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Sample records for 5-ht6 receptor 5-ht6r

  1. Design, synthesis, and pharmacological evaluation of multitarget-directed ligands with both serotonergic subtype 4 receptor (5-HT4R) partial agonist and 5-HT6R antagonist activities, as potential treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Yahiaoui, Samir; Hamidouche, Katia; Ballandonne, Céline; Davis, Audrey; de Oliveira Santos, Jana Sopkova; Freret, Thomas; Boulouard, Michel; Rochais, Christophe; Dallemagne, Patrick

    2016-10-01

    5-HT4 receptor (5-HT4R) activation and blockade of the 5-HT6 receptor (5-HT6R) are known to enhance the release of numerous neurotransmitters whose depletion is implicated in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Furthermore, 5-HT4R agonists seem to favor production of the neurotrophic soluble amyloid protein precursor alpha (sAPPα). Consequently, combining 5-HT4R agonist/5-HT6R antagonist activities in a single chemical compound would constitute a novel approach able to display both a symptomatic and disease-modifying effect in AD. Seventeen novel derivatives of RS67333 (1) were synthesized and evaluated as potential dual-target compounds. Among them, four agents showed nanomolar and submicromolar affinities toward 5-HT4R and 5-HT6R, respectively; one of them, 7m, was selected on the basis of its in vitro affinity (Ki5-HT4R = 5.3 nM, Ki5-HT6R = 219 nM) for further in vivo experiments, where 7m showed an antiamnesic effect in the mouse at 1 mg/kg ip. PMID:27266998

  2. Synthesis of azepino[4,5-b]indol-4-ones via MCR/free radical cyclization and in vitro-in silico studies as 5-Ht6R ligands.

    PubMed

    Rentería-Gómez, Angel; Islas-Jácome, Alejandro; Díaz-Cervantes, Erik; Villaseñor-Granados, Tayde; Robles, Juvencio; Gámez-Montaño, Rocío

    2016-05-01

    A series of nine new 3-acetamide-azepino[4,5-b]indol-4-ones were synthesized in two steps: (i) multicomponent reaction (Ugi-4CR/SN2) and (ii) free radical-mediated cyclization. These compounds, along with their tetrazole-based analogs, were studied in vitro to assess their binding with the 5-hydroxytryptamine type 6 receptor (5-Ht6R). The 3-acetamide-azepino[4,5-b]indol-4-ones displayed moderate affinity, whereas the 3-tetrazolylmethyl-azepino[4,5-b]indol-4-ones affinity values are lower. However, one of the 3-acetamide-azepino[4,5-b]indol-4-ones exhibited a hit value of Ki (211.2nM) to the 5-Ht6R. Minimal-energy structures of one cis-amide and its tetrazole-based analog (calculated by means of the Density Functional Theory) were analyzed to assess some interesting bioisosterism aspects. Interactions and binding energies between all products and the 5-Ht6R were calculated through in silico molecular couplings. Finally, a QSAR model was proposed using the results of the in vitro assays. PMID:26996373

  3. Therapeutic Potential of 5-HT6 Receptor Agonists.

    PubMed

    Karila, Delphine; Freret, Thomas; Bouet, Valentine; Boulouard, Michel; Dallemagne, Patrick; Rochais, Christophe

    2015-10-22

    Given its predominant expression in the central nervous system (CNS), 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT: serotonin) subtype 6 receptor (5-HT6R) has been considered as a valuable target for the development of CNS drugs with limited side effects. After 2 decades of intense research, numerous selective ligands have been developed to target this receptor; this holds potential interest for the treatment of neuropathological disorders. In fact, some agents (mainly antagonists) are currently undergoing clinical trial. More recently, a series of potent and selective agonists have been developed, and preclinical studies have been conducted that suggest the therapeutic interest of 5-HT6R agonists. This review details the medicinal chemistry of these agonists, highlights their activities, and discusses their potential for treating cognitive issues associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD), depression, or obesity. Surprisingly, some studies have shown that both 5-HT6R agonists and antagonists exert similar procognitive activities. This article summarizes the hypotheses that could explain this paradox. PMID:26099069

  4. Distribution of cells responsive to 5-HT6 receptor antagonist-induced hypophagia

    PubMed Central

    Garfield, Alastair S.; Burke, Luke K.; Shaw, Jill; Evans, Mark L.; Heisler, Lora K.

    2014-01-01

    The central 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; serotonin) system is well established as an important regulator of appetite and continues to remain a focus of obesity research. While much emphasis has focussed on the 5-HT2C receptor (5-HT2CR) in 5-HT's anorectic effect, pharmacological manipulation of the 5-HT6 receptor (5-HT6R) also reduces appetite and body weight and may be amenable to obesity treatment. However, the neurological circuits that underlie 5-HT6R-induced hypophagia remain to be identified. Using c-fos immunoreactivity (FOS-IR) as a marker of neuronal activation, here we mapped the neuroanatomical targets activated by an anorectic dose of the 5-HT6R antagonist SB-399885 throughout the brain. Furthermore, we quantified SB-399855 activated cells within brain appetitive nuclei, the hypothalamus, dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) and nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS). Our results reveal that 5-HT6R antagonist-induced hypophagia is associated with significantly increased neuronal activation in two nuclei with an established role in the central control of appetite, the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVH) and the NTS. In contrast, no changes in FOS-IR were observed between treatment groups within other hypothalamic nuclei or DRN. The data presented here provide a first insight into the neural circuitry underlying 5-HT6R antagonist-induced appetite suppression and highlight the PVH and NTS in the coordination of 5-HT6R hypophagia. PMID:24566060

  5. 5-HT6 Receptor Antagonists: Potential Efficacy for the Treatment of Cognitive Impairment in Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    de Bruin, Natasja M W J; Kruse, Chris G

    2015-01-01

    5-hydroxytryptamine6 receptor (5-HT6R) antagonists have shown efficacy in animal models for cognitive impairment in multiple cognitive domains relevant for schizophrenia. Improvements were found with 5-HT6R antagonists in preclinical tests for episodic memory, social cognition, executive function, working memory and several other tests for both learning and memory. In contrast, there is little evidence for efficacy on attention. It will be interesting to further investigate 5-HT6R antagonists in neurodevelopmental animal models which are based on prenatal exposure to specific environmental insults, and are characterized by a high level of face, construct and predictive validity for cognitive impairments associated with schizophrenia. It is also important to do more add-on preclinical studies of 5-HT6 antagonists with antipsychotics. Possible mechanisms of action to improve cognition have been described. 5-HT6R antagonists decrease GABA release and GABAergic interneuron excitability, which subsequently disinhibits glutamate and/or acetylcholine release and results in enhancement of synaptic plasticity. Furthermore, cognition could be improved by 5-HT6R antagonists, because these compounds increase the number of NCAM PSA-immunoreactive neurons in the dendate gyrus, inhibit mTOR and Fyn-tyrosine kinase and interact with DARPP-32. Interestingly, there is increasing preclinical evidence that could support additional benefits of 5-HT6R ligandson comorbid conditions in schizophrenia such as drug abuse, depression, anxiety, obesity andantipsychotic-induced EPS. Finally, we briefly give an overview of the 5-HT6R compounds that are currently in clinical development for the treatment of cognitive impairment in both schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26044973

  6. Direct interaction and functional coupling between human 5-HT6 receptor and the light chain 1 subunit of the microtubule-associated protein 1B (MAP1B-LC1).

    PubMed

    Kim, Soon-Hee; Kim, Dong Hyuk; Lee, Kang Ho; Im, Sun-Kyoung; Hur, Eun-Mi; Chung, Kwang Chul; Rhim, Hyewhon

    2014-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) receptors of type 6 (5-HT6R) play important roles in mood, psychosis, and eating disorders. Recently, a growing number of studies support the use of 5-HT6R-targeting compounds as promising drug candidates for treating cognitive dysfunction associated with Alzheimer's disease. However, the mechanistic linkage between 5-HT6R and such functions remains poorly understood. By using yeast two-hybrid, GST pull-down, and co-immunoprecipitation assays, here we show that human 5-HT6R interacts with the light chain 1 (LC1) subunit of MAP1B protein (MAP1B-LC1), a classical microtubule-associated protein highly expressed in the brain. Functionally, we have found that expression of MAP1B-LC1 regulates serotonin signaling in a receptor subtype-specific manner, specifically controlling the activities of 5-HT6R, but not those of 5-HT4R and 5-HT7R. In addition, we have demonstrated that MAP1B-LC1 increases the surface expression of 5-HT6R and decreases its endocytosis, suggesting that MAP1B-LC1 is involved in the desensitization and trafficking of 5-HT6R via a direct interaction. Together, we suggest that signal transduction pathways downstream of 5-HT6R are regulated by MAP1B, which might play a role in 5-HT6R-mediated signaling in the brain. PMID:24614691

  7. Direct Interaction and Functional Coupling between Human 5-HT6 Receptor and the Light Chain 1 Subunit of the Microtubule-Associated Protein 1B (MAP1B-LC1)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soon-Hee; Kim, Dong Hyuk; Lee, Kang Ho; Im, Sun-Kyoung; Hur, Eun-Mi; Chung, Kwang Chul; Rhim, Hyewhon

    2014-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) receptors of type 6 (5-HT6R) play important roles in mood, psychosis, and eating disorders. Recently, a growing number of studies support the use of 5-HT6R-targeting compounds as promising drug candidates for treating cognitive dysfunction associated with Alzheimer’s disease. However, the mechanistic linkage between 5-HT6R and such functions remains poorly understood. By using yeast two-hybrid, GST pull-down, and co-immunoprecipitation assays, here we show that human 5-HT6R interacts with the light chain 1 (LC1) subunit of MAP1B protein (MAP1B-LC1), a classical microtubule-associated protein highly expressed in the brain. Functionally, we have found that expression of MAP1B-LC1 regulates serotonin signaling in a receptor subtype-specific manner, specifically controlling the activities of 5-HT6R, but not those of 5-HT4R and 5-HT7R. In addition, we have demonstrated that MAP1B-LC1 increases the surface expression of 5-HT6R and decreases its endocytosis, suggesting that MAP1B-LC1 is involved in the desensitization and trafficking of 5-HT6R via a direct interaction. Together, we suggest that signal transduction pathways downstream of 5-HT6R are regulated by MAP1B, which might play a role in 5-HT6R-mediated signaling in the brain. PMID:24614691

  8. Novel 5-HT6 receptor antagonists/D2 receptor partial agonists targeting behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia.

    PubMed

    Kołaczkowski, Marcin; Marcinkowska, Monika; Bucki, Adam; Śniecikowska, Joanna; Pawłowski, Maciej; Kazek, Grzegorz; Siwek, Agata; Jastrzębska-Więsek, Magdalena; Partyka, Anna; Wasik, Anna; Wesołowska, Anna; Mierzejewski, Paweł; Bienkowski, Przemyslaw

    2015-03-01

    We describe a novel class of designed multiple ligands (DMLs) combining serotonin 5-HT6 receptor (5-HT6R) antagonism with dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) partial agonism. Prototype hybrid molecules were designed using docking to receptor homology models. Diverse pharmacophore moieties yielded 3 series of hybrids with varying in vitro properties at 5-HT6R and D2R, and at M1 receptor and hERG channel antitargets. 4-(piperazin-1-yl)-1H-indole derivatives showed highest antagonist potency at 5-HT6R, with 7-butoxy-3,4-dihydroquinolin-2(1H)-one and 2-propoxybenzamide derivatives having promising D2R partial agonism. 2-(3-(4-(1-(phenylsulfonyl)-1H-indol-4-yl)piperazin-1-yl)propoxy)benzamide (47) exhibited nanomolar affinity at both 5-HT6R and D2R and was evaluated in rat models. It displayed potent antidepressant-like and anxiolytic-like activity in the Porsolt and Vogel tests, respectively, more pronounced than that of a reference selective 5-HT6R antagonist or D2R partial agonist. In addition, 47 also showed antidepressant-like activity (Porsolt's test) and anxiolytic-like activity (open field test) in aged (>18-month old) rats. In operant conditioning tests, 47 enhanced responding for sweet reward in the saccharin self-administration test, consistent with anti-anhedonic properties. Further, 47 facilitated extinction of non-reinforced responding for sweet reward, suggesting potential procognitive activity. Taken together, these studies suggest that DMLs combining 5-HT6R antagonism and D2R partial agonism may successfully target affective disorders in patients from different age groups without a risk of cognitive deficits. PMID:25557493

  9. Chronic activation of 5-HT4 receptors or blockade of 5-HT6 receptors improve memory performances.

    PubMed

    Quiedeville, Anne; Boulouard, Michel; Hamidouche, Katia; Da Silva Costa-Aze, Virginie; Nee, Gerald; Rochais, Christophe; Dallemagne, Patrick; Fabis, Frédéric; Freret, Thomas; Bouet, Valentine

    2015-10-15

    5-HT4 and 5-HT6 serotonergic receptors are located in brain structures involved in memory processes. Neurochemical and behavioural studies have demonstrated that acute activation of 5-HT4 receptors (5-HT4R) or blockade of 5-HT6 receptors (5-HT6R) improves memory. To evaluate the potential of these two receptors as targets in the treatment of memory disorders encountered in several situations (ageing, Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, etc.), it is necessary to assess whether their beneficial effects occur after chronic administration, and if such treatment induces adverse effects. The goal of this study was to assess the effects of chronic 5-HT4R or 5-HT6R modulation on recognition memory, and to observe the possible manifestation of side effects (modification of weight gain, locomotor activity or exploratory behaviour, etc.). Mice were treated for 14 days with a 5-HT4R partial agonist (RS-67333) or a 5-HT6R antagonist (SB-271046) at increasing doses. Memory performances, locomotor activity, and exploration were assessed. Both chronic 5-HT4R activation and 5-HT6R blockade extended memory traces in an object recognition test, and were not associated with any adverse effects in the parameters assessed. Chronic modulation of one or both of these receptors thus seems promising as a potential strategy for the treatment memory deficits. PMID:26187692

  10. 5-HT6 receptors and Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    During the past 20 years, the 5-HT6 receptor has received increasing attention and become a promising target for improving cognition. Several studies with structurally different compounds have shown that not only antagonists but also 5-HT6 receptor agonists improve learning and memory in animal models. A large number of publications describing the development of ligands for this receptor have come to light, and it is now quite evident that 5-HT6 receptors have great pharmaceutical potential in terms of related patents. However, 5-HT6 receptor functionality is much more complex than initially defined. According to the existing data, different cellular pathways may be activated, depending on the drug being used. This article reviews preclinical and clinical evidence of the effects that 5-HT6 receptor compounds have on cognition. In addition, the biochemical and neurochemical mechanisms of action through which 5-HT6 receptor compounds can influence cognition will be described. Overall, several 5-HT6-targeted compounds can reasonably be regarded as powerful drug candidates for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:23607787

  11. 1-Sulfonyl-6-Piperazinyl-7-Azaindoles as potent and pseudo-selective 5-HT6 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Fabritius, Charles-Henry; Pesonen, Ullamari; Messinger, Josef; Horvath, Raymond; Salo, Harri; Gałęzowski, Michał; Galek, Mariusz; Stefańska, Klaudia; Szeremeta-Spisak, Joanna; Olszak-Płachta, Marta; Buda, Anna; Adamczyk, Justyna; Król, Marcin; Prusis, Peteris; Sieprawska-Lupa, Magdalena; Mikulski, Maciej; Kuokkanen, Katja; Chapman, Hugh; Obuchowicz, Radosław; Korjamo, Timo; Jalava, Niina; Nowak, Mateusz

    2016-06-01

    A series of 1-Sulfonyl-6-Piperazinyl-7-Azaindoles, showing strong antagonistic activity to 5-HT6 receptor (5-HT6R) was synthesized and characterized. The series was optimized to reduce activity on D2 receptor. Based on the selectivity against this off-target and the analysis of the ADME-tox profile, compound 1c was selected for in vivo efficacy assessment, which demonstrated procognitive effects as shown in reversal of scopolamine induced amnesia in an elevated plus maze test in mice. Compound 3, the demethylated version of compound 1c, was profiled against a panel of 106 receptors, channels and transporters, indicating only D3 receptor as a major off-target. Compound 3 has been selected for this study over compound 1c because of the higher 5-HT6R/D2R binding ratio. These results have defined a new direction for the design of our pseudo-selective 5-HT6R antagonists. PMID:27117428

  12. Design, synthesis and preliminary screening of novel 3-(2-N,N-dimethylaminoethylthio) indole derivatives as potential 5-HT(6) receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Kambhampati, Ramasastri; Konda, Jagadishbabu; Reballi, Veena; Shinde, Anil K; Dubey, Pramod K; Nirogi, Ramakrishna V S

    2008-06-01

    The synthesis and potential 5-hydroxytryptamine(6) receptor (5-HT6R) antagonist activity of a novel series of N-arylsulfonyl-3-(2-N,N-dimethylaminoethylthio) indoles has been reported. The molecular modeling, synthesis and in-vitro radioligand binding data of this series are discussed. The present article describes 37 derivatives of the title series. It was observed that the increased side-chain length with the insertion of a sulfur atom did not lead to the loss of binding affinity of these compounds, although the affinities were reduced. The compounds exhibited moderate affinity and selectivity to human 5-HT6 receptors. PMID:18569332

  13. 5-HT6 receptor agonism facilitates emotional learning

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Marcela; Martynhak, Bruno J.; Andreatini, Roberto; Svenningsson, Per

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) and its receptors play crucial roles in various aspects of mood and cognitive functions. However, the role of specific 5-HT receptors in these processes remains to be better understood. Here, we examined the effects of the selective and potent 5-HT6 agonist (WAY208466) on mood, anxiety and emotional learning in mice. Male C57Bl/6J mice were therefore tested in the forced swim test (FST), elevated plus-maze (EPM), and passive avoidance tests (PA), respectively. In a dose-response experiment, mice were treated intraperitoneally with WAY208466 at 3, 9, or 27 mg/kg and examined in an open field arena open field test (OFT) followed by the FST. 9 mg/kg of WAY208466 reduced immobility in the FST, without impairing the locomotion. Thus, the dose of 9 mg/kg was subsequently used for tests of anxiety and emotional learning. There was no significant effect of WAY208466 in the EPM. In the PA, mice were trained 30 min before the treatment with saline or WAY208466. Two separate sets of animals were used for short term memory (tested 1 h post-training) or long term memory (tested 24 h post-training). WAY208466 improved both short and long term memories, evaluated by the latency to enter the dark compartment, in the PA. The WAY208466-treated animals also showed more grooming and rearing in the light compartment. To better understand the molecular mechanisms and brain regions involved in the facilitation of emotional learning by WAY208466, we studied its effects on signal transduction and immediate early gene expression. WAY208466 increased the levels of phospho-Ser845-GluA1 and phospho-Ser217/221-MEK in the caudate-putamen. Levels of phospho-Thr202/204-Erk1/2 and the ratio mature BDNF/proBDNF were increased in the hippocampus. Moreover, WAY208466 increased c-fos in the hippocampus and Arc expression in both hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFC). The results indicate antidepressant efficacy and facilitation of emotional learning by 5-HT6 receptor agonism via

  14. Sulfonyl-containing modulators of serotonin 5-HT6 receptors and their pharmacophore models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivachtchenko, A. V.

    2014-05-01

    Data published in recent years on the synthesis of serotonin 5-HT6 receptor modulators are summarized. Modulators with high affinity for 5-HT6 receptors exhibiting different degrees of selectivity — from highly selective to semiselective and multimodal — are described. Clinical trial results are reported for the most promising serotonin 5-HT6 receptor modulators attracting special attention of medicinal chemists. The bibliography includes 128 references.

  15. Possible differences in modes of agonist and antagonist binding at human 5-HT6 receptors.

    PubMed

    Pullagurla, Manik R; Westkaemper, Richard B; Glennon, Richard A

    2004-09-01

    A graphics model of the human 5-HT6 receptor was constructed and automated docking studies were performed. The model suggests that 5-HT6 antagonist arylsulfonyltryptamines might bind differently than that of the agonist serotonin. Furthermore, the model explains many of the empirical results from our previous structure-affinity studies. PMID:15357994

  16. AVN-211, Novel and Highly Selective 5-HT6 Receptor Small Molecule Antagonist, for the Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Ivachtchenko, Alexandre V; Lavrovsky, Yan; Ivanenkov, Yan A

    2016-03-01

    Within the past decade several novel targets have been indicated as key players in Alzheimer-type dementia and associated conditions, including a "frightening" memory loss as well as severe cognitive impairments. These proteins are deeply implicated in crucial cell processes, e.g., autophagy, growth and progression, apoptosis, and metabolic equilibrium. Since recently, 5-HT6R has been considered as one of the most prominent biological targets in AD drug therapy. Therefore, we investigated the potential procognitive and neuroprotective effects of our novel selective 5-HT6R antagonist, AVN-211. During an extensive preclinical evaluation the lead compound demonstrated a relatively high therapeutic potential and improved selectivity toward 5-HT6R as compared to reference drug candidates. It was thoroughly examined in different in vivo behavioral models directly related to AD and showed evident improvements in cognition and learning. In many cases, the observed effect was considerably greater than that determined for the reported drugs and drug candidates, including memantine, SB-742457, and Lu AE58054, evaluated under the same conditions. In addition, AVN-211 showed a similar or better anxiolytic efficacy than fenobam, rufinamide, lorazepam, and buspirone in an elevated plus-maze model, elevated platform, and open field tests. The compound demonstrated low toxicity and no side effects in vivo, an appropriate pharmacokinetic profile, and stability. In conclusion, AVN-211 significantly delayed or partially halted the progressive decline in memory function associated with AD, which makes it an interesting drug candidate for the treatment of neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. Advanced clinical trials are currently under active discussion and in high priority. PMID:26886442

  17. Striatal 5-HT6 Receptors Regulate Cocaine Reinforcement in a Pathway-Selective Manner.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, Matthew; Gibson, Alec W; Smirnov, Denis; Nair, Sunila G; Neumaier, John F

    2016-08-01

    The nucleus accumbens (NAc) in the ventral striatum integrates many neurochemical inputs including dopamine and serotonin projections from midbrain nuclei to modulate drug reward. Although D1 and D2 dopamine receptors are differentially expressed in the direct and indirect pathway medium spiny neurons (dMSNs and iMSNs, respectively), 5-HT6 receptors are expressed in both pathways, more strongly than anywhere else in the brain, and are an intriguing target for neuropsychiatric disorders. In the present study, we used viral vectors utilizing dynorphin or enkephalin promoters to drive expression of 5-HT6 receptors or green fluorescent protein (GFP) selectively in the dMSNs or iMSNs of the NAc shell. Rats were then trained to self-administer cocaine. Increased 5-HT6 receptor expression in dMSNs did not change any parameter of cocaine self-administration measured. However, increasing 5-HT6 receptors in iMSNs reduced the amount of cocaine self-administered under fixed-ratio schedules, especially at low doses, increased the time to the first response and the length of the inter-infusion interval, but did not alter motivation as measured by progressive ratio 'break point' analysis. Modeling of cocaine pharmacokinetics in NAc showed that increased 5-HT6 receptors in iMSNs reduced the rat's preferred tissue cocaine concentration at each dose. Finally, increased 5-HT6 receptors in iMSNs facilitated conditioned place preference for a low dose of cocaine. We conclude that 5-HT6 receptors in iMSNs of NAcSh increase the sensitivity to the reinforcing properties of cocaine, particularly at low doses, suggesting that these receptors may be a therapeutic target for the treatment of cocaine addiction. PMID:27032690

  18. Memory consolidation and amnesia modify 5-HT6 receptors expression in rat brain: an autoradiographic study.

    PubMed

    Meneses, A; Manuel-Apolinar, L; Castillo, C; Castillo, E

    2007-03-12

    Traditionally, the search for memory circuits has been centered on examinations of amnesic and AD patients, cerebral lesions and, neuroimaging. A complementary alternative might be the use of autoradiography with radioligands. Indeed, ex vivo autoradiographic studies offer the advantage to detect functionally active receptors altered by pharmacological tools and memory formation. Hence, herein the 5-HT(6) receptor antagonist SB-399885 and the amnesic drugs scopolamine or dizocilpine were used to manipulate memory consolidation and 5-HT(6) receptors expression was determined by using [(3)H]-SB-258585. Thus, memory consolidation was impaired in scopolamine and dizocilpine treated groups relative to control vehicle but improved it in SB-399885-treated animals. SB-399885 improved memory consolidation seems to be associated with decreased 5-HT(6) receptors expression in 15 out 17 brain areas. Scopolamine or dizocilpine decreased 5-HT(6) receptors expression in nine different brain areas and increased it in CA3 hippocampus or other eight areas, respectively. In brain areas thought to be in charge of procedural memory such basal ganglia (i.e., nucleus accumbens, caudate putamen, and fundus striate) data showed that relative to control animals amnesic groups showed diminished (scopolamine) or augmented (dizocilpine) 5-HT(6) receptor expression. SB-399885 showing improved memory displayed an intermediate expression in these same brain regions. A similar intermediate expression occurs with regard to amygdala, septum, and some cortical areas in charge of explicit memory storage. However, relative to control group amnesic and SB-399885 rats in the hippocampus, region where explicit memory is formed, showed a complex 5-HT(6) receptors expression. In conclusion, these results indicate neural circuits underlying the effects of 5-HT(6) receptor antagonists in autoshaping task and offer some general clues about cognitive processes in general. PMID:17267053

  19. Peripheral serotonin-mediated system suppresses bone development and regeneration via serotonin 6 G-protein-coupled receptor

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Hyung-Mun; Park, Kyung-Ran; Hong, Jin Tae; Kim, Eun-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin is important in brain functions and involved in neurological diseases. It is also drawn considerable attention in bone disease since it mainly produced by the gut. Serotonin 6 G-protein-coupled receptor (5-HT6R) is clinical targets for the treatment of neurological diseases. However, 5-HT6R as a therapeutic target in bone has not been reported. Herein, we found that 5-HT6R showed higher expression in bone, and its expression was increased during bone remodeling and osteoblast differentiation. The activation of 5-HT6R by ST1936 caused the inhibition of ALP activity and mineralization in primary osteoblast cultures, which was antagonized by SB258585, an antagonist and by the knockdown of 5-HT6R. Further investigation indicated that 5-HT6R inhibited osteoblast differentiation via Jab1 in BMP2 signaling but not PKA and ERK1/2. In vivo studies showed that the activation of 5-HT6R inhibited bone regeneration in the calvarial defect mice and also delayed bone development in newborn mice; this response was antagonized by SB258585. Therefore, our findings indicate a key role of 5-HT6R in bone formation through serotonin originating in the peripheral system, and suggest that it is a novel therapeutic target for drug development in the bone repair and bone diseases. PMID:27581523

  20. Peripheral serotonin-mediated system suppresses bone development and regeneration via serotonin 6 G-protein-coupled receptor.

    PubMed

    Yun, Hyung-Mun; Park, Kyung-Ran; Hong, Jin Tae; Kim, Eun-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin is important in brain functions and involved in neurological diseases. It is also drawn considerable attention in bone disease since it mainly produced by the gut. Serotonin 6 G-protein-coupled receptor (5-HT6R) is clinical targets for the treatment of neurological diseases. However, 5-HT6R as a therapeutic target in bone has not been reported. Herein, we found that 5-HT6R showed higher expression in bone, and its expression was increased during bone remodeling and osteoblast differentiation. The activation of 5-HT6R by ST1936 caused the inhibition of ALP activity and mineralization in primary osteoblast cultures, which was antagonized by SB258585, an antagonist and by the knockdown of 5-HT6R. Further investigation indicated that 5-HT6R inhibited osteoblast differentiation via Jab1 in BMP2 signaling but not PKA and ERK1/2. In vivo studies showed that the activation of 5-HT6R inhibited bone regeneration in the calvarial defect mice and also delayed bone development in newborn mice; this response was antagonized by SB258585. Therefore, our findings indicate a key role of 5-HT6R in bone formation through serotonin originating in the peripheral system, and suggest that it is a novel therapeutic target for drug development in the bone repair and bone diseases. PMID:27581523

  1. Time-course of 5-HT(6) receptor mRNA expression during memory consolidation and amnesia.

    PubMed

    Huerta-Rivas, A; Pérez-García, G; González-Espinosa, C; Meneses, A

    2010-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates that antagonists of the 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) receptor(6) (5-HT(6)) improve memory and reverse amnesia although the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Hence, in this paper RT-PCR was used to evaluate changes in mRNA expression of 5-HT(6) receptor in trained and untrained rats treated with the 5-HT(6) receptor antagonist SB-399885 and amnesic drugs scopolamine or dizocilpine. Changes in mRNA expression of 5-HT(6) receptor were investigated at different times in prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and striatum. Data indicated that memory in the Pavlovian/instrumental autoshaping task was a progressive process associated to reduced mRNA expression of 5-HT(6) receptor in the three structures examined. SB-399885 improved long-term memory at 48h, while the muscarinic receptor antagonist scopolamine or the non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist dizocilpine impaired it at 24h. Autoshaping training and treatment with SB-399885 increased 5-HT(6) receptor mRNA expression in (maximum increase) prefrontal cortex and striatum, 24 or 48h. The scopolamine-induced amnesia suppressed 5-HT(6) receptor mRNA expression while the dizocilpine-induced amnesia did not modify 5-HT(6) receptor mRNA expression. SB-399885 and scopolamine or dizocilpine were able to reestablish memory and 5-HT(6) receptor mRNA expression. These data confirmed previous memory evidence and of more interest is the observation that training, SB-399885 and amnesic drugs modulated 5-HT(6) receptor mRNA expression in prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and striatum. Further investigation in different memory tasks, times and amnesia models together with more complex control groups might provide further clues. PMID:19733250

  2. Dynamics and structural determinants of ligand recognition of the 5-HT6 receptor.

    PubMed

    Vass, Márton; Jójárt, Balázs; Bogár, Ferenc; Paragi, Gábor; Keserű, György M; Tarcsay, Ákos

    2015-12-01

    In order to identify molecular models of the human 5-HT6 receptor suitable for virtual screening, homology modeling and membrane-embedded molecular dynamics simulations were performed. Structural requirements for robust enrichment were assessed by an unbiased chemometric analysis of enrichments from retrospective virtual screening studies. The two main structural features affecting enrichment are the outward movement of the second extracellular loop and the formation of a hydrophobic cavity deep in the binding site. These features appear transiently in the trajectories and furthermore the stretches of uniformly high enrichment may only last 4-10 ps. The formation of the inner hydrophobic cavity was also linked to the active-like to inactive-like transition of the receptor, especially the so-called connector region. The best structural models provided significant and robust enrichment over three independent ligand sets. PMID:26572911

  3. Binding of serotonin and N1-benzenesulfonyltryptamine-related analogs at human 5-HT6 serotonin receptors: receptor modeling studies.

    PubMed

    Dukat, Małgorzata; Mosier, Philip D; Kolanos, Renata; Roth, Bryan L; Glennon, Richard A

    2008-02-14

    A population of 100 graphics models of the human 5-HT6 serotonin receptor was constructed based on the structure of bovine rhodopsin. The endogenous tryptamine-based agonist serotonin (5-HT; 1) and the benzenesulfonyl-containing tryptamine-derived 5-HT6 receptor antagonist MS-245 (4a) were automatically docked with each of the 100 receptor models using a genetic algorithm approach. Similar studies were conducted with the more selective 5-HT6 receptor agonist EMDT (5) and optical isomers of EMDT-related analog 8, as well as with optical isomers of MS-245 (4a)-related and benzenesulfonyl-containing pyrrolidine 6 and aminotetralin 7. Although associated with the same general aromatic/hydrophobic binding cluster, 5-HT (1) and MS-245 (4a) were found to preferentially bind with distinct receptor conformations, and did so with different binding orientations (i.e., poses). A 5-HT pose/model was found to be common to EMDT (5) and its analogs, whereas that identified for MS-245 (4a) was found common to benzenesulfonyl-containing compounds. Specific amino acid residues were identified that can participate in binding, and evaluation of a sulfenamide analog of MS-245 indicates for the first time that the presence of the sulfonyl oxygen atoms enhances receptor affinity. The results indicate that the presence or absence of an N1-benzenesulfonyl group is a major determinant of the manner in which tryptamine-related agents bind at 5-HT6 serotonin receptors. PMID:18201064

  4. The Serotonin-6 Receptor as a Novel Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Hyung-Mun

    2011-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) is an important neurotransmitter that is found in both the central and peripheral nervous systems. 5-HT mediates its diverse physiological responses through 7 different 5-HT receptor families: 5-HT1, 5-HT2, 5-HT3, 5-HT4, 5-HT5, 5-HT6, and 5-HT7 receptors. Among them, the 5-HT6 receptor (5-HT6R) is the most recently cloned serotonin receptor and plays important roles in the central nervous system (CNS) and in the etiology of neurological diseases. Compared to other 5-HT receptors, the 5-HT6R has been considered as an attractive CNS therapeutic target because it is expressed exclusively in the CNS and has no known isoforms. This review evaluates in detail the role of the 5-HT6R in the physiology and pathophysiology of the CNS and the potential usefulness of 5-HT6R ligands in the development of therapeutic strategies for the treatment of CNS disorders. Preclinical studies provide support for the use of 5-HT6R ligands as promising medications to treat the cognitive dysfunction associated with Alzheimer's disease, obesity, depression, and anxiety. PMID:22355260

  5. N1-Azinylsulfonyl-1H-indoles: 5-HT6 Receptor Antagonists with Procognitive and Antidepressant-Like Properties.

    PubMed

    Zajdel, Paweł; Marciniec, Krzysztof; Satała, Grzegorz; Canale, Vittorio; Kos, Tomasz; Partyka, Anna; Jastrzębska-Więsek, Magdalena; Wesołowska, Anna; Basińska-Ziobroń, Agnieszka; Wójcikowski, Jacek; Daniel, Władysława A; Bojarski, Andrzej J; Popik, Piotr

    2016-06-01

    A series of N1-azinylsulfonyl-3-(1,2,3,6,tetrahyrdopyridin-4-yl)-1H-indole derivatives was designed to obtain highly potent 5-HT6 receptor ligands. The study allowed for the identification of 25 (4-{[5-methoxy-3-(1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridin-4-yl)-1H-indol-1-yl]sulfonyl}isoquinoline), a potent and selective 5-HT6 receptor antagonist. The selected compound, was evaluated in vivo in a novel object recognition (NOR) and forced swim (FST) tests in rats, demonstrating distinct pro-cognitive and antidepressant-like properties (MED = 1 mg/kg and 0.1 mg/kg, i.p., respectively). Compound SB-742457, used as comparator, reversed memory deficits in NOR task in similar doses, while in FST it was active in 10-30-fold higher dose (3 mg/kg). In contrast to SB-742457, which was active in Vogel test (MED = 3 mg/kg), compound 25 displayed no anxiolytic activity. PMID:27326337

  6. Design, synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of indolylsulfonamide amines as potent and selective 5-HT6 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Nirogi, Ramakrishna V S; Bandyala, Thrinath Reddy; Reballi, Veena; Konda, Jagadishu Babu; Daulatabad, Anand V; Khagga, Mukkanti

    2015-02-01

    A series of N'-[3-(indole-1-sulfonyl) aryl]-N,N-dimethyl ethane-1,2-diamines and N'-[3-(indole-1-sulfonyl) aryl]-N,N-dimethyl propane-1,3-diamines was designed and synthesized as 5-HT6 receptor ligands. These compounds, when screened in a functional reporter gene-based assay, displayed potent antagonistic activity with Kb values in the range of 1.8-60 nM. The lead compound 9y has shown good ADME surrogate properties, acceptable pharmacokinetic profile and is active in animal models of cognition like novel object recognition test and Morris water maze. It was selected for detailed profiling. PMID:24666297

  7. ADN-1184 a monoaminergic ligand with 5-HT6/7 receptor antagonist activity: pharmacological profile and potential therapeutic utility

    PubMed Central

    Kołaczkowski, M; Mierzejewski, P; Bieńkowski, P; Wesołowska, A; Newman-Tancredi, A

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Many dementia patients exhibit behavioural and psychological symptoms (BPSD) that include psychosis, aggressivity, depression and anxiety. Antipsychotic drugs are frequently prescribed but fail to significantly attenuate mood deficits, may interfere with cognitive function and are associated with motor and cardiac side effects, which are problematic in elderly patients. A need therefore exists for drugs that are better suited for the treatment of BPSD. Experimental Approach We used in vitro cellular and in vivo behavioural tests to characterize ADN-1184, a novel arylsulfonamide ligand with potential utility for treatment of BPSD. Key Results ADN-1184 exhibits substantial 5-HT6/5-HT7/5-HT2A/D2 receptor affinity and antagonist properties in vitro. In tests of antipsychotic-like activity, it reversed MK-801-induced hyperactivity and stereotypies and inhibited conditioned avoidance response (MED = 3 mg·kg−1 i.p.). Remarkably, ADN-1184 also reduced immobility time in the forced swim test at low doses (0.3 and 1 mg·kg−1 i.p.; higher doses were not significantly active). Notably, up to 30 mg·kg−1 ADN-1184 did not impair memory performance in the passive avoidance test or elicit significant catalepsy and only modestly inhibited spontaneous locomotor activity (MED = 30 mg·kg−1 i.p.). Conclusions and Implications ADN-1184 combines antipsychotic-like with antidepressant-like properties without interfering with memory function or locomotion. This profile is better than that of commonly used atypical antipsychotics tested under the same conditions and suggests that it is feasible to identify drugs that improve BPSD, without exacerbating cognitive deficit or movement impairment, which are of particular concern in patients with dementia. PMID:24199650

  8. The 5-HT6 receptor antagonist idalopirdine potentiates the effects of acetylcholinesterase inhibition on neuronal network oscillations and extracellular acetylcholine levels in the rat dorsal hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Herrik, Kjartan F; Mørk, Arne; Richard, Nelly; Bundgaard, Christoffer; Bastlund, Jesper F; de Jong, Inge E M

    2016-08-01

    The 5-HT6 receptor has emerged as a promising target for cognitive disorders and combining a 5-HT6 receptor antagonist with an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor (AChEI) represents a novel approach for the symptomatic treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). A recent phase 2 trial showed that the selective 5-HT6 receptor antagonist idalopirdine (Lu AE58054) improved cognition in patients with moderate AD on stable treatment with the AChEI donepezil. Here we investigated the effects of idalopirdine in combination with donepezil on hippocampal function using in vivo electrophysiology and microdialysis. Network oscillations in the hippocampus were recorded during electrical stimulation of the brainstem nucleus pontis oralis (nPO) in the anesthetized rat and hippocampal acetylcholine (ACh) levels were measured in the freely-moving rat. In addition, potential pharmacokinetic interactions between idalopirdine and donepezil were assessed. Idalopirdine alone did not affect hippocampal network oscillations or ACh levels. Donepezil (0.3 and 1.0 mg/kg i.v.) dose-dependently increased hippocampal theta and gamma power during nPO stimulation. Idalopirdine (2 mg/kg i.v.), administered 1 h prior to donepezil, potentiated the theta and gamma response to 0.3 mg/kg donepezil and prolonged the gamma response to 1 mg/kg donepezil. Donepezil (1.3 mg/kg s.c.) increased extracellular ACh levels in the hippocampus and this was further augmented by administration of idalopirdine (10 mg/kg p.o.) 2 h prior to donepezil. These effects could not be attributed to a pharmacokinetic interaction between the compounds. This study demonstrates that idalopirdine potentiates the effects of donepezil on two pharmacodynamic biomarkers associated with cognition, i.e. neuronal oscillations and extracellular ACh levels in the hippocampus. Such potentiation could contribute to the procognitive effects of idalopirdine observed in donepezil-treated AD patients. PMID:27039041

  9. Antidepressant-like activity of EMD 386088, a 5-HT6 receptor partial agonist, following systemic acute and chronic administration to rats.

    PubMed

    Jastrzębska-Więsek, Magdalena; Siwek, Agata; Partyka, Anna; Szewczyk, Bernadeta; Sowa-Kućma, Magdalena; Wasik, Anna; Kołaczkowski, Marcin; Wesołowska, Anna

    2015-10-01

    The study was designed to examine the potency of EMD 386088, a 5-HT6 receptor partial agonist, to exert antidepressant-like properties in animal models following acute and chronic intraperitoneal administration to rats. The modified rat forced swim test (FST) was utilized to examine a potential antidepressant effect of EMD 386088 after acute treatment (30 min before the test) and three times in a 24-h administration scheme (24 h, 5 h, and 30 min prior to the FST). The olfactory bulbectomy (OB) model was used to assess its antidepressant-like properties after chronic treatment (the drug was administered once daily for 14 days). EMD 386088 showed an antidepressant-like effect in all conducted tests. Its activity in FST after its acute administration (5 mg/kg) was blocked by the selective 5-HT6 receptor antagonist SB 271046. The obtained results seem to be specific, as there was no observed locomotor stimulation by the drug given at a lower/antidepressant dose. In the three times in the 24-h treatment scheme, EMD 386088 (2.5 mg/kg) exerted antidepressant properties in FST as well as increased locomotor activity in the open field test. Chronic administration of EMD 386088 (2.5 mg/kg) significantly improved the learning deficit in OB rats without affecting performance in Sham-operated (SH) animals in the passive avoidance test, and reduced OB-related rats' locomotor hyperactivity, but did not change the number of rearing + peeping episodes. The obtained findings suggest that EMD 386088 produces antidepressant-like activity after systemic acute and chronic administration which may result from direct stimulation of 5-HT6 receptors. PMID:26077660

  10. Oral administration of the 5-HT6 receptor antagonists SB-357134 and SB-399885 improves memory formation in an autoshaping learning task.

    PubMed

    Perez-García, Georgina; Meneses, Alfredo

    2005-07-01

    In this work we aimed to re-examine the 5-HT6 receptor role, by testing the selective antagonists SB-357134 (1-30 mg/kg p.o.) and SB-399885 (1-30 mg/kg p.o.) during memory consolidation of conditioned responses (CR%), in an autoshaping Pavlovian/instrumental learning task. Bioavailability, half-life and minimum effective dose to induce inappetence for SB-357134 were 65%, 3.4 h, and 30 mg/kg p.o., and for SB-399885 were 52%, 2.2 h, and 50 mg/kg p.o., respectively. Oral acute and chronic administration of either SB-357134 or SB-399885 improved memory consolidation compared to control groups. Acute administration of SB-357134, at 1, 3, 10 and 30 mg/kg, produced a CR% inverted-U curve, eliciting the latter dose a 7-fold increase relative to saline group. Acute injection of SB-399885 produced significant CR% increments, being 1 mg/kg the most effective dose. Repeated administration (7 days) of either SB-357134 (10 mg/kg) or SB-399885 (1 mg/kg) elicited the most significant CR% increments. Moreover, modeling the potential therapeutic benefits of 5-HT6 receptor blockade, acute or repeated administration of SB-399885, at 10 mg/kg reversed memory deficits produced by scopolamine or dizocilpine, and SB-357134 (3 and 10 mg/kg) prevented amnesia and even improved performance. These data support the notion that endogenously 5-HT acting, via 5-HT6 receptor, improves memory consolidation. PMID:15964617

  11. Dimethyl sulfoxide: an antagonist in scintillation proximity assay [(35)S]-GTPgammaS binding to rat 5-HT(6) receptor cloned in HEK-293 cells?

    PubMed

    Mereghetti, Ilario; Cagnotto, Alfredo; Mennini, Tiziana

    2007-03-15

    We have tested by [(35)S]-GTPgammaS binding the intrinsic activity of three full agonists (serotonin, 5-methoxytryptamine and 5-methoxy-2-methyl-N,N-dimethyltryptamine) on rat 5-HT(6) receptors cloned in HEK-293 cells, using the scintillation proximity assay. Serotonin and 5-methoxytryptamine are soluble in water, while the agonist 5-methoxy-2-methyl-N,N-dimethyltryptamine is soluble in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). In [(35)S]-GTPgammaS binding 5-HT and 5-methoxytryptamine were able to increase basal binding, while 5-methoxy-2-methyl-N,N-dimethyltryptamine surprisingly showed an inverse agonist activity. So we have tested 5-HT and 5-methoxytryptamine in the presence of DMSO: in this condition the two agonists behaved as antagonists. This interfering effect of DMSO was not observed when GTP-europium filtration binding was used in place of scintillation proximity assay using [(35)S]-GTPgammaS. In addition, DMSO did not affect [(3)H]-5HT binding or cAMP accumulation in cloned HEK-293 cells expressing rat 5-HT(6) receptors. In conclusion, we demonstrated that DMSO, the most common solvent used to dissolve compounds insoluble in water, interferes with the method of scintillation proximity assay using [(35)S]-GTPgammaS. DMSO does not affect basal signal, nor the GTPgammaS binding itself, as indicated by the experiments with GTP-europium. Therefore its interfering effect is likely to occur at the binding of antibodies in the scintillation proximity assay. PMID:17049618

  12. Pharmacological evaluation of the anxiolytic-like effects of EMD 386088, a partial 5-HT6 receptor agonist, in the rat elevated plus-maze and Vogel conflict tests.

    PubMed

    Jastrzębska-Więsek, Magdalena; Siwek, Agata; Partyka, Anna; Kubacka, Monika; Mogilski, Szczepan; Wasik, Anna; Kołaczkowski, Marcin; Wesołowska, Anna

    2014-10-01

    The 5-HT6 is one of the most recent additions to the 5-HT receptor family. Its pharmacological profile and anatomical distribution is suggestive of a putative role in mood disorders. Most of preclinical evidence suggests an anxiolytic-like action of 5-HT6 receptor antagonists. Evaluation the anxiolytic-like effects of EMD 386088, a partial 5-HT6receptor agonist, and its putative mechanism of action in rats. EMD 386088, administered intraperitoneally at a dose of 2.5 mg/kg evoked specific anxiolytic-like activity in the automated version of the conflict drinking Vogel and the elevated plus-maze tests visible by increasing all parameters indicating a potential anti-anxiety effect. Its activity was blocked by the selective 5-HT6 receptor antagonist SB 271046, but not by the selective GABAA/benzodiazepine receptor antagonist flumazenil. EMD 386088 did not intensify an anxiolytic-like effect produced by diazepam in the elevated plus-maze test. These findings suggest that EMD 386088, a 5-HT6 receptor agonist, produces anxiolytic-like activity after systemic administration which may result from direct stimulation of 5-HT6 receptors. PMID:24905144

  13. Serotonin homeostasis and serotonin receptors as actors of cortical construction: special attention to the 5-HT3A and 5-HT6 receptor subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Vitalis, Tania; Ansorge, Mark S.; Dayer, Alexandre G.

    2013-01-01

    Cortical circuits control higher-order cognitive processes and their function is highly dependent on their structure that emerges during development. The construction of cortical circuits involves the coordinated interplay between different types of cellular processes such as proliferation, migration, and differentiation of neural and glial cell subtypes. Among the multiple factors that regulate the assembly of cortical circuits, 5-HT is an important developmental signal that impacts on a broad diversity of cellular processes. 5-HT is detected at the onset of embryonic telencephalic formation and a variety of serotonergic receptors are dynamically expressed in the embryonic developing cortex in a region and cell-type specific manner. Among these receptors, the ionotropic 5-HT3A receptor and the metabotropic 5-HT6 receptor have recently been identified as novel serotonergic targets regulating different aspects of cortical construction including neuronal migration and dendritic differentiation. In this review, we focus on the developmental impact of serotonergic systems on the construction of cortical circuits and discuss their potential role in programming risk for human psychiatric disorders. PMID:23801939

  14. Chemoproteomic Approach to Explore the Target Profile of GPCR ligands: Application to 5-HT1A and 5-HT6 Receptors.

    PubMed

    Gamo, Ana M; González-Vera, Juan A; Rueda-Zubiaurre, Ainoa; Alonso, Dulce; Vázquez-Villa, Henar; Martín-Couce, Lidia; Palomares, Óscar; López, Juan A; Martín-Fontecha, Mar; Benhamú, Bellinda; López-Rodríguez, María L; Ortega-Gutiérrez, Silvia

    2016-01-22

    Determination of the targets of a compound remains an essential aspect in drug discovery. A complete understanding of all binding interactions is critical to recognize in advance both therapeutic effects and undesired consequences. However, the complete polypharmacology of many drugs currently in clinical development is still unknown, especially in the case of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) ligands. In this work we have developed a chemoproteomic platform based on the use of chemical probes to explore the target profile of a compound in biological systems. As proof of concept, this methodology has been applied to selected ligands of the therapeutically relevant serotonin 5-HT1A and 5-HT6 receptors, and we have identified and validated some of their off-targets. This approach could be extended to other drugs of interest to study the targeted proteome in disease-relevant systems. PMID:26560738

  15. A Chemocentric Informatics Approach to Drug Discovery: Identification and Experimental Validation of Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators as ligands of 5-Hydroxytryptamine-6 Receptors and as Potential Cognition Enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Hajjo, Rima; Setola, Vincent; Roth, Bryan L.; Tropsha, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    We have devised a chemocentric informatics methodology for drug discovery integrating independent approaches to mining biomolecular databases. As a proof of concept, we have searched for novel putative cognition enhancers. First, we generated Quantitative Structure- Activity Relationship (QSAR) models of compounds binding to 5-hydroxytryptamine-6 receptor (5HT6R), a known target for cognition enhancers, and employed these models for virtual screening to identify putative 5-HT6R actives. Second, we queried chemogenomics data from the Connectivity Map (http://www.broad.mit.edu/cmap/) with the gene expression profile signatures of Alzheimer’s disease patients to identify compounds putatively linked to the disease. Thirteen common hits were tested in 5-HT6R radioligand binding assays and ten were confirmed as actives. Four of them were known selective estrogen receptor modulators that were never reported as 5-HT6R ligands. Furthermore, nine of the confirmed actives were reported elsewhere to have memory-enhancing effects. The approaches discussed herein can be used broadly to identify novel drug-target-disease associations. PMID:22537153

  16. Serotonin 6 receptor controls alzheimer’s disease and depression

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun-Cheol; Kim, Sanghyeon; Hong, Jin Tae

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and depression in late life are one of the most severe health problems in the world disorders. Serotonin 6 receptor (5-HT6R) has caused much interest for potential roles in AD and depression. However, a causative role of perturbed 5-HT6R function between two diseases was poorly defined. In the present study, we found that a 5-HT6R antagonist, SB271036 rescued memory impairment by attenuating the generation of Aβ via the inhibition of γ-secretase activity and the inactivation of astrocytes and microglia in the AD mouse model. It was found that the reduction of serotonin level was significantly recovered by SB271036, which was mediated by an indirect regulation of serotonergic neurons via GABA. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), fluoxetine significantly improved cognitive impairment and behavioral changes. In human brain of depression patients, we then identified the potential genes, amyloid beta (A4) precursor protein-binding, family A, member 2 (APBA2), well known AD modulators by integrating datasets from neuropathology, microarray, and RNA seq. studies with correlation analysis tools. And also, it was demonstrated in mouse models and patients of AD. These data indicate functional network of 5-HT6R between AD and depression. PMID:26449188

  17. The selective 5-HT6 receptor antagonist SLV has putative cognitive- and social interaction enhancing properties in rodent models of cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    de Bruin, N M W J; van Loevezijn, A; Wicke, K M; de Haan, M; Venhorst, J; Lange, J H M; de Groote, L; van der Neut, M A W; Prickaerts, J; Andriambeloson, E; Foley, A G; van Drimmelen, M; van der Wetering, M; Kruse, C G

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, our aim was to investigate whether the novel highly selective 5-hydroxytryptamine6 (5-HT6) receptor antagonist SLV can ameliorate impairments in cognition and social interaction with potential relevance for both schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease (AD). SLV sub-chronically - treated Wistar rats reared in isolation showed significantly enhanced prepulse inhibition (PPI) and object recognition performance when compared to vehicle - treated rats. In the isolated rats, also a significant reduction in expression of hippocampal neural cell adhesion molecule polysialylation (NCAM-PSA) was found which was ameliorated following treatment with SLV (30mg/kg). The social engagement deficit in rats exposed in utero (on gestational day 12.5) to valproic acid (VPA) was reversed by treatment with SLV (30mg/kg). SLV (20 and 30mg/kg, p.o.) fully reversed MK-801 - induced deficits in the ORT and also scopolamine - induced deficits in both the Object Recognition Task (ORT) and Object Location Task (OLT) in Wistar rats. In addition, a combination of sub-optimal doses of SLV and donepezil attenuated scopolamine-induced ORT deficits. Furthermore, SLV (10mg/kg, p.o.) reversed spontaneous alternation deficits in the T-maze induced by MK-801 administration in Swiss mice and in aged C57Bl/6J mice. SLV additionally improved T-Maze spatial learning and passive avoidance learning in Sprague-Dawley rats with amyoid-beta (Aβ) injections into the hippocampus. In contrast, no benefits were found with SLV or the tested reference compounds (donepezil and RVT-101) on cognitive performance of 12months old Tg2576 mice. Also, in the social recognition task, an absence of cognitive enhancing properties was observed with SLV on "normal forgetting" in Wistar rats. Finally, analysis of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) frequency recorded from pyramidal cells revealed a reduction in the presence of 1μM of SLV. In conclusion, SLV was investigated in several rodent

  18. QSAR studies of bioactivities of 1-(azacyclyl)-3-arylsulfonyl-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridines as 5-HT6 receptor ligands using physicochemical descriptors and MLR and ANN-modeling.

    PubMed

    Goodarzi, Mohammad; Freitas, Matheus P; Ghasemi, Nahid

    2010-09-01

    Four molecular descriptors were selected from a pool of variables using genetic algorithm, and then used to built a QSAR model for a series of 1-(azacyclyl)-3-arylsulfonyl-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridines as 5-HT(6) receptor agonists or antagonists, useful for the treatment of central nervous system disorders. Simple multiple linear regression (MLR) and a nonlinear method, artificial neural network (ANN), were used to model the bioactivities of the compounds; while MLR gave an acceptable model for predictions, the ANN-based model improved significantly the predictive ability, being more reliable for the prediction and design of novel 5-HT(6) receptor ligands. Topology and molecular/group sizes are important requirements to take into account during the development of novel analogs. PMID:20547432

  19. Highly potent, non-basic 5-HT6 ligands. Site mutagenesis evidence for a second binding mode at 5-HT6 for antagonism.

    PubMed

    Harris, Ralph N; Stabler, Russel S; Repke, David B; Kress, James M; Walker, Keith A; Martin, Renee S; Brothers, Julie M; Ilnicka, Mariola; Lee, Simon W; Mirzadegan, Tara

    2010-06-01

    A series of 5-HT(6) ligands derived from (R)-1-(amino)methyl-6-(phenyl)sulfonyltetralin was prepared that yielded several non-basic analogs having sub-nanomolar affinity. Ligand structure-activity relationships, receptor point mutation studies, and molecular modeling of these novel ligands all combined to reveal a new alternative binding mode to 5-HT(6) for antagonism. PMID:20434910

  20. Multi-Step Protocol for Automatic Evaluation of Docking Results Based on Machine Learning Methods--A Case Study of Serotonin Receptors 5-HT(6) and 5-HT(7).

    PubMed

    Smusz, Sabina; Mordalski, Stefan; Witek, Jagna; Rataj, Krzysztof; Kafel, Rafał; Bojarski, Andrzej J

    2015-04-27

    Molecular docking, despite its undeniable usefulness in computer-aided drug design protocols and the increasing sophistication of tools used in the prediction of ligand-protein interaction energies, is still connected with a problem of effective results analysis. In this study, a novel protocol for the automatic evaluation of numerous docking results is presented, being a combination of Structural Interaction Fingerprints and Spectrophores descriptors, machine-learning techniques, and multi-step results analysis. Such an approach takes into consideration the performance of a particular learning algorithm (five machine learning methods were applied), the performance of the docking algorithm itself, the variety of conformations returned from the docking experiment, and the receptor structure (homology models were constructed on five different templates). Evaluation using compounds active toward 5-HT6 and 5-HT7 receptors, as well as additional analysis carried out for beta-2 adrenergic receptor ligands, proved that the methodology is a viable tool for supporting virtual screening protocols, enabling proper discrimination between active and inactive compounds. PMID:25806997

  1. Optimization of N'-(arylsulfonyl)pyrazoline-1-carboxamidines by exploiting a novel interaction site in the 5-HT6 antagonistic binding pocket.

    PubMed

    van Loevezijn, Arnold; Venhorst, Jennifer; Iwema Bakker, Wouter I; Lange, Jos H M; de Looff, Wouter; Henzen, Remco; de Vries, Jelle; van de Woestijne, Rob P; den Hartog, Arnold P; Verhoog, Stefan; van der Neut, Martina A W; de Bruin, Natasja M W J; Kruse, Chris G

    2016-03-15

    The discovery of non-basic N'-(arylsulfonyl)pyrazoline-1-carboxamidines as 5-HT6 antagonists with unique structural features was recently disclosed. Here we describe how this structural class was further developed by addressing an unexplored interaction site of the 5-HT6 receptor. Compound 13 resulting from this effort is a highly potent and selective 5-HT6 antagonist with improved metabolic stability. It is furthermore devoid of hERG affinity. Despite its modest CNS/plasma ratio, a high brain free fraction ensured substantial exposure to allow for rodent cognition studies. PMID:26876931

  2. Investigation of the Structure Requirement for 5-HT6 Binding Affinity of Arylsulfonyl Derivatives: A Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Ming; Li, Yan; Li, Hanqing; Zhang, Shuwei

    2011-01-01

    5-HT6 receptor has been implicated in a series of diseases including anxiety, depression, schizophrenia and cognitive dysfunctions. 5-HT6 ligands have been reported to play a significant role in the treatment for central nervous system (CNS) diseases. Presently, a large series of 223 5-HT6 ligands were studied using a combinational method by 3D-QSAR, molecular docking and molecular dynamics calculations for further improvement of potency. The optimal 3D models exhibit satisfying statistical results with r2ncv, q2 values of 0.85 and 0.50 for CoMFA, 0.81 and 0.53 for CoMSIA, respectively. Their predictive powers were validated by external test set, showing r2pred of 0.71 and 0.76. The contour maps also provide a visual representation of contributions of steric, electrostatic, hydrophobic and hydrogen bond fields as well as the prospective binding models. In addition, the agreement between 3D-QSAR, molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation proves the rationality of the developed models. These results, we hope, may be helpful in designing novel and potential 5-HT6 ligands. PMID:21954341

  3. New serotonin 5-HT(6) ligands from common feature pharmacophore hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Jung; Doddareddy, Munikumar Reddy; Choo, Hyunah; Cho, Yong Seo; No, Kyoung Tai; Park, Woo-Kyu; Pae, Ae Nim

    2008-01-01

    Serotonin 5-HT6 receptor antagonists are thought to play an important role in the treatment of psychiatry, Alzheimer's disease, and probably obesity. To find novel and potent 5-HT6 antagonists and to provide a new idea for drug design, we used a ligand-based pharmacophore to perform the virtual screening of a commercially available database. A three-dimensional common feature pharmacophore model was developed by using the HipHop program provided in Catalyst software and was used as a query for screening the database. A recursive partitioning (RP) model which can separate active and inactive compounds was used as a filtering system. Finally a sequential virtual screening procedure (SQSP) was conducted, wherein both the common feature pharmacophore and the RP model were used in succession to improve the results. Some of the hits were selected based on druglikeness, ADME properties, structural diversity, and synthetic accessibility for real biological evaluation. The best hit compound showed a significant IC50 value of 9.6 nM and can be used as a lead for further drug development. PMID:18044950

  4. Low-dose prazosin in combination with 5-HT6 antagonist PRX-07034 has antipsychotic effects.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Renny; Nirogi, Ramakrishna; Shinde, Anil; Irupannanavar, Shantaveer

    2015-01-01

    An extensive amount of research has focused on the development of new pharmacological agents to treat schizophrenia. Varying from person to person, schizophrenia is a heterogeneous disease with symptoms of positive, negative, and cognitive deficits. PRX-07034, a 5-hydroxytryptamine6 (5-HT6) receptor antagonist has been evaluated for its potential in treating obesity and cognitive deficits. This study evaluated PRX-07034 (0.1, 0.3, and 1.0 mg/kg body mass, by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection), in combination with a low dose of prazosin (0.3 mg/kg, i.p.), for its antipsychotic potential. The research utilized a stereotypy assay, an open field test, an object recognition task, and prepulse inhibition. Dizocilpine, a non-competitive N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist, was also administered in the above-mentioned assays as a psychomimetic. The combination of PRX-07034 and prazosin alleviated stereotypy and hyperlocomotor activity while enhancing memory in an object recognition task, and reversed sensory-gating deficits induced by dizocilpine. Examination of the medial prefrontal cortex revealed that a combination of PRX-07034 and prazosin reduced the dizocilpine-mediated increase of 5-HT. These results suggest that the combination of a 5-HT6 antagonist with low doses of prazosin could have therapeutic potential in the treatment of schizophrenia. PMID:25429515

  5. Idalopirdine - a small molecule antagonist of 5-HT6 with therapeutic potential against obesity.

    PubMed

    Dudek, Magdalena; Marcinkowska, Monika; Bucki, Adam; Olczyk, Adrian; Kołaczkowski, Marcin

    2015-12-01

    5HT6 receptor antagonists offer the potential for safe and effective drugs against obesity, because they can reduce weight without causing serious side effects in the cardiovascular system. Also, their anorexic effect is associated with reduced food intake via an enhancement of satiety. In the present study we investigated the anorexic effect of idalopirdine (LuAE58054) in a model of obesity induced by high-fat diet. To induce obesity in rats, the animals were treated with feed with a fat content of 40 %. Body weight was controlled and the amount of food and water consumed was determined. The influence of the test compound on the lipid profile and glucose level was measured, as well as locomotor activity in home cages on the 20th day of the treatment. LuAE58054, at 5 mg kg(-1)/day i.p., was significantly anorectic in this model of obesity. Animals treated with LuAE58054 weighed 8 and 9.2 % less than the control obese animals on the 12th and 21st days, respectively. It significantly reduced food intake and the amount of peritoneal fat in animals, and reduced the level of triglycerides in plasma. LuAE58054 did not have a statistically significant effect on the spontaneous activity of diet-induced obese rats. The present study clearly demonstrates the effectiveness of LuAE58054 in reducing body weight. This compound is in phase III of clinical trials for the treatment of cognitive deficits associated with Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. It is a 5HT6 receptor antagonist and is, therefore, free of those unacceptable side effects that preclude chronic use of anti-obesity drugs with other mechanisms of action. The search for an effective and safe anti-obesity drug is essential for an increasingly obese population; therefore, the anorectic action of LuAE58054 is important and there is a need for more research in this direction. PMID:26419385

  6. Study of a mechanism responsible for potential antidepressant activity of EMD 386088, a 5-HT6 partial agonist in rats.

    PubMed

    Jastrzębska-Więsek, Magdalena; Siwek, Agata; Partyka, Anna; Antkiewicz-Michaluk, Lucyna; Michaluk, Jerzy; Romańska, Irena; Kołaczkowski, Marcin; Wesołowska, Anna

    2016-08-01

    It was shown that 5-HT6 receptor agonists can exert pharmacological activity due to various modifications in monoamines' level and metabolism activity in rats' brain structures. This finding was correlated with antidepressant- or anxiolytic-like properties of these compounds. The study was designed to establish a possible mechanism of the antidepressant-like activity of the partial 5-HT6 receptor agonist EMD386088 (5-chloro-2-methyl-3-(1,2,3,6-tetrahydro-4-pyridinyl)-1H-indole hydrochloride) in rats. The concentrations of monoamines (dopamine (DA), noradrenaline (NA), and serotonin (5-HT)) and the rate of their metabolism were measured ex vivo in the brain structures (hippocampus, nucleus accumbens, striatum) using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The rats were killed after the forced swim test (FST); the collected tissue samples were used to ex vivo experiments. The potency of EMD386088 to blockade dopamine transporter (DAT) was tested in a functional in vitro study. FST was used to assess the involvement of D1- and D2-like receptor subfamilies in antidepressant-like properties of EMD386088. Neurochemical data from ex vivo experiments showed that antiimmobility activity of EMD386088 may be connected with the activation of dopaminergic system, while neither noradrenergic nor serotonergic ones are involved in its effect. EMD386088 also possesses a significant affinity for DAT which may be a mechanism in the abovementioned effect. Behavioral data seem to confirm the importance of dopaminergic system activation in antidepressant-like activity of EMD386088, since this effect, observed in the FST, was abolished by the preferential D1- and D2-like receptor subfamily antagonists SCH23390 and sulpiride, respectively. Dopaminergic system is involved in antidepressant-like activity of EMD386088. PMID:27106213

  7. PET Tracers for Serotonin Receptors and Their Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, J.S. Dileep; Mann, J. John

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin receptors (5-HTRs) are implicated in the pathophysiology of a variety of neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders and are also targets for drug therapy. In the CNS, most of these receptors are expressed in high abundance in specific brain regions reflecting their role in brain functions. Quantifying binding to 5-HTRs in vivo may permit assessment of physiologic and pathologic conditions, and monitoring disease progression, evaluating treatment response, and for investigating new treatment modalities. Positron emission tomography (PET) molecular imaging has the sensitivity to quantify binding of 5-HTRs in CNS disorders and to measure drug occupancy as part of a process of new drug development. Although research on PET imaging of 5-HTRs have been performed more than two decades, the successful radiotracers so far developed for human studies are limited to 5-HT1AR, 5-HT1BR, 5-HT2AR, 5-HT4R and 5-HT6R. Herein we review the development and application of radioligands for PET imaging of 5-HTRs in living brain. PMID:25360773

  8. Aryl biphenyl-3-ylmethylpiperazines as 5-HT7 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeeyeon; Kim, Youngjae; Tae, Jinsung; Yeom, Miyoung; Moon, Bongjin; Huang, Xi-Ping; Roth, Bryan L; Lee, Kangho; Rhim, Hyewhon; Choo, Il Han; Chong, Youhoon; Keum, Gyochang; Nam, Ghilsoo; Choo, Hyunah

    2013-11-01

    The 5-HT7 receptor (5-HT7 R) is a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of depression and neuropathic pain. The 5-HT7 R antagonist SB-269970 exhibited antidepressant-like activity, whereas systemic administration of the 5-HT7 R agonist AS-19 significantly inhibited mechanical hypersensitivity and thermal hyperalgesia. In our efforts to discover selective 5-HT7 R antagonists or agonists, aryl biphenyl-3-ylmethylpiperazines were designed, synthesized, and biologically evaluated against the 5-HT7 R. Among the synthesized compounds, 1-([2'-methoxy-(1,1'-biphenyl)-3-yl]methyl)-4-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazine (28) was the best binder to the 5-HT7 R (pKi =7.83), and its antagonistic property was confirmed by functional assays. The selectivity profile of compound 28 was also recorded for the 5-HT7 R over other serotonin receptor subtypes, such as 5-HT1 R, 5-HT2 R, 5-HT3 R, and 5-HT6 R. In a molecular modeling study, the 2-methoxyphenyl moiety attached to the piperazine ring of compound 28 was proposed to be essential for the antagonistic function. PMID:24039134

  9. Central nervous system effects of the interaction between risperidone (single dose) and the 5-HT6 antagonist SB742457 (repeated doses) in healthy men

    PubMed Central

    Liem-Moolenaar, Marieke; Rad, Mandana; Zamuner, Stefano; Cohen, Adam F; Lemme, Francesca; Franson, Kari L; van Gerven, Joop M A; Pich, Emilio Merlo

    2011-01-01

    AIM Several lines of evidence suggest a possible role of 5-HT6receptor antagonists in cognitive dysfunction of schizophrenia. Atypical antipsychotics, such as risperidone, are currently used in these disorders. Therefore, the pharmacological interactions between the 5-HT6 antagonist SB-742457 and risperidone were investigated in the light of possible co-medication. METHODS A randomized, double-blind, two-way crossover design was used to study the interaction between multiple doses SB-742457 50 mg and a single dose risperidone 2 mg in 18 healthy subjects. RESULTS Treatment was well tolerated. The most common adverse event was somnolence in 83% during the combination vs. 50% of subjects after risperidone, 32% after placebo and 11% after SB-742457. Combination treatment produced a statistically significant increase in the maximum plasma concentration of risperidone and had no effect on SB-742457 pharmacokinetics. Risperidone decreased saccadic peak velocity, finger tapping, adaptive tracking, subjective alertness, delayed word recognition and body sway and increased electroencephalogram (EEG) theta power and prolactin. The only pharmacodynamic interaction of risperidone and SB-742457 was an increase of absolute EEG alpha (ratio = 1.25, 95% CI = 1.11, 1.40, P = 0.0004) and beta power (ratio = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.03, 1.27, P = 0.016). No significant effects of SB-742457 alone were found. CONCLUSION The pharmacokinetic interactions between SB-742457 and risperidone detected in this study were not clinically relevant. The increase in EEG alpha and beta power is incompatible with enhanced risperidone activity, but could point to mild arousing effects of the combination. Most pharmacodynamic changes of risperidone are consistent with previously reported data. The potential cognitive effects of SB-742457 remain to be established. PMID:21223356

  10. ADN-1184, a monoaminergic ligand with 5-HT6/7 receptor antagonist action, exhibits activity in animal models of anxiety.

    PubMed

    Partyka, Anna; Wasik, Anna; Jastrzębska-Więsek, Magdalena; Mierzejewski, Paweł; Bieńkowski, Przemysław; Kołaczkowski, Marcin; Wesołowska, Anna

    2016-06-01

    Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) include apathy, sleep problems, irritability, wandering, elation, agitation/aggression, and mood disorders such as depression and/or anxiety. Elderly patients are usually treated with second-generation antipsychotics; however, they present not enough efficacy against all symptoms observed. Hence, there still is an unmet need for novel pharmacotherapeutic agents targeted BPSD. A novel arylsulfonamide derivative ADN-1184 has been developed that possesses a preclinical profile of activity corresponding to criteria required for treatment of both psychosis and depressive symptoms of BPSD without exacerbating cognitive impairment or inducing motor disturbances. To broaden its pharmacological efficacy toward anxiety symptoms, its anxiolytic properties have been examined in common animal preclinical models in rats and mice. ADN-1184 significantly increased the number of entries into open arms measured in the elevated plus-maze test; however, it simultaneously increased parameters of exploratory activity. In the Vogel conflict drinking test, ADN-1184 dose-dependently and significantly increased the number of shocks accepted and the number of licks. Moreover, in mice, it also had specific anxiolytic-like activity in the four-plate test, and only negligible one at a specific mid-range dose measured in the spontaneous marble burying test. The obtained findings reveal that ADN-1184 displays anxiolytic-like activity in animal models of anxiety which employed punished stimuli. In its unusual combination of some anxiolytic action with already proven antipsychotic and antidepressant properties, and lack of any disruptive impact on learning and memory processes and motor coordination, ADN-1184 displays a profile that would be desired for a novel therapeutic for BPSD. PMID:26979176

  11. Effect of Acute and Chronic Electroconvulsive Shock on 5-Hydroxytrypamine 6 Receptor Immunoreactivity in Rat Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Kang, Seungwoo; Kim, Hyun Ju; Choi, Sun-Hye; Shin, Seungkeun; Lee, Hyung Ha

    2014-01-01

    Electroconvulsive shock (ECS) induces not only an antidepressant effect but also adverse effects such as amnesia. One potential mechanism underlying both the antidepressant and amnesia effect of ECS may involve the regulation of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) 6 (5-HT6) receptor, but less is known about the effects of acute ECS on the changes in 5-HT6 receptor expression in the hippocampus. In addition, as regulation of 5-HT receptor expression is influenced by the number of ECS treatment and by interval between ECS treatment and sacrifice, it is probable that magnitude and time-dependent changes in 5-HT6 receptor expression could be influenced by repeated ECS exposure. To explore this possibility, we observed and compared the changes of 5-HT6 receptor immunoreactivity (5-HT6 IR) in rat hippocampus at 1, 8, 24, or 72 h after the treatment with either a single ECS (acute ECS) or daily ECS for 10 days (chronic ECS). We found that acute ECS increased 5-HT6 IR in the CA1, CA3, and granule cell layer of hippocampus, reaching peak levels at 8 h and returning to basal levels 72 h later. The magnitude and time-dependent changes in 5-HT6 IR observed after acute ECS were not affected by chronic ECS. These results demonstrate that both acute and chronic ECS transiently increase the 5-HT6 IR in rat hippocampus, and suggest that the magnitude and time-dependent changes in 5-HT6 IR in the hippocampus appear not to be influenced by repeated ECS treatment. PMID:25258570

  12. Effects of risperidone, clozapine and the 5-HT6 antagonist GSK-742457 on PCP-induced deficits in reversal learning in the two-lever operant task in male Sprague Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    de Bruin, N M W J; van Drimmelen, M; Kops, M; van Elk, J; Wetering, M Middelveld-van de; Schwienbacher, I

    2013-05-01

    Reasoning and problem solving deficits have been reported in schizophrenic patients. In the present study, we have tested rats in a two-lever reversal learning task in a Skinner box to model these deficits. In other studies using the Skinner box, atypical antipsychotics fully reversed phencyclidine (PCP)-induced impairments in reversal learning which is in contrast to clinical observations where antipsychotics lack the ability to fully reverse cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. Therefore, it can be argued that the outcome of these tests may lack predictive value. In the present study, after training on a spatial discrimination between two levers, rats were exposed to a reversal of the previously learned stimulus-response contingency during 5 days. We first investigated the effects of sub-chronic treatment with the non-competitive N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) antagonists dizocilpine (MK-801) and PCP on reversal learning and extinction in male Sprague Dawley rats. Subsequently, we studied the effects of different PCP treatment regimes. Then, we investigated whether the atypical antipsychotics risperidone and clozapine and the 5-hydroxytryptamine6 (5-HT6) antagonist GSK-742457 could reverse the PCP-induced deficits. All drugs were administered subcutaneously (s.c.). MK-801 did not impair reversal learning, while PCP (1.0 and 2.0 mg/kg) induced a clear deficit in reversal learning. Both compounds, however, disrupted extinction at all tested doses. Risperidone and clozapine were both ineffective in significantly ameliorating the PCP-induced deficit in reversal learning which fits well with the clinical observations. The lowest dose of clozapine (1.25 mg/kg) had an intermediate effect in ameliorating the deficit in reversal learning induced by PCP (not different from control or PCP-treated rats). The lowest dose of GSK-742457 (0.63 mg/kg) fully reversed the PCP-induced deficits while the higher dose (5.0 mg/kg) had an intermediate effect. PMID:23384714

  13. Differences in the central nervous system distribution and pharmacology of the mouse 5-hydroxytryptamine-6 receptor compared with rat and human receptors investigated by radioligand binding, site-directed mutagenesis, and molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Hirst, Warren D; Abrahamsen, Bjarke; Blaney, Frank E; Calver, Andrew R; Aloj, Lucia; Price, Gary W; Medhurst, Andrew D

    2003-12-01

    There is increasing evidence for a role of 5-hydroxytrypta-mine-6 (5-HT6) receptors in cognitive function. In the rat and human brain, 5-HT6 receptors are widely expressed and highly enriched in the basal ganglia. However, in the mouse brain, only very low levels of 5-HT6 receptor mRNA and receptor protein, measured by TaqMan reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and selective radioligand binding, could be detected, with no evidence of enrichment in the basal ganglia. The mouse receptor was cloned and transiently expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells to characterize its pharmacological profile. Despite significant sequence homology between human, rat, and mouse 5-HT6 receptors, the pharmacological profile of the mouse receptor was significantly different from the rat and human receptors. Four amino acid residues, conserved in rat and human and divergent in mouse receptors, were identified, and various mutant receptors were generated and their pharmacologies studied. Residues 188 (tyrosine in mouse, phenylalanine in rat and human) in transmembrane region 5 and 290 (serine in mouse, asparagine in rat and human) in transmembrane region 6 were identified as key amino acids responsible for the different pharmacological profiles. Molecular modeling of the receptor and docking of selective and nonselective compounds was undertaken to elucidate the ligand receptor interactions. The binding pocket was predicted to be different in the mouse compared with rat and human 5-HT6 receptors, and the models were in excellent agreement with the observed mutation results and have been used extensively in the design of further selective 5-HT6 antagonists. PMID:14645659

  14. Effect of ketamine administration, alone and in combination with E-6837, on climbing behavior.

    PubMed

    Briones-Aranda, Alfredo; Suárez-Santiago, José E; Picazo, Ofir; Castellanos-Pérez, Manuela

    2016-08-01

    Some types of schizophrenia have been associated with repetitive movements lacking specific purpose, also known as stereotyped behavior. Dopamine agonists (D2) and noncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists (e.g. ketamine) have been administered in rodent models to induce stereotyped behavior that resembles some motor symptoms of schizophrenia. Recently, a relationship has been found between 5-HT6 receptors (5-HT6Rs) and dopaminergic activity. The present study evaluates the effect of ketamine (5 and 10 mg/kg), alone and in combination with the 5-HT6R agonist E-6837, on the climbing behavior of male mice. Ketamine was administered with an acute (1 day) and subchronic (5 day) scheme. Later, these doses and schemes were combined with an acute scheme of E-6837 (5 and 10 mg/kg). With both the acute and the subchronic schemes, ketamine increased climbing behavior at a dose of 10 mg/kg, and this effect was reversed by E-6837 (at 5 and 10 mg/kg). The present results suggest that there is an interaction between N-methyl-D-aspartate and 5-HT6 receptors in the regulation of climbing behavior. Further research is necessary to provide more evidence on this interaction. PMID:27035065

  15. Interaction of tryptamine and ergoline compounds with threonine 196 in the ligand binding site of the 5-hydroxytryptamine6 receptor.

    PubMed

    Boess, F G; Monsma, F J; Meyer, V; Zwingelstein, C; Sleight, A J

    1997-09-01

    We examined the ligand-binding site of the 5-hydroxytryptamine6 (5-HT6) receptor using site-directed mutagenesis. Interactions with residues in two characteristic positions of trans-membrane region V are important for ligand binding in several bioamine receptors. In the 5-HT6 receptor, one of these residues is a threonine (Thr196), whereas in most other mammalian 5-HT receptors, the corresponding residue is alanine. After transient expression in human embryonic kidney 293 cells, we determined the effects of the mutation T196A on [3H]d-lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) binding and adenylyl cyclase stimulation. This mutation produced a receptor with a 10-fold reduced affinity for [3H]LSD and a 6-fold reduced affinity for 5-HT. The potency of both LSD and 5-HT for stimulation of adenylyl cyclase was also reduced by 18- and 7-fold, respectively. The affinity of other N1-unsubstituted ergolines (e.g., ergotamine, lisuride) was reduced 10-30 fold, whereas the affinity of N1-methylated ergolines (e.g., metergoline, methysergide, mesulergine) and other ligands, such as methiothepine, clozapine, ritanserin, amitriptyline, and mainserin, changed very little or increased. This indicates that in wild-type 5-HT6 receptor, Thr196 interacts with the N1 of N1-unsubstituted ergolines and tryptamines, probably forming a hydrogen bond. Based on molecular modeling, a serine residue in transmembrane region IV of the 5-HT2A receptor has previously been proposed to interact with the N1-position of 5-HT. When the corresponding residue of the 5-HT6 receptor (Ala154) was converted to serine, no change in the affinity of twelve 5-HT6 receptor ligands or in the potency of 5-HT and LSD could be detected, suggesting that this position does not contribute to the ligand binding site of the 5-HT6 receptor. PMID:9284367

  16. Pharmacological targeting of the serotonergic system for the treatment of obesity

    PubMed Central

    Garfield, Alastair S; Heisler, Lora K

    2009-01-01

    The attenuation of food intake as induced by an increase in serotonergic (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) efficacy has been a target of antiobesity pharmacotherapies. However, the induction of tolerance and/or side-effects limited the clinical utility of the earliest serotonin-related medications. With the global prevalence of obesity rising, there has been renewed interest in the manipulation of the serotonergic system as a point of pharmacological intervention. The serotonin2C receptor (5-HT2CR), serotonin1B (rodent)/serotonin1Dβ (human) receptor (5-HT1B/1DβR) and serotonin6 receptor (5-HT6R) represent the most promising serotonin receptor therapeutic targets. Canonical serotonin receptor compounds have given way to a myriad of novel receptor-selective ligands, many of which have observable anorectic effects. Here we review serotonergic compounds reducing ingestive behaviour and discuss their clinical potential for the treatment of obesity. PMID:19029184

  17. Serotonin₆ receptors in the dorsal hippocampus regulate depressive-like behaviors in unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned Parkinson's rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kun-Cheng; Li, Jun-Yi; Tan, Hui-Hui; Du, Cheng-Xue; Xie, Wen; Zhang, Yu-Ming; Ma, Wei-Lin; Zhang, Li

    2015-08-01

    Preclinical studies indicate both activation and blockade of serotonin6 (5-HT6) receptors may produce antidepressant-like effects. Depression is a common symptom in Parkinson's disease (PD); however, its pathophysiology is unclear. Here we examined whether 5-HT6 receptors in the dorsal hippocampus (DH) involve in the regulation of PD-associated depression. Unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the medial forebrain bundle in rats induced depressive-like responses as measured by the sucrose preference and forced swim tests when compared to sham-operated rats. In sham-operated rats, intra-DH injection of 5HT6 receptor agonist WAY208466 or antagonist SB258585 increased sucrose consumption and decreased immobility time, indicating the induction of antidepressant effects. In the lesioned rats, WAY208466 also produced antidepressant effects, whereas SB258585 decreased sucrose consumption and increased immobility time, indicating the induction of depressive-like behaviors. Neurochemical results showed that WAY208466 did not change dopamine (DA) levels in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), DH and habenula, and noradrenaline (NA) levels in the DH and habenula in sham-operated rats, and SB258585 increased DA and NA levels in these structures. Further, WAY208466 increased DA levels in the mPFC, DH and habenula, and NA level in the habenula in the lesioned rats, and SB258585 decreased DA levels in the mPFC and habenula. Additionally, the lesion did not change the density of neuronal glutamate transporter EAAC1/5-HT6 receptor co-expressing neurons in the DH. Compared to sham-operated rats, these findings suggest that the effects of 5-HT6 receptors in PD-associated depression may be mediated through different neurochemical mechanisms, and the DH is an important site involved in these effects. PMID:25863121

  18. Novel arylsulfonamide derivatives with 5-HT₆/5-HT₇ receptor antagonism targeting behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia.

    PubMed

    Kołaczkowski, Marcin; Marcinkowska, Monika; Bucki, Adam; Pawłowski, Maciej; Mitka, Katarzyna; Jaśkowska, Jolanta; Kowalski, Piotr; Kazek, Grzegorz; Siwek, Agata; Wasik, Anna; Wesołowska, Anna; Mierzejewski, Paweł; Bienkowski, Przemyslaw

    2014-06-12

    In order to target behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD), we used molecular modeling-assisted design to obtain novel multifunctional arylsulfonamide derivatives that potently antagonize 5-HT(6/7/2A) and D2 receptors, without interacting with M1 receptors and hERG channels. In vitro studies confirmed their antagonism of 5-HT(7/2A) and D2 receptors and weak interactions with key antitargets (M1R and hERG) associated with side effects. Marked 5-HT6 receptor affinities were also observed, notably for 6-fluoro-3-(piperidin-4-yl)-1,2-benzoxazole derivatives connected by a 3-4 unit alkyl linker with mono- or bicyclic, lipophilic arylsulfonamide moieties. N-[4-[4-(6-Fluoro-1,2-benzoxazol-3-yl)piperidin-1-yl]butyl]benzothiophene-2-sulfonamide (72) was characterized in vitro on 14 targets and antitargets. It displayed dual blockade of 5-HT6 and D2 receptors and negligible interactions at hERG and M1 receptors. Unlike reference antipsychotics, 72 displayed marked antipsychotic and antidepressant activity in rats after oral administration, in the absence of cognitive or motor impairment. This profile is particularly attractive when targeting a fragile, elderly BPSD patient population. PMID:24805037

  19. Serotonin induces the migration of PC12 cells via the serotonin receptor 6/cAMP/ERK pathway

    PubMed Central

    KOIZUMI, KEITA; NAKAJIMA, HIDEO

    2014-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) functions as a chemoattractant that modulates neural migration during prenatal and early postnatal development. However, its molecular mechanism remains to be elucidated. The effect of 5-HT on neural cell migration was examined using PC12 neuron-like cell line. Transwell migration assay was used to determine the effect of 5-HT on PC12 cell migration. The results demonstrated that 5-HT and nerve growth factor (NGF) induced PC12 cell migration in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, 5-HT receptor antagonists suggest that 5-HT-induced migration was mediated by serotonin receptor 6 (5-HT6), a Gs-protein coupled receptor that elevates the intercellular cAMP level. By contrast, antagonists of serotonin receptor 3 (5-HT3) did not show any effects on PC12 cell migration. Clozapine, an inhibitor of cAMP accumulation mediated by 5-HT6, significantly reduced the effect of 5-HT on the PC12 cell migration. An inhibitor of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) also suppressed migration. These results suggest that 5-HT induces PC12 cell migration by activating cAMP/ERK signaling pathways, which is mediated by 5-HT6 receptor. PMID:24649064

  20. Synthesis and biological evaluation of 4-nitroindole derivatives as 5-HT2A receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Faisal; Viswanath, Ambily Nath Indu; Pae, Ae Nim; Rhim, Hyewhon; Park, Woo-Kyu; Choo, Hea-Young Park

    2015-03-15

    A novel series of 4-nitroindole sulfonamides containing a methyleneamino-N,N-dimethylformamidine were prepared. The binding of these compounds to 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C was evaluated, and most of the compounds showed IC50 values of less than 1μM, and exhibited high selectivity for the 5-HT2C receptor. However, little selectivity was observed in the functional assay for 5-HT6 receptors. The computational modeling studies further validated the biological results and also demonstrated a reasonable correlation between the activity of compounds and the mode of superimposition with specified pharmacophoric features. PMID:25684421

  1. The role of serotonin receptor subtypes in treating depression: a review of animal studies

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Gregory V.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are effective in treating depression. Given the existence of different families and subtypes of 5-HT receptors, multiple 5-HT receptors may be involved in the antidepressant-like behavioral effects of SSRIs. Objective Behavioral pharmacology studies investigating the role of 5-HT receptor subtypes in producing or blocking the effects of SSRIs were reviewed. Results Few animal behavior tests were available to support the original development of SSRIs. Since their development, a number of behavioral tests and models of depression have been developed that are sensitive to the effects of SSRIs, as well as to other types of antidepressant treatments. The rationale for the development and use of these tests is reviewed. Behavioral effects similar to those of SSRIs (antidepressant-like) have been produced by agonists at 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT2C, 5-HT4, and 5-HT6 receptors. Also, antagonists at 5-HT2A, 5-HT2C, 5-HT3, 5- HT6, and 5-HT7 receptors have been reported to produce antidepressant-like responses. Although it seems paradoxical that both agonists and antagonists at particular 5-HT receptors can produce antidepressant-like effects, they probably involve diverse neurochemical mechanisms. The behavioral effects of SSRIs and other antidepressants may also be augmented when 5-HT receptor agonists or antagonists are given in combination. Conclusions The involvement of 5-HT receptors in the antidepressant-like effects of SSRIs is complex and involves the orchestration of stimulation and blockade at different 5-HT receptor subtypes. Individual 5-HT receptors provide opportunities for the development of a newer generation of antidepressants that may be more beneficial and effective than SSRIs. PMID:21107537

  2. The 5-HT4 receptor: molecular cloning and pharmacological characterization of two splice variants.

    PubMed Central

    Gerald, C; Adham, N; Kao, H T; Olsen, M A; Laz, T M; Schechter, L E; Bard, J A; Vaysse, P J; Hartig, P R; Branchek, T A

    1995-01-01

    Molecular cloning efforts have provided primary amino acid sequence and signal transduction data for a large collection of serotonin receptor subtypes. These include five 5-HT1-like receptors, three 5-HT2 receptors, one 5-HT3 receptor, two 5-HT5 receptors, one 5-HT6 receptor and one 5-HT7 receptor. Molecular biological information on the 5-HT4 receptor is notably absent from this list. We now report the cloning of the pharmacologically defined 5-HT4 receptor. Using degenerate oligonucleotide primers, we identified a rat brain PCR fragment which encoded a '5-HT receptor-like' amino acid sequence. The corresponding full length cDNA was isolated from a rat brain cDNA library. Transiently expressed in COS-7 cells, this receptor stimulates adenylyl cyclase activity and is sensitive to the benzamide derivative cisapride. The response is also blocked by ICS-205930. Interestingly, we isolated two splice variants of the receptor, 5-HT4L and 5-HT4S, differing in the length and sequence of their C-termini. In rat brain, the 5-HT4S transcripts are restricted to the striatum, but the 5-HT4L transcripts are expressed throughout the brain, except in the cerebellum where it was barely detectable. In peripheral tissues, differential expression was also observed in the atrium of the heart where only the 5-HT4S isoform was detectable. Images PMID:7796807

  3. Allergic sensitization modifies the pulmonary expression of 5-hydroxytryptamine receptors in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Córdoba-Rodríguez, Guadalupe; Vargas, Mario H; Ruiz, Víctor; Carbajal, Verónica; Campos-Bedolla, Patricia; Mercadillo-Herrera, Paulina; Arreola-Ramírez, José Luis; Segura-Medina, Patricia

    2016-03-01

    There is mounting evidence that 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) plays a role in asthma. However, scarce information exists about the pulmonary expression of 5-HT receptors and its modification after allergic sensitization. In the present work, we explored the expression of 5-HT1A, 5-HT2A, 5-HT3, 5-HT4, 5-ht5a, 5-HT6, and 5-HT7 receptors in lungs from control and sensitized guinea pigs through qPCR and Western blot. In control animals, mRNA from all receptors was detectable in lung homogenates, especially from 5-HT2A and 5-HT4 receptors. Sensitized animals had decreased mRNA expression of 5-HT2A and 5-HT4 receptors and increased that of 5-HT7 receptor. In contrast, they had increased protein expression of 5-HT2A receptor in bronchial epithelium and of 5-HT4 receptor in lung parenchyma. The degree of airway response to the allergic challenge was inversely correlated with mRNA expression of the 5-HT1A receptor. In summary, our results showed that major 5-HT receptor subtypes are constitutively expressed in the guinea pig lung, and that allergic sensitization modifies the expression of 5-HT2A, 5-HT4, and 5-HT7 receptors. PMID:26657047

  4. 5-Hydroxytryptamine Receptor Subtypes and their Modulators with Therapeutic Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Pithadia, Anand B.; Jain, Sunita M.

    2009-01-01

    5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) has become one of the most investigated and complex biogenic amines. The main receptors and their subtypes, e.g., 5-HTI (5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HTID, 5-HTIE and 5-HT1F), 5-HT2 (5-HT2A, 5-HT2B and 5-HT2C), 5-HT3, 5-HT4, 5-HT5 (5-HT5A, 5-HT5B), 5-HT6 and 5-HT7 have been identified. Specific drugs which are capable of either selectively stimulating or inhibiting these receptor subtypes are being designed. This has generated therapeutic potentials of 5-HT receptor modulators in a variety of disease conditions. Conditions where 5-HT receptor modulators have established their use with distinct efficacy and advantages include migraine, anxiety, psychosis, obesity and cancer therapy-induced vomiting by cytotoxic drugs and radiation. Discovery of 5-HT, its biosynthesis, metabolism, physiological role and the potential of 5-HT receptor modulators in various nervous, cardiovascular and gastrointestinal tract disorders, bone growth and micturition have been discussed in this article. Keywords 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptors; Modulators; Biogenic amines PMID:22505971

  5. GR-127935-sensitive mechanism mediating hypotension in anesthetized rats: are 5-HT5B receptors involved?

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Maldonado, Carolina; López-Sánchez, Pedro; Anguiano-Robledo, Liliana; Leopoldo, Marcello; Lacivita, Enza; Terrón, José A

    2015-04-01

    The 5-HT1B/1D receptor antagonist, GR-127935, inhibits hypotensive responses produced by the 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B/1D and 5-HT7 receptor agonist, and 5-HT5A/5B receptor ligand, 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT), in rats. This work further characterized the above mechanism using more selective 5-HT1B and 5-HT1D receptor antagonists. Also, expression of 5-HT5A and 5-HT5B receptor mRNAs in blood vessels was searched by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Decreases in diastolic blood pressure induced by 5-CT (0.001-10 μg/kg, intravenously) were analyzed in anesthetized rats that had received intravenous vehicle (1 mL/kg), SB-224289 (5-HT1B antagonist; 0.3 and 1.0 mg/kg), BRL15572 (5-HT1D antagonist; 0.3 and 1.0 mg/kg), SB-224289 + BRL15572 (0.3 mg/kg, each), or SB-224289 + BRL15572 (0.3 mg/kg, each) + GR-127935 (1 mg/kg). Because only the latter treatment inhibited 5-CT-induced hypotension, suggestive of a mechanism unrelated to 5-HT1B/1D receptors, the effects of antagonists/ligands at 5-HT5A (SB-699551, 1 mg/kg), 5-HT6 (SB-399885, 1 mg/kg), and 5-HT1B/1D/5A/5B/7 receptors (ergotamine, 0.1 mg/kg) on 5-CT-induced hypotension were tested. Interestingly, only ergotamine blocked 5-CT-induced responses; this effect closely paralleled that of SB-224289 + BRL-15572 + GR-127935. Neither did ergotamine nor GR-127935 inhibit hypotensive responses induced by the 5-HT7 receptor agonist, LP-44. Faint but clear bands corresponding to 5-HT5A and 5-HT5B receptor mRNAs in aorta and mesenteric arteries were detected. Results suggest that the GR-127935-sensitive mechanism mediating hypotension in rats is unrelated to 5-HT1B, 5-HT1D, 5-HT5A, 5-HT6, and 5-HT7 receptors. This mechanism, however, resembles putative 5-HT5B receptors. PMID:25502305

  6. Phosphoinositide system-linked serotonin receptor subtypes and their pharmacological properties and clinical correlates.

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, S C; Davis, J M; Pandey, G N

    1995-01-01

    Serotonergic neurotransmission represents a complex mechanism involving pre- and post-synaptic events and distinct 5-HT receptor subtypes. Serotonin (5-HT) receptors have been classified into several categories, and they are termed as 5-HT1, 5-HT2, 5-HT3, 5-HT4, 5-HT5, 5-HT6 and 5-HT7 type receptors. 5-HT1 receptors have been further subdivided into 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT1D, 5-HT1E and 5-HT1F. 5-HT2 receptors have been divided into 5-HT2A, 5-HT2B and 5-HT2C receptors. All 5-HT2 receptor subtypes are linked to the multifunctional phosphoinositide (PI) signalling system. 5-HT3 receptors are considered ion-gated receptors and are also linked to the PI signalling system by an unknown mechanism. The 5-HT2A receptor subtype is the most widely studied of the 5-HT receptors in psychiatric disorders (for example, suicide, depression and schizophrenia) as well as in relation to the mechanism of action of antidepressant drugs. The roles of 5-HT2C and 5-HT3 receptors in psychiatric disorders are less clear. These 5-HT receptors also play an important role in alcoholism. It has been shown that 5-HT2A, 5-HT2C and 5-HT3 antagonists cause attenuation of alcohol intake in animals and humans. However, the exact mechanisms are unknown. The recent cloning of the cDNAs for 5-HT2A, 5-HT2C and 5-HT3 receptors provides the opportunity to explore the molecular mechanisms responsible for the alterations in these receptors during illness as well as pharmacotherapy. This review article will focus on the current research into the pharmacological properties, molecular biology, and clinical correlates of 5-HT2A, 5-HT2C and 5-HT3 receptors. PMID:7786883

  7. 5-HT3 receptors as important mediators of nausea and vomiting due to chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Navari, Rudolph M

    2015-10-01

    Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) is associated with a significant deterioration in quality of life. The emetogenicity of the chemotherapeutic agents, repeated chemotherapy cycles, and patient risk factors significantly influence CINV. The use of a combination of a 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonist, dexamethasone, and a neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptor antagonist has significantly improved the control of acute and delayed emesis in single-day chemotherapy. The first generation 5-HT3 receptor antagonists have been very effective in the control of chemotherapy induced emesis in the first 24 h postchemotherapy (acute emesis), but have not been as effective against delayed emesis (24-120 h postchemotherapy). Palonosetron, a second generation 5-HT3 receptor antagonist with a different half-life, a different binding capacity, and a different mechanism of action than the first generation 5-HT3 receptor antagonists appears to be the most effective agent in its class. Despite the control of emesis, nausea has not been well controlled by current agents. Olanzapine, a FDA approved antipsychotic that blocks multiple neurotransmitters: dopamine at D1, D2, D3, D4 brain receptors, serotonin at 5-HT2a, 5-HT2c, 5-HT3, 5-HT6 receptors, catecholamines at alpha1 adrenergic receptors, acetylcholine at muscarinic receptors, and histamine at H1 receptors, has emerged in recent trials as an effective preventative agent for chemotherapy-induced emesis and nausea, as well as a very effective agent for the treatment of breakthrough emesis and nausea. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane channels and transporters in cancers. PMID:25838122

  8. Adrenergic and serotonin receptors affect retinal superoxide generation in diabetic mice: relationship to capillary degeneration and permeability.

    PubMed

    Du, Yunpeng; Cramer, Megan; Lee, Chieh Allen; Tang, Jie; Muthusamy, Arivalagan; Antonetti, David A; Jin, Hui; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Kern, Timothy S

    2015-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species play an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. We studied the role of adrenergic and serotonin receptors in the generation of superoxide by retina and 661W retinal cells in high glucose and of the α1-adrenergic receptor (AR) on vascular lesions of the retinopathy in experimentally diabetic C57Bl/6J mice (and controls) after 2 and 8 months. Compared with 5 mM glucose, incubating cells or retinal explants in 30 mM glucose induced superoxide generation. This response was reduced or ablated by pharmacologic inhibition of the α1-AR (a Gq-coupled receptor) or Gs-coupled serotonin (5-HT2, 5-HT4, 5-HT6, and 5-HT7) receptors or by activation of the Gi-coupled α2-AR. In elevated glucose, the α1-AR produced superoxide via phospholipase C, inositol triphosphate-induced Ca(2+) release, and NADPH oxidase, and pharmacologic inhibition of these reactions prevented the superoxide increase. Generation of retinal superoxide, expression of proinflammatory proteins, and degeneration of retinal capillaries in diabetes all were significantly inhibited with daily doxazosin or apocynin (inhibitors of α1-AR and NADPH oxidase, respectively), but increased vascular permeability was not significantly affected. Adrenergic receptors, and perhaps other GPCRs, represent novel targets for inhibiting the development of important features of diabetic retinopathy. PMID:25667222

  9. Serotonin receptors are selectively expressed in the avian germ cells and early embryos.

    PubMed

    Stępińska, Urszula; Kuwana, Takashi; Olszańska, Bożenna

    2015-06-01

    The expression of nine serotonin (5-HT) receptor transcripts was studied using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in germ cells, cleavage and gastrulation stages of Japanese quail, and qPCR for 5-HT3 and 5-HT4 receptors in oocytes and embryos. We show the presence/absence of nine serotonin transcripts known in birds for receptors 5-HT1A, 5-HT1F, 5-HT2B, 5-HT2C, 5-HT3, 5-HT4, 5-HT5A, 5-HT6 and 5-HT7A in avian germ cells and early embryos. The absence of 5-HT3 and 5-HT5A in primordial germ cells and of 5-HT3 and 5-HT7A in sperm is characteristic. All transcripts appeared in oocytes at all stages (except for 5-HT3 and 5-HT5A transcripts) and all were present in cleaving embryos and at gastrulation, except for 5-HT3, which was permanently observed as late as in stage 4. Interestingly, 5-HT3 and 5-HT5A receptors accumulated in 3-mm and F1 oocytes but were degraded at ovulation and started to be re-transcribed in cleavage stage II embryos and beyond. The selective appearance of 5-HT receptors in germ cells and early embryos supports the hypothesis that serotonin may act as a signalling molecule at early stages of germ line and embryo differentiation via individual receptors present during different stages, when specialized communication systems are not yet developed. PMID:24521994

  10. Adrenergic and serotonin receptors affect retinal superoxide generation in diabetic mice: relationship to capillary degeneration and permeability

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yunpeng; Cramer, Megan; Lee, Chieh Allen; Tang, Jie; Muthusamy, Arivalagan; Antonetti, David A.; Jin, Hui; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Kern, Timothy S.

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species play an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. We studied the role of adrenergic and serotonin receptors in the generation of superoxide by retina and 661W retinal cells in high glucose and of the α1-adrenergic receptor (AR) on vascular lesions of the retinopathy in experimentally diabetic C57Bl/6J mice (and controls) after 2 and 8 months. Compared with 5 mM glucose, incubating cells or retinal explants in 30 mM glucose induced superoxide generation. This response was reduced or ablated by pharmacologic inhibition of the α1-AR (a Gq-coupled receptor) or Gs-coupled serotonin (5-HT2, 5-HT4, 5-HT6, and 5-HT7) receptors or by activation of the Gi-coupled α2-AR. In elevated glucose, the α1-AR produced superoxide via phospholipase C, inositol triphosphate-induced Ca2+ release, and NADPH oxidase, and pharmacologic inhibition of these reactions prevented the superoxide increase. Generation of retinal superoxide, expression of proinflammatory proteins, and degeneration of retinal capillaries in diabetes all were significantly inhibited with daily doxazosin or apocynin (inhibitors of α1-AR and NADPH oxidase, respectively), but increased vascular permeability was not significantly affected. Adrenergic receptors, and perhaps other GPCRs, represent novel targets for inhibiting the development of important features of diabetic retinopathy.—Du, Y., Cramer, M., Lee, C. A., Tang, J., Muthusamy, A., Antonetti, D. A., Jin, H., Palczewski, K., Kern, T. S. Adrenergic and serotonin receptors affect retinal superoxide generation in diabetic mice: relationship to capillary degeneration and permeability. PMID:25667222

  11. Discriminative stimulus properties of 1.25mg/kg clozapine in rats: Mediation by serotonin 5-HT2 and dopamine D4 receptors.

    PubMed

    Prus, Adam J; Wise, Laura E; Pehrson, Alan L; Philibin, Scott D; Bang-Andersen, Benny; Arnt, Jørn; Porter, Joseph H

    2016-10-01

    The atypical antipsychotic drug clozapine remains one of most effective treatments for schizophrenia, given a lack of extrapyramidal side effects, improvements in negative symptoms, cognitive impairment, and in symptoms in treatment-resistant schizophrenia. The adverse effects of clozapine, including agranulocytosis, make finding a safe clozapine-like a drug a goal for drug developers. The drug discrimination paradigm is a model of interoceptive stimulus that has been used in an effort to screen experimental drugs for clozapine-like atypical antipsychotic effects. The present study was conducted to elucidate the receptor-mediated stimulus properties that form this clozapine discriminative cue by testing selective receptor ligands in rats trained to discriminate a 1.25mg/kg dose of clozapine from vehicle in a two choice drug discrimination task. Full substitution occurred with the 5-HT2A inverse agonist M100907 and the two preferential D4/5-HT2/α1 receptor antagonists Lu 37-114 ((S)-1-(3-(2-(4-(1H-indol-5-yl)piperazin-1-yl)ethyl)indolin-1-yl)ethan-1-one) and Lu 37-254 (1-(3-(4-(1H-indol-5-yl)piperazin-1-yl)propyl)-3,4-dihydroquinolin-2(1H)-one). Partial substitution occurred with the D4 receptor antagonist Lu 38-012 and the α1 adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin. Drugs selective for 5-HT2C, 5-HT6 muscarinic, histamine H1, and benzodiazepine receptors did not substitute for clozapine. The present findings suggest that 5-HT2A inverse agonism and D4 receptor antagonism mediate the discriminative stimulus properties of 1.25mg/kg clozapine in rats, and further confirm that clozapine produces a complex compound discriminative stimulus. PMID:27502027

  12. Structural modifications of the serotonin 5-HT7 receptor agonist N-(4-cyanophenylmethyl)-4-(2-biphenyl)-1-piperazinehexanamide (LP-211) to improve in vitro microsomal stability: A case study.

    PubMed

    Lacivita, Enza; Podlewska, Sabina; Speranza, Luisa; Niso, Mauro; Satała, Grzegorz; Perrone, Roberto; Perrone-Capano, Carla; Bojarski, Andrzej J; Leopoldo, Marcello

    2016-09-14

    The 5-HT7 serotonin receptor is revealing a promising target for innovative therapeutic strategies of neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders. Here, we report the synthesis of thirty long-chain arylpiperazine analogs of the selective and brain penetrant 5-HT7 receptor agonist LP-211 (1) designed to enhance stability towards microsomal oxidative metabolism. Commonly used medicinal chemistry strategies were used (i.e., reduction of overall lipophilicity, introduction of electron-withdrawing groups, blocking of potential vulnerable sites of metabolism), and in vitro microsomal stability was tested. The data showed that the adopted design strategy does not directly translate into improvements in stability. Instead, the metabolic stability of the compounds was related to the presence of specific substituents in well-defined regions of the molecule. The collected data allowed for the construction of a machine learning model that, in a given chemical space, is able to describe and quantitatively predict the metabolic stability of the compounds. The majority of the synthesized compounds maintained high affinity for 5-HT7 receptors and showed selectivity towards 5-HT6 and dopamine D2 receptors and different selectivity for 5-HT1A and α1 adrenergic receptors. Compound 50 showed 3-fold higher in vitro stability towards oxidative metabolism than 1 and was able to stimulate neurite outgrowth in neuronal primary cultures through the 5-HT7 receptor in a shorter time and at a lower concentration than the agonist 1. A preliminary disposition study in mice revealed that compound 50 was metabolically stable and was able to pass the blood-brain barrier, thus representing a new tool for studying the pharmacotherapeutic potential of 5-HT7 receptor in vivo. PMID:27318552

  13. New therapeutic opportunities for 5-HT2C receptor ligands in neuropsychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Di Giovanni, Giuseppe; De Deurwaerdère, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The 5-HT2C receptor (R) displays a widespread distribution in the CNS and is involved in the action of 5-HT in all brain areas. Knowledge of its functional role in the CNS pathophysiology has been impaired for many years due to the lack of drugs capable of discriminating among 5-HT2R subtypes, and to a lesser extent to the 5-HT1B, 5-HT5, 5-HT6 and 5-HT7Rs. The situation has changed since the mid-90s due to the increased availability of new and selective synthesized compounds, the creation of 5-HT2C knock out mice, and the progress made in molecular biology. Many pharmacological classes of drugs including antipsychotics, antidepressants and anxiolytics display affinities toward 5-HT2CRs and new 5-HT2C ligands have been developed for various neuropsychiatric disorders. The 5-HT2CR is presumed to mediate tonic/constitutive and phasic controls on the activity of different central neurobiological networks. Preclinical data illustrate this complexity to a point that pharmaceutical companies developed either agonists or antagonists for the same disease. In order to better comprehend this complexity, this review will briefly describe the molecular pharmacology of 5-HT2CRs, as well as their cellular impacts in general, before addressing its central distribution in the mammalian brain. Thereafter, we review the preclinical efficacy of 5-HT2C ligands in numerous behavioral tests modeling human diseases, highlighting the multiple and competing actions of the 5-HT2CRs in neurobiological networks and monoaminergic systems. Notably, we will focus this evidence in the context of the physiopathology of psychiatric and neurological disorders including Parkinson's disease, levodopa-induced dyskinesia, and epilepsy. PMID:26617215

  14. Serotonin Receptors in Rat Jugular Vein: Presence and Involvement in the Contraction

    PubMed Central

    Gaskell, Geri L.; Szasz, Theodora; Thompson, Janice M.; Watts, Stephanie W.

    2010-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) is released during platelet aggregation, a phenomenon commonly observed in blood clot formation and venous diseases. Once released, 5-HT can interact with its receptors in the peripheral vasculature to modify vascular tone. The goal of this study was to perform a detailed pharmacological characterization of the 5-HT receptors involved in the contractile response of the rat jugular vein (RJV) using recently developed drugs with greater selectivity toward 5-HT receptor subtypes. We hypothesized that, as for other blood vessels, the 5-HT1B/1D and 5-HT2B receptor subtypes mediate contraction in RJV alongside the 5-HT2A receptor subtype. Endothelium-intact RJV rings were set up in an isolated organ bath for isometric tension recordings, and contractile concentration-effect curves were obtained for 13 distinct serotonergic receptor agonists. Surprisingly, the 5-HT1A and the mixed 5-HT1A/1B receptor agonists (±)-2-dipropyl-amino-8-hydroxyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronapthalene (8-OH-DPAT) and 5-methoxy-3 (1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridin-4-yl) (1H indole) (RU24969) caused contractions that were antagonized by the 5-HT1A receptor antagonist [O-methyl-3H]-N-(2-(4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl)ethyl)-N-(2-pyridinyl)cyclohexanecarboxamide (WAY100135). The contractile curve to 5-HT was shifted to the right by WAY100135, 3-[2-[4-(4-fluoro benzoyl)-piperidin-1-yl]ethyl]-1H-quinazoline-2,4-dione (ketanserin; 5-HT2A/C receptor antagonist), and 1-(2-chloro-3,4-dimethoxybenzyl)-6-methyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-9H-pyrido[3,4-b]indole hydrochloride (LY266097; 5-HT2B receptor antagonist). Ketanserin also caused rightward shifts of the contractile curves to 8-OH-DPAT, RU24969, and the 5-HT2B receptor agonist (α-methyl-5-(2-thienylmethoxy)-1H-indole-3-ethanamine) (BW723C86). Agonists for 5-HT1B/1D/1F, 5-HT3, 5-HT6, and 5-HT7 receptors were inactive. In real-time polymerase chain reaction experiments that have never been performed in this tissue previously, we

  15. Receptor binding profiles and quantitative structure-affinity relationships of some 5-substituted-N,N-diallyltryptamines.

    PubMed

    Cozzi, Nicholas V; Daley, Paul F

    2016-02-01

    N,N-Diallyltryptamine (DALT) and 5-methoxy-N,N-diallyltryptamine (5-MeO-DALT) are two tryptamines synthesized and tested by Alexander Shulgin. In self-experiments, 5-MeO-DALT was reported to be psychoactive in the 12-20mg range, while the unsubstituted compound DALT had few discernible effects in the 42-80 mg range. Recently, 5-MeO-DALT has been used in nonmedical settings for its psychoactive effects, but these effects have been poorly characterized and little is known of its pharmacological properties. We extended the work of Shulgin by synthesizing additional 5-substituted-DALTs. We then compared them to DALT and 5-MeO-DALT for their binding affinities at 45 cloned receptors and transporter proteins. Based on in vitro binding affinity, we identified 27 potential receptor targets for the 5-substituted-DALT compounds. Five of the DALT compounds had affinity in the 10-80 nM range for serotonin 5-HT1A and 5-HT2B receptors, while the affinity of DALT itself at 5-HT1A receptors was slightly lower at 100 nM. Among the 5-HT2 subtypes, the weakest affinity was at 5-HT2A receptors, spanning 250-730 nM. Five of the DALT compounds had affinity in the 50-400 nM range for serotonin 5-HT1D, 5-HT6, and 5-HT7 receptors; again, it was the unsubstituted DALT that had the weakest affinity at all three subtypes. The test drugs had even weaker affinity for 5-HT1B, 5-HT1E, and 5-HT5A subtypes and little or no affinity for the 5-HT3 subtype. These compounds also had generally nanomolar affinities for adrenergic α2A, α2B, and α2C receptors, sigma receptors σ1 and σ2, histamine H1 receptors, and norepinephrine and serotonin uptake transporters. They also bound to other targets in the nanomolar-to-low micromolar range. Based on these binding results, it is likely that multiple serotonin receptors, as well as several nonserotonergic sites are important for the psychoactive effects of DALT drugs. To learn whether any quantitative structure-affinity relationships existed, we evaluated

  16. Lipoxin receptors.

    PubMed

    Romano, Mario; Recchia, Irene; Recchiuti, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Lipoxins (LXs) represent a class of arachidonic acid (AA) metabolites that carry potent immunoregulatory and anti-inflammatory properties, LXA4 and LXB4 being the main components of this series. LXs are generated by cooperation between 5-lipoxygenase (LO) and 12- or 15-LO during cell-cell interactions or by single cell types. LX epimers at carbon 15, the 15-epi-LXs, are formed by aspirin-acetylated cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in cooperation with 5-LO. 15-epi-LXA4 is also termed aspirin-triggered LX (ATL). In vivo studies with stable LX and ATL analogs have established that these eicosanoids possess potent anti-inflammatory activities. A LXA4 receptor has been cloned. It belongs to the family of chemotactic receptors and clusters with formyl peptide receptors on chromosome 19. Therefore, it was initially denominated formyl peptide receptor like 1 (FPRL1). This receptor binds with high affinity and stereoselectivity LXA4 and ATL. It also recognizes a variety of peptides, synthetic, endogenously generated, or disease associated, but with lower affinity compared to LXA4. For this reason, this receptor has been renamed ALX. This review summarizes the current knowledge on ALX expression, signaling, and potential pathophysiological role. The involvement of additional recognition sites in LX bioactions is also discussed. PMID:17767357

  17. WAY208466 inhibits glutamate release at hippocampal nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hue Yu; Lu, Cheng Wei; Lin, Tzu Yu; Kuo, Jinn Rung; Wang, Su Jane

    2016-06-15

    Evidence suggests that the glutamatergic system plays a crucial role in the pathophysiology and treatment of depression. This study investigates the effect of WAY208466, a 5-HT6 receptor agonist exhibiting an antidepressant effect, on glutamate release from rat hippocampal nerve terminals (synaptosomes). WAY208466 inhibited the Ca(2+)-dependent release of glutamate that was evoked by exposing the synaptosomes to the potassium channel blocker 4-aminopyridine, and the selective 5-HT6 receptor antagonist SB258585 blocked this phenomenon. The WAY208466-mediated inhibition of glutamate release was associated with a reduction of 4-aminopyridine-induced increase in the cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]C) mediated via Cav2.2 (N-type) and Cav2.1 (P/Q-type) channels. WAY208466 did not alter the resting synaptosomal membrane potential or 4-aminopyridine-mediated depolarization; thus, the inhibition of the Ca(2+) influx could not be attributed to the decrease in synaptosomal excitability caused by 5-HT6 receptor activation. Furthermore, the effect of WAY208466 on 4-aminopyridine-evoked glutamate release was prevented by a Gi/Go-protein inhibitor pertussis toxin, adenylate cyclase inhibitor SQ22536, and a protein kinase A inhibitor H89. These results suggest that WAY208466 acts at the 5-HT6 receptors present in the hippocampal nerve terminals to suppress the Gi/Go-protein-coupled adenylate cyclase/protein kinase A cascade, which subsequently reduces the Ca(2+) influx via N- and P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels to inhibit the evoked glutamate release. This finding implicated a potential therapeutic role of 5-HT6 receptor agonist in the treatment of depression and other neurological diseases associated with glutamate excitotoxicity. PMID:27068148

  18. Historical overview of nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Jan-Ake

    2016-03-01

    This review summarizes the birth of the field of nuclear receptors, from Jensen's discovery of estrogen receptor alpha, Gustafsson's discovery of the three-domain structure of the glucocorticoid receptor, the discovery of the glucocorticoid response element and the first partial cloning of the glucocorticoid receptor. Furthermore the discovery of the novel receptors called orphan receptors is described. PMID:25797032

  19. Standardizing Scavenger Receptor Nomenclature

    PubMed Central

    PrabhuDas, Mercy; Bowdish, Dawn; Drickamer, Kurt; Febbraio, Maria; Herz, Joachim; Kobzik, Lester; Krieger, Monty; Loike, John; Means, Terry K.; Moestrup, Soren K.; Post, Steven; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Silverstein, Samuel; Wang, Xiang-Yang; El Khoury, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Scavenger receptors constitute a large family of proteins that are structurally diverse and participate in a wide range of biological functions. These receptors are expressed predominantly by myeloid cells and recognize a variety of ligands, including endogenous and modified host-derived molecules and microbial pathogens. There are currently eight classes of scavenger receptors, many of which have multiple names, leading to inconsistencies and confusion in the literature. To address this problem, a workshop was organized by the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health to help develop a clear definition of scavenger receptors and a standardized nomenclature based on that definition. Fifteen experts in the scavenger receptor field attended the workshop and, after extensive discussion, reached a consensus regarding the definition of scavenger receptors and a proposed scavenger receptor nomenclature. Scavenger receptors were defined as cell surface receptors that typically bind multiple ligands and promote the removal of non-self or altered-self targets. They often function by mechanisms that include endocytosis, phagocytosis, adhesion, and signaling that ultimately lead to the elimination of degraded or harmful substances. Based on this definition, nomenclature and classification of these receptors into 10 classes were proposed. The discussion and nomenclature recommendations described in this report only refer to mammalian scavenger receptors. The purpose of this article is to describe the proposed mammalian nomenclature and classification developed at the workshop and to solicit additional feedback from the broader research community. PMID:24563502

  20. Investigation of the structure requirement for 5-HT₆ binding affinity of arylsulfonyl derivatives: a computational study.

    PubMed

    Hao, Ming; Li, Yan; Li, Hanqing; Zhang, Shuwei

    2011-01-01

    5-HT(6) receptor has been implicated in a series of diseases including anxiety, depression, schizophrenia and cognitive dysfunctions. 5-HT(6) ligands have been reported to play a significant role in the treatment for central nervous system (CNS) diseases. Presently, a large series of 223 5-HT(6) ligands were studied using a combinational method by 3D-QSAR, molecular docking and molecular dynamics calculations for further improvement of potency. The optimal 3D models exhibit satisfying statistical results with r(2) (ncv), q(2) values of 0.85 and 0.50 for CoMFA, 0.81 and 0.53 for CoMSIA, respectively. Their predictive powers were validated by external test set, showing r(2) (pred) of 0.71 and 0.76. The contour maps also provide a visual representation of contributions of steric, electrostatic, hydrophobic and hydrogen bond fields as well as the prospective binding models. In addition, the agreement between 3D-QSAR, molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation proves the rationality of the developed models. These results, we hope, may be helpful in designing novel and potential 5-HT(6) ligands. PMID:21954341

  1. 5-HT3 Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, A. J.; Lummis, S. C. R.

    2009-01-01

    The 5-HT3 receptor is a member of the Cys-loop family of ligand-gated ion channels. These receptors are located in both the peripheral and central nervous systems, where functional receptors are constructed from five subunits. These subunits may be the same (homopentameric 5-HT3A receptors) or different (heteropentameric receptors, usually comprising of 5-HT3A and 5-HT3B receptor subunits), with the latter having a number of distinct properties. The 5-HT3 receptor binding site is comprised of six loops from two adjacent subunits, and critical ligand binding amino acids in these loops have been largely identified. There are a range of selective agonists and antagonists for these receptors and the pharmacophore is reasonably well understood. There are also a wide range of compounds that can modulate receptor activity. Studies have suggested many diverse potential disease targets that might be amenable to alleviation by 5-HT3 receptor selective compounds but to date only two applications have been fully realised in the clinic: the treatment of emesis and irritable-bowel syndrome. PMID:17073663

  2. P2X receptors.

    PubMed

    North, R Alan

    2016-08-01

    Extracellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) activates cell surface P2X and P2Y receptors. P2X receptors are membrane ion channels preferably permeable to sodium, potassium and calcium that open within milliseconds of the binding of ATP. In molecular architecture, they form a unique structural family. The receptor is a trimer, the binding of ATP between subunits causes them to flex together within the ectodomain and separate in the membrane-spanning region so as to open a central channel. P2X receptors have a widespread tissue distribution. On some smooth muscle cells, P2X receptors mediate the fast excitatory junction potential that leads to depolarization and contraction. In the central nervous system, activation of P2X receptors allows calcium to enter neurons and this can evoke slower neuromodulatory responses such as the trafficking of receptors for the neurotransmitter glutamate. In primary afferent nerves, P2X receptors are critical for the initiation of action potentials when they respond to ATP released from sensory cells such as taste buds, chemoreceptors or urothelium. In immune cells, activation of P2X receptors triggers the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin 1β. The development of selective blockers of different P2X receptors has led to clinical trials of their effectiveness in the management of cough, pain, inflammation and certain neurodegenerative diseases.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evolution brings Ca(2+) and ATP together to control life and death'. PMID:27377721

  3. Novel hormone "receptors".

    PubMed

    Nemere, Ilka; Hintze, Korry

    2008-02-01

    Our concepts of hormone receptors have, until recently, been narrowly defined. In the last few years, an increasing number of reports identify novel proteins, such as enzymes, acting as receptors. In this review we cover the novel receptors for the hormones atrial naturetic hormone, enterostatin, hepcidin, thyroid hormones, estradiol, progesterone, and the vitamin D metabolites 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) and 24,25(OH)(2)D(3). PMID:17546587

  4. [Nuclear receptors PPARalpha].

    PubMed

    Soska, V

    2006-06-01

    Mechanism of the fibrates action is mediated by nuclear PPARalpha receptors (Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor). These receptors regulate a number of genes that are involved both in lipids and lipoproteins metabolism and other mediators (e.g. inflammatory mediatores). Due to PPARalpha activation by fibrates, triglycerides and small dense LDL concentration is decreased, HDL cholesterol is increased and both inflammation and prothrombotic status are reduced. These effects are very important in patients with metabolic syndrom. PMID:16871768

  5. The growth hormone receptor.

    PubMed

    Waters, Michael J

    2016-06-01

    Once thought to be present only in liver, muscle and adipose tissue, the GH receptor is now known to be ubiquitously distributed, in accord with the many pleiotropic actions of GH. These include the regulation of metabolism, postnatal growth, cognition, immune, cardiac and renal systems and gut function. GH exerts these actions primarily through alterations in gene expression, initiated by activation of its membrane receptor and the resultant activation of the associated JAK2 (Janus kinase 2) and Src family kinases. Receptor activation involves hormone initiated movements within a receptor homodimer, rather than simple receptor dimerization. We have shown that binding of the hormone realigns the orientation of the two receptors both by relative rotation and by closer apposition just above the cell membrane. This is a consequence of the asymmetric placement of the binding sites on the hormone. Binding results in a conversion of parallel receptor transmembrane domains into a rotated crossover orientation, which produces separation of the lower part of the transmembrane helices. Because the JAK2 is bound to the Box1 motif proximal to the inner membrane, receptor activation results in separation of the two associated JAK2s, and in particular the removal of the inhibitory pseudokinase domain from the kinase domain of the other JAK2 (and vice versa). This brings the two kinase domains into position for trans-activation and initiates tyrosine phosphorylation of the receptor cytoplasmic domain and other substrates such as STAT5, the key transcription factor mediating most genomic actions of GH. There are a limited number of genomic actions initiated by the Src kinase family member which also associates with the upper cytoplasmic domain of the receptor, including important immune regulatory actions to dampen exuberant innate immune activation of cells involved in transplant rejection. These findings offer insights for developing specific receptor antagonists which may be

  6. RECEPTOR MODEL DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Source apportionment (receptor) models are mathematical procedures for identifying and quantifying the sources of ambient air pollutants and their effects at a site (the receptor), primarily on the basis of species concentration measurements at the receptor, and generally without...

  7. HYBRID RECEPTOR MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A hybrid receptor model is a specified mathematical procedure which uses not only the ambient species concentration measurements that form the input data for a pure receptor model, but in addition source emission rates or atmospheric dispersion or transformation information chara...

  8. Signals and Receptors.

    PubMed

    Heldin, Carl-Henrik; Lu, Benson; Evans, Ron; Gutkind, J Silvio

    2016-04-01

    Communication between cells in a multicellular organism occurs by the production of ligands (proteins, peptides, fatty acids, steroids, gases, and other low-molecular-weight compounds) that are either secreted by cells or presented on their surface, and act on receptors on, or in, other target cells. Such signals control cell growth, migration, survival, and differentiation. Signaling receptors can be single-span plasma membrane receptors associated with tyrosine or serine/threonine kinase activities, proteins with seven transmembrane domains, or intracellular receptors. Ligand-activated receptors convey signals into the cell by activating signaling pathways that ultimately affect cytosolic machineries or nuclear transcriptional programs or by directly translocating to the nucleus to regulate transcription. PMID:27037414

  9. Laryngeal pressure receptors.

    PubMed

    Mathew, O P; Sant'Ambrogio, G; Fisher, J T; Sant'Ambrogio, F B

    1984-07-01

    We studied the response characteristics of laryngeal pressure receptors in anesthetized dogs, breathing through a tracheal cannula, by recording single unit action potentials from the peripheral cut end of the internal branch of the superior laryngeal nerve. The larynx, with the rest of the upper airway, was isolated and cannulated separately for the application of distending and collapsing pressures. We identified receptors responding to either negative or positive pressure and a few responding to both. All these receptors showed a marked dynamic sensitivity and had the characteristics of slowly adapting mechanoreceptors. The majority of pressure receptors were active at zero transmural pressure and the gain of their response to pressure was higher at lower values, suggesting a role for these receptors in eupnea. Reflex alterations in breathing pattern and upper airway muscle activity during upper airway pressure changes, previously reported, are presumably mediated by the receptors described here. Moreover, these receptors may play a role in certain pathological states, such as obstructive sleep apnea, in which the upper airway is transiently subjected to large collapsing pressure. PMID:6484319

  10. Signaling by Sensory Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Julius, David; Nathans, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Sensory systems detect small molecules, mechanical perturbations, or radiation via the activation of receptor proteins and downstream signaling cascades in specialized sensory cells. In vertebrates, the two principal categories of sensory receptors are ion channels, which mediate mechanosensation, thermosensation, and acid and salt taste; and G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which mediate vision, olfaction, and sweet, bitter, and umami tastes. GPCR-based signaling in rods and cones illustrates the fundamental principles of rapid activation and inactivation, signal amplification, and gain control. Channel-based sensory systems illustrate the integration of diverse modulatory signals at the receptor, as seen in the thermosensory/pain system, and the rapid response kinetics that are possible with direct mechanical gating of a channel. Comparisons of sensory receptor gene sequences reveal numerous examples in which gene duplication and sequence divergence have created novel sensory specificities. This is the evolutionary basis for the observed diversity in temperature- and ligand-dependent gating among thermosensory channels, spectral tuning among visual pigments, and odorant binding among olfactory receptors. The coding of complex external stimuli by a limited number of sensory receptor types has led to the evolution of modality-specific and species-specific patterns of retention or loss of sensory information, a filtering operation that selectively emphasizes features in the stimulus that enhance survival in a particular ecological niche. The many specialized anatomic structures, such as the eye and ear, that house primary sensory neurons further enhance the detection of relevant stimuli. PMID:22110046

  11. Mammalian sweet taste receptors.

    PubMed

    Nelson, G; Hoon, M A; Chandrashekar, J; Zhang, Y; Ryba, N J; Zuker, C S

    2001-08-10

    The sense of taste provides animals with valuable information about the quality and nutritional value of food. Previously, we identified a large family of mammalian taste receptors involved in bitter taste perception (the T2Rs). We now report the characterization of mammalian sweet taste receptors. First, transgenic rescue experiments prove that the Sac locus encodes T1R3, a member of the T1R family of candidate taste receptors. Second, using a heterologous expression system, we demonstrate that T1R2 and T1R3 combine to function as a sweet receptor, recognizing sweet-tasting molecules as diverse as sucrose, saccharin, dulcin, and acesulfame-K. Finally, we present a detailed analysis of the patterns of expression of T1Rs and T2Rs, thus providing a view of the representation of sweet and bitter taste at the periphery. PMID:11509186

  12. Galanin Receptors and Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Webling, Kristin E. B.; Runesson, Johan; Bartfai, Tamas; Langel, Ülo

    2012-01-01

    The neuropeptide galanin was first discovered 30 years ago. Today, the galanin family consists of galanin, galanin-like peptide (GALP), galanin-message associated peptide (GMAP), and alarin and this family has been shown to be involved in a wide variety of biological and pathological functions. The effect is mediated through three GPCR subtypes, GalR1-3. The limited number of specific ligands to the galanin receptor subtypes has hindered the understanding of the individual effects of each receptor subtype. This review aims to summarize the current data of the importance of the galanin receptor subtypes and receptor subtype specific agonists and antagonists and their involvement in different biological and pathological functions. PMID:23233848

  13. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE AH RECEPTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rat liver cytosolic receptor protein containing the Ah-receptor protein was purified and studied using a photochemical assembly of 2,3,7,8-TCDD. The unbound receptor protein rapidly lost its capacity to bind 2,3,7,8-TCDD; however, the 2,3,7,8-TCDD bound Ah receptor did not re...

  14. Chemokine Receptor Oligomerization and Allostery

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Bryan; Handel, Tracy M.

    2014-01-01

    Oligomerization of chemokine receptors has been reported to influence many aspects of receptor function through allosteric communication between receptor protomers. Allosteric interactions within chemokine receptor hetero-oligomers have been shown to cause negative cooperativity in the binding of chemokines and to inhibit receptor activation in the case of some receptor pairs. Other receptor pairs can cause enhanced signaling and even activate entirely new, hetero-oligomer-specific signaling complexes and responses downstream of receptor activation. Many mechanisms contribute to these effects including direct allosteric coupling between the receptors, G protein mediated allostery, G protein stealing, ligand sequestration and recruitment of new intracellular proteins by exposing unique binding interfaces on the oligomerized receptors. These effects present both challenges as well as exciting opportunities for drug discovery. One of the most difficult challenges will involve determining if and when hetero-oligomers versus homo-oligomers are involved in specific disease states. PMID:23415099

  15. Genetics of taste receptors.

    PubMed

    Bachmanov, Alexander A; Bosak, Natalia P; Lin, Cailu; Matsumoto, Ichiro; Ohmoto, Makoto; Reed, Danielle R; Nelson, Theodore M

    2014-01-01

    Taste receptors function as one of the interfaces between internal and external milieus. Taste receptors for sweet and umami (T1R [taste receptor, type 1]), bitter (T2R [taste receptor, type 2]), and salty (ENaC [epithelial sodium channel]) have been discovered in the recent years, but transduction mechanisms of sour taste and ENaC-independent salt taste are still poorly understood. In addition to these five main taste qualities, the taste system detects such noncanonical "tastes" as water, fat, and complex carbohydrates, but their reception mechanisms require further research. Variations in taste receptor genes between and within vertebrate species contribute to individual and species differences in taste-related behaviors. These variations are shaped by evolutionary forces and reflect species adaptations to their chemical environments and feeding ecology. Principles of drug discovery can be applied to taste receptors as targets in order to develop novel taste compounds to satisfy demand in better artificial sweeteners, enhancers of sugar and sodium taste, and blockers of bitterness of food ingredients and oral medications. PMID:23886383

  16. Genetics of Taste Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bachmanov, Alexander A.; Bosak, Natalia P.; Lin, Cailu; Matsumoto, Ichiro; Ohmoto, Makoto; Reed, Danielle R.; Nelson, Theodore M.

    2016-01-01

    Taste receptors function as one of the interfaces between internal and external milieus. Taste receptors for sweet and umami (T1R [taste receptor, type 1]), bitter (T2R [taste receptor, type 2]), and salty (ENaC [epithelial sodium channel]) have been discovered in the recent years, but transduction mechanisms of sour taste and ENaC-independent salt taste are still poorly understood. In addition to these five main taste qualities, the taste system detects such noncanonical “tastes” as water, fat, and complex carbohydrates, but their reception mechanisms require further research. Variations in taste receptor genes between and within vertebrate species contribute to individual and species differences in taste-related behaviors. These variations are shaped by evolutionary forces and reflect species adaptations to their chemical environments and feeding ecology. Principles of drug discovery can be applied to taste receptors as targets in order to develop novel taste compounds to satisfy demand in better artificial sweeteners, enhancers of sugar and sodium taste, and blockers of bitterness of food ingredients and oral medications. PMID:23886383

  17. Dopamine Receptors and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Rangel-Barajas, Claudia; Coronel, Israel; Florán, Benjamín

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) is one of the major neurotransmitters and participates in a number of functions such as motor coordination, emotions, memory, reward mechanism, neuroendocrine regulation etc. DA exerts its effects through five DA receptors that are subdivided in 2 families: D1-like DA receptors (D1 and D5) and the D2-like (D2, D3 and D4). All DA receptors are widely expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) and play an important role in not only in physiological conditions but also pathological scenarios. Abnormalities in the DAergic system and its receptors in the basal ganglia structures are the basis Parkinson’s disease (PD), however DA also participates in other neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington disease (HD) and multiple sclerosis (MS). Under pathological conditions reorganization of DAergic system has been observed and most of the times, those changes occur as a mechanism of compensation, but in some cases contributes to worsening the alterations. Here we review the changes that occur on DA transmission and DA receptors (DARs) at both levels expression and signals transduction pathways as a result of neurotoxicity, inflammation and in neurodegenerative processes. The better understanding of the role of DA receptors in neuropathological conditions is crucial for development of novel therapeutic approaches to treat alterations related to neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26425390

  18. Cannabinoid receptors in invertebrates.

    PubMed

    McPartland, J M; Agraval, J; Gleeson, D; Heasman, K; Glass, M

    2006-03-01

    Two cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2, are expressed in mammals, birds, reptiles, and fish. The presence of cannabinoid receptors in invertebrates has been controversial, due to conflicting evidence. We conducted a systematic review of the literature, using expanded search parameters. Evidence presented in the literature varied in validity, ranging from crude in vivo behavioural assays to robust in silico ortholog discovery. No research existed for several clades of invertebrates; we therefore tested for cannabinoid receptors in seven representative species, using tritiated ligand binding assays with [3H]CP55,940 displaced by the CB1-selective antagonist SR141716A. Specific binding of [3H]CP55,940 was found in neural membranes of Ciona intestinalis (Deuterstoma, a positive control), Lumbricusterrestris (Lophotrochozoa), and three ecdysozoans: Peripatoides novae-zealandiae (Onychophora), Jasus edwardi (Crustacea) and Panagrellus redivivus (Nematoda); the potency of displacement by SR141716A was comparable to measurements on rat cerebellum. No specific binding was observed in Actinothoe albocincta (Cnidaria) or Tethya aurantium (Porifera). The phylogenetic distribution of cannabinoid receptors may address taxonomic questions; previous studies suggested that the loss of CB1 was a synapomorphy shared by ecdysozoans. Our discovery of cannabinoid receptors in some nematodes, onychophorans, and crustaceans does not contradict the Ecdysozoa hypothesis, but gives it no support. We hypothesize that cannabinoid receptors evolved in the last common ancestor of bilaterians, with secondary loss occurring in insects and other clades. Conflicting data regarding Cnidarians precludes hypotheses regarding the last common ancestor of eumetazoans. No cannabinoid receptors are expressed in sponges, which probably diverged before the origin of the eumetazoan ancestor. PMID:16599912

  19. Regulation of plasminogen receptors.

    PubMed

    Herren, Thomas; Swaisgood, Carmen; Plow, Edward F

    2003-01-01

    Many eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells bind plasminogen in a specific and saturable manner. When plasminogen is bound to cell-surface proteins with C-terminal lysines via its lysine binding sites, its activation to plasmin is accelerated, and cell-bound plasmin is protected from inactivation by natural inhibitors. Plasmin mediates direct or indirect degradation of the extracellular matrix, and bound plasmin is used by cells to facilitate migration through extracellular matrices. Since cell migration and tissue remodelling are the underpinnings of many physiological and pathological responses, the modulation of plasminogen receptors may serve as a primary regulatory mechanism for control of many cellular responses. Specific examples of cell types on which plasminogen receptors undergo modulation include: fibroblasts, where modulation may contribute to cartilage and bone destruction in rheumatoid arthritis; leukemic cells, where enhanced plasminogen binding may contribute to the heightened fibrinolytic state in the patients; other tumor cells, where up-regulation may support invasion and metastasis; bacteria, where enhanced plasminogen binding may facilitate tissue destruction and invasion; platelets, where up-regulation of plasminogen binding may play a role in regulating clot lysis; and adipocytes, where the modulation of plasminogen receptor expression may regulate cell differentiation and fat accumulation. Two pathways for modulation of plasminogen receptors have been characterized: A protease-dependent pathway can either up-regulate or down-regulate plasminogen binding to cells by changing the availability of plasminogen-binding proteins with C-terminal lysines. New receptors may be generated by trypsin-like proteases, including plasmin, which create new C-terminal lysines; other enzymes may expose existing membrane proteins by altering the cell surface; or receptor function may be lost by removal of C-terminal lysines. The basic carboxypeptidases of blood

  20. Taste Receptors in Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Taste receptors were first identified on the tongue, where they initiate a signaling pathway that communicates information to the brain about the nutrient content or potential toxicity of ingested foods. However, recent research has shown that taste receptors are also expressed in a myriad of other tissues, from the airway and gastrointestinal epithelia to the pancreas and brain. The functions of many of these extraoral taste receptors remain unknown, but emerging evidence suggests that bitter and sweet taste receptors in the airway are important sentinels of innate immunity. This review discusses taste receptor signaling, focusing on the G-protein coupled–receptors that detect bitter, sweet, and savory tastes, followed by an overview of extraoral taste receptors and in-depth discussion of studies demonstrating the roles of taste receptors in airway innate immunity. Future research on extraoral taste receptors has significant potential for identification of novel immune mechanisms and insights into host-pathogen interactions. PMID:25323130

  1. Ionotropic Crustacean Olfactory Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Corey, Elizabeth A.; Bobkov, Yuriy; Ukhanov, Kirill; Ache, Barry W.

    2013-01-01

    The nature of the olfactory receptor in crustaceans, a major group of arthropods, has remained elusive. We report that spiny lobsters, Panulirus argus, express ionotropic receptors (IRs), the insect chemosensory variants of ionotropic glutamate receptors. Unlike insects IRs, which are expressed in a specific subset of olfactory cells, two lobster IR subunits are expressed in most, if not all, lobster olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs), as confirmed by antibody labeling and in situ hybridization. Ligand-specific ORN responses visualized by calcium imaging are consistent with a restricted expression pattern found for other potential subunits, suggesting that cell-specific expression of uncommon IR subunits determines the ligand sensitivity of individual cells. IRs are the only type of olfactory receptor that we have detected in spiny lobster olfactory tissue, suggesting that they likely mediate olfactory signaling. Given long-standing evidence for G protein-mediated signaling in activation of lobster ORNs, this finding raises the interesting specter that IRs act in concert with second messenger-mediated signaling. PMID:23573266

  2. Ionotropic crustacean olfactory receptors.

    PubMed

    Corey, Elizabeth A; Bobkov, Yuriy; Ukhanov, Kirill; Ache, Barry W

    2013-01-01

    The nature of the olfactory receptor in crustaceans, a major group of arthropods, has remained elusive. We report that spiny lobsters, Panulirus argus, express ionotropic receptors (IRs), the insect chemosensory variants of ionotropic glutamate receptors. Unlike insects IRs, which are expressed in a specific subset of olfactory cells, two lobster IR subunits are expressed in most, if not all, lobster olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs), as confirmed by antibody labeling and in situ hybridization. Ligand-specific ORN responses visualized by calcium imaging are consistent with a restricted expression pattern found for other potential subunits, suggesting that cell-specific expression of uncommon IR subunits determines the ligand sensitivity of individual cells. IRs are the only type of olfactory receptor that we have detected in spiny lobster olfactory tissue, suggesting that they likely mediate olfactory signaling. Given long-standing evidence for G protein-mediated signaling in activation of lobster ORNs, this finding raises the interesting specter that IRs act in concert with second messenger-mediated signaling. PMID:23573266

  3. Trafficking of Kainate Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Pahl, Steffen; Tapken, Daniel; Haering, Simon C.; Hollmann, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) mediate the vast majority of excitatory neurotransmission in the central nervous system of vertebrates. In the protein family of iGluRs, kainate receptors (KARs) comprise the probably least well understood receptor class. Although KARs act as key players in the regulation of synaptic network activity, many properties and functions of these proteins remain elusive until now. Especially the precise pre-, extra-, and postsynaptic localization of KARs plays a critical role for neuronal function, as an unbalanced localization of KARs would ultimately lead to dysregulated neuronal excitability. Recently, important advances in the understanding of the regulation of surface expression, function, and agonist-dependent endocytosis of KARs have been achieved. Post-translational modifications like PKC-mediated phosphorylation and SUMOylation have been reported to critically influence surface expression and endocytosis, while newly discovered auxiliary proteins were shown to shape the functional properties of KARs. PMID:25141211

  4. Selective orexin receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Lebold, Terry P; Bonaventure, Pascal; Shireman, Brock T

    2013-09-01

    The orexin, or hypocretin, neuropeptides (orexin-A and orexin-B) are produced on neurons in the hypothalamus which project to key areas of the brain that control sleep-wake states, modulation of food intake, panic, anxiety, emotion, reward and addictive behaviors. These neuropeptides exert their effects on a pair of G-protein coupled receptors termed the orexin-1 (OX1) and orexin-2 (OX2) receptors. Emerging biology suggests the involvement of these receptors in psychiatric disorders as they are thought to play a key role in the regulation of multiple systems. This review is intended to highlight key selective OX1 or OX2 small-molecule antagonists. PMID:23891187

  5. Olfactory receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Gabriela; Simoes de Souza, Fabio Marques

    2016-01-01

    The guanine nucleotide protein (G protein)-coupled receptors (GPCRs) superfamily represents the largest class of membrane protein in the human genome. More than a half of all GPCRs are dedicated to interact with odorants and are termed odorant-receptors (ORs). Linda Buck and Richard Axel, the Nobel Prize laureates in physiology or medicine in 2004, first cloned and characterized the gene family that encode ORs, establishing the foundations to the understanding of the molecular basis for odor recognition. In the last decades, a lot of progress has been done to unravel the functioning of the sense of smell. This chapter gives a general overview of the topic of olfactory receptor signaling and reviews recent advances in this field. PMID:26928542

  6. Cutaneous temperature receptors.

    PubMed

    Spray, D C

    1986-01-01

    Specific thermoreceptors comprise an electrophysiologically distinct class of cutaneous receptors with a morphological substrate (free nerve endings) and plausible transduction mechanism (electrogenic Na pump with or without auxiliary temperature-dependent processes). Because responses to thermal and mechanical stimuli converge along the neural pathway, we have difficulty explaining the purity of cold and warm sensations; participation of dual-modality receptors in sensory discrimination cannot be ruled out. The field is now at a point where a leap in understanding would be achieved by intracellular recordings from the sensory receptor (for which patch clamp studies on isolated neuronal elements may provide the necessary technology) and from continued analysis of what information is lost and what retained in passage from one synapse to the next along the thermal pathway. PMID:3085583

  7. Neuropharmacology of dopamine receptors:

    PubMed Central

    Tarazi, Frank I.

    2001-01-01

    There has been an extraordinary recent accumulation of information concerning the neurobiology and neuropharmacology of dopamine (DA) receptors in the mammalian central nervous system. Many new DA molecular entities have been cloned, their gene, peptide sequences and structures have been identified, their anatomical distributions in the mammalian brain described, and their pharmacology characterized. Progress has been made toward developing selective ligands and drug-candidates for different DA receptors. The new discoveries have greatly stimulated preclinical and clinical studies to explore the neuropharmacology of DA receptors and their implications in the neuropathophysiology of different neuropsychiatric diseases including schizophrenia, Parkinson’s disease and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. Accordingly, it seems timely to review the salient aspects of this specialized area of preclinical neuropharmacology and its relevance to clinical neuropsychiatry. PMID:24019715

  8. Estrogen receptor scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Scheidhauer, K; Scharl, A; Schicha, H

    1998-03-01

    Radio-labeled estrogen receptor ligands are tracers that can be used for functional receptor diagnosis. Their specificity towards receptors, together with the fact that only 50-70% of mammary carcinomas are receptor positive, renders them unsuitable for detection of primary tumors or metastases, and this means that estrogen receptor scintigraphy can be used neither for tumor screening nor for staging. However, both 18F-labeled and 123I-labeled estradiol derivatives are suitable for in vivo imaging of estrogen receptors. Their high specificity, established in animal experiments and in vitro studies has been reproduced in in vivo applications in humans. Tracers with positron radiation emitters are, however, hardly suitable for broad application owing to the short half-life of 18F, which would mean that users would need to be situated close to a cyclotron and a correspondingly equipped radiochemical laboratory. The number of available PET scanners, on the other hand, has increased over the last few years, especially in Germany, so that this, at least, does not present a limiting factor. All the same, 123I-labeled estradiol derivatives will find more widespread application, since the number of gamma-cameras incorporating modern multi-head systems is several times greater. The results of studies with 123I-E2-scintigraphy published to date are very promising, even given the initial technical problems mentioned above. As a method of examination, it could be optimised by using improved tracers with a higher tumor contrast and less disturbance from overlapping in diagnostically relevant locations, for instance, by selecting tracers with higher activities whose excretion is more renal than hepatobiliary. The use of modern multi-head camera systems can also be expected to improve the photon yield. PMID:9646642

  9. CONTAMINANT INTERACTIONS WITH STEROID RECEPTORS: EVIDENCE FOR RECEPTOR BINDING.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Steroid receptors are important determinants of endocrine disrupter consequences. As the most frequently proposed mechanism of endocrine-disrupting contaminant (EDC) action, steroid receptors are not only targets of natural steroids but are also commonly sites of nonsteroidal com...

  10. Vasopressin receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Biff F

    2015-01-01

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP) is the principal hormone involved in regulating the tonicity of body fluids. Less appreciated is the role that AVP plays in a variety of other physiologic functions including glucose metabolism, cardiovascular homeostasis, bone metabolism, and cognitive behavior. AVP receptor antagonists are now available and currently approved to treat hyponatremia. There is a great deal of interest in exploring the potential benefits that these drugs may play in blocking AVP-mediated effects in other organ systems. The purpose of this report is to provide an update on the expanding role of AVP receptor antagonists and what disease states these drugs may eventually be used for. PMID:25604388

  11. Biomimetic Receptors and Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Dickert, Franz L.

    2014-01-01

    In biomimetics, living systems are imitated to develop receptors for ions, molecules and bioparticles. The most pertinent idea is self-organization in analogy to evolution in nature, which created the key-lock principle. Today, modern science has been developing host-guest chemistry, a strategy of supramolecular chemistry for designing interactions of analytes with synthetic receptors. This can be realized, e.g., by self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) or molecular imprinting. The strategies are used for solid phase extraction (SPE), but preferably in developing recognition layers of chemical sensors. PMID:25436653

  12. Nuclear Receptors and Inflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kun; Wan, Yu-Jui Yvonne

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that the steroid hormone glucocorticoid and its nuclear receptor regulate the inflammatory process, a crucial component in the pathophysiological process related to human diseases that include atherosclerosis, obesity and type II diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease, Alzheimer’s disease, multiple sclerosis, and liver tumors. Growing evidence demonstrates that orphan and adopted orphan nuclear receptors, such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, liver × receptors, the farnesoid × receptor, NR4As, retinoid × receptors, and the pregnane × receptor, regulate the inflammatory and metabolic profiles in a ligand-dependent or -independent manner in human and animal models. This review summarizes the regulatory roles of these nuclear receptors in the inflammatory process and the underlying mechanisms. PMID:18375823

  13. AT1 receptors as mechanosensors.

    PubMed

    Mederos y Schnitzler, Michael; Storch, Ursula; Gudermann, Thomas

    2011-04-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors are appreciated as central components of neurohormonal signaling. Recently, it turned out that they may also play a role in mechanotransduction. The angiotensin II AT(1) receptor was the first G-protein-coupled receptor claimed to be a mechanosensor. In the meantime, several other G(q/11)-coupled receptors were found to be sensitive to mechanical stimuli. Furthermore, there is first evidence to support the concept that G(i/o)-coupled receptors are susceptible to mechanical stimulation as well. Mechanical receptor activation appears to be agonist-independent and is initiated by a conformational change of the receptor protein discernible from agonist-bound conformations. Mechanically induced receptor activation plays a physiological role for myogenic vasoconstriction and is involved in the pathogenesis of cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:21147033

  14. Nicotinic Receptors in Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Posadas, Inmaculada; López-Hernández, Beatriz; Ceña, Valentín

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have focused on expanding our knowledge of the structure and diversity of peripheral and central nicotinic receptors. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are members of the Cys-loop superfamily of pentameric ligand-gated ion channels, which include GABA (A and C), serotonin, and glycine receptors. Currently, 9 alpha (α2-α10) and 3 beta (β2-β4) subunits have been identified in the central nervous system (CNS), and these subunits assemble to form a variety of functional nAChRs. The pentameric combination of several alpha and beta subunits leads to a great number of nicotinic receptors that vary in their properties, including their sensitivity to nicotine, permeability to calcium and propensity to desensitize. In the CNS, nAChRs play crucial roles in modulating presynaptic, postsynaptic, and extrasynaptic signaling, and have been found to be involved in a complex range of CNS disorders including Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), schizophrenia, Tourette´s syndrome, anxiety, depression and epilepsy. Therefore, there is growing interest in the development of drugs that modulate nAChR functions with optimal benefits and minimal adverse effects. The present review describes the main characteristics of nAChRs in the CNS and focuses on the various compounds that have been tested and are currently in phase I and phase II trials for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases including PD, AD and age-associated memory and mild cognitive impairment. PMID:24179465

  15. GPCR heteromers and their allosteric receptor-receptor interactions.

    PubMed

    Fuxe, K; Borroto-Escuela, D O; Marcellino, D; Romero-Fernandez, W; Frankowska, M; Guidolin, D; Filip, M; Ferraro, L; Woods, A S; Tarakanov, A; Ciruela, F; Agnati, L F; Tanganelli, S

    2012-01-01

    The concept of intramembrane receptor-receptor interactions and evidence for their existences were introduced in the beginning of the 1980's, suggesting the existence of receptor heterodimerization. The discovery of GPCR heteromers and the receptor mosaic (higher order oligomers, more than two) has been related to the parallel development and application of a variety of resonance energy transfer techniques such as bioluminescence (BRET), fluorescence (FRET) and sequential energy transfer (SRET). The assembly of interacting GPCRs, heterodimers and receptor mosaic leads to changes in the agonist recognition, signaling, and trafficking of participating receptors via allosteric mechanisms, sometimes involving the appearance of cooperativity. The receptor interface in the GPCR heteromers is beginning to be characterized and the key role of electrostatic epitope-epitope interactions for the formation of the receptor heteromers will be discussed. Furthermore, a "guide-and-clasp" manner of receptor-receptor interactions has been proposed where the "adhesive guides" may be the triplet homologies. These interactions probably represent a general molecular mechanism for receptor-receptor interactions. It is proposed that changes in GPCR function (moonlighting) may develop through the intracellular loops and C-terminii of the GPCR heteromers as a result of dynamic allosteric interactions between different types of G proteins and other receptor interacting proteins in these domains of the receptors. The evidence for the existence of receptor heteromers opens up a new field for a better understanding of neurophysiology and neuropathology. Furthermore, novel therapeutic approaches could be possible based on the use of heteromers as targets for drug development based on their unique pharmacology. PMID:22335512

  16. Structure activity relationship studies of 3-arylsulfonyl-pyrido[1,2-a]pyrimidin-4-imines as potent 5-HT₆ antagonists.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shuanghua; Huang, Yazhong; Wu, Yong-Jin; He, Huan; Grant-Young, Katherine A; Bertekap, Robert L; Whiterock, Valerie; Brassil, Patrick; Lentz, Kimberley; Sivaprakasam, Prasanna; Langley, David R; Westphal, Ryan S; Scola, Paul M

    2014-03-01

    Comprehensive structure activity relationship (SAR) studies were conducted on a focused screening hit, 2-(methylthio)-3-(phenylsulfonyl)-4H-pyrido[1,2-a]pyrimidin-4-imine (1, IC50: 4.0 nM), as 5-HT6 selective antagonists. Activity was improved some 2-4 fold when small, electron-donating groups were added to the central core as observed in 19, 20 and 26. Molecular docking of key compounds in a homology model of the human 5-HT6 receptor was used to rationalize our structure-activity relationship (SAR) findings. In pharmacokinetic experiments, compound 1 displayed good brain uptake in rats following intra-peritoneal administration, but limited oral bioavailability. PMID:24495863

  17. Taste Receptor Genes

    PubMed Central

    Bachmanov, Alexander A.; Beauchamp, Gary K.

    2009-01-01

    In the past several years, tremendous progress has been achieved with the discovery and characterization of vertebrate taste receptors from the T1R and T2R families, which are involved in recognition of bitter, sweet, and umami taste stimuli. Individual differences in taste, at least in some cases, can be attributed to allelic variants of the T1R and T2R genes. Progress with understanding how T1R and T2R receptors interact with taste stimuli and with identifying their patterns of expression in taste cells sheds light on coding of taste information by the nervous system. Candidate mechanisms for detection of salts, acids, fat, complex carbohydrates, and water have also been proposed, but further studies are needed to prove their identity. PMID:17444812

  18. Quantitative receptor autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Boast, C.A.; Snowhill, E.W.; Altar, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    Quantitative receptor autoradiography addresses the topic of technical and scientific advances in the sphere of quantitative autoradiography. The volume opens with a overview of the field from a historical and critical perspective. Following is a detailed discussion of in vitro data obtained from a variety of neurotransmitter systems. The next section explores applications of autoradiography, and the final two chapters consider experimental models. Methodological considerations are emphasized, including the use of computers for image analysis.

  19. Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, James; Franks, Christopher J.; Murray, Caitriona; Edwards, Richard J.; Calahorro, Fernando; Ishihara, Takeshi; Katsura, Isao; Holden-Dye, Lindy; O'Connor, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Glutamatergic neurotransmission is evolutionarily conserved across animal phyla. A major class of glutamate receptors consists of the metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs). In C. elegans, three mGluR genes, mgl-1, mgl-2, and mgl-3, are organized into three subgroups, similar to their mammalian counterparts. Cellular reporters identified expression of the mgls in the nervous system of C. elegans and overlapping expression in the pharyngeal microcircuit that controls pharyngeal muscle activity and feeding behavior. The overlapping expression of mgls within this circuit allowed the investigation of receptor signaling per se and in the context of receptor interactions within a neural network that regulates feeding. We utilized the pharmacological manipulation of neuronally regulated pumping of the pharyngeal muscle in the wild-type and mutants to investigate MGL function. This defined a net mgl-1-dependent inhibition of pharyngeal pumping that is modulated by mgl-3 excitation. Optogenetic activation of the pharyngeal glutamatergic inputs combined with electrophysiological recordings from the isolated pharyngeal preparations provided further evidence for a presynaptic mgl-1-dependent regulation of pharyngeal activity. Analysis of mgl-1, mgl-2, and mgl-3 mutant feeding behavior in the intact organism after acute food removal identified a significant role for mgl-1 in the regulation of an adaptive feeding response. Our data describe the molecular and cellular organization of mgl-1, mgl-2, and mgl-3. Pharmacological analysis identified that, in these paradigms, mgl-1 and mgl-3, but not mgl-2, can modulate the pharyngeal microcircuit. Behavioral analysis identified mgl-1 as a significant determinant of the glutamate-dependent modulation of feeding, further highlighting the significance of mGluRs in complex C. elegans behavior. PMID:25869139

  20. Mechanism of androgen receptor action.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin; Al-Azzawi, Farook

    2009-06-20

    Recent research provides a much more detailed understanding of the role of the androgen receptor in normal human development and physiology, its structure, and its functioning. This review discusses genomic and non-genomic actions of the androgen receptor, as well as their co-regulators. We also explore several clinically relevant aspects of the molecular biology of the androgen receptor and its co-regulators. PMID:19372015

  1. [The beta-adrenergic receptor].

    PubMed

    Bicho, M P; Manso, C F

    1992-12-01

    The Authors review the constitution and mechanism of action of the beta adrenergic receptor. It is part of a large family which includes visual pigments, muscarinic, serotonergic, olfactive and substance K receptors. Catecholamines given an electron to the receptor. It goes then successively to the alpha submit of Gs protein ant to adenylyl cyclase. The process of activation consists in a successive transfer of one electron. PMID:1337834

  2. Angiotensin II receptors in testes

    SciTech Connect

    Millan, M.A.; Aguilera, G.

    1988-05-01

    Receptors for angiotensin II (AII) were identified and characterized in testes of rats and several primate species. Autoradiographic analysis of the binding of 125I-labeled (Sar1,Ile8)AII to rat, rhesus monkey, cebus monkey, and human testicular slide-mounted frozen sections indicated specific binding to Leydig cells in the interstitium. In rat collagenase-dispersed interstitial cells fractionated by Percoll gradient, AII receptor content was parallel to that of hCG receptors, confirming that the AII receptors are in the Leydig cells. In rat dispersed Leydig cells, binding was specific for AII and its analogs and of high affinity (Kd, 4.8 nM), with a receptor concentration of 15 fmol/10(6) cells. Studies of AII receptors in rat testes during development reveals the presence of high receptor density in newborn rats which decreases toward the adult age (4934 +/- 309, 1460 +/- 228, 772 +/- 169, and 82 +/- 12 fmol/mg protein at 5, 15, 20, and 30 days of age, respectively) with no change in affinity. At all ages receptors were located in the interstitium, and the decrease in binding was parallel to the decrease in the interstitial to tubular ratio observed with age. AII receptor properties in membrane-rich fractions from prepuberal testes were similar in the rat and rhesus monkey. Binding was time and temperature dependent, reaching a plateau at 60 min at 37 C, and was increased by divalent cations, EGTA, and dithiothreitol up to 0.5 mM. In membranes from prepuberal monkey testes, AII receptors were specific for AII analogs and of high affinity (Kd, 4.2 nM) with a receptor concentration of 7599 +/- 1342 fmol/mg protein. The presence of AII receptors in Leydig cells in rat and primate testes in conjunction with reports of the presence of other components of the renin-angiotensin system in the testes suggests that the peptide has a physiological role in testicular function.

  3. The human olfactory receptor repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Zozulya, Sergey; Echeverri, Fernando; Nguyen, Trieu

    2001-01-01

    Background The mammalian olfactory apparatus is able to recognize and distinguish thousands of structurally diverse volatile chemicals. This chemosensory function is mediated by a very large family of seven-transmembrane olfactory (odorant) receptors encoded by approximately 1,000 genes, the majority of which are believed to be pseudogenes in humans. Results The strategy of our sequence database mining for full-length, functional candidate odorant receptor genes was based on the high overall sequence similarity and presence of a number of conserved sequence motifs in all known mammalian odorant receptors as well as the absence of introns in their coding sequences. We report here the identification and physical cloning of 347 putative human full-length odorant receptor genes. Comparative sequence analysis of the predicted gene products allowed us to identify and define a number of consensus sequence motifs and structural features of this vast family of receptors. A new nomenclature for human odorant receptors based on their chromosomal localization and phylogenetic analysis is proposed. We believe that these sequences represent the essentially complete repertoire of functional human odorant receptors. Conclusions The identification and cloning of all functional human odorant receptor genes is an important initial step in understanding receptor-ligand specificity and combinatorial encoding of odorant stimuli in human olfaction. PMID:11423007

  4. Adenosine receptor desensitization and trafficking.

    PubMed

    Mundell, Stuart; Kelly, Eamonn

    2011-05-01

    As with the majority of G-protein-coupled receptors, all four of the adenosine receptor subtypes are known to undergo agonist-induced regulation in the form of desensitization and trafficking. These processes can limit the ability of adenosine receptors to couple to intracellular signalling pathways and thus reduce the ability of adenosine receptor agonists as well as endogenous adenosine to produce cellular responses. In addition, since adenosine receptors couple to multiple signalling pathways, these pathways may desensitize differentially, while the desensitization of one pathway could even trigger signalling via another. Thus, the overall picture of adenosine receptor regulation can be complex. For all adenosine receptor subtypes, there is evidence to implicate arrestins in agonist-induced desensitization and trafficking, but there is also evidence for other possible forms of regulation, including second messenger-dependent kinase regulation, heterologous effects involving G proteins, and the involvement of non-clathrin trafficking pathways such as caveolae. In this review, the evidence implicating these mechanisms is summarized for each adenosine receptor subtype, and we also discuss those issues of adenosine receptor regulation that remain to be resolved as well as likely directions for future research in this field. PMID:20550943

  5. The receptor subunits generating NMDA receptor mediated currents in oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Burzomato, Valeria; Frugier, Guillaume; Pérez-Otaño, Isabel; Kittler, Josef T; Attwell, David

    2010-01-01

    NMDA receptors have been shown to contribute to glutamate-evoked currents in oligodendrocytes. Activation of these receptors damages myelin in ischaemia, in part because they are more weakly blocked by Mg2+ than are most neuronal NMDA receptors. This weak Mg2+ block was suggested to reflect an unusual subunit composition including the NR2C and NR3A subunits. Here we expressed NR1/NR2C and triplet NR1/NR2C/NR3A recombinant receptors in HEK cells and compared their currents with those of NMDA-evoked currents in rat cerebellar oligodendrocytes. NR1/NR2C/3A receptors were less blocked by 2 mm Mg2+ than were NR1/NR2C receptors (the remaining current was 30% and 18%, respectively, of that seen without added Mg2+) and showed less channel noise, suggesting a smaller single channel conductance. NMDA-evoked currents in oligodendrocytes showed a Mg2+ block (to 32%) similar to that observed for NR1/NR2C/NR3A and significantly different from that for NR1/NR2C receptors. Co-immunoprecipitation revealed interactions between NR1, NR2C and NR3A subunits in a purified myelin preparation from rat brain. These data are consistent with NMDA-evoked currents in oligodendrocytes reflecting the activation of receptors containing NR1, NR2C and NR3A subunits. PMID:20660562

  6. Molecular mechanisms of serotonergic action of the HIV-1 antiretroviral efavirenz.

    PubMed

    Dalwadi, Dhwanil A; Kim, Seongcheol; Amdani, Shahnawaz M; Chen, Zhenglan; Huang, Ren-Qi; Schetz, John A

    2016-08-01

    Efavirenz is highly effective at suppressing HIV-1, and the WHO guidelines list it as a component of the first-line antiretroviral (ARV) therapies for treatment-naïve patients. Though the pharmacological basis is unclear, efavirenz is commonly associated with a risk for neuropsychiatric adverse events (NPAEs) when taken at the prescribed dose. In many patients these NPAEs appear to subside after several weeks of treatment, though long-term studies show that in some patients the NPAEs persist. In a recent study focusing on the abuse potential of efavirenz, its receptor psychopharmacology was reported to include interactions with a number of established molecular targets for known drugs of abuse, and it displayed a prevailing behavioral profile in rodents resembling an LSD-like activity. In this report, we discovered interactions with additional serotonergic targets that may be associated with efavirenz-induced NPAEs. The most robust interactions were with 5-HT3A and 5-HT6 receptors, with more modest interactions noted for the 5-HT2B receptor and monoamine oxidase A. From a molecular mechanistic perspective, efavirenz acts as a 5-HT6 receptor inverse agonist of Gs-signaling, 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C antagonist of Gq-signaling, and a blocker of the 5-HT3A receptor currents. Efavirenz also completely or partially blocks agonist stimulation of the M1 and M3 muscarinic receptors, respectively. Schild analysis suggests that efavirenz competes for the same site on the 5-HT2A receptor as two known hallucinogenic partial agonists (±)-DOI and LSD. Prolonged exposure to efavirenz reduces 5-HT2A receptor density and responsiveness to 5-HT. Other ARVs such as zidovudine, nevirapine and emtricitabine did not share the same complex pharmacological profile as efavirenz, though some of them weakly interact with the 5-HT6 receptor or modestly block GABAA currents. PMID:27157251

  7. Kinins and peptide receptors.

    PubMed

    Regoli, Domenico; Gobeil, Fernand

    2016-04-01

    This paper is divided into two sections: the first contains the essential elements of the opening lecture presented by Pr. Regoli to the 2015 International Kinin Symposium in S. Paulo, Brazil on June 28th and the second is the celebration of Dr. Regoli's 60 years of research on vasoactive peptides. The cardiovascular homeostasis derives from a balance of two systems, the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and the kallikrein-kinin system (KKS). The biologically active effector entity of RAS is angiotensin receptor-1 (AT-1R), and that of KKS is bradykinin B2 receptor (B2R). The first mediates vasoconstriction, the second is the most potent and efficient vasodilator. Thanks to its complex and multi-functional mechanism of action, involving nitric oxide (NO), prostacyclin and endothelial hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF). B2R is instrumental for the supply of blood, oxygen and nutrition to tissues. KKS is present on the vascular endothelium and functions as an autacoid playing major roles in cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and diabetes. KKS exerts a paramount role in the prevention of thrombosis and atherosclerosis. Such knowledge emphasizes the already prominent value of the ACE-inhibitors (ACEIs) for the treatment of CVDs and diabetes. Indeed, the ACEIs, thanks to their double action (block of the RAS and potentiation of the KKS) are the ideal agents for a rational treatment of these diseases. PMID:26408609

  8. Leptin and its receptors.

    PubMed

    Wada, Nobuhiro; Hirako, Satoshi; Takenoya, Fumiko; Kageyama, Haruaki; Okabe, Mai; Shioda, Seiji

    2014-11-01

    Leptin is mainly produced in the white adipose tissue before being secreted into the blood and transported across the blood-brain barrier. Leptin binds to a specific receptor (LepR) that has numerous subtypes (LepRa, LepRb, LepRc, LepRd, LepRe, and LepRf). LepRb, in particular, is expressed in several brain nuclei, including the arcuate nucleus, the paraventricular nucleus, and the dorsomedial, lateral and ventromedial regions of the hypothalamus. LepRb is also co-expressed with several neuropeptides, including proopiomelanocortin, neuropeptide Y, galanin, galanin-like peptide, gonadotropin-releasing hormone, tyrosine hydroxylase and neuropeptide W. Functionally, LepRb induces activation of the JAK2/ERK, /STAT3, /STAT5 and IRS/PI3 kinase signaling cascades, which are important for the regulation of energy homeostasis and appetite in mammals. In this review, we discuss the structure, genetics and distribution of the leptin receptors, and their role in cell signaling mechanisms. PMID:25218975

  9. Angiotensin II receptor heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Herblin, W.F.; Chiu, A.T.; McCall, D.E.; Ardecky, R.J.; Carini, D.J.; Duncia, J.V.; Pease, L.J.; Wong, P.C.; Wexler, R.R.; Johnson, A.L. )

    1991-04-01

    The possibility of receptor heterogeneity in the angiotensin II (AII) system has been suggested previously, based on differences in Kd values or sensitivity to thiol reagents. One of the authors earliest indications was the frequent observation of incomplete inhibition of the binding of AII to adrenal cortical membranes. Autoradiographic studies demonstrated that all of the labeling of the rat adrenal was blocked by unlabeled AII or saralasin, but not by DuP 753. The predominant receptor in the rat adrenal cortex (80%) is sensitive to dithiothreitol (DTT) and DuP 753, and is designated AII-1. The residual sites in the adrenal cortex and almost all of the sites in the rat adrenal medulla are insensitive to both DTT and DuP 753, but were blocked by EXP655. These sites have been confirmed by ligand binding studies and are designated AII-2. The rabbit adrenal cortex is unique in yielding a nonuniform distribution of AII-2 sites around the outer layer of glomerulosa cells. In the rabbit kidney, the sites on the glomeruli are AII-1, but the sites on the kidney capsule are AII-2. Angiotensin III appears to have a higher affinity for AII-2 sites since it inhibits the binding to the rabbit kidney capsule but not the glomeruli. Elucidation of the distribution and function of these diverse sites should permit the development of more selective and specific therapeutic strategies.

  10. The Multifaceted Mineralocorticoid Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Sanchez, Elise; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso E.

    2015-01-01

    The primary adrenal cortical steroid hormones, aldosterone, and the glucocorticoids cortisol and corticosterone, act through the structurally similar mineralocorticoid (MR) and glucocorticoid receptors (GRs). Aldosterone is crucial for fluid, electrolyte, and hemodynamic homeostasis and tissue repair; the significantly more abundant glucocorticoids are indispensable for energy homeostasis, appropriate responses to stress, and limiting inflammation. Steroid receptors initiate gene transcription for proteins that effect their actions as well as rapid non-genomic effects through classical cell signaling pathways. GR and MR are expressed in many tissues types, often in the same cells, where they interact at molecular and functional levels, at times in synergy, others in opposition. Thus the appropriate balance of MR and GR activation is crucial for homeostasis. MR has the same binding affinity for aldosterone, cortisol, and corticosterone. Glucocorticoids activate MR in most tissues at basal levels and GR at stress levels. Inactivation of cortisol and corticosterone by 11β-HSD2 allows aldosterone to activate MR within aldosterone target cells and limits activation of the GR. Under most conditions, 11β-HSD1 acts as a reductase and activates cortisol/corticosterone, amplifying circulating levels. 11β-HSD1 and MR antagonists mitigate inappropriate activation of MR under conditions of oxidative stress that contributes to the pathophysiology of the cardiometabolic syndrome; however, MR antagonists decrease normal MR/GR functional interactions, a particular concern for neurons mediating cognition, memory, and affect. PMID:24944027

  11. Role of iso-receptors in receptor-receptor interactions with a focus on dopamine iso-receptor complexes.

    PubMed

    Agnati, Luigi F; Guidolin, Diego; Cervetto, Chiara; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O; Fuxe, Kjell

    2016-01-01

    Intercellular and intracellular communication processes consist of signals and recognition/decoding apparatuses of these signals. In humans, the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family represents the largest family of cell surface receptors. More than 30 years ago, it has been proposed that GPCR could form dimers or higher-order oligomers (receptor mosaics [RMs] at the plasma membrane level and receptor-receptor interactions [RRIs] have been proposed as a new integrative mechanism for chemical signals impinging on cell plasma membranes). The basic phenomena involved in RRIs are allostery and cooperativity of membrane receptors, and the present paper provides basic information concerning their relevance for the integrative functions of RMs. In this context, the possible role of iso-receptor RM is discussed (with a special focus on dopamine receptor subtypes and on some of the RMs they form with other dopamine iso-receptors), and it is proposed that two types of cooperativity, namely, homotropic and heterotropic cooperativity, could allow distinguishing two types of functionally different RMs. From a general point of view, the presence of iso-receptors and their topological organization within RMs allow the use of a reduced number of signals for the intercellular communication processes, since the target cells can recognize and decode the same signal in different ways. This theoretical aspect is further analyzed here by means of an analogy with artificial information systems. Thus, it is suggested that the 'multiplexer' and 'demultiplexer' concepts could, at least in part, model the role of RMs formed by iso-receptors in the information handling by the cell. PMID:26418645

  12. PM SOURCE APPORTIONMENT/RECEPTOR MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Source apportionment (receptor) models are mathematical procedures for identifying and quantifying the sources of ambient air pollutants and their effects at a site (the receptor), primarily on the basis of species concentration measurements at the receptor, and generally without...

  13. The olfactory receptor family album

    PubMed Central

    Crasto, Chiquito; Singer, Michael S; Shepherd, Gordon M

    2001-01-01

    Analysis of the human genome draft sequences has revealed a more complete portrait of the olfactory receptor gene repertoire in humans than was available previously. The new information provides a basis for deeper analysis of the functions of the receptors, and promises new insights into the evolutionary history of the family. PMID:11597337

  14. Zinc Modulation of Glycine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Trombley, Paul Q.; Blakemore, Laura J.; Hill, Brook J.

    2011-01-01

    Glycine receptors are widely expressed in the mammalian central nervous system, and previous studies have demonstrated that glycine receptors are modulated by endogenous zinc. Zinc is concentrated in synaptic vesicles in several brain regions but is particularly abundant in the hippocampus and olfactory bulb. In the present study, we used patch-clamp electrophysiology of rat hippocampal and olfactory bulb neurons in primary culture to examine the effects of zinc on glycine receptors. Although glycine has been reported to reach millimolar concentrations during synaptic transmission, most previous studies on the effects of zinc on glycine receptors have used relatively low concentrations of glycine. High concentrations of glycine cause receptor desensitization. Our current results extend our previous demonstration that the modulatory actions of zinc are largely prevented when co-applied with desensitizing concentrations of glycine (300 μM), suggesting that the effects of zinc are dependent on the state of the receptor. In contrast, pre-application of 300 μM zinc, prior to glycine (300 μM) application, causes a slowly developing inhibition with a slow rate of recovery, suggesting that the timing of zinc and glycine release also influences the effects of zinc. Furthermore, previous evidence suggests that synaptically released zinc can gain intracellular access, and we provide the first demonstration that low concentrations of intracellular zinc can potentiate glycine receptors. These results support the notion that zinc has complex effects on glycine receptors and multiple factors may interact to influence the efficacy of glycinergic transmission. PMID:21530619

  15. Allosteric Modulation of Chemoattractant Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Allegretti, Marcello; Cesta, Maria Candida; Locati, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Chemoattractants control selective leukocyte homing via interactions with a dedicated family of related G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). Emerging evidence indicates that the signaling activity of these receptors, as for other GPCR, is influenced by allosteric modulators, which interact with the receptor in a binding site distinct from the binding site of the agonist and modulate the receptor signaling activity in response to the orthosteric ligand. Allosteric modulators have a number of potential advantages over orthosteric agonists/antagonists as therapeutic agents and offer unprecedented opportunities to identify extremely selective drug leads. Here, we resume evidence of allosterism in the context of chemoattractant receptors, discussing in particular its functional impact on functional selectivity and probe/concentration dependence of orthosteric ligands activities. PMID:27199992

  16. [Interceptors:--"silent" chemokine receptors].

    PubMed

    Grodecka, Magdalena; Waśniowska, Kazimiera

    2007-01-01

    The physiological effect caused by chemokines is regulated by interactions with a group of rodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). These receptors share a number of common features: the polypeptide chain is a 7-transmembrane ?-helix (7 TMD motif) and the region involved in G-protein interaction (the DRYLAIV sequence) is located in the second transmembrane loop. So far, 19 chemokine receptors have been identified. Three of them (Duffy glycoprotein, D6, and CCX-CKR proteins), although structurally related to other GPCRs, lack the ability of G-protein signal transduction. Instead, they efficiently internalize their cognate ligands, regulating chemokine levels in various body compartments. These three proteins are suggested to form a distinct chemokine receptor family, designated "interceptors" or "silent" chemokine receptors. PMID:17507871

  17. Molecular characterization of opioid receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, A.D.

    1986-01-01

    The aim of this research was to purify and characterize active opioid receptors and elucidate molecular aspects of opioid receptor heterogeneity. Purification to apparent homogeneity of an opioid binding protein from bovine caudate was achieved by solubilization in the non-ionic detergent, digitonin, followed by sequential chromatography on the opiate affinity matrix, ..beta..-naltrexylethylenediamine-CH-Sepharose 4B, and on the lectine affinity matrix, wheat germ agglutinin-agarose. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS-PAGE) followed by autoradiography revealed that radioiodinated purified receptor gave a single band. Purified receptor preparations showed a specific activity of 12,000-15,000 fmol of opiate bound per mg of protein. Radioiodinated human beta-endorphin (/sup 125/I-beta-end/sub H/) was used as a probe to investigate the ligand binding subunits of mu and delta opioid receptors. /sup 125/I-beta-end/sub H/ was shown to bind to a variety of opioid receptor-containing tissues with high affinity and specificity with preference for mu and delta sites, and with little, if any, binding to kappa sites. Affinity crosslinking techniques were employed to covalently link /sup 125/I-beta-end/sub H/ to opioid receptors, utilizing derivatives of bis-succinimidyl esters that are bifunctional crosslinkers with specificities for amino and sulfhydryl groups. This, and competition experiments with high type-selective ligands, permitted the assignment of two labeled peptides to their receptor types, namely a peptide of M/sub r/ = 65,000 for mu receptors and one of M/sub r/ = 53,000 for delta receptors.

  18. Variant ionotropic glutamate receptors as chemosensory receptors in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Benton, Richard; Vannice, Kirsten S.; Gomez-Diaz, Carolina; Vosshall, Leslie B.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) mediate neuronal communication at synapses throughout vertebrate and invertebrate nervous systems. We have characterized a novel family of iGluR-related genes in Drosophila, which we name Ionotropic Receptors (IRs). These receptors do not belong to the well-described Kainate, AMPA, or NMDA classes of iGluRs, and have divergent ligand-binding domains that lack their characteristic glutamate-interacting residues. IRs are expressed in a combinatorial fashion in sensory neurons that respond to many distinct odors but do not express either insect odorant receptors (ORs) or gustatory receptors (GRs). IR proteins accumulate in sensory dendrites and not at synapses. Mis-expression of IRs induces novel odor responses in ectopic neurons. Together, these results lead us to propose that the IRs comprise a novel family of chemosensory receptors. Conservation of IR/iGluR-related proteins in bacteria, plants, and animals suggests that this receptor family represents an evolutionarily ancient mechanism for sensing both internal and external chemical cues. PMID:19135896

  19. Androgen receptor genomic regulation

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hong-Jian; Kim, Jung

    2013-01-01

    The transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor (AR) is not only critical for the normal development and function of the prostate but also pivotal to the onset and progression of prostate cancer (PCa). The studies of AR transcriptional regulation were previously limited to a handful of AR-target genes. Owing to the development of various high-throughput genomic technologies, significant advances have been made in recent years. Here we discuss the discoveries of genome-wide androgen-regulated genes in PCa cell lines, animal models and tissues using expression microarray and sequencing, the mapping of genomic landscapes of AR using Combining Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-on-chip and ChIP-seq assays, the interplay of transcriptional cofactors in defining AR binding profiles, and the genomic regulation and AR reprogramming in advanced PCa. PMID:25237629

  20. Toll-like receptors.

    PubMed

    Lien, Egil; Ingalls, Robin R

    2002-01-01

    The ability of a host to sense invasion by pathogenic organisms and to respond appropriately to control infection is paramount to survival. In the case of sepsis and septic shock, however, an exaggerated systemic response may, in fact, contribute to the morbidity and mortality associated with overwhelming infections. The innate immune system has evolved as the first line of defense against invading microorganisms. The Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a part of this innate immune defense, recognizing conserved patterns on microorganisms. These TLRs and their signaling pathways are represented in such diverse creatures as mammals, fruit flies, and plants. Ten members of the TLR family have been identified in humans, and several of them appear to recognize specific microbial products, including lipopolysaccharide, bacterial lipoproteins, peptidoglycan, and bacterial DNA. Signals initiated by the interaction of TLRs with specific microbial patterns direct the subsequent inflammatory response. Thus, TLR signaling represents a key component of the innate immune response to microbial infection. PMID:11782555

  1. Antibodies to cardiac receptors.

    PubMed

    Boivin-Jahns, V; Schlipp, A; Hartmann, S; Panjwani, P; Klingel, K; Lohse, M J; Ertl, G; Jahns, R

    2012-12-01

    Inflammation of cardiac tissue is generally associated with an activation of the host's immune system. On the one hand, this activation is mandatory to protect the heart by fighting the invading microbial agents or toxins and by engaging myocardial reparation and healing processes. On the other hand, uncontrolled activation of the immune defense has the risk of an arousal of auto- or cross-reactive immune cells, which in some cases bring more harm than good. Dependent on the individual genetic predisposition, such heart-directed autoimmune reactions most likely occur as a result of myocyte apoptosis or necrosis and subsequent liberation of self-antigens previously hidden to the immune system. During the past two decades, evidence for a pathogenic relevance of autoimmunity in human heart disease has substantially increased. Conformational cardiac (auto)antibodies affecting cardiac function and, in particular, (auto)antibodies that target G protein-coupled cardiac membrane receptors are thought to play a key role in the development of heart failure. Clinical pilot studies even suggest that such antibodies negatively affect survival in heart failure patients. However, the true prevalence and clinical impact of many cardiac (auto)antibodies in human heart diseases are still unclear, as are the events triggering their formation, their titer course, and their patterns of clearance and/or persistence. The present article summarizes current knowledge in the field of cardiac receptor (auto)antibodies including recent efforts to address some of the aforementioned gaps of knowledge, thereby attempting to pave the way for novel, more specific therapeutic approaches. PMID:23183584

  2. Estrogen-related receptor β (ERRβ) – renaissance receptor or receptor renaissance?

    PubMed Central

    Divekar, Shailaja D.; Tiek, Deanna M.; Fernandez, Aileen; Riggins, Rebecca B.

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen-related receptors (ERRs) are founding members of the orphan nuclear receptor (ONR) subgroup of the nuclear receptor superfamily. Twenty-seven years of study have yet to identify cognate ligands for the ERRs, though they have firmly placed ERRα and ERRγ at the intersection of cellular metabolism and oncogenesis. The pace of discovery for novel functions of ERRβ, however, has until recently been somewhat slower than that of its family members. ERRβ has also been largely ignored in summaries and perspectives of the ONR literature. Here, we provide an overview of established and emerging knowledge of ERRβ in mouse, man, and other species, highlighting unique aspects of ERRβ biology that set it apart from the other two estrogen-related receptors, with a focus on the impact of alternative splicing on the structure and function of this receptor. PMID:27507929

  3. Estrogen-related receptor β (ERRβ) - renaissance receptor or receptor renaissance?

    PubMed

    Divekar, Shailaja D; Tiek, Deanna M; Fernandez, Aileen; Riggins, Rebecca B

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen-related receptors (ERRs) are founding members of the orphan nuclear receptor (ONR) subgroup of the nuclear receptor superfamily. Twenty-seven years of study have yet to identify cognate ligands for the ERRs, though they have firmly placed ERRα and ERRγ at the intersection of cellular metabolism and oncogenesis. The pace of discovery for novel functions of ERRβ, however, has until recently been somewhat slower than that of its family members. ERRβ has also been largely ignored in summaries and perspectives of the ONR literature. Here, we provide an overview of established and emerging knowledge of ERRβ in mouse, man, and other species, highlighting unique aspects of ERRβ biology that set it apart from the other two estrogen-related receptors, with a focus on the impact of alternative splicing on the structure and function of this receptor. PMID:27507929

  4. Dopamine receptors - IUPHAR Review 13.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Jean-Martin; Espinoza, Stefano; Gainetdinov, Raul R

    2015-01-01

    The variety of physiological functions controlled by dopamine in the brain and periphery is mediated by the D1, D2, D3, D4 and D5 dopamine GPCRs. Drugs acting on dopamine receptors are significant tools for the management of several neuropsychiatric disorders including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression and Parkinson's disease. Recent investigations of dopamine receptor signalling have shown that dopamine receptors, apart from their canonical action on cAMP-mediated signalling, can regulate a myriad of cellular responses to fine-tune the expression of dopamine-associated behaviours and functions. Such signalling mechanisms may involve alternate G protein coupling or non-G protein mechanisms involving ion channels, receptor tyrosine kinases or proteins such as β-arrestins that are classically involved in GPCR desensitization. Another level of complexity is the growing appreciation of the physiological roles played by dopamine receptor heteromers. Applications of new in vivo techniques have significantly furthered the understanding of the physiological functions played by dopamine receptors. Here we provide an update of the current knowledge regarding the complex biology, signalling, physiology and pharmacology of dopamine receptors. PMID:25671228

  5. Lysophospholipid receptors in drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Kihara, Yasuyuki; Mizuno, Hirotaka; Chun, Jerold

    2014-01-01

    Lysophospholipids (LPs), including lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), sphingosine 1-phospate (S1P), lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI), and lysophosphatidylserine (LysoPS), are bioactive lipids that transduce signals through their specific cell-surface G protein-coupled receptors, LPA1–6, S1P1–5, LPI1, and LysoPS1–3, respectively. These LPs and their receptors have been implicated in both physiological and pathophysiological processes such as autoimmune diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, fibrosis, pain, cancer, inflammation, metabolic syndrome, bone formation, fertility, organismal development, and other effects on most organ systems. Advances in the LP receptor field have enabled the development of novel small molecules targeting LP receptors for several diseases. Most notably, fingolimod (FTY720, Gilenya, Novartis), an S1P receptor modulator, became the first FDA-approved medicine as an orally bioavailable drug for treating relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis. This success is currently being followed by multiple, mechanistically related compounds targeting S1P receptor subtypes, which are in various stages of clinical development. In addition, an LPA1 antagonist, BMS-986020 (Bristol-Myers Squibb), is in Phase 2 clinical development for treating idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, as is a distinct compound, SAR100842 (Sanofi) for the treatment of systemic sclerosis and related fibrotic diseases. This review summarizes the current state of drug discovery in the LP receptor field. PMID:25499971

  6. Discoidin domain receptors in disease.

    PubMed

    Borza, Corina M; Pozzi, Ambra

    2014-02-01

    Discoidin domain receptors, DDR1 and DDR2, lie at the intersection of two large receptor families, namely the extracellular matrix and tyrosine kinase receptors. As such, DDRs are uniquely positioned to function as sensors for extracellular matrix and to regulate a wide range of cell functions from migration and proliferation to cytokine secretion and extracellular matrix homeostasis/remodeling. While activation of DDRs by extracellular matrix collagens is required for normal development and tissue homeostasis, aberrant activation of these receptors following injury or in disease is detrimental. The availability of mice lacking DDRs has enabled us to identify key roles played by these receptors in disease initiation and progression. DDR1 promotes inflammation in atherosclerosis, lung fibrosis and kidney injury, while DDR2 contributes to osteoarthritis. Furthermore, both DDRs have been implicated in cancer progression. Yet the mechanisms whereby DDRs contribute to disease progression are poorly understood. In this review we highlight the mechanisms whereby DDRs regulate two important processes, namely inflammation and tissue fibrosis. In addition, we discuss the challenges of targeting DDRs in disease. Selective targeting of these receptors requires understanding of how they interact with and are activated by extracellular matrix, and whether their cellular function is dependent on or independent of receptor kinase activity. PMID:24361528

  7. Discoidin Domain Receptors in Disease

    PubMed Central

    Borza, Corina M; Pozzi, Ambra

    2014-01-01

    Discoidin domain receptors, DDR1 and DDR2, lie at the intersection of two large receptor families, namely the extracellular matrix and tyrosine kinase receptors. As such, DDRs are uniquely positioned to function as sensors for extracellular matrix and to regulate a wide range of cell functions from migration and proliferation to cytokine secretion and extracellular matrix homeostasis/remodeling. While activation of DDRs by extracellular matrix collagens is required for normal development and tissue homeostasis, aberrant activation of these receptors following injury or in disease is detrimental. The availability of mice lacking DDRs has enabled us to identify key roles played by these receptors in disease initiation and progression. DDR1 promotes inflammation in atherosclerosis, lung fibrosis and kidney injury, while DDR2 contributes to osteoarthritis. Furthermore, both DDRs have been implicated in cancer progression. Yet the mechanisms whereby DDRs contribute to diseases progression are poorly understood. In this review we highlight the mechanisms whereby DDRs regulate two important processes, namely inflammation and tissue fibrosis. In addition, we discuss the challenges of targeting DDRs in disease. Selective targeting of these receptors requires understanding of how they interact with and are activated by extracellular matrix, and whether their cellular function is dependent on or independent of receptor kinase activity. PMID:24361528

  8. Sigma receptors and cocaine abuse.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Sanju; Mesangeau, Christophe; Poupaert, Jacques H; McCurdy, Christopher R

    2011-01-01

    Sigma receptors have been well documented as a protein target for cocaine and have been shown to be involved in the toxic and stimulant actions of cocaine. Strategies to reduce the access of cocaine to sigma receptors have included antisense oligonucleotides to the sigma-1 receptor protein as well as small molecule ligand with affinity for sigma receptor sites. These results have been encouraging as novel protein targets that can attenuate the actions of cocaine are desperately needed as there are currently no medications approved for treatment of cocaine toxicity or addiction. Many years of research in this area have yet to produce an effective treatment and much focus was on dopamine systems. A flurry of research has been carried out to elucidate the role of sigma receptors in the blockade of cocaine effects but this research has yet to yield a clinical agent. This review summarizes the work to date on the linkage of sigma receptors and the actions of cocaine and the progress that has been made with regard to small molecules. Although there is still a lack of an agent in clinical trials with a sigma receptor mechanism of action, work is progressing and the ligands are becoming more selective for sigma systems and the potential remains high. PMID:21050176

  9. Lysophospholipid receptors in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Kihara, Yasuyuki; Mizuno, Hirotaka; Chun, Jerold

    2015-05-01

    Lysophospholipids (LPs), including lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), sphingosine 1-phospate (S1P), lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI), and lysophosphatidylserine (LysoPS), are bioactive lipids that transduce signals through their specific cell-surface G protein-coupled receptors, LPA1-6, S1P1-5, LPI1, and LysoPS1-3, respectively. These LPs and their receptors have been implicated in both physiological and pathophysiological processes such as autoimmune diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, fibrosis, pain, cancer, inflammation, metabolic syndrome, bone formation, fertility, organismal development, and other effects on most organ systems. Advances in the LP receptor field have enabled the development of novel small molecules targeting LP receptors for several diseases. Most notably, fingolimod (FTY720, Gilenya, Novartis), an S1P receptor modulator, became the first FDA-approved medicine as an orally bioavailable drug for treating relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis. This success is currently being followed by multiple, mechanistically related compounds targeting S1P receptor subtypes, which are in various stages of clinical development. In addition, an LPA1 antagonist, BMS-986020 (Bristol-Myers Squibb), is in Phase 2 clinical development for treating idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, as a distinct compound, SAR100842 (Sanofi) for the treatment of systemic sclerosis and related fibrotic diseases. This review summarizes the current state of drug discovery in the LP receptor field. PMID:25499971

  10. Purinergic receptors in psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Krügel, Ute

    2016-05-01

    Psychiatric disorders describe different mental or behavioral patterns, causing suffering or poor coping of ordinary life with manifold presentations. Multifactorial processes can contribute to their development and progression. Purinergic neurotransmission and neuromodulation in the brain have attracted increasing therapeutic interest in the field of psychiatry. Purine nucleotides and nucleosides are well recognized as signaling molecules mediating cell to cell communication. The actions of ATP are mediated by ionotropic P2X and metabotropic P2Y receptor subfamilies, whilst the actions of adenosine are mediated by P1 (A1 or A2) adenosine receptors. Purinergic mechanisms and specific receptor subtypes have been shown to be linked to the regulation of many aspects of behavior and mood and to dysregulation in pathological processes of brain function. In this review the recent knowledge on the role of purinergic receptors in the two most frequent psychiatric diseases, major depression and schizophrenia, as well as on related animal models is summarized. At present the most promising data for therapeutic strategies derive from investigations of the adenosine system emphasizing a unique function of A2A receptors at neurons and astrocytes in these disorders. Among the P2 receptor family, in particular P2X7 and P2Y1 receptors were related to disturbances in major depression and schizophrenia, respectively. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Purines in Neurodegeneration and Neuroregeneration'. PMID:26518371

  11. Glutamate receptor ligands as anxiolytics.

    PubMed

    Chojnacka-Wójcik, E; Kłodzinska, A; Pilc, A

    2001-08-01

    The glutamatergic system has received considerable attention over recent years as a potential target for anxiolytic drugs. In spite of the pronounced anxiolytic-like effects of competitive and non-competitive antagonists of NMDA receptors in animal models of anxiety, these substances can not be regarded as potential anxiolytic drugs, mainly due to their side-effect profiles (eg, ataxia, myorelaxation, impairment of learning and memory processes and psychotomimetic effects). Antagonists and partial agonists of the glycine, receptor inhibit function of the NMDA receptor complex and evoke in animals an anxiolytic-like response. Although data concerning anti-anxiety-like effects of glycine, receptor antagonists are not very promising, studies are underway to develop new, brain-penetrating agents devoid of side effects. Further developments are necessary to more fully elucidate the possible involvement of AMPA/kainate receptors in anxiety. The recent discovery of metabotropic glutamate receptors, which modulate the function of the glutamatergic system, offers new hope for discovery of a new generation of anxiolytics. MPEP, a highly selective, brain penetrable, noncompetitive mGlu5 receptor antagonist, evokes anxiolytic-like effects in several animal models of anxiety, remaining remarkably free of side effects. LY-354740, a selective brain-penetrable group II mGlu receptor agonist, evokes marked anxiolytic-like effects in animal models of anxiety. LY-354740 causes mild sedation in mice, does not disturb motor coordination and has no potential to cause dependence. Therefore mGlu receptor ligands may become the anxiolytics of the future, free from the side effects characteristic of benzodiazepines. PMID:11892923

  12. Immunisation with Torpedo acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Elfman, L

    1984-01-01

    Acetylcholine mediates the transfer of information between neurons in the electric organ of, for example, Torpedo as well as in vertebrate skeletal muscle. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor complex translates the binding of acetylcholine into ion permeability changes. This leads to an action potential in the muscle fibre. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor protein has been purified from Torpedo by use of affinity chromatography. The receptor is an intrinsic membrane glycoprotein composed of five polypeptide chains. When various animals are immunised with the receptor they demonstrate clinical signs of severe muscle weakness coincident with high antibody titres in their sera. The symptoms resemble those found in the autoimmune neuromuscular disease myasthenia gravis in humans. This animal model has constituted a unique model for studying autoimmune diseases. This paper reviews some of the work using Torpedo acetylcholine receptor in order to increase the understanding of the motor nervous system function and myasthenia gravis. It is now known that the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor protein is the antigen involved in myasthenia gravis. The mechanism of immune damage involves a direct block of the receptor function. This depends on the presence of antibodies which crosslink the postsynaptic receptors leading to their degradation. The questions to be answered in the future are; (a) what initiates or triggers the autoimmune response, (b) how do the antibodies cause the symptoms--is there a steric hindrance of the interaction of acetylcholine and the receptor, (c) why is there not a strict relationship between antibody titre and severity of symptoms, and (d) why are some muscles affected and other spared? With help of the experimental model, answers to these questions may result in improved strategies for the treatment of the autoimmune disease myasthenia gravis. PMID:6097937

  13. Teaching old receptors new tricks: biasing seven-transmembrane receptors

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopal, Sudarshan; Rajagopal, Keshava; Lefkowitz, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Seven-transmembrane receptors (7TMRs; also known as G protein-coupled receptors) are the largest class of receptors in the human genome and are common targets for therapeutics. Originally identified as mediators of 7TMR desensitization, β-arrestins (arrestin 2 and arrestin 3) are now recognized as true adaptor proteins that transduce signals to multiple effector pathways. Signalling that is mediated by β-arrestins has distinct biochemical and functional consequences from those mediated by G proteins, and several biased ligands and receptors have been identified that preferentially signal through either G protein- or β-arrestin-mediated pathways. These ligands are not only useful tools for investigating the biochemistry of 7TMR signalling, they also have the potential to be developed into new classes of therapeutics. PMID:20431569

  14. Chemosensory receptor specificity and regulation.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Ryan P; Lomvardas, Stavros

    2015-07-01

    The senses provide a means by which data on the physical and chemical properties of the environment may be collected and meaningfully interpreted. Sensation begins at the periphery, where a multitude of different sensory cell types are activated by environmental stimuli as different as photons and odorant molecules. Stimulus sensitivity is due to expression of different cell surface sensory receptors, and therefore the receptive field of each sense is defined by the aggregate of expressed receptors in each sensory tissue. Here, we review current understanding on patterns of expression and modes of regulation of sensory receptors. PMID:25938729

  15. Receptor-mediated mitophagy.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Osamu; Murakawa, Tomokazu; Nishida, Kazuhiko; Otsu, Kinya

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondria are essential organelles that supply ATP through oxidative phosphorylation to maintain cellular homeostasis. Extrinsic or intrinsic agents can impair mitochondria, and these impaired mitochondria can generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) as byproducts, inducing cellular damage and cell death. The quality control of mitochondria is essential for the maintenance of normal cellular functions, particularly in cardiomyocytes, because they are terminally differentiated. Accumulation of damaged mitochondria is characteristic of various diseases, including heart failure, neurodegenerative disease, and aging-related diseases. Mitochondria are generally degraded through autophagy, an intracellular degradation system that is conserved from yeast to mammals. Autophagy is thought to be a nonselective degradation process in which cytoplasmic proteins and organelles are engulfed by isolation membrane to form autophagosomes in eukaryotic cells. However, recent studies have described the process of selective autophagy, which targets specific proteins or organelles such as mitochondria. Mitochondria-specific autophagy is called mitophagy. Dysregulation of mitophagy is implicated in the development of chronic diseases including neurodegenerative diseases, metabolic diseases, and heart failure. In this review, we discuss recent progress in research on mitophagy receptors. PMID:27021519

  16. Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) are now being used as a treatment for breast cancer, osteoporosis and postmenopausal symptoms, as these drugs have features that can act as an estrogen agonist and an antagonist, depending on the target tissue. After tamoxifen, raloxifene, lasofoxifene and bazedoxifene SERMs have been developed and used for treatment. The clinically decisive difference among these drugs (i.e., the key difference) is their endometrial safety. Compared to bisphosphonate drug formulations for osteoporosis, SERMs are to be used primarily in postmenopausal women of younger age and are particularly recommended if there is a family history of invasive breast cancer, as their use greatly reduces the incidence of this type of cancer in women. Among the above mentioned SERMs, raloxifene has been widely used in prevention and treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis and vertebral compression fractures, and clinical studies are now underway to test the comparative advantages of raloxifene with those of bazedoxifene, a more recently developed SERM. Research on a number of adverse side effects of SERM agents is being performed to determine the long-term safety of this class of compouds for treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:27559463

  17. NMDA receptor antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ramberger, Melanie; Bsteh, Gabriel; Schanda, Kathrin; Höftberger, Romana; Rostásy, Kevin; Baumann, Matthias; Aboulenein-Djamshidian, Fahmy; Lutterotti, Andreas; Deisenhammer, Florian; Berger, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To analyze the frequency of NMDA receptor (NMDAR) antibodies in patients with various inflammatory demyelinating diseases of the CNS and to determine their clinical correlates. Methods: Retrospective case-control study from 2005 to 2014 with the detection of serum IgG antibodies to NMDAR, aquaporin-4, and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein by recombinant live cell-based immunofluorescence assays. Fifty-one patients with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, 41 with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders, 34 with clinically isolated syndrome, and 89 with multiple sclerosis (MS) were included. Due to a known association of NMDAR antibodies with seizures and behavioral symptoms, patients with those clinical manifestations were preferentially included and are therefore overrepresented in our cohort. Nine patients with NMDAR encephalitis, 94 patients with other neurologic diseases, and 48 healthy individuals were used as controls. Results: NMDAR antibodies were found in all 9 patients with NMDAR encephalitis but in only 1 of 215 (0.5%) patients with inflammatory demyelination and in none of the controls. This patient had relapsing-remitting MS with NMDAR antibodies present at disease onset, with an increase in NMDAR antibody titer with the onset of psychiatric symptoms and cognitive deficits. Conclusion: In demyelinating disorders, NMDAR antibodies are uncommon, even in those with symptoms seen in NMDAR encephalitis. PMID:26309901

  18. Rapid mineralocorticoid receptor trafficking.

    PubMed

    Gekle, M; Bretschneider, M; Meinel, S; Ruhs, S; Grossmann, C

    2014-03-01

    The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that physiologically regulates water-electrolyte homeostasis and controls blood pressure. The MR can also elicit inflammatory and remodeling processes in the cardiovascular system and the kidneys, which require the presence of additional pathological factors like for example nitrosative stress. However, the underlying molecular mechanism(s) for pathophysiological MR effects remain(s) elusive. The inactive MR is located in the cytosol associated with chaperone molecules including HSP90. After ligand binding, the MR monomer rapidly translocates into the nucleus while still being associated to HSP90 and after dissociation from HSP90 binds to hormone-response-elements called glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) as a dimer. There are indications that rapid MR trafficking is modulated in the presence of high salt, oxidative or nitrosative stress, hypothetically by induction or posttranslational modifications. Additionally, glucocorticoids and the enzyme 11beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase may also influence MR activation. Because MR trafficking and its modulation by micro-milieu factors influence MR cellular localization, it is not only relevant for genomic but also for nongenomic MR effects. PMID:24252381

  19. Recombinant soluble adenovirus receptor

    DOEpatents

    Freimuth, Paul I.

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed are isolated polypeptides from human CAR (coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor) protein which bind adenovirus. Specifically disclosed are amino acid sequences which corresponds to adenovirus binding domain D1 and the entire extracellular domain of human CAR protein comprising D1 and D2. In other aspects, the disclosure relates to nucleic acid sequences encoding these domains as well as expression vectors which encode the domains and bacterial cells containing such vectors. Also disclosed is an isolated fusion protein comprised of the D1 polypeptide sequence fused to a polypeptide sequence which facilitates folding of D1 into a functional, soluble domain when expressed in bacteria. The functional D1 domain finds application for example in a therapeutic method for treating a patient infected with a virus which binds to D1, and also in a method for identifying an antiviral compound which interferes with viral attachment. Also included is a method for specifically targeting a cell for infection by a virus which binds to D1.

  20. Estrogen receptors and endothelium.

    PubMed

    Arnal, Jean-François; Fontaine, Coralie; Billon-Galés, Audrey; Favre, Julie; Laurell, Henrik; Lenfant, Françoise; Gourdy, Pierre

    2010-08-01

    Estrogens, and in particular 17beta-estradiol (E2), play a pivotal role in sexual development and reproduction and are also implicated in a large number of physiological processes, including the cardiovascular system. Both acetylcholine-induced and flow-dependent vasodilation are preserved or potentiated by estrogen treatment in both animal models and humans. Indeed, E2 increases the endothelial production of nitric oxide and prostacyclin and prevents early atheroma through endothelial-mediated mechanisms. Furthermore, whereas it prevents endothelial activation, E2 potentiates the ability of several subpopulations of the circulating or resident immune cells to produce proinflammatory cytokines. The balance between these 2 actions could determine the final effect in a given pathophysiological process. E2 also promotes endothelial healing, as well as angiogenesis. Estrogen actions are essentially mediated by 2 molecular targets: estrogen receptor-alpha (ERalpha) and ERbeta. The analysis of mouse models targeted for ERalpha or ERbeta demonstrated a prominent role of ERalpha in vascular biology. ERalpha directly modulates transcription of target genes through 2 activation functions (AFs), AF-1 and AF-2. Interestingly, an AF-1-deficient ERalpha isoform can be physiologically expressed in the endothelium and appears sufficient to mediate most of the vasculoprotective actions of E2. In contrast, AF-1 is necessary for the E2 actions in reproductive targets. Thus, it appears conceivable to uncouple the vasculoprotective and sexual actions with appropriate selective ER modulators. PMID:20631350

  1. Lamin B receptor

    PubMed Central

    Olins, Ada L; Rhodes, Gale; Welch, David B Mark; Zwerger, Monika

    2010-01-01

    Lamin B receptor (LBR) is an integral membrane protein of the interphase nuclear envelope (NE). The N-terminal end resides in the nucleoplasm, binding to lamin B and heterochromatin, with the interactions disrupted during mitosis. The C-terminal end resides within the inner nuclear membrane, retreating with the ER away from condensing chromosomes during mitotic NE breakdown. Some of these properties are interpretable in terms of our current structural knowledge of LBR, but many of the structural features remain unknown. LBR apparently has an evolutionary history which brought together at least two ancient conserved structural domains (i.e., Tudor and sterol reductase). This convergence may have occurred with the emergence of the chordates and echinoderms. It is not clear what survival values have maintained LBR structure during evolution. But it seems likely that roles in post-mitotic nuclear reformation, interphase NE growth and compartmentalization of nuclear architecture might have provided some evolutionary advantage to preservation of the LBR gene. PMID:21327105

  2. A threading receptor for polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Mooibroek, Tiddo J; Casas-Solvas, Juan M; Harniman, Robert L; Renney, Charles M; Carter, Tom S; Crump, Matthew P; Davis, Anthony P

    2016-01-01

    Cellulose, chitin and related polysaccharides are key renewable sources of organic molecules and materials. However, poor solubility tends to hamper their exploitation. Synthetic receptors could aid dissolution provided they are capable of cooperative action, for example by multiple threading on a single polysaccharide molecule. Here we report a synthetic receptor designed to form threaded complexes (polypseudorotaxanes) with these natural polymers. The receptor binds fragments of the polysaccharides in aqueous solution with high affinities (K(a) up to 19,000 M(-1)), and is shown--by nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy--to adopt the threading geometry. Evidence from induced circular dichroism and atomic force microscopy implies that the receptor also forms polypseudorotaxanes with cellulose and its polycationic analogue chitosan. The results hold promise for polysaccharide solubilization under mild conditions, as well as for new approaches to the design of biologically active molecules. PMID:26673266

  3. A threading receptor for polysaccharides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooibroek, Tiddo J.; Casas-Solvas, Juan M.; Harniman, Robert L.; Renney, Charles M.; Carter, Tom S.; Crump, Matthew P.; Davis, Anthony P.

    2016-01-01

    Cellulose, chitin and related polysaccharides are key renewable sources of organic molecules and materials. However, poor solubility tends to hamper their exploitation. Synthetic receptors could aid dissolution provided they are capable of cooperative action, for example by multiple threading on a single polysaccharide molecule. Here we report a synthetic receptor designed to form threaded complexes (polypseudorotaxanes) with these natural polymers. The receptor binds fragments of the polysaccharides in aqueous solution with high affinities (Ka up to 19,000 M-1), and is shown—by nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy—to adopt the threading geometry. Evidence from induced circular dichroism and atomic force microscopy implies that the receptor also forms polypseudorotaxanes with cellulose and its polycationic analogue chitosan. The results hold promise for polysaccharide solubilization under mild conditions, as well as for new approaches to the design of biologically active molecules.

  4. Magnets in guitarfish vestibular receptors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Leary, D. P.; Vilches-Troya, J.; Dunn, R. F.; Campos-Munoz, A.

    1981-01-01

    Black magnetic particles are intermixed with white crystalline otoconia in the inner ear gravity receptors of a saltwater ray. Their size and composition suggest that they are multidomains of magnetite-ilmenite.

  5. Evolution of Cytokine Receptor Signaling.

    PubMed

    Liongue, Clifford; Sertori, Robert; Ward, Alister C

    2016-07-01

    Cytokines represent essential mediators of cell-cell communication with particularly important roles within the immune system. These secreted factors are produced in response to developmental and/or environmental cues and act via cognate cytokine receptors on target cells, stimulating specific intracellular signaling pathways to facilitate appropriate cellular responses. This review describes the evolution of cytokine receptor signaling, focusing on the class I and class II receptor families and the downstream JAK-STAT pathway along with its key negative regulators. Individual components generated over a long evolutionary time frame coalesced to form an archetypal signaling pathway in bilateria that was expanded extensively during early vertebrate evolution to establish a substantial "core" signaling network, which has subsequently undergone limited diversification within discrete lineages. The evolution of cytokine receptor signaling parallels that of the immune system, particularly the emergence of adaptive immunity, which has likely been a major evolutionary driver. PMID:27317733

  6. Malaria selectively targets pregnancy receptors.

    PubMed

    Chishti, Athar H

    2015-01-01

    In this issue of Blood, Rieger et al show that malaria parasite infiltration in the human placenta requires a specific geometry and affinity of host receptors to facilitate strong adhesion. PMID:25573970

  7. Receptor-targeted metalloradiopharmaceuticals. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Mark A.

    2000-03-22

    Copper (II) and platinum (II) coordination complexes were prepared and characterized. These complexes were designed to afford structural homology with steroidal and non-steroidal estrogens for possible use as receptor-targeted radiopharmaceuticals. While weak affinity for the estrogen receptor was detectable, none would appear to have sufficient receptor-affinity for estrogen-receptor-targeted imaging or therapy.

  8. L-glutamate Receptor In Paramecium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal-Martínez, Juan; Ortega-Soto, Arturo

    2004-09-01

    Behavioral, electrophysiological and biochemical experiments were performed in order to establish the presence of a glutamate receptor in the ciliate Paramecium. It was found that an AMPA/KA receptor is functionally expressed in Paramecium and that this receptor is immunologically and fillogenetically related to the AMPA/KA receptor present in vertebrates.

  9. Nuclear Receptors, RXR, and the Big Bang.

    PubMed

    Evans, Ronald M; Mangelsdorf, David J

    2014-03-27

    Isolation of genes encoding the receptors for steroids, retinoids, vitamin D, and thyroid hormone and their structural and functional analysis revealed an evolutionarily conserved template for nuclear hormone receptors. This discovery sparked identification of numerous genes encoding related proteins, termed orphan receptors. Characterization of these orphan receptors and, in particular, of the retinoid X receptor (RXR) positioned nuclear receptors at the epicenter of the "Big Bang" of molecular endocrinology. This Review provides a personal perspective on nuclear receptors and explores their integrated and coordinated signaling networks that are essential for multicellular life, highlighting the RXR heterodimer and its associated ligands and transcriptional mechanism. PMID:24679540

  10. [Pathologic manifestations of hormonal receptor mutations].

    PubMed

    Milgrom, E

    2000-01-01

    Mutations of receptor genes are involved in various aspects of thyroid and gonadal pathology. Activating mutations of TSH and LH receptors are associated with hyperthyroidism and premature puberty. These mutations are dominant and lead to the synthesis of a constitutive receptor, i.e. a receptor active even in the absence of hormone. Inactivating mutations of TSH, gonadotropin and GnRH receptors are recessive. They determine either a hypothyroidism or a hypogonadism. In the case of alterations of gonadotropin receptors the hypogonadism is hypergonadotrophic. It is hypogonadotrophic in the case of mutations of the GnRH receptor. PMID:10989556

  11. Chemokine receptor internalization and intracellular trafficking.

    PubMed

    Neel, Nicole F; Schutyser, Evemie; Sai, Jiqing; Fan, Guo-Huang; Richmond, Ann

    2005-12-01

    The internalization and intracellular trafficking of chemokine receptors have important implications for the cellular responses elicited by chemokine receptors. The major pathway by which chemokine receptors internalize is the clathrin-mediated pathway, but some receptors may utilize lipid rafts/caveolae-dependent internalization routes. This review discusses the current knowledge and controversies regarding these two different routes of endocytosis. The functional consequences of internalization and the regulation of chemokine receptor recycling will also be addressed. Modifications of chemokine receptors, such as palmitoylation, ubiquitination, glycosylation, and sulfation, may also impact trafficking, chemotaxis and signaling. Finally, this review will cover the internalization and trafficking of viral and decoy chemokine receptors. PMID:15998596

  12. Nuclear Receptors, RXR & the Big Bang

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Ronald M.; Mangelsdorf, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Isolation of genes encoding the receptors for steroids, retinoids, vitamin D and thyroid hormone, and their structural and functional analysis revealed an evolutionarily conserved template for nuclear hormone receptors. This discovery sparked identification of numerous genes encoding related proteins, termed orphan receptors. Characterization of these orphan receptors, and in particular of the retinoid X receptor (RXR), positioned nuclear receptors at the epicenter of the “Big Bang” of molecular endocrinology. This review provides a personal perspective on nuclear receptors and explores their integrated and coordinated signaling networks that are essential for multi-cellular life, highlighting the RXR heterodimer and its associated ligands and transcriptional mechanism. PMID:24679540

  13. Molecular Pharmacology of Chemokine Receptors.

    PubMed

    de Wit, Raymond H; de Munnik, Sabrina M; Leurs, Rob; Vischer, Henry F; Smit, Martine J

    2016-01-01

    Chemokine receptors are involved in various pathologies such as inflammatory diseases, cancer, and HIV infection. Small molecule and antibody-based antagonists have been developed to inhibit chemokine-induced receptor activity. Currently two small molecule inhibitors targeting CXCR4 and CCR5 are on the market for stem cell mobilization and the treatment of HIV infection, respectively. Antibody fragments (e.g., nanobodies) targeting chemokine receptors are primarily orthosteric ligands, competing for the chemokine binding site. This is opposed by most small molecules, which act as allosteric modulators and bind to the receptor at a topographically distinct site as compared to chemokines. Allosteric modulators can be distinguished from orthosteric ligands by unique features, such as a saturable effect and probe dependency. For successful drug development, it is essential to determine pharmacological parameters (i.e., affinity, potency, and efficacy) and the mode of action of potential drugs during early stages of research in order to predict the biological effect of chemokine receptor targeting drugs in the clinic. This chapter explains how the pharmacological profile of chemokine receptor targeting ligands can be determined and quantified using binding and functional experiments. PMID:26921959

  14. Adenosine Receptors and Membrane Microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Lasley, Robert D.

    2010-01-01

    Adenosine receptors are a member of the large family of seven transmembrane spanning G protein coupled receptors (GPCR). The four adenosine receptor subtypes – A1, A2a, A2b, A3 – exert their effects via the activation of one or more heterotrimeric G proteins resulting in the modulation of intracellular signaling. Numerous studies over the past decade have documented the complexity of GPCR signaling at the level of protein-protein interactions as well as through signaling crosstalk. With respect to adenosine receptors the activation of one receptor subtype can have profound direct effects in one cell type, but little or no effect in other cells. There is significant evidence that the compartmentation of subcellular signaling plays a physiological role in the fidelity of GPCR signaling. This compartmentation is evident at the level of the plasma membrane in the form of membrane microdomains such as caveolae and lipid rafts. This review will summarize and critically assess our current understanding of the role of membrane microdomains in regulating adenosine receptor signaling. PMID:20888790

  15. Eph Receptor Signaling and Ephrins

    PubMed Central

    Lisabeth, Erika M.; Falivelli, Giulia; Pasquale, Elena B.

    2013-01-01

    The Eph receptors are the largest of the RTK families. Like other RTKs, they transduce signals from the cell exterior to the interior through ligand-induced activation of their kinase domain. However, the Eph receptors also have distinctive features. Instead of binding soluble ligands, they generally mediate contact-dependent cell–cell communication by interacting with surface-associated ligands—the ephrins—on neighboring cells. Eph receptor–ephrin complexes emanate bidirectional signals that affect both receptor- and ephrin-expressing cells. Intriguingly, ephrins can also attenuate signaling by Eph receptors coexpressed in the same cell. Additionally, Eph receptors can modulate cell behavior independently of ephrin binding and kinase activity. The Eph/ephrin system regulates many developmental processes and adult tissue homeostasis. Its abnormal function has been implicated in various diseases, including cancer. Thus, Eph receptors represent promising therapeutic targets. However, more research is needed to better understand the many aspects of their complex biology that remain mysterious. PMID:24003208

  16. Piperidine derivatives as nonprostanoid IP receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Ryoji; Sakagami, Hideki; Koiwa, Masakazu; Ito, Hiroaki; Miyamoto, Mitsuko; Isogaya, Masafumi

    2016-05-01

    The discovery of a new class of nonprostanoid prostaglandin I2 receptor (IP receptor) agonists is reported. Among them, the unique piperidine derivative 31b (2-((1-(2-(N-(4-tolyl)benzamido)ethyl)piperidin-4-yl)oxy)acetic acid) was a good IP receptor agonist and was 50-fold more selective for the human IP receptor than for other human prostanoid receptors. This compound showed good pharmacokinetic properties in dog. PMID:26996371

  17. Gravity receptors and responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Allan H.

    1989-01-01

    The overall process of gravity sensing and response processes in plants may be divided conveniently into at least four components or stages: Stimulus susception (a physical event, characteristically the input to the G receptor system of environmental information about the G force magnitude, its vector direction, or both); information perception (an influence of susception on some biological structure or process that can be described as the transformation of environmental information into a biologicallly meaningful change); information transport (the export, if required, of an influence (often chemical) to cells and organs other than those at the sensor location); and biological response (almost always (in plants) a growth change of some kind). Some analysts of the process identify, between information perception and information transport, an additional stage, transduction, which would emphasize the importance of a transformation from one form of information to another, for example from mechanical statolith displacement to an electric, chemical, or other alteration that was its indirect result. These four (or five) stages are temporally sequential. Even if all that occurs at each stage can not be confidently identified, it seems evident that during transduction and transport, matters dealt with are found relatively late in the information flow rather than at the perception stage. As more and more is learned about the roles played by plant hormones which condition the G responses, the mechanism(s) of perception which should be are not necessarily better understood. However, if by asking the right questions and being lucky with experiments perhaps the discovery of how some process (such as sedimentation of protoplasmic organelles) dictates what happens down stream in the information flow sequence may be made.

  18. Insulin receptor-related receptor as an extracellular alkali sensor

    PubMed Central

    Deyev, Igor E.; Sohet, Fabien; Vassilenko, Konstantin P.; Serova, Oxana V.; Popova, Nadezhda V.; Zozulya, Sergey A.; Burova, Elena B.; Houillier, Pascal; Rzhevsky, Dmitry I.; Berchatova, Anastasiya A.; Murashev, Arkady N.; Chugunov, Anton O.; Efremov, Roman G.; Nikol’sky, Nikolai N.; Bertelli, Eugenio; Eladari, Dominique; Petrenko, Alexander G.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The insulin receptor-related receptor (IRR), an orphan receptor tyrosine kinase of the insulin receptor family, can be activated by alkaline media both in vitro and in vivo at pH>7.9. The alkali-sensing property of IRR is conserved in frog, mouse and human. IRR activation is specific, dose-dependent, quickly reversible and demonstrates positive cooperativity. It also triggers receptor conformational changes and elicits intracellular signaling. The pH sensitivity of IRR is primarily defined by its L1F extracellular domains. IRR is predominantly expressed in organs that come in contact with mildly alkaline media. In particular, IRR is expressed in the cell subsets of the kidney that secrete bicarbonate into urine. Disruption of IRR in mice impairs the renal response to alkali loading attested by development of metabolic alkalosis and decreased urinary bicarbonate excretion in response to this challenge. We therefore postulate that IRR is an alkali sensor that functions in the kidney to manage metabolic bicarbonate excess. PMID:21641549

  19. Phenobarbital and Insulin Reciprocate Activation of the Nuclear Receptor Constitutive Androstane Receptor through the Insulin Receptor.

    PubMed

    Yasujima, Tomoya; Saito, Kosuke; Moore, Rick; Negishi, Masahiko

    2016-05-01

    Phenobarbital (PB) antagonized insulin to inactivate the insulin receptor and attenuated the insulin receptor downstream protein kinase B (AKT)-forkhead box protein O1 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 signals in mouse primary hepatocytes and HepG2 cells. Hepatic AKT began dephosphorylation in an early stage of PB treatment, and blood glucose levels transiently increased in both wild-type and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) knockout (KO) mice. On the other hand, blood glucose levels increased in wild-type mice, but not KO mice, in later stages of PB treatment. As a result, PB, acting as an insulin receptor antagonist, elicited CAR-independent increases and CAR-dependent decreases of blood glucose levels at these different stages of treatment, respectively. Reciprocally, insulin activation of the insulin receptor repressed CAR activation and induction of its target CYP2B6 gene in HepG2 cells. Thus, PB and insulin cross-talk through the insulin receptor to regulate glucose and drug metabolism reciprocally. PMID:26994072

  20. Phenobarbital and Insulin Reciprocate Activation of the Nuclear Receptor Constitutive Androstane Receptor through the Insulin Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Yasujima, Tomoya; Saito, Kosuke; Moore, Rick

    2016-01-01

    Phenobarbital (PB) antagonized insulin to inactivate the insulin receptor and attenuated the insulin receptor downstream protein kinase B (AKT)–forkhead box protein O1 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 signals in mouse primary hepatocytes and HepG2 cells. Hepatic AKT began dephosphorylation in an early stage of PB treatment, and blood glucose levels transiently increased in both wild-type and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) knockout (KO) mice. On the other hand, blood glucose levels increased in wild-type mice, but not KO mice, in later stages of PB treatment. As a result, PB, acting as an insulin receptor antagonist, elicited CAR-independent increases and CAR-dependent decreases of blood glucose levels at these different stages of treatment, respectively. Reciprocally, insulin activation of the insulin receptor repressed CAR activation and induction of its target CYP2B6 gene in HepG2 cells. Thus, PB and insulin cross-talk through the insulin receptor to regulate glucose and drug metabolism reciprocally. PMID:26994072

  1. Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) – focus on receptor-receptor-interactions and their physiological and pathophysiological impact

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) are a subfamily of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) with four members, PAR1, PAR2, PAR3 and PAR4, playing critical functions in hemostasis, thrombosis, embryonic development, wound healing, inflammation and cancer progression. PARs are characterized by a unique activation mechanism involving receptor cleavage by different proteinases at specific sites within the extracellular amino-terminus and the exposure of amino-terminal “tethered ligand“ domains that bind to and activate the cleaved receptors. After activation, the PAR family members are able to stimulate complex intracellular signalling networks via classical G protein-mediated pathways and beta-arrestin signalling. In addition, different receptor crosstalk mechanisms critically contribute to a high diversity of PAR signal transduction and receptor-trafficking processes that result in multiple physiological effects. In this review, we summarize current information about PAR-initiated physical and functional receptor interactions and their physiological and pathological roles. We focus especially on PAR homo- and heterodimerization, transactivation of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and receptor serine/threonine kinases (RSTKs), communication with other GPCRs, toll-like receptors and NOD-like receptors, ion channel receptors, and on PAR association with cargo receptors. In addition, we discuss the suitability of these receptor interaction mechanisms as targets for modulating PAR signalling in disease. PMID:24215724

  2. Transferrin Receptor Controls AMPA Receptor Trafficking Efficiency and Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ke; Lei, Run; Li, Qiong; Wang, Xin-Xin; Wu, Qian; An, Peng; Zhang, Jianchao; Zhu, Minyan; Xu, Zhiheng; Hong, Yang; Wang, Fudi; Shen, Ying; Li, Hongchang; Li, Huashun

    2016-01-01

    Transferrin receptor (TFR) is an important iron transporter regulating iron homeostasis and has long been used as a marker for clathrin mediated endocytosis. However, little is known about its additional function other than iron transport in the development of central nervous system (CNS). Here we demonstrate that TFR functions as a regulator to control AMPA receptor trafficking efficiency and synaptic plasticity. The conditional knockout (KO) of TFR in neural progenitor cells causes mice to develop progressive epileptic seizure, and dramatically reduces basal synaptic transmission and long-term potentiation (LTP). We further demonstrate that TFR KO remarkably reduces the binding efficiency of GluR2 to AP2 and subsequently decreases AMPA receptor endocytosis and recycling. Thus, our study reveals that TFR functions as a novel regulator to control AMPA trafficking efficiency and synaptic plasticity. PMID:26880306

  3. Identification and mechanism of ABA receptor antagonism

    SciTech Connect

    Melcher, Karsten; Xu, Yong; Ng, Ley-Moy; Zhou, X. Edward; Soon, Fen-Fen; Chinnusamy, Viswanathan; Suino-Powell, Kelly M; Kovach, Amanda; Tham, Fook S.; Cutler, Sean R.; Li, Jun; Yong, Eu-Leong; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Xu, H. Eric

    2010-11-11

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) functions through a family of fourteen PYR/PYL receptors, which were identified by resistance to pyrabactin, a synthetic inhibitor of seed germination. ABA activates these receptors to inhibit type 2C protein phosphatases, such as ABI1, yet it remains unclear whether these receptors can be antagonized. Here we demonstrate that pyrabactin is an agonist of PYR1 and PYL1 but is unexpectedly an antagonist of PYL2. Crystal structures of the PYL2-pyrabactin and PYL1-pyrabactin-ABI1 complexes reveal the mechanism responsible for receptor-selective activation and inhibition, which enables us to design mutations that convert PYL1 to a pyrabactin-inhibited receptor and PYL2 to a pyrabactin-activated receptor and to identify new pyrabactin-based ABA receptor agonists. Together, our results establish a new concept of ABA receptor antagonism, illustrate its underlying mechanisms and provide a rational framework for discovering novel ABA receptor ligands.

  4. Photo-antagonism of the GABAA receptor.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Martin; Iqbal, Favaad; Pandurangan, Arun P; Hannan, Saad; Huckvale, Rosemary; Topf, Maya; Baker, James R; Smart, Trevor G

    2014-01-01

    Neurotransmitter receptor trafficking is fundamentally important for synaptic transmission and neural network activity. GABAA receptors and inhibitory synapses are vital components of brain function, yet much of our knowledge regarding receptor mobility and function at inhibitory synapses is derived indirectly from using recombinant receptors, antibody-tagged native receptors and pharmacological treatments. Here we describe the use of a set of research tools that can irreversibly bind to and affect the function of recombinant and neuronal GABAA receptors following ultraviolet photoactivation. These compounds are based on the competitive antagonist gabazine and incorporate a variety of photoactive groups. By using site-directed mutagenesis and ligand-docking studies, they reveal new areas of the GABA binding site at the interface between receptor β and α subunits. These compounds enable the selected inactivation of native GABAA receptor populations providing new insight into the function of inhibitory synapses and extrasynaptic receptors in controlling neuronal excitation. PMID:25072879

  5. Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors & CNS Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bowie, Derek

    2008-01-01

    Disorders of the central nervous system (CNS) are complex disease states that represent a major challenge for modern medicine. Although etiology is often unknown, it is established that multiple factors such as defects in genetics and/or epigenetics, the environment as well as imbalance in neurotransmitter receptor systems are all at play in determining an individual’s susceptibility to disease. Gene therapy is currently not available and therefore, most conditions are treated with pharmacological agents that modify neurotransmitter receptor signaling. Here, I provide a review of ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) and the roles they fulfill in numerous CNS disorders. Specifically, I argue that our understanding of iGluRs has reached a critical turning point to permit, for the first time, a comprehensive re-evaluation of their role in the cause of disease. I illustrate this by highlighting how defects in AMPA receptor trafficking are important to Fragile X mental retardation and ectopic expression of kainate (KA) receptor synapses contributes to the pathology of temporal lobe epilepsy. Finally, I discuss how parallel advances in studies of other neurotransmitter systems may allow pharmacologists to work towards a cure for many CNS disorders rather than developing drugs to treat their symptoms. PMID:18537642

  6. Purinergic Receptors in Ocular Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Guzman-Aranguez, Ana; Gasull, Xavier; Diebold, Yolanda; Pintor, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is a complex process that implies the interaction between cells and molecular mediators, which, when not properly “tuned,” can lead to disease. When inflammation affects the eye, it can produce severe disorders affecting the superficial and internal parts of the visual organ. The nucleoside adenosine and nucleotides including adenine mononucleotides like ADP and ATP and dinucleotides such as P1,P4-diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap4A), and P1,P5-diadenosine pentaphosphate (Ap5A) are present in different ocular locations and therefore they may contribute/modulate inflammatory processes. Adenosine receptors, in particular A2A adenosine receptors, present anti-inflammatory action in acute and chronic retinal inflammation. Regarding the A3 receptor, selective agonists like N6-(3-iodobenzyl)-5′-N-methylcarboxamidoadenosine (CF101) have been used for the treatment of inflammatory ophthalmic diseases such as dry eye and uveoretinitis. Sideways, diverse stimuli (sensory stimulation, large intraocular pressure increases) can produce a release of ATP from ocular sensory innervation or after injury to ocular tissues. Then, ATP will activate purinergic P2 receptors present in sensory nerve endings, the iris, the ciliary body, or other tissues surrounding the anterior chamber of the eye to produce uveitis/endophthalmitis. In summary, adenosine and nucleotides can activate receptors in ocular structures susceptible to suffer from inflammatory processes. This involvement suggests the possible use of purinergic agonists and antagonists as therapeutic targets for ocular inflammation. PMID:25132732

  7. Nuclear receptors: the evolution of diversity.

    PubMed

    Schwabe, John W R; Teichmann, Sarah A

    2004-01-27

    Nuclear receptors are an ancient family of transcription factors. Some receptors are regulated by small lipophilic ligands, whereas others are constitutive transcriptional activators or repressors. The evolution of this diversity is poorly understood, and it remains an open question as to whether or not the ancestral receptor was ligand-regulated. The recent cloning, from a snail, of an estrogen receptor that does not bind estrogen not only suggests that the steroid receptors are much more ancient than previous thought, but also points toward a mechanism through which nuclear receptors can lose the ability to be ligand regulated. PMID:14747695

  8. Trafficking of the Follitropin Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Ulloa-Aguirre, Alfredo; Dias, James A.; Bousfield, George; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo; Reiter, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The follitropin or follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) belongs to a highly conserved subfamily of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily and is mainly expressed in specific cells in the gonads. As any other GPCR, the newly synthesized FSHR has to be correctly folded and processed in order to traffic to the cell surface plasma membrane and interact with its cognate ligand. In this chapter, we describe in detail the conditions and procedures used to study outward trafficking of the FSHR from the endoplasmic reticulum to the plasma membrane. We also describe some methods to analyze phosphorylation, β-arrestin recruitment, internalization, and recycling of this particular receptor, which have proved useful in our hands for dissecting its downward trafficking and fate following agonist stimulation. PMID:23351732

  9. Host receptors for bacteriophage adsorption.

    PubMed

    Bertozzi Silva, Juliano; Storms, Zachary; Sauvageau, Dominic

    2016-02-01

    The adsorption of bacteriophages (phages) onto host cells is, in all but a few rare cases, a sine qua non condition for the onset of the infection process. Understanding the mechanisms involved and the factors affecting it is, thus, crucial for the investigation of host-phage interactions. This review provides a survey of the phage host receptors involved in recognition and adsorption and their interactions during attachment. Comprehension of the whole infection process, starting with the adsorption step, can enable and accelerate our understanding of phage ecology and the development of phage-based technologies. To assist in this effort, we have established an open-access resource--the Phage Receptor Database (PhReD)--to serve as a repository for information on known and newly identified phage receptors. PMID:26755501

  10. Toll receptors and pathogen resistance.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Kiyoshi; Akira, Shizuo

    2003-03-01

    Toll receptors in insects, mammals and plants are key players that sense the invasion of pathogens. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in mammals have been established to detect specific components of bacterial and fungal pathogens. Furthermore, recent evidence indicates that TLRs are involved in the recognition of viral invasion. Signalling pathways via TLRs originate from the conserved Toll/IL-1 receptor (TIR) domain. The TIR domain-containing MyD88 acts as a common adaptor that induces inflammatory cytokines; however, there exists a MyD88-independent pathway that induces type I IFNs in TLR4 and TLR3 signalling. Another TIR domain-containing adaptor, TIRAP/Mal has recently been shown to mediate the MyD88-dependent activation in the TLR4 and TLR2 signalling pathway. Thus, individual TLRs may have their own signalling systems that characterize their specific activities. PMID:12614458

  11. Signaling from axon guidance receptors.

    PubMed

    Bashaw, Greg J; Klein, Rüdiger

    2010-05-01

    Determining how axon guidance receptors transmit signals to allow precise pathfinding decisions is fundamental to our understanding of nervous system development and may suggest new strategies to promote axon regeneration after injury or disease. Signaling mechanisms that act downstream of four prominent families of axon guidance cues--netrins, semaphorins, ephrins, and slits--have been extensively studied in both invertebrate and vertebrate model systems. Although details of these signaling mechanisms are still fragmentary and there appears to be considerable diversity in how different guidance receptors regulate the motility of the axonal growth cone, a number of common themes have emerged. Here, we review recent insights into how specific receptors for each of these guidance cues engage downstream regulators of the growth cone cytoskeleton to control axon guidance. PMID:20452961

  12. Monoallelic Expression of Olfactory Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Monahan, Kevin; Lomvardas, Stavros

    2016-01-01

    The sense of smell collects vital information about the environment by detecting a multitude of chemical odorants. Breadth and sensitivity are provided by a huge number of chemosensory receptor proteins, including more than 1,400 olfactory receptors (ORs). Organizing the sensory information generated by these receptors so that it can be processed and evaluated by the central nervous system is a major challenge. This challenge is overcome by monogenic and monoallelic expression of OR genes. The single OR expressed by each olfactory sensory neuron determines the neuron’s odor sensitivity and the axonal connections it will make to downstream neurons in the olfactory bulb. The expression of a single OR per neuron is accomplished by coupling a slow chromatin-mediated activation process to a fast negative-feedback signal that prevents activation of additional ORs. Singular OR activation is likely orchestrated by a network of interchromosomal enhancer interactions and large-scale changes in nuclear architecture. PMID:26359778

  13. Tissue C3b receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Schrieber, L; Penny, R

    1979-01-01

    Using fluorescein-labelled S. typhi coated with C3b (FBC) the presence of a receptor for C3b in normal human glomeruli has been confirmed. A quantitative system, counting the number of FBC bound per unit area of glomerulus, has been developed. Experimental variables have been studied to determine optimal conditions for FBC binding. Glomerular FBC binding has been shown to be dependent on FBC concentration, temperature and time of tissue incubation. A standardized procedure has been adopted. Using this technique we have examined a number of target tissues, including synovium, skin, lung, choroid plexus and uveal tract, which are frequently affected in systemic immune complex diseases. No evidence of this receptor has been found in these tissues. These results suggest a mechanism different from the C3b receptor operating to localise immune complexes in these non-renal sites. Images FIG. 2 PMID:527266

  14. Cannabinoids, cannabinoid receptors and tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Smith, Paul F; Zheng, Yiwen

    2016-02-01

    One hypothesis suggests that tinnitus is a form of sensory epilepsy, arising partly from neuronal hyperactivity in auditory regions of the brain such as the cochlear nucleus and inferior colliculus. Although there is currently no effective drug treatment for tinnitus, anti-epileptic drugs are used in some cases as a potential treatment option. There is increasing evidence to suggest that cannabinoid drugs, i.e. cannabinoid receptor agonists, can also have anti-epileptic effects, at least in some cases and in some parts of the brain. It has been reported that cannabinoid CB1 receptors and the endogenous cannabinoid, 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG), are expressed in the cochlear nucleus and that they are involved in the regulation of plasticity. This review explores the question of whether cannabinoid receptor agonists are likely to be pro- or anti-epileptic in the cochlear nucleus and therefore whether cannabinoids and Cannabis itself are likely to make tinnitus better or worse. PMID:26433054

  15. Nuclear receptors constitutive androstane receptor and pregnane X receptor ameliorate cholestatic liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Stedman, Catherine A. M.; Liddle, Christopher; Coulter, Sally A.; Sonoda, Junichiro; Alvarez, Jacqueline G. A.; Moore, David D.; Evans, Ronald M.; Downes, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Cholestasis is associated with accumulation of bile acids and lipids, and liver injury. The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and pregnane X receptor (PXR) are xenobiotic nuclear receptors that coordinate protective hepatic responses to potentially toxic stimuli, including bile acids. We investigated the role of these receptors in the regulation of bile acid and lipid metabolism in a bile duct ligation (BDL) model of cholestasis applied to receptor knockout mice. Hepatic damage from bile acid accumulation was increased in both CAR knockout (CARKO) and PXR knockout mice, but bile acid concentrations were lower in CARKO mice. High-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol was elevated in CARKO mice, and serum total cholesterol increased less in CARKO or PXR knockout mice than WT mice after BDL. Gene expression analysis of the BDL knockout animals demonstrated that, in response to cholestasis, PXR and CAR both repressed and induced the specific hepatic membrane transporters Oatp-c (organic anion transporting polypeptide C) and Oatp2 (Na+-dependent organic anion transporter 2), respectively. Induction of the xenobiotic transporter multidrug resistance protein 1 in cholestasis was independent of either PXR or CAR, in contrast to the known pattern of induction of multidrug resistance protein 1 by xenobiotics. These results demonstrate that CAR and PXR influence cholesterol metabolism and bile acid synthesis, as well as multiple detoxification pathways, and suggest their potential role as therapeutic targets for the treatment of cholestasis and lipid disorders. PMID:15684063

  16. Beta Adrenergic Receptors in Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sivamani, Raja K.; Lam, Susanne T.; Isseroff, R. Rivkah

    2007-01-01

    Synopsis Beta2 adrenergic receptors were identified in keratinocytes more than 30 years ago, but their function in the epidermis continues to be elucidated. Abnormalities in their expression, signaling pathway, or in the generation of endogenous catecholamine agonists by keratinocytes have been implicated in the pathogenesis of cutaneous diseases such as atopic dermatitis, vitiligo and psoriasis. New studies also indicate that the beta2AR also modulates keratinocyte migration, and thus can function to regulate wound re-epithelialization. This review focuses on the function of these receptors in keratinocytes and their contribution to cutaneous physiology and disease. PMID:17903623

  17. Glutamate receptors at atomic resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, Mark L.

    2010-12-03

    At synapses throughout the brain and spinal cord, the amino-acid glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter. During evolution, a family of glutamate-receptor ion channels seems to have been assembled from a kit consisting of discrete ligand-binding, ion-channel, modulatory and cytoplasmic domains. Crystallographic studies that exploit this unique architecture have greatly aided structural analysis of the ligand-binding core, but the results also pose a formidable challenge, namely that of resolving the allosteric mechanisms by which individual domains communicate and function in an intact receptor.

  18. Nuclear receptors and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Cave, Matthew C; Clair, Heather B; Hardesty, Josiah E; Falkner, K Cameron; Feng, Wenke; Clark, Barbara J; Sidey, Jennifer; Shi, Hongxue; Aqel, Bashar A; McClain, Craig J; Prough, Russell A

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear receptors are transcription factors which sense changing environmental or hormonal signals and effect transcriptional changes to regulate core life functions including growth, development, and reproduction. To support this function, following ligand-activation by xenobiotics, members of subfamily 1 nuclear receptors (NR1s) may heterodimerize with the retinoid X receptor (RXR) to regulate transcription of genes involved in energy and xenobiotic metabolism and inflammation. Several of these receptors including the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), the pregnane and xenobiotic receptor (PXR), the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), the liver X receptor (LXR) and the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) are key regulators of the gut:liver:adipose axis and serve to coordinate metabolic responses across organ systems between the fed and fasting states. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease and may progress to cirrhosis and even hepatocellular carcinoma. NAFLD is associated with inappropriate nuclear receptor function and perturbations along the gut:liver:adipose axis including obesity, increased intestinal permeability with systemic inflammation, abnormal hepatic lipid metabolism, and insulin resistance. Environmental chemicals may compound the problem by directly interacting with nuclear receptors leading to metabolic confusion and the inability to differentiate fed from fasting conditions. This review focuses on the impact of nuclear receptors in the pathogenesis and treatment of NAFLD. Clinical trials including PIVENS and FLINT demonstrate that nuclear receptor targeted therapies may lead to the paradoxical dissociation of steatosis, inflammation, fibrosis, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and obesity. Novel strategies currently under development (including tissue-specific ligands and dual receptor agonists) may be required to separate the beneficial effects of nuclear receptor activation from unwanted metabolic

  19. GABAA receptor subtypes: the "one glass of wine" receptors.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Richard W; Hanchar, Harry J; Meera, Pratap; Wallner, Martin

    2007-05-01

    This review discusses evidence for and apparent controversy about, gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor (GABAAR) subtypes that mediate alcohol effects experienced during social drinking. GABAARs that contain the beta3 and delta subunits were shown to be enhanced by alcohol concentrations that mirror the concentration dependence of alcohol responses in humans. A mutation (alpha6R100Q) previously found in alcohol nontolerant rats in the cerebellar GABAAR alpha6 subunit is sufficient for increased alcohol-induced ataxia in rats homozygous for this mutation (alpha6-100QQ) and further increases alcohol sensitivity of tonic GABA currents (mediated by alpha6betadelta receptors) in cerebellar granule cells of alpha6-100QQ rats and in recombinant alpha6R100Qbeta3delta receptors. This provided the first direct evidence that these types of receptors mediate behavioral effects of ethanol. Furthermore, the behavioral alcohol antagonist Ro15-4513 specifically reverses ethanol enhancement on alpha4/6beta3delta receptors. Unexpectedly, native and recombinant alpha4/6beta3delta receptors bind the behavioral alcohol antagonist Ro15-4513 with high affinity and this binding is competitive with EtOH, suggesting a specific and mutually exclusive (competitive) ethanol/Ro15-4513 site, which explains the puzzling activity of Ro15-4513 as a behavioral alcohol antagonist. Our conclusion from these findings is that alcohol/Ro15-4513-sensitive GABAAR subtypes are important alcohol targets and that alcohol at relevant concentrations is more specific than previously thought. In this review, we discuss technical difficulties in expressing recombinant delta subunit-containing receptors in oocytes and mammalian cells that may have contributed to negative results and confusion. Not only because we have reproduced detailed positive results numerous times, and we and many others have built extensively on basic findings, but also because we explain and combine many previously puzzling

  20. Glutamate Receptor Dynamics in Dendritic Microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Newpher, Thomas M.; Ehlers, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    Among diverse factors regulating excitatory synaptic transmission, the abundance of postsynaptic glutamate receptors figures prominently in molecular memory and learning-related synaptic plasticity. To allow for both long-term maintenance of synaptic transmission and acute changes in synaptic strength, the relative rates of glutamate receptor insertion and removal must be tightly regulated. Interactions with scaffolding proteins control the targeting and signaling properties of glutamate receptors within the postsynaptic membrane. In addition, extrasynaptic receptor populations control the equilibrium of receptor exchange at synapses and activate distinct signaling pathways involved in plasticity. Here, we review recent findings that have shaped our current understanding of receptor mobility between synaptic and extrasynaptic compartments at glutamatergic synapses, focusing on AMPA and NMDA receptors. We also examine the cooperative relationship between intracellular trafficking and surface diffusion of glutamate receptors that underlies the expression of learning-related synaptic plasticity. PMID:18498731

  1. Mechanism for the activation of glutamate receptors

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists at the NIH have used a technique called cryo-electron microscopy to determine a molecular mechanism for the activation and desensitization of ionotropic glutamate receptors, a prominent class of neurotransmitter receptors in the brain and spina

  2. [Intracellular traffic of the progesterone receptor].

    PubMed

    Guiochon-Mantel, A; Lescop, P; Christin-Maitre, S; Perrot-Applanat, M; Milgrom, E

    1992-01-01

    The nuclear localization of the progesterone receptor is mediated by two signal sequences: one is constitutive and lies in the hinge region (between the DNA and steroid binding domains), the other is hormone-dependent and is localized in the second zinc finger of the DNA binding domain. The use of various inhibitors of energy synthesis in cells expressing permanently or transiently the wild-type receptor or a receptor mutated within the nuclear localization signals, demonstrated that the nuclear residency of the receptor reflects a dynamic situation: the receptor diffusing into the cytoplasm and being constantly and actively transported back into the nucleus. The existence of this nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttle mechanism was confirmed by receptor transfer from one nucleus to the other in heterokaryons. Preliminary evidence was obtained, using oestrogen receptor, that this phenomenon may be of general significance for steroid receptors. PMID:1492716

  3. Functional identification of a goldfish odorant receptor.

    PubMed

    Speca, D J; Lin, D M; Sorensen, P W; Isacoff, E Y; Ngai, J; Dittman, A H

    1999-07-01

    The vertebrate olfactory system utilizes odorant receptors to receive and discriminate thousands of different chemical stimuli. An understanding of how these receptors encode information about an odorant's molecular structure requires a characterization of their ligand specificities. We employed an expression cloning strategy to identify a goldfish odorant receptor that is activated by amino acids-potent odorants for fish. Structure-activity analysis indicates that the receptor is preferentially tuned to recognize basic amino acids. The receptor is a member of a multigene family of G protein-coupled receptors, sharing sequence similarities with the calcium sensing, metabotropic glutamate, and V2R class of vomeronasal receptors. The ligand tuning properties of the goldfish amino acid odorant receptor provide information for unraveling the molecular mechanisms underlying olfactory coding. PMID:10433261

  4. Nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of the progesterone receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Guiochon-Mantel, A; Lescop, P; Christin-Maitre, S; Loosfelt, H; Perrot-Applanat, M; Milgrom, E

    1991-01-01

    The nuclear localization of the progesterone receptor is mediated by two signal sequences: one is constitutive and lies in the hinge region (between the DNA and steroid binding domains), the other is hormone dependent and is localized in the second zinc finger of the DNA binding domain. The use of various inhibitors of energy synthesis in cells expressing permanently or transiently the wild-type receptor or a receptor mutated within the nuclear localization signals, demonstrated that the nuclear residency of the receptor reflects a dynamic situation: the receptor diffusing into the cytoplasm and being constantly and actively transported back into the nucleus. The existence of this nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttle mechanism was confirmed by receptor transfer from one nucleus to the other in heterokaryons. Preliminary evidence was obtained, using oestrogen receptor, that this phenomenon may be of general significance for steroid receptors. Images PMID:1935904

  5. Lectins in the investigation of receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakhtin, V. M.; Yamskov, Igor A.

    1991-08-01

    Problems of the purification and characterisation are considered for approximately 270 receptors (including cell surface and organelle enzymes), which are glycoconjugates (mainly glycoproteins) from animals, plants and microorganisms, using various lectins (mainly lectin sorbents). An analysis has been carried out of the stages of lectin affinity chromatography of receptors (choice of detergent, use of organic solvents, elution with carbohydrates, etc.). Examples are given of procedures for the purification of receptors, including the use of paired columns and combination chromatography on lectins. The possibility of separating sub-populations of receptors using lectins has been demonstrated. Examples are given of the use of lectins in the analysis of the oligosaccharide structure of receptors. Cases are recorded of the interaction of receptors with endogenous lectins and of receptor lectins with endogenous glycoconjugates. It has been shown that lectins, in combination with glycosidases and antibodies, may be useful in the investigation of receptors. The bibliography contains 406 references.

  6. Recombinant lymphokines and their receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Gillis, S.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 15 selections. Some of the chapter titles are: Human Interleukin-2, Molecular Analysis of the Murine Interleukin-2 Receptor, Bovine Interleukin-2, Molecular Organization and Expression of the Prointerleukin-1..beta.. Gene, Human Erythroid-Portentiating Activity, and Tumor Necrosis Factors Alpha and Beta.

  7. Cannabinoid receptor localization in brain

    SciTech Connect

    Herkenham, M.; Lynn, A.B.; Little, M.D.; Johnson, M.R.; Melvin, L.S.; de Costa, B.R.; Rice, K.C. )

    1990-03-01

    (3H)CP 55,940, a radiolabeled synthetic cannabinoid, which is 10-100 times more potent in vivo than delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol, was used to characterize and localize a specific cannabinoid receptor in brain sections. The potencies of a series of natural and synthetic cannabinoids as competitors of (3H)CP 55,940 binding correlated closely with their relative potencies in several biological assays, suggesting that the receptor characterized in our in vitro assay is the same receptor that mediates behavioral and pharmacological effects of cannabinoids, including human subjective experience. Autoradiography of cannabinoid receptors in brain sections from several mammalian species, including human, reveals a unique and conserved distribution; binding is most dense in outflow nuclei of the basal ganglia--the substantia nigra pars reticulata and globus pallidus--and in the hippocampus and cerebellum. Generally high densities in forebrain and cerebellum implicate roles for cannabinoids in cognition and movement. Sparse densities in lower brainstem areas controlling cardiovascular and respiratory functions may explain why high doses of delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol are not lethal.

  8. Histamine receptors and cancer pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Vanina A; Rivera, Elena S

    2010-01-01

    Considerable evidence has been collected indicating that histamine can modulate proliferation of different normal and malignant cells. High histamine biosynthesis and content together with histamine receptors have been reported in different human neoplasias including melanoma, colon and breast cancer, as well as in experimental tumours in which histamine has been postulated to behave as an important paracrine and autocrine regulator of proliferation. The discovery of the human histamine H4 receptor in different tissues has contributed to our understanding of histamine role in numerous physiological and pathological conditions revealing novel functions for histamine and opening new perspectives in histamine pharmacology research. In the present review we aimed to briefly summarize current knowledge on histamine and histamine receptor involvement in cancer before focusing on some recent evidence supporting the novel role of histamine H4 receptor in cancer progression representing a promising molecular target and avenue for cancer drug development. LINKED ARTICLES BJP has previously published a Histamine themed issue (2009). To view this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2009.157.issue-1 PMID:20636392

  9. Polypharmacology of dopamine receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Butini, S; Nikolic, K; Kassel, S; Brückmann, H; Filipic, S; Agbaba, D; Gemma, S; Brogi, S; Brindisi, M; Campiani, G; Stark, H

    2016-07-01

    Most neurological diseases have a multifactorial nature and the number of molecular mechanisms discovered as underpinning these diseases is continuously evolving. The old concept of developing selective agents for a single target does not fit with the medical need of most neurological diseases. The development of designed multiple ligands holds great promises and appears as the next step in drug development for the treatment of these multifactorial diseases. Dopamine and its five receptor subtypes are intimately involved in numerous neurological disorders. Dopamine receptor ligands display a high degree of cross interactions with many other targets including G-protein coupled receptors, transporters, enzymes and ion channels. For brain disorders like Parkinsońs disease, schizophrenia and depression the dopaminergic system, being intertwined with many other signaling systems, plays a key role in pathogenesis and therapy. The concept of designed multiple ligands and polypharmacology, which perfectly meets the therapeutic needs for these brain disorders, is herein discussed as a general ligand-based concept while focusing on dopaminergic agents and receptor subtypes in particular. PMID:27234980

  10. Steroid receptor coupling becomes nuclear.

    PubMed

    Galigniana, Mario D

    2012-06-22

    In this issue of Chemistry & Biology, Grossman et al. report a study on aldosterone-dependent nuclear translocation of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR). They analyze the dependency of MR retrotransport, DNA-binding, and transcriptional activity on Hsp90 and demonstrate that MR dimerization is a nuclear event. PMID:22726677

  11. EVALUATION OF COMPOSITE RECEPTOR METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A composite receptor model for PM-10 apportionment was evaluated to determine the stability of its solutions and to devise cost-effective measurement strategies. Ambient aerosol samples used in the evaluation were obtained with dichotomous samplers at three sites in the vicinity ...

  12. Xanthines as Adenosine Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    The natural plant alkaloids caffeine and theophylline were the first adenosine receptor (AR) antagonists described in the literature. They exhibit micromolar affinities and are non-selective. A large number of derivatives and analogs have subsequently been synthesized and evaluated as AR antagonists. Very potent antagonists have thus been developed with selectivity for each of the four AR subtypes. PMID:20859796

  13. FMRFamide receptors of Helix aspersa

    SciTech Connect

    Payza, K.

    1988-01-01

    A receptor binding assay and an isolated heart bioassay were used to identify and characterize the FMRFamide receptors in Helix. In the heart bioassay, FMRFamide increased myocardial contraction force. A potent FMRFamide analog, desaminoTyr-Phe-norLeu-arg-Phe-amide (daYFnLRFamide), was used as a radioiodinated receptor ligand. The high affinity binding of {sup 125}I-daYFnLRFamide at 0{degree}C to Helix brain membranes was reversible, saturable, pH-dependent and specific, with a K{sub D} of 13-14 nM. A lower affinity (245 nM) site was also observed. Radioligand binding sites were also identified in the heart, male reproductive organs and digestive organs. The structure-activity relations (SAR) of cardiostimulation correlated with the specificity of {sup 125}I-daYFnLRFamide binding to brain and heart receptors. The SAR were similar to those of other molluscan FMRFamide bioassays, except that they showed a marked preference for some analogs with blocked amino-terminals.

  14. Triple threat treatment: Exploiting the dependence receptor properties of metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 against melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Gelb, Tara; Hathaway, Hannah A; Wroblewski, Jarda T

    2014-01-01

    Melanoma cells that express metabotropic glutamate 1 (mGlu1) receptors depend on glutamate for their survival and proliferation. The dependence receptor properties of mGlu1 allow us to propose and justify three promising approaches for melanoma treatment: glutamate depletion, mGlu1 receptor antagonism, and targeting of mGlu1 receptor signaling.

  15. NMDA receptors and memory encoding.

    PubMed

    Morris, Richard G M

    2013-11-01

    It is humbling to think that 30 years have passed since the paper by Collingridge, Kehl and McLennan showing that one of Jeff Watkins most interesting compounds, R-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoate (d-AP5), blocked the induction of long-term potentiation in vitro at synapses from area CA3 of the hippocampus to CA1 without apparent effect on baseline synaptic transmission (Collingridge et al., 1983). This dissociation was one of the key triggers for an explosion of interest in glutamate receptors, and much has been discovered since that collectively contributes to our contemporary understanding of glutamatergic synapses - their biophysics and subunit composition, of the agonists and antagonists acting on them, and their diverse functions in different networks of the brain and spinal cord. It can be fairly said that Collingridge et al.'s (1983) observation was the stimulus that has led, on the one hand, to structural biological work at the atomic scale describing the key features of NMDA receptors that enables their coincidence function to happen; and, on the other, to work with whole animals investigating the contributions that calcium signalling via this receptor can have on rhythmical activities controlled by spinal circuits, memory encoding in the hippocampus (the topic of this article), visual cortical plasticity, sensitization in pain, and other functions. In this article, I lay out how my then interest in long-term potentiation (LTP) as a model of memory enabled me to recognise the importance of Collingridge et al.'s discovery - and how I and my colleagues endeavoured to take things forward in the area of learning and memory. This is in some respects a personal story, and I tell it as such. The idea that NMDA receptor activation is essential for memory encoding, though not for storage, took time to develop and to be accepted. Along the way, there have been confusions, challenges, and surprises surrounding the idea that activation of NMDA receptors can

  16. Molecular properties of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    PubMed Central

    HAGA, Tatsuya

    2013-01-01

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, which comprise five subtypes (M1-M5 receptors), are expressed in both the CNS and PNS (particularly the target organs of parasympathetic neurons). M1-M5 receptors are integral membrane proteins with seven transmembrane segments, bind with acetylcholine (ACh) in the extracellular phase, and thereafter interact with and activate GTP-binding regulatory proteins (G proteins) in the intracellular phase: M1, M3, and M5 receptors interact with Gq-type G proteins, and M2 and M4 receptors with Gi/Go-type G proteins. Activated G proteins initiate a number of intracellular signal transduction systems. Agonist-bound muscarinic receptors are phosphorylated by G protein-coupled receptor kinases, which initiate their desensitization through uncoupling from G proteins, receptor internalization, and receptor breakdown (down regulation). Recently the crystal structures of M2 and M3 receptors were determined and are expected to contribute to the development of drugs targeted to muscarinic receptors. This paper summarizes the molecular properties of muscarinic receptors with reference to the historical background and bias to studies performed in our laboratories. PMID:23759942

  17. The Physiology and Biochemistry of Receptors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spitzer, Judy A., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    The syllabus for a refresher course on the physiology and biochemistry of receptors (presented at the 1983 American Physiological Society meeting) is provided. Topics considered include receptor regulation, structural/functional aspects of receptors for insulin and insulin-like growth factors, calcium channel inhibitors, and role of lipoprotein…

  18. Cell surface receptors for CCN proteins.

    PubMed

    Lau, Lester F

    2016-06-01

    The CCN family (CYR61; CTGF; NOV; CCN1-6; WISP1-3) of matricellular proteins in mammals is comprised of six homologous members that play important roles in development, inflammation, tissue repair, and a broad range of pathological processes including fibrosis and cancer. Despite considerable effort to search for a high affinity CCN-specific receptor akin to growth factor receptors, no such receptor has been found. Rather, CCNs bind several groups of multi-ligand receptors as characteristic of other matricellular proteins. The most extensively documented among CCN-binding receptors are integrins, including αvβ3, αvβ5, α5β1, α6β1, αIIbβ3, αMβ2, and αDβ2, which mediate diverse CCN functions in various cell types. CCNs also bind cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs), low density liproprotein receptor-related proteins (LRPs), and the cation-independent mannose-6-phosphate (M6P) receptor, which are endocytic receptors that may also serve as co-receptors in cooperation with other cell surface receptors. CCNs have also been reported to bind FGFR-2, Notch, RANK, and TrkA, potentially altering the affinities of these receptors for their ligands. The ability of CCNs to bind a multitude of receptors in various cell types may account for the remarkable versatility of their functions, and underscore the diverse signaling pathways that mediate their activities. PMID:27098435

  19. General Anesthetic Actions on GABAA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Paul S; Kolesky, Scott E; Jenkins, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    General anesthetic drugs interact with many receptors in the nervous system, but only a handful of these interactions are critical for producing anesthesia. Over the last 20 years, neuropharmacologists have revealed that one of the most important target sites for general anesthetics is the GABAA receptor. In this review we will discuss what is known about anesthetic – GABAA receptor interactions. PMID:20808541

  20. Paired inhibitory and activating receptor signals.

    PubMed

    Taylor, L S; Paul, S P; McVicar, D W

    2000-01-01

    The immunological literature has become inundated with reports regarding paired inhibitory receptors. Paired inhibitory receptor systems are highly conserved families that contain receptors involved in either cellular inhibition or activation. In most cases the paired putative biochemical antagonists are co-expressed on a given cell and thought to bind similar, if not identical, ligands making their biological role difficult to understand. Examples of these systems include immunoglobulin (Ig)-like receptors (Killer Ig Receptors, Immunoglobulin-like Transcripts/Leukocyte Ig-like Receptors/Monocyte Macrophage Ig Receptors, and Paired Ig-like Receptors), and type II lectin-like receptor systems (NKG2 and Ly49). General characteristics of these inhibitory receptors include a cytoplasmic immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM). The ITIM is phosphorylated upon engagement and recruits protein tyrosine phosphatases that dephosphorylate cellular substrates that would otherwise mediate activation. In contrast, the activating receptors of these pairs use charged residues within their transmembrane domains to associate with various signal transduction chains including the gamma chain of the receptor for the Fc portion of IgE, DAP12 or DAP10. Once phosphorylated, these chains direct the signal transduction cascade resulting in cellular activation. Here we review the signaling of several paired systems and present the current models for their signal transduction cascades. PMID:11258418

  1. Characterization of the thyrotropin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    McQuade, R.D.

    1986-01-01

    Scatchard analysis of the binding of (/sup 125/I)TSH to thyroid plasma membranes results in a curvilinear, concave-upward plot. This phenomenon could be indicative of several conditions, including radioligand heterogeneity, negative cooperativity, or multiple binding sites. To investigate the first of these possibilities, (/sup 125/I)TSH was purified by chromatography on Sepharose 6B. The receptor active (/sup 125/I)TSH continued to yield a curvilinear Scatchard plot in equilibrium binding analyses, indicating that this phenomenon was not the result of radioligand impurities of heterogeneity. To determine the contribution of the receptor to this complex behavior, the TSH receptor was solubilized and subjected to concanavalin A chromatography. Two populations of binding sites were recovered. The pass-through fraction contained 70% of the total sites and exhibited a linear Scatchard plot with a K/sub D/ of 67 nM, while 0.2 M methylmannoside eluted 10% of the sites which exhibited a single K/sub D/ of 0.3 nM. To characterize its structure, the TSH receptor was labeled with (/sup 125/I)TSH and cross-linked with disuccinimidyl suberate. Analysis by electrophoresis and autoradiography demonstrated the labeling of two hormone-receptor complexes with M/sub r/ of 80,000 and 68,000. These two bands were demonstrated to be TSH-specific and were present in plasma membranes from thyroid, but not from muscle or liver. Furthermore, antibodies isolated from the sera of Graves' disease patients, which inhibit the bindings of (/sup 125/I)TSH, blocked the labeling of the two complexes. When the separated high and low affinity TSH binding components were similarly analyzed, both components exhibited the 80,000 and 68,000 bands. Furthermore, the autoantibodies from Graves' disease sera inhibited the binding of (/sup 125/I)TSH to both the high and low affinity species.

  2. Sigma 1 receptor modulation of G-protein-coupled receptor signaling: potentiation of opioid transduction independent from receptor binding.

    PubMed

    Kim, Felix J; Kovalyshyn, Ivanka; Burgman, Maxim; Neilan, Claire; Chien, Chih-Cheng; Pasternak, Gavril W

    2010-04-01

    sigma Ligands modulate opioid actions in vivo, with agonists diminishing morphine analgesia and antagonists enhancing the response. Using human BE(2)-C neuroblastoma cells that natively express opioid receptors and human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells transfected with a cloned mu opioid receptor, we now demonstrate a similar modulation of opioid function, as assessed by guanosine 5'-O-(3-[(35)S]thio)triphosphate ([(35)S]GTP gamma S) binding, by sigma(1) receptors. sigma Ligands do not compete opioid receptor binding. Administered alone, neither sigma agonists nor antagonists significantly stimulated [(35)S]GTP gamma S binding. Yet sigma receptor selective antagonists, but not agonists, shifted the EC(50) of opioid-induced stimulation of [(35)S]GTP gamma S binding by 3- to 10-fold to the left. This enhanced potency was seen without a change in the efficacy of the opioid, as assessed by the maximal stimulation of [(35)S]GTP gamma S binding. sigma(1) Receptors physically associate with mu opioid receptors, as shown by coimmunoprecipitation studies in transfected HEK cells, implying a direct interaction between the proteins. Thus, sigma receptors modulate opioid transduction without influencing opioid receptor binding. RNA interference knockdown of sigma(1) in BE(2)-C cells also potentiated mu opioid-induced stimulation of [(35)S]GTP gamma S binding. These modulatory actions are not limited to mu and delta opioid receptors. In mouse brain membrane preparations, sigma(1)-selective antagonists also potentiated both opioid receptor and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated stimulation of [(35)S]GTP gamma S binding, suggesting a broader role for sigma receptors in modulating G-protein-coupled receptor signaling. PMID:20089882

  3. σ1 Receptor Modulation of G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Signaling: Potentiation of Opioid Transduction Independent from Receptor Binding

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Felix J.; Kovalyshyn, Ivanka; Burgman, Maxim; Neilan, Claire; Chien, Chih-Cheng

    2010-01-01

    σ Ligands modulate opioid actions in vivo, with agonists diminishing morphine analgesia and antagonists enhancing the response. Using human BE(2)-C neuroblastoma cells that natively express opioid receptors and human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells transfected with a cloned μ opioid receptor, we now demonstrate a similar modulation of opioid function, as assessed by guanosine 5′-O-(3-[35S]thio)triphosphate ([35S]GTPγS) binding, by σ1 receptors. σ Ligands do not compete opioid receptor binding. Administered alone, neither σ agonists nor antagonists significantly stimulated [35S]GTPγS binding. Yet σ receptor selective antagonists, but not agonists, shifted the EC50 of opioid-induced stimulation of [35S]GTPγS binding by 3- to 10-fold to the left. This enhanced potency was seen without a change in the efficacy of the opioid, as assessed by the maximal stimulation of [35S]GTPγS binding. σ1 Receptors physically associate with μ opioid receptors, as shown by coimmunoprecipitation studies in transfected HEK cells, implying a direct interaction between the proteins. Thus, σ receptors modulate opioid transduction without influencing opioid receptor binding. RNA interference knockdown of σ1 in BE(2)-C cells also potentiated μ opioid-induced stimulation of [35S]GTPγS binding. These modulatory actions are not limited to μ and δ opioid receptors. In mouse brain membrane preparations, σ1-selective antagonists also potentiated both opioid receptor and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated stimulation of [35S]GTPγS binding, suggesting a broader role for σ receptors in modulating G-protein-coupled receptor signaling. PMID:20089882

  4. Can Eph receptors stimulate the mind?

    PubMed

    Murai, Keith K; Pasquale, Elena B

    2002-01-17

    The Eph receptors are multitalented tyrosine kinases capable of performing many tasks. The receptors together with their ligands--the ephrins--are well known to play a critical role in the initial assembly of neuronal circuits in the embryo. However, the recently discovered function of these receptors in the adult brain is now receiving significant acclaim. Three new articles show that the Eph receptors continue to be important in modifying the strength of existing neuronal connections (synapses). They do so in close association with at least one family of ion channels, the NMDA receptors. PMID:11804564

  5. GABA(B) receptors and synaptic modulation.

    PubMed

    Kornau, Hans-Christian

    2006-11-01

    GABA(B) receptors modulate transmitter release and postsynaptic membrane potential at various types of central synapses. They function as heterodimers of two related seven-transmembrane domain receptor subunits. Trafficking, activation and signalling of GABA(B) receptors are regulated both by allosteric interactions between the subunits and by the binding of additional proteins. Recent studies have shed light on the roles of GABA(B) receptors in plasticity processes at excitatory synapses. This review summarizes our knowledge of the localization, structure and function of GABA(B) receptors in the central nervous system and their use as drug targets for neurological and psychiatric disorders. PMID:16932937

  6. Two truncated forms of rat insulin receptor-related receptor.

    PubMed

    Itoh, N; Jobo, K; Tsujimoto, K; Ohta, M; Kawasaki, T

    1993-08-25

    The insulin receptor-related receptor (IRR) (1271 amino acids) is expected to have unique functions as a novel member of the insulin receptor family. In this paper, we report two alternatively spliced variants of rat IRR mRNA, which are predicted to encode two truncated forms of IRR, sIRR-1 (410 amino acids) and sIRR-2 (469 amino acids). The amino acid sequence of sIRR-1 is identical to the N-terminal 410-amino acid sequence of IRR. sIRR-2 has an additional 59-amino acid insertion in the C-terminal region. Both truncated forms retain the N-terminal and cysteine-rich domains but lack the transmembrane and intracellular tyrosine kinase domains, indicating that the truncated forms are the secreted forms. The translation products of the truncated form mRNAs were detected in the stomach and kidney by Western analysis. However, the physiological significance of the secreted forms remains to be elucidated. PMID:7688734

  7. The mammalian mineralocorticoid receptor: tying down a promiscuous receptor.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Sanchez, Elise P

    2010-01-01

    The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) has been called a promiscuous receptor because its intrinsic affinity for aldosterone, cortisol and corticosterone is similar. Since glucocorticoids circulate in concentrations 100- to 1000-fold those of aldosterone, stoichiometry dictates that MR should be activated by glucocorticoids, not aldosterone, yet MRs are expressed in many tissues and regulate diverse functions, many of them under the regulation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. A relatively small number of brain MRs are aldosterone selective and modulate blood pressure. Evidence for possible mechanisms conferring ligand specificity in the context of mineralocorticoid-induced hypertension and the brain are discussed. These include factors (or mechanisms) intrinsic to the receptor, such as alternative splice variants and translation start sites, and extrinsic to the MR, including differential access through the blood-brain barrier, differential recruitment of co-regulators and scaffolding proteins, 11beta-steroid dehydrogenase activity, synthesis of potent acylated aldosterone derivatives and the synthesis of relevant amounts of aldosterone in areas of the brain that modulate blood pressure. PMID:19648477

  8. Dopamine D4 Receptors in Psychostimulant Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Di Ciano, Patricia; Grandy, David; Le Foll, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Since the cloning of the D4 receptor in the 1990s, interest has been building in the role of this receptor in drug addiction, given the importance of dopamine in addiction. Like the D3 receptor, the D4 receptor has limited distribution within the brain suggesting it may have a unique role in drug abuse. However, compared to the D3 receptor, few studies have evaluated the importance of the D4 receptor. This may be due, in part, to the relative lack of compounds selective for the D4 receptor; the early studies were mainly conducted in mice lacking the D4 receptor. In this review, we summarize the literature on the structure and localization of the D4 receptor before reviewing the data from D4 knockout mice that used behavioral models relevant to the understanding of stimulant use. Next, we present evidence from more recent pharmacological studies using selective D4 agonists and antagonists and animal models of drug seeking and taking. The data summarized here suggest a role for D4 receptors in relapse to stimulant use. Therefore, treatments based on antagonism of the D4 receptor may be useful treatments for relapse to nicotine, cocaine and amphetamine use. PMID:24484981

  9. Hormone activation of baculovirus expressed progesterone receptors.

    PubMed

    Elliston, J F; Beekman, J M; Tsai, S Y; O'Malley, B W; Tsai, M J

    1992-03-15

    Human and chicken progesterone receptors (A form) were overproduced in a baculovirus expression system. These recombinant progesterone receptors were full-length bound progesterone specifically and were recognized by monoclonal antibodies, AB52 and PR22, specific for human and chicken progesterone receptor, respectively. In gel retardation studies, binding of recombinant human and chicken progesterone receptors to their progesterone response element (PRE) was specific and was enhanced in the presence of progesterone. Binding of human progesterone receptor to the PRE was also enhanced in the presence of the antiprogestin, RU486, but very little effect was observed in the presence of estradiol, dexamethasone, testosterone, and vitamin D. In our cell-free transcription system, human progesterone receptor induced transcription in a receptor-dependent and hormone-activable manner. Receptor-stimulated transcription required the presence of the PRE in the test template and could be specifically inhibited by excess PRE oligonucleotides. Furthermore, chicken progesterone receptor also induced in vitro transcription in a hormone-activable manner. These results demonstrate that steroid receptors overexpressed in a baculovirus expression system are functional and exhibit steroid-responsive binding and transcription. These observations support our present understanding of the mechanism of steroid receptor-regulated gene expression and provide a technological format for studies of the role of hormone and antihormone in altering gene expression. PMID:1544902

  10. The evolution of vertebrate opioid receptors

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Craig W.

    2011-01-01

    The proteins that mediate the analgesic and other effects of opioid drugs and endogenous opioid peptides are known as opioid receptors. Opioid receptors consist of a family of four closely-related proteins belonging to the large superfamily of G-protein coupled receptors. The three types of opioid receptors shown unequivocally to mediate analgesia in animal models are the mu (MOR), delta (DOR), and kappa (KOR) opioid receptor proteins. The role of the fourth member of the opioid receptor family, the nociceptin or orphanin FQ receptor (ORL), is not as clear as hyperalgesia, analgesia, and no effect was reported after administration of ORL agonists. There are now cDNA sequences for all four types of opioid receptors that are expressed in the brain of six species from three different classes of vertebrates. This review presents a comparative analysis of vertebrate opioid receptors using bioinformatics and data from recent human genome studies. Results indicate that opioid receptors arose by gene duplication, that there is a vector of opioid receptor divergence, and that MOR shows evidence of rapid evolution. PMID:19273128

  11. Stargazin is an AMPA receptor auxiliary subunit.

    PubMed

    Vandenberghe, Wim; Nicoll, Roger A; Bredt, David S

    2005-01-11

    AMPA (alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid) receptors mediate fast excitatory synaptic transmission in brain and underlie aspects of synaptic plasticity. Numerous AMPA receptor-binding proteins have been implicated in AMPA receptor trafficking and anchoring. However, the relative contributions of these proteins to the composition of native AMPA receptor complexes in brain remain uncertain. Here, we use blue native gel electrophoresis to analyze the composition of native AMPA receptor complexes in cerebellar extracts. We identify two receptor populations: a functional form that contains the transmembrane AMPA receptor-regulatory protein stargazin and an apo-form that lacks stargazin. Limited proteolysis confirms assembly of stargazin with a large proportion of native AMPA receptors. In contrast, other AMPA receptor-interacting proteins, such as synapse-associated protein 97, glutamate receptor-interacting protein 1, protein kinase Calpha binding protein, N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein, AP2, and protein 4.1N, do not show significant association with AMPA receptor complexes on native gels. These data identify stargazin as an auxiliary subunit for a neurotransmitter-gated ion channel. PMID:15630087

  12. Structural determinants of sigma receptor affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Largent, B.L.; Wikstroem, H.G.; Gundlach, A.L.; Snyder, S.H.

    1987-12-01

    The structural determinants of sigma receptor affinity have been evaluated by examining a wide range of compounds related to opioids, neuroleptics, and phenylpiperidine dopaminergic structures for affinity at sigma receptor-binding sites labeled with (+)-(/sup 3/H)3-PPP. Among opioid compounds, requirements for sigma receptor affinity differ strikingly from the determinants of affinity for conventional opiate receptors. Sigma sites display reverse stereoselectivity to classical opiate receptors. Multi-ringed opiate-related compounds such as morphine and naloxone have negligible affinity for sigma sites, with the highest sigma receptor affinity apparent for benzomorphans which lack the C ring of opioids. Highest affinity among opioids and other compounds occurs with more lipophilic N-substituents. This feature is particularly striking among the 3-PPP derivatives as well as the opioids. The butyrophenone haloperidol is the most potent drug at sigma receptors we have detected. Among the series of butyrophenones, receptor affinity is primarily associated with the 4-phenylpiperidine moiety. Conformational calculations for various compounds indicate a fairly wide range of tolerance for distances between the aromatic ring and the amine nitrogen, which may account for the potency at sigma receptors of structures of considerable diversity. Among the wide range of structures that bind to sigma receptor-binding sites, the common pharmacophore associated with high receptor affinity is a phenylpiperidine with a lipophilic N-substituent.

  13. Molecular Mechanisms of Prolactin and Its Receptor

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Prolactin and the prolactin receptors are members of a family of hormone/receptor pairs which include GH, erythropoietin, and other ligand/receptor pairs. The mechanisms of these ligand/receptor pairs have broad similarities, including general structures, ligand/receptor stoichiometries, and activation of several common signaling pathways. But significant variations in the structural and mechanistic details are present among these hormones and their type 1 receptors. The prolactin receptor is particularly interesting because it can be activated by three sequence-diverse human hormones: prolactin, GH, and placental lactogen. This system offers a unique opportunity to compare the detailed molecular mechanisms of these related hormone/receptor pairs. This review critically evaluates selected literature that informs these mechanisms, compares the mechanisms of the three lactogenic hormones, compares the mechanism with those of other class 1 ligand/receptor pairs, and identifies information that will be required to resolve mechanistic ambiguities. The literature describes distinct mechanistic differences between the three lactogenic hormones and their interaction with the prolactin receptor and describes more significant differences between the mechanisms by which other related ligands interact with and activate their receptors. PMID:22577091

  14. Nuclear receptors in bile acid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tiangang; Chiang, John Y. L.

    2013-01-01

    Bile acids are signaling molecules that activate nuclear receptors, such as farnesoid X receptor, pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, and vitamin D receptor, and play a critical role in the regulation of lipid, glucose, energy, and drug metabolism. These xenobiotic/endobiotic-sensing nuclear receptors regulate phase I oxidation, phase II conjugation, and phase III transport in bile acid and drug metabolism in the digestive system. Integration of bile acid metabolism with drug metabolism controls absorption, transport, and metabolism of nutrients and drugs to maintain metabolic homeostasis and also protects against liver injury, inflammation, and related metabolic diseases, such as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, diabetes, and obesity. Bile-acid–based drugs targeting nuclear receptors are in clinical trials for treating cholestatic liver diseases and fatty liver disease. PMID:23330546

  15. Receptor arrays optimized for natural odor statistics.

    PubMed

    Zwicker, David; Murugan, Arvind; Brenner, Michael P

    2016-05-17

    Natural odors typically consist of many molecules at different concentrations. It is unclear how the numerous odorant molecules and their possible mixtures are discriminated by relatively few olfactory receptors. Using an information theoretic model, we show that a receptor array is optimal for this task if it achieves two possibly conflicting goals: (i) Each receptor should respond to half of all odors and (ii) the response of different receptors should be uncorrelated when averaged over odors presented with natural statistics. We use these design principles to predict statistics of the affinities between receptors and odorant molecules for a broad class of odor statistics. We also show that optimal receptor arrays can be tuned to either resolve concentrations well or distinguish mixtures reliably. Finally, we use our results to predict properties of experimentally measured receptor arrays. Our work can thus be used to better understand natural olfaction, and it also suggests ways to improve artificial sensor arrays. PMID:27102871

  16. Spatial organization of transmembrane receptor signalling

    PubMed Central

    Bethani, Ioanna; Skånland, Sigrid S; Dikic, Ivan; Acker-Palmer, Amparo

    2010-01-01

    The spatial organization of transmembrane receptors is a critical step in signal transduction and receptor trafficking in cells. Transmembrane receptors engage in lateral homotypic and heterotypic cis-interactions as well as intercellular trans-interactions that result in the formation of signalling foci for the initiation of different signalling networks. Several aspects of ligand-induced receptor clustering and association with signalling proteins are also influenced by the lipid composition of membranes. Thus, lipid microdomains have a function in tuning the activity of many transmembrane receptors by positively or negatively affecting receptor clustering and signal transduction. We review the current knowledge about the functions of clustering of transmembrane receptors and lipid–protein interactions important for the spatial organization of signalling at the membrane. PMID:20717138

  17. NMDA receptor contributions to visual contrast coding

    PubMed Central

    Manookin, Michael B.; Weick, Michael; Stafford, Benjamin K.; Demb, Jonathan B.

    2010-01-01

    Summary In the retina, it is not well understood how visual processing depends on AMPA- and NMDA-type glutamate receptors. Here, we investigated how these receptors contribute to contrast coding in identified guinea pig ganglion cell types, in vitro. NMDA-mediated responses were negligible in ON α cells but substantial in OFF α and δ cells. OFF δ cell NMDA receptors were composed of GluN2B subunits. Using a novel deconvolution method, we determined the individual contributions of AMPA, NMDA and inhibitory currents to light responses of each cell type. OFF α and δ cells used NMDA receptors for encoding either the full contrast range (α), including near-threshold responses, or only a high range (δ). However, contrast sensitivity depended substantially on NMDA receptors only in OFF α cells. NMDA receptors contribute to visual contrast coding in a cell-type specific manner. Certain cell types generate excitatory responses using primarily AMPA receptors or disinhibition. PMID:20670835

  18. Targeting Nuclear Receptors with Marine Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chunyan; Li, Qianrong; Li, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are important pharmaceutical targets because they are key regulators of many metabolic and inflammatory diseases, including diabetes, dyslipidemia, cirrhosis, and fibrosis. As ligands play a pivotal role in modulating nuclear receptor activity, the discovery of novel ligands for nuclear receptors represents an interesting and promising therapeutic approach. The search for novel NR agonists and antagonists with enhanced selectivities prompted the exploration of the extraordinary chemical diversity associated with natural products. Recent studies involving nuclear receptors have disclosed a number of natural products as nuclear receptor ligands, serving to re-emphasize the translational possibilities of natural products in drug discovery. In this review, the natural ligands of nuclear receptors will be described with an emphasis on their mechanisms of action and their therapeutic potentials, as well as on strategies to determine potential marine natural products as nuclear receptor modulators. PMID:24473166

  19. Binding of ATP to the progesterone receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Moudgil, V K; Toft, D O

    1975-01-01

    The possible interaction of progesterone--receptor complexes with nucleotides was tested by affinity chromatography. The cytosol progesterone receptor from hen oviduct was partially purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation before use. When progesterone was bound to the receptor, the resulting complex could be selectively adsorbed onto columns of ATP-Sepharose. This interaction was reversible and of an ionic nature since it could be disrupted by high-salt conditions. A competitive binding assay was used to test the specificity of receptor binding to several other nucleotides, including ADP, AMP, and cAMP. A clear specificity for binding ATP was evident from these studies. When ATP was added to receptor preparations, the nucleotide did not affect the sedimentation properties or hormone binding characteristics of the receptor. Although the function of ATP remains unknown, these studies indicate a role of this nucleotide in some aspect of hormone receptor activity. PMID:165493

  20. Solubilization and reconstitution of renal vasopressin receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Aiyar, N.; Nambi, P.; Stassen, F.; Crooke, S.T.

    1987-05-01

    Renal vasopressin receptors (V/sub 2/) mediating antidiuresis are coupled to adenylate cyclase. To determine the molecular properties of these vasopressin receptors, it is necessary to solubilize the receptors from the membranes. Solubilization of vasopressin receptors in the non-liganded state was shown to abolish hormone recognition. To preserve ligand binding capacity they have developed reconstitution procedures for the renal vasopressin receptors. The pig kidney membranes were solubilized using a zwitterionic detergent, egg lysolecithin and then reconstituted into phospholipid vesicles. Specific binding of (/sup 3/H) lysine vasopressin ((/sup 3/H)LVP) to these solubilized reconstituted fractions was fast, saturable and increased linearly with protein concentration. Scatchard analysis of (/sup 3/H)LVP binding indicated the presence of single class of binding sites with an equilibrium dissociation constant of 2.3 nM. In competition binding experiments, the solubilized receptors displayed the same pharmacological profile as was observed with membrane V/sub 2/ receptors.

  1. Molecular determinants of NMDA receptor internalization.

    PubMed

    Roche, K W; Standley, S; McCallum, J; Dune Ly, C; Ehlers, M D; Wenthold, R J

    2001-08-01

    Although synaptic AMPA receptors have been shown to rapidly internalize, synaptic NMDA receptors are reported to be static. It is not certain whether NMDA receptor stability at synaptic sites is an inherent property of the receptor, or is due to stabilization by scaffolding proteins. In this study, we demonstrate that NMDA receptors are internalized in both heterologous cells and neurons, and we define an internalization motif, YEKL, on the distal C-terminus of NR2B. In addition, we show that the synaptic protein PSD-95 inhibits NR2B-mediated internalization, and that deletion of the PDZ-binding domain of NR2B increases internalization in neurons. This suggests an involvement for PSD-95 in NMDA receptor regulation and an explanation for NMDA receptor stability at synaptic sites. PMID:11477425

  2. What are Nuclear Receptor Ligands?

    PubMed Central

    Sladek, Frances M.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are a family of highly conserved transcription factors that regulate transcription in response to small lipophilic compounds. They play a role in every aspect of development, physiology and disease in humans. They are also ubiquitous in and unique to the animal kingdom suggesting that they may have played an important role in their evolution. In contrast to the classical endocrine receptors that originally defined the family, recent studies suggest that the first NRs might have been sensors of their environment, binding ligands that were external to the host organism. The purpose of this review is to provide a broad perspective on NR ligands and address the issue of exactly what constitutes a NR ligand from historical, biological and evolutionary perspectives. This discussion will lay the foundation for subsequent reviews in this issue as well as pose new questions for future investigation. PMID:20615454

  3. Adenosine receptor interactions and anxiolytics.

    PubMed

    Bruns, R F; Katims, J J; Annau, Z; Snyder, S H; Daly, J W

    1983-12-01

    [3H]-N6-cyclohexyladenosine and [3H]-1,3-diethyl-8-phenylxanthine label the A1 subtype of adenosine receptor in brain membranes. The affinities of methylxanthines in competing for A1 adenosine receptors parallel their potencies as locomotor stimulants. The adenosine agonist N6-(phenylisopropyl) adenosine is a potent locomotor depressant. Both diazepam and N6-(L-phenylisopropyl)adenosine cause locomotor stimulation in a narrow range of subdepressant doses. Combined stimulant doses of the two agents depress motor activity, as do larger doses of either one, given separately. Evidence supporting and against the hypothesis that some of the actions of benzodiazepines are mediated via the adenosine system is reviewed. A number of compounds interact with both systems, probably because of physico-chemical similarities between adenosine and diazepam. It is concluded that of the four classic actions of benzodiazepines, the sedative and muscle relaxant (but not anxiolytic or anticonvulsant) actions could possibly be mediated by adenosine. PMID:6199685

  4. Ligands for Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, Geoffrey T.; Sakai, Ryuichi

    Marine-derived small molecules and peptides have played a central role in elaborating pharmacological specificities and neuronal functions of mammalian ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs), the primary mediators of excitatory syn-aptic transmission in the central nervous system (CNS). As well, the pathological sequelae elicited by one class of compounds (the kainoids) constitute a widely-used animal model for human mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE). New and existing molecules could prove useful as lead compounds for the development of therapeutics for neuropathologies that have aberrant glutamatergic signaling as a central component. In this chapter we discuss natural source origins and pharmacological activities of those marine compounds that target ionotropic glutamate receptors.

  5. Endothelin receptors and their antagonists.

    PubMed

    Maguire, Janet J; Davenport, Anthony P

    2015-03-01

    All three members of the endothelin (ET) family of peptides, ET-1, ET-2, and ET-3, are expressed in the human kidney, with ET-1 being the predominant isoform. ET-1 and ET-2 bind to two G-protein-coupled receptors, ETA and ETB, whereas at physiological concentrations ET-3 has little affinity for the ET(A) receptor. The human kidney is unusual among the peripheral organs in expressing a high density of ET(B). The renal vascular endothelium only expresses the ET(B) subtype and ET-1 acts in an autocrine or paracrine manner to release vasodilators. Endothelial ETB in kidney, as well as liver and lungs, also has a critical role in scavenging ET-1 from the plasma. The third major function is ET-1 activation of ET(B) in in the nephron to reduce salt and water re-absorption. In contrast, ET(A) predominate on smooth muscle, causing vasoconstriction and mediating many of the pathophysiological actions of ET-1. The role of the two receptors has been delineated using highly selective ET(A) (BQ123, TAK-044) and ET(B) (BQ788) peptide antagonists. Nonpeptide antagonists, bosentan, macitentan, and ambrisentan, that are either mixed ET(A)/ET(B) antagonists or display ET(A) selectivity, have been approved for clinical use but to date are limited to pulmonary hypertension. Ambrisentan is in clinical trials in patients with type 2 diabetic nephropathy. This review summarizes ET-receptor antagonism in the human kidney, and considers the relative merits of selective versus nonselective antagonism in renal disease. PMID:25966344

  6. Aza compounds as anion receptors

    DOEpatents

    Lee, H.S.; Yang, X.Q.; McBreen, J.

    1998-01-06

    A family of aza-ether based compounds including linear, multi-branched and aza-crown ethers is provided. When added to non-aqueous battery electrolytes, the family of aza-ether based compounds acts as neutral receptors to complex the anion moiety of the electrolyte salt thereby increasing the conductivity and the transference number of Li{sup +} ion in alkali metal batteries. 3 figs.

  7. Aza compounds as anion receptors

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Hung Sui; Yang, Xiao-Qing; McBreen, James

    1998-01-06

    A family of aza-ether based compounds including linear, multi-branched and aza-crown ethers is provided. When added to non-aqueous battery electrolytes, the family of aza-ether based compounds acts as neutral receptors to complex the anion moiety of the electrolyte salt thereby increasing the conductivity and the transference number of Li.sup.+ ion in alkali metal batteries.

  8. Lymphocyte receptors for pertussis toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, C.G.; Armstrong, G.D. )

    1990-12-01

    We have investigated human T-lymphocyte receptors for pertussis toxin by affinity isolation and photoaffinity labeling procedures. T lymphocytes were obtained from peripheral human blood, surface iodinated, and solubilized in Triton X-100. The iodinated mixture was then passed through pertussis toxin-agarose, and the fractions were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Autoradiography of the fixed, dried gels revealed several bands in the pertussis toxin-bound fraction that were not observed in fractions obtained from histone or fetuin-agarose. Further investigations employed a photoaffinity labeling reagent, sulfosuccinimidyl 2-(p-azido-salicylamido)-1,3'-dithiopropionate, to identify pertussis toxin receptors in freshly isolated peripheral blood monocytic cells, T lymphocytes, and Jurkat cells. In all three cell systems, the pertussis toxin affinity probe specifically labeled a single protein species with an apparent molecular weight of 70,000 that was not observed when the procedure was performed in the presence of excess unmodified pertussis toxin. A protein comparable in molecular weight to the one detected by the photoaffinity labeling technique was also observed among the species that bound to pertussis toxin-agarose. The results suggest that pertussis toxin may bind to a 70,000-Da receptor in human T lymphocytes.

  9. Autophagy selectivity through receptor clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutenberg, Andrew; Brown, Aidan

    Substrate selectivity in autophagy requires an all-or-none cellular response. We focus on peroxisomes, for which autophagy receptor proteins NBR1 and p62 are well characterized. Using computational models, we explore the hypothesis that physical clustering of autophagy receptor proteins on the peroxisome surface provides an appropriate all-or-none response. We find that larger peroxisomes nucleate NBR1 clusters first, and lose them due to competitive coarsening last, resulting in significant size-selectivity. We then consider a secondary hypothesis that p62 inhibits NBR1 cluster formation. We find that p62 inhibition enhances size-selectivity enough that, even if there is no change of the pexophagy rate, the volume of remaining peroxisomes can significantly decrease. We find that enhanced ubiquitin levels suppress size-selectivity, and that this effect is more pronounced for individual peroxisomes. Sufficient ubiquitin allows receptor clusters to form on even the smallest peroxisomes. We conclude that NBR1 cluster formation provides a viable physical mechanism for all-or-none substrate selectivity in pexophagy. We predict that cluster formation is associated with significant size-selectivity. Now at Simon Fraser University.

  10. Insulin receptor in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Petruzzelli, L.; Herrera, R.; Rosen, O.

    1986-05-01

    A specific, high affinity insulin receptor is present in both adult Drosophila and in Drosophila embryos. Wheat germ lectin-enriched extracts of detergent-solubilized membranes from embryos and adults bind insulin with a K/sub d/ of 15 nM. Binding is specific for insulin; micromolar concentrations of proinsulin, IGFI, and IGFII are required to displace bound /sup 125/I-insulin. Insulin-dependent protein tyrosine kinase activity appears during embryogenesis. It is evident between 6 and 12 hours of development, peaks between 12 and 18 hours and falls in the adult. During 0-6 hours of embryogenesis, and in the adult, a specific protein band (Mr = 135,000) is crosslinked to /sup 125/I-insulin. During 6-12 and 12-18 hours of embryogenesis stages in which insulin-dependent protein tyrosine kinase is high, an additional band (Mr = 100,000) becomes crosslinked to /sup 125/I-insulin. Isolation and DNA sequence analysis of genomic clones encoding the Drosophila insulin receptor will be presented as will the characterization of insulin receptor mRNA's during development.

  11. [Anti-NMDA-receptor encephalitis].

    PubMed

    Engen, Kristine; Agartz, Ingrid

    2016-06-01

    BACKGROUND In 2007 a clinical disease caused by autoantibodies directed against the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor was described for the first time. Anti-NMDA-receptor encephalitis is a subacute, autoimmune neurological disorder with psychiatric manifestations. The disease is a form of limbic encephalitis and is often paraneoplastic. The condition is also treatable. In this review article we examine the development of the disease, clinical practice, diagnostics and treatment.MATERIAL AND METHOD The article is based on references retrieved from searches in PubMed, and a discretionary selection of articles from the authors' own literature archive.RESULTS The disease most frequently affects young women. It may initially be perceived as a psychiatric condition, as it usually presents in the form of delusions, hallucinations or mania. The diagnosis should be suspected in patients who later develop neurological symptoms such as various movement disorders, epileptic seizures and autonomic instability. Examination of serum or cerebrospinal fluid for NMDA receptor antibodies should be included in the assessment of patients with suspected encephalitis. MRI, EEG and assessment for tumours are important tools in diagnosing the condition and any underlying malignancy.INTERPRETATION If treatment is initiated early, the prognosis is good. Altogether 75 % of patients will fully recover or experience significant improvement. Apart from surgical resection of a possible tumour, the treatment consists of immunotherapy. Because of good possibilities for treatment, it is important that clinicians, particularly those in acute psychiatry, are aware of and alert to this condition. PMID:27325034

  12. Modes of glutamate receptor gating

    PubMed Central

    Popescu, Gabriela K

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The time course of excitatory synaptic currents, the major means of fast communication between neurons of the central nervous system, is encoded in the dynamic behaviour of post-synaptic glutamate-activated channels. First-pass attempts to explain the glutamate-elicited currents with mathematical models produced reaction mechanisms that included only the most basic functionally defined states: resting vs. liganded, closed vs. open, responsive vs. desensitized. In contrast, single-molecule observations afforded by the patch-clamp technique revealed an unanticipated kinetic multiplicity of transitions: from microseconds-lasting flickers to minutes-long modes. How these kinetically defined events impact the shape of the synaptic response, how they relate to rearrangements in receptor structure, and whether and how they are physiologically controlled represent currently active research directions. Modal gating, which refers to the slowest, least frequently observed ion-channel transitions, has been demonstrated for representatives of all ion channel families. However, reaction schemes have been largely confined to the short- and medium-range time scales. For glutamate receptors as well, modal gating has only recently come under rigorous scrutiny. This article reviews the evidence for modal gating of glutamate receptors and the still developing hypotheses about the mechanism(s) by which modal shifts occur and the ways in which they may impact the time course of synaptic transmission. PMID:22106181

  13. Dimerization of the thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptor potentiates hormone-dependent receptor phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Song, Gyun Jee; Jones, Brian W; Hinkle, Patricia M

    2007-11-13

    The G protein-coupled thyrotropin (TSH)-releasing hormone (TRH) receptor forms homodimers. Regulated receptor dimerization increases TRH-induced receptor endocytosis. These studies test whether dimerization increases receptor phosphorylation, which could potentiate internalization. Phosphorylation at residues 355-365, which is critical for internalization, was measured with a highly selective phospho-site-specific antibody. Two strategies were used to drive receptor dimerization. Dimerization of a TRH receptor-FK506-binding protein (FKBP) fusion protein was stimulated by a dimeric FKBP ligand. The chemical dimerizer caused a large increase in TRH-dependent phosphorylation within 1 min, whereas a monomeric FKBP ligand had no effect. The dimerizer did not alter phoshorylation of receptors lacking the FKBP domain. Dimerization of receptors containing an N-terminal HA epitope also was induced with anti-HA antibody. Anti-HA IgG strongly increased TRH-induced phosphorylation, whereas monomeric Fab fragments had no effect. Anti-HA antibody did not alter phosphorylation in receptors lacking an HA tag. Furthermore, two phosphorylation-defective TRH receptors functionally complemented one another and permitted phosphorylation. Receptors with a D71A mutation in the second transmembrane domain do not signal, whereas receptors with four Ala mutations in the 355-365 region signal normally but lack phosphorylation sites. When D71A- and 4Ala-TRH receptors were expressed alone, neither underwent TRH-dependent phosphorylation. When they were expressed together, D71A receptor was phosphorylated by G protein-coupled receptor kinases in response to TRH. These results suggest that the TRH receptor is phosphorylated preferentially when it is in dimers or when preexisting receptor dimers are driven into microaggregates. Increased receptor phosphorylation may amplify desensitization. PMID:17989235

  14. Protein Connectivity in Chemotaxis Receptor Complexes.

    PubMed

    Eismann, Stephan; Endres, Robert G

    2015-12-01

    The chemotaxis sensory system allows bacteria such as Escherichia coli to swim towards nutrients and away from repellents. The underlying pathway is remarkably sensitive in detecting chemical gradients over a wide range of ambient concentrations. Interactions among receptors, which are predominantly clustered at the cell poles, are crucial to this sensitivity. Although it has been suggested that the kinase CheA and the adapter protein CheW are integral for receptor connectivity, the exact coupling mechanism remains unclear. Here, we present a statistical-mechanics approach to model the receptor linkage mechanism itself, building on nanodisc and electron cryotomography experiments. Specifically, we investigate how the sensing behavior of mixed receptor clusters is affected by variations in the expression levels of CheA and CheW at a constant receptor density in the membrane. Our model compares favorably with dose-response curves from in vivo Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements, demonstrating that the receptor-methylation level has only minor effects on receptor cooperativity. Importantly, our model provides an explanation for the non-intuitive conclusion that the receptor cooperativity decreases with increasing levels of CheA, a core signaling protein associated with the receptors, whereas the receptor cooperativity increases with increasing levels of CheW, a key adapter protein. Finally, we propose an evolutionary advantage as explanation for the recently suggested CheW-only linker structures. PMID:26646441

  15. Update on melatonin receptors: IUPHAR Review 20.

    PubMed

    Jockers, Ralf; Delagrange, Philippe; Dubocovich, Margarita L; Markus, Regina P; Renault, Nicolas; Tosini, Gianluca; Cecon, Erika; Zlotos, Darius P

    2016-09-01

    Melatonin receptors are seven transmembrane-spanning proteins belonging to the GPCR superfamily. In mammals, two melatonin receptor subtypes exist - MT1 and MT2 - encoded by the MTNR1A and MTNR1B genes respectively. The current review provides an update on melatonin receptors by the corresponding subcommittee of the International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. We will highlight recent developments of melatonin receptor ligands, including radioligands, and give an update on the latest phenotyping results of melatonin receptor knockout mice. The current status and perspectives of the structure of melatonin receptor will be summarized. The physiological importance of melatonin receptor dimers and biologically important and type 2 diabetes-associated genetic variants of melatonin receptors will be discussed. The role of melatonin receptors in physiology and disease will be further exemplified by their functions in the immune system and the CNS. Finally, antioxidant and free radical scavenger properties of melatonin and its relation to melatonin receptors will be critically addressed. PMID:27314810

  16. Protein Connectivity in Chemotaxis Receptor Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Eismann, Stephan; Endres, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    The chemotaxis sensory system allows bacteria such as Escherichia coli to swim towards nutrients and away from repellents. The underlying pathway is remarkably sensitive in detecting chemical gradients over a wide range of ambient concentrations. Interactions among receptors, which are predominantly clustered at the cell poles, are crucial to this sensitivity. Although it has been suggested that the kinase CheA and the adapter protein CheW are integral for receptor connectivity, the exact coupling mechanism remains unclear. Here, we present a statistical-mechanics approach to model the receptor linkage mechanism itself, building on nanodisc and electron cryotomography experiments. Specifically, we investigate how the sensing behavior of mixed receptor clusters is affected by variations in the expression levels of CheA and CheW at a constant receptor density in the membrane. Our model compares favorably with dose-response curves from in vivo Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements, demonstrating that the receptor-methylation level has only minor effects on receptor cooperativity. Importantly, our model provides an explanation for the non-intuitive conclusion that the receptor cooperativity decreases with increasing levels of CheA, a core signaling protein associated with the receptors, whereas the receptor cooperativity increases with increasing levels of CheW, a key adapter protein. Finally, we propose an evolutionary advantage as explanation for the recently suggested CheW-only linker structures. PMID:26646441

  17. Amphipathic Benzenes Are Designed Inhibitors of the Estrogen Receptor α/Steroid Receptor Coactivator Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Gunther, Jillian R.; Moore, Terry W.; Collins, Margaret L.; Katzenellenbogen, John A.

    2008-01-01

    We report here on the design, synthesis and evaluation of small molecule inhibitors of the interaction between a steroid receptor coactivator and estrogen receptor α. These inhibitors are based upon an amphipathic benzene scaffold whose hydrophobic face mimics the leucine-rich α-helical consensus sequence on the steroid receptor coactivators that interacts with a shallow groove on estrogen receptor α. Several of these molecules are among the most potent inhibitors of this interaction described to date, and they are active at low micromolar concentrations in both in vitro models of estrogen receptor action and in cell-based assays of estrogen receptor-mediated coactivator interaction and transcription. PMID:18484708

  18. Insulin receptors in normal and disease states.

    PubMed

    Grunberger, G; Taylor, S I; Dons, R F; Gorden, P

    1983-03-01

    The binding of insulin to its receptor has been studied under various physiological and pathological conditions. Quantitative studies have involved human circulating cells such as monocytes and erythrocytes, adipocytes, placental cells, and cultured cells such as fibroblasts and transformed lymphocytes. In animals, other target tissues such as liver and muscle have been studied and correlated with the human studies. Various physiological conditions such as diurnal rhythm, diet, age, exercise and the menstrual cycle affect insulin binding; in addition, many drugs perturb the receptor interaction. Disease affecting the insulin receptor can be divided into five general categories: (1) Receptor regulation--this involves diseases characterized by hyper- or hypoinsulinaemia. Hyperinsulinaemia in the basal state usually leads to receptor 'down' regulation as seen in obesity, type II diabetes, acromegaly and islet cell tumours. Hypoinsulinaemia such as seen in anorexia nervosa or type I diabetes may lead to elevated binding. (2) Antireceptor antibodies--these immunoglobulins bind to the receptor and competitively inhibit insulin binding. They may act as agonists, antagonists or partial agonists. (3) Genetic diseases which produce fixed alterations in both freshly isolated and cultured cells. (4) Diseases of receptor specificity where insulin may bind with different affinity to its own receptor or related receptors such as receptors for insulin-like growth factors. (5) Disease of affinity modulation where physical factors such as pH, temperature, ions, etc. may modify binding. In this review, we have considered primarily abnormality in insulin receptor binding. There are numerous other functions of the receptor such as coupling and transmission of the biological signal. These mechanisms are frequently referred to as postreceptor events, but more properly should be referred to as postbinding events since the receptor subserves other functions in addition to recognition and

  19. Co-receptors are dispensable for tethering receptor-mediated phagocytosis of apoptotic cells.

    PubMed

    Park, B; Lee, J; Moon, H; Lee, G; Lee, D-H; Cho, J Hoon; Park, D

    2015-01-01

    During efferocytosis, phagocytic cells recognize dying cells by receptors binding to ligands specifically exposed on apoptotic cells. Multiple phagocytic receptors and some of their signaling pathways have been identified. However, the downstream pathways of tethering receptors that secure apoptotic cells remain elusive. It is generally assumed that tethering receptors induce signaling to mediate engulfment via interacting with co-receptors or other engulfment receptors located nearby. However, it is poorly understood whether co-receptors for tethering receptors exist during efferocytosis, and, if they do, whether they are indispensable for this process. Here, we address this issue using glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored annexin A5 (Anxa5-GPI), an artificial tethering receptor without a putative co-receptor. Phagocytes expressing Anxa5-GPI exhibited enhanced binding of apoptotic cells, resulting in promoted ingestion of apoptotic cells in a phosphatidylserine-dependent manner. Anxa5-GPI-induced phagocytosis of apoptotic cells relied on the known cytoskeletal engulfment machinery but partially depended on the Elmo-Dock-Rac module or the integrin pathway. In addition, Anxa5-GPI-mediated efferocytosis provoked anti-inflammatory responses. Taken together, our work suggests that co-receptors are dispensable for tethering receptor-induced efferocytosis and that tethering receptors mediate the engulfment of apoptotic cells through multiple engulfment signaling pathways. PMID:26018733

  20. Binding of the Ah receptor to receptor binding factors in chromatin.

    PubMed

    Dunn, R T; Ruh, T S; Ruh, M F

    1993-03-01

    Dioxin induces biological responses through interaction with a specific intracellular receptor, the Ah receptor, and the subsequent interaction of the Ah receptor with chromatin. We report the binding of the Ah receptor, partially purified from rabbit liver, to receptor binding factors in chromatin. Rabbit liver chromatin proteins (CP) were isolated by adsorption of chromatin to hydroxylapatite followed by sequential extraction with 1-8 M GdnHCl. To assay for receptor binding a portion of each CP fraction was reconstituted to rabbit double-stranded DNA using a reverse gradient dialysis of 7.5 to 0 M GdnHCl. These reconstituted nucleoacidic proteins were then examined for binding to [3H]-2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin ([3H]TCDD)-receptor complexes by the streptomycin filter assay. Prior to the binding assay, [3H]TCDD-receptor complexes were partially purified by step elution from DEAE-cellulose columns. CP fractions 2, 5, and 7 were found to bind to the Ah receptor with high affinity. Scatchard analysis yielded Kd values in the nanomolar range. Competition with 2-fold excess unlabeled TCDD-receptor complexes was demonstrated, and binding was reduced markedly when the receptor was prepared in the presence of 10 mM molybdate. Such chromatin receptor binding factors (RBFs) may participate in the interaction of receptor with specific DNA sequences resulting in modulation of specific gene expression. PMID:8384852

  1. Co-receptors are dispensable for tethering receptor-mediated phagocytosis of apoptotic cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, B; Lee, J; Moon, H; Lee, G; Lee, D-H; Hoon Cho, J; Park, D

    2015-01-01

    During efferocytosis, phagocytic cells recognize dying cells by receptors binding to ligands specifically exposed on apoptotic cells. Multiple phagocytic receptors and some of their signaling pathways have been identified. However, the downstream pathways of tethering receptors that secure apoptotic cells remain elusive. It is generally assumed that tethering receptors induce signaling to mediate engulfment via interacting with co-receptors or other engulfment receptors located nearby. However, it is poorly understood whether co-receptors for tethering receptors exist during efferocytosis, and, if they do, whether they are indispensable for this process. Here, we address this issue using glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored annexin A5 (Anxa5-GPI), an artificial tethering receptor without a putative co-receptor. Phagocytes expressing Anxa5-GPI exhibited enhanced binding of apoptotic cells, resulting in promoted ingestion of apoptotic cells in a phosphatidylserine-dependent manner. Anxa5-GPI-induced phagocytosis of apoptotic cells relied on the known cytoskeletal engulfment machinery but partially depended on the Elmo-Dock-Rac module or the integrin pathway. In addition, Anxa5-GPI-mediated efferocytosis provoked anti-inflammatory responses. Taken together, our work suggests that co-receptors are dispensable for tethering receptor-induced efferocytosis and that tethering receptors mediate the engulfment of apoptotic cells through multiple engulfment signaling pathways. PMID:26018733

  2. Human native kappa opioid receptor functions not predicted by recombinant receptors: Implications for drug design.

    PubMed

    Broad, John; Maurel, Damien; Kung, Victor W S; Hicks, Gareth A; Schemann, Michael; Barnes, Michael R; Kenakin, Terrence P; Granier, Sébastien; Sanger, Gareth J

    2016-01-01

    If activation of recombinant G protein-coupled receptors in host cells (by drugs or other ligands) has predictive value, similar data must be obtained with native receptors naturally expressed in tissues. Using mouse and human recombinant κ opioid receptors transfected into a host cell, two selectively-acting compounds (ICI204448, asimadoline) equi-effectively activated both receptors, assessed by measuring two different cell signalling pathways which were equally affected without evidence of bias. In mouse intestine, naturally expressing κ receptors within its nervous system, both compounds also equi-effectively activated the receptor, inhibiting nerve-mediated muscle contraction. However, whereas ICI204448 acted similarly in human intestine, where κ receptors are again expressed within its nervous system, asimadoline was inhibitory only at very high concentrations; instead, low concentrations of asimadoline reduced the activity of ICI204448. This demonstration of species-dependence in activation of native, not recombinant κ receptors may be explained by different mouse/human receptor structures affecting receptor expression and/or interactions with intracellular signalling pathways in native environments, to reveal differences in intrinsic efficacy between receptor agonists. These results have profound implications in drug design for κ and perhaps other receptors, in terms of recombinant-to-native receptor translation, species-dependency and possibly, a need to use human, therapeutically-relevant, not surrogate tissues. PMID:27492592

  3. Human native kappa opioid receptor functions not predicted by recombinant receptors: Implications for drug design

    PubMed Central

    Broad, John; Maurel, Damien; Kung, Victor W. S.; Hicks, Gareth A.; Schemann, Michael; Barnes, Michael R.; Kenakin, Terrence P.; Granier, Sébastien; Sanger, Gareth J.

    2016-01-01

    If activation of recombinant G protein-coupled receptors in host cells (by drugs or other ligands) has predictive value, similar data must be obtained with native receptors naturally expressed in tissues. Using mouse and human recombinant κ opioid receptors transfected into a host cell, two selectively-acting compounds (ICI204448, asimadoline) equi-effectively activated both receptors, assessed by measuring two different cell signalling pathways which were equally affected without evidence of bias. In mouse intestine, naturally expressing κ receptors within its nervous system, both compounds also equi-effectively activated the receptor, inhibiting nerve-mediated muscle contraction. However, whereas ICI204448 acted similarly in human intestine, where κ receptors are again expressed within its nervous system, asimadoline was inhibitory only at very high concentrations; instead, low concentrations of asimadoline reduced the activity of ICI204448. This demonstration of species-dependence in activation of native, not recombinant κ receptors may be explained by different mouse/human receptor structures affecting receptor expression and/or interactions with intracellular signalling pathways in native environments, to reveal differences in intrinsic efficacy between receptor agonists. These results have profound implications in drug design for κ and perhaps other receptors, in terms of recombinant-to-native receptor translation, species-dependency and possibly, a need to use human, therapeutically-relevant, not surrogate tissues. PMID:27492592

  4. GPR34 as a lysophosphatidylserine receptor.

    PubMed

    Makide, Kumiko; Aoki, Junken

    2013-04-01

    GPR34, a P2Y receptor family member, was identified as a candidate lysophosphatidylserine (LysoPS) receptor in 2006. However, it was controversial whether LysoPS is a real ligand for GPR34. Kitamura et al. (GPR34 is a receptor for lysophosphatidylserine with a fatty acid at the sn-2 position. J. Biochem. 2012;151:511-518), using several methods for detecting activation of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) and chemically synthesized LysoPS analogues, concluded that GPR34 is a cellular receptor for LysoPS, especially with a fatty acid at the sn-2 position. Furthermore, three additional GPCRs belonging to the P2Y family were recently identified as GPCRs for LysoPS, supporting the idea that GPR34 is a LysoPS receptor. PMID:23389307

  5. TAM receptor deficiency affects adult hippocampal neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Rui; Meng, Lingbin; Li, Qiutang; Lu, Qingxian

    2014-01-01

    The Tyro3, Axl and Mertk (TAM) subfamily of receptor protein tyrosine kinases functions in cell growth, differentiation, survival, and most recently found, in the regulation of immune responses and phagocytosis. All three receptors and their ligands, Gas6 (growth arrest-specific gene 6) and protein S, are expressed in the central nervous system (CNS). TAM receptors play pivotal roles in adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Loss of these receptors causes a comprised neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of adult hippocampus. TAM receptors have a negative regulatory effect on microglia and peripheral antigen-presenting cells, and play a critical role in preventing overproduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines detrimental to the proliferation, differentiation, and survival of adult neuronal stem cells (NSCs). Besides, these receptors also play an intrinsic trophic function in supporting NSC survival, proliferation, and differentiation into immature neurons. All these events collectively ensure a sustained neurogenesis in adult hippocampus. PMID:25487541

  6. TAM receptor deficiency affects adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ji, Rui; Meng, Lingbin; Li, Qiutang; Lu, Qingxian

    2015-06-01

    The Tyro3, Axl and Mertk (TAM) subfamily of receptor protein tyrosine kinases functions in cell growth, differentiation, survival, and most recently found, in the regulation of immune responses and phagocytosis. All three receptors and their ligands, Gas6 (growth arrest-specific gene 6) and protein S, are expressed in the central nervous system (CNS). TAM receptors play pivotal roles in adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Loss of these receptors causes a comprised neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of adult hippocampus. TAM receptors have a negative regulatory effect on microglia and peripheral antigen-presenting cells, and play a critical role in preventing overproduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines detrimental to the proliferation, differentiation, and survival of adult neuronal stem cells (NSCs). Besides, these receptors also play an intrinsic trophic function in supporting NSC survival, proliferation, and differentiation into immature neurons. All these events collectively ensure a sustained neurogenesis in adult hippocampus. PMID:25487541

  7. Single channel kinetics of a glutamate receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Kerry, C J; Kits, K S; Ramsey, R L; Sansom, M S; Usherwood, P N

    1987-01-01

    The glutamate receptor-channel of locust muscle membrane was studied using the patch-clamp technique. Muscles were pretreated with concanavalin A to block receptor-channel desensitization, thus facilitating analysis of receptor-channel gating kinetics. Single channel kinetics were analyzed to aid in identification of the molecular basis of channel gating. Channel dwell-time distributions and dwell-time autocorrelation functions were calculated from single channel data recorded in the precence of 10-4M glutamate. Analysis of the dwell time distributions in terms of mixtures of exponential functions revealed there to be at least three open states of the receptor-channel and at least four closed states. Autocorrelation function analysis showed there to be at least three pathways linking the open states with the closed. This results in a minimal scheme for gating of the glutamate receptor-channel, which is suggestive of allosteric models of receptor-channel gating. PMID:2436676

  8. Single Channel Kinetics of a Glutamate Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Kerry, Cathryn J.; Kits, Karel S.; Ramsey, Robert L.; Sansom, Mark S. P.; Usherwood, Peter N. R.

    1986-01-01

    The glutamate receptor-channel of locust muscle membrane was studied using the patch-clamp technique. Muscles were pretreated with concanavalin A to block receptor-channel desensitization, thus facilitating analysis of receptor-channel gating kinetics. Single channel kinetics were analyzed to aid in identification of the molecular basis of channel gating. Channel dwell-time distributions and dwell-time autocorrelation functions were calculated from single channel data recorded in the presence of 10-4 M glutamate. Analysis of the dwell time distributions in terms of mixtures of exponential functions revealed there to be at least three open states of the receptor-channel and at least four closed states. Autocorrelation function analysis showed there to be at least three pathways linking the open states with the closed. This results in a minimal scheme for gating of the glutamate receptor-channel, which is suggestive of allosteric models of receptor-channel gating. PMID:19431683

  9. Characteristic molecular vibrations of adenosine receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Chee, Hyun Keun; Yang, Jin-San; Joung, Je-Gun; Zhang, Byoung-Tak; Oh, S June

    2015-02-13

    Although the regulation of membrane receptor activation is known to be crucial for molecular signal transduction, the molecular mechanism underlying receptor activation is not fully elucidated. Here we study the physicochemical nature of membrane receptor behavior by investigating the characteristic molecular vibrations of receptor ligands using computational chemistry and informatics methods. By using information gain, t-tests, and support vector machines, we have identified highly informative features of adenosine receptor (AdoR) ligand and corresponding functional amino acid residues such as Asn (6.55) of AdoR that has informative significance and is indispensable for ligand recognition of AdoRs. These findings may provide new perspectives and insights into the fundamental mechanism of class A G protein-coupled receptor activation. PMID:25622891

  10. Receptor Tyrosine Kinases in Drosophila Development

    PubMed Central

    Sopko, Richelle; Perrimon, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation plays a significant role in a wide range of cellular processes. The Drosophila genome encodes more than 20 receptor tyrosine kinases and extensive studies in the past 20 years have illustrated their diverse roles and complex signaling mechanisms. Although some receptor tyrosine kinases have highly specific functions, others strikingly are used in rather ubiquitous manners. Receptor tyrosine kinases regulate a broad expanse of processes, ranging from cell survival and proliferation to differentiation and patterning. Remarkably, different receptor tyrosine kinases share many of the same effectors and their hierarchical organization is retained in disparate biological contexts. In this comprehensive review, we summarize what is known regarding each receptor tyrosine kinase during Drosophila development. Astonishingly, very little is known for approximately half of all Drosophila receptor tyrosine kinases. PMID:23732470

  11. Allosteric Modulation of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jakubík, Jan; El-Fakahany, Esam E.

    2010-01-01

    An allosteric modulator is a ligand that binds to an allosteric site on the receptor and changes receptor conformation to produce increase (positive cooperativity) or decrease (negative cooperativity) in the binding or action of an orthosteric agonist (e.g., acetylcholine). Since the identification of gallamine as the first allosteric modulator of muscarinic receptors in 1976, this unique mode of receptor modulation has been intensively studied by many groups. This review summarizes over 30 years of research on the molecular mechanisms of allosteric interactions of drugs with the receptor and for new allosteric modulators of muscarinic receptors with potential therapeutic use. Identification of positive modulators of acetylcholine binding and function that enhance neurotransmission and the discovery of highly selective allosteric modulators are mile-stones on the way to novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease and other disorders involving impaired cognitive function.

  12. [Opioid receptors and their selective ligands].

    PubMed

    Piestrzeniewicz, Mariola Katarzyna; Fichna, Jakub; Michna, Jakub; Janecka, Anna

    2006-01-01

    Opioid receptors (micro, delta, and kappa) belong to a large family of G protein-coupled receptors and play an important physiological role. Stimulation of these receptors triggers analgesic effects and affects the function of gastrointestinal tract. The discovery of opioid peptides, which are endogenous ligands of opioid receptors, including delta-selective enkephalins, kappa-selective dynorphins, and micro-selective endomorphins, initiated their structure-activity relationship studies. For the last 30 years, hundreds of analogs of opioid peptides have been synthesized in an effort to obtain the compounds more active, selective, and resistant to biodegradation than the endogenous ligands. Different unnatural amino acids, as well as cyclisation procedures, leading to conformationaly restricted analogs, were employed. All these modifications resulted in obtaining very selective agonists and antagonists with high affinity at micro-, dlta-, and kappa-opioid receptors, which are extremely useful tools in further studies on the pharmacology of opioid receptors in a mammalian organism. PMID:17201067

  13. Toll-Like Receptors in Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Nicotra, Lauren; Loram, Lisa C; Watkins, Linda R; Hutchinson, Mark R

    2011-01-01

    Proinflammatory central immune signaling contributes significantly to the initiation and maintenance of heightened pain states. Recent discoveries have implicated the innate immune system, pattern recognition Toll-like receptors in triggering these proinflammatory central immune signaling events. These exciting developments have been complemented by the discovery of neuronal expression of Toll-like receptors, suggesting pain pathways can be activated directly by the detection of pathogen associated molecular patterns or danger associated molecular patterns. This review will examine the evidence to date implicating Toll-like receptors and their associated signaling components in heightened pain states. In addition, insights into the impact Toll-like receptors have on priming central immune signaling systems for heightened pain states will be discussed. The influence possible sex differences in Toll-like receptor signaling have for female pain and the recognition of small molecule xenobiotics by Toll-like receptors will also be reviewed. PMID:22001158

  14. Kainate receptors in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Lerma, Juan; Marques, Joana M

    2013-10-16

    Our understanding of the molecular properties of kainate receptors and their involvement in synaptic physiology has progressed significantly over the last 30 years. A plethora of studies indicate that kainate receptors are important mediators of the pre- and postsynaptic actions of glutamate, although the mechanisms underlying such effects are still often a topic for discussion. Three clear fields related to their behavior have emerged: there are a number of interacting proteins that pace the properties of kainate receptors; their activity is unconventional since they can also signal through G proteins, behaving like metabotropic receptors; they seem to be linked to some devastating brain diseases. Despite the significant progress in their importance in brain function, kainate receptors remain somewhat puzzling. Here we examine discoveries linking these receptors to physiology and their probable implications in disease, in particular mood disorders, and propose some ideas to obtain a deeper understanding of these intriguing proteins. PMID:24139035

  15. Eph Receptors and Ephrins: Therapeutic Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Barquilla, Antonio; Pasquale, Elena B.

    2015-01-01

    The Eph receptor tyrosine kinase family plays important roles in developmental processes, adult tissue homeostasis and various diseases. Interaction with ephrin ligands on the surface of neighboring cells triggers Eph receptor kinase-dependent signaling. The ephrins can also transmit signals, leading to bidirectional cell contact-dependent communication. Moreover, Eph receptors and ephrins can function independently of each other, through interplay with other signaling systems. Given their involvement in many pathological conditions ranging from neurological disorders to cancer and viral infections, Eph receptors and ephrins are increasingly recognized as attractive therapeutic targets and a variety of strategies are being explored to modulate their expression and function. Eph receptor/ephrin upregulation in cancer cells, the angiogenic vasculature, and injured or diseased tissues also offers opportunities for Eph/ephrin-based targeted drug delivery and imaging. Thus, despite the challenges presented by the complex biology of the Eph receptor/ephrin system, exciting possibilities exist for therapies exploiting these molecules. PMID:25292427

  16. Tetrahydroquinoline derivatives as opioid receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cunyu; Westaway, Susan M; Speake, Jason D; Bishop, Michael J; Goetz, Aaron S; Carballo, Luz Helena; Hu, Mike; Epperly, Andrea H

    2011-01-15

    Opioid receptors play an important role in both behavioral and homeostatic functions. We herein report tetrahydroquinoline derivatives as opioid receptor antagonists. SAR studies led to the identification of the potent antagonist 2v, endowed with 1.58nM (K(i)) functional activity against the μ opioid receptor. DMPK data suggest that novel tetrahydroquinoline analogs may be advantageous in peripheral applications. PMID:21193310

  17. Cytoplasmic and nuclear cytokine receptor complexes.

    PubMed

    Mertani, H C; Morel, G; Lobie, P E

    1999-01-01

    Much of our understanding on how hormones and cytokines transmit their message into the cell is based on the receptor activation at the plasma membrane. Many experimental in vitro models have established the paradigm for cytokine action based upon such activation of their cell surface receptor. The signaling from the plasma membrane activated cytokine receptor is driven to the nucleus by a rapid ricochet of protein phosphorylation, ultimately integrated as a differentiative, proliferative, or transcriptional message. The Janus kinase (JAK)--signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) pathway that was first thought to be cytokine receptor specific now appears to be activated by other noncytokine receptors. Also, evidence is accumulating showing that cytokines modulate the signal transduction machinery of the tyrosine kinase receptors and that of the heterotrimeric guanosine triphosphate (GTP)-binding protein-coupled receptors. Thus cytokine receptor signaling has become much more complex than originally hypothesized, challenging the established model of specificity of the action of a given cytokine. This review is focused on another level of complexity emerging within cytokine receptor superfamily signaling. Over the past 10 years, data from different laboratories have shown that cytokines and their receptors localize to intracellular compartments including the nucleus, and, in some cases, biological responses have been correlated with this unexpected location, raising the possibility that cytokines act as their own messenger through inter-actions with nuclear proteins. Thus, the interplay between cytokine receptor engagement and cellular signaling turns out to be more dynamic than originally suspected. The mechanisms and regulations of intracellular translocation of the cytokines, their receptors, and their signaling proteins are discussed in the context that such compartmentalization provides some of the specificity of the responses mediated by each

  18. Angiotensin II receptors in the gonads

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilera, G.; Millan, M.A.; Harwood, J.P.

    1989-05-01

    The presence of components of the renin-angiotensin system in ovaries and testes suggests that angiotensin II (AII) is involved in gonadal function, and thus we sought to characterize receptors for AII in rat and primate gonads. In the testes, autoradiographic studies showed receptors in the interstitium in all species. In rat interstitial cells fractionated by Percoll gradient, AII receptors coincided with hCG receptors indicating that AII receptors are located on the Leydig cells. In Leydig cells and membranes from rat and rhesus monkey prepuberal testes, AII receptors were specific for AII analogues and of high affinity (Kd=nM). During development, AII receptor content in rat testes decreases with age parallel to a fall in the ratio of interstitial to tubular tissue. In the ovary, the distribution of AII receptors was dependent on the stage of development, being high in the germinal epithelium and stromal tissue between five and 15 days, and becoming localized in secondary follicles in 20-and 40-day-old rats. No binding was found in primordial or primary follicles. In rhesus monkey ovary, AII receptors were higher in stromal tissue and lower in granulosa and luteal cells of the follicles. Characterization of the binding in rat and monkey ovarian membranes showed a single class of sites with a Kd in the nmol/L range and specificity similar to that of the adrenal glomerulosa and testicular AII receptors. Receptors for AII were also present in membrane fractions from PMSG/hCG primed rat ovaries. Infusion of AII (25 ng/min) or captopril (1.4 micrograms/min) during the PMSG/hCG induction period had no effect on ovarian weight or AII receptor concentration in the ovaries.

  19. Characterization of prostanoid receptors on rat neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Wise, H; Jones, R L

    1994-01-01

    1. The effects of various prostanoid agonists have been compared on the increase in intracellular free calcium ([Ca2+]i) and the aggregation reaction of rat peritoneal neutrophils induced by N-formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (FMLP). 2. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and the specific IP-receptor agonist, cicaprost, both inhibited the FMLP-induced increase in [Ca2+]i (IC50 33 nM and 18 nM respectively) and the FMLP-induced aggregation reaction (IC50 5.6 nM and 7.9 nM respectively). PGD2, PGF2 alpha, and the TP-receptor agonist, U 46619, were inactive at the highest concentration tested (1 microM). 3. The EP1-receptor agonist, 17-phenyl-omega-trinor PGE2, and the EP3-receptor agonists, GR 63799X and sulprostone, had no inhibitory effect on FMLP-stimulated rat neutrophils. 4. PGE1 (EP/IP-receptor agonist) and iloprost (IP-receptor agonist) inhibited the FMLP-induced increase in [Ca2+]i with IC50 values of 34 nM and 38 nM respectively. The EP2-receptor agonists, butaprost and misoprostol (1 microM), inhibited both FMLP-stimulated [Ca2+]i and aggregation. However another EP2-receptor agonist, AH 13205, was inactive in both assays. 5. Prostanoid receptors present on rat neutrophils were further characterized by measuring [3H]-adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate ([3H]-cyclic AMP) accumulation. Only those agonists capable of stimulating [3H]-cyclic AMP accumulation were able to inhibit both FMLP-stimulated [Ca2+]i and aggregation. 6. These results indicate that rat neutrophils possess inhibitory IP and EP-receptors; the relative potencies of PGE2, misoprostol and butaprost are those expected for the EP2-receptor subtype. No evidence for DP, FP, TP or EP1 and EP3-receptors was obtained. PMID:7834211

  20. Membrane guanylyl cyclase receptors: an update

    PubMed Central

    Garbers, David L.; Chrisman, Ted D.; Wiegn, Phi; Katafuchi, Takeshi; Albanesi, Joseph P.; Bielinski, Vincent; Barylko, Barbara; Redfield, Margaret M.; Burnett, John C.

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated key roles for several membrane guanylyl cyclase receptors in the regulation of cell hyperplasia, hypertrophy, migration and extracellular matrix production, all of which having an impact on clinically relevant diseases, including tissue remodeling after injury. Additionally, cell differentiation, and even tumor progression, can be profoundly influenced by one or more of these receptors. Some of these receptors also mediate important communication between the heart and intestine, and the kidney to regulate blood volume and Na+ balance. PMID:16815030

  1. Nitrosamines as nicotinic receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Schuller, Hildegard M

    2007-05-30

    Nitrosamines are carcinogens formed in the mammalian organism from amine precursors contained in food, beverages, cosmetics and drugs. The potent carcinogen, NNK, and the weaker carcinogen, NNN, are nitrosamines formed from nicotine. Metabolites of the nitrosamines react with DNA to form adducts responsible for genotoxic effects. We have identified NNK as a high affinity agonist for the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (alpha7nAChR) whereas NNN bound with high affinity to epibatidine-sensitive nAChRs. Diethylnitrosamine (DEN) bound to both receptors but with lower affinity. High levels of the alpha7nAChR were expressed in human small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines and in hamster pulmonary neuroendocrine cells (PNECs), which serve as a model for the cell of origin of human SCLC. Exposure of SCLC or PNECs to NNK or nicotine increased expression of the alpha7nAChR and caused influx of Ca(2+), activation of PKC, Raf-1, ERK1/2, and c-myc, resulting in the stimulation of cell proliferation. Signaling via the alpha7nAChR was enhanced when cells were maintained in an environment of 10-15% CO(2) similar to that in the diseased lung. Hamsters with hyperoxia-induced pulmonary fibrosis developed neuroendocrine lung carcinomas similar to human SCLC when treated with NNK, DEN, or nicotine. The development of the NNK-induced tumors was prevented by green tea or theophylline. The beta-adrenergic receptor agonist, isoproterenol or theophylline blocked NNK-induced cell proliferation in vitro. NNK and nicotine-induced hyperactivity of the alpha7nAChR/RAF/ERK1/2 pathway thus appears to play a crucial role in the development of SCLC in smokers and could be targeted for cancer prevention. PMID:17459420

  2. Androgen receptors in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Culig, Z; Klocker, H; Bartsch, G; Hobisch, A

    2002-09-01

    The androgen receptor (AR), a transcription factor that mediates the action of androgens in target tissues, is expressed in nearly all prostate cancers. Carcinoma of the prostate is the most frequently diagnosed neoplasm in men in industrialized countries. Palliative treatment for non-organ-confined prostate cancer aims to down-regulate the concentration of circulating androgen or to block the transcription activation function of the AR. AR function during endocrine therapy was studied in tumor cells LNCaP subjected to long-term steroid depletion; newly generated sublines could be stimulated by lower concentrations of androgen than parental cells and showed up-regulation of AR expression and activity as well as resistance to apoptosis. Androgenic hormones regulate the expression of key cell cycle regulators, cyclin-dependent kinase 2 and 4, and that of the cell cycle inhibitor p27. Inhibition of AR expression could be achieved by potential chemopreventive agents flufenamic acid, resveratrol, quercetin, polyunsaturated fatty acids and interleukin-1beta, and by the application of AR antisense oligonucleotides. In the clinical situation, AR gene amplification and point mutations were reported in patients with metastatic disease. These mutations generate receptors which could be activated by other steroid hormones and non-steroidal antiandrogens. In the absence of androgen, the AR could be activated by various growth-promoting (growth factors, epidermal growth factor receptor-related oncogene HER-2/neu) and pleiotropic (protein kinase A activators, interleukin-6) compounds as well as by inducers of differentiation (phenylbutyrate). AR function is modulated by a number of coactivators and corepressors. The three coactivators, TIF-2, SRC-1 and RAC3, are up-regulated in relapsed prostate cancer. New experimental therapies for prostate cancer are aimed to down-regulate AR expression and to overcome difficulties which occur because of the acquisition of agonistic properties

  3. Canonical transient receptor potential 5.

    PubMed

    Beech, D J

    2007-01-01

    Canonical transient receptor potential 5 TRPC5 (also TrpC5, trp-5 or trp5) is one of the seven mammalian TRPC proteins. Its known functional property is that of a mixed cationic plasma membrane channel with calcium permeability. It is active alone or as a heteromultimeric assembly with TRPC1; TRPC4 and TRPC3 may also be involved. Multiple activators of TRPC5 are emerging, including various G protein-coupled receptor agonists, lysophospholipids, lanthanide ions and, in some contexts, calcium store depletion. Intracellular calcium has complex impact on TRPC5, including a permissive role for other activators, as well as inhibition at high concentrations. Protein kinase C is inhibitory and mediates desensitisation following receptor activation. Tonic TRPC5 activity is detected and may reflect the presence of constitutive activation signals. The channel has voltage dependence but the biological significance of this is unknown; it is partially due to intracellular magnesium blockade at aspartic acid residue 633. Protein partners include calmodulin, CaBP1, enkurin, Na(+)-H+ exchange regulatory factor (NHERF) and stathmin. TRPC5 is included in local vesicular trafficking regulated by growth factors through phosphatidylinositol (PI)-3-kinase, Rac1 and PIP-5-kinase. Inhibition of myosin light chain kinase suppresses TRPC5, possibly via an effect on trafficking. Biological roles of TRPC5 are emerging but more reports on this aspect are needed. One proposed role is as a mediator of calcium entry and excitation in smooth muscle, another as an inhibitor of neuronal growth cone extension. The latter is intriguing in view of the original cloning of the human TRPC5 gene from a region of the X chromosome linked to mental retardation. TRPC5 is a broadly expressed calcium channel with capability to act as an integrator of extracellular and intracellular signals at the level of calcium entry. PMID:17217053

  4. TRPA1 receptors in cough.

    PubMed

    Grace, Megan S; Belvisi, Maria G

    2011-06-01

    In the early 1990's ion channels of the Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) class were implicated in the afferent sensory loop of the cough reflex and in the heightened cough sensitivity seen in disease. Agonists of the TRPV1 capsaicin receptor such as vanilloids and protons were demonstrated to be amongst the most potent chemical stimuli which cause cough. However, more recently, the TRPA1 receptor (not activated by capsaicin) has become of interest in the cough field because it is known to be activated by ligands such as acrolein which is present in air pollution and the acrid smoke from organic material. TRPA1 is a Ca(2+)-permeant non-selective cation channel with 14 ankyrin repeats in its amino terminus which belongs to the larger TRP family. TRPA1 has been characterised as a thermoreceptor which is activated by cold temperature, environmental irritants and reactive electrophilic molecules which can be generated by oxidant stress and inflammation. TRPA1 is primarily expressed in small diameter, nociceptive neurons where its activation probably contributes to the perception of noxious stimuli and the phenomena known as inflammatory hyperalgesia and neurogenic inflammation. The respiratory tract is innervated by primary sensory afferent nerves which are activated by mechanical and chemical stimuli. Activation of these vagal sensory afferents leads to central reflexes including dyspnoea, changes in breathing pattern and cough. Recently, it has been demonstrated that stimulating TRPA1 channels activates vagal bronchopulmonary C-fibres in the guinea pig and rodent lung, and recent data have shown that TRPA1 ligands cause cough in both animal models and normal volunteers. In summary, due to their activation by a wide range of irritant and chemical substances, either by exogenous agents, endogenously produced mediators during inflammation or by oxidant stress, we suggest TRPA1 channels should be considered as one of the most promising targets currently identified for

  5. NAAG, NMDA receptor and psychosis.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Richard; Coyle, Joseph T

    2012-01-01

    At central synapses, glutamate is the main excitatory neurotransmitter. Once released from presynaptic terminals, glutamate activates a number of different glutamatergic receptors one of which is the ligand gated ionophore glutamatergic subtype N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs). NMDARs play a crucial role in controlling various determinants of synaptic function. N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) is the most prevalent peptide transmitter in the mammalian central nervous system. NAAG is released upon neuronal depolarization by a calcium-dependent process from glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons. It is cleaved by a specific peptidase located on astrocytes, glutamate carboxypeptidase type II (GCP-II), to N-acetylaspartate (NAA) and glutamate. Current evidence supports the hypothesis that NAAG is an endogenous agonist at G protein coupled mGluR3 receptors and an antagonist at NMDAR. In several disorders and animal models of human diseases, the levels of NAAG and the activity of GCP-II are altered in ways that are consistent with NAAG's role in regulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission. Several lines of evidence suggest that a dysfunction in glutamatergic via the NMDAR might be involved in schizophrenia. This hypothesis has evolved from findings that NMDAR antagonists such as phencyclidine (PCP or "angel dust"), produces a syndrome in normal individuals that closely resembles schizophrenia and exacerbates psychotic symptoms in patients with chronic schizophrenia. Recent postmortem, metabolic and genetic studies have provided evidence that hypofunction of discrete populations of NMDAR can contribute to the symptoms of schizophrenia, at least in some patients. The review outlines the role of endogenous NAAG at NMDAR neurotransmission and its putative role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. PMID:22304714

  6. Knock-In Mice with NOP-eGFP Receptors Identify Receptor Cellular and Regional Localization

    PubMed Central

    Ozawa, Akihiko; Brunori, Gloria; Mercatelli, Daniela; Wu, Jinhua; Cippitelli, Andrea; Zou, Bende; Xie, Xinmin (Simon); Williams, Melissa; Zaveri, Nurulain T.; Low, Sarah; Scherrer, Grégory; Kieffer, Brigitte L.

    2015-01-01

    The nociceptin/orphanin FQ (NOP) receptor, the fourth member of the opioid receptor family, is involved in many processes common to the opioid receptors including pain and drug abuse. To better characterize receptor location and trafficking, knock-in mice were created by inserting the gene encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) into the NOP receptor gene (Oprl1) and producing mice expressing a functional NOP-eGFP C-terminal fusion in place of the native NOP receptor. The NOP-eGFP receptor was present in brain of homozygous knock-in animals in concentrations somewhat higher than in wild-type mice and was functional when tested for stimulation of [35S]GTPγS binding in vitro and in patch-clamp electrophysiology in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons and hippocampal slices. Inhibition of morphine analgesia was equivalent when tested in knock-in and wild-type mice. Imaging revealed detailed neuroanatomy in brain, spinal cord, and DRG and was generally consistent with in vitro autoradiographic imaging of receptor location. Multicolor immunohistochemistry identified cells coexpressing various spinal cord and DRG cellular markers, as well as coexpression with μ-opioid receptors in DRG and brain regions. Both in tissue slices and primary cultures, the NOP-eGFP receptors appear throughout the cell body and in processes. These knock-in mice have NOP receptors that function both in vitro and in vivo and appear to be an exceptional tool to study receptor neuroanatomy and correlate with NOP receptor function. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The NOP receptor, the fourth member of the opioid receptor family, is involved in pain, drug abuse, and a number of other CNS processes. The regional and cellular distribution has been difficult to determine due to lack of validated antibodies for immunohistochemical analysis. To provide a new tool for the investigation of receptor localization, we have produced knock-in mice with a fluorescent-tagged NOP receptor in place of the native

  7. EGF receptor ligands: recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Bhuminder; Carpenter, Graham; Coffey, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Seven ligands bind to and activate the mammalian epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR/ERBB1/HER1): EGF, transforming growth factor-alpha (TGFA), heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HBEGF), betacellulin (BTC), amphiregulin (AREG), epiregulin (EREG), and epigen (EPGN). Of these, EGF, TGFA, HBEGF, and BTC are thought to be high-affinity ligands, whereas AREG, EREG, and EPGN constitute low-affinity ligands. This focused review is meant to highlight recent studies related to actions of the individual EGFR ligands, the interesting biology that has been uncovered, and relevant advances related to ligand interactions with the EGFR.

  8. P2 receptors and platelet function.

    PubMed

    Hechler, Béatrice; Gachet, Christian

    2011-09-01

    Following vessel wall injury, platelets adhere to the exposed subendothelium, become activated and release mediators such as TXA(2) and nucleotides stored at very high concentration in the so-called dense granules. Released nucleotides and other soluble agents act in a positive feedback mechanism to cause further platelet activation and amplify platelet responses induced by agents such as thrombin or collagen. Adenine nucleotides act on platelets through three distinct P2 receptors: two are G protein-coupled ADP receptors, namely the P2Y(1) and P2Y(12) receptor subtypes, while the P2X(1) receptor ligand-gated cation channel is activated by ATP. The P2Y(1) receptor initiates platelet aggregation but is not sufficient for a full platelet aggregation in response to ADP, while the P2Y(12) receptor is responsible for completion of the aggregation to ADP. The latter receptor, the molecular target of the antithrombotic drugs clopidogrel, prasugrel and ticagrelor, is responsible for most of the potentiating effects of ADP when platelets are stimulated by agents such as thrombin, collagen or immune complexes. The P2X(1) receptor is involved in platelet shape change and in activation by collagen under shear conditions. Each of these receptors is coupled to specific signal transduction pathways in response to ADP or ATP and is differentially involved in all the sequential events involved in platelet function and haemostasis. As such, they represent potential targets for antithrombotic drugs. PMID:21792575

  9. ABA Receptors: Past, Present and Future

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Jianjun; Yang, Xiaohan; Weston, David; Chen, Jay

    2011-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is the key plant stress hormone. Consistent with the earlier studies in support of the presence of both membrane- and cytoplasm-localized ABA receptors, recent studies have identified multiple ABA receptors located in various subcellular locations. These include a chloroplast envelope-localized receptor (the H subunit of Chloroplast Mg2+-chelatase/ABA Receptor), two plasma membrane-localized receptors (G-protein Coupled Receptor 2 and GPCR-type G proteins), and one cytosol/nucleus-localized Pyrabactin Resistant (PYR)/PYR-Like (PYL)/Regulatory Component of ABA Receptor 1 (RCAR). Although the downstream molecular events for most of the identified ABA receptors are currently unknown, one of them, PYR/PYL/RACR was found to directly bind and regulate the activity of a long-known central regulator of ABA signaling, the A-group protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C). Together with the Sucrose Non-fermentation Kinase Subfamily 2 (SnRK2s) protein kinases, a central signaling complex (ABA-PYR-PP2Cs-SnRK2s) that is responsible for ABA signal perception and transduction is supported by abundant genetic, physiological, biochemical and structural evidence. The identification of multiple ABA receptors has advanced our understanding of ABA signal perception and transduction while adding an extra layer of complexity.

  10. Neuropeptide receptor transcriptome reveals unidentified neuroendocrine pathways.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Naoki; Yamamoto, Sachie; Zitnan, Dusan; Watanabe, Ken; Kawada, Tsuyoshi; Satake, Honoo; Kaneko, Yu; Hiruma, Kiyoshi; Tanaka, Yoshiaki; Shinoda, Tetsuro; Kataoka, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    Neuropeptides are an important class of molecules involved in diverse aspects of metazoan development and homeostasis. Insects are ideal model systems to investigate neuropeptide functions, and the major focus of insect neuropeptide research in the last decade has been on the identification of their receptors. Despite these vigorous efforts, receptors for some key neuropeptides in insect development such as prothoracicotropic hormone, eclosion hormone and allatotropin (AT), remain undefined. In this paper, we report the comprehensive cloning of neuropeptide G protein-coupled receptors from the silkworm, Bombyx mori, and systematic analyses of their expression. Based on the expression patterns of orphan receptors, we identified the long-sought receptor for AT, which is thought to stimulate juvenile hormone biosynthesis in the corpora allata (CA). Surprisingly, however, the AT receptor was not highly expressed in the CA, but instead was predominantly transcribed in the corpora cardiaca (CC), an organ adjacent to the CA. Indeed, by using a reverse-physiological approach, we purified and characterized novel allatoregulatory peptides produced in AT receptor-expressing CC cells, which may indirectly mediate AT activity on the CA. All of the above findings confirm the effectiveness of a systematic analysis of the receptor transcriptome, not only in characterizing orphan receptors, but also in identifying novel players and hidden mechanisms in important biological processes. This work illustrates how using a combinatorial approach employing bioinformatic, molecular, biochemical and physiological methods can help solve recalcitrant problems in neuropeptide research. PMID:18725956

  11. Novel NMDA Receptor Modulators: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Santangelo, Rose M.; Acker, Timothy M.; Zimmerman, Sommer S.; Katzman, Brooke M.; Strong, Katie L.; Traynelis, Stephen F.; Liotta, Dennis C.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction The NMDA receptor is a ligand-gated ion channel that plays a critical role in higher level brain processes and has been implicated in a range of neurological and psychiatric conditions. Although initial studies for the use of NMDA receptor antagonists in neuroprotection were unsuccessful, more recently, NMDA receptor antagonists have shown clinical promise in other indications such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, pain and depression. Based on the clinical observations and more recent insights into receptor pharmacology, new modulatory approaches are beginning to emerge, with potential therapeutic benefit. Areas Covered The article covers the known pharmacology and important features regarding NMDA receptors and their function. A discussion of pre-clinical and clinical relevance is included, as well. The subsequent patent literature review highlights the current state of the art targeting the receptor since the last review in 2010. Expert Opinion The complex nature of the NMDA receptor structure and function is becoming better understood. As knowledge about this receptor increases, it opens up new opportunities for targeting the receptor for many therapeutic indications. New strategies and advances in older technologies will need to be further developed before clinical success can be achieved. First-in-class potentiators and subunit-selective agents form the basis for most new strategies, complemented by efforts to limit off-target liability and fine-tune on-target properties. PMID:23009122

  12. Characterization of the chicken muscle insulin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Adamo, M.; Simon, J.; Rosebrough, R.W.; McMurtry, J.P.; Steele, N.C.; LeRoith, D.

    1987-12-01

    Insulin receptors are present in chicken skeletal muscle. Crude membrane preparations demonstrated specific /sup 125/I-insulin binding. The nonspecific binding was high (36-55% of total binding) and slightly lower affinity receptors were found than are typically observed for crude membrane insulin binding in other chicken tissues. Affinity crosslinking of /sup 125/I-insulin to crude membranes revealed insulin receptor alpha-subunits of Mr 128K, intermediate between those of liver (134K) and brain (124K). When solubilized and partially purified on wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) affinity columns, chicken muscle insulin receptors exhibited typical high affinity binding, with approximately 10(-10) M unlabeled insulin producing 50% inhibition of the specific /sup 125/I-insulin binding. WGA purified chicken muscle insulin receptors also exhibited insulin-stimulated autophosphorylation of the beta-subunit, which appeared as phosphorylated bands of 92- and 81K. Both bands were immunoprecipitated by anti-receptor antiserum (B10). WGA purified membranes also demonstrated dose-dependent insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of the exogenous substrate poly(Glu,Tyr)4:1. However, unlike chicken liver, chicken muscle insulin receptor number and tyrosine kinase activity were unaltered by 48 hr of fasting or 48 hr of fasting and 24 hr of refeeding. Thus, despite the presence of insulin receptors in chicken muscle showing normal coupling to receptor tyrosine kinase activity, nutritional alterations modulate these parameters in a tissue-specific manner in chickens.

  13. Challenges in imaging cell surface receptor clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medda, Rebecca; Giske, Arnold; Cavalcanti-Adam, Elisabetta Ada

    2016-01-01

    Super-resolution microscopy offers unique tools for visualizing and resolving cellular structures at the molecular level. STED microscopy is a purely optical method where neither complex sample preparation nor mathematical post-processing is required. Here we present the use of STED microscopy for imaging receptor cluster composition. We use two-color STED to further determine the distribution of two different receptor subunits of the family of receptor serine/threonine kinases in the presence or absence of their ligands. The implications of receptor clustering on the downstream signaling are discussed, and future challenges are also presented.

  14. Collective binding properties of receptor arrays.

    PubMed Central

    Agmon, N; Edelstein, A L

    1997-01-01

    Binding kinetics of receptor arrays can differ dramatically from that of the isolated receptor. We simulate synaptic transmission using a microscopically accurate Brownian dynamics routine. We study the factors governing the rise and decay of the activation probability as a function of the number of transmitter molecules released. Using a realistic receptor array geometry, the simulation reproduces the time course of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents. A consistent interpretation of experimentally observed synaptic currents in terms of rebinding and spatial correlations is discussed. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 PMID:9083663

  15. Human dopamine receptor and its uses

    DOEpatents

    Civelli, Olivier; Van Tol, Hubert Henri-Marie

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is directed toward the isolation, characterization and pharmacological use of the human D4 dopamine receptor. The nucleotide sequence of the gene corresponding to this receptor and alleleic variant thereof are provided by the invention. The invention also includes recombinant eukaryotic expression constructs capable of expressing the human D4 dopamine receptor in cultures of transformed eukaryotic cells. The invention provides cultures of transformed eukaryotic cells which synthesize the human D4 dopamine receptor, and methods for characterizing novel psychotropic compounds using such cultures.

  16. Human olfactory receptor responses to odorants

    PubMed Central

    Mainland, Joel D; Li, Yun R; Zhou, Ting; Liu, Wen Ling L; Matsunami, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    Although the human olfactory system is capable of discriminating a vast number of odors, we do not currently understand what chemical features are encoded by olfactory receptors. In large part this is due to a paucity of data in a search space covering the interactions of hundreds of receptors with billions of odorous molecules. Of the approximately 400 intact human odorant receptors, only 10% have a published ligand. Here we used a heterologous luciferase assay to screen 73 odorants against a clone library of 511 human olfactory receptors. This dataset will allow other researchers to interrogate the combinatorial nature of olfactory coding. PMID:25977809

  17. Identification of receptors for pig endogenous retrovirus

    PubMed Central

    Ericsson, Thomas A.; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro; Templin, Christian; Quinn, Gary; Farhadian, Shelli F.; Wood, James C.; Oldmixon, Beth A.; Suling, Kristen M.; Ishii, Jennifer K.; Kitagawa, Yoshinori; Miyazawa, Takayuki; Salomon, Daniel R.; Weiss, Robin A.; Patience, Clive

    2003-01-01

    Xenotransplantation of porcine tissues has the potential to treat a wide variety of major health problems including organ failure and diabetes. Balanced against the potential benefits of xenotransplantation, however, is the risk of human infection with a porcine microorganism. In particular, the transmission of porcine endogenous retrovirus (PERV) is a major concern [Chapman, L. E. & Bloom, E. T. (2001) J. Am. Med. Assoc. 285, 2304–2306]. Here we report the identification of two, sequence-related, human proteins that act as receptors for PERV-A, encoded by genes located on chromosomes 8 and 17. We also describe homologs from baboon and porcine cells that also are active as receptors. Conversely, activity could not be demonstrated with a syntenic murine receptor homolog. Sequence analysis indicates that PERV-A receptors [human PERV-A receptor (HuPAR)-1, HuPAR-2, baboon PERV-A receptor 2, and porcine PERV-A receptor] are multiple membrane-spanning proteins similar to receptors for other gammaretroviruses. Expression is widespread in human tissues including peripheral blood mononuclear cells, but their biological functions are unknown. The identification of the PERV-A receptors opens avenues of research necessary for a more complete assessment of the retroviral risks of pig to human xenotransplantation. PMID:12740431

  18. Tandem Subunits Effectively Constrain GABAA Receptor Stoichiometry and Recapitulate Receptor Kinetics But Are Insensitive to GABAA Receptor-Associated Protein

    PubMed Central

    Boileau, Andrew J.; Pearce, Robert A.; Czajkowski, Cynthia

    2008-01-01

    GABAergic synapses likely contain multiple GABAA receptor subtypes, making postsynaptic currents difficult to dissect. However, even in heterologous expression systems, analysis of receptors composed of α, β, and γ subunits can be confounded by receptors expressed from α and β subunits alone. To produce recombinant GABAA receptors containing fixed subunit stoichiometry, we coexpressed individual subunits with a “tandem” α1 subunit linked to a β2 subunit. Cotransfection of the γ2 subunit with αβ-tandem subunits in human embryonic kidney 293 cells produced currents that were similar in their macroscopic kinetics, single-channel amplitudes, and pharmacology to overexpression of the γ subunit with nonlinked α1 and β2 subunits. Similarly, expression of α subunits together with αβ-tandem subunits produced receptors having physiological and pharmacological characteristics that closely matched cotransfection of α with β subunits. In this first description of tandem GABAA subunits measured with patch-clamp and rapid agonist application techniques, we conclude that incorporation of αβ-tandem subunits can be used to fix stoichiometry and to establish the intrinsic kinetic properties of α1β2 and α1β2γ2 receptors. We used this method to test whether the accessory protein GABAA receptor-associated protein (GABARAP) alters GABAA receptor properties directly or influences subunit composition. In recombinant receptors with fixed stoichiometry, coexpression of GABARAP-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) fusion protein had no effect on desensitization, deactivation, or diazepam potentiation of GABA-mediated currents. However, in α1β2γ2S transfections in which stoichiometry was not fixed, GABARAP-EGFP altered desensitization, deactivation, and diazepam potentiation of GABA-mediated currents. The data suggest that GABARAP does not alter receptor kinetics directly but by facilitating surface expression of αβγ receptors. PMID:16339017

  19. A second trigeminal CGRP receptor: function and expression of the AMY1 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Christopher S; Eftekhari, Sajedeh; Bower, Rebekah L; Wilderman, Andrea; Insel, Paul A; Edvinsson, Lars; Waldvogel, Henry J; Jamaluddin, Muhammad A; Russo, Andrew F; Hay, Debbie L

    2015-01-01

    Objective The trigeminovascular system plays a central role in migraine, a condition in need of new treatments. The neuropeptide, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), is proposed as causative in migraine and is the subject of intensive drug discovery efforts. This study explores the expression and functionality of two CGRP receptor candidates in the sensory trigeminal system. Methods Receptor expression was determined using Taqman G protein-coupled receptor arrays and immunohistochemistry in trigeminal ganglia (TG) and the spinal trigeminal complex of the brainstem in rat and human. Receptor pharmacology was quantified using sensitive signaling assays in primary rat TG neurons. Results mRNA and histological expression analysis in rat and human samples revealed the presence of two CGRP-responsive receptors (AMY1: calcitonin receptor/receptor activity-modifying protein 1 [RAMP1]) and the CGRP receptor (calcitonin receptor-like receptor/RAMP1). In support of this finding, quantification of agonist and antagonist potencies revealed a dual population of functional CGRP-responsive receptors in primary rat TG neurons. Interpretation The unexpected presence of a functional non-canonical CGRP receptor (AMY1) at neural sites important for craniofacial pain has important implications for targeting the CGRP axis in migraine. PMID:26125036

  20. Evolution of insect olfactory receptors

    PubMed Central

    Missbach, Christine; Dweck, Hany KM; Vogel, Heiko; Vilcinskas, Andreas; Stensmyr, Marcus C; Hansson, Bill S; Grosse-Wilde, Ewald

    2014-01-01

    The olfactory sense detects a plethora of behaviorally relevant odor molecules; gene families involved in olfaction exhibit high diversity in different animal phyla. Insects detect volatile molecules using olfactory (OR) or ionotropic receptors (IR) and in some cases gustatory receptors (GRs). While IRs are expressed in olfactory organs across Protostomia, ORs have been hypothesized to be an adaptation to a terrestrial insect lifestyle. We investigated the olfactory system of the primary wingless bristletail Lepismachilis y-signata (Archaeognatha), the firebrat Thermobia domestica (Zygentoma) and the neopteran leaf insect Phyllium siccifolium (Phasmatodea). ORs and the olfactory coreceptor (Orco) are with very high probability lacking in Lepismachilis; in Thermobia we have identified three Orco candidates, and in Phyllium a fully developed OR/Orco-based system. We suggest that ORs did not arise as an adaptation to a terrestrial lifestyle, but evolved later in insect evolution, with Orco being present before the appearance of ORs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02115.001 PMID:24670956

  1. Antiplatelet therapy: thrombin receptor antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Tello-Montoliu, Antonio; Tomasello, Salvatore D; Ueno, Masafumi; Angiolillo, Dominick J

    2011-01-01

    Activated platelets stimulate thrombus formation in response to rupture of an atherosclerotic plaque or endothelial cell erosion, promoting atherothrombotic disease. Multiple pathways contribute to platelet activation. Aspirin, an irreversible inhibitor of thromboxane A2 synthesis, in combination with clopidogrel, an inhibitor of P2Y12 adenosine diphosphate platelet receptors, represent the current standard-of-care of antiplatelet therapy for patients with acute coronary syndrome and for those undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. Although these agents have demonstrated significant clinical benefit, the increased risk of bleeding and the recurrence of thrombotic events represent substantial limitations. Thrombin is one of the most important platelet activators. The inhibition of protease-activated receptor 1 showed a good safety profile in preclinical studies. In fact, phase II studies with vorapaxar (SCH530348) and atopaxar (E5555) showed no increase of bleeding events in addition to the current standard-of-care of antiplatelet therapy. Although the results of phase III trials for both drugs are awaited, this family is a promising new addition to the current clinical practice for patients with atherothrombotic disease, not only as an alternative, but also as additional therapy. PMID:21906120

  2. Review of receptor model fundamentals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Ronald C.; Lewis, Charles W.; Hopke, Philip K.; Williamson, Hugh J.

    There are several broad classes of mathematical models used to apportion the aerosol measured at a receptor site to its likely sources. This paper surveys the two types applied in exercises for the Mathematical and Empirical Receptor Models Workshop (Quail Roost II): chemical mass balance models and multivariate models. The fundamental principles of each are reviewed. Also considered are the specific models available within each class. These include: tracer element, linear programming, ordinary linear least-squares, effective variance least-squares and ridge regression (all solutions to the chemical mass balance equation), and factor analysis, target transformation factor analysis, multiple linear regression and extended Q-mode factor analysis (all multivariate models). In practical application of chemical mass balance models, a frequent problem is the presence of two or more emission sources whose signatures are very similar. Several techniques to reduce the effects of such multicollinearity are discussed. The propagation of errors for source contribution estimates, another practical concern, also is given special attention.

  3. Nicotinic receptors in addiction pathways.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Frances M; Mojica, Celina Y; Reynaga, Daisy D

    2013-04-01

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are ligand-gated ion channels that consist of pentameric combinations of α and β subunits. These receptors are widely distributed throughout the brain and are highly expressed in addiction circuitry. The role of nAChRs in regulating neuronal activity and motivated behavior is complex and varies both in and among brain regions. The rich diversity of central nAChRs has hampered the characterization of their structure and function with use of classic pharmacological techniques. However, recent molecular approaches using null mutant mice with specific regional lentiviral re-expression, in combination with neuroanatomical and electrophysiological techniques, have allowed the elucidation of the influence of different nAChR types on neuronal circuit activity and behavior. This review will address the influence of nAChRs on limbic dopamine circuitry and the medial habenula-interpeduncular nucleus complex, which are critical mediators of reinforced behavior. Characterization of the mechanisms underlying regulation of addiction pathways by endogenous cholinergic transmission and by nicotine may lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets for treating tobacco dependence and other addictions. PMID:23247824

  4. Alternatively Spliced Androgen Receptor Variants

    PubMed Central

    Dehm, Scott M.; Tindall, Donald J.

    2011-01-01

    Alternative splicing is an important mechanism for increasing functional diversity from a limited set of genes. De-regulation of this process is common in diverse pathologic conditions. The androgen receptor (AR) is a steroid receptor transcription factor with functions critical for normal male development as well as the growth and survival of normal and cancerous prostate tissue. Studies of AR function in androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) and prostate cancer (PCa) have demonstrated loss-of-function AR alterations in AIS, and gain-of-function AR alterations in PCa. Over the past two decades, AR gene alterations have been identified in various individuals with AIS, which disrupt normal AR splicing patterns and yield dysfunctional AR protein variants. More recently, altered AR splicing patterns have been identified as a mechanism of PCa progression and resistance to androgen-depletion therapy. Several studies have described the synthesis of alternatively spliced transcripts encoding truncated AR isoforms that lack the ligand-binding domain, which is the ultimate target of androgen depletion. Many of these truncated AR isoforms function as constitutively active, ligand-independent transcription factors that can support androgen-independent expression of AR target genes, as well as the androgen-independent growth of PCa cells. In this review, we will summarize the various alternatively spliced AR variants that have been discovered, with a focus on their role and origin in the pathologic conditions of AIS and PCa. PMID:21778211

  5. Chemistry and pharmacology of GABAB receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Froestl, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    This chapter presents new clinical applications of the prototypic GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen for the treatment of addiction by drugs of abuse, such as alcohol, cocaine, nicotine, morphine, and heroin, a novel baclofen prodrug Arbaclofen placarbil, the GABA(B) receptor agonist AZD3355 (Lesogabaran) currently in Phase 2 clinical trials for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease, and four positive allosteric modulators of GABA(B) receptors (CGP7930, GS39783, NVP-BHF177, and BHFF), which have less propensity for the development of tolerance due to receptor desensitization than classical GABA(B) receptor agonists. All four compounds showed anxiolytic affects. In the presence of positive allosteric modulators the "classical" GABA(B) receptor antagonists CGP35348 and 2-hydroxy-saclofen showed properties of partial GABA(B) receptor agonists. Seven micromolar affinity GABA(B) receptor antagonists, phaclofen; 2-hydroxy-saclofen; CGP's 35348, 36742, 46381, 51176; and SCH50911, are discussed. CGP36742 (SGS742) showed statistically significant improvements of working memory and attention in a Phase 2 clinical trial in mild, but not in moderate Alzheimer patients. Eight nanomolar affinity GABA(B) receptor antagonists are presented (CGP's 52432, 54626, 55845, 56433, 56999, 61334, 62349, and 63360) that were used by pharmacologists for numerous in vitro and in vivo investigations. CGP's 36742, 51176, 55845, and 56433 showed antidepressant effects. Several compounds are also available as radioligands, such as [(3)H]CGP27492, [(3)H]CGP54626, [(3)H]CGP5699, and [(3)H]CGP62349. Three novel fluorescent and three GABA(B) receptor antagonists with very high specific radioactivity (>2,000 Ci/mmol) are presented. [(125)I]CGP64213 and the photoaffinity ligand [(125)I]CGP71872 allowed the identification of GABA(B1a) and GABA(B1b) receptors in the expression cloning work. PMID:20655477

  6. HSV-1 infection through inhibitory receptor, PILRalpha.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Takeshi; Arase, Hisashi

    2008-06-01

    Paired receptors that consist of highly related activating and inhibitory receptors are widely involved in the regulation of immune response. Several viruses that persistently infect hosts possess genes that encode ligands for inhibitory receptors in order to escape from host immune system. Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is one of the viruses that cause persistent infection. Here, we found that HSV-1-infected cells express a ligand for paired immunoglobulin like-type 2 receptor (PILR)alpha, one of paired inhibitory receptors mainly expressed on myeloid cells such as monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells. Furthermore, we have identified that glycoprotein B (gB), an envelope protein of HSV-1, is a ligand for PILRalpha by mass spectrometry analysis. Because gB is essential for HSV-1 to infect cells, we analyzed function of PILRalpha in HSV-1 infection. When PILRalpha was transfected into CHO-K1 cells, which is resistant to HSV-1 infection, the PILRalpha-transfected CHO-K1 cells became permissive to HSV-1 infection. We further addressed weather PILRalpha is involved in the HSV-1 infection of primary human cells. CD14-positive monocytes that express both PILRalpha and HVEM, a glycoprotein D receptor, were susceptible to HSV-1 infection. In contrast, HSV-1 did not infect CD14-negative lymphocytes that express HVEM but not PILRalpha. Furthermore, HSV-1 infection of monocyte was blocked by both anti-PILRalpha mAb and anti-HVEM antiserum. These findings indicated that both gB and gD receptors play an important role in HSV-1 infection. We have shown, for the first time, that viruses use an inhibitory immune receptor to enter a cell. Invasion into hematopoietic cells by using inhibitory receptors should be beneficial to the virus because binding to inhibitory receptors may not only provide entry, but also trigger the inhibitory receptor to suppress the immune functions of the infected cell. PMID:19122386

  7. Calcium-sensing receptor 20 years later

    PubMed Central

    Alfadda, Tariq I.; Saleh, Ahmad M. A.; Houillier, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) has played an important role as a target in the treatment of a variety of disease states over the past 20 plus years. In this review, we give an overview of the receptor at the cellular level and then provide details as to how this receptor has been targeted to modulate cellular ion transport mechanisms. As a member of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family, it has a high degree of homology with a variety of other members in this class, which could explain why this receptor has been identified in so many different tissues throughout the body. This diversity of locations sets it apart from other members of the family and may explain how the receptor interacts with so many different organ systems in the body to modulate the physiology and pathophysiology. The receptor is unique in that it has two large exofacial lobes that sit in the extracellular environment and sense changes in a wide variety of environmental cues including salinity, pH, amino acid concentration, and polyamines to name just a few. It is for this reason that there has been a great deal of research associated with normal receptor physiology over the past 20 years. With the ongoing research, in more recent years a focus on the pathophysiology has emerged and the effects of receptor mutations on cellular and organ physiology have been identified. We hope that this review will enhance and update the knowledge about the importance of this receptor and stimulate future potential investigations focused around this receptor in cellular, organ, and systemic physiology and pathophysiology. PMID:24871857

  8. Receptor Activity-modifying Proteins 2 and 3 Generate Adrenomedullin Receptor Subtypes with Distinct Molecular Properties.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Harriet A; Chakravarthy, Madhuri; Abhayawardana, Rekhati S; Gingell, Joseph J; Garelja, Michael; Pardamwar, Meenakshi; McElhinney, James M W R; Lathbridge, Alex; Constantine, Arran; Harris, Paul W R; Yuen, Tsz-Ying; Brimble, Margaret A; Barwell, James; Poyner, David R; Woolley, Michael J; Conner, Alex C; Pioszak, Augen A; Reynolds, Christopher A; Hay, Debbie L

    2016-05-27

    Adrenomedullin (AM) is a peptide hormone with numerous effects in the vascular systems. AM signals through the AM1 and AM2 receptors formed by the obligate heterodimerization of a G protein-coupled receptor, the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR), and receptor activity-modifying proteins 2 and 3 (RAMP2 and RAMP3), respectively. These different CLR-RAMP interactions yield discrete receptor pharmacology and physiological effects. The effective design of therapeutics that target the individual AM receptors is dependent on understanding the molecular details of the effects of RAMPs on CLR. To understand the role of RAMP2 and -3 on the activation and conformation of the CLR subunit of AM receptors, we mutated 68 individual amino acids in the juxtamembrane region of CLR, a key region for activation of AM receptors, and determined the effects on cAMP signaling. Sixteen CLR mutations had differential effects between the AM1 and AM2 receptors. Accompanying this, independent molecular modeling of the full-length AM-bound AM1 and AM2 receptors predicted differences in the binding pocket and differences in the electrostatic potential of the two AM receptors. Druggability analysis indicated unique features that could be used to develop selective small molecule ligands for each receptor. The interaction of RAMP2 or RAMP3 with CLR induces conformational variation in the juxtamembrane region, yielding distinct binding pockets, probably via an allosteric mechanism. These subtype-specific differences have implications for the design of therapeutics aimed at specific AM receptors and for understanding the mechanisms by which accessory proteins affect G protein-coupled receptor function. PMID:27013657

  9. Receptor Activity-modifying Proteins 2 and 3 Generate Adrenomedullin Receptor Subtypes with Distinct Molecular Properties*

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Harriet A.; Chakravarthy, Madhuri; Abhayawardana, Rekhati S.; Gingell, Joseph J.; Garelja, Michael; Pardamwar, Meenakshi; McElhinney, James M. W. R.; Lathbridge, Alex; Constantine, Arran; Harris, Paul W. R.; Yuen, Tsz-Ying; Brimble, Margaret A.; Barwell, James; Poyner, David R.; Woolley, Michael J.; Conner, Alex C.; Pioszak, Augen A.; Reynolds, Christopher A.

    2016-01-01

    Adrenomedullin (AM) is a peptide hormone with numerous effects in the vascular systems. AM signals through the AM1 and AM2 receptors formed by the obligate heterodimerization of a G protein-coupled receptor, the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR), and receptor activity-modifying proteins 2 and 3 (RAMP2 and RAMP3), respectively. These different CLR-RAMP interactions yield discrete receptor pharmacology and physiological effects. The effective design of therapeutics that target the individual AM receptors is dependent on understanding the molecular details of the effects of RAMPs on CLR. To understand the role of RAMP2 and -3 on the activation and conformation of the CLR subunit of AM receptors, we mutated 68 individual amino acids in the juxtamembrane region of CLR, a key region for activation of AM receptors, and determined the effects on cAMP signaling. Sixteen CLR mutations had differential effects between the AM1 and AM2 receptors. Accompanying this, independent molecular modeling of the full-length AM-bound AM1 and AM2 receptors predicted differences in the binding pocket and differences in the electrostatic potential of the two AM receptors. Druggability analysis indicated unique features that could be used to develop selective small molecule ligands for each receptor. The interaction of RAMP2 or RAMP3 with CLR induces conformational variation in the juxtamembrane region, yielding distinct binding pockets, probably via an allosteric mechanism. These subtype-specific differences have implications for the design of therapeutics aimed at specific AM receptors and for understanding the mechanisms by which accessory proteins affect G protein-coupled receptor function. PMID:27013657

  10. 03 SOURCE APPORTIONMENT/RECEPTOR MODELING:OBM FOCUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Source apportionment (receptor) models are mathematical procedures for identifying and quantifying the sources of ambient air pollutants and their effects at a site (the receptor), primarily on the basis of species concentration measurements at the receptor, and generally without...

  11. Nuclear receptors and pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Polvani, Simone; Tarocchi, Mirko; Tempesti, Sara; Galli, Andrea

    2014-09-14

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a devastating disease with a median overall survival time of 5 mo and the five years survival less than 5%, a rate essentially unchanged over the course of the years. A well defined progression model of accumulation of genetic alterations ranging from single point mutations to gross chromosomal abnormalities has been introduced to describe the origin of this disease. However, due to the its subtle nature and concurring events PDAC cure remains elusive. Nuclear receptors (NR) are members of a large superfamily of evolutionarily conserved ligand-regulated DNA-binding transcription factors functionally involved in important cellular functions ranging from regulation of metabolism, to growth and development. Given the nature of their ligands, NR are very tempting drug targets and their pharmacological modulation has been widely exploited for the treatment of metabolic and inflammatory diseases. There are now clear evidences that both classical ligand-activated and orphan NR are involved in the pathogenesis of PDAC from its very early stages; nonetheless many aspects of their role are not fully understood. The purpose of this review is to highlight the striking connections that link peroxisome proliferator activated receptors, retinoic acid receptors, retinoid X receptor, androgen receptor, estrogen receptors and the orphan NR Nur, chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor II and the liver receptor homologue-1 receptor to PDAC development, connections that could lead to the identification of novel therapies for this disease. PMID:25232244

  12. Teaching Receptor Theory to Biochemistry Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benore-Parsons, Marilee; Sufka, Kenneth J.

    2003-01-01

    Receptor:ligand interactions account for numerous reactions critical to biochemistry and molecular biology. While students are typically exposed to some examples, such as hemoglobin binding of oxygen and signal transduction pathways, the topic could easily be expanded. Theory and kinetic analysis, types of receptors, and the experimental assay…

  13. Opioid receptor trafficking and interaction in nociceptors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, X; Bao, L; Li, S

    2015-01-01

    Opiate analgesics such as morphine are often used for pain therapy. However, antinociceptive tolerance and dependence may develop with long-term use of these drugs. It was found that μ-opioid receptors can interact with δ-opioid receptors, and morphine antinociceptive tolerance can be reduced by blocking δ-opioid receptors. Recent studies have shown that μ- and δ-opioid receptors are co-expressed in a considerable number of small neurons in the dorsal root ganglion. The interaction of μ-opioid receptors with δ-opioid receptors in the nociceptive afferents is facilitated by the stimulus-induced cell-surface expression of δ-opioid receptors, and contributes to morphine tolerance. Further analysis of the molecular, cellular and neural circuit mechanisms that regulate the trafficking and interaction of opioid receptors and related signalling molecules in the pain pathway would help to elucidate the mechanism of opiate analgesia and improve pain therapy. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2 PMID:24611685

  14. Allosterism at muscarinic receptors: ligands and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Birdsall, N J M; Lazareno, S

    2005-06-01

    The evaluation of allosteric ligands at muscarinic receptors is discussed in terms of the ability of the experimental data to be interpreted by the allosteric ternary complex model. The compilation of useful SAR information of allosteric ligands is not simple, especially for muscarinic receptors, where there are multiple allosteric sites and complex interactions. PMID:15974931

  15. Thermogenic characterization of ghrelin receptor null mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ghrelin is the only known circulating orexigenic hormone that increases food intake and promotes adiposity, and these physiological functions of ghrelin are mediated through its receptor growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R). Ghrelin/GHS-R signaling plays a crucial role in energy homeostasis....

  16. Regulation of chemotactic networks by 'atypical' receptors.

    PubMed

    Comerford, Iain; Litchfield, Wendel; Harata-Lee, Yuka; Nibbs, Robert J B; McColl, Shaun R

    2007-03-01

    Directed cell migration is a fundamental component of numerous biological systems and is critical to the pathology of many diseases. Although the importance of secreted chemoattractant factors in providing navigational cues to migrating cells bearing specific chemoattractant receptors is now well-established, how the function of these factors is regulated is not so well understood and may be of key importance to the design of new therapeutics for numerous human diseases. While regulation of migration clearly takes place on a number of different levels, it is becoming clear that so-called 'atypical' receptors play a role in scavenging, or altering the localisation of, chemoattractant molecules such as chemokines and complement components. These receptors do this through binding and/or internalising their chemoattractant ligands without activating signal transduction cascades leading to cell migration. The atypical chemokine receptor family currently comprises the receptors D6, DARC and CCX-CKR. In this review, we discuss the evidence from in vitro and in vivo studies that these receptors play a role in regulating cell migration, and speculate that other orphan receptors may also belong to this family. Furthermore, with the advent of gene therapy on the horizon, the therapeutic potential of these receptors in human disease is also considered. PMID:17295321

  17. Chemokine sequestration by atypical chemokine receptors.

    PubMed

    Hansell, C A H; Simpson, C V; Nibbs, R J B

    2006-12-01

    Leucocyte migration is essential for robust immune and inflammatory responses, and plays a critical role in many human diseases. Chemokines, a family of small secreted protein chemoattractants, are of fundamental importance in this process, directing leucocyte trafficking by signalling through heptahelical G-protein-coupled receptors expressed by the migrating cells. However, several mammalian chemokine receptors, including D6 and CCX-CKR (ChemoCentryx chemokine receptor), do not fit existing models of chemokine receptor function, and do not even appear to signal in response to chemokine binding. Instead, these 'atypical' chemokine receptors are biochemically specialized for chemokine sequestration, acting to regulate chemokine bioavailability and thereby influence responses through signalling-competent chemokine receptors. This is of critical importance in vivo, as mice lacking D6 show exaggerated cutaneous inflammatory responses and an increased susceptibility to the development of skin cancer. CCX-CKR, on the other hand, is predicted to modulate homoeostatic lymphocyte and dendritic cell trafficking, key migratory events in acquired immune responses that are directed by CCX-CKR-binding chemokines. Thus studies on 'atypical' chemokine receptors are revealing functional and biochemical diversity within the chemokine receptor family and providing insights into novel mechanisms of chemokine regulation. PMID:17073739

  18. In vivo studies of opiate receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, J.J.; Dannals, R.F.; Duelfer, T.; Burns, H.D.; Ravert, H.T.; Langstroem, B.; Balasubramanian, V.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    To study opiate receptors noninvasively in vivo using positron emission tomography, techniques for preferentially labeling opiate receptors in vivo can be used. The rate at which receptor-bound ligand clears from the brain in vivo can be predicted by measuring the equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) at 37 degrees C in the presence of 100 mM sodium chloride and 100 microM guanyl-5'-imidodiphosphate, the drug distribution coefficient, and the molecular weight. A suitable ligand for labeling opiate receptors in vivo is diprenorphine, which binds to mu, delta, and kappa receptors with approximately equal affinity in vitro. However, in vivo diprenorphine may bind predominantly to one opiate receptor subtype, possibly the mu receptor. To predict the affinity for binding to the opiate receptor, a Hansch correlation was determined between the 50% inhibitory concentration for a series of halogen-substituted fentanyl analogs and electronic, lipophilic, and steric parameters. Radiochemical methods for the synthesis of carbon-11-labeled diprenorphine and lofentanil are presented.

  19. ALT telomeres get together with nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Aeby, Eric; Lingner, Joachim

    2015-02-26

    Nuclear receptors bind chromosome ends in "alternative lengthening of telomeres" (ALT) cancer cells that maintain their ends by homologous recombination instead of telomerase. Marzec et al. now demonstrate that, in ALT cells, nuclear receptors not only trigger distal chromatin associations to mediate telomere-telomere recombination events, but also drive chromosome-internal targeted telomere insertions (TTI). PMID:25723159

  20. Neurosteroids and GABA-A Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingde

    2011-01-01

    Neurosteroids represent a class of endogenous steroids that are synthesized in the brain, the adrenals, and the gonads and have potent and selective effects on the GABAA-receptor. 3α-hydroxy A-ring reduced metabolites of progesterone, deoxycorticosterone, and testosterone are positive modulators of GABAA-receptor in a non-genomic manner. Allopregnanolone (3α-OH-5α-pregnan-20-one), 5α-androstane-3α, 17α-diol (Adiol), and 3α5α-tetrahydrodeoxycorticosterone (3α5α-THDOC) enhance the GABA-mediated Cl- currents acting on a site (or sites) distinct from the GABA, benzodiazepine, barbiturate, and picrotoxin binding sites. 3α5α-P and 3α5α-THDOC potentiate synaptic GABAA-receptor function and activate δ-subunit containing extrasynaptic receptors that mediate tonic currents. On the contrary, 3β-OH pregnane steroids and pregnenolone sulfate (PS) are GABAA-receptor antagonists and induce activation-dependent inhibition of the receptor. The activities of neurosteroid are dependent on brain regions and types of neurons. In addition to the slow genomic action of the parent steroids, the non-genomic, and rapid actions of neurosteroids play a significant role in the GABAA-receptor function and shift in mood and memory function. This review describes molecular mechanisms underlying neurosteroid action on the GABAA-receptor, mood changes, and cognitive functions. PMID:22654809

  1. [Innate immunity, Toll receptor and sepsis].

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Esper, Raúl

    2003-01-01

    The innate immune response is the first line of defense against infection. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognize bacterial lipopolysaccharide and other pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Intracellular signals initiated by interaction between Toll receptors and specific PAMPs results in inflammatory response. Sepsis and septic shock are the result of an exaggerated inflammatory systemic response induced by innate immune dysregulation. PMID:14617415

  2. Silent, fluorescent labeling of native neuronal receptors.

    PubMed

    Vytla, Devaiah; Combs-Bachmann, Rosamund E; Hussey, Amanda M; Hafez, Ismail; Chambers, James J

    2011-10-21

    We have developed a minimally-perturbing strategy that enables labeling and subcellular visualization of endogenous dendritic receptors on live, wild-type neurons. Specifically, calcium-permeable non-NMDA glutamate receptors expressed in hippocampal neurons can be targeted with this novel synthetic tri-functional molecule. This ligand-directed probe was targeted towards AMPA receptors and bears an electrophilic group for covalent bond formation with an amino acid side chain on the extracellular side of the ion channel. This molecule was designed in such a way that the use-dependent, polyamine-based ligand accumulates the chemically-reactive group at the extracellular side of these polyamine-sensitive receptors, thereby allowing covalent bond formation between an electrophilic moiety on the nanoprobe and a nucleophilic amino acid sidechain on the receptor. Bioconjugation of this molecule results in a stable covalent bond between the nanoprobe and the target receptor. Subsequent photolysis of a portion of the nanoprobe may then be employed to effect ligand release allowing the receptor to re-enter the non-liganded state, all the while retaining the fluorescent beacon for visualization. This technology allows for rapid fluorescent labeling of native polyamine-sensitive receptors and further advances the field of fluorescent labeling of native biological molecules. PMID:21897969

  3. Physiology and pathology of NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Petrović, M; Horák, M; Sedlácek, M; Vyklický, L

    2005-01-01

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subtype are highly expressed in the central nervous system and are involved in excitatory synaptic transmission and synaptic plasticity. Prolonged activation of NMDA receptors can lead to excitotoxicity, which is implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodegeneration occurring in various acute and chronic disorders of the central nervous system. Recent advances in understanding the function, pharmacology, genetics and structure of NMDA receptors has promoted a search for new compounds that could be therapeutically used. These compounds act on agonist binding sites, either apart from them or directly within the ion channel pore. Members of the last group are called open channel blockers, and some of them, such as memantine and ketamine, are already clinically used. Kinetic modeling of NMDA receptor activity was employed to define the effects of various groups of modulators. Quantifying the action of these substances by kinetic parameters can help us to reveal the molecular mechanism of action at the receptor and to characterize the dependence of its action on the mode of NMDA receptor activation. Two modes are considered: phasic activation, induced by synaptically released glutamate, and tonic activation, which is expected to occur under pathological conditions when low, but sustained levels of glutamate activate NMDA receptors. The aim of our review is to summarize the recent data about the structural and functional properties of NMDA receptors and their role in long-term potentiation and excitotoxicity. PMID:16315761

  4. Gβ promotes pheromone receptor polarization and yeast chemotropism by inhibiting receptor phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Ismael, Amber; Tian, Wei; Waszczak, Nicholas; Wang, Xin; Cao, Youfang; Suchkov, Dmitry; Bar, Eli; Metodiev, Metodi V; Liang, Jie; Arkowitz, Robert A; Stone, David E

    2016-01-01

    Gradient-directed cell migration (chemotaxis) and growth (chemotropism) are processes that are essential to the development and life cycles of all species. Cells use surface receptors to sense the shallow chemical gradients that elicit chemotaxis and chemotropism. Slight asymmetries in receptor activation are amplified by downstream signaling systems, which ultimately induce dynamic reorganization of the cytoskeleton. During the mating response of budding yeast, a model chemotropic system, the pheromone receptors on the plasma membrane polarize to the side of the cell closest to the stimulus. Although receptor polarization occurs before and independently of actin cable-dependent delivery of vesicles to the plasma membrane (directed secretion), it requires receptor internalization. Phosphorylation of pheromone receptors by yeast casein kinase 1 or 2 (Yck1/2) stimulates their internalization. We showed that the pheromone-responsive Gβγ dimer promotes the polarization of the pheromone receptor by interacting with Yck1/2 and locally inhibiting receptor phosphorylation. We also found that receptor phosphorylation is essential for chemotropism, independently of its role in inducing receptor internalization. A mathematical model supports the idea that the interaction between Gβγ and Yck1/2 results in differential phosphorylation and internalization of the pheromone receptor and accounts for its polarization before the initiation of directed secretion. PMID:27072657

  5. Autocrine endocannabinoid signaling through CB1 receptors potentiates OX1 orexin receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Jäntti, Maria H; Putula, Jaana; Turunen, Pauli M; Näsman, Johnny; Reijonen, Sami; Lindqvist, Christer; Kukkonen, Jyrki P

    2013-03-01

    It has been proposed that OX(1) orexin receptors and CB(1) cannabinoid receptors can form heteromeric complexes, which affect the trafficking of OX(1) receptors and potentiate OX(1) receptor signaling to extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). We have recently shown that OX(1) receptor activity releases high levels of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG), suggesting an alternative route for OX(1)-CB(1) receptor interaction in signaling, for instance, in retrograde synaptic transmission. In the current study, we set out to investigate this possibility utilizing recombinant Chinese hamster ovary K1 cells. 2-AG released from OX(1) receptor-expressing cells acted as a potent paracrine messenger stimulating ERK activity in neighboring CB(1) receptor-expressing cells. When OX(1) and CB(1) receptors were expressed in the same cells, OX(1) stimulation-induced ERK phosphorylation and activity were strongly potentiated. The potentiation but not the OX(1) response as such was fully abolished by specific inhibition of CB(1) receptors or the enzyme responsible for 2-AG generation, diacylglycerol lipase (DAGL). Although the results do not exclude the previously proposed OX(1)-CB(1) heteromerization, they nevertheless unequivocally identify DAGL-dependent 2-AG generation as the pivotal determinant of the OX(1)-CB(1) synergism and thus suggest a functional rather than a molecular interaction of OX(1) and CB(1) receptors. PMID:23233488

  6. [Interactions between dopamine receptor and NMDA/type A γ-aminobutyric acid receptors].

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui-Ying; Wei, Ting-Jia; Weng, Jing-Jin; Qin, Jiang-Yuan; Huang, Xi; Su, Ji-Ping

    2016-04-25

    Type A γ-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABAAR) and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) are the major inhibitory and excitatory receptors in the central nervous system, respectively. Co-expression of the receptors in the synapse may lead to functional influence between receptors, namely receptor interaction. The interactions between GABAAR and NMDAR can be either positive or negative. However, the mechanisms of interaction between the two receptors remain poorly understood, and potential mechanisms include (1) through a second messenger; (2) by receptors trafficking; (3) by direct interaction; (4) by a third receptor-mediation. Dopamine is the most abundant catecholamine neurotransmitter in the brain, and its receptors, dopamine receptors (DR) can activate multiple signaling pathways. Earlier studies on the interaction between DR and GABAAR/NMDAR have shown some underlying mechanisms, suggesting that DR could mediate the interaction between GABAAR and NMDAR. This paper summarized some recent progresses in the studies of the interaction between DR and NMDAR/GABAAR, providing a further understanding on the interaction between NMDAR and GABAAR mediated by DR. PMID:27108906

  7. Human neuroepithelial cells express NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Christopher D; Fowler, M; Jackson, T H; Houghton, J; Warren, A; Nanda, A; Chandler, I; Cappell, B; Long, A; Minagar, A; Alexander, J S

    2003-11-13

    L-glutamate, an excitatory neurotransmitter, binds to both ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors. In certain parts of the brain the BBB contains two normally impermeable barriers: 1) cerebral endothelial barrier and 2) cerebral epithelial barrier. Human cerebral endothelial cells express NMDA receptors; however, to date, human cerebral epithelial cells (neuroepithelial cells) have not been shown to express NMDA receptor message or protein. In this study, human hypothalamic sections were examined for NMDA receptors (NMDAR) expression via immunohistochemistry and murine neuroepithelial cell line (V1) were examined for NMDAR via RT-PCR and Western analysis. We found that human cerebral epithelium express protein and cultured mouse neuroepithelial cells express both mRNA and protein for the NMDA receptor. These findings may have important consequences for neuroepithelial responses during excitotoxicity and in disease. PMID:14614784

  8. Alternative Mechanisms of Immune Receptor Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Litman, Gary W.; Dishaw, Larry J.; Cannon, John P.; Haire, Robert N.; Rast, Jonathan P.

    2007-01-01

    Our views of both innate and adaptive immunity have been significantly modified by recent studies of immune receptors and immunity in protostomes, invertebrate deuterostomes and jawless vertebrates. Extraordinary variation in the means whereby organisms recognize pathogens has been revealed by a series of recent findings, including: novel forms of familiar immune receptors, high genetic polymorphism for new receptor types, germline rearrangement for non-Ig domain receptors, somatic variation of germline-encoded receptors and unusually complex alternative splicing of genes with both immune and non-immune roles. Collectively, these observations underscore pathways in the evolution of immune recognition and suggest universal processes by which immune systems co-opt and integrate existing cellular mechanisms to effect diverse recognition functions. PMID:17703932

  9. G-protein-coupled receptor heteromer dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Vilardaga, Jean-Pierre; Agnati, Luigi F.; Fuxe, Kjell; Ciruela, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent the largest family of cell surface receptors, and have evolved to detect and transmit a large palette of extracellular chemical and sensory signals into cells. Activated receptors catalyze the activation of heterotrimeric G proteins, which modulate the propagation of second messenger molecules and the activity of ion channels. Classically thought to signal as monomers, different GPCRs often pair up with each other as homo- and heterodimers, which have been shown to modulate signaling to G proteins. Here, we discuss recent advances in GPCR heteromer systems involving the kinetics of the early steps in GPCR signal transduction, the dynamic property of receptor–receptor interactions, and how the formation of receptor heteromers modulate the kinetics of G-protein signaling. PMID:21123619

  10. [Beta-adrenergic receptor blocker poisoning].

    PubMed

    Reingardiene, Dagmara

    2007-01-01

    Beta-adrenergic receptor blocking drugs are used in the treatment of hypertension, angina, myocardial infarction, cardiac dysrhythmia, cardiomyopathy, migraine headache, thyrotoxicosis, and glaucoma. beta-adrenergic receptor blocking agents are competitive antagonist at beta(1), beta(2), or both types of adrenergic receptors. Overdoses of beta-adrenergic receptor blockers are uncommon, but are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. This review article discusses the properties of beta-adrenergic receptor blockers, presents the doses of these drugs causing toxicity and doses, after ingestion of which, referral to an emergency department is recommended. Clinical presentation of overdose (the cardiovascular, neurologic manifestations, pulmonary and other complications), diagnosis, and treatment (gastrointestinal decontamination; the usage of atropine, phosphodiesterase inhibitors, glucagon, insulin; indications for cardiac pacing, extracorporeal procedures of drug removal, etc.) are analyzed. In addition, this article focuses on clinical course and prognosis of beta-blocker overdose. PMID:17768375

  11. How receptor diffusion influences gradient sensing

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, H.; Dayan, P.; Goodhill, G. J.

    2015-01-01

    Chemotaxis, or directed motion in chemical gradients, is critical for various biological processes. Many eukaryotic cells perform spatial sensing, i.e. they detect gradients by comparing spatial differences in binding occupancy of chemosensory receptors across their membrane. In many theoretical models of spatial sensing, it is assumed, for the sake of simplicity, that the receptors concerned do not move. However, in reality, receptors undergo diverse modes of diffusion, and can traverse considerable distances in the time it takes such cells to turn in an external gradient. This sets a physical limit on the accuracy of spatial sensing, which we explore using a model in which receptors diffuse freely over the membrane. We find that the Fisher information carried in binding and unbinding events decreases monotonically with the diffusion constant of the receptors. PMID:25551145

  12. Novel Identified Receptors on Mast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Migalovich-Sheikhet, Helena; Friedman, Sheli; Mankuta, David; Levi-Schaffer, Francesca

    2012-01-01

    Mast cells (MC) are major participants in the allergic reaction. In addition they possess immunomodulatory roles in the innate and adaptive immune reactions. Their functions are modulated through a number of activating and inhibitory receptors expressed on their surface. This review deals with some of the most recently described receptors, their expression patterns, ligand(s), signal transduction mechanisms, possible cross-talk with other receptors and, last but not least, regulatory functions that the MC can perform based on their receptor expression in health or in disease. Where the receptor role on MC is still not clear, evidences from other hematopoietic cells expressing them is provided as a possible insight for their function on MC. Suggested strategies to modulate these receptors’ activity for the purpose of therapeutic intervention are also discussed. PMID:22876248

  13. The Ror receptor tyrosine kinase family.

    PubMed

    Forrester, W C

    2002-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) participate in numerous developmental decisions. Ror RTKs are a family of orphan receptors that are related to muscle specific kinase (MuSK) and Trk neurotrophin receptors. MuSK assembles acetylcholine receptors at the neuromuscular junction, and Trk receptors function in the developing nervous system (reviewed in [3-5]). Rors have been identified in nematodes, insects and mammals. Recent studies have begun to shed light on Ror function during development. In most species, Rors are expressed in many tissue types during development. Analyses of mutants that are defective in the single nematode Ror demonstrate a role in cell migration and in orienting cell polarity. Mice lacking one of the two Ror gene products display defects in bone and heart formation. Similarly, two different human bone development disorders, dominant brachydactyly B and recessive Robinow syndrome, result from mutations in one of the human Ror genes. PMID:11846036

  14. Ghrelin Receptor Mutations and Human Obesity.

    PubMed

    Wang, W; Tao, Y-X

    2016-01-01

    Growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR) was originally identified as an orphan receptor in porcine and rat anterior pituitary membranes. In 1999, GHSR was deorphanized and shown to be a receptor for ghrelin, a peptide hormone secreted from the stomach. Therefore, GHSR is also called ghrelin receptor. In addition to regulating growth hormone secretion, ghrelin receptor regulates various physiological processes, including food intake and energy expenditure, glucose metabolism, cardiovascular functions, gastric acid secretion and motility, and immune function. Several human genetic studies conducted in populations originated from Europe, Africa, South America, and East Asia identified rare mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms that might be associated with human obesity and short stature. Functional analyses of mutant GHSRs reveal multiple defects, including cell surface expression, ligand binding, and basal and stimulated signaling. With growing understanding in the functionality of naturally occurring GHSR mutations, potential therapeutic strategies including pharmacological chaperones and novel ligands could be used to correct the GHSR mutants. PMID:27288828

  15. Colocalization of synaptic GABA(C)-receptors with GABA (A)-receptors and glycine-receptors in the rodent central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Frazao, Renata; Nogueira, Maria Ines; Wässle, Heinz

    2007-10-01

    Fast inhibition in the nervous system is preferentially mediated by GABA- and glycine-receptors. Two types of ionotropic GABA-receptor, the GABA(A)-receptor and GABA(C)-receptor, have been identified; they have specific molecular compositions, different sensitivities to GABA, different kinetics, and distinct pharmacological profiles. We have studied, by immunocytochemistry, the synaptic localization of glycine-, GABA(A)-, and GABA(C)-receptors in rodent retina, spinal cord, midbrain, and brain-stem. Antibodies specific for the alpha1 subunit of the glycine-receptor, the gamma2 subunit of the GABA(A)-receptor, and the rho subunits of the GABA(C)-receptor have been applied. Using double-immunolabeling, we have determined whether these receptors are expressed at the same postsynaptic sites. In the retina, no such colocalization was observed. However, in the spinal cord, we found the colocalization of glycine-receptors with GABA(A)- or GABA(C)-receptors and the colocalization of GABA(A)- and GABA(C)-receptors in approximately 25% of the synapses. In the midbrain and brain-stem, GABA(A)- and GABA(C)-receptors were colocalized in 10%-15% of the postsynaptic sites. We discuss the possible expression of heteromeric (hybrid) receptors assembled from GABA(A)- and GABA(C)-receptor subunits. Our results suggest that GABA(A)- and GABA(C)-receptors are colocalized in a minority of synapses of the central nervous system. PMID:17610086

  16. Solution assembly of cytokine receptor ectodomain complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Zining; Ciardelli, T.L.; Johnson, K.W.

    1995-09-01

    For the majority of single transmembrane-spanning cell surface receptors, signal transmission across the lipid bilayer barrier involves several discrete components of molecular recognition. The interaction between ligand and the extracellular segment of its cognate receptor (ectodomain) initiates either homomeric or heteromeric association of receptor subunits. Specific recognition among these subunits may then occur between ectodomain regions, within the membrane by interhelical contact or inside the cell between cytoplasmic domains. Any or all of these interactions may contribute to the stability of the signaling complex. It is the characteristics of ligand binding by the ectodomains of these receptors that controls the heteromeric or homomeric nature and the stoichiometry of the complex. Cytokines and their receptors belong to a growing family of macromolecular systems that exhibit these functional features and share many structural similarities as well. Interleukin-2 is a multifunctional cytokine that represents, perhaps, the most complex example to date of ligand recognition among the hematopoietin receptor family. It is the cooperative binding of IL-2 by all three proteins on the surface of activated T-lymphocytes, however, that ultimately results in crosslinking of the {beta}- and {gamma}-subunits and signaling via association of their cytoplasmic domains. Although the high-affinity IL-2R functions as a heterotrimer, heterodimers of the receptor subunits are also physiologically important. The {alpha}/{beta} heterodimer or {open_quotes}pseudo-high affinity{close_quotes} receptor captures IL-2 as a preformed cell surface complex while the {beta}/{gamma} intermediate affinity site exists, in the absence of the {alpha} subunit, on the majority of natural killer cells. We have begun to study stable complexes of cytokine receptor ectodomains of defined composition and that mimic the ligand binding characteristics of the equivalent cell surface receptor sites.

  17. Characterization of prostanoid receptors in podocytes.

    PubMed

    Bek, M; Nüsing, R; Kowark, P; Henger, A; Mundel, P; Pavenstädt, H

    1999-10-01

    Prostaglandins participate in the regulation of important glomerular functions and are involved in the pathogenesis of glomerular diseases. This study investigates the influence of prostaglandins on membrane voltage, ion conductances, cAMP accumulation, and cytosolic calcium activity ([Ca2+]i) in differentiated podocytes. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) caused a concentration-dependent depolarization and an increase of the whole cell conductance in podocytes (EC50 approximately 50 nM). Compared with PGE2, the EP2/EP3/EP4 receptor agonist 11-deoxy-PGE1 caused an equipotent depolarization, whereas the DP receptor agonist BW 245 C, the EP1/EP3 receptor agonist sulprostone, and the IP receptor agonist iloprost were at least 100 to 1000 times less potent than PGE2. The EP2 receptor agonist butaprost did not change membrane voltage of podocytes. The depolarizing effect of PGE2 was increased in an extracellular solution with a reduced Cl- concentration (from 145 to 32 mM). PGE2 and the prostaglandin agonists, but not the IP receptor agonist iloprost and the EP2 receptor agonist butaprost, induced a time- and concentration-dependent cAMP accumulation in podocytes. In fura-2 fluorescence experiments, PGE2, sulprostone, PGF2alpha, fluprostenol (a potent FP agonist), and U-46619 (a selective thromboxane A2 agonist) induced a biphasic increase of [Ca2+]i in 60 to 80% of podocytes. In reverse transcription-PCR studies, podocyte mRNA for the EP1, EP4, FP, and TP receptor could be amplified. These data indicate that in podocytes, PGE2 regulates distinct cellular functions via the EP1 and EP4 receptor, thereby increasing [Ca2+]i and cAMP, respectively. Furthermore, PGF1alpha and U-46619 increase [Ca2+]i via their specific receptors. PMID:10505684

  18. Orexin/hypocretin receptor signalling cascades

    PubMed Central

    Kukkonen, JP; Leonard, CS

    2014-01-01

    Orexin (hypocretin) peptides and their two known G-protein-coupled receptors play essential roles in sleep–wake control and powerfully influence other systems regulating appetite/metabolism, stress and reward. Consequently, drugs that influence signalling by these receptors may provide novel therapeutic opportunities for treating sleep disorders, obesity and addiction. It is therefore critical to understand how these receptors operate, the nature of the signalling cascades they engage and their physiological targets. In this review, we evaluate what is currently known about orexin receptor signalling cascades, while a sister review (Leonard & Kukkonen, this issue) focuses on tissue-specific responses. The evidence suggests that orexin receptor signalling is multifaceted and is substantially more diverse than originally thought. Indeed, orexin receptors are able to couple to members of at least three G-protein families and possibly other proteins, through which they regulate non-selective cation channels, phospholipases, adenylyl cyclase, and protein and lipid kinases. In the central nervous system, orexin receptors produce neuroexcitation by postsynaptic depolarization via activation of non-selective cation channels, inhibition of K+ channels and activation of Na+/Ca2+ exchange, but they also can stimulate the release of neurotransmitters by presynaptic actions and modulate synaptic plasticity. Ca2+ signalling is also prominently influenced by these receptors, both via the classical phospholipase C−Ca2+ release pathway and via Ca2+ influx, mediated by several pathways. Upon longer-lasting stimulation, plastic effects are observed in some cell types, while others, especially cancer cells, are stimulated to die. Thus, orexin receptor signals appear highly tunable, depending on the milieu in which they are operating. Linked ArticlesThis article is part of a themed section on Orexin Receptors. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10

  19. Internalization and desensitization of adenosine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Klaasse, Elisabeth C.; de Grip, Willem J.; Beukers, Margot W.

    2007-01-01

    Until now, more than 800 distinct G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been identified in the human genome. The four subtypes of the adenosine receptor (A1, A2A, A2B and A3 receptor) belong to this large family of GPCRs that represent the most widely targeted pharmacological protein class. Since adenosine receptors are widespread throughout the body and involved in a variety of physiological processes and diseases, there is great interest in understanding how the different subtypes are regulated, as a basis for designing therapeutic drugs that either avoid or make use of this regulation. The major GPCR regulatory pathway involves phosphorylation of activated receptors by G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs), a process that is followed by binding of arrestin proteins. This prevents receptors from activating downstream heterotrimeric G protein pathways, but at the same time allows activation of arrestin-dependent signalling pathways. Upon agonist treatment, adenosine receptor subtypes are differently regulated. For instance, the A1Rs are not (readily) phosphorylated and internalize slowly, showing a typical half-life of several hours, whereas the A2AR and A2BR undergo much faster downregulation, usually shorter than 1 h. The A3R is subject to even faster downregulation, often a matter of minutes. The fast desensitization of the A3R after agonist exposure may be therapeutically equivalent to antagonist occupancy of the receptor. This review describes the process of desensitization and internalization of the different adenosine subtypes in cell systems, tissues and in vivo studies. In addition, molecular mechanisms involved in adenosine receptor desensitization are discussed. PMID:18368531

  20. Nicotine recruits glutamate receptors to postsynaptic sites.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jing-Jing; Lozada, Adrian F; Gou, Chen-Yu; Xu, Jing; Chen, Yuan; Berg, Darwin K

    2015-09-01

    Cholinergic neurons project throughout the nervous system and activate nicotinic receptors to modulate synaptic function in ways that shape higher order brain function. The acute effects of nicotinic signaling on long-term synaptic plasticity have been well-characterized. Less well understood is how chronic exposure to low levels of nicotine, such as those encountered by habitual smokers, can alter neural connections to promote addiction and other lasting behavioral effects. We show here that chronic exposure of hippocampal neurons in culture to low levels of nicotine recruits AMPA and NMDA receptors to the cell surface and sequesters them at postsynaptic sites. The receptors include GluA2-containing AMPA receptors, which are responsible for most of the excitatory postsynaptic current mediated by AMPA receptors on the neurons, and include NMDA receptors containing GluN1 and GluN2B subunits. Moreover, we find that the nicotine treatment also increases expression of the presynaptic component synapsin 1 and arranges it in puncta juxtaposed to the additional AMPA and NMDA receptor puncta, suggestive of increases in synaptic contacts. Consistent with increased synaptic input, we find that the nicotine treatment leads to an increase in the excitatory postsynaptic currents mediated by AMPA and NMDA receptors. Further, the increases skew the ratio of excitatory-to-inhibitory input that the cell receives, and this holds both for pyramidal neurons and inhibitory neurons in the hippocampal CA1 region. The GluN2B-containing NMDA receptor redistribution at synapses is associated with a significant increase in GluN2B phosphorylation at Tyr1472, a site known to prevent GluN2B endocytosis. These results suggest that chronic exposure to low levels of nicotine not only alters functional connections but also is likely to change excitability levels across networks. Further, it may increase the propensity for synaptic plasticity, given the increase in synaptic NMDA receptors. PMID

  1. Architecture of Eph receptor clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Himanen, Juha P.; Yermekbayeva, Laila; Janes, Peter W.; Walker, John R.; Xu, Kai; Atapattu, Lakmali; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Mensinga, Anneloes; Lackmann, Martin; Nikolov, Dimitar B.; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano

    2010-10-04

    Eph receptor tyrosine kinases and their ephrin ligands regulate cell navigation during normal and oncogenic development. Signaling of Ephs is initiated in a multistep process leading to the assembly of higher-order signaling clusters that set off bidirectional signaling in interacting cells. However, the structural and mechanistic details of this assembly remained undefined. Here we present high-resolution structures of the complete EphA2 ectodomain and complexes with ephrin-A1 and A5 as the base unit of an Eph cluster. The structures reveal an elongated architecture with novel Eph/Eph interactions, both within and outside of the Eph ligand-binding domain, that suggest the molecular mechanism underlying Eph/ephrin clustering. Structure-function analysis, by using site-directed mutagenesis and cell-based signaling assays, confirms the importance of the identified oligomerization interfaces for Eph clustering.

  2. Fluorescent Ligands for Adenosine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kozma, Eszter; Jayasekara, P Suresh; Squarcialupi, Lucia; Paoletta, Silvia; Moro, Stefano; Federico, Stephanie; Spalluto, Giampiero; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    Interest is increasing in developing fluorescent ligands for characterization of adenosine receptors (ARs), which hold a promise of usefulness in the drug discovery process. The size of a strategically labeled AR ligand can be greatly increased after the attachment of a fluorophore. The choice of dye moiety (e.g. Alexa Fluor 488), attachment point and linker length can alter the selectivity and potency of the parent molecule. Fluorescent derivatives of adenosine agonists and antagonists (e.g. XAC and other heterocyclic antagonist scaffolds) have been synthesized and characterized pharmacologically. Some are useful AR probes for flow cytometry, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, fluorescence microscopy, fluorescence polarization, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and scanning confocal microscopy. Thus, the approach of fluorescent labeled GPCR ligands, including those for ARs, is a growing dynamic research field. PMID:23200243

  3. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and cancer

    PubMed Central

    DANG, NINGNING; MENG, XIANGUANG; SONG, HAIYAN

    2016-01-01

    Nicotine, the primary addictive constituent of cigarettes, is believed to contribute to cancer promotion and progression through the activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), which are membrane ligand-gated cation channels. nAChRs activation can be triggered by the neurotransmitter Ach, or certain other biological compounds, such as nicotine. In recent years, genome-wide association studies have indicated that allelic variation in the α5-α3-β4 nAChR cluster on chromosome 15q24-15q25.1 is associated with lung cancer risk. The role of nAChRs in other types of cancer has also been reported. The present review highlights the role of nAChRs in types of human cancer. PMID:27123240

  4. Tachykinin receptors and airway pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Maggi, C A

    1993-05-01

    The mammalian tachykinins (TKs), substance P and neurokinin A, are present in sensory nerve fibres in the upper and lower airways of various mammalian species, including humans. TKs are released from these afferent nerves in an "efferent" mode at peripheral level, especially in response to irritant stimuli. TKs exert a variety of biological effects (bronchoconstriction, plasma protein extravasation, stimulation of mucus secretion), collectively known as "neurogenic inflammation", and this process is thought to be of potential pathogenic relevance for various airway diseases. The recent development of potent and selective TK receptor antagonists on the one hand provides important new tools for the understanding of basic airway physiology and pathophysiology and, on the other, opens new possibilities for therapy of airway diseases. PMID:8390944

  5. Biology of the TAM Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lemke, Greg

    2013-01-01

    The TAM receptors—Tyro3, Axl, and Mer—comprise a unique family of receptor tyrosine kinases, in that as a group they play no essential role in embryonic development. Instead, they function as homeostatic regulators in adult tissues and organ systems that are subject to continuous challenge and renewal throughout life. Their regulatory roles are prominent in the mature immune, reproductive, hematopoietic, vascular, and nervous systems. The TAMs and their ligands—Gas6 and Protein S—are essential for the efficient phagocytosis of apoptotic cells and membranes in these tissues; and in the immune system, they act as pleiotropic inhibitors of the innate inflammatory response to pathogens. Deficiencies in TAM signaling are thought to contribute to chronic inflammatory and autoimmune disease in humans, and aberrantly elevated TAM signaling is strongly associated with cancer progression, metastasis, and resistance to targeted therapies. PMID:24186067

  6. [The pharmacological basis of the serotonin system: Application to antidepressant response].

    PubMed

    David, D J; Gardier, A M

    2016-06-01

    If serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamin [5-HT]) is well known for its role in mood regulation, it also impacts numerous physiological functions at periphery. Serotonin is synthetized at the periphery into the gut by intestinal enterochromaffin cells and in the central nervous system (CNS) in the raphe nucleus from the essential amino acid tryptophan. Physiological effects of 5-HT are mediated by about 15 serotoninergic receptors grouped into seven broad families (5-HT1, 5-HT2, 5-HT3, 5-HT4, 5-HT5, 5-HT6, 5-HT7 receptor families). Except 5-HT3 receptor, a ligand-gated ion channels, all the others are G protein-coupled receptors. Serotonin's homeostasis involves serotoninergic autoreceptor such as 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT1D, the enzymatic degradation of serotonin by monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A), and a transporter (serotoninergic transporter [SERT]). In the CNS, the SERT is a key target for various antidepressant drugs such as Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRI), Serotonin Norepinephrin Reuptake Inhibitors (SNRI) and tricyclics family. However, antidepressant activity of SERT inhibitors is not directly mediated by the SERT inhibition, but a consequence of postsynaptic 5-HT receptor activation following the increase in 5-HT levels in the synaptic cleft. In pharmacology, SSRIs are defined as indirect agonist of postsynaptic receptor. Among all the 5-HT receptors, 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT1D, 5-HT2B and 5-HT4 receptors activation would mediate antidepressant effects. In the meanwhile, 5-HT2A, 5-HT2C, 5-HT3, 5-HT6 and 5-HT7 receptors activation would induce opposite effects. The best serotoninergic antidepressant would directly activate 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT1D, 5-HT2B and 5-HT4 and would block 5-HT2A, 5-HT2C, 5-HT3, 5-HT6 and 5-HT7 receptor. If the chemical synthesis of such a compound may be compromised, SERT inhibition associated with the blockade of some but not all 5-HT receptor could shorten onset of action and/or improve antidepressant efficacy on the overall

  7. Feedback, receptor clustering, and receptor restriction to single cells yield large Turing spaces for ligand-receptor-based Turing models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurics, Tamás; Menshykau, Denis; Iber, Dagmar

    2014-08-01

    Turing mechanisms can yield a large variety of patterns from noisy, homogenous initial conditions and have been proposed as patterning mechanism for many developmental processes. However, the molecular components that give rise to Turing patterns have remained elusive, and the small size of the parameter space that permits Turing patterns to emerge makes it difficult to explain how Turing patterns could evolve. We have recently shown that Turing patterns can be obtained with a single ligand if the ligand-receptor interaction is taken into account. Here we show that the general properties of ligand-receptor systems result in very large Turing spaces. Thus, the restriction of receptors to single cells, negative feedbacks, regulatory interactions among different ligand-receptor systems, and the clustering of receptors on the cell surface all greatly enlarge the Turing space. We further show that the feedbacks that occur in the FGF10-SHH network that controls lung branching morphogenesis are sufficient to result in large Turing spaces. We conclude that the cellular restriction of receptors provides a mechanism to sufficiently increase the size of the Turing space to make the evolution of Turing patterns likely. Additional feedbacks may then have further enlarged the Turing space. Given their robustness and flexibility, we propose that receptor-ligand-based Turing mechanisms present a general mechanism for patterning in biology.

  8. Feedback, receptor clustering, and receptor restriction to single cells yield large Turing spaces for ligand-receptor-based Turing models.

    PubMed

    Kurics, Tamás; Menshykau, Denis; Iber, Dagmar

    2014-08-01

    Turing mechanisms can yield a large variety of patterns from noisy, homogenous initial conditions and have been proposed as patterning mechanism for many developmental processes. However, the molecular components that give rise to Turing patterns have remained elusive, and the small size of the parameter space that permits Turing patterns to emerge makes it difficult to explain how Turing patterns could evolve. We have recently shown that Turing patterns can be obtained with a single ligand if the ligand-receptor interaction is taken into account. Here we show that the general properties of ligand-receptor systems result in very large Turing spaces. Thus, the restriction of receptors to single cells, negative feedbacks, regulatory interactions among different ligand-receptor systems, and the clustering of receptors on the cell surface all greatly enlarge the Turing space. We further show that the feedbacks that occur in the FGF10-SHH network that controls lung branching morphogenesis are sufficient to result in large Turing spaces. We conclude that the cellular restriction of receptors provides a mechanism to sufficiently increase the size of the Turing space to make the evolution of Turing patterns likely. Additional feedbacks may then have further enlarged the Turing space. Given their robustness and flexibility, we propose that receptor-ligand-based Turing mechanisms present a general mechanism for patterning in biology. PMID:25215767

  9. Determination of the architecture of ionotropic receptors using AFM imaging.

    PubMed

    Barrera, Nelson P; Henderson, Robert M; Edwardson, J Michael

    2008-04-01

    Fast neurotransmission in the nervous system is mediated by ionotropic receptors, all of which contain several subunits surrounding an integral ion channel. There are three major families of ionotropic receptors: the 'Cys-loop' receptors (including the nicotinic receptor for acetylcholine, the 5-HT(3) receptor, the GABA(A) receptor and the glycine receptor), the glutamate receptors (including the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid, kainate and N-methyl-D: -aspartic acid receptors) and the P2X receptors for adenosine triphosphate. These receptors are often built from multiple types of subunit, raising the question of the stoichiometry and subunit arrangement within the receptors. This question is of therapeutic significance because in some cases drug-binding sites are located at subunit-subunit interfaces. In this paper, we describe a general method, based on atomic force microscopy imaging, to solve the architecture of multi-subunit proteins, such as the ionotropic receptors. Specific epitope tags are engineered onto each receptor subunit. The subunits are then expressed exogenously in cultured cells, and the receptors are isolated from detergent extracts of membrane fractions by affinity chromatography. The receptors are imaged both alone and in complex with anti-epitope antibodies. The size of the imaged particles provides an estimate of the subunit stoichiometry, whereas the geometry of the receptor-antibody complexes produces more detailed information about the receptor architecture. We use an automated, unbiased system to identify receptors and receptor-antibody complexes and to determine the geometry of the complexes. We are also able to determine the orientation of the receptors on the mica substrate, which will allow us to solve the subunit arrangement within receptors, such as the GABA(A) receptor, which contain three types of subunits. PMID:18026748

  10. Effect of purification followed by solubilization of receptor material on quantitative receptor assays for anticholinergic drugs.

    PubMed

    Smisterová, J; Ensing, K; de Zeeuw, R A

    1996-08-01

    In order to optimize quantitative receptor assays for anticholinergics, the different receptor preparations resulting from the purification and the solubilization of the P2 pellet from the calf striatum were evaluated. The dissociation constants for two chemically different anticholinergics, the tertiary amine scopolamine and the quaternary amine oxyphenonium, were calculated from inhibition studies of 3H-NMS binding in buffer and plasma. The Kd values for both anticholinergics were similar for all the membrane-bound receptor preparations (unpurified and the purified P2 pellet) either in buffer or in plasma. More pronounced differences were observed between the membrane-bound and solubilized receptors. By introducing the solubilized receptor as well, differences between the individual anticholinergics appeared. On the one hand, for scopolamine, a gain in sensitivity of 1.5-2.8 in plasma was observed for the solubilized receptor. On the other hand, in the case of oxyphenonium, a dramatic loss in sensitivity (by a factor of about 24) was observed with the solubilized receptor, as compared to the membrane-bound receptor, in buffer. Very interestingly, however, when the solubilized receptor was used in plasma, a lowering of the Kd value was found for both anticholinergics, i.e. the assays became more sensitive. Such an effect (not observed for the membrane-bound receptor) could be obtained only when the percentage of digitonin present in the assay was at least 0.12% (w/v) or higher. PMID:8877848

  11. Serotonin 5-HT4 receptors and forebrain cholinergic system: receptor expression in identified cell populations.

    PubMed

    Peñas-Cazorla, Raúl; Vilaró, M Teresa

    2015-11-01

    Activation of serotonin 5-HT4 receptors has pro-cognitive effects on memory performance. The proposed underlying neurochemical mechanism is the enhancement of acetylcholine release in frontal cortex and hippocampus elicited by 5-HT4 agonists. Although 5-HT4 receptors are present in brain areas related to cognition, e.g., hippocampus and cortex, the cellular localization of the receptors that might modulate acetylcholine release is unknown at present. We have analyzed, using dual label in situ hybridization, the cellular localization of 5-HT4 receptor mRNA in identified neuronal populations of the rat basal forebrain, which is the source of the cholinergic innervation to cortex and hippocampus. 5-HT4 receptor mRNA was visualized with isotopically labeled oligonucleotide probes, whereas cholinergic, glutamatergic, GABAergic and parvalbumin-synthesizing neurons were identified with digoxigenin-labeled oligonucleotide probes. 5-HT4 receptor mRNA was not detected in the basal forebrain cholinergic cell population. In contrast, basal forebrain GABAergic, parvalbumin synthesizing, and glutamatergic cells contained 5-HT4 receptor mRNA. Hippocampal and cortical glutamatergic neurons also express this receptor. These results indicate that 5-HT4 receptors are not synthesized by cholinergic cells, and thus would be absent from cholinergic terminals. In contrast, several non-cholinergic cell populations within the basal forebrain and its target hippocampal and cortical areas express these receptors and are thus likely to mediate the enhancement of acetylcholine release elicited by 5-HT4 agonists. PMID:25183542

  12. The Proto-oncogene SET Interacts with Muscarinic Receptors and Attenuates Receptor Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Violaine; Guidry, Jessie; Gettys, Thomas W.; Tobin, Andrew B.; Lanier, Stephen M.

    2008-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors mediate cell responses to extra-cellular stimuli and likely function in the context of a larger signal transduction complex. Utilizing the third intracellular loop of a G protein-coupled receptor in glutathione S-transfer-ase pulldown assays from rat brain lysates coupled with high sensitivity detection methods and subsequent functional studies, we report the identification of SET as a regulator of muscarinic receptor signaling. SET is a putative oncogene reported to inhibit protein phosphatase 2A and regulate gene transcription. SET binds the carboxyl region of the M3-muscarinic receptor i3 loop, and endogenous SET co-immunoprecipitates with intact M3 muscarinic receptor expressed in cells. Small interfering RNA knockdown of endogenous SET in Chinese hamster ovary cells stably expressing the M3 muscarinic receptor augmented receptor-mediated mobilization of intracellular calcium by ∼35% with no change in agonist EC50, indicating that interaction of SET with the M3 muscarinic receptor reduces its signaling capacity. SET knockdown had no effect on the mobilization of intracellular calcium by the P2-purinergic receptor, ionomycin, or a direct activator of phospholipase C, indicating a specific regulation of M3 muscarinic receptor signaling. These data provide expanded functionality for SET and a previously unrecognized mechanism for regulation of GPCR signaling capacity. PMID:17065150

  13. Purinergic Receptors in Thrombosis and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Hechler, Béatrice; Gachet, Christian

    2015-11-01

    Under various pathological conditions, including thrombosis and inflammation, extracellular nucleotide levels may increase because of both active release and passive leakage from damaged or dying cells. Once in the extracellular compartment, nucleotides interact with plasma membrane receptors belonging to the P2 purinergic family, which are expressed by virtually all circulating blood cells and in most blood vessels. In this review, we focus on the specific role of the 3 platelet P2 receptors P2Y1, P2Y12, and P2X1 in hemostasis and arterial thrombosis. Beyond platelets, these 3 receptors, along with the P2Y2, P2Y6, and P2X7 receptors, constitute the main P2 receptors mediating the proinflammatory effects of nucleotides, which play important roles in various functions of circulating blood cells and cells of the vessel wall. Each of these P2 receptor subtypes specifically contributes to chronic or acute vascular inflammation and related diseases, such as atherosclerosis, restenosis, endotoxemia, and sepsis. The potential for therapeutic targeting of these P2 receptor subtypes is also discussed. PMID:26359511

  14. Effects of carbon dioxide on laryngeal receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.W.; Sant'Ambrogio, F.B.; Orani, G.P.; Sant'Ambrogio, G.; Mathew, O.P. )

    1990-02-26

    Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) either stimulates or inhibits laryngeal receptors in the cat. The aim of this study was to correlate the CO{sub 2} response of laryngeal receptors with their response to other known stimuli (i.e. pressure, movement, cold, water and smoke). Single unit action potentials were recorded from fibers in the superior laryngeal nerve of 5 anesthetized, spontaneously breathing dogs together with CO{sub 2} concentration, esophageal and subglottic pressure. Constant streams of warm, humidified air or 10% CO{sub 2} in O{sub 2} were passed through the functionally isolated upper airway for 60 s. Eight of 13 randomly firing or silent receptors were stimulated by CO{sub 2} (from 0.4{plus minus}0.1 to 1.8{plus minus}0.4 imp.s). These non-respiratory-modulated receptors were more strongly stimulated by solutions lacking Cl{sup {minus}} and/or cigarette smoke. Six of 21 respiratory modulated receptors (responding to pressure and/or laryngeal motion) were either inhibited or stimulated by CO{sub 2}. Our results show that no laryngeal receptor responds only to CO{sub 2}. Silent or randomly active receptors were stimulated most often by CO{sub 2} consistent with the reflex effect of CO{sub 2} in the larynx.

  15. The evolution of natural killer cell receptors.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Bustamante, Paola; Keşmir, Can; de Boer, Rob J

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are immune cells that play a crucial role against viral infections and tumors. To be tolerant against healthy tissue and simultaneously attack infected cells, the activity of NK cells is tightly regulated by a sophisticated array of germline-encoded activating and inhibiting receptors. The best characterized mechanism of NK cell activation is "missing self" detection, i.e., the recognition of virally infected or transformed cells that reduce their MHC expression to evade cytotoxic T cells. To monitor the expression of MHC-I on target cells, NK cells have monomorphic inhibitory receptors which interact with conserved MHC molecules. However, there are other NK cell receptors (NKRs) encoded by gene families showing a remarkable genetic diversity. Thus, NKR haplotypes contain several genes encoding for receptors with activating and inhibiting signaling, and that vary in gene content and allelic polymorphism. But if missing-self detection can be achieved by a monomorphic NKR system why have these polygenic and polymorphic receptors evolved? Here, we review the expansion of NKR receptor families in different mammal species, and we discuss several hypotheses that possibly underlie the diversification of the NK cell receptor complex, including the evolution of viral decoys, peptide sensitivity, and selective MHC-downregulation. PMID:26392015

  16. Action mechanisms of Liver X Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Gabbi, Chiara; Warner, Margaret; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke

    2014-04-11

    Highlights: • LXRα and LXRβ are ligand-activated nuclear receptors. • They share oxysterol ligands and the same heterodimerization partner, RXR. • LXRs regulate lipid and glucose metabolism, CNS and immune functions, and water transport. - Abstract: The two Liver X Receptors, LXRα and LXRβ, are nuclear receptors belonging to the superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors. They share more than 78% homology in amino acid sequence, a common profile of oxysterol ligands and the same heterodimerization partner, Retinoid X Receptor. LXRs play crucial roles in several metabolic pathways: lipid metabolism, in particular in preventing cellular cholesterol accumulation; glucose homeostasis; inflammation; central nervous system functions and water transport. As with all nuclear receptors, the transcriptional activity of LXR is the result of an orchestration of numerous cellular factors including ligand bioavailability, presence of corepressors and coactivators and cellular context i.e., what other pathways are activated in the cell at the time the receptor recognizes its ligand. In this mini-review we summarize the factors regulating the transcriptional activity and the mechanisms of action of these two receptors.

  17. Nuclear receptors, mitochondria and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Alaynick, William A

    2008-09-01

    Lipid metabolism is a continuum from emulsification and uptake of lipids in the intestine to cellular uptake and transport to compartments such as mitochondria. Whether fats are shuttled into lipid droplets in adipose tissue or oxidized in mitochondria and peroxisomes depends on metabolic substrate availability, energy balance and endocrine signaling of the organism. Several members of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily are lipid-sensing factors that affect all aspects of lipid metabolism. The physiologic actions of glandular hormones (e.g. thyroid, mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid), vitamins (e.g. vitamins A and D) and reproductive hormones (e.g. progesterone, estrogen and testosterone) and their cognate receptors are well established. The peroxisome-proliferator activated receptors (PPARs) and liver X receptors (LXRs), acting in concert with PPARgamma Coactivator 1alpha (PGC-1alpha), have been shown to regulate insulin sensitivity and lipid handling. These receptors are the focus of intense pharmacologic studies to expand the armamentarium of small molecule ligands to treat diabetes and the metabolic syndrome (hypertension, insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia and obesity). Recently, additional partners of PGC-1alpha have moved to the forefront of metabolic research, the estrogen-related receptors (ERRs). Although no endogenous ligands for these receptors have been identified, phenotypic analyses of knockout mouse models demonstrate an important role for these molecules in substrate sensing and handling as well as mitochondrial function. PMID:18375192

  18. Role of Prolactin Receptors in Lymphangioleiomyomatosis.

    PubMed

    Alkharusi, Amira; Lesma, Elena; Ancona, Silvia; Chiaramonte, Eloisa; Nyström, Thomas; Gorio, Alfredo; Norstedt, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a rare lung disease caused by mutations in the tumor suppressor genes encoding Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC) 1 and TSC2. The protein product of the TSC2 gene is a well-known suppressor of the mTOR pathway. Emerging evidence suggests that the pituitary hormone prolactin (Prl) has both endocrine and paracrine modes of action. Here, we have investigated components of the Prl system in models for LAM. In a TSC2 (+/-) mouse sarcoma cell line, down-regulation of TSC2 using siRNA resulted in increased levels of the Prl receptor. In human LAM cells, the Prl receptor is detectable by immunohistochemistry, and the expression of Prl in these cells stimulates STAT3 and Erk phosphorylation, as well as proliferation. A high affinity Prl receptor antagonist consisting of Prl with four amino acid substitutions reduced phosphorylation of STAT3 and Erk. Antagonist treatment further reduced the proliferative and invasive properties of LAM cells. In histological sections from LAM patients, Prl receptor immuno reactivity was observed. We conclude that the Prl receptor is expressed in LAM, and that loss of TSC2 increases Prl receptor levels. It is proposed that Prl exerts growth-stimulatory effects on LAM cells, and that antagonizing the Prl receptor can block such effects. PMID:26765535

  19. Role of Prolactin Receptors in Lymphangioleiomyomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Alkharusi, Amira; Lesma, Elena; Ancona, Silvia; Chiaramonte, Eloisa; Nyström, Thomas; Gorio, Alfredo; Norstedt, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a rare lung disease caused by mutations in the tumor suppressor genes encoding Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC) 1 and TSC2. The protein product of the TSC2 gene is a well-known suppressor of the mTOR pathway. Emerging evidence suggests that the pituitary hormone prolactin (Prl) has both endocrine and paracrine modes of action. Here, we have investigated components of the Prl system in models for LAM. In a TSC2 (+/-) mouse sarcoma cell line, down-regulation of TSC2 using siRNA resulted in increased levels of the Prl receptor. In human LAM cells, the Prl receptor is detectable by immunohistochemistry, and the expression of Prl in these cells stimulates STAT3 and Erk phosphorylation, as well as proliferation. A high affinity Prl receptor antagonist consisting of Prl with four amino acid substitutions reduced phosphorylation of STAT3 and Erk. Antagonist treatment further reduced the proliferative and invasive properties of LAM cells. In histological sections from LAM patients, Prl receptor immuno reactivity was observed. We conclude that the Prl receptor is expressed in LAM, and that loss of TSC2 increases Prl receptor levels. It is proposed that Prl exerts growth-stimulatory effects on LAM cells, and that antagonizing the Prl receptor can block such effects. PMID:26765535

  20. Multiple aberrant hormone receptors in Cushing's syndrome.

    PubMed

    El Ghorayeb, Nada; Bourdeau, Isabelle; Lacroix, André

    2015-10-01

    The mechanisms regulating cortisol production when ACTH of pituitary origin is suppressed in primary adrenal causes of Cushing's syndrome (CS) include diverse genetic and molecular mechanisms. These can lead either to constitutive activation of the cAMP system and steroidogenesis or to its regulation exerted by the aberrant adrenal expression of several hormone receptors, particularly G-protein coupled hormone receptors (GPCR) and their ligands. Screening for aberrant expression of GPCR in bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia (BMAH) and unilateral adrenal tumors of patients with overt or subclinical CS demonstrates the frequent co-expression of several receptors. Aberrant hormone receptors can also exert their activity by regulating the paracrine secretion of ACTH or other ligands for those receptors in BMAH or unilateral tumors. The aberrant expression of hormone receptors is not limited to adrenal CS but can be implicated in other endocrine tumors including primary aldosteronism and Cushing's disease. Targeted therapies to block the aberrant receptors or their ligands could become useful in the future. PMID:25971648

  1. Cannabinoid receptor type-1: breaking the dogmas

    PubMed Central

    Busquets Garcia, Arnau; Soria-Gomez, Edgar; Bellocchio, Luigi; Marsicano, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system (ECS) is abundantly expressed in the brain. This system regulates a plethora of physiological functions and is composed of cannabinoid receptors, their endogenous ligands (endocannabinoids), and the enzymes involved in the metabolism of endocannabinoids. In this review, we highlight the new advances in cannabinoid signaling, focusing on a key component of the ECS, the type-1 cannabinoid receptor (CB 1). In recent years, the development of new imaging and molecular tools has demonstrated that this receptor can be distributed in many cell types (e.g., neuronal or glial cells) and intracellular compartments (e.g., mitochondria). Interestingly, cellular and molecular effects are differentially mediated by CB 1 receptors according to their specific localization (e.g., glutamatergic or GABAergic neurons). Moreover, this receptor is expressed in the periphery, where it can modulate periphery-brain connections. Finally, the better understanding of the CB 1 receptor structure led researchers to propose interesting and new allosteric modulators. Thus, the advances and the new directions of the CB 1 receptor field will provide new insights and better approaches to profit from its interesting therapeutic profile. PMID:27239293

  2. [The cellular receptors of exogenous RNA].

    PubMed

    Reniewicz, Patryk; Zyzak, Joanna; Siednienko, Jakub

    2016-01-01

    One of the key determinants of survival for organisms is proper recognition of exogenous and endogenous nucleic acids. Therefore, high eukaryotes developed a number of receptors that allow for discrimination between friend or foe DNA and RNA. Appearance of exogenous RNA in cytoplasm provides a signal of danger and triggers cellular responses that facilitate eradication of a pathogen. Recognition of exogenous RNA is additionally complicated by fact that large amount of endogenous RNA is present in cytoplasm Thus, number of different receptors, found in eukaryotic cells, is able to recognize that nucleic acid. First group of those receptors consist endosomal Toll like receptors, namely TLR3, TLR7, TLR8 and TLR13. Those receptors recognize RNA released from pathogens that enter the cell by endocytosis. The second group includes cytoplasmic sensors like PKR and the family of RLRs comprised of RIG-I, MDA5 and LGP2. Cytoplasmic receptors recognize RNA from pathogens invading the cell by non-endocytic pathway. In both cases binding of RNA by its receptors results in activation of the signalling cascades that lead to the production of interferon and other cytokines. PMID:27117110

  3. Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors for Parkinson's Disease Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gasparini, Fabrizio; Di Paolo, Thérèse; Gomez-Mancilla, Baltazar

    2013-01-01

    Excessive glutamatergic signalling within the basal ganglia is implicated in the progression of Parkinson's disease (PD) and inthe emergence of dyskinesia associated with long-term treatment with L-DOPA. There is considerable research focus on the discovery and development of compounds that modulate glutamatergic signalling via glutamate receptors, as treatments for PD and L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID). Although initial preclinical studies with ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists showed antiparkinsonian and antidyskinetic activity, their clinical use was limited due to psychiatric adverse effects, with the exception of amantadine, a weak N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist, currently used to reduce dyskinesia in PD patients. Metabotropic receptor (mGlu receptor) modulators were considered to have a more favourable side-effect profile, and several agents have been studied in preclinical models of PD. The most promising results have been seen clinically with selective antagonists of mGlu5 receptor and preclinically with selective positive allosteric modulators of mGlu4 receptor. The growing understanding of glutamate receptor crosstalk also raises the possibility of more precise modulation of glutamatergic transmission, which may lead to the development of more effective agents for PD. PMID:23853735

  4. Renal tubular vasopressin receptors downregulated by dehydration

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, M.; Phillips, M.I. )

    1988-03-01

    Receptors for arginine vasopressin (AVP) were characterized in tubular epithelial basolateral membranes (BL membranes) prepared from the kidneys of male Spraque-Dawley rats. Association of ({sup 3}H)AVP was rapid, reversible, and specific. Saturation studies revealed a single class of saturable binding sites with a maximal binding (B{sub max}) of 184 {plus minus} 15 fmol/mg protein. The V{sub 2} receptor antagonist was more than 3,700 times as effective in displacing ({sup 3}H)AVP than was the V{sub 1} antagonist. To investigate the physiological regulation of vasopressin receptors, the effects of elevated levels of circulating AVP on receptor characteristics were studied. Seventy-two-hour water deprivation significantly elevated plasma osmolality and caused an 11.5-fold increase in plasma (AVP). Scatchard analysis revealed a 38% decreased in the number of AVP receptors on the BL membranes from dehydrated animals. The high-affinity binding sites on the BL membranes fit the pharmacological profile for adenylate cyclase-linked vasopressin receptors (V{sub 2}), which mediate the antidiuretic action of the hormone. The authors conclude that physiologically elevated levels of AVP can downregulate vasopressin receptors in the kidney.

  5. Dopamine receptors – IUPHAR Review 13

    PubMed Central

    Beaulieu, Jean-Martin; Espinoza, Stefano; Gainetdinov, Raul R

    2015-01-01

    The variety of physiological functions controlled by dopamine in the brain and periphery is mediated by the D1, D2, D3, D4 and D5 dopamine GPCRs. Drugs acting on dopamine receptors are significant tools for the management of several neuropsychiatric disorders including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression and Parkinson's disease. Recent investigations of dopamine receptor signalling have shown that dopamine receptors, apart from their canonical action on cAMP-mediated signalling, can regulate a myriad of cellular responses to fine-tune the expression of dopamine-associated behaviours and functions. Such signalling mechanisms may involve alternate G protein coupling or non-G protein mechanisms involving ion channels, receptor tyrosine kinases or proteins such as β-arrestins that are classically involved in GPCR desensitization. Another level of complexity is the growing appreciation of the physiological roles played by dopamine receptor heteromers. Applications of new in vivo techniques have significantly furthered the understanding of the physiological functions played by dopamine receptors. Here we provide an update of the current knowledge regarding the complex biology, signalling, physiology and pharmacology of dopamine receptors. PMID:25671228

  6. Targeting the Fc receptor in autoimmune disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinrui; Kimberly, Robert P

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The Fc receptors and their interaction with immunoglobulin and innate immune opsonins such as CRP are key players in humoral and cellular immune responses. As the effector mechanism for some therapeutic monoclonal antibodies and often a contributor to the pathogenesis and progression of autoimmunity, FcRs are promising targets for treating autoimmune diseases. Areas covered This review discusses the nature of different Fc receptors and the various mechanisms of their involvement in initiating and modulating immunocyte functions and their biological consequences. It describes a range of current strategies in targeting Fc receptors and manipulating their interaction with specific ligands while presenting the pros and cons of these approaches. This review also discusses potential new strategies including regulation of FcR expression and receptor cross-talk. Expert opinion Fc receptors are appealing targets in the treatment of inflammatory autoimmune diseases. However, there are still knowledge limitations and technical challenges, the most important being a better understanding of the individual roles of each of the Fc receptors and enhancement of the specificity in targeting particular cell types and specific Fc receptors. PMID:24521454

  7. Adenosine receptor antagonists alter the stability of human epileptic GABAA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Roseti, Cristina; Martinello, Katiuscia; Fucile, Sergio; Piccari, Vanessa; Mascia, Addolorata; Di Gennaro, Giancarlo; Quarato, Pier Paolo; Manfredi, Mario; Esposito, Vincenzo; Cantore, Gianpaolo; Arcella, Antonella; Simonato, Michele; Fredholm, Bertil B.; Limatola, Cristina; Miledi, Ricardo; Eusebi, Fabrizio

    2008-01-01

    We examined how the endogenous anticonvulsant adenosine might influence γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor stability and which adenosine receptors (ARs) were involved. Upon repetitive activation (GABA 500 μM), GABAA receptors, microtransplanted into Xenopus oocytes from neurosurgically resected epileptic human nervous tissues, exhibited an obvious GABAA-current (IGABA) run-down, which was consistently and significantly reduced by treatment with the nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist CGS15943 (100 nM) or with adenosine deaminase (ADA) (1 units/ml), that inactivates adenosine. It was also found that selective antagonists of A2B (MRS1706, 10 nM) or A3 (MRS1334, 30 nM) receptors reduced IGABA run-down, whereas treatment with the specific A1 receptor antagonist DPCPX (10 nM) was ineffective. The selective A2A receptor antagonist SCH58261 (10 nM) reduced or potentiated IGABA run-down in ≈40% and ≈20% of tested oocytes, respectively. The ADA-resistant, AR agonist 2-chloroadenosine (2-CA) (10 μM) potentiated IGABA run-down but only in ≈20% of tested oocytes. CGS15943 administration again decreased IGABA run-down in patch-clamped neurons from either human or rat neocortex slices. IGABA run-down in pyramidal neurons was equivalent in A1 receptor-deficient and wt neurons but much larger in neurons from A2A receptor-deficient mice, indicating that, in mouse cortex, GABAA-receptor stability is tonically influenced by A2A but not by A1 receptors. IGABA run-down from wt mice was not affected by 2-CA, suggesting maximal ARs activity by endogenous adenosine. Our findings strongly suggest that cortical A2–A3 receptors alter the stability of GABAA receptors, which could offer therapeutic opportunities. PMID:18809912

  8. Role of adenosine receptors in caffeine tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Holtzman, S.G.; Mante, S.; Minneman, K.P. )

    1991-01-01

    Caffeine is a competitive antagonist at adenosine receptors. Receptor up-regulation during chronic drug treatment has been proposed to be the mechanism of tolerance to the behavioral stimulant effects of caffeine. This study reassessed the role of adenosine receptors in caffeine tolerance. Separate groups of rats were given scheduled access to drinking bottles containing plain tap water or a 0.1% solution of caffeine. Daily drug intake averaged 60-75 mg/kg and resulted in complete tolerance to caffeine-induced stimulation of locomotor activity, which could not be surmounted by increasing the dose of caffeine. 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (0.001-1.0 mg/kg) dose dependently decreased the locomotor activity of caffeine-tolerant rats and their water-treated controls but was 8-fold more potent in the latter group. Caffeine (1.0-10 mg/kg) injected concurrently with 5-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine antagonized the decreases in locomotor activity comparably in both groups. Apparent pA2 values for tolerant and control rats also were comparable: 5.05 and 5.11. Thus, the adenosine-antagonist activity of caffeine was undiminished in tolerant rats. The effects of chronic caffeine administration on parameters of adenosine receptor binding and function were measured in cerebral cortex. There were no differences between brain tissue from control and caffeine-treated rats in number and affinity of adenosine binding sites or in receptor-mediated increases (A2 adenosine receptor) and decreases (A1 adenosine receptor) in cAMP accumulation. These results are consistent with theoretical arguments that changes in receptor density should not affect the potency of a competitive antagonist. Experimental evidence and theoretical considerations indicate that up-regulation of adenosine receptors is not the mechanism of tolerance to caffeine-induced stimulation of locomotor activity.

  9. Pharmacological and autoradiographic characterization of sigma receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Largent, B.L.

    1986-01-01

    The existence of three types of opioid receptors - ..mu.., kappa, and sigma - was postulated to explain the effects of different opioids in the chronic spinal dog. Sigma receptors, named for the prototypic agonist SKF 10,047 (N-allylnormetazocine), were suggested to mediate the psychotomimetic-like effects of SKF 10,047 in the dog. 3-(3-Hydroxyphenyl)-N-(1-propyl)piperidine (3-PPP) has been proposed as a selective dopamine autoreceptor agonist. However, the drug specificity of (+)(/sup 3/H)3-PPP binding in brain is identical to that of sigma receptor binding sites which may mediate psychotomimetic effects of some opioids. Pharmacological and autoradiographic analyses reveal that (+)(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047, the prototypic sigma agonist, labels two sites in brain. The drug specificity of the high affinity site for (+)(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047 resembles that of putative sigma receptors labeled with (+)(/sup 3/H)3-PPP, being potently inhibited by (+)3-PPP, haloperidol, and (+/-)pentazocine, and demonstrating stereoselectivity for the (+) isomer of SKF 10,047. Autoradiographic localizations of high affinity (+)(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047 binding sites closely resemble those of (+)(/sup 3/H)3-PPP labeled sites with high levels of binding in the hippocampal pyramidal cell layer, hypothalamus, and pontine and cranial nerve nuclei. Thus, putative sigma receptors and PCP receptors represent distinct receptor populations in brain. This proposal is supported by the presence of sigma binding sites - and absence of PCP receptors - on NCB-20 cell membranes, a hybrid neurotumor cell line that provides a model system for the physiological and biochemical study of sigma receptors.

  10. Soluble cytokine receptors in biological therapy.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Botran, Rafael; Crespo, Fabian A; Sun, Xichun

    2002-08-01

    Due to their fundamental involvement in the pathogenesis of many diseases, cytokines constitute key targets for biotherapeutic approaches. The discovery that soluble forms of cytokine receptors are involved in the endogenous regulation of cytokine activity has prompted substantial interest in their potential application as immunotherapeutic agents. As such, soluble cytokine receptors have many advantages, including specificity, low immunogenicity and high affinity. Potential disadvantages, such as low avidity and short in vivo half-lifes, have been addressed by the use of genetically-designed receptors, hybrid proteins or chemical modifications. The ability of many soluble cytokine receptors to inhibit the binding and biological activity of their ligands makes them very specific cytokine antagonists. Several pharmaceutical companies have generated a number of therapeutic agents based on soluble cytokine receptors and many of them are undergoing clinical trials. The most advanced in terms of clinical development is etanercept (Enbrel, Immunex), a fusion protein between soluble TNF receptor Type II and the Fc region of human IgG1. This TNF-alpha; antagonist was the first soluble cytokine receptor to receive approval for use in humans. In general, most agents based on soluble cytokine receptors have been safe, well-tolerated and have shown only minor side effects in the majority of patients. Soluble cytokine receptors constitute a new generation of therapeutic agents with tremendous potential for applications in a wide variety of human diseases. Two current areas of research are the identification of their most promising applications and characterisation of their long-term effects. PMID:12171504

  11. Regulating hippocampal hyperexcitability through GABAB Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Min; Moradi‐Chameh, Homeira; Zahid, Tariq; Gane, Jonathan; Wu, Chiping; Valiante, Taufik; Zhang, Liang

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Disturbances of GABAergic inhibition are a major cause of epileptic seizures. GABA exerts its actions via ionotropic GABAA receptors and metabotropic G protein‐coupled GABAB receptors. Malfunction of GABAA inhibition has long been recognized in seizure genesis but the role of GABAB receptors in controlling seizure activity is still not well understood. Here, we examined the anticonvulsive, or inhibitory effects, of GABAB receptors in a mouse model of hippocampal kindling as well as mouse hippocampal slices through the use of GS 39783, a positive allosteric GABAB receptor modulator, and CGP 55845, a selective GABAB receptor antagonist. When administered via intraperitoneal injections in kindled mice, GS 39783 (5 mg/kg) did not attenuate hippocampal EEG discharges, but did reduce aberrant hippocampal spikes, whereas CGP 55845 (10 mg/kg) prolonged hippocampal discharges and increased spike incidences. When examined in hippocampal slices, neither GS 39783 at 5 μmol/L nor the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen at 0.1 μmol/L alone significantly altered repetitive excitatory field potentials, but GS 39783 and baclofen together reversibly abolished these field potentials. In contrast, CGP 55845 at 1 μmol/L facilitated induction and incidence of these field potentials. In addition, CGP 55845 attenuated the paired pulse depression of CA3 population spikes and increased the frequency of EPSCs in individual CA3 pyramidal neurons. Collectively, these data suggest that GABABB receptors regulate hippocampal hyperexcitability by inhibiting CA3 glutamatergic synapses. We postulate that positive allosteric modulation of GABAB receptors may be effective in reducing seizure‐related hyperexcitability. PMID:24771688

  12. Mood disorders: regulation by metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Pilc, Andrzej; Chaki, Shigeyuki; Nowak, Gabriel; Witkin, Jeffrey M

    2008-03-01

    Medicinal therapies for mood disorders neither fully serve the efficacy needs of patients nor are they free of side-effect issues. Although monoamine-based therapies are the primary current treatment approaches, both preclinical and clinical findings have implicated the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate in the pathogenesis of major depressive disorders. The present commentary focuses on the metabotropic glutamate receptors and their relationship to mood disorders. Metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors regulate glutamate transmission by altering the release of neurotransmitter and/or modulating the post-synaptic responses to glutamate. Convergent biochemical, pharmacological, behavioral, and clinical data will be reviewed that establish glutamatergic neurotransmission via mGlu receptors as a biologically relevant process in the regulation of mood and that these receptors may serve as novel targets for the discovery of small molecule modulators with unique antidepressant properties. Specifically, compounds that antagonize mGlu2, mGlu3, and/or mGlu5 receptors (e.g. LY341495, MGS0039, MPEP, MTEP) exhibit biochemical effects indicative of antidepressant effects as well as in vivo activity in animal models predictive of antidepressant efficacy. Both preclinical and clinical data have previously been presented to define NMDA and AMPA receptors as important targets for the modulation of major depression. In the present review, we present a model suggesting how the interplay of glutamate at the mGlu and at the ionotropic AMPA and NMDA receptors might account for the antidepressant-like effects of glutamatergic- and monoaminergic-based drugs affecting mood in patients. The current data lead to the hypothesis that mGlu-based compounds and conventional antidepressants impact a network of interactive effects that converge upon a down regulation of NMDA receptor function and an enhancement in AMPA receptor signaling. PMID:18164691

  13. Ghrelin Receptors in Non-Mammalian Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Kaiya, Hiroyuki; Kangawa, Kenji; Miyazato, Mikiya

    2012-01-01

    The growth hormone secretagogue-receptor (GHS-R) was discovered in humans and pigs in 1996. The endogenous ligand, ghrelin, was discovered 3 years later, in 1999, and our understanding of the physiological significance of the ghrelin system in vertebrates has grown steadily since then. Although the ghrelin system in non-mammalian vertebrates is a subject of great interest, protein sequence data for the receptor in non-mammalian vertebrates has been limited until recently, and related biological information has not been well organized. In this review, we summarize current information related to the ghrelin receptor in non-mammalian vertebrates. PMID:23882259

  14. Histamine receptor signaling in energy homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Tabarean, Iustin V

    2016-07-01

    Histamine modulates several aspects of energy homeostasis. By activating histamine receptors in the hypothalamus the bioamine influences thermoregulation, its circadian rhythm, energy expenditure and feeding. These actions are brought about by activation of different histamine receptors and/or the recruitment of distinct neural pathways. In this review we describe the signaling mechanisms activated by histamine in the hypothalamus, the evidence for its role in modulating energy homeostasis as well as recent advances in the understanding of the cellular and neural network mechanisms involved. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Histamine Receptors'. PMID:26107117

  15. Functional properties of Drosophila inositol trisphosphate receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Swatton, J E; Morris, S A; Wissing, F; Taylor, C W

    2001-01-01

    The functional properties of the only inositol trisphosphate (IP(3)) receptor subtype expressed in Drosophila were examined in permeabilized S2 cells. The IP(3) receptors of S2 cells bound (1,4,5)IP(3) with high affinity (K(d)=8.5+/-1.1 nM), mediated positively co-operative Ca(2+) release from a thapsigargin-sensitive Ca(2+) store (EC(50)=75+/-4 nM, Hill coefficient=2.1+/-0.2), and they were recognized by an antiserum to a peptide conserved in all IP(3) receptor subtypes in the same way as mammalian IP(3) receptors. As with mammalian IP(3) receptors, (2,4,5)IP(3) (EC(50)=2.3+/-0.3 microM) and (4,5)IP(2) (EC(50) approx. 10 microM) were approx. 20- and 100-fold less potent than (1,4,5)IP(3). Adenophostin A, which is typically approx. 10-fold more potent than IP(3) at mammalian IP(3) receptors, was 46-fold more potent than IP(3) in S2 cells (EC(50)=1.67+/-0.07 nM). Responses to submaximal concentrations of IP(3) were quantal and IP(3)-evoked Ca(2+) release was biphasically regulated by cytosolic Ca(2+). Using rapid superfusion to examine the kinetics of IP(3)-evoked Ca(2+) release from S2 cells, we established that IP(3) (10 microM) maximally activated Drosophila IP(3) receptors within 400 ms. The activity of the receptors then slowly decayed (t(1/2)=2.03+/-0.07 s) to a stable state which had 47+/-1% of the activity of the maximally active state. We conclude that the single subtype of IP(3) receptor expressed in Drosophila has similar functional properties to mammalian IP(3) receptors and that analyses of IP(3) receptor function in this genetically tractable organism are therefore likely to contribute to understanding the roles of mammalian IP(3) receptors. PMID:11583592

  16. Agonists and antagonists for P2 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Costanzi, Stefano; Joshi, Bhalchandra V.; Besada, Pedro; Shin, Dae Hong; Ko, Hyojin; Ivanov, Andrei A.; Mamedova, Liaman

    2015-01-01

    Recent work has identified nucleotide agonists selective for P2Y1, P2Y2 and P2Y6 receptors and nucleotide antagonists selective for P2Y1, P2Y12 and P2X1 receptors. Selective non-nucleotide antagonists have been reported for P2Y1, P2Y2, P2Y6, P2Y12, P2Y13, P2X2/3/P2X3 and P2X7 receptors. For example, the dinucleotide INS 37217 (Up4dC) potently activates the P2Y2 receptor, and the non-nucleotide antagonist A-317491 is selective for P2X2/3/P2X3 receptors. Nucleotide analogues in which the ribose moiety is substituted by a variety of novel ring systems, including conformation-ally locked moieties, have been synthesized as ligands for P2Y receptors. The focus on conformational factors of the ribose-like moiety allows the inclusion of general modifications that lead to enhanced potency and selectivity. At P2Y1,2,4,11 receptors, there is a preference for the North conformation as indicated with (N)-methanocarba analogues. The P2Y1 antagonist MRS2500 inhibited ADP-induced human platelet aggregation with an IC50 of 0.95 nM. MRS2365, an (N)-methanocarba analogue of 2-MeSADP, displayed potency (EC50) of 0.4 nM at the P2Y1 receptor, with >10 000-fold selectivity in comparison to P2Y12 and P2Y13 receptors. At P2Y6 receptors there is a dramatic preference for the South conformation. Three-dimensional structures of P2Y receptors have been deduced from structure activity relationships (SAR), mutagenesis and modelling studies. Detailed three-dimensional structures of P2X receptors have not yet been proposed. PMID:16805423

  17. Receptors useful for gas phase chemical sensing

    DOEpatents

    Jaworski, Justyn W; Lee, Seung-Wuk; Majumdar, Arunava; Raorane, Digvijay A

    2015-02-17

    The invention provides for a receptor, capable of binding to a target molecule, linked to a hygroscopic polymer or hydrogel; and the use of this receptor in a device for detecting the target molecule in a gaseous and/or liquid phase. The invention also provides for a method for detecting the presence of a target molecule in the gas phase using the device. In particular, the receptor can be a peptide capable of binding a 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) or 2,4,-dinitrotoluene (DNT).

  18. Absolute Ligand Discrimination by Dimeric Signaling Receptors.

    PubMed

    Fathi, Sepehr; Nayak, Chitra R; Feld, Jordan J; Zilman, Anton G

    2016-09-01

    Many signaling pathways act through shared components, where different ligand molecules bind the same receptors or activate overlapping sets of response regulators downstream. Nevertheless, different ligands acting through cross-wired pathways often lead to different outcomes in terms of the target cell behavior and function. Although a number of mechanisms have been proposed, it still largely remains unclear how cells can reliably discriminate different molecular ligands under such circumstances. Here we show that signaling via ligand-induced receptor dimerization-a very common motif in cellular signaling-naturally incorporates a mechanism for the discrimination of ligands acting through the same receptor. PMID:27602720

  19. Regulation of Plasma Cholesterol by Lipoprotein Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Michael S.; Kovanen, Petri T.; Goldstein, Joseph L.

    1981-05-01

    The lipoprotein transport system holds the key to understanding the mechanisms by which genes, diet, and hormones interact to regulate the plasma cholesterol level in man. Crucial components of this system are lipoprotein receptors in the liver and extrahepatic tissues that mediate the uptake and degradation of cholesterol-carrying lipoproteins. The number of lipoprotein receptors, and hence the efficiency of disposal of plasma cholesterol, can be increased by cholesterol-lowering drugs. Regulation of lipoprotein receptors can be exploited pharmacologically in the therapy of hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis in man.

  20. Dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton mediates receptor cross talk: An emerging concept in tuning receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Mattila, Pieta K.; Batista, Facundo D.

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence implicates the actin cytoskeleton in the control of receptor signaling. This may be of particular importance in the context of immune receptors, such as the B cell receptor, where dysregulated signaling can result in autoimmunity and malignancy. Here, we discuss the role of the actin cytoskeleton in controlling receptor compartmentalization, dynamics, and clustering as a means to regulate receptor signaling through controlling the interactions with protein partners. We propose that the actin cytoskeleton is a point of integration for receptor cross talk through modulation of protein dynamics and clustering. We discuss the implication of this cross talk via the cytoskeleton for both ligand-induced and low-level constitutive (tonic) signaling necessary for immune cell survival. PMID:26833785

  1. Hypothyroidism affects D2 receptor-mediated breathing without altering D2 receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Schlenker, Evelyn H; Del Rio, Rodrigo; Schultz, Harold D

    2014-03-01

    Bromocriptine depressed ventilation in air and D2 receptor expression in the nucleus tractus solitaries (NTS) in male hypothyroid hamsters. Here we postulated that in age-matched hypothyroid female hamsters, the pattern of D2 receptor modulation of breathing and D2 receptor expression would differ from those reported in hypothyroid males. In females hypothyroidism did not affect D2 receptor protein levels in the NTS, carotid bodies or striatum. Bromocriptine, but not carmoxirole (a peripheral D2 receptor agonist), increased oxygen consumption and body temperature in awake air-exposed hypothyroid female hamsters and stimulated their ventilation before and following exposure to hypoxia. Carmoxirole depressed frequency of breathing in euthyroid hamsters prior to, during and following hypoxia exposures and stimulated it in the hypothyroid hamsters following hypoxia. Although hypothyroidism did not affect expression of D2 receptors, it influenced central D2 modulation of breathing in a disparate manner relative to euthyroid hamsters. PMID:24434437

  2. Model for growth hormone receptor activation based on subunit rotation within a receptor dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Richard J.; Adams, Julian J.; Pelekanos, Rebecca A.; Wan, Yu; McKinstry, William J.; Palethorpe, Kathryn; Seeber, Ruth M.; Monks, Thea A.; Eidne, Karin A.; Parker, Michael W.; Waters, Michael J.

    2010-07-13

    Growth hormone is believed to activate the growth hormone receptor (GHR) by dimerizing two identical receptor subunits, leading to activation of JAK2 kinase associated with the cytoplasmic domain. However, we have reported previously that dimerization alone is insufficient to activate full-length GHR. By comparing the crystal structure of the liganded and unliganded human GHR extracellular domain, we show here that there is no substantial change in its conformation on ligand binding. However, the receptor can be activated by rotation without ligand by inserting a defined number of alanine residues within the transmembrane domain. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) and coimmunoprecipitation studies suggest that receptor subunits undergo specific transmembrane interactions independent of hormone binding. We propose an activation mechanism involving a relative rotation of subunits within a dimeric receptor as a result of asymmetric placement of the receptor-binding sites on the ligand.

  3. Identification of the salmon somatolactin receptor, a new member of the cytokine receptor family.

    PubMed

    Fukada, Haruhisa; Ozaki, Yuichi; Pierce, Andrew L; Adachi, Shinji; Yamauchi, Kohei; Hara, Akihiko; Swanson, Penny; Dickhoff, Walton W

    2005-05-01

    Somatolactin (SL) is a pituitary hormone of the GH/prolactin (PRL) family that so far has been found only in fish. Compared with GH and PRL, the primary structure of SL is highly conserved among divergent fish species, suggesting it has an important function and a discriminating receptor that constrains structural change. However, SL functions are poorly understood, and receptors for SL have not yet been identified. During cloning of GH receptor cDNA from salmon, we found a variant with relatively high (38-58%) sequence identity to vertebrate GH receptors and low (28-33%) identity to PRL receptors; however, the recombinant protein encoding the extracellular domain showed only weak binding of GH. Ligand binding of the recombinant extracellular domain for this receptor confirmed that the cDNA encoded a specific receptor for SL. The SL receptor (SLR) has common features of a GH receptor including FGEFS motif, six cysteine residues in the extracellular domain, a single transmembrane region, and Box 1 and 2 regions in the intracellular domain. These structural characteristics place the SLR in the cytokine receptor type I homodimeric group, which includes receptors for GH, PRL, erythropoietin, thrombopoietin, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, and leptin. Transcripts for SLR were found in 11 tissues with highest levels in liver and fat, supporting the notion that a major function of SL is regulation of lipid metabolism. Cloning SLR cDNA opens the way for discovery of new SL functions and target tissues in fish, and perhaps novel members of this receptor family in other vertebrates. PMID:15718271

  4. Targeting a family B GPCR/RAMP receptor complex: CGRP receptor antagonists and migraine

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Eric L; Salvatore, Christopher A

    2012-01-01

    The clinical effectiveness of antagonizing the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor for relief of migraine pain has been clearly demonstrated, but the road to the development of these small molecule antagonists has been daunting. The key hurdle that needed to be overcome was the CGRP receptor itself. The vast majority of the current antagonists recognize similar epitopes on the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) and receptor activity-modifying protein 1 (RAMP1). RAMP1 is a relatively small, single, transmembrane-spanning protein and along with the G-protein-coupled receptor CLR comprise a functional CGRP receptor. The tri-helical extracellular domain of RAMP1 plays a key role in the high affinity binding of CGRP receptor antagonists and drives their species-selective pharmacology. Over the years, a significant amount of mutagenesis data has been generated to identify specific amino acids or regions within CLR and RAMP1 that are critical to antagonist binding and has directed attention to the CLR/RAMP1 extracellular domain (ECD) complex. Recently, the crystal structure of the CGRP receptor ECD has been elucidated and not only reinforces the early mutagenesis data, but provides critical insight into the molecular mechanism of CGRP receptor antagonism. This review will highlight the drug design hurdles that must be overcome to meet the desired potency, selectivity and pharmacokinetic profile while retaining drug-like properties. Although the development of these antagonists has proved challenging, blocking the CGRP receptor may one day represent a new way to manage migraine and offer hope to migraine sufferers. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Secretin Family (Class B) G Protein-Coupled Receptors. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2012.166.issue-1 PMID:21871019

  5. The insulin receptor C-terminus is involved in regulation of the receptor kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Kaliman, P; Baron, V; Alengrin, F; Takata, Y; Webster, N J; Olefsky, J M; Van Obberghen, E

    1993-09-21

    During the insulin receptor activation process, ligand binding and autophosphorylation induce two distinct conformational changes in the C-terminal domain of the receptor beta-subunit. To analyze the role of this domain and the involvement of the C-terminal autophosphorylation sites (Tyr1316 and Tyr1322) in receptor activation, we used (i) antipeptide antibodies against three different C-terminal sequences (1270-1281, 1294-1317, and 1309-1326) and (ii) an insulin receptor mutant (Y/F2) where Tyr1316 and Tyr1322 have been replaced by Phe. We show that the autophosphorylation-induced C-terminal conformational change is preserved in the Y/F2 receptor, indicating that this change is not induced by phosphorylation of the C-terminal sites but most likely by phosphorylation of the major sites in the kinase domain (Tyr1146, Tyr1150, and Tyr1151). Binding of antipeptide antibodies to the C-terminal domain modulated (activated or inhibited) both mutant and wild-type receptor-mediated phosphorylation of poly(Glu/Tyr). In contrast to the wild-type receptor, Y/F2 exhibited the same C-terminal configuration before and after insulin binding, evidencing that mutation of Tyr1316 and Tyr1322 introduced conformational changes in the C-terminus. Finally, the mutant receptor was 2-fold more active than the wild-type receptor for poly(Glu/Tyr) phosphorylation. In conclusion, the whole C-terminal region of the insulin receptor beta-subunit is likely to exert a regulatory influence on the receptor kinase activity. Perturbations of the C-terminal region, such as binding of antipeptides or mutation of Tyr1316 and Tyr1322, provoke alterations at the receptor kinase level, leading to activation or inhibition of the enzymic activity. PMID:7690586

  6. 5-HT7 receptor activation promotes an increase in TrkB receptor expression and phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Samarajeewa, Anshula; Goldemann, Lolita; Vasefi, Maryam S.; Ahmed, Nawaz; Gondora, Nyasha; Khanderia, Chandni; Mielke, John G.; Beazely, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin (5-HT) type 7 receptor is expressed throughout the CNS including the cortex and hippocampus. We have previously demonstrated that the application of 5-HT7 receptor agonists to primary hippocampal neurons and SH-SY5Y cells increases platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor expression and promotes neuroprotection against N-methyl-D-aspartate-(NMDA)-induced toxicity. The tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) receptor is one of the receptors for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and is associated with neurodevelopmental and neuroprotective effects. Application of LP 12 to primary cerebral cortical cultures, SH-SY5Y cells, as well as the retinal ganglion cell line, RGC-5, increased both the expression of full length TrkB as well as its basal phosphorylation state at tyrosine 816. The increase in TrkB expression and phosphorylation was observed as early as 30 min after 5-HT7 receptor activation. In addition to full-length TrkB, kinase domain-deficient forms may be expressed and act as dominant-negative proteins toward the full length receptor. We have identified distinct patterns of TrkB isoform expression across our cell lines and cortical cultures. Although TrkB receptor expression is regulated by cyclic AMP and Gαs-coupled GPCRs in several systems, we demonstrate that, depending on the model system, pathways downstream of both Gαs and Gα12 are involved in the regulation of TrkB expression by 5-HT7 receptors. Given the number of psychiatric and degenerative diseases associated with TrkB/BDNF deficiency and the current interest in developing 5-HT7 receptor ligands as pharmaceuticals, identifying signaling relationships between these two receptors will aid in our understanding of the potential therapeutic effects of 5-HT7 receptor ligands. PMID:25426041

  7. Receptor downregulation and desensitization enhance the information processing ability of signaling receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Shankaran, Harish; Wiley, H. S.; Resat, Haluk

    2007-11-09

    The activation of cell surface receptors in addition to initiating signaling events also triggers regulatory processes that restrict the duration of signaling. Acute attenuation of signaling can be accomplished either via ligand-induced internalization of receptors (receptor downregulation) or via ligand-induced receptor desensitization. These phenomena have traditionally been viewed in the context of “adaptation” wherein the receptor system enters a refractory state in the presence of sustained ligand stimuli and thereby prevents the cell from “over-responding” to the ligand. Here we use the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) as model systems to respectively examine the effects of downregulation and desensitization on the ability of signaling receptors to decode time-varying ligand stimuli. We show that downregulation and desensitization mechanisms can lead to tight and efficient input-output coupling thereby ensuring synchronous processing of ligand inputs. Frequency response analysis indicates that upstream elements of the EGFR and GPCR networks behave like low-pass filters. Receptor downregulation and desensitization increase the filter bandwidth thereby enabling the receptor systems to decode inputs in a wider frequency range. Further, system-theoretic analysis reveals that the receptor systems are analogous to classical mechanical over-damped oscillators. This analogy enables us to describe downregulation and desensitization as phenomena that make the systems more resilient in responding to ligand perturbations thereby improving the stability of the system resting state. We hypothesize that, in addition to serving as mechanisms for adaptation, receptor downregulation and desensitization play a critical role in temporal information processing.

  8. Teleost Chemokines and Their Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Steve; Tafalla, Carolina

    2015-01-01

    Chemokines are a superfamily of cytokines that appeared about 650 million years ago, at the emergence of vertebrates, and are responsible for regulating cell migration under both inflammatory and physiological conditions. The first teleost chemokine gene was reported in rainbow trout in 1998. Since then, numerous chemokine genes have been identified in diverse fish species evidencing the great differences that exist among fish and mammalian chemokines, and within the different fish species, as a consequence of extensive intrachromosomal gene duplications and different infectious experiences. Subsequently, it has only been possible to establish clear homologies with mammalian chemokines in the case of some chemokines with well-conserved homeostatic roles, whereas the functionality of other chemokine genes will have to be independently addressed in each species. Despite this, functional studies have only been undertaken for a few of these chemokine genes. In this review, we describe the current state of knowledge of chemokine biology in teleost fish. We have mainly focused on those species for which more research efforts have been made in this subject, specifically zebrafish (Danio rerio), rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and catfish (Ictalurus punctatus), outlining which genes have been identified thus far, highlighting the most important aspects of their expression regulation and addressing any known aspects of their biological role in immunity. Finally, we summarise what is known about the chemokine receptors in teleosts and provide some analysis using recently available data to help characterise them more clearly. PMID:26569324

  9. The Cryptochrome Blue Light Receptors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xuhong; Liu, Hongtao; Klejnot, John; Lin, Chentao

    2010-09-23

    Cryptochromes are photolyase-like blue light receptors originally discovered in Arabidopsis but later found in other plants, microbes, and animals. Arabidopsis has two cryptochromes, CRY1 and CRY2, which mediate primarily blue light inhibition of hypocotyl elongation and photoperiodic control of floral initiation, respectively. In addition, cryptochromes also regulate over a dozen other light responses, including circadian rhythms, tropic growth, stomata opening, guard cell development, root development, bacterial and viral pathogen responses, abiotic stress responses, cell cycles, programmed cell death, apical dominance, fruit and ovule development, seed dormancy, and magnetoreception. Cryptochromes have two domains, the N-terminal PHR (Photolyase-Homologous Region) domain that bind the chromophore FAD (flavin adenine dinucleotide), and the CCE (CRY C-terminal Extension) domain that appears intrinsically unstructured but critical to the function and regulation of cryptochromes. Most cryptochromes accumulate in the nucleus, and they undergo blue light-dependent phosphorylation or ubiquitination. It is hypothesized that photons excite electrons of the flavin molecule, resulting in redox reaction or circular electron shuttle and conformational changes of the photoreceptors. The photoexcited cryptochrome are phosphorylated to adopt an open conformation, which interacts with signaling partner proteins to alter gene expression at both transcriptional and posttranslational levels and consequently the metabolic and developmental programs of plants. PMID:21841916

  10. Immunochemical studies of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    André, C; Marullo, S; Guillet, J G; Convents, A; Lauwereys, M; Kaveri, S; Hoebeke, J; Strosberg, A D

    1987-01-01

    Muscarinic receptors have been purified from calf forebrain plasma cell membranes by affinity chromatography on a dexetimide-agarose gel. SDS-PAGE analysis showed a single 70 kDa band. Monoclonal antibodies have been prepared against these affinity purified 70 kDa protein(s). One antibody, M-35, immunoprecipitated up to 80% of digitonin-solubilized muscarinic receptors. M-35 had agonist-like effects on guinea-pig myometrium: it increased the intracellular cyclic GMP content, decreased prostaglandin-induced cyclic AMP accumulation and caused muscle contractions. The two first effects were inhibited by atropine. M-35 was used to visualize muscarinic receptors at the surface of human fibroblastic cells. In the particular cell line used, the receptors have a low affinity for pirenzepine, were negatively coupled to adenylate cyclase and mediated increase in the phosphatidyl-inositol breakdown. PMID:3040987

  11. Selectivity of odorant receptors in insects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insect olfactory receptors (ORs) detect chemical signals, shape neuronal physiology and regulate behavior. Although ORs have been categorized as generalists and specialists based on their ligand spectrum, both electrophysiological studies and recent pharmacological investigations show that ORs spec...

  12. Bioisosteric matrices for ligands of serotonin receptors.

    PubMed

    Warszycki, Dawid; Mordalski, Stefan; Staroń, Jakub; Bojarski, Andrzej J

    2015-04-01

    The concept of bioisosteric replacement matrices is applied to explore the chemical space of serotonin receptor ligands, aiming to determine the most efficient ways of manipulating the affinity for all 5-HT receptor subtypes. Analysis of a collection of over 1 million bioisosteres of compounds with measured activity towards serotonin receptors revealed that an average of 31 % of the ligands for each target are mutual bioisosteres. In addition, the collected dataset allowed the development of bioisosteric matrices-qualitative and quantitative descriptions of the biological effects of each predefined type of bioisosteric substitution, providing favored paths of modifying the compounds. The concept exemplified here for serotonin receptor ligands can likely be more broadly applied to other target classes, thus representing a useful guide for medicinal chemists designing novel ligands. PMID:25772514

  13. The novel platelet activation receptor CLEC-2.

    PubMed

    Suzuki-Inoue, Katsue; Inoue, Osamu; Ozaki, Yukio

    2011-01-01

    The c-type lectin-like receptor 2 (CLEC-2) was first identified from a bio-informatic screen for c-type lectin-like receptors. However, neither its function nor its ligand(s) had been elucidated for several years. In 2006, we reported that the receptor is expressed on the surface of platelets and serves as a receptor for the snake venom rhodocytin, which potently stimulates platelet aggregation. Since then CLEC-2 has been intensively investigated, and its endogenous/exogenous ligands and several physiological/pathological roles have been clarified. In this article and its accompanying poster, we outline the structure, distribution, signal transduction mechanism and functions of CLEC-2. PMID:21714702

  14. Endothelial glucocorticoid receptor suppresses atherogenesis- Brief Report

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinbo; Rotllan, Noemi; Feng, Yan; Zhou, Han; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos; Yu, Jun; Sessa, William C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to determine the role of the endothelial glucocorticoid receptor in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Approach and Results Control mice and mice lacking the endothelial glucocorticoid receptor were bred onto an Apoe knockout background and subjected to high-fat diet feeding for 12 weeks. Assessment of body weight and total cholesterol and triglycerides before and after the diet revealed no differences between the two groups of mice. However, mice lacking the endothelial glucocorticoid receptor developed more severe atherosclerotic lesions in the aorta, brachiocephalic artery and aortic sinus as well as a heightened inflammatory milieu as evidence by increased macrophage recruitment in the lesions. Conclusions These data suggest the endothelial glucocorticoid receptor is important for tonic inhibition of inflammation and limitation of atherosclerosis progression in this model. PMID:25810297

  15. Structure of toll-like receptors.

    PubMed

    Gay, Nicholas J; Gangloff, Monique

    2008-01-01

    The ten human Toll-like receptors are able to respond to an extremely diverse range of microbial products ranging from di- and tri-acylated lipids to nucleic acids. An understanding of the molecular structure adopted by the receptor extracellular, transmembrane, and cytoplasmic domains and the way in which these structures interact with ligands and downstream signaling adapters can explain how recognition and signal transduction are achieved at a molecular level. In this article we discuss how the leucine-rich repeats of the receptor ectodomain have evolved to bind a wide variety of biological molecules. We also discuss how ligand binding induces dimerization of two receptor chains and initiates a series of protein conformational changes that lead to a signaling event in the cytoplasm of the immune system cell. Thus, the signaling process of the TLRs can be viewed as a unidirectional molecular switch. PMID:18071660

  16. Superactivation of AMPA receptors by auxiliary proteins

    PubMed Central

    Carbone, Anna L.; Plested, Andrew J. R.

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate receptors form complexes in the brain with auxiliary proteins, which control their activity during fast synaptic transmission through a seemingly bewildering array of effects. Here we devise a way to isolate the activation of complexes using polyamines, which enables us to show that transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs) exert their effects principally on the channel opening reaction. A thermodynamic argument suggests that because TARPs promote channel opening, receptor activation promotes AMPAR-TARP complexes into a superactive state with high open probability. A simple model based on this idea predicts all known effects of TARPs on AMPA receptor function. This model also predicts unexpected phenomena including massive potentiation in the absence of desensitization and supramaximal recovery that we subsequently detected in electrophysiological recordings. This transient positive feedback mechanism has implications for information processing in the brain, because it should allow activity-dependent facilitation of excitatory synaptic transmission through a postsynaptic mechanism. PMID:26744192

  17. Genetics Home Reference: leptin receptor deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... leptin receptor gene causes obesity and pituitary dysfunction. Nature. 1998 Mar 26;392(6674):398-401. Citation ... and human weight regulation: lessons from experiments of nature. Ann Acad Med Singapore. 2009 Jan;38(1): ...

  18. Endothelin receptor antagonists in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Channick, Richard N; Sitbon, Olivier; Barst, Robyn J; Manes, Alessandra; Rubin, Lewis J

    2004-06-16

    Endothelin receptor antagonism has emerged as an important therapeutic strategy in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Laboratory and clinical investigations have clearly shown that endothelin (ET)-1 is overexpressed in several forms of pulmonary vascular disease and likely plays a significant pathogenetic role in the development and progression of pulmonary vasculopathy. Oral endothelin receptor antagonists (ERAs) have been shown to improve pulmonary hemodynamics, exercise capacity, functional status, and clinical outcome in several randomized placebo-controlled trials. Bosentan, a dual-receptor antagonist, is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for class III and IV patients with PAH, based on two phase III trials. In addition to its efficacy as sole therapy, bosentan may have a role as part of a combination of drugs such as a prostanoid or sildenafil. The selective endothelin receptor-A antagonists sitaxsentan and ambrisentan are currently undergoing investigation. PMID:15194180

  19. Structure biology of selective autophagy receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byeong-Won; Kwon, Do Hoon; Song, Hyun Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a process tightly regulated by various autophagy-related proteins. It is generally classified into non-selective and selective autophagy. Whereas non-selective autophagy is triggered when the cell is under starvation, selective autophagy is involved in eliminating dysfunctional organelles, misfolded and/or ubiquitylated proteins, and intracellular pathogens. These components are recognized by autophagy receptors and delivered to phagophores. Several selective autophagy receptors have been identified and characterized. They usually have some common domains, such as motif, a specific cargo interacting (ubiquitin-dependent or ubiquitin-independent) domain. Recently, structural data of these autophagy receptors has been described, which provides an insight of their function in the selective autophagic process. In this review, we summarize the most up-to-date findings about the structure-function of autophagy receptors that regulates selective autophagy. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(2): 73-80] PMID:26698872

  20. Histamine-2 Receptor Antagonists and Semen Quality.

    PubMed

    Banihani, Saleem A

    2016-01-01

    Histamine-2 receptor antagonists are a class of drugs used to treat the acid-related gastrointestinal diseases such as ulcer and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. Although such drugs, especially ranitidine and famotidine, are still widely used, their effects on semen quality, and hence on male infertility, is still unclear. This MiniReview systematically addresses and summarizes the effect of histamine-2 receptor antagonists (cimetidine, ranitidine, nizatidine and famotidine) on semen quality, particularly, on sperm function. Cimetidine appears to have adverse effects on semen quality. While the effects of ranitidine and nizatidine on semen quality are still controversial, famotidine does not appear to change semen quality. Therefore, additional studies will be required to clarify whether histamine-2 receptor-independent effects of these drugs play a role in semen quality as well as further clinical studies including direct comparison of the histamine-2 receptor antagonists. PMID:26176290

  1. Estrogen receptor signaling during vertebrate development

    PubMed Central

    Bondesson, Maria; Hao, Ruixin; Lin, Chin-Yo; Williams, Cecilia; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen receptors are expressed and their cognate ligands produced in all vertebrates, indicative of important and conserved functions. Through evolution estrogen has been involved in controlling reproduction, affecting both the development of reproductive organs and reproductive behavior. This review broadly describes the synthesis of estrogens and the expression patterns of aromatase and the estrogen receptors, in relation to estrogen functions in the developing fetus and child. We focus on the role of estrogens for development of reproductive tissues, as well as non-reproductive effects on the developing brain. We collate data from human, rodent, bird and fish studies and highlight common and species-specific effects of estrogen signaling on fetal development. Morphological malformations originating from perturbed estrogen signaling in estrogen receptor and aromatase knockout mice are discussed, as well as the clinical manifestations of rare estrogen receptor alpha and aromatase gene mutations in humans. PMID:24954179

  2. Ecdysteroid receptors in Drosophila melanogaster adult females

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ecdysteroid receptors were identified and partially characterized from total cell extracts of whole animals and dissected tissues from Drosophila melanogaster adult females. Binding studies indicated the presence of two ecdysteroid binding components having high affinity and specificity consistent w...

  3. Gq-Coupled Receptors in Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lu; Shi, Guixiu

    2016-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins can be divided into Gi, Gs, Gq/11, and G12/13 subfamilies according to their α subunits. The main function of G proteins is transducing signals from G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), a family of seven transmembrane receptors. In recent years, studies have demonstrated that GPCRs interact with Gq, a member of the Gq/11 subfamily of G proteins. This interaction facilitates the vital role of this family of proteins in immune regulation and autoimmunity, particularly for Gαq, which is considered the functional α subunit of Gq protein. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms through which Gq-coupled receptors control autoreactive lymphocytes is critical and may provide insights into the treatment of autoimmune disorders. In this review, we summarize recent advances in studies of the role of Gq-coupled receptors in autoimmunity, with a focus on their pathologic role and downstream signaling. PMID:26885533

  4. Common mechanisms activate plant guard receptors and TLR4

    PubMed Central

    Kagan, Jonathan C.

    2014-01-01

    In metazoans, the innate immune system uses Pattern Recognition Receptors to detect conserved microbial products, whereas in plants Guard Receptors detect virulence factors or activities encoded by pathogens. In a recent study, Williams and colleagues report that plant Guard receptors can be activated by a mechanism remarkably similar to that of mammalian Toll-like Receptor 4. PMID:25224694

  5. Imaging dopamine receptors in the human brain by position tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, H.N. Jr.; Burns, H.D.; Dannals, R.F.; Wong, D.F.; Langstrom, B.; Duelfer, T.; Frost, J.J.; Ravert, H.T.; Links, J.M.; Rosenbloom, S.B.

    1983-01-01

    Neurotransmitter receptors may be involved in a number of neuropsychiatric disease states. The ligand 3-N-(/sup 11/C)methylspiperone, which preferentially binds to dopamine receptors in vivo, was used to image the receptors by positron emission tomography scanning in baboons and in humans. This technique holds promise for noninvasive clinical studies of dopamine receptors in humans.

  6. Using Nuclear Receptor Activity to Stratify Hepatocarcinogens

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Imran; Houck, Keith; Judson, Richard S.; Kavlock, Robert J.; Martin, Matthew T.; Reif, David M.; Wambaugh, John; Dix, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Nuclear receptors (NR) are a superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors that control a range of cellular processes. Persistent stimulation of some NR is a non-genotoxic mechanism of rodent liver cancer with unclear relevance to humans. Here we report on a systematic analysis of new in vitro human NR activity data on 309 environmental chemicals in relationship to their liver cancer-related chronic outcomes in rodents. Results The effects of 309 environmental chemicals on human constitutive androstane receptors (CAR/NR1I3), pregnane X receptor (PXR/NR1I2), aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR/NR1C), liver X receptors (LXR/NR1H), retinoic X receptors (RXR/NR2B) and steroid receptors (SR/NR3) were determined using in vitro data. Hepatic histopathology, observed in rodents after two years of chronic treatment for 171 of the 309 chemicals, was summarized by a cancer lesion progression grade. Chemicals that caused proliferative liver lesions in both rat and mouse were generally more active for the human receptors, relative to the compounds that only affected one rodent species, and these changes were significant for PPAR (p0.001), PXR (p0.01) and CAR (p0.05). Though most chemicals exhibited receptor promiscuity, multivariate analysis clustered them into relatively few NR activity combinations. The human NR activity pattern of chemicals weakly associated with the severity of rodent liver cancer lesion progression (p0.05). Conclusions The rodent carcinogens had higher in vitro potency for human NR relative to non-carcinogens. Structurally diverse chemicals with similar NR promiscuity patterns weakly associated with the severity of rodent liver cancer progression. While these results do not prove the role of NR activation in human liver cancer, they do have implications for nuclear receptor chemical biology and provide insights into putative toxicity pathways. More importantly, these findings suggest the

  7. Thyroid hormone receptors regulate adipogenesis and carcinogenesis via crosstalk signaling with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Changxue; Cheng, Sheue-Yann

    2012-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) and thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) are members of the nuclear receptor superfamily. They are ligand-dependent transcription factors that interact with their cognate hormone response elements in the promoters to regulate respective target gene expression to modulate cellular functions. While the transcription activity of each is regulated by their respective ligands, recent studies indicate that via multiple mechanisms PPARs and TRs crosstalk to affect diverse biological functions. Here, we review recent advances in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms and biological impact of crosstalk between these two important nuclear receptors, focusing on their roles in adipogenesis and carcinogenesis. PMID:19741045

  8. Purification of PRL receptors from toad kidney: Comparisons with rabbit mammary PRL receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Dunand, M.; Kraehenbuhl, J.P.; Rossier, B.C.; Aubert, M.L. Univ. of Lausanne School of Medicine )

    1988-03-01

    The binding characteristics of the prolactin (PRL) receptors present in toad (Bufo marinus) kidneys were investigated and compared to those of PRL receptors present in rabbit mammary glands. The molecular characteristics of the Triton X-100 solubilized renal and mammary PRL receptors were assessed by gel filtration and by migration analysis on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) after affinity labeling of the binding sites with {sup 125}I-human growth hormone. Similar results were obtained for both receptors. Partial purification of the toad PRL receptor could be achieved by affinity chromatography. The molecular weight of this purified receptor could be determined by analysis of SDS-PAGE. With the use of a polyclonal antiserum raised against a purified preparation of rabbit mammary PRL receptor, one or several antigenic epitope(s) could be identified on the core of the toad renal PRL receptor. In conclusion, although the structure and the biological role(s) of PRL have substantially changed during evolution, the receptor for this hormone has retained many of its structural features as could be assessed between an amphibian and a mammalian species on functionally different target tissues.

  9. AMPA receptor antibodies in limbic encephalitis alter synaptic receptor location

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Meizan; Hughes, Ethan G.; Peng, Xiaoyu; Zhou, Lei; Gleichman, Amy J.; Shu, Huidy; Matà, Sabrina; Kremens, Daniel; Vitaliani, Roberta; Geschwind, Michael D.; Bataller, Luis; Kalb, Robert G.; Davis, Rebecca; Graus, Francesc; Lynch, David R.; Balice-Gordon, Rita; Dalmau, Josep

    2009-01-01

    Background Limbic encephalitis (LE) frequently associates with antibodies to cell surface antigens. Characterization of these antigens is important because it facilitates the diagnosis of those disorders that are treatment-responsive. We report a novel antigen of LE and the effect of patients' antibodies on neuronal cultures. Methods Clinical analysis of 10 patients with LE. Immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry were used to identify the antigens. HEK293 cells expressing the antigens were used in immunocytochemistry and ELISA. The effect of patients' antibodies on cultures of live rat hippocampal neurons was determined with confocal microscopy. Results Median age was 60 years (38-87); 9 were women. Seven had tumors of the lung, breast or thymus. Nine patients responded to immunotherapy or oncological therapy but neurologic relapses, without tumor recurrence, were frequent and influenced the long-term outcome. One untreated patient died of LE. All patients had antibodies against neuronal cell surface antigens that by immunoprecipitation were found to be the GluR1 and GluR2 subunits of the AMPA receptor (AMPAR). HEK293 cells expressing GluR1/2 reacted with all patients' sera or CSF, providing a diagnostic test for the disorder. Application of antibodies to cultures of neurons significantly decreased the number of GluR2-containing AMPAR clusters at synapses with a smaller decrease in overall AMPAR cluster density; these effects were reversed after antibody removal. Conclusions Antibodies to GluR1/2 associate with LE that is often paraneoplastic, treatment-responsive, and has a tendency to relapse. Our findings support an antibody-mediated pathogenesis in which patients' antibodies alter the synaptic localization and number of AMPAR. PMID:19338055

  10. GABAB Receptors, Schizophrenia and Sleep Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Kantrowitz, Joshua; Citrome, Leslie; Javitt, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Evidence for an intrinsic relationship between sleep, cognition and the symptomatic manifestations of schizophrenia is accumulating. This review presents evidence for the possible utility of GABAB receptor agonists for the treatment of subjective and objective sleep abnormalities related to schizophrenia. At the phenotypic level, sleep disturbance occurs in 16–30% of patients with schizophrenia and is related to reduced quality of life and poor coping skills. On the neurophysiological level, studies suggest that sleep deficits reflect a core component of schizophrenia. Specifically, slow-wave sleep deficits, which are inversely correlated with cognition scores, are seen. Moreover, sleep plays an increasingly well documented role in memory consolidation in schizophrenia. Correlations of slow-wave sleep deficits with impaired reaction time and declarative memory have also been reported. Thus, both behavioural insomnia and sleep architecture are critical therapeutic targets in patients with schizophrenia. However, long-term treatment with antipsychotics often results in residual sleep dysfunction and does not improve slow-wave sleep, and adjunctive GABAA receptor modulators, such as benzodiazepines and zolpidem, can impair sleep architecture and cognition in schizophrenia. GABAB receptor agonists have therapeutic potential in schizophrenia. These agents have minimal effect on rapid eye movement sleep while increasing slow-wave sleep. Preclinical associations with increased expression of genes related to slow-wave sleep production and circadian rhythm function have also been reported. GABAB receptor deficits result in a sustained hyperdopaminergic state and can be reversed by a GABAB receptor agonist. Genetic, postmortem and electrophysiological studies also associate GABAB receptors with schizophrenia. While studies thus far have not shown significant effects, prior focus on the use of GABAB receptor agonists has been on the positive symptoms of schizophrenia, with

  11. Purinergic receptors in embryonic and adult neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Ágatha; Illes, Peter; Ulrich, Henning

    2016-05-01

    ATP (adenosine 5'-triphosphate), one of the most ancient neurotransmitters, exerts essential functions in the brain, including neurotransmission and modulation of synaptic activity. Moreover, this nucleotide has been attributed with trophic properties and experimental evidence points to the participation of ATP-activated P2X and P2Y purinergic receptors in embryonic brain development as well as in adult neurogenesis for maintenance of normal brain functions and neuroregeneration upon brain injury. We discuss here the available data on purinergic P2 receptor expression and function during brain development and in the neurogenic zones of the adult brain, as well as the insights based on the use of in vitro stem cell cultures. While several P2 receptor subtypes were shown to be expressed during in vitro and in vivo neurogenesis, specific functions have been proposed for P2Y1, P2Y2 metabotropic as well as P2X2 ionotropic receptors to promote neurogenesis. Further, the P2X7 receptor is suggested to function in the maintenance of pools of neural stem and progenitor cells through induction of proliferation or cell death, depending on the microenvironment. Pathophysiological actions have been proposed for this receptor in worsening damage in brain disease. The P2X7 receptor and possibly additional P2 receptor subtypes have been implicated in pathophysiology of neurological diseases including Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease and epilepsy. New strategies in cell therapy could involve modulation of purinergic signaling, either in the achievement of more effective protocols to obtain viable and homogeneous cell populations or in the process of functional engraftment of transplanted cells into the damaged brain. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Purines in Neurodegeneration and Neuroregeneration'. PMID:26456352

  12. Structure of the human progesterone receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Misrahi, M; Venencie, P Y; Saugier-Veber, P; Sar, S; Dessen, P; Milgrom, E

    1993-11-16

    The complete organization of the human progesterone receptor (hPR) gene has been determined. It spans over 90 kbp and contains eight exons. The first exon encodes the N-terminal part of the receptor. The DNA binding domain is encoded by two exons, each exon corresponding to one zinc finger. The steroid binding domain is encoded by five exons. The nucleotide sequence of 1144 bp of the 5' flanking region has been determined. PMID:8241270

  13. Progesterone receptor signalling in retinal photoreceptor neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Alice C Wyse; Roche, Sarah L; Byrne, Ashleigh M; Ruiz-Lopez, Ana M; Cotter, Thomas G

    2016-01-01

    'Norgestrel', a synthetic form of the female hormone progesterone has been identified as potential drug candidate for the treatment of the degenerative eye disease retinitis pigmentosa. However, to date, no work has looked at the compound's specific cellular target. Therefore, this study aimed to identify the receptor target of Norgestrel and begin to examine its potential mechanism of action in the retina. In this work, we identify and characterize the expression of progesterone receptors present in the C57 wild type and rd10 mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa. Classical progesterone receptors A and B (PR A/B), progesterone receptor membrane components 1 and 2 (PGRMC1, PGRMC2) and membrane progesterone receptors α, β and γ were found to be expressed. All receptors excluding PR A/B were also found in the 661W photoreceptor cell line. PGRMC1 is a key regulator of apoptosis and its expression is up-regulated in the degenerating rd10 mouse retina. Activated by Norgestrel through nuclear trafficking, siRNA knock down of PGRMC1 abrogated the protective properties of Norgestrel on damaged photoreceptors. Furthermore, specific inhibition of PGRMC1 by AG205 blocked Norgestrel-induced protection in stressed retinal explants. Therefore, we conclude that PGRMC1 is crucial to the neuroprotective effects of Norgestrel on stressed photoreceptors. The synthetic progestin 'Norgestrel' has been identified as a potential therapeutic for the treatment of Retinitis Pigmentosa, a degenerative eye disease. However, the mechanism behind this neuroprotection is currently unknown. In this work, we identify 'Progesterone Receptor Membrane Component 1' as the major progesterone receptor eliciting the protective effects of Norgestrel, both in vitro and ex vivo. This furthers our understanding of Norgestrel's molecular mechanism, which we hope will help bring Norgestrel one step closer to the clinic. PMID:26447367

  14. External imaging of cerebral muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Eckelman, W.C.; Reba, R.C.; Rzeszotarski, W.J.; Gibson, R.E.; Hill, T.; Holman, B.L.; Budinger, T.; Conklin, J.J.; Eng, R.; Grissom, M.P.

    1984-01-20

    A radioiodinated ligand that binds to muscarinic acetylcholine receptors was shown to distribute in the brain by a receptor-mediated process. With single-photon-emission imaging techniques, radioactivity was detected in the cerebrum but not in the cerebellum, whereas with a flow-limited radiotracer, radioactivity was detected in cerebrum and cerebellum. Single-photon-emission computed tomography showed good definition of the caudate putamen and cortex in man.

  15. External Imaging of Cerebral Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckelman, William C.; Reba, Richard C.; Rzeszotarski, Waclaw J.; Gibson, Raymond E.; Hill, Thomas; Holman, B. Leonard; Budinger, Thomas; Conklin, James J.; Eng, Robert; Grissom, Michael P.

    1984-01-01

    A radioiodinated ligand that binds to muscarinic acetylcholine receptors was shown to distribute in the brain by a receptor-mediated process. With single-photon-emission imaging techniques, radioactivity was detected in the cerebrum but not in the cerebellum, whereas with a flow-limited radiotracer, radioactivity was detected in cerebrum and cerebellum. Single-photon-emission computed tomography showed good definition of the caudate putamen and cortex in man.

  16. Photoaffinity labeling of A1-adenosine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Klotz, K.N.; Cristalli, G.; Grifantini, M.; Vittori, S.; Lohse, M.J.

    1985-11-25

    The ligand-binding subunit of the A1-adenosine receptor has been identified by photoaffinity labeling. A photolabile derivative of R-N6-phenylisopropyladenosine, R-2-azido-N6-p-hydroxyphenylisopropyladenosine (R-AHPIA), has been synthesized as a covalent specific ligand for A1-adenosine receptors. In adenylate cyclase studies with membranes of rat fat cells and human platelets, R-AHPIA has adenosine receptor agonist activity with a more than 60-fold selectivity for the A1-subtype. It competes for (TH)N6-phenylisopropyladenosine binding to A1-receptors of rat brain membranes with a Ki value of 1.6 nM. After UV irradiation, R-AHPIA binds irreversibly to the receptor, as indicated by a loss of (TH)N6-phenylisopropyladenosine binding after extensive washing; the Ki value for this photoinactivation is 1.3 nM. The p-hydroxyphenyl substituent of R-AHPIA can be directly radioiodinated to give a photoaffinity label of high specific radioactivity ( SVI-AHPIA). This compound has a KD value of about 1.5 nM as assessed from saturation and kinetic experiments. Adenosine analogues compete for SVI-AHPIA binding to rat brain membranes with an order of potency characteristic for A1-adenosine receptors. Dissociation curves following UV irradiation at equilibrium demonstrate 30-40% irreversible specific binding. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicates that the probe is photoincorporated into a single peptide of Mr = 35,000. Labeling of this peptide can be blocked specifically and stereoselectively by adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists in a manner which is typical for the A1-subtype. The results indicate that SVI-AHPIA identifies the ligand-binding subunit of the A1-adenosine receptor, which is a peptide with Mr = 35,000.

  17. Lipopolysaccharide recognition, CD14, and lipopolysaccharide receptors.

    PubMed

    Ingalls, R R; Heine, H; Lien, E; Yoshimura, A; Golenbock, D

    1999-06-01

    The ability of a host to sense invasion by a pathogenic organism, and to respond appropriately to control infection, is paramount to survival. To that end, an array of receptors and binding proteins has evolved as part of the innate immune system to detect Gram-negative bacteria. This article reviews the role of CD14, other LPS binding proteins, and the Toll family of receptors in the innate recognition of bacterial lipopolysaccharide. PMID:10340170

  18. The receptors and cells for mammalian taste.

    PubMed

    Chandrashekar, Jayaram; Hoon, Mark A; Ryba, Nicholas J P; Zuker, Charles S

    2006-11-16

    The emerging picture of taste coding at the periphery is one of elegant simplicity. Contrary to what was generally believed, it is now clear that distinct cell types expressing unique receptors are tuned to detect each of the five basic tastes: sweet, sour, bitter, salty and umami. Importantly, receptor cells for each taste quality function as dedicated sensors wired to elicit stereotypic responses. PMID:17108952

  19. Dopamine receptors in a songbird brain

    PubMed Central

    Kubikova, Lubica; Wada, Kazuhiro; Jarvis, Erich D

    2010-01-01

    Dopamine is a key neuromodulatory transmitter in the brain. It acts through dopamine receptors to affect changes in neural activity, gene expression, and behavior. In songbirds, dopamine is released into the striatal song nucleus Area X, and the levels depend on social contexts of undirected and directed singing. This differential release is associated with differential expression of activity-dependent genes, such as egr1 (avian zenk), which in mammalian brain are modulated by dopamine receptors. Here we cloned from zebra finch brain cDNAs of all avian dopamine receptors: the D1 (D1A, D1B, D1D) and D2 (D2, D3, D4) families. Comparative sequence analyses of predicted proteins revealed expected phylogenetic relationships, in which the D1 family exists as single exon and the D2 family exists as spliced exon genes. In both zebra finch and chicken, the D1A, D1B, and D2 receptors were highly expressed in the striatum, the D1D and D3 throughout the pallium and within the mesopallium, respectively, and the D4 mainly in the cerebellum. Furthermore, within the zebra finch, all receptors, except for D4, showed differential expression in song nuclei relative to the surrounding regions and developmentally regulated expression that decreased for most receptors during the sensory acquisition and sensorimotor phases of song learning. Within Area X, half of the cells expressed both D1A and D2 receptors, and a higher proportion of the D1A-only-containing neurons expressed egr1 during undirected but not during directed singing. Our findings are consistent with hypotheses that dopamine receptors may be involved in song development and social context-dependent behaviors. J. Comp. Neurol. 518:741–769, 2010. © 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:20058221

  20. Cellular Functions of Transient Receptor Potential channels

    PubMed Central

    Dadon, Daniela; Minke, Baruch

    2010-01-01

    Transient Receptor Potential channels are polymodal cellular sensors involved in a wide variety of cellular processes, mainly by increasing cellular Ca2+. In this review we focus on the roles of these channels in: i) cell death ii) proliferation and differentiation and iii) synaptic vesicle release. Cell death Ca2+ influx participates in apoptotic and necrotic cell death. The Ca2+ permeability and high sensitivity of part of these channels to oxidative/metabolic stress make them important participants in cell death. Several examples are given. Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 2 is activated by H2O2, inducing cell death through an increase in cellular Ca2+ and activation of Poly ADP-Ribose Polymerase. Exposure of cultured cortical neurons to oxygen-glucose deprivation, in vitro, causes cell death via cation influx, mediated by Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 7. Metabolic stress constitutively activates the Ca2+ permeable Transient Receptor Potential channels of Drosophila photoreceptor in the dark, potentially leading to retinal degeneration. Similar sensitivity to metabolic stress characterizes several mammalian Transient Receptor Potential Canonical channels. Proliferation and differentiation The rise in cytosolic Ca2+ induces cell growth, differentiation and proliferation via activation of several transcription factors. Activation a variety of store operated and Transient Receptor Potential channels cause a rise in cytosolic Ca2+, making these channels components involved in proliferation and differentiation. Synaptic vesicle release Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 7 channels reside in synaptic vesicles and regulate neurotransmitter release by a mechanism that is not entirely clear. All the above features of Transient Receptor Potential channels make them crucial components in important, sometimes conflicting, cellular processes that still need to be explored. PMID:20399884

  1. Posttranslational regulation of AMPA receptor trafficking and function

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wei; Roche, Katherine W.

    2011-01-01

    In the mammalian central nervous system, the majority of fast excitatory synaptic transmission is mediated by glutamate acting on AMPA-type ionotropic glutamate receptors. The abundance of AMPA receptors at the synapse can be modulated through receptor trafficking, which dynamically regulates many fundamental brain functions, including learning and memory. Reversible posttranslational modifications, including phosphorylation, palmitoylation and ubiquitination of AMPA receptor subunits are important regulatory mechanisms for controlling synaptic AMPA receptor expression and function. In this review, we highlight recent advances in the study of AMPA receptor posttranslational modifications and discuss how these modifications regulate AMPA receptor trafficking and function at synapses. PMID:22000952

  2. Opioid receptor desensitization: mechanisms and its link to tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Allouche, Stéphane; Noble, Florence; Marie, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Opioid receptors (OR) are part of the class A of G-protein coupled receptors and the target of the opiates, the most powerful analgesic molecules used in clinic. During a protracted use, a tolerance to analgesic effect develops resulting in a reduction of the effectiveness. So understanding mechanisms of tolerance is a great challenge and may help to find new strategies to tackle this side effect. This review will summarize receptor-related mechanisms that could underlie tolerance especially receptor desensitization. We will focus on the latest data obtained on molecular mechanisms involved in opioid receptor desensitization: phosphorylation, receptor uncoupling, internalization, and post-endocytic fate of the receptor. PMID:25566076

  3. Dopamine receptor heteromeric complexes and their emerging functions.

    PubMed

    George, Susan R; Kern, Andras; Smith, Roy G; Franco, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine neurotransmission is traditionally accepted as occurring through the five dopamine receptors that transduce its signal. Recent evidence has demonstrated that the range of physiologically relevant dopamine signaling complexes is greatly expanded by the ability of dopamine receptors to interact with other dopamine receptors and with receptors of other endogenous signaling ligands. These novel heteromeric complexes have functional properties distinct from the component receptors or are able to modulate the canonical signaling and function of the cognate receptors. These dopamine receptor heteromers provide new insight into physiological mechanisms and pathophysiological processes involving dopamine. PMID:24968781

  4. Steroid hormone receptors in prostatic hyperplasia and prostatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Khalid, B A; Nurshireen, A; Rashidah, M; Zainal, B Y; Roslan, B A; Mahamooth, Z

    1990-06-01

    One hundred and six prostatic tissue samples obtained from transurethral resection were analysed for androgen and estrogen receptors. In 62 of these, progesterone and glucocorticoid receptors were also assayed. Steroid receptors were assayed using single saturation dose 3H-labelled ligand assays. Ninety percent of the 97 prostatic hyperplasia tissues and six of the nine prostatic carcinoma tissues were positive for androgen receptors. Estrogen receptors were only present in 19% and 33% respectively. Progesterone receptors were present in 70% of the tissues, but glucocorticoid receptors were present in only 16% of prostatic hyperplasia and none in prostatic carcinoma. PMID:1725553

  5. Origin of basal activity in mammalian olfactory receptor neurons

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Mammalian odorant receptors form a large, diverse group of G protein–coupled receptors that determine the sensitivity and response profile of olfactory receptor neurons. But little is known if odorant receptors control basal and also stimulus-induced cellular properties of olfactory receptor neurons other than ligand specificity. This study demonstrates that different odorant receptors have varying degrees of basal activity, which drives concomitant receptor current fluctuations and basal action potential firing. This basal activity can be suppressed by odorants functioning as inverse agonists. Furthermore, odorant-stimulated olfactory receptor neurons expressing different odorant receptors can have strikingly different response patterns in the later phases of prolonged stimulation. Thus, the influence of odorant receptor choice on response characteristics is much more complex than previously thought, which has important consequences on odor coding and odor information transfer to the brain. PMID:20974772

  6. Sulfate recognition by a hexaaza cryptand receptor.

    PubMed

    Mateus, Pedro; Delgado, Rita; André, Vânia; Teresa Duarte, M

    2015-01-21

    A hexamine macrobicycle with pyrrolyl spacers was evaluated as an anion receptor in its protonated forms. The protonation constants of the receptor, as well as its association constants with Cl(-), NO3(-), AcO(-), ClO4(-), H2PO4(-), and SO4(2-) were determined by potentiometry at 298.2 ± 0.1 K in H2O-MeOH (50 : 50 v/v) and at an ionic strength of 0.10 ± 0.01 M in KTsO. These studies revealed that the Hnpyrr(n+) receptor has a very high effective association constant value for the SO4(2-) at pH 4.0 (log Keff = 6.42), and it is selective for the uptake of this anion in the presence of the other studied anionic substrates. In particular, the receptor showed very high SO4(2-)/NO3(-) selectivity. Using the indicator-displacement approach the receptor is able to signal the presence of sulfate by a change of color. Single crystal X-ray diffraction determination of [(H6pyrr)(SO4)(H2O)3](SO4)2·9.3H2O revealed the presence of one sulfate anion inside the receptor cavity and showed that the encapsulation of the anion is favored by an array of nine hydrogen bonding interactions, including N-HO, C-HO and water-mediated ones. PMID:25407639

  7. Peptide binding at the GLP-1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Mann, R; Nasr, N; Hadden, D; Sinfield, J; Abidi, F; Al-Sabah, S; de Maturana, R López; Treece-Birch, J; Willshaw, A; Donnelly, D

    2007-08-01

    The receptor for GLP-1 [glucagon-like peptide-1-(7-36)-amide] is a member of the 'Family B' of GPCRs (G-protein-coupled receptors) comprising an extracellular N-terminal domain containing six conserved cysteine residues (the N-domain) and a core domain (or J-domain) comprising the seven transmembrane helices and interconnecting loop regions. According to the two-domain model for peptide binding, the N-domain is primarily responsible for providing most of the peptide binding energy, whereas the core domain is responsible for binding the N-terminal region of the peptide agonists and transmitting the signal to the intracellular G-protein. Two interesting differences between the binding properties of two GLP-1 receptor agonists, GLP-1 and EX-4 (exendin-4), can be observed. First, while GLP-1 requires its full length to maintain high affinity, the eight N-terminal residues of EX-4 can be removed with little reduction in affinity. Secondly, EX-4 (but not GLP-1) can bind to the fully isolated N-domain of the receptor with an affinity matching that of the full-length receptor. In order to better understand these differences, we have studied the interaction between combinations of full-length or truncated ligands with full-length or truncated receptors. PMID:17635131

  8. Rapid steroid hormone actions via membrane receptors.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Nofrat; Verma, Anjali; Bivens, Caroline B; Schwartz, Zvi; Boyan, Barbara D

    2016-09-01

    Steroid hormones regulate a wide variety of physiological and developmental functions. Traditional steroid hormone signaling acts through nuclear and cytosolic receptors, altering gene transcription and subsequently regulating cellular activity. This is particularly important in hormonally-responsive cancers, where therapies that target classical steroid hormone receptors have become clinical staples in the treatment and management of disease. Much progress has been made in the last decade in detecting novel receptors and elucidating their mechanisms, particularly their rapid signaling effects and subsequent impact on tumorigenesis. Many of these receptors are membrane-bound and lack DNA-binding sites, functionally separating them from their classical cytosolic receptor counterparts. Membrane-bound receptors have been implicated in a number of pathways that disrupt the cell cycle and impact tumorigenesis. Among these are pathways that involve phospholipase D, phospholipase C, and phosphoinositide-3 kinase. The crosstalk between these pathways has been shown to affect apoptosis and proliferation in cardiac cells, osteoblasts, and chondrocytes as well as cancer cells. This review focuses on rapid signaling by 17β-estradiol and 1α,25-dihydroxy vitamin D3 to examine the integrated actions of classical and rapid steroid signaling pathways both in contrast to each other and in concert with other rapid signaling pathways. This new approach lends insight into rapid signaling by steroid hormones and its potential for use in targeted drug therapies that maximize the benefits of traditional steroid hormone-directed therapies while mitigating their less desirable effects. PMID:27288742

  9. Pattern recognition receptors in antifungal immunity.

    PubMed

    Plato, Anthony; Hardison, Sarah E; Brown, Gordon D

    2015-03-01

    Receptors of the innate immune system are the first line of defence against infection, being able to recognise and initiate an inflammatory response to invading microorganisms. The Toll-like (TLR), NOD-like (NLR), RIG-I-like (RLR) and C-type lectin-like receptors (CLR) are four receptor families that contribute to the recognition of a vast range of species, including fungi. Many of these pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) are able to initiate innate immunity and polarise adaptive responses upon the recognition of fungal cell wall components and other conserved molecular patterns, including fungal nucleic acids. These receptors induce effective mechanisms of fungal clearance in normal hosts, but medical interventions, immunosuppression or genetic predisposition can lead to susceptibility to fungal infections. In this review, we highlight the importance of PRRs in fungal infection, specifically CLRs, which are the major PRR involved. We will describe specific PRRs in detail, the importance of receptor collaboration in fungal recognition and clearance, and describe how genetic aberrations in PRRs can contribute to disease pathology. PMID:25420452

  10. Multiple allosteric sites on muscarinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Birdsall, N J; Lazareno, S; Popham, A; Saldanha, J

    2001-04-27

    Proteins and small molecules are capable of regulating the agonist binding and function of G-protein coupled receptors by multiple allosteric mechanisms. In the case of muscarinic receptors, there is the well-characterised allosteric site that binds, for example, gallamine and brucine. The protein kinase inhibitor, KT5720, has now been shown to bind to a second allosteric site and to regulate agonist and antagonist binding. The binding of brucine and gallamine does not affect KT5720 binding nor its effects on the dissociation of [3H]-N-methylscopolamine from M1 receptors. Therefore it is possible to have a muscarinic receptor with three small ligands bound simultaneously. A model of the M1 receptor, based on the recently determined structure of rhodopsin, has the residues that have been shown to be important for gallamine binding clustered within and to one side of a cleft in the extracellular face of the receptor. This cleft may represent the access route of acetylcholine to its binding site. PMID:11392621

  11. Interactions of methoxyacetic acid with androgen receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Bagchi, Gargi; Hurst, Christopher H.; Waxman, David J.

    2009-07-15

    Endocrine disruptive compounds (EDC) alter hormone-stimulated, nuclear receptor-dependent physiological and developmental processes by a variety of mechanisms. One recently identified mode of endocrine disruption is through hormone sensitization, where the EDC modulates intracellular signaling pathways that control nuclear receptor function, thereby regulating receptor transcriptional activity indirectly. Methoxyacetic acid (MAA), the primary, active metabolite of the industrial solvent ethylene glycol monomethyl ether and a testicular toxicant, belongs to this EDC class. Modulation of nuclear receptor activity by MAA could contribute to the testicular toxicity associated with MAA exposure. In the present study, we evaluated the impact of MAA on the transcriptional activity of several nuclear receptors including the androgen receptor (AR), which plays a pivotal role in the development and maturation of spermatocytes. AR transcriptional activity is shown to be increased by MAA through a tyrosine kinase signaling pathway that involves PI3-kinase. In a combinatorial setting with AR antagonists, MAA potentiated the AR response without significantly altering the EC{sub 50} for androgen responsiveness, partially alleviating the antagonistic effect of the anti-androgens. Finally, MAA treatment of TM3 mouse testicular Leydig cells markedly increased the expression of Cyp17a1 and Shbg while suppressing Igfbp3 expression by {approx} 90%. Deregulation of these genes may alter androgen synthesis and action in a manner that contributes to MAA-induced testicular toxicity.

  12. Progesterone receptors and ventilatory stimulation by progestin.

    PubMed

    Brodeur, P; Mockus, M; McCullough, R; Moore, L G

    1986-02-01

    Progestin is thought to be a ventilatory stimulant but its effectiveness in raising ventilation is variable in humans and other species. We hypothesized that the level of progesterone receptors was an important determinant of the ventilatory response to progestin. Since estradiol induces progesterone receptor formation, we compared the ventilatory effect of the synthetic progestin medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) given in combination with estradiol with the effects of estradiol alone, MPA alone, or vehicle (saline) in ovariectomized rats. Animals receiving MPA alone had low numbers of progesterone receptors (2.43 pmol/g uterine wt) and had no change in ventilation, arterial Pco2, or Po2. MPA administration raised ventilation 23 +/- 5%, lowered arterial Pco2 3.2 +/- 0.9 Torr (both P less than 0.01) and tended to raise arterial Po2 when given in combination with estradiol to animals with increased numbers of progesterone receptors (4.85 pmol/g uterine wt). Estradiol alone produced the highest number of progesterone receptors (12.3 pmol/g uterine wt) but had no effect on ventilation or arterial Pco2 and decreased arterial Po2. Combined estradiol plus MPA treatment produced a greater fall in arterial Pco2 than did treatment with MPA alone, estradiol, or saline (all P less than 0.05). These results suggest that both an elevation in progestin levels and progesterone receptor numbers are required to stimulate ventilation. PMID:2936712

  13. Systematic prediction of human membrane receptor interactions

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yanjun; Dhiman, Harpreet K.; Bhola, Neil; Budyak, Ivan; Kar, Siddhartha; Man, David; Dutta, Arpana; Tirupula, Kalyan; Carr, Brian I.; Grandis, Jennifer; Bar-Joseph, Ziv; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith

    2010-01-01

    Membrane receptor-activated signal transduction pathways are integral to cellular functions and disease mechanisms in humans. Identification of the full set of proteins interacting with membrane receptors by high throughput experimental means is difficult because methods to directly identify protein interactions are largely not applicable to membrane proteins. Unlike prior approaches that attempted to predict the global human interactome we used a computational strategy that only focused on discovering the interacting partners of human membrane receptors leading to improved results for these proteins. We predict specific interactions based on statistical integration of biological data containing highly informative direct and indirect evidences together with feedback from experts. The predicted membrane receptor interactome provides a system-wide view, and generates new biological hypotheses regarding interactions between membrane receptors and other proteins. We have experimentally validated a number of these interactions. The results suggest that a framework of systematically integrating computational predictions, global analyses, biological experimentation and expert feedback is a feasible strategy to study the human membrane receptor interactome. PMID:19798668

  14. New advances in NMDA receptor pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Ogden, Kevin K.; Traynelis, Stephen F.

    2011-01-01

    N-Methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are tetrameric ion channels containing two of four possible GluN2 subunits. These receptors have been implicated for decades in neurological diseases such as stroke, traumatic brain injury, dementia, and schizophrenia. The GluN2 subunits contribute substantially to functional diversity of NMDA receptors and are distinctly expressed in development and among brain regions. Thus, subunit-selective antagonists and modulators that differentially target the GluN2 subunit might provide an opportunity to pharmacologically modify the function of select groups of neurons for therapeutic gain. A flurry of clinical, functional, and chemical studies have together reinvigorated efforts to identify subunit-selective modulators of NMDA receptor function, resulting in a handful of new compounds that appear to act at novel sites. Here we review the properties of new emerging classes of subunit-selective NMDA receptor modulators, which we predict will mark the beginning of a productive period of progress for NMDA receptor pharmacology. PMID:21996280

  15. NMDA receptors in hyperammonemia and hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Llansola, Marta; Rodrigo, Regina; Monfort, Pilar; Montoliu, Carmina; Kosenko, Elena; Cauli, Omar; Piedrafita, Blanca; El Mlili, Nisrin; Felipo, Vicente

    2007-12-01

    The NMDA type of glutamate receptors modulates learning and memory. Excessive activation of NMDA receptors leads to neuronal degeneration and death. Hyperammonemia and liver failure alter the function of NMDA receptors and of some associated signal transduction pathways. The alterations are different in acute and chronic hyperammonemia and liver failure. Acute intoxication with large doses of ammonia (and probably acute liver failure) leads to excessive NMDA receptors activation, which is responsible for ammonia-induced death. In contrast, chronic hyperammonemia induces adaptive responses resulting in impairment of signal transduction associated to NMDA receptors. The function of the glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway is impaired in brain in vivo in animal models of chronic liver failure or hyperammonemia and in homogenates from brains of patients died in hepatic encephalopathy. The impairment of this pathway leads to reduced cGMP and contributes to impaired cognitive function in hepatic encephalopathy. Learning ability is reduced in animal models of chronic liver failure and hyperammonemia and is restored by pharmacological manipulation of brain cGMP by administering phosphodiesterase inhibitors (zaprinast or sildenafil) or cGMP itself. NMDA receptors are therefore involved both in death induced by acute ammonia toxicity (and likely by acute liver failure) and in cognitive impairment in hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:17701332

  16. Endothelin receptor antagonists in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Dupuis, J; Hoeper, M M

    2008-02-01

    The endothelin (ET) system, especially ET-1 and the ET(A) and ET(B) receptors, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Together with prostanoids and phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, ET receptor antagonists have become mainstays in the current treatment of PAH. Three substances are currently available for the treatment of PAH. One of these substances, bosentan, blocks both ET(A) and ET(B) receptors, whereas the two other compounds, sitaxsentan and ambrisentan, are more selective blockers of the ET(A) receptor. There is ongoing debate as to whether selective or nonselective ET receptor blockade is advantageous in the setting of PAH, although there is no clear evidence that receptor selectivity is relevant with regard to the clinical effects of these drugs. For the time being, other features, such as safety profiles and the potential for pharmacokinetic interactions with other drugs used in the treatment of PAH, may be more important than selectivity or nonselectivity when selecting treatments for individual patients. PMID:18238950

  17. Opioid receptors in the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Holzer, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Opium is arguably one of the oldest herbal medicines, being used as analgesic, sedative and antidiarrheal drug for thousands of years. These effects mirror the actions of the endogenous opioid system and are mediated by the principal μ-, κ- and δ-opioid receptors. In the gut, met-enkephalin, leu-enkephalin, β-endorphin and dynorphin occur in both neurons and endocrine cells. When released, opioid peptides activate opioid receptors on the enteric circuitry controlling motility and secretion. As a result, inhibition of gastric emptying, increase in sphincter tone, induction of stationary motor patterns and blockade of peristalsis ensue. Together with inhibition of ion and fluid secretion, these effects cause constipation, one of the most frequent and troublesome adverse reactions of opioid analgesic therapy. Although laxatives are most frequently used to ameliorate opioid-induced bowel dysfunction, their efficacy is unsatisfactory. Specific antagonism of peripheral opioid receptors is a more rational approach. This goal is addressed by the use of opioid receptor antagonists with limited absorption such as oral prolonged-release naloxone and opioid receptor antagonists that do not penetrate the blood-brain barrier such as methylnaltrexone and alvimopan. Preliminary evidence indicates that peripherally restricted opioid receptor antagonists may act as prokinetic drugs in their own right. PMID:19345246

  18. Molecular Physiology of Enteric Opioid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Galligan, James J.; Akbarali, Hamid I.

    2015-01-01

    Opioid drugs have powerful antidiarrheal effects and many patients taking these drugs for chronic pain relief experience chronic constipation that can progress to opioid-induced bowel dysfunction. Three classes of opioid receptors are expressed by enteric neurons: μ-, δ-, and κ-opioid receptors (MOR, DOR, and KOR). MOR and DOR couple to inhibition of adenylate cylase and nerve terminal Ca2+ channels and activation of K+ channels. These effects reduce neuronal activity and neurotransmitter release. KOR couples to inhibition of Ca2+ channels and inhibition of neurotransmitter release. In the human gastrointestinal tract, MOR, DOR, and KOR link to inhibition of acetylcholine release from enteric interneurons and purine/nitric oxide release from inhibitory motorneurons. These actions inhibit propulsive motility. MOR and DOR also link to inhibition of submucosal secretomotor neurons, reducing active Cl− secretion and passive water movement into the colonic lumen. These effects account for the constipation caused by opioid receptor agonists. Tolerance develops to the analgesic effects of opioid receptor agonists but not to the constipating actions. This may be due to differential β-arrestin-2-dependent opioid receptor desensitization and internalization in enteric nerves in the colon compared with the small intestine and in neuronal pain pathways. Further studies of differential opioid receptor desensitization and tolerance in subsets of enteric neurons may identify new drugs or other treatment strategies of opioid-induced bowel dysfunction. PMID:25207608

  19. Molecular physiology of enteric opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Galligan, James J; Akbarali, Hamid I

    2014-09-10

    Opioid drugs have powerful antidiarrheal effects and many patients taking these drugs for chronic pain relief experience chronic constipation that can progress to opioid-induced bowel dysfunction. Three classes of opioid receptors are expressed by enteric neurons: μ-, δ-, and κ-opioid receptors (MOR, DOR, and KOR). MOR and DOR couple to inhibition of adenylate cylase and nerve terminal Ca(2+) channels and activation of K(+) channels. These effects reduce neuronal activity and neurotransmitter release. KOR couples to inhibition of Ca(2+) channels and inhibition of neurotransmitter release. In the human gastrointestinal tract, MOR, DOR, and KOR link to inhibition of acetylcholine release from enteric interneurons and purine/nitric oxide release from inhibitory motorneurons. These actions inhibit propulsive motility. MOR and DOR also link to inhibition of submucosal secretomotor neurons, reducing active Cl(-) secretion and passive water movement into the colonic lumen. These effects account for the constipation caused by opioid receptor agonists. Tolerance develops to the analgesic effects of opioid receptor agonists but not to the constipating actions. This may be due to differential β-arrestin-2-dependent opioid receptor desensitization and internalization in enteric nerves in the colon compared with the small intestine and in neuronal pain pathways. Further studies of differential opioid receptor desensitization and tolerance in subsets of enteric neurons may identify new drugs or other treatment strategies of opioid-induced bowel dysfunction. PMID:25207608

  20. Purification of a putative brain somatostatin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    He, Haitao; Johnson, K.; Thermos, K.; Reisine, T. )

    1989-03-01

    The brain somatostatin receptor was purified by affinity chromatographic techniques. A protein of 60 kDa could be purified from rat brain. The protein was eluted from a (D-Trp{sup 8})SRIF affinity column with either sodium acetate (pH 5.5) or free (D-Trp{sup 8})SRIF. The binding of the protein to the affinity column was prevented by free (D-Trp{sup 8})SRIF or the stable SRIF analogue SMS 201-996 but not by the inactive somatostatin 28-(1-14). The purified receptor could be covalently labeled by the {sup 125}I-labeled SRIF analogue CGP 23996. Excess (D-Trp{sup 8})SRIF blocked the binding of {sup 125}I-labeled CGP 23996 to the purified receptor, but somatostatin 28-(1-14) did not affect the binding. A 60-kDa protein was also purified from the anterior pituitary cell line AtT-20, which has a high expression of SRIF receptors. In contrast, no 60-kDa protein could be purified from CHO cells, which have no detectable SRIF receptors. These findings present evidence for the purification of the SRIF receptor.

  1. The new biology of histamine receptors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jing-Feng; Thurmond, Robin L

    2008-03-01

    The physiologic functions of histamine have been recognized for more than 100 years, yet new roles are still being uncovered. Most importantly, a newly discovered receptor of the amine has helped refine our understanding of histamine. This new receptor, the histamine H4 receptor (H4R), has a higher affinity for histamine compared with the histamine H1 receptor and appears to be more selectively expressed, found mainly on hematopoietic cells. H4R is involved in chemotaxis and inflammatory mediator release by eosinophils, mast cells, monocytes, dendritic cells, and T cells. Studies in animal models using selective antagonists or H4R-deficient mice have shown a role for the receptor in inflammation in vivo. In particular, H4R antagonists have shown promise in experimental models of asthma and pruritus, two conditions where currently marketed antihistamines targeting the histamine H1 receptor are not optimally effective in humans. Thus, a new class of H4R-specific antihistamines may be distinctively effective in treating allergic diseases associated with chronic pruritus and asthma. PMID:18377770

  2. Solubilization of human platelet vasopressin receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Thibonnier, M.

    1987-02-02

    The human platelet membrane receptor for vasopressin (AVP) has been solubilized with the cholic acid derivative detergent 3-((3-cholamidopropyl)-dimethylammonio)-1-propane sulfonate. Rapid and simple separation of free tritiated AVP ((/sup 3/H)AVP) from the solubilized receptor-hormone complex was done by filtration through polyethylenimine-treated filters. (/sup 3/H)AVP binds to this soluble receptor with an equilibrium dissociation constant of 11.03 +/- 1.86 nM and a maximal number of binding sites = 288 +/- 66 fmol/mg protein while the corresponding values of the membrane-bound receptor are 1.62 +/- 0.21 nM and 237 +/- 38 fmol/mg of protein, respectively. The Ki value for native AVP derived from competition experiments is 11.02 +/- 20.5 nM for the soluble receptor. Competition experiments with specific vascular and renal antagonists confirm that the solubilized receptor belongs to the V1-vascular subtype. 10 references, 5 figures.

  3. Crystal structures of the human adiponectin receptors.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Hiroaki; Fujii, Yoshifumi; Okada-Iwabu, Miki; Iwabu, Masato; Nakamura, Yoshihiro; Hosaka, Toshiaki; Motoyama, Kanna; Ikeda, Mariko; Wakiyama, Motoaki; Terada, Takaho; Ohsawa, Noboru; Hato, Masakatsu; Ogasawara, Satoshi; Hino, Tomoya; Murata, Takeshi; Iwata, So; Hirata, Kunio; Kawano, Yoshiaki; Yamamoto, Masaki; Kimura-Someya, Tomomi; Shirouzu, Mikako; Yamauchi, Toshimasa; Kadowaki, Takashi; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2015-04-16

    Adiponectin stimulation of its receptors, AdipoR1 and AdipoR2, increases the activities of 5' AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR), respectively, thereby contributing to healthy longevity as key anti-diabetic molecules. AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 were predicted to contain seven transmembrane helices with the opposite topology to G-protein-coupled receptors. Here we report the crystal structures of human AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 at 2.9 and 2.4 Å resolution, respectively, which represent a novel class of receptor structure. The seven-transmembrane helices, conformationally distinct from those of G-protein-coupled receptors, enclose a large cavity where three conserved histidine residues coordinate a zinc ion. The zinc-binding structure may have a role in the adiponectin-stimulated AMPK phosphorylation and UCP2 upregulation. Adiponectin may broadly interact with the extracellular face, rather than the carboxy-terminal tail, of the receptors. The present information will facilitate the understanding of novel structure-function relationships and the development and optimization of AdipoR agonists for the treatment of obesity-related diseases, such as type 2 diabetes. PMID:25855295

  4. Sensing odorants and pheromones with chemosensory receptors.

    PubMed

    Touhara, Kazushige; Vosshall, Leslie B

    2009-01-01

    Olfaction is a critical sensory modality that allows living things to acquire chemical information from the external world. The olfactory system processes two major classes of stimuli: (a) general odorants, small molecules derived from food or the environment that signal the presence of food, fire, or predators, and (b) pheromones, molecules released from individuals of the same species that convey social or sexual cues. Chemosensory receptors are broadly classified, by the ligands that activate them, into odorant or pheromone receptors. Peripheral sensory neurons expressing either odorant or pheromone receptors send signals to separate odor- and pheromone-processing centers in the brain to elicit distinct behavioral and neuroendocrinological outputs. General odorants activate receptors in a combinatorial fashion, whereas pheromones activate narrowly tuned receptors that activate sexually dimorphic neural circuits in the brain. We review recent progress on chemosensory receptor structure, function, and circuitry in vertebrates and invertebrates from the point of view of the molecular biology and physiology of these sensory systems. PMID:19575682

  5. Different regions of the estrogen receptor are required for synergistic action with the glucocorticoid and progesterone receptors.

    PubMed

    Cato, A C; Ponta, H

    1989-12-01

    Estrogen and progesterone or estrogen and glucocorticoid receptors functionally cooperate in gene activation if their cognate binding sites are close to one another. These interactions have been described as synergism of action of the steroid receptors. The mechanism by which synergism is achieved is not clear, although protein-protein interaction of the receptors is one of the favorite models. In transfection experiments with receptor expression vectors and a reporter gene containing estrogen and progesterone-glucocorticoid receptor binding sites, we have examined the effects that different portions of the various receptors have on synergism. N-terminal domains of the chicken progesterone and human glucocorticoid receptors, when deleted, abolished the synergistic action of these receptors with the estrogen receptor. Deletion of the carboxy-terminal amino acids 341 to 595 of the estrogen receptor produced a mutant receptor that could not trans-activate on its own. This mutant receptor did not affect the action of the glucocorticoid receptor but functioned synergistically with the progesterone receptor. We therefore conclude that the synergistic action of the receptors for estrogen and progesterone is mechanistically different from the synergistic action of the receptors for estrogen and glucocorticoid. PMID:2586523

  6. Coantagonism of Glutamate Receptors and Nicotinic Acetylcholinergic Receptors Disrupts Fear Conditioning and Latent Inhibition of Fear Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Thomas J.; Lewis, Michael C.

    2005-01-01

    The present study investigated the hypothesis that both nicotinic acetylcholinergic receptors (nAChRs) and glutamate receptors ([alpha]-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate receptors (AMPARs) and N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptors (NMDARs)) are involved in fear conditioning, and may modulate similar processes. The effects of the…

  7. Differential effect of glucocorticoid receptor antagonists on glucocorticoid receptor nuclear translocation and DNA binding

    PubMed Central

    Spiga, Francesca; Knight, David M; Droste, Susanne K; Conway-Campbell, Becky; Kershaw, Yvonne; MacSweeney, Cliona P; Thomson, Fiona J; Craighead, Mark; Peeters, Bernard WMM; Lightman, Stafford L

    2016-01-01

    The effects of RU486 and S-P, a more selective glucocorticoid receptor antagonist from Schering-Plough, were investigated on glucocorticoid receptor nuclear translocation and DNA binding. In the in vitro study, AtT20 cells were treated with vehicle or with RU486, S-P or corticosterone (3–300 nM) or co-treated with vehicle or glucocorticoid receptor antagonists (3–300 nM) and 30 nM corticosterone. Both glucocorticoid receptor antagonists induced glucocorticoid receptor nuclear translocation but only RU486 induced DNA binding. RU486 potentiated the effect of corticosterone on glucocorticoid receptor nuclear translocation and DNA binding, S-P inhibited corticosterone-induced glucocorticoid receptor nuclear translocation, but not glucocorticoid receptor-DNA binding. In the in vivo study, adrenalectomized rats were treated with vehicle, RU486 (20 mg/kg) and S-P (50 mg/kg) alone or in combination with corticosterone (3 mg/kg). RU486 induced glucocorticoid receptor nuclear translocation in the pituitary, hippocampus and prefrontal cortex and glucocorticoid receptor-DNA binding in the hippocampus, whereas no effect of S-P on glucocorticoid receptor nuclear translocation or DNA binding was observed in any of the areas analysed. These findings reveal differential effects of RU486 and S-P on areas involved in regulation of hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis activity in vivo and they are important in light of the potential use of this class of compounds in the treatment of disorders associated with hyperactivity of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis. PMID:20093322

  8. Hypotensive effects of ghrelin receptor agonists mediated through a novel receptor

    PubMed Central

    Callaghan, Brid; Kosari, Samin; Pustovit, Ruslan V; Sartor, Daniela M; Ferens, Dorota; Ban, Kung; Baell, Jonathan; Nguyen, Trung V; Rivera, Leni R; Brock, James A; Furness, John B

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Some agonists of ghrelin receptors cause rapid decreases in BP. The mechanisms by which they cause hypotension and the pharmacology of the receptors are unknown. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The effects of ligands of ghrelin receptors were investigated in rats in vivo, on isolated blood vessels and on cells transfected with the only molecularly defined ghrelin receptor, growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a (GHSR1a). KEY RESULTS Three agonists of GHSR1a receptors, ulimorelin, capromorelin and CP464709, caused a rapid decrease in BP in the anaesthetized rat. The effect was not reduced by either of two GHSR1a antagonists, JMV2959 or YIL781, at doses that blocked effects on colorectal motility, in vivo. The rapid hypotension was not mimicked by ghrelin, unacylated ghrelin or the unacylated ghrelin receptor agonist, AZP531. The early hypotension preceded a decrease in sympathetic nerve activity. Early hypotension was not reduced by hexamethonium or by baroreceptor (sino-aortic) denervation. Ulimorelin also relaxed isolated segments of rat mesenteric artery, and, less potently, relaxed aorta segments. The vascular relaxation was not reduced by JMV2959 or YIL781. Ulimorelin, capromorelin and CP464709 activated GHSR1a in transfected HEK293 cells at nanomolar concentrations. JMV2959 and YIL781 both antagonized effects in these cells, with their pA2 values at the GHSR1a receptor being 6.55 and 7.84. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Our results indicate a novel vascular receptor or receptors whose activation by ulimorelin, capromorelin and CP464709 lowered BP. This receptor is activated by low MW GHSR1a agonists, but is not activated by ghrelin. PMID:24670149

  9. Receptor downregulation and desensitization enhance the information processing ability of signalling receptors

    PubMed Central

    Shankaran, Harish; Wiley, H Steven; Resat, Haluk

    2007-01-01

    Background In addition to initiating signaling events, the activation of cell surface receptors also triggers regulatory processes that restrict the duration of signaling. Acute attenuation of signaling can be accomplished either via ligand-induced internalization of receptors (endocytic downregulation) or via ligand-induced receptor desensitization. These phenomena have traditionally been viewed in the context of adaptation wherein the receptor system enters a refractory state in the presence of sustained ligand stimuli and thereby prevents the cell from over-responding to the ligand. Here we use the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) as model systems to respectively examine the effects of downregulation and desensitization on the ability of signaling receptors to decode time-varying ligand stimuli. Results Using a mathematical model, we show that downregulation and desensitization mechanisms can lead to tight and efficient input-output coupling thereby ensuring synchronous processing of ligand inputs. Frequency response analysis indicates that upstream elements of the EGFR and GPCR networks behave like low-pass filters with the system being able to faithfully transduce inputs below a critical frequency. Receptor downregulation and desensitization increase the filter bandwidth thereby enabling the receptor systems to decode inputs in a wider frequency range. Further, system-theoretic analysis reveals that the receptor systems are analogous to classical mechanical over-damped systems. This analogy enables us to metaphorically describe downregulation and desensitization as phenomena that make the systems more resilient in responding to ligand perturbations thereby improving the stability of the system resting state. Conclusion Our findings suggest that in addition to serving as mechanisms for adaptation, receptor downregulation and desensitization can play a critical role in temporal information processing. Furthermore

  10. GABAA receptor target of tetramethylenedisulfotetramine

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chunqing; Hwang, Sung Hee; Buchholz, Bruce A.; Carpenter, Timothy S.; Lightstone, Felice C.; Yang, Jun; Hammock, Bruce D.; Casida, John E.

    2014-01-01

    Use of the highly toxic and easily prepared rodenticide tetramethylenedisulfotetramine (TETS) was banned after thousands of accidental or intentional human poisonings, but it is of continued concern as a chemical threat agent. TETS is a noncompetitive blocker of the GABA type A receptor (GABAAR), but its molecular interaction has not been directly established for lack of a suitable radioligand to localize the binding site. We synthesized [14C]TETS (14 mCi/mmol, radiochemical purity >99%) by reacting sulfamide with H14CHO and s-trioxane then completion of the sequential cyclization with excess HCHO. The outstanding radiocarbon sensitivity of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) allowed the use of [14C]TETS in neuroreceptor binding studies with rat brain membranes in comparison with the standard GABAAR radioligand 4′-ethynyl-4-n-[3H]propylbicycloorthobenzoate ([3H]EBOB) (46 Ci/mmol), illustrating the use of AMS for characterizing the binding sites of high-affinity 14C radioligands. Fourteen noncompetitive antagonists of widely diverse chemotypes assayed at 1 or 10 µM inhibited [14C]TETS and [3H]EBOB binding to a similar extent (r2 = 0.71). Molecular dynamics simulations of these 14 toxicants in the pore region of the α1β2γ2 GABAAR predict unique and significant polar interactions for TETS with α1T1′ and γ2S2′, which are not observed for EBOB or the GABAergic insecticides. Several GABAAR modulators similarly inhibited [14C]TETS and [3H]EBOB binding, including midazolam, flurazepam, avermectin Ba1, baclofen, isoguvacine, and propofol, at 1 or 10 μM, providing an in vitro system for recognizing candidate antidotes. PMID:24912155

  11. GABAA receptor target of tetramethylenedisulfotetramine.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chunqing; Hwang, Sung Hee; Buchholz, Bruce A; Carpenter, Timothy S; Lightstone, Felice C; Lightstone, Felice; Yang, Jun; Hammock, Bruce D; Casida, John E

    2014-06-10

    Use of the highly toxic and easily prepared rodenticide tetramethylenedisulfotetramine (TETS) was banned after thousands of accidental or intentional human poisonings, but it is of continued concern as a chemical threat agent. TETS is a noncompetitive blocker of the GABA type A receptor (GABAAR), but its molecular interaction has not been directly established for lack of a suitable radioligand to localize the binding site. We synthesized [(14)C]TETS (14 mCi/mmol, radiochemical purity >99%) by reacting sulfamide with H(14)CHO and s-trioxane then completion of the sequential cyclization with excess HCHO. The outstanding radiocarbon sensitivity of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) allowed the use of [(14)C]TETS in neuroreceptor binding studies with rat brain membranes in comparison with the standard GABAAR radioligand 4'-ethynyl-4-n-[(3)H]propylbicycloorthobenzoate ([(3)H]EBOB) (46 Ci/mmol), illustrating the use of AMS for characterizing the binding sites of high-affinity (14)C radioligands. Fourteen noncompetitive antagonists of widely diverse chemotypes assayed at 1 or 10 µM inhibited [(14)C]TETS and [(3)H]EBOB binding to a similar extent (r(2) = 0.71). Molecular dynamics simulations of these 14 toxicants in the pore region of the α1β2γ2 GABAAR predict unique and significant polar interactions for TETS with α1T1' and γ2S2', which are not observed for EBOB or the GABAergic insecticides. Several GABAAR modulators similarly inhibited [(14)C]TETS and [(3)H]EBOB binding, including midazolam, flurazepam, avermectin Ba1, baclofen, isoguvacine, and propofol, at 1 or 10 μM, providing an in vitro system for recognizing candidate antidotes. PMID:24912155

  12. Atypical chemokine receptors in cancer: friends or foes?

    PubMed

    Massara, Matteo; Bonavita, Ornella; Mantovani, Alberto; Locati, Massimo; Bonecchi, Raffaella

    2016-06-01

    The chemokine system is a fundamental component of cancer-related inflammation involved in all stages of cancer development. It controls not only leukocyte infiltration in primary tumors but also angiogenesis, cancer cell proliferation, and migration to metastatic sites. Atypical chemokine receptors are a new, emerging class of regulators of the chemokine system. They control chemokine bioavailability by scavenging, transporting, or storing chemokines. They can also regulate the activity of canonical chemokine receptors with which they share the ligands by forming heterodimers or by modulating their expression levels or signaling activity. Here, we summarize recent results about the role of these receptors (atypical chemokine receptor 1/Duffy antigen receptor for chemokine, atypical chemokine receptor 2/D6, atypical chemokine receptor 3/CXC-chemokine receptor 7, and atypical chemokine receptor 4/CC-chemokine receptor-like 1) on the tumorigenesis process, indicating that their effects are strictly dependent on the cell type on which they are expressed and on their coexpression with other chemokine receptors. Indeed, atypical chemokine receptors inhibit tumor growth and progression through their activity as negative regulators of chemokine bioavailability, whereas, on the contrary, they can promote tumorigenesis when they regulate the signaling of other chemokine receptors, such as CXC-chemokine receptor 4. Thus, atypical chemokine receptors are key components of the regulatory network of inflammation and immunity in cancer and may have a major effect on anti-inflammatory and immunotherapeutic strategies. PMID:26908826

  13. Receptor Expression in Rat Skeletal Muscle Cell Cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Ronald B.

    1996-01-01

    One on the most persistent problems with long-term space flight is atrophy of skeletal muscles. Skeletal muscle is unique as a tissue in the body in that its ability to undergo atrophy or hypertrophy is controlled exclusively by cues from the extracellular environment. The mechanism of communication between muscle cells and their environment is through a group of membrane-bound and soluble receptors, each of which carries out unique, but often interrelated, functions. The primary receptors include acetyl choline receptors, beta-adrenergic receptors, glucocorticoid receptors, insulin receptors, growth hormone (i.e., somatotropin) receptors, insulin-like growth factor receptors, and steroid receptors. This project has been initiated to develop an integrated approach toward muscle atrophy and hypertrophy that takes into account information on the populations of the entire group of receptors (and their respective hormone concentrations), and it is hypothesized that this information can form the basis for a predictive computer model for muscle atrophy and hypertrophy. The conceptual basis for this project is illustrated in the figure below. The individual receptors are shown as membrane-bound, with the exception of the glucocorticoid receptor which is a soluble intracellular receptor. Each of these receptors has an extracellular signalling component (e.g., innervation, glucocorticoids, epinephrine, etc.), and following the interaction of the extracellular component with the receptor itself, an intracellular signal is generated. Each of these intracellular signals is unique in its own way; however, they are often interrelated.

  14. Identification and Characterization of Novel Renal Sensory Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Rajkumar, Premraj; Aisenberg, William H.; Acres, Omar W.; Protzko, Ryan J.; Pluznick, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the important roles that “sensory” receptors (olfactory receptors, taste receptors, and orphan “GPR” receptors) play in a variety of tissues, including the kidney. Although several studies have identified important roles that individual sensory receptors play in the kidney, there has not been a systematic analysis of the renal repertoire of sensory receptors. In this study, we identify novel renal sensory receptors belonging to the GPR (n = 76), olfactory receptor (n = 6), and taste receptor (n = 11) gene families. A variety of reverse transcriptase (RT)- PCR screening strategies were used to identify novel renal sensory receptors, which were subsequently confirmed using gene-specific primers. The tissue-specific distribution of these receptors was determined, and the novel renal ORs were cloned from whole mouse kidney. Renal ORs that trafficked properly in vitro were screened for potential ligands using a dual-luciferase ligand screen, and novel ligands were identified for Olfr691. These studies demonstrate that multiple sensory receptors are expressed in the kidney beyond those previously identified. These results greatly expand the known repertoire of renal sensory receptors. Importantly, the mRNA of many of the receptors identified in this study are expressed highly in the kidney (comparable to well-known and extensively studied renal GPCRs), and in future studies it will be important to elucidate the roles that these novel renal receptors play in renal physiology. PMID:25340336

  15. Cannabinoid-receptor expression in human leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Bouaboula, M; Rinaldi, M; Carayon, P; Carillon, C; Delpech, B; Shire, D; Le Fur, G; Casellas, P

    1993-05-15

    Marijuana and many of its constituent cannabinoids influence the central nervous system (CNS), probably through the cannabinoid receptor, which has recently been cloned in rat and human. While numerous reports have also described effects of cannabinoids on the immune system, the observation of both mRNA and cannabinoid receptor has hitherto been exclusively confined to the brain, a reported detection in the testis being the sole example of its presence at the periphery. Here we report the expression of the cannabinoid receptor on human immune tissues using a highly sensitive polymerase-chain-reaction-based method for mRNA quantification. We show that, although present in a much lower abundance than in brain, cannabinoid receptor transcripts are found in human spleen, tonsils and peripheral blood leukocytes. The distribution pattern displays important variations of the mRNA level for the cannabinoid receptor among the main human blood cell subpopulations. The rank order of mRNA levels in these cells is B cells > natural killer cells > or = polymorphonuclear neutrophils > or = T8 cells > monocytes > T4 cells. Cannabinoid-receptor mRNA, which is also found in monocytic, as well as T and B leukemia cell lines but not in Jurkat cells, presents a great diversity of expression on these cells as well, B-cell lines expressing a much higher level than T-cell lines. The cannabinoid receptor PCR products from leukocytes and brain are identical both in size and sequence suggesting a strong similarity between central and peripheral cannabinoid receptors. The expression of this receptor was demonstrated on membranes of the myelomonocytic U937 cells using the synthetic cannabinoid [3H]CP-55940 as ligand. The Kd determined from Scatchard analysis was 0.1 nM and the Bmax for membranes was 525 fmol/mg protein. The demonstration of cannabinoid-receptor expression at both mRNA and protein levels on human leukocytes provides a molecular basis for cannabinoid action on these cells. PMID

  16. Presynaptic adenosine A2A receptors dampen cannabinoid CB1 receptor-mediated inhibition of corticostriatal glutamatergic transmission

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, S G; Gonçalves, F Q; Marques, J M; Tomé, Â R; Rodrigues, R J; Nunes-Correia, I; Ledent, C; Harkany, T; Venance, L; Cunha, R A; Köfalvi, A

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Both cannabinoid CB1 and adenosine A2A receptors (CB1 receptors and A2A receptors) control synaptic transmission at corticostriatal synapses, with great therapeutic importance for neurological and psychiatric disorders. A postsynaptic CB1−A2A receptor interaction has already been elucidated, but the presynaptic A2A receptor-mediated control of presynaptic neuromodulation by CB1 receptors remains to be defined. Because the corticostriatal terminals provide the major input to the basal ganglia, understanding the interactive nature of converging neuromodulation on them will provide us with novel powerful tools to understand the physiology of corticostriatal synaptic transmission and interpret changes associated with pathological conditions. Experimental Approach Pharmacological manipulation of CB1 and A2A receptors was carried out in brain nerve terminals isolated from rats and mice, using flow synaptometry, immunoprecipitation, radioligand binding, ATP and glutamate release measurement. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were made in horizontal corticostriatal slices. Key Results Flow synaptometry showed that A2A receptors were extensively co-localized with CB1 receptor-immunopositive corticostriatal terminals and A2A receptors co-immunoprecipitated CB1 receptors in these purified terminals. A2A receptor activation decreased CB1 receptor radioligand binding and decreased the CB1 receptor-mediated inhibition of high-K+-evoked glutamate release in corticostriatal terminals. Accordingly, A2A receptor activation prevented CB1 receptor-mediated paired-pulse facilitation and attenuated the CB1 receptor-mediated inhibition of synaptic transmission in glutamatergic synapses of corticostriatal slices. Conclusions and Implications Activation of presynaptic A2A receptors dampened CB1 receptor-mediated inhibition of corticostriatal terminals. This constitutes a thus far unrecognized mechanism to modulate the potent CB1 receptor-mediated presynaptic

  17. Pharmacological modulation of chemokine receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Scholten, DJ; Canals, M; Maussang, D; Roumen, L; Smit, MJ; Wijtmans, M; de Graaf, C; Vischer, HF; Leurs, R

    2012-01-01

    G protein-coupled chemokine receptors and their peptidergic ligands are interesting therapeutic targets due to their involvement in various immune-related diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, HIV-1 infection and cancer. To tackle these diseases, a lot of effort has been focused on discovery and development of small-molecule chemokine receptor antagonists. This has been rewarded by the market approval of two novel chemokine receptor inhibitors, AMD3100 (CXCR4) and Maraviroc (CCR5) for stem cell mobilization and treatment of HIV-1 infection respectively. The recent GPCR crystal structures together with mutagenesis and pharmacological studies have aided in understanding how small-molecule ligands interact with chemokine receptors. Many of these ligands display behaviour deviating from simple competition and do not interact with the chemokine binding site, providing evidence for an allosteric mode of action. This review aims to give an overview of the evidence supporting modulation of this intriguing receptor family by a range of ligands, including small molecules, peptides and antibodies. Moreover, the computer-assisted modelling of chemokine receptor–ligand interactions is discussed in view of GPCR crystal structures. Finally, the implications of concepts such as functional selectivity and chemokine receptor dimerization are considered. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on the Molecular Pharmacology of G Protein-Coupled Receptors (GPCRs). To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2012.165.issue-6. To view the 2010 themed section on the same topic visit http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.2010.159.issue-5/issuetoc PMID:21699506

  18. Kinetics of unliganded acetylcholine receptor channel gating.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, M B

    1986-01-01

    Open- and closed-state lifetimes of unliganded acetylcholine receptor channel activity were analyzed by the method of likelihood maximazation. For both open times and closed times, the best-fitting density is most often a sum of two exponentials. These multiple open states cannot depend on the number of receptor binding sites occupied since they are observed in the absence of ligand. The rate of spontaneous opening and the faster decay constant of closing increased as the membrane was hyperpolarized. The voltage dependence of the rate of spontaneous opening is stronger than that for curare-liganded channels. Evidence that the acetylcholine receptor channel can open spontaneously in the absence of ligand has been presented previously (Sanchez et al, 1983; Brehm et al, 1984; Jackson, 1984). To add to this evidence, alpha-bungarotoxin was added to the patch electrode, causing the frequency of openings to decay with time. The rate constant determined from this decay is similar to rate constants reported for the binding of iodinated alpha-bungarotoxin to the acetylcholine receptor. The frequency of unliganded channel opening has been estimated as 2 X 10(-3) s-1 per receptor. A comparison of carbamylcholine-liganded and spontaneous gating transition rates suggests that ligand binding increases the rate of opening by a factor of 1.4 X 10(7). Carbamylcholine binding increases the mean open time by a factor of 5. Thus, a cholinergic agonist activates the acetylcholine receptor by destabilizing the closed state. The liganded and unliganded channel gating rates were used to analyze the energetics of ligand activation of the acetylcholine receptor channel, and to relate the open channel dissociation constant to the closed channel dissociation constant. PMID:2421793

  19. T-cell receptor accessory and co-receptor molecules in channel catfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    T cell receptor (TCR) associated invariant chains CD3gamma/delta,epsilon, and zeta as well as TCR co-receptors CD8alpha and CD8beta were isolated from the channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, at both the gene and cDNA levels. All of catfish CD3 sequences encode for proteins that resemble their resp...

  20. Selenoprotein W controls epidermal growth factor receptor surface expression, activation and degradation via receptor ubiquitination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR) is the founding member of the ErbB family of growth factor receptors that modulate a complex network of intracellular signaling pathways controlling growth, proliferation and differentiation. Selenoprotein W (SEPW1) is a diet-regulated, highly conserved...

  1. Functions of the extracellular histidine residues of receptor activity-modifying proteins vary within adrenomedullin receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwasako, Kenji Kitamura, Kazuo; Nagata, Sayaka; Kato, Johji

    2008-12-05

    Receptor activity-modifying protein (RAMP)-2 and -3 chaperone calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRLR) to the plasma membrane, where together they form heterodimeric adrenomedullin (AM) receptors. We investigated the contributions made by His residues situated in the RAMP extracellular domain to AM receptor trafficking and receptor signaling by co-expressing hCRLR and V5-tagged-hRAMP2 or -3 mutants in which a His residue was substituted with Ala in HEK-293 cells. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that hRAMP2-H71A mediated normal hCRLR surface delivery, but the resultant heterodimers showed significantly diminished [{sup 125}I]AM binding and AM-evoked cAMP production. Expression of hRAMP2-H124A and -H127A impaired surface delivery of hCRLR, which impaired or abolishing AM binding and receptor signaling. Although hRAMP3-H97A mediated full surface delivery of hCRLR, the resultant heterodimers showed impaired AM binding and signaling. Other His residues appeared uninvolved in hCRLR-related functions. Thus, the His residues of hRAMP2 and -3 differentially govern AM receptor function.

  2. Identification of Gene Markers for Activation of the Nuclear Receptor Pregnane X Receptor

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many environmentally-relevant chemicals and drugs activate the nuclear receptor pregnane X receptor (PXR). Activation of PXR in the mouse liver can lead to increases in liver weight in part through increased hepatocyte replication similar to chemicals that activate other nuclear ...

  3. The Orphan Nuclear Receptor TR4 Is a Vitamin A-activated Nuclear Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, X. Edward; Suino-Powell, Kelly M.; Xu, Yong; Chan, Cee-Wah; Tanabe, Osamu; Kruse, Schoen W.; Reynolds, Ross; Engel, James Douglas; Xu, H. Eric

    2015-11-30

    Testicular receptors 2 and 4 (TR2/4) constitute a subgroup of orphan nuclear receptors that play important roles in spermatogenesis, lipid and lipoprotein regulation, and the development of the central nervous system. Currently, little is known about the structural features and the ligand regulation of these receptors. Here we report the crystal structure of the ligand-free TR4 ligand binding domain, which reveals an autorepressed conformation. The ligand binding pocket of TR4 is filled by the C-terminal half of helix 10, and the cofactor binding site is occupied by the AF-2 helix, thus preventing ligand-independent activation of the receptor. However, TR4 exhibits constitutive transcriptional activity on multiple promoters, which can be further potentiated by nuclear receptor coactivators. Mutations designed to disrupt cofactor binding, dimerization, or ligand binding substantially reduce the transcriptional activity of this receptor. Importantly, both retinol and retinoic acid are able to promote TR4 to recruit coactivators and to activate a TR4-regulated reporter. These findings demonstrate that TR4 is a ligand-regulated nuclear receptor and suggest that retinoids might have a much wider regulatory role via activation of orphan receptors such as TR4.

  4. Muscarinic M1 receptor and cannabinoid CB1 receptor do not modulate paraoxon-induced seizures

    PubMed Central

    Kow, Rebecca L; Cheng, Eugene M; Jiang, Kelly; Le, Joshua H; Stella, Nephi; Nathanson, Neil M

    2015-01-01

    One of the major signs of severe organophosphate poisoning is seizures. Previous studies have shown that both muscarinic agonist- and organophosphate-induced seizures require activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the central nervous system. Seizures induced by the muscarinic agonist pilocarpine require the M1 receptor and are modulated by cannabinoid CB1 receptors. In this study, we determined whether M1 and CB1 receptors also regulated seizures induced by the organophosphate paraoxon. We found no differences in seizures induced by paraoxon in wild-type (WT) and M1 knockout (KO) mice, indicating that in contrast to pilocarpine seizures, M1 receptors are not required for paraoxon seizures. Furthermore, we found that pilocarpine administration resulted in seizure-independent activation of ERK in the hippocampus in a M1 receptor-dependent manner, while paraoxon did not induce seizure-independent activation of ERK in the mouse hippocampus. This shows that pilocarpine and paraoxon activated M1 receptors in the hippocampus to different extents. There were no differences in seizures induced by paraoxon in WT and CB1 KO mice, and neither CB1 agonist nor antagonist administration had significant effects on paraoxon seizures, indicating that, in contrast to pilocarpine seizures, paraoxon seizures are not modulated by CB1 receptors. These results demonstrate that there are fundamental molecular differences in the regulation of seizures induced by pilocarpine and paraoxon. PMID:25692018

  5. A retinoic acid receptor-specific element controls the retinoic acid receptor-beta promoter.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, B; Lehmann, J M; Zhang, X K; Hermann, T; Husmann, M; Graupner, G; Pfahl, M

    1990-11-01

    The morphogen retinoic acid (RA) regulates gene transcription by interacting with specific nuclear receptors that recognize DNA sequences near responsive promoters. While much has recently been learned about the nuclear receptor proteins, little is known about the genes that are directly regulated by RA and their cis-acting response elements recognized by these receptors. Here we have analyzed the RA receptor-beta (RAR beta) gene promoter that is controlled by RA. We find that a RA-responsive element (RARE) is located adjacent to the TATA box. The RARE shows a direct repeat symmetry which is essential for its function. While thyroid hormone-responsive elements can also function as RAR response elements, we show here that this RARE is activated by endogenous RARs and RAR beta, but cannot be regulated by thyroid hormone receptors and other known nuclear receptors. In addition, we find that RAR gamma is a poor activator of this RARE. However, the response element is bound with high affinity by both RAR beta and RAR gamma as well as by thyroid hormone receptors. Thus, interaction between specific response elements and receptors is insufficient for gene activation. PMID:2177841

  6. Activating Receptor Signals Drive Receptor Diversity in Developing Natural Killer Cells.

    PubMed

    Freund, Jacquelyn; May, Rebecca M; Yang, Enjun; Li, Hongchuan; McCullen, Matthew; Zhang, Bin; Lenvik, Todd; Cichocki, Frank; Anderson, Stephen K; Kambayashi, Taku

    2016-08-01

    It has recently been appreciated that NK cells exhibit many features reminiscent of adaptive immune cells. Considerable heterogeneity exists with respect to the ligand specificity of individual NK cells and as such, a subset of NK cells can respond, expand, and differentiate into memory-like cells in a ligand-specific manner. MHC I-binding inhibitory receptors, including those belonging to the Ly49 and KIR families, are expressed in a variegated manner, which creates ligand-specific diversity within the NK cell pool. However, how NK cells determine which inhibitory receptors to express on their cell surface during a narrow window of development is largely unknown. In this manuscript, we demonstrate that signals from activating receptors are critical for induction of Ly49 and KIR receptors during NK cell development; activating receptor-derived signals increased the probability of the Ly49 bidirectional Pro1 promoter to transcribe in the forward versus the reverse direction, leading to stable expression of Ly49 receptors in mature NK cells. Our data support a model where the balance of activating and inhibitory receptor signaling in NK cells selects for the induction of appropriate inhibitory receptors during development, which NK cells use to create a diverse pool of ligand-specific NK cells. PMID:27500644

  7. [Nociceptin and the ORL1 receptor: pharmacology of a new opioid receptor].

    PubMed

    Grond, S; Meuser, T; Pietruck, C; Sablotzki, A

    2002-12-01

    Molecular biological investigations led to the discovery of the ORL1 receptor ( opioid receptor like-1 receptor) and its endogenous ligand nociceptin. Although its sequence and structure are closely related to traditional opioid receptors, the ORL1 receptor shows low binding affinities for selective opioid agonists and antagonists. On the other hand, the ORL1 ligand nociceptin does not bind to the three traditional opioid receptors. The activation of the G protein-coupled ORL1 receptor inhibits adenlylate cyclase activity, reduces the intracellular concentration of the second messenger cAMP and regulates ion channels. The supraspinal administration of nociceptin produces hyperalgesia. unlike opioids. Spinal intrathecal and peripheral administration of nociceptin causes hyperalgesia in low doses and analgesia in high doses. The physiological role and detailed mechanisms of these dose-dependent nociceptin effects in opposite directions are not yet known. In addition, nociceptin modulates other biological phenomena such as feeding, locomotion, gastrointestinal function,memory, cardiovascular function,immunity, renal function, anxiety,dependence and tolerance.Future research on the physiological and pathophysiological importance of the nociceptin/ORL1 receptor systems may provide a target for novel therapeutics. PMID:12486589

  8. Activation of G protein by opioid receptors: role of receptor number and G-protein concentration.

    PubMed

    Remmers, A E; Clark, M J; Alt, A; Medzihradsky, F; Woods, J H; Traynor, J R

    2000-05-19

    The collision-coupling model for receptor-G-protein interaction predicts that the rate of G-protein activation is dependent on receptor density, but not G-protein levels. C6 cells expressing mu- or delta-opioid receptors, or SH-SY5Y cells, were treated with beta-funaltrexamine (mu) or naltrindole-5'-isothiocyanate (delta) to decrease receptor number. The time course of full or partial agonist-stimulated ¿35SGTPgammaS binding did not vary in C6 cell membranes containing <1-25 pmol/mg mu-opioid receptor, or 1. 4-4.3 pmol/mg delta-opioid receptor, or in SHSY5Y cells containing 0. 16-0.39 pmol/mg receptor. The association of ¿35SGTPgammaS binding was faster in membranes from C6mu cells than from C6delta cells. A 10-fold reduction in functional G-protein, following pertussis toxin treatment, lowered the maximal level of ¿35SGTPgammaS binding but not the association rate. These data indicate a compartmentalization of opioid receptors and G protein at the cell membrane. PMID:10822058

  9. N-glycosylation sites on the nicotinic ACh receptor subunits regulate receptor channel desensitization and conductance.

    PubMed

    Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2003-06-10

    The present study investigated the effects of N-glycosylation sites on Torpedo acetylcholine (ACh) receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes by monitoring whole-cell membrane currents and single-channel currents from excised patches. Receptors with the mutant subunit at the asparagine residue on the conserved N-glycosylation site (mbetaN141D, mgammaN141D, or mdeltaN143D) or the serine/threonine residue (mbetaT143A, mgammaS143A, or mdeltaS145A) delayed the rate of current decay as compared with wild-type receptors, and the most striking effect was found with receptors with mbetaT143A or mgammaS143A. For wild-type receptors, the lectin concanavalin A, that binds to glycosylated membrane proteins with high affinity, mimicked this effect. Receptors with mbetaN141D or mdeltaN143D exhibited lower single-channel conductance, but those with mbetaT143A, mgammaS143A, or mdeltaS145A otherwise revealed higher conductance than wild-type receptors. Mean opening time of single-channel currents was little affected by the mutation. N-glycosylation sites, thus, appear to play a role in the regulation of ACh receptor desensitization and ion permeability. PMID:12829329

  10. Arrestin Scaffolds NHERF1 to the P2Y12 Receptor to Regulate Receptor Internalization*

    PubMed Central

    Nisar, Shaista P.; Cunningham, Margaret; Saxena, Kunal; Pope, Robert J.; Kelly, Eamonn; Mundell, Stuart J.

    2012-01-01

    We have recently shown in a patient with mild bleeding that the PDZ-binding motif of the platelet G protein-coupled P2Y12 receptor (P2Y12R) is required for effective receptor traffic in human platelets. In this study we show for the first time that the PDZ motif-binding protein NHERF1 exerts a major role in potentiating G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) internalization. NHERF1 interacts with the C-tail of the P2Y12R and unlike many other GPCRs, NHERF1 interaction is required for effective P2Y12R internalization. In vitro and prior to agonist stimulation P2Y12R/NHERF1 interaction requires the intact PDZ binding motif of this receptor. Interestingly on receptor stimulation NHERF1 no longer interacts directly with the receptor but instead binds to the receptor via the endocytic scaffolding protein arrestin. These findings suggest a novel model by which arrestin can serve as an adaptor to promote NHERF1 interaction with a GPCR to facilitate effective NHERF1-dependent receptor internalization. PMID:22610101

  11. Arrestin scaffolds NHERF1 to the P2Y12 receptor to regulate receptor internalization.

    PubMed

    Nisar, Shaista P; Cunningham, Margaret; Saxena, Kunal; Pope, Robert J; Kelly, Eamonn; Mundell, Stuart J

    2012-07-13

    We have recently shown in a patient with mild bleeding that the PDZ-binding motif of the platelet G protein-coupled P2Y(12) receptor (P2Y(12)R) is required for effective receptor traffic in human platelets. In this study we show for the first time that the PDZ motif-binding protein NHERF1 exerts a major role in potentiating G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) internalization. NHERF1 interacts with the C-tail of the P2Y(12)R and unlike many other GPCRs, NHERF1 interaction is required for effective P2Y(12)R internalization. In vitro and prior to agonist stimulation P2Y(12)R/NHERF1 interaction requires the intact PDZ binding motif of this receptor. Interestingly on receptor stimulation NHERF1 no longer interacts directly with the receptor but instead binds to the receptor via the endocytic scaffolding protein arrestin. These findings suggest a novel model by which arrestin can serve as an adaptor to promote NHERF1 interaction with a GPCR to facilitate effective NHERF1-dependent receptor internalization. PMID:22610101

  12. Activating Receptor Signals Drive Receptor Diversity in Developing Natural Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Freund, Jacquelyn; May, Rebecca M.; Li, Hongchuan; McCullen, Matthew; Zhang, Bin; Lenvik, Todd; Cichocki, Frank; Anderson, Stephen K.; Kambayashi, Taku

    2016-01-01

    It has recently been appreciated that NK cells exhibit many features reminiscent of adaptive immune cells. Considerable heterogeneity exists with respect to the ligand specificity of individual NK cells and as such, a subset of NK cells can respond, expand, and differentiate into memory-like cells in a ligand-specific manner. MHC I-binding inhibitory receptors, including those belonging to the Ly49 and KIR families, are expressed in a variegated manner, which creates ligand-specific diversity within the NK cell pool. However, how NK cells determine which inhibitory receptors to express on their cell surface during a narrow window of development is largely unknown. In this manuscript, we demonstrate that signals from activating receptors are critical for induction of Ly49 and KIR receptors during NK cell development; activating receptor-derived signals increased the probability of the Ly49 bidirectional Pro1 promoter to transcribe in the forward versus the reverse direction, leading to stable expression of Ly49 receptors in mature NK cells. Our data support a model where the balance of activating and inhibitory receptor signaling in NK cells selects for the induction of appropriate inhibitory receptors during development, which NK cells use to create a diverse pool of ligand-specific NK cells. PMID:27500644

  13. Regulation and ontogeny of subtypes of muscarinic receptors and muscarinic receptor-mediated

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.

    1989-01-01

    The densities of total and M1 muscarinic receptors were measured using the muscarinic receptor antagonists {sup 3}H-quinuclidinyl benzilate and {sup 3}H-pirenzepine, respectively. Thus, the difference between the density of {sup 3}H-quinuclidinyl benzilate and {sup 3}H-pirenzepine binding sites represents the density of M2 sites. In addition, there is no observable change in either acetylcholine-stimulated phosphoinositide breakdown (suggested to be an M1 receptor-mediated response) or in carbachol-mediated inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation (suggested to be an M2 receptor-mediated response) in slices of cortex+dorsal hippocampus following chronic atropine administration. In other experiments, it has been shown that the M1 and M2 receptors in rat cortex have different ontogenetic profiles. The M2 receptor is present at adult levels at birth, while the M1 receptor develops slowly from low levels at postnatal week 1 to adult levels at postnatal week 3. The expression of acetylcholine-stimulated phosphoinositide breakdown parallels the development of M1 receptors, while the development of carbachol-mediated inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation occurs abruptly between weeks 2 and 3 postnatally.

  14. Intracellular insulin-receptor dissociation and segregation in a rat fibroblast cell line transfected with a human insulin receptor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, J.R.; Olefsky, J.M.

    1988-05-05

    The cellular processing of insulin and insulin receptors was studied using a rat fibroblast cell line that had been transfected with a normal human insulin receptor gene, expressing approximately 500 times the normal number of native fibroblasts insulin receptors. These cells bind and internalize insulin normally. Biochemically assays based on the selective precipitation by polyethylene glycol of intact insulin-receptor complexes but not of free intracellular insulin were developed to study the time course of intracellular insulin-receptor dissociation. Fibroblasts were incubated with radiolabeled insulin at 4/sup 0/C, and internalization of insulin-receptor complexes was initiated by warming the cells to 37/sup 0/C. Within 2 min, 90% of the internalized radioactivity was composed of intact insulin-receptor complexes. The dissociation of insulin from internalized insulin-receptor complexes was markedly inhibited by monensin and chloroquine. Furthermore, chloroquine markedly increased the number of cross-linkable intracellular insulin-receptor complexes, as analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis autoradiography. These findings suggest that acidification of intracellular vesicles is responsible for insulin-receptor dissociation. Physical segregation of dissociated intracellular insulin from its receptor was monitored. The results are consistent with the view that segregation of insulin and receptor occurs 5-10 min after initiation of dissociation. These studies demonstrate the intracellular itinerary of insulin-receptor complexes, including internalization, dissociation of insulin from the internalized receptor within an acidified compartment, segregation of insulin from the receptor, and subsequent ligand degradation.

  15. Receptor activity-modifying proteins; multifunctional G protein-coupled receptor accessory proteins.

    PubMed

    Hay, Debbie L; Walker, Christopher S; Gingell, Joseph J; Ladds, Graham; Reynolds, Christopher A; Poyner, David R

    2016-04-15

    Receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs) are single pass membrane proteins initially identified by their ability to determine the pharmacology of the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR), a family B G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). It is now known that RAMPs can interact with a much wider range of GPCRs. This review considers recent developments on the structure of the complexes formed between the extracellular domains (ECDs) of CLR and RAMP1 or RAMP2 as these provide insights as to how the RAMPs direct ligand binding. The range of RAMP interactions is also considered; RAMPs can interact with numerous family B GPCRs as well as examples of family A and family C GPCRs. They influence receptor expression at the cell surface, trafficking, ligand binding and G protein coupling. The GPCR-RAMP interface offers opportunities for drug targeting, illustrated by examples of drugs developed for migraine. PMID:27068971

  16. The bovine peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor: A receptor with low affinity for benzodiazepines

    SciTech Connect

    Parola, A.L.; Laird, H.E. II )

    1991-01-01

    The density of bovine peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors (PBR) in four tissues was highest in adrenal cortex. The adrenal cortex PBR cofractionated with a mitochondrial membrane marker enzyme and could be solubilized with intact ligand binding properties using digitonin. The membrane bound and soluble mitochondrial receptors were pharmacologically characterized and showed the rank order of potency to inhibit ({sup 3}H)PK 11195 binding was PK 11195 > protoporphyrin IX > benzodiazepines. ({sup 3}H)PK 11195 binding to bovine adrenal mitochondria was unaffected by diethylpyrocarbonate, a histidine residue modifying reagent that decreased binding to rat liver mitochondria by 70%. ({sup 3}H)PK 14105 photolabeled the bovine PBR and the Mr was estimated under nondenaturing and denaturing conditions. These results demonstrate the bovine peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor is pharmacologically and biochemically distinct from the rat receptor, but the receptor component photolabeled by an isoquinoline ligand has a similar molecular weight.

  17. Evolutionary diversification of the trypanosome haptoglobin-haemoglobin receptor from an ancestral haemoglobin receptor

    PubMed Central

    Lane-Serff, Harriet; MacGregor, Paula; Peacock, Lori; Macleod, Olivia JS; Kay, Christopher; Gibson, Wendy; Higgins, Matthew K; Carrington, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The haptoglobin-haemoglobin receptor of the African trypanosome species, Trypanosoma brucei, is expressed when the parasite is in the bloodstream of the mammalian host, allowing it to acquire haem through the uptake of haptoglobin-haemoglobin complexes. Here we show that in Trypanosoma congolense this receptor is instead expressed in the epimastigote developmental stage that occurs in the tsetse fly, where it acts as a haemoglobin receptor. We also present the structure of the T. congolense receptor in complex with haemoglobin. This allows us to propose an evolutionary history for this receptor, charting the structural and cellular changes that took place as it adapted from a role in the insect to a new role in the mammalian host. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13044.001 PMID:27083048

  18. Identification and pharmacological characterization of the prostaglandin FP receptor and FP receptor variant complexes

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Y; Woodward, D F; Guzman, V M; Li, C; Scott, D F; Wang, J W; Wheeler, L A; Garst, M E; Landsverk, K; Sachs, G; Krauss, A H-P; Cornell, C; Martos, J; Pettit, S; Fliri, H

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: A prostamide analogue, bimatoprost, has been shown to be effective in reducing intraocular pressure, but its precise mechanism of action remains unclear. Hence, to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of this effect of bimatoprost, we focused on pharmacologically characterizing prostaglandin FP receptor (FP) and FP receptor variant (altFP) complexes. Experimental approach: FP receptor mRNA variants were identified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The FP-altFP4 heterodimers were established in HEK293/EBNA cells co-expressing FP and altFP4 receptor variants. A fluorometric imaging plate reader was used to study Ca2+ mobilization. Upregulation of cysteine-rich angiogenic protein 61 (Cyr61) mRNA was measured by Northern blot analysis, and phosphorylation of myosin light chain (MLC) by western analysis. Key results: Six splicing variants of FP receptor mRNA were identified in human ocular tissues. Immunoprecipitation confirmed that the FP receptor is dimerized with altFP4 receptors in HEK293/EBNA cells co-expressing FP and altFP4 receptors. In the studies of the kinetic profile for Ca2+ mobilization, prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α) elicited a rapid increase in intracellular Ca2+ followed by a steady state phase. In contrast, bimatoprost elicited an immediate increase in intracellular Ca2+ followed by a second phase. The prostamide antagonist, AGN211335, selectively and dose-dependently inhibited the bimatoprost-initiated second phase of Ca2+ mobilization, Cyr61 mRNA upregulation and MLC phosphorylation, but did not block the action of PGF2α. Conclusion and implications: Bimatoprost lacks effects on the FP receptor but may interact with the FP-altFP receptor heterodimer to induce alterations in second messenger signalling. Hence, FP-altFP complexes may represent the underlying basis of bimatoprost pharmacology. PMID:18587449

  19. Autoantibodies interacting with purified native thyrotropin receptor.

    PubMed

    Atger, M; Misrahi, M; Young, J; Jolivet, A; Orgiazzi, J; Schaison, G; Milgrom, E

    1999-11-01

    Native thyrotropin receptor (TSHR) was purified by immunoaffinity chromatography from membrane extracts of stably transfected L cells. An ELISA test was devised to study anti-TSHR autoantibodies directly. Comparison of native TSHR with bacterially expressed, denatured TSHR showed that the latter was not recognized by the autoantibodies, suggesting that they bind to conformational epitopes only present on the native receptor. The use of deglycosylated TSHR and of purified receptor ectodomain (alpha-subunit) showed that the autoantibodies recognized only the protein backbone moiety of the receptor and that their epitopes were localized entirely in its ectodomain. Autoantibodies were detected in 45 of 48 subjects with untreated Graves' disease and in 26 of 47 healthy volunteers. The affinity for the receptor was similar in the two groups (Kd = 0.25-1 x 10-10 M) and the autoantibodies belonged to the IgG class in all cases. Although the concentration of autoantibodies was higher in Graves' disease patients (3.50 +/- 0.36 mg.L-1) than in control subjects (1.76 +/- 0.21) (mean +/- SEM), there was an overlap between the groups. Receptor-stimulating autoantibodies (TSAb) were studied by measuring cAMP synthesis in stably transfected HEK 293 cells. Their characteristics (recognition of alpha-subunit, of deglycosylated TSHR, nonrecognition of bacterially expressed denatured receptor) were similar to those of the antibodies detected by the ELISA test. TSAb were only found in individuals with Graves' disease. The ELISA test measures total anti-TSHR antibodies, whereas the test using adenylate cyclase stimulation measures antibodies that recognize specific epitopes involved in receptor activation. Our observations thus disprove the hypothesis according to which Graves' disease is related to the appearance of anti-TSHR antibodies not present in normal subjects. Actually, anti-TSHR antibodies exist in many euthyroid subjects, in some cases even at concentrations higher than those

  20. Crystal structure of a heterotetrameric NMDA receptor ion channel

    PubMed Central

    Karakas, Erkan; Furukawa, Hiro

    2014-01-01

    N -methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors belong to the family of ionotropic glutamate receptors, which mediate most excitatory synaptic transmission in mammalian brains. Calcium permeation triggered by activation of NMDA receptors is the pivotal event for initiation of neuronal plasticity. Here we show the crystal structure of the intact heterotetrameric GluN1/GluN2B NMDA receptor ion channel at 4 Å. The NMDA receptors are arranged as a dimer of GluN1-GluN2B heterodimers with the two-fold symmetry axis running through the entire molecule composed of an amino terminal domain (ATD), a ligand-binding domain (LBD), and a transmembrane domain (TMD). The ATD and LBD are much more highly packed in the NMDA receptors than non-NMDA receptors, which may explain why ATD regulates ion channel activity in NMDA receptors but not in non-NMDA receptors. PMID:24876489

  1. Endocytosis and Intracellular Trafficking of Human Natural Killer Cell Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Masilamani, Madhan; Peruzzi, Giovanna; Borrego, Francisco; Coligan, John E.

    2009-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a vital role in the defense against viral infections and tumor development. NK cell function is primarily regulated by the sum of signals from a broad array of activation and inhibitory receptors. Key to generating the input level of either activating or inhibitory signals is the maintenance of receptor expression levels on the cell surface. Although the mechanisms of endocytosis and trafficking for some cell surface receptors, such as transferrin receptor, and certain immune receptors, are very well known, that is not the situation for receptors expressed by NK cells. Recent studies have uncovered that endocytosis and trafficking routes characteristic for specific activation and inhibitory receptors can regulate the functional responses of NK cells. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of receptor endocytosis and trafficking, and integrate this with our current understanding of NK cell receptor trafficking. PMID:19719476

  2. Structural and Molecular Modeling Features of P2X Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Luiz Anastacio; da Silva, João Herminio Martins; Ferreira, Dinarte Neto Moreira; Fidalgo-Neto, Antonio Augusto; Teixeira, Pedro Celso Nogueira; de Souza, Cristina Alves Magalhães; Caffarena, Ernesto Raúl; de Freitas, Mônica Santos

    2014-01-01

    Currently, adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) is recognized as the extracellular messenger that acts through P2 receptors. P2 receptors are divided into two subtypes: P2Y metabotropic receptors and P2X ionotropic receptors, both of which are found in virtually all mammalian cell types studied. Due to the difficulty in studying membrane protein structures by X-ray crystallography or NMR techniques, there is little information about these structures available in the literature. Two structures of the P2X4 receptor in truncated form have been solved by crystallography. Molecular modeling has proven to be an excellent tool for studying ionotropic receptors. Recently, modeling studies carried out on P2X receptors have advanced our knowledge of the P2X receptor structure-function relationships. This review presents a brief history of ion channel structural studies and shows how modeling approaches can be used to address relevant questions about P2X receptors. PMID:24637936

  3. Molecular Mechanisms of Opioid Receptor-Dependent Signaling and Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hasani, Ream; Bruchas, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Opioid receptors have been targeted for the treatment of pain and related disorders for thousands of years, and remain the most widely used analgesics in the clinic. Mu (μ), kappa (κ), and delta (δ) opioid receptors represent the originally classified receptor subtypes, with opioid receptor like-1 (ORL1) being the least characterized. All four receptors are G-protein coupled, and activate inhibitory G-proteins. These receptors form homo- and hetereodimeric complexes, signal to kinase cascades, and scaffold a variety of proteins. In this review, we discuss classical mechanisms and developments in understanding opioid tolerance, opioid receptor signaling, and highlight advances in opioid molecular pharmacology, behavioral pharmacology, and human genetics. We put into context how opioid receptor signaling leads to the modulation of behavior with the potential for therapeutic intervention. Finally, we conclude that there is a continued need for more translational work on opioid receptors in vivo. PMID:22020140

  4. Selectivity of oxomemazine for the M1 muscarinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Lee, S W; Woo, C W; Kim, J G

    1994-12-01

    The binding characteristics of pirenzepine and oxomemazine to muscarinic receptor were studied to evaluate the selectivity of oxomemazine for the muscarinic receptor subtypes in rat cerebral microsomes. Equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) of (-)-[3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate([3H]QNB) determined from saturation isotherms was 64 pM. Analysis of the pirenzepine inhibition curve of [3H]QNB binding to cerebral microsome indicated the presence of two receptor subtypes with high (Ki = 16 nM, M1 receptor) and low (Ki = 400 nM, M3 receptor) affinity for pirenzepine. Oxomemazine also identified two receptor subtypes with about 20-fold difference in the affinity for high (Ki = 84 nM, OH receptor) and low (Ki = 1.65 microM, OL receptor) affinity sites. The percentage populations of M1 and M3 receptors to the total receptors were 61:39, and those of OH and OL receptors 39:61, respectively. Both pirenzepine and oxomemazine increased the KD value for [3H]QNB without affecting the binding site concentrations and Hill coefficient for the [3H]QNB binding. Oxomemazine had a 10-fold higher affinity at M1 receptors than at M3 receptors, and pirenzepine a 8-fold higher affinity at OH receptors than at OL receptors. Analysis of the shallow competition binding curves of oxomemazine for M1 receptors and pirenzepine for OL receptors yielded that 69% of M1 receptors were of OH receptors and the remaining 31% of OL receptors, and that 29% of OL receptors were of M1 receptors and 71% of M3 receptors. However, M3 for oxomemazine and OH for pirenzepine were composed of a uniform population. These results suggest that oxomemazine could be classified as a selective drug for M1 receptors and also demonstrate that rat cerebral microsomes contain three different subtypes of M1, M3 and the other site which is different from M1, M2 and M3 receptors. PMID:10319156

  5. Guidance Receptors in the Nervous and Cardiovascular Systems.

    PubMed

    Rubina, K A; Tkachuk, V A

    2015-10-01

    Blood vessels and nervous fibers grow in parallel, for they express similar receptors for chemokine substances. Recently, much attention is being given to studying guidance receptors and their ligands besides the growth factors, cytokines, and chemokines necessary to form structures in the nervous and vascular systems. Such guidance molecules determine trajectory for growing axons and vessels. Guidance molecules include Ephrins and their receptors, Neuropilins and Plexins as receptors for Semaphorins, Robos as receptors for Slit-proteins, and UNC5B receptors binding Netrins. Apart from these receptors and their ligands, urokinase and its receptor (uPAR) and T-cadherin are also classified as guidance molecules. The urokinase system mediates local proteolysis at the leading edge of cells, thereby providing directed migration. T-cadherin is a repellent molecule that regulates the direction of growing axons and blood vessels. Guidance receptors also play an important role in the diseases of the nervous and cardiovascular systems. PMID:26567567

  6. Receptor Recognition Mechanisms of Coronaviruses: a Decade of Structural Studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Receptor recognition by viruses is the first and essential step of viral infections of host cells. It is an important determinant of viral host range and cross-species infection and a primary target for antiviral intervention. Coronaviruses recognize a variety of host receptors, infect many hosts, and are health threats to humans and animals. The receptor-binding S1 subunit of coronavirus spike proteins contains two distinctive domains, the N-terminal domain (S1-NTD) and the C-terminal domain (S1-CTD), both of which can function as receptor-binding domains (RBDs). S1-NTDs and S1-CTDs from three major coronavirus genera recognize at least four protein receptors and three sugar receptors and demonstrate a complex receptor recognition pattern. For example, highly similar coronavirus S1-CTDs within the same genus can recognize different receptors, whereas very different coronavirus S1-CTDs from different genera can recognize the same receptor. Moreover, coronavirus S1-NTDs can recognize either protein or sugar receptors. Structural studies in the past decade have elucidated many of the puzzles associated with coronavirus-receptor interactions. This article reviews the latest knowledge on the receptor recognition mechanisms of coronaviruses and discusses how coronaviruses have evolved their complex receptor recognition pattern. It also summarizes important principles that govern receptor recognition by viruses in general. PMID:25428871

  7. Insertion of isolated insulin receptors into placental membrane vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen, K; Carlsen, J

    1992-01-01

    Purified human insulin receptors were inserted into placental plasma-membrane vesicles by fusion of membranes with receptor-lysophosphatidylcholine micelles. Scatchard analysis of insulin binding showed that about 10-15% of the added receptors became inserted into the membrane. The receptor number could be increased about 3-fold, corresponding to approx. 5 pmol of receptor/mg of membrane protein. The receptors became firmly bound to the membrane, as they could not be removed by extensive wash. The insertion of exogenous receptors could be demonstrated by immunoblotting. The inserted insulin receptor had the same insulin-binding affinity as the isolated receptor and the endogenous receptor of the membrane. Insulin binding in the presence or absence of Triton X-100 revealed that more than 80% of the exogenous receptors had a right-side-out orientation. Function of the inserted receptors, as observed by insulin-stimulated autophosphorylation, could be demonstrated. About 80% of the added lysophospholipid, corresponding to approx. 160 nmol of lysophospholipid/mg of membrane protein, became integrated into the membrane and was partly metabolized to phospholipid and to non-esterified fatty acid. The method of insertion of isolated insulin receptors using the natural detergent, lysophospholipid, may be a method for insertion of receptors into intact cells, where the lysophospholipid, as in the plasma-membrane vesicles, will be acylated to phospholipid. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:1736892

  8. Dihydropyridine receptor mutations cause hypokalemic periodic paralysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ptacek, L.J.; Leppert, M.F.; Tawil, R.

    1994-09-01

    Hypokalemic periodic paralysis (hypoKPP) is an autosomal dominant skeletal muscle disorder manifested by episodic weakness associated with low serum potassium. Genetic linkage analysis has localized the hypoKPP gene to chromosome 1q31-q32 near a dihydropyridine receptor (DHP) gene. This receptor functions as a voltage-gated calcium channel and is also critical for excitation-contraction coupling in a voltage-sensitive and calcium-independent manner. We have characterized patient-specific DHP receptor mutations in 11 probands of 33 independent hypoKPP kindreds that occur at one of two adjacent nucleotides within the same codon and predict substitution of a highly conserved arginine in the S4 segment of domain 4 with either histidine or glycine. In one kindred, the mutation arose de novo. Taken together, these data establish the DHP receptor as the hypoKPP gene. We are unaware of any other human diseases presently known to result from DHP receptor mutations.

  9. Cellular receptors for human enterovirus species a.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Yorihiro; Shimizu, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Human enterovirus species A (HEV-A) is one of the four species of HEV in the genus Enterovirus in the family Picornaviridae. Among HEV-A, coxsackievirus A16 (CVA16) and enterovirus 71 (EV71) are the major causative agents of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD). Some other types of HEV-A are commonly associated with herpangina. Although HFMD and herpangina due to HEV-A are common febrile diseases among infants and children, EV71 can cause various neurological diseases, such as aseptic meningitis and fatal encephalitis. Recently, two human transmembrane proteins, P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) and scavenger receptor class B, member 2 (SCARB2), were identified as functional receptors for EV71 and CVA16. In in vitro infection experiments using the prototype HEV-A strains, PSGL-1 and SCARB2 could be responsible for the specific receptors for EV71 and CVA16. However, the involvement of both receptors in the in vitro and in vivo infections of clinical isolates of HEV-A has not been clarified yet. To elucidate a diverse array of the clinical outcome of HEV-A-associated diseases, the identification and characterization of HEV-A receptors may provide useful information in understanding the HEV-A pathogenesis at a molecular level. PMID:22470371

  10. Progesterone receptors activation after acute cocaine administration.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hui-Bing K; Fabian, Sosimo; Jenab, Shirzad; Quiñones-Jenab, Vanya

    2006-12-18

    Cocaine modulates serum levels of progesterone in intact female and male rats, as well as in pregnant dams, and progesterone decreases or attenuates cocaine-induced behavioral and reward responses. It has been postulated that cocaine's modulation of serum progesterone levels may in turn alter progesterone receptor activity, thereby contributing to cocaine-induced alterations of neuronal functions and genomic regulations. To test this hypothesis, intact male rats received acute injections of saline or cocaine (15 or 30 mg/kg, dissolved in 0.9% saline, intraperitoneal). Progesterone serum levels, progesterone receptor (PR) protein levels, and PR-DNA binding complexes were measured in the striatum by radioimmunoassay, Western blot, and gel shift analyses, respectively. After injection of 15 mg/kg of cocaine, induction of progesterone serum levels was closely followed by an increase in receptor protein levels and DNA binding complexes. After injection of 30 mg/kg of cocaine, similar effects were observed along with an attenuation of receptor protein levels and DNA binding complexes at 60 min. Our results suggest that activation of progesterone receptors may be a mechanism by which cocaine mediates behavior through molecular alterations in the central nervous system. PMID:17109827

  11. Olfactory Receptor Neuron Dysfunction in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Turetsky, Bruce I; Hahn, Chang-Gyu; Arnold, Steven E; Moberg, Paul J

    2012-01-01

    Olfactory impairments are a common feature of schizophrenia. Impairments in odor detection and odor identification are present early in the course of illness and among those at risk for the disorder. These behavioral impairments have been linked to both physiological and anatomical abnormalities in the neural substrates subserving olfaction, including relatively peripheral elements of the olfactory system. The location of olfactory receptor neurons in the nasal epithelium allows noninvasive access to these neurons in living subjects. This offers a unique opportunity to directly assess neuronal integrity in vivo in patients. The peripheral olfactory receptor neuron response to odor stimulation was assessed in 21 schizophrenia patients and 18 healthy comparison subjects. The electroolfactogram, representing the electrical depolarization of the olfactory receptor neurons, was recording following stimulation with different doses and durations of hydrogen sulfide, a pure olfactory nerve stimulant. Schizophrenia patients had abnormally large depolarization responses following odor stimulation, independent of clinical symptomatology, antipsychotic medication dosage or smoking history. Although the precise pathophysiological mechanism is unknown, this olfactory receptor neuron abnormality is consistent with several lines of evidence suggesting altered proliferation or maturation of olfactory receptor neuron cell lineages in schizophrenia. It is also consistent with emerging evidence of disruptions of cyclic AMP-mediated intracellular signaling mechanisms, and may be a marker of these disruptions. It unambiguously demonstrates that neurophysiological disturbances in schizophrenia are not limited to cortical and subcortical structures, but rather include even the most peripheral sensory neurons. PMID:18754006

  12. Olfactory receptor neuron dysfunction in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Turetsky, Bruce I; Hahn, Chang-Gyu; Arnold, Steven E; Moberg, Paul J

    2009-02-01

    Olfactory impairments are a common feature of schizophrenia. Impairments in odor detection and odor identification are present early in the course of illness and among those at risk for the disorder. These behavioral impairments have been linked to both physiological and anatomical abnormalities in the neural substrates subserving olfaction, including relatively peripheral elements of the olfactory system. The location of olfactory receptor neurons in the nasal epithelium allows noninvasive access to these neurons in living subjects. This offers a unique opportunity to directly assess neuronal integrity in vivo in patients. The peripheral olfactory receptor neuron response to odor stimulation was assessed in 21 schizophrenia patients and 18 healthy comparison subjects. The electroolfactogram, representing the electrical depolarization of the olfactory receptor neurons, was recording following stimulation with different doses and durations of hydrogen sulfide, a pure olfactory nerve stimulant. Schizophrenia patients had abnormally large depolarization responses following odor stimulation, independent of clinical symptomatology, antipsychotic medication dosage or smoking history. Although the precise pathophysiological mechanism is unknown, this olfactory receptor neuron abnormality is consistent with several lines of evidence suggesting altered proliferation or maturation of olfactory receptor neuron cell lineages in schizophrenia. It is also consistent with emerging evidence of disruptions of cyclic AMP-mediated intracellular signaling mechanisms, and may be a marker of these disruptions. It unambiguously demonstrates that neurophysiological disturbances in schizophrenia are not limited to cortical and subcortical structures, but rather include even the most peripheral sensory neurons. PMID:18754006

  13. Roles of transferrin receptors in erythropoiesis.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Soichiro; Masuda, Taro; Uchiyama, Tatsuki; Ohmori, Katsuyuki; Koeffler, H Phillip; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi

    2016-07-01

    Erythropoiesis requires large amounts of iron for hemoglobin synthesis, which is mainly provided by macrophages and the intestines in a transferrin (Tf)-bound form. Bone marrow erythroblasts incorporate Tf through endocytosis, which is mediated by transferrin receptor 1 (TFR1). Recently, human TFR1, aside from its role as a Tf receptor, was also found to be a receptor for the H-subunit of ferritin (FTH). In humans, hematopoietic erythroid precursor cells express high levels of TFR1 and specifically take up the FTH homopolymer (H-ferritin). H-ferritin inhibits the formation of burst forming unit-erythroid colonies in vitro. TFR2, which is also a Tf receptor, is predominantly expressed in hepatocytes and erythroid precursor cells. In the liver, TFR2 forms a complex with HFE, a hereditary hemochromatosis-associated protein, and acts as an iron sensor. In mice, hepatocyte-specific knockout of the TFR2 gene has been shown to cause systemic iron-overload with decreased expression of hepcidin, the central regulator of iron homeostasis. In erythroid cells, TFR2 forms a complex with the erythropoietin receptor and facilitates its trafficking to the cell membrane. Moreover, hematopoietic cell-specific knockout of the TFR2 gene causes microcytic erythrocytosis in mice. This review focuses on the molecular evolution and functions of these TFRs and their ligands. PMID:27498743