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Sample records for 5-ht1a receptor ligands

  1. Asymmetric Clustering Index in a Case Study of 5-HT1A Receptor Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Śmieja, Marek; Warszycki, Dawid; Tabor, Jacek; Bojarski, Andrzej J.

    2014-01-01

    The automatic clustering of chemical compounds is an important branch of chemoinformatics. In this paper the Asymmetric Clustering Index (Aci) is proposed to assess how well an automatically created partition reflects the reference. The asymmetry allows for a distinction between the fixed reference and the numerically constructed partition. The introduced index is applied to evaluate the quality of hierarchical clustering procedures for 5-HT1A receptor ligands. We find that the most appropriate combination of parameters for the hierarchical clustering of compounds with a determined activity for this biological target is the Klekota Roth fingerprint combined with the complete linkage function and the Buser similarity metric. PMID:25019251

  2. Application of Quantitative Structure–Activity Relationship Models of 5-HT1A Receptor Binding to Virtual Screening Identifies Novel and Potent 5-HT1A Ligands

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The 5-hydroxytryptamine 1A (5-HT1A) serotonin receptor has been an attractive target for treating mood and anxiety disorders such as schizophrenia. We have developed binary classification quantitative structure–activity relationship (QSAR) models of 5-HT1A receptor binding activity using data retrieved from the PDSP Ki database. The prediction accuracy of these models was estimated by external 5-fold cross-validation as well as using an additional validation set comprising 66 structurally distinct compounds from the World of Molecular Bioactivity database. These validated models were then used to mine three major types of chemical screening libraries, i.e., drug-like libraries, GPCR targeted libraries, and diversity libraries, to identify novel computational hits. The five best hits from each class of libraries were chosen for further experimental testing in radioligand binding assays, and nine of the 15 hits were confirmed to be active experimentally with binding affinity better than 10 μM. The most active compound, Lysergol, from the diversity library showed very high binding affinity (Ki) of 2.3 nM against 5-HT1A receptor. The novel 5-HT1A actives identified with the QSAR-based virtual screening approach could be potentially developed as novel anxiolytics or potential antischizophrenic drugs. PMID:24410373

  3. Application of quantitative structure-activity relationship models of 5-HT1A receptor binding to virtual screening identifies novel and potent 5-HT1A ligands.

    PubMed

    Luo, Man; Wang, Xiang Simon; Roth, Bryan L; Golbraikh, Alexander; Tropsha, Alexander

    2014-02-24

    The 5-hydroxytryptamine 1A (5-HT1A) serotonin receptor has been an attractive target for treating mood and anxiety disorders such as schizophrenia. We have developed binary classification quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models of 5-HT1A receptor binding activity using data retrieved from the PDSP Ki database. The prediction accuracy of these models was estimated by external 5-fold cross-validation as well as using an additional validation set comprising 66 structurally distinct compounds from the World of Molecular Bioactivity database. These validated models were then used to mine three major types of chemical screening libraries, i.e., drug-like libraries, GPCR targeted libraries, and diversity libraries, to identify novel computational hits. The five best hits from each class of libraries were chosen for further experimental testing in radioligand binding assays, and nine of the 15 hits were confirmed to be active experimentally with binding affinity better than 10 μM. The most active compound, Lysergol, from the diversity library showed very high binding affinity (Ki) of 2.3 nM against 5-HT1A receptor. The novel 5-HT1A actives identified with the QSAR-based virtual screening approach could be potentially developed as novel anxiolytics or potential antischizophrenic drugs.

  4. Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship for High Affinity 5-HT1A Receptor Ligands Based on Norm Indexes.

    PubMed

    Jia, Qingzhu; Cui, Xue; Li, Lei; Wang, Qiang; Liu, Ying; Xia, Shuqian; Ma, Peisheng

    2015-12-24

    Arylpiperazine derivatives are promising 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptor ligands which can inhibit serotonin reuptake effectively. In this work, some norm index descriptors were proposed and further utilized to develop a model for predicting 5-HT1A receptor affinity (pKi) of 88 arylpiperazine derivatives. Results showed that this new model could provide satisfactory predictions with the square of the correction coefficient (R(2)) of 0.8891 and the squared correlation coefficient of cross-validation (Q(2)) of 0.8082, respectively. In addition, the applicability domain of this model was validated by using the leverage approach and results which suggested potential large scale for further utilization of this model. The results of statistical values and validation tests demonstrated that our proposed norm index based model could be successfully applied for predicting the affinity 5-HT1A receptor ligands of arylpiperazine derivatives.

  5. Interaction of 5-HT1B/D ligands with recombinant h 5-HT1A receptors: intrinsic activity and modulation by G-protein activation state.

    PubMed

    Pauwels, P J; Palmier, C; Dupuis, D S; Colpaert, F C

    1998-05-01

    Many 5-HT1B/D receptor ligands have affinity for 5-HT1A receptors. In the present study, the intrinsic activity of a series of 5-HT1B/D ligands was investigated at human 5-HT1A (h 5-HT1A) receptors by measuring G-protein activation in recombinant C6-glial and HeLa membranes, using agonist-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding. In these two membrane preparations, the density of h 5-HT1A receptors (i.e., 246 to 320 fmol mg(-1) protein) and of their G-proteins, and the receptor: G-protein density ratio (0.08 to 0.18) appeared to be similar. It was found that: (i) the maximal [35S]GTPgammaS binding responses induced by the 5-HT1B/D receptor ligands in the HeLa preparation at 30 microM GDP were comparable to that of the native agonist 5-HT; (ii) as compared to 5-HT (1.00), similar potencies but lower maximal responses were observed in the C6-glial preparation at 0.3 microM GDP for zolmitriptan (0.89), dihydroergotamine (0.81), rizatriptan (0.71), CP122638 (0.69), naratriptan (0.60) and sumatriptan (0.53); and that (iii) maximal [35S]GTPgammaS binding responses induced by 5-HT1B/D ligands in the C6-glial preparation were either unaffected or significantly enhanced by increasing the GDP concentration from 0.3 to 30 microM and higher concentrations. These features differ from those observed with 5-HT1A receptor agonists; the latter display the same rank order of potency and efficacy in both membrane preparations, and increasing the amount of GDP with C6-glial membranes results in an attenuation of both the agonist's maximal effect and the apparent potency of partial agonists. The differential regulation of 5-HT1A and 5-HT1B/D agonist responses by GDP suggests that different G-protein subtypes are involved upon 5-HT1A receptor activation by 5-HT1A and 5-HT1B/D agonists. PMID:9650800

  6. Hippocampal 5-HT1A Receptor and Spatial Learning and Memory

    PubMed Central

    Glikmann-Johnston, Yifat; Saling, Michael M.; Reutens, David C.; Stout, Julie C.

    2015-01-01

    Spatial cognition is fundamental for survival in the topographically complex environments inhabited by humans and other animals. The hippocampus, which has a central role in spatial cognition, is characterized by high concentration of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) receptor binding sites, particularly of the 1A receptor (5-HT1A) subtype. This review highlights converging evidence for the role of hippocampal 5-HT1A receptors in spatial learning and memory. We consider studies showing that activation or blockade of the 5-HT1A receptors using agonists or antagonists, respectively, lead to changes in spatial learning and memory. For example, pharmacological manipulation to induce 5-HT release, or to block 5-HT uptake, have indicated that increased extracellular 5-HT concentrations maintain or improve memory performance. In contrast, reduced levels of 5-HT have been shown to impair spatial memory. Furthermore, the lack of 5-HT1A receptor subtype in single gene knockout mice is specifically associated with spatial memory impairments. These findings, along with evidence from recent cognitive imaging studies using positron emission tomography (PET) with 5-HT1A receptor ligands, and studies of individual genetic variance in 5-HT1A receptor availability, strongly suggests that 5-HT, mediated by the 5-HT1A receptor subtype, plays a key role in spatial learning and memory. PMID:26696889

  7. An Algorithm to Identify Target-Selective Ligands – A Case Study of 5-HT7/5-HT1A Receptor Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Kurczab, Rafał; Canale, Vittorio; Zajdel, Paweł; Bojarski, Andrzej J.

    2016-01-01

    A computational procedure to search for selective ligands for structurally related protein targets was developed and verified for serotonergic 5-HT7/5-HT1A receptor ligands. Starting from a set of compounds with annotated activity at both targets (grouped into four classes according to their activity: selective toward each target, not-selective and not-selective but active) and with an additional set of decoys (prepared using DUD methodology), the SVM (Support Vector Machines) models were constructed using a selective subset as positive examples and four remaining classes as negative training examples. Based on these four component models, the consensus classifier was then constructed using a data fusion approach. The combination of two approaches of data representation (molecular fingerprints vs. structural interaction fingerprints), different training set sizes and selection of the best SVM component models for consensus model generation, were evaluated to determine the optimal settings for the developed algorithm. The results showed that consensus models with molecular fingerprints, a larger training set and the selection of component models based on MCC maximization provided the best predictive performance. PMID:27271158

  8. Pharmacology of the hypothermic response to 5-HT1A receptor activation in humans.

    PubMed

    Lesch, K P; Poten, B; Söhnle, K; Schulte, H M

    1990-01-01

    The selective 5-HT1A receptor ligand ipsapirone (IPS) caused dose-related hypothermia in humans. The response was attenuated by the nonselective 5-HT1/2 receptor antagonist metergoline and was completely antagonized by the nonselective beta-adrenoceptor antagonist pindolol, which interacts stereoselectively with the 5-HT1A receptor. The selective beta 1-adrenergic antagonist betaxolol had no effect. The findings indicate that IPS-induced hypothermia specifically involves activation of (presynaptic) 5-HT1A receptors. Therefore, the hypothermic response to IPS may provide a convenient in vivo paradigma to assess the function of the presynaptic 5-HT receptor in affective disorders and its involvement in the effects of psychotropic drugs. PMID:1980461

  9. Pharmacology of the hypothermic response to 5-HT1A receptor activation in humans.

    PubMed

    Lesch, K P; Poten, B; Söhnle, K; Schulte, H M

    1990-01-01

    The selective 5-HT1A receptor ligand ipsapirone (IPS) caused dose-related hypothermia in humans. The response was attenuated by the nonselective 5-HT1/2 receptor antagonist metergoline and was completely antagonized by the nonselective beta-adrenoceptor antagonist pindolol, which interacts stereoselectively with the 5-HT1A receptor. The selective beta 1-adrenergic antagonist betaxolol had no effect. The findings indicate that IPS-induced hypothermia specifically involves activation of (presynaptic) 5-HT1A receptors. Therefore, the hypothermic response to IPS may provide a convenient in vivo paradigma to assess the function of the presynaptic 5-HT receptor in affective disorders and its involvement in the effects of psychotropic drugs.

  10. Classification of 5-HT1A Receptor Ligands on the Basis of Their Binding Affinities by Using PSO-Adaboost-SVM

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Zhengjun; Zhang, Yuntao; Zhou, Changhong; Zhang, Wenjun; Gao, Shibo

    2009-01-01

    In the present work, the support vector machine (SVM) and Adaboost-SVM have been used to develop a classification model as a potential screening mechanism for a novel series of 5-HT1A selective ligands. Each compound is represented by calculated structural descriptors that encode topological features. The particle swarm optimization (PSO) and the stepwise multiple linear regression (Stepwise-MLR) methods have been used to search descriptor space and select the descriptors which are responsible for the inhibitory activity of these compounds. The model containing seven descriptors found by Adaboost-SVM, has showed better predictive capability than the other models. The total accuracy in prediction for the training and test set is 100.0% and 95.0% for PSO-Adaboost-SVM, 99.1% and 92.5% for PSO-SVM, 99.1% and 82.5% for Stepwise-MLR-Adaboost-SVM, 99.1% and 77.5% for Stepwise-MLR-SVM, respectively. The results indicate that Adaboost-SVM can be used as a useful modeling tool for QSAR studies. PMID:20111683

  11. Yokukansan Increases 5-HT1A Receptors in the Prefrontal Cortex and Enhances 5-HT1A Receptor Agonist-Induced Behavioral Responses in Socially Isolated Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ueki, Toshiyuki; Mizoguchi, Kazushige; Yamaguchi, Takuji; Nishi, Akinori; Ikarashi, Yasushi; Hattori, Tomohisa; Kase, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    The traditional Japanese medicine yokukansan has an anxiolytic effect, which occurs after repeated administration. In this study, to investigate the underlying mechanisms, we examined the effects of repeated yokukansan administration on serotonin 1A (5-HT1A) receptor density and affinity and its expression at both mRNA and protein levels in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of socially isolated mice. Moreover, we examined the effects of yokukansan on a 5-HT1A receptor-mediated behavioral response. Male mice were subjected to social isolation stress for 6 weeks and simultaneously treated with yokukansan. Thereafter, the density and affinity of 5-HT1A receptors were analyzed by a receptor-binding assay. Levels of 5-HT1A receptor protein and mRNA were also measured. Furthermore, (±)-8-hydroxy-2-(dipropylamino)tetralin hydrobromide (8-OH-DPAT; a 5-HT1A receptor agonist) was injected intraperitoneally, and rearing behavior was examined. Social isolation stress alone did not affect 5-HT1A receptor density or affinity. However, yokukansan significantly increased receptor density and decreased affinity concomitant with unchanged protein and mRNA levels. Yokukansan also enhanced the 8-OH-DPAT-induced decrease in rearing behavior. These results suggest that yokukansan increases 5-HT1A receptors in the PFC of socially isolated mice and enhances their function, which might underlie its anxiolytic effects. PMID:26681968

  12. New insight into the therapeutic role of 5-HT1A receptors in central nervous system disorders.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Yukihiro

    2010-06-01

    The serotonergic system plays a crucial role in regulating psychoemotional, cognitive and motor functions in the central nervous system (CNS). Among 5-HT receptor subtypes, 5-HT(1A) receptors have long been implicated in the pathogenesis and treatment of anxiety and depressive disorders. 5-HT(1A) receptors function as both presynaptic (autoreceptor) and postsynaptic receptors in specific brain regions such as the limbic areas, septum and raphe nuclei. 5-HT(1A) receptors negatively regulate cAMP-dependent signal transduction and inhibit neuronal activity by opening G-protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium channels. The therapeutic action of 5-HT(1A) agonists and their mechanism in alleviating anxiety and depressive disorders have been well documented. In addition, recent studies have revealed new insights into the therapeutic role of 5-HT(1A) receptors in treating various CNS disorders, including not only depressive disorders (e.g., delayed onset of action and refractory symptoms), but also schizophrenia (e.g., cognitive impairment and antipsychotic-induced extrapyramidal side effects) and Parkinson's disease (e.g., extrapyramidal motor symptoms and L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia). These lines of evidences encourage us to design new generation 5-HT(1A) ligands such as 5-HT(1A) agonists with greater potency, higher selectivity and improved pharmacokinetic properties, and 5-HT(1A) ligands which combine multiple pharmacological actions (e.g., inhibition of serotonin transporter, dopamine D(2) receptors and other 5-HT receptor subtypes). Such new 5-HT(1A) ligands may overcome clinical efficacy limitations and/or improve adverse reactions in current CNS therapies.

  13. Medial hypothalamic 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)1A receptors regulate neuroendocrine responses to stress and exploratory locomotor activity: application of recombinant adenovirus containing 5-HT1A sequences.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Holmes, Andrew; Ma, Li; Van de Kar, Louis D; Garcia, Francisca; Murphy, Dennis L

    2004-12-01

    Our previous studies found that serotonin transporter (SERT) knock-out mice showed increased sensitivity to minor stress and increased anxiety-like behavior but reduced locomotor activity. These mice also showed decreased density of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT1A) receptors in the hypothalamus, amygdala, and dorsal raphe. To evaluate the contribution of hypothalamic 5-HT1A receptors to these phenotypes of SERT knock-out mice, two studies were conducted. Recombinant adenoviruses containing 5-HT1A sense and antisense sequences (Ad-1AP-sense and Ad-1AP-antisense) were used to manipulate 5-HT1A receptors in the hypothalamus. The expression of the 5-HT1A genes is controlled by the 5-HT1A promoter, so that they are only expressed in 5-HT1A receptor-containing cells. (1) Injection of Ad-1AP-sense into the hypothalamus of SERT knock-out mice restored 5-HT1A receptors in the medial hypothalamus; this effect was accompanied by elimination of the exaggerated adrenocorticotropin responses to a saline injection (minor stress) and reduced locomotor activity but not by a change in increased exploratory anxiety-like behavior. (2) To further confirm the observation in SERT-/- mice, Ad-1AP-antisense was injected into the hypothalamus of normal mice. The density and the function of 5-HT1A receptors in the medial hypothalamus were significantly reduced in Ad-1AP-antisense-treated mice. Compared with the control group (injected with Ad-track), Ad-1A-antisense-treated mice showed a significant reduction in locomotor activity, but again no changes in exploratory anxiety-like behaviors, tested by elevated plus-maze and open-field tests. Thus, the present results demonstrate that medial hypothalamic 5-HT1A receptors regulate stress responses and locomotor activity but may not regulate exploratory anxiety-like behaviors. PMID:15574737

  14. Stress-induced alterations in 5-HT1A receptor transcriptional modulators NUDR and Freud-1.

    PubMed

    Szewczyk, Bernadeta; Kotarska, Katarzyna; Daigle, Mireille; Misztak, Paulina; Sowa-Kucma, Magdalena; Rafalo, Anna; Curzytek, Katarzyna; Kubera, Marta; Basta-Kaim, Agnieszka; Nowak, Gabriel; Albert, Paul R

    2014-11-01

    The effect of stress on the mRNA and protein level of the 5-HT1A receptor and two of its key transcriptional modulators, NUDR and Freud-1, was examined in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus (Hp) using rodent models: olfactory bulbectomy (OB) and prenatal stress (PS) in male and female rats; chronic mild stress in male rats (CMS) and pregnancy stress. In PFC, CMS induced the most widespread changes, with significant reduction in both mRNA and protein levels of NUDR, 5-HT1A receptor and in Freud-1 mRNA; while in Hp 5-HT1A receptor and Freud-1 protein levels were also decreased. In male, but not female OB rats PFC Freud-1 and 5-HT1A receptor protein levels were reduced, while in Hp 5-HT1A receptor, Freud-1 and NUDR mRNA's but not protein were reduced. In PS rats PFC 5-HT1A receptor protein was reduced more in females than males; while in Hp Freud-1 protein was increased in females. In pregnancy stress, PFC NUDR, Freud-1 and 5-HT1A protein receptor levels were reduced, and in HP 5-HT1A receptor protein levels were also reduced; in HP only NUDR and Freud-1 mRNA levels were reduced. Overall, CMS and stress during pregnancy produced the most salient changes in 5-HT1A receptor and transcription factor expression, suggesting a primary role for altered transcription factor expression in chronic regulation of 5-HT1A receptor expression. By contrast, OB (in males) and PS (in females) produced gender-specific reductions in PFC 5-HT1A receptor protein levels, suggesting a role for post-transcriptional regulation. These and previous data suggest that chronic stress might be a key regulator of NUDR/Freud-1 gene expression.

  15. High-level stable expression of recombinant 5-HT1A 5-hydroxytryptamine receptors in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed Central

    Newman-Tancredi, A; Wootton, R; Strange, P G

    1992-01-01

    The human 5-hydroxytryptamine 5-HT1A receptor gene was transfected into Chinese hamster ovary cells. A series of recombinant monoclonal cell lines expressing the receptor were isolated and the properties of one cell line that expressed receptors at a high level (2.8 pmol/mg) were studied in detail. In ligand binding assays with the selective 5-HT1A receptor agonist 2-(NN-di[3H]propylamino)-8-hydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene ([3H]8-OH-DPAT) only a single class of saturable high-affinity binding sites was detected, with a pharmacological profile in competition experiments essentially identical to that of the 5-HT1A receptor of bovine hippocampus. [3H]8-OH-DPAT binding to the recombinant cell membranes was inhibited by GTP, showing that the receptors in the transfected cells couple to G-proteins. A series of 5-hydroxytryptamine agonists inhibited forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in the cells and, despite the high level of receptor expression, their apparent efficacies were similar to those observed for inhibition of adenylate cyclase in brain. This recombinant cell line provides a complete model system for studying the 5-HT1A receptor and its transmembrane signalling system. The recombinant cells can also be grown in suspension culture for long periods but, whereas 5-HT1A receptor numbers and receptor regulation by guanine nucleotides are maintained in suspension-grown cells, the inhibition of adenylate cyclase by the 5-HT1A receptor is gradually lost. Images Fig. 1. PMID:1386736

  16. [(3)H]-F13640, a novel, selective and high-efficacy serotonin 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist radioligand.

    PubMed

    Heusler, Peter; Palmier, Christiane; Tardif, Stéphanie; Bernois, Sophie; Colpaert, Francis C; Cussac, Didier

    2010-10-01

    F13640 is a selective and high-efficacy serotonin 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist that demonstrates outstanding analgesic potential in different animal models. Here, we use the radiolabelled compound to further characterise its binding properties at 5-HT(1A) receptors. F13640 was tritium-labelled to 47 and 64 Ci/mmol specific activity and used as radioligand at membrane preparations of CHO cells expressing human (h) 5-HT(1A) receptors. The K (d) of [(3)H]-F13640 was 1.8 nM at h5-HT(1A) receptors as determined from saturation binding experiments. In association time-course experiments, k (obs) of [(3)H]-F13640 was 0.06 min(-1). Dissociation experiments performed in the presence of unlabelled F13640 as competing ligand yielded a k (off) value of 0.05 min(-1), resulting in a calculated K (d) of 1.4 nM. In comparison, [(3)H]-8-OH-DPAT had a k (obs) of 0.50 min(-1), a k (off) of 0.25 min(-1) and a calculated K (d) of 0.37 nM. Surprisingly, [(3)H]-F13640 dissociation kinetics were distinctly slower in the presence of WAY-100635 and spiperone as competing ligands when compared with the agonist competitors, F13640 and (+)8-OH-DPAT. The competitive binding profile of [(3)H]-F13640 with eight chemically diverse 5-HT(1A) receptor agonists and antagonists correlated highly (r = 0.996) with that of [(3)H]-8-OH-DPAT. In conclusion, [(3)H]-F13640 is a potent agonist radioligand at 5-HT(1A) receptors and may be a useful tool in pharmacological studies at native and recombinant 5-HT(1A) receptors. In addition, [(3)H]-F13640 dissociates more slowly from h5-HT(1A) receptors than [(3)H]-8-OH-DPAT, a kinetic property that might be related to its powerful analgesic effects as observed in vivo.

  17. Compositions and methods related to serotonin 5-HT1A receptors

    DOEpatents

    Mukherjee, Jogeshwar; Saigal, Neil; Saigal, legal representative, Harsh

    2012-09-25

    Contemplated substituted arylpiperazinyl compounds, and most preferably 18F-Mefway, exhibit desirable in vitro and in vivo binding characteristics to the 5-HT1A receptor. Among other advantageous parameters, contemplated compounds retain high binding affinity, display optimal lipophilicity, and are radiolabeled efficiently with 18F-fluorine in a single step. Still further, contemplated compounds exhibit high target to non-target ratios in receptor-rich regions both in vitro and in vivo, and selected compounds can be effectively and sensitively displaced by serotonin, thus providing a quantitative tool for measuring 5-HT1A receptors and serotonin concentration changes in the living brain.

  18. Compositions and methods related to serotonin 5-HT1A receptors

    DOEpatents

    Mukherjee, Jogeshwar; Saigal, Neil

    2010-06-08

    Contemplated substituted arylpiperazinyl compounds, and most preferably 18F-Mefway, exhibit desirable in vitro and in vivo binding characteristics to the 5-HT1A receptor. Among other advantageous parameters, contemplated compounds retain high binding affinity, display optimal lipophilicity, and are radiolabeled efficiently with 18F-fluorine in a single step. Still further, contemplated compounds exhibit high target to non-target ratios in receptor-rich regions both in vitro and in vivo, and selected compounds can be effectively and sensitively displaced by serotonin, thus providing a quantitative tool for measuring 5-HT1A receptors and serotonin concentration changes in the living brain.

  19. Identification of serotonin 5-HT1A receptor partial agonists in ginger.

    PubMed

    Nievergelt, Andreas; Huonker, Peter; Schoop, Roland; Altmann, Karl-Heinz; Gertsch, Jürg

    2010-05-01

    Animal studies suggest that ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) reduces anxiety. In this study, bioactivity-guided fractionation of a ginger extract identified nine compounds that interact with the human serotonin 5-HT(1A) receptor with significant to moderate binding affinities (K(i)=3-20 microM). [(35)S]-GTP gamma S assays indicated that 10-shogaol, 1-dehydro-6-gingerdione, and particularly the whole lipophilic ginger extract (K(i)=11.6 microg/ml) partially activate the 5-HT(1A) receptor (20-60% of maximal activation). In addition, the intestinal absorption of gingerols and shogaols was simulated and their interactions with P-glycoprotein were measured, suggesting a favourable pharmacokinetic profile for the 5-HT(1A) active compounds. PMID:20363635

  20. Platelet 5-HT(1A) receptor correlates with major depressive disorder in drug-free patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhang-Jin; Wang, Di; Man, Sui Cheung; Ng, Roger; McAlonan, Grainne M; Wong, Hei Kiu; Wong, Wendy; Lee, Jade; Tan, Qing-Rong

    2014-08-01

    The platelet serotonergic system has potential biomarker utility for major depressive disorder (MDD). In the present study, platelet expression of 5-HT1A receptors and serotonin transporter (SERT) proteins, and serotonin (5-HT) and its metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) were quantified in 53 patients with MDD and 22 unaffected controls. All were drug-free, non-smokers and had no other psychiatric and cardiovascular comorbidity. The severity of depression symptoms was evaluated using the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD-17) and the Self-rating Depression Scale (SDS). Patients with MDD had significantly higher expression of platelet 5-HT1A receptors but significantly lower contents of platelet 5-HT, platelet-poor plasma (PPP) 5-HT and PPP 5-HIAA compared to healthy controls, and this was correlated with the severity of depression. SERT expression did not differ between the two groups. Correlation analysis confirmed a strong, inverse relationship between the 5-HT1A receptor expression and the 5-HT and 5-HIAA levels. Thus overexpression of platelet 5-HT1A receptors and reduced 5-HT tone may function as a peripheral marker of depression.

  1. Influence of light cycle on response to 5-HT1A ligands in punished responding in rats.

    PubMed

    Gleason, S D; Leander, J D

    1999-12-01

    Since the introduction of buspirone, the 5-HT1A receptor has been a focal point for serotonergic research into the treatment of anxiety. Two of the more commonly used methodologies for evaluating potential anxiolytics are the Geller-Seifter model and the elevated plus maze. In the Geller-Seifter model, administration of 5-HT1A agonists produce an anxiolytic-like profile consisting of an increase in the number of responses made during the punished component. An anxiolytic-like response in the elevated plus maze consists of an increase in the number of entries and/or time spent in the open arms of the maze. Recently, there have been reports of differential drug effects with 5-HT1A ligands in the elevated plus maze depending on when in the diurnal cycle the 5-HT1A agents were administered. The purpose of the current study was to characterize the response to 5-HT1A compounds in normal and reverse light cycle animals in the Geller-Seifter model. 8-OH-DPAT [(+/-)-2-dipropylamino-8-hydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronapthalene] produced a decrease in unpunished responding and an increase in punished responding during both the light and dark phase. The administration of WAY 100,635 [N-¿2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl] ethyl¿-N-(2-pyridinyl)cyclohexanecarboxamide trihydrochloridel alone was without effect in both the light and dark phase. Furthermore, pre-treatment with WAY 100,635 completely antagonized both the rate-decreasing effects in the unpunished component and the increase in punished responding observed with 8-OH-DPAT during both the light and dark phase. The results of the current study diverge from previous findings of sensitivity to the diurnal cycle in other models reflective of modulation of the 5-HT1A receptor. The robustness of the response, in this case punished lever pressing, may be less sensitive than other more naturalistic or ethological methods (i.e. elevated plus maze) in detecting the subtle changes in receptor function due to the diurnal cycle. PMID

  2. Role of maternal 5-HT(1A) receptor in programming offspring emotional and physical development.

    PubMed

    van Velzen, A; Toth, M

    2010-11-01

    Serotonin(1A) receptor (5-HT(1A)R) deficiency has been associated with anxiety and depression and mice with genetic receptor inactivation exhibit heightened anxiety. We have reported that 5-HT(1A)R is not only a genetic but also a maternal 'environmental' factor in the development of anxiety in Swiss-Webster mice. Here, we tested whether the emergence of maternal genotype-dependent adult anxiety is preceded by early behavioral abnormalities or whether it is manifested following a normal emotional development. Pups born to null or heterozygote mothers had significantly reduced ultrasonic vocalization (USV) between postnatal day (P) 4 and 12, indicating an influence of the maternal genotype. The offspring's own genotype had an effect limited to P4. Furthermore, we observed reduced weight gain in the null offspring of null but not heterozygote mothers, indicating that a complete maternal receptor deficiency compromises physical development of the offspring. Except a short perinatal deficit during the dark period, heterozygote females displayed normal maternal behavior, which, with the early appearance of USV deficit, suggests a role for 5-HT(1A)R during pre-/perinatal development. Consistent with this notion, adult anxiety in the offspring is determined during the pre-/perinatal period. In contrast to heterozygote females, null mothers exhibited impaired pup retrieval and nest building that may explain the reduced weight gain of their offspring. Taken together, our data indicate an important role for the maternal 5-HT(1A)R in regulating emotional and physical development of their offspring. Because reduced receptor binding has been reported in depression, including postpartum depression, reduced 5-HT(1A)R function in mothers may influence the emotional development of their offspring.

  3. Oleanolic acid acrylate elicits antidepressant-like effect mediated by 5-HT1A receptor.

    PubMed

    Fajemiroye, James O; Polepally, Prabhakar R; Chaurasiya, Narayan D; Tekwani, Babu L; Zjawiony, Jordan K; Costa, Elson A

    2015-01-01

    The development of new drugs for the treatment of depression is strategic to achieving clinical needs of patients. This study evaluates antidepressant-like effect and neural mechanisms of four oleanolic acid derivatives i.e. acrylate (D1), methacrylate (D2), methyl fumarate (D3) and ethyl fumarate (D4). All derivatives were obtained by simple one-step esterification of oleanolic acid prior to pharmacological screening in the forced swimming (FS) and open field (OF) tests. Pharmacological tools like α-methyl-p-tyrosine (AMPT, catecholamine depletor), p-chlorophenylalanine (serotonin depletor), prazosin (PRAZ, selective α1-receptor antagonist), WAY-100635 (selective serotonin 5-HT1A receptor antagonist) as well as monoamine oxidase (MAO) and functional binding assays were conducted to investigate possible neural mechanisms. In the FS test, D1 showed the most promising antidepressant-like effect without eliciting locomotor incoordination. Unlike group of mice pretreated with AMPT 100 mg/kg, PCPA 100 mg/kg or PRAZ 1 mg/kg, the effect of D1 was attenuated by WAY-100635 0.3 mg/kg pretreatment. D1 demonstrated moderate inhibition of MAO-A (IC50 = 48.848 ± 1.935 μM), potency (pEC50 = 6.1 ± 0.1) and intrinsic activity (E max = 26 ± 2.0%) on 5-HT1A receptor. In conclusion, our findings showed antidepressant-like effect of D1 and possible involvement of 5-HT1A receptor.

  4. 5-HT-1A receptor-mediated modulation of medullary expiratory neurones in the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Lalley, P M; Bischoff, A M; Richter, D W

    1994-01-01

    The involvement of the 5-HT-1A receptor in serotoninergic responses of stage 2 expiratory (E-2) neurones was investigated in pentobarbitone-anaesthetized, mechanically ventilated cats. The specific agonist of the 5-HT-1A receptor, 8-hydroxy-diproplaminotetralin (8-OH-DPAT), administered systemically or by ionophoresis directly on to the neurones, had a clear depressant effect. Administration of 8-OH-DPAT at doses of 10-50 micrograms kg-1 (I.V.) increased the membrane hyperpolarizations of E-2 neurones during the inspiratory and postinspiratory phases, and shortened their duration of activity in association with shortening of phrenic nerve activity. Discharges of E-2 neurones were also less intense. At doses of 50-90 micrograms kg-1, 8-OH-DPAT reduced or abolished inspiratory hyperpolarizations, and reduced expiratory depolarizations of membrane potential and discharge in parallel with inhibition of phrenic nerve discharges. The effects of the larger doses were reversed by I.V. injection of NAN-190, an antagonist at the 5-HT-1A receptor. Dose-dependent effects on the membrane potential and discharge of E-2 neurones, but not on phrenic nerve activity, were also seen by ionophoretic administration of 8-OH-DPAT on to E-2 neurones. At low currents, ejection of 8-OH-DPAT hyperpolarized the neurones without affecting the duration of inspiratory hyperpolarization and expiratory depolarization. This hyperpolarization depressed the intensity and the duration of expiratory discharges. Ejection with larger currents hyperpolarized the E-2 neurones further, and depressed expiratory depolarization leading to blockade of expiratory discharges. The effects on membrane potential were accompanied by decreased neuronal input resistance. This depressed the excitability of E-2 neurones as tested by discharge evoked by intracellular current injection. The amplitudes of action potentials decreased in parallel with the changes in input resistance. The effects were attributed to a

  5. Astroglial 5-HT1a receptors and S-100 beta in development and plasticity.

    PubMed

    Whitaker-Azmitia, P M; Azmitia, E C

    1994-01-01

    The work described in this article is concerned with the role of the 5-HT1a receptor in mediating the neurotrophic effects of serotonin, principally through the release of the substance S-100 beta from astroglial cells. These receptors are also present in astrocytes of the mature brain and may play a role in the synaptic plasticity necessary for certain experience-driven brain changes, such as memory or learning. The presence of these receptors on astroglial cells of the adult brain also has interesting implications for the mechanism of action of many psychotropic drugs acting through the serotonergic system. PMID:7850356

  6. Serotonin 5-HT1A receptors as targets for agents to treat psychiatric disorders: rationale and current status of research.

    PubMed

    Celada, Pau; Bortolozzi, Analía; Artigas, Francesc

    2013-09-01

    Psychiatric disorders represent a large economic burden in modern societies. However, pharmacological treatments are still far from optimal. Drugs used in the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD) and anxiety disorders (selective serotonin [5-HT] reuptake inhibitors [SSRIs] and serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors [SNRIs]) are pharmacological refinements of first-generation tricyclic drugs, discovered by serendipity, and show low efficacy and slowness of onset. Moreover, antipsychotic drugs are partly effective in positive symptoms of schizophrenia, yet they poorly treat negative symptoms and cognitive deficits. The present article reviews the neurobiological basis of 5-HT1A receptor (5-HT1A-R) function and the role of pre- and postsynaptic 5-HT1A-Rs in the treatment of MDD, anxiety and psychotic disorders. The activation of postsynaptic 5-HT1A-Rs in corticolimbic areas appears beneficial for the therapeutic action of antidepressant drugs. However, presynaptic 5-HT1A-Rs play a detrimental role in MDD, since individuals with high density or function of presynaptic 5-HT1A-Rs are more susceptible to mood disorders and suicide, and respond poorly to antidepressant drugs. Moreover, the indirect activation of presynaptic 5-HT1A-Rs by SSRIs/SNRIs reduces 5-HT neuron activity and terminal 5-HT release, thus opposing the elevation of extracellular 5-HT produced by blockade of the serotonin transporter (SERT) in the forebrain. Chronic antidepressant treatment desensitizes presynaptic 5-HT1A-Rs, thus reducing the effectiveness of the 5-HT1A autoreceptor-mediated negative feedback. The prevention of this process by the non-selective partial agonist pindolol accelerates clinical antidepressant effects. Two new antidepressant drugs, vilazodone (marketed in the USA) and vortioxetine (in development) incorporate partial 5-HT1A-R agonist properties with SERT blockade. Several studies with transgenic mice have also established the respective role of pre- and

  7. Oleanolic acid acrylate elicits antidepressant-like effect mediated by 5-HT1A receptor

    PubMed Central

    Fajemiroye, James O.; Polepally, Prabhakar R.; Chaurasiya, Narayan D.; Tekwani, Babu L.; Zjawiony, Jordan K.; Costa, Elson A.

    2015-01-01

    The development of new drugs for the treatment of depression is strategic to achieving clinical needs of patients. This study evaluates antidepressant-like effect and neural mechanisms of four oleanolic acid derivatives i.e. acrylate (D1), methacrylate (D2), methyl fumarate (D3) and ethyl fumarate (D4). All derivatives were obtained by simple one-step esterification of oleanolic acid prior to pharmacological screening in the forced swimming (FS) and open field (OF) tests. Pharmacological tools like α-methyl-p-tyrosine (AMPT, catecholamine depletor), p-chlorophenylalanine (serotonin depletor), prazosin (PRAZ, selective α1-receptor antagonist), WAY-100635 (selective serotonin 5-HT1A receptor antagonist) as well as monoamine oxidase (MAO) and functional binding assays were conducted to investigate possible neural mechanisms. In the FS test, D1 showed the most promising antidepressant-like effect without eliciting locomotor incoordination. Unlike group of mice pretreated with AMPT 100 mg/kg, PCPA 100 mg/kg or PRAZ 1 mg/kg, the effect of D1 was attenuated by WAY-100635 0.3 mg/kg pretreatment. D1 demonstrated moderate inhibition of MAO-A (IC50 = 48.848 ± 1.935 μM), potency (pEC50 = 6.1 ± 0.1) and intrinsic activity (Emax = 26 ± 2.0%) on 5-HT1A receptor. In conclusion, our findings showed antidepressant-like effect of D1 and possible involvement of 5-HT1A receptor. PMID:26199018

  8. 5-HT(1A)-like receptor activation inhibits abstinence-induced methamphetamine withdrawal in planarians.

    PubMed

    Rawls, Scott M; Shah, Hardik; Ayoub, George; Raffa, Robert B

    2010-10-29

    No pharmacological therapy is approved to treat methamphetamine physical dependence, but it has been hypothesized that serotonin (5-HT)-enhancing drugs might limit the severity of withdrawal symptoms. To test this hypothesis, we used a planarian model of physical dependence that quantifies withdrawal as a reduction in planarian movement. Planarians exposed to methamphetamine (10 μM) for 60 min, and then placed (tested) into drug-free water for 5 min, displayed less movement (i.e., withdrawal) than either methamphetamine-naïve planarians tested in water or methamphetamine-exposed planarians tested in methamphetamine. A concentration-related inhibition of withdrawal was observed when methamphetamine-exposed planarians were placed into a solution containing either methamphetamine and 5-HT (0.1-100 μM) or methamphetamine and the 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist 8-hydroxy-N,N-dipropyl-2-aminotetralin (8-OH-DPAT) (10, 20 μM). Planarians with prior methamphetamine exposure displayed enhanced withdrawal when tested in a solution of the 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist N-[2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]ethyl]-N-(2-pyridyl)cyclohexanecarboxamide (WAY 100635) (1 μM). Methamphetamine-induced withdrawal was not affected by the 5-HT(2B/2C) receptor agonist meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (m-CPZ) (0.1-20 μM). These results provide pharmacological evidence that serotonin-enhancing drugs inhibit expression of methamphetamine physical dependence in an invertebrate model of withdrawal, possibly through a 5-HT(1A)-like receptor-dependent mechanism.

  9. Adrenalectomy modifies the hippocampal 5-HT(1A) receptors and the anxiolytic-like effect of 8-OH-DPAT in rats.

    PubMed

    Briones-Aranda, Alfredo; Castillo-Salazar, Mariano; Picazo, Ofir

    2009-03-01

    Stress is closely related with levels of corticosteroid and corticotrophin releasing factor, which at the same time can modify 5-HT(1A) receptors and brain serotonin levels. Consequently, the absence of corticosteroids in rats induced by an adrenalectomy could be useful to understand the functionality of the brain serotonergic system after a stressing event. The influence of 15 min of forced swimming was explored on sham and adrenalectomized rats by measuring the 5-HT(1A) receptor density in raphe and hippocampus. Other previously stressed groups (sham and adrenalectomized) were tested in two anxiety models with the 5-HT(1A) agonist 8-OH-DPAT, the postsynaptic antagonist MM-77, and with a combination of these two compounds. It was found that the removal of adrenals in rats that were not previously stressed induced an increase in the postsynaptic 5-HT(1A) receptor density. On the other hand, an adrenalectomy in rats that were previously stressed induced a reduction in the same receptor density. Adrenal gland removal induced an anxiolytic-like effect. However, after the injection of 8-OH-DPAT, adrenalectomized rats showed anxiogenic-like actions, an effect which was reversed by MM-77. Data show that changes in 5-HT(1A) receptors density caused by a stressful session can have behavioral consequences, thus emphasizing the need to reconsider the clinical use of 5-HT(1A) ligands after traumatic events.

  10. The effects of chronic ethanol self-administration on hippocampal 5-HT1A receptors in monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, Elizabeth J.; Grant, Kathleen A.; Davenport, April T.; Hemby, Scott E.; Friedman, David P.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Chronic alcohol consumption reduces brain serotonin and alters the synaptic mechanisms involved in memory formation. Hippocampal 5-HT1A receptors modulate these mechanisms, but the neuroadaptive response of 5HT1A receptors to chronic alcohol self-administration is not well understood. METHODS Hippocampal tissue from monkeys that voluntarily self-administered ethanol for 12 months (n=9) and accompanying controls (n=8) were prepared for in vitro receptor autoradiography and laser capture microdissection. The 5-HT1A receptor antagonist, [3H]MPPF, and the agonist, [3H]8-OH-DPAT, were used to measure total and G-protein coupled 5-HT1A receptors respectively. The expression of the genes encoding the 5-HT1A receptor and its trafficking protein Yif1B was measured in microdissected dentate gyrus (DG) granule cells and CA1 pyramidal neurons. RESULTS An increase in G-protein coupled, but not total, receptors was observed in the posterior pyramidal cell layer of CA1 in ethanol drinkers compared to controls. Chronic ethanol self-administration was also associated with an up-regulation of total and G-protein coupled 5-HT1A receptors in the posterior DG polymorphic layer. Changes in receptor binding were not associated with concomitant changes in 5-HT1A receptor mRNA expression. Chronic ethanol self-administration was associated with a significant increase in Yif1B gene expression in posterior CA1 pyramidal neurons. CONCLUSIONS Chronic, ethanol self-administration up-regulates hippocampal 5-HT1A receptor density in a region-specific manner that does not appear to be due to alterations at the level of transcription but instead may be due to increased receptor trafficking. Further exploration of the mechanisms mediating chronic ethanol-induced 5-HT1A receptor up-regulation and how hippocampal neurotransmission is altered is warranted. PMID:24467872

  11. Drug-induced defaecation in rats: role of central 5-HT1A receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Croci, T.; Landi, M.; Bianchetti, A.; Manara, L.

    1995-01-01

    1. We investigated the acute effects of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), and of the 5-HT1A receptor agonists, 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT), buspirone and SR 57746A, on rat faecal pellet output and water content. 2. 5-HT, 8-OH-DPAT, buspirone and SR 57746A, a new selective 5-HT1A receptor agonist, displaced [3H]-8-OH-DPAT from specific binding sites in rat hippocampus membranes (Ki, nM; 1.8, 1.2, 15, 3.1 respectively) and stimulated rat defaecation dose-dependently. SR 57746A and buspirone induced 1 g dry weight of faeces at 1.3 and 6.1 mg kg-1, p.o. (AD1) respectively. 8-OH-DPAT and 5-HT stimulated defaecation after s.c. injection (AD1, 0.07 and 7.5 mg kg-1, respectively). All these agents increased faecal water content. 3. The putative 5-HT1A receptor antagonist, pindolol, injected s.c. or i.c.v., significantly reduced the defaecation induced by systemically administered 8-OH-DPAT, buspirone or SR 57746A, but not 5-HT. 4. Pretreatment with p-chlorophenylalanine (i.p.) or 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (i.c.v.), according to protocols designed to cause either generalized or CNS-limited 5-HT depletion respectively, also reduced the defaecation induced by buspirone or SR 57746A. 5. No specific 5-HT1A binding sites could be labelled by incubating rat colon membranes with [3H]-8-OH-DPAT, and in vitro preparations of rat colon segments showed no response to 8-OH-DPAT or SR 57746A up to 5 microM. 6. After eight days' repeated daily treatment, complete tolerance developed to the stimulant effects of SR 57746A and buspirone on faecal water content, but not on faecal pellet output.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7647978

  12. Serotonin decreases aggression via 5-HT1A receptors in the fighting fish Betta splendens.

    PubMed

    Clotfelter, Ethan D; O'Hare, Erin P; McNitt, Meredith M; Carpenter, Russ E; Summers, Cliff H

    2007-01-01

    The role of the monoamine neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT) in the modulation of conspecific aggression in the fighting fish (Betta splendens) was investigated using pharmacological manipulations. We used a fish's response to its mirror image as our index of aggressive behavior. We also investigated the effects of some manipulations on monoamine levels in the B. splendens brain. Acute treatment with 5-HT and with the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT both decreased aggressive behavior; however, treatment with the 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY-100635 did not increase aggression. Chronic treatment with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine caused no significant changes in aggressive behavior and a significant decline in 5-HT and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) concentrations. Treatment with the serotonin synthesis inhibitor p-chlorophenylalanine resulted in no change in aggression, yet serotonergic activity decreased significantly. Finally, a diet supplemented with L-tryptophan (Trp), the precursor to 5-HT, showed no consistent effects on aggressive behavior or brain monoamine concentrations. These results suggest a complex role for serotonin in the expression of aggression in teleost fishes, and that B. splendens may be a useful model organism in pharmacological and toxicological studies.

  13. Serotonin decreases aggression via 5-HT1A receptors in the fighting fish Betta splendens.

    PubMed

    Clotfelter, Ethan D; O'Hare, Erin P; McNitt, Meredith M; Carpenter, Russ E; Summers, Cliff H

    2007-01-01

    The role of the monoamine neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT) in the modulation of conspecific aggression in the fighting fish (Betta splendens) was investigated using pharmacological manipulations. We used a fish's response to its mirror image as our index of aggressive behavior. We also investigated the effects of some manipulations on monoamine levels in the B. splendens brain. Acute treatment with 5-HT and with the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT both decreased aggressive behavior; however, treatment with the 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY-100635 did not increase aggression. Chronic treatment with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine caused no significant changes in aggressive behavior and a significant decline in 5-HT and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) concentrations. Treatment with the serotonin synthesis inhibitor p-chlorophenylalanine resulted in no change in aggression, yet serotonergic activity decreased significantly. Finally, a diet supplemented with L-tryptophan (Trp), the precursor to 5-HT, showed no consistent effects on aggressive behavior or brain monoamine concentrations. These results suggest a complex role for serotonin in the expression of aggression in teleost fishes, and that B. splendens may be a useful model organism in pharmacological and toxicological studies. PMID:17553555

  14. The 5-HT1A receptor agonist flesinoxan shares discriminative stimulus properties with some 5-HT2 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Herremans, A H; van der Heyden, J A; van Drimmelen, M; Olivier, B

    1999-10-01

    Ten homing pigeons were trained to discriminate the selective 5-HT1A receptor agonist flesinoxan (0.25 mg/kg p.o.) from its vehicle in a fixed-ratio (FR) 30 two-key operant drug discrimination procedure. The 5-HT2 receptor antagonist mianserin (ED50 = 4.8 mg/kg) fully substituted for flesinoxan, whereas ketanserin, ritanserin, mesulergine, and SB200646A substituted only partially, suggesting an interaction between 5-HT1A and 5-HT2 receptors. However, the 5-HT2 receptor agonists [DOI (0.6 mg/kg), TFMPP (10 mg/kg), mCPP (4 mg/kg)] were unable to antagonize the flesinoxan cue. The 5-HT1A receptor antagonists DU125530 (0.5-13 mg/kg) and WAY100,635 (0.1-1 mg/kg) partially antagonized the generalization of mianserin to flesinoxan. Taken together, these results are in accordance with the hypothesis that 5-HT1A receptor activation exerts an inhibitory effect on activation of 5-HT2 receptors. These results are in broad agreement with existing theories on 5-HT1A and 5-HT2 receptor interaction. Furthermore, it is argued that the discriminative stimulus properties of a drug may undergo qualitative changes with prolonged training.

  15. Altered photic and non-photic phase shifts in 5-HT(1A) receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Smith, V M; Sterniczuk, R; Phillips, C I; Antle, M C

    2008-12-01

    The mammalian circadian clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is thought to be modulated by 5-HT. 5-HT is though to inhibit photic phase shifts by inhibiting the release of glutamate from retinal terminals, as well as by decreasing the responsiveness of retinorecipient cells in the SCN. Furthermore, there is also evidence that 5-HT may underlie, in part, non-photic phase shifts of the circadian system. Understanding the mechanism by which 5-HT accomplishes these goals is complicated by the wide variety of 5-HT receptors found in the SCN, the heterogeneous organization of both the circadian clock and the location of 5-HT receptors, and by a lack of sufficiently selective pharmacological agents for the 5-HT receptors of interest. Genetically modified animals engineered to lack a specific 5-HT receptor present an alternative avenue of investigation to understand how 5-HT regulates the circadian system. Here we examine behavioral and molecular responses to both photic and non-photic stimuli in mice lacking the 5-HT(1A) receptor. When compared with wild-type controls, these mice exhibit larger phase advances to a short late-night light pulse and larger delays to long 12 h light pulses that span the whole subjective night. Fos and mPer1 expression in the retinorecipient SCN is significantly attenuated following late-night light pulses in the 5-HT(1A) knockout animals. Finally, non-photic phase shifts to (+/-)-8-hydroxy-2-(dipropylamino)tetralin hydrobromide (8-OH-DPAT) are lost in the knockout animals, while attenuation of the phase shift to the long light pulse due to rebound activity following a wheel lock is unaffected. These findings suggest that the 5-HT(1A) receptor plays an inhibitory role in behavioral phase shifts, a facilitatory role in light-induced gene expression, a necessary role in phase shifts to 8-OH-DPAT, and is not necessary for activity-induced phase advances that oppose photic phase shifts to long light pulses.

  16. 5-HT(1A) receptors transactivate the platelet-derived growth factor receptor type beta in neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Kruk, Jeff S; Vasefi, Maryam S; Liu, Hui; Heikkila, John J; Beazely, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    In the absence of ligand, certain growth factor receptors can be activated via G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) activation in a process termed transactivation. Serotonin (5-HT) receptors can transactivate platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) β receptors in smooth muscle cells, but it is not known if similar pathways occur in neuronal cells. Here we show that 5-HT can transiently increase the phosphorylation of PDGFβ receptors through 5-HT(1A) receptors in a time- and dose-dependent manner in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. 5-HT also transactivates PDGFβ receptors in primary cortical neurons. This transactivation pathway is pertussis-toxin sensitive and Src tyrosine kinase-dependent. This pathway is also dependent on phospholipase C activity and intracellular calcium signaling. Several studies involving PDGFβ receptor transactivation by GPCRs have also demonstrated a PDGFβ receptor-dependent increase in the phosphorylation of ERK1/2. Yet in SH-SY5Y cells, 5-HT treatment causes a PDGFβ receptor-independent increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation. This crosstalk between 5-HT and PDGFβ receptors identifies a potentially important signaling link between the serotonergic system and growth factor signaling in neurons. PMID:23006663

  17. 5-HT1a receptor antagonists block perforant path-dentate LTP induced in novel, but not familiar, environments

    PubMed Central

    Sanberg, Cyndy Davis; Jones, Floretta L.; Do, Viet H.; Dieguez, Dario; Derrick, Brian E.

    2006-01-01

    Numerous studies suggest roles for monoamines in modulating long-term potentiation (LTP). Previously, we reported that both induction and maintenance of perforant path-dentate gyrus LTP is enhanced when induced while animals explore novel environments. Here we investigate the contribution of serotonin and 5-HT1a receptors to the novelty-mediated enhancement of LTP. In freely moving animals, systemic administration of the selective 5-HT1a antagonist WAY-100635 (WAY) attenuated LTP in a dose-dependent manner when LTP was induced while animals explored novel cages. In contrast, LTP was completely unaffected by WAY when induced in familiar environments. LTP was also blocked in anesthetized animals by direct application of WAY to the dentate gyrus, but not to the median raphe nucleus (MRN), suggesting the effect of systemic WAY is mediated by a block of dentate 5-HT1a receptors. Paradoxically, systemic administration of the 5-HT1a agonist 8-OH-DPAT also attenuated LTP. This attenuation was mimicked in anesthetized animals following application of 8-OH-DPAT to the MRN, but not the dentate gyrus. In addition, application of a 5-HT1a agonist to the dentate gyrus reduced somatic GABAergic inhibition. Because serotonergic projections from the MRN terminate on dentate inhibitory interneurons, these data suggest 5-HT1a receptors contribute to LTP induction via inhibition of GABAergic interneurons. Moreover, activation of raphe 5-HT1a autoreceptors, which inhibits serotonin release, attenuated LTP induction even in familiar environments. This suggests that serotonin normally contributes to dentate LTP induction in a variety of behavioral states. Together, these data suggest that serotonin and dentate 5-HT1a receptors play a permissive role in dentate LTP induction, particularly in novel conditions, and presumably, during the encoding of novel, hippocampus-relevant information. PMID:16452654

  18. Enhancement of agonist binding to 5-HT1A receptors in rat brain membranes by millimolar Mn2+.

    PubMed

    Parkel, Sven; Näsman, Johnny; Rinken, Ago

    2009-06-19

    Manganese in millimolar concentration caused increase in specific binding of [(3)H]8-OH-DPAT to rat hippocampal membranes up to 44% in comparison with experiments in the presence of Mg(2+), while no significant differences were found in rat cortical membranes. Similar increase in high-affinity agonist binding sites by Mn(2+) was found in displacement curves of 8-OH-DPAT, where antagonist [(3)H]WAY100635 was used as reporter ligand. The removal of bivalent ions with EDTA caused full loss of high-affinity binding of agonists, but not for antagonists. Therefore it was hypothesized, that the effect of Mn(2+)- and Mg(2+)-ions was modulated through their action on different G-proteins. Results showed that efficient coupling of G-protein and 5-HT(1A) receptors is crucial to modify Mg(2+) and Mn(2+) effects, whereas Mn(2+) is more potent stabilizer of agonist high-affinity binding, especially when GTPgammaS is present. Using Sf9 cells as model system, we have shown that G(i1) proteins are required to modulate Mn(2+)-dependent high-affinity agonist binding to 5-HT(1A) receptors, but further studies are necessary to find the cofactors of Mn(2+) modulation to signal transduction.

  19. Linear and Nonlinear Support Vector Machine for the Classification of Human 5-HT1A Ligand Functionality.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lirong; Ma, Chao; Wipf, Peter; Xie, Xiang-Qun

    2012-01-01

    Upon binding to a receptor, agonists and antagonists can induce distinct biological functions and thus lead to significantly different pharmacological responses. Thus, in silico prediction or in vitro characterization of ligand agonistic or antagonistic functionalities is an important step toward identifying specific pharmacological therapeutics. In this study, we investigated the molecular properties of agonists and antagonists of human 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor subtype 1A (5-HT1A ). Subsequently, intrinsic functions of these ligands (agonists/antagonists) were modeled by support vector machine (SVM), using five 2D molecular fingerprints and the 3D Topomer distance. Five kernel functions, including linear, polynomial, RBF, Tanimoto and a novel Topomer kernel based on Topomer 3D similarity were used to develop linear and nonlinear classifiers. These classifiers were validated through cross-validation, yielding a classification accuracy ranging from 80.4 % to 92.3 %. The performance of different kernels and fingerprints was analyzed and discussed. Linear and nonlinear models were further interpreted through the illustration of underlying classification mechanism. The computation protocol has been automated and demonstrated through our online service. This study expands the scope and applicability of similarity-based methods in cheminformatics, which are typically used for the identification of active molecules against a target protein. Our findings provide a good starting point for further systematic classifications of other GPCR ligands and for the data mining of large chemical libraries.

  20. Blockade of 5-HT1A receptors by (+/-)-pindolol potentiates cortical 5-HT outflow, but not antidepressant-like activity of paroxetine: microdialysis and behavioral approaches in 5-HT1A receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Guilloux, Jean-Philippe; David, Denis J P; Guiard, Bruno P; Chenu, Franck; Repérant, Christelle; Toth, Miklos; Bourin, Michel; Gardier, Alain M

    2006-10-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors like paroxetine (Prx) often requires 4-6 weeks to achieve clinical benefits in depressed patients. Pindolol shortens this delay and it has been suggested that this effect is mediated by somatodendritic 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) 1A autoreceptors. However clinical data on the beneficial effects of pindolol are conflicting. To study the effects of (+/-)-pindolol-paroxetine administration, we used genetical and pharmacological approaches in 5-HT1A knockout mice (5-HT1A-/-). Two assays, in vivo intracerebral microdialysis in awake mice and the forced swimming test (FST), were used to assess the antidepressant-like effects of this drug combination. Basal levels of extracellular serotonin, 5-HT ([5-HT]ext) in the frontal cortex (FCX) and the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) did not differ between the two strains of mice, suggesting a lack of tonic control of 5-HT1A autoreceptors on nerve terminal 5-HT release. Prx (1 and 4 mg/kg) dose-dependently increased cortical [5-HT]ext in both genotypes, but the effects were greater in mutants. The selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist, WAY-100635 (0.5 mg/kg), or (+/-)-pindolol (5 and 10 mg/kg) potentiated the effects of Prx (4 mg/kg) on cortical [5-HT]ext in 5-HT1A+/+, but not in 5-HT1A-/- mice. Similar responses were obtained following local intra-raphe perfusion by reverse microdialysis of either WAY-100635 or (+/-)-pindolol (100 microM each). In the FST, Prx administration dose-dependently decreased the immobility time in both strains of mice, but the response was much greater in 5HT1A-/- mice. In contrast, (+/-)-pindolol blocked Prx-induced decreases in the immobility time while WAY-100635 had no effect in both genotypes. These findings using 5-HT1A-/- mice confirm that (+/-)-pindolol behaves as an antagonist of 5-HT1A autoreceptor in mice, but its blockade of paroxetine-induced antidepressant-like effects in the FST may be due to its binding to other neurotransmitter receptors.

  1. Cannabidiol blocks long-lasting behavioral consequences of predator threat stress: possible involvement of 5HT1A receptors.

    PubMed

    Campos, Alline Cristina; Ferreira, Frederico Rogério; Guimarães, Francisco Silveira

    2012-11-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is an incapacitating syndrome that follows a traumatic experience. Predator exposure promotes long-lasting anxiogenic effect in rodents, an effect related to symptoms found in PTSD patients. Cannabidiol (CBD) is a non-psychotomimetic component of Cannabis sativa with anxiolytic effects. The present study investigated the anti-anxiety actions of CBD administration in a model of PTSD. Male Wistar rats exposed to a predator (cat) received, 1 h later, singled or repeated i.p. administration of vehicle or CBD. Seven days after the stress animals were submitted to the elevated plus maze. To investigate the involvement of 5HT1A receptors in CBD effects animals were pre-treated with WAY100635, a 5HT1A receptor antagonist. To explore possible neurobiological mechanisms involved in these effects, 5HT1A receptor mRNA and BDNF protein expression were measured in the hippocampus, frontal cortex, amygdaloid complex and dorsal periaqueductal gray. Repeated administration of CBD prevented long-lasting anxiogenic effects promoted by a single predator exposure. Pretreatment with WAY100635 attenuated CBD effects. Seven days after predator exposure 5HT1A mRNA expression was up regulated in the frontal cortex and hippocampus. CBD and paroxetine failed to prevent this effect. No change in BDNF expression was found. In conclusion, predator exposure promotes long-lasting up-regulation of 5HT1A receptor gene expression in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. Repeated CBD administration prevents the long-lasting anxiogenic effects observed after predator exposure probably by facilitating 5HT1A receptors neurotransmission. Our results suggest that CBD has beneficial potential for PTSD treatment and that 5HT1A receptors could be a therapeutic target in this disorder.

  2. On the role of 5-HT(1A) receptor gene in behavioral effect of brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Naumenko, Vladimir S; Kondaurova, Elena M; Bazovkina, Daria V; Tsybko, Anton S; Il'chibaeva, Tatyana V; Popova, Nina K

    2014-08-01

    Experiments were made on a congenic AKR.CBA-D13Mit76C (76C) mouse strain created by transferring a chromosome 13 fragment containing the 5-HT1A receptor gene from a CBA strain to an AKR background. It was shown that 76C mice differed from AKR mice by decreased 5-HT1A receptor and tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (tph-2) genes expression in the midbrain. Functional activity of 5-HT2A receptors and 5-HT(2A) receptor mRNA levels in the midbrain and hippocampus of 76C mice were decreased compared with AKR mice. Central brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) administration (300 ng i.c.v.) reduced 5-HT1A and 5-HT(2A) receptor mRNA levels in the frontal cortex and tph-2 mRNA level in the midbrain of AKR mice. However, BDNF failed to produce any effect on the expression of 5-HT(1A) , 5-HT(2A) , and tph-2 genes in 76C mice but decreased functional activity of 5-HT(2A) receptors in 76C mice and increased it in AKR mice. BDNF restored social deficiency in 76C mice but produced asocial behavior (aggressive attacks towards young mice) in AKR mice. The data indicate that a small genetic variation altered the response to BDNF and show an important role of 5-HT(1A) receptor gene in the 5-HT system response to BDNF treatment and in behavioral effects of BDNF.

  3. Involvement of the 5-HT(1A) receptor in the anti-immobility effects of fluvoxamine in the forced swimming test and mouse strain differences in 5-HT(1A) receptor binding.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Yumi; Furutani, Sachiko; Kajiwara, Yoshinobu; Hirano, Kazufumi; Yamada, Shizuo; Tagawa, Noriko; Kobayashi, Yoshiharu; Hotta, Yoshihiro; Yamada, Jun

    2010-03-10

    We previously demonstrated the presence of strain differences in baseline immobility time and sensitivity to the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluvoxamine in five strains of mice (ICR, ddY, C57BL, DBA/2 and BALB/c mice). Furthermore, variations in serotonin (5-HT) transporter binding in the brain were strongly related to strain differences in baseline immobility and sensitivity to fluvoxamine. In the present study, we examined the involvement of the 5-HT(1A) receptor in anti-immobility effects in DBA/2 mice, which show high sensitivity to fluvoxamine. The anti-immobility effects of fluvoxamine in DBA/2 mice were inhibited by the 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist N-[2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]ethyl]-N-(2-pyridinyl)cyclohexanecarboxamide (WAY 100635). However, the 5-HT(1B) receptor antagonist 3-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl]-4-hydroxy-N-[4-(4-pyridinyl)phenyl]benzamide (GR55562), the 5-HT(2) receptor antagonist 6-methyl-1-(methylethyl)-ergoline-8beta-carboxylic acid 2-hydroxy-1-methylpropyl ester (LY 53857), the 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist ondansetron and the 5-HT(4) receptor antagonist 4-amino-5-chloro-2-methoxy-benzoic acid 2-(diethylamino)ethyl ester (SDZ 205,557) did not influence the anti-immobility effects of fluvoxamine in DBA/2 mice. These results suggest that fluvoxamine-induced antidepressant-like effects in DBA/2 mice are mediated by the 5-HT(1A) receptor. We analyzed 5-HT(1A) receptor binding in the brains of five strains of mice. Strain differences in 5-HT(1A) receptor binding were observed. 5-HT(1A) receptor binding in brain was not correlated with baseline immobility time in the five strains of mice examined. These results suggest that, although the anti-immobility effects of fluvoxamine in DBA/2 mice are mediated by the 5-HT(1A) receptor, strain differences in 5-HT(1A) receptor binding are not related to variation in immobility time and responses to fluvoxamine.

  4. Pharmacological characterization of LY293284: A 5-HT1A receptor agonist with high potency and selectivity.

    PubMed

    Foreman, M M; Fuller, R W; Rasmussen, K; Nelson, D L; Calligaro, D O; Zhang, L; Barrett, J E; Booher, R N; Paget, C J; Flaugh, M E

    1994-09-01

    (-)-LY293284, (-)-4R-6-acetyl-4-(di-n-propylamino)1,3,4,5- tetrahydrobenz[c,d]indole, is a conformationally restricted tryptamine derivative with an acetyl group serving as a protophilic substitution for the hydroxyl in serotonin (5-HT). In ligand displacement studies, LY293284 had a Ki of 0.07 nM for the 5-HT1A receptor but no affinity for other monoaminergic receptors within 3 orders of magnitude. LY293284 was evaluated in in vivo models, which have been used as markers for presynaptic and postsynaptic 5-HT1A receptor activity. LY293284 decreased hypothalamic 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid levels (ED50, 2.9 micrograms/kg s.c.) and dorsal raphe serotonergic neuron firing rate (ED50, 0.08 micrograms/kg s.c.), which are accepted indices of presynaptic activity. LY293284 also induced a reduction in body temperature in rats (ED50, 3.6 micrograms/kg s.c.), which was blocked by pretreatment with (+/-)-pindolol. Hypothermic responses of rats to 5-HT1A agonists have had both pre- and postsynaptic characteristics in previous studies. The ED50 values for 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)-tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) in these tests were 15 to 45 times higher than those observed for LY293284. In models for postsynaptic activity, the ED50 for LY293284 for elevating serum corticosterone levels was 9.7 micrograms/kg s.c. and the minimum effective doses to induce lower lip retraction and flat posture were 3 micrograms/kg s.c. For comparison, the same indices obtained for 8-OH-DPAT were 222.4 and 100 micrograms/kg, respectively. The 5-HT syndrome responses induced by LY293284 were also attenuated by pretreatment with (+/-)-pindolol. LY293284 was 10 times more potent than 8-OH-DPAT in a drug discrimination test that used pigeons trained to identify 8-OH-DPAT. In sexual behavior tests with male rats, LY293284 induced a maximal reduction in ejaculatory latency at 0.01 micrograms/kg s.c., which was approximately 10 times higher potency than 8-OH-DPAT. In the pigeon conflict model for anxiolytic

  5. Cannabidiol injected into the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis modulates baroreflex activity through 5-HT1A receptors.

    PubMed

    Alves, Fernando H F; Crestani, Carlos C; Gomes, Felipe V; Guimarães, Francisco S; Correa, Fernando M A; Resstel, Leonardo B M

    2010-09-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is a non-psychotomimetic constituent of the Cannabis sativa plant that inhibits behavioral and cardiovascular responses to aversive situations, facilitating 5-HT1A-mediated neurotransmission. Previous results from our group suggest that the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) may be involved in CBD's anti-aversive effects. To investigate whether the cardiovascular effects of the CBD could involve a direct drug effect on the BNST, we evaluated the effects of CBD microinjection into this structure on baroreflex activity. We also verified whether these effects were mediated by the activation of 5-HT(1A) receptors. Bilateral microinjection of CBD (60 nmol/100 nL) into the BNST increased the bradycardiac response to arterial pressure increases. However, no changes were observed in tachycardiac responses evoked by arterial pressure decreases. Pretreatment of the BNST with the selective 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist WAY100635 (0.37 nmol/100 nL) prevented CBD effects on the baroreflex activity. Moreover, microinjection of the 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT (4 nmol/100 nL) caused effects that were similar to those observed after the microinjection of CBD, which were also blocked by pretreatment with WAY100635. In conclusion, the present studies show that the microinjection of CBD into the BNST has a facilitatory influence on the baroreflex response to blood pressure increases, acting through the activation of 5-HT1A receptors. PMID:20621717

  6. Development of 5-HT1A receptor radioligands to determine receptor density and changes in endogenous 5-HT.

    PubMed

    Jagoda, Elaine M; Lang, Lixin; Tokugawa, Joji; Simmons, Ashlie; Ma, Ying; Contoreggi, Carlo; Kiesewetter, Dale; Eckelman, William C

    2006-05-01

    [(18)F]FCWAY and [(18)F]FPWAY, analogues of the high affinity 5-HT(1A) receptor (5-HT(1A)R) antagonist WAY100635, were evaluated in rodents as potential radiopharmaceuticals for determining 5-HT(1A)R density and changes in receptor occupancy due to changes in endogenous serotonin (5-HT) levels. The in vivo hippocampus specific binding ratio [(hippocampus(uptake)/cerebellum(uptake))-1] of [(18)F]FPWAY was decreased to 32% of the ratio of [(18)F]FCWAY, indicating that [(18)F]FPWAY has lower affinity than [(18)F]FCWAY. The 5-HT(1A)R selectivity of [(18)F]FPWAY was confirmed using ex vivo autoradiography studies with 5-HT(1A)R knockout, heterozygous, and wildtype mice.Pre- or post-treatment of awake rodents in tissue dissection studies with paroxetine had no effect on hippocampal binding of [(18)F]FCWAY or [(18)F]FPWAY compared to controls, indicating neither tracer was sensitive to changes in endogenous 5-HT. In mouse ex vivo autoradiography studies in which awake mice were treated with fenfluramine following the [(18)F]FPWAY, a significant decrease was not observed in the hippocampus specific binding ratios. In rat dissection studies with fenfluramine administered following [(18)F]FPWAY or [(18)F]FBWAY ([(18)F]-MPPF) in awake or urethane-anesthetized rats, no significant differences in the specific binding ratios of the hippocampus were observed compared to their respective controls. [(18)F]FPWAY and [(18)F]FBWAY uptakes in all brain regions were increased variably in the anesthetized group (with the greatest increase in the hippocampus) vs. the awake group, but were decreased in the fenfluramine-treated anesthetized group vs. the anesthetized group. These data are best explained by changes in blood flow caused by urethane and fenfluramine, which varies from region to region in the brain. PMID:16440292

  7. Differential involvement of 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(1B/1D) receptors in human interferon-alpha-induced immobility in the mouse forced swimming test.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongmei; Wang, Wei; Jiang, Zhenzhou; Shang, Jing; Zhang, Luyong

    2010-01-01

    Although Interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha, CAS 9008-11-1) is a powerful drug in treating several viral infections and certain tumors, a considerable amount of neuropsychiatric side-effects such as depression and anxiety are an unavoidable consequence. Combination with the selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluoxetine (CAS 56296-78-7) significantly improved the situation. However, the potential 5-HT(1A) receptor- and 5-HT(1B) receptor-signals involved in the antidepressant effects are still unclear. The effects of 5-HT(1A) receptor- and 5-HT(1B) receptor signals were analyzed by using the mouse forced swimming test (FST), a predictive test of antidepressant-like action. The present results indicated that (1) fluoxetine (administrated intragastrically, 30 mg/kg; not subactive dose: 15 mg/kg) significantly reduced IFN-alpha-induced increase of the immobility time in the forced swimming test; (2) 5-HT(1A) receptor- and 5-HT(1B) receptor ligands alone or in combination had no effects on IFN-alpha-induced increase of the immobility time in the FST; (3) surprisingly, WAY 100635 (5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist, 634908-75-1) and 8-OH-DPAT(5-HT(1A) receptor agonist, CAS 78950-78-4) markedly enhanced the antidepressant effect of fluoxetine at the subactive dose (15 mg/kg, i. g.) on the IFN-alpha-treated mice in the FST. Further investigations showed that fluoxetine combined with WAY 100635 and 8-OH-DPAT failed to produce antidepressant effects in the FST. (4) Co-application of CGS 12066A (5-HT(1B) receptor agonist, CAS 109028-09-3) or GR 127935 (5-HT(1B/1D) receptor antagonist, CAS 148642-42-6) with fluoxetine had no synergistic effects on the IFN-alpha-induced increase of immobility time in FST. (5) Interestingly, co-administration of GR 127935, WAY 100635 and fluoxetine significantly reduced the IFN-alpha-induced increase in immobility time of FST, being more effective than co-administration of WAY 100635 and fluoxetine. All results suggest that (1) compared to

  8. 5-HT1A receptors of the nucleus tractus solitarii facilitate sympathetic recovery following hypotensive hemorrhage in rats

    PubMed Central

    Vantrease, Jaime E.; Dudek, Nichole; DonCarlos, Lydia L.

    2015-01-01

    The role of serotonin in the hemodynamic response to blood loss remains controversial. Caudal raphe serotonin neurons are activated during hypotensive hemorrhage, and their destruction attenuates sympathetic increases following blood loss in unanesthetized rats. Caudal raphe neurons provide serotonin-positive projections to the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS), and disruption of serotonin-positive nerve terminals in the NTS attenuates sympathetic recovery following hemorrhage. Administration of 5-HT1A-receptor agonists following hemorrhage augments sympathetic-mediated increases in venous tone and tissue hypoxia. These findings led us to hypothesize that severe blood loss promotes activation of 5-HT1A receptors in the NTS, which facilitates sympathetic recovery and peripheral tissue perfusion. Here, we developed an adeno-associated viral vector encoding an efficacious small hairpin RNA sequence targeting the rat 5-HT1A receptor. Unanesthetized rats subjected to NTS injection of the anti-rat 5-HT1A small hairpin RNA-encoding vector 4 wk prior showed normal blood pressure recovery, but an attenuated recovery of renal sympathetic nerve activity (−6.4 ± 12.9 vs. 42.6 ± 15.6% baseline, P < 0.05) 50 min after 21% estimated blood volume withdrawal. The same rats developed increased tissue hypoxia after hemorrhage, as indicated by prolonged elevations in lactate (2.77 ± 0.5 vs. 1.34 ± 0.2 mmol/l, 60 min after start of hemorrhage, P < 0.05). 5-HT1A mRNA levels in the commissural NTS were directly correlated with renal sympathetic nerve activity (P < 0.01) and inversely correlated with lactate (P < 0.05) 60 min after start of hemorrhage. The data suggest that 5-HT1A receptors in the commissural NTS facilitate tissue perfusion after blood loss likely by increasing sympathetic-mediated venous return. PMID:25980022

  9. Activation of 5-HT1A receptors in the rat basolateral amygdala induces both anxiolytic and antipanic-like effects.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Christiana Villela de Andrade; Vicente, Maria Adrielle; Zangrossi, Helio

    2013-06-01

    The relevance of 5-HT1A and 5-HT2C receptors of the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA) in the mediation of anxiety-related defensive responses has long been acknowledged. Whereas strong evidence supports that activation of the latter receptors provokes anxiety, conflicting findings have been reported on the role played by the former binding site. In this study we further investigated the involvement of 5-HT1A receptors (5-HT1A-Rs) in the regulation of anxiety- and panic-related defensive behaviors. The results showed that intra-BLA injection of the 5-HT1A-R agonist 8-OH-DPAT (0.4-16nmol) in male Wistar rats impaired the acquisition of inhibitory avoidance in the elevated T-maze, increased the percentage of time spent in the lit compartment of the light-dark transition model and enhanced the number of punished drinking events in the Vogel conflict test, all changes compatible with an anxiolytic effect. This agonist also impaired escape expression in the elevated T-maze, suggestive of a panicolytic-like effect. 8-OH-DPAT-induced changes in the elevated T-maze and light-dark tests were blocked by previous local administration of the 5-HT1A-R antagonist WAY-100635 (0.37nmol) and were also observed after intra-BLA microinjection of the benzodiazepine receptor agonist midazolam (10-40nmol). Thus, stimulation of 5-HT1A-Rs in the BLA causes both anxiolytic- and panicolytic-like effects, what may have implications for the pathophysiology and treatment of generalized anxiety and panic disorders.

  10. Effects of dominance status on conditioned defeat and expression of 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Kathleen E.; Swallows, Cody L.; Cooper, Matthew A.

    2011-01-01

    Past experience can alter how individuals respond to stressful events. The brain serotonin system is a key factor modulating stress-related behavior and may contribute to individual variation in coping styles. In this study we investigated whether dominant and subordinate hamsters respond differently to social defeat and whether their behavioral responses are associated with changes in 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptor immunoreactivity in several limbic brain regions. We paired weight-matched hamsters in daily aggressive encounters for two weeks so that they formed a stable dominance relationship. We also included controls that were exposed to an empty cage each day for two weeks. Twenty-four hours after the final pairing or empty cage exposure, subjects were socially defeated in 3, 5-min encounters with a more aggressive hamster. Twenty-four hours after social defeat, animals were tested for conditioned defeat in a 5-min social interaction test with a non-aggressive intruder. We collected brains following conditioned defeat testing and performed immunohistochemistry for 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors. We found that dominants showed less submissive and defensive behavior at conditioned defeat testing compared to both subordinates and controls. Additionally, both dominants and subordinates had an increased number of 5-HT1A immunopositive cells in the basolateral amygdala compared to controls. Subordinates also had more 5-HT1A immunopositive cells in the dorsal medial amygdala than did controls. Finally, dominants had fewer 5-HT1A immunopositive cells in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus compared to controls. Our results indicate that dominant social status results in a blunted conditioned defeat response and a distinct pattern of 5-HT1A receptor expression, which may contribute to resistance to conditioned defeat. PMID:21362435

  11. Effects of dominance status on conditioned defeat and expression of 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Kathleen E; Swallows, Cody L; Cooper, Matthew A

    2011-08-01

    Past experience can alter how individuals respond to stressful events. The brain serotonin system is a key factor modulating stress-related behavior and may contribute to individual variation in coping styles. In this study we investigated whether dominant and subordinate hamsters respond differently to social defeat and whether their behavioral responses are associated with changes in 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptor immunoreactivity in several limbic brain regions. We paired weight-matched hamsters in daily aggressive encounters for two weeks so that they formed a stable dominance relationship. We also included controls that were exposed to an empty cage each day for two weeks. Twenty-four hours after the final pairing or empty cage exposure, subjects were socially defeated in 3, 5-min encounters with a more aggressive hamster. Twenty-four hours after social defeat, animals were tested for conditioned defeat in a 5-min social interaction test with a non-aggressive intruder. We collected brains following conditioned defeat testing and performed immunohistochemistry for 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors. We found that dominants showed less submissive and defensive behavior at conditioned defeat testing compared to both subordinates and controls. Additionally, both dominants and subordinates had an increased number of 5-HT1A immunopositive cells in the basolateral amygdala compared to controls. Subordinates also had more 5-HT1A immunopositive cells in the dorsal medial amygdala than did controls. Finally, dominants had fewer 5-HT1A immunopositive cells in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus compared to controls. Our results indicate that dominant social status results in a blunted conditioned defeat response and a distinct pattern of 5-HT1A receptor expression, which may contribute to resistance to conditioned defeat.

  12. Selective serotonin 5-HT1A receptor biased agonists elicitdistinct brain activation patterns: a pharmacoMRI study

    PubMed Central

    Becker, G.; Bolbos, R.; Costes, N.; Redouté, J.; Newman-Tancredi, A.; Zimmer, L.

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin 1A (5-HT1A) receptors are involved in several physiological and pathological processes and constitute therefore an important therapeutic target. The recent pharmacological concept of biased agonism asserts that highly selective agonists can preferentially direct receptor signaling to specific intracellular responses, opening the possibility of drugs targeting a receptor subtype in specific brain regions. The present study brings additional support to this concept thanks to functional magnetic resonance imaging (7 Tesla-fMRI) in anaesthetized rats. Three 5-HT1A receptor agonists (8-OH-DPAT, F13714 and F15599) and one 5-HT1A receptor antagonist (MPPF) were compared in terms of influence on the brain blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal. Our study revealed for the first time contrasting BOLD signal patterns of biased agonists in comparison to a classical agonist and a silent antagonist. By providing functional information on the influence of pharmacological activation of 5-HT1A receptors in specific brain regions, this neuroimaging approach, translatable to the clinic, promises to be useful in exploring the new concept of biased agonism in neuropsychopharmacology. PMID:27211078

  13. 5-HT1a Receptor Antagonists Block Perforant Path-Dentate LTP Induced in Novel, but Not Familiar, Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanberg, Cyndy Davis; Jones, Floretta L.; Do, Viet H.; Dieguez, Dario, Jr.; Derrick, Brian E.

    2006-01-01

    Numerous studies suggest roles for monoamines in modulating long-term potentiation (LTP). Previously, we reported that both induction and maintenance of perforant path-dentate gyrus LTP is enhanced when induced while animals explore novel environments. Here we investigate the contribution of serotonin and 5-HT1a receptors to the novelty-mediated…

  14. [On the role of selective silencer Freud-1 in the regulation of the brain 5-HT(1A) receptor gene expression].

    PubMed

    Naumenko, V S; Osipova, D V; Tsybko, A S

    2010-01-01

    Selective 5-HT(1A) receptor silencer (Freud-1) is known to be one of the main factors for transcriptional regulation of brain serotonin 5-HT(1A) receptor. However, there is a lack of data on implication of Freud-1 in the mechanisms underlying genetically determined and experimentally altered 5-HT(1A) receptor system state in vivo. In the present study we have found a difference in the 5-HT(1A) gene expression in the midbrain of AKR and CBA inbred mouse strains. At the same time no distinction in Freud-1 expression was observed. We have revealed 90.3% of homology between mouse and rat 5-HT(1A) receptor DRE-element, whereas there was no difference in DRE-element sequence between AKR and CBA mice. This indicates the absence of differences in Freud-1 binding site in these mouse strains. In the model of 5-HT(1A) receptor desensitization produced by chronic 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist administration, a significant reduction of 5-HT(1A) receptor gene expression together with considerable increase of Freud-1 expression were found. These data allow us to conclude that the selective silencer of 5-HT(1A) receptor, Freud-1, is involved in the compensatory mechanisms that modulate the functional state of brain serotonin system, although it is not the only factor for 5-HT(1A) receptor transcriptional regulation.

  15. Increased binding of 5-HT1A receptors in a dissociative amnesic patient after the recovery process.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Soichiro; Yasuno, Fumihiko; Inoue, Makoto; Kosaka, Jun; Kiuchi, Kuniaki; Matsuoka, Kiwamu; Kishimoto, Toshifumi; Suhara, Tetsuya

    2014-10-30

    Dissociative amnesia is characterized by an inability to retrieve information already saved in memories. 5-HT has some role in neural regulatory control and may be related to the recovery from dissociative amnesia. To examine the role of 5-HT1A receptors in the recovery from dissociative amnesia, we performed two positron emission tomography (PET) scans on a 30-year-old patient of dissociative amnesia using [(11)C]WAY-100635, the first at amnesic state, and the second at the time he had recovered. Exploratory voxel-based analysis (VBA) was performed using SPM software. 5-HT1A BPND images were compared between the patient at amnesic and recovery states and healthy subjects (14 males, mean age 29.8 ± 6.45) with Jack-knife analysis. 5-HT1A receptor bindings of the patient at the recovery state were significantly higher than those of healthy subjects in the right superior and middle frontal cortex, left inferior frontal and orbitofrontal cortex and bilateral inferior temporal cortex. The increase in BPND values of recovery state was beyond 10% of those of amnesia state in these regions except in the right superior frontal cortex. We considered that neural regulatory control by the increase of 5-HT1A receptors in cortical regions played a role in the recovery from dissociative amnesia.

  16. 5-HT1A Receptor Activation Reduces Fear-related Behavior Following Social Defeat in Syrian Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Bader, Lauren R.; Carboni, Joseph D.; Burleson, Cody A.; Cooper, Matthew A.

    2014-01-01

    Social defeat leads to selective avoidance of familiar opponents as well as general avoidance of novel, non-threatening intruders. Avoidance of familiar opponents represents a fear-related memory whereas generalized social avoidance indicates anxiety-like behavior. We have previously shown that serotonin signaling alters responses to social defeat in Syrian hamsters, although it is unclear whether serotonin modulates defeat-induced fear, anxiety, or both. In this study we focus on 5-HT1A receptors, in part, because their activation had been linked to the acquisition of conditioned fear. We hypothesized that pharmacological activation of 5-HT1A receptors prior to social defeat would reduce avoidance of familiar opponents, impair Arc expression in the basolateral amygdala (BLA), but not alter anxiety-like behavior. We administered 8-OH-DPAT, a 5-HT1A receptor agonist, prior to 3, 5-minute social defeats and 24-hours later exposed hamsters to a social interaction test to measure the conditioned defeat response immediately followed by either a Y-maze test or an open field test. In a separate experiment, we administered 8-OH-DPAT prior to 3, 5-minute social defeats and later removed brains for Arc immunohistochemistry. Social defeat increased the number of Arc immunopositive cells in the central amygdala (CeA), prelimbic cortex (PL), and BLA, and 8-OH-DPAT treatment reduced Arc immunoreactivity in the PL. These results suggest that 5-HT1A receptor activation impairs the fear memory associated with social defeat, but does not alter defeat-induced anxiety. Overall, 5-HT1A receptor activation may impair Arc expression in select brain regions such as the PL and thereby disrupt the development of a fear memory essential for the conditioned defeat response. PMID:24726709

  17. 5-HT1A receptor activation reduces fear-related behavior following social defeat in Syrian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Bader, Lauren R; Carboni, Joseph D; Burleson, Cody A; Cooper, Matthew A

    2014-07-01

    Social defeat leads to selective avoidance of familiar opponents as well as general avoidance of novel, non-threatening intruders. Avoidance of familiar opponents represents a fear-related memory whereas generalized social avoidance indicates anxiety-like behavior. We have previously shown that serotonin signaling alters responses to social defeat in Syrian hamsters, although it is unclear whether serotonin modulates defeat-induced fear, anxiety, or both. In this study we focus on 5-HT1A receptors, in part, because their activation had been linked to the acquisition of conditioned fear. We hypothesized that pharmacological activation of 5-HT1A receptors prior to social defeat would reduce avoidance of familiar opponents and impair Arc expression in the basolateral amygdala (BLA), but not alter anxiety-like behavior. We administered 8-OH-DPAT, a 5-HT1A receptor agonist, prior to 3, 5-minute social defeats and 24h later exposed hamsters to a social interaction test to measure the conditioned defeat response immediately followed by either a Y-maze test or an open field test. In a separate experiment, we administered 8-OH-DPAT prior to 3, 5-minute social defeats and later removed the brains for Arc immunohistochemistry. Social defeat increased the number of Arc immunopositive cells in the central amygdala (CeA), prelimbic cortex (PL), and BLA, and 8-OH-DPAT treatment reduced Arc immunoreactivity in the PL. These results suggest that 5-HT1A receptor activation impairs the fear memory associated with social defeat, but does not alter defeat-induced anxiety. Overall, 5-HT1A receptor activation may impair Arc expression in select brain regions such as the PL and thereby disrupt the development of a fear memory essential for the conditioned defeat response.

  18. HBK-7 - A new xanthone derivative and a 5-HT1A receptor antagonist with antidepressant-like properties.

    PubMed

    Pytka, Karolina; Kazek, Grzegorz; Siwek, Agata; Mordyl, Barbara; Głuch-Lutwin, Monika; Rapacz, Anna; Olczyk, Adrian; Gałuszka, Adam; Waszkielewicz, Anna; Marona, Henryk; Sapa, Jacek; Filipek, Barbara; Zygmunt, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Xanthone derivatives possess many biological properties, including neuroprotective, antioxidant or antidepressant-like. In this study we aimed to investigate antidepressant- and anxiolytic-like properties of a new xanthone derivative - 6-methoxy-4-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazin-1-yl]-9H-xanthen-9-one (HBK-7), as well as its possible mechanism of action, and the influence on cognitive and motor function. HBK-7 in our earlier studies showed high affinity for serotonergic 5-HT1A receptor. We determined the affinity of HBK-7 for CNS receptors and transporters using radioligand assays and examined its intrinsic activity towards 5-HT1A receptor. We evaluated antidepressant- and anxiolytic-like activity of HBK-7 in the mouse forced swim test, and four-plate test, respectively. We examined the influence on locomotor activity in mice to determine if the effect observed in the forced swim test was specific. We used step-through passive avoidance and rotarod tests to evaluate the influence of HBK-7 on cognitive and motor function, respectively. HBK-7 showed moderate affinity for dopaminergic D2 receptor and very low for serotonergic 5-HT2A, adrenergic α2 receptors, as well as serotonin transporter. Functional studies revealed that HBK-7 was a 5-HT1A receptor antagonist. HBK-7 (10mg/kg) decreased immobility time in the forced swim test. Combined treatment with sub-effective doses of HBK-7 and fluoxetine reduced immobility of mice in the forced swim test. Pretreatment with p-chlorophenylalanine and WAY-100,635 antagonized the antidepressant-like effect of HBK-7. Neither of the treatments influenced locomotor activity of mice. HBK-7 at antidepressant-like dose did not impair memory or motor coordination in mice. We demonstrated that HBK-7 was a 5-HT1A receptor antagonist with potent, comparable to mianserin, antidepressant-like activity. HBK-7 mediated its effect through serotonergic system and its antidepressant-like action required the activation of 5-HT1A receptors. At active

  19. HBK-7 - A new xanthone derivative and a 5-HT1A receptor antagonist with antidepressant-like properties.

    PubMed

    Pytka, Karolina; Kazek, Grzegorz; Siwek, Agata; Mordyl, Barbara; Głuch-Lutwin, Monika; Rapacz, Anna; Olczyk, Adrian; Gałuszka, Adam; Waszkielewicz, Anna; Marona, Henryk; Sapa, Jacek; Filipek, Barbara; Zygmunt, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Xanthone derivatives possess many biological properties, including neuroprotective, antioxidant or antidepressant-like. In this study we aimed to investigate antidepressant- and anxiolytic-like properties of a new xanthone derivative - 6-methoxy-4-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazin-1-yl]-9H-xanthen-9-one (HBK-7), as well as its possible mechanism of action, and the influence on cognitive and motor function. HBK-7 in our earlier studies showed high affinity for serotonergic 5-HT1A receptor. We determined the affinity of HBK-7 for CNS receptors and transporters using radioligand assays and examined its intrinsic activity towards 5-HT1A receptor. We evaluated antidepressant- and anxiolytic-like activity of HBK-7 in the mouse forced swim test, and four-plate test, respectively. We examined the influence on locomotor activity in mice to determine if the effect observed in the forced swim test was specific. We used step-through passive avoidance and rotarod tests to evaluate the influence of HBK-7 on cognitive and motor function, respectively. HBK-7 showed moderate affinity for dopaminergic D2 receptor and very low for serotonergic 5-HT2A, adrenergic α2 receptors, as well as serotonin transporter. Functional studies revealed that HBK-7 was a 5-HT1A receptor antagonist. HBK-7 (10mg/kg) decreased immobility time in the forced swim test. Combined treatment with sub-effective doses of HBK-7 and fluoxetine reduced immobility of mice in the forced swim test. Pretreatment with p-chlorophenylalanine and WAY-100,635 antagonized the antidepressant-like effect of HBK-7. Neither of the treatments influenced locomotor activity of mice. HBK-7 at antidepressant-like dose did not impair memory or motor coordination in mice. We demonstrated that HBK-7 was a 5-HT1A receptor antagonist with potent, comparable to mianserin, antidepressant-like activity. HBK-7 mediated its effect through serotonergic system and its antidepressant-like action required the activation of 5-HT1A receptors. At active

  20. Isoquinoline derivatives isolated from the fruit of Annona muricata as 5-HTergic 5-HT1A receptor agonists in rats: unexploited antidepressive (lead) products.

    PubMed

    Hasrat, J A; De Bruyne, T; De Backer, J P; Vauquelin, G; Vlietinck, A J

    1997-11-01

    The fruit and the leaves of Annona muricata (Annonaceae) are used in traditional medicine for their tranquillizing and sedative properties. Extracts of the plant have been shown to inhibit binding of [3H]rauwolscine to 5-HTergic 5-HT1A receptors in calf hippocampus, and three alkaloids, annonaine (1), nornuciferine (2) and asimilobine (3), isolated from the fruit have been shown to have IC50 values of 3 microM, 9 microM and 5 microM, respectively, although in ligand-binding studies it was not possible to determine whether interaction of these ligands with the receptor was agonistic or antagonistic. This paper presents the results of functional assays of the alkaloids. The inhibition of cAMP accumulation was tested in NIH-3T3 cells stably transfected with the 5-HT1A receptor from man. None of the alkaloids showed antagonistic properties towards the 5-HT1A receptors because in the antagonistic tests no influence on the forskolin-stimulated increase of cAMP level was detected. Full agonistic properties were measured for all three compounds; the inhibition constants (Ki) for 1, 2 and 3 were < 10 microM. Inhibition of the binding of the radioligand to the 5-HT1A receptor was observed in every ligand-binding assay performed with the alkaloids; the Ki values for 1, 2 and 3 were in the microM range. These results imply that the fruit of Annona muricata possesses anti-depressive effects, possibly induced by compounds 1, 2 and 3, and that in the past potent leads for the development of anti-depressive therapeutics have not been used.

  1. Isoquinoline derivatives isolated from the fruit of Annona muricata as 5-HTergic 5-HT1A receptor agonists in rats: unexploited antidepressive (lead) products.

    PubMed

    Hasrat, J A; De Bruyne, T; De Backer, J P; Vauquelin, G; Vlietinck, A J

    1997-11-01

    The fruit and the leaves of Annona muricata (Annonaceae) are used in traditional medicine for their tranquillizing and sedative properties. Extracts of the plant have been shown to inhibit binding of [3H]rauwolscine to 5-HTergic 5-HT1A receptors in calf hippocampus, and three alkaloids, annonaine (1), nornuciferine (2) and asimilobine (3), isolated from the fruit have been shown to have IC50 values of 3 microM, 9 microM and 5 microM, respectively, although in ligand-binding studies it was not possible to determine whether interaction of these ligands with the receptor was agonistic or antagonistic. This paper presents the results of functional assays of the alkaloids. The inhibition of cAMP accumulation was tested in NIH-3T3 cells stably transfected with the 5-HT1A receptor from man. None of the alkaloids showed antagonistic properties towards the 5-HT1A receptors because in the antagonistic tests no influence on the forskolin-stimulated increase of cAMP level was detected. Full agonistic properties were measured for all three compounds; the inhibition constants (Ki) for 1, 2 and 3 were < 10 microM. Inhibition of the binding of the radioligand to the 5-HT1A receptor was observed in every ligand-binding assay performed with the alkaloids; the Ki values for 1, 2 and 3 were in the microM range. These results imply that the fruit of Annona muricata possesses anti-depressive effects, possibly induced by compounds 1, 2 and 3, and that in the past potent leads for the development of anti-depressive therapeutics have not been used. PMID:9401954

  2. Mechanisms of cannabidiol neuroprotection in hypoxic-ischemic newborn pigs: role of 5HT(1A) and CB2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Pazos, M Ruth; Mohammed, Nagat; Lafuente, Hector; Santos, Martin; Martínez-Pinilla, Eva; Moreno, Estefania; Valdizan, Elsa; Romero, Julián; Pazos, Angel; Franco, Rafael; Hillard, Cecilia J; Alvarez, Francisco J; Martínez-Orgado, Jose

    2013-08-01

    The mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective effects of cannabidiol (CBD) were studied in vivo using a hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain injury model in newborn pigs. One- to two-day-old piglets were exposed to HI for 30 min by interrupting carotid blood flow and reducing the fraction of inspired oxygen to 10%. Thirty minutes after HI, the piglets were treated with vehicle (HV) or 1 mg/kg CBD, alone (HC) or in combination with 1 mg/kg of a CB₂ receptor antagonist (AM630) or a serotonin 5HT(1A) receptor antagonist (WAY100635). HI decreased the number of viable neurons and affected the amplitude-integrated EEG background activity as well as different prognostic proton-magnetic-resonance-spectroscopy (H(±)-MRS)-detectable biomarkers (lactate/N-acetylaspartate and N-acetylaspartate/choline ratios). HI brain damage was also associated with increases in excitotoxicity (increased glutamate/N-acetylaspartate ratio), oxidative stress (decreased glutathione/creatine ratio and increased protein carbonylation) and inflammation (increased brain IL-1 levels). CBD administration after HI prevented all these alterations, although this CBD-mediated neuroprotection was reversed by co-administration of either WAY100635 or AM630, suggesting the involvement of CB₂ and 5HT(1A) receptors. The involvement of CB₂ receptors was not dependent on a CBD-mediated increase in endocannabinoids. Finally, bioluminescence resonance energy transfer studies indicated that CB₂ and 5HT(1A) receptors may form heteromers in living HEK-293T cells. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that CBD exerts robust neuroprotective effects in vivo in HI piglets, modulating excitotoxicity, oxidative stress and inflammation, and that both CB₂ and 5HT(1A) receptors are implicated in these effects.

  3. The Role of 5-HT1A Receptors in Long-Term Adaptation of Newborn Rats to Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Mikhailenko, V A; Butkevich, I P

    2016-08-01

    We studied the effects of neonatal hypoxia on adaptive behavior of rats during prepubertal and pubertal periods in the control and after repeated injections of 5-HT1A receptor agonist buspirone. Hypoxia enhanced the inflammatory nociceptive response and exacerbated the depressive-like behavior. Repeated injections of buspirone starting from the neonatal period produced a long-term normalizing effect on the inflammatory nociceptive response and psychoemotional behavior disturbed by hypoxia. The protective effect of buspirone can result from strengthening of the adaptive potencies of the serotoninergic system via activation of 5-HT1A receptors that up-regulate secretion of trophic factor S100β under conditions of serotonin deficiency typical of rats exposed to neonatal hypoxia. Buspirone promotes recovery of the afferent and efferent connections of the raphe nuclei with the prefrontal cortex and spinal cord involved in integration of the anti-nociceptive and psychoemotional systems. PMID:27591870

  4. Ipsapirone challenge in aggressive men shows an inverse correlation between 5-HT1A receptor function and aggression.

    PubMed

    Cleare, A J; Bond, A J

    2000-03-01

    Previous studies have suggested that 5-HT(1A) receptor function is linked to aggression. We studied 12 healthy men selected to have high trait levels of aggression. They filled in various self-rating measures of aggression, and underwent a double blind, crossover challenge with ipsapirone (20 mg orally) and a placebo. On both occasions, we measured the endocrine (ACTH, cortisol, growth hormone and prolactin), hypothermic and bodily symptom responses every 30 min for 180 min. We found that subjects with blunted neuroendocrine responses to the ipsapirone challenge had significantly higher self-ratings of aggression on a number of measures. The same relationship held using the bodily symptom response to ipsapirone: blunted responses were associated with higher ratings of aggression. We conclude that impaired 5-HT(1A) receptor function is associated with increased aggressiveness. PMID:10928305

  5. The antipsychotic aripiprazole induces antinociceptive effects: Possible role of peripheral dopamine D2 and serotonin 5-HT1A receptors.

    PubMed

    Almeida-Santos, Ana F; Ferreira, Renata C M; Duarte, Igor D; Aguiar, Daniele C; Romero, Thiago R L; Moreira, Fabricio A

    2015-10-15

    Aripiprazole is an antipsychotic that acts by multiple mechanisms, including partial agonism at dopamine D2 and serotonin 5-HT1A receptors. Since these neurotransmitters also modulate pain and analgesia, we tested the hypothesis that systemic or local administration of aripiprazole induces antinociceptive responses. Systemic aripiprazole (0.1-10 mg/kg; i.p.) injection in mice inhibited formalin-induced paw licking and PGE2-induced hyperalgesia in the paw pressure test. This effect was mimicked by intra-plantar administration (12.5-100 µg/paw) in the ipsi, but not contralateral, paw. The peripheral action of aripiprazole (100 µg/paw) was reversed by haloperidol (0.1-10 µg/paw), suggesting the activation of dopamine receptors as a possible mechanism. Accordingly, quinpirole (25-100 µg/paw), a full agonist at D2/D3 receptors, also reduced nociceptive responses.. In line with the partial agoniztic activity of aripiprazole, low dose of this compound inhibited the effect of quinpirole (both at 25 µg/paw). Finally, peripheral administration of NAN-190 (0.1-10 μg/paw), a 5-HT1A antagonist, also prevented aripiprazole-induced antinociception. In conclusion, systemic or local administration of aripiprazole induces antinociceptive effects. Similar to its antipsychotic activity, the possible peripheral mechanism involves dopamine D2 and serotoninergic 5-HT1A receptors. Aripiprazole and other dopaminergic modulators should be further investigated as new treatments for certain types of pain.

  6. 5-HT1A receptor-responsive pedunculopontine tegmental neurons suppress REM sleep and respiratory motor activity.

    PubMed

    Grace, Kevin P; Liu, Hattie; Horner, Richard L

    2012-02-01

    Serotonin type 1A (5-HT(1A)) receptor-responsive neurons in the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTn) become maximally active immediately before and during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. A prevailing model of REM sleep generation indicates that activation of such neurons contributes significantly to the generation of REM sleep, and if correct then inactivation of such neurons ought to suppress REM sleep. We test this hypothesis using bilateral microperfusion of the 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT, 10 μm) into the PPTn; this tool has been shown to selectively silence REM sleep-active PPTn neurons while the activity of wake/REM sleep-active PPTn neurons is unaffected. Contrary to the prevailing model, bilateral microperfusion of 8-OH-DPAT into the PPTn (n = 23 rats) significantly increased REM sleep both as a percentage of the total recording time and sleep time, compared with both within-animal vehicle controls and between-animal time-controls. This increased REM sleep resulted from an increased frequency of REM sleep bouts but not their duration, indicating an effect on mechanisms of REM sleep initiation but not maintenance. Furthermore, an increased proportion of the REM sleep bouts stemmed from periods of low REM sleep drive quantified electrographically. Targeted suppression of 5-HT(1A) receptor-responsive PPTn neurons also increased respiratory rate and respiratory-related genioglossus activity, and increased the frequency and amplitude of the sporadic genioglossus activations occurring during REM sleep. These data indicate that 5-HT(1A) receptor-responsive PPTn neurons normally function to restrain REM sleep by elevating the drive threshold for REM sleep induction, and restrain the expression of respiratory rate and motor activities.

  7. The 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist F 13640 attenuates mechanical allodynia in a rat model of trigeminal neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Deseure, Kristof; Koek, Wouter; Colpaert, Francis C; Adriaensen, Hugo

    2002-12-01

    The effects of acute intraperitoneal injections of the 5-HT(1A) receptor agonists F 13640 [(3-chloro-4-fluoro-phenyl)-[4-fluoro-4-[[(5-methyl-pyridin-2-ylmethyl)-amino]-methyl]piperidin-1-yl]-methadone] and F 13714 [3-chloro-4-fluorophenyl-(4-fluoro-4-[[(5-methyl-6-methylamino-pyridin-2-ylmethyl)-amino]-methyl]-piperidin-1-yl-methanone] were studied in comparison with those of baclofen and morphine on responsiveness to von Frey hair stimulation after chronic constriction injury to the rat's infraorbital nerve (IoN-CCI). Following IoN-CCI, an ipsilateral hyperresponsiveness developed that remained stable in control rats throughout the period of drug testing. F 13640, F 13714, baclofen and morphine dose-dependently decreased the hyperresponsiveness; normalization of the response occurred at doses 0.63, 0.04, 5 and 10 mg/kg, respectively. Confirming earlier data, baclofen's effects further validate IoN-CCI as a model of trigeminal neuralgia. The effects of F 13640 and F 13714 are initial evidence that 5-HT(1A) receptor agonists produce profound analgesia in the IoN-CCI model. The present data extend recent evidence that high-efficacy 5-HT(1A) receptor activation constitutes a new mechanism of central analgesia the spectrum of which may also encompass trigeminal neuropathic pain. PMID:12450569

  8. Screening of medicinal plants from Suriname for 5-HT(1A) ligands: Bioactive isoquinoline alkaloids from the fruit of Annona muricata.

    PubMed

    Hasrat, J A; Pieters, L; De Backer, J P; Vauquelin, G; Vlietinck, A J

    1997-06-01

    Plants from Suriname (South-America) and several Annona species, including A. muricata, A. ckerimolia, A. montana and A. glabra were screened for 5-HT(1A) receptor binding activity by ligand-binding-studies (LBS). Crude extracts of all Annona species and from Hibiscus bifurcatus, Irlbarchia purpurascens and Scoparia dulcis showed high activity. The isoquinoline alkaloids asimilobine (1), nornuciferine (2), and annonaine (3) were isolated as the active principles from the fruit of Annona muricata. These results may partially explain the use of Hibiscus bifurcatus and Annona muricata in traditional medicine in Suriname.

  9. Rectal antinociceptive properties of alverine citrate are linked to antagonism at the 5-HT1A receptor subtype.

    PubMed

    Coelho, A M; Jacob, L; Fioramonti, J; Bueno, L

    2001-10-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) is considered as a major mediator causing hyperalgesia and is involved in inflammatory reactions and irritable bowel syndrome. Alverine citrate may possess visceral antinociceptive properties in a rat model of rectal distension-induced abdominal contractions. This study was designed to evaluate the pharmacological properties of alverine citrate in a rat model of rectal hyperalgesia induced by 5-HTP (5-HT precursor) and by a selective 5-HT1A agonist (8-OH-DPAT) and to compare this activity with a reference 5-HT1A antagonist (WAY 100635). At 4 h after their administration, 5-HTP and 8-OH-DPAT increased the number of abdominal contractions in response to rectal distension at the lowest volume of distension (0.4 mL). When injected intraperitoneally before 8-OH-DPAT and 5-HTP, WAY 100635 (1 mg kg(-1)) blocked their nociceptive effect, but also reduced the response to the highest volume of distension (1.6 mL). Similarly, when injected intraperitoneally, alverine citrate (20 mg kg(-1)) suppressed the effect of 5-HTP, but not that of 8-OH-DPAT. However, when injected intracerebroventricularly (75 microg/rat) alverine citrate reduced 8-OH-DPAT-induced enhancement of rectal distension-induced abdominal contractions. In-vitro binding studies revealed that alverine citrate had a high affinity for 5-HT1A receptors and a weak affinity for 5-HT3 and 5-HT4 subtypes. These results suggest that 5-HTP-induced rectal hypersensitivity involves 5-TH1A receptors and that alverine citrate acts as a selective antagonist at the 5-HT1A receptor subtype to block both 5-HTP and 8-OH-DPAT-induced rectal hypersensitivity. PMID:11697552

  10. μ-Opioid and 5-HT1A receptors heterodimerize and show signalling crosstalk via G protein and MAP-kinase pathways.

    PubMed

    Cussac, Didier; Rauly-Lestienne, Isabelle; Heusler, Peter; Finana, Frédéric; Cathala, Claudie; Bernois, Sophie; De Vries, Luc

    2012-08-01

    μ-opioid receptors have been shown to form heterodimers with several G protein coupled receptors involved in pain regulation such as α(2A)-adrenergic and neurokinin 1 receptors. Because the 5-HT(1A) receptor is also involved in pain control, we investigated whether it can interact with the μ-opioid receptor in cell lines. Using epitope-tagged μ-opioid and 5-HT(1A) receptors, we show that both receptors can co-immunoprecipate when expressed in the same cells. This physical interaction was corroborated by a Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer signal between the μ-opioid receptor fused to Renilla luciferase and the 5-HT(1A) receptor fused to the Green Fluorescent Protein. Consistent with the presence of functional heterodimers, the μ-opioid receptor activated a Gα(o) protein covalently fused to the 5-HT(1A) receptor in membrane preparations as well as a Gα(15) protein fused to the 5-HT(1A) receptor in living cells. We demonstrate that both receptors can coexerce control of the ERK1/2 pathway: for example, μ-opioid receptor-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation was selectively desensitized by 5-HT(1A) receptor activation. Although 5-HT(1A) and μ-opioid receptors were capable to internalize in response to their own activation, they were ineffective to induce the co-internalization of their partners. Thus, we show a functional heterodimerization of μ-opioid and 5-HT(1A) receptors in cell lines, a complex that might play a role in the control of pain in vivo. These results also support the potential therapeutic action of 5-HT(1A) agonists against nociceptive processes.

  11. Serotonin, serotonin 5-HT(1A) receptors and dopamine in blood peripheral lymphocytes of major depression patients.

    PubMed

    Fajardo, O; Galeno, J; Urbina, M; Carreira, I; Lima, L

    2003-09-01

    There are increasing evidences of cell markers present in the immune and the nervous systems. These include neurotransmitter receptors and transporters. Serotonin receptor subtypes are related to depression and also have been shown to be present in certain cells of the immune system. In the present report, we determined the presence of 5-HT(1A) receptors by the binding of the selective agonist 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propyl-amino)tetralin in lymphocytes of peripheral blood isolated by Ficoll/Hypaque gradients from controls and depressed patients. The capacity of these receptors was around 24 fmol/10(6) cells in both groups of subjects, without significant difference among them. The affinity was in the nM range and either differ between controls and patients. Serotonin, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, dopamine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid were determined by HPLC with electrochemical detector. There were no significant differences between controls and major depression patients in the values obtained for rich and poor platelet plasma or in the isolated cells. However, there was a reduction in serotonin turnover rate indicated by an increase in the ratio serotonin/5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, but not in that of dopamine, in lymphocytes of major depression patients. Thus, there is a serotonergic dysfunction in immune circulating cells of major depression patients, without changes in the number of 5-HT(1A) receptors, although the coupling of these receptors to transduction mechanisms could be affected and may be related to the alteration of 5-HT turnover rate.

  12. Motor effects of the non-psychotropic phytocannabinoid cannabidiol that are mediated by 5-HT1A receptors.

    PubMed

    Espejo-Porras, Francisco; Fernández-Ruiz, Javier; Pertwee, Roger G; Mechoulam, Raphael; García, Concepción

    2013-12-01

    The broad presence of CB1 receptors in the basal ganglia, mainly in GABA- or glutamate-containing neurons, as well as the presence of TRPV1 receptors in dopaminergic neurons and the identification of CB2 receptors in some neuronal subpopulations within the basal ganglia, explain the powerful motor effects exerted by those cannabinoids that can activate/block these receptors. By contrast, cannabidiol (CBD), a phytocannabinoid with a broad therapeutic profile, is generally presented as an example of a cannabinoid compound with no motor effects due to its poor affinity for the CB1 and the CB2 receptor, despite its activity at the TRPV1 receptor. However, recent evidence suggests that CBD may interact with the serotonin 5-HT1A receptor to produce some of its beneficial effects. This may enable CBD to directly influence motor activity through the well-demonstrated role of serotonergic transmission in the basal ganglia. We have investigated this issue in rats using three different pharmacological and neurochemical approaches. First, we compared the motor effects of various i.p. doses of CBD with the selective 5-HT1A receptor agonist, 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino) tetralin (8-OH-DPAT; i.p.). Second, we investigated whether the motor effects of CBD are sensitive to 5-HT1A receptor blockade in comparison with CB1 receptor antagonism. Finally, we investigated whether CBD was able to potentiate the effect of a sub-effective dose of 8-OH-DPAT. Our results demonstrated that: (i) only high doses of CBD (>10 mg/kg) altered motor behavior measured in a computer-aided actimeter; (ii) these alterations were restricted to vertical activity (rearing) with only modest changes in other parameters; (iii) similar effects were produced by 8-OH-DPAT (1 mg/kg), although this agonist affected exclusively vertical activity, with no effects on other motor parameters, and it showed always more potency than CBD; (iv) the effects of 8-OH-DPAT (1 mg/kg) and CBD (20 mg/kg) on vertical activity

  13. The effect of 5-HT1A receptor agonists on locomotor activity in the guinea-pig.

    PubMed Central

    Evenden, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    1. The present study examined the effects of 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino) tetralin (8-OH-DPAT), flesinoxan, ipsapirone and buspirone, all agonists at the 5-HT1A receptor, on the locomotor activity of guinea-pigs. The effects of these drugs were contrasted with those of the non-selective 5-HT agonist, 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyl tryptamine (5-MeO-DMT) and the dopamine D2 antagonist, raclopride. 2. 8-OH-DPAT, flesinoxan and 5-MeO-DMT markedly increased the locomotor activity of naive, unhabituated guinea-pigs in a dose-dependent manner. Buspirone also did so, although to a lesser extent and for a shorter time. The doses at which this effect was seen were higher than those normally employed in rats. Ipsapirone and raclopride had no significant effects on locomotor activity. 3. The locomotor activity increasing effect of 1.0 mg kg-1 8-OH-DPAT was blocked by the selective 5-HT1A antagonist (S)-UH-301 (3.0 and 10.0 mg kg-1), but not by (-)-alprenolol (15.0 mg kg-1). Ipsapirone (30.0 mg kg-1) and raclopride (3.0 mg kg-1) antagonized 8-OH-DPAT-induced locomotor activity but only to a small extent. The 5-HT reuptake inhibitor, zimelidine (10.0 mg kg-1) had no effect. 4. The effect of the 5-HT1A agonists in the guinea-pig contrasts with the effects of 8-OH-DPAT on the locomotor activity of unhabituated rats and mice tested in the same apparatus, but are similar to the effects of 8-OH-DPAT on habituated rats, which show a low baseline of activity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7921613

  14. Serotonin 1A receptor (5-HT1A) of the sea lamprey: cDNA cloning and expression in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Cornide-Petronio, María Eugenia; Anadón, Ramón; Barreiro-Iglesias, Antón; Rodicio, María Celina

    2013-09-01

    Serotonergic cells are among the earliest neurons to be born in the developing central nervous system and serotonin is known to regulate the development of the nervous system. One of the major targets of the activity of serotonergic cells is the serotonin 1A receptor (5-HT1A), an ancestral archetypical serotonin receptor. In this study, we cloned and characterized the 3D structure of the sea lamprey 5-HT1A, and studied the expression of its transcript in the central nervous system by means of in situ hybridization. In phylogenetic analyses, the sea lamprey 5-HT1A sequence clustered together with 5-HT1A sequences of vertebrates and emerged as an outgroup to all gnathostome sequences. In situ hybridization analysis during prolarval, larval and adult stages showed a widespread expression of the lamprey 5-ht1a transcript. In P1 prolarvae 5-ht1a mRNA expression was observed in diencephalic nuclei, the rhombencephalon and rostral spinal cord. At P2 prolarval stage the 5-ht1a expression extended to other brain areas including telencephalic regions. 5-ht1a expression in larvae was observed throughout almost all the main brain regions with the strongest expression in the olfactory bulbs, lateral pallium, striatum, preoptic region, habenula, prethalamus, thalamus, pretectum, hypothalamus, rhombencephalic reticular area, dorsal column nucleus and rostral spinal cord. In adults, the 5-ht1a transcript was also observed in cells of the subcommissural organ. Comparison of the expression of 5-ht1a between the sea lamprey and other vertebrates reveals a conserved pattern in most of the brain regions, likely reflecting the ancestral vertebrate condition.

  15. Serotonin 1A receptor (5-HT1A) of the sea lamprey: cDNA cloning and expression in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Cornide-Petronio, María Eugenia; Anadón, Ramón; Barreiro-Iglesias, Antón; Rodicio, María Celina

    2013-09-01

    Serotonergic cells are among the earliest neurons to be born in the developing central nervous system and serotonin is known to regulate the development of the nervous system. One of the major targets of the activity of serotonergic cells is the serotonin 1A receptor (5-HT1A), an ancestral archetypical serotonin receptor. In this study, we cloned and characterized the 3D structure of the sea lamprey 5-HT1A, and studied the expression of its transcript in the central nervous system by means of in situ hybridization. In phylogenetic analyses, the sea lamprey 5-HT1A sequence clustered together with 5-HT1A sequences of vertebrates and emerged as an outgroup to all gnathostome sequences. In situ hybridization analysis during prolarval, larval and adult stages showed a widespread expression of the lamprey 5-ht1a transcript. In P1 prolarvae 5-ht1a mRNA expression was observed in diencephalic nuclei, the rhombencephalon and rostral spinal cord. At P2 prolarval stage the 5-ht1a expression extended to other brain areas including telencephalic regions. 5-ht1a expression in larvae was observed throughout almost all the main brain regions with the strongest expression in the olfactory bulbs, lateral pallium, striatum, preoptic region, habenula, prethalamus, thalamus, pretectum, hypothalamus, rhombencephalic reticular area, dorsal column nucleus and rostral spinal cord. In adults, the 5-ht1a transcript was also observed in cells of the subcommissural organ. Comparison of the expression of 5-ht1a between the sea lamprey and other vertebrates reveals a conserved pattern in most of the brain regions, likely reflecting the ancestral vertebrate condition. PMID:23052550

  16. Cannabidiol attenuates catalepsy induced by distinct pharmacological mechanisms via 5-HT1A receptor activation in mice.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Felipe V; Del Bel, Elaine A; Guimarães, Francisco S

    2013-10-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is a non-psychotomimetic compound from Cannabis sativa plant that produces antipsychotic effects in rodents and humans. It also reverses L-dopa-induced psychotic symptoms and improves motor function in Parkinson's patients. This latter effect raised the possibility that CBD could have beneficial effects on motor related striatal disorders. To investigate this possibility we evaluated if CBD would prevent catalepsy induced by drugs with distinct pharmacological mechanisms. The catalepsy test is largely used to investigate impairments of motor function caused by interference on striatal function. Male Swiss mice received acute pretreatment with CBD (5, 15, 30 or 60mg/kg, ip) 30min prior to the D2 receptor antagonist haloperidol (0.6mg/kg), the non-selective nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor L-nitro-N-arginine (L-NOARG, 80mg/kg) or the CB1 receptor agonist WIN55,212-2 (5mg/kg). The mice were tested 1, 2 or 4h after haloperidol, L-NOARG or WIN55,212-2 injection. These drugs significantly increased catalepsy time and this effect was attenuated dose-dependently by CBD. CBD, by itself, did not induce catalepsy. In a second set of experiments the mechanism of CBD effects was investigated. Thirty minutes before CBD (30mg/kg) the animals received the 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY100635 (0.1mg/kg). The anticataleptic effect of CBD was prevented by WAY100635. These findings indicate that CBD can attenuate catalepsy caused by different mechanisms (D2 blockade, NOS inhibition and CB1 agonism) via 5-HT1A receptor activation, suggesting that it could be useful in the treatment of striatal disorders.

  17. CREB-mediated synaptogenesis and neurogenesis is crucial for the role of 5-HT1a receptors in modulating anxiety behaviors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Cai, Cheng-Yun; Wu, Hai-Yin; Zhu, Li-Juan; Luo, Chun-Xia; Zhu, Dong-Ya

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin 1a-receptor (5-HT1aR) has been specifically implicated in the pathogenesis of anxiety. However, the mechanism underlying the role of 5-HT1aR in anxiety remains poorly understood. Here we show in mice that the transcription factor cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) in the hippocampus functions as an effector of 5-HT1aR in modulating anxiety-related behaviors. We generated recombinant lentivirus LV-CREB133-GFP expressing a dominant negative CREB which could not be phosphorylated at Ser133 to specifically reduce CREB activity, and LV-VP16-CREB-GFP expressing a constitutively active fusion protein VP16-CREB which could be phosphorylated by itself to specifically enhance CREB activity. LV-CREB133-GFP neutralized 5-HT1aR agonist-induced up-regulation of synapse density, spine density, dendrite complexity, neurogenesis, and the expression of synapsin and spinophilin, two well-characterized synaptic proteins, and abolished the anxiolytic effect of 5-HT1aR agonist; whereas LV-VP16-CREB-GFP rescued the 5-HT1aR antagonist-induced down-regulation of synapse density, spine density, dendrite complexity, neurogenesis and synapsin and spinophilin expression, and reversed the anxiogenic effect of 5-HT1aR antagonist. The deletion of neurogenesis by irradiation or the diminution of synaptogenesis by knockdown of synapsin expression abolished the anxiolytic effects of both CREB and 5-HT1aR activation. These findings suggest that CREB-mediated hippoacampus structural plasticity is crucial for the role of 5-HT1aR in modulating anxiety-related behaviors. PMID:27404655

  18. CREB-mediated synaptogenesis and neurogenesis is crucial for the role of 5-HT1a receptors in modulating anxiety behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Cai, Cheng-Yun; Wu, Hai-Yin; Zhu, Li-Juan; Luo, Chun-Xia; Zhu, Dong-Ya

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin 1a-receptor (5-HT1aR) has been specifically implicated in the pathogenesis of anxiety. However, the mechanism underlying the role of 5-HT1aR in anxiety remains poorly understood. Here we show in mice that the transcription factor cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) in the hippocampus functions as an effector of 5-HT1aR in modulating anxiety-related behaviors. We generated recombinant lentivirus LV-CREB133-GFP expressing a dominant negative CREB which could not be phosphorylated at Ser133 to specifically reduce CREB activity, and LV-VP16-CREB-GFP expressing a constitutively active fusion protein VP16-CREB which could be phosphorylated by itself to specifically enhance CREB activity. LV-CREB133-GFP neutralized 5-HT1aR agonist-induced up-regulation of synapse density, spine density, dendrite complexity, neurogenesis, and the expression of synapsin and spinophilin, two well-characterized synaptic proteins, and abolished the anxiolytic effect of 5-HT1aR agonist; whereas LV-VP16-CREB-GFP rescued the 5-HT1aR antagonist-induced down-regulation of synapse density, spine density, dendrite complexity, neurogenesis and synapsin and spinophilin expression, and reversed the anxiogenic effect of 5-HT1aR antagonist. The deletion of neurogenesis by irradiation or the diminution of synaptogenesis by knockdown of synapsin expression abolished the anxiolytic effects of both CREB and 5-HT1aR activation. These findings suggest that CREB-mediated hippoacampus structural plasticity is crucial for the role of 5-HT1aR in modulating anxiety-related behaviors. PMID:27404655

  19. Divergent effects of the ‘biased’ 5-HT1A receptor agonists F15599 and F13714 in a novel object pattern separation task

    PubMed Central

    van Goethem, N P; Schreiber, R; Newman-Tancredi, A; Varney, M; Prickaerts, J

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Pattern separation, that is, the formation of distinct representations from similar inputs, is an important hippocampal process implicated in cognitive domains like episodic memory. A deficit in pattern separation could lead to memory impairments in several psychiatric and neurological disorders. Hence, mechanisms by which pattern separation can be increased are of potential therapeutic interest. Experimental approach 5-HT1A receptors are involved in spatial memory. Herein we tested the ‘biased’ 5-HT1A receptor agonists F15599, which preferentially activates post-synaptic heteroreceptors, and F13714, which preferentially activates raphe-located autoreceptors, in rats in a novel spatial task assessing pattern separation, the object pattern separation (OPS) task. Key Results The acetylcholinesterase inhibitor donepezil, which served as a positive control, significantly improved spatial pattern separation at a dose of 1 mg·kg−1, p.o. F15599 increased pattern separation at 0.04 mg·kg−1, i.p., while F13714 decreased pattern separation at 0.0025 mg·kg−1, i.p. The selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY-100635 (0.63 mg·kg−1, s.c.) counteracted the effects of both agonists. These data suggest that acute preferential activation of post-synaptic 5-HT1A heteroreceptors improves spatial pattern separation, whereas acute preferential activation of raphe-located 5-HT1A autoreceptors impairs performance. Conclusions and Implications We successfully established and validated a novel, simple and robust OPS task and observed a diverging profile of response with ‘biased’ 5-HT1A receptor agonists based on their targeting of receptors in distinct brain regions. Our data suggest that the post-synaptic 5-HT1A receptor consists of a potential novel molecular target to improve pattern separation performance. PMID:25572672

  20. Differential effects of amyloid-beta 1-40 and 1-42 fibrils on 5-HT1A serotonin receptors in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Verdurand, Mathieu; Chauveau, Fabien; Daoust, Alexia; Morel, Anne-Laure; Bonnefoi, Frédéric; Liger, François; Bérod, Anne; Zimmer, Luc

    2016-04-01

    Evidence accumulates suggesting a complex interplay between neurodegenerative processes and serotonergic neurotransmission. We have previously reported an overexpression of serotonin 5-HT1A receptors (5-HT(1A)R) after intrahippocampal injections of amyloid-beta 1-40 (Aβ40) fibrils in rats. This serotonergic reactivity paralleled results from clinical positron emission tomography studies with [(18)F]MPPF revealing an overexpression of 5-HT(1A)R in the hippocampus of patients with mild cognitive impairment. Because Aβ40 and Aβ42 isoforms are found in amyloid plaques, we tested in this study the hypothesis of a peptide- and region-specific 5-HT(1A)R reactivity by injecting them, separately, into the hippocampus or striatum of rats. [(18)F]MPPF in vitro autoradiography revealed that Aβ40 fibrils, but not Aβ42, were triggering an overexpression of 5-HT(1A)R in the hippocampus and striatum of rat brains after 7 days. Immunohistochemical approaches targeting neuronal precursor cells, mature neurons, and astrocytes showed that Aβ42 fibrils caused more pathophysiological damages than Aβ40 fibrils. The mechanisms of Aβ40 fibrils-induced 5-HT(1A)R expression remains unknown, but hypotheses including neurogenesis, glial expression, and axonal sprouting are discussed. PMID:26973100

  1. Interaction between 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(1B) receptors: effects of 8-OH-DPAT-induced hypothermia in 5-HT(1B) receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Gardier, A M; Gruwez, B; Trillat, A C; Jacquot, C; Hen, R; Bourin, M

    2001-06-15

    To test for adaptive compensatory changes that may have occurred in the functional activity of somatodendritic 5-HT(1A) receptors during the development of constitutive "knockout" mice lacking the 5-HT(1B) receptor subtype (5-HT(1B) -/- KO), we assayed for decrease in body temperature induced by an acute subcutaneous injection of the 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist, 8-hydroxy 2(di-n-propyl(amino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT), either alone or in the presence of a selective 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist, N-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]-N-(2-pyridinyl) cyclo-hexanecarboxamide (WAY 100635). We compared dose-response curves, time course study, calculated ED(50) values (potency), maximal response to 8-OH-DPAT (efficacy) as well as measurements of the dose-dependent blockade of this response by WAY 100635 between wild-type controls and mutant mice. We found a higher efficacy of 8-OH-DPAT-induced hypothermia in 5-HT(1B) -/- KO compared to wild-type mice suggesting that an adaptive thermoregulatory process involving the functional activity of somatodendritic 5-HT(1A) receptors is altered in mutant mice lacking 5-HT(1B) receptors.

  2. Evaluation of Serotonin 5-HT1A Receptors in Rodent Models using [18F]Mefway PET¶

    PubMed Central

    Saigal, Neil; Bajwa, Alisha K.; Faheem, Sara S.; Coleman, Robert A.; Pandey, Suresh K.; Constantinescu, Cristian C.; Fong, Vanessa; Mukherjee, Jogeshwar

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Serotonin 5-HT1A receptors have been investigated in various CNS disorders, including epilepsy, mood disorders and neurodegeneration. [18F]Mefway (N-{2-[4-(2'-methoxyphenyl)piperazinyl]ethyl}-N-(2-pyridyl)-N-(cis/trans-4'-[18F]fluoromethylcyclohexane)-carboxamide) has been developed as a suitable positron emission tomography (PET) imaging agent for these receptors. We have now evaluated the suitability of [18F]trans-mefway in rat and mouse models using PET and computerized tomography (CT) imaging and corroborated with ex vivo and in vitro autoradiographic studies. Methods Normal Sprague-Dawley rats and Balb/C mice were used for PET/CT imaging using intravenously injected [18F]trans-mefway. Brain PET data were coregistered with rat and mouse magnetic resonance (MR) imaging template and regional distribution of radioactivity was quantitated. Select animals were used for ex vivo autoradiographic studies in order to confirm regional brain distribution and quantitative measures of binding, using brain region to cerebellum ratios. Binding affinity of trans-mefway and WAY-100635 was measured in rat brain homogenates. Distribution of [18F]trans-4-fluoromethylcyclohexane carboxylate ([18F]FMCHA), a major metabolite of [18F] trans-mefway, was assessed in the rat by PET/CT. Results The inhibition constant, Ki for trans-mefway was 0.84 nM and that for WAY-100635 was 1.07 nM. Rapid brain uptake of [18F]trans-mefway was observed in all rat brain regions and clearance from cerebellum was fast and was used as a reference region in all studies. Distribution of [18F]trans-mefway in various brain regions was consistent in PET and in vitro studies. The dorsal raphe was visualized and quantified in the rat PET but identification in the mouse was difficult. The rank order of binding to the various brain regions was hippocampus>frontal cortex>anterior cingulate cortex>lateral septal nuclei>dorsal raphe nuclei. Conclusion [18F]trans-Mefway appears to be an effective 5-HT1A

  3. Potentiating effect of spinosin, a C-glycoside flavonoid of Semen Ziziphi spinosae, on pentobarbital-induced sleep may be related to postsynaptic 5-HT(1A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Wang, L-E; Cui, X-Y; Cui, S-Y; Cao, J-X; Zhang, J; Zhang, Y-H; Zhang, Q-Y; Bai, Y-J; Zhao, Y-Y

    2010-05-01

    Previous results have suggested that spinosin, a C-glycoside flavonoid of Semen Ziziphi spinosae, potentiates pentobarbital-induced sleep via the serotonergic system. The present study investigated whether spinosin potentiates pentobarbital-induced sleep via serotonin-1A (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT(1A)) receptors. The results demonstrated that spinosin significantly augmented pentobarbital (35 mg/kg, i.p.)-induced sleep in rats, reflected by reduced sleep latency and increased total sleep time, non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep time, and REM sleep time. With regard to NREM sleep duration, spinosin mainly increased slow-wave sleep (SWS). Additionally, spinosin (15mg/kg, i.g.) significantly antagonized 5-HT(1A) agonist 8-OH-DPAT (0.1mg/kg, i.p.)-induced reductions in total sleep time, NREM sleep, REM sleep, and SWS in pentobarbital-treated rats. These results suggest that spinosin may be an antagonist at postsynaptic 5-HT(1A) receptors because these effects of 8-OH-DPAT were considered to be mediated via postsynaptic 5-HT(1A) receptors. Moreover, co-administration of spinosin and the 5-HT(1A) antagonist 4-iodo-N-{2-[4-(methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]ethyl}-N-2-pyridinylbenzamide (p-MPPI), at doses that are ineffective when administered alone (spinosin 5mg/kg, p-MPPI 1mg/kg), had significant augmentative effects on pentobarbital-induced sleep, reflected by reduced sleep latency and increased total sleep time, NREM sleep, and REM sleep. In contrast to the attenuating effects of p-MPPI on REM sleep via presynaptic 5-HT(1A) autoreceptors, 15mg/kg spinosin significantly increased REM sleep. These results suggest that the effect of spinosin on REM sleep in pentobarbital-treated rats may be related to postsynaptic 5-HT(1A) receptors. PMID:20171860

  4. Selective reduction by isolation rearing of 5-HT1A receptor-mediated dopamine release in vivo in the frontal cortex of mice.

    PubMed

    Ago, Y; Sakaue, M; Baba, A; Matsuda, T

    2002-10-01

    Serotonin (5-HT)1A receptors modulate in vivo release of brain monoaminergic neurotransmitters which may be involved in isolation-induced aggressive behavior. The present study examined the effect of isolation rearing on the 5-HT1A receptor-mediated modulation of dopamine (DA), 5-HT and noradrenaline (NA) release in the frontal cortex of mice. The selective 5-HT1A receptor agonist (S)-5-[-[(1,4-benzodioxan-2-ylmethyl)amino]propoxy]-1,3-benzodioxole HCl (MKC-242) increased the release of DA and NA and decreased the release of 5-HT in the frontal cortex of mice. The effect of MKC-242 on DA release was significantly less in isolation-reared mice than in group-reared mice, while effects of the drug on NA and 5-HT release did not differ between both groups. The effect of the other 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin on cortical DA release was also less in isolation-reared mice than in group-reared mice, and that of the drug on cortical 5-HT release did not differ between both groups. In contrast to MKC-242-induced DA release, amphetamine-induced increase in cortical DA release in vivo was greater in isolation-reared mice. The present findings suggest that isolation rearing enhances the activity of cortical dopaminergic neurons and reduces selectively the 5-HT1A receptor-mediated release of DA in the cortex.

  5. Cartography of 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A Receptor Subtypes in Prefrontal Cortex and Its Projections.

    PubMed

    Mengod, Guadalupe; Palacios, José M; Cortés, Roser

    2015-07-15

    Since the development of chemical neuroanatomical tools in the 1960s, a tremendous wealth of information has been generated on the anatomical components of the serotonergic system, at the microscopic level in the brain including the prefrontal cortex (PFC). The PFC receives a widespread distribution of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) terminals from the median and dorsal raphe nuclei. 5-HT receptors were first visualized using radioligand autoradiography in the late 1980s and early 1990s and showed, in contrast to 5-HT innervation, a differential distribution of binding sites associated with different 5-HT receptor subtypes. Due to the cloning of the different 5-HT receptor subtype genes in the late 1980s and early 1990s, it was possible, using in situ hybridization histochemistry, to localize cells expressing mRNA for these receptors. Double in situ hybridization histochemistry and immunohistochemistry allowed for the chemical characterization of the phenotype of cells expressing 5-HT receptors. Tract tracing technology allowed a detailed cartography of the neuronal connections of PFC and other brain areas. Based on these data, maps have been constructed that reflect our current understanding of the different circuits where 5-HT receptors can modulate the electrophysiological, pharmacological, and behavioral functions of the PFC. We will review current knowledge regarding the cellular localization of 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors in mammalian PFC and their possible functions in the neuronal circuits of the PFC. We will discuss data generated in our laboratory as well as in others, focusing on localization in the pyramidal and GABAergic neuronal cell populations in different mammalian species using molecular neuroanatomy and on the connections with other brain regions. PMID:25739427

  6. Cartography of 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A Receptor Subtypes in Prefrontal Cortex and Its Projections.

    PubMed

    Mengod, Guadalupe; Palacios, José M; Cortés, Roser

    2015-07-15

    Since the development of chemical neuroanatomical tools in the 1960s, a tremendous wealth of information has been generated on the anatomical components of the serotonergic system, at the microscopic level in the brain including the prefrontal cortex (PFC). The PFC receives a widespread distribution of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) terminals from the median and dorsal raphe nuclei. 5-HT receptors were first visualized using radioligand autoradiography in the late 1980s and early 1990s and showed, in contrast to 5-HT innervation, a differential distribution of binding sites associated with different 5-HT receptor subtypes. Due to the cloning of the different 5-HT receptor subtype genes in the late 1980s and early 1990s, it was possible, using in situ hybridization histochemistry, to localize cells expressing mRNA for these receptors. Double in situ hybridization histochemistry and immunohistochemistry allowed for the chemical characterization of the phenotype of cells expressing 5-HT receptors. Tract tracing technology allowed a detailed cartography of the neuronal connections of PFC and other brain areas. Based on these data, maps have been constructed that reflect our current understanding of the different circuits where 5-HT receptors can modulate the electrophysiological, pharmacological, and behavioral functions of the PFC. We will review current knowledge regarding the cellular localization of 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors in mammalian PFC and their possible functions in the neuronal circuits of the PFC. We will discuss data generated in our laboratory as well as in others, focusing on localization in the pyramidal and GABAergic neuronal cell populations in different mammalian species using molecular neuroanatomy and on the connections with other brain regions.

  7. Effects of intra-prelimbic prefrontal cortex injection of cannabidiol on anxiety-like behavior: involvement of 5HT1A receptors and previous stressful experience.

    PubMed

    Fogaça, M V; Reis, F M C V; Campos, A C; Guimarães, F S

    2014-03-01

    The prelimbic medial prefrontal cortex (PL) is an important encephalic structure involved in the expression of emotional states. In a previous study, intra-PL injection of cannabidiol (CBD), a major non-psychotomimetic cannabinoid present in the Cannabis sativa plant, reduced the expression of fear conditioning response. Although its mechanism remains unclear, CBD can facilitate 5HT1A receptor-mediated neurotransmission when injected into several brain structures. This study was aimed at verifying if intra-PL CBD could also induce anxiolytic-like effect in a conceptually distinct animal model, the elevated plus maze (EPM). We also verified if CBD effects in the EPM and contextual fear conditioning test (CFC) depend on 5HT1A receptors and previous stressful experience. CBD induced opposite effects in the CFC and EPM, being anxiolytic and anxiogenic, respectively. Both responses were prevented by WAY100,635, a 5HT1A receptor antagonist. In animals that had been previously (24h) submitted to a stressful event (2h-restraint) CBD caused an anxiolytic, rather than anxiogenic, effect in the EPM. This anxiolytic response was abolished by previous injection of metyrapone, a glucocorticoid synthesis blocker. Moreover, restraint stress increased 5HT1A receptors expression in the dorsal raphe nucleus, an effect that was attenuated by injection of metyrapone before the restraint procedure. Taken together, these results suggest that CBD modulation of anxiety in the PL depend on 5HT1A-mediated neurotransmission and previous stressful experience.

  8. Alterations of 5-HT1A receptor-induced G-protein functional activation and relationship to memory deficits in patients with pharmacoresistant temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Cuellar-Herrera, Manola; Velasco, Ana Luisa; Velasco, Francisco; Trejo, David; Alonso-Vanegas, Mario; Nuche-Bricaire, Avril; Vázquez-Barrón, Daruni; Guevara-Guzmán, Rosalinda; Rocha, Luisa

    2014-12-01

    The 5-hydroxytryptamine-1A (5-HT1A) receptors are known to be involved in the inhibition of seizures in epilepsy. Moreover, studies propose a role for the 5-HT1A receptor in memory function; it is believed that the higher density of this receptor in the hippocampus plays an important role in its regulation. Positron emission tomography (PET) studies in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) have demonstrated that a decrease in 5-HT1A receptor binding in temporal regions may play a role in memory impairment. The evidences lead us to speculate whether this decrease in receptor binding is associated with a reduced receptor number or if the functionality of the 5-HT1A receptor-induced G-protein activation and/or the second messenger cascade is modified. The purpose of the present study is to determine 5-HT1A receptor-induced G-protein functional activation by 8-OH-DPAT-stimulated [(35)S]GTPγS binding assay in hippocampal tissue of surgical patients with mTLE. We correlate functional activity with epilepsy history and neuropsychological assessment of memory. We found that maximum functional activation stimulation values (Emax) of [(35)S]GTPγS binding were significantly increased in mTLE group when compared to autopsy samples. Furthermore, significant correlations were found: (1) positive coefficients between the Emax with the age of patient and frequency of seizures; (2) negative coefficients between the Emax and working memory, immediate recall and delayed recall memory tasks. Our data suggest that the epileptic hippocampus of patients with mTLE presents an increase in 5-HT1A receptor-induced G-protein functional activation, and that this altered activity is related to age and seizure frequency, as well as to memory consolidation deficit.

  9. Alterations of 5-HT1A receptor-induced G-protein functional activation and relationship to memory deficits in patients with pharmacoresistant temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Cuellar-Herrera, Manola; Velasco, Ana Luisa; Velasco, Francisco; Trejo, David; Alonso-Vanegas, Mario; Nuche-Bricaire, Avril; Vázquez-Barrón, Daruni; Guevara-Guzmán, Rosalinda; Rocha, Luisa

    2014-12-01

    The 5-hydroxytryptamine-1A (5-HT1A) receptors are known to be involved in the inhibition of seizures in epilepsy. Moreover, studies propose a role for the 5-HT1A receptor in memory function; it is believed that the higher density of this receptor in the hippocampus plays an important role in its regulation. Positron emission tomography (PET) studies in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) have demonstrated that a decrease in 5-HT1A receptor binding in temporal regions may play a role in memory impairment. The evidences lead us to speculate whether this decrease in receptor binding is associated with a reduced receptor number or if the functionality of the 5-HT1A receptor-induced G-protein activation and/or the second messenger cascade is modified. The purpose of the present study is to determine 5-HT1A receptor-induced G-protein functional activation by 8-OH-DPAT-stimulated [(35)S]GTPγS binding assay in hippocampal tissue of surgical patients with mTLE. We correlate functional activity with epilepsy history and neuropsychological assessment of memory. We found that maximum functional activation stimulation values (Emax) of [(35)S]GTPγS binding were significantly increased in mTLE group when compared to autopsy samples. Furthermore, significant correlations were found: (1) positive coefficients between the Emax with the age of patient and frequency of seizures; (2) negative coefficients between the Emax and working memory, immediate recall and delayed recall memory tasks. Our data suggest that the epileptic hippocampus of patients with mTLE presents an increase in 5-HT1A receptor-induced G-protein functional activation, and that this altered activity is related to age and seizure frequency, as well as to memory consolidation deficit. PMID:25304920

  10. Comparative assessment of (18) F-Mefway as a serotonin 5-HT1A receptor PET imaging agent across species: Rodents, nonhuman primates, and humans.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Jogeshwar; Bajwa, Alisha K; Wooten, Dustin W; Hillmer, Ansel T; Pan, Min-Liang; Pandey, Suresh K; Saigal, Neil; Christian, Bradley T

    2016-05-01

    We have developed (18) F-trans-Mefway ((18) F-Mefway) for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging studies of serotonin 5-HT1A receptors which are implicated in various brain functions. Translation of imaging the 5-HT1A receptor in animal models to humans will facilitate an understanding of the role of the receptor in human brain disorders. We report comparative brain distribution of (18) F-Mefway in normal mice, rats, monkeys, and healthy human volunteers. Mefway was found to be very selective, with subnanomolar affinity for the 5-HT1A receptor. Affinities of >55 nM were found for all other human-cloned receptor subtypes tested. Mefway was found to be a poor substrate (>30 μM) for the multidrug resistance 1 protein, suggesting low likelihood of brain uptake being affected by P-glycoprotein. Cerebellum was used as a reference region in all imaging studies across all species due to the low levels of (18) F-Mefway binding. Consistent binding of (18) F-Mefway in cortical regions, hippocampus, and raphe was observed across all species. (18) F-Mefway in the human brain regions correlated with the known postmortem distribution of 5-HT1A receptors. Quantitation of raphe was affected by the resolution of the PET scanners in rodents, whereas monkeys and humans showed a raphe to cerebellum ratio of approximately 3. (18) F-Mefway appears to be an effective 5-HT1A receptor imaging agent in all models, including humans. (18) F-Mefway therefore may be used to quantify 5-HT1A receptor distribution in brain regions for the study of various CNS disorders. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:1457-1471, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Oestradiol alters central 5HT1A receptor binding potential differences related to psychosocial stress but not differences related to 5HTTLPR genotype in female rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Michopoulos, Vasiliki; Diaz, Maylen Perez; Embree, Molly; Reding, Kathy; Votaw, John R.; Mun, Jiyoung; Voll, Ronald J.; Goodman, Mark M.; Wilson, Mark; Sanchez, Mar; Toufexis, Donna

    2014-01-01

    Social subordination in female macaques represents a well-described model of chronic psychosocial stress. Additionally, a length polymorphism (5HTTLPR) in the regulatory region of the serotonin (5HT) transporter (5HTT) gene (SLC6A4) is present in rhesus macaques, which has been linked to adverse outcomes similar to what has been described in humans with an analogous 5HTTLPR polymorphism. The present study determined the effects of social status and the 5HTTLPR genotype on 5HT1A receptor binding potential (5HT1A BPND) in brain regions implicated in emotional regulation and stress reactivity in ovariectomised female monkeys, and then assessed how these effects were altered by 17β-oestradiol (E2) treatment. Areas analyzed included the prefrontal cortex [anterior cingulate (ACC); medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC); dorsolateral prefrontal cortex; orbitofrontal prefrontal cortex], amygdala, hippocampus, hypothalamus and raphe nucleui. Positron emission tomography (PET) using p-[18F]MPPF was performed to determine the levels of 5HT1A BPND under a non-E2 and a 3-wk E2 treatment condition. The short variant (s-variant) 5HTTLPR genotype produced a significant reduction in 5HT1A BPND in the mPFC regardless of social status, and subordinate s-variant females showed a reduction in 5HT1A BPND within the ACC. Both these effects of 5HTTLPR were unaffected by E2. Additionally, E2 reduced 5HT1A BPND in the dorsal raphe of all females irrespective of psychosocial stress or 5HTTLPR genotype. Hippocampal 5HT1A BPND was attenuated in subordinate females regardless of 5HTTLPR genotype during the non-E2 condition, an effect that was normalised with E2. Similarly, 5HT1A BPND in the hypothalamus was significantly lower in subordinate females regardless of 5HTTLPR genotype, an effect reversed with E2. Together, the data indicate that the effect of E2 on modulation of central 5HT1A BPND may only occur in brain regions that show no 5HTTLPR genotype-linked control of 5HT1A binding. PMID:24382202

  12. TREK1 channel blockade induces an antidepressant-like response synergizing with 5-HT1A receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Ye, Dongqing; Li, Yang; Zhang, Xiangrong; Guo, Fei; Geng, Leiyu; Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Zhijun

    2015-12-01

    Current antidepressants often remain the inadequate efficacy for many depressive patients, which warrant the necessary endeavor to develop the new molecules and targets for treating depression. Recently, the two-pore domain potassium channel TREK1 has been implicated in mood regulation and TREK-1 antagonists could be the promising antidepressant. This study has screened a TREK1 blocker (SID1900) with a satisfactory blood-brain barrier permeation and bioavailability. Electrophysiological research has shown that SID1900 and the previously reported TREK1 blocker (spadin) efficiently blocked TREK-1 current in HEK293 cells and specifically blocked two-pore domain potassium channels in primary-cultured rat hippocampal neurons. SID1900 and spadin induced a significant antidepressant-like response in the rat model of chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS). Both two TREK1 blockers substantially increased the firing rate of 5-HT-ergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nuclei (DRN) and PFC of CUMS rats. SID1900 and spadin significantly up-regulated the expression of PKA-pCREB-BDNF signaling in DRN, hippocampus and PFC of CUMS rats, which were enhanced and reversed by a 5-HTR1A agonist (8-OH-DPAT) and antagonist (WAY100635) respectively. The present findings suggested that TREK1 channel blockers posses the substantial antidepressant-like effect and have the potential synergistic effect with 5-HT1A receptor activation through the common CREB-BDNF signal transduction. PMID:26441141

  13. Effect of early rearing conditions on alcohol drinking and 5-HT1A receptor function in C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Advani, Tushar; Hensler, Julie G; Koek, Wouter

    2007-10-01

    We have evaluated in C57BL/6J mice the effect of maternal separation and post-weaning social isolation on ethanol intake, and on serotonin1A (5-HT1A) receptor function at the level of receptor-G protein interaction in the hippocampus and dorsal raphe nucleus. From postnatal days 2-14, litters were separated from the mother for 15 min (Handled) or for 180 min (Maternal separation). After weaning, pups were housed in pairs or in social isolation. At 2 months of age, ethanol intake and preference in mice were assessed using the two-bottle choice paradigm. Maternal separation increased ethanol preference in female mice that were subsequently housed in isolation. By contrast, post-weaning isolation increased ethanol preference and consumption in male mice regardless of pre-weaning rearing conditions. The increased ethanol preference and intake were limited to a 5% (v/v) concentration of ethanol. Our data suggest that adolescent mice are susceptible to the effects of post-weaning social isolation as shown by increased ethanol preference and consumption. Using quantitative autoradiography, 5-HT1A receptor number and function were determined by the binding of [3H]WAY-100635, and by [35S]GTPgammaS binding stimulated by the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT, respectively. The binding experiments were done at approximately 3 months after the end of the two-bottle choice test in an attempt to minimize direct effects of ethanol drinking on 5-HT1A receptor function and number. 5-HT1A receptor-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding in the dorsal raphe nucleus was increased in animals reared after weaning in isolation vs. in pairs, regardless of gender or pre-weaning rearing conditions. Our data suggest that there are long-term neurochemical consequences of social isolation of adolescent mice, specifically increased 5-HT1A receptor function in the dorsal raphe nucleus.

  14. Chronic mild stress and antidepressant treatment alter 5-HT1A receptor expression by modifying DNA methylation of a conserved Sp4 site.

    PubMed

    Le François, Brice; Soo, Jeremy; Millar, Anne M; Daigle, Mireille; Le Guisquet, Anne-Marie; Leman, Samuel; Minier, Frédéric; Belzung, Catherine; Albert, Paul R

    2015-10-01

    The serotonin 1A receptor (5-HT1A), a critical regulator of the brain serotonergic tone, is implicated in major depressive disorder (MDD) where it is often found to be dys-regulated. However, the extent to which stress and antidepressant treatment impact 5-HT1A expression in adults remains unclear. To address this issue, we subjected adult male BALB/c mice to unpredictable chronic mild stress (UCMS) to induce a depression-like phenotype that was reversed by chronic treatment with the antidepressant imipramine. In prefrontal cortex (PFC) and midbrain tissue, UCMS increased 5-HT1A RNA and protein levels, changes that are expected to decrease the brain serotonergic activity. The stress-induced increase in 5-HT1A expression was paralleled by a specific increase in DNA methylation of the conserved -681 CpG promoter site, located within a Sp1-like element. We show that the -681 CpG site is recognized and repressed by Sp4, the predominant neuronal Sp1-like factor and that Sp4-induced repression is attenuated by DNA methylation, despite a stress-induced increase in PFC Sp4 levels. These results indicate that adult life stress induces DNA methylation of a conserved promoter site, antagonizing Sp4 repression to increase 5-HT1A expression. Chronic imipramine treatment fully reversed the UCMS-induced increase in methylation of the -681 CpG site in the PFC but not midbrain of stressed animals and also increased 5-HT1A expression in the PFC of control animals. Incomplete reversal by imipramine of stress-induced changes in 5-HT1A methylation and expression indicates a persistence of stress vulnerability, and that sustained reversal of behavioral impairments may require additional pathways.

  15. A role for 5-HT1A receptors in the basolateral amygdala in the development of conditioned defeat in Syrian hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Kathleen E.; Cooper, Matthew A.

    2011-01-01

    The basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA) is a key brain region regulating behavioral changes following stressful events, including social defeat. Previous research has shown that activation of serotonin (5-HT) 1A receptors in the BLA reduces conditioned fear and anxiety-like behavior. The objective of this study was to test whether 5-HT1A receptors in the BLA contribute to conditioned defeat in male Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus). We tested whether injection of the selective 5-HT1A receptor agonist flesinoxan (400 ng, 800 ng, or 1200 ng in 200 nl saline) into the BLA prior to social defeat would reduce the acquisition of conditioned defeat, and whether a similar injection prior to testing would reduce the expression of conditioned defeat. We also tested whether injection of the selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY-100635 (400 ng or 1600 ng in 200 nl saline) into the BLA prior to social defeat would enhance the acquisition of conditioned defeat, and whether a similar injection prior to testing would enhance the expression of conditioned defeat. We found that injection of flesinoxan into the BLA decreased both the acquisition and expression of conditioned defeat. However, injection of WAY-100635 into the BLA did not alter the acquisition or expression of conditioned defeat. These data indicate that pharmacological activation of 5-HT1A receptors in the BLA is sufficient to impair the acquisition and expression of conditioned defeat. Our results suggest that pharmacological treatments that activate 5-HT1A receptors in the BLA are capable of reducing the development of stress-induced changes in behavior. PMID:21967885

  16. The Antidepressant-Like Effect of Fish Oil: Possible Role of Ventral Hippocampal 5-HT1A Post-synaptic Receptor.

    PubMed

    Carabelli, Bruno; Delattre, Ana Marcia; Pudell, Claudia; Mori, Marco Aurélio; Suchecki, Deborah; Machado, Ricardo B; Venancio, Daniel Paulino; Piazzetta, Sílvia Regina; Hammerschmidt, Ivilim; Zanata, Sílvio M; Lima, Marcelo M S; Zanoveli, Janaína Menezes; Ferraz, Anete Curte

    2015-08-01

    The pathophysiology of depression is not completely understood; nonetheless, numerous studies point to serotonergic dysfunction as a possible cause. Supplementation with fish oil rich docosahexaenoic (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acids (EPA) during critical periods of development produces antidepressant effects by increasing serotonergic neurotransmission, particularly in the hippocampus. In a previous study, the involvement of 5-HT1A receptors was demonstrated and we hypothesized that fish oil supplementation (from conception to weaning) alters the function of post-synaptic hippocampal 5-HT1A receptors. To test this hypothesis, female rats were supplemented with fish oil during habituation, mating, gestation, and lactation. The adult male offspring was maintained without supplementation until 3 months of age, when they were subjected to the modified forced swimming test (MFST) after infusion of vehicle or the selective 5-HT1A antagonist, WAY100635, and frequency of swimming, immobility, and climbing was recorded for 5 min. After the behavioral test, the hippocampi were obtained for quantification of serotonin (5-HT) and its metabolite, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) and for 5-HT1A receptor expression by Western blotting analysis. Fish oil-supplemented offspring displayed less depressive-like behaviors in the MFST reflected by decreased immobility and increased swimming and higher 5-HT hippocampal levels. Although there was no difference in the expression of hippocampal 5-HT1A receptors, intra-hippocampal infusion of a sub-effective dose of 8-OH-DPAT enhanced the antidepressant effect of fish oil in supplemented animals. In summary, the present findings suggest that the antidepressant-like effects of fish oil supplementation are likely related to increased hippocampal serotonergic neurotransmission and sensitization of hippocampal 5-HT1A receptors.

  17. Antipsychotics differ in their ability to internalise human dopamine D2S and human serotonin 5-HT1A receptors in HEK293 cells.

    PubMed

    Heusler, Peter; Newman-Tancredi, Adrian; Loock, Timothé; Cussac, Didier

    2008-02-26

    Antipsychotic drugs act preferentially via dopamine D(2) receptor blockade, but interaction with serotonin 5-HT(1A) receptors has attracted interest as additional target for antipsychotic treatment. As receptor internalisation is considered crucial for drug action, we tested the propensity of antipsychotics to internalise human (h)D(2S) receptors and h5-HT(1A) receptors. Agonist-induced internalisation of hemaglutinin (HA)-tagged hD(2S) and HA-h5-HT(1A) receptors expressed in HEK293 cells was increased by coexpression of G-protein coupled receptor kinase 2 and beta-arrestin2. At the HA-hD(2S) receptor, dopamine, quinpirole and bromocriptine behaved as full agonists, while S(-)-3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-N-n-propylpiperidine [(-)-3PPP] and sarizotan were partial agonists. The typical antipsychotic, haloperidol, and the atypical compounds, olanzapine, nemonapride, ziprasidone and clozapine did not internalise HA-hD(2S) receptors, whereas aripiprazole potently internalised these receptors (>50% relative efficacy). Among antipsychotics with combined D(2)/5-HT(1A) properties, bifeprunox and (3-exo)-8-benzoyl-N-[[(2S)7-chloro-2,3-dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-1-yl]methyl]-8-azabicyclo-[3.2.1]octane-3-methanamine (SSR181507) partially internalised HA-hD(2S) receptors, piperazine, 1-(2,3-dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-5-yl)-4-[[5-(4-fluorophenyl)-3-pyridinyl]methyl (SLV313) and N-[(2,2-dimethyl-2,3-dihydro-benzofuran-7-yloxy)ethyl]-3-(cyclopent-1-enyl)-benzylamine (F15063) were inactive. At the HA-h5-HT(1A) receptor, serotonin, (+)-8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin [(+)-8-OH-DPAT] and sarizotan were full agonists, buspirone acted as partial agonist. (-)-Pindolol showed little activity and no internalising properties were manifested for the 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist N-[2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]-ethyl]-N-(2-pyridinyl)cyclohexanecarboxamide (WAY100635). Most antipsychotics induced HA-h5-HT(1A) receptor internalisation, with an efficacy rank order: nemonapride>F15063>SSR181507

  18. Interaction between μ-opioid and 5-HT1A receptors in the regulation of panic-related defensive responses in the rat dorsal periaqueductal grey.

    PubMed

    Rangel, Marcel P; Zangrossi, Hélio; Roncon, Camila M; Graeff, Frederico G; Audi, Elisabeth A

    2014-12-01

    A wealth of evidence indicates that the activation of 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors in the dorsal periaqueductal grey matter (dPAG) inhibits escape, a panic-related defensive behaviour. Results that were previously obtained with the elevated T-maze test of anxiety/panic suggest that 5-HT1A and μ-opioid receptors in this midbrain area work together to regulate this response. To investigate the generality of this finding, we assessed whether the same cooperative mechanism is engaged when escape is evoked by a different aversive stimulus electrical stimulation of the dPAG. Administration of the μ-receptor blocker CTOP into the dPAG did not change the escape threshold, but microinjection of the μ-receptor agonist DAMGO (0.3 and 0.5 nmol) or the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OHDPAT (1.6 nmol) increased this index, indicating a panicolytic-like effect. Pretreatment with CTOP antagonised the anti-escape effect of 8-OHDPAT. Additionally, combined administration of subeffective doses of DAMGO and 8-OHDPAT increased the escape threshold, indicating drug synergism. Therefore, regardless of the aversive nature of the stimulus, μ-opioid and 5-HT1A receptors cooperatively act to regulate escape behaviour. A better comprehension of this mechanism might allow for new therapeutic strategies for panic disorder.

  19. The role of 5-HT1A receptors in mediating acute negative effects of antidepressants: implications in pediatric depression

    PubMed Central

    Rahn, K A; Cao, Y-J; Hendrix, C W; Kaplin, A I

    2015-01-01

    Acute antidepressant exposure elevates the frequency of impulsive behavior and suicidal thoughts in children and adolescents with major depressive disorder (MDD). Long-term antidepressant treatment, however, is beneficial for pediatric MDD, so it is necessary to explore novel treatments that prevent the potentially dangerous consequences of acute antidepressant initiation. In the present study, a treatment strategy designed to reverse the acute negative behavioral effects of antidepressants was tested in rodents. Co-administration of the 5-HT1A receptor (5-HT1AR) antagonist WAY-100635 reversed the negative effects of acute fluoxetine, a serotonin reuptake inhibitor, but not reboxetine, a norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, supporting the involvement of 5-HT1AR in mediating the negative consequences of acute selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment. No 5-HT1AR antagonists are currently approved for use in pediatric populations, so alternative strategies should be explored. One such strategy was suggested based on the hypothesis that the rate of 5-HT1AR activation and the subsequent inhibition of serotonergic neuron activity caused by acute SSRI administration is proportional to the loading rate of an antidepressant. Existing pharmacological data were examined, and significant correlations were observed between the half-life of antidepressants and the rate of suicide-related events (SREs). Specifically, antidepressants with longer half-lives have lower rates of SREs. On the basis of these data, novel dosing strategies were developed for five antidepressants to mimic the pharmacological profile of the antidepressant with the longest half-life, fluoxetine. These dosing strategies could be used to decrease the rate of SREs associated with acute antidepressant treatment in pediatric MDD until an improved pharmacological treatment is developed. PMID:25942044

  20. Agonist and antagonist bind differently to 5-HT1A receptors during Alzheimer's disease: A post-mortem study with PET radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Benjamin; Sebti, Johan; Verdurand, Mathieu; Fieux, Sylvain; Billard, Thierry; Streichenberger, Nathalie; Troakes, Claire; Newman-Tancredi, Adrian; Zimmer, Luc

    2016-10-01

    PET imaging studies using 5-HT1A receptor radiotracers show a decreased density of this receptor in hippocampi of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) at advanced stages. However, current 5-HT1A receptor radiopharmaceuticals used in neuroimaging are antagonists, thought to bind to 5-HT1A receptors in different functional states (i.e., both the one which displays high affinity for agonists and is thought to mediate receptor activation, as well as the state which has low affinity for agonists). Comparing the PET imaging obtained using an agonist radiotracer, which binds selectively to functional receptors, with the PET imaging obtained using an antagonist radiotracer would therefore provide original information on 5-HT1A receptor impairment during AD. Quantitative autoradiography using [(18)F]F13640 and [(18)F]MPPF, a 5-HT1A agonist and antagonist, respectively, was measured in hippocampi of patients with AD (n = 25, at different Braak stages) and control subjects (n = 9). The neuronal density was measured in the same tissues by NeuN immunohistochemistry. The specific binding of both radiotracers was determined by addition of WAY-100635, a selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist. The autoradiography distribution of both 5-HT1A PET radiotracers varied across hippocampus regions. The highest binding density was in the pyramidal layer of CA1. Incubation with Gpp(NH)p, a non-hydrolysable analogue of GTP, reduced significantly [(18)F]F13640 binding in hippocampal regions, confirming its preferential interaction with G-coupled receptors, and slightly increased [(18)F]MPPF binding. In the CA1 subfield, [(18)F]F13640 binding was significantly decreased at Braak stages I/II (-19%), Braak stages III/IV (-23%), and Braak stages V/VI (-36%) versus control. In contrast, [(18)F]MPPF binding was statistically reduced only at the most advanced Braak stages V/VI compared to control (-33%). Since [(18)F]F13640 and [(18)F]MPPF can be used in vivo in humans, this

  1. 5-HT(1A)-receptor over-expressing mice: genotype and sex dependent responses to antidepressants in the forced swim-test.

    PubMed

    Günther, Lydia; Rothe, Julia; Rex, André; Voigt, Jörg-Peter; Millan, Mark J; Fink, Heidrun; Bert, Bettina

    2011-09-01

    Deficiencies in serotonergic neurotransmission are involved in the pathophysiology of depression. Due to its modulatory effect on serotonin (5-HT) release, the 5-HT(1A)-receptor is thought to play a decisive role in the therapy of this mood disorder. However, it is not fully understood how antidepressant effects are mediated by pre- and postsynaptic receptor sites. In this study we examined the impact of postsynaptic 5-HT(1A)-receptor over-expression in corticolimbic areas of male and female mice on the performance in the forced swim-test (FST). Furthermore, we investigated their response to the serotonin selective reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) citalopram in comparison to the selective noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor reboxetine, as well as the partial 5-HT(1A)-receptor agonists, buspirone and S 15535. Additionally, these drugs were evaluated in the open field-test in order to observe effects on motor activity. The density of 5-HT(1A)-receptors in discrete corticolimbic regions was determined in detail by quantitative autoradiography with [(3)H]8-OH-DPAT to investigate genotype as well as sex dependent differences in the expression pattern. [(3)H]8-OH-DPAT binding differed depending on sex with female mice of both genotypes displaying higher receptor binding in distinct brain areas. In the FST untreated male but not female over-expressing (OE) mice showed an antidepressant-like behaviour compared to wild-type (WT) mice. Citalopram yielded an antidepressant effect without influencing locomotor activity in OE mice but not in WT mice. Reboxetine had no antidepressant-like effect in OE mice, but sex-dependently in WT mice. The two partial agonists, buspirone and S 15535 produced no antidepressant-like activity in both genotypes and sexes, but aberrant motor effects. The antidepressant-like phenotype of male transgenic mice accounts for an involvement of postsynaptic 5-HT(1A)-receptors in the FST behaviour. In addition, the selective over-expression of postsynaptic 5-HT(1A)-receptors

  2. Serotonin transporter, 5-HT1A receptor, and behavior in DBA/2J mice in comparison with four inbred mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Popova, Nina K; Naumenko, Vladimir S; Tibeikina, Marina A; Kulikov, Alexander V

    2009-12-01

    Prepulse inhibition (PPI), the reduction in acoustic startle produced when it is preceded by a weak prepulse stimulus, is impaired in schizophrenic patients. The DBA/2J mouse strain displayed deficient PPI and is therefore suggested as an experimental animal model for the loss of sensorimotor gating in schizophrenia. Brain serotonin (5-HT) has been implicated in the pathophysiology of several psychiatric disorders, including major depressive disorder and schizophrenia. In the present study, behavior, 5-HT transporter (5-HTT) mRNA level, 5-HT(1A) receptor mRNA level, and 5-HT(1A) receptor density in the brain regions were studied in DBA/2J mice in comparison with four inbred mouse strains (CBA/Lac, C57BL/6, BALB/c, and ICR). A decrease in 5-HTT mRNA level in the midbrain and a reduced density of 5-HT(1A) receptors in the frontal cortex without significant changes in 5-HT(1A) receptor mRNA level in DBA/2J mice were found. It was shown that, along with decreased PPI, DBA/2J mice demonstrated considerably reduced immobility in the tail suspension test and in the forced swim test. No significant interstrain differences in intermale aggression, or in light-dark box and elevated plus-maze tests, were found. The results suggested the involvement of decreased 5-HTT gene expression and 5-HT(1A) receptor density in genetically defined PPI deficiency and showed a lack of any association between PPI deficiency and predisposition to aggressive, anxiety, and depressive-like behaviors.

  3. Similar anxiolytic effects of agonists targeting serotonin 5-HT1A or cannabinoid CB receptors on zebrafish behavior in novel environments

    PubMed Central

    Connors, Kristin A.; Valenti, Theodore W.; Lawless, Kelly; Sackerman, James; Onaivi, Emmanuel S.; Brooks, Bryan W.; Gould, Georgianna G.

    2014-01-01

    The discovery that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) such as fluoxetine are present and bioaccumulate in aquatic ecosystems have spurred studies of fish serotonin transporters (SERTs) and changes in SSRI-sensitive behaviors as adverse outcomes relevant for risk assessment. Many SSRIs also act at serotonin 5-HT1A receptors. Since capitolizing on this action may improve treatments of clinical depression and other psychiatric disorders, novel multimodal drugs that agonize 5-HT1A and block SERT were introduced. In mammals both 5-HT1A and CB agonists, such as buspirone and WIN55,212-2, reduce anxious behaviors. Immunological and behavioral evidence suggests that 5-HT1A-like receptors may function similarly in zebrafish (Danio rerio), yet their pharmacological properties are not well characterized. Herein we compared the density of [3H] 8-hydroxy-2-di-n-propylamino tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) binding to 5-HT1A-like sites in the zebrafish brain, to that of simalarly Gαi/o-coupled cannabinoid receptors. [3H] 8-OH-DPAT specific binding was 176 ± 8, 275 ± 32, and 230 ± 36 fmol/mg protein in the hypothalamus, optic tectum, and telencephalon. [3H] WIN55,212-2 binding density was higher in those same brain regions at 6 ± 0.3, 5.5 ± 0.4 and 7.3 ± 0.3 pm/mg protein. The aquatic light-dark plus maze was used to examine behavioral effects of 5-HT1A and CB receptor agonists on zebrafish novelty-based anxiety. With acute exposure to the 5-HT1A partial-agonist buspirone (50 mg/L), or dietary exposure to WIN55,212-2 (7 μg/week) zebrafish spent more time in and/or entered white arms more often than controls (p < 0.05). Acute exposure to WIN55,212-2 at 0.5-50 mg/L, reduced mobility. These behavioral findings suggest that azipirones, like cannabinoid agonists, have anxiolytic and/or sedative properties on fish in novel environments. These observations highlight the need to consider potential ecological risks of azapirones and multimodal antidepressants in the future. PMID

  4. [CROSS-TALK BETWEEN 5-HT1A AND 5-HT7 RECEPTORS: ROLE IN THE AUTOREGULATION OF THE BRAIN SEROTONIN SYSTEM AND IN MECHANISM OF ANTIDEPRESSANTS ACTION].

    PubMed

    Popova, N K; Ponimaskin, E G; Naumenko, V S

    2015-11-01

    Recent studies considerably extended our knowledge of the mechanisms and physiological role of the interaction between different receptors in the brain. Current review summarizes data on the formation of receptor complexes and the role of such complexes in the autoregulation of the brain serotonin system, behavioral abnormalities and mechanism of antidepressants action. Particular attention is paid to 5-HT1A and 5-HT7 receptor heterodimers. The results described in the present review indicate that: i) dimerization and formation of mobile receptor complexes is a common feature for the members of G-protein coupled receptor superfamily; ii) 5-HT7 receptor appears to be a modulator for 5-HT1A receptor - the key autoregulator of the brain serotonin system; iii) 5-HT1A/5-HT7 receptor complexes formation is one of the mechanisms for inactivation and desensitization of the 5-HTIA receptors in the brain; iv) differences in the 5-HT7 receptor and 5-HTIA/5-HT7 heterodimers density define different sensitivity of pre- and postsynaptic 5-HTlA receptors to chronic treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.

  5. Potentiating action of MKC-242, a selective 5-HT1A receptor agonist, on the photic entrainment of the circadian activity rhythm in hamsters.

    PubMed

    Moriya, T; Yoshinobu, Y; Ikeda, M; Yokota, S; Akiyama, M; Shibata, S

    1998-11-01

    Serotonergic projections from the midbrain raphe nuclei to the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) are known to regulate the photic entrainment of circadian clocks. However, it is not known which 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptor subtypes are involved in the circadian regulation. In order to verify the role of 5-HT1A receptors, we examined the effects of 5-¿3-[((2S)-1,4-benzodioxan-2-ylmethyl)amino]-propoxy¿-1,3-b enzodioxole HCl (MKC-242), a selective 5-HT1A receptor agonist, on photic entrainment of wheel-running circadian rhythms of hamsters. MKC-242 (3 mg kg(-1), i.p.) significantly accelerated the re-entrainment of wheel-running rhythms to a new 8 h delayed or advanced light-dark cycle. MKC-242 (3 mg kg(-1), i.p.) also potentiated the phase advance of the wheel-running rhythm produced by low (5 lux) or high (60 lux) intensity light pulses. In contrast, 8-hydroxydipropylaminotetralin (8-OH-DPAT)(5 mg kg(-1), i.p.), a well known 5-HT1A/5-HT7 receptor agonist, only suppressed low intensity (5 lux) light-induced phase advances. The potentiating actions of MKC-242 on light pulse-induced phase advances were observed even when injected 20 or 60 min after the light exposure. The potentiating action of MKC-242 was antagonized by WAY100635, a selective 5-HT1A receptor blocker, but not by ritanserin, a 5-HT2/5-HT7 receptor blocker, indicating that MKC-242 is activating 5-HT1A receptors. Light pulse-induced c-fos expression in the SCN and the intergeniculate leaflet (IGL) were unaffected by MKC-242 (3 mg kg(-1), i.p.). HPLC analysis demonstrated that MKC-242 (3 mg kg(-1), i.p.) decreased the 5-HIAA content in the SCN. The present results suggest that presynaptic 5-HT1A receptor activation may be involved in the potentiation of photic entrainment by MKC-242 in hamsters. PMID:9863658

  6. Potentiating action of MKC-242, a selective 5-HT1A receptor agonist, on the photic entrainment of the circadian activity rhythm in hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Moriya, T; Yoshinobu, Y; Ikeda, M; Yokota, S; Akiyama, M; Shibata, S

    1998-01-01

    Serotonergic projections from the midbrain raphe nuclei to the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) are known to regulate the photic entrainment of circadian clocks. However, it is not known which 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptor subtypes are involved in the circadian regulation. In order to verify the role of 5-HT1A receptors, we examined the effects of 5-{3-[((2S)-1,4-benzodioxan-2-ylmethyl)amino]propoxy}-1,3-benzodioxole HCl (MKC-242), a selective 5-HT1A receptor agonist, on photic entrainment of wheel-running circadian rhythms of hamsters.MKC-242 (3 mg kg−1, i.p.) significantly accelerated the re-entrainment of wheel-running rhythms to a new 8 h delayed or advanced light-dark cycle.MKC-242 (3 mg kg−1, i.p.) also potentiated the phase advance of the wheel-running rhythm produced by low (5 lux) or high (60 lux) intensity light pulses. In contrast, 8-hydroxy-dipropylaminotetralin (8-OH-DPAT)(5 mg kg−1, i.p.), a well known 5-HT1A/5-HT7 receptor agonist, only suppressed low intensity (5 lux) light-induced phase advances.The potentiating actions of MKC-242 on light pulse-induced phase advances were observed even when injected 20 or 60 min after the light exposure.The potentiating action of MKC-242 was antagonized by WAY100635, a selective 5-HT1A receptor blocker, but not by ritanserin, a 5-HT2/5-HT7 receptor blocker, indicating that MKC-242 is activating 5-HT1A receptors.Light pulse-induced c-fos expression in the SCN and the intergeniculate leaflet (IGL) were unaffected by MKC-242 (3 mg kg−1, i.p.).HPLC analysis demonstrated that MKC-242 (3 mg kg−1, i.p.) decreased the 5-HIAA content in the SCN.The present results suggest that presynaptic 5-HT1A receptor activation may be involved in the potentiation of photic entrainment by MKC-242 in hamsters. PMID:9863658

  7. 5-HT1A and benzodiazepine receptors in the basolateral amygdala modulate anxiety in the social interaction test, but not in the elevated plus-maze.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, L E; Andrews, N; File, S E

    1996-09-01

    In order to investigate the role of the 5-HT1A receptors of the amygdala in modulating anxiety, rats were implanted with bilateral cannulae aimed at the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala complex and infused with either artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) or the selective 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT (50-200 ng) and tested in two animal models of anxiety. In the elevated plus-maze test, no significant effects were detected in this dose range. In contrast, 8-OH-DPAT caused an overall reduction in levels of social investigation, thus indicating anxiogenic actions in the social interaction test. At 50 ng, 8-OH-DPAT had a selective action on anxiety, while at 200 ng there was a concomitant reduction in locomotor activity and, in some animals, signs of the 5-HT1A syndrome. Evidence that the anxiogenic effect of 8-OH-DPAT (50 ng) was due to activation of 5-HT1A receptors came from the finding that (-)-tertatolol, a 5-HT1A receptor antagonist, reversed this effect at a dose (1.5 micrograms) which was silent when given alone. The benzodiazepine receptor agonist, midazolam (1 and 2 micrograms) was bilaterally administered into the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala and evoked clear-cut anxiolytic effects in the social interaction test. These data indicate that the agonist activation of post-synaptic 5-HT1A receptors in the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala may produce anxiogenic effects, while agonist activation of BDZ receptors in the same areas evokes anxiolytic effects. Our results from the social interaction test are similar to those previously reported from tests of anxiety using punished paradigms, but contrast with those found in the elevated plus-maze. Thus, it is concluded that either the two tests have different sensitivities to midazolam and 8-OH-DPAT or more intriguingly, the tests are evoking fundamentally different states of anxiety, with that evoked by the plus-maze being mediated via brain areas or receptors different from those studied here.

  8. Uncoupling of 5-HT1A receptors in the brain by estrogens: regional variations in antagonism by ICI 182,780.

    PubMed

    Mize, A L; Young, L J; Alper, R H

    2003-04-01

    Previously we have shown that 17beta-estradiol (in vivo and in vitro) rapidly decreases the function of serotonin(1A) (5-HT(1A)) receptors, allowing us to hypothesize that 17beta-estradiol accomplished this via activation of a membrane estrogen receptor. Hippocampus and frontal cortex obtained from ovariectomized rats were incubated with 17beta-estradiol or bovine serum albumin (BSA)-estradiol in the presence or absence of the estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist ICI 182,780. Membranes were prepared to measure R(+)8-OH-DPAT-stimulated [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding (a measure of 5-HT(1A) receptor coupling and function). In both hippocampus and frontal cortex, 17beta-estradiol and BSA-estradiol (50 nM) decreased R(+)8-OH-DPAT-stimulated [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding. ICI 182,780 blocked the effect of both the estrogens in hippocampus, but only the effect of 17beta-estradiol in frontal cortex. Due to the inability of ICI 182,780 to block the effects of BSA-estradiol in frontal cortex, similar experiments were performed using the selective estrogen receptor modulator tamoxifen as the agonist. Tamoxifen (100 nM and 1 microM) decreased R(+)8-OH-DPAT-stimulated [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding. ICI 182,780 (1 microM) blocked the ability of tamoxifen to decrease 5-HT(1A) receptor coupling in the hippocampus, but not in the frontal cortex. Taken together, these data support the existence of a pharmacologically distinct ER in hippocampus vs. frontal cortex that might be responsible for rapid uncoupling of 5-HT(1A) receptors. PMID:12668044

  9. Interaction of the alpha-adrenoceptor agonist oxymetazoline with serotonin 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT1C and 5-HT1D receptors.

    PubMed

    Schoeffter, P; Hoyer, D

    1991-04-17

    Oxymetazoline was recognized with nanomolar affinity by 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B and 5-HT1D binding sites and mimicked the effects of 5-hydroxytryptamine with about the same potency and intrinsic activity as the endogenous amine in the corresponding functional tests. At 5-HT1C receptors, oxymetazoline behaved as a mixed agonist-antagonist. Clonidine had minimal activity. Methiothepin antagonized the effects of oxymetazoline (7.4 less than pKB less than 8.8). Thus, oxymetazoline is a full and potent agonist at 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B and 5-HT1D receptors and a partial agonist at 5-HT1C receptors.

  10. Effect of selective agonist of serotonin 5-HT1A receptors on defensive behavior in mice with different predisposition to catalepsy.

    PubMed

    Bazovkina, D V; Terenina, E E; Kulikov, A V

    2010-12-01

    We studied the effect of activation of serotonin 5-HT1A receptors with selective agonist 8-OH-DPAT (0.1, 0.5, and 1.0 mg/kg) on intraspecies aggression and freezing reaction (catalepsy) in male mice of catalepsy-resistant AKR/J and two catalepsy-prone strains CBA/Lac and congenic AKR.CBA-D13Mit76. The latter strain differs from AKR strain only by terminal chromosome 13 fragment transferred from CBA strain and containing a locus determining predisposition to catalepsy and a gene encoding 5-HT1A receptor. 8-OH-DPAT in a low dose (0.1 mg/kg) affecting primarily presynaptic receptors suppressed aggressive behavior in CBA mice, but had no effect on the time of cataleptic freezing. At the same time, this dose of the drug produced no significant effect on aggression in AKR and AKR.CBA-D13Mit76 mice, but significantly attenuated freezing in AKR.CBA-D13Mit76 mice. High doses of 8-OH-DPAT (0.5 and 1 mg/kg) which affected mainly postsynaptic receptors inhibited catalepsy in CBA and AKR.CBA-D13Mit76 mice and in a dose of 1 mg/kg it suppressed aggression in all tested mouse strains. We concluded that the genome of the recipient strain (AKR) modulated the involvement of 5-HT(1A) receptors into the regulation of aggression and catalepsy in mice.

  11. Involvement of the serotonergic type 1A (5-HT1A) receptor in the agranular insular cortex in the consolidation of memory for inhibitory avoidance in rats.

    PubMed

    Mello e Souza, T; Rodrigues, C; Souza, M M; Vinadé, E; Coitinho, A; Choi, H; Izquierdo, I

    2001-09-01

    Adult male Wistar rats were bilaterally implanted with indwelling cannulae in the agranular insular cortex of the prefrontal cortex. After recovery, animals were trained in a step-down inhibitory avoidance task (3.0-s, 0.4-mA footshock) and received, immediately after training, a 0.5-microl infusion of the serotonergic type 1A (5-HT1A) receptor agonist dipropylamino-8-hydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene hydrobromide (8-OH-DPAT) or of the 5- HT1A receptor antagonist 1-(2-methoxyphenyl)-4-[4-(2-phthalimido)butyl] piperazine hydrobromide (NAN-190), or of vehicle alone (20% DMSO). Retention testing was carried out 24 h after training. 8-OH-DPAT (1.25 and 6.25 microg but not 0.0125 or 0.125 microg) was amnesic. NAN-190 was not effective at 0.125 or 1.25 microg any dose but reversed amnesia when given at 1.250 microg simultaneously with both effective doses of 8-OH-DPAT. These results show that an overactivation of 5-HT1A receptors in the agranular insular cortex impairs memory consolidation of inhibitory avoidance, in rats, immediately after training. This suggests that these receptors of the insular cortex may modulate memory consolidation.

  12. Long-Term Citalopram Treatment Alters the Stress Responses of the Cortical Dopamine and Noradrenaline Systems: the Role of Cortical 5-HT1A Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Fumi; Kishikawa, Yuki; Hanada, Yuuki; Yamada, Makiko; Kakuma, Tatsuyuki; Kawahara, Hiroshi; Nishi, Akinori

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cortical dopamine and noradrenaline are involved in the stress response. Citalopram, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, has direct and indirect effects on the serotonergic system. Furthermore, long-term treatment with citalopram affects the dopamine and noradrenaline systems, which could contribute to the therapeutic action of antidepressants. Methods: The effects of long-term treatment with citalopram on the responses of the dopamine and noradrenaline systems in the rat prefrontal cortex to acute handling stress were evaluated using in vivo microdialysis. Results: Acute handling stress increased dopamine and noradrenaline levels in the prefrontal cortex. The dopamine and noradrenaline responses were suppressed by local infusion of a 5-HT1A receptor agonist, 7-(Dipropylamino)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydronaphthalen-1-ol;hydrobromide, into the prefrontal cortex. The dopamine response was abolished by long-term treatment with citalopram, and the abolished dopamine response was reversed by local infusion of a 5-HT1A receptor antagonist, (Z)-but-2-enedioic acid;N-[2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazin-1-yl]ethyl]-N-pyridin-2-ylcyclohexanecarboxamide into the prefrontal cortex. On the other hand, long-term treatment with citalopram reduced the basal noradrenaline levels (approximately 40% of the controls), but not the basal dopamine levels. The noradrenaline response was maintained despite the low basal noradrenaline levels. Signaling from the 5-HT1A receptors and α2-adrenoceptors was not involved in the decrease in the basal noradrenaline levels but partially affected the noradrenaline response. Conclusions: Chronic citalopram treatment differentially suppresses the dopamine and noradrenaline systems in the prefrontal cortex, and the dopamine stress response was preferentially controlled by upregulating 5-HT1A receptor signaling. Our findings provide insight into how antidepressants modulate the dopamine and noradrenaline systems to overcome acute stress. PMID

  13. Cannabidiol attenuates haloperidol-induced catalepsy and c-Fos protein expression in the dorsolateral striatum via 5-HT1A receptors in mice.

    PubMed

    Sonego, Andreza B; Gomes, Felipe V; Del Bel, Elaine A; Guimaraes, Francisco S

    2016-08-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is a major non-psychoactive compound from Cannabis sativa plant. Given that CBD reduces psychotic symptoms without inducing extrapyramidal motor side-effects in animal models and schizophrenia patients, it has been proposed to act as an atypical antipsychotic. In addition, CBD reduced catalepsy induced by drugs with distinct pharmacological mechanisms, including the typical antipsychotic haloperidol. To further investigate this latter effect, we tested whether CBD (15-60mg/kg) would attenuate the catalepsy and c-Fos protein expression in the dorsal striatum induced by haloperidol (0.6mg/kg). We also evaluated if these effects occur through the facilitation of 5-HT1A receptor-mediated neurotransmission. For this, male Swiss mice were treated with CBD and haloperidol systemically and then subjected to the catalepsy test. Independent groups of animals were also treated with the 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY100635 (0.1mg/kg). As expected, haloperidol induced catalepsy throughout the experiments, an effect that was prevented by systemic CBD treatment 30min before haloperidol administration. Also, CBD, administered 2.5h after haloperidol, reversed haloperidol-induced catalepsy. Haloperidol also increased c-Fos protein expression in the dorsolateral striatum, an effect attenuated by previous CBD administration. CBD effects on catalepsy and c-Fos protein expression induced by haloperidol were blocked by the 5-HT1A receptor antagonist. We also evaluated the effects of CBD (60nmol) injection into the dorsal striatum on haloperidol-induced catalepsy. Similar to systemic administration, this treatment reduced catalepsy induced by haloperidol. Altogether, these results suggest that CBD acts in the dorsal striatum to improve haloperidol-induced catalepsy via postsynaptic 5-HT1A receptors. PMID:27131780

  14. Cannabidiol induces rapid-acting antidepressant-like effects and enhances cortical 5-HT/glutamate neurotransmission: role of 5-HT1A receptors.

    PubMed

    Linge, Raquel; Jiménez-Sánchez, Laura; Campa, Leticia; Pilar-Cuéllar, Fuencisla; Vidal, Rebeca; Pazos, Angel; Adell, Albert; Díaz, Álvaro

    2016-04-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD), the main non-psychotomimetic component of marihuana, exhibits anxiolytic-like properties in many behavioural tests, although its potential for treating major depression has been poorly explored. Moreover, the mechanism of action of CBD remains unclear. Herein, we have evaluated the effects of CBD following acute and chronic administration in the olfactory bulbectomy mouse model of depression (OBX), and investigated the underlying mechanism. For this purpose, we conducted behavioural (open field and sucrose preference tests) and neurochemical (microdialysis and autoradiography of 5-HT1A receptor functionality) studies following treatment with CBD. We also assayed the pharmacological antagonism of the effects of CBD to dissect out the mechanism of action. Our results demonstrate that CBD exerts fast and maintained antidepressant-like effects as evidenced by the reversal of the OBX-induced hyperactivity and anhedonia. In vivo microdialysis revealed that the administration of CBD significantly enhanced serotonin and glutamate levels in vmPFCx in a different manner depending on the emotional state and the duration of the treatment. The potentiating effect upon neurotransmitters levels occurring immediately after the first injection of CBD might underlie the fast antidepressant-like actions in OBX mice. Both antidepressant-like effect and enhanced cortical 5-HT/glutamate neurotransmission induced by CBD were prevented by 5-HT1A receptor blockade. Moreover, adaptive changes in pre- and post-synaptic 5-HT1A receptor functionality were also found after chronic CBD. In conclusion, our findings indicate that CBD could represent a novel fast antidepressant drug, via enhancing both serotonergic and glutamate cortical signalling through a 5-HT1A receptor-dependent mechanism.

  15. Early-life stress induces persistent alterations in 5-HT1A receptor and serotonin transporter mRNA expression in the adult rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Bravo, Javier A.; Dinan, Timothy G.; Cryan, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Early-life experience plays a major role in the stress response throughout life. Neonatal maternal separation (MS) is an animal model of depression with an altered serotonergic response. We hypothesize that this alteration may be caused by differences in 5-HT1A receptor and serotonin transporter (SERT) mRNA expression in brain areas involved in the control of emotions, memory, and fear as well as in regions controlling the central serotonergic tone. To test this, Sprague–Dawley rats were subjected to MS for 3 h daily during postnatal days 2–12. As control, age matched rats were non-separated (NS) from their dams. When animals reached adulthood (11–13 weeks) brain was extracted and mRNA expression of 5-HT1A receptor in amygdala, hippocampus and dorsal raphé nucleus (DRN) and SERT in the DRN was analyzed through in situ hybridisation. Densitometric analysis revealed that MS increased 5-HT1A receptor mRNA expression in the amygdala, and reduced its expression in the DRN, but no changes were observed in the hippocampus in comparison to NS controls. Also, MS reduced SERT mRNA expression in the DRN when compared to NS rats. These results suggest that early-life stress induces persistent changes in 5-HT1A receptor and SERT mRNA expression in key brain regions involved in the development of stress-related psychiatric disorders. The reduction in SERT mRNA indicates an alteration that is in line with clinical findings such as polymorphic variants in individuals with higher risk of depression. These data may help to understand how early-life stress contributes to the development of mood disorders in adulthood. PMID:24782706

  16. Escitalopram attenuates β-amyloid-induced tau hyperphosphorylation in primary hippocampal neurons through the 5-HT1A receptor mediated Akt/GSK-3β pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Juan; Ren, Qing-Guo; Gong, Wei-Gang; Wu, Di; Tang, Xiang; Li, Xiao-Li; Wu, Fang-Fang; Bai, Feng; Xu, Lin; Zhang, Zhi-Jun

    2016-03-22

    Tau hyperphosphorylation is an important pathological feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). To investigate whether escitalopram could inhibit amyloid-β (Aβ)-induced tau hyperphosphorylation and the underlying mechanisms, we treated the rat primary hippocampal neurons with Aβ1-42 and examined the effect of escitalopram on tau hyperphosphorylation. Results showed that escitalopram decreased Aβ1-42-induced tau hyperphosphorylation. In addition, escitalopram activated the Akt/GSK-3β pathway, and the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 blocked the attenuation of tau hyperphosphorylation induced by escitalopram. Moreover, the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT also activated the Akt/GSK-3β pathway and decreased Aβ1-42-induced tau hyperphosphorylation. Furthermore, the 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY-100635 blocked the activation of Akt/GSK-3β pathway and the attenuation of tau hyperphosphorylation induced by escitalopram. Finally, escitalopram improved Aβ1-42 induced impairment of neurite outgrowth and spine density, and reversed Aβ1-42 induced reduction of synaptic proteins. Our results demonstrated that escitalopram attenuated Aβ1-42-induced tau hyperphosphorylation in primary hippocampal neurons through the 5-HT1A receptor mediated Akt/GSK-3β pathway. PMID:26950279

  17. Preclinical characterization of WAY-211612: a dual 5-HT uptake inhibitor and 5-HT1A receptor antagonist and potential novel antidepressant

    PubMed Central

    Beyer, CE; Lin, Q; Platt, B; Malberg, J; Hornby, G; Sullivan, KM; Smith, DL; Lock, T; Mitchell, PJ; Hatzenbuhler, NT; Evrard, DA; Harrison, BL; Magolda, R; Pangalos, MN; Schechter, LE; Rosenzweig-Lipson, S; Andree, TH

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose As a combination of 5-HT selective reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) with 5-HT1A receptor antagonism may yield a rapidly acting antidepressant, WAY-211612, a compound with both SSRI and 5-HT1A receptor antagonist activities, was evaluated in preclinical models. Experimental approach Occupancy studies confirmed the mechanism of action of WAY-211612, while its in vivo profile was characterized in microdialysis and behavioural models. Key results WAY-211612 inhibited 5-HT reuptake (Ki = 1.5 nmol·L−1; KB = 17.7 nmol·L−1) and exhibited full 5-HT1A receptor antagonist activity (Ki = 1.2 nmol·L−1; KB = 6.3 nmol·L−1; Imax 100% in adenyl cyclase assays; KB = 19.8 nmol·L−1; Imax 100% in GTPγS). WAY-211612 (3 and 30 mg·kg−1, po) occupied 5-HT reuptake sites in rat prefrontal cortex (56.6% and 73.6% respectively) and hippocampus (52.2% and 78.5%), and 5-HT1A receptors in the prefrontal cortex (6.7% and 44.7%), hippocampus (8.3% and 48.6%) and dorsal raphe (15% and 83%). Acute or chronic treatment with WAY-211612 (3–30 mg·kg−1, po) raised levels of cortical 5-HT approximately twofold, as also observed with a combination of an SSRI (fluoxetine; 30 mg·kg−1, s.c.) and a 5-HT1A antagonist (WAY-100635; 0.3 mg·kg−1, s.c). WAY-211612 (3.3–30 mg·kg−1, s.c.) decreased aggressive behaviour in the resident-intruder model, while increasing the number of punished crossings (3–30 mg·kg−1, i.p. and 10–56 mg·kg−1, po) in the mouse four-plate model and decreased adjunctive drinking behaviour (56 mg·kg−1, i.p.) in the rat scheduled-induced polydipsia model. Conclusions and implications These findings suggest that WAY-211612 may represent a novel antidepressant. PMID:19338583

  18. Autoradiography of serotonin 5-HT1A receptor-activated G proteins in guinea pig brain sections by agonist-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding.

    PubMed

    Dupuis, D S; Palmier, C; Colpaert, F C; Pauwels, P J

    1998-03-01

    G protein activation mediated by serotonin 5-HT1A and 5-HT(1B/D) receptors in guinea pig brain was investigated by using quantitative autoradiography of agonist-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding to brain sections. [35S]GTPgammaS binding was stimulated by the mixed 5-HT1A/5-HT(1B/D) agonist L694247 in brain structures enriched in 5-HT1A binding sites, i.e., hippocampus (+140 +/- 14%), dorsal raphe (+70 +/- 8%), lateral septum (+52 +/- 12%), cingulate (+36 +/- 8%), and entorhinal cortex (+34 +/- 5%). L694247 caused little or no stimulation of [35S]GTPgammaS binding in brain regions with high densities of 5-HT(1B/D) binding sites (e.g., substantia nigra, striatum, central gray, and dorsal subiculum). The [35S]GTPgammaS binding response was antagonized by WAY100635 (10 microM) and methiothepin (10 microM). In contrast, the 5-HT1B inverse agonist SB224289 (10 microM) did not affect the L694247-mediated [35S]GTPgammaS binding response, and the mixed 5-HT(1B/D) antagonist GR127935 (10 microM) yielded a partial blockade. The distribution pattern of the [35S]GTPgammaS binding response and the antagonist profile suggest the L694247-mediated response in guinea pig brain to be mediated by 5-HT1A receptors. In addition to L694247, 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin, and flesinoxan also stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding; their maximal responses varied between 46 and 52% compared with L694247, irrespective of the brain structure being considered. Sumatriptan, rizatriptan, and zolmitriptan (10 microM) stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding in the hippocampus by 20-50%. Naratriptan, CP122638, and dihydroergotamine stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding to a similar level as L694247 in hippocampus, lateral septum, and dorsal raphe. It appears that under the present experimental conditions, G protein activation through 5-HT1A but not 5-HT(1B/D) receptors can be measured in guinea pig brain sections. PMID:9489749

  19. Role of 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(1B) receptors in the antidepressant-like effect of piperine in the forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Mao, Qing-Qiu; Huang, Zhen; Ip, Siu-Po; Xian, Yan-Fang; Che, Chun-Tao

    2011-10-24

    Our previous studies have showed that treating mice with piperine significantly decreased the immobility time of the animals in the forced swim test and tail suspension test, which was related to up-regulation of serotonin (5-HT) level in the brain. The purpose of this study is to explore the contribution of 5-HT receptors in the antidepressant-like effect of piperine. The results showed that pre-treating mice with methiothepin (a non-selective 5-HT receptor antagonist, 0.1mg/kg, intraperitoneally), 4-(2'-methoxy-phenyl)-1-[2'-(n-2″-pyridinyl)-p-iodobenzamino-]ethyl-piperazine (a selective 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist, 1mg/kg, subcutaneously) or 1-(2-(1-pyrrolyl)-phenoxy)-3-isopropylamino-2-propanol (a 5-HT(1B) receptor antagonist, 2.5mg/kg, intraperitoneally) was found to abolish the anti-immobility effect of piperine (10mg/kg, intraperitoneally) in the forced swim test. On the other hand, a sub-effective dose of piperine (1mg/kg, intraperitoneally) produced a synergistic antidepressant-like effect with (+)-8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (a 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist, 1mg/kg, intraperitoneally) or anpirtoline (a 5-HT(1B) receptor agonist, 0.25mg/kg, intraperitoneally). Taken together, these results suggest that the antidepressant-like effect of piperine in the mouse forced swim test may be mediated, at least in part, by the activation of 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(1B) receptors.

  20. Influences of housing conditions and ethanol intake on binding characteristics of D2, 5-HT1A, and benzodiazepine receptors of rats.

    PubMed

    Rilke, O; May, T; Oehler, J; Wolffgramm, J

    1995-09-01

    The effects of different housing conditions and ethanol treatment (6 vol % in the drinking water) on the in vitro binding characteristics of striatal dopaminergic D2 ([3H]spiperone), hippocampal serotonergic 5-HT1A ([3H]8-OH-DPAT), and cortical benzodiazepine ([3H]flunitrazepam) receptors have been examined. Social deprivation due to contact caging, short- (1 day) and long-term isolation (5 weeks) yielded a significant decrease of striatal D2 receptor density with the greatest decrease after long-term isolation (-21% Bmax) without changes of Kd in comparison to group animals. The effect of ethanol on striatal D2 receptor density depended on the housing conditions. Whereas ethanol treatment reduced receptor density of group animals (down to 88%), chronic exposure to ethanol under long-term isolation elicited no significant alteration of D2 receptor density compared with group animals. Different housing and ethanol treatment had no effect on 5-HT1A receptor affinity and density. Alterations of benzodiazepine receptor density were not found, but social deprivation as well as ethanol treatment of group animals caused an increased affinity of [3H]flunitrazepam (reduced Kd value). These results indicate that different housing conditions of adult rats evoked significant alterations in D2 and benzodiazepine receptor binding assays, which were modified by ethanol treatment in the case of striatal D2 receptor density.

  1. NLX-112, a novel 5-HT1A receptor agonist for the treatment of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia: Behavioral and neurochemical profile in rat.

    PubMed

    Iderberg, H; McCreary, A C; Varney, M A; Kleven, M S; Koek, W; Bardin, L; Depoortère, R; Cenci, M A; Newman-Tancredi, A

    2015-09-01

    L-DOPA is the gold-standard treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD), but induces troublesome dyskinesia after prolonged treatment. This is associated with the 'false neurotransmitter' conversion of L-DOPA to dopamine by serotonin neurons projecting from the raphe to the dorsal striatum. Reducing their activity by targeting pre-synaptic 5-HT1A receptors should thus be an attractive therapeutic strategy, but previous 5-HT1A agonists have yielded disappointing results. Here, we describe the activity of a novel, highly selective and potent 5-HT1A agonist, NLX-112 (also known as befiradol or F13640) in rat models relevant to PD and its associated affective disorders. NLX-112 (0.16 mg/kg, i.p.) potently and completely reversed haloperidol-induced catalepsy in intact rats and abolished L-DOPA-induced Abnormal Involuntary Movements (AIMs) in hemiparkinsonian rats, an effect that was reversed by the selective 5-HT1A antagonist, WAY100635. In microdialysis experiments, NLX-112 profoundly decreased striatal 5-HT extracellular levels, indicative of inhibition of serotonergic function. NLX-112 also blunted the L-DOPA-induced surge in dopamine levels on the lesioned side of the brain, an action that likely underlies its anti-dyskinetic effects. NLX-112 (0.16 mg/kg, i.p.) robustly induced rotations in hemiparkinsonian rats, suggesting that it has a motor facilitatory effect. Rotations were abolished by WAY100635 and were ipsilateral to the lesioned side, suggesting a predominant stimulation of the dopamine system on the non-lesioned side of the brain. NLX-112 also efficaciously reduced immobility time in the forced swim test (75% reduction at 0.16 mg/kg, i.p.) and eliminated stress-induced ultrasonic vocalization at 0.08 mg/kg, i.p., effects consistent with potential antidepressant- and anxiolytic-like properties. In other tests, NLX-112 (0.01-0.16 mg/kg, i.p.) did not impair the ability of L-DOPA to rescue forepaw akinesia in the cylinder test but decreased rotarod performance

  2. NLX-112, a novel 5-HT1A receptor agonist for the treatment of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia: Behavioral and neurochemical profile in rat.

    PubMed

    Iderberg, H; McCreary, A C; Varney, M A; Kleven, M S; Koek, W; Bardin, L; Depoortère, R; Cenci, M A; Newman-Tancredi, A

    2015-09-01

    L-DOPA is the gold-standard treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD), but induces troublesome dyskinesia after prolonged treatment. This is associated with the 'false neurotransmitter' conversion of L-DOPA to dopamine by serotonin neurons projecting from the raphe to the dorsal striatum. Reducing their activity by targeting pre-synaptic 5-HT1A receptors should thus be an attractive therapeutic strategy, but previous 5-HT1A agonists have yielded disappointing results. Here, we describe the activity of a novel, highly selective and potent 5-HT1A agonist, NLX-112 (also known as befiradol or F13640) in rat models relevant to PD and its associated affective disorders. NLX-112 (0.16 mg/kg, i.p.) potently and completely reversed haloperidol-induced catalepsy in intact rats and abolished L-DOPA-induced Abnormal Involuntary Movements (AIMs) in hemiparkinsonian rats, an effect that was reversed by the selective 5-HT1A antagonist, WAY100635. In microdialysis experiments, NLX-112 profoundly decreased striatal 5-HT extracellular levels, indicative of inhibition of serotonergic function. NLX-112 also blunted the L-DOPA-induced surge in dopamine levels on the lesioned side of the brain, an action that likely underlies its anti-dyskinetic effects. NLX-112 (0.16 mg/kg, i.p.) robustly induced rotations in hemiparkinsonian rats, suggesting that it has a motor facilitatory effect. Rotations were abolished by WAY100635 and were ipsilateral to the lesioned side, suggesting a predominant stimulation of the dopamine system on the non-lesioned side of the brain. NLX-112 also efficaciously reduced immobility time in the forced swim test (75% reduction at 0.16 mg/kg, i.p.) and eliminated stress-induced ultrasonic vocalization at 0.08 mg/kg, i.p., effects consistent with potential antidepressant- and anxiolytic-like properties. In other tests, NLX-112 (0.01-0.16 mg/kg, i.p.) did not impair the ability of L-DOPA to rescue forepaw akinesia in the cylinder test but decreased rotarod performance

  3. (3H)WB4101 labels the 5-HT1A serotonin receptor subtype in rat brain. Guanine nucleotide and divalent cation sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, A.B.; Battaglia, G.; Creese, I.

    1985-12-01

    In the presence of a 30 nM prazosin mask, (/sup 3/H)-2-(2,6-dimethoxyphenoxyethyl) aminomethyl-1,4-benzodioxane ((/sup 3/H)WB4101) can selectively label 5-HT1 serotonin receptors. Serotonin exhibits high affinity (Ki = 2.5 nM) and monophasic competition for (/sup 3/H) WB4101 binding in cerebral cortex. We have found a significant correlation (r = 0.96) between the affinities of a number of serotonergic and nonserotonergic compounds at (/sup 3/H)WB4101-binding sites in the presence of 30 nM prazosin and (/sup 3/H) lysergic acid diethylamide ((/sup 3/H)LSD)-labeled 5-HT1 serotonin receptors in homogenates of rat cerebral cortex. Despite similar pharmacological profiles, distribution studies indicate that, in the presence of 5 mM MgSO4, the Bmax of (/sup 3/H)WB4101 is significantly lower than the Bmax of (/sup 3/H)LSD in various brain regions. WB4101 competition for (/sup 3/H) LSD-labeled 5-HT1 receptors fits best to a computer-derived model assuming two binding sites, with the KH for WB4101 being similar to the KD of (/sup 3/H)WB4101 binding derived from saturation experiments. This suggests that (/sup 3/H)WB4101 labels only one of the subtypes of the 5-HT1 serotonin receptors labeled by (/sup 3/H)LSD. The selective 5-HT1A serotonin receptor antagonist, spiperone, and the selective 5-HT1A agonist, 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino) tetraline, exhibit high affinity and monophasic competition for (/sup 3/H)WB4101 but compete for multiple (/sup 3/H)LSD 5-HT1 binding sites. These data indicate that (/sup 3/H)WB4101 selectively labels the 5-HT1A serotonin receptor, whereas (/sup 3/H) LSD appears to label both the 5-HT1A and the 5-HT1B serotonin receptor subtypes. The divalent cations, Mn2+, Mg2+, and Ca2+ were found to markedly increase the affinity and Bmax of (/sup 3/H)WB4101 binding in cerebral cortex. Conversely, the guanine nucleotides guanylylimidodiphosphate and GTP, but not the adenosine nucleotide ATP, markedly reduce the Bmax of (/sup 3/H)WB4101 binding.

  4. Age-Dependent Switch of the Role of Serotonergic 5-HT1A Receptors in Gating Long-Term Potentiation in Rat Visual Cortex In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gagolewicz, Peter J.; Dringenberg, Hans C.

    2016-01-01

    The rodent primary visual cortex (V1) is densely innervated by serotonergic axons and previous in vitro work has shown that serotonin (5-HT) can modulate plasticity (e.g., long-term potentiation (LTP)) at V1 synapses. However, little work has examined the effects of 5-HT on LTP under in vivo conditions. We examined the role of 5-HT on LTP in V1 elicited by theta burst stimulation (TBS) of the lateral geniculate nucleus in urethane-anesthetized (adult and juvenile) rats. Thalamic TBS consistently induced potentiation of field postsynaptic potentials (fPSPs) recorded in V1. While 5-HT application (0.1–10 mM) itself did not alter LTP levels, the broad-acting 5-HT receptor antagonists methiothepin (1 mM) resulted in a clear facilitation of LTP in adult animals, an effect that was mimicked by the selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY 100635 (1 mM). Interestingly, in juvenile rats, WAY 100635 application inhibited LTP, indicative of an age-dependent switch in the role of 5-HT1A receptors in gating V1 plasticity. Analyses of spontaneous electrocorticographic (ECoG) activity in V1 indicated that the antagonist-induced LTP enhancement was not related to systematic changes in oscillatory activity in V1. Together, these data suggest a facilitating role of 5-HT1A receptor activation on LTP in the juvenile V1, which switches to a tonic, inhibitory influence in adulthood. PMID:27247804

  5. Activation of GABAA or 5HT1A receptors in the raphé pallidus abolish the cardiovascular responses to exogenous stress in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Pham-Le, Nhut Minh; Cockburn, Chelsea; Nowell, Katherine; Brown, Justin

    2011-11-25

    Dysfunction in serotonin (5HT) neurotransmission in the brainstem of infants may disrupt protective responses to stress and increase the risk for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). The raphé pallidus (NRP) and other brainstem nuclei are rich in 5HT and are thought to mediate stress responses, including increases in blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR). Determining how 5HT neurotransmission in the brainstem mediates responses to stress will help to explain how dysfunction in neurotransmission could increase the risk of SIDS. It was hypothesized that alterations in neurotransmission in the NRP, specifically activation of the 5HT(1A) receptor subtype, would block cardiovascular responses to various types of exogenous stress. Using aseptic techniques, male Sprague-Dawley rats were instrumented with radiotelemetry probes which enabled non-invasive measurement of BP and HR. An indwelling microinjection cannula was also stereotaxically implanted into the NRP for injection of drugs that altered local 5HT neurotransmission. Following a one week recovery period, rats were microinjected with either muscimol (GABA(A) receptor agonist), 8-OH-DPAT (agonist to the inhibitory 5HT(1A) receptor), or a vehicle control (artificial cerebral spinal fluid; ACSF) immediately prior to exposure to one of three stressors: handling, air jet, or restraint. Physical handling and restraint of the animal were designed to elicit a mild and a maximal stress response respectively; while an air jet directed at the rat's face was used to provoke a psychological stress that did not require physical contact. All three stressors elicited similar and significant elevations in HR and BP following ACSF that persisted for at least 15 min with BP and HR elevated by ∼14.0 mmHg and ∼56.3 bpm respectively. The similarity in the stress responses suggest even mild handling of a rat elicits a maximal sympathoexcitatory response. The stress response was abolished following 8-OH-DPAT or muscimol

  6. Facilitating antidepressant-like actions of estrogens are mediated by 5-HT1A and estrogen receptors in the rat forced swimming test.

    PubMed

    Estrada-Camarena, E; López-Rubalcava, C; Fernández-Guasti, A

    2006-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that 17beta-estradiol (E2) induces antidepressant-like actions per se and potentiates those produced by fluoxetine (FLX) in the forced swimming test (FST). The aim of the present work was to explore the participation of serotonin 1A receptors (5-HT1A) and estrogen receptors (ERs) in the antidepressant-like actions of E2, FLX or their combination in the FST. Although all antidepressants reduce behavioral immobility, antidepressants that modulate serotonergic neurotransmission increase swimming behavior whereas those that modulate the catecholaminergic neurotransmission increase climbing behavior. Thus, using this animal model, it is possible to infer which neurotransmitter system is modulating the action of an antidepressant compound. Ovariectomized female Wistar rats were used in all experiments. In the first experiment, an effective dose of E2 (10 microg/rat, -48 h) was combined with several doses (0.5, 1.0 and 2 mg/kg) of RU 58668 (a pure ER antagonist) 48 h previous to the FST. The second experiment evaluated the action of (1 mg/kg, -48 h or -23, -5 and -1 h) WAY 100635 (5-HT1A receptor antagonist) on the antidepressant-like action of FLX (10 mg/kg, -23, -5 and -1 h). In the third experiment, the effect of RU 58668 (2 mg/kg, -48) or WAY 100635 (1 mg/kg, -48 h) on the antidepressant-like action of the combination of a sub-optimal dose of E2 (2.5 microg/rat, -48 h) plus a non-effective dose of FLX (2.5 mg/kg, -23,-5 and -1 h) was evaluated. The results showed that RU 58668, the antagonist to the ER, canceled the antidepressant-like action of E2 in a dose-dependent manner. The antagonist to the 5-HT1A receptor blocked the antidepressant action of FLX only when administered simultaneously with FLX, i.e. -23, -5 and -1 h before the FST. Finally, the administration of both RU 58668, and WAY100635 canceled the antidepressant-like action of the combination of E2/FLX. These results imply that both 5-HT1A receptors and ERs participate in the

  7. Women with Multiple Chemical Sensitivity Have Increased Harm Avoidance and Reduced 5-HT1A Receptor Binding Potential in the Anterior Cingulate and Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Åhs, Fredrik; Savic, Ivanka

    2013-01-01

    Multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) is a common condition, characterized by somatic distress upon exposure to odors. As in other idiopathic environmental intolerances, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Contrary to the expectations it was recently found that persons with MCS activate the odor-processing brain regions less than controls, while their activation of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) is increased. The present follow-up study was designed to test the hypotheses that MCS subjects have increased harm avoidance and deviations in the serotonin system, which could render them intolerant to environmental odors. Twelve MCS and 11 control subjects, age 22–44, all working or studying females, were included in a PET study where 5-HT1A receptor binding potential (BP) was assessed after bolus injection of [11C]WAY100635. Psychological profiles were assessed by the Temperament and Character Inventory and the Swedish universities Scales of Personality. All MCS and 12 control subjects were also tested for emotional startle modulation in an acoustic startle test. MCS subjects exhibited significantly increased harm avoidance, and anxiety compared to controls. They also had a reduced 5-HT1A receptor BP in amygdala (p = 0.029), ACC (p = 0.005) (planned comparisons, significance level 0.05), and insular cortex (p = 0.003; significance level p<0.005 with Bonferroni correction), and showed an inverse correlation between degree of anxiety and the BP in the amygdala (planned comparison). No group by emotional category difference was found in the startle test. Increased harm avoidance and the observed changes in the 5-HT1A receptor BP in the regions processing harm avoidance provides a plausible pathophysiological ground for the symptoms described in MCS, and yields valuable information for our general understanding of idiopathic environmental intolerances. PMID:23349968

  8. Differential modulation of feline defensive rage behavior in the medial hypothalamus by 5-HT1A and 5-HT2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Hassanain, M; Bhatt, S; Siegel, A

    2003-08-15

    Previous studies have established that the expression of defensive rage behavior in the cat is mediated over reciprocal pathways that link the medial hypothalamus and the dorsolateral quadrant of the midbrain periaqueductal gray matter (PAG). The present study was designed to determine the roles played by 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2C) receptors in the medial hypothalamus on the expression of defensive rage behavior elicited from electrical stimulation of the PAG. Monopolar stimulating electrodes were placed in the midbrain PAG from which defensive rage behavior could be elicited by electrical stimulation. During the course of this study, defensive rage was determined by measuring the latency of the "hissing" component of this behavior. Cannula-electrodes were implanted into sites within the medial hypothalamus from which defensive rage behavior could also be elicited by electrical stimulation in order that serotonergic compounds could be microinjected into behaviorally identifiable regions of the hypothalamus at a later time. Microinjections of the 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist 8-OHDPAT (0.1, 1.0 and 3.0 nmol) into the medial hypothalamus suppressed PAG-elicited hissing in a dose-dependent manner. Administration of the 5-HT(1A) antagonist p-MPPI (3.0 nmol) blocked the suppressive effects of 8-OHDPAT upon hissing. The suppressive effects of 8-OHDPAT were specific to defensive rage behavior because this drug (3 nmol) facilitated quiet biting attack. Microinjections of the 5-HT(2C) receptor agonist (+/-)-DOI hydrochloride into the medial hypothalamus (0.5, 1.0, and 3.0 nmol) facilitated the occurrence of PAG-elicited hissing in a dose-dependent manner. In turn, these facilitating effects were blocked by pretreatment with the selective 5-HT(2) antagonist, LY-53,857, which was microinjected into the same medial hypothalamic site. The findings of this study provide evidence that activation of 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2) receptors within the medial hypothalamus exert differential modulatory

  9. Differential modulation of feline defensive rage behavior in the medial hypothalamus by 5-HT1A and 5-HT2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Hassanain, M; Bhatt, S; Siegel, A

    2003-08-15

    Previous studies have established that the expression of defensive rage behavior in the cat is mediated over reciprocal pathways that link the medial hypothalamus and the dorsolateral quadrant of the midbrain periaqueductal gray matter (PAG). The present study was designed to determine the roles played by 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2C) receptors in the medial hypothalamus on the expression of defensive rage behavior elicited from electrical stimulation of the PAG. Monopolar stimulating electrodes were placed in the midbrain PAG from which defensive rage behavior could be elicited by electrical stimulation. During the course of this study, defensive rage was determined by measuring the latency of the "hissing" component of this behavior. Cannula-electrodes were implanted into sites within the medial hypothalamus from which defensive rage behavior could also be elicited by electrical stimulation in order that serotonergic compounds could be microinjected into behaviorally identifiable regions of the hypothalamus at a later time. Microinjections of the 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist 8-OHDPAT (0.1, 1.0 and 3.0 nmol) into the medial hypothalamus suppressed PAG-elicited hissing in a dose-dependent manner. Administration of the 5-HT(1A) antagonist p-MPPI (3.0 nmol) blocked the suppressive effects of 8-OHDPAT upon hissing. The suppressive effects of 8-OHDPAT were specific to defensive rage behavior because this drug (3 nmol) facilitated quiet biting attack. Microinjections of the 5-HT(2C) receptor agonist (+/-)-DOI hydrochloride into the medial hypothalamus (0.5, 1.0, and 3.0 nmol) facilitated the occurrence of PAG-elicited hissing in a dose-dependent manner. In turn, these facilitating effects were blocked by pretreatment with the selective 5-HT(2) antagonist, LY-53,857, which was microinjected into the same medial hypothalamic site. The findings of this study provide evidence that activation of 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2) receptors within the medial hypothalamus exert differential modulatory

  10. Heterogeneous distribution of the serotonin 5-HT(1A) receptor mRNA in chemically identified neurons of the mouse rostral brainstem: Implications for the role of serotonin in the regulation of wakefulness and REM sleep.

    PubMed

    Bonnavion, Patricia; Bernard, Jean-François; Hamon, Michel; Adrien, Joëlle; Fabre, Veronique

    2010-07-15

    The 5-HT(1A) receptor (5-HT(1A)R) plays a key role in the inhibitory influence of serotonin (5-HT) on rapid eye movement (REM) sleep in rodents. However, the neuronal networks mediating such influence are mostly unknown, notably in the mouse. This led us to map 5-HT(1A)R mRNA, by in situ hybridization histochemistry (ISHH), and to characterize the neuronal phenotype of 5-HT(1A)R mRNA-positive neurons by dual ISHH and ISHH combined with immunohistochemistry, throughout the mouse rostral brainstem, a pivotal region for the generation of REM sleep and cortical activation. 5-HT(1A)R mRNA was found in most 5-HT neurons in the dorsal raphe (DR), the median raphe (MnR), the B9, and the interpeduncular (IP) nuclei. 5-HT(1A)R mRNA-positive neurons were also identified in individualized clusters of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic neurons in the DR and in neurons of an undetermined phenotype in the MnR. In addition, 1) GABAergic neurons of the ventral portion of Gudden's dorsal tegmental nucleus (DTg), the IP, and the caudal portion of the deep mesencephalic nucleus (DpMe), and 2) glutamatergic neurons scattered in the caudal pontine reticular nucleus (PnC) and densely packed in the internal lateral parabrachial subnucleus (PBil) also expressed 5-HT(1A)R mRNA. In contrast, no specific 5-HT(1A)R-related ISHH signal was generally detected in brainstem cholinergic and catecholaminergic neurons. These results emphasize the role of 5-HT(1A)R as an autoreceptor and the phenotypical heterogeneity of 5-HT(1A)R-expressing neurons within the DR and the MnR in the mouse brain. They also provide a neuroanatomical basis for understanding the influence of 5-HT(1A)R on REM sleep and wakefulness.

  11. Prophylactic effects of asiaticoside-based standardized extract of Centella asiatica (L.) Urban leaves on experimental migraine: Involvement of 5HT1A/1B receptors.

    PubMed

    Bobade, Vijeta; Bodhankar, Subhash L; Aswar, Urmila; Vishwaraman, Mohan; Thakurdesai, Prasad

    2015-04-01

    The present study aimed at evaluation of prophylactic efficacy and possible mechanisms of asiaticoside (AS) based standardized extract of Centella asiatica (L.) Urban leaves (INDCA) in animal models of migraine. The effects of oral and intranasal (i.n.) pretreatment of INDCA (acute and 7-days subacute) were evaluated against nitroglycerine (NTG, 10 mg·kg(-1), i.p.) and bradykinin (BK, 10 μg, intra-arterial) induced hyperalgesia in rats. Tail flick latencies (from 0 to 240 min) post-NTG treatment and the number of vocalizations post-BK treatment were recorded as a measure of hyperalgesia. Separate groups of rats for negative (Normal) and positive (sumatriptan, 42 mg·kg(-1), s.c.) controls were included. The interaction of INDCA with selective 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, and 5-HT1D receptor antagonists (NAN-190, Isamoltane hemifumarate, and BRL-15572 respectively) against NTG-induced hyperalgesia was also evaluated. Acute and sub-acute pre-treatment of INDCA [10 and 30 mg·kg(-1) (oral) and 100 μg/rat (i.n.) showed significant anti-nociception activity, and reversal of the NTG-induced hyperalgesia and brain 5-HT concentration decline. Oral pre-treatment with INDCA (30 mg·kg(-1), 7 d) showed significant reduction in the number of vocalization. The anti-nociceptive effects of INDCA were blocked by 5-HT1A and 5-HT1B but not 5-HT1D receptor antagonists. In conclusion, INDCA demonstrated promising anti-nociceptive effects in animal models of migraine, probably through 5-HT1A/1B medicated action.

  12. Cooperative regulation of anxiety and panic-related defensive behaviors in the rat periaqueductal grey matter by 5-HT1A and μ-receptors.

    PubMed

    Roncon, Camila M; Biesdorf, Carla; Coimbra, Norberto C; Audi, Elisabeth A; Zangrossi, Hélio; Graeff, Frederico G

    2013-12-01

    Previous results with the elevated T-maze (ETM) test indicate that the antipanic action of serotonin (5-HT) in the dorsal periaqueductal grey (dPAG) depends on the activation endogenous opioid peptides. The aim of the present work was to investigate the interaction between opioid- and serotonin-mediated neurotransmission in the modulation of defensive responses in rats submitted to the ETM. The obtained results showed that intra-dPAG administration of morphine significantly increased escape latency, a panicolytic-like effect that was blocked by pre-treatment with intra-dPAG injection of either naloxone or the 5-HT1A antagonist N-[2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1 piperazinyl] ethyl] -N- 2- pyridinyl-ciclohexanecarboxamide maleate (WAY-100635). In addition, previous administration of naloxone antagonized both the anti-escape and the anti-avoidance (anxiolytic-like) effect of the 5-HT1A agonist (±)-8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin hydrobromide (8-OH-DPAT), but did not affect the anti-escape effect of the 5-HT2A agonist (±)-2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine hydrochloride (DOI). Moreover, the combination of sub-effective doses of locally administered 5-HT and morphine significantly impaired ETM escape performance. Finally, the µ-antagonist D-PHE-CYS-TYR-D-TRP-ORN-THR-PEN (CTOP) blocked the anti-avoidance as well as the anti-escape effect of 8-OHDPAT, and the association of sub-effective doses of the µ-opioid receptor agonist [D-Ala(2), N-Me-Phe(4), Gly(5)-ol]-enkephalin acetate salt (DAMGO) and of 8-OHDPAT had anti-escape and anti-avoidance effects in the ETM. These results suggest a synergic interaction between the 5-HT1A and the µ-opioid receptor at post-synaptic level on neurons of the dPAG that regulate proximal defense, theoretically related to panic attacks.

  13. 5-HT1A receptor gene silencers Freud-1 and Freud-2 are differently expressed in the brain of rats with genetically determined high level of fear-induced aggression or its absence.

    PubMed

    Kondaurova, Elena M; Ilchibaeva, Tatiana V; Tsybko, Anton S; Kozhemyakina, Rimma V; Popova, Nina K; Naumenko, Vladimir S

    2016-09-01

    Serotonin 5-HT1A receptor is known to play a crucial role in the mechanisms of genetically defined aggression. In its turn, 5-HT1A receptor functional state is under control of multiple factors. Among others, transcriptional factors Freud-1 and Freud-2 are known to be involved in the repression of 5-HT1A receptor gene expression. However, implication of these factors in the regulation of behavior is unclear. Here, we investigated the expression of 5-HT1A receptor and silencers Freud-1 and Freud-2 in the brain of rats selectively bred for 85 generations for either high level of fear-induced aggression or its absence. It was shown that Freud-1 and Freud-2 levels were different in aggressive and nonaggressive animals. Freud-1 protein level was decreased in the hippocampus, whereas Freud-2 protein level was increased in the frontal cortex of highly aggressive rats. There no differences in 5-HT1A receptor gene expression were found in the brains of highly aggressive and nonaggressive rats. However, 5-HT1A receptor protein level was decreased in the midbrain and increased in the hippocampus of highly aggressive rats. These data showed the involvement of Freud-1 and Freud-2 in the regulation of genetically defined fear-induced aggression. However, these silencers do not affect transcription of the 5-HT1A receptor gene in the investigated rats. Our data indicate the implication of posttranscriptional rather than transcriptional regulation of 5-HT1A receptor functional state in the mechanisms of genetically determined aggressive behavior. On the other hand, the implication of other transcriptional regulators for 5-HT1A receptor gene in the mechanisms of genetically defined aggression could be suggested.

  14. Anxiolytic-like effect of (S)-WAY 100135, a 5-HT1A receptor antagonist, in the murine elevated plus-maze test.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, R J; Cole, J C

    1994-08-22

    The effects of (S)-WAY 100135 ((S)-N-tert-butyl-3-(4-(2-methoxyphenyl)- piperazin-1-yl)-2-phenyl-propanamide dihydrochloride; 2.5-20.0 mg/kg), a 5-HT1A receptor antagonist, on the behaviour of male mice were examined in the elevated plus-maze test of anxiety. An ethological scoring technique was used to provide a comprehensive profile of drug action. Only minor changes in behaviour were observed at 2.5 and 5.0 mg/kg, and consisted of reductions in some (though not all) risk assessment measures. At 10 mg/kg, the compound increased percent open arm entries and percent open arm time, without altering general activity levels. This classic anxiolytic-like profile was confirmed by major reductions in risk assessment measures including protected head-dips and protected stretched attend postures. Although many of the same changes were also observed at 20 mg/kg, the absence of an effect on percent open arm time and a tendency towards increased non-exploratory behaviour suggested (1) some loss of anxiolytic activity and (2) a possible contribution of non-specific factors at higher doses. Present findings indicate that (S)-WAY 100135 produces clear anxiolytic-like effects in the murine elevated plus-maze, a profile that can be distinguished from that produced by 5-HT1A receptor partial agonists in the same test.

  15. Stimulation of hippocampal 5-HT1A receptors causes amnesia and anxiolytic-like but not antidepressant-like effects in the rat.

    PubMed

    Carli, M; Tatarczynska, E; Cervo, L; Samanin, R

    1993-04-01

    Administration of 2 and 5 but not 0.4 microgram/microliter 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) into the CA1 region of the dorsal hippocampus 10 min before the acquisition trial in a passive avoidance task significantly reduced retention latencies 24 h later. The effect of 5 micrograms 8-OH-DPAT on retention latencies was completely antagonized by 1 microgram/microliter spiroxatrine, a 5-HT1A receptor antagonist, infused into the dorsal hippocampus 5 min before 8-OH-DPAT. Administered 5 min after the acquisition trial, 5 micrograms/microliters 8-OH-DPAT had no effect on retention latencies 24 h later. Administration of 5 micrograms/microliters 8-OH-DPAT into the dorsal hippocampus did not significantly change the thresholds for responses to the same electrical stimuli used in the passive avoidance task and had no antidepressant-like effect in the forced swimming test. The dose of 5 micrograms/microliters 8-OH-DPAT administered into the dorsal hippocampus caused anxiolytic-like effects assessed by stress-induced deficit in open field locomotor activity. The results suggest that stimulation of 5-HT1A receptors in the dorsal hippocampus impairs rats' performance in a passive avoidance task by interfering with memory processes or by attenuating the emotional impact of the shock through an anxiolytic action.

  16. Distinct effect of 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors in the medial nucleus of the amygdala on tonic immobility behavior.

    PubMed

    de Paula, Bruna Balbino; Leite-Panissi, Christie Ramos Andrade

    2016-07-15

    The tonic immobility (TI) response is an innate fear behavior associated with intensely dangerous situations, exhibited by many species of invertebrate and vertebrate animals. In humans, it is possible that TI predicts the severity of posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms. This behavioral response is initiated and sustained by the stimulation of various groups of neurons distributed in the telencephalon, diencephalon and brainstem. Previous research has found the highest Fos-IR in the posteroventral part of the medial nucleus of the amygdala (MEA) during TI behavior; however, the neurotransmission of this amygdaloid region involved in the modulation of this innate fear behavior still needs to be clarified. Considering that a major drug class used for the treatment of psychopathology is based on serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmission, we investigated the effects of serotonergic receptor activation in the MEA on the duration of TI. The results indicate that the activation of the 5HT1A receptors or the blocking of the 5HT2 receptors of the MEA can promote a reduction in fear and/or anxiety, consequently decreasing TI duration in guinea pigs. In contrast, blocking the 5HT1A receptors or activating the 5HT2 receptors in this amygdalar region increased the TI duration, suggesting an increase in fear and/or anxiety. These alterations do not appear to be due to a modification of spontaneous motor activity, which might non-specifically affect TI duration. Thus, these results suggest a distinct role of the 5HT receptors in the MEA in innate fear modulation. PMID:27150816

  17. The role of 5-HT1A and 5-HT1B receptors in antidepressant drug actions in the mouse forced swimming test.

    PubMed

    Redrobe, J P; MacSweeney, C P; Bourin, M

    1996-12-30

    The forced swimming test is a behavioural model developed to predict the efficacy of antidepressant drugs. Few studies have been aimed at evaluating the mechanism of action of antidepressants in the forced swimming test. The present study was designed in order to further evaluate the mode of action of antidepressants in the forced swimming test, by using selective agonists and antagonists at 5-HT1A and 5-HT1B receptor sites. Agonists/antagonists and antidepressants were administered 45 min and 30 min, respectively, prior to testing. Prior administration of 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) (1 mg/kg, i.p.) induced anti-immobility effects with the tricyclic antidepressant imipramine (8 mg/kg, i.p.) and noradrenaline uptake inhibitors maprotiline (8 mg/kg, i.p.) and desipramine (16 mg/kg, i.p.), but not with fluoxetine (16 mg/kg, i.p.), citalopram (16 mg/kg, i.p.) or fluvoxamine (8 mg/kg, i.p.). These effects were antagonised by prior administration of 1-(2-methoxyphenyl)-4-[-(2-phthalimido)butyl]piperazine) (NAN 190) (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.). On the other hand, pretreatment with (+/-)-pindolol (32 mg/kg, i.p.) potentiated the effects of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and was devoid of any activity with imipramine (8 mg/kg, i.p.), maprotiline (8 mg/kg, i.p.) or desipramine (16 mg/kg, i.p.). Prior administration of 5-methoxy-3-(1,2,3,6-tetrahydro-4-pyridyl)-1H-indole (RU 24969) enhanced the antidepressant-like effects of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and imipramine (8 mg/kg, i.p.) in the forced swimming test. The anti-immobility effects of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in the forced swimming test seem to be mediated by presynaptic 5-HT1A receptors as well as postsynaptic 5-HT1B receptors. Antidepressant-like effects of the noradrenaline uptake inhibitors seem, on the other hand, to be mediated by postsynaptic 5-HT1A receptors. Considering the variety of 5-HT receptors, it is possible that other subtypes may participate

  18. Enhanced effects of amphetamine but reduced effects of the hallucinogen, 5-MeO-DMT, on locomotor activity in 5-HT(1A) receptor knockout mice: implications for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    van den Buuse, Maarten; Ruimschotel, Emma; Martin, Sally; Risbrough, Victoria B; Halberstadt, Adam L

    2011-01-01

    Serotonin-1A (5-HT(1A)) receptors may play a role in schizophrenia and the effects of certain antipsychotic drugs. However, the mechanism of interaction of 5-HT(1A) receptors with brain systems involved in schizophrenia, remains unclear. Here we show that 5-HT(1A) receptor knockout mice display enhanced locomotor hyperactivity to acute treatment with amphetamine, a widely used animal model of hyperdopaminergic mechanisms in psychosis. In contrast, the effect of MK-801 on locomotor activity, modeling NMDA receptor hypoactivity, was unchanged in the knockouts. The effect of the hallucinogen 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT) was markedly reduced in 5-HT(1A) receptor knockout mice. There were no changes in apomorphine-induced disruption of PPI, a model of sensory gating deficits seen in schizophrenia. Similarly, there were no major changes in density of dopamine transporters (DAT) or dopamine D(1) or D(2) receptors which could explain the behavioural changes observed in 5-HT(1A) receptor knockout mice. These results extend our insight into the possible role of these receptors in aspects of schizophrenia. As also suggested by previous studies using agonist and antagonist drugs, 5-HT(1A) receptors may play an important role in hallucinations and to modulate dopaminergic activity in the brain.

  19. Effect of dopaminergic D1 receptors on plasticity is dependent of serotoninergic 5-HT1A receptors in L5-pyramidal neurons of the prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Claire Nicole Jeanne; Callebert, Jacques; Cancela, José-Manuel; Fossier, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Major depression and schizophrenia are associated with dysfunctions of serotoninergic and dopaminergic systems mainly in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). Both serotonin and dopamine are known to modulate synaptic plasticity. 5-HT1A receptors (5-HT1ARs) and dopaminergic type D1 receptors are highly represented on dendritic spines of layer 5 pyramidal neurons (L5PyNs) in PFC. How these receptors interact to tune plasticity is poorly understood. Here we show that D1-like receptors (D1Rs) activation requires functional 5HT1ARs to facilitate LTP induction at the expense of LTD. Using 129/Sv and 5-HT1AR-KO mice, we recorded post-synaptic currents evoked by electrical stimulation in layer 2/3 after activation or inhibition of D1Rs. High frequency stimulation resulted in the induction of LTP, LTD or no plasticity. The D1 agonist markedly enhanced the NMDA current in 129/Sv mice and the percentage of L5PyNs displaying LTP was enhanced whereas LTD was reduced. In 5-HT1AR-KO mice, the D1 agonist failed to increase the NMDA current and orientated the plasticity towards L5PyNs displaying LTD, thus revealing a prominent role of 5-HT1ARs in dopamine-induced modulation of plasticity. Our data suggest that in pathological situation where 5-HT1ARs expression varies, dopaminergic treatment used for its ability to increase LTP could turn to be less and less effective. PMID:25775449

  20. Effect of Dopaminergic D1 Receptors on Plasticity Is Dependent of Serotoninergic 5-HT1A Receptors in L5-Pyramidal Neurons of the Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Meunier, Claire Nicole Jeanne; Callebert, Jacques; Cancela, José-Manuel; Fossier, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Major depression and schizophrenia are associated with dysfunctions of serotoninergic and dopaminergic systems mainly in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). Both serotonin and dopamine are known to modulate synaptic plasticity. 5-HT1A receptors (5-HT1ARs) and dopaminergic type D1 receptors are highly represented on dendritic spines of layer 5 pyramidal neurons (L5PyNs) in PFC. How these receptors interact to tune plasticity is poorly understood. Here we show that D1-like receptors (D1Rs) activation requires functional 5HT1ARs to facilitate LTP induction at the expense of LTD. Using 129/Sv and 5-HT1AR-KO mice, we recorded post-synaptic currents evoked by electrical stimulation in layer 2/3 after activation or inhibition of D1Rs. High frequency stimulation resulted in the induction of LTP, LTD or no plasticity. The D1 agonist markedly enhanced the NMDA current in 129/Sv mice and the percentage of L5PyNs displaying LTP was enhanced whereas LTD was reduced. In 5-HT1AR-KO mice, the D1 agonist failed to increase the NMDA current and orientated the plasticity towards L5PyNs displaying LTD, thus revealing a prominent role of 5-HT1ARs in dopamine-induced modulation of plasticity. Our data suggest that in pathological situation where 5-HT1ARs expression varies, dopaminergic treatment used for its ability to increase LTP could turn to be less and less effective. PMID:25775449

  1. Third Trimester Equivalent Alcohol Exposure Reduces Modulation of Glutamatergic Synaptic Transmission by 5-HT1A Receptors in the Rat Hippocampal CA3 Region.

    PubMed

    Morton, Russell A; Valenzuela, C Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Fetal alcohol exposure has been associated with many neuropsychiatric disorders that have been linked to altered serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) signaling, including depression and anxiety. During the first 2 weeks of postnatal life in rodents (equivalent to the third trimester of human pregnancy) 5-HT neurons undergo significant functional maturation and their axons reach target regions in the forebrain (e.g., cortex and hippocampus). The objective of this study was to identify the effects of third trimester ethanol (EtOH) exposure on hippocampal 5-HT signaling. Using EtOH vapor inhalation chambers, we exposed rat pups to EtOH for 4 h/day from postnatal day (P) 2 to P12. The average serum EtOH concentration in the pups was 0.13 ± 0.04 g/dl (legal intoxication limit in humans = 0.08 g/dl). We used brain slices to assess the modulatory actions of 5-HT on field excitatory postsynaptic potentials in the hippocampal CA3 region at P13-P15. Application of the GABAA/glycine receptor antagonist, picrotoxin, caused broadening of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs), an effect that was reversed by application of 5-HT in slices from air exposed rats. However, this effect of 5-HT was absent in EtOH exposed animals. In slices from naïve animals, application of a 5-HT1A receptor antagonist blocked the effect of 5-HT on the fEPSPs recorded in presence of picrotoxin, suggesting that third trimester ethanol exposure acts by inhibiting the function of these receptors. Studies indicate that 5-HT1A receptors play a critical role in the development of hippocampal circuits. Therefore, inhibition of these receptors by third trimester ethanol exposure could contribute to the pathophysiology of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. PMID:27375424

  2. Third Trimester Equivalent Alcohol Exposure Reduces Modulation of Glutamatergic Synaptic Transmission by 5-HT1A Receptors in the Rat Hippocampal CA3 Region

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Russell A.; Valenzuela, C. Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Fetal alcohol exposure has been associated with many neuropsychiatric disorders that have been linked to altered serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) signaling, including depression and anxiety. During the first 2 weeks of postnatal life in rodents (equivalent to the third trimester of human pregnancy) 5-HT neurons undergo significant functional maturation and their axons reach target regions in the forebrain (e.g., cortex and hippocampus). The objective of this study was to identify the effects of third trimester ethanol (EtOH) exposure on hippocampal 5-HT signaling. Using EtOH vapor inhalation chambers, we exposed rat pups to EtOH for 4 h/day from postnatal day (P) 2 to P12. The average serum EtOH concentration in the pups was 0.13 ± 0.04 g/dl (legal intoxication limit in humans = 0.08 g/dl). We used brain slices to assess the modulatory actions of 5-HT on field excitatory postsynaptic potentials in the hippocampal CA3 region at P13-P15. Application of the GABAA/glycine receptor antagonist, picrotoxin, caused broadening of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs), an effect that was reversed by application of 5-HT in slices from air exposed rats. However, this effect of 5-HT was absent in EtOH exposed animals. In slices from naïve animals, application of a 5-HT1A receptor antagonist blocked the effect of 5-HT on the fEPSPs recorded in presence of picrotoxin, suggesting that third trimester ethanol exposure acts by inhibiting the function of these receptors. Studies indicate that 5-HT1A receptors play a critical role in the development of hippocampal circuits. Therefore, inhibition of these receptors by third trimester ethanol exposure could contribute to the pathophysiology of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. PMID:27375424

  3. Involvement of 5-HT1A Receptors in the Anxiolytic-Like Effects of Quercitrin and Evidence of the Involvement of the Monoaminergic System

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian; Liu, Qian-tong; Chen, Yi; Liu, Jie; Shi, Jin-li; Liu, Yong; Guo, Jian-you

    2016-01-01

    Quercitrin is a well-known flavonoid that is contained in Flos Albiziae, which has been used for the treatment of anxiety. The present study investigated the anxiolytic-like effects of quercitrin in experimental models of anxiety. Compared with the control group, repeated treatment with quercitrin (5.0 and 10.0 mg/kg/day, p.o.) for seven days significantly increased the percentage of entries into and time spent on the open arms of the elevated plus maze. In the light/dark box test, quercitrin exerted an anxiolytic-like effect at 5 and 10 mg/kg. In the marble-burying test, quercitrin (5.0 and 10.0 mg/kg) also exerted an anxiolytic-like effect. Furthermore, quercitrin did not affect spontaneous locomotor activity. The anxiolytic-like effects of quercitrin in the elevated plus maze and light/dark box test were blocked by the serotonin-1A (5-hydroxytryptamine-1A (5-HT1A)) receptor antagonist WAY-100635 (3.0 mg/kg, i.p.) but not by the γ-aminobutyric acid-A (GABAA) receptor antagonist flumazenil (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.). The levels of brain monoamines (5-HT and dopamine) and their metabolites (5-hydroxy-3-indoleacetic acid, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, and homovanillic acid) were decreased after quercitrin treatment. These data suggest that the anxiolytic-like effects of quercitrin might be mediated by 5-HT1A receptors but not by benzodiazepine site of GABAA receptors. The results of the neurochemical studies suggest that these effects are mediated by modulation of the levels of monoamine neurotransmitters. PMID:27298626

  4. An Orally Active Phenylaminotetralin-Chemotype Serotonin 5-HT7 and 5-HT1A Receptor Partial Agonist that Corrects Motor Stereotypy in Mouse Models.

    PubMed

    Canal, Clinton E; Felsing, Daniel E; Liu, Yue; Zhu, Wanying; Wood, JodiAnne T; Perry, Charles K; Vemula, Rajender; Booth, Raymond G

    2015-07-15

    Stereotypy (e.g., repetitive hand waving) is a key phenotype of autism spectrum disorder, Fragile X and Rett syndromes, and other neuropsychiatric disorders, and its severity correlates with cognitive and attention deficits. There are no effective treatments, however, for stereotypy. Perturbation of serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmission contributes to stereotypy, suggesting that distinct 5-HT receptors may be pharmacotherapeutic targets to treat stereotypy and related neuropsychiatric symptoms. For example, preclinical studies indicate that 5-HT7 receptor activation corrects deficits in mouse models of Fragile X and Rett syndromes, and clinical trials for autism are underway with buspirone, a 5-HT1A partial agonist with relevant affinity at 5-HT7 receptors. Herein, we report the synthesis, in vitro molecular pharmacology, behavioral pharmacology, and pharmacokinetic parameters in mice after subcutaneous and oral administration of (+)-5-(2'-fluorophenyl)-N,N-dimethyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalen-2-amine ((+)-5-FPT), a new, dual partial agonist targeting both 5-HT7 (Ki = 5.8 nM, EC50 = 34 nM) and 5-HT1A (Ki = 22 nM, EC50 = 40 nM) receptors. Three unique, heterogeneous mouse models were used to assess the efficacy of (+)-5-FPT to reduce stereotypy: idiopathic jumping in C58/J mice, repetitive body rotations in C57BL/6J mice treated with the NMDA antagonist, MK-801, and repetitive head twitching in C57BL/6J mice treated with the 5-HT2 agonist, DOI. Systemic (+)-5-FPT potently and efficaciously reduced or eliminated stereotypy in each of the mouse models without altering locomotor behavior on its own, and additional tests showed that (+)-5-FPT, at the highest behaviorally active dose tested, enhanced social interaction and did not cause behaviors indicative of serotonin syndrome. These data suggest that (+)-5-FPT is a promising medication for treating stereotypy in psychiatric disorders.

  5. Antidepressant-like activity of Tagetes lucida Cav. is mediated by 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Bonilla-Jaime, H; Guadarrama-Cruz, G; Alarcon-Aguilar, F J; Limón-Morales, O; Vazquez-Palacios, G

    2015-10-01

    It has been demonstrated that the aqueous extract of Tagetes lucida Cav. shows an antidepressant-like effect on the forced swimming test (FST) in rats. The aim of this study was to analyze the participation of the serotoninergic system in the antidepressant-like effect of the aqueous extract of T. lucida. Different doses of the extract of T. lucida were administered at 72, 48, 24, 18 and 1 h before FST. The animals were pretreated with a 5-HT1A receptor antagonist (WAY-100635, 0.5 mg/kg), a 5-HT2A receptor antagonist (ketanserin, 5 mg/kg), a β-noradrenergic receptor antagonist (propranolol, 200 mg/kg), and with a α2-noradrenergic receptor antagonist (yohimbine, 1 mg/kg) alone or combined with the extract and pretreated with a serotonin synthesis inhibitor (PCPA) before treatment with 8-OH-DPAT + the extract of T. lucida. In addition, suboptimal doses of the 5-HT1A agonist (8-OH-DPAT) + non-effective dose of extract was analyzed in the FST. To determine the presence of flavonoids, the aqueous extract of T. lucida (20 µl, 4 mg/ml) was injected in HPLC; however, a quercetin concentration of 7.72 mg/g of extract weight was detected. A suboptimal dose of 8-OH-DPAT + extract of T. lucida decreased immobility and increased swimming and climbing. An antidepressant-like effect with the aqueous extract of T. lucida at doses of 100 and 200 mg/kg was observed on the FST with decreased immobility behavior and increased swimming; however, this effect was blocked by WAY-100635, ketanserin and PCPA but not by yohimbine and propranolol, suggesting that the extract of T. lucida could be modulating the release/reuptake of serotonin.

  6. Differential effects of the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)1A receptor inverse agonists Rec 27/0224 and Rec 27/0074 on electrophysiological responses to 5-HT1A receptor activation in rat dorsal raphe nucleus and hippocampus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Corradetti, Renato; Mlinar, Boris; Falsini, Chiara; Pugliese, Anna Maria; Cilia, Antonio; Destefani, Carla; Testa, Rodolfo

    2005-10-01

    The pharmacological properties of cyclohexanecarboxylic acid, {2-[4-(2-bromo-5-methoxybenzyl)piperazin-1-yl]ethyl}-(2-trifluoromethoxyphenyl)amide (Rec 27/0224), and cyclohexanecarboxylic acid, (2-methoxy-phenyl)-{2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-piperazin-1-yl]ethyl}amide (Rec 27/0074), were characterized using radioligand displacement and guanosine 5'-O-(3-[35S]thiotriphosphate) ([35S]GTPgammaS) binding assays, as well as electrophysiological experiments, in rat hippocampal and dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) slices. Both compounds showed a high affinity (Ki, approximately 1 nM) and selectivity (>70-fold) at human 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)1A receptors versus other 5-HT receptors. In [35S]GTPgammaS binding assays on HeLa cells stably expressing human 5-HT1A receptors, Rec 27/0224 and Rec 27/0074 inhibited basal [35S]GTPgammaS binding by 44.8 +/- 1.7% (pEC50 = 8.58) and 25 +/- 2.5% (pEC50 = 8.86), respectively. In intracellularly recorded CA1 pyramidal cells, 5-HT1A (hetero)receptor-mediated hyperpolarization, elicited by 100 nM 5-carboxamidoytryptamine (5-CT), was partially antagonized by Rec 27/0224 (approximately 50%; IC50 = 18.0 nM) and Rec 27/0074 (74%; IC50 = 0.8 nM). In extracellularly recorded DRN serotonergic neurons, Rec 27/0224 and Rec 27/0074 fully antagonized the inhibition of firing caused by the activation of 5-HT1A (auto)receptors by 30 nM 5-CT with an IC50 of 34.9 nM and 16.5 nM, respectively. The antagonism had a slow time course, reaching a steady state within 60 min. Both compounds also antagonized the citalopram-elicited, endogenous 5-HT-mediated inhibition of cell firing. In conclusion, Rec 27/0224 and Rec 27/0074 exhibited inverse agonism in [35S]GTPgammaS binding assays and differential antagonistic properties on 5-HT1A receptor-mediated responses in the hippocampus but not in the DRN. Whether this differential effect is causally related to inverse agonist activity is unclear. The qualitatively different nature of the antagonism in the hippocampus versus

  7. 5-HT1A Receptors on Mature Dentate Gyrus Granule Cells are Critical for the Antidepressant Response

    PubMed Central

    Samuels, Benjamin Adam; Anacker, Christoph; Hu, Alice; Levinstein, Marjorie R.; Pickenhagen, Anouchka; Tsetsenis, Theodore; Madroñal, Noelia; Donaldson, Zoe R.; Drew, Liam John; Dranovsky, Alex; Gross, Cornelius T.; Tanaka, Kenji F.; Hen, René

    2015-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are widely used antidepressants, but the mechanisms by which they influence behavior are only partially resolved. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is necessary for some of the responses to SSRIs, but it is unknown whether the mature dentate gyrus granule cells (mature DG GCs) also contribute. We deleted Serotonin 1A receptor (5HT1AR; a receptor required for the SSRI response) specifically from DG GCs and found that the effects of the SSRI fluoxetine on behavior and the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal (HPA) axis were abolished. By contrast, mice lacking 5HT1ARs only in young adult born granule cells (abGCs) showed normal fluoxetine responses. Importantly, 5HT1AR deficient mice engineered to express functional 5HT1ARs only in DG GCs responded to fluoxetine, indicating that 5HT1ARs in DG GCs are sufficient to mediate an antidepressant response. Taken together, these data indicate that both mature DG GCs and young abGCs must be engaged for an antidepressant response. PMID:26389840

  8. Expression of the 5-HT1A Serotonin Receptor in the Hippocampus Is Required for Social Stress Resilience and the Antidepressant-Like Effects Induced by the Nicotinic Partial Agonist Cytisine

    PubMed Central

    Mineur, Yann S; Einstein, Emily B; Bentham, Matthew P; Wigestrand, Mattis B; Blakeman, Sam; Newbold, Sylvia A; Picciotto, Marina R

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) blockers potentiate the effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in some treatment-resistant patients; however, it is not known whether these effects are independent, or whether the two neurotransmitter systems act synergistically. We first determined that the SSRI fluoxetine and the nicotinic partial agonist cytisine have synergistic effects in a mouse model of antidepressant efficacy, whereas serotonin depletion blocked the effects of cytisine. Using a pharmacological approach, we found that the 5-HT1A agonist 8-OH-DPAT also potentiated the antidepressant-like effects of cytisine, suggesting that this subtype might mediate the interaction between the serotonergic and cholinergic systems. The 5-HT1A receptors are located both presynaptically and postsynaptically. We therefore knocked down 5-HT1A receptors in either the dorsal raphe (presynaptic autoreceptors) or the hippocampus (a brain area with high expression of 5-HT1A heteroreceptors sensitive to cholinergic effects on affective behaviors). Knockdown of 5-HT1A receptors in hippocampus, but not dorsal raphe, significantly decreased the antidepressant-like effect of cytisine. This study suggests that serotonin signaling through postsynaptic 5-HT1A receptors in the hippocampus is critical for the antidepressant-like effects of a cholinergic drug and begins to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying interactions between the serotonergic and cholinergic systems related to mood disorders. PMID:25288485

  9. Expression of the 5-HT1A serotonin receptor in the hippocampus is required for social stress resilience and the antidepressant-like effects induced by the nicotinic partial agonist cytisine.

    PubMed

    Mineur, Yann S; Einstein, Emily B; Bentham, Matthew P; Wigestrand, Mattis B; Blakeman, Sam; Newbold, Sylvia A; Picciotto, Marina R

    2015-03-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) blockers potentiate the effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in some treatment-resistant patients; however, it is not known whether these effects are independent, or whether the two neurotransmitter systems act synergistically. We first determined that the SSRI fluoxetine and the nicotinic partial agonist cytisine have synergistic effects in a mouse model of antidepressant efficacy, whereas serotonin depletion blocked the effects of cytisine. Using a pharmacological approach, we found that the 5-HT1A agonist 8-OH-DPAT also potentiated the antidepressant-like effects of cytisine, suggesting that this subtype might mediate the interaction between the serotonergic and cholinergic systems. The 5-HT1A receptors are located both presynaptically and postsynaptically. We therefore knocked down 5-HT1A receptors in either the dorsal raphe (presynaptic autoreceptors) or the hippocampus (a brain area with high expression of 5-HT1A heteroreceptors sensitive to cholinergic effects on affective behaviors). Knockdown of 5-HT1A receptors in hippocampus, but not dorsal raphe, significantly decreased the antidepressant-like effect of cytisine. This study suggests that serotonin signaling through postsynaptic 5-HT1A receptors in the hippocampus is critical for the antidepressant-like effects of a cholinergic drug and begins to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying interactions between the serotonergic and cholinergic systems related to mood disorders.

  10. Cannabidiol inhibits the reward-facilitating effect of morphine: involvement of 5-HT1A receptors in the dorsal raphe nucleus.

    PubMed

    Katsidoni, Vicky; Anagnostou, Ilektra; Panagis, George

    2013-03-01

    Cannabidiol is a non-psychotomimetic constituent of Cannabis sativa, which induces central effects in rodents. It has been shown that cannabidiol attenuates cue-induced reinstatement of heroin seeking. However, to the best of our knowledge, its effects on brain stimulation reward and the reward-facilitating effects of drugs of abuse have not yet been examined. Therefore, we investigated the effects of cannabidiol on brain reward function and on the reward-facilitating effect of morphine and cocaine using the intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) paradigm. Rats were prepared with a stimulating electrode into the medial forebrain bundle (MFB), and a guide cannula into the dorsal raphe (microinjection experiments), and were trained to respond for electrical brain stimulation. A low dose of cannabidiol did not affect the reinforcing efficacy of brain stimulation, whereas higher doses significantly elevated the threshold frequency required for MFB ICSS. Both cocaine and morphine lowered ICSS thresholds. Cannabidiol inhibited the reward-facilitating effect of morphine, but not cocaine. This effect was reversed by pre-treatment with an intra-dorsal raphe injection of the selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY-100635. The present findings indicate that cannabidiol does not exhibit reinforcing properties in the ICSS paradigm at any of the doses tested, while it decreases the reward-facilitating effects of morphine. These effects were mediated by activation of 5-HT1A receptors in the dorsal raphe. Our results suggest that cannabidiol interferes with brain reward mechanisms responsible for the expression of the acute reinforcing properties of opioids, thus indicating that cannabidiol may be clinically useful in attenuating the rewarding effects of opioids.

  11. The spleen is required for 5-HT1A receptor agonist-mediated increases in mean circulatory filling pressure during hemorrhagic shock in the rat.

    PubMed

    Tiniakov, Ruslan; Scrogin, Karie E

    2009-05-01

    The 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist, 8- OH-DPAT, increases whole body venous tone (mean circulatory filling pressure; MCFP), and attenuates metabolic acidosis in a rat model of unresuscitated hemorrhagic shock. To determine whether improved acid-base balance was associated with sympathetic activation and venous constriction, MCFP, sympathetic activity (SA), and blood gases were compared in hemorrhaged rats following administration of 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT, the arterial vasoconstrictor arginine vasopressin (AVP), or saline. To further determine whether protection of acid-base balance was dependent on splenic contraction and blood mobilization, central venous pressure (CVP), MCFP, and blood gases were determined during hemorrhage and subsequent 8-OH-DPAT-administration in rats subjected to real or sham splenectomy. Subjects were hemorrhaged to an arterial pressure of 50 mmHg for 25 min and subsequently were treated with 8-OH-DPAT (30 nmol/kg iv), AVP titrated to match the pressor effect of 8-OH-DPAT (approximately 2 ng/min iv), or infusion of normal saline. 8-OH-DPAT increased MAP, CVP, MCFP, and SA, and decreased lactate accumulation. AVP did not affect CVP or SA, but raised MCFP slightly to a level intermediate between 8-OH-DPAT- and saline-treated rats. Infusion of AVP also produced a modest protection against metabolic acidosis. Splenectomy prevented the rise in CVP, MCFP, and protection against metabolic acidosis produced by 8-OH-DPAT but had no effect on the immediate pressor response to the drug. Together, the data indicate that 8-OH-DPAT produces a pattern of cardiovascular responses consistent with a sympathetic-mediated venoconstriction that is, in part, responsible for the drug's beneficial effect on acid-base balance. Moreover, blood mobilization stimulated by the spleen is required for the beneficial effects of 8-OH-DPAT.

  12. 5-HT1A receptor gene C -1019 G polymorphism and amygdala volume in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Zetzsche, T; Preuss, U W; Bondy, B; Frodl, T; Zill, P; Schmitt, G; Koutsouleris, N; Rujescu, D; Born, C; Reiser, M; Möller, H-J; Meisenzahl, E M

    2008-04-01

    Alterations of amygdala structure and function have been repeatedly described in patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD). The aim of our study was to determine whether a functional polymorphism of the 5-hydroxytryptamine(1A) receptor (5-HTR(1A)) gene C -1019 G (identity number: rs6295 G/C) is associated with structural changes of the amygdala in patients with BPD. Twenty-five right-handed female inpatients with BPD according to DSM IV and 25 healthy controls matched for age, sex, handedness and educational status were enrolled. Brain volumetry of the amygdala was performed with a 1.5-T Magnetom Vision apparatus (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) and analyzed by the software program 'BRAINS'. Patients who have the 5-HTR(1A) gene G allele had significantly smaller amygdala volumes than C/C genotype carriers (P = 0.02). While no difference of allelic distribution between patients and controls was detected, the described effect of 5-HTR(1A) genotype on amygdala volume was found for the whole group of patients, as well as in the subgroup of patients with comorbid major depression (P = 0.004) but not in controls. In contrast to these subgroups of BPD patients who had significant amygdala volume differences, the mean amygdala volume of the whole group of BPD patients was not significantly different from that of controls. In summary, our study provides first evidence that 5-HTR(1A) gene C -1019 G polymorphism is associated with structural changes in the limbic system of BPD patients, a finding that might be disease related and might contribute to explanation of previous discrepant results regarding amygdala volume changes in BPD. Future research is recommended to clarify possible interactions between this functional polymorphism and symptoms, course and treatment responses in this disorder.

  13. Synthesis and structure-affinity relationships of novel small molecule natural product derivatives capable of discriminating between serotonin 5-HT1A, 5-HT2A, 5-HT2C receptor subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, David F.; Canseco, Diana C.; Sheth, Pratikkumar; Johnson, James E.; Schetz, John A.

    2010-01-01

    Efforts to develop ligands that distinguish between clinically relevant 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C serotonin receptor subtypes have been challenging, because their sequences have high homology. Previous studies reported that a novel aplysinopsin belonging to a chemical class of natural products isolated from a marine sponge was selective for the 5-HT2C over the 5-HT2A receptor subtype. Our goal was to explore the 5-HT2A/2C receptor structure-affinity relationships of derivatives based on the aplysinopsin natural product pharmacophore. Twenty aplysinopsin derivatives were synthesized, purified and tested for their affinities for cloned human serotonin 5-HT1A, 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptor subtypes. Four compounds in this series had >30-fold selectivity for 5-HT2A or 5-HT2C receptors. The compound (E)-5-((5,6-dichloro-1H-indol-3-yl)methylene)-2-imino-1,3-dimethylimidazolidin-4-one (UNT-TWU-22, 16) had approximately 2100-fold selectivity for the serotonin 5-HT2C receptor subtype: an affinity for 5-HT2C equal to 46 nM and no detectable affinity for the 5-HT1A or 5-HT2A receptor subtypes. The two most important factors controlling 5-HT2A or 5-HT2C receptor subtype selectivity were the combined R1, R3-alkylation of the imidazolidinone ring and the type and number of halogens on the indole ring of the aplysinopsin pharmacophore. PMID:20570529

  14. Central amygdala nicotinic and 5-HT1A receptors mediate the reversal effect of nicotine and MDMA on morphine-induced amnesia.

    PubMed

    Tirgar, F; Rezayof, A; Zarrindast, M-R

    2014-09-26

    The present study was designed to investigate possible involvement of the central amygdala (CeA) nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) and 5-hydroxytryptamine 1A (5-HT1A) receptors in the reversal effect of nicotine and 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine (MDMA or ecstasy) on morphine-induced amnesia. Two guide cannulas were stereotaxically implanted in the CeA regions and a step-through passive avoidance task was used for the assessment of memory retrieval in adult male Wistar rats. Our results indicated that post-training s.c. administration of morphine (3-7-mg/kg) impaired memory retrieval. Pre-test administration of nicotine (0.3- and 0.5-mg/kg, s.c.) reversed morphine-induced amnesia. In addition, pre-test intra-CeA injection of MDMA (1-2-μg/rat) with an ineffective dose of nicotine (0.1-mg/kg, s.c.) improved memory retrieval, suggesting the interactive effect of the drugs on memory formation. It should be noted that that pre-test intra-CeA injection of 2-μg/rat of MDMA by itself produced amnesia. Interestingly, pre-test intra-CeA injection of mecamylamine, a nACh receptor antagonist (1-2-μg/rat) or (S)-WAY 100135 (0.25-1-μg/rat), a selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist inhibited the improvement of morphine-induced amnesia which was produced by pre-test co-injection of nicotine and MDMA. Pre-test intra-CeA injection of the same doses of MDMA, mecamylamine or (S)-WAY 100135 by itself had no effect on morphine-induced amnesia. Moreover, pre-test injection of the same doses of mecamylamine or (S)-WAY 100135 into the CeA alone could not change memory retrieval. Taken together, it can be concluded that there is a functional interaction between morphine, nicotine and MDMA via the CeA nicotinic and serotonergic receptor mechanisms in passive avoidance memory retrieval. Moreover, cross state-dependent memory retrieval may have been induced between the drugs and this probably depends on the rewarding effects of the drugs.

  15. Potentiation of 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine-induced hyperthermia by harmaline and the involvement of activation of 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xi-Ling; Shen, Hong-Wu; Yu, Ai-Ming

    2015-02-01

    5-Methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT) and harmaline are serotonin (5-HT) analogs often abused together, which alters thermoregulation that may indicate the severity of serotonin toxicity. Our recent studies have revealed that co-administration of monoamine oxidase inhibitor harmaline leads to greater and prolonged exposure to 5-HT agonist 5-MeO-DMT that might be influenced by cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) status. This study was to define the effects of harmaline and 5-MeO-DMT on thermoregulation in wild-type and CYP2D6-humanized (Tg-CYP2D6) mice, as well as the involvement of 5-HT receptors. Animal core body temperatures were monitored noninvasively in the home cages after implantation of telemetry transmitters and administration of drugs. Harmaline (5 and 15 mg/kg, i.p.) alone was shown to induce hypothermia that was significantly affected by CYP2D6 status. In contrast, higher doses of 5-MeO-DMT (10 and 20 mg/kg) alone caused hyperthermia. Co-administration of harmaline (2, 5 or 15 mg/kg) remarkably potentiated the hyperthermia elicited by 5-MeO-DMT (2 or 10 mg/kg), which might be influenced by CYP2D6 status at certain dose combination. Interestingly, harmaline-induced hypothermia was only attenuated by 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY-100635, whereas 5-MeO-DMT- and harmaline-5-MeO-DMT-induced hyperthermia could be suppressed by either WAY-100635 or 5-HT2A receptor antagonists (MDL-100907 and ketanserin). Moreover, stress-induced hyperthermia under home cage conditions was not affected by WAY-100635 but surprisingly attenuated by MDL-100907 and ketanserin. Our results indicate that co-administration of monoamine oxidase inhibitor largely potentiates 5-MeO-DMT-induced hyperthermia that involves the activation of both 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors. These findings shall provide insights into development of anxiolytic drugs and new strategies to relieve the lethal hyperthermia in serotonin toxicity.

  16. Pindolol does not act only on 5-HT1A receptors in augmenting antidepressant activity in the mouse forced swimming test.

    PubMed

    Bourin, M; Redrobe, J P; Baker, G B

    1998-04-01

    The present study was undertaken to identify the receptor subtypes involved in (+/-) pindolol's ability to enhance the effects of antidepressant drugs in the mouse forced swimming test. Interaction studies were performed with S 15535 (presynaptic 5-HT1A receptor agonist) and methiothepin (5-HT1B autoreceptor antagonist) in an attempt to attenuate or potentiate antidepressant-like activity. (+/-) Pindolol was tested in combination with selective agonists and antagonists at 5-HT1, 5-HT2 and 5-HT3 receptor subtypes. Pretreatment with S 15535 and methiothepin attenuated the activity of paroxetine, fluvoxamine and citalopram (32 mg/kg, i.p.; P < 0.01). (+/-) Pindolol (32 mg/kg, i.p.) induced significant anti-immobility effects when tested in combination with 5-methoxy-3-(1,2,3,6-tetrahydro-4-pyridyl)-1H-indole (RU 24969) (1 mg/kg, i.p.; P < 0.05), 1-(2-methoxyphenyl)-4-[-(2-phthalimido) butyl]piperazine) (NAN 190) (0.5 mg/kg; P < 0.05) and ondansetron (0.00001 mg/kg, i.p.; P < 0.01). Pretreatment with NAN 190 (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) potentiated the effects of RU 24969 (1 mg/kg, i.p.; P < 0.05) and (+/-) pindolol (32 mg/kg, i.p.; P < 0.05) in the forced swimming test, as did ondansetron (0.00001 mg/kg, i.p.). Significant additive effects were induced when RU 24969 (1 mg/kg, i.p.) was tested in combination with NAN 190 (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.; P < 0.05), (+/-) pindolol (32 mg/kg, i.p.; P < 0.05) and ondansetron (0.0000 mg/kg, i.p.; P < 0.05). 8-Hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) (1 mg/kg, i.p.) or ketanserin (8 mg/kg, i.p.) did not induce significant antidepressant-like effects with any of the agonists/antagonists tested. The results of the present study suggest that pindolol is acting at presynaptic 5-HT1B serotonergic receptors, in addition to the 5-HT1A subtype, in augmenting the activity of antidepressants in the mouse forced swimming test.

  17. Effects of 5-HT1A receptor agonists and NMDA receptor antagonists in the social interaction test and the elevated plus maze.

    PubMed

    Dunn, R W; Corbett, R; Fielding, S

    1989-10-01

    The effects of several 5-HT1A agonists and excitatory amino acid antagonists were compared to the standard benzodiazepines, diazepam and chlordiazepoxide (CDP) in two assays predictive of anxiolytic activity, the social interaction and elevated plus maze procedures. Indicative of anxiolytic effects the 5-HT1A agonists, buspirone, gepirone and 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino) tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) all significantly increased social interaction time and open arm exploration time in the social interaction and elevated plus maze procedures, respectively. Likewise, anxiolytic activity in these assays were also produced by the competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonists, 2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (AP-5), 2-amino-7-phosphonoheptanoic acid (AP-7), 3-(2-carboxypiperazin-4-yl)-propyl-1-phosphonic acid (CPP) and the non-competitive NMDA antagonist, (+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine (MK-801) while NMDA produced anxiogenic effects. Furthermore, the anxiolytic effects of these agents were of equal magnitude to the benzodiazepines. These two classes of compounds were differentiated in the yohimbine-induced seizure assay, with the NMDA antagonists dose dependently antagonizing seizures similar to the benzodiazepines while the 5-HT1A agonists were inactive. These results suggest that the 5-HT1A agonists and the NMDA antagonists may be potential non-classical anxiolytic agents with different mechanisms of action.

  18. Contribution of the Striatum to the Effects of 5-HT1A Receptor Stimulation in L-DOPA-treated Hemiparkinsonian Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Christopher; Krolewski, David M.; Eskow, Karen L.; Barnum, Christopher J.; Dupre, Kristin B.; Deak, Terrence; Walker, Paul D.

    2009-01-01

    Clinical and experimental studies implicate the use of serotonin (5-HT)1A receptor agonists for the reduction of l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA)-induced dyskinesia (LID). Although raphe nuclei likely play a role in these antidyskinetic effects, an unexplored population of striatal 5-HT1A receptors (5-HT1AR) may also contribute. To better characterize this mechanism, L-DOPA-primed hemiparkinsonian rats received the 5-HT1AR agonist ±8-OH-DPAT (0, 0.1, 1.0 mg/kg, i.p.) with or without cotreatment with the 5-HT1AR antagonist WAY100635 (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) 5 min after L-DOPA, after which abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs), rotations, and forelimb akinesia were quantified. To establish the effects of 5-HT1AR stimulation on L-DOPA-induced c-fos and preprodynorphin (PPD) mRNA within the dopamine-depleted striatum, immunohistochemistry and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, respectively, were used. Finally, to determine the contribution of striatal 5-HT1AR to these effects, L-DOPA-primed hemiparkinsonian rats received bilateral intrastriatal microinfusions of ±8-OH-DPAT (0, 5, or 10 μg/side), WAY100635 (5 μg/side), or both (10 μg + 5 μg/side) 5 min after L-DOPA, after which AIMs and rotations were examined. Systemic ±8-OH-DPAT dose- and receptor-dependently attenuated L-DOPA-mediated AIMs and improved forelimb akinesia. Striatal c-fos immuno-reactivity and PPD mRNA ipsilateral to the lesion were strongly induced by L-DOPA, while ±8-OH-DPAT suppressed these effects. Finally, intrastriatal infusions of ±8-OH-DPAT reduced AIMs while coinfusion of WAY100635 reversed its antidyskinetic effect. Collectively, these results support the hypothesis that the cellular and behavioral properties of 5-HT1AR agonists are conveyed in part via a population of functional 5-HT1AR within the striatum. PMID:19115412

  19. A 5-HT1A-like receptor is involved in the regulation of the embryonic rotation of Lymnaea stagnalis L.

    PubMed

    Hiripi, László; Elekes, Károly

    2010-06-01

    Cilia driven rotation of the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis embryos is regulated by serotonin (5-HT). In the present study, physiological and biochemical assays were used to identify the 5-HT receptor type involved in rotation. The 5-HTergic agonists applied stimulated the rotation by 180-400% and their rank order potency was as follows: LSD>5-HT>8-OH-DPAT>WB4101>5-CT. The applied antagonists, spiperone, propranalol and mianserin inhibited the 5-HT or 8-OH-DPAT stimulated rotation of the embryos by 50-70%. (3)H-5-HT was bound specifically to the washed pellet of the embryo homogenates. The specific binding of (3)H-5-HT was saturable and showed a single, high affinity binding site with K(d) 7.36 nM and B(max) 221 fmol/mg pellet values. This is the first report demonstrating the high affinity binding of (3)H-5-HT to the native receptor in molluscs. All of the pharmacons that stimulated the rotation or inhibited the 5-HT or 8-OH-DPAT evoked stimulation displaced effectively the binding of (3)H-5-HT. 5-HT resulted in the inhibition of forskolin stimulated cAMP accumulation, showing that 5-HT is negatively coupled to adenylate cyclase. Our results suggest that in the 5-HTergic regulation of the embryonic rotation in L. stagnalis a 5-HT(1A)-like receptor of the vertebrate type is involved.

  20. Effect of mouse chromosome 13 terminal fragment on liability to catalepsy and expression of tryptophane hydroxylase-2, serotonin transporter, and 5-HT1A receptor genes in the brain.

    PubMed

    Kulikov, A V; Naumenko, V S; Bazovkina, D V; Dee, V Yu; Osipova, D V; Popova, N K

    2009-05-01

    Congenic mice obtained by genome fragments transfer from one strain to another are a potent tool for studies of the molecular mechanisms of behavioral mutations. The 59-70 cM fragment of chromosome 13 containing the locus determining predisposition to freezing reaction (catalepsy) and the gene encoding 5-HT(1A) receptor were transferred from cataleptic CBA/Lac mice into the genome of catalepsy-resistant AKR/J mice. The impact of this fragment for the severity of catalepsy and expression of genes encoding tryptophane hydroxylase-2, serotonin transporter, and 5-HT(1A) receptor was studied. Half of mice of the resultant congenic AKR.CBA-D13Mit76 strain exhibited pronounced catalepsy, similarly to donor CBA animals. The expression of 5-HT(1A) receptor gene in the midbrain of AKR animals was significantly higher than in CBA. The level of 5-HT(1A) receptor mRNA in AKR.CBA-D13Mit76 animals was significantly higher than in the donor strain. Mice of parental AKR and CBA strains did not differ from each other and from AKR.CBA-D13Mit76 animals by the levels of tryptophane hydroxylase-2 and serotonin transporter genes mRNA. These data prove the location of catalepsy regulating gene in the distal fragment of chromosome 13. The recipient strain genome enhanced the expression of 5-HT(1A) receptor gene in the brain without modulating the expression of catalepsy gene.

  1. Decreased expression of Freud-1/CC2D1A, a transcriptional repressor of the 5-HT1A receptor, in the prefrontal cortex of subjects with major depression.

    PubMed

    Szewczyk, Bernadeta; Albert, Paul R; Rogaeva, Anastasia; Fitzgibbon, Heidi; May, Warren L; Rajkowska, Grazyna; Miguel-Hidalgo, Jose J; Stockmeier, Craig A; Woolverton, William L; Kyle, Patrick B; Wang, Zhixia; Austin, Mark C

    2010-09-01

    Serotonin1A (5-HT(1A)) receptors are reported altered in the brain of subjects with major depressive disorder (MDD). Recent studies have identified transcriptional regulators of the 5-HT(1A) receptor and have documented gender-specific alterations in 5-HT(1A) transcription factor and 5-HT(1A) receptors in female MDD subjects. The 5' repressor element under dual repression binding protein-1 (Freud-1) is a calcium-regulated repressor that negatively regulates the 5-HT(1A) receptor gene. This study documented the cellular expression of Freud-1 in the human prefrontal cortex (PFC) and quantified Freud-1 protein in the PFC of MDD and control subjects as well as in the PFC of rhesus monkeys chronically treated with fluoxetine. Freud-1 immunoreactivity was present in neurons and glia and was co-localized with 5-HT(1A) receptors. Freud-1 protein level was significantly decreased in the PFC of male MDD subjects (37%, p=0.02) relative to gender-matched control subjects. Freud-1 protein was also reduced in the PFC of female MDD subjects (36%, p=0.18) but was not statistically significant. When the data was combined across genders and analysed by age, the decrease in Freud-1 protein level was greater in the younger MDD subjects (48%, p=0.01) relative to age-matched controls as opposed to older depressed subjects. Similarly, 5-HT(1A) receptor protein was significantly reduced in the PFC of the younger MDD subjects (48%, p=0.01) relative to age-matched controls. Adult male rhesus monkeys administered fluoxetine daily for 39 wk revealed no significant change in cortical Freud-1 or 5-HT(1A) receptor proteins compared to vehicle-treated control monkeys. Reduced protein expression of Freud-1 in MDD subjects may reflect dysregulation of this transcription factor, which may contribute to the altered regulation of 5-HT(1A) receptors observed in subjects with MDD. These data may also suggest that reductions in Freud-1 protein expression in the PFC may be associated with early onset of

  2. Citrus aurantium L. essential oil exhibits anxiolytic-like activity mediated by 5-HT1A-receptors and reduces cholesterol after repeated oral treatment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The current treatments for anxiety disorders and depression have multiple adverse effects in addition to a delayed onset of action, which has prompted efforts to find new substances with potential activity in these disorders. Citrus aurantium was chosen based on ethnopharmacological data because traditional medicine refers to the Citrus genus as useful in diminishing the symptoms of anxiety or insomnia, and C. aurantium has more recently been proposed as an adjuvant for antidepressants. In the present work, we investigated the biological activity underlying the anxiolytic and antidepressant effects of C. aurantium essential oil (EO), the putative mechanism of the anxiolytic-like effect, and the neurochemical changes in specific brain structures of mice after acute treatment. We also monitored the mice for possible signs of toxicity after a 14-day treatment. Methods The anxiolytic-like activity of the EO was investigated in a light/dark box, and the antidepressant activity was investigated in a forced swim test. Flumazenil, a competitive antagonist of benzodiazepine binding, and the selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY100635 were used in the experimental procedures to determine the mechanism of action of the EO. To exclude false positive results due to motor impairment, the mice were submitted to the rotarod test. Results The data suggest that the anxiolytic-like activity observed in the light/dark box procedure after acute (5 mg/kg) or 14-day repeated (1 mg/kg/day) dosing was mediated by the serotonergic system (5-HT1A receptors). Acute treatment with the EO showed no activity in the forced swim test, which is sensitive to antidepressants. A neurochemical evaluation showed no alterations in neurotransmitter levels in the cortex, the striatum, the pons, and the hypothalamus. Furthermore, no locomotor impairment or signs of toxicity or biochemical changes, except a reduction in cholesterol levels, were observed after treatment with the EO. Conclusion

  3. No evidence that MDMA-induced enhancement of emotional empathy is related to peripheral oxytocin levels or 5-HT1a receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Kuypers, Kim P C; de la Torre, Rafael; Farre, Magi; Yubero-Lahoz, Samanta; Dziobek, Isabel; Van den Bos, Wouter; Ramaekers, Johannes G

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed at investigating the effect of MDMA on measures of empathy and social interaction, and the roles of oxytocin and the 5-HT1A receptor in these effects. The design was placebo-controlled within-subject with 4 treatment conditions: MDMA (75 mg), with or without pindolol (20 mg), oxytocin nasal spray (40 IU+16 IU) or placebo. Participants were 20 healthy poly-drug MDMA users, aged between 18-26 years. Cognitive and emotional empathy were assessed by means of the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test and the Multifaceted Empathy Test. Social interaction, defined as trust and reciprocity, was assessed by means of a Trust Game and a Social Ball Tossing Game. Results showed that MDMA selectively affected emotional empathy and left cognitive empathy, trust and reciprocity unaffected. When combined with pindolol, these effects remained unchanged. Oxytocin did not affect measures of empathy and social interaction. Changes in emotional empathy were not related to oxytocin plasma levels. It was concluded that MDMA (75 mg) selectively enhances emotional empathy in humans. While the underlying neurobiological mechanism is still unknown, it is suggested that peripheral oxytocin does not seem to be the main actor in this; potential candidates are the serotonin 2A and the vasopressin 1A receptors. Trial registration: MDMA & PSB NTR 2636.

  4. Methylation at a transcription factor-binding site on the 5-HT1A receptor gene correlates with negative symptom treatment response in first episode schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hao; Dalton, Caroline F; Srisawat, Umarat; Zhang, Zhi Jun; Reynolds, Gavin P

    2014-04-01

    Individual variability and inadequate response of negative symptoms are major limitations of antipsychotic treatment in schizophrenia. A functional polymorphism, rs6295, in the 5-HT1A-receptor gene (HTR1A) contributes to this variability in negative symptom response. The DNA sequence containing rs6295 is rich in cytosine methylation (CpG) sites; CpG methylation is an epigenetic factor that, like rs6295, can modify transcriptional control. To investigate whether DNA methylation influences response to antipsychotic treatment, we determined methylation at CpG sites close to rs6295 in DNA from 82 Chinese subjects with a first psychotic episode. Methylation of one CpG site within a recognition sequence for HES transcriptional repressors was found to correlate with changes in total PANSS score (p = 0.006) and negative factor sub-score (p < 0.001) following 10 wk initial antipsychotic treatment, as well as with baseline negative factor score (p = 0.019); the effect on symptom change remained after correction for this baseline score. An effect of rs6295 on negative symptom response was not seen in this sample, which may not have provided sufficient power for the pharmacogenetic association. These preliminary results indicate that epigenetic modification of transcriptional regulation by specific cytosine methylation may modulate HTR1A expression, resulting in effects on emotional dysfunction and negative symptom response to antipsychotic treatment. PMID:24331356

  5. Systemic modulation of serotonergic synapses via reuptake blockade or 5HT1A receptor antagonism does not alter perithreshold taste sensitivity in rats.

    PubMed

    Mathes, Clare M; Spector, Alan C

    2014-09-01

    Systemic blockade of serotonin (5HT) reuptake with paroxetine has been shown to increase sensitivity to sucrose and quinine in humans. Here, using a 2-response operant taste detection task, we measured the effect of paroxetine and the 5HT1A receptor antagonist WAY100635 on the ability of rats to discriminate sucrose, NaCl, and citric acid from water. After establishing individual psychometric functions, 5 concentrations of each taste stimulus were chosen to represent the dynamic portion of the concentration-response curve, and the performance of the rats to these stimuli was assessed after vehicle, paroxetine (7mg/kg intraperitoneally), and WAY100635 (0.3mg/kg subcutaneously; 1mg/kg intravenously) administration. Although, at times, overall performance across concentrations dropped, at most, 5% from vehicle to drug conditions, no differences relative to vehicle were seen on the parameters of the psychometric function (asymptote, slope, or EC50) after drug administration. In contrast to findings in humans, our results suggest that modulation of 5HT activity has little impact on sucrose detectability at perithreshold concentrations in rats, at least at the doses used in this task. In the rat model, the purported paracrine/neurocrine action of serotonin in the taste bud may work in a manner that does not impact overt taste detection behavior.

  6. Central PGE2 exhibits anxiolytic-like activity via EP1 and EP4 receptors in a manner dependent on serotonin 5-HT1A, dopamine D1 and GABAA receptors.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Chihiro; Miyamoto, Chihiro; Furuyashiki, Tomoyuki; Narumiya, Shuh; Ohinata, Kousaku

    2011-07-21

    We found that centrally administered prostaglandin (PG) E(2) exhibited anxiolytic-like activity in the elevated plus-maze and open field test in mice. Agonists selective for EP(1) and EP(4) receptors, among four receptor subtypes for PGE(2), mimicked the anxiolytic-like activity of PGE(2). The anxiolytic-like activity of PGE(2) was blocked by an EP(1) or EP(4) antagonist, as well as in EP(4) but not EP(1) knockout mice. Central activation of either EP(1) or EP(4) receptors resulted in anxiolytic-like activity. The PGE(2)-induced anxiolytic-like activity was inhibited by antagonists for serotonin 5-HT(1A), dopamine D(1) and GABA(A) receptors. Taken together, PGE(2) exhibits anxiolytic-like activity via EP(1) and EP(4) receptors, with downstream involvement of 5-HT(1A), D(1) and GABA(A) receptor systems.

  7. Depressed GABA and glutamate synaptic signaling by 5-HT1A receptors in the nucleus tractus solitarii and their role in cardiorespiratory function

    PubMed Central

    Ostrowski, Tim D.; Ostrowski, Daniela; Hasser, Eileen M.

    2014-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT), and its 5-HT1A receptor (5-HT1AR) subtype, is a powerful modulator of the cardiorespiratory system and its sensory reflexes. The nucleus tractus solitarii (nTS) serves as the first central station for visceral afferent integration and is critical for cardiorespiratory reflex responses. However, the physiological and synaptic role of 5-HT1ARs in the nTS is relatively unknown. In the present study, we examined the distribution and modulation of 5-HT1ARs on cardiorespiratory and synaptic parameters in the nTS. 5-HT1ARs were widely distributed to cell bodies within the nTS but not synaptic terminals. In anesthetized rats, activation of 5-HT1ARs by microinjection of the 5-HT1AR agonist 8-OH-DPAT into the caudal nTS decreased minute phrenic neural activity via a reduction in phrenic amplitude. In brain stem slices, 8-OH-DPAT decreased the amplitude of glutamatergic tractus solitarii-evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents, and reduced overall spontaneous excitatory nTS network activity. These effects persisted in the presence of GABAA receptor blockade and were antagonized by coapplication of 5-HT1AR blocker WAY-100135. 5-HT1AR blockade alone had no effect on tractus solitarii-evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents, but increased excitatory network activity. On the other hand, GABAergic nTS-evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents did not change by activation of the 5-HT1ARs, but spontaneous inhibitory nTS network activity decreased. Blocking 5-HT1ARs tended to increase nTS-evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents and inhibitory network activity. Taken together, 5-HT1ARs in the caudal nTS decrease breathing, likely via attenuation of afferent transmission, as well as overall nTS network activity. PMID:24671532

  8. Occupancy of dopamine D2 and D3 and serotonin 5-HT1A receptors by the novel antipsychotic drug candidate, cariprazine (RGH-188), in monkey brain measured using positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Seneca, Nicholas; Finnema, Sjoerd J.; Laszlovszky, István; Kiss, Béla; Horváth, Attila; Pásztor, Gabriella; Kapás, Margó; Gyertyán, István; Farkas, Sándor; Innis, Robert B.; Halldin, Christer

    2011-01-01

    Rationale Cariprazine is a novel antipsychotic drug candidate that exhibits high selectivity and affinity to dopamine D3 and D2 receptors and moderate affinity to serotonin 5-HT1A receptors. Targeting receptors other than D2 may provide a therapeutic benefit for both positive and negative symptoms associated with schizophrenia. Positron emission tomography (PET) can be used as a tool in drug development to assess the in vivo distribution and pharmacological properties of a drug. Objectives The objective of this study was to determine dopamine D2/D3 and serotonin 5-HT1A receptor occupancy in monkey brain after the administration of cariprazine. Methods We examined three monkeys using the following PET radioligands: [11C]MNPA (an agonist at D2 and D3 receptors), [11C]raclopride (an antagonist at D2 and D3 receptors), and [11C]WAY-100635 (an antagonist at 5-HT1A receptors). During each experimental day, the first PET measurement was a baseline study, the second after a low dose of cariprazine, and the third after the administration of a high dose. Results We found that cariprazine occupied D2/D3 receptors in a dose-dependent and saturable manner, with the lowest dose occupying ~5% of receptors and the highest dose showing more than 90% occupancy. 5-HT1A receptor occupancy was considerably lower compared with D2/D3 occupancy at the same doses, with a maximal value of ~30% for the raphe nuclei. Conclusions We conclude that cariprazine binds preferentially to dopamine D2/D3 rather than to serotonin 5-HT1A receptors in monkey brain. These findings can be used to guide the selection of cariprazine dosing in humans. PMID:21625907

  9. Evaluation of a combined treatment paradigm consisting of environmental enrichment and the 5-HT1A receptor agonist buspirone after experimental traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Kline, Anthony E; Olsen, Adam S; Sozda, Christopher N; Hoffman, Ann N; Cheng, Jeffrey P

    2012-07-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) and serotonin(1A) (5-HT(1A))-receptor agonists provide significant benefit after experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI). The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that combining these therapies would produce an effect that is more robust than either therapy alone. Anesthetized adult male rats received a cortical impact or sham injury and then were randomly assigned to EE or standard (STD) housing where they received either buspirone (0.3 mg/kg) or vehicle (1.0 mL/kg) once daily for 3 weeks. Motor and cognitive assessments were conducted on post-injury days 1-5 and 14-19, respectively. CA1/3 neurons were quantified at 3 weeks. No differences were observed among buspirone and vehicle sham groups in any task regardless of housing condition and thus the data were pooled. CA3 cell loss was reduced in the TBI+EE+buspirone and TBI+EE+vehicle groups. Motor recovery, spatial learning, and memory retention were enhanced in the TBI+EE+buspirone, TBI+EE+vehicle, and TBI+STD+buspirone groups versus the TBI+STD+vehicle group (p ≤ 0.005). Moreover, spatial learning was significantly better in the TBI+EE+buspirone group versus the TBI+STD+buspirone group (p<0.0001). No differences were revealed between the buspirone and vehicle EE groups. These data show that EE and buspirone benefit functional outcome after TBI, but their combination is not more robust than either alone, which does not support the hypothesis. The lack of an additive effect may be due to the early-and-continuous EE paradigm on its own producing marked benefits, resulting in a ceiling effect. The evaluation of buspirone in a delayed-and-abbreviated EE paradigm is ongoing in our laboratory.

  10. Acute treatment with the 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT and chronic environmental enrichment confer neurobehavioral benefit after experimental brain trauma.

    PubMed

    Kline, Anthony E; Wagner, Amy K; Westergom, Brian P; Malena, Rebecca R; Zafonte, Ross D; Olsen, Adam S; Sozda, Christopher N; Luthra, Pallavi; Panda, Monisha; Cheng, Jeffery P; Aslam, Haris A

    2007-02-27

    Acute treatment with the 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) or chronic environmental enrichment (EE) hasten behavioral recovery after experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI). The aim of this study was to determine if combining these interventions would confer additional benefit. Anesthetized adult male rats received either a cortical impact or sham injury followed 15min later by a single intraperitoneal injection of 8-OH-DPAT (0.5mg/kg) or saline vehicle (1.0mL/kg) and then randomly assigned to either enriched or standard (STD) housing. Behavioral assessments were conducted utilizing established motor and cognitive tests on post-injury days 1-5 and 14-18, respectively. Hippocampal CA(1)/CA(3) neurons were quantified at 3 weeks. Both 8-OH-DPAT and EE attenuated CA(3) cell loss. 8-OH-DPAT enhanced spatial learning in a Morris water maze (MWM) as revealed by differences between the TBI+8-OH-DPAT+STD and TBI+VEHICLE+STD groups (P=0.0014). EE improved motor function as demonstrated by reduced time to traverse an elevated narrow beam in both the TBI+8-OH-DPAT+EE and TBI+VEHICLE+EE groups versus the TBI+VEHICLE+STD group (P=0.0007 and 0.0016, respectively). EE also facilitated MWM learning as evidenced by both the TBI+8-OH-DPAT+EE and TBI+VEHICLE+EE groups locating the escape platform quicker than the TBI+VEHICLE+STD group (P's<0.0001). MWM differences were also observed between the TBI+8-OH-DPAT+EE and TBI+8-OH-DPAT+STD groups (P=0.0004) suggesting that EE enhanced the effect of 8-OH-DPAT. However, there was no difference between the TBI+8-OH-DPAT+EE and TBI+VEHICLE+EE groups. These data replicate previous results from our laboratory showing that both a single systemic administration of 8-OH-DPAT and EE improve recovery after TBI and extend those findings by elucidating that the combination of treatments in this particular paradigm did not confer additional benefit. One explanation for the lack of an additive effect is that EE

  11. Acute treatment with the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT and chronic environmental enrichment confer neurobehavioral benefit after experimental brain trauma

    PubMed Central

    Kline, Anthony E.; Wagner, Amy K.; Westergom, Brian P.; Malena, Rebecca R.; Zafonte, Ross D.; Olsen, Adam S.; Sozda, Christopher N.; Luthra, Pallavi; Panda, Monisha; Cheng, Jeffery P.; Aslam, Haris A.

    2007-01-01

    Acute treatment with the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) or chronic environmental enrichment (EE) hasten behavioral recovery after experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI). The aim of this study was to determine if combining these interventions would confer additional benefit. Anesthetized adult male rats received either a cortical impact or sham injury followed 15 min later by a single intraperitoneal injection of 8-OH-DPAT (0.5 mg/kg) or saline vehicle (1.0 mL/kg) and then randomly assigned to either enriched or standard (STD) housing. Behavioral assessments were conducted utilizing established motor and cognitive tests on post-injury days 1-5 and 14-18, respectively. Hippocampal CA1/CA3 neurons were quantified at 3 weeks. Both 8-OH-DPAT and EE attenuated CA3 cell loss. 8-OH-DPAT enhanced spatial learning in a Morris water maze (MWM) as revealed by differences between the TBI+8-OH-DPAT+STD and TBI+VEHICLE+STD groups (P=0.0014). EE improved motor function as demonstrated by reduced time to traverse an elevated narrow beam in both the TBI+8-OH-DPAT+EE and TBI+VEHICLE+EE groups vs. the TBI+VEHICLE+STD group (P=0.0007 and P=0.0016, respectively). EE also facilitated MWM learning as evidenced by both the TBI+8-OH-DPAT+EE and TBI+VEHICLE+EE groups locating the escape platform quicker than the TBI+VEHICLE+STD group (P's<0.0001). MWM differences were also observed between the TBI+8-OH-DPAT+EE and TBI+8-OH-DPAT+STD groups (P=0.0004) suggesting that EE enhanced the effect of 8-OH-DPAT. However, there was no difference between the TBI+8-OH-DPAT+EE and TBI+VEHICLE+EE groups. These data replicate previous results from our laboratory showing that both a single systemic administration of 8-OH-DPAT and EE improve recovery after TBI and extend those findings by elucidating that the combination of treatments in this particular paradigm did not confer additional benefit. One explanation for the lack of an additive effect is that EE is a

  12. Linoleic acid derivative DCP-LA ameliorates stress-induced depression-related behavior by promoting cell surface 5-HT1A receptor translocation, stimulating serotonin release, and inactivating GSK-3β.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Takeshi; Tanaka, Akito; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2015-04-01

    Impairment of serotonergic neurotransmission is the major factor responsible for depression and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β) participates in serotonergic transmission-mediated signaling networks relevant to mental illnesses. In the forced-swim test to assess depression-like behavior, the immobility time for mice with restraint stress was significantly longer than that for nonstressed control mice. Postsynaptic cell surface localization of 5-HT1A receptor, but not 5-HT2A receptor, in the hypothalamus for mice with restraint stress was significantly reduced as compared with that for control mice, which highly correlated to prolonged immobility time, i.e., depression-like behavior. The linoleic acid derivative 8-[2-(2-pentyl-cyclopropylmethyl)-cyclopropyl]-octanoic acid (DCP-LA) restored restraint stress-induced reduction of cell surface 5-HT1A receptor and improved depression-like behavior in mice with restraint stress. Moreover, DCP-LA stimulated serotonin release from hypothalamic slices and cancelled restraint stress-induced reduction of GSK-3β phosphorylation at Ser9. Taken together, the results of the present study indicate that DCP-LA could ameliorate depression-like behavior by promoting translocation of 5-HT1A receptor to the plasma membrane on postsynaptic cells, stimulating serotonin release, and inactivating GSK-3β.

  13. Rapid activation of sodium-proton exchange and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase in fibroblasts by G protein-coupled 5-HT1A receptor involves distinct signalling cascades.

    PubMed Central

    Garnovskaya, M N; Mukhin, Y; Raymond, J R

    1998-01-01

    These experiments tested the hypothesis that signalling elements involved in the activation of the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) mediate rapid activation of sodium-proton exchange (NHE) in fibroblasts when both signals are initiated by a single G protein-coupled receptor, the 5-HT1A receptor. Similarities between the two processes were comparable concentration-response curves and time-courses, and overlapping sensitivity to some pharmacological inhibitors of tyrosine kinases (staurosporine and genistein), and phosphoinositide 3'-kinase (wortmannin and LY204002). Activation of NHE was much more sensitive to the phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase inhibitor (D609) than was ERK. Neither pathway was sensitive to manoeuvres designed to block PKC. In contrast, Src or related kinases appear to be required to activate ERK, but not NHE. Transfection of cDNA constructs encoding inactive mutant phosphoinositide 3'-kinase, Grb2, Sos, Ras, and Raf molecules were successful in attenuating ERK, but had essentially no effect upon NHE activation. Finally, PD98059, an inhibitor of mitogen activated/extracellular signal regulated kinase kinase, blocked ERK but not NHE activation. Thus, in CHO fibroblast cells, activation by the 5-HT1A receptor of ERK and NHE share a number of overlapping features. However, our studies do not support a major role for ERK, when activated by the 5-HT1A receptor, as a short-term upstream regulator of NHE activity. PMID:9461547

  14. Combined serotonin (5-HT)1A agonism, 5-HT(2A) and dopamine D₂ receptor antagonism reproduces atypical antipsychotic drug effects on phencyclidine-impaired novel object recognition in rats.

    PubMed

    Oyamada, Yoshihiro; Horiguchi, Masakuni; Rajagopal, Lakshmi; Miyauchi, Masanori; Meltzer, Herbert Y

    2015-05-15

    Subchronic administration of an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist, e.g. phencyclidine (PCP), produces prolonged impairment of novel object recognition (NOR), suggesting they constitute a hypoglutamate-based model of cognitive impairment in schizophrenia (CIS). Acute administration of atypical, e.g. lurasidone, but not typical antipsychotic drugs (APDs), e.g. haloperidol, are able to restore NOR following PCP (acute reversal model). Furthermore, atypical APDs, when co-administered with PCP, have been shown to prevent development of NOR deficits (prevention model). Most atypical, but not typical APDs, are more potent 5-HT(2A) receptor inverse agonists than dopamine (DA) D2 antagonists, and have been shown to enhance cortical and hippocampal efflux and to be direct or indirect 5-HT(1A) agonists in vivo. To further clarify the importance of these actions to the restoration of NOR by atypical APDs, sub-effective or non-effective doses of combinations of the 5-HT(1A) partial agonist (tandospirone), the 5-HT(2A) inverse agonist (pimavanserin), or the D2 antagonist (haloperidol), as well as the combination of all three agents, were studied in the acute reversal and prevention PCP models of CIS. Only the combination of all three agents restored NOR and prevented the development of PCP-induced deficit. Thus, this triple combination of 5-HT(1A) agonism, 5-HT(2A) antagonism/inverse agonism, and D2 antagonism is able to mimic the ability of atypical APDs to prevent or ameliorate the PCP-induced NOR deficit, possibly by stimulating signaling cascades from D1 and 5-HT(1A) receptor stimulation, modulated by D2 and 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonism. PMID:25448429

  15. Effect of Chaihu-Shugan-San on the mRNA expression of the 5-HT1A receptor and cellular proliferation in the hippocampus of epileptic rats with depression

    PubMed Central

    YANG, PING; LI, LIANG; LIU, XUE-JUN; CAI, XIONG; SUN, MEI-ZHEN; HE, JUN-FENG; ZENG, GUANG; HUANG, HUI-YONG

    2016-01-01

    Chaihu-Shugan-San (CHSGS) is a herbal preparation that has been shown to effectively relieve neurologic impairment and reduce depression. However, the efficacy of CHSGS in the treatment of patients with epilepsy with depression is unknown. Therefore, in the present study, adult rats were exposed to chronic mild stress following the establishment of chronic pilocarpine-induced epilepsy. Subsequently, a sucrose consumption test and open-field test (OFT) were performed to assess depression-like behavior. Rats were randomly divided into four groups: Control, model, fluoxetine (1.8 g/kg) and CHSGS (2.7 g/kg) groups. The control and model groups received normal saline. The mRNA expression levels of the 5-hydroxytryptamine 1A (5-HT1A) receptor and the number of 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU)-labeled cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus were detected using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemical analysis, respectively. Treatment administration was conducted by once daily intragastric perfusion for 28 days. The mRNA expression levels of the 5-HT1A receptor, the number of BrdU-labeled cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus, the consumption of sucrose, and frequency of vertical and horizontal movement scores in the OFT were enhanced in the fluoxetine and CHSGS groups compared with the model group (P<0.05). However, no statistically significant difference was detected between the fluoxetine and CHSGS groups. These data suggest that CHSGS is able to increase the expression of 5-HT1A receptor mRNA and cellular proliferation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus in epileptic rats with depression, and thus effectively improve certain symptoms of depression. PMID:26889228

  16. Serotonin 5-HT1A and 5-HT2/1C receptors in the midbrain periaqueductal gray differentially modulate defensive rage behavior elicited from the medial hypothalamus of the cat.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, M B; De Lanerolle, N C; Siegel, A

    1997-08-15

    Recent studies have established that the expression of defensive rage behavior in the cat is mediated over a descending pathway from the medial hypothalamus to the dorsolateral quadrant of the midbrain periaqueductal gray matter (PAG). The present study was designed to determine the roles played by 5-HT1A and 5-HT2/1C receptors in this region of PAG in modulating defensive rage behavior elicited from the cat's medial hypothalamus. Monopolar stimulating electrodes were implanted into the medial hypothalamus from which defensive rage behavior could be elicited by electrical stimulation. During the course of the study, the 'hissing' component of the defensive rage response was used as a measure of defensive rage behavior. Cannula-electrodes were implanted into sites within the PAG from which defensive rage could also be elicited by electrical stimulation in order that 5-HT compounds could be microinjected into behaviorally identifiable regions of the PAG at a later time. Microinjections of the selective 5-HT1A agonist, (+)-8-hydroxy-dipropylaminotetralin hydrobromide (8-OHDPAT) (50 pmol, 2.0 and 3.0 nmol), into the PAG suppressed the hissing response in a dose-dependent manner. Administration of the selective 5-HT1A antagonist, 4-iodo-N-[2-[4-(methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl] ethyl]-N-2-pyridinyl-benzamide hydrochloride (p-MPPI) (1.5 and 3.0 nmol), blocked the suppressive effects of 8-OHDPAT upon hissing. In contrast, microinjections of the 5-HT2/1C receptor agonist (+)-1-(4-iodo-2,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-2-aminopropane hydrochloride ((+)-DOI hydrochloride) (0.01, 1.0 and 1.5 nmol) facilitated the occurrence of hissing elicited from the medial hypothalamus in a dose-dependent manner. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed the presence of 5-HT axons and preterminals throughout the PAG, and in particular, in its dorsolateral aspect which receives major inputs from the medial hypothalamus in association with defensive rage behavior. The overall findings of the study provide

  17. Characterization of MDL 73005EF as a 5-HT1A selective ligand and its effects in animal models of anxiety: comparison with buspirone, 8-OH-DPAT and diazepam.

    PubMed Central

    Moser, P. C.; Tricklebank, M. D.; Middlemiss, D. N.; Mir, A. K.; Hibert, M. F.; Fozard, J. R.

    1990-01-01

    1. With radioligand binding techniques, MDL 73005 EF (8-[2-(2,3-dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-2-yl-methylamino)ethyl]-8-az aspiro[4, 5]decane-7,9-dione methyl sulphonate) shows high affinity (pIC50 8.6) and selectivity (greater than 100 fold compared to other monoamine and benzodiazepine receptor sites) for the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)1A recognition site; it was both more potent and more selective than buspirone in this respect. 2. In rats pretreated with reserpine, 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propyl-amino) tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) induced forepaw treading and flat body posture; in the same model, MDL 73005EF and buspirone showed minimal agonist activity and at high doses MDL 73005EF inhibited responses to 8-OH-DPAT. 3. In rats trained to discriminate 8-OH-DPAT from saline in a drug discrimination paradigm, both MDL 73005EF and buspirone generalized dose-dependently and completely to the 8-OH-DPAT cue. 4. To define the anxiolytic potential of MDL 73005EF, it was examined in the elevated plus-maze test and in the water-lick conflict test in comparison with diazepam and buspirone. In both tests MDL 73005EF induced effects similar to those seen following diazepam. Buspirone had similar effects to both MDL 73005EF and diazepam in the water-lick conflict test but opposite effects in the elevated plus-maze. 8-OH-DPAT also had opposite effects in the elevated plus-maze test to MDL 73005EF and diazepam. 5. The anti-conflict effects of MDL 73005EF were reversed by low doses of the 5-HT1A receptor agonist, 8-OH-DPAT; those of buspirone were neither antagonised nor mimicked by 8-OH-DPAT.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1970269

  18. The role of 5-HT1A receptors in the anti-aversive effects of cannabidiol on panic attack-like behaviors evoked in the presence of the wild snake Epicrates cenchria crassus (Reptilia, Boidae).

    PubMed

    Twardowschy, André; Castiblanco-Urbina, Maria Angélica; Uribe-Mariño, Andres; Biagioni, Audrey Francisco; Salgado-Rohner, Carlos José; Crippa, José Alexandre de Souza; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2013-12-01

    The potential anxiolytic and antipanic properties of cannabidiol have been shown; however, its mechanism of action seems to recruit other receptors than those involved in the endocannabinoid-mediated system. It was recently shown that the model of panic-like behaviors elicited by the encounters between mice and snakes is a good tool to investigate innate fear-related responses, and cannabidiol causes a panicolytic-like effect in this model. The aim of the present study was to investigate the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) co-participation in the panicolytic-like effects of cannabidiol on the innate fear-related behaviors evoked by a prey versus predator interaction-based paradigm. Male Swiss mice were treated with intraperitoneal (i.p.) administrations of cannabidiol (3 mg/kg, i.p.) and its vehicle and the effects of the peripheral pre-treatment with increasing doses of the 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY-100635 (0.1, 0.3 and 0.9 mg/kg, i.p.) on instinctive fear-induced responses evoked by the presence of a wild snake were evaluated. The present results showed that the panicolytic-like effects of cannabidiol were blocked by the pre-treatment with WAY-100635 at different doses. These findings demonstrate that cannabidiol modulates the defensive behaviors evoked by the presence of threatening stimuli, and the effects of cannabidiol are at least partially dependent on the recruitment of 5-HT1A receptors. PMID:23926240

  19. The role of 5-HT1A receptors in the anti-aversive effects of cannabidiol on panic attack-like behaviors evoked in the presence of the wild snake Epicrates cenchria crassus (Reptilia, Boidae).

    PubMed

    Twardowschy, André; Castiblanco-Urbina, Maria Angélica; Uribe-Mariño, Andres; Biagioni, Audrey Francisco; Salgado-Rohner, Carlos José; Crippa, José Alexandre de Souza; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2013-12-01

    The potential anxiolytic and antipanic properties of cannabidiol have been shown; however, its mechanism of action seems to recruit other receptors than those involved in the endocannabinoid-mediated system. It was recently shown that the model of panic-like behaviors elicited by the encounters between mice and snakes is a good tool to investigate innate fear-related responses, and cannabidiol causes a panicolytic-like effect in this model. The aim of the present study was to investigate the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) co-participation in the panicolytic-like effects of cannabidiol on the innate fear-related behaviors evoked by a prey versus predator interaction-based paradigm. Male Swiss mice were treated with intraperitoneal (i.p.) administrations of cannabidiol (3 mg/kg, i.p.) and its vehicle and the effects of the peripheral pre-treatment with increasing doses of the 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY-100635 (0.1, 0.3 and 0.9 mg/kg, i.p.) on instinctive fear-induced responses evoked by the presence of a wild snake were evaluated. The present results showed that the panicolytic-like effects of cannabidiol were blocked by the pre-treatment with WAY-100635 at different doses. These findings demonstrate that cannabidiol modulates the defensive behaviors evoked by the presence of threatening stimuli, and the effects of cannabidiol are at least partially dependent on the recruitment of 5-HT1A receptors.

  20. The antidepressant-like activity of 6-methoxy-2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazin-1-yl]-9H-xanthen-9-one involves serotonergic 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2A/C) receptors activation.

    PubMed

    Pytka, Karolina; Walczak, Maria; Kij, Agnieszka; Rapacz, Anna; Siwek, Agata; Kazek, Grzegorz; Olczyk, Adrian; Gałuszka, Adam; Waszkielewicz, Anna; Marona, Henryk; Sapa, Jacek; Filipek, Barbara

    2015-10-01

    Xanthone derivatives have been shown to posses many biological properties. Some of them act within the central nervous system and show neuroprotective or antidepressant-like properties. Taking this into account we investigated antidepressant-like activity in mice and the possible mechanism of action of 6-methoxy-2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazin-1-yl]-9H-xanthen-9-one (HBK-11) - a new xanthone derivative. We demonstrated that HBK-11 produced antidepressant-like effects in the forced swim test and tail suspension test, comparable to that of venlafaxine. The combined treatment with sub-effective doses of HBK-11 and fluoxetine (but not reboxetine or bupropion) significantly reduced the immobility in the forced swim test. Moreover, the antidepressant-like activity of HBK-11 in the aforementioned test was blocked by p-chlorophenylalanine, and significantly reduced by serotonergic 5HT1A receptor antagonist - WAY-1006335 and 5HT2A/C receptor antagonist - ritanserin. As none of the above treatments influenced the spontaneous locomotor activity, it can be concluded that HBK-11 mediates its activity through a serotonergic system, and its antidepressant-like effect involves 5HT1A and 5HT2A/C receptor activation. Furthermore, at antidepressant-like doses HBK-11 did not cause the mice to display locomotor deficits in rotarod or chimney tests. Considering the pharmacokinetic profile, HBK-11 demonstrated rapid absorption after i.p. administration, high clearance value, short terminal half-life, very high volume of distribution and incomplete bioavailability. The compound studied had good penetration into the brain tissue of mice. Since studied xanthone derivative seems to present interesting, untypical mechanism of antidepressant-like action i.e. 5HT2A/C receptor activation, it may have a potential in the treatment of depressive disorders, and surely requires further studies. PMID:26210317

  1. 5-HT1A/1B, 5-HT6, and 5-HT7 serotonergic receptors recruitment in tonic-clonic seizure-induced antinociception: role of dorsal raphe nucleus.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Renato Leonardo; Ferreira, Célio Marcos dos Reis; Urbina, Maria Angélica Castiblanco; Mariño, Andrés Uribe; Carvalho, Andressa Daiane; Butera, Giuseppe; de Oliveira, Ana Maria; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2009-05-01

    Pharmacological studies have been focused on the involvement of different neural pathways in the organization of antinociception that follows tonic-clonic seizures, including 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)-, norepinephrine-, acetylcholine- and endogenous opioid peptide-mediated mechanisms, giving rise to more in-depth comprehension of this interesting post-ictal antinociceptive phenomenon. The present work investigated the involvement of 5-HT(1A/1B), 5-HT(6), and 5-HT(7) serotonergic receptors through peripheral pretreatment with methiothepin at doses of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 mg/kg in the organization of the post-ictal antinociception elicited by pharmacologically (with pentylenetetrazole at 64 mg/kg)-induced tonic-clonic seizures. Methiothepin at 1.0 mg/kg blocked the post-ictal antinociception recorded after the end of seizures, whereas doses of 2.0 and 3.0 mg/kg potentiated the post-ictal antinociception. The nociceptive thresholds were kept higher than those of the control group. However, when the same 5-hydroxytryptamine receptors antagonist was microinjected (at 1.0, 3.0 and 5.0 microg/0.2 microL) in the dorsal raphe nucleus, a mesencephalic structure rich in serotonergic neurons and 5-HT receptors, the post-ictal hypo-analgesia was consistently antagonized. The present findings suggest a dual effect of methiothepin, characterized by a disinhibitory effect on the post-ictal antinociception when peripherally administered (possibly due to an antagonism of pre-synaptic 5-HT(1A) serotonergic autoreceptors in the pain endogenous inhibitory system) and an inhibitory effect (possibly due to a DRN post-synaptic 5-HT(1B), 5-HT(6), and 5-HT(7) serotonergic receptors blockade) when centrally administered. The present data also suggest that serotonin-mediated mechanisms of the dorsal raphe nucleus exert a key-role in the modulation of the post-ictal antinociception.

  2. GPER1 stimulation alters posttranslational modification of RGSz1 and induces desensitization of 5-HT1A receptor signaling in the rat hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, Carrie E; Mi, Zhen; Mure, Minae; Li, Qian; Muma, Nancy A

    2014-01-01

    Hyperactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis is a consistent biological characteristic of depression and response normalization coincides with clinical responsiveness to antidepressant medications. Desensitization of serotonin 1A receptor (5-HT1AR) signaling in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) follows selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressant treatment and contributes to the antidepressant response. Estradiol alone produces a partial desensitization of 5-HT1AR signaling, and synergizes with SSRIs to result in a complete and more rapid desensitization than with SSRIs alone as measured by a decrease in the oxytocin and adrenocorticotrophic hormone(ACTH) responses to 5-HT1AR stimulation. G protein-coupled estrogen receptor1 (GPER1) is necessary for estradiol-induced desensitization of 5-HT1AR signaling, although the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. We now find that stimulation of GPER1 with the selective agonist G-1 and non-selective stimulation of estrogen receptors dramatically alter isoform expression of a key component of the 5-HT1AR signaling pathway, RGSz1, a GTPase activating protein selective for Gαz, the Gα subunit necessary for 5-HT1AR-mediated hormone release. RGSz1 isoforms are differentially glycosylated, SUMOylated, and phosphorylated, and differentially distributed in subcellular organelles. High molecular weight RGSz1 is SUMOylated and glycosylated, localized to the detergent-resistant microdomain (DRM) of the cell membrane, and increased by estradiol and G-1 treatment. Because activated Gαz also localizes to the DRM, increased DRM-localized RGSz1 by estradiol and G-1could reduce Gαz activity, functionally uncoupling 5-HT1AR signaling. Peripheral G-1 treatment produced partial reduction in oxytocin and ACTH responses to 5-HT1AR-stimulation similar to direct injections into the PVN. Together, these results identify GPER1 and RGSz1 as novel targets for the treatment of depression. PMID:25402859

  3. Serotonergic 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist (8-OH-DPAT) ameliorates impaired micturition reflexes in a chronic ventral root avulsion model of incomplete cauda equina/conus medullaris injury.

    PubMed

    Chang, Huiyi H; Havton, Leif A

    2013-01-01

    Trauma to the thoracolumbar spine commonly results in injuries to the cauda equina and the lumbosacral portion of the spinal cord. Both complete and partial injury syndromes may follow. Here, we tested the hypothesis that serotonergic modulation may improve voiding function after an incomplete cauda equina/conus medullaris injury. For this purpose, we used a unilateral L5-S2 ventral root avulsion (VRA) injury model in the rat to mimic a partial lesion to the cauda equina and conus medullaris. Compared to a sham-operated series, comprehensive urodynamic studies demonstrated a markedly reduced voiding efficiency at 12 weeks after the VRA injury. Detailed cystometrogram studies showed injury-induced decreased peak bladder pressures indicative of reduced contractile properties. Concurrent external urethral sphincter (EUS) electromyography demonstrated shortened burst and prolonged silent periods associated with the elimination phase. Next, a 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist, 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)-tetralin (8-OH-DPAT), was administered intravenously at 12 weeks after the unilateral L5-S2 VRA injury. Both voiding efficiency and maximum intravesical pressure were significantly improved by 8-OH-DPAT (0.3-1.0 mg/kg). 8-OH-DPAT also enhanced the amplitude of EUS tonic and bursting activity as well as duration of EUS bursting and silent period during EUS bursting. The results indicate that 8-OH-DPAT improves voiding efficiency and enhances EUS bursting in rats with unilateral VRA injury. We conclude that serotonergic modulation of the 5-HT(1A) receptor may represent a new strategy to improve lower urinary tract function after incomplete cauda equina/conus medullaris injuries in experimental studies.

  4. Dual role of serotonin in the acquisition and extinction of reward-driven learning: involvement of 5-HT1A, 5-HT2A and 5-HT3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Frick, Luciana Romina; Bernardez-Vidal, Micaela; Hocht, Christian; Zanutto, Bonifacio Silvano; Rapanelli, Maximiliano

    2015-01-15

    Serotonin (5-HT) has been proposed as a possible encoder of reward. Nevertheless, the role of this neurotransmitter in reward-based tasks is not well understood. Given that the major serotonergic circuit in the rat brain comprises the dorsal raphe nuclei and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), and because the latter structure is involved in the control of complex behaviors and expresses 1A (5-HT1A), 2A (5-HT2A), and 3 (5-HT3) receptors, the aim was to study the role of 5-HT and of these receptors in the acquisition and extinction of a reward-dependent operant conditioning task. Long Evans rats were trained in an operant conditioning task while receiving fluoxetine (serotonin reuptake inhibitor, 10mg/kg), tianeptine (serotonin reuptake enhancer, 10mg/kg), buspirone (5-HT1A partial agonist, 10mg/kg), risperidone (5-HT2A antagonist, 1mg/kg), ondansetron (5-HT3 antagonist, 2mg/kg) or vehicle. Then, animals that acquired the operant conditioning without any treatment were trained to extinct the task in the presence of the pharmacological agents. Fluoxetine impaired acquisition but improved extinction. Tianeptine administration induced the opposite effects. Buspirone induced a mild deficit in acquisition and had no effects during the extinction phase. Risperidone administration resulted in learning deficits during the acquisition phase, although it promoted improved extinction. Ondansetron treatment showed a deleterious effect in the acquisition phase and an overall improvement in the extinction phase. These data showed a differential role of 5-HT in the acquisition and extinction of an operant conditioning task, suggesting that it may have a dual function in reward encoding. PMID:24949809

  5. Nonphotic entrainment by 5-HT1A/7 receptor agonists accompanied by reduced Per1 and Per2 mRNA levels in the suprachiasmatic nuclei.

    PubMed

    Horikawa, K; Yokota, S; Fuji, K; Akiyama, M; Moriya, T; Okamura, H; Shibata, S

    2000-08-01

    In mammals, the environmental light/dark cycle strongly synchronizes the circadian clock within the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) to 24 hr. It is well known that not only photic but also nonphotic stimuli can entrain the SCN clock. Actually, many studies have shown that a daytime injection of 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino) tetralin (8-OH DPAT), a serotonin 1A/7 receptor agonist, as a nonphotic stimulus induces phase advances in hamster behavioral circadian rhythms in vivo, as well as the neuron activity rhythm of the SCN in vitro. Recent reports suggest that mammalian homologs of the Drosophila clock gene, Period (Per), are involved in photic entrainment. Therefore, we examined whether phase advances elicited by 8-OH DPAT were associated with a change of Period mRNA levels in the SCN. In this experiment, we cloned partial cDNAs encoding hamster Per1, Per2, and Per3 and observed both circadian oscillation and the light responsiveness of Period. Furthermore, we found that the inhibitory effect of 8-OH DPAT on hamster Per1 and Per2 mRNA levels in the SCN occurred only during the hamster's mid-subjective day, but not during the early subjective day or subjective night. The present findings demonstrate that the acute and circadian time-dependent reduction of Per1 and/or Per2 mRNA in the hamster SCN by 8-OH DPAT is strongly correlated with the phase resetting in response to 8-OH DPAT. PMID:10908630

  6. The role of the serotonin receptor subtypes 5-HT1A and 5-HT7 and its interaction in emotional learning and memory

    PubMed Central

    Stiedl, Oliver; Pappa, Elpiniki; Konradsson-Geuken, Åsa; Ögren, Sven Ove

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] is a multifunctional neurotransmitter innervating cortical and limbic areas involved in cognition and emotional regulation. Dysregulation of serotonergic transmission is associated with emotional and cognitive deficits in psychiatric patients and animal models. Drugs targeting the 5-HT system are widely used to treat mood disorders and anxiety-like behaviors. Among the fourteen 5-HT receptor (5-HTR) subtypes, the 5-HT1AR and 5-HT7R are associated with the development of anxiety, depression and cognitive function linked to mechanisms of emotional learning and memory. In rodents fear conditioning and passive avoidance (PA) are associative learning paradigms to study emotional memory. This review assesses the role of 5-HT1AR and 5-HT7R as well as their interplay at the molecular, neurochemical and behavioral level. Activation of postsynaptic 5-HT1ARs impairs emotional memory through attenuation of neuronal activity, whereas presynaptic 5-HT1AR activation reduces 5-HT release and exerts pro-cognitive effects on PA retention. Antagonism of the 5-HT1AR facilitates memory retention possibly via 5-HT7R activation and evidence is provided that 5HT7R can facilitate emotional memory upon reduced 5-HT1AR transmission. These findings highlight the differential role of these 5-HTRs in cognitive/emotional domains of behavior. Moreover, the results indicate that tonic and phasic 5-HT release can exert different and potentially opposing effects on emotional memory, depending on the states of 5-HT1ARs and 5-HT7Rs and their interaction. Consequently, individual differences due to genetic and/or epigenetic mechanisms play an essential role for the responsiveness to drug treatment, e.g., by SSRIs which increase intrasynaptic 5-HT levels thereby activating multiple pre- and postsynaptic 5-HTR subtypes. PMID:26300776

  7. Anxiolytic actions of the substance P (NK1) receptor antagonist L-760735 and the 5-HT1A agonist 8-OH-DPAT in the social interaction test in gerbils.

    PubMed

    Cheeta, S; Tucci, S; Sandhu, J; Williams, A R; Rupniak, N M; File, S E

    2001-10-12

    The gerbil social interaction test has previously detected anxiolytic effects of nicotine and diazepam. In the present study, the high affinity substance P (NK(1)) receptor antagonist L-760735 (3 mg/kg) significantly increased the time spent in social interaction, whereas its low affinity analogue L-781773 (3 mg/kg) was without effect. Diazepam (0.1 mg/kg) and the 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT (0.003 and 0.01 mg/kg) also increased social interaction, whereas an acute dose of the selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor fluoxetine (10 mg/kg) decreased the time spent in social interaction. Diazepam (0.1 mg/kg) significantly increased locomotor activity, but this effect was independent of the increase in social interaction. The other drugs tested were without effect on locomotor activity. The present findings suggest that the gerbil social interaction may well provide a useful assay for detecting both anxiolytic and anxiogenic compounds, and suggests that the high affinity NK(1) receptor antagonist L-760735 may prove to be useful as an anxiolytic therapy.

  8. Actions of the prototypical 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT at human alpha2-adrenoceptors: (+)8-OH-DPAT, but not (-)8-OH-DPAT is an alpha2B subtype preferential agonist.

    PubMed

    Heusler, Peter; Rauly-Lestienne, Isabelle; Tourette, Amélie; Tardif, Stéphanie; Ailhaud, Marie-Christine; Croville, Guillaume; Cussac, Didier

    2010-08-25

    8-OH-DPAT [8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin] is the prototypical agonist at serotonin 5-HT1A receptors; however, activity at other targets contributes to the functional effects of the compound as well. We examined the properties of 8-OH-DPAT and its enantiomers at recombinant human (h)alpha2-adrenoceptor subtypes, using a panel of radioligand binding and functional tests. In competition binding experiments using [3H]-RX821002, about 10-fold selectivity of (+)8-OH-DPAT for the halpha2B subtype (pKi about 7) over halpha2A- and halpha2C-adrenoceptors was observed. In contrast, the S(-) enantiomer of 8-OH-DPAT showed similar weak affinities for the three receptor subtypes (pKis<6). The binding affinity of (+)8-OH-DPAT at the halpha2B- and the halpha2A-adrenoceptor was found sensitive to GTPgammaS, a receptor/G protein-uncoupling agent, indicating agonist properties of the drug. Furthermore, using [35S]GTPgammaS binding determination at CHO-halpha2B or CHO-halpha2A cell membranes and G protein coupled inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) current recordings in Xenopus oocytes expressing halpha2B, partial agonist activity of (+)8-OH-DPAT at the respective receptors was confirmed in these two different functional assays. Potency of (+)8-OH-DPAT for stimulation of [35S]GTPgammaS incorporation was lower at the halpha2A- than at the halpha2B-adrenoceptor, consistent with binding affinities. Thus, (+)8-OH-DPAT and, as a consequence, racemic (+/-)8-OH-DPAT are partial agonists at halpha2-adrenoceptors with selectivity for the halpha2B subtype, a property that might contribute to the effects of the compound described in native systems.

  9. Regulator of G-protein signaling 6 (RGS6) promotes anxiety and depression by attenuating serotonin-mediated activation of the 5-HT1A receptor-adenylyl cyclase axis

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Adele; Maity, Biswanath; Wunsch, Amanda M.; Meng, Fantao; Wu, Qi; Wemmie, John A.; Fisher, Rory A.

    2014-01-01

    Targeting serotonin (5-HT) bioavailability with selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) remains the most widely used treatment for mood disorders. However, their limited efficacy, delayed onset of action, and side effects restrict their clinical utility. Endogenous regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) proteins have been implicated as key inhibitors of 5-HT1ARs, whose activation is believed to underlie the beneficial effects of SSRIs, but the identity of the specific RGS proteins involved remains unknown. We identify RGS6 as the critical negative regulator of 5-HT1AR-dependent antidepressant actions. RGS6 is enriched in hippocampal and cortical neurons, 5-HT1AR-expressing cells implicated in mood disorders. RGS6−/− mice exhibit spontaneous anxiolytic and antidepressant behavior rapidly and completely reversibly by 5-HT1AR blockade. Effects of the SSRI fluvoxamine and 5-HT1AR agonist 8-OH-DPAT were also potentiated in RGS6+/− mice. The phenotype of RGS6−/− mice was associated with decreased CREB phosphorylation in the hippocampus and cortex, implicating enhanced Gαi-dependent adenylyl cyclase inhibition as a possible causative factor in the behavior observed in RGS6−/− animals. Our results demonstrate that by inhibiting serotonergic innervation of the cortical-limbic neuronal circuit, RGS6 exerts powerful anxiogenic and prodepressant actions. These findings indicate that RGS6 inhibition may represent a viable means to treat mood disorders or enhance the efficacy of serotonergic agents.—Stewart, A., Maity, B., Wunsch, A. M., Meng, F., Wu, Q., Wemmie, J. A., Fisher, R. A. Regulator of G-protein signaling 6 (RGS6) promotes anxiety and depression by attenuating serotonin-mediated activation of the 5-HT1A receptor-adenylyl cyclase axis. PMID:24421401

  10. The serotonergic hallucinogen 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine disrupts cortical activity in a regionally-selective manner via 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Riga, Maurizio S; Bortolozzi, Analia; Campa, Letizia; Artigas, Francesc; Celada, Pau

    2016-02-01

    5-Methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT) is a natural hallucinogen, acting as a non-selective serotonin 5-HT(1A)/5-HT(2A)-R agonist. Psychotomimetic agents such as the non-competitive NMDA-R antagonist phencyclidine and serotonergic hallucinogens (DOI and 5-MeO-DMT) disrupt cortical synchrony in the low frequency range (<4 Hz) in rat prefrontal cortex (PFC), an effect reversed by antipsychotic drugs. Here we extend these observations by examining the effect of 5-MeO-DMT on low frequency cortical oscillations (LFCO, <4 Hz) in PFC, visual (V1), somatosensory (S1) and auditory (Au1) cortices, as well as the dependence of these effects on 5-HT(1A)-R and 5-HT(2A)-R, using wild type (WT) and 5-HT(2A)-R knockout (KO2A) anesthetized mice. 5-MeO-DMT reduced LFCO in the PFC of WT and KO2A mice. The effect in KO2A mice was fully prevented by the 5-HT(1A)-R antagonist WAY-100635. Systemic and local 5-MeO-DMT reduced 5-HT release in PFC mainly via 5-HT(1A)-R. Moreover, 5-MeO-DMT reduced LFCO in S1, Au1 and V1 of WT mice and only in V1 of KO2A mice, suggesting the involvement of 5-HT(1A)-R activation in the 5-MeO-DMT-induced disruption of V1 activity. In addition, antipsychotic drugs reversed 5-MeO-DMT effects in WT mice. The present results suggest that the hallucinogen action of 5-MeO-DMT is mediated by simultaneous alterations of the activity of sensory (S1, Au1, V1) and associative (PFC) cortical areas, also supporting a role of 5-HT(1A)-R stimulation in V1 and PFC, in addition to the well-known action on 5-HT(2A)-R. Moreover, the reversal by antipsychotic drugs of 5-MeO-DMT effects adds to previous literature supporting the usefulness of the present model in antipsychotic drug development.

  11. Omega-3 fatty acid deficient male rats exhibit abnormal behavioral activation in the forced swim test following chronic fluoxetine treatment: association with altered 5-HT1A and alpha2A adrenergic receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Able, Jessica A; Liu, Yanhong; Jandacek, Ronald; Rider, Therese; Tso, Patrick; McNamara, Robert K

    2014-03-01

    Omega-3 fatty acid deficiency during development leads to enduing alterations in central monoamine neurotransmission in rat brain. Here we investigated the effects of omega-3 fatty acid deficiency on behavioral and neurochemical responses to chronic fluoxetine (FLX) treatment. Male rats were fed diets with (CON, n = 34) or without (DEF, n = 30) the omega-3 fatty acid precursor alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) during peri-adolescent development (P21-P90). A subset of CON (n = 14) and DEF (n = 12) rats were administered FLX (10 mg/kg/d) through their drinking water for 30 d beginning on P60. The forced swimming test (FST) was initiated on P90, and regional brain mRNA markers of serotonin and noradrenaline neurotransmission were determined. Dietary ALA depletion led to significant reductions in frontal cortex docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) composition in DEF (-26%, p = 0.0001) and DEF + FLX (-32%, p = 0.0001) rats. Plasma FLX and norfluoxetine concentrations did not different between FLX-treated DEF and CON rats. During the 15-min FST pretest, DEF + FLX rats exhibited significantly greater climbing behavior compared with CON + FLX rats. During the 5-min test trial, FLX treatment reduced immobility and increased swimming in CON and DEF rats, and only DEF + FLX rats exhibited significant elevations in climbing behavior. DEF + FLX rats exhibited greater midbrain, and lower frontal cortex, 5-HT1A mRNA expression compared with all groups including CON + FLX rats. DEF + FLX rats also exhibited greater midbrain alpha2A adrenergic receptor mRNA expression which was positively correlated with climbing behavior in the FST. These preclinical data demonstrate that low omega-3 fatty acid status leads to abnormal behavioral and neurochemical responses to chronic FLX treatment in male rats.

  12. Descending Control of Itch Transmission by the Serotonergic System via 5-HT1A-Facilitated GRP-GRPR Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhong-Qiu; Liu, Xian-Yu; Jeffry, Joseph; Karunarathne, W.K. Ajith; Li, Jin-Lian; Munanairi, Admire; Zhou, Xuan-Yi; Li, Hui; Sun, Yan-Gang; Wan, Li; Wu, Zhen-Yu; Kim, Seungil; Huo, Fu-Quan; Mo, Ping; Barry, Devin M; Zhang, Chun-Kui; Kim, Ji-Young; Gautam, N.; Renner, Kenneth J.; Li, Yun-Qing; Chen, Zhou-Feng

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Central serotonin (5-HT) modulates somatosensory transduction, but how it achieves sensory modality-specific modulation remains unclear. Here we report that enhancing serotonergic tone via administration of 5-hydroxytryptophan potentiates itch sensation, whereas mice lacking 5-HT or serotonergic neurons in the brainstem exhibit markedly reduced scratching behavior. Through pharmacological and behavioral screening, we identified 5-HT1A as a key receptor in facilitating gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP)-dependent scratching behavior. Co-activation of 5-HT1A and GRP receptors (GRPR) greatly potentiates subthreshold, GRP-induced Ca2+ transients and action potential firing of GRPR+ neurons. Immunostaining, biochemical and biophysical studies suggest that 5-HT1A and GRPR may function as receptor heteromeric complexes. Furthermore, 5-HT1A blockade significantly attenuates, whereas its activation contributes to, long-lasting itch transmission. Thus, our studies demonstrate that the descending 5-HT system facilitates GRP-GRPR signaling via 5-HT1A to augment itch-specific outputs and a disruption of crosstalk between 5-HT1A and GRPR may be a useful anti-pruritic strategy. PMID:25453842

  13. Functional Selectivity and Antidepressant Activity of Serotonin 1A Receptor Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Chilmonczyk, Zdzisław; Bojarski, Andrzej Jacek; Pilc, Andrzej; Sylte, Ingebrigt

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) is a monoamine neurotransmitter that plays an important role in physiological functions. 5-HT has been implicated in sleep, feeding, sexual behavior, temperature regulation, pain, and cognition as well as in pathological states including disorders connected to mood, anxiety, psychosis and pain. 5-HT1A receptors have for a long time been considered as an interesting target for the action of antidepressant drugs. It was postulated that postsynaptic 5-HT1A agonists could form a new class of antidepressant drugs, and mixed 5-HT1A receptor ligands/serotonin transporter (SERT) inhibitors seem to possess an interesting pharmacological profile. It should, however, be noted that 5-HT1A receptors can activate several different biochemical pathways and signal through both G protein-dependent and G protein-independent pathways. The variables that affect the multiplicity of 5-HT1A receptor signaling pathways would thus result from the summation of effects specific to the host cell milieu. Moreover, receptor trafficking appears different at pre- and postsynaptic sites. It should also be noted that the 5-HT1A receptor cooperates with other signal transduction systems (like the 5-HT1B or 5-HT2A/2B/2C receptors, the GABAergic and the glutaminergic systems), which also contribute to its antidepressant and/or anxiolytic activity. Thus identifying brain specific molecular targets for 5-HT1A receptor ligands may result in a better targeting, raising a hope for more effective medicines for various pathologies. PMID:26262615

  14. Functional Selectivity and Antidepressant Activity of Serotonin 1A Receptor Ligands.

    PubMed

    Chilmonczyk, Zdzisław; Bojarski, Andrzej Jacek; Pilc, Andrzej; Sylte, Ingebrigt

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) is a monoamine neurotransmitter that plays an important role in physiological functions. 5-HT has been implicated in sleep, feeding, sexual behavior, temperature regulation, pain, and cognition as well as in pathological states including disorders connected to mood, anxiety, psychosis and pain. 5-HT1A receptors have for a long time been considered as an interesting target for the action of antidepressant drugs. It was postulated that postsynaptic 5-HT1A agonists could form a new class of antidepressant drugs, and mixed 5-HT1A receptor ligands/serotonin transporter (SERT) inhibitors seem to possess an interesting pharmacological profile. It should, however, be noted that 5-HT1A receptors can activate several different biochemical pathways and signal through both G protein-dependent and G protein-independent pathways. The variables that affect the multiplicity of 5-HT1A receptor signaling pathways would thus result from the summation of effects specific to the host cell milieu. Moreover, receptor trafficking appears different at pre- and postsynaptic sites. It should also be noted that the 5-HT1A receptor cooperates with other signal transduction systems (like the 5-HT1B or 5-HT2A/2B/2C receptors, the GABAergic and the glutaminergic systems), which also contribute to its antidepressant and/or anxiolytic activity. Thus identifying brain specific molecular targets for 5-HT1A receptor ligands may result in a better targeting, raising a hope for more effective medicines for various pathologies. PMID:26262615

  15. Modulatory effect of the 5-HT1A agonist buspirone and the mixed non-hallucinogenic 5-HT1A/2A agonist ergotamine on psilocybin-induced psychedelic experience.

    PubMed

    Pokorny, Thomas; Preller, Katrin H; Kraehenmann, Rainer; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2016-04-01

    The mixed serotonin (5-HT) 1A/2A/2B/2C/6/7 receptor agonist psilocybin dose-dependently induces an altered state of consciousness (ASC) that is characterized by changes in sensory perception, mood, thought, and the sense of self. The psychological effects of psilocybin are primarily mediated by 5-HT2A receptor activation. However, accumulating evidence suggests that 5-HT1A or an interaction between 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors may contribute to the overall effects of psilocybin. Therefore, we used a double-blind, counterbalanced, within-subject design to investigate the modulatory effects of the partial 5-HT1A agonist buspirone (20mg p.o.) and the non-hallucinogenic 5-HT2A/1A agonist ergotamine (3mg p.o.) on psilocybin-induced (170 µg/kg p.o.) psychological effects in two groups (n=19, n=17) of healthy human subjects. Psychological effects were assessed using the Altered State of Consciousness (5D-ASC) rating scale. Buspirone significantly reduced the 5D-ASC main scale score for Visionary Restructuralization (VR) (p<0.001), which was mostly driven by a reduction of the VR item cluster scores for elementary and complex visual hallucinations. Further, buspirone also reduced the main scale score for Oceanic Boundlessness (OB) including derealisation and depersonalisation phenomena at a trend level (p=0.062), whereas ergotamine did not show any effects on the psilocybin-induced 5D-ASC main scale scores. The present finding demonstrates that buspirone exerts inhibitory effects on psilocybin-induced effects, presumably via 5-HT1A receptor activation, an interaction between 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors, or both. The data suggest that the modulation of 5-HT1A receptor activity may be a useful target in the treatment of visual hallucinations in different psychiatric and neurological diseases. PMID:26875114

  16. Modulatory effect of the 5-HT1A agonist buspirone and the mixed non-hallucinogenic 5-HT1A/2A agonist ergotamine on psilocybin-induced psychedelic experience.

    PubMed

    Pokorny, Thomas; Preller, Katrin H; Kraehenmann, Rainer; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2016-04-01

    The mixed serotonin (5-HT) 1A/2A/2B/2C/6/7 receptor agonist psilocybin dose-dependently induces an altered state of consciousness (ASC) that is characterized by changes in sensory perception, mood, thought, and the sense of self. The psychological effects of psilocybin are primarily mediated by 5-HT2A receptor activation. However, accumulating evidence suggests that 5-HT1A or an interaction between 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors may contribute to the overall effects of psilocybin. Therefore, we used a double-blind, counterbalanced, within-subject design to investigate the modulatory effects of the partial 5-HT1A agonist buspirone (20mg p.o.) and the non-hallucinogenic 5-HT2A/1A agonist ergotamine (3mg p.o.) on psilocybin-induced (170 µg/kg p.o.) psychological effects in two groups (n=19, n=17) of healthy human subjects. Psychological effects were assessed using the Altered State of Consciousness (5D-ASC) rating scale. Buspirone significantly reduced the 5D-ASC main scale score for Visionary Restructuralization (VR) (p<0.001), which was mostly driven by a reduction of the VR item cluster scores for elementary and complex visual hallucinations. Further, buspirone also reduced the main scale score for Oceanic Boundlessness (OB) including derealisation and depersonalisation phenomena at a trend level (p=0.062), whereas ergotamine did not show any effects on the psilocybin-induced 5D-ASC main scale scores. The present finding demonstrates that buspirone exerts inhibitory effects on psilocybin-induced effects, presumably via 5-HT1A receptor activation, an interaction between 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors, or both. The data suggest that the modulation of 5-HT1A receptor activity may be a useful target in the treatment of visual hallucinations in different psychiatric and neurological diseases.

  17. Variability in the benzodiazepine response of serotonin 5-HT1A receptor null mice displaying anxiety-like phenotype: evidence for genetic modifiers in the 5-HT-mediated regulation of GABA(A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Sarah J; Toth, Miklos

    2004-07-14

    Benzodiazepines (BZs) acting as modulators of GABA(A) receptors (GABA(A)Rs) are an important group of drugs for the treatment of anxiety disorders. However, a large inter-individual variation in BZ sensitivity occurs in the human population with some anxiety disorder patients exhibiting diminished sensitivity to BZ and reduced density of GABA(A)Rs. The mechanism underlying BZ treatment resistance is not known, and it is not possible to predict whether an anxiety patient will respond to BZ. 5-hydroxytryptamine1A receptor (5-HT1AR) null mice (R-/-) on the Swiss-Webster (SW) background reproduce several features of BZ-resistant anxiety; they exhibit anxiety-related behaviors, do not respond to BZ, have reduced BZ binding, and have decreased expression of the major GABA(A)R subunits alpha1 and alpha2. Here, we show that R-/- mice on the C57Bl6 (B6) background also have anxiety phenotype, but they respond to BZ and have normal GABA(A)R subunit expression. This indicates that the 5-HT1AR-mediated regulation of GABA(A)R alpha subunit expression is subject to genetic modification. Hybrid SW/B6-R-/- mice also exhibit BZ-resistant anxiety, suggesting that SW mice carry a genetic modifier, which mediates the effect of the 5-HT1AR on the expression of GABA(A)Ralpha subunits. In addition, we show that this genetic interaction in SW mice operates early in postnatal life to influence the expression of GABA(A)R alpha subunits at the transcriptional level. These data indicate that BZ-resistant anxiety results from a developmental arrest of GABA(A)R expression in SW-R-/- mice, and a similar mechanism may be responsible for the BZ insensitivity of some anxiety patients.

  18. Pharmacological, neurochemical, and behavioral profile of JB-788, a new 5-HT1A agonist.

    PubMed

    Picard, M; Morisset, S; Cloix, J F; Bizot, J C; Guerin, M; Beneteau, V; Guillaumet, G; Hevor, T K

    2010-09-01

    A novel pyridine derivative, 8-{4-[(6-methoxy-2,3-dihydro-[1,4]dioxino[2,3-b]pyridine-3-ylmethyl)-amino]-butyl}-8-aza-spiro[4.5]decane-7,9-dione hydrochloride, termed JB-788, was designed to selectively target 5-HT(1A) receptors. In the present study, the pharmacological profile of JB-788 was characterized in vitro using radioligands binding tests and in vivo using neurochemical and behavioural experiments. JB-788 bound tightly to human 5-HT(1A) receptor expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK-293) cells with a K(i) value of 0.8 nM. Its binding affinity is in the same range as that observed for the (+/-)8-OH-DPAT, a reference 5HT(1A) agonist compound. Notably, JB-788 only bound weakly to 5-HT(1B) or 5-HT(2A) receptors and moreover the drug displayed only weak or indetectable binding to muscarinic, alpha(2), beta(1) and beta(2) adrenergic receptors, or dopaminergic D(1) receptors. JB-788 was found to display substantial binding affinity for dopaminergic D(2) receptors and, to a lesser extend to alpha(1) adrenoreceptors. JB-788 dose-dependently decreased forskolin-induced cAMP accumulation in HEK cells expressing human 5-HT(1A), thus acting as a potent 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist (E(max.) 75%, EC(50) 3.5 nM). JB-788 did not exhibit any D(2) receptor agonism but progressively inhibited the effects of quinpirole, a D(2) receptor agonist, in the cAMP accumulation test with a K(i) value of 250 nM. JB-788 induced a weak change in cAMP levels in mouse brain but, like some antipsychotics, transiently increased glycogen contents in various brain regions. Behavioral effects were investigated in mice using the elevated plus-maze. JB-788 was found to increase the time duration spent by animals in anxiogenic situations. Locomotor hyperactivity induced by methamphetamine in mouse, a model of antipsychotic activity, was dose-dependently inhibited by JB-788. Altogether, these results suggest that JB-788 displays pharmacological properties, which could be of interest in the area

  19. Increased serotonin-1A (5-HT1A) autoreceptor expression and reduced raphe serotonin levels in deformed epidermal autoregulatory factor-1 (Deaf-1) gene knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Czesak, Margaret; Le François, Brice; Millar, Anne M; Deria, Mariam; Daigle, Mireille; Visvader, Jane E; Anisman, Hymie; Albert, Paul R

    2012-02-24

    Altered regulation of the serotonin-1A (5-HT1A) receptor gene is implicated in major depression and mood disorders. The functional human 5-HT1A C(-1019)G promoter polymorphism (rs6295), which prevents the binding of Deaf-1/NUDR leading to dysregulation of the receptor, has been associated with major depression. In cell models Deaf-1 displays dual activity, repressing 5-HT1A autoreceptor expression in serotonergic raphe cells while enhancing postsynaptic 5-HT1A heteroreceptor expression in nonserotonergic neurons. A functional Deaf-1 binding site on the mouse 5-HT1A promoter was recognized by Deaf-1 in vitro and in vivo and mediated dual activity of Deaf-1 on 5-HT1A gene transcription. To address regulation by Deaf-1 in vivo, Deaf-1 knock-out mice bred to a C57BL/6 background were compared with wild-type siblings for changes in 5-HT1A RNA and protein by quantitative RT-PCR, in situ hybridization, and immunofluorescence. In the dorsal raphe, Deaf-1 knock-out mice displayed increased 5-HT1A mRNA, protein, and 5-HT1A-positive cell counts but reduced 5-HT levels, whereas other serotonergic markers, such as tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH)- or 5-HT-positive cells and TPH2 RNA levels, were unchanged. By contrast, 5-HT1A mRNA and 5-HT1A-positive cells were reduced in the frontal cortex of Deaf-1-null mice, with no significant change in hippocampal 5-HT1A RNA, protein, or cell counts. The region-specific alterations of brain 5-HT1A gene expression and reduced raphe 5-HT content in Deaf-1(-/-) mice indicate the importance of Deaf-1 in regulation of 5-HT1A gene expression and provide insight into the role of the 5-HT1A G(-1019) allele in reducing serotonergic neurotransmission by derepression of 5-HT1A autoreceptors.

  20. 5-HT1A Agonist Properties Contribute to a Robust Response to Vilazodone in the Novelty Suppressed Feeding Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Garcia, Alvaro L.; Navarro-Sobrino, Míriam; Pilosof, Gila; Banerjee, Pradeep; Dranovsky, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Background: Differences in 5-HT1A receptor function have been implicated in vulnerability to depression and in response to treatment. Adding 5-HT1A partial agonists to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors has been touted as a strategy to increase their efficacy. Here we use the novelty suppressed feeding paradigm to compare the effects of vilazodone, a high-potency selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, with high affinity for 5-HT1A receptors to the reference selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine across several mouse strains that differ in their response to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Methods: To confirm 5-HT1A agonist activity, body temperature was measured after acute administration of vilazodone or fluoxetine, as administration of 5-HT1A agonists induces hypothermia. We next used 3 strains of mice to examine the effects of the drugs on latency in the novelty suppressed feeding, a paradigm generally sensitive to chronic but not acute effects of antidepressants. Results: Vilazodone induces robust hypothermia and blocks stress-induced hyperthermia in a 5-HT1A-dependent manner, consistent with agonist effects at 5-HT1A autoreceptors. In 129SvEv mice, vilazodone (10mg/kg/d) reduces the latency to eat in the novelty suppressed feeding test within 8 days, while no effect of fluoxetine (20mg/kg/d) was detected at that time. In contrast, both vilazodone and fluoxetine are effective at decreasing latency to eat in the novelty suppressed feeding paradigm in a strain with low autoreceptor levels. In mice with higher autoreceptor levels, no significant difference was detected between fluoxetine and vehicle (P=.8) or vilazodone and vehicle (P=.06). Conclusion: In mice, vilazodone may offer advantages in time of onset and efficacy over a reference selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor in the novelty suppressed feeding test. PMID:27352617

  1. Rat dams exposed repeatedly to a daily brief separation from the pups exhibit increased maternal behavior, decreased anxiety and altered levels of receptors for estrogens (ERα, ERβ), oxytocin and serotonin (5-HT1A) in their brain.

    PubMed

    Stamatakis, Antonios; Kalpachidou, Theodora; Raftogianni, Androniki; Zografou, Efstratia; Tzanou, Athanasia; Pondiki, Stavroula; Stylianopoulou, Fotini

    2015-02-01

    In the present study we investigated the neurobiological mechanisms underlying expression of maternal behavior. Increased maternal behavior was experimentally induced by a brief 15-min separation between the mother and the pups during postnatal days 1 to 22. On postnatal days (PND) 12 and 22, we determined in experimental and control dams levels of anxiety in the elevated plus maze (EPM) as well as the levels of receptors for estrogens (ERα, ERβ), oxytocin (OTR) and serotonin (5-HT1AR) in areas of the limbic system (prefrontal cortex-PFC, hippocampus, lateral septum-SL, medial preoptic area-MPOA, shell of nucleus accumbens-nAc-Sh, central-CeA and basolateral-BLA amygdala), involved in the regulation of maternal behavior. Experimental dams, which showed increased maternal behavior towards their offspring, displayed reduced anxiety in the EPM on both PND12 and PND22. These behavioral differences could be attributed to neurochemical alterations in their brain: On both PND12 and PND22, experimental mothers had higher levels of ERα and OTRs in the PFC, hippocampus, CeA, SL, MPOA and nAc-Sh. The experimental manipulation-induced increase in ERβ levels was less widespread, being localized in PFC, the hippocampal CA2 area, MPOA and nAc-Sh. In addition, 5-HT1ARs were reduced in the PFC, hippocampus, CeA, MPOA and nAc-Sh of the experimental mothers. Our results show that the experience of the daily repeated brief separation from the pups results in increased brain ERs and OTRs, as well as decreased 5-HT1ARs in the dam's brain; these neurochemical changes could underlie the observed increase in maternal behavior and the reduction of anxiety.

  2. THE EFFECT OF SEROTONIN 5-HT1A, 5-HT2 RECEPTOR LIGANDS, KETOPROFEN AND THEIR COMBINATION IN MODELS OF INDUCED PAIN IN MICE.

    PubMed

    Zygmunt, Małgorzata; Chłoń-Rzepa, Grażyna; Sapa, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the effects of the 7-(3-chlorophenyl)piperazinylalkyl derivatives of 8-alkoxypurine-2,6-dione (compounds 1-4) in two animal models of induced pain and to compare their effects with ketoprofen and with their combination. All experiments were performed on albino mice. Mice were evaluated for their responsiveness to noxious stimuli using: the hot-plate test and the phenylbenzo-quinone-induced writhing test. All compounds showed analgesic activity only in the writhing test. The analgesic activities of compounds 3 and 4 were similar to ketoprofen. The compounds slightly increased the analgesic effect of ketoprofen when used in combination in the visceral type of pain. The possible mechanisms of the antinociceptive effect of these compounds are thought to involve the activation of analgesic effect mediated by the serotonergic pathways or combination of this mechanism with other important mediators playing a role in pain modulation.

  3. Pharmacological profiles in rats of novel antipsychotics with combined dopamine D2/serotonin 5-HT1A activity: comparison with typical and atypical conventional antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Bardin, Laurent; Auclair, Agnès; Kleven, Mark S; Prinssen, Eric P M; Koek, Wouter; Newman-Tancredi, Adrian; Depoortère, Ronan

    2007-03-01

    Combining antagonist/partial agonist activity at dopamine D2 and agonist activity at serotonin 5-HT1A receptors is one of the approaches that has recently been chosen to develop new generation antipsychotics, including bifeprunox, SSR181507 and SLV313. There have been, however, few comparative data on their pharmacological profiles. Here, we have directly compared a wide array of these novel dopamine D2/5-HT1A and conventional antipsychotics in rat models predictive of antipsychotic activity. Potency of antipsychotics to antagonize conditioned avoidance, methylphenidate-induced behaviour and D-amphetamine-induced hyperlocomotion correlated with their affinity at dopamine D2 receptors. Potency against ketamine-induced hyperlocomotion was independent of affinity at dopamine D2 or 5-HT1A receptors. Propensity to induce catalepsy, predictive of occurrence of extrapyramidal side effects, was inversely related to affinity at 5-HT1A receptors. As a result, preferential D2/5-HT1A antipsychotics displayed a large separation between doses producing 'antipsychotic-like' vs. cataleptogenic actions. These data support the contention that 5-HT1A receptor activation greatly reduces or prevents the cataleptogenic potential of novel antipsychotics. They also emphasize that interactions at 5-HT1A and D2 receptors, and the nature of effects (antagonism or partial agonism) at the latter has a profound influence on pharmacological activities, and is likely to affect therapeutic profiles.

  4. Investigating the Motivational Mechanism of Altered Saline Consumption Following 5-HT1A Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Caras, Melissa L.; MacKenzie, Kimberly; Rodwin, Benjamin; Katz, Donald B.

    2010-01-01

    The precise role played by serotonin (5-HT) in taste—an issue of great interest given the involvement of serotonin in human sensory and eating disorders—is a matter of considerable debate, perhaps because of the variety of methodologies that have been brought to bear by different researchers. Here, we use multiple methods to reveal the motivational mechanism whereby 5-HT1A receptor activation modulates drinking behavior. Subcutaneous injections of the selective 5-HT1A agonist 8-hydroxy-2-di-n-propylamino-tetralin (8-OH-DPAT), a drug that reduces 5-HT release by acting on presynaptic auto-receptors, dose-dependently increased consumption of 0.45M NaCl in a one-bottle test. In a two-bottle test, however, 8-OH-DPAT-treated animals (30 μg/kg/ml) demonstrated decreased NaCl preference—although our detection of this effect was obscured by adaptation to the drug across days. Rats’ performance in a brief access test confirmed that 8-OH-DPAT decreased preference for saline by both increasing water consumption and decreasing NaCl consumption. Finally, taste reactivity tests demonstrated that the latter result does not reflect decreased NaCl palatability. Overall, the results suggest that 8-OH-DPAT-induced 5-HT hypofunction increases thirst without substantially affecting the palatability of NaCl. PMID:18410179

  5. Electrophysiological responses of serotoninergic dorsal raphe neurons to 5-HT1A and 5-HT1B agonists.

    PubMed

    Sprouse, J S; Aghajanian, G K

    1987-01-01

    A direct comparison was made of the effects of serotonin 5-HT1A and 5-HT1B selective compounds on the spontaneous firing rate of dorsal raphe serotoninergic neurons in chloral-hydrate-anesthetized rats. Following intravenous administration, the 5-HT1A selective compounds ipsapirone (TVX Q 7821) and LY 165163 potently inhibited single-unit activity in a dose-dependent manner whereas the 5-HT1B selective compounds, m-chlorophenylpiperazine (mCPP) and trifluoromethylphenylpiperazine (TFMPP), displayed only weak or irregular actions. Low microiontophoretic currents of ipsapirone and LY 165163 were also effective in suppressing spontaneous firing; dose-response relationships for the 5-HT1A compounds were indistinguishable from that of 5-HT itself. In contrast, dorsal raphe neurons were only weakly responsive to microiontophoretic application of mCPP and TFMPP; dose-response relationships for the 5-HT1B compounds were significantly displaced from that of 5-HT. In intracellular studies, ipsapirone and LY 165163, when added to the media bathing brain slices, mimicked the actions of 5-HT in hyperpolarizing dorsal raphe cell membranes and decreasing input resistance; however, the maximal effects of the 5-HT1A compounds on these membrane properties exceeded those of 5-HT. In summary, dorsal raphe 5-HT neurons appear highly responsive to 5-HT1A, but not to 5-HT1B compounds; these findings are discussed with regard to the 5-HT receptor subtypes as candidates for the somatodendritic autoreceptor of dorsal raphe neurons. PMID:3505364

  6. Yohimbine is a 5-HT1A agonist in rats in doses exceeding 1 mg/kg

    PubMed Central

    Zaretsky, Dmitry V.; Zaretskaia, Maria V.; DiMicco, Joseph A.; Rusyniak, Daniel E.

    2015-01-01

    Yohimbine is a prototypical alpha2-adrenergic receptor antagonist. Due to its relatively high selectivity, yohimbine is often used in experiments whose purpose is to examine the role of these receptors. For example, yohimbine has been employed at doses of 1–5 mg/kg to reinstate drug-seeking behavior after extinction or to antagonize general anesthesia, an effects presumably being a consequence of blocking alpha2-adrenergic receptors. In this report we characterized dose-dependent autonomic and behavioral effects of yohimbine and its interaction with an antagonist of 5-HT1A receptors, WAY 100635. In low doses (0.5 – 2 mg/kg i.p.) yohimbine induced locomotor activation which was accompanied by a tachycardia and mild hypertension. Increasing the dose to 3–4.5 mg/kg reversed the hypertension and locomotor activation and induced profound hypothermia. The hypothermia as well as the suppression of the locomotion and the hypertension could be reversed by the blockade of 5-HT1A receptors with WAY 100635. Our data confirm that yohimbine possesses 5-HT1A properties, and demonstrated that in doses above 1 mg/kg significantly activate these receptors. PMID:26366943

  7. The 5-HT1A antagonist, WAY 100 635, alleviates cognitive impairments induced by dizocilpine (MK-801) in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Harder, J A; Ridley, R M

    2000-02-14

    Central glutamate neurotransmission is modulated by an upregulatory cholinergic influence and an inhibitory serotonergic influence. In Alzheimer's disease, cognitive decline is associated with loss of both glutamatergic and cholinergic neurones (Francis et al., 1992, Progress in Neurobiology 39, 517-545). While therapeutic strategies for alleviating this cognitive decline have concentrated on restoring cholinergic tone, we suggest that 5-HT1A antagonists also have the potential to alleviate the cognitive symptoms of Alzheimer's disease. Previous studies have shown that dizocilpine (MK-801), a glutamatergic antagonist acting at the NMDA receptor, produces learning impairments in the common marmoset, a non-human primate. Specifically, it impairs the acquisition of shape discrimination and visuospatial conditional tasks, at doses that do not affect locomotor behaviour or coordination (Harder et al., 1998, Society for Neuroscience Abstracts 23(1), 219). In the present study we investigated the effects of WAY 100 635, a 5-HT1A antagonist, on the cognitive deficits induced by dizocilpine. The number of trials required to learn each type of task under combined treatment with dizocilpine and WAY 100 635 was significantly lower than under dizocilpine treatment alone, and did not differ significantly from the number of trials required under saline, demonstrating that the cognitive effects of glutamatergic blockade can be overcome by treatment with a 5-HT1A antagonist.

  8. 17β-estradiol-induced regulation of the novel 5-HT1A-related transcription factors NUDR and Freud-1 in SH SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Adeosun, Samuel O; Albert, Paul R; Austin, Mark C; Iyo, Abiye H

    2012-05-01

    Nuclear deformed epidermal autoregulatory factor-1 (NUDR/Deaf-1) and five prime repressor element under dual repression (Freud-1) are novel transcriptional regulators of the 5-HT(1A) receptor, a receptor that has been implicated in the pathophysiology of various psychiatric illnesses. The antidepressant effect of 17β-Estradiol (17βE(2)) is purported to involve the downregulation of this receptor. We investigated the possible role of NUDR and Freud-1 in 17βE(2)-induced downregulation of the 5-HT(1A) receptor in the neuroblastoma cell line SH SY5Y. Cells were treated with 10 nM of 17βE(2) for 3 or 48 h, followed by a 24-h withdrawal period. Proteins were isolated and analyzed by western blotting. 17βE(2) treatment increased NUDR immunoreactivity while Freud-1 and the 5-HT(1A) receptor showed significant decreases. Upon withdrawal of 17βE(2), protein expression returned to control levels, except for NUDR, which remained significantly elevated in the 3-h treatment. Taken together, these data support a non-genomic downregulation of 5-HT(1A) receptor protein by 17βE(2), which does not involve NUDR and Freud-1. Rather, changes in both transcription factors seem to be compensatory/homeostatic responses to changes in 5-HT(1A) receptor induced by 17βE(2). These observations further highlight the importance of NUDR and Freud-1 in regulating 5-HT(1A) receptor expression.

  9. Mass screening of rare 5HT1A variants using ECL detection

    SciTech Connect

    Bergen, A.; Wang, C.Y.; Nakhai, B.

    1994-09-01

    We are using electrochemiluminescence (ECL) detection technology to screen a large collection of patient DNAs (approximately 4000) arranged in pooled arrays for two rare amino acid substitutions in the 5HT1A serotonin receptor gene. The nucleotide changes are G746A (G22S) and A765G (128V). Conversion of two SSCP variants to allele-specific amplification (ASA) polymorphisms was accomplished and ECL detection enabled with the chemical addition of biotin and tris-bipyridyl ruthenium chelate to 5{prime} (specific) and 3{prime} (non-specific) oligonucleotide PCR primers, respectively. Pooling experiments indicate that the ASA-PCR is sensitive enough to reproducibily amplify the polymorphic allele from as little as 2 ng of genomic DNA in the presence of a 50-fold excess of genomic DNA from individuals negative for the polymorphic allele. ECL detection of specific PCR products indicates that the ECL device being used provides two logs of electrochemiluminescent discrimination between {open_quotes}positive{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}negative{close_quotes} PCR reactions. SSCP screening and ECL detection methods are being performed on approximately one-tenth of the collection to validate the ECL method. The detection sensitivity of the ECL device and the design of the pooled DNA arrays will reduce the number of PCRs required to detect these rare polymorphisms to 10% of that required with conventional screening techniques.

  10. Identification of dual active agents targeting 5-HT1A and SERT by combinatorial virtual screening methods.

    PubMed

    Wang, Panpan; Yang, Fengyuan; Yang, Hong; Xu, Xiaofei; Liu, Duo; Xue, Weiwei; Zhu, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are most adopted therapeutics marketed for major depression, and the efficacy of which are greatly reduced by their delayed onset of action and undesirable side effects. 5-HT1A receptor partial agonist and SERT inhibitor (SPARI) was proposed as a novel strategy to overcome the shortage of efficacy by a negative feedback control of 5-HT1A receptor. However, only one SPARI (vilazodone) has been approved for clinical use, and none is currently in clinical trial, which demonstrates a strong need for searching more novel SPARIs to facilitate antidepressants discovery. This work applied a combinatorial virtual screening method (CVSM) by integrating multiple tools. Statistic analysis reveals that CVSM surpasses single virtual screening methods in terms of hit rates and enrichment factors. By adopting optimized CVSM, 91 promising dual target leads form 15 scaffolds were identified, and 40% of these scaffolds have already been reported to show antidepressant related therapeutic effects. In sum, CVSM is capable in identifying novel SPARIs from large chemical libraries with extremely low false hit rate. PMID:26406003

  11. Enhancement of the FGFR1 signaling in the FGFR1-5-HT1A heteroreceptor complex in midbrain raphe 5-HT neuron systems. Relevance for neuroplasticity and depression.

    PubMed

    Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O; Pérez-Alea, Mileidys; Narvaez, Manuel; Tarakanov, Alexander O; Mudó, Giuseppa; Jiménez-Beristain, Antonio; Agnati, Luigi F; Ciruela, Francisco; Belluardo, Natale; Fuxe, Kjell

    2015-07-31

    New findings show existence of FGFR1-5-HT1A heteroreceptor complexes in 5-HT nerve cells of the dorsal and median raphe nuclei of the rat midbrain and hippocampus. Synergistic receptor-receptor interactions in these receptor complexes indicated their enhancing role in hippocampal plasticity. The existence of FGFR1-5-HT1A heteroreceptor complexes also in midbrain raphe 5-HT nerve cells open up the possibility that antidepressant drugs by increasing extracellular 5-HT levels can cause an activation of the FGF-2/FGFR1 mechanism in these nerve cells as well. Therefore, the agonist modulation of the FGFR1-5-HT1A heteroreceptor complexes and their specific role is now determined in rat medullary raphe RN33B cells and in the caudal midline raphe area of the midbrain rich in 5-HT nerve cells. The combined i.c.v. treatment with FGF-2 and the 5-HT1A agonist 8-OHDPAT synergistically increased FGFR1 and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in the raphe midline area of the midbrain and in the RN33B cells. Cotreatment with FGF2 and the 5-HT1A agonist induced RN33B cell differentiation as seen from development of an increased number and length of extensions per cell and their increased 5-HT immunoreactivity. These signaling and differentiation events were dependent on the receptor interface since they were blocked by incubation with TMV but not by TMII of the 5-HT1A receptor. Taken together, the 5-HT1A autoreceptors by being part of a FGFR1-5-HT1A heteroreceptor complex in the midbrain raphe 5-HT nerve cells appears to have also a trophic role in the central 5-HT neuron systems besides playing a key role in reducing the firing of these neurons.

  12. Predictive comparative QSAR modelling of (phenylpiperazinyl-alkyl) oxindoles as selective 5-HT1A antagonists by stepwise regression, PCRA, FA-MLR and PLS techniques.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Nilanjan; Maiti, Milan K; Jha, Tarun

    2010-03-01

    5-Hydroxytryptamine, a neurotransmitter released by 5-HT neurons in raphe nuclei and 5-HT(1A) receptors are involved in the pain mechanism of migraine, prevention of postpartum haemorrhage, CNS effects like sleep, anxiety and thermoregulation. Comparative QSAR study was done on thirtytwo (phenylpiperazinyl-alkyl) oxindoles using stepwise regression, PCRA, FA-MLR and PLS techniques to find structurally significant models. ETSA indices at atom numbers 19, 20 and 22, RTSA indices at atom numbers 6, 10 and 20, charge at atom number 19 and presence of chlorine at the atom number 6 may be conducive for the receptor inhibition. Electrophilic attack at atom number 21 may be unfavourable but nucleophilic attack at atom numbers 8 and 14 may be beneficial for % 5-HT(1A) inhibition.

  13. Spacer conformation in biologically active molecules. Part 2. Structure and conformation of 4-[2-(diphenylmethylamino)ethyl]-1-(2-methoxyphenyl) piperazine and its diphenylmethoxy analog—potential 5-HT 1A receptor ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karolak-Wojciechowska, J.; Fruziński, A.; Czylkowski, R.; Paluchowska, M. H.; Mokrosz, M. J.

    2003-09-01

    As a part of studies on biologically active molecule structures with aliphatic linking chain, the structures of 4-[2-diphenylmethylamino)ethyl]-1-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazine dihydrochloride ( 1) and 4-[2-diphenylmethoxy)ethyl]-1-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazine fumarate ( 2) have been reported. In both compounds, four atomic non-all-carbons linking chains (N)C-C-X-C are present. The conformation of that linking spacer depends on the nature of the X-atom. The preferred conformation for chain with XNH has been found to be fully extended while for that with XO—the bend one. It was confirmed by conformational calculations (strain energy distribution and random search) and crystallographic data, including statistics from CCDC.

  14. Multitarget-directed tricyclic pyridazinones as G protein-coupled receptor ligands and cholinesterase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pau, Amedeo; Catto, Marco; Pinna, Giovanni; Frau, Simona; Murineddu, Gabriele; Asproni, Battistina; Curzu, Maria M; Pisani, Leonardo; Leonetti, Francesco; Loza, Maria Isabel; Brea, José; Pinna, Gérard A; Carotti, Angelo

    2015-06-01

    By following a multitarget ligand design approach, a library of 47 compounds was prepared, and they were tested as binders of selected G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and inhibitors of acetyl and/or butyryl cholinesterase. The newly designed ligands feature pyridazinone-based tricyclic scaffolds connected through alkyl chains of variable length to proper amine moieties (e.g., substituted piperazines or piperidines) for GPCR and cholinesterase (ChE) molecular recognition. The compounds were tested at three different GPCRs, namely serotoninergic 5-HT1A, adrenergic α1A, and dopaminergic D2 receptors. Our main goal was the discovery of compounds that exhibit, in addition to ChE inhibition, antagonist activity at 5-HT1A because of its involvement in neuronal deficits typical of Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases. Ligands with nanomolar affinity for the tested GPCRs were discovered, but most of them behaved as dual antagonists of α1A and 5-HT1A receptors. Nevertheless, several compounds displaying this GPCR affinity profile also showed moderate to good inhibition of AChE and BChE, thus deserving further investigations to exploit the therapeutic potential of such unusual biological profiles.

  15. Clonidine potentiates the effects of 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B and 5-HT2A/2C antagonists and 8-OH-DPAT in the mouse forced swimming test.

    PubMed

    Redrobe, J P; Bourin, M

    1998-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to identify the receptor subtypes involved in clonidine's ability to enhance the effects of antidepressant drugs in the mouse forced swimming test. Clonidine (0.06 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly enhanced the antidepressant-like effects of subactive doses of the 5-HT1A receptor agonist, 8-OH-DPAT (1 mg/kg, i.p.; P<0.01); the 5-HT1A receptor antagonist, NAN 190 (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.; P<0.01); the 5-HT1A/1B autoreceptor antagonist, (+/-) pindolol (32 mg/kg, i.p.; P<0.01); the 5-HT2A/2C receptor antagonist, ritanserin (4 mg/kg, i.p.; P<0.01). Pretreatment with clonidine failed to increase mobility when administered in combination with the 5-HT1B receptor agonist, RU 24969 (1 mg/kg, i.p.) or the 5-HT2A receptor antagonist, ketanserin (8 mg/kg, i.p.). In conclusion, clonidine-induced anti-immobility effects are more likely mediated by 5-HT1A and 5-HT2C receptors, as well as alpha-2-adrenergic autoreceptors situated on noradrenergic neurones. The results of the present study also demonstrate that serotonergic receptor function can influence alpha-2-adrenoreceptor mediated responses in the mouse forced swimming test.

  16. The association between romantic relationship status and 5-HT1A gene in young adults.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinting; Gong, Pingyuan; Zhou, Xiaolin

    2014-01-01

    What factors determine whether or not a young adult will fall in love? Sociological surveys and psychological studies have shown that non-genetic factors, such as socioeconomic status, external appearance, and personality attributes, are crucial components in romantic relationship formation. Here we demonstrate that genetic variants also contribute to romantic relationship formation. As love-related behaviors are associated with serotonin levels in the brain, this study investigated to what extent a polymorphism (C-1019G, rs6295) of 5-HT1A gene is related to relationship status in 579 Chinese Han people. We found that 50.4% of individuals with the CC genotype and 39.0% with CG/GG genotype were in romantic relationship. Logistic regression analysis indicated that the C-1019G polymorphism was significantly associated with the odds of being single both before and after controlling for socioeconomic status, external appearance, religious beliefs, parenting style, and depressive symptoms. These findings provide, for the first time, direct evidence for the genetic contribution to romantic relationship formation. PMID:25412229

  17. Additive effect of lithium and clonidine with 5-HT1A agonists in the forced swimming test.

    PubMed

    Hascoet, M; Bourin, M; Khimake, S

    1994-03-01

    1. The aim of the present work was to demonstrate the possible additive effect of lithium and clonidine with 5-HT1a agonists in the forced swimming test. 2. Anti-depressant like effects of 5-HT1a agonists was investigated using forced swimming test. When administered alone, only 8-OH-DPAT reduced the immobility time in mice. 3. 5-HT1a agonists were then tested in combination with clonidine or lithium. Only gepirone and ipsapirone pretreated by either lithium or clonidine reduced immobility time in the forced swimming test. 4. The authors conclude that lithium and clonidine might be useful to predict antidepressant-like activity of new compounds.

  18. On the structural and mechanistic basis of function, classification, and ligand design for 5-HT receptors.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, H; Osman, R

    1990-01-01

    We review our results from the first computational simulations of a mechanism by which ligands can activate a 5-HT1A receptor, and relate the findings to information on the structure and function of the authentic receptor. The computational exploration of the recognition and activation mechanisms is carried out inside a protein selected as a model for the receptor based on cognate physicochemical and experimental data. A similar approach is applied to the 5-HT2 receptor. The interaction mechanisms at the two 5-HT receptor subtypes differ in the nature of the forces determining ligand-receptor interactions and the types of receptor activation mechanisms they entail. The main molecular property related to recognition at 5-HT1A receptors was shown to be the directional character of the electrostatic potential generated by the ligands in the molecular region corresponding to the indole in 5-HT. The corresponding recognition site was shown to have properties of a positively-charged (imidazolium) form of the side chain of a His residue. The mechanism of recognition at the 5-HT1A receptor was shown to be electrostatic, and conducive to a triggering of the receptor response through the change in the electronic structure of the imidazolium recognition site when it interacts with an activating ligand (agonist). This effect was shown to induce a proton transfer from the ring to a neighboring residue to which it can be hydrogen-bonded in the resting state. We show how this model for recognition and activation defines in molecular terms the mechanisms underlying the classical pharmacologic properties of agonists, partial agonists, and antagonists. The molecular correlates of pharmacologic efficacy emerge from the calculations of the effect of the ligands on the barriers for proton transfer, and on the energy drive for the proton transfer reaction. A different model is proposed for selective recognition at the 5-HT2 receptors, based on structural details of 5-HT-binding peptides

  19. Differences among conventional, atypical and novel putative D(2)/5-HT(1A) antipsychotics on catalepsy-associated behaviour in cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Auclair, Agnès L; Kleven, Mark S; Barret-Grévoz, Catherine; Barreto, Martine; Newman-Tancredi, Adrian; Depoortère, Ronan

    2009-11-01

    Typical antipsychotics such as haloperidol exert their therapeutic effects via blockade of dopamine (DA) D(2) receptors, leading to extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS) in humans and catalepsy in rodents. In contrast, atypical antipsychotics and new generation D(2)/5-HT(1A) antipsychotics have low cataleptogenic potential. However, there has been no systematic comparative study on the effects of these different classes of antipsychotics in non-human primates, a species displaying a more sophisticated repertoire of behavioural/motor activity than rats. Once weekly, six young adult female non-haloperidol-sensitised cynomolgus monkeys were treated i.m. with a test compound and videotaped to score catalepsy-associated behaviour (CAB: static postures, unusual positions and crouching). Haloperidol, risperidone, olanzapine, nemonapride and remoxipride induced, to different extents, an increase in unusual positions (a response akin to dystonia), some crouching and static postures. In contrast, clozapine, quetiapine, ziprasidone and aripiprazole produced much lower or no unusual positions; clozapine also produced marked increases in static postures and crouching. Among novel D(2)/5-HT(1A) antipsychotics, SLV313 and F15063 augmented the number of unusual positions, albeit at doses 16-63 times higher than those of haloperidol for approximately the same score. SSR181507 and bifeprunox produced moderate static postures, little crouching and negligible unusual positions. These data provide the first comparative analysis in cynomolgus monkeys of EPS liability of conventional, atypical and novel D(2)/5-HT(1A) antipsychotics. They indicate that the latter are less prone than haloperidol to produce CAB, and provide a basis for comparison with rodent catalepsy studies. PMID:19464324

  20. Pharmacological Characterization of 5-HT1A Autoreceptor-Coupled GIRK Channels in Rat Dorsal Raphe 5-HT Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Montalbano, Alberto; Corradetti, Renato; Mlinar, Boris

    2015-01-01

    G protein-activated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels in 5-HT neurons are assumed to be principal effectors of 5-hydroxytryptamine 1A (5-HT1A) autoreceptors, but their pharmacology, subunit composition and the role in regulation of 5-HT neuron activity have not been fully elucidated. We sought for a pharmacological tool for assessing the functional role of GIRK channels in 5-HT neurons by characterizing the effects of drugs known to block GIRK channels in the submicromolar range of concentrations. Whole-cell voltage-clamp recording in brainstem slices were used to determine concentration-response relationships for the selected GIRK channel blockers on 5-HT1A autoreceptor-activated inwardly rectifying K+ conductance in rat dorsal raphe 5-HT neurons. 5-HT1A autoreceptor-activated GIRK conductance was completely blocked by the nonselective inwardly rectifying potassium channels blocker Ba2+ (EC50 = 9.4 μM, full block with 100 μM) and by SCH23390 (EC50 = 1.95 μM, full block with 30 μM). GIRK-specific blocker tertiapin-Q blocked 5-HT1A autoreceptor-activated GIRK conductance with high potency (EC50 = 33.6 nM), but incompletely, i.e. ~16% of total conductance resulted to be tertiapin-Q-resistant. U73343 and SCH28080, reported to block GIRK channels with submicromolar EC50s, were essentially ineffective in 5-HT neurons. Our data show that inwardly rectifying K+ channels coupled to 5-HT1A autoreceptors display pharmacological properties generally expected for neuronal GIRK channels, but different from GIRK1-GIRK2 heteromers, the predominant form of brain GIRK channels. Distinct pharmacological properties of GIRK channels in 5-HT neurons should be explored for the development of new therapeutic agents for mood disorders. PMID:26460748

  1. The 5-HT1A C(-1019)G polymorphism, personality and electrodermal reactivity in a reward/punishment paradigm.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Anja; Kirsch, Peter; Reuter, Martin; Alexander, Nina; Kozyra, Eva; Kuepper, Yvonne; Osinsky, Roman; Hennig, Juergen

    2009-04-01

    During past years the 5-HT(1A) C(-1019)G polymorphism has been associated with vulnerability to depression, anxiety-disorder and personality traits related to negative emotionality (e.g. neuroticism). Many of these studies focused on case-control comparisons or associations between genetic markers and personality traits assessed by the use of questionnaires. In contrast, overt behaviour and physiological measures in experimental paradigms, although very promising, have seldom been the focus of studies investigating the role of the 5-HT(1A) polymorphism for behaviour and psychopathology. To fill this gap, we examined the relationship between the 5-HT(1A) C(-1019)G polymorphism and reaction times (in a reward/punishment paradigm) as well as electrodermal activity, as a marker of autonomic arousal, in 123 healthy subjects. This paradigm seems very promising, as sensitivity to punishment in particular, is strongly associated to traits related to negative emotionality. Carriers of the GG genotype, which is related to increased expression of 5-HT(1A) autoreceptors, exhibited increased reaction times when they were able to win money (reward condition). In direct contrast to the reward condition, these subjects show faster reaction times in the punishment condition (losing money). Moreover, GG carriers are characterized by an enhanced electrodermal activity in all experimental conditions (win, lose and verbal feedback). Finally, the reaction-time pattern mentioned was related to higher scores on negative emotionality as revealed by self-reports. These findings demonstrate for the first time that the 5-HT(1A) polymorphism is related to personality on the level of a triadic approach including behaviour, physiology and self-reports. PMID:18796187

  2. Anticonflict effects of 5HT(1A) agonists in pigeons are dependent on the level of response suppression.

    PubMed

    Benvenga, M.J.; Leander, J.D.

    1996-11-01

    Anxiety is a phenomenon that has many different manifestations. In order to test whether or not agents targeted to treat anxiety may have the properties necessary to treat differing types of anxiety, we have studied a 8-OH DPAT, buspirone, LY228729, chlordiazepoxide and pentobarbital on three different punished responding procedures in pigeons. Procedure one was a fairly standard multiple FR30 FR30 punished responding model where responding into he punished component was suppressed by electric shock to 7-10% of responding in the unpunished component. Procedure two was similar except that responding during the punished component was suppressed more severely to 1-3% of control, using increased levels of shock. Procedure three was a VI30 schedule as the unpunished component, with concomitant FR5 shock in a second component, and concomitant FR20 shock in the third component. 5HT(1A) agonists, 8-OH DPAT, buspirone and LY228729 produced the typical large increases in punished responding in procedure one, were substantially less effective when shock levels were increased in procedure two, and produced differential results which were likely due to the schedule in procedure three. The more traditional anxiolytics, chlordiazepoxide and pentobarbital, were consistently effective across all three punished responding procedures. These results would seem to indicate that 5HT(1A) agonists may not be as broadly efficacious as traditional anxiolytics, and that the state or severity of anxiety may be an important variable to predict efficacy for 5HT(1A) agonists.

  3. The 5-HT1A antagonist, WAY 100635, ameliorates the cognitive impairment induced by fornix transection in the marmoset.

    PubMed

    Harder, J A; Maclean, C J; Alder, J T; Francis, P T; Ridley, R M

    1996-10-01

    Fornix transection in the marmoset produces a specific pattern of cognitive deficits, notably a lack of ability to recall visuospatial tasks learnt preoperatively, and a deficit in acquiring new visuospatial tasks following transection. Previous work has shown that this learning impairment can be ameliorated by cholinergic agonists, suggesting that it occurs as a consequence of destroying the cholinergic projection from the vertical limb of the diagonal band to the hippocampus which runs through the fornix. We have now shown that this deficit in new learning can be significantly alleviated by the 5-HT1A antagonist, WAY 100635. This result supports the suggestion that 5-HT1A projections are inhibitory on the same target cells for which cholinergic projections are excitatory, and that loss of function in the target cells caused by loss of excitatory tone can be compensated by blockade of inhibitory tone. Since cholinergic loss in the hippocampus (and neocortex) occurs in association with cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease, these results suggest that 5-HT1A antagonists may have a role in the treatment of some of the cognitive symptoms of dementia.

  4. Antidepressant- and Anxiolytic-Like Effects of New Dual 5-HT1A and 5-HT7 Antagonists in Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Pytka, Karolina; Partyka, Anna; Jastrzębska-Więsek, Magdalena; Siwek, Agata; Głuch-Lutwin, Monika; Mordyl, Barbara; Kazek, Grzegorz; Rapacz, Anna; Olczyk, Adrian; Gałuszka, Adam; Błachuta, Marian; Waszkielewicz, Anna; Marona, Henryk; Sapa, Jacek; Filipek, Barbara; Wesołowska, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to further characterize pharmacological properties of two phenylpiperazine derivatives: 1-{2-[2-(2,6-dimethlphenoxy)ethoxy]ethyl}-4-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazynine hydrochloride (HBK-14) and 2-[2-(2-chloro-6-methylphenoxy)ethoxy]ethyl-4-(2- methoxyphenyl)piperazynine dihydrochloride (HBK-15) in radioligand binding and functional in vitro assays as well as in vivo models. Antidepressant-like properties were investigated in the forced swim test (FST) in mice and rats. Anxiolytic-like activity was evaluated in the four-plate test in mice and elevated plus maze test (EPM) in rats. Imipramine and escitalopram were used as reference drugs in the FST, and diazepam was used as a standard anxiolytic drug in animal models of anxiety. Our results indicate that HBK-14 and HBK-15 possess high or moderate affinity for serotonergic 5-HT2, adrenergic α1, and dopaminergic D2 receptors as well as being full 5-HT1A and 5-HT7 receptor antagonists. We also present their potent antidepressant-like activity (HBK-14—FST mice: 2.5 and 5 mg/kg; FST rats: 5 mg/kg) and (HBK-15—FST mice: 1.25, 2.5 and 5 mg/kg; FST rats: 1.25 and 2.5 mg/kg). We show that HBK-14 (four-plate test: 2.5 and 5 mg/kg; EPM: 2.5 mg/kg) and HBK-15 (four-plate test: 2.5 and 5 mg/kg; EPM: 5 mg/kg) possess anxiolytic-like properties. Among the two, HBK-15 has stronger antidepressant-like properties, and HBK-14 displays greater anxiolytic-like activity. Lastly, we demonstrate the involvement of serotonergic system, particularly 5-HT1A receptor, in the antidepressant- and anxiolytic-like actions of investigated compounds. PMID:26554929

  5. NMDA-induced glutamate and aspartate release from rat cortical pyramidal neurones: evidence for modulation by a 5-HT1A antagonist.

    PubMed Central

    Dijk, S. N.; Francis, P. T.; Stratmann, G. C.; Bowen, D. M.

    1995-01-01

    1. We have investigated an aspect of the regulation of cortical pyramidal neurone activity. Microdialysis was used to assess whether topical application of drugs (in 10 microliter) to fill a burr hole over the frontal cortex, where part of the corticostriatal pathway originates, would change concentrations of the excitatory amino acids glutamate and aspartate in the striatum of the anaesthetized rat. 2. Topical application of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA, 2 and 20 mM) dose-dependently increased glutamate and aspartate concentrations in the striatum. Coapplication of tetrodotoxin (10 microM) blocked the NMDA-evoked rise in these amino acids. A calcium-free medium, perfused through the probe also blocked the rise, indicating that it was due to an exocytotic mechanism in the striatum. 3. It was hypothesized that the rise observed was due to an increase in the activity of the corticostriatal pathway. As 5-hydroxytryptamine1A (5-HT1A) receptors are enriched on cell bodies of corticostriatal neurones, a selective 5-HT1A-antagonist (WAY 100135) was coapplied with the lower dose of NMDA. Compared to NMDA alone, coapplication of 50 microM WAY 100135 significantly increased glutamate release. This effect was sensitive to tetrodotoxin and calcium-dependent. Application of 50 microM WAY 100135 alone significantly enhanced glutamate release above baseline; this was also tested at 100 microM (not significant). 4. Compared to NMDA alone, coapplication of WAY 100135 (20 microM) significantly enhanced aspartate release; the mean value was also increased (not significantly) with 50 microM. This rise was calcium-dependent, but not tetrodotoxin-sensitive. WAY 100135 (100 microM) reduced NMDA-induced aspartate release.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7582540

  6. Anti-conflict effect of 5-HT1A agonists in rats: a new model for evaluating anxiolytic-like activity.

    PubMed

    Hascoët, M; Bourin, M; Todd, K G; Coüetoux du Tertre, A

    1994-01-01

    A new conflict procedure was developed to study the potential anti-punishment effects of 5-HT( 1A) agonists as compared to diazepam. In this paradigm, the opportunity existed for rats to choose during punished periods between immediate, punished reinforcement and delayed, non-punished reinforcement. The results confirm that, for non-sedative doses (1 mg/kg), diazepam increases the number of punished responses. Furthermore, the present paradigm seems sensitive for the detection of 5-HT(1A) activity. Buspirone, gepirone, ipsapirone, zalospirone and 8-OH-DPAT increased responding for immediate but punished reinforcement. 1-(2-pyrimidinyl)piperazine, the common metabolite of the azapirones, does not participate in their anti-conflict effect. NAN 190, a 5-HT(1A) antagonist, was shown to block the 5-HT(1A) agonists. The findings of the present study suggest that benzodiazepines and 5-HT( 1A) agonists reduce the capacity to tolerate delays in reward. Abnormality in serotonin systems may be associated with poor impulse control.

  7. The effect of urapidil, an alpha-1 adrenoceptor antagonist and a 5-HT1A agonist, on the vascular tone of the porcine coronary and pulmonary arteries, the rat aorta and the human pulmonary artery.

    PubMed

    Bopp, Claire; Auger, Cyril; Diemunsch, Pierre; Schini-Kerth, Valérie

    2016-05-15

    Urapidil (Eupressyl(®)) an antihypertensive drug acting as an α1 antagonist and a 5-HT1A agonist, may be of special interest in the treatment of hypertension associated with preeclamptic toxaemia and hypoxia-induced pulmonary arterial vasoconstriction. However, the effect of urapidil on vascular tone has been poorly investigated. Vascular reactivity was evaluated using pulmonary and coronary arteries from 36 pigs, aortae from 22 rats and 9 human pulmonary artery samples suspended in organ chambers. Concentration-relaxation curves either to urapidil, 5-HT, or the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT were constructed after pre-contraction of rings. Pig pulmonary and coronary artery rings were contracted with U46619, a thromboxane mimetic, rat aortic rings with either endothelin-1 or phenylephrine, and human pulmonary artery rings with U46619 or phenylephrine. Urapidil markedly inhibited phenylephrine-induced contractions in rat aortic rings with and without endothelium with a more pronounced effect observed in rings without endothelium. Both 5-HT and 8-OH-DPAT failed to induce relaxation in rat aortic rings with an intact endothelium. 5-HT, but not urapidil and 8-OH-DPAT, induced a concentration-dependent relaxation in the porcine coronary and pulmonary artery rings with an intact endothelium (P<0.05). 5-HT and phenylephrine but not urapidil caused concentration-dependent contractions in human pulmonary artery rings. The present findings, while confirming that urapidil is a potent inhibitor of α1-adrenoceptor-induced contraction, do not support the role of 5-HT1A receptor activation in the control of the vascular tone of the different types of arteries tested in response to urapidil. In addition, they indicate that urapidil seems to preferentially target arteries with endothelial dysfunction.

  8. Modulating the rate and rhythmicity of perceptual rivalry alternations with the mixed 5-HT2A and 5-HT1A agonist psilocybin.

    PubMed

    Carter, Olivia L; Pettigrew, John D; Hasler, Felix; Wallis, Guy M; Liu, Guang B; Hell, Daniel; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2005-06-01

    Binocular rivalry occurs when different images are presented simultaneously to corresponding points within the left and right eyes. Under these conditions, the observer's perception will alternate between the two perceptual alternatives. Motivated by the reported link between the rate of perceptual alternations, symptoms of psychosis and an incidental observation that the rhythmicity of perceptual alternations during binocular rivalry was greatly increased 10 h after the consumption of LSD, this study aimed to investigate the pharmacology underlying binocular rivalry and to explore the connection between the timing of perceptual switching and psychosis. Psilocybin (4-phosphoryloxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine, PY) was chosen for the study because, like LSD, it is known to act as an agonist at serotonin (5-HT)1A and 5-HT2A receptors and to produce an altered state sometimes marked by psychosis-like symptoms. A total of 12 healthy human volunteers were tested under placebo, low-dose (115 microg/kg) and high-dose (250 microg/kg) PY conditions. In line with predictions, under both low- and high-dose conditions, the results show that at 90 min postadministration (the peak of drug action), rate and rhythmicity of perceptual alternations were significantly reduced from placebo levels. Following the 90 min testing period, the perceptual switch rate successively increased, with some individuals showing increases well beyond pretest levels at the final testing, 360 min postadministration. However, as some subjects had still not returned to pretest levels by this time, the mean phase duration at 360 min was not found to differ significantly from placebo. Reflecting the drug-induced changes in rivalry phase durations, subjects showed clear changes in psychological state as indexed by the 5D-ASC (altered states of consciousness) rating scales. This study suggests the involvement of serotonergic pathways in binocular rivalry and supports the previously proposed role of a brainstem

  9. Systemic treatment with a 5HT1a agonist induces anti-oxidant protection and preserves the retina from mitochondrial oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Biswal, Manas R; Ahmed, Chulbul M; Ildefonso, Cristhian J; Han, Pingyang; Li, Hong; Jivanji, Hiral; Mao, Haoyu; Lewin, Alfred S

    2015-11-01

    Chronic oxidative stress contributes to age related diseases including age related macular degeneration (AMD). Earlier work showed that the 5-hydroxy-tryptamine 1a (5HT1a) receptor agonist 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)-tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) protects retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells from hydrogen peroxide treatment and mouse retinas from oxidative insults including light injury. In our current experiments, RPE derived cells subjected to mitochondrial oxidative stress were protected from cell death by the up-regulation of anti-oxidant enzymes and of the metal ion chaperone metallothionein. Differentiated RPE cells were resistant to oxidative stress, and the expression of genes for protective proteins was highly increased by oxidative stress plus drug treatment. In mice treated with 8-OH-DPAT, the same genes (MT1, HO1, NqO1, Cat, Sod1) were induced in the neural retina, but the drug did not affect the expression of Sod2, the gene for manganese superoxide dismutase. We used a mouse strain deleted for Sod2 in the RPE to accelerate age-related oxidative stress in the retina and to test the impact of 8-OH-DPAT on the photoreceptor and RPE degeneration developed in these mice. Treatment of mice with daily injections of the drug led to increased electroretinogram (ERG) amplitudes in dark-adapted mice and to a slight improvement in visual acuity. Most strikingly, in mice treated with a high dose of the drug (5 mg/kg) the structure of the RPE and Bruch's membrane and the normal architecture of photoreceptor outer segments were preserved. These results suggest that systemic treatment with this class of drugs may be useful in preventing geographic atrophy, the advanced form of dry AMD, which is characterized by RPE degeneration.

  10. EGF receptor ligands: recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Bhuminder; Carpenter, Graham; Coffey, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Seven ligands bind to and activate the mammalian epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR/ERBB1/HER1): EGF, transforming growth factor-alpha (TGFA), heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HBEGF), betacellulin (BTC), amphiregulin (AREG), epiregulin (EREG), and epigen (EPGN). Of these, EGF, TGFA, HBEGF, and BTC are thought to be high-affinity ligands, whereas AREG, EREG, and EPGN constitute low-affinity ligands. This focused review is meant to highlight recent studies related to actions of the individual EGFR ligands, the interesting biology that has been uncovered, and relevant advances related to ligand interactions with the EGFR.

  11. EGF receptor ligands: recent advances.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bhuminder; Carpenter, Graham; Coffey, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Seven ligands bind to and activate the mammalian epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR/ERBB1/HER1): EGF, transforming growth factor-alpha (TGFA), heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HBEGF), betacellulin (BTC), amphiregulin (AREG), epiregulin (EREG), and epigen (EPGN). Of these, EGF, TGFA, HBEGF, and BTC are thought to be high-affinity ligands, whereas AREG, EREG, and EPGN constitute low-affinity ligands. This focused review is meant to highlight recent studies related to actions of the individual EGFR ligands, the interesting biology that has been uncovered, and relevant advances related to ligand interactions with the EGFR. PMID:27635238

  12. EGF receptor ligands: recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Bhuminder; Carpenter, Graham; Coffey, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Seven ligands bind to and activate the mammalian epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR/ERBB1/HER1): EGF, transforming growth factor-alpha (TGFA), heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HBEGF), betacellulin (BTC), amphiregulin (AREG), epiregulin (EREG), and epigen (EPGN). Of these, EGF, TGFA, HBEGF, and BTC are thought to be high-affinity ligands, whereas AREG, EREG, and EPGN constitute low-affinity ligands. This focused review is meant to highlight recent studies related to actions of the individual EGFR ligands, the interesting biology that has been uncovered, and relevant advances related to ligand interactions with the EGFR. PMID:27635238

  13. What are Nuclear Receptor Ligands?

    PubMed Central

    Sladek, Frances M.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are a family of highly conserved transcription factors that regulate transcription in response to small lipophilic compounds. They play a role in every aspect of development, physiology and disease in humans. They are also ubiquitous in and unique to the animal kingdom suggesting that they may have played an important role in their evolution. In contrast to the classical endocrine receptors that originally defined the family, recent studies suggest that the first NRs might have been sensors of their environment, binding ligands that were external to the host organism. The purpose of this review is to provide a broad perspective on NR ligands and address the issue of exactly what constitutes a NR ligand from historical, biological and evolutionary perspectives. This discussion will lay the foundation for subsequent reviews in this issue as well as pose new questions for future investigation. PMID:20615454

  14. Polypharmacology of dopamine receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Butini, S; Nikolic, K; Kassel, S; Brückmann, H; Filipic, S; Agbaba, D; Gemma, S; Brogi, S; Brindisi, M; Campiani, G; Stark, H

    2016-07-01

    Most neurological diseases have a multifactorial nature and the number of molecular mechanisms discovered as underpinning these diseases is continuously evolving. The old concept of developing selective agents for a single target does not fit with the medical need of most neurological diseases. The development of designed multiple ligands holds great promises and appears as the next step in drug development for the treatment of these multifactorial diseases. Dopamine and its five receptor subtypes are intimately involved in numerous neurological disorders. Dopamine receptor ligands display a high degree of cross interactions with many other targets including G-protein coupled receptors, transporters, enzymes and ion channels. For brain disorders like Parkinsońs disease, schizophrenia and depression the dopaminergic system, being intertwined with many other signaling systems, plays a key role in pathogenesis and therapy. The concept of designed multiple ligands and polypharmacology, which perfectly meets the therapeutic needs for these brain disorders, is herein discussed as a general ligand-based concept while focusing on dopaminergic agents and receptor subtypes in particular. PMID:27234980

  15. Effect of the 5-HT(1A) partial agonist buspirone on regional brain electrical activity in man: a functional neuroimaging study using low-resolution electromagnetic tomography (LORETA).

    PubMed

    Anderer, P; Saletu, B; Pascual-Marqui, R D

    2000-12-01

    In a double-blind, placebo-controlled study, the effects of 20 mg buspirone - a 5-HT(1A) partial agonist - on regional electrical generators within the human brain were investigated utilizing three-dimensional EEG tomography. Nineteen-channel vigilance-controlled EEG recordings were carried out in 20 healthy subjects before and 1, 2, 4, 6 and 8 h after drug intake. Low-resolution electromagnetic tomography (LORETA; Key Institute for Brain-Mind Research, software: http://www.keyinst.unizh.ch) was computed from spectrally analyzed EEG data, and differences between drug- and placebo-induced changes were displayed as statistical parametric maps. Data were registered to the Talairach-Tournoux human brain atlas available as a digitized MRI (McConnell Brain Imaging Centre: http://www.bic.mni.mcgill.ca). At the pharmacodynamic peak (1st hour), buspirone increased theta and decreased fast alpha and beta sources. Areas of theta increase were mainly the left temporo-occipito-parietal and left prefrontal cortices, which is consistent with PET studies on buspirone-induced decreases in regional cerebral blood flow and fenfluramine-induced serotonin activation demonstrated by changes in regional cerebral glucose metabolism. In later hours (8th hour) with lower buspirone plasma levels, delta, theta, slow alpha and fast beta decreased, predominantly in the prefrontal and anterior limbic lobe. Whereas the results of the 1st hour speak for a slight CNS sedation (more in the sense of relaxation), those obtained in the 8th hour indicate activation. Thus, LORETA may provide useful and direct information on drug-induced changes in central nervous system function in man.

  16. Fluorescent ligands for adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Kozma, Eszter; Jayasekara, P Suresh; Squarcialupi, Lucia; Paoletta, Silvia; Moro, Stefano; Federico, Stephanie; Spalluto, Giampiero; Jacobson, Kenneth A

    2013-01-01

    Interest is increasing in developing fluorescent ligands for characterization of adenosine receptors (ARs), which hold a promise of usefulness in the drug discovery process. The size of a strategically labeled AR ligand can be greatly increased after the attachment of a fluorophore. The choice of dye moiety (e.g. Alexa Fluor 488), attachment point and linker length can alter the selectivity and potency of the parent molecule. Fluorescent derivatives of adenosine agonists and antagonists (e.g. XAC and other heterocyclic antagonist scaffolds) have been synthesized and characterized pharmacologically. Some are useful AR probes for flow cytometry, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, fluorescence microscopy, fluorescence polarization, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and scanning confocal microscopy. Thus, the approach of fluorescent labeled GPCR ligands, including those for ARs, is a growing dynamic research field.

  17. SB-649915-B, a novel 5-HT1A/B autoreceptor antagonist and serotonin reuptake inhibitor, is anxiolytic and displays fast onset activity in the rat high light social interaction test.

    PubMed

    Starr, Kathryn R; Price, Gary W; Watson, Jeannette M; Atkinson, Peter J; Arban, Roberto; Melotto, Sergio; Dawson, Lee A; Hagan, Jim J; Upton, Neil; Duxon, Mark S

    2007-10-01

    Preclinically, the combination of an SSRI and 5-HT autoreceptor antagonist has been shown to reduce the time to onset of anxiolytic activity compared to an SSRI alone. In accordance with this, clinical data suggest the coadministration of an SSRI and (+/-) pindolol can decrease the time to onset of anxiolytic/antidepressant activity. Thus, the dual-acting novel SSRI and 5-HT(1A/B) receptor antagonist, SB-649915-B, has been assessed in acute and chronic preclinical models of anxiolysis. SB-649915-B (0.1-1.0 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly reduced ultrasonic vocalization in male rat pups separated from their mothers (ED(50) of 0.17 mg/kg). In the marmoset human threat test SB-649915-B (3.0 and 10 mg/kg, s.c.) significantly reduced the number of postures with no effect on locomotion. In the rat high light social interaction (SI), SB-649915-B (1.0-7.5 mg/kg, t.i.d.) and paroxetine (3.0 mg/kg, once daily) were orally administered for 4, 7, and 21 days. Ex vivo inhibition of [(3)H]5-HT uptake was also measured following SI. SB-649915-B and paroxetine had no effect on SI after 4 days. In contrast to paroxetine, SB-649915-B (1.0 and 3.0 mg/kg, p.o., t.i.d.) significantly (p<0.05) increased SI time with no effect on locomotion, indicative of an anxiolytic-like profile on day 7. Anxiolysis was maintained after chronic (21 days) administration by which time paroxetine also increased SI significantly. 5-HT uptake was inhibited by SB-649915-B at all time points to a similar magnitude as that seen with paroxetine. In conclusion, SB-649915-B is acutely anxiolytic and reduces the latency to onset of anxiolytic behavior compared to paroxetine in the SI model.

  18. Antidepressant- and anxiolytic-like activity of 7-phenylpiperazinylalkyl-1,3-dimethyl-purine-2,6-dione derivatives with diversified 5-HT₁A receptor functional profile.

    PubMed

    Partyka, Anna; Chłoń-Rzepa, Grażyna; Wasik, Anna; Jastrzębska-Więsek, Magdalena; Bucki, Adam; Kołaczkowski, Marcin; Satała, Grzegorz; Bojarski, Andrzej J; Wesołowska, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Continuing our earlier study in a group of purine-2,6-dione derivatives of long chain arylpiperazines (LCAPs), a series of 8-unsubstituted 7-phenylpiperazin-4-yl-alkyl (4-14) and 7-tetrahydroisoquinolinyl-alkyl (15-17) analogues were synthesized and their serotonin 5-HT1A, 5-HT2A, 5-HT6, 5-HT7 and dopamine D2 receptor affinities were determined. The study allowed us to identify some potent 5-HT1A receptor ligands with additional moderate affinity for 5-HT2A, 5-HT7 and dopamine D2 receptors. Compounds 9, 12, 13 and 14, with the highest 5HT1A receptor affinity, were selected for further functional in vivo studies and behavioural evaluation of antidepressant- and antianxiety-like activity. Compounds 9, 12 and 13 showed features of agonists of pre- and/or post-synaptic 5-HT1A receptors, whereas 14 was classified as an antagonist of postsynaptic sites. Moreover, derivatives 9 and 14 acted as antagonists of 5-HT2A receptors. In behavioural studies, compounds 9 and 13 showed antidepressant-like activity in the mouse forced swim test, and their effects were similar or stronger than those of imipramine. Compounds 9, 12 and 14 displayed potential anxiolytic-like properties in the mouse four-plate test, similar or even greater than those of the reference anxiolytic drug, diazepam.

  19. Absolute Ligand Discrimination by Dimeric Signaling Receptors.

    PubMed

    Fathi, Sepehr; Nayak, Chitra R; Feld, Jordan J; Zilman, Anton G

    2016-09-01

    Many signaling pathways act through shared components, where different ligand molecules bind the same receptors or activate overlapping sets of response regulators downstream. Nevertheless, different ligands acting through cross-wired pathways often lead to different outcomes in terms of the target cell behavior and function. Although a number of mechanisms have been proposed, it still largely remains unclear how cells can reliably discriminate different molecular ligands under such circumstances. Here we show that signaling via ligand-induced receptor dimerization-a very common motif in cellular signaling-naturally incorporates a mechanism for the discrimination of ligands acting through the same receptor. PMID:27602720

  20. The Relevance of the Functional 5-HT1A Receptor Polymorphism for Attention and Working Memory Processes during Mental Rotation of Characters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beste, Christian; Heil, Martin; Domschke, Katharina; Konrad, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    Numerous lines of research indicate that attentional processes, working memory and saccadic processes are highly interrelated. In the current study, we examine the relation between these processes with respect to their cognitive-neurophysiological and neurobiological background by means of event-related potentials (ERPs) in a sample of N = 72…

  1. Distribution of serotonin 5-HT1A-binding sites in the brainstem and the hypothalamus, and their roles in 5-HT-induced sleep and ingestive behaviors in rock pigeons (Columba livia).

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Tiago Souza; Krüger, Jéssica; Melleu, Fernando Falkenburger; Herold, Christina; Zilles, Karl; Poli, Anicleto; Güntürkün, Onur; Marino-Neto, José

    2015-12-15

    Serotonin 1A receptors (5-HT1ARs), which are widely distributed in the mammalian brain, participate in cognitive and emotional functions. In birds, 5-HT1ARs are expressed in prosencephalic areas involved in visual and cognitive functions. Diverse evidence supports 5-HT1AR-mediated 5-HT-induced ingestive and sleep behaviors in birds. Here, we describe the distribution of 5-HT1ARs in the hypothalamus and brainstem of birds, analyze their potential roles in sleep and ingestive behaviors, and attempt to determine the involvement of auto-/hetero-5-HT1ARs in these behaviors. In 6 pigeons, the anatomical distribution of [(3)H]8-OH-DPAT binding in the rostral brainstem and hypothalamus was examined. Ingestive/sleep behaviors were recorded (1h) in 16 pigeons pretreated with MM77 (a heterosynaptic 5-HT1AR antagonist; 23 or 69 nmol) for 20 min, followed by intracerebroventricular ICV injection of 5-HT (N:8; 150 nmol), 8-OH-DPAT (DPAT, a 5-HT1A,7R agonist, 30 nmol N:8) or vehicle. 5-HT- and DPAT-induced sleep and ingestive behaviors, brainstem 5-HT neuronal density and brain 5-HT content were examined in 12 pigeons, pretreated by ICV with the 5-HT neurotoxin 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT) or vehicle (N:6/group). The distribution of brainstem and diencephalic c-Fos immunoreactivity after ICV injection of 5-HT, DPAT or vehicle (N:5/group) into birds provided with or denied access to water is also described. 5-HT1ARs are concentrated in the brainstem 5-HTergic areas and throughout the periventricular hypothalamus, preoptic nuclei and circumventricular organs. 5-HT and DPAT produced a complex c-Fos expression pattern in the 5-HT1AR-enriched preoptic hypothalamus and the circumventricular organs, which are related to drinking and sleep regulation, but modestly affected c-Fos expression in 5-HTergic neurons. The 5-HT-induced ingestivebehaviors and the 5-HT- and DPAT-induced sleep behaviors were reduced by MM77 pretreatment. 5,7-DHT increased sleep per se, decreased tryptophan

  2. Engineering death receptor ligands for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Wajant, Harald; Gerspach, Jeannette; Pfizenmaier, Klaus

    2013-05-28

    CD95, TNFR1, TRAILR1 and TRAILR2 belong to a subgroup of TNF receptors which is characterized by a conserved cell death-inducing protein domain that connects these receptors to the apoptotic machinery of the cell. Activation of death receptors in malignant cells attracts increasing attention as a principle to fight cancer. Besides agonistic antibodies the major way to stimulate death receptors is the use of their naturally occurring "death ligands" CD95L, TNF and TRAIL. However, dependent from the concept followed to develop a death ligand-based therapy various limiting aspects have to be taken into consideration on the way to a "bedside" usable drug. Problems arise in particular from the cell associated transmembrane nature of the death ligands, the poor serum half life of the soluble fragments derived from the transmembrane ligands, the ubiquitous expression of the death receptors and the existence of additional non-death receptors of the death ligands. Here, we summarize strategies how these limitations can be overcome by genetic engineering.

  3. Determining ligand specificity of Ly49 receptors.

    PubMed

    Lavender, Kerry J; Kane, Kevin P

    2010-01-01

    Ly49 receptors in rodents, like KIR in humans, play an integral role in the regulation of NK cell activity. Some inhibitory Ly49 are known to interact with specific MHC I alleles to maintain tolerance to self tissues, and NK activation is triggered upon the loss of inhibitory signals due to pathological downregulation of self MHC I. Although a virally encoded ligand has been identified that can trigger NK cytotoxicity through an activating Ly49, some activating Ly49 also recognize MHC I and the role of most activating receptors in NK effector function remains poorly defined. As many Ly49 remain orphan receptors, we describe methods to unambiguously discern receptor-ligand pairs. Additionally, we describe a method for the mutagenesis of Ly49 and MHC ligands that can be used to define the motifs conferring receptor specificity for their ligands. Further elucidation of Ly49 ligands is required to continue to define the role of Ly49 in regulating NK cell effector function and may give vital clues to the role of KIR in human health and disease. PMID:20033649

  4. The Retinoid X Receptors and Their Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Marcia I.; Xia, Zebin

    2014-01-01

    This chapter presents an overview of the current status of studies on the structural and molecular biology of the retinoid X receptor subtypes α, β, and γ (RXRs, NR2B1–3), their nuclear and cytoplasmic functions, post-transcriptional processing, and recently reported ligands. Points of interest are the different changes in the ligand-binding pocket induced by variously shaped agonists, the communication of the ligand–bound pocket with the coactivator binding surface and the heterodimerization interface, and recently identified ligands that are natural products, those that function as environmental toxins or drugs that had been originally designed to interact with other targets, as well as those that were deliberately designed as RXR-selective transcriptional agonists, synergists, or antagonists. Of these synthetic ligands, the general trend in design appears to be away from fully aromatic rigid structures to those containing partial elements of the flexible tetraene side chain of 9-cis-retinoic acid. PMID:22020178

  5. Ligands for Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, Geoffrey T.; Sakai, Ryuichi

    Marine-derived small molecules and peptides have played a central role in elaborating pharmacological specificities and neuronal functions of mammalian ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs), the primary mediators of excitatory syn-aptic transmission in the central nervous system (CNS). As well, the pathological sequelae elicited by one class of compounds (the kainoids) constitute a widely-used animal model for human mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE). New and existing molecules could prove useful as lead compounds for the development of therapeutics for neuropathologies that have aberrant glutamatergic signaling as a central component. In this chapter we discuss natural source origins and pharmacological activities of those marine compounds that target ionotropic glutamate receptors.

  6. Ligands for Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Geoffrey T.; Sakai, Ryuichi

    2010-01-01

    Marine-derived small molecules and peptides have played a central role in elaborating pharmacological specificities and neuronal functions of mammalian ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs), the primary mediators of excitatory synaptic transmission in the central nervous system (CNS). As well, the pathological sequelae elicited by one class of compounds (the kainoids) constitute a widely-used animal model for human mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE). New and existing molecules could prove useful as lead compounds for the development of therapeutics for neuropathologies that have aberrant glutamatergic signaling as a central component. In this chapter we discuss natural source origins and pharmacological activities of those marine compounds that target ionotropic glutamate receptors. PMID:19184587

  7. Glycomimetic ligands for the human asialoglycoprotein receptor.

    PubMed

    Mamidyala, Sreeman K; Dutta, Sanjay; Chrunyk, Boris A; Préville, Cathy; Wang, Hong; Withka, Jane M; McColl, Alexander; Subashi, Timothy A; Hawrylik, Steven J; Griffor, Matthew C; Kim, Sung; Pfefferkorn, Jeffrey A; Price, David A; Menhaji-Klotz, Elnaz; Mascitti, Vincent; Finn, M G

    2012-02-01

    The asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) is a high-capacity galactose-binding receptor expressed on hepatocytes that binds its native substrates with low affinity. More potent ligands are of interest for hepatic delivery of therapeutic agents. We report several classes of galactosyl analogues with varied substitution at the anomeric, C2-, C5-, and C6-positions. Significant increases in binding affinity were noted for several trifluoromethylacetamide derivatives without covalent attachment to the protein. A variety of new ligands were obtained with affinity for ASGPR as good as or better than that of the parent N-acetylgalactosamine, showing that modification on either side of the key C3,C4-diol moiety is well tolerated, consistent with previous models of a shallow binding pocket. The galactosyl pyranose motif therefore offers many opportunities for the attachment of other functional units or payloads while retaining low-micromolar or better affinity for the ASGPR.

  8. Receptor-ligand interactions: Advanced biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Guryanov, Ivan; Fiorucci, Stefano; Tennikova, Tatiana

    2016-11-01

    Receptor-ligand interactions (RLIs) are at the base of all biological events occurring in living cells. The understanding of interactions between complementary macromolecules in biological systems represents a high-priority research area in bionanotechnology to design the artificial systems mimicking natural processes. This review summarizes and analyzes RLIs in some cutting-edge biomedical fields, in particular, for the preparation of novel stationary phases to separate complex biological mixtures in medical diagnostics, for the design of ultrasensitive biosensors for identification of biomarkers of various diseases at early stages, as well as in the development of innovative biomaterials and approaches for regenerative medicine. All these biotechnological fields are closely related, because their success depends on a proper choice, combination and spatial disposition of the single components of ligand-receptor pairs on the surface of appropriately designed support.

  9. Receptor-ligand interactions: Advanced biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Guryanov, Ivan; Fiorucci, Stefano; Tennikova, Tatiana

    2016-11-01

    Receptor-ligand interactions (RLIs) are at the base of all biological events occurring in living cells. The understanding of interactions between complementary macromolecules in biological systems represents a high-priority research area in bionanotechnology to design the artificial systems mimicking natural processes. This review summarizes and analyzes RLIs in some cutting-edge biomedical fields, in particular, for the preparation of novel stationary phases to separate complex biological mixtures in medical diagnostics, for the design of ultrasensitive biosensors for identification of biomarkers of various diseases at early stages, as well as in the development of innovative biomaterials and approaches for regenerative medicine. All these biotechnological fields are closely related, because their success depends on a proper choice, combination and spatial disposition of the single components of ligand-receptor pairs on the surface of appropriately designed support. PMID:27524092

  10. Molecular modulators of benzodiazepine receptor ligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Villar, H.O.; Loew, G.H. )

    1989-01-01

    Ten derivatives of {beta}-carbolines with known affinities to the GABA{sub A}/BDZ (benzodiazepine) receptor were studied using the Am 1 and MNDO/H Semiempirical techniques to identify and characterize molecular modulators of receptor recognition. Steric, lipophilic, and electrostatic properties of these compounds were calculated and examined for their possible role in recognition. Particular attention was paid to the regions around the two most favorable proton-accepting sites, the ON and the substituent at the C{sub 3} position, already implicated in recognition, as well as to the acidic N9H group that could be a proton donating center. To probe further the role of these three ligand sites in receptor interactions, a model of the receptor using three methanol molecules was made and optimum interactions of these three sites with them characterized. The results indicate some similarity in the shape of these ligands, which could reflect a steric requirement. The receptor affinity appears to be modulated to some extent by the ratio of lipophilic to hydrophilic surface, the negative potential at the {beta}N, provided there is also one at the C{sub 3} substituent confirming the importance of two accepting sites in recognition. The acidic N9H does not appear to be a modulator of affinity or does it form a stable H-bond with methanol as acceptor. The two proton donating molecules do form such a stable complex, and both are needed for high affinity.

  11. Activation of Neuropeptide FF Receptors by Kisspeptin Receptor Ligands.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Shinya; Misu, Ryosuke; Tomita, Kenji; Setsuda, Shohei; Masuda, Ryo; Ohno, Hiroaki; Naniwa, Yousuke; Ieda, Nahoko; Inoue, Naoko; Ohkura, Satoshi; Uenoyama, Yoshihisa; Tsukamura, Hiroko; Maeda, Kei-Ichiro; Hirasawa, Akira; Tsujimoto, Gozoh; Fujii, Nobutaka

    2011-01-13

    Kisspeptin is a member of the RFamide neuropeptide family that is implicated in gonadotropin secretion. Because kisspeptin-GPR54 signaling is implicated in the neuroendocrine regulation of reproduction, GPR54 ligands represent promising therapeutic agents against endocrine secretion disorders. In the present study, the selectivity profiles of GPR54 agonist peptides were investigated for several GPCRs, including RFamide receptors. Kisspeptin-10 exhibited potent binding and activation of neuropeptide FF receptors (NPFFR1 and NPFFR2). In contrast, short peptide agonists bound with much lower affinity to NPFFRs while showing relatively high selectivity toward GPR54. The possible localization of secondary kisspeptin targets was also demonstrated by variation in the levels of GnRH release from the median eminence and the type of GPR54 agonists used. Negligible affinity of the reported NPFFR ligands to GPR54 was observed and indicates the unidirectional cross-reactivity between both ligands.

  12. Chemistry and pharmacology of GABAB receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Froestl, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    This chapter presents new clinical applications of the prototypic GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen for the treatment of addiction by drugs of abuse, such as alcohol, cocaine, nicotine, morphine, and heroin, a novel baclofen prodrug Arbaclofen placarbil, the GABA(B) receptor agonist AZD3355 (Lesogabaran) currently in Phase 2 clinical trials for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease, and four positive allosteric modulators of GABA(B) receptors (CGP7930, GS39783, NVP-BHF177, and BHFF), which have less propensity for the development of tolerance due to receptor desensitization than classical GABA(B) receptor agonists. All four compounds showed anxiolytic affects. In the presence of positive allosteric modulators the "classical" GABA(B) receptor antagonists CGP35348 and 2-hydroxy-saclofen showed properties of partial GABA(B) receptor agonists. Seven micromolar affinity GABA(B) receptor antagonists, phaclofen; 2-hydroxy-saclofen; CGP's 35348, 36742, 46381, 51176; and SCH50911, are discussed. CGP36742 (SGS742) showed statistically significant improvements of working memory and attention in a Phase 2 clinical trial in mild, but not in moderate Alzheimer patients. Eight nanomolar affinity GABA(B) receptor antagonists are presented (CGP's 52432, 54626, 55845, 56433, 56999, 61334, 62349, and 63360) that were used by pharmacologists for numerous in vitro and in vivo investigations. CGP's 36742, 51176, 55845, and 56433 showed antidepressant effects. Several compounds are also available as radioligands, such as [(3)H]CGP27492, [(3)H]CGP54626, [(3)H]CGP5699, and [(3)H]CGP62349. Three novel fluorescent and three GABA(B) receptor antagonists with very high specific radioactivity (>2,000 Ci/mmol) are presented. [(125)I]CGP64213 and the photoaffinity ligand [(125)I]CGP71872 allowed the identification of GABA(B1a) and GABA(B1b) receptors in the expression cloning work. PMID:20655477

  13. Affinity Regulates Spatial Range of EGF Receptor Autocrine Ligand Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Dewitt, Ann; Iida, Tomoko; Lam, Ho-Yan; Hill, Virginia; Wiley, H S.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2002-08-08

    Proper spatial localization of EGFR signaling activated by autocrine ligands represents a critical factor in embryonic development as well as tissue organization and function, and ligand/receptor binding affinity is among the molecular and cellular properties suggested to play a role in governing this localization. The authors employ a computational model to predict how receptor-binding affinity affects local capture of autocrine ligand vis-a-vis escape to distal regions, and provide experimental test by constructing cell lines expressing EGFR along with either wild-type EGF or a low-affinity mutant, EGF{sup L47M}. The model predicts local capture of a lower affinity autocrine ligand to be less efficient when the ligand production rate is small relative to receptor appearance rate. The experimental data confirm this prediction, demonstrating that cells can use ligand/receptor binding affinity to regulate ligand spatial distribution when autocrine ligand production is limiting for receptor signaling.

  14. Ligand-directed trafficking of receptor stimulus.

    PubMed

    Chilmonczyk, Zdzisław; Bojarski, Andrzej J; Sylte, Ingebrigt

    2014-12-01

    GPCRs are seven transmembrane-spanning receptors that convey specific extracellular stimuli to intracellular signalling. They represent the largest family of cell surface proteins that are therapeutically targeted. According to the traditional two-state model of receptor theory, GPCRs were considered as operating in equilibrium between two functional conformations, an active (R*) and inactive (R) state. Thus, it was assumed that a GPCR can exist either in an "off" or "on" conformation causing either no activation or equal activation of all its signalling pathways. Over the past several years it has become evident that this model is too simple and that GPCR signalling is far more complex. Different studies have presented a multistate model of receptor activation in which ligand-specific receptor conformations are able to differentiate between distinct signalling partners. Recent data show that beside G proteins numerous other proteins, such as β-arrestins and kinases, may interact with GPCRs and activate intracellular signalling pathways. GPCR activation may therefore involve receptor desensitization, coupling to multiple G proteins, Gα or Gβγ signalling, and pathway activation that is independent of G proteins. This latter effect leads to agonist "functional selectivity" (also called ligand-directed receptor trafficking, stimulus trafficking, biased agonism, biased signalling), and agonist intervention with functional selectivity may improve the therapy. Many commercially available drugs with beneficial efficacy also show various undesirable side effects. Further studies of biased signalling might facilitate our understanding of the side effects of current drugs and take us to new avenues to efficiently design pathway-specific medications.

  15. Integrin receptors and ligand-gated channels.

    PubMed

    Morini, Raffaella; Becchetti, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Plastic expression of different integrin subunits controls the different stages of neural development, whereas in the adult integrins regulate synaptic stability. Evidence of integrin-channel crosstalk exists for ionotropic glutamate receptors. As is often the case in other tissues, integrin engagement regulates channel activity through complex signaling pathways that often include tyrosine phosphorylation cascades. The specific pathways recruited by integrin activation depend on cerebral region and cell type. In turn, ion channels control integrin expression onto the plasma membrane and their ligand binding affinity. The most extensive studies concern the hippocampus and suggest implications for neuronal circuit plasticity. The physiological relevance of these findings depends on whether adhesion molecules, aside from determining tissue stability, contribute to synaptogenesis and the responsiveness of mature synapses, thus contributing to long-term circuit consolidation. Little evidence is available for other ligand-gated channels, with the exception of nicotinic receptors. These exert a variety of functions in neurons and non neural tissue, both in development and in the adult, by regulating cell cycle, synaptogenesis and synaptic circuit refinement. Detailed studies in epidermal keratinocytes have shed some light on the possible mechanisms through which ACh can regulate cell motility, which may be of general relevance for morphogenetic processes. As to the control of mature synapses, most results concern the integrinic control of nicotinic receptors in the neuromuscular junction. Following this lead, a few studies have addressed similar topics in adult cerebral synapses. However, pursuing and interpreting these results in the brain is especially difficult because of the complexity of the nicotinic roles and the widespread contribution of nonsynaptic, paracrine transmission. From a pathological point of view, considering the well-known contribution of both

  16. Modulatory Role of Postsynaptic 5-Hydroxytryptamine Type 1A Receptors in (±)-8-Hydroxy-N,N-dipropyl-2-aminotetralin-Induced Hyperphagia in Mice.

    PubMed

    Brosda, Jan; Müller, Nadine; Bert, Bettina; Fink, Heidrun

    2015-07-15

    Brain serotonin (5-HT) is involved in the control of food intake. The ingestive effects of 5-HT are mediated by various receptor subtypes, among others the 5-HT1A receptor. While the involvement of presynaptic 5-HT1A receptors is regarded as certain, the role of postsynaptic 5-HT1A receptors is rather vague. Here, we studied the role of the 5-HT1A receptor on feeding in non-food-deprived and food-deprived (young adult and adult, both sexes) wild-type NMRI mice as well as transgenic NMRI mice, which are characterized by a distinct overexpression of postsynaptic 5-HT1A receptors. The known hyperphagic effect of the 5-HT1A receptor full agonist 8-OH-DPAT ((±)-8-hydroxy-N,N-dipropyl-2-aminotetralin) in non-food-deprived animals was demonstrated in male NMRI wild-type mice and could be antagonized by the selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY100635. In transgenic mice, this hyperphagic response was induced at lower doses, with an earlier onset and even in females. However, in adult male transgenic mice, the hyperphagic effect did not occur. In food-deprived NMRI wild-type as well as transgenic mice, 8-OH-DPAT first induced a hypophagic and subsequently a hyperphagic effect. Again, in transgenic animals most responses occurred at lower doses and with an earlier onset. The results indicate that postsynaptic 5-HT1A receptors exert a modulatory function in food intake in free-feeding and fasted mice, which for the first time shows an involvement of postsynaptic 5-HT1A receptors in feeding behavior. Understanding the function of pre- and postsynaptic 5-HT1A receptors may help to achieve new insights into the regulation of food intake and foster prospective treatment strategies for eating disorders.

  17. Limited proteolysis for assaying ligand binding affinities of nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Benkoussa, M; Nominé, B; Mouchon, A; Lefebvre, B; Bernardon, J M; Formstecher, P; Lefebvre, P

    1997-01-01

    The binding of natural or synthetic ligands to nuclear receptors is the triggering event leading to gene transcription activation or repression. Ligand binding to the ligand binding domain of these receptors induces conformational changes that are evidenced by an increased resistance of this domain to proteases. In vitro labeled receptors were incubated with various synthetic or natural agonists or antagonists and submitted to trypsin digestion. Proteolysis products were separated by SDS-PAGE and quantified. The amount of trypsin-resistant fragments was proportional to receptor occupancy by the ligand, and allowed the determination of dissociation constants (kDa). Using the wild-type or mutated human retinoic acid receptor alpha as a model, kDa values determined by classical competition binding assays using tritiated ligands are in agreement with those measured by the proteolytic assay. This method was successfully extended to human retinoic X receptor alpha, glucocorticoid receptor, and progesterone receptor, thus providing a basis for a new, faster assay to determine simultaneously the affinity and conformation of receptors when bound to a given ligand.

  18. Synthesis, Pharmacological Evaluation and Molecular Modeling Studies of Triazole Containing Dopamine D3 Receptor Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xin; Wang, Qi; Mishra, Yogesh; Xu, Jinbin; Reichert, David E.; Malik, Maninder; Taylor, Michelle; Luedtke, Robert R.; Mach, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    A series of 2-methoxyphenyl piperazine analogues containing a triazole ring were synthesized and their in vitro binding affinities at human dopamine D2 and D3 receptors were evaluated. Compounds 5b, 5c, 5d, and 4g, demonstrate high affinity for dopamine D3 receptors and moderate selectivity for the dopamine D3 versus D2 receptor subtypes. To further examine their potential as therapeutic agents, their intrinsic efficacy at both D2 and D3 receptors was determined using a forskolin-dependent adenylyl cyclase inhibition assay. Affinity at dopamine D4 and serotonin 5-HT1A receptors was also determined. In addition, information from previous molecular modeling studies of the binding of a panel of 163 structurally-related benzamide analogues at dopamine D2 and D3 receptors was applied to this series of compounds. The results of the modeling studies were consistent with our previous experimental data. More importantly, the modeling study results explained why the replacement of the amide linkage with the hetero-aromatic ring leads to a reduction in the affinity of these compounds at D3 receptors. PMID:25556097

  19. [Antidepressants, stressors and the serotonin 1A receptor].

    PubMed

    Kirilly, Eszter; Gonda, Xénia; Bagdy, György

    2015-06-01

    5-HT(1A) receptor is a receptor of surprises. Buspirone, an anxiolytic drug with a then yet unidentified mechanism of action had been marketed for years when it was discovered that it is a 5-HT(1A) partial agonist. Several more years had to pass before it was accepted that this receptor plays the key role in the action mechanism of buspirone. This was followed by further surprises. It was discovered that in spite of its anxiolytic effect buspirone activates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) stress axis, furthermore, it increases peripheral noradrenaline and adrenaline concentration via a central mechanism. Thus activation of this receptor leads to ACTH/corticosterone and catecholamine release and also increases beta-endorphine, oxytocin and prolactin secretion while decreasing body temperature, increasing food uptake, eliciting characteristic behavioural responses in rodents and also playing a role in the development of certain types of epilepsy. Human genetic studies revealed the role of 5-HT(1A) receptors in cognitive processes playing a role in the development of depression such as impulsiveness or response to environmental stress. This exceptionally wide spectrum of effects is attributable to the presence of 5-HT1A receptors in serotonergic as well as other, for example glutamatergic, cholinergic, dopaminergic and noradrenergic neurons. The majority of the effects of 5-HT(1A) receptors is manifested via the mediation of Gi proteins through the hyperpolarisation or inhibition of the neuron carrying the receptor. 5-HT(1A) receptors on serotonergic neurons can be found in the somatodendritic area and play a significant role in delaying the effects of antidepressants which is an obvious disadvantage. Therefore the newest serotonergic antidepressants including vilazodone and vortioxetine have been designed to possess 5-HT(1A) receptor partial agonist properties. In the present paper we focus primarily on the role of 5-HT(1A) receptors in stress and

  20. Sliding tethered ligands add topological interactions to the toolbox of ligand-receptor design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Martin; Kékicheff, Patrick; Iss, Jean; Fajolles, Christophe; Charitat, Thierry; Daillant, Jean; Marques, Carlos M.

    2015-09-01

    Adhesion in the biological realm is mediated by specific lock-and-key interactions between ligand-receptor pairs. These complementary moieties are ubiquitously anchored to substrates by tethers that control the interaction range and the mobility of the ligands and receptors, thus tuning the kinetics and strength of the binding events. Here we add sliding anchoring to the toolbox of ligand-receptor design by developing a family of tethered ligands for which the spacer can slide at the anchoring point. Our results show that this additional sliding degree of freedom changes the nature of the adhesive contact by extending the spatial range over which binding may sustain a significant force. By introducing sliding tethered ligands with self-regulating length, this work paves the way for the development of versatile and reusable bio-adhesive substrates with potential applications for drug delivery and tissue engineering.

  1. Adenosine receptor ligands: differences with acute versus chronic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.; von Lubitz, Dag K. J. E.; Daly, John W.; Fredholm, Bertil B.

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine receptors have been the target of intense research with respect to potential use of selective ligands in a variety of therapeutic areas. Caffeine and theophylline are adenosine receptor antagonists, and over the past three decades a wide range of selective agonists and antagonists for adenosine receptor subtypes have been developed. A complication to the therapeutic use of adenosine receptor ligands is the observation that the effects of acute administration of a particular ligand can be diametrically opposite to the chronic effects of the same ligand. This ‘effect inversion’ is discussed here by Ken Jecobson and colleagues, and has been observed for effects on cognitive processes, seizures and ischaemic damage. PMID:8936347

  2. Synthesis of 3-alkyl naphthalenes as novel estrogen receptor ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Jing; Akwabi-Ameyaw, Adwoa; Britton, Jonathan E.; Katamreddy, Subba R.; Navas III, Frank; Miller, Aaron B.; Williams, Shawn P.; Gray, David W.; Orband-Miller, Lisa A.; Shearin, Jean; Heyer, Dennis

    2009-06-24

    A series of estrogen receptor ligands based on a 3-alkyl naphthalene scaffold was synthesized using an intramolecular enolate-alkyne cycloaromatization as the key step. Several of these compounds bearing a C6-OH group were shown to be high affinity ligands. All compounds had similar ER{alpha} and ER{beta} binding affinity ranging from micromolar to low nanomolar.

  3. Freud-2/CC2D1B mediates dual repression of the serotonin-1A receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Hadjighassem, Mahmoud R; Galaraga, Kimberly; Albert, Paul R

    2011-01-01

    The serotonin-1A (5-HT1A) receptor functions as a pre-synaptic autoreceptor in serotonin neurons that regulates their activity, and is also widely expressed on non-serotonergic neurons as a post-synaptic heteroreceptor to mediate serotonin action. The 5-HT1A receptor gene is strongly repressed by a dual repressor element (DRE), which is recognized by two proteins: Freud-1/CC2D1A and another unknown protein. Here we identify mouse Freud-2/CC2D1B as the second repressor of the 5-HT1A-DRE. Freud-2 shares 50% amino acid identity with Freud-1, and contains conserved structural domains. Mouse Freud-2 bound specifically to the rat 5-HT1A-DRE adjacent to, and partially overlapping, the Freud-1 binding site. By supershift assay using nuclear extracts from L6 myoblasts, Freud-2-DRE complexes were distinguished from Freud-1-DRE complexes. Freud-2 mRNA and protein were detected throughout mouse brain and peripheral tissues. Freud-2 repressed 5-HT1A promoter-reporter constructs in a DRE-dependent manner in non-neuronal (L6) or 5-HT1A-expressing neuronal (NG108-15, RN46A) cell models. In NG108-15 cells, knockdown of Freud-2 using a specific short-interfering RNA reduced endogenous Freud-2 protein levels and decreased Freud-2 bound to the 5-HT1A-DRE as detected by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, but increased 5-HT1A promoter activity and 5-HT1A protein levels. Taken together, these data show that Freud-2 is the second component that, with Freud-1, mediates dual repression of the 5-HT1A receptor gene at the DRE.

  4. Database of Ligand-Receptor Partners, a DIP subset

    DOE Data Explorer

    Graeber, Thomas G.; Eisenberg, David

    The Database of Ligand-Receptor Partners (DLRP) is a subset of DIP (Database of Interacting Proteins). The DLRP is a database of protein ligand and protein receptor pairs that are known to interact with each other. By interact we mean that the ligand and receptor are members of a ligand-receptor complex and, unless otherwise noted, transduce a signal. In some instances the ligand and/or receptor may form a heterocomplex with other ligands/receptors in order to be functional. We have entered the majority of interactions in DLRP as full DIP entries, with links to references and additional information (see the DIP User's Guide). DLRP is a web supplement for: Thomas G. Graeber and David Eisenberg. Bioinformatic identification of potential autocrine signaling loops in cancers from gene expression profiles. Nature Genetics, 29(3):295-300 (November 2001). [Quoted from the DLRP homepage at http://dip.doe-mbi.ucla.edu/dip/DLRP.cgi] Also available from this page is the DLRP chemokine subset.

  5. Biotechnological Fluorescent Ligands of the Bradykinin B1 Receptor: Protein Ligands for a Peptide Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Charest-Morin, Xavier; Marceau, François

    2016-01-01

    The bradykinin (BK) B1 receptor (B1R) is a peculiar G protein coupled receptor that is strongly regulated to the point of being inducible in immunopathology. Limited clinical evidence suggests that its expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells is a biomarker of active inflammatory states. In an effort to develop a novel imaging/diagnostic tool, we report the rational design and testing of a fusion protein that is a ligand of the human B1R but not likely to label peptidases. This ligand is composed of a fluorescent protein (FP) (enhanced green FP [EGFP] or mCherry) prolonged at its N-terminus by a spacer peptide and a classical peptide agonist or antagonist (des-Arg9-BK, [Leu8]des-Arg9-BK, respectively). The design of the spacer-ligand joint peptide was validated by a competition assay for [3H]Lys-des-Arg9-BK binding to the human B1R applied to 4 synthetic peptides of 18 or 19 residues. The labeling of B1R-expressing cells with EGFP or mCherry fused with 7 of such peptides was performed in parallel (microscopy). Both assays indicated that the best design was FP-(Asn-Gly)n-Lys-des-Arg9-BK; n = 15 was superior to n = 5, suggesting benefits from minimizing steric hindrance between the FP and the receptor. Cell labeling concerned mostly plasma membranes and was inhibited by a B1R antagonist. EGFP-(Asn-Gly)15-Lys-des-Arg9-BK competed for the binding of [3H]Lys-des-Arg9-BK to human recombinant B1R, being only 10-fold less potent than the unlabeled form of Lys-des-Arg9-BK to do so. The fusion protein did not label HEK 293a cells expressing recombinant human BK B2 receptors or angiotensin converting enzyme. This study identifies a modular C-terminal sequence that can be adapted to protein cargoes, conferring high affinity for the BK B1R, with possible applications in diagnostic cytofluorometry, histology and drug delivery (e.g., in oncology). PMID:26844555

  6. Biotechnological Fluorescent Ligands of the Bradykinin B1 Receptor: Protein Ligands for a Peptide Receptor.

    PubMed

    Charest-Morin, Xavier; Marceau, François

    2016-01-01

    The bradykinin (BK) B1 receptor (B1R) is a peculiar G protein coupled receptor that is strongly regulated to the point of being inducible in immunopathology. Limited clinical evidence suggests that its expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells is a biomarker of active inflammatory states. In an effort to develop a novel imaging/diagnostic tool, we report the rational design and testing of a fusion protein that is a ligand of the human B1R but not likely to label peptidases. This ligand is composed of a fluorescent protein (FP) (enhanced green FP [EGFP] or mCherry) prolonged at its N-terminus by a spacer peptide and a classical peptide agonist or antagonist (des-Arg9-BK, [Leu8]des-Arg9-BK, respectively). The design of the spacer-ligand joint peptide was validated by a competition assay for [3H]Lys-des-Arg9-BK binding to the human B1R applied to 4 synthetic peptides of 18 or 19 residues. The labeling of B1R-expressing cells with EGFP or mCherry fused with 7 of such peptides was performed in parallel (microscopy). Both assays indicated that the best design was FP-(Asn-Gly)n-Lys-des-Arg9-BK; n = 15 was superior to n = 5, suggesting benefits from minimizing steric hindrance between the FP and the receptor. Cell labeling concerned mostly plasma membranes and was inhibited by a B1R antagonist. EGFP-(Asn-Gly)15-Lys-des-Arg9-BK competed for the binding of [3H]Lys-des-Arg9-BK to human recombinant B1R, being only 10-fold less potent than the unlabeled form of Lys-des-Arg9-BK to do so. The fusion protein did not label HEK 293a cells expressing recombinant human BK B2 receptors or angiotensin converting enzyme. This study identifies a modular C-terminal sequence that can be adapted to protein cargoes, conferring high affinity for the BK B1R, with possible applications in diagnostic cytofluorometry, histology and drug delivery (e.g., in oncology).

  7. 5-Hydroxytryptamine 1A receptors in the dorsomedial hypothalamus connected to dorsal raphe nucleus inputs modulate defensive behaviours and mediate innate fear-induced antinociception.

    PubMed

    Biagioni, Audrey Franceschi; de Oliveira, Rithiele Cristina; de Oliveira, Ricardo; da Silva, Juliana Almeida; dos Anjos-Garcia, Tayllon; Roncon, Camila Marroni; Corrado, Alexandre Pinto; Zangrossi, Hélio; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2016-03-01

    The dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) is an important brainstem source of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), and 5-HT plays a key role in the regulation of panic attacks. The aim of the present study was to determine whether 5-HT1A receptor-containing neurons in the medial hypothalamus (MH) receive neural projections from DRN and to then determine the role of this neural substrate in defensive responses. The neurotracer biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) was iontophoretically microinjected into the DRN, and immunohistochemical approaches were then used to identify 5HT1A receptor-labelled neurons in the MH. Moreover, the effects of pre-treatment of the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) with 8-OH-DPAT and WAY-100635, a 5-HT1A receptor agonist and antagonist, respectively, followed by local microinjections of bicuculline, a GABAA receptor antagonist, were investigated. We found that there are many projections from the DRN to the perifornical lateral hypothalamus (PeFLH) but also to DMH and ventromedial (VMH) nuclei, reaching 5HT1A receptor-labelled perikarya. DMH GABAA receptor blockade elicited defensive responses that were followed by antinociception. DMH treatment with 8-OH-DPAT decreased escape responses, which strongly suggests that the 5-HT1A receptor modulates the defensive responses. However, DMH treatment with WAY-100635 failed to alter bicuculline-induced defensive responses, suggesting that 5-HT exerts a phasic influence on 5-HT1A DMH neurons. The activation of the inhibitory 5-HT1A receptor had no effect on antinociception. However, blockade of the 5-HT1A receptor decreased fear-induced antinociception. The present data suggest that the ascending pathways from the DRN to the DMH modulate panic-like defensive behaviours and mediate antinociceptive phenomenon by recruiting 5-HT1A receptor in the MH. PMID:26749090

  8. Development of a membrane-anchored ligand and receptor yeast two-hybrid system for ligand-receptor interaction identification

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jingjing; Gao, Jin; Han, Lei; Zhang, Yinjie; Guan, Wen; Zhou, Liang; Yu, Yan; Han, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Identifying interactions between ligands and transmembrane receptors is crucial for understanding the endocrine system. However, the present approaches for this purpose are still not capable of high-throughput screening. In this report, a membrane-anchored ligand and receptor yeast two-hybrid (MALAR-Y2H) system was established. In the method, an extracellular ligand is linked with an intracellular split-ubiquitin reporter system via a chimeric transmembrane structure. Meanwhile, the prey proteins of transmembrane receptors are fused to the other half of the split-ubiquitin reporter system. The extracellular interaction of ligands and receptors can lead to the functional recovery of the ubiquitin reporter system in yeast, and eventually lead to the expression of report genes. Consequently, the system can be used to detect the interactions between extracellular ligands and their transmembrane receptors. To test the efficiency and universality of the method, interactions between several pairs of ligands and receptors of mouse were analyzed. The detecting results were shown to be thoroughly consistent with the present knowledge, indicating MALAR-Y2H can be utilized for such purpose with high precision, high efficiency and strong universality. The characteristics of the simple procedure and high-throughput potential make MALAR-Y2H a powerful platform to study protein-protein interaction networks between secreted proteins and transmembrane proteins. PMID:27762338

  9. Multivalent Ligand-Receptor Binding on Supported Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hyunsook; Robison, Aaron D.; Cremer, Paul S.

    2009-01-01

    Fluid supported lipid bilayers provide an excellent platform for studying multivalent protein-ligand interactions because the two-dimensional fluidity of the membrane allows for lateral rearrangement of ligands in order to optimize binding. Our laboratory has combined supported lipid bilayer-coated microfluidic platforms with total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) to obtain equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) data for these systems. This high throughput, on-chip approach provides highly accurate thermodynamic information about multivalent binding events while requiring only very small sample volumes. Herein, we review some of the most salient findings from these studies. In particular, increasing ligand density on the membrane surface can provide a modest enhancement or attenuation of ligand-receptor binding depending upon whether the surface ligands interact strongly with each other. Such effects, however, lead to little more than one order of magnitude change in the apparent KD values. On the other hand, the lipophilicity and presentation of lipid bilayer-conjugated ligands can have a much greater impact. Indeed, changing the way a particular ligand is conjugated to the membrane can alter the apparent KD value by at least three orders of magnitude. Such a result speaks strongly to the role of ligand availability for multivalent ligand-receptor binding. PMID:19508894

  10. The imidazoline receptors and ligands in pain modulation

    PubMed Central

    Bektas, Nurcan; Nemutlu, Dilara; Arslan, Rana

    2015-01-01

    Pain is an unpleasant experience and effects daily routine negatively. Although there are various drugs, many of them are not entirely successful in relieving pain, since pain modulation is a complex process involving numerous mediators and receptors. Therefore, it is a rational approach to identify the factors involved in the complex process and develop new agents that act on these pain producing mechanisms. In this respect, the involvement of the imidazoline receptors in pain modulation has drawn attention in recent years. In this review, it is aimed to focus on the imidazoline receptors and their ligands which contribute to the pain modulation. It is demonstrated that imidazoline-2 (I2) receptors are steady new drug targets for analgesics. Even if the mechanism of I2 receptor is not well known in the modulation of pain, it is known that it plays a role in tonic and chronic pain but not in acute phasic pain. Moreover, the I2 receptor ligands increase the analgesic effects of opioids in both acute and chronic pain and prevent the development of opioid tolerance. So, they are valuable for the chronic pain treatment and also therapeutic coadjuvants in the management of chronic pain with opiate drugs due to the attenuation of opioid tolerance and addiction. Thus, the use of the ligands which bind to the imidazoline receptors is an effective strategy for relieving pain. This educational forum exhibits the role of imidazoline receptors and ligands in pain process by utilizing experimental studies. PMID:26600633

  11. A Natural Mutation in Helix 5 of the Ligand Binding Domain of Glucocorticoid Receptor Enhances Receptor-Ligand Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Reyer, Henry; Ponsuksili, Siriluck; Kanitz, Ellen; Pöhland, Ralf; Wimmers, Klaus; Murani, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is a central player in the neuroendocrine stress response; it mediates feedback regulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and physiological actions of glucocorticoids in the periphery. Despite intensive investigations of GR in the context of receptor-ligand interaction, only recently the first naturally occurring gain-of-function substitution, Ala610Val, of the ligand binding domain was identified in mammals. We showed that this mutation underlies a major quantitative trait locus for HPA axis activity in pigs, reducing cortisol production by about 40–50 percent. To unravel the molecular mechanisms behind this gain of function, receptor-ligand interactions were evaluated in silico, in vitro and in vivo. In accordance with previously observed phenotypic effects, the mutant Val610 GR showed significantly increased activation in response to glucocorticoid and non-glucocorticoid steroids, and, as revealed by GR-binding studies in vitro and in pituitary glands, enhanced ligand binding. Concordantly, the protein structure prediction depicted reduced binding distances between the receptor and ligand, and altered interactions in the ligand binding pocket. Consequently, the Ala610Val substitution opens up new structural information for the design of potent GR ligands and to examine effects of the enhanced GR responsiveness to glucocorticoids on the entire organism. PMID:27736993

  12. Brain Serotonin 1A Receptor Binding as a Predictor of Treatment Outcome in Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jeffrey M.; Hesselgrave, Natalie; Ogden, R. Todd; Zanderigo, Francesca; Oquendo, Maria A.; Mann, J. John; Parsey, Ramin V.

    2013-01-01

    Background We previously reported higher serotonin 1A receptor (5-HT1A) binding in subjects with major depressive disorder (MDD) during a major depressive episode using positron emission tomography imaging with [11C]WAY-100635. 5-HT1A receptor binding is also associated with treatment outcome after nonstandardized antidepressant treatment. We examined whether pretreatment 5-HT1A binding is associated with treatment outcome following standardized escitalopram treatment in MDD. We also compared 5-HT1A binding between all MDD subjects in this cohort and a sample of healthy control subjects. Methods Twenty-four MDD subjects in a current major depressive episode and 51 previously studied healthy control subjects underwent positron emission tomography scanning with [11C]WAY-100635, acquiring a metabolite-corrected arterial input function and free-fraction measurement to estimate 5-HT1A binding potential (BPF = Bmax/KD, where Bmax = available receptors and KD = dissociation constant). Major depressive disorder subjects then received 8 weeks of treatment with escitalopram; remission was defined as a posttreatment 24-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale <10 and ≥50% reduction in Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. Results Remitters to escitalopram had 33% higher baseline 5-HT1A binding in the raphe nuclei than nonremitters (p = .047). Across 12 cortical and subcortical regions, 5-HT1A binding did not differ between remitters and nonremitters (p = .86). Serotonin 1A receptor binding was higher in MDD than control subjects across all regions (p = .0003). Remitters did not differ from nonremitters in several relevant clinical measures. Conclusions Elevated 5-HT1A binding in raphe nuclei is associated with subsequent remission with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor escitalopram; this is consistent with data from a separate cohort receiving naturalistic antidepressant treatment. We confirmed our previous findings of higher 5-HT1A binding in current MDD compared with

  13. Mechanokinetics of receptor-ligand interactions in cell adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ning; Lü, Shouqin; Zhang, Yan; Long, Mian

    2015-04-01

    Receptor-ligand interactions in blood flow are crucial to initiate such biological processes as inflammatory cascade, platelet thrombosis, as well as tumor metastasis. To mediate cell adhesion, the interacting receptors and ligands must be anchored onto two apposing surfaces of two cells or a cell and a substratum, i.e., two-dimensional (2D) binding, which is different from the binding of a soluble ligand in fluid phase to a receptor, i.e., three-dimensional (3D) binding. While numerous works have been focused on 3D kinetics of receptor-ligand interactions in the immune system, 2D kinetics and its regulations have been less understood, since no theoretical framework or experimental assays were established until 1993. Not only does the molecular structure dominate 2D binding kinetics, but the shear force in blood flow also regulates cell adhesion mediated by interacting receptors and ligands. Here, we provide an overview of current progress in 2D binding and regulations, mainly from our group. Relevant issues of theoretical frameworks, experimental measurements, kinetic rates and binding affinities, and force regulations are discussed.

  14. The Principles of Ligand Specificity on beta-2-adrenergic receptor

    PubMed Central

    Chan, H. C. Stephen; Filipek, Slawomir; Yuan, Shuguang

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors are recognized as one of the largest families of membrane proteins. Despite sharing a characteristic seven-transmembrane topology, G protein-coupled receptors regulate a wide range of cellular signaling pathways in response to various physical and chemical stimuli, and prevail as an important target for drug discovery. Notably, the recent progress in crystallographic methods led to a breakthrough in elucidating the structures of membrane proteins. The structures of β2-adrenergic receptor bound with a variety of ligands provide atomic details of the binding modes of agonists, antagonists and inverse agonists. In this study, we selected four representative molecules from each functional class of ligands and investigated their impacts on β2-adrenergic receptor through a total of 12 × 100 ns molecular dynamics simulations. From the obtained trajectories, we generated molecular fingerprints exemplifying propensities of protein-ligand interactions. For each functional class of compounds, we characterized and compared the fluctuation of the protein backbone, the volumes in the intracellular pockets, the water densities in the receptors, the domain interaction networks as well as the movements of transmembrane helices. We discovered that each class of ligands exhibits a distinct mode of interactions with mainly TM5 and TM6, altering the shape and eventually the state of the receptor. Our findings provide insightful prospective into GPCR targeted structure-based drug discoveries. PMID:27703221

  15. Regulation of G Protein-Coupled Receptors by Allosteric Ligands

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Topographically distinct, druggable, allosteric sites may be present on all G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). As such, targeting these sites with synthetic small molecules offers an attractive approach to develop receptor-subtype selective chemical leads for the development of novel therapies. A crucial part of drug development is to understand the acute and chronic effects of such allosteric modulators at their corresponding GPCR target. Key regulatory processes including cell-surface delivery, endocytosis, recycling, and down-regulation tightly control the number of receptors at the surface of the cell. As many GPCR therapeutics will be administered chronically, understanding how such ligands modulate these regulatory pathways forms an essential part of the characterization of novel GPCR ligands. This is true for both orthosteric and allosteric ligands. In this Review, we summarize our current understanding of GPCR regulatory processes with a particular focus on the effects and implications of allosteric targeting of GPCRs. PMID:23398684

  16. Expression of notch receptors and ligands in the adult gut.

    PubMed

    Sander, Guy R; Powell, Barry C

    2004-04-01

    The Notch signaling pathway has become recognized as a vitally important pathway in regulating proliferative/differentiative decisions and cell fate. To explore the involvement of the Notch pathway in adult gut, we investigated the expression of Notch receptors and their ligands by Northern blotting and in situ hybridization. Notch receptors and ligands were expressed in both proliferative and post-mitotic cells throughout adult rat gut, variously in epithelial, immune, and endothelial cells. Expression of Notch1, Jagged1, and Jagged2 frequently overlapped, whereas Notch2 expression was restricted to specific crypt cells, the lamina propria of the large intestine, and Peyer's patch lymphocytes. We propose that the expression of multiple Notch receptors and ligands in a range of different intestinal cell types indicates that this signaling pathway underpins many of the processes involved in the maintenance and function of the adult gut.

  17. Estrogen Receptor Ligands: A Review (2013–2015)

    PubMed Central

    Farzaneh, Shabnam; Zarghi, Afshin

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen receptors (ERs) are a group of compounds named for their importance in both menstrual and estrous reproductive cycles. They are involved in the regulation of various processes ranging from tissue growth maintenance to reproduction. Their action is mediated through ER nuclear receptors. Two subtypes of the estrogen receptor, ERα and ERβ, exist and exhibit distinct cellular and tissue distribution patterns. In humans, both receptor subtypes are expressed in many cells and tissues, and they control key physiological functions in various organ systems. Estrogens attract great attention due to their wide applications in female reproductive functions and treatment of some estrogen-dependent cancers and osteoporosis. This paper provides a general review of ER ligands published in international journals patented between 2013 and 2015. The broad physiological profile of estrogens has attracted the attention of many researchers to develop new estrogen ligands as therapeutic molecules for various clinical purposes. After the discovery of the ERβ receptor, subtype-selective ligands could be used to elicit beneficial estrogen-like activities and reduce adverse side effects, based on the different distributions and relative levels of the two ER subtypes in different estrogen target tissues. Therefore, recent literature has focused on selective estrogen ligands as highly promising agents for the treatment of some types of cancer, as well as for cardiovascular, inflammatory, and neurodegenerative diseases. Estrogen receptors are nuclear transcription factors that are involved in the regulation of many complex physiological functions in humans. Selective estrogen ligands are highly promising targets for treatment of some types of cancer, as well as for cardiovascular, inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases. Extensive structure-activity relationship studies of ER ligands based on small molecules indicate that many different structural scaffolds may provide high

  18. Quantifying ligand bias at seven-transmembrane receptors.

    PubMed

    Rajagopal, Sudarshan; Ahn, Seungkirl; Rominger, David H; Gowen-MacDonald, William; Lam, Christopher M; Dewire, Scott M; Violin, Jonathan D; Lefkowitz, Robert J

    2011-09-01

    Seven transmembrane receptors (7TMRs), commonly referred to as G protein-coupled receptors, form a large part of the "druggable" genome. 7TMRs can signal through parallel pathways simultaneously, such as through heterotrimeric G proteins from different families, or, as more recently appreciated, through the multifunctional adapters, β-arrestins. Biased agonists, which signal with different efficacies to a receptor's multiple downstream pathways, are useful tools for deconvoluting this signaling complexity. These compounds may also be of therapeutic use because they have distinct functional and therapeutic profiles from "balanced agonists." Although some methods have been proposed to identify biased ligands, no comparison of these methods applied to the same set of data has been performed. Therefore, at this time, there are no generally accepted methods to quantify the relative bias of different ligands, making studies of biased signaling difficult. Here, we use complementary computational approaches for the quantification of ligand bias and demonstrate their application to two well known drug targets, the β2 adrenergic and angiotensin II type 1A receptors. The strategy outlined here allows a quantification of ligand bias and the identification of weakly biased compounds. This general method should aid in deciphering complex signaling pathways and may be useful for the development of novel biased therapeutic ligands as drugs.

  19. Ligand regulation of retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptors: implications for development of novel therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Solt, Laura A.; Griffin, Patrick R.; Burris, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review In the late 1980s, the cloning of several nuclear receptors led to the intense search and isolation of new members of this superfamily. Despite their identification, many of these receptors were dubbed ‘orphan’ receptors, as their physiological ligands remained unknown. Recent reports have presented evidence for one family of orphan receptors, the retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptors (RORs), in several pathologies, including osteoporosis, several autoimmune diseases, asthma, cancer, diabetes and obesity. The present review summarizes the studies identifying ligands for the RORs and evaluates their role as targets for potential therapeutics. Recent findings Significant progress was made in the initial identification of ligands for the RORs when X-ray crystallographic studies identified several molecules within the ligand-binding pockets of RORα and RORβ. Recently, we identified endogenous and synthetic ligands for RORα and RORγ, thereby solidifying their function as ligand-dependent transcription factors. Summary Recent studies have established roles for the RORs in physiological development and the advent of disease. Identification of ligands for the RORs, both endogenous and synthetic, has established these receptors as attractive new therapeutic targets for the treatment of ROR-related diseases. PMID:20463469

  20. Effects of 5-HT-receptor and alpha 2-adrenoceptor ligands on the haemodynamic response to acute central hypovolaemia in conscious rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, R. G.; Haynes, J. M.; Ludbrook, J.

    1993-01-01

    1. We set out to elucidate the pharmacological mechanisms by which alpha 2-adrenoceptor and 5-HT-receptor ligands affect the haemodynamic response to acute central hypovolaemia in conscious rabbits. 2. Acute central hypovolaemia was produced by inflating an inferior vena caval cuff so that cardiac output fell at a constant rate of approximately 8.5% of its baseline level per min. 3. Drugs were administered into the fourth cerebral ventricle in either 154 mM NaCl (saline) or 20% w/v 2-hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CDX). After vehicle treatments, the haemodynamic response to acute central hypovolaemia had the usual two phases. During Phase I, systemic vascular conductance fell in proportion to cardiac output so that mean arterial pressure fell by only 8 mmHg. Phase II commenced when cardiac output had fallen to approximately 60% of its baseline level, when vascular conductance rose abruptly and arterial pressure fell to < or = 40 mmHg. The haemodynamic response was not dependent on the vehicle used (saline or beta-CDX). 4. Methysergide delayed the occurrence of Phase II in a dose-dependent manner, and prevented it at a dose of 30- 600 nmol (geometric mean = 186 nmol). The effects and potency of methysergide were not dependent on the vehicle used, indicating that beta-CDX can be used as a vehicle for fourth ventricular administration of lipophilic drugs to conscious rabbits. Clonidine (10 nmol) reversed the effects of a critical dose of methysergide. 5. Phase II was also prevented by 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (5-HT1A-selective agonist, geometric mean critical dose (range) = 13.1 (10-30) nmol), sumatriptan (5-HT1D-selective agonist, 72.1 (10-300) nmol), mesulergine (5-HT2/1C-selective antagonist, 173 (30-1000) nmol), idazoxan (alpha 2-adrenoceptor-selective antagonist, 548 (100-3000) nmol), and mianserin (5-HT2/1C-selective antagonist, 548 (100-3000) nmol). It was not affected by MDL 72222 (5-HT3-selective antagonist, 300 nmol) or ketanserin (5-HT2

  1. Ligand regulation of a constitutively dimeric EGF receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freed, Daniel M.; Alvarado, Diego; Lemmon, Mark A.

    2015-06-01

    Ligand-induced receptor dimerization has traditionally been viewed as the key event in transmembrane signalling by epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs). Here we show that the Caenorhabditis elegans EGFR orthologue LET-23 is constitutively dimeric, yet responds to its ligand LIN-3 without changing oligomerization state. SAXS and mutational analyses further reveal that the preformed dimer of the LET-23 extracellular region is mediated by its domain II dimerization arm and resembles other EGFR extracellular dimers seen in structural studies. Binding of LIN-3 induces only minor structural rearrangements in the LET-23 dimer to promote signalling. Our results therefore argue that EGFR can be regulated by allosteric changes within an existing receptor dimer--resembling signalling by insulin receptor family members, which share similar extracellular domain compositions but form covalent dimers.

  2. [Determining the parameters for receptor-ligand interaction by serial dilution method for the case when the ligand and receptor are in a pre-existing mixture].

    PubMed

    Bobrovnik, S A

    2005-01-01

    New methods of determining the binding parameters for ligand-receptor interaction are considered. The considered approaches are based on the earlier suggested method of serial dilution and application of so-called coordinates of dilution. It was shown that the suggested methods allow to evaluate affinity constant and ligand concentration even for the case, when the receptor and corresponding ligand of unknown concentration are in a mixture and their separation from each other is impossible. In this connection the suggested methods are especially useful for studying the ligand-receptor interaction if the receptor is very liable and its purification from the ligand would cause drastic changes of its binding properties.

  3. [Effect of ligand concentration on the precision of determining the parameters of ligand-receptor interaction by serial dilution methods].

    PubMed

    Bobrovnik, S A

    2004-01-01

    Earlier we suggested the method of serial dilution, which allows one to determine the parameters of ligand-receptor interaction even if the reactants are in a mixture and their concentrations are unknown. The method is especially useful if the liability of studied receptor does not allow its separation from corresponding ligand. The important prerequisite of the method's precision is that the concentration of the ligand should be sufficiently high comparing to the concentration of the receptor. In the present paper it was demonstrated that the method allows one to obtain sufficiently good precision even in the case when the concentration of the ligand is only one tenth of the receptor concentration.

  4. A Rapid Method for Refolding Cell Surface Receptors and Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Lu; Wu, Ling; Li, Feng; Burnham, Robert S.; Pizarro, Juan C.; Xu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Production of membrane-associated cell surface receptors and their ligands is often a cumbersome, expensive, and time-consuming process that limits detailed structural and functional characterization of this important class of proteins. Here we report a rapid method for refolding inclusion-body-based, recombinant cell surface receptors and ligands in one day, a speed equivalent to that of soluble protein production. This method efficiently couples modular on-column immobilized metal ion affinity purification and solid-phase protein refolding. We demonstrated the general utility of this method for producing multiple functionally active immunoreceptors, ligands, and viral decoys, including challenging cell surface proteins that cannot be produced using typical dialysis- or dilution-based refolding approaches. PMID:27215173

  5. Nonsteroidal Androgen Receptor Ligands: Versatile Syntheses and Biological Data

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We report herein a stereoselective and straightforward methodology for the synthesis of new androgen receptor ligands with (anti)-agonistic activities. Oxygen–nitrogen replacement in bicalutamide-like structures paves the way to the disclosure of a new class of analogues, including cyclized/nitrogen-substituted derivatives, with promising antiandrogen (or anabolic) activity. PMID:24900495

  6. Structural and Functional Diversity of Estrogen Receptor Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Farooq, Amjad

    2015-01-01

    Estrogen receptors, comprised of ERα and ERβ isoforms in mammals, act as ligand-modulated transcription factors and orchestrate a plethora of cellular functions from sexual development and reproduction to metabolic homeostasis. Herein, I revisit the structural basis of the binding of ERα to DNA and estradiol in light of the recent discoveries and emerging trends in the field of nuclear receptors. A particular emphasis of this review is on the chemical and structural diversity of an ever-increasing repertoire of physiological, environmental and synthetic ligands of estrogen receptors that ultimately modulate their interactions with cognate DNA located within the promoters of estrogen-responsive genes. In particular, modulation of estrogen receptors by small molecule ligands represents an important therapeutic goal toward the treatment of a wide variety of human pathologies including breast cancer, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis and obesity. Collectively, this article provides an overview of a wide array of small organic and inorganic molecules that can fine-tune the physiological function of estrogen receptors, thereby bearing a direct impact on human health and disease. PMID:25866274

  7. Why do cannabinoid receptors have more than one endogenous ligand?

    PubMed Central

    Di Marzo, Vincenzo; De Petrocellis, Luciano

    2012-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system was revealed following the understanding of the mechanism of action of marijuana's major psychotropic principle, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, and includes two G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs; the cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors), their endogenous ligands (the endocannabinoids, the best studied of which are anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG)), and the proteins that regulate the levels and activity of these receptors and ligands. However, other minor lipid metabolites different from, but chemically similar to, anandamide and 2-AG have also been suggested to act as endocannabinoids. Thus, unlike most other GPCRs, cannabinoid receptors appear to have more than one endogenous agonist, and it has been often wondered what could be the physiological meaning of this peculiarity. In 1999, it was proposed that anandamide might also activate other targets, and in particular the transient receptor potential of vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1) channels. Over the last decade, this interaction has been shown to occur both in peripheral tissues and brain, during both physiological and pathological conditions. TRPV1 channels can be activated also by another less abundant endocannabinoid, N-arachidonoyldopamine, but not by 2-AG, and have been proposed by some authors to act as ionotropic endocannabinoid receptors. This article will discuss the latest discoveries on this subject, and discuss, among others, how anandamide and 2-AG differential actions at TRPV1 and cannabinoid receptors contribute to making this signalling system a versatile tool available to organisms to fine-tune homeostasis. PMID:23108541

  8. Receptor Specific Ligands for Spect Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kung, H. F.

    2003-02-25

    In the past funding period we have concentrated in developing new 99mTc labeled MIBG analogs. Basic chemistry of ligand synthesis, radiochemistry of Re and 99mTc complex formation, separation of stereoisomers and in vitro stability were investigated. We have prepared a number of new MIBG derivatives containing chelating moiety N2S2 and additional groups to increase lipophilicity. Unfortunately none of the new 99mTc labeled MIBG analogs showed promise as an imaging agent for myocardial neuronal function. Radioactive-iodine-labeled meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) is currently being used as an in vivo imaging agent to evaluate neuroendocrine tumors as well as the myocardial sympathetic nervous system in patients with myocardial infarct and cardiomyopathy. It is generally accepted that MIBG is an analog of norepinephrine and its uptake in the heart corresponds to the distribution of norepinephrine and the density of sympathetic neurons. A series of MIBG derivatives containing suitable chelating functional groups N2S2 for the formation of [Tcv0]+3N2S2 complex was successfully synthesized and the 99mTc-labeled complexes were prepared and tested in rats. One of the compounds, [99mTc]M2, tested showed significant, albeit lower, heart uptakes post iv injection in rats (0.18% dose/organ at 4 hours) as compared to [l25l]MIBG (1.4% dose/organ at 4 hours). The heart uptake of the 99mTc-labeled complex, [99mTc]M2, appears to be specific and can be reduced by coinjection with nonradioactive MIBG or by pretreatment with desipramine. a selective norepinephrine transporter inhibitor. Further evaluation of the in vitro uptake of [99mTc]M2 in cultured neuroblastoma cells displayed consistently lower, but measurable uptake (app. 10% of that for [125l]MlBG). These preliminary results suggested that the mechanisms of heart uptake of [99mTc]M2 may be related to those for [125l]MIBG uptake. To improve the heart uptake of the MIBG derivatives we have developed chemistry related to the

  9. Ah receptor ligands in tobacco smoke.

    PubMed

    Löfroth, G; Rannug, A

    1988-08-01

    Tar particulates from cigarette smoke contain compounds with affinity for the Ah receptor. The sidestream activity is larger than that of the mainstream with a ratio of about 5. The compounds causing the affinity appear in the neutral fraction after chemical fractionation excluding basic and acidic components as major contributors to the affinity. The affinity cannot be explained by benzo[a]pyrene and other polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons but it might be caused by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and related compounds and by oxidized tryptophan derivatives.

  10. Ligands for cannabinoid receptors, promising anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Nikan, Marjan; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad; Manayi, Azadeh

    2016-02-01

    Cannabinoid compounds are unique to cannabis and provide some interesting biological properties. These compounds along with endocannabinoids, a group of neuromodulator compounds in the body especially in brain, express their effects by activation of G-protein-coupled cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2. There are several physiological properties attributed to the endocannabinoids including pain relief, enhancement of appetite, blood pressure lowering during shock, embryonic development, and blocking of working memory. On the other hand, activation of endocannabinoid system may be suppresses evolution and progression of several types of cancer. According to the results of recent studies, CB receptors are over-expressed in cancer cell lines and application of multiple cannabinoid or cannabis-derived compounds reduce tumor size through decrease of cell proliferation or induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis along with desirable effect on decrease of tumor-evoked pain. Therefore, modulation of endocannabinoid system by inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), the enzyme, which metabolized endocannabinoids, or application of multiple cannabinoid or cannabis-derived compounds, may be appropriate for the treatment of several cancer subtypes. This review focuses on how cannabinoid affect different types of cancers. PMID:26764235

  11. Cannabinoid ligand-receptor signaling in the mouse uterus.

    PubMed

    Das, S K; Paria, B C; Chakraborty, I; Dey, S K

    1995-05-01

    Using RNA (Northern) blot hybridization and reverse transcription-PCR, we demonstrate that the brain-type cannabinoid receptor (CB1-R) mRNA, but not the spleen-type cannabinoid receptor (CB2-R) mRNA, is expressed in the mouse uterus and that this organ has the capacity to synthesize the putative endogenous cannabinoid ligand, anandamide (arachidonylethanolamide). The psychoactive cannabinoid component of marijuana--delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)--or anandamide, but not the inactive and nonpsychoactive cannabidiol (CBD), inhibited forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP formation in the mouse uterus, which was prevented by pertussis toxin pretreatment. These results suggest that uterine CB1-R is coupled to inhibitory guanine nucleotide-binding protein and is biologically active. Autoradiographic studies identified ligand binding sites ([3H]anandamide) in the uterine epithelium and stromal cells, suggesting that these cells are perhaps the targets for cannabinoid action. Scatchard analysis of the binding of [3H]WIN 55212-2, another cannabinoid receptor ligand, showed a single class of high-affinity binding sites in the endometrium with an apparent Kd of 2.4 nM and Bmax of 5.4 x 10(9) molecules per mg of protein. The gene encoding lactoferrin is an estrogen-responsive gene in the mouse uterus that was rapidly and transiently up-regulated by THC, but not by CBD, in ovariectomized mice in the absence of ovarian steroids. This effect, unlike that of 17 beta-estradiol (E2), was not influenced by a pure antiestrogen, ICI 182780, suggesting that the THC-induced uterine lactoferrin gene expression does not involve estrogen receptors. We propose that the uterus is a new target for cannabinoid ligand-receptor signaling.

  12. Metabotropic glutamate receptor ligands as potential therapeutics for addiction

    PubMed Central

    Olive, M. F.

    2009-01-01

    There is now compelling evidence that the excitatory amino acid neurotransmitter glutamate plays a pivotal role in drug addiction and alcoholism. As a result, there has been increasing interest in developing glutamate-based therapies for the treatment of addictive disorders. Receptors for glutamate are primarily divided into two classes: ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) that mediate fast excitatory glutamate transmission, and metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), which are G-protein coupled receptors that mediate slower, modulatory glutamate transmission. Most iGluR antagonists, while showing some efficacy in animal models of addiction, exhibit serious side effects when tested in humans. mGluR ligands, on the other hand, which have been advanced to testing in clinical trials for various medical conditions, have demonstrated the ability to reduce drug reward, reinforcement, and relapse-like behaviors in animal studies. mGluR ligands that have been shown to be primarily effective are Group I (mGluR1 and mGluR5) negative allosteric modulators and Group II (mGluR2 and mGluR3) orthosteric presynaptic autoreceptor agonists. In this review, we will summarize findings from animal studies suggesting that these mGluR ligands may be of potential benefit in reducing on-going drug self-administration and may aid in the prevention of relapse. The neuroanatomical distribution of mGluR1, mGluR2/3, and mGluR5 receptors and the pharmacological properties of Group I negative allosteric modulators and Group II agonists will also be overviewed. Finally, we will discuss the current status of mGluR ligands in human clinical trials. PMID:19630739

  13. Cannabinoid ligand-receptor signaling in the mouse uterus.

    PubMed Central

    Das, S K; Paria, B C; Chakraborty, I; Dey, S K

    1995-01-01

    Using RNA (Northern) blot hybridization and reverse transcription-PCR, we demonstrate that the brain-type cannabinoid receptor (CB1-R) mRNA, but not the spleen-type cannabinoid receptor (CB2-R) mRNA, is expressed in the mouse uterus and that this organ has the capacity to synthesize the putative endogenous cannabinoid ligand, anandamide (arachidonylethanolamide). The psychoactive cannabinoid component of marijuana--delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)--or anandamide, but not the inactive and nonpsychoactive cannabidiol (CBD), inhibited forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP formation in the mouse uterus, which was prevented by pertussis toxin pretreatment. These results suggest that uterine CB1-R is coupled to inhibitory guanine nucleotide-binding protein and is biologically active. Autoradiographic studies identified ligand binding sites ([3H]anandamide) in the uterine epithelium and stromal cells, suggesting that these cells are perhaps the targets for cannabinoid action. Scatchard analysis of the binding of [3H]WIN 55212-2, another cannabinoid receptor ligand, showed a single class of high-affinity binding sites in the endometrium with an apparent Kd of 2.4 nM and Bmax of 5.4 x 10(9) molecules per mg of protein. The gene encoding lactoferrin is an estrogen-responsive gene in the mouse uterus that was rapidly and transiently up-regulated by THC, but not by CBD, in ovariectomized mice in the absence of ovarian steroids. This effect, unlike that of 17 beta-estradiol (E2), was not influenced by a pure antiestrogen, ICI 182780, suggesting that the THC-induced uterine lactoferrin gene expression does not involve estrogen receptors. We propose that the uterus is a new target for cannabinoid ligand-receptor signaling. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7753807

  14. Persistent Binding of Ligands to the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Bohonowych, Jessica E.; Denison, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that mediates many of the biological and toxic effects of halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (HAHs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and other structurally diverse ligands. While HAHs are several orders of magnitude more potent in producing AhR-dependent biochemical effects than PAHs or other AhR agonists, only the HAHs have been observed to produce AhR-dependent toxicity in vivo. Here we have characterized the dissociation of a prototypical HAH ligand ([3H] 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin [TCDD]) and PAH-like ligand ([3H] β-naphthoflavone [βNF]) from the guinea pig, hamster, mouse, and rat hepatic cytosolic AhR in order to elucidate the relationship between the apparent ligand-binding affinities and the divergent potency of these chemicals. Both compounds dissociated very slowly from the AhR with the amount of specific binding remaining at 96 h ranging from 53% to 70% for [3H]TCDD and 26% to 85% for [3H] βNF, depending upon the species examined. The rate of ligand dissociation was unaffected by protein concentration or incubation temperature. Preincubation of cytosol with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran, carbaryl, or primaquine, prior to the addition of [3H]TCDD, shifted the apparent IC50 of these compounds as competitive AhR ligands by ∼10- to 50-fold. Our results support the need for reassessment of previous AhR ligand-binding affinity calculations and competitive binding analysis since these measurements are not carried out at equilibrium binding conditions. Our studies suggest that AhR binding affinity/occupancy has little effect on the observed differences in the persistence of gene expression by HAHs and PAHs. PMID:17431010

  15. A synthetic chemomechanical machine driven by ligand-receptor bonding.

    PubMed

    Lavella, Gabriel J; Jadhav, Amol D; Maharbiz, Michel M

    2012-09-12

    The ability to create synthetic chemomechanical machines with engineered functionality promises large technological rewards. However, current efforts in molecular chemistry are restrained by the formidable challenges faced in molecular structure and function prediction. An alternative approach to engineering machines with tailorable chemomechanical functionality is to design Brownian ratchet devices using molecular assemblies. We demonstrate this through the creation of autonomous molecular machines that sense, mechanically react, and extract energy from ligand-receptor binding. We present a specific instantiation, measuring approximately 100 nm in length, which actuates upon detection of a streptavidin ligand. Machines were designed through the tailoring of energy landscapes on 3D DNA origami motifs. We also analyzed the response over a logarithmic concentration ratio (device:ligand) range from 1:10(1) to 1:10(5). PMID:22920279

  16. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ligands; a patent review (2006-2011)

    PubMed Central

    Gündisch, Daniela; Eibl, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), pentameric ligand-gated cation channels, are potential targets for the development of therapeutics for a variety of disease states. Areas covered This article is reviewing recent advances in the development of small molecule ligands for diverse nAChR subtypes and is a continuation of an earlier review in this journal. Expert opinion The development of nAChR ligands with preference for α4β2 or α7 subtypes for the treatment of CNS disorders are in the most advanced developmental stage. In addition, there is a fast growing interest to generate so-called PAMs, positive allosteric modulators, to influence the channels’ functionalities. PMID:22098319

  17. High-affinity benzodiazepine receptor ligands among benzodiazepines and betacarbolines with different intrinsic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Yliniemelae, A.; Gynther, J. ); Konschin, H.; Tylli, H. ); Rouvinen, J. )

    1989-01-01

    Structural and electrostatic features of diazepam, flumazenil, and methyl betacarboline-3-carboxylate (BCCM) have been investigated using the molecular superimposition method. These high-affinity benzodiazepine (BZ) receptor ligands are structurally unrelated and they have different intrinsic activity. These ligands are superimposed in such a way that common structural and electrostatic features essential for the high receptor binding affinity overlap. In addition to this binding pharmacophore, there are roughly three separate binding zones in the BZ receptor, one for each class of ligands. The intrinsic activity of BZ receptor ligands depends on the molecular structures and the way the ligand approaches the receptor.

  18. Peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) ligand cytotoxicity unrelated to PBR expression.

    PubMed

    Hans, Gregory; Wislet-Gendebien, Sabine; Lallemend, François; Robe, Pierre; Rogister, Bernard; Belachew, Shibeshih; Nguyen, Laurent; Malgrange, Brigitte; Moonen, Gustave; Rigo, Jean-Michel

    2005-03-01

    Some synthetic ligands of the peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR), an 18 kDa protein of the outer mitochondrial membrane, are cytotoxic for several tumor cell lines and arise as promising chemotherapeutic candidates. However, conflicting results were reported regarding the actual effect of these drugs on cellular survival ranging from protection to toxicity. Moreover, the concentrations needed to observe such a toxicity were usually high, far above the affinity range for their receptor, hence questioning its specificity. In the present study, we have shown that micromolar concentrations of FGIN-1-27 and Ro 5-4864, two chemically unrelated PBR ligands are toxic for both PBR-expressing SK-N-BE neuroblastoma cells and PBR-deficient Jurkat lymphoma cells. We have thereby demonstrated that the cytotoxicity of these drugs is unrelated to their PBR-binding activity. Moreover, Ro 5-4864-induced cell death differed strikingly between both cell types, being apoptotic in Jurkat cells while necrotic in SK-N-BE cells. Again, this did not seem to be related to PBR expression since Ro 5-4864-induced death of PBR-transfected Jurkat cells remained apoptotic. Taken together, our results show that PBR is unlikely to mediate all the effects of these PBR ligands. They however confirm that some of these ligands are very effective cytotoxic drugs towards various cancer cells, even for reputed chemoresistant tumors such as neuroblastoma, and, surprisingly, also for PBR-lacking tumor cells.

  19. Optimizing Ligand Efficiency of Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators (SARMs).

    PubMed

    Handlon, Anthony L; Schaller, Lee T; Leesnitzer, Lisa M; Merrihew, Raymond V; Poole, Chuck; Ulrich, John C; Wilson, Joseph W; Cadilla, Rodolfo; Turnbull, Philip

    2016-01-14

    A series of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) containing the 1-(trifluoromethyl)benzyl alcohol core have been optimized for androgen receptor (AR) potency and drug-like properties. We have taken advantage of the lipophilic ligand efficiency (LLE) parameter as a guide to interpret the effect of structural changes on AR activity. Over the course of optimization efforts the LLE increased over 3 log units leading to a SARM 43 with nanomolar potency, good aqueous kinetic solubility (>700 μM), and high oral bioavailability in rats (83%).

  20. Systematic Exploitation of Multiple Receptor Conformations for Virtual Ligand Screening

    PubMed Central

    Bottegoni, Giovanni; Rocchia, Walter; Rueda, Manuel; Abagyan, Ruben; Cavalli, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    The role of virtual ligand screening in modern drug discovery is to mine large chemical collections and to prioritize for experimental testing a comparatively small and diverse set of compounds with expected activity against a target. Several studies have pointed out that the performance of virtual ligand screening can be improved by taking into account receptor flexibility. Here, we systematically assess how multiple crystallographic receptor conformations, a powerful way of discretely representing protein plasticity, can be exploited in screening protocols to separate binders from non-binders. Our analyses encompass 36 targets of pharmaceutical relevance and are based on actual molecules with reported activity against those targets. The results suggest that an ensemble receptor-based protocol displays a stronger discriminating power between active and inactive molecules as compared to its standard single rigid receptor counterpart. Moreover, such a protocol can be engineered not only to enrich a higher number of active compounds, but also to enhance their chemical diversity. Finally, some clear indications can be gathered on how to select a subset of receptor conformations that is most likely to provide the best performance in a real life scenario. PMID:21625529

  1. 5D-QSAR for spirocyclic sigma1 receptor ligands by Quasar receptor surface modeling.

    PubMed

    Oberdorf, Christoph; Schmidt, Thomas J; Wünsch, Bernhard

    2010-07-01

    Based on a contiguous and structurally as well as biologically diverse set of 87 sigma(1) ligands, a 5D-QSAR study was conducted in which a quasi-atomistic receptor surface modeling approach (program package Quasar) was applied. The superposition of the ligands was performed with the tool Pharmacophore Elucidation (MOE-package), which takes all conformations of the ligands into account. This procedure led to four pharmacophoric structural elements with aromatic, hydrophobic, cationic and H-bond acceptor properties. Using the aligned structures a 3D-model of the ligand binding site of the sigma(1) receptor was obtained, whose general features are in good agreement with previous assumptions on the receptor structure, but revealed some novel insights since it represents the receptor surface in more detail. Thus, e.g., our model indicates the presence of an H-bond acceptor moiety in the binding site as counterpart to the ligands' cationic ammonium center, rather than a negatively charged carboxylate group. The presented QSAR model is statistically valid and represents the biological data of all tested compounds, including a test set of 21 ligands not used in the modeling process, with very good to excellent accuracy [q(2) (training set, n=66; leave 1/3 out) = 0.84, p(2) (test set, n=21)=0.64]. Moreover, the binding affinities of 13 further spirocyclic sigma(1) ligands were predicted with reasonable accuracy (mean deviation in pK(i) approximately 0.8). Thus, in addition to novel insights into the requirements for binding of spirocyclic piperidines to the sigma(1) receptor, the presented model can be used successfully in the rational design of new sigma(1) ligands.

  2. Steroid receptors and their ligands: Effects on male gamete functions

    SciTech Connect

    Aquila, Saveria; De Amicis, Francesca

    2014-11-01

    In recent years a new picture of human sperm biology is emerging. It is now widely recognized that sperm contain nuclear encoded mRNA, mitochondrial encoded RNA and different transcription factors including steroid receptors, while in the past sperm were considered incapable of transcription and translation. One of the main targets of steroid hormones and their receptors is reproductive function. Expression studies on Progesterone Receptor, estrogen receptor, androgen receptor and their specific ligands, demonstrate the presence of these systems in mature spermatozoa as surface but also as nuclear conventional receptors, suggesting that both systemic and local steroid hormones, through sperm receptors, may influence male reproduction. However, the relationship between the signaling events modulated by steroid hormones and sperm fertilization potential as well as the possible involvement of the specific receptors are still controversial issues. The main line of this review highlights the current research in human sperm biology examining new molecular systems of response to the hormones as well as specific regulatory pathways controlling sperm cell fate and biological functions. Most significant studies regarding the identification of steroid receptors are reported and the mechanistic insights relative to signaling pathways, together with the change in sperm metabolism energy influenced by steroid hormones are discussed.The reviewed evidences suggest important effects of Progesterone, Estrogen and Testosterone and their receptors on spermatozoa and implicate the involvement of both systemic and local steroid action in the regulation of male fertility potential. - Highlights: • One of the main targets of steroid hormones and their receptors is reproductive function. • Pg/PR co-work to stimulate enzymatic activities to sustain a capacitation process. • E2/ERs regulate sperm motility, capacitation and acrosome reaction and act as survival factors. • Androgens

  3. Structural and Functional Profiling of Environmental Ligands for Estrogen Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Delfosse, Vanessa; Grimaldi, Marina; Cavaillès, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Background: Individuals are exposed daily to environmental pollutants that may act as endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), causing a range of developmental, reproductive, metabolic, or neoplastic diseases. With their mostly hydrophobic pocket that serves as a docking site for endogenous and exogenous ligands, nuclear receptors (NRs) can be primary targets of small molecule environmental contaminants. However, most of these compounds are chemically unrelated to natural hormones, so their binding modes and associated hormonal activities are hardly predictable. Objectives: We conducted a correlative analysis of structural and functional data to gain insight into the mechanisms by which 12 members of representative families of pollutants bind to and activate the estrogen receptors ERα and ERβ. Methods: We used a battery of biochemical, structural, biophysical, and cell-based approaches to characterize the interaction between ERs and their environmental ligands. Results: Our study revealed that the chemically diverse compounds bound to ERs via varied sets of protein–ligand interactions, reflecting their differential activities, binding affinities, and specificities. We observed xenoestrogens binding to both ERs—with affinities ranging from subnanomolar to micromolar values—and acting in a subtype-dependent fashion as full agonists or partial agonists/antagonists by using different combinations of the activation functions 1 and 2 of ERα and ERβ. Conclusions: The precise characterization of the interactions between major environmental pollutants and two of their primary biological targets provides rational guidelines for the design of safer chemicals, and will increase the accuracy and usefulness of structure-based computational methods, allowing for activity prediction of chemicals in risk assessment. Citation: Delfosse V, Grimaldi M, Cavaillès V, Balaguer P, Bourguet W. 2014. Structural and functional profiling of environmental ligands for estrogen

  4. Feedback, receptor clustering, and receptor restriction to single cells yield large Turing spaces for ligand-receptor-based Turing models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurics, Tamás; Menshykau, Denis; Iber, Dagmar

    2014-08-01

    Turing mechanisms can yield a large variety of patterns from noisy, homogenous initial conditions and have been proposed as patterning mechanism for many developmental processes. However, the molecular components that give rise to Turing patterns have remained elusive, and the small size of the parameter space that permits Turing patterns to emerge makes it difficult to explain how Turing patterns could evolve. We have recently shown that Turing patterns can be obtained with a single ligand if the ligand-receptor interaction is taken into account. Here we show that the general properties of ligand-receptor systems result in very large Turing spaces. Thus, the restriction of receptors to single cells, negative feedbacks, regulatory interactions among different ligand-receptor systems, and the clustering of receptors on the cell surface all greatly enlarge the Turing space. We further show that the feedbacks that occur in the FGF10-SHH network that controls lung branching morphogenesis are sufficient to result in large Turing spaces. We conclude that the cellular restriction of receptors provides a mechanism to sufficiently increase the size of the Turing space to make the evolution of Turing patterns likely. Additional feedbacks may then have further enlarged the Turing space. Given their robustness and flexibility, we propose that receptor-ligand-based Turing mechanisms present a general mechanism for patterning in biology.

  5. Feedback, receptor clustering, and receptor restriction to single cells yield large Turing spaces for ligand-receptor-based Turing models.

    PubMed

    Kurics, Tamás; Menshykau, Denis; Iber, Dagmar

    2014-08-01

    Turing mechanisms can yield a large variety of patterns from noisy, homogenous initial conditions and have been proposed as patterning mechanism for many developmental processes. However, the molecular components that give rise to Turing patterns have remained elusive, and the small size of the parameter space that permits Turing patterns to emerge makes it difficult to explain how Turing patterns could evolve. We have recently shown that Turing patterns can be obtained with a single ligand if the ligand-receptor interaction is taken into account. Here we show that the general properties of ligand-receptor systems result in very large Turing spaces. Thus, the restriction of receptors to single cells, negative feedbacks, regulatory interactions among different ligand-receptor systems, and the clustering of receptors on the cell surface all greatly enlarge the Turing space. We further show that the feedbacks that occur in the FGF10-SHH network that controls lung branching morphogenesis are sufficient to result in large Turing spaces. We conclude that the cellular restriction of receptors provides a mechanism to sufficiently increase the size of the Turing space to make the evolution of Turing patterns likely. Additional feedbacks may then have further enlarged the Turing space. Given their robustness and flexibility, we propose that receptor-ligand-based Turing mechanisms present a general mechanism for patterning in biology. PMID:25215767

  6. Lighting up G protein-coupled purinergic receptors with engineered fluorescent ligands

    PubMed Central

    Ciruela, Francisco; Fernández-Dueñas, Víctor; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2015-01-01

    The use of G protein-coupled receptors fluorescent ligands is undergoing continuous expansion. In line with this, fluorescent agonists and antagonists of high affinity for G protein-coupled adenosine and P2Y receptors have been shown to be useful pharmacological probe compounds. Fluorescent ligands for A1R, A2AR, and A3R (adenosine receptors) and P2Y2R, P2Y4R, P2Y6R, and P2Y14R (nucleotide receptors) have been reported. Such ligands have been successfully applied to drug discovery and to GPCR characterization by flow cytometry, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, fluorescence microscopy, fluorescence polarization, fluorescence resonance energy transfer and scanning confocal microscopy. Here we summarize recently reported and readily available representative fluorescent ligands of purinergic receptors. In addition, we pay special attention on the use of this family of fluorescent ligands revealing two main aspects of purinergic receptor biology, namely ligand binding and receptor oligomerization. PMID:25890205

  7. Modulation of the vagal bradycardia evoked by stimulation of upper airway receptors by central 5-HT1 receptors in anaesthetized rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Dando, Simon B; Skinner, Matthew R; Jordan, David; Ramage, Andrew G

    1998-01-01

    The effects of central application of 5-HT1A and 5-HT1B/1D receptor ligands on the reflex bradycardia, apnoea, renal sympathoexcitation and pressor response evoked by stimulating upper airway receptors with smoke in atenolol-pretreated anaesthetized rabbits were studied.Intracisternal administration of the 5-HT1A receptor antagonists WAY-100635 (100 μg kg−1) and (−)pindolol (100 μg kg−1) significantly reduced the smoke-induced bradycardia, attenuated the pressor response and in the case of (−)pindolol, sympathetic nerve activity. The same dose of WAY-100635 i.v. was without effect.Buspirone (200 μg kg−1, i.c.) potentiated the reflex bradycardia. This action was prevented if the animals were pretreated with WAY-100635 (100 μg kg−1, i.v.)(+)8-OH-DPAT (25 μg kg−1, i.c.) attenuated the evoked bradycardia, pressor response, apnoea and renal sympathoexcitation. The attenuation of the apnoea and renal sympathoexcitation, but not the bradycardia or pressor response was prevented in animals pretreated with WAY-100635 (100 μg kg−1, i.v.). The attenuation of the reflex bradycardia and the reduction in the renal sympathoexcitation were reduced by pretreatment with the 5-HT1B/1D receptor antagonist GR127935 (100 μg kg−1, i.v.).In WAY-100635 (100 μg kg−1, i.v.) pretreated animals, sumatriptan (a 5-HT1B/1D receptor agonist) reduced the reflex bradycardia and the pressor response. The 5-HT1B/1D receptor antagonist GR127935 (20 μg kg−1, i.c. or 100 μg kg−1, i.v.) had no effect on the reflex responses.In conclusion, the present data are consistent with the hypothesis that activation of central 5-HT1A receptors potentiate whilst activation of 5-HT1B/1D receptors attenuate the reflex activation of cardiac preganglionic vagal motoneurones evoked by stimulation of upper airway receptors with smoke in rabbits. PMID:9786516

  8. Role of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases and Their Ligands in Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco-García, Estefanía; Saceda, Miguel; Martínez-Lacaci, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is the most frequent, aggressive and fatal type of brain tumor. Glioblastomas are characterized by their infiltrating nature, high proliferation rate and resistance to chemotherapy and radiation. Recently, oncologic therapy experienced a rapid evolution towards “targeted therapy,” which is the employment of drugs directed against particular targets that play essential roles in proliferation, survival and invasiveness of cancer cells. A number of molecules involved in signal transduction pathways are used as molecular targets for the treatment of various tumors. In fact, inhibitors of these molecules have already entered the clinic or are undergoing clinical trials. Cellular receptors are clear examples of such targets and in the case of glioblastoma multiforme, some of these receptors and their ligands have become relevant. In this review, the importance of glioblastoma multiforme in signaling pathways initiated by extracellular tyrosine kinase receptors such as EGFR, PDGFR and IGF-1R will be discussed. We will describe their ligands, family members, structure, activation mechanism, downstream molecules, as well as the interaction among these pathways. Lastly, we will provide an up-to-date review of the current targeted therapies in cancer, in particular glioblastoma that employ inhibitors of these pathways and their benefits. PMID:24709958

  9. Somatostatin receptor ligands and resistance to treatment in pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Cuevas-Ramos, Daniel; Fleseriu, Maria

    2014-06-01

    Somatostatin (SST), an inhibitory polypeptide with two biologically active forms SST14 and SST28, inhibits GH, prolactin (PRL), TSH, and ACTH secretion in the anterior pituitary gland. SST also has an antiproliferative effect inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Such actions are mediated through five G-protein-coupled somatostatin receptors (SSTR): SSTR1-SSTR5. In GH-secreting adenomas, SSTR2 expression predominates, and somatostatin receptor ligands (SRLs; octreotide and lanreotide) directed to SSTR2 are presently the mainstays of medical therapy. However, about half of patients show incomplete biochemical remission, but the definition of resistance per se remains controversial. We summarize here the determinants of SRL resistance in acromegaly patients, including clinical, imaging features as well as molecular (mutations, SSTR variants, and polymorphisms), and histopathological (granulation pattern, and proteins and receptor expression) predictors. The role of SSTR5 may explain the partial responsiveness to SRLs in patients with adequate SSTR2 density in the cell membrane. In patients with ACTH-secreting pituitary adenomas, i.e. Cushing's disease (CD), SSTR5 is the most abundant receptor expressed and tumors show low SSTR2 density due to hypercortisolism-induced SSTR2 down-regulation. Clinical studies with pasireotide, a multireceptor-targeted SRL with increased SSTR5 activity, lead to approval of pasireotide for treatment of patients with CD. Other SRL delivery modes (oral octreotide), multireceptor-targeted SRL (somatoprim) or chimeric compounds targeting dopamine D2 receptors and SSTR2 (dopastatin), are briefly discussed. PMID:24647046

  10. Characterization of three non-peptide endothelin receptor ligands using human cloned ETA and ETB receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Buchan, K. W.; Alldus, C.; Christodoulou, C.; Clark, K. L.; Dykes, C. W.; Sumner, M. J.; Wallace, D. M.; White, D. G.; Watts, I. S.

    1994-01-01

    1. A number of putative endothelin (ET) receptor ligands were synthesized with a view to assessing their relative affinity for human recombinant ET receptors. 2. Human (h) and endothelin ETA and ETB receptor open reading frames were cloned by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction into the mammalian expression vector pcDNA1 and stable cell lines were created by transfection of Chinese hamster ovary cells. 3. Scatchard analyses of saturation isotherms for the specific binding of [125I]-endothelin-1 ([125I]-ET-1) to membranes, prepared from Chinese hamster ovary cells transfected with hETA or hETB receptors, yielded values for equilibrium dissociation constants (Kd) of 20.5 +/- 1.8 pM and 25.5 +/- 5.5 pM, respectively. Hill coefficients did not differ significantly from unity, suggesting binding to homogeneous, non-interacting receptor populations. 4. Pharmacological characterization of the transfected hETA and hETB receptors was undertaken by measuring the relative abilities of ETA and ETB receptor-selective peptide ligands to inhibit binding of [125I]ET-1. For interaction with hETA receptors, the relative order of potency was ET-1 > ET-3 = FR139317 = BQ123 >[Ala1,3,11,15]-ET-1 = sarafotoxin S6c (S6c). In contrast, the relative order of potency, at hETB receptors, was ET-1 = ET-3 = [Ala1,3,11,15]-ET-1 = S6c >> FR139317 = BQ123. 5. The novel non-peptide ligands, Ro 46-2005, SB 209670 and BMS 182874, were found to inhibit [125I]-ET-1 binding to human recombinant ETA and ETB receptors.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7952888

  11. Analysis of Edg-Like LPA Receptor-Ligand Interactions.

    PubMed

    Balogh, Balazs; Pazmany, Tamas; Matyus, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The phospholipid derivative lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) serves as a signalling molecule through the activation of LPA receptors, which belong to the G-protein-coupled receptors. From a pharmacological point of view, the ('EDG-like') LPA1-3 receptors have attracted much attention, therefore we have also been focusing in our study on these subtypes. The LPA1receptors are widely expressed in the human body; interestingly, LPA1 might have a role in the pathomechanism of obesity. In order to recognize key structural features of the molecular interactions of human LPA1with its agonists, we built up the 3D structure of the LPA1 through homology modeling. Next, LPA1 agonists and antagonists were docked into the model. The mode of binding and the interactions between ligands and key amino acids (R3.28 and Q3.29) were consistent with mutagenesis assays and previously published models, indicating that this model is able to discriminate high-affinity compounds and may be useful for the development of novel agonists of LPA1. Homology models were also constructed for LPA2 and LPA3. All available agonists with published EC50 values, antagonists with IC50 values and compounds with Ki values for either of LPA1, LPA2 or LPA3 were collected from the ChEMBL database and were docked into the corresponding model.Ourmodels for the LPA1-3 receptors can discriminate high-affinity compounds identified in silico HTS studies and may be useful for the development of novel agonistsof LPA receptors. With a better understanding of the differences between LPA1-3 receptors new, selective agonists and antagonist could be designed, which could be used in the therapy of various diseases with a better side-effect profile. PMID:25686617

  12. Ligand-binding assays for cyanobacterial neurotoxins targeting cholinergic receptors.

    PubMed

    Aráoz, Rómulo; Vilariño, Natalia; Botana, Luis M; Molgó, Jordi

    2010-07-01

    Toxic cyanobacterial blooms are a threat to public health because of the capacity of some cyanobacterial species to produce potent hepatotoxins and neurotoxins. Cyanobacterial neurotoxins are involved in the rapid death of wild and domestic animals by targeting voltage gated sodium channels and cholinergic synapses, including the neuromuscular junction. Anatoxin-a and its methylene homologue homoanatoxin-a are potent agonists of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Since the structural determination of anatoxin-a, several mass spectrometry-based methods have been developed for detection of anatoxin-a and, later, homoanatoxin-a. Mass spectrometry-based techniques provide accuracy, precision, selectivity, sensitivity, reproducibility, adequate limit of detection, and structural and quantitative information for analyses of cyanobacterial anatoxins from cultured and environmental cyanobacterial samples. However, these physicochemical techniques will only detect known toxins for which toxin standards are commercially available, and they require highly specialized laboratory personnel and expensive equipment. Receptor-based assays are functional methods that are based on the mechanism of action of a class of toxins and are thus, suitable tools for survey of freshwater reservoirs for cyanobacterial anatoxins. The competition between cyanobacterial anatoxins and a labelled ligand for binding to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors is measured radioactively or non-radioactively providing high-throughput screening formats for routine detection of this class of neurotoxins. The mouse bioassay is the method of choice for marine toxin monitoring, but has to be replaced by fully validated functional methods. In this paper we review the ligand-binding assays developed for detection of cyanobacterial and algal neurotoxins targeting the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and for high-throughput screening of novel nicotinic agents.

  13. Identification of Putative Receptors for the Novel Adipokine CTRP3 Using Ligand-Receptor Capture Technology

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying; Ozment, Tammy; Wright, Gary L.

    2016-01-01

    C1q TNF Related Protein 3 (CTRP3) is a member of a family of secreted proteins that exert a multitude of biological effects. Our initial work identified CTRP3’s promise as an effective treatment for Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Specifically, we demonstrated that mice fed a high fat diet failed to develop NAFLD when treated with CTRP3. The purpose of this current project is to identify putative receptors which mediate the hepatic actions of CTRP3. Methods We used Ligand-receptor glycocapture technology with TriCEPS™-based ligand-receptor capture (LRC-TriCEPS; Dualsystems Biotech AG). The LRC-TriCEPS experiment with CTRP3-FLAG protein as ligand and insulin as a control ligand was performed on the H4IIE rat hepatoma cell line. Results Initial analysis demonstrated efficient coupling of TriCEPS to CTRP3. Further, flow cytometry analysis (FACS) demonstrated successful oxidation and crosslinking of CTRP3-TriCEPS and Insulin-TriCEPS complexes to cell surface glycans. Demonstrating the utility of TriCEPS under these conditions, the insulin receptor was identified in the control dataset. In the CTRP3 treated cells a total enrichment of 261 peptides was observed. From these experiments 5 putative receptors for CTRP3 were identified with two reaching statistically significance: Lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP-1) and Lysosome membrane protein 2 (LIMP II). Follow-up Co-immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed the association between LAMP1 and CTRP3 and further testing using a polyclonal antibody to block potential binding sites of LAMP1 prevented CTRP3 binding to the cells. Conclusion The LRC-TriCEPS methodology was successful in identifying potential novel receptors for CTRP3. Relevance The identification of the receptors for CTRP3 are important prerequisites for the development of small molecule drug candidates, of which none currently exist, for the treatment NAFLD. PMID:27727322

  14. Identifying ligand-specific signalling within biased responses: focus on δ opioid receptor ligands

    PubMed Central

    Charfi, I; Audet, N; Bagheri Tudashki, H; Pineyro, G

    2015-01-01

    Opioids activate GPCRs to produce powerful analgesic actions but at the same time induce side effects and generate tolerance, which restrict their clinical use. Reducing this undesired response profile has remained a major goal of opioid research and the notion of ‘biased agonism’ is raising increasing interest as a means of separating therapeutic responses from unwanted side effects. However, to fully exploit this opportunity, it is necessary to confidently identify biased signals and evaluate which type of bias may support analgesia and which may lead to undesired effects. The development of new computational tools has made it possible to quantify ligand-dependent signalling and discriminate this component from confounders that may also yield biased responses. Here, we analyse different approaches to identify and quantify ligand-dependent bias and review different types of confounders. Focus is on δ opioid receptor ligands, which are currently viewed as promising agents for chronic pain management. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2 PMID:24665881

  15. Ligand and receptor dynamics contribute to the mechanism of graded PPARγ agonism

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Travis S.; Chalmers, Michael J.; Novick, Scott; Kuruvilla, Dana S.; Chang, Mi Ra; Kamenecka, Theodore M.; Rance, Mark; Johnson, Bruce A.; Burris, Thomas P.; Griffin, Patrick R.; Kojetin, Douglas J.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Ligand binding to proteins is not a static process, but rather involves a number of complex dynamic transitions. A flexible ligand can change conformation upon binding its target. The conformation and dynamics of a protein can change to facilitate ligand binding. The conformation of the ligand, however, is generally presumed to have one primary binding mode, shifting the protein conformational ensemble from one state to another. We report solution NMR studies that reveal peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) modulators can sample multiple binding modes manifesting in multiple receptor conformations in slow conformational exchange. Our NMR, hydrogen/deuterium exchange and docking studies reveal that ligand-induced receptor stabilization and binding mode occupancy correlate with the graded agonist response of the ligand. Our results suggest that ligand and receptor dynamics affect the graded transcriptional output of PPARγ modulators. PMID:22244763

  16. Fcγ Receptors and Ligands and Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tanigaki, Keiji; Sundgren, Nathan; Khera, Amit; Vongpatanasin, Wanpen; Mineo, Chieko; Shaul, Philip W.

    2015-01-01

    Fcγ receptors (FcγR) classically modulate intracellular signaling upon binding of the Fc region of IgG in immune response cells. How FcγR and their ligands impact cardiovascular health and disease has recently been interrogated in both preclinical and clinical studies. The stimulation of activating FcγR in endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells and monocytes/macrophages causes a variety of cellular responses that may contribute to vascular disease pathogenesis. Stimulation of the lone inhibitory FγcR, FcγRIIB, also has adverse consequences in endothelial cells, antagonizing NO production and reparative mechanisms. In preclinical disease models, activating FcγR promote atherosclerosis whereas FcγRIIB is protective, and activating FcγR also enhance thrombotic and non-thrombotic vascular occlusion. The FcγR ligand C-reactive protein (CRP) has undergone intense study. Although in rodents CRP does not impact atherosclerosis, it causes hypertension and insulin resistance and worsens myocardial infarction. Massive data has accumulated indicating an association between increases in circulating CRP and coronary heart disease in humans. However, Mendelian randomization studies reveal that CRP is not likely a disease mediator. CRP genetics and hypertension warrants further investigation. Studies to date of genetic variants of activating FcγR are insufficient to implicate the receptors in coronary heart disease pathogenesis in humans. However, a link between FcγRIIB and human hypertension may be emerging. Further knowledge of the vascular biology of FcγR and their ligands will potentially enhance our understanding of cardiovascular disorders, particularly in patients whose greater predisposition for disease is not explained by traditional risk factors, such as individuals with autoimmune disorders. PMID:25593280

  17. Purine derivatives as ligands for A3 adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Bhalchandra V; Jacobson, Kenneth A

    2005-01-01

    Selective agonists and antagonists for A3 adenosine receptors (ARs) are being explored for the treatment of a variety of disorders, including brain and heart ischemic conditions, cancer, and rheumatoid arthritis. This review covers both the structure activity relationships of nucleoside agonist ligands and selected antagonists acting at this receptor and the routes of synthesis. Highly selective agonists have been designed, using both empirical approaches and a semi-rational approach based on molecular modeling. The prototypical A3 agonists IB-MECA 10 and the more receptor-subtype-selective Cl-IB-MECA 11, both of which have affinity in binding to the receptor of approximately 1 nM, have been used widely as pharmacological probes in the elucidation of the physiological role of this receptor. In addition to the exploration of the effects of structural modification of the adenine and ribose moieties on A3AR affinity, the effects of these structural changes on the intrinsic efficacy have also been studied in a systematic fashion. Key structural features determining A3AR interaction include the N6-benzyl group, 2-position substitution such as halo, substitution of ribose (e.g., the (N)-methanocarba ring system, various 2'- and 3'-substitutions and 4'-thio substitution of oxygen). Conformational studies of the ribose moiety and its equivalents indicate that the ring oxygen is not required and the North (N) ring conformation is preferred in binding to the A3AR. Using these observations, a series of ring constrained (N)-methanocarba 5'-uronamide derivatives was recently reported to be highly selective A3AR agonists, the most notable amongst them was MRS3558 113 having a Ki value in binding to the human A3 receptor of 0.3 nM. PMID:16305531

  18. In vitro screening strategies for nicotinic receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Dunlop, John; Roncarati, Renza; Jow, Brian; Bothmann, Hendrick; Lock, Tim; Kowal, Dianne; Bowlby, Mark; Terstappen, Georg C

    2007-10-15

    A common historical strategy to the discovery of nicotinic receptor ligands has involved the use of radioligand-binding assays for ligand identification in combination with two-electrode voltage clamp in Xenopus oocytes for electrophysiological characterization. More recently, higher-throughput methodologies have replaced these approaches to accommodate screening of large compound libraries and to provide increased capacity for electrophysiological profiling in mammalian cell lines. We, and others, have implemented cell-based screening assays using the fluorometric imaging plate reader (FLIPR) for primary and lead optimization screening of nicotinic receptor agonists and positive allosteric modulators (PAMs). Using GH4C1 cells expressing the rat alpha7 nicotinic receptor, both acetylcholine and nicotine produced concentration-dependent elevations of intracellular calcium with EC(50) values of 5.5 and 1.6 microM, respectively. PAM activity was robustly detected using the FLIPR assay; for example, the known alpha7 receptor PAM 5-hydroxyindole failed to directly activate the receptor but produced a leftward shift of the nicotine concentration-response curve in combination with a potentiation of the maximum evoked response to nicotine. Electrophysiological confirmation of agonist activity was achieved using the Dynaflow rapid perfusion system and patch clamp in the same GH4C1 cell expression system. Estimated EC(50) values for acetylcholine-evoked currents in GH4C1/alpha7 cells were 55 and 576 microM for area-under-the-curve (AUC) and maximum peak height calculations, respectively. Similarly, PAM activity was confirmed using electrophysiological recordings while also allowing for the mechanistic discrimination of compounds, not possible using the FLIPR assay. Specifically, PAMs capable of slowing the rapid desensitization of alpha7 receptors to different extents were discernable in these studies. Further improvements in the capacity to screen compounds using

  19. Biased ligands at G-protein-coupled receptors: promise and progress.

    PubMed

    Violin, Jonathan D; Crombie, Aimee L; Soergel, David G; Lark, Michael W

    2014-07-01

    Drug discovery targeting G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is no longer limited to seeking agonists or antagonists to stimulate or block cellular responses associated with a particular receptor. GPCRs are now known to support a diversity of pharmacological profiles, a concept broadly referred to as functional selectivity. In particular, the concept of ligand bias, whereby a ligand stabilizes subsets of receptor conformations to engender novel pharmacological profiles, has recently gained increasing prominence. This review discusses how biased ligands may deliver safer, better tolerated, and more efficacious drugs, and highlights several biased ligands that are in clinical development. Biased ligands targeting the angiotensin II type 1 receptor and the μ opioid receptor illustrate the translation of the biased ligand concept from basic biology to clinical drug development.

  20. Biased ligands at G-protein-coupled receptors: promise and progress.

    PubMed

    Violin, Jonathan D; Crombie, Aimee L; Soergel, David G; Lark, Michael W

    2014-07-01

    Drug discovery targeting G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is no longer limited to seeking agonists or antagonists to stimulate or block cellular responses associated with a particular receptor. GPCRs are now known to support a diversity of pharmacological profiles, a concept broadly referred to as functional selectivity. In particular, the concept of ligand bias, whereby a ligand stabilizes subsets of receptor conformations to engender novel pharmacological profiles, has recently gained increasing prominence. This review discusses how biased ligands may deliver safer, better tolerated, and more efficacious drugs, and highlights several biased ligands that are in clinical development. Biased ligands targeting the angiotensin II type 1 receptor and the μ opioid receptor illustrate the translation of the biased ligand concept from basic biology to clinical drug development. PMID:24878326

  1. Ligand-receptor interactions in live cells by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pramanik, Aladdin

    2004-04-01

    Receptor binding studies most often require the use of radioactively labeled ligands. In certain cases, the numbers of receptors are few per cell and no specific binding is detected because of a high background. Specific interactions between certain ligands (e.g. peptides, hormones, natural products) and their receptors are, therefore, often overlooked by the conventional binding technique. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) allows detection of the interaction of ligands with receptors in their native environment in live cells in a tiny confocal volume element (0.2 fl) at single-molecule detection sensitivity. This technique permits the identification of receptors which were not possible before to detect by isotope labeling. The beauty of the FCS technique is that there is no need for separating an unbound ligand from a bound one to calculate the receptor bound and free ligand fractions. This review will show FCS as a sensitive and a rapid technique to study ligand-receptor interaction in live cells and will demonstrate that the FCS-analysis of ligand-receptor interactions in live cells fulfils all the criteria of a ligand binding to its receptor i.e. it is able to provide information on the affinity and specificity of a ligand, binding constant, association and dissociation rate constants as well as the number and mobility of receptors carrying a fluorescently labeled ligand. This review is of pharmaceutical significance since it will provide insights on how FCS can be used as a rapid technique for studying ligand-receptor interactions in cell cultures, which is one step forward towards a high throughput drug screening in cell cultures. PMID:15078155

  2. Three's company: two or more unrelated receptors pair with the same ligand.

    PubMed

    Ben-Shlomo, Izhar; Hsueh, Aaron J W

    2005-05-01

    Intercellular communication relies on signal transduction mediated by extracellular ligands and their receptors. Although the ligand-receptor interaction is usually a two-player event, there are selective examples of one polypeptide ligand interacting with more than one phylogenetically unrelated receptor. Likewise, a few receptors interact with more than one polypeptide ligand, and sometimes with more than one coreceptor, likely through an interlocking of unique protein domains. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that for certain triumvirates, the matching events could have taken place at different evolutionary times. In contrast to a few polypeptide ligands interacting with more than one receptor, we found that many small nonpeptide ligands have been paired with two or more plasma membrane receptors, nuclear receptors, or channels. The observation that many small ligands are paired with more than one receptor type highlights the utilitarian use of a limited number of cellular components during metazoan evolution. These conserved ligands are ubiquitous cell metabolites likely favored by natural selection to establish novel regulatory networks. They likely possess structural features useful for designing agonistic and antagonistic drugs to target diverse receptors.

  3. A structural chemogenomics analysis of aminergic GPCRs: lessons for histamine receptor ligand design

    PubMed Central

    Kooistra, A J; Kuhne, S; de Esch, I J P; Leurs, R; de Graaf, C

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Chemogenomics focuses on the discovery of new connections between chemical and biological space leading to the discovery of new protein targets and biologically active molecules. G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a particularly interesting protein family for chemogenomics studies because there is an overwhelming amount of ligand binding affinity data available. The increasing number of aminergic GPCR crystal structures now for the first time allows the integration of chemogenomics studies with high-resolution structural analyses of GPCR-ligand complexes. Experimental Approach In this study, we have combined ligand affinity data, receptor mutagenesis studies, and amino acid sequence analyses to high-resolution structural analyses of (hist)aminergic GPCR-ligand interactions. This integrated structural chemogenomics analysis is used to more accurately describe the molecular and structural determinants of ligand affinity and selectivity in different key binding regions of the crystallized aminergic GPCRs, and histamine receptors in particular. Key Results Our investigations highlight interesting correlations and differences between ligand similarity and ligand binding site similarity of different aminergic receptors. Apparent discrepancies can be explained by combining detailed analysis of crystallized or predicted protein-ligand binding modes, receptor mutation studies, and ligand structure-selectivity relationships that identify local differences in essential pharmacophore features in the ligand binding sites of different receptors. Conclusions and Implications We have performed structural chemogenomics studies that identify links between (hist)aminergic receptor ligands and their binding sites and binding modes. This knowledge can be used to identify structure-selectivity relationships that increase our understanding of ligand binding to (hist)aminergic receptors and hence can be used in future GPCR ligand discovery and design. Linked

  4. Transport regulation of two-dimensional receptor-ligand association.

    PubMed

    Ju, Lining; Qian, Jin; Zhu, Cheng

    2015-04-01

    The impact of flow disturbances on platelet adhesion is complex and incompletely understood. At the molecular scale, platelet glycoprotein Ibα (GPIbα) must associate with the von Willebrand factor A1 domain (VWF-A1) with a rapid on-rate under high hemodynamic forces, as occurs in arterial thrombosis, where various transport mechanisms are at work. Here, we theoretically modeled the coupled transport-reaction process of the two-dimensional (2D) receptor-ligand association kinetics in a biomembrane force probe to explicitly account for the effects of molecular length, confinement stiffness, medium viscosity, surface curvature, and separation distance. We experimentally verified the theoretical approach by visualizing association and dissociation of individual VWF-A1-GPIbα bonds in a real-time thermal fluctuation assay. The apparent on-rate, reciprocal of the average time intervals between sequential bonds, decreased with the increasing gap distance between A1- and GPIbα-bearing surfaces with an 80-nm threshold (beyond which bond formation became prohibitive) identified as the combined contour length of the receptor and ligand molecules. The biomembrane force probe spring constant and diffusivity of the protein-bearing beads also significantly influenced the apparent on-rate, in accordance with the proposed transport mechanisms. The global agreement between the experimental data and the model predictions supports the hypothesis that receptor-ligand association behaves distinctly in the transport- and reaction-limited scenarios. To our knowledge, our results represent the first detailed quantification of physical regulation of the 2D on-rate that allows platelets to sense and respond to local changes in their hemodynamic environment. In addition, they provide an approach for determining the intrinsic kinetic parameters that employs simultaneous experimental measurements and theoretical modeling of bond association in a single assay. The 2D intrinsic forward rate

  5. Transport Regulation of Two-Dimensional Receptor-Ligand Association

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Lining; Qian, Jin; Zhu, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    The impact of flow disturbances on platelet adhesion is complex and incompletely understood. At the molecular scale, platelet glycoprotein Ibα (GPIbα) must associate with the von Willebrand factor A1 domain (VWF-A1) with a rapid on-rate under high hemodynamic forces, as occurs in arterial thrombosis, where various transport mechanisms are at work. Here, we theoretically modeled the coupled transport-reaction process of the two-dimensional (2D) receptor-ligand association kinetics in a biomembrane force probe to explicitly account for the effects of molecular length, confinement stiffness, medium viscosity, surface curvature, and separation distance. We experimentally verified the theoretical approach by visualizing association and dissociation of individual VWF-A1-GPIbα bonds in a real-time thermal fluctuation assay. The apparent on-rate, reciprocal of the average time intervals between sequential bonds, decreased with the increasing gap distance between A1- and GPIbα-bearing surfaces with an 80-nm threshold (beyond which bond formation became prohibitive) identified as the combined contour length of the receptor and ligand molecules. The biomembrane force probe spring constant and diffusivity of the protein-bearing beads also significantly influenced the apparent on-rate, in accordance with the proposed transport mechanisms. The global agreement between the experimental data and the model predictions supports the hypothesis that receptor-ligand association behaves distinctly in the transport- and reaction-limited scenarios. To our knowledge, our results represent the first detailed quantification of physical regulation of the 2D on-rate that allows platelets to sense and respond to local changes in their hemodynamic environment. In addition, they provide an approach for determining the intrinsic kinetic parameters that employs simultaneous experimental measurements and theoretical modeling of bond association in a single assay. The 2D intrinsic forward rate

  6. Interactions of (+)- and (-)-8- and 7-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin at human (h)D3, hD2 and h serotonin1A receptors and their modulation of the activity of serotoninergic and dopaminergic neurones in rats.

    PubMed

    Lejeune, F; Newman-Tancredi, A; Audinot, V; Millan, M J

    1997-03-01

    The aminotetralins, 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) and 7-OH-DPAT behave as preferential agonists at serotonin (5-HT)1A and dopamine D3 and D2 receptors, respectively. In our study, we evaluated the influence of their (+)- and (-) isomers on the electrical activity of serotoninergic neurones of the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), which bear 5-HT1A autoreceptors, and of dopaminergic neurones of the ventral tegmental area (VTA), which possess inhibitory D3 and D2 receptors. These actions were compared to their in vitro interactions with cloned, human (h)5-HT1A, hD3 and hD2 receptors. In binding studies, racemic 8-OH-DPAT showed 100-fold selectivity for h5-HT1A vs. hD2 and hD3 receptors and there was little difference between its (+)- and (-)-isomers either in terms of their potency at 5-HT1A receptors or of their selectivity at 5-HT1A vs hD2/hD3 sites. Nevertheless, the (+)-isomer was markedly more efficacious than its (-)-counterpart in stimulating the binding of guanosine 5'-O-(3-[35S]thiotriphosphate) ([35S]-GTPgammaS) at h5-HT1A receptors, a measure of coupling to G-proteins; 90 vs. 57% maximal stimulation respectively, relative to 5-HT = 100%. Also the (+)-isomer was ca. 3-fold more potent than the (-)-isomer in inhibiting the firing rate of DRN neurones. These actions were abolished by the 5-HT1A antagonist, (-)-tertatolol, but unaffected by the hD2/hD3 antagonist, haloperidol. Whereas (+)-8-OH-DPAT stimulated VTA neurone firing with a bell-shaped dose response curve, the (-)-isomer only inhibited VTA firing. The (+)-isomer-induced stimulation was blocked by (-)-tertatolol but not haloperidol, whereas the (-)-isomer-induced inhibition was abolished by haloperidol and unaffected by (-)-tertatolol. In contrast to 8-OH-DPAT, the (+)- and (-)isomers of 7-OH-DPAT showed marked stereoselectivity inasmuch as the latter bound with 20-fold less potency than the former at hD3 and, at higher concentrations, hD2 receptors. Correspondingly, (+)-7-OH-DPAT was

  7. Quantifying the rebinding effect in multivalent chemical ligand-receptor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Marcus; Bujotzek, Alexander; Haag, Rainer

    2012-08-01

    Multivalent ligand-receptor systems often show an enhancement in binding compared to the constituent monovalent systems. This "cooperativity effect" is often attributed to the favorable spatial preorganisation of the ligands by the connecting spacer that leads to a reduction of entropy loss at ligand binding. A different factor that has been proposed to contribute to the cooperativity effect is "rebinding": As soon as a single ligand-receptor complex dissociates, the presence of another ligand "on coat-tails" will increase the probability of another binding event, which in turn will drive the system to a state where all ligands are bound. In this article, we derive a first quantitative description of the rebinding effect. In order to model the inherent memory effect of a spacer-connected system, we pursue a mathematical approach based on Markov state models and conformation dynamics. The theoretical investigations are illustrated by studying different prototypic ligand-receptor systems.

  8. Functional phylogenetics reveals contributions of pleiotropic peptide action to ligand-receptor coevolution

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The evolution of peptidergic signaling has been accompanied by a significant degree of ligand-receptor coevolution. Closely related clusters of peptide signaling molecules are observed to activate related groups of receptors, implying that genes encoding these ligands may orchestrate an array of fu...

  9. Novel photoaffinity ligands for the GA-receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Suttle, J.C.; Hultstrand, J.F.; Tanaka, F.S. )

    1990-05-01

    Previous studies from this laboratory have shown that certain N-substituted phthalimides (NSPs) exhibit GA-like activity in a range of specific bioassays and that bioactive NSPs compete with ({sup 3}H)-GA{sub 4} for soluble binding sites in cucumber homogenates. As such, these compounds may prove useful in the purification and characterization of GA receptor proteins. To this end, five azido-NSPs have been synthesized and are currently being screened for biological activity and photochemical stability. Three azido-NSPs elicit {alpha}-amylase production in barley half-seeds and stimulate tissue elongation in d{sub 5} maize, lettuce, sunflower, and soybean. Further evaluations are in progress and these data as well as the utility of these compounds as photo-affinity ligands will be discussed.

  10. Prolonged signaling at the parathyroid hormone receptor by peptide ligands targeted to a specific receptor conformation

    PubMed Central

    Okazaki, Makoto; Ferrandon, Sebastien; Vilardaga, Jean-Pierre; Bouxsein, Mary L.; Potts, John T.; Gardella, Thomas J.

    2008-01-01

    The parathyroid hormone receptor (PTHR) is a class B G protein-coupled receptor that plays critical roles in bone and mineral ion metabolism. Ligand binding to the PTHR involves interactions to both the amino-terminal extracellular (N) domain, and transmembrane/extracellular loop, or juxtamembrane (J) regions of the receptor. Recently, we found that PTH(1–34), but not PTH-related protein, PTHrP(1–36), or M-PTH(1–14) (M = Ala/Aib1,Aib3,Gln10,Har11,Ala12,Trp14,Arg19), binds to the PTHR in a largely GTPγS-resistant fashion, suggesting selective binding to a novel, high-affinity conformation (R0), distinct from the GTPγS-sensitive conformation (RG). We examined the effects in vitro and in vivo of introducing the M substitutions, which enhance interaction to the J domain, into PTH analogs extended C-terminally to incorporate residues involved in the N domain interaction. As compared with PTH(1–34), M-PTH(1–28) and M-PTH(1–34) bound to R0 with higher affinity, produced more sustained cAMP responses in cells, formed more stable complexes with the PTHR in FRET and subcellular localization assays, and induced more prolonged calcemic and phosphate responses in mice. Moreover, after 2 weeks of daily injection in mice, M-PTH(1–34) induced larger increases in trabecular bone volume and greater increases in cortical bone turnover, than did PTH(1–34). Thus, the putative R0 PTHR conformation can form highly stable complexes with certain PTH ligand analogs and thereby mediate surprisingly prolonged signaling responses in bone and/or kidney PTH target cells. Controlling, via ligand analog design, the selectivity with which a PTH ligand binds to R0, versus RG, may be a strategy for optimizing signaling duration time, and hence therapeutic efficacy, of PTHR agonist ligands. PMID:18946036

  11. Imaging of a glioma using peripheral benzodiazepine receptor ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Starosta-Rubinstein, S.; Ciliax, B.J.; Penney, J.B.; McKeever, P.; Young, A.B.

    1987-02-01

    Two types of benzodiazepine receptors have been demonstrated in mammalian tissues, one which is localized on neuronal elements in brain and the other, on glial cells and in peripheral tissues such as kidney. In vivo administration of /sup 3/H-labeled PK 11195 (1-(2-chlorophenyl-N-methyl-N-(1-methylpropyl)-3-isoquinoline carboxamide) or (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam with 5 mg of clonazepam per kg to rats with intracranial C6 gliomas resulted in high levels of tritiated-drug binding to the tumor as shown by quantitative autoradiography. Pharmacological studies indicated that the bound drugs labeled the peripheral benzodiazepine binding site. Binding to the peripheral benzodiazepine site was confirmed primarily to malignant cells with little binding to adjacent normal brain tissue or to necrotic tissue. Tumor cell binding was completely inhibited by preadministration of the peripheral benzodiazepine blocking agent PK 11195 at 5 mg/kg. The centrally selective benzodiazepine ligand clonazepam had no effect on PK 11195 binding to the tumor cells. When binding to other tumor cell lines grown in nude mice and nude athymic rats was evaluated, little or no peripheral benzodiazepine binding was detected on human pheochromocytoma (RN1) and neuroblastoma (SK-N-MC, SK-N-SH) tumor cells, respectively. However, high densities of peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites were observed on tumors derived from a human glioma cell line (ATCC HTB 14, U-87 MG). The presence of high concentrations of specific peripheral benzodiazepine receptors on glial tumors suggests that human primary central nervous system tumors could be imaged and diagnosed using peripheral benzodiazepine ligands labeled with positron- or gamma-emitting isotopes.

  12. Imaging of a glioma using peripheral benzodiazepine receptor ligands.

    PubMed Central

    Starosta-Rubinstein, S; Ciliax, B J; Penney, J B; McKeever, P; Young, A B

    1987-01-01

    Two types of benzodiazepine receptors have been demonstrated in mammalian tissues, one which is localized on neuronal elements in brain and the other, on glial cells and in peripheral tissues such as kidney. In vivo administration of 3H-labeled PK 11195 [1-(2-chlorophenyl-N-methyl-N-(1-methylpropyl)-3-isoquinoline carboxamide] or [3H]flunitrazepam with 5 mg of clonazepam per kg to rats with intracranial C6 gliomas resulted in high levels of tritiated-drug binding to the tumor as shown by quantitative autoradiography. Pharmacological studies indicated that the bound drugs labeled the peripheral benzodiazepine binding site. Binding to the peripheral benzodiazepine site was confirmed primarily to malignant cells with little binding to adjacent normal brain tissue or to necrotic tissue. Tumor cell binding was completely inhibited by preadministration of the peripheral benzodiazepine blocking agent PK 11195 at 5 mg/kg. The centrally selective benzodiazepine ligand clonazepam had no effect on PK 11195 binding to the tumor cells. When binding to other tumor cell lines grown in nude mice and nude athymic rats was evaluated, little or no peripheral benzodiazepine binding was detected on human pheochromocytoma (RN1) and neuroblastoma (SK-N-MC, SK-N-SH) tumor cells, respectively. However, high densities of peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites were observed on tumors derived from a human glioma cell line (ATCC HTB 14, U-87 MG). The presence of high concentrations of specific peripheral benzodiazepine receptors on glial tumors suggests that human primary central nervous system tumors could be imaged and diagnosed using peripheral benzodiazepine ligands labeled with positron- or gamma-emitting isotopes. Images PMID:3027710

  13. G Protein-Coupled Receptor Heteromerization: A Role in Allosteric Modulation of Ligand BindingS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Ivone; IJzerman, Adriaan P.; Ye, Kai; Maillet, Emeline L.

    2011-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly recognized that G protein-coupled receptors physically interact. These interactions may provide a mechanism for allosteric modulation of receptor function. In this study, we examined this possibility by using an established model system of a receptor heteromer consisting of μ and δ opioid receptors. We examined the effect of a number of μ receptor ligands on the binding equilibrium and association and dissociation kinetics of a radiolabeled δ receptor agonist, [3H]deltorphin II. We also examined the effect of δ receptor ligands on the binding equilibrium and association and dissociation kinetics of a radiolabeled μ receptor agonist, [3H][d-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4,Gly5-ol]-enkephalin ([3H]DAMGO). We show that μ receptor ligands are capable of allosterically enhancing δ receptor radioligand binding and vice versa. Thus, there is strong positive cooperativity between the two receptor units with remarkable consequences for ligand pharmacology. We find that the data can be simulated by adapting an allosteric receptor model previously developed for small molecules, suggesting that the ligand-occupied protomers function as allosteric modulators of the partner receptor's activity. PMID:21415307

  14. Development of radioiodinated receptor ligands for cerebral single photon emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; McPherson, D.W.

    1992-01-01

    In the last decade the use of radiolabeled ligands for the imaging of cerebral receptors by emission computed tomography (ECT) has seen rapid growth. The opportunity to routinely perform cerebral single photon emission tomography (SPET) with iodine-123-labeled ligands depends on the availability of receptor ligands into which iodine can be introduced without decreasing the required high target receptor specificity. The use of iodine-123-labeled receptor-specific ligands also depends on the availability of high purity iodine-123 at reasonable costs and the necessary imaging instrumentation. In this paper, the development and current stage of evaluation of various iodine-123-labeled ligands for SPET imaging of dopaminergic, serotonergic and muscarinic acetylcholinergic receptor classes are discussed.

  15. Development of radioiodinated receptor ligands for cerebral single photon emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; McPherson, D.W.

    1992-03-01

    In the last decade the use of radiolabeled ligands for the imaging of cerebral receptors by emission computed tomography (ECT) has seen rapid growth. The opportunity to routinely perform cerebral single photon emission tomography (SPET) with iodine-123-labeled ligands depends on the availability of receptor ligands into which iodine can be introduced without decreasing the required high target receptor specificity. The use of iodine-123-labeled receptor-specific ligands also depends on the availability of high purity iodine-123 at reasonable costs and the necessary imaging instrumentation. In this paper, the development and current stage of evaluation of various iodine-123-labeled ligands for SPET imaging of dopaminergic, serotonergic and muscarinic acetylcholinergic receptor classes are discussed.

  16. Bioluminescent Ligand-Receptor Binding Assays for Protein or Peptide Hormones.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ya-Li; Guo, Zhan-Yun

    2016-01-01

    Bioluminescence has been widely used in biomedical research due to its high sensitivity, low background, and broad linear range. In recent studies, we applied bioluminescence to ligand-receptor binding assays for some protein or peptide hormones based on a newly developed small monomeric Nanoluciferase (NanoLuc) reporter that has the so far brightest bioluminescence. The conventional ligand-receptor binding assays rely on radioligands that have drawbacks, such as radioactive hazards and short shelf lives. In contrast, the novel bioluminescent binding assays use the NanoLuc-based protein or peptide tracers that are safe, stable, and ultrasensitive. Thus, the novel bioluminescent ligand-receptor binding assay would be applied to more and more protein or peptide hormones for ligand-receptor interaction studies in future. In the present article, we provided detailed protocols for setting up the novel bioluminescent ligand-receptor binding assays using two representative protein hormones as examples. PMID:27424896

  17. Receptor, Ligand and Transducer Contributions to Dopamine D2 Receptor Functional Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Sean M.; Pack, Thomas F.; Caron, Marc G.

    2015-01-01

    Functional selectivity (or biased agonism) is a property exhibited by some G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) ligands, which results in the modulation of a subset of a receptor’s signaling capabilities and more precise control over complex biological processes. The dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) exhibits pleiotropic responses to the biogenic amine dopamine (DA) to mediate complex central nervous system functions through activation of G proteins and β-arrestins. D2R is a prominent therapeutic target for psychological and neurological disorders in which DA biology is dysregulated and targeting D2R with functionally selective drugs could provide a means by which pharmacotherapies could be developed. However, factors that determine GPCR functional selectivity in vivo may be multiple with receptors, ligands and transducers contributing to the process. We have recently described a mutagenesis approach to engineer biased D2R mutants in which G protein-dependent ([Gprot]D2R) and β-arrestin-dependent signaling ([βarr]D2R) were successfully separated (Peterson, et al. PNAS, 2015). Here, permutations of these mutants were used to identify critical determinants of the D2R signaling complex that impart signaling bias in response to the natural or synthetic ligands. Critical residues identified in generating [Gprot]D2R and [βarr]D2R conferred control of partial agonism at G protein and/or β-arrestin activity. Another set of mutations that result in G protein bias was identified that demonstrated that full agonists can impart unique activation patterns, and provided further credence to the concept of ligand texture. Finally, the contributions and interplay between different transducers indicated that G proteins are not aberrantly activated, and that receptor kinase and β-arrestin activities are inextricably linked. These data provide a thorough elucidation of the feasibility and malleability of D2R functional selectivity and point to means by which novel in vivo therapies

  18. The Quantum Nature of Drug-Receptor Interactions: Deuteration Changes Binding Affinities for Histamine Receptor Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Repič, Matej; Zakšek, Maja; Kotnik, Kristina; Fijan, Estera; Mavri, Janez

    2016-01-01

    In this article we report a combined experimental and computational study concerning the effects of deuteration on the binding of histamine and two other histaminergic agonists to 3H-tiotidine-labeled histamine H2 receptor in neonatal rat astrocytes. Binding affinities were measured by displacing radiolabeled tiotidine from H2 receptor binding sites present on cultured neonatal rat astrocytes. Quantum-chemical calculations were performed by employing the empirical quantization of nuclear motion within a cluster model of the receptor binding site extracted from the homology model of the entire H2 receptor. Structure of H2 receptor built by homology modelling is attached in the supporting information (S1 Table) Experiments clearly demonstrate that deuteration affects the binding by increasing the affinity for histamine and reducing it for 2-methylhistamine, while basically leaving it unchanged for 4-methylhistamine. Ab initio quantum-chemical calculations on the cluster system extracted from the homology H2 model along with the implicit quantization of the acidic N–H and O–H bonds demonstrate that these changes in the binding can be rationalized by the altered strength of the hydrogen bonding upon deuteration known as the Ubbelohde effect. Our computational analysis also reveals a new mechanism of histamine binding, which underlines an important role of Tyr250 residue. The present work is, to our best knowledge, the first study of nuclear quantum effects on ligand receptor binding. The ligand H/D substitution is relevant for therapy in the context of perdeuterated and thus more stable drugs that are expected to enter therapeutic practice in the near future. Moreover, presented approach may contribute towards understanding receptor activation, while a distant goal remains in silico discrimination between agonists and antagonists based on the receptor structure. PMID:27159606

  19. The Quantum Nature of Drug-Receptor Interactions: Deuteration Changes Binding Affinities for Histamine Receptor Ligands.

    PubMed

    Kržan, Mojca; Vianello, Robert; Maršavelski, Aleksandra; Repič, Matej; Zakšek, Maja; Kotnik, Kristina; Fijan, Estera; Mavri, Janez

    2016-01-01

    In this article we report a combined experimental and computational study concerning the effects of deuteration on the binding of histamine and two other histaminergic agonists to 3H-tiotidine-labeled histamine H2 receptor in neonatal rat astrocytes. Binding affinities were measured by displacing radiolabeled tiotidine from H2 receptor binding sites present on cultured neonatal rat astrocytes. Quantum-chemical calculations were performed by employing the empirical quantization of nuclear motion within a cluster model of the receptor binding site extracted from the homology model of the entire H2 receptor. Structure of H2 receptor built by homology modelling is attached in the supporting information (S1 Table) Experiments clearly demonstrate that deuteration affects the binding by increasing the affinity for histamine and reducing it for 2-methylhistamine, while basically leaving it unchanged for 4-methylhistamine. Ab initio quantum-chemical calculations on the cluster system extracted from the homology H2 model along with the implicit quantization of the acidic N-H and O-H bonds demonstrate that these changes in the binding can be rationalized by the altered strength of the hydrogen bonding upon deuteration known as the Ubbelohde effect. Our computational analysis also reveals a new mechanism of histamine binding, which underlines an important role of Tyr250 residue. The present work is, to our best knowledge, the first study of nuclear quantum effects on ligand receptor binding. The ligand H/D substitution is relevant for therapy in the context of perdeuterated and thus more stable drugs that are expected to enter therapeutic practice in the near future. Moreover, presented approach may contribute towards understanding receptor activation, while a distant goal remains in silico discrimination between agonists and antagonists based on the receptor structure. PMID:27159606

  20. Selectively Promiscuous Opioid Ligands: Discovery of High Affinity/Low Efficacy Opioid Ligands with Substantial Nociceptin Opioid Peptide Receptor Affinity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Emerging clinical and preclinical evidence suggests that a compound displaying high affinity for μ, κ, and δ opioid (MOP, KOP, and DOP) receptors and antagonist activity at each, coupled with moderate affinity and efficacy at nociceptin opioid peptide (NOP) receptors will have utility as a relapse prevention agent for multiple types of drug abuse. Members of the orvinol family of opioid ligands have the desired affinity profile but have typically displayed substantial efficacy at MOP and or KOP receptors. In this study it is shown that a phenyl ring analogue (1d) of buprenorphine displays the desired profile in vitro with high, nonselective affinity for the MOP, KOP, and DOP receptors coupled with moderate affinity for NOP receptors. In vivo, 1d lacked any opioid agonist activity and was an antagonist of both the MOP receptor agonist morphine and the KOP receptor agonist ethylketocyclazocine, confirming the desired opioid receptor profile in vivo. PMID:24761755

  1. (Phenylpiperazinyl-butyl)oxindoles as selective 5-HT7 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Volk, Balázs; Barkóczy, József; Hegedus, Endre; Udvari, Szabolcs; Gacsályi, István; Mezei, Tibor; Pallagi, Katalin; Kompagne, Hajnalka; Lévay, György; Egyed, András; Hársing, László G; Spedding, Michael; Simig, Gyula

    2008-04-24

    A series of potent 5-hydroxytryptamine 7 (5-HT 7) ligands has been synthesized that contain a 1,3-dihydro-2 H-indol-2-one (oxindole) skeleton. The binding of these compounds to the 5-HT 7 and 5-HT 1A receptors was measured. Despite the structural similarity of these two serotonin receptor subtypes, several derivatives exhibited a high selectivity to the 5-HT 7 receptor. According to the structure-activity relationship observations, compounds unsubstituted at the oxindole nitrogen atom and containing a tetramethylene spacer between the oxindole skeleton and the basic nitrogen atom are the most potent ligands. Concerning the basic group, besides the moieties of the 4-phenylpiperazine type, halophenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridines also proved to be 5-HT 7 receptor-ligands. Because of halogen substitution on the aromatic rings, good metabolic stability could be achieved. A representative of the family, 3-{4-[4-(4-chlorophenyl)-piperazin-1-yl]-butyl}-3-ethyl-6-fluoro-1,3-dihydro-2 H-indol-2-one ( 9e') exhibited selective 5-HT 7 antagonist activity ( K i = 0.79 nM). The in vivo pharmacological potencies of these 5-HT 7 receptor-ligands were estimated by the conflict drinking (Vogel) and the light-dark anxiolytic tests.

  2. Labeling of receptor ligands and other compounds with halogen radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, M.J. . Edward Mallinckrodt Inst. of Radiology)

    1989-08-01

    Major advances have been made in all the areas. Specifically, patient studies have been carried out. This work has shown that the uptake of fluorine-18 labeled 16{alpha}-fluoroestradiol-17{beta} correlates well with receptor levels measured in vivo and also that the uptake of the tracer is blocked in humans by the administration of the antiestrogen tamoxifen. An image from this work was designated Image of the Year by Dr. Wagner, Jr., following his summary of the 1987 Society of Nuclear Medicine Meeting. We have also evaluated the brain uptake of both estrogen and progesterone, and this work was awarded the Berson-Yalow Award from the Society of Nuclear Medicine in 1988. This publication represents a new application of radiolabeled sex hormones. Hines and coworkers have suggested that hormone levels in the brain are important for sexual differentiation of human behavior. We have shown that both 16{alpha}-(F-18)-fluoroestradiol-17{beta} and 21-(F-18)-fluoro-16{alpha}-ethyl-19-norprogesterone (FENP) accumulate in the hypothalamus and pituitary tissues of primates and humans; and in primates this uptake can be blocked by administration of nonradioactive competing ligands. This presents an opportunity for studying sex hormone receptors in mammalian brain.

  3. Discriminative stimulus effects of the imidazoline I2 receptor ligands BU224 and phenyzoline in rats

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Yanyan; Zhang, Yanan; Li, Jun-Xu

    2015-01-01

    Although imidazoline I2 receptor ligands have been used as discriminative stimuli, the role of efficacy of I2 receptor ligands as a critical determinant in drug discrimination has not been explored. This study characterized the discriminative stimulus effects of selective imidazoline I2 receptor ligands BU224 (a low-efficacy I2 receptor ligand) and phenyzoline (a higher efficacy I2 receptor ligand) in rats. Two groups of male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained to discriminate 5.6 mg/kg BU224 or 32 mg/kg phenyzoline (i.p.) from their vehicle in a two-lever food-reinforced drug discrimination procedure, respectively. All rats acquired the discriminations after an average of 18 (BU224) and 56 (phenyzoline) training sessions, respectively. BU224 and phenyzoline completely substituted for one another symmetrically. Several I2 receptor ligands (tracizoline, CR4056, RS45041, and idazoxan) all occasioned > 80% drug-associated lever responding in both discriminations. The I2 receptor ligand 2-BFI and a monoamine oxidase inhibitor harmane occasioned > 80% drug-associated lever responding in rats discriminating BU224. Other drugs that occasioned partial or less substitution to BU224 cue included clonidine, methamphetamine, ketamine, morphine, methadone and agmatine. Clonidine, methamphetamine and morphine also only produced partial substitution to phenyzoline cue. Naltrexone, dopamine D2 receptor antagonist haloperidol and serotonin (5-HT) 2A receptor antagonist MDL100907 failed to alter the discriminative stimulus effects of BU224 or phenyzoline. Combined, these results are the first to demonstrate that BU224 and phenyzoline can serve as discriminative stimuli and that the low-efficacy I2 receptor ligand BU224 shares similar discriminative stimulus effects with higher-efficacy I2 receptor ligands such as phenyzoline and 2-BFI. PMID:25617792

  4. Acetylcholine receptors and cholinergic ligands: biochemical and genetic aspects in Torpedo californica and Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, L.S.

    1987-01-01

    This study evaluates the biochemical and genetic aspects of the acetylcholine receptor proteins and cholinergic ligands in Drosophila melanogaster and Torpedo californica. Included are (1) a comparative study of nicotinic ligand-induced cation release from acetylcholine receptors isolated from Torpedo californica and from Drosophila melanogaster, (2) solution studies of the cholinergic ligands, nikethamide and ethamivan, aimed at measuring internal molecular rotational barriers in solvents of different polarity; and (3) the isolation and characterization of the gene(s) for the acetylcholine receptor in Drosophila melasogaster. Acetylcholine receptor proteins isolated from Drosphila melanogaster heads were found to behave kinetically similar (with regards to cholinergic ligand-induced /sup 155/Eu:/sup 3 +/ displacement from prelabeled proteins) to receptor proteins isolated from Torpedo californica electric tissue, providing additional biochemical evidence for the existence of a Drosophila acetylcholine receptor.

  5. Vasopeptidase-activated latent ligands of the histamine receptor-1.

    PubMed

    Gera, Lajos; Roy, Caroline; Charest-Morin, Xavier; Marceau, François

    2013-11-01

    Whether peptidases present in vascular cells can activate prodrugs active on vascular cells has been tested with 2 potential latent ligands of the histamine H1 receptor (H1R). First, a peptide consisting of the antihistamine cetirizine (CTZ) condensed at the N-terminus of ε-aminocaproyl-bradykinin (εACA-BK) was evaluated for an antihistamine activity that could be revealed by degradation of the peptide part of the molecule. CTZ-εACA-BK had a submicromolar affinity for the BK B2 receptor (B2R; IC50 of 590 nM, [(3)H]BK binding competition), but a non-negligible affinity for the human H1 receptor (H1R; IC50 of 11 μM for [(3)H]pyrilamine binding). In the human isolated umbilical vein, a system where both endogenous B2R and H1R mediate strong contractions, CTZ-εACA-BK exerted mild antagonist effects on histamine-induced contraction that were not modified by omapatrilat or by a B2R antagonist that prevents endocytosis of the BK conjugate. Cells expressing recombinant ACE or B2R incubated with CTZ-εACA-BK did not release a competitor of [(3)H]pyrilamine binding to H1Rs. Thus, there is no evidence that CTZ-εACA-BK can release free cetirizine in biological environments. The second prodrug was a blocked agonist, L-alanyl-histamine, potentially activated by aminopeptidase N (APN). This compound did not compete for [(3)H]pyrilamine binding to H1Rs. The human umbilical vein contractility assay responded to L-alanyl-histamine (EC50 54.7 μM), but the APN inhibitor amastatin massively (17-fold) reduced its apparent potency. Amastatin did not influence the potency of histamine as a contractile agent. One of the 2 tested latent H1R ligands, L-alanyl-histamine, supported the feasibility of pro-drug activation by vascular ectopeptidases.

  6. Fluorescent Approaches for Understanding Interactions of Ligands with G Protein Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sridharan, Rajashri; Zuber, Jeffrey; Connelly, Sara M.; Mathew, Elizabeth; Dumont, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    G Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) are responsible for a wide variety of signaling responses in diverse cell types. Despite major advances in the determination of structures of this class of receptors, the underlying mechanisms by which binding of different types of ligands specifically elicits particular signaling responses remains unclear. The use of fluorescence spectroscopy can provide important information about the process of ligand binding and ligand dependent conformational changes in receptors, especially kinetic aspects of these processes, that can be difficult to extract from x-ray structures. We present an overview of the extensive array of fluorescent ligands that have been used in studies of GPCRs and describe spectroscopic approaches for assaying binding and probing the environment of receptor-bound ligands with particular attention to examples involving yeast pheromone receptors. In addition, we discuss the use of fluorescence spectroscopy for detecting and characterizing conformational changes in receptors induced by the binding of ligands. Such studies have provided strong evidence for diversity of receptor conformations elicited by different ligands, consistent with the idea that GPCRs are not simple on and off switches. This diversity of states constitutes an underlying mechanistic basis for biased agonism, the observation that different stimuli can produce different responses from a single receptor. It is likely that continued technical advances will allow fluorescence spectroscopy to play an important role in continued probing of structural transitions in GPCRs. PMID:24055822

  7. Cellular approaches to the interaction between cannabinoid receptor ligands and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Oz, Murat; Al Kury, Lina; Keun-Hang, Susan Yang; Mahgoub, Mohamed; Galadari, Sehamuddin

    2014-05-15

    Cannabinoids are among the earliest known drugs to humanity. Cannabis plant contains various phytochemicals that bind to cannabinoid receptors. In addition, synthetic and endogenously produced cannabinoids (endocannabinoids) constitute other classes of cannabinoid receptor ligands. Although many pharmacological effects of these cannabinoids are mediated by the activation of cannabinoid receptors, recent studies indicate that cannabinoids also modulate the functions of various integral membrane proteins including ion channels, receptors, neurotransmitter transporters, and enzymes by mechanism(s) not involving the activation of known cannabinoid receptors. Currently, the mechanisms of these effects were not fully understood. However, it is likely that direct actions of cannabinoids are closely linked to their lipophilic structures. This report will focus on the actions of cannabinoids on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and will examine the results of recent studies in this field. In addition some mechanistic approaches will be provided. The results discussed in this review indicate that, besides cannabinoid receptors, further molecular targets for cannabinoids exist and that these targets may represent important novel sites to alter neuronal excitability.

  8. Higher density of serotonin-1A receptors in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex of alcohol-preferring P rats

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, D.T.; Threlkeld, P.G. ); Lumeng, L.; Li, Ting-Kai )

    1990-01-01

    Saturable ({sup 3}H)-80HDPAT binding to 5HT-1A receptors in membranes prepared from hippocampus and frontal cerebral cortex of alcohol-preferring (P) rats and of alcohol-nonpreferring (NP) rats has been compared. The B{sub max} values or densities of recognition sites for 5HT-1A receptors in both brain areas of the P rats are 38 and 44 percent lower in the P rats than in the NP rats. The corresponding K{sub D} values are 38 and 44 percent lower in the P rats than in the NP rats, indicating higher affinities of the recognition sites for the 5HT-1A receptors in hippocampus and cerebral cortex of the P rats. These findings indicate either an enrichment of 5HT-1A receptor density during selective breeding for alcohol preference or an upregulation of 5HT-1A receptors of 5HT found in these brain areas of P rats as compared with the NP rats.

  9. Development of generic calcium imaging assay for monitoring Gi-coupled receptors and G-protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Takashi; Ugawa, Shinya; Ishida, Yusuke; Hondoh, Aki; Shimada, Shoichi

    2009-08-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are important therapeutic targets for many areas of drug research and development. Although chimeric Galpha16 proteins are valuable tools for detecting the activation of Galpha(i/o)-coupled receptors, the details of the activation process remain unclear. The authors introduce a series of chimeras that combine both Galpha16 and Galpha(i/o) (Galpha(16/o), Galpha(16/i2), and Galpha(16/i3)) into a well-established transient expression system to examine the ability of these chimeras to interact with D2 long-form (D2L) dopamine and 5-HT1A serotonin receptors. The pEC50 data obtained for known agonists were similar to results from previous studies that used other cell-based assays, thus indicating sufficient sensitivity for the assay. Moreover, quinpirole exhibited similar intrinsic activity to dopamine at the D2L receptor, whereas S-(-)-3-PPP displayed partial activity of dopamine and quinpirole in the presence of the Galpha(16/o) chimera. The potency of dopamine for D2L receptors was similar among Galpha(16/o), Galpha(16/i2), and Galpha(16/i3). In contrast, the 5-HT1A receptor exhibited a significantly preferential coupling for Galpha(16/i3) compared with Galpha(16/i2) when serotonin was used as a ligand. This finding was in close agreement with the results of previous reports. The present system could therefore be used as a rapid functional assay for high-throughput screening and deorphanization.

  10. Biased ligands for better cardiovascular drugs: dissecting G-protein-coupled receptor pharmacology.

    PubMed

    DeWire, Scott M; Violin, Jonathan D

    2011-07-01

    Drug discovery efforts targeting G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) have been immensely successful in creating new cardiovascular medicines. Currently marketed GPCR drugs are broadly classified as either agonists that activate receptors or antagonists that prevent receptor activation by endogenous stimuli. However, GPCR couple to a multitude of intracellular signaling pathways beyond classical G-protein signals, and these signals can be independently activated by biased ligands to vastly expand the potential for new drugs at these classic targets. By selectively engaging only a subset of a receptor's potential intracellular partners, biased ligands may deliver more precise therapeutic benefit with fewer side effects than current GPCR-targeted drugs. In this review, we discuss the history of biased ligand research, the current understanding of how biased ligands exert their unique pharmacology, and how research into GPCR signaling has uncovered previously unappreciated capabilities of receptor pharmacology. We focus on several receptors to illustrate the approaches taken and discoveries made, and how these are steadily illuminating the intricacies of GPCR pharmacology. Discoveries of biased ligands targeting the angiotensin II type 1 receptor and of separable pharmacology suggesting the potential value of biased ligands targeting the β-adrenergic receptors and nicotinic acid receptor GPR109a highlight the powerful clinical promise of this new category of potential therapeutics.

  11. Potential ligand-binding residues in rat olfactory receptors identified by correlated mutation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, M. S.; Oliveira, L.; Vriend, G.; Shepherd, G. M.

    1995-01-01

    A family of G-protein-coupled receptors is believed to mediate the recognition of odor molecules. In order to identify potential ligand-binding residues, we have applied correlated mutation analysis to receptor sequences from the rat. This method identifies pairs of sequence positions where residues remain conserved or mutate in tandem, thereby suggesting structural or functional importance. The analysis supported molecular modeling studies in suggesting several residues in positions that were consistent with ligand-binding function. Two of these positions, dominated by histidine residues, may play important roles in ligand binding and could confer broad specificity to mammalian odor receptors. The presence of positive (overdominant) selection at some of the identified positions provides additional evidence for roles in ligand binding. Higher-order groups of correlated residues were also observed. Each group may interact with an individual ligand determinant, and combinations of these groups may provide a multi-dimensional mechanism for receptor diversity.

  12. Divergent Ah Receptor Ligand Selectivity during Hominin Evolution.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Troy D; Murray, Iain A; Bisson, William H; Sullivan, Alexis P; Sebastian, Aswathy; Perry, George H; Jablonski, Nina G; Perdew, Gary H

    2016-10-01

    We have identified a fixed nonsynonymous sequence difference between humans (Val381; derived variant) and Neandertals (Ala381; ancestral variant) in the ligand-binding domain of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) gene. In an exome sequence analysis of four Neandertal and Denisovan individuals compared with nine modern humans, there are only 90 total nucleotide sites genome-wide for which archaic hominins are fixed for the ancestral nonsynonymous variant and the modern humans are fixed for the derived variant. Of those sites, only 27, including Val381 in the AHR, also have no reported variability in the human dbSNP database, further suggesting that this highly conserved functional variant is a rare event. Functional analysis of the amino acid variant Ala381 within the AHR carried by Neandertals and nonhuman primates indicate enhanced polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) binding, DNA binding capacity, and AHR mediated transcriptional activity compared with the human AHR. Also relative to human AHR, the Neandertal AHR exhibited 150-1000 times greater sensitivity to induction of Cyp1a1 and Cyp1b1 expression by PAHs (e.g., benzo(a)pyrene). The resulting CYP1A1/CYP1B1 enzymes are responsible for PAH first pass metabolism, which can result in the generation of toxic intermediates and perhaps AHR-associated toxicities. In contrast, the human AHR retains the ancestral sensitivity observed in primates to nontoxic endogenous AHR ligands (e.g., indole, indoxyl sulfate). Our findings reveal that a functionally significant change in the AHR occurred uniquely in humans, relative to other primates, that would attenuate the response to many environmental pollutants, including chemicals present in smoke from fire use during cooking. PMID:27486223

  13. Divergent Ah Receptor Ligand Selectivity during Hominin Evolution.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Troy D; Murray, Iain A; Bisson, William H; Sullivan, Alexis P; Sebastian, Aswathy; Perry, George H; Jablonski, Nina G; Perdew, Gary H

    2016-10-01

    We have identified a fixed nonsynonymous sequence difference between humans (Val381; derived variant) and Neandertals (Ala381; ancestral variant) in the ligand-binding domain of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) gene. In an exome sequence analysis of four Neandertal and Denisovan individuals compared with nine modern humans, there are only 90 total nucleotide sites genome-wide for which archaic hominins are fixed for the ancestral nonsynonymous variant and the modern humans are fixed for the derived variant. Of those sites, only 27, including Val381 in the AHR, also have no reported variability in the human dbSNP database, further suggesting that this highly conserved functional variant is a rare event. Functional analysis of the amino acid variant Ala381 within the AHR carried by Neandertals and nonhuman primates indicate enhanced polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) binding, DNA binding capacity, and AHR mediated transcriptional activity compared with the human AHR. Also relative to human AHR, the Neandertal AHR exhibited 150-1000 times greater sensitivity to induction of Cyp1a1 and Cyp1b1 expression by PAHs (e.g., benzo(a)pyrene). The resulting CYP1A1/CYP1B1 enzymes are responsible for PAH first pass metabolism, which can result in the generation of toxic intermediates and perhaps AHR-associated toxicities. In contrast, the human AHR retains the ancestral sensitivity observed in primates to nontoxic endogenous AHR ligands (e.g., indole, indoxyl sulfate). Our findings reveal that a functionally significant change in the AHR occurred uniquely in humans, relative to other primates, that would attenuate the response to many environmental pollutants, including chemicals present in smoke from fire use during cooking.

  14. Cell Surface Receptors for Signal Transduction and Ligand Transport: A Design Principles Study

    PubMed Central

    Shankaran, Harish; Resat, Haluk; Wiley, H. Steven

    2007-01-01

    Receptors constitute the interface of cells to their external environment. These molecules bind specific ligands involved in multiple processes, such as signal transduction and nutrient transport. Although a variety of cell surface receptors undergo endocytosis, the systems-level design principles that govern the evolution of receptor trafficking dynamics are far from fully understood. We have constructed a generalized mathematical model of receptor–ligand binding and internalization to understand how receptor internalization dynamics encodes receptor function and regulation. A given signaling or transport receptor system represents a particular implementation of this module with a specific set of kinetic parameters. Parametric analysis of the response of receptor systems to ligand inputs reveals that receptor systems can be characterized as being: i) avidity-controlled where the response control depends primarily on the extracellular ligand capture efficiency, ii) consumption-controlled where the ability to internalize surface-bound ligand is the primary control parameter, and iii) dual-sensitivity where both the avidity and consumption parameters are important. We show that the transferrin and low-density lipoprotein receptors are avidity-controlled, the vitellogenin receptor is consumption-controlled, and the epidermal growth factor receptor is a dual-sensitivity receptor. Significantly, we show that ligand-induced endocytosis is a mechanism to enhance the accuracy of signaling receptors rather than merely serving to attenuate signaling. Our analysis reveals that the location of a receptor system in the avidity-consumption parameter space can be used to understand both its function and its regulation. PMID:17542642

  15. Cell surface receptors for signal transduction and ligand transport - a design principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Shankaran, Harish; Resat, Haluk; Wiley, H. S.

    2007-06-01

    Although many different receptors undergo endocytosis, the system-level design principles that govern the evolution of receptor dynamics are far from fully understood. We have constructed a generalized mathematical model to understand how receptor internalization dynamics encodes receptor function and regulation. Parametric analysis of the response of receptor systems to ligand inputs reveals that receptors can be categorized a being: i) avidity-controlled where the response control depends primarily on the extracelluar ligand capture efficiency, ii) consumption-controlled where the ability to internalize surface-bound ligand is the primary control parameter, and iii) dual-sensitivity where both the avidity and consumption parameters are important. We show that the transferrin and low-density lipoprotein receptors are avidity-controlled, the vitellogenin receptor is consumption-controlled and epidermal growth factor receptor is a dual-sensitivity receptor. Significantly, we show that ligand-induced endocytosis is a mechanism to anhance the accuracy of signaling receptors rather than serving to attenuate signaling. Our analysis reveals that the location of a receptor system in the avidity-consumption parameter space can be used to understand both its function and its regulations.

  16. Lipid Homeostasis and Ligands for Liver X Receptors: Identification and Characterization.

    PubMed

    Lobaccaro, Jean-Marc A; Beaudoin, Claude; Bayala, Bagora; Baron, Silvère; Trousson, Amalia

    2016-01-01

    Screening of bona fide ligands for nuclear receptors is a real tour de force as the identified molecules are supposed to be able to activate the targeted proteins in cell culture as well as in vivo. Indeed orphan nuclear receptors are putative pharmacologically targets for various diseases. It is thus necessary to have quick and reproductive systems that help in identifying new ligands, agonist or antagonist, before using them in vivo in animal models to check for secondary effects. Here, we describe the transient transfections (homologous and heterologous) used for the screening of ligands for liver X receptor α (LXRα, NR1H3) in HeLa cells. PMID:27246331

  17. Trace amine-associated receptors and their ligands

    PubMed Central

    Zucchi, R; Chiellini, G; Scanlan, T S; Grandy, D K

    2006-01-01

    Classical biogenic amines (adrenaline, noradrenaline, dopamine, serotonin and histamine) interact with specific families of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The term ‘trace amines' is used when referring to p-tyramine, β-phenylethylamine, tryptamine and octopamine, compounds that are present in mammalian tissues at very low (nanomolar) concentrations. The pharmacological effects of trace amines are usually attributed to their interference with the aminergic pathways, but in 2001 a new gene was identified, that codes for a GPCR responding to p-tyramine and β-phenylethylamine but not to classical biogenic amines. Several closely related genes were subsequently identified and designated as the trace amine-associated receptors (TAARs). Pharmacological investigations in vitro show that many TAAR subtypes may not respond to p-tyramine, β-phenylethylamine, tryptamine or octopamine, suggesting the existence of additional endogenous ligands. A novel endogenous thyroid hormone derivative, 3-iodothyronamine, has been found to interact with TAAR1 and possibly other TAAR subtypes. In vivo, micromolar concentrations of 3-iodothyronamine determine functional effects which are opposite to those produced on a longer time scale by thyroid hormones, including reduction in body temperature and decrease in cardiac contractility. Expression of all TAAR subtypes except TAAR1 has been reported in mouse olfactory epithelium, and several volatile amines were shown to interact with specific TAAR subtypes. In addition, there is evidence that TAAR1 is targeted by amphetamines and other psychotropic agents, while genetic linkage studies show a significant association between the TAAR gene family locus and susceptibility to schizophrenia or bipolar affective disorder. PMID:17088868

  18. Designing bifunctional NOP receptor-mu opioid receptor ligands from NOP-receptor selective scaffolds. Part II

    PubMed Central

    Journigan, V. Blair; Polgar, Willma; Khroyan, Taline V.; Zaveri, Nurulain T.

    2014-01-01

    The nociceptin opioid receptor (NOP) and its endogenous peptide ligand nociceptin/orphanin FQ have been shown to modulate the pharmacological effects of the classical opioid receptor system. Suppression of opioid-induced reward associated with mu-opioid receptor (MOP)-mediated analgesia, without decreasing anti-nociceptive efficacy, can potentially be achieved with NOP agonists having bifunctional agonist activity at MOP, to afford ‘non-addicting’ analgesics. In Part II of this series, we describe a continuing structure-activity relationship (SAR) study of the NOP-selective piperidin-4-yl-1,3-dihydroindol-2-one scaffold, to obtain bifunctional activity at MOP, and a suitable ratio of NOP/MOP agonist activity that produces a non-addicting analgesic profile. The SAR reported here is focused on the influence of various piperidine nitrogen aromatic substituents on the ratio of binding affinity and intrinsic activity at both the NOP and MOP receptors. PMID:24657054

  19. Transcriptional activation by the thyroid hormone receptor through ligand-dependent receptor recruitment and chromatin remodelling.

    PubMed

    Grøntved, Lars; Waterfall, Joshua J; Kim, Dong Wook; Baek, Songjoon; Sung, Myong-Hee; Zhao, Li; Park, Jeong Won; Nielsen, Ronni; Walker, Robert L; Zhu, Yuelin J; Meltzer, Paul S; Hager, Gordon L; Cheng, Sheue-yann

    2015-01-01

    A bimodal switch model is widely used to describe transcriptional regulation by the thyroid hormone receptor (TR). In this model, the unliganded TR forms stable, chromatin-bound complexes with transcriptional co-repressors to repress transcription. Binding of hormone dissociates co-repressors and facilitates recruitment of co-activators to activate transcription. Here we show that in addition to hormone-independent TR occupancy, ChIP-seq against endogenous TR in mouse liver tissue demonstrates considerable hormone-induced TR recruitment to chromatin associated with chromatin remodelling and activated gene transcription. Genome-wide footprinting analysis using DNase-seq provides little evidence for TR footprints both in the absence and presence of hormone, suggesting that unliganded TR engagement with repressive complexes on chromatin is, similar to activating receptor complexes, a highly dynamic process. This dynamic and ligand-dependent interaction with chromatin is likely shared by all steroid hormone receptors regardless of their capacity to repress transcription in the absence of ligand. PMID:25916672

  20. Transcriptional activation by the thyroid hormone receptor through ligand-dependent receptor recruitment and chromatin remodelling.

    PubMed

    Grøntved, Lars; Waterfall, Joshua J; Kim, Dong Wook; Baek, Songjoon; Sung, Myong-Hee; Zhao, Li; Park, Jeong Won; Nielsen, Ronni; Walker, Robert L; Zhu, Yuelin J; Meltzer, Paul S; Hager, Gordon L; Cheng, Sheue-yann

    2015-01-01

    A bimodal switch model is widely used to describe transcriptional regulation by the thyroid hormone receptor (TR). In this model, the unliganded TR forms stable, chromatin-bound complexes with transcriptional co-repressors to repress transcription. Binding of hormone dissociates co-repressors and facilitates recruitment of co-activators to activate transcription. Here we show that in addition to hormone-independent TR occupancy, ChIP-seq against endogenous TR in mouse liver tissue demonstrates considerable hormone-induced TR recruitment to chromatin associated with chromatin remodelling and activated gene transcription. Genome-wide footprinting analysis using DNase-seq provides little evidence for TR footprints both in the absence and presence of hormone, suggesting that unliganded TR engagement with repressive complexes on chromatin is, similar to activating receptor complexes, a highly dynamic process. This dynamic and ligand-dependent interaction with chromatin is likely shared by all steroid hormone receptors regardless of their capacity to repress transcription in the absence of ligand.

  1. Monitoring ligand-receptor interactions by photonic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Jeney, Sylvia; Mor, Flavio; Koszali, Roland; Forró, László; Moy, Vincent T.

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a method for the acquisition of single molecule force measurements of ligandreceptor interactions using the photonic force microscope (PFM). Biotin-functionalized beads, manipulated with an optical trap, and a streptavidin-functionalized coverslip were used to measure the effect of different pulling forces on the lifetime of individual streptavidin-biotin complexes. By optimizing the design of the optical trap and selection of the appropriate bead size, pulling forces in excess of 50 pN were achieved. Based on the amplitude of three dimensional (3D) thermal position fluctuations of the attached bead, we were able to select for a bead-coverslip interaction that was mediated by a single streptavidin-biotin complex. Moreover, the developed experimental system was greatly accelerated by automation of data acquisition and analysis. In force-dependent kinetic measurements carried out between streptavidin and biotin, we observed that the streptavidin-biotin complex exhibited properties of a catch bond with the lifetime increasing 10 fold when the pulling force increased from 10 to 20 pN. We also show that silica beads were more appropriate than polystyrene beads for the force measurements as polystyrene tethers, longer than 200 nm, could be extracted from the beads. PMID:20516583

  2. Effect of size and conformation of the ligand on asialoglycoprotein receptor-mediated ligand internalization and degradation in rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.H.; Chang, T.M.

    1987-05-01

    The rates of internalization and degradation of /sup 125/-I-labeled desialylated cyanogen bromide fragment I of orosomucoid (AS-CNBr-I) and its reduced and carboxymethylated derivative (AS-RC-CNBr-I) were compared with those of /sup 125/I-labeled asialoorosomucoid (ASOR) in rat hepatocytes. At 30 nM the rates of internalization and degradation of /sup 125/I-AS-CNBr-I were greater than those of /sup 125/I-ASOR. /sup 125/I-AS-RC-CNBr-I also had a lower rate of internalization and degradation. In contrast to /sup 125/I-ASOR, when degradation was inhibited by 5 ..mu..M colchicine there was a significant intracellular accumulation of the smaller ligands. At 4/sup 0/C the hepatocytes were found to bind the fragmented ligands more than /sup 125/I-ASOR. Incubation of the cells with bound ligand at 37/sup 0/ indicated that diacytosis of /sup 125/I-ASOR was greater than the smaller ligands. Colchincine markedly enhanced diacytosis of /sup 125/I-ASOR. On the other hand, there were marked accumulation of the smaller ligands by colchicine. These results suggest that the rates of internalization, degradation and diacytosis of the ligand are affected by the size and conformation of the ligand through different rates of receptor binding and intracellular transport.

  3. The sigma receptor as a ligand-regulated auxiliary potassium channel subunit.

    PubMed

    Aydar, Ebru; Palmer, Christopher P; Klyachko, Vitaly A; Jackson, Meyer B

    2002-04-25

    The sigma receptor is a novel protein that mediates the modulation of ion channels by psychotropic drugs through a unique transduction mechanism depending neither on G proteins nor protein phosphorylation. The present study investigated sigma receptor signal transduction by reconstituting responses in Xenopus oocytes. Sigma receptors modulated voltage-gated K+ channels (Kv1.4 or Kv1.5) in different ways in the presence and absence of ligands. Association between Kv1.4 channels and sigma receptors was demonstrated by coimmunoprecipitation. These results indicate a novel mechanism of signal transduction dependent on protein-protein interactions. Domain accessibility experiments suggested a structure for the sigma receptor with two cytoplasmic termini and two membrane-spanning segments. The ligand-independent effects on channels suggest that sigma receptors serve as auxiliary subunits to voltage-gated K+ channels with distinct functional interactions, depending on the presence or absence of ligand.

  4. RECEPTOR AFFINITY AND PHOSPHODIESTERASES 4B AND 10A ACTIVITY OF OCTAHYDRO- AND 6,7-DIMETHOXY-3,4-DIHYDRO- ISOQUINOLIN-2(1H)-YL-ALKYL DERIVATIVES OF IMIDAZO- AND PYRIMIDINO[2,1-f]PURINES.

    PubMed

    Zagórska, Agnieszka; Gryzło, Beata; Satała, Grzegorz; Bojarski, Andrzej J; Głuch-Lutwin, Monika; Mordyl, Barbara; Kazek, Grzegorz; Pawłowski, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    A series of octahydro- and 6,7-dimethoxy-3,4-dihydro- isoquinolin-2(1H)-yl-alkyl derivatives of imidazo- and pyrimidino[2,1-f]purines were synthesized and biologically evaluated in in vitro competition binding experiments for serotonin 5-HT(1A), 5-HT(6), 5-HT(7), and dopamine D2 receptors and inhibitory potencies for phosphodiesterases - PDE4B1 and PDE10A. The structure-activity relationships allowed to determine the structural features responsible for receptor and enzyme activity. Compound 5 (8-(4-(6,7-dimethoxy-3,4-dihydroiso- quinolin-2(1H)butyl)1,3-dimethyl-H-imidazo[2,1-f]purine-2,4(3H,8H)-dione) could be regarded as promising structure for further modification and detailed mechanistic study for obtained hybrid ligands.

  5. Activation of 5-HT(2C) receptors in the dorsal periaqueductal gray increases antinociception in mice exposed to the elevated plus-maze.

    PubMed

    Baptista, Daniela; Nunes-de-Souza, Ricardo Luiz; Canto-de-Souza, Azair

    2012-11-01

    Several findings have pointed to the role of the dorsal periaqueductal gray (dPAG) serotonin 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2A-C) receptor subtypes in the modulation of defensive behavior in animals exposed to the elevated plus-maze (EPM). Besides displaying anxiety-like behavior, rodents also exhibit antinociception in the EPM. This study investigated the effects of intra-dPAG injections of 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2B/2C) receptor ligands on EPM-induced antinociception in mice. Male Swiss mice received 0.1 μl intra-dPAG injections of vehicle, 5.6 and 10 nmol of 8-OHDPAT, a 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist (Experiment 1), or 0.01, 0.03 and 0.1 nmol of mCPP, a 5-HT(2B/2C) receptor agonist (Experiment 2). Five minutes later, each mouse received an intraperitoneal injection of 0.6% acetic acid (0.1 ml/10 g body weight; nociceptive stimulus) and was individually confined in the open (OA) or enclosed (EA) arms of the EPM for 5 min, during which the number of abdominal writhes induced by the acetic acid was recorded. While intra-dPAG injection of 8-OHDPAT did not change open-arm antinociception (OAA), mCPP (0.01 nmol) enhanced it. Combined injections of ketanserin (10 nmol/0.1 μl), a 5-HT(2A/2C) receptor antagonist, and 0.01 nmol of mCPP (Experiment 3), selectively and completely blocked the OAA enhancement induced by mCPP. Although intra-dPAG injection of mCPP (0.01 nmol) also produced antinociception in EA-confined mice (Experiment 2), this effect was not confirmed in Experiment 3. Moreover, no other compound changed the nociceptive response in EA-confined animals. These results suggest that the 5-HT(2C) receptors located within the PAG play a role in this type of environmentally induced pain inhibition in mice.

  6. Imaging G protein–coupled receptors while quantifying their ligand-binding free-energy landscape

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cheng; Spoerri, Patrizia M; Coughlin, Shaun R; Kobilka, Brian K; Müller, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    Imaging native membrane receptors and testing how they interact with ligands is of fundamental interest in the life sciences but has proven remarkably difficult to accomplish. Here, we introduce an approach that uses force-distance curve–based atomic force microscopy to simultaneously image single native G protein–coupled receptors in membranes and quantify their dynamic binding strength to native and synthetic ligands. We measured kinetic and thermodynamic parameters for individual protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) molecules in the absence and presence of antagonists, and these measurements enabled us to describe PAR1’s ligand-binding free-energy landscape with high accuracy. Our nanoscopic method opens an avenue to directly image and characterize ligand binding of native membrane receptors. PMID:26167642

  7. Computational Exploration of a Protein Receptor Binding Space with Student Proposed Peptide Ligands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Matthew D.; Phillips, Paul; Turner, Matthew W.; Katz, Michael; Lew, Sarah; Bradburn, Sarah; Andersen, Tim; McDougal, Owen M.

    2016-01-01

    Computational molecular docking is a fast and effective "in silico" method for the analysis of binding between a protein receptor model and a ligand. The visualization and manipulation of protein to ligand binding in three-dimensional space represents a powerful tool in the biochemistry curriculum to enhance student learning. The…

  8. Computer-aided design of a novel ligand for retinoic acid receptor in cancer chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Carlos H. T. P.; Leopoldino, Andreia M.; Silva, Eloiza H. T.; Espinoza, V. A. A.; Taft, C. A.

    The isotypes of RAR and RXR are retinoic acid and retinoid X acid receptors, respectively, whose ligand-binding domain contains the ligand-dependent activation function, with distinct pharmacological targets for retinoids, involved in the treatment of various cancers and skin diseases. Due to the major challenge which cancer treatment and cure still imposes after many decades to the international scientific community, there is actually considerable interest in new ligands with increased bioactivity. We have focused on the retinoid acid receptor, which is considered an interesting target for drug design. In this work, we carried out density functional geometry optimizations and different docking procedures. We performed screening in a large database (hundreds of thousands of molecules which we optimized at the AM1 level) yielding a set of potential bioactive ligands. A new ligand was selected and optimized at the B3LYP/6-31G* level. A flexible docking program was used to investigate the interactions between the receptor and the new ligand. The result of this work is compared with several crystallographic ligands of RAR. Our theoretically more bioactive new ligand indicates stronger and more hydrogen bonds as well as hydrophobic interactions with the receptor.

  9. Discriminative stimulus effects of the novel imidazoline I2 receptor ligand CR4056 in rats

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Yanyan; He, Xiao-Hua; Zhang, Yanan; Li, Jun-Xu

    2014-01-01

    This study examined whether a novel imidazoline I2 receptor ligand CR4056 could serve as a discriminative stimulus and whether it shares similar discriminative stimulus effects with other reported I2 receptor ligands. Eight male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained to discriminate 10.0 mg/kg CR4056 (i.p.) from vehicle in a two-lever food-reinforced drug discrimination procedure. Once rats acquired the discrimination, substitution and combination studies were conducted to elucidate the underlying receptor mechanisms. All rats acquired CR4056 discrimination after an average of 26 training sessions. Several I2 receptor ligands (phenyzoline, tracizoline, RS45041, and idazoxan, 3.2–75 mg/kg, i.p.) all occasioned > 80% CR4056-associated lever responding. Other drugs that occasioned partial or no CR4056-associated lever responding included methamphetamine, ketamine, the endogenous imidazoline ligand agmatine, the monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor harmane, the α2-adrenoceptor agonist clonidine, the μ-opioid receptor agonists morphine and methadone, and the selective I2 receptor ligands BU224 and 2-BFI. The α1 adrenoceptor antagonist WB4101, α2 adrenoceptor antagonist yohimbine and μ-opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone failed to alter the stimulus effects of CR4056. Together, these results show that CR4056 can serve as a discriminative stimulus in rats, which demonstrates high pharmacological specificity and appears to be mediated by imidazoline I2 receptors. PMID:25308382

  10. Expression and Purification of Functional Ligand-binding Domains of T1R3 Taste Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Nie,Y.; Hobbs, J.; Vigues, S.; Olson, W.; Conn, G.; Munger, S.

    2006-01-01

    Chemosensory receptors, including odor, taste, and vomeronasal receptors, comprise the largest group of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in the mammalian genome. However, little is known about the molecular determinants that are critical for the detection and discrimination of ligands by most of these receptors. This dearth of understanding is due in part to difficulties in preparing functional receptors suitable for biochemical and biophysical analyses. Here we describe in detail two strategies for the expression and purification of the ligand-binding domain of T1R taste receptors, which are constituents of the sweet and umami taste receptors. These class C GPCRs contain a large extracellular N-terminal domain (NTD) that is the site of interaction with most ligands and that is amenable to expression as a separate polypeptide in heterologous cells. The NTD of mouse T1R3 was expressed as two distinct fusion proteins in Escherichia coli and purified by column chromatography. Spectroscopic analysis of the purified NTD proteins shows them to be properly folded and capable of binding ligands. This methodology should not only facilitate the characterization of T1R ligand interactions but may also be useful for dissecting the function of other class C GPCRs such as the large family of orphan V2R vomeronasal receptors.

  11. Impact of killer immunoglobulin-like receptor-human leukocyte antigens ligand incompatibility among renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Alam, S.; Rangaswamy, D.; Prakash, S.; Sharma, R. K.; Khan, M. I.; Sonawane, A.; Agrawal, S.

    2015-01-01

    Killer immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) gene shows a high degree of polymorphism. Natural killer cell receptor gets activated once they bind to self-human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) with specific ligand. KIR gene and HLA ligand incompatibility due to the presence/absence of KIR in the recipient and the corresponding HLA ligand in the allograft may impact graft survival in solid organ transplantation. This study evaluates the effect of matches between KIR genes and known HLA ligands. KIR genotypes were determined using sequence specific primer polymerase chain reaction. Presence of certain KIR in a recipient, where the donor lacked the corresponding HLA ligand was considered a mismatch. The allograft was considered matched when both KIR receptor and HLA alloantigen reveald compatibility among recipient and donor. The data revealed better survival among individuals with matched inhibitory KIR receptors and their corresponding HLA ligands (KIR2DL2/DL3-HLAC2, KIR3DL1-HLABw4). On the contrary, no adverse effect was seen for matched activating KIR receptors and their corresponding HLA ligands. One of the activating gene KIR2DS4 showed risk (P = 0.0413, odds ratio = 1.91, 95% confidence interval = 1.02-3.57) association with renal allograft rejection. We conclude that the presence of inhibitory KIR gene leads to better survival; whereas activating motifs show no significant role in renal allograft survival. PMID:25684869

  12. Impact of killer immunoglobulin-like receptor-human leukocyte antigens ligand incompatibility among renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Alam, S; Rangaswamy, D; Prakash, S; Sharma, R K; Khan, M I; Sonawane, A; Agrawal, S

    2015-01-01

    Killer immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) gene shows a high degree of polymorphism. Natural killer cell receptor gets activated once they bind to self-human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) with specific ligand. KIR gene and HLA ligand incompatibility due to the presence/absence of KIR in the recipient and the corresponding HLA ligand in the allograft may impact graft survival in solid organ transplantation. This study evaluates the effect of matches between KIR genes and known HLA ligands. KIR genotypes were determined using sequence specific primer polymerase chain reaction. Presence of certain KIR in a recipient, where the donor lacked the corresponding HLA ligand was considered a mismatch. The allograft was considered matched when both KIR receptor and HLA alloantigen reveald compatibility among recipient and donor. The data revealed better survival among individuals with matched inhibitory KIR receptors and their corresponding HLA ligands (KIR2DL2/DL3-HLAC2, KIR3DL1-HLABw4). On the contrary, no adverse effect was seen for matched activating KIR receptors and their corresponding HLA ligands. One of the activating gene KIR2DS4 showed risk (P = 0.0413, odds ratio = 1.91, 95% confidence interval = 1.02-3.57) association with renal allograft rejection. We conclude that the presence of inhibitory KIR gene leads to better survival; whereas activating motifs show no significant role in renal allograft survival.

  13. A ligand channel through the G protein coupled receptor opsin.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Peter W; Scheerer, Patrick; Park, Jung Hee; Choe, Hui-Woog; Piechnick, Ronny; Ernst, Oliver P; Hofmann, Klaus Peter; Heck, Martin

    2009-01-01

    The G protein coupled receptor rhodopsin contains a pocket within its seven-transmembrane helix (TM) structure, which bears the inactivating 11-cis-retinal bound by a protonated Schiff-base to Lys296 in TM7. Light-induced 11-cis-/all-trans-isomerization leads to the Schiff-base deprotonated active Meta II intermediate. With Meta II decay, the Schiff-base bond is hydrolyzed, all-trans-retinal is released from the pocket, and the apoprotein opsin reloaded with new 11-cis-retinal. The crystal structure of opsin in its active Ops* conformation provides the basis for computational modeling of retinal release and uptake. The ligand-free 7TM bundle of opsin opens into the hydrophobic membrane layer through openings A (between TM1 and 7), and B (between TM5 and 6), respectively. Using skeleton search and molecular docking, we find a continuous channel through the protein that connects these two openings and comprises in its central part the retinal binding pocket. The channel traverses the receptor over a distance of ca. 70 A and is between 11.6 and 3.2 A wide. Both openings are lined with aromatic residues, while the central part is highly polar. Four constrictions within the channel are so narrow that they must stretch to allow passage of the retinal beta-ionone-ring. Constrictions are at openings A and B, respectively, and at Trp265 and Lys296 within the retinal pocket. The lysine enforces a 90 degrees elbow-like kink in the channel which limits retinal passage. With a favorable Lys side chain conformation, 11-cis-retinal can take the turn, whereas passage of the all-trans isomer would require more global conformational changes. We discuss possible scenarios for the uptake of 11-cis- and release of all-trans-retinal. If the uptake gate of 11-cis-retinal is assigned to opening B, all-trans is likely to leave through the same gate. The unidirectional passage proposed previously requires uptake of 11-cis-retinal through A and release of photolyzed all-trans-retinal through

  14. Cholangiocarcinomas express Fas ligand and disable the Fas receptor.

    PubMed

    Que, F G; Phan, V A; Phan, V H; Celli, A; Batts, K; LaRusso, N F; Gores, G J

    1999-12-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma is a highly-malignant adenocarcinoma originating from cholangiocytes. Current concepts support escape from immune surveillance using aberrant expression of Fas ligand (FasL) and dysregulation of receptor (FasR) signaling as a potential mechanism for tumor progression. Our aims were to determine if altered expression of FasR and FasL or changes in expression of FLICE inhibitor (I-FLICE) allow cholangiocarcinoma cells to escape immune surveillance. Human cholangiocarcinoma cell lines were evaluated for the functional expression of FasR and FasL by (1) quantitating apoptosis after incubation of cells with agonistic antibodies and (2) an in vitro cell death assay involving coculture of cholangiocarcinoma cells with Fas-sensitive thymocytes. I-FLICE antisense treatment was performed by stable transfection with complementary DNA (cDNA) for I-FLICE in the reverse orientation. We found that normal cholangiocytes in vivo express FasL. Human cholangiocarcinoma cell lines express both FasL and FasR and I-FLICE. FasL expressed by cholangiocarcinomas in vitro induced lymphocyte cell death (70% after 24 hours). Despite the expression of FasR, exposure of the cells to agonistic antibodies (500 ng/mL) induced only minimal apoptosis in the Jurkat cells. Antisense treatment of cholangiocarcinomas in vitro with I-FLICE reduced protein expression of I-FLICE by 90% to 95% and increased Fas-mediated apoptosis 2-fold. We concluded that cholangiocarcinomas escape immune surveillance either by disabling FasR signaling through the expression of I-FLICE and/or increased FasL expression to induce apoptosis of invading T cells. Reduction of I-FLICE expression in cholangiocarcinoma cells restored Fas-mediated apoptosis. Therapeutic maneuvers to inhibit expression of I-FLICE may aid in the treatment of cholangiocarcinoma.

  15. Recombinant T Cell Receptor Ligand (RTL) Treats Experimental Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Sandhya; Zhang, Bing; Kosaka, Yasuharu; Burrows, Gregory G.; Grafe, Marjorie R.; Vandenbark, Arthur A.; Hurn, Patricia D.; Offner, Halina

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose Experimental stroke induces a biphasic effect on the immune response that involves early activation of peripheral leukocytes followed by severe immunodepression and atrophy of spleen and thymus. In tandem, the developing infarct is exacerbated by influx of numerous inflammatory cell types, including T and B lymphocytes. These features of stroke prompted our use of Recombinant T Cell Receptor Ligands (RTL), partial MHC class II molecules covalently bound to myelin peptides. We tested the hypothesis that RTL would improve ischemic outcome in brain without exacerbating defects in peripheral immune system function. Methods Four daily doses of RTL were administered subcutaneously to C57BL/6 mice after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), and lesion size and cellular composition were assessed in brain, and cell numbers were assessed in spleen and thymus. Results Treatment with RTL551 (I-Ab molecule linked to MOG-35−55 peptide) reduced cortical and total stroke lesion size by ∼50%, inhibited the accumulation of inflammatory cells, particularly macrophages/activated microglial cells and dendritic cells, and mitigated splenic atrophy. Treatment with RTL1000 (HLA-DR2 moiety linked to human MOG-35−55 peptide) similarly reduced the stroke lesion size in HLA-DR2 transgenic mice. In contrast, control RTL with a non-neuroantigen peptide or a mismatched MHC class II moiety had no effect on stroke lesion size. Conclusions These data are the first to demonstrate successful treatment of experimental stroke using a neuroantigen specific immunomodulatory agent administered after ischemia, suggesting therapeutic potential in human stroke. PMID:19443805

  16. Insights into bombesin receptors and ligands: Highlighting recent advances.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Álvarez, Irene; Moreno, Paola; Mantey, Samuel A; Nakamura, Taichi; Nuche-Berenguer, Bernardo; Moody, Terry W; Coy, David H; Jensen, Robert T

    2015-10-01

    This following article is written for Prof. Abba Kastin's Festschrift, to add to the tribute to his important role in the advancement of the role of peptides in physiological, as well as pathophysiological processes. There have been many advances during the 35 years of his prominent role in the Peptide field, not only as editor of the journal Peptides, but also as a scientific investigator and editor of two volumes of the Handbook of Biological Active Peptides [146,147]. Similar to the advances with many different peptides, during this 35 year period, there have been much progress made in the understanding of the pharmacology, cell biology and the role of (bombesin) Bn receptors and their ligands in various disease states, since the original isolation of bombesin from skin of the European frog Bombina bombina in 1970 [76]. This paper will briefly review some of these advances over the time period of Prof. Kastin 35 years in the peptide field concentrating on the advances since 2007 when many of the results from earlier studies were summarized [128,129]. It is appropriate to do this because there have been 280 articles published in Peptides during this time on bombesin-related peptides and it accounts for almost 5% of all publications. Furthermore, 22 Bn publications we have been involved in have been published in either Peptides [14,39,55,58,81,92,93,119,152,216,225,226,231,280,302,309,355,361,362] or in Prof. Kastin's Handbook of Biological Active Peptides [137,138,331].

  17. Phencyclidine-induced disruption of oscillatory activity in prefrontal cortex: Effects of antipsychotic drugs and receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Lladó-Pelfort, L; Troyano-Rodriguez, E; van den Munkhof, H E; Cervera-Ferri, A; Jurado, N; Núñez-Calvet, M; Artigas, F; Celada, P

    2016-03-01

    The non-competitive NMDA receptor (NMDA-R) antagonist phencyclidine (PCP) markedly disrupts thalamocortical activity, increasing excitatory neuron discharge and reducing low frequency oscillations (LFO, <4Hz) that temporarily group neuronal discharge. These actions are mainly driven by PCP interaction with NMDA-R in GABAergic neurons of the thalamic reticular nucleus and likely underlie PCP psychotomimetic activity. Here we report that classical (haloperidol, chlorpromazine, perphenazine) and atypical (clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, ziprasidone, aripripazole) antipsychotic drugs--but not the antidepressant citalopram--countered PCP-evoked fall of LFO in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of anesthetized rats. PCP reduces LFO by breaking the physiological balance between excitatory and inhibitory transmission. Next, we examined the role of different neurotransmitter receptors to reverse PCP actions. D2-R and D1-R blockade may account for classical antipsychotic action since raclopride and SCH-23390 partially reversed PCP effects. Atypical antipsychotic reversal may additionally involve 5-HT1A-R activation (but not 5-HT2A-R blockade) since 8-OH-DPAT and BAYx3702 (but not M100907) fully countered PCP effects. Blockade of histamine H1-R (pyrilamine) and α1-adrenoceptors (prazosin) was without effect. However, the enhancement of GABAA-R-mediated neurotransmission (using muscimol, diazepam or valproate) and the reduction of excitatory neurotransmission (using the mGluR2/3 agonist LY379268 and the preferential kainite/AMPA antagonist CNQX--but not the preferential AMPA/kainate antagonist NBQX) partially or totally countered PCP effects. Overall, these results shed new light on the neurobiological mechanisms used by antipsychotic drugs to reverse NMDA-R antagonist actions and suggest that agents restoring the physiological excitatory/inhibitory balance altered by PCP may be new targets in antipsychotic drug development.

  18. Directed evolution of estrogen receptor proteins with altered ligand-binding specificities.

    PubMed

    Islam, Kazi Mohammed Didarul; Dilcher, Meik; Thurow, Corinna; Vock, Carsten; Krimmelbein, Ilga Kristine; Tietze, Lutz Friedjan; Gonzalez, Victor; Zhao, Huimin; Gatz, Christiane

    2009-01-01

    Transcriptional activators that respond to ligands with no cellular targets are powerful tools that can confer regulated expression of a transgene in almost all biological systems. In this study, we altered the ligand-binding specificity of the human estrogen receptor alpha (hER alpha) so that it would recognize a non-steroidal synthetic compound with structural similarities to the phytoestrogen resveratrol. For this purpose, we performed iterative rounds of site-specific saturation mutagenesis of a fixed set of ligand-contacting residues and subsequent random mutagenesis of the entire ligand-binding domain. Selection of the receptor mutants and quantification of the interaction were carried out by exploiting a yeast two-hybrid system that reports the ligand-dependent interaction between hER alpha and steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC-1). The screen was performed with a synthetic ligand (CV3320) that promoted growth of the reporter yeast strain to half maximal levels at a concentration of 3.7 microM. The optimized receptor mutant (L384F/L387M/Y537S) showed a 67-fold increased activity to the synthetic ligand CV3320 (half maximal yeast growth at 0.055 microM) and a 10-fold decreased activity to 17beta-estradiol (E2; half maximal yeast growth at 4 nM). The novel receptor-ligand pair partially fulfills the requirements for a specific 'gene switch' as it responds to concentrations of the synthetic ligand which do not activate the wildtype receptor. Due to its residual responsiveness to E2 at concentrations (4 nM) that might occur in vivo, further improvements have to be performed to render the system applicable in organisms with endogenous E2 synthesis.

  19. Pharmacophore modeling improves virtual screening for novel peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma ligands

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Stephanie N.; Garcia, Zulma; Hontecillas, Raquel; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep; Bevan, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARγ) is a nuclear hormone receptor involved in regulating various metabolic and immune processes. The PPAR family of receptors possesses a large binding cavity that imparts promiscuity of ligand binding not common to other nuclear receptors. This feature increases the challenge of using computational methods to identify PPAR ligands that will dock favorably into a structural model. Utilizing both ligand- and structure-based pharmacophore methods, we sought to improve agonist prediction by grouping ligands according to pharmacophore features, and pairing models derived from these features with receptor structures for docking. For 22 of the 33 receptor structures evaluated we observed an increase in true positive rate (TPR) when screening was restricted to compounds sharing molecular features found in rosiglitazone. A combination of structure models used for docking resulted in a higher TPR (40%) when compared to docking with a single structure model (less than 20%). Prediction was also improved when specific protein-ligand interactions between the docked ligands and structure models were given greater weight than the calculated free energy of binding. A large-scale screen of compounds using a marketed drug database verified the predictive ability of the selected structure models. This study highlights the steps necessary to improve screening for PPARγ ligands using multiple structure models, ligand-based pharmacophore data, evaluation of protein-ligand interactions, and comparison of docking datasets. The unique combination of methods presented here holds potential for more efficient screening of compounds with unknown affinity for PPARγ that could serve as candidates for therapeutic development. PMID:25616366

  20. The type I interleukin-1 receptor mediates fever in the rat as shown by interleukin-1 receptor subtype selective ligands.

    PubMed

    Malinowsky, D; Chai, Z; Bristulf, J; Simoncsits, A; Bartfai, T

    1995-12-01

    The interleukin-1 (IL-1) system possesses two distinct receptors (type I and type II) which, together with the accessory protein, mediate a multitude of responses to IL-1 alpha and IL-1 beta, including fever. So far, no receptor subtype-specific ligands have been described. Since both types of IL-1 receptors occur in the thermoregulatory areas it was unclear which IL-1 receptor type mediates fever. We report here that for a series of deletion mutants of human recombinant IL-1 beta (hrIL-1 beta), the affinity of these ligands for the type I IL-1 receptor correlates with their efficacy to evoke the fever response (hrIL-1 beta > des-SND52-54 > des-QGE48-50 > des-I56). Thus, the results suggest that agonist occupancy of the type I IL-1 receptor is essential for IL-1 beta-mediated fever.

  1. An ELISA Based Binding and Competition Method to Rapidly Determine Ligand-receptor Interactions.

    PubMed

    Syedbasha, Mohameedyaseen; Linnik, Janina; Santer, Deanna; O'Shea, Daire; Barakat, Khaled; Joyce, Michael; Khanna, Nina; Tyrrell, D Lorne; Houghton, Michael; Egli, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive understanding of signaling pathways requires detailed knowledge regarding ligand-receptor interaction. This article describes two fast and reliable point-by-point protocols of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for the investigation of ligand-receptor interactions: the direct ligand-receptor interaction assay (LRA) and the competition LRA. As a case study, the ELISA based analysis of the interaction between different lambda interferons (IFNLs) and the alpha subunit of their receptor (IL28RA) is presented: the direct LRA is used for the determination of dissociation constants (KD values) between receptor and IFN ligands, and the competition LRA for the determination of the inhibitory capacity of an oligopeptide, which was designed to compete with the IFNLs at their receptor binding site. Analytical steps to estimate KD and half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values are described. Finally, the discussion highlights advantages and disadvantages of the presented method and how the results enable a better molecular understanding of ligand-receptor interactions.

  2. Delta/Notch-Like EGF-Related Receptor (DNER) Is Not a Notch Ligand.

    PubMed

    Greene, Maxwell; Lai, Yongjie; Pajcini, Kostandin; Bailis, Will; Pear, Warren S; Lancaster, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Delta/Notch-like EGF-related receptor (DNER) has been reported to act as a Notch ligand, despite lacking a Delta/Serrate/Lag (DSL) binding domain common to all other known ligands. The established Notch ligand Delta-like 1 (DLL1), but not DNER, activated Notch1 in a luciferase assay, prevented the differentiation of myoblasts through Notch signaling, and bound Notch-fc in a cell-based assay. DNER is not a Notch ligand and its true function remains unknown. PMID:27622512

  3. Delta/Notch-Like EGF-Related Receptor (DNER) Is Not a Notch Ligand.

    PubMed

    Greene, Maxwell; Lai, Yongjie; Pajcini, Kostandin; Bailis, Will; Pear, Warren S; Lancaster, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Delta/Notch-like EGF-related receptor (DNER) has been reported to act as a Notch ligand, despite lacking a Delta/Serrate/Lag (DSL) binding domain common to all other known ligands. The established Notch ligand Delta-like 1 (DLL1), but not DNER, activated Notch1 in a luciferase assay, prevented the differentiation of myoblasts through Notch signaling, and bound Notch-fc in a cell-based assay. DNER is not a Notch ligand and its true function remains unknown.

  4. Delta/Notch-Like EGF-Related Receptor (DNER) Is Not a Notch Ligand

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Yongjie; Pajcini, Kostandin; Bailis, Will; Pear, Warren S.; Lancaster, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Delta/Notch-like EGF-related receptor (DNER) has been reported to act as a Notch ligand, despite lacking a Delta/Serrate/Lag (DSL) binding domain common to all other known ligands. The established Notch ligand Delta-like 1 (DLL1), but not DNER, activated Notch1 in a luciferase assay, prevented the differentiation of myoblasts through Notch signaling, and bound Notch-fc in a cell-based assay. DNER is not a Notch ligand and its true function remains unknown. PMID:27622512

  5. Lipid G Protein-coupled Receptor Ligand Identification Using β-Arrestin PathHunter™ Assay

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Hong; Chu, Alan; Li, Wei; Wang, Bin; Shelton, Fabiola; Otero, Francella; Nguyen, Deborah G.; Caldwell, Jeremy S.; Chen, Yu Alice

    2009-01-01

    A growing number of orphan G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been reported to be activated by lipid ligands, such as lysophosphatidic acid, sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), and cannabinoids, for which there are already well established receptors. These new ligand claims are controversial due to either lack of independent confirmations or conflicting reports. We used the β-arrestin PathHunter™ assay system, a newly developed, generic GPCR assay format that measures β-arrestin binding to GPCRs, to evaluate lipid receptor and ligand pairing. This assay eliminates interference from endogenous receptors on the parental cells because it measures a signal that is specifically generated by the tagged receptor and is immediately downstream of receptor activation. We screened a large number of newly “deorphaned” receptors (GPR23, GPR92, GPR55, G2A, GPR18, GPR3, GPR6, GPR12, and GPR63) and control receptors against a collection of ∼400 lipid molecules to try to identify the receptor ligand in an unbiased fashion. GPR92 was confirmed to be a lysophosphatidic acid receptor with weaker responses to farnesyl pyrophosphate and geranylgeranyl diphosphate. The putative cannabinoid receptor GPR55 responded strongly to AM251, rimonabant, and lysophosphatidylinositol but only very weakly to endocannabinoids. G2A receptor was confirmed to be an oxidized free fatty acid receptor. In addition, we discovered that 3,3′-diindolylmethane, a dietary molecule from cruciferous vegetables, which has known anti-cancer properties, to be a CB2 receptor partial agonist, with binding affinity around 1 μm. The anti-inflammatory effect of 3,3′-diindolylmethane in RAW264.7 cells was shown to be partially mediated by CB2. PMID:19286662

  6. Revealing a steroid receptor ligand as a unique PPAR[gamma] agonist

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Shengchen; Han, Ying; Shi, Yuzhe; Rong, Hui; Zheng, Songyang; Jin, Shikan; Lin, Shu-Yong; Lin, Sheng-Cai; Li, Yong

    2012-06-28

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR{gamma}) regulates metabolic homeostasis and is a molecular target for anti-diabetic drugs. We report here the identification of a steroid receptor ligand, RU-486, as an unexpected PPAR{gamma} agonist, thereby uncovering a novel signaling route for this steroid drug. Similar to rosiglitazone, RU-486 modulates the expression of key PPAR{gamma} target genes and promotes adipocyte differentiation, but with a lower adipogenic activity. Structural and functional studies of receptor-ligand interactions reveal the molecular basis for a unique binding mode for RU-486 in the PPAR{gamma} ligand-binding pocket with distinctive properties and epitopes, providing the molecular mechanisms for the discrimination of RU-486 from thiazolidinediones (TZDs) drugs. Our findings together indicate that steroid compounds may represent an alternative approach for designing non-TZD PPAR{gamma} ligands in the treatment of insulin resistance.

  7. Visualization and ligand-induced modulation of dopamine receptor dimerization at the single molecule level

    PubMed Central

    Tabor, Alina; Weisenburger, Siegfried; Banerjee, Ashutosh; Purkayastha, Nirupam; Kaindl, Jonas M.; Hübner, Harald; Wei, Luxi; Grömer, Teja W.; Kornhuber, Johannes; Tschammer, Nuska; Birdsall, Nigel J. M.; Mashanov, Gregory I.; Sandoghdar, Vahid; Gmeiner, Peter

    2016-01-01

    G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs), including dopamine receptors, represent a group of important pharmacological targets. An increased formation of dopamine receptor D2 homodimers has been suggested to be associated with the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Selective labeling and ligand-induced modulation of dimerization may therefore allow the investigation of the pathophysiological role of these dimers. Using TIRF microscopy at the single molecule level, transient formation of homodimers of dopamine receptors in the membrane of stably transfected CHO cells has been observed. The equilibrium between dimers and monomers was modulated by the binding of ligands; whereas antagonists showed a ratio that was identical to that of unliganded receptors, agonist-bound D2 receptor-ligand complexes resulted in an increase in dimerization. Addition of bivalent D2 receptor ligands also resulted in a large increase in D2 receptor dimers. A physical interaction between the protomers was confirmed using high resolution cryogenic localization microscopy, with ca. 9 nm between the centers of mass. PMID:27615810

  8. Increased accuracy of ligand sensing by receptor diffusion on cell surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aquino, Gerardo; Endres, Robert G.

    2010-10-01

    The physical limit with which a cell senses external ligand concentration corresponds to the perfect absorber, where all ligand particles are absorbed and overcounting of same ligand particles does not occur. Here, we analyze how the lateral diffusion of receptors on the cell membrane affects the accuracy of sensing ligand concentration. Specifically, we connect our modeling to neurotransmission in neural synapses where the diffusion of glutamate receptors is already known to refresh synaptic connections. We find that receptor diffusion indeed increases the accuracy of sensing for both the glutamate α -Amino-3-hydroxy-5-Methyl-4-isoxazolePropionic Acid (AMPA) and N -Methyl-D-aspartic Acid (NMDA) receptor, although the NMDA receptor is overall much noisier. We propose that the difference in accuracy of sensing of the two receptors can be linked to their different roles in neurotransmission. Specifically, the high accuracy in sensing glutamate is essential for the AMPA receptor to start membrane depolarization, while the NMDA receptor is believed to work in a second stage as a coincidence detector, involved in long-term potentiation and memory.

  9. Visualization and ligand-induced modulation of dopamine receptor dimerization at the single molecule level.

    PubMed

    Tabor, Alina; Weisenburger, Siegfried; Banerjee, Ashutosh; Purkayastha, Nirupam; Kaindl, Jonas M; Hübner, Harald; Wei, Luxi; Grömer, Teja W; Kornhuber, Johannes; Tschammer, Nuska; Birdsall, Nigel J M; Mashanov, Gregory I; Sandoghdar, Vahid; Gmeiner, Peter

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), including dopamine receptors, represent a group of important pharmacological targets. An increased formation of dopamine receptor D2 homodimers has been suggested to be associated with the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Selective labeling and ligand-induced modulation of dimerization may therefore allow the investigation of the pathophysiological role of these dimers. Using TIRF microscopy at the single molecule level, transient formation of homodimers of dopamine receptors in the membrane of stably transfected CHO cells has been observed. The equilibrium between dimers and monomers was modulated by the binding of ligands; whereas antagonists showed a ratio that was identical to that of unliganded receptors, agonist-bound D2 receptor-ligand complexes resulted in an increase in dimerization. Addition of bivalent D2 receptor ligands also resulted in a large increase in D2 receptor dimers. A physical interaction between the protomers was confirmed using high resolution cryogenic localization microscopy, with ca. 9 nm between the centers of mass. PMID:27615810

  10. Modeling multivalent ligand-receptor interactions with steric constraints on configurations of cell surface receptor aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Monine, Michael; Posner, Richard; Savage, Paul; Faeder, James; Hlavacek, William S

    2008-01-01

    Signal transduction generally involves multivalent protein-protein interactions, which can produce various protein complexes and post-translational modifications. The reaction networks that characterize these interactions tend to be so large as to challenge conventional simulation procedures. To address this challenge, a kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) method has been developed that can take advantage of a model specification in terms of reaction rules for molecular interactions. A set of rules implicitly defines the reactions that can occur as a result of the interactions represented by the rules. With the rule-based KMC method, explicit generation of the underlying chemical reaction network implied by rules is avoided. Here, we apply and extend this method to characterize the interactions of a trivalent ligand with a bivalent cell-surface receptor. This system is also studied experimentally. We consider the following kinetic models: an equivalent-site model, an extension of this model, which takes into account steric constraints on the configurations of receptor aggregates, and finally, a model that accounts for cyclic receptor aggregates. Simulation results for the equivalent-site model are consistent with an equilibrium continuum model. Using these models, we investigate the effects of steric constraints and the formation of cyclic aggregates on the kinetics and equilibria of small and large aggregate formation and the percolation phase transition that occurs in this system.

  11. Ligand Binding Ensembles Determine Graded Agonist Efficacies at a G Protein-coupled Receptor.

    PubMed

    Bock, Andreas; Bermudez, Marcel; Krebs, Fabian; Matera, Carlo; Chirinda, Brian; Sydow, Dominique; Dallanoce, Clelia; Holzgrabe, Ulrike; De Amici, Marco; Lohse, Martin J; Wolber, Gerhard; Mohr, Klaus

    2016-07-29

    G protein-coupled receptors constitute the largest family of membrane receptors and modulate almost every physiological process in humans. Binding of agonists to G protein-coupled receptors induces a shift from inactive to active receptor conformations. Biophysical studies of the dynamic equilibrium of receptors suggest that a portion of receptors can remain in inactive states even in the presence of saturating concentrations of agonist and G protein mimetic. However, the molecular details of agonist-bound inactive receptors are poorly understood. Here we use the model of bitopic orthosteric/allosteric (i.e. dualsteric) agonists for muscarinic M2 receptors to demonstrate the existence and function of such inactive agonist·receptor complexes on a molecular level. Using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, dynophores (i.e. a combination of static three-dimensional pharmacophores and molecular dynamics-based conformational sampling), ligand design, and receptor mutagenesis, we show that inactive agonist·receptor complexes can result from agonist binding to the allosteric vestibule alone, whereas the dualsteric