serotonin and norepinephrine transporters. Based on potency (e.g., K(i)=800 pM) and significant functional selectivity (e.g., IC(50) ratios for human dopamine:serotonin or norepinephrine:serotonin, >or=1397) highly potent and selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors were identified. Optimal features playing a dominant role in binding affinity and re-uptake inhibition included lipophilic substitution on the aromatic moiety, trans relative stereochemistry of the 2,5-disubstituted tetrahydrofuran ring, and a total of four or five methylene groups between the alkyl amine and the alkyl aryl moiety and the tetrahydrofuran group. A number of the most potent serotonin re-uptake inhibitors were tested in Balb/c mice in the forced-swim test (FST), a behavioral test used to measure the effects of antidepressant agents. Acute administration of 32c (10mg/kg), or 32d (10mg/kg) ip tended to decrease the duration of mouse immobility in the FST although the effect was not statistically significant.

  8. Down-regulation of the rat serotonin transporter upon exposure to a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Horschitz, S; Hummerich, R; Schloss, P

    2001-07-20

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) terminates serotonergic neurotransmission by rapid reuptake of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) into the nerve terminal or axonal varicosities. SERT represents the target of various antidepressants which inhibit 5-HT transport and are widely used for the pharmacotherapy of depression. Here, we have analyzed the function of SERT stably expressed in HEK 293 cells upon exposure to citalopram, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), with respect to 5-HT transport activity and protein expression as estimated by ligand binding experiments. Our results show that long-term exposure to an SSRI causes a down-regulation of transport activity as revealed by a reduction of the maximal transport rate, without affecting substrate affinity, accompanied by a decrease in ligand binding sites.

  9. Vortioxetine, but not escitalopram or duloxetine, reverses memory impairment induced by central 5-HT depletion in rats: evidence for direct 5-HT receptor modulation.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jesper Bornø; du Jardin, Kristian Gaarn; Song, Dekun; Budac, David; Smagin, Gennady; Sanchez, Connie; Pehrson, Alan Lars

    2014-01-01

    Depressed patients suffer from cognitive dysfunction, including memory deficits. Acute serotonin (5-HT) depletion impairs memory and mood in vulnerable patients. The investigational multimodal acting antidepressant vortioxetine is a 5-HT3, 5-HT7 and 5-HT1D receptor antagonist, 5-HT1B receptor partial agonist, 5-HT1A receptor agonist and 5-HT transporter (SERT) inhibitor that enhances memory in normal rats in novel object recognition (NOR) and conditioned fear (Mørk et al., 2013). We hypothesized that vortioxetine's 5-HT receptor mechanisms are involved in its memory effects, and therefore investigated these effects in 5-HT depleted rats. Four injections of the irreversible tryptophan hydroxylase inhibitor 4-chloro-dl-phenylalanine methyl ester hydrochloride (PCPA, 86mg/kg, s.c.) induced 5-HT depletion, as measured in hippocampal homogenate and microdialysate. The effects of acute challenge with vortioxetine or the 5-HT releaser fenfluramine on extracellular 5-HT were measured in PCPA-treated and control rats. PCPA's effects on NOR and spontaneous alternation (SA) performance were assessed along with the effects of acute treatment with 5-hydroxy-l-tryptophan (5-HTP), vortioxetine, the selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitor escitalopram, or the 5-HT norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor duloxetine. SERT occupancies were estimated by ex vivo autoradiography. PCPA depleted central 5-HT by >90% in tissue and microdialysate, and impaired NOR and SA performance. Restoring central 5-HT with 5-HTP reversed these deficits. At similar SERT occupancies (>90%) vortioxetine, but not escitalopram or duloxetine, restored memory performance. Acute fenfluramine significantly increased extracellular 5-HT in control and PCPA-treated rats, while vortioxetine did so only in control rats. Thus, vortioxetine restores 5-HT depletion impaired memory performance in rats through one or more of its receptor activities.

  10. Systemic modulation of serotonergic synapses via reuptake blockade or 5HT1A receptor antagonism does not alter perithreshold taste sensitivity in rats.

    PubMed

    Mathes, Clare M; Spector, Alan C

    2014-09-01

    Systemic blockade of serotonin (5HT) reuptake with paroxetine has been shown to increase sensitivity to sucrose and quinine in humans. Here, using a 2-response operant taste detection task, we measured the effect of paroxetine and the 5HT1A receptor antagonist WAY100635 on the ability of rats to discriminate sucrose, NaCl, and citric acid from water. After establishing individual psychometric functions, 5 concentrations of each taste stimulus were chosen to represent the dynamic portion of the concentration-response curve, and the performance of the rats to these stimuli was assessed after vehicle, paroxetine (7mg/kg intraperitoneally), and WAY100635 (0.3mg/kg subcutaneously; 1mg/kg intravenously) administration. Although, at times, overall performance across concentrations dropped, at most, 5% from vehicle to drug conditions, no differences relative to vehicle were seen on the parameters of the psychometric function (asymptote, slope, or EC50) after drug administration. In contrast to findings in humans, our results suggest that modulation of 5HT activity has little impact on sucrose detectability at perithreshold concentrations in rats, at least at the doses used in this task. In the rat model, the purported paracrine/neurocrine action of serotonin in the taste bud may work in a manner that does not impact overt taste detection behavior.

  11. Systemic Modulation of Serotonergic Synapses via Reuptake Blockade or 5HT1A Receptor Antagonism Does Not Alter Perithreshold Taste Sensitivity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Spector, Alan C.

    2014-01-01

    Systemic blockade of serotonin (5HT) reuptake with paroxetine has been shown to increase sensitivity to sucrose and quinine in humans. Here, using a 2-response operant taste detection task, we measured the effect of paroxetine and the 5HT1A receptor antagonist WAY100635 on the ability of rats to discriminate sucrose, NaCl, and citric acid from water. After establishing individual psychometric functions, 5 concentrations of each taste stimulus were chosen to represent the dynamic portion of the concentration–response curve, and the performance of the rats to these stimuli was assessed after vehicle, paroxetine (7mg/kg intraperitoneally), and WAY100635 (0.3mg/kg subcutaneously; 1mg/kg intravenously) administration. Although, at times, overall performance across concentrations dropped, at most, 5% from vehicle to drug conditions, no differences relative to vehicle were seen on the parameters of the psychometric function (asymptote, slope, or EC50) after drug administration. In contrast to findings in humans, our results suggest that modulation of 5HT activity has little impact on sucrose detectability at perithreshold concentrations in rats, at least at the doses used in this task. In the rat model, the purported paracrine/neurocrine action of serotonin in the taste bud may work in a manner that does not impact overt taste detection behavior. PMID:25056731

  12. 5-HT manipulation and dietary choice: variable carbohydrate (Polycose) suppression demonstrated only under specific experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Lawton, C L; Blundell, J E

    1993-01-01

    The effects of six 5-HT anorectic agents, d-fenfluramine (5-HT releaser and reuptake inhibitor), fluoxetine (5-HT reuptake inhibitor), mCPP (5-HT1B/5-HT1C receptor agonist), RU24969 (5-HT1A/5-HT1B receptor agonist), MK212 (5-HT1C receptor agonist) and DOI (5-HT2/5-HT1C receptor agonist), and two non-5-HT anorectic agents, salbutamol (beta 2-adrenergic agonist) and d-amphetamine (catecholaminergic agonist), were examined in an experimental procedure designed to disclose selective effects on carbohydrate consumption. In this procedure, a revised version of what we have termed "The Classic Sclafani Paradigm", animals are presented with powdered Polycose as an optional carbohydrate supplement to hydrated chow (nutritionally complete diet). All drugs produced significant reductions in total (hydrated chow plus powdered Polycose) intake. However, only the 5-HT drugs DOI and fluoxetine exerted significantly stronger anorectic effects on intake of powdered Polycose than on intake of hydrated chow. d-Fenfluramine also showed a tendency to selectively suppress Polycose intake but this effect marginally failed to reach significance. These results suggest that when experimental conditions are favourable, what appears to be selective carbohydrate (Polycose) suppression can be demonstrated with certain 5-HT drugs. They also suggest that a selective effect on carbohydrate intake is not the most prominent feeding response to 5-HT drugs.

  13. Tianeptine: 5-HT uptake sites and 5-HT(1-7) receptors modulate memory formation in an autoshaping Pavlovian/instrumental task.

    PubMed

    Meneses, Alfredo

    2002-05-01

    Recent studies using invertebrate and mammal species have revealed that, endogenous serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) modulates cognitive processes, particularly learning and memory, though, at present, it is unclear the manner, where, and how long 5-HT systems are involved. Hence in this work, an attempt was made to study the effects of 5-HT endogenous on memory formation, using a 5-HT uptake facilitator (tianeptine) and, selective 5-HT(1-7) receptor antagonists to determine whether 5-HT uptake sites and which 5-HT receptors are involved, respectively. Results showed that post-training tianeptine injection enhanced memory consolidation in an autoshaping Pavlovian/instrumental learning task, which has been useful to detect changes on memory formation elicited by drugs or aging. On interaction experiments, ketanserin (5-HT(1D/2A/2C) antagonist) slightly enhanced tianeptine effects, while WAY 100635 (5-HT(1A) antagonist), SB-224289 (5-HT(1B) inverse agonist), SB-200646 (5-HT(2B/2C) antagonist), ondansetron (5-HT(3) antagonist), GR 127487 (5-HT(4) antagonist), Ro 04-6790 (5-HT(6) antagonist), DR 4004 (5-HT(7) antagonist), or fluoxetine (an inhibitor of 5-HT reuptake) blocked the facilitatory tianeptine effect. Notably, together tianeptine and Ro 04-6790 impaired learning consolidation. Moreover, 5-HT depletion completely reversed the tianeptine effect. Tianeptine also normalized an impaired memory elicited by scopolamine (an antimuscarinic) or dizocilpine (non-competitive glutamatergic antagonist), while partially reversed that induced by TFMPP (5-HT(1B/1D/2A-2C/7) agonist/antagonist). Finally, tianeptine-fluoxetine coadministration had no effect on learning consolidation; nevertheless, administration of an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, phenserine, potentiated subeffective tianeptine or fluoxetine doses. Collectively, these data confirmed that endogenously 5-HT modulates, via uptake sites and 5-HT(1-7) receptors, memory consolidation, and are consistent with the

  14. N-methyl-citalopram: A quaternary selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Bismuth-Evenzal, Yona; Roz, Netta; Gurwitz, David; Rehavi, Moshe

    2010-11-15

    We describe the synthesis and the pharmacological characterization of a new quaternary selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) N-methyl-citalopram (NMC) with periphery restricted action due to its inability to cross the blood brain barrier. NMC recognized and blocked the human platelet serotonin transporter (SERT) with similar affinity to that of citalopram as was evident from competition binding studies with [(3)H]citalopram and uptake studies with [(3)H]5-HT. In contrast, the affinity of NMC to rat brain SERT was 10-fold lower than its parent compound citalopram. Similarly to citalopram, NMC did not inhibit dopamine and noradrenaline uptake in rat brain synaptosomes at 10(-7)M as well as [(3)H]ketanserin binding to rat brain membranes at 10(-5)M, demonstrating its SSRI profile. A comparison of radioactivity retained in perfused mice brain following in vivo intraperitoneal injections of tritium-labeled NMC or citalopram showed that unlike citalopram, NMC did not penetrate the brain. Taken together, our observations suggest that N-methyl-citalopram is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor that does not penetrate the mouse brain. Epidemiological studies have suggested that chronic use of SSRI drugs may confer a protective effect against myocardial infarction (MI) apparently reflecting reduced platelet aggregation secondary to reduced platelet serotonin levels. N-methyl-citalopram may therefore have a potential as a new anti-platelet drug that does not cross the blood brain barrier and is thus devoid of the adverse CNS effects of SSRI drugs.

  15. Milnacipran, a serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, induces appetite-suppressing effects without inducing hypothalamic stress responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Nonogaki, Katsunori; Nozue, Kana; Kuboki, Tomifusa; Oka, Yoshitomo

    2007-05-01

    Milnacipran, a selective serotonin (5-HT) and norepinephrine (NE) reuptake inhibitor, increases extracellular 5-HT and NA levels equally in the central nervous system. Here, we report that systemic administration of milnacipran (20-60 mg/kg) significantly suppressed food intake after fasting in C57BL6J mice. The appetite-suppressing effects of milnacipran were sustained for 5 h. Neither SB242084, a selective 5-HT2C receptor antagonist, nor SB224289, a selective 5-HT1B receptor antagonist, reversed the appetite-suppressing effects of milnacipran. Milnacipran suppressed food intake and body weight in wild-type mice and in A(y) mice, which have ectopic expression of the agouti protein. Moreover, milnacipran significantly increased hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) mRNA levels, while having no effect on hypothalamic neuropeptide Y, ghrelin, corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), and suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 mRNA levels. Interestingly, milnacipran did not increase plasma corticosterone and blood glucose levels, whereas fenfluramine, which inhibits 5-HT reuptake and stimulates 5-HT release, significantly increased plasma corticosterone and blood glucose levels in association with increased hypothalamic CRH mRNA levels. The appetite-suppressing effects of milnacipran had no effects on food intake in food-restricted, wild-type mice and A(y) mice. On the other hand, fenfluramine suppressed food intake in food-restricted wild-type mice, but it had no effects in food-restricted A(y) mice. These results suggest that inhibition of 5-HT and NA reuptake induces appetite-suppressing effects independent of 5-HT2C and 5-HT1B receptors, and increases hypothalamic POMC and CART gene expression without increasing plasma corticosterone and blood glucose levels in mice.

  16. Inhibitors of serotonin reuptake and specific imipramine binding in human blood plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Brusov, O.S.; Fomenko, A.M.; Katasonov, A.B.; Lidemann, R.R.

    1985-12-01

    This paper describes a method of extraction of endogenous inhibitors of specific IMI binding and of 5-HT reuptake, from human blood plasma and the heterogeneity of these compounds is demonstrated. Specific binding was determined as the difference between binding of /sup 3/H-IMI in the absence and in the presence of 50 microM IMI. Under these conditions, specific binding amounted to 70-80% of total binding of /sup 3/H-IMI. It is shown that extract obtained from human blood contains a material which inhibits dose-dependently both 5-HT reuptake and specific binding of /sup 3/H-IMI. Gel-chromatography of extracts of human blood plasma on Biogel P-2 is also shown.

  17. The rapid recovery of 5-HT cell firing induced by the antidepressant vortioxetine involves 5-HT(3) receptor antagonism.

    PubMed

    Bétry, Cécile; Pehrson, Alan L; Etiévant, Adeline; Ebert, Bjarke; Sánchez, Connie; Haddjeri, Nasser

    2013-06-01

    The therapeutic effect of current antidepressant drugs appears after several weeks of treatment and a significant number of patients do not respond to treatment. Here, we report the effects of the multi-modal antidepressant vortioxetine (Lu AA21004), a 5-HT(3) and 5-HT(7) receptor antagonist, 5-HT(1B) receptor partial agonist, 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist and 5-HT transporter (SERT) inhibitor, on rat 5-HT neurotransmission. Using in vivo electrophysiological recordings in the dorsal raphe nucleus of anaesthetized rats, we assessed the acute and subchronic effects of vortioxetine and/or the selective 5-HT(3) receptor agonist, SR57227 or the selective 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist flesinoxan, on 5-HT neuronal firing activity. Using ex-vivo autoradiography, we correlated SERT occupancy and presumed 5-HT firing activity. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine, was used as comparator. Importantly, the recovery of 5-HT neuronal firing was achieved after 1 d with vortioxetine and 14 d with fluoxetine. SR57227 delayed this recovery. In contrast, vortioxetine failed to alter the reducing action of 3 d treatment of flesinoxan. Acute dosing of vortioxetine inhibited neuronal firing activity more potently than fluoxetine. SR57227 prevented the suppressant effect of vortioxetine, but not of fluoxetine. In contrast, flesinoxan failed to modify the suppressant effect of vortioxetine acutely administered. Differently to fluoxetine, vortioxetine suppressed neuronal firing without saturating occupancy at the SERT. Vortioxetine produced a markedly faster recovery of 5-HT neuronal firing than fluoxetine. This is at least partly due to 5-HT(3) receptor antagonism of vortioxetine in association with its reduced SERT occupancy.

  18. Role of 5-HT2 receptors in diabetes: Swertiamarin seco-iridoid glycoside might be a possible 5-HT2 receptor modulator.

    PubMed

    Sonawane, Rakesh Deelip; Deore, Vijaykumar B; Patil, Savita D; Patil, Chandragouda R; Surana, Sanjay J; Goyal, Ramesh K

    2015-05-15

    In the present review, we are focusing on modulators of 5-HT2 receptors, swertiamarin and their role in diabetes. These drugs possess both central and peripheral actions in various animal models of depression, diabetes and obesity. Swertiamarin and 5-HT2 antagonist are reported antidepressant, hypolipidemic and beneficial in peripheral vasculopathy. In contrast to this, 5-HT2C selective agonist decreases hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia and insulin secretogogue by action. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are known antidepressant having weight gain as an adverse effect. Swertiamarin has similar pharmacological actions as 5-HT2 antagonist and 5-HT2C selective agonist. This warrants that swertiamarin might modulate 5-HT2 receptors rather than affecting the uptake of serotonin. In the light of present investigation, the mechanism of these drugs can correlate the role of central and peripheral 5-HT2 receptors in diabetes.

  19. Effects of the selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor reboxetine on norepinephrine and serotonin transmission in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Szabo, S T; Blier, P

    2001-12-01

    Given that norepinephrine (NE) and serotonin (5-HT) neurons are implicated in the mechanisms of action of antidepressant drugs and both project to the hippocampus, the impact of acute and long-term administration of the selective NE inhibitor reboxetine was assessed on CA(3) pyramidal neuron firing in this postsynaptic structure. Cumulative injections of reboxetine (1-4 mg/kg, i.v.) dose-dependently increased the recovery time of the firing of these neurons following iontophoretic applications of NE, but not 5-HT. In rats treated with reboxetine for 2.5 mg/kg/day for 21 days, a robust increase in the recovery time following NE applications was observed, and a small but significant prolongation occurred following 5-HT applications. In controls and reboxetine-treated rats, 1 and 5 Hz stimulations of the afferent 5-HT bundle to the hippocampus, which allows determination of terminal 5-HT(1B) autoreceptor sensitivity, produced similar frequency-dependent decreases in pyramidal neuron firing in both groups. However, after low and high doses of clonidine (10 and 400 microg/kg, i.v.), which assesses alpha(2)-adrenergic auto- and heteroreceptor sensitivity, respectively, only the effect of the high dose of clonidine was attenuated. Interestingly, administration of the selective 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist WAY 100,635 induced a 140% increase in basal pyramidal neuron firing in reboxetine as compared to saline-treated rats. This increase in tonic activation of postsynaptic 5-HT(1A) receptors might be attributable in part to a desensitization of alpha(2)-adrenergic heteroreceptors, presumably resulting from sustained NE reuptake inhibition. These results indicate that even a selective NE reuptake inhibitor can modulate 5-HT transmission.

  20. [Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) and osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Fétique-Will, Anne-Catherine; Chevalley, Thierry; Rizzoli, René

    2011-06-15

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) represent the first-line treatment of depression. Several studies demonstrate that use of therapeutical doses of SSRI is associated with a decreased bone mineral density (BMD) and an increased risk of fracture. Mechanisms of action of SSRI on bone tissue are not totally clarified. These treatments would be associated with an increased risk of falls and would also have a direct effect on bone metabolism. Regarding proofs existing of the implication of SSRI on osteoporosis, while waiting for larger-scale prospective studies, it appears reasonable that practitioners assess bone loss within risk groups of patients treated with SSRI.

  1. [Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor and gastrointestinal hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takatsugu; Abe, Koichiro; Kuyama, Yasushi

    2013-04-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) are widely used antidepressants characterized by less-frequent adverse effects compared with classical anti-depressive agents. On the other hand, SSRI can cause hemorrhagic events more due to impaired platelet aggregation induced by a depletion of serotonin in the peripheral platelet. Epidemiological studies have indicated that patients taking SSRI are predisposed to gastrointestinal hemorrhage, especially in case that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are prescribed concomitantly. Here we describe a risk of the gastrointestinal hemorrhage in patients taking SSRI.

  2. Treatment with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine, attenuates the fish hypoxia response.

    PubMed

    Panlilio, Jennifer M; Marin, Sara; Lobl, Marissa B; McDonald, M Danielle

    2016-08-08

    The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluoxetine (FLX), the active ingredient of the antidepressant drug Prozac, inhibits reuptake of the neurotransmitter, serotonin (5-HT; 5-hydroxytryptamine), into cells by the 5-HT transporter (SERT). Given the role of 5-HT in oxygen detection and the cardiovascular and ventilatory responses of fish to hypoxia, we hypothesized that treatment of the Gulf toadfish, Opsanus beta, with FLX would interfere with their response to hypoxia. Toadfish treated intra-arterially with 3.4 μg.g(-1) FLX under normoxic conditions displayed a transient tachycardia and a biphasic caudal arterial blood pressure (PCA) response that are in direct conflict with the typical hypoxia response. Fish injected intraperitoneally with FLX under normoxia had resting cardiovascular and ventilatory parameters similar to controls. Upon exposure to hypoxia, control toadfish exhibit a significant bradycardia, reduction in PCA and an increase in ventilatory amplitude (VAMP) without any changes in ventilatory frequency (fV). Fish treated IP with 10 μg.g(-1) FLX showed an interference in the cardiovascular and ventilatory response to hypoxia. Interestingly, when treated with 25 μg.g(-1) FLX, the bradycardia and VAMP response to hypoxia were similar to control fish while the PCA response to hypoxia was further inhibited. These results suggest that SERT inhibition by FLX may hinder survival in hypoxia.

  3. Treatment with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine, attenuates the fish hypoxia response

    PubMed Central

    Panlilio, Jennifer M.; Marin, Sara; Lobl, Marissa B.; McDonald, M. Danielle

    2016-01-01

    The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluoxetine (FLX), the active ingredient of the antidepressant drug Prozac, inhibits reuptake of the neurotransmitter, serotonin (5-HT; 5-hydroxytryptamine), into cells by the 5-HT transporter (SERT). Given the role of 5-HT in oxygen detection and the cardiovascular and ventilatory responses of fish to hypoxia, we hypothesized that treatment of the Gulf toadfish, Opsanus beta, with FLX would interfere with their response to hypoxia. Toadfish treated intra-arterially with 3.4 μg.g−1 FLX under normoxic conditions displayed a transient tachycardia and a biphasic caudal arterial blood pressure (PCA) response that are in direct conflict with the typical hypoxia response. Fish injected intraperitoneally with FLX under normoxia had resting cardiovascular and ventilatory parameters similar to controls. Upon exposure to hypoxia, control toadfish exhibit a significant bradycardia, reduction in PCA and an increase in ventilatory amplitude (VAMP) without any changes in ventilatory frequency (fV). Fish treated IP with 10 μg.g−1 FLX showed an interference in the cardiovascular and ventilatory response to hypoxia. Interestingly, when treated with 25 μg.g−1 FLX, the bradycardia and VAMP response to hypoxia were similar to control fish while the PCA response to hypoxia was further inhibited. These results suggest that SERT inhibition by FLX may hinder survival in hypoxia. PMID:27499056

  4. Serotonin reuptake inhibitor citalopram inhibits GnRH synthesis and spermatogenesis in the male zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Parvathy; Ogawa, Satoshi; Parhar, Ishwar S

    2015-10-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are widely used antidepressants for the treatment of depression. However, SSRIs cause sexual side effects such as anorgasmia, erectile dysfunction, and diminished libido that are thought to be mediated through the serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) system. In vertebrates, gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons play an important role in the control of reproduction. To elucidate the neuroendocrine mechanisms of SSRI-induced reproductive failure, we examined the neuronal association between 5-HT and GnRH (GnRH2 and GnRH3) systems in the male zebrafish. Double-label immunofluorescence and confocal laser microscopy followed by three-dimensional construction analysis showed close associations between 5-HT fibers with GnRH3 fibers and preoptic-GnRH3 cell bodies, but there was no association with GnRH2 cell bodies and fibers. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that short-term treatment (2 wk) with low to medium doses (4 and 40 μg/L, respectively) of citalopram significantly decreased mRNA levels of gnrh3, gonadotropins (lhb and fshb) and 5-HT-related genes (tph2 and sert) in the male zebrafish. In addition, short-term citalopram treatment significantly decreased the fluorescence density of 5-HT and GnRH3 fibers compared with controls. Short-term treatment with low, medium, and high (100 μg/L) citalopram doses had no effects on the profiles of different stages of spermatogenesis, while long-term (1 mo) citalopram treatment with medium and high doses significantly inhibited the different stages of spermatogenesis. These results show morphological and functional associations between the 5-HT and the hypophysiotropic GnHR3 system, which involve SSRI-induced reproductive failures.

  5. Monoamine Reuptake Inhibitors in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Huot, Philippe; Fox, Susan H.; Brotchie, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    The motor manifestations of Parkinson's disease (PD) are secondary to a dopamine deficiency in the striatum. However, the degenerative process in PD is not limited to the dopaminergic system and also affects serotonergic and noradrenergic neurons. Because they can increase monoamine levels throughout the brain, monoamine reuptake inhibitors (MAUIs) represent potential therapeutic agents in PD. However, they are seldom used in clinical practice other than as antidepressants and wake-promoting agents. This review article summarises all of the available literature on use of 50 MAUIs in PD. The compounds are divided according to their relative potency for each of the monoamine transporters. Despite wide discrepancy in the methodology of the studies reviewed, the following conclusions can be drawn: (1) selective serotonin transporter (SERT), selective noradrenaline transporter (NET), and dual SERT/NET inhibitors are effective against PD depression; (2) selective dopamine transporter (DAT) and dual DAT/NET inhibitors exert an anti-Parkinsonian effect when administered as monotherapy but do not enhance the anti-Parkinsonian actions of L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA); (3) dual DAT/SERT inhibitors might enhance the anti-Parkinsonian actions of L-DOPA without worsening dyskinesia; (4) triple DAT/NET/SERT inhibitors might exert an anti-Parkinsonian action as monotherapy and might enhance the anti-Parkinsonian effects of L-DOPA, though at the expense of worsening dyskinesia. PMID:25810948

  6. Vortioxetine restores reversal learning impaired by 5-HT depletion or chronic intermittent cold stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Ashley; Pehrson, Alan L; Sánchez, Connie; Morilak, David A

    2014-10-01

    Current treatments for depression, including serotonin-specific reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), are only partially effective, with a high incidence of residual symptoms, relapse, and treatment resistance. Loss of cognitive flexibility, a component of depression, is associated with dysregulation of the prefrontal cortex. Reversal learning, a form of cognitive flexibility, is impaired by chronic stress, a risk factor for depression, and the stress-induced impairment in reversal learning is sensitive to chronic SSRI treatment, and is mimicked by serotonin (5-HT) depletion. Vortioxetine, a novel, multimodal-acting antidepressant, is a 5-HT3, 5-HT7 and 5-HT1D receptor antagonist, a 5-HT1B receptor partial agonist, a 5-HT1A receptor agonist, and inhibits the 5-HT transporter. Using adult male rats, we first investigated the direct effects of vortioxetine, acting at post-synaptic 5-HT receptors, on reversal learning that was compromised by 5-HT depletion using 4-chloro-DL-phenylalanine methyl ester hydrochloride (PCPA), effectively eliminating any contribution of 5-HT reuptake blockade. PCPA induced a reversal learning impairment that was alleviated by acute or sub-chronic vortioxetine administration, suggesting that post-synaptic 5-HT receptor activation contributes to the effects of vortioxetine. We then investigated the effects of chronic dietary administration of vortioxetine on reversal learning that had been compromised in intact animals exposed to chronic intermittent cold (CIC) stress, to assess vortioxetine's total pharmacological effect. CIC stress impaired reversal learning, and chronic vortioxetine administration prevented the reversal-learning deficit. Together, these results suggest that the direct effect of vortioxetine at 5-HT receptors may contribute to positive effects on cognitive flexibility deficits, and may enhance the effect of 5-HT reuptake blockade.

  7. Higher levels of aggression are observed in socially dominant toadfish treated with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine.

    PubMed

    McDonald, M Danielle; Gonzalez, Alexander; Sloman, Katherine A

    2011-01-01

    The following study set out to test the hypothesis that acute treatment with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine, would result in a rise in circulating 5-HT levels and consequently a decrease in territorial aggression in the Gulf toadfish, Opsanus beta. Size-matched pairs of toadfish were implanted intraperitoneally with the same dose of fluoxetine (0, 10 or 25 μg g⁻¹). After a social interaction between a pair of fish, circulating levels of serotonin (5-HT; 5-hydroxytryptamine) and cortisol were measured and relative mRNA expression of the 5-HT(1A) receptor in the toadfish brain was determined using quantitative (real-time) PCR (qPCR). Behavioral endpoints such as the number of aggressive acts and swimming activity were also quantified so that dominant and subordinate fish could be identified. Fluoxetine treatment resulted in an increase in circulating levels of 5-HT, regardless of social status. Circulating cortisol concentrations were unaffected by fluoxetine, but were significantly higher in subordinate individuals when compared to dominant fish. Toadfish brain 5-HT(1A) receptor mRNA expression was not affected by treatment or social status. Lastly and contrary to our predictions, fluoxetine treatment resulted in an increase in the number of aggressive acts made by dominant individuals, with no differences in the level of aggression or swimming activity of subordinate fish. This study is the first to describe elevated aggression in a teleost fish with elevated circulating levels of 5-HT.

  8. Evaluation of the analgesic effects of ammoxetine, a novel potent serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ting-ting; Xue, Rui; Zhu, Lei; Li, Juan; Fan, Qiong-yin; Zhong, Bo-hua; Li, Yun-feng; Ye, Cai-ying; Zhang, You-zhi

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The selective serotonin (5-HT) and norepinephrine (NE) reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) are commonly used for the treatment of neuropathic pain and fibromyalgia. Ammoxetine ((±)-3-(benzo[d] [1,3]dioxol-4-yloxy)-N-methyl-3-(thiophen-2-yl)propan-1-amine) has been identified as a novel potent SNRI. In this study, we evaluated the acute analgesic properties of ammoxetine in different animal models of pain, and examined the involvement of monoamines in its analgesic actions. Methods: The analgesic effects of ammoxetine were assayed using models of acetic acid- and formalin-induced pain in mice, neuropathic pain induced by sciatic nerve injury (SNI), chronic constriction injury (CCI) and reserpine-induced fibromyalgia pain in rats. The contents of 5-HT and NE in brain regions of fibromyalgia rats were measured using HPLC-ECD. In all the experiments, duloxetine was used as a positive control drug. Results: Oral administration of ammoxetine (0.625–10 mg/kg) or duloxetine (2.5–40 mg/kg) dose-dependently decreased the number of acetic acid-induced writhing and formalin-induced first phase and second phase paw licking time in mice. Oral administration of ammoxetine (2.5–10 mg/kg) or duloxetine (10 mg/kg) alleviated mechanical allodynia in SNI and CCI rats and thermal hyperalgesia in CCI rats. The antiallodynic effect of ammoxetine in CCI rats was abolished by pretreatment with para-chlorophenylalanine methyl ester hydrochloride (PCPA, a 5-HT synthesis inhibitor) or α-methyl-para-tyrosine methylester (AMPT, a catecholamine synthesis inhibitor). Oral administration of ammoxetine (30 mg/kg) or duloxetine (50 mg/kg) significantly attenuated tactile allodynia in rats with reserpine-induced fibromyalgia. In the fibromyalgia rats, administration of ammoxetine (10, 30 mg/kg) or duloxetine (30, 50 mg/kg) dose-dependently increased the levels of 5-HT and NE, and decreased the metabolite ratio of 5-HT (5-HIAA/5-HT) in the spinal cord, hypothalamus, thalamus and prefrontal cortex

  9. Involvement of 5-HT3 receptors in the action of vortioxetine in rat brain: Focus on glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Riga, Maurizio S; Sánchez, Connie; Celada, Pau; Artigas, Francesc

    2016-09-01

    The antidepressant vortioxetine is a 5-HT3-R, 5-HT7-R and 5-HT1D-R antagonist, 5-HT1B-R partial agonist, 5-HT1A-R agonist, and serotonin (5-HT) transporter (SERT) inhibitor. Vortioxetine occupies all targets at high therapeutic doses and only SERT and 5-HT3-R at low doses. Vortioxetine increases extracellular monoamine concentrations in rat forebrain more than selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) and shows pro-cognitive activity in preclinical models. Given its high affinity for 5-HT3-R (Ki = 3.7 nM), selectively expressed in GABA interneurons, we hypothesized that vortioxetine may disinhibit glutamatergic and monoaminergic neurotransmission following 5-HT3-R blockade. Here we assessed vortioxetine effect on pyramidal neuron activity and extracellular 5-HT concentration using in vivo extracellular recordings of rat medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) pyramidal neurons and microdialysis in mPFC and ventral hippocampus (vHPC). Vortioxetine, but not escitalopram, increased pyramidal neuron discharge in mPFC. This effect was prevented by SR57227A (5-HT3-R agonist) and was mimicked by ondansetron (5-HT3-R antagonist) and by escitalopram/ondansetron combinations. In microdialysis experiments, ondansetron augmented the 5-HT-enhancing effect of escitalopram in mPFC and vHPC. Local ondansetron in vHPC augmented escitalopram effect, indicating the participation of intrinsic mechanisms. Since 5-HT neurons express GABAB receptors, we examined their putative involvement in controlling 5-HT release after 5-HT3-R blockade. Co-perfusion of baclofen (but not muscimol) reversed the increased 5-HT levels produced by vortioxetine and escitalopram/ondansetron combinations in vHPC. The present results suggest that vortioxetine increases glutamatergic and serotonergic neurotransmission in rat forebrain by blocking 5-HT3 receptors in GABA interneurons.

  10. Relative contributions of norepinephrine and serotonin transporters to antinociceptive synergy between monoamine reuptake inhibitors and morphine in the rat formalin model.

    PubMed

    Shen, Fei; Tsuruda, Pamela R; Smith, Jacqueline A M; Obedencio, Glenmar P; Martin, William J

    2013-01-01

    Multimodal analgesia is designed to optimize pain relief by coadministering drugs with distinct mechanisms of action or by combining multiple pharmacologies within a single molecule. In clinical settings, combinations of monoamine reuptake inhibitors and opioid receptor agonists have been explored and one currently available analgesic, tapentadol, functions as both a µ-opioid receptor agonist and a norepinephrine transporter inhibitor. However, it is unclear whether the combination of selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibition and µ-receptor agonism achieves an optimal antinociceptive synergy. In this study, we assessed the pharmacodynamic interactions between morphine and monoamine reuptake inhibitors that possess different affinities and selectivities for norepinephrine and serotonin transporters. Using the rat formalin model, in conjunction with measurements of ex vivo transporter occupancy, we show that neither the norepinephrine-selective inhibitor, esreboxetine, nor the serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine, produce antinociceptive synergy with morphine. Atomoxetine, a monoamine reuptake inhibitor that achieves higher levels of norepinephrine than serotonin transporter occupancy, exhibited robust antinociceptive synergy with morphine. Similarly, a fixed-dose combination of esreboxetine and fluoxetine which achieves comparable levels of transporter occupancy potentiated the antinociceptive response to morphine. By contrast, duloxetine, a monoamine reuptake inhibitor that achieves higher serotonin than norepinephrine transporter occupancy, failed to potentiate the antinociceptive response to morphine. However, when duloxetine was coadministered with the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, ondansetron, potentiation of the antinociceptive response to morphine was revealed. These results support the notion that inhibition of both serotonin and norepinephrine transporters is required for monoamine reuptake inhibitor and opioid-mediated antinociceptive

  11. Robust presynaptic serotonin 5-HT1B receptor inhibition of the striatonigral output and its sensitization by chronic fluoxetine treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Shengyuan; Li, Li

    2015-01-01

    The striatonigral projection is a striatal output pathway critical to motor control, cognition, and emotion regulation. Its axon terminals in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr) express a high level of serotonin (5-HT) type 1B receptors (5-HT1BRs), whereas the SNr also receives an intense 5-HT innervation that expresses 5-HT transporters, providing an anatomic substrate for 5-HT and selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitor (SSRI)-based antidepressant treatment to regulate the striatonigral output. In this article we show that 5-HT, by activating presynaptic 5-HT1BRs on the striatonigral axon terminals, potently inhibited the striatonigral GABA output, as reflected in the reduction of the striatonigral inhibitory postsynaptic currents in SNr GABA neurons. Functionally, 5-HT1BR agonism reduced the striatonigral GABA output-induced pause of the spontaneous high-frequency firing in SNr GABA neurons. Equally important, chronic SSRI treatment with fluoxetine enhanced this presynaptic 5-HT1BR-mediated pause reduction in SNr GABA neurons. Taken together, these results indicate that activation of the 5-HT1BRs on the striatonigral axon terminals can limit the motor-promoting GABA output. Furthermore, in contrast to the desensitization of 5-HT1 autoreceptors, chronic SSRI-based antidepressant treatment sensitizes this presynaptic 5-HT1BR-mediated effect in the SNr, a novel cellular mechanism that alters the striatonigral information transfer, potentially contributing to the behavioral effects of chronic SSRI treatment. PMID:25787955

  12. Effects of 071031B, a novel serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, on monoamine system in mice and rats.

    PubMed

    Xue, Rui; He, Xin-Hua; Yuan, Li; Chen, Hong-Xia; Zhang, Li-Ming; Yong, Zheng; Yu, Gang; Fan, Shi-Yong; Li, Yun-Feng; Zhong, Bo-Hua; Zhang, You-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Our previous study indicated that 071031B, a novel potential serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, showed robust antidepressant activity in multiple depression models, and could simultaneously inhibit 5-HT and NE reuptake in vitro. The present study was to evaluate the effects of 071031B on monoamine system in vivo, by using pharmacological models, including 5-HTP induced head-twitch test, yohimbine toxicity potentiation test, and reserpine induced hypothermia test, and determining monoamine transmitter levels in reserpine induced monoamine depletion model or chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) model. Results in pharmacological models indicated that acute administration of 071031B at 5-20 mg/kg significantly enhanced 5-HTP induced head-twitch behavior, potentiated yohimbine induced lethal rate, and reversed reserpine induced hypothermia. Further monoamine assays demonstrated that acute or chronic administration of 071031B at 10 or 20 mg/kg increased 5-HT and/or NE levels in various brain regions in reserpine or CUS induced monoamine depletion models, respectively, without effect on DA and its metabolites. Our results revealed that 071031B produces potent inhibition of 5-HT and NE reuptake in vivo.

  13. Design of Monoamine Reuptake Inhibitors: SSRIs, SNRIs and NRIs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitlock, Gavin A.; Andrews, Mark D.; Brown, Alan D.; Fish, Paul V.; Stobie, Alan; Wakenhut, Florian

    This review will detail the medicinal chemistry involved in the design, synthesis and discovery of selective serotonin, noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors and dual serotonin/noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors. In particular, this review will focus exclusively on series and compounds which have been disclosed within the medicinal chemistry literature between January 2000 and June 2008. Background information on previously disclosed clinical agents, such as atomoxetine, milnacipran and reboxetine, is included for comparison purposes with more recently disclosed agents.

  14. Changes in intensity of serotonin syndrome caused by adverse interaction between monoamine oxidase inhibitors and serotonin reuptake blockers.

    PubMed

    Tao, Rui; Rudacille, Mary; Zhang, Gongliang; Ma, Zhiyuan

    2014-07-01

    Drug interaction between inhibitors of monoamine oxidase (MAOIs) and selective serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) reuptake (SSRIs) induces serotonin syndrome, which is usually mild but occasionally severe in intensity. However, little is known about neural mechanisms responsible for the syndrome induction and intensification. In this study, we hypothesized that the syndrome induction and intensity utilize two different but inter-related mechanisms. Serotonin syndrome is elicited by excessive 5-HT in the brain (presynaptic mechanism), whereas syndrome intensity is attributed to neural circuits involving 5-HT2A and NMDA receptors (postsynaptic mechanism). To test this hypothesis, basal 5-HT efflux and postsynaptic circuits were pharmacologically altered in rats by once daily pretreatment of the MAOI clorgyline for 3, 6, or 13 days. Syndrome intensity was estimated by measuring 5-HT efflux, neuromuscular activity, and body-core temperature in response to challenge injection of clorgyline combined with the SSRI paroxetine. Results showed that the onset of serotonin syndrome is caused by 5-HT efflux exceeding 10-fold above baseline, confirming the presynaptic hypothesis. The neuromuscular and body-core temperature abnormalities, which were otherwise mild in drug-naive rats, were significantly intensified to a severe level in rats pretreated with daily clorgyline for 3 and 6 days but not in rats pretreated for 13 days. The intensified effect was blocked by M100907 and MK-801, suggesting that variation in syndrome intensity was mediated through a 5-HT2A and NMDA receptor-engaged circuit. Therefore, we concluded that pretreatments of MAOI pharmacologically alter the activity of postsynaptic circuits, which is responsible for changes in syndrome intensity.

  15. Combinatorial support vector machines approach for virtual screening of selective multi-target serotonin reuptake inhibitors from large compound libraries.

    PubMed

    Shi, Z; Ma, X H; Qin, C; Jia, J; Jiang, Y Y; Tan, C Y; Chen, Y Z

    2012-02-01

    Selective multi-target serotonin reuptake inhibitors enhance antidepressant efficacy. Their discovery can be facilitated by multiple methods, including in silico ones. In this study, we developed and tested an in silico method, combinatorial support vector machines (COMBI-SVMs), for virtual screening (VS) multi-target serotonin reuptake inhibitors of seven target pairs (serotonin transporter paired with noradrenaline transporter, H(3) receptor, 5-HT(1A) receptor, 5-HT(1B) receptor, 5-HT(2C) receptor, melanocortin 4 receptor and neurokinin 1 receptor respectively) from large compound libraries. COMBI-SVMs trained with 917-1951 individual target inhibitors correctly identified 22-83.3% (majority >31.1%) of the 6-216 dual inhibitors collected from literature as independent testing sets. COMBI-SVMs showed moderate to good target selectivity in misclassifying as dual inhibitors 2.2-29.8% (majority <15.4%) of the individual target inhibitors of the same target pair and 0.58-7.1% of the other 6 targets outside the target pair. COMBI-SVMs showed low dual inhibitor false hit rates (0.006-0.056%, 0.042-0.21%, 0.2-4%) in screening 17 million PubChem compounds, 168,000 MDDR compounds, and 7-8181 MDDR compounds similar to the dual inhibitors. Compared with similarity searching, k-NN and PNN methods, COMBI-SVM produced comparable dual inhibitor yields, similar target selectivity, and lower false hit rate in screening 168,000 MDDR compounds. The annotated classes of many COMBI-SVMs identified MDDR virtual hits correlate with the reported effects of their predicted targets. COMBI-SVM is potentially useful for searching selective multi-target agents without explicit knowledge of these agents.

  16. Methylene blue inhibits function of the 5-HT transporter

    PubMed Central

    Oz, Murat; Isaev, Dmytro; Lorke, Dietrich E; Hasan, Muhammed; Petroianu, Georg; Shippenberg, Toni S

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Methylene blue (MB) is commonly employed as a treatment for methaemoglobinaemia, malaria and vasoplegic shock. An increasing number of studies indicate that MB can cause 5-HT toxicity when administered with a 5-HT reuptake inhibitor. MB is a potent inhibitor of monoamine oxidases, but other targets that may contribute to MB toxicity have not been identified. Given the role of the 5-HT transporter (SERT) in the regulation of extracellular 5-HT concentrations, the present study aimed to characterize the effect of MB on SERT. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Live cell imaging, in conjunction with the fluorescent SERT substrate 4-(4-(dimethylamino)-styryl)-N-methylpyridinium (ASP+), [3H]5-HT uptake and whole-cell patch-clamp techniques were employed to examine the effects of MB on SERT function. KEY RESULTS In EM4 cells expressing GFP-tagged human SERT (hSERT), MB concentration-dependently inhibited ASP+ accumulation (IC50: 1.4 ± 0.3 µM). A similar effect was observed in N2A cells. Uptake of [3H]5-HT was decreased by MB pretreatment. Furthermore, patch-clamp studies in hSERT expressing cells indicated that MB significantly inhibited 5-HT-evoked ion currents. Pretreatment with 8-Br-cGMP did not alter the inhibitory effect of MB on hSERT activity, and intracellular Ca2+ levels remained unchanged during MB application. Further experiments revealed that ASP+ binding to cell surface hSERT was reduced after MB treatment. In whole-cell radioligand experiments, exposure to MB (10 µM; 10 min) did not alter surface binding of the SERT ligand [125I]RTI-55. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS MB modulated SERT function and suggested that SERT may be an additional target upon which MB acts to produce 5-HT toxicity. PMID:21542830

  17. Altered response to the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor escitalopram in mice heterozygous for the serotonin transporter: an electrophysiological and neurochemical study.

    PubMed

    Guiard, Bruno P; Mansari, Mostafa El; Murphy, Dennis L; Blier, Pierre

    2012-04-01

    A serotonin (5-HT) transporter (5-HTT; SERT) polymorphism has been associated with depressive states and poor responses to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Given the similar attenuation of SERT activity in SERT+/- mice and in humans with short allele(s) of SERT in its promoter region, it is conceivable that SERT+/- mice offer an adequate model to mimic the human subpopulation with respect to their altered response to SSRIs. This study investigated the effects of the most selective SSRI escitalopram, in heterozygous SERT+/- mice using a combined electrophysiological and neurochemical approach. Results indicated that administration of escitalopram for 2 d resulted in a 72% and 63% decrease in dorsal raphe 5-HT neuronal firing rate in SERT+/+ and SERT+/- mice, respectively. In contrast, administration of escitalopram for 21 d produced a gradual recovery of 5-HT neuronal firing rate to basal level in SERT+/+, but not in SERT+/- mice. In the hippocampus, microdialysis revealed that sustained administration of escitalopram produced a greater increase in extracellular 5-HT ([5-HT]ext) outflow in SERT+/- than in the wild-types with or without a washout of the SSRI. Nevertheless, the ability of microiontophoretically applied 5-HT to inhibit the firing rate of CA3 pyramidal neurons was not different between SERT+/+ and SERT+/- mice given escitalopram for 21 d. The data indicate that the poor response to SSRIs of depressive patients with short allele(s) of SERT is not attributable to a lesser increase in 5-HT transmission in the hippocampus.

  18. Phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors prevent 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine-induced 5-HT deficits in the rat.

    PubMed

    Puerta, Elena; Hervias, Isabel; Goñi-Allo, Beatriz; Lasheras, Berta; Jordan, Joaquin; Aguirre, Norberto

    2009-02-01

    Phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors are often used in combination with club drugs such as 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA or ecstasy). We investigated the consequences of such combination in the serotonergic system of the rat. Oral administration of sildenafil citrate (1.5 or 8 mg/kg) increased brain cGMP levels and protected in a dose-dependent manner against 5-hydroxytryptamine depletions caused by MDMA (3 x 5 mg/kg, i.p., every 2 h) in the striatum, frontal cortex and hippocampus without altering the acute hyperthermic response to MDMA. Intrastriatal administration of the protein kinase G (PKG) inhibitor, KT5823 [(9S, 10R, 12R)-2,3,9,10,11,12-Hexahydro-10-methoxy-2,9-dimethyl-1-oxo-9,12-epoxy-1H-diindolo[1,2,3-fg:3',2',1'-kl]pyrrolo[3,4-i][1,6]benzodiazocine-10-carboxylic acid, methyl ester)], suppressed sildenafil-mediated protection. By contrast, the cell permeable cGMP analogue, 8-bromoguanosine cyclic 3',5'-monophosphate, mimicked sildenafil effects further suggesting the involvement of the PKG pathway in mediating sildenafil protection. Because mitochondrial ATP-sensitive K(+) channels are a target for PKG, we next administered the specific mitochondrial ATP-sensitive K(+) channel blocker, 5-hydroxydecanoic acid, 30 min before sildenafil. 5-hydroxydecanoic acid completely reversed the protection afforded by sildenafil, thereby implicating the involvement of mitochondrial ATP-sensitive K(+) channels. Sildenafil also increased Akt phosphorylation, and so the possible involvement of the Akt/endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)/sGC signalling pathway was analysed. Neither the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor, wortmannin, nor the selective eNOS inhibitor, L-N5-(1-iminoethyl)-L-ornithine dihydrochloride, reversed the protection afforded by sildenafil, suggesting that Akt/eNOS/sGC cascade does not participate in the protective mechanisms. Our data also show that the protective effect of sildenafil can be extended to vardenafil, another PDE5

  19. Monoaminergic Antidepressants in the Relief of Pain: Potential Therapeutic Utility of Triple Reuptake Inhibitors (TRIs)

    PubMed Central

    Hache, Guillaume; Coudore, François; Gardier, Alain M.; Guiard, Bruno P.

    2011-01-01

    Over 75% of depressed patients suffer from painful symptoms predicting a greater severity and a less favorable outcome of depression. Imaging, anatomical and functional studies have demonstrated the existence of common brain structures, neuronal pathways and neurotransmitters in depression and pain. In particular, the ascending serotonergic and noradrenergic pathways originating from the raphe nuclei and the locus coeruleus; respectively, send projections to the limbic system. Such pathways control many of the psychological functions that are disturbed in depression and in the perception of pain. On the other hand, the descending pathways, from monoaminergic nuclei to the spinal cord, are specifically implicated in the inhibition of nociception providing rationale for the use of serotonin (5-HT) and/or norepinephrine (NE) reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs, NRIs, SNRIs), in the relief of pain. Compelling evidence suggests that dopamine (DA) is also involved in the pathophysiology and treatment of depression. Indeed, recent insights have demonstrated a central role for DA in analgesia through an action at both the spinal and suprasinal levels including brain regions such as the periaqueductal grey (PAG), the thalamus, the basal ganglia and the limbic system. In this context, dopaminergic antidepressants (i.e., containing dopaminergic activity), such as bupropion, nomifensine and more recently triple reuptake inhibitors (TRIs), might represent new promising therapeutic tools in the treatment of painful symptoms with depression. Nevertheless, whether the addition of the dopaminergic component produces more robust effects than single- or dual-acting agents, has yet to be demonstrated. This article reviews the main pathways regulating pain transmission in relation with the monoaminergic systems. It then focuses on the current knowledge regarding the in vivo pharmacological properties and mechanism of action of monoaminergic antidepressants including SSRIs, NRIs, SNRIs and TRIs

  20. [CROSS-TALK BETWEEN 5-HT1A AND 5-HT7 RECEPTORS: ROLE IN THE AUTOREGULATION OF THE BRAIN SEROTONIN SYSTEM AND IN MECHANISM OF ANTIDEPRESSANTS ACTION].

    PubMed

    Popova, N K; Ponimaskin, E G; Naumenko, V S

    2015-11-01

    Recent studies considerably extended our knowledge of the mechanisms and physiological role of the interaction between different receptors in the brain. Current review summarizes data on the formation of receptor complexes and the role of such complexes in the autoregulation of the brain serotonin system, behavioral abnormalities and mechanism of antidepressants action. Particular attention is paid to 5-HT1A and 5-HT7 receptor heterodimers. The results described in the present review indicate that: i) dimerization and formation of mobile receptor complexes is a common feature for the members of G-protein coupled receptor superfamily; ii) 5-HT7 receptor appears to be a modulator for 5-HT1A receptor - the key autoregulator of the brain serotonin system; iii) 5-HT1A/5-HT7 receptor complexes formation is one of the mechanisms for inactivation and desensitization of the 5-HTIA receptors in the brain; iv) differences in the 5-HT7 receptor and 5-HTIA/5-HT7 heterodimers density define different sensitivity of pre- and postsynaptic 5-HTlA receptors to chronic treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.

  1. Dual role of serotonin in the acquisition and extinction of reward-driven learning: involvement of 5-HT1A, 5-HT2A and 5-HT3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Frick, Luciana Romina; Bernardez-Vidal, Micaela; Hocht, Christian; Zanutto, Bonifacio Silvano; Rapanelli, Maximiliano

    2015-01-15

    Serotonin (5-HT) has been proposed as a possible encoder of reward. Nevertheless, the role of this neurotransmitter in reward-based tasks is not well understood. Given that the major serotonergic circuit in the rat brain comprises the dorsal raphe nuclei and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), and because the latter structure is involved in the control of complex behaviors and expresses 1A (5-HT1A), 2A (5-HT2A), and 3 (5-HT3) receptors, the aim was to study the role of 5-HT and of these receptors in the acquisition and extinction of a reward-dependent operant conditioning task. Long Evans rats were trained in an operant conditioning task while receiving fluoxetine (serotonin reuptake inhibitor, 10mg/kg), tianeptine (serotonin reuptake enhancer, 10mg/kg), buspirone (5-HT1A partial agonist, 10mg/kg), risperidone (5-HT2A antagonist, 1mg/kg), ondansetron (5-HT3 antagonist, 2mg/kg) or vehicle. Then, animals that acquired the operant conditioning without any treatment were trained to extinct the task in the presence of the pharmacological agents. Fluoxetine impaired acquisition but improved extinction. Tianeptine administration induced the opposite effects. Buspirone induced a mild deficit in acquisition and had no effects during the extinction phase. Risperidone administration resulted in learning deficits during the acquisition phase, although it promoted improved extinction. Ondansetron treatment showed a deleterious effect in the acquisition phase and an overall improvement in the extinction phase. These data showed a differential role of 5-HT in the acquisition and extinction of an operant conditioning task, suggesting that it may have a dual function in reward encoding.

  2. 5-HT1A Agonist Properties Contribute to a Robust Response to Vilazodone in the Novelty Suppressed Feeding Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Garcia, Alvaro L.; Navarro-Sobrino, Míriam; Pilosof, Gila; Banerjee, Pradeep; Dranovsky, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Background: Differences in 5-HT1A receptor function have been implicated in vulnerability to depression and in response to treatment. Adding 5-HT1A partial agonists to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors has been touted as a strategy to increase their efficacy. Here we use the novelty suppressed feeding paradigm to compare the effects of vilazodone, a high-potency selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, with high affinity for 5-HT1A receptors to the reference selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine across several mouse strains that differ in their response to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Methods: To confirm 5-HT1A agonist activity, body temperature was measured after acute administration of vilazodone or fluoxetine, as administration of 5-HT1A agonists induces hypothermia. We next used 3 strains of mice to examine the effects of the drugs on latency in the novelty suppressed feeding, a paradigm generally sensitive to chronic but not acute effects of antidepressants. Results: Vilazodone induces robust hypothermia and blocks stress-induced hyperthermia in a 5-HT1A-dependent manner, consistent with agonist effects at 5-HT1A autoreceptors. In 129SvEv mice, vilazodone (10mg/kg/d) reduces the latency to eat in the novelty suppressed feeding test within 8 days, while no effect of fluoxetine (20mg/kg/d) was detected at that time. In contrast, both vilazodone and fluoxetine are effective at decreasing latency to eat in the novelty suppressed feeding paradigm in a strain with low autoreceptor levels. In mice with higher autoreceptor levels, no significant difference was detected between fluoxetine and vehicle (P=.8) or vilazodone and vehicle (P=.06). Conclusion: In mice, vilazodone may offer advantages in time of onset and efficacy over a reference selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor in the novelty suppressed feeding test. PMID:27352617

  3. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors for fibromyalgia syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Walitt, Brian; Urrútia, Gerard; Nishishinya, María Betina; Cantrell, Sarah E; Häuser, Winfried

    2016-01-01

    Background Fibromyalgia is a clinically well-defined chronic condition with a biopsychosocial aetiology. Fibromyalgia is characterized by chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain, sleep problems, cognitive dysfunction, and fatigue. Patients often report high disability levels and poor quality of life. Since there is no specific treatment that alters the pathogenesis of fibromyalgia, drug therapy focuses on pain reduction and improvement of other aversive symptoms. Objectives The objective was to assess the benefits and harms of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in the treatment of fibromyalgia. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2014, Issue 5), MEDLINE (1966 to June 2014), EMBASE (1946 to June 2014), and the reference lists of reviewed articles. Selection criteria We selected all randomized, double-blind trials of SSRIs used for the treatment of fibromyalgia symptoms in adult participants. We considered the following SSRIs in this review: citalopram, fluoxetine, escitalopram, fluvoxamine, paroxetine, and sertraline. Data collection and analysis Three authors extracted the data of all included studies and assessed the risks of bias of the studies. We resolved discrepancies by discussion. Main results The quality of evidence was very low for each outcome. We downgraded the quality of evidence to very low due to concerns about risk of bias and studies with few participants. We included seven placebo-controlled studies, two with citalopram, three with fluoxetine and two with paroxetine, with a median study duration of eight weeks (4 to 16 weeks) and 383 participants, who were pooled together. All studies had one or more sources of potential major bias. There was a small (10%) difference in patients who reported a 30% pain reduction between SSRIs (56/172 (32.6%)) and placebo (39/171 (22.8%)) risk difference (RD) 0.10, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.01 to 0.20; number needed to treat for an additional

  4. An AOP analysis of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) for fish.

    PubMed

    Danielle McDonald, M

    2017-03-10

    Pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) are found in measureable quantities within the aquatic environment. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants are one class of pharmaceutical compound that has received a lot of attention. Consistent with most PPCPs, the pharmacokinetics and physiological impacts of SSRI treatment have been well-studied in small mammals and humans and this, combined with the evolutionary conservation of the serotonergic system across vertebrates, allows for the read-across of known SSRI effects in mammals to potential SSRI impacts on aquatic organisms. Using an Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) framework, this review examines the similarities and differences between the mammalian and teleost fish SSRI target, the serotonin transporter (SERT; SLC6A4), and the downstream impacts of elevated extracellular serotonin (5-HT; 5-hydroxytryptamine), the consequence of SERT inhibition, on organ systems and physiological processes within teleost fish. This review also intends to reveal potentially understudied endpoints for SSRI toxicity based on what is known to be controlled by 5-HT in fish.

  5. Mechanisms of action of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Campos, Bruno; Piña, Benjamín; Barata C, Carlos

    2012-03-06

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) are known to increase offspring production in Daphnia magna. This study tested the hypothesis that the increase of serotonin postsynaptic activity by SSRI changes the perception of the food environment and switches life-history responses toward higher food level: females reproduced earlier, producing more but smaller offspring. D. magna reproduction tests, respiration, feeding, and survival-starvation assays and studies of lipids, proteins, and carbohydrate levels of unexposed and exposed females to the SSRI fluoxetine and fluvoxamine and the 5-HT serotonin receptor antagonist cyproheptadine were conducted. Factorial life-history experiments and reproductive assays showed that exposure to SSRI increased juvenile development rate, clutch size, and decrease offspring size at low and intermediate levels of food rations. These effects were reversed by the presence of cyproheptadine, indicating that 5-HT function was essential to the SSRI effects on Daphnia and linking them to the pharmacological effects of SSRI in humans. Respirometry and survival assays and biochemical analyses of lipids, proteins and carbohydrate levels showed that exposure to SSRI increased oxygen consumption rates and decreased carbohydrate levels in adult females. These changes did not affect survival under starving conditions, but they significantly affected the capacity of the exposed animals to survive under anoxic conditions. These results suggest that SSRI increased aerobic catabolism in D. magna making exposed individuals apparently more able to exploit food resources under normoxic conditions, but at the cost of being more sensitive to low oxygen levels, a common situation in natural environments.

  6. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (fluoxetine) decreases the effects of ghrelin on memory retention and food intake.

    PubMed

    Carlini, Valeria P; Gaydou, Romina C; Schiöth, Helgi B; de Barioglio, Susana R

    2007-04-05

    Ghrelin (Ghr) is an appetite stimulating hormone that is produced peripherally, by the stomach, and centrally as well. Previous investigations show that Ghr increases food intake and memory retention in rats, and that extra-hypothalamic structures, such as the hippocampus, participate in these effects. In the present work we analyzed the effect on food intake and memory retention induced by Ghr after serotonin (5-HT) availability modification at the serotoninergic synapses. Animals only treated with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), fluoxetine (FLU) 5 mg/kg or clomipramine (CLO) 2.5 and 5 mg/kg, showed a significant reduction in both food intake and memory retention. On the contrary, Ghr administration induces a significant increase in food intake and a dose-dependent increase in short and long term memory retention. When the animals were treated with FLU prior to Ghr injection, the food intake induced, as well as the expression of short and long term memory retention, was decreased. In conclusion, evidence presented in this paper suggests that the effects of Ghr on both feeding and memory retention in extra-hypothalamic structures such as the hippocampus, could depend on the availability of 5-HT.

  7. Cardiac Toxicity in Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Users.

    PubMed

    Lusetti, Monia; Licata, Manuela; Silingardi, Enrico; Reggiani Bonetti, Luca; Palmiere, Cristian

    2015-12-01

    Several classes of recreational and prescription drugs have been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and the occurrence of arrhythmias, which may be involved in sudden deaths in chronic users even at therapeutic doses. The study presented herein focuses on pathological changes involving the heart, which may be caused by selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor use and their possible role in the occurrence of sudden cardiac death. A total of 40 cases were included in the study and were divided evenly into 2 groups: 20 cases of patients treated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and 20 cases of sudden deaths involving patients void of any drug treatment. The first group included 16 patients treated with citalopram and 4 with sertraline. Autopsies, histology, biochemistry, and toxicology were performed in all cases. Pathological changes in selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor users consisted of various degrees of interstitial and perivascular fibrosis as well as a small degree of perineural fibrosis within the myocardium of the left ventricle. Within the limits of the small number of investigated cases, the results of this study seem to confirm former observations on this topic, suggesting that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors may play a potential, causative role in the pathogenesis of sudden deaths in chronic users even at therapeutic concentrations.

  8. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors for depression in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Susser, Leah C; Sansone, Stephanie A; Hermann, Alison D

    2016-12-01

    Perinatal depression is associated with a high risk of morbidity and mortality and may have long-term consequences on child development. The US Preventive Services Task Force has recently recognized the importance of identifying and treating women with depression in the perinatal period. However, screening and accessing appropriate treatment come with logistical challenges. In many areas, there may not be sufficient access to psychiatric care, and, until these resources develop, the burden may inadvertently fall on obstetricians. As a result, understanding the risks of perinatal depression in comparison with the risks of treatment is important. Many studies of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in pregnancy fail to control for underlying depressive illness, which can lead to misinterpretation of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor risk by clinicians. This review discusses the risks and benefits of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor treatment in pregnancy within the context of perinatal depression. Whereas selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors may be associated with certain risks, the absolute risks are low and may be outweighed by the risks of untreated depression for many women and their offspring.

  9. [Pharmacological characterization of alpha 2-adrenoceptor regulated 5-HT release in the rat hippocampus].

    PubMed

    Numazawa, R

    1994-07-01

    The purpose of the present study is to confirm the functional regulation of alpha 2-adrenoceptor on the release of serotonin (5-HT) from the rat hippocampus in vivo. Under several pharmacological conditions, extracellular levels of 5-HT were estimated by assaying its concentrations in the perfusion fluid through the use of high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Extracellular 5-HT in the hippocampus was reduced by tetrodotoxin, 10 microM co-perfusion and was increased by perfusion with a selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine, 10 microM. Addition of potassium (K+; 120 mM) to the perfusion fluid evoked an approximately 3-fold increase in 5-HT release, and a calcium free medium completely prevented this K(+)-evoked 5-HT release. Potassium-evoked 5-HT release from the hippocampus of freely moving rats was significantly and concentration-dependently inhibited when alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist, UK14,304, 0.1 microM to 10 microM was added to the perfusion solution, while the output of a 5-HT major metabolite, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), remained unchanged. This action of UK14,304 was prevented by pretreatment with idazoxan, 5 mg/kg, i. p., an alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist. In rats that were catecholaminergically denervated with 6-hydroxydopamine, UK14,304, 10 microM also inhibited the potassium-evoked 5-HT release, but had no effect on the 5-HIAA output. The UK14,304-induced inhibition of 5-HT release was prevented by pretreatment with pertussis toxin (PTX). These findings suggest that 5-HT release is functionally modulated via alpha 2-adrenoceptors located on the serotonergic nerve terminals in the rat hippocampus. They also indicate the possibility that the inhibition of 5-HT release via alpha 2-adrenoceptors is linked to G-proteins which are substrates of PTX.

  10. Effects of acute administration of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors on sympathetic nerve activity

    PubMed Central

    Tiradentes, R.V.; Pires, J.G.P.; Silva, N.F.; Ramage, A.G.; Santuzzi, C.H.; Futuro, H.A.

    2014-01-01

    Serotonergic mechanisms have an important function in the central control of circulation. Here, the acute effects of three selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) on autonomic and cardiorespiratory variables were measured in rats. Although SSRIs require 2-3 weeks to achieve their full antidepressant effects, it has been shown that they cause an immediate inhibition of 5-HT reuptake. Seventy male Wistar rats were anesthetized with urethane and instrumented to record blood pressure, heart rate, renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), and respiratory frequency. At lower doses, the acute cardiovascular effects of fluoxetine, paroxetine and sertraline administered intravenously were insignificant and variable. At middle and higher doses, a general pattern was observed, with significant reductions in sympathetic nerve activity. At 10 min, fluoxetine (3 and 10 mg/kg) reduced RSNA by -33±4.7 and -31±5.4%, respectively, without changes in blood pressure; 3 and 10 mg/kg paroxetine reduced RSNA by -35±5.4 and -31±5.5%, respectively, with an increase in blood pressure +26.3±2.5; 3 mg/kg sertraline reduced RSNA by -59.4±8.6%, without changes in blood pressure. Sympathoinhibition began 5 min after injection and lasted approximately 30 min. For fluoxetine and sertraline, but not paroxetine, there was a reduction in heart rate that was nearly parallel to the sympathoinhibition. The effect of these drugs on the other variables was insignificant. In conclusion, acute peripheral administration of SSRIs caused early autonomic cardiovascular effects, particularly sympathoinhibition, as measured by RSNA. Although a peripheral action cannot be ruled out, such effects are presumably mostly central. PMID:25003632

  11. Effects of acute administration of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors on sympathetic nerve activity.

    PubMed

    Tiradentes, R V; Pires, J G P; Silva, N F; Ramage, A G; Santuzzi, C H; Futuro Neto, H A

    2014-07-01

    Serotonergic mechanisms have an important function in the central control of circulation. Here, the acute effects of three selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) on autonomic and cardiorespiratory variables were measured in rats. Although SSRIs require 2-3 weeks to achieve their full antidepressant effects, it has been shown that they cause an immediate inhibition of 5-HT reuptake. Seventy male Wistar rats were anesthetized with urethane and instrumented to record blood pressure, heart rate, renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), and respiratory frequency. At lower doses, the acute cardiovascular effects of fluoxetine, paroxetine and sertraline administered intravenously were insignificant and variable. At middle and higher doses, a general pattern was observed, with significant reductions in sympathetic nerve activity. At 10 min, fluoxetine (3 and 10 mg/kg) reduced RSNA by -33 ± 4.7 and -31 ± 5.4%, respectively, without changes in blood pressure; 3 and 10 mg/kg paroxetine reduced RSNA by -35 ± 5.4 and -31 ± 5.5%, respectively, with an increase in blood pressure +26.3 ± 2.5; 3 mg/kg sertraline reduced RSNA by -59.4 ± 8.6%, without changes in blood pressure. Sympathoinhibition began 5 min after injection and lasted approximately 30 min. For fluoxetine and sertraline, but not paroxetine, there was a reduction in heart rate that was nearly parallel to the sympathoinhibition. The effect of these drugs on the other variables was insignificant. In conclusion, acute peripheral administration of SSRIs caused early autonomic cardiovascular effects, particularly sympathoinhibition, as measured by RSNA. Although a peripheral action cannot be ruled out, such effects are presumably mostly central.

  12. 5-HT1 agonists reduce 5-hydroxytryptamine release in rat hippocampus in vivo as determined by brain microdialysis.

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, T.; Bramwell, S. R.; Grahame-Smith, D. G.

    1989-01-01

    1. An intracerebral perfusion method, brain microdialysis, was used to assess changes of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) release in the ventral hippocampus of the chloral hydrate-anaesthetized rat in response to systemic administration of a variety of 5-HT1 receptor agonists. 2. A stable output of reliably detectable endogenous 5-HT was measured in dialysates collected from ventral hippocampus with the 5-HT reuptake inhibitor, citalopram, present in the perfusion medium. 3. Under these conditions the putative 5-HT1A agonist 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) caused a dose-dependent (5-250 micrograms kg-1, s.c.) reduction of 5-HT in hippocampal dialysates. 4. Similarly, the putative 5-HT1A agonists gepirone (5 mg kg-1, s.c.), ipsapirone (5 mg kg-1, s.c.) and buspirone (5 mg kg-1, s.c.) markedly reduced levels of 5-HT in hippocampal perfusates whereas their common metabolite 1-(2-pyrimidinyl) piperazine (5 mg kg-1, s.c.), which does not bind to central 5-HT1A recognition sites, had no effect. 5. 5-Methoxy-3-(1,2,3,6-tetrahydro-4-pyridinyl)-1H-indole (RU 24969), a drug with reported high affinity for brain 5-HT1B binding sites, also produced a dose-dependent (0.25-5 mg kg-1, s.c.) decrease of hippocampal 5-HT output. 6. These data are direct biochemical evidence that systemically administered putative 5-HT1A and 5-HT1B agonists markedly inhibit 5-HT release in rat ventral hippocampus in vivo. PMID:2466516

  13. Prelimbic cortex 5-HT1A and 5-HT2C receptors are involved in the hypophagic effects caused by fluoxetine in fasted rats.

    PubMed

    Stanquini, Laura A; Resstel, Leonardo B M; Corrêa, Fernando M A; Joca, Sâmia R L; Scopinho, América A

    2015-09-01

    The regulation of food intake involves a complex interplay between the central nervous system and the activity of organs involved in energy homeostasis. Besides the hypothalamus, recognized as the center of this regulation, other structures are involved, especially limbic regions such as the ventral medial prefrontal cortex (vMPFC). Monoamines, such as serotonin (5-HT), play an important role in appetite regulation. However, the effect in the vMPFC of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), fluoxetine, on food intake has not been studied. The aim of the present study was to study the effects on food intake of fed and fasted rats evoked by fluoxetine injection into the prelimbic cortex (PL), a sub-region of the vMPFC, or given systemically, and which 5-HT receptors in the PL are involved in fluoxetine responses. Fluoxetine was injected into the PL or given systemically in male Wistar rats. Independent groups of rats were pretreated with intra-PL antagonists of 5-HT receptors: 5-HT1A (WAY100635), 5-HT2C (SB242084) or 5-HT1B (SB216641). Fluoxetine (0.1; 1; 3; 10nmol/200nL) injected into the PL induced a dose-dependent hypophagic effect in fasted rats. This effect was reversed by prior local treatment with WAY100635 (1; 10nmol) or SB242084 (1; 10nmol), but not with SB216641 (0.2; 2.5; 10nmol). Systemic fluoxetine induced a hypophagic effect, which was blocked by intra-PL 5-HT2C antagonist (10nmol) administration. Our findings suggest that PL 5-HT neurotransmission modulates the central control of food intake and 5-HT1A and 5-HT2C receptors in the PL could be potential targets for the action of fluoxetine.

  14. Serotonin 5-HT1A receptors as targets for agents to treat psychiatric disorders: rationale and current status of research.

    PubMed

    Celada, Pau; Bortolozzi, Analía; Artigas, Francesc

    2013-09-01

    Psychiatric disorders represent a large economic burden in modern societies. However, pharmacological treatments are still far from optimal. Drugs used in the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD) and anxiety disorders (selective serotonin [5-HT] reuptake inhibitors [SSRIs] and serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors [SNRIs]) are pharmacological refinements of first-generation tricyclic drugs, discovered by serendipity, and show low efficacy and slowness of onset. Moreover, antipsychotic drugs are partly effective in positive symptoms of schizophrenia, yet they poorly treat negative symptoms and cognitive deficits. The present article reviews the neurobiological basis of 5-HT1A receptor (5-HT1A-R) function and the role of pre- and postsynaptic 5-HT1A-Rs in the treatment of MDD, anxiety and psychotic disorders. The activation of postsynaptic 5-HT1A-Rs in corticolimbic areas appears beneficial for the therapeutic action of antidepressant drugs. However, presynaptic 5-HT1A-Rs play a detrimental role in MDD, since individuals with high density or function of presynaptic 5-HT1A-Rs are more susceptible to mood disorders and suicide, and respond poorly to antidepressant drugs. Moreover, the indirect activation of presynaptic 5-HT1A-Rs by SSRIs/SNRIs reduces 5-HT neuron activity and terminal 5-HT release, thus opposing the elevation of extracellular 5-HT produced by blockade of the serotonin transporter (SERT) in the forebrain. Chronic antidepressant treatment desensitizes presynaptic 5-HT1A-Rs, thus reducing the effectiveness of the 5-HT1A autoreceptor-mediated negative feedback. The prevention of this process by the non-selective partial agonist pindolol accelerates clinical antidepressant effects. Two new antidepressant drugs, vilazodone (marketed in the USA) and vortioxetine (in development) incorporate partial 5-HT1A-R agonist properties with SERT blockade. Several studies with transgenic mice have also established the respective role of pre- and

  15. 5-HT(1A) receptors and memory.

    PubMed

    Meneses, Alfredo; Perez-Garcia, Georgina

    2007-01-01

    The study of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) systems has benefited from the identification, classification and cloning of multiple 5-HT receptors (5-HT(1)-5-HT(7)). Increasing evidence suggests that 5-HT pathways, reuptake site/transporter complex and 5-HT receptors represent a strategic distribution for learning and memory. A key question still remaining is whether 5-HT markers (e.g., receptors) are directly or indirectly contributing to the physiological and pharmacological basis of memory and its pathogenesis or, rather, if they represent protective or adaptable mechanisms (at least in initial stages). In the current paper, the major aim is to revise recent advances regarding mammalian 5-HT(1A) receptors in light of their physiological, pathophysiological and therapeutic implications in memory. An attempt is made to identify and discuss sources of discrepancies by employing an analytic approach to examine the nature and degree of difficulty of behavioral tasks used, as well as implicating other factors (for example, brain areas, training time or duration, and drug administration) which might offer new insights into the understanding and interpretation of these data. In this context, 8-OH-DPAT deserves special attention since for many years it has been the more selective 5-HT drug and, hence, more frequently used. As 5-HT(1A) receptors are key components of serotonergic signaling, investigation of their memory mechanisms and action sites and the conditions under which they might operate, could yield valuable insights. Moreover, selective drugs with agonists, neutral antagonists or inverse agonist properties for 5-HT(1A) (and 5-HT(7)) receptors may constitute a new therapeutic opportunity for learning and memory disorders.

  16. Preclinical and clinical pharmacology of DOV 216,303, a "triple" reuptake inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Skolnick, Phil; Krieter, Philip; Tizzano, Joseph; Basile, Anthony; Popik, Piotr; Czobor, Pal; Lippa, Arnold

    2006-01-01

    DOV 216,303 [(+/-)-1-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-3-azabicyclo-[3.1.0]hexane hydrochloride] is the prototype of a class of compounds referred to as "triple" reuptake inhibitors. Such compounds inhibit the reuptake of norepinephrine (NE), serotonin (5-HT), and dopamine (DA), the three neurotransmitters most closely linked to major depressive disorder. DOV 216,303 inhibits [(3)H]NE, [(3)H]5-HT, and [(3)H]DA uptake to the corresponding human recombinant transporters (expressed in HEK 293 cells) with IC(50) values of approximately 20, 14, and 78 nM, respectively. DOV 216,303 is active in tests predictive of antidepressant activity including the mouse forced swim test and reversal of tetrabenazine-induced ptosis and locomotor depression. The pharmacodynamic, pharmacokinetic, and toxicological profile of DOV 216,303 in animals prompted us to initiate clinical studies. In both single and multiple dose studies using normal volunteers, DOV 216,303 was safe and well-tolerated. Furthermore, both C(max) and AUC values were dose-proportional between 5-150 mg. The plasma concentrations of DOV 216,303 at doses >10 mg were in excess of the IC(50) values for inhibition of biogenic amine reuptake. In a Phase II study designed to explore the safety and tolerability of DOV 216,303 in depressed individuals, patients received either 100 mg DOV 216,303 (50 mg b.i.d.) or 40 mg citalopram (20 mg, b.i.d.) for two weeks. A placebo arm was not employed in this study because several institutional review boards required administration of an active control to severely depressed individuals. Time dependent reductions in HAM-D scores (the primary outcome measure) were observed in both the DOV 216,303 and citalopram groups compared to baseline scores (p < 0.0001). The side effect profile was not remarkably different between treatment arms. These findings provide preliminary evidence of a clinically meaningful antidepressant action with a molecule capable of inhibiting the three transmitters most closely

  17. Functional expression of 5-HT{sub 2A} receptor in osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hirai, Takao; Kaneshige, Kota; Kurosaki, Teruko; Nishio, Hiroaki

    2010-05-28

    In the previous study, we reported the gene expression for proteins related to the function of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, serotonin) and elucidated the expression patterns of 5-HT{sub 2} receptor subtypes in mouse osteoblasts. In the present study, we evaluated the possible involvement of 5-HT receptor subtypes and its inactivation system in MC3T3-E1 cells, an osteoblast cell line. DOI, a 5-HT{sub 2A} and 5-HT{sub 2C} receptor selective agonist, as well as 5-HT concentration-dependently increased proliferative activities of MC3T3-E1 cells in their premature period. This effect of 5-HT on cell proliferation were inhibited by ketanserin, a 5-HT{sub 2A} receptor specific antagonist. Moreover, both DOI-induced cell proliferation and phosphorylation of ERK1 and 2 proteins were inhibited by PD98059 and U0126, selective inhibitors of MEK in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, treatment with fluoxetine, a 5-HT specific re-uptake inhibitor which inactivate the function of extracellular 5-HT, significantly increased the proliferative activities of MC3T3-E1 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Our data indicate that 5-HT fill the role for proliferation of osteoblast cells in their premature period. Notably, 5-HT{sub 2A} receptor may be functionally expressed to regulate mechanisms underlying osteoblast cell proliferation, at least in part, through activation of ERK/MAPK pathways in MC3T3-E1 cells.

  18. Disrupting 5-HT2A Receptor/PDZ Protein Interactions Reduces Hyperalgesia and Enhances SSRI Efficacy in Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Pichon, Xavier; Wattiez, Anne S; Becamel, Carine; Ehrlich, Ingrid; Bockaert, Joel; Eschalier, Alain; Marin, Philippe; Courteix, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Antidepressants are one of the first-line treatments for neuropathic pain. Despite the influence of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) in pain modulation, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are less effective than tricyclic antidepressants. Here, we show, in diabetic neuropathic rats, an alteration of the antihyperalgesic effect induced by stimulation of 5-HT2A receptors, which are known to mediate SSRI-induced analgesia. 5-HT2A receptor density was not changed in the spinal cord of diabetic rats, whereas postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95), one of the PSD-95/disc large suppressor/zonula occludens-1 (PDZ) domain containing proteins interacting with these receptors, was upregulated. Intrathecal injection of a cell-penetrating peptidyl mimetic of the 5-HT2A receptor C-terminus, which disrupts 5-HT2A receptor–PDZ protein interactions, induced an antihyperalgesic effect in diabetic rats, which results from activation of 5-HT2A receptors by endogenous 5-HT. The peptide also enhanced antihyperalgesia induced by the SSRI fluoxetine. Its effects likely resulted from an increase in receptor responsiveness, because it revealed functional 5-HT2A receptor-operated Ca2+ responses in neurons, an effect mimicked by knockdown of PSD-95. Hence, 5-HT2A receptor/PDZ protein interactions might contribute to the resistance to SSRI-induced analgesia in painful diabetic neuropathy. Disruption of these interactions might be a valuable strategy to design novel treatments for neuropathic pain and to increase the effectiveness of SSRIs. PMID:20531396

  19. Mice with compromised 5-HTT function lack phosphotyrosine-mediated inhibitory control over prefrontal 5-HT responses.

    PubMed

    Goodfellow, Nathalie M; Sargin, Derya; Ansorge, Mark S; Gingrich, Jay A; Lambe, Evelyn K

    2014-04-23

    The activity of the prefrontal cortex is essential for normal emotional processing and is strongly modulated by serotonin (5-HT). Yet, little is known about the regulatory mechanisms that control the activity of the prefrontal 5-HT receptors. Here, we found and characterized a deregulation of prefrontal 5-HT receptor electrophysiological signaling in mouse models of disrupted serotonin transporter (5-HTT) function, a risk factor for emotional and cognitive disturbances. We identified a novel tyrosine kinase-dependent mechanism that regulates 5-HT-mediated inhibition of prefrontal pyramidal neurons. We report that mice with compromised 5-HTT, resulting from either genetic deletion or brief treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors during development, have amplified 5-HT1A receptor-mediated currents in adulthood. These greater inhibitory effects of 5-HT are accompanied by enhanced downstream coupling to Kir3 channels. Notably, in normal wild-type mice, we found that these larger 5-HT1A responses can be mimicked through inhibition of Src family tyrosine kinases. By comparison, in our 5-HTT mouse models, the larger 5-HT1A responses were rapidly reduced through inhibition of tyrosine phosphatases. Our findings implicate tyrosine phosphorylation in regulating the electrophysiological effects of prefrontal 5-HT1A receptors with implications for neuropsychiatric diseases associated with emotional dysfunction, such as anxiety and depressive disorders.

  20. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor (SSRI) Antidepressants, Prolactin and Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ashbury, Janet E; Lévesque, Linda E; Beck, Patricia A; Aronson, Kristan J

    2012-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are a widely prescribed class of antidepressants. Laboratory and epidemiologic evidence suggests that a prolactin-mediated mechanism secondary to increased serotonin levels at neuronal synapses could lead to a potentially carcinogenic effect of SSRIs. In this population-based case-control study, we evaluated the association between SSRI use and breast cancer risk as a function of their relative degree of inhibition of serotonin reuptake as a proxy for their impact on prolactin levels. Cases were 2,129 women with primary invasive breast cancer diagnosed from 2003 to 2007, and controls were 21,297 women randomly selected from the population registry. Detailed information for each SSRI prescription dispensed was compiled using the Saskatchewan prescription database. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the impact of use of high and lower inhibitors of serotonin reuptake and duration of use, as well as to assess the effect of individual high inhibitors on the risk of breast cancer. Exclusive users of high or lower inhibitors of serotonin reuptake were not at increased risk for breast cancer compared with non-users of SSRIs (OR = 1.01, CI = 0.88-1.17 and OR = 0.91, CI = 0.67-1.25 respectively), regardless of their duration of use or menopausal status. While we cannot rule out the possibility of a clinically important risk increase (OR = 1.83, CI = 0.99-3.40) for long-term users of sertraline (≥24 prescriptions), given the small number of exposed cases (n = 12), the borderline statistical significance, and the wide confidence interval, these results need to be interpreted cautiously. In this large population-based case-control study, we found no conclusive evidence of breast cancer risk associated with the use of SSRIs even after assessing the degree of serotonin reuptake inhibition and duration of use. Our results do not support the serotonin-mediated pathway for the prolactin

  1. Novel multi-target-directed ligands for Alzheimer's disease: Combining cholinesterase inhibitors and 5-HT6 receptor antagonists. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Więckowska, Anna; Kołaczkowski, Marcin; Bucki, Adam; Godyń, Justyna; Marcinkowska, Monika; Więckowski, Krzysztof; Zaręba, Paula; Siwek, Agata; Kazek, Grzegorz; Głuch-Lutwin, Monika; Mierzejewski, Paweł; Bienkowski, Przemysław; Sienkiewicz-Jarosz, Halina; Knez, Damijan; Wichur, Tomasz; Gobec, Stanislav; Malawska, Barbara

    2016-11-29

    As currently postulated, a complex treatment may be key to an effective therapy for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent clinical trials in patients with moderate AD have shown a superior effect of the combination therapy of donepezil (a selective acetylcholinesterase inhibitor) with idalopirdine (a 5-HT6 receptor antagonist) over monotherapy with donepezil. Here, we present the first report on the design, synthesis and biological evaluation of a novel class of multifunctional ligands that combines a 5-HT6 receptor antagonist with a cholinesterase inhibitor. Novel multi-target-directed ligands (MTDLs) were designed by combining pharmacophores directed against the 5-HT6 receptor (1-(phenylsulfonyl)-4-(piperazin-1-yl)-1H-indole) and cholinesterases (tacrine or N-benzylpiperidine analogues). In vitro evaluation led to the identification of tacrine derivative 12 with well-balanced potencies against the 5-HT6 receptor (Kb = 27 nM), acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase (IC50hAChE = 12 nM, IC50hBuChE = 29 nM). The compound also showed good in vitro blood-brain-barrier permeability (PAMPA-BBB assay), which was confirmed in vivo (open field study). Central cholinomimetic activity was confirmed in vivo in rats using a scopolamine-induced hyperlocomotion model. A novel class of multifunctional ligands with compound 12 as the best derivative in a series represents an excellent starting point for the further development of an effective treatment for AD.

  2. Selective Serotonin–norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitors-induced Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Vasudev, Rahul; Rampal, Upamanyu; Patel, Hiten; Patel, Kunal; Bikkina, Mahesh; Shamoon, Fayez

    2016-01-01

    Context: Takotsubo translates to “octopus pot” in Japanese. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC) is characterized by a transient regional systolic dysfunction of the left ventricle. Catecholamine excess is the one most studied and favored theories explaining the pathophysiology of TTC. Case Report: We present the case of a 52-year-old Hispanic female admitted for venlafaxine-induced TTC with a review literature on all the cases of Serotonin–norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRI)-associated TTC published so far. Conclusion: SNRI inhibit the reuptake of catecholamines into the presynaptic neuron, resulting in a net gain in the concentration of epinephrine and serotonin in the neuronal synapses and causing iatrogenic catecholamine excess, ultimately leading to TTC. PMID:27583240

  3. 5-HT(2B) receptors are required for serotonin-selective antidepressant actions.

    PubMed

    Diaz, S L; Doly, S; Narboux-Nême, N; Fernández, S; Mazot, P; Banas, S M; Boutourlinsky, K; Moutkine, I; Belmer, A; Roumier, A; Maroteaux, L

    2012-02-01

    The therapeutic effects induced by serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants are initially triggered by blocking the serotonin transporter and rely on long-term adaptations of pre- and post-synaptic receptors. We show here that long-term behavioral and neurogenic SSRI effects are abolished after either genetic or pharmacological inactivation of 5-HT(2B) receptors. Conversely, direct agonist stimulation of 5-HT(2B) receptors induces an SSRI-like response in behavioral and neurogenic assays. Moreover, the observation that (i) this receptor is expressed by raphe serotonergic neurons, (ii) the SSRI-induced increase in hippocampal extracellular serotonin concentration is strongly reduced in the absence of functional 5-HT(2B) receptors and (iii) a selective 5-HT(2B) agonist mimics SSRI responses, supports a positive regulation of serotonergic neurons by 5-HT(2B) receptors. The 5-HT(2B) receptor appears, therefore, to positively modulate serotonergic activity and to be required for the therapeutic actions of SSRIs. Consequently, the 5-HT(2B) receptor should be considered as a new tractable target in the combat against depression.

  4. Chlorpheniramine, selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and over-the-counter (OTC) treatment.

    PubMed

    Hellbom, Einar

    2006-01-01

    Some old antihistamines were selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and the SSRI effect was discovered by Nobel Laureate Professor Arvid Carlsson as early as 1969. Chlorpheniramine was the most active of the tested drugs, and it compares favourably with amitriptyline and imipramine with respect to actions on both serotonergic and noradrenergic neurons. Chlorpheniramine can be called a SSRI, since the blocking of 5HT is stronger than the effect on noradrenaline neurons; however it might also be called a selective serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor (SSNRI) and be compared with new drugs, such as venlafaxine. Carlsson suggested the potential value of clinical studies of the antidepressant properties of this and related antihistamine drugs. But, in the event, no such trials were ever performed at the time. However, later clinical observations of the benefits of dex-chlorpheniramine treatment in panic disorder have been published. Clinical experience suggests that patients using chlorpheniramine, and having also a concomitant depression or panic disorder, may experience a return of symptoms when their old drug is changed to a new antihistamine lacking SSRI effects. Yet this phenomenon is not known to many doctors, and even less known to the large number of patients buying chlorpheniramine under various trade names over-the-counter (OTC) at a low price for self-treatment of hay fewer or as a cold remedy. Chlorpheniramine was introduced in USA under the name Chlor-Trimeton as long ago as July 1950, and is still on the market. Therefore, this SSRI is now over 50 years old. If chlorpheniramine had been tested in depression in the nineteen seventies, it is probable that a safe, inexpensive SSRI drug could have been used some 15 years earlier than fluoxetine - which became available in 1987. Chlorpheniramine might have been the first safe, non-cardiotoxic and well-tolerated antidepressant. Billions of dollars in the development and marketing costs would

  5. Serotonin decreases aggression via 5-HT1A receptors in the fighting fish Betta splendens.

    PubMed

    Clotfelter, Ethan D; O'Hare, Erin P; McNitt, Meredith M; Carpenter, Russ E; Summers, Cliff H

    2007-01-01

    The role of the monoamine neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT) in the modulation of conspecific aggression in the fighting fish (Betta splendens) was investigated using pharmacological manipulations. We used a fish's response to its mirror image as our index of aggressive behavior. We also investigated the effects of some manipulations on monoamine levels in the B. splendens brain. Acute treatment with 5-HT and with the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT both decreased aggressive behavior; however, treatment with the 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY-100635 did not increase aggression. Chronic treatment with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine caused no significant changes in aggressive behavior and a significant decline in 5-HT and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) concentrations. Treatment with the serotonin synthesis inhibitor p-chlorophenylalanine resulted in no change in aggression, yet serotonergic activity decreased significantly. Finally, a diet supplemented with L-tryptophan (Trp), the precursor to 5-HT, showed no consistent effects on aggressive behavior or brain monoamine concentrations. These results suggest a complex role for serotonin in the expression of aggression in teleost fishes, and that B. splendens may be a useful model organism in pharmacological and toxicological studies.

  6. Discovery of a Potent, Dual Serotonin and Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the described research effort was to identify a novel serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) with improved norepinephrine transporter activity and acceptable metabolic stability and exhibiting minimal drug–drug interaction. We describe herein the discovery of a series of 3-substituted pyrrolidines, exemplified by compound 1. Compound 1 is a selective SNRI in vitro and in vivo, has favorable ADME properties, and retains inhibitory activity in the formalin model of pain behavior. Compound 1 thus represents a potential new probe to explore utility of SNRIs in central nervous system disorders, including chronic pain conditions. PMID:24900709

  7. Selective blockade of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)7 receptors enhances 5-HT transmission, antidepressant-like behavior, and rapid eye movement sleep suppression induced by citalopram in rodents.

    PubMed

    Bonaventure, Pascal; Kelly, Lisa; Aluisio, Leah; Shelton, Jonathan; Lord, Brian; Galici, Ruggero; Miller, Kirsten; Atack, John; Lovenberg, Timothy W; Dugovic, Christine

    2007-05-01

    Evidence has accumulated supporting a role for 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)7 receptors in circadian rhythms, sleep, and mood disorders, presumably as a consequence of the modulation of 5-HT-mediated neuronal activity. We hypothesized that a selective 5-HT7 receptor antagonist, (2R)-1-[(3-hydroxyphenyl)sulfonyl]-2-[2-(4-methyl-1-piperidinyl)ethyl]-pyrrolidine (SB-269970), should increase activity of 5-HT neurons and potentiate the effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (citalopram). In rats, administration of 3 mg/kg s.c. citalopram alone increased the extracellular concentration of 5-HT. This effect of citalopram on extracellular 5-HT concentration was significantly enhanced by an ineffective dose of SB-269970. Combining this dose of SB-269970 with a low dose of citalopram also resulted in a significant increase in extracellular concentration of 5-HT, suggesting a potentiation of neurochemical effects. In mice, citalopram and SB-269970 dose-dependently decreased immobility time in the tail suspension test. The dose-effect curve of citalopram was shifted leftward by coadministration of an effective dose of SB-269970. Furthermore, combining ineffective doses of citalopram and SB-269970 also resulted in a significant decrease of immobility time in the tail suspension test, suggesting potentiation of antidepressant-like effects. In rats, SB-269970 potentiated the increase of rapid eye movement (REM) latency and the REM sleep decrease induced by citalopram. SB-269970 also reversed the increase in sleep fragmentation induced by citalopram. Rat plasma and brain concentrations of citalopram were not affected by coadministration of SB-269970, arguing for a pharmacodynamic rather than a pharmacokinetic mechanism. Overall, these results indicate that selective blockade of 5-HT7 receptors may enhance the antidepressant efficacy of citalopram and may provide a novel therapy to alleviate sleep disturbances associated with depression.

  8. Olanzapine augments the effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors by suppressing GABAergic inhibition via antagonism of 5-HT₆ receptors in the dorsal raphe nucleus.

    PubMed

    Asaoka, Nozomi; Nagayasu, Kazuki; Nishitani, Naoya; Yamashiro, Mayumi; Shirakawa, Hisashi; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Kaneko, Shuji

    2015-08-01

    The combination of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and atypical antipsychotic drugs shows better therapeutic efficacy than SSRI monotherapy in the treatment of depression. However, the underlying mechanisms responsible for the augmenting effects of olanzapine are not fully understood. Here, we report that olanzapine enhances the SSRI-induced increase in extracellular serotonin (5-HT) levels and antidepressant-like effects by inhibiting GABAergic neurons through 5-HT6 receptor antagonism in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN). In organotypic raphe slice cultures, treatment with olanzapine (1-100 μM) enhanced the increase in extracellular 5-HT levels in the presence of fluoxetine (10 μM) or citalopram (1 μM). The enhancing effect of olanzapine was not further augmented by the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline. Electrophysiological analysis revealed that olanzapine (50 μM) decreased the firing frequency of GABAergic neurons in acute DRN slices. Among many serotonergic agents, the 5-HT6 receptor antagonist SB399885 (1-100 μM) mimicked the effects of olanzapine by enhancing the SSRI-induced increase in extracellular 5-HT levels, which was not further augmented by bicuculline or olanzapine. SB399885 (50 μM) also decreased the firing frequency of GABAergic neurons in the DRN. In addition, an intraperitoneal administration of SB399885 (10 mg/kg) to mice significantly enhanced the antidepressant-like effect of a subeffective dose of citalopram (3 mg/kg) in the tail-suspension test. These results suggest that olanzapine decreases local inhibitory GABAergic tone in the DRN through antagonism of 5-HT6 receptors, thereby increasing the activity of at least part of serotonergic neurons, which may contribute to the augmentation of the efficacy of SSRIs.

  9. Long-term administration of cocaine or serotonin reuptake inhibitors results in anatomical and neurochemical changes in noradrenergic, dopaminergic, and serotonin pathways.

    PubMed

    Horne, Malcolm K; Lee, Joohyung; Chen, Feng; Lanning, Katherine; Tomas, Doris; Lawrence, Andrew J

    2008-08-01

    The catechol and indole pathways are important components underlying plasticity in the frontal cortex and basal ganglia. This study demonstrates that administering rats either cocaine or a selective serotonin (or 5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) for 16 weeks results in reduced density of dopaminergic and noradrenergic terminals in the striatum and olfactory bulb, respectively, reflecting pruning of the terminal arbor of ventral midbrain dopaminergic and locus coeruleus noradrenergic neurones. In the striatum of cocaine-treated animals, basal dopamine levels, as well as cocaine-induced dopamine release, is diminished compared with controls. In contrast, serotonergic fibers, projecting from the raphe, sprout and have increased terminal density in the lateral septal nucleus and frontal cortex, following long-term cocaine or SSRI treatment. This is associated with elevated basal 5-HT and enhanced cocaine-induced 5-HT release in the frontal cortex. The anatomical and neurochemical changes in serotonergic fibers following cocaine or SSRI treatment may be explained by attenuated 5-HT(1A) autoreceptor function in the raphe. This study demonstrates extensive plasticity in the morphology and neurochemistry of the catechol and indole pathways that contribute to drug-induced plasticity of the corticostriatal (and other) projections. Moreover, our data suggest that drug-induced plastic adaptation is anatomically widespread and consequently, likely to have multiple and complex consequences.

  10. Acute neural effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors versus noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors on emotion processing: Implications for differential treatment efficacy.

    PubMed

    Outhred, Tim; Hawkshead, Brittany E; Wager, Tor D; Das, Pritha; Malhi, Gin S; Kemp, Andrew H

    2013-09-01

    Clinical research has demonstrated differential efficacy of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (NRIs), which may relate to differential acute effects these medications have on emotional brain processes. Here we present findings from a Multi-Level Kernel Density Analysis meta-analysis that integrates and contrasts activations from disparate fMRI studies in order to examine whether single dose SSRIs and NRIs have different effects on emotion processing tasks in healthy participants. Seven SSRI and four NRI studies were eligible for inclusion. SSRIs decreased amygdala responses, suggesting reduced emotional reactivity to emotional stimuli, whereas NRIs increased frontal and medial activation, suggesting increased emotion regulation. As hypothesised, an interaction of antidepressant and task type was found, such that SSRIs modulated amygdaloid-hippocampal, medial and frontal activity during both the presentation of faces and pictures, whereas NRIs only modulated the activation in medial and frontal regions during the presentation of pictures. Findings are interpreted within a novel model of the differential effects of SSRIs and NRIs on emotion processing.

  11. Effects of serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors on depressive- and impulsive-like behaviors and on monoamine transmission in experimental temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Udaya; Medel-Matus, Jesus-Servando; Redwine, Hannah M.; Shin, Don; Hensler, Julie G.; Sankar, Raman; Mazarati, Andrey

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective Examine therapeutic potential of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) and a norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (NERI) in an animal model of comorbidity between epilepsy, depression-like, and impulsive-like impairments. Methods Epilepsy was induced in male Wistar rats by LiCl and pilocarpine. An SSRI fluoxetine (FLX), and a NERI reboxetine (RBX) were administered either alone or as a combination over one week. Depressive-like and impulsive-like behaviors were examined using forced swim test. Fast scan cyclic voltammetry was used to analyze serotonergic transmission in the raphe nucleus (RN)-prefrontal cortex (PFC) pathway, and noradrenergic transmission in locus coeruleus (LC)-PFC, and LC-RN projections. Monoamine levels in PFC were measured using high performance liquid chromatography. Functional capacities of 5-HT1A receptors and α2A adrenoreceptors in PFC were analyzed by autoradiography. Results Epileptic rats showed behavioral signs of depression and hyper-impulsivity, suppressed serotonergic and noradrenergic tones, decreased levels of serotonin (5-HT) and norepinephrine (NE); 5-HT1A receptor and α2A adrenoreceptors functions remained intact. FLX failed to improve behavioral deficits, but effectively raised 5-HT level and marginally improved RN-PFC serotonergic transmission. RBX reversed impulsive-like behavior, normalized content of NE and noradrenergic tone in LC-PFC and LC-RN. FLX-RBX combination fully reversed depressive-like behavior, and normalized RN-PFC serotonergic transmission. None of the treatment modified the function of 5-HT and NE receptors. Significance Depressive- and impulsive-like behaviors in the pilocarpine model of epilepsy stem respectively from dysfunctions of serotonergic and noradrenergic ascending pathways. At the same time, epilepsy-associated depression is SSRI-resistant. The finding that an SSRI-NERI combination exerts antidepressant effect, along with RBX-induced improvement of LC-RN noradrenergic

  12. Repetitive Thoughts and Behavior in Pervasive Developmental Disorders: Treatment with Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDougle, Christopher J.; Kresch, Laura E.; Posey, David J.

    2000-01-01

    Results from two studies indicate the nonselective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SRI) clomipramine is more efficacious than the relatively selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor desipramine and placebo in children with autism. A study of the selective SRI fluvoxamine found it to be significantly better than placebo for reducing repetitive…

  13. Synergistic effect of 5-HT1A and σ1 receptor activation on prefrontal dopaminergic transmission under circulating steroid deficiency.

    PubMed

    Hiramatsu, Naoki; Ago, Yukio; Hasebe, Shigeru; Nishimura, Akira; Mori, Kazuya; Takuma, Kazuhiro; Matsuda, Toshio

    2013-12-01

    Serotonin (5-HT)1A and σ1 receptors have been implicated in psychiatric disorders. We previously found that combined 5-HT reuptake inhibition and σ1 receptor activation has a synergistic effect on prefrontal dopaminergic transmission in adrenalectomized/castrated mice lacking circulating steroid hormones. In the present study, we examined the mechanisms underlying this neurochemical synergism. Systemic administration of fluvoxamine, a selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitor with agonistic activity towards the σ1 receptor, increased prefrontal dopamine (DA) levels, and adrenalectomy/castration potentiated this fluvoxamine-induced increase in DA. This enhancement of DA release was blocked by WAY100635 (a 5-HT1A receptor antagonist), but not by ritanserin (a 5-HT2 receptor antagonist), azasetron (a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist) or SB269970 (a 5-HT7 receptor antagonist). Individually, osemozotan (a 5-HT1A receptor agonist) and (+)-SKF-10,047 (a σ1 receptor agonist) did not alter prefrontal monoamine levels in adrenalectomized/castrated and sham-operated mice differentially. In contrast, co-administration of these drugs increased prefrontal DA levels to a greater extent in adrenalectomized/castrated mice than in sham-operated animals. Furthermore, co-administration of osemozotan and (+)-SKF-10,047 increased expression of the neuronal activity marker c-Fos in the ventral tegmental area of adrenalectomized/castrated mice, but not in sham-operated animals. These findings suggest that combined activation of 5-HT1A and σ1 receptors has a synergistic effect on prefrontal dopaminergic transmission under circulating steroid deficiency, and that this interaction may play an important role in the regulation of the prefrontal DA system.

  14. Candidate genes for antidepressant response to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Lotrich, Francis E; Pollock, Bruce G

    2005-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) can safely and successfully treat major depression, although a substantial number of patients benefit only partially or not at all from treatment. Genetic polymorphisms may play a major role in determining the response to SSRI treatment. Nonetheless, it is likely that efficacy is determined by multiple genes, with individual genetic polymorphisms having a limited effect size. Initial studies have identified the promoter polymorphism in the gene coding for the serotonin reuptake transporter as moderating efficacy for several SSRIs. The goal of this review is to suggest additional plausible polymorphisms that may be involved in antidepressant efficacy. These include genes affecting intracellular transductional cascades; neuronal growth factors; stress-related hormones, such as corticotropin-releasing hormone and glucocorticoid receptors; ion channels and synaptic efficacy; and adaptations of monoaminergic pathways. Association analyses to examine these candidate genes may facilitate identification of patients for targeted alternative therapies. Determining which genes are involved may also assist in identifying future, novel treatments. PMID:18568127

  15. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors for premature ejaculation: review of erectile and ejaculatory side effects.

    PubMed

    Lasker, George F; Halis, Fikret; Gokce, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Premature ejaculation is one of the most prevalent sexual disorders affecting men today. The lack of approved therapies has resulted in the prescription of many 'off-label' treatments to manage the condition. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors have an interesting side effect of prolonging ejaculatory latency. Consequently, these agents are often considered a first line treatment for patients suffering from premature ejaculation. Erectile dysfunction is another common side effect reported by men treated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Nitric oxide is the primary mediator of erectile function. Preclinical studies have provided evidence that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors decrease nitric oxide bioavailability. This invited mini-review aims to examine the physiology of the erectile and ejaculatory responses, discuss the indicated and 'off-label' clinical utility of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and to summarize evidence from basic science and clinical studies pertaining to mechanisms of how selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor therapy modifies ejaculatory and erectile function.

  16. Serotonin syndrome: fentanyl and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor interactions.

    PubMed

    Greenier, Ewa; Lukyanova, Valentina; Reede, Lynn

    2014-10-01

    Serotonin syndrome is a rare but potentially fatal adverse drug reaction associated with increased serotonergic activity in the central nervous system. It is characterized by a triad of symptoms, which include altered mental status, neuromuscular hyperactivity, and autonomic instability or hyperactivity. Due to the potential of rapid onset, it is important for clinicians to recognize the signs and symptoms of serotonin syndrome. Serotonin syndrome symptoms may resemble other conditions. Although this article focuses on serotonin syndrome as a result of an adverse interaction of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) and fentanyl, it is important for not only anesthesia professionals, but all clinicians--such as those in emergency medicine and critical care--to be aware of this syndrome and its management. This article discusses the clinical manifestations of the serotonin syndrome and highlights reported cases of serotonin syndrome specifically related to an interaction between SSRIs and fentanyl, a commonly used opioid in anesthesia practice.

  17. Gray matter and intrinsic network changes in the posterior cingulate cortex after selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor intake.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Christoph; Ganger, Sebastian; Losak, Jan; Hahn, Andreas; Savli, Markus; Kranz, Georg S; Baldinger, Pia; Windischberger, Christian; Kasper, Siegfried; Lanzenberger, Rupert

    2014-01-01

    Preclinical studies have demonstrated that serotonin (5-HT) challenge changes neuronal circuitries and microarchitecture. However, evidence in human subjects is missing. Pharmacologic magnetic resonance imaging (phMRI) applying selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and high-resolution structural and functional brain assessment is able to demonstrate the impact of 5-HT challenge on neuronal network morphology and functional activity. To determine how SSRIs induce changes in gray matter and neuronal activity, we conducted a longitudinal study using citalopram and escitalopram. Seventeen healthy subjects completed a structural and functional phMRI study with randomized, cross-over, placebo-controlled, double-blind design. Significant gray matter increases were observed (among other regions) in the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and the ventral precuneus after SSRI intake of 10days, while decreases were observed within the pre- and postcentral gyri (all P<0.05, family-wise error [FWE] corrected). Furthermore, enhanced resting functional connectivity (rFC) within the ventral precuneus and PCC was associated with gray matter increases in the PCC (all FWE Pcorr<0.05). Corroborating these results, whole-brain connectivity density, measuring the brain's functional network hubs, was significantly increased after SSRI-intake in the ventral precuneus and PCC (all FWE Pcorr<0.05). Short-term administration of SSRIs changes gray matter structures, consistent with previous work reporting enhancement of neuroplasticity by serotonergic neurotransmission. Furthermore, increased gray matter in the PCC is associated with increased functional connectivity in one of the brain's metabolically most active regions. Our novel findings provide convergent evidence for dynamic alterations of brain structure and function associated with SSRI pharmacotherapy.

  18. A 5-HT3 receptor antagonist potentiates the behavioral, neurochemical and electrophysiological actions of an SSRI antidepressant.

    PubMed

    Bétry, C; Overstreet, D; Haddjeri, N; Pehrson, A L; Bundgaard, C; Sanchez, C; Mørk, A

    2015-04-01

    More effective treatments for major depression are needed. We studied if the selective 5-HT3 receptor antagonist ondansetron can potentiate the antidepressant potential of the selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) paroxetine using behavioral, neurochemical and electrophysiological methods. Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) rats, treated with ondansetron, and/or a sub-effective dose of paroxetine, were assessed in the forced swim test. The effects of an acute intravenous administration of each compound alone and in combination were evaluated with respect to 5-HT neuronal firing rate in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN). Effects of s.c. administration of the compounds alone and in combination on extracellular levels of 5-HT were assessed in the ventral hippocampus of freely moving rats by microdialysis. The results showed that ondansetron enhanced the antidepressant activity of paroxetine in the forced swim test. It partially prevented the suppressant effect of paroxetine on DRN 5-HT neuronal firing and enhanced the paroxetine-induced increase of hippocampal extracellular 5-HT release. These findings indicate that 5-HT3 receptor blockade potentiates the antidepressant effects of SSRIs. Since both paroxetine and ondansetron are used clinically, it might be possible to validate this augmentation strategy in depressed patients.

  19. Effects of systemic injections of vilazodone, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor and serotonin 1A receptor agonist, on anxiety induced by predator stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Adamec, Robert; Bartoszyk, Gerd D; Burton, Paul

    2004-11-03

    We examined the effect of Vilazodone, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) and serotonin 1A (5-HT(1A)) receptor agonist [Bartoszyk, G.D., Hegenbart, R., Ziegler, H., 1997. EMD 68843, a serotonin reuptake inhibitor with selective presynaptic 5-HT1A receptor agonistic properties. Eur. J. Pharmacol. 322, 147-153.], on change in affect following predator stress. Vilazodone and vehicle injection (intraperitoneal) occurred either 10 min after predator stress (prophylactic testing), or 90 min prior to behavioral testing for the effects of predator stress (therapeutic testing). Predator stress involved unprotected exposure of rats to a domestic cat. Behavioral effects of stress were evaluated with hole board, plus-maze, and acoustic startle tests 1 week after stress. Predator stress increased anxiety-like behavior in the plus-maze and elevated response to acoustic startle. In prophylactic testing, Vilazodone affected stress potentiation of startle at doses above 5 mg/kg. Vilazodone increased stress elevation of startle at 10 mg/kg. Higher doses of Vilazodone (20 and 40 mg/kg) blocked stress potentiation of startle. In contrast, Vilazodone had no effect on stress potentiation of anxiety in the plus-maze. In therapeutic testing, Vilazodone increased stress elevation of startle at all doses. In contrast, therapeutic Vilazodone had no effect on stress potentiation of anxiety in the plus-maze. Taken together, the data suggest a prophylactic potential for Vilazodone in the treatment of changes in hypervigilance following severe stress.

  20. Oppositional Effects of Serotonin Receptors 5-HT1a, 2, and 2c in the Regulation of Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Klempin, Friederike; Babu, Harish; Tonelli, Davide De Pietri; Alarcon, Edson; Fabel, Klaus; Kempermann, Gerd

    2009-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) appears to play a major role in controlling adult hippocampal neurogenesis and thereby it is relevant for theories linking failing adult neurogenesis to the pathogenesis of major depression and the mechanisms of action of antidepressants. Serotonergic drugs lacked acute effects on adult neurogenesis in many studies, which suggested a surprisingly long latency phase. Here we report that the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine, which has no acute effect on precursor cell proliferation, causes the well-described increase in net neurogenesis upon prolonged treatment partly by promoting the survival and maturation of new postmitotic neurons. We hypothesized that this result is the cumulative effect of several 5-HT-dependent events in the course of adult neurogenesis. Thus, we used specific agonists and antagonists to 5-HT1a, 2, and 2c receptor subtypes to analyze their impact on different developmental stages. We found that 5-HT exerts acute and opposing effects on proliferation and survival or differentiation of precursor cells by activating the diverse receptor subtypes on different stages within the neuronal lineage in vivo. This was confirmed in vitro by demonstrating that 5-HT1a receptors are involved in self-renewal of precursor cells, whereas 5-HT2 receptors effect both proliferation and promote neuronal differentiation. We propose that under acute conditions 5-HT2 effects counteract the positive proliferative effect of 5-HT1a receptor activation. However, prolonged 5-HT2c receptor activation fosters an increase in late-stage progenitor cells and early postmitotic neurons, leading to a net increase in adult neurogenesis. Our data indicate that serotonin does not show effect latency in the adult dentate gyrus. Rather, the delayed response to serotonergic drugs with respect to endpoints downstream of the immediate receptor activity is largely due to the initially antagonistic and un-balanced action of different 5-HT receptors. PMID

  1. The selective 5-HT2A receptor antagonist M100907 enhances antidepressant-like behavioral effects of the SSRI fluoxetine.

    PubMed

    Marek, Gerard J; Martin-Ruiz, Raul; Abo, Allyson; Artigas, Francesc

    2005-12-01

    The addition of low doses of atypical antipsychotic drugs, which saturate 5-HT(2A) receptors, enhances the therapeutic effect of selective serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in patients with major depression as well as treatment-refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder. The purpose of the present studies was to test the effects of combined treatment with a low dose of a highly selective 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonist (M100907; formerly MDL 100,907) and low doses of a SSRI using a behavioral screen in rodents (the differential-reinforcement-of low rate 72-s schedule of reinforcement; DRL 72-s) which previously has been shown to be sensitive both to 5-HT(2) antagonists and SSRIs. M100907 has a approximately 100-fold or greater selectivity at 5-HT(2A) receptors vs other 5-HT receptor subtypes, and would not be expected to appreciably occupy non-5-HT(2A) receptors at doses below 100 microg/kg. M100907 increased the reinforcement rate, decreased the response rate, and shifted the inter-response time distributions to the right in a pattern characteristic of antidepressant drugs. In addition, a positive synergistic interaction occurred when testing low doses of the 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonist (6.25-12.5 microg/kg) with clinically relevant doses of the SSRI fluoxetine (2.5-5 mg/kg), which both exerted minimal antidepressant-like effects by themselves. In vivo microdialysis study revealed that a low dose of M100907 (12.5 microg/kg) did not elevate extracellular 5-HT levels in the prefrontal cortex over those observed with fluoxetine alone (5 mg/kg). These results will be discussed in the context that the combined blockade of 5-HT(2A) receptors and serotonin transporters (SERT) may result in greater efficacy in treating neuropsychiatric syndromes than blocking either site alone.

  2. Pharmacological and Behavioral Characterization of D-473, an Orally Active Triple Reuptake Inhibitor Targeting Dopamine, Serotonin and Norepinephrine Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Aloke K.; Santra, Soumava; Sharma, Horrick; Voshavar, Chandrashekhar; Xu, Liping; Mabrouk, Omar; Antonio, Tamara; Reith, Maarten E. A.

    2014-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a debilitating disease affecting a wide cross section of people around the world. The current therapy for depression is less than adequate and there is a considerable unmet need for more efficacious treatment. Dopamine has been shown to play a significant role in depression including production of anhedonia which has been one of the untreated symptoms in MDD. It has been hypothesized that drugs acting at all three monoamine transporters including dopamine transporter should provide more efficacious antidepressants activity. This has led to the development of triple reuptake inhibitor D-473 which is a novel pyran based molecule and interacts with all three monoamine transporters. The monoamine uptake inhibition activity in the cloned human transporters expressed in HEK-293 cells (70.4, 9.18 and 39.7 for DAT, SERT and NET, respectively) indicates a serotonin preferring triple reuptake inhibition profile for this drug. The drug D-473 exhibited good brain penetration and produced efficacious activity in rat forced swim test under oral administration. The optimal efficacy dose did not produce any locomotor activation. Microdialysis experiment demonstrated that systemic administration of D-473 elevated extracellular level of the three monoamines DA, 5-HT, and NE efficaciously in the dorsal lateral striatum (DLS) and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) area, indicating in vivo blockade of all three monoamine transporters by D-473. Thus, the current biological data from D-473 indicate potent antidepressant activity of the molecule. PMID:25427177

  3. Monoamine-dependent, opioid-independent antihypersensitivity effects of intrathecally administered milnacipran, a serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor, in a postoperative pain model in rats.

    PubMed

    Obata, Hideaki; Kimura, Masafumi; Nakajima, Kunie; Tobe, Masaru; Nishikawa, Koichi; Saito, Shigeru

    2010-09-01

    The neurotransmitters serotonin (5-HT) and noradrenaline (NA) have important roles in suppressing nociceptive transmission in the spinal cord. In the present study, we determined the efficacy and nature of the antihypersensitivity effects of milnacipran, a 5-HT and NA reuptake inhibitor (SNRI), in the spinal cord in a rat model of postoperative pain. Sprague-Dawley rats were used in all experiments. An incision was made on the plantar aspect of the hind paw. Mechanical hypersensitivity was measured by determining the withdrawal threshold to von Frey filaments applied to the paw. Drugs were administered intrathecally 24 h after paw incision. Microdialysis studies of the dorsal horn of the lumbar spinal cord were also performed to measure 5-HT and NA levels after systemic injection of milnacipran. Milnacipran (1-30 microg) produced dose-dependent antihypersensitivity effects. The effect lasted 6 h after the 30-microg injection. Doses of 30 microg or less produced no abnormal behavior. The peak antihypersensitivity effect of 10 microg of milnacipran was blocked by intrathecal pretreatment with antagonists of the alpha(2)-adrenoceptor (idazoxan; 30 microg) or 5-HT receptors (methysergide; 30 microg). Intrathecal pretreatment with 30 microg of naloxone, a mu-opioid receptor antagonist, did not reverse the effect of milnacipran. Isobolographic analysis indicated antinociceptive synergism between milnacipran and morphine. Microdialysis studies revealed that milnacipran increased both 5-HT and NA levels in the spinal dorsal horn. These findings suggest that the antihypersensitivity effect of intrathecal milnacipran in the postoperative pain model is monoamine-mediated. Combined administration of an SNRI with morphine might be a promising treatment to suppress postoperative hypersensitivity.

  4. Estrogenic/antiestrogenic activity of selected selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    POP, ANCA; LUPU, DIANA IOANA; CHERFAN, JULIEN; KISS, BELA; LOGHIN, FELICIA

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are one of the most prescribed classes of psychotropics. Even though the SSRI class consists of 6 molecules (citalopram, escitalopram, fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, paroxetine and sertraline), only fluoxetine was intensively studied for endocrine disruptive effects, while the other SSRIs received less attention. This study was designed to evaluate the estrogenic/antiestrogenic effect of fluoxetine, sertraline and paroxetine. Methods The in vitro (anti)estrogenic activity was assessed using a firefly luciferase reporter construct in the T47D-KBluc breast cancer cell line. These cells express nuclear estrogen receptors that can activate the transcription of the luciferase reporter gene upon binding of estrogen receptor agonists. Results All three compounds were found to interact with the estrogen receptor. Fluoxetine had dual properties, weak estrogenic at lower concentrations and antiestrogenic effect at higher concentrations. Sertraline shared the same properties with fluoxetine, but also increased the estradiol-mediated transcriptional activity. Paroxetine presented only one type of effect, the ability to increase the estradiol-mediated transcriptional activity. Conclusions Overall, our results indicate a possible interaction of SSRIs with the estrogen receptor. As SSRIs are being used by all categories of population, including pregnant women or children, establishing whether they can affect the endocrine mediated mechanisms should be a priority. PMID:26609273

  5. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and cardiovascular events: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Nezafati, Mohammad Hassan; Eshraghi, Ali; Vojdanparast, Mohammad; Abtahi, Saeed; Nezafati, Pouya

    2016-01-01

    Background: Given the importance of the role of depression in predicting the outcome of cardiovascular disorders, current medications for treating depression, particularly selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), are taken into consideration. This study aimed to systematically review the published findings in the use of SSRIs and the risk for cardiac events. Materials and Methods: An independent review of the Web of Science, PubMed, Scopus, Cochrane, CINAHL, index Copernicus, and Google Scholar, up to 2014, was performed. We identified studies evaluating the effect of SSRIs, on cardiovascular events. Articles in English with full text availability, review articles, and experimental studies were included in the study. Among 150 studies reviewed based on the included keywords, 17 met the study criteria and were finally reviewed. Results: The use of some types of SSRIs may prevent platelet adhesion and aggregation; control the cardiovascular risk profile including hypertension, insulin resistance, and body weight; and also inhibit inflammatory processes. The appearance of adverse cardiac events, including cardiac arrhythmias (torsade de pointes and QT prolongation), syncope, increased systolic and diastolic right ventricular volume, and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines leading atherosclerosis development, has also been expected with the chronic use of some types of SSRIs. Conclusion: According to our systematic review, both beneficial and adverse cardiovascular events can be established following the chronic use of various types of SSRIs. Therefore, when taking SSRIs, the cardiovascular effect of each SSRI has to be carefully considered, based on patients’ cardiovascular risk profiles. PMID:27904611

  6. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor drug interactions in patients receiving statins.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2014-02-01

    Elderly patients commonly receive statin drugs for the primary or secondary prevention of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events. Elderly patients also commonly receive antidepressant drugs, usually selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), for the treatment of depression, anxiety, or other conditions. SSRIs are associated with many pharmacokinetic drug interactions related to the inhibition of the cytochrome P450 (CYP) metabolic pathways. There is concern that drugs that inhibit statin metabolism can trigger statin adverse effects, especially myopathy (which can be potentially serious, if rhabdomyolysis occurs). However, a detailed literature review of statin metabolism and of SSRI effects on CYP enzymes suggests that escitalopram, citalopram, and paroxetine are almost certain to be safe with all statins, and rosuvastatin, pitavastatin, and pravastatin are almost certain to be safe with all SSRIs. Even though other SSRI-statin combinations may theoretically be associated with risks, the magnitude of the pharmacokinetic interaction is likely to be below the threshold for clinical significance. Risk, if at all, lies in combining fluvoxamine with atorvastatin, simvastatin, or lovastatin, and even this risk can be minimized by using lower statin doses and monitoring the patient.

  7. Use of bupropion in combination with serotonin reuptake inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zisook, Sidney; Rush, A John; Haight, Barbara R; Clines, Dawn C; Rockett, Carol B

    2006-02-01

    Incomplete symptom remission and sexual side effects are common problems for which bupropion often is added to treatment with selective serotonin and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs and SNRIs) for patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). This article reviews the literature on combining bupropion with SSRIs or SNRIs. We used MEDLINE to select studies that included patients diagnosed with MDD treated with any combination of bupropion and an SSRI or SNRI, either to enhance antidepressant response or to ameliorate antidepressant-associated sexual dysfunction. Bibliographies of located articles were searched for additional studies. Controlled and open-label studies support the effectiveness of bupropion in reversing antidepressant-associated sexual dysfunction, whereas open trials suggest that combination treatment with bupropion and an SSRI or SNRI is effective for the treatment of MDD in patients refractory to the SSRI, SNRI, or bupropion alone. The available data suggest that, although not an approved indication, the combination of bupropion and either an SSRI or an SNRI is generally well tolerated, can boost antidepressant response, and can reduce SSRI or SNRI-associated sexual side effects. Additional randomized controlled studies are needed to answer important questions, such as those regarding optimal dose and duration of treatment.

  8. Comparison of the effects of antidepressants and their metabolites on reuptake of biogenic amines and on receptor binding.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, C; Hyttel, J

    1999-08-01

    1. The present survey compares the effects of antidepressants and their principal metabolites on reuptake of biogenic amines and on receptor binding. The following antide-pressants were included in the study: the tricyclic antidepressants amitriptyline, dothiepin, and lofepramine and the atypical antidepressant bupropion, which all have considerable market shares in the UK and/or US markets; the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) citalopram, fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, paroxetine, and sertraline; and the recently approved antidepressants venlafaxine and nefazodone. 2. Amitriptyline has similar in vitro reuptake inhibitory potencies for 5-HT and NA, whereas the metabolite nortriptyline is preferentially a NA reuptake inhibitor. Both amitriptyline and nortriptyline are also 5-HT2 receptor antagonists. 3. Dothiepin has equipotent 5-HT and NA reuptake inhibitory activity, whereas northiaden shows a slight selectivity for NA reuptake inhibition. Dothiepin and northiaden are also 5-HT2 receptor antagonists. The slow elimination rate of northiaden (36-46 hr) compared to dothiepin (14-24 hr) suggests that northiaden contributes significantly to the therapeutic effect of dothiepin. 4. Lofepramine is extensively metabolized to desipramine. Desipramine plays an important role in the antidepressant activity of lofepramine, as the plasma elimination half-life of lofepramine (4-6 hr) is much shorter than that of desipramine (24 hr). Both compounds are potent and selective inhibitors of NA reuptake. 5. The five approved SSRIs, citalopram, fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, paroxetine, and sertraline, are potent 5-HT reuptake inhibitors, and the demethyl metabolites, norfluoxetine, demethylsertraline, and demethylcitalopram, also show selectivity. Paroxetine and sertraline are the most potent inhibitors of 5-HT reuptake, whereas citalopram is the most selective. Fluoxetine is the least selective and the metabolite of fluoxetine, norfluoxetine, is a more selective and more potent 5

  9. Preclinical to Clinical Translation of CNS Transporter Occupancy of TD-9855, a Novel Norepinephrine and Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Patil, DL; Daniels, OT; Ding, Y-S; Gallezot, J-D; Henry, S; Kim, KHS; Kshirsagar, S; Martin, WJ; Obedencio, GP; Stangeland, E; Tsuruda, PR; Williams, W; Carson, RE; Patil, ST

    2015-01-01

    Background: Monoamine reuptake inhibitors exhibit unique clinical profiles that reflect distinct engagement of the central nervous system (CNS) transporters. Methods: We used a translational strategy, including rodent pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in humans, to establish the transporter profile of TD-9855, a novel norepinephrine and serotonin reuptake inhibitor. Results: TD-9855 was a potent inhibitor of norepinephrine (NE) and serotonin 5-HT uptake in vitro with an inhibitory selectivity of 4- to 10-fold for NE at human and rat transporters. TD-9855 engaged norepinephrine transporters (NET) and serotonin transporters (SERT) in rat spinal cord, with a plasma EC50 of 11.7ng/mL and 50.8ng/mL, respectively, consistent with modest selectivity for NET in vivo. Accounting for species differences in protein binding, the projected human NET and SERT plasma EC50 values were 5.5ng/mL and 23.9ng/mL, respectively. A single-dose, open-label PET study (4–20mg TD-9855, oral) was conducted in eight healthy males using the radiotracers [11C]-3-amino-4- [2-[(di(methyl)amino)methyl]phenyl]sulfanylbenzonitrile for SERT and [11C]-(S,S)-methylreboxetine for NET. The long pharmacokinetic half-life (30–40h) of TD-9855 allowed for sequential assessment of SERT and NET occupancy in the same subject. The plasma EC50 for NET was estimated to be 1.21ng/mL, and at doses of greater than 4mg the projected steady-state NET occupancy is high (>75%). After a single oral dose of 20mg, SERT occupancy was 25 (±8)% at a plasma level of 6.35ng/mL. Conclusions: These data establish the CNS penetration and transporter profile of TD-9855 and inform the selection of potential doses for future clinical evaluation. PMID:25522383

  10. Pharmacological profile of the 5-HT-induced inhibition of cardioaccelerator sympathetic outflow in pithed rats: correlation with 5-HT1 and putative 5-ht5A/5B receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-López, Araceli; Centurión, David; Vázquez, Erika; Arulmani, Udayasankar; Saxena, Pramod R; Villalón, Carlos M

    2003-01-01

    Continuous infusions of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) inhibit the tachycardiac responses to preganglionic (C7-T1) sympathetic stimulation in pithed rats pretreated with desipramine. The present study identified the pharmacological profile of this inhibitory action of 5-HT. The inhibition induced by intravenous (i.v.) continuous infusions of 5-HT (5.6 μg kg−1 min−1) on sympathetically induced tachycardiac responses remained unaltered after i.v. treatment with saline or the antagonists GR 127935 (5-HT1B/1D), the combination of WAY 100635 (5-HT1A) plus GR 127935, ritanserin (5-HT2), tropisetron (5-HT3/4), LY215840 (5-HT7) or a cocktail of antagonists/inhibitors consisting of yohimbine (α2), prazosin (α1), ritanserin, GR 127935, WAY 100635 and indomethacin (cyclooxygenase), but was abolished by methiothepin (5-HT1/2/6/7 and recombinant 5-ht5A/5B). These drugs, used in doses high enough to block their respective receptors/mechanisms, did not modify the sympathetically induced tachycardiac responses per se. I.v. continuous infusions of the agonists 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT; 5-HT1/7 and recombinant 5-ht5A/5B), CP 93,129 (r5-HT1B), sumatriptan (5-HT1B/1D), PNU-142633 (5-HT1D) and ergotamine (5-HT1B/1D and recombinant 5-ht5A/5B) mimicked the above sympatho-inhibition to 5-HT. In contrast, the agonists indorenate (5-HT1A) and LY344864 (5-ht1F) were inactive. Interestingly, 5-CT-induced cardiac sympatho-inhibition was abolished by methiothepin, the cocktail of antagonists/inhibitors, GR 127935 or the combination of SB224289 (5-HT1B) plus BRL15572 (5-HT1D), but remained unchanged when SB224289 or BRL15572 were given separately. Therefore, 5-HT-induced cardiac sympatho-inhibition, being unrelated to 5-HT2, 5-HT3, 5-HT4, 5-ht6, 5-HT7 receptors, α1/2-adrenoceptor or prostaglandin synthesis, seems to be primarily mediated by (i) 5-HT1 (probably 5-HT1B/1D) receptors and (ii) a novel mechanism antagonized by methiothepin that, most likely, involves putative 5-ht5A/5B

  11. The role of 5-HT1A receptors in mediating acute negative effects of antidepressants: implications in pediatric depression.

    PubMed

    Rahn, K A; Cao, Y-J; Hendrix, C W; Kaplin, A I

    2015-05-05

    Acute antidepressant exposure elevates the frequency of impulsive behavior and suicidal thoughts in children and adolescents with major depressive disorder (MDD). Long-term antidepressant treatment, however, is beneficial for pediatric MDD, so it is necessary to explore novel treatments that prevent the potentially dangerous consequences of acute antidepressant initiation. In the present study, a treatment strategy designed to reverse the acute negative behavioral effects of antidepressants was tested in rodents. Co-administration of the 5-HT1A receptor (5-HT1AR) antagonist WAY-100635 reversed the negative effects of acute fluoxetine, a serotonin reuptake inhibitor, but not reboxetine, a norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, supporting the involvement of 5-HT1AR in mediating the negative consequences of acute selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment. No 5-HT1AR antagonists are currently approved for use in pediatric populations, so alternative strategies should be explored. One such strategy was suggested based on the hypothesis that the rate of 5-HT1AR activation and the subsequent inhibition of serotonergic neuron activity caused by acute SSRI administration is proportional to the loading rate of an antidepressant. Existing pharmacological data were examined, and significant correlations were observed between the half-life of antidepressants and the rate of suicide-related events (SREs). Specifically, antidepressants with longer half-lives have lower rates of SREs. On the basis of these data, novel dosing strategies were developed for five antidepressants to mimic the pharmacological profile of the antidepressant with the longest half-life, fluoxetine. These dosing strategies could be used to decrease the rate of SREs associated with acute antidepressant treatment in pediatric MDD until an improved pharmacological treatment is developed.

  12. Pharmacological characterization of the behavioural syndrome induced by the NK-3 tachykinin agonist senktide in rodents: evidence for mediation by endogenous 5-HT.

    PubMed

    Stoessl, A J; Dourish, C T; Iversen, S D

    1990-05-28

    The effects of various manipulations of brain 5-HT mechanisms on the behavioural responses induced by the selective NK-3 tachykinin agonist senktide in rodents were assessed. Senktide elicited wet dog shakes in the rat which were attenuated by the 5-HT1C/2 antagonist mianserin and the selective 5-HT2 antagonist altanserin. Senktide-induced forepaw treading was stereospecifically attenuated by the 5-HT1A + B antagonist (-)-alprenolol. Senktide also elicited chewing mouth movements and yawning, which were unaffected by mianserin, altanserin, (+)- or (-)-alprenolol, or the selective 5-HT3 antagonist ICS 205-930, but attenuated by the muscarinic antagonist scopolamine. Penile grooming elicited by senktide was attenuated by mianserin, but was unaffected by the other antagonists. Senktide-induced wet dog shakes were enhanced by the 5-HT reuptake inhibitors citalopram and fluoxetine, suppressed by the monoamine oxidase (MAO)-B inhibitor pargyline, but unaffected by the MAO-A inhibitor clorgyline. Forepaw treading was potentiated by citalopram and clorgyline, but not significantly altered by fluoxetine or pargyline. Depletion of 5-HT by p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA) in the rat attenuated senktide-induced wet dog shakes and forepaw treading. Neither PCPA nor 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine affected senktide-induced behaviours in the mouse, but the degree of brain 5-HT depletion caused by these treatments in mice was relatively small. These findings indicate that stimulation of NK-3 tachykinin receptors by senktide results in a complex behavioural syndrome which is mediated by multiple 5-HT receptors, and dependent upon intact stores of endogenous 5-HT. Independent stimulation of brain cholinergic mechanisms by senktide is also confirmed.

  13. Stimulation of 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT2A/2C, 5-HT3 and 5-HT4 receptors or 5-HT uptake inhibition: short- and long-term memory.

    PubMed

    Meneses, Alfredo

    2007-11-22

    In order to determine whether short- (STM) and long-term memory (LTM) function in serial or parallel manner, serotonin (5-hydroxtryptamine, 5-HT) receptor agonists were tested in autoshaping task. Results show that control-vehicle animals were modestly but significantly mastering the autoshaping task as illustrated by memory scores between STM and LTM. Thus, post-training administration of 8-OHDPAT (agonist for 5-HT(1A/7) receptors) only at 0.250 and 0.500 mg/kg impaired both STM and LTM. CGS12066 (agonist for 5-HT(1B)) produced biphasic affects, at 5.0 mg/kg impaired STM but at 1.0 and 10.0 mg/kg, respectively, improved or impaired LTM. DOI (agonist for 5-HT(2A/2C) receptors) dose-dependently impaired STM and, at 10.0 mg/kg only impaired LTM. Both, STM and LTM were impaired by either mCPP (mainly agonist for 5-HT(2C) receptors) or mesulergine (mainly antagonist for 5-HT(2C) receptors) lower dose. The 5-HT(3) agonist mCPBG at 1.0 impaired STM and its higher dose impaired both STM and LTM. RS67333 (partial agonist for 5-HT(4) receptors), at 5.0 and 10.0 mg/kg facilitated both STM and LTM. The higher dose of fluoxetine (a 5-HT uptake inhibitor) improved both STM and LTM. Using as head-pokes during CS as an indirect measure of food-intake showed that of 30 memory changes, 21 of these were unrelated to the former. While some STM or LTM impairments can be attributed to decrements in food-intake, but not memory changes (either increase or decreases) produced by 8-OHDPAT, CGS12066, RS67333 or fluoxetine. Except for animals treated with DOI, mCPBG or fluoxetine, other groups treated with 5-HT agonists 6 h following autoshaping training showed similar LTM and unmodified CS-head-pokes scores.

  14. Effect of duloxetine, a norepinephrine and serotonin reuptake inhibitor, on sneeze-induced urethral continence reflex in rats.

    PubMed

    Miyazato, Minoru; Kaiho, Yasuhiro; Kamo, Izumi; Chancellor, Michael B; Sugaya, Kimio; de Groat, William C; Yoshimura, Naoki

    2008-07-01

    We investigated the effect of duloxetine, a norepinephrine (NE) and serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitor, on the neurally evoked urethral continence reflex induced by sneezing in rats. To clarify the role of noradrenergic and serotonergic mechanisms in preventing stress urinary incontinence (SUI) during sneezing, we examined the effect of duloxetine followed by intrathecal (it) methiothepin maleate (5-HT receptor and alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonist) or terazosin or idazoxan (selective alpha1- and alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonists, respectively). Amplitude of urethral pressure responses during sneezing (A-URS), urethral baseline pressure (UBP) at the midurethra, and sneeze-induced leak point pressure (S-LPP) were measured in normal adult female rats and rats with SUI induced by vaginal distension (VD). In normal and VD rats, intravenous application of duloxetine (1 mg/kg) increased A-URS by 35% and 34% and UBP by 21% and 34%, respectively. Sneezing-induced fluid leakage from the urethral orifice was observed in VD rats but not in normal rats. S-LPP was increased from 39.1 to 92.2 cmH2O by intravenous duloxetine in incontinent VD rats. Duloxetine-mediated enhancement of A-URS was inhibited by terazosin but not methiothepin maleate (it). In addition, simultaneous intrathecal application of methiothepin and terazosin induced a reduction in A-URS during sneezing, which was not increased by intravenous duloxetine. However, the reduced A-URS after intrathecal application of methiothepin and terazosin returned to the control level when duloxetine (iv) was applied after intrathecal idazoxan administration. These results indicate that duloxetine can prevent SUI by facilitating noradrenergic and serotonergic systems in the spinal cord to enhance the sneeze-induced active urethral closure mechanism.

  15. Intracranial haemorrhage and use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    de Abajo, Francisco J; Jick, Hershel; Derby, Laura; Jick, Susan; Schmitz, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    Aims In the past few years an increasing number of bleeding disorders have been reported in association with the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), including serious cases of intracranial haemorrhage, raising concerns about the safety of this class of drugs. The present study was performed to test the hypothesis of an increased risk of intracranial haemorrhage associated with the use of SSRIs. Methods We carried out a case-control study nested in a cohort of antidepressants users with the UK-based General Practice Research Database (GPRD) as the primary source of information. The study cohort encompassed subjects aged between 18 and 79 years who received a first-time prescription for any antidepressant from January, 1990 to October, 1997. Patients with presenting conditions or treatments that could be associated with an increased risk of intracranial haemorrhage were excluded from the cohort. Patients were followed-up until the occurrence of an idiopathic intracranial haemorrhage. Up to four controls per case, matched on age, sex, calendar time and practice were randomly selected from the study cohort. We estimated adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals of intracranial haemorrhage with current use of SSRIs and other antidepressants as compared with nonuse using conditional logistic regression. Results We identified 65 cases of idiopathic intracranial haemorrhage and 254 matched controls. Current exposure to SSRIs was ascertained in 7 cases (10.8%) and 24 controls (9.7%) resulting in an adjusted OR (95%CI) of 0.8 (0.3,2.3). The estimate for ‘other antidepressants’ was 0.7 (0.3,1.6). The effect measures were not modified by gender or age. No effect related to dose or treatment duration was detected. The risk estimates did not change according to the location of bleeding (intracerebral or subarachnoid). Conclusions Our results are not compatible with a major increased risk of intracranial haemorrhage among users of SSRIs or other

  16. Amelioration of deficit syndrome of schizophrenia by norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Shoja Shafti, Saeed; Jafarabad, Mohammad Sadeghe; Azizi, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Negative symptoms are a significant barrier to successful functional outcome and recovery in individuals with schizophrenia and their management is not unproblematic. Reboxetine is a norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (NRI). Previous studies regarding the useful effects of reboxetine on deficit symptoms of schizophrenia have resulted in inconsistent results. The present study therefore evaluated the effectiveness of reboxetine as an adjunctive treatment in a group of schizophrenic patients with prominent negative symptoms. Method: A total of 50 male inpatients meeting diagnosis of schizophrenia entered into a 12-week parallel group, double-blind study for random assignment to reboxetine (n = 25 patients) or placebo (n = 25 patients). The inclusion criterion, in addition to the diagnosis of schizophrenia, was the existence of obvious negative symptoms for a duration of at least 2 years. The Scale for Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS) was used as the primary outcome measure. The Scale for Assessment of Positive Symptoms (SAPS), Simpson Angus Scale (SAS), Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D) and Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE) were used for comparison of the intervening parameters in this study. Results: According to the findings, 76% of patients in the target group showed some positive response to reboxetine compared with 24% in the control group (p < 0.01). The mean total score of SANS in the reboxetine group decreased significantly from 79.94 ± 1.20 to 74.23 ± 4.07 (p < 0.0001) at the end of the study; such an improvement was not significant in the placebo group with a decrease from 80.42 ± 2.46 to 79.08 ± 5.83 (p < 0.29). Changes of SAPS were insignificant in both groups. Effect size analysis for changes of SANS at the end of assessment indicated a large improvement with reboxetine (Cohen’s d = 2.91). Conclusion: Reboxetine, as an adjuvant to haloperidol, may have a helpful effect on the deficit syndrome of schizophrenia. PMID

  17. Suppression of inflammatory events associated to intestinal ischemia-reperfusion by 5-HT1A blockade in mice.

    PubMed

    Bertoni, Simona; Arcaro, Valentina; Vivo, Valentina; Rapalli, Alberto; Tognolini, Massimiliano; Cantoni, Anna Maria; Saccani, Francesca; Flammini, Lisa; Domenichini, Giuseppe; Ballabeni, Vigilio; Barocelli, Elisabetta

    2014-03-01

    Intestinal ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) is a potentially life-threatening disease, ensuing from various clinical conditions. Experimentally, either protective or detrimental roles have been attributed to 5-HT in the functional and morphological injury caused by mesenteric I/R. Recently, we proved the involvement of 5-HT2A receptors in the intestinal dysmotility and leukocyte recruitment induced by 45min occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) followed by 24h reperfusion in mice. Starting from these premises, the aim of our present work was to investigate the role played by endogenous 5-HT in the same experimental model where 45min SMA clamping was followed by 5h reflow. To this end, we first observed that ischemic preconditioning before I/R injury (IPC+I/R) reverted the increase in 5-HT tissue content and in inflammatory parameters induced by I/R in mice. Second, the effects produced by intravenous administration of 5-HT1A ligands (partial agonist buspirone 10mgkg(-1), antagonist WAY100135 0.5-5mgkg(-1)), 5-HT2A antagonist sarpogrelate (10mgkg(-1)), 5-HT3 antagonist alosetron (0.1mgkg(-1)), 5-HT4 antagonist GR125487 (5mgkg(-1)) and 5-HT re-uptake inhibitor fluoxetine (10mgkg(-1)) on I/R-induced inflammatory response were investigated in I/R mice and compared to those obtained in sham-operated animals (S). Our results confirmed the significant role played by 5-HT2A receptors not only in the late but also in the early I/R-induced microcirculatory dysfunction and showed that blockade of 5-HT1A receptors protected against the intestinal leukocyte recruitment, plasma extravasation and reactive oxygen species formation triggered by SMA occlusion and reflow. The ability of α7 nicotinic receptor (α7nAchR) antagonist methyllycaconitine (5mgkg(-1)) to counteract the beneficial action provided by buspirone on I/R-induced neutrophil infiltration suggests that the anti-inflammatory effect produced by 5-HT1A receptor antagonism could be partly ascribed to the

  18. Effect of the selective noradrenergic reuptake inhibitor reboxetine on the firing activity of noradrenaline and serotonin neurons.

    PubMed

    Szabo, S T; Blier, P

    2001-06-01

    Reboxetine is a non-tricyclic antidepressant with selective noradrenergic (NA) reuptake-blocking effects. The effects of acute and sustained administration of reboxetine, on the firing activity of locus coeruleus NA neurons and dorsal raphe 5-HT neurons, were assessed using in vivo extracellular unitary recording in rats anaesthetized with chloral hydrate. Reboxetine (0.1-1.25 mg/kg, i.v.) dose-dependently decreased the firing activity of NA neurons (ED50 = 480 +/- 14 microg/kg). A 2-day treatment with reboxetine at 1.25, 2.5, 5, or 10 mg/kg per day (using osmotic minipumps implanted subcutaneously) produced significant decreases of 52%, 68%, 81%, and 83%, respectively, of NA firing activity. When the reboxetine treatment (2.5 mg/kg per day) duration was prolonged to 7 days, a 66% decrease in NA firing activity was observed which further decreased to 80% after 21 days of treatment. In contrast, 5-HT neuron firing rate remained unaltered following short- and long-term reboxetine treatments. The suppressant effect of the alpha2-adrenoceptor agonist clonidine on the firing activity of NA neurons was unchanged in long-term reboxetine-treated rats, but its effect on the firing activity of 5-HT neurons was blunted. The enhancement of NA firing activity by the 5-HT1A agonist 8-OH-DPAT was abolished in long-term reboxetine-treated rats, whereas, the inhibitory effect of the 5-HT2 agonist DOI was attenuated by about three-fold. In conclusion, sustained NA reuptake blockade by reboxetine lead to profound alterations in the function of NA neurons and of 5-HT receptors modulating their firing activity.

  19. 5-HT1B autoreceptor regulation of serotonin transporter activity in synaptosomes

    PubMed Central

    Hagan, Catherine E.; McDevitt, Ross A.; Liu, Yusha; Furay, Amy R.; Neumaier, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Serotonin-1B (5-HT1B) autoreceptors are located in serotonin (5-HT) terminals along with serotonin transporters (SERT), and play a critical role in autoregulation of serotonergic neurotransmission, and are implicated in disorders of serotonergic function, particularly emotional regulation. SERT modulates serotonergic neurotransmission by high-affinity reuptake of 5-HT. Alterations in SERT activity are associated with increased risk for depression and anxiety. Several neurotransmitter receptors are known to regulate SERT Km and Vmax, and previous work suggests that 5-HT1B autoreceptors may regulate 5-HT reuptake, in addition to modulating 5-HT release and synthesis. We used rotating disk electrode voltammetry to investigate 5-HT1B autoreceptor regulation of SERT-mediated 5-HT uptake into synaptosomes. The selective 5-HT1B antagonist SB224289 decreased SERT activity in synaptosomes prepared from wild-type but not 5-HT1B knockout mice, whereas SERT uptake was enhanced after pre-treatment with the selective 5-HT1B agonist CP94253. Furthermore, SERT activity varies as a function of 5-HT1B receptor expression—specifically, genetic deletion of 5-HT1B decreased SERT function, while viral-mediated overexpression of 5-HT1B autoreceptors in rat raphe neurons increased SERT activity in rat hippocampal synaptosomes. Considered collectively, these results provide evidence that 5-HT1B autoreceptors regulate SERT activity. Since SERT clearance rate varies as a function of 5-HT1B autoreceptor expression levels and is modulated by both activation and inhibition of 5-HT1B autoreceptors, this dynamic interaction may be an important mechanism of serotonin autoregulation with therapeutic implications. PMID:22961814

  20. Long-term treatment with fluoxetine induces desensitization of 5-HT4 receptor-dependent signalling and functionality in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Rebeca; Valdizán, Elsa M; Mostany, Ricardo; Pazos, Angel; Castro, Elena

    2009-08-01

    The mode of action of antidepressant drugs may be related to mechanisms of monoamines receptor adaptation, including serotonin 5-HT(4) receptor subtypes. Here we investigated the effects of repeated treatment with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine for 21 days (5 and 10 mg/kg, p.o., once daily) on the sensitivity of 5-HT(4) receptors by using receptor autoradiography, adenylate cyclase assays and extracellular recording techniques in rat brain. Fluoxetine treatment decreased the density of 5-HT(4) receptor binding in the CA1 field of hippocampus as well as in several areas of the striatum over the doses of 5-10 mg/kg. In a similar way, we found a significant lower response to zacopride-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in the fluoxetine 10 mg/kg/day treated group. Furthermore, post-synaptic 5-HT(4) receptor activity in hippocampus-measured as the excitatory action of zacopride in the pyramidal cells of CA1 evoked by Schaffer collateral stimulation was attenuated in rats treated with both doses of fluoxetine. Taken together, these results support the concept that a net decrease in the signalization pathway of 5-HT(4) receptors occurs after chronic selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor treatment: this effect may underlie the therapeutic efficacy of these drugs.

  1. Day/night variation of 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid concentration in rat cerebrospinal fluid after acute and long-term administration of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, fluvoxamine.

    PubMed

    Egashira, T; Takayama, F; Yamanaka, Y; Takada, K; Takeda, H; Matsumiya, T

    2000-08-01

    When 30 mg/kg, p.o. of fluvoxamine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, was administered, significant increases of 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG) and 5-hydroxy indole-3-acetic acid (5-HIAA) contents in rat cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were observed from two days after administration of fluvoxamine in both the light and dark periods and in the dark period of the light/dark cycle, respectively. In long-term treatment with 15 mg/kg, p.o. of fluvoxamine, the level of MHPG in CSF exhibited no difference, whereas the levels of 5-HIAA showed a significant increase during the light periods. These results suggest that fluvoxamine enhances the 5-HT system, but only with long-term treatment.

  2. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors and Violent Crime: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Molero, Yasmina; Lichtenstein, Paul; Zetterqvist, Johan; Gumpert, Clara Hellner; Fazel, Seena

    2015-01-01

    Background Although selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are widely prescribed, associations with violence are uncertain. Methods and Findings From Swedish national registers we extracted information on 856,493 individuals who were prescribed SSRIs, and subsequent violent crimes during 2006 through 2009. We used stratified Cox regression analyses to compare the rate of violent crime while individuals were prescribed these medications with the rate in the same individuals while not receiving medication. Adjustments were made for other psychotropic medications. Information on all medications was extracted from the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register, with complete national data on all dispensed medications. Information on violent crime convictions was extracted from the Swedish national crime register. Using within-individual models, there was an overall association between SSRIs and violent crime convictions (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.19, 95% CI 1.08–1.32, p < 0.001, absolute risk = 1.0%). With age stratification, there was a significant association between SSRIs and violent crime convictions for individuals aged 15 to 24 y (HR = 1.43, 95% CI 1.19–1.73, p < 0.001, absolute risk = 3.0%). However, there were no significant associations in those aged 25–34 y (HR = 1.20, 95% CI 0.95–1.52, p = 0.125, absolute risk = 1.6%), in those aged 35–44 y (HR = 1.06, 95% CI 0.83–1.35, p = 0.666, absolute risk = 1.2%), or in those aged 45 y or older (HR = 1.07, 95% CI 0.84–1.35, p = 0.594, absolute risk = 0.3%). Associations in those aged 15 to 24 y were also found for violent crime arrests with preliminary investigations (HR = 1.28, 95% CI 1.16–1.41, p < 0.001), non-violent crime convictions (HR = 1.22, 95% CI 1.10–1.34, p < 0.001), non-violent crime arrests (HR = 1.13, 95% CI 1.07–1.20, p < 0.001), non-fatal injuries from accidents (HR = 1.29, 95% CI 1.22–1.36, p < 0.001), and emergency inpatient or outpatient treatment for alcohol intoxication or misuse

  3. Association between selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and upper gastrointestinal bleeding: population based case-control study

    PubMed Central

    de Abajo, Francisco José; Rodríguez, Luis Alberto García; Montero, Dolores

    1999-01-01

    Objective To examine the association between selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Design Population based case-control study. Setting General practices included in the UK general practice research database. Subjects 1651 incident cases of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and 248 cases of ulcer perforation among patients aged 40 to 79 years between April 1993 and September 1997, and 10 000 controls matched for age, sex, and year that the case was identified. Interventions Review of computer profiles for all potential cases, and an internal validation study to confirm the accuracy of the diagnosis on the basis of the computerised information. Main outcome measures Current use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or other antidepressants within 30 days before the index date. Results Current exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors was identified in 3.1% (52 of 1651) of patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding but only 1.0% (95 of 10 000) of controls, giving an adjusted rate ratio of 3.0 (95% confidence interval 2.1 to 4.4). This effect measure was not modified by sex, age, dose, or treatment duration. A crude incidence of 1 case per 8000 prescriptions was estimated. A small association was found with non-selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (relative risk 1.4, 1.1 to 1.9) but not with antidepressants lacking this inhibitory effect. None of the groups of antidepressants was associated with ulcer perforation. The concurrent use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs increased the risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding beyond the sum of their independent effects (15.6, 6.6 to 36.6). A smaller interaction was also found between selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and low dose aspirin (7.2, 3.1 to 17.1). Conclusions Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors increase the risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The absolute effect is, however

  4. Perinatal exposure to the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor citalopram alters spatial learning and memory, anxiety, depression, and startle in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Sprowles, Jenna L N; Hufgard, Jillian R; Gutierrez, Arnold; Bailey, Rebecca A; Jablonski, Sarah A; Williams, Michael T; Vorhees, Charles V

    2016-11-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) block the serotonin (5-HT) reuptake transporter (SERT) and increase synaptic 5-HT. 5-HT is also important in brain development; hence when SSRIs are taken during pregnancy there exists the potential for these drugs to affect CNS ontogeny. Prenatal SSRI exposure has been associated with an increased prevalence of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and peripheral 5-HT is elevated in some ASD patients. Perinatal SSRI exposure in rodents has been associated with increased depression and anxiety-like behavior, decreased sociability, and impaired learning in the offspring, behaviors often seen in ASD. The present study investigated whether perinatal exposure to citalopram causes persistent neurobehavioral effects. Gravid Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to two groups and subcutaneously injected twice per day with citalopram (10mg/kg; Cit) or saline (Sal) 6h apart on embryonic day (E)6-21, and then drug was given directly to the pups after delivery from postnatal day (P)1-20. Starting on P60, one male/female from each litter was tested in the Cincinnati water maze (CWM) and open-field before and after MK-801. A second pair from each litter was tested in the Morris water maze (MWM) and open-field before and after (+)-amphetamine. A third pair was tested as follows: elevated zero-maze, open-field, marble burying, prepulse inhibition of acoustic startle, social preference, and forced swim. Cit-exposed rats were impaired in the MWM during acquisition and probe, but not during reversal, shift, or cued trials. Cit-exposed rats also showed increased marble burying, decreased time in the center of the open-field, decreased latency to immobility in forced swim, and increased acoustic startle across prepulse intensities with no effects on CWM. The results are consistent with citalopram inducing several ASD-like effects. The findings add to concerns about use of SSRIs during pregnancy. Further research on different classes of

  5. Physiological, pathophysiological and therapeutic roles of 5-HT systems in learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Meneses, A

    1998-01-01

    Multiple 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptors have been identified (5-HT1A/1B/1D/1E/1F, 5-HT2A/2B/2C, 5-HT3A/3B, 5-HT4A/4B, 5-HT5A/5B, 5-HT6 and 5-HT7A/7B/7C/7D) and extensive evidence suggests that 5-HT receptors have a role in learning and memory. Indeed, available evidence strongly supports physiological, pathophysiological and therapeutic roles of 5-HT systems in cognitive processes, although the evidence seems incomplete. Indeed, there has been a clear tendency to use pre-learning administration most frequently, whereas post-learning and pre-retention administration protocols have been utilized in only a few studies, and probably this trend has led to missed relevant information. For instance, when pre- vs post-training administration of 5-HT1A agonist, 5-HT2 antagonists and 5-HT4 agonists have been compared contrasting findings were reported in aversive and appetitive learning tasks. Emerging evidence also indicates that 5-HT1A and 5-HT4 receptor agonists, as well as, 5-HT1A antagonists, 5-HT2 antagonists, 5-HT3 antagonists and 5-HT uptake inhibitors may have therapeutic utility in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease and amnesia. Inasmuch as the activation or blockade of diverse 5-HT receptors is able to modulate cognitive processes, and 5-HT uptake inhibition could have therapeutic applications in the treatment of cognitive disorders, it seems evident that the role of 5-HT in learning and memory is more complex than a simple imbalance. Consequently, the notion that activation of the 5-HT systems impairs performance, whereas reduced serotonergic function may facilitate learning, must be reconsidered.

  6. Possible roles of 5-HT in vein graft failure due to intimal hyperplasia 5-HT, nitric oxide and vein graft.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Akio; Itoh, Takeo; Komori, Kimihiro

    2014-02-01

    For vascular occlusive disease, an autologous vein graft is the most suitable conduit for arterial reconstruction. Intimal hyperplasia, resulting from the migration and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells, is a major obstacle to patency after vein grafting. The degree to which the function of nitric oxide (NO) in the vein graft is preserved has been reported to be associated with the magnitude of intimal hyperplasia. Serotonin (5-HT) is released from platelets in the vascular system and plays physiological roles in controlling the vascular tone. The subtype receptors contributing to the 5-HT-induced mechanical responses vary by vessel type (artery and vein) and among species (dogs, rabbits, rats, and so on). Recent studies have demonstrated that 5-HT induces vasoconstriction through the activation of 5-HT2A receptors in smooth muscle cells or vasodilatation through the activation of endothelial 5-HT1B receptors in arteries from various animals. However, the effects of 5-HT have not been clarified in grafted veins. We herein demonstrate the responses to 5-HT in un-operated veins and then autogenous vein grafts. Next, we describe the effects of chronic in vivo administration of Rho-kinase inhibitors and 5-HT2A receptor antagonists, both of which reduce the 5-HT-induced contraction and intimal hyperplasia in vein grafts. Further studies targeting 5-HT are required to evaluate its possible benefits for autologous vein grafts with respect to vasospasm, function, and patency.

  7. 5-HT2 receptor blockade exhibits 5-HT vasodilator effects via nitric oxide, prostacyclin and ATP-sensitive potassium channels in rat renal vasculature.

    PubMed

    García-Pedraza, J A; García, M; Martín, M L; Rodríguez-Barbero, A; Morán, A

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether orally sarpogrelate (selective 5-HT2 antagonist) treatment (30 mg/kg/day; 14 days) could modify 5-HT renal vasoconstrictor responses, characterizing 5-HT receptors and mediator mechanisms involved in serotonergic responses in the in situ autoperfused rat kidney. Intra-arterial (i.a.) injections of 5-HT (0.00000125 to 0.1 μg/kg) decreased renal perfusion pressure (RPP) but did not affect the mean blood pressure (MBP). i.a. agonists 5-CT (5-HT1/7), CGS-12066B (5-HT1B), L-694,247 (5-HT1D) or AS-19 (5-HT7) mimicked renal 5-HT vasodilator effect. However, neither 8-OH-DPAT (5-HT1A) nor 1-phenylbiguanide (5-HT3) modified RPP. Moreover: (i) GR-55562 (5-HT1B antagonist) and L-NAME (nitric oxide synthase [NOS] inhibitor) blocked CGS-12066B-induced vasodilator response, (ii) LY310762 (5-HT1D antagonist) and indomethacin (non-selective cyclooxygenase inhibitor) blocked L-694,247-induced vasodilator response; (iii) SB-258719 (5-HT7 antagonist) and glibenclamide (ATP-sensitive K+ channel blocker) blocked AS-19-induced vasodilator response; and (iv) 5-HT- or 5-CT-elicited renal vasodilation was significantly blocked by the mixture of GR-55562 + LY310762 + SB-258719. Furthermore, eNOS and iNOS proteins and prostacyclin levels are overexpressed in sarpogrelate-treated rats. Our data suggest that 5-HT exerts renal vasodilator effect in the in situ autoperfused sarpogrelate-treated rat kidney, mediated by 5-HT1D, 5-HT1B and 5-HT7 receptors, involving cyclooxygenase-derived prostacyclin, nitric oxide synthesis/release and ATP-sensitive K+ channels, respectively.

  8. Commentary: Considerations on the Pharmacological Treatment of Compulsions and Stereotypies with Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors in Pervasive Developmental Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, C. T.

    2000-01-01

    This commentary discusses study results that indicate the nonselective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SRI) clomipramine is more efficacious than the relatively selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor desipramine and placebo in treating repetitive or ritualized behaviors in children with autism. The need for concurrent genetic and biochemical…

  9. Selective siRNA-mediated suppression of 5-HT1A autoreceptors evokes strong anti-depressant-like effects.

    PubMed

    Bortolozzi, A; Castañé, A; Semakova, J; Santana, N; Alvarado, G; Cortés, R; Ferrés-Coy, A; Fernández, G; Carmona, M C; Toth, M; Perales, J C; Montefeltro, A; Artigas, F

    2012-06-01

    Depression is a major health problem worldwide. Most prescribed anti-depressants, the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) show limited efficacy and delayed onset of action, partly due to the activation of somatodendritic 5-HT(1A)-autoreceptors by the excess extracellular serotonin (5-HT) produced by SSRI in the raphe nuclei. Likewise, 5-HT(1A) receptor (5-HT(1A)R) gene polymorphisms leading to high 5-HT(1A)-autoreceptor expression increase depression susceptibility and decrease treatment response. In this study, we report on a new treatment strategy based on the administration of small-interfering RNA (siRNA) to acutely suppress 5-HT(1A)-autoreceptor-mediated negative feedback mechanisms. We developed a conjugated siRNA (C-1A-siRNA) by covalently binding siRNA targeting 5-HT(1A) receptor mRNA with the SSRI sertraline in order to concentrate it in serotonin axons, rich in serotonin transporter (SERT) sites. The intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) infusion of C-1A-siRNA to mice resulted in its selective accumulation in serotonin neurons. This evoked marked anti-depressant-like effects in the forced swim and tail suspension tests, but did not affect anxiety-like behaviors in the elevated plus-maze. In parallel, C-1A-siRNA administration markedly decreased 5-HT(1A)-autoreceptor expression and suppressed 8-OH-DPAT-induced hypothermia (a pre-synaptic 5-HT(1A)R effect in mice) without affecting post-synaptic 5-HT(1A)R expression in hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. Moreover, i.c.v. C-1A-siRNA infusion augmented the increase in extracellular serotonin evoked by fluoxetine in prefrontal cortex to the level seen in 5-HT(1A)R knockout mice. Interestingly, intranasal C-1A-siRNA administration produced the same effects, thus opening the way to the therapeutic use of C-1A-siRNA. Hence, C-1A-siRNA represents a new approach to treat mood disorders as monotherapy or in combination with SSRI.

  10. Effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors on in vitro fertilization outcome.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Brooke E; Rogers, Jayna L; Shahine, Lora K; Westphal, Lynn M; Lathi, Ruth B

    2009-10-01

    A review of 950 patients was performed to investigate the impact of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) on in vitro fertilization outcome. The 41 patients (4.3%) taking an SSRI had a higher cycle cancellation rate but no statistically significant difference in pregnancy rate and live birth rate per cycle started.

  11. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor-Induced Sexual Dysfunction in Adolescents: A Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scharko, Alexander M.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To review the existing literature on selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI)-induced sexual dysfunction in adolescents. Method: A literature review of SSRI-induced adverse effects in adolescents focusing on sexual dysfunction was done. Nonsexual SSRI-induced adverse effects were compared in adult and pediatric populations.…

  12. In Utero Exposure to Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors and Risk for Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gidaya, Nicole B.; Lee, Brian K.; Burstyn, Igor; Yudell, Michael; Mortensen, Erik L.; Newschaffer, Craig J.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated whether there is an association between increased risk for autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) used during pregnancy. This study used Denmark's health and population registers to obtain information regarding prescription drugs, ASD diagnosis, and health and socioeconomic status. There…

  13. Anhedonia Predicts Poorer Recovery among Youth with Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Treatment-Resistant Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMakin, Dana L.; Olino, Thomas M.; Porta, Giovanna; Dietz, Laura J.; Emslie, Graham; Clarke, Gregory; Wagner, Karen Dineen; Asarnow, Joan R.; Ryan, Neal D.; Birmaher, Boris; Shamseddeen, Wael; Mayes, Taryn; Kennard, Betsy; Spirito, Anthony; Keller, Martin; Lynch, Frances L.; Dickerson, John F.; Brent, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To identify symptom dimensions of depression that predict recovery among selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment-resistant adolescents undergoing second-step treatment. Method: The Treatment of Resistant Depression in Adolescents (TORDIA) trial included 334 SSRI treatment-resistant youth randomized to a medication…

  14. Deletion of Munc18-1 in 5-HT Neurons Results in Rapid Degeneration of the 5-HT System and Early Postnatal Lethality

    PubMed Central

    Dudok, Jacobus J.; Groffen, Alexander J. A.; Toonen, Ruud F. T.; Verhage, Matthijs

    2011-01-01

    The serotonin (5-HT) system densely innervates many brain areas and is important for proper brain development. To specifically ablate the 5-HT system we generated mutant mice carrying a floxed Munc18-1 gene and Cre recombinase driven by the 5-HT-specific serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT) promoter. The majority of mutant mice died within a few days after birth. Immunohistochemical analysis of brains of these mice showed that initially 5-HT neurons are formed and the cortex is innervated with 5-HT projections. From embryonic day 16 onwards, however, 5-HT neurons started to degenerate and at postnatal day 2 hardly any 5-HT projections were present in the cortex. The 5-HT system of mice heterozygous for the floxed Munc18-1 allele was indistinguishable from control mice. These data show that deletion of Munc18-1 in 5-HT neurons results in rapid degeneration of the 5-HT system and suggests that the 5-HT system is important for postnatal survival. PMID:22140524

  15. Metabolic and Cardiovascular Benefits and Risks of EMD386088—A 5-HT6 Receptor Partial Agonist and Dopamine Transporter Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Kotańska, Magdalena; Śniecikowska, Joanna; Jastrzębska-Więsek, Magdalena; Kołaczkowski, Marcin; Pytka, Karolina

    2017-01-01

    Since 5-HT6 receptors play role in controlling feeding and satiety and dopamine is essential for normal feeding behavior, we evaluated the ability of EMD 386088—5-HT6 receptor partial agonist and dopamine transporter inhibitor—to reduce body weight in obese rats, as well as its anorectic properties (calorie intake reduction) in rat model of excessive eating and the influence on metabolism (plasma glucose and glycerol levels). We also determined the effect of the studied compound on pica behavior in rats and its influence on blood pressure after single administration. EMD 386088 reduced body weight in obese rats fed high-fat diet and decreased calorie intake in both models applied (rat model of obesity and of excessive eating). In both models EMD 386088 regulated plasma glucose and increased plasma glycerol levels. The latter proves that the compound reduced body fat. We think that it might have increased lipolysis, but this requires further studies. The reduction in glucose levels is the first symptom of metabolic disorders compensation. EMD 386088 did not cause pica behavior in rats but increased blood pressure after single administration. We think that partial 5-HT6 agonists might have potential in the treatment of obesity. Thus, EMD 386088 requires extended studies. PMID:28228713

  16. Triple reuptake inhibitors as potential next-generation antidepressants: a new hope?

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Horrick; Santra, Soumava; Dutta, Aloke

    2015-01-01

    The current therapy for depression is less than ideal with remission rates of only 25–35% and a slow onset of action with other associated side effects. The persistence of anhedonia originating from depressed dopaminergic activity is one of the most treatment-resistant symptoms of depression. Therefore, it has been hypothesized that triple reuptake inhibitors (TRIs) with potency to block dopamine reuptake in addition to serotonin and norepinephrine transporters should produce higher efficacy. The current review comprehensively describes the development of TRIs and discusses the importance of evaluation of in vivo transporter occupancy of TRIs, which should correlate with efficacy in humans. PMID:26619226

  17. Antidepressant activity: contribution of brain microdialysis in knock-out mice to the understanding of BDNF/5-HT transporter/5-HT autoreceptor interactions

    PubMed Central

    Gardier, Alain M.

    2013-01-01

    Why antidepressants vary in terms of efficacy is currently unclear. Despite the leadership of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in the treatment of depression, the precise neurobiological mechanisms involved in their therapeutic action are poorly understood. A better knowledge of molecular interactions between monoaminergic system, pre- and post-synaptic partners, brain neuronal circuits and regions involved may help to overcome limitations of current treatments and identify new therapeutic targets. Intracerebral in vivo microdialysis (ICM) already provided important information about the brain mechanism of action of antidepressants first in anesthetized rats in the early 1990s, and since then in conscious wild-type or knock-out mice. The principle of ICM is based on the balance between release of neurotransmitters (e.g., monoamines) and reuptake by selective transporters [e.g., serotonin transporter for serotonin 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)]. Complementary to electrophysiology, this technique reflects pre-synaptic monoamines release and intrasynaptic events corresponding to ≈80% of whole brain tissue content. The inhibitory role of serotonergic autoreceptors infers that they limit somatodendritic and nerve terminal 5-HT release. It has been proposed that activation of 5-HT1A and 5-HT1B receptor sub-types limits the antidepressant-like activity of SSRIs. This hypothesis is based partially on results obtained in ICM experiments performed in naïve, non-stressed rodents. The present review will first remind the principle and methodology of ICM performed in mice. The crucial need of developing animal models that display anxiety and depression-like behaviors, neurochemical and brain morphological phenotypes reminiscent of these mood disorders in humans, will be underlined. Recently developed genetic mouse models have been generated to independently manipulate 5-HT1A auto and heteroreceptors and ICM helped to clarify the role of the pre-synaptic component

  18. Clinical effects of pharmacological variations in selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors: an overview.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, J L; Sandner, C

    2005-12-01

    Although the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) class of antidepressants shares a common primary pharmacology, namely the inhibition of serotonin reuptake, their secondary pharmacology is remarkably heterogeneous. Inhibition of serotonin reuptake and the consequent increase in serotonin availability are responsible for the relief of depressive symptoms and for some of the adverse effects of this class of drugs. Transsynaptic effects such as modulation of signalling cascades, gene expression processes and neuroplasticity are also important in the mechanism of action of antidepressants. However, this review shows that secondary properties of the SSRIs may contribute to the differences in efficacy and tolerability between members of the class. For example, fluvoxamine has affinity for sigma(1)-receptors -- a property likely to be responsible for its particular efficacy in delusional depression. By understanding the properties of SSRIs and employing careful selection of agents for individual patients, physicians are more able to tailor antidepressant treatments to their patients' particular circumstances.

  19. A Pharmacological Analysis of an Associative Learning Task: 5-HT1 to 5-HT7 Receptor Subtypes Function on a Pavlovian/Instrumental Autoshaped Memory

    PubMed Central

    Meneses, Alfredo

    2003-01-01

    Recent studies using both invertebrates and mammals have revealed that endogenous serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]) modulates plasticity processes, including learning and memory. However, little is currently known about the mechanisms, loci, or time window of the actions of 5-HT. The aim of this review is to discuss some recent results on the effects of systemic administration of selective agonists and antagonists of 5-HT on associative learning in a Pavlovian/instrumental autoshaping (P/I-A) task in rats. The results indicate that pharmacological manipulation of 5-HT1-7 receptors or 5-HT reuptake sites might modulate memory consolidation, which is consistent with the emerging notion that 5-HT plays a key role in memory formation. PMID:14557609

  20. A pharmacological analysis of an associative learning task: 5-HT(1) to 5-HT(7) receptor subtypes function on a pavlovian/instrumental autoshaped memory.

    PubMed

    Meneses, Alfredo

    2003-01-01

    Recent studies using both invertebrates and mammals have revealed that endogenous serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]) modulates plasticity processes, including learning and memory. However, little is currently known about the mechanisms, loci, or time window of the actions of 5-HT. The aim of this review is to discuss some recent results on the effects of systemic administration of selective agonists and antagonists of 5-HT on associative learning in a Pavlovian/instrumental autoshaping (P/I-A) task in rats. The results indicate that pharmacological manipulation of 5-HT1-7 receptors or 5-HT reuptake sites might modulate memory consolidation, which is consistent with the emerging notion that 5-HT plays a key role in memory formation.

  1. The in vivo pharmacological profile of a 5-HT1 receptor agonist, CP-122,288, a selective inhibitor of neurogenic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Gupta, P; Brown, D; Butler, P; Ellis, P; Grayson, K L; Land, G C; Macor, J E; Robson, S F; Wythes, M J; Shepperson, N B

    1995-11-01

    1. The aim of the present study was to investigate the in vivo pharmacological profile of CP-122,288, an indole-derivative with a conformationally restricted N-methylpyrrolidinyl basic side chain in the C-3 position. This C-3 substituent structurally differentiates CP-122,288 from the 5-HT1D receptor agonist sumatriptan, which possesses an N,N-dimethylaminoethyl group. [Formula: see text] 2. When administered prior to electrical stimulation of the trigeminal ganglion, CP-122,288 (0.3-300 ng kg-1, i.v.) produced a dose-related inhibition of plasma protein extravasation in rat dura mater (minimum effective dose, MED, 3 ng kg-1 i.v., P < 0.05; maximal inhibition of plasma extravasation at 30 ng kg-1 i.v., P < 0.01). Sumatriptan produced a similar inhibition of plasma leakage in the dura, but at much higher dose levels (MED, 100 micrograms kg-1 i.v., P < 0.05). Thus, CP-122,288 is of the order of 10(4) fold more potent than sumatriptan. 3. At all doses tested, CP-122,288 did not inhibit plasma protein extravasation measured in extracranial tissues such as the lower lip, eyelid, and conjunctiva. 4. In a separate series of studies in the anaesthetized rat, CP-122,288 (0.003-3 micrograms kg-1 i.v.) produced no change in either heart rate or mean arterial blood pressure, thus demonstrating that doses of CP-122,288 which inhibit plasma protein leakage in rat dura, are devoid of hemodynamic effects. 5. Following a 5 min period of electrical stimulation of the trigeminal ganglion, a 20 min period of sustained neurogenically-driven plasma extravasation, occurring in the absence of electrical stimulation, was initiated. By administration of the compound 5 min after completing the phase of electrical stimulation, this protocol permitted the evaluation of the activity of CP-122,288 on an ongoing and established inflammatory event. CP-122,288 (30 and 300 ng kg-1, i.v., P < 0.01 and P < 0.05, respectively) produced a complete inhibition of plasma protein leakage which was

  2. Effectiveness of ipsapirone, a 5-HT-1A partial agonist, in major depressive disorder: support for the role of 5-HT-1A receptors in the mechanism of action of serotonergic antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Stephen M.; Kaiser, Lee; Roeschen, Julie; Keppel Hesselink, Jan M.; Orazem, John

    1998-07-01

    Desensitisation of serotonin 1A (5-HT-1A) receptors is a leading hypothesis for the mechanism of action of antidepressants which block serotonin reuptake. This hypothesis predicts that direct-acting 5-HT-1A agonists should also exhibit anti-depressant properties. Here we report the results of the first large-scale controlled study of the efficacy and tolerability of a 5-HT-1A agonist in outpatients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Three hundred and seventy-three subjects meeting DSM-III-R criteria for MDD participated in this randomised, double-blind comparison of the 5-HT-1A partial agonist ipsapirone (5 mg, 7.5 mg and 10 mg t.i.d.) to placebo t.i.d. Improvement in depressive symptoms relative to placebo, as measured by the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, occurred in the ipsapirone (7.5 mg t.i.d.) group with a magnitude of effect (D=-2.53 points) that was statistically significant (p=0.010). Adverse events occurred in 76% of the placebo patients and 92% of the ipsapirone patients. A dose-related increase in the incidence of adverse events led to discontinuation of treatment with the 10 mg t.i.d. Results of this study demonstrate that ipsapirone, at a dose of 7.5 mg t.i.d., is an effective antidepressant agent in the treatment of MDD, supporting the hypothesised role of 5-HT-1A receptors in the mechanism of action of serotonin reuptake inhibitors. However, as a potential therapeutic agent for depression, ipsapirone shows only a modest magnitude of drug-placebo differences as well as a side-effect profile less favorable than many of the newer antidepressants.

  3. Serotonin (5-HT) 5-HT2A Receptor (5-HT2AR):5-HT2CR Imbalance in Medial Prefrontal Cortex Associates with Motor Impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Anastasio, Noelle C; Stutz, Sonja J; Fink, Latham H L; Swinford-Jackson, Sarah E; Sears, Robert M; DiLeone, Ralph J; Rice, Kenner C; Moeller, F Gerard; Cunningham, Kathryn A

    2015-07-15

    A feature of multiple neuropsychiatric disorders is motor impulsivity. Recent studies have implicated serotonin (5-HT) systems in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in mediating individual differences in motor impulsivity, notably the 5-HT2AR receptor (5-HT2AR) and 5-HT2CR. We investigated the hypothesis that differences in the ratio of 5-HT2AR:5-HT2CR protein expression in mPFC would predict the individual level of motor impulsivity and that the engineered loss of the 5-HT2CR would result in high motor impulsivity concomitant with elevated 5-HT2AR expression and pharmacological sensitivity to the selective 5-HT2AR antagonist M100907. High and low impulsive rats were identified in a 1-choice serial reaction time task. Native protein levels of the 5-HT2AR and the 5-HT2CR predicted the intensity of motor impulsivity and the 5-HT2AR:5-HT2CR ratio in mPFC positively correlated with levels of premature responses in individual outbred rats. The possibility that the 5-HT2AR and 5-HT2CR act in concert to control motor impulsivity is supported by the observation that high phenotypic motor impulsivity associated with a diminished mPFC synaptosomal 5-HT2AR:5-HT2CR protein:protein interaction. Knockdown of mPFC 5-HT2CR resulted in increased motor impulsivity and triggered a functional disruption of the local 5-HT2AR:5-HT2CR balance as evidenced by a compensatory upregulation of 5-HT2AR protein expression and a leftward shift in the potency of M100907 to suppress impulsive behavior. We infer that there is an interactive relationship between the mPFC 5-HT2AR and 5-HT2CR, and that a 5-HT2AR:5-HT2CR imbalance may be a functionally relevant mechanism underlying motor impulsivity.

  4. Serotonin (5-HT) 5-HT2A Receptor (5-HT2AR):5-HT2CR Imbalance in Medial Prefrontal Cortex Associates with Motor Impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Anastasio, Noelle C.; Stutz, Sonja J.; Fink, Latham H. L.; Swinford-Jackson, Sarah E.; Sears, Robert M; DiLeone, Ralph J.; Rice, Kenner C.; Moeller, F. Gerard; Cunningham, Kathryn A.

    2016-01-01

    A feature of multiple neuropsychiatric disorders is motor impulsivity. Recent studies have implicated serotonin (5-HT) systems in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in mediating individual differences in motor impulsivity, notably the 5-HT2AR receptor (5-HT2AR) and 5-HT2CR. We investigated the hypothesis that differences in the ratio of 5-HT2AR:5-HT2CR protein expression in mPFC would predict the individual level of motor impulsivity and that the engineered loss of the 5-HT2CR would result in high motor impulsivity concomitant with elevated 5-HT2AR expression and pharmacological sensitivity to the selective 5-HT2AR antagonist M100907. High and low impulsive rats were identified in a 1-choice serial reaction time task. Native protein levels of the 5-HT2AR and the 5-HT2CR predicted the intensity of motor impulsivity and the 5-HT2AR:5-HT2CR ratio in mPFC positively correlated with levels of premature responses in individual outbred rats. The possibility that the 5-HT2AR and 5-HT2CR act in concert to control motor impulsivity is supported by the observation that high phenotypic motor impulsivity associated with a diminished mPFC synaptosomal 5-HT2AR:5-HT2CR protein:protein interaction. Knockdown of mPFC 5-HT2CR resulted in increased motor impulsivity and triggered a functional disruption of the local 5-HT2AR:5-HT2CR balance as evidenced by a compensatory upregulation of 5-HT2AR protein expression and a leftward shift in the potency of M100907 to suppress impulsive behavior. We infer that there is an interactive relationship between the mPFC 5-HT2AR and 5-HT2CR, and that a 5-HT2AR:5-HT2CR imbalance may be a functionally-relevant mechanism underlying motor impulsivity. PMID:26120876

  5. Japanese experience with milnacipran, the first serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi, Teruhiko; Briley, Mike

    2007-01-01

    Milnacipran is a serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI), with a balanced potency for the inhibition of the reuptake of the two monoamines. In this, it contrasts with venlafaxine and duloxetine which, while possessing a dual action, have a selectivity of the order of 30-fold and 10-fold respectively for the reuptake of serotonin. Milnacipran has mainly been launched in countries where the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and venlafaxine had been established for several years. As such it has attracted relative little interest from clinician investigators as a research tool. Japan, however, represents a unique situation because in 1999 milnacipran was launched within months of the first SSRI and is still the only SNRI in Japan together with only two SSRIs (a third has just been introduced). This has led to a large number of investigative clinical studies, many of which give interesting insights into the potential of milnacipran in the treatment of depression and of other disorders. This article reviews these Japanese studies with milnacipran. PMID:19300537

  6. Effects of imipramine and bupropion on the duration of immobility of ACTH-treated rats in the forced swim test: involvement of the expression of 5-HT2A receptor mRNA.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Fujitani, Yoshika; Kitagawa, Kouhei; Miyazaki, Toshiaki; Sagara, Hidenori; Kawasaki, Hiromu; Shibata, Kazuhiko; Sendo, Toshiaki; Gomita, Yutaka

    2008-02-01

    We examined the effect of chronic administration of imipramine and bupropion, monoamine reuptake inhibitors, on the duration of immobility in the forced swim test and serotonin (5-HT)(2A) receptor function in the form of 5-HT(2A) receptor mRNA levels in rats chronically treated with adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). The immobility-decreasing effect of bupropion without imipramine did not influence the chronic ACTH treatment. The effect on the expression of 5-HT(2A) receptor mRNA of chronic ACTH treatment was decreased by bupropion, but not imipramine. These results suggest that bupropion has the effect of reducing immobility time in the forced swim test in the tricyclic antidepressant-resistant depressive model induced by chronic ACTH treatment in rats, and that decreased 5-HT(2A) receptor mRNA levels may be involved in this phenomenon.

  7. Synthesis and molecular modeling of new 1-aryl-3-[4-arylpiperazin-1-yl]-1-propane derivatives with high affinity at the serotonin transporter and at 5-HT(1A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Orús, Lara; Pérez-Silanes, Silvia; Oficialdegui, Ana-M; Martínez-Esparza, Javier; Del Castillo, Juan-C; Mourelle, Marisa; Langer, Thierry; Guccione, Salvatore; Donzella, Giuseppina; Krovat, Eva M; Poptodorov, Konstantin; Lasheras, Berta; Ballaz, Santiago; Hervías, Isabel; Tordera, Rosa; Del Río, Joaquín; Monge, Antonio

    2002-09-12

    It has been proposed that 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonists augment the antidepressant efficacy of selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitors. In a search toward new and efficient antidepressants, 1-(aryl)-3-[4-arylpiperazin-1-yl]-1-propane molecular hybrids were designed, synthesized, and evaluated for 5-HT reuptake inhibition and 5-HT(1A) receptor affinity. The design was based in coupling structural moieties related to inhibition of serotonin reuptake, such as benzo[b]thiophene derivatives to arylpiperazines, typical 5-HT(1A) receptor ligands. In binding studies, several compounds showed affinity at the 5-HT transporter and at 5-HT(1A) receptors. Molecular modeling studies predicted the pharmacophore elements required for high affinity binding and the features that enable to discriminate between agonist, partial agonist, or antagonist action at 5-HT(1A) receptors and 5-HT transporter inhibition. Solvent interactions in desolvation prior to the binding step along with enthalpy and enthropy compensations might be responsible to explain agonist, partial agonist, and antagonist character. Hydrogen-bonding capability seems to be important to break hydrogen interhelical hydrogen bonds or alternatively to form other bonds upon ligand binding. Partial agonists and antagonists are unable to do this as the full agonist, which interacts closely by long-range forces or directly. The compounds showing the higher affinity at both the 5-HT transporter (K(i) < 50 nM) and the 5-HT(1A) receptors (K(i) < 20 nM) were further explored for their ability to stimulate [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding or to antagonize 8-hydroxy-2-di-n-propylamino-tetralin (8-OH-DPAT)-stimulated [(35)]GTPgammaS binding to rat hippocampal membranes, an index of agonist/antagonist action at 5-HT(1A) receptors, respectively. Compound 8g exhibited agonist activity (EC(50) = 30 nM) in this assay, whereas compounds 7g and 8h,i behaved as weak partial agonists and 7h-j and 8j,l antagonized the R(+)-8-OH

  8. The effect of antenatal depression and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor treatment on nerve growth factor signaling in human placenta.

    PubMed

    Kaihola, Helena; Olivier, Jocelien; Poromaa, Inger Sundström; Åkerud, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Depressive symptoms during pregnancy are common and may have impact on the developing child. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the most prescribed antidepressant treatment, but unfortunately, these treatments can also negatively affect the behavioral development and health of a child during pregnancy. In addition, serotonin (5-HT) exerts neurotrophic actions with thus far not fully known effects in the offspring. The neurotrophic growth factor (NGF) is involved in neuronal cell survival and differentiation, and altered placenta levels have been found to increase the risk for pregnancy complications, similar to those found in women treated with SSRIs. We therefore investigated whether the NGF signaling pathway was altered in the placenta from women treated with SSRIs (n = 12) and compared them with placenta from depressed (n = 12) and healthy mothers (n = 12). Results from immunohistochemical stainings revealed that placental NGF protein levels of SSRI-treated women were increased in both trophoblasts and endothelial cells compared with depressed and control women. In addition, downstream of the NGF receptor TrkA, increased levels of the signaling proteins ROCK2 and phosphorylated Raf-1 were found in stromal cells and a tendency towards increased levels of ROCK2 in trophoblasts and endothelial cells in SSRI-treated women when compared to healthy controls. SSRI-treated women also displayed increased levels of phosphorylated ROCK2 in all placental cell types studied in comparison with depressed and control women. Interestingly, in placental endothelial cells from depressed women, NGF levels were significantly lower compared to control women, but ROCK2 levels were increased compared with control and SSRI-treated women. Taken together, these results show that the NGF signaling and downstream pathways in the placenta are affected by SSRI treatment and/or antenatal depression. This might lead to an altered placental function, although the clinical

  9. A neurobiological hypothesis of treatment-resistant depression - mechanisms for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor non-efficacy.

    PubMed

    Coplan, Jeremy D; Gopinath, Srinath; Abdallah, Chadi G; Berry, Benjamin R

    2014-01-01

    First-line treatment of major depression includes administration of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), yet studies suggest that remission rates following two trials of an SSRI are <50%. The authors examine the putative biological substrates underlying "treatment resistant depression (TRD)" with the goal of elucidating novel rationales to treat TRD. We look at relevant articles from the preclinical and clinical literature combined with clinical exposure to TRD patients. A major focus was to outline pathophysiological mechanisms whereby the serotonin system becomes impervious to the desired enhancement of serotonin neurotransmission by SSRIs. A complementary focus was to dissect neurotransmitter systems, which serve to inhibit the dorsal raphe. We propose, based on a body of translational studies, TRD may not represent a simple serotonin deficit state but rather an excess of midbrain peri-raphe serotonin and subsequent deficit at key fronto-limbic projection sites, with ultimate compromise in serotonin-mediated neuroplasticity. Glutamate, serotonin, noradrenaline, and histamine are activated by stress and exert an inhibitory effect on serotonin outflow, in part by "flooding" 5-HT1A autoreceptors by serotonin itself. Certain factors putatively exacerbate this scenario - presence of the short arm of the serotonin transporter gene, early-life adversity and comorbid bipolar disorder - each of which has been associated with SSRI-treatment resistance. By utilizing an incremental approach, we provide a system for treating the TRD patient based on a strategy of rescuing serotonin neurotransmission from a state of SSRI-induced dorsal raphe stasis. This calls for "stacked" interventions, with an SSRI base, targeting, if necessary, the glutamatergic, serotonergic, noradrenergic, and histaminergic systems, thereby successively eliminating the inhibitory effects each are capable of exerting on serotonin neurons. Future studies are recommended to test this

  10. A Neurobiological Hypothesis of Treatment-Resistant Depression – Mechanisms for Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Non-Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Coplan, Jeremy D.; Gopinath, Srinath; Abdallah, Chadi G.; Berry, Benjamin R.

    2014-01-01

    First-line treatment of major depression includes administration of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), yet studies suggest that remission rates following two trials of an SSRI are <50%. The authors examine the putative biological substrates underlying “treatment resistant depression (TRD)” with the goal of elucidating novel rationales to treat TRD. We look at relevant articles from the preclinical and clinical literature combined with clinical exposure to TRD patients. A major focus was to outline pathophysiological mechanisms whereby the serotonin system becomes impervious to the desired enhancement of serotonin neurotransmission by SSRIs. A complementary focus was to dissect neurotransmitter systems, which serve to inhibit the dorsal raphe. We propose, based on a body of translational studies, TRD may not represent a simple serotonin deficit state but rather an excess of midbrain peri-raphe serotonin and subsequent deficit at key fronto-limbic projection sites, with ultimate compromise in serotonin-mediated neuroplasticity. Glutamate, serotonin, noradrenaline, and histamine are activated by stress and exert an inhibitory effect on serotonin outflow, in part by “flooding” 5-HT1A autoreceptors by serotonin itself. Certain factors putatively exacerbate this scenario – presence of the short arm of the serotonin transporter gene, early-life adversity and comorbid bipolar disorder – each of which has been associated with SSRI-treatment resistance. By utilizing an incremental approach, we provide a system for treating the TRD patient based on a strategy of rescuing serotonin neurotransmission from a state of SSRI-induced dorsal raphe stasis. This calls for “stacked” interventions, with an SSRI base, targeting, if necessary, the glutamatergic, serotonergic, noradrenergic, and histaminergic systems, thereby successively eliminating the inhibitory effects each are capable of exerting on serotonin neurons. Future studies are recommended to test

  11. Novel 3,3-disubstituted pyrrolidines as selective triple serotonin/norepinephrine/dopamine reuptake inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Bannwart, Linda M; Carter, David S; Cai, Hai-Ying; Choy, Jason C; Greenhouse, Robert; Jaime-Figueroa, Saul; Iyer, Pravin S; Lin, Clara J; Lee, Eun Kyung; Lucas, Matthew C; Lynch, Stephen M; Madera, Ann Marie; Moore, Amy; Ozboya, Kerem; Raptova, Lubica; Roetz, Ralf; Schoenfeld, Ryan C; Stein, Karin Ann; Steiner, Sandra; Villa, Marzia; Weikert, Robert J; Zhai, Yansheng

    2008-12-01

    A series of 3,3-disubstituted pyrrolidine monoamine triple reuptake inhibitors were discovered. Analogues with low nanomolar potency, good human in vitro microsomal stability and in vitro permeability, and low drug-drug interaction potential are described. One example showed in vivo anti-depressant-like effects in the mouse tail suspension assay with a minimum effective dose of 30 mg/kg i.p.

  12. Electroacupuncture Restores 5-HT System Deficit in Chronic Mild Stress-Induced Depressed Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Ya; Yang, Xiuyan; Liu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The current study is designed to investigate the antidepressant efficacy of electroacupuncture (EA) treatment by evaluating its effect on the synthesis, metabolism, reuptake, and receptors of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), so as to clarify the molecular mechanisms of EA for antidepression. Materials and Methods. Solitary combined with the chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) was used to establish the rat model with depression. The depressed rats were supplied with EA treatment for 4 weeks, and the behavior change and the following indices including 5-HT, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A), tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH), 5-HT transporter (SERT), 5-HT1A, and 5-HT2A in hippocampus and prefrontal cortex were examined. Results. EA treatment significantly improved the behavior of rats and increased 5-HT level in hippocampus of depressed rats. Similarly, EA treatment could significantly increase protein and mRNA expression of TPH and 5-HT1A during 5-HT synthesis process in hippocampus of depressed rats. However, EA treatment had no effect on the activity of MAO-A and the expression of SERT protein and mRNA. Conclusion. Antidepressant efficacy of EA treatment can be accomplished through enhancing 5-HT synthesis, upregulating 5-HT1A level, and improving 5-HT content in brain and synaptic gaps. PMID:27994633

  13. Fluoxetine potentiation of methylphenidate-induced gene regulation in striatal output pathways: potential role for 5-HT1B receptor.

    PubMed

    Van Waes, Vincent; Ehrlich, Sarah; Beverley, Joel A; Steiner, Heinz

    2015-02-01

    Drug combinations that include the psychostimulant methylphenidate plus a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) such as fluoxetine are increasingly used in children and adolescents. For example, this combination is indicated in the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and depression comorbidity and other mental disorders. Such co-exposure also occurs in patients on SSRIs who use methylphenidate as a cognitive enhancer. The neurobiological consequences of these drug combinations are poorly understood. Methylphenidate alone can produce gene regulation effects that mimic addiction-related gene regulation by cocaine, consistent with its moderate addiction liability. We have previously shown that combining SSRIs with methylphenidate potentiates methylphenidate-induced gene regulation in the striatum. The present study investigated which striatal output pathways are affected by the methylphenidate + fluoxetine combination, by assessing effects on pathway-specific neuropeptide markers, and which serotonin receptor subtypes may mediate these effects. Our results demonstrate that a 5-day repeated treatment with fluoxetine (5 mg/kg) potentiates methylphenidate (5 mg/kg)-induced expression of both dynorphin (direct pathway marker) and enkephalin (indirect pathway). These changes were accompanied by correlated increases in the expression of the 5-HT1B, but not 5-HT2C, serotonin receptor in the same striatal regions. A further study showed that the 5-HT1B receptor agonist CP94253 (3-10 mg/kg) mimics the fluoxetine potentiation of methylphenidate-induced gene regulation. These findings suggest a role for the 5-HT1B receptor in the fluoxetine effects on striatal gene regulation. Given that 5-HT1B receptors are known to facilitate addiction-related gene regulation and behavior, our results suggest that SSRIs may enhance the addiction liability of methylphenidate by increasing 5-HT1B receptor signaling.

  14. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants potentiate methylphenidate (Ritalin)-induced gene regulation in the adolescent striatum.

    PubMed

    Van Waes, Vincent; Beverley, Joel; Marinelli, Michela; Steiner, Heinz

    2010-08-01

    The psychostimulant methylphenidate (Ritalin) is used in conjunction with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in the treatment of medical conditions such as attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder with anxiety/depression comorbidity and major depression. Co-exposure also occurs in patients on SSRIs who use psychostimulant 'cognitive enhancers'. Methylphenidate is a dopamine/norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor that produces altered gene expression in the forebrain; these effects partly mimic gene regulation by cocaine (dopamine/norepinephrine/serotonin reuptake inhibitor). We investigated whether the addition of SSRIs (fluoxetine or citalopram; 5 mg/kg) modified gene regulation by methylphenidate (2-5 mg/kg) in the striatum and cortex of adolescent rats. Our results show that SSRIs potentiate methylphenidate-induced expression of the transcription factor genes zif268 and c-fos in the striatum, rendering these molecular changes more cocaine-like. Present throughout most of the striatum, this potentiation was most robust in its sensorimotor parts. The methylphenidate + SSRI combination also enhanced behavioral stereotypies, consistent with dysfunction in sensorimotor striatal circuits. In so far as such gene regulation is implicated in psychostimulant addiction, our findings suggest that SSRIs may enhance the addiction potential of methylphenidate.

  15. Chronic escitalopram treatment caused dissociative adaptation in serotonin (5-HT) 2C receptor antagonist-induced effects in REM sleep, wake and theta wave activity.

    PubMed

    Kostyalik, Diána; Kátai, Zita; Vas, Szilvia; Pap, Dorottya; Petschner, Péter; Molnár, Eszter; Gyertyán, István; Kalmár, Lajos; Tóthfalusi, László; Bagdy, Gyorgy

    2014-03-01

    Several multi-target drugs used in treating psychiatric disorders, such as antidepressants (e.g. agomelatine, trazodone, nefazodone, amitriptyline, mirtazapine, mianserin, fluoxetine) or most atypical antipsychotics, have 5-hydroxytryptamine 2C (5-HT2C) receptor-blocking property. Adaptive changes in 5-HT2C receptor-mediated functions are suggested to contribute to therapeutic effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants after weeks of treatment, at least in part. Beyond the mediation of anxiety and other functions, 5-HT2C receptors are involved in sleep regulation. Anxiety-related adaptive changes caused by antidepressants have been studied extensively, although sleep- and electroencephalography (EEG)-related functional studies are still lacking. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of chronic SSRI treatment on 5-HT2C receptor antagonist-induced functions in different vigilance stages and on quantitative EEG (Q-EEG) spectra. Rats were treated with a single dose of the selective 5-HT2C receptor antagonist SB-242084 (1 mg/kg, i.p.) or vehicle at the beginning of passive phase following a 20-day-long SSRI (escitalopram; 10 mg/kg/day, osmotic minipump) or VEHICLE pretreatment. Fronto-parietal electroencephalogram, electromyogram and motility were recorded during the first 3 h of passive phase. We found that the chronic escitalopram pretreatment attenuated the SB-242084-caused suppression in rapid eye movement sleep (REMS). On the contrary, the 5-HT2C receptor antagonist-induced elevations in passive wake and theta (5-9 Hz) power density during active wake and REMS were not affected by the SSRI. In conclusion, attenuation in certain, but not all vigilance- and Q-EEG-related functions induced by the 5-HT2C receptor antagonist, suggests dissociation in 5-HT2C receptor adaptation.

  16. Serotonin (5-HT) regulates neurite outgrowth through 5-HT1A and 5-HT7 receptors in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Paulina S; Neira, David; Muñoz, Mauricio; Lavandero, Sergio; Fiedler, Jenny L

    2014-08-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) production and expression of 5-HT receptors (5-HTRs) occur early during prenatal development. Recent evidence suggests that, in addition to its classical role as a neurotransmitter, 5-HT regulates neuronal connectivity during mammalian development by modulating cell migration and neuronal cytoarchitecture. Given the variety of 5-HTRs, researchers have had difficulty clarifying the specific role of each receptor subtype in brain development. Signalling mediated by the G-protein-coupled 5-HT1A R and 5-HT7 R, however, has been associated with neuronal plasticity. Thus, we hypothesized that 5-HT promotes neurite outgrowth through 5-HT1A R and 5-HT7 R. The involvement of 5-HT1A R and 5-HT7 R in the morphology of rat hippocampal neurons was evaluated by treating primary cultures at 2 days in vitro with 5-HT and specific antagonists for 5-HT1A R and 5-HT7 R (WAY-100635 and SB269970, respectively). The stimulation of hippocampal neurons with 100 nM 5-HT for 24 hr produced no effect on either the number or the length of primary neurites. Nonetheless, after 5HT7 R was blocked, the addition of 5-HT increased the number of primary neurites, suggesting that 5HT7 R could inhibit neuritogenesis. In contrast, 5-HT induced secondary neurite outgrowth, an effect inhibited by 1 μM WAY-100635 or SB269970. These results suggest that both serotonergic receptors participate in secondary neurite outgrowth. We conclude that 5-HT1A R and 5-HT7 R regulate neuronal morphology in primary hippocampal cultures by promoting secondary neurite outgrowth.

  17. Evidence for 5-HT1B/1D and 5-HT2A receptors mediating constriction of the canine internal carotid circulation

    PubMed Central

    Centurión, David; Ortiz, Mario I; Sánchez-López, Araceli; De Vries, Peter; Saxena, Pramod R; Villalón, Carlos M

    2001-01-01

    The present study has investigated the preliminary pharmacological profile of the receptors mediating vasoconstriction to 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in the internal carotid bed of vagosympathectomised dogs. One minute intracarotid infusions of the agonists 5-HT (0.1–10 μg min−1), sumatriptan (0.3–10 μg min−1; 5-HT1B/1D), 5-methoxytryptamine (1–100 μg min−1; 5-HT1, 5-HT2, 5-HT4, 5-ht6 and 5-HT7) or DOI (0.31–10 μg min−1; 5-HT2), but not 5-carboxamidotryptamine (0.01–0.3 μg min−1; 5-HT1, 5-ht5A and 5-HT7), 1-(m-chlorophenyl)-biguanide (mCPBG; 1–1000 μg min−1; 5-HT3) or cisapride (1–1000 μg min−1; 5-HT4), resulted in dose-dependent decreases in internal carotid blood flow, without changing blood pressure or heart rate. The vasoconstrictor responses to 5-HT, which remained unaffected after saline, were resistant to blockade by i.v. administration of the antagonists ritanserin (100 μg kg−1; 5-HT2A/2B/2C) in combination with tropisetron (3000 μg kg−1; 5-HT3/4) or the cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin (5000 μg kg−1), but were abolished by the 5-HT1B/1D receptor antagonist, GR127935 (30 μg kg−1). Interestingly, after administration of GR127935, the subsequent administration of ritanserin unmasked a dose-dependent vasodilator component. GR127935 or saline did not practically modify the vasoconstrictor effects of 5-MeO-T. In animals receiving GR127935, the subsequent administration of ritanserin abolished the vasoconstrictor responses to 5-MeO-T unmasking a dose-dependent vasodilator component. The vasoconstriction induced by sumatriptan was antagonized by GR127935, but not by ritanserin. Furthermore, ritanserin (100 μg kg−1) or ketanserin (100 μg kg−1; 5-HT2A), but not GR127935, abolished DOI-induced vasoconstrictor responses. The above results suggest that 5-HT-induced internal carotid vasoconstriction is predominantly mediated by 5-HT1B/1D and 5-HT2A receptors

  18. Milnacipran: a selective serotonin and norepinephrine dual reuptake inhibitor for the management of fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Robert H; Periclou, Antonia; Banerjee, Pradeep

    2010-08-01

    Milnacipran, a serotonin and norepinephrfrine reuptake inhibitor with preferential inhibition of norepinephrine reuptake over serotonin, is approved in the United States for the management of fibromyalgia. Owing to its effects on norepinephrine and serotonin, as well as its lack of activity at other receptor systems, it was hypothesized that milnacipran would provide improvements in pain and other fibromyalgia symptoms without some of the unpleasant side effects associated with other medications historically used for treating fibromyalgia. The clinical safety and efficacy of milnacipran 100 and 200 mg/day in individuals with fibromyalgia has been investigated in four large, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies and three long-term extension studies. The clinical studies used composite responder analyses to identify the proportion of individual patients reporting simultaneous and clinically significant improvements in pain, global status, and physical function, in addition to assessing improvement in various symptom domains such as fatigue and dyscognition. In the clinical studies, patients receiving milnacipran reported significant improvements in pain and other symptoms for up to 15 months of treatment. Most adverse events were mild to moderate in severity and were related to the intrinsic pharmacologic properties of the drug. Long-term exposure to milnacipran did not result in any new safety concerns. As with other serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, increases in heart rate and blood pressure have been observed in some patients with milnacipran treatment.

  19. The R-enantiomer of citalopram counteracts escitalopram-induced increase in extracellular 5-HT in the frontal cortex of freely moving rats.

    PubMed

    Mørk, A; Kreilgaard, M; Sánchez, C

    2003-08-01

    The selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitor, citalopram, is a racemic mixture of an S(+)- and R(-)-enantiomer, escitalopram and R-citalopram, respectively. The present study compares the effects of escitalopram, R-citalopram and citalopram on extracellular levels of 5-HT in the frontal cortex of freely moving rats. In addition, co-injection of escitalopram and R-citalopram (ratios 1:2 and 1:4) were assessed. In some experiments escitalopram and R-citalopram were infused into the frontal cortex by reverse microdialysis. Finally, the extracellular level of escitalopram in the frontal cortex was studied after administration of escitalopram alone or in combination with R-citalopram. Escitalopram (1.0-3.9 mg/kg, s.c.) produced a greater maximal increase in extracellular 5-HT than citalopram (2.0-8.0 mg/kg, s.c.). R-citalopram (15.6 mg/kg s.c.) did not affect the 5-HT levels. When co-injected, R-citalopram counteracted the escitalopram-induced increase in extracellular 5-HT levels. Local infusion of the two enantiomers into the frontal cortex produced a similar inhibitory response. R-citalopram did not influence the extracellular levels of escitalopram and therefore does not exert its effect via a pharmacokinetic interaction with escitalopram. In conclusion, the 5-HT-reuptake inhibitory activity of citalopram resides in escitalopram, and the R-enantiomer counteracts this effect. This observation would predict an improved clinical profile of escitalopram compared to citalopram.

  20. Distinct effects of the serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors milnacipran and venlafaxine on rat pineal monoamines.

    PubMed

    Muneoka, Katsumasa; Kuwagata, Makiko; Ogawa, Tetsuo; Shioda, Seiji

    2015-06-17

    Monoamine systems are involved in the pathology and therapeutic mechanism of depression. The pineal gland contains large amounts of serotonin as a precursor for melatonin, and its activity is controlled by noradrenergic sympathetic nerves. Pineal diurnal activity and its release of melatonin are relevant to aberrant states observed in depression. We investigated the effects on pineal monoamines of serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors, which are widely used antidepressants. Four days of milnacipran treatment led to an increase in noradrenaline and serotonin levels, whereas 4 days of venlafaxine treatment reduced 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid levels; both agents induced an increase in dopamine levels. Our data suggest that milnacipran increases levels of the precursor for melatonin synthesis by facilitating the noradrenergic regulation of pineal activity and that venlafaxine inhibits serotonin reuptake into noradrenergic terminals on the pineal gland.

  1. Perinatal selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor exposure: impact on brain development and neural plasticity.

    PubMed

    Pawluski, Jodi L

    2012-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) medications are the most common antidepressant treatment used during pregnancy and the postpartum period. Up to 10% of pregnant women are prescribed SSRIs. Serotonin plays an integral part in neurodevelopment, and questions have been raised about the placental transfer of SSRIs and the effects of preventing reuptake of presynaptic serotonin on fetal neurodevelopment. Preclinical data is beginning to document a role of early exposure to SSRIs in long-term developmental outcomes related to a number of brain regions, such as the hippocampus, cortex and cerebellum. To date, the majority of preclinical work has investigated the developmental effects of SSRIs in the offspring of healthy mothers; however, more research is needed on the effects of these medications in the face of maternal adversity. This minireview will highlight emerging evidence from clinical and preclinical studies investigating the impact of perinatal SSRI exposure on brain development and neural plasticity.

  2. Use of selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitors and platelet aggregation inhibitors among individuals with co-occurring atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and depression or anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, J Douglas; Agarwal, Parul; Sambamoorthi, Usha

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Medications commonly used to treat heart disease, anxiety, and depression can interact resulting in an increased risk of bleeding, warranting a cautious approach in medical decision making. This retrospective, descriptive study examined the prevalence and the factors associated with the use of both selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor and platelet aggregation inhibitor among individuals with co-occurring atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and anxiety or depression. Methods: Respondents aged 22 years and older, alive throughout the study period, and diagnosed with co-occurring atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and anxiety or depression (n = 1507) in years 2007 through 2013 of the Medical Expenditures Panel Survey were included. The use of treatment was grouped as follows: selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor and platelet aggregation inhibitor, selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor or platelet aggregation inhibitor, and neither selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor nor platelet aggregation inhibitor. Results: Overall, 16.5% used both selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor and platelet aggregation inhibitor, 61.2% used selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor or platelet aggregation inhibitor, and 22.3% used neither selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor nor platelet aggregation inhibitor. Respondents aged over 65 years (adjusted odds ratio = 1.93 (95% confidence interval = 1.08–3.45)) and having a diagnosis of diabetes (adjusted odds ratio = 1.63 (95% confidence interval = 1.15–2.31)) and hypertension (adjusted odds ratio = 1.84 (95% confidence interval = 1.04–3.27)) were more likely to be prescribed the combination. Conclusion: The drug interaction was prevalent in patients who are already at higher risk of health disparities and worse outcomes thus requiring vigilant evaluation. PMID:28348738

  3. Serotonin-Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitor and Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Use and Risk of Fractures: A new-user cohort study among US adults aged 50 and older

    PubMed Central

    Lanteigne, Amy; Sheu, Yi-han; Stürmer, Til; Pate, Virginia; Azrael, Deb; Swanson, Sonja A.; Miller, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Background Antidepressants may increase the risk of fractures by disrupting sensory-motor function, thereby increasing the risk of falls, and by decreasing bone mineral density and consequently increasing the fall- or impact-related risk of fracture. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants appear to increase fracture risk relative to no treatment, while less is known about the effect of serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) antidepressants, despite SNRIs being prescribed with increasing frequency. No prior study has directly examined how fracture risk differs among patients initiating SNRIs versus those initiating SSRIs. Objective The objective of this study was to assess the effect of SNRI vs. SSRI initiation on fracture rates. Data source Data came from a PharMetrics claims database, 1998–2010, which is comprised of commercial health plan information obtained from managed care plans throughout the US. Methods We constructed a cohort of patients aged 50 years or older initiating either of the two drug classes (SSRI, N=335,146; SNRI, N=61,612). Standardized mortality weighting and Cox proportional hazards regression were used to estimate hazard ratios for fractures by antidepressant class. Results In weighted analyses, the fracture rates were approximately equal in SNRI and SSRI initiators: hazard ratios for the first one and five-year periods following initiation were, respectively, 1.11 (95% CI: 0.92–1.36) and 1.06 (95% CI: 0.90–1.26). For the sub-group of patients with depression who initiated on either SNRIs or SSRIs, those initiating SNRIs had a modestly, but not significantly elevated fracture risk, compared with those who initiated on SSRIs, hazard ratio = 1.31 (95% CI: 0.95–1.79). Conclusions We found no evidence that initiating SNRIs rather than SSRIs materially influenced fracture risk among a cohort of middle-aged and older adults. PMID:25708711

  4. The selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor antidepressant reboxetine: pharmacological and clinical profile.

    PubMed

    Hajós, Mihály; Fleishaker, Joseph C; Filipiak-Reisner, Jacqueline K; Brown, Mark T; Wong, Erik H F

    2004-01-01

    Reboxetine is the first commercially available norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor developed specifically as a first line therapy for major depressive disorder. In vitro and in vivo pharmacological studies indicated that reboxetine methanesulphonate has high affinity and selectivity for the human norepinephrine transporter over the serotonin and dopamine transporters. Pharmacological specificity is further demonstrated by the absence of affinity for 45 transmitter receptors and CNS targets. Pharmacokinetic studies demonstrated that reboxetine is suitable for twice daily administration (8-10 mg/day) and that it exhibits minimal drug-drug interactions. The starting dose of reboxetine should be reduced in the elderly, in patients with renal or hepatic impairment, or in patients receiving potent CYP3A inhibitors. A total of 20 phase II/III clinical studies comprising placebo-controlled, active comparator-controlled and open-label uncontrolled studies in both short-term and long-term treatment of major depression have been conducted. In the treatment of major depression, reboxetine was superior to placebo in 5 of 12 short- or long-term placebo-controlled studies and was comparable in efficacy to active comparators in 3 out of 3 active-controlled studies. Unlike conventional tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), reboxetine had only minimal sedative and cardiovascular liabilities, probably due to increased pharmacological specificity of reboxetine as compared with TCAs. Unlike serotonin reuptake inhibitors, this selective and specific norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor demonstrated a distinct side-effect profile with diminishing sexual dysfunction and GI side effects. The availability of this agent has afforded patients suffering from major depressive disorder a new class of agents to combat the debilitating consequence of this psychiatric disease. The demonstrated pharmacological specificity of this compound has provided the psychopharmacology community with a tool to elucidate

  5. Aging and chronic administration of serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitor citalopram upregulate Sirt4 gene expression in the preoptic area of male mice.

    PubMed

    Wong, Dutt Way; Soga, Tomoko; Parhar, Ishwar S

    2015-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction and cognitive deficits are markers of the aging process. Mammalian sirtuins (SIRT), encoded by sirt 1-7 genes, are known as aging molecules which are sensitive to serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT). Whether the 5-HT system regulates SIRT in the preoptic area (POA), which could affect reproduction and cognition has not been examined. Therefore, this study was designed to examine the effects of citalopram (CIT, 10 mg/kg for 4 weeks), a potent selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor and aging on SIRT expression in the POA of male mice using real-time PCR and immunocytochemistry. Age-related increases of sirt1, sirt4, sirt5, and sirt7 mRNA levels were observed in the POA of 52 weeks old mice. Furthermore, 4 weeks of chronic CIT treatment started at 8 weeks of age also increased sirt2 and sirt4 mRNA expression in the POA. Moreover, the number of SIRT4 immuno-reactive neurons increased with aging in the medial septum area (12 weeks = 1.00 ± 0.15 vs. 36 weeks = 1.68 ± 0.14 vs. 52 weeks = 1.54 ± 0.11, p < 0.05). In contrast, the number of sirt4-immunopositive cells did not show a statistically significant change with CIT treatment, suggesting that the increase in sirt4 mRNA levels may occur in cells in which sirt4 is already being expressed. Taken together, these studies suggest that CIT treatment and the process of aging utilize the serotonergic system to up-regulate SIRT4 in the POA as a common pathway to deregulate social cognitive and reproductive functions.

  6. Aging and chronic administration of serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitor citalopram upregulate Sirt4 gene expression in the preoptic area of male mice

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Dutt Way; Soga, Tomoko; Parhar, Ishwar S.

    2015-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction and cognitive deficits are markers of the aging process. Mammalian sirtuins (SIRT), encoded by sirt 1-7 genes, are known as aging molecules which are sensitive to serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT). Whether the 5-HT system regulates SIRT in the preoptic area (POA), which could affect reproduction and cognition has not been examined. Therefore, this study was designed to examine the effects of citalopram (CIT, 10 mg/kg for 4 weeks), a potent selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor and aging on SIRT expression in the POA of male mice using real-time PCR and immunocytochemistry. Age-related increases of sirt1, sirt4, sirt5, and sirt7 mRNA levels were observed in the POA of 52 weeks old mice. Furthermore, 4 weeks of chronic CIT treatment started at 8 weeks of age also increased sirt2 and sirt4 mRNA expression in the POA. Moreover, the number of SIRT4 immuno-reactive neurons increased with aging in the medial septum area (12 weeks = 1.00 ± 0.15 vs. 36 weeks = 1.68 ± 0.14 vs. 52 weeks = 1.54 ± 0.11, p < 0.05). In contrast, the number of sirt4-immunopositive cells did not show a statistically significant change with CIT treatment, suggesting that the increase in sirt4 mRNA levels may occur in cells in which sirt4 is already being expressed. Taken together, these studies suggest that CIT treatment and the process of aging utilize the serotonergic system to up-regulate SIRT4 in the POA as a common pathway to deregulate social cognitive and reproductive functions. PMID:26442099

  7. 5-HT is a potent relaxant in rat superior mesenteric veins.

    PubMed

    Watts, Stephanie W; Darios, Emma S; Seitz, Bridget M; Thompson, Janice M

    2015-02-01

    Serotonin (5-HT, 5-hydroxytryptamine) reduces blood pressure of the conscious rat when administered chronically (1 week). 5-HT does not directly relax isolated arteries, and microsphere experiments in 5-HT-infused rats suggested that 5-HT increased flow to the splanchnic bed. We hypothesized that 5-HT increased splanchnic flow because of direct venous relaxation; our focus was thus on the superior mesenteric vein (SMV) as an important vein in splanchnic circulation. Real-time RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry and Western analyses supported the predominant expression of the 5-HT2B and 5-HT7 receptor in the SMV. The SMV was mounted in tissue baths for measurement of isometric contraction. 5-HT caused a concentration-dependent relaxation of the endothelin-1 (ET-1)-contracted vein. The threshold of 5-HT-induced venous relaxation was significantly lower than for 5-HT-induced venous contraction (∼2 vs. 700 nmol/L, respectively). A series of serotonergic agonists established in their use of receptor characterization was tested, and the following rank order of potency found for agonist-induced relaxation (receptor selectivity): 5-CT (5-HT1/5-HT7)>5-HT = LP-44 (5-HT7)>PNU109291 (5-HT1D) = BW723C86 (5-HT2B). 8-OH-DPAT (5-HT1A/7), CP93129 (5-HT1B), mCPBG (5-HT3/4), AS19 (5-HT7) and TCB-2 (5-HT2A) did not relax the isolated vein. Consistent with these findings, two different 5-HT7 receptor antagonists SB 269970 and LY215840 but not the 5-HT2B receptor antagonist LY272015 nor the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor LNNA abolished 5-CT-induced relaxation of the isolated SMV. 5-CT (1 μg kg(-1) min(-1), sc) also reduced blood pressure over 7 days. These findings suggest that 5-HT directly relaxes the SMV primarily through activation of the 5-HT7 receptor.

  8. 5-HT is a potent relaxant in rat superior mesenteric veins

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Stephanie W; Darios, Emma S; Seitz, Bridget M; Thompson, Janice M

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT, 5-hydroxytryptamine) reduces blood pressure of the conscious rat when administered chronically (1 week). 5-HT does not directly relax isolated arteries, and microsphere experiments in 5-HT-infused rats suggested that 5-HT increased flow to the splanchnic bed. We hypothesized that 5-HT increased splanchnic flow because of direct venous relaxation; our focus was thus on the superior mesenteric vein (SMV) as an important vein in splanchnic circulation. Real-time RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry and Western analyses supported the predominant expression of the 5-HT2B and 5-HT7 receptor in the SMV. The SMV was mounted in tissue baths for measurement of isometric contraction. 5-HT caused a concentration-dependent relaxation of the endothelin-1 (ET-1)-contracted vein. The threshold of 5-HT-induced venous relaxation was significantly lower than for 5-HT-induced venous contraction (∼2 vs. 700 nmol/L, respectively). A series of serotonergic agonists established in their use of receptor characterization was tested, and the following rank order of potency found for agonist-induced relaxation (receptor selectivity): 5-CT (5-HT1/5-HT7)>5-HT = LP-44 (5-HT7)>PNU109291 (5-HT1D) = BW723C86 (5-HT2B). 8-OH-DPAT (5-HT1A/7), CP93129 (5-HT1B), mCPBG (5-HT3/4), AS19 (5-HT7) and TCB-2 (5-HT2A) did not relax the isolated vein. Consistent with these findings, two different 5-HT7 receptor antagonists SB 269970 and LY215840 but not the 5-HT2B receptor antagonist LY272015 nor the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor LNNA abolished 5-CT-induced relaxation of the isolated SMV. 5-CT (1 μg kg−1 min−1, sc) also reduced blood pressure over 7 days. These findings suggest that 5-HT directly relaxes the SMV primarily through activation of the 5-HT7 receptor. PMID:25692021

  9. Antidepressant-like activity of Tagetes lucida Cav. is mediated by 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Bonilla-Jaime, H; Guadarrama-Cruz, G; Alarcon-Aguilar, F J; Limón-Morales, O; Vazquez-Palacios, G

    2015-10-01

    It has been demonstrated that the aqueous extract of Tagetes lucida Cav. shows an antidepressant-like effect on the forced swimming test (FST) in rats. The aim of this study was to analyze the participation of the serotoninergic system in the antidepressant-like effect of the aqueous extract of T. lucida. Different doses of the extract of T. lucida were administered at 72, 48, 24, 18 and 1 h before FST. The animals were pretreated with a 5-HT1A receptor antagonist (WAY-100635, 0.5 mg/kg), a 5-HT2A receptor antagonist (ketanserin, 5 mg/kg), a β-noradrenergic receptor antagonist (propranolol, 200 mg/kg), and with a α2-noradrenergic receptor antagonist (yohimbine, 1 mg/kg) alone or combined with the extract and pretreated with a serotonin synthesis inhibitor (PCPA) before treatment with 8-OH-DPAT + the extract of T. lucida. In addition, suboptimal doses of the 5-HT1A agonist (8-OH-DPAT) + non-effective dose of extract was analyzed in the FST. To determine the presence of flavonoids, the aqueous extract of T. lucida (20 µl, 4 mg/ml) was injected in HPLC; however, a quercetin concentration of 7.72 mg/g of extract weight was detected. A suboptimal dose of 8-OH-DPAT + extract of T. lucida decreased immobility and increased swimming and climbing. An antidepressant-like effect with the aqueous extract of T. lucida at doses of 100 and 200 mg/kg was observed on the FST with decreased immobility behavior and increased swimming; however, this effect was blocked by WAY-100635, ketanserin and PCPA but not by yohimbine and propranolol, suggesting that the extract of T. lucida could be modulating the release/reuptake of serotonin.

  10. 5-HT1A/1B Receptors as Targets for Optimizing Pigmentary Responses in C57BL/6 Mouse Skin to Stress

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hua-Li; Pang, Si-Lin; Liu, Qiong-Zhen; Wang, Qian; Cai, Min-Xuan; Shang, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Stress has been reported to induce alterations of skin pigmentary response. Acute stress is associated with increased turnover of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) whereas chronic stress causes a decrease. 5-HT receptors have been detected in pigment cells, indicating their role in skin pigmentation. To ascertain the precise role of 5-HT in stress-induced pigmentary responses, C57BL/6 mice were subjected to chronic restraint stress and chronic unpredictable mild stress (CRS and CUMS, two models of chronic stress) for 21 days, finally resulting in abnormal pigmentary responses. Subsequently, stressed mice were characterized by the absence of a black pigment in dorsal coat. The down-regulation of tyrosinase (TYR) and tyrosinase-related proteins (TRP1 and TRP2) expression in stressed skin was accompanied by reduced levels of 5-HT and decreased expression of 5-HT receptor (5-HTR) system. In both murine B16F10 melanoma cells and normal human melanocytes (NHMCs), 5-HT had a stimulatory effect on melanin production, dendricity and migration. When treated with 5-HT in cultured hair follicles (HFs), the increased expression of melanogenesis-related genes and the activation of 5-HT1A, 1B and 7 receptors also occurred. The serum obtained from stressed mice showed significantly decreased tyrosinase activity in NHMCs compared to that from nonstressed mice. The decrease in tyrosinase activity was further augmented in the presence of 5-HTR1A, 1B and 7 antagonists, WAY100635, SB216641 and SB269970. In vivo, stressed mice received 5-HT precursor 5-hydroxy-l-tryptophan (5-HTP), a member of the class of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (fluoxetine; FX) and 5-HTR1A/1B agonists (8-OH-DPAT/CP94253), finally contributing to the normalization of pigmentary responses. Taken together, these data strongly suggest that the serotoninergic system plays an important role in the regulation of stress-induced depigmentation, which can be mediated by 5-HT1A/1B receptors. 5-HT and 5-HTR1A

  11. Effects of serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors on locomotion and prefrontal monoamine release in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Umehara, Masato; Ago, Yukio; Fujita, Kazumi; Hiramatsu, Naoki; Takuma, Kazuhiro; Matsuda, Toshio

    2013-02-28

    Catecholamine neurotransmission in the prefrontal cortex plays a key role in the therapeutic actions of drugs for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Recent clinical studies show that several serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors have potential for treating ADHD. In this study, we examined the effects of acute treatment with serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors on locomotion and the extracellular levels of monoamines in the prefrontal cortex in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), an animal model of ADHD. Adolescent male SHR exhibited greater horizontal locomotion in an open-field test than male WKY control rats. Psychostimulant methylphenidate (0.3 and 1 mg/kg), the selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor atomoxetine (1 and 3 mg/kg), and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors duloxetine (10 mg/kg), venlafaxine (10 and 30 mg/kg) and milnacipran (30 mg/kg) reduced the horizontal activity in SHR, but did not affect in WKY rats. The selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor reboxetine (10 mg/kg) and the tricyclic antidepressant desipramine (10 and 30 mg/kg) also reduced the horizontal activity in SHR, whereas the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor citalopram (30 mg/kg) did not. Microdialysis studies showed that atomoxetine, methylphenidate, duloxetine, venlafaxine, milnacipran, and reboxetine increased the extracellular levels of norepinephrine and dopamine in the prefrontal cortex in SHR. Citalopram did not affect norepinephrine and dopamine levels in the prefrontal cortex, although it increased the serotonin levels. Neither duloxetine nor venlafaxine increased the dopamine levels in the striatum. These findings suggest that serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, similar to methylphenidate and atomoxetine, have potential for ameliorating motor abnormality in the SHR model.

  12. Tricyclic isoxazolines: identification of R226161 as a potential new antidepressant that combines potent serotonin reuptake inhibition and alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonism.

    PubMed

    Andrés, J Ignacio; Alcázar, Jesús; Alonso, José M; Alvarez, Rosa M; Bakker, Margot H; Biesmans, Ilse; Cid, José M; De Lucas, Ana I; Drinkenburg, Wilhelmus; Fernández, Javier; Font, Luis M; Iturrino, Laura; Langlois, Xavier; Lenaerts, Ilse; Martínez, Sonia; Megens, Anton A; Pastor, Joaquín; Pullan, Shirley; Steckler, Thomas

    2007-06-01

    In previous articles we have described the discovery of a new series of tricyclic isoxazolines combining central serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibition with alpha(2)-adrenoceptor antagonistic activity. We report now on the synthesis, the in vitro binding potency and the primary in vivo activity of six enantiomers within this series, one of which was selected for further pharmacological evaluation and assigned as R226161. Some additional in vivo studies in rats are described with this compound, which proved to be centrally and orally active as a combined 5-HT reuptake inhibitor and alpha(2)-adrenoceptor antagonist.

  13. Selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in the aquatic environment: an ecopharmacovigilance approach.

    PubMed

    Silva, Liliana J G; Lino, Celeste M; Meisel, Leonor M; Pena, Angelina

    2012-10-15

    Selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) antidepressants are among the most prescribed pharmaceutical active substances throughout the world. The occurrence of these widely used compounds in different environmental compartments (wastewaters, surface, ground and drinking waters, and sediments), justify the growing concern about these emerging environmental pollutants. Viewing an ecopharmacovigilance approach, a comprehensive discussion of the state of the art regarding different contamination sources, fate, degradation and occurrence is presented. Information on the current distribution levels and fate in different environmental matrices continues to be sparse and measures are imperative to improve awareness and encourage precautionary actions to minimize SSRIs' environmental impact.

  14. [HYPERPROLACTINEMIA AND SELECTIVE SEROTONIN REUPTAKE INHIBITORS. A NARRATIVE REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE].

    PubMed

    Rosón-González, Mirian; Tajima-Pozo, Kazuhiro; Montañés-Rada, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    A large number of scientific papers have reported the relationship between the development of hyperprolactinemia and the use of psychotropic drugs, especially the role of antipsychotics which are antidopaminergic drugs. However, less information is known about the role of antidepressants in the development of hyperprolactinemia, specially the selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). The prevalence of hyperprolactinemia as a pharmacological side effect of SSRIs is still unknown, despite the widespread use over the last decade. The aim of this review is to explore the relationship between hyperprolactinemia and SSRIs.

  15. Exacerbation of migraine attacks during treatment with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor sertraline. A case report.

    PubMed

    Bickel, A; Kornhuber, J; Maihöfner, C; Ropohl, A

    2005-11-01

    Abnormal signal transmission in central serotonergic pathways is supposed to play an important role in the pathogenesis of migraine and major depression. We report on a patient, who was treated during an episode of depression with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) sertraline and developed frequent migraine attacks under this therapeutical regime. Single migraine attacks were treated successfully with triptanes. Although SSRIs may be beneficial for migraine prophylaxis at long term administration, this case suggests that acute administration of SSRIs in migraineurs may include the risk of worsening migraine.

  16. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Use during Pregnancy and the Risk of Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Boukhris, Takoua; Bérard, Anick

    2015-01-01

    Antidepressants are widely used during pregnancy. Several studies have shown that the use of antidepressants during pregnancy is linked to adverse outcomes, including congenital malformations, prematurity, and low birth weight. However, there is a knowledge gap regarding the potential association between gestational exposure to antidepressants and the risk of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The etiology of ASD remains unclear, although studies have implicated genetic predispositions and environmental risk factors in the development of ASD in children. In this review, we describe the association between gestational use of antidepressants, specifically selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and the risk of ASD. PMID:27617119

  17. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors for the Treatment of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Jennifer Schoelles; Moore, Thea; Collins, Candace L.; Thomas, Kerry-Ann E.

    2003-01-01

    The introduction of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) has been a major advance in pediatric psychiatry, while contemporary advances in the understanding of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) phenomenon in children have facilitated its identification and treatment. Currently, fluvoxamine and sertraline are the only SSRIs that have received FDA approval for the treatment of childhood OCD. The purpose of this article is to review the safety and efficacy of SSRIs in the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) in children and adolescents. PMID:23118677

  18. Increasing spinal 5-HT2A receptor responsiveness mediates anti-allodynic effect and potentiates fluoxetine efficacy in neuropathic rats. Evidence for GABA release.

    PubMed

    Dupuis, Amandine; Wattiez, Anne-Sophie; Pinguet, Jérémy; Richard, Damien; Libert, Frédéric; Chalus, Maryse; Aissouni, Youssef; Sion, Benoit; Ardid, Denis; Marin, Philippe; Eschalier, Alain; Courteix, Christine

    2017-04-01

    Antidepressants are one of the first line treatments for neuropathic pain but their use is limited by the incidence and severity of side effects of tricyclics and the weak effectiveness of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Serotonin type 2A (5-HT2A) receptors interact with PDZ proteins that regulate their functionality and SSRI efficacy to alleviate pain. We investigated whether an interfering peptide (TAT-2ASCV) disrupting the interaction between 5-HT2A receptors and associated PDZ proteins would improve the treatment of traumatic neuropathic allodynia. Tactile allodynia was assessed in spinal nerve ligation-induced neuropathic pain in rats using von Frey filaments after acute treatment with TAT-2ASCV and/or 5-HT2A receptor agonist, alone or in combination with repeated treatment with fluoxetine. In vivo microdialysis was performed in order to examine the involvement of GABA in TAT-2ASCV/fluoxetine treatment-associated analgesia. TAT-2ASCV (100ng, single i.t. injection) improved SNL-induced tactile allodynia by increasing 5-HT2A receptor responsiveness to endogenous 5-HT. Fluoxetine alone (10mg/kg, five i.p. injections) slightly increased tactile thresholds and its co-administration with TAT-2ASCV (100ng, single i.t. injection) further enhanced the anti-allodynic effect. This effect depends on the integrity of descending serotonergic bulbospinal pathways and spinal release of GABA. The anti-allodynic effect of fluoxetine can be enhanced by disrupting 5-HT2A receptor-PDZ protein interactions. This enhancement depends on 5-HT2A receptor activation, spinal GABA release and GABAA receptor activation.

  19. 5-HT(1A)-receptor over-expressing mice: genotype and sex dependent responses to antidepressants in the forced swim-test.

    PubMed

    Günther, Lydia; Rothe, Julia; Rex, André; Voigt, Jörg-Peter; Millan, Mark J; Fink, Heidrun; Bert, Bettina

    2011-09-01

    Deficiencies in serotonergic neurotransmission are involved in the pathophysiology of depression. Due to its modulatory effect on serotonin (5-HT) release, the 5-HT(1A)-receptor is thought to play a decisive role in the therapy of this mood disorder. However, it is not fully understood how antidepressant effects are mediated by pre- and postsynaptic receptor sites. In this study we examined the impact of postsynaptic 5-HT(1A)-receptor over-expression in corticolimbic areas of male and female mice on the performance in the forced swim-test (FST). Furthermore, we investigated their response to the serotonin selective reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) citalopram in comparison to the selective noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor reboxetine, as well as the partial 5-HT(1A)-receptor agonists, buspirone and S 15535. Additionally, these drugs were evaluated in the open field-test in order to observe effects on motor activity. The density of 5-HT(1A)-receptors in discrete corticolimbic regions was determined in detail by quantitative autoradiography with [(3)H]8-OH-DPAT to investigate genotype as well as sex dependent differences in the expression pattern. [(3)H]8-OH-DPAT binding differed depending on sex with female mice of both genotypes displaying higher receptor binding in distinct brain areas. In the FST untreated male but not female over-expressing (OE) mice showed an antidepressant-like behaviour compared to wild-type (WT) mice. Citalopram yielded an antidepressant effect without influencing locomotor activity in OE mice but not in WT mice. Reboxetine had no antidepressant-like effect in OE mice, but sex-dependently in WT mice. The two partial agonists, buspirone and S 15535 produced no antidepressant-like activity in both genotypes and sexes, but aberrant motor effects. The antidepressant-like phenotype of male transgenic mice accounts for an involvement of postsynaptic 5-HT(1A)-receptors in the FST behaviour. In addition, the selective over-expression of postsynaptic 5-HT(1A

  20. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor sertraline: its profile and use in psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    MacQueen, G; Born, L; Steiner, M

    2001-01-01

    The naphthylamine derivative sertraline is a potent and selective inhibitor of serotonin reuptake into presynaptic terminals. Sertraline has a linear pharmacokinetic profile and a half-life of about 26 h. Its major metabolite, desmethylsertraline does not appear to inhibit serotonin reuptake. Sertraline mildly inhibits the CYP2D6 isoform of the cytochrome P450 system but has little effect on CYP1A2, CYP3A3/4, CYP2C9, or CYP2C19. It is, however, highly protein bound and may alter blood levels of other highly protein bound agents. Sertraline is a widely used serotonin reuptake inhibitor that has been shown to have both antidepressant and antianxiety effects. Many clinical trials have demonstrated its efficacy in depression compared with both placebo and other antidepressant drugs. Its efficacy has also been demonstrated in randomized, controlled trials of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder, panic disorder, social phobia, and premenstrual dysphoric disorder. In short-term, open-label studies it has appeared efficacious and tolerable in children and adolescents and in the elderly, and data are positive for its use in pregnant or lactating women. Typical side effects include gastrointestinal and central nervous system effects as well as treatment-emergent sexual dysfunction; withdrawal reactions may be associated with abrupt discontinuation of the agent. The safety profile of sertraline in overdose is very favorable. Sertraline's efficacy for both mood and anxiety disorders, relatively weak effect on the cytochrome P450 system, and tolerability profile and safety in overdose are factors that contribute to make it a first-line agent for treatment in both primary and tertiary care settings.

  1. 5-HT Radioligands for Human Brain Imaging With PET and SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, Louise M.; Kornum, Birgitte R.; Nutt, David J.; Pike, Victor W.; Knudsen, Gitte M.

    2014-01-01

    The serotonergic system plays a key modulatory role in the brain and is the target for many drug treatments for brain disorders either through reuptake blockade or via interactions at the 14 subtypes of 5-HT receptors. This review provides the history and current status of radioligands used for positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) imaging of human brain serotonin (5-HT) receptors, the 5-HT transporter (SERT), and 5-HT synthesis rate. Currently available radioligands for in vivo brain imaging of the 5-HT system in humans include antagonists for the 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT2A, and 5-HT4 receptors, and for SERT. Here we describe the evolution of these radioligands, along with the attempts made to develop radioligands for additional serotonergic targets. We describe the properties needed for a radioligand to become successful and the main caveats. The success of a PET or SPECT radioligand can ultimately be assessed by its frequency of use, its utility in humans, and the number of research sites using it relative to its invention date, and so these aspects are also covered. In conclusion, the development of PET and SPECT radioligands to image serotonergic targets is of high interest, and successful evaluation in humans is leading to invaluable insight into normal and abnormal brain function, emphasizing the need for continued development of both SPECT and PET radioligands for human brain imaging. PMID:21674551

  2. 5-HT systems: emergent targets for memory formation and memory alterations.

    PubMed

    Meneses, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Drugs acting through 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin or 5-HT) systems modulate memory and its alterations, although the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. 5-HT drugs may present promnesic and/or antiamnesic (or even being amnesic) effects. Key questions regarding 5-HT markers include whether receptors directly or indirectly participate and/or contribute to the physiological and pharmacological basis of memory and its pathogenesis; hence, the major aim of this article was to examine recent advances in emergent targets of the 5-HT systems for memory formation and memory alterations. Recent reviews and findings are summarized, mainly in the context of the growing notion of memory deficits in brain disorders (e.g., posttraumatic stress disorder, mild cognitive impairment, consumption of drugs, poststroke cognitive dysfunctions, schizophrenia, Parkinson disease, and infection-induced memory impairments). Mainly, mammalian and (some) human data were the focus. At least agonists and antagonists for 5-HT1A/1B, 5-HT2A/2B/2C, 5-HT3, 5-HT4, 5-HT6, and 5-HT7 receptors as well as serotonin uptake inhibitors seem to have a promnesic and/or antiamnesic effect in different conditions and 5-HT markers seem to be associated to neural changes. Available evidence offers clues about the possibilities, but the exact mechanisms remain unclear. For instance, 5-HT transporter expression seems to be a reliable neural marker related to memory mechanisms and its alterations.

  3. Menthol inhibits 5-HT3 receptor-mediated currents.

    PubMed

    Ashoor, Abrar; Nordman, Jacob C; Veltri, Daniel; Yang, Keun-Hang Susan; Shuba, Yaroslav; Al Kury, Lina; Sadek, Bassem; Howarth, Frank C; Shehu, Amarda; Kabbani, Nadine; Oz, Murat

    2013-11-01

    The effects of alcohol monoterpene menthol, a major active ingredient of the peppermint plant, were tested on the function of human 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 (5-HT3) receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. 5-HT (1 μM)-evoked currents recorded by two-electrode voltage-clamp technique were reversibly inhibited by menthol in a concentration-dependent (IC50 = 163 μM) manner. The effects of menthol developed gradually, reaching a steady-state level within 10-15 minutes and did not involve G-proteins, since GTPγS activity remained unaltered and the effect of menthol was not sensitive to pertussis toxin pretreatment. The actions of menthol were not stereoselective as (-), (+), and racemic menthol inhibited 5-HT3 receptor-mediated currents to the same extent. Menthol inhibition was not altered by intracellular 1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid injections and transmembrane potential changes. The maximum inhibition observed for menthol was not reversed by increasing concentrations of 5-HT. Furthermore, specific binding of the 5-HT3 antagonist [(3)H]GR65630 was not altered in the presence of menthol (up to 1 mM), indicating that menthol acts as a noncompetitive antagonist of the 5-HT3 receptor. Finally, 5-HT3 receptor-mediated currents in acutely dissociated nodose ganglion neurons were also inhibited by menthol (100 μM). These data demonstrate that menthol, at pharmacologically relevant concentrations, is an allosteric inhibitor of 5-HT3 receptors.

  4. Methylenedioxymethamphetamine induces spontaneous tail-flicks in the rat via 5-HT1A receptors.

    PubMed

    Millan, M J; Colpaert, F C

    1991-02-07

    In rats lightly restrained in horizontal cylinders, (+/-)-3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) dose dependently (0.16-10.0 mg/kg, s.c.) elicited spontaneous tail-flicks; that is, tail-flicks in the absence of extraneous stimulation. In contrast, amphetamine over a similar dose-range was inactive. Selective inhibitors of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) uptake and carrier-mediated 5-HT release, paroxetine and citalopram, did not induce spontaneous tail-flicks themselves and blocked those induced by MDMA. In distinction, maprotiline and bupropion, selective inhibitors of noradrenaline and dopamine uptake, respectively, failed to modify the action of MDMA. Spontaneous tail-flicks elicited by MDMA were unaffected by the selective 5-HT3 receptor antagonists, ICS 205,930 and GR 38032F. They were attenuated by the mixed 5-HT1/5-HT2 receptor antagonist, methiotepin, the mixed 5-HT1A/5-HT1B receptor antagonist, (-)-alprenolol and the mixed 5-HT1A/5-HT2 receptor antagonist, spiperone, but not by the selective 5-HT1C/5-HT2 receptor antagonists, ritanserin, ICI 169,369 and ketanserin. The novel 5-HT1A receptor antagonists, BMY 7378 and NAN-190, each abolished MDMA-evoked spontaneous tail-flicks. Selective D1, D2, alpha 1, alpha 2, beta 1 and beta 2 antagonists had little influence upon induction of spontaneous tail-flicks by MDMA. These data indicate that MDMA evokes spontaneous tail-flicks in the rat via a release of 5-HT which acts at 5-HT1A receptors. Thus, 5-HT1A receptors appear to be involved in the acute functional actions of MDMA.

  5. Novel Azido-Iodo Photoaffinity Ligands for the Human Serotonin Transporter Based on the Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor (S)-Citalopram

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Three photoaffinity ligands (PALs) for the human serotonin transporter (hSERT) were synthesized based on the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), (S)-citalopram (1). The classic 4-azido-3-iodo-phenyl group was appended to either the C-1 or C-5 position of the parent molecule, with variable-length linkers, to generate ligands 15, 22, and 26. These ligands retained high to moderate affinity binding (Ki = 24–227 nM) for hSERT, as assessed by [3H]5-HT transport inhibition. When tested against Ser438Thr hSERT, all three PALs showed dramatic rightward shifts in inhibitory potency, with Ki values ranging from 3.8 to 9.9 μM, consistent with the role of Ser438 as a key residue for high-affinity binding of many SSRIs, including (S)-citalopram. Photoactivation studies demonstrated irreversible adduction to hSERT by all ligands, but the reduced (S)-citalopram inhibition of labeling by [125I]15 compared to that by [125I]22 and [125I]26 suggests differences in binding mode(s). These radioligands will be useful for characterizing the drug–protein binding interactions for (S)-citalopram at hSERT. PMID:26153715

  6. Novel Azido-Iodo Photoaffinity Ligands for the Human Serotonin Transporter Based on the Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor (S)-Citalopram.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vivek; Yarravarapu, Nageswari; Lapinsky, David J; Perley, Danielle; Felts, Bruce; Tomlinson, Michael J; Vaughan, Roxanne A; Henry, L Keith; Lever, John R; Newman, Amy Hauck

    2015-07-23

    Three photoaffinity ligands (PALs) for the human serotonin transporter (hSERT) were synthesized based on the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), (S)-citalopram (1). The classic 4-azido-3-iodo-phenyl group was appended to either the C-1 or C-5 position of the parent molecule, with variable-length linkers, to generate ligands 15, 22, and 26. These ligands retained high to moderate affinity binding (K(i) = 24-227 nM) for hSERT, as assessed by [(3)H]5-HT transport inhibition. When tested against Ser438Thr hSERT, all three PALs showed dramatic rightward shifts in inhibitory potency, with Ki values ranging from 3.8 to 9.9 μM, consistent with the role of Ser438 as a key residue for high-affinity binding of many SSRIs, including (S)-citalopram. Photoactivation studies demonstrated irreversible adduction to hSERT by all ligands, but the reduced (S)-citalopram inhibition of labeling by [(125)I]15 compared to that by [(125)I]22 and [(125)I]26 suggests differences in binding mode(s). These radioligands will be useful for characterizing the drug-protein binding interactions for (S)-citalopram at hSERT.

  7. Design, synthesis, and biological activities of 1-aryl-1,4-diazepan-2-one derivatives as novel triple reuptake inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Honda, Eiji; Ishichi, Yuji; Kimura, Eiji; Yoshikawa, Masato; Kanzaki, Naoyuki; Nakagawa, Hideyuki; Terao, Yasuko; Suzuki, Atsuko; Kawai, Takayuki; Arakawa, Yuuichi; Ohta, Hiroyuki; Terauchi, Jun

    2014-08-15

    A novel series of triple reuptake inhibitors were explored by ligand-based drug design. A cyclic structure was designed from cyclopropane derivative 5 using the core structure of reported monoamine reuptake inhibitors, leading to the formation of the 1-aryl-1,4-diazepan-2-one derivative 23j-S. Compound 23j-S was shown to act as a potent TRI with an excellent ADME-Tox profile. Oral administration of 23j-S significantly enhanced norepinephrine, dopamine, and serotonin levels in the mouse prefrontal cortex and showed significant antidepressant-like activity in tail suspension tests in mouse.

  8. Metabolic interactions of central nervous system medications and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Naranjo, C A; Sproule, B A; Knoke, D M

    1999-05-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are prescribed alone and in combination with other psychotropic medications in the treatment of a variety of psychiatric disorders. Such combinations create the potential for pharmacokinetic interactions by affecting the activity of the cytochromes P450 (CYP450), drug metabolizing oxidative enzymes. SSRIs are not equivalent in their potential for interactions when combined with other central nervous system (CNS) medication. Generally citalopram and sertraline are characterized by weaker inhibition of CYP450 enzymes and, therefore, hold less potential for interaction than the other SSRIs. Paroxetine potently inhibits CYP2D6, which can result in increased neuroleptic serum concentrations, accompanied by increased CNS side-effects. Similarly, as a potent inhibitor of CYP2D6, fluoxetine can increase serum concentrations of neuroleptics and antidepressants and numerous case reports have documented concomitant adverse events. Fluoxetine also inhibits CYP3A and CYP2C19, increasing serum concentrations of some benzodiazepines. Fluvoxamine is a potent inhibitor of CYP1A2, a moderate inhibitor of CYP3A and a mild inhibitor of CYP2D6. Therefore, interactions with clozapine and benzodiazepines are evident.

  9. Some selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors inhibit dynamin I guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase).

    PubMed

    Otomo, Masahiro; Takahashi, Kiyofumi; Miyoshi, Hiroshi; Osada, Kenichi; Nakashima, Hideki; Yamaguchi, Noboru

    2008-08-01

    Neuronal dynamin I plays a critical role in the recycling of synaptic vesicles, and thus in nervous system function. We expressed and purified dynamin I to explore potentially clinically useful endocytosis inhibitors and to examine the mechanism of their action. We estimated the IC(50) of nineteen psychotropic drugs for dynamin I. The IC(50) values of two selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (sertraline and fluvoxamine) were 7.3+/-1.0 and 14.7+/-1.6 microM, respectively. Kinetic analyses revealed that fluvoxamine is a noncompetitive inhibitor of dynamin I guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) with respect to guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP) and a competitive inhibitor with respect to L-phosphatidylserine (PS). Fluvoxamine may compete with PS for binding to the pleckstrin homology domain of dynamin I. On the other hand, sertraline was a mixed type inhibitor with respect to both GTP and PS. Our results indicate that sertraline and fluvoxamine may regulate the transportation of neurotransmitters by modulating synaptic vesicle endocytosis via the inhibition of dynamin I GTPase.

  10. Signalling pathways activated by 5-HT(1B)/5-HT(1D) receptors in native smooth muscle and primary cultures of rabbit renal artery smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Hinton, J M; Hill, P; Jeremy, J; Garland, C

    2000-01-01

    The potential of primary cultures of rabbit renal artery vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) was assessed as a means to investigate the signalling pathways linked to 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) 5-HT(1B)/5-HT(1D) receptors in native arteries. In renal artery segments denuded of endothelium, incubated with ketanserin and prazosin (each 1 microM), and prestimulated with 20 mM K(+) Krebs buffer, 5-HT and CP 93,129, a 5-HT(1B) receptor agonist, evoked concentration-dependent contractions. GR 127935, a 5-HT(1B)/5-HT(1D) receptor antagonist, significantly antagonised 5-HT-evoked contractions at nanomolar concentrations. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of mRNA from smooth muscle cells from the isolated renal artery and from primary cultures of VSMCs from the same artery expressed mRNA transcripts for the 5-HT(1B) receptor and the 5-HT(1D) receptor in both preparations. The sequence of the PCR fragments corresponded to the known sequence for these receptors. Application of 5-HT evoked a concentration-dependent, pertussis toxin (PTx)-sensitive reduction in cyclic AMP in both cultured cells and intact artery (cyclic AMP concentration reduced by 65.53 +/- 3.33 and 52.65 +/- 5.34% from basal with 10 microM 5-HT, respectively). The effect of 10 microM 5-HT on cAMP was increased in the presence of 20 mM K(+) (reduced by 82.50 +/- 2.50 and 87.54 +/- 3.97%, respectively). In intact arteries, contraction through 5-HT(1B)/5-HT(1D) receptors was significantly attenuated by inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (wortmannin) and activated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), MEK (U0126). In the cultured VSMCs, activated MAPK was identified by immunocytochemistry and immunoblotting after stimulation with 5-HT, but only if 20 mM K(+) was present at the onset of stimulation. These data provide the first direct evidence that 5-HT(1B)/5-HT(1B) receptors are linked to the activation of MAPK and indicate that primary cultures of renal VSMCs could provide a

  11. Constitutively active 5-HT2/α1 receptors facilitate muscle spasms after human spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    D'Amico, Jessica M.; Murray, Katherine C.; Li, Yaqing; Chan, K. Ming; Finlay, Mark G.; Bennett, David J.

    2013-01-01

    In animals, the recovery of motoneuron excitability in the months following a complete spinal cord injury is mediated, in part, by increases in constitutive serotonin (5-HT2) and norepinephrine (α1) receptor activity, which facilitates the reactivation of calcium-mediated persistent inward currents (CaPICs) without the ligands serotonin and norepinephrine below the injury. In this study we sought evidence for a similar role of constitutive monoamine receptor activity in the development of spasticity in human spinal cord injury. In chronically injured participants with partially preserved sensory and motor function, the serotonin reuptake inhibitor citalopram facilitated long-lasting reflex responses (spasms) previously shown to be mediated by CaPICs, suggesting that in incomplete spinal cord injury, functional descending sources of monoamines are present to activate monoamine receptors below the lesion. However, in participants with motor or motor/sensory complete injuries, the inverse agonist cyproheptadine, which blocks both ligand and constitutive 5-HT2/α1 receptor activity, decreased long-lasting reflexes, whereas the neutral antagonist chlorpromazine, which only blocks ligand activation of these receptors, had no effect. When tested in noninjured control participants having functional descending sources of monoamines, chlorpromazine was effective in reducing CaPIC-mediated motor unit activity. On the basis of these combined results, it appears that in severe spinal cord injury, facilitation of persistent inward currents and muscle spasms is mainly mediated by the activation of constitutive 5-HT2 and α1 receptor activity. Drugs that more selectively block these constitutively active monoamine receptors may provide better oral control of spasticity, especially in motor complete spinal cord injury where reducing motoneuron excitability is the primary goal. PMID:23221402

  12. Levomilnacipran (Fetzima): A New Serotonin-Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitor for the Treatment of Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Saraceni, Megan M; Venci, Jineane V; Gandhi, Mona A

    2014-08-01

    In July 2013, the US Food and Drug Administration approved levomilnacipran extended release (ER; Fetzima), a serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, for the treatment of adults with major depressive disorder. Levomilnacipran is an active enantiomer of the racemic drug milnacipran that is currently approved in the United States for the treatment of fibromyalgia. This article provides an overview of the mechanism of action, pharmacokinetic properties, clinical efficacy, safety, and tolerability of levomilnacipran ER. Relevant information was identified through a search of databases using the key word levomilnacipran. Additional information was obtained from fda.gov, by a review of the reference lists of identified articles, and from posters and abstracts from scientific meetings. Levomilnacipran ER, dosed once daily, is generally well tolerated and has demonstrated favorable effects compared to placebo in clinical trials of patients with major depressive disorder. The increased potency for norepinephrine reuptake inhibition is a characteristic that may represent a novel contribution for levomilnacipran. Additional studies comparing levomilnacipran ER to other commonly prescribed antidepressants are needed to further evaluate its place in therapy.

  13. Mosapride, a selective serotonin 5-HT4 receptor agonist, and alogliptin, a selective dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, exert synergic effects on plasma active GLP-1 levels and glucose tolerance in mice.

    PubMed

    Nonogaki, Katsunori; Kaji, Takao

    2015-12-01

    Pharmacologic stimulation of serotonin 5-HT4 receptors increased plasma active glucagon-like-peptide-1 (GLP-1) levels independent of feeding, and that pharmacologic stimulation of 5-HT4 receptors and pharmacologic inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 exerted synergic effects on plasma active GLP-1 levels and glucose tolerance in mice.

  14. Measuring endogenous 5-HT release by emission tomography: promises and pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, Louise M; Tyacke, Robin J; Nutt, David J; Knudsen, Gitte M

    2010-01-01

    Molecular in vivo neuroimaging techniques can be used to measure regional changes in endogenous neurotransmitters, evoked by challenges that alter synaptic neurotransmitter concentration. This technique has most successfully been applied to the study of endogenous dopamine release using positron emission tomography, but has not yet been adequately extended to other neurotransmitter systems. This review focuses on how the technique has been applied to the study of the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) system. The principles behind visualising fluctuations in neurotransmitters are introduced, with reference to the dopaminergic system. Studies that aim to image acute, endogenous 5-HT release or depletion at 5-HT receptor targets are summarised, with particular attention to studies in humans. Radiotracers targeting the 5-HT1A, 5-HT2A, and 5-HT4 receptors and the serotonin reuptake transporter have been explored for their sensitivity to 5-HT fluctuations, but with mixed outcomes; tracers for these targets cannot reliably image endogenous 5-HT in humans. Shortcomings in our basic knowledge of the mechanisms underlying changes in binding potential are addressed, and suggestions are made as to how the selection of targets, radiotracers, challenge paradigms, and experimental design might be optimised to improve our chances of successfully imaging endogenous neurotransmitters in the future. PMID:20664611

  15. Pharmacogenetics of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in pediatric depression and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Kronenberg, Sefi; Frisch, Amos; Rotberg, Beni; Carmel, Miri; Apter, Alan; Weizman, Abraham

    2008-11-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are now an accepted and widely used first-line treatment for pediatric depression and anxiety. However, the data indicate that SSRI treatment achieves a clinical response in only 55-60% of children, and some may develop drug-induced suicidal behavior. Clinicians have no reliable tools to help them identify in advance those youths who are not likely to respond to an SSRI, or who are likely to develop SSRI-induced suicidality. Pharmacogenetic research attempts to identify genetic markers that are associated with response and side-effect profile. This review covers all the pharmacogenetic studies conducted as yet on pediatric samples and compares them with available data on adult samples. An emphasis is put on serotonergic genes such as the serotonin transporter (5-HTT) and additional genes known to be active in the CNS.

  16. Revisiting serotonin reuptake inhibitors and the therapeutic potential of "uptake-2" in psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Daws, Lynette C; Koek, Wouter; Mitchell, Nathan C

    2013-01-16

    Depression is among the most common psychiatric disorders, and in many patients a disorder for which available medications provide suboptimal or no symptom relief. The most commonly prescribed class of antidepressants, the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), are thought to act by increasing extracellular serotonin in brain by blocking its uptake via the high-affinity serotonin transporter (SERT). However, the relative lack of therapeutic efficacy of SSRIs has brought into question the utility of increasing extracellular serotonin for the treatment of depression. In this Viewpoint, we discuss why increasing extracellular serotonin should not be written off as a therapeutic strategy. We describe how "uptake-2" transporters may explain the relative lack of therapeutic efficacy of SSRIs, as well as why "uptake-2" transporters might be useful therapeutic targets.

  17. Reviewing the serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) footprint in the aquatic biota: uptake, bioaccumulation and ecotoxicology.

    PubMed

    Silva, Liliana J G; Pereira, André M P T; Meisel, Leonor M; Lino, Celeste M; Pena, Angelina

    2015-02-01

    Selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) antidepressants are amongst the most prescribed pharmaceutical active substances throughout the world. Their presence, already described in different environmental compartments such as wastewaters, surface, ground and drinking waters, and sediments, and their remarkable effects on non-target organisms justify the growing concern about these emerging environmental pollutants. A comprehensive review of the literature data with focus on their footprint in the aquatic biota, namely their uptake, bioaccumulation and both acute and chronic ecotoxicology is presented. Long-term multigenerational exposure studies, at environmental relevant concentrations and in mixtures of related compounds, such as oestrogenic endocrine disruptors, continue to be sparse and are imperative to better know their environmental impact.

  18. Augmenting selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors with clomipramine in obsessive-compulsive disorder: benefits and risks.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2013-12-01

    A small body of literature suggests that clomipramine may usefully augment selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) patients who do not respond to SSRI monotherapy. The combination, however, is associated with the risk of clinically significant drug interactions. Clomipramine can raise the blood levels and hence the adverse effects of most SSRIs, and many SSRIs can raise the blood levels and hence the adverse effects of clomipramine. The latter situation is more important because certain dose-dependent adverse effects of clomipramine, such as seizures, can be life-threatening. This article presents an evidence-based discussion of the pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic adverse effects of the SSRI-clomipramine combination along with suggestions for dosing and monitoring when the combination is used in OCD.

  19. Delayed pressure urticaria treated with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor escitalopram.

    PubMed

    Eskeland, S; Tanum, L; Halvorsen, J A

    2016-07-01

    There is increasing evidence of platelet activation and systemic inflammation in chronic spontaneous urticaria and delayed pressure urticaria (DPU). Inflammation may be central to understanding the high comorbidity of depression and anxiety in patients with chronic urticaria (CU). We report a case of DPU and depression in a patient, which responded favourably to treatment with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) escitalopram. Sustained administration of SSRIs is associated with downregulation of serotonin transporters/receptors and depletion of platelet stored serotonin, which may reduce the ability of platelets to aggregate after thrombotic triggers. SSRIs are easier to manage and have significantly less disturbing adverse effects and cardiotoxicity than the tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs). SSRIs may represent an alternative to the traditional use of TCAs in treatment of CU.

  20. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor exposure constricts the mouse ductus arteriosus in utero.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Christopher W; Delaney, Cassidy; Streeter, Taylor; Yarboro, Michael T; Poole, Stanley; Brown, Naoko; Slaughter, James C; Cotton, Robert B; Reese, Jeff; Shelton, Elaine L

    2016-09-01

    Use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) is common during pregnancy. Fetal exposure to SSRIs is associated with persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN); however, a direct link between the two has yet to be established. Conversely, it is well known that PPHN can be caused by premature constriction of the ductus arteriosus (DA), a fetal vessel connecting the pulmonary and systemic circulations. We hypothesized that SSRIs could induce in utero DA constriction. Using isolated vessels and whole-animal models, we sought to determine the effects of two commonly prescribed SSRIs, fluoxetine and sertraline, on the fetal mouse DA. Cannulated vessel myography studies demonstrated that SSRIs caused concentration-dependent DA constriction and made vessels less sensitive to prostaglandin-induced dilation. Moreover, in vivo studies showed that SSRI-exposed mice had inappropriate DA constriction in utero. Taken together, these findings establish that SSRIs promote fetal DA constriction and provide a potential mechanism by which SSRIs could contribute to PPHN.

  1. The use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors during pregnancy and lactation: current knowledge.

    PubMed

    Misri, S; Kostaras, D; Kostaras, X

    2000-04-01

    This article reviews the effects of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) class of antidepressants in pregnant and lactating women for the treatment of depression and anxiety disorders. An examination of the literature was conducted using Medline (1966 to present). Despite methodological concerns and the scarcity of data on this important subject, the majority of recent investigations demonstrate safety of the fetus exposed to SSRIs during pregnancy. All of the SSRIs reported in the studies are excreted into breast milk, and low levels have been found in infant serum. The implications of this for practice include identifying the effects of treatment versus nontreatment on the mother-infant dyad. Further research must examine long-term neurobehavioural teratogenicity in exposed infants.

  2. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor use during pregnancy and possible neonatal complications.

    PubMed

    Cantor Sackett, Jillan; Weller, Ronald A; Weller, Elizabeth B

    2009-06-01

    This paper reviews the risks and benefits of using selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in pregnant women. The effects of SSRI use on pregnant women and fetuses are discussed, and the need for SSRI treatment is explained. Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn, teratogenic risks of SSRI treatment during pregnancy, neonatal adaptations, and long-term outcomes for children whose mothers used SSRIs during pregnancy are specifically considered. Due to conflicting results from current studies, there are no clear guidelines for SSRI treatment in pregnancy. Patients and doctors must discuss together the risks and benefits of SSRI use during pregnancy and decide on a course of treatment. Potential risks must be balanced against the effects of untreated maternal depression.

  3. Fatal serotonin syndrome precipitated by oxcarbazepine in a patient using an selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Dardis, Christopher; Omoregie, Eghosa; Ly, Vanthanh

    2012-07-01

    Oxcarbazepine, a metabolite of carbamazepine, is used as an antiepileptic, analgesic for neuropathic pain and in the treatment of affective disorders. It has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for partial seizures in adults as both adjunctive and monotherapy, and as adjunctive therapy in children aged from 2 to 16 years (http://www.fda.gov/ohrms/dockets/ac/06/briefing/2006-4254b_07_05_KP%20OxcarbazepineFDAlabel102005.pdf). We present a case of serotonin syndrome, which was precipitated by this medicine in a patient who had been predisposed by long-term treatment with sertraline, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor. This is the first reported fatality due to this drug interaction and only the second case of serotonin syndrome reported with oxcarbazepine. Physicians should consider this risk when prescribing the above combination.

  4. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and hyponatraemia: review and proposed mechanisms in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Kirchner, V; Silver, L E; Kelly, C A

    1998-01-01

    The association between selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and hyponatraemia has been well documented, the elderly appearing to be at greatest risk. An analysis of data of hyponatraemia in the elderly using SSRIs from all published cases and from the Committee on Safety of Medicines found that the mean time to detection was about 3 weeks after commencing SSRIs. A wide range of time to detection (1-253 days) and non-specific symptoms suggest hyponatraemia is detected by chance rather than being specifically looked for. In the elderly there are physiological changes, a high prevalence of medical illnesses and concomitant drug use, which may precipitate hyponatraemia. Together with a risk of altered water regulation in psychiatric illness this may account for the particular susceptibility of the elderly to hyponatraemia whilst using SSRIs.

  5. [Susceptibility of the elderly patient to hyponatremia induced by selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Fonzo-Christe, C; Vogt, N

    2000-01-01

    Numerous spontaneous reports of the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) have followed the increased use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI). It has been estimated that 1 in 200 patients treated per year developed SIADH, age and low body weight being particular risk factors. No clear gender effect has been detected when confounding factors such as body weight or antidepressant consumption are taken into account. Age-related susceptibility to hyponatraemia may be explained by physiological changes in renal and endocrine function. The high prevalence of polymedication and pluripathology in the elderly may be a contributing factor as well. To date, no study has demonstrated how SSRIs affect the regulation of fluid/sodium balance nor whether they have an independent effect on this regulation in depressed subjects.

  6. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors for children and adolescents with major depression: current controversies and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Hamrin, Vanya; Scahill, Lawrence

    2005-05-01

    Recent warnings about potential serious adverse effects with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in children and adolescents with depression raises questions about the risk-benefit ratio of these drugs in this population. Published safety and efficacy trials of SSRIs for the treatment of youth with depression are critically reviewed. These data were augmented by information from regulatory hearings in 2003-2004 and selected open-label reports. Based on this review, recommendations for medication treatment and monitoring of children and adolescents with major depression on SSRIs are provided. Emerging data from several clinical trials show that the SSRIs provide moderate benefits for youth with depression. In addition, SSRI treatment may be associated with increased risk of behavioral activation, self-harm, and suicidal ideation. Appropriate use of the SSRIs in children and adolescents requires careful diagnostic assessment, evaluation of comorbidity, and close monitoring, especially early in treatment.

  7. 5-HT2C Receptor Desensitization Moderates Anxiety in 5-HTT Deficient Mice: From Behavioral to Cellular Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Cédric BP; Martin, Vincent S.; Trigo, José M.; Chevarin, Caroline; Maldonado, Rafael; Fink, Latham H.; Cunningham, Kathryn A.; Hamon, Michel; Lanfumey, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    Background: Desensitization and blockade of 5-HT2C receptors (5-HT2CR) have long been thought to be central in the therapeutic action of antidepressant drugs. However, besides behavioral pharmacology studies, there is little in vivo data documenting antidepressant-induced 5-HT2CR desensitization in specific brain areas. Methods: Mice lacking the 5-HT reuptake carrier (5-HTT-/-) were used to model the consequences of chronic 5-HT reuptake inhibition with antidepressant drugs. The effect of this mutation on 5-HT2CR was evaluated at the behavioral (social interaction, novelty-suppressed feeding, and 5-HT2CR–induced hypolocomotion tests), the neurochemical, and the cellular (RT-qPCR, mRNA editing, and c-fos–induced expression) levels. Results: Although 5-HTT-/- mice had an anxiogenic profile in the novelty-suppressed feeding test, they displayed less 5-HT2CR–mediated anxiety in response to the agonist m-chlorophenylpiperazine in the social interaction test. In addition, 5-HT2CR–mediated inhibition of a stress-induced increase in 5-HT turnover, measured in various brain areas, was markedly reduced in 5-HTT-/- mutants. These indices of tolerance to 5-HT2CR stimulation were associated neither with altered levels of 5-HT2CR protein and mRNA nor with changes in pre-mRNA editing in the frontal cortex. However, basal c-fos mRNA production in cells expressing 5-HT2CR was higher in 5-HTT-/- mutants, suggesting an altered basal activity of these cells following sustained 5-HT reuptake carrier inactivation. Furthermore, the increased c-fos mRNA expression in 5-HT2CR–like immune-positive cortical cells observed in wild-type mice treated acutely with the 5-HT2CR agonist RO-60,0175 was absent in 5-HTT-/- mutants. Conclusions: Such blunted responsiveness of the 5-HT2CR system, observed at the cell signaling level, probably contributes to the moderation of the anxiety phenotype in 5-HTT-/- mice. PMID:25522398

  8. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) use during pregnancy and effects on the fetus and newborn: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Lattimore, Keri A; Donn, Steven M; Kaciroti, Niko; Kemper, Alex R; Neal, Charles R; Vazquez, Delia M

    2005-09-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are frequently used to treat depression during pregnancy and the postpartum period. These drugs are capable of crossing the placenta and being transferred to the newborn during lactation. This report reviews the available information regarding the effects of SSRIs on the fetus and newborn; including long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes.

  9. Treatment of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor-Resistant Depression in Adolescents: Predictors and Moderators of Treatment Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asarnow, Joan Rosenbaum; Emslie, Graham; Clarke, Greg; Wagner, Karen Dineen; Spirito, Anthony; Vitiello, Benedetto; Iyengar, Satish; Shamseddeen, Wael; Ritz, Louise; Birmaher, Boris; Ryan, Neal; Kennard, Betsy; Mayes, Taryn; DeBar, Lynn; McCracken, James; Strober, Michael; Suddath, Robert; Leonard, Henrietta; Porta, Giovanna; Keller, Martin; Brent, David

    2009-01-01

    Adolescents who did not improve with Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor (SSRI) were provided an alternative SSRI plus cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). The superiority of the CBT/combined treatment as compared to medication alone is more evident in youths who had more comorbid disorders, no abuse history, and lower hopelessness.

  10. Non-tricyclic/non-selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants and recurrent falls in frail older women

    PubMed Central

    Naples, Jennifer G.; Kotlarczyk, Mary P.; Perera, Subashan; Greenspan, Susan L.; Hanlon, Joseph T.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the risk of recurrent falls associated with antidepressants other than tricyclics (TCAs) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) among frail older women. Design/data source Secondary analysis of the Zoledronic acid in frail Elders to STrengthen bone (ZEST) trial data treated as a longitudinal cohort. Residents/setting 181 frail, osteoporotic women ≥ 65 years old in long-term care. Measurements The primary exposure was individual non-TCA/non-SSRI antidepressants (i.e., serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, mirtazapine, trazodone, and bupropion) at baseline and 6 months. The main outcome was recurrent (≥2) falls within 6 months after antidepressant exposure. Adjusted odds ratios (AOR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were derived using a generalized estimating equations model. Results At least 15% of women experienced recurrent falls between 0–6 or 6–12 months. At baseline and 6 months, 18.2% and 6.9% had a non-TCA/non-SSRI antidepressant, respectively. Adjusting for demographics, health status, and other drugs that increase risk of falls, non-TCA/non-SSRI antidepressant exposure significantly increased the risk of recurrent falls (AOR 2.14, 95% CI 1.01–4.54). Fall risk further increased after removing bupropion from the non-TCA/non-SSRI antidepressant group in sensitivity analyses (AOR 2.73, CI 1.24–6.01). Conclusions Other antidepressant classes may not be safer than TCAs/SSRIs with respect to recurrent falls in frail older women. PMID:27743842

  11. Effect of fluvoxamine on platelet 5-HT2A receptors as studied by [3H]lysergic acid diethylamide ([3H]LSD) binding in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Spigset, O; Mjörndal, T

    1997-09-01

    Alterations in platelet 5-HT2A receptor characteristics have been reported in major depression as well as in other psychiatric diseases, and some effort has been made to utilize platelet 5-HT2A receptor status as a biological correlate to antidepressant drug response. In order to investigate whether treatment with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor affects platelet 5-HT2A receptors, we have studied platelet [3H]lysergic acid diethylamide ([3H]LSD) binding in healthy subjects treated with fluvoxamine in increasing dosage once weekly for 4 weeks. After 1 week of fluvoxamine treatment (25 mg/day), both Bmax and Kd were significantly lower than before the start of the treatment (19.9 versus 25.5 fmol/mg protein, P = 0.005 for Bmax; 0.45 versus 0.93 nM, P = 0.006 for Kd). Bmax returned to baseline during week 2, whereas Kd was lower than the baseline value throughout the treatment period. After discontinuation of fluvoxamine treatment, there was a significant increase in Kd (0.50 nM before discontinuation vs. 1.14 nM after discontinuation; P = 0.001), but not in Bmax. The study demonstrates that fluvoxamine affects platelet 5-HT2A receptor status irrespective of underlying psychiatric disease, and that this effect is evident already after 1 week at a subtherapeutic fluvoxamine dose.

  12. Control of Amygdala Circuits by 5-HT Neurons via 5-HT and Glutamate Cotransmission

    PubMed Central

    Bannerman, David M.

    2017-01-01

    The serotonin (5-HT) system and the amygdala are key regulators of emotional behavior. Several lines of evidence suggest that 5-HT transmission in the amygdala is implicated in the susceptibility and drug treatment of mood disorders. Therefore, elucidating the physiological mechanisms through which midbrain 5-HT neurons modulate amygdala circuits could be pivotal in understanding emotional regulation in health and disease. To shed light on these mechanisms, we performed patch-clamp recordings from basal amygdala (BA) neurons in brain slices from mice with channelrhodopsin genetically targeted to 5-HT neurons. Optical stimulation of 5-HT terminals at low frequencies (≤1 Hz) evoked a short-latency excitation of BA interneurons (INs) that was depressed at higher frequencies. Pharmacological analysis revealed that this effect was mediated by glutamate and not 5-HT because it was abolished by ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists. Optical stimulation of 5-HT terminals at higher frequencies (10–20 Hz) evoked both slow excitation and slow inhibition of INs. These effects were mediated by 5-HT because they were blocked by antagonists of 5-HT2A and 5-HT1A receptors, respectively. These fast glutamate- and slow 5-HT-mediated responses often coexisted in the same neuron. Interestingly, fast-spiking and non-fast-spiking INs displayed differential modulation by glutamate and 5-HT. Furthermore, optical stimulation of 5-HT terminals did not evoke glutamate release onto BA principal neurons, but inhibited these cells directly via activation of 5-HT1A receptors and indirectly via enhanced GABA release. Collectively, these findings suggest that 5-HT neurons exert a frequency-dependent, cell-type-specific control over BA circuitry via 5-HT and glutamate co-release to inhibit the BA output. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The modulation of the amygdala by serotonin (5-HT) is important for emotional regulation and is implicated in the pathogenesis and treatment of affective disorders

  13. Zaprinast, a phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor, overcomes sexual dysfunction produced by fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor in hamsters.

    PubMed

    Frye, Cheryl A; Rhodes, Madeline E

    2003-02-01

    A high incidence of sexual dysfunction among women is reported in the clinical literature. Little experimental investigation has been initiated on the ability of phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors to overcome deficits in sexual functioning because of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). The effects of fluoxetine, an SSRI, and zaprinast, a PDE-5 inhibitor, on the lateral displacement response (used as a measure of sensitivity to reproductively relevant stimuli) of hamsters in behavioral estrus were investigated. In Experiment 1, hamsters that were maximally sensitive to reproductively relevant stimuli because they were at the peak of behavioral estrus were administered fluoxetine (10 mg/kg, i.p.); they had significantly decreased lateral displacement responses compared to vehicle-administered hamsters. In Experiment 2, hamsters that were relatively less sensitive to sexual stimuli because they were at the termination of behavioral estrus were administered zaprinast (3 mg/kg; i.p.); they had significantly enhanced lateral displacement responses compared to responses seen following vehicle administration. In Experiment 3, fluoxetine-induced deficits in the lateral displacement of hamsters at the peak of behavioral estrus were overcome by the coadministration of zaprinast. These data confirm previous findings that sexual dysfunction can be induced by SSRIs and extend the current knowledge to suggest that administration of a PDE-5 inhibitor can override SSRI-induced deficits in sexual functioning.

  14. Effects of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors on Interregional Relation of Serotonin Transporter Availability in Major Depression

    PubMed Central

    James, Gregory M.; Baldinger-Melich, Pia; Philippe, Cecile; Kranz, Georg S.; Vanicek, Thomas; Hahn, Andreas; Gryglewski, Gregor; Hienert, Marius; Spies, Marie; Traub-Weidinger, Tatjana; Mitterhauser, Markus; Wadsak, Wolfgang; Hacker, Marcus; Kasper, Siegfried; Lanzenberger, Rupert

    2017-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) modulate serotonergic neurotransmission by blocking reuptake of serotonin from the extracellular space. Up to now, it remains unclear how SSRIs achieve their antidepressant effect. However, task-based and resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging studies, have demonstrated connectivity changes between brain regions. Here, we use positron emission tomography (PET) to quantify SSRI’s main target, the serotonin transporter (SERT), and assess treatment-induced molecular changes in the interregional relation of SERT binding potential (BPND). Nineteen out-patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and 19 healthy controls (HC) were included in this study. Patients underwent three PET measurements with the radioligand [11C]DASB: (1) at baseline, (2) after a first SSRI dose; and (3) following at least 3 weeks of daily intake. Controls were measured once with PET. Correlation analyses were restricted to brain regions repeatedly implicated in MDD pathophysiology. After 3 weeks of daily SSRI administration a significant increase in SERT BPND correlations of anterior cingulate cortex and insula with the amygdala, midbrain, hippocampus, pallidum and putamen (p < 0.05; false discovery rate, FDR corrected) was revealed. No significant differences were found when comparing MDD patients and HC at baseline. These findings are in line with the clinical observation that treatment response to SSRIs is often achieved only after a latency of several weeks. The elevated associations in interregional SERT associations may be more closely connected to clinical outcomes than regional SERT occupancy measures and could reflect a change in the regional interaction of serotonergic neurotransmission during antidepressant treatment. PMID:28220069

  15. Effects of donepezil and serotonin reuptake inhibitor on acute regression during adolescence in Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tamasaki, Akiko; Saito, Yoshiaki; Ueda, Riyo; Ohno, Koyo; Yokoyama, Katsutoshi; Satake, Takahiro; Sakuma, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Yukitoshi; Kondoh, Tatsuro; Maegaki, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    A 14-year-old boy with Down syndrome (DS) showed a gradual decline in his daily activities and feeding capacities, and a marked deterioration triggered by a streptococcal infection was observed at the age of 15 years. He became bedridden, accompanied by sleep disturbance, sustained upward gaze, and generalized rigidity. Magnetic resonance imaging showed unremarkable findings, but antiglutamate receptor autoantibodies were positive in his cerebrospinal fluid. Treatment with thiamine infusion and steroid pulse therapy showed little effect, but gross motor dysfunction and appetite loss were ameliorated by the administration of l-DOPA and serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Thereafter, autistic behaviors predominated, including loss of social interaction, oral tendency, water phobia, and aggressiveness. Initiation of donepezil, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, resulted in the disappearance of these symptoms and total recovery of the patient to his previous psychosocial levels. We hypothesize that the acute regression in adolescence represents a process closely related to the defects of serotonergic and cholinergic systems that are innate to DS brains and not just a nonspecific comorbidity of depression or limbic encephalitis.

  16. The serotonin reuptake inhibitor citalopram suppresses activity in the neonatal rat barrel cortex in vivo.

    PubMed

    Akhmetshina, Dinara; Zakharov, Andrei; Vinokurova, Daria; Nasretdinov, Azat; Valeeva, Guzel; Khazipov, Roustem

    2016-06-01

    Inhibition of serotonin uptake, which causes an increase in extracellular serotonin levels, disrupts the development of thalamocortical barrel maps in neonatal rodents. Previous in vitro studies have suggested that the disruptive effect of excessive serotonin on barrel map formation involves a depression at thalamocortical synapses. However, the effects of serotonin uptake inhibitors on the early thalamocortical activity patterns in the developing barrel cortex in vivo remain largely unknown. Here, using extracellular recordings of the local field potentials and multiple unit activity (MUA) we explored the effects of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) citalopram (10-20mg/kg, intraperitoneally) on sensory evoked activity in the barrel cortex of neonatal (postnatal days P2-5) rats in vivo. We show that administration of citalopram suppresses the amplitude and prolongs the delay of the sensory evoked potentials, reduces the power and frequency of the early gamma oscillations, and suppresses sensory evoked and spontaneous neuronal firing. In the adolescent P21-29 animals, citalopram affected neither sensory evoked nor spontaneous activity in barrel cortex. We suggest that suppression of the early thalamocortical activity patterns contributes to the disruption of the barrel map development caused by SSRIs and other conditions elevating extracellular serotonin levels.

  17. Combining structure-based pharmacophore and in silico approaches to discover novel selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zheng-Li; Liu, Hsuan-Liang; Wu, Josephine W; Tsao, Cheng-Wen; Chen, Wei-Hsi; Liu, Kung-Tien; Ho, Yih

    2013-12-01

    Inhibition of human serotonin transporter (hSERT) has been reported to be a potent strategy for the treatment for depression. To discover novel selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), a structure-based pharmacophore model (SBPM) was developed using the docked conformations of six highly active SSRIs. The best SBPM, consisting of four chemical features: two ring aromatics (RAs), one hydrophobic (HY), and one positive ionizable (PI), was further validated using Gunner-Henry (GH) scoring and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve methods. This well-validated SBPM was then used as a 3D-query in virtual screening to identify potential hits from National Cancer Institute (NCI) database. These hits were subsequently filtered by absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity (ADMET) prediction and molecular docking, and their binding stabilities were validated by 20-ns MD simulations. Finally, only two compounds (NSC175176 and NSC705841) were identified as potential leads, which exhibited higher binding affinities in comparison with the paroxetine. Our results also suggest that cation-π interaction plays a crucial role in stabilizing the hSERT-inhibitor complex. To our knowledge, the present work is the first structure-based virtual screening study for new SSRI discovery, which should be a useful guide for the rapid identification of novel therapeutic agents from chemical database.

  18. NO-SSRIs: Nitric Oxide Chimera Drugs Incorporating a Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Hay, Samer; Schiefer, Isaac T; Chandrasena, R Esala P; Li, Min; Abdelhamid, Ramy; Wang, Yue-Ting; Tavassoli, Ehsan; Michalsen, Bradley; Asghodom, Rezene T; Luo, Jia; Thatcher, Gregory R J

    2011-09-08

    Hybrid nitrate drugs have been reported to provide NO bioactivity to ameliorate side effects or to provide ancillary therapeutic activity. Hybrid nitrate selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (NO-SSRIs) were prepared to improve the therapeutic profile of this drug class. A synthetic strategy for use of a thiocarbamate linker was developed, which in the case of NO-fluoxetine facilitated hydrolysis to fluoxetine at pH 7.4 within 7 hours. In cell culture, NO-SSRIs were weak inhibitors of the serotonin transporter, however, in the forced swimming task (FST) in rats, NO-fluoxetine demonstrated classical antidepressant activity. Comparison of NO-fluoxetine, with fluoxetine, and an NO-chimera nitrate developed for Alzheimer's disease (GT-1061), was made in the step through passive avoidance (STPA) test of learning and memory in rats treated with scopolamine as an amnesic agent. Fluoxetine was inactive, whereas NO-fluoxetine and GT-1061 both restored long-term memory. GT-1061 also produced antidepressant behavior in FST. These data support the potential for NO-SSRIs to overcome the lag in onset of therapeutic action and provide co-therapy of neuropathologies concomitant with depression.

  19. Human therapeutic plasma levels of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) sertraline decrease serotonin reuptake transporter binding and shelter-seeking behavior in adult male fathead minnows.

    PubMed

    Valenti, Theodore W; Gould, Georgianna G; Berninger, Jason P; Connors, Kristin A; Keele, N Bradley; Prosser, Krista N; Brooks, Bryan W

    2012-02-21

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) represent a class of pharmaceuticals previously reported in aquatic ecosystems. SSRIs are designed to treat depression and other disorders in humans, but are recognized to elicit a variety of effects on aquatic organisms, ranging from neuroendocrine disruption to behavioral perturbations. However, an understanding of the relationships among mechanistic responses associated with SSRI targets and ecologically important behavioral responses of fish remains elusive. Herein, linking Adverse Outcomes Pathways (AOP) models with internal dosimetry represent potential approaches for developing an understanding of pharmaceutical risks to aquatic life. We selected sertraline as a model SSRI for a 28-d study with adult male fathead minnows. Binding activity of the serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT), previously demonstrated in mammals and fish models to respond to sertraline exposure, was selected as an endpoint associated with therapeutic activity. Shelter-seeking behavior was monitored using digital tracking software to diagnose behavioral abnormalities. Fish plasma levels of sertraline exceeding human therapeutic doses were accurately modeled from external exposure concentrations when pH influences on ionization and log D were considered. We observed statistically significant decreases in binding at the therapeutic target (SERT) and shelter-seeking behavior when fish plasma levels exceeded human therapeutic thresholds. Such observations highlights the strengths of coupling physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling and AOP approaches and suggest that internal dosimetry should be monitored to advance an understanding of the ecological consequences of SSRI exposure to aquatic vertebrates.

  20. Influence of sodium substitutes on 5-HT-mediated effects at mouse 5-HT3 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Barann, M; Schmidt, K; Göthert, M; Urban, B W; Bönisch, H

    2004-01-01

    The influence of sodium ion substitutes on the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)-induced flux of the organic cation [14C]guanidinium through the ion channel of the mouse 5-HT3 receptor and on the competition of 5-HT with the selective 5-HT3 receptor antagonist [3H]GR 65630 was studied, unless stated otherwise, in mouse neuroblastoma N1E-115 cells. Under physiological conditions (135 mM sodium), 5-HT induced a concentration-dependent [14C]guanidinium influx with an EC50 (1.3 μM) similar to that in electrophysiological studies. The stepwise replacement of sodium by increasing concentrations of the organic cation hydroxyethyl trimethylammonium (choline) concentration dependently caused both a rightward shift of the 5-HT concentration–response curve and an increase in the maximum effect of 5-HT. Complete replacement of sodium resulted in a 34-fold lower potency of 5-HT and an almost two times higher maximal response. A low potency of 5-HT in choline buffer was also observed in other 5-HT3 receptor-expressing rodent cell lines (NG 108-15 or NCB 20). Replacement of Na+ by Li+ left the potency and maximal effects of 5-HT almost unchanged. Replacement by tris (hydroxymethyl) methylamine (Tris), tetramethylammonium (TMA) or N-methyl-D-glucamine (NMDG) caused an increase in maximal response to 5-HT similar to that caused by choline. The potency of 5-HT was only slightly reduced by Tris, to a high degree decreased by TMA (comparable to the decrease by choline), but not influenced by NMDG. The potency of 5-HT in inhibiting [3H]GR65630 binding to intact cells was 35-fold lower when sodium was completely replaced by choline, but remained unchanged after replacement by NMDG. The results are compatible with the suggestion that choline competes with 5-HT for the 5-HT3 receptor; the increase in maximal response may be partly due to a choline-mediated delay of the 5-HT-induced desensitization. For studies of 5-HT-evoked [14C]guanidinium flux through 5-HT3 receptor channels, NMDG appears

  1. 5-HT6 receptors and Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    During the past 20 years, the 5-HT6 receptor has received increasing attention and become a promising target for improving cognition. Several studies with structurally different compounds have shown that not only antagonists but also 5-HT6 receptor agonists improve learning and memory in animal models. A large number of publications describing the development of ligands for this receptor have come to light, and it is now quite evident that 5-HT6 receptors have great pharmaceutical potential in terms of related patents. However, 5-HT6 receptor functionality is much more complex than initially defined. According to the existing data, different cellular pathways may be activated, depending on the drug being used. This article reviews preclinical and clinical evidence of the effects that 5-HT6 receptor compounds have on cognition. In addition, the biochemical and neurochemical mechanisms of action through which 5-HT6 receptor compounds can influence cognition will be described. Overall, several 5-HT6-targeted compounds can reasonably be regarded as powerful drug candidates for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:23607787

  2. COMMUNICATION BETWEEN 5-HT AND SMALL GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Mercado, Charles P.; Ziu, Endrit; Kilic, Fusun

    2011-01-01

    Advances over the past decade have improved our understanding of the serotonin (5-HT) biology outside the central nervous system specifically the molecular mechanisms of serotonergic signaling in association with small GTPases. It is now recognized that the communication between 5-HT and GTPases plays important roles in peripheral tissues, vascular cells and are involved in coagulation, hypertension, inflammation, healing and protection. Furthermore, 5-HT receptors as heterotrimeric GTP-binding protein-coupled receptors act as effector protein on the small GTPases. Therefore, the antagonists or agonists of the effector proteins of small GTPases could be useful therapeutic agents for the treatment of several diseases and disorders. PMID:21320798

  3. QTc intervals in drug poisoning patients with tricyclic antidepressants and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Açikalin, Ayça; Satar, Salim; Avc, Akkan; Topal, Metin; Kuvandk, Güven; Sebe, Ahmet

    2010-01-01

    Commonly used agents of drug poisoning among patients who come to the emergency services are tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs). These drugs may cause defect in cardiac conduction due to the slowdown in the cardiac depolarization and expansions in the QT interval. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are less expansion of the QT period and lower cardio toxic side effects. The aim of this study was to investigate QTc intervals and prognosis of the patients who come to the emergency service due to TCA and SSRI group antidepressant drug poisoning. In a study of 96 patients, 75 of whom were diagnosed to be poisoned by TCAs (TCA group) and 21 by SSRIs (SSRI group) were examined. Electrocardiographic alterations and QTc intervals all of patients were evaluated. QTc intervals of patients in TCA group were determined to be slightly more than those in SSRI group and it was not statistically significant. In the SSRI group, only one patient had QTc period more than 500 milliseconds (520 milliseconds); however, TCA overdose showed 9 (12%) patients with QTc interval over 500 milliseconds, and QTc values of 2 patients were over 600 milliseconds. In our study, it was determined that SSRI group drugs caused similar expansion of the QTc period as TCA drugs but they did not reach high values like TCA drugs, and their OTc intervals stayed in more innocent levels.

  4. Possible role of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor sertraline on oxidative stress responses.

    PubMed

    Battal, D; Yalin, S; Eker, E D; Aktas, A; Sahin, N O; Cebo, M; Berköz, M

    2014-01-01

    The naphthylamine derivative sertraline is a potent and selective inhibitor of serotonin reuptake into presynaptic terminals and the most widely used that has been shown to have both antidepressant and antianxiety effects. In the present study the possible role of sertraline (acute and chronically doses) was evaluated on lipid peroxidation levels and antioxidant enzyme activities in plasma and brain tissues of (10, 40, 80 mg/kg) sertraline treated Wistar albino rats (n=48). Lipid peroxidation levels (MDA) of plasma and brain tissue increased in all acute and chronic sertraline treated rats (p < 0.05). According to results of present study superoxide dismutase (SOD) levels of brain tissue decreased while plasma levels increased (p < 0.05) as compared with vehicle group. Catalase (CAT) levels of plasma and brain tissue and paraoxonase (PON) levels of plasma decreased (p < 0.05) as compared with vehicle group. Based on the data, it can be concluded that high dose sertraline administration enhances oxidative stress. Therefore, dose adjustment in depression patients seems significant as it may help prevention of further prognosis of the diseases.

  5. Effect of the interaction between atorvastatin and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors on the blood redox equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Herbet, Mariola; Gawrońska-Grzywacz, Monika; Izdebska, Magdalena; Piątkowska-Chmiel, Iwona

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease and depression often occur simultaneously in the same patient. Long-term polypharmacotherapy can lead to drug-induced oxidative stress. Data concerning the effects of concomitant treatment with atorvastatin and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are lacking. The aim of the present study was to examine oxidative stress parameters in the blood of rats after 28 days treatment with atorvastatin combined with fluoxetine or paroxetine. The study was carried out on male Wistar rats weighing 200–250 g. Aqueous solutions of atorvastatin (10 mg/kg), fluoxetine (10 mg/kg) and paroxetine (10 mg/kg) were injected once a day for 28 days, separately or concomitantly. The activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPX) was determined in the whole blood, whereas the activity of glutathione reductase (GR) and the total antioxidant status (TAS) were determined in the serum. The results demonstrated that concomitant administration of atorvastatin with fluoxetine caused an increase in the GPX activity and the TAS. Atorvastatin administered to rats with paroxetine increased the activities of GPX and GR. In the groups of rats receiving atorvastatin or SSRIs separately, no statistically significant changes in the investigated parameters were observed. The changes that were detected may indicate an increase in endogenous antioxidant levels during the concomitant application of atorvastatin with SSRIs and thus a drug-drug interaction having an effect on the blood redox equilibrium. PMID:27882176

  6. Treatment with serotonin reuptake inhibitors during pregnancy is associated with elevated corticotropin-releasing hormone levels.

    PubMed

    Hannerfors, A-K; Hellgren, C; Schijven, D; Iliadis, S I; Comasco, E; Skalkidou, A; Olivier, J D A; Sundström-Poromaa, I

    2015-08-01

    Treatment with serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) has been associated with an increased risk of preterm birth, but causality remains unclear. While placental CRH production is correlated with gestational length and preterm birth, it has been difficult to establish if psychological stress or mental health problems are associated with increased CRH levels. This study compared second trimester CRH serum concentrations in pregnant women on SSRI treatment (n=207) with untreated depressed women (n=56) and controls (n=609). A secondary aim was to investigate the combined effect of SSRI treatment and CRH levels on gestational length and risk for preterm birth. Women on SSRI treatment had significantly higher second trimester CRH levels than controls, and untreated depressed women. CRH levels and SSRI treatment were independently associated with shorter gestational length. The combined effect of SSRI treatment and high CRH levels yielded the highest risk estimate for preterm birth. SSRI treatment during pregnancy is associated with increased CRH levels. However, the elevated risk for preterm birth in SSRI users appear not to be mediated by increased placental CRH production, instead CRH appear as an independent risk factor for shorter gestational length and preterm birth.

  7. Ondansetron augmentation of serotonin reuptake inhibitors as a treatment strategy in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs) are the mainstay in the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Patients who do not respond adequately to SRIs commonly receive augmentation therapy with another agent, usually an atypical antipsychotic drug. Atypical antipsychotics, however, may not be appropriate for or acceptable to all patients. Ondansetron is an experimental alternative for such patients. There have been at least 6 trials that have examined a short-term (8-12 weeks) role for ondansetron in patients with OCD. These include 1 placebo-controlled crossover trial (N = 11); 1 uncontrolled monotherapy trial (N = 8); 2 low-dose (0.5-1.0 mg/d), uncontrolled augmentation trials in patients who did not respond adequately to ongoing or earlier treatments (pooled N = 35); and 2 moderate- to high-dose (4-8 mg/d) randomized, placebo-controlled augmentation trials in patients with undocumented past treatment history (pooled N = 88). Ondansetron was modestly effective in the uncontrolled trials and strikingly effective in the controlled trials. Ondansetron was also very well tolerated in all of the studies. These enthusiastic observations must be tempered by the limitations of the reviewed data, such as small sample sizes, short study durations, lack of data on the effects of blinded ondansetron discontinuation, lack of long-term data, and study-specific limitations. At best, ondansetron (1-8 mg/d) may be considered an experimental SRI augmentation agent in OCD patients for whom augmentation with an atypical antipsychotic drug is problematic.

  8. Pharmacokinetics, metabolism, and excretion of nefopam, a dual reuptake inhibitor in healthy male volunteers.

    PubMed

    Sanga, Madhu; Banach, John; Ledvina, Aaron; Modi, Nishit B; Mittur, Aravind

    2016-11-01

    1. The disposition of nefopam, a serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, was characterized in eight healthy male volunteers following a single oral dose of 75 mg [(14)C]-nefopam (100 μCi). Blood, urine, and feces were sampled for 168 h post-dose. 2. Mean (± SD) maximum blood and plasma radioactivity concentrations were 359 ± 34.2 and 638 ± 64.7 ngEq free base/g, respectively, at 2 h post-dose. Recovery of radioactive dose was complete (mean 92.6%); a mean of 79.3% and 13.4% of the dose was recovered in urine and feces, respectively. 3. Three main radioactive peaks were observed in plasma (metabolites M2 A-D, M61, and M63). Intact [(14)C]-nefopam was less than 5% of the total radioactivity in plasma. In urine, the major metabolites were M63, M2 A-D, and M51 which accounted for 22.9%, 9.8%, and 8.1% of the dose, respectively. An unknown entity, M55, was the major metabolite in feces (4.6% of dose). Excretion of unchanged [(14)C]-nefopam was minimal.

  9. Serotonin hypothesis of autism: implications for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor use during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Rebecca A; Lee, Li-Ching; Crum, Rosa M; Zimmerman, Andrew W; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva

    2013-06-01

    Serotonin, a neurotransmitter found throughout the brain and body, has long been of interest in autism. Repeated findings of elevated platelet serotonin levels in approximately one third of children with autism has led some to believe that dysfunctional serotonin signaling may be a causal mechanism for the disorder. Because serotonin is critical to fetal brain development, concerns have arisen regarding prenatal exposure to substances that manipulate serotonin levels, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). This review examines evidence regarding the serotonin system and autism spectrum disorders (ASD), as well as what the literature has reported thus far on developmental effects of prenatal exposure to SSRIs. Possible mechanisms by which SSRIs could affect the fetus during pregnancy and clinical implications are also discussed. Though the majority of studies conducted in infants and children suggest prenatal exposure to SSRIs does not affect neurodevelopment, interpretation must be tempered given small sample sizes. The only published study that focused on prenatal SSRI exposure and ASD found an increased risk with exposure to SSRIs, especially during the first trimester. Obstacles that will be faced in future research are isolating medication effects from maternal depression and, given the infrequent occurrence of exposure and outcome, obtaining an adequate sample size. Whether serotonin is an etiologic factor in ASD, and what it points to as a marker for subgrouping, remains unclear. Understanding how the development of ASD might be affected by prenatal factors that influence serotonin levels, such as SSRIs, could identify modifiable targets for prevention.

  10. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of a novel series of peripheral-selective noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Fujimori, Ikuo; Yukawa, Tomoya; Kamei, Taku; Nakada, Yoshihisa; Sakauchi, Nobuki; Yamada, Masami; Ohba, Yusuke; Takiguchi, Maiko; Kuno, Masako; Kamo, Izumi; Nakagawa, Hideyuki; Hamada, Teruki; Igari, Tomoko; Okuda, Teruaki; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Tsukamoto, Tetsuya; Ishichi, Yuji; Ueno, Hiroyuki

    2015-08-01

    Centrally acting noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor (NRI) is reportedly effective for patients with stress urinary incontinence (SUI) by increasing urethral closure in the clinical Phase IIa study with esreboxetine. Noradrenaline transporters are expressed in both central and peripheral nervous systems and the contribution of each site to efficacy has not been clarified. This report describes the development of a series of peripheral-selective 7-phenyl-1,4-oxazepane NRIs to investigate the contribution of the peripheral site to increasing urethral resistance in rats. (6S,7R)-1,4-Oxazepane derivative 7 exhibited noradrenaline transporter inhibition with high selectivity against inhibitions of serotonin and dopamine transporters. A replacement of hydroxyl with acetamide group contributed to enhancement of peripheral selectivity by increasing molecular polarity. Compound 12, N-{[(6S,7R)-7-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,4-oxazepan-6-yl]methyl}acetamide 0.5 fumarate, which showed effectively no brain penetration in rats, increased urethral resistance in a dose-dependent manner and exhibited a maximal effect on par with esreboxetine. These results demonstrate that the urethral resistance-increasing effects of NRI in rats are mainly caused by the inhibition of noradrenaline transporters in the peripheral sites.

  11. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, escitalopram, enhances inhibition of prepotent responding and spatial reversal learning.

    PubMed

    Brown, Holden D; Amodeo, Dionisio A; Sweeney, John A; Ragozzino, Michael E

    2012-11-01

    Previous findings indicate treatment with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) facilitates behavioral flexibility when conditions require inhibition of a learned response pattern. The present experiment investigated whether acute treatment with the SSRI, escitalopram, affects behavioral flexibility when conditions require inhibition of a naturally biased response pattern (elevated conflict test) and/or reversal of a learned response pattern (spatial reversal learning). An additional experiment was carried out to determine whether escitalopram, at doses that affected behavioral flexibility, also reduced anxiety as tested in the elevated plus-maze. In each experiment, Long-Evans rats received an intraperitoneal injection of either saline or escitalopram (0.03, 0.3 or 1.0 mg/kg) 30 min prior to behavioral testing. Escitalopram, at all doses tested, enhanced acquisition in the elevated conflict test, but did not affect performance in the elevated plus-maze. Escitalopram (0.3 and 1.0 mg/kg) did not alter acquisition of the spatial discrimination, but facilitated reversal learning. In the elevated conflict and spatial reversal learning test, escitalopram enhanced the ability to maintain the relevant strategy after being initially selected. The present findings suggest that enhancing serotonin transmission with an SSRI facilitates inhibitory processes when conditions require a shift away from either a naturally biased response pattern or a learned choice pattern.

  12. Time-dependent inhibition of CYP3A4 by sertraline, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Masubuchi, Yasuhiro; Kawaguchi, Yuki

    2013-11-01

    Drug-drug interactions associated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are widely known. A major interaction by SSRIs is the inhibition of cytochrome P450 (P450)-mediated hepatic drug metabolism. The SSRI, sertraline, is also reported to increase the blood concentration of co-administered drugs. The potency of sertraline directly to inhibit hepatic drug metabolism is relatively weak compared with the other SSRIs, implying that additional mechanisms are involved in the interactions. The study examined whether sertraline produces time-dependent inhibition of CYP3A4 and/or other P450 enzymes. Incubation of human liver microsomes with sertraline in the presence of NADPH resulted in marked decreases in testosterone 6β-hydroxylation activities, indicating that sertraline metabolism leads to CYP3A4 inactivation. This inactivation required NADPH and was not protected by glutathione. No significant inactivation was observed for other P450 enzymes. Spectroscopic evaluation revealed that microsomes with and without sertraline in the presence of NADPH gave a Soret peak at 455 nm, suggesting the formation of metabolic intermediate (MI) complexes of sertraline metabolite(s) with the reduced form of P450. This is the first report indicating that sertraline produced time-dependent inhibition of CYP3A4, which may be associated with MI complex formation.

  13. The impact of treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors on primate cardiovascular disease, behavior, and neuroanatomy.

    PubMed

    Shively, Carol A; Silverstein-Metzler, Marnie; Justice, Jamie; Willard, Stephanie L

    2017-03-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) use is ubiquitous because they are widely prescribed for a number of disorders in addition to depression. Depression increases the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Hence, treating depression with SSRIs could reduce CHD risk. However, the effects of long term antidepressant treatment on CHD risk, as well as other aspects of health, remain poorly understood. Thus, we undertook an investigation of multisystem effects of SSRI treatment with a physiologically relevant dose in middle-aged adult female cynomolgus monkeys, a primate species shown to be a useful model of both depression and coronary and carotid artery atherosclerosis. Sertraline had no effect on depressive behavior, reduced anxious behavior, increased affiliation, reduced aggression, changed serotonin neurotransmission and volumes of neural areas critical to mood disorders, and exacerbated coronary and carotid atherosclerosis. These data suggest that a conservative approach to prescribing SSRIs for cardiovascular or other disorders for long periods may be warranted, and that further study is critical given the widespread use of these medications.

  14. Use of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor citalopram in a possible animal analogue of obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Stein, D J; Mendelsohn, I; Potocnik, F; Van Kradenberg, J; Wessels, C

    1998-01-01

    Canine acral lick dermatitis (ALD) has been suggested as an animal analogue of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). A series of dogs with ALD or similar conditions were treated with citalopram, the most selective of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Six of nine (66.7%) dogs showed significant improvement. Given the apparent efficacy of citalopram in the treatment of OCD and related disorders, these data provide further evidence that ALD is a useful animal analogue of OCD.

  15. Maternal use of selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors and risk of persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn.

    PubMed

    Alwan, S; Bandoli, G; Chambers, C D

    2016-07-01

    Use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in late pregnancy has been associated with persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN), a rare condition with substantial infant mortality and morbidity. Although the increase in absolute risk is small on a population level, it may be of concern to many patients. It remains unclear the extent to which the increased risks reported for PPHN are explained by the underlying maternal illness rather than the use of SSRIs.

  16. The effects of aging and chronic fluoxetine treatment on circadian rhythms and suprachiasmatic nucleus expression of neuropeptide genes and 5-HT1B receptors

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Marilyn J.; Hester, James M.; Hopper, Jason A.; Franklin, Kathleen M.

    2010-01-01

    Age-related changes in circadian rhythms, including attenuation of photic phase shifts, are associated with changes in the central pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Aging decreases expression of mRNA for vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), a key neuropeptide for rhythm generation and photic phase shifts, and increases expression of serotonin transporters and 5-HT1B receptors, whose activation inhibits these phase shifts. Here we describe studies in hamsters showing that aging decreases SCN expression of mRNA for gastrin-releasing peptide, which also modulates photic phase resetting. Because serotonin innervation trophically supports SCN VIP mRNA expression, and serotonin transporters decrease extracellular serotonin, we predicted that chronic administration of the serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine, would attenuate the age-related changes in SCN VIP mRNA expression and 5-HT1B receptors. In situ hybridization studies showed that fluoxetine treatment does not alter SCN VIP mRNA expression, in either age group, at zeitgeber time (ZT)6 or 13 (ZT12 corresponds to lights off). However, receptor autoradiographic studies showed that fluoxetine prevents the age-related increase in SCN 5-HT1B receptors at ZT6, and decreases SCN 5-HT1B receptors in both ages at ZT13. Therefore, aging effects on SCN VIP mRNA and SCN 5-HT1B receptors are differentially regulated; the age-related increase in serotonin transporter sites mediates the latter but not the former. The studies also showed that aging and chronic fluoxetine treatment decrease total daily wheel running without altering the phase of the circadian wheel running rhythm, in contrast to previous reports of phase resetting by acute fluoxetine treatment. PMID:20525077

  17. 5-HT induces cAMP production in crypt colonocytes at a 5-HT4 receptor.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, F C; Smith, E H; Kellum, J M

    1998-07-01

    Previous studies demonstrate that both 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and cyclic AMP (cAMP) induce chloride efflux from crypt colonocytes in the rat distal colon; antagonist studies suggest that the 5-HT response is mediated primarily by the 5-HT4 receptor. Since this receptor is known to be positively coupled to adenylate cyclase, we postulated that 5-HT should induce generation of cAMP, which should be inhibited by 5-HT4 antagonists. Method. Mucosal cells from rat distal colon were taken by a sequential calcium chelation technique for enrichment of crypt cells. Cytokeratin stains demonstrated that >99% of cells were colonocytes. [3H]Thymidine uptake studies demonstrate a fivefold increased incorporation in this cell preparation compared to earlier fractions. 3-Isobutyl-l-methylxanthine (IBMX, 100 microM) was added to all cell suspensions in order to prevent cAMP metabolism. Cell suspensions were incubated for 2 min at 37 degreesC with different concentrations of 5-HT (n = 7). cAMP was measured by enzyme immunoassay. In another series of experiments, 5-HT (0.3 microM) stimulation of cAMP was similarly measured in the presence and absence of 5-HT receptor antagonists: 10 microM 5-HTP-DP (5-HT1P; n = 4), 0.1 microM ketanserin (5-HT2A; n = 4), 0.3 microM ondansetron (5-HT3; n = 4), 3 microM tropisetron (5-HT3 and 5-HT4; n = 4), and 10 nM GR-113808 (5-HT4; n = 5). Results. 5-HT produced a dose-dependent increase in cAMP. The increase was significant at concentrations >/=0.3 microM when compared to cells incubated with IBMX alone. In the second series of experiment, 5-HT-induced generation of cAMP at a dose of 0.3 microM was significantly inhibited in the presence of GR-113808 and tropisetron. Conclusion. 5-HT acts at a 5-HT4 receptor to induce production of cAMP in rat distal crypt colonocytes.

  18. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) Inhibit Insulin Secretion and Action in Pancreatic β Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Isaac, Roi; Boura-Halfon, Sigalit; Gurevitch, Diana; Shainskaya, Alla; Levkovitz, Yechiel; Zick, Yehiel

    2013-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are antidepressants used for the treatment of mood and anxiety disorders. Here, we demonstrate that incubation (2 h) of murine islets or Min6 β cell line with the SSRIs paroxetine, fluoxetine, or sertraline inhibited insulin-induced Tyr phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-2 protein and the activation of its downstream targets Akt and the ribosomal protein S6 kinase-1 (S6K1). Inhibition was dose-dependent with half-maximal effects at ∼15–20 μm. It correlated with a rapid dephosphorylation and activation of the IRS kinase GSK3β. Introduction of GSK3β siRNAs eliminated the inhibitory effects of the SSRIs. Inhibition of IRS-2 action by 30 μm SSRI was associated with a marked inhibition of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from murine and human pancreatic islets. Secretion induced by basic secretagogues (KCl and Arg) was not affected by these drugs. Prolonged treatment (16 h) of Min6 cells with sertraline resulted in the induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase; activation of endoplasmic reticulum stress, and the initiation of the unfolded protein response, manifested by enhanced transcription of ATF4 and C/EBP homologous protein. This triggered an apoptotic process, manifested by enhanced caspase 3/7 activity, which resulted in β cell death. These findings implicate SSRIs as inhibitors of IRS protein function and insulin action through the activation of GSK3β. They further suggest that SSRIs inhibit insulin secretion; induce the unfolded protein response; activate an apoptotic process, and trigger β cell death. Given that SSRIs promote insulin resistance while inhibiting insulin secretion, these drugs might accelerate the transition from an insulin-resistant state to overt diabetes. PMID:23275337

  19. Serotonergic 5-HT7 receptors and cognition.

    PubMed

    Gasbarri, Antonella; Pompili, Assunta

    2014-01-01

    The abundant distribution of serotonin (5-HT) in different areas of the central nervous system can explain the involvement of this neurotransmitter in the regulation of several functions, such as sleep, pain, feeding, and sexual and emotional behaviors. Moreover, the serotonergic system is also involved in other more complex roles, such as cognition, including learning and memory processes. Recent studies led to the discovery of various types and subtypes of receptors differentially associated to cognitive mechanisms. 5-HT7 is the most recently discovered receptor for 5-HT; therefore, it is also one of the least well characterized. Studies exist hypothesizing the role of 5-HT7 on the modulation of learning and memory processes and other cognitive functions. Moreover, much attention has been devoted to the possible role of 5-HT7 receptors in psychiatric disorders. Therefore, the aim of this review is to clarify the behavioral role of the recently discovered 5-HT7 type receptor and highlight its involvement in the cognitive functions, with particular attention to the modulation of learning and memory processes, thus providing a basis to obtain new therapeutic agents and strategies for the treatment of cognitive disorders.

  20. [5-HT1A/5-HT7 receptor interplay: Chronic activation of 5-HT7 receptors decreases the functional activity of 5-HT1A receptor and its сontent in the mouse brain].

    PubMed

    Kondaurova, E M; Bazovkina, D V; Naumenko, V S

    2017-01-01

    Serotonin receptors 5-HT1A and 5-HT7 are involved in the development of various psychopathologies. Some data indicate that there is an interplay between 5-HT1A 5-HT7 receptors that could be implicated in the regulation of their function. This work analyzed the effects of chronic 5-HT7 activation on the functional activity of 5-HT7 and 5-HT1A receptors, on the corresponding protein levels, and on the expression of genes encoding 5-HT7 and 5-HT1A receptors in the mouse brain. Chronic administration of the 5-HT7 selective agonist LP44 (20.5 nmol, i.c.v., 14 days) produced considerable desensitization of both 5-HT7 and 5-HT1A receptors. In LP44-treated mice, the hypothermic responses mediated by both 5-HT7 and 5-HT1A receptors were attenuated. Moreover, the levels of 5-HT1A receptor protein in the midbrain and the frontal cortex of LP44-treated mice were significantly decreased. However, the brain levels of 5-HT7 receptor protein did not differ between LP44-treated and control mice. Chronic LP44 treatment did not alter the expression of the 5-HT7 and 5-HT1A receptor genes in all investigated brain structure. These data suggest that 5-HT7 receptors participate in the posttranscriptional regulation of the 5-HT1A receptors functioning.

  1. Rapid intracellular release of calcium in human platelets by stimulation of 5-HT2-receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Erne, P.; Pletscher, A.

    1985-01-01

    The concentration of intracellular free Ca2+ ( [Ca2+]i) in human blood platelets was measured by use of the fluorescent probe quin-2. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) caused a rapid increase of [Ca2+]i in the presence or absence of Ca2+ in the medium. The [Ca2+]i-rise was less marked in the absence of Ca2+ and could be antagonized by 8-(N,N-diethylamino)octyl-3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoate-hydrochloride (TMB-8), an inhibitor of calcium release from internal stores. 5-HT induced a shape change reaction in the presence or absence of extracellular Ca2+, but the pEC50 of 5-HT was slightly higher in the presence of the cation. Shape change reaction and [Ca2+]i-rise showed similar time courses. Various 5-HT-agonists caused a rise of [Ca2+]i, whereas 5-HT-antagonists, but not the 5-HT-uptake inhibitor desmethylimipramine and the alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist yohimbine, counteracted the 5-HT-induced rise of the cation in a stereospecific manner. The antagonists were more potent than the agonists. The orders of potencies of the drugs affecting [Ca2+]i and platelet shape were similar. It is concluded that stimulation of 5-HT2-receptors of platelets causes a rapid release of intracellular calcium which, by activation of the contractile system, mediates the shape change reaction. PMID:3156650

  2. 5-HT1A and 5-HT7 receptors contribute to lurasidone-induced dopamine efflux.

    PubMed

    Huang, Mei; Horiguchi, Masakuni; Felix, Anna R; Meltzer, Herbert Y

    2012-05-09

    Lurasidone is a novel, atypical antipsychotic drug with serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)]2A, 5-HT7, dopamine (DA) D2 antagonist, and 5-HT1A receptor partial agonist properties. The ability of lurasidone to reverse the effects of subchronic administration phencyclidine, to impair novel object recognition in rats, an animal model of cognitive impairment in schizophrenia, is dependent, in part, on its 5-HT1A agonist and 5-HT7 receptor antagonist properties. We tested whether 5-HT1A partial agonism or 5-HT7 antagonism, or both, contributed to the ability of lurasidone to enhance cortical and hippocampal DA efflux, which may be related to its ability to improve cognition. Here, we report that lurasidone, 0.25 and 0.5, but not 0.1 mg/kg, subcutaneously, significantly increased DA efflux in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus in a dose-dependent manner. Lurasidone, 0.5 mg/kg, also produced a smaller increase in DA efflux in the nucleus accumbens. Pretreatment with the 5-HT1A receptor antagonist, WAY100635 (0.2 mg/kg, subcutaneously), partially blocked the lurasidone-induced cortical and hippocampal DA efflux. Further, subeffective doses of the 5-HT1A receptor agonist, tandospirone (0.2 mg/kg), or the 5-HT7 antagonist, SB269970 (0.3 mg/kg), potentiated the ability of a subeffective dose of lurasidone (0.1 mg/kg) to increase DA efflux in the prefrontal cortex. These findings suggest that the effects of lurasidone on the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus, DA efflux are dependent, at least partially, on its 5-HT1A agonist and 5-HT7 antagonist properties and may contribute to its efficacy to reverse the effects of subchronic phencyclidine treatment and improve schizophrenia.

  3. Pharmacological characterization of JNJ-28583867, a histamine H(3) receptor antagonist and serotonin reuptake inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Barbier, Ann J; Aluisio, Leah; Lord, Brian; Qu, Ying; Wilson, Sandy J; Boggs, Jamin D; Bonaventure, Pascal; Miller, Kirsten; Fraser, Ian; Dvorak, Lisa; Pudiak, Cindy; Dugovic, Christine; Shelton, Jonathan; Mazur, Curt; Letavic, Michael A; Carruthers, Nicholas I; Lovenberg, Timothy W

    2007-12-08

    Wake-promoting agents such as modafinil are used in the clinic as adjuncts to antidepressant therapy in order to alleviate lethargy. The wake-promoting action of histamine H(3) receptor antagonists has been evidenced in numerous animal studies. They may therefore be a viable strategy for use as an antidepressant therapy in conjunction with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. JNJ-28583867 (2-Methyl-4-(4-methylsulfanyl-phenyl)-7-(3-morpholin-4-yl-propoxy)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-isoquinoline) is a selective and potent histamine H(3) receptor antagonist (K(i)=10.6 nM) and inhibitor of the serotonin transporter (SERT) (K(i)=3.7 nM), with 30-fold selectivity for SERT over the dopamine and norepinephrine transporters. After subcutaneous administration, JNJ-28583867 occupied both the histamine H(3) receptor and the SERT in rat brain at low doses (<1 mg/kg). JNJ-28583867 blocked imetit-induced drinking (3-10 mg/kg i.p.), confirming in vivo functional activity at the histamine H(3) receptor and also significantly increased cortical extracellular levels of serotonin at doses of 0.3 mg/kg (s.c.) and higher. Smaller increases in cortical extracellular levels of norepinephrine and dopamine were also observed. JNJ-28583867 (3-30 mg/kg p.o.) showed antidepressant-like activity in the mouse tail suspension test. JNJ-28583867 (1-3 mg/kg s.c.) caused a dose-dependent increase in the time spent awake mirrored by a decrease in NREM. Concomitantly, JNJ-28583867 produced a potent suppression of REM sleep from the dose of 1 mg/kg onwards. JNJ-28583867 has good oral bioavailability in the rat (32%), a half-life of 6.9 h and a C(max) of 260 ng/ml after 10 mg/kg p.o. In summary, JNJ-28583867 is a combined histamine H(3) receptor antagonist-SERT inhibitor with in vivo efficacy in biochemical and behavioral models of depression and wakefulness.

  4. Memory formation and memory alterations: 5-HT6 and 5-HT7 receptors, novel alternative.

    PubMed

    Meneses, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Agonists and antagonists of the 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) receptor6 (5-HT6) or receptor7 (5-HT7) might improve memory and/or reverse amnesia, although the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Hence, the current work summarizes recent reviews and findings involving these receptors. Evidence indicates that diverse 5-HT6 receptor antagonists produce promnesic and/or antiamnesic effect in conditions, such as memory formation, age-related cognitive impairments and memory deficit in preclinical studies, as well as in diseases such as schizophrenia, Parkinson's, and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Memory, aging, and AD modify 5-HT6 receptors and signaling cascades; likewise, the modulation of 5-HT6 drugs on memory seems to be accompanied with neural changes. Moreover, 5-HT7 receptors are localized in brain areas mediating memory, including the cortex, hippocampus (e.g., Zola-Morgan and Squire, 1993) and raphe nuclei; however, the role of these receptors on memory has yet to be fully explored. Hence, findings and reviews are summarized in this work. Evidence suggests that both 5-HT7 receptor agonists and antagonists might have promnesic and anti-amnesic effects. These effects seem to be dependent on the basal level of performance, i.e., normal or impaired. Available evidence suggests that a potential utility of 5-HT6 and 5-HT7 receptor in mild-to-moderate AD patients and other memory dysfunctions as therapeutic targets.

  5. Interplay between serotonin 5-HT1A and 5-HT7 receptors in depressive disorders.

    PubMed

    Naumenko, Vladimir S; Popova, Nina K; Lacivita, Enza; Leopoldo, Marcello; Ponimaskin, Evgeni G

    2014-07-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine or 5-HT) is an important neurotransmitter regulating a wide range of physiological and pathological functions via activation of heterogeneously expressed 5-HT receptors. Besides the important role of 5-HT receptors in the pathogenesis of depressive disorders and in their clinical medications, underlying mechanisms are far from being completely understood. This review focuses on possible cross talk between two serotonin receptors, 5-HT1A and the 5-HT7 . Although these receptors are highly co-expressed in brain regions implicated in depression, and most agonists developed for the 5-HT1A or 5-HT7 receptors have cross-reactivity, their functional interaction has not been yet established. It has been recently shown that 5-HT1A and 5-HT7 receptors form homo- and heterodimers both in vitro and in vivo. From the functional point of view, heterodimerization has been shown to play an important role in regulation of receptor-mediated signaling and internalization, suggesting the implication of heterodimerization in the development and maintenance of depression. Interaction between these receptors is also of clinical interest, because both receptors represent an important pharmacological target for the treatment of depression and anxiety.

  6. Does adding noradrenaline reuptake inhibition to selective serotonin reuptake inhibition improve efficacy in patients with depression? A systematic review of meta-analyses and large randomised pragmatic trials.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Andrew J; Lenox-Smith, Alan J

    2013-08-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are recommended as first-line pharmacological treatment for depression and are the most commonly prescribed class of antidepressants. However, there is substantial evidence that noradrenaline has a role in the pathogenesis and treatment of depression. This review aims to examine the evidence of including noradrenaline reuptake inhibition with serotonin reuptake inhibition with respect to increasing efficacy in the treatment of depression. Evidence from meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and randomised pragmatic trials was found in support of greater efficacy of the serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), venlafaxine and duloxetine, in moderate to severe depression compared to SSRIs but no evidence was found for superiority of milnacipran. There is sufficient current evidence that demonstrates an increase in efficacy, when noradrenaline reuptake is added to serotonin (5-HT) reuptake, to suggest that patients with severe depression or those who have failed to reach remission with a SSRI may benefit from treatment with a SNRI. However, as these conclusions are drawn from the evidence derived from meta-analyses and pragmatic trials, large adequately powered RCTs using optimal dosing regimens and clinically relevant outcome measures in severe depression and SSRI treatment failures are still required to confirm these findings.

  7. Bleeding risk under selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants: A meta-analysis of observational studies.

    PubMed

    Laporte, Silvy; Chapelle, Céline; Caillet, Pascal; Beyens, Marie-Noëlle; Bellet, Florelle; Delavenne, Xavier; Mismetti, Patrick; Bertoletti, Laurent

    2017-04-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) have been reported to be potentially associated with an increased risk of bleeding. A meta-analysis of observational studies was conducted to quantify this risk. Case-control and cohort studies investigating bleeding risk under SSRI therapy were retrieved by searching the Medline, Pascal, Google Scholar and Scopus databases. Case-control studies were included if they reported bleeding incidents with and without the use of SSRIs and cohort studies were included if they reported the rate of bleeds among SSRI users and non-users. The main outcome was severe bleeding, whatever the site. Only data concerning SSRI belonging to the ATC class N06AB were used. For both case-control and cohort studies, we recorded the adjusted effect estimates and their 95% confidence intervals (CI). Pooled adjusted odds ratio (OR) estimates were computed for case-control and cohort studies using an inverse-variance model. Meta-analysis of the adjusted ORs of 42 observational studies showed a significant association between SSRI use and the risk of bleeding [OR 1.41 (95% CI 1.27-1.57), random effect model, p<0.0001]. The association was found for the 31 case-control studies (1,255,073 patients), with an increased risk of 41% of bleeding [OR 1.41 (95% CI 1.25-1.60)], as well as for the 11 cohort studies including 187,956 patients [OR 1.36 (95% CI 1.12-1.64)]. Subgroup analyses showed that the association remained constant whatever the characteristics of studies. This meta-analysis shows an increased risk of bleeding of at least 36% (from 12% to 64%) based on the high-level of observational studies with SSRIs use.

  8. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors and Gastrointestinal Bleeding: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Carvajal, Alfonso; Ortega, Sara; Del Olmo, Lourdes; Vidal, Xavier; Aguirre, Carmelo; Ruiz, Borja; Conforti, Anita; Leone, Roberto; López-Vázquez, Paula; Figueiras, Adolfo; Ibáñez, Luisa

    2011-01-01

    Background Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) have been associated with upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Given their worldwide use, even small risks account for a large number of cases. This study has been conducted with carefully collected information to further investigate the relationship between SSRIs and upper GI bleeding. Methods We conducted a case-control study in hospitals in Spain and in Italy. Cases were patients aged ≥18 years with a primary diagnosis of acute upper GI bleeding diagnosed by endoscopy; three controls were matched by sex, age, date of admission (within 3 months) and hospital among patients who were admitted for elective surgery for non-painful disorders. Exposures to SSRIs, other antidepressants and other drugs were defined as any use of these drugs in the 7 days before the day on which upper gastrointestinal bleeding started (index day). Results 581 cases of upper GI bleeding and 1358 controls were considered eligible for the study; no differences in age or sex distribution were observed between cases and controls after matching. Overall, 4.0% of the cases and 3.3% of controls used an SSRI antidepressant in the week before the index day. No significant risk of upper GI bleeding was encountered for SSRI antidepressants (adjusted odds ratio, 1.06, 95% CI, 0.57–1.96) or for whichever other grouping of antidepressants. Conclusions The results of this case-control study showed no significant increase in upper GI bleeding with SSRIs and provide good evidence that the magnitude of any increase in risk is not greater than 2. PMID:21625637

  9. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor sertraline enhances counterregulatory responses to hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Nicole M; Wilkinson, Charles W; Taborsky, Gerald J; Al-Noori, Salwa; Daumen, Wendi; Zavosh, Aryana; Figlewicz, Dianne P

    2008-05-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are widely prescribed for patients with comorbid diabetes and depression. Clinical case studies in diabetic patients, however, suggest that SSRI therapy may exacerbate hypoglycemia. We hypothesized that SSRIs might increase the risk of hypoglycemia by impairing hormonal counterregulatory responses (CRR). We evaluated the effect of the SSRI sertraline on hormonal CRR to single or recurrent hypoglycemia in nondiabetic rats. Since there are time-dependent effects of SSRIs on serotonin neurotransmission that correspond with therapeutic action, we evaluated the effect of 6- or 20-day sertraline treatment on hypoglycemia CRR. We found that 6-day sertraline (SERT) treatment specifically enhanced the epinephrine response to a single bout of hypoglycemia vs. vehicle (VEH)-treated rats (t = 120: VEH, 2,573 +/- 448 vs. SERT, 4,202 +/- 545 pg/ml, P < 0.05). In response to recurrent hypoglycemia, VEH-treated rats exhibited the expected impairment in epinephrine secretion (t = 60: 678 +/- 73 pg/ml) vs. VEH-treated rats experiencing first-time hypoglycemia (t = 60: 2,081 +/- 436 pg/ml, P < 0.01). SERT treatment prevented the impaired epinephrine response in recurrent hypoglycemic rats (t = 60: 1,794 +/- 276 pgl/ml). In 20-day SERT-treated rats, epinephrine, norepinephrine, and glucagon CRR were all significantly elevated above VEH-treated controls in response to hypoglycemia. Similarly to 6-day SERT treatment, 20-day SERT treatment rescued the impaired epinephrine response in recurrent hypoglycemic rats. Our data demonstrate that neither 6- nor 20-day sertraline treatment impaired hormonal CRR to hypoglycemia in nondiabetic rats. Instead, sertraline treatment resulted in an enhancement of hypoglycemia CRR and prevented the impaired adrenomedullary response normally observed in recurrent hypoglycemic rats.

  10. Serotonin transporter occupancy in rats exposed to serotonin reuptake inhibitors in utero or via breast milk.

    PubMed

    Capello, Catherine F; Bourke, Chase H; Ritchie, James C; Stowe, Zachary N; Newport, D Jeffrey; Nemeroff, Amanda; Owens, Michael J

    2011-10-01

    Rigorous data regarding fetal central nervous system (CNS) exposure after antidepressant exposure are sparse. The magnitude of serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SRI) CNS exposure was measured in three groups of rats using ex vivo autoradiography of the serotonin transporter (SERT): 1) in utero, 2) postnatal clearance after birth, and 3) exposure through lactation. Rats were exposed to one of five SRI-type antidepressants (escitalopram, fluoxetine, paroxetine, sertraline, and venlafaxine) administered continuously via osmotic minipumps to pregnant or nursing dams. Dam dosing was adjusted to reflect the 50th and 85th percentiles of serum concentrations observed in pregnant women. Embryonic day 21 rat pups exposed in utero exhibited >80% SERT occupancy in brain tissue, which is equivalent to that of the pregnant dam and similar to that reported for human pharmacotherapy. Venlafaxine was the exception with occupancies ranging from 61 to 92% across different litters. The magnitude of SERT occupancy is essentially equivalent between dams and fetuses. By postnatal day 4, high SERT occupancy was observed only in fluoxetine-exposed pups (41-92% occupancy). Significantly less, but measurable, exposure occurred via breast milk exposure even in the absence of detectable drug concentrations in nursing pup sera. Pups exposed to SRIs via breast milk for 3 or 7 days exhibited varying SERT occupancies (0-57% depending on the individual medication and dam dose). These data highlight the need for animal modeling of fetal and nursing infant drug exposure using clinically meaningful dosing strategies and appropriate CNS measures to develop rational treatment guidelines that systematically minimize fetal and neonatal medication exposure in humans.

  11. Augmenting serotonin reuptake inhibitors in obsessive-compulsive disorder: What moderates improvement?

    PubMed Central

    Wheaton, Michael G.; Rosenfield, David; Foa, Edna B.; Simpson, H. Blair

    2015-01-01

    Objective Patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) often only partially respond to serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs). In such cases, American Psychiatric Association practice guidelines suggest augmenting SRIs with cognitive behavioral therapy consisting of exposure and response prevention (EX/RP) or antipsychotic medication (i.e., risperidone). We examined moderators and predictors of these two augmentation strategies. Method Data came from a randomized controlled trial that compared adding EX/RP or risperidone to SRIs in adults with OCD. Patients entered the study on a stable SRI dosage and were randomized to EX/RP (N= 40), risperidone (N= 40) or placebo (N = 20). Data were analyzed using multilevel modeling. Results Pre-treatment OCD severity, age and depression were significant moderators. Although OCD severity was unrelated to EX/RP response, individuals with more severe OCD had poorer outcome and slower improvement with risperidone. Increasing age predicted better response to risperidone, but not EX/RP. Increased depression predicted poorer response to placebo, but not EX/RP or risperidone. Poorer functioning predicted worse outcome across all three conditions. Together, these moderators and predictor accounted for 33% of the variance in outcomes, above and beyond the 30.8% accounted for by treatment condition. Conclusions SRI augmentation with EX/RP was more effective than risperidone across all of the demographic and clinical variables tested. EX/RP’s superiority over risperidone increased with baseline OCD severity and with younger age. These data indicate that EX/RP should be the recommended SRI augmentation strategy, even for severe OCD. What determines the degree of EX/RP response in individual patients deserves further study. PMID:26009783

  12. Long-Term Use of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors and Risk of Glaucoma in Depression Patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsin-Yi; Lin, Cheng-Li; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated whether the long-term use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) influences the risk of primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) and primary angle-closure glaucoma (PACG) in the Chinese ethnic population in Taiwan.The authors retrieved the data under analysis from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan and identified 26,186 newly diagnosed depression patients without preexisting glaucoma. The study cohort included 13,093 patients with over 1 year of SSRI use, and a comparison cohort of 13,093 patients who had never used SSRIs. The main outcome was a diagnosis of POAG or PACG during follow-up. The authors used univariable and multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models to assess the effects of SSRIs on the risk of POAG and PACG.The cumulative incidences of POAG and PACG between the SSRI and comparison cohorts exhibited nonsignificant differences (log-rank test P = .52 for POAG, P = .32 for PACG). The overall incidence of POAG in the SSRI cohort was nonsignificantly higher than that in the comparison cohort (1.51 versus 1.39 per 1000 person-years), with an adjusted hazard ratio of 1.07 (95% confidence interval = 0.82-1.40). The overall incidence of PACG in the SSRI cohort was nonsignificantly lower than that in the comparison cohort (0.95 versus 1.11 per 1000 person-years), with an adjusted hazard ratio of 0.85 (95% confidence interval = 0.62-1.18).The long-term use of SSRIs does not influence the risk of POAG or PACG in depression patients.

  13. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and the risk of osseointegrated implant failure: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Wu, X; Al-Abedalla, K; Rastikerdar, E; Abi Nader, S; Daniel, N G; Nicolau, B; Tamimi, F

    2014-11-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), the most widely used drugs for the treatment of depression, have been reported to reduce bone formation and increase the risk of bone fracture. Since osseointegration is influenced by bone metabolism, this study aimed to investigate the association between SSRIs and the risk of failures in osseointegrated implants. This retrospective cohort study was conducted on patients treated with dental implants from January 2007 to January 2013. A total of 916 dental implants in 490 patients (94 implants on 51 patients using SSRIs) were used to estimate the risk of failure associated with the use of SSRIs. Data analysis involved Cox proportional hazards, generalized estimating equation models, multilevel mixed effects parametric survival analysis, and Kaplan-Meier analysis. After 3 to 67 mo of follow-up, 38 dental implants failed and 784 succeeded in the nonusers group, while 10 failed and 84 succeeded in the SSRI-users group. The main limitation of this retrospective study was that drug compliance dose and treatment period could not be acquired from the files of the patients. The primary outcome was that compared with nonusers of SSRIs, SSRI usage was associated with an increased risk of dental implants failure (hazard ratio, 6.28; 95% confidence interval, 1.25-31.61; p = .03). The failure rates were 4.6% for SSRI nonusers and 10.6% for SSRI users. The secondary outcomes were that small implant diameters (≤4 mm; p = .02) and smoking habits (p = .01) also seemed to be associated with higher risk of implant failure. Our findings indicate that treatment with SSRIs is associated with an increased failure risk of osseointegrated implants, which might suggest a careful surgical treatment planning for SSRI users.

  14. Effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors on bleeding risk in patients with atrial fibrillation taking warfarin.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Gene R; Singer, Daniel E; Chang, Yuchiao; Go, Alan S; Borowsky, Leila H; Udaltsova, Natalia; Fang, Margaret C

    2014-08-15

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) medications have been linked to increased bleeding risk; however, the actual association among warfarin, SSRI exposure, and bleeding risk has not been well-established. We studied the AnTicoagulation and Risk factors In Atrial fibrillation cohort of 13,559 adults with atrial fibrillation, restricted to the 9,186 patients contributing follow-up time while taking warfarin. Exposure to SSRIs and tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) was assessed from pharmacy database dispensing data. The main outcome was hospitalization for major hemorrhage. Results were adjusted for bleeding risk and time in international normalized ratio range >3. We identified 461 major hemorrhages during 32,888 person-years of follow-up, 45 events during SSRI use, 12 during TCA-only use, and 404 without either medication. Hemorrhage rates were higher during periods of SSRI exposure compared with periods on no antidepressants (2.32 per 100 person-years vs 1.35 per 100 person-years, p <0.001) and did not differ between TCA exposure and no antidepressants (1.30 per 100 person-years on TCAs, p = 0.94). After adjustment for underlying bleeding risk and time in international normalized ratio range >3, SSRI exposure was associated with an increased rate of hemorrhage compared with no antidepressants (adjusted relative risk 1.41, 95% confidence interval 1.04 to 1.92, p = 0.03), whereas TCA exposure was not (adjusted relative risk 0.82, 95% confidence interval 0.46 to 1.46, p = 0.50). In conclusion, SSRI exposure was associated with higher major hemorrhage risk in patients taking warfarin, and this risk should be considered when selecting antidepressant treatments in those patients.

  15. FKBP5 genetic variation: association with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor treatment outcomes in major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Ellsworth, Katarzyna A.; Moon, Irene; Eckloff, Bruce W.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Jenkins, Gregory D.; Batzler, Anthony; Biernacka, Joanna M.; Abo, Ryan; Brisbin, Abra; Ji, Yuan; Hebbring, Scott; Wieben, Eric D.; Mrazek, David A.; Weinshilboum, Richard M.; Wang, Liewei

    2013-01-01

    Objectives FKBP51 (51 kDa immunophilin) acts as a modulator of the glucocorticoid receptor and a negative regulator of the Akt pathway. Genetic variation in FKBP5 plays a role in antidepressant response. The aim of this study was to comprehensively assess the role of genetic variation in FKBP5, identified by both Sanger and Next Generation DNA resequencing, as well as genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with FKBP5 expression in the response to the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment of major depressive disorder. Methods We identified 657 SNPs in FKBP5 by Next Generation sequencing of 96 DNA samples from white patients, and 149 SNPs were selected for the genotyping together with 235 SNPs that were trans-associated with variation in FKBP5 expression in lymphoblastoid cells. A total of 529 DNA samples from the Mayo Clinic PGRN-SSRI Pharmacogenomic trial for which genome-wide SNPs had already been obtained were genotyped for these 384 SNPs, and associations with treatment outcomes were determined. The most significant SNPs were genotyped using 96 DNA samples from white non-Hispanic patients of the NIMH-supported Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D) study to attempt replication, followed by functional genomic studies. Results Genotype–phenotype association analysis indicated that rs352428 was associated with both 8-week treatment response in the Mayo study (odds ratio =0.49; P = 0.003) and 6-week response in the STAR*D replication study (odds ratio = 0.74; P =0.05). The electrophoresis mobility shift assay and the reporter gene assay confirmed the possible role of this SNP in transcription regulation. Conclusion This comprehensive FKBP5 sequence study provides insight into the role of common genetic polymorphisms that might influence SSRI treatment outcomes in major depressive disorder patients. PMID:23324805

  16. Use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) during pregnancy and disorganized infant-mother attachment

    PubMed Central

    Troutman, Beth R.; Momany, Allison M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Examine the quality of infant-mother attachment in a prospective case series of infants whose mothers took selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) during pregnancy. Background SSRIs are prescribed to 2 to 6% of pregnant women (National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health, 2007; Stewart, 2011). Recent articles on the use of SSRIs during pregnancy note the increased risk for problematic infant-mother relationships among mothers with untreated postpartum depression (Gentile, 2011; Stewart, 2011). However, little is known about the quality of infant-mother relationships among mothers who took SSRIs during pregnancy. Methods Five mothers who took SSRIs during pregnancy were recruited from a community study of infant development. Mothers completed ratings of postpartum depression symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory) 4 to 6 times between 1 month and 1 year following the infant’s birth. At 1 year postpartum, quality of infant-mother attachment was assessed using the strange situation procedure. Results Four of the 5 infant-mother dyads (80%) were classified as disorganized, a rate considerably higher than in postpartum depression samples. Conclusion These results are used to raise questions about the clinical implications of research on in utero exposure to SSRIs, perinatal depression, and disorganized attachment. Specifically, this case series raises questions about using research on the link between postpartum depression and infant-mother attachment as a rationale for the use of SSRIs during pregnancy. Current research indicates use of SSRIs during pregnancy may: 1) increase risk for disorganized attachment, 2) decrease risk for disorganized attachment, or 3) have no effect on disorganized attachment. PMID:23509416

  17. Acute and chronic toxicity of five selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in Ceriodaphnia dubia.

    PubMed

    Henry, Theodore B; Kwon, Jeong-Wook; Armbrust, Kevin L; Black, Marsha C

    2004-09-01

    Contamination of surface waters by pharmaceutical chemicals has raised concern among environmental scientists because of the potential for negative effects on aquatic organisms. Of particular importance are pharmaceutical compounds that affect the nervous or endocrine systems because effects on aquatic organisms are possible at low environmental concentrations. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are drugs used to treat clinical depression in humans, and have been detected in low concentrations in surface waters. In this investigation, the acute and chronic toxicity of five SSRIs (fluoxetine, Prozac; fluvoxamine, Luvox; paroxetine, Paxil; citalopram, Celexa; and sertraline, Zoloft) were evaluated in the daphnid Ceriodaphnia dubia. For each SSRI, the 48-h median lethal concentration (LC50) was determined in three static tests with neonate C. dubia, and chronic (8-d) tests were conducted to determine no-observable-effect concentrations (NOEC) and lowest-observable-effect concentrations (LOEC) for reproduction endpoints. The 48-h LC50 for the SSRIs ranged from 0.12 to 3.90 mg/L and the order of toxicity of the compounds was (lowest to highest): Citalopram, fluvoxamine, paroxetine, fluoxetine, sertraline. Mortality data for the 8-d chronic tests were similar to the 48-h acute data. The SSRIs negatively affected C. dubia reproduction by reducing the number of neonates per female, and for some SSRIs, by reducing the number of broods per female. For sertraline, the most toxic SSRI, the LOEC for the number of neonates per female was 0.045 mg/L and the NOEC was 0.009 mg/L. Results indicate that SSRIs can impact survival and reproduction of C. dubia; however, only at concentrations that are considerably higher than those expected in the environment.

  18. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors and the Risk of Osseointegrated Implant Failure

    PubMed Central

    Wu, X.; Al-Abedalla, K.; Rastikerdar, E.; Abi Nader, S.; Daniel, N.G.; Nicolau, B.; Tamimi, F.

    2014-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), the most widely used drugs for the treatment of depression, have been reported to reduce bone formation and increase the risk of bone fracture. Since osseointegration is influenced by bone metabolism, this study aimed to investigate the association between SSRIs and the risk of failures in osseointegrated implants. This retrospective cohort study was conducted on patients treated with dental implants from January 2007 to January 2013. A total of 916 dental implants in 490 patients (94 implants on 51 patients using SSRIs) were used to estimate the risk of failure associated with the use of SSRIs. Data analysis involved Cox proportional hazards, generalized estimating equation models, multilevel mixed effects parametric survival analysis, and Kaplan-Meier analysis. After 3 to 67 mo of follow-up, 38 dental implants failed and 784 succeeded in the nonusers group, while 10 failed and 84 succeeded in the SSRI-users group. The main limitation of this retrospective study was that drug compliance dose and treatment period could not be acquired from the files of the patients. The primary outcome was that compared with nonusers of SSRIs, SSRI usage was associated with an increased risk of dental implants failure (hazard ratio, 6.28; 95% confidence interval, 1.25-31.61; p = .03). The failure rates were 4.6% for SSRI nonusers and 10.6% for SSRI users. The secondary outcomes were that small implant diameters (≤4 mm; p = .02) and smoking habits (p = .01) also seemed to be associated with higher risk of implant failure. Our findings indicate that treatment with SSRIs is associated with an increased failure risk of osseointegrated implants, which might suggest a careful surgical treatment planning for SSRI users. PMID:25186831

  19. [Three cases of severe hyponatremia under taking selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI)].

    PubMed

    Inaguma, D; Kitagawa, W; Hayashi, H; Kanoh, T; Kurata, K; Kumon, S

    2000-10-01

    The association between selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors(SSRIs) and hyponatremia has been documented throughout the world. In Japan, since SSRIs have recently come into use for patients with depression, there are only a few reports of hyponatremia associated with SSRIs. We present here three cases of the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone(SIADH) associated with the administration of fluvoxamine for depression. They were admitted to our hospital because of deep coma, and revealed severe hyponatremia. Their serum sodium levels were 103-112 mEq/l, serum osmolalities were 227-241 mmol/kg, urine sodium levels were 38-107 mEq/l, and urine osmolalities were 352-781 mmol/kg. These patients were started on fluvoxamine 3 days-3 months previously. The diagnosis of SIADH in these patients was made based on hyponatremia, and low serum and high urine osmolalities. The fluvoxamine treatment was discontinued, and hypertonic saline was infused. Their serum sodium levels and osmolalities were subsequently normalized. None of the other known causes of hyponatremia, including diuretic therapy, tumors, and respiratory and central nervous system diseases, were present. High plasma AVP levels observed in the two cases suggest that SSRIs stimulate AVP secretion, thereby causing SIADH. Many reports have shown that people older than 70 years were at a particularly high risk of developing hyponatremia when SSRIs were used. In the future, since the use of SSRIs will be increasing, the water and electrolyte balance of elderly patients should be monitored carefully during SSRIs therapy.

  20. Serotonin reuptake inhibitor discontinuation syndrome: a hypothetical definition. Discontinuation Consensus panel.

    PubMed

    Schatzberg, A F; Haddad, P; Kaplan, E M; Lejoyeux, M; Rosenbaum, J F; Young, A H; Zajecka, J

    1997-01-01

    Adverse events following discontinuation from serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs) are being reported in the literature with increasing frequency; the frequency and severity of these symptoms appear to vary according to the half-life of the SRI, e.g., the incidence appears higher with the shorter half-life agents than with fluoxetine, which has an extended half-life. Yet, there have been no systematic studies of the phenomenon to date. Therefore, a group of experts convened in Phoenix, Arizona, to develop a clear description or definition of the phenomenon based on these reports. The SRI discontinuation syndrome, referred to as "withdrawal symptoms" in many anecdotal case reports, is distinctly different from the classic withdrawal syndrome associated with alcohol and barbiturates. Anti-depressants are not associated with dependence or drug-seeking behavior. SRI discontinuation symptoms tend to be short-lived and self-limiting, but can be troublesome. They may emerge when an SRI is abruptly discontinued, when doses are missed, and less frequently, during dosage reduction. In addition, the symptoms are not attributable to any other cause and can be reversed when the original agent is reinstituted, or one that is pharmacologically similar is substituted. SRI discontinuation symptoms, in most cases, may be minimized by slowly tapering antidepressant therapy, but there have been several case reports where symptoms occurred consistently even through repeated attempts to taper therapy. Physical symptoms include problems with balance, gastrointestinal and flu-like symptoms, and sensory and sleep disturbances. Psychological symptoms include anxiety and/or agitation, crying spells, and irritability. Further analyses of data bases and clinical studies are needed to define this proposed syndrome more clearly.

  1. Dual role of serotonin in the pathogenesis of indomethacin-induced small intestinal ulceration: pro-ulcerogenic action via 5-HT3 receptors and anti-ulcerogenic action via 5-HT4 receptors.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shinichi; Matsuda, Narumi; Matsumoto, Kenjiro; Wada, Mai; Onimaru, Naoki; Yasuda, Masashi; Amagase, Kikuko; Horie, Syunji; Takeuchi, Koji

    2012-09-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) exerts multiple physiological functions not only in the central and peripheral nervous systems but also in the gastrointestinal tract, and these multiple functions are accounted for by a variety of 5-HT receptor subtypes. We investigated the role of 5-HT in the pathogenesis of indomethacin-induced intestinal lesions in mice, in relation to 5-HT receptor subtypes. A single oral administration of indomethacin (10 mg/kg) provoked damage in the small intestine of mice 24 h later, and this response was prevented by pretreatment with p-chlorophenylalanine (a 5-HT synthesis inhibitor). The administration of 5-HT3 receptor antagonists, such as ondansetron and ramosetron, dose-dependently reduced the severity of the intestinal lesions, whereas a high dose of GR113808 (a 5-HT4 receptor antagonist) significantly aggravated these lesions. In contrast, NAN-190 (a 5-HT1 receptor antagonist), ketanserin (a 5-HT2 receptor antagonist), and SB269970 (a 5-HT7 receptor antagonist) had no effect on these lesions. Mosapride (a 5-HT4 receptor agonist) significantly reduced the severity of indomethacin-induced intestinal lesions, and this protective effect was totally prevented by either GR113808 or methyllycaconitine (an α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist). Indomethacin increased the activity of myeloperoxidase and the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, inflammatory cytokines, and chemokines in the small intestine; these responses were significantly attenuated by ondansetron and mosapride. These findings suggest that endogenous 5-HT exerts a dual role in the pathogenesis of indomethacin-induced intestinal lesions: pro-ulcerogenic action via 5-HT3 receptors and anti-ulcerogenic action via 5-HT4 receptors, and the latter effect via 5-HT4 receptors may be mediated by activation of α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

  2. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor sertraline inhibits voltage-dependent K+ channels in rabbit coronary arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Han Sol; Li, Hongliang; Kim, Hye Won; Shin, Sung Eun; Choi, Il-Whan; Firth, Amy L; Bang, Hyoweon; Bae, Young Min; Park, Won Sun

    2016-12-01

    We examined the effects of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) sertraline on voltage-dependent K+ (Kv) channels in freshly isolated rabbit coronary arterial smooth muscle cells using the voltage-clamp technique. Sertraline decreased the Kv channel current in a dose-dependent manner, with an IC50 value of 0.18 mu M and a slope value (Hill coefficient) of 0.61. Although the application of 1 mu M sertraline did not affect the steady-state activation curves, sertraline caused a significant, negative shift in the inactivation curves. Pretreatment with another SSRI, paroxetine, had no significant effect on Kv currents and did not alter the inhibitory effects of sertraline on Kv currents. From these results, we concluded that sertraline dose-dependently inhibited Kv currents independently of serotonin reuptake inhibition by shifting inactivation curves to a more negative potential.

  3. Combination therapy with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors in the treatment of premature ejaculation.

    PubMed

    Polat, E C; Ozbek, E; Otunctemur, A; Ozcan, L; Simsek, A

    2015-06-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of paroxetine and tadalafil combination in the treatment of premature ejaculation (PE). A total of 150 primary (lifelong)PE patients were randomly distributed into three groups of 50 patients each. Group 1 received 20 mg paroxetine every day for 1 month, Group 2 received 20 mg tadalafil on demand 2 h before intercourse, and Group 3 received paroxetine and tadalafil on demand 2 h before intercourse. Intravaginal ejaculatory latency times (IELT) scores were evaluated at baseline, at the end of the first month of therapy and 1 month after discontinuation of the treatment, while International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) questionnaire scores were evaluated both prior to and after the treatment. At the end of the first month of therapy, IELT scores were compared with the basal values and statistically significant changes were detected (60.6 ± 30.2-117.3 ± 67.3, 68.5 ± 21.4-110.2 ± 37.3, 71.56 ± 40.23-175.2 ± 60.2)(P < 0.01). IELT scores after discontinuation of treatment were found to be close to the baseline IELT scores (P > 0.05). IIEF scores were evaluated both prior to and after the treatment, and no statistically significant difference was detected (P > 0.05). It is concluded that utilisation of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) and phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors (PDE5i) combination before intercourse seems to provide significantly longer ejaculatory latency times as compared with SSRI alone for a long time in patients with PE.

  4. Memory time-course: mRNA 5-HT1A and 5-HT7 receptors.

    PubMed

    Perez-Garcia, Georgina; Meneses, Alfredo

    2009-08-24

    In an attempt to clarify conflicting results about serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(7) receptors in memory formation, their mRNA expression was determined by RT-PCR in key brain areas for explicit and implicit memory. The time-course (0-120 h) of autoshaped responses was progressive and mRNA 5-HT(1A) or 5-HT(7) receptors expression monotonically augmented or declined in prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and raphe nuclei, respectively. At 24-48 h acutely 8-OH-DPAT (0.062 mg/kg) administration enhanced memory and attenuated mRNA 5-HT(1A)<5-HT(7) receptors expression respect to saline group. WAY100635 (0.3 mg/kg) or SB-269970 (10.0 mg/kg) did not affect the former, partially blocked or reversed the latter, respectively. Furthermore, lower WAY100635 (0.001-0.1 mg/kg) or SB-269970 (1.0-5.0 mg/kg) doses plus 8-OHDPAT not affected memory; however both combinations suppressed or up-regulated mRNA expression 5-HT(1A) or 5-HT(7) receptors. In contrast, AS19 (5.0 mg/kg) facilitated memory consolidation, decreased or increased hippocampal 5-HT(7) and 5-HT(1A) receptors expression. Together these data revealed that, when both 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(7) receptors were stimulated by 8-OHDPAT under memory consolidation, subtle changes emerged, not evident at behavioral level though detectable at genes expression. Notably, high levels of efficient memory were maintained even when serotonergic tone, via either 5-HT(1A) or 5-HT(7) receptor, was down- or up-regulated. Nevertheless, WAY100635 plus SB-269970 impaired memory consolidation and suppressed their expression. Considering that serotonergic changes are prominent in AD patients with an earlier onset of disease the present approach might be useful in the identification of functional changes associated to memory formation, memory deficits and reversing or even preventing these deficits.

  5. Hyperforin represents the neurotransmitter reuptake inhibiting constituent of hypericum extract.

    PubMed

    Müller, W E; Singer, A; Wonnemann, M; Hafner, U; Rolli, M; Schäfer, C

    1998-06-01

    Hydroalcoholic hypericum extract inhibits the synaptosomal uptake of serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine with about similar affinities and leads to a significant down-regulation of cortical beta-adrenoceptors and 5-HT2-receptors after subchronic treatment of rats. While neither hypericine nor kaempferol did show any reuptake inhibiting properties, hyperforin was identified as the unspecific reuptake inhibitor of hypericum extracts with half-maximal inhibitory concentrations for the three synaptosomal uptake systems mentioned above between 80 and 200 nmol/l. Moreover, a hyperforin-enriched (38%) CO2 extract also leads to a significant beta-receptor down-regulation after subchronic treatment. The data suggest hyperforin as the active principle of hypericum extracts in biochemical models of antidepressant activity.

  6. Similar anxiolytic effects of agonists targeting serotonin 5-HT1A or cannabinoid CB receptors on zebrafish behavior in novel environments

    PubMed Central

    Connors, Kristin A.; Valenti, Theodore W.; Lawless, Kelly; Sackerman, James; Onaivi, Emmanuel S.; Brooks, Bryan W.; Gould, Georgianna G.

    2014-01-01

    The discovery that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) such as fluoxetine are present and bioaccumulate in aquatic ecosystems have spurred studies of fish serotonin transporters (SERTs) and changes in SSRI-sensitive behaviors as adverse outcomes relevant for risk assessment. Many SSRIs also act at serotonin 5-HT1A receptors. Since capitolizing on this action may improve treatments of clinical depression and other psychiatric disorders, novel multimodal drugs that agonize 5-HT1A and block SERT were introduced. In mammals both 5-HT1A and CB agonists, such as buspirone and WIN55,212-2, reduce anxious behaviors. Immunological and behavioral evidence suggests that 5-HT1A-like receptors may function similarly in zebrafish (Danio rerio), yet their pharmacological properties are not well characterized. Herein we compared the density of [3H] 8-hydroxy-2-di-n-propylamino tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) binding to 5-HT1A-like sites in the zebrafish brain, to that of simalarly Gαi/o-coupled cannabinoid receptors. [3H] 8-OH-DPAT specific binding was 176 ± 8, 275 ± 32, and 230 ± 36 fmol/mg protein in the hypothalamus, optic tectum, and telencephalon. [3H] WIN55,212-2 binding density was higher in those same brain regions at 6 ± 0.3, 5.5 ± 0.4 and 7.3 ± 0.3 pm/mg protein. The aquatic light-dark plus maze was used to examine behavioral effects of 5-HT1A and CB receptor agonists on zebrafish novelty-based anxiety. With acute exposure to the 5-HT1A partial-agonist buspirone (50 mg/L), or dietary exposure to WIN55,212-2 (7 μg/week) zebrafish spent more time in and/or entered white arms more often than controls (p < 0.05). Acute exposure to WIN55,212-2 at 0.5-50 mg/L, reduced mobility. These behavioral findings suggest that azipirones, like cannabinoid agonists, have anxiolytic and/or sedative properties on fish in novel environments. These observations highlight the need to consider potential ecological risks of azapirones and multimodal antidepressants in the future. PMID

  7. Spinal 5-HT7 receptors induce phrenic motor facilitation via EPAC-mTORC1 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Fields, D. P.; Springborn, S. R.

    2015-01-01

    Spinal serotonin type 7 (5-HT7) receptors elicit complex effects on motor activity. Whereas 5-HT7 receptor activation gives rise to long-lasting phrenic motor facilitation (pMF), it also constrains 5-HT2 receptor-induced pMF via “cross-talk inhibition.” We hypothesized that divergent cAMP-dependent signaling pathways give rise to these distinct 5-HT7 receptor actions. Specifically, we hypothesized that protein kinase A (PKA) mediates cross-talk inhibition of 5-HT2 receptor-induced pMF whereas 5-HT7 receptor-induced pMF results from exchange protein activated by cAMP (EPAC) signaling. Anesthetized, paralyzed, and ventilated rats receiving intrathecal (C4) 5-HT7 receptor agonist (AS-19) injections expressed pMF for >90 min, an effect abolished by pretreatment with a selective EPAC inhibitor (ESI-05) but not a selective PKA inhibitor (KT-5720). Furthermore, intrathecal injections of a selective EPAC activator (8-pCPT-2′-Me-cAMP) were sufficient to elicit pMF. Finally, spinal mammalian target of rapamycin complex-1 (mTORC1) inhibition via intrathecal rapamycin abolished 5-HT7 receptor- and EPAC-induced pMF, demonstrating that spinal 5-HT7 receptors elicit pMF by an EPAC-mTORC1 signaling pathway. Thus 5-HT7 receptors elicit and constrain spinal phrenic motor plasticity via distinct signaling mechanisms that diverge at cAMP (EPAC vs. PKA). Selective manipulation of these molecules may enable refined regulation of serotonin-dependent spinal motor plasticity for therapeutic advantage. PMID:26269554

  8. Spinal 5-HT7 receptors induce phrenic motor facilitation via EPAC-mTORC1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Fields, D P; Springborn, S R; Mitchell, G S

    2015-09-01

    Spinal serotonin type 7 (5-HT7) receptors elicit complex effects on motor activity. Whereas 5-HT7 receptor activation gives rise to long-lasting phrenic motor facilitation (pMF), it also constrains 5-HT2 receptor-induced pMF via "cross-talk inhibition." We hypothesized that divergent cAMP-dependent signaling pathways give rise to these distinct 5-HT7 receptor actions. Specifically, we hypothesized that protein kinase A (PKA) mediates cross-talk inhibition of 5-HT2 receptor-induced pMF whereas 5-HT7 receptor-induced pMF results from exchange protein activated by cAMP (EPAC) signaling. Anesthetized, paralyzed, and ventilated rats receiving intrathecal (C4) 5-HT7 receptor agonist (AS-19) injections expressed pMF for >90 min, an effect abolished by pretreatment with a selective EPAC inhibitor (ESI-05) but not a selective PKA inhibitor (KT-5720). Furthermore, intrathecal injections of a selective EPAC activator (8-pCPT-2'-Me-cAMP) were sufficient to elicit pMF. Finally, spinal mammalian target of rapamycin complex-1 (mTORC1) inhibition via intrathecal rapamycin abolished 5-HT7 receptor- and EPAC-induced pMF, demonstrating that spinal 5-HT7 receptors elicit pMF by an EPAC-mTORC1 signaling pathway. Thus 5-HT7 receptors elicit and constrain spinal phrenic motor plasticity via distinct signaling mechanisms that diverge at cAMP (EPAC vs. PKA). Selective manipulation of these molecules may enable refined regulation of serotonin-dependent spinal motor plasticity for therapeutic advantage.

  9. Serotonin 5-HT2 Receptor Interactions with Dopamine Function: Implications for Therapeutics in Cocaine Use Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Kathryn A.

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine exhibits prominent abuse liability, and chronic abuse can result in cocaine use disorder with significant morbidity. Major advances have been made in delineating neurobiological mechanisms of cocaine abuse; however, effective medications to treat cocaine use disorder remain to be discovered. The present review will focus on the role of serotonin (5-HT; 5-hydroxytryptamine) neurotransmission in the neuropharmacology of cocaine and related abused stimulants. Extensive research suggests that the primary contribution of 5-HT to cocaine addiction is a consequence of interactions with dopamine (DA) neurotransmission. The literature on the neurobiological and behavioral effects of cocaine is well developed, so the focus of the review will be on cocaine with inferences made about other monoamine uptake inhibitors and releasers based on mechanistic considerations. 5-HT receptors are widely expressed throughout the brain, and several different 5-HT receptor subtypes have been implicated in mediating the effects of endogenous 5-HT on DA. However, the 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptors in particular have been implicated as likely candidates for mediating the influence of 5-HT in cocaine abuse as well as to traits (e.g., impulsivity) that contribute to the development of cocaine use disorder and relapse in humans. Lastly, new approaches are proposed to guide targeted development of serotonergic ligands for the treatment of cocaine use disorder. PMID:25505168

  10. Design and synthesis of dual 5-HT1A and 5-HT7 receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Ofori, Edward; Zhu, Xue Y; Etukala, Jagan R; Peprah, Kwakye; Jordan, Kamanski R; Adkins, Adia A; Bricker, Barbara A; Kang, Hye J; Huang, Xi-Ping; Roth, Bryan L; Ablordeppey, Seth Y

    2016-08-15

    5-HT1A and 5-HT7 receptors have been at the center of discussions recently due in part to their major role in the etiology of major central nervous system diseases such as depression, sleep disorders, and schizophrenia. As part of our search to identify dual targeting ligands for these receptors, we have carried out a systematic modification of a selective 5HT7 receptor ligand culminating in the identification of several dual 5-HT1A and 5-HT7 receptor ligands. Compound 16, a butyrophenone derivative of tetrahydroisoquinoline (THIQ), was identified as the most potent agent with low nanomolar binding affinities to both receptors. Interestingly, compound 16 also displayed moderate affinity to other clinically relevant dopamine receptors. Thus, it is anticipated that compound 16 may serve as a lead for further exploitation in our quest to identify new ligands with the potential to treat diseases of CNS origin.

  11. Antidepressant and anti-anxiety like effects of 4i (N-(3-chloro-2-methylphenyl) quinoxalin-2-carboxamide), a novel 5-HT3 receptor antagonist in acute and chronic neurobehavioral rodent models.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Deepali; Radhakrishnan, Mahesh; Thangaraj, Devadoss; Kurhe, Yeshwant

    2014-07-15

    Depression and anxiety are the most debilitating mood disorders with poor therapeutic recovery rates. In the last decades, 5-HT3 receptor antagonists have been identified as potential agents for mood disorders. The current investigation focuses on evaluating the, antidepressant and anti-anxiety like effects of a novel 5-HT3 antagonist, 4i (N-(3-chloro-2-methylphenyl) quinoxalin-2-carboxamide). Preliminary, in vitro 5-HT3 receptor binding affinity was performed in isolated longitudinal muscle-myenteric plexus from the guinea pig ileum. Consequently, neurobehavioral effects of 4i in acute and chronic rodent models were evaluated. In addition, involvement of serotonergic system in the postulated effects of the compound was analyzed by in vivo assay. in vitro, 4i demonstrated high 5-HT3 receptor antagonistic activity (pA2, 7.6). in vivo acute study, 4i exhibited decreased duration of immobility in forced swim and tail suspension tests, and increased exploratory parameters as number and duration of nose-poking in hole board test and latency and time spent in aversive brightly illuminated light chamber in light-dark model. Moreover, in chronic model of depression, i.e., olfactory bulbectomy with behavioral deficits, 4i reversed depressive anhedonia in sucrose preference test and anxious hyperactive behavior in open field test in rats. Furthermore, synergistic effect of 4i with fluoxetine (a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor) and inhibitory effect of 1-(m-chlorophenyl)-biguanide (a 5-HT3 receptor agonist) revealed serotonergic modulation by 4i mediated 5-HT3 receptor antagonism, which was further confirmed by potentiation of 5-hydroxytryptophan (a serotonin synthesis precursor) induced head twitch response. These findings suggest the potential antidepressant and anti-anxiety like effects of 4i, which may be related to the modulation of serotonergic system.

  12. Enhanced reactivity of 5-HT1A receptors in the rat dorsal periaqueductal gray matter after chronic treatment with fluoxetine and sertraline: evidence from the elevated T-maze.

    PubMed

    Zanoveli, Janaina Menezes; Nogueira, Regina Lúcia; Zangrossi, Hélio

    2007-03-01

    Behavioral evidence indicates that sensitization of 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors in the dorsal periaqueductal gray (DPAG) may underlie the therapeutic effect of serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs) in panic disorder. These results were obtained from studies using animal models that associate escape behavior with panic attacks, such as the elevated T-maze. In this test, chronic administration of the non-selective SRI imipramine enhances the inhibitory effect on escape caused by the intra-DPAG injection of the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT. We here evaluated the generality of this finding by investigating the effect of chronic administration of two selective SRIs (SSRIs), fluoxetine and sertraline, on the reactivity of the rat DPAG 5-HT1A receptors. The results showed that both SSRIs inhibited escape behavior in the elevated T-maze, suggestive of a panicolytic-like effect. Whereas intra-DPAG injection of a low dose of 8-OH-DPAT (0.4nmol) had no effect on escape in control animals, it significantly enhanced the inhibitory effect caused by the SSRIs on this response. Microinjection of 8-OH-DPAT in SSRI-treated rats also inhibited the acquisition of inhibitory avoidance, another defensive response measured by the elevated T-maze. The results indicate that chronic administration of fluoxetine and sertraline sensitizes 5-HT1A receptors in the DPAG. Overall, they support the view that facilitation of 5-HT1A receptor-mediated neurotransmission in the DPAG is implicated in the therapeutic effect of SRIs on panic disorder.

  13. Effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors on glaucoma: A nationwide population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Vincent Chin-Hung; McIntyre, Roger S.; Lee, Yena; Lin, Tsang-Yaw; Weng, Jun-Cheng; Chen, Pau-Chung; Hsu, Chung-Yao

    2017-01-01

    Background Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are one of the most commonly prescribed classes of antidepressants. Glaucoma is the second leading cause of blindness globally and iatrogenic glaucoma has been implicated across disparate medication classes. Available studies that have sought to determine the association between SSRI exposure and glaucoma have provided mixed results. The aim of the study herein was to investigate whether an association exists between SSRI exposure and glaucoma incidence. Methods Glaucoma cases were identified from Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database with a new primary diagnosis of glaucoma between 1997 and 2009. The date wherein the cases were diagnosed with glaucoma was operationalized as the index date. The control group was comprised of individuals within the database who were not diagnosed with glaucoma. 15,865 glaucoma cases were compared to 77,014 sex-, age-, residence- and insurance premium-matched controls on measures of prescribed duration and dosage of SSRIs up to 365 days before index date to proxy SSRIs exposure. Results Individuals receiving SSRIs were at greater risk of glaucoma incidence (OR = 1.39; 95% CI = 1.29–1.50); the foregoing increased likelihood was reduced after adjusting for confounding variables (aOR = 1.09; 95% CI = 1.00,1.18). SSRI treatment of longer duration (i.e. >365 days) and higher doses (≥1 defined daily dose) were associated with greater risk of glaucoma incidence (aOR = 1.36; 95% CI = 1.08–1.71). Subgroup analysis showed that the effect of SSRIs on glaucoma was limited to individuals younger than 65 years of age (aOR = 1.37; 95% CI = 1.25–1.50), without diabetes (aOR = 1.39; 95% CI = 1.27–1.52), without hypertension (aOR = 1.46; 95% CI = 1.31–1.63) or hypercholesterolemia (aOR = 1.35; 95% CI = 1.23–1.48). Conclusion Treatment with SSRIs was associated with greater risk of having a diagnosis of glaucoma, particularly in individuals with longer duration

  14. Adverse effects associated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and tricyclic antidepressants: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Trindade, E; Menon, D; Topfer, L A; Coloma, C

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The use of antidepressant medications and the resulting costs have increased dramatically in recent years, partly because of the introduction of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). An assessment of the clinical and economic aspects of SSRIs compared with the older tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) was initiated to generate information for purchasers of these drugs as well as clinicians. One component of this study was an examination of the adverse effects associated with the use of these drugs. METHODS: Searches of bibliographic databases (for January 1980 through May 1996) and manual scanning of both peer-reviewed publications and other documents were used to identify double-blind, randomized controlled trials involving at least one SSRI and one TCA. For the study of adverse effects, only trials that had at least 20 patients in each trial arm and that reported rates of adverse effects in both arms were retained. In total 84 trials reporting on 18 adverse effects were available. Meta-analyses were undertaken to calculate pooled differences in rates of adverse effects. The question of whether the method of eliciting information from patients about adverse effects made a difference in the findings was also examined. Finally, differences in drop-out rates due to adverse effects were calculated. RESULTS: The crude rates of occurrence of adverse effects ranged from 4% (palpitations) to 26% (nausea) for SSRIs and from 4% (diarrhea) to 27% (dry mouth) for TCAs. The differences in the rates of adverse effects between the 2 types of drugs ranged from 14% more with SSRIs (for nausea) to 11% more with TCAs (for constipation). The results did not depend on the method of eliciting information from patients. There were no statistically significant differences between drug classes in terms of drop-outs due to adverse effects. INTERPRETATION: SSRIs and TCAs are both associated with adverse effects, although the key effects differ between the drug classes

  15. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor use associates with apathy among depressed elderly: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Wongpakaran, Nahathai; van Reekum, Robert; Wongpakaran, Tinakon; Clarke, Diana

    2007-01-01

    Background It has been reported for over the past decade that the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI's) may associate with the emergence of apathy. The authors hypothesized that depressed patients treated with SSRI's would show more signs of apathy than patients treated with non-SSRI antidepressants. This case control study was conducted to investigate the possibility of the association between SSRI use and the occurrence of apathy. Methods Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care's Day Hospital Database of elderly depressed patients who received antidepressants was divided into 2 groups depending on antidepressant use at discharge: SSRI user group-SUG, and non-SSRI user group-NSUG. Apathy scales developed by the authors were selected from the Geriatric depression Scale (GDS) and the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAMD), and were titled as GDS-apathy subscale (GAS) and HAMD-apathy subscale (HAS). Demographic data, baseline apathy, underlying medical conditions and medication use were studied. Proportion, analysis of variances, Chi-square test, odds ratio with 95% confidence interval were reported. Results Among 384 patients (160 SUG and 224 NSUG), mean GDS and HAM-D at discharge were 12.46 and 10.61 in SUG, and were 11.37 and 9.30 in NSUG, respectively. Using GAS for apathy assessment, 83.7% of patients in SUG and 73.4% in NSUG stayed apathetic at discharge. As evaluated by HAS, 44.2% of patients in SUG and 36.5% in NSUG stayed apathetic. SSRI use was not a predictor of apathy at admission, while it was at discharge, p = 0.029. The SUG showed more patients with apathy than that found in NSUG (adjusted OR = 1.90 (1.14–3.17). Age 70–75 years tended to be a predictor for the apathy (p = 0.058). Using HAS, age 70–75 years and living situation were associated with apathy at discharge, p = 0.032 and 0.038 respectively. Conclusion Even though depression was improved in elderly patients receiving antidepressants, apathy appeared to be greater in

  16. [Adverse effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors use during the third trimester of pregnancy and prevention guidelines].

    PubMed

    Mejías, Consuelo; Rodríguez-Pinilla, Elvira; Fernández Martín, Paloma; Martínez-Frías, María Luisa

    2007-04-21

    Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) have become the drug of choice for the treatment of depression and have shown to be effective in the treatment for other mental disorders. Recently, several articles have reported about the adverse effects observed in newborns after maternal exposure to these drugs during the last trimester of pregnancy. In this work, a review of literature is presented, regarding the above mentioned adverse effects. Moreover, some guidelines for the rational use of these drugs during the last trimester of pregnancy and for the management of prenatally exposed newborns are provided.

  17. Effects of 5-HT2B, 5-HT3 and 5-HT4 receptor antagonists on gastrointestinal motor activity in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Hiroki; Mochiki, Erito; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Kawamura, Kiyoshi; Watanabe, Akira; Sutou, Toshinaga; Ogawa, Atsushi; Yanai, Mitsuhiro; Ogata, Kyoichi; Fujii, Takaaki; Ohno, Tetsuro; Tsutsumi, Souichi; Asao, Takayuki; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To study the effects of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptor antagonists on normal colonic motor activity in conscious dogs. METHODS: Colonic motor activity was recorded using a strain gauge force transducer in 5 dogs before and after 5-HT2B, 5-HT3 and 5-HT4 receptor antagonist administration. The force transducers were implanted on the serosal surfaces of the gastric antrum, terminal ileum, ileocecal sphincter and colon. Test materials or vehicle alone was administered as an intravenous bolus injection during a quiescent period of the whole colon in the interdigestive state. The effects of these receptor antagonists on normal gastrointestinal motor activity were analyzed. RESULTS: 5-HT2B, 5-HT3 and 5-HT4 receptor antagonists had no contractile effect on the fasting canine terminal ileum. The 5-HT3 and 5-HT4 receptor antagonists inhibited phase III of the interdigestive motor complex of the antrum and significantly inhibited colonic motor activity. In the proximal colon, the inhibitory effect was dose dependent. Dose dependency, however, was not observed in the distal colon. The 5-HT2B receptor antagonist had no contractile effect on normal colonic motor activity. CONCLUSION: The 5-HT3 and 5-HT4 receptor antagonists inhibited normal colonic motor activity. The 5-HT2B receptor antagonist had no contractile effect on normal colonic motor activity. PMID:24151388

  18. Effects of intracerebroventricular injections of 5-HT on systemic vascular resistances of conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Davisson, Robin L; Bates, James N; Johnson, Alan Kim; Lewis, Stephen J

    2014-09-01

    The aims of this study were to determine (i) the effects of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injections of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, 10μg) on mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR) and mesenteric (MR), renal (RR) and hindquarter (HQR) vascular resistances of conscious rats, (ii) the central 5-HT receptor subtype which mediates these effects, and (iii) the role of nitric oxide (NO) in the expression of these responses. The i.c.v. injection of 5-HT had minor effects on MAP but produced a decrease in HR (-18±4%), which lasted for 20min. The i.c.v. injection of 5-HT elicited marked increases in MR (+50±7%) and reductions in HQR (-31±3%). These responses occurred promptly and lasted for 25-35min. 5-HT also produced a transient decrease in RR (-26±8% at 10min). All of these responses were prevented by the prior i.c.v. injection of the 5-HT1/5-HT2-receptor antagonist, methysergide (10μg). The intravenous injection of the NO synthesis inhibitor, L-NAME (25μmol/kg), produced a sustained pressor response, bradycardia and increases in MR, RR and HQR. Subsequent i.c.v. injection of 5-HT produced a minor pressor response (+7±2%), bradycardia (-18±3%), an increase in MR (+52±8%) but no decreases in RR or HQR. This study demonstrates that i.c.v. 5-HT differentially affects peripheral vascular resistances by activation of central 5-HT1/5-HT2-receptors. It appears that L-NAME did not interfere with the central actions of 5-HT as it did not prevent the 5-HT-induced bradycardia or mesenteric vasoconstriction. Since the 5-HT-induced falls in RR and HQR were abolished by L-NAME, it is possible that these responses are mediated by an active neurogenic process involving the release of NO within the vasculature.

  19. Comparative receptor mapping of serotoninergic 5-HT3 and 5-HT4 binding sites*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Rodríguez, María L.; Morcillo, María José; Benhamú, Bellinda; Rosado, María Luisa

    1997-11-01

    The clinical use of currently available drugs acting at the5-HT4 receptor has been hampered by their lack of selectivityover 5-HT3 binding sites. For this reason, there is considerableinterest in the medicinal chemistry of these serotonin receptor subtypes, andsignificant effort has been made towards the discovery of potent and selectiveligands. Computer-aided conformational analysis was used to characterizeserotoninergic 5-HT3 and 5-HT4 receptorrecognition. On the basis of the generally accepted model of the5-HT3 antagonist pharmacophore, we have performed a receptormapping of this receptor binding site, following the active analog approach(AAA) defined by Marshall. The receptor excluded volume was calculated as theunion of the van der Waals density maps of nine active ligands(pKi ≥ 8.9), superimposed in pharmacophoric conformations.Six inactive analogs (pKi < 7.0) were subsequently used todefine the essential volume, which in its turn can be used to define theregions of steric intolerance of the 5-HT3 receptor. Five activeligands (pKi ≥ 9.3) at 5-HT4 receptors wereused to construct an antagonist pharmacophore for this receptor, and todetermine its excluded volume by superimposition of pharmacophoricconformations. The volume defined by the superimposition of five inactive5-HT4 receptor analogs that possess the pharmacophoric elements(pKi ≤ 6.6) did not exceed the excluded volume calculated forthis receptor. In this case, the inactivity may be due to the lack of positiveinteraction of the amino moiety with a hypothetical hydrophobic pocket, whichwould interact with the voluminous substituents of the basic nitrogen ofactive ligands. The difference between the excluded volumes of both receptorshas confirmed that the main difference is indeed in the basic moiety. Thus,the 5-HT3 receptor can only accommodate small substituents inthe position of the nitrogen atom, whereas the 5-HT4 receptorrequires more voluminous groups. Also, the basic nitrogen is located at ca

  20. Treatment of cognitive dysfunction in major depressive disorder--a review of the preclinical evidence for efficacy of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors and the multimodal-acting antidepressant vortioxetine.

    PubMed

    Pehrson, Alan L; Leiser, Steven C; Gulinello, Maria; Dale, Elena; Li, Yan; Waller, Jessica A; Sanchez, Connie

    2015-04-15

    Although major depressive disorder is primarily considered a mood disorder, depressed patients commonly present with clinically significant cognitive dysfunction that may add to their functional disability. This review paper summarizes the available preclinical data on the effects of antidepressants, including monoamine reuptake inhibitors and the multimodal antidepressant vortioxetine, in behavioral tests of cognition such as cognitive flexibility, attention, and memory, or in potentially cognition-relevant mechanistic assays such as electroencephalography, in vivo microdialysis, in vivo or in vitro electrophysiology, and molecular assays related to neurogenesis or synaptic sprouting. The available data are discussed in context with clinically relevant doses and their relationship to target occupancy levels, in order to evaluate the translational relevance of preclinical doses used during testing. We conclude that there is preclinical evidence suggesting that traditional treatment with monoamine reuptake inhibitors can induce improved cognitive function, for example in cognitive flexibility and memory, and that the multimodal-acting antidepressant vortioxetine may have some advantages by comparison to these treatments. However, the translational value of the reviewed preclinical data can be questioned at times, due to the use of doses outside the therapeutically-relevant range, the lack of data on target engagement or exposure, the tendency to investigate acute rather than long term antidepressant administration, and the trend towards using normal rodents rather than models with translational relevance for depression. Finally, several suggestions are made for advancing this field, including expanded use of target occupancy assessments in preclinical and clinical experiments, and the use of translationally valuable techniques such as electroencephalography.

  1. Comparison of the Antidepressant-Like Effects of Estradiol and That of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors in Middle-Aged Ovariectomized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Benmansour, Saloua; Arroyo, Luis D.; Frazer, Alan

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of age and that of the post-ovariectomy (OVX) time interval on the antidepressant (AD)-like effects of estradiol (E2) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in middle-aged (10 month) OVX rats (10m-OVX). Acute or chronic effects of these treatments in 10m-OVX were compared with those (1) in young adult (4-month) OVX rats (4m-OVX) or with older (14-month) OVX rats (14m-OVX), at a short time: 2 weeks post-OVX (+2w) and (2) in 10m-OVX rats after a longer times: 4 or 8 months post-OVX (+4m or +8m). Using in vivo chronoamperometry in the CA3 region of the hippocampus, E2 at 20 pmol, a dose shown previously to inhibit the serotonin transporter (SERT) in 4m-OVX, had no effect in 10m-OVX+2w. A higher dose of E2 (40 pmol) increased T80 value, a measure of serotonin or 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) clearance, and also blocked the ability of fluvoxamine to increase T80. By contrast, estradiol had no effects on SERT function in 10m-OVX+4m, even at a higher dose than 40 pmol. Fluvoxamine slowed 5-HT clearance in 10m-OVX at +2w, +4m and +8m post-OVX as it did in the 4m-OVX. Using the forced swim test, 2 weeks treatment with E2 (5 μg/day), a dose shown previously to induce AD-like effects in 4m-OVX, had no effect in 10m-OVX+2w. However, a higher dose (10 μg/day) of E2 induced an AD-like effect as demonstrated by significantly increased swimming behavior and decreased immobility. This effect was not seen in 10m-OVX+4m. By contrast, significant AD-like effects were obtained in 14m-OVX+2w, thereby demonstrating that the lack of an AD effect of E2 is due to the 4-month hormone withdrawal and not to an age effect. After 2 weeks treatment with the SSRI sertraline, similar AD-like effects were obtained in 10m-OVX tested at +2w, +4m or +8m post-OVX as those found in 4m-OVX. Thus, the potency of estradiol to produce effects consistent with inhibition of the SERT was not only decreased in older rats but its effects were markedly diminished the

  2. Role of 5-HT1B, 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptors in learning.

    PubMed

    Meneses, A; Hong, E

    1997-08-01

    The effects of post-training (i.p.) injection of TFMPP, mCPP, DOI or 1-NP in the autoshaping learning task was explored. Furthermore, the post-training effects of these agonists after treatment with the antagonists (+/-)-pindolol, (+/-)-propranolol, NAN-190, ketanserin, ritanserin, mesulergine, MDL-72222 or p-chloroamphetamine (5-HT depleter) were studied. Rats were individually trained with a lever-press response (conditioned response; CR) on the autoshaping task and tested 24 h later. The results showed that the injection of TFMPP (1-10 mg/kg), mCPP (1-10 mg/kg), 1-NP (0.1-1.0 mg/kg) or mesulergine (0.4 mg/kg) decreased the rate of CR, while DOI (0.01-0.1 mg/kg) and ritanserin (0.5 mg/kg) and ketanserin (0.001-0.1 mg/kg) increased it. However, the effect induced by TFMPP was reversed by (+/-)-pindolol, ketanserin, ritanserin and PCA; the mCPP-induced effect was antagonized by (+/-)-propranolol, ketanserin, ritanserin and MDL-72222; and the effect produced by 1-NP was reversed by ketanserin, ritanserin and PCA. In addition, the increment in CR provoked by DOI was enhanced by ketanserin, and reversed by ritanserin, mesulergine and PCA. These findings suggest that TFMPP, 1-NP and DOI exerted their effects via stimulation of presynaptic 5-HT receptors. The effects of mCPP most probably reflect activation of postsynaptic receptors. The present data suggest that both 5-HT1B and 5-HT2A-2C receptors play a significant role in the consolidation of learning.

  3. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and β-blocker transformation products may not pose a significant risk of toxicity to aquatic organisms in wastewater effluent-dominated receiving waters.

    PubMed

    Brown, Alistair K; Challis, Jonathan K; Wong, Charles S; Hanson, Mark L

    2015-10-01

    A probabilistic ecological risk assessment was conducted for the transformation products (TPs) of 3 β-blockers (atenolol, metoprolol, and propranolol) and 5 selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs; citalopram, fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, paroxetine, and sertraline) to assess potential threats to aquatic organisms in effluent-dominated surface waters. To this end, the pharmacokinetic literature, the University of Minnesota's Biocatalysis/Biodegradation Database Pathway Prediction System aerobic microbial degradation software, and photolysis literature pertaining to β-blockers and SSRIs were used to determine their most likely TPs formed via human metabolism, aerobic biodegradation, and photolysis, respectively. Monitoring data from North American and European surface waters receiving human wastewater inputs were the basis of the exposure characterizations of the parent compounds and the TPs, where available. In most cases, where monitoring data for TPs did not exist, we assumed a conservative 1:1 parent-to-TP production ratio (i.e., 100% of parent converted). The US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)'s EPISuite and ECOSAR v1.11 software were used to estimate acute and chronic toxicities to aquatic organisms. Hazard quotients, which were calculated using the 95(th) percentile of the exposure distributions, ranged from 10(-11) to 10(-3) (i.e., all significantly less than 1). Based on these results, the TPs of interest would be expected to pose little to no environmental risk in surface waters receiving wastewater inputs. Overall, we recommend developing analytical methods that can isolate and quantify human metabolites and TPs at environmentally relevant concentrations to confirm these predictions. Further, we recommend identifying the major species of TPs from classes of pharmaceuticals that could elicit toxic effects via specific modes of action (e.g., norfluoxetine via the serotonin 5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]1A receptors) and conducting aquatic toxicity

  4. Long-Term Citalopram Treatment Alters the Stress Responses of the Cortical Dopamine and Noradrenaline Systems: the Role of Cortical 5-HT1A Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Fumi; Kishikawa, Yuki; Hanada, Yuuki; Yamada, Makiko; Kakuma, Tatsuyuki; Kawahara, Hiroshi; Nishi, Akinori

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cortical dopamine and noradrenaline are involved in the stress response. Citalopram, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, has direct and indirect effects on the serotonergic system. Furthermore, long-term treatment with citalopram affects the dopamine and noradrenaline systems, which could contribute to the therapeutic action of antidepressants. Methods: The effects of long-term treatment with citalopram on the responses of the dopamine and noradrenaline systems in the rat prefrontal cortex to acute handling stress were evaluated using in vivo microdialysis. Results: Acute handling stress increased dopamine and noradrenaline levels in the prefrontal cortex. The dopamine and noradrenaline responses were suppressed by local infusion of a 5-HT1A receptor agonist, 7-(Dipropylamino)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydronaphthalen-1-ol;hydrobromide, into the prefrontal cortex. The dopamine response was abolished by long-term treatment with citalopram, and the abolished dopamine response was reversed by local infusion of a 5-HT1A receptor antagonist, (Z)-but-2-enedioic acid;N-[2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazin-1-yl]ethyl]-N-pyridin-2-ylcyclohexanecarboxamide into the prefrontal cortex. On the other hand, long-term treatment with citalopram reduced the basal noradrenaline levels (approximately 40% of the controls), but not the basal dopamine levels. The noradrenaline response was maintained despite the low basal noradrenaline levels. Signaling from the 5-HT1A receptors and α2-adrenoceptors was not involved in the decrease in the basal noradrenaline levels but partially affected the noradrenaline response. Conclusions: Chronic citalopram treatment differentially suppresses the dopamine and noradrenaline systems in the prefrontal cortex, and the dopamine stress response was preferentially controlled by upregulating 5-HT1A receptor signaling. Our findings provide insight into how antidepressants modulate the dopamine and noradrenaline systems to overcome acute stress. PMID

  5. Fluvoxamine alleviates seizure activity and downregulates hippocampal GAP-43 expression in pentylenetetrazole-kindled mice: role of 5-HT3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Alhaj, Momen W; Zaitone, Sawsan A; Moustafa, Yasser M

    2015-06-01

    Epilepsy has been documented to lead to many changes in the nervous system including cell loss and mossy fiber sprouting. Neuronal loss and aberrant neuroplastic changes in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus have been identified in the pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) kindling model. Antiseizure activity of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors has been reported in several studies. In the current study, the protective effect of fluvoxamine against PTZ-kindling was investigated in terms of seizure scores, neuronal loss, and regulation of hippocampal neuroplasticity. Further, the role of 5-HT3 receptors was determined. Kindling was induced by repeated injections of PTZ (35 mg/kg) thrice weekly, for a total of 13 injections. One hundred male albino mice were allocated into 10 groups: (1) saline, (2) PTZ, (3) diazepam (1 mg/kg)+PTZ, (4-6) fluvoxamine (5, 10 or 20 mg/kg)+PTZ, (7) ondansetron+fluvoxamine (20 mg/kg)+PTZ, (8) ondansetron+PTZ group, (9) ondansetron (2 mg/kg, i.p.)+saline, and (10) fluvoxamine (20 mg/kg)+saline. PTZ-kindled mice showed high seizure activity, hippocampal neuronal loss, and expression of growth-associated phosphoprotein (GAP-43) compared with saline-treated mice. Repeated administration of fluvoxamine (20 mg/kg) in PTZ-kindled mice suppressed seizure scores, protected against hippocampal neuronal loss, and downregulated GAP-43 expression, without producing any signs of the 5-HT syndrome in healthy rats. Importantly, pretreatment with a selective 5-HT3 receptor blocker (ondansetron) attenuated the aforementioned effects of fluvoxamine. In conclusion, the ameliorating effect of fluvoxamine on hippocampal neurons and neuroplasticity in PTZ-kindled mice was, at least in part, dependent on enhancement of hippocampal serotoninergic transmission at 5-HT3 receptors.

  6. Selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors potentiate gene blunting induced by repeated methylphenidate treatment: Zif268 versus Homer1a.

    PubMed

    Van Waes, Vincent; Vandrevala, Malcolm; Beverley, Joel; Steiner, Heinz

    2014-11-01

    There is a growing use of psychostimulants, such as methylphenidate (Ritalin; dopamine re-uptake inhibitor), for medical treatments and as cognitive enhancers in the healthy. Methylphenidate is known to produce some addiction-related gene regulation. Recent findings in animal models show that selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs), including fluoxetine, can potentiate acute induction of gene expression by methylphenidate, thus indicating an acute facilitatory role for serotonin in dopamine-induced gene regulation. We investigated whether repeated exposure to fluoxetine, in conjunction with methylphenidate, in adolescent rats facilitated a gene regulation effect well established for repeated exposure to illicit psychostimulants such as cocaine-blunting (repression) of gene inducibility. We measured, by in situ hybridization histochemistry, the effects of a 5-day repeated treatment with methylphenidate (5 mg/kg), fluoxetine (5 mg/kg) or a combination on the inducibility (by cocaine) of neuroplasticity-related genes (Zif268, Homer1a) in the striatum. Repeated methylphenidate treatment alone produced minimal gene blunting, while fluoxetine alone had no effect. In contrast, fluoxetine added to methylphenidate robustly potentiated methylphenidate-induced blunting for both genes. This potentiation was widespread throughout the striatum, but was most robust in the lateral, sensorimotor striatum, thus mimicking cocaine effects. For illicit psychostimulants, blunting of gene expression is considered part of the molecular basis of addiction. Our results thus suggest that SSRIs, such as fluoxetine, may increase the addiction liability of methylphenidate.

  7. Treating Trichotillomania: A Meta-Analysis of Treatment Effects and Moderators for Behavior Therapy and Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Joseph F.; Ung, Danielle; Selles, Robert R.; Rahman, Omar; Lewin, Adam B.; Murphy, Tanya K.; Storch, Eric A.

    2014-01-01

    Few randomized controlled trials (RCTs) exist examining the efficacy of behavior therapy (BT) or serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs) for the treatment of trichotillomania (TTM), with no examination of treatment moderators. The present meta-analysis synthesized the treatment effect sizes (ES) of BT and SRI relative to comparison conditions, and examined moderators of treatment. A comprehensive literature search identified 11 RCTs that met inclusion criteria. Clinical characteristics (e.g., age, comorbidity, therapeutic contact hours), outcome measures, treatment subtypes (e.g., SRI subtype, BT subtype), and ES data were extracted. The standardized mean difference of change in hair pulling severity was the outcome measure. A random effects meta-analysis found a large pooled ES for BT (ES= 1.41, p< 0.001). BT trials with greater therapeutic contact hours exhibited larger ES (p= 0.009). Additionally, BT trials that used mood enhanced therapeutic techniques exhibited greater ES relative to trials including only traditional BT components (p= 0.004). For SRI trials, a random effects meta-analysis identified a moderate pooled ES (ES= 0.41, p= 0.02). Although clomipramine exhibited larger ES relative to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, the difference was not statistically significant. Publication bias was not identified for either treatment. BT yields large treatment effects for TTM, with further examination needed to disentangle confounded treatment moderators. SRI trials exhibited a moderate pooled ES, with no treatment moderators identified. Sensitivity analyses highlighted the need for further RCTs of SRIs, especially among youth with TTM. PMID:25108618

  8. Lamotrigine Augmentation of Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors in Severe and Long-Term Treatment-Resistant Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Arrojo-Romero, Manuel; Tajes Alonso, María; de Leon, Jose

    2013-01-01

    The treatment recommendations in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) after lack of response to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) include augmentation with other drugs, particularly clomipramine, a more potent serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SRI), or antipsychotics. We present two cases of response to lamotrigine augmentation in treatment-refractory OCD; each received multiple SRI trials over a >10-year period. The first patient had eleven years of treatment with multiple combinations including clomipramine and SSRIs. She had a >50% decrease of Y-BOCS (from 29 to 14) by augmenting paroxetine (60 mg/day) with lamotrigine (100 mg/day). The second patient had 22 years of treatment with multiple combinations, including combinations of SSRIs with clomipramine and risperidone. She had an almost 50% decrease of Y-BOCS (from 30 to 16) and disappearance of tics by augmenting clomipramine (225 mg/d) with lamotrigine (200 mg/day). These two patients were characterized by lack of response to multiple treatments, making a placebo response to lamotrigine augmentation unlikely. Prospective randomized trials in treatment-resistant OCD patients who do not respond to combinations of SSRIs with clomipramine and/or antipsychotics are needed, including augmentation with lamotrigine. Until these trials are available, our cases suggest that clinicians may consider lamotrigine augmentation in such treatment-resistant OCD patients. PMID:23936714

  9. Biomarkers for the effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, G J H; de Visser, S J; Cohen, A F; van Gerven, J M A

    2005-01-01

    Aims Studies of novel centrally acting drugs in healthy volunteers are traditionally concerned with kinetics and tolerability, but useful information may also be obtained from biomarkers of clinical endpoints. This paper provides a systematic overview of CNS-tests used with SSRIs in healthy subjects. A useful biomarker should meet the following requirements: a consistent response across studies and drugs; a clear response of the biomarker to a therapeutic dose; a dose–response relationship; a plausible relationship between biomarker, pharmacology and pathogenesis. Methods These criteria were applied to all individual tests found in studies of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), performed in healthy subjects since 1966, identified with a systematic MedLine search. Separate databases were created to evaluate the effects of single or multiple dose SSRI-studies, and for amitriptyline whenever the original report included this antidepressant as a positive control. Doses of the antidepressant were divided into high- and low-dose ranges, relative to a medium range of therapeutic doses. For each test, the drug effects were scored as statistically significant impairment/decrease (−), improvement/increase (+) or no change (=) relative to placebo. Results 56 single dose studies and 22 multiple dose studies were identified, investigating the effects of 13 different SSRIs on 171 variants of neuropsychological tests, which could be clustered into seven neuropsychological domains. Low single doses of SSRIs generally stimulated tests of attention and memory. High doses tended to impair visual/auditory and visuomotor systems and subjective performance, while showing an acceleration in motor function. The most pronounced effects were observed using tests that measure flicker discrimination (improvement at low doses: 75%, medium doses: 40%, high doses: 43% of studies); REM sleep (inconsistent decrease after medium doses, decrease in 83% of studies after high doses

  10. Constitutively Active 5-HT Receptors: An Explanation of How 5-HT Antagonists Inhibit Gut Motility in Species Where 5-HT is Not an Enteric Neurotransmitter?

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Nick J.

    2015-01-01

    Antagonists of 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptors are well known to inhibit gastrointestinal (GI)-motility and transit in a variety of mammals, including humans. Originally, these observations had been interpreted by many investigators (including us) as evidence that endogenous 5-HT plays a major role in GI motility. This seemed a logical assumption. However, the story changed dramatically after recent studies revealed that 5-HT antagonists still blocked major GI motility patterns (peristalsis and colonic migrating motor complexes) in segments of intestine depleted of all 5-HT. Then, these results were further supported by Dr. Gershons' laboratory, which showed that genetic deletion of all genes that synthesizes 5-HT had minor, or no inhibitory effects on GI transit in vivo. If 5-HT was essential for GI motility patterns and transit, then one would expect major disruptions in motility and transit when 5-HT synthesis was genetically ablated. This does not occur. The inhibitory effects of 5-HT antagonists on GI motility clearly occur independently of any 5-HT in the gut. Evidence now suggests that 5-HT antagonists act on 5-HT receptors in the gut which are constitutively active, and don't require 5-HT for their activation. This would explain a long-standing mystery of how 5-HT antagonists inhibit gut motility in species like mice, rats, and humans where 5-HT is not an enteric neurotransmitter. Studies are now increasingly demonstrating that the presence of a neurochemical in enteric neurons does not mean they function as neurotransmitters. Caution should be exercised when interpreting any inhibitory effects of 5-HT antagonists on GI motility. PMID:26732863

  11. Side effect profile of 5-HT treatments for Parkinson's disease and L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia in rats

    PubMed Central

    Lindenbach, D; Palumbo, N; Ostock, C Y; Vilceus, N; Conti, M M; Bishop, C

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD) with L-DOPA eventually causes abnormal involuntary movements known as dyskinesias in most patients. Dyskinesia can be reduced using compounds that act as direct or indirect agonists of the 5-HT1A receptor, but these drugs have been reported to worsen PD features and are known to produce ‘5-HT syndrome’, symptoms of which include tremor, myoclonus, rigidity and hyper-reflexia. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Sprague-Dawley rats were given unilateral nigrostriatal dopamine lesions with 6-hydroxydopamine. Each of the following three purportedly anti-dyskinetic 5-HT compounds were administered 15 min before L-DOPA: the full 5-HT1A agonist ±-8-hydroxy-2-dipropylaminotetralin (±8-OH-DPAT), the partial 5-HT1A agonist buspirone or the 5-HT transporter inhibitor citalopram. After these injections, animals were monitored for dyskinesia, 5-HT syndrome, motor activity and PD akinesia. KEY RESULTS Each 5-HT drug dose-dependently reduced dyskinesia by relatively equal amounts (±8-OH-DPAT ≥ citalopram ≥ buspirone), but 5-HT syndrome was higher with ±8-OH-DPAT, lower with buspirone and not present with citalopram. Importantly, with or without L-DOPA, all three compounds provided an additional improvement of PD akinesia. All drugs tempered the locomotor response to L-DOPA suggesting dyskinesia reduction, but vertical rearing was reduced with 5-HT drugs, potentially reflecting features of 5-HT syndrome. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS The results suggest that compounds that indirectly facilitate 5-HT1A receptor activation, such as citalopram, may be more effective therapeutics than direct 5-HT1A receptor agonists because they exhibit similar anti-dyskinesia efficacy, while possessing a reduced side effect profile. PMID:25175895

  12. Internalization and recycling of 5-HT2A receptors activated by serotonin and protein kinase C-mediated mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Samarjit; Puri, Sapna; Miledi, Ricardo; Panicker, Mitradas M.

    2002-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT), a major neurotransmitter, has a large number of G protein-coupled receptors in mammals. On activation by exposure to their ligand, 5-HT2 receptor subtypes increase IP3 levels and undergo desensitization and internalization. To visualize the receptor in cells during these processes, we have constructed a 5-HT2A-enhanced GFP (SR2-GFP) fusion receptor. We show that this fusion receptor undergoes internalization on exposure to its natural ligand, 5-HT. Because 5-HT2A receptors activate the phospholipase C pathway, we studied the effect of protein kinase C (PKC) on the internalization process and found that activation of PKC by its specific activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, in the absence of 5-HT, leads to internalization of the receptor. Moreover, inhibition of PKC by its inhibitor sphingosine in the presence of 5-HT prevents the internalization process, suggesting that activation of PKC is sufficient and necessary for the internalization of 5-HT2A receptors. We also show that SR2-GFP recycles back to the plasma membrane after 5-HT-dependent internalization, suggesting a mechanism for resensitization. In addition, receptors that have been internalized on addition of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate in the absence of 5-HT also recycle to the surface, with a time course similar to that seen after activation of the receptors by 5-HT. Our study suggests that 5-HT2A receptors internalize and return to the surface after both serotonin- and PKC-mediated processes. This study reveals a role for PKC in receptor internalization and also shows that 5-HT2A receptors are recycled. PMID:12388782

  13. Roles of the serotonin 5-HT4 receptor in dendrite formation of the rat hippocampal neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kozono, Naoki; Ohtani, Akiko; Shiga, Takashi

    2017-01-15

    Serotonin (5-HT) is involved in various aspects of hippocampal development, although the specific roles of 5-HT receptors are poorly understood. We investigated the roles of 5-HT receptors in the dendrite formation of hippocampal neurons. We focused on the 5-HT4 receptor, which is coupled with Gs protein, and compared the effects with those of the Gi-coupled 5-HT1A receptor. Neurons from rat hippocampi at embryonic day 18 were dissociated and treated for 4 days with the 5-HT4 receptor agonist BIMU8 or the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH DPAT. The formation of primary dendrites and dendrite branching were promoted by BIMU8, whereas the dendrite branching was inhibited by 8-OH DPAT. BIMU8-induced promotion of dendrite formation was neutralized by concomitant treatment with the 5-HT4 receptor antagonist, confirming the specific actions of the 5-HT4 receptor. We then examined the signaling mechanisms underlying the actions of the 5-HT4 receptor by using a protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor. The BIMU8-induced promotion of dendrite formation was reversed partially by the PKA inhibitor, suggesting involvement of PKA signaling downstream of the 5-HT4 receptor. Finally, we examined the contribution of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) to the promotion of dendrite formation by BIMU8. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that BIMU8 increased the BDNF mRNA expression and that treatment of cultured neurons with the TrkB antagonist reversed the BIMU8-induced increase in dendrite formation. In summary, the present study suggests a novel role for the 5-HT4 receptor in facilitation of dendrite formation in which intracellular signaling of PKA and the BDNF-TrkB system may be involved.

  14. From Chemotherapy-Induced Emesis to Neuroprotection: Therapeutic Opportunities for 5-HT3 Receptor Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Fakhfouri, Gohar; Mousavizadeh, Kazem; Mehr, Sharam Ejtemaei; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza; Zirak, Mohammad Reza; Ghia, Jean-Eric; Rahimian, Reza

    2015-12-01

    5-HT3 receptor antagonists are extensively used as efficacious agents in counteracting chemotherapy-induced emesis. Recent investigations have shed light on other potential effects (analgesic, anxiolytic, and anti-psychotic). Some studies have reported neuroprotective properties for the 5-HT3 receptor antagonists in vitro and in vivo. When administered to Aβ-challenged rat cortical neurons, 5-HT3 receptor antagonists substantially abated apoptosis, elevation of cytosolic Ca(2), glutamate release, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and caspase-3 activity. In addition, in vivo studies show that 5-HT3 receptor antagonists possess, alongside their anti-emetic effects, notable immunomodulatory properties in CNS. We found that pretreatment with tropisetron significantly improved neurological deficits and diminished leukocyte transmigration into the brain, TNF-α level, and brain infarction in a murine model of embolic stroke. Our recent investigation revealed that tropisetron protects against Aβ-induced neurotoxicity in vivo through both 5-HT3 receptor-dependent and -independent pathways. Tropisetron, in vitro, was found to be an efficacious inhibitor of the signaling pathway leading to the activation of pro-inflammatory NF-κB, a transcription factor pivotal to the upregulation of several neuroinflammatory mediators in brain. This mini review summarizes novel evidence concerning effects of 5-HT3 antagonists and their possible mechanisms of action in ameliorating neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer, multiple sclerosis, and stroke. Further, we discuss some newly synthesized 5-HT3 receptor antagonists with dual properties of 5-HT3 receptor blockade/alpha-7 nicotinic receptor activator and their potential in management of memory impairment. Since 5-HT3 receptor antagonists possess a large therapeutic window, they can constitute a scaffold for design and synthesis of new neuroprotective medications.

  15. The 5-HT1-like receptors mediating inhibition of sympathetic vasopressor outflow in the pithed rat: operational correlation with the 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B and 5-HT1D subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Villalón, Carlos M; Centurión, David; Rabelo, Gonzalo; de Vries, Peter; Saxena, Pramod R; Sánchez-López, Araceli

    1998-01-01

    It has been suggested that the inhibition of sympathetically-induced vasopressor responses produced by 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in pithed rats is mediated by 5-HT1-like receptors. The present study has re-analysed this suggestion with regard to the classification schemes recently proposed by the NC-IUPHAR subcommittee on 5-HT receptors.Intravenous (i.v.) continuous infusions of 5-HT and the 5-HT1 receptor agonists, 8-OH-DPAT (5-HT1A), indorenate (5-HT1A), CP 93,129 (5-HT1B) and sumatriptan (5-HT1B/1D), resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of sympathetically-induced vasopressor responses.The sympatho-inhibitory responses induced by 5-HT, 8-OH-DPAT, indorenate, CP 93,129 or sumatriptan were analysed before and after i.v. treatment with blocking doses of the putative 5-HT receptor antagonists, WAY 100635 (5-HT1A), cyanopindolol (5-HT1A/1B) or GR 127935 (5-HT1B/1D). Thus, after WAY 100635, the responses to 5-HT and indorenate, but not to 8-OH-DPAT, CP 93,129 and sumatriptan, were blocked. After cyanopindolol, the responses to 5-HT, indorenate and CP 93,129 were abolished, whilst those to 8-OH-DPAT and sumatriptan (except at the lowest frequency of stimulation) remained unaltered. In contrast, after GR 127935, the responses to 5-HT, CP 93,129 and sumatriptan, but not to 8-OH-DPAT and indorenate, were abolished.In additional experiments, the inhibition induced by 5-HT was not modified after 5-HT7 receptor blocking doses of mesulergine.The above results suggest that the 5-HT1-like receptors, which inhibit the sympathetic vasopressor outflow in pithed rats, display the pharmacological profile of the 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B and 5-HT1D, but not that of 5-HT7, receptors. PMID:9692787

  16. Selective 5HT2A and 5HT6 Receptor Antagonists Promote Sleep in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Morairty, Stephen R.; Hedley, Linda; Flores, Judith; Martin, Renee; Kilduff, Thomas S.

    2008-01-01

    Study Objectives: Serotonin (5-HT) has long been implicated in the control of sleep and wakefulness. This study evaluated the hypnotic efficacy of the 5-HT6 antagonist RO4368554 (RO) and the 5-HT2A receptor antagonist MDL100907 (MDL) relative to zolpidem. Design: A randomized, repeated-measures design was utilized in which Wistar rats received intraperitoneal injections of RO (1.0, 3.0, and 10 mg/kg), MDL (0.1, 1.0 and 3.0 mg/kg), zolpidem (10 mg/kg), or vehicle in the middle of the dark (active) period. Electroencephalogram, electromyogram, body temperature (Tb) and locomotor activity were analyzed for 6 hours after injection. Measurements and Results: RO, MDL, and zolpidem all produced significant increases in sleep and decreases in waking, compared with vehicle control. All 3 doses of MDL produced more consolidated sleep, increased non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREM) sleep, and increased electroencephalographic delta power during NREM sleep. The highest dose of RO (10.0 mg/kg) produced significant increases in sleep and decreases in waking during hour 2 following dosing. These increases in sleep duration were associated with greater delta power during NREM sleep. ZO Zolpidem induced sleep with the shortest latency and significantly increased NREM sleep and delta power but also suppressed rapid eye movement sleep sleep; in contrast, neither RO nor MDL affected rapid eye movement sleep. Whereas RO did not affect Tb, both zolpidem and MDL reduced Tb relative to vehicle-injected controls. Conclusions: These results support a role for 5-HT2A receptor modulation in NREM sleep and suggest a previously unrecognized role for 5-HT6 receptors in sleep-wake regulation. Citation: Morairty SR; Hedley L; Flores J; Martin R; Kilduff TS. Selective 5HT2A and 5HT6 receptor antagonists promote sleep in rats. SLEEP 2008;31(1):34-44. PMID:18220076

  17. Brain Histamine Is Crucial for Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors‘ Behavioral and Neurochemical Effects

    PubMed Central

    Munari, Leonardo; Provensi, Gustavo; Passani, Maria Beatrice; Galeotti, Nicoletta; Cassano, Tommaso; Benetti, Fernando; Corradetti, Renato

    2015-01-01

    Backgound: The neurobiological changes underlying depression resistant to treatments remain poorly understood, and failure to respond to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors may result from abnormalities of neurotransmitter systems that excite serotonergic neurons, such as histamine. Methods: Using behavioral (tail suspension test) and neurochemical (in vivo microdialysis, Western-blot analysis) approaches, here we report that antidepressant responses to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (citalopram or paroxetine) are abolished in mice unable to synthesize histamine due to either targeted disruption of histidine decarboxylase gene (HDC-/-) or injection of alpha-fluoromethylhistidine, a suicide inhibitor of this enzyme. Results: In the tail suspension test, all classes of antidepressants tested reduced the immobility time of controls. Systemic reboxetine or imipramine reduced the immobility time of histamine-deprived mice as well, whereas selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors did not even though their serotonergic system is functional. In in vivo microdialysis experiments, citalopram significantly increased histamine extraneuronal levels in the cortex of freely moving mice, and methysergide, a serotonin 5-HT1/5-HT2 receptor antagonist, abolished this effect, thus suggesting the involvement of endogenous serotonin. CREB phosphorylation, which is implicated in the molecular mechanisms of antidepressant treatment, was abolished in histamine-deficient mice treated with citalopram. The CREB pathway is not impaired in HDC-/- mice, as administration of 8-bromoadenosine 3’, 5’-cyclic monophosphate increased CREB phosphorylation, and in the tail suspension test it significantly reduced the time spent immobile by mice of both genotypes. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors selectively require the integrity of the brain histamine system to exert their preclinical responses. PMID:25899065

  18. Serotonin Selective Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) and Female Sexual Dysfunction (FSD): Hypothesis on Its association and options of treatment.

    PubMed

    Rappek, Nurul Azmi Mahamad; Sidi, Hatta; Kumar, Jaya; Kamarazaman, Sazlina; Das, Srijit; Masiran, Ruziana; Baharudin, Najwa; Hatta, Muhammad

    2016-12-27

    Sexual dysfunctions are commonly seen in women on selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). The complexities of female sexual functioning are reflected through modulation of inter-playing factors like the neuropsychophysiological factors, inter-personal and relationship issue, psychiatric co-morbidities and physical disorder. The incidence of SSRIs-induced FSD is difficult to estimate because of the potentially confounding effects of SSRIs, presence of polypharmacy, marital effect, socio-cultural factors and due to the design and assessment problems in majority of the studies.The exact mechanism of FSD-induced SSRIs is unknown. It has been postulated that although SSRIs may modulate other neurotransmitter sytem such as nitric oxide (NO), noradgenergic and dopamine in inducing FSD. In the present review, we highlight current evidence regarding potential mechanism of SSRIs in causing FSD, which include low sexual desire (low libido), arousal difficulties (lack of lubrication), and anorgasmia. The specific association of FSD to SSRI use, has not been ellucidated. The relationship is dose-dependent, and may vary among the groups with respect to mechanism of serotonin and dopamine reuptake, induction of release of prolactin from the pituitary gland, anticholinergic side-effects, inhibition of NO synthesis and emotional-memory circuit encryption for sexual experiences. Various interventional strategies exist regarding the treatment of SSRI-induced FSD and this includes tolerance, titration dosage, substitution to another antidepressant drug and psychotherapy. There is a need of better understanding of SSRIs-induced FSD for better treatment outcome.

  19. Serotonin reuptake inhibitors act centrally to cause bone loss in mice by counteracting a local antiresorptive effect

    PubMed Central

    Ortuño, María José; Robinson, Samuel T.; Subramanyam, Prakash; Paone, Riccardo; Huang, Yung-yu; Guo, X. Edward; Colecraft, Henry M.; Mann, J. John; Ducy, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    The use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) has been associated with an increased risk of bone fracture, raising concerns about their increasingly broader usage. This deleterious effect is poorly understood and thus strategies to avoid this side effect remain elusive. We show here that fluoxetine (Flx), one of the most prescribed SSRI, acts on bone remodeling through two distinct mechanisms. Peripherally, Flx has antiresorptive properties, directly impairing osteoclast differentiation and function through a serotonin reuptake-independent Ca2+-calmodulin-NFATc1-dependent mechanism. With time, however, Flx also triggers a brain serotonin-dependent rise in sympathetic output that increases bone resorption sufficiently to counteract its local antiresorptive effect; thus leading to a net effect of impaired bone formation and bone loss. Accordingly, neutralizing this second mode of action through co-treatment with the β-blocker propranolol, while leaving the peripheral effect intact, prevents Flx-induced bone loss in mice. Hence, this study identifies a dual mode of action of SSRIs on bone remodeling and suggests a therapeutic strategy to block the deleterious effect on bone homeostasis from their chronic use. PMID:27595322

  20. Serotonin-reuptake inhibitors act centrally to cause bone loss in mice by counteracting a local anti-resorptive effect.

    PubMed

    Ortuño, María José; Robinson, Samuel T; Subramanyam, Prakash; Paone, Riccardo; Huang, Yung-Yu; Guo, X Edward; Colecraft, Henry M; Mann, J John; Ducy, Patricia

    2016-10-01

    The use of selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) has been associated with an increased risk of bone fracture, raising concerns about their increasingly broader usage. This deleterious effect is poorly understood, and thus strategies to avoid this side effect remain elusive. We show here that fluoxetine (Flx), one of the most-prescribed SSRIs, acts on bone remodeling through two distinct mechanisms. Peripherally, Flx has anti-resorptive properties, directly impairing osteoclast differentiation and function through a serotonin-reuptake-independent mechanism that is dependent on intracellular Ca(2+) levels and the transcription factor Nfatc1. With time, however, Flx also triggers a brain-serotonin-dependent rise in sympathetic output that increases bone resorption sufficiently to counteract its local anti-resorptive effect, thus leading to a net effect of impaired bone formation and bone loss. Accordingly, neutralizing this second mode of action through co-treatment with the β-blocker propranolol, while leaving the peripheral effect intact, prevents Flx-induced bone loss in mice. Hence, this study identifies a dual mode of action of SSRIs on bone remodeling and suggests a therapeutic strategy to block the deleterious effect on bone homeostasis from their chronic use.

  1. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor dapoxetine inhibits voltage-dependent K(+) channels in rabbit coronary arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Han Sol; Li, Hongliang; Kim, Hye Won; Shin, Sung Eun; Jung, Won-Kyo; Ha, Kwon-Soo; Han, Eun-Taek; Hong, Seok-Ho; Firth, Amy L; Choi, Il-Whan; Park, Won Sun

    2017-04-01

    We investigated the inhibitory effect of dapoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), on voltage-dependent K(+) (Kv) channels using native smooth muscle cells from rabbit coronary arteries. Dapoxetine inhibited Kv channel currents in a concentration-dependent manner, with an IC50 value of 2.68±0.94 μmol/L and a slope value (Hill coefficient) of 0.63±0.11. Application of 10 μmol/L dapoxetine accelerated the rate of inactivation of Kv currents. Although dapoxetine did not modify current activation kinetics, it caused a significant negative shift in the inactivation curves. Application of train step (1 or 2 Hz) progressively increased the inhibitory effect of dapoxetine on Kv channels. In addition, the recovery time constant was extended in its presence, suggesting that the longer recovery time constant from inactivation underlies a use-dependent inhibition of the channel. From these results, we conclude that dapoxetine inhibits Kv channels in a dose-, time-, use-, and state (open)-dependent manner, independent of serotonin reuptake inhibition.

  2. [Pharmacological and clinical aspects of fluvoxamine (Depromel), the first selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor approved for clinical use employed in Japan].

    PubMed

    Hachisu, M; Ichimaru, Y

    2000-05-01

    Fluvoxamine (Depromel), a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), was launched in May 1999 in Japan with more than 10 years' delay from the marketing in Europe and the United States. Fluvoxamine has been approved in about 80 countries as the indication to "depression" since 1983. As the indication to obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), fluvoxamine was first approved in the United States in 1994 and then in about 30 countries. Efficacy of the drug on "depression and depressed state" was found to be comparable to traditional tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) by the clinical studies in Japan. Indication to OCD was first approved for fluvoxamine in Japan. The antidepressant and the anti-OCD action are considered the result of the serotonin reuptake inhibition at the serotonergic neurons. Fluvoxamine has little affinity for muscarinic, adrenergic alpha 1- and histamine H1-receptors, which TCAs have. Therefore, fluvoxamine possesses less side effects such as dry mouse, disuria, dizziness, orthostatic hypotension and drowsiness, etc.; and it is useful for elderly patients and long-term treatments for depression and OCD.

  3. Contractile 5-HT1 receptors in human isolated pial arterioles: correlation with 5-HT1D binding sites.

    PubMed Central

    Hamel, E.; Bouchard, D.

    1991-01-01

    1. The 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptor responsible for inducing vasoconstriction in human isolated pial arterioles has been pharmacologically characterized. 2. Of several 5-HT agonists tested, 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT) was the most potent and the rank order of agonist potency can be summarized as: 5-CT greater than 5-HT greater than RU 24969 = alpha-methyl-5-HT = methysergide much greater than MDL 72832 = 2-methyl-5-HT much greater than 2-dipropylamino-8-hydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-naphthalene (8-OH-DPAT). With few exceptions, the maximal contractile responses of these agonists were comparable to that induced by 5-HT. 3. A correlation analysis performed between the agonists vascular potency (pD2 values) and their affinities (pKD values) published at various subtypes of 5-HT binding sites showed a positive significant correlation with rat cortical 5-HT1B (r = 0.86; P less than 0.01) and human caudate 5-HT1D (r = 0.98; P less than 0.005) subtypes. 4. Selective antagonists at 5-HT2 (ketanserin, mianserin, MDL 11939) and 5-HT3 (MDL 72222) sites were totally devoid of inhibitory activity on the 5-HT-induced contraction, an observation which agreed with the agonist data and further excluded activation of these receptors. In contrast, the 5-HT1-like/5-HT2 antagonist methiothepin and the non-selective 5-HT1D compound metergoline inhibited with high affinity the contraction induced by 5-HT with respective pA2 values of 8.55 +/- 0.16 and 6.88 +/- 0.05. This contractile response was, however, insensitive to 5-HT1B (propranolol) and 5-HT1C (mesulergine, mianserin) antagonists.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2043924

  4. Conservation of 5-HT1A receptor-mediated autoinhibition of serotonin (5-HT) neurons in mice with altered 5-HT homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Araragi, Naozumi; Mlinar, Boris; Baccini, Gilda; Gutknecht, Lise; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Corradetti, Renato

    2013-01-01

    Firing activity of serotonin (5-HT) neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) is controlled by inhibitory somatodendritic 5-HT1A autoreceptors. This autoinhibitory mechanism is implicated in the etiology of disorders of emotion regulation, such as anxiety disorders and depression, as well as in the mechanism of antidepressant action. Here, we investigated how persistent alterations in brain 5-HT availability affect autoinhibition in two genetically modified mouse models lacking critical mediators of serotonergic transmission: 5-HT transporter knockout (Sert-/-) and tryptophan hydroxylase-2 knockout (Tph2-/-) mice. The degree of autoinhibition was assessed by loose-seal cell-attached recording in DRN slices. First, application of the 5-HT1A-selective agonist R(+)-8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin showed mild sensitization and marked desensitization of 5-HT1A receptors in Tph2-/- mice and Sert-/- mice, respectively. While 5-HT neurons from Tph2-/- mice did not display autoinhibition in response to L-tryptophan, autoinhibition of these neurons was unaltered in Sert-/- mice despite marked desensitization of their 5-HT1A autoreceptors. When the Tph2-dependent 5-HT synthesis step was bypassed by application of 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan (5-HTP), neurons from both Tph2-/- and Sert-/- mice decreased their firing rates at significantly lower concentrations of 5-HTP compared to wildtype controls. Our findings demonstrate that, as opposed to the prevalent view, sensitivity of somatodendritic 5-HT1A receptors does not predict the magnitude of 5-HT neuron autoinhibition. Changes in 5-HT1A receptor sensitivity may rather be seen as an adaptive mechanism to keep autoinhibition functioning in response to extremely altered levels of extracellular 5-HT resulting from targeted inactivation of mediators of serotonergic signaling.

  5. Prenatal exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) increases aggression and modulates maternal behavior in offspring mice.

    PubMed

    Svirsky, Natali; Levy, Sigal; Avitsur, Ronit

    2016-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) are commonly prescribed antidepressant drugs in pregnant women. SSRIs cross the placental barrier and affect serotonergic neurotransmission in the fetus. Although no gross SSRI-related teratogenic effects were reported, infants born following prenatal exposure to SSRIs are at higher risk for various developmental abnormalities. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of prenatal SSRI on social and maternal behavior in mice. To this end, pregnant female dams were exposed to saline or fluoxetine (FLX) throughout pregnancy, and the behavior of the offspring was examined. The results indicate that in utero FLX increased aggression in adult males and delayed emergence of maternal behavior in adult females. Social exploration and recognition memory were not affected by prenatal FLX exposure. These findings support the notion that alterations in the development of serotonergic pathways following prenatal exposure to SSRIs are associated with changes in social and maternal behavior throughout life.

  6. Treating depression in coronary artery disease and chronic heart failure: what's new in using selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors?

    PubMed

    Paraskevaidis, Ioannis; Palios, John; Parissis, John; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Anastasiou-Nana, Maria

    2012-06-01

    Depression is a common co-morbidity in patients with cardiovascular diseases such as chronic coronary artery disease, acute coronary syndromes, post by-pass surgery and chronic heart failure. The presence of depression is independently associated with a decline in health status and an increase in the risk of hospitalization and death for patients with coronary artery disease or congestive heart failure. Novel treatment modalities such as selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) may improve depressive symptoms and prognosis of post-myocardial infarction and heart failure patients interacting with the common pathophysiological mechanisms of depression and cardiovascular disease. This review summarizes current experimental and clinical evidence regarding the effects of SSRIs on platelet functions, immune and neurohormonal activation, and cardiac rhythm disturbances in patients with cardiovascular disease.

  7. Carbonic anhydrase activators. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors fluoxetine, sertraline and citalopram are strong activators of isozymes I and II.

    PubMed

    Casini, Angela; Caccia, Silvio; Scozzafava, Andrea; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2003-08-18

    The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) fluoxetine, sertraline and citalopram have been investigated for their ability to activate two carbonic anhydrase (CA) isozymes, hCA I and hCA II, in parallel with two standard activators for which the X-ray structure (in complex with isozyme II) has been resolved: histamine and phenylalanine. All three SSRI activated both isozymes with potencies comparable to that of the standards although the profile was different: for hCA I, best activators were fluoxetine and histamine, with citalopram and sertraline showing weaker activity. For hCA II, the best activators were phenylalanine and citalopram, and the weakest histamine and sertraline, whereas fluoxetine showed an intermediate behavior. These results suggest that SSRI efficacy in major depression complicating Alzheimer's disease may be partly due to their ability to activate CA isozymes and may lead to the development of potent activators for the therapy of diseases associated with significant decreases in brain CA activity.

  8. Revisiting Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors and the Therapeutic Potential of “Uptake-2” in Psychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Depression is among the most common psychiatric disorders, and in many patients a disorder for which available medications provide suboptimal or no symptom relief. The most commonly prescribed class of antidepressants, the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), are thought to act by increasing extracellular serotonin in brain by blocking its uptake via the high-affinity serotonin transporter (SERT). However, the relative lack of therapeutic efficacy of SSRIs has brought into question the utility of increasing extracellular serotonin for the treatment of depression. In this Viewpoint, we discuss why increasing extracellular serotonin should not be written off as a therapeutic strategy. We describe how “uptake-2” transporters may explain the relative lack of therapeutic efficacy of SSRIs, as well as why “uptake-2” transporters might be useful therapeutic targets. PMID:23336039

  9. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) Cellular Sequestration during Chronic Exposure Delays 5-HT3 Receptor Resensitization due to Its Subsequent Release*

    PubMed Central

    Hothersall, J. Daniel; Alexander, Amy; Samson, Andrew J.; Moffat, Christopher; Bollan, Karen A.; Connolly, Christopher N.

    2014-01-01

    The serotonergic synapse is dynamically regulated by serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)) with elevated levels leading to the down-regulation of the serotonin transporter and a variety of 5-HT receptors, including the 5-HT type-3 (5-HT3) receptors. We report that recombinantly expressed 5-HT3 receptor binding sites are reduced by chronic exposure to 5-HT (IC50 of 154.0 ± 45.7 μm, t½ = 28.6 min). This is confirmed for 5-HT3 receptor-induced contractions in the guinea pig ileum, which are down-regulated after chronic, but not acute, exposure to 5-HT. The loss of receptor function does not involve endocytosis, and surface receptor levels are unaltered. The rate and extent of down-regulation is potentiated by serotonin transporter function (IC50 of 2.3 ± 1.0 μm, t½ = 3.4 min). Interestingly, the level of 5-HT uptake correlates with the extent of down-regulation. Using TX-114 extraction, we find that accumulated 5-HT remains soluble and not membrane-bound. This cytoplasmically sequestered 5-HT is readily releasable from both COS-7 cells and the guinea pig ileum. Moreover, the 5-HT level released is sufficient to prevent recovery from receptor desensitization in the guinea pig ileum. Together, these findings suggest the existence of a novel mechanism of down-regulation where the chronic release of sequestered 5-HT prolongs receptor desensitization. PMID:25281748

  10. High trait aggression in men is associated with low 5-HT levels, as indexed by 5-HT4 receptor binding.

    PubMed

    da Cunha-Bang, Sofi; Mc Mahon, Brenda; Fisher, Patrick MacDonald; Jensen, Peter Steen; Svarer, Claus; Knudsen, Gitte Moos

    2016-04-01

    Impulsive aggression has commonly been associated with a dysfunction of the serotonin (5-HT) system: many, but not all, studies point to an inverse relationship between 5-HT and aggression. As cerebral 5-HT4 receptor (5-HT4R) binding has recently been recognized as a proxy for stable brain levels of 5-HT, we here test the hypothesis in healthy men and women that brain 5-HT levels, as indexed by cerebral 5-HT4R, are inversely correlated with trait aggression and impulsivity. Sixty-one individuals (47 men) underwent positron emission tomography scanning with the radioligand [(11)C]SB207145 for quantification of brain 5-HT4R binding. The Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire (BPAQ) and the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale were used for assessment of trait aggression and trait impulsivity. Among male subjects, there was a positive correlation between global 5-HT4R and BPAQ total score (P = 0.037) as well as BPAQ physical aggression (P = 0.025). No main effect of global 5-HT4R on trait aggression or impulsivity was found in the mixed gender sample, but there was evidence for sex interaction effects in the relationship between global 5-HT4R and BPAQ physical aggression. In conclusion we found that low cerebral 5-HT levels, as indexed by 5-HT4R binding were associated with high trait aggression in males, but not in females.

  11. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, fluoxetine and paroxetine, attenuate the expression of the established behavioral sensitization induced by methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Yujiro; Kashiwa, Atsushi; Ito, Takashi; Ishii, Sumikazu; Umino, Asami; Nishikawa, Toru

    2007-03-01

    To obtain an insight into the development of a new pharmacotherapy that prevents the treatment-resistant relapse of psychostimulant-induced psychosis and schizophrenia, we have investigated in the mouse the effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI), fluoxetine (FLX) and paroxetine (PRX), on the established sensitization induced by methamphetamine (MAP), a model of the relapse of these psychoses, because the modifications of the brain serotonergic transmission have been reported to antagonize the sensitization phenomenon. In agreement with previous reports, repeated MAP treatment (1.0 mg/kg a day, subcutaneously (s.c.)) for 10 days induced a long-lasting enhancement of the increasing effects of a challenge dose of MAP (0.24 mg/kg, s.c.) on motor activity on day 12 or 29 of withdrawal. The daily injection of FLX (10 mg/kg, s.c.) or PRX (8 mg/kg, s.c.) from 12 to 16 days of withdrawal of repeated MAP administration markedly attenuated the ability of the MAP pretreatment to augment the motor responses to the challenge dose of the stimulant 13 days after the SSRI injection. The repeated treatment with FLX or PRX alone failed to affect the motor stimulation following the challenge of saline and MAP 13 days later. These results suggest that the intermittent and repetitive elevation of serotonergic tone may inhibit the expression of the motor sensitization induced by pretreatment with MAP. It is proposed that clinically available serotonin reuptake inhibitors could be useful for preventing the recurrence of hallucinatory-paranoid state in drug-induced psychosis and schizophrenia.

  12. Analysis of the 5-HT1A receptor involvement in passive avoidance in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Misane, Ilga; Johansson, Christina; Ove Ögren, Sven

    1998-01-01

    The effects of the 5-HT2A/2C agonist DOB, the selective 5-HT1A agonist NDO 008 (3-dipropylamino-5-hydroxychroman), and the two enantiomers of the selective 5-HT1A agonist 8-OH-DPAT (R(+)-8-OH-DPAT and S(−)-8-OH-DPAT) were studied in a step-through passive avoidance (PA) test in the male rat.The 5-HT1A agonists injected prior to training (conditioning) produced a dose-dependent impairment of PA retention when examined 24 h later. R(+)-8-OH-DPAT was four times more effective than S(−)-8-OH-DPAT to cause an impairment of PA retention. Both NDO 008 and the two enantiomers of 8-OH-DPAT induced the serotonin syndrome at the dose range that produced inhibition of the PA response, thus, indicating activation of postsynaptic 5-HT1A receptors.Neither NDO 008 nor R(+)-8-OH-DPAT induced head-twitches, a behavioural response attributed to stimulation of postsynaptic 5-HT2A receptors. In contrast, DOB induced head-twitches at the 0.01 mg kg−1 dose while a 200 times higher dose was required to produce a significant impairment of PA retention.The impairment of PA retention induced by both NDO 008 and R(+)-8-OH-DPAT was fully blocked by the active S(+)- enantiomer of the selective 5-HT1A antagonist WAY 100135 and the mixed 5-HT1A/β-adrenoceptor antagonist L(−)-alprenolol. In contrast, the mixed 5-HT2A/2C antagonists ketanserin and pirenperone were found to be ineffective. Moreover, the β2-adrenoceptor antagonist ICI 118551, the β1-antagonist metoprolol as well as the mixed β-adrenoceptor blocker D(+)-alprenolol all failed to modify the deficit of PA retention by NDO 008 and R(+)-8-OH-DPAT. None of the 5-HT1A or 5-HT2A/2C receptor antagonists tested or the β-blockers altered PA retention by themselves.A 3 day pretreatment procedure (200+100+100 mg kg−1) with the tryptophan hydroxylase inhibitor p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA) did not alter PA retention and did not prevent the inhibitory action of the 5-HT1A agonists, indicating that their effects on PA do not

  13. Aryl biphenyl-3-ylmethylpiperazines as 5-HT7 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeeyeon; Kim, Youngjae; Tae, Jinsung; Yeom, Miyoung; Moon, Bongjin; Huang, Xi-Ping; Roth, Bryan L; Lee, Kangho; Rhim, Hyewhon; Choo, Il Han; Chong, Youhoon; Keum, Gyochang; Nam, Ghilsoo; Choo, Hyunah

    2013-11-01

    The 5-HT7 receptor (5-HT7 R) is a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of depression and neuropathic pain. The 5-HT7 R antagonist SB-269970 exhibited antidepressant-like activity, whereas systemic administration of the 5-HT7 R agonist AS-19 significantly inhibited mechanical hypersensitivity and thermal hyperalgesia. In our efforts to discover selective 5-HT7 R antagonists or agonists, aryl biphenyl-3-ylmethylpiperazines were designed, synthesized, and biologically evaluated against the 5-HT7 R. Among the synthesized compounds, 1-([2'-methoxy-(1,1'-biphenyl)-3-yl]methyl)-4-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazine (28) was the best binder to the 5-HT7 R (pKi =7.83), and its antagonistic property was confirmed by functional assays. The selectivity profile of compound 28 was also recorded for the 5-HT7 R over other serotonin receptor subtypes, such as 5-HT1 R, 5-HT2 R, 5-HT3 R, and 5-HT6 R. In a molecular modeling study, the 2-methoxyphenyl moiety attached to the piperazine ring of compound 28 was proposed to be essential for the antagonistic function.

  14. Serotonin regulates β-casein expression via 5-HT7 receptors in human mammary epithelial MCF-12A cells.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Takeshi; Kimura, Soichiro; Takahashi, Katsuo; Morimoto, Yasunori; Maeda, Tomoji; Sanbe, Atsushi; Ueda, Hideo; Kudo, Kenzo

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported that serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) suppresses β-casein expression, a differentiation marker in mammary epithelial cells, via inhibition of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) phosphorylation in the human mammary epithelial cell line, MCF-12A. In this study, we investigated the expression pattern of the different 5-HT receptor subtypes in MCF-12A cells, and identified the receptors involved in 5-HT-mediated suppression of β-casein protein expression. β-Casein mRNA expression was inhibited by 30 µM 5-HT in a time-dependent manner. Treatment with 30 µM 5-HT for 72 h decreased β-casein protein levels and STAT5 phosphorylation (pSTAT5). The cells expressed four 5-HT receptors subtypes (5-HTR1D, 2B, 3A, and 7) at the mRNA and protein level, and their expression was elevated by prolactin (PRL) treatment. Additionally, the mRNA levels of 5-HTR1D and 5-HTR7 were significantly higher than the other 5-HT receptors in the cells. Tryptophan hydroxylase 1 mRNA was detectable in the cells in the absence of PRL, and PRL treatment significantly increased its expression. β-Casein and pSTAT5/STAT5 levels in the cells co-treated with 5-HT and a selective 5-HTR1D inhibitor, BRL15572, were equal to those observed in cells treated with 5-HT alone. However, in the cells co-treated with 5-HT and a selective 5-HTR7 inhibitor, SB269970, β-casein and pSTAT5/STAT5 levels increased in a SB269970 concentration-dependent manner. In conclusion, we showed that 5-HT regulates β-casein expression via 5-HTR7 in MCF-12A human mammary epithelial cells.

  15. Seizure susceptibility alteration through 5-HT(3) receptor: modulation by nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Gholipour, Taha; Ghasemi, Mehdi; Riazi, Kiarash; Ghaffarpour, Majid; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2010-01-01

    There is some evidence that epileptic seizures could be induced or increased by 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) attenuation, while augmentation of serotonin functions within the brain (e.g. by SSRIs) has been reported to be anticonvulsant. This study was performed to determine the effect of selective 5-HT(3) channel/receptor antagonist granisetron and agonist SR57227 hydrochloride on the pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizure threshold in mice. The possible interaction of this effect with nitrergic system was also examined using the nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) and the NO precursor l-arginine. SR57227 (10mg/kg, i.p.) significantly increased the seizure threshold compared to control group, while high dose granisetron (10mg/kg, i.p.) proved proconvulsant. Co-administration of sub-effective doses of the 5-HT(3) agonist with l-NAME (5 and 60mg/kg, i.p., respectively) exerted a significant anticonvulsive effect, while sub-effective doses of granisetron (3mg/kg) was observed to have a proconvulsive action with the addition of l-arginine (75mg/kg, i.p.). Our data demonstrate that enhancement of 5-HT(3) receptor function results in as anticonvulsant effect in the PTZ-induced seizure model, and that selective antagonism at the 5-HT(3) receptor yields proconvulsive effects. Furthermore, the NO system may play a role in 5-HT(3) receptor function.

  16. Prostaglandin potentiates 5-HT responses in stomach and ileum innervating visceral afferent sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sojin; Jin, Zhenhua; Lee, Goeun; Park, Yong Seek; Park, Cheung-Seog; Jin, Young-Ho

    2015-01-02

    Gastrointestinal disorder is a common symptom induced by diverse pathophysiological conditions that include food tolerance, chemotherapy, and irradiation for therapy. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) level increase was often reported during gastrointestinal disorder and prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors has been used for ameliorate the symptoms. Exogenous administration of PGE2 induces gastrointestinal disorder, however, the mechanism of action is not known. Therefore, we tested PGE2 effect on visceral afferent sensory neurons of the rat. Interestingly, PGE2 itself did not evoked any response but enhanced serotonin (5-HT)-evoked currents up to 167% of the control level. The augmented 5-HT responses were completely inhibited by a 5-HT type 3 receptor antagonist, ondansetron. The PGE2-induced potentiation were blocked by a selective E-prostanoid type 4 (EP4) receptors antagonist, L-161,982, but type 1 and 2 receptor antagonist AH6809 has no effect. A membrane permeable protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, KT5720 also inhibited PGE2 effects. PGE2 induced 5-HT current augmentation was observed on 15% and 21% of the stomach and ileum projecting neurons, respectively. Current results suggest a synergistic signaling in visceral afferent neurons underlying gastrointestinal disorder involving PGE2 potentiation of 5-HT currents. Our findings may open a possibility for screen a new type drugs with lower side effects than currently using steroidal prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors by selectively targeting EP4 receptor/PKA pathway without interrupt prostaglandin synthesis.

  17. On the role of brain 5-HT7 receptor in the mechanism of hypothermia: comparison with hypothermia mediated via 5-HT1A and 5-HT3 receptor.

    PubMed

    Naumenko, Vladimir S; Kondaurova, Elena M; Popova, Nina K

    2011-12-01

    Intracerebroventricular administration of selective agonist of serotonin 5-HT(7) receptor LP44 (4-[2-(methylthio)phenyl]-N-(1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-1-naphthalenyl)-1-pyperasinehexanamide hydrochloride; 10.3, 20.5 or 41.0 nmol) produced considerable hypothermic response in CBA/Lac mice. LP44-induced (20.5 nmol) hypothermia was significantly attenuated by the selective 5-HT(7) receptor antagonist SB 269970 (16.1 fmol, i.c.v.) pretreatment. At the same time, intraperitoneal administration of LP44 in a wide range of doses 1.0, 2.0 or 10.0 mg/kg (2.0, 4.0, 20.0 μmol/kg) did not cause considerable hypothermic response. These findings indicate the implication of central, rather than peripheral 5-HT(7) receptors in the regulation of hypothermia. The comparison of LP44-induced (20.5 nmol) hypothermic reaction in eight inbred mouse strains (DBA/2J, CBA/Lac, C57BL/6, BALB/c, ICR, AKR/J, C3H and Asn) was performed and a significant effect of genotype was found. In the same eight mouse strains, functional activity of 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(3) receptors was studied. The comparison of hypothermic responses produced by 5-HT(7) receptor agonist LP44 (20.5 nmol, i.c.v.) and 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT 1.0 mg/kg, i.p. (3.0 μmol/kg), 5-HT(3) receptor agonist m-CPBG (40.0 nmol, i.c.v.) did not reveal considerable interstrain correlations between 5-HT(7) and 5-HT(1A) or 5-HT(3) receptor-induced hypothermia. The selective 5-HT(7) receptor antagonist SB 269970 (16.1 fmol, i.c.v.) failed to attenuate the hypothermic effect of 8-OH-DPAT 1.0 mg/kg, i.p. (3.0 μmol/kg) and m-CPBG (40.0 nmol, i.c.v.) indicating that the brain 5-HT(7) receptor is not involved in the hypothermic effects of 8-OH-DPAT or m-CPBG. The obtained results suggest that the central 5-HT(7) receptor plays an essential role in the mediation of thermoregulation independent of 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(3) receptors.

  18. Role of 5-HT6 receptors in memory formation.

    PubMed

    Meneses, A

    2001-09-01

    Mice lacking the 5-HT(6) receptor presented neither gross anatomical or behavioral abnormalities nor obvious changes in microscopic brain morphology, and their performance in rotarod, open field and novel object testing paradigms revealed no differences compared with wild-type animals. Nevertheless, an association between the 5-HT(6) receptor polymorphism C267T and Alzheimer's disease has been reported. Interestingly, the 5-HT(6) antisense oligonucleotide decreased 5-HT(6) gene expression and enhanced spatial learning acquisition in the water maze. Similarly, injection of the 5-HT(6) receptor antagonist Ro-04-6790 improved learning consolidation in an autoshaping task, while mCPP, scopolamine and dizocilpine decreased performance. The effect induced by scopolamine or dizocilpine, but not that induced by mCPP, was completely or partially reversed by Ro-04-6790. Ro-04-6790 did not modify the 8-OH-DPAT facilitatory effects on learning consolidation. Since Ro-04-6790 facilitatory effect was unaffected by 5-HT(1A), 5-HT(2A/2B/2C), 5-HT(3), 5-HT(4) or 5-HT(7) receptor blockade, the facilitatory effect induced by Ro-04-6790 involved specifically 5-HT6 receptors. Similarly, the 5-HT(6) receptor antagonist SB-271046 improved retention in the water maze and produced a significant performance improvement in aged rats in an operant-delayed alternation task. A series of Ro-04-6790 analogues that penetrate the brain and specifically bind to 5-HT(6) receptors reversed scopolamine-induced retention deficit in a passive avoidance learning test. Collectively, these data provide further support to the notion that 5-HT systems, via 5-HT(6) receptors, also play a significant role in memory formation under normal and dysfunctional memory conditions.

  19. Pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamic modelling of fluvoxamine 5-HT transporter occupancy in rat frontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Geldof, M; Freijer, J I; van Beijsterveldt, L; Langlois, X; Danhof, M

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: The pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamic (PK–PD) correlation of fluvoxamine 5-HT transporter (SERT) occupancy was determined in rat frontal cortex ex vivo. Experimental approach: Rats (n=47) with permanent arterial and venous cannulas received a 30 min intravenous infusion of fluvoxamine (1 or 7.3 mg kg−1). At various time points after dosing, brains were collected for determination of fluvoxamine concentration and SERT occupancy. In addition, the time course of fluvoxamine concentration in plasma was determined up to the time of brain collection. In a separate study (n=26), the time course of fluvoxamine concentration in brain extracellular fluid (ECF) and plasma was determined. The results of the investigations were interpreted by nonlinear mixed effects modeling Key results: Highest SERT occupancy was reached at the first time point (10 or 15 min) and maintained for 1.5 and 7 h after 1 and 7.3 mg kg−1, respectively. Thereafter, SERT occupancy decreased linearly at a rate of 8% h−1. SERT occupancy could be directly related to plasma, brain ECF and brain tissue concentrations by a hyperbolic function (Bmax model). Maximal SERT occupancy (Bmax) was 95%. Estimated concentrations at half-maximal SERT occupancy (EC50) in plasma, ECF and brain tissue were 0.48, 0.22 and 14.8 ng mL−1 respectively. The minimum value of the objective function decreased 12 points for ECF and brain tissue concentrations relative to plasma (P<0.01), presumably as a result of nonlinear brain distribution. Conclusions and implications: The proposed PK–PD model constitutes a useful basis for prediction of the time course of ex vivo SERT occupancy in behavioural studies with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. PMID:18493251

  20. Behavioural evidence for a functional interaction between central 5-HT2 and 5-HT1A receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Backus, L. I.; Sharp, T.; Grahame-Smith, D. G.

    1990-01-01

    1. The possibility of 5-HT2 receptor modulation of central 5-HT1A receptor function has been examined using the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) behavioural syndrome induced by 5-HT1A receptor active drugs in rats. 2. The 5-HT2/5-HTIC antagonist ritanserin (0.1-2 mg kg-1) increased the 5-HT behavioural syndrome induced by submaximally effective doses of 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT), 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeODMT) and gepirone. 3. Pretreatment with the 5-HT2/5-HT1C antagonist ICI 170,809 (0.25-5 mg kg-1) also enhanced the behavioural syndrome induced by 8-OH-DPAT or 5-MeODMT. 4. The 5-HT2/alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonist ketanserin in a low dose (0.25 mg kg-1) significantly increased the 5-HT behavioural syndrome induced by 8-OH-DPAT or 5-MeODMT, while in a higher dose (2.5 mg kg-1) this drug decreased the response. Experiments with prazosin indicate that the higher dose of ketanserin might reduce the 5-HT behavioural syndrome through blockade of alpha 1-adrenoceptors. 5. Ritanserin and ICI 170,809 had no effect on apomorphine-induced stereotypy or hyperactivity, indicating that these drugs do not produce non-specific behavioural activation. 6. Ritanserin and ICI 170,809 inhibited quipazine-induced wet dog shakes at doses similar to those enhancing the 5-HT behavioural syndrome. 7. We suggest that ritanserin, ICI 170,809 and ketanserin enhance 5-HT1A agonist-induced behaviour through blockade of an inhibitory 5-HT2 receptor regulating or coupled to 5-HT1A receptor-mediated function. PMID:2145051

  1. 5-HT spatial distribution imaging with multiphoton excitation of 5-HT correlative visible fluorescence in live cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhihong; Zeng, Shaoqun; Liu, Yafeng; Zhou, Wei; Chen, Tongsheng; Luo, Qingming

    2002-04-01

    The autofluorescence of 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) loaded rat mucosal mast cells (RBL-2H3 cells) is imaged with multiphoton excitation laser scanning microscope (MPELSM). 5-HT correlative visible fluorescence (Fco-vis) excited with 740-nm multiphoton excitation is observed in live cells for the first time, and the generating mechanism of 5-HT Fco-vis is studied. The spatial distribution of 5-HT in live cells is imaged at high spatial resolution in our experiment, which provides a new way to study the correlation between 5-HT spatial distribution and content, and the cellular functional state in live tissue or cells.

  2. Sleep and EEG power spectrum effects of the 5-HT1A antagonist NAN-190 alone and in combination with citalopram.

    PubMed

    Neckelmann, D; Bjørkum, A A; Bjorvatn, B; Ursin, R

    1996-02-01

    The sleep and waking and EEG power spectrum effects of the putative 5-HT1A antagonist NAN-190 (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) were studied alone and in co-administration with the selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor citalopram (5.0 mg/kg, i.p.) in the rat. Citalopram, as in a prior dose-response study, reduced REM sleep. In addition, a slight increase in NREM sleep was observed. Citalopram reduced NREM fronto-parietal (FP) EEG power density in the 5-20 Hz range. When administered alone, NAN-190 suppressed REM sleep in the first 2 h, and reduced SWS-2 in the first 4 after administration. NAN-190 also suppressed selectively NREM sleep slow-wave activity in both fronto-frontal (FF) and FP EEG power spectrum. When administered in combination with citalopram, an attenuation of the power density reduction in the 7-15 Hz range in the FF EEG of citalopram alone, was observed. However, the EEG power spectral density and REM sleep suppressive effects of NAN-190 were both augmented. The results are compatible with the notion that serotonin is involved in the modulation of the slow wave activity in the EEG during NREM sleep. The results are cordant with other data suggesting that postsynaptic 5-HT1A stimulation might increase slow wave activity in the NREM EEG, and that serotonergic stimulation of other receptor subtypes (possibly 5-HT2) may decrease slow wave activity in the NREM EEG.

  3. The GR127935-sensitive 5-HT1 receptors mediating canine internal carotid vasoconstriction: resemblance to the 5-HT1B, but not to the 5-HT1D or 5-ht1F, receptor subtype

    PubMed Central

    Centurión, David; Sánchez-López, Araceli; De Vries, Peter; Saxena, Pramod R; Villalón, Carlos M

    2001-01-01

    This study has further investigated the pharmacological profile of the GR127935-sensitive 5-HT1 receptors mediating vasoconstriction in the internal carotid bed of anaesthetized vagosympathectomized dogs. One-minute intracarotid infusions of the agonists 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; 0.1–10 μg min−1; endogenous ligand) and sumatriptan (0.3–10 μg min−1; 5-HT1B/1D), but not PNU-142633 (1–1000 μg min−1; 5-HT1D) or LY344864 (1–1000 μg min−1; 5-ht1F), produced dose-dependent decreases in internal carotid blood flow without changing blood pressure or heart rate. The responses to 5-HT were apparently resistant to blockade by i.v. administration of the antagonists SB224289 (300 μg kg−1; 5-HT1B), BRL15572 (300 μg kg−1; 5-HT1D) or ritanserin (100 μg kg−1; 5-HT2). In contrast, the responses to sumatriptan were antagonized by SB224289, but not by BRL15572. In the animals receiving SB224289, but not those receiving BRL15572, the subsequent administration of ritanserin abolished the 5-HT-induced vasoconstriction and unmasked a vasodilator component. Similarly, in ritanserin-treated animals, the subsequent administration of SB224289, but not BRL15572, completely blocked the 5-HT-induced vasoconstriction, revealing vasodilatation. In animals receiving initially BRL15572, the subsequent administration of SB224289 did not affect (except at 10 μg min−1) the vasoconstrictor responses to 5-HT. Notably, in animals pretreated with 1000 μg kg−1 of mesulergine, a 5-HT2/7 receptor antagonist, 5-HT produced a dose-dependent vasoconstriction, which was practically abolished by SB224289. After BRL15572, no further blockade was produced and the subsequent administration of ritanserin was similarly inactive. These results suggest that the GR127935-sensitive 5-HT1 receptors mediating canine internal carotid vasoconstriction resemble the 5-HT1B but not the 5-HT1D or 5-ht1F, receptor subtype. PMID:11226129

  4. Effect of Selective 5-HT6R Agonist on Expression of 5-HT Receptor and Neurotransmitter in Vascular Dementia Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Haining; Chen, Tao; Zhou, Li; Tang, Jiyou

    2017-01-01

    Background 5-HT6 receptor (5-HT6R) has pluripotent roles regulating secretion of neurotransmitters. However, whether 5-HT6R is involved in the development of vascular dementia (VD) remains unclear. To evaluate the role and mechanism of 5-HT6R in VD, this study established a rat VD model to evaluate the effect of selective 5-HT6R agonist on the expression of 5-HT6R mRNA and neurotransmitter. Material/Methods Eighty healthy male SD rats (7 weeks old) were randomly assigned to sham, model, 5-HT6R agonist, and placebo groups (N=20 each). A rat VD model was generated by permeant bilateral ligation of the common carotid artery. 5-HT6R agonist, placebo, or saline were given intraperitoneally for 4 weeks. The Morris water maze was utilized to test learning and memory function. Brains were extracted to separate the cortex and hippocampal tissues, in which glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels were analyzed. mRNA and protein levels of 5-HT6R were determined by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry (IHC), respectively. Results Model rats had longer escape latency and fewer crossing platform times. Contents of DA, Glu, GABA, and Ach were lowered in cortical and hippocampal tissues, and 5-HT6R expression was suppressed (p<0.05). The application of 5-HT6R agonist shortened escape latency and increased the number of passing through the platform. It also improved hippocampal CA1 neuronal damage and elevated DA, Glu, GABA, and Ach contents and expression of 5-HT6R. Expression of 5-HT6R was not different from the placebo group. Conclusions Selective 5-HT6R agonist can alleviate learning deficit of VD rats, possibly via improving neurotransmitter levels in brain regions. PMID:28196966

  5. Effects of the 5-HT receptor antagonists GR127935 (5-HT1B/1D) and MDL100907 (5-HT2A) in the consolidation of learning.

    PubMed

    Meneses, A; Terrón, J A; Hong, E

    1997-12-01

    We have previously reported that 5-HT1B/1D and 5-HT2A/2B/2C receptors play a role in learning and memory. The present investigation was devoted to analyze further in the autoshaping learning task: (1) the effects of the 5-HT1A/1B/1D receptor agonist, GR46611, the 5-HT1B/1D receptor antagonist, GR127935, and the selective 5-HT2A receptor antagonist, MDL100907. Consistent with a role of 5-HT1B/1D receptors in learning, the post-training injection of GR46611 (1-10 mg/kg) decreased the consolidation of learning whereas GR127935 (10 mg/kg) increased it; the effects of both drugs were reversed by PCA pretreatment. GR127935 abolished the decrease induced by GR46611, TFMPP and mCPP, whereas MDL100907 (0.1-3.0 mg/kg) had no effect by itself but abolished the effects of DOI, ketanserin and TFMPP and moderately inhibited the effects elicited by mCPP, 1-NP and mesulergine. Neither did GR127935 nor MDL100907 significantly modify the increase in the consolidation of learning induced by 8-OH-DPAT. Thus, the present findings suggest that stimulation of presynaptic 5-HT1B/1D receptors impairs the consolidation of learning whilst stimulation of 5-HT2A/2C receptors enhances it; the blockade of 5-HT2A receptors has no effects. In addition, 5-HT2 receptors seem to modulate this cognitive stage.

  6. Amitifadine, a triple monoamine re-uptake inhibitor, reduces nicotine self-administration in female rats

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Edward D; Wells, Corinne; Johnson, Joshua E; Rezvani, Amir H.; Bymaster, Frank P.; Rose, Jed E.

    2016-01-01

    A wider diversity of drug treatments to aid smoking cessation is needed to help tailor the most efficacious treatment for different types of smokers. This study was conducted to determine whether amitifadine, which inhibits re-uptake of dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin, would decrease nicotine self-administration at doses that do not cause adverse side effects. Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were trained to self-administer nicotine intravenous (IV) and were given acute doses of amitifadine in a repeated measures counterbalanced design. Effects of amitifadine on locomotor activity and food motivated responding were also evaluated. Chronic amitifadine effects were also examined. The 30 mg/kg amitifadine dose significantly reduced nicotine self-administration. The 5 and 10 mg/kg doses reduced nicotine self-administration during the first 15 min. of the session when the greatest amount of nicotine was self-administered. The 30 mg/kg amitifadine dose, but not the lower doses caused a significant reduction in locomotor activity averaged over the 1-hour session and reduced food motivated responding. The 10 mg/kg dose caused hypoactivity at the beginning of the session, but 5 mg/kg did not cause any hypoactivity. The effects of chronic amitifadine treatment (10 mg/kg) over the course of 15 sessions was also determined. Amitifadine caused a significant reduction in nicotine self-administration, which was not seen to diminish over two consecutive weeks of treatment and a week after enforced abstinence. Amitifadine significantly reduced nicotine self-administration. This prompts further research to determine if amitifadine might be an effective treatment for smoking cessation. PMID:26101069

  7. Amitifadine, a triple monoamine re-uptake inhibitor, reduces nicotine self-administration in female rats.

    PubMed

    Levin, Edward D; Wells, Corinne; Johnson, Joshua E; Rezvani, Amir H; Bymaster, Frank P; Rose, Jed E

    2015-10-05

    A wider diversity of drug treatments to aid smoking cessation is needed to help tailor the most efficacious treatment for different types of smokers. This study was conducted to determine whether amitifadine, which inhibits re-uptake of dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin, would decrease nicotine self-administration at doses that do not cause adverse side effects. Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were trained to self-administer nicotine intravenous (IV) and were given acute doses of amitifadine in a repeated measures counterbalanced design. Effects of amitifadine on locomotor activity and food motivated responding were also evaluated. Chronic amitifadine effects were also examined. The 30 mg/kg amitifadine dose significantly reduced nicotine self-administration. The 5 and 10 mg/kg doses reduced nicotine self-administration during the first 15 min of the session when the greatest amount of nicotine was self-administered. The 30 mg/kg amitifadine dose, but not the lower doses caused a significant reduction in locomotor activity averaged over the one-hour session and reduced food motivated responding. The 10 mg/kg dose caused hypoactivity at the beginning of the session, but 5 mg/kg did not cause any hypoactivity. The effects of chronic amitifadine treatment (10 mg/kg) over the course of 15 sessions was also determined. Amitifadine caused a significant reduction in nicotine self-administration, which was not seen to diminish over two consecutive weeks of treatment and a week after enforced abstinence. Amitifadine significantly reduced nicotine self-administration. This prompts further research to determine if amitifadine might be an effective treatment for smoking cessation.

  8. New potent and selective inhibitors of anandamide reuptake with antispastic activity in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ligresti, Alessia; Cascio, Maria Grazia; Pryce, Gareth; Kulasegram, Sanjitha; Beletskaya, Irina; De Petrocellis, Luciano; Saha, Bijali; Mahadevan, Anu; Visintin, Cristina; Wiley, Jenny L; Baker, David; Martin, Billy R; Razdan, Raj K; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2006-01-01

    We previously reported that the compound O-2093 is a selective inhibitor of the reuptake of the endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA). We have now re-examined the activity of O-2093 in vivo and synthesized four structural analogs (O-2247, O-2248, O-3246, and O-3262), whose activity was assessed in: (a) binding assays carried out with membranes from cells overexpressing the human CB(1) and CB(2) receptors; (b) assays of transient receptor potential of the vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1) channel functional activity (measurement of [Ca(2+)](i)); (c) [(14)C]AEA cellular uptake and hydrolysis assays in rat basophilic leukaemia (RBL-2H3) cells; (d) the mouse 'tetrad' tests (analgesia on a hot plate, immobility on a 'ring', rectal hypothermia and hypolocomotion in an open field); and (e) the limb spasticity test in chronic relapsing experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (CREAE) mice, a model of multiple sclerosis (MS). O-2093, either synthesized by us or commercially available, was inactive in the 'tetrad' up to a 20 mg kg(-1) dose (i.v.). Like O-2093, the other four compounds exhibited low affinity in CB(1) (K(i) from 1.3 to >10 microM) and CB(2) binding assays (1.310 microM), very low potency as fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitors (IC(50)>25 microM) and were inactive in the 'tetrad' up to a 30 mg kg(-1) dose (i.v.). While O-2247 and O-2248 were poor inhibitors of [(14)C]AEA cellular uptake (IC(50)>40 microM), O-3246 and O-3262 were quite potent in this assay. O-3246, which exhibits only a very subtle structural difference with O-2093, is the most potent inhibitor of AEA uptake reported in vitro under our experimental conditions (IC(50)=1.4 microM) and is 12-fold more potent than O-2093. When injected intravenously O-3246 and O-3262, again like O-2093 and unlike O-2247 and O-2248, significantly inhibited limb spasticity in mice with CREAE. These data confirm the potential utility of selective

  9. New potent and selective inhibitors of anandamide reuptake with antispastic activity in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ligresti, Alessia; Cascio, Maria Grazia; Pryce, Gareth; Kulasegram, Sanjitha; Beletskaya, Irina; De Petrocellis, Luciano; Saha, Bijali; Mahadevan, Anu; Visintin, Cristina; Wiley, Jenny L; Baker, David; Martin, Billy R; Razdan, Raj K; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2005-01-01

    We previously reported that the compound O-2093 is a selective inhibitor of the reuptake of the endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA). We have now re-examined the activity of O-2093 in vivo and synthesized four structural analogs (O-2247, O-2248, O-3246, and O-3262), whose activity was assessed in: (a) binding assays carried out with membranes from cells overexpressing the human CB1 and CB2 receptors; (b) assays of transient receptor potential of the vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1) channel functional activity (measurement of [Ca2+]i); (c) [14C]AEA cellular uptake and hydrolysis assays in rat basophilic leukaemia (RBL-2H3) cells; (d) the mouse ‘tetrad' tests (analgesia on a hot plate, immobility on a ‘ring', rectal hypothermia and hypolocomotion in an open field); and (e) the limb spasticity test in chronic relapsing experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (CREAE) mice, a model of multiple sclerosis (MS). O-2093, either synthesized by us or commercially available, was inactive in the ‘tetrad' up to a 20 mg kg−1 dose (i.v.). Like O-2093, the other four compounds exhibited low affinity in CB1 (Ki from 1.3 to >10 μM) and CB2 binding assays (1.310 μM), very low potency as fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitors (IC50>25 μM) and were inactive in the ‘tetrad' up to a 30 mg kg−1 dose (i.v.). While O-2247 and O-2248 were poor inhibitors of [14C]AEA cellular uptake (IC50>40 μM), O-3246 and O-3262 were quite potent in this assay. O-3246, which exhibits only a very subtle structural difference with O-2093, is the most potent inhibitor of AEA uptake reported in vitro under our experimental conditions (IC50=1.4 μM) and is 12-fold more potent than O-2093. When injected intravenously O-3246 and O-3262, again like O-2093 and unlike O-2247 and O-2248, significantly inhibited limb spasticity in mice with CREAE. These data confirm the potential utility of selective AEA uptake

  10. Prostaglandin potentiates 5-HT responses in stomach and ileum innervating visceral afferent sensory neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sojin; Jin, Zhenhua; Lee, Goeun; Park, Yong Seek; Park, Cheung-Seog; Jin, Young-Ho

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • Prostaglandin E2 (PGE{sub 2}) effect was tested on visceral afferent neurons. • PGE{sub 2} did not evoke response but potentiated serotonin (5-HT) currents up to 167%. • PGE{sub 2}-induced potentiation was blocked by E-prostanoid type 4 receptors antagonist. • PGE{sub 2} effect on 5-HT response was also blocked by protein kinase A inhibitor KT5720. • Thus, PGE{sub 2} modulate visceral afferent neurons via synergistic signaling with 5-HT. - Abstract: Gastrointestinal disorder is a common symptom induced by diverse pathophysiological conditions that include food tolerance, chemotherapy, and irradiation for therapy. Prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) level increase was often reported during gastrointestinal disorder and prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors has been used for ameliorate the symptoms. Exogenous administration of PGE{sub 2} induces gastrointestinal disorder, however, the mechanism of action is not known. Therefore, we tested PGE{sub 2} effect on visceral afferent sensory neurons of the rat. Interestingly, PGE{sub 2} itself did not evoked any response but enhanced serotonin (5-HT)-evoked currents up to 167% of the control level. The augmented 5-HT responses were completely inhibited by a 5-HT type 3 receptor antagonist, ondansetron. The PGE{sub 2}-induced potentiation were blocked by a selective E-prostanoid type4 (EP{sub 4}) receptors antagonist, L-161,982, but type1 and 2 receptor antagonist AH6809 has no effect. A membrane permeable protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, KT5720 also inhibited PGE{sub 2} effects. PGE{sub 2} induced 5-HT current augmentation was observed on 15% and 21% of the stomach and ileum projecting neurons, respectively. Current results suggest a synergistic signaling in visceral afferent neurons underlying gastrointestinal disorder involving PGE{sub 2} potentiation of 5-HT currents. Our findings may open a possibility for screen a new type drugs with lower side effects than currently using steroidal prostaglandin

  11. Peripheral 5-HT1A and 5-HT7 Serotonergic Receptors Modulate Parasympathetic Neurotransmission in Long-Term Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Restrepo, Beatriz; Martín, María Luisa; San Román, Luis; Morán, Asunción

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed the modulation of serotonin on the bradycardia induced in vivo by vagal electrical stimulation in alloxan-induced long-term diabetic rats. Bolus intravenous administration of serotonin had a dual effect on the bradycardia induced either by vagal stimulation or exogenous Ach, increasing it at low doses and decreasing it at high doses of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), effect reproduced by 5-carboxamidotryptamine maleate (5-CT), a 5-HT1/7 agonist. The enhancement of the bradycardia at low doses of 5-CT was reproduced by 5-HT1A agonist 8-hydroxy-2-dipropylaminotetralin hydrobromide (8-OH-DPAT) and abolished by WAY-100,635, 5-HT1A antagonist. Pretreatment with 5-HT1 antagonist methiothepin blocked the stimulatory and inhibitory effect of 5-CT, whereas pimozide, 5-HT7 antagonist, only abolished 5-CT inhibitory action. In conclusion, long-term diabetes elicits changes in the subtype of the 5-HT receptor involved in modulation of vagally induced bradycardia. Activation of the 5-HT1A receptors induces enhancement, whereas attenuation is due to 5-HT7 receptor activation. This 5-HT dual effect occurs at pre- and postjunctional levels. PMID:21403818

  12. Convergence of melatonin and serotonin (5-HT) signaling at MT2/5-HT2C receptor heteromers.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Maud; Gbahou, Florence; Guillaume, Jean-Luc; Daulat, Avais M; Benleulmi-Chaachoua, Abla; Luka, Marine; Chen, Patty; Kalbasi Anaraki, Dina; Baroncini, Marc; Mannoury la Cour, Clotilde; Millan, Mark J; Prevot, Vincent; Delagrange, Philippe; Jockers, Ralf

    2015-05-01

    Inasmuch as the neurohormone melatonin is synthetically derived from serotonin (5-HT), a close interrelationship between both has long been suspected. The present study reveals a hitherto unrecognized cross-talk mediated via physical association of melatonin MT2 and 5-HT2C receptors into functional heteromers. This is of particular interest in light of the "synergistic" melatonin agonist/5-HT2C antagonist profile of the novel antidepressant agomelatine. A suite of co-immunoprecipitation, bioluminescence resonance energy transfer, and pharmacological techniques was exploited to demonstrate formation of functional MT2 and 5-HT2C receptor heteromers both in transfected cells and in human cortex and hippocampus. MT2/5-HT2C heteromers amplified the 5-HT-mediated Gq/phospholipase C response and triggered melatonin-induced unidirectional transactivation of the 5-HT2C protomer of MT2/5-HT2C heteromers. Pharmacological studies revealed distinct functional properties for agomelatine, which shows "biased signaling." These observations demonstrate the existence of functionally unique MT2/5-HT2C heteromers and suggest that the antidepressant agomelatine has a distinctive profile at these sites potentially involved in its therapeutic effects on major depression and generalized anxiety disorder. Finally, MT2/5-HT2C heteromers provide a new strategy for the discovery of novel agents for the treatment of psychiatric disorders.

  13. WAY-318068: a novel, potent and selective noradrenaline re-uptake inhibitor with activity in rodent models of pain and depression

    PubMed Central

    Whiteside, GT; Dwyer, JM; Harrison, JE; Beyer, CE; Cummons, T; Manzino, L; Mark, L; Johnston, GH; Strassle, BW; Adedoyin, A; Lu, P; Piesla, MJ; Pulicicchio, CM; Erve, JCL; Platt, BJ; Hughes, ZA; Rogers, KE; Deecher, DC; Trybulski, EJ; Kennedy, JD; Zhang, P; Leventhal, L

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Antidepressants, which raise the CNS concentrations of 5-HT and noradrenaline, are frequently used in the treatment of chronic pain; however, it is not known if increasing CNS noradrenaline levels alone is sufficient for efficacy, in part resulting from a lack of small molecules with sufficient selectivity. Experimental approach: In this report, we present the in vitro pharmacological and in vivo pharmacokinetic and pharmacological properties of the novel, orally available and CNS penetrant inhibitor of the noradrenaline transporter (NET), WAY-318068 (1-[(1S,2R)-1-(3,5-difluorophenyl)-2-hydroxy-3-(methylamino)propyl]-7-fluoro-3,3-dimethyl-1,3-dihydro-2H-indol-2-one). Key results: WAY-318068 is a potent and effective inhibitor of the NET with a Ki of 8.7 nM in a binding assay, and an IC50 of 6.8 nM in an assay of transporter function, without significant binding to the dopamine transporter. Furthermore, the compound has only weak activity at the 5-HT transporter, leading to a functional selectivity of greater than 2500-fold. It is orally bioavailable with substantial quantities of the compound found in the CNS after oral dosing. As measured by microdialysis in rats, the compound causes a robust and significant increase in cortical noradrenaline levels without affecting 5-HT. WAY-318068 was effective in models of acute, visceral, inflammatory, osteoarthritic, neuropathic, diabetic and bone cancer pain, as well as in traditional models of depression at doses that do not cause motor deficits. Conclusions and implications: Collectively, the present results support the conclusion that selectively increasing CNS levels of noradrenaline is sufficient for efficacy in models of depression and pain. PMID:20590604

  14. RU 24969-induced emesis in the cat - 5-HT1 sites other than 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B or 5-HT1C implicated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucot, James B.

    1990-01-01

    RU 24969 was administered s.c. to cats and found to elicit emesis with a maximally effective dose of 1.0 mg/kg 5-Methoxytryptamine was found to have lower efficacy and to produce a higher incidence of nonspecific effects while trifluoromethylphenylpiperizine (TFMPP) was devoid of emetic effects. The emesis elicited by 1.0 mg/kg of RU 24969 was not altered by pretreatment with phentolamine, haloperidol, yohimbine or (-)-propranolol, indicating that catecholamines played no role in this response. The emesis was prevented by metergoline and methysergide but not by ketanserin, cyproheptadine, mesulergine, ICS 205 930, methiothepin, trimethobenzamide or BMY 7378. An indirect argument is presented that implicates a role for 5-HT1D sites. This conclusion must remain tentative until drugs selective for this site are synthesized and tested. The emesis was also prevented by 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamine)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT), confirming that this drug has a general antiemetic effect in cats.

  15. Potentiation of 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine-induced hyperthermia by harmaline and the involvement of activation of 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xi-Ling; Shen, Hong-Wu; Yu, Ai-Ming

    2014-01-01

    5-Methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT) and harmaline are serotonin (5-HT) analogs often abused together, which alters thermoregulation that may indicate the severity of serotonin toxicity. Our recent studies have revealed that co-administration of monoamine oxidase inhibitor harmaline leads to greater and prolonged exposure to 5-HT agonist 5-MeO-DMT that might be influenced by cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) status. This study was to define the effects of harmaline and 5-MeO-DMT on thermoregulation in wild-type and CYP2D6-humanized (Tg-CYP2D6) mice, as well as the involvement of 5-HT receptors. Animal core body temperatures were monitored noninvasively in the home cages after implantation of telemetry transmitters and administration of drugs. Harmaline (5 and 15 mg/kg, i.p.) alone was shown to induce hypothermia that was significantly affected by CYP2D6 status. In contrast, higher doses of 5-MeO-DMT (10 and 20 mg/kg) alone caused hyperthermia. Co-administration of harmaline (2, 5 or 15 mg/kg) remarkably potentiated the hyperthermia elicited by 5-MeO-DMT (2 or 10 mg/kg), which might be influenced by CYP2D6 status at certain dose combination. Interestingly, harmaline-induced hypothermia was only attenuated by 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY-100635, whereas 5-MeO-DMT- and harmaline-5-MeO-DMT-induced hyperthermia could be suppressed by either WAY-100635 or 5-HT2A receptor antagonists (MDL-100907 and ketanserin). Moreover, stress-induced hyperthermia under home cage conditions was not affected by WAY-100635 but surprisingly attenuated by MDL-100907 and ketanserin. Our results indicate that co-administration of monoamine oxidase inhibitor largely potentiates 5-MeO-DMT-induced hyperthermia that involves the activation of both 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors. These findings shall provide insights into development of anxiolytic drugs and new strategies to relieve the lethal hyperthermia in serotonin toxicity. PMID:25446678

  16. Potentiation of 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine-induced hyperthermia by harmaline and the involvement of activation of 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xi-Ling; Shen, Hong-Wu; Yu, Ai-Ming

    2015-02-01

    5-Methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT) and harmaline are serotonin (5-HT) analogs often abused together, which alters thermoregulation that may indicate the severity of serotonin toxicity. Our recent studies have revealed that co-administration of monoamine oxidase inhibitor harmaline leads to greater and prolonged exposure to 5-HT agonist 5-MeO-DMT that might be influenced by cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) status. This study was to define the effects of harmaline and 5-MeO-DMT on thermoregulation in wild-type and CYP2D6-humanized (Tg-CYP2D6) mice, as well as the involvement of 5-HT receptors. Animal core body temperatures were monitored noninvasively in the home cages after implantation of telemetry transmitters and administration of drugs. Harmaline (5 and 15 mg/kg, i.p.) alone was shown to induce hypothermia that was significantly affected by CYP2D6 status. In contrast, higher doses of 5-MeO-DMT (10 and 20 mg/kg) alone caused hyperthermia. Co-administration of harmaline (2, 5 or 15 mg/kg) remarkably potentiated the hyperthermia elicited by 5-MeO-DMT (2 or 10 mg/kg), which might be influenced by CYP2D6 status at certain dose combination. Interestingly, harmaline-induced hypothermia was only attenuated by 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY-100635, whereas 5-MeO-DMT- and harmaline-5-MeO-DMT-induced hyperthermia could be suppressed by either WAY-100635 or 5-HT2A receptor antagonists (MDL-100907 and ketanserin). Moreover, stress-induced hyperthermia under home cage conditions was not affected by WAY-100635 but surprisingly attenuated by MDL-100907 and ketanserin. Our results indicate that co-administration of monoamine oxidase inhibitor largely potentiates 5-MeO-DMT-induced hyperthermia that involves the activation of both 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors. These findings shall provide insights into development of anxiolytic drugs and new strategies to relieve the lethal hyperthermia in serotonin toxicity.

  17. Incubation of cocaine cue reactivity associates with neuroadaptations in the cortical serotonin (5-HT) 5-HT2C receptor (5-HT2CR) system.

    PubMed

    Swinford-Jackson, S E; Anastasio, N C; Fox, R G; Stutz, S J; Cunningham, K A

    2016-06-02

    Intensification of craving elicited by drug-associated cues during abstinence occurs over time in human cocaine users while elevation of cue reactivity ("incubation") is observed in rats exposed to extended forced abstinence from cocaine self-administration. Incubation in rodents has been linked to time-dependent neuronal plasticity in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). We tested the hypothesis that incubation of cue reactivity during abstinence from cocaine self-administration is accompanied by lower potency and/or efficacy of the selective serotonin (5-HT) 5-HT2C​ receptor (5-HT2CR) agonist WAY163909 to suppress cue reactivity and a shift in the subcellular localization profile of the mPFC 5-HT2CR protein. We observed incubation of cue reactivity (measured as lever presses reinforced by the discrete cue complex) between Day 1 and Day 30 of forced abstinence from cocaine relative to sucrose self-administration. Pharmacological and biochemical analyses revealed that the potency of the selective 5-HT2CR agonist WAY163909 to suppress cue reactivity, the expression of synaptosomal 5-HT2CR protein in the mPFC, and the membrane to cytoplasmic expression of the 5-HT2CR in mPFC were lower on Day 30 vs. Day 1 of forced abstinence from cocaine self-administration. Incubation of cue reactivity assessed during forced abstinence from sucrose self-administration did not associate with 5-HT2CR protein expression in the mPFC. Collectively, these outcomes are the first indication that neuroadaptations in the 5-HT2CR system may contribute to incubation of cocaine cue reactivity.

  18. The serotonin 5-HT3 receptor: a novel neurodevelopmental target.

    PubMed

    Engel, Mareen; Smidt, Marten P; van Hooft, Johannes A

    2013-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT), next to being an important neurotransmitter, recently gained attention as a key-regulator of pre- and postnatal development in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). Several receptors for 5-HT are expressed in the developing brain including a ligand-gated ion channel, the 5-HT3 receptor. Over the past years, evidence has been accumulating that 5-HT3 receptors are involved in the regulation of neurodevelopment by serotonin. Here, we review the spatial and temporal expression patterns of 5-HT3 receptors in the pre- and early postnatal rodent brain and its functional implications. First, 5-HT3 receptors are expressed on GABAergic interneurons in neocortex and limbic structures derived from the caudal ganglionic eminence. Mature inhibitory GABAergic interneurons fine-tune neuronal excitability and thus are crucial for the physiological function of the brain. Second, 5-HT3 receptors are expressed on specific glutamatergic neurons, Cajal-Retzius cells in the cortex and granule cells in the cerebellum, where they regulate morphology, positioning, and connectivity of the local microcircuitry. Taken together, the 5-HT3 receptor emerges as a potential key-regulator of network formation and function in the CNS, which could have a major impact on our understanding of neurodevelopmental disorders in which 5-HT plays a role.

  19. Effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and immunomodulator on cytokines levels: an alternative therapy for patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, María Eugenia; Mendieta, Danelia; Pérez-Tapia, Mayra; Bojalil, Rafael; Estrada-Garcia, Iris; Estrada-Parra, Sergio; Pavón, Lenin

    2013-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a psychiatric illness that presents as a deficit of serotonergic neurotransmission in the central nervous system. MDD patients also experience alterations in cortisol and cytokines levels. Treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) is the first-line antidepressant regimen for MDD. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a combination of SSRIs and an immunomodulator-human dialyzable leukocyte extract (hDLE)-on cortisol and cytokines levels. Patients received SSRIs or SSRIs plus hDLE. The proinflammatory cytokines IL-1 β , IL-2, and IFN- γ ; anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-13 and IL-10; and 24-h urine cortisol were measured at weeks (W) 0, 5, 20, 36, and 52 of treatment. The reduction in cortisol levels in the SSRI-treated group was 30% until W52, in contrast, the combined treatment induced a 54% decrease at W36. The decline in cortisol in patients who were treated with SSRI plus hDLE correlated with reduction of anti-inflammatory cytokines and increases levels of proinflammatory cytokines at the study conclusion. These results suggest that the immune-stimulating activity of hDLE, in combination with SSRIs, restored the pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine balance and cortisol levels in depressed patients versus those who were given SSRIs alone.

  20. Effect of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors and Immunomodulator on Cytokines Levels: An Alternative Therapy for Patients with Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, María Eugenia; Mendieta, Danelia; Pérez-Tapia, Mayra; Bojalil, Rafael; Estrada-Parra, Sergio; Pavón, Lenin

    2013-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a psychiatric illness that presents as a deficit of serotonergic neurotransmission in the central nervous system. MDD patients also experience alterations in cortisol and cytokines levels. Treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) is the first-line antidepressant regimen for MDD. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a combination of SSRIs and an immunomodulator—human dialyzable leukocyte extract (hDLE)—on cortisol and cytokines levels. Patients received SSRIs or SSRIs plus hDLE. The proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-2, and IFN-γ; anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-13 and IL-10; and 24-h urine cortisol were measured at weeks (W) 0, 5, 20, 36, and 52 of treatment. The reduction in cortisol levels in the SSRI-treated group was 30% until W52, in contrast, the combined treatment induced a 54% decrease at W36. The decline in cortisol in patients who were treated with SSRI plus hDLE correlated with reduction of anti-inflammatory cytokines and increases levels of proinflammatory cytokines at the study conclusion. These results suggest that the immune-stimulating activity of hDLE, in combination with SSRIs, restored the pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine balance and cortisol levels in depressed patients versus those who were given SSRIs alone. PMID:24348675

  1. Serotonin reuptake inhibitor-induced sexual dysfunction and its treatment: a large-scale retrospective study of 596 psychiatric outpatients.

    PubMed

    Keller Ashton, A; Hamer, R; Rosen, R C

    1997-01-01

    In the present study, a large-scale retrospective case review was undertaken to assess the incidence and type of sexual dysfunctions associated with serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SRI) therapy, in addition to the effects of three pharmacological antidotes (yohimbine, amantadine, cyproheptadine) on SRI-induced sexual dysfunctions. A retrospective chart review was conducted on 596 patients treated with SRIs in an outpatient psychiatric practice between July 1991 and September 1994. Patients who reported new-onset sexual dysfunction during this time were categorized as having SRI-induced sexual dysfunctions. Sexual difficulties were characterized by type and duration, and the background characteristics and psychiatric diagnoses of all patients were recorded. Psychiatric outcome and sexual functioning at follow-up were independently assessed by a single psychiatrist by means of a 4-point rating scale. Sexual dysfunction symptoms were clearly associated with SRI administration in 97 (16.3%) cases. The most common problems reported were orgasmic delay or anorgasmia and hypoactive sexual desire. Sexual difficulties were more frequent among men (23.4%) and married patients of both sexes (22.3%), whereas psychiatric diagnosis and type of SRI were unrelated to the occurrence of sexual problems. Of the patients with sexual dysfunction, 45 (46.4%) opted for a trial of antidote therapy with yohimbine, amantadine, or cyproheptadine. All three antidotes were found to be safe and relatively effective, although yohimbine was significantly more effective than amantadine or cyproheptadine in reversing SRI-induced sexual dysfunction.

  2. Comparing the Efficacy of Bupropion and Amantadine on Sexual Dysfunction Induced by a Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Zahiroddin, Alireza; Faridhosseini, Farhad; Zamani, Azar; Shahini, Najmeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Antidepressant-induced sexual dysfunction (SD) is a common problem, associated with a significant risk of non-adherence. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) are associated with a substantial risk of SD. Only 10 % of patients show spontaneous improvement during follow up period. Objectives: This study aimed to compare two proposed medication (bupropion vs. amantadine) in alleviating SD in patients treated with SSRIs. Patients and Methods: In a randomized, single-blinded, clinical trial in Iran, 46 patients were recruited based on DSM-IV-TR criteria and semi-structured interview. Then, they were randomized into two treatment groups using table of random numbers. Eight patients were excluded and finally 38 patients completed the study which lasted for 4 weeks. Twenty patients were given bupropion, 18 patients were randomly assigned to another group, and given amantadine. Patients were assessed with the Arizona sexual experience scale (ASEX) at baseline and 4 weeks after the treatment. Results: A total of 38 patients completed the study (18 patients in amantadine vs. 20 patients in bupropion).The mean ASEX scores gradually declined in both study groups during the trial. The reduction of ASEX score in bupropion group was more than that of amantadine group that was statistically significant. So, the addition of bupropion at higher doses appears to be more effective approach in comparison with amantadine. Conclusions: These results provide empirical support for conducting a further study on comparing different add-on strategies for treating drug-induced SD. PMID:26744632

  3. Effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor on treating tinnitus in patients stratified for presence of depression or anxiety.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Naoki; Kanzaki, Sho; Shinden, Seiichi; Saito, Hideyuki; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Ogawa, Kaoru

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, paroxetine, on treating tinnitus.Tinnitus patients stratified for the presence of depression and anxiety were studied retrospectively. Fifty-six patients were observed for more than 6 months. They were initially treated with paroxetine only at a dose of 10 mg/day for 2-4 weeks; thereafter, the dose was increased to 20 mg/day. Tinnitus distress was evaluated with the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI) and with visual analog scales (VASs) for tinnitus loudness and annoyance. Depression and anxiety were measured with the Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS) and the trait section of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). The patients were grouped according to their SDS and STAI scores, and each variable was compared at baseline and the 6-month follow-up. Changes among these variables were also examined to determine whether reduced tinnitus distress was related to the improvement of depression or anxiety. Patients with both depression and anxiety showed better results (decrease in THI, VASs, SDS and STAI scores) than patients with anxiety alone, or patients without depression and anxiety. In patients with depression and anxiety, changes in tinnitus variables and changes in depression and anxiety scores were strongly correlated. In other patients, however, changes in tinnitus variables and changes in depression and anxiety scores were not correlated. These results suggest that paroxetine is effective in treating distressed tinnitus patients with depression and anxiety by reducing their tinnitus severity as well as their depression and anxiety.

  4. Exploring the Inhibitory Mechanism of Approved Selective Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitors and Reboxetine Enantiomers by Molecular Dynamics Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Guoxun; Xue, Weiwei; Wang, Panpan; Yang, Fengyuan; Li, Bo; Li, Xiaofeng; Li, Yinghong; Yao, Xiaojun; Zhu, Feng

    2016-05-01

    Selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (sNRIs) provide an effective class of approved antipsychotics, whose inhibitory mechanism could facilitate the discovery of privileged scaffolds with enhanced drug efficacy. However, the crystal structure of human norepinephrine transporter (hNET) has not been determined yet and the inhibitory mechanism of sNRIs remains elusive. In this work, multiple computational methods were integrated to explore the inhibitory mechanism of approved sNRIs (atomoxetine, maprotiline, reboxetine and viloxazine), and 3 lines of evidences were provided to verify the calculation results. Consequently, a binding mode defined by interactions between three chemical moieties in sNRIs and eleven residues in hNET was identified as shared by approved sNRIs. In the meantime, binding modes of reboxetine’s enantiomers with hNET were compared. 6 key residues favoring the binding of (S, S)-reboxetine over that of (R, R)-reboxetine were discovered. This is the first study reporting that those 11 residues are the common determinants for the binding of approved sNRIs. The identified binding mode shed light on the inhibitory mechanism of approved sNRIs, which could help identify novel scaffolds with improved drug efficacy.

  5. Combination treatment with clomipramine and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors for obsessive-compulsive disorder in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Y; Rosenberg, D R; Birmaher, B; Keshavan, M S

    1998-01-01

    Medication management of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) has consisted of monotherapy with either clomipramine (CMI) or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) such as fluvoxamine, paroxetine, or sertraline. Frequently, OCD patients receiving monotherapy experience low treatment response rates and problematic side effects that may result in discontinuation or noncompliance. This open-label case series presents 7 patients (6 male, 1 female) ages 9 to 23 years with OCD who were effectively treated with combination of CMI plus an SSRI. Treatment effects persisted through 5 to 22 months of follow-up from onset of combination therapy. The drug combination was effective in the 2 patients with OCD and no mood/anxiety comorbidity. Side effects appeared in 5 of 7 patients; cardiovascular side effects were the most common adverse effects. Two patients had prolongation of QTc intervals and 2 developed tachycardia while taking CMI and SSRI combinations. Other risks might include serotonin syndrome, manic switch, insomnia, and possibly headaches, EPS, and sexual dysfunction. Recommendations are made to monitor electrocardiograms, CMI blood concentrations, and vital signs in all cases because SSRIs can increase the blood levels of CMI and/or its active metabolite, desmethylclomipramine (DCMI). CMI could also potentially increase SSRI absorption and/or protein binding. The use of CMI and SSRI combination therapy was found to be more effective compared with their monotherapy in all 7 cases.

  6. Anti-inflammatory drugs as moderators of antidepressant effects, especially those of the selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitor class.

    PubMed

    Kronenberg, Sefi

    2011-09-01

    Large studies examining remission rates obtained by antidepressants have yielded somewhat dismal results. In the well-reported Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D) study, only 36.8% of patients exhibited remission with the selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) citalopram and the cumulative remission rate was 67% after multiple treatments were attempted. Warner-Schmidt et al. recently published an interesting paper that suggests specific mechanisms by which anti-inflammatory drugs inhibit the antidepressant effects of SSRIs. They employed well-established mouse models of depression: the tail suspension test and the forced swim test. In their experiment, ibuprofen significantly attenuated the antidepressant-like effects of SSRIs in both tests. The authors also presented data from the STAR*D study itself. These data - demonstrating higher remission rates for depressed patients receiving citalopram without concomitant NSAIDs (55.2%) than those receiving citalopram with NSAIDs (44.5%) - serve to illustrate the potential hindering effects of anti-inflammatory drugs.

  7. Cognitive Function before and during Treatment with Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors in Patients with Depression or Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Identification of adverse effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) is of great importance due to their extensive use in medicine. Some studies have reported the effects of SSRIs on cognitive functions, but the results are conflicting. This study was designed to assess the effect of these drugs on cognition of patients with depression or obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Methods. Patients with depression or OCD, naïve to therapy, and candidates of receiving one drug from SSRI class, voluntarily, entered this study. Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) test was the tool to assess their cognitive functions. MMSE scores of each patient were recorded prior to taking SSRIs and at weeks 3, 5, and 8 of drug therapy. Results. 50 patients met our inclusion criteria, with a baseline mean MMSE score of 23.94. At 3, 5, and 8 weeks of treatment, the mean scores were 22.1, 21.4, and 20.66, respectively. With a p value of <0.0001, the gradual decline was statistically significant. Conclusion. The MMSE scores of our patients showed a gradual decline over the consecutive weeks after taking SSRI drugs. It seems that the use of SSRIs in patients with depression or OCD, can cause cognitive dysfunction in the acute phase of treatment. PMID:27597949

  8. Compound stimulus presentation and the norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor atomoxetine enhance long-term extinction of cocaine-seeking behavior.

    PubMed

    Janak, Patricia H; Bowers, M Scott; Corbit, Laura H

    2012-03-01

    Drug abstinence is frequently compromised when addicted individuals are re-exposed to environmental stimuli previously associated with drug use. Research with human addicts and in animal models has demonstrated that extinction learning (non-reinforced cue-exposure) can reduce the capacity of such stimuli to induce relapse, yet extinction therapies have limited long-term success under real-world conditions (Bouton, 2002; O'Brien, 2008). We hypothesized that enhancing extinction would reduce the later ability of drug-predictive cues to precipitate drug-seeking behavior. We, therefore, tested whether compound stimulus presentation and pharmacological treatments that augment noradrenergic activity (atomoxetine; norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor) during extinction training would facilitate the extinction of drug-seeking behaviors, thus reducing relapse. Rats were trained that the presentation of a discrete cue signaled that a lever press response would result in cocaine reinforcement. Rats were subsequently extinguished and spontaneous recovery of drug-seeking behavior following presentation of previously drug-predictive cues was tested 4 weeks later. We find that compound stimulus presentations or pharmacologically increasing noradrenergic activity during extinction training results in less future recovery of responding, whereas propranolol treatment reduced the benefit seen with compound stimulus presentation. These data may have important implications for understanding the biological basis of extinction learning, as well as for improving the outcome of extinction-based therapies.

  9. Significant reductions in human visual gamma frequency by the gaba reuptake inhibitor tiagabine revealed by robust peak frequency estimation

    PubMed Central

    Muthukumaraswamy, Suresh D.; Campbell, Anne E.; Hamandi, Khalid; Lingford‐Hughes, Anne; Myers, Jim F. M.; Nutt, David J.; Sumner, Petroc; Wilson, Sue J.; Singh, Krish D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The frequency of visual gamma oscillations is determined by both the neuronal excitation–inhibition balance and the time constants of GABAergic processes. The gamma peak frequency has been linked to sensory processing, cognitive function, cortical structure, and may have a genetic contribution. To disentangle the intricate relationship among these factors, accurate and reliable estimates of peak frequency are required. Here, a bootstrapping approach that provides estimates of peak frequency reliability, thereby increasing the robustness of the inferences made on this parameter was developed. The method using both simulated data and real data from two previous pharmacological MEG studies of visual gamma with alcohol and tiagabine was validated. In particular, the study by Muthukumaraswamy et al. [2013a] (Neuropsychopharmacology 38(6):1105–1112), in which GABAergic enhancement by tiagabine had previously demonstrated a null effect on visual gamma oscillations, contrasting with strong evidence from both animal models and very recent human studies was re‐evaluated. After improved peak frequency estimation and additional exclusion of unreliably measured data, it was found that the GABA reuptake inhibitor tiagabine did produce, as predicted, a marked decrease in visual gamma oscillation frequency. This result demonstrates the potential impact of objective approaches to data quality control, and provides additional translational evidence for the mechanisms of GABAergic transmission generating gamma oscillations in humans. Hum Brain Mapp 37:3882–3896, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27273695

  10. Sensitive capillary GC-MS-SIM determination of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors: reliability evaluation by validation and robustness study.

    PubMed

    Berzas Nevado, Juan José; Villaseñor Llerena, María Jesús; Guiberteau Cabanillas, Carmen; Rodríguez Robledo, Virginia; Buitrago, Sierra

    2006-01-01

    A simple, fast, selective and very sensitive capillary GC-MS method for the simultaneous determination of five antidepressant drugs is described. Fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, citalopram, sertraline and paroxetine belong to the newest and most important drug group termed selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Imipramine was used in this method as an internal standard for quantification. Optimum parameters for GC separation were investigated, i.e., flow rate, column head pressure, injector temperature, injection splitless conditions and oven temperature program. MS detection was performed in SIM mode to increase the sensitivity. Stability of the solutions, linear concentration range, accuracy, precision, LOD, LOQ (3.6-41.5 mg/L) and specificity were examined in the presence of excipients for checking the reliability of this method. The robustness was evaluated with a matrix of 15 experiments (seven factors and three levels) using Plackett-Burman fractional factorial experimental design, and Youden and Steiner statistical treatment. The method was applied to the analysis of these antidepressants in nearly all their pharmaceutical formulations, obtaining recoveries between 98.1% and 102.7% with regard to the claimed values.

  11. Pharmacogenomics of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor treatment for major depressive disorder: genome-wide associations and functional genomics.

    PubMed

    Ji, Y; Biernacka, J M; Hebbring, S; Chai, Y; Jenkins, G D; Batzler, A; Snyder, K A; Drews, M S; Desta, Z; Flockhart, D; Mushiroda, T; Kubo, M; Nakamura, Y; Kamatani, N; Schaid, D; Weinshilboum, R M; Mrazek, D A

    2013-10-01

    A genome-wide association (GWA) study of treatment outcomes (response and remission) of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) was conducted using 529 subjects with major depressive disorder. While no SNP associations reached the genome-wide level of significance, 14 SNPs of interest were identified for functional analysis. The rs11144870 SNP in the riboflavin kinase (RFK) gene on chromosome 9 was associated with 8-week treatment response (odds ratio (OR)=0.42, P=1.04 × 10⁻⁶). The rs915120 SNP in the G protein-coupled receptor kinase 5 (GRK5) gene on chromosome 10 was associated with 8-week remission (OR=0.50, P=1.15 × 10⁻⁵). Both SNPs were shown to influence transcription by a reporter gene assay and to alter nuclear protein binding using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. This report represents an example of joining functional genomics with traditional GWA study results derived from a GWA analysis of SSRI treatment outcomes. The goal of this analytical strategy is to provide insights into the potential relevance of biologically plausible observed associations.

  12. Depression impairs learning, whereas the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, paroxetine, impairs generalization in patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Herzallah, Mohammad M; Moustafa, Ahmed A; Natsheh, Joman Y; Danoun, Omar A; Simon, Jessica R; Tayem, Yasin I; Sehwail, Mahmud A; Amleh, Ivona; Bannoura, Issam; Petrides, Georgios; Myers, Catherine E; Gluck, Mark A

    2013-11-01

    To better understand how medication status and task demands affect cognition in major depressive disorder (MDD), we evaluated medication-naïve patients with MDD, medicated patients with MDD receiving the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) paroxetine, and healthy controls. All three groups were administered a computer-based cognitive task with two phases, an initial phase in which a sequence is learned through reward-based feedback (which our prior studies suggest is striatal-dependent), followed by a generalization phase that involves a change in the context where learned rules are to be applied (which our prior studies suggest is hippocampal-region dependent). Medication-naïve MDD patients were slow to learn the initial sequence but were normal on subsequent generalization of that learning. In contrast, medicated patients learned the initial sequence normally, but were impaired at the generalization phase. We argue that these data suggest (i) an MDD-related impairment in striatal-dependent sequence learning which can be remediated by SSRIs and (ii) an SSRI-induced impairment in hippocampal-dependent generalization of past learning to novel contexts, not otherwise seen in the medication-naïve MDD group. Thus, SSRIs might have a beneficial effect on striatal function required for sequence learning, but a detrimental effect on the hippocampus and other medial temporal lobe structures is critical for generalization.

  13. Effects of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor escitalopram on the cutaneous silent period: a randomized controlled study in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Pujia, Francesco; Serrao, Mariano; Brienza, Marianna; Vestrini, Elisa; Valente, Gabriele Oreste; Coppola, Gianluca; Pierelli, Francesco

    2014-04-30

    The cutaneous silent period (CSP) involves a transient inhibition of the electromyographic (EMG) activity in the hand muscles induced by a painful electrical stimulation of the digital nerves. The neurotransmitters potentially involved in mediating the CSP have not been completely elucidated thus far. However, few studies suggest that the monoaminergic system may play a role in the CSP. We elicited CSPs in the first dorsal interosseous muscle of the right hand before and 3h after administration of a single oral dose of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor escitalopram (20mg) or placebo. The two experimental sessions (drug and placebo) were performed in a random order at ≥1-week intervals. All recordings were numbered anonymously and analysed offline in a blind manner by one investigator. A significant increase in the CSP duration was observed 3h after escitalopram administration (p=0.01), and no changes were observed in the reflex latency and subjective pain sensation (p>0.05). No significant changes were observed in the CSP duration in subjects who received the placebo (all, p>0.05). Our results indicate that escitalopram increases the central disposition of serotonin and increases the activity of the spinal inhibitory interneurons on the α-motoneurons of the hand muscles. Thus, our results indicate the involvement of the monoaminergic system in controlling the spinal pain mechanisms by supraspinal descending pathways originating from the brainstem neural structures.

  14. Significant reductions in human visual gamma frequency by the gaba reuptake inhibitor tiagabine revealed by robust peak frequency estimation.

    PubMed

    Magazzini, Lorenzo; Muthukumaraswamy, Suresh D; Campbell, Anne E; Hamandi, Khalid; Lingford-Hughes, Anne; Myers, Jim F M; Nutt, David J; Sumner, Petroc; Wilson, Sue J; Singh, Krish D

    2016-11-01

    The frequency of visual gamma oscillations is determined by both the neuronal excitation-inhibition balance and the time constants of GABAergic processes. The gamma peak frequency has been linked to sensory processing, cognitive function, cortical structure, and may have a genetic contribution. To disentangle the intricate relationship among these factors, accurate and reliable estimates of peak frequency are required. Here, a bootstrapping approach that provides estimates of peak frequency reliability, thereby increasing the robustness of the inferences made on this parameter was developed. The method using both simulated data and real data from two previous pharmacological MEG studies of visual gamma with alcohol and tiagabine was validated. In particular, the study by Muthukumaraswamy et al. [] (Neuropsychopharmacology 38(6):1105-1112), in which GABAergic enhancement by tiagabine had previously demonstrated a null effect on visual gamma oscillations, contrasting with strong evidence from both animal models and very recent human studies was re-evaluated. After improved peak frequency estimation and additional exclusion of unreliably measured data, it was found that the GABA reuptake inhibitor tiagabine did produce, as predicted, a marked decrease in visual gamma oscillation frequency. This result demonstrates the potential impact of objective approaches to data quality control, and provides additional translational evidence for the mechanisms of GABAergic transmission generating gamma oscillations in humans. Hum Brain Mapp 37:3882-3896, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Growth and development of tadpoles (Xenopus laevis) exposed to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, fluoxetine and sertraline, throughout metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Conners, Deanna E; Rogers, Emily D; Armbrust, Kevin L; Kwon, Jeong-Wook; Black, Marsha C

    2009-12-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are widely prescribed drugs that are present in sewage effluents and surface waters. The objective of the present study was to determine whether low environmentally relevant concentrations of the SSRIs fluoxetine and sertraline could impair growth and development in tadpoles of the African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis) and to evaluate if such effects may be caused by a disruption of the neuroendocrine system. Tadpoles were exposed to SSRIs at concentrations of 0.1, 1, and 10 microg/L for 70 d throughout metamorphosis. No effects on deformities were observed. Tadpoles exposed to fluoxetine (10 microg/L) and sertraline (0.1, 1, and 10 microg/L) exhibited reduced growth at metamorphosis. Tadpoles exposed to sertraline (0.1 and 1 microg/L) exhibited an acceleration of development as indicated by an increase in the time to tail resorption. The effects of SSRIs on growth and development in tadpoles were likely driven by reduced food intake. Reduced feeding rates were observed in SSRI-exposed tadpoles, and nutritional status can influence growth and development in amphibians via effects on the neuroendocrine system. Only sertraline was capable of causing developmental toxicity in tadpoles at environmentally relevant concentrations. These data warrant additional research to characterize the risks to human health and wildlife from pharmaceutical exposures.

  16. Aqueous solubility, n-octanol-water partition coefficient, and sorption of five selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors to sediments and soils.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jeong-Wook; Armbrust, Kevin L

    2008-08-01

    Aqueous solubilities (S (w)) and n-octanol-water partition coefficients (K (ow)) of five selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) were measured and sorption to two sediments and three soils with organic matter contents ranging from 0.16% to 1.77% and pH ranging between 5.0 and 7.8 was investigated using a batch equilibrium method. SSRIs had high S (w) (3,022-15,460 mg/l) and relatively low log K (ow) (1.12-1.39). Sorption isotherms followed the Freundlich equation. All SSRIs had sorption capacities of greater than 91% except fluvoxamine with a minimum capacity of 73%. Organic matter contents partly affected sorption, however no correlation between sorption characteristics and cation exchange capacity (CEC) or clay content was observed for any SSRI or adsorbent. Values of K (f), K (d), and log K (oc) ranged from 39 to 18,342, from 60 to 42,579, and 3.35 to 6.02 for the SSRIs. SSRIs likely exhibit mixed mechanisms of sorption such as ionic binding in addition to hydrophobic interactions.

  17. Successful treatment of relapsed Ménière's disease using selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors: A report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Goto, Fumiyuki; Tsutsumi, Tomoko; Ogawa, Kaoru

    2014-02-01

    Patients with Ménière's disease who have relapsed following endolymphatic sac surgery (EDS) or intratympanic gentamicin injection are occasionally treated with intratympanic gentamicin injections or revision surgery. However, there is a potential link between Ménière's disease and anxiety or depression. The use of serotonin selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) is likely be beneficial in the treatment of patients with Ménière's disease. The aim of this report is to describe the benefits of SSRIs in patients with relapsed Meniere's disease. Over the course of two years, three patients were treated for symptoms associated with Ménière's disease with an SSRI (sertraline), with the complete resolution, or significant improvement, of symptoms. In these cases, the SSRI may have treated the associated morbidity and not Ménière's disease itself. Ménière's disease that appears to be resistant to typical otological treatment may not be just Ménière's disease. Ménière's disease may co-exist with three other conditions that are able to cause vestibular symptoms and respond to SSRIs: migraine-associated vertigo (MAV), panic disorders and chronic subjective dizziness (CSD).

  18. Exploring the Inhibitory Mechanism of Approved Selective Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitors and Reboxetine Enantiomers by Molecular Dynamics Study

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Guoxun; Xue, Weiwei; Wang, Panpan; Yang, Fengyuan; Li, Bo; Li, Xiaofeng; Li, Yinghong; Yao, Xiaojun; Zhu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (sNRIs) provide an effective class of approved antipsychotics, whose inhibitory mechanism could facilitate the discovery of privileged scaffolds with enhanced drug efficacy. However, the crystal structure of human norepinephrine transporter (hNET) has not been determined yet and the inhibitory mechanism of sNRIs remains elusive. In this work, multiple computational methods were integrated to explore the inhibitory mechanism of approved sNRIs (atomoxetine, maprotiline, reboxetine and viloxazine), and 3 lines of evidences were provided to verify the calculation results. Consequently, a binding mode defined by interactions between three chemical moieties in sNRIs and eleven residues in hNET was identified as shared by approved sNRIs. In the meantime, binding modes of reboxetine’s enantiomers with hNET were compared. 6 key residues favoring the binding of (S, S)-reboxetine over that of (R, R)-reboxetine were discovered. This is the first study reporting that those 11 residues are the common determinants for the binding of approved sNRIs. The identified binding mode shed light on the inhibitory mechanism of approved sNRIs, which could help identify novel scaffolds with improved drug efficacy. PMID:27230580

  19. Acute effects of a dopamine/norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor on neuromuscular performance following self-paced exercise in cool and hot environments.

    PubMed

    Onus, Katrina; Cannon, Jack; Liberts, Liz; Marino, Frank E

    2016-08-01

    Dopamine/norepinephrine (DA/NE) reuptake inhibitors have been used to manipulate the central mechanisms affecting arousal and motivation during exercise. Eight healthy, physically active males performed 30min fixed-intensity cycling at 50% Wmax followed by 30min of self paced time trial (TT) with each section interspersed with a 30 s maximal sprint at 9, 19 and 29min. The DA/NE re-uptake inhibitor administered was bupropion (BUP) versus a placebo (PLA) in either warm (32°C, BUP32 or PLA32) or moderate (20°C; BUP20, PLA20) ambient conditions. Core and skin temperature, heart rate and perceptual responses, neuromuscular and hormonal measures were assessed at multiple times throughout the trials and post exercise. Time trial performance remained unchanged across conditions (12.7-13.1km) although core temperature was elevated in the fixed intensity section of the trials for BUP32 and BUP20 but continued to rise only in BUP32 during the time trial reaching 38.6°C (P<0.05). NE increased in all conditions from pre-exercise with BUP32 values peaking at the end of TT to 1245.3±203.1pg/mL (P<0.05) compared to the other conditions. Neuromuscular responses were similar among conditions although peak force was significantly reduced from pre (262±31N) to post (202±31N, P<0.05) exercise along with contraction duration (22%, P<0.05) in BUP20. We conclude that DA/NE re-uptake inhibitors influenced thermoregulation in the heat but not exercise performance. DA/NE re-uptake inhibitors are likely to act centrally to override the inhibitory signals for the cessation of exercise with these drugs acting peripherally to reduce the twitch characteristics of skeletal muscle in cooler conditions.

  20. Environmental risk assessment of three selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in the aquatic environment: a case study including a cocktail scenario.

    PubMed

    Styrishave, Bjarne; Halling-Sørensen, Bent; Ingerslev, Flemming

    2011-01-01

    We present an environmental risk assessment of three selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs; citalopram, sertraline, and fluoxetine) in the aquatic environment based on two case scenarios. Abiotic and biotic degradation experiments and sorption estimates were used to predict environmental concentrations of three SSRIs from the wastewater of two psychiatric hospitals, the primary sector, and wastewater entering and leaving wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Assuming a sewage treatment retention time of 8 h, abiotic degradation was low, for all three SSRIs inhibitors, ranging between 0 and 2% for hydrolysis and 0 and 6% for photolysis. The biodegradation was also slow, ranging from 0 to 3% within an 8-h period. In untreated sewage, citalopram (CIT) and sertraline (SER) concentrations may be high enough to exert effects on the aquatic biota (CIT: 0.19-10.3 µg/L; SER: 0.14-17.1 µg/L). Removal of the pharmaceuticals is due primarily to sorption in the WWTP. Sertraline was estimated to have the highest concentrations in the sewage effluents, 4.4 and 19.9 ng/L for the two cases, respectively. In treated wastewater, individual SSRI concentrations are probably too low to exert effects on biota. By using concentration addition, a cocktail exposure scenario was estimated. The predicted concentration in the biota calculated from the cocktail effect was 0.05 and 0.16 nmol/g for the two cases, respectively, and SER was found to give the highest contribution to this cocktail effect. The results indicate that the concentrations in the wastewater effluents are one to two orders of magnitude lower than the concentrations likely to cause an effect in the aquatic biota.

  1. Inflammation and peripheral 5-HT7 receptors: the role of 5-HT7 receptors in carrageenan induced inflammation in rats.

    PubMed

    Albayrak, Abdulmecit; Halici, Zekai; Cadirci, Elif; Polat, Beyzagul; Karakus, Emre; Bayir, Yasin; Unal, Deniz; Atasoy, Mustafa; Dogrul, Ahmet

    2013-09-05

    The aim of this study was: (1) to investigate possible role for 5-HT7 receptors in carrageenan induced inflammatory paw oedema in rats; (2) to determine the presence of 5-HT7 receptors in rat paw tissue; (3) to observe the effects of 5-HT7 receptor agonist and antagonist administration on inflammation; and (4) to determine a unique mechanism for inflammatory processes via 5-HT7 receptors. Effects of 5-HT7 receptor agonist, antagonist and indomethacin were investigated in carrageenan induced paw oedema in rats. Blood and tissue samples were collected and evaluated biochemically for serum cytokine levels, tissue oxidant-antioxidant balance and histopathologically for inflammatory cell accumulation. We performed Real Time PCR analyses for tissue 5-HT7 receptor and COX mRNA expressions. The 5-HT7 receptor agonist AS-19 exerted significant anti-inflammatory effect both alone and in combination with indomethacin. Antagonist, SB269970, did not affect inflammation alone but decreased the effects of agonist when co-administered. 5-HT7 mRNA levels were higher in the carrageenan group than healthy control. Carrageenan+indometacin group decreased the mRNA expression of 5-HT7 when compared to carrageenan group. While agonist administration decreased 5-HT7 mRNA expression when compared to carrageenan group. Agonist decreased paw COX expression. Agonist also decreased serum cytokine levels and tissue oxidative stress. In conclusion, this study demonstrated for the first time that 5-HT7 receptors are expressed in rat paw tissue and that this expression responds to inflammatory stimuli. The 5-HT7 receptor may be a promising new therapeutic target for prevention of inflammation and inflammatory disorders and may also provide a new glimpse into inflammation pathophysiology.

  2. Gi-protein-coupled 5-HT1B/D receptor agonist sumatriptan induces type I hyperalgesic priming.

    PubMed

    Araldi, Dioneia; Ferrari, Luiz F; Levine, Jon D

    2016-08-01

    We have recently described a novel form of hyperalgesic priming (type II) induced by agonists at two clinically important Gi-protein-coupled receptors (Gi-GPCRs), mu-opioid and A1-adenosine. Like mu-opioids, the antimigraine triptans, which act at 5-HT1B/D Gi-GPCRs, have been implicated in pain chronification. We determined whether sumatriptan, a prototypical 5-HT1B/D agonist, produces type II priming. Characteristic of hyperalgesic priming, intradermal injection of sumatriptan (10 ng) induced a change in nociceptor function such that a subsequent injection of prostaglandin-E2 (PGE2) induces prolonged mechanical hyperalgesia. However, onset to priming was delayed 3 days, characteristic of type I priming. Also characteristic of type I priming, a protein kinase Cε, but not a protein kinase A inhibitor attenuated the prolongation phase of PGE2 hyperalgesia. The prolongation of PGE2 hyperalgesia was also permanently reversed by intradermal injection of cordycepin, a protein translation inhibitor. Also, hyperalgesic priming did not occur in animals pretreated with pertussis toxin or isolectin B4-positive nociceptor toxin, IB4-saporin. Finally, as observed for other agonists that induce type I priming, sumatriptan did not induce priming in female rats. The prolongation of PGE2 hyperalgesia induced by sumatriptan was partially prevented by coinjection of antagonists for the 5-HT1B and 5-HT1D, but not 5-HT7, serotonin receptors and completely prevented by coadministration of a combination of the 5-HT1B and 5-HT1D antagonists. Moreover, the injection of selective agonists, for 5-HT1B and 5-HT1D receptors, also induced hyperalgesic priming. Our results suggest that sumatriptan, which signals through Gi-GPCRs, induces type I hyperalgesic priming, unlike agonists at other Gi-GPCRs, which induce type II priming.

  3. Short-term effect on intestinal epithelial Na(+)/H(+) exchanger by Gi(alpha1,2)-coupled 5-HT(1A) and G(q/11)-coupled 5-HT(2) receptors.

    PubMed

    Magro, Fernando; Fraga, Sónia; Soares-da-Silva, Patrício

    2007-07-26

    The present study evaluated the effect of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) on intestinal Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (NHE) activity and the cellular signaling pathways involved in T84 cells. T84 cells express endogenous NHE1 and NHE2 proteins, detected by immunoblotting, but not NHE3. The rank order for inhibition of NHE activity in acid-loaded T84 cells was 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl)-amiloride (EIPA; IC(50)=519 [465, 579] nM)>cariporide (IC(50)=630 [484, 819] nM)>amiloride (IC(50)=19 [16, 24] microM); the NHE3 inhibitor S3226 was found to be devoid of effect. This different inhibitory sensitivity indicates that both NHE1 and NHE2 isoforms may play an active role in Na(+)-dependent intracellular pH (pH(i)) recovery in T84 cells. Short-term exposure (0.5 h) of T84 cells to 5-HT increased NHE activity in a concentration-dependent manner. The stimulation induced by 5-HT (30 microM) was partially inhibited by both WAY 100135 (300 nM) and ketanserin (300 nM), antagonists of 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2) receptors, respectively. NHE activity was significantly increased by 8-OH-DPAT and alpha-methyl-5-HT, agonists of, respectively, 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2) receptors. An incubation of T84 cells with anti-G(s) and anti-G(beta) antibodies complexed with lipofectin did not prevent the 5-HT-induced stimulation of NHE activity. Overnight treatment with anti-G(ialpha1,2) and anti-G(q/11) antibodies complexed with lipofectin blocked the stimulatory effect induced by 8-OH-DPAT and alpha-methyl-5-HT, respectively. It is concluded that in T84 cells 5-HT enhances intestinal NHE activity through stimulation of G(ialpha1,2)-coupled 5-HT(1A) and G(q/11)-coupled 5-HT(2) receptors.

  4. 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(7) receptors differently modulate AMPA receptor-mediated hippocampal synaptic transmission.

    PubMed

    Costa, L; Trovato, C; Musumeci, S A; Catania, M V; Ciranna, L

    2012-04-01

    We have studied the effects of 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(7) serotonin receptor activation in hippocampal CA3-CA1 synaptic transmission using patch clamp on mouse brain slices. Application of either 5-HT or 8-OH DPAT, a mixed 5-HT(1A)/5-HT(7) receptor agonist, inhibited AMPA receptor-mediated excitatory post synaptic currents (EPSCs); this effect was mimicked by the 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist 8-OH PIPAT and blocked by the 5-HT(1A) antagonist NAN-190. 8-OH DPAT increased paired-pulse facilitation and reduced the frequency of mEPSCs, indicating a presynaptic reduction of glutamate release probability. In another group of neurons, 8-OH DPAT enhanced EPSC amplitude but did not alter paired-pulse facilitation, suggesting a postsynaptic action; this effect persisted in the presence of NAN-190 and was blocked by the 5-HT(7) receptor antagonist SB-269970. To confirm that EPSC enhancement was mediated by 5-HT(7) receptors, we used the compound LP-44, which is considered a selective 5-HT(7) agonist. However, LP-44 reduced EPSC amplitude in most cells and instead increased EPSC amplitude in a subset of neurons, similarly to 8-OH DPAT. These effects were respectively antagonized by NAN-190 and by SB-269970, indicating that under our experimental condition LP-44 behaved as a mixed agonist. 8-OH DPAT also modulated the current evoked by exogenously applied AMPA, inducing either a reduction or an increase of amplitude in distinct neurons; these effects were respectively blocked by 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(7) receptor antagonists, indicating that both receptors exert a postsynaptic action. Our results show that 5-HT(1A) receptors inhibit CA3-CA1 synaptic transmission acting both pre- and postsynaptically, whereas 5-HT(7) receptors enhance CA3-CA1 synaptic transmission acting exclusively at a postsynaptic site. We suggest that a selective pharmacological targeting of either subtype may be envisaged in pathological loss of hippocampal-dependent cognitive functions. In this respect, we underline the

  5. Agonist properties of N,N-dimethyltryptamine at serotonin 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptors.

    PubMed

    Smith, R L; Canton, H; Barrett, R J; Sanders-Bush, E

    1998-11-01

    Extensive behavioral and biochemical evidence suggests an agonist role at the 5-HT2A receptor, and perhaps the 5-HT2C receptor, in the mechanism of action of hallucinogenic drugs. However the published in vitro pharmacological properties of N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT), an hallucinogenic tryptamine analog, are not consistent with this hypothesis. We, therefore, undertook an extensive investigation into the properties of DMT at 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptors. In fibroblasts transfected with the 5-HT2A receptor or the 5-HT2C receptor, DMT activated the major intracellular signaling pathway (phosphoinositide hydrolysis) to an extent comparable to that produced by serotonin. Because drug efficacy changes with receptor density and cellular microenvironment, we also examined the properties of DMT in native preparations using a behavioral and biochemical approach. Rats were trained to discriminate an antagonist ketanserin from an agonist 1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane (DOI) in a two-lever choice paradigm. Pharmacological studies showed that responding on the DOI and ketanserin lever reflected agonist and antagonist activity at 5-HT2A receptors, and hence, was a suitable model for evaluating the in vivo functional properties of DMT. Like other 5-HT2A receptor agonists, DMT substituted fully for DOI. Intact choroid plexus was used to evaluate the agonist properties at endogenous 5-HT2C receptors; DMT was a partial agonist at 5-HT2C receptors in this native preparation. Thus, we conclude that DMT behaves as an agonist at both 5-HT2A and 5-HT2A receptors. One difference was evident in that the 5-HT2C, but not the 5-HT2A, receptor showed a profound desensitization to DMT over time. This difference is interesting in light of the recent report that the hallucinogenic activity of DMT does not tolerate in humans and suggests the 5-HT2C receptor plays a less prominent role in the action of DMT.

  6. Efficacy and safety of phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors on primary premature ejaculation in men receiving selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors therapy: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Men, C; Yu, L; Yuan, H; Cui, Y

    2016-11-01

    We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess whether selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (PDE5-Is) may have an additive therapeutic effect. A literature review was performed to identify all published randomised controlled trials (RCT) that used SSRIs combined with PDE5-Is therapy for the treatment of primary PE. The search included the following databases: EMBASE, MEDLINE and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register. The reference lists of the retrieved studies were also investigated. Five publications involving a total of 419 patients were used in the analysis, including 5 RCTs that compared PDE5-Is plus SSRIs with SSRIs treating primary PE. Primary efficacy endpoints: IELT (the standardised mean difference (SMD) = 1.07, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.00 to 1.14, P < 0.00001) indicated that utilisation of PDE5-Is and SSRIs was more effective than the SSRIs alone for a long time in patients with primary PE. Safety assessments included headache (odds ratio (OR) = 3.16, 95% CI = 1.63 to 6.11, P = 0.0006), and flushing indicated that PDE5-Is plus SSRIs were well tolerated. This meta-analysis indicates that PDE5-Is combined with SSRIs seem to provide significantly better ejaculatory latency time as compared with SSRIs alone in patients with primary PE.

  7. Effects of MDMA and related analogs on plasma 5-HT: relevance to 5-HT transporters in blood and brain.

    PubMed

    Yubero-Lahoz, Samanta; Ayestas, Mario A; Blough, Bruce E; Partilla, John S; Rothman, Richard B; de la Torre, Rafael; Baumann, Michael H

    2012-01-15

    (±)-3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) is an illicit drug that evokes transporter-mediated release of serotonin (5-HT) in the brain. 5-HT transporter (SERT) proteins are also expressed in non-neural tissues (e.g., blood), and evidence suggests that MDMA targets platelet SERT to increase plasma 5-HT. Here we tested two hypotheses related to the effects of MDMA on circulating 5-HT. First, to determine if MDMA metabolites might contribute to actions of the drug in vivo, we used in vitro microdialysis in rat blood specimens to examine the effects of MDMA and its metabolites on plasma 5-HT. Second, to determine whether effects of MDMA on plasma 5-HT might be used as an index of central SERT activity, we carried out in vivo microdialysis in blood and brain after intravenous MDMA administration. The in vitro results show that test drugs evoke dose-related increases in plasma 5-HT ranging from two- to sevenfold above baseline, with MDMA and its metabolite, (±)-3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), producing the largest effects. The ability of MDMA and related analogs to elevate plasma 5-HT is correlated with their potency as SERT substrates in rat brain synaptosomes. The in vivo results reveal that MDMA causes concurrent increases in extracellular 5-HT in blood and brain, but there are substantial individual differences in responsiveness to the drug. Collectively, our findings indicate that MDMA and its metabolites increase plasma 5-HT by a SERT-dependent mechanism, and suggest the possibility that measures of evoked 5-HT release in blood may reflect central SERT activity.

  8. Bivalent Ligands for the Serotonin 5-HT3 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The serotonin 5-HT3 receptor is a ligand-gated ion channel, which by virtue of its pentameric architecture, can be considered to be an intriguing example of intrinsically multivalent biological receptors. This paper describes a general design approach to the study of multivalency in this multimeric ion channel. Bivalent ligands for 5-HT3 receptor have been designed by linking an arylpiperazine moiety to probes showing different functional features. Both homobivalent and heterobivalent ligands have shown 5-HT3 receptor affinity in the nanomolar range, providing evidence for the viability of our design approach. Moreover, the high affinity shown by homobivalent ligands suggests that bivalency is a promising approach in 5-HT3 receptor modulation and provides the rational basis for applying the concepts of multivalency to the study of 5-HT3 receptor function. PMID:24900351

  9. Effects of serotonin reuptake inhibitors on aggressive behavior in psychiatrically hospitalized adolescents: results of an open trial.

    PubMed

    Constantino, J N; Liberman, M; Kincaid, M

    1997-01-01

    Low concentrations of the neurotransmitter serotonin and its 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid metabolite in the central nervous system have been associated with increased aggressive behavior in animals and humans. Controlled clinical trials of serotonin agonists in depressed adults have suggested that aggressive behavior is less likely during treatment with these medications than with placebo, but there have been no previous studies of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and aggression in children. We prospectively followed the course of aggressive behavior in 19 psychiatrically hospitalized adolescents (not selected for aggressiveness) who received open clinical trials of fluoxetine, paroxetine, or sertraline. The patients received standard doses (equivalent to fluoxetine 10-40 mg daily) for a minimum of 5 weeks. The starting dose was 15 +/- 5 mg, and dosages were raised at a mean rate of 5 mg every 4 days up to a mean dose of 25 +/- 10 mg daily. Results from trials of the three SSRIs were clustered because the sample sizes were not sufficient for separate analyses. Overall, there were no statistically meaningful improvements in the level of aggressive behavior, as measured on a modified version of the Overt Aggression Scale, over the course of these patients' SSRI trials. Symptoms of physical aggression toward others or self were manifest in 12 of the 19 patients while on SSRIs. Of the 19 patients, 13 were assessed both on and off SSRIs: verbal aggression (p = 0.04), physical aggression toward objects (p = 0.05), and physical aggression toward self (p < 0.02) occurred significantly more frequently on SSRIs than off; no increase was observed in physical aggression toward others. Patients with the highest baseline aggressivity scores did not show greater improvement during SSRI treatment. Further research is warranted, particularly to explore whether SSRIs may have therapeutic effects on aggression at higher (or lower) doses than were administered in this

  10. Adjunctive Sleep Medications and Depression Outcome in the Treatment of Serotonin-Selective Reuptake Inhibitor Resistant Depression in Adolescents Study

    PubMed Central

    Shamseddeen, Wael; Clarke, Gregory; Keller, Martin B.; Wagner, Karen Dineen; Birmaher, Boris; Emslie, Graham J.; Ryan, Neal; Asarnow, Joan Rosenbaum; Porta, Giovanna

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective In the Treatment of Resistant Depression in Adolescents, study participants who received medication for sleep had a lower response rate. This report sought to clarify this finding. Method Depressed adolescents who had not responded to a previous adequate serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) trial were randomly assigned to another SSRI, venlafaxine, another SSRI+cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), or venlafaxine+CBT. Augmentation with sleep medication was permitted as clinically indicated. Results Youth who received trazodone were six times less likely to respond than those with no sleep medication (adjusted odds ratio [OR]=0.16, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.05–0.50, p=0.001) and were three times more likely to experience self-harm (OR=3.0, 95% CI: 1.1–7.9, p=0.03), even after adjusting for baseline differences associated with trazodone use. None (0/13) of those cotreated with trazodone and either paroxetine or fluoxetine responded. In contrast, those treated with other sleep medications had similar rates of response (60.0% vs. 50.4%, χ2=0.85, p=0.36) and of self-harm events (OR=0.5, 95% CI: 0.1–2.6, p=0.53) as those who received no sleep medication. Conclusions These findings should be interpreted cautiously because these sleep agents were not assigned randomly, but at clinician discretion. Nevertheless, they suggest that the use of trazodone for the management of sleep difficulties in adolescent depression should be re-evaluated and that future research on the management of sleep disturbance in adolescent depression is needed. The very low response rate of participants cotreated with trazodone and either fluoxetine or paroxetine could be due to inhibition of CYP 2D6 by these antidepressants. PMID:22251024

  11. Metabolic Abnormalities Related to Treatment With Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors in Patients With Schizophrenia or Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Fjukstad, Katrine Kveli; Engum, Anne; Lydersen, Stian; Dieset, Ingrid; Steen, Nils Eiel; Andreassen, Ole A.; Spigset, Olav

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) on cardiovascular risk factors in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. Method We used data from a cross-sectional study on 1301 patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, of whom 280 were treated with SSRIs. The primary outcome variable was the serum concentration of total cholesterol. Secondary outcome variables were low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglyceride and glucose levels, body mass index, waist circumference, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Results After adjusting for potential confounders, an SSRI serum concentration in the middle of the reference interval was associated with an increase of the total cholesterol level by 14.56 mg/dL (95% confidence interval (CI) 5.27–23.85 mg/dL, P = 0.002), the LDL cholesterol level by 8.50 mg/dL (CI 0.22–16.77 mg/dL, P = 0.044), the triglyceride level by 46.49 mg/dL (CI 26.53–66.46 mg/dL, P < 0.001) and the occurrence of the metabolic syndrome by a factor of 2.10 (CI 1.21–3.62, P = 0.008). There were also significant associations between the SSRI dose and total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol levels. Conclusions This study is the first to reveal significant associations between SSRI use and metabolic abnormalities in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. Although the effects were statistically significant, alterations were small. Thus, the clinical impact of the findings is most likely limited. PMID:27749681

  12. MATERNAL CRH AND THE USE OF SELECTIVE SEROTONIN REUPTAKE INHIBITORS INDEPENDENTLY PREDICT THE OCCURRENCE OF PRETERM BIRTH

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, RJ

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Studies support the premise that chronic maternal stress may trigger a premature sequence of physiologic events ending in preterm birth (PTB). Furthermore, chronic stress is highly correlated with depression and anxiety, which are also associated with PTB. However, some studies report that medication status rather than depression and/or anxiety may reflect the risk for PTB. OBJECTIVE While the purpose of this small preliminary study was to evaluate the association between chronic maternal stress and PTB, this report focuses on the unexpected finding of the association between maternal use of selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs), and PTB. METHODS A prospective cohort study of 100 pregnant women included measures of contributors to chronic maternal stress, and corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH). Demographic and behavioral data included smoking, substance use, and use of medications for depression and anxiety. RESULTS Pregnant women who used SSRIs to treat depression and/or anxiety were nearly 12 times more likely to deliver preterm when compared to women who did not use these medications. Women with CRH levels in the 4th quartile were 6 times more likely to deliver preterm when compared to women whose CRH levels were in the lower three quartiles. No associations were found between SSRI use and CRH levels. IMPLICATIONS Associations between preterm birth and maternal use of SSRIs are not understood. It is important not to alter current approaches to the treatment of depression and anxiety without thorough discussion with women regarding the potential benefits and harms of various treatment options. PMID:21429075

  13. Role of prefrontal cortical calcium-independent phospholipase A2 in antinociceptive effect of the norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor antidepresssant maprotiline.

    PubMed

    Chew, Wee-Siong; Shalini, Suku-Maran; Torta, Federico; Wenk, Markus R; Stohler, Christian; Yeo, Jin-Fei; Herr, Deron R; Ong, Wei-Yi

    2017-01-06

    The prefrontal cortex is essential for executive functions such as decision-making and planning. There is also accumulating evidence that it is important for the modulation of pain. In this study, we investigated a possible role of prefrontal cortical calcium-independent phospholipase A2 (iPLA2) in antinociception induced by the norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (NRI) and tetracyclic (tricyclic) antidepressant, maprotiline. Intraperitoneal injections of maprotiline increased iPLA2 mRNA and protein expression in the prefrontal cortex. This treatment also reduced grooming responses to von-Frey hair stimulation of the face after facial carrageenan injection, indicating decreased sensitivity to pain. The antinociceptive effect of maprotiline was abrogated by iPLA2 antisense oligonucleotide injection to the prefrontal cortex, indicating a role of this enzyme in antinociception. In contrast, injection of iPLA2 antisense oligonucleotide to the somatosensory cortex did not reduce the antinociceptive effect of maprotiline. Lipidomic analysis of the prefrontal cortex showed decrease in phosphatidylcholine species, but increase in lysophosphatidylcholine species, indicating increased PLA2 activity, and release of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) after maprotiline treatment. Differences in sphingomyelin/ceramide were also detected. These changes were not observed in maprotiline-treated mice that received iPLA2 antisense oligonucleotide to the prefrontal cortex. Metabolites of DHA and EPA may help to strengthen a known supraspinal antinociceptive pathway from the prefrontal cortex to the periaqueductal gray. Together, results indicate a role of prefrontal cortical iPLA2 and its enzymatic products in the antinociceptive effect of maprotiline.

  14. The Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Fluoxetine Directly Inhibits Osteoblast Differentiation and Mineralization During Fracture Healing in Mice.

    PubMed

    Bradaschia-Correa, Vivian; Josephson, Anne M; Mehta, Devan; Mizrahi, Matthew; Neibart, Shane S; Liu, Chao; Kennedy, Oran D; Castillo, Alesha B; Egol, Kenneth A; Leucht, Philipp

    2016-11-21

    Chronic use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) for the treatment of depression has been linked to osteoporosis. In this study, we investigated the effect of chronic SSRI use on fracture healing in two murine models of bone regeneration. First, we performed a comprehensive analysis of endochondral bone healing in a femur fracture model. C57/BL6 mice treated with fluoxetine, the most commonly prescribed SSRI, developed a normal cartilaginous soft-callus at 14 days after fracture and demonstrated a significantly smaller and biomechanically weaker bony hard-callus at 28 days. In order to further dissect the mechanism that resulted in a smaller bony regenerate, we used an intramembranous model of bone healing and revealed that fluoxetine treatment resulted in a significantly smaller bony callus at 7 and 14 days postinjury. In order to test whether the smaller bony regenerate following fluoxetine treatment was caused by an inhibition of osteogenic differentiation and/or mineralization, we employed in vitro experiments, which established that fluoxetine treatment decreases osteogenic differentiation and mineralization and that this effect is serotonin-independent. Finally, in a translational approach, we tested whether cessation of the medication would result in restoration of the regenerative potential. However, histologic and μCT analysis revealed non-union formation in these animals with fibrous tissue interposition within the callus. In conclusion, fluoxetine exerts a direct, inhibitory effect on osteoblast differentiation and mineralization, shown in two disparate murine models of bone repair. Discontinuation of the drug did not result in restoration of the healing potential, but rather led to complete arrest of the repair process. Besides the well-established effect of SSRIs on bone homeostasis, our study provides strong evidence that fluoxetine use negatively impacts fracture healing. © 2016 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  15. Acute and chronic effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor treatment on fear conditioning: implications for underlying fear circuits.

    PubMed

    Burghardt, N S; Bauer, E P

    2013-09-05

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are widely used for the treatment of a spectrum of anxiety disorders, yet paradoxically they may increase symptoms of anxiety when treatment is first initiated. Despite extensive research over the past 30 years focused on SSRI treatment, the precise mechanisms by which SSRIs exert these opposing acute and chronic effects on anxiety remain unknown. By testing the behavioral effects of SSRI treatment on Pavlovian fear conditioning, a well characterized model of emotional learning, we have the opportunity to identify how SSRIs affect the functioning of specific brain regions, including the amygdala, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) and hippocampus. In this review, we first define different stages of learning involved in cued and context fear conditioning and describe the neural circuits underlying these processes. We examine the results of numerous rodent studies investigating how acute SSRI treatment modulates fear learning and relate these effects to the known functions of serotonin in specific brain regions. With these findings, we propose a model by which acute SSRI administration, by altering neural activity in the extended amygdala and hippocampus, enhances both acquisition and expression of cued fear conditioning, but impairs the expression of contextual fear conditioning. Finally, we review the literature examining the effects of chronic SSRI treatment on fear conditioning in rodents and describe how downregulation of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the amygdala and hippocampus may mediate the impairments in fear learning and memory that are reported. While long-term SSRI treatment effectively reduces symptoms of anxiety, their disruptive effects on fear learning should be kept in mind when combining chronic SSRI treatment and learning-based therapies, such as cognitive behavioral therapy.

  16. Chronic administration of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) paroxetine modulates human motor cortex excitability in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Gerdelat-Mas, A; Loubinoux, I; Tombari, D; Rascol, O; Chollet, F; Simonetta-Moreau, M

    2005-08-15

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of chronic administration of paroxetine (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor: SSRI) on motor cortex excitability in healthy subjects by means of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and behavioral motor tests. In a randomized, double-blind, crossover study, twenty-one right-handed subjects received 20 mg daily of either paroxetine or a placebo over a period of 30 days separated by a period of 3 months wash-out. The TMS study is presented here correlated with some results of the motor behavior study (finger tapping test) and the fMRI study (primary sensorimotor cortex (S1M1) volume of activation). TMS was used to test motor threshold (MT), motor evoked potential recruitment curve (RC), cortical silent period (CSP) and paired-pulse intracortical inhibition and facilitation (ICI, ICF). Chronic administration of paroxetine did not modulate ICI or CSP but induced a significant enhancement of mean ICF (ANOVA P=0.04), which significantly correlated with increase of speed in a finger tapping test (P=0.02). This suggests a modulation of cortical interneuronal excitatory pathways without changes in the excitability of cortical inhibitory GABAergic interneurons. A decrease of RC (ANOVA P=0.05) was also observed after 30 days intake of paroxetine in comparison with placebo and was associated with changes of fMRI activation intensity (left S1M1 hypoactivation, ), without changes of S1M1 activation volume. Finally, the different modulation of RC and ICF after chronic administration of paroxetine compared to single dose (opposite effects) emphasizes the different pharmacological action of the drug at cortical level depending on its acute or long-term administration.

  17. Determination of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in plasma and urine by micellar liquid chromatography coupled to fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Nitasha; Esteve-Romero, Josep; Bose, Devasish; Dubey, Neeti Prakesh; Peris-Vicente, Juan; Carda-Broch, Samuel

    2014-08-15

    Citalopram, paroxetine and fluoxetine are selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRIs) currently used in the treatment of psychiatric disorders. We present an analytical method using micellar liquid chromatography to quantify these three drugs in pharmaceutical formulations, plasma and urine. The resolution was performed using a mobile phase of 0.075 M SDS - 6% (v/v) butanol buffered at pH 7 running through a C18 column under isocratic mode at 1 mL/min at 25°C. The analytes were eluted in less than 20 min. The fluorescence detection was programmed at the maximum excitation (236, 295 and 230 nm) and emission (310, 350 and 305 nm) wavelengths for citalopram, paroxetine and fluoxetine, respectively. The experimental procedure was expedited to 1/5 dilution of the sample in the micellar mobile phase and filtration, thus avoiding clean-up and extraction steps. An aliquot of 20 μL was injected after 80 min of preparation, to obtain maximum sensitivity. The method was validated according to the guidelines of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in terms of calibration range (20-500 ng/mL; r(2)>0.999), sensitivity, accuracy (91.3-103.2%), precision (<9.3%), and robustness (<6.1%). The suitability of the method was successfully evaluated by analyzing plasma and urine samples from patients treated with SSRIs and checking the content of the active principle in tablets. Thus, the method can be applied to pharmacokinetics studies and in forensic cases, as well as in quality control of commercial pharmaceutical formulations.

  18. Pharmacokinetics and tolerability of DA-8031, a novel selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor for premature ejaculation in healthy male subjects

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Dongseong; Lee, SeungHwan; Yi, Sojeong; Yoon, Seo Hyun; Cho, Joo-Youn; Bahng, Mi Young; Jang, In-Jin; Yu, Kyung-Sang

    2017-01-01

    Objective DA-8031 is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor under development for the treatment of premature ejaculation. This is the first-in-human study aimed at evaluating the pharmacokinetics and tolerability of DA-8031 and its metabolites (M1, M2, M4, and M5) in the plasma and urine after administration of a single oral dose in healthy male subjects. Methods A dose block-randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, single ascending dose study was conducted. Subjects received either placebo or a single dose of DA-8031 at 5, 10, 20, 40, 60, 80, or 120 mg. DA-8031 and its four metabolites were analyzed in the plasma and urine for pharmacokinetic evaluation. The effect of genetic polymorphisms of cytochrome-P450 (CYP) enzymes on the pharmacokinetics of DA-8031 was evaluated. Results After a single dose, plasma DA-8031 reached the maximum concentration at a median of 2–3 h and was eliminated with terminal elimination half-life of 17.9–28.7 h. The mean renal clearance was 3.7–5.6 L/h. Dose-proportional pharmacokinetics was observed over the dose range of 20–80 mg. Among the metabolites, M4 had the greatest plasma concentration, followed by M5 and M1. Subjects with CYP2D6 intermediate metabolizer had significantly greater dose-normalized Cmax and AUC0–t of DA-8031 as well as smaller metabolic ratios than those subjects with CYP2D6 extensive metabolizer. The most common adverse events were nausea, dizziness, and headache, and no serious adverse events were reported. Conclusion In conclusion, the systemic exposure of DA-8031 was increased proportionally to the dose within 20–80 mg. Genetic polymorphisms of CYP2D6 had an effect on the systemic exposure of DA-8031. DA-8031 was well tolerated after single doses of 80 mg or less. PMID:28331291

  19. Klotho Gene and Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors: Response to Treatment in Late-Life Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Paroni, Giulia; Seripa, Davide; Fontana, Andrea; D'Onofrio, Grazia; Gravina, Carolina; Urbano, Maria; Addante, Filomena; Lozupone, Madia; Copetti, Massimiliano; Pilotto, Alberto; Greco, Antonio; Panza, Francesco

    2017-03-01

    Klotho protein, encoded by the Klotho gene (KL) at locus 13q12, is an antiaging hormone-like protein playing a pivotal role in cell metabolism homeostasis and associated to longevity and age-related diseases. In particular, altered cell metabolism in central nervous system may influence the behavior of serotoninergic neurons. The role of KL in the response to treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in late-life depressive syndromes and late-life major depressive disorder (MDD) is unclear. We genotyped three single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of KL in 329 older patients with diagnosis of late-life MDD, treated with SSRIs and evaluated with the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression 21-items (HRSD-21) at baseline and after 6 months. A reduction ≥50 and <10 % in HDRS-21 score was considered as response or nonresponse to therapy, respectively, and the values of reduction between 10 and 49 % as poor responders. After 6 months of SSRI treatment, 176 patients responded, 54 patients did not respond and 99 patients showed a poor response. Ordinal logistic models showed a significant association between mutation of SNP rs1207568 and responders and, similarly, for each unitary risk allele increase overlapping results were found. Conversely, a significantly higher frequency of the minor genotype of SNP rs9536314 was found in nonresponders. Considering the pre-post differences of HRSD-21 scores as a continue variable, we confirmed a significant improvement of depressive symptoms after treatment in patients carrying at least one minor allele at rs1207568 and a worse response in patients homozygous for the minor allele at rs9536314. Our results were the first that suggested a possible role of KL in the complex pathway of SSRI response in late-life MDD.

  20. Possible involvement of sigma-1 receptors in the anti-immobility action of bupropion, a dopamine reuptake inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Dhir, Ashish; Kulkarni, S K

    2008-08-01

    Sigma receptors particularly, sigma-1 subtype is known to modulate the release of catecholamines in the brain and may participate in the mechanism of action of various antidepressants. The present study investigated the possible involvement of sigma receptors in modulating the anti-immobility-like effect of bupropion (a dopamine reuptake inhibitor) using the forced swim test (FST) in mice. Bupropion produced dose-dependent (10-40 mg/kg, i.p.) reduction in immobility period and the ED(50) value was found to be 18.5 (7.34-46.6) mg/kg, i.p. (+)-Pentazocine (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.), a high-affinity sigma-1 receptor agonist, produced synergistic response when it was co-administered with a subeffective dose of bupropion (10 mg/kg, i.p.). On the contrary, pretreatment with progesterone (10 mg/kg, s.c.), a sigma-1 receptor antagonist neurosteroid, rimcazole (5 mg/kg, i.p.), another sigma-1 receptor antagonist, or BD 1047 (1 mg/kg, i.p.), a novel sigma-1 receptor antagonist, reversed the anti-immobility effects of bupropion (20 mg/kg, i.p.). The various modulators used in the study did not show any effect per se on locomotor activity except bupropion which at a higher dose (15-40 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly increased the locomotor activity. The results for the first time demonstrated the involvement of sigma-1 receptors in the anti-immobility effects of bupropion.

  1. The Effects of the Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Fluvoxamine on Voltage-Dependent K(+) Channels in Rabbit Coronary Arterial Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Hong, Da Hye; Li, Hongliang; Kim, Han Sol; Kim, Hye Won; Shin, Sung Eun; Jung, Won-Kyo; Na, Sung Hun; Choi, Il-Whan; Firth, Amy Leanne; Park, Won Sun; Kim, Dae-Joong

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrated the inhibitory effect of fluvoxamine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), on voltage-dependent K(+) (Kv) channels in freshly isolated rabbit coronary arterial smooth muscle cells using a whole-cell patch clamp technique. Fluvoxamine reduced the amplitude of Kv currents in a concentration-dependent manner with an IC50 value of 3.71±1.09 µM and a Hill coefficient of 0.62±0.14. Although fluvoxamine did not significantly affect the steady-state activation curve, it shifted the steady-state inactivation curve toward a more negative potential. Pretreatment with another SSRI, paroxetine, did not affect the basal Kv current and did not alter the inhibitory effect of fluvoxamine on Kv channels. We concluded that fluvoxamine inhibits the Kv current in a concentration-dependent manner and in a closed (inactivated) state of the Kv channels independent of serotonin reuptake inhibition.

  2. G-protein-linked serotonin receptors in mouse kidney exhibit identical properties to 5-HT1b receptors in brain

    SciTech Connect

    Ciaranello, R.D.; Tan, G.L.; Dean, R. )

    1990-03-01

    The serotonin 1b (5-HT1b) receptor is thought to mediate both pre- and postsynaptic actions of serotonin. Until recently 5-HT1b sites were thought to be present only in rodent brain. We now report the presence of high-affinity (125I)iodocyanopindolol ((125I) ICYP) binding sites in the mouse renal medulla with properties identical to those of brain 5-HT1b receptors. In vitro receptor autoradiography demonstrates that (125I)ICYP binding is highly localized to the outer stripe of the renal medulla. Association and dissociation kinetics, saturation analysis and competition displacement analyses indicate that renal medullary (125I)ICYP binding sites exhibit identical properties with brain 5-HT1b receptors. Incubation of renal medullary or brain membranes with guanylimidodiphosphate results in a decreased affinity of 5-HT1b sites for 5-HT and (125I)ICYP; this can be reversed by the addition of a purified mixture of G proteins (Gi/Go). Treatment of brain or kidney membranes with N-ethylmaleimide results in a decrease in 5-HT1b binding which can also be restored by reconstitution with purified G proteins. Adenylyl cyclase from renal medullary homogenates or minces can be stimulated more than 3-fold by forskolin and attenuated by 5-HT. These results indicate that mouse kidney contains high-affinity 5-HT1b receptors with identical properties to those found in brain. These are localized in the outer stripe of the renal medulla and are functionally coupled to adenylyl cyclase inhibitor (Gi) G-proteins.

  3. Serotonin 2B Receptor (5-HT2B R) Signals through Prostacyclin and PPAR-ß/δ in Osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Chabbi-Achengli, Yasmine; Launay, Jean-Marie; Maroteaux, Luc; de Vernejoul, Marie Christine; Collet, Corinne

    2013-01-01

    Osteoporosis is due to an imbalance between decreased bone formation by osteoblasts and increased resorption by osteoclasts. Deciphering factors controlling bone formation is therefore of utmost importance for the understanding and the treatment of osteoporosis. Our previous in vivo results showed that bone formation is reduced in the absence of the serotonin receptor 5-HT2B, causing impaired osteoblast proliferation, recruitment, and matrix mineralization. In this study, we investigated the signaling pathways responsible for the osteoblast defect in 5-HT2BR−/− mice. Notably, we investigated the phospholipase A2 pathway and synthesis of eicosanoids in 5-HT2BR−/− compared to wild type (WT) osteoblasts. Compared to control osteoblasts, the lack of 5-HT2B receptors was only associated with a 10-fold over-production of prostacyclin (PGI2). Also, a specific prostacyclin synthase inhibitor (U51605) rescued totally osteoblast aggregation and matrix mineralization in the 5-HT2BR−/− osteoblasts without having any effect on WT osteoblasts. Prostacyclin is the endogenous ligand of the nuclear peroxisome proliferator activated receptor ß/δ (PPAR-ß/δ), and its inhibition in 5-HT2BR−/− cells rescued totally the alkaline phosphatase and osteopontin mRNA levels, cell-cell adhesion, and matrix mineralization. We conclude that the absence of 5-HT2B receptors leads to the overproduction of prostacyclin, inducing reduced osteoblast differentiation due to PPAR-ß/δ -dependent target regulation and defective cell-cell adhesion and matrix mineralization. This study thus reveals a previously unrecognized cell autonomous osteoblast defect in the absence of 5-HT2BR and highlights a new pathway linking 5-HT2B receptors and nuclear PPAR- ß/δ via prostacyclin. PMID:24069449

  4. Platelet 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) transporter and 5-HT2A receptor binding after chronic hypercorticosteronemia, (+/-)-1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane administration or neurotoxin-induced depletion of central nervous system 5-HT in the rat.

    PubMed

    Owens, M J; Ballenger, C A; Knight, D L; Nemeroff, C B

    1996-09-01

    There is considerable evidence that the number of platelet 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) transporter binding sites, as measured by [3H]imipramine binding, are significantly decreased, and platelet 5-HT2 receptor density is increased, in drug-free patients with major depression. To investigate whether these changes in the platelet 5-HT transporter or 5-HT2 receptor sites resulted from known or hypothesized biochemical changes observed in major depression, we examined, in the rat, whether a chronic hyperglucocorticoid state, or decreases or increases in central nervous system 5-HT neurotransmission, altered binding of the selective ligands [3H]citalopram and [125I] (+/-)-1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane to platelet and brain 5-HT transporters and 5-HT2 receptors, respectively. Chronic (6 weeks) hypercorticosteronemia did not alter either brain or platelet 5-HT transporter or 5-HT2A receptor binding. Similarly, 8-week administration of the 5-HT2A/5-HT2C agonist (+/-)-1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane, at a dose which down-regulates brain 5-HT2A/2C receptors, did not alter brain or platelet 5-HT transporters or platelet 5-HT2A receptors. Additionally, para-chloroamphetamine-(11 weeks) or fenfluramine-induced chronic (1.5-10 weeks) depletion of central nervous system 5-HT did not alter platelet 5-HT transporter or 5-HT2A receptor binding. Finally, there was no correlation between the number of 5-HT transporters in brain and platelets in any of the control or treatment groups. These findings suggest that the observed changes in platelet 5-HT transporter and 5-HT2A receptor binding in depressed patients are more apt to be of genetic origin (i.e., trait-dependent) rather than an epiphenomenon of hypercortisolemia or altered central nervous system 5-HT status.

  5. Inflammation and depression: combined use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and NSAIDs or paracetamol and psychiatric outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Köhler, Ole; Petersen, Liselotte; Mors, Ole; Gasse, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    Background Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and paracetamol have been shown to yield the potential of adjunctive antidepressant treatment effects to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs); however, when investigating treatment effects of concomitant use, simultaneous evaluation of potential adverse events is important. The objective was thus to investigate treatment effectiveness and safety aspects of concomitant SSRI use with NSAIDs or paracetamol. Methods Within a 25% random sample of the Danish population, we identified all incident SSRI users between 1997 and 2006 (N = 123,351). Effectiveness and safety measures were compared between periods of SSRI use only and periods of combined SSRI and NSAID or paracetamol use by applying Cox regression. Results Among 123,351 SSRI users (follow-up: 53,697.8 person-years), 21,666 (17.5%) used NSAIDs and 10,232 (8.3%) paracetamol concomitantly. Concomitant NSAID use increased the risk of any psychiatric contact [Hazard rate ratio (95%-confidence interval): 1.22 (1.07; 1.38)] and with depression [1.31 (1.11; 1.55)]. Low-dose acetylsalicylic acid reduced the risk of psychiatric contact in general [0.74 (0.56; 0.98)] and with depression [0.71 (0.50; 1.01)]. Ibuprofen reduced the risk of psychiatric contacts [0.76 (0.60; 0.98)]. Concerning safety, paracetamol was associated with increased mortality [3.18 (2.83; 3.58)], especially cardiovascular [2.51 (1.93; 3.28)]. Diclofenac [1.77 (1.22; 2.55)] and the selective COX-2 inhibitors [1.75 (1.21; 2.53)] increased mortality risks. Conclusions Concomitant use of SSRIs and NSAIDs occurred frequently, and effectiveness and safety outcomes varied across individual NSAIDs. Especially low-dose acetylsalicylic acid may represent an adjunctive antidepressant treatment option. The increased mortality risk of concomitant use of paracetamol needs further investigation. PMID:26357585

  6. Shuyu Capsules Relieve Premenstrual Syndrome Depression by Reducing 5-HT3AR and 5-HT3BR Expression in the Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fang; Feng, Jizhen; Gao, Dongmei; Wang, Jieqiong; Song, Chunhong; Wei, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    The effects of the Shuyu capsule on 5-HT3AR and 5-HT3BR expression in a rat model of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) depression and on 5-HT3AR and 5-HT3BR expression and hippocampal neuron 5-HT3 channel current were investigated, to elucidate its mechanism of action against PMS depression. PMS depression model rats were divided into depression and Shuyu- and fluoxetine-treated groups, which were compared to control rats for frontal lobe and hippocampal 5-HT3AR and 5-HT3BR expression and behavior. The depressed model rats displayed symptoms of depression, which were reduced in treated and normal control rats. Frontal lobe and hippocampal 5-HT3AR and 5-HT3BR levels were significantly higher in the model versus the control group and were significantly lower in the Shuyu group. As compared to control rats, the 5-HT3R channel current in the model group was significantly higher; the 5-HT3R channel current in hippocampal neurons treated with serum from Shuyu group rats was significantly lower than that in those treated with model group serum. Thus, PMS depression may be related to 5-HT3AR and 5-HT3BR expression and increased 5-HT3 channel current. Shuyu capsules rectified abnormal 5-HT3AR and 5-HT3BR expression and 5-HT3 channel current changes in a rat model; this finding may provide insight into treating PMS depression. PMID:27725889

  7. Cartography of 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A Receptor Subtypes in Prefrontal Cortex and Its Projections.

    PubMed

    Mengod, Guadalupe; Palacios, José M; Cortés, Roser

    2015-07-15

    Since the development of chemical neuroanatomical tools in the 1960s, a tremendous wealth of information has been generated on the anatomical components of the serotonergic system, at the microscopic level in the brain including the prefrontal cortex (PFC). The PFC receives a widespread distribution of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) terminals from the median and dorsal raphe nuclei. 5-HT receptors were first visualized using radioligand autoradiography in the late 1980s and early 1990s and showed, in contrast to 5-HT innervation, a differential distribution of binding sites associated with different 5-HT receptor subtypes. Due to the cloning of the different 5-HT receptor subtype genes in the late 1980s and early 1990s, it was possible, using in situ hybridization histochemistry, to localize cells expressing mRNA for these receptors. Double in situ hybridization histochemistry and immunohistochemistry allowed for the chemical characterization of the phenotype of cells expressing 5-HT receptors. Tract tracing technology allowed a detailed cartography of the neuronal connections of PFC and other brain areas. Based on these data, maps have been constructed that reflect our current understanding