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Sample records for 5-ht3a receptor channel

  1. Pathways and Barriers for Ion Translocation through the 5-HT3A Receptor Channel

    PubMed Central

    Di Maio, Danilo; Chandramouli, Balasubramanian; Brancato, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Pentameric ligand gated ion channels (pLGICs) are ionotropic receptors that mediate fast intercellular communications at synaptic level and include either cation selective (e.g., nAChR and 5-HT3) or anion selective (e.g., GlyR, GABAA and GluCl) membrane channels. Among others, 5-HT3 is one of the most studied members, since its first cloning back in 1991, and a large number of studies have successfully pinpointed protein residues critical for its activation and channel gating. In addition, 5-HT3 is also the target of a few pharmacological treatments due to the demonstrated benefits of its modulation in clinical trials. Nonetheless, a detailed molecular analysis of important protein features, such as the origin of its ion selectivity and the rather low conductance as compared to other channel homologues, has been unfeasible until the recent crystallization of the mouse 5-HT3A receptor. Here, we present extended molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations of the whole 5-HT3A protein with the aim of better understanding its ion transport properties, such as the pathways for ion permeation into the receptor body and the complex nature of the selectivity filter. Our investigation unravels previously unpredicted structural features of the 5-HT3A receptor, such as the existence of alternative intersubunit pathways for ion translocation at the interface between the extracellular and the transmembrane domains, in addition to the one along the channel main axis. Moreover, our study offers a molecular interpretation of the role played by an arginine triplet located in the intracellular domain on determining the characteristic low conductance of the 5-HT3A receptor, as evidenced in previous experiments. In view of these results, possible implications on other members of the superfamily are suggested. PMID:26465896

  2. Immunohistochemical characterization of 5-HT(3A) receptors in the Syrian hamster forebrain.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, Maria; Ricci, Lesley A; Schwartzer, Jared J; Melloni, Richard H

    2010-05-06

    The Syrian hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) has been extensively used as an animal model to investigate neuronal networks underlying various behaviors where 5-HT(3A) receptors have been found to play a critical role. To date, however, there is no comprehensive description of the distribution of 5-HT(3A) receptors in the Syrian hamster brain. The current study examined the localization of 5-HT(3A) receptors across the neuraxis of the Syrian hamster forebrain using immunohistochemistry. Overall, 5-HT(3A) receptors were widely and heterogeneously distributed across the neuraxis of the Syrian hamster brain. Notably, the most intense 5-HT(3A) immunolabeling patterns were observed in the cerebral cortex and amygdala. In addition, high variability in receptor density and expression patterns (i.e., perikarya, fibers and/or neuropilar puncta) was observed within the majority of brain areas examined, indicating that the role this receptor has in the modulation of a particular neural function differs depending on brain region. In some regions (i.e., nucleus accumbens) differences in the immunolabeling pattern between rostral, medial and caudal portions were also observed, suggesting functional heterogeneity of this receptor within a single brain region. Together, these results and the localization of this receptor to brain areas involved in the regulation of sexual behavior, aggression, circadian rhythm, drug abuse and anxiety implicate 5-HT(3A) receptors in the modulation of various behaviors and neural functions in the Syrian hamster. Further, these results underscore the importance of evaluating 5-HT(3A) receptors as a pharmacological target for the treatment of various psychopathological disorders.

  3. Open probability of homomeric murine 5-HT3A serotonin receptors depends on subunit occupancy

    PubMed Central

    Mott, David D; Erreger, Kevin; Banke, Tue G; Traynelis, Stephen F

    2001-01-01

    The time course of macroscopic current responses of homomeric murine serotonin 5-HT3A receptors was studied in whole cells and excised membrane patches under voltage clamp in response to rapid application of serotonin. Serotonin activated whole cell currents with an EC50 value for the peak response of 2 μm and a Hill slope of 3.0 (n = 12), suggesting that the binding of at least three agonist molecules is required to open the channel. Homomeric 5-HT3A receptors in excised membrane patches had a slow activation time course (mean ±s.e.m. 10-90 % rise time 12.5 ± 1.6 ms; n = 9 patches) for 100 μm serotonin. The apparent activation rate was estimated by fitting an exponential function to the rising phase of responses to supramaximal serotonin to be 136 s−1. The 5-HT3A receptor response to 100 μm serotonin in outside-out patches (n = 19) and whole cells (n = 41) desensitized with a variable rate that accelerated throughout the experiment. The time course for desensitization was described by two exponential components (for patches τslow 1006 ± 139 ms, amplitude 31 % τfast 176 ± 25 ms, amplitude 69 %). Deactivation of the response following serotonin removal from excised membrane patches (n = 8) and whole cells (n = 29) was described by a dual exponential time course with time constants similar to those for desensitization (for patches τslow 838 ± 217 ms, 55 % amplitude; τfast 213 ± 44 ms, 45 % amplitude). In most patches (6 of 8), the deactivation time course in response to a brief 1-5 ms pulse of serotonin was similar to or slower than desensitization. This suggests that the continued presence of agonist can induce desensitization with a similar or more rapid time course than agonist unbinding. The difference between the time course for deactivation and desensitization was voltage independent over the range -100 to -40 mV in patches (n = 4) and -100 to +50 mV in whole cells (n = 4), suggesting desensitization of these receptors in the presence of

  4. Unraveling mechanisms underlying partial agonism in 5-HT3A receptors.

    PubMed

    Corradi, Jeremías; Bouzat, Cecilia

    2014-12-10

    Partial agonists have emerged as attractive therapeutic molecules. 2-Me-5HT and tryptamine have been defined as partial agonists of 5-HT3 receptors on the basis of macroscopic measurements. Because several mechanisms may limit maximal responses, we took advantage of the high-conductance form of the mouse serotonin type 3A (5-HT3A) receptor to understand their molecular actions. Individual 5-HT-bound receptors activate in long episodes of high open probability, consisting of groups of openings in quick succession. The activation pattern is similar for 2-Me-5HT only at very low concentrations since profound channel blockade takes place within the activating concentration range. In contrast, activation episodes are significantly briefer in the presence of tryptamine. Generation of a full activation scheme reveals that the fully occupied receptor overcomes transitions to closed preopen states (primed states) before opening. Reduced priming explains the partial agonism of tryptamine. In contrast, 2-Me-5HT is not a genuine partial agonist since priming is not dramatically affected and its low apparent efficacy is mainly due to channel blockade. The analysis also shows that the first priming step is the rate-limiting step and partial agonists require an increased number of priming steps for activation. Molecular docking suggests that interactions are similar for 5-HT and 2-Me-5HT but slightly different for tryptamine. Our study contributes to understanding 5-HT3A receptor activation, extends the novel concept of partial agonism within the Cys-loop family, reveals novel aspects of partial agonism, and unmasks molecular actions of classically defined partial agonists. Unraveling mechanisms underlying partial responses has implications in the design of therapeutic compounds.

  5. 5-HT3a Receptors Modulate Hippocampal Gamma Oscillations by Regulating Synchrony of Parvalbumin-Positive Interneurons.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying; Yoon, Kristopher; Ko, Ho; Jiao, Song; Ito, Wataru; Wu, Jian-Young; Yung, Wing-Ho; Lu, Bai; Morozov, Alexei

    2016-02-01

    Gamma-frequency oscillatory activity plays an important role in information integration across brain areas. Disruption in gamma oscillations is implicated in cognitive impairments in psychiatric disorders, and 5-HT3 receptors (5-HT3Rs) are suggested as therapeutic targets for cognitive dysfunction in psychiatric disorders. Using a 5-HT3aR-EGFP transgenic mouse line and inducing gamma oscillations by carbachol in hippocampal slices, we show that activation of 5-HT3aRs, which are exclusively expressed in cholecystokinin (CCK)-containing interneurons, selectively suppressed and desynchronized firings in these interneurons by enhancing spike-frequency accommodation in a small conductance potassium (SK)-channel-dependent manner. Parvalbumin-positive interneurons therefore received diminished inhibitory input leading to increased but desynchronized firings of PV cells. As a consequence, the firing of pyramidal neurons was desynchronized and gamma oscillations were impaired. These effects were independent of 5-HT3aR-mediated CCK release. Our results therefore revealed an important role of 5-HT3aRs in gamma oscillations and identified a novel crosstalk among different types of interneurons for regulation of network oscillations. The functional link between 5-HT3aR and gamma oscillations may have implications for understanding the cognitive impairments in psychiatric disorders.

  6. Molecular properties of psychopharmacological drugs determining non-competitive inhibition of 5-HT3A receptors.

    PubMed

    Kornhuber, Johannes; Terfloth, Lothar; Bleich, Stefan; Wiltfang, Jens; Rupprecht, Rainer

    2009-06-01

    We developed a structure-property-activity relationship (SPAR)-model for psychopharmacological drugs acting as non-competitive 5-HT(3A) receptor antagonists by using a decision-tree learner provided by the RapidMiner machine learning tool. A single molecular descriptor, namely the molecular dipole moment per molecular weight (mu/MW), predicts whether or not a substance non-competitively antagonizes 5-HT-induced Na(+) currents. A low mu/MW is compatible with drug-cumulation in apolar lipid rafts. This study confirms that size-intensive descriptors allow the development of compact SPAR models.

  7. Inhibitory effects of dextrorotatory morphinans on the human 5-HT(3A) receptor expressed in Xenopus oocytes: Involvement of the N-terminal domain of the 5-HT(3A) receptor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung-Hwan; Hwang, Sung-Hee; Choi, Sun-Hye; Shin, Tae-Joon; Kang, Jiyeon; Kim, Hyun-Joong; Kim, Hyoung-Chun; Lee, Joon-Hee; Nah, Seung-Yeol

    2012-07-05

    We previously developed a series of dextromethorphan (DM, 3-methoxy-17-methylmorphinan) analogs modified at positions 3 and 17 of the morphinan ring system. Recent reports have shown that DM attenuates abdominal pain caused by irritable bowel syndrome, and multidrug regimens that include DM prevent nausea/vomiting following cancer surgery. However, little is known regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of DM. Here, we investigated the effects of DM, 3 of its analogs (AM, 3-allyloxy-17-methoxymorphian; CM, 3-cyclopropyl-17-methoxymorphinan; and DF, 3-methyl-17-methylmorphinan), and 1 of its metabolites (HM, 3-methoxymorphinan) on the activity of the human 5-HT(3A) receptor channel expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, using the 2-microelectrode voltage clamp technique. We found that intra-oocyte injection of human 5-HT(3A) receptor cRNAs elicited an inward current (I(5-HT)) in the presence of 5-HT. Cotreatment with AM, CM, DF, DM, or HM inhibited I(5-HT) in a dose-dependent, voltage-independent, and reversible manner. The IC(50) values for AM, CM, DF, DM, and HM were 24.5±1.4, 21.5±4.2, 132.6±35.8, 181.3±23.5, and 191.3±31.5μM, respectively. The IC(50) values of AM and CM were 7-fold lower than that of DM, and mechanistic analysis revealed that DM, DF, HM, AM, and CM were competitive inhibitors of I(5-HT). Point mutations of Arg241 in the N-terminal, but not amino acids in the pore region, to other amino acid residues attenuated or abolished DM- and DM-analog-induced inhibition of I(5-HT). Together, these results demonstrated that dextrorotatory morphinans might regulate 5-HT(3A) receptor channel activity via interaction with its N-terminal domain.

  8. Cation-pi interactions in ligand recognition by serotonergic (5-HT3A) and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: the anomalous binding properties of nicotine.

    PubMed

    Beene, Darren L; Brandt, Gabriel S; Zhong, Wenge; Zacharias, Niki M; Lester, Henry A; Dougherty, Dennis A

    2002-08-13

    A series of tryptophan analogues has been introduced into the binding site regions of two ion channels, the ligand-gated nicotinic acetylcholine and serotonin 5-HT(3A) receptors, using unnatural amino acid mutagenesis and heterologous expression in Xenopus oocytes. A cation-pi interaction between serotonin and Trp183 of the serotonin channel 5-HT(3A)R is identified for the first time, precisely locating the ligand-binding site of this receptor. The energetic contribution of the observed cation-pi interaction between a tryptophan and the primary ammonium ion of serotonin is estimated to be approximately 4 kcal/mol, while the comparable interaction with the quaternary ammonium of acetylcholine is approximately 2 kcal/mol. The binding mode of nicotine to the nicotinic receptor of mouse muscle is examined by the same technique and found to differ significantly from that of the natural agonist, acetylcholine.

  9. Dynamic Expression of Serotonin Receptor 5-HT3A in Developing Sensory Innervation of the Lower Urinary Tract

    PubMed Central

    Ritter, K. Elaine; Southard-Smith, E. Michelle

    2017-01-01

    Sensory afferent signaling is required for normal function of the lower urinary tract (LUT). Despite the wide prevalence of bladder dysfunction and pelvic pain syndromes, few effective treatment options are available. Serotonin receptor 5-HT3A is a known mediator of visceral afferent signaling and has been implicated in bladder function. However, basic expression patterns for this gene and others among developing bladder sensory afferents that could be used to inform regenerative efforts aimed at treating deficiencies in pelvic innervation are lacking. To gain greater insight into the molecular characteristics of bladder sensory innervation, we conducted a thorough characterization of Htr3a expression in developing and adult bladder-projecting lumbosacral dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. Using a transgenic Htr3a-EGFP reporter mouse line, we identified 5-HT3A expression at 10 days post coitus (dpc) in neural crest derivatives and in 12 dpc lumbosacral DRG. Using immunohistochemical co-localization we observed Htr3a-EGFP expression in developing lumbosacral DRG that partially coincides with neuropeptides CGRP and Substance P and capsaicin receptor TRPV1. A majority of Htr3a-EGFP+ DRG neurons also express a marker of myelinated Aδ neurons, NF200. There was no co-localization of 5-HT3A with the TRPV4 receptor. We employed retrograde tracing in adult Htr3a-EGFP mice to quantify the contribution of 5-HT3A+ DRG neurons to bladder afferent innervation. We found that 5-HT3A is expressed in a substantial proportion of retrograde traced DRG neurons in both rostral (L1, L2) and caudal (L6, S1) axial levels that supply bladder innervation. Most bladder-projecting Htr3a-EGFP+ neurons that co-express CGRP, Substance P, or TRPV1 are found in L1, L2 DRG, whereas Htr3a-EGFP+, NF200+ bladder-projecting neurons are from the L6, S1 axial levels. Our findings contribute much needed information regarding the development of LUT innervation and highlight the 5-HT3A serotonin receptor as

  10. Kampo Medicine: Evaluation of the Pharmacological Activity of 121 Herbal Drugs on GABAA and 5-HT3A Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Katrin M.; Herbrechter, Robin; Ziemba, Paul M.; Lepke, Peter; Beltrán, Leopoldo; Hatt, Hanns; Werner, Markus; Gisselmann, Günter

    2016-01-01

    Kampo medicine is a form of Japanese phytotherapy originating from traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). During the last several decades, much attention has been paid to the pharmacological effects of these medical plants and their constituents. However, in many cases, a systematic screening of Kampo remedies to determine pharmacologically relevant targets is still lacking. In this study, a broad screening of Kampo remedies was performed to look for pharmacologically relevant 5-HT3A and GABAA receptor ligands. Several of the Kampo remedies are currently used for symptoms such as nausea, emesis, gastrointestinal motility disorders, anxiety, restlessness, or insomnia. Therefore, the pharmacological effects of 121 herbal drugs from Kampo medicine were analyzed as ethanol tinctures on heterologously expressed 5-HT3A and GABAA receptors, due to the involvement of these receptors in such pathophysiological processes. The tinctures of Lindera aggregata (radix) and Leonurus japonicus (herba) were the most effective inhibitory compounds on the 5-HT3A receptor. Further investigation of known ingredients in these compounds led to the identification of leonurine from Leonurus as a new natural 5-HT3A receptor antagonist. Several potentiating herbs (e.g., Magnolia officinalis (cortex), Syzygium aromaticum (flos), and Panax ginseng (radix)) were also identified for the GABAA receptor, which are all traditionally used for their sedative or anxiolytic effects. A variety of tinctures with antagonistic effects Salvia miltiorrhiza (radix) were also detected. Therefore, this study reveals new insights into the pharmacological action of a broad spectrum of herbal drugs from Kampo, allowing for a better understanding of their physiological effects and clinical applications. PMID:27524967

  11. Building a 5-HT3A Receptor Expression Map in the Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Yoshihisa; Kondo, Makoto; Shimada, Shoichi

    2017-01-01

    Of the many serotonin receptors, the type 3 receptors (5-HT3R) are the only ionotropic ones, playing a key role in fast synaptic transmission and cognitive and emotional brain function through controlled neuronal excitation. To better understand the various functions of 5-HT3Rs, it is very important to know their expression pattern in the central nervous system (CNS). To date, many distributional studies have shown localized 5-HT3R expression in the brain and spinal cord. However, an accurate pattern of 5-HT3R expression in the CNS remains to be elucidated. To investigate the distribution of 5-HT3R in the mouse brain in detail, we performed immunofluorescent staining using 5-HT3AR-GFP transgenic mice. We found strong 5-HT3AR expression in the olfactory bulb, cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and amygdala; and partial expression in the pons, medulla, and spinal cord. Meanwhile, the thalamus, hypothalamus, and midbrain exhibited a few 5-HT3AR-expressing cells, and no expression was detected in the cerebellum. Further, double-immunostaining using neural markers confirmed that 5-HT3AR is expressed in GABAergic interneurons containing somatostatin or calretinin. In the present study, we built a 5-HT3AR expression map in the mouse brain. Our findings make significant contributions in elucidating the novel functions of 5-HT3R in the CNS. PMID:28276429

  12. Investigation of 5-HT3A receptor gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of individuals who had been exposed to air pollution.

    PubMed

    Ahangari, Ghasem; Amirabad, Leila Mohammadi; Mozafari, Sona; Majeidi, Ali; Deilami, Gholamreza Derkhshan

    2013-12-01

    The role of air pollution in exacerbation of allergic symptoms is well known. Several studies have shown the effect of air pollution on serotonergic system. The changes in serotonergic system could trigger several allergic symptoms. 5-HT(3A) is among serotonin receptors on the peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMCs) as well as other cells. In the present study we compared the 5-HT(3A) gene expression in PBMCs of the asthmatic patients as well as individuals who had been exposed to the air pollution. Normal individuals were also included in the study as control for comparison of 5-HT(3A) gene expression. Following the synthesis of the cDNA using mRNA extracted from PBMCs the level of 5- HT(3A) gene expression was measured using real-time PCR. The results showed t a significant increase in the relative expression level of 5-HT(3A) receptor in PBMCs from asthmatic patients and individuals exposed to the air pollutants compared to normal controls. Our result indicates that significant increase in 5-HT(3A) receptor may contribute to the pathogenesis as well as allergic symptoms which resulted from air pollution.

  13. Structure-activity relationships of quinoxaline-based 5-HT3A and 5-HT3AB receptor-selective ligands.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Andrew J; Verheij, Mark H P; van Muijlwijk-Koezen, Jacqueline E; Lummis, Sarah C R; Leurs, Rob; de Esch, Iwan J P

    2013-06-01

    Until recently, discriminating between homomeric 5-HT3A and heteromeric 5-HT3AB receptors was only possible with ligands that bind in the receptor pore. This study describes the first series of ligands that can discriminate between these receptor types at the level of the orthosteric binding site. During a recent fragment screen, 2-chloro-3-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)quinoxaline (VUF10166) was identified as a ligand that displays an 83-fold difference in [(3)H]granisetron binding affinity between 5-HT3A and 5-HT3AB receptors. Fragment hit exploration, initiated from VUF10166 and 3-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)quinoxalin-2-ol, resulted in a series of compounds with higher affinity at either 5-HT3A or 5-HT3AB receptors. These ligands reveal that a single atom is sufficient to change the selectivity profile of a compound. At the extremes of the new compounds were 2-amino-3-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)quinoxaline, which showed 11-fold selectivity for the 5-HT3A receptor, and 2-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)quinoxaline, which showed an 8.3-fold selectivity for the 5-HT3AB receptor. These compounds represent novel molecular tools for studying 5-HT3 receptor subtypes and could help elucidate their physiological roles.

  14. Regulation of the 5-HT3A receptor-mediated current by alkyl 4-hydroxybenzoates isolated from the seeds of Nelumbo nucifera.

    PubMed

    Youn, Ui Joung; Lee, Jun-Ho; Lee, Yoo Jin; Nam, Joo Won; Bae, Hyunsu; Seo, Eun-Kyoung

    2010-09-01

    Four known alkyl 4-hydroxybenzoates, i.e., methyl 4-hydroxybenzoate (1), ethyl 4-hydroxybenzoate (2), propyl 4-hydroxybenzoate (3), and butyl 4-hydroxybenzoate (4), were isolated from the seeds of Nelumbo nucifera Gaertner (Nymphaeaceae) for the first time. The structures of the isolates were identified by 1D- and 2D-NMR spectroscopy and comparison with published values. The compounds were evaluated for their effects on the 5-HT-stimulated inward current (I(5-HT)) mediated by the human 5-HT(3)A receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Compounds 1 and 2 enhanced the I(5-HT), but 4 reduced it. These results indicate that 4 is an inhibitor of the 5-HT(3)A receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

  15. The effects of varenicline on sensory gating and exploratory behavior with pretreatment with nicotinic or 5-HT3A receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Kucinski, Aaron; Wersinger, Scott; Stachowiak, Ewa K; Becker, Chani; Lippiello, Pat; Bencherif, Merouane; Stachowiak, Michal K

    2015-02-01

    Individuals with schizophrenia smoke at high frequency relative to the general population. Despite the harmful effects of cigarette smoking, smoking among schizophrenic patients improves cognitive impairments not addressed or worsened by common neuroleptics. Varenicline, a nonselective neuronal nicotinic receptor (NNR) agonist and full agonist of 5-HT3A receptors, helps reduce smoking among schizophrenic patients. To determine whether varenicline also improves a cognitive symptom of schizophrenia, namely, impaired sensory gating, a transgenic mouse with schizophrenia, th-fgfr1(tk-), was used. Varenicline dose-dependently increased prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the startle response, a measure of sensory gating, in th-fgfr1(tk-) mice and normalized PPI deficits relative to nontransgenic controls. With the highest dose (10 mg/kg), however, there was a robust elevation of PPI and startle response, as well as reduced exploratory behavior in the open field and elevated plus maze. Pretreatment with the nonspecific NNR antagonist mecamylamine attenuated the exaggerated PPI response and, similar to the 5-HT3A receptor antagonist ondansetron, it prevented the reduction in exploratory behavior. Collectively, these results indicate that varenicline at low-to-moderate doses may be beneficial against impaired sensory gating in schizophrenia; however, higher doses may induce anxiogenic effects, which can be prevented with antagonists of NNRs or 5-HT3A receptors.

  16. The binding characteristics and orientation of a novel radioligand with distinct properties at 5-HT3A and 5-HT3AB receptors

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Andrew J.; Verheij, Mark H.P.; Verbeek, Joost; Windhorst, Albert D.; de Esch, Iwan J.P.; Lummis, Sarah C.R.

    2014-01-01

    VUF10166 (2-chloro-3-(4-methyl piperazin-1-yl)quinoxaline) is a ligand that binds with high affinity to 5-HT3 receptors. Here we synthesise [3H]VUF10166 and characterise its binding properties at 5-HT3A and 5-HT3AB receptors. At 5-HT3A receptors [3H]VUF10166 displayed saturable binding with a Kd of 0.18 nM. Kinetic measurements gave monophasic association (6.25 × 107 M−1 min−1) and dissociation (0.01 min−1) rates that yielded a similar Kd value (0.16 nM). At 5-HT3AB receptors two association (6.15 × 10−7, 7.23 M−1 min−1) and dissociation (0.024, 0.162 min−1) rates were seen, yielding Kd values (0.38 nM and 22 nM) that were consistent with values obtained in saturation (Kd = 0.74 nM) and competition (Ki = 37 nM) binding experiments respectively. At both receptor types, specific binding was inhibited by classical 5-HT3 receptor-selective orthosteric ligands (5-HT, allosetron, d-tubocurarine, granisetron, mCPBG, MDL72222, quipazine), but not by non-competitive antagonists (bilobalide, ginkgolide B, picrotoxin) or competitive ligands of other Cys-loop receptors (ACh, bicuculline, glycine, gabazine). To explore VUF10166 ligand–receptor interactions we used in silico modelling and docking, and tested the predictions using site directed mutagenesis. The data suggest that VUF10166 adopts a similar orientation to 5-HT3 receptor agonists bound in AChBP (varenicline) and 5HTBP (5-HT) crystal structures. PMID:25174552

  17. Design and validation of a homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence cell-based assay targeting the ligand-gated ion channel 5-HT3A.

    PubMed

    Blanc, Emilie; Wagner, Patrick; Plaisier, Fabrice; Schmitt, Martine; Durroux, Thierry; Bourguignon, Jean-Jacques; Partiseti, Michel; Dupuis, Elodie; Bihel, Frederic

    2015-09-01

    Ligand-gated ion channels (LGICs) are considered as attractive protein targets in the search for new therapeutic agents. Nowadays, this strategy involves the capability to screen large chemical libraries. We present a new Tag-lite ligand binding assay targeting LGICs on living cells. This technology combines the use of suicide enzyme tags fused to channels of interest with homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence (HTRF) as the detection readout. Using the 5-HT3 receptor as system model, we showed that the pharmacology of the HALO-5HT3 receptor was identical to that of the native receptor. After validation of the assay by using 5-HT3 agonists and antagonists of reference, a pilot screen enabled us to identify azelastine, a well-known histamine H1 antagonist, as a potent 5-HT3 antagonist. This interesting result was confirmed with electrophysiological experiments. The method described here is easy to implement and could be applicable for other LGICs, opening new ways for the screening of chemical libraries.

  18. Importance of M2-M3 loop in governing properties of genistein at the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor inferred from α7/5-HT3A chimera.

    PubMed

    Grønlien, Jens Halvard; Ween, Hilde; Thorin-Hagene, Kirsten; Cassar, Steven; Li, Jinhe; Briggs, Clark A; Gopalakrishnan, Murali; Malysz, John

    2010-11-25

    Genistein and 5-hydroxyindole (5-HI) potentiate the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor current by primarily increasing peak amplitude, a property of type I α7 positive allosteric modulation. In this study, the effects of these two compounds were investigated at two different α7/5-HT(3) chimeras (chimera 1, comprising of extracellular α7 N-terminus fused to the remainder of 5-HT(3A), and chimera 2 containing an additional α7 encoded M2-M3 loop), and wild-type α7 and 5-HT(3A) receptors. Agonist-evoked responses, examined by expression of the chimeras in Xenopus laevis oocytes or HEK-293 cells, revealed that currents decayed slower and compounds {rank order: N-[(3R)-1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-3-yl]-4-chlorobenzamide hydrochloride (PNU-282987)~2-(1,4-diazabicyclo[3.2.2]nonan-4-yl)-5-phenyl-1,3,4-oxadiazole (NS6784)>acetylcholine>choline} were more potent in chimera 2 than chimera 1 or α7 receptors. In chimera 2, genistein and 5-HI potentiated agonist-evoked responses (EC(50): 4-5 μM for genistein and 300-500 μM for 5-HI) and at higher concentrations evoked current directly consistent with ago-allosteric modulation. At chimera 1 and 5-HT(3A) receptors, neither compound directly evoked any current and 5-HI, only at chimera 1, was able to potentiate agonist-evoked responses. Genistein and 5-HI did not inhibit the binding of the α7 agonist [(3)H](1S,4S)-2,2-dimethyl-5-(6-phenylpyridazin-3-yl)-5-aza-2-azoniabicyclo[2.2.1] heptane ([(3)H]A-585539) to rat brain or chimera 2. In summary, this study supports the role of the M2-M3 loop being critical for the positive allosteric effect of genistein, but not 5-HI, and in agonist-evoked response fine-tuning. The identification of distinct α7 receptor modulatory sites offers unique opportunities for developing CNS therapeutics and understanding its pharmacology.

  19. Ethanol Stabilizes the Open State of Single 5-Hydroxytryptamine3A(QDA) Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Feinberg-Zadek, Paula L.

    2010-01-01

    Ethanol enhancement of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)3A receptor-mediated responses may have important consequences in the intoxicating and addictive properties of ethanol. Although the exact mechanism is unknown, ethanol-mediated enhancement of 5-HT3 receptor current has been proposed to occur due to stabilization of the open-channel state. It has not been possible to directly measure the open state of the channel due to the extremely low single-channel conductance of 5-HT3A channels. Recently, three arginine residues within the large intracellular loop of the 5-HT3A subunit were substituted by their equivalent residues (glutamine, aspartate, and alanine) of the 5-HT3B subunit to produce a 5-HT3A(QDA) subunit that forms functional homomeric channels exhibiting a measurable single-channel conductance. Using whole-cell rapid-agonist application techniques and the cell-attached single-channel recording configuration, we examined human 5-HT3A(QDA) receptors expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. The agonist sensitivity, macroscopic kinetics, and modulation by ethanol were similar between mutant and wild-type channels, suggesting the substitutions had not altered these channel structure-function properties. The open time histogram for single-channel events mediated by 5-HT3A(QDA) receptors in the presence of maximal 5-HT was best fit by three exponentials, but in the presence of ethanol a fourth open state was evident. In summary, the QDA substitution greatly enhanced single-channel conductance with little effect on 5-HT3A channel's kinetic properties and ethanol enhances agonist action on 5-HT3A receptors by inducing a new, long-lived open-channel state. Furthermore, the 5-HT3A(QDA) receptor appears to be suitable for pharmacological studies of 5-HT3A receptor modulation at a single-channel level. PMID:20200118

  20. Fragment library screening reveals remarkable similarities between the G protein-coupled receptor histamine H₄ and the ion channel serotonin 5-HT₃A.

    PubMed

    Verheij, Mark H P; de Graaf, Chris; de Kloe, Gerdien E; Nijmeijer, Saskia; Vischer, Henry F; Smits, Rogier A; Zuiderveld, Obbe P; Hulscher, Saskia; Silvestri, Linda; Thompson, Andrew J; van Muijlwijk-Koezen, Jacqueline E; Lummis, Sarah C R; Leurs, Rob; de Esch, Iwan J P

    2011-09-15

    A fragment library was screened against the G protein-coupled histamine H(4) receptor (H(4)R) and the ligand-gated ion channel serotonin 5-HT(3A) (5-HT(3A)R). Interestingly, significant overlap was found between H(4)R and 5-HT(3A)R hit sets. The data indicates that dual active H(4)R and 5 HT(3A)R fragments have a higher complexity than the selective compounds which has important implications for chemical genomics approaches. The results of our fragment-based library screening study illustrate similarities in ligand recognition between H(4)R and 5-HT(3A)R and have important consequences for selectivity profiling in ongoing drug discovery efforts on H(4)R and 5-HT(3A)R. The affinity profiles of our fragment screening studies furthermore match the chemical properties of the H(4)R and 5-HT(3A)R binding sites and can be used to define molecular interaction fingerprints to guide the in silico prediction of protein-ligand interactions and structure.

  1. Universality of receptor channel responses.

    PubMed

    Kardos, J; Nyikos, L

    2001-12-01

    Rate parameters estimated for neurotransmitter-gated receptor channel opening and receptor desensitization are classified according to their dependence on the temporal resolution of the techniques applied in the measurements. Because allosteric proteins constituting receptor channels impose restrictions on the types of model suitable to describe the dynamic response of channels to neurotransmitters, Markovian, non-linear or fractal dynamic models and their possible extension to receptor channel response in excitable membranes are discussed.

  2. Activation and modulation of recombinantly expressed serotonin receptor type 3A by terpenes and pungent substances.

    PubMed

    Ziemba, Paul M; Schreiner, Benjamin S P; Flegel, Caroline; Herbrechter, Robin; Stark, Timo D; Hofmann, Thomas; Hatt, Hanns; Werner, Markus; Gisselmann, Günter

    2015-11-27

    Serotonin receptor type 3 (5-HT3 receptor) is a ligand-gated ion channel that is expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) as well as in the peripheral nervous system (PNS). The receptor plays an important role in regulating peristalsis of the gastrointestinal tract and in functions such as emesis, cognition and anxiety. Therefore, a variety of pharmacologically active substances target the 5-HT3 receptor to treat chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. The 5-HT3 receptors are activated, antagonized, or modulated by a wide range of chemically different substances, such as 2-methyl-serotonin, phenylbiguanide, setrones, or cannabinoids. Whereas the action of all of these substances is well described, less is known about the effect of terpenoids or fragrances on 5-HT3A receptors. In this study, we screened a large number of natural odorous and pungent substances for their pharmacological action on recombinantly expressed human 5-HT3A receptors. The receptors were functionally expressed in Xenopus oocytes and characterized by electrophysiological recordings using the two-electrode voltage-clamp technique. A screening of two odorous mixes containing a total of 200 substances revealed that the monoterpenes, thymol and carvacrol, act as both weak partial agonists and positive modulators on the 5-HT3A receptor. In contrast, the most effective blockers were the terpenes, citronellol and geraniol, as well as the pungent substances gingerol, capsaicin and polygodial. In our study, we identified new modulators of 5-HT3A receptors out of the classes of monoterpenes and vanilloid substances that frequently occur in various plants.

  3. Cloning and expression of ligand-gated ion-channel receptor L2 in central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Houtani, Takeshi; Munemoto, Yumi; Kase, Masahiko; Sakuma, Satoru; Tsutsumi, Toshiyuki; Sugimoto, Tetsuo . E-mail: sugimoto@takii.kmu.ac.jp

    2005-09-23

    An orphan receptor of ligand-gated ion-channel type (L2, also termed ZAC according to the presence of zinc ion for channel activation) was identified by computer-assisted search programs on human genome database. The L2 protein shares partial homology with serotonin receptors 5HT3A and 5HT3B. We have cloned L2 cDNA derived from human caudate nucleus and characterized the exon-intron structure as follows: (1) The L2 protein has four transmembrane regions (M1-M4) and a long cytoplasmic loop between M3 and M4. (2) The sequence is conserved in species including chimpanzee, dog, cow, and opossum. (3) Nine exons form its protein-coding region and especially exon 5 corresponds to a disulfide bond region on the amino-terminal side. Our analysis using multiple tissue cDNA panels revealed that at least two splicing variants of L2 mRNA are present. The cDNA PCR amplification study revealed that L2 mRNA is expressed in tissues including brain, pancreas, liver, lung, heart, kidney, and skeletal muscle while 5HT3A mRNA could be detected in brain, heart, placenta, lung, kidney, pancreas, and skeletal muscle, and 5HT3B mRNA in brain, kidney, and skeletal muscle, suggesting different significance in tissue expression of these receptors. Regional expression of L2 mRNA and protein was examined in brain. The RT-PCR studies confirmed L2 mRNA expression in hippocampus, striatum, amygdala, and thalamus in adult brain. The L2 protein was immunolocalized by using antipeptide antibodies. Immunostained tissue sections revealed that L2-like immunoreactivity was dominantly expressed in the hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cells and in the polymorphic layer of the dentate gyrus. We analyzed the expression of L2 protein in HEK293 cells using GFP fusion protein reporter system. Western blots revealed that L2 protein confers sugar chains on the extracellular side. In transfected HEK293 cells, cellular membranes and intracellular puncta were densely labeled with GFP, suggesting selective dispatch to the

  4. Ryanodine receptors as leak channels.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Hernández, Agustín; Ávila, Guillermo; Rueda, Angélica

    2014-09-15

    Ryanodine receptors are Ca(2+) release channels of internal stores. This review focuses on those situations and conditions that transform RyRs from a finely regulated ion channel to an unregulated Ca(2+) leak channel and the pathological consequences of this alteration. In skeletal muscle, mutations in either CaV1.1 channel or RyR1 results in a leaky behavior of the latter. In heart cells, RyR2 functions normally as a Ca(2+) leak channel during diastole within certain limits, the enhancement of this activity leads to arrhythmogenic situations that are tackled with different pharmacological strategies. In smooth muscle, RyRs are involved more in reducing excitability than in stimulating contraction so the leak activity of RyRs in the form of Ca(2+) sparks, locally activates Ca(2+)-dependent potassium channels to reduce excitability. In neurons the enhanced activity of RyRs is associated with the development of different neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer and Huntington diseases. It appears then that the activity of RyRs as leak channels can have both physiological and pathological consequences depending on the cell type and the metabolic condition.

  5. Impact of intracellular domain flexibility upon properties of activated human 5-HT3 receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Kozuska, J L; Paulsen, I M; Belfield, W J; Martin, I L; Cole, D J; Holt, A; Dunn, S M J

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose It has been proposed that arginine residues lining the intracellular portals of the homomeric 5-HT3A receptor cause electrostatic repulsion of cation flow, accounting for a single-channel conductance substantially lower than that of the 5-HT3AB heteromer. However, comparison of receptor homology models for wild-type pentamers suggests that salt bridges in the intracellular domain of the homomer may impart structural rigidity, and we hypothesized that this rigidity could account for the low conductance. Experimental Approach Mutations were introduced into the portal region of the human 5-HT3A homopentamer, such that putative salt bridges were broken by neutralizing anionic partners. Single-channel and whole cell currents were measured in transfected tsA201 cells and in Xenopus oocytes respectively. Computational simulations of protein flexibility facilitated comparison of wild-type and mutant receptors. Key Results Single-channel conductance was increased substantially, often to wild-type heteromeric receptor values, in most 5-HT3A mutants. Conversely, introduction of arginine residues to the portal region of the heteromer, conjecturally creating salt bridges, decreased conductance. Gating kinetics varied significantly between different mutant receptors. EC50 values for whole-cell responses to 5-HT remained largely unchanged, but Hill coefficients for responses to 5-HT were usually significantly smaller in mutants. Computational simulations suggested increased flexibility throughout the protein structure as a consequence of mutations in the intracellular domain. Conclusions and Implications These data support a role for intracellular salt bridges in maintaining the quaternary structure of the 5-HT3 receptor and suggest a role for the intracellular domain in allosteric modulation of cooperativity and agonist efficacy. Linked Article This article is commented on by Vardy and Kenakin, pp. 1614–1616 of volume 171 issue 7. To view this commentary

  6. Dipicrylamine Modulates GABAρ1 Receptors through Interactions with Residues in the TM4 and Cys-Loop Domains.

    PubMed

    Limon, Agenor; Estrada-Mondragón, Argel; Ruiz, Jorge M Reyes; Miledi, Ricardo

    2016-04-01

    Dipicrylamine (DPA) is a commonly used acceptor agent in Förster resonance energy transfer experiments that allows the study of high-frequency neuronal activity in the optical monitoring of voltage in living cells. However, DPA potently antagonizes GABAA receptors that contain α1 and β2 subunits by a mechanism which is not clearly understood. In this work, we aimed to determine whether DPA modulation is a general phenomenon of Cys-loop ligand-gated ion channels (LGICs), and whether this modulation depends on particular amino acid residues. For this, we studied the effects of DPA on human homomeric GABAρ1, α7 nicotinic, and 5-HT3A serotonin receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Our results indicate that DPA is an allosteric modulator of GABAρ1 receptors with an IC50 of 1.6 µM, an enhancer of α7 nicotinic receptors at relatively high concentrations of DPA, and has little, if any, effect on 5-HT3A receptors. DPA antagonism of GABAρ1 was strongly enhanced by preincubation, was slightly voltage-dependent, and its washout was accelerated by bovine serum albumin. These results indicate that DPA modulation is not a general phenomenon of LGICs, and structural differences between receptors may account for disparities in DPA effects. In silico modeling of DPA docking to GABAρ1, α7 nicotinic, and 5-HT3A receptors suggests that a hydrophobic pocket within the Cys-loop and the M4 segment in GABAρ1, located at the extracellular/membrane interface, facilitates the interaction with DPA that leads to inhibition of the receptor. Functional examinations of mutant receptors support the involvement of the M4 segment in the allosteric modulation of GABAρ1 by DPA.

  7. Transient Receptor Potential Channels in the Vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Earley, Scott; Brayden, Joseph E.

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian genome encodes 28 distinct members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) superfamily of cation channels, which exhibit varying degrees of selectivity for different ionic species. Multiple TRP channels are present in all cells and are involved in diverse aspects of cellular function, including sensory perception and signal transduction. Notably, TRP channels are involved in regulating vascular function and pathophysiology, the focus of this review. TRP channels in vascular smooth muscle cells participate in regulating contractility and proliferation, whereas endothelial TRP channel activity is an important contributor to endothelium-dependent vasodilation, vascular wall permeability, and angiogenesis. TRP channels are also present in perivascular sensory neurons and astrocytic endfeet proximal to cerebral arterioles, where they participate in the regulation of vascular tone. Almost all of these functions are mediated by changes in global intracellular Ca2+ levels or subcellular Ca2+ signaling events. In addition to directly mediating Ca2+ entry, TRP channels influence intracellular Ca2+ dynamics through membrane depolarization associated with the influx of cations or through receptor- or store-operated mechanisms. Dysregulation of TRP channels is associated with vascular-related pathologies, including hypertension, neointimal injury, ischemia-reperfusion injury, pulmonary edema, and neurogenic inflammation. In this review, we briefly consider general aspects of TRP channel biology and provide an in-depth discussion of the functions of TRP channels in vascular smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, and perivascular cells under normal and pathophysiological conditions. PMID:25834234

  8. Toward Biophysical Probes for the 5-HT3 Receptor: Structure−Activity Relationship Study of Granisetron Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    This report describes the synthesis and biological characterization of novel granisetron derivatives that are antagonists of the human serotonin (5-HT3A) receptor. Some of these substituted granisetron derivatives showed low nanomolar binding affinity and allowed the identification of positions on the granisetron core that might be used as attachment points for biophysical tags. A BODIPY fluorophore was appended to one such position and specifically bound to 5-HT3A receptors in mammalian cells. PMID:20146481

  9. 5-Chloroindole: a potent allosteric modulator of the 5-HT3 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Amy S; Batis, Nikolaos; Grafton, Gillian; Caputo, Francesca; Brady, Catherine A; Lambert, Jeremy J; Peters, John A; Gordon, John; Brain, Keith L; Powell, Andrew D; Barnes, Nicholas M

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose The 5-HT3 receptor is a ligand-gated ion channel that is modulated allosterically by various compounds including colchicine, alcohols and volatile anaesthetics. However the positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) identified to date have low affinity, which hinders investigation because of non-selective effects at pharmacologically active concentrations. The present study identifies 5-chloroindole (Cl-indole) as a potent PAM of the 5-HT3 receptor. Experimental Approach 5-HT3 receptor function was assessed by the increase in intracellular calcium and single-cell electrophysiological recordings in HEK293 cells stably expressing the h5-HT3A receptor and also the mouse native 5-HT3 receptor that increases neuronal contraction of bladder smooth muscle. Key Results Cl-indole (1–100 μM) potentiated agonist (5-HT) and particularly partial agonist [(S)-zacopride, DDP733, RR210, quipazine, dopamine, 2-methyl-5-HT, SR57227A, meta chlorophenyl biguanide] induced h5-HT3A receptor-mediated responses. This effect of Cl-indole was also apparent at the mouse native 5-HT3 receptor. Radioligand-binding studies identified that Cl-indole induced a small (∼twofold) increase in the apparent affinity of 5-HT for the h5-HT3A receptor, whereas there was no effect upon the affinity of the antagonist, tropisetron. Cl-indole was able to reactivate desensitized 5-HT3 receptors. In contrast to its effect on the 5-HT3 receptor, Cl-indole did not alter human nicotinic α7 receptor responses. Conclusions and Implications The present study identifies Cl-indole as a relatively potent and selective PAM of the 5-HT3 receptor; such compounds will aid investigation of the molecular basis for allosteric modulation of the 5-HT3 receptor and may assist the discovery of novel therapeutic drugs targeting this receptor. Linked Articles Recent reviews on allosteric modulation can be found at: Kenakin, T (2013). New concepts in pharmacological efficacy at 7TM receptors: IUPHAR Review 2

  10. Agonists block currents through acetylcholine receptor channels.

    PubMed Central

    Sine, S M; Steinbach, J H

    1984-01-01

    We have examined the effects of high concentrations of cholinergic agonists on currents through single acetylcholine receptor (AChR) channels on clonal BC3H1 cells. We find that raised concentrations of acetylcholine (ACh; above 300 microM) or carbamylcholine (Carb; above 1,000 microM) produce a voltage- and concentration-dependent reduction in the mean single-channel current. Raised concentrations of suberyldicholine (Sub; above 3 microM) produce a voltage- and concentration-dependent increase in the number of brief duration low-conductance interruptions of open-channel currents. These observations can be quantitatively described by a model in which agonist molecules enter and transiently occlude the ion-channel of the AChR. PMID:6478036

  11. Transient Receptor Potential Channels in neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Basso, Lilian; Altier, Christophe

    2016-10-27

    Neuropathic pain caused by disease or dysfunction of the nervous system is one of the most difficult pain conditions to treat. Symptoms include a hypersensitivity to mechanical and thermal stimuli, processed by specialized nociceptors that constitute the first line of defence of the somatosensory system. The detection of these stimuli depends on the TRP ion channel family, which activates upon damaging pressure, extreme temperature, or toxic endogenous and exogenous chemicals. This review will summarize the current knowledge of the contribution of TRP channels, particularly the thermosensitive TRP, including TRPV1, TRPA1 and TRPM8 channels that play a central role in the sensitization of nociceptive transduction. We will discuss the pharmacology of these receptors and their relative success in preclinical and clinical studies.

  12. Arresting a Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) Channel

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Arun K.; Kim, Jihee; Ahn, Seungkirl; Xiao, Kunhong; Shenoy, Sudha K.; Liedtke, Wolfgang; Lefkowitz, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    β-Arrestins, originally discovered to desensitize activated G protein-coupled receptors, (aka seven-transmembrane receptors, 7TMRs) also mediate 7TMR internalization and G protein-independent signaling via these receptors. More recently, several regulatory roles of β-arrestins for atypical 7TMRs and non-7TM receptors have emerged. Here, we uncover an entirely novel regulatory role of β-arrestins in cross-talk between the angiotensin receptor (AT1aR) and a member of the transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channel family, TRPV4. AT1aR and TRPV4 form a constitutive complex in the plasma membrane, and angiotensin stimulation leads to recruitment of β-arrestin 1 to this complex. Surprisingly, angiotensin stimulation results in ubiquitination of TRPV4, a process that requires β-arrestin 1, and subsequently to internalization and functional down-regulation of TRPV4. β-Arrestin 1 interacts with, and acts as an adaptor for AIP4, an E3 ubiquitin ligase responsible for TRPV4 ubiquitination. Thus, our data provide the first evidence of a functional link between β-arrestins and TRPV4 and uncovers an entirely novel mechanism to maintain appropriate intracellular Ca2+ concentration to avoid excessive Ca2+ signaling. PMID:20650893

  13. Inositol Trisphosphate Receptor Ca2+ Release Channels

    PubMed Central

    FOSKETT, J. KEVIN; WHITE, CARL; CHEUNG, KING-HO; MAK, DON-ON DANIEL

    2010-01-01

    The inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) receptors (InsP3Rs) are a family of Ca2+ release channels localized predominately in the endoplasmic reticulum of all cell types. They function to release Ca2+ into the cytoplasm in response to InsP3 produced by diverse stimuli, generating complex local and global Ca2+ signals that regulate numerous cell physiological processes ranging from gene transcription to secretion to learning and memory. The InsP3R is a calcium-selective cation channel whose gating is regulated not only by InsP3, but by other ligands as well, in particular cytoplasmic Ca2+. Over the last decade, detailed quantitative studies of InsP3R channel function and its regulation by ligands and interacting proteins have provided new insights into a remarkable richness of channel regulation and of the structural aspects that underlie signal transduction and permeation. Here, we focus on these developments and review and synthesize the literature regarding the structure and single-channel properties of the InsP3R. PMID:17429043

  14. Metal interactions with voltage- and receptor-activated ion channels.

    PubMed Central

    Vijverberg, H P; Oortgiesen, M; Leinders, T; van Kleef, R G

    1994-01-01

    Effects of Pb and several other metal ions on various distinct types of voltage-, receptor- and Ca-activated ion channels have been investigated in cultured N1E-115 mouse neuroblastoma cells. Experiments were performed using the whole-cell voltage clamp and single-channel patch clamp techniques. External superfusion of nanomolar to submillimolar concentrations of Pb causes multiple effects on ion channels. Barium current through voltage-activated Ca channels is blocked by micromolar concentrations of Pb, whereas voltage-activated Na current appears insensitive. Neuronal type nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-activated ion current is blocked by nanomolar concentrations of Pb and this block is reversed at micromolar concentrations. Serotonin 5-HT3 receptor-activated ion current is much less sensitive to Pb. In addition, external superfusion with micromolar concentrations of Pb as well as of Cd and aluminum induces inward current, associated with the direct activation of nonselective cation channels by these metal ions. In excised inside-out membrane patches of neuroblastoma cells, micromolar concentrations of Ca activate small (SK) and big (BK) Ca-activated K channels. Internally applied Pb activates SK and BK channels more potently than Ca, whereas Cd is approximately equipotent to Pb with respect to SK channel activation, but fails to activate BK channels. The results show that metal ions cause distinct, selective effects on the various types of ion channels and that metal ion interaction sites of ion channels may be highly selective for particular metal ions. PMID:7531139

  15. Allosterism and Structure in Thermally Activated Transient Receptor Potential Channels.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Franulic, Ignacio; Poblete, Horacio; Miño-Galaz, Germán; González, Carlos; Latorre, Ramón

    2016-07-05

    The molecular sensors that mediate temperature changes in living organisms are a large family of proteins known as thermosensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels. These membrane proteins are polymodal receptors that can be activated by cold or hot temperatures, depending on the channel subtype, voltage, and ligands. The stimuli sensors are allosterically coupled to a pore domain, increasing the probability of finding the channel in its ion conductive conformation. In this review we first discuss the allosteric coupling between the temperature and voltage sensor modules and the pore domain, and then discuss the thermodynamic foundations of thermo-TRP channel activation. We provide a structural overview of the molecular determinants of temperature sensing. We also posit an anisotropic thermal diffusion model that may explain the large temperature sensitivity of TRP channels. Additionally, we examine the effect of several ligands on TRP channel function and the evidence regarding their mechanisms of action.

  16. Redox regulation of the ryanodine receptor/calcium release channel.

    PubMed

    Zissimopoulos, S; Lai, F A

    2006-11-01

    The RyR (ryanodine receptor)/calcium release channel contains a number of highly reactive thiol groups that endow it with redox sensitivity. In general, oxidizing conditions favour channel opening, while reducing conditions have the opposite effect. Thiol modification affects the channel sensitivity to its principal effectors, Ca2+, Mg2+ and ATP, and alters RyR protein interactions. Here, we give a brief account of the major findings and prevailing views in the field.

  17. Zinc as Allosteric Ion Channel Modulator: Ionotropic Receptors as Metalloproteins.

    PubMed

    Peralta, Francisco Andrés; Huidobro-Toro, Juan Pablo

    2016-07-02

    Zinc is an essential metal to life. This transition metal is a structural component of many proteins and is actively involved in the catalytic activity of cell enzymes. In either case, these zinc-containing proteins are metalloproteins. However, the amino acid residues that serve as ligands for metal coordination are not necessarily the same in structural proteins compared to enzymes. While crystals of structural proteins that bind zinc reveal a higher preference for cysteine sulfhydryls rather than histidine imidazole rings, catalytic enzymes reveal the opposite, i.e., a greater preference for the histidines over cysteines for catalysis, plus the influence of carboxylic acids. Based on this paradigm, we reviewed the putative ligands of zinc in ionotropic receptors, where zinc has been described as an allosteric modulator of channel receptors. Although these receptors do not strictly qualify as metalloproteins since they do not normally bind zinc in structural domains, they do transitorily bind zinc at allosteric sites, modifying transiently the receptor channel's ion permeability. The present contribution summarizes current information showing that zinc allosteric modulation of receptor channels occurs by the preferential metal coordination to imidazole rings as well as to the sulfhydryl groups of cysteine in addition to the carboxyl group of acid residues, as with enzymes and catalysis. It is remarkable that most channels, either voltage-sensitive or transmitter-gated receptor channels, are susceptible to zinc modulation either as positive or negative regulators.

  18. Zinc as Allosteric Ion Channel Modulator: Ionotropic Receptors as Metalloproteins

    PubMed Central

    Peralta, Francisco Andrés; Huidobro-Toro, Juan Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Zinc is an essential metal to life. This transition metal is a structural component of many proteins and is actively involved in the catalytic activity of cell enzymes. In either case, these zinc-containing proteins are metalloproteins. However, the amino acid residues that serve as ligands for metal coordination are not necessarily the same in structural proteins compared to enzymes. While crystals of structural proteins that bind zinc reveal a higher preference for cysteine sulfhydryls rather than histidine imidazole rings, catalytic enzymes reveal the opposite, i.e., a greater preference for the histidines over cysteines for catalysis, plus the influence of carboxylic acids. Based on this paradigm, we reviewed the putative ligands of zinc in ionotropic receptors, where zinc has been described as an allosteric modulator of channel receptors. Although these receptors do not strictly qualify as metalloproteins since they do not normally bind zinc in structural domains, they do transitorily bind zinc at allosteric sites, modifying transiently the receptor channel’s ion permeability. The present contribution summarizes current information showing that zinc allosteric modulation of receptor channels occurs by the preferential metal coordination to imidazole rings as well as to the sulfhydryl groups of cysteine in addition to the carboxyl group of acid residues, as with enzymes and catalysis. It is remarkable that most channels, either voltage-sensitive or transmitter-gated receptor channels, are susceptible to zinc modulation either as positive or negative regulators. PMID:27384555

  19. TRPV channels as thermosensory receptors in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyosang; Caterina, Michael J

    2005-10-01

    Temperature-sensitive transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) ion channels are critical contributors to normal pain and temperature sensation and therefore represent attractive targets for pain therapy. When these channels were first discovered, most attention was focused on their potential contributions to direct thermal activation of peripheral sensory neurons. However, recent anatomical, physiological, and behavioral studies have provided evidence that TRPV channels expressed in skin epithelial cells may also contribute to thermosensation in vitro and in vivo. Here, we review these studies and speculate on possible communication mechanisms from cutaneous epithelial cells to sensory neurons.

  20. Glutamate Receptor Ion Channels: Structure, Regulation, and Function

    PubMed Central

    Wollmuth, Lonnie P.; McBain, Chris J.; Menniti, Frank S.; Vance, Katie M.; Ogden, Kevin K.; Hansen, Kasper B.; Yuan, Hongjie; Myers, Scott J.; Dingledine, Ray

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian ionotropic glutamate receptor family encodes 18 gene products that coassemble to form ligand-gated ion channels containing an agonist recognition site, a transmembrane ion permeation pathway, and gating elements that couple agonist-induced conformational changes to the opening or closing of the permeation pore. Glutamate receptors mediate fast excitatory synaptic transmission in the central nervous system and are localized on neuronal and non-neuronal cells. These receptors regulate a broad spectrum of processes in the brain, spinal cord, retina, and peripheral nervous system. Glutamate receptors are postulated to play important roles in numerous neurological diseases and have attracted intense scrutiny. The description of glutamate receptor structure, including its transmembrane elements, reveals a complex assembly of multiple semiautonomous extracellular domains linked to a pore-forming element with striking resemblance to an inverted potassium channel. In this review we discuss International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology glutamate receptor nomenclature, structure, assembly, accessory subunits, interacting proteins, gene expression and translation, post-translational modifications, agonist and antagonist pharmacology, allosteric modulation, mechanisms of gating and permeation, roles in normal physiological function, as well as the potential therapeutic use of pharmacological agents acting at glutamate receptors. PMID:20716669

  1. Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors at the Single-Channel Level.

    PubMed

    Bouzat, Cecilia; Sine, Steven M

    2017-03-05

    Over the past four decades, the patch clamp technique and nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) receptors have established an enduring partnership. Like all good partnerships, each partner has proven significant in its own right, while their union has spurred innumerable advances in life science research. A member and prototype of the superfamily of pentameric ligand-gated ion channels, the nACh receptor is a chemo-electric transducer, binding nerve-released ACh and rapidly opening its channel to cation flow to elicit cellular excitation. A subject of a Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, the patch clamp technique provides unprecedented resolution of currents through single ion channels in their native cellular environments. Here, focusing on muscle and α7 nACh receptors, we describe the extraordinary contribution of the patch clamp technique toward understanding how they activate in response to neurotransmitter, how subtle structural and mechanistic differences among nACh receptor subtypes translate into significant physiological differences, and how nACh receptors are being exploited as therapeutic drug targets.

  2. Capsaicin receptor: TRPV1 a promiscuous TRP channel.

    PubMed

    Pingle, S C; Matta, J A; Ahern, G P

    2007-01-01

    TRPV1, the archetypal member of the vanilloid TRP family, was initially identified as the receptor for capsaicin, the pungent ingredient in hot chili peppers. The receptor has a diverse tissue distribution, with high expression in sensory neurons. TRPV1 is a nonselective cation channel with significant permeability to calcium, protons, and large polyvalent cations. It is the most polymodal TRP channel, being activated by numerous stimuli, including heat, voltage, vanilloids, lipids, and protons/cations. TRPV1 acts as a molecular integrator of physical and chemical stimuli in peripheral nociceptor terminals and plays a critical role in thermal inflammatory hyperalgesia. In addition, TRPV1 may regulate a variety of physiological functions in different organ systems. Various second messenger systems regulate TRPV1 activity, predominantly by serine-threonine phosphorylation. In this review, we provide a concise summary of the information currently available about this channel.

  3. Single acetylcholine receptor channel currents recorded at high hydrostatic pressures.

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, S H; Stühmer, W; Conti, F

    1987-01-01

    A technique for performing patch-clamp experiments under high hydrostatic (oil) pressure is described. The method allows the transfer of whole cell or membrane patches in a recording configuration into a pressure vessel, where pressure can be increased up to 60 MPa (approximately equal to 600 bar). We have studied in this way the pressure dependence of single acetylcholine receptor channels in excised "outside-out" membrane patches from cultured rat muscle cells. In the range of 0.1 to 60 MPa the open channel conductance in 140 mM NaCl solutions did not vary by more than 2%, which implies that the translocation of sodium ions through the channel pore does not involve steps with significant activation volumes. At high acetylcholine concentrations (20 microM) bursts of single-channel activity allowed measurements of the mean open and mean closed times of the channel. Pressurization to 40 MPa increased both mean open and mean closed times giving apparent activation volumes of about 59 and 139 A3, respectively. This implies a net volume increase of 80 A3, associated with the transition from the agonist-free state to the open state of the channel, which may be partially associated with the agonist-binding step. All the observed pressure effects were reversible. The activation volumes for the gating of acetylcholine receptor channels are comparable to those of sodium and potassium channels in the squid giant axon, suggesting that there is some basic common mechanism in the operation of ion-channel proteins. Images PMID:2437577

  4. Integration of transient receptor potential canonical channels with lipids

    PubMed Central

    Beech, D J

    2012-01-01

    Transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels are the canonical (C) subset of the TRP proteins, which are widely expressed in mammalian cells. They are thought to be primarily involved in determining calcium and sodium entry and have wide-ranging functions that include regulation of cell proliferation, motility and contraction. The channels are modulated by a multiplicity of factors, putatively existing as integrators in the plasma membrane. This review considers the sensitivities of TRPC channels to lipids that include diacylglycerols, phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate, lysophospholipids, oxidized phospholipids, arachidonic acid and its metabolites, sphingosine-1-phosphate, cholesterol and some steroidal derivatives and other lipid factors such as gangliosides. Promiscuous and selective lipid sensing have been detected. There appear to be close working relationships with lipids of the phospholipase C and A2 enzyme systems, which may enable integration with receptor signalling and membrane stretch. There are differences in the properties of each TRPC channel that are further complicated by TRPC heteromultimerization. The lipids modulate activity of the channels or insertion in the plasma membrane. Lipid microenvironments and intermediate sensing proteins have been described that include caveolae, G protein signalling, SEC14-like and spectrin-type domains 1 (SESTD1) and podocin. The data suggest that lipid sensing is an important aspect of TRPC channel biology enabling integration with other signalling systems. PMID:21624095

  5. A pentasymmetric open channel blocker for Cys-loop receptor channels.

    PubMed

    Carta, Valentina; Pangerl, Michael; Baur, Roland; Puthenkalam, Roshan; Ernst, Margot; Trauner, Dirk; Sigel, Erwin

    2014-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid type A receptors (GABAA receptors) are chloride ion channels composed of five subunits, mediating fast synaptic and tonic inhibition in the mammalian brain. These receptors show near five-fold symmetry that is most pronounced in the second trans-membrane domain M2 lining the Cl- ion channel. To take advantage of this inherent symmetry, we screened a variety of aromatic anions with matched symmetry and found an inhibitor, pentacyanocyclopentdienyl anion (PCCP-) that exhibited all characteristics of an open channel blocker. Inhibition was strongly dependent on the membrane potential. Through mutagenesis and covalent modification, we identified the region α1V256-α1T261 in the rat recombinant GABAA receptor to be important for PCCP- action. Introduction of positive charges into M2 increased the affinity for PCCP- while PCCP- prevented the access of a positively charged molecule into M2. Interestingly, other anion selective cys-loop receptors were also inhibited by PCCP-, among them the Drosophila RDL GABAA receptor carrying an insecticide resistance mutation, suggesting that PCCP- could serve as an insecticide.

  6. Signaling by purinergic receptors and channels in the pituitary gland

    PubMed Central

    Stojilkovic, Stanko S.; He, Mu-Lan; Koshimizu, Taka-aki; Balik, Ales; Zemkova, Hana

    2009-01-01

    Adenosine 5′-triphosphate is frequently released by cells and acts as an agonist for G protein-coupled P2Y receptors and ligand-gated P2X cationic channels in numerous tissues. The breakdown of ATP by ectonucleotidases not only terminates its extracellular messenger functions, but also provides a pathway for the generation of two additional agonists: adenosine 5′-diphosphate, acting via some P2Y receptors, and adenosine, a native agonist for G protein-coupled adenosine receptors. In the pituitary gland, adenosine 5′-triphosphate is released from the endings of magnocellular hypothalamic neurons and by anterior pituitary cells through pathway(s) that are still not well characterized. This gland also expresses several members of each family of purinergic receptors. P2X and adenosine receptors are co-expressed in the somata and nerve terminals of vasopressin-releasing neurons as well as in some secretory pituitary cells. P2X receptors stimulate electrical activity and modulate InsP3-dependent calcium release from intracellular stores, whereas adenosine receptors terminate electrical activity. Calcium-mobilizing P2Y receptors are predominantly expressed in non-secretory cells of the anterior and posterior pituitary. PMID:19467293

  7. Receptor for protons: First observations on Acid Sensing Ion Channels.

    PubMed

    Krishtal, Oleg

    2015-07-01

    The history of ASICs began in 1980 with unexpected observation. The concept of highly selective Na(+) current gated by specific receptors for protons was not easily accepted. It took 16 years to get these receptor/channels cloned and start a new stage in their investigation. "The receptor for protons" became ASIC comprising under this name a family of receptor/channels ubiquitous for mammalian nervous system, both peripheral and central. The role of ASICs as putative nociceptors was suggested almost immediately after their discovery. This role subsequently was proven in many forms of pain-related phenomena. Many other functions of ASICs have been also found or primed for speculations both in physiology and in disease. Despite the width of field and strength of efforts, numerous basic questions are to be answered before we understand how the local changes in pH in the nervous tissue transform into electric and messenger signaling via ASICs as transducers. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Acid-Sensing Ion Channels in the Nervous System'.

  8. Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels: a clinical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Yosuke; Szallasi, Arpad

    2014-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are important mediators of sensory signals with marked effects on cellular functions and signalling pathways. Indeed, mutations in genes encoding TRP channels are the cause of several inherited diseases in humans (the so-called ‘TRP channelopathies’) that affect the cardiovascular, renal, skeletal and nervous systems. TRP channels are also promising targets for drug discovery. The initial focus of research was on TRP channels that are expressed on nociceptive neurons. Indeed, a number of potent, small-molecule TRPV1, TRPV3 and TRPA1 antagonists have already entered clinical trials as novel analgesic agents. There has been a recent upsurge in the amount of work that expands TRP channel drug discovery efforts into new disease areas such as asthma, cancer, anxiety, cardiac hypertrophy, as well as obesity and metabolic disorders. A better understanding of TRP channel functions in health and disease should lead to the discovery of first-in-class drugs for these intractable diseases. With this review, we hope to capture the current state of this rapidly expanding and changing field. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on the pharmacology of TRP channels. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-10 PMID:24102319

  9. The transient receptor potential family of ion channels.

    PubMed

    Nilius, Bernd; Owsianik, Grzegorz

    2011-01-01

    The transient receptor potential (TRP) multigene superfamily encodes integral membrane proteins that function as ion channels. Members of this family are conserved in yeast, invertebrates and vertebrates. The TRP family is subdivided into seven subfamilies: TRPC (canonical), TRPV (vanilloid), TRPM (melastatin), TRPP (polycystin), TRPML (mucolipin), TRPA (ankyrin) and TRPN (NOMPC-like); the latter is found only in invertebrates and fish. TRP ion channels are widely expressed in many different tissues and cell types, where they are involved in diverse physiological processes, such as sensation of different stimuli or ion homeostasis. Most TRPs are non-selective cation channels, only few are highly Ca2+ selective, some are even permeable for highly hydrated Mg2+ ions. This channel family shows a variety of gating mechanisms, with modes of activation ranging from ligand binding, voltage and changes in temperature to covalent modifications of nucleophilic residues. Activated TRP channels cause depolarization of the cellular membrane, which in turn activates voltage-dependent ion channels, resulting in a change of intracellular Ca2+ concentration; they serve as gatekeeper for transcellular transport of several cations (such as Ca2+ and Mg2+), and are required for the function of intracellular organelles (such as endosomes and lysosomes). Because of their function as intracellular Ca2+ release channels, they have an important regulatory role in cellular organelles. Mutations in several TRP genes have been implicated in diverse pathological states, including neurodegenerative disorders, skeletal dysplasia, kidney disorders and pain, and ongoing research may help find new therapies for treatments of related diseases.

  10. Transient Receptor Potential Channels as Targets for Phytochemicals

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    To date, 28 mammalian transient receptor potential (TRP) channels have been cloned and characterized. They are grouped into six subfamilies on the basis of their amino acid sequence homology: TRP Ankyrin (TRPA), TRP Canonical (TRPC), TRP Melastatin (TRPM), TRP Mucolipin (TRPML), TRP Polycystin (TRPP), and TRP Vanilloid (TRPV). Most of the TRP channels are nonselective cation channels expressed on the cell membrane and exhibit variable permeability ratios for Ca2+ versus Na+. They mediate sensory functions (such as vision, nociception, taste transduction, temperature sensation, and pheromone signaling) and homeostatic functions (such as divalent cation flux, hormone release, and osmoregulation). Significant progress has been made in our understanding of the specific roles of these TRP channels and their activation mechanisms. In this Review, the emphasis will be on the activation of TRP channels by phytochemicals that are claimed to exert health benefits. Recent findings complement the anecdotal evidence that some of these phytochemicals have specific receptors and the activation of which is responsible for the physiological effects. Now, the targets for these phytochemicals are being unveiled; a specific hypothesis can be proposed and tested experimentally to infer a scientific validity of the claims of the health benefits. The broader and pressing issues that have to be addressed are related to the quantities of the active ingredients in a given preparation, their bioavailability, metabolism, adverse effects, excretion, and systemic versus local effects. PMID:24926802

  11. TRP channel cannabinoid receptors in skin sensation, homeostasis, and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Caterina, Michael J

    2014-11-19

    In the skin, cannabinoid lipids, whether of endogenous or exogenous origin, are capable of regulating numerous sensory, homeostatic, and inflammatory events. Although many of these effects are mediated by metabotropic cannabinoid receptors, a growing body of evidence has revealed that multiple members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channel family can act as "ionotropic cannabinoid receptors". Furthermore, many of these same TRP channels are intimately involved in cutaneous processes that include the initiation of pain, temperature, and itch perception, the maintenance of epidermal homeostasis, the regulation of hair follicles and sebaceous glands, and the modulation of dermatitis. Ionotropic cannabinoid receptors therefore represent potentially attractive targets for the therapeutic use of cannabinoids to treat sensory and dermatological diseases. Furthermore, the interactions between neurons and other cell types that are mediated by cutaneous ionotropic cannabinoid receptors are likely to be recapitulated during physiological and pathophysiological processes in the central nervous system and elsewhere, making the skin an ideal setting in which to dissect general complexities of cannabinoid signaling.

  12. Transient receptor potential M3 channels are ionotropic steroid receptors in pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Thomas F J; Loch, Sabine; Lambert, Sachar; Straub, Isabelle; Mannebach, Stefanie; Mathar, Ilka; Düfer, Martina; Lis, Annette; Flockerzi, Veit; Philipp, Stephan E; Oberwinkler, Johannes

    2008-12-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channels are renowned for their ability to sense diverse chemical stimuli. Still, for many members of this large and heterogeneous protein family it is unclear how their activity is regulated and whether they are influenced by endogenous substances. On the other hand, steroidal compounds are increasingly recognized to have rapid effects on membrane surface receptors that often have not been identified at the molecular level. We show here that TRPM3, a divalent-permeable cation channel, is rapidly and reversibly activated by extracellular pregnenolone sulphate, a neuroactive steroid. We show that pregnenolone sulphate activates endogenous TRPM3 channels in insulin-producing beta cells. Application of pregnenolone sulphate led to a rapid calcium influx and enhanced insulin secretion from pancreatic islets. Our results establish that TRPM3 is an essential component of an ionotropic steroid receptor enabling unanticipated crosstalk between steroidal and insulin-signalling endocrine systems.

  13. Differential effects of quercetin glycosides on GABAC receptor channel activity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeon-Joong; Lee, Byung-Hwan; Choi, Sun-Hye; Jung, Seok-Won; Kim, Hyun-Sook; Lee, Joon-Hee; Hwang, Sung-Hee; Pyo, Mi-Kyung; Kim, Hyoung-Chun; Nah, Seung-Yeol

    2015-01-01

    Quercetin, a representative flavonoid, is a compound of low molecular weight found in various colored plants and vegetables. Quercetin shows a wide range of neuropharmacological activities. In fact, quercetin naturally exists as monomer-(quercetin-3-O-rhamnoside) (Rham1), dimer-(Rutin), or trimer-glycosides [quercetin-3-(2(G)-rhamnosylrutinoside)] (Rham2) at carbon-3 in fruits and vegetables. The carbohydrate components are removed after ingestion into gastrointestinal systems. The role of the glycosides attached to quercetin in the regulation of γ-aminobutyric acid class C (GABAC) receptor channel activity has not been determined. In the present study, we examined the effects of quercetin glycosides on GABAC receptor channel activity by expressing human GABAC alone in Xenopus oocytes using a two-electrode voltage clamp technique and also compared the effects of quercetin glycosides with quercetin. We found that GABA-induced inward current (I GABA ) was inhibited by quercetin or quercetin glycosides. The inhibitory effects of quercetin and its glycosides on I GABA were concentration-dependent and reversible in the order of Rutin ≈ quercetin ≈ Rham 1 > Rham 2. The inhibitory effects of quercetin and its glycosides on I GABA were noncompetitive and membrane voltage-insensitive. These results indicate that quercetin and its glycosides regulate GABAC receptor channel activity through interaction with a different site from that of GABA, and that the number of carbohydrate attached to quercetin might play an important role in the regulation of GABAC receptor channel activity.

  14. Subunit-dependent effects of nickel on NMDA receptor channels.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, Carla; Gavazzo, Paola

    2003-10-07

    Nickel (Ni2+) is a transition metal that affects different neuronal ionic channels. We investigated its effects on glutamate channels of the NMDA-type in the presence of saturating concentration of glutamate or NMDA (50 microM), in 0 external Mg and in the continuous presence of saturating glycine (30 microM). In neonatal rat cerebellar granule cells, Ni2+ inhibited the current evoked by NMDA at -60 mV with an IC50 close to 40 microM. The inhibition was weakly voltage-dependent and the current at +40 mV was inhibited with IC50=86 microM. Wash out of the metal unmasked a stimulatory effect which persisted for a few seconds. In HEK293 cells transiently transfected with recombinant NR1a-NR2A receptors, Ni2+ inhibited the current elicited by glutamate with an IC50=52 microM at -60 mV and 90 microM at +40 mV. In HEK293 expressing NR1a-NR2B receptors, 0.1-100 microM Ni2+ caused a potentiation of the current, with EC50=4 microM, while with 300 microM, a voltage-dependent block became apparent (IC50=170 microM). As previously reported, the current through both classes of recombinant receptors was steeply dependent on external pH, and in both cases the protonic block had an IC50 close to pH 7.2. Application of Ni2+ showed that stimulation of NR1a-NR2B receptor channels was dependent on external pH, while voltage-independent inhibition of NR1a-NR2A was less sensitive to pH change. These results indicate that Ni2+ has multiple and complex effects on NMDA channels, which are largely dependent on the NR2 subunit.

  15. TRP Channel Cannabinoid Receptors in Skin Sensation, Homeostasis, and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In the skin, cannabinoid lipids, whether of endogenous or exogenous origin, are capable of regulating numerous sensory, homeostatic, and inflammatory events. Although many of these effects are mediated by metabotropic cannabinoid receptors, a growing body of evidence has revealed that multiple members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channel family can act as “ionotropic cannabinoid receptors”. Furthermore, many of these same TRP channels are intimately involved in cutaneous processes that include the initiation of pain, temperature, and itch perception, the maintenance of epidermal homeostasis, the regulation of hair follicles and sebaceous glands, and the modulation of dermatitis. Ionotropic cannabinoid receptors therefore represent potentially attractive targets for the therapeutic use of cannabinoids to treat sensory and dermatological diseases. Furthermore, the interactions between neurons and other cell types that are mediated by cutaneous ionotropic cannabinoid receptors are likely to be recapitulated during physiological and pathophysiological processes in the central nervous system and elsewhere, making the skin an ideal setting in which to dissect general complexities of cannabinoid signaling. PMID:24915599

  16. Receptors and Channels Targeted by Synthetic Cannabinoid Receptor Agonists and Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Pertwee, R.G.

    2010-01-01

    It is widely accepted that non-endogenous compounds that target CB1 and/or CB2 receptors possess therapeutic potential for the clinical management of an ever growing number of disorders. Just a few of these disorders are already treated with Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol or nabilone, both CB1/CB2 receptor agonists, and there is now considerable interest in expanding the clinical applications of such agonists and also in exploiting CB2-selective agonists, peripherally restricted CB1/CB2 receptor agonists and CB1/CB2 antagonists and inverse agonists as medicines. Already, numerous cannabinoid receptor ligands have been developed and their interactions with CB1 and CB2 receptors well characterized. This review describes what is currently known about the ability of such compounds to bind to, activate, inhibit or block non-CB1, non-CB2 G protein-coupled receptors such as GPR55, transmitter gated channels, ion channels and nuclear receptors in an orthosteric or allosteric manner. It begins with a brief description of how each of these ligands interacts with CB1 and/or CB2 receptors. PMID:20166927

  17. Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels and taste sensation.

    PubMed

    Ishimaru, Y; Matsunami, H

    2009-03-01

    Humans have 5 basic taste sensations: sweet, bitter, sour, salty, and umami (taste of 1-amino acids). Among 33 genes related to transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, 3--including TRP-melastatin 5 (TRPM5), polycystic kidney disease-1-like 3 (PKD1L3), and polycystic kidney disease-2-like 1 (PKD2L1)--are specifically and abundantly expressed in taste receptor cells. TRP-melastatin 5 is co-expressed with taste receptors T1Rs and T2Rs, and functions as a common downstream component in sweet, bitter, and umami taste signal transduction. In contrast, polycystic kidney disease-1-like 3 and polycystic kidney disease-2-like 1 are co-expressed in distinct subsets of taste receptor cells not expressing TRP-melastatin 5. In the heterologous expression system, cells expressing both polycystic kidney disease-1-like 3 and polycystic kidney disease-2-like 1 responded to sour stimuli, showing a unique "off-response" property. Genetic ablation of poly-cystic kidney disease-2-like 1-expressing cells resulted in elimination of gustatory nerve response to sour stimuli, indicating that cells expressing polycystic kidney disease-2-like 1 function as sour taste detectors. These results suggest that polycystic kidney disease-1-like 3/polycystic kidney disease-2-like 1 may play a significant role, possibly as taste receptors, in sour taste sensation.

  18. Acid-sensing ion channels and transient-receptor potential ion channels in zebrafish taste buds.

    PubMed

    Levanti, M; Randazzo, B; Viña, E; Montalbano, G; Garcia-Suarez, O; Germanà, A; Vega, J A; Abbate, F

    2016-09-01

    Sensory information from the environment is required for life and survival, and it is detected by specialized cells which together make up the sensory system. The fish sensory system includes specialized organs that are able to detect mechanical and chemical stimuli. In particular, taste buds are small organs located on the tongue in terrestrial vertebrates that function in the perception of taste. In fish, taste buds occur on the lips, the flanks, and the caudal (tail) fins of some species and on the barbels of others. In fish taste receptor cells, different classes of ion channels have been detected which, like in mammals, presumably participate in the detection and/or transduction of chemical gustatory signals. However, since some of these ion channels are involved in the detection of additional sensory modalities, it can be hypothesized that taste cells sense stimuli other than those specific for taste. This mini-review summarizes current knowledge on the presence of transient-receptor potential (TRP) and acid-sensing (ASIC) ion channels in the taste buds of teleosts, especially adult zebrafish. Up to now ASIC4, TRPC2, TRPA1, TRPV1 and TRPV4 ion channels have been found in the sensory cells, while ASIC2 was detected in the nerves supplying the taste buds.

  19. Tunable Calcium Current through TRPV1 Receptor Channels*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Samways, Damien S. K.; Khakh, Baljit S.; Egan, Terrance M.

    2008-01-01

    TRPV1 receptors are polymodal cation channels that open in response to diverse stimuli including noxious heat, capsaicin, and protons. Because Ca2+ is vital for TRPV1 signaling, we sought to precisely measure its contribution to TRPV1 responses and discovered that the Ca2+ current was tuned by the mode of activation. Using patch clamp photometry, we found that the fraction of the total current carried by Ca2+ (called the Pf%) was significantly smaller for TRPV1 currents evoked by protons than for those evoked by capsaicin. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we discovered that the smaller Pf% was due to protonation of three acidic amino acids (Asp646, Glu648, and Glu651) that are located in the mouth of the pore. Thus, in keeping with recent reports of time-dependent changes in the ionic permeability of some ligand-gated ion channels, we now show for the first time that the physiologically important Ca2+ current of the TRPV1 receptor is also dynamic and depends on the mode of activation. This current is significantly smaller when the receptor is activated by a change in pH, owing to atomic scale interactions of H+ and Ca2+ with the fixed negative charge of side chains in the pore. PMID:18775990

  20. Activation and Regulation of Purinergic P2X Receptor Channels

    PubMed Central

    Coddou, Claudio; Yan, Zonghe; Obsil, Tomas; Huidobro-Toro, J. Pablo

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian ATP-gated nonselective cation channels (P2XRs) can be composed of seven possible subunits, denoted P2X1 to P2X7. Each subunit contains a large ectodomain, two transmembrane domains, and intracellular N and C termini. Functional P2XRs are organized as homomeric and heteromeric trimers. This review focuses on the binding sites involved in the activation (orthosteric) and regulation (allosteric) of P2XRs. The ectodomains contain three ATP binding sites, presumably located between neighboring subunits and formed by highly conserved residues. The detection and coordination of three ATP phosphate residues by positively charged amino acids are likely to play a dominant role in determining agonist potency, whereas an AsnPheArg motif may contribute to binding by coordinating the adenine ring. Nonconserved ectodomain histidines provide the binding sites for trace metals, divalent cations, and protons. The transmembrane domains account not only for the formation of the channel pore but also for the binding of ivermectin (a specific P2X4R allosteric regulator) and alcohols. The N- and C- domains provide the structures that determine the kinetics of receptor desensitization and/or pore dilation and are critical for the regulation of receptor functions by intracellular messengers, kinases, reactive oxygen species and mercury. The recent publication of the crystal structure of the zebrafish P2X4.1R in a closed state provides a major advance in the understanding of this family of receptor channels. We will discuss data obtained from numerous site-directed mutagenesis experiments accumulated during the last 15 years with reference to the crystal structure, allowing a structural interpretation of the molecular basis of orthosteric and allosteric ligand actions. PMID:21737531

  1. Classification of Na channel receptors specific for various scorpion toxins.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, K P; Watt, D D; Lazdunski, M

    1983-04-01

    1. The specific binding to rat brain synaptosomes of a radiolabelled derivative of toxin II from the scorpion Centruroides suffusus suffusus could be prevented by toxins III and IV, but not by toxin V or variants 1-3, from the venom of Centruroides sculpturatus. 2. The specific binding of a similar derivative of toxin II from Androctonus australis Hector was not affected by any of the toxins from Centruroides sculpturatus. 3. There is biochemical evidence for only two distinct classes of Na channel receptors specific for known scorpion toxins.

  2. Emerging models of glutamate receptor ion channel structure and function.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Mark L

    2011-10-12

    Excitatory synaptic transmission in the brain is mediated by ligand-gated ion channels (iGluRs) activated by glutamate. Distinct from other neurotransmitter receptors, the extracellular domains of iGluRs are loosely packed assemblies with two clearly distinct layers, each of which has both local and global 2-fold axes of symmetry. By contrast, the iGluR transmembrane segments have 4-fold symmetry and share a conserved pore loop architecture found in tetrameric voltage-gated ion channels. The striking layered architecture of iGluRs revealed by the 3.6 Å resolution structure of an AMPA receptor homotetramer likely arose from gene fusion events that occurred early in evolution. Although this modular design has greatly facilitated biophysical and structural studies on individual iGluR domains, and suggested conserved mechanisms for iGluR gating, recent work is beginning to reveal unanticipated diversity in the structure, allosteric regulation, and assembly of iGluR subtypes.

  3. The antiallodynic action target of intrathecal gabapentin: Ca2+ channels, KATP channels or N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptors?

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jen-Kun; Chen, Chien-Chuan; Yang, Jia-Rung; Chiou, Lih-Chu

    2006-01-01

    Gabapentin is a novel analgesic whose mechanism of action is not known. We investigated in a postoperative pain model whether adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive K+ (K(ATP)) channels, N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors, and Ca2+ channels are involved in the antiallodynic effect of intrathecal gabapentin. Mechanical allodynia was induced by a paw incision in isoflurane-anesthetized rats. Withdrawal thresholds to von Frey filament stimulation near the incision site were measured before and after incision and after intrathecal drug administration. The antiallodynic effect of gabapentin (100 mug) was not affected by intrathecal pretreatment with antagonists of K(ATP) channels, NMDA receptors or gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)(A) receptors. K(ATP) channel openers and GABA(A) receptor agonist, per se, had little effect on the postincision allodynic response. The Ca2+ channel blocker of N-type (omega-conotoxin GVIA, 0.1-3 microg), but not of P/Q-type (omega-agatoxin IVA), L-type (verapamil, diltiazem or nimodipine), or T-type (mibefradil), attenuated the incision-induced allodynia, as did gabapentin. Both the antiallodynic effects of gabapentin and omega-conotoxin GVIA were attenuated by Bay K 8644, an L-type Ca2+ channel activator. These results provide correlative evidence to support the contention that N-type Ca2+ channels, but not K(ATP) channels or NMDA or GABA(A) receptors, might be involved in the antiallodynic effect of intrathecal gabapentin.

  4. Voltage-gated sodium channel modulation by sigma-receptors in cardiac myocytes and heterologous systems.

    PubMed

    Johannessen, Molly; Ramachandran, Subramaniam; Riemer, Logan; Ramos-Serrano, Andrea; Ruoho, Arnold E; Jackson, Meyer B

    2009-05-01

    The sigma-receptor, a broadly distributed integral membrane protein with a novel structure, is known to modulate various voltage-gated K(+) and Ca(2+) channels through a mechanism that involves neither G proteins nor phosphorylation. The present study investigated the modulation of the heart voltage-gated Na(+) channel (Na(v)1.5) by sigma-receptors. The sigma(1)-receptor ligands [SKF-10047 and (+)-pentazocine] and sigma(1)/sigma(2)-receptor ligands (haloperidol and ditolylguanidine) all reversibly inhibited Na(v)1.5 channels to varying degrees in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK-293) cells and COS-7 cells, but the sigma(1)-receptor ligands were less effective in COS-7 cells. The same four ligands also inhibited Na(+) current in neonatal mouse cardiac myocytes. In sigma(1)-receptor knockout myocytes, the sigma(1)-receptor-specific ligands were far less effective in modulating Na(+) current, but the sigma(1)/sigma(2)-receptor ligands modulated Na(+) channels as well as in wild type. Photolabeling with the sigma(1)-receptor photoprobe [(125)I]-iodoazidococaine demonstrated that sigma(1)-receptors were abundant in heart and HEK-293 cells, but scarce in COS-7 cells. This difference was consistent with the greater efficacy of sigma(1)-receptor-specific ligands in HEK-293 cells than in COS-7 cells. sigma-Receptors modulated Na(+) channels despite the omission of GTP and ATP from the patch pipette solution. sigma-Receptor-mediated inhibition of Na(+) current had little if any voltage dependence and produced no change in channel kinetics. Na(+) channels represent a new addition to the large number of voltage-gated ion channels modulated by sigma-receptors. The modulation of Na(v)1.5 channels by sigma-receptors in the heart suggests an important pathway by which drugs can alter cardiac excitability and rhythmicity.

  5. Modulation of ryanodine receptor Ca2+ channels (Review).

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Terutaka

    2010-01-01

    Ryanodine-sensitive Ca2+ release channels (ryanodine receptors, RyRs) play a crucial role in the mobilization of Ca2+ from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) during the excitation-contraction coupling of muscle cells. In skeletal muscle, depolarization of transverse tubules activates the RyR, whereas in cardiac muscle, a Ca2+ influx through an L-type Ca2+ channel activates the RyR. The RyR is also activated by caffeine, a low concentration (<10 µM) of ryanodine or cyclic ADP-ribose. RyR activity is inhibited by Mg2+, ruthenium red, or higher concentrations (≥100 µM) of ryanodine. The activity of RyR channels is modulated by phosphorylation and by associated proteins, including calmodulin (CaM), calsequestrin (CSQ) and FK506-binding proteins (FKBPs). In muscle cells, apoCaM (Ca2+-free CaM) activates the RyR channel, and Ca2+ CaM (Ca2+-bound CaM) inhibits the channel. CSQ can bind approximately 40 moles of Ca2+/mole of CSQ in the SR lumen of muscle cells, and interacts functionally with RyR protein. When the RyR is stimulated, Ca2+ released from the lumen is dissociated from the CSQ- Ca2+ complex. A 12-kDa or 12.6-kDa FK506-binding protein (FKBP12 or FKBP12.6, respectively) is associated with RyR protein. When FKBP12 or FKBP12.6 is dissociated from the FKBP-RyR complex, the RyR is modulated (activated). Phosphorylation of the RyR by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II modulates the channel. PKA phosphorylation of the RyR on the skeletal and cardiac muscle SR dissociates FKBP12 or FKBP12.6 from the RyR complex. This review deals with the modulation mechanisms of RyR proteins by associated proteins and phosphorylation.

  6. Lead inhibition of NMDA channels in native and recombinant receptors.

    PubMed

    Gavazzo, P; Gazzoli, A; Mazzolini, M; Marchetti, C

    2001-10-08

    NMDA channels are key targets for lead (Pb2+) neurotoxicity and Pb2+-induced inhibition of NMDA current is age- and subunit-dependent. In rat cerebellar granule cells maintained in high KCl, glycine affinity as well as sensitivity to ifenprodil change significantly with the days in vitro, indicating a reduction of NR2B subunit expression. Pb2+ blocked NMDA current with IC50 approximately 4 microM and this effect decreased significantly during the second week in vitro. In Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing recombinant NR1-NR2A, NR1-NR2B or NR1-NR2C receptors, Pb2+ inhibited glutamate-activated currents with IC50 of 3.3, 2.5 and 4.7 microM respectively. These data indicate that Pb2+ action is dependent on subunit composition and suggest that down-regulation of the NR2B subunit is correlated to a diminished sensitivity to Pb2+ inhibition.

  7. Neurotransmitter Receptors and Their Ionic Channels as Targets for Drugs and Toxins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-06

    binding site and/or noncompetitively via its allosteric sites. Drugs acting on the latter sites included amantadine and perhydrohistrionicotoxin, which...channel conformation of the ACh-receptor. Fixamples are H12MT (Albuquerque - et al., 1974), PCP (Albuquerque et al., 1980), amantadine (Tai et al., 1978...receptor’s channel in a closed conformation. -- We found that amantadine , PCP and HI h bound t t the receptorts open- as well as closed-channel

  8. Pre-synaptic GABA receptors inhibit glutamate release through GIRK channels in rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Ladera, Carolina; del Carmen Godino, María; José Cabañero, María; Torres, Magdalena; Watanabe, Masahiko; Luján, Rafael; Sánchez-Prieto, José

    2008-12-01

    Neuronal G protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels mediate the slow inhibitory effects of many neurotransmitters post-synaptically. However, no evidence exists that supports that GIRK channels play any role in the inhibition of glutamate release by GABA(B) receptors. In this study, we show for the first time that GABA(B) receptors operate through two mechanisms in nerve terminals from the cerebral cortex. As shown previously, GABA(B) receptors reduces glutamate release and the Ca(2+) influx mediated by N-type Ca(2+) channels in a mode insensitive to the GIRK channel blocker tertiapin-Q and consistent with direct inhibition of this voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel. However, by means of weak stimulation protocols, we reveal that GABA(B) receptors also reduce glutamate release mediated by P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels, and that these responses are reversed by the GIRK channel blocker tertiapin-Q. Consistent with the functional interaction between GABA(B) receptors and GIRK channels at nerve terminals we demonstrate by immunogold electron immunohistochemistry that pre-synaptic boutons of asymmetric synapses co-express GABA(B) receptors and GIRK channels, thus suggesting that the functional interaction of these two proteins, found at the post-synaptic level, also occurs at glutamatergic nerve terminals.

  9. Reversible block of the calcium release channel/ryanodine receptor by protamine, a heparin antidote.

    PubMed

    Koulen, P; Ehrlich, B E

    2000-07-01

    Channel activity of the calcium release channel from skeletal muscle, ryanodine receptor type 1, was measured in the presence and absence of protamine sulfate on the cytoplasmic side of the channel. Single-channel activity was measured after incorporating channels into planar lipid bilayers. Optimally and suboptimally calcium-activated calcium release channels were inactivated by the application of protamine to the cytoplasmic side of the channel. Recovery of channel activity was not observed while protamine was present. The addition of protamine bound to agarose beads did not change channel activity, implying that the mechanism of action involves an interaction with the ryanodine receptor rather than changes in the bulk calcium concentration of the medium. The block of channel activity by protamine could be reversed either by removal by perfusion with buffer or by the addition of heparin to the cytoplasmic side of the channel. Microinjection of protamine into differentiated C(2)C(12) mouse muscle cells prevented caffeine-induced intracellular calcium release. The results suggest that protamine acts on the ryanodine receptor in a similar but opposite manner from heparin and that protamine can be used as a potent, reversible inhibitor of ryanodine receptor activity.

  10. Incorporation of acetylcholine receptors and Cl- channels in Xenopus oocytes injected with Torpedo electroplaque membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Marsal, J; Tigyi, G; Miledi, R

    1995-01-01

    A method was developed to transplant assembled nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AcChoRs) and Cl- channels from the electric organ of Torpedo to the membrane of Xenopus oocytes. Membrane vesicles from Torpedo electroplaques were injected into the oocytes and, within a few hours, the oocyte membrane acquired AcChoRs and Cl- channels. The mechanism of expression of these receptors and channels is very different from that which follows the injection of mRNA, since the appearance of receptors after membrane injection does not require de novo protein synthesis or N-glycosylation. This, and other controls, indicate that the foreign receptor-bearing membranes fuse with the oocyte membrane and cause the appearance of functional receptors and channels. All this makes the Xenopus oocyte an even more powerful tool for studies of the structure and function of membrane proteins. PMID:7761478

  11. Combined single channel and single molecule detection identifies subunit composition of STIM1-activated transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels.

    PubMed

    Asanov, Alexander; Sampieri, Alicia; Moreno, Claudia; Pacheco, Jonathan; Salgado, Alfonso; Sherry, Ryan; Vaca, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Depletion of intracellular calcium ion stores initiates a rapid cascade of events culminating with the activation of the so-called Store-Operated Channels (SOC) at the plasma membrane. Calcium influx via SOC is essential in the initiation of calcium-dependent intracellular signaling and for the refilling of internal calcium stores, ensuring the regeneration of the signaling cascade. In spite of the significance of this evolutionary conserved mechanism, the molecular identity of SOC has been the center of a heated controversy spanning over the last 20 years. Initial studies positioned some members of the transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channel superfamily of channels (with the more robust evidence pointing to TRPC1) as a putative SOC. Recent evidence indicates that Stromal Interacting Molecule 1 (STIM1) activates some members from the TRPC family of channels. However, the exact subunit composition of TRPC channels remains undetermined to this date. To identify the subunit composition of STIM1-activated TRPC channels, we developed novel method, which combines single channel electrophysiological measurements based on the patch clamp technique with single molecule fluorescence imaging. We termed this method Single ion Channel Single Molecule Detection technique (SC-SMD). Using SC-SMD method, we have obtained direct evidence of the subunit composition of TRPC channels activated by STIM1. Furthermore, our electrophysiological-imaging SC-SMD method provides evidence at the molecular level of the mechanism by which STIM1 and calmodulin antagonize to modulate TRPC channel activity.

  12. sigma Receptor activation blocks potassium channels and depresses neuroexcitability in rat intracardiac neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongling; Cuevas, Javier

    2005-06-01

    The sigma receptors have been implicated in the regulation of the cardiovascular system, and sigma-1 receptor transcripts have been found in parasympathetic intracardiac neurons. However, the cellular function of sigma-1 receptors in these cells remains to be determined. Effects of sigma receptor activation on voltage-activated K(+) channels and action potential firing were studied in isolated intracardiac neurons using whole-cell patch-clamp recording techniques. Activation of sigma receptors reversibly blocked delayed outwardly rectifying potassium channels, large conductance Ca(2+)-sensitive K(+) channels, and the M-current with maximal inhibition >80%. The inhibition of K(+) channels by sigma ligands was dose-dependent, and the rank order potency of (+)-pentazocine > ibogaine > 1,3-di-O-tolyguanidin (DTG) suggests that the effect is mediated by sigma-1 receptor activation. Preincubation of neurons with the irreversible sigma receptor antagonist metaphit blocked DTG-induced inhibition of K(+) channels, confirming that the effect is mediated by sigma receptor activation. Although bath application of sigma ligands depolarized intracardiac neurons, the number of action potentials fired by the cells in response to depolarizing current pulses was decreased in the presence of these drugs. Neither dialysis of the neurons nor application of intracellular 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) trilithium salt inhibited the effect of sigma receptors on K(+) channels, which suggests that the signal transduction pathway does not involve a diffusible cytosolic second messenger or a G protein. Together, these data suggest that sigma-1 receptors are directly coupled to K(+) channels in intracardiac neurons. Furthermore, activation of sigma-1 receptors depresses the excitability of intracardiac neurons and is thus likely to block parasympathetic input to the heart.

  13. Discovery of a novel allosteric modulator of 5-HT3 receptors: inhibition and potentiation of Cys-loop receptor signaling through a conserved transmembrane intersubunit site.

    PubMed

    Trattnig, Sarah M; Harpsøe, Kasper; Thygesen, Sarah B; Rahr, Louise M; Ahring, Philip K; Balle, Thomas; Jensen, Anders A

    2012-07-20

    The ligand-gated ion channels in the Cys-loop receptor superfamily mediate the effects of neurotransmitters acetylcholine, serotonin, GABA, and glycine. Cys-loop receptor signaling is susceptible to modulation by ligands acting through numerous allosteric sites. Here we report the discovery of a novel class of negative allosteric modulators of the 5-HT(3) receptors (5-HT(3)Rs). PU02 (6-[(1-naphthylmethyl)thio]-9H-purine) is a potent and selective antagonist displaying IC(50) values of ~1 μM at 5-HT(3)Rs and substantially lower activities at other Cys-loop receptors. In an elaborate mutagenesis study of the 5-HT(3)A receptor guided by a homology model, PU02 is demonstrated to act through a transmembrane intersubunit site situated in the upper three helical turns of TM2 and TM3 in the (+)-subunit and TM1 and TM2 in the (-)-subunit. The Ser(248), Leu(288), Ile(290), Thr(294), and Gly(306) residues are identified as important molecular determinants of PU02 activity with minor contributions from Ser(292) and Val(310), and we propose that the naphthalene group of PU02 docks into the hydrophobic cavity formed by these. Interestingly, specific mutations of Ser(248), Thr(294), and Gly(306) convert PU02 into a complex modulator, potentiating and inhibiting 5-HT-evoked signaling through these mutants at low and high concentrations, respectively. The PU02 binding site in the 5-HT(3)R corresponds to allosteric sites in anionic Cys-loop receptors, which emphasizes the uniform nature of the molecular events underlying signaling through the receptors. Moreover, the dramatic changes in the functional properties of PU02 induced by subtle changes in its binding site bear witness to the delicate structural discrimination between allosteric inhibition and potentiation of Cys-loop receptors.

  14. G-protein mediates voltage regulation of agonist binding to muscarinic receptors: effects on receptor-Na/sup +/ channel interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen-Armon, M.; Garty, H.; Sokolovsky, M.

    1988-01-12

    The authors previous experiments in membranes prepared from rat heart and brain led them to suggest that the binding of agonist to the muscarinic receptors and to the Na/sup +/ channels is a coupled event mediated by guanine nucleotide binding protein(s) (G-protein(s)). These in vitro findings prompted us to employ synaptoneurosomes from brain stem tissue to examine (i) the binding properties of (/sup 3/H) acetylcholine at resting potential and under depolarization conditions in the absence and presence of pertussis toxin; (ii) the binding of (/sup 3/H)batrachotoxin to Na/sup +/ channel(s) in the presence of the muscarinic agonists; and (iii) muscarinically induced /sup 22/Na/sup +/ uptake in the presence and absence of tetrodotoxin, which blocks Na/sup +/ channels. The findings indicate that agonist binding to muscarinic receptors is voltage dependent, that this process is mediated by G-protein(s), and that muscarinic agonists induce opening of Na/sup +/channels. The latter process persists even after pertussis toxin treatment, indicating that it is not likely to be mediated by pertussis toxin sensitive G-protein(s). The system with its three interacting components-receptor, G-protein, and Na/sup +/ channel-is such that at resting potential the muscarinic receptor induces opening of Na/sup +/ channels; this property may provide a possible physiological mechanism for the depolarization stimulus necessary for autoexcitation or repetitive firing in heart or brain tissues.

  15. Functional Coupling of Ca2+ Channels and Ryanodine Receptors in Cardiac Myocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sham, James S. K.; Cleemann, Lars; Morad, Martin

    1995-01-01

    In skeletal muscle, dihydropyridine receptors are functionally coupled to ryanodine receptors of the sarcoplasmic reticulum in triadic or diadic junctional complexes. In cardiac muscle direct physical or functional couplings have not been demonstrated. We have tested the hypothesis of functional coupling of L-type Ca2+ channels and ryanodine receptors in rat cardiac myocytes by comparing the efficacies of Ca2+ in triggering Ca2+ release when the ion enters the cell via the Ca2+ channels or the Na^+/Ca2+ exchanger. Ca2+ transported through the Ca2+ channels was 20-160 times more effective than Ca2+ influx via the Na^+/Ca2+ exchanger in gating Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, suggesting privileged communication between Ca2+ channels and ryanodine receptors. In support of this hypothesis we found that Ca2+ channels were inactivated by Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, even though the myoplasmic Ca2+ concentrations were buffered with 10 mM EGTA. The data thus suggest privileged cross signaling between the dihydropyridine and ryanodine receptors such that Ca2+ flux through either the Ca2+ channel or the ryanodine receptor alters the gating kinetics of the other channel.

  16. Domain-based identification and analysis of glutamate receptor ion channels and their relatives in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Ger, Mao-Feng; Rendon, Gloria; Tilson, Jeffrey L; Jakobsson, Eric

    2010-10-06

    Voltage-gated and ligand-gated ion channels are used in eukaryotic organisms for the purpose of electrochemical signaling. There are prokaryotic homologues to major eukaryotic channels of these sorts, including voltage-gated sodium, potassium, and calcium channels, Ach-receptor and glutamate-receptor channels. The prokaryotic homologues have been less well characterized functionally than their eukaryotic counterparts. In this study we identify likely prokaryotic functional counterparts of eukaryotic glutamate receptor channels by comprehensive analysis of the prokaryotic sequences in the context of known functional domains present in the eukaryotic members of this family. In particular, we searched the nonredundant protein database for all proteins containing the following motif: the two sections of the extracellular glutamate binding domain flanking two transmembrane helices. We discovered 100 prokaryotic sequences containing this motif, with a wide variety of functional annotations. Two groups within this family have the same topology as eukaryotic glutamate receptor channels. Group 1 has a potassium-like selectivity filter. Group 2 is most closely related to eukaryotic glutamate receptor channels. We present analysis of the functional domain architecture for the group of 100, a putative phylogenetic tree, comparison of the protein phylogeny with the corresponding species phylogeny, consideration of the distribution of these proteins among classes of prokaryotes, and orthologous relationships between prokaryotic and human glutamate receptor channels. We introduce a construct called the Evolutionary Domain Network, which represents a putative pathway of domain rearrangements underlying the domain composition of present channels. We believe that scientists interested in ion channels in general, and ligand-gated ion channels in particular, will be interested in this work. The work should also be of interest to bioinformatics researchers who are interested in the use

  17. A Transient Receptor Potential Ion Channel in Chlamydomonas Shares Key Features with Sensory Transduction-Associated TRP Channels in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Arias-Darraz, Luis; Cabezas, Deny; Colenso, Charlotte K.; Alegría-Arcos, Melissa; Bravo-Moraga, Felipe; Varas-Concha, Ignacio; Almonacid, Daniel E.; Madrid, Rodolfo; Brauchi, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Sensory modalities are essential for navigating through an ever-changing environment. From insects to mammals, transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are known mediators for cellular sensing. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a motile single-celled freshwater green alga that is guided by photosensory, mechanosensory, and chemosensory cues. In this type of alga, sensory input is first detected by membrane receptors located in the cell body and then transduced to the beating cilia by membrane depolarization. Although TRP channels seem to be absent in plants, C. reinhardtii possesses genomic sequences encoding TRP proteins. Here, we describe the cloning and characterization of a C. reinhardtii version of a TRP channel sharing key features present in mammalian TRP channels associated with sensory transduction. In silico sequence-structure analysis unveiled the modular design of TRP channels, and electrophysiological experiments conducted on Human Embryonic Kidney-293T cells expressing the Cr-TRP1 clone showed that many of the core functional features of metazoan TRP channels are present in Cr-TRP1, suggesting that basic TRP channel gating characteristics evolved early in the history of eukaryotes. PMID:25595824

  18. From The Cover: Microtransplantation of functional receptors and channels from the Alzheimer's brain to frog oocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miledi, R.; Dueñas, Z.; Martinez-Torres, A.; Kawas, C. H.; Eusebi, F.

    2004-02-01

    About a decade ago, cell membranes from the electric organ of Torpedo and from the rat brain were transplanted to frog oocytes, which thus acquired functional Torpedo and rat neurotransmitter receptors. Nevertheless, the great potential that this method has for studying human diseases has remained virtually untapped. Here, we show that cell membranes from the postmortem brains of humans that suffered Alzheimer's disease can be microtransplanted to the plasma membrane of Xenopus oocytes. We show also that these postmortem membranes carry neurotransmitter receptors and voltage-operated channels that are still functional, even after they have been kept frozen for many years. This method provides a new and powerful approach to study directly the functional characteristics and structure of receptors, channels, and other membrane proteins of the Alzheimer's brain. This knowledge may help in understanding the basis of Alzheimer's disease and also help in developing new treatments. -aminobutyric acid receptors | sodium channels | calcium channels | postmortem brain

  19. Transient Receptor Potential Ion Channels Control Thermoregulatory Behaviour in Reptiles

    PubMed Central

    Seebacher, Frank; Murray, Shauna A.

    2007-01-01

    Biological functions are governed by thermodynamics, and animals regulate their body temperature to optimise cellular performance and to avoid harmful extremes. The capacity to sense environmental and internal temperatures is a prerequisite for the evolution of thermoregulation. However, the mechanisms that enable ectothermic vertebrates to sense heat remain unknown. The recently discovered thermal characteristics of transient receptor potential ion channels (TRP) render these proteins suitable to act as temperature sensors. Here we test the hypothesis that TRPs are present in reptiles and function to control thermoregulatory behaviour. We show that the hot-sensing TRPV1 is expressed in a crocodile (Crocodylus porosus), an agamid (Amphibolurus muricatus) and a scincid (Pseudemoia entrecasteauxii) lizard, as well as in the quail and zebrafinch (Coturnix chinensis and Poephila guttata). The TRPV1 genes from all reptiles form a unique clade that is delineated from the mammalian and the ancestral Xenopus sequences by an insertion of two amino acids. TRPV1 and the cool-sensing TRPM8 are expressed in liver, muscle (transversospinalis complex), and heart tissues of the crocodile, and have the potential to act as internal thermometer and as external temperatures sensors. Inhibition of TRPV1 and TRPM8 in C. porosus abolishes the typically reptilian shuttling behaviour between cooling and heating environments, and leads to significantly altered body temperature patterns. Our results provide the proximate mechanism of thermal selection in terrestrial ectotherms, which heralds a fundamental change in interpretation, because TRPs provide the mechanism for a tissue-specific input into the animals' thermoregulatory response. PMID:17356692

  20. Structure-Driven Pharmacology of Transient Receptor Potential Channel Vanilloid 1.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Franulic, Ignacio; Caceres-Molina, Javier; Sepulveda, Romina V; Gonzalez-Nilo, Fernando; Latorre, Ramon

    2016-09-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) ion channel is a polymodal receptor that mediates the flux of cations across the membrane in response to several stimuli, including heat, voltage, and ligands. The best known agonist of TRPV1 channels is capsaicin, the pungent component of "hot" chili peppers. In addition, peptides found in the venom of poisonous animals, along with the lipids phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate, lysophosphatidic acid, and cholesterol, bind to TRPV1 with high affinity to modulate channel gating. Here, we discuss the functional evidence regarding ligand-dependent activation of TRPV1 channels in light of structural data recently obtained by cryoelectron microscopy. This review focuses on the mechanistic insights into ligand binding and allosteric gating of TRPV1 channels and the relevance of accurate polymodal receptor biophysical characterization for drug design in novel pain therapies.

  1. Expression-dependent pharmacology of transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 channels in Xenopus laevis oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Acevedo, Ricardo E.; Pless, Stephan A.; Schwarz, Stephan K.W.; Ahern, Christopher A.

    2013-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily member 1 channels are polymodal sensors of noxious stimuli and integral players in thermosensation, inflammation and pain signaling. It has been shown previously that under prolonged stimulation, these channels show dynamic pore dilation, providing a pathway for large and otherwise relatively impermeant molecules. Further, we have shown recently that these nonselective cation channels, when activated by capsaicin, are potently and reversibly blocked by external application of quaternary ammonium compounds and local anesthetics. Here we describe a novel phenomenon in transient receptor potential channel pharmacology whereby their expression levels in Xenopus laevis oocytes, as assessed by the magnitude of macroscopic currents, are negatively correlated with extracellular blocker affinity: small current densities give rise to nanomolar blockade by quaternary ammoniums and this affinity decreases linearly as current density increases. Possible mechanisms to explain these data are discussed in light of similar observations in other channels and receptors. PMID:23428812

  2. Optical control of trimeric P2X receptors and acid-sensing ion channels.

    PubMed

    Browne, Liam E; Nunes, João P M; Sim, Joan A; Chudasama, Vijay; Bragg, Laricia; Caddick, Stephen; North, R Alan

    2014-01-07

    P2X receptors are trimeric membrane proteins that function as ion channels gated by extracellular ATP. We have engineered a P2X2 receptor that opens within milliseconds by irradiation at 440 nm, and rapidly closes at 360 nm. This requires bridging receptor subunits via covalent attachment of 4,4'-bis(maleimido)azobenzene to a cysteine residue (P329C) introduced into each second transmembrane domain. The cis-trans isomerization of the azobenzene pushes apart the outer ends of the transmembrane helices and opens the channel in a light-dependent manner. Light-activated channels exhibited similar unitary currents, rectification, calcium permeability, and dye uptake as P2X2 receptors activated by ATP. P2X3 receptors with an equivalent mutation (P320C) were also light sensitive after chemical modification. They showed typical rapid desensitization, and they could coassemble with native P2X2 subunits in pheochromocytoma cells to form light-activated heteromeric P2X2/3 receptors. A similar approach was used to open and close human acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), which are also trimers but are unrelated in sequence to P2X receptors. The experiments indicate that the opening of the permeation pathway requires similar and substantial movements of the transmembrane helices in both P2X receptors and ASICs, and the method will allow precise optical control of P2X receptors or ASICs in intact tissues.

  3. Molecular mechanism of ATP binding and ion channel activation in P2X receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Hattori, Motoyuki; Gouaux, Eric

    2012-10-24

    P2X receptors are trimeric ATP-activated ion channels permeable to Na{sup +}, K{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+}. The seven P2X receptor subtypes are implicated in physiological processes that include modulation of synaptic transmission, contraction of smooth muscle, secretion of chemical transmitters and regulation of immune responses. Despite the importance of P2X receptors in cellular physiology, the three-dimensional composition of the ATP-binding site, the structural mechanism of ATP-dependent ion channel gating and the architecture of the open ion channel pore are unknown. Here we report the crystal structure of the zebrafish P2X4 receptor in complex with ATP and a new structure of the apo receptor. The agonist-bound structure reveals a previously unseen ATP-binding motif and an open ion channel pore. ATP binding induces cleft closure of the nucleotide-binding pocket, flexing of the lower body {beta}-sheet and a radial expansion of the extracellular vestibule. The structural widening of the extracellular vestibule is directly coupled to the opening of the ion channel pore by way of an iris-like expansion of the transmembrane helices. The structural delineation of the ATP-binding site and the ion channel pore, together with the conformational changes associated with ion channel gating, will stimulate development of new pharmacological agents.

  4. A model of the closed form of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor m2 channel pore.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sanguk; Chamberlain, Aaron K; Bowie, James U

    2004-08-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor is a neurotransmitter-gated ion channel in the postsynaptic membrane. It is composed of five homologous subunits, each of which contributes one transmembrane helix--the M2 helix--to create the channel pore. The M2 helix from the delta subunit is capable of forming a channel by itself. Although a model of the receptor was recently proposed based on a low-resolution, cryo-electron microscopy density map, we found that the model does not explain much of the other available experimental data. Here we propose a new model of the M2 channel derived solely from helix packing and symmetry constraints. This model agrees well with experimental results from solid-state NMR, chemical reactivity, and mutagenesis experiments. The model depicts the channel pore, the channel gate, and the residues responsible for cation specificity.

  5. Principal pathway coupling agonist binding to channel gating in nicotinic receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Won Yong; Sine, Steven M.

    2005-11-01

    Synaptic receptors respond to neurotransmitters by opening an intrinsic ion channel in the final step in synaptic transmission. How binding of the neurotransmitter is conveyed over the long distance to the channel remains a central question in neurobiology. Here we delineate a principal pathway that links neurotransmitter binding to channel gating by using a structural model of the Torpedo acetylcholine receptor at 4-Å resolution, recordings of currents through single receptor channels and determinations of energetic coupling between pairs of residues. We show that a pair of invariant arginine and glutamate residues in each receptor α-subunit electrostatically links peripheral and inner β-sheets from the binding domain and positions them to engage with the channel. The key glutamate and flanking valine residues energetically couple to conserved proline and serine residues emerging from the top of the channel-forming α-helix, suggesting that this is the point at which the binding domain triggers opening of the channel. The series of interresidue couplings identified here constitutes a primary allosteric pathway that links neurotransmitter binding to channel gating.

  6. Physical basis of apparent pore-dilation of ATP-activated P2X receptor channels

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mufeng; Toombes, Gilman E S; Silberberg, Shai D; Swartz, Kenton J

    2016-01-01

    The selectivity of ion channels is fundamental for their roles in electrical and chemical signaling, and ion homeostasis. Although most ion channels exhibit stable ion selectivity, the prevailing view for purinergic P2X receptor channels, transient receptor potential V1 (TRPV1) channels and acid sensing ion channels (ASICs) is that their ion conduction pores dilate upon prolonged activation. We investigated this mechanism in P2X receptors and found that the hallmark shift in equilibrium potential observed with prolonged channel activation does not result from pore dilation, but from time-dependent alterations in the concentration of intracellular ions. We derived a physical model to calculate ion concentration changes during patch-clamp recordings, which validates our experimental findings and provides a quantitative guideline for effectively controlling ion concentration. Our results have fundamental implications for understanding ion permeation and gating in P2X receptor channels, and more broadly for using patch-clamp techniques to study ion channels and neuronal excitability. PMID:26389841

  7. Allosteric modulation of ATP-gated P2X receptor channels

    PubMed Central

    Coddou, Claudio; Stojilkovic, Stanko S.; Huidobro-Toro, J. Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Seven mammalian purinergic receptor subunits, denoted P2X1 to P2X7, and several spliced forms of these subunits have been cloned. When heterologously expressed, these cDNAs encode ATP-gated non-selective cation channels organized as trimers. All activated receptors produce cell depolarization and promote Ca2+ influx through their pores and indirectly by activating voltage-gated calcium channels. However, the biophysical and pharmacological properties of these receptors differ considerably, and the majority of these subunits are also capable of forming heterotrimers with other members of the P2X receptor family, which confers further different properties. These channels have three ATP binding domains, presumably located between neighboring subunits, and occupancy of at least two binding sites is needed for their activation. In addition to the orthosteric binding sites for ATP, these receptors have additional allosteric sites that modulate the agonist action at receptors, including sites for trace metals, protons, neurosteroids, reactive oxygen species and phosphoinositides. The allosteric regulation of P2X receptors is frequently receptor-specific and could be a useful tool to identify P2X members in native tissues and their roles in signaling. The focus of this review is on common and receptor-specific allosteric modulation of P2X receptors and the molecular base accounting for allosteric binding sites. PMID:21639805

  8. Cannabinoid receptor agonists modulate calcium channels in rat retinal Müller cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, W; Li, Q; Wang, S-Y; Gao, F; Qian, W-J; Li, F; Ji, M; Sun, X-H; Miao, Y; Wang, Z

    2016-01-28

    While activation of cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R) regulates a variety of retinal neuronal functions by modulating ion channels in these cells, effect of activated cannabinoid receptors on Ca(2+) channels in retinal Müller cells is still largely unknown. In the present work we show that three subunits of T-type Ca(2+) channels, CaV3.1, CaV3.2 and CaV3.3, as well as one subunit of L-type Ca(2+) channels, CaV1.2, were expressed in rat Müller cells by immunofluorescent staining. Consistently, nimodipine- and mibefradil-sensitive Na(+) currents through L- and T-type Ca(2+) channels could be recorded electrophysiologically. The cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN55212-2 significantly suppressed Ca(2+) channel currents, mainly the T-type one, in acutely isolated rat Müller cells in a dose-dependent manner, with an IC50 of 3.98μM. The WIN55212-2 effect was not blocked by AM251/SR141716, specific CB1R antagonists. Similar suppression of the currents was observed when anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG), endogenous ligands of cannabinoid receptors, were applied. Moreover, even though CB2 receptors (CB2Rs) were expressed in rat Müller cells, the effects of WIN55212-2 and 2-AG on Ca(2+) channel currents were not blocked by AM630, a selective CB2R antagonist. However, the effect of AEA could be partially rescued by AM630. These results suggest that WIN55212-2 and 2-AG receptor-independently suppressed the Ca(2+) channel currents in Müller cells, while AEA suppressed the currents partially through CB2Rs. The existence of receptor-dependent and -independent mechanisms suggests that cannabinoids may modulate Müller cell functions through multiple pathways.

  9. Molecular size of different neurotoxin receptors on the voltage-sensitive Na+ channel.

    PubMed

    Barhanin, J; Schmid, A; Lombet, A; Wheeler, K P; Lazdunski, M; Ellory, J C

    1983-01-25

    Measurements were made of the molecular sizes of two distinct receptors on the Na+ channel in rat brain synaptosomes that are specific for different neurotoxins. Radiation inactivation of the binding of radiolabeled derivatives of the toxins was consistent with Mr = 260,000 for the tetrodotoxin receptor and Mr = 266,000 for the receptor specific for two scorpion toxins, toxin II from Centruroides suffusus suffusus and toxin gamma from Tityus serrulatus serrulatus. Covalent cross-linking of the latter to its receptor similarly indicated Mr = 270,000. It seems most likely that these two distinct receptors reside on the same molecule.

  10. Transient Activation of GABAB Receptors Suppresses SK Channel Currents in Substantia Nigra Pars Compacta Dopaminergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Estep, Chad M.; Galtieri, Daniel J.; Zampese, Enrico; Goldberg, Joshua A.; Brichta, Lars; Greengard, Paul; Surmeier, D. James

    2016-01-01

    Dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) are richly innervated by GABAergic neurons. The postsynaptic effects of GABA on SNc DA neurons are mediated by a mixture of GABAA and GABAB receptors. Although activation of GABAA receptors inhibits spike generation, the consequences of GABAB receptor activation are less well characterized. To help fill this gap, perforated patch recordings were made from young adult mouse SNc DA neurons. Sustained stimulation of GABAB receptors hyperpolarized SNc DA neurons, as previously described. However, transient stimulation of GABAB receptors by optical uncaging of GABA did not; rather, it reduced the opening of small-conductance, calcium-activated K+ (SK) channels and increased the irregularity of spiking. This modulation was attributable to inhibition of adenylyl cyclase and protein kinase A. Thus, because suppression of SK channel activity increases the probability of burst spiking, transient co-activation of GABAA and GABAB receptors could promote a pause-burst pattern of spiking. PMID:28036359

  11. Recombinant nicotinic receptors, expressed in Xenopus oocytes, do not resemble native rat sympathetic ganglion receptors in single-channel behaviour.

    PubMed

    Sivilotti, L G; McNeil, D K; Lewis, T M; Nassar, M A; Schoepfer, R; Colquhoun, D

    1997-04-01

    1. In order to establish the subunit composition of neuronal nicotinic receptors in rat superior cervical ganglia (SCG), their single-channel properties were compared with those of recombinant receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes, using outside-out excised patch recording. 2. The mean main conductance of SCG channels from adult and 1-day-old rats was 34.8 and 36.6 pS, respectively. Less frequent openings to lower conductances occurred both as isolated bursts and as events connected to the main level by direct transitions. There was considerable interpatch variability in the values of the lower conductances. 3. Nicotinic receptors from oocytes expressing alpha3beta4 and alpha4beta4 subunits had chord conductances lower than that of SCG neurones (22 pS for alpha3beta4 and 29 pS for alpha4beta4). 4. Prolonged recording from both native and recombinant channels was precluded by 'run-down', i.e. channel activity could be elicited for only a few minutes after excision. Nevertheless, SCG channel openings were clearly seen to occur as short bursts (slowest component, 38 ms), whereas recombinant channels opened in very prolonged bursts of activity, the major component being the slowest (480 ms). 5. Addition of the alpha5 subunit to the alpha3beta4 pair produced channels with a higher conductance than those observed after injection of the pair alone (24.9 vs. 22 pS), suggesting incorporation of alpha5 into the channel. Addition of the beta2 subunit did not change alpha3beta4 single-channel properties. In one out of fourteen alpha3alpha5beta4 patches, both ganglion-like, high conductance, short burst openings and recombinant-type, low conductance, slow burst openings were observed. 6. Channels produced by expression in Xenopus oocytes of neuronal nicotinic subunits present in rat SCG as a rule differ from native ganglion receptors in single-channel conductance and gross kinetics. While it is possible that an essential nicotinic subunit remains to be cloned, it is perhaps

  12. The opioid peptide dynorphin directly blocks NMDA receptor channels in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, L; Gu, Y; Huang, L Y

    1995-01-01

    1. The actions of dynorphin on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) responses were examined in acutely dissociated trigeminal neurons in rat. Whole-cell and single-channel currents were recorded using the patch clamp technique. 2. Dynorphins reduced NMDA-activated currents (INMDA). The IC50 was 0.25 microM for dynorphin (1-32), 1.65 microM for dynorphin (1-17) and 1.8 microM for dynorphin (1-13). 3. The blocking action of dynorphin is voltage independent. 4. The inhibitory action of dynorphin cannot be blocked by high concentration of the non-selective opioid receptor antagonist naloxone, nor by the specific kappa-opioid receptor antagonist nor-Binaltorphimine (nor-BNI). 5. Single-channel analyses indicate that dynorphin reduces the fraction of time the channel is open without altering the channel conductance. 6. We propose that dynorphin acts directly on NMDA receptors. PMID:7537820

  13. Surface charge potentiates conduction through the cardiac ryanodine receptor channel

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Single channel currents through cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ release channels were measured in very low levels of current carrier (e.g., 1 mM Ba2+). The hypothesis that surface charge contributes to these anomalously large single channel currents was tested by changing ionic strength and surface charge density. Channel identity and sidedness was pharmacologically determined. At low ionic strength (20 mM Cs+), Cs+ conduction in the lumen-->myoplasm (L-->M) direction was significantly greater than in the reverse direction (301.7 +/- 92.5 vs 59.8 +/- 38 pS, P < 0.001; mean +/- SD, t test). The Cs+ concentration at which conduction reached half saturation was asymmetric (32 vs 222 mM) and voltage independent. At high ionic strength (400 mM Cs+), conduction in both direction saturated at 550 +/- 32 pS. Further, neutralization of carboxyl groups on the lumenal side of the channel significantly reduced conduction (333.0 +/- 22.5 vs 216.2 +/- 24.4 pS, P < 0.002). These results indicate that negative surface charge exists near the lumenal mouth of the channel but outside the electric field of the membrane. In vivo, this surface charge may potentiate conduction by increasing the local Ca2+ concentration and thus act as a preselection filter for this poorly selective channel. PMID:8035165

  14. Peptide fragments of the dihydropyridine receptor can modulate cardiac ryanodine receptor channel activity and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release.

    PubMed Central

    Dulhunty, Angela F; Curtis, Suzanne M; Cengia, Louise; Sakowska, Magdalena; Casarotto, Marco G

    2004-01-01

    We show that peptide fragments of the dihydropyridine receptor II-III loop alter cardiac RyR (ryanodine receptor) channel activity in a cytoplasmic Ca2+-dependent manner. The peptides were AC (Thr-793-Ala-812 of the cardiac dihydropyridine receptor), AS (Thr-671-Leu-690 of the skeletal dihydropyridine receptor), and a modified AS peptide [AS(D-R18)], with an extended helical structure. The peptides added to the cytoplasmic side of channels in lipid bilayers at > or = 10 nM activated channels when the cytoplasmic [Ca2+] was 100 nM, but either inhibited or did not affect channel activity when the cytoplasmic [Ca2+] was 10 or 100 microM. Both activation and inhibition were independent of bilayer potential. Activation by AS, but not by AC or AS(D-R18), was reduced at peptide concentrations >1 mM in a voltage-dependent manner (at +40 mV). In control experiments, channels were not activated by the scrambled AS sequence (ASS) or skeletal II-III loop peptide (NB). Resting Ca2+ release from cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum was not altered by peptide AC, but Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release was depressed. Resting and Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release were enhanced by both the native and modified AS peptides. NMR revealed (i) that the structure of peptide AS(D-R18) is not influenced by [Ca2+] and (ii) that peptide AC adopts a helical structure, particularly in the region containing positively charged residues. This is the first report of specific functional interactions between dihydropyridine receptor A region peptides and cardiac RyR ion channels in lipid bilayers. PMID:14678014

  15. Subunit-specific mechanisms and proton sensitivity of NMDA receptor channel block.

    PubMed

    Dravid, Shashank M; Erreger, Kevin; Yuan, Hongjie; Nicholson, Katherine; Le, Phuong; Lyuboslavsky, Polina; Almonte, Antoine; Murray, Ernest; Mosely, Cara; Barber, Jeremy; French, Adam; Balster, Robert; Murray, Thomas F; Traynelis, Stephen F

    2007-05-15

    We have compared the potencies of structurally distinct channel blockers at recombinant NR1/NR2A, NR1/NR2B, NR1/NR2C and NR1/NR2D receptors. The IC50 values varied with stereochemistry and subunit composition, suggesting that it may be possible to design subunit-selective channel blockers. For dizocilpine (MK-801), the differential potency of MK-801 stereoisomers determined at recombinant NMDA receptors was confirmed at native receptors in vitro and in vivo. Since the proton sensor is tightly linked both structurally and functionally to channel gating, we examined whether blocking molecules that interact in the channel pore with the gating machinery can differentially sense protonation of the receptor. Blockers capable of remaining trapped in the pore during agonist unbinding showed the strongest dependence on extracellular pH, appearing more potent at acidic pH values that promote channel closure. Determination of pK(a) values for channel blockers suggests that the ionization of ketamine but not of other blockers can influence its pH-dependent potency. Kinetic modelling and single channel studies suggest that the pH-dependent block of NR1/NR2A by (-)MK-801 but not (+)MK-801 reflects an increase in the MK-801 association rate even though protons reduce channel open probability and thus MK-801 access to its binding site. Allosteric modulators that alter pH sensitivity alter the potency of MK-801, supporting the interpretation that the pH sensitivity of MK-801 binding reflects the changes at the proton sensor rather than a secondary effect of pH. These data suggest a tight coupling between the proton sensor and the ion channel gate as well as unique subunit-specific mechanisms of channel block.

  16. Role of transient receptor potential and acid-sensing ion channels in peripheral inflammatory pain.

    PubMed

    White, John P M; Cibelli, Mario; Rei Fidalgo, Antonio; Paule, Cleoper C; Noormohamed, Faruq; Urban, Laszlo; Maze, Mervyn; Nagy, Istvan

    2010-03-01

    Pain originating in inflammation is the most common pathologic pain condition encountered by the anesthesiologist whether in the context of surgery, its aftermath, or in the practice of pain medicine. Inflammatory agents, released as components of the body's response to peripheral tissue damage or disease, are now known to be collectively capable of activating transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1, transient receptor potential vanilloid type 4, transient receptor potential ankyrin type 1, and acid-sensing ion channels, whereas individual agents may activate only certain of these ion channels. These ionotropic receptors serve many physiologic functions-as, indeed, do many of the inflammagens released in the inflammatory process. Here, we introduce the reader to the role of these ionotropic receptors in mediating peripheral pain in response to inflammation.

  17. State-dependent block of Na+ channels by articaine via the local anesthetic receptor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ging Kuo; Calderon, Joanna; Jaw, Shiow-Jiin; Wang, Sho-Ya

    2009-05-01

    Articaine is widely used as a local anesthetic (LA) in dentistry, but little is known regarding its blocking actions on Na+ channels. We therefore examined the state-dependent block of articaine first in rat skeletal muscle rNav1.4 Na+ channels expressed in Hek293t cells. Articaine exhibited a weak block of resting rNav1.4 Na+ channels at -140 mV with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) of 378 +/- 26 microM (n = 5). The affinity was higher for inactivated Na+ channels measured at -70 mV with an IC50 value of 40.6 +/- 2.7 microM (n = 5). The open-channel block by articaine was measured using inactivation-deficient rNav1.4 Na+ channels with an IC50 value of 15.8 +/- 1.5 microM (n = 5). Receptor mapping demonstrated that articaine interacted strongly with a D4S6 phenylalanine residue, which is known to form a part of the LA receptor. Thus the block of rNav1.4 Na+ channels by articaine is via the conserved LA receptor in a highly state-dependent manner, with a ranking order of open (23.9x) > inactivated (9.3x) > resting (1x) state. Finally, the open-channel block by articaine was likewise measured in inactivation-deficient hNav1.7 and rNav1.8 Na+ channels, with IC(50) values of 8.8 +/- 0.1 and 22.0 +/- 0.5 microM, respectively (n = 5), indicating that the high-affinity open-channel block by articaine is indeed preserved in neuronal Na+ channel isoforms.

  18. Temperature-sensitive transient receptor potential channels in corneal tissue layers and cells.

    PubMed

    Mergler, Stefan; Valtink, Monika; Takayoshi, Sumioka; Okada, Yuka; Miyajima, Masayasu; Saika, Shizuya; Reinach, Peter S

    2014-01-01

    We here provide a brief summary of the characteristics of transient receptor potential channels (TRPs) identified in corneal tissue layers and cells. In general, TRPs are nonselective cation channels which are Ca(2+) permeable. Most TRPs serve as thermosensitive molecular sensors (thermo-TRPs). Based on their functional importance, the possibilities are described for drug-targeting TRP activity in a clinical setting. TRPs are expressed in various tissues of the eye including both human corneal epithelial and endothelial layers as well as stromal fibroblasts and stromal nerve fibers. TRP vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) heat receptor, also known as capsaicin receptor, along with TRP melastatin type 8 (TRPM8) cold receptor, which is also known as menthol receptor, are prototypes of the thermo-TRP family. The TRPV1 functional channel is the most investigated TRP channel in these tissues, owing to its contribution to maintaining tissue homeostasis as well as eliciting wound healing responses to injury. Other thermo-TRP family members identified in these tissues are TRPV2, 3 and 4. Finally, there is the TRP ankyrin type 1 (TRPA1) cold receptor. All of these thermo-TRPs can be activated within specific temperature ranges and transduce such inputs into chemical and electrical signals. Although several recent studies have begun to unravel complex roles for thermo-TRPs such as TRPV1 in corneal layers and resident cells, additional studies are needed to further elucidate their roles in health and disease.

  19. Transient Receptor Potential Ion Channel Function in Sensory Transduction and Cellular Signaling Cascades Underlying Visceral Hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Balemans, Dafne; Boeckxstaens, Guy E; Talavera, Karel; Wouters, Mira M

    2017-04-06

    Visceral hypersensitivity is an important mechanism underlying increased abdominal pain perception in functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID) including functional dyspepsia, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and inflammatory bowel disease in remission. Although the exact pathophysiological mechanisms are poorly understood, recent studies described upregulation and altered functions of nociceptors and their signaling pathways in aberrant visceral nociception, in particular the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel family. A variety of TRP channels are present in the gastrointestinal tract (TRPV1, TRPV3, TRPV4, TRPA1, TRPM2, TRPM5 and TRPM8) and modulation of their function by increased activation or sensitization (decreased activation threshold) or altered expression in visceral afferents, have been reported in visceral hypersensitivity. TRP channels directly detect or transduce osmotic, mechanical, thermal and chemosensory stimuli. In addition, pro-inflammatory mediators released in tissue damage or inflammation can activate receptors of the G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily leading to TRP channel sensitization and activation, which amplify pain and neurogenic inflammation. In this review, we highlight the current knowledge on the functional roles of neuronal TRP channels in visceral hypersensitivity and discuss the signaling pathways that underlie TRP channel modulation. We propose that a better understanding of TRP channels and their modulators may facilitate the development of more selective and effective therapies to treat visceral hypersensitivity.

  20. Sequential phosphorylation mediates receptor- and kinase-induced inhibition of TREK-1 background potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Murbartián, Janet; Lei, Qiubo; Sando, Julianne J; Bayliss, Douglas A

    2005-08-26

    Background potassium channels determine membrane potential and input resistance and serve as prominent effectors for modulatory regulation of cellular excitability. TREK-1 is a two-pore domain background K+ channel (KCNK2, K2P2.1) that is sensitive to a variety of physicochemical and humoral factors. In this work, we used a recombinant expression system to show that activation of G alpha(q)-coupled receptors leads to inhibition of TREK-1 channels via protein kinase C (PKC), and we identified a critical phosphorylation site in a key regulatory domain that mediates inhibition of the channel. In HEK 293 cells co-expressing TREK-1 and either the thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptor (TRHR1) or the Orexin receptor (Orx1R), agonist stimulation induced robust channel inhibition that was suppressed by a bisindolylmaleimide PKC inhibitor but not by a protein kinase A blocker ((R(p))-cAMP-S). Channel inhibition by agonists or by direct activators of PKC (phorbol dibutyrate) and PKA (forskolin) was disrupted not only by alanine or aspartate mutations at an identified PKA site (Ser-333) in the C terminus, but also at a more proximal regulatory site in the cytoplasmic C terminus (Ser-300); S333A and S300A mutations enhanced basal TREK-1 current, whereas S333D and S300D substitutions mimicked phosphorylation and strongly diminished currents. When studied in combination, TREK-1 current density was enhanced in S300A/S333D but reduced in S300D/S333A mutant channels. Channel mutants were expressed and appropriately targeted to cell membranes. Together, these data support a sequential phosphorylation model in which receptor-induced kinase activation drives modification at Ser-333 that enables subsequent phosphorylation at Ser-300 to inhibit TREK-1 channel activity.

  1. NompC TRP channel is essential for Drosophila sound receptor function.

    PubMed

    Effertz, Thomas; Wiek, Robert; Göpfert, Martin C

    2011-04-12

    The idea that the NompC TRPN1 channel is the Drosophila transducer for hearing has been challenged by remnant sound-evoked nerve potentials in nompC nulls. We now report that NompC is essential for the function of Drosophila sound receptors and that the remnant nerve potentials of nompC mutants are contributed by gravity/wind receptor cells. Ablating the sound receptors reduces the amplitude and sensitivity of sound-evoked nerve responses, and the same effects ensued from mutations in nompC. Ablating the sound receptors also suffices to abolish mechanical amplification, which arises from active receptor motility, is linked to transduction, and also requires NompC. Calcium imaging shows that the remnant nerve potentials in nompC mutants are associated with the activity of gravity/wind receptors and that the sound receptors of the mutants fail to respond to sound. Hence, Drosophila sound receptors require NompC for mechanical signal detection and amplification, demonstrating the importance of this transient receptor potential channel for hearing and reviving the idea that the fly's auditory transducer might be NompC.

  2. An N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor channel blocker with neuroprotective activity

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Kwok-Keung; Blondelle, Sylvie E.; Ostresh, John M.; Houghten, Richard A.; Montal, Mauricio

    2001-01-01

    Excitotoxicity, resulting from sustained activation of glutamate receptors of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) subtype, is considered to play a causative role in the etiology of ischemic stroke and several neurodegenerative diseases. The NMDA receptor is therefore a target for the development of neuroprotective agents. Here, we identify an N-benzylated triamine (denoted as NBTA) as a highly selective and potent NMDA-receptor channel blocker selected by screening a reduced dipeptidomimetic synthetic combinatorial library. NBTA blocks recombinant NMDA receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes with a mean IC50 of 80 nM; in contrast, it does not block GluR1, a glutamate receptor of the non-NMDA subtype. The blocking activity of NBTA on NMDA receptors exhibits the characteristics of an open-channel blocker: (i) no competition with agonists, (ii) voltage dependence, and (iii) use dependence. Significantly, NBTA protects rodent hippocampal neurons from NMDA receptor, but not kainate receptor-mediated excitotoxic cell death, in agreement with its selective action on the corresponding recombinant receptors. Mutagenesis data indicate that the N site, a key asparagine on the M2 transmembrane segment of the NR1 subunit, is the main determinant of the blocker action. The results highlight the potential of this compound as a neuroprotectant. PMID:11248110

  3. Expression of Caenorhabditis elegans neurotransmitter receptors and ion channels in Xenopus oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Torres, Ataúlfo; Miledi, Ricardo

    2006-01-01

    Injection of Caenorhabditis elegans polyA RNA into Xenopus laevis oocytes led to the expression of neurotransmitter receptors that generated some unique responses, including ionotropic α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors as well as receptors that coupled to G proteins, such as those to octopamine, norepinephrine, and angiotensin, which activated the oocyte’s own phosphatidylinositol system and calcium-gated chloride channels. The oocytes also expressed chloride-conducting glutamate receptors, muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, and voltage-operated calcium channels. Unexpectedly, serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine), dopamine, GABA, and kainate did not generate ionic currents, suggesting that the corresponding receptors were not expressed or were not functional in the oocytes. The use of X. laevis oocytes for expressing worm RNA demonstrates that there are many molecular components whose role remains to be clarified in the nematode. Among them are the nature of the endogenous agonists for the octopamine and angiotensin receptors and the subunits that compose the ionotropic α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors and the norepinephrine receptors that couple to the phosphoinositide cascade. PMID:16549772

  4. Vector-averaged gravity does not alter acetylcholine receptor single channel properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reitstetter, R.; Gruener, R.

    1994-01-01

    To examine the physiological sensitivity of membrane receptors to altered gravity, we examined the single channel properties of the acetylcholine receptor (AChR), in co-cultures of Xenopus myocytes and neurons, to vector-averaged gravity in the clinostat. This experimental paradigm produces an environment in which, from the cell's perspective, the gravitational vector is "nulled" by continuous averaging. In that respect, the clinostat simulates one aspect of space microgravity where the gravity force is greatly reduced. After clinorotation, the AChR channel mean open-time and conductance were statistically not different from control values but showed a rotation-dependent trend that suggests a process of cellular adaptation to clinorotation. These findings therefore suggest that the ACHR channel function may not be affected in the microgravity of space despite changes in the receptor's cellular organization.

  5. Receptor-mediated glutamate release from volume sensitive channels in astrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Takahiro; Kang, Jian; Jaiswal, Jyoti K.; Simon, Sanford M.; Lin, Jane H.-C.; Yu, Yufei; Li, Yuxing; Yang, Jay; Dienel, Gerald; Zielke, H. Ronald; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2005-11-01

    Several lines of work have shown that astrocytes release glutamate in response to receptor activation, which results in a modulation of local synaptic activity. Astrocytic glutamate release is Ca2+-dependent and occurs in conjunction with exocytosis of glutamate containing vesicles. However, astrocytes contain a millimolar concentration of cytosolic glutamate and express channels permeable to small anions, such as glutamate. Here, we tested the idea that astrocytes respond to receptor stimulation by dynamic changes in cell volume, resulting in volume-sensitive channel activation, and efflux of cytosolic glutamate. Confocal imaging and whole-cell recordings demonstrated that astrocytes exhibited a transient Ca2+-dependent cell volume increase, which activated glutamate permeable channels. HPLC analysis revealed that glutamate was released in conjunction with other amino acid osmolytes. Our observations indicate that volume-sensitive channel may constitute a previously uncharacterized target for modulation of astrocyte-neuronal interactions. electrophysiology | exocytosis | neurotransmitters | osmolarity | synapses

  6. A transient receptor potential-like channel mediates synaptic transmission in rod bipolar cells

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yin; Heimel, J. Alexander; Kamermans, Maarten; Peachey, Neal S.; Gregg, Ronald G.; Nawy, Scott

    2009-01-01

    On bipolar cells are connected to photoreceptors via a sign-inverting synapse. At this synapse, glutamate binds to a metabotropic receptor which couples to the closure of a cation-selective transduction channel. The molecular identity of both the receptor and the G protein are known, but the identity of the transduction channel has remained elusive. Here we show that the transduction channel in mouse rod bipolar cells, a subtype of On bipolar cell, is likely to be a member of the TRP family of channels. To evoke a transduction current, the metabotropic receptor antagonist LY341495 was applied to the dendrites of cells that were bathed in a solution containing the mGluR6 agonists L-AP4 or glutamate. The transduction current was suppressed by ruthenium red and the TRPV1 antagonists capsazepine and SB-366791. Furthermore, focal application of the TRPV1 agonists capsaicin and anandamide evoked a transduction-like current. The capsaicin-evoked and endogenous transduction current displayed prominent outward rectification, a property of the TRPV1 channel. To test the possibility that the transduction channel is TRPV1, we measured rod bipolar cell function in the TRPV1-/-mouse. The ERG b-wave, a measure of On bipolar cell function, as well as the transduction current and the response to TRPV1 agonists were normal, arguing against a role for TRPV1. However, ERG measurements from mice lacking TRPM1 receptors, another TRP channel implicated in retinal function, revealed the absence of a b-wave. Our results suggest that a TRP-like channel, possibly TRPM1, is essential for synaptic function in On bipolar cells. PMID:19439586

  7. Single-Particle Cryo-EM of the Ryanodine Receptor Channel in an Aqueous Environment

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Mariah R.; Fan, Guizhen

    2015-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are tetrameric ligand-gated Ca2+ release channels that are responsible for the increase of cytosolic Ca2+ concentration leading to muscle contraction. Our current understanding of RyR channel gating and regulation is greatly limited due to the lack of a high-resolution structure of the channel protein. The enormous size and unwieldy shape of Ca2+ release channels make X-ray or NMR methods difficult to apply for high-resolution structural analysis of the full-length functional channel. Single-particle electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) is one of the only effective techniques for the study of such a large integral membrane protein and its molecular interactions. Despite recent developments in cryo-EM technologies and break-through single-particle cryo-EM studies of ion channels, cryospecimen preparation, particularly the presence of detergent in the buffer, remains the main impediment to obtaining atomic-resolution structures of ion channels and a multitude of other integral membrane protein complexes. In this review we will discuss properties of several detergents that have been successfully utilized in cryo-EM studies of ion channels and the emergence of the detergent alternative amphipol to stabilize ion channels for structure-function characterization. Future structural studies of challenging specimen like ion channels are likely to be facilitated by cryo-EM amenable detergents or alternative surfactants. PMID:26913144

  8. Single-particle cryo-EM of the ryanodine receptor channel in an aqueous environment

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Mariah R.; Fan, Guizhen; Serysheva, Irina I.

    2015-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are tetrameric ligand-gated Ca2+ release channels that are responsible for the increase of cytosolic Ca2+ concentration leading to muscle contraction. Our current understanding of RyR channel gating and regulation is greatly limited due to the lack of a high-resolution structure of the channel protein. The enormous size and unwieldy shape of Ca2+ release channels make X-ray or NMR methods difficult to apply for high-resolution structural analysis of the full-length functional channel. Single-particle electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) is one of the only effective techniques for the study of such a large integral membrane protein and its molecular interactions. Despite recent developments in cryo-EM technologies and break-through single-particle cryo-EM studies of ion channels, cryospecimen preparation, particularly the presence of detergent in the buffer, remains the main impediment to obtaining atomic-resolution structures of ion channels and a multitude of other integral membrane protein complexes. In this review we will discuss properties of several detergents that have been successfully utilized in cryo-EM studies of ion channels and the emergence of the detergent alternative amphipol to stabilize ion channels for structure-function characterization. Future structural studies of challenging specimen like ion channels are likely to be facilitated by cryo-EM amenable detergents or alternative surfactants. PMID:25844145

  9. Transient receptor potential melastatin 3 is a phosphoinositide-dependent ion channel.

    PubMed

    Badheka, Doreen; Borbiro, Istvan; Rohacs, Tibor

    2015-07-01

    Phosphoinositides are emerging as general regulators of the functionally diverse transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channel family. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) has been reported to positively regulate many TRP channels, but in several cases phosphoinositide regulation is controversial. TRP melastatin 3 (TRPM3) is a heat-activated ion channel that is also stimulated by chemical agonists, such as pregnenolone sulfate. Here, we used a wide array of approaches to determine the effects of phosphoinositides on TRPM3. We found that channel activity in excised inside-out patches decreased over time (rundown), an attribute of PI(4,5)P2-dependent ion channels. Channel activity could be restored by application of either synthetic dioctanoyl (diC8) or natural arachidonyl stearyl (AASt) PI(4,5)P2. The PI(4,5)P2 precursor phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI(4)P) was less effective at restoring channel activity. TRPM3 currents were also restored by MgATP, an effect which was inhibited by two different phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase inhibitors, or by pretreatment with a phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) enzyme, indicating that MgATP acted by generating phosphoinositides. In intact cells, reduction of PI(4,5)P2 levels by chemically inducible phosphoinositide phosphatases or a voltage-sensitive 5'-phosphatase inhibited channel activity. Activation of PLC via muscarinic receptors also inhibited TRPM3 channel activity. Overall, our data indicate that TRPM3 is a phosphoinositide-dependent ion channel and that decreasing PI(4,5)P2 abundance limits its activity. As all other members of the TRPM family have also been shown to require PI(4,5)P2 for activity, our data establish PI(4,5)P2 as a general positive cofactor of this ion channel subfamily.

  10. Regulation of synaptic signalling by postsynaptic, non-glutamate receptor ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Bloodgood, Brenda L; Sabatini, Bernardo L

    2008-01-01

    Activation of glutamatergic synapses onto pyramidal neurons produces a synaptic depolarization as well as a buildup of intracellular calcium (Ca2+). The synaptic depolarization propagates through the dendritic arbor and can be detected at the soma with a recording electrode. Current influx through AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs) provides the depolarizing drive, and the amplitudes of synaptic potentials are generally thought to reflect the number and properties of these receptors at each synapse. In contrast, synaptically evoked Ca2+ transients are limited to the spine containing the active synapse and result primarily from Ca2+ influx through NMDA-type glutamate receptors (NMDARs). Here we review recent studies that reveal that both synaptic depolarizations and spine head Ca2+ transients are strongly regulated by the activity of postsynaptic, non-glutamate receptor ion channels. In hippocampal pyramidal neurons, voltage- and Ca2+-gated ion channels located in dendritic spines open as downstream consequences of glutamate receptor activation and act within a complex signalling loop that feeds back to regulate synaptic signals. Dynamic regulation of these ion channels offers a powerful mechanism of synaptic plasticity that is independent of direct modulation of glutamate receptors. PMID:18096597

  11. Insights into the channel gating of P2X receptors from structures, dynamics and small molecules

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jin; Yu, Ye

    2016-01-01

    P2X receptors, as ATP-gated non-selective trimeric ion channels, are permeable to Na+, K+ and Ca2+. Comparing with other ligand-gated ion channel families, P2X receptors are distinct in their unique gating properties and pathophysiological roles, and have attracted attention as promising drug targets for a variety of diseases, such as neuropathic pain, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis and thrombus. Several small molecule inhibitors for distinct P2X subtypes have entered into clinical trials. However, many questions regarding the gating mechanism of P2X remain unsolved. The structural determinations of P2X receptors at the resting and ATP-bound open states revealed that P2X receptor gating is a cooperative allosteric process involving multiple domains, which marks the beginning of the post-structure era of P2X research at atomic level. Here, we review the current knowledge on the structure-function relationship of P2X receptors, depict the whole picture of allosteric changes during the channel gating, and summarize the active sites that may contribute to new strategies for developing novel allosteric drugs targeting P2X receptors. PMID:26725734

  12. Do cysteine residues regulate transient receptor potential canonical type 6 channel protein expression?

    PubMed

    Thilo, Florian; Liu, Ying; Krueger, Katharina; Förste, Nora; Wittstock, Antje; Scholze, Alexandra; Tepel, Martin

    2012-03-01

    The regulation of calcium influx through transient receptor potential canonical type 6 (TRPC6) channel is mandatory for the activity of human monocytes. We submit the first evidence that cysteine residues of homocysteine (HC) or acetylcysteine (ACC) affect TRPC6 expression in human monocytes. We observed that patients with chronic renal failure had significantly elevated HC levels and TRPC6 mRNA expression levels in monocytes compared with control subjects. We further observed that administration of HC or ACC significantly increased TRPC6 channel protein expression compared with control conditions. We, therefore, hypothesize that cysteine residues increase TRPC6 channel protein expression in humans.

  13. Biophysical analysis of thermosensitive TRP channels with a special focus on the cold receptor TRPM8

    PubMed Central

    Carrasquel-Ursulaez, Willy; Moldenhauer, Hans; Castillo, Juan Pablo; Latorre, Ramón; Alvarez, Osvaldo

    2015-01-01

    Mammals maintain homeostatic control of their body temperature. Therefore, these organisms are expected to have adaptations that confer the ability to detect and react to both self and ambient temperature. Temperature-activated ion channels have been discovered to be the primary molecular determinants of thermosensation. The most representative group of these determinants constitutes members of the transient receptor potential superfamily, TRP, which are activated by either low or high temperatures covering the whole range of physiologically relevant temperatures. This review makes a critical assessment of existing analytical methods of temperature-activated TRP channel mechanisms using the cold-activated TRPM8 channel as a paradigm. PMID:27227023

  14. Energetic Contributions to Channel Gating of Residues in the Muscle Nicotinic Receptor β1 Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Akk, Gustav; Eaton, Megan; Li, Ping; Zheng, Steven; Lo, Joshua; Steinbach, Joe Henry

    2013-01-01

    In the pentameric ligand-gated ion channel family, transmitter binds in the extracellular domain and conformational changes result in channel opening in the transmembrane domain. In the muscle nicotinic receptor and other heteromeric members of the family one subunit does not contribute to the canonical agonist binding site for transmitter. A fundamental question is whether conformational changes occur in this subunit. We used records of single channel activity and rate-equilibrium free energy relationships to examine the β1 (non-ACh-binding) subunit of the muscle nicotinic receptor. Mutations to residues in the extracellular domain have minimal effects on the gating equilibrium constant. Positions in the channel lining (M2 transmembrane) domain contribute strongly and relatively late during gating. Positions thought to be important in other subunits in coupling the transmitter-binding to the channel domains have minimal effects on gating. We conclude that the conformational changes involved in channel gating propagate from the binding-site to the channel in the ACh-binding subunits and subsequently spread to the non-binding subunit. PMID:24194945

  15. Vanilloid receptor-related osmotically activated channel (VR-OAC), a candidate vertebrate osmoreceptor

    PubMed Central

    Liedtke, Wolfgang; Choe, Yong; Martí-Renom, Marc A.; Bell, Andrea M.; Denis, Charlotte S.; Šali, Andrej; Hudspeth, A. J.; Friedman, Jeffrey M.; Heller, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY The detection of osmotic stimuli is essential for all organisms, yet few osmoreceptive proteins are known, none of them in vertebrates. By employing a candidate-gene approach based on genes encoding members of the TRP superfamily of ion channels, we cloned cDNAs encoding the vanilloid receptor-related osmotically activated channel (VR-OAC) from the rat, mouse, human, and chicken. This novel cation-selective channel is gated by exposure to hypotonicity within the physiological range. In the central nevous system, the channel is expressed neurons of the circumventricular organs, neurosensory cells responsive to systemic osmotic pressure. The channel also occurs in other neurosensory cells, including inner-ear hair cells, sensory neurons, and Merkel cells. PMID:11081638

  16. Vanilloid receptor-related osmotically activated channel (VR-OAC), a candidate vertebrate osmoreceptor.

    PubMed

    Liedtke, W; Choe, Y; Martí-Renom, M A; Bell, A M; Denis, C S; Sali, A; Hudspeth, A J; Friedman, J M; Heller, S

    2000-10-27

    The detection of osmotic stimuli is essential for all organisms, yet few osmoreceptive proteins are known, none of them in vertebrates. By employing a candidate-gene approach based on genes encoding members of the TRP superfamily of ion channels, we cloned cDNAs encoding the vanilloid receptor-related osmotically activated channel (VR-OAC) from the rat, mouse, human, and chicken. This novel cation-selective channel is gated by exposure to hypotonicity within the physiological range. In the central nervous system, the channel is expressed in neurons of the circumventricular organs, neurosensory cells responsive to systemic osmotic pressure. The channel also occurs in other neurosensory cells, including inner-ear hair cells, sensory neurons, and Merkel cells.

  17. [Molecular dynamics simulations of migration of ions and molecules through the acetylcholine receptor channel].

    PubMed

    Shaĭtan, K V; Li, A; Tershkina, K B; Kirpichnikov, M P

    2007-01-01

    A dynamic model of the channel of an acetylcholine receptor in a closed state has been proposed. The channel is formed by five a-helices of subunit M2 and stabilized by the cyclic hydrocarbon (CH2)105. The migration of charged and unchanged van der Waals particles with a diameter of 7.72 A equivalent to the diameter of a hydrated sodium ion has been studied. The migration occurred by the action of external force applied to the complex along the channel axis. In the closed state, the inhibition of ions is due to two components: electrostatic interaction and steric constraints. The van der Waals channel gate is formed by residues 13'-A-Val255, B-Val261, C-Val269, D-Val255, and E-Ile264, and the negatively changed residues occurring in the upper part of the channel have a great effect on ion selectivity.

  18. The diversity of GABAA receptors. Pharmacological and electrophysiological properties of GABAA channel subtypes.

    PubMed

    Hevers, W; Lüddens, H

    1998-08-01

    The amino acid gamma-aminobutyric-acid (GABA) prevails in the CNS as an inhibitory neurotransmitter that mediates most of its effects through fast GABA-gated Cl(-)-channels (GABAAR). Molecular biology uncovered the complex subunit architecture of this receptor channel, in which a pentameric assembly derived from five of at least 17 mammalian subunits, grouped in the six classes alpha, beta, gamma, delta, sigma and epsilon, permits a vast number of putative receptor isoforms. The subunit composition of a particular receptor determines the specific effects of allosterical modulators of the GABAARs like benzodiazepines (BZs), barbiturates, steroids, some convulsants, polyvalent cations, and ethanol. To understand the physiology and diversity of GABAARs, the native isoforms have to be identified by their localization in the brain and by their pharmacology. In heterologous expression systems, channels require the presence of alpha, beta, and gamma subunits in order to mimic the full repertoire of native receptor responses to drugs, with the BZ pharmacology being determined by the particular alpha and gamma subunit variants. Little is known about the functional properties of the beta, delta, and epsilon subunit classes and only a few receptor subtype-specific substances like loreclezole and furosemide are known that enable the identification of defined receptor subtypes. We will summarize the pharmacology of putative receptor isoforms and emphasize the characteristics of functional channels. Knowledge of the complex pharmacology of GABAARs might eventually enable site-directed drug design to further our understanding of GABA-related disorders and of the complex interaction of excitatory and inhibitory mechanisms in neuronal processing.

  19. Manganese inhibits NMDA receptor channel function: implications to psychiatric and cognitive effects.

    PubMed

    Guilarte, Tomás R; Chen, Ming-Kai

    2007-11-01

    Humans exposed to excess levels of manganese (Mn(2+)) express psychiatric problems and deficits in attention and learning and memory. However, there is a paucity of knowledge on molecular mechanisms by which Mn(2+) produces such effects. We now report that Mn(2+) is a potent inhibitor of [(3)H]-MK-801 binding to the NMDA receptor channel in rat neuronal membrane preparations. The inhibition of [(3)H]-MK-801 to the NMDA receptor channel by Mn(2+) was activity-dependent since Mn(2+) was a more potent inhibitor in the presence of the NMDA receptor co-agonists glutamate and glycine (K(i)=35.9+/-3.1 microM) than in their absence (K(i)=157.1+/-6.5 microM). We also show that Mn(2+) is a NMDA receptor channel blocker since its inhibition of [(3)H]-MK-801 binding to the NMDA receptor channel is competitive in nature. That is, Mn(2+) significantly increased the affinity constant (K(d)) with no significant effect on the maximal number of [(3)H]-MK-801 binding sites (B(max)). Under stimulating conditions, Mn(2+) was equipotent in inhibiting [(3)H]-MK-801 binding to NMDA receptors expressed in neuronal membrane preparations from different brain regions. However, under basal, non-stimulated conditions, Mn(2+) was more potent in inhibiting NMDA receptors in the cerebellum than other brain regions. We have previously shown that chronic Mn(2+) exposure in non-human primates increases Cu(2+), but not zinc or iron concentrations in the basal ganglia [Guilarte TR, Chen M-K, McGlothan JL, Verina T, Wong DF, Zhou Y, Alexander M, Rohde CA, Syversen T, Decamp E, Koser AJ, Fritz S, Gonczi H, Anderson DW, Schneider JS. Nigrostriatal dopamine system dysfunction and subtle motor deficits in manganese-exposed non-human primates. Exp Neurol 2006a;202:381-90]. Therefore, we also tested the inhibitory effects of Cu(2+) on [(3)H]-MK-801 binding to the NMDA receptor channel. The data shows that Cu(2+) in the presence of glutamate and glycine is a more potent inhibitor of the NMDA receptor than Mn(2

  20. Ca2+ influx through L-type Ca2+ channels and transient receptor potential channels activate pathological hypertrophy signaling

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hui; Wang, Fang; Wang, Wei; Makarewich, Catherine A.; Zhang, Hongyu; Kubo, Hajime; Berretta, Remus M.; Barr, Larry A.; Molkentin, Jeffrey D.; Houser, Steven R.

    2012-01-01

    Common cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension and myocardial infarction require that myocytes develop greater than normal force to maintain cardiac pump function. This requires increases in [Ca2+]. These diseases induce cardiac hypertrophy and increases in [Ca2+] are known to be an essential proximal signal for activation of hypertrophic genes. However, the source of “hypertrophic” [Ca2+] is not known and is the topic of this study. The role of Ca2+ influx through L-type Ca2+ channels (LTCC), T-type Ca2+ channels (TTCC) and transient receptor potential (TRP) channels on the activation of Calcineurin (Cn) – Nuclear Factor of Activated T cells (NFAT) signaling and myocyte hypertrophy was studied. Neonatal rat (NRVMs) and adult feline (AFVM) ventricular myocytes were infected with an adenovirus containing NFAT-GFP, to determine factors that could induce NFAT nuclear translocation. Four millimolar Ca2+ or pacing induced NFAT nuclear translocation. This effect was blocked by Cn inhibitors. In NRVMs Nifedipine (Nif, LTCC antagonist) blocked high Ca2+-induced NFAT nuclear translocation while SKF-96365 (TRP channel antagonist) and Nickel (Ni, TTCC antagonist) were less effective. The relative potency of these antagonists against Ca2+ induced NFAT nuclear translocation (Nif>SKF-96365>Ni) was similar to their effects on Ca2+ transients and the LTCC current. Infection of NRVM with viruses containing TRP channels also activated NFAT-GFP nuclear translocation and caused myocyte hypertrophy. TRP effects were reduced by SKF-96365, but were more effectively antagonized by Nif. These experiments suggest that Ca2+ influx through LTCCs is the primary source of Ca2+ to activate Cn-NFAT signaling in NRVMs and AFVMs. While TRP channels cause hypertrophy, they appear to do so through a mechanism involving Ca2+ entry via LTCCs. PMID:22921230

  1. Main ion channels and receptors associated with visceral hypersensitivity in irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho Rocha, Heraldo Arcela; Dantas, Bruna Priscilla Vasconcelos; Rolim, Thaísa Leite; Costa, Bagnólia Araújo; de Medeiros, Arnaldo Correia

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a very frequent functional gastrointestinal disorder characterized by recurrent abdominal pain or discomfort and alteration of bowel habits. The IBS physiopathology is extremely complex. Visceral hypersensitivity plays an important role in the pathogenesis of abdominal pain in both in vitro and in vivo models of this functional disorder. In order to obtain a general view of the participation of the main ion channels and receptors regarding the visceral hypersensitivity in the IBS and to describe their chemical structure, a literature review was carried out. A bibliographical research in the following electronic databases: Pubmed and Virtual Library in Health (BVS) was fulfilled by using the search terms “ion channels” “or” “receptors” “and” “visceral hypersensitivity” “or” “visceral nociception” “and” “irritable bowel syndrome”. Original and review articles were considered for data acquisition. The activation of the ATP ion-gated channels, voltage-gated sodium (Nav) and calcium (Cav) channels, as well as the activation of protease-activated receptors (PAR2), transient receptor potential vanilloide-1, serotonin, cannabinoids and cholecystokinin are involved in the genesis of visceral hypersensitivity in IBS. The involvement of ion channels and receptors concerning visceral hypersensitivity is noteworthy in IBS models. PMID:24976114

  2. Reconstitution of Purified Acetylcholine Receptors with Functional Ion Channels in Planar Lipid Bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, N.; Anholt, R.; Lindstrom, J.; Montal, M.

    1980-05-01

    Acetylcholine receptor, solubilized and purified from Torpedo californica electric organ under conditions that preserve the activity of its ion channel, was reconstituted into vesicles of soybean lipid by the cholate-dialysis technique. The reconstituted vesicles were then spread into monolayers at an air-water interface and planar bilayers were subsequently formed by apposition of two monolayers. Addition of carbamoylcholine caused an increase in membrane conductance that was transient and relaxed spontaneously to the base level (i.e., became desensitized). The response to carbamoylcholine was dose dependent and competitively inhibited by curare. Fluctuations of membrane conductance corresponding to the opening and closing of receptor channels were observed. Fluctuation analysis indicated a single-channel conductance of 16± 3 pS (in 0.1 M NaCl) with a mean channel open time estimated to be 35± 5 ms. Thus, purified acetylcholine receptor reconstituted into lipid bilayers exhibited the pharmacological specificity, activation, and desensitization properties expected of this receptor in native membranes.

  3. Characterization of additional novel immune type receptors in channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mining of channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) expressed sequence tag databases identified seven new novel immune type receptors (IpNITRs). These differed in sequence, but not structure, from previously described IpNITR1-11. IpNITR12a, 12b, 13 and 14, encode proteins containing a single variable (V...

  4. Ion channels, ion channel receptors, and visceral hypersensitivity in irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, I M; Christianson, J A

    2016-11-01

    Ion channels are expressed throughout the gastrointestinal system and regulate nearly every aspect of digestion, including fluid secretion and absorption, motility, and visceral sensitivity. It is therefore not surprising that in the setting of functional bowel disorders, such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), ion channels are often altered in terms of expression level and function and are a target of pharmacological intervention. This is particularly true of their role in driving abdominal pain through visceral hypersensitivity (VH), which is the main reason IBS patients seek medical care. In the study by Scanzi et al., in the current issue of this journal, they provide evidence that the T-type voltage-gated calcium channel (Cav ) Cav 3.2 is upregulated in human IBS patients, and is necessary for the induction of an IBS-like disease state in mice. In this mini-review, we will discuss the contribution of specific ion channels to VH in IBS, both in human patients and rodent models. We will also discuss how Cav 3.2 may play a role as an integrator of multiple environmental stimuli contributing toward VH.

  5. Inhibition of calcium channels by neurokinin receptor and signal transduction in hamster submandibular ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Yamada, T; Endoh, T; Suzuki, T

    1999-04-16

    Both substance P (SP) and neurokinin A (NKA) are known as neurotransmitters of the submandibular ganglion (SMG) neurons. SP released from collaterals of the sensory nerves also regulates the excitability of SMG neurons. It has recently been shown that neurokinins (NK) inhibit calcium channels in various neurons. In this study, the effects of NK on voltage-dependent calcium channel current (I(Ca)) in SMG cells were investigated using the whole-cell patch-clamp recording method. NK-1 receptor agonist and SP caused inhibition of I(Ca) in SMG cells in a dose-dependent manner. NK-1 receptor agonist inhibited L-, N- and P/Q-type I(Ca) components. GDP-beta-S included in the pipette solution reduced the NK-1 receptor agonist-induced inhibition of I(Ca). In addition, NK-1 receptor agonist-induced inhibition of I(Ca) was reduced by stimulation of protein kinase C (PKC) but not cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). The results provided evidence for a signal transduction pathway in which calcium channel inhibition by NK receptors required activation of G-protein and PKC-affected step phosphorylation in SMG neurons.

  6. Identification of Functionally Critical Residues in the Channel Domain of Inositol Trisphosphate Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Bhanumathy, Cunnigaiper; da Fonseca, Paula C. A.; Morris, Edward P.; Joseph, Suresh K.

    2012-01-01

    We have combined alanine mutagenesis and functional assays to identify amino acid residues in the channel domain that are critical for inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) channel function. The residues selected were highly conserved in all three IP3R isoforms and were located in the cytosolic end of the S6 pore-lining helix and proximal portion of the C-tail. Two adjacent hydrophobic amino acids (Ile-2588 and Ile-2589) at the putative cytosolic interface of the S6 helix inactivated channel function and could be candidates for the channel gate. Of five negatively charged residues mutated, none completely eliminated channel function. Of five positively charged residues mutated, only one inactivated the channel (Arg-2596). In addition to the previously identified role of a pair of cysteines in the C-tail (Cys-2610 and Cys-2613), a pair of highly conserved histidines (His-2630 and His-2635) were also essential for channel function. Expression of the H2630A and H2635A mutants (but not R2596A) produced receptors with destabilized interactions between the N-terminal fragment and the channel domain. A previously unrecognized association between the cytosolic C-tail and the TM 4,5-loop was demonstrated using GST pulldown assays. However, none of the mutations in the C-tail interfered with this interaction or altered the ability of the C-tail to assemble into dimers. Our present findings and recent information on IP3R structure from electron microscopy and crystallography are incorporated into a revised model of channel gating. PMID:23086950

  7. Single-Channel Current Through Nicotinic Receptor Produced by Closure of Binding Site C-Loop

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hailong; Cheng, Xiaolin; McCammon, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the initial coupling of agonist binding to channel gating of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor using targeted molecular-dynamics (TMD) simulation. After TMD simulation to accelerate closure of the C-loops at the agonist binding sites, the region of the pore that passes through the cell membrane expands. To determine whether the structural changes in the pore result in ion conduction, we used a coarse-grained ion conduction simulator, Biology Boltzmann transport Monte Carlo, and applied it to two structural frames taken before and after TMD simulation. The structural model before TMD simulation represents the channel in the proposed resting state, whereas the model after TMD simulation represents the channel in the proposed active state. Under external voltage biases, the channel in the active state was permeable to cations. Our simulated ion conductance approaches that obtained experimentally and recapitulates several functional properties characteristic of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Thus, closure of the C-loop triggers a structural change in the channel sufficient to account for the open channel current. This approach of applying Biology Boltzmann transport Monte Carlo simulation can be used to further investigate the binding to gating transduction mechanism and the structural bases for ion selection and translocation.

  8. Interaction with Dopamine D2 Receptor Enhances Expression of Transient Receptor Potential Channel 1 at the Cell Surface

    PubMed Central

    Hannan, Meredith A.; Kabbani, Nadine; Paspalas, Constantinos D.; Levenson, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Receptor signaling is mediated by direct protein interaction with various types of cytoskeletal, adapter, effector, and additional receptor molecules. In brain tissue and in cultured neurons, activation of dopamine D2 receptors (D2Rs) has been found to impact cellular calcium signaling. Using a yeast two-hybrid approach, we have uncovered a direct physical interaction between the D2R and the transient receptor potential channel (TRPC) subtypes 1, 4 and 5. The TRPC/D2R interaction was further validated by GST-pulldown assays and coimmunoprecipitation from mammalian brain. Ultrastructural analysis of TRPC1 and D2R expression indicates colocalization of the two proteins within the cell body and dendrites of cortical neurons. In cultured cells, expression of D2Rs was found to increase expression of TRPC1 at the cell surface by 50%. These findings shed new light on the constituents of the D2R signalplex, and support the involvement of D2Rs in cellular calcium signaling pathways via a novel link to TRPC channels. PMID:18261457

  9. Pore architecture and ion sites in acid-sensing ion channels and P2X receptors.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Eric B; Kawate, Toshimitsu; Gouaux, Eric

    2009-07-30

    Acid-sensing ion channels are proton-activated, sodium-selective channels composed of three subunits, and are members of the superfamily of epithelial sodium channels, mechanosensitive and FMRF-amide peptide-gated ion channels. These ubiquitous eukaryotic ion channels have essential roles in biological activities as diverse as sodium homeostasis, taste and pain. Despite their crucial roles in biology and their unusual trimeric subunit stoichiometry, there is little knowledge of the structural and chemical principles underlying their ion channel architecture and ion-binding sites. Here we present the structure of a functional acid-sensing ion channel in a desensitized state at 3 A resolution, the location and composition of the approximately 8 A 'thick' desensitization gate, and the trigonal antiprism coordination of caesium ions bound in the extracellular vestibule. Comparison of the acid-sensing ion channel structure with the ATP-gated P2X(4) receptor reveals similarity in pore architecture and aqueous vestibules, suggesting that there are unanticipated yet common structural and mechanistic principles.

  10. Ca2+ channel inhibition by endomorphins via the cloned mu-opioid receptor expressed in NG108-15 cells.

    PubMed

    Mima, H; Morikawa, H; Fukuda, K; Kato, S; Shoda, T; Mori, K

    1997-12-11

    Endomorphin-1 and -2, recently isolated endogenous peptides specific for the mu-opioid receptor, inhibited Ca2+ channel currents with EC50 of 6 and 9 nM, respectively, in NG108-15 cells transformed to express the cloned rat mu-opioid receptor. On the other hand, they elicited no response in nontransfected NG108-15 cells. It is concluded that endomorphin-1 and -2 induce Ca2+ channel inhibition by selectively activating the mu-opioid receptor.

  11. Kainate receptor pore‐forming and auxiliary subunits regulate channel block by a novel mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Patricia M. G. E.; Aurousseau, Mark R. P.; Musgaard, Maria; Biggin, Philip C.

    2016-01-01

    Key points Kainate receptor heteromerization and auxiliary subunits, Neto1 and Neto2, attenuate polyamine ion‐channel block by facilitating blocker permeation.Relief of polyamine block in GluK2/GluK5 heteromers results from a key proline residue that produces architectural changes in the channel pore α‐helical region.Auxiliary subunits exert an additive effect to heteromerization, and thus relief of polyamine block is due to a different mechanism.Our findings have broad implications for work on polyamine block of other cation‐selective ion channels. Abstract Channel block and permeation by cytoplasmic polyamines is a common feature of many cation‐selective ion channels. Although the channel block mechanism has been studied extensively, polyamine permeation has been considered less significant as it occurs at extreme positive membrane potentials. Here, we show that kainate receptor (KAR) heteromerization and association with auxiliary proteins, Neto1 and Neto2, attenuate polyamine block by enhancing blocker permeation. Consequently, polyamine permeation and unblock occur at more negative and physiologically relevant membrane potentials. In GluK2/GluK5 heteromers, enhanced permeation is due to a single proline residue in GluK5 that alters the dynamics of the α‐helical region of the selectivity filter. The effect of auxiliary proteins is additive, and therefore the structural basis of polyamine permeation and unblock is through a different mechanism. As native receptors are thought to assemble as heteromers in complex with auxiliary proteins, our data identify an unappreciated impact of polyamine permeation in shaping the signalling properties of neuronal KARs and point to a structural mechanism that may be shared amongst other cation‐selective ion channels. PMID:26682513

  12. Coregulation of calcium channels and beta-adrenergic receptors in cultured chick embryo ventricular cells

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, J.D. )

    1989-09-01

    To examine mechanisms whereby the abundance of functional Ca channels may be regulated in excitable tissue, Ca channel number was estimated by binding of the dihydropyridine (DHP) antagonist {sup 3}H (+)PN200-110 to monolayers of intact myocytes from chick embryo ventricle. Beta adrenergic receptor properties were studied in cultured myocytes using ({sup 3}H)CGP12177, an antagonist ligand. Physiological correlates for alterations in DHP binding site number included {sup 45}Ca uptake and contractile response to (+)BAYk 8644, a specific L-type Ca channel activator. All binding and physiological determinations were performed in similar intact cell preparations under identical conditions. 4-h exposure to 1 microM isoproterenol reduced cell surface beta-adrenergic receptor number from 44 +/- 3 to 17 +/- 2 fmol/mg (P less than 0.05); DHP binding sites declined in number from 113 +/- 25 to 73 +/- 30 fmol/mg (P less than 0.03). When protein kinase A was activated by a non-receptor-dependent mechanism, DHP binding declined similarly to 68% of control. Exposure to diltiazem, a Ca channel antagonist, for 18-24 h had no effect on number of DHP binding sites. After 4-h isoproterenol exposure, {sup 45}Ca uptake stimulated by BAYk 8644 declined from 3.3 +/- 0.2 nmol/mg to 2.9 +/- 0.3 nmol/mg (P less than 0.01) and BAYk 8644-stimulated increase in amplitude of contraction declined from 168 +/- 7 to 134 +/- 11% (P = 0.02). Thus, elevation of (cAMP) in myocytes is associated with a time-dependent decline in Ca channel abundance as estimated by DHP binding and a decline in physiological responses that are in part dependent on abundance of Ca channels. Binding of a directly acting Ca channel antagonist for 18-24 h does not modulate the number of DHP binding sites.

  13. The L-, N-, and T-type triple calcium channel blocker benidipine acts as an antagonist of mineralocorticoid receptor, a member of nuclear receptor family.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Hiromichi; Hirayama, Kazunori; Yoda, Nobuyuki; Sasaki, Katsutoshi; Kitayama, Tetsuya; Kusaka, Hideaki; Matsubara, Masahiro

    2010-06-10

    Aldosterone-induced activation of mineralocorticoid receptor, a member of the nuclear receptor family, results in increased tissue damage such as vascular inflammation and cardiac and perivascular fibrosis. Benidipine, a long-lasting dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker, is used for hypertension and angina. Benidipine exhibits pleiotropic pharmacological features such as renoprotective and cardioprotective effects through triple blockade of L-, N-, and T-type calcium channels. However, the mechanism of additional beneficial effects on end-organ damage is poorly understood. Here, we examined the effects of benidipine and other calcium channel blockers on aldosterone-induced mineralocorticoid receptor activation using luciferase reporter assay system. Benidipine showed more potent activity than efonidipine, amlodipine, or azelnidipine. Benidipine depressed the response to higher concentrations of aldosterone, whereas pretreatment of eplerenone, a steroidal mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist, did not. Binding studies using [(3)H] aldosterone indicated that benidipine and other calcium channel blockers competed for binding to mineralocorticoid receptor. Benidipine and other calcium channel blockers showed antagonistic activity on Ser810 to Leu mutant mineralocorticoid receptor, which is identified in patients with early-onset hypertension. On the other hand, eplerenone partially activated the mutant. Results of analysis using optical isomers of benidipine indicated that inhibitory effect of aldosterone-induced mineralocorticoid receptor activation was independent of its primary blockade of calcium channels. These results suggested that benidipine directly inhibits aldosterone-induced mineralocorticoid receptor activation, and the antagonistic activity might contribute to the drug's pleiotropic pharmacological features.

  14. Taste receptors and gustatory associated G proteins in channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus.

    PubMed

    Gao, Sen; Liu, Shikai; Yao, Jun; Zhou, Tao; Li, Ning; Li, Qi; Dunham, Rex; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2017-03-01

    Taste sensation plays a pivotal role in nutrient identification and acquisition. This is particularly true for channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) that live in turbid waters with limited visibility. This biological process is mainly mediated by taste receptors expressed in taste buds that are distributed in several organs and tissues, including the barbels and skin. In the present study, we identified a complete repertoire of taste receptor and gustatory associated G protein genes in the channel catfish genome. A total of eight taste receptor genes were identified, including five type I and three type II taste receptor genes. Their genomic locations, phylogenetic relations, orthologies and expression were determined. Phylogenetic and collinear analyses provided understanding of the evolution dynamics of this gene family. Furthermore, the motif and dN/dS analyses indicated that selection pressures of different degrees were imposed on these receptors. Additionally, four genes of gustatory associated G proteins were also identified. It was indicated that expression patterns of catfish taste receptors and gustatory associated G proteins across organs mirror the distribution of taste buds across organs. Finally, the expression comparison between catfish and zebrafish organs provided evidence of potential roles of catfish skin and gill involved in taste sensation.

  15. Voltage-gated calcium channels function as Ca2+-activated signaling receptors.

    PubMed

    Atlas, Daphne

    2014-02-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) are transmembrane cell surface proteins responsible for multifunctional signals. In response to voltage, VGCCs trigger synaptic transmission, drive muscle contraction, and regulate gene expression. Voltage perturbations open VGCCs enabling Ca(2+) binding to the low affinity Ca(2+) binding site of the channel pore. Subsequent to permeation, Ca(2+) targets selective proteins to activate diverse signaling pathways. It is becoming apparent that the Ca(2+)-bound channel triggers secretion in excitable cells and drives contraction in cardiomyocytes prior to Ca(2+) permeation. Here, I highlight recent data implicating receptor-like function of the Ca(2+)-bound channel in converting external Ca(2+) into an intracellular signal. The two sequential mechanistic perspectives of VGCC function are discussed in the context of the prevailing and long-standing current models of depolarization-evoked secretion and cardiac contraction.

  16. [Intracellular calcium channels, hormone receptors and intercellular calcium waves].

    PubMed

    Tordjmann, T; Tran, D; Berthon, B; Jacquemin, E; Guillon, G; Combettes, L; Claret, M

    1998-01-01

    The hormone-mediated intercellular Ca2+ waves were analyzed in multiplets of rat hepatocytes by video imaging of fura2 fluorescence. These multicellular systems are composed of groups of several cells (doublets to quintuplets) issued from the liver cell plate, a one cell-thick cord of about 20 hepatocytes long between portal and centrolobular veins. When the multiplets were homogeneously bathed with the glycogenolytic agonists vasopressin, noradrenaline, angiotensin II and ATP, they showed highly organized Ca2+ signals. Surprisingly, for a given agonist, the primary rises in intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) originated invariably in the same hepatocyte, then was propagated in a sequential manner to the nearest connected cells (cell 2, then 3, cell 4 in a quadruplet, for example). The sequential activation of the cells appeared to be an intrinsic property of multiplets of rat hepatocytes. The same sequence was observed at each train of oscillations occurring between cells. The order of [Ca2+]i responses was modified neither by repeated additions of hormones nor by the hormonal dose. The mechanical disruption of an intermediate cell did not prevent the activation of the next cell. These results suggest that each hepatocyte in the multiplet displays its own sensitivity to the hormone and that a gradient of sensitivity between each cell could be responsible for directing the intercellular Ca2+ wave. To test this hypothesis, we selectively isolated rat hepatocytes from periportal (PP) and perivenous (PV) areas of the liver cell plate. Periportal (PP) and perivenous (PV) rat hepatocyte suspensions were loaded with quin2/AM and hormonal responses were studied in a spectrofluorimeter. Noradrenaline, angiotensin II, and vasopressin-induced [Ca2+]i rises were greater in PV than in PP hepatocytes. In contrast, PP cells were more responsive than PV cells to ATP. The function of the InsP3 receptor (InsP3R) was also studied by measuring the InsP3-mediated 45Ca2+ release

  17. Antagonist action of progesterone at σ-receptors in the modulation of voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Johannessen, Molly; Fontanilla, Dominique; Mavlyutov, Timur; Ruoho, Arnold E; Jackson, Meyer B

    2011-02-01

    σ-Receptors are integral membrane proteins that have been implicated in a number of biological functions, many of which involve the modulation of ion channels. A wide range of synthetic ligands activate σ-receptors, but endogenous σ-receptor ligands have proven elusive. One endogenous ligand, dimethyltryptamine (DMT), has been shown to act as a σ-receptor agonist. Progesterone and other steroids bind σ-receptors, but the functional consequences of these interactions are unclear. Here we investigated progesterone binding to σ(1)- and σ(2)-receptors and evaluated its effect on σ-receptor-mediated modulation of voltage-gated Na(+) channels. Progesterone binds both σ-receptor subtypes in liver membranes with comparable affinities and blocks photolabeling of both subtypes in human embryonic kidney 293 cells that stably express the human cardiac Na(+) channel Na(v)1.5. Patch-clamp recording in this cell line tested Na(+) current modulation by the σ-receptor ligands ditolylguanidine, PB28, (+)SKF10047, and DMT. Progesterone inhibited the action of these ligands to varying degrees, and some of these actions were reduced by σ(1)-receptor knockdown with small interfering RNA. Progesterone inhibition of channel modulation by drugs was consistent with stronger antagonism of σ(2)-receptors. By contrast, progesterone inhibition of channel modulation by DMT was consistent with stronger antagonism of σ(1)-receptors. Progesterone binding to σ-receptors blocks σ-receptor-mediated modulation of a voltage-gated ion channel, and this novel membrane action of progesterone may be relevant to changes in brain and cardiovascular function during endocrine transitions.

  18. Modulation of calcium channels by taurine acting via a metabotropic-like glycine receptor.

    PubMed

    Albiñana, E; Sacristán, S; Martín del Río, R; Solís, J M; Hernández-Guijo, J M

    2010-11-01

    Taurine is one of the most abundant free amino acids in the central nervous system, where it displays several functions. However, its molecular targets remain unknown. It is well known that taurine can activate GABA-A and strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors, which increases a chloride conductance. In this study, we describe that acute application of taurine induces a dose-dependent inhibition of voltage-dependent calcium channels in chromaffin cells from bovine adrenal medullae. This taurine effect was not explained by the activation of either GABA-A, GABA-B or strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors. Interestingly, glycine mimicked the modulatory action exerted by taurine on calcium channels, although the acute application of glycine did not elicit any ionic current in these cells. Additionally, the modulation of calcium channels exerted by both taurine and glycine was prevented by the intracellular dialysis of GDP-β-S. Thus, the modulation of voltage-dependent calcium channels by taurine seems to be mediated by a metabotropic-like glycinergic receptor coupled to G-protein activation in a membrane delimited pathway.

  19. Channel opening by anesthetics and GABA induces similar changes in the GABAA receptor M2 segment.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Ayelet; Bali, Moez; Horenstein, Jeffrey; Akabas, Myles H

    2007-05-01

    For many general anesthetics, their molecular basis of action involves interactions with GABA(A) receptors. Anesthetics produce concentration-dependent effects on GABA(A) receptors. Low concentrations potentiate submaximal GABA-induced currents. Higher concentrations directly activate the receptors. Functional effects of anesthetics have been characterized, but little is known about the conformational changes they induce. We probed anesthetic-induced conformational changes in the M2 membrane-spanning, channel-lining segment using disulfide trapping between engineered cysteines. Previously, we showed that oxidation by copper phenanthroline in the presence of GABA of the M2 6' cysteine mutants, alpha(1)T261Cbeta(1)T256C and alpha(1)beta(1)T256C resulted in formation of an intersubunit disulfide bond between the adjacent beta-subunits that significantly increased the channels' spontaneous open probability. Oxidation in GABA's absence had no effect. We examined the effect on alpha(1)T261Cbeta(1)T256C and on alpha(1)beta(1)T256C of oxidation by copper phenanthroline in the presence of potentiating and directly activating concentrations of the general anesthetics propofol, pentobarbital, and isoflurane. Oxidation in the presence of potentiating concentration of anesthetics had little effect. Oxidation in the presence of directly activating anesthetic concentrations significantly increased the channels' spontaneous open probability. We infer that activation by anesthetics and GABA induces a similar conformational change at the M2 segment 6' position that is related to channel opening.

  20. Intersubunit Physical Couplings Fostered By The Left Flipper Domain Facilitate Channel Opening Of P2X4 Receptors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin; Sun, Liang-Fei; Cui, Wen-Wen; Zhao, Wen-Shan; Ma, Xue-Fei; Li, Bin; Liu, Yan; Yang, Yang; Hu, You-Min; Huang, Li-Dong; Cheng, Xiao-Yang; Li, Lingyong; Lu, Xiang-Yang; Tian, Yun; Yu, Ye

    2017-03-16

    P2X receptors are ATP-gated trimeric channels with important roles in diverse pathophysiological functions. A detailed understanding of the mechanism underlying the gating process of these receptors is thus fundamentally important and may open new therapeutic avenues. The left flipper (LF) domain of P2X receptors is a flexible loop structure and its coordinated motions together with the dorsal fin (DF) domain are crucial for the channel gating of the P2X receptors. However, the mechanism underlying the crucial role of the LF domain in the channel gating remains obscure. Here, we propose that the ATP-induced allosteric changes of the LF domain enable it to foster intersubunit physical couplings among the DF and two lower body domains, which is pivotal for the channel gating of P2X4 receptors. Metadynamics analysis indicated that these newly established intersubunit couplings correlate well with the ATP-bound open state of the receptors. Moreover, weakening or strengthening these physical interactions with engineered intersubunit metal bridges remarkably decreased or increased the open probability of the receptors, respectively. Further disulfide crosslinking and covalent modification confirmed that the intersubunit physical couplings among the DF and two lower body domains fostered by the LF domain at the open state act as an integrated structural element that is stringently required for the channel gating of P2X4 receptors. Our observations provide new mechanistic insights into P2X receptor activation and will stimulate development of new allosteric modulators of P2X receptors.

  1. Transient receptor potential channels function as a coincidence signal detector mediating phosphatidylserine exposure.

    PubMed

    Harper, Matthew T; Londoño, Juan E Camacho; Quick, Kathryn; Londoño, Julia Camacho; Flockerzi, Veit; Philipp, Stephan E; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Freichel, Marc; Poole, Alastair W

    2013-06-25

    Blood platelet aggregation must be tightly controlled to promote clotting at injury sites but avoid inappropriate occlusion of blood vessels. Thrombin, which cleaves and activates Gq-coupled protease-activated receptors, and collagen-related peptide, which activates the receptor glycoprotein VI, stimulate platelets to aggregate and form thrombi. Coincident activation by these two agonists synergizes, causing the exposure of phosphatidylserine on the cell surface, which is a marker of cell death in many cell types. Phosphatidylserine exposure is also essential to produce additional thrombin on platelet surfaces, which contributes to thrombosis. We found that activation of either thrombin receptors or glycoprotein VI alone produced a calcium signal that was largely dependent only on store-operated Ca(2+) entry. In contrast, experiments with platelets from knockout mice showed that the presence of both ligands activated nonselective cation channels of the transient receptor potential C (TRPC) family, TRPC3 and TRPC6. These channels principally allowed entry of Na(+), which coupled to reverse-mode Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange to allow calcium influx and thereby contribute to Ca(2+) signaling and phosphatidylserine exposure. Thus, TRPC channels act as coincidence detectors to coordinate responses to multiple signals in cells, thereby indirectly mediating in platelets an increase in intracellular calcium concentrations and exposure of prothrombotic phosphatidylserine.

  2. Bromoenol Lactone Inhibits Voltage-Gated Ca2+ and Transient Receptor Potential Canonical ChannelsS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Saikat; Berwick, Zachary C.; Bartlett, Paula J.; Kumar, Sanjay; Thomas, Andrew P.; Sturek, Michael; Tune, Johnathan D.

    2011-01-01

    Circulating hormones stimulate the phospholipase Cβ (PLC)/Ca2+ influx pathway to regulate numerous cell functions, including vascular tone. It was proposed previously that Ca2+-independent phospholipase A2 (iPLA2)-dependent store-operated Ca2+ influx channels mediate hormone-induced contractions in isolated arteries, because bromoenol lactone (BEL), a potent irreversible inhibitor of iPLA2, inhibited such contractions. However, the effects of BEL on other channels implicated in mediating hormone-induced vessel contractions, specifically voltage-gated Ca2+ (CaV1.2) and transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels, have not been defined clearly. Using isometric tension measurements, we found that thapsigargin-induced contractions were ∼34% of those evoked by phenylephrine or KCl. BEL completely inhibited not only thapsigargin- but also phenylephrine- and KCl-induced ring contractions, suggesting that CaV1.2 and receptor-operated TRPC channels also may be sensitive to BEL. Therefore, we investigated the effects of BEL on heterologously expressed CaV1.2 and TRPC channels in human embryonic kidney cells, a model system that allows probing of individual protein function without interference from other signaling elements of native cells. We found that low micromolar concentrations of BEL inhibited CaV1.2, TRPC5, TRPC6, and heteromeric TRPC1–TRPC5 channels in an iPLA2-independent manner. BEL also attenuated PLC activity, suggesting that the compound may inhibit TRPC channel activity in part by interfering with an initial PLC-dependent step required for TRPC channel activation. Conversely, BEL did not affect endogenous voltage-gated K+ channels in human embryonic kidney cells. Our findings support the hypothesis that iPLA2-dependent store-operated Ca2+ influx channels and iPLA2-independent hormone-operated TRPC channels can serve as smooth muscle depolarization triggers to activate CaV1.2 channels and to regulate vascular tone. PMID:21795434

  3. Evidence for Novel Pharmacological Sensitivities of Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) Channels in Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Bais, Swarna; Churgin, Matthew A.; Fang-Yen, Christopher; Greenberg, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Schistosomiasis, caused by parasitic flatworms of the genus Schistosoma, is a neglected tropical disease affecting hundreds of millions globally. Praziquantel (PZQ), the only drug currently available for treatment and control, is largely ineffective against juvenile worms, and reports of PZQ resistance lend added urgency to the need for development of new therapeutics. Ion channels, which underlie electrical excitability in cells, are validated targets for many current anthelmintics. Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are a large family of non-selective cation channels. TRP channels play key roles in sensory transduction and other critical functions, yet the properties of these channels have remained essentially unexplored in parasitic helminths. TRP channels fall into several (7–8) subfamilies, including TRPA and TRPV. Though schistosomes contain genes predicted to encode representatives of most of the TRP channel subfamilies, they do not appear to have genes for any TRPV channels. Nonetheless, we find that the TRPV1-selective activators capsaicin and resiniferatoxin (RTX) induce dramatic hyperactivity in adult worms; capsaicin also increases motility in schistosomula. SB 366719, a highly-selective TRPV1 antagonist, blocks the capsaicin-induced hyperactivity in adults. Mammalian TRPA1 is not activated by capsaicin, yet knockdown of the single predicted TRPA1-like gene (SmTRPA) in S. mansoni effectively abolishes capsaicin-induced responses in adult worms, suggesting that SmTRPA is required for capsaicin sensitivity in these parasites. Based on these results, we hypothesize that some schistosome TRP channels have novel pharmacological sensitivities that can be targeted to disrupt normal parasite neuromuscular function. These results also have implications for understanding the phylogeny of metazoan TRP channels and may help identify novel targets for new or repurposed therapeutics. PMID:26655809

  4. Temperature and voltage coupling to channel opening in transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8).

    PubMed

    Raddatz, Natalia; Castillo, Juan P; Gonzalez, Carlos; Alvarez, Osvaldo; Latorre, Ramon

    2014-12-19

    Expressed in somatosensory neurons of the dorsal root and trigeminal ganglion, the transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8) channel is a Ca(2+)-permeable cation channel activated by cold, voltage, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, and menthol. Although TRPM8 channel gating has been characterized at the single channel and macroscopic current levels, there is currently no consensus regarding the extent to which temperature and voltage sensors couple to the conduction gate. In this study, we extended the range of voltages where TRPM8-induced ionic currents were measured and made careful measurements of the maximum open probability the channel can attain at different temperatures by means of fluctuation analysis. The first direct measurements of TRPM8 channel temperature-driven conformational rearrangements provided here suggest that temperature alone is able to open the channel and that the opening reaction is voltage-independent. Voltage is a partial activator of TRPM8 channels, because absolute open probability values measured with fully activated voltage sensors are less than 1, and they decrease as temperature rises. By unveiling the fast temperature-dependent deactivation process, we show that TRPM8 channel deactivation is well described by a double exponential time course. The fast and slow deactivation processes are temperature-dependent with enthalpy changes of 27.2 and 30.8 kcal mol(-1). The overall Q10 for the closing reaction is about 33. A three-tiered allosteric model containing four voltage sensors and four temperature sensors can account for the complex deactivation kinetics and coupling between voltage and temperature sensor activation and channel opening.

  5. Investigations of the contribution of a putative glycine hinge to ryanodine receptor channel gating.

    PubMed

    Euden, Joanne; Mason, Sammy A; Viero, Cedric; Thomas, N Lowri; Williams, Alan J

    2013-06-07

    Ryanodine receptor channels (RyR) are key components of striated muscle excitation-contraction coupling, and alterations in their function underlie both inherited and acquired disease. A full understanding of the disease process will require a detailed knowledge of the mechanisms and structures involved in RyR function. Unfortunately, high-resolution structural data, such as exist for K(+)-selective channels, are not available for RyR. In the absence of these data, we have used modeling to identify similarities in the structural elements of K(+) channel pore-forming regions and postulated equivalent regions of RyR. This has identified a sequence of residues in the cytosolic cavity-lining transmembrane helix of RyR (G(4864)LIIDA(4869) in RyR2) analogous to the glycine hinge motif present in many K(+) channels. Gating in these K(+) channels can be disrupted by substitution of residues for the hinge glycine. We investigated the involvement of glycine 4864 in RyR2 gating by monitoring properties of recombinant human RyR2 channels in which this glycine is replaced by residues that alter gating in K(+) channels. Our data demonstrate that introducing alanine at position 4864 produces no significant change in RyR2 function. In contrast, function is altered when glycine 4864 is replaced by either valine or proline, the former preventing channel opening and the latter modifying both ion translocation and gating. Our studies reveal novel information on the structural basis of RyR gating, identifying both similarities with, and differences from, K(+) channels. Glycine 4864 is not absolutely required for channel gating, but some flexibility at this point in the cavity-lining transmembrane helix is necessary for normal RyR function.

  6. Characterization of ryanodine receptor type 1 single channel activity using "on-nucleus" patch clamp.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Larry E; Groom, Linda A; Dirksen, Robert T; Yule, David I

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we provide the first description of the biophysical and pharmacological properties of ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1) expressed in a native membrane using the on-nucleus configuration of the patch clamp technique. A stable cell line expressing rabbit RyR1 was established (HEK-RyR1) using the FLP-in 293 cell system. In contrast to untransfected cells, RyR1 expression was readily demonstrated by immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry in HEK-RyR1 cells. In addition, the RyR1 agonists 4-CMC and caffeine activated Ca(2+) release that was inhibited by high concentrations of ryanodine. On nucleus patch clamp was performed in nuclei prepared from HEK-RyR1 cells. Raising the [Ca(2+)] in the patch pipette resulted in the appearance of a large conductance cation channel with well resolved kinetics and the absence of prominent subconductance states. Current versus voltage relationships were ohmic and revealed a chord conductance of ∼750pS or 450pS in symmetrical 250mM KCl or CsCl, respectively. The channel activity was markedly enhanced by caffeine and exposure to ryanodine resulted in the appearance of a subconductance state with a conductance ∼40% of the full channel opening with a Po near unity. In total, these properties are entirely consistent with RyR1 channel activity. Exposure of RyR1 channels to cyclic ADP ribose (cADPr), nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) or dantrolene did not alter the single channel activity stimulated by Ca(2+), and thus, it is unlikely these molecules directly modulate RyR1 channel activity. In summary, we describe an experimental platform to monitor the single channel properties of RyR channels. We envision that this system will be influential in characterizing disease-associated RyR mutations and the molecular determinants of RyR channel modulation.

  7. Temperature and Voltage Coupling to Channel Opening in Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 8 (TRPM8)*♦

    PubMed Central

    Raddatz, Natalia; Castillo, Juan P.; Gonzalez, Carlos; Alvarez, Osvaldo; Latorre, Ramon

    2014-01-01

    Expressed in somatosensory neurons of the dorsal root and trigeminal ganglion, the transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8) channel is a Ca2+-permeable cation channel activated by cold, voltage, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, and menthol. Although TRPM8 channel gating has been characterized at the single channel and macroscopic current levels, there is currently no consensus regarding the extent to which temperature and voltage sensors couple to the conduction gate. In this study, we extended the range of voltages where TRPM8-induced ionic currents were measured and made careful measurements of the maximum open probability the channel can attain at different temperatures by means of fluctuation analysis. The first direct measurements of TRPM8 channel temperature-driven conformational rearrangements provided here suggest that temperature alone is able to open the channel and that the opening reaction is voltage-independent. Voltage is a partial activator of TRPM8 channels, because absolute open probability values measured with fully activated voltage sensors are less than 1, and they decrease as temperature rises. By unveiling the fast temperature-dependent deactivation process, we show that TRPM8 channel deactivation is well described by a double exponential time course. The fast and slow deactivation processes are temperature-dependent with enthalpy changes of 27.2 and 30.8 kcal mol−1. The overall Q10 for the closing reaction is about 33. A three-tiered allosteric model containing four voltage sensors and four temperature sensors can account for the complex deactivation kinetics and coupling between voltage and temperature sensor activation and channel opening. PMID:25352597

  8. The Role of 5-HT3 Receptors in Signaling from Taste Buds to Nerves.

    PubMed

    Larson, Eric D; Vandenbeuch, Aurelie; Voigt, Anja; Meyerhof, Wolfgang; Kinnamon, Sue C; Finger, Thomas E

    2015-12-02

    Activation of taste buds triggers the release of several neurotransmitters, including ATP and serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT). Type III taste cells release 5-HT directly in response to acidic (sour) stimuli and indirectly in response to bitter and sweet tasting stimuli. Although ATP is necessary for activation of nerve fibers for all taste stimuli, the role of 5-HT is unclear. We investigated whether gustatory afferents express functional 5-HT3 receptors and, if so, whether these receptors play a role in transmission of taste information from taste buds to nerves. In mice expressing GFP under the control of the 5-HT(3A) promoter, a subset of cells in the geniculate ganglion and nerve fibers in taste buds are GFP-positive. RT-PCR and in situ hybridization confirmed the presence of 5-HT(3A) mRNA in the geniculate ganglion. Functional studies show that only those geniculate ganglion cells expressing 5-HT3A-driven GFP respond to 10 μM 5-HT and this response is blocked by 1 μM ondansetron, a 5-HT3 antagonist, and mimicked by application of 10 μM m-chlorophenylbiguanide, a 5-HT3 agonist. Pharmacological blockade of 5-HT3 receptors in vivo or genetic deletion of the 5-HT3 receptors reduces taste nerve responses to acids and other taste stimuli compared with controls, but only when urethane was used as the anesthetic. We find that anesthetic levels of pentobarbital reduce taste nerve responses apparently by blocking the 5-HT3 receptors. Our results suggest that 5-HT released from type III cells activates gustatory nerve fibers via 5-HT3 receptors, accounting for a significant proportion of the neural taste response.

  9. Acetylcholine receptor channels are present in undifferentiated satellite cells but not in embryonic myoblasts in culture.

    PubMed

    Cossu, G; Eusebi, F; Grassi, F; Wanke, E

    1987-09-01

    The expression and the physiological properties of acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) of mononucleated myogenic cells, isolated from either embryonic or adult muscle of the mouse, have been investigated using the gigaohm seal patch-clamp technique in combination with immunocytochemistry (with an anti-myosin antibody) and alpha-bungarotoxin binding techniques. Undifferentiated (myosin-negative) embryonic myoblasts, grown either in mass culture or under clonal conditions, were found to be unresponsive to ACh and did not bind alpha-bungarotoxin. On the contrary, undifferentiated satellite cells (from adult muscle) exhibited channels activated by ACh and alpha-bungarotoxin binding sites similar to those observed in differentiated (myosin-positive) embryonic myoblasts and myotubes. Two classes of ACh-activated channels with different opening frequencies were identified. The major class of channels had a conductance of about 42 pS and mean open time of 3.1-8.2 msec. The minor class of channels had smaller conductance (about 17 pS) and similar open time. During differentiation, the conductance of the two channels did not change significantly, while channel lifetime became shorter in myotubes derived from satellite cells but not in myotubes derived from embryonic myoblasts. The relative proportion of small over large channels was significantly larger in embryonic than in adult myogenic cells.

  10. Transient receptor potential canonical channels are essential for chemotactic migration of human malignant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Bomben, Valerie C; Turner, Kathryn L; Barclay, Tia-Tabitha C; Sontheimer, Harald

    2011-07-01

    The majority of malignant primary brain tumors are gliomas, derived from glial cells. Grade IV gliomas, Glioblastoma multiforme, are extremely invasive and the clinical prognosis for patients is dismal. Gliomas utilize a number of proteins and pathways to infiltrate the brain parenchyma including ion channels and calcium signaling pathways. In this study, we investigated the localization and functional relevance of transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels in glioma migration. We show that gliomas are attracted in a chemotactic manner to epidermal growth factor (EGF). Stimulation with EGF results in TRPC1 channel localization to the leading edge of migrating D54MG glioma cells. Additionally, TRPC1 channels co-localize with the lipid raft proteins, caveolin-1 and β-cholera toxin, and biochemical assays show TRPC1 in the caveolar raft fraction of the membrane. Chemotaxis toward EGF was lost when TRPC channels were pharmacologically inhibited or by shRNA knockdown of TRPC1 channels, yet without affecting unstimulated cell motility. Moreover, lipid raft integrity was required for gliomas chemotaxis. Disruption of lipid rafts not only impaired chemotaxis but also impaired TRPC currents in whole cell recordings and decreased store-operated calcium entry as revealed by ratiomeric calcium imaging. These data indicated that TRPC1 channel association with lipid rafts is essential for glioma chemotaxis in response to stimuli, such as EGF.

  11. Hypernitrosylated ryanodine receptor calcium release channels are leaky in dystrophic muscle.

    PubMed

    Bellinger, Andrew M; Reiken, Steven; Carlson, Christian; Mongillo, Marco; Liu, Xiaoping; Rothman, Lisa; Matecki, Stefan; Lacampagne, Alain; Marks, Andrew R

    2009-03-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is characterized by progressive muscle weakness and early death resulting from dystrophin deficiency. Loss of dystrophin results in disruption of a large dystrophin glycoprotein complex, leading to pathological calcium (Ca2+)-dependent signals that damage muscle cells. We have identified a structural and functional defect in the ryanodine receptor (RyR1), a sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release channel, in the mdx mouse model of muscular dystrophy that contributes to altered Ca2+ homeostasis in dystrophic muscles. RyR1 isolated from mdx skeletal muscle showed an age-dependent increase in S-nitrosylation coincident with dystrophic changes in the muscle. RyR1 S-nitrosylation depleted the channel complex of FKBP12 (also known as calstabin-1, for calcium channel stabilizing binding protein), resulting in 'leaky' channels. Preventing calstabin-1 depletion from RyR1 with S107, a compound that binds the RyR1 channel and enhances the binding affinity of calstabin-1 to the nitrosylated channel, inhibited sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ leak, reduced biochemical and histological evidence of muscle damage, improved muscle function and increased exercise performance in mdx mice. On the basis of these findings, we propose that sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ leak via RyR1 due to S-nitrosylation of the channel and calstabin-1 depletion contributes to muscle weakness in muscular dystrophy, and that preventing the RyR1-mediated sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ leak may provide a new therapeutic approach.

  12. Local anaesthetics transiently block currents through single acetylcholine-receptor channels.

    PubMed Central

    Neher, E; Steinbach, J H

    1978-01-01

    1. Single channel currents through acetylcholine receptor channels (ACh channels) were recorded at chronically denervated frog muscle extrajunctional membranes in the absence and presence of the lidocaine derivatives QX-222 and QX-314. 2. The current wave forms due to the opening and closing of single ACh channels (activated by suberyldicholine) normally are square pulses. These single pulses appear to be chopped into bursts of much shorter pulses, when the drug QX-222 is present in addition to the agonist. 3. The mean duration of the bursts is comparable to or longer than the normal channel open time, and increases with increasing drug concentration. 4. The duration of the short pulses within a burst decreases with increasing drug concentration. 5. It is concluded that drug molecules reversibly block open end-plate channels and that the flickering within a burst represents this fast, repeatedly occurring reaction. 6. The voltage dependence of the reaction rates involved, suggested that the site of the blocking reaction is in the centre of the membrane, probably inside the ionic channel. PMID:306437

  13. Expression of transient receptor potential channels in the ependymal cells of the developing rat brain.

    PubMed

    Jo, Kwang Deog; Lee, Kyu-Seok; Lee, Won Taek; Hur, Mi-Sun; Kim, Ho-Jeong

    2013-03-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) plays an important role in providing brain tissue with a stable internal environment as well as in absorbing mechanical and thermal stresses. From its initial composition, derived from the amniotic fluid trapped by the closure of neuropores, CSF is modified by developing and differentiating ependymal cells lining the ventricular surface or forming the choroid plexus. Its osmolarity and ionic composition brings about a change through the action of many channels expressed on the ependymal cells. Some newly discovered transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are known to be expressed in the choroid plexus ependyma. To detect additional TRP channel expression, immunohistochemical screening was performed at the choroid plexus of 13-, 15-, 17-, and 19-day embryos, using antibodies against TRPV1, TRPV3, and TRPA1, and the expression was compared with those in the adult TRP channels. The level of TRP channel expression was higher in the choroid plexus which suggests more active functioning of TRP channels in the developing choroid plexus than the ventricular lining ependyma in the 15- and 17-day embryos. All the expression of TRP channels decreased at the 19th day of gestation. TRPA1 was expressed at a higher level than TRPV1 and TRPV3 in almost all stages in both the choroid plexus and ventricular lining epithelium. The highest level of TRPV1 and TRPV3 expression was observed in association with the glycogen deposits in the cytoplasm of the choroid plexus ependymal cells of the 15- and 17-day embryos.

  14. Mechanism of ivermectin facilitation of human P2X4 receptor channels.

    PubMed

    Priel, Avi; Silberberg, Shai D

    2004-03-01

    Ivermectin (IVM), a widely used antiparasitic agent in human and veterinary medicine, was recently shown to augment macroscopic currents through rat P2X(4) receptor channels. In the present study, the effects of IVM on the human P2X(4) (hP2X(4)) receptor channel stably transfected in HEK293 cells were investigated by recording membrane currents using the patch clamp technique. In whole-cell recordings, IVM (< or =10 microM) applied from outside the cell (but not from inside) increased the maximum current activated by ATP, and slowed the rate of current deactivation. These two phenomena likely result from the binding of IVM to separate sites. A higher affinity site (EC(50) 0.25 microM) increased the maximal current activated by saturating concentrations of ATP without significantly changing the rate of current deactivation or the EC(50) and Hill slope of the ATP concentration-response relationship. A lower affinity site (EC(50) 2 microM) slowed the rate of current deactivation, and increased the apparent affinity for ATP. In cell-attached patch recordings, P2X(4) receptor channels exhibited complex kinetics, with multiple components in both the open and shut distributions. IVM (0.3 microM) increased the number of openings per burst, without significantly changing the mean open or mean shut time within a burst. At higher concentrations (1.5 microM) of IVM, two additional open time components of long duration were observed that gave rise to long-lasting bursts of channel activity. Together, the results suggest that the binding of IVM to the higher affinity site increases current amplitude by reducing channel desensitization, whereas the binding of IVM to the lower affinity site slows the deactivation of the current predominantly by stabilizing the open conformation of the channel.

  15. Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels as drug targets for diseases of the digestive system

    PubMed Central

    Holzer, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Approximately 20 of the 30 mammalian transient receptor potential (TRP) channel subunits are expressed by specific neurons and cells within the alimentary canal. They subserve important roles in taste, chemesthesis, mechanosensation, pain and hyperalgesia and contribute to the regulation of gastrointestinal motility, absorptive and secretory processes, blood flow, and mucosal homeostasis. In a cellular perspective, TRP channels operate either as primary detectors of chemical and physical stimuli, as secondary transducers of ionotropic or metabotropic receptors, or as ion transport channels. The polymodal sensory function of TRPA1, TRPM5, TRPM8, TRPP2, TRPV1, TRPV3 and TRPV4 enables the digestive system to survey its physical and chemical environment, which is relevant to all processes of digestion. TRPV5 and TRPV6 as well as TRPM6 and TRPM7 contribute to the absorption of Ca2+ and Mg2+, respectively. TRPM7 participates in intestinal pacemaker activity, and TRPC4 transduces muscarinic acetylcholine receptor activation to smooth muscle contraction. Changes in TRP channel expression or function are associated with a variety of diseases/disorders of the digestive system, notably gastro-esophageal reflux disease, inflammatory bowel disease, pain and hyperalgesia in heartburn, functional dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome, cholera, hypomagnesemia with secondary hypocalcemia, infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis, esophageal, gastrointestinal and pancreatic cancer, and polycystic liver disease. These implications identify TRP channels as promising drug targets for the management of a number of gastrointestinal pathologies. As a result, major efforts are put into the development of selective TRP channel agonists and antagonists and the assessment of their therapeutic potential. PMID:21420431

  16. Modelling and simulation of ion channels: applications to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Sansom, M S; Adcock, C; Smith, G R

    1998-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations with experimentally derived restraints have been used to develop atomic models of M2 helix bundles forming the pore-lining domains of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and related ligand-gated ion channels. M2 helix bundles have been used in microscopic simulations of the dynamics and energetics of water and ions within an ion channel. Translational and rotational motion of water are restricted within the pore, and water dipoles are aligned relative to the pore axis by the surrounding helix dipoles. Potential energy profiles for translation of a Na+ ion along the pore suggest that the protein and water components of the interaction energy exert an opposing effect on the ion, resulting in a relatively flat profile which favors cation permeation. Empirical conductance calculations based on a pore radius profile suggest that the M2 helix model is consistent with a single channel conductance of ca. 50 pS. Continuum electrostatics calculations indicate that a ring of glutamate residues at the cytoplasmic mouth of the alpha 7 nicotinic receptor M2 helix bundle may not be fully ionized. A simplified model of the remainder of the channel protein when added to the M2 helix bundle plays a significant role in enhancing the ion selectivity of the channel.

  17. The inhibition of release by mGlu7 receptors is independent of the Ca2+ channel type but associated to GABAB and adenosine A1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Martín, Ricardo; Ladera, Carolina; Bartolomé-Martín, David; Torres, Magdalena; Sánchez-Prieto, José

    2008-09-01

    Neurotransmitter release is inhibited by G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) through signalling pathways that are negatively coupled to Ca2+ channels and adenylyl cyclase. Through Ca2+ imaging and immunocytochemistry, we have recently shown that adenosine A1, GABAB and the metabotropic glutamate type 7 receptors coexist in a subset of cerebrocortical nerve terminals. As these receptors inhibit glutamate release through common intracellular signalling pathways, their co-activation occluded each other responses. Here we have addressed whether the occlusion of receptor responses is restricted to the glutamate release mediated by N-type Ca2+ channels by analysing this process in nerve terminals from mice lacking the alpha1B subunit (Cav 2.2) of these channels. We found that glutamate release from cerebrocortical nerve terminals without these channels, in which release relies exclusively on P/Q type Ca2+ channels, is not modulated by mGlu7 receptors. Furthermore, there is no occlusion of the release inhibition by GABAB and adenosine A1. Hence, in the cerebrocortical preparation, these three receptors only appear to coexist in N-type channel containing nerve terminals. In contrast, in hippocampal nerve terminals lacking this subunit, where mGlu7 receptors modulate glutamate release via P/Q type channels, the occlusion of inhibitory responses by co-stimulation of adenosine A1, GABAB and mGlu7 receptors was observed. Thus, occlusion of the responses by the three GPCRs is independent of the Ca2+ channel type but rather, it is associated to functional mGlu7 receptors.

  18. Activation of lysophosphatidic acid receptor by gintonin inhibits Kv1.2 channel activity: involvement of tyrosine kinase and receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase α.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun-Ho; Choi, Sun-Hye; Lee, Byung-Hwan; Hwang, Sung-Hee; Kim, Hyeon-Joong; Rhee, Jeehae; Chung, Chihye; Nah, Seung-Yeol

    2013-08-26

    Gintonin is a novel ginseng-derived G protein-coupled lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptor ligand. The primary action of gintonin is to elicit a transient increase in [Ca(2+)]i via activation of LPA receptor subtypes. Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels play important roles in synaptic transmission in nervous systems. The previous reports have shown that Kv channels can be regulated by Gαq/11 protein-coupled receptor ligands. In the present study, we examined the effects of gintonin on Kv1.2 channel activity expressed in Xenopus oocytes after injection of RNA encoding the human Kv1.2 α subunit. Gintonin treatment inhibited Kv1.2 channel activity in reversible and concentration-dependent manners. The inhibitory effect of gintonin on Kv1.2 channel activity was blocked by active phospholipase C inhibitor, inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor antagonist, and intracellular Ca(2+) chelator. The co-expression of active receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase α (RPTPα) with Kv1.2 channel greatly attenuated gintonin-mediated inhibition of Kv1.2 channel activity, but attenuation was not observed with catalytically inactive RPTPα. Furthermore, neither genistein, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, nor site-directed mutation of a tyrosine residue (Y132 to Y132F), which is phosphorylated by tyrosine kinase of the N-terminal of the Kv1.2 channel α subunit, significantly attenuated gintonin-mediated inhibition of Kv1.2 channel activity. These results indicate that the gintonin-mediated Kv1.2 channel regulation involves the dual coordination of both tyrosine kinase and RPTPα coupled to this receptor. Finally, gintonin-mediated regulation of Kv1.2 channel activity might explain one of the modulations of gintonin-mediated neuronal activities in nervous systems.

  19. A functional tandem between transient receptor potential canonical channels 6 and calcium-dependent chloride channels in human epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Johanna; Dannhoffer, Luc; Antigny, Fabrice; Vachel, Laura; Jayle, Christophe; Vandebrouck, Clarisse; Becq, Frédéric; Norez, Caroline

    2015-10-15

    TRPC6 plays important human physiological functions, notably in artery and arterioles constriction, in regulation of vascular volume and in bronchial muscle constriction. It is implicated in pulmonary hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and seems to play a role in cancer development. Previously, we identified Guanabenz, an α2-adrenergic agonist used for hypertension treatment (Wytensin®), as an activator of calcium-dependent chloride channels (CaCC) in human Cystic Fibrosis (CF) nasal epithelial cells by transiently increasing [Ca2+]i via an influx of extracellular Ca2+. In this study, using assays to measure chloride channel activity, we show that guanabenz is an activator of CaCC in freshly dissociated human bronchial epithelial cells from three CF patients with various genotypes (F508del/F508del, F508del/R1066C, F508del/H1085R). We further characterised the effect of guanabenz and show that it is independent of α-adrenergic receptors, is inhibited by the TRPC family inhibitor SKF-96365 but not by the TRPV family inhibitor ruthenium red. Using western-blotting, Ca2+ measurements and iodide efflux assay, we found that TRPC1 siRNA has no effect on guanabenz induced responses whereas TRPC6 siRNA prevented the guanabenz-dependent Ca2+ influx and the CaCC-dependent activity stimulated by guanabenz. In conclusion, we show that TRPC6 channel is pivotal for the activation of CaCC by guanabenz through a α2-adrenergic-independent pathway in human airway epithelial cells. We suggest propose a functional coupling between TRPC6 and CaCC and guanabenz as a potential TRPC6 activator for exploring TRPC6 and CaCC channel functions and corresponding channelopathies.

  20. Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) Channel and Neurogenic Inflammation in Pathogenesis of Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hang; Li, ShuZhuang

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is characterized by airway inflammation, airway obstruction, and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), and it affects 300 million people worldwide. However, our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie asthma remains limited. Recent studies have suggested that transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1), one of the transient receptor potential cation channels, may be involved in airway inflammation in asthma. The present review discusses the relationship between TRPA1 and neurogenic inflammation in asthma, hoping to enhance our understanding of the mechanisms of airway inflammation in asthma. PMID:27539812

  1. Mapping domains and mutations on the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor channel.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jean H; Zorzato, Francesco; Clarke, Nigel F; Treves, Susan

    2012-11-01

    The skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor isoform 1 (RyR1) is a calcium release channel involved in excitation-contraction coupling, the process whereby an action potential is translated to a cytoplasmic Ca(2+) signal that activates muscle contraction. Dominant and recessive mutations in RYR1 cause a range of muscle disorders, including malignant hyperthermia and several forms of congenital myopathies. Many aspects of disease pathogenesis in ryanodinopathies remain uncertain, particularly for those myopathies due to recessive mutations. A thorough understanding of the ryanodine receptor macromolecular complex and its interactions with proteins and small molecular modulators is an essential starting point from which to investigate disease mechanisms.

  2. Ion permeation properties of the glutamate receptor channel in cultured embryonic Drosophila myotubes.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, H; Ciani, S; Kidokoro, Y

    1994-01-01

    Ion permeation properties of the glutamate receptor channel in cultured myotubes of Drosophila embryos were studied using the inside-out configuration of the patch-clamp technique. Lowering the NaCl concentration in the bath (intracellular solution), while maintaining that of the external solution constant, caused a shift of the reversal potential in the positive direction, thus indicating a higher permeability of the channel to Na+ than to Cl- (PCl/PNa < 0.04), and suggesting that the channel is cation selective. With 145 mM Na+ on both sides of the membrane, the single-channel current-voltage relation was almost linear in the voltage range between -80 and +80 mV, the conductance showing some variability in the range between 140 and 170 pS. All monovalent alkali cations tested, as well as NH4+, permeated the channel effectively. Using the Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz equation for the reversal potential, the permeability ratios with respect to Na+ were estimated to be: 1.32 for K+, 1.18 for NH4+, 1.15 for Rb+, 1.09 for Cs+, and 0.57 for Li+. Divalent cations, i.e. Mg2+ and Ca2+, in the external solution depressed not only the inward but also the outward Na+ currents, although reversal potential measurements indicated that both ions have considerably higher permeabilities than Na+ (PMg/PNa = 2.31; PCa/PNa = 9.55). The conductance-activity relation for Na+ was described by a hyperbolic curve. The maximal conductance was about 195 pS and the half-saturating activity 45 mM. This result suggests that Na+ ions bind to sites in the channel. All data were fitted by a model based on the Eyring's reaction rate theory, in which the receptor channel is a one-ion pore with three energy barriers and two internal sites. PMID:7519261

  3. Transient receptor potential melastatin 1: a hair cell transduction channel candidate.

    PubMed

    Gerka-Stuyt, John; Au, Adrian; Peachey, Neal S; Alagramam, Kumar N

    2013-01-01

    Sound and head movements are perceived through sensory hair cells in the inner ear. Mounting evidence indicates that this process is initiated by the opening of mechanically sensitive calcium-permeable channels, also referred to as the mechanoelectrical transducer (MET) channels, reported to be around the tips of all but the tallest stereocilia. However, the identity of MET channel remains elusive. Literature suggests that the MET channel is a non-selective cation channel with a high Ca(2+) permeability and ~100 picosiemens conductance. These characteristics make members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) superfamily likely candidates for this role. One of these candidates is the transient receptor potential melastatin 1 protein (TRPM1), which is expressed in various cells types within the cochlea of the mouse including the hair cells. Recent studies demonstrate that mutations in the TRPM1 gene underlie the inherited retinal disease complete congenital stationary night blindness in humans and depolarizing bipolar cell dysfunction in the mouse retina, but auditory function was not assessed. Here we investigate the role of Trpm1 in hearing and as a possible hair cell MET channel using mice homozygous for the null allele of Trpm1 (Trpm1(-/-)) or a missense mutation in the pore domain of TRPM1 (Trpm1(tvrm27/tvrm27)). Hearing thresholds were evaluated in adult (4-5 months old) mice with auditory-evoked brain stem responses. Our data shows no statistically significant difference in hearing thresholds in Trpm1(-/-) or Trpm1(tvrm27/tvrm27) mutants compared to littermate controls. Further, none of the mutant mice showed any sign of balance disorder, such as head bobbing or circling. These data suggest that TRPM1 is not essential for development of hearing or balance and it is unlikely that TRPM1 is a component of the hair cell MET channel.

  4. Functional calcium release channel formed by the carboxyl-terminal portion of ryanodine receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, M B; Zhao, J; Takeshima, H; Ma, J

    1997-01-01

    The ryanodine receptor (RyR) is one of the key proteins involved in excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling in skeletal muscle, where it functions as a Ca2+ release channel in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) membrane. RyR consists of a single polypeptide of approximately 560 kDa normally arranged in a homotetrameric structure, which contains a carboxyl (C)-terminal transmembrane domain and a large amino (N)-terminal cytoplasmic domain. To test whether the carboxyl-terminal portion of RyR is sufficient to form a Ca2+ release channel, we expressed the full-length (RyR-wt) and C-terminal (RyR-C, approximately 130 kDa) RyR proteins in a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line, and measured their Ca2+ release channel functions in planar lipid bilayer membranes. The single-channel properties of RyR-wt were found to be similar to those of RyR from skeletal muscle SR. The RyR-C protein forms a cation-selective channel that shares some of the channel properties with RyR-wt, including activation by cytoplasmic Ca2+ and regulation by ryanodine. Unlike RyR-wt, which exhibits a linear current-voltage relationship and inactivates at millimolar Ca2+, the channels formed by RyR-C display significant inward rectification and fail to close at high cytoplasmic Ca2+. Our results show that the C-terminal portion of RyR contains structures sufficient to form a functional Ca2+ release channel, but the N-terminal portion of RyR also affects the ion-conduction and calcium-dependent regulation of the Ca2+ release channel. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 PMID:9284301

  5. Photoaffinity labeling of alpha- and beta- scorpion toxin receptors associated with rat brain sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Darbon, H; Jover, E; Couraud, F; Rochat, H

    1983-09-15

    Azido nitrophenylaminoacetyl [125I]iodo derivative of toxin II from Centruroides suffusus suffusus, a beta-toxin, and azido nitrophenylaminoacetyl [125I]iodo derivative of toxin V from Leiurus quinquestriatus quinquestriatus, an alpha-toxin, have been covalently linked after binding to their receptor sites that are related to the voltage sensitive sodium channel present in rat brain synaptosomes. Both derivatives labeled two polypeptides of 253000 +/- 20000 and 35000 +/- 2000 mol. wt. Labeling was blocked for each derivative by a large excess of the corresponding native toxin but no cross inhibition was obtained. These results suggest that both alpha - and beta - scorpion toxin receptors are located on or near the same two membrane polypeptides which may be part of the voltage dependent sodium channel.

  6. Selenoprotein N is required for ryanodine receptor calcium release channel activity in human and zebrafish muscle.

    PubMed

    Jurynec, Michael J; Xia, Ruohong; Mackrill, John J; Gunther, Derrick; Crawford, Thomas; Flanigan, Kevin M; Abramson, Jonathan J; Howard, Michael T; Grunwald, David Jonah

    2008-08-26

    Mutations affecting the seemingly unrelated gene products, SepN1, a selenoprotein of unknown function, and RyR1, the major component of the ryanodine receptor intracellular calcium release channel, result in an overlapping spectrum of congenital myopathies. To identify the immediate developmental and molecular roles of SepN and RyR in vivo, loss-of-function effects were analyzed in the zebrafish embryo. These studies demonstrate the two proteins are required for the same cellular differentiation events and are needed for normal calcium fluxes in the embryo. SepN is physically associated with RyRs and functions as a modifier of the RyR channel. In the absence of SepN, ryanodine receptors from zebrafish embryos or human diseased muscle have altered biochemical properties and have lost their normal sensitivity to redox conditions, which likely accounts for why mutations affecting either factor lead to similar diseases.

  7. Channel gating of the glycine receptor changes accessibility to residues implicated in receptor potentiation by alcohols and anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Ingrid A; Mascia, Maria Paola; Trudell, James R; Harris, R Adron

    2004-08-06

    The glycine receptor is a target for both alcohols and anesthetics, and certain amino acids in the alpha1 subunit transmembrane segments (TM) are critical for drug effects. Introducing larger amino acids at these positions increases the potency of glycine, suggesting that introducing larger residues, or drug molecules, into the drug-binding cavity facilitates channel opening. A possible mechanism for these actions is that the volume of the cavity expands and contracts during channel opening and closing. To investigate this hypothesis, mutations for amino acids in TM1 (I229C) and TM2 (G256C, T259C, V260C, M263C, T264C, S267C, S270C) and TM3 (A288C) were individually expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. The ability of sulfhydryl-specific alkyl methanethiosulfonate (MTS) compounds of different lengths to covalently react with introduced cysteines in both the closed and open states of the receptor was determined. S267C was accessible to short chain (C3-C8) MTS in both open and closed states, but was only accessible to longer chain (C10-C16) MTS compounds in the open state. Reaction with S267C was faster in the open state. I229C and A288C showed state-dependent reaction with MTS only in the presence of agonist. M263C and S270C were also accessible to MTS labeling. Mutated residues more intracellular than M263C did not react, indicating a floor of the cavity. These data demonstrate that the conformational changes accompanying channel gating increase accessibility to amino acids critical for drug action in TM1, TM2, and TM3, which may provide a mechanism by which alcohols and anesthetics can act on glycine (and likely other) receptors.

  8. Regulation of Ca(V)2 calcium channels by G protein coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Zamponi, Gerald W; Currie, Kevin P M

    2013-07-01

    Voltage gated calcium channels (Ca²⁺ channels) are key mediators of depolarization induced calcium influx into excitable cells, and thereby play pivotal roles in a wide array of physiological responses. This review focuses on the inhibition of Ca(V)2 (N- and P/Q-type) Ca²⁺-channels by G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), which exerts important autocrine/paracrine control over synaptic transmission and neuroendocrine secretion. Voltage-dependent inhibition is the most widespread mechanism, and involves direct binding of the G protein βγ dimer (Gβγ) to the α1 subunit of Ca(V)2 channels. GPCRs can also recruit several other distinct mechanisms including phosphorylation, lipid signaling pathways, and channel trafficking that result in voltage-independent inhibition. Current knowledge of Gβγ-mediated inhibition is reviewed, including the molecular interactions involved, determinants of voltage-dependence, and crosstalk with other cell signaling pathways. A summary of recent developments in understanding the voltage-independent mechanisms prominent in sympathetic and sensory neurons is also included. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium channels.

  9. The transient receptor potential channel TRPA1: from gene to pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Nilius, Bernd; Appendino, Giovanni; Owsianik, Grzegorz

    2012-11-01

    The Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin 1 channel (TRPA1), is a member of the large TRP family of ion channels, and functions as a Ca(2+) permeable non-selective cation channel in many different cell processes, ranging from sensory to homeostatic tasks. TRPA1 is highly conserved across the animal kingdom. The only mammalian TRPA subfamily member, TRPA1, is widely expressed in neuronal (e.g. sensory dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia neurons)- and in non-neuronal cells (e.g. epithelial cells, hair cells). It exhibits 14-19 amino-(N-)terminal ankyrin repeats, an unusual structural feature. The TRPA1 channel is activated by noxious cold (<17 °C) as well as by a plethora of chemical compounds that includes not only electrophilic compounds and oxidants that can modify, in an alkylative or oxidative fashion, nucleophilic cysteine residues in the channel's N-terminus, but also compounds that do not covalently bind to the channel proteins (e.g. menthol, nifedipin). Based on localization and functional properties, TRPA1 is considered a key player in acute and chronic (neuropathic) pain and inflammation. Moreover, its role in the (patho)physiology of nearly all organ systems is anticipated, and will be discussed along with the potential of TRPA1 as a drug target for the management of various pathological conditions.

  10. Ryanodine receptor/calcium release channel PKA phosphorylation: a critical mediator of heart failure progression.

    PubMed

    Wehrens, Xander H T; Lehnart, Stephan E; Reiken, Steven; Vest, John A; Wronska, Anetta; Marks, Andrew R

    2006-01-17

    Defective regulation of the cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2)/calcium release channel, required for excitation-contraction coupling in the heart, has been linked to cardiac arrhythmias and heart failure. For example, diastolic calcium "leak" via RyR2 channels in the sarcoplasmic reticulum has been identified as an important factor contributing to impaired contractility in heart failure and ventricular arrhythmias that cause sudden cardiac death. In patients with heart failure, chronic activation of the "fight or flight" stress response leads to protein kinase A (PKA) hyperphosphorylation of RyR2 at Ser-2808. PKA phosphorylation of RyR2 Ser-2808 reduces the binding affinity of the channel-stabilizing subunit calstabin2, resulting in leaky RyR2 channels. We developed RyR2-S2808A mice to determine whether Ser-2808 is the functional PKA phosphorylation site on RyR2. Furthermore, mice in which the RyR2 channel cannot be PKA phosphorylated were relatively protected against the development of heart failure after myocardial infarction. Taken together, these data show that PKA phosphorylation of Ser-2808 on the RyR2 channel appears to be a critical mediator of progressive cardiac dysfunction after myocardial infarction.

  11. Direct inhibition of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor channel by dopamine and (+)-SKF38393.

    PubMed

    Castro, N G; de Mello, M C; de Mello, F G; Aracava, Y

    1999-04-01

    1. Dopamine is known to modulate glutamatergic synaptic transmission in the retina and in several brain regions by activating specific G-protein-coupled receptors. We have examined the possibility of a different type of mechanism for this modulation, one involving direct interaction of dopamine with ionotropic glutamate receptors. 2. Ionic currents induced by fast application of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) were recorded under whole-cell patch-clamp in cultured striatal, thalamic and hippocampal neurons of the rat and in retinal neurons of the chick. Dopamine at concentrations above 100 microM inhibited the NMDA response in all four neuron types, exhibiting an IC50 of 1.2 mM in hippocampal neurons. The time course of this inhibition was fast, developing in less than 100 ms. 3. The D1 receptor agonist (+)-SKF38393 mimicked the effect of dopamine, with an IC50 of 58.9 microM on the NMDA response, while the enantiomer (-)-SKF38393 was ineffective at 50 microM. However, the D1 antagonist R(+)-SCH23390 did not prevent the inhibitory effect of (+)-SKF38393. 4. The degree of inhibition by dopamine and (+)-SKF38393 depended on transmembrane voltage, increasing 2.7 times with a hyperpolarization of about 80 mV. The voltage-dependent block by dopamine was also observed in the presence of MgCl2 1 mM. 5. Single-channel recordings showed that the open times of NMDA-gated channels were shortened by (+)-SKF38393. 6. These data suggested that the site to which the drugs bound to produce the inhibitory effect was distinct from the classical D1-type dopamine receptor sites, possibly being located inside the NMDA channel pore. It is concluded that dopamine and (+)-SKF38393 are NMDA channel ligands.

  12. Direct inhibition of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor channel by dopamine and (+)-SKF38393

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Newton G; de Mello, Maria Christina F; de Mello, Fernando G; Aracava, Yasco

    1999-01-01

    Dopamine is known to modulate glutamatergic synaptic transmission in the retina and in several brain regions by activating specific G-protein-coupled receptors. We have examined the possibility of a different type of mechanism for this modulation, one involving direct interaction of dopamine with ionotropic glutamate receptors.Ionic currents induced by fast application of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) were recorded under whole-cell patch-clamp in cultured striatal, thalamic and hippocampal neurons of the rat and in retinal neurons of the chick. Dopamine at concentrations above 100 μM inhibited the NMDA response in all four neuron types, exhibiting an IC50 of 1.2 mM in hippocampal neurons. The time course of this inhibition was fast, developing in less than 100 ms.The D1 receptor agonist (+)-SKF38393 mimicked the effect of dopamine, with an IC50 of 58.9 μM on the NMDA response, while the enantiomer (−)-SKF38393 was ineffective at 50 μM. However, the D1 antagonist R(+)-SCH23390 did not prevent the inhibitory effect of (+)-SKF38393.The degree of inhibition by dopamine and (+)-SKF38393 depended on transmembrane voltage, increasing 2.7 times with a hyperpolarization of about 80 mV. The voltage-dependent block by dopamine was also observed in the presence of MgCl2 1 mM.Single-channel recordings showed that the open times of NMDA-gated channels were shortened by (+)-SKF38393.These data suggested that the site to which the drugs bound to produce the inhibitory effect was distinct from the classical D1-type dopamine receptor sites, possibly being located inside the NMDA channel pore. It is concluded that dopamine and (+)-SKF38393 are NMDA channel ligands. PMID:10372829

  13. A novel muscarinic receptor-independent mechanism of KCNQ2/3 potassium channel blockade by Oxotremorine-M.

    PubMed

    Zwart, Ruud; Reed, Hannah; Clarke, Sophie; Sher, Emanuele

    2016-11-15

    Inhibition of KCNQ (Kv7) potassium channels by activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors has been well established, and the ion currents through these channels have been long known as M-currents. We found that this cross-talk can be reconstituted in Xenopus oocytes by co-transfection of human recombinant muscarinic M1 receptors and KCNQ2/3 potassium channels. Application of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist Oxotremorine-methiodide (Oxo-M) between voltage pulses to activate KCNQ2/3 channels caused inhibition of the subsequent KCNQ2/3 responses. This effect of Oxo-M was blocked by the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist atropine. We also found that KCNQ2/3 currents were inhibited when Oxo-M was applied during an ongoing KCNQ2/3 response, an effect that was not blocked by atropine, suggesting that Oxo-M inhibits KCNQ2/3 channels directly. Indeed, also in oocytes that were transfected with only KCNQ2/3 channels, but not with muscarinic M1 receptors, Oxo-M inhibited the KCNQ2/3 response. These results show that besides the usual muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated inhibition, Oxo-M also inhibits KCNQ2/3 channels by a direct mechanism. We subsequently tested xanomeline, which is a chemically distinct muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist, and oxotremorine, which is a close analogue of Oxo-M. Both compounds inhibited KCNQ2/3 currents via activation of M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors but, in contrast to Oxo-M, they did not directly inhibit KCNQ2/3 channels. Xanomeline and oxotremorine do not contain a positively charged trimethylammonium moiety that is present in Oxo-M, suggesting that such a charged moiety could be a crucial component mediating this newly described direct inhibition of KCNQ2/3 channels.

  14. Non-classical mechanism of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor channel block by fluoxetine.

    PubMed

    Barygin, Oleg I; Komarova, Margarita S; Tikhonova, Tatiana B; Tikhonov, Denis B

    2015-04-01

    Antidepressants have many targets in the central nervous system. A growing body of data demonstrates the influence of antidepressants on glutamatergic neurotransmission. In the present work, we studied the inhibition of native Ca(2+)-permeable and Ca(2+)-impermeable α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors in rat brain neurons by fluoxetine. The Ca(2+)-impermeable AMPA receptors in CA1 hippocampal pyramidal neurons were weakly affected. The IC50 value for the inhibition of Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptors in giant striatal interneurons was 43 ± 7 μM. The inhibition of Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptors was voltage dependent, suggesting deep binding in the pore. However, the use dependence of fluoxetine action differed markedly from that of classical AMPA receptor open-channel blockers. Moreover, fluoxetine did not compete with other channel blockers. In contrast to fluoxetine, its membrane-impermeant quaternary analog demonstrated all of the features of channel inhibition typical for open-channel blockers. It is suggested that fluoxetine reaches the binding site through a hydrophobic access pathway. Such a mechanism of block is described for ligands of sodium and calcium channels, but was never found in AMPA receptors. Molecular modeling suggests binding of fluoxetine in the subunit interface; analogous binding was proposed for local anesthetics in closed sodium channels and for benzothiazepines in calcium channels.

  15. Blockade of P2X7 receptors or pannexin-1 channels similarly attenuates postischemic damage

    PubMed Central

    Cisneros-Mejorado, Abraham; Gottlieb, Miroslav; Cavaliere, Fabio; Magnus, Tim; Koch-Nolte, Friederich; Scemes, Eliana; Pérez-Samartín, Alberto; Matute, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The role of P2X7 receptors and pannexin-1 channels in ischemic damage remains controversial. Here, we analyzed their contribution to postanoxic depolarization after ischemia in cultured neurons and in brain slices. We observed that pharmacological blockade of P2X7 receptors or pannexin-1 channels delayed the onset of postanoxic currents and reduced their slope, and that simultaneous inhibition did not further enhance the effects of blocking either one. These results were confirmed in acute cortical slices from P2X7 and pannexin-1 knockout mice. Oxygen-glucose deprivation in cortical organotypic cultures caused neuronal death that was reduced with P2X7 and pannexin-1 blockers as well as in organotypic cultures derived from mice lacking P2X7 and pannexin 1. Subsequently, we used transient middle cerebral artery occlusion to monitor the neuroprotective effect of those drugs in vivo. We found that P2X7 and pannexin-1 antagonists, and their ablation in knockout mice, substantially attenuated the motor symptoms and reduced the infarct volume to ~50% of that in vehicle-treated or wild-type animals. These results show that P2X7 receptors and pannexin-1 channels are major mediators of postanoxic depolarization in neurons and of brain damage after ischemia, and that they operate in the same deleterious signaling cascade leading to neuronal and tissue demise. PMID:25605289

  16. Lipids as regulators of the activity of transient receptor potential type V1 (TRPV1) channels.

    PubMed

    De Petrocellis, Luciano; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2005-08-19

    After 7 years from its cloning, the transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1) channel remains the sole membrane receptor mediating the pharmacological effects of the hot chilli pepper pungent component, capsaicin, and of the Euphorbia toxin, resiniferatoxin. Yet, this ion channel represents one of the most complex examples of how the activity of a protein can be regulated. Among the several chemicophysical stimuli that can modulate TRPV1 permeability to cations, endogenous lipids appear to play a major role, either as allosteric effectors or as direct agonists, or both. Furthermore, the capability of some mediators, such as the endocannabinoid anandamide, or the eicosanoid precursors 12- and 5-hydroperoxy-eicosatetraenoic acids, to activate TRPV1 receptors provides a striking example of the "site-dependent" and "metabolic" functional plasticity, respectively, typical of bioactive lipids. In this article, the multi-faceted and most recently discovered aspects of TRPV1 regulation are reviewed, with particular emphasis on the interaction between these membrane channels and some lipid molecules.

  17. Micromolar-affinity benzodiazepine receptors regulate voltage-sensitive calcium channels in nerve terminal preparations.

    PubMed Central

    Taft, W C; DeLorenzo, R J

    1984-01-01

    Benzodiazepines in micromolar concentrations significantly inhibit depolarization-sensitive Ca2+ uptake in intact nerve-terminal preparations. Benzodiazepine inhibition of Ca2+ uptake is concentration dependent and stereospecific. Micromolar-affinity benzodiazepine receptors have been identified and characterized in brain membrane and shown to be distinct from nanomolar-affinity benzodiazepine receptors. Evidence is presented that micromolar, and not nanomolar, benzodiazepine binding sites mediate benzodiazepine inhibition of Ca2+ uptake. Irreversible binding to micromolar benzodiazepine binding sites also irreversibly blocked depolarization-dependent Ca2+ uptake in synaptosomes, indicating that these compounds may represent a useful marker for identifying the molecular components of Ca2+ channels in brain. Characterization of benzodiazepine inhibition of Ca2+ uptake demonstrates that these drugs function as Ca2+ channel antagonists, because benzodiazepines effectively blocked voltage-sensitive Ca2+ uptake inhibited by Mn2+, Co2+, verapamil, nitrendipine, and nimodipine. These results indicate that micromolar benzodiazepine binding sites regulate voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels in brain membrane and suggest that some of the neuronal stabilizing effects of micromolar benzodiazepine receptors may be mediated by the regulation of Ca2+ conductance. PMID:6328498

  18. Micromolar-Affinity Benzodiazepine Receptors Regulate Voltage-Sensitive Calcium Channels in Nerve Terminal Preparations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taft, William C.; Delorenzo, Robert J.

    1984-05-01

    Benzodiazepines in micromolar concentrations significantly inhibit depolarization-sensitive Ca2+ uptake in intact nerve-terminal preparations. Benzodiazepine inhibition of Ca2+ uptake is concentration dependent and stereospecific. Micromolar-affinity benzodiazepine receptors have been identified and characterized in brain membrane and shown to be distinct from nanomolar-affinity benzodiazepine receptors. Evidence is presented that micromolar, and not nanomolar, benzodiazepine binding sites mediate benzodiazepine inhibition of Ca2+ uptake. Irreversible binding to micromolar benzodiazepine binding sites also irreversibly blocked depolarization-dependent Ca2+ uptake in synaptosomes, indicating that these compounds may represent a useful marker for identifying the molecular components of Ca2+ channels in brain. Characterization of benzodiazepine inhibition of Ca2+ uptake demonstrates that these drugs function as Ca2+ channel antagonists, because benzodiazepines effectively blocked voltage-sensitive Ca2+ uptake inhibited by Mn2+, Co2+, verapamil, nitrendipine, and nimodipine. These results indicate that micromolar benzodiazepine binding sites regulate voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels in brain membrane and suggest that some of the neuronal stabilizing effects of micromolar benzodiazepine receptors may be mediated by the regulation of Ca2+ conductance.

  19. Transient receptor potential channels in sensory neurons are targets of the antimycotic agent clotrimazole.

    PubMed

    Meseguer, Victor; Karashima, Yuji; Talavera, Karel; D'Hoedt, Dieter; Donovan-Rodríguez, Tansy; Viana, Felix; Nilius, Bernd; Voets, Thomas

    2008-01-16

    Clotrimazole (CLT) is a widely used drug for the topical treatment of yeast infections of skin, vagina, and mouth. Common side effects of topical CLT application include irritation and burning pain of the skin and mucous membranes. Here, we provide evidence that transient receptor potential (TRP) channels in primary sensory neurons underlie these unwanted effects of CLT. We found that clinically relevant CLT concentrations activate heterologously expressed TRPV1 and TRPA1, two TRP channels that act as receptors of irritant chemical and/or thermal stimuli in nociceptive neurons. In line herewith, CLT stimulated a subset of capsaicin-sensitive and mustard oil-sensitive trigeminal neurons, and evoked nocifensive behavior and thermal hypersensitivity with intraplantar injection in mice. Notably, CLT-induced pain behavior was suppressed by the TRPV1-antagonist BCTC [(N-(-4-tertiarybutylphenyl)-4-(3-cholorpyridin-2-yl)tetrahydropyrazine-1(2H)-carboxamide)] and absent in TRPV1-deficient mice. In addition, CLT inhibited the cold and menthol receptor TRPM8, and blocked menthol-induced responses in capsaicin- and mustard oil-insensitive trigeminal neurons. The concentration for 50% inhibition (IC50) of inward TRPM8 current was approximately 200 nM, making CLT the most potent known TRPM8 antagonist and a useful tool to discriminate between TRPM8- and TRPA1-mediated responses. Together, our results identify TRP channels in sensory neurons as molecular targets of CLT, and offer means to develop novel CLT preparations with fewer unwanted sensory side effects.

  20. Blockade of P2X7 receptors or pannexin-1 channels similarly attenuates postischemic damage.

    PubMed

    Cisneros-Mejorado, Abraham; Gottlieb, Miroslav; Cavaliere, Fabio; Magnus, Tim; Koch-Nolte, Friederich; Scemes, Eliana; Pérez-Samartín, Alberto; Matute, Carlos

    2015-05-01

    The role of P2X7 receptors and pannexin-1 channels in ischemic damage remains controversial. Here, we analyzed their contribution to postanoxic depolarization after ischemia in cultured neurons and in brain slices. We observed that pharmacological blockade of P2X7 receptors or pannexin-1 channels delayed the onset of postanoxic currents and reduced their slope, and that simultaneous inhibition did not further enhance the effects of blocking either one. These results were confirmed in acute cortical slices from P2X7 and pannexin-1 knockout mice. Oxygen-glucose deprivation in cortical organotypic cultures caused neuronal death that was reduced with P2X7 and pannexin-1 blockers as well as in organotypic cultures derived from mice lacking P2X7 and pannexin 1. Subsequently, we used transient middle cerebral artery occlusion to monitor the neuroprotective effect of those drugs in vivo. We found that P2X7 and pannexin-1 antagonists, and their ablation in knockout mice, substantially attenuated the motor symptoms and reduced the infarct volume to ~50% of that in vehicle-treated or wild-type animals. These results show that P2X7 receptors and pannexin-1 channels are major mediators of postanoxic depolarization in neurons and of brain damage after ischemia, and that they operate in the same deleterious signaling cascade leading to neuronal and tissue demise.

  1. Sodium channel activation augments NMDA receptor function and promotes neurite outgrowth in immature cerebrocortical neurons

    PubMed Central

    George, Joju; Dravid, Shashank M.; Prakash, Anand; Xie, Jun; Peterson, Jennifer; Jabba, Sairam V.; Baden, Daniel G.; Murray, Thomas F.

    2009-01-01

    A range of extrinsic signals, including afferent activity, affect neuronal growth and plasticity. Neuronal activity regulates intracellular Ca2+ and activity-dependent calcium signaling has been shown to regulate dendritic growth and branching (Konur and Ghosh, 2005). NMDA receptor (NMDAR) stimulation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase signaling cascades has moreover been demonstrated to regulate neurite/axonal outgrowth (Wayman et al., 2004). We used a sodium channel activator, brevetoxin (PbTx-2), to explore the relationship between intracellular [Na+] and NMDAR-dependent development. PbTx-2 alone, at a concentration of 30 nM, did not affect Ca2+ dynamics in DIV-2 cerebrocortical neurons; however, this treatment robustly potentiated NMDA-induced Ca2+ influx. The 30 nM PbTx-2 treatment produced a maximum [Na+]i of 16.9 ± 1.5 mM representing an increment of 8.8 ± 1.8 mM over basal. The corresponding membrane potential change produced by 30 nM PbTx-2 was modest and therefore insufficient to relieve the voltage-dependent Mg2+ block of NMDARs. To unambiguously demonstrate the enhancement of NMDA receptor function by PbTx-2, we recorded single-channel currents from cell-attached patches. PbTx-2 treatment was found to increase both the mean open time and open probability of NMDA receptors. These effects of PbTx-2 on NMDA receptor function were dependent on extracellular Na+ and activation of Src kinase. The functional consequences of PbTx-2-induced enhancement of NMDAR function were evaluated in immature cerebrocortical neurons. PbTx-2 concentrations between 3 and 300 nM enhanced neurite outgrowth. Voltage-gated sodium channel activators may accordingly represent a novel pharmacologic strategy to regulate neuronal plasticity through an NMDA receptor and Src family kinase-dependent mechanism. PMID:19279266

  2. Sustained calcium entry through P2X nucleotide receptor channels in human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zsembery, Akos; Boyce, Amanda T; Liang, Lihua; Peti-Peterdi, János; Bell, P Darwin; Schwiebert, Erik M

    2003-04-11

    Purinergic receptor stimulation has potential therapeutic effects for cystic fibrosis (CF). Thus, we explored roles for P2Y and P2X receptors in stably increasing [Ca(2+)](i) in human CF (IB3-1) and non-CF (16HBE14o(-)) airway epithelial cells. Cytosolic Ca(2+) was measured by fluorospectrometry using the fluorescent dye Fura-2/AM. Expression of P2X receptor (P2XR) subtypes was assessed by immunoblotting and biotinylation. In IB3-1 cells, ATP and other P2Y agonists caused only a transient increase in [Ca(2+)](i) derived from intracellular stores in a Na(+)-rich environment. In contrast, ATP induced an increase in [Ca(2+)](i) that had transient and sustained components in a Na(+)-free medium; the sustained plateau was potentiated by zinc or increasing extracellular pH. Benzoyl-benzoyl-ATP, a P2XR-selective agonist, increased [Ca(2+)](i) only in Na(+)-free medium, suggesting competition between Na(+) and Ca(2+) through P2XRs. Biochemical evidence showed that the P2X(4) receptor is the major subtype shared by these airway epithelial cells. A role for store-operated Ca(2+) channels, voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels, or Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger in the ATP-induced sustained Ca(2+) signal was ruled out. In conclusion, these data show that epithelial P2X(4) receptors serve as ATP-gated calcium entry channels that induce a sustained increase in [Ca(2+)](i). In airway epithelia, a P2XR-mediated Ca(2+) signal may have therapeutic benefit for CF.

  3. Intracellular postsynaptic cannabinoid receptors link thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptors to TRPC-like channels in thalamic paraventricular nucleus neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Kolaj, M; Renaud, L P

    2015-12-17

    postsynaptic currents, suggesting presynaptic CB receptors are not involved in this situation. Collectively, the data imply that activation of TRH receptors in these midline thalamic neurons engages novel signaling pathways that include postsynaptic intracellular CB1 and CB2 receptors in the activation of TRPC4/5-like channels.

  4. Canonical Transient Receptor Potential Channels and Their Link with Cardio/Cerebro-Vascular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xiong; Liu, Hui-Xia; Shen, Kuo; Cao, Wei; Li, Xiao-Qiang

    2017-03-10

    The canonical transient receptor potential channels (TRPCs) constitute a series of nonselective cation channels with variable degrees of Ca²⁺ selectivity. TRPCs consist of seven mammalian members, TRPC1, TRPC2, TRPC3, TRPC4, TRPC5, TRPC6, and TRPC7, which are further divided into four subtypes, TRPC1, TRPC2, TRPC4/5, and TRPC3/6/7. These channels take charge of various essential cell functions such as contraction, relaxation, proliferation, and dysfunction. This review, organized into seven main sections, will provide an overview of current knowledge about the underlying pathogenesis of TRPCs in cardio/cerebrovascular diseases, including hypertension, pulmonary arterial hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy, atherosclerosis, arrhythmia, and cerebrovascular ischemia reperfusion injury. Collectively, TRPCs could become a group of drug targets with important physiological functions for the therapy of human cardio/cerebro-vascular diseases.

  5. When a TRP goes bad: transient receptor potential channels in addiction.

    PubMed

    Wescott, Seth A; Rauthan, Manish; Xu, X Z Shawn

    2013-03-19

    Drug addiction is a psychiatric disease state, wherein a drug is impulsively and compulsively self-administered despite negative consequences. This repeated administration results in permanent changes to nervous system physiology and architecture. The molecular pathways affected by addictive drugs are complex and inter-dependent on each other. Recently, various new proteins and protein families have been discovered to play a role in drug abuse. Emerging players in this phenomenon include TRP (Transient Receptor Potential) family channels, which are primarily known to function in sensory systems. Several TRP family channels identified in both vertebrates and invertebrates are involved in psychostimulant-induced plasticity, suggesting their involvement in drug dependence. This review summarizes various observations, both from studies in humans and other organisms, which support a role for these channels in the development of drug-related behaviors.

  6. Mapping of scorpion toxin receptor sites at voltage-gated sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Gurevitz, Michael

    2012-09-15

    Scorpion alpha and beta toxins interact with voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(v)s) at two pharmacologically distinct sites. Alpha toxins bind at receptor site-3 and inhibit channel inactivation, whereas beta toxins bind at receptor site-4 and shift the voltage-dependent activation toward more hyperpolarizing potentials. The two toxin classes are subdivided to distinct pharmacological groups according to their binding preferences and ability to compete for the receptor sites at Na(v) subtypes. To elucidate the toxin-channel surface of interaction at both receptor sites and clarify the molecular basis of varying toxin preferences, an efficient bacterial system for their expression in recombinant form was established. Mutagenesis accompanied by toxicity, binding and electrophysiological assays, in parallel to determination of the three-dimensional structure using NMR and X-ray crystallography uncovered a bipartite bioactive surface in toxin representatives of all pharmacological groups. Exchange of external loops between the mammalian brain channel rNa(v)1.2a and the insect channel DmNa(v)1 highlighted channel regions involved in the varying sensitivity to assorted toxins. In parallel, thorough mutagenesis of channel external loops illuminated points of putative interaction with the toxins. Amino acid substitutions at external loops S1-S2 and S3-S4 of the voltage sensor module in domain II of rNa(v)1.2a had prominent impact on the activity of the beta-toxin Css4 (from Centruroides suffusus suffusus), and substitutions at external loops S1-S2 and S3-S4 of the voltage sensor module in domain IV affected the activity of the alpha-toxin Lqh2 (from Leiurus quinquestriatus hebraeus). Rosetta modeling of toxin-Na(v) interaction using the voltage sensor module of the potassium channel as template raises commonalities in the way alpha and beta toxins interact with the channel. Css4 interacts with rNa(v)1.2a at a crevice between S1-S2 and S3-S4 transmembrane segments in domain

  7. A thermodynamic framework for understanding temperature sensing by transient receptor potential (TRP) channels.

    PubMed

    Clapham, David E; Miller, Christopher

    2011-12-06

    The exceptionally high temperature sensitivity of certain transient receptor potential (TRP) family ion channels is the molecular basis of hot and cold sensation in sensory neurons. The laws of thermodynamics dictate that opening of these specialized TRP channels must involve an unusually large conformational standard-state enthalpy, ΔH(o): positive ΔH(o) for heat-activated and negative ΔH(o) for cold-activated TRPs. However, the molecular source of such high-enthalpy changes has eluded neurobiologists and biophysicists. Here we offer a general, unifying mechanism for both hot and cold activation that recalls long-appreciated principles of protein folding. We suggest that TRP channel gating is accompanied by large changes in molar heat capacity, ΔC(P). This postulate, along with the laws of thermodynamics and independent of mechanistic detail, leads to the conclusion that hot- and cold-sensing TRPs operate by identical conformational changes.

  8. The M-channel blocker linopirdine is an agonist of the capsaicin receptor TRPV1.

    PubMed

    Neacsu, Cristian; Babes, Alexandru

    2010-01-01

    Linopirdine is a well known blocker of voltage-gated potassium channels from the Kv7 (or KCNQ) family that generate the so called M current in mammalian neurons. Kv7 subunits are also expressed in pain-sensing neurons in dorsal root ganglia, in which they modulate neuronal excitability. In this study we demonstrate that linopirdine acts as an agonist of TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1), another ion channel expressed in nociceptors and involved in pain signaling. Linopirdine induces increases in intracellular calcium concentration in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells expressing TRPV1, but not TRPA1 and TRPM8 or in wild-type HEK293 cells. Linopirdine also activates an inward current in TRPV1-expressing HEK293 cells that is almost completely blocked by the selective TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine. At low concentrations linopirdine sensitizes both recombinant and native TRPV1 channels to heat, in a manner that is not prevented by the Kv7-channel opener flupirtine. Taken together, these results indicate that linopirdine exerts an excitatory action on mammalian nociceptors not only through inhibition of the M current but also through activation of the capsaicin receptor TRPV1.

  9. Novel expression of a functional glycine receptor chloride channel that attenuates contraction in airway smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Peter D.; Gallos, George; Xu, Dingbang; Zhang, Yi; Emala, Charles W.

    2011-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) contraction is an important component of the pathophysiology of asthma. Taurine, an agonist of glycine receptor chloride (GlyR Cl−) channels, was found to relax contracted ASM, which led us to question whether functional GlyR Cl− channels are expressed in ASM. Messenger RNA for β (GLRB), α1 (GLRA1), α2 (GLRA2), and α4 (GLRA4) subunits were found in human (Homo sapiens) and guinea pig (Cavia porcellus) tracheal smooth muscle. Immunoblotting confirmed the protein expression of GLRA1 and GLRB subunits in ASM. Electrical activity of cultured human ASM cells was assessed using a fluorescent potentiometric dye and electrophysiological recordings. Glycine increased current and significantly increased fluorescence in a dose-dependent manner. The GlyR Cl− channel antagonist strychnine significantly blocked the effects of glycine on potentiometric fluorescence in ASM cells. Guinea pig airway ring relaxation of ACh-induced contractions by isoproterenol was significantly left-shifted in the presence of glycine. This effect of glycine was blocked by pretreatment with the GlyR Cl− channel antagonist strychnine. Glycine treatment during tachykinin- and acetylcholine-induced contractions significantly decreased the maintenance of muscle force compared to control. GlyR Cl− channels are expressed on ASM and regulate smooth muscle force and offer a novel target for therapeutic relaxation of ASM.—Yim, P. D., Gallos, G., Xu, D., Zhang, Y., Emala, C. W. Novel expression of a functional glycine receptor chloride channel that attenuates contraction in airway smooth muscle. PMID:21282206

  10. Secondary Structure and Gating Rearrangements of Transmembrane Segments in Rat P2X4 Receptor Channels

    PubMed Central

    Silberberg, Shai D.; Chang, Tsg-Hui; Swartz, Kenton J.

    2005-01-01

    P2X receptors are cation selective channels that are activated by extracellular nucleotides. These channels are likely formed by three identical or related subunits, each having two transmembrane segments (TM1 and TM2). To identify regions that undergo rearrangement during gating and to probe their secondary structure, we performed tryptophan scanning mutagenesis on the two putative TMs of the rat P2X4 receptor channel. Mutant channels were expressed in Xenopus oocytes, concentration–response relationships constructed for ATP, and the EC50 estimated by fitting the Hill equation to the data. Of the 22 mutations in TM1 and 24 in TM2, all but one in TM1 and seven in TM2 result in functional channels. Interestingly, the majority of the functional mutants display an increased sensitivity to ATP, and in general these perturbations are more pronounced for TM2 when compared with TM1. For TM1 and for the outer half of TM2, the perturbations are consistent with these regions adopting α-helical secondary structures. In addition, the greatest perturbations in the gating equilibrium occur for mutations near the outer ends of both TM1 and TM2. Surface biotinylation experiments reveal that all the nonfunctional mutants traffic to the surface membrane at levels comparable to the WT channel, suggesting that these mutations likely disrupt ion conduction or gating. Taken together, these results suggest that the outer parts of TM1 and TM2 are helical and that they move during activation. The observation that the majority of nonconducting mutations are clustered toward the inner end of TM2 suggests a critical functional role for this region. PMID:15795310

  11. Channel Gating Dependence on Pore Lining Helix Glycine Residues in Skeletal Muscle Ryanodine Receptor.

    PubMed

    Mei, Yingwu; Xu, Le; Mowrey, David D; Mendez Giraldez, Raul; Wang, Ying; Pasek, Daniel A; Dokholyan, Nikolay V; Meissner, Gerhard

    2015-07-10

    Type 1 ryanodine receptors (RyR1s) release Ca(2+) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum to initiate skeletal muscle contraction. The role of RyR1-G4934 and -G4941 in the pore-lining helix in channel gating and ion permeation was probed by replacing them with amino acid residues of increasing side chain volume. RyR1-G4934A, -G4941A, and -G4941V mutant channels exhibited a caffeine-induced Ca(2+) release response in HEK293 cells and bound the RyR-specific ligand [(3)H]ryanodine. In single channel recordings, significant differences in the number of channel events and mean open and close times were observed between WT and RyR1-G4934A and -G4941A. RyR1-G4934A had reduced K(+) conductance and ion selectivity compared with WT. Mutations further increasing the side chain volume at these positions (G4934V and G4941I) resulted in reduced caffeine-induced Ca(2+) release in HEK293 cells, low [(3)H]ryanodine binding levels, and channels that were not regulated by Ca(2+) and did not conduct Ca(2+) in single channel measurements. Computational predictions of the thermodynamic impact of mutations on protein stability indicated that although the G4934A mutation was tolerated, the G4934V mutation decreased protein stability by introducing clashes with neighboring amino acid residues. In similar fashion, the G4941A mutation did not introduce clashes, whereas the G4941I mutation resulted in intersubunit clashes among the mutated isoleucines. Co-expression of RyR1-WT with RyR1-G4934V or -G4941I partially restored the WT phenotype, which suggested lessening of amino acid clashes in heterotetrameric channel complexes. The results indicate that both glycines are important for RyR1 channel function by providing flexibility and minimizing amino acid clashes.

  12. Sphingosylphosphocholine modulates the ryanodine receptor/calcium-release channel of cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Betto, R; Teresi, A; Turcato, F; Salviati, G; Sabbadini, R A; Krown, K; Glembotski, C C; Kindman, L A; Dettbarn, C; Pereon, Y; Yasui, K; Palade, P T

    1997-01-01

    Sphingosylphosphocholine (SPC) modulates Ca2+ release from isolated cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes; 50 microM SPC induces the release of 70 80% of the accumulated calcium. SPC release calcium from cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum through the ryanodine receptor, since the release is inhibited by the ryanodine receptor channel antagonists ryanodine. Ruthenium Red and sphingosine. In intact cardiac myocytes, even in the absence of extracellular calcium. SPC causes a rise in diastolic Ca2+, which is greatly reduced when the sarcoplasmic reticulum is depleted of Ca2+ by prior thapsigargin treatment. SPC action on the ryanodine receptor is Ca(2+)-dependent. SPC shifts to the left the Ca(2+)-dependence of [3H]ryanodine binding, but only at high pCa values, suggesting that SPC might increase the sensitivity to calcium of the Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+)-release mechanism. At high calcium concentrations (pCa 4.0 or lower), where [3H]ryanodine binding is maximally stimulated, no effect of SPC is observed. We conclude that SPC releases calcium from cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes by activating the ryanodine receptor and possibly another intracellular Ca(2+)-release channel, the sphingolipid Ca(2+)-release-mediating protein of endoplasmic reticulum (SCaMPER) [Mao, Kim, Almenoff, Rudner, Kearney and Kindman (1996) Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci. U.S.A 93, 1993-1996], which we have identified for the first time in cardiac tissue. PMID:9078280

  13. Differences in the expression of transient receptor potential channel V1, transient receptor potential channel A1 and mechanosensitive two pore-domain K+ channels between the lumbar splanchnic and pelvic nerve innervations of mouse urinary bladder and colon.

    PubMed

    La, J H; Schwartz, E S; Gebhart, G F

    2011-07-14

    The bladder and distal colon are innervated by lumbar splanchnic (LSN) and pelvic nerves (PN) whose axons arise from dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons at thoracolumbar (TL) and lumbosacral (LS) spinal levels, respectively. In an attempt to understand the molecular basis of differences between LSN and PN mechanosensitive afferents, we analyzed the gene expression of two potentially counteracting ion channel groups involved in mechanosensation, transient receptor potential channels (TRPV1 and TRPA1) and mechanosensitive two pore-domain K(+) (K(2P)) channels (TREK-1, TREK-2 and TRAAK), in TL and LS DRG neurons innervating mouse bladder or distal colon. The proportion of TRPV1-expressing cells (41∼61%) did not differ between TL and LS neurons innervating bladder or colon. TRPA1 was seldom detected in bladder LS neurons whereas it was expressed in 64∼66% of bladder TL, colon TL and colon LS neurons. Coexpression of TRPV1 and TRPA1 was frequent. TREK-1-expressing cells were more prevalent in LS than TL ganglia in both bladder- and colon-DRG neurons. All three K(2P) channels were detected more frequently in TRPV1-positive neurons in TL ganglia. More than half of TL neurons expressing only TRPA1 were devoid of any of the three K(2P) channels, whereas all TL neurons expressing both TRPA1 and TRPV1 expressed at least one of the K(2P) channels. These results reveal clear differences between LSN and PN sensory pathways in TRPA1 and TREK-1 gene expression and in the gene expression of K(2P) channels in TRPV1-expressing neurons. This study further documents heterogeneity of visceral afferents based on combinations of the five channels examined.

  14. Transient receptor potential ion channels in primary sensory neurons as targets for novel analgesics.

    PubMed

    Sousa-Valente, J; Andreou, A P; Urban, L; Nagy, I

    2014-05-01

    The last decade has witnessed an explosion in novel findings relating to the molecules involved in mediating the sensation of pain in humans. Transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels emerged as the greatest group of molecules involved in the transduction of various physical stimuli into neuronal signals in primary sensory neurons, as well as, in the development of pain. Here, we review the role of TRP ion channels in primary sensory neurons in the development of pain associated with peripheral pathologies and possible strategies to translate preclinical data into the development of effective new analgesics. Based on available evidence, we argue that nociception-related TRP channels on primary sensory neurons provide highly valuable targets for the development of novel analgesics and that, in order to reduce possible undesirable side effects, novel analgesics should prevent the translocation from the cytoplasm to the cell membrane and the sensitization of the channels rather than blocking the channel pore or binding sites for exogenous or endogenous activators.

  15. Ca sup 2+ channel blockers interact with. alpha. sub 2 -adrenergic receptors in rabbit ileum

    SciTech Connect

    Homaidan, F.R.; Donowitz, M.; Wicks, J.; Cusolito, S.; El Sabban, M.E.; Weiland, G.A.; Sharp, G.W.G. Tufts Univ. School of Medicine and New England Medical Center Hospital, Boston, MA )

    1988-04-01

    An interaction between Ca{sup 2+} channel blockers and {alpha}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptors has been demonstrated in rabbit ileum by studying the effect of clonidine on active electrolyte transport, under short-circuited conditions, in the presence and absence of several Ca{sup 2+} channel blocking agents. Clonidine, verapamil, diltiazem, cadmium, and nitrendipine all decrease short-circuit current and stimulate NaCl absorption to different extents with clonidine having the largest effect. Exposure to verapamil, diltiazem, and cadmium inhibited the effects of clonidine on transport, whereas nitrendipine had no such effect. Verapamil, diltiazem, and cadmium, but not nitrendipine, also decreased the specific binding of ({sup 3}H){alpha}{sub 2}-adrenergic agents to a preparation of ileal basolateral membranes explaining the observed decrease in the transport effects of clonidine. The effective concentrations of the Ca{sup 2+} channel blockers that inhibited the effects of clonidine on transport were fairly similar to the concentrations needed to inhibit its specific binding. The displacement of clonidine by calcium channel blockers is ascribed to a nonspecific effect of these agents, although the possibility that their effects are exerted via their binding to the calcium channels is not excluded.

  16. Transient receptor potential channel A1 and noxious cold responses in rat cutaneous nociceptors.

    PubMed

    Dunham, J P; Leith, J L; Lumb, B M; Donaldson, L F

    2010-02-17

    The role of transient receptor potential channel A1 (TRPA1) in noxious cold sensation remains unclear. Some data support the hypothesis that TRPA1 is a transducer of noxious cold whilst other data contest it. In this study we investigated the role of TRPA1 in cold detection in cutaneous nociceptors in vivo using complementary experimental approaches. We used noxious withdrawal reflex electromyography, and single fibre recordings in vivo, to test the hypothesis that TRPA1-expressing primary afferents mediate noxious cold responses in anaesthetised rats. TRPV1 and TRPM8 agonists sensitise their cognate receptors to heat and cold stimuli respectively. Herein we show that the TRPA1 agonist cinnamaldehyde applied to the skin in anaesthetised rats did not sensitise noxious cold evoked hind limb withdrawal. In contrast, cinnamaldehyde did sensitise the C fibre-mediated noxious heat withdrawal, indicated by a significant drop in the withdrawal temperature. TRPA1 agonist thus sensitised the noxious reflex withdrawal to heat, but not cold. Thermal stimuli also sensitise transient receptor potential (TRP) channels to agonist. Activity evoked by capsaicin in teased primary afferent fibres showed a significant positive correlation with receptive field temperature, in both normal and Freund's complete adjuvant-induced cutaneous inflammation. Altering the temperature of the receptive field did not modulate TRPA1 agonist evoked-activity in cutaneous primary afferents, in either normal or inflamed skin. In addition, block of the TRPA1 channel with Ruthenium Red did not inhibit cold evoked activity in either cinnamaldehyde sensitive or insensitive cold responsive nociceptors. In cinnamaldehyde-sensitive-cold-sensitive afferents, although TRPA1 agonist-evoked activity was totally abolished by Ruthenium Red, cold evoked activity was unaffected by channel blockade. We conclude that these results do not support the hypothesis that TRPA1-expressing cutaneous afferents play an important

  17. Transient receptor potential channel A1 and noxious cold responses in rat cutaneous nociceptors

    PubMed Central

    Dunham, J.P.; Leith, J.L.; Lumb, B.M.; Donaldson, L.F.

    2010-01-01

    The role of transient receptor potential channel A1 (TRPA1) in noxious cold sensation remains unclear. Some data support the hypothesis that TRPA1 is a transducer of noxious cold whilst other data contest it. In this study we investigated the role of TRPA1 in cold detection in cutaneous nociceptors in vivo using complementary experimental approaches. We used noxious withdrawal reflex electromyography, and single fibre recordings in vivo, to test the hypothesis that TRPA1-expressing primary afferents mediate noxious cold responses in anaesthetised rats. TRPV1 and TRPM8 agonists sensitise their cognate receptors to heat and cold stimuli respectively. Herein we show that the TRPA1 agonist cinnamaldehyde applied to the skin in anaesthetised rats did not sensitise noxious cold evoked hind limb withdrawal. In contrast, cinnamaldehyde did sensitise the C fibre-mediated noxious heat withdrawal, indicated by a significant drop in the withdrawal temperature. TRPA1 agonist thus sensitised the noxious reflex withdrawal to heat, but not cold. Thermal stimuli also sensitise transient receptor potential (TRP) channels to agonist. Activity evoked by capsaicin in teased primary afferent fibres showed a significant positive correlation with receptive field temperature, in both normal and Freund's complete adjuvant-induced cutaneous inflammation. Altering the temperature of the receptive field did not modulate TRPA1 agonist evoked-activity in cutaneous primary afferents, in either normal or inflamed skin. In addition, block of the TRPA1 channel with Ruthenium Red did not inhibit cold evoked activity in either cinnamaldehyde sensitive or insensitive cold responsive nociceptors. In cinnamaldehyde-sensitive–cold-sensitive afferents, although TRPA1 agonist-evoked activity was totally abolished by Ruthenium Red, cold evoked activity was unaffected by channel blockade. We conclude that these results do not support the hypothesis that TRPA1-expressing cutaneous afferents play an important

  18. Inhibitory effect of positively charged triazine antagonists of prokineticin receptors on the transient receptor vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1) channel.

    PubMed

    De Petrocellis, Luciano; Schiano Moriello, Aniello; Byun, Joon Seok; Sohn, Joo Mi; Lee, Jae Yeol; Vázquez-Romero, Ana; Garrido, Maria; Messeguer, Angel; Zhang, Fang-Xiong; Zamponi, Gerald W; Deplano, Alessandro; Congiu, Cenzo; Onnis, Valentina; Balboni, Gianfranco; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2015-09-01

    Four positively charged compounds, previously shown to produce analgesic activity by interacting with prokineticin receptor or T-type calcium channels, were tested for their ability to inhibit capsaicin-induced elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) in HEK-293 cells stably transfected with the human recombinant TRPV1, with the goal of identifying novel TRPV1 open-pore inhibitors. KYS-05090 showed the highest potency as a TRPV1 antagonist, even higher than that of the open-pore triazine inhibitor 8aA. The latter showed quite remarkable agonist/desensitizer activity at the rat recombinant TRPM8 channel. The activity of KYS-05090 and the other compounds was selective because none of these compounds was able to modulate the rat TRPA1 channel. Open-pore inhibitors of TRPV1 may be a new class of multi-target analgesics with lesser side effects, such as loss of acute pain sensitivity and hyperthermia, than most TRPV1 antagonists developed so far.

  19. Cross-talk and co-trafficking between rho1/GABA receptors and ATP-gated channels.

    PubMed

    Boué-Grabot, Eric; Emerit, Michel B; Toulmé, Estelle; Séguéla, Philippe; Garret, Maurice

    2004-02-20

    Gamma-aminobutyric-acid (GABA) and ATP ionotropic receptors represent two structurally and functionally different classes of neurotransmitter-gated channels involved in fast synaptic transmission. We demonstrate here that, when the inhibitory rho1/GABA and the excitatory P2X2 receptor channels are co-expressed in Xenopus oocytes, activation of one channel reduces the currents mediated by the other one. This reciprocal inhibitory cross-talk is a receptor-mediated phenomenon independent of agonist cross-modulation, membrane potential, direction of ionic flux, or channel densities. Functional interaction is disrupted when the cytoplasmic C-terminal domain of P2X2 is deleted or in competition experiments with minigenes coding for the C-terminal domain of P2X2 or the main intracellular loop of rho1 subunits. We also show a physical interaction between P2X2 and rho1 receptors expressed in oocytes and the co-clustering of these receptors in transfected hippocampal neurons. Co-expression with P2X2 induces retargeting and recruitment of mainly intracellular rho1/GABA receptors to surface clusters. Therefore, molecular and functional cross-talk between inhibitory and excitatory ligand-gated channels may regulate synaptic strength both by activity-dependent current occlusion and synaptic receptors co-trafficking.

  20. Fundamental Gating Mechanism of Nicotinic Receptor Channel Revealed by Mutation Causing a Congenital Myasthenic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hai-Long; Ohno, Kinji; Milone, Margherita; Brengman, Joan M.; Evoli, Amelia; Batocchi, Anna-Paola; Middleton, Lefkos T.; Christodoulou, Kyproula; Engel, Andrew G.; Sine, Steven M.

    2000-01-01

    We describe the genetic and kinetic defects in a congenital myasthenic syndrome due to the mutation εA411P in the amphipathic helix of the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) ε subunit. Myasthenic patients from three unrelated families are either homozygous for εA411P or are heterozygous and harbor a null mutation in the second ε allele, indicating that εA411P is recessive. We expressed human AChRs containing wild-type or A411P ε subunits in 293HEK cells, recorded single channel currents at high bandwidth, and determined microscopic rate constants for individual channels using hidden Markov modeling. For individual wild-type and mutant channels, each rate constant distributes as a Gaussian function, but the spread in the distributions for channel opening and closing rate constants is greatly expanded by εA411P. Prolines engineered into positions flanking residue 411 of the ε subunit greatly increase the range of activation kinetics similar to εA411P, whereas prolines engineered into positions equivalent to εA411 in β and δ subunits are without effect. Thus, the amphipathic helix of the ε subunit stabilizes the channel, minimizing the number and range of kinetic modes accessible to individual AChRs. The findings suggest that analogous stabilizing structures are present in other ion channels, and possibly allosteric proteins in general, and that they evolved to maintain uniformity of activation episodes. The findings further suggest that the fundamental gating mechanism of the AChR channel can be explained by a corrugated energy landscape superimposed on a steeply sloped energy well. PMID:10962020

  1. Antibody probe study of Ca2+ channel regulation by interdomain interaction within the ryanodine receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Shigeki; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Parness, Jerome; Ikemoto, Noriaki

    2004-01-01

    N-terminal and central domains of ryanodine receptor 1 (RyR1), where many reported malignant hyperthermia (MH) mutations are localized, represent putative channel regulatory domains. Recent domain peptide (DP) probe studies led us to the hypothesis that these domains interact to stabilize the closed state of channel (zipping), while weakening of domain-domain interactions (unzipping) by mutation de-stabilizes the channel, making it leaky to Ca2+ or sensitive to the agonists of RyR1. As shown previously, DP1 (N-terminal domain peptide) and DP4 (central domain peptide) produced MH-like channel activation/sensitization effects, presumably by peptide binding to sites critical to stabilizing domain-domain interactions and resultant loss of conformational constraints. Here we report that polyclonal anti-DP1 and anti-DP4 antibodies also produce MH-like channel activation and sensitization effects as evidenced by about 4-fold enhancement of high affinity [3H]ryanodine binding to RyR1 and by a significant left-shift of the concentration-dependence of activation of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release by polylysine. Fluorescence quenching experiments demonstrate that the accessibility of a DP4-directed, conformationally sensitive fluorescence probe linked to the RyR1 N-terminal domain is increased in the presence of domain-specific antibodies, consistent with the view that these antibodies produce unzipping of interacting domains that are of hindered accessibility to the surrounding aqueous environment. Our results suggest that domain-specific antibody binding induces a conformational change resulting in channel activation, and are consistent with the hypothesis that interacting N-terminal and central domains are intimately involved in the regulation of RyR1 channel function. PMID:15027895

  2. Sigma-1 receptors modulate neonatal Nav1.5 ion channels in breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Aydar, Ebru; Stratton, Dan; Fraser, Scott P; Djamgoz, Mustafa B A; Palmer, Christopher

    2016-10-01

    The main aim of this study was to investigate a possible functional connection between sigma-1 receptors and voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) in human breast cancer cells. The hypothesis was that sigma-1 drugs could alter the metastatic properties of breast cancer cells via the VGSC. Evidence was found for expression of sigma-1 receptor and neonatal Nav1.5 (nNav1.5) expression in both MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 cells. Sigma-1 drugs (SKF10047 and dimethyltryptamine) did not affect cell proliferation or migration but significantly reduced adhesion to the substrate. Silencing sigma-1 receptor expression by siRNA similarly reduced the adhesion. Blocking nNav1.5 activity with a polyclonal antibody (NESOpAb) targeting an extracellular region of nNav1.5 also reduced the adhesion in both cell lines. Importantly, the results of combined treatments with NESOpAb and a sigma-1 drug or sigma-1 siRNA suggested that both treatments targeted the same mechanism. The possibility was tested, therefore, that the sigma-1 receptor and the nNav1.5 channel formed a physical, functional complex. This suggestion was supported by the results of co-immunoprecipitation experiments. Furthermore, application of sigma-1 drugs to the cells reduced the surface expression of nNav1.5 protein, which could explain how sigma-1 receptor activation could alter the metastatic behaviour of breast cancer cells. Overall, these results are consistent with the idea of a sigma-1 protein behaving like either a "chaperone" or a regulatory subunit associated with nNav1.5.

  3. Modulation of nociceptive ion channels and receptors via protein-protein interactions: implications for pain relief

    PubMed Central

    Rouwette, Tom; Avenali, Luca; Sondermann, Julia; Narayanan, Pratibha; Gomez-Varela, David; Schmidt, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    In the last 2 decades biomedical research has provided great insights into the molecular signatures underlying painful conditions. However, chronic pain still imposes substantial challenges to researchers, clinicians and patients alike. Under pathological conditions, pain therapeutics often lack efficacy and exhibit only minimal safety profiles, which can be largely attributed to the targeting of molecules with key physiological functions throughout the body. In light of these difficulties, the identification of molecules and associated protein complexes specifically involved in chronic pain states is of paramount importance for designing selective interventions. Ion channels and receptors represent primary targets, as they critically shape nociceptive signaling from the periphery to the brain. Moreover, their function requires tight control, which is usually implemented by protein-protein interactions (PPIs). Indeed, manipulation of such PPIs entails the modulation of ion channel activity with widespread implications for influencing nociceptive signaling in a more specific way. In this review, we highlight recent advances in modulating ion channels and receptors via their PPI networks in the pursuit of relieving chronic pain. Moreover, we critically discuss the potential of targeting PPIs for developing novel pain therapies exhibiting higher efficacy and improved safety profiles. PMID:26039491

  4. Insulin Excites Anorexigenic Proopiomelanocortin Neurons via Activation of Canonical Transient Receptor Potential Channels

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jian; Zhang, Chunguang; Borgquist, Amanda; Nestor, Casey C; Smith, Arik W.; Bosch, Martha A.; Ku, Stephen; Wagner, Edward J.; Rønnekleiv, Oline K.; Kelly, Martin J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons within the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus are vital anorexigenic neurons. Although both the leptin receptor and insulin receptor are coupled to activation of phosphatidylinositide3-kinase (PI3K) in POMC neurons, they are thought to have disparate actions on POMC excitability. Using whole-cell recording and selective pharmacological tools, we have found that similar to leptin, purified insulin depolarized POMC, and adjacent kisspeptin neurons via activation of TRPC5 channels, which are highly expressed in these neurons. In contrast, insulin hyperpolarized and inhibited NPY/AgRP neurons via activation of KATP channels. Moreover, Zn2+, which is found in insulin formulations at nanomolar concentrations, inhibited POMC neurons via activation of KATP channels. Finally as predicted, insulin given intracerebroventrically robustly inhibited food intake and activated c-fos expression in arcuate POMC neurons. Our results show that purified insulin excites POMC neurons in the arcuate nucleus, which we propose is a major mechanism by which insulin regulates energy homeostasis. PMID:24703699

  5. Functional unit size of the neurotoxin receptors on the voltage-dependent sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Angelides, K J; Nutter, T J; Elmer, L W; Kempner, E S

    1985-03-25

    Radiation inactivation was used in situ to determine the functional unit sizes of the neurotoxin receptors of the voltage-dependent sodium channel from rat brain. Frozen or lyophilized synaptosomes were irradiated with high energy electrons generated by a linear accelerator and assayed for [3H]saxitoxin, 125I-Leiurus quinquestriatus quinquestriatus (alpha-scorpion toxin), 125I-Centruroides suffusus suffusus (beta-scorpion toxin), and batrachotoxinin-A 20 alpha-[3H]benzoate binding activity. The functional unit size of the neurotoxin receptors determined in situ by target analysis are 220,000 for saxitoxin, 263,000 for alpha-scorpion toxin, and 45,000 for beta-scorpion toxin. Analysis of the inactivation curve for batrachotoxinin-A 20 alpha-benzoate binding to the channel yields two target sizes of Mr approximately 287,000 (50%) and approximately 51,000 (50%). The results are independent of the purity of the membrane preparation. Comparison of the radiation inactivation data with the protein composition of the rat brain sodium channel indicates that there are at least two functional components.

  6. Calcium channel receptor sites for (+)-[3H]PN 200-110 in coronary artery.

    PubMed

    Yamada, S; Kimura, R; Harada, Y; Nakayama, K

    1990-01-01

    The receptor sites for 1,4-dihydropyridine (DHP) Ca++ channel antagonists in porcine coronary artery were identified and characterized by a binding assay using (+)-[3H]PN 200-110 as a radioligand. Specific (+)-[3H]PN 200-110 binding in porcine coronary artery was saturable, reversible and of high affinity (Kd = 0.24 nM) and it showed a pharmacological specificity as well as stereoselectivity which characterized the receptor sites for DHP Ca++ channel antagonists. DHP antagonists competed for the (+)-[3H]PN 200-110 binding in order: PN 200-110 greater than mepirodipine greater than nisoldipine greater than nicardipine greater than nitrendipine greater than nimodipine greater than nifedipine greater than (-)-PN 200-110. (+)-PN 200-110 was approximately 140 times as potent as the (-)-isomer. The potencies (PKi) of these eight DHP Ca++ channel antagonists in competing for (+)-[3H]PN 200-110 binding sites in porcine coronary artery correlated well with their pharmacological potencies. Specific (+)-[3H]PN 200-110 binding in the coronary artery was enhanced by d-cis-diltiazem and was inhibited incompletely by verapamil and D-600. In EDTA-pretreated coronary artery, the maximal number of binding sites for specific (+)-[3H]PN 200-110 binding was reduced (80%) markedly, and it was restored to the untreated level by the addition of Ca++ and Mg++.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. A polycystin-type transient receptor potential (Trp) channel that is activated by ATP

    PubMed Central

    Traynor, David

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT ATP and ADP are ancient extra-cellular signalling molecules that in Dictyostelium amoebae cause rapid, transient increases in cytosolic calcium due to an influx through the plasma membrane. This response is independent of hetero-trimeric G-proteins, the putative IP3 receptor IplA and all P2X channels. We show, unexpectedly, that it is abolished in mutants of the polycystin-type transient receptor potential channel, TrpP. Responses to the chemoattractants cyclic-AMP and folic acid are unaffected in TrpP mutants. We report that the DIF morphogens, cyclic-di-GMP, GABA, glutamate and adenosine all induce strong cytoplasmic calcium responses, likewise independently of TrpP. Thus, TrpP is dedicated to purinergic signalling. ATP treatment causes cell blebbing within seconds but this does not require TrpP, implicating a separate purinergic receptor. We could detect no effect of ATP on chemotaxis and TrpP mutants grow, chemotax and develop almost normally in standard conditions. No gating ligand is known for the human homologue of TrpP, polycystin-2, which causes polycystic kidney disease. Our results now show that TrpP mediates purinergic signalling in Dictyostelium and is directly or indirectly gated by ATP. PMID:28011630

  8. Mathematical modelling of non-stationary fluctuation analysis for studying channel properties of synaptic AMPA receptors.

    PubMed

    Benke, T A; Lüthi, A; Palmer, M J; Wikström, M A; Anderson, W W; Isaac, J T; Collingridge, G L

    2001-12-01

    1. The molecular properties of synaptic alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA) receptors are an important factor determining excitatory synaptic transmission in the brain. Changes in the number (N) or single-channel conductance (gamma) of functional AMPA receptors may underlie synaptic plasticity, such as long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD). These parameters have been estimated using non-stationary fluctuation analysis (NSFA). 2. The validity of NSFA for studying the channel properties of synaptic AMPA receptors was assessed using a cable model with dendritic spines and a microscopic kinetic description of AMPA receptors. Electrotonic, geometric and kinetic parameters were altered in order to determine their effects on estimates of the underlying gamma. 3. Estimates of gamma were very sensitive to the access resistance of the recording (R(A)) and the mean open time of AMPA channels. Estimates of gamma were less sensitive to the distance between the electrode and the synaptic site, the electrotonic properties of dendritic structures, recording electrode capacitance and background noise. Estimates of gamma were insensitive to changes in spine morphology, synaptic glutamate concentration and the peak open probability (P(o)) of AMPA receptors. 4. The results obtained using the model agree with biological data, obtained from 91 dendritic recordings from rat CA1 pyramidal cells. A correlation analysis showed that R(A) resulted in a slowing of the decay time constant of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) by approximately 150 %, from an estimated value of 3.1 ms. R(A) also greatly attenuated the absolute estimate of gamma by approximately 50-70 %. 5. When other parameters remain constant, the model demonstrates that NSFA of dendritic recordings can readily discriminate between changes in gamma vs. changes in N or P(o). Neither background noise nor asynchronous activation of multiple synapses prevented reliable

  9. Tuning the allosteric regulation of artificial muscarinic and dopaminergic ligand-gated potassium channels by protein engineering of G protein-coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, Christophe J.; Revilloud, Jean; Caro, Lydia N.; Dupuis, Julien P.; Trouchet, Amandine; Estrada-Mondragón, Argel; Nieścierowicz, Katarzyna; Sapay, Nicolas; Crouzy, Serge; Vivaudou, Michel

    2017-01-01

    Ligand-gated ion channels enable intercellular transmission of action potential through synapses by transducing biochemical messengers into electrical signal. We designed artificial ligand-gated ion channels by coupling G protein-coupled receptors to the Kir6.2 potassium channel. These artificial channels called ion channel-coupled receptors offer complementary properties to natural channels by extending the repertoire of ligands to those recognized by the fused receptors, by generating more sustained signals and by conferring potassium selectivity. The first artificial channels based on the muscarinic M2 and the dopaminergic D2L receptors were opened and closed by acetylcholine and dopamine, respectively. We find here that this opposite regulation of the gating is linked to the length of the receptor C-termini, and that C-terminus engineering can precisely control the extent and direction of ligand gating. These findings establish the design rules to produce customized ligand-gated channels for synthetic biology applications. PMID:28145461

  10. Nicotinic receptor M3 transmembrane domain: position 8' contributes to channel gating.

    PubMed

    De Rosa, María José; Rayes, Diego; Spitzmaul, Guillermo; Bouzat, Cecilia

    2002-08-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) is a pentamer of homologous subunits with composition alpha(2)(beta)(epsilon)(delta) in adult muscle. Each subunit contains four transmembrane domains (M1-M4). Position 8' of the M3 domain is phenylalanine in all heteromeric alpha subunits, whereas it is a hydrophobic nonaromatic residue in non-alpha subunits. Given this peculiar conservation pattern, we studied its contribution to muscle nAChR activation by combining mutagenesis with single-channel kinetic analysis. Construction of nAChRs carrying different numbers of phenylalanine residues at 8' reveals that the mean open time decreases as a function of the number of phenylalanine residues. Thus, all subunits contribute through this position independently and additively to the channel closing rate. The impairment of channel opening increases when the number of phenylalanine residues at 8' increases from two (wild-type nAChR) to five. The gating equilibrium constant of the latter mutant nAChR is 13-fold lower than that of the wild-type nAChR. The replacement of (alpha)F8', (beta)L8', (delta)L8', and (epsilon)V8' by a series of hydrophobic amino acids reveals that the structural bases of the observed kinetic effects are nonequivalent among subunits. In the alpha subunit, hydrophobic amino acids at 8' lead to prolonged channel lifetimes, whereas they lead either to normal kinetics (delta and epsilon subunits) or impaired channel gating (beta subunit) in the non-alpha subunits. The overall results indicate that 8' positions of the M3 domains of all subunits contribute to channel gating.

  11. Effects of ginger and its pungent constituents on transient receptor potential channels.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Soo; Hong, Chan Sik; Lee, Sang Weon; Nam, Joo Hyun; Kim, Byung Joo

    2016-12-01

    Ginger extract is used as an analeptic in herbal medicine and has been reported to exert antioxidant effects. Transient receptor potential (TRP) canonical 5 (TRPC5), TRP cation channel, subfamily M, member 7 (TRPM7; melastatin 7), and TRP cation channel, subfamily A, member 1 (TRPA1; ankyrin 1) are non-selective cation channels that are modulated by reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) and subsequently control various cellular processes. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether ginger and its pungent constituents modulate these channels and exert antioxidant effects. It was found that TRPC5 and TRPA1 currents were modulated by ginger extract and by its pungent constituents, [6]-gingerol, zingerone and [6]-shogaol. In particular, [6]-shogaol markedly and dose-dependently inhibited TRPC5 currents with an IC50 of value of ~18.3 µM. Furthermore, the strong dose-dependent activation of TRPA1 currents by [6]-shogaol was abolished by A‑967079 (a selective TRPA1 inhibitor). However, ginger extract and its pungent constituents had no effect on TRPM7 currents. These results suggest the antioxidant effects of ginger extract and its pungent constituents are mediated through TRPC5 and TRPA1, and that [6]-shogaol is predominantly responsible for the regulation of TRPC5 and TRPA1 currents by ginger extract.

  12. Natural product modulators of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels as potential anti-cancer agents.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Tiago; Sieglitz, Florian; Bernardes, Gonçalo J L

    2016-11-07

    Treatment of cancer is a significant challenge in clinical medicine, and its research is a top priority in chemical biology and drug discovery. Consequently, there is an urgent need for identifying innovative chemotypes capable of modulating unexploited drug targets. The transient receptor potential (TRPs) channels persist scarcely explored as targets, despite intervening in a plethora of pathophysiological events in numerous diseases, including cancer. Both agonists and antagonists have proven capable of evoking phenotype changes leading to either cell death or reduced cell migration. Among these, natural products entail biologically pre-validated and privileged architectures for TRP recognition. Furthermore, several natural products have significantly contributed to our current knowledge on TRP biology. In this Tutorial Review we focus on selected natural products, e.g. capsaicinoids, cannabinoids and terpenes, by highlighting challenges and opportunities in their use as starting points for designing natural product-inspired TRP channel modulators. Importantly, the de-orphanization of natural products as TRP channel ligands may leverage their exploration as viable strategy for developing anticancer therapies. Finally, we foresee that TRP channels may be explored for the selective pharmacodelivery of cytotoxic payloads to diseased tissues, providing an innovative platform in chemical biology and molecular medicine.

  13. The molecular architecture of dihydropyrindine receptor/L-type Ca2+ channel complex

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hongli; Wang, Zhao; Wei, Risheng; Fan, Guizhen; Wang, Qiongling; Zhang, Kaiming; Yin, Chang-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Dihydropyridine receptor (DHPR), an L-type Ca2+ channel complex, plays an essential role in muscle contraction, secretion, integration of synaptic input in neurons and synaptic transmission. The molecular architecture of DHPR complex remains elusive. Here we present a 15-Å resolution cryo-electron microscopy structure of the skeletal DHPR/L-type Ca2+ channel complex. The DHPR has an asymmetrical main body joined by a hook-like extension. The main body is composed of a “trapezoid” and a “tetrahedroid”. Homologous crystal structure docking and site-specific antibody labelling revealed that the α1 and α2 subunits are located in the “trapezoid” and the β subunit is located in the “tetrahedroid”. This structure revealed the molecular architecture of a eukaryotic Ca2+ channel complex. Furthermore, this structure provides structural insights into the key elements of DHPR involved in physical coupling with the RyR/Ca2+ release channel and shed light onto the mechanism of excitation-contraction coupling. PMID:25667046

  14. Single Ryanodine Receptor Channel Basis of Caffeine's Action on Ca2+ Sparks

    PubMed Central

    Porta, Maura; Zima, Aleksey V.; Nani, Alma; Diaz-Sylvester, Paula L.; Copello, Julio A.; Ramos-Franco, Josefina; Blatter, Lothar A.; Fill, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Caffeine (1, 3, 7-trimethylxanthine) is a widely used pharmacological agonist of the cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2) Ca2+ release channel. It is also a well-known stimulant that can produce adverse side effects, including arrhythmias. Here, the action of caffeine on single RyR2 channels in bilayers and Ca2+ sparks in permeabilized ventricular cardiomyocytes is defined. Single RyR2 caffeine activation depended on the free Ca2+ level on both sides of the channel. Cytosolic Ca2+ enhanced RyR2 caffeine affinity, whereas luminal Ca2+ essentially scaled maximal caffeine activation. Caffeine activated single RyR2 channels in diastolic quasi-cell-like solutions (cytosolic MgATP, pCa 7) with an EC50 of 9.0 ± 0.4 mM. Low-dose caffeine (0.15 mM) increased Ca2+ spark frequency ∼75% and single RyR2 opening frequency ∼150%. This implies that not all spontaneous RyR2 openings during diastole are associated with Ca2+ sparks. Assuming that only the longest openings evoke sparks, our data suggest that a spark may result only when a spontaneous single RyR2 opening lasts >6 ms. PMID:21320437

  15. The sorting receptor Rer1 controls Purkinje cell function via voltage gated sodium channels

    PubMed Central

    Valkova, Christina; Liebmann, Lutz; Krämer, Andreas; Hübner, Christian A.; Kaether, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Rer1 is a sorting receptor in the early secretory pathway that controls the assembly and the cell surface transport of selected multimeric membrane protein complexes. Mice with a Purkinje cell (PC) specific deletion of Rer1 showed normal polarization and differentiation of PCs and normal development of the cerebellum. However, PC-specific loss of Rer1 led to age-dependent motor deficits in beam walk, ladder climbing and gait. Analysis of brain sections revealed a specific degeneration of PCs in the anterior cerebellar lobe in old animals. Electrophysiological recordings demonstrated severe deficits in spontaneous action potential generation. Measurements of resurgent currents indicated decreased surface densities of voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav), but not changes in individual channels. Analysis of mice with a whole brain Rer1-deletion demonstrated a strong down-regulation of Nav1.6 and 1.1 in the absence of Rer1, whereas protein levels of the related Cav2.1 and of Kv3.3 and 7.2 channels were not affected. The data suggest that Rer1 controls the assembly and transport of Nav1.1 and 1.6, the principal sodium channels responsible for recurrent firing, in PCs. PMID:28117367

  16. Bidirectional effects of hydrogen sulfide via ATP-sensitive K(+) channels and transient receptor potential A1 channels in RIN14B cells.

    PubMed

    Ujike, Ayako; Otsuguro, Ken-ichi; Miyamoto, Ryo; Yamaguchi, Soichiro; Ito, Shigeo

    2015-10-05

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) reportedly acts as a gasotransmitter because it mediates various cellular responses through several ion channels including ATP-sensitive K(+) (KATP) channels and transient receptor potential (TRP) A1 channels. H2S can activate both KATP and TRPA1 channels at a similar concentration range. In a single cell expressing both channels, however, it remains unknown what happens when both channels are simultaneously activated by H2S. In this study, we examined the effects of H2S on RIN14B cells that express both KATP and TRPA1 channels. RIN14B cells showed several intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) responses to NaHS (300 µM), an H2S donor, i.e., inhibition of spontaneous Ca(2+) oscillations (37%), inhibition followed by [Ca(2+)]i increase (24%), and a rapid increase in [Ca(2+)]i (25%). KATP channel blockers, glibenclamide or tolbutamide, abolished any inhibitory effects of NaHS and enhanced NaHS-mediated [Ca(2+)]i increases, which were inhibited by extracellular Ca(2+) removal, HC030031 (a TRPA1 antagonist), and disulfide bond-reducing agents. NaHS induced 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) release from RIN14B cells, which was also inhibited by TRPA1 antagonists. These results indicate that H2S has both inhibitory and excitatory effects by opening KATP and TRPA1 channels, respectively, in RIN14B cells, suggesting potential bidirectional modulation of secretory functions.

  17. Activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 channel prevents adipogenesis and obesity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li Li; Yan Liu, Dao; Ma, Li Qun; Luo, Zhi Dan; Cao, Ting Bing; Zhong, Jian; Yan, Zhen Cheng; Wang, Li Juan; Zhao, Zhi Gang; Zhu, Shan Jun; Schrader, Mark; Thilo, Florian; Zhu, Zhi Ming; Tepel, Martin

    2007-04-13

    We tested the hypothesis that activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1) by capsaicin prevents adipogenesis. TRPV1 channels in 3T3-L1-preadipocytes and visceral adipose tissue from mice and humans were detected by immunoblotting and quantitative real-time RT-PCR. The effect of TRPV1 on cytosolic calcium was determined fluorometrically in 3T3-L1-preadipocytes and in human visceral fat tissue. Adipogenesis in stimulated 3T3-L1-preadipocytes was determined by oil red O-staining of intracellular lipid droplets, triglyceride levels, expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma, and expression of fatty acid synthase. Long-term feeding experiments were undertaken in wild-type mice and TRPV1 knockout mice. We detected TRPV1 channels in 3T3-L1-preadipocytes and visceral adipose tissue from mice and humans. In vitro, the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin dose-dependently induced calcium influx and prevented the adipogenesis in stimulated 3T3-L1-preadipocytes. RNA interference knockdown of TRPV1 in 3T3-L1-preadipocytes attenuated capsaicin-induced calcium influx, and adipogenesis in stimulated 3T3-L1-preadipocytes was no longer prevented. During regular adipogenesis TRPV1 channels were downregulated which was accompanied by a significant and time-dependent reduction of calcium influx. Compared with lean counterparts in visceral adipose tissue from obese db/db and ob/ob mice, and from obese human male subjects we observed a reduced TRVP1 expression. The reduced TRPV1 expression in visceral adipose tissue from obese humans was accompanied by reduced capsaicin-induced calcium influx. The oral administration of capsaicin for 120 days prevented obesity in male wild type mice but not in TRPV1 knockout mice assigned to high fat diet. We conclude that the activation of TRPV1 channels by capsaicin prevented adipogenesis and obesity.

  18. Molecular pharmacology of the calcium channel: evidence for subtypes, multiple drug-receptor sites, channel subunits, and the development of a radioiodinated 1,4-dihydropyridine calcium channel label, (/sup 125/I)iodipine

    SciTech Connect

    Glossmann, H.; Ferry, D.R.; Goll, A.; Rombusch, M.

    1984-01-01

    Radiolabeled Ca2+ antagonists (1,4-dihydropyridines, verapamil, and D-cis-diltiazem) were used to study voltage-operated Ca2+ channels in different excitable tissues. The concept of three subtypes of Ca2+ channels, represented by brain, heart, and skeletal-muscle isoreceptors for 1,4-dihydropyridines, is developed. The three subtypes are characterized by a variety of criteria. Despite the biochemical differences between the subtypes, they have the same Mr in situ by target-size analysis (Mr approximately equal to 180,000, when evaluated by (/sub 3/H)nimodipine). The concept of the metalloprotein nature of the channel and the interaction of channel drugs with the Me2+ binding sites of the ionic pore is demonstrated. Distinct but interacting drug-receptor sites of the Ca2+ channel are found by direct labeling as well as indirectly by drug competition studies. The authors distinguish between the 1,4-dihydropyridine site, the verapamil site, and the D-cis-diltiazem site. Each receptor site can exist in high and low-affinity state; the distribution of receptor sites in these states is regulated by temperature, ions, and drugs. The concept of intrinsic activity of drugs to stabilize the high-affinity state is exemplified for the 1,4-dihydropyridines. A change in the channel architecture is induced by binding of D-cis-diltiazem to its drug receptor site. This is proven by target-size analysis of the channel in situ. Partially purified t-tubule membranes from skeletal muscle are an extremely rich source of Ca2+ channel drug-receptor sites. The stoichiometry was determined in this preparation and found to be four verapamil:two 1,4-dihydropyridine:one D-cis-diltiazem site. A novel Ca2+ channel probe, (/sup 125/I)iodipine (2,200 Ci/mmol), was synthetized, and the properties of this ligand are presented.

  19. Ion access pathway to the transmembrane pore in P2X receptor channels

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Janice L.; Li, Mufeng; Silberberg, Shai D.

    2011-01-01

    P2X receptors are trimeric cation channels that open in response to the binding of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to a large extracellular domain. The x-ray structure of the P2X4 receptor from zebrafish (zfP2X4) receptor reveals that the extracellular vestibule above the gate opens to the outside through lateral fenestrations, providing a potential pathway for ions to enter and exit the pore. The extracellular region also contains a void at the central axis, providing a second potential pathway. To investigate the energetics of each potential ion permeation pathway, we calculated the electrostatic free energy by solving the Poisson-Boltzmann equation along each of these pathways in the zfP2X4 crystal structure and a homology model of rat P2X2 (rP2X2). We found that the lateral fenestrations are energetically favorable for monovalent cations even in the closed-state structure, whereas the central pathway presents strong electrostatic barriers that would require structural rearrangements to allow for ion accessibility. To probe ion accessibility along these pathways in the rP2X2 receptor, we investigated the modification of introduced Cys residues by methanethiosulfonate (MTS) reagents and constrained structural changes by introducing disulfide bridges. Our results show that MTS reagents can permeate the lateral fenestrations, and that these become larger after ATP binding. Although relatively small MTS reagents can access residues in one of the vestibules within the central pathway, no reactive positions were identified in the upper region of this pathway, and disulfide bridges that constrain movements in that region do not prevent ion conduction. Collectively, these results suggest that ions access the pore using the lateral fenestrations, and that these breathe as the channel opens. The accessibility of ions to one of the chambers in the central pathway likely serves a regulatory function. PMID:21624948

  20. Evolution of Pentameric Ligand-Gated Ion Channels: Pro-Loop Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jaiteh, Mariama; Taly, Antoine; Hénin, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    Pentameric ligand-gated ion channels (pLGICs) are ubiquitous neurotransmitter receptors in Bilateria, with a small number of known prokaryotic homologues. Here we describe a new inventory and phylogenetic analysis of pLGIC genes across all kingdoms of life. Our main finding is a set of pLGIC genes in unicellular eukaryotes, some of which are metazoan-like Cys-loop receptors, and others devoid of Cys-loop cysteines, like their prokaryotic relatives. A number of such “Cys-less” receptors also appears in invertebrate metazoans. Together, those findings draw a new distribution of pLGICs in eukaryotes. A broader distribution of prokaryotic channels also emerges, including a major new archaeal taxon, Thaumarchaeota. More generally, pLGICs now appear nearly ubiquitous in major taxonomic groups except multicellular plants and fungi. However, pLGICs are sparsely present in unicellular taxa, suggesting a high rate of gene loss and a non-essential character, contrasting with their essential role as synaptic receptors of the bilaterian nervous system. Multiple alignments of these highly divergent sequences reveal a small number of conserved residues clustered at the interface between the extracellular and transmembrane domains. Only the “Cys-loop” proline is absolutely conserved, suggesting the more fitting name “Pro loop” for that motif, and “Pro-loop receptors” for the superfamily. The infered molecular phylogeny shows a Cys-loop and a Cys-less clade in eukaryotes, both containing metazoans and unicellular members. This suggests new hypotheses on the evolutionary history of the superfamily, such as a possible origin of the Cys-loop cysteines in an ancient unicellular eukaryote. Deeper phylogenetic relationships remain uncertain, particularly around the split between bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes. PMID:26986966

  1. Further analysis of counterion permeation through anion-selective glycine receptor channels.

    PubMed

    Barry, Peter H; Sugiharto, Silas; Lewis, Trevor M; Moorhouse, Andrew J

    2010-01-01

    The functional role of ion channels, which allow counterion permeation, depends critically on their relative anion-cation relative selectivity. From whole-cell patch clamp reversal potential measurements under dilution potential conditions, we have already shown that anion-cation permeabilities of anion-selective wild-type (WT) and mutant (with larger pore diameter) glycine receptor (GlyR) channels in the presence of Li(+), Na(+) and Cs(+) counterions, were inversely correlated with the equivalent hydration diameter of the counterion, with chloride-cation permeability increasing as counterion equivalent hydration diameter increased with respect to the channel minimum pore diameter. Corrected for liquid junction potentials (LJPs; using ion activities), the previous chloride-cation permeabilities for the alkali cations were 23.4 (Li(+)), 10.9 (Na(+)) and 5.0 (Cs(+)) for the smaller WT channel. Further analysis to incorporate an initial offset potential correction, to fully allow for slight differences between internal cell composition and external control salt solution, changed the above permeability ratios to 30.6 (Li(+)), 11.8 (Na(+)) and 5.0 (Cs(+)), adding enhanced support for the inverse correlation between anion-to-counterion permeability ratio and equivalent hydrated counterion diameter relative to channel pore diameter (erroneously ignoring LJPs reduces each permeability ratio to about 4). Also, new direct measurements of LJPs (for NaCl and LiCl salt dilutions) using a 3M KCl-agar reference salt bridge (with freshly-cut end for each solution composition change) have shown excellent agreement with calculated LJPs (using ion activities), validating calculated LJP values. We continue to suggest that counterion cations permeate with chloride ions as neutral pairs.

  2. Cholinergic and ghrelinergic receptors and KCNQ channels in the medial PFC regulate the expression of palatability

    PubMed Central

    Parent, Marc A.; Amarante, Linda M.; Swanson, Kyra; Laubach, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is a key brain region for the control of consummatory behavior. Neuronal activity in this area is modulated when rats initiate consummatory licking and reversible inactivations eliminate reward contrast effects and reduce a measure of palatability, the duration of licking bouts. Together, these data suggest the hypothesis that rhythmic neuronal activity in the mPFC is crucial for the control of consummatory behavior. The muscarinic cholinergic system is known to regulate membrane excitability and control low-frequency rhythmic activity in the mPFC. Muscarinic receptors (mAChRs) act through KCNQ (Kv7) potassium channels, which have recently been linked to the orexigenic peptide ghrelin. To understand if drugs that act on KCNQ channels within the mPFC have effects on consummatory behavior, we made infusions of several muscarinic drugs (scopolamine, oxotremorine, physostigmine), the KCNQ channel blocker XE-991, and ghrelin into the mPFC and evaluated their effects on consummatory behavior. A consistent finding across all drugs was an effect on the duration of licking bouts when animals consume solutions with a relatively high concentration of sucrose. The muscarinic antagonist scopolamine reduced bout durations, both systemically and intra-cortically. By contrast, the muscarinic agonist oxotremorine, the cholinesterase inhibitor physostigmine, the KCNQ channel blocker XE-991, and ghrelin all increased the durations of licking bouts when infused into the mPFC. Our findings suggest that cholinergic and ghrelinergic signaling in the mPFC, acting through KCNQ channels, regulates the expression of palatability. PMID:26578914

  3. Interaction between Ca/sup + +/-channel antagonists and. cap alpha. /sub 2/-adrenergic receptors in rabbit ileal cell membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Homeidan, F.R.; Wicks, J.; Cusolito, S.; El-Sabban, M.E.; Sharp, G.W.G.; Donowitz, M.

    1986-03-05

    An interaction between Ca/sup + +/-channel antagonists and the ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic receptor on active electrolyte transport was demonstrated in rabbit ileum. Clonidine, an ..cap alpha../sub 2/-agonist, stimulated NaCl absorption apparently by Ca/sup + +/-channel antagonism since it inhibited /sup 45/Ca/sup + +/ uptake across the basolateral membrane and decreased total ileal calcium content. This stimulation was inhibited by the Ca/sup + +/-channel antagonists dl- and l-verapamil and cadmium but not by nifedipine. The binding of /sup 3/H-yohimbine, a specific ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic antagonist, was studied on purified ileal cell membranes using a rapid filtration technique. dl-Verapamil and Cd/sup + +/ inhibited the specific binding of /sup 3/H-yohimbine over the same concentration range in which they affected transport. In contrast, nifedipine had no effect on binding, just as it had no effect on clonidine-stimulated NaCl absorption. These data demonstrate that there is an interaction between Ca/sup + +/-channels and ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic receptors in ileal basolateral membranes. Some Ca/sup + +/-channel antagonists alter ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic binding to the receptor and ..cap alpha../sub 2/-agonist binding leads to changes in Ca/sup + +/ entry. A close spatial relationship between the Ca/sup + +/-channel and the ..cap alpha../sub 2/-receptor could explain the data.

  4. Negative regulation of opioid receptor-G protein-Ca2+ channel pathway by the nootropic nefiracetam.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, Mitsunobu; Furukawa, Taiji; Ogihara, Yoshiyasu; Watabe, Shigeo; Shiotani, Tadashi; Ishikawa, Yasuro; Nishimura, Masao; Nukada, Toshihide

    2004-10-01

    It has recently been reported that nefiracetam, a nootropic agent, is capable of attenuating the development of morphine dependence and tolerance in mice. The mechanism of this antimorphine action is not clear. The present study was designed to address this issue using Xenopus oocytes expressing delta-opioid receptors, G proteins (G(i3alpha) or G(o1alpha)), and N-type (alpha1B) Ca2+ channels. Membrane currents through Ca2+ channels were recorded from the oocytes under voltage-clamp conditions. The Ca2+ channel currents were reduced reversibly by 40-60% in the presence of 1 microM leucine-enkephalin (Leu-Enk). The Leu-Enk-induced current inhibition was recovered promptly by nefiracetam (1 microM), while control currents in the absence of Leu-Enk were not influenced by nefiracetam. A binding assay revealed that 3H-nefiracetam preferentially bound to the membrane fraction of oocytes expressing G(i3alpha). When delta-opioid receptors were coexpressed, the binding was significantly increased. However, an additional expression of alpha1B Ca2+ channels decreased the binding. The results suggest that nefiracetam preferentially binds to G(i3alpha) associated with delta-opioid receptors, thereby inhibiting the association of G proteins with Ca2+ channels. In conclusion, nefiracetam negatively regulates the inhibitory pathway of opioid receptor-G protein-Ca2+ channel.

  5. [Role of Transient Receptor Potential Channels in Paclitaxel- and Oxaliplatin-induced Peripheral Neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Kyoji

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a common adverse effect of paclitaxel and oxaliplatin treatment. The major dose-limiting side effect of these drugs is peripheral sensory neuropathy. The symptoms of paclitaxel-induced neuropathy are mostly sensory and peripheral in nature, consisting of mechanical allodynia/hyperalgesia, tingling, and numbness. Oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity manifests as rapid-onset neuropathic symptoms that are exacerbated by cold exposure and as chronic neuropathy that develops after several treatment cycles. Although many basic and clinical researchers have studied anticancer drug-induced peripheral neuropathy, the mechanism is not well understood. In this review, we focus on (1) analysis of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel expression in the rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) after paclitaxel treatment and (2) analysis of transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) channel in the DRG after oxaliplatin treatment. This review describes that (1) paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain may be the result of up-regulation of TRPV1 in small- and medium-diameter DRG neurons. In addition, paclitaxel treatment increases the release of substance P, but not calcitonin gene-related peptide, in the superficial layers of the spinal dorsal horn. (2) TRPA1 expression via activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase in small-diameter DRG neurons, at least in part, contributes to the development of oxaliplatin-induced acute cold hyperalgesia. We suggest that TRPV1 or TRPA1 antagonists may be potential therapeutic lead compounds for treating anticancer drug-induced peripheral neuropathy.

  6. α4β2 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors: RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN SUBUNIT STOICHIOMETRY AND FUNCTION AT THE SINGLE CHANNEL LEVEL.

    PubMed

    Mazzaferro, Simone; Bermudez, Isabel; Sine, Steven M

    2017-02-17

    Acetylcholine receptors comprising α4 and β2 subunits are the most abundant class of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in the brain. They contribute to cognition, reward, mood, and nociception and are implicated in a range of neurological disorders. Previous measurements of whole-cell macroscopic currents showed that α4 and β2 subunits assemble in two predominant pentameric stoichiometries, which differ in their sensitivity to agonists, antagonists, and allosteric modulators. Here we compare agonist-elicited single channel currents from receptors assembled with an excess of either the α4 or β2 subunit, forming receptor populations biased toward one or the other stoichiometry, with currents from receptors composed of five concatemeric subunits in which the subunit stoichiometry is predetermined. Our results associate each subunit stoichiometry with a unique single channel conductance, mean open channel lifetime, and sensitivity to the allosteric potentiator 3-[3-(3-pyridinyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazol-5-yl]benzonitrile (NS-9283). Receptors with the composition (α4β2)2α4 exhibit high single channel conductance, brief mean open lifetime, and strong potentiation by NS-9283, whereas receptors with the composition (α4β2)2β2 exhibit low single channel conductance and long mean open lifetime and are not potentiated by NS-9283. Thus single channel current measurements reveal bases for the distinct functional and pharmacological properties endowed by different stoichiometries of α4 and β2 subunits and establish pentameric concatemers as a means to delineate interactions between subunits that confer these properties.

  7. Spontaneous thermal motion of the GABA(A) receptor M2 channel-lining segments.

    PubMed

    Bera, Amal K; Akabas, Myles H

    2005-10-21

    The gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptor channel opening involves translational and rotational motions of the five channel-lining, M2 transmembrane segments. The M2 segment's extracellular half is loosely packed and undergoes significant thermal motion. To characterize the extent of the M2 segment's motion, we used disulfide trapping experiments between pairs of engineered cysteines. In alpha1beta1 gamma2S receptors the single gamma subunit is flanked by an alpha and beta subunit. The gamma2 M2-14' position is located in the alpha-gamma subunit interface. Gamma2 13' faces the channel lumen. We expressed either the gamma2 14' or the gamma2 13' cysteine substitution mutants with alpha1 cysteine substitution mutants between 12' and 16' and wild-type beta1. Disulfide bonds formed spontaneously between gamma2 14'C and both alpha1 15'C and alpha1 16'C and also between gamma2 13'C and alpha1 13'C. Oxidation by copper phenanthroline induced disulfide bond formation between gamma2 14'C and alpha1 13'C. Disulfide bond formation rates with gamma2 14'C were similar in the presence and absence of GABA, although the rate with alpha1 13'C was slower than with the other two positions. In a homology model based on the acetylcholine receptor structure, alphaM2 would need to rotate in opposite directions by approximately 80 degrees to bring alpha1 13' and alpha1 15' into close proximity with gamma2 14'. Alternatively, translational motion of alphaM2 would reduce the extent of rotational motion necessary to bring these two alpha subunit residues into close proximity with the gamma2 14' position. These experiments demonstrate that in the closed state the M2 segments undergo continuous spontaneous motion in the region near the extracellular end of the channel gate. Opening the gate may involve similar but concerted motions of the M2 segments.

  8. Sequence, genomic organization and expression of two channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, ghrelin receptors.

    PubMed

    Small, Brian C; Quiniou, Sylvie M A; Kaiya, Hiroyuki

    2009-12-01

    Two ghrelin receptor (GHS-R) genes were isolated from channel catfish tissue and a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library. The two receptors were characterized by determining tissue distribution, ontogeny of receptor mRNA expression, and effects of exogenous homologous ghrelin administration on target tissue mRNA expression. Analysis of sequence similarities indicated two genes putatively encoding GHS-R1 and GHS-R2, respectively, which have been known to be present in zebrafish. Organization and tissue expression of the GHS-R1 gene was similar to that reported for other species, and likewise yielded two detectable mRNA products as a result of alternative splicing. Expression of both full-length, GHS-R1a, and splice variant, GHS-R1b, mRNA was highest in the pituitary. Gene organization of GHS-R2 was similar to GHS-R1, but no splice variant was identified. Expression of GHS-R2a mRNA was highest in the Brockmann bodies. GHS-R1a mRNA was detected in unfertilized eggs and throughout embryogenesis, whereas GHR-R2a mRNA was not expressed in unfertilized eggs or early developing embryos and was the highest at the time of hatching. Catfish intraperitoneally injected with catfish ghrelin-Gly had greater mRNA expression of GHS-R1a in pituitaries at 2 h and Brockmann bodies at 4 h, and of GHS-R2a in Brockmann bodies at 6 h post injection. Amidated catfish ghrelin (ghrelin-amide) had no observable effect on expression of either pituitary receptor; however, GHS-R1a and GHS-R2a mRNA expression levels were increased 4 h post injection of ghrelin-amide in Brockmann bodies. This is the first characterization of GHS-R2a and suggests regulatory and functional differences between the two catfish receptors.

  9. Use of label-free optical biosensors to detect modulation of potassium channels by G-protein coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Matthew R; Shamah, Steven M; Kaczmarek, Leonard K

    2014-02-10

    Ion channels control the electrical properties of neurons and other excitable cell types by selectively allowing ions to flow through the plasma membrane(1). To regulate neuronal excitability, the biophysical properties of ion channels are modified by signaling proteins and molecules, which often bind to the channels themselves to form a heteromeric channel complex(2,3). Traditional assays examining the interaction between channels and regulatory proteins require exogenous labels that can potentially alter the protein's behavior and decrease the physiological relevance of the target, while providing little information on the time course of interactions in living cells. Optical biosensors, such as the X-BODY Biosciences BIND Scanner system, use a novel label-free technology, resonance wavelength grating (RWG) optical biosensors, to detect changes in resonant reflected light near the biosensor. This assay allows the detection of the relative change in mass within the bottom portion of living cells adherent to the biosensor surface resulting from ligand induced changes in cell adhesion and spreading, toxicity, proliferation, and changes in protein-protein interactions near the plasma membrane. RWG optical biosensors have been used to detect changes in mass near the plasma membrane of cells following activation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), receptor tyrosine kinases, and other cell surface receptors. Ligand-induced changes in ion channel-protein interactions can also be studied using this assay. In this paper, we will describe the experimental procedure used to detect the modulation of Slack-B sodium-activated potassium (KNa) channels by GPCRs.

  10. Mechanisms of modulation by internal protons of cyclic nucleotide-gated channels cloned from sensory receptor cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gavazzo, P; Picco, C; Menini, A

    1997-01-01

    We have examined the modulation by internal protons of cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels cloned from bovine olfactory receptor cells and retinal rods. CNG channels were studied in excised inside-out membrane patches from Xenopus laevis oocytes previously injected with the mRNA encoding for the subunit 1 of olfactory or rod channels. Channels were activated by cGMP or cAMP, and currents as a function of cyclic nucleotide concentrations were measured as pHi varied between 7.6 and 5.0. Increasing internal proton concentrations caused a partial blockage of the single-channel current, consistent with protonation of a single acidic site with a pK1 of 4.5-4.7, both in rod and in olfactory CNG channels. Channel gating properties were also affected by internal protons. The open probability at low cyclic nucleotide concentrations was greatly increased by lowering pHi, and the increase was larger when channels were activated by cAMP than by cGMP. Therefore, internal protons affected both channel permeation and gating properties, causing a reduction in single-channel current and an increase in open probability. These effects are likely to be caused by different titratable groups on the channel. PMID:9308192

  11. Melanocortin 4 receptor activation inhibits presynaptic N-type calcium channels in amygdaloid complex neurons.

    PubMed

    Agosti, Francina; López Soto, Eduardo J; Cabral, Agustina; Castrogiovanni, Daniel; Schioth, Helgi B; Perelló, Mario; Raingo, Jesica

    2014-09-01

    The melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R) is a G protein-coupled receptor involved in food intake and energy expenditure regulation. MC4R activation modifies neuronal activity but the molecular mechanisms by which this regulation occurs remain unclear. Here, we tested the hypothesis that MC4R activation regulates the activity of voltage-gated calcium channels and, as a consequence, synaptic activity. We also tested whether the proposed effect occurs in the amygdala, a brain area known to mediate the anorexigenic actions of MC4R signaling. Using the patch-clamp technique, we found that the activation of MC4R with its agonist melanotan II specifically inhibited 34.5 ± 1.5% of N-type calcium currents in transiently transfected HEK293 cells. This inhibition was concentration-dependent, voltage-independent and occluded by the Gαs pathway inhibitor cholera toxin. Moreover, we found that melanotan II specifically inhibited 25.9 ± 2.0% of native N-type calcium currents and 55.4 ± 14.4% of evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents in mouse cultured amygdala neurons. In vivo, we found that the MC4R agonist RO27-3225 increased the marker of cellular activity c-Fos in several components of the amygdala, whereas the N-type channel blocker ω conotoxin GVIA increased c-Fos expression exclusively in the central subdivision of the amygdala. Thus, MC4R specifically inhibited the presynaptic N-type channel subtype, and this inhibition may be important for the effects of melanocortin in the central subdivision of the amygdala.

  12. A mutational analysis of the acetylcholine receptor channel transmitter binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Akk, G; Zhou, M; Auerbach, A

    1999-01-01

    Mutagenesis and single-channel kinetic analysis were used to investigate the roles of four acetylcholine receptor channel (AChR) residues that are candidates for interacting directly with the agonist. The EC50 of the ACh dose-response curve was increased following alpha-subunit mutations Y93F and Y198F and epsilon-subunit mutations D175N and E184Q. Single-channel kinetic modeling indicates that the increase was caused mainly by a reduced gating equilibrium constant (Theta) in alphaY198F and epsilonD175N, by an increase in the equilibrium dissociation constant for ACh (KD) and a reduction in Theta in alphaY93F, and only by a reduction in KD in epsilonE184Q. This mutation altered the affinity of only one of the two binding sites and was the only mutation that reduced competition by extracellular K+. Additional mutations of epsilonE184 showed that K+ competition was unaltered in epsilonE184D and was virtually eliminated in epsilonE184K, but that neither of these mutations altered the intrinsic affinity for ACh. Thus there is an apparent electrostatic interaction between the epsilonE184 side chain and K+ ( approximately 1.7kBT), but not ACh+. The results are discussed in terms of multisite and induced-fit models of ligand binding to the AChR. PMID:9876135

  13. Upregulation of Transient Receptor Potential Canonical Channels Contributes to Endotoxin-Induced Pulmonary Arterial Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gui-Lan; Jiang, Hongni; Zou, Fangdong

    2016-01-01

    Background Septic shock is a pathologic condition caused by endotoxin-producing bacteria, and often associated with severe pulmonary hypertension. Inflammation is a major systemic response to endotoxin; however, it is unknown whether endotoxin has a direct impact on pulmonary arteries that contributes to pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension. Material/Methods Rat pulmonary arteries and primary pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) were cultured in vitro and treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and blockers of transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels. Neointimal growth and arterial stenosis were observed on cryosections of cultured pulmonary arteries. Proliferation of PASMCs was examined by a WST-1 (water-soluble tetrazolium salt) assay. Expression of TRPC genes in pulmonary arteries and PASMCs were detected and quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. Results LPS significantly induced neointimal growth and stenosis of pulmonary arteries and promoted proliferation of PASMCs. TRPC channel blockers 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate and SKF-96365 inhibited LPS-induced remodeling of pulmonary arteries and PASMC proliferation. Expression of TRPC1/3/4/6 was detected in pulmonary arteries and PASMCs. LPS treatment dramatically increased the expression of TRPC3 and TRPC4 at both messenger RNA and protein levels. Conclusions LPS stimulates stenosis of pulmonary arteries through enhancement of TRPC-mediated Ca2+ entry into PASMCs, which is caused by upregulation of TRPC3 and TRPC4 channels. PMID:27471122

  14. Spontaneous opening of the acetylcholine receptor channel in developing muscle cells from normal and dystrophic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Franco-Obregon, A.; Lansman, J.B.

    1995-12-31

    Single-channel activity was recorded from cell-attached patches on skeletal muscle cells isolated from wild-type mice and from mice carrying the dy or mdx mutations. Spontaneous openings of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor channel (nAChR) were detected in virtually all recordings from either 4v/dy or dyl + myotubes. but only infrequently from wild-type or mdx myotubes. Spontaneous openings were also present in most recordings from undifferentiated myoblasts from all of the mouse strains studied. The biophysical properties of the spontaneous activity were similar to those of the embryonic form of the nAChR in the presence of acetylcholine (ACh). Examination of the single-channel currents evoked by low concentrations of ACh showed a reduced sensitivity to the agonist in the dystrophic dy and mdx myotubes. but not in wild- type myotubes. The results suggest that alterations in nAChR function are associated with the pathogenesis of muscular dystrophy in the dy mouse.

  15. Acetylcholine regulation of nicotinic receptor channels through a putative G protein in chick myotubes.

    PubMed Central

    Eusebi, F; Grassi, F; Molinaro, M; Zani, B M

    1987-01-01

    1. Single-channel currents induced by acetylcholine (ACh) were recorded from unstriated and non-innervated embryonic chick myotubes using the cell-attached patch-clamp technique. 2. ACh applied to the non-patched membrane decreased both channel opening probability and conductance. These ACh-induced effects occurred also when the non-patched membrane was exposed to nominally Ca2+-free extracellular medium, but were absent when it was treated with curare. 3. ACh-induced membrane current recorded under whole-cell patch-clamp conditions decreased in amplitude and time course when myotubes were intracellularly loaded with guanosine-5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) GTP gamma S), but not with guanosine-5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) (GDP beta S) or cyclic adenosine-5'-monophosphate (cyclic AMP). Internal perfusion of GTP gamma S affected the ACh-induced openings in a similar manner to the non-patch ACh application. 4. These results suggest that ACh, in addition to its direct effect, acts indirectly on the nicotinic receptor channels by delivering an intracellular messenger and through the activation of a putative G protein. PMID:2451747

  16. Regulation of the transient receptor potential channel TRPM3 by phosphoinositides.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Balázs I; Konrad, Maik; Ghosh, Debapriya; Mohr, Florian; Halaszovich, Christian R; Leitner, Michael G; Vriens, Joris; Oberwinkler, Johannes; Voets, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    The transient receptor potential (TRP) channel TRPM3 is a calcium-permeable cation channel activated by heat and by the neurosteroid pregnenolone sulfate (PregS). TRPM3 is highly expressed in sensory neurons, where it plays a key role in heat sensing and inflammatory hyperalgesia, and in pancreatic β cells, where its activation enhances glucose-induced insulin release. However, despite its functional importance, little is known about the cellular mechanisms that regulate TRPM3 activity. Here, we provide evidence for a dynamic regulation of TRPM3 by membrane phosphatidylinositol phosphates (PIPs). Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI[4,5]P2) and ATP applied to the intracellular side of excised membrane patches promote recovery of TRPM3 from desensitization. The stimulatory effect of cytosolic ATP on TRPM3 reflects activation of phosphatidylinositol kinases (PI-Ks), leading to resynthesis of PIPs in the plasma membrane. Various PIPs directly enhance TRPM3 activity in cell-free inside-out patches, with a potency order PI(3,4,5)P3 > PI(3,5)P2 > PI(4,5)P2 ≈ PI(3,4)P2 > PI(4)P. Conversely, TRPM3 activity is rapidly and reversibly inhibited by activation of phosphatases that remove the 5-phosphate from PIPs. Finally, we show that recombinant TRPM3, as well as the endogenous TRPM3 in insuloma cells, is rapidly and reversibly inhibited by activation of phospholipase C-coupled muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. Our results reveal basic cellular mechanisms whereby membrane receptors can regulate TRPM3 activity.

  17. Rat renal arcade segment expresses vasopressin-regulated water channel and vasopressin V2 receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Kishore, B K; Mandon, B; Oza, N B; DiGiovanni, S R; Coleman, R A; Ostrowski, N L; Wade, J B; Knepper, M A

    1996-01-01

    The arcades are long, branched renal tubules which connect deep and mid-cortical nephrons to cortical collecting ducts in the renal cortex. Because they are inaccessible by standard physiological techniques, their functions are poorly understood. In this paper, we demonstrate that the arcades are a site of expression of two proteins, aquaporin-2 (the vasopressin-regulated water channel) and the V2 vasopressin receptor, that are important to regulated water transport in the kidney. Using a peptide-derived polyclonal antibody to aquaporin-2, quantitative ELISA in microdissected segments showed that aquaporin-2 is highly expressed in arcades and that the expression is increased in response to restriction of fluid intake. Immunocytochemistry revealed abundant aquaporin-2 labeling of structures in the cortical labyrinth in a pattern similar to that of the Na(+)-Ca2+ exchanger and kallikrein, marker proteins expressed in arcades but not in cortical collecting ducts. RT-PCR experiments demonstrated substantial aquaporin-2 and V2 receptor mRNA in microdissected arcades. In situ hybridization, using 35S-labeled antisense cRNA probes for the V2 receptor demonstrated strong labeling of both arcades and cortical collecting ducts. Thus, these results indicate that the arcades contain the specific proteins associated with vasopressin-regulated water transport, and may be a heretofore unrecognized site of free water absorption. PMID:8675687

  18. [Activation and regulation of nociceptive transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, TRPV1 and TRPA1].

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Makoto

    2010-03-01

    TRP channels are well recognized for their contributions to sensory transduction, responding to a wide variety of stimuli including temperature, nociceptive stimuli, touch, osmolarity and pheromones. In particular, the involvement of TRP channels in nociception has been extensively studied following the cloning of the capsaicin receptor, TRPV1. Painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy is described as a superficial burning pain, and it is one of the most commonly encountered neuropathic pain syndromes in clinical practice. We found that hypoxic and high glucose conditions commonly observed in diabetes potentiate TRPV1 activity without affecting TRPV1 expression both in native rat sensory neurons and HEK293 cells expressing rat TRPV1. The potentiation seems to be caused by phosphorylation of the serine residues of TRPV1 by PKC. These data indicate that PKC-dependent potentiation of TRPV1 activities under hypoxia and hyperglycemia might be involved in early diabetic neuropathy. Mechanisms for the detection of alkaline pH by sensory neurons are not well understood, although it is well accepted that acidic pH monitoring can be attributed to several ion channels, including TRPV1 and ASICs. We found that alkaline pH activates TRPA1 and that the TRPA1 activation is involved in nociception, using Ca(2+)-imaging and patch-clamp methods. In addition, intracellular alkalization activated TRPA1 at the whole-cell level, and single-channel openings were observed in the inside-out configuration. Furthermore, intraplantar injection of ammonium chloride into the mouse hind paw caused pain-related behaviors, which were not observed in TRPA1-deficient mice. These results suggest that alkaline pH causes pain sensation through activation of TRPA1.

  19. Transient Receptor Potential Canonical Type 3 Channels Control the Vascular Contractility of Mouse Mesenteric Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Yeon, Soo-In; Kim, Joo Young; Yeon, Dong-Soo; Abramowitz, Joel; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Muallem, Shmuel; Lee, Young-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Transient receptor potential canonical type 3 (TRPC3) channels are non-selective cation channels and regulate intracellular Ca2+ concentration. We examined the role of TRPC3 channels in agonist-, membrane depolarization (high K+)-, and mechanical (pressure)-induced vasoconstriction and vasorelaxation in mouse mesenteric arteries. Vasoconstriction and vasorelaxation of endothelial cells intact mesenteric arteries were measured in TRPC3 wild-type (WT) and knockout (KO) mice. Calcium concentration ([Ca2+]) was measured in isolated arteries from TRPC3 WT and KO mice as well as in the mouse endothelial cell line bEnd.3. Nitric oxide (NO) production and nitrate/nitrite concentrations were also measured in TRPC3 WT and KO mice. Phenylephrine-induced vasoconstriction was reduced in TRPC3 KO mice when compared to that of WT mice, but neither high K+- nor pressure-induced vasoconstriction was altered in TRPC3 KO mice. Acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation was inhibited in TRPC3 KO mice and by the selective TRPC3 blocker pyrazole-3. Acetylcholine blocked the phenylephrine-induced increase in Ca2+ ratio and then relaxation in TRPC3 WT mice but had little effect on those outcomes in KO mice. Acetylcholine evoked a Ca2+ increase in endothelial cells, which was inhibited by pyrazole-3. Acetylcholine induced increased NO release in TRPC3 WT mice, but not in KO mice. Acetylcholine also increased the nitrate/nitrite concentration in TRPC3 WT mice, but not in KO mice. The present study directly demonstrated that the TRPC3 channel is involved in agonist-induced vasoconstriction and plays important role in NO-mediated vasorelaxation of intact mesenteric arteries. PMID:25310225

  20. Differential expression of canonical (classical) transient receptor potential channels in guinea pig enteric nervous system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sumei; Qu, Mei-Hua; Ren, Wei; Hu, Hong-Zhen; Gao, Na; Wang, Guo-Du; Wang, Xi-Yu; Fei, Guijun; Zuo, Fei; Xia, Yun; Wood, Jackie D

    2008-12-20

    The canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) family of ion channels is implicated in many neuronal processes including calcium homeostasis, membrane excitability, synaptic transmission, and axon guidance. TRPC channels are postulated to be important in the functional neurobiology of the enteric nervous system (ENS); nevertheless, details for expression in the ENS are lacking. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and immunohistochemistry were used to study the expression and localization of TRPC channels. We found mRNA transcripts, protein on Western blots, and immunoreactivity (IR) for TRPC1/3/4/6 expressed in the small intestinal ENS of adult guinea pigs. TRPC1/3/4/6-IR was localized to distinct subpopulations of enteric neurons and was differentially distributed between the myenteric and submucosal divisions of the ENS. TRPC1-IR was widely distributed and localized to neurons with cholinergic, calretinin, and nitrergic neuronal immunochemical codes in the myenteric plexus. It was localized to both cholinergic and noncholinergic secretomotor neurons in the submucosal plexus. TRPC3-IR was found only in the submucosal plexus and was expressed exclusively by neuropeptide Y-IR neurons. TRPC4/6-IR was expressed in only a small population of myenteric neurons, but was abundantly expressed in the submucosal plexus. TRPC4/6-IR was coexpressed with both cholinergic and nitrergic neurochemical codes in the myenteric plexus. In the submucosal plexus, TRPC4/6-IR was expressed exclusively in noncholinergic secretomotor neurons. No TRPC1/3/4/6-IR was found in calbindin-IR neurons. TRPC3/4/6-IR was widely expressed along varicose nerve fibers and colocalized with synaptophysin-IR at putative neurotransmitter release sites. Our results suggest important roles for TRPC channels in ENS physiology and neuronal regulation of gut function.

  1. Dynamic regulation of ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1) channel activity by Homer 1.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wei; Tu, Jiancheng; Pouliquin, Pierre; Cabrales, Elaine; Shen, Xiaohua; Dulhunty, Angela; Worley, Paul F; Allen, Paul D; Pessah, Isaac N

    2008-03-01

    Homer, a family of scaffolding proteins originally identified in neurons, is also expressed in skeletal muscle. Previous studies showed that splice variants of Homer 1 (H1) amplify the gain of the ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1) channel complex. Using [3H]ryanodine ([3H]Ry) to probe the conformational state of RyR1, the actions of long- and short-forms of H1 are examined singly and in combination. At < or =200 nM, H1 long-forms (H1b or H1c possessing coiled-coil (CC) domains) and short-forms (H1a or H1EVH1 lacking CC domains) enhance specific [3H]Ry binding to RyR1. However, at a concentration > 200 nM, either H1 form completely inhibited [3H]Ry binding. Importantly, the combinations of H1c+H1EVH1, or H1b+H1a acted in an additive manner to enhance or inhibit [3H]Ry-binding activity. H1a and H1c individually or in combination produced the same dynamic pattern in regulating purified RyR1 channels reconstituted in planar lipid bilayers. In combination, their net action on RyR1 channels depends on total concentrations of H1. These data provide a mechanism by which constitutively and transiently expressed H1 forms can tightly regulate RyR1 channel activity in response to changing levels of expression and degradation of H1 proteins.

  2. Phylogenetic sequence analysis, recombinant expression, and tissue distribution of a channel catfish estrogen receptor beta

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, Zhenfang; Gale, William L.; Chang, Xiaotian; Langenau, David; Patino, Reynaldo; Maule, Alec G.; Densmore, Llewellyn D.

    2000-01-01

    An estrogen receptor β (ERβ) cDNA fragment was amplified by RT-PCR of total RNAextracted from liver and ovary of immature channel catfish. This cDNA fragment was used to screen an ovarian cDNA library made from an immature female fish. A clone was obtained that contained an open reading frame encoding a 575-amino-acid protein with a deduced molecular weight of 63.9 kDa. Maximum parsimony and Neighbor Joining analyses were used to generate a phylogenetic classification of channel catfish ERβ on the basis of 25 full-length teleost and tetrapod ER sequences. The consensus tree obtained indicated the existence of two major vertebrate ER subtypes, α and β. Within each subtype, and in accordance with established phylogenetic relationships, teleost and tetrapod ER were monophyletic confirming the results of a previous analysis (Z. Xiaet al., 1999, Gen. Comp. Endocrinol. 113, 360–368). Extracts of COS-7 cells transfectedwith channel catfish ERβ cDNA bound estrogen with high affinity (Kd = 0.21 nM) and specificity. The affinity of channel catfish ERβ for estrogen was higher than previously reported for channel catfish ERα. As determined by qualitative RT-PCR, the tissue distributions of ERα and ERβ were similar but not identical. Both ER subtypes were present in ovary and testis. ERα was found in all other tissues examined from juvenile and mature fish of both sexes. ERβ was also found in most tissues except, in most cases, whole blood and head kidney. Interestingly, the pattern of expression of ER subtypes in head kidney always corresponded to the pattern in whole blood. In conclusion, we isolated a channel catfish ERβ with ligand-binding affinity and tissue expression patterns different from ERα. Also, we confirmed the validity of our previously proposed general classification scheme for vertebrate ER into α and β subtypes and within each subtype, into teleost and tetrapod clades.

  3. TARP-associated AMPA receptors display an increased maximum channel conductance and multiple kinetically distinct open states.

    PubMed

    Shelley, Chris; Farrant, Mark; Cull-Candy, Stuart G

    2012-11-15

    Fast excitatory synaptic transmission in the CNS is mediated mainly by AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs), whose biophysical properties are dramatically modulated by the presence of transmembrane AMPAR regulatory proteins (TARPs). To help construct a kinetic model that will realistically describe native AMPAR/TARP function, we have examined the single-channel properties of homomeric GluA1 AMPARs in combination with the TARPs, γ-2, γ-4 and γ-5. In a saturating concentration of agonist, each of these AMPAR/TARP combinations gave rise to single-channel currents with multiple conductance levels that appeared intrinsic to the receptor-channel complex, and showed long-lived subconductance states. The open time and burst length distributions of the receptor complexes displayed multiple dwell-time components. In the case of γ-2- and γ-4-associated receptors, these distributions included a long-lived component lasting tens of milliseconds that was absent from both GluA1 alone and γ-5-associated receptors. The open time distributions for each conductance level required two dwell-time components, indicating that at each conductance level the channel occupies a minimum of two kinetically distinct open states. We have explored how these data place novel constraints on possible kinetic models of TARP-associated AMPARs that may be used to define AMPAR-mediated synaptic transmission.

  4. Neurotransmitter receptors and voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels encoded by mRNA from the adult corpus callosum.

    PubMed Central

    Matute, C; Miledi, R

    1993-01-01

    The presence of mRNAs encoding neurotransmitter receptors and voltage-gated channels in the adult human and bovine corpus callosum was investigated using Xenopus oocytes. Oocytes injected with mRNA extracted from the corpus callosum expressed functional receptors to glutamate, acetylcholine, and serotonin, and also voltage-operated Ca2+ channels, all with similar properties in the two species studied. Acetylcholine and serotonin elicited oscillatory Cl- currents due to activation of the inositol phosphate-Ca2+ receptor-channel coupling system. Glutamate and its analogs N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), kainate, quisqualate, and alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) induced smooth currents. The non-NMDA responses showed a strong inward rectification at positive potentials and were potently blocked by 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione, as observed for the AMPA/kainate glutamate receptors GLUR1 and GLUR3. Furthermore, in situ hybridization experiments showed that GLUR1 and GLUR3 mRNAs are present in corpus callosum cells that were labeled with antiserum to glial fibrillary acid protein and that, in primary cell cultures, had the morphology of type 2 astrocytes. These results indicate that glial cells in the adult corpus callosum possess mRNA encoding functional neurotransmitter receptors and Ca2+ channels. These molecules may provide a mechanism for glial-neuronal interactions. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:7682696

  5. Serotonin stimulates lateral habenula via activation of the post-synaptic serotonin 2/3 receptors and transient receptor potential channels

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Wanhong; Zhang, Yong; Xie, Guiqin; Gregor, Danielle; Bekker, Alex; Ye, Jiang-Hong

    2015-01-01

    There is growing interest on the role of the lateral habenula (LHb) in depression, because it closely and bilaterally connects with the serotoninergic raphe nuclei. The LHb sends glutamate efferents to the raphe nuclei, while it receives serotoninergic afferents, and expresses a high density of serotonin (5-HT) receptors. Recent studies suggest that 5-HT receptors exist both in the presynaptic and postsynaptic sites of LHb neurons, and activation of these receptors may have different effects on the activity of LHb neurons. The current study focused on the effect of 5-HT on the postsynaptic membrane. We found that 5-HT initiated a depolarizing inward current (I(5-HTi)) and accelerated spontaneous firing in ~80% of LHb neurons in rat brain slices. I(5-HTi) was also induced by the 5-HT uptake blocker citalopram, indicating activity of endogenous 5-HT. I(5-HTi) was diminished by 5-HT2/3 receptor antagonists (ritanserin, SB-200646 or ondansetron), and activated by the selective 5-HT2/3 agonists 1-(3- Chlorophenyl) piperazine hydrochloride or 1-(3-Chlorophenyl) biguanide hydrochloride. Furthermore, I(5-HTi) was attenuated by 2-Aminoethyl diphenylborinate, a blocker of transient receptor potential channels, and an IP3 receptor inhibitor, indicating the involvement of transient receptor potential channels. These results demonstrate that the reciprocal connection between the LHb and the 5-HT system highlights a key role for 5-HT stimulation of LHb neurons that may be important in the pathogenesis of depression. PMID:26471419

  6. Serotonin stimulates lateral habenula via activation of the post-synaptic serotonin 2/3 receptors and transient receptor potential channels.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Wanhong; Zhang, Yong; Xie, Guiqin; Gregor, Danielle; Bekker, Alex; Ye, Jiang-Hong

    2016-02-01

    There is growing interest on the role of the lateral habenula (LHb) in depression, because it closely and bilaterally connects with the serotoninergic raphe nuclei. The LHb sends glutamate efferents to the raphe nuclei, while it receives serotoninergic afferents, and expresses a high density of serotonin (5-HT) receptors. Recent studies suggest that 5-HT receptors exist both in the presynaptic and postsynaptic sites of LHb neurons, and activation of these receptors may have different effects on the activity of LHb neurons. The current study focused on the effect of 5-HT on the postsynaptic membrane. We found that 5-HT initiated a depolarizing inward current (I((5-HTi))) and accelerated spontaneous firing in ∼80% of LHb neurons in rat brain slices. I((5-HTi)) was also induced by the 5-HT uptake blocker citalopram, indicating activity of endogenous 5-HT. I((5-HTi)) was diminished by 5-HT(2/3) receptor antagonists (ritanserin, SB-200646 or ondansetron), and activated by the selective 5-HT(2/3) agonists 1-(3-Chlorophenyl) piperazine hydrochloride or 1-(3-Chlorophenyl) biguanide hydrochloride. Furthermore, I((5-HTi)) was attenuated by 2-Aminoethyl diphenylborinate, a blocker of transient receptor potential channels, and an IP3 receptor inhibitor, indicating the involvement of transient receptor potential channels. These results demonstrate that the reciprocal connection between the LHb and the 5-HT system highlights a key role for 5-HT stimulation of LHb neurons that may be important in the pathogenesis of depression.

  7. Calcium permeability of transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) 4 channels measured by TRPC4-GCaMP6s

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Juyeon; Myeong, Jongyun; Yang, Dongki

    2017-01-01

    Conflicting evidence has been obtained regarding whether transient receptor potential cation channels (TRPC) are store-operated channels (SOCs) or receptor-operated channels (ROCs). Moreover, the Ca/Na permeability ratio differs depending on whether the current-voltage (I-V) curve has a doubly rectifying shape or inward rectifying shape. To investigate the calcium permeability of TRPC4 channels, we attached GCaMP6s to TRPC4 and simultaneously measured the current and calcium signals. A TRPC4 specific activator, (–)-englerin A, induced both current and calcium fluorescence with the similar time course. Muscarinic receptor stimulator, carbachol, also induced both current and calcium fluorescence with the similar time course. By forming heteromers with TRPC4, TRPC1 significantly reduced the inward current with outward rectifying I-V curve, which also caused the decrease of calcium fluorescence intensity. These results suggest that GCaMP6s attached to TRPC4 can detect slight calcium changes near TRPC4 channels. Consequently, TRPC4-GCaMP6s can be a useful tool for testing the calcium permeability of TRPC4 channels. PMID:28066150

  8. [Regulation of potential-dependant calcium channels by 5-HT1B serotonin receptors in various populations of hippocampal cells].

    PubMed

    Kononov, A V; Ivanov, S V; Zinchenko, V P

    2013-01-01

    Metabotropic serotonin receptors of 5HT1-type in brain neurons participate in regulation of such human emotional states as aggression, fear and dependence on alcohol. Activated presynaptic 5-HT1B receptors suppress the Ca2+ influx through the potential-dependent calcium channels in certain neurons. The Ca2+ influx into the cells has been measured by increase of calcium ions concentration in cytoplasm in reply to the depolarization caused by 35mM KC1. Using system of image analysis in hippocampal cells culture we found out that Ca2+-signals to depolarization oin various populations of neurons differed in form, speed and amplitude. 5HT1B receptor agonists in 86 +/- 3 % of neurons slightly suppressed the activity of potential-dependent calcium channels. Two minor cell populations (5-8 % of cells each) were found out, that strongly differed in Ca2+ signal desensitization. Calcium signal caused by depolarization in one cells population differed in characteristic delay and high rate of decay. 5HT1B receptor agonists strongly inhibited the amplitude of the Ca2+ response on KCl only in this population of neurons. The calcium signal in second cell population differed by absence desensitization and smaller amplitude which constantly increased during depolarization. 5HT 1 B receptor agonists increased the calcium response amplitude to depolarization in this population of neurons. Thus we show various sensitivity of potential-dependent calcium channels of separate neurons to 5HTB1 receptor agonist.

  9. The role of palmitoylation in functional expression of nicotinic alpha7 receptors.

    PubMed

    Drisdel, Renaldo C; Manzana, Ehrine; Green, William N

    2004-11-17

    Neuronal alpha-bungarotoxin receptors (BgtRs) are nicotinic receptors that require as yet unidentified post-translational modifications to achieve functional expression. In this study, we examined the role of protein palmitoylation in BgtR expression. BgtR alpha7 subunits are highly palmitoylated in neurons from brain and other cells capable of BgtR expression, such as pheochromocytoma 12 (PC12) cells. In PC12 cells, alpha7 subunits are palmitoylated with a stoichiometry of approximately one palmitate per subunit, and inhibition of palmitoylation blocks BgtR expression. In cells incapable of BgtR expression, such as human embryonic kidney cells, alpha7 subunits are not significantly palmitoylated. However, in these same cells, chimeric subunits with the N-terminal half of alpha7 fused to the C-terminal half of serotonin-3A receptor (alpha7/5-HT3A) subunits form functional BgtRs that are palmitoylated to an extent similar to that of BgtRalpha7 subunits in PC12 cells. Palmitoylation of PC12 and alpha7/5-HT3A BgtRs occurred during assembly in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In conclusion, our data indicate a function for protein palmitoylation in which palmitoylation of assembling alpha7 subunits in the ER has a role in the formation of functional BgtRs.

  10. Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate Receptors in the Endoplasmic Reticulum: a Single-channel Point of View

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Don-On Daniel; Foskett, J. Kevin

    2015-01-01

    As an intracellular Ca2+ release channel at the endoplasmic reticulum membrane, the ubiquitous inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) receptor (InsP3R) plays a crucial role in the generation, propagation and regulation of intracellular Ca2+ signals that regulate numerous physiological and pathophysiological processes. This review provides a concise account of the fundamental single-channel properties of the InsP3R channel: its conductance properties and its regulation by InsP3 and Ca2+, its physiological ligands, studied using nuclear patch clamp electrophysiology. PMID:25555684

  11. Activity-dependent bidirectional regulation of GABAA receptor channels by the 5-HT4 receptor-mediated signalling in rat prefrontal cortical pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xiang; Flores-Hernandez, Jorge; Feng, Jian; Yan, Zhen

    2002-01-01

    Emerging evidence has implicated a potential role for 5-HT4 receptors in cognition and anxiolysis. One of the main target structures of 5-HT4 receptors on ‘cognitive and emotional’ pathways is the prefrontal cortex (PFC). As GABAergic signalling plays a key role in regulating PFC functions, we examined the effect of 5-HT4 receptors on GABAA receptor channels in PFC pyramidal neurons. Application of 5-HT4 receptor agonists produced either an enhancement or a reduction of GABA-evoked currents in PFC neurons, which are both mediated by anchored protein kinase A (PKA). Although PKA phosphorylation of GABAA receptor β3 or β1 subunits leads to current enhancement or reduction respectively in heterologous expression systems, we found that β3 and β1 subunits are co-expressed in PFC pyramidal neurons. Interestingly, altering PKA activation levels can change the direction of the dual effect, switching enhancement to reduction and vice versa. In addition, increased neuronal activity in PFC slices elevated the PKA activation level, changing the enhancing effect of 5-HT4 receptors on the amplitude of GABAergic inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) to a reduction. These results suggest that 5-HT4 receptors can modulate GABAergic signalling bidirectionally, depending on the basal PKA activation levels that are determined by neuronal activity. This modulation provides a unique and flexible mechanism for 5-HT4 receptors to dynamically regulate synaptic transmission and neuronal excitability in the PFC network. PMID:11986365

  12. Discovery of functional monoclonal antibodies targeting G-protein-coupled receptors and ion channels.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Trevor C I

    2016-06-15

    The development of recombinant antibody therapeutics is a significant area of growth in the pharmaceutical industry with almost 50 approved monoclonal antibodies on the market in the US and Europe. Despite this growth, however, certain classes of important molecular targets have remained intractable to therapeutic antibodies due to complexity of the target molecules. These complex target molecules include G-protein-coupled receptors and ion channels which represent a large potential target class for therapeutic intervention with monoclonal antibodies. Although these targets have typically been addressed by small molecule approaches, the exquisite specificity of antibodies provides a significant opportunity to provide selective modulation of these target proteins. Given this opportunity, substantial effort has been applied to address the technical challenges of targeting these complex membrane proteins with monoclonal antibodies. In this review recent progress made in the strategies for discovery of functional monoclonal antibodies for these challenging membrane protein targets is addressed.

  13. Melanocortin 4 receptor constitutive activity inhibits L-type voltage-gated calcium channels in neurons.

    PubMed

    Agosti, F; Cordisco Gonzalez, S; Martinez Damonte, V; Tolosa, M J; Di Siervi, N; Schioth, H B; Davio, C; Perello, M; Raingo, J

    2017-03-27

    The melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R) is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that is expressed in several brain nuclei playing a crucial role in the regulation of energy balance controlling the homeostasis of the organism. It displays both agonist-evoked and constitutive activity, and moreover, it can couple to different G proteins. Most of the research on MC4R has been focused on agonist-induced activity, while the molecular and cellular basis of MC4R constitutive activity remains scarcely studied. We have previously shown that neuronal N-type voltage-gated calcium channels (CaV2.2) are inhibited by MC4R agonist-dependent activation, while the CaV subtypes that carry L- and P/Q-type current are not. Here, we tested the hypothesis that MC4R constitutive activity can affect CaV, with focus on the channel subtypes that can control transcriptional activity coupled to depolarization (L-type, CaV1.2/1.3) and neurotransmitter release (N- and P/Q-type, CaV2.2 and CaV2.1). We found that MC4R constitutive activity inhibits specifically CaV1.2/1.3 and CaV2.1 subtypes of CaV. We also explored the signaling pathways mediating this inhibition, and thus propose that agonist-dependent and basal MC4R activation modes signal differentially through Gs and Gi/o pathways to impact on different CaV subtypes. In addition, we found that chronic incubation with MC4R endogenous inverse agonist, agouti and agouti-related peptide (AgRP), occludes CaV inhibition in a cell line and in amygdaloid complex cultured neurons as well. Thus, we define new mechanisms of control of the main mediators of depolarization-induced calcium entry into neurons by a GPCR that displays constitutive activity.

  14. P2Y purinergic receptor regulation of CFTR chloride channels in mouse cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto-Mizuma, Shintaro; Wang, Ge-Xin; Hume, Joseph R

    2004-05-01

    The intracellular signalling pathways and molecular mechanisms responsible for P2-purinoceptor-mediated chloride (Cl(-)) currents (I(Cl,ATP)) were studied in mouse ventricular myocytes. In standard NaCl-containing extracellular solutions, extracellular ATP (100 microm) activated two different currents, I(Cl,ATP) with a linear I-V relationship in symmetrical Cl(-) solutions, and an inwardly rectifying cation conductance (cationic I(ATP)). Cationic I(ATP) was selectively inhibited by Gd(3+) and Zn(2+), or by replacement of extracellular NaCl by NMDG; I(Cl,ATP) was Cl(-) selective, and inhibited by replacement of extracellular Cl(-) by Asp(-); both currents were prevented by suramin or DIDS pretreatment. In GTPgammaS-loaded cells, I(Cl,ATP) was irreversibly activated by ATP, but cationic I(ATP) was still regulated reversibly. GDPbetaS prevented activation of the I(Cl,ATP,) even though pertussis toxin pretreatment did not modulate I(Cl,ATP). These results suggest that activation of I(Cl,ATP) occurs via a G-protein coupled P2Y purinergic receptor. The I(Cl,ATP) persistently activated by GTPgammaS, was inhibited by glibenclamide but not by DIDS, thus exhibiting known pharmacological properties of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channels. In ventricular cells of cftr(-/-) mice, extracellular ATP activated cationic I(ATP), but failed to activate any detectable I(Cl,ATP). These results provide compelling evidence that activation of CFTR Cl(-) channels in mouse heart are coupled to G-protein coupled P2Y purinergic receptors.

  15. Mapping the receptor site for α-scorpion toxins on a Na+ channel voltage sensor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinti; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Kahn, Roy; Gordon, Dalia; Gurevitz, Michael; Scheuer, Todd; Catterall, William A.

    2011-01-01

    The α-scorpions toxins bind to the resting state of Na+ channels and inhibit fast inactivation by interaction with a receptor site formed by domains I and IV. Mutants T1560A, F1610A, and E1613A in domain IV had lower affinities for Leiurus quinquestriatus hebraeus toxin II (LqhII), and mutant E1613R had ∼73-fold lower affinity. Toxin dissociation was accelerated by depolarization and increased by these mutations, whereas association rates at negative membrane potentials were not changed. These results indicate that Thr1560 in the S1-S2 loop, Phe1610 in the S3 segment, and Glu1613 in the S3-S4 loop in domain IV participate in toxin binding. T393A in the SS2-S6 loop in domain I also had lower affinity for LqhII, indicating that this extracellular loop may form a secondary component of the receptor site. Analysis with the Rosetta-Membrane algorithm resulted in a model of LqhII binding to the voltage sensor in a resting state, in which amino acid residues in an extracellular cleft formed by the S1-S2 and S3-S4 loops in domain IV interact with two faces of the wedge-shaped LqhII molecule. The conserved gating charges in the S4 segment are in an inward position and form ion pairs with negatively charged amino acid residues in the S2 and S3 segments of the voltage sensor. This model defines the structure of the resting state of a voltage sensor of Na+ channels and reveals its mode of interaction with a gating modifier toxin. PMID:21876146

  16. Intracellular calcium level is an important factor influencing ion channel modulations by PLC-coupled metabotropic receptors in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Yuto; Echigo, Ryousuke; Kashima, Kousuke; Minami, Hanae; Watanabe, Megumi; Nishikawa, Yuiko; Muranishi, Miho; Yoneda, Mitsugu; Ohno-Shosaku, Takako

    2013-05-28

    Signaling pathways involving phospholipase C (PLC) are involved in various neural functions. Understanding how these pathways are regulated will lead to a better understanding of their roles in neural functions. Previous studies demonstrated that receptor-driven PLCβ activation depends on intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i), suggesting the possibility that PLCβ-dependent cellular responses are basically Ca(2+) dependent. To test this possibility, we examined whether modulations of ion channels driven by PLC-coupled metabotropic receptors are sensitive to [Ca(2+)]i using cultured hippocampal neurons. Muscarinic activation triggered an inward current at -100 mV (the equilibrium potential for K(+)) in a subpopulation of neurons. This current response was suppressed by pirenzepine (an M1-preferring antagonist), PLC inhibitor, non-selective cation channel blocker, and lowering [Ca(2+)]i. Using the neurons showing no response at -100 mV, effects of muscarinic activation on K(+) channels were examined at -40 mV. Muscarinic activation induced a transient decrease of the holding outward current. This current response was mimicked and occluded by XE991, an M-current K(+) channel blocker, suppressed by pirenzepine, PLC inhibitor and lowering [Ca(2+)]i, and enhanced by elevating [Ca(2+)]i. Similar results were obtained when group I metabotropic glutamate receptors were activated instead of muscarinic receptors. These results clearly show that ion channel modulations driven by PLC-coupled metabotropic receptors are dependent on [Ca(2+)]i, supporting the hypothesis that cellular responses induced by receptor-driven PLCβ activation are basically Ca(2+) dependent.

  17. Design and Synthesis of a New Series of 4-Heteroarylamino-1'-azaspiro[oxazole-5,3'-bicyclo[2.2.2]octanes as α7 Nicotinic Receptor Agonists. 1. Development of Pharmacophore and Early Structure-Activity Relationship.

    PubMed

    Cook, James; Zusi, F Christopher; McDonald, Ivar M; King, Dalton; Hill, Matthew D; Iwuagwu, Christiana; Mate, Robert A; Fang, Haiquan; Zhao, Rulin; Wang, Bei; Cutrone, Jingfang; Ma, Baoqing; Gao, Qi; Knox, Ronald J; Matchett, Michele; Gallagher, Lizbeth; Ferrante, Meredith; Post-Munson, Debra; Molski, Thaddeus; Easton, Amy; Miller, Regina; Jones, Kelli; Digavalli, Siva; Healy, Francine; Lentz, Kimberley; Benitex, Yulia; Clarke, Wendy; Natale, Joanne; Siuciak, Judith A; Lodge, Nicholas; Zaczek, Robert; Denton, Rex; Morgan, Daniel; Bristow, Linda J; Macor, John E; Olson, Richard E

    2016-12-22

    The design and synthesis of a series of quinuclidine-containing spirooxazolidines ("spiroimidates") and their utility as α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor partial agonists are described. Selected members of the series demonstrated excellent selectivity for α7 over the highly homologous 5-HT3A receptor. Modification of the N-spiroimidate heterocycle substituent led to (1S,2R,4S)-N-isoquinolin-3-yl)-4'H-4-azaspiro[bicyclo[2.2.2]octane-2,5'oxazol]-2'-amine (BMS-902483), a potent α7 partial agonist, which improved cognition in preclinical rodent models.

  18. Chronic Caffeine Alters the Density of Adenosine, Adrenergic, Cholinergic, GABA, and Serotonin Receptors and Calcium Channels in Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Dan; Nikodijević, Olga; Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Daly, John W.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY 1. Chronic ingestion of caffeine by male NIH strain mice alters the density of a variety of central receptors. 2. The density of cortical A1 adenosine receptors is increased by 20%, while the density of striatal A2A adenosine receptors is unaltered. 3. The densities of cortical β1 and cerebellar β2 adrenergic receptors are reduced by ca. 25%, while the densities of cortical α1 and α2 adrenergic receptors are not significantly altered. Densities of striatal D1 and D2 dopaminergic receptors are unaltered. The densities of cortical 5 HT1 and 5 HT2 serotonergic receptors are increased by 26–30%. Densities of cortical muscarinic and nicotinic receptors are increased by 40–50%. The density of cortical benzodiazepine-binding sites associated with GABAA receptors is increased by 65%, and the affinity appears slightly decreased. The density of cortical MK-801 sites associated with NMDA-glutaminergic receptors appear unaltered. 4. The density of cortical nitrendipine-binding sites associated with calcium channels is increased by 18%. 5. The results indicate that chronic ingestion of caffeine equivalent to about 100 mg/kg/day in mice causes a wide range of biochemical alterations in the central nervous system. PMID:8242688

  19. Effect of gadolinium on the ryanodine receptor/sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium release channel of skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Sárközi, Sándor; Szegedi, Csaba; Lukács, Balázs; Ronjat, Michel; Jóna, István

    2005-01-01

    The effect of gadolinium ions on the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium release channel/ryanodine receptor (RyR1) was studied using heavy SR (HSR) vesicles and RyR1 isolated from rabbit fast twitch muscle. In the [(3)H]ryanodine binding assay, 5 microM Gd(3+) increased the K(d) of the [(3)H]ryanodine binding of the vesicles from 33.8 nM to 45.6 nM while B(max), referring to the binding capacity, was not affected significantly. In the presence of 18 nM[(3)H]ryanodine and 100 microM free Ca(2+), Gd(3+) inhibited the binding of the radiolabeled ryanodine with an apparent K(d) value of 14.7 microM and a Hill coefficient of 3.17. In (45)Ca(2+) experiments the time constant of (45)Ca(2+) efflux from HSR vesicles increased from 90.9 (+/- 11.1) ms to 187.7 (+/- 24.9) ms in the presence of 20 microM gadolinium. In single channel experiments gadolinium inhibited the channel activity from both the cytoplasmic (cis) (IC(50) = 5.65 +/- 0.33 microM, n(Hill) = 4.71) and the luminal (trans) side (IC(50) = 5.47 +/- 0.24 microM, n(Hill) = 4.31). The degree of inhibition on the cis side didn't show calcium dependency in the 100 microM to 1 mM Ca(2+) concentration range which indicates no competition with calcium on its regulatory binding sites. When Gd(3+) was applied at the trans side, EGTA was present at the cis side to prevent the binding of Gd(+3) to the cytoplasmic calcium binding regulatory sites of the RyR1 if Gd(3+) accidentally passed through the channel. The inhibition of the channel did not show any voltage dependence, which would be the case if Gd(3+) exerted its effect after getting to the cis side. Our results suggest the presence of inhibitory binding sites for Gd(3+) on both sides of the RyR1 with similar Hill coefficients and IC(50) values.

  20. Transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 (TRPV-1) channels contribute to cutaneous thermal hyperaemia in humans.

    PubMed

    Wong, Brett J; Fieger, Sarah M

    2010-11-01

    The initial, rapid increase in skin blood flow in response to direct application of heat is thought to be mediated by an axon reflex, which is dependent on intact cutaneous sensory nerves. We tested the hypothesis that inhibition of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV-1) channels, which are putative channels located on sensory nerves, would attenuate the skin blood flow response to local heating in humans. Ten subjects were equipped with four microdialysis fibres which were randomly assigned one of four treatments: (1) vehicle control (90% propylene glycol + 10% lactated Ringer solution); (2) 20 mm capsazepine to inhibit TRPV-1 channels; (3) 10 mm l-NAME to inhibit NO synthase; and (4) combined 20 mm capsazepine + 10 mm l-NAME. Following baseline measurements, the temperature of skin heaters was increased from 33°C to 42°C at a rate of 1.0°C every 10 s and local temperature was held at 42°C for 20-30 min until a stable plateau in skin blood flow was achieved. An index of skin blood flow was measured directly over each microdialysis site via laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF). Beat-by-beat blood pressure was measured via photoplethysmography and verified via automated brachial auscultation. At the end of the local heating protocol, temperature of the heaters was increased to 43°C and 28 mm nitroprusside was infused to achieve maximal vasodilatation. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was calculated as LDF/mean arterial pressure and normalized to maximal values (%CVCmax). Initial peak in capsazepine (44 ± 4%CVCmax), l-NAME (56 ± 4%CVCmax) and capsazepine + l-NAME (32 ± 6%CVCmax) sites was significantly attenuated compared to control (87 ± 5%CVCmax; P < 0.001 for all conditions). The plateau phase of thermal hyperaemia was significantly attenuated in capsazepine (73 ± 6%CVCmax), l-NAME (47 ± 5%CVCmax) and capsazepine + l-NAME (31 ± 7%CVCmax) sites compared to control (92 ± 5%CVCmax; P < 0.001 for all conditions). These data suggest TRPV-1

  1. CaV3.2 calcium channels control NMDA receptor-mediated transmission: a new mechanism for absence epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangfu; Bochorishvili, Genrieta; Chen, Yucai; Salvati, Kathryn A; Zhang, Peng; Dubel, Steve J; Perez-Reyes, Edward; Snutch, Terrance P; Stornetta, Ruth L; Deisseroth, Karl; Erisir, Alev; Todorovic, Slobodan M; Luo, Jian-Hong; Kapur, Jaideep; Beenhakker, Mark P; Zhu, J Julius

    2015-07-15

    CaV3.2 T-type calcium channels, encoded by CACNA1H, are expressed throughout the brain, yet their general function remains unclear. We discovered that CaV3.2 channels control NMDA-sensitive glutamatergic receptor (NMDA-R)-mediated transmission and subsequent NMDA-R-dependent plasticity of AMPA-R-mediated transmission at rat central synapses. Interestingly, functional CaV3.2 channels primarily incorporate into synapses, replace existing CaV3.2 channels, and can induce local calcium influx to control NMDA transmission strength in an activity-dependent manner. Moreover, human childhood absence epilepsy (CAE)-linked hCaV3.2(C456S) mutant channels have a higher channel open probability, induce more calcium influx, and enhance glutamatergic transmission. Remarkably, cortical expression of hCaV3.2(C456S) channels in rats induces 2- to 4-Hz spike and wave discharges and absence-like epilepsy characteristic of CAE patients, which can be suppressed by AMPA-R and NMDA-R antagonists but not T-type calcium channel antagonists. These results reveal an unexpected role of CaV3.2 channels in regulating NMDA-R-mediated transmission and a novel epileptogenic mechanism for human CAE.

  2. CaV3.2 calcium channels control NMDA receptor-mediated transmission: a new mechanism for absence epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangfu; Bochorishvili, Genrieta; Chen, Yucai; Salvati, Kathryn A.; Zhang, Peng; Dubel, Steve J.; Perez-Reyes, Edward; Snutch, Terrance P.; Stornetta, Ruth L.; Deisseroth, Karl; Erisir, Alev; Todorovic, Slobodan M.; Luo, Jian-Hong; Kapur, Jaideep; Beenhakker, Mark P.; Zhu, J. Julius

    2015-01-01

    CaV3.2 T-type calcium channels, encoded by CACNA1H, are expressed throughout the brain, yet their general function remains unclear. We discovered that CaV3.2 channels control NMDA-sensitive glutamatergic receptor (NMDA-R)-mediated transmission and subsequent NMDA-R-dependent plasticity of AMPA-R-mediated transmission at rat central synapses. Interestingly, functional CaV3.2 channels primarily incorporate into synapses, replace existing CaV3.2 channels, and can induce local calcium influx to control NMDA transmission strength in an activity-dependent manner. Moreover, human childhood absence epilepsy (CAE)-linked hCaV3.2(C456S) mutant channels have a higher channel open probability, induce more calcium influx, and enhance glutamatergic transmission. Remarkably, cortical expression of hCaV3.2(C456S) channels in rats induces 2- to 4-Hz spike and wave discharges and absence-like epilepsy characteristic of CAE patients, which can be suppressed by AMPA-R and NMDA-R antagonists but not T-type calcium channel antagonists. These results reveal an unexpected role of CaV3.2 channels in regulating NMDA-R-mediated transmission and a novel epileptogenic mechanism for human CAE. PMID:26220996

  3. Association of transient receptor potential canonical type 3 (TRPC3) channel transcripts with proinflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Thilo, Florian; Scholze, Alexandra; Liu, Dao Yan; Zidek, Walter; Tepel, Martin

    2008-03-01

    We investigated whether expression of non-selective cation channels of the transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channel family are associated with proinflammatory cytokines in monocytes. Using quantitative RT-PCR we studied the expression of TRPC3, interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in monocytes from 15 patients with essential hypertension and 16 age- and sex-matched normotensive control subjects. We observed an approximately 8-fold increase of TRPC3 transcripts in monocytes from patients with essential hypertension compared to normotensive control subjects (p<0.05). We found an approximately 3-fold increase of IL-1beta, and an approximately 9-fold increase of TNF-alpha in patients with essential hypertension compared to normotensive control subjects (each p<0.05). We observed a significant correlation between TRPC3 transcripts with systolic blood pressure, expression of IL-1beta, and TNF-alpha. Using quantitative RT-PCR we observed an association of TRPC3 transcripts and proinflammatory cytokines in monocytes.

  4. Nereistoxin and cartap neurotoxicity attributable to direct block of the insect nicotinic receptor/channel.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seog-Jong; Tomizawa, Motohiro; Casida, John E

    2003-04-23

    Nereistoxin (NTX) (4-dimethylamino-1,2-dithiolane) is the naturally occurring prototype for cartap [the bis(thiocarbamate) derivative of the NTX dithiol], which is generally regarded as a proinsecticide reverting to NTX. The aim of this study is to define the target site(s) for dithiolanes and dithiol esters. The affinity of [(3)H]NTX was not suitable for binding assays with honeybee (Apis mellifera) head membranes. However, NTX and cartap are equally potent, direct-acting, and competitive displacers of [(3)H]thienylcyclohexylpiperidine binding at the noncompetitive blocker (NCB) site of the Apis nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR)/channel. NTX also binds at the Apis [(3)H]imidacloprid agonist site, but cartap does not. As candidate metabolic pathways, sequential N-desmethylation and S-oxidation of NTX progressively reduce its potency at the NCB site and toxicity to houseflies. A P450 inhibitor reduces the toxicity of NTX and enhances it with cartap. Surprisingly, cartap is not just a pro-NTX but instead directly induces inhibitory neurotoxicity by blocking the nAChR/channel, whereas NTX may have dual NCB and agonist targets.

  5. Activation of the chemosensing transient receptor potential channel A1 (TRPA1) by alkylating agents.

    PubMed

    Stenger, Bernhard; Zehfuss, Franziska; Mückter, Harald; Schmidt, Annette; Balszuweit, Frank; Schäfer, Eva; Büch, Thomas; Gudermann, Thomas; Thiermann, Horst; Steinritz, Dirk

    2015-09-01

    The transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) cation channel is expressed in different tissues including skin, lung and neuronal tissue. Recent reports identified TRPA1 as a sensor for noxious substances, implicating a functional role in the molecular toxicology. TRPA1 is activated by various potentially harmful electrophilic substances. The chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard (SM) is a highly reactive alkylating agent that binds to numerous biological targets. Although SM is known for almost 200 years, detailed knowledge about the pathophysiology resulting from exposure is lacking. A specific therapy is not available. In this study, we investigated whether the alkylating agent 2-chloroethyl-ethylsulfide (CEES, a model substance for SM-promoted effects) and SM are able to activate TRPA1 channels. CEES induced a marked increase in the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in TRPA1-expressing but not in TRPA1-negative cells. The TRP-channel blocker AP18 diminished the CEES-induced calcium influx. HEK293 cells permanently expressing TRPA1 were more sensitive toward cytotoxic effects of CEES compared with wild-type cells. At low CEES concentrations, CEES-induced cytotoxicity was prevented by AP18. Proof-of-concept experiments using SM resulted in a pronounced increase in [Ca(2+)]i in HEK293-A1-E cells. Human A549 lung epithelial cells, which express TRPA1 endogenously, reacted with a transient calcium influx in response to CEES exposure. The CEES-dependent calcium response was diminished by AP18. In summary, our results demonstrate that alkylating agents are able to activate TRPA1. Inhibition of TRPA1 counteracted cellular toxicity and could thus represent a feasible approach to mitigate SM-induced cell damage.

  6. A new cytoplasmic interaction between junctin and ryanodine receptor Ca2+ release channels

    PubMed Central

    Li, Linwei; Mirza, Shamaruh; Richardson, Spencer J.; Gallant, Esther M.; Thekkedam, Chris; Pace, Suzy M.; Zorzato, Francesco; Liu, Dan; Beard, Nicole A.; Dulhunty, Angela F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Junctin, a non-catalytic splice variant encoded by the aspartate-β-hydroxylase (Asph) gene, is inserted into the membrane of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ store where it modifies Ca2+ signalling in the heart and skeletal muscle through its regulation of ryanodine receptor (RyR) Ca2+ release channels. Junctin is required for normal muscle function as its knockout leads to abnormal Ca2+ signalling, muscle dysfunction and cardiac arrhythmia. However, the nature of the molecular interaction between junctin and RyRs is largely unknown and was assumed to occur only in the SR lumen. We find that there is substantial binding of RyRs to full junctin, and the junctin luminal and, unexpectedly, cytoplasmic domains. Binding of these different junctin domains had distinct effects on RyR1 and RyR2 activity: full junctin in the luminal solution increased RyR channel activity by ∼threefold, the C-terminal luminal interaction inhibited RyR channel activity by ∼50%, and the N-terminal cytoplasmic binding produced an ∼fivefold increase in RyR activity. The cytoplasmic interaction between junctin and RyR is required for luminal binding to replicate the influence of full junctin on RyR1 and RyR2 activity. The C-terminal domain of junctin binds to residues including the S1–S2 linker of RyR1 and N-terminal domain of junctin binds between RyR1 residues 1078 and 2156. PMID:25609705

  7. A new cytoplasmic interaction between junctin and ryanodine receptor Ca2+ release channels.

    PubMed

    Li, Linwei; Mirza, Shamaruh; Richardson, Spencer J; Gallant, Esther M; Thekkedam, Chris; Pace, Suzy M; Zorzato, Francesco; Liu, Dan; Beard, Nicole A; Dulhunty, Angela F

    2015-03-01

    Junctin, a non-catalytic splice variant encoded by the aspartate-β-hydroxylase (Asph) gene, is inserted into the membrane of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) store where it modifies Ca(2+) signalling in the heart and skeletal muscle through its regulation of ryanodine receptor (RyR) Ca(2+) release channels. Junctin is required for normal muscle function as its knockout leads to abnormal Ca(2+) signalling, muscle dysfunction and cardiac arrhythmia. However, the nature of the molecular interaction between junctin and RyRs is largely unknown and was assumed to occur only in the SR lumen. We find that there is substantial binding of RyRs to full junctin, and the junctin luminal and, unexpectedly, cytoplasmic domains. Binding of these different junctin domains had distinct effects on RyR1 and RyR2 activity: full junctin in the luminal solution increased RyR channel activity by ∼threefold, the C-terminal luminal interaction inhibited RyR channel activity by ∼50%, and the N-terminal cytoplasmic binding produced an ∼fivefold increase in RyR activity. The cytoplasmic interaction between junctin and RyR is required for luminal binding to replicate the influence of full junctin on RyR1 and RyR2 activity. The C-terminal domain of junctin binds to residues including the S1-S2 linker of RyR1 and N-terminal domain of junctin binds between RyR1 residues 1078 and 2156.

  8. UV light phototransduction activates transient receptor potential A1 ion channels in human melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Bellono, Nicholas W; Kammel, Laura G; Zimmerman, Anita L; Oancea, Elena

    2013-02-05

    Human skin is constantly exposed to solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR), the most prevalent environmental carcinogen. Humans have the unique ability among mammals to respond to UVR by increasing their skin pigmentation, a protective process driven by melanin synthesis in epidermal melanocytes. The molecular mechanisms used by melanocytes to detect and respond to long-wavelength UVR (UVA) are not well understood. We recently identified a UVA phototransduction pathway in melanocytes that is mediated by G protein-coupled receptors and leads to rapid calcium mobilization. Here we report that in human epidermal melanocytes physiological doses of UVR activate a retinal-dependent current mediated by transient receptor potential A1 (TRPA1) ion channels. The TRPA1 photocurrent is UVA-specific and requires G protein and phospholipase C signaling, thus contributing to UVA-induced calcium responses to mediate downstream cellular effects and providing evidence for TRPA1 function in mammalian phototransduction. Remarkably, TRPA1 activation is required for the UVR-induced and retinal-dependent early increase in cellular melanin. Our results show that TRPA1 is essential for a unique extraocular phototransduction pathway in human melanocytes that is activated by physiological doses of UVR and results in early melanin synthesis.

  9. Flavaglines Stimulate Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin Type 6 (TRPM6) Channel Activity

    PubMed Central

    Verkaart, Sjoerd A. J.; Lameris, Anke L.; Basmadjian, Christine; Zhao, Qian; Désaubry, Laurent; Bindels, René J. M.; Hoenderop, Joost G. J.

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium (Mg2+) is essential for enzymatic activity, brain function and muscle contraction. Blood Mg2+ concentrations are tightly regulated between 0.7 and 1.1 mM by Mg2+ (re)absorption in kidney and intestine. The apical entry of Mg2+ in (re)absorbing epithelial cells is mediated by the transient receptor potential melastatin type 6 (TRPM6) ion channel. Here, flavaglines are described as a novel class of stimulatory compounds for TRPM6 activity. Flavaglines are a group of natural and synthetic compounds that target the ubiquitously expressed prohibitins and thereby affect cellular signaling. By whole-cell patch clamp analyses, it was demonstrated that nanomolar concentrations of flavaglines increases TRPM6 activity by ∼2 fold. The stimulatory effects were dependent on the presence of the alpha-kinase domain of TRPM6, but did not require its phosphotransferase activity. Interestingly, it was observed that two natural occurring TRPM6 mutants with impaired insulin-sensitivity, TRPM6-p.Val1393Ile and TRPM6-p.Lys1584Glu, are not sensitive to flavagline stimulation. In conclusion, we have identified flavaglines as potent activators of TRPM6 activity. Our results suggest that flavaglines stimulate TRPM6 via the insulin receptor signaling pathway. PMID:25774985

  10. Flavaglines Stimulate Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin Type 6 (TRPM6) Channel Activity.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Maxime G; de Baaij, Jeroen H F; Verkaart, Sjoerd A J; Lameris, Anke L; Basmadjian, Christine; Zhao, Qian; Désaubry, Laurent; Bindels, René J M; Hoenderop, Joost G J

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium (Mg2+) is essential for enzymatic activity, brain function and muscle contraction. Blood Mg2+ concentrations are tightly regulated between 0.7 and 1.1 mM by Mg2+ (re)absorption in kidney and intestine. The apical entry of Mg2+ in (re)absorbing epithelial cells is mediated by the transient receptor potential melastatin type 6 (TRPM6) ion channel. Here, flavaglines are described as a novel class of stimulatory compounds for TRPM6 activity. Flavaglines are a group of natural and synthetic compounds that target the ubiquitously expressed prohibitins and thereby affect cellular signaling. By whole-cell patch clamp analyses, it was demonstrated that nanomolar concentrations of flavaglines increases TRPM6 activity by ∼2 fold. The stimulatory effects were dependent on the presence of the alpha-kinase domain of TRPM6, but did not require its phosphotransferase activity. Interestingly, it was observed that two natural occurring TRPM6 mutants with impaired insulin-sensitivity, TRPM6-p.Val1393Ile and TRPM6-p.Lys1584Glu, are not sensitive to flavagline stimulation. In conclusion, we have identified flavaglines as potent activators of TRPM6 activity. Our results suggest that flavaglines stimulate TRPM6 via the insulin receptor signaling pathway.

  11. Neurosteroids shift partial agonist activation of GABA(A) receptor channels from low- to high-efficacy gating patterns.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Matt T; Macdonald, Robert L

    2003-11-26

    Although GABA activates synaptic (alphabetagamma) GABA(A) receptors with high efficacy, partial agonist activation of alphabetagamma isoforms and GABA activation of the primary extrasynaptic (alphabetadelta) GABA(A) receptors are limited to low-efficacy activity, characterized by minimal desensitization and brief openings. The unusual sensitivity of alphabetadelta receptor channels to neurosteroid modulation prompted investigation of whether this high sensitivity was dependent on the delta subunit or the low-efficacy channel function that it confers. We show that the isoform specificity (alphabetadelta > alphabetagamma) of neurosteroid modulation could be reversed by conditions that reversed isoform-specific activity modes, including the use of beta-alanine to achieve increased efficacy with alphabetadelta receptors and taurine to render alphabetagamma receptors low efficacy. We suggest that neurosteroids preferentially enhance low-efficacy GABA(A) receptor activity independent of subunit composition. Allosteric conversion of partial to full agonism may be a general mechanism for reversibly scaling the efficacy of GABA(A) receptors to endogenous partial agonists.

  12. A leukocyte immune-type receptor (LITR) subset is a marker of antiviral cytotoxic cells in channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, leukocyte immune type-receptors (LITRs) represent a multigene family that encodes immunoglobulin superfamily proteins that mediate activating or inhibitory signaling. Here we demonstrate the utility of mAb CC41 to monitor viral cytotoxic responses in catfish an...

  13. Rapid and contrasting effects of rosiglitazone on transient receptor potential TRPM3 and TRPC5 channels.

    PubMed

    Majeed, Yasser; Bahnasi, Yahya; Seymour, Victoria A L; Wilson, Lesley A; Milligan, Carol J; Agarwal, Anil K; Sukumar, Piruthivi; Naylor, Jacqueline; Beech, David J

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to generate new insight into chemical regulation of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels with relevance to glucose homeostasis and the metabolic syndrome. Human TRP melastatin 2 (TRPM2), TRPM3, and TRP canonical 5 (TRPC5) were conditionally overexpressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells and studied by using calcium-measurement and patch-clamp techniques. Rosiglitazone and other peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) agonists were investigated. TRPM2 was unaffected by rosiglitazone at concentrations up to 10 μM but was inhibited completely at higher concentrations (IC(50), ∼22.5 μM). TRPM3 was more potently inhibited, with effects occurring in a biphasic concentration-dependent manner such that there was approximately 20% inhibition at low concentrations (0.1-1 μM) and full inhibition at higher concentrations (IC(50), 5-10 μM). PPAR-γ antagonism by 2-chloro-5-nitrobenzanilide (GW9662) did not prevent inhibition of TRPM3 by rosiglitazone. TRPC5 was strongly stimulated by rosiglitazone at concentrations of ≥10 μM (EC(50), ∼30 μM). Effects on TRPM3 and TRPC5 occurred rapidly and reversibly. Troglitazone and pioglitazone inhibited TRPM3 (IC(50), 12 μM) but lacked effect on TRPC5, suggesting no relevance of PPAR-γ or the thiazolidinedione moiety to rosiglitazone stimulation of TRPC5. A rosiglitazone-related but nonthiazolidinedione PPAR-γ agonist, N-(2-benzoylphenyl)-O-[2-(methyl-2-pyridinylamino)ethyl]-l-tyrosine (GW1929), was a weak stimulator of TRPM3 and TRPC5. The natural PPAR-γ agonist 15-deoxy prostaglandin J(2), had no effect on TRPM3 or TRPC5. The data suggest that rosiglitazone contains chemical moieties that rapidly, strongly, and differentially modulate TRP channels independently of PPAR-γ, potentially contributing to biological consequences of the agent and providing the basis for novel TRP channel pharmacology.

  14. Altered Channel Conductance States and Gating of GABAA Receptors by a Pore Mutation Linked to Dravet Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Ciria C.; Kong, Weijing; Zhang, Yujia; Jackson, Laurel; Liu, Xiaoyan; Jiang, Yuwu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract We identified a de novo missense mutation, P302L, in the γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor γ2 subunit gene GABRG2 in a patient with Dravet syndrome using targeted next-generation sequencing. The mutation was in the cytoplasmic portion of the transmembrane segment M2 of the γ2 subunit that faces the pore lumen. GABAA receptor α1 and β3 subunits were coexpressed with wild-type (wt) γ2L or mutant γ2L(P302L) subunits in HEK 293T cells and cultured mouse cortical neurons. We measured currents using whole-cell and single-channel patch clamp techniques, surface and total expression levels using surface biotinylation and Western blotting, and potential structural perturbations in mutant GABAA receptors using structural modeling. The γ2(P302L) subunit mutation produced an ∼90% reduction of whole-cell current by increasing macroscopic desensitization and reducing GABA potency, which resulted in a profound reduction of GABAA receptor-mediated miniature IPSCs (mIPSCs). The conductance of the receptor channel was reduced to 24% of control conductance by shifting the relative contribution of the conductance states from high- to low-conductance levels with only slight changes in receptor surface expression. Structural modeling of the GABAA receptor in the closed, open, and desensitized states showed that the mutation was positioned to slow activation, enhance desensitization, and shift channels to a low-conductance state by reshaping the hour-glass-like pore cavity during transitions between closed, open, and desensitized states. Our study revealed a novel γ2 subunit missense mutation (P302L) that has a novel pathogenic mechanism to cause defects in the conductance and gating of GABAA receptors, which results in hyperexcitability and contributes to the pathogenesis of the genetic epilepsy Dravet syndrome. PMID:28197552

  15. Channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) leukocytes express estrogen receptor isoforms ERα and ERβ2 and are functionally modulated by estrogens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Stafford, James L.; Patiño, Reynaldo; Bengten, Eva; Miller, Norman W.; Blazer, Vicki

    2014-01-01

    Estrogens are recognized as modulators of immune responses in mammals and teleosts. While it is known that the effects of estrogens are mediated via leukocyte-specific estrogen receptors (ERs) in humans and mice, leucocyte-specific estrogen receptor expression and the effects of estrogens on this cell population is less explored and poorly understood in teleosts. Here in, we verify that channel catfish (Ictalurus punctaus) leukocytes express ERα and ERβ2. Transcripts of these isoforms were detected in tissue-associated leukocyte populations by PCR, but ERβ2 was rarely detected in PBLs. Expression of these receptors was temporally regulated in PBLs following polyclonal activation by concanavalin A, lipopolysaccharide or alloantigen based on evaluation by quantitative and end-point PCR. Examination of long-term leukocyte cell lines demonstrated that these receptors are differentially expressed depending on leukocyte lineage and phenotype. Expression of ERs was also temporally dynamic in some leukocyte lineages and may reflect stage of cell maturity. Estrogens affect the responsiveness of channel catfish peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) to mitogens in vitro. Similarly, bactericidal activity and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate induced respiratory burst was modulated by 17β-estradiol. These actions were blocked by the pure ER antagonist ICI 182780 indicating that response is, in part, mediated via ERα. In summary, estrogen receptors are expressed in channel catfish leukocytes and participate in the regulation of the immune response. This is the first time leukocyte lineage expression has been reported in teleost cell lines.

  16. The Roles of Rasd1 small G proteins and leptin in the activation of TRPC4 transient receptor potential channels

    PubMed Central

    Wie, Jinhong; Kim, Byung Joo; Myeong, Jongyun; Ha, Kotdaji; Jeong, Seung Joo; Yang, Dongki; Kim, Euiyong; Jeon, Ju-Hong; So, Insuk

    2015-01-01

    TRPC4 is important regulators of electrical excitability in gastrointestinal myocytes, pancreatic β-cells and neurons. Much is known regarding the assembly and function of these channels including TRPC1 as a homotetramer or a heteromultimer and the roles that their interacting proteins play in controlling these events. Further, they are one of the best-studied targets of G protein-coupled receptors and growth factors in general and Gαi/o and Gαq protein coupled receptor or epidermal growth factor and leptin in particular. However, our understanding of the roles of small G proteins and leptin on TRPC4 channels is still rudimentary. We discuss potential roles for Rasd1 small G protein and leptin in channel activation in addition to their known role in cellular signaling. PMID:26083271

  17. Two P2X1 receptor transcripts able to form functional channels are present in most human monocytes.

    PubMed

    López-López, Cintya; Jaramillo-Polanco, Josue; Portales-Pérez, Diana P; Gómez-Coronado, Karen S; Rodríguez-Meléndez, Jessica G; Cortés-García, Juan D; Espinosa-Luna, Rosa; Montaño, Luis M; Barajas-López, Carlos

    2016-12-15

    To characterize the presence and general properties of P2X1 receptors in single human monocytes we used RT-PCR, flow cytometry, and the patch-clamp and the two-electrode voltage-clamp techniques. Most human monocytes expressed the canonical P2X1 (90%) and its splicing variant P2X1del (88%) mRNAs. P2X1 receptor immunoreactivity was also observed in 70% of these cells. Currents mediated by P2X1 (EC50=1.9±0.8µm) and P2X1del (EC50 >1000µm) channels, expressed in Xenopus leavis oocytes, have different ATP sensitivity and kinetics. Both currents mediated by P2X1 and P2X1del channels kept increasing during the continuous presence of high ATP concentrations. Currents mediated by the native P2X1 receptors in human monocytes showed an EC50=6.3±0.2µm. Currents have kinetics that resemble those observed for P2X1 and P2X1del receptors in oocytes. Our study is the first to demonstrate the expression of P2X1 transcript and its splicing variant P2X1del in most human monocytes. We also, for the first time, described functional homomeric P2X1del channels and demonstrated that currents mediated by P2X1 or P2X1del receptors, during heterologous expression, increased in amplitude when activated with high ATP concentrations in a similar fashion to those channels that increase their conductance under similar conditions, such as P2X7, P2X2, and P2X4 channels.

  18. Receptor model for the molecular basis of tissue selectivity of 1,4-dihydropyridine calcium channel drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langs, David A.; Strong, Phyllis D.; Triggle, David J.

    1990-09-01

    Our analysis of the solid state conformations of nifedipine [dimethyl 1,4-dihydro-2,6-dimethyl-4-(2-nitrophenyl)-3,5-pyridinecarboxylate] and its 1,4-dihydropyridine (1,4-DHP) analogues produced a cartoon description of the important interactions between these drugs and their voltage-dependent calcium channel receptor. In the present study a molecular-level detailed model of the 1,4-DHP receptor binding site has been built from the published amino acid sequence of the 215-1 subunit of the voltage-dependent calcium channel isolated from rabbit skeletal muscle transverse tubule membranes. The voltage-sensing component of the channel described in this work differs from others reported for the homologous sodium channel in that it incorporates a water structure and a staggered, rather than eclipsed, hydrogen bonded S4 helix conformation. The major recognition surfaces of the receptor lie in helical grooves on the S4 or voltagesensing α-helix that is positioned in the center of the bundle of transmembrane helices that define each of the four calcium channel domains. Multiple binding clefts defined by Arg-X-X-Arg-P-X-X-S `reading frames' exist on the S4 strand. The tissue selectivity of nifedipine and its analogues may arise, in part, from conservative changes in the amino acid residues at the P and S positions of the reading frame that define the ester-binding regions of receptors from different tissues. The crystal structures of two tissue-selective nifedipine analogues, nimodipine [isopropyl (2-methoxyethyl) 1,4-dihydro-2,6- dimethyl-4-(3-nitrophenyl)-3,5-pyridinecarboxylate] and nitrendipine [ethyl methyl 1,4-dihydro-2,6-dimethyl-4-(3-nitrophenyl)-3,5-pyridinecarboxylate] are reported. Nimodipine was observed to have an unusual ester side chain conformation that enhances the fit to the proposed ester-sensing region of the receptor.

  19. Analysis of TRPV channel activation by stimulation of FCεRI and MRGPR receptors in mouse peritoneal mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Solís-López, A.; Kriebs, U.; Marx, A.; Mannebach, S.; Liedtke, W. B.; Caterina, M. J.; Freichel, M.; Tsvilovskyy, V. V.

    2017-01-01

    The activation of mast cells (MC) is part of the innate and adaptive immune responses and depends on Ca2+ entry across the plasma membrane, leading to the release of preformed inflammatory mediators by degranulation or by de novo synthesis. The calcium conducting channels of the TRPV family, known by their thermo and osmotic sensitivity, have been proposed to be involved in the MC activation in murine, rat, and human mast cell models. So far, immortalized mast cell lines and nonspecific TRPV blockers have been employed to characterize the role of TRPV channels in MC. The aim of this work was to elucidate the physiological role of TRPV channels by using primary peritoneal mast cells (PMCs), a model of connective tissue type mast cells. Our RT-PCR and NanoString analysis identified the expression of TRPV1, TRPV2, and TRPV4 channels in PMCs. For determination of the functional role of the expressed TRPV channels we performed measurements of intracellular free Ca2+ concentrations and beta-hexosaminidase release in PMCs obtained from wild type and mice deficient for corresponding TRPV1, TRPV2 and TRPV4 in response to various receptor-mediated and physical stimuli. Furthermore, substances known as activators of corresponding TRPV-channels were also tested using these assays. Our results demonstrate that TRPV1, TRPV2, and TRPV4 do not participate in activation pathways triggered by activation of the high-affinity receptors for IgE (FcεRI), Mrgprb2 receptor, or Endothelin-1 receptor nor by heat or osmotic stimulation in mouse PMCs. PMID:28158279

  20. Expressional potency of mRNAs encoding receptors and voltage-activated channels in the postmortem rat brain.

    PubMed Central

    Ragsdale, D S; Miledi, R

    1991-01-01

    The stability and integrity of mRNAs encoding neurotransmitter receptors and voltage-activated channels in the postmortem rat brain was investigated by isolating poly(A)+ mRNA, injecting it into Xenopus oocytes, and then examining the expression of functional neurotransmitter receptors and voltage-activated channels in the oocyte membrane by electrophysiological recording. This approach was also used to assess the stability of mRNAs in brains that were incubated in oxygenated mammalian Ringer's solution for various lengths of time and from brains that were freshly frozen and then thawed at room temperature. Oocytes injected with mRNA from up to 21-hr postmortem brains gave large agonist- and voltage-activated responses, indicating that mRNAs encoding neurotransmitter receptors and voltage-activated channels are relatively stable in postmortem brain tissue. In contrast, oocytes injected with mRNA from brains incubated in Ringer's solution exhibited smaller responses, and oocytes injected with mRNA from tissue that was frozen and then thawed displayed very small or undetectable responses. Northern blot analysis using a nucleic acid probe for rat brain Na(+)-channel mRNA indicated that the size of the Na+ currents in injected oocytes reflected the levels of mRNA for Na+ channels in the different mRNA preparations. Thus, the expressional potency of mRNAs encoding neurotransmitter receptors and voltage-activated channels is quite stable in postmortem brains in situ, but it is reduced if the brains are kept in oxygenated saline, and freezing and thawing of tissue results in rapid degeneration of mRNA. Images PMID:1705710

  1. Analysis of TRPV channel activation by stimulation of FCεRI and MRGPR receptors in mouse peritoneal mast cells.

    PubMed

    Solís-López, A; Kriebs, U; Marx, A; Mannebach, S; Liedtke, W B; Caterina, M J; Freichel, M; Tsvilovskyy, V V

    2017-01-01

    The activation of mast cells (MC) is part of the innate and adaptive immune responses and depends on Ca2+ entry across the plasma membrane, leading to the release of preformed inflammatory mediators by degranulation or by de novo synthesis. The calcium conducting channels of the TRPV family, known by their thermo and osmotic sensitivity, have been proposed to be involved in the MC activation in murine, rat, and human mast cell models. So far, immortalized mast cell lines and nonspecific TRPV blockers have been employed to characterize the role of TRPV channels in MC. The aim of this work was to elucidate the physiological role of TRPV channels by using primary peritoneal mast cells (PMCs), a model of connective tissue type mast cells. Our RT-PCR and NanoString analysis identified the expression of TRPV1, TRPV2, and TRPV4 channels in PMCs. For determination of the functional role of the expressed TRPV channels we performed measurements of intracellular free Ca2+ concentrations and beta-hexosaminidase release in PMCs obtained from wild type and mice deficient for corresponding TRPV1, TRPV2 and TRPV4 in response to various receptor-mediated and physical stimuli. Furthermore, substances known as activators of corresponding TRPV-channels were also tested using these assays. Our results demonstrate that TRPV1, TRPV2, and TRPV4 do not participate in activation pathways triggered by activation of the high-affinity receptors for IgE (FcεRI), Mrgprb2 receptor, or Endothelin-1 receptor nor by heat or osmotic stimulation in mouse PMCs.

  2. Baclofen, an agonist at peripheral GABAB receptors, induces antinociception via activation of TEA-sensitive potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Reis, G M L; Duarte, I D G

    2006-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Central anti-nociceptive actions of baclofen involve activation of K+ channels. Here we assessed what types of K+ channel might participate in the peripheral anti-nociception induced by baclofen. Experimental approach: Nociceptive thresholds to mechanical stimulation in rat paws treated with intraplantar prostaglandin E2.(PGE2) to induce hyperalgesia were measured 3h after PGE2 injection. Other agents were also given by intraplantar injection Key results: Baclofen elicited a dose-dependent (15 - 240 μg per paw) anti-nociceptive effect. An intermediate dose of baclofen (60 μg) did not produce antinociception in the contralateral paw, showing its peripheral site of action. The GABAB receptor antagonist saclofen (12.5 - 100 μg per paw) antagonized, in a dose-dependent manner, peripheral antinociception induced by baclofen (60 μg), suggesting a specific effect. This antinociceptive action of baclofen was unaffected by bicuculline, GABAA receptor antagonist (80 μg per paw), or by (1,2,5,6 tetrahydropyridin-4-yl) methylphosphinic acid, GABAC receptor antagonist (20 μg per paw). The peripheral antinociception induced by baclofen (60 μg) was reversed, in a dose-dependent manner, by the voltage-dependent K+ channel blockers tetraethylammonium (7.5 - 30 μg per paw) and 4-aminopyridine (2.5 - 10 μg per paw). The blockers of other K+ channels, glibenclamide (160 μg), tolbutamide (320 μg), charybdotoxin (2 μg), dequalinium (50 μg) and caesium (500 μg) had no effect. Conclusions and Implications: This study provides evidence that the peripheral antinociceptive effect of the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen results from the activation of tetraethylammonium-sensitive K+ channels. Other K+ channels appear not to be involved. PMID:17016510

  3. Heterologously-expressed and Liposome-reconstituted Human Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 4 Channel (TRPM4) is a Functional Tetramer

    PubMed Central

    Constantine, Maryrose; Liew, Chu Kong; Lo, Victor; Macmillan, Alex; Cranfield, Charles G.; Sunde, Margaret; Whan, Renee; Graham, Robert M.; Martinac, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Mutation, irregular expression and sustained activation of the Transient Receptor Potential Channel, type Melastatin 4 (TRPM4), have been linked to various cardiovascular diseases. However, much remains unknown about the structure of this important ion channel. Here, we have purified a heterologously expressed TRPM4-eGFP fusion protein and investigated the oligomeric state of TRPM4-eGFP in detergent micelles using crosslinking, native gel electrophoresis, multi-angle laser light scattering and electron microscopy. Our data indicate that TRPM4 is tetrameric, like other TRP channels studied to date. Furthermore, the functionality of liposome reconstituted TRPM4-eGFP was examined using electrophysiology. Single-channel recordings from TRPM4-eGFP proteoliposomes showed inhibition of the channel using Flufenamic acid, a well-established inhibitor of TRPM4, suggesting that the channels are functional upon reconstitution. Our characterisation of the oligomeric structure of TRPM4 and the ability to reconstitute functional channels in liposomes should facilitate future studies into the structure, function and pharmacology of this therapeutically relevant channel. PMID:26785754

  4. Yeast gain-of-function mutations reveal structure–function relationships conserved among different subfamilies of transient receptor potential channels

    PubMed Central

    Su, Zhenwei; Zhou, Xinliang; Haynes, W. John; Loukin, Stephen H.; Anishkin, Andriy; Saimi, Yoshiro; Kung, Ching

    2007-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels found in animals, protists, and fungi are primary chemo-, thermo-, or mechanosensors. Current research emphasizes the characteristics of individual channels in each animal TRP subfamily but not the mechanisms common across subfamilies. A forward genetic screen of the TrpY1, the yeast TRP channel, recovered gain-of-function (GOF) mutations with phenotype in vivo and in vitro. Single-channel patch-clamp analyses of these GOF-mutant channels show prominent aberrations in open probability and channel kinetics. These mutations revealed functionally important aromatic amino acid residues in four locations: at the intracellular end of the fifth transmembrane helix (TM5), at both ends of TM6, and at the immediate extension of TM6. These aromatics have counterparts in most TRP subfamilies. The one in TM5 (F380L) aligns precisely with an exceptional Drosophila mutant allele (F550I) that causes constitutive activity in the canonical TRP channel, resulting in rapid and severe retinal degeneration beyond mere loss of phototaxis. Thus, this phenylalanine maintains the balance of various functional states (conformations) of a channel for insect phototransduction as well as one for fungal mechanotransduction. This residue is among a small cluster of phenylalanines found in all known subfamilies of TRP channels. This unique case illustrates that GOF mutations can reveal structure–function principles that can be generalized across different TRP subfamilies. It appears that the conserved aromatics in the four locations have conserved functions in most TRP channels. The possible mechanistic roles of these aromatics and the further use of yeast genetics to dissect TRP channels are discussed. PMID:18042709

  5. Member of the Ampakine class of memory enhancers prolongs the single channel open time of reconstituted AMPA receptors.

    PubMed

    Suppiramaniam, V; Bahr, B A; Sinnarajah, S; Owens, K; Rogers, G; Yilma, S; Vodyanoy, V

    2001-05-01

    Ampakines are small benzamide compounds that allosterically produce the positive modulation of AMPA receptors and improve performance on a variety of behavioral tasks. To test if the native synaptic membrane is necessary for the effects of such positive modulators, the mechanism of action of the Ampakine 1-(1,3-benzodioxol-5-ylcarbonyl)-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (CX509) was investigated in isolated rat brain AMPA receptors reconstituted in lipid bilayers. The drug increased the open time of AMPA-induced single channel current fluctuations with an EC(50) of 4 microM. The action of CX509 was highly selective since it had no effect on the amplitude or close time of channel events. The open time effect had a maximum enhancement of 70-fold and the modulated currents were blocked by CNQX. It is concluded that the synaptic membrane environment is not necessary for Ampakine effects. In fact, CX509 was about 100 times more potent on the reconstituted AMPA receptors than on receptors in their native membrane. These findings indicate that centrally active Ampakines modulate specific kinetic properties of AMPA currents. They also raise the possibility that AMPA receptors are regulated by factors present in situ, thus explaining the more efficient modulatory effects of CX509 when acting on receptors removed from their synaptic location.

  6. Glucocorticoid receptor activation lowers the threshold for NMDA-receptor-dependent homosynaptic long-term depression in the hippocampus through activation of voltage-dependent calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Coussens, C M; Kerr, D S; Abraham, W C

    1997-07-01

    The effects of the glucocorticoid receptor agonist RU-28362 on homosynaptic long-term depression (LTD) were examined in hippocampal slices obtained from adrenal-intact adult male rats. Field excitatory postsynaptic potentials were evoked by stimulation of the Schaffer collateral/commissural pathway and recorded in stratum radiatum of area CA1. Low-frequency stimulation (LFS) was delivered at LTD threshold (2 bouts of 600 pulses, 1 Hz, at baseline stimulation intensity). LFS of the Schaffer collaterals did not produce significant homosynaptic LTD in control slices. However, identical conditioning in the presence of the glucocorticoid receptor agonist RU-28362 (10 microM) produced a robust LTD, which was blocked by the selective glucocorticoid antagonist RU-38486. The LTD induced by glucocorticoid receptor activation was dependent on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activity, because the specific NMDA receptor antagonist D(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (D-AP5) blocked the facilitation. However, the facilitation of LTD was not due to a potentiation of the isolated NMDA receptor potential by RU-28362. The facilitation of LTD by RU-28362 was also blocked by coincubation of the L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel (VDCC) antagonist nimodipine. Selective activation of the L-type VDCCs by the agonist Bay K 8644 also facilitated LTD induction. Both nimodipine and D-AP5 were effective in blocking the facilitation of LTD by Bay K 8644. These results indicate that L-type VDCCs can contribute to NMDA-receptor-dependent LTD induction.

  7. Sulfonylurea receptors inhibit the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) by reducing surface expression.

    PubMed

    Konstas, A A; Bielfeld-Ackermann, A; Korbmacher, C

    2001-08-01

    In the kidney the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) is co-expressed with the sulfonylurea receptor (SUR), an ABC protein that shares a high degree of homology with the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and reportedly modifies ENaC in various preparations. To investigate a possible regulatory relationship between SUR and ENaC, we performed co-expression studies on Xenopus laevis oocytes, which were assayed for amiloride-sensitive currents (DeltaIami). Moreover, a chemiluminescence assay was used to investigate the surface expression of extracellular hemagglutinin-tagged SUR1 (SUR1-HA) or HA-tagged ENaC (ENaC-HA). In oocytes co-injected with SUR1/ENaC (or SUR2B/ENaC) DeltaIami was reduced by congruent with 53% (or congruent with 45%) compared to DeltaIami measured in matched control oocytes injected with ENaC alone. The inhibitory effect of SUR on DeltaIami was preserved in oocytes expressing ENaC with C-terminally truncated subunits. Co-expression of SURs did not confer sensitivity of DeltaIami to diazoxide, pinacidil, tolbutamide, or glibenclamide. ENaC does not facilitate the surface expression of SUR1-HA, which is known to be retained in the endoplasmatic reticulum (ER) by an ER-retention/retrieval signal. SUR1-HAAAA, a mutant that lacks this signal, still inhibits ENaC currents. Chemiluminescence was reduced by congruent with 49% in oocytes co-expressing ENaC-HA/SUR1 compared to that in control oocytes expressing ENaC-HA alone. We conclude that SUR does not interact with ENaC at the level of the plasma membrane but that it inhibits DeltaIami by reducing surface expression of the channel.

  8. Raloxifene inhibits cloned Kv4.3 channels in an estrogen receptor-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Chae, Yun Ju; Kim, Dae Hun; Lee, Hong Joon; Sung, Ki-Wug; Kwon, Oh-Joo; Hahn, Sang June

    2015-08-01

    Raloxifene is widely used for the treatment and prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis. We examined the effects of raloxifene on the Kv4.3 currents expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique and on the long-term modulation of Kv4.3 messenger RNA (mRNA) by real-time PCR analysis. Raloxifene decreased the Kv4.3 currents with an IC50 of 2.0 μM and accelerated the inactivation and activation kinetics in a concentration-dependent manner. The inhibitory effects of raloxifene on Kv4.3 were time-dependent: the association and dissociation rate constants for raloxifene were 9.5 μM(-1) s(-1) and 23.0 s(-1), respectively. The inhibition by raloxifene was voltage-dependent (δ = 0.13). Raloxifene shifted the steady-state inactivation curves in a hyperpolarizing direction and accelerated the closed-state inactivation of Kv4.3. Raloxifene slowed the time course of recovery from inactivation, thus producing a use-dependent inhibition of Kv4.3. β-Estradiol and tamoxifen had little effect on Kv4.3. A preincubation of ICI 182,780, an estrogen receptor antagonist, for 1 h had no effect on the inhibitory effect of raloxifene on Kv4.3. The metabolites of raloxifene, raloxifene-4'-glucuronide and raloxifene-6'-glucuronide, had little or no effect on Kv4.3. Coexpression of KChIP2 subunits did not alter the drug potency and steady-state inactivation of Kv4.3 channels. Long-term exposure to raloxifene (24 h) significantly decreased the expression level of Kv4.3 mRNA. This effect was not abolished by the coincubation with ICI 182,780. Raloxifene inhibited Kv4.3 channels by interacting with their open state during depolarization and with the closed state at subthreshold potentials. This effect was not mediated via an estrogen receptor.

  9. IP3 receptor binds to and sensitizes TRPV4 channel to osmotic stimuli via a calmodulin-binding site.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Elias, Anna; Lorenzo, Ivan M; Vicente, Rubén; Valverde, Miguel A

    2008-11-14

    Activation of the non-selective cation channel TRPV4 by mechanical and osmotic stimuli requires the involvement of phospholipase A2 and the subsequent production of the arachidonic acid metabolites, epoxieicosatrienoic acids (EET). Previous studies have shown that inositol trisphosphate (IP3) sensitizes TRPV4 to mechanical, osmotic, and direct EET stimulation. We now search for the IP3 receptor-binding site on TRPV4 and its relevance to IP3-mediated sensitization. Three putative sites involved in protein-protein interactions were evaluated: a proline-rich domain (PRD), a calmodulin (CaM)-binding site, and the last four amino acids (DAPL) that show a PDZ-binding motif-like. TRPV4-DeltaCaM-(Delta812-831) channels preserved activation by hypotonicity, 4alpha-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate, and EET but lost their physical interaction with IP3 receptor 3 and IP3-mediated sensitization. Deletion of a PDZ-binding motif-like (TRPV4-DeltaDAPL) did not affect channel activity or IP3-mediated sensitization, whereas TRPV4-DeltaPRD-(Delta132-144) resulted in loss of channel function despite correct trafficking. We conclude that IP3-mediated sensitization requires IP3 receptor binding to a TRPV4 C-terminal domain that overlaps with a previously described calmodulin-binding site.

  10. Separate fractions of mRNA from Torpedo electric organ induce chloride channels and acetylcholine receptors in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Sumikawa, K; Parker, I; Amano, T; Miledi, R

    1984-01-01

    Poly(A)+ mRNA extracted from the electric organ of Torpedo was fractionated by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. After injection into Xenopus oocytes one mRNA fraction induced the appearance of chloride channels in the oocyte membrane. Many of these channels were normally open, and the ensuing chloride current kept the resting potential of injected oocytes close to the chloride equilibrium potential. When the membrane was hyperpolarized, the chloride current was reduced. A separate fraction of mRNA induced the incorporation of acetylcholine receptors into the oocyte membrane. When translated in a cell-free system this fraction directed the synthesis of the alpha, beta, gamma, and delta subunits of the acetylcholine receptor. In contrast, the mRNA fraction that induced the chloride channels caused the synthesis of the delta subunit, a very small amount of alpha, and no detectable beta or gamma subunits. This suggests that the size of the mRNA coding for the chloride channel is similar to the preponderant species of mRNA coding for the delta subunit of the acetylcholine receptor. Images Fig. 1. PMID:6094179

  11. The K+ channel TASK1 modulates β-adrenergic response in brown adipose tissue through the mineralocorticoid receptor pathway.

    PubMed

    Pisani, Didier F; Beranger, Guillaume E; Corinus, Alain; Giroud, Maude; Ghandour, Rayane A; Altirriba, Jordi; Chambard, Jean-Claude; Mazure, Nathalie M; Bendahhou, Saïd; Duranton, Christophe; Michiels, Jean-François; Frontini, Andrea; Rohner-Jeanrenaud, Françoise; Cinti, Saverio; Christian, Mark; Barhanin, Jacques; Amri, Ez-Zoubir

    2016-02-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is essential for adaptive thermogenesis and dissipation of caloric excess through the activity of uncoupling protein (UCP)-1. BAT in humans is of great interest for the treatment of obesity and related diseases. In this study, the expression of Twik-related acid-sensitive K(+) channel (TASK)-1 [a pH-sensitive potassium channel encoded by the potassium channel, 2-pore domain, subfamily K, member 3 (Kcnk3) gene] correlated highly with Ucp1 expression in obese and cold-exposed mice. In addition, Task1-null mice, compared with their controls, became overweight, mainly because of an increase in white adipose tissue mass and BAT whitening. Task1(-/-)-mouse-derived brown adipocytes, compared with wild-type mouse-derived brown adipocytes, displayed an impaired β3-adrenergic receptor response that was characterized by a decrease in oxygen consumption, Ucp1 expression, and lipolysis. This phenotype was thought to be caused by an exacerbation of mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) signaling, given that it was mimicked by corticoids and reversed by an MR inhibitor. We concluded that the K(+) channel TASK1 controls the thermogenic activity in brown adipocytes through modulation of β-adrenergic receptor signaling.

  12. Coupling between inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors and human transient receptor potential channel 1 when intracellular Ca2+ stores are depleted.

    PubMed Central

    Rosado, J A; Sage, S O

    2000-01-01

    In the present study we have investigated the role of inositol 1,4, 5-trisphosphate (IP(3)), functional IP(3) receptors (IP(3)Rs) and the human homologue of the Drosophila transient receptor potential (Trp) channel, human Trp1 (hTrp1), in store-mediated Ca(2+) entry (SMCE) in human platelets. Inhibition of IP(3) recycling using Li(+), or the inhibition of IP(3)Rs using xestospongin C, both resulted in the inhibition of SMCE activation following Ca(2+) store depletion using thapsigargin. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments indicated that endogenously expressed hTrp1 couples with IP(3)R type II, but not types I or III, in platelets with depleted intracellular Ca(2+) stores, but not in control, undepleted cells. These results provide strong evidence for the activation of SMCE by conformational coupling involving de novo association between IP(3)Rs and a plasma membrane channel in normal human cells. PMID:10970773

  13. Cloning, in Vitro expression, and novel phylogenetic classification of a channel catfish estrogen receptor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, Z.; Patino, R.; Gale, W.L.; Maule, A.G.; Densmore, L.D.

    1999-01-01

    We obtained two channel catfish estrogen receptor (ccER) cDNA from liver of female fish using RT–PCR. The two fragments were identical in sequence except that the smaller one had an out-of-frame deletion in the E domain, suggesting the existence of ccER splice variants. The larger fragment was used to screen a cDNA library from liver of a prepubescent female. A cDNA was obtained that encoded a 581-amino-acid ER with a deduced molecular weight of 63.8 kDa. Extracts of COS-7 cells transfected with ccER cDNA bound estrogen with high affinity (Kd = 4.7 nM) and specificity. Maximum parsimony and Neighbor Joining analyses were used to generate a phylogenetic classification of ccER on the basis of 18 full-length ER sequences. The tree suggested the existence of two major ER branches. One branch contained two clearly divergent clades which included all piscine ER (except Japanese eel ER) and all tetrapod ERα, respectively. The second major branch contained the eel ER and the mammalian ERβ. The high degree of divergence between the eel ER and mammalian ERβ suggested that they also represent distinct piscine and tetrapod ER. These data suggest that ERα and ERβ are present throughout vertebrates and that these two major ER types evolved by duplication of an ancestral ER gene. Sequence alignments with other members of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily indicated the presence of 8 amino acids in the E domain that align exclusively among ER. Four of these amino acids have not received prior research attention and their function is unknown. The novel finding of putative ER splice variants in a nonmammalian vertebrate and the novel phylogenetic classification of ER offer new perspectives in understanding the diversification and function of ER.

  14. RGS2 modulates coupling between GABAB receptors and GIRK channels in dopamine neurons of the ventral tegmental area.

    PubMed

    Labouèbe, Gwenaël; Lomazzi, Marta; Cruz, Hans G; Creton, Cyril; Luján, Rafael; Li, Meng; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Obata, Kunihiko; Watanabe, Masahiko; Wickman, Kevin; Boyer, Stephanie B; Slesinger, Paul A; Lüscher, Christian

    2007-12-01

    Agonists of GABA(B) receptors exert a bi-directional effect on the activity of dopamine (DA) neurons of the ventral tegmental area, which can be explained by the fact that coupling between GABA(B) receptors and G protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels is significantly weaker in DA neurons than in GABA neurons. Thus, low concentrations of agonists preferentially inhibit GABA neurons and thereby disinhibit DA neurons. This disinhibition might confer reinforcing properties on addictive GABA(B) receptor agonists such as gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) and its derivatives. Here we show that, in DA neurons of mice, the low coupling efficiency reflects the selective expression of heteromeric GIRK2/3 channels and is dynamically modulated by a member of the regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) protein family. Moreover, repetitive exposure to GHB increases the GABA(B) receptor-GIRK channel coupling efficiency through downregulation of RGS2. Finally, oral self-administration of GHB at a concentration that is normally rewarding becomes aversive after chronic exposure. On the basis of these results, we propose a mechanism that might underlie tolerance to GHB.

  15. Transient receptor potential melastatin 1 (TRPM1) is an ion-conducting plasma membrane channel inhibited by zinc ions.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Sachar; Drews, Anna; Rizun, Oleksandr; Wagner, Thomas F J; Lis, Annette; Mannebach, Stefanie; Plant, Sandra; Portz, Melanie; Meissner, Marcel; Philipp, Stephan E; Oberwinkler, Johannes

    2011-04-08

    TRPM1 is the founding member of the melastatin subgroup of transient receptor potential (TRP) proteins, but it has not yet been firmly established that TRPM1 proteins form ion channels. Consequently, the biophysical and pharmacological properties of these proteins are largely unknown. Here we show that heterologous expression of TRPM1 proteins induces ionic conductances that can be activated by extracellular steroid application. However the current amplitudes observed were too small to enable a reliable biophysical characterization. We overcame this limitation by modifying TRPM1 channels in several independent ways that increased the similarity to the closely related TRPM3 channels. The resulting constructs produced considerably larger currents after overexpression. We also demonstrate that unmodified TRPM1 and TRPM3 proteins form functional heteromultimeric channels. With these approaches, we measured the divalent permeability profile and found that channels containing the pore of TRPM1 are inhibited by extracellular zinc ions at physiological concentrations, in contrast to channels containing only the pore of TRPM3. Applying these findings to pancreatic β cells, we found that TRPM1 proteins do not play a major role in steroid-activated currents of these cells. The inhibition of TRPM1 by zinc ions is primarily due to a short stretch of seven amino acids present only in the pore region of TRPM1 but not of TRPM3. Combined, our data demonstrate that TRPM1 proteins are bona fide ion-conducting plasma membrane channels. Their distinct biophysical properties allow a reliable identification of endogenous TRPM1-mediated currents.

  16. Fast-channel congenital myasthenic syndrome with a novel acetylcholine receptor mutation at the α-ε subunit interface.

    PubMed

    Webster, Richard; Liu, Wei-Wei; Chaouch, Amina; Lochmüller, Hanns; Beeson, David

    2014-02-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMS) result from the failure to achieve muscle depolarisation due to disorders in the structure and/or function of the neuromuscular synapse. Mutations of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) form a major subset of CMS. We describe a patient who presented with recurrent apnoeic crises in the neonatal period requiring ventilator support. Electromyography revealed compound muscle action potential decrement upon repetitive stimulation. Sequencing of nAChR subunit genes revealed two missense mutations. One previously reported null mutation p.εTyr15His, and a second novel missense mutation, p.εThr38Lys, that is well expressed in mammalian cell culture and thus likely to exert its effect via alteration of ion channel kinetics. Functional analysis revealed abbreviated ion channel bursts characteristic of a fast channel CMS. The mutation p.εThr38Lys occurs at the interface between the α and ε subunits of the nAChR pentamer and leads to instability of the open channel. The effects of this mutation on channel function were investigated in relation to other fast channel mutants at an analogous subunit interface within the nAChR pentamer. Fast channel syndromes are frequently characterised by severe myasthenic weakness with apnoeic crises; knowledge of the underlying mutation and its functional consequences can be vital for appropriate therapy and patient management.

  17. Kinin Receptors Sensitize TRPV4 Channel and Induce Mechanical Hyperalgesia: Relevance to Paclitaxel-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy in Mice.

    PubMed

    Costa, Robson; Bicca, Maíra A; Manjavachi, Marianne N; Segat, Gabriela C; Dias, Fabiana Chaves; Fernandes, Elizabeth S; Calixto, João B

    2017-03-10

    Kinin B1 (B1R) and B2 receptors (B2R) and the transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) channel are known to play a critical role in the peripheral neuropathy induced by paclitaxel (PTX) in rodents. However, the downstream pathways activated by kinin receptors as well as the sensitizers of the TRPV4 channel involved in this process remain unknown. Herein, we investigated whether kinins sensitize TRPV4 channels in order to maintain PTX-induced peripheral neuropathy in mice. The mechanical hyperalgesia induced by bradykinin (BK, a B2R agonist) or des-Arg(9)-BK (DABK, a B1R agonist) was inhibited by the selective TRPV4 antagonist HC-067047. Additionally, BK was able to sensitize TRPV4, thus contributing to mechanical hyperalgesia. This response was dependent on phospholipase C/protein kinase C (PKC) activation. The selective kinin B1R (des-Arg(9)-[Leu(8)]-bradykinin) and B2R (HOE 140) antagonists reduced the mechanical hyperalgesia induced by PTX, with efficacies and time response profiles similar to those observed for the TRPV4 antagonist (HC-067047). Additionally, both kinin receptor antagonists inhibited the overt nociception induced by hypotonic solution in PTX-injected animals. The same animals presented lower PKCε levels in skin and dorsal root ganglion samples. The selective PKCε inhibitor (εV1-2) reduced the hypotonicity-induced overt nociception in PTX-treated mice with the same magnitude observed for the kinin receptor antagonists. These findings suggest that B1R or B2R agonists sensitize TRPV4 channels to induce mechanical hyperalgesia in mice. This mechanism of interaction may contribute to PTX-induced peripheral neuropathy through the activation of PKCε. We suggest these targets represent new opportunities for the development of effective analgesics to treat chronic pain.

  18. Two regions of the ryanodine receptor calcium channel are involved in Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Angela C; Yamaguchi, Naohiro

    2014-03-04

    Skeletal (RyR1) and cardiac muscle (RyR2) isoforms of ryanodine receptor calcium channels are inhibited by millimollar Ca(2+), but the affinity of RyR2 for inhibitory Ca(2+) is ~10 times lower than that of RyR1. Previous studies demonstrated that the C-terminal quarter of RyR has critical domain(s) for Ca(2+) inactivation. To obtain further insights into the molecular basis of regulation of RyRs by Ca(2+), we constructed and expressed 18 RyR1-RyR2 chimeras in HEK293 cells and determined the Ca(2+) activation and inactivation affinities of these channels using the [(3)H]ryanodine binding assay. Replacing two distinct regions of RyR1 with corresponding RyR2 sequences reduced the affinity for Ca(2+) inactivation. The first region (RyR2 amino acids 4020-4250) contains two EF-hand Ca(2+) binding motifs (EF1, amino acids 4036-4047; EF2, amino acids 4071-4082), and the second region includes the putative second transmembrane segment (S2). A RyR1-backbone chimera containing only EF2 from RyR2 had a modest (not significant) change in Ca(2+) inactivation, whereas another chimera channel carrying only EF1 from RyR2 had a significantly reduced level of Ca(2+) inactivation. The results suggest that EF1 is a more critical determinant for RyR inactivation by Ca(2+). In addition, activities of the chimera carrying RyR2 EF-hands were suppressed at 10-100 μM Ca(2+), and the suppression was relieved by 1 mM Mg(2+). The same effects have been observed with wild-type RyR2. A mutant RyR1 carrying both regions replaced with RyR2 sequences (amino acids 4020-4250 and 4560-4618) showed a Ca(2+) inactivation affinity comparable to that of RyR2, indicating that these regions are sufficient to confer RyR2-type Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation on RyR1.

  19. Properties of transient K+ currents and underlying single K+ channels in rat olfactory receptor neurons

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    The transient potassium current, IK(t), of enzymatically dissociated rat olfactory receptor neurons was studied using patch-clamp techniques. Upon depolarization from negative holding potentials, IK(t) activated rapidly and then inactivated with a time course described by the sum of two exponential components with time constants of 22.4 and 143 ms. Single-channel analysis revealed a further small component with a time constant of several seconds. Steady-state inactivation was complete at -20 mV and completely removed at -80 mV (midpoint -45 mV). Activation was significant at -40 mV and appeared to reach a maximum conductance at +40 mV (midpoint -13 mV). Deactivation was described by the sum of two voltage-dependent exponential components. Recovery from inactivation was extraordinarily slow (50 s at -100 mV) and the underlying processes appeared complex. IK(t) was reduced by 4- aminopyridine and tetraethylammonium applied externally. Increasing the external K+ concentration ([K+]o) from 5 to 25 mM partially removed IK(t) inactivation, usually without affecting activation kinetics. The elevated [K+]o also hyperpolarized the steady-state inactivation curve by 9 mV and significantly depolarized the voltage dependence of activation. Single transient K+ channels, with conductances of 17 and 26 pS, were observed in excised patches and often appeared to be localized into large clusters. These channels were similar to IK(t) in their kinetic, pharmacological, and voltage-dependent properties and their inactivation was also subject to modulation by [K+]o. The properties of IK(t) imply a role in action potential repolarization and suggest it may also be important in modulating spike parameters during neuronal burst firing. A simple method is also presented to correct for errors in the measurement of whole-cell resistance (Ro) that can result when patch-clamping very small cells. The analysis revealed a mean corrected Ro of 26 G omega for these cells. PMID:1865174

  20. Novel transcripts of the estrogen receptor α gene in channel catfish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patino, Reynaldo; Xia, Zhenfang; Gale, William L.; Wu, Chunfa; Maule, Alec G.; Chang, Xiaotian

    2000-01-01

    Complementary DNA libraries from liver and ovary of an immature female channel catfish were screened with a homologous ERα cDNA probe. The hepatic library yielded two new channel catfish ER cDNAs that encode N-terminal ERα variants of different sizes. Relative to the catfish ERα (medium size; 581 residues) previously reported, these new cDNAs encode Long-ERα (36 residues longer) and Short-ERα (389 residues shorter). The 5′-end of Long-ERα cDNA is identical to that of Medium-ERα but has an additional 503-bp segment with an upstream, in-frame translation-start codon. Recombinant Long-ERα binds estrogen with high affinity (Kd = 3.4 nM), similar to that previously reported for Medium-ERα but lower than reported for catfish ERβ. Short-ERα cDNA encodes a protein that lacks most of the receptor protein and does not bind estrogen. Northern hybridization confirmed the existence of multiple hepatic ERα RNAs that include the size range of the ERα cDNAs obtained from the libraries as well as additional sizes. Using primers for RT-PCR that target locations internal to the protein-coding sequence, we also established the presence of several ERα cDNA variants with in-frame insertions in the ligand-binding and DNA-binding domains and in-frame or out-of-frame deletions in the ligand-binding domain. These internal variants showed patterns of expression that differed between the ovary and liver. Further, the ovarian library yielded a full-length, ERα antisense cDNA containing a poly(A) signal and tail. A limited survey of histological preparations from juvenile catfish by in situ hybridization using directionally synthesized cRNA probes also suggested the expression of ERα antisense RNA in a tissue-specific manner. In conclusion, channel catfish seemingly have three broad classes of ERα mRNA variants: those encoding N-terminal truncated variants, those encoding internal variants (including C-terminal truncated variants), and antisense mRNA. The sense variants may

  1. Batrachotoxin Changes the Properties of the Muscarinic Receptor in Rat Brain and Heart: Possible Interaction(s) between Muscarinic Receptors and Sodium Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen-Armon, Malca; Kloog, Yoel; Henis, Yoav I.; Sokolovsky, Mordechai

    1985-05-01

    The effects of Na+-channel activator batrachotoxin (BTX) on the binding properties of muscarinic receptors in homogenates of rat brain and heart were studied. BTX enhanced the affinity for the binding of the agonists carbamoylcholine and acetylcholine to the muscarinic receptors in brainstem and ventricle, but not in the cerebral cortex. Analysis of the data according to a two-site model for agonist binding indicated that the effect of BTX was to increase the affinity of the agonists to the high-affinity site. Guanyl nucleotides, known to induce interconversion of high-affinity agonist binding sites to the low-affinity state, canceled the effect of BTX on carbamoylcholine and acetylcholine binding. BTX had no effect on the binding of the agonist oxotremorine or on the binding of the antagonist [3H]-N-methyl-4-piperidyl benzilate. The local anesthetics dibucaine and tetracaine antagonized the effect of BTX on the binding of muscarinic agonists at concentrations known to inhibit the activation of Na+ channels by BTX. On the basis of these findings, we propose that in specific tissues the muscarinic receptors may interact with the BTX binding site (Na+ channels).

  2. ThermoTRP channels in nociceptors: taking a lead from capsaicin receptor TRPV1.

    PubMed

    Mandadi, Sravan; Roufogalis, Basil D

    2008-03-01

    Nociceptors with peripheral and central projections express temperature sensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels, also called thermoTRP's. Chemosensitivity of thermoTRP's to certain natural compounds eliciting pain or exhibiting thermal properties has proven to be a good tool in characterizing these receptors. Capsaicin, a pungent chemical in hot peppers, has assisted in the cloning of the first thermoTRP, TRPV1. This discovery initiated the search for other receptors encoding the response to a wide range of temperatures encountered by the body. Of these, TRPV1 and TRPV2 encode unique modalities of thermal pain when exposed to noxious heat. The ability of TRPA1 to encode noxious cold is presently being debated. The role of TRPV1 in peripheral inflammatory pain and central sensitization during chronic pain is well known. In addition to endogenous agonists, a wide variety of chemical agonists and antagonists have been discovered to activate and inhibit TRPV1. Efforts are underway to determine conditions under which agonist-mediated desensitization of TRPV1 or inhibition by antagonists can produce analgesia. Also, identification of specific second messenger molecules that regulate phosphorylation of TRPV1 has been the focus of intense research, to exploit a broader approach to pain treatment. The search for a role of TRPV2 in pain remains dormant due to the lack of suitable experimental models. However, progress into TRPA1's role in pain has received much attention recently. Another thermoTRP, TRPM8, encoding for the cool sensation and also expressed in nociceptors, has recently been shown to reduce pain via a central mechanism, thus opening a novel strategy for achieving analgesia. The role of other thermoTRP's (TRPV3 and TRPV4) encoding for detection of warm temperatures and expressed in nociceptors cannot be excluded. This review will discuss current knowledge on the role of nociceptor thermoTRPs in pain and therapy and describes the activator and

  3. Subunit-specific coupling between gamma-aminobutyric acid type A and P2X2 receptor channels.

    PubMed

    Boué-Grabot, Eric; Toulmé, Estelle; Emerit, Michel B; Garret, Maurice

    2004-12-10

    ATP and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) are two fast neurotransmitters co-released at central synapses, where they co-activate excitatory P2X and inhibitory GABAA (GABA type A) receptors. We report here that co-activation of P2X2 and various GABAA receptors, co-expressed in Xenopus oocytes, leads to a functional cross-inhibition dependent on GABAA subunit composition. Sequential applications of GABA and ATP revealed that alphabeta- or alphabetagamma-containing GABAA receptors inhibited P2X2 channels, whereas P2X2 channels failed to inhibit gamma-containing GABAA receptors. This functional cross-talk is independent of membrane potential, changes in current direction, and calcium. Non-additive responses observed between cation-selective GABAA and P2X2 receptors further indicate the chloride independence of this process. Overexpression of minigenes encoding either the C-terminal fragment of P2X2 or the intracellular loop of the beta3 subunit disrupted the functional cross-inhibition. We previously demonstrated functional and physical cross-talk between rho1 and P2X2 receptors, which induced a retargeting of rho1 channels to surface clusters when co-expressed in hippocampal neurons (Boue-Grabot, E., Emerit, M. B., Toulme, E., Seguela, P., and Garret, M. (2004) J. Biol. Chem. 279, 6967-6975). Co-expression of P2X2 and chimeric rho1 receptors with the C-terminal sequences of alpha2, beta3, or gamma2 subunits indicated that only rho1-beta3 and P2X2 channels exhibit both functional cross-inhibition in Xenopus oocytes and co-clustering/retargeting in hippocampal neurons. Therefore, the C-terminal domain of P2X2 and the intracellular loop of beta GABAA subunits are required for the functional interaction between ATP- and GABA-gated channels. This gamma subunit-dependent cross-talk may contribute to the regulation of synaptic activity.

  4. Alpha2-adrenoceptor-independent inhibition of acetylcholine receptor channel and sodium channel by dexmedetomidine in rat superior cervical ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Yang, L; Tang, J; Dong, J; Zheng, J

    2015-03-19

    Both central and peripheral sympathetic nervous systems contribute to the cardiovascular effects of dexmedetomidine (DMED), a highly selective and widely used a2-adrenoceptor agonist for sedation, analgesia, and stress management. The central sympatholytic effects are augmented by peripheral inhibition of sympathetic ganglion transmission. The mechanism is not clear. In this research, using conventional patch-clamp recordings we investigated the direct effects of DMED on sodium (Na(+)) channel currents (INa) and nicotinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptor (nAChRs) channel currents (IACh) in rat superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons to explore the possible mechanisms of sympathetic ganglion transmission inhibition by DMED. DMED voltage-dependently suppressed INa with half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 67.2±9.6μM and 26.1±5.3μM at holding potentials of -80mV and -60mV, respectively. The inhibition of Na(+) channels by DMED was also frequency dependent. 100μM DMED shifted the Na(+) channel inactivation curves to the hyperpolarizing direction by 9.8mV (P<0.01) and slowed the recovery from inactivation by 8.9ms (P<0.01), but no effects were seen on the shape of the current-voltage relationship or Na(+) channels activation curves. DMED dose-dependently inhibited IACh with an IC50 value of 5.5±2.4μM in SCG neurons, and this inhibition was voltage-independent. DMED pretreatment followed by fast co-application of DMED and ACh produced a significantly larger IACh inhibition than without DMED pretreatment. Yohimbine, phentolamine, and atropine pretreatment did not alter the inhibitory effects of DMED on INa and IACh. In conclusion, DMED dose-dependently inhibits INa and IACh in rat SCG neurons by preferential binding to the inactivated state of the Na(+) channels and the closed state (resting) of nAChR channels respectively. Both inhibitions are a2-adrenoceptor independent. Furthermore, the nAChR channels in rat SCG neurons are much more sensitive to

  5. The Role of 5-HT3 Receptors in Signaling from Taste Buds to Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Vandenbeuch, Aurelie; Voigt, Anja; Meyerhof, Wolfgang; Kinnamon, Sue C.; Finger, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    Activation of taste buds triggers the release of several neurotransmitters, including ATP and serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT). Type III taste cells release 5-HT directly in response to acidic (sour) stimuli and indirectly in response to bitter and sweet tasting stimuli. Although ATP is necessary for activation of nerve fibers for all taste stimuli, the role of 5-HT is unclear. We investigated whether gustatory afferents express functional 5-HT3 receptors and, if so, whether these receptors play a role in transmission of taste information from taste buds to nerves. In mice expressing GFP under the control of the 5-HT3A promoter, a subset of cells in the geniculate ganglion and nerve fibers in taste buds are GFP-positive. RT-PCR and in situ hybridization confirmed the presence of 5-HT3A mRNA in the geniculate ganglion. Functional studies show that only those geniculate ganglion cells expressing 5-HT3A-driven GFP respond to 10 μm 5-HT and this response is blocked by 1 μm ondansetron, a 5-HT3 antagonist, and mimicked by application of 10 μm m-chlorophenylbiguanide, a 5-HT3 agonist. Pharmacological blockade of 5-HT3 receptors in vivo or genetic deletion of the 5-HT3 receptors reduces taste nerve responses to acids and other taste stimuli compared with controls, but only when urethane was used as the anesthetic. We find that anesthetic levels of pentobarbital reduce taste nerve responses apparently by blocking the 5-HT3 receptors. Our results suggest that 5-HT released from type III cells activates gustatory nerve fibers via 5-HT3 receptors, accounting for a significant proportion of the neural taste response. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Historically, serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) has been described as a candidate neurotransmitter in the gustatory system and recent studies show that type III taste receptor cells release 5-HT in response to various taste stimuli. In the present study, we demonstrate that a subset of gustatory sensory neurons express functional

  6. Receptor Species-dependent Desensitization Controls KCNQ1/KCNE1 K+ Channels as Downstream Effectors of Gq Protein-coupled Receptors.

    PubMed

    Kienitz, Marie-Cécile; Vladimirova, Dilyana; Müller, Christian; Pott, Lutz; Rinne, Andreas

    2016-12-16

    Activation of Gq protein-coupled receptors (GqPCRs) might induce divergent cellular responses, related to receptor-specific activation of different branches of the Gq signaling pathway. Receptor-specific desensitization provides a mechanism of effector modulation by restricting the spatiotemporal activation of signaling components downstream of Gq We quantified signaling events downstream of GqPCR activation with FRET-based biosensors in CHO and HEK 293 cells. KCNQ1/KCNE1 channels (IKs) were measured as a functional readout of receptor-specific activation. Activation of muscarinic M1 receptors (M1-Rs) caused robust and reversible inhibition of IKs. In contrast, activation of α1B-adrenergic receptors (α1B-ARs) induced transient inhibition of IKs, which turned into delayed facilitation after agonist withdrawal. As a novel finding, we demonstrate that GqPCR-specific kinetics of IKs modulation are determined by receptor-specific desensitization, evident at the level of Gαq activation, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) depletion, and diacylglycerol production. Sustained IKs inhibition during M1-R stimulation is attributed to robust membrane PIP2 depletion, whereas the rapid desensitization of α1B-AR delimits PIP2 reduction and augments current activation by protein kinase C (PKC). Overexpression of Ca(2+)-independent PKCδ did not affect the time course of α1B-AR-induced diacylglycerol formation, excluding a contribution of PKCδ to α1B-AR desensitization. Pharmacological inhibition of Ca(2+)-dependent PKC isoforms abolished fast α1B receptor desensitization and augmented IKs reduction, but did not affect IKs facilitation. These data indicate a contribution of Ca(2+)-dependent PKCs to α1B-AR desensitization, whereas IKs facilitation is induced by Ca(2+)-independent PKC isoforms. In contrast, neither inhibition of Ca(2+)-dependent/Ca(2+)-independent isoforms nor overexpression of PKCδ induced M1 receptor desensitization, excluding a contribution of

  7. Receptor channel TRPC6 orchestrate the activation of human hepatic stellate cell under hypoxia condition

    SciTech Connect

    Iyer, Soumya C; Kannan, Anbarasu; Gopal, Ashidha; Devaraj, Niranjali; Halagowder, Devaraj

    2015-08-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), a specialized stromal cytotype have a great impact on the biological behaviors of liver diseases. Despite this fact, the underlying mechanism that regulates HSC still remains poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to understand the role of TRPC6 signaling in regulating the molecular mechanism of HSCs in response to hypoxia. In the present study we showed that under hypoxia condition, the upregulated Hypoxia Inducible Factor 1α (HIF1α) increases NICD activation, which in turn induces the expression of transient receptor potential channel 6 (TRPC6) in HSC line lx-2. TRPC6 causes a sustained elevation of intracellular calcium which is coupled with the activation of the calcineurin-nuclear factor of activated T-cell (NFAT) pathway which activates the synthesis of extracellular matrix proteins. TRPC6 also activates SMAD2/3 dependent TGF-β signaling in facilitating upregulated expression of αSMA and collagen. As activated HSCs may be a suitable target for HCC therapy and targeting these cells rather than the HCC cells may result in a greater response. Collectively, our studies indicate for the first time the detailed mechanism of activation of HSC through TRPC6 signaling and thus being a promising therapeutic target. - Highlights: • HIF1α increases NICD, induces TRPC6 in lx2 cells. • TRPC6 a novel regulator in the activation of HSC. • HSCs as target for HCC therapy.

  8. Energy for wild-type acetylcholine receptor channel gating from different choline derivatives.

    PubMed

    Bruhova, Iva; Gregg, Timothy; Auerbach, Anthony

    2013-02-05

    Agonists, including the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh), bind at two sites in the neuromuscular ACh receptor channel (AChR) to promote a reversible, global change in protein conformation that regulates the flow of ions across the muscle cell membrane. In the synaptic cleft, ACh is hydrolyzed to acetate and choline. Replacement of the transmitter's ester acetyl group with a hydroxyl (ACh→choline) results in a + 1.8 kcal/mol reduction in the energy for gating generated by each agonist molecule from a low- to high-affinity change of the transmitter binding site (ΔG(B)). To understand the distinct actions of structurally related agonist molecules, we measured ΔG(B) for 10 related choline derivatives. Replacing the hydroxyl group of choline with different substituents, such as hydrogen, chloride, methyl, or amine, increased the energy for gating (i.e., it made ΔG(B) more negative relative to choline). Extending the ethyl hydroxide tail of choline to propyl and butyl hydroxide also increased this energy. Our findings reveal the amount of energy that is available for the AChR conformational change provided by different, structurally related agonists. We speculate that a hydrogen bond between the choline hydroxyl and the backbone carbonyl of αW149 positions this agonist's quaternary ammonium group so as to reduce the cation-π interaction between this moiety and the aromatic groups at the binding site.

  9. Transient receptor potential melastatin 4 channel contributes to migration of androgen-insensitive prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kilch, Tatiana; Jochum, Marcus Martin; Urban, Sabine Katharina; Jung, Volker; Stöckle, Michael; Rother, Karen; Greiner, Markus; Peinelt, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Impaired Ca2+ signaling in prostate cancer contributes to several cancer hallmarks, such as enhanced proliferation and migration and a decreased ability to induce apoptosis. Na+ influx via transient receptor potential melastatin 4 channel (TRPM4) can reduce store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) by decreasing the driving force for Ca2+. In patients with prostate cancer, gene expression of TRPM4 is elevated. Recently, TRPM4 was identified as a cancer driver gene in androgen-insensitive prostate cancer. We investigated TRPM4 protein expression in cancer tissue samples from 20 patients with prostate cancer. We found elevated TRPM4 protein levels in prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and prostate cancer tissue compared to healthy tissue. In primary human prostate epithelial cells (hPEC) from healthy tissue and in the androgen-insensitive prostate cancer cell lines DU145 and PC3, TRPM4 mediated large Na+ currents. We demonstrated significantly increased SOCE after siRNA targeting of TRPM4 in hPEC and DU145 cells. In addition, knockdown of TRPM4 reduced migration but not proliferation of DU145 and PC3 cells. Taken together, our data identify TRPM4 as a regulator of SOCE in hPEC and DU145 cells, demonstrate a role for TRPM4 in cancer cell migration and suggest that TRPM4 is a promising potential therapeutic target. PMID:26496025

  10. The overexpressed functional transient receptor potential channel TRPM2 in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ling-Yan; Xu, Wan-Lin; Xu, Zeng-Qi; Qi, Cui; Li, Yang; Cheng, Jie; Liu, Lai-Kui; Wu, Yu-Nong; Gao, Jun; Ye, Jin-Hai

    2016-01-01

    TRPM2, one member of the transient receptor potential (TRP) protein super-family, is a Ca2+-permeable channel that is activated by oxidative stress and confers susceptibility to cell death. In the human tongue specimens of carcinoma and the tongue carcinoma SCC cell lines, we observed the enhanced expression of TRPM2. By means of the whole-cell electrophysiological recording, the ADPR-induced currents mediated by TRPM2 were recorded in cultured SCC9 cells. Moreover, after H2O2 treatment for 24 hours, the apoptotic number of SCC9 cells was significantly increased. However, the selectively knocked-down TRPM2 with the small interfering RNA technique inhibited the survival and migration of the SCC9 cancer cells, which was independent of the p53-p21 pathway, since the expression of p21 was enhanced after TRPM2 knockdown. Furthermore, the sub-cellular localization of TRPM2 was remarkably different between cancerous and non-cancerous cells. A significant amount of the TRPM2 proteins were located in the nuclei in cancer cells. All these data suggest that TRPM2 is essential for the survival and migration of SCC cancer cells and may be a potential target for the selective treatment of tongue cancer. PMID:28008929

  11. Sources of energy for gating by neurotransmitters in acetylcholine receptor channels.

    PubMed

    Purohit, Prasad; Bruhova, Iva; Auerbach, Anthony

    2012-06-12

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) mediate signaling in the central and peripheral nervous systems. The AChR gating conformational change is powered by a low- to high-affinity change for neurotransmitters at two transmitter binding sites. We estimated (from single-channel currents) the components of energy for gating arising from binding site aromatic residues in the α-subunit. All mutations reduced the energy (TyrC1>TrpB≈TyrC2>TyrA), with TyrC1 providing ~40% of the total. Considered one at a time, the fractional energy contributions from the aromatic rings were TrpB ~35%, TyrC1 ~28%, TyrC2 ~28%, and TyrA ~10%. Together, TrpB, TyrC1, and TyrC2 comprise an "aromatic triad" that provides much of the total energy from the transmitter for gating. Analysis of mutant pairs suggests that the energy contributions from some residues are nearly independent. Mutations of TyrC1 cause particularly large energy reductions because they remove two favorable and approximately equal interactions between the aromatic ring and the quaternary amine of the agonist and between the hydroxyl and αLysβ7.

  12. Potentiation of acid-sensing ion channel activity by peripheral group I metabotropic glutamate receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Gan, Xiong; Wu, Jing; Ren, Cuixia; Qiu, Chun-Yu; Li, Yan-Kun; Hu, Wang-Ping

    2016-05-01

    Glutamate activates peripheral group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) and contributes to inflammatory pain. However, it is still not clear the mechanisms are involved in group I mGluR-mediated peripheral sensitization. Herein, we report that group I mGluRs signaling sensitizes acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and contributes to acidosis-evoked pain. DHPG, a selective group I mGluR agonist, can potentiate the functional activity of ASICs, which mediated the proton-induced events. DHPG concentration-dependently increased proton-gated currents in DRG neurons. It shifted the proton concentration-response curve upwards, with a 47.3±7.0% increase of the maximal current response to proton. Group I mGluRs, especially mGluR5, mediated the potentiation of DHPG via an intracellular cascade. DHPG potentiation of proton-gated currents disappeared after inhibition of intracellular Gq/11 proteins, PLCβ, PKC or PICK1 signaling. Moreover, DHPG enhanced proton-evoked membrane excitability of rat DRG neurons and increased the amplitude of the depolarization and the number of spikes induced by acid stimuli. Finally, peripherally administration of DHPG dose-dependently exacerbated nociceptive responses to intraplantar injection of acetic acid in rats. Potentiation of ASIC activity by group I mGluR signaling in rat DRG neurons revealed a novel peripheral mechanism underlying group I mGluRs involvement in hyperalgesia.

  13. Species dependent dual modulation of the benzodiazepine/GABA receptor chloride channel by dihydroergosine

    SciTech Connect

    Pericic, D.; Tvrdeic, A. )

    1990-01-01

    Dihydroergosine enhanced the incidence of bicuculline induced convulsions in female rats, while 100 mg/kg of dihydroergosine given to female mice made 45% convulsive dose of bicuculline to be subconvulsive. The same dose of dihydroergosine enhanced in mice the latency of bicuculline-induced convulsions. Although, in in vitro experiments dihydroergosine showed very weak ability to prevent the binding of {sup 3}H-muscimol, the drug was able to diminish and to augment the IC{sub 50} of bicuculline and GABA when added to crude synaptosomal pellet of the rat and mouse brain respectively. Lower concentrations of dihydroergosine stimulated and higher inhibited {sup 3}H-TBOB binding to the crude synaptosomal pellet of the rat brain. In the preparation of mouse brain dihydroergosine produced only inhibition of {sup 3}H-TBOB binding. Only slight quantitative differences were observed in bicuculline-induced stimulation and in GABA- and diazepam-induced inhibition of {sup 3}H-TBOB binding between the two species. The results suggest that the opposite species-dependent effects of dihydroergosine on bicuculline-induced convulsions are due to the ability of this drug to modulate species-dependently the benzodiazepine/GABA receptor chloride channel complex.

  14. Involvement of Transient Receptor Potential Cation Channel Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in Myoblast Fusion.

    PubMed

    Kurosaka, Mitsutoshi; Ogura, Yuji; Funabashi, Toshiya; Akema, Tatsuo

    2016-10-01

    The mechanisms that underlie the complex process of muscle regeneration after injury remain unknown. Transient receptor potential cation channel vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is expressed in several cell types, including skeletal muscle, and is activated by high temperature and by certain molecules secreted during tissue inflammation. Severe inflammation and local temperature perturbations are induced during muscle regeneration, which suggests that TRPV1 might be activated and involved in the process. The aim of this study, was to clarify the role of TRPV1 in the myogenic potential of satellite cells responsible for muscle regeneration. We found that mRNA and protein levels of TRPV1 increased during regeneration after cardiotoxin (CTX)-induced muscle injury in mice. Using isolated mouse satellite cells (i.e., myoblasts), we observed that activation of TRPV1 by its agonist capsaicin (CAP) augmented myogenin protein levels. Whereas CAP did not alter myoblast proliferation, it facilitated myoblast fusion (evaluated using myonucleii number per myotube and fusion index). In contrast, suppression of TRPV1 by siRNA impaired myoblast fusion. Using mice, we also demonstrated that intramuscular injection of CAP facilitated muscle repair after CTX-induced muscle injury. Moreover, we showed that these roles of TRPV1 might be mediated by interleukin-4 and calcium signaling during myoblast fusion. Collectively, these results suggest that TRPV1 underlies normal myogenesis through promotion of myoblast fusion. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2275-2285, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Potassium ion channels operated by receptor stimulation can be activated simply by raising temperature.

    PubMed

    Tamazawa, Y; Matsumoto, M; Kudo, A; Sasaki, K

    1991-01-01

    Application of either dopamine (DA), acetylcholine (ACh), or histamine (HA) to the identified ganglion cells of Aplysia elicits a K(+)-dependent slow hyperpolarization. When temperature of the bathing solution was raised from 22 to 32 degrees C, these cells were also hyperpolarized with a marked increase in K+ conductance. The warm- and transmitter-induced current responses recorded under voltage clamp were not blocked by either 1 mM Ba2+ or 10 mM TEA. Intracellularly injected guanosine 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) (GDP beta S) depressed both warm- and transmitter-induced K+ responses immediately after the injection. Intracellular application of guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTP gamma S) caused a gradual, irreversible increase in K+ conductance of the plasma membrane and occluded both responses. Transmitter-induced response markedly decreased when the temperature was raised from 22 to 32 degrees C, suggesting that the response to transmitter was occluded during the warm-induced response. These results suggested that the G-protein regulating the receptor-operated K+ channels could be activated simply by raising temperature.

  16. Effects of nicotinic and NMDA receptor channel blockers on intravenous cocaine and nicotine self-administration in mice.

    PubMed

    Blokhina, Elena A; Kashkin, Vladimir A; Zvartau, Edwin E; Danysz, Wojciech; Bespalov, Anton Y

    2005-03-01

    Previous studies have indicated that blockade of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subtype of glutamate receptors prevents acquisition of instrumental behaviors reinforced by food and drugs such as morphine and cocaine. The present study aimed to extend this evidence by testing whether NMDA receptor channel blocker, memantine, would exert similar effects on acquisition of cocaine and nicotine self-administration in mice. Inasmuch as memantine also acts as nicotinic receptor channel blocker, this study assessed the effects of mecamylamine and MRZ 2/621 that are more selective nicotinic blockers. Adult male Swiss mice were allowed to self-administer cocaine (0.8-2.4 microg/infusion) or nicotine (0.08-0.32 microg/infusion) during the 30-min test. Pretreatment with memantine (0.1-10 mg/kg) prevented acquisition of nicotine but not cocaine self-administration. Pretreatment with mecamylamine (0.3-3 mg/kg) and MRZ 2/621 (0.3-10 mg/kg) produced dose-dependent suppression of both cocaine and nicotine self-administration. Taken together with the previous reports, these results indicate that nicotinic receptor blockers antagonize acute reinforcing effects of cocaine while NMDA receptor blockade may have limited effectiveness.

  17. Analysis of macroscopic ionic currents mediated by GABAρ1 receptors during lanthanide modulation predicts novel states controlling channel gating

    PubMed Central

    Goutman, Juan D; Escobar, Ariel L; Calvo, Daniel J

    2005-01-01

    Lanthanide-induced modulation of GABAC receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes was studied. We obtained two-electrode voltage-clamp recordings of ionic currents mediated by recombinant homomeric GABAρ1 receptors and performed numerical simulations of kinetic models of the macroscopic ionic currents. GABA-evoked chloride currents were potentiated by La3+, Lu3+ and Gd3+ in the micromolar range. Lanthanide effects were rapid, reversible and voltage independent. The degree of potentiation was reduced by increasing GABA concentration. Lu3+ also induced receptor desensitization and decreased the deactivation rate of GABAρ1 currents. In the presence of 300 μM Lu3+, dose–response curves for GABA-evoked currents showed a significant enhancement of the maximum amplitude and an increase of the apparent affinity. The rate of onset of TPMPA and picrotoxin antagonism of GABAρ1 receptors was modulated by Lu3+. These results suggest that the potentiation of the anionic current was the result of a direct lanthanide–receptor interaction at a site capable of allosterically modulating channel properties. Based on kinetic schemes, which included a second open state and a nonconducting desensitized state that closely reproduced the experimental results, two nonexclusive probable models of GABAρ1 channels gating are proposed. PMID:16231008

  18. Taurine blocks ATP-sensitive potassium channels of rat skeletal muscle fibres interfering with the sulphonylurea receptor.

    PubMed

    Tricarico, D; Barbieri, M; Camerino, D C

    2000-06-01

    Taurine is a sulphonic aminoacid present in high amounts in various tissues including cardiac and skeletal muscles showing different properties such as antioxidative, antimyotonic and anti-schaemic effects. The cellular mechanism of action of taurine is under investigation and appears to involve the interaction of the sulphonic aminoacid with several ion channels. Using the patch-clamp technique we studied the effects of taurine in rat skeletal muscle fibres on ATP-sensitive K(+) channel (K(ATP)) immediately after excision and on channels that underwent rundown. The cytoplasmic application of 20 mM of taurine reduced the K(ATP) current; this effect was reverted by washout of the drug solution. In this experimental condition the IC(50) was 20.1 mM. After rundown, taurine inhibited the K(ATP) current with similar efficacy. Competition experiments showed that taurine shifted the dose-response inhibition curve of glybenclamide to the left on the log-dose axis without significantly affecting those of ATP or Ca(2+) ion. Single channel recording revealed that taurine affects the close state of the channel prolonging it and reducing the bursts duration. Our data indicate that taurine inhibits the muscular K(ATP) channel interfering with the glybenclamide site on the sulphonylurea receptor of the channel or on the site allosterically coupled to it. During ischaemia and hypoxia, the skeletal and heart muscles undergo several changes; for example, the activation of K(ATP) channels and loss of the intracellular taurine content. The depletion of taurine during ischaemia would contribute to the early activation of K(ATP) channels and salvage the intracellular ATP content.

  19. Differential regulation of SK and BK channels by Ca2+ signals from Ca2+ channels and ryanodine receptors in guinea-pig urinary bladder myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Gerald M; Nelson, Mark T

    2002-01-01

    Small-conductance (SK) and large-conductance (BK) Ca2+-activated K+ channels are key regulators of excitability in urinary bladder smooth muscle (UBSM) of guinea-pig. The overall goal of this study was to define how SK and BK channels respond to Ca2+ signals from voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels (VDCCs) in the surface membrane and from ryanodine-sensitive Ca2+ release channels or ryanodine receptors (RyRs) in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) membrane. To characterize the role of SK channels in UBSM, the effects of the SK channel blocker apamin on phasic contractions were examined. Apamin caused a dose-dependent increase in the amplitude of phasic contractions over a broad concentration range (10−10 to 10−6m). To determine the effects of Ca2+ signals from VDCCs and RyRs to SK and BK channels, whole cell membrane current was measured in isolated myocytes bathed in physiological solutions. Depolarization (-70 to +10 mV for 100 ms) of isolated myocytes caused an inward Ca2+ current (ICa), followed by an outward current. The outward current was reduced in a dose-dependent manner by apamin (10−10 to 10−6m), and designated ISK. ISK had a mean amplitude of 53.8 ± 6.1 pA or ∼1.4 pA pF−1 at +10 mV. The amplitude of ISK correlated with the peak ICa. Blocking ICa abolished ISK. In contrast, ISK was insensitive to the RyR blocker ryanodine (10 μM). These data indicate that Ca2+ signals from VDCCs, but not from RyRs, activate SK channels. BK channel currents (IBK) were isolated from other currents by using the BK channel blockers tetraethylammonium ions (TEA+; 1 mm) or iberiotoxin (200 nm). Voltage steps evoked transient and steady-state IBK components. Transient BK currents have previously been shown to result from BK channel activation by local Ca2+ release through RyRs (‘Ca2+ sparks’). Transient BK currents were inhibited by ryanodine (10 μM), as expected, and had a mean amplitude of 152.6 pA at +10 mV. The mean number of transient BK currents during a

  20. Alternative splicing of a protein domain indispensable for function of transient receptor potential melastatin 3 (TRPM3) ion channels.

    PubMed

    Frühwald, Julia; Camacho Londoño, Julia; Dembla, Sandeep; Mannebach, Stefanie; Lis, Annette; Drews, Anna; Wissenbach, Ulrich; Oberwinkler, Johannes; Philipp, Stephan E

    2012-10-26

    TRPM3 channels form ionotropic steroid receptors in the plasma membrane of pancreatic β and dorsal root ganglion cells and link steroid hormone signaling to insulin release and pain perception, respectively. We identified and compared the function of a number of TRPM3 splice variants present in mouse, rat and human tissues. We found that variants lacking a region of 18 amino acid residues display neither Ca(2+) entry nor ionic currents when expressed alone. Hence, splicing removes a region that is indispensable for channel function, which is called the ICF region. TRPM3 variants devoid of this region (TRPM3ΔICF), are ubiquitously present in different tissues and cell types where their transcripts constitute up to 15% of the TRPM3 isoforms. The ICF region is conserved throughout the TRPM family, and its presence in TRPM8 proteins is also necessary for function. Within the ICF region, 10 amino acid residues form a domain essential for the formation of operative TRPM3 channels. TRPM3ΔICF variants showed reduced interaction with other TRPM3 isoforms, and their occurrence at the cell membrane was diminished. Correspondingly, coexpression of ΔICF proteins with functional TRPM3 subunits not only reduced the number of channels but also impaired TRPM3-mediated Ca(2+) entry. We conclude that TRPM3ΔICF variants are regulatory channel subunits fine-tuning TRPM3 channel activity.

  1. Calcium-dependent expression of transient receptor potential canonical type 3 channels in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Krueger, Katharina; Hovsepian, Anahit; Tepel, Martin; Thilo, Florian

    2011-10-01

    It is unknown whether extracellular calcium may regulate the expression of transient receptor potential canonical type 3 (TRPC3) channels in patients with chronic kidney disease. Using quantitative in-cell Western assay we compared the expression of TRPC3 channel protein in monocytes from 20 patients with chronic kidney disease and 19 age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects. TRPC3 channels were identified by immunoblotting using specific antibodies and TRPC3 protein was further confirmed by mass spectrometry. We observed a significant increase of TRPC3 channel protein expression in patients with chronic kidney disease compared to healthy control subjects (normalized expression, 0.42±0.06 vs. 0.19±0.03; p<0.01). Expression of TRPC3 was significantly inversely correlated with estimated glomerular filtration rates (Spearman r=-0.41) or serum calcium concentration (Spearman r=-0.34). During a hemodialysis session serum calcium concentrations significantly increased, whereas the expression of TRPC3 channels and calcium influx significantly decreased. In vitro studies confirmed that higher calcium concentrations but not magnesium, barium nor sodium concentrations significantly decreased TRPC3 expression in human monocytes. This study indicates that reduced extracellular calcium concentrations up-regulate TRPC3 channel protein expression in patients with chronic kidney disease.

  2. Gain-of-function mutations in the transient receptor potential channels TRPV1 and TRPA1: how painful?

    PubMed

    Boukalova, S; Touska, F; Marsakova, L; Hynkova, A; Sura, L; Chvojka, S; Dittert, I; Vlachova, V

    2014-01-01

    Gain-of-function (GOF) mutations in ion channels are rare events, which lead to increased agonist sensitivity or altered gating properties, and may render the channel constitutively active. Uncovering and following characterization of such mutants contribute substantially to the understanding of the molecular basis of ion channel functioning. Here we give an overview of some GOF mutants in polymodal ion channels specifically involved in transduction of painful stimuli--TRPV1 and TRPA1, which are scrutinized by scientists due to their important role in development of some pathological pain states. Remarkably, a substitution of single amino acid in the S4-S5 region of TRPA1 (N855S) has been recently associated with familial episodic pain syndrome. This mutation increases chemical sensitivity of TRPA1, but leaves the voltage sensitivity unchanged. On the other hand, mutations in the analogous region of TRPV1 (R557K and G563S) severely affect all aspects of channel activation and lead to spontaneous activity. Comparison of the effects induced by mutations in homologous positions in different TRP receptors (or more generally in other distantly related ion channels) may elucidate the gating mechanisms conserved during evolution.

  3. Regulation of Drosophila transient receptor potential-like (TrpL) channels by phospholipase C-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Estacion, M; Sinkins, W G; Schilling, W P

    2001-01-01

    Patch clamp and fura-2 fluorescence were employed to characterize receptor-mediated activation of recombinant Drosophila TrpL channels expressed in Sf9 insect cells. TrpL was activated by receptor stimulation and by exogenous application of diacylglycerol (DAG) or poly-unsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). Activation of TrpL was blocked more than 70% by U73122, suggesting that the effect of these agents was dependent upon phospholipase C (PLC). In fura-2 assays, extracellular application of bacterial phosphatidylinositol (PI)-PLC or phosphatidylcholine (PC)-PLC caused a transient increase in TrpL channel activity, the magnitude of which was significantly less than that observed following receptor stimulation. TrpL channels were also activated in excised inside-out patches by cytoplasmic application of mammalian PLC-b2, bacterial PI-PLC and PC-PLC, but not by phospholipase D (PLD). The phospholipases had little or no effect when examined in either whole-cell or cell-attached configurations.TrpL activity was inhibited by addition of phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) to excised inside-out membrane patches exhibiting spontaneous channel activity or to patches pre-activated by treatment with PLC. The effect was reversible, specific for PIP2, and was not observed with phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), PI, PC or phosphatidylserine (PS). However, antibodies against PIP2 consistently failed to activate TrpL in inside-out patches. It is concluded that both the hydrolysis of PIP2 and the generation of DAG are required to rapidly activate TrpL following receptor stimulation, or that some other PLC-dependent mechanism plays a crucial role in the activation process.

  4. Enhanced dihydropyridine receptor calcium channel activity restores muscle strength in JP45/CASQ1 double knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Mosca, Barbara; Delbono, Osvaldo; Messi, Maria Laura; Bergamelli, Leda; Wang, Zhong-Min; Vukcevic, Mirko; Lopez, Ruben; Treves, Susan; Nishi, Miyuki; Takeshima, Hiroshi; Paolini, Cecilia; Martini, Marta; Rispoli, Giorgio; Protasi, Feliciano; Zorzato, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Muscle strength declines with age in part due to a decline of Ca2+ release from sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium stores. Skeletal muscle dihydropyridine receptors (Cav1.1) initiate muscle contraction by activating ryanodine receptors in the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Cav1.1 channel activity is enhanced by a retrograde stimulatory signal delivered by the ryanodine receptor. JP45 is a membrane protein interacting with Cav1.1 and the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ storage protein calsequestrin (CASQ1). Here we show that JP45 and CASQ1 strengthen skeletal muscle contraction by modulating Cav1.1 channel activity. Using muscle fibres from JP45 and CASQ1 double knockout mice, we demonstrate that Ca2+ transients evoked by tetanic stimulation are the result of massive Ca2+ influx due to enhanced Cav1.1 channel activity, which restores muscle strength in JP45/CASQ1 double knockout mice. We envision that JP45 and CASQ1 may be candidate targets for the development of new therapeutic strategies against decay of skeletal muscle strength caused by a decrease in sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ content. PMID:23443569

  5. The Pyrexia transient receptor potential channel mediates circadian clock synchronization to low temperature cycles in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Wolfgang, Werner; Simoni, Alekos; Gentile, Carla; Stanewsky, Ralf

    2013-10-07

    Circadian clocks are endogenous approximately 24 h oscillators that temporally regulate many physiological and behavioural processes. In order to be beneficial for the organism, these clocks must be synchronized with the environmental cycles on a daily basis. Both light : dark and the concomitant daily temperature cycles (TCs) function as Zeitgeber ('time giver') and efficiently entrain circadian clocks. The temperature receptors mediating this synchronization have not been identified. Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels function as thermo-receptors in animals, and here we show that the Pyrexia (Pyx) TRP channel mediates temperature synchronization in Drosophila melanogaster. Pyx is expressed in peripheral sensory organs (chordotonal organs), which previously have been implicated in temperature synchronization. Flies deficient for Pyx function fail to synchronize their behaviour to TCs in the lower range (16-20°C), and this deficit can be partially rescued by introducing a wild-type copy of the pyx gene. Synchronization to higher TCs is not affected, demonstrating a specific role for Pyx at lower temperatures. In addition, pyx mutants speed up their clock after being exposed to TCs. Our results identify the first TRP channel involved in temperature synchronization of circadian clocks.

  6. Dynamics of receptor-operated Ca(2+) currents through TRPC channels controlled via the PI(4,5)P2-PLC signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Mori, Masayuki X; Itsuki, Kyohei; Hase, Hideharu; Sawamura, Seishiro; Kurokawa, Tatsuki; Mori, Yasuo; Inoue, Ryuji

    2015-01-01

    Transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels are Ca(2+)-permeable, nonselective cation channels that carry receptor-operated Ca(2+) currents (ROCs) triggered by receptor-induced, phospholipase C (PLC)-catalyzed hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]. Within the vasculature, TRPC channel ROCs contribute to smooth muscle cell depolarization, vasoconstriction, and vascular remodeling. However, TRPC channel ROCs exhibit a variable response to receptor-stimulation, and the regulatory mechanisms governing TRPC channel activity remain obscure. The variability of ROCs may be explained by their complex regulation by PI(4,5)P2 and its metabolites, which differentially affect TRPC channel activity. To resolve the complex regulation of ROCs, the use of voltage-sensing phosphoinositide phosphatases and model simulation have helped to reveal the time-dependent contribution of PI(4,5)P2 and the possible role of PI(4,5)P2 in the regulation of ROCs. These approaches may provide unprecedented insight into the dynamics of PI(4,5)P2 regulation of TRPC channels and the fundamental mechanisms underlying transmembrane ion flow. Within that context, we summarize the regulation of TRPC channels and their coupling to receptor-mediated signaling, as well as the application of voltage-sensing phosphoinositide phosphatases to this research. We also discuss the controversial bidirectional effects of PI(4,5)P2 using a model simulation that could explain the complicated effects of PI(4,5)P2 on different ROCs.

  7. [Activation of ATP-sensitive K+ channels by ADP and K+ channel openers: homology model of sulfonylurea receptor carboxyl-termini].

    PubMed

    Fujita, A; Matsuoka, T; Matsushita, K; Kurachi, Y

    2001-09-01

    The ATP-sensitive K+ channels (KATP) are composed of Kir6.0 subunits and sulfonylurea receptors (SUR1, 2A and 2B). SUR2A and SUR2B are splice variants and differ only in the C-terminal 42 amino acid residue (C42). SURs are supposed to be the subunit that determines the different response of KATPs to intracellular nucleotides, K+ channel openers and inhibitors. In this study, we report that C42 of SURs plays critical roles in differential activation of various KATPs by ADP and K+ channel openers such as diazoxide and nicorandil. KATPs containing distinct SURs and Kir6.2 were reconstructed on HEK293T cells. Much higher concentrations of ADP were necessary to activate channels which SUR1 or SUR2B. In all KATPs containing different SUR, diazoxide increased the potency of ADP for channel activity without affecting its efficacy. From the electrophysiological data obtained from C-terminal chimeras and point mutants in the second nucleotide binding domain (NBDs), we developed the homology model of each SUR-NBD2 based on the crystallgraphically determined structure of HisP, a member of the ABC protein superfamily. In this model, C42 is located just beneath the Walker A motif of NBD2 and regulates the binding of nucleotide to NBD2 by affecting the 3-D construct of NBD2. This homology model well explains the different response of KATPs to ADP. Based on this model, it will be possible to develop new ligands for KATPs.

  8. [Properties of cholinergic receptor-mediated ion channels on type I vestibular hair cells of guinea pigs].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yun; Kong, Wei-Jia; Xia, Jiao; Zhang, Yu; Cheng, Hua-Mao; Guo, Chang-Kai

    2008-06-25

    To confirm the existence of cholinergic receptors on type I vestibular hair cells (VHCs I) of guinea pigs and to study the properties of the cholinergic receptor-mediated ion channels on VHCs I, electrophysiological responses of isolated VHCs I to external ACh were examined by means of whole-cell patch-clamp recordings. The results showed that 7.5% (21/279) VHCs I were found to be sensitive to ACh (10-1000 μmol/L). ACh generated an outward current in a steady, slow, dose-dependent [EC(50) was (63.78±2.31) μmol/L] and voltage-independent manner. In standard extracellular solution, ACh at the concentration of 100 μmol/L triggered a calcium-dependent current of (170±15) pA at holding potential of -50 mV, and the current amplitude could be depressed by extracellularly added calcium-dependent potassium channel antagonist TEA. The time interval for the next complete activation of ACh-sensitive current was no less than 1 min. The ion channels did not shut off even when they were exposed to ACh for an extended period of time (8 min). The results suggest that dose-dependent, calcium-dependent and voltage-independent cholinergic receptors were located on a few of the VHCs I investibular epithelium of guinea pigs. The cholinergic receptors did not show desensitization to ACh. This work reveals the existence of efferent neurotransmitter receptors on VHCs I and helps in understanding the function of vestibular efferent nervous system, and may provide some useful information on guiding the clinical rehabilitative treatment of vertigo.

  9. Insights into the gating mechanism of the ryanodine-modified human cardiac Ca2+-release channel (ryanodine receptor 2).

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Saptarshi; Thomas, N Lowri; Williams, Alan J

    2014-09-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are intracellular membrane channels playing key roles in many Ca(2+) signaling pathways and, as such, are emerging novel therapeutic and insecticidal targets. RyRs are so named because they bind the plant alkaloid ryanodine with high affinity and although it is established that ryanodine produces profound changes in all aspects of function, our understanding of the mechanisms underlying altered gating is minimal. We address this issue using detailed single-channel gating analysis, mathematical modeling, and energetic evaluation of state transitions establishing that, with ryanodine bound, the RyR pore adopts an extremely stable open conformation. We demonstrate that stability of this state is influenced by interaction of divalent cations with both activating and inhibitory cytosolic sites and, in the absence of activating Ca(2+), trans-membrane voltage. Comparison of the conformational stability of ryanodine- and Imperatoxin A-modified channels identifies significant differences in the mechanisms of action of these qualitatively similar ligands.

  10. Erythropoietin increases expression and function of transient receptor potential canonical 5 channels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Xu, Yunfei; Thilo, Florian; Friis, Ulla G; Jensen, Boye L; Scholze, Alexandra; Zheng, Junhua; Tepel, Martin

    2011-08-01

    Hypertension is a common complication in hemodialysis patients during erythropoietin (EPO) treatment. The underlying mechanisms of EPO-induced hypertension still remain to be determined. Increased transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels have been associated with hypertension. Now, TRPC gene expression was investigated using quantitative real-time RT-PCR and immunoblotting in cultured human endothelial cells and in monocytes from hemodialysis patients. EPO dose-dependently increased TRPC5 mRNA in endothelial cells. EPO increased TRPC5 mRNA stability, that is, EPO prolonged the half-life period for TRPC5 mRNA from 16 hours (control) to 24 hours (P<0.05). The poly(A) tail length was measured by rapid amplification of cDNA ends-poly(A) test. Increased TRPC5 mRNA stability was attributed to longer 3' poly(A) tail lengths after EPO administration. EPO also significantly increased TRPC5 channel protein abundance by 70% (P<0.05). Whole-cell patch clamp showed that angiotensin II-induced, TRPC5-mediated currents were dramatically increased in endothelial cells treated with EPO. Fluorescent dye techniques confirmed that increased calcium influx after EPO treatment was abolished after TRPC5 knockdown (P<0.05). EPO also significantly increased intracellular reactive oxygen species production. Knockdown of TRPC5 alleviated EPO-induced reactive oxygen species generation in endothelial cells (P<0.05). In vivo, EPO-treated hemodialysis patients showed significantly increased amounts of TRPC5 mRNA in monocytes compared with EPO-free hemodialysis patients (6.0±2.4 [n=12] versus 1.0±0.5 [n=9]; P<0.01). Patients undergoing EPO treatment also showed significantly elevated systolic blood pressure (160±7 versus 139±6 mm Hg; P<0.05). Our findings suggest that upregulated functional TRPC5 gene may be one cause of EPO-induced hypertension in patients with chronic kidney disease.

  11. Sigma-1 receptor alters the kinetics of Kv1.3 voltage gated potassium channels but not the sensitivity to receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Maho; Matsuoka, Yoshikazu; Suzuki, Takeshi; Mirrielees, Jennifer; Yang, Jay

    2012-05-03

    Sigma1 receptors (Sigma1R) are intracellular chaperone proteins that bind psychotropic drugs and also clinically used drugs such as ketamine and haloperidol. Co-expression of the Sigma1R has been reported to enhance the sensitivity of several voltage-gated ion channels to Sigma1R ligands. Kv1.3 is the predominant voltage-gated potassium channel expressed in T lymphocytes with a documented role in immune activation. To gain a better understanding of Sigma1R modulation of Kv ion channels, we investigated the effects of Sigma1R co-expression on Kv1.3 physiology and pharmacology in ion channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes. We also explored the protein domains of Kv1.3 necessary for protein:protein interaction between Kv1.3 and Sigma1R through co-immunoprecipitation studies. Slowly inactivating outward-going currents consistent with Kv1.3 expression were elicited on step depolarizations. The current characterized by E(rev), V(1/2), and slope factor remained unchanged when co-expressed with Sigma1R. Analysis of inactivation time constant revealed a faster Kv1.3 current decay when co-expressed with Sigma1R. However the sensitivity to Sigma1R ligands remained unaltered when co-expressed with the Sigma1R in contrast to the previously reported modulation of ligand sensitivity in closely related Kv1.4 and Kv1.5 voltage gated potassium channels. Co-immunoprecipitation assays of various Kv1.3 truncation constructs indicated that the transmembrane domain of the Kv1.3 protein was responsible for the protein:protein interaction with the Sigma1R. Sigma1R likely interacts with different domains of Kv ion channel family proteins resulting in distinct modulation of different channels.

  12. The foot structure from the type 1 ryanodine receptor is required for functional coupling to store-operated channels.

    PubMed

    Sampieri, Alicia; Diaz-Muñoz, Mauricio; Antaramian, Anaid; Vaca, Luis

    2005-07-01

    In the present study we have explored structural determinants of the functional interaction between skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor (RyR1) and transient receptor potential channel 1 (TRPC1) channels expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. We have illustrated a functional interaction between TRPC1 channels and RyR1 for the regulation of store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) initiated after releasing calcium from a caffeine-sensitive intracellular calcium pool. RNA interference experiments directed to reduce the amount of TRPC1 protein indicate that RyR1 associates to at least two different types of store-operated channels (SOCs), one dependent and one independent of TRPC1. In contrast, bradykinin-induced SOCE is completely dependent on the presence of TRPC1 protein, as we have previously illustrated. Removing the foot structure from RyR1 results in normal caffeine-induced release of calcium from internal stores but abolishes the activation of SOCE, indicating that this structure is require for functional coupling to SOCs. The footless RyR1 protein shows a different cellular localization when compared with wild type RyR1. The later protein shows a higher percentage of colocalization with FM-464, a marker of plasma membrane. The implications of the foot structure for the functional and physical coupling to TRPC and SOCs is discussed.

  13. Arachidonic acid activates release of calcium ions from reticulum via ryanodine receptor channels in C2C12 skeletal myotubes.

    PubMed

    Muslikhov, E R; Sukhanova, I F; Avdonin, P V

    2014-05-01

    Arachidonic acid causes an increase in free cytoplasmic calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in differentiated skeletal multinucleated myotubes C2C12 and does not induce calcium response in C2C12 myoblasts. The same reaction of myotubes to arachidonic acid is observed in Ca2+-free medium. This indicates that arachidonic acid induces release of calcium ions from intracellular stores. The blocker of ryanodine receptor channels of sarcoplasmic reticulum dantrolene (20 µM) inhibits this effect by 68.7 ± 6.3% (p < 0.001). The inhibitor of two-pore calcium channels of endolysosomal vesicles trans-NED19 (10 µM) decreases the response to arachidonic acid by 35.8 ± 5.4% (p < 0.05). The phospholipase C inhibitor U73122 (10 µM) has no effect. These data indicate the involvement of ryanodine receptor calcium channels of sarcoplasmic reticulum in [Ca2+]i elevation in skeletal myotubes caused by arachidonic acid and possible participation of two-pore calcium channels from endolysosomal vesicles in this process.

  14. Increased transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) channel expression in hypertrophic heart.

    PubMed

    Thilo, Florian; Liu, Ying; Schulz, Nico; Gergs, Ulrich; Neumann, Joachim; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Gollasch, Maik; Tepel, Martin

    2010-10-08

    The aim of this study was to compare the expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) channels in hypertrophic hearts from transgenic mice showing overexpression of the catalytic subunit alpha of protein phosphatase 2A alpha (PP2Ac alpha) with wild-type mice and with TRPV1-/- mice. Transcripts of TRPV1, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9), discoidin domain receptor family, member 2 (DDR-2), atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), GATA 4, and regulatory microRNA (miR-21) were analyzed using quantitative real-time PCR. Ventricle-to-body-weight-ratio was significantly higher in PP2Ac alpha transgenic mice compared to wild-type mice and TRPV1-/- mice (8.6±1.3mg/g; 5.4±0.3mg/g; and 5.4±0.4mg/g; respectively; p<0.05 by Kruskal-Wallis test). TRPV1 transcripts were significantly higher in PP2Ac alpha transgenic mice compared to wild-type mice (1.7±0.2 arbitrary units vs. 0.8±0.1 arbitrary units; p<0.05). TRPV1 protein expression was also significantly higher in PP2Ac alpha transgenic mice compared to wild-type mice. A significant linear correlation was observed between TRPV1 transcripts and the ventricle-to-body-weight-ratio (Spearman r=0.78; p<0.05). The expression of DDR-2 was significantly higher in PP2Ac alpha transgenic mice compared to wild-type mice and TRPV1 knockout mice. The expression of miR21 was significantly higher in PP2Ac alpha transgenic mice compared with TRPV1-/- mice (0.103±0.018 (PP2Ac alpha transgenic mice); 0.089±0.009 (wild-type mice); and 0.045±0.013 (TRPV1-/- mice), respectively; p<0.05). Masson Goldner staining revealed that PP2Ac alpha transgenic mice showed increased heart fibrosis compared with TRPV1 knockout mice. The study suggests an important role of TRPV1 in the pathogenesis of genetically associated heart hypertrophy.

  15. Cross-reactivity of acid-sensing ion channel and Na+–H+ exchanger antagonists with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Santos-Torres, Julio; Ślimak, Marta A; Auer, Sebastian; Ibañez-Tallon, Inés

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are widely distributed throughout the mammalian central and peripheral nervous systems, where they contribute to neuronal excitability and synaptic communication. It has been reported that nAChRs are modulated by BK channels and that BK channels, in turn, are inhibited by acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs). Here we investigate the possible functional interaction between these channels in medial habenula (MHb) neurones. We report that selective antagonists of large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels and ASIC1a channels, paxilline and psalmotoxin 1, respectively, did not induce detectable changes in nicotine-evoked currents. In contrast, the non-selective ASIC and Na+–H+ exchanger (NHE1) antagonists, amiloride and its analogues, suppressed nicotine-evoked responses in MHb neurones of wild-type and ASIC2 null mice, excluding a possible involvement of ASIC2 in the nAChR inhibition by amiloride. Zoniporide, a more selective inhibitor of NHE1, reversibly inhibited α3β4-, α7- and α4-containing (*) nAChRs in Xenopus oocytes and in brain slices, as well as in PS120 cells deficient in NHE1 and virally transduced with nAChRs, suggesting a generalized effect of zoniporide in most neuronal nAChR subtypes. Independently from nAChR antagonism, zoniporide profoundly blocked synaptic transmission onto MHb neurones without affecting glutamatergic and GABA receptors. Taken together, these results indicate that amiloride and zoniporide, which are clinically used to treat hypertension and cardiovascular disease, have an inhibitory effect on neuronal nAChRs when used experimentally at high doses. The possible cross-reactivity of these compounds with nAChRs in vivo will require further investigation. PMID:21911609

  16. Subconductance states in single-channel activity of skeletal muscle ryanodine receptors after removal of FKBP12.

    PubMed Central

    Ahern, G P; Junankar, P R; Dulhunty, A F

    1997-01-01

    FKBP12 was removed from ryanodine receptors (RyRs) by incubation of rabbit skeletal muscle terminal cisternae membranes with rapamycin. The extent of FKBP12 removal was estimated by immunostaining Western blots of terminal cisternae proteins. Single FKBP12-depleted RyR channels, incorporated into planar lipid bilayers, were modulated by Ca2+, ATP, ryanodine, and ruthenium red in the cis chamber and opened frequently to the normal maximum conductance of approximately 230 pS and to substate levels of approximately 0.25, approximately 0.5, and approximately 0.75 of the maximum conductance. Substate activity was rarely seen in native RyRs. Ryanodine did not after the number of conductance levels in FKBP12-depleted channels, but, at a membrane potential of +40 mV, reduced both the maximum and the substate conductances by approximately 50%. FKBP12-stripped channels were activated by a 10-fold-lower [Ca2+] and inhibited by a 10-fold-higher [Ca2+], than RyRs from control-incubated and native terminal cisternae vesicles. The open probability (Po) of these FKBP12-deficient channels was greater than that of control channels at 0.1 microM and 1 mM cis Ca2+ but no different at 10 microM cis Ca2+, where channels showed maximal Ca2+ activation. The approximately 0.25 substate was less sensitive than the maximum conductance to inhibition by Ca2+ and was the dominant level in channels inhibited by 1 mM cis Ca2+. The results show that FKBP12 coordinates the gating of channel activity in control and ryanodine-modified RyRs. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8994600

  17. Pulsatile atheroprone shear stress affects the expression of transient receptor potential channels in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Thilo, Florian; Vorderwülbecke, Bernd J; Marki, Alex; Krueger, Katharina; Liu, Ying; Baumunk, Daniel; Zakrzewicz, Andreas; Tepel, Martin

    2012-06-01

    The goal of the study was to assess whether pulsatile atheroprone shear stress modulates the expression of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, TRPC3, TRPC6, TRPM7, and TRPV1 mRNA, in human umbilical vascular endothelial cells. Exposure of cultured vascular endothelial cells to defined shear stress, producing a constant laminar flow (generating a shear stress of 6 dyne/cm(2)), laminar pulsatile atheroprotective flow (with a mean shear stress of 20 dyne/cm(2)), or laminar atheroprone bidirectional flow (with a mean shear stress of 0 dyne/cm(2)) differentially induced TRPC6 and TRPV1 mRNA as measured by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and normalized to GAPDH expression. Thereby, TRPC6 and TRPV1 mRNA expressions were significantly increased after 24 hours of exposure to an atheroprone flow profile compared with an atheroprotective flow profile. Furthermore, the expression of transcription factors GATA1 and GATA4 was significantly correlated with the expression of TRPC6 mRNA. In contrast, after 24 hours of constant laminar flow, the expression of TRPC6 and TRPV1 mRNA was unchanged, whereas the expression of TRPC3 and TRPM7 was significantly higher in endothelial cells exposed to shear stress in comparison with endothelial cells grown under static conditions. There was a significant association between the expression of TRPC6 and tumor necrosis factor-α mRNA in human vascular tissue. No-flow and atheroprone flow conditions are equally characterized by an increase in the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α; however, inflammation-associated endothelial cell reactions may be further aggravated at atheroprone flow conditions by the increase of TRPV1 and TRPC6, as observed in our study.

  18. Indistinguishable Synaptic Pharmacodynamics of the N-Methyl-d-Aspartate Receptor Channel Blockers Memantine and Ketamine

    PubMed Central

    Emnett, Christine M.; Eisenman, Lawrence N.; Taylor, Amanda M.; Izumi, Yukitoshi; Zorumski, Charles F.

    2013-01-01

    Memantine and ketamine, voltage- and activation-dependent channel blockers of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors (NMDARs), have enjoyed a recent resurgence in clinical interest. Steady-state pharmacodynamic differences between these blockers have been reported, but it is unclear whether the compounds differentially affect dynamic physiologic signaling. In this study, we explored nonequilibrium conditions relevant to synaptic transmission in hippocampal networks in dissociated culture and hippocampal slices. Equimolar memantine and ketamine had indistinguishable effects on the following measures: steady-state NMDA currents, NMDAR excitatory postsynaptic current (EPSC) decay kinetics, progressive EPSC inhibition during repetitive stimulation, and extrasynaptic NMDAR inhibition. Therapeutic drug efficacy and tolerability of memantine have been attributed to fast kinetics and strong voltage dependence. However, pulse depolarization in drug presence revealed a surprisingly slow and similar time course of equilibration for the two compounds, although memantine produced a more prominent fast component (62% versus 48%) of re-equilibration. Simulations predicted that low gating efficacy underlies the slow voltage–dependent relief from block. This prediction was empirically supported by faster voltage-dependent blocker re-equilibration with several experimental manipulations of gating efficacy. Excitatory postsynaptic potential–like voltage commands produced drug differences only with large, prolonged depolarizations unlikely to be attained physiologically. In fact, we found no difference between drugs on measures of spontaneous network activity or acute effects on plasticity in hippocampal slices. Despite indistinguishable synaptic pharmacodynamics, ketamine provided significantly greater neuroprotection from damage induced by oxygen glucose deprivation, consistent with the idea that under extreme depolarizing conditions, the biophysical difference between drugs

  19. Calmodulin regulation and identification of calmodulin binding region of type-3 ryanodine receptor calcium release channel.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Naohiro; Xu, Le; Pasek, Daniel A; Evans, Kelly E; Chen, S R Wayne; Meissner, Gerhard

    2005-11-15

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are a family of intracellular Ca(2+) channels that are regulated by calmodulin (CaM). At low Ca(2+) concentrations (<1 microM), CaM activates RyR1 and RyR3 and inhibits RyR2. At elevated Ca(2+) concentrations (>1 microM), CaM inhibits all three RyR isoforms. Here we report that the regulation of recombinant RyR3 by CaM is sensitive to redox regulation. RyR3 in the presence of reduced glutathione binds CaM with 10-15-fold higher affinity, at low and high Ca(2+) concentrations, compared to in the presence of oxidized glutathione. However, compared to RyR1 assayed at low Ca(2+) concentrations under both reducing and oxidizing conditions, CaM binds RyR3 with reduced affinity but activates RyR3 to a greater extent. Under reducing conditions, RyR1 and RyR3 activities are inhibited with a similar affinity at [Ca(2+)] > 1 microM. Mutagenesis studies demonstrate that RyR3 contains a single conserved CaM binding site. Corresponding amino acid substitutions in the CaM binding site differentially affect CaM binding and CaM regulation of RyR3 and those of the two other isoforms. The results support the suggestion that other isoform dependent regions have a major role in the regulation of RyRs by CaM [Yamaguchi et al. (2004) J. Biol. Chem. 279, 36433-36439].

  20. (Pro)renin receptor contributes to regulation of renal epithelial sodium channel

    PubMed Central

    Quadri, Syed; Siragy, Helmy M.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies reported increased (Pro)renin receptor (PRR) expression during low-salt intake. We hypothesized that PRR plays a role in regulation of renal epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) through serum and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase isoform 1 (SGK-1)-neural precursor cell expressed, developmentally downregulated 4–2 (Nedd4–2) signaling pathway. Male Sprague–Dawley rats on normal-sodium diet and mouse renal inner medullary collecting duct cells treated with NaCl at 130 mmol/l (normal salt), or 63 mmol/l (low salt) were studied. PRR and α-ENaC expressions were evaluated 1 week after right uninephrectomy and left renal interstitial administration of 5% dextrose, scramble shRNA, or PRR shRNA (n = 6 each treatment). In-vivo PRR shRNA significantly reduced expressions of PRR throughout the kidney and α-ENaC subunits in the renal medulla. In inner medullary collecting duct cells, low salt or angiopoietin II (Ang II) augmented the mRNA and protein expressions of PRR (P < 0.05), SGK-1 (P < 0.05), and α-ENaC (P < 0.05). Low salt or Ang II increased the phosphorylation of Nedd4–2. In cells treated with low salt or Ang II, PRR siRNA significantly downregulated the mRNA and protein expressions of PRR (P < 0.05), SGK-1 (P < 0.05), and α-ENaC expression (P < 0.05). We conclude that PRR contributes to the regulation of α-ENaC via SGK-1-Nedd4–2 signaling pathway. PMID:26771338

  1. Distribution profiles of transient receptor potential melastatin- and vanilloid-related channels in rat spermatogenic cells and sperm.

    PubMed

    Li, Shilin; Wang, Xinghuan; Ye, Haixia; Gao, Weicheng; Pu, Xiaoyong; Yang, Zhonghua

    2010-03-01

    In the present study, we aimed to investigate the expression and distribution of transient receptor potential melastatin (TRPM)- and vanilloid (TRPV)- related channels in rat spermatogenic cells and spermatozoa. Spermatogenic cells and spermatozoa were obtained from male Sprague-Dawley rats. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were used to detect the expression of all TRPM and TRPV channel members with specific primers. Western blot analysis was applied for detecting the expression of TRPM and TRPV channel proteins. Immunohistochemistry staining for TRPM4, TRPM7 and TRPV5 was also performed in rat testis. The mRNAs of TRPM3, TRPM4, TRPM7 and TRPV5 were detected in the spermatogenic cells and spermatozoa in rat. Western blot analysis verified the expression of TRPM4, TRPM7 and TRPV5 in the rat spermatogenic cells and spermatozoa. Immunocytochemistry staining for TRPM and TRPV channel families indicated that TRPM4 and TRPM7 proteins were highly expressed in different stages of spermatogenic cells and spermatozoa, while TRPV5 protein was lowly expressed in these cells. Our results demonstrate that mRNAs or proteins for TRPM3, TRPM4, TRPM7 and TRPV5 exist in rat spermatogenic cells and spermatozoa. These data presented here may assist in elucidating the possible physiological function of TRPM and TRPV channels in spermatogenic cells and spermatozoa.

  2. Antagonism of Nav channels and α1-adrenergic receptors contributes to vascular smooth muscle effects of ranolazine

    PubMed Central

    Virsolvy, Anne; Farah, Charlotte; Pertuit, Nolwenn; Kong, Lingyan; Lacampagne, Alain; Reboul, Cyril; Aimond, Franck; Richard, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    Ranolazine is a recently developed drug used for the treatment of patients with chronic stable angina. It is a selective inhibitor of the persistent cardiac Na+ current (INa), and is known to reduce the Na+-dependent Ca2+ overload that occurs in cardiomyocytes during ischemia. Vascular effects of ranolazine, such as vasorelaxation,have been reported and may involve multiple pathways. As voltage-gated Na+ channels (Nav) present in arteries play a role in contraction, we hypothesized that ranolazine could target these channels. We studied the effects of ranolazine in vitro on cultured aortic smooth muscle cells (SMC) and ex vivo on rat aortas in conditions known to specifically activate or promote INa. We observed that in the presence of the Nav channel agonist veratridine, ranolazine inhibited INa and intracellular Ca2+ calcium increase in SMC, and arterial vasoconstriction. In arterial SMC, ranolazine inhibited the activity of tetrodotoxin-sensitive voltage-gated Nav channels and thus antagonized contraction promoted by low KCl depolarization. Furthermore, the vasorelaxant effects of ranolazine, also observed in human arteries and independent of the endothelium, involved antagonization of the α1-adrenergic receptor. Combined α1-adrenergic antagonization and inhibition of SMCs Nav channels could be involved in the vascular effects of ranolazine. PMID:26655634

  3. Antagonism of Nav channels and α1-adrenergic receptors contributes to vascular smooth muscle effects of ranolazine.

    PubMed

    Virsolvy, Anne; Farah, Charlotte; Pertuit, Nolwenn; Kong, Lingyan; Lacampagne, Alain; Reboul, Cyril; Aimond, Franck; Richard, Sylvain

    2015-12-10

    Ranolazine is a recently developed drug used for the treatment of patients with chronic stable angina. It is a selective inhibitor of the persistent cardiac Na(+) current (INa), and is known to reduce the Na(+)-dependent Ca(2+) overload that occurs in cardiomyocytes during ischemia. Vascular effects of ranolazine, such as vasorelaxation,have been reported and may involve multiple pathways. As voltage-gated Na(+) channels (Nav) present in arteries play a role in contraction, we hypothesized that ranolazine could target these channels. We studied the effects of ranolazine in vitro on cultured aortic smooth muscle cells (SMC) and ex vivo on rat aortas in conditions known to specifically activate or promote INa. We observed that in the presence of the Nav channel agonist veratridine, ranolazine inhibited INa and intracellular Ca(2+) calcium increase in SMC, and arterial vasoconstriction. In arterial SMC, ranolazine inhibited the activity of tetrodotoxin-sensitive voltage-gated Nav channels and thus antagonized contraction promoted by low KCl depolarization. Furthermore, the vasorelaxant effects of ranolazine, also observed in human arteries and independent of the endothelium, involved antagonization of the α1-adrenergic receptor. Combined α1-adrenergic antagonization and inhibition of SMCs Nav channels could be involved in the vascular effects of ranolazine.

  4. The anthelmintic pyrantel acts as a low efficacious agonist and an open-channel blocker of mammalian acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Rayes, D; De Rosa, M J; Spitzmaul, G; Bouzat, C

    2001-08-01

    Pyrantel is an anthelmintic which acts as an agonist of nicotinic receptors (AChRs) of nematodes and exerts its therapeutic effects by depolarizing their muscle membranes. Here we explore at the single-channel level the action of pyrantel at mammalian muscle AChR. AChR currents are elicited by pyrantel. However, openings do not appear in clearly identifiable clusters over a range of pyrantel concentrations (1-300 microM). The mean open time decreases as a function of concentration, indicating an additional open-channel block. Single-channel recordings in the presence of high ACh concentrations and pyrantel demonstrate that the anthelmintic acts as a high-affinity open-channel blocker. When analyzed in terms of a sequential blocking scheme, the calculated forward rate constant for the blocking process is 8x10(7) M(-1) x s(-1), the apparent dissociation constant is 8 microM at a membrane potential of -70 mV and the process is voltage dependent. Pyrantel displaces alpha-bungarotoxin binding but the concentration dependence of equilibrium binding is shifted towards higher concentrations with respect to that of ACh binding. Thus, by acting at the binding site pyrantel activates mammalian AChRs with low efficacy, and by sterical blockade of the pore, the activated channels are then rapidly inhibited.

  5. Functional properties of internalization-deficient P2X4 receptors reveal a novel mechanism of ligand-gated channel facilitation by ivermectin.

    PubMed

    Toulmé, Estelle; Soto, Florentina; Garret, Maurice; Boué-Grabot, Eric

    2006-02-01

    Although P2X receptors within the central nervous system mediate excitatory ATP synaptic transmission, the identity of central ATP-gated channels has not yet been elucidated. P2X(4), the most widely expressed subunit in the brain, was previously shown to undergo clathrin-dependent constitutive internalization by direct interaction between activator protein (AP)2 adaptors and a tyrosine-based sorting signal specifically present in the cytosolic C-terminal tail of mammalian P2X(4) sequences. In this study, we first used internalization-deficient P2X(4) receptor mutants to show that suppression of the endocytosis motif significantly increased the apparent sensitivity to ATP and the ionic permeability of P2X(4) channels. These unique properties, observed at low channel density, suggest that interactions with AP2 complexes may modulate the function of P2X(4) receptors. In addition, ivermectin, an allosteric modulator of several receptor channels, including mammalian P2X(4), did not potentiate the maximal current of internalization-deficient rat or human P2X(4) receptors. We demonstrated that binding of ivermectin onto wild-type P2X(4) channels increased the fraction of plasma membrane P2X(4) receptors, whereas surface expression of internalization-deficient P2X(4) receptors remained unchanged. Disruption of the clathrin-mediated endocytosis with the dominant-negative mutants Eps15 or AP-50 abolished the ivermectin potentiation of wild-type P2X(4) channel currents. Likewise, ivermectin increased the membrane fraction of nicotinic alpha7 acetylcholine (nalpha7ACh) receptors and the potentiation of acetylcholine current by ivermectin was suppressed when the same dominant-negative mutants were expressed. These data showed that potentiation by ivermectin of both P2X(4) and nalpha7ACh receptors was primarily caused by an increase in the number of cell surface receptors resulting from a mechanism dependent on clathrin/AP2-mediated endocytosis.

  6. ZD0947, a sulphonylurea receptor modulator, detects functional sulphonylurea receptor subunits in murine vascular smooth muscle ATP-sensitive K(+) channels.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tadashi; Takahara, Kohei; Uchida, Keiichiro; Teramoto, Noriyoshi

    2017-02-16

    In order to identify functional sulphonylurea receptor (SUR.x) subunits of native ATP-sensitive K(+) channels (KATP channels) in mouse portal vein, the effects of ZD0947, a SUR.x modulator, were investigated on spontaneous portal vein contractions, macroscopic membrane currents and unitary currents recorded (using patch-clamp techniques) in freshly dispersed mouse portal vein myocytes. Spontaneous contractions in mouse portal vein were reversibly reduced by ZD0947 in a concentration-dependent manner (Ki =293nM). The relaxation elicited by 3µM ZD0947 was antagonized by the additional application of glibenclamide (300nM), but not gliclazide (100-300nM). In the conventional whole-cell configuration, 100µM ZD0947 elicited inward glibenclamide-sensitive currents at a holding potential of -60mV that demonstrated selectivity for K(+)(i.e. KATP currents). The peak amplitude of the membrane current elicited by 30µM or 100µM ZD0947 was smaller than that elicited by 100µM pinacidil at -60mV. In the cell-attached mode, 100µM ZD0947 activated glibenclamide-sensitive K(+) channels with a conductance (35 pS) similar to that of recombinant Kir6.1/SUR2B channels that were expressed in HEK293 cells and activated by 100µM ZD0947. These results demonstrate that ZD0947 caused a significant vascular relaxation through the activation of KATP channels and that SUR2B may be the major functional subunit of SUR.x in mouse portal vein KATP channels, based on its pharmacological selectivity.

  7. P2Y1 Receptor Activation of the TRPV4 Ion Channel Enhances Purinergic Signaling in Satellite Glial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekhar, Pradeep; Poole, Daniel P.; Liedtke, Wolfgang; Bunnett, Nigel W.; Veldhuis, Nicholas A.

    2015-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels of peripheral sensory pathways are important mediators of pain, itch, and neurogenic inflammation. They are expressed by primary sensory neurons and by glial cells in the central nervous system, but their expression and function in satellite glial cells (SGCs) of sensory ganglia have not been explored. SGCs tightly ensheath neurons of sensory ganglia and can regulate neuronal excitability in pain and inflammatory states. Using a modified dissociation protocol, we isolated neurons with attached SGCs from dorsal root ganglia of mice. SGCs, which were identified by expression of immunoreactive Kir4.1 and glutamine synthetase, were closely associated with neurons, identified using the pan-neuronal marker NeuN. A subpopulation of SGCs expressed immunoreactive TRP vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) and responded to the TRPV4-selective agonist GSK1016790A by an influx of Ca2+ ions. SGCs did not express functional TRPV1, TRPV3, or TRP ankyrin 1 channels. Responses to GSK1016790A were abolished by the TRPV4 antagonist HC067047 and were absent in SGCs from Trpv4−/− mice. The P2Y1-selective agonist 2-methylthio-ADP increased [Ca2+]i in SGCs, and responses were prevented by the P2Y1-selective antagonist MRS2500. P2Y1 receptor-mediated responses were enhanced in TRPV4-expressing SGCs and HEK293 cells, suggesting that P2Y1 couples to and activates TRPV4. PKC inhibitors prevented P2Y1 receptor activation of TRPV4. Our results provide the first evidence for expression of TRPV4 in SGCs and demonstrate that TRPV4 is a purinergic receptor-operated channel in SGCs of sensory ganglia. PMID:26475857

  8. Benzodiazepine agonist and inverse agonist actions on GABAA receptor-operated chloride channels. II. Chronic effects of ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, K.J.; Harris, R.A. )

    1990-05-01

    Mice were made tolerant to and dependent on ethanol by administration of a liquid diet. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor-dependent uptake of 36Cl- by mouse cortical microsacs was used to study the actions of benzodiazepine (BZ) agonists and inverse agonists. Chronic exposure to ethanol attenuated the ability of a BZ agonist, flunitrazepam, to augment muscimol-stimulated uptake of 36Cl- and enhanced the actions of BZ inverse agonists, Ro15-4513 (ethyl-8-azido-5,6-dihydro-5-methyl-6-oxo-4H-imidazo(1,4)-benzodiazepine - 3-carboxylate) and DMCM (methyl-6,7-dimethoxy-4-ethyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxylate), to inhibit GABAA receptor-operated chloride channels. Augmentation of chloride flux by pentobarbital was not reduced by chronic ethanol exposure. Attenuation of flunitrazepam efficacy was transient and returned to control levels within 6 to 24 hr after withdrawal from ethanol, but increased sensitivity to Ro15-4513 was observed as long as 8 days after withdrawal. Chronic exposure to ethanol did not alter (3H)SR 95531 (2-(3'-carbethoxy-2'propyl)-3-amino-6-p-methoxyphenylpyridazinium bromide) binding to low-affinity GABAA receptors or muscimol stimulation of chloride flux; and did not alter (3H)Ro15-4513 or (3H)flunitrazepam binding to central BZ receptors or allosteric modulation of this binding by muscimol (i.e., muscimol-shift). These results suggest that chronic exposure to ethanol reduces coupling between BZ agonist sites and the chloride channel, and may be responsible for the development of cross-tolerance between ethanol and BZ agonists. In contrast, coupling between BZ inverse agonist sites and the chloride channel is increased.

  9. Pregnenolone sulfate activates basic region leucine zipper transcription factors in insulinoma cells: role of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels and transient receptor potential melastatin 3 channels.

    PubMed

    Müller, Isabelle; Rössler, Oliver G; Thiel, Gerald

    2011-12-01

    The neurosteroid pregnenolone sulfate activates a signaling cascade in insulinoma cells involving activation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase and enhanced expression of the transcription factor Egr-1. Here, we show that pregnenolone sulfate stimulation leads to a significant elevation of activator protein-1 (AP-1) activity in insulinoma cells. Expression of the basic region leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors c-Jun and c-Fos is up-regulated in insulinoma cells and pancreatic β-cells in primary culture after pregnenolone sulfate stimulation. Up-regulation of a chromatin-embedded c-Jun promoter/luciferase reporter gene transcription in pregnenolone sulfate-stimulated insulinoma cells was impaired when the AP-1 binding sites were mutated, indicating that these motifs function as pregnenolone sulfate response elements. In addition, phosphorylation of cAMP response element (CRE)-binding protein is induced and transcription of a CRE-controlled reporter gene is stimulated after pregnenolone sulfate treatment, indicating that the CRE functions as a pregnenolone sulfate response element as well. Pharmacological and genetic experiments revealed that both L-type Ca(2+) channels and transient receptor potential melastatin 3 (TRPM3) channels are essential for connecting pregnenolone sulfate stimulation with enhanced AP-1 activity and bZIP-mediated transcription in insulinoma cells. In contrast, pregnenolone sulfate stimulation did not enhance AP-1 activity or c-Jun and c-Fos expression in pituitary corticotrophs that express functional L-type Ca(2+) channels but only trace amounts of TRPM3. We conclude that expression of L-type Ca(2+) channels is not sufficient to activate bZIP-mediated gene transcription by pregnenolone sulfate. Rather, additional expression of TRPM3 or depolarization of the cells is required to connect pregnenolone sulfate stimulation with enhanced gene transcription.

  10. Structural and Single-Channel Results Indicate that the Rates of Ligand Binding Domain Closing and Opening Directly Impact AMPA Receptor Gating

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang,W.; Cho, Y.; Lolis, E.; Howe, J.

    2008-01-01

    At most excitatory central synapses, glutamate is released from presynaptic terminals and binds to postsynaptic AMPA receptors, initiating a series of conformational changes that result in ion channel opening. Efficient transmission at these synapses requires that glutamate binding to AMPA receptors results in rapid and near-synchronous opening of postsynaptic receptor channels. In addition, if the information encoded in the frequency of action potential discharge is to be transmitted faithfully, glutamate must dissociate from the receptor quickly, enabling the synapse to discriminate presynaptic action potentials that are spaced closely in time. The current view is that the efficacy of agonists is directly related to the extent to which ligand binding results in closure of the binding domain. For glutamate to dissociate from the receptor, however, the binding domain must open. Previously, we showed that mutations in glutamate receptor subunit 2 that should destabilize the closed conformation not only sped deactivation but also altered the relative efficacy of glutamate and quisqualate. Here we present x-ray crystallographic and single-channel data that support the conclusions that binding domain closing necessarily precedes channel opening and that the kinetics of conformational changes at the level of the binding domain importantly influence ion channel gating. Our findings suggest that the stability of the closed-cleft conformation has been tuned during evolution so that glutamate dissociates from the receptor as rapidly as possible but remains an efficacious agonist.

  11. The Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor: The Founding Father of the Pentameric Ligand-gated Ion Channel Superfamily*

    PubMed Central

    Changeux, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    A critical event in the history of biological chemistry was the chemical identification of the first neurotransmitter receptor, the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Disciplines as diverse as electrophysiology, pharmacology, and biochemistry joined together in a unified and rational manner with the common goal of successfully identifying the molecular device that converts a chemical signal into an electrical one in the nervous system. The nicotinic receptor has become the founding father of a broad family of pentameric membrane receptors, paving the way for their identification, including that of the GABAA receptors. PMID:23038257

  12. Molecular mechanisms contributing to TARP regulation of channel conductance and polyamine block of calcium-permeable AMPA receptors.

    PubMed

    Soto, David; Coombs, Ian D; Gratacòs-Batlle, Esther; Farrant, Mark; Cull-Candy, Stuart G

    2014-08-27

    Many properties of fast synaptic transmission in the brain are influenced by transmembrane AMPAR regulatory proteins (TARPs) that modulate the pharmacology and gating of AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs). Although much is known about TARP influence on AMPAR pharmacology and kinetics through their modulation of the extracellular ligand-binding domain (LBD), less is known about their regulation of the ion channel region. TARP-induced modifications in AMPAR channel behavior include increased single-channel conductance and weakened block of calcium-permeable AMPARs (CP-AMPARs) by endogenous intracellular polyamines. To investigate how TARPs modify ion flux and channel block, we examined the action of γ-2 (stargazin) on GluA1 and GluA4 CP-AMPARs. First, we compared the permeation of organic cations of different sizes. We found that γ-2 increased the permeability of several cations but not the estimated AMPAR pore size, suggesting that TARP-induced relief of polyamine block does not reflect altered pore diameter. Second, to determine whether residues in the TARP intracellular C-tail regulate polyamine block and channel conductance, we examined various γ-2 C-tail mutants. We identified the membrane proximal region of the C terminus as crucial for full TARP-attenuation of polyamine block, whereas complete deletion of the C-tail markedly enhanced the TARP-induced increase in channel conductance; thus, the TARP C-tail influences ion permeation. Third, we identified a site in the pore-lining region of the AMPAR, close to its Q/R site, that is crucial in determining the TARP-induced changes in single-channel conductance. This conserved residue represents a site of TARP action, independent of the AMPAR LBD.

  13. Molecular Mechanisms Contributing to TARP Regulation of Channel Conductance and Polyamine Block of Calcium-Permeable AMPA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Coombs, Ian D.; Gratacòs-Batlle, Esther

    2014-01-01

    Many properties of fast synaptic transmission in the brain are influenced by transmembrane AMPAR regulatory proteins (TARPs) that modulate the pharmacology and gating of AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs). Although much is known about TARP influence on AMPAR pharmacology and kinetics through their modulation of the extracellular ligand-binding domain (LBD), less is known about their regulation of the ion channel region. TARP-induced modifications in AMPAR channel behavior include increased single-channel conductance and weakened block of calcium-permeable AMPARs (CP-AMPARs) by endogenous intracellular polyamines. To investigate how TARPs modify ion flux and channel block, we examined the action of γ-2 (stargazin) on GluA1 and GluA4 CP-AMPARs. First, we compared the permeation of organic cations of different sizes. We found that γ-2 increased the permeability of several cations but not the estimated AMPAR pore size, suggesting that TARP-induced relief of polyamine block does not reflect altered pore diameter. Second, to determine whether residues in the TARP intracellular C-tail regulate polyamine block and channel conductance, we examined various γ-2 C-tail mutants. We identified the membrane proximal region of the C terminus as crucial for full TARP-attenuation of polyamine block, whereas complete deletion of the C-tail markedly enhanced the TARP-induced increase in channel conductance; thus, the TARP C-tail influences ion permeation. Third, we identified a site in the pore-lining region of the AMPAR, close to its Q/R site, that is crucial in determining the TARP-induced changes in single-channel conductance. This conserved residue represents a site of TARP action, independent of the AMPAR LBD. PMID:25164663

  14. Functional and biochemical properties of ryanodine receptor type 1 channels from heterozygous R163C malignant hyperthermia-susceptible mice.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wei; Barrientos, Genaro C; Cherednichenko, Gennady; Yang, Tianzhong; Padilla, Isela T; Truong, Kim; Allen, Paul D; Lopez, José R; Pessah, Isaac N

    2011-03-01

    Mutations in ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1) confer malignant hyperthermia susceptibility. How inherent impairments in Ca(2+) channel regulation affect skeletal muscle function in myotubes and adult fibers under basal (nontriggering) conditions are not understood. Myotubes, adult flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) fibers, and sarcoplasmic reticulum skeletal membranes were isolated from heterozygous knockin R163C and wild-type (WT) mice. Compared with WT myotubules, R163C myotubes have reduced Ca(2+) transient amplitudes in response to electrical field pulses; however, R163C FDB fibers do not differ in their responses to electrical stimuli, despite heightened cellular cytoplasmic resting Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)](rest)) and sensitivity to halothane. Immunoblotting of membranes from each genotype shows similar expression of RyR1, FK506 binding protein 12 kDa, and Ca(2+)-ATPase, but RyR1 (2844)Ser phosphorylation in R163C muscle is 31% higher than that of WT muscle (p < 0.001). RyR1 channels reconstituted in planar lipid bilayers reveal ∼65% of R163C channels exhibit ≥2-fold greater open probability (P(o)) than WT, with prolonged mean open dwell times and shortened closed dwell times. [(3)H]Ryanodine (Ry) binding and single-channel analyses show that R163C-RyR1 has altered regulation compared with WT: 1) 3-fold higher sensitivity to Ca(2+) activation; 2) 2-fold greater [(3)H]Ry receptor occupancy; 3) comparatively higher channel activity, even in reducing glutathione buffer; 4) enhanced RyR1 activity both at 25 and 37°C; and 5) elevated cytoplasmic [Ca(2+)](rest). R163C channels are inherently more active than WT channels, a functional impairment that cannot be reversed by dephosphorylation with protein phosphatase. Dysregulated R163C channels produce a more overt phenotype in myotubes than in adult fibers in the absence of triggering agents, suggesting tighter negative regulation of R163C-RyR1 within the Ca(2+) release unit of adult fibers.

  15. Calcium-sensing receptor activation contributed to apoptosis stimulates TRPC6 channel in rat neonatal ventricular myocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yi-hua; Li, Yong-quan; Feng, Shan-li; Li, Bao-xin; Pan, Zhen-wei; Xu, Chang-qing; Li, Ting-ting; Yang, Bao-feng

    2010-04-16

    Capacitative calcium entry (CCE) refers to the influx of calcium through plasma membrane channels activated on depletion of endoplasmic sarcoplasmic/reticulum (ER/SR) Ca{sup 2+} stores, which is performed mainly by the transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. TRP channels are expressed in cardiomyocytes. Calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) is also expressed in rat cardiac tissue and plays an important role in mediating cardiomyocyte apoptosis. However, there are no data regarding the link between CaR and TRP channels in rat heart. In this study, in rat neonatal myocytes, by Ca{sup 2+} imaging, we found that the depletion of ER/SR Ca{sup 2+} stores by thapsigargin (TG) elicited a transient rise in cytoplasmic Ca{sup 2+} ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}), followed by sustained increase depending on extracellular Ca{sup 2+}. But, TRP channels inhibitor (SKF96365), not L-type channels or the Na{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+} exchanger inhibitors, inhibited [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} relatively high. Then, we found that the stimulation of CaR with its activator gadolinium chloride (GdCl{sub 3}) or by an increased extracellular Ca{sup 2+}([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o}) increased the concentration of intracelluar Ca{sup 2+}, whereas, the sustained elevation of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} was reduced in the presence of SKF96365. Similarly, the duration of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increase was also shortened in the absence of extracellular Ca{sup 2+}. Western blot analysis showed that GdCl{sub 3} increased the expression of TRPC6, which was reversed by SKF96365. Additionally, SKF96365 reduced cardiomyocyte apoptosis induced by GdCl{sub 3}. Our results suggested that CCE exhibited in rat neonatal myocytes and CaR activation induced Ca{sup 2+}-permeable cationic channels TRPCs to gate the CCE, for which TRPC6 was one of the most likely candidates. TRPC6 channel was functionally coupled with CaR to enhance the cardiomyocyte apoptosis.

  16. Molecular Basis of Ion Channels and Receptors Involved in Nerve Excitation, Synaptic Transmission and Muscle Contraction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-20

    Channel Mutations in Periodic Paralysis and Related MYotonic Discas1es By RoBERT H. BROWN’ ............... ........................ ..... 30 ’he Role...CIIIKARA SAIO and (;EF MAISUMOI.o . 3 •t) Identification of a Thr-to-Met Mutation in the Skeletal Muscle Sodium Channel Gene in Hyperkalemic Periodic...MAN ......... 42 Cloning and Characterization of Sodium Channel eDNA from Pufltr Fish. By MOHAMMED SHAIIJAIIAN, MAMORU’ YAMADA, MANABI. NAGAYA

  17. Activation of single cardiac and skeletal ryanodine receptor channels by flash photolysis of caged Ca2+.

    PubMed Central

    Györke, S; Vélez, P; Suárez-Isla, B; Fill, M

    1994-01-01

    Single ryanodine-sensitive sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ release channels isolated from rabbit skeletal and canine cardiac muscle were reconstituted in planar lipid bilayers. Single channel activity was measured in simple solutions (no ATP or Mg2+) with 250 mM symmetrical Cs+ as charge carrier. A laser flash was used to photolyze caged-Ca2+ (DM-nitrophen) in a small volume directly in front of the bilayer. The free [Ca2+] in this small volume and in the bulk solution was monitored with Ca2+ electrodes. This setup allowed fast, calibrated free [Ca2+] stimuli to be applied repetitively to single SR Ca2+ release channels. A standard photolytically induced free [Ca2+] step (pCa 7-->6) was applied to both the cardiac and skeletal release channels. The rate of channel activation was determined by fitting a single exponential to ensemble currents generated from at least 50 single channel sweeps. The time constants of activation were 1.43 +/- 0.65 ms (mean +/- SD; n = 5) and 1.28 +/- 0.61 ms (n = 5) for cardiac and skeletal channels, respectively. This study presents a method for defining the fast Ca2+ regulation kinetics of single SR Ca2+ release channels and shows that the activation rate of skeletal SR Ca2+ release channels is consistent with a role for CICR in skeletal muscle excitation-contraction coupling. PMID:8075325

  18. Microtransplantation of ligand-gated receptor-channels from fresh or frozen nervous tissue into Xenopus oocytes: a potent tool for expanding functional information.

    PubMed

    Eusebi, F; Palma, E; Amici, M; Miledi, R

    2009-05-01

    Despite huge improvements in neurobiological approaches for investigating the functional properties of neurotransmitter receptors and ion channels, many difficulties are still encountered when focusing on the human brain. Electrophysiological studies aimed at performing direct determinations on human nervous tissue are limited by neurosurgery and also by pathophysiological conditions prevailing before and after the resective operation. The electrophysiological study of receptors and channels becomes difficult also in animal models when the cells are not accessible and/or the experiments last many hours, during which the examined nervous tissue usually becomes unhealthy. To increase the possibility of doing optimal electrophysiological recordings, addressed to investigate the functional properties of receptors and channels, more than two decades ago, foreign mRNAs were injected into Xenopus oocytes to heterologously express the receptors; and about a decade ago cell membranes were injected into the oocytes to directly transplant the native receptors. While the first approach needs complex procedures for mRNA isolation, the membrane preparations are simpler to obtain and the embedded receptors are transplanted in their own membrane, with their own glycosylation and together with any ancillary proteins they may have. Using injections of membranes isolated from fresh nervous tissues several issues have already been addressed and many questions can be answered in the near future. Strikingly, with this approach it has been possible to "resuscitate" receptors and ion channels from tissues kept frozen for many years. This review focuses on recently obtained information and on some new lines of biological research using receptor microtransplantation into oocytes.

  19. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor channel blockers prevent pentylenetetrazole-induced convulsions and morphological changes in rat brain neurons.

    PubMed

    Zaitsev, Aleksey V; Kim, Kira Kh; Vasilev, Dmitry S; Lukomskaya, Nera Ya; Lavrentyeva, Valeria V; Tumanova, Natalia L; Zhuravin, Igor A; Magazanik, Lev G

    2015-03-01

    Alterations in inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmission play a central role in the etiology of epilepsy, with overstimulation of glutamate receptors influencing epileptic activity and corresponding neuronal damage. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, which belong to a class of ionotropic glutamate receptors, play a primary role in this process. This study compared the anticonvulsant properties of two NMDA receptor channel blockers, memantine and 1-phenylcyclohexylamine (IEM-1921), in a pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) model of seizures in rats and investigated their potencies in preventing PTZ-induced morphological changes in the brain. The anticonvulsant properties of IEM-1921 (5 mg/kg) were more pronounced than those of memantine at the same dose. IEM-1921 and memantine decreased the duration of convulsions by 82% and 37%, respectively. Both compounds were relatively effective at preventing the tonic component of seizures but not myoclonic seizures. Memantine significantly reduced the lethality caused by PTZ-induced seizures from 42% to 11%, and all animals pretreated with IEM-1921 survived. Morphological examination of the rat brain 24 hr after administration of PTZ revealed alterations in the morphology of 20-25% of neurons in the neocortex and the hippocampus, potentially induced by excessive glutamate. The expression of the excitatory amino acid transporter 1 protein was increased in the hippocampus of the PTZ-treated rats. However, dark neurons did not express caspase-3 and were immunopositive for the neuronal nuclear antigen protein, indicating that these neurons were alive. Both NMDA antagonists prevented neuronal abnormalities in the brain. These results suggest that NMDA receptor channel blockers might be considered possible neuroprotective agents for prolonged seizures or status epilepticus leading to neuronal damage.

  20. Phenylalanine in the Pore of the Erwinia Ligand-Gated Ion Channel Modulates Picrotoxinin Potency but Not Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The Erwinia ligand-gated ion channel (ELIC) is a bacterial homologue of eukaryotic Cys-loop ligand-gated ion channels. This protein has the potential to be a useful model for Cys-loop receptors but is unusual in that it has an aromatic residue (Phe) facing into the pore, leading to some predictions that this protein is incapable of ion flux. Subsequent studies have shown this is not the case, so here we probe the role of this residue by examining the function of the ELIC in cases in which the Phe has been substituted with a range of alternative amino acids, expressed in Xenopus oocytes and functionally examined. Most of the mutations have little effect on the GABA EC50, but the potency of the weak pore-blocking antagonist picrotoxinin at F16′A-, F16′D-, F16′S-, and F16′T-containing receptors was increased to levels comparable with those of Cys-loop receptors, suggesting that this antagonist can enter the pore only when residue 16′ is small. T6′S has no effect on picrotoxinin potency when expressed alone but abolishes the increased potency when combined with F16′S, indicating that the inhibitor binds at position 6′, as in Cys-loop receptors, if it can enter the pore. Overall, the data support the proposal that the ELIC pore is a good model for Cys-loop receptor pores if the role of F16′ is taken into consideration. PMID:25238029

  1. P2X(7) receptor activation enhances SK3 channels- and cystein cathepsin-dependent cancer cells invasiveness.

    PubMed

    Jelassi, B; Chantôme, A; Alcaraz-Pérez, F; Baroja-Mazo, A; Cayuela, M L; Pelegrin, P; Surprenant, A; Roger, S

    2011-05-05

    ATP-gated P2X(7) receptors (P2X(7)R) are unusual plasma membrane ion channels that have been extensively studied in immune cells. More recently, P2X(7)R have been described as potential cancer cell biomarkers. However, mechanistic links between P2X(7)R and cancer cell processes are unknown. Here, we show, in the highly aggressive human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-435s, that P2X(7) receptor is highly expressed and fully functional. Its activation is responsible for the extension of neurite-like cellular prolongations, of the increase in cell migration by 35% and in cell invasion through extracellular matrix by 150%. The change in cancer cell morphology and the increased migration appeared to be due to the activation of Ca(2+)-activated SK3 potassium channels. The enhanced invasion through the extracellular matrix was related to the increase of mature forms of cysteine cathepsins in the extracellular medium, which was independent of SK3 channel activity and not associated with cell death. Pharmacological targeting of P2X(7)R in vivo was crucial for cell invasiveness in a zebrafish model of metastases. Our results demonstrate a novel mechanistic link between P2X(7)R functionality in cancer cells and invasiveness, a key parameter in tumour growth and in the development of metastases. They also suggest a potential therapeutic role for the newly developed P2X(7)R antagonists.

  2. The canonical transient receptor potential 6 (TRPC6) channel is sensitive to extracellular pH in mouse platelets.

    PubMed

    Berna-Erro, Alejandro; Albarran, Letizia; Dionisio, Natalia; Redondo, Pedro C; Alonso, Nieves; Gomez, Luis J; Salido, Gines M; Rosado, Juan A

    2014-01-01

    The canonical transient receptor potential-6 (TRPC6) is a receptor-activated non-selective Ca(2+) channel regulated by a variety of modulators such as diacylglycerol, Ca(2+)/calmodulin or phosphorylation. The present study is aimed to investigate whether different situations, such as acidic pH, exposure to reactive oxygen species (ROS) or hypoxic-like conditions modulate TRPC6 channel function. Here we show normal aggregation and Ca(2+) mobilization stimulated by thrombin in TRPC6 KO platelets; however, OAG (1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol)-evoked Ca(2+) entry was attenuated in the absence of TRPC6. Exposure of mouse platelets to acidic pH resulted in abolishment of thrombin-evoked aggregation and attenuated platelet aggregation induced by thapsigargin (TG) or OAG. Both OAG-induced Ca(2+) entry and platelet aggregation were greatly attenuated in cells expressing TRPC6 channels. Exposure of platelets to H2O2 or deferoxamine did not clearly alter thrombin, TG or OAG-induced platelet aggregation. Our results indicate that TRPC6 is sensitive to acidic pH but not to exposure to ROS or hypoxic-like conditions, which might be involved in the pathogenesis of the altered platelet responsiveness to DAG-generating agonists in disorders associated to acidic pH.

  3. Sigma ligands indirectly modulate the NMDA receptor-ion channel complex on intact neuronal cells via sigma 1 site.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, H; Yamamoto, T; Sagi, N; Klenerová, V; Goji, K; Kawai, N; Baba, A; Takamori, E; Moroji, T

    1995-01-01

    To investigate the modulatory effects of sigma ligands on the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-ion channel complex in vivo, we examined the intact cell binding of 3H-N-[1-(2-thienyl)cyclohexyl]piperidine (3H-TCP) to cultured neuronal cells prepared from fetal rat telencephalon. The 3H-TCP binding was saturable, reversible, and inhibited by a selective NMDA receptor antagonist, D-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid. MII-limolar Mg2+ inhibited 3H-TCP binding both in the absence and presence of L-glutamate. 5-Methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo [a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine maleate (MK801) inhibited 3H-TCP intact cell binding in a competitive manner, while haloperidol inhibited it in a noncompetitive manner. The effect of the test drugs to inhibit 3H-TCP intact cell binding was in the order of dextromethorphan, haloperidol > (+/-)MK 801 > (+)pentazocine > (-)pentazocine > DTG > PCP > (+)-N-allylnormetazocine [(+)SKF 10047] > (+)3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-N- (1-propyl)piperidine [(+)3-PPP] > (-)SKF 10047 > (-)3-PPP. The IC50 values of the six sigma ligands for 3H-TCP binding were closely correlated with the Ki values of the corresponding drugs for DTG site 1 in the guinea pig brain reported by Rothman et al. (1991). These findings suggest that the sigma ligand indirectly modulates the NMDA receptor ion channel complex, presumably through sigma 1 sites in vivo as well as in vitro.

  4. Alcohol interactions with channel activation and desensitization at 5-HT[sub 3] and GABA[sub A] receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Lovinger, D.M.; Zhou, O. )

    1992-01-01

    Ethanol (EtOH) and trichloroethanol (TCEt) potentiate 5-HT[sub 3] receptor-mediated ion current in NCB-20 neuroblastoma cells and nodose ganglion neurons. TCEt potentiates GABA[sub A] receptor-mediated current in dorsal root ganglion neurons. Whole-cell patch-clamp recording was used to examine the interactions of alcohols with current activation and receptor desensitization. Alcohols increased the potency of 5-HT, consistent with an increase in channel activation rate. Current decay rate increased in the presence of alcohols such that potentiation decreased with time following in onset of agonist + alcohol treatment. Potentiation of 5-HT-activated current by EtOH was 61 [plus minus] 17% above control at the start of application but was absent 10 sec after current onset. Agonist pretreatment decreased potentiation by subsequent agonist + alcohol application. Potentiation by TCEt of 5-HT-activated current decreased from 96% above control with simultaneous application of 5-HT + TCEt to 44% after a 30 sec 5-HT treatment. This agonist- and time-dependent loss of potentiation was observed prior to the onset of current decay when low agonist concentrations were used. Agonist pretreatment appears to drive the channel into an alcohol-insensitive. Current activated by GABA + TCEt recovers from desensitization produced by GABA alone more slowly than recovery tested in the absence of TCEt.

  5. Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 7 Cation Channel Kinase: New Player in Angiotensin II-Induced Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Tayze T; Callera, Glaucia E; He, Ying; Yogi, Alvaro; Ryazanov, Alexey G; Ryazanova, Lillia V; Zhai, Alexander; Stewart, Duncan J; Shrier, Alvin; Touyz, Rhian M

    2016-04-01

    Transient receptor potential melastatin 7 (TRPM7) is a bifunctional protein comprising a magnesium (Mg(2+))/cation channel and a kinase domain. We previously demonstrated that vasoactive agents regulate vascular TRPM7. Whether TRPM7 plays a role in the pathophysiology of hypertension and associated cardiovascular dysfunction is unknown. We studied TRPM7 kinase-deficient mice (TRPM7Δkinase; heterozygous for TRPM7 kinase) and wild-type (WT) mice infused with angiotensin II (Ang II; 400 ng/kg per minute, 4 weeks). TRPM7 kinase expression was lower in heart and aorta from TRPM7Δkinase versus WT mice, effects that were further reduced by Ang II infusion. Plasma Mg(2+) was lower in TRPM7Δkinase versus WT mice in basal and stimulated conditions. Ang II increased blood pressure in both strains with exaggerated responses in TRPM7Δkinase versus WT groups (P<0.05). Acetylcholine-induced vasorelaxation was reduced in Ang II-infused TRPM7Δkinase mice, an effect associated with Akt and endothelial nitric oxide synthase downregulation. Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression was increased in Ang II-infused TRPM7 kinase-deficient mice. TRPM7 kinase targets, calpain, and annexin-1, were activated by Ang II in WT but not in TRPM7Δkinase mice. Echocardiographic and histopathologic analysis demonstrated cardiac hypertrophy and left ventricular dysfunction in Ang II-treated groups. In TRPM7 kinase-deficient mice, Ang II-induced cardiac functional and structural effects were amplified compared with WT counterparts. Our data demonstrate that in TRPM7Δkinase mice, Ang II-induced hypertension is exaggerated, cardiac remodeling and left ventricular dysfunction are amplified, and endothelial function is impaired. These processes are associated with hypomagnesemia, blunted TRPM7 kinase expression/signaling, endothelial nitric oxide synthase downregulation, and proinflammatory vascular responses. Our findings identify TRPM7 kinase as a novel player in Ang II-induced hypertension

  6. Heteromeric heat-sensitive transient receptor potential channels exhibit distinct temperature and chemical response.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wei; Yang, Fan; Liu, Shuang; Colton, Craig K; Wang, Chunbo; Cui, Yuanyuan; Cao, Xu; Zhu, Michael X; Sun, Changsen; Wang, KeWei; Zheng, Jie

    2012-03-02

    TRPV1 and TRPV3 are two heat-sensitive ion channels activated at distinct temperature ranges perceived by human as hot and warm, respectively. Compounds eliciting human sensations of heat or warmth can also potently activate these channels. In rodents, TRPV3 is expressed predominantly in skin keratinocytes, whereas in humans TRPV1 and TRPV3 are co-expressed in sensory neurons of dorsal root ganglia and trigeminal ganglion and are known to form heteromeric channels with distinct single channel conductances as well as sensitivities to TRPV1 activator capsaicin and inhibitor capsazepine. However, how heteromeric TRPV1/TRPV3 channels respond to heat and other stimuli remains unknown. In this study, we examined the behavior of heteromeric TRPV1/TRPV3 channels activated by heat, capsaicin, and voltage. Our results demonstrate that the heteromeric channels exhibit distinct temperature sensitivity, activation threshold, and heat-induced sensitization. Changes in gating properties apparently originate from interactions between TRPV1 and TRPV3 subunits. Our results suggest that heteromeric TRPV1/TRPV3 channels are unique heat sensors that may contribute to the fine-tuning of sensitivity to sensory inputs.

  7. Temperature dependence of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor channels and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor excitatory postsynaptic currents.

    PubMed

    Korinek, M; Sedlacek, M; Cais, O; Dittert, I; Vyklicky, L

    2010-02-03

    N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors (NMDARs) are highly expressed in the CNS and mediate the slow component of excitatory transmission. The present study was aimed at characterizing the temperature dependence of the kinetic properties of native NMDARs, with special emphasis on the deactivation of synaptic NMDARs. We used patch-clamp recordings to study synaptic NMDARs at layer II/III pyramidal neurons of the rat cortex, recombinant GluN1/GluN2B receptors expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells, and NMDARs in cultured hippocampal neurons. We found that time constants characterizing the deactivation of NMDAR-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) were similar to those of the deactivation of responses to a brief application of glutamate recorded under conditions of low NMDAR desensitization (whole-cell recording from cultured hippocampal neurons). In contrast, the deactivation of NMDAR-mediated responses exhibiting a high degree of desensitization (outside-out recording) was substantially faster than that of synaptic NMDA receptors. The time constants characterizing the deactivation of synaptic NMDARs and native NMDARs activated by exogenous glutamate application were only weakly temperature sensitive (Q(10)=1.7-2.2), in contrast to those of recombinant GluN1/GluN2B receptors, which are highly temperature sensitive (Q(10)=2.7-3.7). Ifenprodil reduced the amplitude of NMDAR-mediated EPSCs by approximately 50% but had no effect on the time course of deactivation. Analysis of GluN1/GluN2B responses indicated that the double exponential time course of deactivation reflects mainly agonist dissociation and receptor desensitization. We conclude that the temperature dependences of native and recombinant NMDAR are different; in addition, we contribute to a better understanding of the molecular mechanism that controls the time course of NMDAR-mediated EPSCs.

  8. 17β-Estradiol Regulation of the mRNA Expression of T-type Calcium Channel subunits: Role of Estrogen Receptor α and Estrogen Receptor β

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Martha A.; Hou, Jingwen; Fang, Yuan; Kelly, Martin J.; Rønnekleiv., Oline K.

    2009-01-01

    Low voltage-activated (T-type) calcium channels are responsible for burst firing and transmitter release in neurons and are important for exocytosis and hormone secretion in pituitary cells. T-type channels contain an α1 subunit, of which there are three subtypes, Cav3.1, 3.2 and 3.3, and each subtype has distinct kinetic characteristics. Although 17β-estradiol modulates T-type calcium channel expression and function, little is known about the molecular mechanisms involved. Presently, we used real-time PCR quantification of RNA extracted from hypothalamic nuclei and pituitary in vehicle and E2-treated C57BL/6 mice to elucidate E2-mediated regulation of Cav3.1, 3.2 and 3.3 subunits. The three subunits were expressed in both the hypothalamus and the pituitary. E2 treatment increased the mRNA expression of Cav3.1 and 3.2, but not Cav3.3, in the medial preoptic area and the arcuate nucleus. In the pituitary, Cav3.1 was increased with E2-treatment and Cav3.2 and 3.3 were decreased. In order to examine whether the classical estrogen receptors (ERs) were involved in the regulation, we used ERα- and ERβ-deficient C57BL/6 mice and explored the effects of E2 on T-type channel subtypes. Indeed, we found that the E2-induced increase in Cav3.1 in the hypothalamus was dependent on ERα, whereas the E2 effect on Cav3.2 was dependent on both ERα and ERβ. However, the E2-induced effects in the pituitary were dependent on only the expression of ERα. The robust E2-regulation of the T-type calcium channels could be an important mechanism by which E2 increases the excitability of hypothalamic neurons and modulates pituitary secretion. PMID:19003958

  9. Designing calcium release channel inhibitors with enhanced electron donor properties: stabilizing the closed state of ryanodine receptor type 1.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yanping; Yaeger, Daniel; Owen, Laura J; Escobedo, Jorge O; Wang, Jialu; Singer, Jeffrey D; Strongin, Robert M; Abramson, Jonathan J

    2012-01-01

    New drugs with enhanced electron donor properties that target the ryanodine receptor from skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum (RyR1) are shown to be potent inhibitors of single-channel activity. In this article, we synthesize derivatives of the channel activator 4-chloro-3-methyl phenol (4-CmC) and the 1,4-benzothiazepine channel inhibitor 4-[-3{1-(4-benzyl) piperidinyl}propionyl]-7-methoxy-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1,4-benzothiazepine (K201, JTV519) with enhanced electron donor properties. Instead of activating channel activity (~100 μM), the 4-methoxy analog of 4-CmC [4-methoxy-3-methyl phenol (4-MmC)] inhibits channel activity at submicromolar concentrations (IC(50) = 0.34 ± 0.08 μM). Increasing the electron donor characteristics of K201 by synthesizing its dioxole congener results in an approximately 16 times more potent RyR1 inhibitor (IC(50) = 0.24 ± 0.05 μM) compared with K201 (IC(50) = 3.98 ± 0.79 μM). Inhibition is not caused by an increased closed time of the channel but seems to be caused by an open state block of RyR1. These alterations to chemical structure do not influence the ability of these drugs to affect Ca(2+)-dependent ATPase activity of sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase type 1. Moreover, the FKBP12 protein, which stabilizes RyR1 in a closed configuration, is shown to be a strong electron donor. It seems as if FKBP12, K201, its dioxole derivative, and 4-MmC inhibit RyR1 channel activity by virtue of their electron donor characteristics. These results embody strong evidence that designing new drugs to target RyR1 with enhanced electron donor characteristics results in more potent channel inhibitors. This is a novel approach to the design of new, more potent drugs with the aim of functionally modifying RyR1 single-channel activity.

  10. Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels as a therapeutic target for intervention of respiratory effects and lethality from phosgene.

    PubMed

    Andres, Devon; Keyser, Brian; Benton, Betty; Melber, Ashley; Olivera, Dorian; Holmes, Wesley; Paradiso, Danielle; Anderson, Dana; Ray, Radharaman

    2016-02-26

    Phosgene (CG), a toxic inhalation and industrial hazard, causes bronchoconstriction, vasoconstriction and associated pathological effects that could be life threatening. Ion channels of the transient receptor potential (TRP) family have been identified to act as specific chemosensory molecules in the respiratory tract in the detection, control of adaptive responses and initiation of detrimental signaling cascades upon exposure to various toxic inhalation hazards (TIH); their activation due to TIH exposure may result in broncho- and vasoconstriction. We studied changes in the regulation of intracellular free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in cultures of human bronchial smooth muscle cells (BSMC) and human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HPMEC) exposed to CG (16ppm, 8min), using an air/liquid interface exposure system. CG increased [Ca(2+)]i (p<0.05) in both cell types, The CG-induced [Ca(2+)]i was blocked (p<0.05) by two types of TRP channel blockers, SKF-96365, a general TRP channel blocker, and RR, a general TRPV (vanilloid type) blocker, in both BSMC and HPMEC. These effects correlate with the in vivo efficacies of these compounds to protect against lung injury and 24h lethality from whole body CG inhalation exposure in mice (8-10ppm×20min). Thus the TRP channel mechanism appears to be a potential target for intervention in CG toxicity.

  11. Subunit-selective role of the M3 transmembrane domain of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in channel gating.

    PubMed

    De Rosa, María José; Corradi, Jeremías; Bouzat, Cecilia

    2008-02-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) can be either hetero-pentameric, composed of alpha and non-alpha subunits, or homo-pentameric, composed of alpha7 subunits. To explore the subunit-selective contributions of transmembrane domains to channel gating we analyzed single-channel activity of chimeric muscle AChRs. We exchanged M3 between alpha1 and epsilon or alpha7 subunits. The replacement of M3 in alpha1 by epsilonM3 significantly alters activation properties. Channel activity appears as bursts of openings whose durations are 20-fold longer than those of wild-type AChRs. In contrast, 7-fold briefer openings are observed in AChRs containing the reverse epsilon chimeric subunit. The duration of the open state decreases with the increase in the number of alpha1M3 segments, indicating additive contributions of M3 of all subunits to channel closing. Each alpha1M3 segment decreases the energy barrier of the closing process by approximately 0.8 kcal/mol. Partial chimeric subunits show that small stretches of the M3 segment contribute additively to the open duration. The replacement of alpha1 sequence by alpha7 in M3 leads to 3-fold briefer openings whereas in M1 it leads to 10-fold prolonged openings, revealing that the subunit-selective role is unique to each transmembrane segment.

  12. The ryanodine receptor/calcium channel genes are widely and differentially expressed in murine brain and peripheral tissues

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are intracellular calcium release channels that participate in controlling cytosolic calcium levels. At variance with the probably ubiquitous inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-operated calcium channels (1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors), RyRs have been mainly regarded as the calcium release channels controlling skeletal and cardiac muscle contraction. Increasing evidence has recently suggested that RyRs may be more widely expressed, but this has never been extensively examined. Therefore, we cloned three cDNAs corresponding to murine RyR homologues to carry a comprehensive analysis of their expression in murine tissues. Here, we report that the three genes are expressed in almost all tissues analyzed, where tissue-specific patterns of expression were observed. In the uterus and vas deferens, expression of RyR3 was localized to the smooth muscle component of these organs. In the testis, expression of RyR1 and RyR3 was detected in germ cells. RyR mRNAs were also detected in in vitro-cultured cell lines. RyR1, RyR2, and RyR3 mRNA were detected in the cerebrum and in the cerebellum. In situ analysis revealed a cell type-specific pattern of expression in the different regions of the central nervous system. The differential expression of the three ryanodine receptor genes in the central nervous system was also confirmed using specific antibodies against the respective proteins. This widespread pattern of expression suggests that RyRs may participate in the regulation of intracellular calcium homeostasis in a range of cells wider than previously recognized. PMID:7876312

  13. Plant-derived cannabinoids modulate the activity of transient receptor potential channels of ankyrin type-1 and melastatin type-8.

    PubMed

    De Petrocellis, Luciano; Vellani, Vittorio; Schiano-Moriello, Aniello; Marini, Pietro; Magherini, Pier Cosimo; Orlando, Pierangelo; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2008-06-01

    The plant cannabinoids (phytocannabinoids), cannabidiol (CBD), and Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) were previously shown to activate transient receptor potential channels of both vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) and ankyrin type 1 (TRPA1), respectively. Furthermore, the endocannabinoid anandamide is known to activate TRPV1 and was recently found to antagonize the menthol- and icilin-sensitive transient receptor potential channels of melastatin type 8 (TRPM8). In this study, we investigated the effects of six phytocannabinoids [i.e., CBD, THC, CBD acid, THC acid, cannabichromene (CBC), and cannabigerol (CBG)] on TRPA1- and TRPM8-mediated increase in intracellular Ca2+ in either HEK-293 cells overexpressing the two channels or rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) sensory neurons. All of the compounds tested induced TRPA1-mediated Ca2+ elevation in HEK-293 cells with efficacy comparable with that of mustard oil isothiocyanates (MO), the most potent being CBC (EC(50) = 60 nM) and the least potent being CBG and CBD acid (EC(50) = 3.4-12.0 microM). CBC also activated MO-sensitive DRG neurons, although with lower potency (EC(50) = 34.3 microM). Furthermore, although none of the compounds tested activated TRPM8-mediated Ca2+ elevation in HEK-293 cells, they all, with the exception of CBC, antagonized this response when it was induced by either menthol or icilin. CBD, CBG, THC, and THC acid were equipotent (IC(50) = 70-160 nM), whereas CBD acid was the least potent compound (IC(50) = 0.9-1.6 microM). CBG inhibited Ca2+ elevation also in icilin-sensitive DRG neurons with potency (IC(50) = 4.5 microM) similar to that of anandamide (IC(50) = 10 microM). Our findings suggest that phytocannabinoids and cannabis extracts exert some of their pharmacological actions also by interacting with TRPA1 and TRPM8 channels, with potential implications for the treatment of pain and cancer.

  14. Differential effects of bitter compounds on the taste transduction channels TRPM5 and IP3 receptor type 3.

    PubMed

    Gees, Maarten; Alpizar, Yeranddy A; Luyten, Tomas; Parys, Jan B; Nilius, Bernd; Bultynck, Geert; Voets, Thomas; Talavera, Karel

    2014-05-01

    Transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily M member 5 (TRPM5) is a Ca(2+)-activated nonselective cation channel involved in the transduction of sweet, bitter, and umami tastes. We previously showed that TRPM5 is a locus for the modulation of taste perception by temperature changes, and by quinine and quinidine, 2 bitter compounds that suppress gustatory responses. Here, we determined whether other bitter compounds known to modulate taste perception also affect TRPM5. We found that nicotine inhibits TRPM5 currents with an effective inhibitory concentration of ~1.3mM at -50 mV. This effect may contribute to the inhibitory effect of nicotine on gustatory responses in therapeutic and experimental settings, where nicotine is often employed at millimolar concentrations. In addition, it implies the existence of a TRPM5-independent pathway for the detection of nicotine bitterness. Nicotine seems to act from the extracellular side of the channel, reducing the maximal whole-cell conductance and inducing an acceleration of channel closure that leads to a negative shift of the activation curve. TRPM5 currents were unaffected by nicotine's metabolite cotinine, the intensive sweetener saccharin or by the bitter xanthines caffeine, theobromine, and theophylline. We also tested the effects of bitter compounds on another essential element of the sweet taste transduction pathway, the type 3 IP3 receptor (IP3R3). We found that IP3R3-mediated Ca(2+) flux is slightly enhanced by nicotine, not affected by saccharin, modestly inhibited by caffeine, theobromine, and theophylline, and strongly inhibited by quinine. Our results demonstrate that bitter compounds have differential effects on key elements of the sweet taste transduction pathway, suggesting for heterogeneous mechanisms of bitter-sweet taste interactions.

  15. Localization of Receptor Site on Insect Sodium Channel for Depressant β-toxin BmK IT2

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Bangqian; Zhang, Jianwei; Shu, Xueqin; Zhou, Jingjing; Ji, Yonghua

    2011-01-01

    Background BmK IT2 is regarded as a receptor site-4 modulator of sodium channels with depressant insect toxicity. It also displays anti-nociceptive and anti-convulsant activities in rat models. In this study, the potency and efficacy of BmK IT2 were for the first time assessed and compared among four sodium channel isoforms expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Combined with molecular approach, the receptor site of BmK IT2 was further localized. Principal Findings 2 µM BmK IT2 strongly shifted the activation of DmNav1, the sodium channel from Drosophila, to more hyperpolarized potentials; whereas it hardly affected the gating properties of rNav1.2, rNav1.3 and mNav1.6, three mammalian central neuronal sodium channel subtypes. (1) Mutations of Glu896, Leu899, Gly904 in extracellular loop Domain II S3–S4 of DmNav1 abolished the functional action of BmK IT2. (2) BmK IT2-preference for DmNav1 could be conferred by Domain III. Analysis of subsequent DmNav1 mutants highlighted the residues in Domain III pore loop, esp. Ile1529 was critical for recognition and binding of BmK IT2. Conclusions/Significance In this study, BmK IT2 displayed total insect-selectivity. Two binding regions, comprising domains II and III of DmNav1, play separated but indispensable roles in the interaction with BmK IT2. The insensitivity of Nav1.2, Nav1.3 and Nav1.6 to BmK IT2 suggests other isoforms or mechanism might be involved in the suppressive activity of BmK IT2 in rat pathological models. PMID:21264295

  16. Role of pairwise interactions between M1 and M2 domains of the nicotinic receptor in channel gating.

    PubMed

    Corradi, Jeremías; Spitzmaul, Guillermo; De Rosa, María José; Costabel, Marcelo; Bouzat, Cecilia

    2007-01-01

    The adult form of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) consists of five subunits (alpha(2)betaepsilondelta), each having four transmembrane domains (M1-M4). The atomic model of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor shows that the pore-lining M2 domains make no extensive contacts with the rest of the transmembrane domains. However, there are several sites where close appositions between segments occur. It has been suggested that the pair alphaM1-F15' and alphaM2-L11' is one of the potential interactions between segments. To determine experimentally if these residues are interacting and to explore if this interhelical interaction is essential for channel gating, we combined mutagenesis with single-channel kinetic analysis. Mutations in alphaM1-F15' lead to profound changes in the opening rate and slighter changes in the closing rate. Channel gating is impaired as the volume of the residue increases. Rate-equilibrium linear free-energy relationship analysis reveals an approximately 70% open-state-like environment for alphaM1-F15' at the transition state of the gating reaction, suggesting that it moves early during the gating process. Replacing the residue at alphaM1-15' by that at alphaM2-11' and vice versa profoundly alters gating, but the combination of the two mutations restores gating to near normal, indicating that alphaM1-F15' and alphaM2-L11' are interchangeable. Double-mutant cycle analysis shows that these residues are energetically coupled. Thus, the interaction between M1 and M2 plays a key role in channel gating.

  17. Cooling-induced contraction of the rat gastric fundus: mediation via transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channel TRPM8 receptor and Rho-kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, S; Oriowo, Ma

    2005-10-01

    1. Cooling has been shown to induce contractions of several smooth muscles in vitro. However, the mechanism involved in the response is not yet known. In the present study, we investigated the possible involvement of transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channel TRPM8 receptors and the Rho-kinase pathway in cooling-induced contraction of the rat fundus. 2. Cooling-induced contractions were inversely proportional to temperature. Contractions were significantly reduced (by 65.6 +/- 2.4%; P < 0.05) in a Ca2+-free (1 mmol/L EGTA) medium, but were not significantly inhibited by nifedipine (10(-6) mol/L). 3. Capsazepine (3 x 10(-6) and 3 x 10(-5) mol/L), a TRPM8 receptor antagonist, inhibited cooling-induced contraction of the rat gastric fundus. 4. The Rho-kinase inhibitor Y-27632 concentration-dependently inhibited cooling-induced contraction of the gastric fundus, producing approximately 90% inhibition at a concentration of 10(-5) mol/L. Contractions were also inhibited by genistein (3 x 10(-5) mol/L), a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, but not by GF 109203X (10(-7) mol/L), a protein kinase C inhibitor. 5. Using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction techniques, it was observed that the mRNA for the TRPM8 receptor and Rho-kinase were expressed in the rat gastric fundus. 6. These results would suggest that cooling-induced contraction of the rat fundus is mediated by activation of TRPM8 receptors via a mechanism involving activation of Rho-kinase.

  18. Cannabinoid receptor activation differentially modulates ion channels in photoreceptors of the tiger salamander.

    PubMed

    Straiker, Alex; Sullivan, Jane M

    2003-05-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptors have been detected in retinas of numerous species, with prominent labeling in photoreceptor terminals of the chick and monkey. CB1 labeling is well-conserved across species, suggesting that CB1 receptors might also be present in photoreceptors of the tiger salamander. Synaptic transmission in vertebrate photoreceptors is mediated by L-type calcium currents-currents that are modulated by CB1 receptors in bipolar cells of the tiger salamander. Presence of CB1 receptors in photoreceptor terminals would therefore be consistent with presynaptic modulation of synaptic transmission, a role seen for cannabinoids in other parts of the brain. Here we report immunohistochemical and electrophysiological evidence for the presence of functional CB1 receptors in rod and cone photoreceptors of the tiger salamander. The cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN 55212-2 enhances calcium currents of rod photoreceptors by 39% but decreases calcium currents of large single cones by 50%. In addition, WIN 55212-2 suppresses potassium currents of rods and large single cones by 44 and 48%, respectively. Thus functional CB1 receptors, present in the terminals of rod and cone photoreceptors, differentially modulate calcium and potassium currents in rods and large single cones. CB1 receptors are therefore well positioned to modulate neurotransmitter release at the first synapse of the visual system.

  19. AHR-16303B, a novel antagonist of 5-HT2 receptors and voltage-sensitive calcium channels

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, R.J.; Appell, K.C.; Kilpatrick, B.F.; Proakis, A.G.; Nolan, J.C.; Walsh, D.A. )

    1991-01-01

    In vivo and in vitro methods were used to characterize AHR-16303B, a novel compound with antagonistic action at 5-HT2 receptors and voltage-sensitive calcium channels. The 5-HT2 receptor-antagonistic properties of AHR-16303B were demonstrated by inhibition of (a) (3H)ketanserin binding to rat cerebral cortical membranes (IC50 = 165 nM); (b) 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)-induced foot edema in rats (minimum effective dose, (MED) = 0.32 mg/kg orally, p.o.); (c) 5-HT-induced vasopressor responses in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) (ID50 = 0.18 mg/kg intravenously (i.v.), 1.8 mg/kg p.o.), (d) 5-HT-induced antidiuresis in rats (MED = 1 mg/kg p.o.), and (e) platelet aggregation induced by 5-HT + ADP (IC50 = 1.5 mM). The calcium antagonist properties of AHR-16303B were demonstrated by inhibition of (a) (3H)nimodipine binding to voltage-sensitive calcium channels on rabbit skeletal muscle membranes (IC50 = 15 nM), (b) KCl-stimulated calcium flux into cultured PC12 cells (IC50 = 81 nM), and (c) CaCl2-induced contractions of rabbit thoracic aortic strips (pA2 = 8.84). AHR-16303B had little or no effect on binding of radioligands to dopamine2 (DA2) alpha 1, alpha 2, H1, 5-HT1 alpha, beta 2, muscarinic M1, or sigma opioid receptors; had no effect on 5-HT3 receptor-mediated vagal bradycardia; and had only minor negative inotropic, chronotropic, and dromotropic effects on isolated guinea pig atria. In conscious SHR, 30 mg/kg p.o. AHR-16303B completely prevented the vasopressor responses to i.v. 5-HT, and decreased blood pressure (BP) by 24% 3 h after dosing.

  20. Transcranial random noise stimulation-induced plasticity is NMDA-receptor independent but sodium-channel blocker and benzodiazepines sensitive

    PubMed Central

    Chaieb, Leila; Antal, Andrea; Paulus, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Background: Application of transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS) between 0.1 and 640 Hz of the primary motor cortex (M1) for 10 min induces a persistent excitability increase lasting for at least 60 min. However, the mechanism of tRNS-induced cortical excitability alterations is not yet fully understood. Objective: The main aim of this study was to get first efficacy data with regard to the possible neuronal effect of tRNS. Methods: Single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was used to measure levels of cortical excitability before and after combined application of tRNS at an intensity of 1 mA for 10 min stimulation duration and a pharmacological agent (or sham) on eight healthy male participants. Results: The sodium channel blocker carbamazepine showed a tendency toward inhibiting MEPs 5–60 min poststimulation. The GABAA agonist lorazepam suppressed tRNS-induced cortical excitability increases at 0–20 and 60 min time points. The partial NMDA receptor agonist D-cycloserine, the NMDA receptor antagonist dextromethorphan and the D2/D3 receptor agonist ropinirole had no significant effects on the excitability increases seen with tRNS. Conclusions: In contrast to transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), aftereffects of tRNS are seem to be not NMDA receptor dependent and can be suppressed by benzodiazepines suggesting that tDCS and tRNS depend upon different mechanisms. PMID:25914617

  1. Purified omega-conotoxin GVIA receptor of rat brain resembles a dihydropyridine-sensitive L-type calcium channel

    SciTech Connect

    McEnery, M.W.; Snowman, A.M.; Sharp, A.H.; Snyder, S.H. ); Adams, M.E. )

    1991-12-15

    The {omega}-conotoxin GVIA (CTX) receptor has been purified 1,900-fold to apparent homogeneity by monitoring both reversible binding of {sup 125}I-labeled CTX ({sup 125}I-CTX) and photoincorporation of N-hydroxysuccinimidyl-4-azidobenzoate-{sup 125}I-CTX (HSA-{sup 125}I-CTX). Photoincorporation of HSA-{sup 125}I-CTX into a 230-kDa protein exhibits a pharmacologic and chromatographic profile indicating that the 230-kDa protein is the CTX-binding subunit of the receptor. The pharmacologic specificity of {sup 125}I-CTX binding to the purified CTX receptor closely resembles that of the native membrane-bound form with respect to sensitivity towards CTX and other peptide toxin antagonists. The purified CTX receptor comprises the 230-kDa protein ({alpha}{sub 1}) and four additional proteins with apparent molecular masses of 140 ({alpha}{sub 2}), 110, 70 ({beta}{sub 2}), and 60({beta}{sub 1}) kDa. This subunit structure closely resembles that of the 1,4-dihydropyridine-sensitive L-type calcium channel.

  2. Opposing roles for cannabinoid receptor type-1 (CB₁) and transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 channel (TRPV1) on the modulation of panic-like responses in rats.

    PubMed

    Casarotto, Plínio C; Terzian, Ana Luisa B; Aguiar, Daniele C; Zangrossi, Hélio; Guimarães, Francisco S; Wotjak, Carsten T; Moreira, Fabrício A

    2012-01-01

    The midbrain dorsal periaqueductal gray (dPAG) has an important role in orchestrating anxiety- and panic-related responses. Given the cellular and behavioral evidence suggesting opposite functions for cannabinoid type 1 receptor (CB₁) and transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 channel (TRPV1), we hypothesized that they could differentially influence panic-like reactions induced by electrical stimulation of the dPAG. Drugs were injected locally and the expression of CB₁ and TRPV1 in this structure was assessed by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. The CB₁-selective agonist, ACEA (0.01, 0.05 and 0.5 pmol) increased the threshold for the induction of panic-like responses solely at the intermediary dose, an effect prevented by the CB₁-selective antagonist, AM251 (75 pmol). Panicolytic-like effects of ACEA at the higher dose were unmasked by pre-treatment with the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine (0.1 nmol). Similarly to ACEA, capsazepine (1 and 10 nmol) raised the threshold for triggering panic-like reactions, an effect mimicked by another TRPV1 antagonist, SB366791 (1 nmol). Remarkably, the effects of both capsazepine and SB366791 were prevented by AM251 (75 pmol). These pharmacological data suggest that a common endogenous agonist may have opposite functions at a given synapse. Supporting this view, we observed that several neurons in the dPAG co-expressed CB₁ and TRPV1. Thus, the present work provides evidence that an endogenous substance, possibly anandamide, may exert both panicolytic and panicogenic effects via its actions at CB₁ receptors and TRPV1 channels, respectively. This tripartite set-point system might be exploited for the pharmacotherapy of panic attacks and anxiety-related disorders.

  3. Structure-affinity relationships and pharmacological characterization of new alkyl-resorcinol cannabinoid receptor ligands: Identification of a dual cannabinoid receptor/TRPA1 channel agonist.

    PubMed

    Brizzi, Antonella; Aiello, Francesca; Marini, Pietro; Cascio, Maria Grazia; Corelli, Federico; Brizzi, Vittorio; De Petrocellis, Luciano; Ligresti, Alessia; Luongo, Livio; Lamponi, Stefania; Maione, Sabatino; Pertwee, Roger G; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2014-09-01

    In our ongoing program aimed at deeply investigating the endocannabinoid system (ES), a set of new alkyl-resorcinol derivatives was prepared focusing on the nature and the importance of the carboxamide functionality. Binding studies on CB1 and CB2 receptors, monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) showed that some of the newly developed compounds behaved as very potent cannabinoid receptor ligands (Ki in the nanomolar range) while, however, none of them was able to inhibit MAGL and/or FAAH. Derivative 11 was a potent CB1 and CB2 ligand, with Ki values similar to WIN 55,212, exhibiting a CB1 and CB2 agonist profile in vitro. In the formalin test of peripheral acute and inflammatory pain in mice, this compound showed a weak and delayed antinociceptive effect against the second phase of the nocifensive response, exhibiting, interestingly, a quite potent transient receptor potential ankyrin type-1 (TRPA1) channel agonist activity. Moreover, derivative 14, characterized by lower affinity but higher CB2 selectivity than 11, proved to behave as a weak CB2 competitive inverse agonist.

  4. Type-specific inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor localization in the vomeronasal organ and its interaction with a transient receptor potential channel, TRPC2

    PubMed Central

    Brann, Jessica H.; Dennis, John C.; Morrison, Edward E.; Fadool, Debra A.

    2011-01-01

    The vomeronasal organ (VNO) is the receptor portion of the accessory olfactory system and transduces chemical cues that identify social hierarchy, reproductive status, conspecifics and prey. Signal transduction in VNO neurons is apparently accomplished via an inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-activated calcium conductance that includes a different set of G proteins than those identified in vertebrate olfactory sensory neurons. We used immunohistochemical (IHC) and SDS–PAGE/western analysis to localize three IP3 receptors (IP3R) in the rat VNO epithelium. Type-I IP3R expression was weak or absent. Antisera for type-II and -III IP3R recognized appropriate molecular weight proteins by SDS–PAGE, and labeled protein could be abolished by pre-adsorption of the respective antibody with antigenic peptide. In tissue sections, type-II IP3R immunoreactivity was present in the supporting cell zone but not in the sensory cell zone. Type-III IP3R immunoreactivity was present throughout the sensory zone and overlapped that of transient receptor potential channel 2 (TRPC2) in the microvillar layer of sensory epithelium. Co-immunoprecipitation of type-III IP3R and TRPC2 from VNO lysates confirmed the overlapping immunoreactivity patterns. The protein–protein interaction complex between type-III IP3R and TRPC2 could initiate calcium signaling leading to electrical signal production in VNO neurons. PMID:12472899

  5. T Cell Receptor Mediated Calcium Entry Requires Alternatively Spliced Cav1.1 Channels.

    PubMed

    Matza, Didi; Badou, Abdallah; Klemic, Kathryn G; Stein, Judith; Govindarajulu, Usha; Nadler, Monica J; Kinet, Jean-Pierre; Peled, Amnon; Shapira, Oz M; Kaczmarek, Leonard K; Flavell, Richard A

    2016-01-01

    The process of calcium entry in T cells is a multichannel and multi-step process. We have studied the requirement for L-type calcium channels (Cav1.1) α1S subunits during calcium entry after TCR stimulation. High expression levels of Cav1.1 channels were detected in activated T cells. Sequencing and cloning of Cav1.1 channel cDNA from T cells revealed that a single splice variant is expressed. This variant lacks exon 29, which encodes the linker region adjacent to the voltage sensor, but contains five new N-terminal exons that substitute for exons 1 and 2, which are found in the Cav1.1 muscle counterpart. Overexpression studies using cloned T cell Cav1.1 in 293HEK cells (that lack TCR) suggest that the gating of these channels was altered. Knockdown of Cav1.1 channels in T cells abrogated calcium entry after TCR stimulation, suggesting that Cav1.1 channels are controlled by TCR signaling.

  6. T Cell Receptor Mediated Calcium Entry Requires Alternatively Spliced Cav1.1 Channels

    PubMed Central

    Matza, Didi; Badou, Abdallah; Klemic, Kathryn G.; Stein, Judith; Govindarajulu, Usha; Nadler, Monica J.; Kinet, Jean-Pierre; Peled, Amnon; Shapira, Oz M.; Kaczmarek, Leonard K.; Flavell, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    The process of calcium entry in T cells is a multichannel and multi-step process. We have studied the requirement for L-type calcium channels (Cav1.1) α1S subunits during calcium entry after TCR stimulation. High expression levels of Cav1.1 channels were detected in activated T cells. Sequencing and cloning of Cav1.1 channel cDNA from T cells revealed that a single splice variant is expressed. This variant lacks exon 29, which encodes the linker region adjacent to the voltage sensor, but contains five new N-terminal exons that substitute for exons 1 and 2, which are found in the Cav1.1 muscle counterpart. Overexpression studies using cloned T cell Cav1.1 in 293HEK cells (that lack TCR) suggest that the gating of these channels was altered. Knockdown of Cav1.1 channels in T cells abrogated calcium entry after TCR stimulation, suggesting that Cav1.1 channels are controlled by TCR signaling. PMID:26815481

  7. Upregulation of swelling-activated Cl− channel sensitivity to cell volume by activation of EGF receptors in murine mammary cells

    PubMed Central

    Abdullaev, Iskandar F; Sabirov, Ravshan Z; Okada, Yasunobu

    2003-01-01

    Whole-cell recordings showed that, in mouse mammary C127 cells transfected with the full genome of the bovine papilloma virus (BPV), a hypotonic challenge induced the activation of outwardly rectifying Cl− currents with a peak amplitude 2.7 times greater than that in control C127 cells. Cell-attached single-channel recordings showed that BPV-induced augmentation of the peak amplitude of the whole-cell current could not chiefly be explained by a small increase (1.2 times) in unitary conductance. There was no difference between control and BPV-transfected cells in the osmotic cell swelling rate, and hence, osmotic water permeability. However, a plot of the whole-cell current density as a function of cell volume, which was measured simultaneously, showed that the BPV-transfected cells had a strikingly greater volume sensitivity than control cells. Since the E5 protein of BPV has been reported to induce constitutive activation of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor in a variety of cell lines including C127 cells, effects of the growth factors on volume-sensitive outwardly rectifying (VSOR) Cl− currents were examined in C127 cells. Application of PDGF peptides failed to affect the Cl− currents in control and BPV-transfected cells, although C127 cells are known to endogenously express PDGF receptors. In contrast, EGF peptides significantly increased the VSOR Cl− current in control cells. However, they failed to induce further augmentation of the current in BPV-transfected cells. VSOR Cl− currents were inhibited by tyrphostin B46, an inhibitor of the EGF receptor tyrosine kinase, in both control and BPV-transfected cells. The IC50 value in BPV-transfected cells (12 μm) was lower than that in control cells (31 μm). However, the VSOR Cl− currents in both cell types were insensitive to tyrphostin AG1296, an inhibitor of the PDGF receptor tyrosine kinase. The rate of regulatory volume decrease (RVD) was

  8. Sildenafil prevents the up-regulation of transient receptor potential canonical channels in the development of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Kiso, Hironori; Ohba, Takayoshi; Iino, Kenji; Sato, Kazuhiro; Terata, Yutaka; Murakami, Manabu; Ono, Kyoichi; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Ito, Hiroshi

    2013-07-05

    Highlights: •Transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC1, 3 and 6) are up-regulated by ET-1. •Sildenafil inhibited hypertrophic responses (BNP, Ca entry, NFAT activation). •Sildenafil suppressed TRPC1, 3 and 6 expression. -- Abstract: Background: Transient receptor potential canonical (TRPCs) channels are up-regulated in the development of cardiac hypertrophy. Sildenafil inhibits TRPC6 activation and expression, leading to the prevention of cardiac hypertrophy. However, the effects of sildenafil on the expression of other TRPCs remain unknown. We hypothesized that in addition to its effects of TRPC6, sildenafil blocks the up-regulation of other TRPC channels to suppress cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Methods and results: In cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, a 48 h treatment with 10 nM endothelin (ET)-1 induced hypertrophic responses characterized by nuclear factor of activated T cells activation and enhancement of brain natriuretic peptide expression and cell surface area. Co-treatment with sildenafil (1 μM, 48 h) inhibited these ET-1-induced hypertrophic responses. Although ET-1 enhanced the gene expression of TRPCs, sildenafil inhibited the enhanced gene expression of TRPC1, C3 and C6. Moreover, co-treatment with sildenafil abolished the augmentation of SOCE in the hypertrophied cardiomyocytes. Conclusions: These results suggest that sildenafil inhibits cardiomyocyte hypertrophy by suppressing the up-regulation of TRPC expression.

  9. Structural mapping of the voltage-dependent sodium channel. Distance between the tetrodotoxin and Centruroides suffusus suffusus II beta-scorpion toxin receptors.

    PubMed

    Darbon, H; Angelides, K J

    1984-05-25

    A 7- dimethylaminocoumarin -4-acetate fluorescent derivative of toxin II from the venom of the scorpion Centruroides suffusus suffusus (Css II) has been prepared to study the structural, conformational, and cellular properties of the beta-neurotoxin receptor site on the voltage-dependent sodium channel. The derivative retains high affinity for its receptor site on the synaptosomal sodium channel with a KD of 7 nM and site capacity of 1.5 pmol/mg of synaptosomal protein. The fluorescent toxin is very environmentally sensitive and the fluorescence emission upon binding indicates that the Css II receptor is largely hydrophobic. Binding of tetrodotoxin or batrachotoxin does not alter the spectroscopic properties of bound Css II, whereas toxin V from Leiurus quinquestriatus effects a 10-nm blue shift to a more hydrophobic environment. This is the first direct indication of conformational coupling between these separate neurotoxin receptor sites. The distance between the tetrodotoxin and Css II scorpion toxin receptors on the sodium channel was measured by fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Efficiencies were measured by both donor quenching and acceptor-sensitized emission. The distance between these two neurotoxin sites is about 34 A. The implications of these receptor locations together with other known molecular distances are discussed in terms of a molecular structure of the voltage-dependent sodium channel.

  10. Glutamate receptor-like channels in plants: a role as amino acid sensors in plant defence?

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Plant glutamate receptor-like genes (GLRs) are homologous to the genes for mammalian ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs), after which they were named, but in the 16 years since their existence was first revealed, progress in elucidating their biological role has been disappointingly slow. Recently, however, studies from a number of laboratories focusing on the model plant species Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) have thrown new light on the functional properties of some members of the GLR gene family. One important finding has been that plant GLR receptors have a much broader ligand specificity than their mammalian iGluR counterparts, with evidence that some individual GLR receptors can be gated by as many as seven amino acids. These results, together with the ubiquity of their expression throughout the plant, open up the possibility that GLR receptors could have a pervasive role in plants as non-specific amino acid sensors in diverse biological processes. Addressing what one of these roles could be, recent studies examining the wound response and disease susceptibility in GLR knockout mutants have provided evidence that some members of clade 3 of the GLR gene family encode important components of the plant's defence response. Ways in which this family of amino acid receptors might contribute to the plant's ability to respond to an attack from pests and pathogens are discussed. PMID:24991414

  11. Mechanisms of activation of nucleus accumbens neurons by cocaine via sigma-1 receptor-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-transient receptor potential canonical channel pathways.

    PubMed

    Barr, Jeffrey L; Deliu, Elena; Brailoiu, G Cristina; Zhao, Pingwei; Yan, Guang; Abood, Mary E; Unterwald, Ellen M; Brailoiu, Eugen

    2015-08-01

    Cocaine promotes addictive behavior primarily by blocking the dopamine transporter, thus increasing dopamine transmission in the nucleus accumbens (nAcc); however, additional mechanisms are continually emerging. Sigma-1 receptors (σ1Rs) are known targets for cocaine, yet the mechanisms underlying σ1R-mediated effects of cocaine are incompletely understood. The present study examined direct effects of cocaine on dissociated nAcc neurons expressing phosphatidylinositol-linked D1 receptors. Endoplasmic reticulum-located σ1Rs and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptors (IP3Rs) were targeted using intracellular microinjection. IP3 microinjection robustly elevated intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, [Ca(2+)]i. While cocaine alone was devoid of an effect, the IP3-induced response was σ1R-dependently enhanced by cocaine co-injection. Likewise, cocaine augmented the [Ca(2+)]i increase elicited by extracellularly applying an IP3-generating molecule (ATP), via σ1Rs. The cocaine-induced enhancement of the IP3/ATP-mediated Ca(2+) elevation occurred at pharmacologically relevant concentrations and was mediated by transient receptor potential canonical channels (TRPC). IP3 microinjection elicited a slight, transient depolarization, further converted to a greatly enhanced, prolonged response, by cocaine co-injection. The cocaine-triggered augmentation was σ1R-dependent, TRPC-mediated and contingent on [Ca(2+)]i elevation. ATP-induced depolarization was similarly enhanced by cocaine. Thus, we identify a novel mechanism by which cocaine promotes activation of D1-expressing nAcc neurons: enhancement of IP3R-mediated responses via σ1R activation at the endoplasmic reticulum, resulting in augmented Ca(2+) release and amplified depolarization due to subsequent stimulation of TRPC. In vivo, intra-accumbal blockade of σ1R or TRPC significantly diminished cocaine-induced hyperlocomotion and locomotor sensitization, endorsing a physio-pathological significance of the pathway

  12. 5-Hydroxytryptamine1A receptor-activation hyperpolarizes pyramidal cells and suppresses hippocampal gamma oscillations via Kir3 channel activation.

    PubMed

    Johnston, April; McBain, Chris J; Fisahn, André

    2014-10-01

    Rhythmic cortical neuronal oscillations in the gamma frequency band (30-80 Hz, gamma oscillations) have been associated with cognitive processes such as sensory perception and integration, attention, learning, and memory. Gamma oscillations are disrupted in disorders for which cognitive deficits are hallmark symptoms such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease.In vitro, various neurotransmitters have been found to modulate gamma oscillations. Serotonin(5-HT) has long been known to be important for both behavioural and cognitive functions such as learning and memory. Multiple 5-HT receptor subtypes are expressed in the CA3 region of the hippocampus and high doses of 5-HT reduce the power of induced gamma oscillations.Hypothesizing that 5-HT may have cell- and receptor subtype-specific modulatory effects, we investigated the receptor subtypes, cell types and cellular mechanisms engaged by 5-HT in the modulation of gamma oscillations in mice and rats. We found that 5-HT decreases the power of kainate-induced hippocampal gamma oscillations in both species via the 5-HT1A receptor subtype. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings demonstrated that this decrease was caused by a hyperpolarization of CA3 pyramidal cells and a reduction of their firing frequency, but not by alteration of inhibitory neurotransmission. Finally, our results show that the effect on pyramidal cells is mediated via the G protein-coupled receptor inwardly rectifying potassium channel Kir3.Our findings suggest this novel cellular mechanism as a potential target for therapies that are aimed at alleviating cognitive decline by helping the brain to maintain or re-establish normal gamma oscillation levels in neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders.

  13. Dominant mutations in the cation channel gene transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 cause an unusual spectrum of neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Zimoń, Magdalena; Baets, Jonathan; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; Berciano, José; Garcia, Antonio; Lopez-Laso, Eduardo; Merlini, Luciano; Hilton-Jones, David; McEntagart, Meriel; Crosby, Andrew H.; Barisic, Nina; Boltshauser, Eugen; Shaw, Christopher E.; Landouré, Guida; Ludlow, Christy L.; Gaudet, Rachelle; Houlden, Henry; Reilly, Mary M.; Fischbeck, Kenneth H.; Sumner, Charlotte J.; Timmerman, Vincent; Jordanova, Albena

    2010-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathies form a heterogeneous group of disorders for which over 40 causal genes have been identified to date. Recently, dominant mutations in the transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 gene were found to be associated with three distinct neuromuscular phenotypes: hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy 2C, scapuloperoneal spinal muscular atrophy and congenital distal spinal muscular atrophy. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 encodes a cation channel previously implicated in several types of dominantly inherited bone dysplasia syndromes. We performed DNA sequencing of the coding regions of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 in a cohort of 145 patients with various types of hereditary neuropathy and identified five different heterozygous missense mutations in eight unrelated families. One mutation arose de novo in an isolated patient, and the remainder segregated in families. Two of the mutations were recurrent in unrelated families. Four mutations in transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 targeted conserved arginine residues in the ankyrin repeat domain, which is believed to be important in protein–protein interactions. Striking phenotypic variability between and within families was observed. The majority of patients displayed a predominantly, or pure, motor neuropathy with axonal characteristics observed on electrophysiological testing. The age of onset varied widely, ranging from congenital to late adulthood onset. Various combinations of additional features were present in most patients including vocal fold paralysis, scapular weakness, contractures and hearing loss. We identified six asymptomatic mutation carriers, indicating reduced penetrance of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 defects. This finding is relatively unusual in the context of hereditary neuropathies and has important implications for diagnostic testing and genetic counselling. PMID:20460441

  14. Enhancement of acid-sensing ion channel activity by metabotropic P2Y UTP receptors in primary sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Ren, Cuixia; Gan, Xiong; Wu, Jing; Qiu, Chun-Yu; Hu, Wang-Ping

    2016-03-01

    Peripheral purinergic signaling plays an important role in nociception. Increasing evidence suggests that metabotropic P2Y receptors are also involved, but little is known about the underlying mechanism. Herein, we report that selective P2Y receptor agonist uridine 5'-triphosphate (UTP) can exert an enhancing effect on the functional activity of acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), key sensors for extracellular protons, in rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. First, UTP dose-dependently increased the amplitude of ASIC currents. UTP also shifted the concentration-response curve for proton upwards, with a 56.6 ± 6.4% increase of the maximal current response to proton. Second, UTP potentiation of proton-gated currents can be mimicked by adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP), but not by P2Y1 receptor agonist ADP. Potentiation of UTP was blocked by P2Y receptor antagonist suramin and by inhibition of intracellular G protein, phospholipase C (PLC), protein kinase C (PKC), or protein interacting with C-kinase 1 (PICK1) signaling. Third, UTP altered acidosis-evoked membrane excitability of DRG neurons and caused a significant increase in the amplitude of the depolarization and the number of spikes induced by acid stimuli. Finally, UTP dose-dependently exacerbated nociceptive responses to injection of acetic acid in rats. These results suggest that UTP enhanced ASIC-mediated currents and nociceptive responses, which reveal a novel peripheral mechanism underlying UTP-sensitive P2Y2 receptor involvement in hyperalgesia by sensitizing ASICs in primary sensory neurons.

  15. Potentiation of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 channel contributes to pruritogenesis in a rat model of liver disease.

    PubMed

    Belghiti, Majedeline; Estévez-Herrera, Judith; Giménez-Garzó, Carla; González-Usano, Alba; Montoliu, Carmina; Ferrer-Montiel, Antonio; Felipo, Vicente; Planells-Cases, Rosa

    2013-04-05

    Persistent pruritus is a common disabling dermatologic symptom associated with different etiologic factors. These include primary skin conditions, as well as neuropathic, psychogenic, or systemic disorders like chronic liver disease. Defective clearance of potential pruritogenic substances that activate itch-specific neurons innervating the skin is thought to contribute to cholestatic pruritus. However, because the underlying disease-specific pruritogens and itch-specific neuronal pathways and mechanism(s) are unknown, symptomatic therapeutic intervention often leads to no or only limited success. In the current study, we aimed to first validate rats with bile duct ligation (BDL) as a model for hepatic pruritus and then to evaluate the contribution of inflammation, peripheral neuronal sensitization, and specific signaling pathways and subpopulations of itch-responsive neurons to scratching behavior and thermal hypersensitivity. Chronic BDL rats displayed enhanced scratching behavior and thermal hyperalgesia indicative of peripheral neuroinflammation. BDL-induced itch and hypersensitivity involved a minor contribution of histaminergic/serotonergic receptors, but significant activation of protein-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) receptors, prostaglandin PGE2 formation, and potentiation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel activity. The sensitization of dorsal root ganglion nociceptors in BDL rats was associated with increased surface expression of PAR2 and TRPV1 proteins and an increase in the number of PAR2- and TRPV1-expressing peptidergic neurons together with a shift of TRPV1 receptor expression to medium sized dorsal root ganglion neurons. These results suggest that pruritus and hyperalgesia in chronic cholestatic BDL rats are associated with neuroinflammation and involve PAR2-induced TRPV1 sensitization. Thus, pharmacological modulation of PAR2 and/or TRPV1 may be a valuable therapeutic approach for patients with chronic liver pruritus

  16. D2 dopamine receptors modulate neuronal resonance in subthalamic nucleus and cortical high-voltage spindles through HCN channels.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chen; Yan, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Bo; Wang, Julei; Gao, Guodong; Zhu, Junling; Wang, Wenting

    2016-06-01

    The high-voltage spindles (HVSs), one of the characteristic oscillations that include theta frequencies in the basal ganglia (BG)-cortical system, are involved in immobile behavior and show increasing power in Parkinson's disease (PD). Our previous results suggested that the D2 dopamine receptor might be involved in HVSs modulations in a rat model of PD. Membrane resonance is one of the cellular mechanisms of network oscillation; therefore, we investigated how dopamine modulates the theta frequency membrane resonance of neurons in the subthalamic nucleus (STN), a central pacemaker of BG, and whether such changes in STN neurons subsequently alter HVSs in the BG-cortical system. In particular, we tested whether dopamine modulates HVSs through hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels-dependent membrane resonance in STN neurons. We found that an antagonist of D2 receptors, but not of D1 receptors, inhibited membrane resonance and HCN currents of STN neurons through a G-protein activity in acute brain slices. Our further in vivo experiments using local injection of a D2 receptor antagonist or an HCN blocker in STNs of free-moving rats showed an increase in HVSs power and correlation in the BG-cortical system. Local injection of lamotrigine, an HCN agonist, counteracted the effect induced by the D2 antagonist. Taken together, our results revealed a potential cellular mechanism underlying HVSs activity modulation in the BG-cortical system, i.e. tuning HCN activities in STN neurons through dopamine D2 receptors. Our findings might lead to a new direction in PD treatment by providing promising new drug targets for HVSs activity modulation.

  17. Activation of α7 nicotinic receptors by orthosteric and allosteric agonists: influence on single-channel kinetics and conductance.

    PubMed

    Pałczyńska, Magda M; Jindrichova, Marie; Gibb, Alasdair J; Millar, Neil S

    2012-11-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are oligomeric transmembrane proteins in which five subunits coassemble to form a central ion channel pore. Conventional agonists, such as acetylcholine (ACh), bind to an orthosteric site, located at subunit interfaces in the extracellular domain. More recently, it has been demonstrated that nAChRs can also be activated by ligands binding to an allosteric transmembrane site. In the case of α7 nAChRs, ACh causes rapid activation and almost complete desensitization. In contrast, allosteric agonists such as 4-(4-bromophenyl)-3a,4,5,9b-tetrahydro-3H-cyclopenta[c] quin oline-8-sulfonamide (4BP-TQS) activate α7 nAChRs more slowly and cause only low levels of apparent desensitization. In the present study, single-channel patch-clamp recording has been used to investigate differences in the mechanism of activation of α7 nAChRs by ACh and 4BP-TQS. The most striking difference between activation by ACh and 4BP-TQS is in single-channel kinetics. In comparison with activation by ACh, single-channel open times and burst lengths are substantially longer (~160-800-fold, respectively), and shut times are shorter (~8-fold) when activated by 4BP-TQS. In addition, coapplication of ACh and 4BP-TQS results in a further increase in single-channel burst lengths. Mean burst lengths seen when the two agonists are coapplied (3099 ± 754 ms) are ~2.5-fold longer than with 4BP-TQS alone and ∼370-fold longer than with ACh alone. Intriguingly, the main single-channel conductance of α7 nAChRs, was significantly larger when activated by 4BP-TQS (100.3 ± 2.4 pS) than when activated by ACh (90.0 ± 2.7 pS), providing evidence that activation by allosteric and orthosteric agonists results in different α7 nAChRs open-channel conformations.

  18. Activation of α7 Nicotinic Receptors by Orthosteric and Allosteric Agonists: Influence on Single-Channel Kinetics and Conductance

    PubMed Central

    Pałczyńska, Magda M.; Jindrichova, Marie; Gibb, Alasdair J.

    2012-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are oligomeric transmembrane proteins in which five subunits coassemble to form a central ion channel pore. Conventional agonists, such as acetylcholine (ACh), bind to an orthosteric site, located at subunit interfaces in the extracellular domain. More recently, it has been demonstrated that nAChRs can also be activated by ligands binding to an allosteric transmembrane site. In the case of α7 nAChRs, ACh causes rapid activation and almost complete desensitization. In contrast, allosteric agonists such as 4-(4-bromophenyl)-3a,4,5,9b-tetrahydro-3H-cyclopenta[c] quin oline-8-sulfonamide (4BP-TQS) activate α7 nAChRs more slowly and cause only low levels of apparent desensitization. In the present study, single-channel patch-clamp recording has been used to investigate differences in the mechanism of activation of α7 nAChRs by ACh and 4BP-TQS. The most striking difference between activation by ACh and 4BP-TQS is in single-channel kinetics. In comparison with activation by ACh, single-channel open times and burst lengths are substantially longer (∼160–800-fold, respectively), and shut times are shorter (∼8-fold) when activated by 4BP-TQS. In addition, coapplication of ACh and 4BP-TQS results in a further increase in single-channel burst lengths. Mean burst lengths seen when the two agonists are coapplied (3099 ± 754 ms) are ∼2.5-fold longer than with 4BP-TQS alone and ∼370-fold longer than with ACh alone. Intriguingly, the main single-channel conductance of α7 nAChRs, was significantly larger when activated by 4BP-TQS (100.3 ± 2.4 pS) than when activated by ACh (90.0 ± 2.7 pS), providing evidence that activation by allosteric and orthosteric agonists results in different α7 nAChRs open-channel conformations. PMID:22874415

  19. Involvement of plasma membrane Ca2+ channels, IP3 receptors, and ryanodine receptors in the generation of spontaneous rhythmic contractions of the cricket lateral oviduct.

    PubMed

    Tamashiro, Hirotake; Yoshino, Masami

    2014-12-01

    In the present study, the isolated cricket (Gryllus bimaculatus) lateral oviduct exhibited spontaneous rhythmic contractions (SRCs) with a frequency of 0.29±0.009 Hz (n=43) and an amplitude of 14.6±1.25 mg (n=29). SRCs completely disappeared following removal of extracellular Ca2+ using a solution containing 5mM EGTA. Application of the non-specific Ca2+ channel blockers Co2+, Ni2+, and Cd2+ also decreased both the frequency and amplitude of SRCs in dose-dependent manners, suggesting that Ca2+ entry through plasma membrane Ca2+ channels is essential for the generation of SRCs. Application of ryanodine (30 μM), which depletes intracellular Ca2+ by locking ryanodine receptor (RyR)-Ca2+ channels in an open state, gradually reduced the frequency and amplitude of SRCs. A RyR antagonist, tetracaine, reduced both the frequency and amplitude of SRCs, whereas a RyR activator, caffeine, increased the frequency of SRCs with a subsequent increase in basal tonus, indicating that RyRs are essential for generating SRCs. To further investigate the involvement of phospholipase C (PLC) and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) in SRCs, we examined the effect of a PLC inhibitor, U73122, and an IP3R antagonist, 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), on SRCs. Separately, U73122 (10 μM) and 2-APB (30-50 μM) both significantly reduced the amplitude of SRCs with little effect on their frequency, further indicating that the PLC/IP3R signaling pathway is fundamental to the modulation of the amplitude of SRCs. A hypotonic-induced increase in the frequency and amplitude of SRCs and a hypertonic-induced decrease in the frequency and amplitude of SRCs indicated that mechanical stretch of the lateral oviduct is involved in the generation of SRCs. The sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-pump ATPase inhibitors thapsigargin and cyclopiazonic acid impaired or suppressed the relaxation phase of SRCs. Taken together, the present results indicate that Ca2+ influx through plasma membrane Ca2

  20. The stress protein heat shock cognate 70 (Hsc70) inhibits the Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) channel

    PubMed Central

    Iftinca, Mircea; Flynn, Robyn; Basso, Lilian; Melo, Helvira; Aboushousha, Reem; Taylor, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    Background Specialized cellular defense mechanisms prevent damage from chemical, biological, and physical hazards. The heat shock proteins have been recognized as key chaperones that maintain cell survival against a variety of exogenous and endogenous stress signals including noxious temperature. However, the role of heat shock proteins in nociception remains poorly understood. We carried out an expression analysis of the constitutively expressed 70 kDa heat-shock cognate protein, a member of the stress-induced HSP70 family in lumbar dorsal root ganglia from a mouse model of Complete Freund’s Adjuvant-induced chronic inflammatory pain. We used immunolabeling of dorsal root ganglion neurons, behavioral analysis and patch clamp electrophysiology in both dorsal root ganglion neurons and HEK cells transfected with Hsc70 and Transient Receptor Potential Channels to examine their functional interaction in heat shock stress condition. Results We report an increase in protein levels of Hsc70 in mouse dorsal root ganglia, 3 days post Complete Freund’s Adjuvant injection in the hind paw. Immunostaining of Hsc70 was observed in most of the dorsal root ganglion neurons, including the small size nociceptors immunoreactive to the TRPV1 channel. Standard whole-cell patch-clamp technique was used to record Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid type 1 current after exposure to heat shock. We found that capsaicin-evoked currents are inhibited by heat shock in dorsal root ganglion neurons and transfected HEK cells expressing Hsc70 and TRPV1. Blocking Hsc70 with matrine or spergualin compounds prevented heat shock-induced inhibition of the channel. We also found that, in contrast to TRPV1, both the cold sensor channels TRPA1 and TRPM8 were unresponsive to heat shock stress. Finally, we show that inhibition of TRPV1 depends on the ATPase activity of Hsc70 and involves the rho-associated protein kinase. Conclusions Our work identified Hsc70 and its ATPase activity as a central

  1. The receptor-like pseudokinase MRH1 interacts with the voltage-gated potassium channel AKT2.

    PubMed

    Sklodowski, Kamil; Riedelsberger, Janin; Raddatz, Natalia; Riadi, Gonzalo; Caballero, Julio; Chérel, Isabelle; Schulze, Waltraud; Graf, Alexander; Dreyer, Ingo

    2017-03-16

    The potassium channel AKT2 plays important roles in phloem loading and unloading. It can operate as inward-rectifying channel that allows H(+)-ATPase-energized K(+) uptake. Moreover, through reversible post-translational modifications it can also function as an open, K(+)-selective channel, which taps a 'potassium battery', providing additional energy for transmembrane transport processes. Knowledge about proteins involved in the regulation of the operational mode of AKT2 is very limited. Here, we employed a large-scale yeast two-hybrid screen in combination with fluorescence tagging and null-allele mutant phenotype analysis and identified the plasma membrane localized receptor-like kinase MRH1/MDIS2 (AT4G18640) as interaction partner of AKT2. The phenotype of the mrh1-1 knockout plant mirrors that of akt2 knockout plants in energy limiting conditions. Electrophysiological analyses showed that MRH1/MDIS2 failed to exert any functional regulation on AKT2. Using structural protein modeling approaches, we instead gathered evidence that the putative kinase domain of MRH1/MDIS2 lacks essential sites that are indispensable for a functional kinase suggesting that MRH1/MDIS2 is a pseudokinase. We propose that MRH1/MDIS2 and AKT2 are likely parts of a bigger protein complex. MRH1 might help to recruit other, so far unknown partners, which post-translationally regulate AKT2. Additionally, MRH1 might be involved in the recognition of chemical signals.

  2. The surface accessibility of the glycine receptor M2-M3 loop is increased in the channel open state.

    PubMed

    Lynch, J W; Han, N L; Haddrill, J; Pierce, K D; Schofield, P R

    2001-04-15

    Mutations in the extracellular M2-M3 loop of the glycine receptor (GlyR) alpha1 subunit have been shown previously to affect channel gating. In this study, the substituted cysteine accessibility method was used to investigate whether a structural rearrangement of the M2-M3 loop accompanies GlyR activation. All residues from R271C to V277C were covalently modified by both positively charged methanethiosulfonate ethyltrimethylammonium (MTSET) and negatively charged methanethiosulfonate ethylsulfonate (MTSES), implying that these residues form an irregular surface loop. The MTSET modification rate of all residues from R271C to K276C was faster in the glycine-bound state than in the unliganded state. MTSES modification of A272C, L274C, and V277C was also faster in the glycine-bound state. These results demonstrate that the surface accessibility of the M2-M3 loop is increased as the channel transitions from the closed to the open state, implying that either the loop itself or an overlying domain moves during channel activation.

  3. The receptor-like pseudokinase MRH1 interacts with the voltage-gated potassium channel AKT2

    PubMed Central

    Sklodowski, Kamil; Riedelsberger, Janin; Raddatz, Natalia; Riadi, Gonzalo; Caballero, Julio; Chérel, Isabelle; Schulze, Waltraud; Graf, Alexander; Dreyer, Ingo

    2017-01-01

    The potassium channel AKT2 plays important roles in phloem loading and unloading. It can operate as inward-rectifying channel that allows H+-ATPase-energized K+ uptake. Moreover, through reversible post-translational modifications it can also function as an open, K+-selective channel, which taps a ‘potassium battery’, providing additional energy for transmembrane transport processes. Knowledge about proteins involved in the regulation of the operational mode of AKT2 is very limited. Here, we employed a large-scale yeast two-hybrid screen in combination with fluorescence tagging and null-allele mutant phenotype analysis and identified the plasma membrane localized receptor-like kinase MRH1/MDIS2 (AT4G18640) as interaction partner of AKT2. The phenotype of the mrh1-1 knockout plant mirrors that of akt2 knockout plants in energy limiting conditions. Electrophysiological analyses showed that MRH1/MDIS2 failed to exert any functional regulation on AKT2. Using structural protein modeling approaches, we instead gathered evidence that the putative kinase domain of MRH1/MDIS2 lacks essential sites that are indispensable for a functional kinase suggesting that MRH1/MDIS2 is a pseudokinase. We propose that MRH1/MDIS2 and AKT2 are likely parts of a bigger protein complex. MRH1 might help to recruit other, so far unknown partners, which post-translationally regulate AKT2. Additionally, MRH1 might be involved in the recognition of chemical signals. PMID:28300158

  4. The receptor-like pseudokinase MRH1 interacts with the voltage-gated potassium channel AKT2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sklodowski, Kamil; Riedelsberger, Janin; Raddatz, Natalia; Riadi, Gonzalo; Caballero, Julio; Chérel, Isabelle; Schulze, Waltraud; Graf, Alexander; Dreyer, Ingo

    2017-03-01

    The potassium channel AKT2 plays important roles in phloem loading and unloading. It can operate as inward-rectifying channel that allows H+-ATPase-energized K+ uptake. Moreover, through reversible post-translational modifications it can also function as an open, K+-selective channel, which taps a ‘potassium battery’, providing additional energy for transmembrane transport processes. Knowledge about proteins involved in the regulation of the operational mode of AKT2 is very limited. Here, we employed a large-scale yeast two-hybrid screen in combination with fluorescence tagging and null-allele mutant phenotype analysis and identified the plasma membrane localized receptor-like kinase MRH1/MDIS2 (AT4G18640) as interaction partner of AKT2. The phenotype of the mrh1-1 knockout plant mirrors that of akt2 knockout plants in energy limiting conditions. Electrophysiological analyses showed that MRH1/MDIS2 failed to exert any functional regulation on AKT2. Using structural protein modeling approaches, we instead gathered evidence that the putative kinase domain of MRH1/MDIS2 lacks essential sites that are indispensable for a functional kinase suggesting that MRH1/MDIS2 is a pseudokinase. We propose that MRH1/MDIS2 and AKT2 are likely parts of a bigger protein complex. MRH1 might help to recruit other, so far unknown partners, which post-translationally regulate AKT2. Additionally, MRH1 might be involved in the recognition of chemical signals.

  5. The proposed channel-enzyme transient receptor potential melastatin 2 does not possess ADP ribose hydrolase activity

    PubMed Central

    Iordanov, Iordan; Mihályi, Csaba; Tóth, Balázs; Csanády, László

    2016-01-01

    Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 2 (TRPM2) is a Ca2+-permeable cation channel essential for immunocyte activation, insulin secretion, and postischemic cell death. TRPM2 is activated by ADP ribose (ADPR) binding to its C-terminal cytosolic NUDT9-homology (NUDT9H) domain, homologous to the soluble mitochondrial ADPR pyrophosphatase (ADPRase) NUDT9. Reported ADPR hydrolysis classified TRPM2 as a channel-enzyme, but insolubility of isolated NUDT9H hampered further investigations. Here we developed a soluble NUDT9H model using chimeric proteins built from complementary polypeptide fragments of NUDT9H and NUDT9. When expressed in E.coli, chimeras containing up to ~90% NUDT9H sequence remained soluble and were affinity-purified. In ADPRase assays the conserved Nudix-box sequence of NUDT9 proved essential for activity (kcat~4-9s-1), that of NUDT9H did not support catalysis. Replacing NUDT9H in full-length TRPM2 with soluble chimeras retained ADPR-dependent channel gating (K1/2~1-5 μM), confirming functionality of chimeric domains. Thus, TRPM2 is not a 'chanzyme'. Chimeras provide convenient soluble NUDT9H models for structural/biochemical studies. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17600.001 PMID:27383051

  6. The Apparent Voltage Dependence of GABAA Receptor Activation and Modulation Is Inversely Related to Channel Open Probability

    PubMed Central

    O'Toole, Kate K.

    2012-01-01

    The GABA type A receptor (GABAAR) is expressed ubiquitously throughout the brain and is a target for many therapeutic agents, including general anesthetics and benzodiazepines, which enhance receptor function by increasing the open probability (Po) of the ion channel. It is commonplace for in vitro studies of receptor pharmacological characteristics to use negative membrane holding potentials to mimic the resting potential of neurons and symmetrical chloride to eliminate Goldman rectification, which results in chloride flow in the opposite direction, compared with in vivo conditions. This critical difference is usually overlooked because the GABAAR has been reported to behave as an ohmic pore, but our results show that the current-voltage relationship is nonlinear with respect to Po. Specifically, we found that currents were outwardly rectifying at low Po and linear at high Po. We confirmed the correlation between Po and rectification with a partial agonist, piperidine-4-sulfonic acid, and a gating-impaired mutation, α1(L277A); both exhibited enhanced outward rectification. Furthermore, this correlation was independent of Goldman rectification and persisted under altered chloride gradient conditions, which suggests that rectification is linked to the direction of chloride flux. Finally, our results showed that the degree of potentiation by general anesthetics (etomidate, propofol, and isoflurane) was greater at negative membrane potentials. Traditional in vitro experiments thus overestimate the action of positive allosteric modulators of the GABAAR. Our results show that the direction of the driving force on the permeant ion, as well as Po, must be considered together for a complete understanding of drug actions on ligand-gated ion channels. PMID:22042665

  7. Functional assay for T4 lysozyme-engineered G Protein-Coupled Receptors with an ion channel reporter

    PubMed Central

    Niescierowicz, Katarzyna; Caro, Lydia; Cherezov, Vadim; Vivaudou, Michel; Moreau, Christophe J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary: Structural studies of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) extensively use the insertion of globular soluble protein domains in order to facilitate their crystallization. However, when inserted in the third intracellular loop (i3 loop), the soluble protein domain disrupts their coupling to G proteins and impedes the GPCRs functional characterization by standard G protein-based assays. Therefore, activity tests of crystallization-optimized GPCRs are essentially limited to their ligand binding properties using radioligand binding assays. Functional characterization of additional thermostabilizing mutations requires the insertion of similar mutations in the wild-type receptor to allow G protein-activation tests. We demonstrate that Ion Channel-Coupled Receptor technology is a complementary approach for a comprehensive functional characterization of crystallization-optimized GPCRs and potentially of any engineered GPCR. Ligand-induced conformational changes of the GPCRs are translated into electrical signal and detected by simple current recordings, even though binding of G proteins is sterically blocked by the added soluble protein domain. PMID:24268646

  8. Spexin Enhances Bowel Movement through Activating L-type Voltage-dependent Calcium Channel via Galanin Receptor 2 in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cheng-yuan; Zhang, Man; Huang, Tao; Yang, Li-ling; Fu, Hai-bo; Zhao, Ling; Zhong, Linda LD; Mu, Huai-xue; Shi, Xiao-ke; Leung, Christina FP; Fan, Bao-min; Jiang, Miao; Lu, Ai-ping; Zhu, Li-xin; Bian, Zhao-xiang

    2015-01-01

    A novel neuropeptide spexin was found to be broadly expressed in various endocrine and nervous tissues while little is known about its functions. This study investigated the role of spexin in bowel movement and the underlying mechanisms. In functional constipation (FC) patients, serum spexin levels were significantly decreased. Consistently, in starved mice, the mRNA of spexin was significantly decreased in intestine and colon. Spexin injection increased the velocity of carbon powder propulsion in small intestine and decreased the glass beads expulsion time in distal colon in mice. Further, spexin dose-dependently stimulated the intestinal/colonic smooth muscle contraction. Galanin receptor 2 (GALR2) antagonist M871, but not Galanin receptor 3 (GALR3) antagonist SNAP37899, effectively suppressed the stimulatory effects of spexin on intestinal/colonic smooth muscle contraction, which could be eliminated by extracellular [Ca2+] removal and L-type voltage-dependentCa2+ channel (VDCC) inhibitor nifedipine. Besides, spexin dramatically increased the [Ca2+]i in isolated colonic smooth muscle cells. These data indicate that spexin can act on GALR2 receptor to regulate bowel motility by activating L-type VDCC. Our findings provide evidence for important physiological roles of spexin in GI functions. Selective action on spexin pathway might have therapeutic effects on GI diseases with motility disorders. PMID:26160593

  9. Channel catfish CD8a and CD8ß co-receptors characterization expression and polymorphism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study we report the identification and characterization of channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus CD8a and CD8ß genes. Both genes encode predicted proteins containing a leader, a immunoglobulin superfamily V domain, a stalk/hinge region, a transmembrane region and a positively charged cytoplas...

  10. Stimulation of calcium-sensing receptors induces endothelium-dependent vasorelaxations via nitric oxide production and activation of IKCa channels

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Harry Z.E.; Shi, Jian; Jahan, Kazi S.; Martinucci, Matthew C.; Gilbert, Steven J.; Vanessa Ho, W.-S.; Albert, Anthony P.

    2016-01-01

    Stimulation of vascular calcium-sensing receptors (CaSRs) is reported to induce both constrictions and relaxations. However, cellular mechanisms involved in these responses remain unclear. The present study investigates the effect of stimulating CaSRs on vascular contractility and focuses on the role of the endothelium, nitric oxide (NO) and K+ channels in these responses. In wire myography studies, increasing [Ca2 +]o from 1 mM to 6 mM induced concentration-dependent relaxations of methoxamine pre-contracted rabbit mesenteric arteries. [Ca2 +]o-induced relaxations were dependent on a functional endothelium, and were inhibited by the negative allosteric CaSR modulator Calhex-231. [Ca2 +]o-induced relaxations were reduced by inhibitors of endothelial NO synthase, guanylate cyclase, and protein kinase G. CaSR activation also induced NO production in freshly isolated endothelial cells (ECs) in experiments using the fluorescent NO indicator DAF-FM. Pre-treatment with inhibitors of large (BKCa) and intermediate (IKCa) Ca2 +-activated K+ channels (iberiotoxin and charybdotoxin), and Kv7 channels (linopirdine) also reduced [Ca2 +]o-induced vasorelaxations. Increasing [Ca2 +]o also activated IKCa currents in perforated-patch recordings of isolated mesenteric artery ECs. These findings indicate that stimulation of CaSRs induces endothelium-dependent vasorelaxations which are mediated by two separate pathways involving production of NO and activation of IKCa channels. NO stimulates PKG leading to BKCa activation in vascular smooth muscle cells, whereas IKCa activity contributes to endothelium-derived hyperpolarisations. PMID:26772767

  11. Agonists binding nicotinic receptors elicit specific channel-opening patterns at αγ and αδ sites

    PubMed Central

    Stock, Patrick; Ljaschenko, Dmitrij; Heckmann, Manfred; Dudel, Josef

    2014-01-01

    ‘Embryonic’ muscle-type nicotinic acetylcholine receptor channels (nAChRs) bind ligands at interfaces of α- and γ- or δ-subunits. αγ and αδ sites differ in affinity, but their contributions to opening the channel have remained elusive. We compared high-resolution patch clamp currents evoked by epibatidine (Ebd), carbamylcholine (CCh) and acetylcholine (ACh). Ebd binds with 75-fold higher affinity at αγ than at αδ sites, whereas CCh and ACh prefer αδ sites. Similar short (τO1), intermediate (τO2) and long (τO3) types of opening were observed with all three agonists. τO2 openings were maximally prevalent at low Ebd concentrations, binding at αγ sites. By contrast, τO1 openings appear to be generated at αδ sites. In addition, two types of burst appeared: short bursts of an average of 0.75 ms (τB1) that should arise from the αγ site, and long bursts of 12–25 ms (τB2) in duration arising from double liganded receptors. Limited by the temporal resolution, the closings within bursts were invariant at 3 μs. Corrected for missed closings, in the case of ACh the openings within long bursts lasted 170 μs and those in short bursts about 30 μs. Blocking αδ sites with α-conotoxin M1 (CTx) eliminated both τO1 and τB2 and left only τO2 and the short τB1 bursts, as expected. Furthermore we found desensitization when the receptors bound ACh only at the αγ site. When CTx was applied to ‘embryonic’ mouse endplates, monoquantal current rise times were increased, and amplitude and decay time constants were reduced, as expected. Thus the αγ and αδ sites of nAChRs elicit specific channel-opening patterns. PMID:24665094

  12. Glycine activated ion channel subunits encoded by ctenophore glutamate receptor genes

    PubMed Central

    Alberstein, Robert; Grey, Richard; Zimmet, Austin; Simmons, David K.; Mayer, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    Recent genome projects for ctenophores have revealed the presence of numerous ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) in Mnemiopsis leidyi and Pleurobrachia bachei, among our earliest metazoan ancestors. Sequence alignments and phylogenetic analysis show that these form a distinct clade from the well-characterized AMPA, kainate, and NMDA iGluR subtypes found in vertebrates. Although annotated as glutamate and kainate receptors, crystal structures of the ML032222a and PbiGluR3 ligand-binding domains (LBDs) reveal endogenous glycine in the binding pocket, whereas ligand-binding assays show that glycine binds with nanomolar affinity; biochemical assays and structural analysis establish that glutamate is occluded from the binding cavity. Further analysis reveals ctenophore-specific features, such as an interdomain Arg-Glu salt bridge, present only in subunits that bind glycine, but also a conserved disulfide in loop 1 of the LBD that is found in all vertebrate NMDA but not AMPA or kainate receptors. We hypothesize that ctenophore iGluRs are related to an early ancestor of NMDA receptors, suggesting a common evolutionary path for ctenophores and bilaterian species, and suggest that future work should consider both glycine and glutamate as candidate neurotransmitters in ctenophore species. PMID:26460032

  13. Glycine activated ion channel subunits encoded by ctenophore glutamate receptor genes

    DOE PAGES

    Alberstein, Robert; Grey, Richard; Zimmet, Austin; ...

    2015-10-12

    Recent genome projects for ctenophores have revealed the presence of numerous ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) in Mnemiopsis leidyi and Pleurobrachia bachei, among our earliest metazoan ancestors. Sequence alignments and phylogenetic analysis show that these form a distinct clade from the well-characterized AMPA, kainate, and NMDA iGluR subtypes found in vertebrates. Although annotated as glutamate and kainate receptors, crystal structures of the ML032222a and PbiGluR3 ligand-binding domains (LBDs) reveal endogenous glycine in the binding pocket, whereas ligand-binding assays show that glycine binds with nanomolar affinity; biochemical assays and structural analysis establish that glutamate is occluded from the binding cavity. Further analysismore » reveals ctenophore-specific features, such as an interdomain Arg-Glu salt bridge, present only in subunits that bind glycine, but also a conserved disulfide in loop 1 of the LBD that is found in all vertebrate NMDA but not AMPA or kainate receptors. In this paper, we hypothesize that ctenophore iGluRs are related to an early ancestor of NMDA receptors, suggesting a common evolutionary path for ctenophores and bilaterian species, and finally suggest that future work should consider both glycine and glutamate as candidate neurotransmitters in ctenophore species.« less

  14. Glycine activated ion channel subunits encoded by ctenophore glutamate receptor genes

    SciTech Connect

    Alberstein, Robert; Grey, Richard; Zimmet, Austin; Simmons, David K.; Mayer, Mark L.

    2015-10-12

    Recent genome projects for ctenophores have revealed the presence of numerous ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) in Mnemiopsis leidyi and Pleurobrachia bachei, among our earliest metazoan ancestors. Sequence alignments and phylogenetic analysis show that these form a distinct clade from the well-characterized AMPA, kainate, and NMDA iGluR subtypes found in vertebrates. Although annotated as glutamate and kainate receptors, crystal structures of the ML032222a and PbiGluR3 ligand-binding domains (LBDs) reveal endogenous glycine in the binding pocket, whereas ligand-binding assays show that glycine binds with nanomolar affinity; biochemical assays and structural analysis establish that glutamate is occluded from the binding cavity. Further analysis reveals ctenophore-specific features, such as an interdomain Arg-Glu salt bridge, present only in subunits that bind glycine, but also a conserved disulfide in loop 1 of the LBD that is found in all vertebrate NMDA but not AMPA or kainate receptors. In this paper, we hypothesize that ctenophore iGluRs are related to an early ancestor of NMDA receptors, suggesting a common evolutionary path for ctenophores and bilaterian species, and finally suggest that future work should consider both glycine and glutamate as candidate neurotransmitters in ctenophore species.

  15. Glycine activated ion channel subunits encoded by ctenophore glutamate receptor genes.

    PubMed

    Alberstein, Robert; Grey, Richard; Zimmet, Austin; Simmons, David K; Mayer, Mark L

    2015-11-03

    Recent genome projects for ctenophores have revealed the presence of numerous ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) in Mnemiopsis leidyi and Pleurobrachia bachei, among our earliest metazoan ancestors. Sequence alignments and phylogenetic analysis show that these form a distinct clade from the well-characterized AMPA, kainate, and NMDA iGluR subtypes found in vertebrates. Although annotated as glutamate and kainate receptors, crystal structures of the ML032222a and PbiGluR3 ligand-binding domains (LBDs) reveal endogenous glycine in the binding pocket, whereas ligand-binding assays show that glycine binds with nanomolar affinity; biochemical assays and structural analysis establish that glutamate is occluded from the binding cavity. Further analysis reveals ctenophore-specific features, such as an interdomain Arg-Glu salt bridge, present only in subunits that bind glycine, but also a conserved disulfide in loop 1 of the LBD that is found in all vertebrate NMDA but not AMPA or kainate receptors. We hypothesize that ctenophore iGluRs are related to an early ancestor of NMDA receptors, suggesting a common evolutionary path for ctenophores and bilaterian species, and suggest that future work should consider both glycine and glutamate as candidate neurotransmitters in ctenophore species.

  16. Mapping of the toll like receptor family in channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Toll Like Receptors (TLRs) are key elements of the innate response to pathogens. They recognize Pathogen Associated Molecular Patterns (PAMPs) and activate the host defense responses. As such, they are candidate genes for disease resistance. In teleost, eight homologs of the endothermic vertebra...

  17. The Ca2+ channel β subunit determines whether stimulation of Gq-coupled receptors enhances or inhibits N current

    PubMed Central

    Heneghan, John F.; Mitra-Ganguli, Tora; Stanish, Lee F.; Liu, Liwang; Zhao, Rubing

    2009-01-01

    In superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons, stimulation of M1 receptors (M1Rs) produces a distinct pattern of modulation of N-type calcium (N-) channel activity, enhancing currents elicited with negative test potentials and inhibiting currents elicited with positive test potentials. Exogenously applied arachidonic acid (AA) reproduces this profile of modulation, suggesting AA functions as a downstream messenger of M1Rs. In addition, techniques that diminish AA's concentration during M1R stimulation minimize N-current modulation. However, other studies suggest depletion of phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate during M1R stimulation suffices to elicit modulation. In this study, we used an expression system to examine the physiological mechanisms regulating modulation. We found the β subunit (CaVβ) acts as a molecular switch regulating whether modulation results in enhancement or inhibition. In human embryonic kidney 293 cells, stimulation of M1Rs or neurokinin-1 receptors (NK-1Rs) inhibited activity of N channels formed by CaV2.2 and coexpressed with CaVβ1b, CaVβ3, or CaVβ4 but enhanced activity of N channels containing CaVβ2a. Exogenously applied AA produced the same pattern of modulation. Coexpression of CaVβ2a, CaVβ3, and CaVβ4 recapitulated the modulatory response previously seen in SCG neurons, implying heterogeneous association of CaVβ with CaV2.2. Further experiments with mutated, chimeric CaVβ subunits and free palmitic acid revealed that palmitoylation of CaVβ2a is essential for loss of inhibition. The data presented here fit a model in which CaVβ2a blocks inhibition, thus unmasking enhancement. Our discovery that the presence or absence of palmitoylated CaVβ2a toggles M1R- or NK-1R–mediated modulation of N current between enhancement and inhibition identifies a novel role for palmitoylation. Moreover, these findings predict that at synapses, modulation of N-channel activity by M1Rs or NK-1Rs will fluctuate between enhancement and

  18. Intracellular P2X receptors as novel calcium release channels and modulators of osmoregulation in Dictyostelium: a comparison of two common laboratory strains.

    PubMed

    Sivaramakrishnan, Venketesh; Fountain, Samuel J

    2013-01-01

    P2X receptors are calcium permeable ligand-gated ion channels activated by ATP. Their role as cell surface receptors for extracellular ATP released physiologically by mammalian cells is well established. However, the cellular function of P2X receptor subtypes that populate the membranes of intracellular compartments is not defined. An initial report described how intracellular P2X receptors control the function of the contractile vacuole, an osmoregulatory organelle in Dictyostelium and other protists, and that genetic disruption of P2X receptors severely impaired cell volume control during hypotonic stress. However, later studies refuted a functional role of intracellular P2X receptors in Dictyostelium. Here we provide evidence that the discrepancies reported between the studies are due to the laboratory strain of Dictyostelium employed, which display different phenotypes in response to hypotonic stress and a varied dependency upon P2X receptors for osmoregulation. We use the recent discovery that intracellular P2X receptors are novel calcium release channels to provide some mechanistic insight in an effort to explain why the strain variance may exist.

  19. Single nucleotide polymorphisms and genotypes of transient receptor potential ion channel and acetylcholine receptor genes from isolated B lymphocytes in myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Marshall-Gradisnik, Sonya; Johnston, Samantha; Chacko, Anu; Nguyen, Thao; Smith, Peter; Staines, Donald

    2016-12-01

    Objective The pathomechanism of chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) is unknown; however, a small subgroup of patients has shown muscarinic antibody positivity and reduced symptom presentation following anti-CD20 intervention. Given the important roles of calcium (Ca(2+)) and acetylcholine (ACh) signalling in B cell activation and potential antibody development, we aimed to identify relevant single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and genotypes in isolated B cells from CFS/ME patients. Methods A total of 11 CFS/ME patients (aged 31.82 ± 5.50 years) and 11 non-fatigued controls (aged 33.91 ± 5.06 years) were included. Flow cytometric protocols were used to determine B cell purity, followed by SNP and genotype analysis for 21 mammalian TRP ion channel genes and nine mammalian ACh receptor genes. SNP association and genotyping analysis were performed using ANOVA and PLINK analysis software. Results Seventy-eight SNPs were identified in nicotinic and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor genes in the CFS/ME group, of which 35 were in mAChM3. The remaining SNPs were identified in nAChR delta (n = 12), nAChR alpha 9 (n = 5), TRPV2 (n = 7), TRPM3 (n = 4), TRPM4 (n = 1) mAChRM3 2 (n = 2), and mAChRM5 (n = 3) genes. Nine genotypes were identified from SNPs in TRPM3 (n = 1), TRPC6 (n = 1), mAChRM3 (n = 2), nAChR alpha 4 (n = 1), and nAChR beta 1 (n = 4) genes, and were located in introns and 3' untranslated regions. Odds ratios for these specific genotypes ranged between 7.11 and 26.67 for CFS/ME compared with the non-fatigued control group. Conclusion This preliminary investigation identified a number of SNPs and genotypes in genes encoding TRP ion channels and AChRs from B cells in patients with CFS/ME. These may be involved in B cell functional changes, and suggest a role for Ca(2+) dysregulation in AChR and TRP ion channel signalling in the pathomechanism of CFS/ME.

  20. Piperazinyl carbamate fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitors and transient receptor