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Sample records for 5-ht3 antagonist tropisetron

  1. The effects of the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist tropisetron on cocaine-induced conditioned taste aversions.

    PubMed

    Briscione, Maria A; Serafine, Katherine M; Merluzzi, Andrew P; Rice, Kenner C; Riley, Anthony L

    2013-04-01

    Although cocaine readily induces taste aversions, little is known about the mechanisms underlying this effect. Recent work has shown that cocaine's actions on serotonin (5-HT) may be involved. To address this possibility, the present experiments examined a role of the specific 5-HT receptor, 5-HT3, in this effect given that it is implicated in a variety of behavioral effects of cocaine. This series of investigations first assessed the aversive effects of the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist tropisetron alone (Experiment 1). Specifically, in Experiment 1 male Sprague-Dawley rats were given repeated pairings of a novel saccharin solution and tropisetron (0, 0.056, 0.18 and 0.56mg/kg). Following this, a non-aversion-inducing dose of tropisetron (0.18mg/kg) was assessed for its ability to block aversions induced by a range of doses of cocaine (Experiment 2). Specifically, in Experiment 2 animals were given access to a novel saccharin solution and then injected with tropisetron (0 or 0.18mg/kg) followed by an injection of various doses of cocaine (0, 10, 18 and 32mg/kg). Cocaine induced dose-dependent taste aversions that were not blocked by tropisetron, suggesting that cocaine's aversive effects are not mediated by 5-HT, at least at this specific receptor subtype. At the intermediate dose of cocaine, aversions appeared to be potentiated, suggesting 5-HT3 may play a limiting role in cocaine's aversive effects. These data are discussed in the context of previous examinations of the roles of serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine in cocaine-induced aversions.

  2. Acute treatment with 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, tropisetron, reduces immobility in intact female rats exposed to the forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Gabriela; Maswood, Sharmin

    2006-10-01

    The effects of tropisetron, a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, were evaluated in adult Fischer female rats exposed to the Forced Swim Test (FST). Rats selected on the days of proestrus or estrus was immersed in a cylinder of water for 2 consecutive days. Rats were exposed to the FST for 15 min on day 1 (pretest), followed by a 5-min session (test), 24 h later. The proestrous-estrous group consisted of rats that were exposed to the FST on their proestrous stage (pretest); then 24 h later the same rats were exposed to the FST on their estrous stage (test). Rats in the estrous-diestrous group were exposed to the FST on their estrous stage (pretest) and 24 h later on their diestrous stage (test). Rats were injected intraperitoneally with saline or 1.0 or 2.0 mg/kg tropisetron 30 min prior to exposure to the cylinder on the test day. Immobility, swimming, and struggling behaviors were scored for 5 min. There was a significant decline in immobility after treatment with 2.0 mg/kg tropisetron in both groups. In addition, a significant decline in swimming was observed in the estrous rats (proestrous-estrous group) after treatment with 2.0 mg/kg tropisetron. There were no significant effects of tropisetron on struggling in any groups examined.

  3. [5-HT3 receptor antagonist als analgetics in rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Müller, W; Fiebich, B L; Stratz, T

    2006-10-01

    Various rheumatic diseases like fibromyalgia, systemic inflammatory rheumatic disorders and localized diseases, such as arthritides and activated arthroses, tendinopathies and periarthropathies, as well as trigger points can be improved considerably by treatment with the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist tropisetron. Particularly in the latter group of diseases, local injections have done surprisingly rapid analgesic action. This effect matches that of local anesthetics, but lasts considerably longer and is comparable to local injections of local anesthetics combined with corticosteroids. The action of the 5-HT3 receptor antagonists can be attributed to an antinociceptive effect that occurs at the same time as an antiphlogistic and probably also an immunosuppressive effect. Whereas an inhibited release of substance P from the nociceptors, and possibly some other neurokins as well, seems to be the most likely explanation for the antinociceptive action, the antiphlogistic effect is primarily due to an inhibited formation of various different phlogistic substances; in some conditions, like systemic inflammatory rheumatic diseases, for example, the 5-HT3 receptor antagonists may exert an immunosuppressive effect in addition to this.

  4. From Chemotherapy-Induced Emesis to Neuroprotection: Therapeutic Opportunities for 5-HT3 Receptor Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Fakhfouri, Gohar; Mousavizadeh, Kazem; Mehr, Sharam Ejtemaei; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza; Zirak, Mohammad Reza; Ghia, Jean-Eric; Rahimian, Reza

    2015-12-01

    5-HT3 receptor antagonists are extensively used as efficacious agents in counteracting chemotherapy-induced emesis. Recent investigations have shed light on other potential effects (analgesic, anxiolytic, and anti-psychotic). Some studies have reported neuroprotective properties for the 5-HT3 receptor antagonists in vitro and in vivo. When administered to Aβ-challenged rat cortical neurons, 5-HT3 receptor antagonists substantially abated apoptosis, elevation of cytosolic Ca(2), glutamate release, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and caspase-3 activity. In addition, in vivo studies show that 5-HT3 receptor antagonists possess, alongside their anti-emetic effects, notable immunomodulatory properties in CNS. We found that pretreatment with tropisetron significantly improved neurological deficits and diminished leukocyte transmigration into the brain, TNF-α level, and brain infarction in a murine model of embolic stroke. Our recent investigation revealed that tropisetron protects against Aβ-induced neurotoxicity in vivo through both 5-HT3 receptor-dependent and -independent pathways. Tropisetron, in vitro, was found to be an efficacious inhibitor of the signaling pathway leading to the activation of pro-inflammatory NF-κB, a transcription factor pivotal to the upregulation of several neuroinflammatory mediators in brain. This mini review summarizes novel evidence concerning effects of 5-HT3 antagonists and their possible mechanisms of action in ameliorating neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer, multiple sclerosis, and stroke. Further, we discuss some newly synthesized 5-HT3 receptor antagonists with dual properties of 5-HT3 receptor blockade/alpha-7 nicotinic receptor activator and their potential in management of memory impairment. Since 5-HT3 receptor antagonists possess a large therapeutic window, they can constitute a scaffold for design and synthesis of new neuroprotective medications.

  5. Spinal 5-HT3 receptor mediates nociceptive effect on central neuropathic pain; possible therapeutic role for tropisetron

    PubMed Central

    Nasirinezhad, Farinaz; Hosseini, Marjan; Karami, Zohre; Yousefifard, Mahmoud; Janzadeh, Autosa

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To test the analgesic effect of 5-HT-3 receptor antagonist, tropisetron, in a clip compression injury model of spinal cord pain in rats. Methods Four weeks post compression of the spinal cord at lumbar level, tropisetron was administered intrathecally at 100 μg and 150 μg dosages. Behavioral tests were assessed before administration. Fifteen minutes after injection, behavioral tests were repeated. Randall-Sellitto and plantar test was used for mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia, respectively. Mechanical and cold allodynia were evaluated by Von Frey filament and acetone droplets, respectively. The analgesic effect of tropisetron was compared with intrathecal administration of salicylate. Locomotor score was evaluated by Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan (BBB) test every week after spinal cord injury. Results Intrathecal administration of tropisetron, decreased hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia, but not cold allodynia were observed after compression of the spinal cord. Conclusion Blockade of 5-HT-3 receptors by tropisetron at the spinal level induces an antinociceptive effect on chronic central neuropathic pain and suggests that this compound may have potential clinical utility for the management of central neuropathic pain, particularly in patients with hyperalgesia and tactile allodynia. PMID:26338446

  6. Downregulated hypothalamic 5-HT3 receptor expression and enhanced 5-HT3 receptor antagonist-mediated improvement in fatigue-like behaviour in cholestatic rats.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, H; Wang, H; le, T; Ho, W; Sharkey, K A; Swain, M G

    2008-03-01

    The serotonin neurotransmitter system, including the 5-HT(3) receptor, has been implicated in the genesis of fatigue in patients with liver disease. Therefore, we examined the possible role of 5-HT(3) receptors in cholestasis-associated fatigue. Rats were either bile duct resected (BDR) or sham resected and studied 10 days postsurgery. A significant decrease in hypothalamic 5-HT(3) receptor expression was detected by immunohistochemistry and Western blot in BDR vs sham rats, coupled with increased hypothalamic serotonin turnover identified by an elevated 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) to 5-HT ratio in BDR vs sham rats. To examine fatigue-like behaviour, an activity meter was used. BDR rats exhibited significantly lower locomotor activity than did sham animals. Subcutaneous injection of the 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist tropisetron (0.1 mg kg(-1)) resulted in significantly increased locomotor activity in BDR rats compared to the activity in saline-treated controls, but was without effect in sham rats. However, a 10-fold higher dose of tropisetron significantly increased locomotor activity in both BDR and sham rats compared to saline-injected controls. These findings indicate that cholestasis in the rat is associated with increased hypothalamic serotonin turnover, decreased hypothalamic 5-HT(3) receptor expression, and enhanced sensitivity to locomotor activation induced by 5-HT(3) receptor antagonism, thereby implicating the 5-HT(3) receptor system in cholestasis associated fatigue.

  7. [Medical economics evaluation of 5-HT3 receptor antagonist drugs].

    PubMed

    Utsunomiya, Junpei; Hirano, Shigeki; Fukui, Aiko; Funabashi, Kazuaki; Deguchi, Yuko; Yamada, Susumu; Naito, Kazuyuki

    2010-10-01

    At Komaki City Hospital, the drug cost in connection with cancer chemotherapy was re-examined as part of improved management along with the introduction of DPC in July 2008. With due attention to the 5-HT3 receptor antagonists, both the change from injections to oral drugs and the change from brand-name drugs to generic drugs were tried between July 2008 and June 2009. After that, in order to examine the economic impact of these changes, we investigated and analyzed the number of medications, the cost of medicine purchased, and the average drug cost per medication of the 5-HT3 receptor antagonists between April 2008 and September 2009. As a result, the cost of 5-HT3 receptor antagonists purchased decreased greatly, and the impact of the improvement was mainly due to the change to oral drugs, and partially to the change to generic drugs. Therefore, from the viewpoint of hospital economic improvement in DPC, it was thought that the change to oral drugs(5-HT3 receptor antagonists)is given top priority.

  8. 5-HT3 receptors antagonists reduce serotonin-induced scratching in mice.

    PubMed

    Ostadhadi, Sattar; Kordjazy, Nastaran; Haj-Mirzaian, Arya; Mansouri, Parvin; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2015-06-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) acts as a pruritogen in humans and animals, but the mechanisms of action through that serotonin induces itch response have not been extensively discovered. In our study, we attempted to investigate the role of 5-HT3 receptors in scratching behavior due to intradermal serotonin injection. Intradermal injection of serotonin (14.1-235 nmol/site) into the nape of the neck of mice was performed to elicit itch. Scratching behavior was evaluated by measuring the number of bouts during 60 min after injection. We evaluated the effect of intraperitoneal pretreatment with ondansetron and tropisetron (0.1, 0.3, and 1 mg/kg) on itch induced by serotonin. Also, intradermal ondansetron and tropisetron at doses 50, 100, and 200 nmol/site were concurrently administrated with serotonin. Serotonin produced a significant enhancement in scratching at dose 141 nmol/site. Concurrent administration of ondansetron (50, 100, and 200 nmol/site) and tropisetron (100 and 200 nmol/site) with serotonin reduced scratching activity compared to the animals that only received serotonin. Also, pretreatment with intraperitoneal ondansetron and tropisetron (0.3 and 1 mg/kg) 30 min before serotonin attenuated the itch response. We showed that the scratching induced by intradermal serotonin is mediated by 5-HT3 receptors subtype. It can be concluded that 5-HT3 may play a role in mediating serotonin-associated itch responses, and we introduce 5-HT3 receptors as possible targets for antipruritic agents.

  9. Local-anesthetic like inhibition of the cardiac sodium channel Nav1.5 α-subunit by 5-HT3 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Van't Klooster, Mariet P; Foadi, Nilufar; Hage, Axel; Stoetzer, Carsten; Wegner, Florian; Eberhardt, Mirjam; Leffler, Andreas

    2016-10-15

    5-hydroxytryptamine 3 receptor (5-HT3 receptor) antagonists are administered for prevention and therapy of nausea and vomiting. Although regarded as safe therapeutics, they can also provoke arrhythmias by prolonging the QRS interval. However, the mechanisms mediating this cardiotoxicity are poorly understood. Here we investigated effects of 5-HT3 receptor antagonists on the cardiac Na(+) channel Nav1.5. We explored the interaction of dolasetron, tropisetron, granisetron and ondansetron on the human α-subunit Nav1.5 heterologously expressed in HEK293 cells. Sodium currents were explored by means of whole-cell patch clamp recordings. All four substances inhibited the Nav1.5 in a concentration and state-dependent manner. Dolasetron displayed the lowest blocking efficacy, and tropisetron was the most potent blocker with a half maximum blocking concentration of 18µM for tonic block of inactivated channels. Tropisetron was also the most potent use-dependent inhibitor, and it also induced a strong open -channel block. Both tonic and use-dependent block by tropisetron were abbreviated on the local-anesthetic insensitive mutant Nav1.5-F1760A. Co-administration of tropisetron and the local anesthetic bupivacaine or the hypnotic propofol augmented inhibition of Nav1.5. Our data demonstrate that 5-HT3 receptor antagonists induce a local-anesthetic like inhibition of Nav1.5, and that they display different blocking efficacies. Reports on a relevant cardiotoxicity of dolasetron as opposed to other 5-HT3 receptor antagonists do not seem to correlate with a block of Nav1.5. As inhibition of Nav1.5 was enhanced by propofol and bupivacaine however, it is possible that a combined administration of Na(+) channel blockers and 5-HT3 receptor antagonists can provoke arrhythmias.

  10. Synergistic antiemetic interactions between serotonergic 5-HT3 and tachykininergic NK1-receptor antagonists in the least shrew (Cryptotis parva).

    PubMed

    Darmani, Nissar A; Chebolu, Seetha; Amos, Barry; Alkam, Tursun

    2011-10-01

    Significant electrophysiological and biochemical findings suggest that receptor cross-talk occurs between serotonergic 5-HT(3)- and tachykininergic NK(1)-receptors in which co-activation of either receptor by ineffective doses of their corresponding agonists (serotonin (5-HT) or substance P (SP), respectively) potentiates the activity of the other receptor to produce a response. In contrast, selective blockade of any one of these receptors attenuates the increase in abdominal vagal afferent activity caused by either 5-HT or SP. This interaction has important implications in chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) since 5-HT(3)- and NK(1)-receptor antagonists are the major classes of antiemetics used in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate whether the discussed interaction produces effects at the behavioral level in a vomit-competent species, the least shrew. Our results demonstrate that pretreatment with either a 5-HT(3) (tropisetron)- or an NK(1) (CP99,994)-receptor specific antagonist, attenuates vomiting caused by a selective agonist (2-methyl 5-HT or GR73632, respectively) of both emetic receptors. In addition, relative to each antagonist alone, their combined doses were 4-20 times more potent against vomiting caused by each emetogen. Moreover, combined sub-maximal doses of the agonists 2-methyl 5-HT and GR73632, produced 8-12 times greater number of vomits relative to each emetogen tested alone. However, due to large variability in vomiting caused by the combination doses, the differences failed to attain significance. The antiemetic dose-response curves of tropisetron against both emetogens were U-shaped probably because larger doses of this antagonist behave as a partial agonist. The data demonstrate that 5-HT(3)- and NK(1)-receptors cross-talk to produce vomiting, and that synergistic antiemetic effects occur when both corresponding antagonists are concurrently used against emesis caused by each

  11. Is All Radiation-Induced Emesis Ameliorated by 5-HT3 Receptor Antagonists

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    5 - HT3 receptor antagonists ;~// 9-72 Bernard M.I Rabin 0’) and Gregory L. Kingt2) -) Behavioral Sciences and 2 PhYSzo~o~y Dcpiarlrnvni . Arm,. ii - R...RY Exposing ferrets to gamuma rays or X-rays produces vomiting that can be attenuated by 5 - HT3 receptor antagonists and by subdiaphraqmatic vagotomy...Pretreating ferrets with serotonin type-3 ( 5 - HT3 ) receptor antagonists or performing bilateral subdiaphragmatic vagotomy reliably attenuates the

  12. Interaction of Pyridostigmine with the 5-HT(3) Receptor Antagonist Ondansetron in Guinea Pigs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-13

    5 - HT3 RECEPTOR - ANTAGONIST .ONDANSETRON IN GUINEA PIGS BR. Capacio, CE. Byers...apart. REFERENCES 1. Fozard JR. 5 -HT; The Enigma Variations. =JE, 8, 501-506 (December 1987). 2. Watling KJ. 5 - HT3 Receptor Agonists and Antagonists . In... 5 -HT receptor subtype three antagonists (5HT 3 ) such as the compound ondansetron (OND) have been identified as useful in the treatment of

  13. Effects of iodoproxyfan, a potent and selective histamine H3 receptor antagonist, on alpha 2 and 5-HT3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Schlicker, E; Pertz, H; Bitschnau, H; Purand, K; Kathmann, M; Elz, S; Schunack, W

    1995-07-01

    We determined the affinity and/or potency of the novel H3 receptor antagonist iodoproxyfan at alpha 2 and 5-HT3 receptors. Iodoproxyfan and rauwolscine (a reference alpha 2 ligand) (i) monophasically displaced 3H-rauwolscine binding to rat brain cortex membranes (pKi 6.79 and 8.59); (ii) facilitated the electrically evoked tritium overflow from superfused mouse brain cortex slices preincubated with 3H-noradrenaline (pEC50 6.46 and 7.91) and (iii) produced rightward shifts of the concentration-response curve (CRC) of (unlabelled) noradrenaline for its inhibitory effect on the evoked overflow (pA2 6.65 and 7.88). In the guinea-pig ileum, iodoproxyfan 6.3 mumol/l failed to evoke a contraction by itself but depressed the maximum of the CRC of 5-hydroxytryptamine (pD'2 5.24). Tropisetron (a reference 5-HT3 antagonist) produced rightward shifts of the CRC of 5-hydroxytryptamine (pA2 7.84). In conclusion, the affinity/potency of iodoproxyfan at H3 receptors (range 8.3-9.7 [1]) exceeds that at alpha 2 receptors by at least 1.5 log units and that at 5-HT3 receptors by at least 3 log units.

  14. The muscarinic antagonists scopolamine and atropine are competitive antagonists at 5-HT3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Lochner, Martin; Thompson, Andrew J

    2016-09-01

    Scopolamine is a high affinity muscarinic antagonist that is used for the prevention of post-operative nausea and vomiting. 5-HT3 receptor antagonists are used for the same purpose and are structurally related to scopolamine. To examine whether 5-HT3 receptors are affected by scopolamine we examined the effects of this drug on the electrophysiological and ligand binding properties of 5-HT3A receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes and HEK293 cells, respectively. 5-HT3 receptor-responses were reversibly inhibited by scopolamine with an IC50 of 2.09 μM. Competitive antagonism was shown by Schild plot (pA2 = 5.02) and by competition with the 5-HT3 receptor antagonists [(3)H]granisetron (Ki = 6.76 μM) and G-FL (Ki = 4.90 μM). The related molecule, atropine, similarly inhibited 5-HT evoked responses in oocytes with an IC50 of 1.74 μM, and competed with G-FL with a Ki of 7.94 μM. The reverse experiment revealed that granisetron also competitively bound to muscarinic receptors (Ki = 6.5 μM). In behavioural studies scopolamine is used to block muscarinic receptors and induce a cognitive deficit, and centrally administered concentrations can exceed the IC50 values found here. It is therefore possible that 5-HT3 receptors are also inhibited. Studies that utilise higher concentrations of scopolamine should be mindful of these potential off-target effects.

  15. Method for individualized evaluation of antiemetic effect induced by 5-HT3 receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hironori; Yokoyama, Haruko; Yoshimoto, Koichi; Nakajima, Akihiro; Okuyama, Kiyoshi; Iwase, Osamu; Yamada, Yasuhiko

    2013-01-01

    5-HT3 receptor antagonists are widely used for prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, though their antiemetic effects vary among patients. We investigated a method for evaluation of antiemetic effects in individual patients. We used the 5-HT3 receptor occupancy of serotonin for our evaluation, which was estimated based on the plasma concentration of granisetron and concentration of serotonin near the 5-HT3 receptor in the small intestine, obtained by measuring the urinary concentrations of granisetron and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA)/creatinine (Cre). The mean cumulative percent for urinary excretion of granisetron at 24 h after administration and coefficient of variation were 16.19 ± 6.30% and 38.91%, respectively. The time course of urinary concentration of 5-HIAA/Cre also varied among the patients. The value for 5-HT3 receptor occupancy of serotonin without granisetron was higher than that prior to administration (blank), thus most treated patients had the possibility of induced emesis. In contrast, that with granisetron was lower than the blank value, indicating that those treated patients would not develop emesis. Furthermore, the estimated 5-HT3 receptor occupancy of serotonin in the small intestine and actual individual patient condition corresponded well, showing the validity of our method. Our results suggest that it is possible to evaluate individual antiemetic effects by estimating the 5-HT3 receptor occupancy of serotonin in the small intestine based on plasma concentrations of granisetron and serotonin near the 5-HT3 receptor in the small intestine using noninvasive urine samples. This method of individual evaluation is considered to be useful and effective.

  16. The antimalarial drug proguanil is an antagonist at 5-HT3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Lochner, Martin; Thompson, Andrew J

    2014-12-01

    Proguanil is an antimalarial prodrug that is metabolized to 4-chlorophenyl-1-biguanide (CPB) and the active metabolite cycloguanil (CG). These compounds are structurally related to meta-chlorophenyl biguanide (mCPBG), a 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 (5-HT3) receptor agonist. Here we examine the effects of proguanil and its metabolites on the electrophysiology and ligand-binding properties of human 5-HT3A receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes and human embryonic kidney 293 cells, respectively. 5-HT3 receptor responses were reversibly inhibited by proguanil, with an IC50 of 1.81 μM. Competitive antagonism was shown by a lack of voltage-dependence, Schild plot (Kb = 1.70 μM), and radioligand competition (Ki = 2.61 μM) with the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist [(3)H]granisetron. Kinetic measurements (kon = 4.0 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) ; koff = 0.23 s(-1)) were consistent with a simple bimolecular reaction scheme with a Kb of 4.35 μM. The metabolites CG and CPB similarly inhibited 5-HT3 receptors as assessed by IC50 (1.48 and 4.36 μM, respectively), Schild plot (Kb = 2.97 and 11.4 μM), and radioligand competition (Ki = 4.89 and 0.41 μM). At higher concentrations, CPB was a partial agonist (EC50 = 14.1 μM; I/Imax = 0.013). These results demonstrate that proguanil competitively inhibits 5-HT3 receptors, with an IC50 that exceeds whole-blood concentrations following its oral administration. They may therefore be responsible for the occasional gastrointestinal side effects, nausea, and vomiting reported following its use. Clinical development of related compounds should therefore consider effects at 5-HT3 receptors as an early indication of possible unwanted gastrointestinal side effects.

  17. Serotonin (5-HT3) receptor antagonists for the reduction of symptoms of low anterior resection syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Itagaki, Ryohei; Koda, Keiji; Yamazaki, Masato; Shuto, Kiyohiko; Kosugi, Chihiro; Hirano, Atsushi; Arimitsu, Hidehito; Shiragami, Risa; Yoshimura, Yukino; Suzuki, Masato

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT])3 receptor antagonists are effective for the treatment of diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D), in which exaggerated intestinal/colonic hypermotility is often observed. Recent studies have suggested that the motility disorder, especially spastic hypermotility, seen in the neorectum following sphincter-preserving operations for rectal cancer may be the basis of the postoperative defecatory malfunction seen in these patients. We investigated the efficacy of 5-HT3 receptor antagonists in patients suffering from severe low anterior resection syndrome. Patients and methods A total of 25 male patients with complaints of uncontrollable urgency or fecal incontinence following sphincter-preserving operations were enrolled in this study. Defecatory status, assessed on the basis of incontinence score (0–20), urgency grade (0–3), and number of toilet visits per day, was evaluated using a questionnaire before and 1 month after the administration of the 5-HT3 antagonist ramosetron. Results All the parameters assessed improved significantly after taking ramosetron for 1 month. The effect was more prominent in cases whose anastomotic line was lower, ie, inside the anal canal. Defecatory function was better in patients who commenced ramosetron therapy within 6 months postoperatively, as compared to those who were not prescribed ramosetron for more than 7 months postoperatively. Conclusion These results suggest that 5-HT3 antagonists are effective for the treatment of low anterior resection syndrome, as in diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome. The improvement in symptoms is not merely time dependent, but it is related to treatment with 5-HT3 antagonists. PMID:24648748

  18. Changes in characteristics of the specific binding of [3H]LY-278584, a 5-HT3-receptor antagonist, on differentiated NG108-15 cells.

    PubMed

    Matsushima, Kayoko; Imanishi, Takashi; Asano, Hajime; Funakami, Yoshinori; Wada, Tetsuyuki; Ichida, Seiji

    2010-01-01

    We have reported previously that the concentration of intracellular Ca2+ evoked by serotonin (5-HT) was significantly augmented in differentiated NG108-15 (NG) cells treated with dibutyryl cAMP and the enhanced response occurred via 5-HT3 receptors. We investigated changes in the characteristics for specific binding of [(3)H]LY-278584 (a specific antagonist of the 5-HT3 receptor) on membranes from differentiated NG cells. The results indicated that the K(d) and B(max) values for the specific binding to differentiated NG cells were significantly smaller and larger, respectively, than those for undifferentiated NG cells. The binding was significantly inhibited by 10 nM tropisetron, a specific 5-HT3-receptor antagonist, but not by any other types of 5-HT-receptor antagonists. These results suggested that the enhanced response by 5-HT in differentiated NG cells was due to both qualitative and quantitative changes in the 5-HT3 receptor.

  19. Ondansetron, a selective 5-HT3 antagonist, antagonizes methamphetamine-induced anorexia in mice.

    PubMed

    Ginawi, O T; Al-Majed, A A; Al-Suwailem, A K

    2005-03-01

    Effects of some selective serotonergic (5-HT) antagonists on methamphetamine-induced anorexia were investigated in male mice. The least possible dose of methamphetamine alone that caused significant anorectic activity was 11 micromolkg(-1), i.p. (2 mgkg(-1)). Various doses of some selective serotonergic receptor antagonists were administered half an hour before the above mentioned dose of methamphetamine. Methiothepin potentiated, whereas NAN-190, methysergide, mianserin and ondansetron antagonized methamphetamine-induced anorectic activity. The least possible doses of these antagonists which modified methamphetamine-induced anorexia were as follows: methiothepin (1.1 micromolkg(-1), i.p.), NAN-190 (4.2 micromolkg(-1), i.p.), methysergide (2.1 micromolkg(-1), i.p.), mianserin (3.3 micromolkg(-1), i.p.) and ondansetron (0.003 micromolkg(-1), i.p.). The serotonergic antagonists at the above mentioned doses did not modify the food intake of animals not treated with methamphetamine, except for methiothepin, which produced a significant reduction, and mianserin, which produced a significant increase in food intake. The results of the present study indicated that the anorectic activity induced by methamphetamine is related to the interactions of methamphetamine with 5-HT receptor. Since a very small dose (0.003 micromolkg(-1)) of ondansetron (the 5-HT(3) antagonist), as compared with the other antagonists used in this study, antagonized the anorexia induced by methamphetamine, the 5-HT(3) receptor is likely to be the site for this interaction.

  20. Theoretical evaluation of antiemetic effects of 5-HT3 receptor antagonists for prevention of vomiting induced by cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hironori; Yokoyama, Haruko; Takayanagi, Risa; Yoshimoto, Koichi; Nakajima, Akihiro; Okuyama, Kiyoshi; Iwase, Osamu; Yamada, Yasuhiko

    2015-03-01

    5-HT(3) receptor antagonists are widely used as antiemetic agents in clinical setting, of which palonosetron, with a long elimination half life (t(1/2)), has recently become available. It is important to evaluate the concentration of serotonin when investigating the antiemetic effects of 5-HT(3) receptor antagonists, as those effects are not based solely on the t(1/2) value. We theoretically evaluated the antiemetic effects of three 5-HT(3) receptor antagonists (granisetron, azasetron, palonosetron) on cisplatin-induced nausea and vomiting by estimating the time course of the 5-HT(3) receptor occupancy of serotonin. We estimated the 5-HT(3) receptor occupancy of serotonin in the small intestine, based on the time course of plasma concentration of each 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist and the time course of concentration of serotonin near the 5-HT(3) receptor in the small intestine after administration of cisplatin. The antiemetic effect of each 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist was evaluated based on the normal level of 5-HT(3) receptor occupancy of serotonin. Our results suggest that an adequate antiemetic effect will be provided when a dose of 75 mg/m(2) of cisplatin is given to patients along with any single administration of granisetron, azasetron, or palonosetron at a usual dose. On the other hand, the 5-HT(3) receptor occupancy of serotonin was found to be significantly lower than normal for several days after administration of palonosetron, as compared to granisetron and azasetron, indicating that constipation may be induced. Our results show that granisetron, azasetron, and palonosetron each have an adequate antiemetic effect after administration of 75 mg/m(2) of cisplatin.

  1. [Cost-effectiveness analysis of 5-HT3 receptor antagonist drugs in cancer chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Ishimaru, Hiromasa; Takayama, Shinji; Shiokawa, Mitsuru; Inoue, Tadao

    2008-04-01

    Recently, ambulatory treatment centers (ATC) are markedly increasingboth in number and scale. It is therefore important to consolidate an efficient therapeutic system. A decrease in both treatment time and waitingtime leads to not only the improvement of the quality of life (QOL) for patients but also the efficient use of personnel and running costs for medical institutions by reducingthe bed occupation rate. In ATC, 5-HT3 receptor antagonists are extensively used for high emetic risk patients. However, their high cost and prolonged treatment causes one of the problems in improvingthe efficiency of the therapeutic system when they are administered by intravenous infusion. Amongthe 4 types of 5-HT3 receptor antagonists (injections) currently available in Japan, azasetron is the only drugthat is not designated as a powerful drug and that can be administered by bolus intravenous infusion. In this study, we investigated azasetron and granisetron from the standpoint of pharmacoeconomics with a simulation model using the results of clinical studies in Japan. Accordingto the results of cost-effectiveness analysis, therapeutic and time costs per patient for azasetron 10 mgand granisetron 2 mg (calculated in consideration of both medical institutions and patients) was 8,219 and 10,193 yen, respectively. This gap was attributable to the time loss due to the difference in administration methods. The result suggests that this time loss is more significant not only for patients but also for medical staff than the loss attributable to the drugcost. Furthermore, the bolus intravenous infusion of azasetron is considered superior to the non-bolus intravenous infusion of granisetron from a pharmacoeconomic standpoint. It is desirable to choose the appropriate administration method of 5-HT3 receptor antagonists in various chemotherapy regimens for the purpose of reducingthe treatment time and promotingthe efficiency of the therapeutic system at ATCs.

  2. 2-Amino-6-chloro-3,4-dihydroquinazoline: A novel 5-HT3 receptor antagonist with antidepressant character.

    PubMed

    Dukat, Małgorzata; Alix, Katie; Worsham, Jessica; Khatri, Shailesh; Schulte, Marvin K

    2013-11-01

    2-Amino-6-chloro-3,4-dihydroquinazoline HCl (A6CDQ, 4) binds at 5-HT3 serotonin receptors and displays antidepressant-like action in the mouse tail suspension test (TST). Empirically, 4 was demonstrated to be a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist (two-electrode voltage clamp recordings using frog oocytes; IC50=0.26μM), and one that should readily penetrate the blood-brain barrier (logP=1.86). 5-HT3 receptor antagonists represent a potential approach to the development of new antidepressants, and 4 is an example of a structurally novel 5-HT3 receptor antagonist that is active in a preclinical antidepressant model (i.e., the mouse TST).

  3. 5-HT3 receptor influences the washing phenotype and visual organization in obsessive-compulsive disorder supporting 5-HT3 receptor antagonists as novel treatment option.

    PubMed

    Lennertz, Leonhard; Wagner, Michael; Grabe, Hans Jörgen; Franke, Petra E; Guttenthaler, Vera; Rampacher, Friederike; Schulze-Rauschenbach, Svenja; Vogeley, Andrea; Benninghoff, Jens; Ruhrmann, Stephan; Pukrop, Ralf; Klosterkötter, Joachim; Falkai, Peter; Maier, Wolfgang; Mössner, Rainald

    2014-01-01

    A role of the HTR3A-E genes in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) can be expected based on promising effects of 5-HT3 receptor antagonists as adjunctive treatment of OCD. We therefore genotyped six common coding or promoter variants within the HTR3A-E genes in a case-control-sample consisting of N=236 OCD patients and N=310 control subjects and in N=58 parent-child-trios. Given the heterogeneous OCD phenotype, we also investigated OCD symptom dimensions and cognitive endophenotypes in subsamples. OCD patients scoring high for the washing subtype were significantly more likely to carry the c.256G-allele of the HTR3E variant rs7627615 (p=0.0001) as compared to OCD patients low for this symptom dimension. Visual organization was impaired in OCD patients and unaffected relatives as compared to healthy control subjects and carriers of the HTR3E c.256G/c.256G-genotype performed significantly worse (p=0.007). The case-control analyses revealed a nominal significant association of the HTR3D variant rs1000592 (p.H52R) with OCD (p=0.029) which was also evident after combination of the case-control and the trio-results (p=0.024). In male subjects, the variant rs6766410 (p.N163K) located in the HTR3C was significantly associated with OCD (p=0.007). The association findings of the HTR3C and the HTR3E remained significant after correction for the number of variants investigated. These findings indicate a role of common variants of the HTR3A-E genes in OCD and OCD-related phenotypes and further support the use of 5-HT3 receptor antagonists as novel treatment options. The HTR3E gene is a novel candidate gene impacting on the individual expression of OC symptoms and OCD-related cognitive dysfunction.

  4. Comparative Pharmacology and Guide to the Use of the Serotonin 5-HT3 Receptor Antagonists for Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting.

    PubMed

    Kovac, Anthony L

    2016-12-01

    Since the introduction of the serotonin 5-hydroxy tryptamine 3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonists in the early 1990s, the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) and post-discharge nausea and vomiting (PDNV) has decreased, yet continues to be a problem for the surgical patient. The clinical application of the 5-HT3 receptor antagonists has helped define the approach and role of these antiemetics in the prevention and treatment of PONV and PDNV. Pharmacological and clinical differences exist among these medications resulting in corresponding differences in effectiveness, safety, optimal dosage, time of administration, and use as combination and rescue antiemetic therapy. The clinical application of the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist antiemetics has improved the prevention and treatment of PONV and PDNV. The most recent consensus guidelines for PONV published in 2014 outline the use of these antiemetics. The 5-HT3 receptor antagonists play an important role to help prevent PONV and PDNV in perioperative care pathways such as Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS). Comparisons and guidelines for use of the 5-HT3 receptor antagonists in relation to the risk for PONV and PDNV are reviewed.

  5. Impact of 5-HT3 receptor antagonists on chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background 1st generation 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor antagonists (5-HT3 RAs), and palonosetron, a 2nd generation 5-HT3 RA, are indicated for the prevention of chemotherapy (CT)-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) associated with moderately (MEC) and highly emetogenic CT agents (HEC). This study explores the impact of step therapy policies requiring use of an older 5-HT3 RA before palonosetron on risk of CINV associated with hospital or emergency department (ED) admissions. Methods Patients who received cyclophosphamide post breast cancer (BC) surgery or who were diagnosed with lung cancer on carboplatin (LC-carboplatin) or cisplatin (LC-cisplatin) were selected from PharMetrics’ (IMS LifeLink) claims dataset (2005-2008). Patients were followed for 6 months from initial CT administration for CINV events identified through ICD-9-CM codes. Patients were grouped into those initiated with older, generic 5-HT3 RAs (ondansetron, granisetron, and dolasetron) and those initiated and maintained on palonosetron throughout study follow-up. CINV events and CINV days were analyzed using multivariate regressions controlling for demographic and clinical variables. Results Eligible patients numbered 3,606 in BC, 4,497 in LC-carboplatin and 1,154 in LC-cisplatin cohorts, with 52%, 40%, and 34% in the palonosetron group, respectively. There was no significant difference between the two 5-HT3 RA groups in age or Charlson Comorbidity Index among the two MEC cohorts (BC and LC-carboplatin). Among the LC-cisplatin cohort, palonosetron users were older with more males than the older 5-HT3 RA group (age: 60.1 vs. 61.3; males, 66.9% vs. 56.9%). Compared to the older 5-HT3 RAs, the palonosetron groups incurred 22%-51% fewer 5-HT3 RA pharmacy claims, had fewer patients with CINV events (3.5% vs. 5.5% in BC, 9.5% vs. 12.8% in LC-carboplatin, 16.4% vs. 21.7% in LC-cisplatin), and had lower risk for CINV events (odds ratios 0.62, 0.71, or 0.71, respectively; p < 0.05). The BC and LC

  6. MDL72222, a serotonin 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, blocks MDMA's ability to establish a conditioned place preference.

    PubMed

    Bilsky, E J; Reid, L D

    1991-06-01

    Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) has previously been shown to produce a positive conditioned place preference (CPP) among rats. Here the effects of doses of a specific 5-HT3 antagonist, MDL72222, on MDMA's ability to produce a CPP were assessed. A dose of MDL72222 (0.03 mg/kg) blocked the establishment of a MDMA CPP. These results support the suggestions that compounds affecting the 5-HT3 receptor may be of particular interest in studying the pharmacology of self-administered drugs.

  7. The antiemetic 5-HT3 receptor antagonist Palonosetron inhibits substance P-mediated responses in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Camilo; Li, Ying; Zhang, Jie; Stathis, Marigo; Alt, Jesse; Thomas, Ajit G; Cantoreggi, Sergio; Sebastiani, Silvia; Pietra, Claudio; Slusher, Barbara S

    2010-11-01

    Palonosetron is the only 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist approved for the treatment of delayed chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) in moderately emetogenic chemotherapy. Accumulating evidence suggests that substance P (SP), the endogenous ligand acting preferentially on neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptors, not serotonin (5-HT), is the dominant mediator of delayed emesis. However, palonosetron does not bind to the NK-1 receptor. Recent data have revealed cross-talk between the NK-1 and 5HT(3) receptor signaling pathways; we postulated that if palonosetron differentially inhibited NK-1/5-HT(3) cross-talk, it could help explain its efficacy profile in delayed emesis. Consequently, we evaluated the effect of palonosetron, granisetron, and ondansetron on SP-induced responses in vitro and in vivo. NG108-15 cells were preincubated with palonosetron, granisetron, or ondansetron; antagonists were removed and the effect on serotonin enhancement of SP-induced calcium release was measured. In the absence of antagonist, serotonin enhanced SP-induced calcium-ion release. After preincubation with palonosetron, but not ondansetron or granisetron, the serotonin enhancement of the SP response was inhibited. Rats were treated with cisplatin and either palonosetron, granisetron, or ondansetron. At various times after dosing, single neuronal recordings from nodose ganglia were collected after stimulation with SP; nodose ganglia neuronal responses to SP were enhanced when the animals were pretreated with cisplatin. Palonosetron, but not ondansetron or granisetron, dose-dependently inhibited the cisplatin-induced SP enhancement. The results are consistent with previous data showing that palonosetron exhibits distinct pharmacology versus the older 5-HT(3) receptor antagonists and provide a rationale for the efficacy observed with palonosetron in delayed CINV in the clinic.

  8. QoL evaluation of olanzapine for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting comparing with 5-HT3 receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Liu, J; Tan, L; Zhang, H; Li, H; Liu, X; Yan, Z; Chen, J; Yang, H; Zhang, D

    2015-05-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of olanzapine in preventing chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) and improving the quality of life (QoL) of patients with cancer during chemotherapy. Two hundred twenty-nine patients with cancer who received chemotherapy from January 2008 to August 2008 were enrolled, and they were randomised to receive olanzapine or a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist. The patients completed a CINV questionnaire once daily on days 1-5 and a QoL questionnaire on days 0 and 6. The complete response (CR) rates for nausea (76.85% versus 46.2%) and vomiting (84.3% versus 67.6%) were significantly higher in the olanzapine group than in the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist group for delayed CINV but not for acute CINV. The CR rates for nausea (76.85% versus 44.44%) and vomiting (85.95% versus 67.59%) were also significantly higher in the olanzapine group for the 5 days post-chemotherapy. After chemotherapy, global health status, emotional functioning, and insomnia were improved in the olanzapine group but worsened in the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist group, whereas cognitive functioning and appetite loss were unchanged. Moreover, olanzapine significantly improved global health status, emotional functioning, social functioning, fatigue, nausea/vomiting, insomnia, and appetite loss. Olanzapine improved the QoL of patients with cancer during chemotherapy, in part by reducing the incidence of delayed CINV.

  9. Effects of repeated daily treatments with a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist on dopamine neurotransmission and functional activity of 5-HT3 receptors within the nucleus accumbens of Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen; Thielen, Richard J; McBride, William J

    2006-06-01

    A previous study indicated that pretreatment with repeated daily injections of serotonin-3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonists subsequently reduced the effectiveness of the 5-HT3 antagonists to attenuate ethanol intake under 24-h free-choice conditions; one possibility to account for this is that the functional activity of the 5-HT3 receptor may have been altered by prior treatment with the antagonists. The present experiments were conducted to examine the effects of local perfusion of the 5-HT3 agonist 1-(m-chlorophenyl)-biguanide (CPBG) on the extracellular levels of dopamine (DA) in the nucleus accumbens (ACB) and ventral tegmental area (VTA) of adult male Wistar rats that had received repeated daily injections of the 5-HT3 antagonist, MDL 72222 (MDL). In vivo microdialysis was used to test the hypothesis that alterations in 5-HT3 receptor function have occurred with repeated antagonist injections. One group was given daily injections of MDL (1 mg/kg, s.c.) for 10 consecutive days (MDL group), and the other group was administered saline for 10 days (saline group). On the day after the last treatment, rats were implanted with a unilateral guide cannula aimed at either the ACB or VTA. Two days later, the microdialysis probe was inserted into the guide cannula; on the next day, microdialysis experiments were conducted to determine the extracellular levels of DA in the ACB or VTA. Local perfusion of CPBG (17.5, 35, 70 microM) in the ACB significantly stimulated DA release in the saline- and MDL-treated animals. In terms of percent baseline, the CPBG-stimulated DA release was higher in the MDL-treated group than in the saline-treated group in both the ACB and VTA; however, on the basis of the extracellular concentration, there were no significant differences in the ACB between the two groups. Using the no-net-flux microdialysis, it was determine that the basal extracellular concentration of DA in the ACB was approximately 60% lower in the MDL group than saline group; there

  10. Inhibition of temporomandibular joint input to medullary dorsal horn neurons by 5HT3 receptor antagonist in female rats

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Keiichiro; Katagiri, Ayano; Rahman, Mostafeezur; Thompson, Randall; Bereiter, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Repeated forced swim (FS) conditioning enhances nociceptive responses to temporomandibular joint (TMJ) stimulation in male and female rats. The basis for FS-induced TMJ hyperalgesia remains unclear. To test the hypothesis that serotonin 3 receptor (5HT3R) mechanisms contribute to enhanced TMJ nociception after FS, ovariectomized female rats were treated with estradiol and subjected to FS for three days. On day 4, rats were anesthetized with isoflurane and TMJ-responsive neurons were recorded from superficial and deep laminae at the trigeminal subnucleus caudalis/upper cervical (Vc/C1–2) region and electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded from the masseter muscle. Only Vc/C1–2 neurons activated by intra-TMJ injections of ATP were included for further analysis. Although neurons in both superficial and deep laminae were activated by ATP, only neurons in deep laminae displayed enhanced responses after FS. Local application of the 5HT3R antagonist, ondansetron (OND), at the Vc/C1–2 region reduced the ATP-evoked responses of neurons in superficial and deep laminae and reduced the EMG response in both sham and FS rats. OND also decreased the spontaneous firing rate of neurons in deep laminae and reduced the high threshold convergent cutaneous receptive field area of neurons in superficial and deep laminae in both sham and FS rats. These results revealed that central application of a 5HT3R antagonist, had widespread effects on the properties of TMJ-responsive neurons at the Vc/C1–2 region and on jaw muscle reflexes under sham and FS conditions. It is concluded that 5HT3R does not play a unique role in mediating stress-induced hyperalgesia related to TMJ nociception. PMID:25913635

  11. Antiemetic effects of YM060, a potent and selective serotonin (5HT)3-receptor antagonist, in ferrets and dogs.

    PubMed

    Kamato, T; Miyata, K; Ito, H; Yuki, H; Yamano, M; Honda, K

    1991-11-01

    YM060, (R)-5-[(1-methyl-3-indolyl)carbonyl]-4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-1H-benzimidazole hydrochloride, is a new serotonin (5HT)3-receptor antagonist. We examined the effects of YM060 on chemotherapeutic agent-, apomorphine- and copper sulfate-induced emesis. Intravenous YM060 potently prevented cisplatin (10 mg/kg, i.v.)-induced emesis with ED50 values of 0.06 (0.05-0.07) micrograms/kg, i.v. in ferrets. Based on the ED50 values, YM060 was 300, 20 and 100 times more potent than ondansetron, granisetron and the S-isomer of YM060, respectively. The relative potencies of these drugs described above were similar to those in the previously reported 5HT3-receptor antagonism. YM060 given orally also potently inhibited cisplatin (10 mg/kg, i.p.)- and cyclophosphamide (200 mg/kg, i.p.)-induced emesis in ferrets with ED50 values of 0.1 (0.09-0.11) and 0.02 (0.16-0.27) micrograms/kg, p.o., respectively. All tested 5HT3-receptor antagonists including YM060 failed to prevent apomorphine (0.1 mg/kg, s.c.)-induced emesis in dogs and copper sulfate (1%, 10 ml, p.o.)-induced emesis in ferrets. Our data indicate that YM060 is a highly potent inhibitor of chemotherapeutic agent-induced emesis and that the antiemetic effect of YM060 may be depend on 5HT3-receptor antagonism.

  12. Inhibition of temporomandibular joint input to medullary dorsal horn neurons by 5HT3 receptor antagonist in female rats.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, K; Katagiri, A; Rahman, M; Thompson, R; Bereiter, D A

    2015-07-23

    Repeated forced swim (FS) conditioning enhances nociceptive responses to temporomandibular joint (TMJ) stimulation in female rats. The basis for FS-induced TMJ hyperalgesia remains unclear. To test the hypothesis that serotonin 3 receptor (5HT3R) mechanisms contribute to enhanced TMJ nociception after FS, ovariectomized female rats were treated with estradiol and subjected to FS for three days. On day 4, rats were anesthetized with isoflurane and TMJ-responsive neurons were recorded from superficial and deep laminae at the trigeminal subnucleus caudalis/upper cervical (Vc/C1-2) region and electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded from the masseter muscle. Only Vc/C1-2 neurons activated by intra-TMJ injections of ATP were included for further analysis. Although neurons in both superficial and deep laminae were activated by ATP, only neurons in deep laminae displayed enhanced responses after FS. Local application of the 5HT3R antagonist, ondansetron (OND), at the Vc/C1-2 region reduced the ATP-evoked responses of neurons in superficial and deep laminae and reduced the EMG response in both sham and FS rats. OND also decreased the spontaneous firing rate of neurons in deep laminae and reduced the high-threshold convergent cutaneous receptive field area of neurons in superficial and deep laminae in both sham and FS rats. These results revealed that central application of a 5HT3R antagonist, had widespread effects on the properties of TMJ-responsive neurons at the Vc/C1-2 region and on jaw muscle reflexes under sham and FS conditions. It is concluded that 5HT3R does not play a unique role in mediating stress-induced hyperalgesia related to TMJ nociception.

  13. Superagonist, Full Agonist, Partial Agonist, and Antagonist Actions of Arylguanidines at 5-Hydroxytryptamine-3 (5-HT3) Subunit A Receptors.

    PubMed

    Alix, Katie; Khatri, Shailesh; Mosier, Philip D; Casterlow, Samantha; Yan, Dong; Nyce, Heather L; White, Michael M; Schulte, Marvin K; Dukat, Małgorzata

    2016-11-16

    Introduction of minor variations to the substitution pattern of arylguanidine 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 (5-HT3) receptor ligands resulted in a broad spectrum of functionally-active ligands from antagonist to superagonist. For example, (i) introduction of an additional Cl-substituent(s) to our lead full agonist N-(3-chlorophenyl)guanidine (mCPG, 2; efficacy % = 106) yielded superagonists 7-9 (efficacy % = 186, 139, and 129, respectively), (ii) a positional isomer of 2, p-Cl analog 11, displayed partial agonist actions (efficacy % = 12), and (iii) replacing the halogen atom at the meta or para position with an electron donating OCH3 group or a stronger electron withdrawing (i.e., CF3) group resulted in antagonists 13-16. We posit based on combined mutagenesis, crystallographic, and computational analyses that for the 5-HT3 receptor, the arylguanidines that are better able to simultaneously engage the primary and complementary subunits, thus keeping them in close proximity, have greater agonist character while those that are deficient in this ability are antagonists.

  14. [Effect of the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist granisetron on estramustine phosphate sodium (Estracyt)-induced emesis in ferrets].

    PubMed

    Higashioka, Masaya; Yamaguchi, Emi; Takatori, Shingo; Tanaka, Mitsushi; Kyoi, Takashi

    2010-07-01

    Estracyt(R) is an antimitotic drug used for the treatment of prostate cancer, and its most common adverse effects are nausea and vomiting. In this study, we investigated the effect of a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, granisetron, on emesis induced in ferrets by estramustine phosphate sodium (EMP), the active ingredient of Estracyt. To clarify the mechanism of action of EMP-induced emesis, we also investigated the effect of EMP on the release of serotonin (5-HT) in the isolated rat ileum. EMP (3 mg/kg, per os) induced 75.3+/-10.2 retching episodes and 7.5+/-1.3 vomiting episodes during a 2-h observation period. The latency to the first emetic response was 58.0+/-13.5 min. Granisetron (0.1 mg/kg, per os) administered 1 h before the administration of EMP reduced the number of EMP-induced retching and vomiting episodes to 1.3+/-1.3 and 1.0+/-1.0, respectively, and prolonged the latency by a factor of almost two. EMP (10-5 and 10-4 M) increased 5-HT release from isolated rat ileum, and 10 -7 M granisetron almost completely inhibited the increase induced by 10-4 M EMP. These results suggest that EMP induces nausea and vomiting via 5-HT release from the ileum, and that 5-HT3 receptor antagonists may be useful to prevent gastrointestinal adverse effects that occur during treatment with Estracyt.

  15. Block of the delayed rectifier current (IK) by the 5-HT3 antagonists ondansetron and granisetron in feline ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    de Lorenzi, F G; Bridal, T R; Spinelli, W

    1994-10-01

    1. We investigated the effects of two 5-HT3 antagonists, ondansetron and granisetron, on the action potential duration (APD) and the delayed rectifier current (IK) of feline isolated ventricular myocytes. Whole-cell current and action potential recordings were performed at 37 degrees C with the patch clamp technique. 2. Ondansetron and granisetron blocked IK with a KD of 1.7 +/- 1.0 and 4.3 +/- 1.7 microM, respectively. At a higher concentration (30 microM), both drugs blocked the inward rectifier (IKl). 3. The block of IK was dependent on channel activation. Both drugs slowed the decay of IK tail currents and produced a crossover with the pre-drug current trace. These results are consistent with block and unblock from the open state of the channel. 4. Granisetron showed an intrinsic voltage-dependence as the block increased with depolarization. The equivalent voltage-dependency of block (delta) was 0.10 +/- 0.04, suggesting that granisetron blocks from the intracellular side at a binding site located 10% across the transmembrane electrical field. 5. Ondansetron (1 microM) and granisetron (3 microM) prolonged APD by about 30% at 0.5 Hz. The prolongation of APD by ondansetron was abolished at faster frequencies (3 Hz) showing reverse rate dependence. 6. In conclusion, the 5-HT3 antagonists, ondansetron and granisetron, are open state blockers of the ventricular delayed rectifier and show a clear class III action.

  16. The 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, ondansetron, blocks the development and expression of ethanol-induced locomotor sensitization in mice.

    PubMed

    Umathe, Sudhir N; Bhutada, Pravinkumar S; Raut, Vivek S; Jain, Nishant S; Mundhada, Yogita R

    2009-02-01

    Manipulation of the serotonergic system has been shown to alter ethanol sensitization. Ondansetron is a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, reported to attenuate cocaine and methamphetamine-induced behavioral sensitization, but no reports are available on its role in ethanol-induced behavioral sensitization. Therefore, an attempt has been made to assess this issue by using an earlier used animal model of ethanol-induced locomotor sensitization. Results indicated that ondansetron (0.25-1.0 mg/kg, subcutaneously) given before the challenge dose of ethanol (2.4 g/kg, intraperitoneally) injection, significantly and dose dependently attenuated the expression of sensitization. In addition, ondansetron (1.0 mg/kg, subcutaneously) given before ethanol injection on days 1, 4, 7, and 10 significantly blocked the development (days 1, 4, 7, and 10), and expression (day 15) of sensitization to the locomotor stimulant effect of ethanol injection. Ondansetron had no effect per se on locomotor activity and did not affect blood ethanol levels. Therefore, the results raise the possibility that ondansetron blocked the development and expression of ethanol-induced locomotor sensitization by acting on 5-HT3 receptors.

  17. A 5-HT3 receptor antagonist potentiates the behavioral, neurochemical and electrophysiological actions of an SSRI antidepressant.

    PubMed

    Bétry, C; Overstreet, D; Haddjeri, N; Pehrson, A L; Bundgaard, C; Sanchez, C; Mørk, A

    2015-04-01

    More effective treatments for major depression are needed. We studied if the selective 5-HT3 receptor antagonist ondansetron can potentiate the antidepressant potential of the selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) paroxetine using behavioral, neurochemical and electrophysiological methods. Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) rats, treated with ondansetron, and/or a sub-effective dose of paroxetine, were assessed in the forced swim test. The effects of an acute intravenous administration of each compound alone and in combination were evaluated with respect to 5-HT neuronal firing rate in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN). Effects of s.c. administration of the compounds alone and in combination on extracellular levels of 5-HT were assessed in the ventral hippocampus of freely moving rats by microdialysis. The results showed that ondansetron enhanced the antidepressant activity of paroxetine in the forced swim test. It partially prevented the suppressant effect of paroxetine on DRN 5-HT neuronal firing and enhanced the paroxetine-induced increase of hippocampal extracellular 5-HT release. These findings indicate that 5-HT3 receptor blockade potentiates the antidepressant effects of SSRIs. Since both paroxetine and ondansetron are used clinically, it might be possible to validate this augmentation strategy in depressed patients.

  18. Spatial orientation of the antagonist granisetron in the ligand-binding site of the 5-HT3 receptor.

    PubMed

    Yan, Dong; White, Michael M

    2005-08-01

    The serotonin type 3 receptor (5-HT(3)R) is a member of the cys-loop ligand-gated ion channel (LGIC) superfamily. Like almost all membrane proteins, high-resolution structural data are unavailable for this class of receptors. We have taken advantage of the high degree of homology between LGICs and the acetylcholine binding protein (AChBP) from the freshwater snail Lymnea stagnalis, for which high-resolution structural data are available, to create a structural model for the extracellular (i.e., ligand-binding) domain of the 5-HT(3)R and to perform a series of ligand docking experiments to delineate the architecture of the ligand-binding site. Structural models were created using homology modeling with the AChBP as a template. Docking of the antagonist granisetron was carried out using a Lamarckian genetic algorithm to produce models of ligand-receptor complexes. Two energetically similar conformations of granisetron in the binding site were obtained from the docking simulations. In one model, the indazole ring of granisetron is near Trp90 and the tropane ring is near Arg92; in the other, the orientation is reversed. We used double-mutant cycle analysis to determine which of the two orientations is consistent with experimental data and found that the data are consistent with the model in which the indazole ring of granisetron interacts with Arg92 and the tropane ring interacts with Trp90. The combination of molecular modeling with double-mutant cycle analysis offers a powerful approach for the delineation of the architecture of the ligand-binding site.

  19. Effects of 5-HT2B, 5-HT3 and 5-HT4 receptor antagonists on gastrointestinal motor activity in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Hiroki; Mochiki, Erito; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Kawamura, Kiyoshi; Watanabe, Akira; Sutou, Toshinaga; Ogawa, Atsushi; Yanai, Mitsuhiro; Ogata, Kyoichi; Fujii, Takaaki; Ohno, Tetsuro; Tsutsumi, Souichi; Asao, Takayuki; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To study the effects of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptor antagonists on normal colonic motor activity in conscious dogs. METHODS: Colonic motor activity was recorded using a strain gauge force transducer in 5 dogs before and after 5-HT2B, 5-HT3 and 5-HT4 receptor antagonist administration. The force transducers were implanted on the serosal surfaces of the gastric antrum, terminal ileum, ileocecal sphincter and colon. Test materials or vehicle alone was administered as an intravenous bolus injection during a quiescent period of the whole colon in the interdigestive state. The effects of these receptor antagonists on normal gastrointestinal motor activity were analyzed. RESULTS: 5-HT2B, 5-HT3 and 5-HT4 receptor antagonists had no contractile effect on the fasting canine terminal ileum. The 5-HT3 and 5-HT4 receptor antagonists inhibited phase III of the interdigestive motor complex of the antrum and significantly inhibited colonic motor activity. In the proximal colon, the inhibitory effect was dose dependent. Dose dependency, however, was not observed in the distal colon. The 5-HT2B receptor antagonist had no contractile effect on normal colonic motor activity. CONCLUSION: The 5-HT3 and 5-HT4 receptor antagonists inhibited normal colonic motor activity. The 5-HT2B receptor antagonist had no contractile effect on normal colonic motor activity. PMID:24151388

  20. Systemic injection of p-chloroamphetamine eliminates the effect of the 5-HT3 compounds on learning.

    PubMed

    Hong, E; Meneses, A

    1996-04-01

    There is evidence that 5-HT3 antagonists enhance learning and memory; however, their mechanisms of action are unknown. The aim of the present work was to investigate further the role of 5-HT3 receptors involved in learning, using the specific 5-HT3 agonist 1-(m-chlorophenyl)-biguanide (mCPBG) and the 5-HT3 antagonists ondansetron and tropisetron. p-Chloroamphetamine (PCA) pretreatment was used to determine whether pre- or postsynaptic 5-HT3 receptors are involved in learning. The posttraining intraperitoneal (IP) injection of each drug was analyzed on a lever-press response on autoshaping, which is an associative learning task. The results showed that mCPBG impaired retention of the conditioned response (CR), whereas tropisetron and ondansetron improved it. In other animals, PCA alone did not affect CR but was able to block the effects of the 5-HT3 ligands. The present data suggest that the actions of 5-HT3 compounds could be due to their interaction with presynaptic 5-HT3 receptors.

  1. A nanocomposite material formed by benzofulvene polymer nanoparticles loaded with a potent 5-HT3 receptor antagonist (CR3124)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappelli, Andrea; Galeazzi, Simone; Zanardi, Iacopo; Travagli, Valter; Anzini, Maurizio; Mendichi, Raniero; Petralito, Stefania; Memoli, Adriana; Paccagnini, Eugenio; Peris, Walter; Giordani, Antonio; Makovec, Francesco; Fresta, Massimo; Vomero, Salvatore

    2010-03-01

    Poly- BF3a, a new hydrophobic polymer obtained by spontaneous polymerization of 1-methylene-3-phenyl-1 H-indene, was found to give nanoparticles characterized by favorable shape and dimensions. Poly- BF3a nanoparticles were loaded with CR3124, a potent 5HT3 antagonist, as a drug model by desolvation methods either in the absence or in the presence of polyethylene glycol (PEG1000) as a wetting agent. The SEM studies showed that the introduction of CR3124 into the preparation led to a variable degree of aggregation-cementation, which afforded a sort of nanocomposite material. In the absence of PEG1000, the drug molecule was found to stay in the amorphous state (DSC studies) when its percentage is not higher than 10% by weight. In vitro release experiments showed that the formation and stability of the dispersion as well as the drug release were remarkably affected by the presence of PEG1000, demonstrating its beneficial effect to the nanoparticle morphology and disaggregation.

  2. Piperazine analogs of naphthyridine-3-carboxamides and indole-2-carboxamides: novel 5-HT3 receptor antagonists with antidepressant-like activity.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Arghya K; Mahesh, Radhakrishnan; Jindal, Ankur; Bhatt, Shvetank

    2015-01-01

    Series of piperazine analogs of naphthyridine-3-carboxamides and indole-2-carboxamides were designed using a ligand-based approach with consideration of the pharmacophoric requirements for 5-HT3 receptor antagonists. The title carboxamides were synthesized using appropriate synthetic routes. Initially, the 5-HT3 receptor antagonistic activity of all the compounds was determined on isolated guinea pig ileum tissue against the 5-HT3 agonist, 2-methyl-5-hydroxytryptamine, which was denoted in the form of pA2 values. The structure-activity relationship regarding the influence of the aromatic part and basic moiety as features in the 5-HT3 pharmacophore was derived. Among all the compounds screened, the piperazine derivatives of indole-2-carboxamide 13i and naphthyridine-3-carboxamide 8h exhibited prominent 5-HT3 receptor antagonism with pA2 values of 7.5 and 7.3, respectively. Subsequent investigation of the antidepressant activities of selected compounds in the mouse forced swim test (FST) led to the identification of the piperazine analogs of indole-2-carboxamide 13i and naphthyridine-3-carboxamide 8h as the most promising compounds. Both 13i and 8h demonstrated significant reduction in the duration of immobility as compared to the control. Importantly, none of the tested compounds affected the baseline locomotion of mice at the tested dose levels.

  3. Design, synthesis and structure-activity relationship of novel quinoxalin-2-carboxamides as 5-HT3 receptor antagonists for the management of depression.

    PubMed

    Mahesh, Radhakrishnan; Devadoss, Thangaraj; Pandey, Dilip Kumar; Bhatt, Shvetank; Yadav, Shushil Kumar

    2010-11-15

    A novel series of quinoxalin-2-carboxamides were designed based on the ligand-based approach, employing a three-point pharmacophore model; it consists of an aromatic residue and a linking carbonyl group and a basic nitrogen. The target new chemical entities were synthesized from the key intermediate, quinoxalin-2-carboxylic acid, by coupling it with various amines in the presence of 1-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-3-ethylcarbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC·HCl) and 1-hydroxybenzotriazole (HOBt). The obtained compounds' structures were confirmed by spectral data. The target new chemical entities were evaluated for their 5-HT(3) receptor antagonisms in longitudinal muscle myenteric plexus preparation from guinea pig ileum against 5-HT(3) agonist, 2-methyl-5-HT, which was expressed in the form of pA(2) value. All the synthesized compounds showed antagonism towards 5-HT(3) receptor; based on this result, a structure-activity relationship was derived, which reveals that the aromatic residue in 5-HT(3) receptor antagonists may have hydrophobic interaction with 5-HT(3) receptor. Regardless of their antagonistic potentials, all the synthesized molecules were screened for their anti-depressant potentials by using forced swim test in mice model; interestingly none of the tested compounds affect the locomotion of mice in the tested dose levels. Compounds with significant pA(2) values exhibited good anti-depressant-like activity as compared to the vehicle-treated group.

  4. 5HT3 Antagonists versus Dexamethasone in the Prevention of PONV in Patients Undergoing Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy: A Meta-Analysis of RCTs.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chengmao; Zhu, Yu; Liu, Zhen; Ruan, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Background. 5HT3 antagonist, an antiemetic alternative to dexamethasone, is an effective drug for the prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV). Methods. PubMed and The Cochrane Library (from inception to June 2016) were searched for relevant RCTs (randomized controlled trials). Results. Seven trials, totaling 682 patients, were included in this meta-analysis. This meta-analysis demonstrated that 5HT3 antagonist was as effective as dexamethasone in preventing PONV (RR, 1.12; 95% CI, [0.86, 1.45]; P = 0.40) within 24 hours of laparoscopic cholecystectomy, and no significant heterogeneity was observed among the studies (I(2) = 0%; P = 0.98). During the early postoperative period (0-6 h), 5HT3 antagonists were superior to dexamethasone in reducing POV (RR, 0.31; 95% CI, [0.11, 0.93]; P = 0.04), while, in other postoperative stages (6-12 h, 12-24 h, and 0-24 h), it was not more effective in the prevention of POV than dexamethasone. And no significant difference was found in the prevention of PON between 5HT3 antagonists and dexamethasone at different postoperative periods (0-6 h, 6-12 h, 12-24 h, and 0-24 h). Conclusions. As a result, it is advisable to encourage 5HT3 antagonists as an alternative to dexamethasone for the prevention of PONV in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

  5. 5HT3 Antagonists versus Dexamethasone in the Prevention of PONV in Patients Undergoing Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy: A Meta-Analysis of RCTs

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chengmao; Zhu, Yu; Liu, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Background. 5HT3 antagonist, an antiemetic alternative to dexamethasone, is an effective drug for the prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV). Methods. PubMed and The Cochrane Library (from inception to June 2016) were searched for relevant RCTs (randomized controlled trials). Results. Seven trials, totaling 682 patients, were included in this meta-analysis. This meta-analysis demonstrated that 5HT3 antagonist was as effective as dexamethasone in preventing PONV (RR, 1.12; 95% CI, [0.86, 1.45]; P = 0.40) within 24 hours of laparoscopic cholecystectomy, and no significant heterogeneity was observed among the studies (I2 = 0%; P = 0.98). During the early postoperative period (0–6 h), 5HT3 antagonists were superior to dexamethasone in reducing POV (RR, 0.31; 95% CI, [0.11, 0.93]; P = 0.04), while, in other postoperative stages (6–12 h, 12–24 h, and 0–24 h), it was not more effective in the prevention of POV than dexamethasone. And no significant difference was found in the prevention of PON between 5HT3 antagonists and dexamethasone at different postoperative periods (0–6 h, 6–12 h, 12–24 h, and 0–24 h). Conclusions. As a result, it is advisable to encourage 5HT3 antagonists as an alternative to dexamethasone for the prevention of PONV in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. PMID:27891523

  6. Antidepressant Potential of 5-HT3 Receptor Antagonist, N-n- propyl-3-ethoxyquinoxaline-2-carboxamide (6n).

    PubMed

    Mahesh, R; Bhatt, S; Devadoss, T; Jindal, Ak; Gautam, Bk; Pandey, Dk

    2012-10-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the antidepressant potential of 5-HT3 receptor antagonist N-n-propyl-3-ethoxyquinoxaline-2-carboxamide (6n). The compound '6n' with optimum log P and pA 2 value identified from a series of compounds synthesized in our laboratory was subjected to forced Swim Test (FST) (1, 2, and 4 mg/kg, i.p) and Tail Suspension Test (TST) (1, 2, and 4 mg/kg, i.p.). The compound '6n' significantly reduced the duration of immobility in mice without affecting the baseline locomotion. Moreover, '6n' (2 mg/kg, i.p.) potentiated the 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP)-induced head twitch responses in mice and '6n' at tested dose (1 and 2 mg/kg, i.p.) reversed the reserpine-induced hypothermia in rats. In interaction studies of '6n' with various standard drugs/ligands using FST, '6n' (1 mg/kg, i.p.) potentiated the antidepressant effect of venlafaxine (4 and 8 mg/kg, i.p.) and fluoxetine (10 and 20 mg/kg, i.p.). Additionally, '6n' (1 and 2 mg/kg, i.p.) influenced the effect of harmane (5 mg/ kg, i.p.) as well as reversed the effect of parthenolide (1 mg/kg, i.p.) by reducing the duration of immobility in FST. Furthermore, '6n' (1 mg/kg, i.p.) potentiated the effect of bupropion (10 and 20 mg/kg, i.p.) in TST. Chronic '6n' (1 and 2 mg/kg, i.p.) treatment attenuated the behavioral abnormalities in olfactory bulbectomized rats. In conclusion, these various findings reiterated the antidepressant-like effects of '6n' in behavioral models of depression.

  7. Antidepressant Potential of 5-HT3 Receptor Antagonist, N-n- propyl-3-ethoxyquinoxaline-2-carboxamide (6n)

    PubMed Central

    Mahesh, R; Bhatt, S; Devadoss, T; Jindal, AK; Gautam, BK; Pandey, DK

    2012-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the antidepressant potential of 5-HT3 receptor antagonist N-n-propyl-3-ethoxyquinoxaline-2-carboxamide (6n). The compound ‘6n’ with optimum log P and pA2 value identified from a series of compounds synthesized in our laboratory was subjected to forced Swim Test (FST) (1, 2, and 4 mg/kg, i.p) and Tail Suspension Test (TST) (1, 2, and 4 mg/kg, i.p.). The compound ‘6n’ significantly reduced the duration of immobility in mice without affecting the baseline locomotion. Moreover, ‘6n’ (2 mg/kg, i.p.) potentiated the 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP)-induced head twitch responses in mice and ‘6n’ at tested dose (1 and 2 mg/kg, i.p.) reversed the reserpine-induced hypothermia in rats. In interaction studies of ‘6n’ with various standard drugs/ligands using FST, ‘6n’ (1 mg/kg, i.p.) potentiated the antidepressant effect of venlafaxine (4 and 8 mg/kg, i.p.) and fluoxetine (10 and 20 mg/kg, i.p.). Additionally, ‘6n’ (1 and 2 mg/kg, i.p.) influenced the effect of harmane (5 mg/ kg, i.p.) as well as reversed the effect of parthenolide (1 mg/kg, i.p.) by reducing the duration of immobility in FST. Furthermore, ‘6n’ (1 mg/kg, i.p.) potentiated the effect of bupropion (10 and 20 mg/kg, i.p.) in TST. Chronic ‘6n’ (1 and 2 mg/kg, i.p.) treatment attenuated the behavioral abnormalities in olfactory bulbectomized rats. In conclusion, these various findings reiterated the antidepressant-like effects of ‘6n’ in behavioral models of depression. PMID:23493308

  8. Design, synthesis and evaluation of antidepressant activity of novel 2-methoxy 1, 8 naphthyridine 3-carboxamides as 5-HT3 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Mahesh, Radhakrishnan; Dhar, Arghya Kusum; Jindal, Ankur; Bhatt, Shvetank

    2014-05-01

    A series of novel 1,8-naphthyridine-3-carboxamides as 5-HT3 receptor antagonists were synthesized with an intention to explore the antidepressant activity of these compounds. The title carboxamides were designed using ligand-based approach keeping in consideration the structural requirement of the pharmacophore of 5-HT3 receptor antagonists. The compounds were synthesized using appropriate synthetic route from the starting material nicotinamide. 5-HT3 receptor antagonism of all the compounds, which was denoted in the form of pA2 value, was determined in longitudinal muscle myenteric plexus preparation from guinea-pig ileum against 5-HT3 agonist, 2-methyl-5-HT. Compound 8g (2-methoxy-1, 8-naphthyridin-3-yl) (2-methoxy phenyl piperazine-1-yl) methanone was identified as the most active compound, which expressed a pA2 value of 7.67. The antidepressant activity of all the compounds was examined in mice model of forced swim test (FST); importantly, none of the compounds was found to cause any significant changes in the locomotor activity of mice at the tested dose levels. In FST, the compounds with considerably higher pA2 value exhibited promising antidepressant-like activity, whereas compounds with lower pA2 value did not show antidepressant-like activity as compared to the control group.

  9. The role of second-generation 5-HT3 receptor antagonists in managing chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Schwartzberg, Lee S; Jacobs, Peter; Matsouka, Panagiota; Azevedo, Wellington; Pinto, Antonio

    2012-07-01

    Compared with solid tumor patients, those with hematological malignancies are at particular risk of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) because of their young age, exposure to highly-emetogenic induction, consolidation and salvage regimens, the high-dose conditioning regimens used before stem cell transplantation (SCT), and the heavy psychological burden of such treatments. In the absence of prophylaxis, around 75% of patients undergoing SCT experience delayed CINV. With first-generation 5-HT(3) receptor antagonists, only about 20% are completely protected from nausea and vomiting, and this frequent and debilitating adverse event has not been fully addressed. In contrast to solid tumors, there are no internationally agreed guidelines for the prevention and treatment of CINV in hematological malignancies. Work on a consensus is urgently required. The second-generation 5-HT(3) antagonist palonosetron is highly effective in preventing CINV in patients with solid tumors. The extended half-life of this agent and its mechanisms of action including allosteric binding, positive cooperativity and 5-HT(3) receptor internalization, may make it particularly effective in controlling delayed CINV. Although controlled comparisons against first-generation 5HT(3) agents have not yet been conducted in the setting of SCT, available evidence suggests that palonosetron may prove beneficial in preventing CINV in high risk patients with hematological malignancies.

  10. The effects of varenicline on sensory gating and exploratory behavior with pretreatment with nicotinic or 5-HT3A receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Kucinski, Aaron; Wersinger, Scott; Stachowiak, Ewa K; Becker, Chani; Lippiello, Pat; Bencherif, Merouane; Stachowiak, Michal K

    2015-02-01

    Individuals with schizophrenia smoke at high frequency relative to the general population. Despite the harmful effects of cigarette smoking, smoking among schizophrenic patients improves cognitive impairments not addressed or worsened by common neuroleptics. Varenicline, a nonselective neuronal nicotinic receptor (NNR) agonist and full agonist of 5-HT3A receptors, helps reduce smoking among schizophrenic patients. To determine whether varenicline also improves a cognitive symptom of schizophrenia, namely, impaired sensory gating, a transgenic mouse with schizophrenia, th-fgfr1(tk-), was used. Varenicline dose-dependently increased prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the startle response, a measure of sensory gating, in th-fgfr1(tk-) mice and normalized PPI deficits relative to nontransgenic controls. With the highest dose (10 mg/kg), however, there was a robust elevation of PPI and startle response, as well as reduced exploratory behavior in the open field and elevated plus maze. Pretreatment with the nonspecific NNR antagonist mecamylamine attenuated the exaggerated PPI response and, similar to the 5-HT3A receptor antagonist ondansetron, it prevented the reduction in exploratory behavior. Collectively, these results indicate that varenicline at low-to-moderate doses may be beneficial against impaired sensory gating in schizophrenia; however, higher doses may induce anxiogenic effects, which can be prevented with antagonists of NNRs or 5-HT3A receptors.

  11. Dopamine neurotransmission is involved in the attenuating effects of 5-HT3 receptor antagonist MDL 72222 on acute methamphetamine-induced locomotor hyperactivity in mice.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Ji-Hoon; Nam, Yun-Sun; Lee, Seok-Yong; Jang, Choon-Gon

    2008-01-01

    We have previously shown that 5-HT3 receptors are involved in the development and expression of methamphetamine (MAP)-induced locomotor sensitization in mice. In the present study, we further examined whether the dopaminergic system is involved in the attenuating effects of MDL 72222, a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, on acute MAP-induced locomotor hyperactivity. For this, we examined alterations of dopamine (DA) in the form of D1 receptor, D2 receptor, and dopamine transporter (DAT) binding labeled with [3H]SCH23390 for D1, [3H]raclopride for D2, and [3H]mazindol for DAT binding in the mouse brains with acute MAP exposure or pretreatment of MDL 72222 with MAP. No significant differences were detected in the D1 receptor, D2 receptor, or DAT binding between any of the groups studied. Interestingly, we found increased DA levels in the striatum following acute MAP exposure; these increased levels were reversed by pretreatment with MDL 72222, but did not affect 5-HT levels in the dorsal raphe. Overall, our results suggest that dopamine neurotransmission plays an important role in the attenuating effects of 5-HT3 receptor antagonist MDL 72222 on acute MAP-induced locomotor hyperactivity in mice.

  12. Differential effects of a short-term high-fat diet in an animal model of depression in rats treated with the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, ondansetron, the 5-HT3 receptor agonist, 2-methyl-5-HT, and the SSRI, fluoxetine.

    PubMed

    Sumaya, Isabel C; Bailey, Dee; Catlett, Susan L

    2016-05-01

    Investigation into the effects of a high-fat diet on depression in the context of 5-HT3 receptor function is important given 5-HT3 antagonism may represent a novel candidate for drug discovery. To more fully understand the relationship between the 5-HT3 receptor system, depression, and high-fat intake, our main interest was to study the short-term effects of a high-fat diet on the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, ondansetron, and the 5-HT3 receptor agonist, 2-methyl-5-HT, as well as the SSRI, fluoxetine, in an animal model of depression. Male Sprague Dawley rats were fed either a standard diet (11% fat) or a high-fat diet (32.5% fat) for seven days then treated with either fluoxetine (10mg/kg, ip), ondansetron (1mg/kg, ip), 2-methyl-5-HT (3mg/kg, ip), fluoxetine+ondansetron or, 2-methyl-5-HT+ondansetron prior to the Forced Swim Test. In the standard diet group, treatment with the 5HT3 receptor agonist, 2-methyl-5-HT, served to significantly decrease time of immobility as compared to controls thus showing anti-depressive-like effects. Treatment with the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, ondansetron, served to enhance the anti-depressive like effects of the SSRI, fluoxetine, as treatment with both the SSRI and 5-HT3 receptor antagonist dramatically decreased immobility. Importantly, in the high-fat diet groups, a week of high-fat intake served to: 1) counteract the anti-depressive-like effect of the SSRI, fluoxetine, 2) reverse the anti-depressive-like effect of the 5HT3 receptor agonist, 2-methyl-5-HT and 3) provide protection against the depressive-like effects induced by the Forced Swim Test as rats fed a high-fat diet displayed the lowest amounts of immobility. In the aggregate, these data suggest that both SSRIs and the 5HT3 receptor system are affected by short-term high-fat intake and that a short-term high-fat diet protects against depressive-like effects in an animal model of depression.

  13. Discovery of new anti-depressants from structurally novel 5-HT3 receptor antagonists: design, synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of 3-ethoxyquinoxalin-2-carboxamides.

    PubMed

    Mahesh, Radhakrishnan; Devadoss, Thangaraj; Pandey, Dilip Kumar; Bhatt, Shvetank

    2011-02-15

    A novel series of 3-ethoxyquinoxalin-2-carboxamides were designed as per the pharmacophoric requirements of 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist using ligand-based approach. The desired carboxamides were synthesized from the key intermediate, 3-ethoxyquinoxalin-2-carboxylic acid by coupling with appropriate amines in the presence of 1-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-3-ethylcarbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC·HCl) and 1-hydroxybenzotriazole (HOBt). The 5-HT(3) receptor antagonism was evaluated in longitudinal muscle myenteric plexus preparation from guinea pig ileum against 5-HT(3) agonist, 2-methy-5-HT, which was expressed in the form of pA(2) values. Compound 6h (3-ethoxyquinoxalin-2-yl)(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)methanone was found to be the most active compound, which expressed a pA(2) value of 7.7. In forced swim test, the compounds with higher pA(2) value exhibited good anti-depressant-like activity and compounds with lower pA(2) value failed to show activity as compared to the vehicle-treated group.

  14. Expression of 5-HT3 receptors by extrinsic duodenal afferents contribute to intestinal inhibition of gastric emptying.

    PubMed

    Raybould, Helen E; Glatzle, Jorg; Robin, Carla; Meyer, James H; Phan, Thomas; Wong, Helen; Sternini, Catia

    2003-03-01

    Intestinal perfusion with carbohydrates inhibits gastric emptying via vagal and spinal capsaicin-sensitive afferent pathways. The aim of the present study was to determine the role of 1) 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)(3) receptors (5-HT(3)R) in mediating glucose-induced inhibition of gastric emptying and 2) 5-HT(3)R expression in vagal and spinal afferents in innervating the duodenum. In awake rats fitted with gastric and duodenal cannulas, perfusion of the duodenum with glucose (50 and 100 mg) inhibited gastric emptying. Intestinal perfusion of mannitol inhibited gastric emptying only at the highest concentration (990 mosm/kgH(2)O). Pretreatment with the 5-HT(3)R antagonist tropisetron abolished both glucose- and mannitol-induced inhibition of gastric emptying. Retrograde labeling of visceral afferents by injection of dextran-conjugated Texas Red into the duodenal wall was used to identify extrinsic primary afferents. Immunoreactivity for 5-HT(3)R, visualized with an antibody directed to the COOH terminus of the rat 5-HT(3)R, was found in >80% of duodenal vagal and spinal afferents. These results show that duodenal extrinsic afferents express 5-HT(3)R and that the receptor mediates specific glucose-induced inhibition of gastric emptying. These findings support the hypothesis that enterochromaffin cells in the intestinal mucosa release 5-HT in response to glucose, which activates 5-HT(3)R on afferent nerve terminals to evoke reflex changes in gastric motility. The primary glucose sensors of the intestine may be mucosal enterochromaffin cells.

  15. 5HT3 receptor antagonist (ondansetron) reverses depressive behavior evoked by chronic unpredictable stress in mice: modulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical and brain serotonergic system.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Deepali; Radhakrishnan, Mahesh; Kurhe, Yeshwant

    2014-09-01

    Chronic stress is one of the major causes of depression, associated with behavioral and biochemical impairments. 5HT3 receptor antagonists (such as ondansetron) have shown alleviation of depressive symptomology in preclinical and in few clinical studies. However, their effects in chronic stress-induced depressive behavior and the underlying mechanism(s) are yet to be known. In the present study, the effects of a 5HT3 receptor antagonist, ondansetron were evaluated in chronic unpredictable stress (CUS)-evoked depressive behavior. In addition, the possible mechanism was determined by measuring plasma corticosterone (CORT) as a marker of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA)-axis activity and serotonin levels in the discrete brain regions. Mice were subjected to a battery of unpredictable stressors for 28 days. Ondansetron (0.05, 0.1 and 1mg/kg, p.o.) and fluoxetine (10mg/kg, p.o.) were administered during the last 14 days (day 15-28th) of CUS testing paradigm. The results showed that the 4-week CUS produced significant depressive behavior in mice, which included increased despair effects in forced swim test (FST) and reward-related deficits in sucrose preference test. Biochemical assays demonstrated a significant increase in percentage of plasma CORT and decrease in percentage of serotonin levels in the discrete brain regions of CUS mice. Chronic ondansetron treatment, similar to that of positive control fluoxetine, significantly reversed despair effects in FST and reward-related deficits in sucrose preference test. In addition, ondansetron and fluoxetine treatments significantly increased percentage of serotonin levels in the measured brain regions and attenuated HPA-axis hyperactivity, as evidenced by low percentage of plasma CORT levels in CUS mice. These findings indicate the potential role of ondansetron (a 5HT3 receptor antagonist) in reversing CUS-induced depressive behavior, which is possibly mediated by its modulating effects on the HPA-axis and

  16. Safety of serotonin (5-HT3) receptor antagonists in patients undergoing surgery and chemotherapy: protocol for a systematic review and network meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Serotonin (5-HT3) receptor antagonists are a class of antiemetic medications often used to prevent nausea and vomiting among patients undergoing chemotherapy, radiotherapy or surgery. However, recent studies suggest that these agents might be associated with increased cardiac harm. To examine this further, we are proposing to conduct a systematic review and network meta-analysis on the comparative safety of 5-HT3 receptor antagonists among patients undergoing chemotherapy or surgery. Methods/Design Studies reporting one or more safety outcomes of interest for 5-HT3 receptor antagonists compared with each other, placebo, and/or other anti-emetic agents (for example, benzamides, phenothiazines, butyrophenones, antihistamines, and anticholinergics) among children and adult patients undergoing surgery or chemotherapy will be included. Our primary outcome of interest is arrhythmia. Our secondary outcomes include cardiac death, QT prolongation, PR prolongation, all-cause mortality, nausea, and vomiting. We will include experimental studies, quasi-experimental studies (namely controlled before-after and interrupted time series), and observational studies (namely cohort studies). We will not limit inclusion by publication status, time period, duration of follow-up or language of dissemination. Electronic databases (for example, MEDLINE, EMBASE) will be searched from inception onwards. These main searches will be supplemented by searching for difficult to locate and unpublished studies, such as dissertations, and governmental reports. The eligibility criteria will be pilot-tested and subsequently used to screen the literature search results by two reviewers in duplicate. A similar process will be followed for full-text screening, data abstraction, and risk of bias/methodological quality appraisal. The Cochrane Risk of Bias tool will be used to appraise experimental and quasi-experimental studies, and cohort studies will be assessed using the Newcastle Ottawa

  17. Competitive interaction of agonists and antagonists with 5-HT3 recognition sites in membranes of neuroblastoma cells labelled with (/sup 3/H)ICS 205-930

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyer, D.; Neijt, H.C.; Karpf, A.

    1989-01-01

    (3H)ICS 205-930 labelled 5-HT3 recognition sites in membranes prepared from murine neuroblastoma N1E-115 cells. Binding was rapid, reversible, saturable and stereoselective to an apparently homogeneous population of sites. Kinetic studies revealed that agonists and antagonists produced a monophasic dissociation reaction of (3H)ICS 205-930 from its recognition sites. The dissociation rate constant of the radioligand was similar whether the dissociation was induced by an agonist or an antagonist. Competition studies carried out with agonists and antagonists also suggested the presence of a homogeneous population of (3H)ICS 205-930 recognition sites. Competition curves were best fit for a 1 site model. (3H)ICS 205-930 binding sites displayed the pharmacological profile of a 5-HT3 receptor. The interactions of agonists and antagonists with (3H)ICS 205-930 recognition sites were apparently competitive in nature, as demonstrated in kinetic and equilibrium experiments. In saturation experiments carried out with (3H)ICS 205-930 in the presence and the absence of unlabelled agonists and antagonists, apparent Bmax values were not reduced whereas apparent Kd values were increased in the presence of competing ligands. There was a good agreement between apparent pKB values calculated for the competing ligands in saturation experiments and pKd values calculated from competition experiments. The present data demonstrate that (3H)ICS 205-930 labels a homogeneous population of sites at which agonists and antagonists interact competitively.

  18. Differences in regional cerebral blood flow response to a 5HT3 antagonist in early- and late-onset cocaine-dependent subjects.

    PubMed

    Adinoff, Bryon; Devous, Michael D; Williams, Mark J; Harris, Thomas S; Best, Susan E; Dong, Hongyun; Zielinski, Tanya

    2014-03-01

    5-hydroxytryptamine 3 (5HT3) receptors are important modulators of mesostriatal dopaminergic transmission and have been implicated in the pathophysiology of cocaine reward, withdrawal and self-administration. In addition, the 5HT3 antagonist ondansetron is effective in treating early-onset, but not late-onset, alcohol-dependent subjects. To explore the role of 5HT3 receptor systems in cocaine addiction using functioning imaging, we administered ondansetron to 23 abstinent, treatment-seeking cocaine-addicted and 22 sex-, age- and race-matched healthy control participants. Differences between early- (first use before 20 years, n = 10) and late-onset (first use after 20 years, n = 10) cocaine-addicted subjects were also assessed. On two separate days, subjects were administered ondansetron (0.15 mg/kg intravenously over 15 minutes) or saline. Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured following each infusion with single photon emission computed tomography. No significant rCBF differences between the cocaine-addicted and control participants were observed following ondansetron relative to saline. Early-onset subjects, however, showed increased (P < 0.001) right posterior parahippocampal rCBF following ondansetron. In contrast, late-onset subjects showed decreased rCBF following ondansetron in an overlapping region of the right parahippocampal/hippocampal gyrus. Early-onset subjects also displayed increased rCBF in the left anterior insula and subthalamic nucleus following ondansetron; late-onset subjects showed decreased rCBF in the right anterior insula. These findings suggest that the age of drug use onset is associated with serotonergic biosignatures in cocaine-addicted subjects. Further clarification of these alterations may guide targeted treatment with serotonergic medications similar to those successfully used in alcohol-dependent patients.

  19. 5-Chloroindole: a potent allosteric modulator of the 5-HT3 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Amy S; Batis, Nikolaos; Grafton, Gillian; Caputo, Francesca; Brady, Catherine A; Lambert, Jeremy J; Peters, John A; Gordon, John; Brain, Keith L; Powell, Andrew D; Barnes, Nicholas M

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose The 5-HT3 receptor is a ligand-gated ion channel that is modulated allosterically by various compounds including colchicine, alcohols and volatile anaesthetics. However the positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) identified to date have low affinity, which hinders investigation because of non-selective effects at pharmacologically active concentrations. The present study identifies 5-chloroindole (Cl-indole) as a potent PAM of the 5-HT3 receptor. Experimental Approach 5-HT3 receptor function was assessed by the increase in intracellular calcium and single-cell electrophysiological recordings in HEK293 cells stably expressing the h5-HT3A receptor and also the mouse native 5-HT3 receptor that increases neuronal contraction of bladder smooth muscle. Key Results Cl-indole (1–100 μM) potentiated agonist (5-HT) and particularly partial agonist [(S)-zacopride, DDP733, RR210, quipazine, dopamine, 2-methyl-5-HT, SR57227A, meta chlorophenyl biguanide] induced h5-HT3A receptor-mediated responses. This effect of Cl-indole was also apparent at the mouse native 5-HT3 receptor. Radioligand-binding studies identified that Cl-indole induced a small (∼twofold) increase in the apparent affinity of 5-HT for the h5-HT3A receptor, whereas there was no effect upon the affinity of the antagonist, tropisetron. Cl-indole was able to reactivate desensitized 5-HT3 receptors. In contrast to its effect on the 5-HT3 receptor, Cl-indole did not alter human nicotinic α7 receptor responses. Conclusions and Implications The present study identifies Cl-indole as a relatively potent and selective PAM of the 5-HT3 receptor; such compounds will aid investigation of the molecular basis for allosteric modulation of the 5-HT3 receptor and may assist the discovery of novel therapeutic drugs targeting this receptor. Linked Articles Recent reviews on allosteric modulation can be found at: Kenakin, T (2013). New concepts in pharmacological efficacy at 7TM receptors: IUPHAR Review 2

  20. Tropisetron attenuates cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Zirak, Mohammad Reza; Rahimian, Reza; Ghazi-Khansari, Mahmoud; Abbasi, Ata; Razmi, Ali; Mehr, Shahram Ejtemaei; Mousavizadeh, Kazem; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2014-09-05

    Nephrotoxicity is one of the most important complications of cisplatin, a potent chemotherapeutic agent used in the treatment of various malignancies. 5-HT3 antagonists are widely used to counteract chemotherapy-induced emesis and new studies reveal that they poses notable anti-inflammatory properties. In current study, we investigated the effects of 5-HT3 antagonists on cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity in mice. To identify the underlying mechanism of renal protection by tropisetron, we investigated the probable involvement of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR). A single injection of cisplatin (20mg/kg; i.p) induced nephrotoxicity, 5-HT3 antagonists (tropisetron, granisetron and ondansetron,) were given twice daily for 3 day (3mg/kg; i.p). Finally animals were euthanized and blood sample was collected to measure urea and creatinin level. Also kidneys were removed for histopathological examination and biochemical measurements including glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and inflammatory cytokines. Tropisetron decreased the expression of inflammatory molecules including tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and iNOS and improved histopathological damage and renal dysfunction. However other 5-HT3 antagonists, granisetron or ondansetron do not have any elicit effects on biochemical markers and histological damages. Since methyllycaconitine, antagonist of α7nAChR, was unable to reverse the beneficial effect of tropisetron, we concluded that this effect of tropisetron is not mediated by α7nAChR.Our results showed that tropisetron treatment markedly ameliorated the experimental cisplatin induced-nephrotoxicity and this effect might be 5-HT3 receptor and α7nAChR independent.

  1. Anti-depressant-like activity of a novel serotonin type-3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonist in rodent models of depression.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Deepali; Devadoss, Thangaraj; Bhatt, Shvetank; Gautam, Baldev; Jindal, Ankur; Pandey, Dilip; Mahesh, Radhakrishnan

    2011-08-01

    N-Cyclohexyl-3-methoxyquinoxalin-2-carboxamide (QCM-13), a novel 5-HT3 antagonist identified from a series of compounds with higher pA2 (7.6) and good log P (2.91) value was screened in rodent models of depression such as forced swim test (FST), tail suspension test (TST), interaction studies with standard anti-depressants and confirmatory studies such as reversal of parthenolide induced depression and reserpine induced hypothermia. In FST (2 and 4 mg/kg) and TST (2 and 4 mg/kg), QCM-13 significantly reduced the duration of immobility in mice without affecting the base line locomotion. QCM-13 (2 and 4 mg/kg) was also found to have significant interaction with standard anti-depressants (fluoxetine and bupropion in FST and TST respectively). Further, reversal of parthenolide induced depression in mice and reserpine induced hypothermia in rat models indicate the serotonergic influence of QCM-13 for anti-depressant potential.

  2. X-ray analysis of the effect of the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist granisetron on gastrointestinal motility in rats repeatedly treated with the antitumoral drug cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Vera, Gema; López-Pérez, Ana Esther; Martínez-Villaluenga, María; Cabezos, Pablo Antonio; Abalo, Raquel

    2014-08-01

    Cancer chemotherapy is associated with the development of numerous adverse effects, including nausea, emesis and other alterations in gastrointestinal (GI) motility. The administration of 5-HT3 receptor antagonists has provided a clinical advance in the treatment of chemotherapy-induced vomiting but these drugs lose efficacy throughout chronic treatment. The effects of these drugs in experimental animals under chronic administration are not well known. Our aim was to study, using radiographic methods, the effect of the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist granisetron on GI dysmotility induced in the rat by repeated cisplatin administration. First, invasive methods were used to select a dose of granisetron capable of reducing increased stomach weight due to acute cisplatin administration (6 mg/kg, ip). Second, rats received two intraperitoneal (ip) injections once a week for 4 weeks: granisetron (1 mg/kg, ip) or saline and, thirty min later, saline or cisplatin (2 mg/kg, ip). Body weight gain was measured throughout treatment. Radiological techniques were used to determine the acute (after first dose) and chronic (after last dose) effects of cisplatin and/or granisetron on GI motility. Repeated cisplatin-induced weight loss which granisetron did not prevent. Gastric emptying was delayed after the first cisplatin administration. Granisetron completely prevented this effect. After weekly administration, cisplatin-induced gastric dysmotility was enhanced and granisetron was not capable of completely preventing this effect. Granisetron prevents gastric emptying alterations, but its efficacy decreases throughout antineoplastic treatment. This might be due to the enhanced effect of cisplatin.

  3. Effect of R3487/MEM3454, a novel nicotinic alpha7 receptor partial agonist and 5-HT3 antagonist on sustained attention in rats.

    PubMed

    Rezvani, Amir H; Kholdebarin, Ehsan; Brucato, Frederic H; Callahan, Patrick M; Lowe, David A; Levin, Edward D

    2009-03-17

    It is well established that nicotinic systems in the brain are critically involved in attentional processes in both animals and humans. The current study assessed the effects of a novel nicotinic alpha7 receptor partial agonist and 5-HT3 antagonist, R3487/MEM3454 (also referred to as R3487 or MEM 3454) on sustained attention in rats performing an operant visual signal detection task. The effects of R3487/MEM3454 were compared to those of the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor/nicotinic alpha7 allosteric positive modulator galanthamine. Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were injected subcutaneously with R3487/MEM3454 (0.03, 0.1, 0.15, 0.3 and 0.6 mg/kg), galanthamine (0.25, 0.5, 1, 2 mg/kg) or vehicle 30 min before the attentional test. In the second study, the time-dependent effects of R3487/MEM3454 were assessed by injecting the compound (0.6 mg/kg, s.c.) at different pretreatment intervals (30, 60 or 90 min) before the start of the attentional task. Our results show a significant dose-effect for R3487/MEM3454 on percent hit accuracy performance without any significant alteration on percent correct rejection performance. In the time-dependent test, R3487/MEM3454 significantly increased the percent hit accuracy performance when animals were injected 60 min before the start of the attentional task. Administration of galanthamine failed to significantly increase percent hit accuracy performance and increasing the dose of galanthamine produced a decrease in percent correct rejection performance. The present findings with R3487/MEM3454 suggest that nicotinic alpha7 receptors and/or 5-HT3 receptors may play an important role in modulating sustained attention and that R3487/MEM3454 may have therapeutic potential in improving sustained attention in humans.

  4. Effect of a novel 5-HT3 receptor antagonist 4i, in corticosterone-induced depression-like behavior and oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Deepali; Radhakrishnan, Mahesh; Kurhe, Yeshwant

    2015-04-01

    Stress in our daily life severely affects the normal physiology of the biological system. Dysregulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis has been implicated in the development of depression-like behavior, which remains under diagnosed and poorly treated. Exogenous corticosterone (CORT) administration has been demonstrated to develop a depression model, which has shown to mimic HPA-axis induced depression-like state in rodents. In the present study, the effect of a novel 5HT3 receptor, 4i was examined on CORT induced depression in mice. CORT (30mg/kg, subcutaneously) was given for 4-weeks to mice in control group, while mice in drug treated group were given 4i (0.5-1mg/kg, intraperitoneally)/fluoxetine (as a positive control, 10mg/kg), for the last 2-weeks of CORT dosing. Repeated CORT dosing caused depression-like behavior in mice as indicated by increased despair effects in forced swim test (FST) and anhedonia in sucrose preference test. In addition, CORT administration induced oxidative load in the brain with significant increase in pro-oxidant (lipid peroxidation and nitrite levels) markers and a substantial decline in anti-oxidant defense (catalase and reduced glutathione levels) system, indicating a direct effect of stress hormones in the induction of the brain oxidative damage. On the other hand, 4i and fluoxetine treatment reversed the CORT induced depressive-like deficits. Furthermore, 4i and fluoxetine prevented CORT induced oxidative brain insults, which may plausibly demonstrate one of the key mechanisms for antidepressant-like effects of the compounds. Thus, the study suggests that 5HT3 antagonist; 4i may be implicated as pharmacological intervention targeting depressive-like anomaly associated with HPA-axis dysregulation.

  5. Palonosetron-5-HT3 Receptor Interactions As Shown by a Binding Protein Cocrystal Structure.

    PubMed

    Price, Kerry L; Lillestol, Reidun K; Ulens, Chris; Lummis, Sarah C R

    2016-12-21

    Palonosetron is a potent 5-HT3 receptor antagonist and an effective therapeutic agent against emesis. Here we identify the molecular determinants of compound recognition in the receptor binding site by obtaining a high resolution structure of palonosetron bound to an engineered acetylcholine binding protein that mimics the 5-HT3 receptor binding site, termed 5-HTBP, and by examining the potency of palonosetron in a range of 5-HT3 receptors with mutated binding site residues. The structural data indicate that palonosetron forms a tight and effective wedge in the binding pocket, made possible by its rigid tricyclic ring structure and its interactions with binding site residues; it adopts a binding pose that is distinct from the related antiemetics granisetron and tropisetron. The functional data show many residues previously shown to interact with agonists and antagonists in the binding site are important for palonosetron binding, and indicate those of particular importance are W183 (a cation-π interaction and a hydrogen bond) and Y153 (a hydrogen bond). This information, and the availability of the structure of palonosetron bound to 5-HTBP, should aid the development of novel and more efficacious drugs that act via 5-HT3 receptors.

  6. The interaction of trichloroethanol with murine recombinant 5-HT3 receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Downie, D L; Hope, A G; Belelli, D; Lambert, J J; Peters, J A; Bentley, K R; Steward, L J; Chen, C Y; Barnes, N M

    1995-01-01

    108-15 cells or HEK 293 cells. Similarly, competition for [3H]-granisetron binding by the 5-HT3 receptor antagonists ondansetron and tropisetron was unaffected. However, competition for [3H]-granisetron binding by the 5-HT3 receptor agonists, 5-HT, 2-methyl-5-HT and phenylbiguanide was enhanced by trichloroethanol (2.5 mM).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:7541281

  7. Effects of serotonin 5-HT3 receptor antagonists on stress-induced colonic hyperalgesia and diarrhoea in rats: a comparative study with opioid receptor agonists, a muscarinic receptor antagonist and a synthetic polymer.

    PubMed

    Hirata, T; Keto, Y; Nakata, M; Takeuchi, A; Funatsu, T; Akuzawa, S; Sasamata, M; Miyata, K

    2008-05-01

    In this study, we examined the effects of serotonin (5-HT)3 receptor antagonists (5-HT3RAs) including ramosetron, alosetron, and cilansetron on colonic nociceptive threshold in rats. Furthermore, we established a restraint stress-induced colonic hyperalgesia model in rats, and compared the inhibitory effects of 5-HT3RAs on restraint stress-induced colonic hyperalgesia and diarrhoea with those of loperamide, trimebutine, tiquizium and polycarbophil. The colonic nociceptive threshold was measured as the balloon pressure at the time the rat showed a nociceptive response during colonic distension by an intrarectally inserted balloon. Oral administration of ramosetron (3-30 microg kg(-1)), alosetron (30-300 microg kg(-1)), or cilansetron (30-300 microg kg(-1)) increased the colonic nociceptive threshold in a dose-dependent manner in non-stressed rats. Restraint stress for 1 h significantly decreased the colonic nociceptive threshold, but ramosetron (0.3-3 microg kg(-1)), alosetron (3-30 microg kg(-1)), cilansetron (3-30 microg kg(-1)) and trimebutine (100-1000 mg kg(-1)) significantly inhibited the decrease in the threshold. Loperamide (3-30 mg kg(-1)), tiquizium (100-1000 mg kg(-1)) and polycarbophil (1000 mg kg(-1)) did not affect the restraint stress-induced decrease in the colonic nociceptive threshold. All drugs tested in this study showed dose-dependent inhibition of restraint stress-induced diarrhoea in rats. These results indicate that, unlike existing antidiarrhoeal and spasmolytic agents, 5-HT3RAs have inhibitory effects on colonic nociception, and prevented restraint stress-induced both diarrhoea and hyperalgesia at almost the same doses in rats. This suggests that the 5-HT3RAs may be useful in ameliorating both colonic hyperalgesia and diarrhoea in patients with irritable bowel syndrome.

  8. Antidepressant and anxiolytic-like effects of 4n, a novel 5-HT3 receptor antagonist using behaviour based rodent models.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Baldev; Jindal, Ankur; Pandey, Dilip Kumar; Bhatt, Shvetank; Devadoss, Thangaraj; Mahesh, Radhakrishnan

    2012-09-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the putative antidepressant and anxiolytic-like effects of N-n-Butylquinoxalin-2-carboxamide (4n), a novel 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, with an optimal log P (2.01) and pA2 value (7.3) greater than ondansetron (6.9) using rodent behavioural models of depression and anxiety. Acute treatment of 4n (1-4 mg/kg, ip) in mice produced antidepressant-like effect in forced swim test (FST) without affecting the baseline locomotion in actophotometer test in mice. 4n (2-4 mg/kg, ip) treatment also potentiated the 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) induced head twitch response in mice. Further, 4n (1-4 mg/kg, ip) treatment antagonized reserpine induced hypothermia in rats. Chronic treatment (14 days) with 4n (1-4 mg/kg) and paroxetine (10 mg/kg) significantly attenuated the behavioural anomalies induced by bilateral olfactory bulbectomy in rats in modified open field paradigm. An anxiogenic-like behaviour was induced by light alone as the stimulus using light-dark aversion test. 4n (2-4 mg/kg, ip) treatment significantly increased no. of transitions between dark and lit area and the time spent in the lit area. In conclusion, these preliminary investigations confirm that 4n exhibited antidepressant and anxiolytic-like effects in rodent models of depression and anxiety.

  9. Antidepressant-like effect of novel 5-HT3 receptor antagonist N-n-butyl-3-ethoxyquinoxalin-2-carboxamide (6p): An approach using rodent behavioral antidepressant tests

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Shvetank; Mahesh, Radhakrishnan; Devadoss, Thangaraj; Jindal, Ankur Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The present study was designed to investigate the antidepressant potential of N-n-butyl-3-ethoxyquinoxalin-2-carboxamide (6p), a novel 5-HT3 receptor antagonist in rodent behavioral models of depression. Materials and Methods: The compound 6p was examined in various behavioral models like forced swim test (FST), tail suspension test (TST), mechanistic models [5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP)-induced head twitch and reserpine-induced hypothermia (RIH)], and in chronic surgery model-olfactory bulbectomy in rats. Results: Compound 6p (1, 2, and 4 mg/kg, i.p.) exhibited antidepressant-like effect in FST and TST after acute treatment without having an effect on baseline locomotor activity. Moreover, 6p (2 mg/kg, i.p.), potentiated the 5-HTP–induced head twitch responses in mice and inhibited the RIH in rats. Chronic treatment (14 days) with 6p (1 and 2 mg/kg, p.o.) and paroxetine (10 mg/kg, p.o.) in rats significantly reversed the behavioral anomalies induced by bilateral olfactory bulbectomy using open field exploration. Conclusion: The preliminary studies reveal that compound 6p exhibits antidepressant-like effect in behavioral rodent models of depression. PMID:24014909

  10. Influence of Polymorphisms in the HTR3A and HTR3B Genes on Experimental Pain and the Effect of the 5-HT3 Antagonist Granisetron

    PubMed Central

    Hedenberg-Magnusson, Britt; List, Thomas; Svensson, Peter; Schalling, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate experimentally if 5-HT3 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) contribute to pain perception and efficacy of the 5-HT3-antagonist granisetron and sex differences. Sixty healthy participants were genotyped regarding HTR3A (rs1062613) and HTR3B (rs1176744). First, pain was induced by bilateral hypertonic saline injections (HS, 5.5%, 0.2 mL) into the masseter muscles. Thirty min later the masseter muscle on one side was pretreated with 0.5 mL granisetron (1 mg/mL) and on the other side with 0.5 mL placebo (isotonic saline) followed by another HS injection (0.2 mL). Pain intensity, pain duration, pain area and pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were assessed after each injection. HS evoked moderate pain, with higher intensity in the women (P = 0.023), but had no effect on PPTs. None of the SNPs influenced any pain variable in general, but compared to men, the pain area was larger in women carrying the C/C (HTR3A) (P = 0.015) and pain intensity higher in women with the A/C alleles (HTR3B) (P = 0.019). Pre-treatment with granisetron reduced pain intensity, duration and area to a lesser degree in women (P < 0.05), but the SNPs did not in general influence the efficacy of granisetron. Women carrying the C/T & T/T (HTR3A) genotype had less reduction of pain intensity (P = 0.041) and area (P = 0.005), and women with the C/C genotype (HTR3B) had less reduction of pain intensity (P = 0.030), duration (P = 0.030) and area compared to men (P = 0.017). In conclusion, SNPs did not influence experimental muscle pain or the effect of granisetron on pain variables in general, but there were some sex differences in pain variables that seem to be influenced by genotypes. However, due to the small sample size further research is needed before any firm conclusions can be drawn. PMID:28002447

  11. Antidepressant and anti-anxiety like effects of 4i (N-(3-chloro-2-methylphenyl) quinoxalin-2-carboxamide), a novel 5-HT3 receptor antagonist in acute and chronic neurobehavioral rodent models.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Deepali; Radhakrishnan, Mahesh; Thangaraj, Devadoss; Kurhe, Yeshwant

    2014-07-15

    Depression and anxiety are the most debilitating mood disorders with poor therapeutic recovery rates. In the last decades, 5-HT3 receptor antagonists have been identified as potential agents for mood disorders. The current investigation focuses on evaluating the, antidepressant and anti-anxiety like effects of a novel 5-HT3 antagonist, 4i (N-(3-chloro-2-methylphenyl) quinoxalin-2-carboxamide). Preliminary, in vitro 5-HT3 receptor binding affinity was performed in isolated longitudinal muscle-myenteric plexus from the guinea pig ileum. Consequently, neurobehavioral effects of 4i in acute and chronic rodent models were evaluated. In addition, involvement of serotonergic system in the postulated effects of the compound was analyzed by in vivo assay. in vitro, 4i demonstrated high 5-HT3 receptor antagonistic activity (pA2, 7.6). in vivo acute study, 4i exhibited decreased duration of immobility in forced swim and tail suspension tests, and increased exploratory parameters as number and duration of nose-poking in hole board test and latency and time spent in aversive brightly illuminated light chamber in light-dark model. Moreover, in chronic model of depression, i.e., olfactory bulbectomy with behavioral deficits, 4i reversed depressive anhedonia in sucrose preference test and anxious hyperactive behavior in open field test in rats. Furthermore, synergistic effect of 4i with fluoxetine (a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor) and inhibitory effect of 1-(m-chlorophenyl)-biguanide (a 5-HT3 receptor agonist) revealed serotonergic modulation by 4i mediated 5-HT3 receptor antagonism, which was further confirmed by potentiation of 5-hydroxytryptophan (a serotonin synthesis precursor) induced head twitch response. These findings suggest the potential antidepressant and anti-anxiety like effects of 4i, which may be related to the modulation of serotonergic system.

  12. Ondansetron, a 5HT3 receptor antagonist reverses depression and anxiety-like behavior in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice: possible implication of serotonergic system.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Deepali; Radhakrishnan, Mahesh; Kurhe, Yeshwant

    2014-12-05

    Increased prevalence and high comorbidity of depression-like mood disorders and diabetes have prompted investigation of new targets and potential contributing agents. There is considerable evidence supporting the inconsistent clinical efficacy and persistent undesirable effects of existing antidepressant therapy for depression associated with diabetes. Therefore, the present study was aimed at investigating the effect of ondansetron, a selective 5HT3 receptor antagonist in attenuating depression and anxiety-like behavior comorbid with diabetes. Experimentally, Swiss albino mice were rendered diabetic by a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of streptozotocin (STZ, 200 mg/kg). After 8 weeks, diabetic mice received a single dose of vehicle/ondansetron (0.5 and 1 mg/kg, p.o.)/fluoxetine (the positive control, 10 mg/kg p.o.) for 28 days. Thereafter, behavioral studies were conducted to test depression-like behavior using forced swim test (FST) and anxiety-like deficits using hole-board and light-dark tests, followed by biochemical estimation of serotonin content in discrete brain regions. The results demonstrated that, STZ-induced diabetic mice exhibited increased duration of immobility and decreased swimming behavior in FST, reduced exploratory behavior during hole-board test and increased aversion to brightly illuminated light area in light-dark test as compared to non-diabetic mice, while ondansetron (similar to fluoxetine) treatment significantly reversed the same. Biochemical assay revealed that ondansetron administration attenuated diabetes-induced neurochemical impairment of serotonin function, indicated by elevated serotonin levels in discrete brain regions of diabetic mice. Collectively, the data indicate that ondansetron may reverse depression and anxiety-like behavioral deficits associated with diabetes in mice and modulation of serotonergic activity may be a key mechanism of the compound.

  13. Tropisetron suppresses colitis-associated cancer in a mouse model in the remission stage.

    PubMed

    Amini-Khoei, Hossein; Momeny, Majid; Abdollahi, Alireza; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza; Amiri, Shayan; Haj-Mirzaian, Arya; Tavangar, Seyed Mohammad; Ghaffari, Seyed Hamid; Rahimian, Reza; Mehr, Shahram Ejtemaei

    2016-07-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have a high risk for development of colitis-associated cancer (CAC). Serotonin is a neurotransmitter produced by enterochromaffin cells of the intestine. Serotonin and its receptors, mainly 5-HT3 receptor, are overexpressed in IBD and promote development of CAC through production of inflammatory cytokines. In the present study, we demonstrated the in vivo activity of tropisetron, a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, against experimental CAC. CAC was induced by azoxymethane (AOM)/dextran sodium sulfate (DDS) in BALB/c mice. The histopathology of colon tissue was performed. Beta-catenin and Cox-2 expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry as well as quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR). Alterations in the expression of 5-HT3 receptor and inflammatory-associated genes such as Il-1β, Tnf-α, Tlr4 and Myd88 were determined by qRT-PCR. Our results showed that tumor development in tropisetron-treated CAC group was significantly lower than the controls. The qRT-PCR analysis demonstrated that the expression of 5-HT3 receptor was significantly increased following CAC induction. In addition, tropisetron reduced expression of β-catenin and Cox-2 in the CAC experimental group. The levels of Il-1β, Tnf-α, Tlr4 and Myd88 were significantly decreased upon tropisetron treatment in the AOM/DSS group. Taken together, our data show that tropisetron inhibits development of CAC probably by attenuation of inflammatory reactions in the colitis.

  14. Blockade of peripheral 5HT3 receptor attenuates the formalin-induced nocifensive behavior in persistent temporomandibular joint inflammation of rat.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Keiichiro; Imbe, Hiroki; Tashiro, Akimasa; Kumabe, Shunji; Senba, Emiko

    2004-09-02

    The role of peripheral 5HT3 receptors in the orofacial nocifensive behavior induced by the injection of formalin into masseter muscle was evaluated. The behavioral activities evoked by the formalin injection exhibited a biphasic response in the rats with or without temporomandibular joint (TMJ) inflammation (CFA group or non-CFA group). The orofacial nocifensive behavioral activity was enhanced after TMJ inflammation. Systemic administration of tropisetron, 5HT3 receptor antagonist, reduced the nocifensive behavioral activities in the late phase of orofacial formalin test in CFA group, but not in non-CFA group. Local administration of tropisetron into the masseter muscle in CFA group, but not in non-CFA group also attenuated the behavioral activities in the late phase. Unexpectedly, low dose of local tropisetron reduced the nocifensive behavioral activities in the early phase of orofacial formalin test in CFA group. These data suggest that induction of TMJ inflammation causes the elevation of the orofacial nocifensive behavioral activities evoked by formalin injection into masseter muscle, and that peripheral 5HT3 receptors may play a critical role in nociception and the transmission of orofacial pain.

  15. The neuroprotective effect of tropisetron on vincristine-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Barzegar-Fallah, Anita; Alimoradi, Houman; Mehrzadi, Saeed; Barzegar-Fallah, Niloofar; Zendedel, Adib; Abbasi, Ata; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2014-03-01

    Vincristine (VCR) peripheral neuropathy is a dose-limiting side effect. Several studies have shown that tropisetron, a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, exerts anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties. Current study was designed to investigate a suppressive effect of tropisetron on VCR-induced neuropathy and whether this effect exerts through the 5-HT3 receptor or not. Neuropathy was induced in rats by administration of vincristine (0.5mg/kg, 3 intraperitoneal injections on alternate days) and in treatment group, tropisetron (3mg/kg); m-chlorophenylbiguanide (mCPBG), a selective 5-HT3 receptor agonist (15mg/kg); tropisetron (3mg/kg) plus mCPBG (15mg/kg); granisetron, another selective 5-HT3 receptor antagonist (3mg/kg) were administered intraperitoneally 1h prior to vincristine injection. Hot plate, open field tests (total distance moved, mean velocity and percentage of total duration of the movement) and motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV) were performed to evaluate the sensory and motor neuropathy. Further, plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-2 (IL-2) and the level of TNF-α in sciatic nerve were assessed as well as histological examination. In only VCR-treated rats hot plate latencies were significantly increased, total distance moved, mean velocity, total duration of the movement and sciatic MNCV significantly decreased compared with control. In tropisetron and tropisetron plus mCPBG groups, one injection of tropisetron prior to each VCR injection robustly diminished TNF-α and IL-2 levels, and also prevented mixed sensory-motor neuropathy, as indicated by less mortality rate, better general conditions, behavioral and electrophysiological studies. Moreover, pathological evidence confirmed the results obtained from other findings. But granisetron and mCPBG had no significant effect on the mentioned parameters. In conclusion, these studies demonstrate that tropisetron significantly suppressed VCR-induced neuropathy and could

  16. Effect of acute and chronic treatment with QCF-3 (4-benzylpiperazin-1-yl) (quinoxalin-2-yl) methanone, a novel 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist, in animal models of depression.

    PubMed

    Devadoss, Thangaraj; Pandey, Dilip K; Mahesh, Radhakrishnan; Yadav, Shushil K

    2010-01-01

    The serotonin type 3 (5-HT(3)) receptor is unique among the seven recognized serotonin receptor "families". The existence serotonin type 3 receptor (5-HT(3)) in neuro-anatomical regions stimulated the research interest for novel therapeutic targets such as anxiety, depression, nociception and cognitive function. In the current study, (4-benzylpiperazin-1-yl) (quinoxalin-2-yl) methanone (QCF-3), a novel 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist, with an optimal log P (the logarithm of the ratio of the concentrations of the un-ionized solute in the solvents is called log P) and significant pA2 value (is a negative logarithm of the molar concentration of antagonist required to reduce the effect of multiple dose agonist to that of single dose) was screened for its anti-depressant potential using rodent behavioral models of depression. Psycho-pharmacological investigations involved acute and chronic treatment (14 days) with QCF-3 and assessment of behavior during the forced swim test (FST) and tail suspension test (TST) in mice and olfactory bulbectomised rats. A dose response study in mice revealed an initial anti-depressant-like effect of QCF-3 (0.5-4 mg/kg, ip) in the FST and TST. Interaction studies showed that QCF-3 (1 and 2 mg/kg) significantly enhanced the antidepressant action of fluoxetine and bupropion in the FST and TST, respectively. QCF-3 (1 and 2 mg/kg) potentiated the 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) induced head twitches response in mice and reversed reserpine-induced hypothermia in rats. Further, OBX rats exhibited behavioral anomalies in the open field and hyper-emotionality tests that were attenuated by chronic QCF-3 treatment. In conclusion, this behavioral study describes an antidepressant-like effect of QCF-3 in rodent behavioral models of depression.

  17. 2-(4-substituted piperazin-1-yl)-1,8-naphthyridine-3-carboxylic acids: novel 5-HT3 receptor antagonists with anxiolytic-like activity in rodent behavioral models.

    PubMed

    Mahesh, Radhakrishnan; Dhar, Arghya Kusum; Jindal, Ankur; Bhatt, Shvetank

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the anxiolytic potential of a series of novel carboxylic acid based 1,8 naphthyridines as 5-HT3 receptor antagonists. The pA2 values of all the compounds were determined against agonist 2-methyl-5-hydroxytryptamine in longitudinal muscle myenteric plexus preparations from guinea pig ileum. Compounds with higher pA2 values, particularly those greater than ondansetron, a standard 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, and optimal log P values were screened in mice by using behavioral tests such as a light-dark (L/D) aversion test, elevated plus maze (EPM) test, and an open field test (OFT). In the L/D test, compounds 7a, 7b, 7d, 7e, and 7i (2 mg/kg body mass, intraperitoneal) significantly (P < 0.05) increased the latency time to leave the light compartment, total time spent in the light compartment, and the number of transitions between the light and dark compartments. Compounds 7a, 7d, 7f, 7h, and 7i (2 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly (P < 0.05) increased the time spent in the open arms and the number of entries into the open arms in the EPM test. In addition, compounds 7a, 7d, 7e, 7f, and 7h (2 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly (P < 0.05) increased the ambulation scores and the frequency of rearing in the OFT.

  18. Role of 5-HT3 receptors in basal and K(+)-evoked dopamine release from rat olfactory tubercle and striatal slices.

    PubMed Central

    Zazpe, A; Artaiz, I; Del Río, J

    1994-01-01

    1. The present study was aimed at examining the role of 5-HT3 receptors in basal and depolarization-evoked dopamine release from rat olfactory tubercle and striatal slices. [3H]-dopamine ([3H]-DA) release was measured in both brain regions and endogenous dopamine release from striatal slices was also studied. 2. The selective 5-HT3 receptor agonist 2-methyl-5-HT (0.5-10 microM) produced a concentration-dependent increase in [3H]-DA efflux evoked by K+ (20 mM) from slices of rat olfactory tubercle. 1-Phenylbiguanide (PBG) and 5-HT also increased K(+)-evoked [3H]-DA efflux. 3. 5-HT (1-100 microM) increased in a concentration-dependent manner basal [3H]-DA release from olfactory tubercle and striatal slices as well as endogenous DA release from striatal slices. The selective 5-HT3 receptor agonists 2-methyl-5-HT and 1-phenylbiguanide were weaker releasing agents. In all cases, the release was Ca2+ independent and tetrodotoxin insensitive. 4. 5-HT3 receptor antagonists such as ondansetron, granisetron and tropisetron (0.2 microM) significantly blocked the enhanced K(+)-evoked [3H]-DA efflux from rat olfactory tubercle slices induced by 2-methyl-5HT. A ten fold higher concentration of the 5-HT2 receptor antagonist ketanserin was ineffective. 5. Much higher concentrations, up to 50 microM, of the same 5-HT3 receptor antagonists did not block the increase in basal [3H]-DA release from striatal or olfactory tubercle slices induced by 5-HT or the release of endogenous DA induced by 5-HT from striatal slices.2+ off PMID:7858893

  19. Menthol inhibits 5-HT3 receptor-mediated currents.

    PubMed

    Ashoor, Abrar; Nordman, Jacob C; Veltri, Daniel; Yang, Keun-Hang Susan; Shuba, Yaroslav; Al Kury, Lina; Sadek, Bassem; Howarth, Frank C; Shehu, Amarda; Kabbani, Nadine; Oz, Murat

    2013-11-01

    The effects of alcohol monoterpene menthol, a major active ingredient of the peppermint plant, were tested on the function of human 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 (5-HT3) receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. 5-HT (1 μM)-evoked currents recorded by two-electrode voltage-clamp technique were reversibly inhibited by menthol in a concentration-dependent (IC50 = 163 μM) manner. The effects of menthol developed gradually, reaching a steady-state level within 10-15 minutes and did not involve G-proteins, since GTPγS activity remained unaltered and the effect of menthol was not sensitive to pertussis toxin pretreatment. The actions of menthol were not stereoselective as (-), (+), and racemic menthol inhibited 5-HT3 receptor-mediated currents to the same extent. Menthol inhibition was not altered by intracellular 1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid injections and transmembrane potential changes. The maximum inhibition observed for menthol was not reversed by increasing concentrations of 5-HT. Furthermore, specific binding of the 5-HT3 antagonist [(3)H]GR65630 was not altered in the presence of menthol (up to 1 mM), indicating that menthol acts as a noncompetitive antagonist of the 5-HT3 receptor. Finally, 5-HT3 receptor-mediated currents in acutely dissociated nodose ganglion neurons were also inhibited by menthol (100 μM). These data demonstrate that menthol, at pharmacologically relevant concentrations, is an allosteric inhibitor of 5-HT3 receptors.

  20. Sleep Deprivation-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Breakdown and Brain Dysfunction are Exacerbated by Size-Related Exposure to Ag and Cu Nanoparticles. Neuroprotective Effects of a 5-HT3 Receptor Antagonist Ondansetron.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Aruna; Muresanu, Dafin F; Lafuente, José V; Patnaik, Ranjana; Tian, Z Ryan; Buzoianu, Anca D; Sharma, Hari S

    2015-10-01

    Military personnel are often subjected to sleep deprivation (SD) during combat operations. Since SD is a severe stress and alters neurochemical metabolism in the brain, a possibility exists that acute or long-term SD will influence blood-brain barrier (BBB) function and brain pathology. This hypothesis was examined in young adult rats (age 12 to 14 weeks) using an inverted flowerpot model. Rats were placed over an inverted flowerpot platform (6.5 cm diameter) in a water pool where the water levels are just 3 cm below the surface. In this model, animals can go to sleep for brief periods but cannot achieve deep sleep as they would fall into water and thus experience sleep interruption. These animals showed leakage of Evans blue in the cerebellum, hippocampus, caudate nucleus, parietal, temporal, occipital, cingulate cerebral cortices, and brain stem. The ventricular walls of the lateral and fourth ventricles were also stained blue, indicating disruption of the BBB and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB). Breakdown of the BBB or the BCSFB fluid barrier was progressive in nature from 12 to 48 h but no apparent differences in BBB leakage were seen between 48 and 72 h of SD. Interestingly, rats treated with metal nanoparticles, e.g., Cu or Ag, showed profound exacerbation of BBB disruption by 1.5- to 4-fold, depending on the duration of SD. Measurement of plasma and brain serotonin showed a close correlation between BBB disruption and the amine level. Repeated treatment with the serotonin 5-HT3 receptor antagonist ondansetron (1 mg/kg, s.c.) 4 and 8 h after SD markedly reduced BBB disruption and brain pathology after 12 to 24 h SD but not following 48 or 72 h after SD. However, TiO2-nanowired ondansetron (1 mg/kg, s.c) in an identical manner induced neuroprotection in rats following 48 or 72 h SD. However, plasma and serotonin levels were not affected by ondansetron treatment. Taken together, our observations are the first to show that (i) SD could induce BBB

  1. Neuropharmacological evaluation of a novel 5-HT3 receptor antagonist (6g) on chronic unpredictable mild stress-induced changes in behavioural and brain oxidative stress parameters in mice

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Shvetank; Radhakrishnan, Mahesh; Jindal, Ankur; Devadoss, Thangaraj; Dhar, Arghya Kusum

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the study was to evaluate a novel 5 HT3 receptor antagonist (6g) on chronic stress induced changes in behavioural and brain oxidative stress parameter in mice. A complicated relationship exists among stressful stimuli, body's reaction to stress and the onset of clinical depression. Chronic unpredictable stressors can produce a situation similar to human depression, and such animal models can be used for the preclinical evaluation of antidepressants. Materials and Methods: In the present study, a novel and potential 5-HT3 receptor antagonist (4-benzylpiperazin-1-yl)(3-methoxyquinoxalin-2-yl) methanone (6g) with good Log P (3.08) value and pA2(7.5) values, synthesized in our laboratory was investigated to study the effects on chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS)-induced behavioural and biochemical alterations in mice. Mice were subjected to different stress paradigms daily for a period of 28 days to induce depressive-like behaviour. Results: The results showed that CUMS caused depression-like behaviour in mice, as indicated by the significant (P < 0.05) decrease in sucrose consumption and locomotor activity and increase in immobility the forced swim test. In addition, it was found that lipid peroxidation and nitrite levels were significantly (P < 0.05) increased, whereas glutathione levels, superoxide dismutase and catalase activities decreased in brain tissue of CUMS-treated mice. ‘6g’ (1 and 2 mg/kg, p.o., 21 days) and fluoxetine treatment (20 mg/kg, p.o., 21 days) significantly (P < 0.05) reversed the CUMS-induced behavioural (increased immobility period, reduced sucrose preference and decreased locomotor activity) and biochemical (increased lipid peroxidation; decreased glutathione levels, superoxide dismutase and catalase activities). However fluoxetine treatment (20 mg/kg, p.o., 21 days) significantly decreased the nitrite level in the brain while ‘6g’ (1 and 2 mg/kg, p.o., 21 days) did not show significant (P < 0.05) effect on the

  2. Involvement of nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway in the antidepressant-like effect of tropisetron and ondansetron in mice forced swimming test and tail suspension test.

    PubMed

    Haj-Mirzaian, Arya; Kordjazy, Nastaran; Amiri, Shayan; Haj-Mirzaian, Arvin; Amini-Khoei, Hossien; Ostadhadi, Sattar; Dehpour, AhmadReza

    2016-06-05

    Antidepressant-like effects of 5-hydroxytryptamine subtype 3 (5-HT3) antagonists including tropisetron and ondansetron have been previously demonstrated in the literature. It was reported that stimulation of 5-HT3 receptors activate the nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (NO-cGMP) pathway, which is involved in regulation of behavioral and emotional functions. In our study, treating animals with tropisetron (5, 10, and 30mg/kg) and ondansetron (0.01 and 0.1µg/kg) significantly decreased the immobility time in forced swimming test (FST) and tail-suspension test (TST). Co-administration of subeffective doses of tropisetron (1mg/kg) and ondansetron (0.001µg/kg) with subeffective dose of l-NAME (10mg/kg, nonselective NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor) and 7-nitroindazole (25mg/kg, neural NOS inhibitor) exerted antidepressant-like effect in FST and TST, while aminoguanidine (50mg/kg, inducible NOS inhibitor) did not enhance the antidepressant-like effect of 5-HT3 antagonists. Besides, l-arginine (750mg/kg, NO precursor) and sildenafil (5mg/kg, phosphodiesterase inhibitor) suppressed the anti-immobility effect of 5-HT3 antagonists. None of the treatments altered the locomotor behavior of mice in open-field test. Also, hippocampal (but not cortical) nitrite level was significantly lower in tropisetron and ondansetron-treated mice compared with saline-injected mice. Also, co-administration of 7-nitroindazole with tropisetron or ondansetron caused a significant decrease in hippocampal nitrite levels. In conclusion, we suggest that antidepressant-like effect of tropisetron and ondansetron are partially mediated by modulation of NO-cGMP pathway.

  3. Structural, conformational, biochemical, and pharmacological study of some amides derived from 3,7-dimethyl-3,7-diazabicyclo [3.3.1] nonan-9-amine as potential 5-HT 3 receptor antagonists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, M. J.; Huertas, R. M.; Gálvez, E.; Orjales, A.; Berisa, A.; Labeaga, L.; Garcia, A. G.; Uceda, G.; Server-Carrió, J.; Martinez-Ripoll, M.

    1995-12-01

    A series of amides derived from 3,7-dimethyl-3,7-diazabicyclo [3.3.1] nonan-9-amine have been synthesized and examined by 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy and the crystal structure of 9-(2,4,6-trichlorobenzamido)-3,7-dimethyl-3,7-diazabicyclo[3.3.1] nonane hydrochloride ( 4a·HCl) has been determined by X-ray diffraction. These compounds adopt an almost perfect chair-chair conformation with the NCH 3 groups in equatorial position. This conformation is nearly the same as that observed for compound 4a in the solid state. From binding studies of compounds 4a-c, compound 4b demonstrated the ability to efficiently displace [ 3H]GR65630 bound to bovine brain area postrema membranes to an extent comparable to MDL 72222. In the von Bezold-Jarish reflex, compound 4b showed significant results at a dose of 25 mg Kg -1. It is shown for the first time that a series of compounds with a bispidine skeleton linked through an amide moiety to several aromatic rings, shows 5-HT 3 antagonistic profiles.

  4. Inhibitory effects of ramosetron, a potent and selective 5-HT3-receptor antagonist, on conditioned fear stress-induced abnormal defecation and normal defecation in rats: comparative studies with antidiarrheal and spasmolytic agents.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Takuya; Funatsu, Toshiyuki; Keto, Yoshihiro; Akuzawa, Shinobu; Sasamata, Masao; Miyata, Keiji

    2008-02-01

    We examined the effect of ramosetron, a potent serotonin (5-HT)(3)-receptor antagonist for irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea, on conditioned fear stress (CFS)-induced defecation and normal (non-stressed) defecation in rats and compared ramosetron with the antidiarrheal agent loperamide and the spasmolytic agents trimebutine and tiquizium. Ramosetron, loperamide, trimebutine, and tiquizium significantly inhibited CFS-induced defecation in a dose-dependent manner with ED(50) (95% confidence limit) values of 0.019 (0.01 - 0.028), 9.4 (4.0 - 22), 850 (520 - 2,400), and 300 (190 - 450) mg/kg, respectively. A significant effect of ramosetron on CFS-induced defecation appeared at 10 min after dosing and was sustained for 8 h. In contrast, loperamide, trimebutine, and tiquizium significantly inhibited CFS-induced defecation between 1 - 8, 1 - 4, and 1 - 8 h after administration, respectively. High doses of ramosetron did not affect normal defecation, whereas loperamide, trimebutine, and tiquizium significantly inhibited this process. In conclusion, ramosetron has potent, rapid-onset, and long-lasting inhibitory effects on CFS-induced defecation in rats, but does not influence normal defecation. The present findings indicate that ramosetron will be a useful therapeutic agent for irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea, showing greater efficacy and safety than other antidiarrheal and spasmolytic agents.

  5. The effect of paracetamol and tropisetron on pain: experimental studies and a review of published data.

    PubMed

    Tiippana, Elina; Hamunen, Katri; Kontinen, Vesa; Kalso, Eija

    2013-02-01

    Experimental studies suggest that paracetamol-induced analgesia is mediated via central serotonergic pathways and attenuated by 5-HT3-antagonists. However, clinical studies do not support this, and 5-HT3-antagonists are expected to reduce pain by blocking the descending pronociceptive pathway. The current project tested whether tropisetron attenuates analgesia by paracetamol. Two randomized, double-blind, crossover studies with 18 healthy male volunteers in each were performed. Pain stimuli were cold water immersion (cold pressor test), contact heat pain (study 1) and electrical stimulation (study 2). In both studies, tropisetron 5 mg i.v. or saline was administered, followed by paracetamol 2 g i.v. 30 min. later. Individual changes in heat and cold pain intensity, cold pain tolerance and unpleasantness were recorded. The same thresholds were also expressed as scores (% of the individual score at baseline). Additionally, previously published findings on the effects of paracetamol and its interaction with 5HT3-antagonists in human experimental pain models were reviewed. After calculation of the sensory and pain scores (%), tropisetron seemed to amplify the analgesic action of paracetamol. Paracetamol 2 g i.v. did not show any statistically significant analgesia in thermal tests (study 1), or differences in sensory, pain detection or moderate pain thresholds of the electrical stimulus (study 2). As paracetamol did not have a measurable analgesic effect in these tests, no conclusions can be drawn about the interaction between paracetamol and tropisetron. However, tropisetron may have an analgesic effect of its own. Clinicians should not avoid using these drugs together, unless larger clinical studies indicate otherwise.

  6. Effect of intravenous tropisetron on modulation of pain and central hypersensitivity in chronic low back pain patients.

    PubMed

    Neziri, Alban Y; Dickenmann, Martina; Scaramozzino, Pasquale; Andersen, Ole K; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Dickenson, Anthony H; Curatolo, Michele

    2012-02-01

    The activation of 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 (5-HT-3) receptors in spinal cord can enhance intrinsic spinal mechanisms of central hypersensitivity, possibly leading to exaggerated pain responses. Clinical studies suggest that 5-HT-3 receptor antagonists may have an analgesic effect. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study tested the hypothesis that the 5-HT-3 receptor antagonist tropisetron attenuates pain and central hypersensitivity in patients with chronic low back pain. Thirty patients with chronic low back pain, 15 of whom were women (aged 53 ± 14 years) and 15 men (aged 48 ± 14 years), were studied. A single intravenous injection of 0.9% saline solution, tropisetron 2mg, and tropisetron 5mg was administrated in 3 different sessions, in a double-blind crossover manner. The main outcome was the visual analogue scale (VAS) score of spontaneous low back pain before, and 15, 30, 60, and 90 minutes after drug administration. Secondary outcomes were nociceptive withdrawal reflexes to single and repeated electrical stimulation, area of reflex receptive fields, pressure pain detection and tolerance thresholds, conditioned pain modulation, and area of clinical pain. The data were analyzed by analysis of variance and panel multiple regressions. All 3 treatments reduced VAS scores. However, there was no statistically significant difference between tropisetron and placebo in VAS scores. Compared to placebo, tropisetron produced a statistically significant increase in pain threshold after single electrical stimulation, but no difference in all other secondary outcomes was found. A single-dose intravenous administration of tropisetron in patients with chronic low back pain had no significant specific effect on intensity of pain and most parameters of central hypersensitivity.

  7. P2X3 receptors induced inflammatory nociception modulated by TRPA1, 5-HT3 and 5-HT1A receptors.

    PubMed

    Krimon, Suzy; Araldi, Dionéia; do Prado, Filipe César; Tambeli, Cláudia Herrera; Oliveira-Fusaro, Maria Cláudia G; Parada, Carlos Amílcar

    2013-11-01

    It has been described that endogenous ATP via activation of P2X3 and P2X2/3 receptors contributes to inflammatory nociception in different models, including the formalin injected in subcutaneous tissue of the rat's hind paw. In this study, we have evaluated whether TRPA1, 5-HT3 and 5-HT1A receptors, whose activation is essential to formalin-induced inflammatory nociception, are involved in the nociception induced by activation of P2X3 receptors on subcutaneous tissue of the rat's hind paw. We have also evaluated whether the activation of P2X3 receptors increases the susceptibility of primary afferent neurons to formalin action modulated by activation of TRPA1, 5-HT3 or 5-HT1A receptors. Nociceptive response intensity was measured by observing the rat's behavior and considering the number of times the animal reflexively raised its hind paw (flinches) in 60min. Local subcutaneous administration of the selective TRPA1, 5-HT3 or 5-HT1A receptor antagonists HC 030031, tropisetron and WAY 100,135, respectively, prevented the nociceptive responses induced by the administration in the same site of the non-selective P2X3 receptor agonist αβmeATP. Administration of the selective P2X3 and P2X2/3 receptor antagonist A-317491 or pretreatment with oligonucleotides antisense against P2X3 receptor prevented the formalin-induced behavioral nociceptive responses during the first and second phases. Also, the co-administration of a subthreshold dose of αβmeATP with a subthreshold dose of formalin induced nociceptive behavior, which was prevented by local administration of tropisetron, HC 030031 or WAY 100, 135. These findings have demonstrated that the activation of P2X3 receptors induces inflammatory nociception modulated by TRPA1, 5-HT3 and 5-HT1A receptors. Also, they suggest that inflammatory nociception is modulated by the release of endogenous ATP and P2X3 receptor activation, which in turn, increases primary afferent nociceptor susceptibility to the action of inflammatory

  8. Design, synthesis, and pharmacological evaluation of novel 2-(4-substituted piperazin-1-yl)1, 8 naphthyridine 3-carboxylic acids as 5-HT3 receptor antagonists for the management of depression.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Arghya K; Mahesh, Radhakrishnan; Jindal, Ankur; Devadoss, Thangaraj; Bhatt, Shvetank

    2014-12-01

    1, 8-naphthyridine-3-carboxylic acid analogs were synthesized and found to possess potential 5-HT3 receptor antagonism as well as antidepressant-like activity. Initially, 5-HT3 receptor antagonism of all the compounds was determined in the form of pA2 value against agonist 2-methyl 5-HT in longitudinal muscle-myenteric plexus preparation from guinea-pig ileum. Among all the compounds tested, compound 7a demonstrated most promising pA2 value of 7.6. Subsequently, all the compounds were evaluated for antidepressant activity using forced swim test and tail suspension test in mice. Compounds 7a, 7d, 7f, 7h, and 7i exhibited significant (p < 0.05) antidepressant-like activity as compound to vehicle-treated group. Importantly, none of the tested compound affected locomotor activity of mice at tested dose levels.

  9. The Role of 5-HT3 Receptors in Signaling from Taste Buds to Nerves.

    PubMed

    Larson, Eric D; Vandenbeuch, Aurelie; Voigt, Anja; Meyerhof, Wolfgang; Kinnamon, Sue C; Finger, Thomas E

    2015-12-02

    Activation of taste buds triggers the release of several neurotransmitters, including ATP and serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT). Type III taste cells release 5-HT directly in response to acidic (sour) stimuli and indirectly in response to bitter and sweet tasting stimuli. Although ATP is necessary for activation of nerve fibers for all taste stimuli, the role of 5-HT is unclear. We investigated whether gustatory afferents express functional 5-HT3 receptors and, if so, whether these receptors play a role in transmission of taste information from taste buds to nerves. In mice expressing GFP under the control of the 5-HT(3A) promoter, a subset of cells in the geniculate ganglion and nerve fibers in taste buds are GFP-positive. RT-PCR and in situ hybridization confirmed the presence of 5-HT(3A) mRNA in the geniculate ganglion. Functional studies show that only those geniculate ganglion cells expressing 5-HT3A-driven GFP respond to 10 μM 5-HT and this response is blocked by 1 μM ondansetron, a 5-HT3 antagonist, and mimicked by application of 10 μM m-chlorophenylbiguanide, a 5-HT3 agonist. Pharmacological blockade of 5-HT3 receptors in vivo or genetic deletion of the 5-HT3 receptors reduces taste nerve responses to acids and other taste stimuli compared with controls, but only when urethane was used as the anesthetic. We find that anesthetic levels of pentobarbital reduce taste nerve responses apparently by blocking the 5-HT3 receptors. Our results suggest that 5-HT released from type III cells activates gustatory nerve fibers via 5-HT3 receptors, accounting for a significant proportion of the neural taste response.

  10. The binding characteristics and orientation of a novel radioligand with distinct properties at 5-HT3A and 5-HT3AB receptors

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Andrew J.; Verheij, Mark H.P.; Verbeek, Joost; Windhorst, Albert D.; de Esch, Iwan J.P.; Lummis, Sarah C.R.

    2014-01-01

    VUF10166 (2-chloro-3-(4-methyl piperazin-1-yl)quinoxaline) is a ligand that binds with high affinity to 5-HT3 receptors. Here we synthesise [3H]VUF10166 and characterise its binding properties at 5-HT3A and 5-HT3AB receptors. At 5-HT3A receptors [3H]VUF10166 displayed saturable binding with a Kd of 0.18 nM. Kinetic measurements gave monophasic association (6.25 × 107 M−1 min−1) and dissociation (0.01 min−1) rates that yielded a similar Kd value (0.16 nM). At 5-HT3AB receptors two association (6.15 × 10−7, 7.23 M−1 min−1) and dissociation (0.024, 0.162 min−1) rates were seen, yielding Kd values (0.38 nM and 22 nM) that were consistent with values obtained in saturation (Kd = 0.74 nM) and competition (Ki = 37 nM) binding experiments respectively. At both receptor types, specific binding was inhibited by classical 5-HT3 receptor-selective orthosteric ligands (5-HT, allosetron, d-tubocurarine, granisetron, mCPBG, MDL72222, quipazine), but not by non-competitive antagonists (bilobalide, ginkgolide B, picrotoxin) or competitive ligands of other Cys-loop receptors (ACh, bicuculline, glycine, gabazine). To explore VUF10166 ligand–receptor interactions we used in silico modelling and docking, and tested the predictions using site directed mutagenesis. The data suggest that VUF10166 adopts a similar orientation to 5-HT3 receptor agonists bound in AChBP (varenicline) and 5HTBP (5-HT) crystal structures. PMID:25174552

  11. The Role of 5-HT3 Receptors in Signaling from Taste Buds to Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Vandenbeuch, Aurelie; Voigt, Anja; Meyerhof, Wolfgang; Kinnamon, Sue C.; Finger, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    Activation of taste buds triggers the release of several neurotransmitters, including ATP and serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT). Type III taste cells release 5-HT directly in response to acidic (sour) stimuli and indirectly in response to bitter and sweet tasting stimuli. Although ATP is necessary for activation of nerve fibers for all taste stimuli, the role of 5-HT is unclear. We investigated whether gustatory afferents express functional 5-HT3 receptors and, if so, whether these receptors play a role in transmission of taste information from taste buds to nerves. In mice expressing GFP under the control of the 5-HT3A promoter, a subset of cells in the geniculate ganglion and nerve fibers in taste buds are GFP-positive. RT-PCR and in situ hybridization confirmed the presence of 5-HT3A mRNA in the geniculate ganglion. Functional studies show that only those geniculate ganglion cells expressing 5-HT3A-driven GFP respond to 10 μm 5-HT and this response is blocked by 1 μm ondansetron, a 5-HT3 antagonist, and mimicked by application of 10 μm m-chlorophenylbiguanide, a 5-HT3 agonist. Pharmacological blockade of 5-HT3 receptors in vivo or genetic deletion of the 5-HT3 receptors reduces taste nerve responses to acids and other taste stimuli compared with controls, but only when urethane was used as the anesthetic. We find that anesthetic levels of pentobarbital reduce taste nerve responses apparently by blocking the 5-HT3 receptors. Our results suggest that 5-HT released from type III cells activates gustatory nerve fibers via 5-HT3 receptors, accounting for a significant proportion of the neural taste response. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Historically, serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) has been described as a candidate neurotransmitter in the gustatory system and recent studies show that type III taste receptor cells release 5-HT in response to various taste stimuli. In the present study, we demonstrate that a subset of gustatory sensory neurons express functional

  12. Bivalent Ligands for the Serotonin 5-HT3 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The serotonin 5-HT3 receptor is a ligand-gated ion channel, which by virtue of its pentameric architecture, can be considered to be an intriguing example of intrinsically multivalent biological receptors. This paper describes a general design approach to the study of multivalency in this multimeric ion channel. Bivalent ligands for 5-HT3 receptor have been designed by linking an arylpiperazine moiety to probes showing different functional features. Both homobivalent and heterobivalent ligands have shown 5-HT3 receptor affinity in the nanomolar range, providing evidence for the viability of our design approach. Moreover, the high affinity shown by homobivalent ligands suggests that bivalency is a promising approach in 5-HT3 receptor modulation and provides the rational basis for applying the concepts of multivalency to the study of 5-HT3 receptor function. PMID:24900351

  13. Synthesis and characterization of photoaffinity probes that target the 5-HT3 receptor.

    PubMed

    Jack, Thomas; Ruepp, Marc-David; Thompson, Andrew J; Mühlemann, Oliver; Lochner, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The 5-HT3 receptor is one of several ion channels responsible for the transmission of nerve impulses in the peripheral and central nervous systems. Until now, it has been difficult to characterize transmembrane receptors with classical structural biology approaches like X-ray crystallography. The use of photoaffinity probes is an alternative approach to identify regions in the protein where small molecules bind. To this end, we present two photoaffinity probes based on granisetron, a well known antagonist of the 5-HT3 receptor. These new probes show nanomolar binding affinity for the orthosteric binding site. In addition, we investigated their reactivity using irradiation experiments.

  14. Seizure susceptibility alteration through 5-HT(3) receptor: modulation by nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Gholipour, Taha; Ghasemi, Mehdi; Riazi, Kiarash; Ghaffarpour, Majid; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2010-01-01

    There is some evidence that epileptic seizures could be induced or increased by 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) attenuation, while augmentation of serotonin functions within the brain (e.g. by SSRIs) has been reported to be anticonvulsant. This study was performed to determine the effect of selective 5-HT(3) channel/receptor antagonist granisetron and agonist SR57227 hydrochloride on the pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizure threshold in mice. The possible interaction of this effect with nitrergic system was also examined using the nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) and the NO precursor l-arginine. SR57227 (10mg/kg, i.p.) significantly increased the seizure threshold compared to control group, while high dose granisetron (10mg/kg, i.p.) proved proconvulsant. Co-administration of sub-effective doses of the 5-HT(3) agonist with l-NAME (5 and 60mg/kg, i.p., respectively) exerted a significant anticonvulsive effect, while sub-effective doses of granisetron (3mg/kg) was observed to have a proconvulsive action with the addition of l-arginine (75mg/kg, i.p.). Our data demonstrate that enhancement of 5-HT(3) receptor function results in as anticonvulsant effect in the PTZ-induced seizure model, and that selective antagonism at the 5-HT(3) receptor yields proconvulsive effects. Furthermore, the NO system may play a role in 5-HT(3) receptor function.

  15. 5-HT3 receptors as important mediators of nausea and vomiting due to chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Navari, Rudolph M

    2015-10-01

    Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) is associated with a significant deterioration in quality of life. The emetogenicity of the chemotherapeutic agents, repeated chemotherapy cycles, and patient risk factors significantly influence CINV. The use of a combination of a 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonist, dexamethasone, and a neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptor antagonist has significantly improved the control of acute and delayed emesis in single-day chemotherapy. The first generation 5-HT3 receptor antagonists have been very effective in the control of chemotherapy induced emesis in the first 24 h postchemotherapy (acute emesis), but have not been as effective against delayed emesis (24-120 h postchemotherapy). Palonosetron, a second generation 5-HT3 receptor antagonist with a different half-life, a different binding capacity, and a different mechanism of action than the first generation 5-HT3 receptor antagonists appears to be the most effective agent in its class. Despite the control of emesis, nausea has not been well controlled by current agents. Olanzapine, a FDA approved antipsychotic that blocks multiple neurotransmitters: dopamine at D1, D2, D3, D4 brain receptors, serotonin at 5-HT2a, 5-HT2c, 5-HT3, 5-HT6 receptors, catecholamines at alpha1 adrenergic receptors, acetylcholine at muscarinic receptors, and histamine at H1 receptors, has emerged in recent trials as an effective preventative agent for chemotherapy-induced emesis and nausea, as well as a very effective agent for the treatment of breakthrough emesis and nausea. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane channels and transporters in cancers.

  16. Toward Biophysical Probes for the 5-HT3 Receptor: Structure−Activity Relationship Study of Granisetron Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    This report describes the synthesis and biological characterization of novel granisetron derivatives that are antagonists of the human serotonin (5-HT3A) receptor. Some of these substituted granisetron derivatives showed low nanomolar binding affinity and allowed the identification of positions on the granisetron core that might be used as attachment points for biophysical tags. A BODIPY fluorophore was appended to one such position and specifically bound to 5-HT3A receptors in mammalian cells. PMID:20146481

  17. The serotonin 5-HT3 receptor: a novel neurodevelopmental target.

    PubMed

    Engel, Mareen; Smidt, Marten P; van Hooft, Johannes A

    2013-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT), next to being an important neurotransmitter, recently gained attention as a key-regulator of pre- and postnatal development in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). Several receptors for 5-HT are expressed in the developing brain including a ligand-gated ion channel, the 5-HT3 receptor. Over the past years, evidence has been accumulating that 5-HT3 receptors are involved in the regulation of neurodevelopment by serotonin. Here, we review the spatial and temporal expression patterns of 5-HT3 receptors in the pre- and early postnatal rodent brain and its functional implications. First, 5-HT3 receptors are expressed on GABAergic interneurons in neocortex and limbic structures derived from the caudal ganglionic eminence. Mature inhibitory GABAergic interneurons fine-tune neuronal excitability and thus are crucial for the physiological function of the brain. Second, 5-HT3 receptors are expressed on specific glutamatergic neurons, Cajal-Retzius cells in the cortex and granule cells in the cerebellum, where they regulate morphology, positioning, and connectivity of the local microcircuitry. Taken together, the 5-HT3 receptor emerges as a potential key-regulator of network formation and function in the CNS, which could have a major impact on our understanding of neurodevelopmental disorders in which 5-HT plays a role.

  18. Shuyu Capsules Relieve Premenstrual Syndrome Depression by Reducing 5-HT3AR and 5-HT3BR Expression in the Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fang; Feng, Jizhen; Gao, Dongmei; Wang, Jieqiong; Song, Chunhong; Wei, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    The effects of the Shuyu capsule on 5-HT3AR and 5-HT3BR expression in a rat model of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) depression and on 5-HT3AR and 5-HT3BR expression and hippocampal neuron 5-HT3 channel current were investigated, to elucidate its mechanism of action against PMS depression. PMS depression model rats were divided into depression and Shuyu- and fluoxetine-treated groups, which were compared to control rats for frontal lobe and hippocampal 5-HT3AR and 5-HT3BR expression and behavior. The depressed model rats displayed symptoms of depression, which were reduced in treated and normal control rats. Frontal lobe and hippocampal 5-HT3AR and 5-HT3BR levels were significantly higher in the model versus the control group and were significantly lower in the Shuyu group. As compared to control rats, the 5-HT3R channel current in the model group was significantly higher; the 5-HT3R channel current in hippocampal neurons treated with serum from Shuyu group rats was significantly lower than that in those treated with model group serum. Thus, PMS depression may be related to 5-HT3AR and 5-HT3BR expression and increased 5-HT3 channel current. Shuyu capsules rectified abnormal 5-HT3AR and 5-HT3BR expression and 5-HT3 channel current changes in a rat model; this finding may provide insight into treating PMS depression. PMID:27725889

  19. Protective effects of a novel 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, N-n-butyl-3-methoxy quinoxaline-2-carboxamide (6o) against chronic unpredictable mild stress-induced behavioral changes and biochemical alterations.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Shvetank; Mahesh, Radhakrishnan; Jindal, Ankur; Devadoss, Thangaraj

    2014-07-01

    Stimulation of high oxidative stress in the brain is considered as an important factor for neurotoxicity towards the pathophysiology of chronic stress-induced depression disorder. In the present research, a potential 5-HT₃ receptor antagonist N-n-butyl-3-methoxy quinoxaline-2-carboxamide (6o) having good Log P (2.60) and pA₂ (7.7) values was examined for its effect on the behavioral and biochemical changes induced by the chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) model. In the current investigation mice were introduced to different stress procedures daily for a period of 28 days to induce a depressive-like behavior. The results show that CUMS caused a depression-like behavior in mice, as indicated by the significant decrease in sucrose consumption and locomotor activity and increase in immobility in the forced swim test (FST). Moreover, it was found that oxidative stress markers such as lipid peroxide and nitrite levels were significantly increased, whereas, antioxidant enzymes such as glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) levels were decreased in the brain tissue of CUMS-subjected mice. "Compound 6o" (1 and 2 mg/kg, p.o.) and fluoxetine treatment (20 mg/kg, p.o.) for a period of 21 days altered the CUMS-induced behavioral (increased immobility period, reduced sucrose preference and decreased locomotor activity) and biochemical (increased lipid peroxide, increased brain nitrite; decreased GSH, SOD and CAT levels) alterations. Moreover normal mice treated with "compound 6o" (2 mg/kg, p.o.) showed a significant decrease in the duration of immobility in FST as compared to normal vehicle treated mice. In conclusion, "compound 6o" produced antidepressant-like effects in behavioral despair paradigm in chronically stressed mice by restoring antioxidant enzyme activity.

  20. Involvement of 5-HT3 receptors in the action of vortioxetine in rat brain: Focus on glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Riga, Maurizio S; Sánchez, Connie; Celada, Pau; Artigas, Francesc

    2016-09-01

    The antidepressant vortioxetine is a 5-HT3-R, 5-HT7-R and 5-HT1D-R antagonist, 5-HT1B-R partial agonist, 5-HT1A-R agonist, and serotonin (5-HT) transporter (SERT) inhibitor. Vortioxetine occupies all targets at high therapeutic doses and only SERT and 5-HT3-R at low doses. Vortioxetine increases extracellular monoamine concentrations in rat forebrain more than selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) and shows pro-cognitive activity in preclinical models. Given its high affinity for 5-HT3-R (Ki = 3.7 nM), selectively expressed in GABA interneurons, we hypothesized that vortioxetine may disinhibit glutamatergic and monoaminergic neurotransmission following 5-HT3-R blockade. Here we assessed vortioxetine effect on pyramidal neuron activity and extracellular 5-HT concentration using in vivo extracellular recordings of rat medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) pyramidal neurons and microdialysis in mPFC and ventral hippocampus (vHPC). Vortioxetine, but not escitalopram, increased pyramidal neuron discharge in mPFC. This effect was prevented by SR57227A (5-HT3-R agonist) and was mimicked by ondansetron (5-HT3-R antagonist) and by escitalopram/ondansetron combinations. In microdialysis experiments, ondansetron augmented the 5-HT-enhancing effect of escitalopram in mPFC and vHPC. Local ondansetron in vHPC augmented escitalopram effect, indicating the participation of intrinsic mechanisms. Since 5-HT neurons express GABAB receptors, we examined their putative involvement in controlling 5-HT release after 5-HT3-R blockade. Co-perfusion of baclofen (but not muscimol) reversed the increased 5-HT levels produced by vortioxetine and escitalopram/ondansetron combinations in vHPC. The present results suggest that vortioxetine increases glutamatergic and serotonergic neurotransmission in rat forebrain by blocking 5-HT3 receptors in GABA interneurons.

  1. Comparative receptor mapping of serotoninergic 5-HT3 and 5-HT4 binding sites*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Rodríguez, María L.; Morcillo, María José; Benhamú, Bellinda; Rosado, María Luisa

    1997-11-01

    The clinical use of currently available drugs acting at the5-HT4 receptor has been hampered by their lack of selectivityover 5-HT3 binding sites. For this reason, there is considerableinterest in the medicinal chemistry of these serotonin receptor subtypes, andsignificant effort has been made towards the discovery of potent and selectiveligands. Computer-aided conformational analysis was used to characterizeserotoninergic 5-HT3 and 5-HT4 receptorrecognition. On the basis of the generally accepted model of the5-HT3 antagonist pharmacophore, we have performed a receptormapping of this receptor binding site, following the active analog approach(AAA) defined by Marshall. The receptor excluded volume was calculated as theunion of the van der Waals density maps of nine active ligands(pKi ≥ 8.9), superimposed in pharmacophoric conformations.Six inactive analogs (pKi < 7.0) were subsequently used todefine the essential volume, which in its turn can be used to define theregions of steric intolerance of the 5-HT3 receptor. Five activeligands (pKi ≥ 9.3) at 5-HT4 receptors wereused to construct an antagonist pharmacophore for this receptor, and todetermine its excluded volume by superimposition of pharmacophoricconformations. The volume defined by the superimposition of five inactive5-HT4 receptor analogs that possess the pharmacophoric elements(pKi ≤ 6.6) did not exceed the excluded volume calculated forthis receptor. In this case, the inactivity may be due to the lack of positiveinteraction of the amino moiety with a hypothetical hydrophobic pocket, whichwould interact with the voluminous substituents of the basic nitrogen ofactive ligands. The difference between the excluded volumes of both receptorshas confirmed that the main difference is indeed in the basic moiety. Thus,the 5-HT3 receptor can only accommodate small substituents inthe position of the nitrogen atom, whereas the 5-HT4 receptorrequires more voluminous groups. Also, the basic nitrogen is located at ca

  2. Spinal 5-HT3AR contributes to BmK I-induced inflammatory pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jin; Jiao, Yun-Lu; Li, Zheng-Wei; Ji, Yong-Hua

    2015-06-25

    Subcutaneous injection of BmK I could be adopted to well establish a novel pain model. Moreover, 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin, 5-HT) receptor is involved in regulating animal pain-related behaviors. However, the underlying mechanism of 5-HT3R on BmK I-induced pain remains unclear. Animal behavioral testing, RT-PCR and Western blotting were used to yield the following results: first, intraplantar (i.pl.) injection of BmK I (10 μg) induced elevated mRNA and protein levels of 5-HT3AR in bilateral L4-L5 spinal cord; Second, intrathecal (i.t.) injection of ondansetron (a specific antagonist of 5-HT3AR) reduced spontaneous pain responses, attenuated unilateral thermal and bilateral mechanical hypersensitivity elicited by BmK I; Microglia could be activated by BmK I (i.pl.) in both sides of L4-L5 spinal cord, and this effect was reversed by intrathecal pre-treatment with 5-HT3AR antagonist. Meanwhile, the 5-HT3AR in L4-L5 spinal cord was almost co-localized with NeuN (a marker of nerve cell), but not co-expressed with Iba-1 (a marker of microglia). Finally, the expression level of CX3CL1 and CX3CR1 was reduced by intrathecal pre-treatment with ondansetron. Our results indicate that both 5-HT3AR signaling pathway and microglia are activated in the process of induction and maintenance of BmK I-induced pain nociception. Meanwhile, our results suggest that the neuronal 5-HT3AR may communicate with microglia indirectly via CX3CL1 which is involved in regulating the BmK I-induced hyperalgesia and sensitization.

  3. Role of 5-HT3 Receptor on Food Intake in Fed and Fasted Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bingjin; Shao, Dongyuan; Luo, Yungang; Wang, Pu; Liu, Changhong; Zhang, Xingyi; Cui, Ranji

    2015-01-01

    Background Many studies have shown that 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptor subtypes are involved in the regulation of feeding behavior. However, the relative contribution of 5-HT3 receptor remains unclear. The present study was aimed to investigate the role of 5-HT3 receptor in control of feeding behavior in fed and fasted mice. Methodology/Principal Findings Food intake and expression of c-Fos, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and 5-HT in the brain were examined after acute treatment with 5-HT3 receptor agonist SR-57227 alone or in combination with 5-HT3 receptor antagonist ondansetron. Food intake was significantly inhibited within 3 h after acute treatment with SR 57227 in fasted mice but not fed mice, and this inhibition was blocked by ondansetron. Immunohistochemical study revealed that fasting-induced c-Fos expression was further enhanced by SR 57227 in the brainstem and the hypothalamus, and this enhancement was also blocked by ondansetron. Furthermore, the fasting-induced downregulation of POMC expression in the hypothalamus and the TH expression in the brain stem was blocked by SR 57227 in the fasted mice, and this effect of SR 57227 was also antagonized by ondansetron. Conclusion/Significance Taken together, our findings suggest that the effect of SR 57227 on the control of feeding behavior in fasted mice may be, at least partially, related to the c-Fos expression in hypothalamus and brain stem, as well as POMC system in the hypothalamus and the TH system in the brain stem. PMID:25789930

  4. Emesis and Defecations Induced by the 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT3) Receptor Anatagonist Zacopride in the Ferret

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-16

    and Defecations Induced by the 5 -Hydroxytryptamine ( 5 -HT 3) Receptor Antagonist Zacopride in the Ferret1 GREGORY L. KING Department of Physiology...benzamides and 5 -hydroxytryptamine ( 5 - Zacopride (4-amino-N-[ 1-azabicyclo(2.2.2)oct-3-yl]- 5 -chloro- HT:i) receptor antagonists are effective...prompted development of 5 - the dose-response properties of zacop -ide-induced emesis and HT, receptor antagonist antiemetics with limited gastric

  5. Partial Agonism of 5-HT3 Receptors: A Novel Approach to the Symptomatic Treatment of IBS-D

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional bowel disorder characterized by abdominal pain, discomfort, and altered bowel habits, which have a significant impact on quality of life for approximately 10–20% of the population. IBS can be divided into three main types IBS-D (diarrhea predominant), IBS-C (constipation predominant), and mixed or alternating IBS. 5-HT3 receptor antagonism has proved to be an efficacious treatment option for IBS-D. For example, alosetron displays efficacy in the treatment of multiple symptoms, including abdominal pain, discomfort, urgency, stool frequency and consistency. However, significant constipation occurred in approximately 25% of patients, leading to withdrawal of up to 10% of patients in clinical trials. Targeting compounds with partial agonist activity at the 5-HT3 receptor represents a mechanistic departure from the classic 5-HT3 receptor antagonist approach and should result in agents that are applicable to a broader array of IBS patient populations. Attenuation of the activity of the ion channel without completely abolishing its function may control or normalize bowel function without leading to a total block associated with severe constipation. We have identified a new class of selective, orally active 5-HT3 receptor ligands with high 5-HT3 receptor affinity and low partial agonist activity currently in preclinical development that should offer a significant advantage over existing therapies. PMID:23342199

  6. Molecular properties of psychopharmacological drugs determining non-competitive inhibition of 5-HT3A receptors.

    PubMed

    Kornhuber, Johannes; Terfloth, Lothar; Bleich, Stefan; Wiltfang, Jens; Rupprecht, Rainer

    2009-06-01

    We developed a structure-property-activity relationship (SPAR)-model for psychopharmacological drugs acting as non-competitive 5-HT(3A) receptor antagonists by using a decision-tree learner provided by the RapidMiner machine learning tool. A single molecular descriptor, namely the molecular dipole moment per molecular weight (mu/MW), predicts whether or not a substance non-competitively antagonizes 5-HT-induced Na(+) currents. A low mu/MW is compatible with drug-cumulation in apolar lipid rafts. This study confirms that size-intensive descriptors allow the development of compact SPAR models.

  7. Influence of sodium substitutes on 5-HT-mediated effects at mouse 5-HT3 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Barann, M; Schmidt, K; Göthert, M; Urban, B W; Bönisch, H

    2004-01-01

    The influence of sodium ion substitutes on the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)-induced flux of the organic cation [14C]guanidinium through the ion channel of the mouse 5-HT3 receptor and on the competition of 5-HT with the selective 5-HT3 receptor antagonist [3H]GR 65630 was studied, unless stated otherwise, in mouse neuroblastoma N1E-115 cells. Under physiological conditions (135 mM sodium), 5-HT induced a concentration-dependent [14C]guanidinium influx with an EC50 (1.3 μM) similar to that in electrophysiological studies. The stepwise replacement of sodium by increasing concentrations of the organic cation hydroxyethyl trimethylammonium (choline) concentration dependently caused both a rightward shift of the 5-HT concentration–response curve and an increase in the maximum effect of 5-HT. Complete replacement of sodium resulted in a 34-fold lower potency of 5-HT and an almost two times higher maximal response. A low potency of 5-HT in choline buffer was also observed in other 5-HT3 receptor-expressing rodent cell lines (NG 108-15 or NCB 20). Replacement of Na+ by Li+ left the potency and maximal effects of 5-HT almost unchanged. Replacement by tris (hydroxymethyl) methylamine (Tris), tetramethylammonium (TMA) or N-methyl-D-glucamine (NMDG) caused an increase in maximal response to 5-HT similar to that caused by choline. The potency of 5-HT was only slightly reduced by Tris, to a high degree decreased by TMA (comparable to the decrease by choline), but not influenced by NMDG. The potency of 5-HT in inhibiting [3H]GR65630 binding to intact cells was 35-fold lower when sodium was completely replaced by choline, but remained unchanged after replacement by NMDG. The results are compatible with the suggestion that choline competes with 5-HT for the 5-HT3 receptor; the increase in maximal response may be partly due to a choline-mediated delay of the 5-HT-induced desensitization. For studies of 5-HT-evoked [14C]guanidinium flux through 5-HT3 receptor channels, NMDG appears

  8. Tropisetron sensitizes α7 containing nicotinic receptors to low levels of acetylcholine in vitro and improves memory-related task performance in young and aged animals.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Patrick M; Bertrand, Daniel; Bertrand, Sonia; Plagenhoef, Marc R; Terry, Alvin V

    2017-03-01

    Tropisetron, a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist commonly prescribed for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting also exhibits high affinity, partial agonist activity at α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7 nAChRs). α7 nAChRs are considered viable therapeutic targets for neuropsychiatric disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here we further explored the nAChR pharmacology of tropisetron to include the homomeric α7 nAChR and recently characterized heteromeric α7β2 nAChR (1:10 ratio) and we evaluated its cognitive effects in young and aged animals. Electrophysiological studies on human nAChRs expressed in Xenopus oocytes confirmed the partial agonist activity of tropisetron at α7 nAChRs (EC50 ∼2.4 μM) with a similar effect at α7β2 nAChRs (EC50 ∼1.5 μM). Moreover, currents evoked by irregular pulses of acetylcholine (40 μM) at α7 and α7β2 nAChRs were enhanced during sustained exposure to low concentrations of tropisetron (10 and 30 nM) indicative of a "priming" or co-agonist effect. Tropisetron (0.1-10 mg/kg) improved novel object recognition performance in young Sprague-Dawley rats and in aged Fischer rats. In aged male and female rhesus monkeys, tropisetron (0.03-1 mg/kg) produced a 17% increase from baseline levels in delayed match to sample long delay accuracy while combination of non-effective doses of donepezil (0.1 mg/kg) and tropisetron (0.03 and 0.1 mg/kg) produced a 24% change in accuracy. Collectively, these animal experiments indicate that tropisetron enhances cognition and has the ability to improve the effective dose range of currently prescribed AD therapy (donepezil). Moreover, these effects may be explained by tropisetron's ability to sensitize α7 containing nAChRs to low levels of acetylcholine.

  9. Structure-activity relationships of quinoxaline-based 5-HT3A and 5-HT3AB receptor-selective ligands.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Andrew J; Verheij, Mark H P; van Muijlwijk-Koezen, Jacqueline E; Lummis, Sarah C R; Leurs, Rob; de Esch, Iwan J P

    2013-06-01

    Until recently, discriminating between homomeric 5-HT3A and heteromeric 5-HT3AB receptors was only possible with ligands that bind in the receptor pore. This study describes the first series of ligands that can discriminate between these receptor types at the level of the orthosteric binding site. During a recent fragment screen, 2-chloro-3-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)quinoxaline (VUF10166) was identified as a ligand that displays an 83-fold difference in [(3)H]granisetron binding affinity between 5-HT3A and 5-HT3AB receptors. Fragment hit exploration, initiated from VUF10166 and 3-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)quinoxalin-2-ol, resulted in a series of compounds with higher affinity at either 5-HT3A or 5-HT3AB receptors. These ligands reveal that a single atom is sufficient to change the selectivity profile of a compound. At the extremes of the new compounds were 2-amino-3-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)quinoxaline, which showed 11-fold selectivity for the 5-HT3A receptor, and 2-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)quinoxaline, which showed an 8.3-fold selectivity for the 5-HT3AB receptor. These compounds represent novel molecular tools for studying 5-HT3 receptor subtypes and could help elucidate their physiological roles.

  10. Contrasting effects of 5-HT3 receptor stimulation of the nucleus accumbens or ventral tegmentum on food intake in the rat.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Wayne E; Lin, Peagan; Pierce-Messick, Zachary; Ilesanmi, Adeolu O; Clissold, Kara A

    2017-04-14

    Although serotonin (5-HT) signaling is known to regulate food intake and energy homeostasis, the roles of the 5-HT3 receptor in feeding processes have been elusive. 5-HT3 receptors are found throughout mesolimbic circuitry that promote feeding not only in response to hunger, but also to the palatable and rewarding properties of food. These experiments examined if stimulation or blockade of the 5-HT3 receptor of the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) or ventral tegmentum affected food intake in the rat in response to hunger or the presence of a palatable diet. Rats (N=6-9/group) received bilateral injections of the 5-HT3 agonist m-chlorophenylbiguanide hydrochloride (mCPBG; at 0.0, 10.0, or 20.0μg/0.5μl/side) or the 5-HT3 antagonist ondansetron hydrochloride (at 0.0, 1.0, 2.0, or 5.0μg/0.5μl/side) into either the NAcc or the ventral tegmentum. NAcc 5-HT3 receptor stimulation significantly increased 2-h food intake in food-deprived animals offered rat chow and in a separate group of unrestricted rats offered a sweetened fat diet. In contrast to the feeding increase seen with NAcc treatments, stimulation of 5-HT3 receptors of the ventral tegmentum significantly reduced food and water intake in food-restricted animals; reductions of intake in non-restricted rats offered the palatable diet did not approach significance. Blockade of the 5-HT3 receptor had no effect on feeding in either brain region. These data support a functional role for serotonergic signaling in the mesolimbic pathway on motivated behavior, and demonstrate that 5-HT3 receptors differentially modulate food consumption in a region-dependent manner.

  11. Building a 5-HT3A Receptor Expression Map in the Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Yoshihisa; Kondo, Makoto; Shimada, Shoichi

    2017-01-01

    Of the many serotonin receptors, the type 3 receptors (5-HT3R) are the only ionotropic ones, playing a key role in fast synaptic transmission and cognitive and emotional brain function through controlled neuronal excitation. To better understand the various functions of 5-HT3Rs, it is very important to know their expression pattern in the central nervous system (CNS). To date, many distributional studies have shown localized 5-HT3R expression in the brain and spinal cord. However, an accurate pattern of 5-HT3R expression in the CNS remains to be elucidated. To investigate the distribution of 5-HT3R in the mouse brain in detail, we performed immunofluorescent staining using 5-HT3AR-GFP transgenic mice. We found strong 5-HT3AR expression in the olfactory bulb, cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and amygdala; and partial expression in the pons, medulla, and spinal cord. Meanwhile, the thalamus, hypothalamus, and midbrain exhibited a few 5-HT3AR-expressing cells, and no expression was detected in the cerebellum. Further, double-immunostaining using neural markers confirmed that 5-HT3AR is expressed in GABAergic interneurons containing somatostatin or calretinin. In the present study, we built a 5-HT3AR expression map in the mouse brain. Our findings make significant contributions in elucidating the novel functions of 5-HT3R in the CNS. PMID:28276429

  12. Blockade of 5-Ht3 receptors in the septal area increases Fos expression in selected brain areas.

    PubMed

    Urzedo-Rodrigues, Lilia S; Ferreira, Hilda S; Santana, Rejane Conceição; Luz, Carla Patrícia; Perrone, Camila F; Fregoneze, Josmara B

    2014-04-01

    Serotonin is widely distributed throughout the brain and is involved in a multiplicity of visceral, cognitive and behavioral responses. It has been previously shown that injections of different doses of ondansetron, a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, into the medial septum/vertical limb of the diagonal band complex (MS/vDB) induce a hypertensive response in rats. On the other hand, administration of m-CPBG, a 5-HT3 agonist, into the MS/vDB inhibits the increase of blood pressure during restraint stress. However, it is unclear which neuronal circuitry is involved in these responses. The present study investigated Fos immunoreactive nuclei (Fos-IR) in different brain areas following the blockade of 5-HT3 receptors located in the MS/vDB in sham and in sinoaortic denervated (SAD) rats. Ondansetron injection into the MS/vDB increases Fos-IR in different brain areas including the limbic system (central amygdala and ventral part of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis), hypothalamus (medial parvocellular parts of the paraventricular nucleus, anterodorsal preoptic area, dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus), mesencephalon (ventrolateral periaqueductal gray region) and rhombencephalon (lateral parabrachial nucleus) in sham rats. Barodenervation results in higher Fos expression at the parvocellular and magnocellular part of the paraventricular nucleus, the lateral parabrachial nucleus, the central nucleus of amygdala, the locus coeruleus, the medial part of the nucleus of the solitary tract, the rostral ventrolateral medulla and the caudal ventrolateral medulla following 5-HT3receptor blockade in the MS/vDB. Based on the present results and previous data showing a hypertensive response to ondansetron injected into the MS/vDB, it is reasonable to suggest that 5-HT3receptors in the MS/vDB exert an inhibitory drive that may oscillate as a functional regulatory part of the complex central neuronal network participating in the control of blood pressure.

  13. Kampo Medicine: Evaluation of the Pharmacological Activity of 121 Herbal Drugs on GABAA and 5-HT3A Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Katrin M.; Herbrechter, Robin; Ziemba, Paul M.; Lepke, Peter; Beltrán, Leopoldo; Hatt, Hanns; Werner, Markus; Gisselmann, Günter

    2016-01-01

    Kampo medicine is a form of Japanese phytotherapy originating from traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). During the last several decades, much attention has been paid to the pharmacological effects of these medical plants and their constituents. However, in many cases, a systematic screening of Kampo remedies to determine pharmacologically relevant targets is still lacking. In this study, a broad screening of Kampo remedies was performed to look for pharmacologically relevant 5-HT3A and GABAA receptor ligands. Several of the Kampo remedies are currently used for symptoms such as nausea, emesis, gastrointestinal motility disorders, anxiety, restlessness, or insomnia. Therefore, the pharmacological effects of 121 herbal drugs from Kampo medicine were analyzed as ethanol tinctures on heterologously expressed 5-HT3A and GABAA receptors, due to the involvement of these receptors in such pathophysiological processes. The tinctures of Lindera aggregata (radix) and Leonurus japonicus (herba) were the most effective inhibitory compounds on the 5-HT3A receptor. Further investigation of known ingredients in these compounds led to the identification of leonurine from Leonurus as a new natural 5-HT3A receptor antagonist. Several potentiating herbs (e.g., Magnolia officinalis (cortex), Syzygium aromaticum (flos), and Panax ginseng (radix)) were also identified for the GABAA receptor, which are all traditionally used for their sedative or anxiolytic effects. A variety of tinctures with antagonistic effects Salvia miltiorrhiza (radix) were also detected. Therefore, this study reveals new insights into the pharmacological action of a broad spectrum of herbal drugs from Kampo, allowing for a better understanding of their physiological effects and clinical applications. PMID:27524967

  14. Lamotrigine, an antiepileptic drug, inhibits 5-HT3 receptor currents in NCB-20 neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki Jung; Jeun, Seung Hyun

    2017-01-01

    Lamotrigine is an antiepileptic drug widely used to treat epileptic seizures. Using whole-cell voltage clamp recordings in combination with a fast drug application approach, we investigated the effects of lamotrigine on 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)3 receptors in NCB-20 neuroblastoma cells. Co-application of lamotrigine (1~300 µM) resulted in a concentration-dependent reduction in peak amplitude of currents induced by 3 µM of 5-HT for an IC50 value of 28.2±3.6 µM with a Hill coefficient of 1.2±0.1. These peak amplitude decreases were accompanied by the rise slope reduction. In addition, 5-HT3-mediated currents evoked by 1 mM dopamine, a partial 5-HT3 receptor agonist, were inhibited by lamotrigine co-application. The EC50 of 5-HT for 5-HT3 receptor currents were shifted to the right by co-application of lamotrigine without a significant change of maximal effect. Currents activated by 5-HT and lamotrigine co-application in the presence of 1 min pretreatment of lamotrigine were similar to those activated by 5-HT and lamotrigine co-application alone. Moreover, subsequent application of lamotrigine in the presence of 5-HT and 5-hydroxyindole, known to attenuate 5-HT3 receptor desensitization, inhibited 5-HT3 receptor currents in a concentration-dependent manner. The deactivation of 5-HT3 receptor was delayed by washing with an external solution containing lamotrigine. Lamotrigine accelerated the desensitization process of 5-HT3 receptors. There was no voltage-dependency in the inhibitory effects of lamotrigine on the 5-HT3 receptor currents. These results indicate that lamotrigine inhibits 5-HT3-activated currents in a competitive manner by binding to the open state of the channels and blocking channel activation or accelerating receptor desensitization. PMID:28280410

  15. Lamotrigine, an antiepileptic drug, inhibits 5-HT3 receptor currents in NCB-20 neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Jung; Jeun, Seung Hyun; Sung, Ki-Wug

    2017-03-01

    Lamotrigine is an antiepileptic drug widely used to treat epileptic seizures. Using whole-cell voltage clamp recordings in combination with a fast drug application approach, we investigated the effects of lamotrigine on 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)3 receptors in NCB-20 neuroblastoma cells. Co-application of lamotrigine (1~300 µM) resulted in a concentration-dependent reduction in peak amplitude of currents induced by 3 µM of 5-HT for an IC50 value of 28.2±3.6 µM with a Hill coefficient of 1.2±0.1. These peak amplitude decreases were accompanied by the rise slope reduction. In addition, 5-HT3-mediated currents evoked by 1 mM dopamine, a partial 5-HT3 receptor agonist, were inhibited by lamotrigine co-application. The EC50 of 5-HT for 5-HT3 receptor currents were shifted to the right by co-application of lamotrigine without a significant change of maximal effect. Currents activated by 5-HT and lamotrigine co-application in the presence of 1 min pretreatment of lamotrigine were similar to those activated by 5-HT and lamotrigine co-application alone. Moreover, subsequent application of lamotrigine in the presence of 5-HT and 5-hydroxyindole, known to attenuate 5-HT3 receptor desensitization, inhibited 5-HT3 receptor currents in a concentration-dependent manner. The deactivation of 5-HT3 receptor was delayed by washing with an external solution containing lamotrigine. Lamotrigine accelerated the desensitization process of 5-HT3 receptors. There was no voltage-dependency in the inhibitory effects of lamotrigine on the 5-HT3 receptor currents. These results indicate that lamotrigine inhibits 5-HT3-activated currents in a competitive manner by binding to the open state of the channels and blocking channel activation or accelerating receptor desensitization.

  16. Design and validation of a homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence cell-based assay targeting the ligand-gated ion channel 5-HT3A.

    PubMed

    Blanc, Emilie; Wagner, Patrick; Plaisier, Fabrice; Schmitt, Martine; Durroux, Thierry; Bourguignon, Jean-Jacques; Partiseti, Michel; Dupuis, Elodie; Bihel, Frederic

    2015-09-01

    Ligand-gated ion channels (LGICs) are considered as attractive protein targets in the search for new therapeutic agents. Nowadays, this strategy involves the capability to screen large chemical libraries. We present a new Tag-lite ligand binding assay targeting LGICs on living cells. This technology combines the use of suicide enzyme tags fused to channels of interest with homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence (HTRF) as the detection readout. Using the 5-HT3 receptor as system model, we showed that the pharmacology of the HALO-5HT3 receptor was identical to that of the native receptor. After validation of the assay by using 5-HT3 agonists and antagonists of reference, a pilot screen enabled us to identify azelastine, a well-known histamine H1 antagonist, as a potent 5-HT3 antagonist. This interesting result was confirmed with electrophysiological experiments. The method described here is easy to implement and could be applicable for other LGICs, opening new ways for the screening of chemical libraries.

  17. Roles of serotonin 5-HT3 receptor in the formation of dendrites and axons in the rat cerebral cortex: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takahiro; Ohtani, Akiko; Onuki, Fumiaki; Natsume, Masaki; Li, Fei; Satou, Tomomi; Yoshikawa, Masaaki; Senzaki, Kouji; Shiga, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    The serotonin type 3 (5-HT(3)) receptor is an only ligand-gated ion channel among 14 serotonin receptors. Here, we examined the roles of the 5-HT(3) receptor in the formation of dendrites and axons, using a dissociation culture of embryonic rat cerebral cortex. Cortical neurons at embryonic day 16 were cultured for 4 days in the presence of a selective 5-HT(3) receptor agonist with or without an antagonist. Neurons were then immunostained by antibodies against microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) 65. All cells expressed MAP2, whereas only limited number of cells expressed GAD65. From the immunoreactivity and the cell shape, we tentatively divided neurons into 3 types; GAD-positive multipolar, GAD-positive bipolar/tripolar and GAD-negative neurons. The total length of axons and dendrites, the number of primary dendrites and the dendritic branching of GAD-negative neurons were decreased by the agonist (10 or 100nM), most of which were reversed by the concomitant treatment of the antagonist. In contrast, no or little effect was observed on the formation of dendrites and axons of GAD-positive multipolar neurons, and the neurite formation of GAD-positive bipolar/tripolar neurons. The present study revealed differential roles of the 5-HT(3) receptor in the formation of dendrites and axons of subtypes of cortical neurons.

  18. The rapid recovery of 5-HT cell firing induced by the antidepressant vortioxetine involves 5-HT(3) receptor antagonism.

    PubMed

    Bétry, Cécile; Pehrson, Alan L; Etiévant, Adeline; Ebert, Bjarke; Sánchez, Connie; Haddjeri, Nasser

    2013-06-01

    The therapeutic effect of current antidepressant drugs appears after several weeks of treatment and a significant number of patients do not respond to treatment. Here, we report the effects of the multi-modal antidepressant vortioxetine (Lu AA21004), a 5-HT(3) and 5-HT(7) receptor antagonist, 5-HT(1B) receptor partial agonist, 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist and 5-HT transporter (SERT) inhibitor, on rat 5-HT neurotransmission. Using in vivo electrophysiological recordings in the dorsal raphe nucleus of anaesthetized rats, we assessed the acute and subchronic effects of vortioxetine and/or the selective 5-HT(3) receptor agonist, SR57227 or the selective 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist flesinoxan, on 5-HT neuronal firing activity. Using ex-vivo autoradiography, we correlated SERT occupancy and presumed 5-HT firing activity. The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine, was used as comparator. Importantly, the recovery of 5-HT neuronal firing was achieved after 1 d with vortioxetine and 14 d with fluoxetine. SR57227 delayed this recovery. In contrast, vortioxetine failed to alter the reducing action of 3 d treatment of flesinoxan. Acute dosing of vortioxetine inhibited neuronal firing activity more potently than fluoxetine. SR57227 prevented the suppressant effect of vortioxetine, but not of fluoxetine. In contrast, flesinoxan failed to modify the suppressant effect of vortioxetine acutely administered. Differently to fluoxetine, vortioxetine suppressed neuronal firing without saturating occupancy at the SERT. Vortioxetine produced a markedly faster recovery of 5-HT neuronal firing than fluoxetine. This is at least partly due to 5-HT(3) receptor antagonism of vortioxetine in association with its reduced SERT occupancy.

  19. The Role of 5-HT3 Receptors in Drug Abuse and as a Target for Pharmacotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Engleman, E.A.; Rodd, Z.A.; Bell, R.L.; Murphy, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Alcohol and drug abuse continue to be a major public health problem in the United States and other industrialized nations. Extensive preclinical research indicates the mesolimbic dopamine (DA) pathway and associated regions mediate the rewarding and reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse and natural rewards, such as food and sex. The serotonergic (5-HT) system, in concert with others neurotransmitter systems, plays a key role in modulating neuronal systems within the mesolimbic pathway. A substantial portion of this modulation is mediated by activity at the 5-HT3 receptor. The 5-HT3 receptor is unique among the 5-HT receptors in that it directly gates an ion channel inducing rapid depolarization that, in turn, causes the release of neurotransmitters and/or peptides. Preclinical findings indicate that antagonism of the 5-HT3 receptor in the ventral tegmental area, nucleus accumbens or amygdala reduces alcohol self-administration and/or alcohol-associated effects. Less is known about the effects of 5-HT3 receptor activity on the self-administration of other drugs of abuse or their associated effects. Clinical findings parallel the preclinical findings such that antagonism of the 5-HT3 receptor reduces alcohol consumption and some of its subjective effects. This review provides an overview of the structure, function, and pharmacology of 5-HT3 receptors, the role of these receptors in regulating DA neurotransmission in mesolimbic brain areas, and discusses data from animal and human studies implicating 5-HT3 receptors as targets for the development of new pharmacological agents to treat addictions. PMID:19128203

  20. Immunohistochemical characterization of 5-HT(3A) receptors in the Syrian hamster forebrain.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, Maria; Ricci, Lesley A; Schwartzer, Jared J; Melloni, Richard H

    2010-05-06

    The Syrian hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) has been extensively used as an animal model to investigate neuronal networks underlying various behaviors where 5-HT(3A) receptors have been found to play a critical role. To date, however, there is no comprehensive description of the distribution of 5-HT(3A) receptors in the Syrian hamster brain. The current study examined the localization of 5-HT(3A) receptors across the neuraxis of the Syrian hamster forebrain using immunohistochemistry. Overall, 5-HT(3A) receptors were widely and heterogeneously distributed across the neuraxis of the Syrian hamster brain. Notably, the most intense 5-HT(3A) immunolabeling patterns were observed in the cerebral cortex and amygdala. In addition, high variability in receptor density and expression patterns (i.e., perikarya, fibers and/or neuropilar puncta) was observed within the majority of brain areas examined, indicating that the role this receptor has in the modulation of a particular neural function differs depending on brain region. In some regions (i.e., nucleus accumbens) differences in the immunolabeling pattern between rostral, medial and caudal portions were also observed, suggesting functional heterogeneity of this receptor within a single brain region. Together, these results and the localization of this receptor to brain areas involved in the regulation of sexual behavior, aggression, circadian rhythm, drug abuse and anxiety implicate 5-HT(3A) receptors in the modulation of various behaviors and neural functions in the Syrian hamster. Further, these results underscore the importance of evaluating 5-HT(3A) receptors as a pharmacological target for the treatment of various psychopathological disorders.

  1. The role of 5-HT3 receptors in drug abuse and as a target for pharmacotherapy.

    PubMed

    Engleman, E A; Rodd, Z A; Bell, R L; Murphy, J M

    2008-11-01

    Alcohol and drug abuse continue to be a major public health problem in the United States and other industrialized nations. Extensive preclinical research indicates the mesolimbic dopamine (DA) pathway and associated regions mediate the rewarding and reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse and natural rewards, such as food and sex. The serotonergic (5-HT) system, in concert with others neurotransmitter systems, plays a key role in modulating neuronal systems within the mesolimbic pathway. A substantial portion of this modulation is mediated by activity at the 5-HT3 receptor. The 5-HT3 receptor is unique among the 5-HT receptors in that it directly gates an ion channel inducing rapid depolarization that, in turn, causes the release of neurotransmitters and/or peptides. Preclinical findings indicate that antagonism of the 5-HT3 receptor in the ventral tegmental area, nucleus accumbens or amygdala reduces alcohol self-administration and/or alcohol-associated effects. Less is known about the effects of 5-HT3 receptor activity on the self-administration of other drugs of abuse or their associated effects. Clinical findings parallel the preclinical findings such that antagonism of the 5-HT3 receptor reduces alcohol consumption and some of its subjective effects. This review provides an overview of the structure, function, and pharmacology of 5-HT3 receptors, the role of these receptors in regulating DA neurotransmission in mesolimbic brain areas, and discusses data from animal and human studies implicating 5-HT3 receptors as targets for the development of new pharmacological agents to treat addictions.

  2. Role of central vagal 5-HT3 receptors in gastrointestinal physiology and pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Browning, Kirsteen N.

    2015-01-01

    Vagal neurocircuits are vitally important in the co-ordination and modulation of GI reflexes and homeostatic functions. 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; serotonin) is critically important in the regulation of several of these autonomic gastrointestinal (GI) functions including motility, secretion and visceral sensitivity. While several 5-HT receptors are involved in these physiological responses, the ligand-gated 5-HT3 receptor appears intimately involved in gut-brain signaling, particularly via the afferent (sensory) vagus nerve. 5-HT is released from enterochromaffin cells in response to mechanical or chemical stimulation of the GI tract which leads to activation of 5-HT3 receptors on the terminals of vagal afferents. 5-HT3 receptors are also present on the soma of vagal afferent neurons, including GI vagal afferent neurons, where they can be activated by circulating 5-HT. The central terminals of vagal afferents also exhibit 5-HT3 receptors that function to increase glutamatergic synaptic transmission to second order neurons of the nucleus tractus solitarius within the brainstem. While activation of central brainstem 5-HT3 receptors modulates visceral functions, it is still unclear whether central vagal neurons, i.e., nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS) and dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV) neurons themselves also display functional 5-HT3 receptors. Thus, activation of 5-HT3 receptors may modulate the excitability and activity of gastrointestinal vagal afferents at multiple sites and may be involved in several physiological and pathophysiological conditions, including distention- and chemical-evoked vagal reflexes, nausea, and vomiting, as well as visceral hypersensitivity. PMID:26578870

  3. Pathways and Barriers for Ion Translocation through the 5-HT3A Receptor Channel

    PubMed Central

    Di Maio, Danilo; Chandramouli, Balasubramanian; Brancato, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Pentameric ligand gated ion channels (pLGICs) are ionotropic receptors that mediate fast intercellular communications at synaptic level and include either cation selective (e.g., nAChR and 5-HT3) or anion selective (e.g., GlyR, GABAA and GluCl) membrane channels. Among others, 5-HT3 is one of the most studied members, since its first cloning back in 1991, and a large number of studies have successfully pinpointed protein residues critical for its activation and channel gating. In addition, 5-HT3 is also the target of a few pharmacological treatments due to the demonstrated benefits of its modulation in clinical trials. Nonetheless, a detailed molecular analysis of important protein features, such as the origin of its ion selectivity and the rather low conductance as compared to other channel homologues, has been unfeasible until the recent crystallization of the mouse 5-HT3A receptor. Here, we present extended molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations of the whole 5-HT3A protein with the aim of better understanding its ion transport properties, such as the pathways for ion permeation into the receptor body and the complex nature of the selectivity filter. Our investigation unravels previously unpredicted structural features of the 5-HT3A receptor, such as the existence of alternative intersubunit pathways for ion translocation at the interface between the extracellular and the transmembrane domains, in addition to the one along the channel main axis. Moreover, our study offers a molecular interpretation of the role played by an arginine triplet located in the intracellular domain on determining the characteristic low conductance of the 5-HT3A receptor, as evidenced in previous experiments. In view of these results, possible implications on other members of the superfamily are suggested. PMID:26465896

  4. Hypoxia switches episodic breathing to singlet breathing in red-eared slider turtles (Trachemys scripta) via a tropisetron-sensitive mechanism.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Stephen M; Krisp, Ashley R; Bartman, Michelle E

    2015-02-01

    Hypoxia-induced changes in the chelonian breathing pattern are poorly understood. Thus, breathing was measured in freely swimming adult red-eared slider turtles breathing air prior to breathing nitrogen for 4h. Ventilation increased 10-fold within 10min due to increased breath frequency and tidal volume. Breaths/episode decreased by ∼50% within after 1h of hypoxia while the number of singlet breaths increased from 3.1±1.6singlets/h to a maximum of 66.1±23.5singlets/h. Expiratory and inspiratory duration increased during hypoxia. For doublet and triplet breaths, expiratory duration increased during the first breath only, while inspiratory duration increased for all breaths. Tropisetron (5-HT3 receptor antagonist, 5mg/kg) administration prior to hypoxia attenuated the hypoxia-induced increase in singlet breath frequency. Along with results from previous in vitro studies, this study suggests that 5-HT3 receptor activation may be required for the hypoxia-induced increase in singlet breathing pattern in red-eared slider turtles.

  5. Quantitation of 5HT3 receptors in forebrain of serotonin transporter deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Mössner, R; Schmitt, A; Hennig, T; Benninghoff, J; Gerlach, M; Riederer, P; Deckert, J; Lesch, K P

    2004-01-01

    Mice deficient in the serotonin transporter (5HTT) display highly elevated extracellular 5HT levels. 5HT exerts ist effects via at least fourteen different cloned 5HT receptors located pre- and postsynaptically. In contrast to the other 5HT receptors, the 5HT3 receptor is a ionotropic receptor with ligand-gated cation channel function. Since G-protein-coupled 5HT receptors show extensive adaptive changes in 5HTT-deficient mice, we investigated whether 5HT3 receptors are also altered in these mice. Using quantitative autoradiography, we found that 5HT3 receptors are upregulated in frontal cortex (+46%), parietal cortex (+42%), and in stratum oriens of the CA3 region of the hippocampus (+18%) of 5HTT knockout mice. Changes in 5HT3 receptor mRNA expression, as determined by quantitative in situ hybridisation, were less pronounced. The adaptive changes of 5HT3 receptor expression constitute a part of the complex regulatory pattern of 5HT receptors in 5HTT knockout mice.

  6. Investigation of 5-HT3 receptor-triggered serotonin release from guinea-pig isolated colonic mucosa: a role of PYY-containing endocrine cell.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Shu-Ichi; Kojima, Ken; Fujita, Tomoe

    2017-03-15

    The effect of a 5-HT3 receptor-selective agonist SR57227A was investigated on the outflow of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) from isolated muscle layer-free mucosal preparations of guinea-pig colon. The mucosal preparations were incubated in vitro and the outflow of 5-HT from these preparations was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. SR57227A (100μM) produced a tetrodotoxin-resistant and sustained increase in the outflow of 5-HT from the mucosal preparations. The SR57227A-evoked sustained 5-HT outflow was completely inhibited by the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist ramosetron (1μM). The neuropeptide Y1 receptor antagonist BIBO3304 (100nM) partially inhibited the SR57227A-evoked sustained 5-HT outflow, but the Y2 receptor antagonist BIIE0246 (1μM) or the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor antagonist exendin-(9-39) (1μM), showed a minimal effect on the SR57227A-evoked sustained 5-HT outflow. In the presence of BIBO3304 (100nM) and exendin-(9-39) (1μM), SR57227A (100μM) failed to produce a sustained increase in the outflow of 5-HT. The Y1 receptor agonist [Leu(31), Pro(34)]-neuropeptide Y (10nM), but not GLP-1-(7-36) amide (100nM), produced a sustained increase in the outflow of 5-HT. We found that 5-HT3 receptor-triggered 5-HT release from guinea-pig colonic mucosa is mediated by the activation of 5-HT3 receptors located at endocrine cells (enterochromaffin cells and peptide YY (PYY)-containing endocrine cells). The activation of both Y1 and GLP-1 receptors appears to be required for the maintenance of 5-HT3 receptor-triggered 5-HT release. It is therefore considered that 5-HT3 receptors located at colonic mucosa play a crucial role in paracrine signaling between enterochromaffin cells and PYY-containing endocrine cells.

  7. Key role of 5-HT3 receptors in the nucleus tractus solitarii in cardiovagal stress reactivity.

    PubMed

    Sévoz-Couche, Caroline; Brouillard, Charly

    2017-03-01

    Serotonin plays a modulatory role in central control of the autonomic nervous system (ANS). The nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) in the medulla is an area of viscerosomatic integration innervated by both central and peripheral serotonergic fibers. Influences from different origins therefore trigger the release of serotonin into the NTS and exert multiple influences on the ANS. This major influence on the ANS is also mediated by activation of several receptors in the NTS. In particular, the NTS is the central zone with the highest density of serotonin3 (5-HT3) receptors. In this review, we present evidence that 5-HT3 receptors in the NTS play a key role in one of the crucial homeostatic responses to acute and chronic stress: inhibitory modulation of the parasympathetic component of the ANS. The possible functional interactions of 5-HT3 receptors with GABAA and NK1 receptors in the NTS are also discussed.

  8. Molecular dynamics simulation of the structure and dynamics of 5-HT3 serotonin receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, M. Yu.; Popinako, A. V.; Prokopiev, G. A.

    2016-10-01

    In this work, we investigated structure, dynamics and ion transportation in transmembrane domain of the 5-HT3 serotonin receptor. High-resolution (0.35 nm) structure of the 5-HT3 receptor in complex with stabilizing nanobodies was determined by protein crystallography in 2014 (Protein data bank (PDB) code 4PIR). Transmembrane domain of the structure was prepared in complex with explicit membrane environment (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (POPC)) and solvent (TIP3P water model). Molecular dynamics protocols for simulation and stabilization of the transmembrane domain of the 5-HT3 receptor model were developed and 60 ns simulation of the structure was conducted in order to explore structural parameters of the system. We estimated the mean force profile for Na+ ions using umbrella sampling method.

  9. The Structure of the Mouse Serotonin 5-HT3 Receptor in Lipid Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Kudryashev, Mikhail; Castaño-Díez, Daniel; Deluz, Cédric; Hassaine, Gherici; Grasso, Luigino; Graf-Meyer, Alexandra; Vogel, Horst; Stahlberg, Henning

    2016-01-05

    The function of membrane proteins is best understood if their structure in the lipid membrane is known. Here, we determined the structure of the mouse serotonin 5-HT3 receptor inserted in lipid bilayers to a resolution of 12 Å without stabilizing antibodies by cryo electron tomography and subtomogram averaging. The reconstruction reveals protein secondary structure elements in the transmembrane region, the extracellular pore, and the transmembrane channel pathway, showing an overall similarity to the available X-ray model of the truncated 5-HT3 receptor determined in the presence of a stabilizing nanobody. Structural analysis of the 5-HT3 receptor embedded in a lipid bilayer allowed the position of the membrane to be determined. Interactions between the densely packed receptors in lipids were visualized, revealing that the interactions were maintained by the short horizontal helices. In combination with methodological improvements, our approach enables the structural analysis of membrane proteins in response to voltage and ligand gating.

  10. Regulation of central noradrenergic activity by 5-HT(3) receptors located in the locus coeruleus of the rat.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Jorge E; Mendiguren, Aitziber; Pineda, Joseba; Meana, J Javier

    2012-06-01

    A functional interaction between serotonergic and noradrenergic systems has been shown in the locus coeruleus (LC). Noradrenaline (NA) levels in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) are dependent on the firing rate of LC neurons, which is controlled by α(2) adrenoceptors (α2ADR). The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of 5-HT(3) receptors (5HT3R) in the modulation of central noradrenergic activity. We measured extracellular NA concentrations in the LC and PFC by dual-probe microdialysis in awake rats and the firing rate of LC neurons by electrophysiological techniques in vitro. Administration of the 5HT3R agonists SR57227 (1-100 μM) and m-chlorophenylbiguanide (mCPBG, 1-100 μM) into the LC increased NA in this nucleus (E(max) = 675 ± 121% and E(max) = 5575 ± 1371%, respectively) and decreased NA in the PFC (E(max) = -49 ± 6% and E(max) = -25 ± 11%, respectively). Administration of the 5HT3R antagonist Y25130 (50 μM) into LC attenuated SR57227 effect in the LC (E(max) = 323 ± 28%) and PFC (E(max) = -37 ± 7%). The α2ADR antagonist RS79948 (1 μM) blocked the SR57227 effect in the PFC but it did not change the effect in the LC (E(max) = 677 ± 202%). In electrophysiological assays, both mCPBG (1-10 μM) and SR57227 (1-10 μM) reduced the firing rate of about 50% of tested LC neurons (maximal effect = -37 ± 2% and -31 ± 4%, respectively); this effect was partially blocked by Y25130 (50 μM). Administration of RS79948 (1 μM) reversed the inhibition induced by mCPBG. Competition radioligand assays against [(3)H]UK14304 and [(3)H]RX821002 (α2ADR selective drugs) in the rat brain cortex showed a very weak affinity of SR57227 for α2ADR, whereas the affinity of mCPBG for α2ADR was 17-fold higher than that of SR57227 for α2ADR. The present results suggest that 5HT3R stimulate NA release in the LC, which promotes simultaneously a decrease in the firing rate of LC neurons through α2ADR and then a decrease

  11. Discovery of a novel allosteric modulator of 5-HT3 receptors: inhibition and potentiation of Cys-loop receptor signaling through a conserved transmembrane intersubunit site.

    PubMed

    Trattnig, Sarah M; Harpsøe, Kasper; Thygesen, Sarah B; Rahr, Louise M; Ahring, Philip K; Balle, Thomas; Jensen, Anders A

    2012-07-20

    The ligand-gated ion channels in the Cys-loop receptor superfamily mediate the effects of neurotransmitters acetylcholine, serotonin, GABA, and glycine. Cys-loop receptor signaling is susceptible to modulation by ligands acting through numerous allosteric sites. Here we report the discovery of a novel class of negative allosteric modulators of the 5-HT(3) receptors (5-HT(3)Rs). PU02 (6-[(1-naphthylmethyl)thio]-9H-purine) is a potent and selective antagonist displaying IC(50) values of ~1 μM at 5-HT(3)Rs and substantially lower activities at other Cys-loop receptors. In an elaborate mutagenesis study of the 5-HT(3)A receptor guided by a homology model, PU02 is demonstrated to act through a transmembrane intersubunit site situated in the upper three helical turns of TM2 and TM3 in the (+)-subunit and TM1 and TM2 in the (-)-subunit. The Ser(248), Leu(288), Ile(290), Thr(294), and Gly(306) residues are identified as important molecular determinants of PU02 activity with minor contributions from Ser(292) and Val(310), and we propose that the naphthalene group of PU02 docks into the hydrophobic cavity formed by these. Interestingly, specific mutations of Ser(248), Thr(294), and Gly(306) convert PU02 into a complex modulator, potentiating and inhibiting 5-HT-evoked signaling through these mutants at low and high concentrations, respectively. The PU02 binding site in the 5-HT(3)R corresponds to allosteric sites in anionic Cys-loop receptors, which emphasizes the uniform nature of the molecular events underlying signaling through the receptors. Moreover, the dramatic changes in the functional properties of PU02 induced by subtle changes in its binding site bear witness to the delicate structural discrimination between allosteric inhibition and potentiation of Cys-loop receptors.

  12. Mode of action of peppermint oil and (-)-menthol with respect to 5-HT3 receptor subtypes: binding studies, cation uptake by receptor channels and contraction of isolated rat ileum.

    PubMed

    Heimes, Katharina; Hauk, Florian; Verspohl, Eugen J

    2011-05-01

    Peppermint oil (Mentha × piperita L. (Lamiaceae) has been shown to exert potent antiemetic properties, but its mode of action has not yet been elucidated. Among its active constituents (-)-menthol is the most important. Three different in vitro models were used to investigate the effects on 5-HT(3) receptors (serotonin receptor subtype): [(14)C]guanidinium influx into N1E-115 cells which express 5-HT(3) receptors, isotonic contractions of the isolated rat ileum and equilibrium competition binding studies using a radioactively labelled 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist ([(3)H]GR65630) (3-(5-methyl-1H-imidazol-4-yl)-1-(1-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)-1-propanone). Both peppermint oil and (-)-menthol inhibited [(14)C]guanidinium influx through 5-HT(3) receptor channels as well as contractions of the ileum induced by serotonin. Neither the peppermint oil nor (-)-menthol, however, was able to displace [(3)H]GR65630 from 5-HT(3) binding sites. It may be concluded that peppermint oil and (-)-menthol exert their antiemetic effect at least partly by acting on the 5-HT(3) receptor ion-channel complex, probably by binding to a modulatory site distinct from the serotonin binding site.

  13. Impact of intracellular domain flexibility upon properties of activated human 5-HT3 receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Kozuska, J L; Paulsen, I M; Belfield, W J; Martin, I L; Cole, D J; Holt, A; Dunn, S M J

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose It has been proposed that arginine residues lining the intracellular portals of the homomeric 5-HT3A receptor cause electrostatic repulsion of cation flow, accounting for a single-channel conductance substantially lower than that of the 5-HT3AB heteromer. However, comparison of receptor homology models for wild-type pentamers suggests that salt bridges in the intracellular domain of the homomer may impart structural rigidity, and we hypothesized that this rigidity could account for the low conductance. Experimental Approach Mutations were introduced into the portal region of the human 5-HT3A homopentamer, such that putative salt bridges were broken by neutralizing anionic partners. Single-channel and whole cell currents were measured in transfected tsA201 cells and in Xenopus oocytes respectively. Computational simulations of protein flexibility facilitated comparison of wild-type and mutant receptors. Key Results Single-channel conductance was increased substantially, often to wild-type heteromeric receptor values, in most 5-HT3A mutants. Conversely, introduction of arginine residues to the portal region of the heteromer, conjecturally creating salt bridges, decreased conductance. Gating kinetics varied significantly between different mutant receptors. EC50 values for whole-cell responses to 5-HT remained largely unchanged, but Hill coefficients for responses to 5-HT were usually significantly smaller in mutants. Computational simulations suggested increased flexibility throughout the protein structure as a consequence of mutations in the intracellular domain. Conclusions and Implications These data support a role for intracellular salt bridges in maintaining the quaternary structure of the 5-HT3 receptor and suggest a role for the intracellular domain in allosteric modulation of cooperativity and agonist efficacy. Linked Article This article is commented on by Vardy and Kenakin, pp. 1614–1616 of volume 171 issue 7. To view this commentary

  14. Intrathecal nefopam-induced antinociception through activation of descending serotonergic projections involving spinal 5-HT7 but not 5-HT3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyung Gon; Kim, Woong Mo; Kim, Joung Min; Bae, Hong-Beom; Choi, Jeong Il

    2015-02-05

    We examined the involvement of spinal 5-HT(5-hydroxytryptamine) receptor 3(5-HT3R) and 7(5-HT7R) as well as the overall role of descending serotonergic projections in the analgesic effects of intrathecal(i.t.) nefopam for two rat models of formalin and paw incision test. I.t. nefopam produced an antinociceptive effect in a dose-dependent manner in both tests. Lesioning the spinal serotonergic projections using i.t. 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine(5,7-DHT) did not influence the intensity of allodynia in the paw incision test, but i.t. 5,7-DHT abolished the effect of nefopam. In the formain test, i.t. 5,7-DHT alone significantly diminished the flinches, but the effect of nefopam was not affected by i.t. 5,7-DHT. Antagonism study showed that i.t. 5-HT7R antagonist, SB269970 significantly blocked the antinociceptive effect of nefopam in both tests, but i.t. 5-HT3R antagonist, ondansetron has no influence on the effect of nefopam. The present study demonstrates that descending spinal serotonergic projections play a vital role in antinociceptive effect of i.t. nefopam in the paw incision test, but indeterminate in the formalin test. In both tests, the antinociceptive effect of i.t. nefopam involves the spinal 5-HT7R, but not 5-HT3R.

  15. Synthesis and biochemical evaluation of tritium-labeled 1-methyl-N-(8-methyl-8-azabicyclo(3. 2. 1)oct-3-yl)-1H-indazole-3-carboxa mide, a useful radioligand for 5HT3 receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, D.W.; Bloomquist, W.; Cohen, M.L.; Reid, L.R.; Schenck, K.; Wong, D.T. )

    1990-12-01

    The advent of potent, highly selective 5HT3 receptor antagonists has stimulated considerable interest in 5HT3 receptor mediated physiology and pharmacology. To permit detailed biochemical studies regarding interaction of the indazole class of serotonin (5HT) antagonists with 5HT3 receptors in multiple tissues, we synthesized 1-methyl-N-(8-methyl-8-azabicyclo(3.2.1)oct-3-yl)-1H-indazole- 3-carboxamide (LY278584, compound 9) in high specific activity, tritium-labeled form. This radioligand was selected as a synthetic target because of its potency as a 5HT3-receptor antagonist, its selectivity for this receptor viz a viz other 5HT-receptor subtypes, and the ability to readily incorporate three tritia via the indazole N-CH3 substituent. Alkylation of N-(8-methyl-8-azabicyclo(3.2.1)oct-3-yl)-1H-indazole-3-carboxamide (8) with sodium hydride and tritium-labeled iodomethane, followed by HPLC purification, resulted in (3H)-9 with a radiochemical purity of 99% and a specific activity of 80.5 Ci/mmol. This radioligand bound with high affinity to a single class of saturable recognition sites in membranes isolated from cerebral cortex of rat brain. The Kd was 0.69 nM and the Bmax was 16.9 fmol/mg of protein. The specific binding was excellent, and accounted for 83-93% of total binding at concentrations of 2 nM or less. The potencies of known 5HT3-receptor antagonists as inhibitors of (3H)-9 binding correlated well with their pharmacological receptor affinities as antagonists of 5HT-induced decreases in heart rate and contraction of guinea pig ileum, suggesting the central recognition site for this radioligand may be extremely similar to or identical with peripheral 5HT3 receptors.

  16. Tropisetron ameliorates early diabetic nephropathy in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Barzegar-Fallah, Anita; Alimoradi, Houman; Asadi, Firouzeh; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza; Asgari, Mojgan; Shafiei, Massoumeh

    2015-04-01

    to be independent of the 5-HT3 receptor.

  17. The 5-HT3 receptor is essential for exercise-induced hippocampal neurogenesis and antidepressant effects.

    PubMed

    Kondo, M; Nakamura, Y; Ishida, Y; Shimada, S

    2015-11-01

    Exercise has a variety of beneficial effects on brain structure and function, such as hippocampal neurogenesis, mood and memory. Previous studies have shown that exercise enhances hippocampal neurogenesis, induces antidepressant effects and improves learning behavior. Brain serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) levels increase following exercise, and the 5-HT system has been suggested to have an important role in these exercise-induced neuronal effects. However, the precise mechanism remains unclear. In this study, analysis of the 5-HT type 3A receptor subunit-deficient (htr3a(-/-)) mice revealed that lack of the 5-HT type 3 (5-HT3) receptor resulted in loss of exercise-induced hippocampal neurogenesis and antidepressant effects, but not of learning enhancement. Furthermore, stimulation of the 5-HT3 receptor promoted neurogenesis. These findings demonstrate that the 5-HT3 receptor is the critical target of 5-HT action in the brain following exercise, and is indispensable for hippocampal neurogenesis and antidepressant effects induced by exercise. This is the first report of a pivotal 5-HT receptor subtype that has a fundamental role in exercise-induced morphological changes and psychological effects.

  18. Synergistic effect between prelimbic 5-HT3 and CB1 receptors on memory consolidation deficit in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats: An isobologram analysis.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi-Mahmoodabadi, N; Nasehi, M; Emam Ghoreishi, M; Zarrindast, M-R

    2016-03-11

    The serotonergic system has often been defined as a neuromodulator system, and is specifically involved in learning and memory via its various receptors. Serotonin is involved in many of the same processes affected by cannabinoids. The present study investigated the influence of bilateral post-training intra-prelimbic (PL) administrations of serotonergic 5-hydroxytryptamine type-3 (5-HT3) receptor agents on arachidonylcyclopropylamide (ACPA) (cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonist)-induced amnesia, using the step-through inhibitory avoidance (IA) task to assess memory in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. The results indicated that sole intra-PL microinjection of ACPA (0.1 and 0.5 μg/rat) and 5-HT3 serotonin receptor agonist (m-Chlorophenylbiguanide hydrochloride, m-CPBG; 0.001, 0.01 and 0.1 μg/rat) impaired, whereas Y-25130 (a selective 5-HT3 serotonin receptor antagonist; 0.001 and 0.01 and 0.1 μg/rat) did not alter IA memory consolidation, by itself. Moreover, intra-PL administration of subthreshold dose of m-CPBG (0.0005 μg/rat) potentiated, while Y-25130 (0. 1 μg/rat) restored ACPA-induced memory consolidation deficit. The isobologram analysis showed that there is a synergistic effect between ACPA and m-CPBG on memory consolidation deficit. These findings suggest that 5-HT3 receptor mechanism(s), at least partly, play(s) a role in modulating the effect of ACPA on memory consolidation in the PL area.

  19. Synthesis and Pharmacological Evaluation of [(11)C]Granisetron and [(18)F]Fluoropalonosetron as PET Probes for 5-HT3 Receptor Imaging.

    PubMed

    Mu, Linjing; Müller Herde, Adrienne; Rüefli, Pascal M; Sladojevich, Filippo; Milicevic Sephton, Selena; Krämer, Stefanie D; Thompson, Andrew J; Schibli, Roger; Ametamey, Simon M; Lochner, Martin

    2016-11-16

    Serotonin-gated ionotropic 5-HT3 receptors are the major pharmacological targets for antiemetic compounds. Furthermore, they have become a focus for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and there is some evidence that pharmacological modulation of 5-HT3 receptors might alleviate symptoms of other neurological disorders. Highly selective, high-affinity antagonists, such as granisetron (Kytril) and palonosetron (Aloxi), belong to a family of drugs (the "setrons") that are well established for clinical use. To enable us to better understand the actions of these drugs in vivo, we report the synthesis of 8-fluoropalonosetron (15) that has a binding affinity (Ki = 0.26 ± 0.05 nM) similar to the parent drug (Ki = 0.21 ± 0.03 nM). We radiolabeled 15 by nucleophilic (18)F-fluorination of an unsymmetrical diaryliodonium palonosetron precursor and achieved the radiosynthesis of 1-(methyl-(11)C)-N-granisetron ([(11)C]2) through N-alkylation with [(11)C]CH3I, respectively. Both compounds [(18)F]15 (chemical and radiochemical purity >95%, specific activity 41 GBq/μmol) and [(11)C]2 (chemical and radiochemical purity ≥99%, specific activity 170 GBq/μmol) were evaluated for their utility as positron emission tomography (PET) probes. Using mouse and rat brain slices, in vitro autoradiography with both [(18)F]15 and [(11)C]2 revealed a heterogeneous and displaceable binding in cortical and hippocampal regions that are known to express 5-HT3 receptors at significant levels. Subsequent PET experiments suggested that [(18)F]15 and [(11)C]2 are of limited utility for the PET imaging of brain 5-HT3 receptors in vivo.

  20. Wood creosote prevents CRF-induced motility via 5-HT3 receptors in proximal and 5-HT4 receptors in distal colon in rats.

    PubMed

    Ataka, Koji; Kuge, Tomoo; Fujino, Kazunori; Takahashi, Toku; Fujimiya, Mineko

    2007-05-30

    Wood creosote has been used as an herbal medicine against acute diarrhea caused by food poisoning and has an inhibitory effect on colonic motility and enterotoxin-induced ion secretion. Since no previous studies have examined the effects of wood creosote on stress-induced alteration of colonic motility, we examined the effects on the colonic motility altered by intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), which is a key mediator in responses to stress. We recorded motor activity in proximal and distal colon of unrestrained conscious rats via two manometory catheters. The frequencies of phase III-like contraction and the % motor indices in both proximal and distal colon were measured. At the same time the number of fecal pellets excreted was counted. I.c.v. injection of CRF increased the motor activity in both proximal and distal colon, and these effects were completely antagonized by i.c.v. injection of a selective CRF type 1 antagonist but not by a CRF type 2 antagonist. Changes in colonic motility induced by CRF were reversed by intravenously administered wood creosote. Intraluminal administration of the 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist granisetron, or the 5-HT(4) receptor antagonist SB 204070 blocked the increase in colonic motility induced by i.c.v. injection of CRF. Wood creosote prevented the increase in colonic motility induced by the 5-HT(3) receptor agonist SR57227A in the proximal colon, while it prevented the increase in colonic motility induced by the 5-HT(4) receptor agonist RS67506 in the distal colon. These results indicate that wood creosote prevents the increase in colonic motility induced by CRF via 5-HT(3) receptors in the proximal colon, and via 5-HT(4) receptors in the distal colon, suggesting that wood creosote might be useful to treat stress-induced diarrhea.

  1. Serotonin 5-HT3 receptor-mediated vomiting occurs via the activation of Ca2+/CaMKII-dependent ERK1/2 signaling in the least shrew (Cryptotis parva).

    PubMed

    Zhong, Weixia; Hutchinson, Tarun E; Chebolu, Seetha; Darmani, Nissar A

    2014-01-01

    Stimulation of 5-HT3 receptors (5-HT3Rs) by 2-methylserotonin (2-Me-5-HT), a selective 5-HT3 receptor agonist, can induce vomiting. However, downstream signaling pathways for the induced emesis remain unknown. The 5-HT3R channel has high permeability to extracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) and upon stimulation allows increased Ca(2+) influx. We examined the contribution of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIα (Ca(2+)/CaMKIIα), interaction of 5-HT3R with calmodulin, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) signaling to 2-Me-5-HT-induced emesis in the least shrew. Using fluo-4 AM dye, we found that 2-Me-5-HT augments intracellular Ca(2+) levels in brainstem slices and that the selective 5-HT3R antagonist palonosetron, can abolish the induced Ca(2+) signaling. Pre-treatment of shrews with either: i) amlodipine, an antagonist of L-type Ca(2+) channels present on the cell membrane; ii) dantrolene, an inhibitor of ryanodine receptors (RyRs) Ca2+-release channels located on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER); iii) a combination of their less-effective doses; or iv) inhibitors of CaMKII (KN93) and ERK1/2 (PD98059); dose-dependently suppressed emesis caused by 2-Me-5-HT. Administration of 2-Me-5-HT also significantly: i) enhanced the interaction of 5-HT3R with calmodulin in the brainstem as revealed by immunoprecipitation, as well as their colocalization in the area postrema (brainstem) and small intestine by immunohistochemistry; and ii) activated CaMKIIα in brainstem and in isolated enterochromaffin cells of the small intestine as shown by Western blot and immunocytochemistry. These effects were suppressed by palonosetron. 2-Me-5-HT also activated ERK1/2 in brainstem, which was abrogated by palonosetron, KN93, PD98059, amlodipine, dantrolene, or a combination of amlodipine plus dantrolene. However, blockade of ER inositol-1, 4, 5-triphosphate receptors by 2-APB, had no significant effect on the discussed behavioral and biochemical parameters. This study

  2. Serotonin 5-HT3 Receptor-Mediated Vomiting Occurs via the Activation of Ca2+/CaMKII-Dependent ERK1/2 Signaling in the Least Shrew (Cryptotis parva)

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Weixia; Hutchinson, Tarun E.; Chebolu, Seetha; Darmani, Nissar A.

    2014-01-01

    Stimulation of 5-HT3 receptors (5-HT3Rs) by 2-methylserotonin (2-Me-5-HT), a selective 5-HT3 receptor agonist, can induce vomiting. However, downstream signaling pathways for the induced emesis remain unknown. The 5-HT3R channel has high permeability to extracellular calcium (Ca2+) and upon stimulation allows increased Ca2+ influx. We examined the contribution of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIα (Ca2+/CaMKIIα), interaction of 5-HT3R with calmodulin, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) signaling to 2-Me-5-HT-induced emesis in the least shrew. Using fluo-4 AM dye, we found that 2-Me-5-HT augments intracellular Ca2+ levels in brainstem slices and that the selective 5-HT3R antagonist palonosetron, can abolish the induced Ca2+ signaling. Pre-treatment of shrews with either: i) amlodipine, an antagonist of L-type Ca2+ channels present on the cell membrane; ii) dantrolene, an inhibitor of ryanodine receptors (RyRs) Ca2+-release channels located on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER); iii) a combination of their less-effective doses; or iv) inhibitors of CaMKII (KN93) and ERK1/2 (PD98059); dose-dependently suppressed emesis caused by 2-Me-5-HT. Administration of 2-Me-5-HT also significantly: i) enhanced the interaction of 5-HT3R with calmodulin in the brainstem as revealed by immunoprecipitation, as well as their colocalization in the area postrema (brainstem) and small intestine by immunohistochemistry; and ii) activated CaMKIIα in brainstem and in isolated enterochromaffin cells of the small intestine as shown by Western blot and immunocytochemistry. These effects were suppressed by palonosetron. 2-Me-5-HT also activated ERK1/2 in brainstem, which was abrogated by palonosetron, KN93, PD98059, amlodipine, dantrolene, or a combination of amlodipine plus dantrolene. However, blockade of ER inositol-1, 4, 5-triphosphate receptors by 2-APB, had no significant effect on the discussed behavioral and biochemical parameters. This study demonstrates

  3. Unraveling mechanisms underlying partial agonism in 5-HT3A receptors.

    PubMed

    Corradi, Jeremías; Bouzat, Cecilia

    2014-12-10

    Partial agonists have emerged as attractive therapeutic molecules. 2-Me-5HT and tryptamine have been defined as partial agonists of 5-HT3 receptors on the basis of macroscopic measurements. Because several mechanisms may limit maximal responses, we took advantage of the high-conductance form of the mouse serotonin type 3A (5-HT3A) receptor to understand their molecular actions. Individual 5-HT-bound receptors activate in long episodes of high open probability, consisting of groups of openings in quick succession. The activation pattern is similar for 2-Me-5HT only at very low concentrations since profound channel blockade takes place within the activating concentration range. In contrast, activation episodes are significantly briefer in the presence of tryptamine. Generation of a full activation scheme reveals that the fully occupied receptor overcomes transitions to closed preopen states (primed states) before opening. Reduced priming explains the partial agonism of tryptamine. In contrast, 2-Me-5HT is not a genuine partial agonist since priming is not dramatically affected and its low apparent efficacy is mainly due to channel blockade. The analysis also shows that the first priming step is the rate-limiting step and partial agonists require an increased number of priming steps for activation. Molecular docking suggests that interactions are similar for 5-HT and 2-Me-5HT but slightly different for tryptamine. Our study contributes to understanding 5-HT3A receptor activation, extends the novel concept of partial agonism within the Cys-loop family, reveals novel aspects of partial agonism, and unmasks molecular actions of classically defined partial agonists. Unraveling mechanisms underlying partial responses has implications in the design of therapeutic compounds.

  4. 5-HT3a Receptors Modulate Hippocampal Gamma Oscillations by Regulating Synchrony of Parvalbumin-Positive Interneurons.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying; Yoon, Kristopher; Ko, Ho; Jiao, Song; Ito, Wataru; Wu, Jian-Young; Yung, Wing-Ho; Lu, Bai; Morozov, Alexei

    2016-02-01

    Gamma-frequency oscillatory activity plays an important role in information integration across brain areas. Disruption in gamma oscillations is implicated in cognitive impairments in psychiatric disorders, and 5-HT3 receptors (5-HT3Rs) are suggested as therapeutic targets for cognitive dysfunction in psychiatric disorders. Using a 5-HT3aR-EGFP transgenic mouse line and inducing gamma oscillations by carbachol in hippocampal slices, we show that activation of 5-HT3aRs, which are exclusively expressed in cholecystokinin (CCK)-containing interneurons, selectively suppressed and desynchronized firings in these interneurons by enhancing spike-frequency accommodation in a small conductance potassium (SK)-channel-dependent manner. Parvalbumin-positive interneurons therefore received diminished inhibitory input leading to increased but desynchronized firings of PV cells. As a consequence, the firing of pyramidal neurons was desynchronized and gamma oscillations were impaired. These effects were independent of 5-HT3aR-mediated CCK release. Our results therefore revealed an important role of 5-HT3aRs in gamma oscillations and identified a novel crosstalk among different types of interneurons for regulation of network oscillations. The functional link between 5-HT3aR and gamma oscillations may have implications for understanding the cognitive impairments in psychiatric disorders.

  5. Serotonin enhances urinary bladder nociceptive processing via a 5-HT3 receptor mechanism.

    PubMed

    Hall, Jason D; DeWitte, Cary; Ness, Timothy J; Robbins, Meredith T

    2015-09-14

    Serotonin from the descending pain modulatory pathway is critical to nociceptive processing. Its effects on pain modulation may either be inhibitory or facilitatory, depending on the type of pain and which receptors are involved. Little is known about the role of serotonergic systems in bladder nociceptive processing. These studies examined the effect of systemic administration of the serotonin precursor, 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP), on normal bladder and somatic sensation in rats. ELISA was used to quantify peripheral and central changes in serotonin and its major metabolite following 5-HTP administration, and the potential role of the 5-HT3 receptor on changes in bladder sensation elicited by 5-HTP was investigated. 5-HTP produced bladder hypersensitivity and somatic analgesia. The pro-nociceptive effect of 5-HTP was attenuated by intrathecal, but not systemic, ondansetron. Peripheral increases in serotonin, its metabolism and rate of turnover were detectable within 30min of 5-HTP administration. Significant enhancement of serotonin metabolism was observed centrally. These findings suggest that 5-HTP increases serotonin, which may then affect descending facilitatory systems to produce bladder hypersensitivity via activation of spinal 5-HT3 receptors.

  6. In silico investigation into the interactions between murine 5-HT3 receptor and the principle active compounds of ginger (Zingiber officinale).

    PubMed

    Lohning, Anna E; Marx, Wolfgang; Isenring, Liz

    2016-11-01

    Gingerols and shogaols are the primary non-volatile actives within ginger (Zingiber officinale). These compounds have demonstrated in vitro to exert 5-HT3 receptor antagonism which could benefit chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). The site and mechanism of action by which these compounds interact with the 5-HT3 receptor is not fully understood although research indicates they may bind to a currently unidentified allosteric binding site. Using in silico techniques, such as molecular docking and GRID analysis, we have characterized the recently available murine 5-HT3 receptor by identifying sites of strong interaction with particular functional groups at both the orthogonal (serotonin) site and a proposed allosteric binding site situated at the interface between the transmembrane region and the extracellular domain. These were assessed concurrently with the top-scoring poses of the docked ligands and included key active gingerols, shogaols and dehydroshogaols as well as competitive antagonists (e.g. setron class of pharmacologically active drugs), serotonin and its structural analogues, curcumin and capsaicin, non-competitive antagonists and decoys. Unexpectedly, we found that the ginger compounds and their structural analogs generally outscored other ligands at both sites. Our results correlated well with previous site-directed mutagenesis studies in identifying key binding site residues. We have identified new residues important for binding the ginger compounds. Overall, the results suggest that the ginger compounds and their structural analogues possess a high binding affinity to both sites. Notwithstanding the limitations of such theoretical analyses, these results suggest that the ginger compounds could act both competitively or non-competitively as has been shown for palonosetron and other modulators of CYS loop receptors.

  7. Open probability of homomeric murine 5-HT3A serotonin receptors depends on subunit occupancy

    PubMed Central

    Mott, David D; Erreger, Kevin; Banke, Tue G; Traynelis, Stephen F

    2001-01-01

    The time course of macroscopic current responses of homomeric murine serotonin 5-HT3A receptors was studied in whole cells and excised membrane patches under voltage clamp in response to rapid application of serotonin. Serotonin activated whole cell currents with an EC50 value for the peak response of 2 μm and a Hill slope of 3.0 (n = 12), suggesting that the binding of at least three agonist molecules is required to open the channel. Homomeric 5-HT3A receptors in excised membrane patches had a slow activation time course (mean ±s.e.m. 10-90 % rise time 12.5 ± 1.6 ms; n = 9 patches) for 100 μm serotonin. The apparent activation rate was estimated by fitting an exponential function to the rising phase of responses to supramaximal serotonin to be 136 s−1. The 5-HT3A receptor response to 100 μm serotonin in outside-out patches (n = 19) and whole cells (n = 41) desensitized with a variable rate that accelerated throughout the experiment. The time course for desensitization was described by two exponential components (for patches τslow 1006 ± 139 ms, amplitude 31 % τfast 176 ± 25 ms, amplitude 69 %). Deactivation of the response following serotonin removal from excised membrane patches (n = 8) and whole cells (n = 29) was described by a dual exponential time course with time constants similar to those for desensitization (for patches τslow 838 ± 217 ms, 55 % amplitude; τfast 213 ± 44 ms, 45 % amplitude). In most patches (6 of 8), the deactivation time course in response to a brief 1-5 ms pulse of serotonin was similar to or slower than desensitization. This suggests that the continued presence of agonist can induce desensitization with a similar or more rapid time course than agonist unbinding. The difference between the time course for deactivation and desensitization was voltage independent over the range -100 to -40 mV in patches (n = 4) and -100 to +50 mV in whole cells (n = 4), suggesting desensitization of these receptors in the presence of

  8. Vortioxetine dose-dependently reverses 5-HT depletion-induced deficits in spatial working and object recognition memory: a potential role for 5-HT1A receptor agonism and 5-HT3 receptor antagonism.

    PubMed

    du Jardin, Kristian Gaarn; Jensen, Jesper Bornø; Sanchez, Connie; Pehrson, Alan L

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported that the investigational multimodal antidepressant, vortioxetine, reversed 5-HT depletion-induced memory deficits while escitalopram and duloxetine did not. The present report studied the effects of vortioxetine and the potential impact of its 5-HT1A receptor agonist and 5-HT3 receptor antagonist properties on 5-HT depletion-induced memory deficits. Recognition and spatial working memory were assessed in the object recognition (OR) and Y-maze spontaneous alternation (SA) tests, respectively. 5-HT depletion was induced in female Long-Evans rats using 4-cholro-DL-phenylalanine methyl ester HCl (PCPA) and receptor occupancies were determined by ex vivo autoradiography. Rats were acutely dosed with vortioxetine, ondansetron (5-HT3 receptor antagonist) or flesinoxan (5-HT1A receptor agonist). The effects of chronic vortioxetine administration on 5-HT depletion-induced memory deficits were also assessed. 5-HT depletion reliably impaired memory performance in both the tests. Vortioxetine reversed PCPA-induced memory deficits dose-dependently with a minimal effective dose (MED) ≤0.1mg/kg (∼80% 5-HT3 receptor occupancy; OR) and ≤3.0mg/kg (5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT3 receptor occupancy: ∼15%, 60%, 95%) in SA. Ondansetron exhibited a MED ≤3.0μg/kg (∼25% 5-HT3 receptor occupancy; OR), but was inactive in the SA test. Flesinoxan had a MED ≤1.0mg/kg (∼25% 5-HT1A receptor occupancy; SA); only 1.0mg/kg ameliorated deficits in the NOR. Chronic p.o. vortioxetine administration significantly improved memory performance in OR and occupied 95%, 66%, and 9.5% of 5-HT3, 5-HT1B, and 5-HT1A receptors, respectively. Vortioxetine's effects on SA performance may involve 5-HT1A receptor agonism, but not 5-HT3 receptor antagonism, whereas the effects on OR performance may involve 5-HT3 receptor antagonism and 5-HT1A receptor agonism.

  9. Spinal 5-HT1A, not the 5-HT1B or 5-HT3 receptors, mediates descending serotonergic inhibition for late-phase mechanical allodynia of carrageenan-induced peripheral inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joung Min; Jeong, Seong Wook; Yang, Jihoon; Lee, Seong Heon; Kim, Woon Mo; Jeong, Seongtae; Bae, Hong Beom; Yoon, Myung Ha; Choi, Jeong Il

    2015-07-23

    Previous electrophysiological studies demonstrated a limited role of 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 receptor (5-HT3R), but facilitatory role of 5-HT1AR and 5-HT1BR in spinal nociceptive processing of carrageenan-induced inflammatory pain. The release of spinal 5-HT was shown to peak in early-phase and return to baseline in late-phase of carrageenan inflammation. We examined the role of the descending serotonergic projections involving 5-HT1AR, 5-HT1BR, and 5-HT3R in mechanical allodynia of early- (first 4h) and late-phase (24h after) carrageenan-induced inflammation. Intrathecal administration of 5-HT produced a significant anti-allodynic effect in late-phase, but not in early-phase. Similarly, intrathecal 5-HT1AR agonist (8-OH-DPAT) attenuated the intensity of late-phase allodynia in a dose dependent fashion which was antagonized by 5-HT1AR antagonist (WAY-100635), but produced no effect on the early-phase allodynia. However, other agonists or antagonists of 5-HT1BR (CP-93129, SB-224289) and 5-HT3R (m-CPBG, ondansetron) did not produce any anti- or pro-allodynic effect in both early- and late- phase allodynia. These results suggest that spinal 5-HT1A, but not 5-HT1B or 5-HT3 receptors mediate descending serotonergic inhibition on nociceptive processing of late-phase mechanical allodynia in carrageenan-induced inflammation.

  10. On the role of brain 5-HT7 receptor in the mechanism of hypothermia: comparison with hypothermia mediated via 5-HT1A and 5-HT3 receptor.

    PubMed

    Naumenko, Vladimir S; Kondaurova, Elena M; Popova, Nina K

    2011-12-01

    Intracerebroventricular administration of selective agonist of serotonin 5-HT(7) receptor LP44 (4-[2-(methylthio)phenyl]-N-(1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-1-naphthalenyl)-1-pyperasinehexanamide hydrochloride; 10.3, 20.5 or 41.0 nmol) produced considerable hypothermic response in CBA/Lac mice. LP44-induced (20.5 nmol) hypothermia was significantly attenuated by the selective 5-HT(7) receptor antagonist SB 269970 (16.1 fmol, i.c.v.) pretreatment. At the same time, intraperitoneal administration of LP44 in a wide range of doses 1.0, 2.0 or 10.0 mg/kg (2.0, 4.0, 20.0 μmol/kg) did not cause considerable hypothermic response. These findings indicate the implication of central, rather than peripheral 5-HT(7) receptors in the regulation of hypothermia. The comparison of LP44-induced (20.5 nmol) hypothermic reaction in eight inbred mouse strains (DBA/2J, CBA/Lac, C57BL/6, BALB/c, ICR, AKR/J, C3H and Asn) was performed and a significant effect of genotype was found. In the same eight mouse strains, functional activity of 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(3) receptors was studied. The comparison of hypothermic responses produced by 5-HT(7) receptor agonist LP44 (20.5 nmol, i.c.v.) and 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT 1.0 mg/kg, i.p. (3.0 μmol/kg), 5-HT(3) receptor agonist m-CPBG (40.0 nmol, i.c.v.) did not reveal considerable interstrain correlations between 5-HT(7) and 5-HT(1A) or 5-HT(3) receptor-induced hypothermia. The selective 5-HT(7) receptor antagonist SB 269970 (16.1 fmol, i.c.v.) failed to attenuate the hypothermic effect of 8-OH-DPAT 1.0 mg/kg, i.p. (3.0 μmol/kg) and m-CPBG (40.0 nmol, i.c.v.) indicating that the brain 5-HT(7) receptor is not involved in the hypothermic effects of 8-OH-DPAT or m-CPBG. The obtained results suggest that the central 5-HT(7) receptor plays an essential role in the mediation of thermoregulation independent of 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(3) receptors.

  11. Ondansetron reverses anti-hypersensitivity from clonidine in rats following peripheral nerve injury: Role of γ-amino butyric acid in α2-adrenoceptor and 5-HT3 serotonin receptor analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Hayashida, Ken-ichiro; Kimura, Masafumi; Yoshizumi, Masaru; Hobo, Shotaro; Obata, Hideaki; Eisenach, James C.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Monoaminergic pathways, impinging an α2-adrenoceptors and 5-HT3 serotonin receptors, modulate nociceptive transmission, but their mechanisms and interactions after neuropathic injury are unknown. Here we examine these interactions in rodents after nerve injury. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats following L5-L6 spinal nerve ligation (SNL) were used for either behavioral testing, in vivo microdialysis for γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) and acetylcholine release, or synaptosome preparation for GABA release. Results Intrathecal administration of the α2-adrenoceptor agonist (clonidine) and 5-HT3 receptor agonist (chlorophenylbiguanide) reduced hypersensitivity in SNL rats via GABA receptor-mediated mechanisms. Clonidine increased GABA and acetylcholine release in vivo in the spinal cord of SNL rats but not in normal rats. Clonidine-induced spinal GABA release in SNL rats was blocked by α2-adrenergic and nicotinic cholinergic antagonists. The 5-HT3 receptor antagonist ondansetron decreased and chlorophenylbiguanide increased spinal GABA release in both normal and SNL rats. In synaptosomes from the spinal dorsal horn of SNL rats, pre-synaptic GABA release was increased by nicotinic agonists and decreased by muscarinic and α2-adrenergic agonists. Spinally administered ondansetron significantly reduced clonidine-induced anti-hypersensitivity and spinal GABA release in SNL rats. Conclusion These results suggest that spinal GABA contributes to anti-hypersensitivity from intrathecal α2-adrenergic and 5-HT3 receptor agonists in the neuropathic pain state, that cholinergic neuroplasticity after nerve injury is critical for α2-adrenoceptor-mediated GABA release, and that blockade of spinal 5-HT3 receptors reduces α2-adrenoceptor-mediated anti-hypersensitivity via reducing total GABA release. PMID:22722575

  12. Functional evidence for the rapid desensitization of 5-HT(3) receptors on vagal afferents mediating the Bezold-Jarisch reflex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, E. J.; Johnson, A. K.; Lewis, S. J.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)(3) receptors on cardiopulmonary afferents mediating the Bezold-Jarisch reflex (BJR) desensitize upon repeated exposure to selective agonists. BJR-mediated falls in heart rate, diastolic arterial blood pressure and cardiac output elicited by the 5-HT(3)-receptor agonists, phenylbiguanide (100 microg/kg, i.v.) or 2-methyl-5-HT (100 microg/kg, i.v.), progressively diminished upon repeated injection in conscious rats. The BJR responses elicited by 5-HT (40 microg/kg, i.v.) were markedly reduced in rats which had received the above injections of phenylbiguanide or 2-methyl-5-HT whereas the BJR responses elicited by L-S-nitrosocysteine (10 micromol/kg, i.v.) were similar before and after the injections of the 5-HT(3) receptor agonists. These findings suggest that tachyphylaxis to 5-HT(3) receptor agonists may be due to the desensitization of 5-HT(3) receptors on cardiopulmonary afferents rather than the impairment of the central or peripheral processing of the BJR.

  13. [The effects of selective 5HT3 receptor blockade on physiological markers of abdominal pain in awake dogs].

    PubMed

    Panteleev, S S; Busygina, I I; Liubashina, O A

    2013-04-01

    In awake dogs, the visceromotor and cardioautonomic responses to the rectal balloon distension were studied before and after intravenous administration of a selective 5HT3 receptor antagonist granisetron. It was shown that balloon distension level up to 60 mmHg caused neither noticeable muscle responses nor substantial changes in heart rate. In turn, distending pressures of 80 mmHg and higher induced vigorous abdominal muscle contractions and tachycardia that were graded with increasing intensities of stimulation. Thus, the rectal stimulation with pressures 80 mmHg and more produced the changes in visceromotor and cardiovascular indices which could be considered as suitable indicators of visceral nociception in conscious animals. Based on monitoring of these physiological markers in a model of abdominal pain the dose-dependent antinociceptive effect of granisetron in awake dogs has been demonstrated for the first time. It was determined that granisetron in doses of 0.25, 0.5 or 1.0 mg/kg induced correspondingly 33.6 +/- 9.2, 58.0+/- 8.6 [see text] 76.7 +/- 5.5 % decrease in visceromotor response of dogs to nociceptive visceral stimulation. The effect occurred immediately after the drug administration and was lasting more than 90 min. In turn, the dose-dependent suppression of the rectal distension-induced tachycardia was less prominent and only observed during the initial period of granisetron action. The described model of abdominal pain in awake dogs might be useful for preclinical screening of new pharmacological substances, whereas the obtained data could contribute to the development of more efficient analgesics aimed in patients with irritable bowel syndrome.

  14. Subunit rotation models activation of serotonin 5-HT3AB receptors by agonists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksay, Gábor; Simonyi, Miklós; Bikádi, Zsolt

    2004-10-01

    The N-terminal extracellular regions of heterooligomeric 3AB-type human 5-hydroxytryptamine receptors (5-HT 3ABR) were modelled based on the crystal structure of snail acetylcholine binding protein AChBP. Stepwise rotation of subunit A by 5° was performed between -10° and 15° to mimic agonist binding and receptor activation. Anticlockwise rotation reduced the size of the binding cavity in interface AB and reorganised the network of hydrogen bonds along the interface. AB subunit dimers with different rotations were applied for docking of ligands with different efficacies: 5-HT, m-chlorophenylbiguanide, SR 57227, quinolinyl piperazine and lerisetron derivatives. All ligands were docked into the dimer with -10° rotation representing ligand-free, open binding cavities similarly, without pharmacological discrimination. Their ammonium ions were in hydrogen bonding distance to the backbone carbonyl of W183. Anticlockwise rotation and contraction of the binding cavity led to distinctive docking interactions of agonists with E129 and cation-π interactions of their ammonium ions. Side chains of several further amino acids participating in docking (Y143, Y153, Y234 and E236) are in agreement with the effects of point mutations in the binding loops. Our model postulates that 5-HT binds to W183 in a hydrophobic cleft as well as to E236 in a hydrophilic vestibule. Then it elicits anticlockwise rotation to draw in loop C via π-cation-π interactions of␣its ammonium ion with W183 and Y234. Finally, closure of the binding cavity might end in rebinding of 5-HT to E129 in the hydrophilic vestibule.

  15. The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor channel blockers memantine, MRZ 2/579 and other amino-alkyl-cyclohexanes antagonise 5-HT(3) receptor currents in cultured HEK-293 and N1E-115 cell systems in a non-competitive manner.

    PubMed

    Rammes, G; Rupprecht, R; Ferrari, U; Zieglgänsberger, W; Parsons, C G

    2001-06-22

    The type 3 serotonin (5-HT(3)) receptor is a ligand-gated ion channel. In concentration-clamp experiments, we investigated the effects of the uncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists memantine, amantadine and MRZ 2/579 on 5-HT receptors stabley expressed in HEK-293 cells and on native 5-HT(3) receptors in the N1E-115 cell line. All agents antagonized serotonin (10 microM)-induced inward currents with similar potency to that reported for NMDA receptors. This effect was characterized by inducing a pronounced receptor desensitization, and was probably non-competitive and voltage-independent. In contrast, (S)-ketamine was much weaker as an antagonist of 5-HT(3) receptors than NMDA receptors. Similar effects on 5-HT(3) receptors have been reported previously for a variety of anti-depressants and it is possible that the clinical anti-depressant effects reported for both memantine and amantadine are mediated, at least in part, by antagonistic effects at 5-HT(3) receptors.

  16. Spinal 5-HT(3) receptor activation induces behavioral hypersensitivity via a neuronal-glial-neuronal signaling cascade.

    PubMed

    Gu, Ming; Miyoshi, Kan; Dubner, Ronald; Guo, Wei; Zou, Shiping; Ren, Ke; Noguchi, Koichi; Wei, Feng

    2011-09-07

    Recent studies indicate that the descending serotonin (5-HT) system from the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) in the brainstem and the 5-HT(3) receptor subtype in the spinal dorsal horn are involved in enhanced descending pain facilitation after tissue and nerve injury. However, the mechanisms underlying the activation of the 5-HT(3) receptor and its contribution to facilitation of pain remain unclear. In the present study, activation of spinal 5-HT(3) receptor by intrathecal injection of a selective 5-HT(3) receptor agonist, SR57227, induced spinal glial hyperactivity, neuronal hyperexcitability, and pain hypersensitivity in rats. We found that there was neuron-to-microglia signaling via chemokine fractalkine, microglia to astrocyte signaling via the cytokine IL-18, astrocyte to neuronal signaling by IL-1β, and enhanced activation of GluN (NMDA) receptors in the spinal dorsal horn. In addition, exogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor-induced descending pain facilitation was accompanied by upregulation of CD11b and GFAP expression in the spinal dorsal horn after microinjection in the RVM, and these events were significantly prevented by functional blockade of spinal 5-HT(3) receptors. Enhanced expression of spinal CD11b and GFAP after hindpaw inflammation was also attenuated by molecular depletion of the descending 5-HT system by intra-RVM Tph-2 shRNA interference. Thus, these findings offer new insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms at the spinal level responsible for descending 5-HT-mediated pain facilitation during the development of persistent pain after tissue and nerve injury. New pain therapies should focus on prime targets of descending facilitation-induced glial involvement, and in particular the blocking of intercellular signaling transduction between neuron and glia.

  17. Spinal 5-HT3 receptor activation induces behavioral hypersensitivity via a neuronal-glial-neuronal signaling cascade

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Ming; Miyoshi, Kan; Dubner, Ronald; Guo, Wei; Zou, Shiping; Ren, Ke; Noguchi, Koichi; Wei, Feng

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that the descending serotonin (5-HT) system from the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) in brainstem and the 5-HT3 receptor subtype in the spinal dorsal horn are involved in enhanced descending pain facilitation after tissue and nerve injury. However, the mechanisms underlying the activation of the 5-HT3 receptor and its contribution to facilitation of pain remain unclear. In the present study, activation of spinal 5-HT3 receptor by intrathecal injection of a selective 5-HT3 receptor agonist SR 57227 induced spinal glial hyperactivity, neuronal hyperexcitability and pain hypersensitivity in rats. We found that there was neuron-to-microglia signaling via chemokine fractalkine, microglia to astrocyte signaling via cytokine IL-18, astrocyte to neuronal signaling by IL-1β, and enhanced activation of GluN (NMDA) receptors in the spinal dorsal horn. In addition, exogenous BDNF-induced descending pain facilitation was accompanied with up-regulation of CD11b and GFAP expression in the spinal dorsal horn after microinjection in the RVM, which were significantly prevented by functional blockade of spinal 5-HT3 receptors. Enhanced expression of spinal CD11b and GFAP after hindpaw inflammation was also attenuated by molecular depletion of the descending 5-HT system by intra-RVM Tph-2 shRNA interference. Thus, these findings offer new insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms at the spinal level responsible for descending 5-HT-mediated pain facilitation during the development of persistent pain after tissue and nerve injury. New pain therapies should focus on prime targets of descending facilitation-induced glial involvement, and in particular the blocking of intercellular signaling transduction between neuron and glia. PMID:21900561

  18. Anxiolytic-like effects observed in rats exposed to the elevated zero-maze following treatment with 5-HT2/5-HT3/5-HT4 ligands

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Rob; Duke, Aaron A.; Gilmore, Paula E.; Page, Deaglan; Bègue, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    The present study examined the effects of administering selective 5-HT antagonists and agonists to rats tested in the elevated zero-maze (EZM) model of anxiety. The EZM paradigm has advantages over the elevated plus-maze (EPM) paradigm with respect to measuring anxiety, yet has been utilized less frequently. Three experiments were conducted each with a diazepam control (0.25, 0.5 and 0.75 mg/kg). In the first experiment, we administered the 5-HT2C antagonist RS 102221 (0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 mg/kg) and 5-HT2C agonist MK-212 (0.25, 0.5 and 0.75 mg/kg); in the second experiment, we administered the 5-HT3 antagonist Y-25130 (0.1, 1.0 and 3.0 mg/kg) and 5-HT3 agonist SR 57227A (0.1, 1.0 and 3.0 mg/kg), and in the third experiment, we administered the 5-HT4 antagonist RS 39604 (0.01, 0.1, 1.0 mg/kg) and 5-HT4 agonist RS 67333 (0.01, 0.1 and 0.5 mg/kg). The administration of 5-HT2/3/4 subtype antagonists all generated behavioral profiles indicative of anxiolytic-like effects in the EZM, which was apparent from examination of both traditional and ethological measures. While little effect was observed from 5-HT2 and 5-HT3 agonists, the 5-HT4 agonist RS 67333 was found to produce a paradoxical anxiolytic-like effect similar to that produced by the 5-HT4 antagonist RS 39604. We conclude by discussing the implications of these findings. PMID:24457553

  19. Dynamic Expression of Serotonin Receptor 5-HT3A in Developing Sensory Innervation of the Lower Urinary Tract

    PubMed Central

    Ritter, K. Elaine; Southard-Smith, E. Michelle

    2017-01-01

    Sensory afferent signaling is required for normal function of the lower urinary tract (LUT). Despite the wide prevalence of bladder dysfunction and pelvic pain syndromes, few effective treatment options are available. Serotonin receptor 5-HT3A is a known mediator of visceral afferent signaling and has been implicated in bladder function. However, basic expression patterns for this gene and others among developing bladder sensory afferents that could be used to inform regenerative efforts aimed at treating deficiencies in pelvic innervation are lacking. To gain greater insight into the molecular characteristics of bladder sensory innervation, we conducted a thorough characterization of Htr3a expression in developing and adult bladder-projecting lumbosacral dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. Using a transgenic Htr3a-EGFP reporter mouse line, we identified 5-HT3A expression at 10 days post coitus (dpc) in neural crest derivatives and in 12 dpc lumbosacral DRG. Using immunohistochemical co-localization we observed Htr3a-EGFP expression in developing lumbosacral DRG that partially coincides with neuropeptides CGRP and Substance P and capsaicin receptor TRPV1. A majority of Htr3a-EGFP+ DRG neurons also express a marker of myelinated Aδ neurons, NF200. There was no co-localization of 5-HT3A with the TRPV4 receptor. We employed retrograde tracing in adult Htr3a-EGFP mice to quantify the contribution of 5-HT3A+ DRG neurons to bladder afferent innervation. We found that 5-HT3A is expressed in a substantial proportion of retrograde traced DRG neurons in both rostral (L1, L2) and caudal (L6, S1) axial levels that supply bladder innervation. Most bladder-projecting Htr3a-EGFP+ neurons that co-express CGRP, Substance P, or TRPV1 are found in L1, L2 DRG, whereas Htr3a-EGFP+, NF200+ bladder-projecting neurons are from the L6, S1 axial levels. Our findings contribute much needed information regarding the development of LUT innervation and highlight the 5-HT3A serotonin receptor as

  20. L-type calcium channels contribute to 5-HT3-receptor-evoked CaMKIIα and ERK activation and induction of emesis in the least shrew (Cryptotis parva).

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Tarun E; Zhong, Weixia; Chebolu, Seetha; Wilson, Sean M; Darmani, Nissar A

    2015-05-15

    Activation of serotonergic 5-HT3 receptors by its selective agonist 2-methyl serotonin (2-Me-5-HT) induces vomiting, which is sensitive to selective antagonists of both 5-HT3 receptors (palonosetron) and L-type calcium channels (LTCC) (amlodipine or nifedipine). Previously we demonstrated that 5-HT3 receptor activation also causes increases in a palonosetron-sensitive manner in: i) intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, ii) attachment of calmodulin (CaM) to 5-HT3 receptor, and iii) phosphorylation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIα (CaMKIIα) and extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2). Here, we investigate the role of the short-acting LTCC blocker nifedipine on 2-Me-5-HT-evoked intracellular Ca(2+) increase and on downstream intracellular emetic signaling, which have been shown to be coupled with 2-Me-5-HT׳s emetic effects in the least shrew. Using the cell-permeant Ca(2+) indicator fluo-4 AM, here we present evidence for the contribution of Ca(2+) influx through LTCCs (sensitive to nifedipine) in 2-Me-5-HT (1µM) -evoked rise in cytosolic Ca(2+) levels in least shrew brainstem slices. Nifedipine pretreatment (10mg/kg, s.c.) also suppressed 2-Me-5-HT-evoked interaction of 5-HT3 receptors with CaM as well as phosphorylation of CaMKIIα and ERK1/2 in the least shrew brainstem, and 5-HT3 receptors -CaM colocalization in jejunum of the small intestine. In vitro exposure of isolated enterochromaffin cells of the small intestine to 2-Me-5-HT (1µM) caused CaMKIIα phosphorylation, which was also abrogated by nifedipine pretreatment (0.1µM). In addition, pretreatment with the CaMKII inhibitor KN62 (10mg/kg, i.p.) suppressed emesis and also the activation of CaMKIIα, and ERK in brainstem caused by 2-Me-5-HT (5mg/kg, i.p.). This study provides further mechanistic explanation for our published findings that nifedipine can dose-dependently protect shrews from 2-Me-5-HT-induced vomiting.

  1. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) Cellular Sequestration during Chronic Exposure Delays 5-HT3 Receptor Resensitization due to Its Subsequent Release*

    PubMed Central

    Hothersall, J. Daniel; Alexander, Amy; Samson, Andrew J.; Moffat, Christopher; Bollan, Karen A.; Connolly, Christopher N.

    2014-01-01

    The serotonergic synapse is dynamically regulated by serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)) with elevated levels leading to the down-regulation of the serotonin transporter and a variety of 5-HT receptors, including the 5-HT type-3 (5-HT3) receptors. We report that recombinantly expressed 5-HT3 receptor binding sites are reduced by chronic exposure to 5-HT (IC50 of 154.0 ± 45.7 μm, t½ = 28.6 min). This is confirmed for 5-HT3 receptor-induced contractions in the guinea pig ileum, which are down-regulated after chronic, but not acute, exposure to 5-HT. The loss of receptor function does not involve endocytosis, and surface receptor levels are unaltered. The rate and extent of down-regulation is potentiated by serotonin transporter function (IC50 of 2.3 ± 1.0 μm, t½ = 3.4 min). Interestingly, the level of 5-HT uptake correlates with the extent of down-regulation. Using TX-114 extraction, we find that accumulated 5-HT remains soluble and not membrane-bound. This cytoplasmically sequestered 5-HT is readily releasable from both COS-7 cells and the guinea pig ileum. Moreover, the 5-HT level released is sufficient to prevent recovery from receptor desensitization in the guinea pig ileum. Together, these findings suggest the existence of a novel mechanism of down-regulation where the chronic release of sequestered 5-HT prolongs receptor desensitization. PMID:25281748

  2. Inhibitory effects of dextrorotatory morphinans on the human 5-HT(3A) receptor expressed in Xenopus oocytes: Involvement of the N-terminal domain of the 5-HT(3A) receptor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung-Hwan; Hwang, Sung-Hee; Choi, Sun-Hye; Shin, Tae-Joon; Kang, Jiyeon; Kim, Hyun-Joong; Kim, Hyoung-Chun; Lee, Joon-Hee; Nah, Seung-Yeol

    2012-07-05

    We previously developed a series of dextromethorphan (DM, 3-methoxy-17-methylmorphinan) analogs modified at positions 3 and 17 of the morphinan ring system. Recent reports have shown that DM attenuates abdominal pain caused by irritable bowel syndrome, and multidrug regimens that include DM prevent nausea/vomiting following cancer surgery. However, little is known regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of DM. Here, we investigated the effects of DM, 3 of its analogs (AM, 3-allyloxy-17-methoxymorphian; CM, 3-cyclopropyl-17-methoxymorphinan; and DF, 3-methyl-17-methylmorphinan), and 1 of its metabolites (HM, 3-methoxymorphinan) on the activity of the human 5-HT(3A) receptor channel expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, using the 2-microelectrode voltage clamp technique. We found that intra-oocyte injection of human 5-HT(3A) receptor cRNAs elicited an inward current (I(5-HT)) in the presence of 5-HT. Cotreatment with AM, CM, DF, DM, or HM inhibited I(5-HT) in a dose-dependent, voltage-independent, and reversible manner. The IC(50) values for AM, CM, DF, DM, and HM were 24.5±1.4, 21.5±4.2, 132.6±35.8, 181.3±23.5, and 191.3±31.5μM, respectively. The IC(50) values of AM and CM were 7-fold lower than that of DM, and mechanistic analysis revealed that DM, DF, HM, AM, and CM were competitive inhibitors of I(5-HT). Point mutations of Arg241 in the N-terminal, but not amino acids in the pore region, to other amino acid residues attenuated or abolished DM- and DM-analog-induced inhibition of I(5-HT). Together, these results demonstrated that dextrorotatory morphinans might regulate 5-HT(3A) receptor channel activity via interaction with its N-terminal domain.

  3. Noncompetitive Inhibition of 5-HT3 Receptors by Citral, Linalool, and Eucalyptol Revealed by Nonlinear Mixed-Effects Modeling.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Gavin E; Barbosa, Roseli; Thompson, Andrew J

    2016-03-01

    Citral, eucalyptol, and linalool are widely used as flavorings, fragrances, and cosmetics. Here, we examined their effects on electrophysiological and binding properties of human 5-HT3 receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes and human embryonic kidney 293 cells, respectively. Data were analyzed using nonlinear mixed-effects modeling to account for random variance in the peak current response between oocytes. The oils caused an insurmountable inhibition of 5-HT-evoked currents (citral IC50 = 120 µM; eucalyptol = 258 µM; linalool = 141 µM) and did not compete with fluorescently labeled granisetron, suggesting a noncompetitive mechanism of action. Inhibition was not use-dependent but required a 30-second preapplication. Compound washout caused a slow (∼180 seconds) but complete recovery. Coapplication of the oils with bilobalide or diltiazem indicated they did not bind at the same locations as these channel blockers. Homology modeling and ligand docking predicted binding to a transmembrane cavity at the interface of adjacent subunits. Liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry showed that an essential oil extracted from Lippia alba contained 75.9% citral. This inhibited expressed 5-HT3 receptors (IC50 = 45 µg ml(-1)) and smooth muscle contractions in rat trachea (IC50 = 200 µg ml(-1)) and guinea pig ileum (IC50 = 20 µg ml(-1)), providing a possible mechanistic explanation for why this oil has been used to treat gastrointestinal and respiratory ailments. These results demonstrate that citral, eucalyptol, and linalool inhibit 5-HT3 receptors, and their binding to a conserved cavity suggests a valuable target for novel allosteric modulators.

  4. Evidence for the involvement of the serotonergic 5-HT2A/C and 5-HT3 receptors in the antidepressant-like effect caused by oral administration of bis selenide in mice.

    PubMed

    Jesse, Cristiano R; Wilhelm, Ethel A; Bortolatto, Cristiani F; Nogueira, Cristina W

    2010-03-17

    The present study investigated a possible antidepressant-like activity of bis selenide using two predictive tests for antidepressant effect on rodents: the forced swimming test (FST) and the tail suspension test (TST). Bis selenide (0.5-5 mg/kg, p.o.) decreased the immobility time in the mouse FST and TST. The anti-immobility effect of bis selenide (1 mg/kg, p.o.) in the TST was prevented by the pretreatment of mice with p-chlorophenylalanine methyl ester (PCPA; 100 mg/kg, i.p., an inhibitor of serotonin synthesis), ketanserin (1 mg/kg, i.p., a 5-HT(2A/2C) receptor antagonist), and ondasentron (1 mg/kg, i.p., a 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist). Pretreatment of mice with prazosin (1 mg/kg, i.p., an alpha(1)-adrenoceptor antagonist), yohimbine (1 mg/kg, i.p., an alpha(2)-adrenoceptor antagonist), propranolol (2 mg/kg, i.p., a beta-adrenoceptor antagonist), SCH23390 (0.05 mg/kg, s.c., a dopamine D(1) receptor antagonist), sulpiride (50 mg/kg, i.p., a dopamine D(2) receptor antagonist), or WAY 100635 (0.1 mg/kg, s.c., a selective 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist) did not block the antidepressant-like effect of bis selenide (1 mg/kg, p.o.) in the TST. Administration of bis selenide (0.1 mg/kg, p.o.) and fluoxetine (1 mg/kg), at subeffective doses, produced an antidepressant-like effect in the TST. Bis selenide did not alter Na(+) K(+) ATPase, MAO-A and MAO-B activities in whole brains of mice. Bis selenide produced an antidepressant-like effect in the mouse TST and FST, which may be related to the serotonergic system (5-HT(2A/2C) and 5-HT(3) receptors).

  5. Role of the 5HT3 Receptor in Alcohol Drinking and Aggression Using A Transgenic Mouse Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    F(1,35) = 33.85, P < 0.0005] and N5 generations [F(1,35) = 6.33, P < 0.017]. Interactions of background and transgene presence were found for N1 [F... interaction was found for the N5 generation as well [F(2,51) = 4.55, P < 0.15]. Figure 2. Contextual conditioning is influenced by 5-HT3 receptor...2,51) = 164.56, P < 0.0005] and transgene presence [F(1,51) = 51.66, P < 0.0005] were found, as was an interaction between background and transgene

  6. Transcriptomic and anatomic parcellation of 5-HT3AR expressing cortical interneuron subtypes revealed by single-cell RNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Frazer, Sarah; Prados, Julien; Niquille, Mathieu; Cadilhac, Christelle; Markopoulos, Foivos; Gomez, Lucia; Tomasello, Ugo; Telley, Ludovic; Holtmaat, Anthony; Jabaudon, Denis; Dayer, Alexandre

    2017-01-01

    Cortical GABAergic interneurons constitute a highly diverse population of inhibitory neurons that are key regulators of cortical microcircuit function. An important and heterogeneous group of cortical interneurons specifically expresses the serotonin receptor 3A (5-HT3AR) but how this diversity emerges during development is poorly understood. Here we use single-cell transcriptomics to identify gene expression patterns operating in Htr3a-GFP+ interneurons during early steps of cortical circuit assembly. We identify three main molecular types of Htr3a-GFP+ interneurons, each displaying distinct developmental dynamics of gene expression. The transcription factor Meis2 is specifically enriched in a type of Htr3a-GFP+ interneurons largely confined to the cortical white matter. These MEIS2-expressing interneurons appear to originate from a restricted region located at the embryonic pallial–subpallial boundary. Overall, this study identifies MEIS2 as a subclass-specific marker for 5-HT3AR-containing interstitial interneurons and demonstrates that the transcriptional and anatomical parcellation of cortical interneurons is developmentally coupled. PMID:28134272

  7. Dual role of serotonin in the pathogenesis of indomethacin-induced small intestinal ulceration: pro-ulcerogenic action via 5-HT3 receptors and anti-ulcerogenic action via 5-HT4 receptors.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shinichi; Matsuda, Narumi; Matsumoto, Kenjiro; Wada, Mai; Onimaru, Naoki; Yasuda, Masashi; Amagase, Kikuko; Horie, Syunji; Takeuchi, Koji

    2012-09-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) exerts multiple physiological functions not only in the central and peripheral nervous systems but also in the gastrointestinal tract, and these multiple functions are accounted for by a variety of 5-HT receptor subtypes. We investigated the role of 5-HT in the pathogenesis of indomethacin-induced intestinal lesions in mice, in relation to 5-HT receptor subtypes. A single oral administration of indomethacin (10 mg/kg) provoked damage in the small intestine of mice 24 h later, and this response was prevented by pretreatment with p-chlorophenylalanine (a 5-HT synthesis inhibitor). The administration of 5-HT3 receptor antagonists, such as ondansetron and ramosetron, dose-dependently reduced the severity of the intestinal lesions, whereas a high dose of GR113808 (a 5-HT4 receptor antagonist) significantly aggravated these lesions. In contrast, NAN-190 (a 5-HT1 receptor antagonist), ketanserin (a 5-HT2 receptor antagonist), and SB269970 (a 5-HT7 receptor antagonist) had no effect on these lesions. Mosapride (a 5-HT4 receptor agonist) significantly reduced the severity of indomethacin-induced intestinal lesions, and this protective effect was totally prevented by either GR113808 or methyllycaconitine (an α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist). Indomethacin increased the activity of myeloperoxidase and the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, inflammatory cytokines, and chemokines in the small intestine; these responses were significantly attenuated by ondansetron and mosapride. These findings suggest that endogenous 5-HT exerts a dual role in the pathogenesis of indomethacin-induced intestinal lesions: pro-ulcerogenic action via 5-HT3 receptors and anti-ulcerogenic action via 5-HT4 receptors, and the latter effect via 5-HT4 receptors may be mediated by activation of α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

  8. Investigation of 5-HT3A receptor gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of individuals who had been exposed to air pollution.

    PubMed

    Ahangari, Ghasem; Amirabad, Leila Mohammadi; Mozafari, Sona; Majeidi, Ali; Deilami, Gholamreza Derkhshan

    2013-12-01

    The role of air pollution in exacerbation of allergic symptoms is well known. Several studies have shown the effect of air pollution on serotonergic system. The changes in serotonergic system could trigger several allergic symptoms. 5-HT(3A) is among serotonin receptors on the peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMCs) as well as other cells. In the present study we compared the 5-HT(3A) gene expression in PBMCs of the asthmatic patients as well as individuals who had been exposed to the air pollution. Normal individuals were also included in the study as control for comparison of 5-HT(3A) gene expression. Following the synthesis of the cDNA using mRNA extracted from PBMCs the level of 5- HT(3A) gene expression was measured using real-time PCR. The results showed t a significant increase in the relative expression level of 5-HT(3A) receptor in PBMCs from asthmatic patients and individuals exposed to the air pollutants compared to normal controls. Our result indicates that significant increase in 5-HT(3A) receptor may contribute to the pathogenesis as well as allergic symptoms which resulted from air pollution.

  9. Contribution of Hippocampal 5-HT3 Receptors in Hippocampal Autophagy and Extinction of Conditioned Fear Responses after a Single Prolonged Stress Exposure in Rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhong-Min; Yang, Li-Hua; Cui, Rong; Ni, Gui-Lian; Wu, Feng-Tian; Liang, Yong

    2017-05-01

    One of the hypotheses about the pathogenesis of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is the dysfunction of serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmission. While certain 5-HT receptor subtypes are likely critical for the symptoms of PTSD, few studies have examined the role of 5-HT3 receptor in the development of PTSD, even though 5-HT3 receptor is critical for contextual fear extinction and anxiety-like behavior. Therefore, we hypothesized that stimulation of 5-HT3 receptor in the dorsal hippocampus (DH) could prevent hippocampal autophagy and the development of PTSD-like behavior in animals. To this end, we infused SR57227, selective 5-HT3 agonist, into the DH after a single prolonged stress (SPS) treatment in rats. Three weeks later, we evaluated the effects of this pharmacological treatment on anxiety-related behaviors and extinction of contextual fear memory. We also accessed hippocampal autophagy and the expression of 5-HT3A subunit, Beclin-1, LC3-I, and LC3-II in the DH. We found that SPS treatment did not alter anxiety-related behaviors but prolonged the extinction of contextual fear memory, and such a behavioral phenomenon was correlated with increased hippocampal autophagy, decreased 5-HT3A expression, and increased expression of Beclin-1 and LC3-II/LC3-I ratio in the DH. Furthermore, intraDH infusions of SR57227 dose-dependently promoted the extinction of contextual fear memory, prevented hippocampal autophagy, and decreased expression of Beclin-1 and LC3-II/LC3-I ratio in the DH. These results indicated that 5-HT3 receptor in the hippocampus may play a critical role in the pathogenesis of hippocampal autophagy, and is likely involved in the pathophysiology of PTSD.

  10. Effects of various serotonin agonists, antagonists, and uptake inhibitors on the discriminative stimulus effects of methamphetamine in rats.

    PubMed

    Munzar, P; Laufert, M D; Kutkat, S W; Nováková, J; Goldberg, S R

    1999-10-01

    Neurochemical studies indicate that methamphetamine increases central serotonin (5-HT) levels more markedly than other psychomotor stimulants such as amphetamine or cocaine. In the present study, we investigated 5-HT involvement in the discriminative stimulus effects of methamphetamine. In Sprague-Dawley rats trained to discriminate 1.0 mg/kg methamphetamine i.p. from saline under a fixed-ratio schedule of food presentation, the effects of selected 5-HT agonists, antagonists, and uptake inhibitors were tested. Fluoxetine (1.8-18.0 mg/kg) and clomipramine (3.0-18.0 mg/kg), selective serotonin uptake inhibitors, did not produce any methamphetamine-like discriminative stimulus effects when administered alone, but fluoxetine (5.6 mg/kg), unlike clomipramine (5.6 mg/kg), significantly shifted the methamphetamine dose-response curve to the left. Both 8-hydroxy-2-dipropylaminotetralin (0.03-0.56 mg/kg), a full agonist, and buspirone (1.0-10.0 mg/kg), a partial agonist at 5-HT(1A) receptors, partially generalized to the training dose of methamphetamine but only at high doses that decreased response rate. This generalization was antagonized by the coadministration of the 5-HT(1A) antagonist WAY-100635 (1.0 mg/kg). WAY-100635 (1.0 mg/kg) also partially reversed the leftward shift of the methamphetamine dose-response curve produced by fluoxetine. (+/-)-1-(2, 5-Dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane (0.3 mg/kg), a 5-HT(2A/2C) agonist, shifted the methamphetamine dose-response curve to the left, and this leftward shift was antagonized by the coadministration of ketanserin (3.0 mg/kg), a 5-HT(2A/2C) antagonist. Ketanserin (3.0 mg/kg) also produced a shift to the right in the methamphetamine dose-response curve and completely reversed the leftward shift in the methamphetamine dose-response curve produced by fluoxetine. In contrast, tropisetron (1.0 mg/kg), a 5-HT(3) antagonist, produced a shift to the left of the methamphetamine dose-response curve, and this effect of tropisetron

  11. 5-HT3 and 5-HT4 receptor-mediated facilitation of the emptying phase of the peristaltic reflex in the marmoset isolated ileum.

    PubMed Central

    Tuladhar, B. R.; Costall, B.; Naylor, R. J.

    1996-01-01

    .83 +/- 0.36 respectively in the presence of GR 113808 (30 nM). 6. In the presence of a high concentration of (10 microM) 5-methoxytryptamine the subsequent addition of 2-methyl-5-HT (3-10 microM) but not 5-methoxytryptamine (10 microM) facilitated peristalsis; the effect of 3 microM 2-methyl-5-HT was significantly decreased by 2 microM ondansetron. 7. It is concluded that the facilitation of the peristaltic reflex in the marmoset intestine induced by 5-HT at submicromolar concentrations involves a 5-HT4 receptor stimulation with an additional 5-HT3 receptor activation at higher concentrations. PMID:8732276

  12. A molecular dynamics approach to receptor mapping: application to the 5HT3 and beta 2-adrenergic receptors.

    PubMed

    Gouldson, P R; Winn, P J; Reynolds, C A

    1995-09-29

    A molecular dynamics-based approach to receptor mapping is proposed, based on the method of Rizzi (Rizzi, J. P.; et al. J. Med. Chem. 1990, 33, 2721). In Rizzi's method, the interaction energy between a series of drug molecules and probe atoms (which mimic functional groups on the receptor, such as hydrogen bond donors) was calculated. These interactions were calculated on a three-dimensional grid within a molecular mechanics parameters, were placed at these minima. The distances between the dummy atom sites were monitored during molecular dynamics simulations and plotted as distance distribution functions. Important distances within the receptor became apparent, as drugs with a common mode of binding share similar peaks in the distance distribution functions. In the case of specific 5HT3 ligands, the important donor--acceptor distance within the receptor has a range of ca. 7.9--8.9 A. In the case of specific beta 2-adrenergic ligands, the important donor--acceptor distances within the receptor lie between ca. 7--9 A and between 8 and 10 A. These distances distribution functions were used to assess three different models of the beta 2-adrenergic G-protein-coupled receptor. The comparison of the distance distribution functions for the simulation with the actual donor--acceptor distances in the receptor models suggested that two of the three receptor models were much more consistent with the receptor-mapping studies. These receptor-mapping studies gave support for the use of rhodopsin, rather than the bacteriorhodopsin template, for modeling G-protein-coupled receptors but also sounded a warning that agreement with binding data from site-directed mutagenesis experiments does not necessarily validate a receptor model.

  13. Modes and nodes explain the mechanism of action of vortioxetine, a multimodal agent (MMA): blocking 5HT3 receptors enhances release of serotonin, norepinephrine, and acetylcholine.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Stephen M

    2015-10-01

    Vortioxetine is an antidepressant with multiple pharmacologic modes of action at targets where serotonin neurons connect with other neurons. 5HT3 receptor antagonism is one of these actions, and this leads to increased release of norepinephrine (NE), acetylcholine (ACh), and serotonin (5HT) within various brain circuits.

  14. Spinal 5-HT3 receptors mediate descending facilitation and contribute to behavioral hypersensitivity via a reciprocal neuron-glial signaling cascade

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background It has been recently recognized that the descending serotonin (5-HT) system from the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) in the brainstem and the 5-HT3 receptor subtype in the spinal dorsal horn are involved in enhanced descending pain facilitation after tissue and nerve injury. However, the mechanisms underlying the activation of the 5-HT3 receptor and its contribution to facilitation of pain remain unclear. Results In the present study, activation of spinal 5-HT3 receptors by intrathecal injection of a selective 5-HT3 receptor agonist SR 57227 induced spinal glial hyperactivity, neuronal hyperexcitability and pain hypersensitivity in rats. We found that there was neuron-to-microglia signaling via the chemokine fractalkine, microglia to astrocyte signaling via cytokine IL-18, astrocyte to neuronal signaling by IL-1β, and enhanced activation of NMDA receptors in the spinal dorsal horn. Glial hyperactivation in spinal dorsal horn after hindpaw inflammation was also attenuated by molecular depletion of the descending 5-HT system by intra-RVM Tph-2 shRNA interference. Conclusions These findings offer new insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms at the spinal level responsible for descending 5-HT-mediated pain facilitation during the development of persistent pain after tissue and nerve injury. New pain therapies should focus on prime targets of descending facilitation-induced glial involvement, and in particular the blocking of intercellular signaling transduction between neurons and glia. PMID:24913307

  15. Dual role of serotonin in the acquisition and extinction of reward-driven learning: involvement of 5-HT1A, 5-HT2A and 5-HT3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Frick, Luciana Romina; Bernardez-Vidal, Micaela; Hocht, Christian; Zanutto, Bonifacio Silvano; Rapanelli, Maximiliano

    2015-01-15

    Serotonin (5-HT) has been proposed as a possible encoder of reward. Nevertheless, the role of this neurotransmitter in reward-based tasks is not well understood. Given that the major serotonergic circuit in the rat brain comprises the dorsal raphe nuclei and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), and because the latter structure is involved in the control of complex behaviors and expresses 1A (5-HT1A), 2A (5-HT2A), and 3 (5-HT3) receptors, the aim was to study the role of 5-HT and of these receptors in the acquisition and extinction of a reward-dependent operant conditioning task. Long Evans rats were trained in an operant conditioning task while receiving fluoxetine (serotonin reuptake inhibitor, 10mg/kg), tianeptine (serotonin reuptake enhancer, 10mg/kg), buspirone (5-HT1A partial agonist, 10mg/kg), risperidone (5-HT2A antagonist, 1mg/kg), ondansetron (5-HT3 antagonist, 2mg/kg) or vehicle. Then, animals that acquired the operant conditioning without any treatment were trained to extinct the task in the presence of the pharmacological agents. Fluoxetine impaired acquisition but improved extinction. Tianeptine administration induced the opposite effects. Buspirone induced a mild deficit in acquisition and had no effects during the extinction phase. Risperidone administration resulted in learning deficits during the acquisition phase, although it promoted improved extinction. Ondansetron treatment showed a deleterious effect in the acquisition phase and an overall improvement in the extinction phase. These data showed a differential role of 5-HT in the acquisition and extinction of an operant conditioning task, suggesting that it may have a dual function in reward encoding.

  16. Regulation of the 5-HT3A receptor-mediated current by alkyl 4-hydroxybenzoates isolated from the seeds of Nelumbo nucifera.

    PubMed

    Youn, Ui Joung; Lee, Jun-Ho; Lee, Yoo Jin; Nam, Joo Won; Bae, Hyunsu; Seo, Eun-Kyoung

    2010-09-01

    Four known alkyl 4-hydroxybenzoates, i.e., methyl 4-hydroxybenzoate (1), ethyl 4-hydroxybenzoate (2), propyl 4-hydroxybenzoate (3), and butyl 4-hydroxybenzoate (4), were isolated from the seeds of Nelumbo nucifera Gaertner (Nymphaeaceae) for the first time. The structures of the isolates were identified by 1D- and 2D-NMR spectroscopy and comparison with published values. The compounds were evaluated for their effects on the 5-HT-stimulated inward current (I(5-HT)) mediated by the human 5-HT(3)A receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Compounds 1 and 2 enhanced the I(5-HT), but 4 reduced it. These results indicate that 4 is an inhibitor of the 5-HT(3)A receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

  17. Cation-pi interactions in ligand recognition by serotonergic (5-HT3A) and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: the anomalous binding properties of nicotine.

    PubMed

    Beene, Darren L; Brandt, Gabriel S; Zhong, Wenge; Zacharias, Niki M; Lester, Henry A; Dougherty, Dennis A

    2002-08-13

    A series of tryptophan analogues has been introduced into the binding site regions of two ion channels, the ligand-gated nicotinic acetylcholine and serotonin 5-HT(3A) receptors, using unnatural amino acid mutagenesis and heterologous expression in Xenopus oocytes. A cation-pi interaction between serotonin and Trp183 of the serotonin channel 5-HT(3A)R is identified for the first time, precisely locating the ligand-binding site of this receptor. The energetic contribution of the observed cation-pi interaction between a tryptophan and the primary ammonium ion of serotonin is estimated to be approximately 4 kcal/mol, while the comparable interaction with the quaternary ammonium of acetylcholine is approximately 2 kcal/mol. The binding mode of nicotine to the nicotinic receptor of mouse muscle is examined by the same technique and found to differ significantly from that of the natural agonist, acetylcholine.

  18. Fluvoxamine alleviates seizure activity and downregulates hippocampal GAP-43 expression in pentylenetetrazole-kindled mice: role of 5-HT3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Alhaj, Momen W; Zaitone, Sawsan A; Moustafa, Yasser M

    2015-06-01

    Epilepsy has been documented to lead to many changes in the nervous system including cell loss and mossy fiber sprouting. Neuronal loss and aberrant neuroplastic changes in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus have been identified in the pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) kindling model. Antiseizure activity of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors has been reported in several studies. In the current study, the protective effect of fluvoxamine against PTZ-kindling was investigated in terms of seizure scores, neuronal loss, and regulation of hippocampal neuroplasticity. Further, the role of 5-HT3 receptors was determined. Kindling was induced by repeated injections of PTZ (35 mg/kg) thrice weekly, for a total of 13 injections. One hundred male albino mice were allocated into 10 groups: (1) saline, (2) PTZ, (3) diazepam (1 mg/kg)+PTZ, (4-6) fluvoxamine (5, 10 or 20 mg/kg)+PTZ, (7) ondansetron+fluvoxamine (20 mg/kg)+PTZ, (8) ondansetron+PTZ group, (9) ondansetron (2 mg/kg, i.p.)+saline, and (10) fluvoxamine (20 mg/kg)+saline. PTZ-kindled mice showed high seizure activity, hippocampal neuronal loss, and expression of growth-associated phosphoprotein (GAP-43) compared with saline-treated mice. Repeated administration of fluvoxamine (20 mg/kg) in PTZ-kindled mice suppressed seizure scores, protected against hippocampal neuronal loss, and downregulated GAP-43 expression, without producing any signs of the 5-HT syndrome in healthy rats. Importantly, pretreatment with a selective 5-HT3 receptor blocker (ondansetron) attenuated the aforementioned effects of fluvoxamine. In conclusion, the ameliorating effect of fluvoxamine on hippocampal neurons and neuroplasticity in PTZ-kindled mice was, at least in part, dependent on enhancement of hippocampal serotoninergic transmission at 5-HT3 receptors.

  19. Anti-depressant like activity of N-n-butyl-3-methoxyquinoxaline-2-carboxamide (6o) a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Shvetank; Mahesh, Radhakrishnan; Devadoss, Thangaraj; Jindal, Ankur

    2013-06-01

    The compound 6o (at 0.5, 1 and 2 mg/kg, ip) with optimum log P and pA2 value, was subjected to forced swim test (FST) and tail suspension test (TST). The compound 6o significantly reduced the duration of immobility in mice without affecting the base line locomotion in actophotometer. Moreover, 6o (2 mg/kg, ip), potentiated the 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP)-induced head twitch responses in mice and at 1 and 2 mg/kg, ip antagonized the reserpine-induced hypothermia (RIH) in rats. In interaction studies with various standard drugs/ligands using FST, 6o (1 and 2 mg/kg, ip) potentiated the anti-depressant effect fluoxetine (5 mg/kg, ip) and reversed the depressant effect of parthenolide (1 mg/kg, ip) by reducing the duration of immobility. Furthermore, 6o (1 and 2 mg/kg, ip) potentiated the effect of bupropion (10 mg/kg, ip) in TST. The behavioural anomalies of the olfactory bulbectomised (OBX) rats were augmented by chronic 6o (1 and 2 mg/kg) treatment as observed from the modified open field test (parameters: ambulation, rearing, fecal pellet). The results suggest that compound 6o exhibited anti-depressant like effect in rodent models of depression.

  20. Effect of palonosetron (5HT-3 antagonist) and pantoprazole (proton pump inhibitor) against surgical esophagitis induced by forestomach and pylorus ligation in albino rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, A; Gautam, S; Rawat, J K; Singh, M; Saraf, S A; Kaithwas, G

    2016-01-01

    This study was embarked upon to evaluate the effects of pantoprazole and palonosetron on experimental esophagitis in albino wistar rats. Groups of rats, fasted for 36 h, were subjected to pylorus and forestomach ligation, supervened by treatment with normal saline (3 ml/kg, po, sham control), esophagitis control (3 ml/kg, po), pantoprazole (30 mg/kg, po), palonosetron (0.5 mg/kg, po), and their combination. Animals were sacrificed after 12 h and appraised for the volume of gastric juices, total acidity, free acidity, and esophagitis index. Esophageal tissues were further figured out biochemically for markers of oxidative stress and inflammatory mediators. The combination therapy comparably inhibited the esophagitis index (52.86%), gastric volume (66.04%), free acidity (43.76%), and total acidity (42.60%) in comparison with toxic control. The combination therapy also subsidized the biochemical and inflammatory markers to the purview less than toxic control. The morphological changes were scrutinized by scanning electron microscopy and were observed to demonstrate momentous protection by the amalgamation therapy. Combination therapy with pantoprazole and palonosetron flaunted sententious protection against experimental esophagitis.

  1. Bidirectional amygdaloid control of neuropathic hypersensitivity mediated by descending serotonergic pathways acting on spinal 5-HT3 and 5-HT1A receptors.

    PubMed

    Sagalajev, B; Bourbia, N; Beloushko, E; Wei, H; Pertovaara, A

    2015-04-01

    Amygdala is involved in processing of primary emotions and particularly its central nucleus (CeA) also in pain control. Here we studied mechanisms mediating the descending control of mechanical hypersensitivity by the CeA in rats with a peripheral neuropathy in the left hind limb. For drug administrations, the animals had a guide cannula in the right CeA and an intrathecal catheter or another guide cannula in the medullary raphe. Hypersensitivity was tested with monofilaments. Glutamate administration in the CeA produced a bidirectional effect on hypersensitivity that varied from an increase at a low-dose (9μg) to a reduction at high doses (30-100μg). The increase but not the reduction of hypersensitivity was prevented by blocking the amygdaloid NMDA receptor with a dose of MK-801 that alone had no effects. The glutamate-induced increase in hypersensitivity was reversed by blocking the spinal 5-HT3 receptor with ondansetron, whereas the reduction in hypersensitivity was reversed by blocking the spinal 5-HT1A receptor with WAY-100635. Both the increase and decrease of hypersensitivity induced by amygdaloid glutamate treatment were reversed by medullary administration of a 5-HT1A agonist, 8-OH-DPAT, that presumably produced autoinhibition of serotonergic cell bodies in the medullary raphe. The results indicate that depending on the dose, glutamate in the CeA has a descending facilitatory or inhibitory effect on neuropathic pain hypersensitivity. Serotoninergic raphe neurons are involved in mediating both of these effects. Spinally, the 5-HT3 receptor contributes to the increase and the 5-HT1A receptor to the decrease of neuropathic hypersensitivity induced by amygdaloid glutamate.

  2. Stimulation of 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT2A/2C, 5-HT3 and 5-HT4 receptors or 5-HT uptake inhibition: short- and long-term memory.

    PubMed

    Meneses, Alfredo

    2007-11-22

    In order to determine whether short- (STM) and long-term memory (LTM) function in serial or parallel manner, serotonin (5-hydroxtryptamine, 5-HT) receptor agonists were tested in autoshaping task. Results show that control-vehicle animals were modestly but significantly mastering the autoshaping task as illustrated by memory scores between STM and LTM. Thus, post-training administration of 8-OHDPAT (agonist for 5-HT(1A/7) receptors) only at 0.250 and 0.500 mg/kg impaired both STM and LTM. CGS12066 (agonist for 5-HT(1B)) produced biphasic affects, at 5.0 mg/kg impaired STM but at 1.0 and 10.0 mg/kg, respectively, improved or impaired LTM. DOI (agonist for 5-HT(2A/2C) receptors) dose-dependently impaired STM and, at 10.0 mg/kg only impaired LTM. Both, STM and LTM were impaired by either mCPP (mainly agonist for 5-HT(2C) receptors) or mesulergine (mainly antagonist for 5-HT(2C) receptors) lower dose. The 5-HT(3) agonist mCPBG at 1.0 impaired STM and its higher dose impaired both STM and LTM. RS67333 (partial agonist for 5-HT(4) receptors), at 5.0 and 10.0 mg/kg facilitated both STM and LTM. The higher dose of fluoxetine (a 5-HT uptake inhibitor) improved both STM and LTM. Using as head-pokes during CS as an indirect measure of food-intake showed that of 30 memory changes, 21 of these were unrelated to the former. While some STM or LTM impairments can be attributed to decrements in food-intake, but not memory changes (either increase or decreases) produced by 8-OHDPAT, CGS12066, RS67333 or fluoxetine. Except for animals treated with DOI, mCPBG or fluoxetine, other groups treated with 5-HT agonists 6 h following autoshaping training showed similar LTM and unmodified CS-head-pokes scores.

  3. Importance of M2-M3 loop in governing properties of genistein at the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor inferred from α7/5-HT3A chimera.

    PubMed

    Grønlien, Jens Halvard; Ween, Hilde; Thorin-Hagene, Kirsten; Cassar, Steven; Li, Jinhe; Briggs, Clark A; Gopalakrishnan, Murali; Malysz, John

    2010-11-25

    Genistein and 5-hydroxyindole (5-HI) potentiate the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor current by primarily increasing peak amplitude, a property of type I α7 positive allosteric modulation. In this study, the effects of these two compounds were investigated at two different α7/5-HT(3) chimeras (chimera 1, comprising of extracellular α7 N-terminus fused to the remainder of 5-HT(3A), and chimera 2 containing an additional α7 encoded M2-M3 loop), and wild-type α7 and 5-HT(3A) receptors. Agonist-evoked responses, examined by expression of the chimeras in Xenopus laevis oocytes or HEK-293 cells, revealed that currents decayed slower and compounds {rank order: N-[(3R)-1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-3-yl]-4-chlorobenzamide hydrochloride (PNU-282987)~2-(1,4-diazabicyclo[3.2.2]nonan-4-yl)-5-phenyl-1,3,4-oxadiazole (NS6784)>acetylcholine>choline} were more potent in chimera 2 than chimera 1 or α7 receptors. In chimera 2, genistein and 5-HI potentiated agonist-evoked responses (EC(50): 4-5 μM for genistein and 300-500 μM for 5-HI) and at higher concentrations evoked current directly consistent with ago-allosteric modulation. At chimera 1 and 5-HT(3A) receptors, neither compound directly evoked any current and 5-HI, only at chimera 1, was able to potentiate agonist-evoked responses. Genistein and 5-HI did not inhibit the binding of the α7 agonist [(3)H](1S,4S)-2,2-dimethyl-5-(6-phenylpyridazin-3-yl)-5-aza-2-azoniabicyclo[2.2.1] heptane ([(3)H]A-585539) to rat brain or chimera 2. In summary, this study supports the role of the M2-M3 loop being critical for the positive allosteric effect of genistein, but not 5-HI, and in agonist-evoked response fine-tuning. The identification of distinct α7 receptor modulatory sites offers unique opportunities for developing CNS therapeutics and understanding its pharmacology.

  4. Efficacy and safety of 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 receptor antagonists in irritable bowel syndrome: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yurong; Xiong, Wenjie; Shen, Xiaoxue; Jiang, Ling; Lin, Lin

    2017-01-01

    Aim We assessed the efficacy and safety of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT3) receptor antagonists in adults with non-constipated irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) or diarrhea-predominant IBS (IBS-D). Methods We searched PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving adults with non-constipated IBS or IBS-D that compared 5-HT3 receptor antagonists with placebo or other conventional treatment. Dichotomous symptom data were pooled to obtain the relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for improving global IBS symptoms, abdominal pain and abnormal bowel habits, or stool consistency symptoms after therapy, and adverse events, including constipation. Meta- analysis was performed with Mantel Haenszel method using Revman 5.3 software. Results We included 21 RCTs; 16 were high quality (Jadad score ≥ 4). The pooled RR of global IBS symptoms improved by 5-HT3 receptor antagonists versus placebo or mebeverine was 1.56 (95% CI: 1.43–1.71); alosetron, ramosetron, and cilansetron had similar treatment effects. The pooled RR of abdominal pain relieved by 5-HT3 receptor antagonists versus placebo was 1.33 (95% CI: 1.26–1.39). The pooled RR showed that 5-HT3 receptor antagonists improved abnormal bowel habits or stool consistency symptoms (RR = 1.63, 95% CI: 1.33, 1.99). The pooled RR of adverse events following 5-HT3 receptor antagonist treatment was 1.15 (95% CI: 1.08, 1.22). Subgroup analysis indicated that alosetron had a high rate of adverse effects (RR = 1.16, 95% CI: 1.08, 1.25); adverse events following ramosetron treatment were not statistically significantly different. 5-HT3 receptor antagonists were likelier to cause constipation: the pooled RR of constipation developing with 5-HT3 receptor antagonist versus placebo was 3.71 (95% CI: 2.98–4.61). However, constipation was likelier in patients with non-constipated IBS after taking 5-HT3 receptor antagonists than in patients with IBS-D only

  5. Characterization of Beta-leptinotarsin-h and the Effects of Calcium Flux Antagonists on its Activity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    observation eliminated non-selective cation channels such as nicotinic, glutamatergic, purinergic P2X, and serotoni- nergic 5 - HT3 ligand-operated Ca 2C...Characterization of b-leptinotarsin-h and the effects of calcium flux antagonists on its activity Richard D. Croslanda,*, Richard W. Fitchb,1, Harry...presynaptic nerve terminals. We tested antagonists of Ca2C flux for their effects on b-leptinotarsin-h-stimulated Ca2C uptake in rat brain synaptosomes

  6. [Tropisetron for the prevention of nausea and vomiting during chemotherapy: multicenter clinical study].

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, J; Bronfman, L; Cao, C; Vásquez, A; Derio, L; Rosas, J; del Castillo, C; Yáñez, M; Fodor, M; Gallardo, J; Cerda, B; Torres, R; Orlandi, L; Orlandi, F; Kleinman, S; Vogel, C

    1996-08-01

    The antiemetic effect of tropisetron was studied in 97 cancer patients (67 men, 30 women) receiving cisplatin in doses of 75 mg/m2 or higher. On 279 chemotherapy cycles studied (max 6 per patient) 5 mg of tropisetron was administered once a day i.v on day 1 and p.o. on days 2 to 6. Efficacy preventing vomiting and nausea was measured in 24 hour period as: complete control O episodes, major control 1 to 2 episodes, minor control 3 to 4 episodes and no control 5 or more episodes. Satisfactory vomiting control (complete and major) was 69%, 63%, 82%, 88%, 96% and 96% in days 1 to 6 of cycle 1. Satisfactory nausea control (complete and major) for the same days was 70%, 66%, 72%, 85%, 92% and 97%. Similar data was obtained for the subsequent cycles. Complete vomiting control was obtained in 47%, 35%, 56%, 72%, 81% and 84% and for nausea in 42%, 39%, 48%, 64%, 81% and 87%. 19 patients presented adverse effects (19.6%). Only 2 headache episodes had a definite relation with the antiemetic drug. 12 patients discontinued the medication; 6 due to drug inefficacy, 2 to illness unrelated to the drug, 1 to lack of collaboration, and 3 due to other reasons. We conclude that tropisetron allows satisfactory control of acute and delayed vomiting in a high percentage of patients treated with high doses of cisplatin. The drug does not have significant secondary effects. Tropisetron administration in only one daily dose implies an evident advantage and a treatment cost reduction.

  7. Stability of butorphanol-tropisetron mixtures in 0.9% sodium chloride injection for patient-controlled analgesia use.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fu-Chao; Shi, Xiao-Ya; Li, Peng; Yang, Jin-Guo; Zhou, Ben-Hong

    2015-02-01

    Tropisetron is an adjuvant for butorphanol used in intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) and has been reported to provide superior pain control. It is efficacious in reducing the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting. However, this admixture is not available commercially and stability data applicable to hospital practice are limited. This study aimed to describe the drug compounding and evaluates the long-term (up to 14 days) stability of butorphanol and tropisetron in 0.9% sodium chloride injection for PCA use.In this study, commercial solutions of butorphanol tartrate and tropisetron hydrochloride were combined and further diluted with 0.9% sodium chloride injection to final concentrations of butorphanol tartrate 0.08 mg/mL and tropisetron hydrochloride 0.05 mg/mL. The polyolefin bags and glass bottles were stored at 4°C and 25°C for up to 14 days. The drug stabilities were determined by visual inspection, pH measurement, and high-pressure liquid chromatography assay of drug concentrations.The data obtained for admixtures prepared and stored at temperatures of 25°C and 4°C show the drugs have maintained at least 98% of the initial concentration. All solutions remained clear and colorless over the 14-day period, and the pH value did not change significantly.The results indicate that admixtures of butorphanol tartrate 0.08 mg/mL and tropisetron hydrochloride 0.05 mg/mL in 0.9% sodium chloride injection solution were stable for 14 days when stored in polyolefin bags or glass bottles at 4°C and 25°C and protected from light. The infusion is feasible for manufacturing in pharmacy aseptic units and can be stored for up to 14 days for routine use in PCA infusions.

  8. Tropisetron Protects Against Acetaminophen-Induced Liver Injury via Suppressing Hepatic Oxidative Stress and Modulating the Activation of JNK/ERK MAPK Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hung-Chen; Liao, Chia-Chih; Li, Allen H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate the protective effects of tropisetron on acetaminophen- (APAP-) induced liver injury in a mice model. Methods. C57BL/6 male mice were given tropisetron (0.3 to 10 mg/kg) 30 minutes before a hepatotoxic dose of acetaminophen (300 mg/kg) intraperitoneally. Twenty hours after APAP intoxication, sera alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels, hepatic myeloperoxidase (MPO), malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities, and liver histopathological changes were examined. The MAP kinases were also detected by western blotting. Results. Our results showed that tropisetron pretreatment significantly attenuated the acute elevations of the liver enzyme ALT level, hepatic MPO activity, and hepatocytes necrosis in a dose-dependent manner (0.3–10 mg/kg) in APAP-induced hepatotoxicity mice. Tropisetron (1 and 3 mg/kg) suppressed APAP-induced hepatic lipid peroxidation expression and alleviated GSH and SOD depletion. Administration of tropisetron also attenuated the phosphorylation of c-Jun-NH2-terminal protein kinase (JNK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) caused by APAP. Conclusion. Our data demonstrated that tropisetron's hepatoprotective effect was in part correlated with the antioxidant, which were mediated via JNK and ERK pathways on acetaminophen-induced liver injury in mice. PMID:27891510

  9. Simultaneous Determination of Dexamethasone, Ondansetron, Granisetron, Tropisetron, and Azasetron in Infusion Samples by HPLC with DAD Detection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fu-chao; Wang, Lin-hai; Guo, Jun; Shi, Xiao-ya

    2017-01-01

    A simple and rapid high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detector (HPLC-DAD) method has been developed and validated for simultaneous quantification of five antiemetic agents in infusion samples: dexamethasone, ondansetron, granisetron, tropisetron, and azasetron. The chromatographic separation was achieved on a Phenomenex C18 column (4.6 mm × 150 mm, 5 μm) using acetonitrile-50 mM KH2PO4 buffer-triethylamine (25 : 74 : 1; v/v; pH 4.0). Flow rate was 1.0 mL/min with a column temperature of 30°C. Validation of the method was made in terms of specificity, linearity, accuracy, and intra- and interday precision, as well as quantification and detection limits. The developed method can be used in the laboratory to routinely quantify dexamethasone, ondansetron, granisetron, tropisetron, and azasetron simultaneously and to evaluate the physicochemical stability of referred drugs in mixtures for endovenous use. PMID:28168082

  10. Re-examination for pharmacological properties of serotonin-induced tachycardia in isolated guinea-pig atrium.

    PubMed

    Nishio, H; Fujii, A; Nakata, Y

    1996-01-01

    In the presence of 10(-6) M atropine, 5-HT induced a positive chronotropic and inotropic effect in isolated guinea-pig atrium preparation. Both propranolol, a beta-adrenoceptor blocker, and imipramine, a 5-HT uptake inhibitor, did not affect the response induced by 5-HT, indicating that a tyramine-like mechanism is not involved. The positive chronotropic effect of 5-HT was mimicked by several 5-HT3 receptor agonists. N omega-Methyl-5-HT, reported to have a high affinity for 5-HT1B recognition sites, was found to act as a 5-HT3 receptor agonist with higher efficacy. The other 5-HT receptor agonists tested did not produced any responses. The positive chronotropic effect of 5-HT was inhibited by various 5-HT3 receptor antagonists, such as tropisetron, granisetron, ondansetron, cisapride and zacopride, but it was unaffected by various 5-HT receptor antagonists which are not selective for 5-HT3 receptor. Thus, the positive chronotropic response to 5-HT is a direct effect, and it was suggested to be mediated by 5-HT3 receptor subtype with rather an atypical profile.

  11. Aryl biphenyl-3-ylmethylpiperazines as 5-HT7 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeeyeon; Kim, Youngjae; Tae, Jinsung; Yeom, Miyoung; Moon, Bongjin; Huang, Xi-Ping; Roth, Bryan L; Lee, Kangho; Rhim, Hyewhon; Choo, Il Han; Chong, Youhoon; Keum, Gyochang; Nam, Ghilsoo; Choo, Hyunah

    2013-11-01

    The 5-HT7 receptor (5-HT7 R) is a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of depression and neuropathic pain. The 5-HT7 R antagonist SB-269970 exhibited antidepressant-like activity, whereas systemic administration of the 5-HT7 R agonist AS-19 significantly inhibited mechanical hypersensitivity and thermal hyperalgesia. In our efforts to discover selective 5-HT7 R antagonists or agonists, aryl biphenyl-3-ylmethylpiperazines were designed, synthesized, and biologically evaluated against the 5-HT7 R. Among the synthesized compounds, 1-([2'-methoxy-(1,1'-biphenyl)-3-yl]methyl)-4-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazine (28) was the best binder to the 5-HT7 R (pKi =7.83), and its antagonistic property was confirmed by functional assays. The selectivity profile of compound 28 was also recorded for the 5-HT7 R over other serotonin receptor subtypes, such as 5-HT1 R, 5-HT2 R, 5-HT3 R, and 5-HT6 R. In a molecular modeling study, the 2-methoxyphenyl moiety attached to the piperazine ring of compound 28 was proposed to be essential for the antagonistic function.

  12. HPLC, TLC, and first-derivative spectrophotometry stability-indicating methods for the determination of tropisetron in the presence of its acid degradates.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Fattah, Laila S; El-Sherif, Zeinab A; Kilani, Khadiga M; El-Haddad, Dalia A

    2010-01-01

    Three stability-indicating assay methods were developed for the determination of tropisetron in a pharmaceutical dosage form in the presence of its degradation products. The proposed techniques are HPLC, TLC, and first-derivative spectrophotometry (1D). Acid degradation was carried out, and the degradation products were separated by TLC and identified by IR, NMR, and MS techniques. The HPLC method was based on determination of tropisetron in the presence of its acid-induced degradation product on an RP Nucleosil C18 column using methanol-water-acetonitrile-trimethylamine (65 + 20 + 15 + 0.2, v/v/v/v) mobile phase and UV detection at 285 nm. The TLC method was based on the separation of tropisetron and its acid-induced degradation products, followed by densitometric measurement of the intact spot at 285 nm. The separation was carried out on silica gel 60 F254 aluminum sheets using methanol-glacial acetic acid (22 + 3, v/v) mobile phase. The 1D method was based on the measurement of first-derivative amplitudes of tropisetron in H2O at the zero-crossing point of its acid-induced degradation product at 271.9 nm. Linearity, accuracy, and precision were found to be acceptable over concentration ranges of 40-240 microg/mL, 1-10 microg/spot, and 6-36 micro/mL for the HPLC, TLC, and 1D methods, respectively. The suggested methods were successfully applied for the determination of the drug in bulk powder, laboratory-prepared mixtures, and a commercial sample.

  13. Selective corticotropin-releasing factor 1 receptor antagonist E2508 reduces restraint stress-induced defecation and visceral pain in rat models.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Ryota; Shikata, Kodo; Furuya, Yoshiaki; Hirakawa, Tetsuya; Ino, Mitsuhiro; Shin, Kogyoku; Shibata, Hisashi

    2017-01-01

    N-Cyclopropylmethyl-7-(2,6-dimethoxy-4-methoxymethylphenyl)-2-ethyl-N-(tetrahydro-2H-pyran-4-ylmethyl)pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyridin-3-amine tosylate (E2508) is a newly discovered selective corticotropin-releasing factor 1 receptor antagonist. Here, we investigated the effects of E2508 on wrap restraint stress-induced defecation and visceral pain in rats. Oral pretreatment with E2508 dose-dependently decreased stool weights after 20min wrap restraint stress and significant effects were observed at doses of 30 and 100mg/kg. However, E2508 did not affect basal defecation at doses up to 100mg/kg. In contrast, alosetron, a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, decreased both wrap restraint stress-induced and basal stool output at a dose of 0.1mg/kg. In a rat visceral pain model, subcutaneous injections of both E2508 (0.01 and 0.1mg/kg) and alosetron (0.001 and 0.01mg/kg) significantly decreased the number of abdominal muscle contractions induced by colonic distention, suggesting these drugs reduced visceral pain. Together, these results demonstrate E2508 has the potential to be an effective therapy for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome with a lower risk of adverse events such as constipation compared with the current clinically used 5-HT3 receptor antagonist.

  14. Kisspeptin antagonists.

    PubMed

    Roseweir, Antonia Kathryn; Millar, Robert P

    2013-01-01

    Kisspeptin is now known to be an important regulator of the hypothalamic--pituitary-gonadal axis and is the target of a range of regulators, such as steroid hormone feedback, nutritional and metabolic regulation. Kisspeptin binds to its cognate receptor, KISS1R (also called GPR54), on GnRH neurons and stimulates their activity, which in turn provides an obligatory signal for GnRH secretion-thus gating down-stream events supporting reproduction. The development of peripherally active kisspeptin antagonists could offer a unique therapeutic agent for treating hormone-dependent disorders of reproduction, including precocious puberty, endometriosis, and metastatic prostate cancer. The following chapter discusses the advances made in the search for both peptide and small molecule kisspeptin antagonists and their use in delineating the role of kisspeptin within the reproductive system. To date, four peptide antagonists and one small molecule antagonist have been designed.

  15. Casopitant: a novel NK1-receptor antagonist in the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting

    PubMed Central

    Ruhlmann, Christina; Herrstedt, Jørn

    2009-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) are among the most feared and distressing symptoms experienced by patients with cancer. The knowledge of the pathogenesis and neuropharmacology of CINV has expanded enormously over the last decades, the most significant discoveries being the role of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)3- and neurokinin (NK)1 receptors in the emetic reflex arch. This has led to the development of two new classes of antiemetics acting as highly selective antagonists at one of these receptors. These drugs have had a huge impact in the protection from chemotherapy-induced vomiting, whereas the effect on nausea seems to be limited. The first NK1 receptor antagonist, aprepitant, became clinically available in 2003, and casopitant, the second in this class of antiemetics, has now completed phase III trials. This review delineates the properties and clinical use of casopitant in the prevention of CINV. PMID:19536319

  16. Multiple 5-HT receptors in the guinea-pig superior cervical ganglion.

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, C. J.; Newberry, N. R.

    1996-01-01

    1. We have studied the pharmacology of the depolarization by 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) of the guinea-pig isolated superior cervical ganglion (SCG) using the grease-gap technique. We studied the effects of selective and non-selective antagonists on the responses to 5-HT and other 5-HT receptor agonists. 2. We have extended the pharmacology of the 5-HT3 receptor in this preparation by studying the effects of granisetron, BRL 46470 and mianserin on the concentration-response curve (CRC) to 2-methyl-5-HT. As with other 5-HT3 receptor antagonists, these compounds exhibited a lower affinity for guinea-pig 5-HT3 receptors than for rat 5-HT3 receptors. 3. We have confirmed that low concentrations of 5-HT (< or = 1 microM) mediate ketanserin-sensitive responses and higher concentrations of 5-HT also recruit 5-HT3 receptors. The responses to low concentrations of 5-HT were antagonized by low concentrations of ketanserin, spiperone, mianserin, DOI and LSD indicating probably mediation by 5-HT2A receptors. At high concentrations, the hallucinogen, DOI, but not LSD, evoked a ketanserin-sensitive depolarization. 4. Although mianserin could bind to the 5-HT2A receptors in this preparation, we could not demonstrate a down-regulation of depolarizations evoked by these receptors after a 10 day oral treatment with mianserin (10 mg kg-1, daily). 5. 5-Carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT) evoked a prolonged depolarization. Although high concentrations of 5-CT (> or = microM) appeared to activate 5-HT2A receptors, lower concentrations of 5-CT evoked a response with a distinct pharmacology. After studying the action of 20 selective and non-selective 5-HT receptor ligands we believe that this response may be mediated by a novel receptor; but its pharmacology is closest to that of receptors in the 5-HT2 receptor family. Like 5-CT, 5-HT (3-300 microM) could evoke an LSD-sensitive response in the presence of the 5-HT2 receptor antagonist, ketanserin and the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, tropisetron

  17. ACTH Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Adrian John; Forfar, Rachel; Hussain, Mashal; Jerman, Jeff; McIver, Ed; Taylor, Debra; Chan, Li

    2016-01-01

    Adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) acts via a highly selective receptor that is a member of the melanocortin receptor subfamily of type 1 G protein-coupled receptors. The ACTH receptor, also known as the melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2R), is unusual in that it is absolutely dependent on a small accessory protein, melanocortin receptor accessory protein (MRAP) for cell surface expression and function. ACTH is the only known naturally occurring agonist for this receptor. This lack of redundancy and high degree of ligand specificity suggests that antagonism of this receptor could provide a useful therapeutic aid and a potential investigational tool. Clinical situations in which this could be useful include (1) Cushing’s disease and ectopic ACTH syndrome – especially while preparing for definitive treatment of a causative tumor, or in refractory cases, or (2) congenital adrenal hyperplasia – as an adjunct to glucocorticoid replacement. A case for antagonism in other clinical situations in which there is ACTH excess can also be made. In this article, we will explore the scientific and clinical case for an ACTH antagonist, and will review the evidence for existing and recently described peptides and modified peptides in this role. PMID:27547198

  18. Acute Radiation Sickness Amelioration Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-05-01

    5 - HT3 ) receptor antagonist anti-emetic drug...THIS PAGE UNCLASSIFIED SUMMARY Serotonin type-3 ( 5 - HT3 ) receptor antagonists were identified in the early to mid-1980s as a new class of anti-emetic...NAAG) was formed to evaluate 5 - HT3 receptor antagonists for protection of military personnel against radiation-induced nausea and vomiting.

  19. Cardiovascular effects of selective agonists and antagonists of histamine H3 receptors in the anaesthetized rat.

    PubMed

    Coruzzi, G; Gambarelli, E; Bertaccini, G; Timmerman, H

    1995-06-01

    The cardiovascular responses to a series of selective histamine H3 receptor agonists, (R) alpha-methylhistamine, imetit and immepip and selective antagonists, thioperamide, clobenpropit and clophenpropit, were studied in anaesthetized rats. At 0.003-1 mumol/kg i.v. doses, H3 agonists failed to produce any significant change in the basal blood pressure and heart rate. Larger doses of (R) alpha-methylhistamine increased the blood pressure and heart rate and higher doses of imetit caused vasodepressor responses and reduced heart rate, whereas immepip proved virtually inactive. While (R) alpha-methylhistamine-induced effects were not blocked by histamine H1-, H2- and H3-receptor antagonists, they were however reduced by idazoxan and propranolol, which indicates that the mechanisms involved are adrenergic. The effects induced by imetit are not related to histamine H3 receptors but are mediated by indirect (via 5HT3 receptors) cholinergic mechanisms, since these effects were prevented by 1 mg/kg i.v. atropine and by 0.1 mg/kg i.v. ondansetron. Similarly, the H3 antagonists per se failed to change basal cardiovascular function up to 10 mumol/kg i.v. and only at 30 mumol/kg i.v. were marked decreases observed in the blood pressure and heart rate with a significant reduction in the effects of noradrenaline. These data indicate that in anaesthetized rats, histamine H3 receptor activation or blockade has no effect on basal cardiovascular function. The effects recorded after the administration of large doses of (R) alpha-methylhistamine and imetit are clearly unrelated to histamine H3 receptors and should be taken into account when using these compounds as H3 ligands for "in vivo" experiments.

  20. Effects of the 5-HT(6) receptor antagonist Ro 04-6790 on learning consolidation.

    PubMed

    Meneses, A

    2001-01-08

    The 5-HT(6) receptor antagonist Ro-04-6790 or 8-OH-DPAT injection improved learning consolidation on an autoshaping task, while mCPP, scopolamine and dizocilpine decreased the performance. The effect induced by scopolamine, but not that induced by mCPP, was reversed completely by Ro-04-6790, while dizocilpine effect was antagonized partially. Nevertheless, ritanserin or WAY 100635, but not Ro 04-6790, antagonized the 8-OH-DPAT facilitatory effects on learning consolidation. As WAY 100635 did not modify the Ro 04-6790 facilitatory effect, hence 5-HT(1A), and/or 5-HT(7), but not 5-HT(6), receptors might mediate the 8-OH-DPAT facilitatory effect on learning consolidation. Since, the Ro 04-6790 facilitatory effect was unaffected by 5-HT(1A), 5-HT(2A)/(2B)/(2C), 5-HT(3) or 5-HT(4) receptor blockade, thereby, the facilitatory effect induced by Ro 04-6790 involved specifically 5-HT(6) receptors. Indeed, the present data provide further support to the notion that, 5-HT(6) receptors play a significant part in the learning consolidation under normal and dysfunctional memory conditions.

  1. Muscarinic Receptor Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Matera, Maria Gabriella; Cazzola, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Parasympathetic activity is increased in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma and appears to be the major reversible component of airway obstruction. Therefore, treatment with muscarinic receptor antagonists is an effective bronchodilator therapy in COPD and also in asthmatic patients. In recent years, the accumulating evidence that the cholinergic system controls not only contraction by airway smooth muscle but also the functions of inflammatory cells and airway epithelial cells has suggested that muscarinic receptor antagonists could exert other effects that may be of clinical relevance when we must treat a patient suffering from COPD or asthma. There are currently six muscarinic receptor antagonists licenced for use in the treatment of COPD, the short-acting muscarinic receptor antagonists (SAMAs) ipratropium bromide and oxitropium bromide and the long-acting muscarinic receptor antagonists (LAMAs) aclidinium bromide, tiotropium bromide, glycopyrronium bromide and umeclidinium bromide. Concerns have been raised about possible associations of muscarinic receptor antagonists with cardiovascular safety, but the most advanced compounds seem to have an improved safety profile. Further beneficial effects of SAMAs and LAMAs are seen when added to existing treatments, including LABAs, inhaled corticosteroids and phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitors. The importance of tiotropium bromide in the maintenance treatment of COPD, and likely in asthma, has spurred further research to identify new LAMAs. There are a number of molecules that are being identified, but only few have reached the clinical development.

  2. AHR-16303B, a novel antagonist of 5-HT2 receptors and voltage-sensitive calcium channels

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, R.J.; Appell, K.C.; Kilpatrick, B.F.; Proakis, A.G.; Nolan, J.C.; Walsh, D.A. )

    1991-01-01

    In vivo and in vitro methods were used to characterize AHR-16303B, a novel compound with antagonistic action at 5-HT2 receptors and voltage-sensitive calcium channels. The 5-HT2 receptor-antagonistic properties of AHR-16303B were demonstrated by inhibition of (a) (3H)ketanserin binding to rat cerebral cortical membranes (IC50 = 165 nM); (b) 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)-induced foot edema in rats (minimum effective dose, (MED) = 0.32 mg/kg orally, p.o.); (c) 5-HT-induced vasopressor responses in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) (ID50 = 0.18 mg/kg intravenously (i.v.), 1.8 mg/kg p.o.), (d) 5-HT-induced antidiuresis in rats (MED = 1 mg/kg p.o.), and (e) platelet aggregation induced by 5-HT + ADP (IC50 = 1.5 mM). The calcium antagonist properties of AHR-16303B were demonstrated by inhibition of (a) (3H)nimodipine binding to voltage-sensitive calcium channels on rabbit skeletal muscle membranes (IC50 = 15 nM), (b) KCl-stimulated calcium flux into cultured PC12 cells (IC50 = 81 nM), and (c) CaCl2-induced contractions of rabbit thoracic aortic strips (pA2 = 8.84). AHR-16303B had little or no effect on binding of radioligands to dopamine2 (DA2) alpha 1, alpha 2, H1, 5-HT1 alpha, beta 2, muscarinic M1, or sigma opioid receptors; had no effect on 5-HT3 receptor-mediated vagal bradycardia; and had only minor negative inotropic, chronotropic, and dromotropic effects on isolated guinea pig atria. In conscious SHR, 30 mg/kg p.o. AHR-16303B completely prevented the vasopressor responses to i.v. 5-HT, and decreased blood pressure (BP) by 24% 3 h after dosing.

  3. Role of the 5HT3 Receptor in Alcohol Drinking and Aggression Using a Transgenic Mouse Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    found for each N1 [F(1,35) = 56.0, P < 0.0005], N3, [F(1,35) = 33.85, P < 0.0005] and N5 6 generations [F(1,35) = 6.33, P < 0.017]. Interactions of...presence was also found for N1 [F(1,51) = 10.9, P < 0.003] and N5 [F(1,51) = 11.32, P < 0.001]. A background x transgene presence interaction was...0.0005] were found, as was an interaction between background and transgene presence [F(2,51) = 13.93, P < 0.0005]. For the measure of percent time spent

  4. The Effects of Electroacupuncture on Cyclophosphamide-Induced Emesis in Ferrets.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-07-01

    serotonin ( 5 - HT3 ) receptor antagonists have been shown to be effective antiemetics for cyclophosphamide-induced emesis in ferrets (1) and humans (2,3,5,8...the 5 - HT3 receptor in the gastrointestinal tract and the chemoreceptor trigger zone (Fraschini et al., 1991; Hawthorn et al., 1988). The 5 -HT 3...possibly through release of serotonin to stimulate the 5 - HT3 receptor in the gastrointestinal tract and the chemoreceptor trigger zone (5,6). The

  5. Opioid Antagonist Impedes Exposure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merluzzi, Thomas V.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Thirty spider-phobic adults underwent exposure to 17 phobic-related, graded performance tests. Fifteen subjects were assigned to naltrexone, an opioid antagonist, and 15 were assigned to placebo. Naltrexone had a significant effect on exposure, with naltrexone subjects taking significantly longer to complete first 10 steps of exposure and with…

  6. Induction of emesis in Suncus murinus by pyrogallol, a generator of free radicals.

    PubMed Central

    Torii, Y.; Saito, H.; Matsuki, N.

    1994-01-01

    1. We investigated whether or not pyrogallol, a generator of free radicals, is emetogenic in Suncus murinus, the house musk shrew. Pyrogallol (i.p.) caused dose-dependent emesis in suncus with an ED50 value of 77.3 mg kg-1. At a dose of 128 mg kg-1, all suncus vomited with mean latency of 18.8 +/- 5.2 min and the number of vomiting episodes was 8.6 +/- 2.9. 2. The prophylactic effects of N-(2-mercaptopropionyl)-glycine (MPG), an antioxidant, and tropisetron, a 5-hydroxytryptamine3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonist, were studied. Pyrogallol (128 mg kg-1, i.p.)-induced emesis was prevented by treatment with MPG (i.p.) or tropisetron (s.c.) with ID50 values of 149 mg kg-1 and 117 micrograms kg-1, respectively. 3. Pyrogallol-induced emesis was completely prevented by surgical abdominal vagotomy. 4. The present results indicate that pyrogallol-induced emesis is characteristically very similar to that caused by cisplatin and support the idea that generation of free radicals causes the release of peripheral 5-HT, which stimulates vagal afferent sensory nerves to cause emesis. PMID:8004387

  7. Advantages of an antagonist: bicuculline and other GABA antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Graham AR

    2013-01-01

    The convulsant alkaloid bicuculline continues to be investigated more than 40 years after the first publication of its action as an antagonist of receptors for the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA. This historical perspective highlights key aspects of the discovery of bicuculline as a GABA antagonist and the sustained interest in this and other GABA antagonists. The exciting advances in the molecular biology, pharmacology and physiology of GABA receptors provide a continuing stimulus for the discovery of new antagonists with increasing selectivity for the myriad of GABA receptor subclasses. Interesting GABA antagonists not structurally related to bicuculline include gabazine, salicylidene salicylhydrazide, RU5135 and 4-(3-biphenyl-5-(4-piperidyl)-3-isoxazole. Bicuculline became the benchmark antagonist for what became known as GABAA receptors, but not all ionotropic GABA receptors are susceptible to bicuculline. In addition, not all GABAA receptor antagonists are convulsants. Thus there are still surprises in store as the study of GABA receptors evolves. PMID:23425285

  8. alpha2-Adrenoreceptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Mayer, P; Imbert, T

    2001-06-01

    A review of the literature relating to the therapeutic potential of alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonists published between 1990 and 2000 is presented. Although extensively studied since the early 1970s in a wide spectrum of therapeutic applications, the distinction of alpha2-adrenoceptor subtypes and some emerging evidence concerning new applications in neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, obesity and schizophrenia, have refreshed an interest in this class of agents.

  9. QCM-4, a 5-HT₃ receptor antagonist ameliorates plasma HPA axis hyperactivity, leptin resistance and brain oxidative stress in depression and anxiety-like behavior in obese mice.

    PubMed

    Kurhe, Yeshwant; Mahesh, Radhakrishnan; Devadoss, Thangaraj

    2015-01-02

    Several preclinical studies have revealed antidepressant and anxiolytic-like effect of 5-HT3 receptor antagonists. In our earlier study, we have reported the antidepressive-like effect of 3-methoxy-N-p-tolylquinoxalin-2-carboxamide (QCM-4) in obese mice subjected to chronic stress. The present study deals with the biochemical mechanisms associated with depression co-morbid with obesity. Mice were fed with high fat diet (HFD) for 14 weeks, further subjected for treatment with QCM-4 (1 and 2mg/kg p.o.) and standard antidepressant escitalopram (ESC) (10mg/kg p.o.) for 28 days. Behavioral assays for depression such as sucrose preference test (SPT), forced swim test (FST) and for anxiety such as light and dark test (LDT) and hole board test (HBT) were performed in obese mice. Biochemical assessments including plasma leptin and corticosterone concentration followed by brain oxidative stress parameters malonaldehyde (MDA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) were performed. Results confirmed that QCM-4 exhibits antidepressive effect by increasing the sucrose consumption in SPT, reducing immobility time in FST and anxiolytic effect by increasing transitions and time in light chamber in LDT, increasing head dip and crossing score in HBT. Furthermore, QCM-4 attenuated the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis hyperactivity by reducing the plasma corticosterone, reversing altered plasma leptin, restoring the imbalance of brain MDA and GSH concentration. In conclusion, QCM-4 showed antidepressive and anxiolytic effect by reversing the behavioral alterations that were supported by biochemical estimations in obese mice.

  10. Small Molecule CXCR3 Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Stephen P; Cox, Rhona J

    2016-04-14

    Chemokines and their receptors are known to play important roles in disease. More than 40 chemokine ligands and 20 chemokine receptors have been identified, but, to date, only two small molecule chemokine receptor antagonists have been approved by the FDA. The chemokine receptor CXCR3 was identified in 1996, and nearly 20 years later, new areas of CXCR3 disease biology continue to emerge. Several classes of small molecule CXCR3 antagonists have been developed, and two have shown efficacy in preclinical models of inflammatory disease. However, only one CXCR3 antagonist has been evaluated in clinical trials, and there remain many opportunities to further investigate known classes of CXCR3 antagonists and to identify new chemotypes. This Perspective reviews the known CXCR3 antagonists and considers future opportunities for the development of small molecules for clinical evaluation.

  11. Role of catecholamines and serotonin receptor subtypes in nefopam-induced antinociception.

    PubMed

    Girard, Philippe; Coppé, Marie-Claude; Verniers, Danielle; Pansart, Yannick; Gillardin, Jean-Marie

    2006-09-01

    The non-opiate analgesic nefopam has been shown to inhibit monoamines uptake, but little is known about receptor subtypes effectively involved in its analgesic effect. In vitro binding assays yielded the following measures of affinity (IC(50)): serotonergic 5-HT(2C) (1.4 microM), 5-HT(2A) (5.1 microM), 5-HT(3) (22.3 microM), 5-HT(1B) (41.7 microM), 5-HT(1A) (64.9 microM), adrenergic alpha(1) (15.0 microM) and dopaminergic D(1) (100 microM). Subcutaneous nefopam administration dose-dependently inhibited pain in acetic acid-induced writhing (1-30 mg kg(-1)) and formalin (1-10 mg kg(-1)) tests in the mouse. Pretreatments with adrenergic alpha(1) (prazosin) and alpha(2) (yohimbine), and serotonergic 5-HT(1B) (GR127935) receptor antagonists significantly increased the nefopam ED(50) in the writhing test. The serotonergic 5-HT(2C) (RS102221) and the dopaminergic D(2) (sulpiride) receptor antagonists inhibited nefopam antinociception in the formalin test. However, in both tests, nefopam analgesic activity was not modified by the following receptor antagonists: dopaminergic D(1) (SCH23390), serotonergic 5-HT(1A) (NAN-190, WAY100635), 5-HT(2A) (R96544, ketanserin), 5-HT(3) (tropisetron), and 5-HT(4) (SDZ205557). In conclusion, nefopam analgesic activity could be modulated by the adrenergic alpha(1) and alpha(2) receptors, the dopaminergic D(2) receptors, and the serotonergic 5-HT(1B) and 5-HT(2C) receptor subtypes.

  12. The binding orientations of structurally-related ligands can differ; A cautionary note.

    PubMed

    Ruepp, Marc-David; Wei, Hao; Leuenberger, Michele; Lochner, Martin; Thompson, Andrew J

    2017-01-27

    Crystal structures can identify ligand-receptor interactions and assist the development of novel therapeutics, but experimental challenges sometimes necessitate the use of homologous proteins. Tropisetron is an orthosteric ligand at both 5-HT3 and α7 nACh receptors and its binding orientation has been determined in the structural homologue AChBP (pdbid: 2WNC). Co-crystallisation with a structurally-related ligand, granisetron, reveals an almost identical orientation (pdbid; 2YME). However, there is a >1000-fold difference in the affinity of tropisetron at 5-HT3 versus α7 nACh receptors, and α7 nACh receptors do not bind granisetron. These striking pharmacological differences prompt questions about which receptor the crystal structures most closely represent and whether the ligand orientations are correct. Here we probe the binding orientation of tropisetron and granisetron at 5-HT3 receptors by in silico modelling and docking, radioligand binding on cysteine-substituted 5-HT3 receptor mutants transiently expressed in HEK 293 cells, and synthetic modification of the ligands. For 15 of the 23 cysteine substitutions, the effects on tropisetron and granisetron were different. Structure-activity relationships on synthesised derivatives of both ligands were also consistent with different orientations, revealing that contrary to the crystallographic evidence from AChBP, the two ligands adopt different orientations in the 5-HT3 receptor binding site. Our results show that even quite structurally similar molecules can adopt different orientations in the same binding site, and that caution may be needed when using homologous proteins to predict ligand binding.

  13. 5-HT induces cAMP production in crypt colonocytes at a 5-HT4 receptor.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, F C; Smith, E H; Kellum, J M

    1998-07-01

    Previous studies demonstrate that both 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and cyclic AMP (cAMP) induce chloride efflux from crypt colonocytes in the rat distal colon; antagonist studies suggest that the 5-HT response is mediated primarily by the 5-HT4 receptor. Since this receptor is known to be positively coupled to adenylate cyclase, we postulated that 5-HT should induce generation of cAMP, which should be inhibited by 5-HT4 antagonists. Method. Mucosal cells from rat distal colon were taken by a sequential calcium chelation technique for enrichment of crypt cells. Cytokeratin stains demonstrated that >99% of cells were colonocytes. [3H]Thymidine uptake studies demonstrate a fivefold increased incorporation in this cell preparation compared to earlier fractions. 3-Isobutyl-l-methylxanthine (IBMX, 100 microM) was added to all cell suspensions in order to prevent cAMP metabolism. Cell suspensions were incubated for 2 min at 37 degreesC with different concentrations of 5-HT (n = 7). cAMP was measured by enzyme immunoassay. In another series of experiments, 5-HT (0.3 microM) stimulation of cAMP was similarly measured in the presence and absence of 5-HT receptor antagonists: 10 microM 5-HTP-DP (5-HT1P; n = 4), 0.1 microM ketanserin (5-HT2A; n = 4), 0.3 microM ondansetron (5-HT3; n = 4), 3 microM tropisetron (5-HT3 and 5-HT4; n = 4), and 10 nM GR-113808 (5-HT4; n = 5). Results. 5-HT produced a dose-dependent increase in cAMP. The increase was significant at concentrations >/=0.3 microM when compared to cells incubated with IBMX alone. In the second series of experiment, 5-HT-induced generation of cAMP at a dose of 0.3 microM was significantly inhibited in the presence of GR-113808 and tropisetron. Conclusion. 5-HT acts at a 5-HT4 receptor to induce production of cAMP in rat distal crypt colonocytes.

  14. Anti-Hu antibodies activate enteric and sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qin; Michel, Klaus; Annahazi, Anita; Demir, Ihsan E.; Ceyhan, Güralp O.; Zeller, Florian; Komorowski, Lars; Stöcker, Winfried; Beyak, Michael J.; Grundy, David; Farrugia, Gianrico; De Giorgio, Roberto; Schemann, Michael

    2016-01-01

    IgG of type 1 anti-neuronal nuclear antibody (ANNA-1, anti-Hu) specificity is a serological marker of paraneoplastic neurological autoimmunity (including enteric/autonomic) usually related to small-cell lung carcinoma. We show here that IgG isolated from such sera and also affinity-purified anti-HuD label enteric neurons and cause an immediate spike discharge in enteric and visceral sensory neurons. Both labelling and activation of enteric neurons was prevented by preincubation with the HuD antigen. Activation of enteric neurons was inhibited by the nicotinic receptor antagonists hexamethonium and dihydro-β-erythroidine and reduced by the P2X antagonist pyridoxal phosphate-6-azo (benzene-2,4-disulfonic acid (PPADS) but not by the 5-HT3 antagonist tropisetron or the N-type Ca-channel blocker ω-Conotoxin GVIA. Ca++ imaging experiments confirmed activation of enteric neurons but not enteric glia. These findings demonstrate a direct excitatory action of ANNA-1, in particular anti-HuD, on visceral sensory and enteric neurons, which involves nicotinic and P2X receptors. The results provide evidence for a novel link between nerve activation and symptom generation in patients with antibody-mediated gut dysfunction. PMID:27905561

  15. Antidepressant & anxiolytic activities of N-(pyridin-3-yl) quinoxalin-2-carboxamide: A novel serotonin type 3 receptor antagonist in behavioural animal models

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Dilip Kumar; Devadoss, Thangraj; Modak, Neha; Mahesh, Radhakrishnan

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Alteration in the serotonin leads to the psychological illness, such as depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, eating disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder, panic disorders and migraines. The objective of the current study was to investigate the antidepressant and anxiolytic activities of N-(pyridin-3-yl) quinoxalin-2-carboxamide (QCF-21), a novel 5-HT3 receptor antagonist in preclinical models of depression and anxiety. Methods: Antidepressant activity was evaluated in preliminary tests such as forced swim and tail suspension tests (FST & TST). Anti-anxiety effect of QCF-21 was investigated by employing elevated plus maze (EPM), light/dark and hole board tests. Olfactory bulbectomy (OBX) in rats was used as chronic model of depression. Mechanistic test of QCF-21 was evaluated by reserpine-induced hypothermia and 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP)-induced head-twitch response. Results: The dose-response study revealed an initial antidepressant-like effect of QCF-21(0.25-1 mg/kg, i.p.) in the FST and TST and anxiolytic-like effect in EPM, light and dark and hole board tests. QCF-21 potentiated the 5-HTP-induced head-twitches response in mice and reversed reserpine-induced hypothermia in rats. QCF-21 significantly reversed the behavioural anomalies post-OBX in rats. Interpretation & conclusions: The present findings indicate the potential antidepressant-like and anxiolytic-like effects of QCF-21 at low doses in rodent behavioural models of depression and anxiety. Further studies need to be done to understand the underlying mechanism. PMID:28256473

  16. Opioid antagonists for smoking cessation

    PubMed Central

    David, Sean P; Lancaster, Tim; Stead, Lindsay F; Evins, A. Eden; Prochaska, Judith J

    2014-01-01

    Background The reinforcing properties of nicotine may be mediated through release of various neurotransmitters both centrally and systemically. People who smoke report positive effects such as pleasure, arousal, and relaxation as well as relief of negative affect, tension, and anxiety. Opioid (narcotic) antagonists are of particular interest to investigators as potential agents to attenuate the rewarding effects of cigarette smoking. Objectives To evaluate the efficacy of opioid antagonists in promoting long-term smoking cessation. The drugs include naloxone and the longer-acting opioid antagonist naltrexone. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group Specialised Register for trials of naloxone, naltrexone and other opioid antagonists and conducted an additional search of MEDLINE using ’Narcotic antagonists’ and smoking terms in April 2013. We also contacted investigators, when possible, for information on unpublished studies. Selection criteria We considered randomised controlled trials comparing opioid antagonists to placebo or an alternative therapeutic control for smoking cessation. We included in the meta-analysis only those trials which reported data on abstinence for a minimum of six months. We also reviewed, for descriptive purposes, results from short-term laboratory-based studies of opioid antagonists designed to evaluate psycho-biological mediating variables associated with nicotine dependence. Data collection and analysis We extracted data in duplicate on the study population, the nature of the drug therapy, the outcome measures, method of randomisation, and completeness of follow-up. The main outcome measure was abstinence from smoking after at least six months follow-up in patients smoking at baseline. Abstinence at end of treatment was a secondary outcome. We extracted cotinine- or carbon monoxide-verified abstinence where available. Where appropriate, we performed meta-analysis, pooling risk ratios using a Mantel

  17. Analysis of free ACh and 5-HT in milk from four different species and their bioactivity on 5-HT(3) and nACh receptors.

    PubMed

    Gallegos-Perez, Jose-Luis; Limon, Agenor; Reyes-Ruiz, Jorge M; Alshanqeeti, Ali S; Aljohi, Mohammad A; Miledi, Ricardo

    2014-07-25

    Milk is one of the most beneficial aliments and is highly recommended in normal conditions; however, in certain disorders, like irritable bowel syndrome, cow milk and dairy products worsen the gastric symptoms and their use is not recommended. Among the most recognized milk-induced gatrointestinal symptoms are abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, which are processes controlled by cholinergic and serotonergic transmission. Whether the presence of bioavailable ACh and 5-HT in milk may contribute to normal peristalsis, or to the developing of these symptoms, is not known. In this work we attempt to determine whether the content of free ACh and 5-HT is of physiological significance in milk from four different species: cow (bovine), goat, camel and human. Liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to identify and quantify free ACh and 5-HT in milk, and activation of the serotonergic and cholinergic ionotropic receptors was investigated using electrophysiological experiments. Our principal hypothesis was that milk from these four species had sufficient free ACh and 5-HT to activate their correspondent receptors expressed in a heterologous system. Our results showed a more complex picture, in which free ACh and 5-HT and their ability to activate cholinergic and serotonergic receptors are not correlated. This work is a first step to elucidate whether 5-HT and ACh, at the concentrations present in the milk, can be associated to a direct function in the GI.

  18. Synthesis and structure-activity relationships of a new model of arylpiperazines. 5. Study of the physicochemical influence of the pharmacophore on 5-HT(1a)/alpha(1)-adrenergic receptor affinity: synthesis of a new derivative with mixed 5-HT(1a)/d(2) antagonist properties.

    PubMed

    López-Rodríguez, M L; Morcillo, M J; Fernández, E; Porras, E; Orensanz, L; Beneytez, M E; Manzanares, J; Fuentes, J A

    2001-01-18

    In this paper we have designed and synthesized a test series of 32 amide arylpiperazine derivatives VI in order to gain insight into the physicochemical influence of the pharmacophores of 5-HT(1A) and alpha(1)-adrenergic receptors. The training set was designed applying a fractional factorial design using six physicochemical descriptors. The amide moiety is a bicyclohydantoin or a diketopiperazine (X = -(CH(2))(3)-, -(CH(2))(4)-; m = 0, 1), the spacer length is 3 or 4 methylene units, which are the optimum values for both receptors, and the aromatic substituent R occupies the ortho- or meta-position and has been selected from a database of 387 substituents using the EDISFAR program. The 5-HT(1A) and alpha(1)-adrenergic receptor binding affinities of synthesized compounds VI (1-32) have been determined. This data set has been used to derive classical quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) and neural networks models for both receptors (following paper). A comparison of these models gives information for the design of the new ligand EF-7412 (46) (5-HT(1A): K(i) = 27 nM; alpha(1): K(i) > 1000 nM). This derivative displays affinity for the dopamine D(2) receptor (K(i) = 22 nM) and is selective versus all other receptors examined (5-HT(2A), 5-HT(3), 5-HT(4) and Bz; K(i) > 1000 nM). EF-7412 (46) acts as an antagonist in vivo in pre- and postsynaptic 5-HT(1A) receptor sites and as an antagonist in the dopamine D(2) receptor. Thus, EF-7412 (46) is a derivative with mixed 5-HT(1A)/D(2) antagonist properties and this derivative could be useful as a pharmacological tool.

  19. Mineralcorticoid antagonists in heart failure.

    PubMed

    D'Elia, Emilia; Krum, Henry

    2014-10-01

    Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRAs) have become mandated therapy in patients with reduced ejection fraction (systolic) heart failure (HF) across all symptom classes. These agents should also be prescribed in the early post-myocardial infarction setting in those with reduced ejection fraction and either HF symptoms or diabetes. This article explores the pathophysiological role of aldosterone, an endogenous ligand for the mineralcorticoid receptor (MR), and summarizes the clinical data supporting guideline recommendations for these agents in systolic HF. The use of MRAs in novel areas beyond systolic HF ejection is also explored. Finally, the current status of newer agents will be examined.

  20. NK-1 Antagonists and Itch.

    PubMed

    Ständer, Sonja; Luger, Thomas A

    2015-01-01

    Substance P (SP) is an important mediator of pro-inflammatory mechanisms in the skin. It targets multiple cells such as keratinocytes, mast cells, and fibroblasts which are involved in the cutaneous generation of pruritus. This suggests that SP is an interesting target for therapy. In fact, in recent case reports and case series, SP antagonists demonstrated a significant antipruritic effect in acute and chronic pruritus such as drug-induced pruritus, paraneoplastic pruritus, prurigo nodularis, cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, and brachioradial pruritus.

  1. Vitamin K antagonists: beyond bleeding.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Thilo; Floege, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Warfarin is the most widely used oral anticoagulant in clinical use today. Indications range from prosthetic valve replacement to recurrent thromboembolic events due to antiphospholipid syndrome. In hemodialysis (HD) patients, warfarin use is even more frequent than in the nonrenal population due to increased cardiovascular comorbidities. The use of warfarin in dialysis patients with atrial fibrillation requires particular caution because side effects may outweigh the assumed benefit of reduced stroke rates. Besides increased bleeding risk, coumarins exert side effects which are not in the focus of clinical routine, yet they deserve special consideration in dialysis patients and should influence the decision of whether or not to prescribe vitamin K antagonists in cases lacking clear guidelines. Issues to be taken into consideration in HD patients are the induction or acceleration of cardiovascular calcifications, a 10-fold increased risk of calciphylaxis and problems related to maintaining a target INR range. New anticoagulants like direct thrombin inhibitors are promising but have not yet been approved for ESRD patients. Here, we summarize the nontraditional side effects of coumarins and give recommendations about the use of vitamin K antagonists in ESRD patients.

  2. Cholinergic antagonists in a solitary wasp venom.

    PubMed

    Piek, T; Mantel, P

    1986-01-01

    The venom of the solitary wasp Philanthus triangulum contains a cholinergic antagonist of the nicotinic receptor of the rectus abdominis muscle of the frog, Xenopus laevis. The venom of African P. triangulum contains two different cholinergic factors, a competitive and a non-competitive antagonist. The venom of the European P. triangulum may not contain a competitive antagonist of the nicotinic receptor of X. laevis, but only a very strong non-competitive antagonist. The possible non-synonymity of both groups of P. triangulum is discussed.

  3. A new alcohol antagonist: Phaclofen

    SciTech Connect

    Allan, A.M. ); Harris, R.A. )

    1989-01-01

    The ability of the GABA{sub B} receptor antagonist, phaclofen to alter behavioral effects of ethanol was evaluated by loss of righting reflex (sleep time), motor incoordination (bar holding), spontaneous locomotion (open field activity) and hypothermia. Pretreatment with phaclofen significantly decreased the effects of ethanol on motor incoordination, locomotor activity and hypothermia. However, phaclofen had no effect on either pentobarbital- or diazepam-induced motor incoordination. Phaclofen slightly increased the ED{sub 50} for loss of the righting reflex but did not alter either the duration of reflex loss produced by ethanol or blood ethanol levels at awakening. Our results suggest phaclofen is rapidly inactivated resulting in difficulty in observing antagonism of long duration ethanol effects. These findings suggest that the GABA{sub B} system may play a role in mediating several important actions of ethanol.

  4. Client Perceptions of Two Antagonist Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capone, Thomas A.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Reports results of a questionnaire administered to participants in an antagonist drug outpatient clinic and an antagonist drug work-release program to obtain awareness of acceptance of the program participants. Naltrexone patients recommended an alternative method of administering the drug and changing the money system to award deserving inmates…

  5. Antidepressant-like activity of 2-(4-phenylpiperazin-1-yl)-1, 8-naphthyridine-3-carboxylic acid (7a), a 5-HT₃ receptor antagonist in behaviour based rodent models: evidence for the involvement of serotonergic system.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Baldev Kumar; Jindal, Ankur; Dhar, Arghya Kusum; Mahesh, Radhakrishnan

    2013-08-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the putative antidepressant-like activity of 7a, a 5-HT₃ receptor antagonist, (although indirect evidence of 5-HT3 antagonism) with an optimal log P (3.35) and pA₂ value (7.6) greater than ondansetron (pA₂--6.6) using behavioural tests battery of depression. Acute treatment of 7a (0.5-2 mg/kg, i.p.) in mice produced antidepressant-like effects in forced swim test (FST) and tail suspension test (TST) without affecting the baseline locomotion in actophotometer test in mice. Moreover, the combination of a sub-effective dose of 7a (0.25 mg/kg, i.p.) and fluoxetine (5 mg/kg, i.p.) produced an anti-immobility effect in mouse FST. Pretreatment of mice with p-chlorophenylalanine methyl ester (PCPA; 100 mg/kg, i.p., an inhibitor of serotonin (5-HT) synthesis, for 4 consecutive days) and 1-(m-Chlorophenyl)-biguanide (mCPBG, 10 mg/kg, i.p., a 5-HT₃ receptor agonist) prevented the anti-immobility effects of 7a (2 mg/kg, i.p.) in the mouse FST. In addition, 7a (0.5-2 mg/kg, i.p.) treatment also potentiated the 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) and pargyline induced head twitch response in mice. Furthermore, sub-chronic treatment (14 days) with 7a (0.5-2 mg/kg, i.p.) and paroxetine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly attenuated the behavioural anomalies induced by bilateral olfactory bulbectomy in rats in a modified open field paradigm. These results suggest that the antidepressant-like action of 7a may be mediated by an interaction with the serotonergic system and this molecule should be further investigated as an alternative therapeutic approach for the treatment of depression.

  6. Antianginal Actions of Beta-Adrenoceptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Angina pectoris is usually the first clinical sign of underlying myocardial ischemia, which results from an imbalance between oxygen supply and oxygen demand in the heart. This report describes the pharmacology of β-adrenoceptor antagonists as it relates to the treatment of angina. The β-adrenoceptor antagonists are widely used in long-term maintenance therapy to prevent acute ischemic episodes in patients with chronic stable angina. Beta-adrenoceptor antagonists competitively inhibit the binding of endogenous catecholamines to β1-adrenoceptors in the heart. Their anti-ischemic effects are due primarily to a reduction in myocardial oxygen demand. By decreasing heart rate, myocardial contractility and afterload, β-adrenoceptor antagonists reduce myocardial workload and oxygen consumption at rest as well as during periods of exertion or stress. Predictable adverse effects include bradycardia and cardiac depression, both of which are a direct result of the blockade of cardiac β1-adrenoceptors, but adverse effects related to the central nervous system (eg, lethargy, sleep disturbances, and depression) may also be bothersome to some patients. Beta-adrenoceptor antagonists must be used cautiously in patients with diabetes mellitus, peripheral vascular disease, heart failure, and asthma or other obstructive airway diseases. Beta-adrenoceptor antagonists may be used in combination with nitrates or calcium channel blockers, which takes advantage of the diverse mechanisms of action of drugs from each pharmacologic category. Moreover, concurrent use of β-adrenoceptor antagonists may alleviate the reflex tachycardia that sometimes occurs with other antianginal agents. PMID:17998992

  7. Antagonistic coevolution accelerates molecular evolution

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, Steve; Vogwill, Tom; Buckling, Angus; Benmayor, Rebecca; Spiers, Andrew J.; Thomson, Nicholas R.; Quail, Mike; Smith, Frances; Walker, Danielle; Libberton, Ben; Fenton, Andrew; Hall, Neil; Brockhurst, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    The Red Queen hypothesis proposes that coevolution of interacting species (such as hosts and parasites) should drive molecular evolution through continual natural selection for adaptation and counter-adaptation1–3. Although the divergence observed at some host-resistance4–6 and parasite-infectivity7–9 genes is consistent with this, the long time periods typically required to study coevolution have so far prevented any direct empirical test. Here we show, using experimental populations of the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 and its viral parasite, phage Φ2 (refs 10, 11), that the rate of molecular evolution in the phage was far higher when both bacterium and phage coevolved with each other than when phage evolved against a constant host genotype. Coevolution also resulted in far greater genetic divergence between replicate populations, which was correlated with the range of hosts that coevolved phage were able to infect. Consistent with this, the most rapidly evolving phage genes under coevolution were those involved in host infection. These results demonstrate, at both the genomic and phenotypic level, that antagonistic coevolution is a cause of rapid and divergent evolution, and is likely to be a major driver of evolutionary change within species. PMID:20182425

  8. Antagonists of the kappa opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Urbano, Mariangela; Guerrero, Miguel; Rosen, Hugh; Roberts, Edward

    2014-05-01

    The research community has increasingly focused on the development of OPRK antagonists as pharmacotherapies for the treatment of depression, anxiety, addictive disorders and other psychiatric conditions produced or exacerbated by stress. Short-acting OPRK antagonists have been recently developed as a potential improvement over long-acting prototypic ligands including nor-BNI and JDTic. Remarkably the short-acting LY2456302 is undergoing phase II clinical trials for the augmentation of the antidepressant therapy in treatment-resistant depression. This Letter reviews relevant chemical and pharmacological advances in the identification and development of OPRK antagonists.

  9. Emerging cardiovascular indications of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Parviz, Yasir; Iqbal, Javaid; Pitt, Bertram; Adlam, David; Al-Mohammad, Abdallah; Zannad, Faiez

    2015-04-01

    Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonism is a well-established treatment modality for patients with hypertension, heart failure, and left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD) post-myocardial infarction (MI). There are emerging data showing potential benefits of MR antagonists in other cardiovascular conditions. Studies have shown association between MR activation and the development of myocardial fibrosis, coronary artery disease, metabolic syndrome, and cerebrovascular diseases. This review examines the preclinical and clinical data of MR antagonists for novel indications including heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF), pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), arrhythmia, sudden cardiac death, valvular heart disease, metabolic syndrome, renal disease, and stroke. MR antagonists are not licensed for these conditions yet; however, emerging data suggest that indication for MR antagonists are likely to broaden; further studies are warranted.

  10. Plant Evolution: Evolving Antagonistic Gene Regulatory Networks.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Endymion D

    2016-06-20

    Developing a structurally complex phenotype requires a complex regulatory network. A new study shows how gene duplication provides a potential source of antagonistic interactions, an important component of gene regulatory networks.

  11. Macrophages: micromanagers of antagonistic signaling nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Eggeling, Christian; Davis, Simon J

    2017-04-03

    How cells integrate antagonistic receptor signaling events is enigmatic. Using superresolution optical microscopy, Lopes et al. (2017. J. Cell Biol. https://doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201608094) demonstrate the nanometer-scale molecular reorganization of antagonistic signaling receptors in macrophages, after engagement by the receptors of activating and inhibitory ligands. They propose that large-scale rearrangements of this type underpin decision-making by these cells.

  12. Pharmacological profile of the 5-HT-induced inhibition of cardioaccelerator sympathetic outflow in pithed rats: correlation with 5-HT1 and putative 5-ht5A/5B receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-López, Araceli; Centurión, David; Vázquez, Erika; Arulmani, Udayasankar; Saxena, Pramod R; Villalón, Carlos M

    2003-01-01

    Continuous infusions of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) inhibit the tachycardiac responses to preganglionic (C7-T1) sympathetic stimulation in pithed rats pretreated with desipramine. The present study identified the pharmacological profile of this inhibitory action of 5-HT. The inhibition induced by intravenous (i.v.) continuous infusions of 5-HT (5.6 μg kg−1 min−1) on sympathetically induced tachycardiac responses remained unaltered after i.v. treatment with saline or the antagonists GR 127935 (5-HT1B/1D), the combination of WAY 100635 (5-HT1A) plus GR 127935, ritanserin (5-HT2), tropisetron (5-HT3/4), LY215840 (5-HT7) or a cocktail of antagonists/inhibitors consisting of yohimbine (α2), prazosin (α1), ritanserin, GR 127935, WAY 100635 and indomethacin (cyclooxygenase), but was abolished by methiothepin (5-HT1/2/6/7 and recombinant 5-ht5A/5B). These drugs, used in doses high enough to block their respective receptors/mechanisms, did not modify the sympathetically induced tachycardiac responses per se. I.v. continuous infusions of the agonists 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT; 5-HT1/7 and recombinant 5-ht5A/5B), CP 93,129 (r5-HT1B), sumatriptan (5-HT1B/1D), PNU-142633 (5-HT1D) and ergotamine (5-HT1B/1D and recombinant 5-ht5A/5B) mimicked the above sympatho-inhibition to 5-HT. In contrast, the agonists indorenate (5-HT1A) and LY344864 (5-ht1F) were inactive. Interestingly, 5-CT-induced cardiac sympatho-inhibition was abolished by methiothepin, the cocktail of antagonists/inhibitors, GR 127935 or the combination of SB224289 (5-HT1B) plus BRL15572 (5-HT1D), but remained unchanged when SB224289 or BRL15572 were given separately. Therefore, 5-HT-induced cardiac sympatho-inhibition, being unrelated to 5-HT2, 5-HT3, 5-HT4, 5-ht6, 5-HT7 receptors, α1/2-adrenoceptor or prostaglandin synthesis, seems to be primarily mediated by (i) 5-HT1 (probably 5-HT1B/1D) receptors and (ii) a novel mechanism antagonized by methiothepin that, most likely, involves putative 5-ht5A/5B

  13. Calcium antagonists and atherosclerosis protection in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Rafael Hernández; Armas-Hernández, María José; Velasco, Manuel; Israili, Zafar H; Armas-Padilla, María Cristina

    2003-01-01

    Calcium antagonists are effective in hypertensive patients of all ethnic groups, irrespective of age, dietary salt intake, salt-sensitivity status or plasma renin activity profile. Some prospective studies show that the calcium antagonists, nifedipine GITS and nitrendipine, reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality at least to the same extent as the diuretics. Other prospective studies are in progress to evaluate the effect of calcium antagonists on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and the progression of atherosclerosis in hypertensive patients. Calcium antagonists, especially the highly lipophilic amlodipine, lacidipine and nisoldipine, are shown to possess antioxidant properties. These drugs reduce the oxidation of LDL and its influx into the arterial wall, and reduce atherosclerotic lesions in animals. Platelet production of malondialdehyde, a marker of oxygen free radical formation, is suppressed by amlodipine, lacidipine or nifedipine in hypertensive patients. New evidence from long-term clinical trials of calcium antagonists indicates that these drugs can reduce the rate of progression of atherosclerosis in hypertensive and coronary heart disease patients. In the Regression Growth Evaluation Statin Study (REGRESS), co-administration of calcium antagonist, amlodipine or nifedipine with pravasatin caused a significant reduction in the appearance of new angiographic lesions. In the Verapamil in Hypertension and Atherosclerosis Study (VHAS), verapamil was more effective than chlorthalidone in promoting regression of thicker carotid lesions in parallel with a reduction in the incidence of cardiovascular events. In the Prospective Randomized Evaluation of the Vascular Effects of Norvasc Trial (PREVENT), amlodipine slowed the progression of early coronary atherosclerosis in patients with coronary artery disease. In a subprotocol of the Intervention as a Goal in the Hypertension Treatment (INSIGHT) study, nifedipine GITS significantly decreased intima

  14. Effects of 5-HT receptor agonists on depolarization-induced [3H]-noradrenaline release in rabbit hippocampus and human neocortex.

    PubMed Central

    Allgaier, C.; Warnke, P.; Stangl, A. P.; Feuerstein, T. J.

    1995-01-01

    1. The present study attempted to determine whether noradrenaline (NA) release in rabbit hippocampus and human neocortex is modulated by presynaptic 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptors. 2. Slices of rabbit hippocampus and human neocortex, loaded with [3H]-noradrenaline ([3H]-NA) were superfused and the effects of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptor ligands on electrically evoked [3H]-NA release were investigated. 3. In rabbit hippocampus, 5-HT, 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT; 32 microM) and 2-CH3-5-HT (32 microM) increased [3H]-NA release elicited with 360 pulses/3 Hz. Facilitation of transmitter release was not influenced by the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, tropisetron but was prevented by the alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist, rauwolscine. When autoinhibition was avoided by stimulating the tissue with 4 pulses/100 Hz (pseudo-one pulse-(POP) stimulation), 2-CH3-5-HT decreased evoked transmitter release, whereas 5-HT and 5-CT had no effect. Inhibition caused by 2-CH3-5-HT was not affected by tropisetron but counteracted by the alpha 2-adrenoceptor ligands, clonidine and rauwolscine. Inhibition caused by clonidine was diminished in the presence of 5-CT or 2-CH3-5-HT. 4. In human neocortex, [3H]-NA release elicited with 360 pulses/3 Hz was increased by 10 microM 5-HT and 32 microM 5-CT, whereas 2-CH3-5-HT was ineffective. [3H]-NA release evoked with a modified POP stimulation (2 bursts of 4 pulses/100 Hz, 3.5 min apart) was not affected by 2-CH3-5-HT or 5-CT. 5. The present results indicate that 5-HT, 2-CH3-5-HT and 5-CT can act on presynaptic alpha 2-autoreceptors as partial agonists (2-CH3-5-HT; in rabbit hippocampal tissue) or antagonists (5-HT and 5-CT; in tissue of rabbit hippocampus and human neocortex). Furthermore the existence of autoinhibition dictates whether these drugs cause facilitation of release, inhibition or have no effect. PMID:8528558

  15. Neuropharmacology of emesis in relation to clinical response.

    PubMed Central

    Costall, B.; Naylor, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    5-HT3 receptor antagonists such as ondansetron, granisetron, ICS205-930 and zacopride are highly effective in the ferret, cat or dog to prevent emesis caused by cisplatin and other chemotherapeutic agents, and radiation treatment. The anti-emetic effects may be mediated centrally in the area postrema and associated structures of the emetic reflex such as the nucleus tractus solitarius, which have a very high density of 5-HT3 receptors. Additional sites of action may be found on the 5-HT3 receptors located on the vagus nerve or enteric neuronal elements in the gastro-intestinal tract. The precise site(s) and mechanism(s) of action of different cytotoxic treatments to induce emesis remains to be determined, but appears to involve a common action on a 5-HT3 system. The 5-HT3 receptor antagonists do not impair normal behaviour and, in particular, fail to affect the extrapyramidal motor system and do not cause sedation. Of potential benefit, the 5-HT3 receptor antagonists have an anxiolytic profile of action in rodent and primate models. The 5-HT3 receptor antagonists are revealed as an important group of drugs to prevent emesis induced by a wide range of cytotoxic treatments. PMID:1467196

  16. Embryo implantation and GnRH antagonists: embryo implantation: the Rubicon for GnRH antagonists.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, E R

    2000-06-01

    When gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) was discovered, the agonist and antagonist of GnRH were developed to control the release of FSH and LH by the gonadotrophs. More than 10 years of research were needed to develop a GnRH antagonist free of histamine release. Recent studies have shown that these GnRH antagonists are effective in preventing a rise in LH during ovarian stimulation in IVF. However, a decrease in ongoing pregnancies seems to suggest that implantation rates per transferred embryo are reduced in GnRH antagonist-stimulated cycles. In my opinion, these data highlight an area less well known to clinicians: the role of the GnRH antagonist at the cellular level in extrapituitary tissues. There are sufficient data in the literature suggesting that GnRH antagonist is an inhibitor of the cell cycle by decreasing the synthesis of growth factors. Given that, for folliculogenesis, blastomere formation and endometrium development, mitosis is everything; the interaction between the GnRH antagonist and the GnRH receptor (present in all these cells and tissues) may compromise the mitotic programme of these cells. This is the Rubicon for the GnRH antagonist: to demonstrate irrevocably that, at the minimal doses necessary to suppress LH release, it does not affect processes such as implantation, embryo development and folliculogenesis.

  17. Drugs to Treat Nausea and Vomiting

    MedlinePlus

    ... little or no alcohol Source: American Cancer Society Side Effects of 5-HT3 Antagonists Constipation Increased liver enzymes (AST/ALT) Diarrhea Muscle cramps Dizziness Nervousness Fatigue Sleepiness Headache AN1109

  18. Granisetron

    MedlinePlus

    ... to prevent nausea and vomiting caused by cancer chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Granisetron is in a class of medications called 5-HT3 receptor antagonists. It works by blocking serotonin, a natural substance in the ...

  19. Palonosetron Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... that may occur several days after receiving certain chemotherapy medications. Palonosetron injection is in a class of medications called 5-HT3 receptor antagonists. It works by blocking the action of serotonin, a natural ...

  20. Skimmianine and related furoquinolines function as antagonists of 5-hydroxytryptamine receptors in animals.

    PubMed

    Cheng, J T; Chang, T K; Chen, I S

    1994-10-01

    1. Skimmianine, kokusaginine and confusameline, three furoquinolines extracted from the leaves of Evodia merrillii (Rutaceae), were investigated to characterize their selective effects on subtypes of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptors. 2. In the isolated membranes of rat cerebrocortex, using [3H]-5-HT and [3H]-ketanserin as radioligands, skimmianine and the two other furoquinolines displaced radioligand bindings in a concentration-dependent manner. Lower concentrations were required to affect [3H]-ketanserin binding than [3H]-5-HT binding in the order skimmianine > kokusaginine > confusameline. 3. Furoquinolines inhibited 5-HT-induced contraction mediated by 5-HT2 receptors in the presence of methiothepin in rat isolated aorta. Also, the combination of furoquinolines with ketanserin showed an additive antagonism. 4. These furoquinolines were inactive on the 5-carboxamidotryptamine-induced relaxation of guinea-pig ileum, a 5-HT1-mediated event. However, 5-HT-induced contraction via 5-HT2 receptors was reduced by these furoquinolines in a way similar to that in blood vessels. 5. The failure of these compounds to affect the 5-HT-induced Bezold-Jarisch-like reflex in anaesthetized rats, the major 5-HT3-mediated action, ruled out an action on 5-HT3 receptors. 6. The results obtained suggest that three furoquinoline alkaloids may act on 5-HT receptors in animals, more selectively to the 5-HT2 subtype, in the order of skimmianine > kokusaginine > confusameline.

  1. Evidence for 5-HT1B/1D and 5-HT2A receptors mediating constriction of the canine internal carotid circulation

    PubMed Central

    Centurión, David; Ortiz, Mario I; Sánchez-López, Araceli; De Vries, Peter; Saxena, Pramod R; Villalón, Carlos M

    2001-01-01

    The present study has investigated the preliminary pharmacological profile of the receptors mediating vasoconstriction to 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in the internal carotid bed of vagosympathectomised dogs. One minute intracarotid infusions of the agonists 5-HT (0.1–10 μg min−1), sumatriptan (0.3–10 μg min−1; 5-HT1B/1D), 5-methoxytryptamine (1–100 μg min−1; 5-HT1, 5-HT2, 5-HT4, 5-ht6 and 5-HT7) or DOI (0.31–10 μg min−1; 5-HT2), but not 5-carboxamidotryptamine (0.01–0.3 μg min−1; 5-HT1, 5-ht5A and 5-HT7), 1-(m-chlorophenyl)-biguanide (mCPBG; 1–1000 μg min−1; 5-HT3) or cisapride (1–1000 μg min−1; 5-HT4), resulted in dose-dependent decreases in internal carotid blood flow, without changing blood pressure or heart rate. The vasoconstrictor responses to 5-HT, which remained unaffected after saline, were resistant to blockade by i.v. administration of the antagonists ritanserin (100 μg kg−1; 5-HT2A/2B/2C) in combination with tropisetron (3000 μg kg−1; 5-HT3/4) or the cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin (5000 μg kg−1), but were abolished by the 5-HT1B/1D receptor antagonist, GR127935 (30 μg kg−1). Interestingly, after administration of GR127935, the subsequent administration of ritanserin unmasked a dose-dependent vasodilator component. GR127935 or saline did not practically modify the vasoconstrictor effects of 5-MeO-T. In animals receiving GR127935, the subsequent administration of ritanserin abolished the vasoconstrictor responses to 5-MeO-T unmasking a dose-dependent vasodilator component. The vasoconstriction induced by sumatriptan was antagonized by GR127935, but not by ritanserin. Furthermore, ritanserin (100 μg kg−1) or ketanserin (100 μg kg−1; 5-HT2A), but not GR127935, abolished DOI-induced vasoconstrictor responses. The above results suggest that 5-HT-induced internal carotid vasoconstriction is predominantly mediated by 5-HT1B/1D and 5-HT2A receptors

  2. Antagonist-Elicited Cannabis Withdrawal in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Gorelick, David A.; Goodwin, Robert S.; Schwilke, Eugene; Schwope, David M.; Darwin, William D.; Kelly, Deanna L.; McMahon, Robert P.; Liu, Fang; Ortemann-Renon, Catherine; Bonnet, Denis; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2013-01-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonists have potential therapeutic benefits, but antagonist-elicited cannabis withdrawal has not been reported in humans. Ten male daily cannabis smokers received 8 days of increasingly frequent 20-mg oral Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) dosages (40–120 mg/d) around-the-clock to standardize cannabis dependence while residing on a closed research unit. On the ninth day, double-blind placebo or 20- (suggested therapeutic dose) or 40-mg oral rimonabant, a CB1-cannabinoid receptor antagonist, was administered. Cannabis withdrawal signs and symptoms were assessed before and for 23.5 hours after rimonabant. Rimonabant, THC, and 11-hydroxy-THC plasma concentrations were quantified by mass spectrometry. The first 6 subjects received 20-mg rimonabant (1 placebo); the remaining 4 subjects received 40-mg rimonabant (1 placebo). Fourteen subjects enrolled; 10 completed before premature termination because of withdrawal of rimonabant from clinical development. Three of 5 subjects in the 20-mg group, 1 of 3 in the 40-mg group, and none of 2 in the placebo group met the prespecified withdrawal criterion of 150% increase or higher in at least 3 visual analog scales for cannabis withdrawal symptoms within 3 hours of rimonabant dosing. There were no significant associations between visual analog scale, heart rate, or blood pressure changes and peak rimonabant plasma concentration, area-under-the-rimonabant-concentration-by-time curve (0–8 hours), or peak rimonabant/THC or rimonabant/(THC + 11-hydroxy-THC) plasma concentration ratios. In summary, prespecified criteria for antagonist-elicited cannabis withdrawal were not observed at the 20- or 40-mg rimonabant doses. These data do not preclude antagonist-elicited withdrawal at higher rimonabant doses. PMID:21869692

  3. Antagonistic and synergistic interactions among predators.

    PubMed

    Huxel, Gary R

    2007-08-01

    The structure and dynamics of food webs are largely dependent upon interactions among consumers and their resources. However, interspecific interactions such as intraguild predation and interference competition can also play a significant role in the stability of communities. The role of antagonistic/synergistic interactions among predators has been largely ignored in food web theory. These mechanisms influence predation rates, which is one of the key factors regulating food web structure and dynamics, thus ignoring them can potentially limit understanding of food webs. Using nonlinear models, it is shown that critical aspects of multiple predator food web dynamics are antagonistic/synergistic interactions among predators. The influence of antagonistic/synergistic interactions on coexistence of predators depended largely upon the parameter set used and the degree of feeding niche differentiation. In all cases when there was no effect of antagonism or synergism (a ( ij )=1.00), the predators coexisted. Using the stable parameter set, coexistence occurred across the range of antagonism/synergism used. However, using the chaotic parameter strong antagonism resulted in the extinction of one or both species, while strong synergism tended to coexistence. Whereas using the limit cycle parameter set, coexistence was strongly dependent on the degree of feeding niche overlap. Additionally increasing the degree of feeding specialization of the predators on the two prey species increased the amount of parameter space in which coexistence of the two predators occurred. Bifurcation analyses supported the general pattern of increased stability when the predator interaction was synergistic and decreased stability when it was antagonistic. Thus, synergistic interactions should be more common than antagonistic interactions in ecological systems.

  4. Antagonist-elicited cannabis withdrawal in humans.

    PubMed

    Gorelick, David A; Goodwin, Robert S; Schwilke, Eugene; Schwope, David M; Darwin, William D; Kelly, Deanna L; McMahon, Robert P; Liu, Fang; Ortemann-Renon, Catherine; Bonnet, Denis; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2011-10-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonists have potential therapeutic benefits, but antagonist-elicited cannabis withdrawal has not been reported in humans. Ten male daily cannabis smokers received 8 days of increasingly frequent 20-mg oral Δ⁹-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) dosages (40-120 mg/d) around-the-clock to standardize cannabis dependence while residing on a closed research unit. On the ninth day, double-blind placebo or 20- (suggested therapeutic dose) or 40-mg oral rimonabant, a CB1-cannabinoid receptor antagonist, was administered. Cannabis withdrawal signs and symptoms were assessed before and for 23.5 hours after rimonabant. Rimonabant, THC, and 11-hydroxy-THC plasma concentrations were quantified by mass spectrometry. The first 6 subjects received 20-mg rimonabant (1 placebo); the remaining 4 subjects received 40-mg rimonabant (1 placebo). Fourteen subjects enrolled; 10 completed before premature termination because of withdrawal of rimonabant from clinical development. Three of 5 subjects in the 20-mg group, 1 of 3 in the 40-mg group, and none of 2 in the placebo group met the prespecified withdrawal criterion of 150% increase or higher in at least 3 visual analog scales for cannabis withdrawal symptoms within 3 hours of rimonabant dosing. There were no significant associations between visual analog scale, heart rate, or blood pressure changes and peak rimonabant plasma concentration, area-under-the-rimonabant-concentration-by-time curve (0-8 hours), or peak rimonabant/THC or rimonabant/(THC + 11-hydroxy-THC) plasma concentration ratios. In summary, prespecified criteria for antagonist-elicited cannabis withdrawal were not observed at the 20- or 40-mg rimonabant doses. These data do not preclude antagonist-elicited withdrawal at higher rimonabant doses.

  5. Progress in corticotropin-releasing factor-1 antagonist development

    PubMed Central

    Zorrilla, Eric P.; Koob, George F.

    2010-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptor antagonists have been sought since the stress-secreted peptide was isolated in 1981. Although evidence suggests the limited efficacy of CRF1 antagonists as antidepressants, CRF1 antagonists might be novel pharmacotherapies for anxiety and addiction. Progress in understanding the two-domain model of ligand–receptor interactions for CRF family receptors might yield chemically novel CRF1 receptor antagonists, including peptide CRF1 antagonists, antagonists with signal transduction selectivity and nonpeptide CRF1 antagonists that act via the extracellular (rather than transmembrane) domains. Novel ligands that conform to prevalent pharmacophore and exhibit drug-like pharmacokinetic properties have been identified. The therapeutic utility of CRF1 antagonists should soon be clearer: several small molecules are currently in Phase II/III clinical trials for depression, anxiety and irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:20206287

  6. Treatment of established postoperative nausea and vomiting: a quantitative systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Kazemi-Kjellberg, Faranak; Henzi, Iris; Tramèr, Martin R

    2001-01-01

    Background The relative efficacy of antiemetics for the treatment of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) is poorly understood. Methods Systematic search (MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Library, bibliographies, any language, to 8.2000) for randomised comparisons of antiemetics with any comparator for the treatment of established PONV. Dichotomous data on prevention of further nausea and vomiting, and on side effects were combined using a fixed effect model. Results In seven trials (1,267 patients), 11 different antiemetics were tested without placebos; these data were not further analysed. Eighteen trials (3,809) had placebo controls. Dolasetron 12.5–100 mg, granisetron 0.1–3 mg, tropisetron 0.5–5 mg, and ondansetron 1–8 mg prevented further vomiting with little evidence of dose-responsiveness; with all regimens, absolute risk reductions compared with placebo were 20%–30%. The anti-nausea effect was less pronounced. Headache was dose-dependent. Results on propofol were contradictory. The NK1 antagonist GR205171, isopropyl alcohol vapor, metoclopramide, domperidone, and midazolam were tested in one trial each with a limited number of patients. Conclusions Of 100 vomiting surgical patients receiving a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, 20 to 30 will stop vomiting who would not have done so had they received a placebo; less will profit from the anti-nausea effect. There is a lack of evidence for a clinically relevant dose-response; minimal effective doses may be used. There is a discrepancy between the plethora of trials on prevention of PONV and the paucity of trials on treatment of established symptoms. Valid data on the therapeutic efficacy of classic antiemetics, which have been used for decades, are needed. PMID:11734064

  7. Novel benzimidazole-based MCH R1 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Andrew J; Al-Barazanji, Kamal A; Barvian, Kevin K; Bishop, Michael J; Britt, Christy S; Cooper, Joel P; Goetz, Aaron S; Grizzle, Mary K; Hertzog, Donald L; Ignar, Diane M; Morgan, Ronda O; Peckham, Gregory E; Speake, Jason D; Swain, Will R

    2006-10-01

    The identification of an MCH R1 antagonist screening hit led to the optimization of a class of benzimidazole-based MCH R1 antagonists. Structure-activity relationships and efforts to optimize pharmacokinetic properties are detailed along with the demonstration of the effectiveness of an MCH R1 antagonist in an animal model of obesity.

  8. Development of Kappa Opioid Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, F. Ivy; Carlezon, William A.

    2013-01-01

    Kappa opioid receptors (KORs) belong to the G-protein coupled class of receptors (GPCRs). They are activated by the endogenous opioid peptide dynorphin (DYN) and expressed at particularly high levels within brain areas implicated in modulation of motivation, emotion, and cognitive function. Chronic activation of KORs in animal models has maladaptive effects including increases in behaviors that reflect depression, the propensity to engage in drug-seeking behavior, and drug craving. The fact that KOR activation has such a profound influence on behaviors often triggered by stress has led to interest in selective KOR antagonists as potential therapeutic agents. This perspective provides a description of preclinical research conducted in the development of several different classes of selective KOR antagonists, a summary of the clinical studies conducted thus far, and recommendations for the type of work needed in the future to determine if these agents would be useful as pharmacotherapies for neuropsychiatric illness. PMID:23360448

  9. The treatment of hyponatraemia using vasopressin antagonists.

    PubMed

    Gross, P; Palm, C

    2000-03-01

    Hyponatraemia is a frequent electrolyte disorder. It is primarily attributable to vasopressin excess plus sustained fluid intake. Hyponatraemia causes CNS symptoms, especially during the first 2-4 days; these symptoms are related to brain swelling. Hyponatraemia occurs in the setting of liver cirrhosis and congestive cardiac failure, in which it is related to stimulation by low arterial blood pressure acting through baroreceptors. Hyponatraemia also occurs in the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion, usually from neoplasms releasing vasopressin. The conventional treatment of hyponatraemia used to be fluid restriction and treatment of the underlying disorder. This kind of treatment has been unreliable, cumbersome and difficult to comply with for the patient. In the future, effective vasopressin V2 antagonists will become available for clinical use in the treatment of hyponatraemia, and are expected to improve the management of hyponatraemia. Pharmacological characteristics and observations of biological effects of three antagonists are reported in the present article.

  10. TRPV1 antagonists as potential antitussive agents.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Robbie L; Correll, Craig C; Jia, Yanlin; Anthes, John C

    2008-01-01

    Cough is an important defensive pulmonary reflex that removes irritants, fluids, or foreign materials from the airways. However, when cough is exceptionally intense or when it is chronic and/or nonproductive it may require pharmacologic suppression. For many patients, antitussive therapies consist of OTC products with inconsequential efficacies. On the other hand, the prescription antitussive market is dominated by older opioid drugs such as codeine. Unfortunately, "codeine-like" drugs suppress cough at equivalent doses that also often produce significant ancillary liabilities such as GI constipation, sedation, and respiratory depression. Thus, the discovery of a novel and effective antitussive drug with an improved side effect profile relative to codeine would fulfill an unmet clinical need in the treatment of cough. Afferent pulmonary nerves are endowed with a multitude of potential receptor targets, including TRPV1, that could act to attenuate cough. The evidence linking TRPV1 to cough is convincing. TRPV1 receptors are found on sensory respiratory nerves that are important in the generation of the cough reflex. Isolated pulmonary vagal afferent nerves are responsive to TRPV1 stimulation. In vivo, TRPV1 agonists such as capsaicin elicit cough when aerosolized and delivered to the lungs. Pertinent to the debate on the potential use of TRPV1 antagonist as antitussive agents are the observations that airway afferent nerves become hypersensitive in diseased and inflamed lungs. For example, the sensitivity of capsaicin-induced cough responses following upper respiratory tract infection and in airway inflammatory diseases such as asthma and COPD is increased relative to that of control responses. Indeed, we have demonstrated that TRPV1 antagonism can attenuate antigen-induced cough in the allergic guinea pig. However, it remains to be determined if the emerging pharmacologic profile of TRPV1 antagonists will translate into a novel human antitussive drug. Current

  11. Interactions of Freshwater Cyanobacteria with Bacterial Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Beier, Sara; Grabherr, Manfred

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cyanobacterial and algal mass development, or blooms, have severe effects on freshwater and marine systems around the world. Many of these phototrophs produce a variety of potent toxins, contribute to oxygen depletion, and affect water quality in several ways. Coexisting antagonists, such as cyanolytic bacteria, hold the potential to suppress, or even terminate, such blooms, yet the nature of this interaction is not well studied. We isolated 31 cyanolytic bacteria affiliated with the genera Pseudomonas, Stenotrophomonas, Acinetobacter, and Delftia from three eutrophic freshwater lakes in Sweden and selected four phylogenetically diverse bacterial strains with strong-to-moderate lytic activity. To characterize their functional responses to the presence of cyanobacteria, we performed RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) experiments on coculture incubations, with an initial predator-prey ratio of 1:1. Genes involved in central cellular pathways, stress-related heat or cold shock proteins, and antitoxin genes were highly expressed in both heterotrophs and cyanobacteria. Heterotrophs in coculture expressed genes involved in cell motility, signal transduction, and putative lytic activity. l,d-Transpeptidase was the only significantly upregulated lytic gene in Stenotrophomonas rhizophila EK20. Heterotrophs also shifted their central metabolism from the tricarboxylic acid cycle to the glyoxylate shunt. Concurrently, cyanobacteria clearly show contrasting antagonistic interactions with the four tested heterotrophic strains, which is also reflected in the physical attachment to their cells. In conclusion, antagonistic interactions with cyanobacteria were initiated within 24 h, and expression profiles suggest varied responses for the different cyanobacteria and studied cyanolytes. IMPORTANCE Here, we present how gene expression profiles can be used to reveal interactions between bloom-forming freshwater cyanobacteria and antagonistic heterotrophic bacteria. Species

  12. Medicinal chemistry of competitive kainate receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Ann M; Bunch, Lennart

    2011-02-16

    Kainic acid (KA) receptors belong to the group of ionotropic glutamate receptors and are expressed throughout in the central nervous system (CNS). The KA receptors have been shown to be involved in neurophysiological functions such as mossy fiber long-term potentiation (LTP) and synaptic plasticity and are thus potential therapeutic targets in CNS diseases such as schizophrenia, major depression, neuropathic pain and epilepsy. Extensive effort has been made to develop subtype-selective KA receptor antagonists in order to elucidate the physiological function of each of the five subunits known (GluK1-5). However, to date only selective antagonists for the GluK1 subunit have been discovered, which underlines the strong need for continued research in this area. The present review describes the structure-activity relationship and pharmacological profile for 10 chemically distinct classes of KA receptor antagonists comprising, in all, 45 compounds. To the medicinal chemist this information will serve as reference guidance as well as an inspiration for future effort in this field.

  13. Medicinal Chemistry of Competitive Kainate Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Kainic acid (KA) receptors belong to the group of ionotropic glutamate receptors and are expressed throughout in the central nervous system (CNS). The KA receptors have been shown to be involved in neurophysiological functions such as mossy fiber long-term potentiation (LTP) and synaptic plasticity and are thus potential therapeutic targets in CNS diseases such as schizophrenia, major depression, neuropathic pain and epilepsy. Extensive effort has been made to develop subtype-selective KA receptor antagonists in order to elucidate the physiological function of each of the five subunits known (GluK1−5). However, to date only selective antagonists for the GluK1 subunit have been discovered, which underlines the strong need for continued research in this area. The present review describes the structure−activity relationship and pharmacological profile for 10 chemically distinct classes of KA receptor antagonists comprising, in all, 45 compounds. To the medicinal chemist this information will serve as reference guidance as well as an inspiration for future effort in this field. PMID:22778857

  14. NMDA Receptor Antagonists for Treatment of Depression

    PubMed Central

    Ates-Alagoz, Zeynep; Adejare, Adeboye

    2013-01-01

    Depression is a psychiatric disorder that affects millions of people worldwide. Individuals battling this disorder commonly experience high rates of relapse, persistent residual symptoms, functional impairment, and diminished well-being. Medications have important utility in stabilizing moods and daily functions of many individuals. However, only one third of patients had considerable improvement with a standard antidepressant after 2 months and all patients had to deal with numerous side effects. The N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor family has received special attention because of its critical role in psychiatric disorders. Direct targeting of the NMDA receptor could result in more rapid antidepressant effects. Antidepressant-like effects of NMDA receptor antagonists have been demonstrated in different animal models. MK-801 (a use-dependent channel blocker), and CGP 37849 (an NMDA receptor antagonist) have shown antidepressant properties in preclinical studies, either alone or combined with traditional antidepressants. A recent development is use of ketamine clinically for refractory depression. The purpose of this review is to examine and analyze current literature on the role of NMDA receptor antagonists for treatment of depression and whether this is a feasible route in drug discovery. PMID:24276119

  15. Pharmacological analysis of calcium antagonist receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, I.J.

    1987-01-01

    This work focuses on two aspects of the action of calcium antagonist drugs, namely, the interaction of drugs with receptors for verapamil-like calcium antagonists, and the interactions of drugs with voltage-sensitive calcium fluxes in rat brain synaptosomes. From binding studies I have found that the ligand of choice for labeling the verapamil receptor is (-)(/sup 3/H)desmethoxy-verapamil. This drug labels potently, reversibly and stereoselectively two receptors in membranes prepared from rat brain and rabbit skeletal muscle tissues. In equilibrium studies dihydropyridine calcium antagonists interact in a non-competitive fashion, while many non-DHPs are apparently competitive. In-depth kinetic studies in skeletal muscle membranes indicate that the two receptors are linked in a negative heterotropic fashion, and that low-affinity binding of (-) (/sup 3/H)desmethoxy-verapamil may be to the diltiazem receptor. However, these studies were not able to distinguish between the hypothesis that diltiazem binds to spatially separate, allosterically coupled receptors, and the hypothesis that diltiazem binds to a subsite of the verapamil receptor.

  16. From the Cover: Glutamate antagonists limit tumor growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rzeski, Wojciech; Turski, Lechoslaw; Ikonomidou, Chrysanthy

    2001-05-01

    Neuronal progenitors and tumor cells possess propensity to proliferate and to migrate. Glutamate regulates proliferation and migration of neurons during development, but it is not known whether it influences proliferation and migration of tumor cells. We demonstrate that glutamate antagonists inhibit proliferation of human tumor cells. Colon adenocarcinoma, astrocytoma, and breast and lung carcinoma cells were most sensitive to the antiproliferative effect of the N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist dizocilpine, whereas breast and lung carcinoma, colon adenocarcinoma, and neuroblastoma cells responded most favorably to the -amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate antagonist GYKI52466. The antiproliferative effect of glutamate antagonists was Ca2+ dependent and resulted from decreased cell division and increased cell death. Morphological alterations induced by glutamate antagonists in tumor cells consisted of reduced membrane ruffling and pseudopodial protrusions. Furthermore, glutamate antagonists decreased motility and invasive growth of tumor cells. These findings suggest anticancer potential of glutamate antagonists.

  17. Investigation of orexin-2 selective receptor antagonists: Structural modifications resulting in dual orexin receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Skudlarek, Jason W; DiMarco, Christina N; Babaoglu, Kerim; Roecker, Anthony J; Bruno, Joseph G; Pausch, Mark A; O'Brien, Julie A; Cabalu, Tamara D; Stevens, Joanne; Brunner, Joseph; Tannenbaum, Pamela L; Wuelfing, W Peter; Garson, Susan L; Fox, Steven V; Savitz, Alan T; Harrell, Charles M; Gotter, Anthony L; Winrow, Christopher J; Renger, John J; Kuduk, Scott D; Coleman, Paul J

    2017-03-15

    In an ongoing effort to explore the use of orexin receptor antagonists for the treatment of insomnia, dual orexin receptor antagonists (DORAs) were structurally modified, resulting in compounds selective for the OX2R subtype and culminating in the discovery of 23, a highly potent, OX2R-selective molecule that exhibited a promising in vivo profile. Further structural modification led to an unexpected restoration of OX1R antagonism. Herein, these changes are discussed and a rationale for selectivity based on computational modeling is proposed.

  18. Antagonistic functional duality of cancer genes.

    PubMed

    Stepanenko, A A; Vassetzky, Y S; Kavsan, V M

    2013-10-25

    Cancer evolution is a stochastic process both at the genome and gene levels. Most of tumors contain multiple genetic subclones, evolving in either succession or in parallel, either in a linear or branching manner, with heterogeneous genome and gene alterations, extensively rewired signaling networks, and addicted to multiple oncogenes easily switching with each other during cancer progression and medical intervention. Hundreds of discovered cancer genes are classified according to whether they function in a dominant (oncogenes) or recessive (tumor suppressor genes) manner in a cancer cell. However, there are many cancer "gene-chameleons", which behave distinctly in opposite way in the different experimental settings showing antagonistic duality. In contrast to the widely accepted view that mutant NADP(+)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenases 1/2 (IDH1/2) and associated metabolite 2-hydroxyglutarate (R)-enantiomer are intrinsically "the drivers" of tumourigenesis, mutant IDH1/2 inhibited, promoted or had no effect on cell proliferation, growth and tumorigenicity in diverse experiments. Similar behavior was evidenced for dozens of cancer genes. Gene function is dependent on genetic network, which is defined by the genome context. The overall changes in karyotype can result in alterations of the role and function of the same genes and pathways. The diverse cell lines and tumor samples have been used in experiments for proving gene tumor promoting/suppressive activity. They all display heterogeneous individual karyotypes and disturbed signaling networks. Consequently, the effect and function of gene under investigation can be opposite and versatile in cells with different genomes that may explain antagonistic duality of cancer genes and the cell type- or the cellular genetic/context-dependent response to the same protein. Antagonistic duality of cancer genes might contribute to failure of chemotherapy. Instructive examples of unexpected activity of cancer genes and

  19. Neuromuscular adaptations following antagonist resisted training.

    PubMed

    MacKenzie, Sasho J; Rannelli, Luke A; Yurchevich, Jordan J

    2010-01-01

    The purpose was to assess a novel form of strength training, antagonist resisted training (ART), with potential use in microgravity and athletic rehabilitation settings. ART uses the force from antagonist muscles, during cocontractions, as the source of resistance for the agonists. Strength and electromyography (EMG) measurements were recorded before and after a 6-week training program during which participants trained the left arm while the right arm served as a control. Training was designed so that the elbow extensors (antagonists) served as resistance for the elbow flexors (agonists). Elbow flexor and extensor strengths were measured during maximal isometric contractions with the elbow fixed at 90 degrees. EMG was recorded from the biceps brachii and lateral head of the triceps brachii during all strength tests. EMG was also recorded from both muscles during a maximal isometric cocontraction of the elbow flexors and extensors. Elbow flexion strength increased significantly for the trained arm (5.8%) relative to the control (0.5%) (p = 0.003). Elbow extension strength of the trained limb also increased significantly (8.5%) relative to the control (4.5%) (p = 0.029). Biceps and triceps EMG, during maximum strength tests, increased significantly for the trained arm (18.5 and 18.6%) relative to the control (0.5 and -5.2%) (p = 0.035 and p = 0.01). Biceps and triceps EMG, during maximum cocontraction tests, increased significantly for the trained arm (30.1 and 61.1%) relative to the control (9.2 and 1.1%) (p = 0.042 and p = 0.0005). ART was found to increase strength and therefore could be an effective form of resistance training. Because it requires no equipment, ART may be especially applicable in microgravity environments, which have space and weight constraints.

  20. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists and endothelial function

    PubMed Central

    Maron, Bradley A.; Leopold, Jane A.

    2010-01-01

    Hyperaldosteronism has been associated with endothelial dysfunction and impaired vascular reactivity in patients with hypertension or congestive heart failure. The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists spironolactone and eplerenone have been shown to reduce morbidity and mortality, in part, by ameliorating the adverse effects of aldosterone on vascular function. Although spironolactone and eplerenone are increasingly utilized in patients with cardiovascular disease, widespread clinical use is limited by the development of gynecomastia with spironolactone and hyperkalemia with both agents. This suggests that the development of newer agents with favorable side effect profiles is warranted. PMID:18729003

  1. Elucidating the `Jekyll and Hyde' Nature of PXR: The Case for Discovering Antagonists or Allosteric Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Arunima; Mani, Sridhar; Redinbo, Matthew R.; Krasowski, Matthew D.; Li, Hao; Ekins, Sean

    2010-01-01

    The pregnane X receptor belongs to the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily and is involved in the transcriptional control of numerous genes. It was originally thought that it was a xenobiotic sensor controlling detoxification pathways. Recent studies have shown an increasingly important role in inflammation and cancer, supporting its function in abrogating tissue damage. PXR orthologs and PXR-like pathways have been identified in several non-mammalian species which corroborate a conserved role for PXR in cellular detoxification. In summary, PXR has a multiplicity of roles in vivo and is being revealed as behaving like a “Jekyll and Hyde” nuclear hormone receptor. The importance of this review is to elucidate the need for discovery of antagonists of PXR to further probe its biology and therapeutic applications. Although several PXR agonists are already reported, virtually nothing is known about PXR antagonists. Here, we propose the development of PXR antagonists through chemical, genetic and molecular modeling approaches. Based on this review it will be clear that antagonists of PXR and PXR-like pathways will have widespread utility in PXR biology and therapeutics. PMID:19415465

  2. Rational discovery of novel nuclear hormone receptor antagonists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schapira, Matthieu; Raaka, Bruce M.; Samuels, Herbert H.; Abagyan, Ruben

    2000-02-01

    Nuclear hormone receptors (NRs) are potential targets for therapeutic approaches to many clinical conditions, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological diseases. The crystal structure of the ligand binding domain of agonist-bound NRs enables the design of compounds with agonist activity. However, with the exception of the human estrogen receptor-, the lack of antagonist-bound "inactive" receptor structures hinders the rational design of receptor antagonists. In this study, we present a strategy for designing such antagonists. We constructed a model of the inactive conformation of human retinoic acid receptor- by using information derived from antagonist-bound estrogen receptor-α and applied a computer-based virtual screening algorithm to identify retinoic acid receptor antagonists. Thus, the currently available crystal structures of NRs may be used for the rational design of antagonists, which could lead to the development of novel drugs for a variety of diseases.

  3. Antioxidant effects of calcium antagonists in rat brain homogenates.

    PubMed

    Yao, K; Ina, Y; Nagashima, K; Ohmori, K; Ohno, T

    2000-06-01

    We studied the antioxidant activities of calcium antagonists against autoxidation in rat brain homogenates. The homogenates were incubated for 30 min at 37 degrees C with or without a calcium antagonist and subsequently assayed for lipid peroxide content. Percent inhibition of the lipid peroxidation was used as an index of the antioxidant effect. Dihydropyridine calcium antagonists exhibited concentration-dependent (3-300 micromol/l) inhibitory effects against lipid peroxidation. The relative order of antioxidant potency and associated IC50 values (micromol/l) of the calcium antagonists for inhibition of the lipid peroxidation were as follows: nifedipine (51.5)>barnidipine (58.6)>benidipine (71.2)>nicardipine (129.3)>amlodipine (135.5)>nilvadipine (167.3)>nitrendipine (252.1)> diltiazem (>300)=verapamil (>300). These results suggest that some dihydropyridine calcium antagonists show antioxidant properties. The antioxidant effects of the calcium antagonists may contribute to their pharmacological actions.

  4. Opioid antagonists and the sexual satiation phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Manzo, G; Fernández-Guasti, A

    1995-11-01

    This study evaluates the effects of the IP injection of naloxone (0.3, 3 and 30 mg/kg) and naltrexone (0.2, 2 and 20 mg/kg) on the sexual satiation phenomenon. It was found that both antagonists exert a dose-based biphasic effect on the proportion of sexually exhausted rats displaying copulation. The intermediate doses of both opioid antagonists were more effective than the low and high doses in increasing the percentage of animals engaged in copulation. The analysis of the specific sexual behaviour parameters revealed that naloxone produces a slight inhibitory effect at the lowest dose, evidenced as an increase in the intromission number. The higher doses of this compound facilitated copulation reflected as a shortening of the ejaculation latency and the interintromission interval (III) and an increase in the copulatory rate. Naltrexone treatment had only facilitatory effects at the lower doses by reducing the III. The higher doses of naloxone (3 and 30 mg/kg) and the intermediate dose of naltrexone (2 mg/kg) decreased the spontaneous ambulatory behaviour of sexually satiated rats without impairing sexual behaviour execution. Data suggest a participation of the endogenous opioid systems in the sexual inhibition resulting from sexual exhaustion.

  5. D-Cycloserine: Agonist turned antagonist.

    PubMed

    Lanthorn, T H

    1994-10-01

    D-Cycloserine can enhance activation of the NMDA receptor complex and could enhance the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP). In animals and humans, D-cycloserine can enhance performance in learning and memory tasks. This enhancing effect can disappear during repeated administration. The enhancing effects are also lost when higher doses are used, and replaced by behavioral and biochemical effects like those produced by NMDA antagonists. It has been reported that NMDA agonists, applied before or after tetanic stimulation, can block the induction of LTP. This may be the result of feedback inhibition of second messenger pathways stimulated by receptor activation. This may explain the antagonist-like effects of glycine partial agonists like D-cycloserine. In clinical trials of D-cycloserine in age-associated memory impairment (AAMI) and Alzheimer's disease, chronic treatment provided few positive effects on learning and memory. This may be due to inhibition of second messenger pathways following chronic stimulation of the receptor complex.

  6. Zebrafish phenotypic screen identifies novel Notch antagonists.

    PubMed

    Velaithan, Vithya; Okuda, Kazuhide Shaun; Ng, Mei Fong; Samat, Norazwana; Leong, Sze Wei; Faudzi, Siti Munirah Mohd; Abas, Faridah; Shaari, Khozirah; Cheong, Sok Ching; Tan, Pei Jean; Patel, Vyomesh

    2017-04-01

    Zebrafish represents a powerful in vivo model for phenotype-based drug discovery to identify clinically relevant small molecules. By utilizing this model, we evaluated natural product derived compounds that could potentially modulate Notch signaling that is important in both zebrafish embryogenesis and pathogenic in human cancers. A total of 234 compounds were screened using zebrafish embryos and 3 were identified to be conferring phenotypic alterations similar to embryos treated with known Notch inhibitors. Subsequent secondary screens using HEK293T cells overexpressing truncated Notch1 (HEK293TΔE) identified 2 compounds, EDD3 and 3H4MB, to be potential Notch antagonists. Both compounds reduced protein expression of NOTCH1, Notch intracellular domain (NICD) and hairy and enhancer of split-1 (HES1) in HEK293TΔE and downregulated Notch target genes. Importantly, EDD3 treatment of human oral cancer cell lines demonstrated reduction of Notch target proteins and genes. EDD3 also inhibited proliferation and induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest of ORL-150 cells through inducing p27(KIP1). Our data demonstrates the utility of the zebrafish phenotypic screen and identifying EDD3 as a promising Notch antagonist for further development as a novel therapeutic agent.

  7. Sexually antagonistic selection in human male homosexuality.

    PubMed

    Camperio Ciani, Andrea; Cermelli, Paolo; Zanzotto, Giovanni

    2008-06-18

    Several lines of evidence indicate the existence of genetic factors influencing male homosexuality and bisexuality. In spite of its relatively low frequency, the stable permanence in all human populations of this apparently detrimental trait constitutes a puzzling 'Darwinian paradox'. Furthermore, several studies have pointed out relevant asymmetries in the distribution of both male homosexuality and of female fecundity in the parental lines of homosexual vs. heterosexual males. A number of hypotheses have attempted to give an evolutionary explanation for the long-standing persistence of this trait, and for its asymmetric distribution in family lines; however a satisfactory understanding of the population genetics of male homosexuality is lacking at present. We perform a systematic mathematical analysis of the propagation and equilibrium of the putative genetic factors for male homosexuality in the population, based on the selection equation for one or two diallelic loci and Bayesian statistics for pedigree investigation. We show that only the two-locus genetic model with at least one locus on the X chromosome, and in which gene expression is sexually antagonistic (increasing female fitness but decreasing male fitness), accounts for all known empirical data. Our results help clarify the basic evolutionary dynamics of male homosexuality, establishing this as a clearly ascertained sexually antagonistic human trait.

  8. Hypocretin antagonists in insomnia treatment and beyond.

    PubMed

    Ruoff, Chad; Cao, Michelle; Guilleminault, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Hypocretin neuropeptides have been shown to regulate transitions between wakefulness and sleep through stabilization of sleep promoting GABAergic and wake promoting cholinergic/monoaminergic neural pathways. Hypocretin also influences other physiologic processes such as metabolism, appetite, learning and memory, reward and addiction, and ventilatory drive. The discovery of hypocretin and its effect upon the sleep-wake cycle has led to the development of a new class of pharmacologic agents that antagonize the physiologic effects of hypocretin (i.e. hypocretin antagonists). Further investigation of these agents may lead to novel therapies for insomnia without the side-effect profile of currently available hypnotics (e.g. impaired cognition, confusional arousals, and motor balance difficulties). However, antagonizing a system that regulates the sleep-wake cycle while also influencing non-sleep physiologic processes may create an entirely different but equally concerning side-effect profile such as transient loss of muscle tone (i.e. cataplexy) and a dampened respiratory drive. In this review, we will discuss the discovery of hypocretin and its receptors, hypocretin and the sleep-wake cycle, hypocretin antagonists in the treatment of insomnia, and other implicated functions of the hypocretin system.

  9. Sexually Antagonistic Selection in Human Male Homosexuality

    PubMed Central

    Camperio Ciani, Andrea; Cermelli, Paolo; Zanzotto, Giovanni

    2008-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate the existence of genetic factors influencing male homosexuality and bisexuality. In spite of its relatively low frequency, the stable permanence in all human populations of this apparently detrimental trait constitutes a puzzling ‘Darwinian paradox’. Furthermore, several studies have pointed out relevant asymmetries in the distribution of both male homosexuality and of female fecundity in the parental lines of homosexual vs. heterosexual males. A number of hypotheses have attempted to give an evolutionary explanation for the long-standing persistence of this trait, and for its asymmetric distribution in family lines; however a satisfactory understanding of the population genetics of male homosexuality is lacking at present. We perform a systematic mathematical analysis of the propagation and equilibrium of the putative genetic factors for male homosexuality in the population, based on the selection equation for one or two diallelic loci and Bayesian statistics for pedigree investigation. We show that only the two-locus genetic model with at least one locus on the X chromosome, and in which gene expression is sexually antagonistic (increasing female fitness but decreasing male fitness), accounts for all known empirical data. Our results help clarify the basic evolutionary dynamics of male homosexuality, establishing this as a clearly ascertained sexually antagonistic human trait. PMID:18560521

  10. Synthesis of actively adjustable springs by antagonistic redundant actuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yi, Byung-Ju; Freeman, Robert A.

    1992-01-01

    A methodology for active spring generation is presented based on antagonistic redundant actuation. Antagonistic properties are characterized using an effective system stiffness. 'Antagonistic stiffness' is generated by preloading a closed-chain (parallel) linkage system. Internal load distribution is investigated along with the necessary conditions for spring synthesis. The performance and stability of a proposed active spring are shown by simulation, and applications are discussed.

  11. Activation of serotonin 3 receptors changes in vivo auditory responses in the mouse inferior colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Bohorquez, Alexander; Hurley, Laura M.

    2009-01-01

    Metabotropic serotonin receptors such as 5-HT1A and 5-HT1B receptors shape the level, selectivity, and timing of auditory responses in the inferior colliculus (IC). Less is known about the effects of ionotropic 5-HT3 receptors, which are cation channels that depolarize neurons. In the current study, the influence of the 5-HT3 receptor on auditory responses in vivo was explored by locally iontophoresing a 5-HT3 receptor agonist and antagonists onto single neurons recorded extracellularly in mice. Three main findings emerge from these experiments. First, activation of the 5-HT3 receptor can either facilitate or suppress auditory responses, but response suppressions are not consistent with 5-HT3 effects on presynaptic GABAergic neurons. Both response facilitations and suppressions are less pronounced in neurons with high precision in response latency, suggesting functional differences in the role of receptor activation for different classes of neuron. Finally, the effects of 5-HT3 activation vary across repetition rate within a subset of single neurons, suggesting that the influence of receptor activation sometimes varies with the level of activity. These findings contribute to the view of the 5-HT3 receptor as an important component of the serotonergic infrastructure in the IC, with effects that are complex and neuron- selective. PMID:19236912

  12. Antagonists of IAP proteins as cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Dynek, Jasmin N; Vucic, Domagoj

    2013-05-28

    Inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins play pivotal roles in cellular survival by blocking apoptosis, modulating signal transduction, and affecting cellular proliferation. Through their interactions with inducers and effectors of apoptosis IAP proteins can effectively suppress apoptosis triggered by diverse stimuli including death receptor signaling, irradiation, chemotherapeutic agents, or growth factor withdrawal. Evasion of apoptosis, in part due to the action of IAP proteins, enhances resistance of cancer cells to treatment with chemotherapeutic agents and contributes to tumor progression. Additionally, IAP genes are known to be subject to amplification, mutation, and chromosomal translocation in human malignancies and autoimmune diseases. In this review we will discuss the role of IAP proteins in cancer and the development of antagonists targeting IAP proteins for cancer treatment.

  13. Mutually-antagonistic interactions in baseball networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saavedra, Serguei; Powers, Scott; McCotter, Trent; Porter, Mason A.; Mucha, Peter J.

    2010-03-01

    We formulate the head-to-head matchups between Major League Baseball pitchers and batters from 1954 to 2008 as a bipartite network of mutually-antagonistic interactions. We consider both the full network and single-season networks, which exhibit structural changes over time. We find interesting structure in the networks and examine their sensitivity to baseball’s rule changes. We then study a biased random walk on the matchup networks as a simple and transparent way to (1) compare the performance of players who competed under different conditions and (2) include information about which particular players a given player has faced. We find that a player’s position in the network does not correlate with his placement in the random walker ranking. However, network position does have a substantial effect on the robustness of ranking placement to changes in head-to-head matchups.

  14. Drug effects: agonistic and antagonistic processes.

    PubMed

    Flaten, Magne Arve

    2009-12-01

    The research presented here has shown that tolerance to drugs can be accelerated by conditioning processes. Placebo effects may be considered the opposite of tolerance, and we have shown that placebo effects may be objectively recorded by physiological measures (electromyography, skin conductance responses, and event-related potentials), as well as by behavioral and subjective methods. The placebo response, or more precisely, the expectation of drug effects, can add to the effect of the drug. Drug antagonistic expectations can also reverse the effect of the drug. There is some evidence that placebo effects are strongest when expectations are reinforced by administration of an active drug. Expectations have graded effects and may affect symptoms to a smaller or larger degree. Although drug effects can be considered stimuli, the investigation of the role of classical conditioning in drug use and drug effects involves special issues that must be carefully considered.

  15. Identification of a sulfonamide series of CCR2 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Peace, Simon; Philp, Joanne; Brooks, Carl; Piercy, Val; Moores, Kitty; Smethurst, Chris; Watson, Steve; Gaines, Simon; Zippoli, Mara; Mookherjee, Claudette; Ife, Robert

    2010-07-01

    A series of sulfonamide CCR2 antagonists was identified by high-throughput screening. Management of molecular weight and physical properties, in particular moderation of lipophilicity and study of pK(a), yielded highly potent CCR2 antagonists exhibiting good pharmacokinetic properties and improved potency in the presence of human plasma.

  16. Antagonistic and Bargaining Games in Optimal Marketing Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipovetsky, S.

    2007-01-01

    Game theory approaches to find optimal marketing decisions are considered. Antagonistic games with and without complete information, and non-antagonistic games techniques are applied to paired comparison, ranking, or rating data for a firm and its competitors in the market. Mix strategy, equilibrium in bi-matrix games, bargaining models with…

  17. [Effects of PAF antagonists in experimental models. Therapeutical perspectives].

    PubMed

    Desquand, S

    1993-01-01

    The discovery, during the last ten years, of Platelet Activating Factor (PAF) antagonists with different frameworks, but efficient on platelets tests, led the authors to study their activity in vivo against PAF-induced effects. These antagonists inhibit, with various potencies, the effects of PAF administration such as hypotension and bronchoconstriction in different animal species. Since PAF is assumed to play a central role in many diseases, effects of its antagonists have been studied in experimentally induced pathologies and in few clinical studies. We have been particularly interested in their effects on the first manifestation of asthma which is hypersensitivity. This manifestation is experimentally reproduced by anaphylactic bronchoconstriction, usually in the guinea-pig. Our results showed that different sensitization procedures may determine the relative efficiency of a PAF antagonist on subsequent antigen challenge. Indeed, the booster injection of antigen to a pre-sensitized animal could account for the refractoriness of anaphylactic bronchoconstriction to PAF antagonists. This booster injection mimics the clinical situation of atopic patients repeatedly exposed to allergen. Thus, it seems that immediate hypersensitivity could not be treated by the unique administration of a PAF antagonist. However, those antagonists may have more benefit in the clinical management of the late phase of asthma and of hyperreactivity and could thus provide anti-asthmatic drugs. PAF antagonists may have also therapeutical effects in septic shock, in myocardial ischemia and cardiac rhythm disturbances, in brain damage following cerebral ischemia and neurological trauma, in gastric and intestinal damages or in some inflammatory reactions.

  18. Microbial antagonists of Verticillium dahliae colonize cotton root system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Verticillium wilt remains one of the most severe diseases affecting cotton production in Uzbekistan. We are investigating microbial antagonist to control this pathogen. To this end, we have identified several antagonists of Verticillium dahliae (Bacillus sp. 234, Bacillus sp. 3, Streptomyces roseofl...

  19. Third Generation Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonists; Why We Need a Fourth

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Sanchez, Elise

    2015-01-01

    The first mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist, spironolactone, was developed almost 60 years ago to treat primary aldosteronism and pathological edema. Its use waned in part due to its lack of selectivity. Subsequently knowledge of the scope of MR function was expanded along with clinical evidence of the therapeutic importance of MR antagonists to prevent the ravages of inappropriate MR activation. Forty-two years elapsed between the first and MR-selective second generation of MR antagonists. Fifteen years later, despite serious shortcomings of the existing antagonists, a third generation antagonist has yet to be marketed. Progress has been slowed by the lack of appreciation of the large variety of cell types that express the MR and its diverse cell-type-specific actions, as well as its uniquely complex interactions actions at the molecular level. New MR antagonists should preferentially target the inflammatory and fibrotic effects of MR and perhaps its excitatory effects on sympathetic nervous system, but not the renal tubular epithelium or neurons of the cortex and hippocampus. This review briefly describes efforts to develop a third generation MR antagonist and why fourth generation antagonists and selective agonists based on structural determinants of tissue and ligand-specific MR activation should be contemplated. PMID:26466326

  20. Pharmacological and clinical importance of narcotic antagonists and mixed antagonists — use in cardiology

    PubMed Central

    Coltart, D. John; Malcolm, Alasdair D.

    1979-01-01

    1 The treatment of pain of cardiac origin requires a knowledge of the haemodynamic action of the analgesic agents used. 2 The haemodynamic effects of morphine, diamorphine, pavaveretum, pethidine and pentazocine are reviewed. 3 Clinical experience with the new antagonist analgesic buprenorphine is reported. 4 These studies indicate that buprenorphine may be the agent of choice for the relief of severe pain in patients with unstable circulation. PMID:465292

  1. Prostanoid receptor antagonists: development strategies and therapeutic applications

    PubMed Central

    Jones, RL; Giembycz, MA; Woodward, DF

    2009-01-01

    Identification of the primary products of cyclo-oxygenase (COX)/prostaglandin synthase(s), which occurred between 1958 and 1976, was followed by a classification system for prostanoid receptors (DP, EP1, EP2 …) based mainly on the pharmacological actions of natural and synthetic agonists and a few antagonists. The design of potent selective antagonists was rapid for certain prostanoid receptors (EP1, TP), slow for others (FP, IP) and has yet to be achieved in certain cases (EP2). While some antagonists are structurally related to the natural agonist, most recent compounds are ‘non-prostanoid’ (often acyl-sulphonamides) and have emerged from high-throughput screening of compound libraries, made possible by the development of (functional) assays involving single recombinant prostanoid receptors. Selective antagonists have been crucial to defining the roles of PGD2 (acting on DP1 and DP2 receptors) and PGE2 (on EP1 and EP4 receptors) in various inflammatory conditions; there are clear opportunities for therapeutic intervention. The vast endeavour on TP (thromboxane) antagonists is considered in relation to their limited pharmaceutical success in the cardiovascular area. Correspondingly, the clinical utility of IP (prostacyclin) antagonists is assessed in relation to the cloud hanging over the long-term safety of selective COX-2 inhibitors. Aspirin apart, COX inhibitors broadly suppress all prostanoid pathways, while high selectivity has been a major goal in receptor antagonist development; more targeted therapy may require an intermediate position with defined antagonist selectivity profiles. This review is intended to provide overviews of each antagonist class (including prostamide antagonists), covering major development strategies and current and potential clinical usage. PMID:19624532

  2. Antagonistic neural networks underlying differentiated leadership roles

    PubMed Central

    Boyatzis, Richard E.; Rochford, Kylie; Jack, Anthony I.

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of two distinct leadership roles, the task leader and the socio-emotional leader, has been documented in the leadership literature since the 1950s. Recent research in neuroscience suggests that the division between task-oriented and socio-emotional-oriented roles derives from a fundamental feature of our neurobiology: an antagonistic relationship between two large-scale cortical networks – the task-positive network (TPN) and the default mode network (DMN). Neural activity in TPN tends to inhibit activity in the DMN, and vice versa. The TPN is important for problem solving, focusing of attention, making decisions, and control of action. The DMN plays a central role in emotional self-awareness, social cognition, and ethical decision making. It is also strongly linked to creativity and openness to new ideas. Because activation of the TPN tends to suppress activity in the DMN, an over-emphasis on task-oriented leadership may prove deleterious to social and emotional aspects of leadership. Similarly, an overemphasis on the DMN would result in difficulty focusing attention, making decisions, and solving known problems. In this paper, we will review major streams of theory and research on leadership roles in the context of recent findings from neuroscience and psychology. We conclude by suggesting that emerging research challenges the assumption that role differentiation is both natural and necessary, in particular when openness to new ideas, people, emotions, and ethical concerns are important to success. PMID:24624074

  3. Endothelin receptor antagonists in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Dupuis, J; Hoeper, M M

    2008-02-01

    The endothelin (ET) system, especially ET-1 and the ET(A) and ET(B) receptors, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Together with prostanoids and phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, ET receptor antagonists have become mainstays in the current treatment of PAH. Three substances are currently available for the treatment of PAH. One of these substances, bosentan, blocks both ET(A) and ET(B) receptors, whereas the two other compounds, sitaxsentan and ambrisentan, are more selective blockers of the ET(A) receptor. There is ongoing debate as to whether selective or nonselective ET receptor blockade is advantageous in the setting of PAH, although there is no clear evidence that receptor selectivity is relevant with regard to the clinical effects of these drugs. For the time being, other features, such as safety profiles and the potential for pharmacokinetic interactions with other drugs used in the treatment of PAH, may be more important than selectivity or nonselectivity when selecting treatments for individual patients.

  4. Antagonists for acute oral cadmium chloride intoxication

    SciTech Connect

    Basinger, M.A.; Jones, M.M.; Holscher, M.A.; Vaughn, W.K.

    1988-01-01

    An examination has been carried out on the relative efficacy of a number of chelating agents when acting as antagonists for oral cadmium chloride intoxication in mice. The compounds were administered orally after the oral administration of cadmium chloride at 1 mmol/kg. Of the compounds examined, several were useful in terms of enhancing survival, but by far the most effective in both enhancing survival and leaving minimal residual levels of cadmium in the liver and the kidney, was meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA). Several polyaminocarboxylic acids also enhanced survival. The most effective of these in reducing liver and kidney levels of cadmium were diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane-N,N,N'N'-tetraacetic acid (CDTA), and triethylenetetraminehexaacetic acid (TTHA). D-Penicillamine (DPA) was found to promote survival but also led to kidney cadmium levels higher than those found in the controls. Sodium 2,3-dimercaptopropane-1-sulfonate (DMPS) was as effective in promoting survival as DMSA but left levels of cadmium in the kidney and liver that were approximately four times greater than those found with DMSA.

  5. New potential uroselective NO-donor alpha1-antagonists.

    PubMed

    Boschi, Donatella; Tron, Gian Cesare; Di Stilo, Antonella; Fruttero, Roberta; Gasco, Alberto; Poggesi, Elena; Motta, Gianni; Leonardi, Amedeo

    2003-08-14

    A recent uroselective alpha(1)-adrenoceptor antagonist, REC15/2739, has been joined with nitrooxy and furoxan NO-donor moieties to give new NO-donor alpha(1)-antagonists. All the compounds studied proved to be potent and selective ligands of human cloned alpha(1a)-receptor subtype. Derivatives 6 and 7 were able to relax the prostatic portion of rat vas deferens contracted by (-)-noradrenaline because of both their alpha(1A)-antagonist and their NO-donor properties.

  6. Multiple Targeting Approaches on Histamine H3 Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Khanfar, Mohammad A.; Affini, Anna; Lutsenko, Kiril; Nikolic, Katarina; Butini, Stefania; Stark, Holger

    2016-01-01

    With the very recent market approval of pitolisant (Wakix®), the interest in clinical applications of novel multifunctional histamine H3 receptor antagonists has clearly increased. Since histamine H3 receptor antagonists in clinical development have been tested for a variety of different indications, the combination of pharmacological properties in one molecule for improved pharmacological effects and reduced unwanted side-effects is rationally based on the increasing knowledge on the complex neurotransmitter regulations. The polypharmacological approaches on histamine H3 receptor antagonists on different G-protein coupled receptors, transporters, enzymes as well as on NO-signaling mechanism are described, supported with some lead structures. PMID:27303254

  7. Multiple Targeting Approaches on Histamine H3 Receptor Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Khanfar, Mohammad A; Affini, Anna; Lutsenko, Kiril; Nikolic, Katarina; Butini, Stefania; Stark, Holger

    2016-01-01

    With the very recent market approval of pitolisant (Wakix®), the interest in clinical applications of novel multifunctional histamine H3 receptor antagonists has clearly increased. Since histamine H3 receptor antagonists in clinical development have been tested for a variety of different indications, the combination of pharmacological properties in one molecule for improved pharmacological effects and reduced unwanted side-effects is rationally based on the increasing knowledge on the complex neurotransmitter regulations. The polypharmacological approaches on histamine H3 receptor antagonists on different G-protein coupled receptors, transporters, enzymes as well as on NO-signaling mechanism are described, supported with some lead structures.

  8. Single exposure of dopamine D1 antagonist prevents and D2 antagonist attenuates methylphenidate effect

    PubMed Central

    Claussen, Catherine M; Witte, Lindsey J; Dafny, Nachum

    2015-01-01

    Methylphenidate (MPD) is a readily prescribed drug for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and moreover is used illicitly by youths for its cognitive-enhancing effects and recreation. MPD exposure in rodents elicits increased locomotor activity. Repetitive MPD exposure leads to further augmentation of their locomotor activity. This behavioral response is referred to as behavioral sensitization. Behavioral sensitization is used as an experimental marker for a drug’s ability to elicit dependence. There is evidence that dopamine (DA) is a key player in the acute and chronic MPD effect; however, the role of DA in the effects elicited by MPD is still debated. The objective of this study was to investigate the role of D1 and/or D2 DA receptors in the acute and chronic effect of MPD on locomotor activity. The study lasted for 12 consecutive days. Seven groups of male Sprague Dawley® rats were used. A single D1 or D2 antagonist was given before and after acute and chronic MPD administration. Single injection of D1 DA antagonist was able to significantly attenuate the locomotor activity when given prior to the initial MPD exposure and after repetitive MPD exposure, while the D2 DA antagonist partially attenuated the locomotor activity only when given before the second MPD exposure. The results show the role, at least in part, of the D1 DA receptor in the mechanism of behavioral sensitization, whereas the D2 DA receptor only partially modulates the response to acute and chronic MPD. PMID:27186140

  9. Anthropomorphic finger antagonistically actuated by SMA plates.

    PubMed

    Engeberg, Erik D; Dilibal, Savas; Vatani, Morteza; Choi, Jae-Won; Lavery, John

    2015-08-20

    Most robotic applications that contain shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators use the SMA in a linear or spring shape. In contrast, a novel robotic finger was designed in this paper using SMA plates that were thermomechanically trained to take the shape of a flexed human finger when Joule heated. This flexor actuator was placed in parallel with an extensor actuator that was designed to straighten when Joule heated. Thus, alternately heating and cooling the flexor and extensor actuators caused the finger to flex and extend. Three different NiTi based SMA plates were evaluated for their ability to apply forces to a rigid and compliant object. The best of these three SMAs was able to apply a maximum fingertip force of 9.01N on average. A 3D CAD model of a human finger was used to create a solid model for the mold of the finger covering skin. Using a 3D printer, inner and outer molds were fabricated to house the actuators and a position sensor, which were assembled using a multi-stage casting process. Next, a nonlinear antagonistic controller was developed using an outer position control loop with two inner MOSFET current control loops. Sine and square wave tracking experiments demonstrated minimal errors within the operational bounds of the finger. The ability of the finger to recover from unexpected disturbances was also shown along with the frequency response up to 7 rad s(-1). The closed loop bandwidth of the system was 6.4 rad s(-1) when operated intermittently and 1.8 rad s(-1) when operated continuously.

  10. [Angiotensin II receptor antagonists: different or equivalent?].

    PubMed

    Mounier-Vehier, C; Devos, P

    ARA-II: Angiotensin II receptor antagonists (ARA-II) belong to a recent class of antihypertensive drugs whose mechanism of action is similar to converting enzyme inhibitors (CEI). ARA-II are particularly interesting due to the excellent clinical and biological tolerance, similar to placebo, and their antihypertensive efficacy, comparable with classical drug classes. PUBLISHED TRIALS: A meta-analysis, published by Conlin in the American Journal of Hypertension, suggests that ARA-II, specifically losartan, valsartan, irbesartan and candesartan, have an equipotent blood pressure lowering effect. The careful lecture of this meta-analysis however discloses a faulty methodology from which no valid conclusion can be drawn. Since this early publication, several other comparative studies have been published. These multicentric, randomized double-blind studies enrolled a sufficient number of patients and demonstrated a clinical difference between certain ARA-II at usual dosages. CLINICAL PRACTICE: These studies do have an impact on everyday practice. For the practitioner, the goal is to obtain and then maintain a long-term and optimal reduction in the blood pressure level (reduction or prevention of target-organ disorders and cardiovascular complications of high blood pressure). This reduction in the cardiovascular risk will also depend directly on tolerance and compliance to the antihypertensive treatment. This element must also be considered in assessing treatment efficacy, independent of the blood pressure lowering effect. The results of several other studies will be published in 2001-2003. These large-scale studies on ARA-II related morbidity and mortality will be most useful in determining the role of these drugs in different therapeutic strategies compared with other drug classes.

  11. The pharmacological properties of lipophilic calcium antagonists.

    PubMed

    van Zwieten, P A

    1998-01-01

    Several types of calcium antagonists (CA) (verapamil, diltiazem, nifedipine and related drugs) may be used as antihypertensives. In practice, the dihydropyridines (nifedipine and related drugs) are the CA used most frequently as antihypertensives. Apart from the lowering of blood pressure CA may lead to other, theoretically beneficial, effects: regression of left ventricular and vascular hypertrophy, renal protection, weak natriuretic, weak antiplatelet, anti-ischaemic and antiatherogenic activity. Several new dihydropyridine CA have been introduced in recent years. The advantages of the newer compounds, such as amlodipine, felodipine, isradipine, lacidipine and lercanidipine, may include: vasoselectivity, hence little or no cardiodepressant activity; an improved kinetic profile, resulting in a slow onset and long duration of action, fewer side-effects such as reflex tachycardia and headache, owing to the slow onset of the antihypertensive action. For a few newer CA a predominant effect on specialized circulatory beds (renal, coronary and cerebral) has been claimed. The new CA, which are clearly lipophilic, deserve special attention. Owing to the lipophilic character of such compounds considerable concentration occurs in lipid-containing membrane depots. The CA thus concentrated are slowly released from these depots and, subsequently, reach their targets, the L-type calcium channels. This phenomenon explains both the slow onset and the long duration of action of these CA. Owing to the slow onset of action reflex tachycardia is virtually absent. The long duration of action allows satisfactory control of blood pressure in hypertensives by means of a single daily dose. A few lipophilic dihydropyridine CA are vasoselective. This property implies that at therapeutic, vasodilatory dosages no cardiodepressant activity occurs. Lercanidipine is a recently introduced example of a lipophilic and vasoselective dihydropyridine CA. It is an effective vasodilator

  12. Complications of TNF-α antagonists and iron homeostasis

    EPA Science Inventory

    TNF-α is a central regulator of inflammation and its blockade downregulates other proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors. Subsequently, TNF-α antagonists are currently used in treatment regimens directed toward several inflammatory diseases. Despite a beneficia...

  13. Solution structures and molecular interactions of selective melanocortin receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chul-Jin; Yun, Ji-Hye; Lim, Sung-Kil; Lee, Weontae

    2010-12-01

    The solution structures and inter-molecular interaction of the cyclic melanocortin antagonists SHU9119, JKC363, HS014, and HS024 with receptor molecules have been determined by NMR spectroscopy and molecular modeling. While SHU9119 is known as a nonselective antagonist, JKC363, HS014, and HS024 are selective for the melanocortin subtype-4 receptor (MC4R) involved in modulation of food intake. Data from NMR and molecular dynamics suggest that the conformation of the Trp9 sidechain in the three MC4R-selective antagonists is quite different from that of SHU9119. This result strongly supports the concept that the spatial orientation of the hydrophobic aromatic residue is more important for determining selectivity than the presence of a basic, "arginine-like" moiety responsible for biological activity. We propose that the conformation of hydrophobic residues of MCR antagonists is critical for receptor-specific selectivity.

  14. Structure-based drug design identifies novel LPA3 antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Fells, James I.; Tsukahara, Ryoko; Liu, Jianxiong; Tigyi, Gabor; Parrill, Abby L.

    2009-01-01

    Compound 5 ([5-(3-nitrophenoxy)-1,3-dioxo-1,3-dihydro-2-isoindol-2-yl]acetic acid) was identified as a weak selective LPA3 antagonist (IC50=4504 nM) in a virtual screening effort to optimize a dual LPA2&3 antagonist. Structure-based drug design techniques were used to prioritize similarity search matches of compound 5. This strategy rapidly identified 10 novel antagonists. The two most efficacious compounds identified inhibit activation of the LPA3 receptor by 200 nM LPA with IC50 values of 752 nM and 2992 nM. These compounds additionally define changes to our previously reported pharmacophore that will improve its ability to identify more potent and selective LPA3 receptor antagonists. The results of the combined computational and experimental screening are reported. PMID:19800804

  15. Structure-based drug design identifies novel LPA3 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Fells, James I; Tsukahara, Ryoko; Liu, Jianxiong; Tigyi, Gabor; Parrill, Abby L

    2009-11-01

    Compound 5 ([5-(3-nitrophenoxy)-1,3-dioxo-1,3-dihydro-2-isoindol-2-yl]acetic acid) was identified as a weak selective LPA(3) antagonist (IC(50)=4504 nM) in a virtual screening effort to optimize a dual LPA(2 and 3) antagonist. Structure-based drug design techniques were used to prioritize similarity search matches of compound 5. This strategy rapidly identified 10 novel antagonists. The two most efficacious compounds identified inhibit activation of the LPA(3) receptor by 200 nM LPA with IC(50) values of 752 nM and 2992 nM. These compounds additionally define changes to our previously reported pharmacophore that will improve its ability to identify more potent and selective LPA(3) receptor antagonists. The results of the combined computational and experimental screening are reported.

  16. Assortative mating by fitness and sexually antagonistic genetic variation.

    PubMed

    Arnqvist, Göran

    2011-07-01

    Recent documentations of sexually antagonistic genetic variation in fitness have spurred an interest in the mechanisms that may act to maintain such variation in natural populations. Using individual-based simulations, I show that positive assortative mating by fitness increases the amount of sexually antagonistic genetic variance in fitness, primarily by elevating the equilibrium frequency of heterozygotes, over most of the range of sex-specific selection and dominance. Further, although the effects of assortative mating by fitness on the protection conditions of polymorphism in sexually antagonistic loci were relatively minor, it widens the protection conditions under most reasonable scenarios (e.g., under heterozygote superiority when fitness is averaged across the sexes) but can also somewhat narrow the protection conditions under other circumstances. The near-ubiquity of assortative mating in nature suggests that it may contribute to upholding standing sexually antagonistic genetic variation in fitness.

  17. Vasopressin-receptor antagonist therapy in patients with hyponatraemia.

    PubMed

    Vachharajani, Tushar; Vachharajani, Vidula

    2007-07-01

    Hyponatraemia often complicates the treatment of underlying conditions in patients who are seriously ill. Arginine vasopressin receptor antagonists block the action of arginine vasopressin and correct sodium and water imbalance in patients with euvolaemic or hypervolaemic hyponatraemia.

  18. Antagonistic interactions of soil pseudomonads are structured in time.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, Susanne A; Soucy, Jean-Paul R; Kassen, Rees

    2017-04-06

    Social interactions have been invoked as potential major selective forces structuring natural microbial communities and thus may help explain the astonishing bacterial diversity of natural ecosystems. Here, we investigate the prevalence and structure of exotoxin-mediated antagonistic interactions among free-living soil Pseudomonas strains collected over the course of two years at distances of up to one kilometer. Unlike some previous studies on antagonistic interactions among natural isolates, we found the prevalence of exotoxin-mediated inhibitions to be relatively low. When present, antagonistic interactions show a weakly negative relationship with genetic relatedness and metabolic similarity. Intriguingly, isolates sampled from the same growing season were significantly more likely to inhibit each other than they were to inhibit isolates from different growing seasons. Exotoxin-mediated antagonistic interactions between soil pseudomonads thus seem to be structured in time but do not appear to be a major selective force structuring free-living soil bacterial communities of soil pseudomonads.

  19. Structure-activity relationships of benzothiazole GPR35 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Abdalhameed, Manahil M; Zhao, Pingwei; Hurst, Dow P; Reggio, Patricia H; Abood, Mary E; Croatt, Mitchell P

    2017-02-01

    The first structure-activity relationships for a benzothiazole scaffold acting as an antagonist at GPR35 is presented. Analogues were designed based on a lead compound that was previously determined to have selective activity as a GPR35 antagonist. The synthetic route was modular in nature to independently explore the role of the middle and both ends of the scaffold. The activities of the analogues illustrate the importance of all three segments of the compound.

  20. Structure-activity relationships of benzothiazole GPR35 antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Abdalhameed, Manahil M.; Zhao, Pingwei; Hurst, Dow P.; Reggio, Patricia H.; Abood, Mary E.; Croatt, Mitchell P.

    2017-01-01

    The first structure-activity relationships for a benzothiazole scaffold acting as an antagonist at GPR35 is presented. Analogues were designed based on a lead compound that was previously determined to have selective activity as a GPR35 antagonist. The synthetic route was modular in nature to independently explore the role of the middle and both ends of the scaffold. The activities of the analogues illustrate the importance of all three segments of the compound. PMID:27989666

  1. Discovery of Novel Triazole-Based Opioid Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiang; Keenan, Susan M.; Peng, Youyi; Nair, Anil C.; Yu, Seong Jae; Howells, Richard D.; Welsh, William J.

    2009-01-01

    We report the computer-aided design, chemical synthesis, and biological evaluation of a novel family of δ opioid receptor (DOR) antagonists containing a 1,2,4-triazole core structure that are structurally distinct from other known opioid receptor active ligands. Among those δ antagonists sharing this core structure, 8 exhibited strong binding affinity (Ki = 50 nM) for the DOR and appreciable selectivity for δ over μ and opioid receptors (δ/μ = 80; δ/κ > 200). PMID:16821764

  2. Identification of M-CSF agonists and antagonists

    DOEpatents

    Pandit, Jayvardhan; Jancarik, Jarmila; Kim, Sung-Hou; Koths, Kirston; Halenbeck, Robert; Fear, Anna Lisa; Taylor, Eric; Yamamoto, Ralph; Bohm, Andrew

    2000-02-15

    The present invention is directed to methods for crystallizing macrophage colony stimulating factor. The present invention is also directed to methods for designing and producing M-CSF agonists and antagonists using information derived from the crystallographic structure of M-CSF. The invention is also directed to methods for screening M-CSF agonists and antagonists. In addition, the present invention is directed to an isolated, purified, soluble and functional M-CSF receptor.

  3. CXCR2 receptor antagonists: a medicinal chemistry perspective.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, Michael P; Yu, Younong

    2014-01-01

    Dysregulated leukocyte recruitment is believed to be a key contributor to various acute and chronic inflammatory disorders which can lead to serious pathological consequences. Chemokines are small molecular weight proteins that have been shown to be imperative in the direction of leukocytes to the sites of inflammation. In humans, several of these chemokines (CXCL8 and CXCL1) are elevated in inflammatory disorders such as asthma, arthritis, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). These chemokines modulate their downstream effects thru G-protein coupled receptors, such as CXCR2, making the identification of small-molecule antagonists of this receptor attractive towards developing novel therapies to treat inflammatory conditions. Since the first report of a CXCR2 receptor antagonist in 1998, there has been a considerable effort conducted mainly in the pharmaceutical industry to identify novel classes of CXCR2 receptor antagonists. Over a dozen distinct classes of CXCR2 receptor antagonists have been reported in the literature to date with a number of these compounds having reached mid-stage clinical trials. This review will provide a broad overview the medicinal chemistry efforts over the past 15 years towards the identification of CXCR2 receptor antagonists. The discussion will focus upon the early preclinical space covering the structure activity relationships (SAR), pharmacology, as well in preclinical in vivo evaluation for the different series of CXCR2 receptor antagonists. In addition, the available clinical data for the most advanced compounds in the clinic will be discussed and along with a perspective of the area moving forward.

  4. Neuronal death enhanced by N-methyl-d-aspartate antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Ikonomidou, Chrysanthy; Stefovska, Vanya; Turski, Lechoslaw

    2000-01-01

    Glutamate promotes neuronal survival during brain development and destroys neurons after injuries in the mature brain. Glutamate antagonists are in human clinical trials aiming to demonstrate limitation of neuronal injury after head trauma, which consists of both rapid and slowly progressing neurodegeneration. Furthermore, glutamate antagonists are considered for neuroprotection in chronic neurodegenerative disorders with slowly progressing cell death only. Therefore, humans suffering from Huntington's disease, characterized by slowly progressing neurodegeneration of the basal ganglia, are subjected to trials with glutamate antagonists. Here we demonstrate that progressive neurodegeneration in the basal ganglia induced by the mitochondrial toxin 3-nitropropionate or in the hippocampus by traumatic brain injury is enhanced by N-methyl-d-aspartate antagonists but ameliorated by α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate antagonists. These observations reveal that N-methyl-d-aspartate antagonists may increase neurodestruction in mature brain undergoing slowly progressing neurodegeneration, whereas blockade of the action of glutamate at α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate receptors may be neuroprotective. PMID:11058158

  5. Ethanol and Mesolimbic Serotonin/Dopamine Interactions Via 5-HT1B Receptors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    5 - HT3 receptor antagonist antagonized systemic ethanol- induced increases of DA release in the VTA [10] or the NACC [9]. Moreover, the...experiments with a selective 5 -HT1B receptor antagonist such as SB 216641 are required to strengthen this conclusion. The future experiments will be... receptor antagonist ), but not BRL 15572 (a 5 -HT1D/1A receptor antagonist ) or WAY 100635 (a 5 -HT1A receptor antagonist ). Administration

  6. Early Illustrations of Geste Antagoniste in Cervical and Generalized Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Broussolle, Emmanuel; Laurencin, Chloé; Bernard, Emilien; Thobois, Stéphane; Danaila, Teodor; Krack, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background Geste antagoniste, or sensory trick, is a voluntary maneuver that temporarily reduces the severity of dystonic postures or movements. We present a historical review of early reports and illustrations of geste antagoniste. Results In 1894, Brissaud described this phenomenon in Paris in patients with torticollis. He noted that a violent muscular contraction could be reversed by a minor voluntary action. He considered the improvement obtained by what he called “simple mannerisms, childish behaviour or fake pathological movements” was proof of the psychogenic origin of what he named mental torticollis. This concept was supported by photographical illustrations of the patients. The term geste antagoniste was used by Brissaud’s pupils, Meige and Feindel, in their 1902 monograph on movement disorders. Other reports and illustrations of this sign were published in Europe between 1894 and 1906. Although not mentioned explicitly, geste antagoniste was also illustrated in a case report of generalized dystonia in Oppenheim’s 1911 seminal description of dystonia musculorum deformans in Berlin. Discussion Brissaud-Meige’s misinterpretation of the geste antagoniste unfortunately anchored the psychogenic origin of dystonia for decades. In New York, Herz brought dystonia back into the realm of organic neurology in 1944. Thereafter, it was given prominence by other authors, notably Fahn and Marsden in the 1970–1980s. Nowadays, neurologists routinely investigate for geste antagoniste when a dystonic syndrome is suspected, because it provides a further argument in favor of dystonia. The term alleviating maneuver was proposed in 2014 to replace sensory trick or geste antagoniste. This major sign is now part of the motor phenomenology of the 2013 Movement Disorder Society’s classification of dystonia. PMID:26417535

  7. Boosting Adaptive Immunity: A New Role for PAFR Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Koga, Marianna M.; Bizzarro, Bruna; Sá-Nunes, Anderson; Rios, Francisco J.; Jancar, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    We have previously shown that the Platelet-Activating Factor Receptor (PAFR) engagement in murine macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) promotes a tolerogenic phenotype reversed by PAFR-antagonists treatment in vitro. Here, we investigated whether a PAFR antagonist would modulate the immune response in vivo. Mice were subcutaneously injected with OVA or OVA with PAFR-antagonist WEB2170 on days 0 and 7. On day 14, OVA–specific IgG2a and IgG1 were measured in the serum. The presence of WEB2170 during immunization significantly increased IgG2a without affecting IgG1 levels. When WEB2170 was added to OVA in complete Freund’s adjuvant, enhanced IgG2a but not IgG1 production was also observed, and CD4+ FoxP3+ T cell frequency in the spleen was reduced compared to mice immunized without the antagonist. Similar results were observed in PAFR-deficient mice, along with increased Tbet mRNA expression in the spleen. Additionally, bone marrow-derived DCs loaded with OVA were transferred into naïve mice and their splenocytes were co-cultured with fresh OVA-loaded DCs. CD4+ T cell proliferation was higher in the group transferred with DCs treated with the PAFR-antagonist. We propose that the activation of PAFR by ligands present in the site of immunization is able to fine-tune the adaptive immune response. PMID:27966635

  8. GnRH antagonists may affect endometrial receptivity

    PubMed Central

    Rackow, Beth W.; Kliman, Harvey J.; Taylor, Hugh S.

    2009-01-01

    Study objective HOXA10 is an essential regulator of endometrial receptivity. To determine the effect of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonists on endometrial receptivity we assessed endometrial HOXA10 expression in GnRH antagonist, GnRH agonist, and natural cycles. Design Prospective case-control study Setting University academic medical center Patients Nineteen subjects were included: 12 subjects underwent controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) with recombinant follicle stimulating hormone (rFSH) and used either a GnRH antagonist or a GnRH agonist; 7 control subjects underwent natural cycles. Interventions Pipelle endometrial biopsies were obtained 11 days after human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) administration or spontaneous luteinizing hormone (LH) surge in untreated cycles, respectively. Immunohistochemistry was used to assess HOXA10 protein expression in endometrial glands and stroma. Main outcome measure(s) Endometrial HOXA10 protein expression Results HOXA10 expression was significantly decreased in endometrial stromal cells in GnRH antagonist treated cycles compared with GnRH agonist treated cycles or natural cycle controls. There was no significant difference in glandular cell HOXA10 expression among the three groups. Conclusions Use of GnRH antagonists may be associated with impaired HOXA10 expression in endometrial stromal cells, and thus may affect endometrial receptivity. PMID:18410932

  9. Pharmacophore development for antagonists at α1 adrenergic receptor subtypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bremner, J. B.; Coban, B.; Griffith, R.

    1996-12-01

    Many receptors, including α1 adrenergic receptors, have a range of subtypes. This offers possibilities for the development of highly selective antagonists with potentially fewer detrimental effects. Antagonists developed for α1A receptors, for example, would have potential in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. As part of the molecular design process, structural features necessary for the selective affinity for α1A and α1B adrenergic receptors have been investigated. The molecular modelling software (particularly the Apex module) of Molecular Simulations, Inc. was used to develop pharmacophore models for these two subtypes. Low-energy conformations of a set of known antagonists were used as input, together with a classification of the receptor affinity data. The biophores proposed by the program were evaluated and pharmacophores were proposed. The pharmacophore models were validated by testing the fit of known antagonists, not included in the training set. The critical structural feature for selectivity between the α1A and α1B adrenergic receptor sites is the distance between the basic nitrogen atom and the centre of an aromatic ring system. This will be exploited in the design and synthesis of structurally new selective antagonists for these sites.

  10. Small molecule antagonists for chemokine CCR3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Willems, Lianne I; Ijzerman, Ad P

    2010-09-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR3 is believed to play a role in the development of allergic diseases such as asthma, atopic dermatitis, and allergic rhinitis. Despite the conflicting results that have been reported regarding the importance of eosinophils and CCR3 in allergic inflammation, inhibition of this receptor with small molecule antagonists is thought to provide a valuable approach for the treatment of these diseases. This review describes the structure-activity relationships (SAR) of small molecule CCR3 antagonists as reported in the scientific and patent literature. Various chemical classes of small molecule CCR3 antagonists have been described so far, including (bi)piperidine and piperazine derivatives, N-arylalkylpiperidine urea derivatives and (N-ureidoalkyl)benzylpiperidines, phenylalanine derivatives, morpholinyl derivatives, pyrrolidinohydroquinazolines, arylsulfonamides, amino-alkyl amides, imidazole- and pyrimidine-based antagonists, and bicyclic diamines. The (N-ureidoalkyl)benzylpiperidines are the best studied class in view of their generally high affinity and antagonizing potential. For many of these antagonists subnanomolar IC(50) values were reported for binding to CCR3 along with the ability to effectively inhibit intracellular calcium mobilization and eosinophil chemotaxis induced by CCR3 agonist ligands in vitro.

  11. Characterization of putative 5-HT7 receptors mediating tachycardia in the cat

    PubMed Central

    Villalón, Carlos M; Heiligers, Jan P C; Centurión, David; De Vries, Peter; Saxena, Pramod R

    1997-01-01

    It has been suggested that the tachycardic response to 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in the spinal-transected cat is mediated by ‘5-HT1-like' receptors since this effect, being mimicked by 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT), is not modified by ketanserin or MDL 72222, but it is blocked by methiothepin, methysergide or mesulergine. The present study was set out to reanalyse this suggestion in terms of the IUPHAR 5-HT receptor classification schemes proposed in 1994 and 1996. Intravenous (i.v.) bolus injections of the tryptamine derivatives, 5-CT (0.01, 0.03, 0.1, 0.3, 1, 3, 10 and 30 μg kg−1), 5-HT (3, 10 and 30 μg kg−1) and 5-methoxytryptamine (3, 10 and 30 μg kg−1) as well as the atypical antipsychotic drug, clozapine (1000 and 3000 μg kg−1) resulted in dose-dependent increases in heart rate, with a rank order of agonist potency of 5-CT >> 5-HT > 5-methoxytryptamine >> clozapine. The tachycardic effects of 5-HT and 5-methoxytryptamine were dose-dependently antagonized by i.v. administration of lisuride (30 and 100 μg kg−1), ergotamine (100 and 300 μg kg−1) or mesulergine (100, 300 and 1000 μg kg−1); the highest doses of these antagonists used also blocked the tachycardic effects of 5-CT. Clozapine (1000 and 3000 μg kg−1) did not affect the 5-HT-induced tachycardia, but attenuated, with its highest dose, the responses to 5-methoxytryptamine and 5-CT. However, these doses of clozapine as well as the high doses of ergotamine (300 μg kg−1) and mesulergine (300 and 1000 μg kg−1) also attenuated the tachycardic effects of isoprenaline. In contrast, 5-HT-, 5-methoxytryptamine- and 5-CT-induced tachycardia were not significantly modified after i.v. administration of physiological saline (0.1 and 0.3 ml kg−1), the 5-HT1B/1D receptor antagonist, GR127935 (500 μg kg−1) or the 5-HT3/4 receptor antagonist, tropisetron (3000 μg kg−1). Intravenous injections of the 5-HT1 receptor agonists

  12. Mixed antagonistic effects of bilobalide at rho1 GABAC receptor.

    PubMed

    Huang, S H; Duke, R K; Chebib, M; Sasaki, K; Wada, K; Johnston, G A R

    2006-01-01

    Bilobalide was found to be a moderately potent antagonist with a weak use-dependent effect at recombinant human rho(1) GABA(C) receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes using two-electrode voltage clamp methodology. Antagonism of bilobalide at homomeric rho(1) GABA(C) receptors appeared to be mixed. At low concentration, bilobalide (3 microM) caused a parallel right shift and surmountable GABA maximal response of the GABA dose-response curve characteristic of a competitive antagonist. At high concentrations, bilobalide (10-100 microM) caused nonparallel right shifts and reduced maximal GABA responses of GABA dose-response curves characteristic of a noncompetitive antagonist. The potency of bilobalide appears to be dependent on the concentrations of GABA and was more potent at lower GABA concentrations. The mechanism of action of bilobalide at rho(1) GABA(C) receptors appears to be similar to that of the chloride channel blocker picrotoxinin.

  13. Enhancer Responses to Similarly Distributed Antagonistic Gradients in Development

    PubMed Central

    Zinzen, Robert P; Papatsenko, Dmitri

    2007-01-01

    Formation of spatial gene expression patterns in development depends on transcriptional responses mediated by gene control regions, enhancers. Here, we explore possible responses of enhancers to overlapping gradients of antagonistic transcriptional regulators in the Drosophila embryo. Using quantitative models based on enhancer structure, we demonstrate how a pair of antagonistic transcription factor gradients with similar or even identical spatial distributions can lead to the formation of distinct gene expression domains along the embryo axes. The described mechanisms are sufficient to explain the formation of the anterior and the posterior knirps expression, the posterior hunchback expression domain, and the lateral stripes of rhomboid expression and of other ventral neurogenic ectodermal genes. The considered principles of interaction between antagonistic gradients at the enhancer level can also be applied to diverse developmental processes, such as domain specification in imaginal discs, or even eyespot pattern formation in the butterfly wing. PMID:17500585

  14. Neuroprotective Effects of Glutamate Antagonists and Extracellular Acidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaku, David A.; Giffard, Rona G.; Choi, Dennis W.

    1993-06-01

    Glutamate antagonists protect neurons from hypoxic injury both in vivo and in vitro, but in vitro studies have not been done under the acidic conditions typical of hypoxia-ischemia in vivo. Consistent with glutamate receptor antagonism, extracellular acidity reduced neuronal death in murine cortical cultures that were deprived of oxygen and glucose. Under these acid conditions, N-methyl-D-aspartate and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isox-azolepropionate-kainate antagonists further reduced neuronal death, such that some neurons tolerated prolonged oxygen and glucose deprivation almost as well as did astrocytes. Neuroprotection induced by this combination exceeded that induced by glutamate antagonists alone, suggesting that extracellular acidity has beneficial effects beyond the attenuation of ionotropic glutamate receptor activation.

  15. Discovery of the improved antagonistic prolactin variants by library screening.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun; Gong, Wei; Breinholt, Jens; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Leif; Zhang, Jinchao; Ma, Qinhong; Chen, Jianhe; Panina, Svetlana; Guo, Wei; Li, Tengkun; Zhang, Jingyuan; Kong, Meng; Liu, Zibing; Mao, Jingjing; Christensen, Leif; Hu, Sean; Wang, Lingyun

    2011-11-01

    Prolactin (PRL), a potent growth stimulator of the mammary epithelium, has been suggested to be a factor contributing to the development and progression of breast and prostate cancer. Several PRL receptor (PRLR) antagonists have been identified in the past decades, but their in vivo growth inhibitory potency was restricted by low receptor affinity, rendering them pharmacologically unattractive for clinical treatment. Thus, higher receptor affinity is essential for the development of improved PRLR antagonistic variants with improved in vivo potency. In this study, we generated Site 1 focused protein libraries of human G129R-PRL mutants and screened for those with increased affinity to the human PRLR. By combining the mutations with enhanced affinities for PRLR, we identified a novel G129R-PRL variant with mutations at Site 1 that render nearly 50-fold increase in the antagonistic potency in vitro.

  16. Thermodynamic analysis of antagonist and agonist interactions with dopamine receptors.

    PubMed

    Duarte, E P; Oliveira, C R; Carvalho, A P

    1988-03-01

    The binding of [3H]spiperone to dopamine D-2 receptors and its inhibition by antagonists and agonists were examined in microsomes derived from the sheep caudate nucleus, at temperatures between 37 and 1 degree C, and the thermodynamic parameters of the binding were evaluated. The affinity of the receptor for the antagonists, spiperone and (+)-butaclamol, decreased as the incubation temperature decreased; the affinity for haloperidol did not further decrease at temperatures below 15 degrees C. The binding of the antagonists was associated with very large increases in entropy, as expected for hydrophobic interactions. The enthalpy and entropy changes associated with haloperidol binding were dependent on temperature, in contrast to those associated with spiperone and (+)-butaclamol. The magnitude of the entropy increase associated with the specific binding of the antagonists did not correlate with the degree of lipophilicity of these drugs. The data suggest that, in addition to hydrophobic forces, other forces are also involved in the antagonist-dopamine receptor interactions, and that a conformational change of the receptor could occur when the antagonist binds. Agonist binding data are consistent with a two-state model of the receptor, a high-affinity state (RH) and a low-affinity state (RL). The affinity of dopamine binding to the RH decreased with decreasing temperatures below 20 degrees C, whereas the affinity for the RL increased at low temperatures. In contrast, the affinity of apomorphine for both states of receptor decreased as the temperature decreased from 30 to 8 degrees C. A clear distinction between the energetics of high-affinity and low-affinity agonist binding was observed. The formation of the high-affinity complex was associated with larger increases in enthalpy and entropy than the interaction with the low-affinity state was. The results suggest that the interaction of the receptor with the G-proteins, induced or stabilized by the binding of

  17. Discovery of Tertiary Sulfonamides as Potent Liver X Receptor Antagonists

    SciTech Connect

    Zuercher, William J.; Buckholz†, Richard G.; Campobasso, Nino; Collins, Jon L.; Galardi, Cristin M.; Gampe, Robert T.; Hyatt, Stephen M.; Merrihew, Susan L.; Moore, John T.; Oplinger, Jeffrey A.; Reid, Paul R.; Spearing, Paul K.; Stanley, Thomas B.; Stewart, Eugene L.; Willson, Timothy M.

    2010-08-12

    Tertiary sulfonamides were identified in a HTS as dual liver X receptor (LXR, NR1H2, and NR1H3) ligands, and the binding affinity of the series was increased through iterative analogue synthesis. A ligand-bound cocrystal structure was determined which elucidated key interactions for high binding affinity. Further characterization of the tertiary sulfonamide series led to the identification of high affinity LXR antagonists. GSK2033 (17) is the first potent cell-active LXR antagonist described to date. 17 may be a useful chemical probe to explore the cell biology of this orphan nuclear receptor.

  18. Scaffold variations in amine warhead of histamine H₃ receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Wingen, Kerstin; Stark, Holger

    2013-12-01

    The histamine H₃ receptor (H₃R) is involved in numerous regulatory neurotransmission processes and there-fore, is a prominent target for centrally occurring disease with some promising clinical candidates. Previous research resulted in the identification of a core pharmacophore blueprint for H₃R antagonists/inverse agonists, which when inserted in a molecule, mostly ensures acceptable affinity. Nevertheless, variations of scaffold and peripheral areas can increase potency and pharmacokinetic profile of drug candidates. The variations in amine scaffolds of antagonists for this aminergic GPCR are of special importance.

  19. Barnidipine, a long-acting slow onset calcium antagonist.

    PubMed

    Korstanje, C

    2000-11-01

    Barnidipine is a stereochemically pure dihydropyridine calcium antagonist with a high potency. The drug showed a slow onset and long-lasting vasorelaxating effect in vitro, and strong antihypertensive activity in hypertension models. Barnidipine was shown to have a high vasoselectivity and offered protection in cardiac and renal ischaemia models. The in vitro drug:drug interaction profile suggests a low potential for clinically relevant interactions with concomitant medication. It can be anticipated that barnidipine is an attractive calcium antagonist, offering good blood pressure control without compensatory baroreflex activity.

  20. Retention and Outcome in a Narcotic Antagonist Treatment Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capone, Thomas; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Patients in an outpatient narcotic antagonist treatment program were followed through their course of treatment. Those who remained longer were found to enter treatment with more stable employment records and less recent opiate use. They also appeared more successful at termination, with better vocational stability, less extraneous drug use, and…

  1. Endothelin receptor antagonists and cardiovascular diseases of aging.

    PubMed

    Love, M P; McMurray, J J

    2001-01-01

    Our understanding of the role of the endothelin system in human cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology has evolved very rapidly since the initial description of its constituent parts in 1988. Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is the predominant endothelin isoform in the human cardiovascular system and has potent vasoconstrictor, mitogenic and antinatriuretic properties which have implicated it in the pathophysiology of a number of cardiovascular diseases. The effects of ET-1 have been shown to be mediated by 2 principal endothelin receptor subtypes: ET(A) and ET(B). The development of a range of peptidic and nonpeptidic endothelin receptor antagonists represents an exciting breakthrough in human cardiovascular therapeutics. Two main classes of endothelin receptor antagonist have been developed for possible human therapeutic use: ET(A)-selective and nonselective antagonists. Extensive laboratory and clinical research with these agents has highlighted their promise in various cardiovascular diseases. Randomised, placebo-controlled clinical trials have yielded very encouraging results in patients with hypertension and chronic heart failure with more preliminary data suggesting a possible role in the treatment and prevention of atherosclerosis and stroke. Much more research is needed, however, before endothelin receptor antagonists can be considered for clinical use.

  2. Fine-Tuning Development Through Antagonistic Peptides: An Emerging Theme.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Suk; De Smet, Ive

    2016-12-01

    Peptide ligand-receptor kinase interactions have emerged as a key component of plant growth and development. Now, highly related small signaling peptides have been shown to act antagonistically on the same receptor kinase, providing new insights into how plants optimize developmental processes using competitive peptides.

  3. Novel benzopolycyclic amines with NMDA receptor antagonist activity.

    PubMed

    Valverde, Elena; Sureda, Francesc X; Vázquez, Santiago

    2014-05-01

    A new series of benzopolycyclic amines active as NMDA receptor antagonists were synthesized. Most of them exhibited increased activity compared with related analogues previously published. All the tested compounds were more potent than clinically approved amantadine and one of them displayed a lower IC50 value than memantine, an anti-Alzheimer's approved drug.

  4. Non-NMDA receptor antagonist-induced drinking in rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Z.; Johnson, A. K.

    1998-01-01

    Glutamate has been implicated in the central control of mechanisms that maintain body fluid homeostasis. The present studies demonstrate that intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injections of the non-N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists 6, 7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (DNQX) and 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3 dione (CNQX) induce drinking in rats. The dipsogenic effect of i.c.v. DNQX was antagonized by the non-NMDA receptor agonist alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA). The water intake induced by DNQX was also blocked by pretreatment with a NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801, but not by angiotensin type 1 (AT1) or acetylcholine muscarinic receptor antagonists (losartan and atropine). The results indicate that non-NMDA receptors may exert a tonic inhibitory effect within brain circuits that control dipsogenic activity and that functional integrity of NMDA receptors may be required for the non-NMDA receptor antagonists to induce water intake. Copyright 1998 Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  5. Medium-Induced Antagonistic Behavior in Staphylococcus Aureus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benathen, Isaiah A.

    1992-01-01

    Antagonism is the production of substances by microorganisms that inhibit or prevent the growth of other bacteria. This paper demonstrates the antagonistic behavior of gram-positive coccus on the B. subtilis and Enterococcus faecalis gram-positive microorganisms, showing that the process of antagonism is sometimes dependent on the nutritional…

  6. The Effect of Antagonist Muscle Sensory Input on Force Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Onushko, Tanya; Schmit, Brian D.; Hyngstrom, Allison

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand how stretch-related sensory feedback from an antagonist muscle affects agonist muscle output at different contraction levels in healthy adults. Ten young (25.3 ± 2.4 years), healthy subjects performed constant isometric knee flexion contractions (agonist) at 6 torque levels: 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, 30%, and 40% of their maximal voluntary contraction. For half of the trials, subjects received patellar tendon taps (antagonist sensory feedback) during the contraction. We compared error in targeted knee flexion torque and hamstring muscle activity, with and without patellar tendon tapping, across the 6 torque levels. At lower torque levels (5%, 10%, and 15%), subjects produced greater knee torque error following tendon tapping compared with the same torque levels without tendon tapping. In contrast, we did not find any difference in torque output at higher target levels (20%, 30%, and 40%) between trials with and without tendon tapping. We also observed a load-dependent increase in the magnitude of agonist muscle activity after tendon taps, with no associated load-dependent increase in agonist and antagonist co-activation, or reflex inhibition from the antagonist tapping. The findings suggest that at relatively low muscle activity there is a deficiency in the ability to correct motor output after sensory disturbances, and cortical centers (versus sub-cortical) are likely involved. PMID:26186590

  7. Characterization of a novel non-steroidal glucocorticoid receptor antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Qun-Yi; Zhang, Meng; Hallis, Tina M.; DeRosier, Therese A.; Yue, Jian-Min; Ye, Yang; Mais, Dale E.; Wang, Ming-Wei

    2010-01-15

    Selective antagonists of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) are desirable for the treatment of hypercortisolemia associated with Cushing's syndrome, psychic depression, obesity, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases, and glaucoma. NC3327, a non-steroidal small molecule with potent binding affinity to GR (K{sub i} = 13.2 nM), was identified in a high-throughput screening effort. As a full GR antagonist, NC3327 greatly inhibits the dexamethasone (Dex) induction of marker genes involved in hepatic gluconeogenesis, but has a minimal effect on matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), a GR responsive pro-inflammatory gene. Interestingly, the compound recruits neither coactivators nor corepressors to the GR complex but competes with glucocorticoids for the interaction between GR and a coactivator peptide. Moreover, NC3327 does not trigger GR nuclear translocation, but significantly blocks Dex-induced GR transportation to the nucleus, and thus appears to be a 'competitive' GR antagonist. Therefore, the non-steroidal compound, NC3327, may represent a new class of GR antagonists as potential therapeutics for a variety of cortisol-related endocrine disorders.

  8. Diversity, distribution, and antagonistic activities of rhizobacteria of Panax notoginseng

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ze-Yan; Miao, Cui-Ping; Qiao, Xin-Guo; Zheng, You-Kun; Chen, Hua-Hong; Chen, You-Wei; Xu, Li-Hua; Zhao, Li-Xing; Guan, Hui-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Background Rhizobacteria play an important role in plant defense and could be promising sources of biocontrol agents. This study aimed to screen antagonistic bacteria and develop a biocontrol system for root rot complex of Panax notoginseng. Methods Pure-culture methods were used to isolate bacteria from the rhizosphere soil of notoginseng plants. The identification of isolates was based on the analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences. Results A total of 279 bacteria were obtained from rhizosphere soils of healthy and root-rot notoginseng plants, and uncultivated soil. Among all the isolates, 88 showed antagonistic activity to at least one of three phytopathogenic fungi, Fusarium oxysporum, Fusarium solani, and Phoma herbarum mainly causing root rot disease of P. notoginseng. Based on the 16S rRNA sequencing, the antagonistic bacteria were characterized into four clusters, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetesi. The genus Bacillus was the most frequently isolated, and Bacillus siamensis (Hs02), Bacillus atrophaeus (Hs09) showed strong antagonistic activity to the three pathogens. The distribution pattern differed in soil types, genera Achromobacter, Acidovorax, Brevibacterium, Brevundimonas, Flavimonas, and Streptomyces were only found in rhizosphere of healthy plants, while Delftia, Leclercia, Brevibacillus, Microbacterium, Pantoea, Rhizobium, and Stenotrophomonas only exist in soil of diseased plant, and Acinetobacter only exist in uncultivated soil. Conclusion The results suggest that diverse bacteria exist in the P. notoginseng rhizosphere soil, with differences in community in the same field, and antagonistic isolates may be good potential biological control agent for the notoginseng root-rot diseases caused by F. oxysporum, Fusarium solani, and Panax herbarum. PMID:27158229

  9. Design, synthesis, and structure-activity relationship of novel CCR2 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Kothandaraman, Shankaran; Donnely, Karla L; Butora, Gabor; Jiao, Richard; Pasternak, Alexander; Morriello, Gregori J; Goble, Stephen D; Zhou, Changyou; Mills, Sander G; Maccoss, Malcolm; Vicario, Pasquale P; Ayala, Julia M; Demartino, Julie A; Struthers, Mary; Cascieri, Margaret A; Yang, Lihu

    2009-03-15

    A series of novel 1-aminocyclopentyl-3-carboxyamides incorporating substituted tetrahydropyran moieties have been synthesized and subsequently evaluated for their antagonistic activity against the human CCR2 receptor. Among them analog 59 was found to posses potent antagonistic activity.

  10. Lead Optimization Studies of Cinnamic Amide EP2 Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Prostanoid receptor EP2 can play a proinflammatory role, exacerbating disease pathology in a variety of central nervous system and peripheral diseases. A highly selective EP2 antagonist could be useful as a drug to mitigate the inflammatory consequences of EP2 activation. We recently identified a cinnamic amide class of EP2 antagonists. The lead compound in this class (5d) displays anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective actions. However, this compound exhibited moderate selectivity to EP2 over the DP1 prostanoid receptor (∼10-fold) and low aqueous solubility. We now report compounds that display up to 180-fold selectivity against DP1 and up to 9-fold higher aqueous solubility than our previous lead. The newly developed compounds also display higher selectivity against EP4 and IP receptors and a comparable plasma pharmacokinetics. Thus, these compounds are useful for proof of concept studies in a variety of models where EP2 activation is playing a deleterious role. PMID:24773616

  11. From Bioinactive ACTH to ACTH Antagonist: The Clinical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ghaddhab, Chiraz; Vuissoz, Jean-Marc; Deladoëy, Johnny

    2017-01-01

    The adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) is a pituitary hormone derived from a larger peptide, the proopiomelanocortin (POMC), as are the MSHs (α-MSH, β-MSH, and γ-MSH) and the β-LPH-related polypeptides (Figure 1A). ACTH drives adrenal steroidogenesis and growth of the adrenal gland. ACTH is a 39 amino acid polypeptide that binds and activates its cognate receptor [melanocortin receptor 2 (MC2R)] through the two regions H6F7R8W9 and K15K16R17R18P19. Most POMC-derived polypeptides contain the H6F7R8W9 sequence that is conserved through evolution. This explains the difficulties in developing selective agonists or antagonists to the MCRs. In this review, we will discuss the clinical aspects of the role of ACTH in physiology and disease, and potential clinical use of selective ACTH antagonists. PMID:28228747

  12. Lead optimization studies of cinnamic amide EP2 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Ganesh, Thota; Jiang, Jianxiong; Yang, Myung-Soon; Dingledine, Ray

    2014-05-22

    Prostanoid receptor EP2 can play a proinflammatory role, exacerbating disease pathology in a variety of central nervous system and peripheral diseases. A highly selective EP2 antagonist could be useful as a drug to mitigate the inflammatory consequences of EP2 activation. We recently identified a cinnamic amide class of EP2 antagonists. The lead compound in this class (5d) displays anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective actions. However, this compound exhibited moderate selectivity to EP2 over the DP1 prostanoid receptor (∼10-fold) and low aqueous solubility. We now report compounds that display up to 180-fold selectivity against DP1 and up to 9-fold higher aqueous solubility than our previous lead. The newly developed compounds also display higher selectivity against EP4 and IP receptors and a comparable plasma pharmacokinetics. Thus, these compounds are useful for proof of concept studies in a variety of models where EP2 activation is playing a deleterious role.

  13. Therapeutic antagonists and conformational regulation of integrin function.

    PubMed

    Shimaoka, Motomu; Springer, Timothy A

    2003-09-01

    Integrins are a structurally elaborate family of adhesion molecules that transmit signals bi-directionally across the plasma membrane by undergoing large-scale structural rearrangements. By regulating cell-cell and cell-matrix contacts, integrins participate in a wide range of biological processes, including development, tissue repair, angiogenesis, inflammation and haemostasis. From a therapeutic standpoint, integrins are probably the most important class of cell-adhesion receptors. Recent progress in the development of integrin antagonists has resulted in their clinical application and has shed new light on integrin biology. On the basis of their mechanism of action, small-molecule integrin antagonists fall into three different classes. Each of these classes affect the equilibria that relate integrin conformational states, but in different ways.

  14. Agonist-antagonist combinations in opioid dependence: a translational approach

    PubMed Central

    Mannelli, P.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The potential therapeutic benefits of co-administering opiate agonist and antagonist agents remain largely to be investigated. This paper focuses on the mechanisms of very low doses of naltrexone that help modulate the effects of methadone withdrawal and review pharmacological properties of the buprenorphine/naltrexone combination that support its clinical investigation. The bench-to-bedside development of the very low dose naltrexone treatment can serve as a translational paradigm to investigate and treat drug addiction. Further research on putative mechanisms elicited by the use of opioid agonist-antagonist combinations may lead to effective pharmacological alternatives to the gold standard methadone treatment, also useful for the management of the abuse of non opioid drugs and alcohol. PMID:22448305

  15. Non-imidazole histamine NO-donor H3-antagonists.

    PubMed

    Tosco, Paolo; Bertinaria, Massimo; Di Stilo, Antonella; Cena, Clara; Fruttero, Roberta; Gasco, Alberto

    2005-01-01

    Recently a series of H3-antagonists related to Imoproxifan was realised (I); in these products the oxime substructure of the lead was constrained in NO-donor furoxan systems and in the corresponding furazan derivatives. In this paper, a new series of compounds derived from I by substituting the imidazole ring with the ethoxycarbonylpiperazino moiety present in the non-imidazole H3-ligand A-923 is described. For all the products synthesis and preliminary pharmacological characterisation, as well as their hydrophilic-lipophilic balance, are reported. The imidazole ring replacement generally results in a decreased H3-antagonist activity with respect to the analogues of series I and, in some cases, induces relaxing effects on the electrically contracted guinea-pig ileum, probably due to increased affinity for other receptor systems.

  16. Antagonists of Plant-parasitic Nematodes in Florida Citrus

    PubMed Central

    Walter, David Evans; Kaplan, David T.

    1990-01-01

    In a survey of antagonists of nematodes in 27 citrus groves, each with a history of Tylenchulus semipenetrans infestation, and 17 noncitrus habitats in Florida, approximately 24 species of microbial antagonists capable of attacking vermiform stages of Radopholus citrophilus were recovered. Eleven of these microbes and a species of Pasteuria also were observed attacking vermiform stages of T. semipenetrans. Verticillium chlamydosporium, Paecilomyces lilacinus, P. marquandii, Streptomyces sp., Arthrobotrys oligospora, and Dactylella ellipsospora were found infecting T. semipenetrans egg masses. Two species of nematophagous amoebae, five species of predatory nematodes, and 29 species of nematophagous arthropods also were detected. Nematode-trapping fungi and nematophagous arthropods were common inhabitants of citrus groves with a history of citrus nematode infestation; however, obligate parasites of nematodes were rare. PMID:19287759

  17. Antagonistic Coevolution of Marine Planktonic Viruses and Their Hosts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martiny, Jennifer B. H.; Riemann, Lasse; Marston, Marcia F.; Middelboe, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    The potential for antagonistic coevolution between marine viruses and their (primarily bacterial) hosts is well documented, but our understanding of the consequences of this rapid evolution is in its infancy. Acquisition of resistance against co-occurring viruses and the subsequent evolution of virus host range in response have implications for bacterial mortality rates as well as for community composition and diversity. Drawing on examples from a range of environments, we consider the potential dynamics, underlying genetic mechanisms and fitness costs, and ecological impacts of virus-host coevolution in marine waters. Given that much of our knowledge is derived from laboratory experiments, we also discuss potential challenges and approaches in scaling up to diverse, complex networks of virus-host interactions. Finally, we note that a variety of novel approaches for characterizing virus-host interactions offer new hope for a mechanistic understanding of antagonistic coevolution in marine plankton.

  18. Antagonistic otolith-visual units in cat vestibular nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daunton, Nancy G.; Christensen, Carol A.

    1992-01-01

    The nature of neural coding of visual (Vis) and vestibular (Vst) information on translational motion in the region of the vestibular nuclei was investigated using extracellular single-unit recordings in alert adult cats. Responses were recorded and averaged over 60 cycles of stimulation in the vertical and horizontal planes, which included the Vst (movement of the animal in the dark), Vis (movement within lighted visual surround), and combined Vis and Vst (movement of the animal within the lighted stationary visual surround). Data are reported on responses to stimulations along the axis showing maximal sensitivity. A small number of units were identified that showed an antagonistic relationship between their Vis and Vst responses (since they were maximally excited by Vis and by Vst stimulations in the same direction). Results suggest that antagonistic units may belong to an infrequently encountered, but functionally distinct, class of neurons.

  19. Antagonistic coevolution of marine planktonic viruses and their hosts.

    PubMed

    Martiny, Jennifer B H; Riemann, Lasse; Marston, Marcia F; Middelboe, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    The potential for antagonistic coevolution between marine viruses and their (primarily bacterial) hosts is well documented, but our understanding of the consequences of this rapid evolution is in its infancy. Acquisition of resistance against co-occurring viruses and the subsequent evolution of virus host range in response have implications for bacterial mortality rates as well as for community composition and diversity. Drawing on examples from a range of environments, we consider the potential dynamics, underlying genetic mechanisms and fitness costs, and ecological impacts of virus-host coevolution in marine waters. Given that much of our knowledge is derived from laboratory experiments, we also discuss potential challenges and approaches in scaling up to diverse, complex networks of virus-host interactions. Finally, we note that a variety of novel approaches for characterizing virus-host interactions offer new hope for a mechanistic understanding of antagonistic coevolution in marine plankton.

  20. Antagonists of Plant-parasitic Nematodes in Florida Citrus.

    PubMed

    Walter, D E; Kaplan, D T

    1990-10-01

    In a survey of antagonists of nematodes in 27 citrus groves, each with a history of Tylenchulus semipenetrans infestation, and 17 noncitrus habitats in Florida, approximately 24 species of microbial antagonists capable of attacking vermiform stages of Radopholus citrophilus were recovered. Eleven of these microbes and a species of Pasteuria also were observed attacking vermiform stages of T. semipenetrans. Verticillium chlamydosporium, Paecilomyces lilacinus, P. marquandii, Streptomyces sp., Arthrobotrys oligospora, and Dactylella ellipsospora were found infecting T. semipenetrans egg masses. Two species of nematophagous amoebae, five species of predatory nematodes, and 29 species of nematophagous arthropods also were detected. Nematode-trapping fungi and nematophagous arthropods were common inhabitants of citrus groves with a history of citrus nematode infestation; however, obligate parasites of nematodes were rare.

  1. Potent and orally efficacious benzothiazole amides as TRPV1 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Besidski, Yevgeni; Brown, William; Bylund, Johan; Dabrowski, Michael; Dautrey, Sophie; Harter, Magali; Horoszok, Lucy; Hu, Yin; Johnson, Dean; Johnstone, Shawn; Jones, Paul; Leclerc, Sandrine; Kolmodin, Karin; Kers, Inger; Labarre, Maryse; Labrecque, Denis; Laird, Jennifer; Lundström, Therese; Martino, John; Maudet, Mickaël; Munro, Alexander; Nylöf, Martin; Penwell, Andrea; Rotticci, Didier; Slaitas, Andis; Sundgren-Andersson, Anna; Svensson, Mats; Terp, Gitte; Villanueva, Huascar; Walpole, Christopher; Zemribo, Ronald; Griffin, Andrew M

    2012-10-01

    Benzothiazole amides were identified as TRPV1 antagonists from high throughput screening using recombinant human TRPV1 receptor and structure-activity relationships were explored to pinpoint key pharmacophore interactions. By increasing aqueous solubility, through the attachment of polar groups to the benzothiazole core, and enhancing metabolic stability, by blocking metabolic sites, the drug-like properties and pharmokinetic profiles of benzothiazole compounds were sufficiently optimized such that their therapeutic potential could be verified in rat pharmacological models of pain.

  2. Optimization of amide-based EP3 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Lee, Esther C Y; Futatsugi, Kentaro; Arcari, Joel T; Bahnck, Kevin; Coffey, Steven B; Derksen, David R; Kalgutkar, Amit S; Loria, Paula M; Sharma, Raman

    2016-06-01

    Prostaglandin E receptor subtype 3 (EP3) antagonism may treat a variety of symptoms from inflammation to cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Previously, most EP3 antagonists were large acidic ligands that mimic the substrate, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). This manuscript describes the optimization of a neutral small molecule amide series with improved lipophilic efficiency (LipE) also known as lipophilic ligand efficiency (LLE) ((a) Nat. Rev. Drug Disc.2007, 6, 881; (b) Annu. Rep. Med. Chem.2010, 45, 380).

  3. Exploration of a new series of PAR1 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Planty, Bruno; Pujol, Chantal; Lamothe, Marie; Maraval, Catherine; Horn, Clemens; Le Grand, Bruno; Perez, Michel

    2010-03-01

    Two series of new PAR1 antagonists have been identified. The first incorporates a cinnamoylpiperidine motif and the second a cinnamoylpyridine pattern. The synthesis, biological activity and structure-activity relationship of these compounds are presented. In each series, one analog showed potent in vivo antithrombotic activity in a rat AV shunt model, with up to 53% inhibition at 1.25mpk iv for compound 30.

  4. Human glucagon receptor antagonists based on alkylidene hydrazides.

    PubMed

    Ling, Anthony; Plewe, Michael; Gonzalez, Javier; Madsen, Peter; Sams, Christian K; Lau, Jesper; Gregor, Vlad; Murphy, Doug; Teston, Kimberly; Kuki, Atsuo; Shi, Shenghua; Truesdale, Larry; Kiel, Dan; May, John; Lakis, James; Anderes, Kenna; Iatsimirskaia, Eugenia; Sidelmann, Ulla G; Knudsen, Lotte B; Brand, Christian L; Polinsky, Alex

    2002-02-25

    A series of alkylidene hydrazide derivatives containing an alkoxyaryl moiety was optimized. The resulting hydrazide-ethers were competitive antagonists at the human glucagon receptor. Pharmacokinetic experiments showed fast clearance of most of the compounds tested. A representative compound [4-hydroxy-3-cyanobenzoic acid (4-isopropylbenzyloxy-3,5-dimethoxymethylene)hydrazide] with an IC50 value of 20 nM was shown to reduce blood glucose levels in fasted rats.

  5. Calmodulin antagonists promote TRA-8 therapy of resistant pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Kaiyu; Yong, Sun; Xu, Fei; Zhou, Tong; McDonald, Jay M; Chen, Yabing

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is highly malignant with limited therapy and a poor prognosis. TRAIL-activating therapy has been promising, however, clinical trials have shown resistance and limited responses of pancreatic cancers. We investigated the effects of calmodulin(CaM) antagonists, trifluoperazine(TFP) and tamoxifen(TMX), on TRA-8-induced apoptosis and tumorigenesis of TRA-8-resistant pancreatic cancer cells, and underlying mechanisms. TFP or TMX alone did not induce apoptosis of resistant PANC-1 cells, while they dose-dependently enhanced TRA-8-induced apoptosis. TMX treatment enhanced efficacy of TRA-8 therapy on tumorigenesis in vivo. Analysis of TRA-8-induced death-inducing-signaling-complex (DISC) identified recruitment of survival signals, CaM/Src, into DR5-associated DISC, which was inhibited by TMX/TFP. In contrast, TMX/TFP increased TRA-8-induced DISC recruitment/activation of caspase-8. Consistently, caspase-8 inhibition blocked the effects of TFP/TMX on TRA-8-induced apoptosis. Moreover, TFP/TMX induced DR5 expression. With a series of deletion/point mutants, we identified CaM antagonist-responsive region in the putative Sp1-binding domain between −295 to −300 base pairs of DR5 gene. Altogether, we have demonstrated that CaM antagonists enhance TRA-8-induced apoptosis of TRA-8-resistant pancreatic cancer cells by increasing DR5 expression and enhancing recruitment of apoptotic signal while decreasing survival signals in DR5-associated DISC. Our studies support the use of these readily available CaM antagonists combined with TRAIL-activating agents for pancreatic cancer therapy. PMID:26320171

  6. Pyrrolidinyl phenylurea derivatives as novel CCR3 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Nitta, Aiko; Iura, Yosuke; Inoue, Hideki; Sato, Ippei; Morihira, Koichiro; Kubota, Hirokazu; Morokata, Tatsuaki; Takeuchi, Makoto; Ohta, Mitsuaki; Tsukamoto, Shin-ichi; Imaoka, Takayuki; Takahashi, Toshiya

    2012-11-15

    Optimization starting with our lead compound 1 (IC(50)=4.9 nM) led to the identification of pyrrolidinyl phenylurea derivatives. Further modification toward improvement of the bioavailability provided (R)-1-(1-((6-fluoronaphthalen-2-yl)methyl)pyrrolidin-3-yl)-3-(2-(2-hydroxyethoxy)phenyl)urea 32 (IC(50)=1.7 nM), a potent and orally active CCR3 antagonist.

  7. Effect of a Hypocretin/Orexin Antagonist on Neurocogniive Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    until animals performed the water maze tests. SLEEP DEPRIVATION PROCEDURES Animals were sleep deprived (SD) from ZT12-18 by progressive manual... sleep and performance , and the effects of these compounds on biomarkers associated with normal sleep . BODY Task 2. Test the hypothesis that...antagonist almorexant promotes sleep without impairment of performance in rats" was published in Frontiers in Neuroscience in January, 2014. Progress

  8. Systemic Mineralocorticoid Antagonists in the Treatment of Central Serous Chorioretinopathy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dong; Eliott, Dean

    2017-01-01

    Central serous chorioretinopathy (CSCR) is a challenging disease characterized by subretinal serous fluid accumulation. The complex pathogenesis is still not fully understood, but is thought to be multifactorial and involves exogenous and endogenous factors affecting the choroid and retinal pigment epithelium. The involvement of corticosteroids is undisputed, while the contribution of mineralocorticoid pathways is under investigation. This review addresses the proposed pathogenesis models and the evidence for systemic treatment of CSCR with mineralocorticoid antagonists.

  9. Discovery of new muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists from Scopolia tangutica

    PubMed Central

    Du, Nana; Liu, Yanfang; Zhang, Xiuli; Wang, Jixia; Zhao, Jianqiang; He, Jian; Zhou, Han; Mei, Lijuan; Liang, Xinmiao

    2017-01-01

    Scopolia tangutica (S. tangutica) is a traditional Chinese medicinal plant used for antispasmodics, anesthesia, analgesia and sedation. Its pharmacological activities are mostly associated with the antagonistic activity at muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAchRs) of several known alkaloids such as atropine and scopolamine. With our recent identification of four hydroxycinnamic acid amides from S. tangutica, we hypothesized that this plant may contain previously unidentified alkaloids that may also contribute to its in vivo effect. Herein, we used a bioassay-guided multi-dimension separation strategy to discover novel mAchR antagonists from S. tangutica. The core of this approach is to use label-free cell phenotypic assay to first identify active fractions, and then to guide purification of active ligands. Besides four tropanes and six cinnamic acid amides that have been previously isolated from S. tangutica, we recently identified two new tropanes, one new cinnamic acid amide, and nine other compounds. Six tropane compounds purified from S. tangutica for the first time were confirmed to be competitive antagonists of muscarinic receptor 3 (M3), including the two new ones 8 and 12 with IC50 values of 1.97 μM and 4.47 μM, respectively. Furthermore, the cinnamic acid amide 17 displayed 15-fold selectivity for M1 over M3 receptors. These findings will be useful in designing lead compounds for mAchRs and elucidating mechanisms of action of S. tangutica. PMID:28387362

  10. Synergistic and antagonistic drug combinations depend on network topology.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ning; Ma, Wenzhe; Pei, Jianfeng; Ouyang, Qi; Tang, Chao; Lai, Luhua

    2014-01-01

    Drug combinations may exhibit synergistic or antagonistic effects. Rational design of synergistic drug combinations remains a challenge despite active experimental and computational efforts. Because drugs manifest their action via their targets, the effects of drug combinations should depend on the interaction of their targets in a network manner. We therefore modeled the effects of drug combinations along with their targets interacting in a network, trying to elucidate the relationships between the network topology involving drug targets and drug combination effects. We used three-node enzymatic networks with various topologies and parameters to study two-drug combinations. These networks can be simplifications of more complex networks involving drug targets, or closely connected target networks themselves. We found that the effects of most of the combinations were not sensitive to parameter variation, indicating that drug combinational effects largely depend on network topology. We then identified and analyzed consistent synergistic or antagonistic drug combination motifs. Synergistic motifs encompass a diverse range of patterns, including both serial and parallel combinations, while antagonistic combinations are relatively less common and homogenous, mostly composed of a positive feedback loop and a downstream link. Overall our study indicated that designing novel synergistic drug combinations based on network topology could be promising, and the motifs we identified could be a useful catalog for rational drug combination design in enzymatic systems.

  11. The complex roles of Wnt antagonists in RCC.

    PubMed

    Saini, Sharanjot; Majid, Shahana; Dahiya, Rajvir

    2011-10-25

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most lethal of all the genitourinary cancers, as it is generally refractory to current treatment regimens, including chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Targeted therapies against critical signaling pathways associated with RCC pathogenesis, such as vascular endothelial growth factor, von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor and mammalian target of rapamycin, have shown limited efficacy so far. Thus, Wnt signaling, which is known to be intricately involved in the pathogenesis of RCC, has attracted much interest. Several Wnt signaling components have been examined in RCC, and, while studies suggest that Wnt signaling is constitutively active in RCC, the molecular mechanisms differ considerably from other human carcinomas. Increasing evidence indicates that secreted Wnt antagonists have important roles in RCC pathogenesis. Considering these vital roles, it has been postulated--and supported by experimental evidence--that the functional loss of Wnt antagonists, for example by promoter hypermethylation, can contribute to constitutive activation of the Wnt pathway, resulting in carcinogenesis through dysregulation of cell proliferation and differentiation. However, subsequent functional studies of these Wnt antagonists have demonstrated the inherent complexities underlying their role in RCC pathogenesis.

  12. μ Opioid receptor: novel antagonists and structural modeling

    PubMed Central

    Kaserer, Teresa; Lantero, Aquilino; Schmidhammer, Helmut; Spetea, Mariana; Schuster, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    The μ opioid receptor (MOR) is a prominent member of the G protein-coupled receptor family and the molecular target of morphine and other opioid drugs. Despite the long tradition of MOR-targeting drugs, still little is known about the ligand-receptor interactions and structure-function relationships underlying the distinct biological effects upon receptor activation or inhibition. With the resolved crystal structure of the β-funaltrexamine-MOR complex, we aimed at the discovery of novel agonists and antagonists using virtual screening tools, i.e. docking, pharmacophore- and shape-based modeling. We suggest important molecular interactions, which active molecules share and distinguish agonists and antagonists. These results allowed for the generation of theoretically validated in silico workflows that were employed for prospective virtual screening. Out of 18 virtual hits evaluated in in vitro pharmacological assays, three displayed antagonist activity and the most active compound significantly inhibited morphine-induced antinociception. The new identified chemotypes hold promise for further development into neurochemical tools for studying the MOR or as potential therapeutic lead candidates. PMID:26888328

  13. Effects of two antagonistic ecosystem engineers on infaunal diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Ortiz, V.; Alcazar, P.; Vergara, J. J.; Pérez-Lloréns, J. L.; Brun, F. G.

    2014-02-01

    The role of ecosystem engineers has been highlighted in recent decades because of their importance for ecosystem functioning, although the interaction between different antagonistic engineer species and their effects on ecosystems have been so far poorly investigated. Coastal areas are good natural laboratories to explore such interactions, since they are often inhabited by macrophyte beds (autogenic engineers) and bioturbator species (allogenic engineers) with antagonistic effects on ecosystem properties and processes (e.g. species diversity, nutrient fluxes, etc.). The main goal of this study was to determine how coexisting antagonistic ecosystem engineers could influence benthic diversity and available resources in soft-bottom areas. To achieve this goal, a two-month experiment was carried out in situ by introducing artificial seagrass patches in a soft-bottom area inhabited by the fiddler crab Uca tangeri. Both the experimental exclusion of burrows as well as the presence of artificial seagrass-like structures (mimics) resulted in higher macrobenthic density and species richness in the benthic community. Resource availability for organisms (sediment chlorophyll a and epiphytes) was also favoured by the presence of mimics. Therefore, the higher structural complexity (above- and below-ground) associated with seagrass mimics promoted positive effects for infauna such as creation of a new habitat ready to colonize, reduction of the crab burrowing activity and the enhancement of resource availability, which resulted in increased diversity in the benthic community.

  14. Does intergenerational social mobility affect antagonistic attitudes towards ethnic minorities?

    PubMed

    Tolsma, Jochem; de Graaf, Nan Dirk; Quillian, Lincoln

    2009-06-01

    Up till now, no study satisfactorily addressed the effect of social mobility on antagonistic attitudes toward ethnic minorities. In this contribution, we investigate the effect of educational and class intergenerational mobility on ethnic stereotypes, ethnic threat, and opposition to ethnic intermarriage by using diagonal mobility models. We test several hypotheses derived from ethnic competition theory and socialization theory with data from the Social and Cultural Developments in The Netherlands surveys (SOCON, waves 1995, 2000, and 2005) and The Netherlands Kinship and Panel Study (NKPS, wave 2002). We find that the relative influence of social origin and social destination depends on the specific origin and destination combination. If one moves to a more tolerant social destination position, the influence of the social origin position is negligible. If on the other hand, one is socially mobile to a less tolerant social position, the impact of the origin on antagonistic attitudes is substantial and may even exceed the impact of the destination category. This confirms our hypothesis that adaptation to more tolerant norms is easier than adaptation to less tolerant norms. We find only meagre evidence for the hypothesis that downward mobility leads to frustration and consequently to more antagonistic attitudes.

  15. μ Opioid receptor: novel antagonists and structural modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaserer, Teresa; Lantero, Aquilino; Schmidhammer, Helmut; Spetea, Mariana; Schuster, Daniela

    2016-02-01

    The μ opioid receptor (MOR) is a prominent member of the G protein-coupled receptor family and the molecular target of morphine and other opioid drugs. Despite the long tradition of MOR-targeting drugs, still little is known about the ligand-receptor interactions and structure-function relationships underlying the distinct biological effects upon receptor activation or inhibition. With the resolved crystal structure of the β-funaltrexamine-MOR complex, we aimed at the discovery of novel agonists and antagonists using virtual screening tools, i.e. docking, pharmacophore- and shape-based modeling. We suggest important molecular interactions, which active molecules share and distinguish agonists and antagonists. These results allowed for the generation of theoretically validated in silico workflows that were employed for prospective virtual screening. Out of 18 virtual hits evaluated in in vitro pharmacological assays, three displayed antagonist activity and the most active compound significantly inhibited morphine-induced antinociception. The new identified chemotypes hold promise for further development into neurochemical tools for studying the MOR or as potential therapeutic lead candidates.

  16. Antagonistic interaction networks among bacteria from a cold soil environment.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Sathish; Manasa, Poorna; Buddhi, Sailaja; Singh, Shiv Mohan; Shivaji, Sisinthy

    2011-11-01

    Microbial antagonism in an Arctic soil habitat was demonstrated by assessing the inhibitory interactions between bacterial isolates from the same location. Of 139 isolates obtained from five soil samples, 20 antagonists belonging to the genera, Arthrobacter, Pseudomonas and Flavobacterium were identified. Inter-genus, inter-species and inter-strain antagonism was observed between the interacting members. The extent of antagonism was temperature dependent. In some cases, antagonism was enhanced at 4 °C but suppressed at 18 °C while in some the reverse phenomenon was observed. To interpret antagonism from an ecological perspective, the interacting members were delineated according to their positional roles in a theoretical antagonistic network. When only one antimicrobial producer (P) was present, all the other members permitted grouping into either sensitive (S) or resistant (R). Composite interactive types such as PSR, PS, PR or SR could be designated only when at least two producers were present. Mapping of all possible antagonistic interaction networks based on the individual positional roles of the interactive types illustrates the existence of complex and interconnected networks among microbial communities.

  17. Newer calcium channel antagonists and the treatment of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Cummins, D F

    1999-07-01

    Calcium channel antagonists have become popular medications for the management of hypertension. These agents belong to the diphenylalkylamine, benzothiazepine, dihydropyridine, or tetralol chemical classes. Although the medications share a common pharmacological mechanism in reducing peripheral vascular resistance, clinical differences between the sub-classes can be linked to structural profiles. This heterogeneity is manifested by differences in vascular selectivity, effects on cardiac conduction and adverse events. The lack of differentiation between calcium channel antagonists in clinical trials has contributed to uncertainty associated with their impact on morbidity and mortality. Data from more recent studies in specific patient populations underscores the importance of investigating these antihypertensives as individual agents. A proposed therapeutic classification system suggests that newer agents should share the slow onset and long-acting antihypertensive effect of amlodipine. Additionally, a favourable trough-to-peak ratio has been recommended as an objective measurement of efficacy. The newer drugs, barnidipine and lacidipine, have a therapeutic profile similar to amlodipine, but trough-to-peak ratios are not substantially greater than the recommended minimum of 0.50. Aranidipine, cilnidipine and efonidipine have unique pharmacological properties that distinguish them from traditional dihydropyridines. Although clinical significance is unconfirmed, these newer options may be beneficial for patients with co-morbid conditions that preclude use of older antagonists.

  18. The effects of histamine H3-receptor antagonists on amygdaloid kindled seizures in rats.

    PubMed

    Kakinoki, H; Ishizawa, K; Fukunaga, M; Fujii, Y; Kamei, C

    1998-07-15

    The effects of histamine H3-receptor antagonists, thioperamide, and clobenpropit on amygdaloid kindled seizures were investigated in rats. Both intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) and intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of H3-antagonists resulted in a dose-related inhibition of amygdaloid kindled seizures. An inhibition induced by thioperamide was antagonized by an H3-agonist [(R)-alpha-methylhistamine] and H1-antagonists (diphenhydramine and chlorpheniramine). On the other hand, an H2-antagonist (cimetidine and ranitidine) caused no antagonistic effect. Metoprine, an inhibitor of N-methyltransferase was also effective in inhibiting amygdaloid kindled seizure, and this effect was augmented by thioperamide treatment.

  19. Arginine mimetic structures in biologically active antagonists and inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Masic, Lucija Peterlin

    2006-01-01

    Peptidomimetics have found wide application as bioavailable, biostable, and potent mimetics of naturally occurring biologically active peptides. L-Arginine is a guanidino group-containing basic amino acid, which is positively charged at neutral pH and is involved in many important physiological and pathophysiological processes. Many enzymes display a preference for the arginine residue that is found in many natural substrates and in synthetic inhibitors of many trypsin-like serine proteases, e.g. thrombin, factor Xa, factor VIIa, trypsin, and in integrin receptor antagonists, used to treat many blood-coagulation disorders. Nitric oxide (NO), which is produced by oxidation of L-arginine in an NADPH- and O(2)-dependent process catalyzed by isoforms of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), exhibits diverse roles in both normal and pathological physiologies and has been postulated to be a contributor to the etiology of various diseases. Development of NOS inhibitors as well as analogs and mimetics of the natural substrate L-arginine, is desirable for potential therapeutic use and for a better understanding of their conformation when bound in the arginine binding site. The guanidino residue of arginine in many substrates, inhibitors, and antagonists forms strong ionic interactions with the carboxylate of an aspartic acid moiety, which provides specificity for the basic amino acid residue in the active side. However, a highly basic guanidino moiety incorporated in enzyme inhibitors or receptor antagonists is often associated with low selectivity and poor bioavailability after peroral application. Thus, significant effort is focused on the design and preparation of arginine mimetics that can confer selective inhibition for specific trypsin-like serine proteases and NOS inhibitors as well as integrin receptor antagonists and possess reduced basicity for enhanced oral bioavailability. This review will describe the survey of arginine mimetics designed to mimic the function of the

  20. Anti free radical action of calcium antagonists and H1 and H2 receptors antagonists in neoplastic disease.

    PubMed

    della Rovere, F; Broccio, M; Granata, A; Zirilli, A; Brugnano, L; Artemisia, A; Broccio, G

    1996-01-01

    The blood of the subjects suffering from Neoplastic Disease (ND) shows phenomena of membrane peroxidation due to the presence of Free Radicals (FRs), in a quantity much greater than the one observed in the blood of healthy subjects. This can be detected either by calculating the time necessary for the formation of "Heinz bodies" (Hbs), (p < 0.00001) after oxidative stress of the blood in vitro with acetylphenylidrazine (APH), or by calculating the methemoglobin (metHb) quantity that forms after the same treatment (P < 0.00001). The statistical analyses we carried out showed that metHb formation was not affected by age, sex, smoking habits, red blood cell number, Hb, Ht or tumor staging. In this study, by using equal parameters of investigation, we noted that the blood of the subjects with ND who were previously treated with calcium-antagonists drugs and with antagonists of H1 and H2 receptors, gave results completely superimposable on the results obtained from healthy subjects, implying that the treatment had avoided the increase of FRs. Therefore we concluded that calcium-antagonists and the antagonists of the H1 and H2 receptors behave as antioxidant substances, having decreased the FRs damaging activity on the cellular membranes, thus controlling, although to a limited degree, the pejorative evolution of the disease. It is also important to remember that investigations into the ND, even possible screenings, must take into account the above said data, submitting the subjects under investigation to a pharmacological wash out, particularly with those substances which, are considered to be scavengers of FRs. Some of these substances are investigated in this work.

  1. Conformational studies of 3-amino-1-alkyl-cyclopentane carboxamide CCR2 antagonists leading to new spirocyclic antagonists.

    PubMed

    Pasternak, Alexander; Goble, Stephen D; Doss, George A; Tsou, Nancy N; Butora, Gabor; Vicario, Pasquale P; Ayala, Julia Marie; Struthers, Mary; Demartino, Julie A; Mills, Sander G; Yang, Lihu

    2008-02-15

    In an effort to shed light on the active binding conformation of our 3-amino-1-alkyl-cyclopentane carboxamide CCR2 antagonists, we prepared several conformationally constrained analogs resulting from backbone cyclization. Evaluation of CCR2 binding affinities for these analogs gave insight into the optimal relative positions of the piperidine and benzylamide moieties while simultaneously leading to the discovery of a new, potent lead type based upon a spirocyclic acetal scaffold.

  2. Pharmacological profile of the receptors that mediate external carotid vasoconstriction by 5-HT in vagosympathectomized dogs.

    PubMed

    Villalón, C M; Ramírez-San Juan, E; Castillo, C; Castillo, E; López-Muñoz, F J; Terrón, J A

    1995-11-01

    1. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) can produce vasodilatation or vasoconstriction of the canine external carotid bed depending upon the degree of carotid sympathetic tone. Hence, external carotid vasodilatation to 5-HT in dogs with intact sympathetic tone is primarily mediated by prejunctional 5-HT1-like receptors similar to the 5-HT1D subtype, which inhibit the carotid sympathetic outflow. The present investigation is devoted to the pharmacological analysis of the receptors mediating external carotid vasoconstriction by 5-HT in vagosympathectomized dogs. 2. Intracarotid (i.c.) infusions for 1 min of 5-HT (0.3, 1, 3, 10, 30 and 100 micrograms) resulted in dose-dependent decreases in both external carotid blood flow and the corresponding conductance; both mean arterial blood pressure and heart rate remained unchanged during the infusions of 5-HT. These responses to 5-HT were resistant to blockade by antagonists at 5-HT2 (ritanserin) and 5-HT3/5-HT4 (tropisetron) receptors, but were partly blocked by the 5-HT1-like and 5-HT2 receptor antagonist, methiothepin (0.3 mg kg-1); higher doses of methiothepin (1 and 3 mg kg-1) caused little, if any, further blockade. These methiothepin (3 mg kg-1)-resistant responses to 5-HT were not significantly antagonized by MDL 72222 (0.3 mg kg-1) or tropisetron (3 mg kg-1). 3. The external carotid vasoconstrictor effects of 5-HT were mimicked by the selective 5-HT1-like receptor agonist, sumatriptan (3, 10, 30 and 100 micrograms during 1 min, i.c.), which produced dose-dependent decreases in external carotid blood flow and the corresponding conductance; these effects of sumatriptan were dose-dependently antagonized by methiothepin (0.3, 1 and 3 mg kg-1), but not by 5-HT1D-like receptor blocking doses of metergoline (0.1 mg kg-1). 4. The above vasoconstrictor effects of 5-HT remained unaltered after administration of phentolamine, propranolol, atropine, hexamethonium, brompheniramine, cimetidine and haloperidol, thus excluding the

  3. Pharmacological profile of the receptors that mediate external carotid vasoconstriction by 5-HT in vagosympathectomized dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Villalón, C. M.; Ramírez-San Juan, E.; Castillo, C.; Castillo, E.; López-Muñoz, F. J.; Terrón, J. A.

    1995-01-01

    1. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) can produce vasodilatation or vasoconstriction of the canine external carotid bed depending upon the degree of carotid sympathetic tone. Hence, external carotid vasodilatation to 5-HT in dogs with intact sympathetic tone is primarily mediated by prejunctional 5-HT1-like receptors similar to the 5-HT1D subtype, which inhibit the carotid sympathetic outflow. The present investigation is devoted to the pharmacological analysis of the receptors mediating external carotid vasoconstriction by 5-HT in vagosympathectomized dogs. 2. Intracarotid (i.c.) infusions for 1 min of 5-HT (0.3, 1, 3, 10, 30 and 100 micrograms) resulted in dose-dependent decreases in both external carotid blood flow and the corresponding conductance; both mean arterial blood pressure and heart rate remained unchanged during the infusions of 5-HT. These responses to 5-HT were resistant to blockade by antagonists at 5-HT2 (ritanserin) and 5-HT3/5-HT4 (tropisetron) receptors, but were partly blocked by the 5-HT1-like and 5-HT2 receptor antagonist, methiothepin (0.3 mg kg-1); higher doses of methiothepin (1 and 3 mg kg-1) caused little, if any, further blockade. These methiothepin (3 mg kg-1)-resistant responses to 5-HT were not significantly antagonized by MDL 72222 (0.3 mg kg-1) or tropisetron (3 mg kg-1). 3. The external carotid vasoconstrictor effects of 5-HT were mimicked by the selective 5-HT1-like receptor agonist, sumatriptan (3, 10, 30 and 100 micrograms during 1 min, i.c.), which produced dose-dependent decreases in external carotid blood flow and the corresponding conductance; these effects of sumatriptan were dose-dependently antagonized by methiothepin (0.3, 1 and 3 mg kg-1), but not by 5-HT1D-like receptor blocking doses of metergoline (0.1 mg kg-1). 4. The above vasoconstrictor effects of 5-HT remained unaltered after administration of phentolamine, propranolol, atropine, hexamethonium, brompheniramine, cimetidine and haloperidol, thus excluding the

  4. Current Status of Treatment of Radiation Injury in the United States

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    intravenous 5 - HT3 antagonist with longer half-life and higher receptor -binding affinity than similar drugs. It was approved by the U.S. FDA in July 2003 for...emetic agents including the serotonin receptor antagonists ondansetron (ZofranTM) or granisetron (KytrilTM). Although treating acute symptoms is...once every 7 days. [Physicians’ Desk Reference 2005] Aprepitant is a P/neurokinin 1 (NK-1) receptor antagonist that is given orally once daily for 3

  5. Cisplatin-Induced Conditioned Taste Aversion: Attenuation by Dexamethasone but not Zacopride or GR38032F

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    1988, The potential anxiolytic activity of GR38032F, a 5 - HT3 - receptor antagonist . Br. J. Pharmacol. 93, 985. References Kilpatrick. G.J.. B.J. Jones...April IM92 accepted 5 May 1992 3 7 The 54HT, receptor antagonists zacotiride and GR38032F are highly effective inhibitors of emcsii induced by...to 5 -H1’, receptor blockade. 5 -HT., receptor antagonists ; Zacopridc: GR38032F; Desamethasone: Cisplatin: Taste aversion (conditioned) I. Introductlon

  6. Classification and virtual screening of androgen receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiazhong; Gramatica, Paola

    2010-05-24

    Computational tools, such as quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR), are highly useful as screening support for prioritization of substances of very high concern (SVHC). From the practical point of view, QSAR models should be effective to pick out more active rather than inactive compounds, expressed as sensitivity in classification works. This research investigates the classification of a big data set of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs)-androgen receptor (AR) antagonists, mainly aiming to improve the external sensitivity and to screen for potential AR binders. The kNN, lazy IB1, and ADTree methods and the consensus approach were used to build different models, which improve the sensitivity on external chemicals from 57.1% (literature) to 76.4%. Additionally, the models' predictive abilities were further validated on a blind collected data set (sensitivity: 85.7%). Then the proposed classifiers were used: (i) to distinguish a set of AR binders into antagonists and agonists; (ii) to screen a combined estrogen receptor binder database to find out possible chemicals that can bind to both AR and ER; and (iii) to virtually screen our in-house environmental chemical database. The in silico screening results suggest: (i) that some compounds can affect the normal endocrine system through a complex mechanism binding both to ER and AR; (ii) new EDCs, which are nonER binders, but can in silico bind to AR, are recognized; and (iii) about 20% of compounds in a big data set of environmental chemicals are predicted as new AR antagonists. The priority should be given to them to experimentally test the binding activities with AR.

  7. Cardiovascular effects of ghrelin antagonist in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Vlasova, Maria A; Järvinen, Kristiina; Herzig, Karl-Heinz

    2009-08-07

    Ghrelin, a 28 aa growth-hormone-releasing peptide, has been shown to increase food intake and decrease arterial pressure in animals and in humans. Recently, a ghrelin antagonist (GhA), [d-Lys-3]-GHRP-6, was demonstrated to decrease food intake in mice, but its cardiovascular actions have not been described. In the present study, the effects of the GhA on cardiovascular parameters in conscious rats were investigated and the involvement of the sympathetic nervous system evaluated. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) measurements were assessed by radiotelemetry. GhA was administered in doses of 2, 4 and 6 mg/kg subcutaneously (s.c.). MAP as well as HR was dose-dependently elevated after sc application of GhA. Sympathetic blockade of alpha-adrenoreceptors with phentolamine (3 mg/kg, s.c.) and simultaneous antagonism of beta(1)-adrenoreceptors with atenolol (10 mg/kg, s.c.) abolished the increase in MAP and HR induced by GhA (4 mg/kg, s.c.). Administration of phentolamine alone inhibited the increase of MAP, but not HR; atenolol alone abolished the elevation of both MAP and HR evoked by GhA. These results suggest that the peripheral injection of ghrelin antagonist increases arterial pressure and heart rate, at least in part, through the activation of the sympathetic nervous system. Therefore, the use of the ghrelin antagonist system as a therapeutic target for reduction in food intake might lead to serious side effects like elevated blood pressure in humans mostly already having an elevated blood pressure as part of their metabolic syndrome.

  8. Making safer preoperative arrangements for patients using vitamin K antagonists

    PubMed Central

    van Fessem, Joris; Willems, Jessica; Kruip, Marieke; Hoeks, Sanne; Jan Stolker, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Use of vitamin K antagonists creates a risk for patient health and safety. The Dutch framework “Nationwide Standard Integrated Care of Anticoagulation” propagates a shared plan and responsibility by surgeon and anesthesiologist together in the preoperative setting. In our institution, this framework had not been implemented. Therefore, a quality-improvement project was started at the Anesthesia Department to improve perioperative safety. After exploration of barriers, multiple interventions were carried out to encourage co-workers at the preoperative screening department to take shared responsibility: distribution of prints, adjustments in electronic patient records, introduction of a protocol and education sessions. Efficacy was measured retrospectively performing a before-after study collecting perioperative data of patients using vitamin K antagonists. The primary outcome measure was the percentage of predefined safe preoperative plans. Secondary outcome measures were (1) incidence of postoperative bleeding and thrombo-embolic events within the first 24 hours after intervention and (2) necessity to preoperative correction of anticoagulation. Before intervention 72 (29%) safe, 93 (38%) partially unsafe and 83 (33%) unsafe arrangements were made. After the intervention these numbers were 105 (80%), 23 (17%) en 4 (3%), respectively: a significant 51% increase in safe preoperative plans (P<0.001). We observed no significant difference (P=0.369) regarding bleeding and thrombo-embolic events: pre-intervention 12 (5%) cases of postoperative bleeding were documented, vs. 6 (5%) post intervention and the number of thrombo-embolic events was 5 (2%) vs. 0. Also, no significant differences concerning preoperative correction of anticoagulation were observed: 11 (4%) vs. 8 (6%) (P=0.489). This quality improvement project demonstrates a major improvement in safer preoperative arrangements in our institution regarding vitamin K antagonists, using the described interventions

  9. Sexually Antagonistic “Zygotic Drive” of the Sex Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Rice, William R.; Gavrilets, Sergey; Friberg, Urban

    2008-01-01

    Genomic conflict is perplexing because it causes the fitness of a species to decline rather than improve. Many diverse forms of genomic conflict have been identified, but this extant tally may be incomplete. Here, we show that the unusual characteristics of the sex chromosomes can, in principle, lead to a previously unappreciated form of sexual genomic conflict. The phenomenon occurs because there is selection in the heterogametic sex for sex-linked mutations that harm the sex of offspring that does not carry them, whenever there is competition among siblings. This harmful phenotype can be expressed as an antagonistic green-beard effect that is mediated by epigenetic parental effects, parental investment, and/or interactions among siblings. We call this form of genomic conflict sexually antagonistic “zygotic drive”, because it is functionally equivalent to meiotic drive, except that it operates during the zygotic and postzygotic stages of the life cycle rather than the meiotic and gametic stages. A combination of mathematical modeling and a survey of empirical studies is used to show that sexually antagonistic zygotic drive is feasible, likely to be widespread in nature, and that it can promote a genetic “arms race” between the homo- and heteromorphic sex chromosomes. This new category of genomic conflict has the potential to strongly influence other fundamental evolutionary processes, such as speciation and the degeneration of the Y and W sex chromosomes. It also fosters a new genetic hypothesis for the evolution of enigmatic fitness-reducing traits like the high frequency of spontaneous abortion, sterility, and homosexuality observed in humans. PMID:19096519

  10. Short stature caused by a natural growth hormone antagonist.

    PubMed

    Chihara, K; Takahashi, Y; Kaji, H; Goji, K; Okimura, Y; Abe, H

    1998-01-01

    Severe short stature in a male child due to a single mutation in the GH-1 gene was first reported in 1996 by Takahashi et al. [N Engl J Med 1996;334:432-436]. This missense mutation was predicted to convert codon 77 from arginine (R) to cysteine (C). The child's chronological age was 4 years and 11 months, and his bone age 2 years and 6 months, i.e., equal to only 51% of his chronological age. Body proportions were normal except for the prominent forehead and saddle nose. Pituitary size was normal on magnetic resonance imaging examinations. Serum IGF-1, IGFBP-3 and GHBP were all decreased or at the lower limit of the normal range. Nocturnal urinary growth hormone (GH) excretion was high. Isoelectric focusing analysis revealed the presence of an abnormal GH peak in addition to the normal one. The R77C mutant GH possessed a 6 times greater affinity to GHBP than the wild-type GH, and inhibited tyrosine phosphorylation in IM-9 cells 10 times more potently than the wild-type GH, showing an antagonistic or a dominant negative action. In agreement with the antagonistic property of the mutant GH exhibited, the child did not show any increase in serum IGF-1 levels after exogenous hGH administration. It should be noted that the child in this study is not a typical case of Kowarski syndrome in which endogenous GH is found to be simply bioinactive, as in the patient we recently described elsewhere. Therefore, this patient's condition should be categorized as a new syndrome of short stature caused by a natural GH antagonist.

  11. Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Isnard, Richard; Bauer, Fabrice; Cohen-Solal, Alain; Damy, Thibaud; Donal, Erwan; Galinier, Michel; Hagège, Albert; Jourdain, Patrick; Leclercq, Christophe; Sabatier, Rémi; Trochu, Jean-Noël; Cohen, Ariel

    2016-11-01

    Thromboembolism contributes to morbidity and mortality in patients with heart failure (HF), and atrial fibrillation (AF) is one of the main factors promoting this complication. As they share many risk factors, HF and AF frequently coexist, and patients with both conditions are at a particularly high risk of thromboembolism. Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are direct antagonists of thrombin (dabigatran) and factor Xa (rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban), and were designed to overcome the limitations of vitamin K antagonists. Compared with warfarin in non-valvular AF, NOACs demonstrated non-inferiority with better safety, most particularly for intracranial haemorrhages. Therefore, the European Society of Cardiology guidelines recommend NOACs for most patients with non-valvular AF. Subgroups of patients with both AF and HF from the pivotal studies investigating the safety and efficacy of NOACs have been analysed and, for each NOAC, results were similar to those of the total analysis population. A recent meta-analysis of these subgroups has confirmed the better efficacy and safety of NOACs in patients with AF and HF - particularly the 41% decrease in the incidence of intracranial haemorrhages. The prothrombotic state associated with HF suggests that patients with HF in sinus rhythm could also benefit from treatment with NOACs. However, in the absence of clinical trial data supporting this indication, current guidelines do not recommend anticoagulant treatment of patients with HF in sinus rhythm. In conclusion, recent analyses of pivotal studies support the use of NOACs in accordance with their indications in HF patients with non-valvular AF.

  12. Behavioral approach to nondyskinetic dopamine antagonists: identification of seroquel.

    PubMed

    Warawa, E J; Migler, B M; Ohnmacht, C J; Needles, A L; Gatos, G C; McLaren, F M; Nelson, C L; Kirkland, K M

    2001-02-01

    A great need exists for antipsychotic drugs which will not induce extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS) and tardive dyskinesias (TDs). These side effects are deemed to be a consequence of nonselective blockade of nigrostriatal and mesolimbic dopamine D2 receptors. Nondyskinetic clozapine (1) is a low-potency D2 dopamine receptor antagonist which appears to act selectively in the mesolimbic area. In this work dopamine antagonism was assessed in two mouse behavioral assays: antagonism of apomorphine-induced climbing and antagonism of apomorphine-induced disruption of swimming. The potential for the liability of dyskinesias was determined in haloperidol-sensitized Cebus monkeys. Initial examination of a few close cogeners of 1 enhanced confidence in the Cebus model as a predictor of dyskinetic potential. Considering dibenzazepines, 2 was not dyskinetic whereas 2a was dyskinetic. Among dibenzodiazepines, 1 did not induce dyskinesias whereas its N-2-(2-hydroxyethoxy)ethyl analogue 3 was dyskinetic. The emergence of such distinctions presented an opportunity. Thus, aromatic and N-substituted analogues of 6-(piperazin-1-yl)-11H-dibenz[b,e]azepines and 11-(piperazin-1-yl)dibenzo[b,f][1,4]thiazepines and -oxazepines were prepared and evaluated. 11-(4-[2-(2-Hydroxyethoxy)ethyl]piperazin-1-yl)dibenzo[b,f][1,4]thiazepine (23) was found to be an apomorphine antagonist comparable to clozapine. It was essentially nondyskinetic in the Cebus model. With 23 as a platform, a number of N-substituted analogues were found to be good apomorphine antagonists but all were dyskinetic.

  13. Peripheral and spinal 5-HT receptors participate in cholestatic itch and antinociception induced by bile duct ligation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Bin; Wang, Xue-Long; Huang, Ya; Chen, Li-Hua; Cheng, Ruo-Xiao; Zhou, Feng-Ming; Guo, Ran; Li, Jun-Cheng; Liu, Tong

    2016-01-01

    Although 5-HT has been implicated in cholestatic itch and antinociception, two common phenomena in patients with cholestatic disease, the roles of 5-HT receptor subtypes are unclear. Herein, we investigated the roles of 5-HT receptors in itch and antinociception associated with cholestasis, which was induced by common bile duct ligation (BDL) in rats. 5-HT-induced enhanced scratching and antinociception to mechanical and heat stimuli were demonstrated in BDL rats. 5-HT level in the skin and spinal cord was significantly increased in BDL rats. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed 5-HT1B, 5-HT1D, 5-HT2A, 5-HT3A, 5-HT5B, 5-HT6, and 5-HT7 were up-regulated in peripheral nervous system and 5-HT1A, 5-HT1F, 5-HT2B, and 5-HT3A were down-regulated in the spinal cord of BDL rats. Intradermal 5-HT2, 5-HT3, and 5-HT7 receptor agonists induced scratching in BDL rats, whereas 5-HT3 agonist did not induce scratching in sham rats. 5-HT1A, 5-HT2, 5-HT3, and 5-HT7 agonists or antagonists suppressed itch in BDL rats. 5-HT1A agonist attenuated, but 5-HT1A antagonist enhanced antinociception in BDL rats. 5-HT2 and 5-HT3 agonists or antagonists attenuated antinociception in BDL rats. Our data suggested peripheral and central 5-HT system dynamically participated in itch and antinociception under cholestasis condition and targeting 5-HT receptors may be an effective treatment for cholestatic itch. PMID:27824106

  14. Esthetic Prosthetic Restorations: Reliability and Effects on Antagonist Dentition

    PubMed Central

    Daou, Elie E.

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in ceramics have greatly improved the functional and esthetic properties of restorative materials. New materials offer an esthetic and functional oral rehabilitation, however their impact on opposing teeth is not welldocumented. Peer-reviewed articles published till December 2014 were identified through Pubmed (Medline and Elsevier). Scientifically, there are several methods of measuring the wear process of natural dentition which enhances the comparison of the complicated results. This paper presents an overview of the newly used prosthetic materials and their implication on antagonist teeth or prostheses, especially emphasizing the behavior of zirconia restorations. PMID:26962376

  15. The pharmacology of fluparoxan: a selective alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Halliday, C A; Jones, B J; Skingle, M; Walsh, D M; Wise, H; Tyers, M B

    1991-04-01

    1. This paper describes the pharmacology of the novel alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist fluparoxan (GR 50360) which is currently being studied clinically as a potential anti-depressant. Idazoxan and yohimbine were included in many studies for comparison. 2. In the rat isolated, field-stimulated vas deferens and the guinea-pig isolated, field-stimulated ileum preparations, fluparoxan was a reversible competitive antagonist of the inhibitory responses to the alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist UK-14304 with pKB values of 7.87 and 7.89 respectively. In the rat isolated anococcygeus muscle, fluparoxan was a much weaker competitive antagonist of the contractile response to the alpha 1-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine with a pKB of 4.45 giving an alpha 2: alpha 1-adrenoceptor selectivity ratio of greater than 2500. 3. In the conscious mouse, fluparoxan (0.2-3.0 mg kg-1) was effective by the oral route and of similar potency to idazoxan in preventing clonidine-induced hypothermia and antinociception. In the rat, UK-14304-induced hypothermia (ED50 = 1.4 mg kg-1, p.o. or 0.5 mg kg-1, i.v.) and rotarod impairment (ED50 = 1.1 mg kg-1 p.o. or 1.3 mg kg-1, i.v.) were antagonized by fluparoxan. Fluparoxan, 0.67-6 mg kg-1, p.o., also prevented UK-14304-induced sedation and bradycardia in the dog. 4. In specificity studies fluparoxan had low or no affinity for a wide range of neurotransmitter receptor sites at concentrations up to at least 1 x 10(-5) M. It displayed weak affinity for 5-HT1A (pIC50 = 5.9) and 5-HT1B (pKi = 5.5) binding sites in rat brain. 5. We conclude that fluparoxan is a highly selective and potent alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist. The density of rat brain [3H]-dihydroalprenolol binding sites was reduced by 26% when fluparoxan was administered chronically for 6 days at a dose of 12 mg kg- 1 orally twice daily. The down-regulation of beta-adrenoceptors by fluparoxan is consistent with its antidepressant potential.

  16. Lymphocyte homing antagonists in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Saruta, Masayuki; Papadakis, Konstantinos A

    2014-09-01

    Lymphocyte homing antagonists represent promising therapeutic agents for the treatment of idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Several critical molecules involved in the recruitment of inflammatory cells in the intestine, including integrins and chemokine receptors, have been successfully targeted for the treatment of IBD. These agents have shown great promise for the induction and maintenance of remission for both Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis. This article discusses currently approved prototypic agents for the treatment of IBD (natalizumab, anti-α4 integrin; vedolizumab, anti-α4β7 integrin), and several other agents in the same class currently under development.

  17. Antagonistic action of pitrazepin on human and rat GABAA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Demuro, Angelo; Martinez-Torres, Ataulfo; Francesconi, Walter; Miledi, Ricardo

    1999-01-01

    Pitrazepin, 3-(piperazinyl-1)-9H-dibenz(c,f) triazolo(4,5-a)azepin is a piperazine antagonist of GABA in a variety of electrophysiological and in vitro binding studies involving GABA and glycine receptors. In the present study we have investigated the effects of pitrazepin, and the GABAA antagonist bicuculline, on membrane currents elicited by GABA in Xenopus oocytes injected with rat cerebral cortex mRNA or cDNAs encoding α1β2 or α1β2γ2S human GABAA receptor subunits.The three types of GABAA receptors expressed were reversibly antagonized by bicuculline and pitrazepin in a concentration-dependent manner. GABA dose-current response curves for the three types of receptors were shifted to the right, in a parallel manner, by increasing concentrations of pitrazepin.Schild analyses gave pA2 values of 6.42±0.62, n=4, 6.41±1.2, n=5 and 6.21±1.24, n=6, in oocytes expressing rat cerebral cortex, α1β2 or α1β2γ2S human GABAA receptors respectively (values are given as means±s.e.mean), and the Hill coefficients were all close to unity. All this is consistent with the notion that pitrazepin acts as a competitive antagonist of these GABAA receptors; and that their antagonism by pitrazepin is not strongly dependent on the subunit composition of the receptors here studied.Since pitrazepin has been reported to act also at the benzodiazepine binding site, we studied the effect of the benzodiazepine antagonist Ro 15-1788 (flumazenil) on the inhibition of α1β2γ2S receptors by pitrazepin. Co-application of Ro 15-1788 did not alter the inhibiting effect of pitrazepin. Moreover, pitrazepin did not antagonize the potentiation of GABA-currents by flunitrazepam. All this suggests that pitrazepin does not affect the GABA receptor-chloride channel by interacting with the benzodiazepine receptor site. PMID:10369456

  18. [Vitamin K antagonist, direct oral anticoagulants: Where is the truth?

    PubMed

    Laroche, J-P; Schved, J-F

    2016-12-01

    Vitamin K antagonists (VKA) and direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are now in competition. The companies are trying to replace VKA by DOACs, totally or at least greatly VKA should VKA disappear in favor of DOACs? There are still many questions about DOACs. The purpose of this article is to make a well-considered decision in this area. The aim is not to denigrate one or the other but to share things between these two families of anticoagulants. Physicians using these drugs must have a full knowledge about compared efficacy and safety. We feel necessary to increase distance between effective results of the clinical trials and industrial communication around DOACs.

  19. Substituted Tetrahydroisoquinolines as Selective Antagonists for the Orexin 1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Perrey, David A.; German, Nadezhda A.; Gilmour, Brian P.; Li, Jun-Xu; Harris, Danni L.; Thomas, Brian F.; Zhang, Yanan

    2013-01-01

    Increasing evidence implicates the orexin 1 (OX1) receptor in reward processes, suggesting OX1 antagonism could be therapeutic in drug addiction. In a program to develop an OX1 selective antagonist, we designed and synthesized a series of substituted tetrahydroisoquinolines and determined their potency in OX1 and OX2 calcium mobilization assays. Structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies revealed limited steric tolerance and preference for electron deficiency at the 7-position. Pyridylmethyl groups were shown to be optimal for activity at the acetamide position. Computational studies resulted in a pharmacophore model and confirmed the SAR results. Compound 72 significantly attenuated the development of place preference for cocaine in rats. PMID:23941044

  20. Use and cardiovascular safety of transdermal and other granisetron preparations in cancer management

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Jay W; Moon, Thomas E

    2013-01-01

    5-HT3 antagonists have been available as oral and intravenous preparations for decades. The availability more recently of transdermal granisetron and the anticipated availability of a subcutaneous granisetron preparation have provided helpful alternatives to patients, and these preparations have been shown to have less potential to prolong QT than other drugs in the class. PMID:23930078

  1. Safety profile of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists: Spironolactone and eplerenone.

    PubMed

    Lainscak, Mitja; Pelliccia, Francesco; Rosano, Giuseppe; Vitale, Cristiana; Schiariti, Michele; Greco, Cesare; Speziale, Giuseppe; Gaudio, Carlo

    2015-12-01

    Spironolactone was first developed over 50 years ago as a potent mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist with undesirable side effects; it was followed a decade ago by eplerenone, which is less potent but much more mineralocorticoid receptor-specific. From a marginal role as a potassium-sparing diuretic, spironolactone has been shown to be an extraordinarily effective adjunctive agent in the treatment of progressive heart failure. Also, spironolactone is safe and protective in arterial hypertension, particularly in patients with so-called resistant hypertension. Eplerenone is the second oral aldosterone antagonist available for the treatment of arterial hypertension and heart failure. Treatment with eplerenone has been associated with decreased blood pressure and improved survival for patients with heart failure and reduced left ventricular ejection fraction. Due to the selectivity of eplerenone for the aldosterone receptor, severe adverse effects such as gynecomastia and vaginal bleeding seem to be less likely in patients who take eplerenone than in those who take spironolactone. The most common and potentially dangerous side effect of spironolactone--hyperkalemia--is also observed with eplerenone but the findings from clinical trials do not indicate more hyperkalemia induced drug withdrawals. Treatment with eplerenone should be initiated at a dosage of 25mg once daily and titrated to a target dosage of 50mg once daily preferably within 4 weeks. Serum potassium levels and renal function should be assessed prior to initiating eplerenone therapy, and periodic monitoring is recommended, especially in patients at high risk of developing hyperkalemia.

  2. NMDA receptor antagonists extend the sensitive period for imprinting.

    PubMed

    Parsons, C H; Rogers, L J

    2000-03-01

    Filial imprinting in the domestic chick occurs during a sensitive period of development. The exact timing of this period can vary according to the methods used to measure imprinting. Using our imprinting paradigm, we have shown that normal, dark-reared chicks lose the ability to imprint after the second day post-hatching. Further, we reported that chicks treated 10 h after hatching with a mixture of the noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine (55 mg/kg) and the alpha(2)-adrenergic receptor agonist xylazine (6 mg/kg) were able to imprint on day 8 after hatching, whereas controls treated with saline did not imprint. We now show that the effect of the ketamine-xylazine mixture can be mimicked by treating chicks with ketamine alone or with another noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801 (5 mg/kg). Treating chicks with a single dose of ketamine (55 mg/kg) or with a single dose of xylazine (6 mg/kg) failed to produce the effect on the sensitive period. However, prolonging the action of ketamine by treating chicks with two doses of ketamine (at 10 and 12 h after hatching) did allow imprinting on day 8. In contrast, prolonging the action of xylazine had no effect on the sensitive period for imprinting. Chicks treated with MK-801 were also able to imprint on day 8. Thus, we have evidence that the NMDA receptor system is involved in the mechanisms that control the sensitive period for imprinting.

  3. Fires can benefit plants by disrupting antagonistic interactions.

    PubMed

    García, Y; Castellanos, M C; Pausas, J G

    2016-12-01

    Fire has a key role in the ecology and evolution of many ecosystems, yet its effects on plant-insect interactions are poorly understood. Because interacting species are likely to respond to fire differently, disruptions of the interactions are expected. We hypothesized that plants that regenerate after fire can benefit through the disruption of their antagonistic interactions. We expected stronger effects on interactions with specialist predators than with generalists. We studied two interactions between two Mediterranean plants (Ulex parviflorus, Asphodelus ramosus) and their specialist seed predators after large wildfires. In A. ramosus we also studied the generalist herbivores. We sampled the interactions in burned and adjacent unburned areas during 2 years by estimating seed predation, number of herbivores and fruit set. To assess the effect of the distance to unburned vegetation we sampled plots at two distance classes from the fire perimeter. Even 3 years after the fires, Ulex plants experienced lower seed damage by specialists in burned sites. The presence of herbivores on Asphodelus decreased in burned locations, and the variability in their presence was significantly related to fruit set. Generalist herbivores were unaffected. We show that plants can benefit from fire through the disruption of their antagonistic interactions with specialist seed predators for at least a few years. In environments with a long fire history, this effect might be one additional mechanism underlying the success of fire-adapted plants.

  4. A prototypical Sigma-1 receptor antagonist protects against brain ischemia.

    PubMed

    Schetz, John A; Perez, Evelyn; Liu, Ran; Chen, Shiuhwei; Lee, Ivan; Simpkins, James W

    2007-11-21

    Previous studies indicate that the Sigma-1 ligand 4-phenyl-1-(4-phenylbutyl) piperidine (PPBP) protects the brain from ischemia. Less clear is whether protection is mediated by agonism or antagonism of the Sigma-1 receptor, and whether drugs already in use for other indications and that interact with the Sigma-1 receptor might also prevent oxidative damage due to conditions such as cerebral ischemic stroke. The antipsychotic drug haloperidol is an antagonist of Sigma-1 receptors and in this study it potently protects against oxidative stress-related cell death in vitro at low concentrations. The protective potency of haloperidol and a number of other butyrophenone compounds positively correlate with their affinity for a cloned Sigma-1 receptor, and the protection is mimicked by a Sigma-1 receptor-selective antagonist (BD1063), but not an agonist (PRE-084). In vivo, an acute low dose (0.05 mg/kg s.c.) of haloperidol reduces by half the ischemic lesion volume induced by a transient middle cerebral artery occlusion. These in vitro and in vivo pre-clinical results suggest that a low dose of acutely administered haloperidol might have a novel application as a protective agent against ischemic cerebral stroke and other types of brain injury with an ischemic component.

  5. Abnormal reciprocal inhibition between antagonist muscles in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Meunier, S; Pol, S; Houeto, J L; Vidailhet, M

    2000-05-01

    Disynaptic Ia reciprocal inhibition acts, at the spinal level, by actively inhibiting antagonist motor neurons and reducing the inhibition of agonist motor neurons. The deactivation of this pathway in Parkinson's disease is still debated. Disynaptic reciprocal inhibition of H reflexes in the forearm flexor muscles was examined in 15 control subjects and 16 treated parkinsonian patients at rest and at the onset of a voluntary wrist flexion. Two patients were reassessed 18 h after withdrawal of antiparkinsonian medication. At rest, the level of Ia reciprocal inhibition between the wrist antagonist muscles was not significantly different between patients and controls. In contrast, clear abnormalities of this inhibition were revealed by voluntary movements in the patients. In normal subjects, at the onset of a wrist flexion, Ia reciprocal inhibition showed a large decrease, and we argue that this decrease is supraspinal in origin. On the less affected sides of the patients the descending modulation was still present but lower than in controls; on the more affected sides this modulation had vanished almost completely. These movement-induced abnormalities of disynaptic Ia reciprocal inhibition were closely associated with Parkinson's disease but were probably not dependent on L-dopa. They could play a role in the disturbances of precise voluntary movements observed in Parkinson's disease.

  6. CCR9 Antagonists in the Treatment of Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Bekker, Pirow; Ebsworth, Karen; Walters, Matthew J.; Berahovich, Robert D.; Ertl, Linda S.; Charvat, Trevor T.; Punna, Sreenivas; Powers, Jay P.; Campbell, James J.; Sullivan, Timothy J.; Jaen, Juan C.; Schall, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    While it has long been established that the chemokine receptor CCR9 and its ligand CCL25 are essential for the movement of leukocytes into the small intestine and the development of small-intestinal inflammation, the role of this chemokine-receptor pair in colonic inflammation is not clear. Toward this end, we compared colonic CCL25 protein levels in healthy individuals to those in patients with ulcerative colitis. In addition, we determined the effect of CCR9 pharmacological inhibition in the mdr1a−/− mouse model of ulcerative colitis. Colon samples from patients with ulcerative colitis had significantly higher levels of CCL25 protein compared to healthy controls, a finding mirrored in the mdr1a−/− mice. In the mdr1a−/− mice, CCR9 antagonists significantly decreased the extent of wasting and colonic remodeling and reduced the levels of inflammatory cytokines in the colon. These findings indicate that the CCR9:CCL25 pair plays a causative role in ulcerative colitis and suggest that CCR9 antagonists will provide a therapeutic benefit in patients with colonic inflammation. PMID:26457007

  7. The use of melanocortin antagonists in cachexia of chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Scarlett, Jarrad M; Marks, Daniel L

    2005-10-01

    Cachexia is a wasting syndrome that frequently develops in the setting of chronic diseases including cancer, congestive heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, AIDS, renal failure and liver failure. Loss of lean body mass is believed to be a significant factor contributing to morbidity and mortality in these chronic diseases; however, there are currently no treatments available that have proven to be effective in reversing the progressive loss of lean body mass in cachectic patients. Evidence from animal models suggests a compelling link between inflammation, the central melanocortin system and cachexia. This review summarises the current evidence supporting the role of the melanocortin 4 (MC4) receptor subtype in cachexia, and discusses the development and use of small-molecule MC4 antagonists, which have proved to be effective in preventing the loss of lean body mass in animal models of cachexia. MC4 antagonists represent an attractive therapeutic approach for cachexia that may attenuate the loss of lean body mass in cachectic patients.

  8. The evolution of histamine H₃ antagonists/inverse agonists.

    PubMed

    Lebois, Evan P; Jones, Carrie K; Lindsley, Craig W

    2011-01-01

    This article describes our efforts along with recent advances in the development, biological evaluation and clinical proof of concept of small molecule histamine H₃ antagonists/inverse agonists. The H3 receptor is a presynaptic autoreceptor within the Class A GPCR family, but also functions as a heteroreceptor modulating levels of neurotransmitters such as dopamine, acetylcholine, norepinephrine, serotonin, GABA and glutamate. Thus, H₃R has garnered a great deal of interest from the pharmaceutical industry for the possible treatment of obesity, epilepsy, sleep/wake, schizophrenia, Alzheimer's disease, neuropathic pain and ADHD. Within the two main classes of H₃ ligands, both imidazole and non-imidazole derived, have shown sufficient potency and specificity which culminated with efficacy in preclinical models for various CNS disorders. Importantly, conserved elements have been identified within the small molecule H₃ ligand scaffolds that resulted in a highly predictive pharmacophore model. Understanding of the pharmacophore model has allowed several groups to dial H₃R activity into scaffolds designed for other CNS targets, and engender directed polypharmacology. Moreover, Abbott, GSK, Pfizer and several others have reported positive Phase I and/or Phase II data with structurally diverse H₃R antagonists/inverse agonists.

  9. Evodiamine as a novel antagonist of aryl hydrocarbon receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Hui; Tu, Yongjiu; Zhang, Chun; Fan, Xia; Wang, Xi; Wang, Zhanli; Liang, Huaping

    2010-11-05

    Research highlights: {yields} Evodiamine interacted with the AhR. {yields} Evodiamine inhibited the specific binding of [{sup 3}H]-TCDD to the AhR. {yields} Evodiamine acts as an antagonist of the AhR. -- Abstract: Evodiamine, the major bioactive alkaloid isolated from Wu-Chu-Yu, has been shown to interact with a wide variety of proteins and modify their expression and activities. In this study, we investigated the interaction between evodiamine and the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Molecular modeling results revealed that evodiamine directly interacted with the AhR. Cytosolic receptor binding assay also provided the evidence that evodiamine could interact with the AhR with the K{sub i} value of 28.4 {+-} 4.9 nM. In addition, we observed that evodiamine suppressed the 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) induced nuclear translocation of the AhR and the expression of CYP1A1 dose-dependently. These results suggested that evodiamine was able to bind to the AhR as ligand and exhibit antagonistic effects.

  10. Human homosexuality: a paradigmatic arena for sexually antagonistic selection?

    PubMed

    Camperio Ciani, Andrea; Battaglia, Umberto; Zanzotto, Giovanni

    2015-01-29

    Sexual conflict likely plays a crucial role in the origin and maintenance of homosexuality in our species. Although environmental factors are known to affect human homosexual (HS) preference, sibling concordances and population patterns related to HS indicate that genetic components are also influencing this trait in humans. We argue that multilocus, partially X-linked genetic factors undergoing sexually antagonistic selection that promote maternal female fecundity at the cost of occasional male offspring homosexuality are the best candidates capable of explaining the frequency, familial clustering, and pedigree asymmetries observed in HS male proband families. This establishes male HS as a paradigmatic example of sexual conflict in human biology. HS in females, on the other hand, is currently a more elusive phenomenon from both the empirical and theoretical standpoints because of its fluidity and marked environmental influence. Genetic and epigenetic mechanisms, the latter involving sexually antagonistic components, have been hypothesized for the propagation and maintenance of female HS in the population. However, further data are needed to truly clarify the evolutionary dynamics of this trait.

  11. Human Homosexuality: A Paradigmatic Arena for Sexually Antagonistic Selection?

    PubMed Central

    Ciani, Andrea Camperio; Battaglia, Umberto; Zanzotto, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Sexual conflict likely plays a crucial role in the origin and maintenance of homosexuality in our species. Although environmental factors are known to affect human homosexual (HS) preference, sibling concordances and population patterns related to HS indicate that genetic components are also influencing this trait in humans. We argue that multilocus, partially X-linked genetic factors undergoing sexually antagonistic selection that promote maternal female fecundity at the cost of occasional male offspring homosexuality are the best candidates capable of explaining the frequency, familial clustering, and pedigree asymmetries observed in HS male proband families. This establishes male HS as a paradigmatic example of sexual conflict in human biology. HS in females, on the other hand, is currently a more elusive phenomenon from both the empirical and theoretical standpoints because of its fluidity and marked environmental influence. Genetic and epigenetic mechanisms, the latter involving sexually antagonistic components, have been hypothesized for the propagation and maintenance of female HS in the population. However, further data are needed to truly clarify the evolutionary dynamics of this trait. PMID:25635045

  12. Carbobenzoxy amino acids: Structural requirements for cholecystokinin receptor antagonist activity

    SciTech Connect

    Maton, P.N.; Sutliff, V.E.; Jensen, R.T.; Gardner, J.D.

    1985-04-01

    The authors used dispersed acini prepared from guinea pig pancreas to examine 28 carbobenzoxy (CBZ) amino acids for their abilities to function as cholecystokinin receptor antagonists. All amino acid derivatives tested, except for CBZ-alanine, CBZ-glycine, and N alpha-CBZ- lysine, were able to inhibit the stimulation of amylase secretion caused by the C-terminal octapeptide of cholecystokinin. In general, there was a good correlation between the ability of a carbobenzoxy amino acid to inhibit stimulated amylase secretion and the ability of the amino acid derivative to inhibit binding of /sup 125/I-cholecystokinin. The inhibition of cholecystokinin-stimulated amylase secretion was competitive, fully reversible, and specific for those secretagogues that interact with the cholecystokinin receptor. The potencies with which the various carbobenzoxy amino acids inhibited the action of cholecystokinin varied 100-fold and CBZ-cystine was the most potent cholecystokinin receptor antagonist. This variation in potency was primarily but not exclusively a function of the hydrophobicity of the amino acid side chain.

  13. Contrasting effects of intralocus sexual conflict on sexually antagonistic coevolution

    PubMed Central

    Pennell, Tanya M.; de Haas, Freek J. H.; Morrow, Edward H.; van Doorn, G. Sander

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary conflict between the sexes can induce arms races in which males evolve traits that are detrimental to the fitness of their female partners, and vice versa. This interlocus sexual conflict (IRSC) has been proposed as a cause of perpetual intersexual antagonistic coevolution with wide-ranging evolutionary consequences. However, theory suggests that the scope for perpetual coevolution is limited, if traits involved in IRSC are subject to pleiotropic constraints. Here, we consider a biologically plausible form of pleiotropy that has hitherto been ignored in treatments of IRSC and arrive at drastically different conclusions. Our analysis is based on a quantitative genetic model of sexual conflict, in which genes controlling IRSC traits have side effects in the other sex, due to incompletely sex-limited gene expression. As a result, the genes are exposed to intralocus sexual conflict (IASC), a tug-of-war between opposing male- and female-specific selection pressures. We find that the interaction between the two forms of sexual conflict has contrasting effects on antagonistic coevolution: Pleiotropic constraints stabilize the dynamics of arms races if the mating traits are close to evolutionary equilibrium but can prevent populations from ever reaching such a state. Instead, the sexes are drawn into a continuous cycle of arms races, causing the buildup of IASC, alternated by phases of IASC resolution that trigger the next arms race. These results encourage an integrative perspective on the biology of sexual conflict and generally caution against relying exclusively on equilibrium stability analysis. PMID:26755609

  14. [Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists and therapeutic strategies of cardiovascular damage].

    PubMed

    Verdugo, Fernando J; Montellano, Felipe A; Carreño, Juan E; Marusic, Elisa T

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, much attention has focused on the role of aldosterone and mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs) in the pathophysiology of hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Patients with primary aldosteronism, in whom angiotensin II levels are low, have a higher incidence of cardiovascular complications than patients with essential hypertension. The Randomized Aldactone Evaluation Study (RALES) demonstrated that adding a non-specific MR antagonist, spironolactone, to a standard therapy that included angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, loop diuretics, and digoxin, significantly reduced morbidity and mortality in patients with moderate to severe heart failure. Similarly, the Eplerenone Post-Acute Myocardial Infarction Heart Failure Efficacy and Survival Study (EPHESUS) showed that the addition of a selective MR antagonist (ARM), eplerenone, to an optimal medical therapy reduces morbidity and mortality among patients with acute myocardial infarction complicated by left ventricular dysfunction and heart failure. These data suggest that aldosterone induces cardiac injury through activation of MRs and support the notion that MR blockade has beneficial effects on aldosterone-dependent cardiac injury, through mechanisms that cannot be simply explained by hemodynamic changes. Although, MRA are highly effective in patients with heart failure, the risk of hyperkalemia should not be overlooked. Serious hyperkalemia events were reported in some MRA clinical trials; however these risks can be mitigated through appropriate patient selection, dose selection, patient education, monitoring, and follow-up.

  15. Quinidine as a muscarinic antagonist: a structural approach.

    PubMed

    Ciechanowicz-Rutkowska, M; Oleksyn, B J; Suszko-Purzycka, A; Lipińska, T

    1992-06-01

    The synthesis, spectroscopic characteristics, and single-crystal X-ray structural analysis of quitenidine methyl ester monohydrate, a derivative of the muscarinic antagonist quinidine, are presented. Quitenidine methyl ester monohydrate (C20H24N2O4.H2O) crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with a = 16.69(3) A, b = 12.46(2) A, c = 9.70(1) A, and Z = 4. The crystal structure was refined to a discrepancy factor (R) of 0.097. Substitution of the quinidine vinyl chain with a carboxymethyl group does not influence the conformation. The carboxymethyl group is positionally disordered, a fact that complicates refinement of the structure. The water molecule is bonded to the quinuclidine nitrogen atom, and the hydroxyl group forms an intermolecular hydrogen bond with the quinoline nitrogen atom. The molecular structure of the ester was compared with those of quinidine, quinine, and four other antimuscarinic agents. An approximately linear relationship between the distance from the nonaromatic nitrogen to the plane of the aromatic part of the molecules and the blocking potency of these agents was noted; the greater this distance, the more potent is the antagonist.

  16. In dermographic urticaria H2 receptor antagonists have a small but therapeutically irrelevant additional effect compared with H1 antagonists alone.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, G R; Shuster, S

    1993-11-01

    Two studies of the additional effect of an H2 receptor antagonist when given in combination with an H1 antagonist were undertaken in dermographic urticaria. Using a randomized, double-blind, crossover design in 19 patients, a combination of cetirizine (10 mg at night) and ranitidine (150 mg twice daily) was compared with a combination of cetirizine (10 mg at night) and placebo. The addition of ranitidine did not produce any significant difference in linear analogue scores for weal, itch or sleep disturbance. There was a significant depression of the frictional force/wealing response curve with an increase in wealing threshold (P < 0.0001) following the addition of H2 blockade. The wealing threshold was 54.7 +/- 4.4 (mean +/- SEM) g/mm2 for the H1 antagonist alone, and 73.2 +/- 5.7 for the combination of H1 and H2 antagonists. In a second similar study involving nine different patients, comparing terfenadine (120 mg twice daily) with a combination of terfenadine and ranitidine (150 mg twice daily), the weal threshold was 59.8 +/- 6.6 for the H1 antagonist alone, and 73.0 +/- 6.4 for the combination of H1 and H2 antagonists. Thus, in dermographic urticaria, adding an H2 antagonist to treatment with a potent H1 antagonist gives a small, significant reduction in wealing response, but no symptomatic benefit. We conclude that involvement of the H2 receptor in this urticarial disease is minimal, and does not justify the use of H2 receptor antagonists.

  17. High antagonist potency of GT-2227 and GT-2331, new histamine H3 receptor antagonists, in two functional models.

    PubMed

    Tedford, C E; Hoffmann, M; Seyedi, N; Maruyama, R; Levi, R; Yates, S L; Ali, S M; Phillips, J G

    1998-06-26

    GT-2227 (4-(6-cyclohexylhex-cis-3-enyl)imidazole) and GT-2331 ((1R,2R)-4-(2-(5,5-dimethylhex-1-ynyl)cyclopropyl)imidazole) were developed as new potent histamine H3 receptor antagonists. The functional activity of these ligands on the histamine H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of neurogenic contraction of the guinea-pig jejunum and histamine H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of norepinephrine release from guinea-pig heart synaptosomes were investigated. GT-2227 and GT-2331 both antagonized the inhibitory effects of (R)-alpha-methylhistamine on the contraction induced by electrical field stimulation in the guinea-pig jejunum with pA2 values of 7.9+/-0.1 and 8.5+/-0.03, respectively. In addition, GT-2227 and GT-2331 antagonized the inhibition of norepinephrine release in cardiac synaptosomes by GT-2203 ((1R,2R)-trans-2-(1H-imidazol-4-yl)cyclopropylamine), a histamine H3 receptor agonist. The current results demonstrate the antagonist activity for both GT-2227 and GT-2331 in two functional assays for histamine H3 receptors.

  18. Functionalized Congeners of P2Y1 Receptor Antagonists:

    SciTech Connect

    de Castro, Sonia; Maruoka, Hiroshi; Hong, Kunlun; Kilbey, II, S Michael; Costanzi, Stefano; Hechler, Béatrice; Gachet, Christian; Harden, T. Kendall; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2010-01-01

    The P2Y{sub 1} receptor is a prothrombotic G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) activated by ADP. Preference for the North (N) ring conformation of the ribose moiety of adenine nucleotide 3',5'-bisphosphate antagonists of the P2Y{sub 1} receptor was established by using a ring-constrained methanocarba (a bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane) ring as a ribose substitute. A series of covalently linkable N{sup 6}-methyl-(N)-methanocarba-2'-deoxyadenosine-3',5'-bisphosphates containing extended 2-alkynyl chains was designed, and binding affinity at the human (h) P2Y{sub 1} receptor determined. The chain of these functionalized congeners contained hydrophilic moieties, a reactive substituent, or biotin, linked via an amide. Variation of the chain length and position of an intermediate amide group revealed high affinity of carboxylic congener 8 (K{sub i} 23 nM) and extended amine congener 15 (K{sub i} 132 nM), both having a 2-(1-pentynoyl) group. A biotin conjugate 18 containing an extended {epsilon}-aminocaproyl spacer chain exhibited higher affinity than a shorter biotinylated analogue. Alternatively, click coupling of terminal alkynes of homologous 2-dialkynyl nucleotide derivatives to alkyl azido groups produced triazole derivatives that bound to the P2Y{sub 1} receptor following deprotection of the bisphosphate groups. The preservation of receptor affinity of the functionalized congeners was consistent with new P2Y{sub 1} receptor modeling and ligand docking. Attempted P2Y{sub 1} antagonist conjugation to PAMAM dendrimer carriers by amide formation or palladium-catalyzed reaction between an alkyne on the dendrimer and a 2-iodopurine-derivatized nucleotide was unsuccessful. A dialkynyl intermediate containing the chain length favored in receptor binding was conjugated to an azide-derivatized dendrimer, and the conjugate inhibited ADP-promoted human platelet aggregation. This is the first example of attaching a strategically functionalized P2Y receptor antagonist to a PAMAM dendrimer to

  19. Tamoxifen resistant breast cancer: coregulators determine the direction of transcription by antagonist-occupied steroid receptors.

    PubMed

    Takimoto, G S; Graham, J D; Jackson, T A; Tung, L; Powell, R L; Horwitz, L D; Horwitz, K B

    1999-01-01

    Pharmacological antagonists of steroid receptor action had been thought to exert their effects by a passive mechanism driven principally by the ability of the antagonist to compete with agonist for the ligand binding site. However, recent analyses of antagonist-occupied receptor function suggest a more complex picture. Antagonists can be subdivided into two groups, type I, or pure antagonists, and type II, or mixed antagonists that can have variable transcriptional activity based upon differential dimerization and DNA binding properties. This led us to propose that receptor antagonism may not simply be a passive competition for the ligand binding site, but may, in some cases, involve active recruitment of corepressor or coactivator proteins to produce a mixed transcriptional phenotype. We used a yeast two-hybrid screen to identify proteins that interact specifically with antagonist-occupied receptors. Two proteins have been characterized: L7/SPA, a ribosome-associated protein that is localized in both the cytoplasm and nucleus, but with no known extranucleolar nuclear function; and hN-CoR, the human homolog of the mouse thyroid receptor corepressor mN-CoR. In in vivo transcription assays we show that L7/SPA enhances the partial agonist activity of type II mixed antagonists, and that N-CoR and the related corepressor, SMRT, suppresses it. The coregulators do not affect agonists or pure antagonists. Moreover, the net agonist activity seen with mixed antagonists is a function of the ratio of coactivator to corepressor. Based upon these results, we proposed that in breast tumors the inappropriate agonist activity seen with therapeutic antagonists such as tamoxifen is responsible for the hormone-resistant state. To confirm this, we are quantitating coactivator/corepressor ratios in breast tumor cells lines and clinical breast cancers. Results should provide new insights into the mechanisms underlying the progression of breast cancer to hormone resistance, and may

  20. Cangrelor: a novel P2Y12 receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Norgard, Nicholas B

    2009-08-01

    Antiplatelet therapy is critical in the prevention of thrombotic complications of acute coronary syndrome and percutaneous coronary interventions. Current antiplatelet agents (aspirin, clopidogrel and glycoprotein IIb/IIIa antagonists) have demonstrated the capacity to reduce major adverse cardiac events. However, these agents have limitations that compromise their clinical utility. The platelet P2Y12 receptor plays a central role in platelet function and is a focus in the development of antiplatelet therapies. Cangrelor is a potent, competitive inhibitor of the P2Y12 receptor that is administered by intravenous infusion and rapidly achieves near complete inhibition of ADP-induced platelet aggregation. This investigational drug has been studied for use during coronary procedures and the management of patients experiencing acute coronary syndrome and is undergoing evaluation for use in the prevention of perioperative stent thrombosis.

  1. 1/f scaling in heart rate requires antagonistic autonomic control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struzik, Zbigniew R.; Hayano, Junichiro; Sakata, Seiichiro; Kwak, Shin; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2004-11-01

    We present systematic evidence for the origins of 1/f -type temporal scaling in human heart rate. The heart rate is regulated by the activity of two branches of the autonomic nervous system: the parasympathetic (PNS) and the sympathetic (SNS) nervous systems. We examine alterations in the scaling property when the balance between PNS and SNS activity is modified, and find that the relative PNS suppression by congestive heart failure results in a substantial increase in the Hurst exponent H towards random-walk scaling 1/f2 and a similar breakdown is observed with relative SNS suppression by primary autonomic failure. These results suggest that 1/f scaling in heart rate requires the intricate balance between the antagonistic activity of PNS and SNS.

  2. Vasopressin receptor antagonists, heart failure, and polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Torres, Vicente E

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis of nonpeptide orally bioavailable vasopressin antagonists devoid of agonistic activity (vaptans) has made possible the selective blockade of vasopressin receptor subtypes for therapeutic purposes. Vaptans acting on the vasopressin V2 receptors (aquaretics) have attracted attention as a possible therapy for heart failure and polycystic kidney disease. Despite a solid rationale and encouraging preclinical testing, aquaretics have not improved clinical outcomes in randomized clinical trials for heart failure. Additional clinical trials with select population targets, more flexible dosing schedules, and possibly a different drug type or combination (balanced V1a/V2 receptor antagonism) may be warranted. Aquaretics are promising for the treatment of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and have been approved in Japan for this indication. More studies are needed to better define their long-term safety and efficacy and optimize their utilization.

  3. Discovery and characterization of carbamothioylacrylamides as EP2 selective antagonists.

    PubMed

    Ganesh, Thota; Jiang, Jianxiong; Shashidharamurthy, Rangaiah; Dingledine, Ray

    2013-07-11

    Prostanoid receptor EP2 is emerging as a novel target for development of anti-inflammatory drugs for the treatment of chronic neurodegenerative and peripheral diseases; however, the availability of EP2 antagonist probes for exploration of peripheral disease models is very limited. We now report identification and characterization of a novel chemical class of compounds that show nanomolar potency and competitive antagonism of the EP2 receptor. A compound in this class, TG6-129, showed prolonged plasma half-life and did not cross the blood brain barrier. This compound also suppressed the induction of inflammatory mRNA markers in a macrophage cell line upon activation of EP2. Thus, this compound could be useful as a probe for a variety of peripheral chronic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, in which EP2 appears to play a pathogenic role.

  4. PAI-1 antagonists: the promise and the peril.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Douglas E

    2011-01-01

    The plasminogen activator (i.e., fibrinolytic) system is one of the key endogenous defense mechanisms against intravascular thrombosis. Thrombolytic agents represent the only direct way of augmenting fibrinolytic activity in humans, and have proven to be of value in the treatment of acute myocardial infarction and stroke. Although these agents are efficacious in the acute setting, they are not a viable option for long-term use. Net fibrinolytic activity is plasma is largely determined by the balance between tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) and its natural, fast-acting inhibitor, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). The recent development of specific PAI-1 antagonists promises to expand the limits of understanding of the role of the fibrinolytic system in human disease, and to break through the current confines of therapeutic options that can effectively restore and augment the activity of the fibrinolytic system.

  5. Nef proteins from simian immunodeficiency viruses are tetherin antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fengwen; Wilson, Sam J.; Langford, Wilmina; Virgen, Beatriz; Gregory, Devon; Johnson, Marc; Munch, Jan; Kirchhoff, Frank; Bieniasz, Paul D.; Hatziioannou, Theodora

    2010-01-01

    The tetherin/BST2/CD317 protein blocks the release of HIV-1 and other enveloped viruses by inducing tethering of nascent particles to infected cell surfaces. The HIV-1 Vpu protein antagonizes the antiviral activity of human but not monkey tetherins and many simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs) do not encode Vpu. Here, we show that the apparently ‘missing’ anti-tetherin activity in SIVs has been acquired by several SIV Nef proteins. Specifically, SIVMAC/SIVSMM, SIVAGM and SIVBLU Nef proteins can suppress tetherin activity. Notably, tetherin antagonism by SIV Nef proteins is species-specific, is genetically separable from other Nef activities and is most evident with simian rather than human tetherin proteins. Accordingly, a critical determinant of sensitivity to SIVMAC Nef in the tetherin cytoplasmic tail is variable in nonhuman primate tetherins and deleted in human tetherin, likely due to selective pressures imposed by viral antagonists, perhaps including Nef proteins. PMID:19501037

  6. M sub 1 muscarinic antagonists interact with. sigma. recognition sites

    SciTech Connect

    Hudkins, R.L. ); DeHaven-Hudkins, D.L. )

    1991-01-01

    The M{sub 1}-selective muscarinic antagonists aprophen, caramiphen, carbetapentane, 2-DAEX, dicyclomine, hexahydrosiladifenidol, iodocaramiphen, nitrocaramiphen, oxybutynin and trihexyphenidyl potently inhibited binding to {sigma} sites in brain. Both basic ester and non-ester structural type compounds which exhibit affinity for the muscarinic receptor also demonstrated affinity for the {sigma} site, while the classical antimuscarinic agents atropine and QNB, and the tricyclic pirenzepine, were ineffective in binding to this site. The authors also observed a significant correlation between the K{sub i} values for {sigma}compounds to inhibit ({sup 3}H)pirenzepine binding and their IC{sub 50} values to inhibit carbachol-stimulated phosphoinositide turnover. These observations may aid in elucidating the relationship of {sigma} binding to inhibition of phosphoinositide turnover stimulated by cholinergic agonists.

  7. Physico-chemical pathways in radioprotective action of calmodulin antagonists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varshney, Rajeev; Kale, R. K.

    1996-04-01

    Ghost membranes prepared from erythrocytes of Swiss albino mice were irradiated with gamma rays at a dose rate of 0.9 Gy/s. The fluidity of membrane decreased with radiation dose and in the presence of calmodulin antagonists (CA) like chlorpromazine (CPZ), promethazine (PMZ) and trimeprazine (TMZ) it increased. Radiation induced release of Ca 2+ from membranes. This release was inhibited by CA mainly by CPZ and PMZ. Being Ca 2+ dependent, the changes in the activity of acetylcholine estrase (AchE) following irradiation was also studied. Radiation decreased the activity of AchE in dose dependent manner. Presence of CPZ and PMZ diminished the radiation induced inhibition of AchE but not in the presence of TMZ at the lower concentration tested. It is suggested that apart from scavenging of free radicals, CA perhaps exert their euxoic radioprotective effect through Ca 2+ dependent processes.

  8. Acyclic Tethers Mimicking Subunits of Polysaccharide Ligands: Selectin Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We report on the design and synthesis of molecules having E- and P-selectins blocking activity both in vitro and in vivo. The GlcNAc component of the selectin ligand sialyl LewisX was replaced by an acyclic tether that links two saccharide units. The minimization of intramolecular dipole–dipole interactions and the gauche effect would be at the origin of the conformational bias imposed by this acyclic tether. The stereoselective synthesis of these molecules, their biochemical and biological evaluations using surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPR), and in vivo assays are described. Because the structure of our analogues differs from the most potent E-selectin antagonists reported, our acyclic analogues offer new opportunities for chemical diversity. PMID:25221666

  9. Mesenteric vascular reactivity to histamine receptor agonists and antagonists. [Dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Walus, K.M.; Fondacaro, J.D.; Jacobson, E.D.

    1981-05-01

    Response patterns of intestinal blood flow, oxygen extraction and consumption, blood flow distribution, and motility were assessed during intraarterial infusions of histamine, histamine after H1 or H2 blockade, dimaprit or dimaprit after H2 blockade. Histamine produced an initial peak response of blood flow with a slow decrease thereafter. Oxygen extraction was evenly depressed throughout the infusion, and oxygen consumption increased at the beginning. All initial responses were blocked by tripelennamine. Ranitidine, a new H2 antagonist, accelerated the decay of all responses. Dimaprit produced effects identical to those of histamine after tripelennamine. Distribution of blood flow was unchanged at the beginning of histamine infusion, but subsequently showed a shift to muscularis which was blocked by tripelennamine. Histamine usually stimulated intestinal contractions and this effect was abolished by tripelennamine. Thus, H1 stimulation, besides producing an initial vasodilation, increases oxygen uptake and redistributes flow to the muscularis.

  10. Identification of Bexarotene as a PPARγ Antagonist with HDX

    PubMed Central

    Marciano, David P.; Kuruvilla, Dana S.; Pascal, Bruce D.; Griffin, Patrick R.

    2015-01-01

    The retinoid x receptors (RXRs) are the pharmacological target of Bexarotene, an antineoplastic agent indicated for the treatment of cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL). The RXRs form heterodimers with several nuclear receptors (NRs), including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), to regulate target gene expression through cooperative recruitment of transcriptional machinery. Here we have applied hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) mass spectrometry to characterize the effects of Bexarotene on the conformational plasticity of the intact RXRα:PPARγ heterodimer. Interestingly, addition of Bexarotene to PPARγ in the absence of RXRα induced protection from solvent exchange, suggesting direct receptor binding. This observation was confirmed using a competitive binding assay. Furthermore, Bexarotene functioned as a PPARγ antagonist able to alter rosiglitazone induced transactivation in a cell based promoter:reporter transactivation assay. Together these results highlight the complex polypharmacology of lipophilic NR targeted small molecules and the utility of HDX for identifying and characterizing these interactions. PMID:26451138

  11. Oxycodone with an opioid receptor antagonist: A review.

    PubMed

    Davis, Mellar P; Goforth, Harold W

    2016-01-01

    The rationale for putting opioid antagonists with an agonist is to improve pain control, to reduce side effects, and/or to reduce abuse. The combination of prolonged release (PR) oxycodone and naloxone reduces constipation as demonstrated in multiple studies and has been designated a tamper-resistant opioid by the Food and Drug Administration. Bioequivalence of the combination product compared with PR oxycodone has not been established. Several of the pivotal studies provided suboptimal laxative support in the control arm of the randomized trials. Two noninferiority trials have demonstrated equivalent analgesia between PR oxycodone and the combination product at doses of less than 120 mg of oxycodone per day. There appears to be an analgesic ceiling above 80-120 mg of oxycodone per day. Safety monitoring during randomized trials was not been well described in published manuscripts. Benefits appear to be better for those with chronic noncancer pain compared with individuals with cancer when constipation was the primary outcome.

  12. Antagonistic pleiotropy involving promoter sequences in a virus

    PubMed Central

    Presloid, John B.; Ebendick-Corpus, Bonnie E.; Zárate, Selene; Novella, Isabel S.

    2008-01-01

    Selection of specialist genotypes, that is, populations with limited niche width, promotes the maintenance of diversity. Specialization to a particular environment may have a cost in other environments, including fitness tradeoffs. When the tradeoffs are the result of mutations that have a beneficial effect in the selective environment, but a deleterious effect in other environment, we have antagonistic pleiotropy. Alternatively, tradeoffs can result from the fixation of mutations that are neutral in the selective environment but have a negative effect in other environment, and thus the tradeoff is due to mutation accumulation. We tested the mechanisms underlying the fitness tradeoffs observed during adaptation to persistent infection of vesicular stomatitis virus in insect cells by sequencing the full-length genomes of twelve strains with a history of replication in a single niche (acute mammalian infection or persistent insect infection) or in temporally-heterogeneous niches, and correlated genetic and fitness changes. Ecological theory predicts a correlation between the selective environment and the niche width of the evolved populations, such that adaptation to single niches should lead to the selection of specialists and niche cycling should result in the selection of generalists. Contrary to this expectation, adaptation to one of the single niches resulted in a generalist and adaptation to a heterogeneous environment led to the selection of a specialist. Only one-third of the mutations that accumulated during persistent infection had a fitness cost that could be explained in all cases by antagonistic pleiotropy. Mutations involved in fitness tradeoffs included changes in regulatory sequences, particularly at the 3′ termini of the genomes, which contain the single promoter that controls viral transcription and replication. PMID:18644381

  13. SP 01-3 ALDOSTERONE ANTAGONISTS IN HEART FAILURE.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Colin

    2016-09-01

    Aldosterone's deleterious pathophysiological effects on the cardiovascular system if blocked by mineralcorticord antagonists (MRAs) logically should lead to improvement in heart function and outcomes in heart failure (HF). The first trial to test this hypothesis was tthe RALES trial in 1999 which treated patients with class III-IV HF with spironolactone. It showed significant reduction in mortality and cardiovascular hospitalzation rates. This was confirmed & extended in EMHASIS-HF RCT with classs II-III being treated with ACEIs & BB who received placebo or elperinone (a MRA) with again a statistically significant fall in mortality & hospitalization.The possible cardioprotective effects of MRA post acute myocardial infarct (MI) is less clear. The EPHESUS RCT in 2003 demostrated that elperinone given 3-14 days AMI in patients with early signs of HF reduced mortality & morbidity. However in the ALBTROSS trial using spironolactone 2 days after AMI showed no benfit in patients without HF but in a subgroup with ST elevation there was a 80% reduction in mortality after 6 months. However a recent meta-analysis from 25 RCT with data invovling 19,333 patients with either HF or post MI assigned aldosterone antagonists (AA)or placebo showed a 18% reduction in mortality including a 20% fall in CV mortality and a 19% reduction in SCD.The role of AA in HFPEF is even even more contraversial. The TOPCAT RCT of 3445 patients with symptomatc HFPEF randomised to spironolactone failed to meet the primary composite end point of death, aborted cardiac arrest or hospitalization although there was a reduction in hospitalization for HF (HR 0.83 P = 0.04).The differences between selective or non-selective MRAs, their ADRs & off target effects will also be discussed.

  14. Adenosine receptor antagonist and augmented vasodilation during hypoxic exercise.

    PubMed

    Casey, Darren P; Madery, Brandon D; Pike, Tasha L; Eisenach, John H; Dietz, Niki M; Joyner, Michael J; Wilkins, Brad W

    2009-10-01

    We tested the hypothesis that adenosine contributes to augmented skeletal muscle vasodilation during hypoxic exercise. In separate protocols, subjects performed incremental rhythmic forearm exercise (10% and 20% of maximum) during normoxia and normocapnic hypoxia (80% arterial O2 saturation). In protocol 1 (n = 8), subjects received an intra-arterial administration of saline (control) and aminophylline (adenosine receptor antagonist). In protocol 2 (n = 10), subjects received intra-arterial phentolamine (alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist) and combined phentolamine and aminophylline administration. Forearm vascular conductance (FVC; in ml x min(-1).100 mmHg(-1)) was calculated from forearm blood flow (in ml/min) and blood pressure (in mmHg). In protocol 1, the change in FVC (DeltaFVC; change from normoxic baseline) during hypoxic exercise with saline was 172 +/- 29 and 314 +/- 34 ml x min(-1) x 100 mmHg(-1) (10% and 20%, respectively). Aminophylline administration did not affect DeltaFVC during hypoxic exercise at 10% (190 +/- 29 ml x min(-1)x100 mmHg(-1), P = 0.4) or 20% (287 +/- 48 ml x min(-1) x 100 mmHg(-1), P = 0.3). In protocol 2, DeltaFVC due to hypoxic exercise with phentolamine infusion was 313 +/- 30 and 453 +/- 41 ml x min(-1) x 100 mmHg(-1) (10% and 20% respectively). DeltaFVC was similar at 10% (352 +/- 39 ml min(-1) x 100 mmHg(-1), P = 0.8) and 20% (528 +/- 45 ml x min(-1) x 100 mmHg(-1), P = 0.2) hypoxic exercise with combined phentolamine and aminophylline. In contrast, DeltaFVC to exogenous adenosine was reduced by aminophylline administration in both protocols (P < 0.05 for both). These observations suggest that adenosine receptor activation is not obligatory for the augmented hyperemia during hypoxic exercise in humans.

  15. Guanidinoethyl sulphonate is a glycine receptor antagonist in striatum.

    PubMed

    Sergeeva, Olga A; Chepkova, Aisa N; Haas, Helmut L

    2002-11-01

    1. Guanidinoethyl sulphonate (GES) is an analogue of taurine and an inhibitor of taurine transport. Interactions of GES with GABA(A) and glycine receptors are studied by whole cell recording and fast drug application in isolated striatal neurons of the mouse. 2. We confirm that GES is a weak agonist at GABA(A) receptors, and is able to antagonize GABA-evoked responses. GES did not gate GlyR. 3. GES antagonized glycine responses in a concentration-dependent and surmountable manner. Glycine dose-response curves were shifted to the right by GES (0.5 mM), yielding EC(50)s and Hill coefficients of 62 micro M and 2.5 in control, 154 micro M and 1.3 in the presence of GES. 4. GlyR-mediated taurine responses were competitively antagonized by GES. Taurine dose-response curves, in contrast to the glycine dose-response curves were shifted by GES to the right in a parallel manner. 5. The GlyR-block by GES was not voltage-dependent. 6. In contrast to our findings in the mouse, in rat striatal neurons which lack expression of the alpha3 GlyR subunit, GES shifted the glycine dose-response curve to the right in a parallel way without affecting the maximal response. Subtype-specificity of the GES action at GlyR must await further investigation in artificial expression systems. 7. We conclude that GES is a competitive antagonist at GlyR. The antagonistic action of GES at inhibitory ionotropic receptors can explain its epileptogenic action. Care must be taken with the interpretation of data on GES evoked taurine release.

  16. Sexually antagonistic cytonuclear fitness interactions in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Rand, D M; Clark, A G; Kann, L M

    2001-01-01

    Theoretical and empirical studies have shown that selection cannot maintain a joint nuclear-cytoplasmic polymorphism within a population except under restrictive conditions of frequency-dependent or sex-specific selection. These conclusions are based on fitness interactions between a diploid autosomal locus and a haploid cytoplasmic locus. We develop a model of joint transmission of X chromosomes and cytoplasms and through simulation show that nuclear-cytoplasmic polymorphisms can be maintained by selection on X-cytoplasm interactions. We test aspects of the model with a "diallel" experiment analyzing fitness interactions between pairwise combinations of X chromosomes and cytoplasms from wild strains of Drosophila melanogaster. Contrary to earlier autosomal studies, significant fitness interactions between X chromosomes and cytoplasms are detected among strains from within populations. The experiment further demonstrates significant sex-by-genotype interactions for mtDNA haplotype, cytoplasms, and X chromosomes. These interactions are sexually antagonistic--i.e., the "good" cytoplasms in females are "bad" in males--analogous to crossing reaction norms. The presence or absence of Wolbachia did not alter the significance of the fitness effects involving X chromosomes and cytoplasms but tended to reduce the significance of mtDNA fitness effects. The negative fitness correlations between the sexes demonstrated in our empirical study are consistent with the conditions that maintain cytoplasmic polymorphism in simulations. Our results suggest that fitness interactions with the sex chromosomes may account for some proportion of cytoplasmic variation in natural populations. Sexually antagonistic selection or reciprocally matched fitness effects of nuclear-cytoplasmic genotypes may be important components of cytonuclear fitness variation and have implications for mitochondrial disease phenotypes that differ between the sexes. PMID:11560895

  17. Agonistic and antagonistic estrogens in licorice root (Glycyrrhiza glabra).

    PubMed

    Simons, Rudy; Vincken, Jean-Paul; Mol, Loes A M; The, Susan A M; Bovee, Toine F H; Luijendijk, Teus J C; Verbruggen, Marian A; Gruppen, Harry

    2011-07-01

    The roots of licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra) are a rich source of flavonoids, in particular, prenylated flavonoids, such as the isoflavan glabridin and the isoflavene glabrene. Fractionation of an ethyl acetate extract from licorice root by centrifugal partitioning chromatography yielded 51 fractions, which were characterized by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and screened for activity in yeast estrogen bioassays. One third of the fractions displayed estrogenic activity towards either one or both estrogen receptors (ERs; ERα and ERβ). Glabrene-rich fractions displayed an estrogenic response, predominantly to the ERα. Surprisingly, glabridin did not exert agonistic activity to both ER subtypes. Several fractions displayed higher responses than the maximum response obtained with the reference compound, the natural hormone 17β-estradiol (E(2)). The estrogenic activities of all fractions, including this so-called superinduction, were clearly ER-mediated, as the estrogenic response was inhibited by 20-60% by known ER antagonists, and no activity was found in yeast cells that did not express the ERα or ERβ subtype. Prolonged exposure of the yeast to the estrogenic fractions that showed superinduction did, contrary to E(2), not result in a decrease of the fluorescent response. Therefore, the superinduction was most likely the result of stabilization of the ER, yeast-enhanced green fluorescent protein, or a combination of both. Most fractions displaying superinduction were rich in flavonoids with single prenylation. Glabridin displayed ERα-selective antagonism, similar to the ERα-selective antagonist RU 58668. Whereas glabridin was able to reduce the estrogenic response of E(2) by approximately 80% at 6 × 10(-6) M, glabrene-rich fractions only exhibited agonistic responses, preferentially on ERα.

  18. Anticonvulsive effect of nonimidazole histamine H3 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Sadek, Bassem; Kuder, Kamil; Subramanian, Dhanasekaran; Shafiullah, Mohamed; Stark, Holger; Lażewska, Dorota; Adem, Abdu; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna

    2014-06-01

    To determine the potential of histamine H3 receptor (H3R) ligands as new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), aromatic ether, and diether derivatives (1-12) belonging to the nonimidazole class of ligands, with high in-vitro binding affinity at human H3R, were tested for their in-vivo anticonvulsive activity in the maximal electroshock (MES)-induced and pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-kindled seizure models in rats. The anticonvulsive effects of a systemic injection of 1-12 on MES-induced and PTZ-kindled seizures were evaluated against the reference AED phenytoin (PHT) and the structurally related H3R antagonist/inverse agonist pitolisant (PIT). Among the most promising ligands 2, 4, 5, and 11, there was a significant and dose-dependent reduction in the duration of tonic hind limb extension (THLE) in MES-induced seizure subsequent to administration of 4 and 5 [(5, 10, and 15 mg/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p.)]. The protective effects observed for the 1-(3-(3-(4-chlorophenyl)propoxy)propyl)-3-methylpiperidine derivative 11 at 10 mg/kg, i.p. were significantly greater than those of PIT, and were reversed by pretreatment with the central nervous system penetrant H1R antagonist pyrilamine (PYR) (10 mg/kg). Moreover, the protective action of the reference AED PHT, at a dose of 5 mg/kg (without considerable protection in the MES model), was significantly augmented when coadministered with derivative 11 (5 mg/kg, i.p.). Surprisingly, pretreatment with derivative 7 (10 mg/kg, i.p.), an ethylphenoxyhexyl-piperidine derivative without considerable protection in the MES model, potently altered PTZ-kindled seizure, significantly prolonged myoclonic latency time, and clearly shortened the total seizure time when compared with control, PHT, and PIT. These interesting results highlight the potential of H3R ligands as new AEDs or as adjuvants to available AED therapeutics.

  19. Serotonin activates catecholamine neurons in the solitary tract nucleus by increasing spontaneous glutamate inputs.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ran Ji; Roberts, Brandon L; Zhao, Huan; Zhu, Mingyan; Appleyard, Suzanne M

    2012-11-14

    Serotonin (5-HT) is a critical neurotransmitter in the control of autonomic functions. 5-HT(3) receptors participate in vagal afferent feedback to decrease food intake and regulate cardiovascular reflexes; however, the phenotype of the solitary tract nucleus (NTS) neurons involved is not known. A(2)/C(2) catecholamine (CA) neurons in the NTS are directly activated by visceral afferents and are important for the control of food intake and cardiovascular function, making them good candidates to respond to and mediate the effects of serotonin at the level of the NTS. This study examines serotonin's effects on NTS-CA neurons using patch-clamp techniques and transgenic mice expressing an enhanced green fluorescent protein driven by the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) promoter (TH-EGFP) to identify catecholamine neurons. Serotonin increased the frequency of spontaneous glutamate excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) in >90% of NTS-TH-EGFP neurons, an effect blocked by the 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist ondansetron and mimicked by the 5-HT(3) receptor agonists SR5227 and mCPBG. In contrast, 5-HT(3) receptor agonists increased sEPSCs on a minority (<30%) of non-TH neurons. 5-HT(3) receptor agonists increased the frequency, but not the amplitude, of mini-EPSCs, suggesting that their actions are presynaptic. 5-HT(3) receptor agonists increased the firing rate of TH-EGFP neurons, an effect dependent on the increased spontaneous glutamate inputs as it was blocked by the ionotropic glutamate antagonist NBQX, but independent of visceral afferent activation. These results demonstrate a cellular mechanism by which serotonin activates NTS-TH neurons and suggest a pathway by which it can increase catecholamine release in target regions to modulate food intake, motivation, stress, and cardiovascular function.

  20. Serotonin Activates Catecholamine Neurons in the Solitary Tract Nucleus by Increasing Spontaneous Glutamate Inputs

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Ran Ji; Roberts, Brandon L.; Zhao, Huan; Zhu, Mingyan

    2012-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) is a critical neurotransmitter in the control of autonomic functions. 5-HT3 receptors participate in vagal afferent feedback to decrease food intake and regulate cardiovascular reflexes; however, the phenotype of the solitary tract nucleus (NTS) neurons involved is not known. A2/C2 catecholamine (CA) neurons in the NTS are directly activated by visceral afferents and are important for the control of food intake and cardiovascular function, making them good candidates to respond to and mediate the effects of serotonin at the level of the NTS. This study examines serotonin's effects on NTS-CA neurons using patch-clamp techniques and transgenic mice expressing an enhanced green fluorescent protein driven by the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) promoter (TH-EGFP) to identify catecholamine neurons. Serotonin increased the frequency of spontaneous glutamate excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) in >90% of NTS-TH-EGFP neurons, an effect blocked by the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist ondansetron and mimicked by the 5-HT3 receptor agonists SR5227 and mCPBG. In contrast, 5-HT3 receptor agonists increased sEPSCs on a minority (<30%) of non-TH neurons. 5-HT3 receptor agonists increased the frequency, but not the amplitude, of mini-EPSCs, suggesting that their actions are presynaptic. 5-HT3 receptor agonists increased the firing rate of TH-EGFP neurons, an effect dependent on the increased spontaneous glutamate inputs as it was blocked by the ionotropic glutamate antagonist NBQX, but independent of visceral afferent activation. These results demonstrate a cellular mechanism by which serotonin activates NTS-TH neurons and suggest a pathway by which it can increase catecholamine release in target regions to modulate food intake, motivation, stress, and cardiovascular function. PMID:23152635

  1. Peripheral 5-HT2-like receptors. Can they be classified with the available antagonists?

    PubMed Central

    Leff, P.; Martin, G. R.

    1986-01-01

    Interactions between 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and the so-called 5-HT2 receptor antagonists ketanserin, spiperone, trazodone and methysergide were studied in isolated preparations of the rabbit aorta, rat jugular vein, and rat caudal artery. Trazodone and spiperone were apparently simple competitive antagonists since they produced antagonism that was surmountable over the concentration range studied and, in each tissue, their apparent affinity appeared to be independent of the antagonist concentration. Furthermore, concentration-ratios obtained with the two antagonists in combination suggested that antagonism was additive, implying mutual competition with a single population of 5-HT receptors. Ketanserin was a non-surmountable antagonist of 5-HT in the rat caudal artery and methysergide demonstrated surmountable, competitive antagonism only in the rabbit aorta. Antagonist dissociation constants estimated for apparently competitive interactions showed that ketanserin, spiperone and trazodone expressed affinities which differed according to the tissue used. In the case of trazodone, affinity estimates differed by as much as 12 fold. These discrepancies were independent of the 5-HT receptor agonist used and could not be attributed to an inadequate equilibration of the antagonist. These results can be interpreted in two ways: either the receptors in the different tissues are heterogeneous or the antagonists used here must be considered as unreliable probes for the classification of 5-HT2-like receptors. PMID:2943354

  2. Marketed New Drug Delivery Systems for Opioid Agonists/Antagonists Administration: A Rapid Overview

    PubMed Central

    Soltani, Hoda; Pardakhty, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Novel drug delivery systems for controlled-release of opioid agonists as a long time painkillers or opioid antagonists for opium, heroin, and alcohol addiction are under development or in clinical use today. In this article, the field of “new drug delivery systems” is momentarily reviewed from the viewpoint of the marketed opioid agonists/antagonists dosage forms today. PMID:27882209

  3. Histamine-Induced Hypotension Modified by H1 and H2 Antagonists.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The hypotensive response of monkeys to exogenous histamine was measured when the histamine was given without antagonist, after chlorpheniramine (10...percent maximal response was: without antagonist, 0.115 micrograms/kg; after chlorpheniramine , 13.5 micrograms/kg; after chlorpheniramine and

  4. A long-acting GH receptor antagonist through fusion to GH binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Ian R.; Pradhananga, Sarbendra L.; Speak, Rowena; Artymiuk, Peter J.; Sayers, Jon R.; Ross, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Acromegaly is a human disease of growth hormone (GH) excess with considerable morbidity and increased mortality. Somatostatin analogues are first line medical treatment but the disease remains uncontrolled in up to 40% of patients. GH receptor (GHR) antagonist therapy is more effective but requires frequent high-dose injections. We have developed an alternative technology for generating a long acting potent GHR antagonist through translational fusion of a mutated GH linked to GH binding protein and tested three candidate molecules. All molecules had the amino acid change (G120R), creating a competitive GHR antagonist and we tested the hypothesis that an amino acid change in the GH binding domain (W104A) would increase biological activity. All were antagonists in bioassays. In rats all antagonists had terminal half-lives >20 hours. After subcutaneous administration in rabbits one variant displayed a terminal half-life of 40.5 hours. A single subcutaneous injection of the same variant in rabbits resulted in a 14% fall in IGF-I over 7 days. In conclusion: we provide proof of concept that a fusion of GHR antagonist to its binding protein generates a long acting GHR antagonist and we confirmed that introducing the W104A amino acid change in the GH binding domain enhances antagonist activity. PMID:27731358

  5. Addressing PXR liabilities of phthalazine-based hedgehog/smoothened antagonists using novel pyridopyridazines.

    PubMed

    Kaizerman, Jacob A; Aaron, Wade; An, Songzhu; Austin, Richard; Brown, Matt; Chong, Angela; Huang, Tom; Hungate, Randall; Jiang, Ben; Johnson, Michael G; Lee, Gary; Lucas, Brian S; Orf, Jessica; Rong, Minqing; Toteva, Maria M; Wickramasinghe, Dineli; Xu, Guifen; Ye, Qiuping; Zhong, Wendy; McMinn, Dustin L

    2010-08-01

    Pyridopyridazine antagonists of the hedgehog signaling pathway are described. Designed to optimize our previously described phthalazine smoothened antagonists, a representative compound eliminates a PXR liability while retaining potency and in vitro metabolic stability. Moreover, the compound has improved efficacy in a hedgehog/smoothened signaling mouse pharmacodynamic model.

  6. Cannabinoid discrimination and antagonism by CB(1) neutral and inverse agonist antagonists.

    PubMed

    Kangas, Brian D; Delatte, Marcus S; Vemuri, V Kiran; Thakur, Ganesh A; Nikas, Spyridon P; Subramanian, Kumara V; Shukla, Vidyanand G; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Bergman, Jack

    2013-03-01

    Cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB(1)) inverse agonists (e.g., rimonabant) have been reported to produce adverse effects including nausea, emesis, and anhedonia that limit their clinical applications. Recent laboratory studies suggest that the effects of CB(1) neutral antagonists differ from those of such inverse agonists, raising the possibility of improved clinical utility. However, little is known regarding the antagonist properties of neutral antagonists. In the present studies, the CB(1) inverse agonist SR141716A (rimonabant) and the CB(1) neutral antagonist AM4113 were compared for their ability to modify CB(1) receptor-mediated discriminative stimulus effects in nonhuman primates trained to discriminate the novel CB(1) full agonist AM4054. Results indicate that AM4054 serves as an effective CB(1) discriminative stimulus, with an onset and time course of action comparable with that of the CB(1) agonist Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, and that the inverse agonist rimonabant and the neutral antagonist AM4113 produce dose-related rightward shifts in the AM4054 dose-effect curve, indicating that both drugs surmountably antagonize the discriminative stimulus effects of AM4054. Schild analyses further show that rimonabant and AM4113 produce highly similar antagonist effects, as evident in comparable pA(2) values (6.9). Taken together with previous studies, the present data suggest that the improved safety profile suggested for CB(1) neutral antagonists over inverse agonists is not accompanied by a loss of antagonist action at CB(1) receptors.

  7. Marketed New Drug Delivery Systems for Opioid Agonists/Antagonists Administration: A Rapid Overview.

    PubMed

    Soltani, Hoda; Pardakhty, Abbas

    2016-04-01

    Novel drug delivery systems for controlled-release of opioid agonists as a long time painkillers or opioid antagonists for opium, heroin, and alcohol addiction are under development or in clinical use today. In this article, the field of "new drug delivery systems" is momentarily reviewed from the viewpoint of the marketed opioid agonists/antagonists dosage forms today.

  8. Coptis extracts enhance the anticancer effect of estrogen receptor antagonists on human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; He, Chengwei; Zhou, Keyuan; Wang, Jingdong; Kang, Jing X

    2009-01-09

    Estrogen receptor (ER) antagonists have been widely used for breast cancer treatment, but the efficacy and drug resistance remain to be clinical concerns. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the extracts of coptis, an anti-inflammatory herb, improve the anticancer efficacy of ER antagonists. The results showed that the combined treatment of ER antagonists and the crude extract of coptis or its purified compound berberine conferred synergistic growth inhibitory effect on MCF-7 cells (ER+), but not on MDA-MB-231 cells (ER-). Similar results were observed in the combined treatment of fulvestrant, a specific aromatase antagonist. Analysis of the expression of breast cancer related genes indicated that EGFR, HER2, bcl-2, and COX-2 were significantly downregulated, while IFN-beta and p21 were remarkably upregulated by berberine. Our results suggest that coptis extracts could be promising adjuvant to ER antagonists in ER positive breast cancer treatment through regulating expression of multiple genes.

  9. Functional properties of a cloned 5-hydroxytryptamine ionotropic receptor subunit: comparison with native mouse receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Hussy, N; Lukas, W; Jones, K A

    1994-01-01

    1. A comparative study of the whole-cell and single-channel properties of cloned and native mouse 5-hydroxytryptamine ionotropic receptors (5-HT3) was undertaken using mammalian cell lines expressing the cloned 5-HT3 receptor subunit A (5-HT3R-A), superior cervical ganglia (SCG) neurones and N1E-115 cells. 2. No pharmacological difference was found in the sensitivity to the agonists 5-HT and 2-methyl-5-HT, or to the antagonists d-tubocurare and 3-tropanyl-3,5-dichlorobenzoate (MDL-72222). 3. Current-voltage (I-V) relationships of whole-cell currents showed inward rectification in the three preparations. Rectification was stronger both in cells expressing the 5-HT3R-A subunit and in N1E-115 cells when compared with SCG neurones. 4. No clear openings could be resolved in 5-HT-activated currents in patches excised from cells expressing the 5-HT3R-A subunit or N1E-115 cells. Current fluctuation analysis of whole-cell and excised-patch records revealed a slope conductance of 0.4-0.6 pS in both preparations. Current-voltage relationships of these channels showed strong rectification that fully accounted for the whole-cell voltage dependence. 5. In contrast, single channels of about 10 pS were activated by 5-HT in patches excised from SCG neurones. The weak voltage dependence of their conductance did not account completely for the rectification of whole-cell currents. A lower unitary conductance (3.4 pS) was inferred from whole-cell noise analysis. 6. We conclude that the receptor expressed from the cloned cDNA is indistinguishable from the 5-HT3 receptor of N1E-115 cells, suggesting an identical structure for these two receptors. The higher conductance and different voltage dependence of the 5-HT3 receptor in SCG neurones might indicate the participation of an additional subunit in the structure of native ganglionic 5-HT3 receptors. Homo-oligomeric 5-HT3R-A channels may also be present as suggested by the lower conductance estimated by whole-cell noise analysis. PMID

  10. The identification of a series of novel, soluble non-peptidic neuropeptide Y Y2 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Lunniss, Gillian E; Barnes, Ashley A; Barton, Nick; Biagetti, Matteo; Bianchi, Federica; Blowers, Stephen M; Caberlotto, Laura L; Emmons, Amanda; Holmes, Ian P; Montanari, Dino; Norris, Roz; Puckey, Gemma V; Walters, Dewi J; Watson, Steve P; Willis, John

    2010-12-15

    The identification and subsequent optimisation of a selective non-peptidic NPY Y2 antagonist series is described. This led to the development of amine 2, a selective, soluble NPY Y2 receptor antagonist with enhanced CNS exposure.

  11. The NK1 receptor antagonist L822429 reduces heroin reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Barbier, Estelle; Vendruscolo, Leandro F; Schlosburg, Joel E; Edwards, Scott; Juergens, Nathan; Park, Paula E; Misra, Kaushik K; Cheng, Kejun; Rice, Kenner C; Schank, Jesse; Schulteis, Gery; Koob, George F; Heilig, Markus

    2013-05-01

    Genetic deletion of the neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) has been shown to decrease the reinforcing properties of opioids, but it is unknown whether pharmacological NK1R blockade has the same effect. Here, we examined the effect of L822429, a rat-specific NK1R antagonist, on the reinforcing properties of heroin in rats on short (1 h: ShA) or long (12 h: LgA) access to intravenous heroin self-administration. ShA produces heroin self-administration rates that are stable over time, whereas LgA leads to an escalation of heroin intake thought to model important dependence-related aspects of addiction. L822429 reduced heroin self-administration and the motivation to consume heroin, measured using a progressive-ratio schedule, in both ShA and LgA rats. L822429 also decreased anxiety-like behavior in both groups, measured on the elevated plus maze, but did not affect mechanical hypersensitivity observed in LgA rats. Expression of TacR1 (the gene encoding NK1R) was decreased in reward- and stress-related brain areas both in ShA and LgA rats compared with heroin-naïve rats, but did not differ between the two heroin-experienced groups. In contrast, passive exposure to heroin produced increases in TacR1 expression in the prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens. Taken together, these results show that pharmacological NK1R blockade attenuates heroin reinforcement. The observation that animals with ShA and LgA to heroin were similarly affected by L822429 indicates that the SP/NK1R system is not specifically involved in neuroadaptations that underlie escalation resulting from LgA self-administration. Instead, the NK1R antagonist appears to attenuate acute, positively reinforcing properties of heroin and may be useful as an adjunct to relapse prevention in detoxified opioid-dependent subjects.

  12. Anticonvulsant effects of isomeric nonimidazole histamine H3 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Sadek, Bassem; Saad, Ali; Schwed, Johannes Stephan; Weizel, Lilia; Walter, Miriam; Stark, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Phenytoin (PHT), valproic acid, and modern antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), eg, remacemide, loreclezole, and safinamide, are only effective within a maximum of 70%-80% of epileptic patients, and in many cases the clinical use of AEDs is restricted by their side effects. Therefore, a continuous need remains to discover innovative chemical entities for the development of active and safer AEDs. Ligands targeting central histamine H3 receptors (H3Rs) for epilepsy might be a promising therapeutic approach. To determine the potential of H3Rs ligands as new AEDs, we recently reported that no anticonvulsant effects were observed for the (S)-2-(4-(3-(piperidin-1-yl)propoxy)benzylamino)propanamide (1). In continuation of our research, we asked whether anticonvulsant differences in activities will be observed for its R-enantiomer, namely, (R)-2-(4-(3-(piperidin-1-yl)propoxy)benzylamino)propaneamide (2) and analogs thereof, in maximum electroshock (MES)-, pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-, and strychnine (STR)-induced convulsion models in rats having PHT and valproic acid (VPA) as reference AEDs. Unlike the S-enantiomer (1), the results show that animals pretreated intraperitoneally (ip) with the R-enantiomer 2 (10 mg/kg) were moderately protected in MES and STR induced models, whereas proconvulsant effect was observed for the same ligand in PTZ-induced convulsion models. However, animals pretreated with intraperitoneal doses of 5, 10, or 15 mg/kg of structurally bulkier (R)-enantiomer (3), in which 3-piperidinopropan-1-ol in ligand 2 was replaced by (4-(3-(piperidin-1-yl)propoxy)phenyl)methanol, and its (S)-enantiomer (4) significantly and in a dose-dependent manner reduced convulsions or exhibited full protection in MES and PTZ convulsions model, respectively. Interestingly, the protective effects observed for the (R)-enantiomer (3) in MES model were significantly greater than those of the standard H3R inverse agonist/antagonist pitolisant, comparable with those observed for PHT, and

  13. Dotarizine versus flunarizine as calcium antagonists in chromaffin cells.

    PubMed Central

    Villarroya, M; Gandía, L; Lara, B; Albillos, A; López, M G; García, A G

    1995-01-01

    1. Dotarizine is a novel piperazine derivative structurally related to flunarizine that is currently being evaluated in clinical trials for its antimigraine and antivertigo effects. This clinical profile may be related to its Ca2+ antagonist properties. Therefore, the actions of both compounds as calcium antagonists were compared in bovine chromaffin cells. 2. Dotarizine and flunarizine blocked 45Ca2+ uptake into K+ depolarized chromaffin cells (70 mM K+/0.5 mM Ca2+ for 60 s) in a concentration-dependent manner, with IC50s of 4.8 and 6.7 microM, respectively. 3. Dotarizine and flunarizine also inhibited the whole-cell Ca2+ and Ba2+ currents (ICa, IBa) in voltage-clamped chromaffin cells, induced by depolarizing test pulses to 0 mV, during 50 ms, from a holding potential of -80 mV. Blockade exhibited IC50s of 4 microM for dotarizine and 2.2 microM for flunarizine. Dotarizine increased the rate of inactivation of ICa and IBa; inhibition of whole-cell currents was use-dependent. 4. Transient increases of the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration, [Ca2+]i, produced by K+ stimulation (70 mM K+ for 5 s) of single fura-2-loaded chromaffin cells, were also inhibited by dotarizine and flunarizine with IC50s of 1.2 and 0.6 microM, respectively. Upon washout of dotarizine, the [Ca2+]i increases recovered fully after 5-10 min. In contrast, the responses remained largely inhibited 10 min after washing out flunarizine. 5. Catecholamine release induced by K+ stimulation (10-s pulses of 70 mM) was inhibited by dotarizine with an IC50 of 2.6 microM and by flunarizine with an IC50 of 1.2 microM. The blocking effects of both compounds developed slowly, and was fully established after 20-30 min of superfusion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7881736

  14. Anticonvulsant effects of isomeric nonimidazole histamine H3 receptor antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Sadek, Bassem; Saad, Ali; Schwed, Johannes Stephan; Weizel, Lilia; Walter, Miriam; Stark, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Phenytoin (PHT), valproic acid, and modern antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), eg, remacemide, loreclezole, and safinamide, are only effective within a maximum of 70%–80% of epileptic patients, and in many cases the clinical use of AEDs is restricted by their side effects. Therefore, a continuous need remains to discover innovative chemical entities for the development of active and safer AEDs. Ligands targeting central histamine H3 receptors (H3Rs) for epilepsy might be a promising therapeutic approach. To determine the potential of H3Rs ligands as new AEDs, we recently reported that no anticonvulsant effects were observed for the (S)-2-(4-(3-(piperidin-1-yl)propoxy)benzylamino)propanamide (1). In continuation of our research, we asked whether anticonvulsant differences in activities will be observed for its R-enantiomer, namely, (R)-2-(4-(3-(piperidin-1-yl)propoxy)benzylamino)propaneamide (2) and analogs thereof, in maximum electroshock (MES)-, pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-, and strychnine (STR)-induced convulsion models in rats having PHT and valproic acid (VPA) as reference AEDs. Unlike the S-enantiomer (1), the results show that animals pretreated intraperitoneally (ip) with the R-enantiomer 2 (10 mg/kg) were moderately protected in MES and STR induced models, whereas proconvulsant effect was observed for the same ligand in PTZ-induced convulsion models. However, animals pretreated with intraperitoneal doses of 5, 10, or 15 mg/kg of structurally bulkier (R)-enantiomer (3), in which 3-piperidinopropan-1-ol in ligand 2 was replaced by (4-(3-(piperidin-1-yl)propoxy)phenyl)methanol, and its (S)-enantiomer (4) significantly and in a dose-dependent manner reduced convulsions or exhibited full protection in MES and PTZ convulsions model, respectively. Interestingly, the protective effects observed for the (R)-enantiomer (3) in MES model were significantly greater than those of the standard H3R inverse agonist/antagonist pitolisant, comparable with those observed for PHT, and

  15. Effect of calmodulin antagonists on the growth and graviresponsiveness of primary roots of maize.

    PubMed

    Stinemetz, C L; Hasenstein, K H; Young, L M; Evans, M L

    1992-11-01

    We examined the effect of calmodulin (CaM) antagonists applied at the root tip on root growth, gravity-induced root curvature, and the movement of calcium across the root tip and auxin (IAA) across the elongation zone of gravistimulated roots. All of the CaM antagonists used in these studies delayed gravity-induced curvature at a concentration (1 micromole) that did not affect root growth. Calmodulin antagonists (> or = 1 micromole) inhibited downward transport of label from 45Ca2+ across the caps of gravistimulated roots relative to the downward transport of 45Ca2+ in gravistimulated roots which were not treated with CaM antagonists. Application of CaM antagonists at the root tip (> or = 1 micromole) also decreased the relative downward movement of label from 3H-IAA applied to the upper side of the elongation zone of gravistimulated roots. In general, tip application of antagonists inhibited neither the upward transport of 45Ca2+ in the root tip nor the upward movement of label from 3H-IAA in the elongation zone of gravistimulated roots. Thus, roots treated with CaM antagonists > or = 1 micromole become less graviresponsive and exhibit reduced or even a reversal of downward polarity of calcium transport across the root tip and IAA transport across the elongation zone. The results indicate that calmodulin-regulated events play a role in root gravitropism.

  16. Effect of calmodulin antagonists on the growth and graviresponsiveness of primary roots of maize

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stinemetz, C. L.; Hasenstein, K. H.; Young, L. M.; Evans, M. L.

    1992-01-01

    We examined the effect of calmodulin (CaM) antagonists applied at the root tip on root growth, gravity-induced root curvature, and the movement of calcium across the root tip and auxin (IAA) across the elongation zone of gravistimulated roots. All of the CaM antagonists used in these studies delayed gravity-induced curvature at a concentration (1 micromole) that did not affect root growth. Calmodulin antagonists (> or = 1 micromole) inhibited downward transport of label from 45Ca2+ across the caps of gravistimulated roots relative to the downward transport of 45Ca2+ in gravistimulated roots which were not treated with CaM antagonists. Application of CaM antagonists at the root tip (> or = 1 micromole) also decreased the relative downward movement of label from 3H-IAA applied to the upper side of the elongation zone of gravistimulated roots. In general, tip application of antagonists inhibited neither the upward transport of 45Ca2+ in the root tip nor the upward movement of label from 3H-IAA in the elongation zone of gravistimulated roots. Thus, roots treated with CaM antagonists > or = 1 micromole become less graviresponsive and exhibit reduced or even a reversal of downward polarity of calcium transport across the root tip and IAA transport across the elongation zone. The results indicate that calmodulin-regulated events play a role in root gravitropism.

  17. Survey of H2-antagonist usage in acute upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, B D; Meriano, F V; Phipps, T L; Ho, H; Zuckerman, M J

    1990-02-01

    H2-antagonists are frequently used in the management of upper gastrointestinal (UGI) hemorrhage despite their lack of proven efficacy. In order to determine the pattern of H2-antagonist usage for this indication, we retrospectively reviewed the charts of 137 patients admitted with acute UGI bleeding over a 1-year period at two teaching hospitals in West Texas. An H2-antagonist was ordered in 89% of patients (77%) intravenous, 12% oral). It was administered within 2 h of admission in 25% of these patients, within 4 h in 54%, and within 8 h in 78%. An H2-antagonist was ordered among the initial six orders in 49% and among the initial 10 orders in 77% of patients. Considering orders for specific therapies, an H2-antagonist was in the initial three orders in 60% of patients and among the initial six orders in 97%. Of the patients who were prescribed an H2-antagonist and who also had upper endoscopy, the drug was ordered prior to endoscopy in 86%. This review of H2-antagonist usage in the management of acute UGI bleeding has identified a prescribing pattern of writing for these drugs early in the sequence of order writing, with the drugs being given early in the course of hospitalization.

  18. [Distribution and characteristics of soil antagonistic actinomycetes on northern slope of Taibai Mountain, Qinling].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wen-Jie; Xue, Quan-Hong; Cao, Yan-Ru; Xue, Lei; Shen, Guang-Hui; Lai, Hang-Xian

    2011-11-01

    Twelve representative soil samples were collected from different altitudes on the northern slope of Taibai Mountain to study the distribution and characteristics of soil antagonistic actinomyces by using agar block method. There existed a great deal of soil antagonistic actinomyces in the study area. Among the 141 actinomycete strains isolated, 116 strains (82.3%) showed antagonism toward 12 target bacteria or fungi. The antagonistic strains at altitudes 800-1845, 3488, 3655, and 3670 m occupied 73.7% -86.8%, 81.3%, 78.9% and 82.3% of the total, respectively. 42.1% of the strains at altitudes 1200-2300 m and > 3400 m showed strong and broad spectrum antagonistic activity, suggesting that there was a great potential for the isolation of actinomycete strains with strong anti-biotic capability at these altitudes. 24.1% of the antagonistic actinomycetes showed antagonism against Staphyloccocus aureu, and 2.4%, 6.9% and 11.2% of them showed activity toward Verticillium dahliae in cotton, Phytophthora sp. in strawberry and Neonectria radiciccla in ginseng, respectively. This study showed that the soil actinomycete antagonistic potentiality (SAAP) could be used as a quantitative indicator to evaluate the potential of antagonistic actinomycete resources in soil.

  19. The Role of α1-Adrenoceptor Antagonists in the Treatment of Prostate and Other Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Batty, Mallory; Pugh, Rachel; Rathinam, Ilampirai; Simmonds, Joshua; Walker, Edwin; Forbes, Amanda; Anoopkumar-Dukie, Shailendra; McDermott, Catherine M.; Spencer, Briohny; Christie, David; Chess-Williams, Russ

    2016-01-01

    This review evaluates the role of α-adrenoceptor antagonists as a potential treatment of prostate cancer (PCa). Cochrane, Google Scholar and Pubmed were accessed to retrieve sixty-two articles for analysis. In vitro studies demonstrate that doxazosin, prazosin and terazosin (quinazoline α-antagonists) induce apoptosis, decrease cell growth, and proliferation in PC-3, LNCaP and DU-145 cell lines. Similarly, the piperazine based naftopidil induced cell cycle arrest and death in LNCaP-E9 cell lines. In contrast, sulphonamide based tamsulosin did not exhibit these effects. In vivo data was consistent with in vitro findings as the quinazoline based α-antagonists prevented angiogenesis and decreased tumour mass in mice models of PCa. Mechanistically the cytotoxic and antitumor effects of the α-antagonists appear largely independent of α 1-blockade. The proposed targets include: VEGF, EGFR, HER2/Neu, caspase 8/3, topoisomerase 1 and other mitochondrial apoptotic inducing factors. These cytotoxic effects could not be evaluated in human studies as prospective trial data is lacking. However, retrospective studies show a decreased incidence of PCa in males exposed to α-antagonists. As human data evaluating the use of α-antagonists as treatments are lacking; well designed, prospective clinical trials are needed to conclusively demonstrate the anticancer properties of quinazoline based α-antagonists in PCa and other cancers. PMID:27537875

  20. Bcl-2 Antagonists: A Proof of Concept for CLL Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Kumudha; Gandhi, Varsha

    2014-01-01

    Defective apoptosis is a fundamental hallmark feature of CLL biology and is a major target of cancer therapy development. High levels of Bcl-2 family anti-apoptotic proteins are considered primarily responsible for inhibiting apoptosis in CLL cells. While several approaches were considered to selectively inhibit Bcl-2 family anti-apoptotic proteins, the discovery that gossypol binds and antagonizes anti-apoptotic effect of Bcl-2 family proteins was a major breakthrough in identifying specific Bcl-2 antagonists. The concept of mimicking BH3 domain emphasized the importance of Bcl-2 family-targeted therapy that can modulate the function of anti-apoptotic proteins. Although parent compound gossypol did not sustain in the clinic, its structural modifications led to the development of additional analogues that demonstrated improved efficacy and reduced toxicity in preclinical and clinical investigations. Proof of concept of this hypothesis was demonstrated by structure based BH3 mimetic ABT-737 that has shown greater cytotoxicity towards CLL cells both in pre-clinical models and clinical trials. Its oral compound ABT-263 has demonstrated the substantial susceptibility of chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells through Bcl-2 inhibition. Collectively, results of a Phase I Study of Navitoclax (ABT-263) in patients with relapsed or refractory disease warrants Bcl-2 as a valid therapeutic target in CLL. Importantly, molecules that mimic pro-apoptotic BH3 domains represent a direct approach to overcoming the protective effects of anti-apoptotic proteins such as Mcl-1, Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL. PMID:23907405

  1. [Vascular calcifications, the hidden side effects of vitamin K antagonists].

    PubMed

    Bennis, Youssef; Vengadessane, Subashini; Bodeau, Sandra; Gras, Valérie; Bricca, Giampiero; Kamel, Saïd; Liabeuf, Sophie

    2016-09-01

    Despite the availability of new oral anticoagulants, vitamin K antagonists (VKA, such as fluindione, acenocoumarol or warfarin) remain currently the goal standard medicines for oral prevention or treatment of thromboembolic disorders. They inhibit the cycle of the vitamin K and its participation in the enzymatic gamma-carboxylation of many proteins. The VKA prevent the activation of the vitamin K-dependent blood clotting factors limiting thus the initiation of the coagulation cascade. But other proteins are vitamin K-dependent and also remain inactive in the presence of VKA. This is the case of matrix Gla-protein (MGP), a protein that plays a major inhibitory role in the development of vascular calcifications. Several experimental and epidemiological results suggest that the use of the VKA could promote the development of vascular calcifications increasing thus the cardiovascular risk. This risk seems to be higher in patients with chronic kidney disease or mellitus diabetes who are more likely to develop vascular calcifications, and may be due to a decrease of the MGP activity. This review aims at summarizing the data currently available making vascular calcifications the probably underestimated side effects of VKA.

  2. Bioisosteric phentolamine analogs as potent alpha-adrenergic antagonists.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seoung-Soo; Bavadekar, Supriya A; Lee, Sang-Il; Patil, Popat N; Lalchandani, S G; Feller, Dennis R; Miller, Duane D

    2005-11-01

    The synthesis and biological evaluation of a new series of bioisosteric phentolamine analogs are described. Replacement of the carbon next to the imidazoline ring of phentolamine with a nitrogen atom provides compounds (2, 3) that are about 1.6 times and 4.1 times more potent functionally than phentolamine on rat alpha1-adrenergic receptors, respectively. In receptor binding assays, the affinities of phentolamine and its bioisosteric analogs were determined on the human embryonic kidney (HEK) and Chinese Hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines expressing the human alpha1- and alpha2-AR subtypes, respectively. Analogs 2 and 3, both, displayed higher binding affinities at the alpha2- versus the alpha1-ARs, affinities being the least at the alpha1B-AR. Binding affinities of the methoxy ether analog 2 were greater than those of the phenolic analog 3 at all six alpha-AR subtypes. One of the nitrogen atoms in the imidazoline ring of phentolamine was replaced with an oxygen atom to give compounds 4 and 5, resulting in a 2-substituted oxazoline ring. The low functional antagonist activity on rat aorta, and binding potencies of these two compounds on human alpha1A- and alpha2A-AR subtypes indicate that a basic functional group is important for optimum binding to the alpha1- and alpha2A-adrenergic receptors.

  3. Major Depressive Disorder and Kappa Opioid Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Sun, Huijiao; Chen, Hao; Yang, Xicheng; Xiao, Li; Liu, Renyu; Shao, Liming; Qiu, Zhuibai

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a common psychiatric disease worldwide. The clinical use of tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs)/serotonin–norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRIs) for this condition have been widely accepted, but they were challenged by unacceptable side-effects, potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs) or slow onset/lack of efficacy. The endogenous opioid system is involved in stress and emotion regulatory processes and its role in MDD has been implicated. Although several KOR antagonists including JDTic and PF-04455242 were discontinued in early clinical trials, ALKS 5461 and CERC-501(LY-2456302) survived and entered into Phase-III and Phase-II trials, respectively. Considering the efficacy and safety of early off-label use of buprenorphine in the management of the treatment-resistant depression (TRD), it will be not surprising to predict the potential success of ALKS 5461 (a combination of buprenorphine and ALKS-33) in the near future. Moreover, CERC-501 will be expected to be available as monotherapy or adjuvant therapy with other first-line antidepressants in the treatment of TRD, if ongoing clinical trials continue to provide positive benefit-risk profiles. Emerging new researches might bring more drug candidates targeting the endogenous opioid system to clinical trials to address current challenges in MDD treatment in clinical practice. PMID:27213169

  4. Antagonistic autoregulation speeds up a homogeneous response in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigo, Guillermo; Bajic, Djordje; Elola, Ignacio; Poyatos, Juan F.

    2016-01-01

    By integrating positive and negative feedback loops, biological systems establish intricate gene expression patterns linked to multistability, pulsing, and oscillations. This depends on the specific characteristics of each interlinked feedback, and thus one would expect additional expression programs to be found. Here, we investigate one such program associated with an antagonistic positive and negative transcriptional autoregulatory motif derived from the multiple antibiotic resistance (mar) system of Escherichia coli. We studied the dynamics of the system by combining a predictive mathematical model with high-resolution experimental measures of the response both at the population and single-cell level. We show that in this motif the weak positive autoregulation does not slow down but rather enhances response speedup in combination with a strong negative feedback loop. This balance of feedback strengths anticipates a homogeneous population phenotype, which we corroborate experimentally. Theoretical analysis also emphasized the specific molecular properties that determine the dynamics of the mar phenotype. More broadly, response acceleration could provide a rationale for the presence of weak positive feedbacks in other biological scenarios exhibiting these interlinked regulatory architectures. PMID:27796341

  5. Side Effects of Leukotriene Receptor Antagonists in Asthmatic Children

    PubMed Central

    Erdem, Semiha Bahceci; Nacaroglu, Hikmet Tekin; Unsal Karkiner, Canan Sule; Gunay, Ilker; Can, Demet

    2015-01-01

    Background: Leukotriene receptor antagonists (LTRAs) are drugs which have been widely used more than ten years. As the use of LTRAs increases, our knowledge with respect to their side effects increases as well. Objectives: The objective of our study was to evaluat the observed side effects of LTRAs used in patients with astma. Patients and Methods: 1024 patients treated only with LTRAs owing to asthma or early wheezing were included in the study for a five-year period. The observed side effects of LTRAs in these patients were retrospectively investigated. The side effects were divided into two parts as psychiatric and non-psychiatric. Results: Among the 1024 cases included in the study, 67.5% of the patients out of 41 with side effects were male, 32.5% were female and the average age was 6.5 years. The rate of patients with asthma was 63.41% and 36.58% of the patients had early wheezing. It was determined that sex, age and diagnosis (early wheezing or asthma) of the patients were ineffective in the emergence of side effects. The average period for the emergence of side effects was the first month. It was observed that hyperactivity was the most frequently observed psychiatric side effect and that abdominal pain was the non-psychiatric side effect. Conclusions: The side effects of LTRAs were common in children. Therefore, patients must be informed at the beginning of the treatment and they must be evaluated at certain intervals. PMID:26495098

  6. Inhibition of radiation-induced polyuria by histamine receptor antagonists

    SciTech Connect

    Donlon, M.A.; Melia, J.A.; Helgeson, E.A.; Wolfe, W.W.

    1986-03-01

    In previous studies the authors have demonstrated that gamma radiation results in polyuria, which is preceded by polydypsia. This suggests that the increased thirst elicited by radiation causes increased urinary volume (UV). Histamine, which is released following radiation exposure, also elicits drinking by nonirradiated rats when administered exogenously. In this study the authors have investigated both the role of water deprivation and the effect of histamine receptor antagonists (HRA) on radiation-induced polyuria. Sprague-Dawley rats were housed individually in metabolic cages. Water was allowed ad libitum except in deprivation experiments where water was removed for 24 hr immediately following radiation. Cimetidine (CIM), an H2 HRA, and dexbromopheniramine (DXB), an H1 HRA, were administered i.p. (16 and 1 mg/kg, respectively) 30 min prior to irradiation (950 rads from a cobalt source). UV was determined at 24-hr intervals for 3 days preceding irradiation and 24 hr postirradiation. UV in DXB treated rats was significantly reduced 24 hr postirradiation (CON = 427 +/- 54%; DXB = 247 +/- 39% of preirradiated CON) compared to postirradiation control values. CIM did not affect postirradiation UV. These data suggest that radiation-induced polyuria is caused by polydypsia which is, in part, mediated by histamine induced by an H1 receptor.

  7. Vasopressin receptor antagonists and their role in clinical medicine

    PubMed Central

    Narayen, Girish; Mandal, Surya Narayan

    2012-01-01

    Hyponatremia is the most common electrolyte abnormality in hospitalized patients. Its treatment is based not only on extracellular fluid volume status of patients but also on its pathogenetic mechanisms. Conventional treatment of hyponatremia like fluid restriction, which is useful in euvolemic and hypervolemic hyponatremia, has very poor patient compliance over long term. Vasopressin receptor antagonists (Vaptans) are a new group of nonpeptide drugs which have been used in various clinical conditions with limited success. Whereas conivaptan is to be administered intravenously, the other vaptans like tolvaptan, lixivaptan, and satavaptan are effective as oral medication. They produce aquaresis by their action on vasopressin type 2 (V2R) receptors in the collecting duct and thus increase solute free water excretion. Vaptans are being used as an alternative to fluid restriction in euvolemic and hypervolemic hyponatremic patients. Efficacy of vaptans is now well accepted for management of correction of hyponatremia over a short period. However, its efficacy in improving the long-term morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic hyponatremia due to cirrhosis and heart failure is yet to be established. Vaptans have not become the mainstay treatment of hyponatremia yet. PMID:22470853

  8. Signatures of Sex-Antagonistic Selection on Recombining Sex Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, Mark; Guerrero, Rafael F.

    2014-01-01

    Sex-antagonistic (SA) selection has major evolutionary consequences: it can drive genomic change, constrain adaptation, and maintain genetic variation for fitness. The recombining (or pseudoautosomal) regions of sex chromosomes are a promising setting in which to study SA selection because they tend to accumulate SA polymorphisms and because recombination allows us to deploy the tools of molecular evolution to locate targets of SA selection and quantify evolutionary forces. Here we use coalescent models to characterize the patterns of polymorphism expected within and divergence between recombining X and Y (or Z and W) sex chromosomes. SA selection generates peaks of divergence between X and Y that can extend substantial distances away from the targets of selection. Linkage disequilibrium between neutral sites is also inflated. We show how the pattern of divergence is altered when the SA polymorphism or the sex-determining region was recently established. We use data from the flowering plant Silene latifolia to illustrate how the strength of SA selection might be quantified using molecular data from recombining sex chromosomes. PMID:24578352

  9. Calcium antagonists. A role in the management of cyanide poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    Maduh, E.U.; Porter, D.W.; Baskin, S.I.

    1993-12-31

    The physiological role of calcium was demonstrated by Ringer (1883) when he linked the omission of calcium (Ca++) from the bathing medium to the induction of cardiac arrest in the isolated frog heart. This observation established that Ca++ controlled muscle contraction but it was not until the autumn of 1963 that the specific pharmacological significance of this contribution was realised by Fleckenstein (1964), leading to the development of Ca++ antagonism as a concept in drug action (Fleckenstein 1977). Identifying the precise role of Ca++ ions in toxic cell injury and tissue death attributable to drug and chemical intoxication has lagged behind developments in Ca++ physiology and pharmacology and to date, much remains to be learned, although studies aimed at characterising the role of Ca++ in cytotoxic cell injury are receiving intense attention (Bondy Komulainen 1988; Maduh et al. l988a, l99Oa,b; Orrenius et al. 1989; Trump et al. 1989). On the other hand, the importance of cyanide as a poison has been known from antiquity (for references to earlier literature see Baskin Fricke 1992; Solomonson 1981). In experimental cyanide poisoning, recent studies have examined alterations in cell Ca++ and the influence of Ca++ antagonists in the management of this chemical toxicological emergency. These efforts have principally focused on the cellular Ca++ homeostasis system, its interrelationship with cellular components, and its susceptibility to cyanide action.

  10. A new class of NO-donor H3-antagonists.

    PubMed

    Tosco, Paolo; Bertinaria, Massimo; Di Stilo, Antonella; Marini, Elisabetta; Rolando, Barbara; Sorba, Giovanni; Fruttero, Roberta; Gasco, Alberto

    2004-05-01

    Synthesis and pharmacological characterisation of a series of compounds obtained by joining, through appropriate spacers, NO-donor furoxan and nitrooxy moieties to the imidazole ring, as well as their structurally related analogues devoid of NO-donating properti