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Sample records for 5-hydroxytryptamine dorsal raphe

  1. 5-Hydroxytryptamine 1A receptors in the dorsomedial hypothalamus connected to dorsal raphe nucleus inputs modulate defensive behaviours and mediate innate fear-induced antinociception.

    PubMed

    Biagioni, Audrey Franceschi; de Oliveira, Rithiele Cristina; de Oliveira, Ricardo; da Silva, Juliana Almeida; dos Anjos-Garcia, Tayllon; Roncon, Camila Marroni; Corrado, Alexandre Pinto; Zangrossi, Hélio; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2016-03-01

    The dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) is an important brainstem source of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), and 5-HT plays a key role in the regulation of panic attacks. The aim of the present study was to determine whether 5-HT1A receptor-containing neurons in the medial hypothalamus (MH) receive neural projections from DRN and to then determine the role of this neural substrate in defensive responses. The neurotracer biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) was iontophoretically microinjected into the DRN, and immunohistochemical approaches were then used to identify 5HT1A receptor-labelled neurons in the MH. Moreover, the effects of pre-treatment of the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) with 8-OH-DPAT and WAY-100635, a 5-HT1A receptor agonist and antagonist, respectively, followed by local microinjections of bicuculline, a GABAA receptor antagonist, were investigated. We found that there are many projections from the DRN to the perifornical lateral hypothalamus (PeFLH) but also to DMH and ventromedial (VMH) nuclei, reaching 5HT1A receptor-labelled perikarya. DMH GABAA receptor blockade elicited defensive responses that were followed by antinociception. DMH treatment with 8-OH-DPAT decreased escape responses, which strongly suggests that the 5-HT1A receptor modulates the defensive responses. However, DMH treatment with WAY-100635 failed to alter bicuculline-induced defensive responses, suggesting that 5-HT exerts a phasic influence on 5-HT1A DMH neurons. The activation of the inhibitory 5-HT1A receptor had no effect on antinociception. However, blockade of the 5-HT1A receptor decreased fear-induced antinociception. The present data suggest that the ascending pathways from the DRN to the DMH modulate panic-like defensive behaviours and mediate antinociceptive phenomenon by recruiting 5-HT1A receptor in the MH. PMID:26749090

  2. Differential effects of the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)1A receptor inverse agonists Rec 27/0224 and Rec 27/0074 on electrophysiological responses to 5-HT1A receptor activation in rat dorsal raphe nucleus and hippocampus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Corradetti, Renato; Mlinar, Boris; Falsini, Chiara; Pugliese, Anna Maria; Cilia, Antonio; Destefani, Carla; Testa, Rodolfo

    2005-10-01

    The pharmacological properties of cyclohexanecarboxylic acid, {2-[4-(2-bromo-5-methoxybenzyl)piperazin-1-yl]ethyl}-(2-trifluoromethoxyphenyl)amide (Rec 27/0224), and cyclohexanecarboxylic acid, (2-methoxy-phenyl)-{2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-piperazin-1-yl]ethyl}amide (Rec 27/0074), were characterized using radioligand displacement and guanosine 5'-O-(3-[35S]thiotriphosphate) ([35S]GTPgammaS) binding assays, as well as electrophysiological experiments, in rat hippocampal and dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) slices. Both compounds showed a high affinity (Ki, approximately 1 nM) and selectivity (>70-fold) at human 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)1A receptors versus other 5-HT receptors. In [35S]GTPgammaS binding assays on HeLa cells stably expressing human 5-HT1A receptors, Rec 27/0224 and Rec 27/0074 inhibited basal [35S]GTPgammaS binding by 44.8 +/- 1.7% (pEC50 = 8.58) and 25 +/- 2.5% (pEC50 = 8.86), respectively. In intracellularly recorded CA1 pyramidal cells, 5-HT1A (hetero)receptor-mediated hyperpolarization, elicited by 100 nM 5-carboxamidoytryptamine (5-CT), was partially antagonized by Rec 27/0224 (approximately 50%; IC50 = 18.0 nM) and Rec 27/0074 (74%; IC50 = 0.8 nM). In extracellularly recorded DRN serotonergic neurons, Rec 27/0224 and Rec 27/0074 fully antagonized the inhibition of firing caused by the activation of 5-HT1A (auto)receptors by 30 nM 5-CT with an IC50 of 34.9 nM and 16.5 nM, respectively. The antagonism had a slow time course, reaching a steady state within 60 min. Both compounds also antagonized the citalopram-elicited, endogenous 5-HT-mediated inhibition of cell firing. In conclusion, Rec 27/0224 and Rec 27/0074 exhibited inverse agonism in [35S]GTPgammaS binding assays and differential antagonistic properties on 5-HT1A receptor-mediated responses in the hippocampus but not in the DRN. Whether this differential effect is causally related to inverse agonist activity is unclear. The qualitatively different nature of the antagonism in the hippocampus versus

  3. Effects of morphine, physostigmine and raphe nuclei stimulation on 5-hydroxytryptamine release from the cerebral cortex of the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Aiello-Malmberg, P; Bartolini, A; Bartolini, R; Galli, A

    1979-01-01

    1. The release of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) from the cerebral cortex and caudate nucleus of brainstem-transected cats and from the cerebral cortex of rats anaesthetized with urethane was determined by radioenzymatic and biological assay. 2. The stimulation of nucleus linearis intermedius of raphe doubles the basal 5-HT release in the caudate nucleus and increases it 3 fold in the cerebral cortex. The effects of the electrical stimulation of the raphe are potentiated by chlorimipramine. 3. Brain 5-HT release is greatly increased by morphine hydrochloride (6 mg/kg i.v.) and by physostigmine (100 microgram/kg i.v.), but not by DL-DOPA (50 mg/kg i.v.). 4. It is suggested that the 5-HT releasing action of physostigmine can contribute to some of its pharmacological effects such as the analgesic effect so far attributed exclusively to its indirect cholinomimetic activity. 5. The 5-HT releasing action of physostigmine seems unrelated to its anticholinesterase activity. PMID:435680

  4. The dorsal raphe modulates sensory responsiveness during arousal in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Yokogawa, Tohei; Hannan, Markus C.; Burgess, Harold A.

    2012-01-01

    During waking behavior animals adapt their state of arousal in response to environmental pressures. Sensory processing is regulated in aroused states and several lines of evidence imply that this is mediated at least partly by the serotonergic system. However there is little information directly showing that serotonergic function is required for state-dependent modulation of sensory processing. Here we find that zebrafish larvae can maintain a short-term state of arousal during which neurons in the dorsal raphe modulate sensory responsiveness to behaviorally relevant visual cues. Following a brief exposure to water flow, larvae show elevated activity and heightened sensitivity to perceived motion. Calcium imaging of neuronal activity after flow revealed increased activity in serotonergic neurons of the dorsal raphe. Genetic ablation of these neurons abolished the increase in visual sensitivity during arousal without affecting baseline visual function or locomotor activity. We traced projections from the dorsal raphe to a major visual area, the optic tectum. Laser ablation of the tectum demonstrated that this structure, like the dorsal raphe, is required for improved visual sensitivity during arousal. These findings reveal that serotonergic neurons of the dorsal raphe have a state-dependent role in matching sensory responsiveness to behavioral context. PMID:23100441

  5. Reward processing by the dorsal raphe nucleus: 5-HT and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jingfeng; Liu, Zhixiang

    2015-01-01

    The dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) represents one of the most sensitive reward sites in the brain. However, the exact relationship between DRN neuronal activity and reward signaling has been elusive. In this review, we will summarize anatomical, pharmacological, optogenetics, and electrophysiological studies on the functions and circuit mechanisms of DRN neurons in reward processing. The DRN is commonly associated with serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT), but this nucleus also contains neurons of the neurotransmitter phenotypes of glutamate, GABA and dopamine. Pharmacological studies indicate that 5-HT might be involved in modulating reward- or punishment-related behaviors. Recent optogenetic stimulations demonstrate that transient activation of DRN neurons produces strong reinforcement signals that are carried out primarily by glutamate. Moreover, activation of DRN 5-HT neurons enhances reward waiting. Electrophysiological recordings reveal that the activity of DRN neurons exhibits diverse behavioral correlates in reward-related tasks. Studies so far thus demonstrate the strong power of DRN neurons in reward signaling and at the same time invite additional efforts to dissect the roles and mechanisms of different DRN neuron types in various processes of reward-related behaviors. PMID:26286655

  6. Serotonergic and nonserotonergic dorsal raphe neurons are pharmacologically and electrophysiologically heterogeneous.

    PubMed

    Marinelli, Silvia; Schnell, Stephen A; Hack, Stephen P; Christie, MacDonald J; Wessendorf, Martin W; Vaughan, Christopher W

    2004-12-01

    The dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) projects serotonergic axons throughout the brain and is involved in a variety of physiological functions. However, it also includes a large population of cells that contain other neurotransmitters. To clarify the physiological and pharmacological differences between the serotonergic and nonserotonergic neurons of the DRN, their postsynaptic responses to 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, serotonin) and to selective activation of 5-HT1A or 5-HT2A/C receptors and their action potential characteristics were determined using in vitro patch-clamp recordings. The slices containing these neurons were then immunostained for tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH), a marker of serotonergic neurons. It was found that subpopulations of both serotonergic and nonserotonergic neurons responded to 5-HT with outward (i.e., inhibitory) and inward (i.e., excitatory) currents, responded to both 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A/C receptor activation with outward and inward currents, respectively, and displayed overlapping action potential characteristics. These findings suggest that serotonergic and nonserotonergic neurons in the DRN are both heterogeneous with respect to their individual pharmacological and electrophysiological characteristics. The findings also suggest that the activity of the different populations of DRN neurons will display heterogeneous changes when the serotonergic tone in the DRN is altered by neurological disorders or by drug treatment.

  7. Reward processing by the dorsal raphe nucleus: 5-HT and beyond.

    PubMed

    Luo, Minmin; Zhou, Jingfeng; Liu, Zhixiang

    2015-09-01

    The dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) represents one of the most sensitive reward sites in the brain. However, the exact relationship between DRN neuronal activity and reward signaling has been elusive. In this review, we will summarize anatomical, pharmacological, optogenetics, and electrophysiological studies on the functions and circuit mechanisms of DRN neurons in reward processing. The DRN is commonly associated with serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT), but this nucleus also contains neurons of the neurotransmitter phenotypes of glutamate, GABA and dopamine. Pharmacological studies indicate that 5-HT might be involved in modulating reward- or punishment-related behaviors. Recent optogenetic stimulations demonstrate that transient activation of DRN neurons produces strong reinforcement signals that are carried out primarily by glutamate. Moreover, activation of DRN 5-HT neurons enhances reward waiting. Electrophysiological recordings reveal that the activity of DRN neurons exhibits diverse behavioral correlates in reward-related tasks. Studies so far thus demonstrate the strong power of DRN neurons in reward signaling and at the same time invite additional efforts to dissect the roles and mechanisms of different DRN neuron types in various processes of reward-related behaviors. PMID:26286655

  8. Effect of sex steroid hormones on the number of serotonergic neurons in rat dorsal raphe nucleus.

    PubMed

    Kunimura, Yuyu; Iwata, Kinuyo; Iijima, Norio; Kobayashi, Makito; Ozawa, Hitoshi

    2015-05-01

    Disorders caused by the malfunction of the serotonergic system in the central nervous system show sex-specific prevalence. Many studies have reported a relationship between sex steroid hormones and the brain serotonergic system; however, the interaction between sex steroid hormones and the number of brain neurons expressing serotonin has not yet been elucidated. In the present study, we determined whether sex steroid hormones altered the number of serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DR) of adult rat brains. Animals were divided into five groups: ovariectomized (OVX), OVX+low estradiol (E2), OVX+high E2, castrated males, and intact males. Antibodies against 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, serotonin) and tryptophan hydroxylase (Tph), an enzyme for 5-HT synthesis, were used as markers of 5-HT neurons, and the number of 5-HT-immunoreactive (ir) or Tph-ir cells was counted. We detected no significant differences in the number of 5-HT-ir or Tph-ir cells in the DR among the five groups. By contrast, the intensity of 5-HT-ir showed significant sex differences in specific subregions of the DR independent of sex steroid levels, suggesting that the manipulation of sex steroid hormones after maturation does not affect the number and intensive immunostaining of serotonergic neurons in rat brain. Our results suggest that, the sexual dimorphism observed in the serotonergic system is due to factors such as 5-HT synthesis, transportation, and degradation but not to the number of serotonergic neurons.

  9. The interaction of cocaine with serotonin dorsal raphe neurons. Single-unit extracellular recording studies.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, K A; Lakoski, J M

    1990-02-01

    Cocaine potently inhibits the spontaneous activity of dorsal raphe serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT] neurons which possess impulse-modulating receptors of the 5-HT1A subtype. In an investigation of the neuropharmacologic mechanisms underlying this electrophysiologic effect, we have compared cocaine with structurally and functionally similar compounds, attempted to reverse cocaine-induced suppression of 5-HT dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) neuronal activity, and assessed the effects of 5-HT depletion on the response to cocaine. Extracellular recordings in chloral hydrate-anesthetized rats were obtained using single-unit recording techniques; drugs were infused intravenously IV) in a cumulative dose manner. The active isomer (-)-cocaine (ID50 = 0.5 +/- 0.15 mg/kg) and the phenyltropane analogue WIN 35428 (ID50 = 0.17 +/- 0.03 mg/kg) that share the ability of cocaine to block monoamine uptake also inhibit impulse activity in 5-HT neurons. In contrast, the inactive isomers (+)-cocaine, (+)-pseudococaine and the metabolite benzoylecgonine do not exhibit the same range of potency (maximal 20% to 30% inhibition at a cumulative dose of 8 to 16 mg/kg). A selective inhibitor of uptake for 5-HT (fluoxetine; ID50 = 1.8 +/- 0.5 mg/kg), but not norepinephrine (desipramine) or dopamine (GBR 12909), mimicked cocaine, as did the monoamine releaser amphetamine (ID50 = 2.86 +/- 0.46 mg/kg). The putative 5-HT1A autoreceptor antagonist spiperone reversed the cocaine-induced depression of firing rate in 64% of 5-HT neurons tested whereas receptor antagonists for dopamine D2 (haloperidol), 5-HT2 (ketanserin), gamma-aminobutyric acid (picrotoxin) and 5-HT1/beta-adrenergic (propranolol) were ineffective. Following treatment with the 5-HT synthesis inhibitor p-chlorophenylalanine (100 mg/kg/day of the base for 3 days), impulse depression induced by cocaine was significantly attenuated as compared to control, which suggests that the effects of cocaine may be dependent on endogenous 5-HT

  10. Dorsal Raphe Dopamine Neurons Represent the Experience of Social Isolation

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Gillian A.; Nieh, Edward H.; Vander Weele, Caitlin M.; Halbert, Sarah A.; Pradhan, Roma V.; Yosafat, Ariella S.; Glober, Gordon F.; Izadmehr, Ehsan M.; Thomas, Rain E.; Lacy, Gabrielle D.; Wildes, Craig P.; Ungless, Mark A.; Tye, Kay M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The motivation to seek social contact may arise from either positive or negative emotional states, as social interaction can be rewarding and social isolation can be aversive. While ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA) neurons may mediate social reward, a cellular substrate for the negative affective state of loneliness has remained elusive. Here, we identify a functional role for DA neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), in which we observe synaptic changes following acute social isolation. DRN DA neurons show increased activity upon social contact following isolation, revealed by in vivo calcium imaging. Optogenetic activation of DRN DA neurons increases social preference but causes place avoidance. Furthermore, these neurons are necessary for promoting rebound sociability following an acute period of isolation. Finally, the degree to which these neurons modulate behavior is predicted by social rank, together supporting a role for DRN dopamine neurons in mediating a loneliness-like state. PaperClip PMID:26871628

  11. Serotonin neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus encode reward signals.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Zhong, Weixin; Wang, Daqing; Feng, Qiru; Liu, Zhixiang; Zhou, Jingfeng; Jia, Chunying; Hu, Fei; Zeng, Jiawei; Guo, Qingchun; Fu, Ling; Luo, Minmin

    2016-01-28

    The dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) is involved in organizing reward-related behaviours; however, it remains unclear how genetically defined neurons in the DRN of a freely behaving animal respond to various natural rewards. Here we addressed this question using fibre photometry and single-unit recording from serotonin (5-HT) neurons and GABA neurons in the DRN of behaving mice. Rewards including sucrose, food, sex and social interaction rapidly activate 5-HT neurons, but aversive stimuli including quinine and footshock do not. Both expected and unexpected rewards activate 5-HT neurons. After mice learn to wait for sucrose delivery, most 5-HT neurons fire tonically during waiting and then phasically on reward acquisition. Finally, GABA neurons are activated by aversive stimuli but inhibited when mice seek rewards. Thus, DRN 5-HT neurons positively encode a wide range of reward signals during anticipatory and consummatory phases of reward responses. Moreover, GABA neurons play a complementary role in reward processing.

  12. Serotonin neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus encode reward signals

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Zhong, Weixin; Wang, Daqing; Feng, Qiru; Liu, Zhixiang; Zhou, Jingfeng; Jia, Chunying; Hu, Fei; Zeng, Jiawei; Guo, Qingchun; Fu, Ling; Luo, Minmin

    2016-01-01

    The dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) is involved in organizing reward-related behaviours; however, it remains unclear how genetically defined neurons in the DRN of a freely behaving animal respond to various natural rewards. Here we addressed this question using fibre photometry and single-unit recording from serotonin (5-HT) neurons and GABA neurons in the DRN of behaving mice. Rewards including sucrose, food, sex and social interaction rapidly activate 5-HT neurons, but aversive stimuli including quinine and footshock do not. Both expected and unexpected rewards activate 5-HT neurons. After mice learn to wait for sucrose delivery, most 5-HT neurons fire tonically during waiting and then phasically on reward acquisition. Finally, GABA neurons are activated by aversive stimuli but inhibited when mice seek rewards. Thus, DRN 5-HT neurons positively encode a wide range of reward signals during anticipatory and consummatory phases of reward responses. Moreover, GABA neurons play a complementary role in reward processing. PMID:26818705

  13. Dorsal Raphe Dopamine Neurons Represent the Experience of Social Isolation.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Gillian A; Nieh, Edward H; Vander Weele, Caitlin M; Halbert, Sarah A; Pradhan, Roma V; Yosafat, Ariella S; Glober, Gordon F; Izadmehr, Ehsan M; Thomas, Rain E; Lacy, Gabrielle D; Wildes, Craig P; Ungless, Mark A; Tye, Kay M

    2016-02-11

    The motivation to seek social contact may arise from either positive or negative emotional states, as social interaction can be rewarding and social isolation can be aversive. While ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA) neurons may mediate social reward, a cellular substrate for the negative affective state of loneliness has remained elusive. Here, we identify a functional role for DA neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), in which we observe synaptic changes following acute social isolation. DRN DA neurons show increased activity upon social contact following isolation, revealed by in vivo calcium imaging. Optogenetic activation of DRN DA neurons increases social preference but causes place avoidance. Furthermore, these neurons are necessary for promoting rebound sociability following an acute period of isolation. Finally, the degree to which these neurons modulate behavior is predicted by social rank, together supporting a role for DRN dopamine neurons in mediating a loneliness-like state. PAPERCLIP. PMID:26871628

  14. Dorsal Raphe Dopamine Neurons Represent the Experience of Social Isolation.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Gillian A; Nieh, Edward H; Vander Weele, Caitlin M; Halbert, Sarah A; Pradhan, Roma V; Yosafat, Ariella S; Glober, Gordon F; Izadmehr, Ehsan M; Thomas, Rain E; Lacy, Gabrielle D; Wildes, Craig P; Ungless, Mark A; Tye, Kay M

    2016-02-11

    The motivation to seek social contact may arise from either positive or negative emotional states, as social interaction can be rewarding and social isolation can be aversive. While ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA) neurons may mediate social reward, a cellular substrate for the negative affective state of loneliness has remained elusive. Here, we identify a functional role for DA neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), in which we observe synaptic changes following acute social isolation. DRN DA neurons show increased activity upon social contact following isolation, revealed by in vivo calcium imaging. Optogenetic activation of DRN DA neurons increases social preference but causes place avoidance. Furthermore, these neurons are necessary for promoting rebound sociability following an acute period of isolation. Finally, the degree to which these neurons modulate behavior is predicted by social rank, together supporting a role for DRN dopamine neurons in mediating a loneliness-like state. PAPERCLIP.

  15. Neuropharmacology of 5-hydroxytryptamine

    PubMed Central

    Richard Green, A

    2006-01-01

    This review outlines the history of our knowledge of the neuropharmacology of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; serotonin), focusing primarily on the work of U.K. scientists. The existence of a vasoconstrictive substance in the blood has been known for over 135 years. The substance was named serotonin and finally identified as 5-HT in 1949. The presence of 5-HT in the brain was reported by Gaddum in 1954 and it was Gaddum who also demonstrated that the action of 5-HT (in the gut) was antagonised by the potent hallucinogen lysergic acid diethylamide. This provoked the notion that 5-HT played a pivotal role in the control of mood and subsequent investigations have generally confirmed this hypothesis. Over the last 50 years a good understanding has been gained of the mechanisms involved in control of the storage, synthesis and degradation of 5-HT in the brain. Knowledge has also been gained on control of the functional activity of this monoamine, often by the use of behavioural models. A considerable literature also now exists on the mechanisms by which many of the drugs used to treat psychiatric illness alter the functional activity of 5-HT, particularly the drugs used to treat depression. Over the last 20 years the number of identified 5-HT receptor subtypes has increased from 2 to 14, or possibly more. A major challenge now is to utilise this knowledge to develop receptor-specific drugs and use the information gained to better treat central nervous system disorders. PMID:16402098

  16. Dorsal raphe nucleus projecting retinal ganglion cells: Why Y cells?

    PubMed Central

    Pickard, Gary E.; So, Kwok-Fai; Pu, Mingliang

    2015-01-01

    Retinal ganglion Y (alpha) cells are found in retinas ranging from frogs to mice to primates. The highly conserved nature of the large, fast conducting retinal Y cell is a testament to its fundamental task, although precisely what this task is remained ill-defined. The recent discovery that Y-alpha retinal ganglion cells send axon collaterals to the serotonergic dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) in addition to the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN), medial interlaminar nucleus (MIN), pretectum and the superior colliculus (SC) has offered new insights into the important survival tasks performed by these cells with highly branched axons. We propose that in addition to its role in visual perception, the Y-alpha retinal ganglion cell provides concurrent signals via axon collaterals to the DRN, the major source of serotonergic afferents to the forebrain, to dramatically inhibit 5-HT activity during orientation or alerting/escape responses, which dis-facilitates ongoing tonic motor activity while dis-inhibiting sensory information processing throughout the visual system. The new data provide a fresh view of these evolutionarily old retinal ganglion cells. PMID:26363667

  17. Nicotinic modulation of serotonergic activity in the dorsal raphe nucleus.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Lopez, Salvador; Garduño, Julieta; Mihailescu, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Cholinergic signaling mediated by nicotinic receptors has been associated to a large number of physiological and behavioral processes such as learning, memory, attention, food-intake and mood disorders. Although it is well established that many nicotinic actions are mediated through an increase in serotonin (5-HT) release, the physiological mechanisms by which nicotine produces these effects are still unclear. The dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) contains the major amount of 5-HT neurons projecting to different parts of the brain. DRN also contains nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) located at somatic and presynaptic elements. Nicotine produces both inhibitory and excitatory effects on different subpopulations of 5-HT DRN neurons. In this review, we describe the presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanisms by which nicotine increases the excitability of DRN neurons as well as the subtypes of nAChRs involved. We also describe the inhibitory effects of nicotine and the role of 5-HT1A receptors in this effect. These nicotinic actions modulate the activity of different neuronal subpopulations in the DRN, changing the 5-HT tone in the brain areas where these groups of neurons project. Some of the physiological implications of nicotine-induced 5-HT release are discussed. PMID:24021594

  18. Sleep-waking discharge profiles of dorsal raphe nucleus neurons in mice.

    PubMed

    Sakai, K

    2011-12-01

    We have recorded, for the first time, in non-anesthetized, head-restrained mice, a total of 407 single units throughout the dorsal raphe nucleus (DR), which contains serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) neurons, during the complete wake-sleep cycle. The mouse DR was found to contain a large proportion (52.0%) of waking (W)-active neurons, together with many sleep-active (24.8%) and W/paradoxical sleep (PS)-active (18.4%) neurons and a few state-unrelated neurons (4.7%). The W-active, W/PS-active, and sleep-active neurons displayed a biphasic narrow or triphasic broad action potential. Of the 212 W-active neurons, 194 were judged serotonergic (5-HT W-active neurons) because of their triphasic long-duration action potential and low rate of spontaneous discharge, while the remaining 18 were judged non-serotonergic (non-5-HT W-active neurons) because of their biphasic narrow action potential and higher rate of spontaneous discharge. The 5-HT W-active neurons were subdivided into four groups, types I, II, III, and IV, on the basis of differences in firing pattern during wake-sleep states, their waking selectivity of discharge being in the order type I>type II>type III>type IV. During the transition from sleep to waking, the vast majority of waking-specific or waking-selective type I and II neurons discharged after onset of waking, as seen with non-5-HT W-specific neurons. Triphasic DR W/PS-active neurons were characterized by a low rate of spontaneous discharge and a similar distribution to that of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive, dopaminergic neurons. Triphasic DR slow-wave sleep (SWS)-active and SWS/PS neurons were also characterized by slow firing. At the transition from sleep to waking, sleep-selective neurons with no discharge activity during waking ceased firing before onset of waking, while, at the transition from waking to sleep, they fired after onset of sleep. The present study shows a marked heterogeneity and functional topographic organization of both

  19. Sleep-waking discharge profiles of dorsal raphe nucleus neurons in mice.

    PubMed

    Sakai, K

    2011-12-01

    We have recorded, for the first time, in non-anesthetized, head-restrained mice, a total of 407 single units throughout the dorsal raphe nucleus (DR), which contains serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) neurons, during the complete wake-sleep cycle. The mouse DR was found to contain a large proportion (52.0%) of waking (W)-active neurons, together with many sleep-active (24.8%) and W/paradoxical sleep (PS)-active (18.4%) neurons and a few state-unrelated neurons (4.7%). The W-active, W/PS-active, and sleep-active neurons displayed a biphasic narrow or triphasic broad action potential. Of the 212 W-active neurons, 194 were judged serotonergic (5-HT W-active neurons) because of their triphasic long-duration action potential and low rate of spontaneous discharge, while the remaining 18 were judged non-serotonergic (non-5-HT W-active neurons) because of their biphasic narrow action potential and higher rate of spontaneous discharge. The 5-HT W-active neurons were subdivided into four groups, types I, II, III, and IV, on the basis of differences in firing pattern during wake-sleep states, their waking selectivity of discharge being in the order type I>type II>type III>type IV. During the transition from sleep to waking, the vast majority of waking-specific or waking-selective type I and II neurons discharged after onset of waking, as seen with non-5-HT W-specific neurons. Triphasic DR W/PS-active neurons were characterized by a low rate of spontaneous discharge and a similar distribution to that of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive, dopaminergic neurons. Triphasic DR slow-wave sleep (SWS)-active and SWS/PS neurons were also characterized by slow firing. At the transition from sleep to waking, sleep-selective neurons with no discharge activity during waking ceased firing before onset of waking, while, at the transition from waking to sleep, they fired after onset of sleep. The present study shows a marked heterogeneity and functional topographic organization of both

  20. Dorsal Raphe Neuroinflammation Promotes Dramatic Behavioral Stress Dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Howerton, Alexis R.; Roland, Alison V.

    2014-01-01

    Impulsivity, risk-taking behavior, and elevated stress responsivity are prominent symptoms of mania, a behavioral state common to schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Though inflammatory processes activated within the brain are involved in the pathophysiology of both disorders, the specific mechanisms by which neuroinflammation drives manic behavior are not well understood. Serotonin cell bodies originating within the dorsal raphe (DR) play a major role in the regulation of behavioral features characteristic of mania. Therefore, we hypothesized that the link between neuroinflammation and manic behavior may be mediated by actions on serotonergic neurocircuitry. To examine this, we induced local neuroinflammation in the DR by viral delivery of Cre recombinase into interleukin (IL)-1βXAT transgenic male and female mice, resulting in overexpressing of the proinflammatory cytokine, IL-1β. For assertion of brain-region specificity of these outcomes, the prefrontal cortex (PFC), as a downstream target of DR serotonergic projections, was also infused. Inflammation within the DR, but not the PFC, resulted in a profound display of manic-like behavior, characterized by increased stress-induced locomotion and responsivity, and reduced risk-aversion/fearfulness. Microarray analysis of the DR revealed a dramatic increase in immune-related genes, and dysregulation of genes important in GABAergic, glutamatergic, and serotonergic neurotransmission. Behavioral and physiological changes were driven by a loss of serotonergic neurons and reduced output as measured by high-performance liquid chromatography, demonstrating inflammation-induced serotonergic hypofunction. Behavioral changes were rescued by acute selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor treatment, supporting the hypothesis that serotonin dysregulation stemming from neuroinflammation in the DR underlies manic-like behaviors. PMID:24849347

  1. Serotoninergic dorsal raphe neurons possess functional postsynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Galindo-Charles, Luis; Hernandez-Lopez, Salvador; Galarraga, Elvira; Tapia, Dagoberto; Bargas, José; Garduño, Julieta; Frías-Dominguez, Carmen; Drucker-Colin, René; Mihailescu, Stefan

    2008-08-01

    Very few neurons in the telencephalon have been shown to express functional postsynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), among them, the noradrenergic and dopaminergic neurons. However, there is no evidence for postsynaptic nAChRs on serotonergic neurons. In this study, we asked if functional nAChRs are present in serotonergic (5-HT) and nonserotonergic (non-5-HT) neurons of the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN). In rat midbrain slices, field stimulation at the tegmental pedunculopontine (PPT) nucleus evoked postsynaptic currents (eEPSCs) with different components in DRN neurons. After blocking the glutamatergic and GABAergic components, the remaining eEPSCs were blocked by mecamylamine and reduced by either the selective alpha7 nAChR antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA) or the selective alpha4beta2 nAChR antagonist dihydro-beta-eritroidine (DHbetaE). Simultaneous addition of MLA and DHbetaE blocked all eEPSCs. Integrity of the PPT-DRN pathway was assessed by both anterograde biocytin tracing and antidromic stimulation from the DRN. Inward currents evoked by the direct application of acetylcholine (ACh), in the presence of atropine and tetrodotoxin, consisted of two kinetically different currents: one was blocked by MLA and the other by DHbetaE; in both 5-HT and non-5-HT DR neurons. Analysis of spontaneous (sEPSCs) and evoked (eEPSCs) synaptic events led to the conclusion that nAChRs were located at the postsynaptic membrane. The possible implications of these newly described nAChRs in various physiological processes and behavioral events, such as the wake-sleep cycle, are discussed. PMID:18512214

  2. Dorsal raphe nucleus and harm avoidance: A resting-state investigation.

    PubMed

    Meylakh, N; Henderson, L A

    2016-06-01

    The temperament dimension of harm avoidance defines an individual's biological tendency to exhibit altering levels of anxious, inhibiting, and cautious behavior. High harm avoidance and anxiety are highly comorbid, likely due to activity in similar neural circuitries involving the dorsal raphe nucleus. Despite the many investigations that have explored personality factors and brain function, none have determined the influence of ongoing activity within dorsal raphe networks on harm avoidance. The aim of this study was to explore such a relationship. In 62 healthy subjects, a series of 180 functional magnetic resonance images covering the entire brain were collected, and each subject completed the 240-item TCI-R questionnaire. Independent component analyses were performed to define the dorsal raphe network and then to determine the regions significantly correlated with harm avoidance. The independent component analyses revealed three signal intensity fluctuation maps encompassing the dorsal raphe nucleus, showing interactions with regions of the amygdala, hippocampus, nucleus accumbens, and prefrontal, insular, and cingulate cortices. Within these systems, the resting signal intensity was significantly coupled to harm avoidance in the bilateral basal amygdala, bilateral ventral hippocampus, bilateral insula, bilateral nucleus accumbens, and medial prefrontal cortex. Note that we could not measure serotonergic output, but instead measured signal changes in the dorsal raphe that likely reflect synaptic activity. These data provide evidence that at rest, signal intensity fluctuations within the dorsal raphe networks are related to harm avoidance. Given the strong relationship between harm avoidance and anxiety-like behaviors, it is possible that ongoing activity within this identified neural circuitry can contribute to an individual developing anxiety disorders.

  3. Neonatal hypoxia-ischaemia disrupts descending neural inputs to dorsal raphé nuclei.

    PubMed

    Reinebrant, H E; Wixey, J A; Buller, K M

    2013-09-17

    Neuronal losses have been shown to occur in the brainstem following a neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic (HI) insult. In particular serotonergic neurons, situated in the dorsal raphé nuclei, appear to be vulnerable to HI injury. Nonetheless the mechanisms contributing to losses of serotonergic neurons in the brainstem remain to be elucidated. One possible mechanism is that disruption of neural projections from damaged forebrain areas to dorsal raphé nuclei may play a role in the demise of serotonergic neurons. To test this, postnatal day 3 (P3) rat pups underwent unilateral common carotid artery ligation followed by hypoxia (6% O₂ for 30 min). On P38 a retrograde tracer, fluorescent-coupled choleratoxin b, was deposited in the dorsal raphé dorsal (DR dorsal) nucleus or the dorsal raphé ventral (DR ventral) nucleus. Compared to control animals, P3 HI animals had significant losses of retrogradely labelled neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex, preoptic area and lateral habenula after tracer deposit in the DR dorsal nucleus. On the other hand, after tracer deposit in the DR ventral nucleus, we found significant reductions in numbers of retrogradely labelled neurons in the hypothalamus, preoptic area and medial amygdala in P3 HI animals compared to controls. Since losses of descending inputs are associated with decreases in serotonergic neurons in the brainstem raphé nuclei, we propose that disruption of certain descending neural inputs from the forebrain to the DR dorsal and the DR ventral nuclei may contribute to losses of serotonergic neurons after P3 HI. It is important to delineate the phenotypes of different neuronal networks affected by neonatal HI, and the mechanisms underpinning this damage, so that interventions can be devised to target and protect axons from the harmful effects of neonatal HI.

  4. In vivo release of serotonin in cat dorsal vagal complex and cervical ventral horn induced by electrical stimulation of the medullary raphe nuclei.

    PubMed

    Brodin, E; Linderoth, B; Goiny, M; Yamamoto, Y; Gazelius, B; Millhorn, D E; Hökfelt, T; Ungerstedt, U

    1990-12-10

    Extracellular levels of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) were monitored by microdialysis in the dorsal vagal complex (DVC) and the ventral horn of the spinal cord at the level of the phrenic motor nucleus in decerebrated cats. A selective serotonin uptake inhibitor, alaproclate (10(-4) M) was included in the dialysis probe perfusion fluid to increase basal and stimulated levels of 5-HT. Electrical stimulation (30 Hz, 10 V, 0.5 ms) in the nucleus raphe obscurus, containing neurons projecting to the DVC and to the ventral horn, induced a 2-3-fold increase of the 5-HT release in both these regions. After termination of the stimulation, the release gradually decreased during the following 60 min. Substance P, which coexists with 5-HT in descending neurons, did not significantly affect the 5-HT release when it was added (100 microM) to the probe perfusion fluid. The present findings are in accordance with the hypothesis that prolonged release of 5-HT is responsible for the previously demonstrated long-lasting facilitation of phrenic activity following raphe obscurus stimulation. PMID:1705856

  5. Reward Processing by the Dorsal Raphe Nucleus: 5-HT and Beyond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luo, Minmin; Zhou, Jingfeng; Liu, Zhixiang

    2015-01-01

    The dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) represents one of the most sensitive reward sites in the brain. However, the exact relationship between DRN neuronal activity and reward signaling has been elusive. In this review, we will summarize anatomical, pharmacological, optogenetics, and electrophysiological studies on the functions and circuit mechanisms of…

  6. Morphine history sensitizes postsynaptic GABA receptors on dorsal raphe serotonin neurons in a stress-induced relapse model in rats.

    PubMed

    Staub, D R; Lunden, J W; Cathel, A M; Dolben, E L; Kirby, L G

    2012-06-01

    The serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) system plays an important role in stress-related psychiatric disorders and substance abuse. Previous work has shown that the dorsal raphe nucleus (DR)-5-HT system is inhibited by swim stress via stimulation of GABA synaptic activity by the stress neurohormone corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF). Additionally, the DR 5-HT system is regulated by opioids. The present study tests the hypothesis that the DR 5-HT system regulates stress-induced opioid relapse. In the first experiment, electrophysiological recordings of GABA synaptic activity in 5-HT DR neurons were conducted in brain slices from Sprague-Dawley rats that were exposed to swim stress-induced reinstatement of previously extinguished morphine conditioned place preference (CPP). Behavioral data indicate that swim stress triggers reinstatement of morphine CPP. Electrophysiology data indicate that 5-HT neurons in the morphine-conditioned group exposed to stress had increased amplitude of inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs), which would indicate greater postsynaptic GABA receptor density and/or sensitivity, compared to saline controls exposed to stress. In the second experiment, rats were exposed to either morphine or saline CPP and extinction, and then 5-HT DR neurons from both groups were examined for sensitivity to CRF in vitro. CRF induced a greater inward current in 5-HT neurons from morphine-conditioned subjects compared to saline-conditioned subjects. These data indicate that morphine history sensitizes 5-HT DR neurons to the GABAergic inhibitory effects of stress as well as to some of the effects of CRF. These mechanisms may sensitize subjects with a morphine history to the dysphoric effects of stressors and ultimately confer an enhanced vulnerability to stress-induced opioid relapse.

  7. Pharmacological Characterization of 5-HT1A Autoreceptor-Coupled GIRK Channels in Rat Dorsal Raphe 5-HT Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Montalbano, Alberto; Corradetti, Renato; Mlinar, Boris

    2015-01-01

    G protein-activated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels in 5-HT neurons are assumed to be principal effectors of 5-hydroxytryptamine 1A (5-HT1A) autoreceptors, but their pharmacology, subunit composition and the role in regulation of 5-HT neuron activity have not been fully elucidated. We sought for a pharmacological tool for assessing the functional role of GIRK channels in 5-HT neurons by characterizing the effects of drugs known to block GIRK channels in the submicromolar range of concentrations. Whole-cell voltage-clamp recording in brainstem slices were used to determine concentration-response relationships for the selected GIRK channel blockers on 5-HT1A autoreceptor-activated inwardly rectifying K+ conductance in rat dorsal raphe 5-HT neurons. 5-HT1A autoreceptor-activated GIRK conductance was completely blocked by the nonselective inwardly rectifying potassium channels blocker Ba2+ (EC50 = 9.4 μM, full block with 100 μM) and by SCH23390 (EC50 = 1.95 μM, full block with 30 μM). GIRK-specific blocker tertiapin-Q blocked 5-HT1A autoreceptor-activated GIRK conductance with high potency (EC50 = 33.6 nM), but incompletely, i.e. ~16% of total conductance resulted to be tertiapin-Q-resistant. U73343 and SCH28080, reported to block GIRK channels with submicromolar EC50s, were essentially ineffective in 5-HT neurons. Our data show that inwardly rectifying K+ channels coupled to 5-HT1A autoreceptors display pharmacological properties generally expected for neuronal GIRK channels, but different from GIRK1-GIRK2 heteromers, the predominant form of brain GIRK channels. Distinct pharmacological properties of GIRK channels in 5-HT neurons should be explored for the development of new therapeutic agents for mood disorders. PMID:26460748

  8. Effects of electrical stimulation of the dorsal raphe nucleus on local cerebral blood flow in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Bonvento, G.; Lacombe, P.; Seylaz, J. )

    1989-06-01

    We have studied the effects of electrical stimulation of the dorsal raphe nucleus on local cerebral blood flow (LCBF), as assessed by the quantitative ({sup 14}C)-iodoantipyrine autoradiographic technique. Stimulation of the dorsal raphe nucleus in the alpha-chloralose anesthetized rat caused a significant decrease in LCBF, ranging from -13 to -26% in 24 brain structures out of 33 investigated. The most pronounced decreases (-23 to -26%) were observed in the accumbens, amygdaloid, interpeduncular nuclei and in the median raphe nucleus, limbic system relays. The decreases also concerned cortical regions and the extrapyramidal system. These results indicate that activation of ascending serotonergic system produces a vasoconstriction and that the dorsal raphe nucleus has a widespread modulatory influence on the cerebral circulation.

  9. 5-HT1A/1B, 5-HT6, and 5-HT7 serotonergic receptors recruitment in tonic-clonic seizure-induced antinociception: role of dorsal raphe nucleus.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Renato Leonardo; Ferreira, Célio Marcos dos Reis; Urbina, Maria Angélica Castiblanco; Mariño, Andrés Uribe; Carvalho, Andressa Daiane; Butera, Giuseppe; de Oliveira, Ana Maria; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2009-05-01

    Pharmacological studies have been focused on the involvement of different neural pathways in the organization of antinociception that follows tonic-clonic seizures, including 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)-, norepinephrine-, acetylcholine- and endogenous opioid peptide-mediated mechanisms, giving rise to more in-depth comprehension of this interesting post-ictal antinociceptive phenomenon. The present work investigated the involvement of 5-HT(1A/1B), 5-HT(6), and 5-HT(7) serotonergic receptors through peripheral pretreatment with methiothepin at doses of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 mg/kg in the organization of the post-ictal antinociception elicited by pharmacologically (with pentylenetetrazole at 64 mg/kg)-induced tonic-clonic seizures. Methiothepin at 1.0 mg/kg blocked the post-ictal antinociception recorded after the end of seizures, whereas doses of 2.0 and 3.0 mg/kg potentiated the post-ictal antinociception. The nociceptive thresholds were kept higher than those of the control group. However, when the same 5-hydroxytryptamine receptors antagonist was microinjected (at 1.0, 3.0 and 5.0 microg/0.2 microL) in the dorsal raphe nucleus, a mesencephalic structure rich in serotonergic neurons and 5-HT receptors, the post-ictal hypo-analgesia was consistently antagonized. The present findings suggest a dual effect of methiothepin, characterized by a disinhibitory effect on the post-ictal antinociception when peripherally administered (possibly due to an antagonism of pre-synaptic 5-HT(1A) serotonergic autoreceptors in the pain endogenous inhibitory system) and an inhibitory effect (possibly due to a DRN post-synaptic 5-HT(1B), 5-HT(6), and 5-HT(7) serotonergic receptors blockade) when centrally administered. The present data also suggest that serotonin-mediated mechanisms of the dorsal raphe nucleus exert a key-role in the modulation of the post-ictal antinociception.

  10. High frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus increases c-fos immunoreactivity in the dorsal raphe nucleus and afferent brain regions.

    PubMed

    Tan, Sonny K H; Janssen, Marcus L F; Jahanshahi, Ali; Chouliaras, Leonidas; Visser-Vandewalle, Veerle; Lim, Lee Wei; Steinbusch, Harry W M; Sharp, Trevor; Temel, Yasin

    2011-10-01

    High frequency stimulation (HFS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is the neurosurgical therapy of choice for the management of motor deficits in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease, but this treatment can elicit disabling mood changes. Our recent experiments show that in rats, HFS of the STN both inhibits the firing of 5-HT (5-hydroxytryptamine; serotonin) neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) and elicits 5-HT-dependent behavioral effects. The neural circuitry underpinning these effects is unknown. Here we investigated in the dopamine-denervated rat the effect of bilateral HFS of the STN on markers of neuronal activity in the DRN as well as DRN input regions. Controls were sham-stimulated rats. HFS of the STN elicited changes in two 5-HT-sensitive behavioral tests. Specifically, HFS increased immobility in the forced swim test and increased interaction in a social interaction task. HFS of the STN at the same stimulation parameters, increased c-fos immunoreactivity in the DRN, and decreased cytochrome C oxidase activity in this region. The increase in c-fos immunoreactivity occurred in DRN neurons immunopositive for the GABA marker parvalbumin. HFS of the STN also increased the number of c-fos immunoreactive cells in the lateral habenula nucleus, medial prefrontal cortex but not significantly in the substantia nigra. Collectively, these findings support a role for circuitry involving DRN GABA neurons, as well as DRN afferents from the lateral habenula nucleus and medial prefrontal cortex, in the mood effects of HFS of the STN.

  11. Single-prolonged stress induces apoptosis in dorsal raphe nucleus in the rat model of posttraumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder that develops after exposure to a life-threatening traumatic experience. Meta-analyses of the brainstem showed that midsagittal area of the pons was significantly reduced in patients with PTSD, suggesting a potential apoptosis in dorsal raphe nucleus after single-prolonged stress (SPS). The aim of this study is to investigate whether SPS induces apoptosis in dorsal raphe nucleus in PTSD rats, which may be a possible mechanism of reduced volume of pons and density of gray matter. Methods In this study, rats were randomly divided into 1d, 7d and 14d groups after SPS along with the control group. The apoptosis rate was determined using annexin V-FITC/PI double-labeled flow cytometry (FCM). Levels of Cytochrome c (Cyt-C) was examined by Western blotting. Expression of Cyt-C on mitochondria in the dorsal raphe nucleus neuron was determined by enzymohistochemistry under transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The change of thiamine monophosphatase (TMP) levels was assessed by enzymohistochemistry under light microscope and TEM. Morphological changes of the ultrastructure of the dorsal raphe nucleus neuron were determined by TEM. Results Apoptotic morphological alterations were observed in dorsal raphe nucleus neuron for all SPS-stimulate groups of rats. The apoptosis rates were significantly increased in dorsal raphe nucleus neuron of SPS rats, along with increased release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria into the cytoplasm, increased expression of Cyt-C and TMP levels in the cytoplasm, which reached to the peak of increase 7 days of SPS. Conclusions The results indicate that SPS induced Cyt-C released from mitochondria into cytosol and apoptosis in dorsal raphe nucleus neuron of rats. Increased TMP in cytoplasm facilitated the clearance of apoptotic cells. We propose that this presents one of the mechanisms that lead to reduced volume of pons and gray matter associated with PTSD. PMID

  12. Activity of dorsal raphe cells across the sleep–waking cycle and during cataplexy in narcoleptic dogs

    PubMed Central

    Wu, M-F; John, J; Boehmer, L N; Yau, D; Nguyen, G B; Siegel, J M

    2004-01-01

    Cataplexy, a symptom associated with narcolepsy, represents a unique dissociation of behavioural states. During cataplectic attacks, awareness of the environment is maintained, as in waking, but muscle tone is lost, as in REM sleep. We have previously reported that, in the narcoleptic dog, noradrenergic cells of the locus coeruleus cease discharge during cataplexy. In the current study, we report on the activity of serotonergic cells of the dorsal raphe nucleus. The discharge patterns of serotonergic dorsal raphe cells across sleep–waking states did not differ from those of dorsal raphe and locus coeruleus cells recorded in normal rats, cats and monkeys, with tonic discharge in waking, reduced activity in non-REM sleep and cessation of activity in REM sleep. However, in contrast with locus coeruleus cells, dorsal raphe REM sleep-off neurones did not cease discharge during cataplexy. Instead, discharge continued at a level significantly higher than that seen in REM sleep and comparable to that seen in non-REM sleep. We also identified several cells in the dorsal raphe whose pattern of activity was the opposite of that of the presumed serotonergic cells. These cells were maximally active in REM sleep and minimally active in waking and increased activity during cataplexy. The difference between noradrenergic and serotonergic cell discharge profiles in cataplexy suggests different roles for these cell groups in the normal regulation of environmental awareness and muscle tone and in the pathophysiology of narcolepsy. PMID:14678502

  13. A role for galanin in antidepressant actions with a focus on the dorsal raphe nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaoying; Barr, Alasdair M.; Kinney, Jefferson W.; Sanna, Pietro; Conti, Bruno; Behrens, M. Margarita; Bartfai, Tamas

    2005-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, such as fluoxetine (FLX), are the most commonly used drugs in the treatment of major depression. However, there is a limited understanding of their molecular mechanism of action. Although the acute effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in elevating synaptic serotonin concentrations is well known, the clinical amelioration of depressive symptoms requires 14-21 days of treatment, suggesting that numerous other rearrangements of function in the CNS must take place. In the present study, we demonstrated that 14 days of FLX treatment up-regulated galanin mRNA levels by 100% and GalR2-binding sites by 50%, in the rat dorsal raphe nucleus, where galanin coexists with serotonin. Furthermore, a galanin receptor antagonist, M40, attenuated the antidepressant-like effect of FLX in the forced swim test, a rodent preclinical screen commonly used to evaluate antidepressant-like efficacy. Direct activation of galanin receptors by a galanin receptor agonist, galnon, was found to produce an antidepressant-like effect in the same task. Two other antidepressant treatments also affected the galaninergic system in the monoaminergic nuclei: Electroconvulsive shock elevated galanin mRNA levels in dorsal raphe nucleus, whereas sleep deprivation increased galanin mRNA levels in the locus coeruleus, further underlining the connection between activation of the galaninergic system and antidepressant action of various clinically proven treatments. PMID:15647369

  14. A subpopulation of dorsal raphe nucleus neurons retrogradely labeled with cholera toxin-B injected into the inner ear.

    PubMed

    Kim, D O; Yang, X M; Ye, Y

    2003-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that: (1) raphe neurons respond to acoustic and vestibular stimuli, some with a latency of 10-15 ms; (2) alterations of the raphe nuclei alter the acoustic startle reflex; (3) the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) is the major source of serotonergic neurons; and (4) approximately 57% of the DRN neurons are nonserotonergic. In the present study, cholera toxin subunit-B (CTB) was injected into cat cochleas, and the brain tissue was examined after a survival period of 5-7 days. Aside from neurons which were known to project to the inner ear, i.e., olivocochlear and vestibular efferent neurons, a surprising new finding was made that somata of a subpopulation of DRN neurons were intensely labeled with CTB. These CTB-labeled neurons were densely distributed in a dorsomedian part of the DRN with some in a surrounding area outside the DRN. The present results suggest that a novel raphe-labyrinthine projection may exist. A future study of anterograde labeling with injections of a tracer in the DRN will be needed to establish the existence of a raphe-labyrinthine projection more thoroughly. A raphe-labyrinthine descending input, together with an ascending input from the inner ear to the DRN through intervening neurons, such as the juxta-acousticofloccular raphe neurons (JAFRNs) described by Ye and Kim, may mediate a brain stem reflex whereby a salient multisensory (including auditory and vestibular) stimulus may alter the sensitivity of the inner ear. As a mammal responds to a biologically important auditory-vestibular multisensory event, the raphe projections to the inner ear and other auditory and vestibular structures may enhance the mammal's ability to localize and recognize the sound and respond properly. The raphe-labyrinthine projection may also modulate the inner ear's sensitivity as a function of the sleep-wake arousal state of an organism on a slower time course. PMID:12961055

  15. A glutamatergic reward input from the dorsal raphe to ventral tegmental area dopamine neurons

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Jia; Zhang, Shiliang; Wang, Hui-Ling; Wang, Huikun; de Jesus Aceves Buendia, Jose; Hoffman, Alexander F.; Lupica, Carl R.; Seal, Rebecca P.; Morales, Marisela

    2014-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of the dorsal raphe (DR) and ventral tegmental area (VTA) activates the fibers of the same reward pathway but the phenotype of this pathway and the direction of the reward-relevant fibers have not been determined. Here we report rewarding effects following activation of a DR-originating pathway consisting of vesicular glutamate transporter 3 (VGluT3) containing neurons that form asymmetric synapses onto VTA dopamine neurons that project to nucleus accumbens. Optogenetic VTA activation of this projection elicits AMPA-mediated synaptic excitatory currents in VTA mesoaccumbens dopaminergic neurons and causes dopamine release innucleus accumbens. Activation also reinforces instrumental behavior and establishes conditioned place preferences. These findings indicate that the DR-VGluT3 pathway to VTA utilizes glutamate as a neurotransmitter and is a substrate linking the DR—one of the most sensitive reward sites in the brain—to VTA dopaminergic neurons. PMID:25388237

  16. A glutamatergic reward input from the dorsal raphe to ventral tegmental area dopamine neurons.

    PubMed

    Qi, Jia; Zhang, Shiliang; Wang, Hui-Ling; Wang, Huikun; de Jesus Aceves Buendia, Jose; Hoffman, Alexander F; Lupica, Carl R; Seal, Rebecca P; Morales, Marisela

    2014-11-12

    Electrical stimulation of the dorsal raphe (DR) and ventral tegmental area (VTA) activates the fibres of the same reward pathway but the phenotype of this pathway and the direction of the reward-relevant fibres have not been determined. Here we report rewarding effects following activation of a DR-originating pathway consisting of vesicular glutamate transporter 3 (VGluT3) containing neurons that form asymmetric synapses onto VTA dopamine neurons that project to nucleus accumbens. Optogenetic VTA activation of this projection elicits AMPA-mediated synaptic excitatory currents in VTA mesoaccumbens dopaminergic neurons and causes dopamine release in nucleus accumbens. Activation also reinforces instrumental behaviour and establishes conditioned place preferences. These findings indicate that the DR-VGluT3 pathway to VTA utilizes glutamate as a neurotransmitter and is a substrate linking the DR-one of the most sensitive reward sites in the brain--to VTA dopaminergic neurons.

  17. Cigarette Smoking and Tryptophan Hydroxylase 2 mRNA in the Dorsal Raphe Nucleus in Suicides

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Helene; Arango, Victoria; Kassir, Suham A.; Dwork, Andrew J.; Mann, J. John; Underwood, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is associated with suicide and mood disorders and stimulates serotonin release. Tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH2) synthesizes serotonin and is over-expressed in suicides. We determined whether smoking is associated with TPH2 mRNA in suicides and controls. TPH2 mRNA was measured postmortem in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) of controls (N=26, 17 nonsmokers and nine smokers) and suicides (N=23, 5 nonsmokers and 18 smokers). Psychiatric history was obtained by psychological autopsy. TPH2 mRNA was greater in suicide nonsmokers than suicide smokers, control smokers and control nonsmokers (p=0.006). There was more TPH2 mRNA throughout the DRN. Smoking interferes with the TPH2 mRNA increase observed in suicide nonsmokers. The absence of altered TPH2 expression in non-suicide smokers suggests no pharmacological effect of smoking. PMID:26954509

  18. Electrophysiological responses of serotoninergic dorsal raphe neurons to 5-HT1A and 5-HT1B agonists.

    PubMed

    Sprouse, J S; Aghajanian, G K

    1987-01-01

    A direct comparison was made of the effects of serotonin 5-HT1A and 5-HT1B selective compounds on the spontaneous firing rate of dorsal raphe serotoninergic neurons in chloral-hydrate-anesthetized rats. Following intravenous administration, the 5-HT1A selective compounds ipsapirone (TVX Q 7821) and LY 165163 potently inhibited single-unit activity in a dose-dependent manner whereas the 5-HT1B selective compounds, m-chlorophenylpiperazine (mCPP) and trifluoromethylphenylpiperazine (TFMPP), displayed only weak or irregular actions. Low microiontophoretic currents of ipsapirone and LY 165163 were also effective in suppressing spontaneous firing; dose-response relationships for the 5-HT1A compounds were indistinguishable from that of 5-HT itself. In contrast, dorsal raphe neurons were only weakly responsive to microiontophoretic application of mCPP and TFMPP; dose-response relationships for the 5-HT1B compounds were significantly displaced from that of 5-HT. In intracellular studies, ipsapirone and LY 165163, when added to the media bathing brain slices, mimicked the actions of 5-HT in hyperpolarizing dorsal raphe cell membranes and decreasing input resistance; however, the maximal effects of the 5-HT1A compounds on these membrane properties exceeded those of 5-HT. In summary, dorsal raphe 5-HT neurons appear highly responsive to 5-HT1A, but not to 5-HT1B compounds; these findings are discussed with regard to the 5-HT receptor subtypes as candidates for the somatodendritic autoreceptor of dorsal raphe neurons. PMID:3505364

  19. Ovarian Steroids Increase PSD-95 Expression and Dendritic Spines in the Dorsal Raphe of Ovariectomized Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Heidi M.; Bethea, Cynthia L.

    2014-01-01

    Estradiol (E) and progesterone (P) promote spinogenesis in several brain areas. Intracellular signaling cascades that promote spinogenesis involve RhoGTPases, glutamate signaling and synapse assembly. We found that in serotonin neurons, E±P administration increases (a) gene and protein expression of RhoGTPases, (b) gene expression of glutamate receptors (c) gene expression of pivotal synapse assembly proteins. Therefore, in this study we determined whether structural changes in dendritic spines in the dorsal raphe follow the observed changes in gene and protein expression. Dendritic spines were examined with immunogold silver staining of a spine marker protein, postsynaptic density-95 (PSD-95) and with Golgi staining. In the PSD-95 study, adult Ovx monkeys received placebo, E, P, or E+P for 1 month (n=3/group). Sections were immunostained for PSD-95 and the number of PSD-95-positive puncta was determined with stereology. E, P and E+P treatment significantly increased the total number of PSD-95-positive puncta (ANOVA, P=0.04). In the Golgi study, adult Ovx monkeys received placebo, E or E+P for 1 month (n=3–4) and the midbrain was Golgi-stained. A total of 80 neurons were analyzed with Neurolucida software. There was a significant difference in spine density that depended on branch order (two-way ANOVA). E+P treatment significantly increased spine density in higher-order (3–5°) dendritic branches relative to Ovx group (Bonferroni, P<0.05). In summary, E+P leads to the elaboration of dendritic spines on dorsal raphe neurons. The ability of E to induce PSD-95, but not actual spines, suggests either a sampling or time lag issue. Increased spinogenesis on serotonin dendrites would facilitate excitatory glutamatergic input and, in turn, increase serotonin neurotransmission throughout the brain. PMID:23959764

  20. Moderate differences in circulating corticosterone alter receptor-mediated regulation of 5-hydroxytryptamine neuronal activity.

    PubMed

    Judge, Sarah J; Ingram, Colin D; Gartside, Sarah E

    2004-12-01

    Circulating glucocorticoid levels vary with stress and psychiatric illness and play a potentially important role in regulating transmitter systems that regulate mood. To determine whether chronic variation in corticosterone levels within the normal diurnal range altered the control of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) neuronal activity, male rats were adrenalectomized and implanted with either a 2% or 70% corticosterone/cholesterol pellet (100 mg). Two weeks later, the regulation of 5-HT neuronal activity in the dorsal raphe nucleus was studied by in vitro electrophysiology. At this time, serum corticosterone levels approximated the low-point (2%) and mid-point (70%) of the diurnal range. The excitatory response of 5-HT neurones to the alpha1-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine (1-11 microM) was significantly greater in the 2% group compared to the 70% group. By contrast, the inhibitory response to 5-HT (10-50 microM) was significantly lower in the 2% group compared to the 70% group. Thus, chronic variation in circulating corticosterone over a narrow part of the normal diurnal range causes a shift in the balance of positive and negative regulation of 5-HT neurones, with increased alpha 1-adrenoceptor-mediated excitation and reduced 5-HT-mediated autoinhibition at lower corticosterone levels. This shift would have a major impact on control of 5-HT neuronal activity. PMID:15582914

  1. Swim stress differentially blocks CRF receptor mediated responses in dorsal raphe nucleus.

    PubMed

    Lamy, Christophe M; Beck, Sheryl G

    2010-10-01

    Modulation of the serotonergic (5-HT) neurotransmitter system arising from the dorsal raphe nucleus (DR) is thought to support the behavioral effects of swim stress, i.e., immobility. In vivo pharmacological and anatomical studies suggest that corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) synaptic transmission closely interact to set the response of the DR to swim stress. To investigate the cellular basis of these physiological mechanisms the effects of ovine CRF (oCRF) on GABA(A)-dependent miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs) in 5-HT and non-5-HT DR neurons in acute mesencephalic slices obtained from rats either naïve or 24h after a 15 min swim stress session were tested. In this study, the effect of swim stress alone was to decrease the holding current, i.e., hyperpolarize the neuron, and to increase the amplitude and charge of mIPSCs recorded from non-5-HT neurons. Ovine CRF (10 nM) induced an increase in mIPSC frequency in 5-HT neurons recorded from naïve rats, an effect that was suppressed by swim stress. The inward current elicited by oCRF in both 5-HT and non-5-HT neurons was also blocked by swim stress. Ovine CRF increased mIPSCs amplitude and charge in both 5-HT and non-5-HT neurons, but this effect was not modified by swim stress. In concert with our previous findings that swim stress decreased input resistance, action potential threshold and action potential duration and increased glutamatergic synaptic activity the overall primary effect of swim stress is to increase the excitability of 5-HT neurons. These data provide a mechanism at the cellular level for the immobility induced by swim stress and identifies critical components of the raphe circuitry responsible for the altered output of 5-HT neurons induced by swim stress.

  2. Glutamate input in the dorsal raphe nucleus as a determinant of escalated aggression in male mice.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Aki; Lee, Ray X; Iwasato, Takuji; Itohara, Shigeyoshi; Arima, Hiroshi; Bettler, Bernhard; Miczek, Klaus A; Koide, Tsuyoshi

    2015-04-22

    Although the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) has long been linked to neural control of aggression, little is known about the regulatory influences of the DRN when an animal engages in either adaptive species-typical aggressive behavior or escalated aggression. Therefore it is important to explore which neurotransmitter inputs into the DRN determine the escalation of aggression in male mice. Previously, we observed that microinjection of the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen into the DRN escalates aggressive behavior in male mice. Here, we used a serotonin (5-HT) neuron-specific GABAB receptor knock-out mouse to demonstrate that baclofen acts on nonserotonergic neurons to escalate aggression. Intra-DRN baclofen administration increased glutamate release, but did not alter GABA release, within the DRN. Microinjection of l-glutamate into the DRN escalated dose-dependently attack bites toward an intruder. In vivo microdialysis showed that glutamate release increased in the DRN during an aggressive encounter, and the level of glutamate was further increased when the animal was engaged in escalated aggressive behavior after social instigation. Finally, 5-HT release was increased within the DRN and also in the medial prefrontal cortex when animals were provoked by social instigation, and during escalated aggression after social instigation, but this increase in 5-HT release was not observed when animals were engaged in species-typical aggression. In summary, glutamate input into the DRN is enhanced during escalated aggression, which causes a phasic increase of 5-HT release from the DRN 5-HT neurons.

  3. Evidence for Transcriptional Factor Dysregulation in the Dorsal Raphe Nucleus of Patients with Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kerman, Ilan A.; Bernard, René; Bunney, William E.; Jones, Edward G.; Schatzberg, Alan F.; Myers, Richard M.; Barchas, Jack D.; Akil, Huda; Watson, Stanley J.; Thompson, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    Extensive evidence implicates dysfunction in serotonin (5-HT) signaling in the etiology of major depressive disorder (MDD). Dorsal raphe nucleus (DR) is a major source of serotonin in the brain, and previous studies have reported within it alterations in 5-HT-related gene expression, protein levels, receptor binding, and morphological organization in mood disorders. In the present study, we utilized in situ hybridization-guided laser capture microdissection to harvest tissue samples from the middle-caudal subregion of the human DR post-mortem from MDD patients and from psychiatrically normal comparison subjects. Extracted RNA was prepared for gene expression profiling, and subsequent confirmation of select targets with quantitative real-time PCR. Our data indicate expression changes in functional gene families that regulate: (1) cellular stress and energy balance, (2) intracellular signaling and transcriptional regulation, and (3) cell proliferation and connectivity. The greatest changes in expression were observed among transcriptional regulators, including downregulation in the expression of TOB1, EGR1, and NR4A2 and their downstream targets. Previous studies have implicated these gene products in the regulation of functional domains impacted by MDD, including cognitive function, affective regulation, and emotional memory formation. These observations indicate altered function of several transcriptional regulators and their downstream targets, which may lead to the dysregulation of multiple cellular functions that contribute to the pathophysiology of MDD. Future studies will require single cell analyses in the DR to determine potential impact of these changes on its cellular functions and related circuits. PMID:23087602

  4. Neuropeptide FF receptors exhibit direct and anti-opioid effects on mice dorsal raphe nucleus neurons.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zhong; Zajac, Jean-Marie

    2014-10-01

    By using acutely dissociated dorsal raphe nucleus neurons (DRN) from young mice, direct and anti-opioid effects of Neuropeptide FF (NPFF) receptors were measured. The NPFF analog 1 DMe (10 µM) had no effect on resting Ca2+ channels but reduced the magnitude of Ca2+ transients induced by depolarization in 83.3% neurons tested, of which the inhibition rate is 45.4±2.9%. Pertussis toxin treatment reduced to 18.9% the number of responding neurons and attenuated by 47% the response of 1 DMe. In contrast, cholera toxin treatment had no significant effect. Eighteen minute perfusion with 1 DMe at a very low 10 nM concentration, that did not directly inhibit Ca2+ transients triggered by depolarization in every neuron, attenuated by 78% the inhibitory effect of Nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) on Ca2+ transients, but not that of by serotonin. These results demonstrated for the first time that NPFF receptors on mice DRN inhibit Ca2+ transients induced by depolarization via Gi/o protein and also exhibit a specific anti-opioid activity on nociceptin receptors, and that their specific anti-opioid activity is not a direct consequence of their activity on Ca2+ transients.

  5. Corticotropin-releasing Factor in the Dorsal Raphe Nucleus: Linking Stress Coping and Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Valentino, Rita J.; Lucki, Irwin; Van Bockstaele, Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    Addiction and stress are linked at multiple levels. Drug abuse is often initiated as a maladaptive mechanism for coping with stress. It is maintained in part by negative reinforcement to prevent the aversive consequences of stress associated with abstinence. Finally, stress is a major factor leading to relapse in subjects in which drug seeking behavior has extinguished. These associations imply overlapping or converging neural circuits and substrates that underlie the processes of addiction and the expression of the stress response. Here we discuss the major brain serotonin (5-HT) system, the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN)-5-HT system as a point of convergence that links these processes and how the stress-related neuropeptide, corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) directs this by a bimodal regulation of DRN neuronal activity. The review begins by describing a structural basis for CRF regulation of the DRN-5-HT system. This is followed by a review of the effects of CRF and stress on DRN function based on electrophysiological and microdialysis studies. The concept that multiple CRF receptor subtypes in the DRN facilitate distinct coping behaviors is reviewed with recent evidence for a unique cellular mechanism by which stress history can determine the type of coping behavior. Finally, work on CRF regulation of the DRN-5-HT system is integrated with literature on the role of 5-HT-dopamine interactions in addiction. PMID:19800322

  6. Firing Properties of Genetically Identified Dorsal Raphe Serotonergic Neurons in Brain Slices

    PubMed Central

    Mlinar, Boris; Montalbano, Alberto; Piszczek, Lukasz; Gross, Cornelius; Corradetti, Renato

    2016-01-01

    Tonic spiking of serotonergic neurons establishes serotonin levels in the brain. Since the first observations, slow regular spiking has been considered as a defining feature of serotonergic neurons. Recent studies, however, have revealed the heterogeneity of serotonergic neurons at multiple levels, comprising their electrophysiological properties, suggesting the existence of functionally distinct cellular subpopulations. In order to examine in an unbiased manner whether serotonergic neurons of the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) are heterogeneous, we used a non-invasive loose-seal cell-attached method to record α1 adrenergic receptor-stimulated spiking of a large sample of neurons in brain slices obtained from transgenic mice lines that express fluorescent marker proteins under the control of serotonergic system-specific Tph2 and Pet-1 promoters. We found wide homogeneous distribution of firing rates, well fitted by a single Gaussian function (r2 = 0.93) and independent of anatomical location (P = 0.45), suggesting that in terms of intrinsic firing properties, serotonergic neurons in the DRN represent a single cellular population. Characterization of the population in terms of spiking regularity was hindered by its dependence on the firing rate. For instance, the coefficient of variation of the interspike intervals (ISI), a common measure of spiking irregularity, is of limited usefulness since it correlates negatively with the firing rate (r = −0.33, P < 0.0001). Nevertheless, the majority of neurons exhibited regular, pacemaker-like activity, with coefficient of variance of the ISI lower than 0.5 in ~97% of cases. Unexpectedly, a small percentage of neurons (~1%) exhibited a particular spiking pattern, characterized by low frequency (~0.02–0.1 Hz) oscillations in the firing rate. Transitions between regular and oscillatory firing were observed, suggesting that the oscillatory firing is an alternative firing pattern of serotonergic neurons. PMID:27536220

  7. Optogenetic activation of dorsal raphe serotonin neurons enhances patience for future rewards.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Kayoko W; Miyazaki, Katsuhiko; Tanaka, Kenji F; Yamanaka, Akihiro; Takahashi, Aki; Tabuchi, Sawako; Doya, Kenji

    2014-09-01

    Serotonin is a neuromodulator that is involved extensively in behavioral, affective, and cognitive functions in the brain. Previous recording studies of the midbrain dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) revealed that the activation of putative serotonin neurons correlates with the levels of behavioral arousal [1], rhythmic motor outputs [2], salient sensory stimuli [3-6], reward, and conditioned cues [5-8]. The classic theory on serotonin states that it opposes dopamine and inhibits behaviors when aversive events are predicted [9-14]. However, the therapeutic effects of serotonin signal-enhancing medications have been difficult to reconcile with this theory [15, 16]. In contrast, a more recent theory states that serotonin facilitates long-term optimal behaviors and suppresses impulsive behaviors [17-21]. To test these theories, we developed optogenetic mice that selectively express channelrhodopsin in serotonin neurons and tested how the activation of serotonergic neurons in the DRN affects animal behavior during a delayed reward task. The activation of serotonin neurons reduced the premature cessation of waiting for conditioned cues and food rewards. In reward omission trials, serotonin neuron stimulation prolonged the time animals spent waiting. This effect was observed specifically when the animal was engaged in deciding whether to keep waiting and was not due to motor inhibition. Control experiments showed that the prolonged waiting times observed with optogenetic stimulation were not due to behavioral inhibition or the reinforcing effects of serotonergic activation. These results show, for the first time, that the timed activation of serotonin neurons during waiting promotes animals' patience to wait for a delayed reward.

  8. Dorsal raphe 5-HT(2C) receptor and GABA networks regulate anxiety produced by cocaine withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Craige, Caryne P; Lewandowski, Stacia; Kirby, Lynn G; Unterwald, Ellen M

    2015-06-01

    The serotonin system is intimately linked to both the mediation of anxiety and long-term effects of cocaine, potentially through interaction of inhibitory 5-HT2C receptor and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) networks. This study characterized the function of the dorsal raphe (DR) 5-HT2C receptor and GABA network in anxiety produced by chronic cocaine withdrawal. C57BL/6 mice were injected with saline or cocaine (15 mg/kg) 3 times daily for 10 days, and tested on the elevated plus maze 30 min, 25 h, or 7 days after the last injection. Cocaine-withdrawn mice showed heightened anxiety-like behavior at 25 h of withdrawal, as compared to saline controls. Anxiety-like behavior was not different when mice were tested 30 min or 7 days after the last cocaine injection. Electrophysiology data revealed that serotonin cells from cocaine-withdrawn mice exhibited increased GABA inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) in specific DR subregions dependent on withdrawal time (25 h or 7 d), an effect that was absent in cells from non-withdrawn mice (30 min after the last cocaine injection). Increased IPSC activity was restored to baseline levels following bath application of the 5-HT2C receptor antagonist, SB 242084. In a separate cohort of cocaine-injected mice at 25 h of withdrawal, both global and intra-DR blockade of 5-HT2C receptors prior to elevated plus maze testing attenuated anxiety-like behavior. This study demonstrates that DR 5-HT2C receptor blockade prevents anxiety-like behavior produced by cocaine withdrawal, potentially through attenuation of heightened GABA activity, supporting a role for the 5-HT2C receptor in mediating anxiety produced by cocaine withdrawal.

  9. Nicotine increases GABAergic input on rat dorsal raphe serotonergic neurons through alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Vázquez, F; Chavarría, K; Garduño, J; Hernández-López, S; Mihailescu, S P

    2014-12-15

    The dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) contains large populations of serotonergic (5-HT) neurons. This nucleus receives GABAergic inhibitory afferents from many brain areas and from DRN interneurons. Both GABAergic and 5-HT DRN neurons express functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Previous studies have demonstrated that nicotine increases 5-HT release and 5-HT DRN neuron discharge rate by stimulating postsynaptic nAChRs and by increasing glutamate and norepinephrine release inside DRN. However, the influence of nicotine on the GABAergic input to 5-HT DRN neurons was poorly investigated. Therefore, the aim of this work was to determine the effect of nicotine on GABAergic spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) of 5-HT DRN neurons and the subtype of nAChR(s) involved in this response. Experiments were performed in coronal slices obtained from young Wistar rats. GABAergic sIPSCs were recorded from post hoc-identified 5-HT DRN neurons with the whole cell voltage patch-clamp technique. Administration of nicotine (1 μM) increased sIPSC frequency in 72% of identified 5-HT DRN neurons. This effect was not reproduced by the α4β2 nAChR agonist RJR-2403 and was not influenced by TTX (1 μM). It was mimicked by the selective agonist for α7 nAChR, PNU-282987, and exacerbated by the positive allosteric modulator of the same receptor, PNU-120596. The nicotine-induced increase in sIPSC frequency was independent on voltage-gated calcium channels and dependent on Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release (CICR). These results demonstrate that nicotine increases the GABAergic input to most 5-HT DRN neurons, by activating α7 nAChRs and producing CICR in DRN GABAergic terminals.

  10. Nicotine increases GABAergic input on rat dorsal raphe serotonergic neurons through alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Vázquez, F; Chavarría, K; Garduño, J; Hernández-López, S; Mihailescu, S P

    2014-12-15

    The dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) contains large populations of serotonergic (5-HT) neurons. This nucleus receives GABAergic inhibitory afferents from many brain areas and from DRN interneurons. Both GABAergic and 5-HT DRN neurons express functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Previous studies have demonstrated that nicotine increases 5-HT release and 5-HT DRN neuron discharge rate by stimulating postsynaptic nAChRs and by increasing glutamate and norepinephrine release inside DRN. However, the influence of nicotine on the GABAergic input to 5-HT DRN neurons was poorly investigated. Therefore, the aim of this work was to determine the effect of nicotine on GABAergic spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) of 5-HT DRN neurons and the subtype of nAChR(s) involved in this response. Experiments were performed in coronal slices obtained from young Wistar rats. GABAergic sIPSCs were recorded from post hoc-identified 5-HT DRN neurons with the whole cell voltage patch-clamp technique. Administration of nicotine (1 μM) increased sIPSC frequency in 72% of identified 5-HT DRN neurons. This effect was not reproduced by the α4β2 nAChR agonist RJR-2403 and was not influenced by TTX (1 μM). It was mimicked by the selective agonist for α7 nAChR, PNU-282987, and exacerbated by the positive allosteric modulator of the same receptor, PNU-120596. The nicotine-induced increase in sIPSC frequency was independent on voltage-gated calcium channels and dependent on Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release (CICR). These results demonstrate that nicotine increases the GABAergic input to most 5-HT DRN neurons, by activating α7 nAChRs and producing CICR in DRN GABAergic terminals. PMID:25231613

  11. Orexinergic signaling mediates light-induced neuronal activation in the dorsal raphe nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Adidharma, Widya; Leach, Greg; Yan, Lily

    2012-01-01

    Seasonal affective disorder (SAD), a major depressive disorder recurring in the fall and winter, is caused by the reduction of light in the environment, and its depressive symptoms can be alleviated by bright light therapy. Both circadian and monoaminergic systems have been implicated in the etiology of SAD. However, the underlying neural pathways through which light regulates mood are not well understood. The present study utilized a diurnal rodent model, Arvicanthis niloticus, to explore the neural pathways mediating the effects of light on brain regions involved in mood regulation. Animals kept in constant darkness received light exposure in early subjective day, the time when light therapy is usually applied. The time course of neural activity following light exposure was assessed using Fos as a marker in the following brain regions/cells: the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), orexin neurons in the perifornical-lateral hypothalamic area (PF-LHA) and the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN). A light-induced increase in Fos expression was observed in orexin neurons and the DRN, but not in the SCN. As the DRN is densely innervated by orexinergic inputs, the involvement of orexinergic signaling in mediating the effects of light on the DRN was tested in the second experiment. The animals were injected with the selective orexin receptor type 1 (OXR1) antagonist SB-334867 prior to the light exposure. The treatment of SB-334867 significantly inhibited the Fos induction in the DRN. The results collectively point to the role of orexin neurons in mediating the effects of light on the mood-regulating monoaminergic areas, suggesting an orexinergic pathway that underlies light-dependent mood fluctuation and the beneficial effects of light therapy. PMID:22710065

  12. Dorsal Raphe Nucleus Down-Regulates Medial Prefrontal Cortex during Experience of Flow.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Martin; Keller, Johannes; Grön, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Previous neuroimaging studies have suggested that the experience of flow aligns with a relative increase in activation of the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), and relative activation decreases of the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) and of the amygdala (AMY). In the present study, Dynamic Causal Modeling (DCM) was used to explore effective connectivity between those brain regions. To test our hypothesis that the DRN causally down-regulates activity of the MPFC and/or of the AMY, 23 healthy male students solved mental arithmetic tasks of varying difficulty during functional magnetic resonance imaging. A "flow" condition, with task demands automatically balanced with participants' skill level, was compared with conditions of "boredom" and "overload". DCM models were constructed modeling full reciprocal endogenous connections between the DRN, the MPFC, the AMY, and the calcarine. The calcarine was included to allow sensory input to enter the system. Experimental conditions were modeled as exerting modulatory effects on various possible connections between the DRN, the MPFC, and the AMY, but not on self-inhibitory connections, yielding a total of 64 alternative DCM models. Model space was partitioned into eight families based on commonalities in the arrangement of the modulatory effects. Random effects Bayesian Model Selection (BMS) was applied to identify a possible winning family (and model). Although BMS revealed a clear winning family, an outstanding winning model could not be identified. Therefore, Bayesian Model Averaging was performed over models within the winning family to obtain representative DCM parameters for subsequent analyses to test our hypothesis. In line with our expectations, Bayesian averaged parameters revealed stronger down-regulatory influence of the DRN on the MPFC when participants experienced flow relative to control conditions. In addition, these condition-dependent modulatory effects significantly predicted participants' experienced degree of

  13. Neuropeptide Y signaling in the dorsal raphe nucleus inhibits male sexual behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Inaba, A; Komori, Y; Muroi, Y; Kinoshita, K; Ishii, T

    2016-04-21

    Animals change their biological activities depending on their nutritional state. Reproductive functions, including sexual behavior, are suppressed under low-energy conditions; however, the underlying neuronal mechanism is poorly understood. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is an orexigenic molecule released in response to low-energy conditions and has an inhibitory effect on sexual behavior. We examined how NPY is involved in energy state-dependent regulation of male sexual behavior. Mounting, intromission, and ejaculation were evaluated as parameters of sexual behavior. Almost all parameters indicated that fasting for 24h suppressed male sexual behavior. Intracerebroventricular injection of NPY inhibited sexual behavior in males that free-fed for 8h following 24-h fasting (fed males). We next examined whether the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), in which serotonergic (5-HT) neurons are distributed, is involved in NPY-mediated inhibition of male sexual behavior. NPY-positive processes immunoreactive for a presynaptic marker, synaptophysin, were distributed in the DRN of both fed and fasted males. Expression of the NPY Y1 receptor in 5-HT neurons was also observed. Direct injection of NPY or 8-OH-DPAT (a 5-HT1A receptor agonist that inhibits the activity of 5-HT neurons) into the DRN inhibited male sexual behavior in fed males. In contrast, injection of BIBP-3226, a NPY Y1 receptor antagonist, or (+)-DOI hydrochloride (DOI), a 5-HT2A/2C receptor agonist that activates 5-HT neurons, into the DRN partially recovered male sexual behavior in 24-h fasted males. These results suggest that NPY inhibits serotonergic neuronal activity via the Y1 receptor in the DRN, resulting in suppression of male sexual behavior in low-energy conditions.

  14. Firing Properties of Genetically Identified Dorsal Raphe Serotonergic Neurons in Brain Slices.

    PubMed

    Mlinar, Boris; Montalbano, Alberto; Piszczek, Lukasz; Gross, Cornelius; Corradetti, Renato

    2016-01-01

    Tonic spiking of serotonergic neurons establishes serotonin levels in the brain. Since the first observations, slow regular spiking has been considered as a defining feature of serotonergic neurons. Recent studies, however, have revealed the heterogeneity of serotonergic neurons at multiple levels, comprising their electrophysiological properties, suggesting the existence of functionally distinct cellular subpopulations. In order to examine in an unbiased manner whether serotonergic neurons of the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) are heterogeneous, we used a non-invasive loose-seal cell-attached method to record α1 adrenergic receptor-stimulated spiking of a large sample of neurons in brain slices obtained from transgenic mice lines that express fluorescent marker proteins under the control of serotonergic system-specific Tph2 and Pet-1 promoters. We found wide homogeneous distribution of firing rates, well fitted by a single Gaussian function (r (2) = 0.93) and independent of anatomical location (P = 0.45), suggesting that in terms of intrinsic firing properties, serotonergic neurons in the DRN represent a single cellular population. Characterization of the population in terms of spiking regularity was hindered by its dependence on the firing rate. For instance, the coefficient of variation of the interspike intervals (ISI), a common measure of spiking irregularity, is of limited usefulness since it correlates negatively with the firing rate (r = -0.33, P < 0.0001). Nevertheless, the majority of neurons exhibited regular, pacemaker-like activity, with coefficient of variance of the ISI lower than 0.5 in ~97% of cases. Unexpectedly, a small percentage of neurons (~1%) exhibited a particular spiking pattern, characterized by low frequency (~0.02-0.1 Hz) oscillations in the firing rate. Transitions between regular and oscillatory firing were observed, suggesting that the oscillatory firing is an alternative firing pattern of serotonergic neurons. PMID:27536220

  15. Dorsal Raphe Nucleus Down-Regulates Medial Prefrontal Cortex during Experience of Flow

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Martin; Keller, Johannes; Grön, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Previous neuroimaging studies have suggested that the experience of flow aligns with a relative increase in activation of the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), and relative activation decreases of the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) and of the amygdala (AMY). In the present study, Dynamic Causal Modeling (DCM) was used to explore effective connectivity between those brain regions. To test our hypothesis that the DRN causally down-regulates activity of the MPFC and/or of the AMY, 23 healthy male students solved mental arithmetic tasks of varying difficulty during functional magnetic resonance imaging. A “flow” condition, with task demands automatically balanced with participants’ skill level, was compared with conditions of “boredom” and “overload”. DCM models were constructed modeling full reciprocal endogenous connections between the DRN, the MPFC, the AMY, and the calcarine. The calcarine was included to allow sensory input to enter the system. Experimental conditions were modeled as exerting modulatory effects on various possible connections between the DRN, the MPFC, and the AMY, but not on self-inhibitory connections, yielding a total of 64 alternative DCM models. Model space was partitioned into eight families based on commonalities in the arrangement of the modulatory effects. Random effects Bayesian Model Selection (BMS) was applied to identify a possible winning family (and model). Although BMS revealed a clear winning family, an outstanding winning model could not be identified. Therefore, Bayesian Model Averaging was performed over models within the winning family to obtain representative DCM parameters for subsequent analyses to test our hypothesis. In line with our expectations, Bayesian averaged parameters revealed stronger down-regulatory influence of the DRN on the MPFC when participants experienced flow relative to control conditions. In addition, these condition-dependent modulatory effects significantly predicted participants

  16. Dorsal Raphe Nucleus Down-Regulates Medial Prefrontal Cortex during Experience of Flow

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Martin; Keller, Johannes; Grön, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Previous neuroimaging studies have suggested that the experience of flow aligns with a relative increase in activation of the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), and relative activation decreases of the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) and of the amygdala (AMY). In the present study, Dynamic Causal Modeling (DCM) was used to explore effective connectivity between those brain regions. To test our hypothesis that the DRN causally down-regulates activity of the MPFC and/or of the AMY, 23 healthy male students solved mental arithmetic tasks of varying difficulty during functional magnetic resonance imaging. A “flow” condition, with task demands automatically balanced with participants’ skill level, was compared with conditions of “boredom” and “overload”. DCM models were constructed modeling full reciprocal endogenous connections between the DRN, the MPFC, the AMY, and the calcarine. The calcarine was included to allow sensory input to enter the system. Experimental conditions were modeled as exerting modulatory effects on various possible connections between the DRN, the MPFC, and the AMY, but not on self-inhibitory connections, yielding a total of 64 alternative DCM models. Model space was partitioned into eight families based on commonalities in the arrangement of the modulatory effects. Random effects Bayesian Model Selection (BMS) was applied to identify a possible winning family (and model). Although BMS revealed a clear winning family, an outstanding winning model could not be identified. Therefore, Bayesian Model Averaging was performed over models within the winning family to obtain representative DCM parameters for subsequent analyses to test our hypothesis. In line with our expectations, Bayesian averaged parameters revealed stronger down-regulatory influence of the DRN on the MPFC when participants experienced flow relative to control conditions. In addition, these condition-dependent modulatory effects significantly predicted participants

  17. Postnatal Treadmill Exercise Alleviates Prenatal Stress-Induced Anxiety in Offspring Rats by Enhancing Cell Proliferation Through 5-Hydroxytryptamine 1A Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Stress during pregnancy is a risk factor for the development of anxiety-related disorders in offspring later in life. The effects of treadmill exercise on anxiety-like behaviors and hippocampal cell proliferation were investigated using rats exposed to prenatal stress. Methods: Exposure of pregnant rats to a hunting dog in an enclosed room was used to induce stress. Anxiety-like behaviors of offspring were evaluated using the elevated plus maze test. Immunohistochemistry for the detection of 5-bromo-2ʹ- deoxyuridine and doublecortin (DCX) in the hippocampal dentate gyrus and 5-hydroxytryptamine 1A receptors (5-HT1A) in the dorsal raphe was conducted. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tyrosine kinase B (TrkB) levels in the hippocampus were evaluated by western blot analysis. Results: Offspring of maternal rats exposed to stress during pregnancy showed anxiety-like behaviors. Offspring also showed reduced expression of BDNF, TrkB, and DCX in the dentate gyrus, decreased cell proliferation in the hippocampus, and reduced 5-HT1A expression in the dorsal raphe. Postnatal treadmill exercise by offspring, but not maternal exercise during pregnancy, enhanced cell proliferation and expression of these proteins. Conclusions: Postnatal treadmill exercise ameliorated anxiety-like behaviors in offspring of stressed pregnant rats, and the alleviating effect of exercise on these behaviors is hypothesized to result from enhancement of cell proliferation through 5-HT1A activation in offspring rats. PMID:27230461

  18. Glucocorticoid status affects antidepressant regulation of locus coeruleus tyrosine hydroxylase and dorsal raphé tryptophan hydroxylase gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Heydendael, Willem; Jacobson, Lauren

    2009-01-01

    Brainstem monoaminergic nuclei express glucocorticoid receptors (GR), and glucocorticoids have been shown to inhibit expression of enzymes involved in monoamine synthesis. Monoamine deficits have been implicated in depression pathology. However, it is unknown if antidepressants regulate brainstem GR, and if glucocorticoids might influence antidepressant effects on monoamine-synthesizing enzymes. Our lab has found opposing effects of the monoamine oxidase inhibitor phenelzine and the tricyclic antidepressant imipramine on HPA activity and forebrain GR expression. We therefore hypothesized that phenelzine and imipramine would also affect brainstem GR gene expression differentially, and that antidepressant-induced changes in GR expression would correlate with effects on monoamine-synthesizing enzyme expression. Using in situ hybridization, we measured effects of chronic antidepressant treatment on brainstem GR, locus coeruleus and ventral tegmental area (VTA) tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), and dorsal raphé tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH2) gene expression in male C57BL/6 mice that were adrenalectomized and replaced with defined levels of corticosterone. GR expression was decreased by phenelzine in the locus coeruleus and decreased by imipramine in the dorsal raphé. Phenelzine increased locus coeruleus TH and imipramine increased dorsal raphé TPH2 gene expression in a glucocorticoid-dependent manner, suggesting that increases in these enzymes were due to relief of inhibitory glucocorticoid signaling. We did not find antidepressant effects on GR or TH expression in the VTA or on MR expression in any of the nuclei examined. Our findings represent a potential mechanism through which antidepressants and glucocorticoids could alter both HPA activity and mood via effects on brainstem GR, norepinephrine, and serotonin. PMID:19577549

  19. ON and OFF retinal ganglion cells differentially regulate serotonergic and GABAergic activity in the dorsal raphe nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ting; Huang, Lu; Zhang, Li; Tan, Minjie; Pu, Mingliang; Pickard, Gary E.; So, Kwok-Fai; Ren, Chaoran

    2016-01-01

    The dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), the major source of serotonergic input to the forebrain, receives excitatory input from the retina that can modulate serotonin levels and depressive-like behavior. In the Mongolian gerbil, retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) with alpha-like morphological and Y-like physiological properties innervate the DRN with ON DRN-projecting RGCs out numbering OFF DRN-projecting RGCs. The DRN neurons targeted by ON and OFF RGCs are unknown. To explore retino-raphe anatomical organization, retinal afferents labeled with Cholera toxin B were examined for association with the postsynaptic protein PSD-95. Synaptic associations between retinal afferents and DRN serotonergic and GABAergic neurons were observed. To explore retino-raphe functional organization, light-evoked c-fos expression was examined. Light significantly increased the number of DRN serotonergic and GABAergic cells expressing c-Fos. When ON RGCs were rendered silent while enhancing the firing rate of OFF RGCs, c-Fos expression was greatly increased in DRN serotonergic neurons suggesting that OFF DRN-projecting RGCs predominately activate serotonergic neurons whereas ON DRN-projecting RGCs mainly target GABAergic neurons. Direct glutamatergic retinal input to DRN 5-HT neurons contributes to the complex excitatory drive regulating these cells. Light, via the retinoraphe pathway can modify DRN 5-HT neuron activity which may play a role in modulating affective behavior. PMID:27181078

  20. 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine lesions of dorsal and median raphé nuclei and performance in the social interaction test of anxiety and in a home-cage aggression test.

    PubMed

    File, S E; Hyde, J R; MacLeod, N K

    1979-06-01

    Micro-injections of the neurotoxin 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine into the dorsal raphe nucleus produced a behavioural profile in the social interaction test of anxiety similar to that seen in rats treated chronically with benzodiazepines. Neurotoxin injections into the median raphé nucleus did not produce a profile significantly different from that of the controls. In the control rats and in the rats with lesions of the median raphé nucleus, ACTH1-24 (corticotrophin) significantly reduced active social interactions, whereas it was without effect on the rats with lesions of the dorsal raphé nucleus. In the home-cage intruder test, the median raphé-lesioned rats submitted less to the intruder and stood and jumped on him more often than did the controls. The dorsal raphé-lesioned rats showed significantly fewer interactions of all kinds, compared with control rats when an intruder was placed in their home cages.

  1. GABAB receptor modulation of serotonin neurons in the dorsal raphé nucleus and escalation of aggression in mice

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Aki; Shimamoto, Akiko; Boyson, Christopher O.; DeBold, Joseph F.; Miczek, Klaus A.

    2010-01-01

    The serotonin (5-HT) system in the brain has been studied more than any other neurotransmitter for its role in the neurobiological basis of aggression. However, which mechanisms modulate the 5-HT system to promote escalated aggression is not clear. We here explore the role of GABAergic modulation in the raphé nuclei, from where most 5-HT in the forebrain originates, on escalated aggression in male mice. Pharmacological activation of GABAB, but not GABAA, receptors in the dorsal raphé nucleus (DRN) escalated aggressive behaviors. In contrast, GABA agonists did not escalate aggressive behaviors after microinjection into the median raphé nucleus (MRN). The aggression-heightening effect of the GABAB agonist baclofen depended on the activation of 5-HT neurons in the DRN because it was blocked by co-administration of the 5-HT1A agonist 8-OH-DPAT, which acts on autoreceptors and inhibits 5-HT neural activity. In vivo microdialysis showed that GABAB activation in the DRN increased extracellular 5-HT level in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). This may be due to an indirect action via presynaptic GABAB receptors. The presynaptic GABAB receptors suppress Ca2+ channel activity and inhibit neurotransmission, and the co-administration of N-type Ca2+ channel blocker facilitated the effect of baclofen. These findings suggest that the indirect disinhibition of 5-HT neuron activity by presynaptic GABAB receptors on non-5-HT neurons in the DRN is one of the neurobiological mechanisms of escalated aggression. PMID:20810897

  2. Evidence that PGE2 in the dorsal and median raphe nuclei is involved in LPS-induced anorexia in rats.

    PubMed

    Kopf, Brigitte S; Langhans, Wolfgang; Geary, Nori; Hrupka, Brian; Asarian, Lori

    2011-09-01

    Anorexia is an element of the acute-phase immune response. Its mechanisms remain poorly understood. Activation of inducible cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in blood-brain-barrier endothelial cells and subsequent release of prostaglandins (e.g., prostaglandin E2, PGE2) may be involved. Therefore, we sought to relate the effects of prostaglandins on the anorexia following gram-negative bacterial lipopolysaccharide treatment (LPS) to neural activity in the dorsal and median raphe nuclei (DRN and MnR) in rats. COX-2 antagonist (NS-398, 10mg/kg; IP) administration prior to LPS (100μg/kg; IP) prevented anorexia and reduced c-Fos expression the DRN, MnR, nucleus tractus solitarii and several related forebrain areas. These data indicate that COX-2-mediated prostaglandin synthesis is necessary for LPS anorexia and much of the initial LPS-induced neural activation. Injection of NS-398 into the DRN and MnR (1ng/site) attenuated LPS-induced anorexia to nearly the same extent as IP NS-398, suggesting that prostaglandin signaling in these areas is necessary for LPS anorexia. Because the DRN and MnR are sources of major serotonergic projections to the forebrain, these data suggest that serotonergic neurons originating in the midbrain raphe play an important role in acute-phase response anorexia.

  3. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) in the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Gershon, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review Although the gut contains most of the body’s 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), many of its most important functions have recently been discovered. This review summarizes and directs attention to this new burst of knowledge. Recent findings Enteroendocrine cells have classically been regarded as pressure sensors, which secrete 5-HT to initiate peristaltic reflexes; nevertheless, recent data obtained from studies of mice that selectively lack 5-HT either in enterochromaffin cells (deletion of tryptophan hydroxylase 1 knockout; TPH1KO) or neurons (TPH2KO) imply that neuronal 5-HT is more important for constitutive gastrointestinal transit than that of enteroendocrine cells. The enteric nervous system of TPH2KO mice, however, also lacks a full complement of neurons; therefore, it is not clear whether slow transit in TPH2KO animals is due to their neuronal deficiency or absence of serotonergic neurotransmission. Neuronal 5-HT promotes the growth/maintenance of the mucosa as well as neurogenesis. Enteroendocrine cell derived 5-HT is an essential component of the gastrointestinal inflammatory response; thus, deletion of the serotonin transporter increases, whereas TPH1KO decreases the severity of intestinal inflammation. Enteroendocrine cell derived 5-HT, moreover, is also a hormone, which inhibits osteoblast proliferation and promotes hepatic regeneration. Summary New studies show that enteric 5-HT is a polyfunctional signalling molecule, acting both in developing and mature animals as a neurotransmitter paracrine factor, endocrine hormone and growth factor. PMID:23222853

  4. A whole-brain atlas of inputs to serotonergic neurons of the dorsal and median raphe nuclei.

    PubMed

    Pollak Dorocic, Iskra; Fürth, Daniel; Xuan, Yang; Johansson, Yvonne; Pozzi, Laura; Silberberg, Gilad; Carlén, Marie; Meletis, Konstantinos

    2014-08-01

    The serotonin system is proposed to regulate physiology and behavior and to underlie mood disorders; nevertheless, the circuitry controlling serotonergic neurons remains uncharacterized. We therefore generated a comprehensive whole-brain atlas defining the monosynaptic inputs onto forebrain-projecting serotonergic neurons of dorsal versus median raphe based on a genetically restricted transsynaptic retrograde tracing strategy. We identified discrete inputs onto serotonergic neurons from forebrain and brainstem neurons, with specific inputs from hypothalamus, cortex, basal ganglia, and midbrain, displaying a greater than anticipated complexity and diversity in cell-type-specific connectivity. We identified and functionally confirmed monosynaptic glutamatergic inputs from prefrontal cortex and lateral habenula onto serotonergic neurons as well as a direct GABAergic input from striatal projection neurons. In summary, our findings emphasize the role of hyperdirect inputs to serotonergic neurons. Cell-type-specific classification of connectivity patterns will allow for further functional analysis of the diverse but specific inputs that control serotonergic neurons during behavior.

  5. Catecholamines and 5-hydroxytryptamine in nervous tissue of cephalopods

    PubMed Central

    Juorio, A. V.

    1971-01-01

    1. Catecholamines and 5-hydroxytryptamine were measured fluorimetrically in nervous tissue of cephalopod molluscs. 2. The only catecholamines found present in nervous tissue of Eledone, Octopus and Sepia were dopamine and noradrenaline. The highest concentrations were found in the optic lobes and in the superior buccal lobe. The concentrations of dopamine and noradrenaline were smaller in other regions of the nervous tissue taken. 3. 5-Hydroxytryptamine was also found in most of the regions investigated. The highest concentration was found in the inferior buccal ganglia and in the optic lobes. 4. The administration of reserpine produced a marked decrease in the concentration of catecholamines and 5-hydroxytryptamine in octopod nervous tissue. 5. These findings suggest that dopamine, noradrenaline and 5-hydroxytryptamine may function as neurotransmitters in cephalopod molluscs. PMID:5558355

  6. Inter- and intracellular relationship of substance P-containing neurons with serotonin and GABA in the dorsal raphe nucleus: combination of autoradiographic and immunocytochemical techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Magoul, R.; Onteniente, B.; Oblin, A.; Calas, A.

    1986-06-01

    Double-labeling experiments were performed at the electron microscopic level in the dorsal raphe nucleus of rat, in order to study the inter- and intracellular relationship of substance P with gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and serotonin. Autoradiography for either (/sup 3/H)serotonin or (/sup 3/H)GABA was coupled, on the same tissue section, with peroxidase-antiperoxidase immunocytochemistry for substance P in colchicine-treated animals. Intercellular relationships were represented by synaptic contacts made by (/sup 3/H)serotonin-labeled terminals on substance P-containing somata and dendrites, and by substance P-containing terminals on (/sup 3/H)GABA-labeled cells. Intracellular relationships were suggested by the occurrence of the peptide within (/sup 3/H)serotonin-containing and (/sup 3/H)GABA-containing cell bodies and fibers. Doubly labeled varicosities of the two kinds were also observed in the supraependymal plexus adjacent to the dorsal raphe nucleus. The results demonstrated that, in addition to reciprocal synaptic interactions made by substance P with serotonin and GABA, the dorsal raphe nucleus is the site of intracellular relationships between the peptide and either the amine or the amino acid.

  7. Electrophysiological Assessment of Serotonin and GABA Neuron Function in the Dorsal Raphe during the Third Trimester Equivalent Developmental Period in Mice123

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Russell A.; Yanagawa, Yuchio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Alterations in the development of the serotonin system can have prolonged effects, including depression and anxiety disorders later in life. Serotonin axonal projections from the dorsal raphe undergo extensive refinement during the first 2 weeks of postnatal life in rodents (equivalent to the third trimester of human pregnancy). However, little is known about the functional properties of serotonin and GABA neurons in the dorsal raphe during this critical developmental period. We assessed the functional properties and synaptic connectivity of putative serotoninergic neurons and GABAergic neurons in the dorsal raphe during early [postnatal day (P) P5–P7] and late (P15–P17) stages of the third trimester equivalent period using electrophysiology. Our studies demonstrate that GABAergic neurons are hyperexcitable at P5–P7 relative to P15–P17. Furthermore, putative serotonin neurons exhibit an increase in both excitatory and GABAA receptor-mediated spontaneous postsynaptic currents during this developmental period. Our data suggest that GABAergic neurons and putative serotonin neurons undergo significant electrophysiological changes during neonatal development. PMID:26730407

  8. Dorsal raphe nucleus acetylcholine-mediated neurotransmission modulates post-ictal antinociception: The role of muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptors.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Rithiele Cristina; de Oliveira, Ricardo; Biagioni, Audrey Francisco; Falconi-Sobrinho, Luiz Luciano; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2016-01-15

    The dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) is a key structure of the endogenous pain inhibitory system. Although the DRN is rich in serotoninergic neurons, cholinergic neurons are also found in that nucleus. Both ictal and inter-ictal states are followed by post-ictal analgesia. The present study investigated the role of cholinergic mechanisms in postictal antinociceptive processes using microinjections of atropine and mecamylamine, muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptor antagonists, respectively, in the DRN of rats. Intraperitoneal injection of pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) (at 64mg/kg) caused tonic and tonic-clonic seizures. The convulsive motor reactions were followed by an increase in pain thresholds, a phenomenon known as post-ictal analgesia. Pre-treatment of the DRN with atropine or mecamylamine at 1µg, 3µg and 5µg/0.2µL decreased the post-ictal antinociceptive phenomenon. The present results showed that the post-ictal analgesia was mediated by muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptors in the DRN, a structure crucially involved in the neural network that organises post-ictal hypoalgesia. PMID:26620541

  9. Ribosomal DNA transcription in dorsal raphe nucleus neurons is increased in residual schizophrenia compared to depressed patients with affective disorders.

    PubMed

    Krzyżanowska, Marta; Steiner, Johann; Brisch, Ralf; Mawrin, Christian; Busse, Stefan; Braun, Katharina; Jankowski, Zbigniew; Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Bogerts, Bernhard; Gos, Tomasz

    2015-12-15

    The central serotonergic system is implicated differentially in the pathogenesis of depression and schizophrenia. The dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) is the main source of serotonergic innervation of forebrain limbic structures disturbed in both disorders. The study was carried out on paraffin-embedded brains from 27 depressed (15 major depressive disorder, MDD and 12 bipolar disorder, BD) and 17 schizophrenia (9 residual and 8 paranoid) patients and 28 matched controls without mental disorders. The transcriptional activity of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) in DRN neurons was evaluated by the AgNOR silver staining method. A significant effect of diagnosis on rDNA activity was found in the cumulative analysis of all DRN subnuclei. Further analysis revealed an increase in this activity in residual (but not paranoid) schizophrenia compared to depressed (both MDD and BD) patients. The effect was most probably neither confounded by suicide nor related to antidepressant and antipsychotic medication. Our findings suggest that increased activity of rDNA in DRN neurons is a distinct phenomenon in residual schizophrenia, related presumably to differentially disturbed inputs to the DRN and/or their local transformation compared with depressive episodes in patients with affective disorders.

  10. Altered taste preference and loss of limbic-projecting serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus of chronically epileptic rats.

    PubMed

    Maia, Gisela H; Soares, Joana I; Andrade, Pedro A; Leite, Juliana F; Luz, Liliana L; Andrade, José P; Lukoyanov, Nikolai V

    2016-01-15

    Mood disorders and major depression are frequently comorbid with epilepsy. While the nature of this comorbidity is not fully understood, multiple lines of evidence suggest that changes in serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmission may be an underlying mechanism. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that chronic epilepsy in rats can be associated with loss of 5-HT neurons in the dorsal raphe (DR) nuclear complex, the main source of 5-HT projections to the cerebral cortex, which would help to explain respective behavioral deficits. Epilepsy was induced using the kainate model of status epilepticus in adult Wistar rats. After a 3-month recovery period, all kainate-treated rats that had experienced status epilepticus showed spontaneous seizures and reduced sucrose preference (anhedonia), a core symptom of depression. No changes in the forced swim test were detected. The total numbers of 5-HT immunoreactive cells were estimated in all DR subdivisions of control and epileptic rats. Interestingly, epilepsy-related loss of 5-HT neurons (approximately 35%) was observed only in the interfascicular part of the DR complex, which is known to innervate brain regions involved in depression. These findings support the notion that mental health impairments observed in epilepsy may be related to loss of a specific population of the DR 5-HT neurons projecting to limbic brain areas.

  11. Activation of serotonin 5-HT(1B) receptor in the dorsal raphe nucleus affects REM sleep in the rat.

    PubMed

    Monti, Jaime M; Jantos, Héctor; Lagos, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    The effects of CP-94253, a selective 5-HT(1B) receptor agonist, and of SB 224-289, a selective 5-HT(1B) receptor antagonist, on spontaneous sleep were studied in adult rats implanted for chronic sleep recordings. The 5-HT(1B) receptor ligands were microinjected directly into the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) during the light period of the 12-h light/12-h dark cycle. Infusion of CP-94253 (1-4 mM) into the DRN induced a significant reduction of rapid-eye-movement sleep (REMS) and of the mean duration of REM episodes. On the other hand, SB 224-289 (0.25-0.5 mM) decreased REMS and the number of REM periods. Pretreatment with SB 224-289 (0.125-0.25 mM) antagonized the CP-94253 (4 mM)-induced reduction of REMS and of the mean duration of REM periods. Administration of the GABA(A) receptor agonist muscimol (1.5mM), which by itself did not significantly affect sleep variables, prevented the effect of CP-94253 (4 mM) on REMS suppression. It is proposed that the suppression of REMS after microinjection of CP-94253 into the DRN is related to the inhibition of GABAergic interneurons that make synaptic contacts with serotonergic cells. The resultant increase of serotonin release at postsynaptic sites involved in the induction and maintenance of REMS would induce the suppression of the behavioral state.

  12. Dorsal raphe nucleus and locus coeruleus neural networks and the elaboration of the sweet-substance-induced antinociception.

    PubMed

    Kishi, Renato; Bongiovanni, Renata; de Nadai, Tales Rubens; Freitas, Renato Leonardo; de Oliveira, Ricardo; Ferreira, Célio Marcos Dos Reis; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2006-02-27

    In order to investigate the effects of monoaminergic neurons of the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) and locus coeruleus (LC) on the elaboration and control of sweet-substance-induced antinociception, male albino Wistar rats weighing 180-200 g received sucrose solution (250 g/L) for 7-14 days as their only source of liquid. After the chronic consumption of sucrose solution, each animal was pretreated with unilateral microinjection of ibotenic acid (1.0 microg/0.2 microL) in the DRN or in the LC. The tail withdrawal latencies of the rats in the tail-flick test were measured immediately before and 7 days after this treatment. The neurochemical lesion of locus coeruleus, but not of DRN neural networks with ibotenic acid, after the chronic intake of sweetened solution, decreased the sweet-substance-induced antinociception. These results indicate the involvement of noradrenaline-containing neurons of the LC in the sucrose-induced antinociception. We also consider the possibility of DRN serotonergic neurons exerting some inhibitory effect on the LC neural networks involved with the elaboration of the sweet-substance-induced antinociception.

  13. Ca(2+) in the dorsal raphe nucleus promotes wakefulness via endogenous sleep-wake regulating pathway in the rats.

    PubMed

    Cui, Su-Ying; Li, Sheng-Jie; Cui, Xiang-Yu; Zhang, Xue-Qiong; Yu, Bin; Huang, Yuan-Li; Cao, Qing; Xu, Ya-Ping; Yang, Guang; Ding, Hui; Song, Jin-Zhi; Ye, Hui; Sheng, Zhao-Fu; Wang, Zi-Jun; Zhang, Yong-He

    2016-01-01

    Serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) are involved in the control of sleep-wake states. Our previous studies have indicated that calcium (Ca(2+)) modulation in the DRN plays an important role in rapid-eye-movement sleep (REMS) and non-REMS (NREMS) regulation during pentobarbital hypnosis. The present study investigated the effects of Ca(2+) in the DRN on sleep-wake regulation and the related neuronal mechanism in freely moving rats. Our results showed that microinjection of CaCl2 (25 or 50 nmol) in the DRN promoted wakefulness and suppressed NREMS including slow wave sleep and REMS in freely moving rats. Application of CaCl2 (25 or 50 nmol) in the DRN significantly increased serotonin in the DRN and hypothalamus, and noradrenaline in the locus coeruleus and hypothalamus. Immunohistochemistry study indicated that application of CaCl2 (25 or 50 nmol) in the DRN significantly increased c-Fos expression ratio in wake-promoting neurons including serotonergic neurons in the DRN, noradrenergic neurons in the locus coeruleus, and orxinergic neurons in the perifornical nucleus, but decreased c-Fos expression ratio of GABAergic sleep-promoting neurons in the ventrolateral preoptic nucleus. These results suggest that Ca(2+) in the DRN exert arousal effects via up-regulating serotonergic functions in the endogenous sleep-wake regulating pathways. PMID:27456222

  14. Lack of response of serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus of freely moving cats to stressful stimuli.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, L O; Jacobs, B L

    1988-09-01

    Changes in brain serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmission have been implicated in the mammalian response to stressful stimuli. The purpose of this study was to examine the extracellular single-unit activity of 5-HT neurons in cats exposed to three stressors: loud (100 dB) white noise, restraint, and confrontation with a dog. Serotonergic neurons were recorded in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) and were identified by (i) slow and regular spontaneous activity, (ii) long duration (approximately 2 ms) waveform, (iii) complete suppression of activity during REM sleep and after systemic administration of 5-methoxy-N-N-dimethyltryptamine (250 micrograms/kg i.m.), and (iv) histological localization in the DRN. Despite behavioral and physiological evidence that all three manipulations induced a stress response, the maximal firing rate of 5-HT neurons was not significantly different from that observed under unstressed conditions. These data are consistent with previous studies from our laboratory which have indicated that very few manipulations are able to perturb the slow and regular activity of these neurons. In contrast, previous work has shown that the firing rate of noradrenergic neurons in the locus ceruleus is dramatically increased by these stressors. The relative imbalance in the activity of these two neuronal groups observed during stress may affect postsynaptic neuronal processing patterns and have adaptive significance during stressful conditions.

  15. The role of lateral habenula-dorsal raphe nucleus circuits in higher brain functions and psychiatric illness.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hua; Zhang, Bei-Lin; Yang, Shao-Jun; Rusak, Benjamin

    2015-01-15

    Serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) play an important role in regulation of many physiological functions. The lateral nucleus of the habenular complex (LHb) is closely connected to the DRN both morphologically and functionally. The LHb is a key regulator of the activity of DRN serotonergic neurons, and it also receives reciprocal input from the DRN. The LHb is also a major way-station that receives limbic system input via the stria medullaris and provides output to the DRN and thereby indirectly connects a number of other brain regions to the DRN. The complex interactions of the LHb and DRN contribute to the regulation of numerous important behavioral and physiological mechanisms, including those regulating cognition, reward, pain sensitivity and patterns of sleep and waking. Disruption of these functions is characteristic of major psychiatric illnesses, so there has been a great deal of interest in how disturbed LHb-DRN interactions may contribute to the symptoms of these illnesses. This review summarizes recent research related to the roles of the LHb-DRN system in regulation of higher brain functions and the possible role of disturbed LHb-DRN function in the pathogenesis of psychiatric disorders, especially depression.

  16. Depressive-like profile induced by MCH microinjections into the dorsal raphe nucleus evaluated in the forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Lagos, Patricia; Urbanavicius, Jessika; Scorza, María Cecilia; Miraballes, Rodrigo; Torterolo, Pablo

    2011-04-15

    Antagonism of the melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) receptor 1 (MCH-R1) has been recently shown to have antidepressant-like profile in rats. However, the mechanisms by which the MCHergic system participates in the modulation of emotional states are still to be determined. In the present study we confirmed the presence of MCHergic fibers within the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), a serotonergic nucleus involved in the physiopathology of major depression. We also assessed the effects of the administration of MCH and anti-MCH antibody (immunoneutralization) into the DRN using the forced swim test in rats, an animal model to screen antidepressant drugs. We found that a low dose of MCH (50 ng) evoked a depressive-like behavior indicated by a significant increase in the immobility time as well as a decrease in climbing behavior. Furthermore, the depressive-like response was prevented by pretreatment with fluoxetine. Consistent with these results, the immunoneutralization of MCH produced an antidepressant-like effect. By means of the open field test we discarded that these effects were related to unspecific changes in motor activity. Our results suggest that the MCHergic neurons are involved in the regulation of emotional behaviors through the modulation of the serotonergic neuronal activity within the DRN. In addition, the present results are in agreement with previous reports showing that antagonism of the MCHergic system may be a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of depressive disorders.

  17. Epigenetic regulation of dorsal raphe GABA(B1a) associated with isolation-induced abnormal responses to social stimulation in mice.

    PubMed

    Araki, Ryota; Hiraki, Yosuke; Nishida, Shoji; Kuramoto, Nobuyuki; Matsumoto, Kinzo; Yabe, Takeshi

    2016-02-01

    In isolation-reared mice, social encounter stimulation induces locomotor hyperactivity and activation of the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), suggesting that dysregulation of dorsal raphe function may be involved in abnormal behaviors. In this study, we examined the involvement of dorsal raphe GABAergic dysregulation in the abnormal behaviors of isolation-reared mice. We also studied an epigenetic mechanism underlying abnormalities of the dorsal raphe GABAergic system. Both mRNA and protein levels of GABA(B1a), a GABA(B) receptor subunit, were increased in the DRN of isolation-reared mice, compared with these levels in group-reared mice. In contrast, mRNA levels for other GABAergic system-related genes (GABA(A) receptor α1, β2 and γ2 subunits, GABA(B) receptor 1b and 2 subunits, and glutamate decarboxylase 67 and 65) were unchanged. Intra-DRN microinjection of 0.06 nmol baclofen (a GABA(B) receptor agonist) exacerbated encounter-induced hyperactivity and aggressive behavior, while microinjection of 0.3 nmol phaclofen (a GABA(B) receptor antagonist) attenuated encounter-induced hyperactivity and aggressive behavior in isolation-reared mice. Furthermore, microinjection of 0.06 nmol baclofen elicited encounter-induced hyperactivity in group-reared mice. Neither baclofen nor phaclofen affected immobility time in the forced swim test and hyperactivity in a novel environment of isolation reared mice. Bisulfite sequence analyses revealed that the DNA methylation level of the CpG island around the transcription start site (TSS) of GABA(B1a) was decreased in the DRN of isolation-reared mice. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis showed that histone H3 was hyperacetylated around the TSS of GABA(B1a) in the DRN of isolation-reared mice. These findings indicate that an increase in dorsal raphe GABA(B1a) expression via epigenetic regulation is associated with abnormal responses to social stimulation such as encounter-induced hyperactivity and aggressive behavior in isolation

  18. Swim stress activates serotonergic and nonserotonergic neurons in specific subdivisions of the rat dorsal raphe nucleus in a temperature-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Kelly, K J; Donner, N C; Hale, M W; Lowry, C A

    2011-12-01

    Physical (exteroceptive) stimuli and emotional (interoceptive) stimuli are thought to influence stress-related physiologic and behavioral responses through different neural mechanisms. Previous studies have demonstrated that stress-induced activation of brainstem serotonergic systems is influenced by environmental factors such as temperature. In order to further investigate the effects of environmental influences on stress-induced activation of serotonergic systems, we exposed adult male Wistar rats to either home cage control conditions or a 15-min swim in water maintained at 19 °C, 25 °C, or 35 °C and conducted dual immunohistochemical staining for c-Fos, a marker of immediate-early nuclear activation, and tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH), a marker of serotonergic neurons. Changes in core body temperature were documented using biotelemetry. As expected, exposure to cold (19 °C) swim, relative to warm (35 °C) swim, increased c-Fos expression in the external lateral part of the parabrachial nucleus (LPBel), an important part of the spinoparabrachial pathway involved in sensation of cold, cutaneous stimuli, and in serotonergic neurons in the raphe pallidus nucleus (RPa), an important part of the efferent mechanisms controlling thermoregulatory warming responses. In addition, exposure to cold (19 °C) swim, relative to 35 °C swim, increased c-Fos expression in the dorsal raphe nucleus, ventrolateral part/periaqueductal gray (DRVL/VLPAG) and dorsal raphe nucleus, interfascicular part (DRI). Both of these subregions of the dorsal raphe nucleus (DR) have previously been implicated in thermoregulatory responses. Altogether, the data are consistent with the hypothesis that midbrain serotonergic neurons, possibly via activation of afferents to the DR by thermosensitive spinoparabrachial pathways, play a role in integration of physiologic and behavioral responses to interoceptive stress-related cues involved in forced swimming and exteroceptive cues related to cold

  19. Lesions in Guddesn's tegmental nuclei produce behavioral and 5-HT effects similar to those after raphe lesions.

    PubMed

    Lorens, S A; Köhler, C; Guldberg, H C

    1975-01-01

    Lesions largely restricted to the dorsal and ventral tegmental nuclei of Gudden (GTN) produced several effects similar to those seen after midbrain raphe lesions. GTN lesions significantly reduced the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) concentration of the diencephalon (31 percent), hippocampus (59 percent), and remaining portion of the telencephalon (29 percent). Striatal 5-HT, however, was not affected. GTN lesions enhanced activity in an enclosed field and facilitated two-way avoidance acquisition. Pain sensitivity as measured by the flinch-jump method was not affected. These results suggest that the GTN may be the origin of ascending 5-HT fides and may be involved in the regulation of activity level and the adaptation of an animal to aversive situations. Thus, some of the behavioral and 5-HT effects of lesions in the midbrain raphe nuclei may be due to their involvement of the GTN and associated pathways. PMID:1187729

  20. GABAergic neurons of the cat dorsal raphe nucleus express c-fos during carbachol-induced active sleep.

    PubMed

    Torterolo, P; Yamuy, J; Sampogna, S; Morales, F R; Chase, M H

    2000-11-24

    Serotonergic neurons of the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) cease firing during active sleep (AS, also called rapid-eye-movement sleep). This cessation of electrical activity is believed to play a 'permissive' role in the generation of AS. In the present study we explored the possibility that GABAergic cells in the DRN are involved in the suppression of serotonergic activity during AS. Accordingly, we examined whether immunocytochemically identified GABAergic neurons in the DRN were activated, as indicated by their expression of c-fos, during carbachol-induced AS (AS-carbachol). Three chronically-prepared cats were euthanized after prolonged episodes of AS that was induced by microinjections of carbachol into the nucleus pontis oralis. Another four cats (controls) were maintained 2 h in quiet wakefulness before being euthanized. Thereafter, immunocytochemical studies were performed on brainstem sections utilizing antibodies against Fos, GABA and serotonin. When compared with identically prepared tissue from awake cats, the number of Fos+ neurons was larger in the DRN during AS-carbachol (35.9+/-5.6 vs. 13.9+/-4.4, P<0.05). Furthermore, a larger number of GABA+ Fos+ neurons were observed during AS-carbachol than during wakefulness (24.8+/-3.3 vs. 4.0+/-1.0, P<0.001). These GABA+ Fos+ neurons were distributed asymmetrically with a larger number located ipsilaterally to the site of injection. There was no significant difference between control and experimental animals in the number of non-GABAergic neurons that expressed c-fos in the DRN. We therefore suggest that activated GABAergic neurons of the DRN are responsible for the inhibition of serotonergic neurons that occurs during natural AS. PMID:11082488

  1. Optogenetic modulation of descending prefrontocortical inputs to the dorsal raphe bidirectionally bias socioaffective choices after social defeat.

    PubMed

    Challis, Collin; Beck, Sheryl G; Berton, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    It has been well established that modulating serotonin (5-HT) levels in humans and animals affects perception and response to social threats, however the circuit mechanisms that control 5-HT output during social interaction are not well understood. A better understanding of these systems could provide groundwork for more precise and efficient therapeutic interventions. Here we examined the organization and plasticity of microcircuits implicated in top-down control of 5-HT neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) by excitatory inputs from the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) and their role in social approach-avoidance decisions. We did this in the context of a social defeat model that induces a long lasting form of social aversion that is reversible by antidepressants. We first used viral tracing and Cre-dependent genetic identification of vmPFC glutamatergic synapses in the DRN to determine their topographic distribution in relation to 5-HT and GABAergic subregions and found that excitatory vmPFC projections primarily localized to GABA-rich areas of the DRN. We then used optogenetics in combination with cFos mapping and slice electrophysiology to establish the functional effects of repeatedly driving vmPFC inputs in DRN. We provide the first direct evidence that vmPFC axons drive synaptic activity and immediate early gene expression in genetically identified DRN GABA neurons through an AMPA receptor-dependent mechanism. In contrast, we did not detect vmPFC-driven synaptic activity in 5-HT neurons and cFos induction in 5-HT neurons was limited. Finally we show that optogenetically increasing or decreasing excitatory vmPFC input to the DRN during sensory exposure to an aggressor's cues enhances or diminishes avoidance bias, respectively. These results clarify the functional organization of vmPFC-DRN pathways and identify GABAergic neurons as a key cellular element filtering top-down vmPFC influences on affect-regulating 5-HT output.

  2. Melanin-concentrating hormone projections to the dorsal raphe nucleus: An immunofluorescence and in vivo microdialysis study.

    PubMed

    Urbanavicius, Jessika; Lagos, Patricia; Torterolo, Pablo; Abin-Carriquiry, Juan A; Scorza, Cecilia

    2016-03-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH)-containing neurons are localized in the lateral hypothalamus and incerto-hypothalamic areas, and project to several brain regions including the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN). The MCHergic system has been involved in the regulation of emotional states and we have demonstrated that MCH microinjections into the rat DRN promote a depressive-like state. To understand the MCHergic transmission into the DRN, in the present study we characterized the distribution and density of the MCHergic fibers along the rostro-caudal axis of the rat DRN and their anatomical relationship with the 5-HT- and GABA-containing neurons. Additionally, a functional in vivo microdialysis study was carried out in order to evaluate the MCH effects on the 5-HT extracellular levels. Immunolabeling studies showed that MCHergic fibers were widely distributed throughout the rostro-caudal DRN extent and a reduced density at the most caudal level was observed. Interestingly, MCHergic fibers appeared in close apposition to 5-HT and GABA-containing neurons. Microdialysis studies evidenced an opposite effect of two concentrations of MCH on 5-HT levels: the lower concentration (30 μM) produced a significant and long-lasting (up to 120 min) decrease while the higher (100 μM) induced a slight and brief (20 min) increase. Morphological and functional results strongly suggest that both 5-HT- and GABA-containing neurons of the DRN are modulated by MCH. A different sensitivity of these neurons to MCH may explain the dose-response effect on 5-HT release. The decrease in extracellular 5-HT levels may account for the depressive-like effect induced by MCH reported in our previous studies.

  3. Presynaptic α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors increase glutamate release and serotonin neuron excitability in the dorsal raphe nucleus.

    PubMed

    Garduño, Julieta; Galindo-Charles, Luis; Jiménez-Rodríguez, Javier; Galarraga, Elvira; Tapia, Dagoberto; Mihailescu, Stefan; Hernandez-Lopez, Salvador

    2012-10-24

    Several behavioral effects of nicotine are mediated by changes in serotonin (5-HT) release in brain areas that receive serotonergic afferents from the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN). In vitro experiments have demonstrated that nicotine increases the firing activity in the majority of DRN 5-HT neurons and that DRN contains nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) located at both somata and presynaptic elements. One of the most common presynaptic effects of nicotine is to increase glutamate release. Although DRN receives profuse glutamatergic afferents, the effect of nicotine on glutamate release in the DRN has not been studied in detail. Using whole-cell recording techniques, we investigated the effects of nicotine on the glutamatergic input to 5-HT DRN neurons in rat midbrain slices. Low nicotine concentrations, in the presence of bicuculline and tetrodotoxin (TTX), increased the frequency but did not change the amplitude of glutamate-induced EPSCs, recorded from identified 5-HT neurons. Nicotine-induced increase of glutamatergic EPSC frequency persisted 10-20 min after drug withdrawal. This nicotinic effect was mimicked by exogenous administration of acetylcholine (ACh) or inhibition of ACh metabolism. In addition, the nicotine-induced increase in EPSC frequency was abolished by blockade of α4β2 nAChRs, voltage-gated calcium channels, or intracellular calcium signaling but not by α7 nAChR antagonists. These data suggest that both nicotine and endogenous ACh can increase glutamate release through activation of presynaptic α4β2 but not α7 nAChRs in the DRN. The effect involves long-term changes in synaptic function, and it is dependent on voltage-gated calcium channels and presynaptic calcium stores. PMID:23100436

  4. Mu Opioid Receptor Modulation of Dopamine Neurons in the Periaqueductal Gray/Dorsal Raphe: A Role in Regulation of Pain.

    PubMed

    Li, Chia; Sugam, Jonathan A; Lowery-Gionta, Emily G; McElligott, Zoe A; McCall, Nora M; Lopez, Alberto J; McKlveen, Jessica M; Pleil, Kristen E; Kash, Thomas L

    2016-07-01

    The periaqueductal gray (PAG) is a brain region involved in nociception modulation, and an important relay center for the descending nociceptive pathway through the rostral ventral lateral medulla. Given the dense expression of mu opioid receptors and the role of dopamine in pain, the recently characterized dopamine neurons in the ventral PAG (vPAG)/dorsal raphe (DR) region are a potentially critical site for the antinociceptive actions of opioids. The objectives of this study were to (1) evaluate synaptic modulation of the vPAG/DR dopamine neurons by mu opioid receptors and to (2) dissect the anatomy and neurochemistry of these neurons, in order to assess the downstream loci and functions of their activation. Using a mouse line that expresses eGFP under control of the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) promoter, we found that mu opioid receptor activation led to a decrease in inhibitory inputs onto the vPAG/DR dopamine neurons. Furthermore, combining immunohistochemistry, optogenetics, electrophysiology, and fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in a TH-cre mouse line, we demonstrated that these neurons also express the vesicular glutamate type 2 transporter and co-release dopamine and glutamate in a major downstream projection structure-the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. Finally, activation of TH-positive neurons in the vPAG/DR using Gq designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs displayed a supraspinal, but not spinal, antinociceptive effect. These results indicate that vPAG/DR dopamine neurons likely play a key role in opiate antinociception, potentially via the activation of downstream structures through dopamine and glutamate release.

  5. Chronic Stress Impairs α1-Adrenoceptor-Induced Endocannabinoid-Dependent Synaptic Plasticity in the Dorsal Raphe Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Roh-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Alpha 1-adrenergic receptors (α1-ARs) control the activity of dorsal raphe nucleus (DRn) serotonin (5-HT) neurons and play crucial role in the regulation of arousal and stress homoeostasis. However, the precise role of these receptors in regulating glutamate synapses of rat DRn 5-HT neurons and whether chronic stress exposure alters such regulation remain unknown. In the present study, we examined the impact of chronic restraint stress on α1-AR-mediated regulation of glutamate synapses onto DRn 5-HT neurons. We found that, in the control condition, activation of α1-ARs induced an inward current and long-term depression (LTD) of glutamate synapses of DRn 5-HT neurons. The α1-AR LTD was initiated by postsynaptic α1-ARs but mediated by a decrease in glutamate release. The presynaptic expression of the α1-AR LTD was signaled by retrograde endocannabinoids (eCBs). Importantly, we found that chronic exposure to restraint stress profoundly reduced the magnitude of α1-AR LTD but had no effect on the amplitude of α1-AR-induced inward current. Chronic restraint stress also reduced the CB1 receptor-mediated inhibition of EPSC and the eCB-mediated depolarization-induced suppression of excitation. Collectively, these results indicate that chronic restraint stress impairs the α1-AR LTD by reducing the function of presynaptic CB1 receptors and reveal a novel mechanism by which noradrenaline controls synaptic strength and plasticity in the DRn. They also provide evidence that chronic stress impairs eCB signaling in the DRn, which may contribute, at least in part, to the dysregulation of the stress homeostasis. PMID:25355210

  6. Optogenetic modulation of descending prefrontocortical inputs to the dorsal raphe bidirectionally bias socioaffective choices after social defeat

    PubMed Central

    Challis, Collin; Beck, Sheryl G.; Berton, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    It has been well established that modulating serotonin (5-HT) levels in humans and animals affects perception and response to social threats, however the circuit mechanisms that control 5-HT output during social interaction are not well understood. A better understanding of these systems could provide groundwork for more precise and efficient therapeutic interventions. Here we examined the organization and plasticity of microcircuits implicated in top-down control of 5-HT neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) by excitatory inputs from the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) and their role in social approach-avoidance decisions. We did this in the context of a social defeat model that induces a long lasting form of social aversion that is reversible by antidepressants. We first used viral tracing and Cre-dependent genetic identification of vmPFC glutamatergic synapses in the DRN to determine their topographic distribution in relation to 5-HT and GABAergic subregions and found that excitatory vmPFC projections primarily localized to GABA-rich areas of the DRN. We then used optogenetics in combination with cFos mapping and slice electrophysiology to establish the functional effects of repeatedly driving vmPFC inputs in DRN. We provide the first direct evidence that vmPFC axons drive synaptic activity and immediate early gene expression in genetically identified DRN GABA neurons through an AMPA receptor-dependent mechanism. In contrast, we did not detect vmPFC-driven synaptic activity in 5-HT neurons and cFos induction in 5-HT neurons was limited. Finally we show that optogenetically increasing or decreasing excitatory vmPFC input to the DRN during sensory exposure to an aggressor's cues enhances or diminishes avoidance bias, respectively. These results clarify the functional organization of vmPFC-DRN pathways and identify GABAergic neurons as a key cellular element filtering top-down vmPFC influences on affect-regulating 5-HT output. PMID:24596546

  7. The Cholinergic Agonist Carbachol Increases the Frequency of Spontaneous GABAergic Synaptic Currents in Dorsal Raphe Serotonergic Neurons in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chun; Brown, Ritchie E.

    2013-01-01

    Dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) serotonin (5-HT) neurons play an important role in feeding, mood control and stress responses. One important feature of their activity across the sleep-wake cycle is their reduced firing during rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep which stands in stark contrast to the wake/REM-on discharge pattern of brainstem cholinergic neurons. A prominent model of REM sleep control posits a reciprocal interaction between these cell groups. 5-HT inhibits cholinergic neurons, and activation of nicotinic receptors can excite DRN 5-HT neurons but the cholinergic effect on inhibitory inputs is incompletely understood. Here, in vitro, in DRN brain slices prepared from GAD67-GFP knock-in mice, a brief (3 min) bath application of carbachol (50 μM) increased the frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) in GFP-negative, putative serotonin neurons but did not affect miniature (tetrodotoxin-insensitive) IPSCs. Carbachol had no direct postsynaptic effect. Thus, carbachol likely increases the activity of local GABAergic neurons which synapse on 5-HT neurons. Removal of dorsal regions of the slice including the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (vlPAG) region where GABAergic neurons projecting to the DRN have been identified, abolished the effect of carbachol on sIPSCs whereas removal of ventral regions containing the oral region of the pontine reticular nucleus (PnO) did not. In addition, carbachol directly excited GFP-positive, GABAergic vlPAG neurons. Antagonism of both muscarinic and nicotinic receptors completely abolished the effects of carbachol. We suggest cholinergic neurons inhibit DRN 5-HT neurons when acetylcholine levels are lower i.e. during quiet wakefulness and the beginning of REM sleep periods, in part via excitation of muscarinic and nicotinic receptors located on local vlPAG and DRN GABAergic neurons. Higher firing rates or burst firing of cholinergic neurons associated with attentive wakefulness or phasic REM sleep periods

  8. The cholinergic agonist carbachol increases the frequency of spontaneous GABAergic synaptic currents in dorsal raphe serotonergic neurons in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Yang, C; Brown, R E

    2014-01-31

    Dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) serotonin (5-HT) neurons play an important role in feeding, mood control and stress responses. One important feature of their activity across the sleep-wake cycle is their reduced firing during rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep which stands in stark contrast to the wake/REM-on discharge pattern of brainstem cholinergic neurons. A prominent model of REM sleep control posits a reciprocal interaction between these cell groups. 5-HT inhibits cholinergic neurons, and activation of nicotinic receptors can excite DRN 5-HT neurons but the cholinergic effect on inhibitory inputs is incompletely understood. Here, in vitro, in DRN brain slices prepared from GAD67-GFP knock-in mice, a brief (3 min) bath application of carbachol (50 μM) increased the frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) in GFP-negative, putative 5-HT neurons but did not affect miniature (tetrodotoxin-insensitive) IPSCs. Carbachol had no direct postsynaptic effect. Thus, carbachol likely increases the activity of local GABAergic neurons which synapse on 5-HT neurons. Removal of dorsal regions of the slice including the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (vlPAG) region where GABAergic neurons projecting to the DRN have been identified, abolished the effect of carbachol on sIPSCs whereas the removal of ventral regions containing the oral region of the pontine reticular nucleus (PnO) did not. In addition, carbachol directly excited GFP-positive, GABAergic vlPAG neurons. Antagonism of both muscarinic and nicotinic receptors completely abolished the effects of carbachol. We suggest cholinergic neurons inhibit DRN 5-HT neurons when acetylcholine levels are lower i.e. during quiet wakefulness and the beginning of REM sleep periods, in part via excitation of muscarinic and nicotinic receptors located on local vlPAG and DRN GABAergic neurons. Higher firing rates or burst firing of cholinergic neurons associated with attentive wakefulness or phasic REM sleep periods

  9. [EXPRESSION OF SEROTONIN TRANSPORTER IN THE DORSAL RAPHE NUCLEUS DURING THE EARLY POSTNATAL PERIOD IN NORMAL STATE AND UNDER PRENATAL DEFICIENCY OF THE SEROTONERGIC SYSTEM IN RATS].

    PubMed

    Khozhai, L I

    2016-01-01

    The expression of the serotonin transport membrane protein (5-NTT) in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DNR) was investigated in laboratory Wistar rats during the early postnatal period. The results of the immunocytochemical study using primary antibodies--anti-Serotonin transporter antibody (AbCam, UK)--showed that during the first 3 postnatal weeks the intensity of 5-NTT expression in DNR of control animals changes. At the earliest postnatal times the main part of subnuclear neurons (dorsal, ventral and lateral ones) of the dorsal raphe nucleus (DNR-d, DNR-v, DNR-lat) was shown to intensely express 5-NTT. Sites of 5-NTT localization are found on the membrane surface of neuron bodies and processes in neuropile. The reduction in the number of neurons expressing 5-NTT and of its binding sites was observed on P10. At this time a redistribution of 5-NTT localization sites occurs: they are very few on neuron bodies and dendrites but are located rather densely on the plasma membrane of axons. The number of neurons expressing 5-NTT gradually increases with age and in neuropile the density of 5-NTT localization sites rises. It is shown that during the prenatal development the reduction of serotonin level in all parts of the DNR leads to a reduction in both the number of neurons expressing 5-NTT and sites of its localization in the early postnatal period, this trend continuing with age. PMID:27220242

  10. [EXPRESSION OF SEROTONIN TRANSPORTER IN THE DORSAL RAPHE NUCLEUS DURING THE EARLY POSTNATAL PERIOD IN NORMAL STATE AND UNDER PRENATAL DEFICIENCY OF THE SEROTONERGIC SYSTEM IN RATS].

    PubMed

    Khozhai, L I

    2016-01-01

    The expression of the serotonin transport membrane protein (5-NTT) in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DNR) was investigated in laboratory Wistar rats during the early postnatal period. The results of the immunocytochemical study using primary antibodies--anti-Serotonin transporter antibody (AbCam, UK)--showed that during the first 3 postnatal weeks the intensity of 5-NTT expression in DNR of control animals changes. At the earliest postnatal times the main part of subnuclear neurons (dorsal, ventral and lateral ones) of the dorsal raphe nucleus (DNR-d, DNR-v, DNR-lat) was shown to intensely express 5-NTT. Sites of 5-NTT localization are found on the membrane surface of neuron bodies and processes in neuropile. The reduction in the number of neurons expressing 5-NTT and of its binding sites was observed on P10. At this time a redistribution of 5-NTT localization sites occurs: they are very few on neuron bodies and dendrites but are located rather densely on the plasma membrane of axons. The number of neurons expressing 5-NTT gradually increases with age and in neuropile the density of 5-NTT localization sites rises. It is shown that during the prenatal development the reduction of serotonin level in all parts of the DNR leads to a reduction in both the number of neurons expressing 5-NTT and sites of its localization in the early postnatal period, this trend continuing with age.

  11. Cannabidiol inhibits the reward-facilitating effect of morphine: involvement of 5-HT1A receptors in the dorsal raphe nucleus.

    PubMed

    Katsidoni, Vicky; Anagnostou, Ilektra; Panagis, George

    2013-03-01

    Cannabidiol is a non-psychotomimetic constituent of Cannabis sativa, which induces central effects in rodents. It has been shown that cannabidiol attenuates cue-induced reinstatement of heroin seeking. However, to the best of our knowledge, its effects on brain stimulation reward and the reward-facilitating effects of drugs of abuse have not yet been examined. Therefore, we investigated the effects of cannabidiol on brain reward function and on the reward-facilitating effect of morphine and cocaine using the intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) paradigm. Rats were prepared with a stimulating electrode into the medial forebrain bundle (MFB), and a guide cannula into the dorsal raphe (microinjection experiments), and were trained to respond for electrical brain stimulation. A low dose of cannabidiol did not affect the reinforcing efficacy of brain stimulation, whereas higher doses significantly elevated the threshold frequency required for MFB ICSS. Both cocaine and morphine lowered ICSS thresholds. Cannabidiol inhibited the reward-facilitating effect of morphine, but not cocaine. This effect was reversed by pre-treatment with an intra-dorsal raphe injection of the selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY-100635. The present findings indicate that cannabidiol does not exhibit reinforcing properties in the ICSS paradigm at any of the doses tested, while it decreases the reward-facilitating effects of morphine. These effects were mediated by activation of 5-HT1A receptors in the dorsal raphe. Our results suggest that cannabidiol interferes with brain reward mechanisms responsible for the expression of the acute reinforcing properties of opioids, thus indicating that cannabidiol may be clinically useful in attenuating the rewarding effects of opioids.

  12. Dorsal raphe nucleus of brain in the rats flown in space inflight and postflight alteration of structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnov, I.

    The structure of brain dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) was studied in the rats flown in space aboard Space Shuttle "Columbia" (STS-58, SLS-2 program) and dissected on day 13 of the mission ("inflight" rats) and in 5-6 hours after finishing 14-day flight ("postflight" rats). The brain of "inflight" rats were excised after decapitation, sectioned sagitally halves of brain were fixed by immersion in 2,5 % glutaraldehyde in 0.1 M cacodylate buffer pH 7.3 at 4°C and kept in the flight at 4°C. After landing the brain frontal 0.5 mm sections from DRN area were osmificated and embedded in araldite at NASA ARC. The brains of "postflight": and control rats were underwent to the same procedure. Electronmicroscopical analysis, computer morphometry and glial cell count were performed at Moscow. In DRN neuropil of "inflight" rats the most part of axo-dendritic synapses were surrounded by glia cell processes and had decreased electron density of pre- and postsynaptic membrane and pronounced diminution of synaptic vesicle amount while dendrites were characterized by decrease in matrix electron density and microtubule quantity that in total indicates the decline of afferent flow reaching DRN neurons in microgravity. In DRN neurons of "inflight" rats all mitochondria were characterized by evenly increased dimensions, decreased matrix electron density, small amount of short and far- between located cristae and enlarged intermembrane and intercristae spaces, that in total points out low level of coupling of oxidation to phosphorilation, decrease in energy supply of neuron. Amount of ribosome in cytoplasm was significantly decreased indicating lower lever of biosynthetic processes. The last is supported by diminished dimensions of neuronal body, nucleus and nucleolus (place of r RNA synthesis), cross section area of that were reduced in DRN neurons of "inflight" rats by 18.8 % (p < 0.01), 11.1 % and 26.6 % (p <0,005) correspondingly. Ultrastructure and dimensions of intracellular

  13. Involvement of 5-hydroxytryptamine7 receptors in inhibition of porcine myometrial contractility by 5-hydroxytryptamine

    PubMed Central

    Kitazawa, Takio; Kubo, Osamu; Satoh, Masami; Taneike, Tetsuro

    1998-01-01

    5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; 1 nM–100 μM) concentration-dependently inhibited the amplitude and frequency of spontaneous contractions in longitudinal and circular muscles of the porcine myometrium. The circular muscle (EC50; 68–84 nM) was more sensitive than the longitudinal muscle (EC50; 1.3–1.44 μM) to 5-HT. To characterize the 5-HT receptor subtype responsible for inhibition of myometrial contractility, the effects of 5-HT receptor agonists on spontaneous contractions and of 5-HT receptor antagonists on inhibition by 5-HT were examined in circular muscle preparations.Pretreatment with tetrodotoxin (1 μM), propranolol (1 μM), atropine (1 μM), guanethidine (10 μM) or L-NAME (100 μM) failed to change the inhibition by 5-HT, indicating that the inhibition was due to a direct action of 5-HT on the smooth muscle cells.5-CT, 5-MeOT and 8-OH-DPAT mimicked the inhibitory response of 5-HT, and the rank order of the potency was 5-CT>5-HT>5-MeOT>8-OH-DPAT. On the other hand, oxymethazoline, α-methyl-5-HT, 2-methyl-5-HT, cisapride, BIMU-1, BIMU-8, ergotamine and dihydroergotamine had almost no effect on spontaneous contractions, even at 10–100 μM.Inhibition by 5-HT was not decreased by either pindolol (1 μM), ketanserin (1 μM), tropisetron (10 μM), MDL72222 (1 μM) or GR113808 (10 μM), but was antagonized by the following compounds in a competitive manner (with pA2 values in parentheses): methiothepin (8.05), methysergide (7.92), metergoline (7.4), mianserin (7.08), clozapine (7.06) and spiperone (6.86).Ro 20-1724 (20 μM) and rolipram (10 μM) significantly enhanced the inhibitory response of 5-HT, but neither zaprinast (10 μM) nor dipyridamole (10 μM) altered the response of 5-HT.5-HT (1 nM–1 μM) caused a concentration-dependent accumulation of intracellular cyclic AMP in the circular muscle.From the present results, the 5-HT receptor, which is functionally correlated with the 5-HT7 receptor, mediates the

  14. Involvement of pre- and post-synaptic serotonergic receptors of dorsal raphe nucleus neural network in the control of the sweet-substance-induced analgesia in adult Rattus norvegicus (Rodentia, Muridae).

    PubMed

    Miyase, Cátia Isumi; Kishi, Renato; de Freitas, Renato Leonardo; Paz, Denise Amorim; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2005-05-13

    In order to investigate the effects of monoaminergic mechanisms of the dorsal raphe nucleus on the elaboration and control of sweet-substance-induced antinociception, male albino Wistar rats weighing 180-200 g received sucrose solution (250 g/L) for 14 days as their only source of liquid. After the chronic consumption of sucrose solution, each animal was pretreated with unilateral microinjection of methiothepin mesylate (5.0 microg/0.2 microL), or methysergide maleate (5.0 microg/0.2 microL) in the dorsal raphe nucleus. Each rat consumed an average of 15.6g sucrose/day. Their tail withdrawal latencies in the tail-flick test were measured immediately before and after this treatment. An analgesia index was calculated from the withdrawal latencies before and after the pharmacological treatment. The blockade of serotonergic receptor in the dorsal raphe nucleus with methysergide after the chronic intake of sucrose decreased the sweet-induced antinociception. However, microinjections of methiothepin in the dorsal raphe nucleus did not cause a similar effect on the tail-flick latencies after the chronic intake of sucrose solution, increasing the sweet-substance-induced analgesia. These results indicate the involvement of serotonin as a neurotransmitter in the sucrose-produced antinociception. Considering that the blockade of pre-synaptic serotonergic receptors of the neural networks of the dorsal raphe nucleus with methiothepin did not decrease the sweet-substance-induced antinociception, and the central blockade of post-synaptic serotonergic receptors decreased the sucrose-induced analgesia, the modulation of the release of serotonin in the neural substrate of the dorsal raphe nucleus seems to be crucial for the organization of this interesting antinociceptive process.

  15. Bupropion-induced inhibition of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed in heterologous cells and neurons from dorsal raphe nucleus and hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Gómez, Elizabeth; Arias, Hugo R; Feuerbach, Dominik; Miranda-Morales, Marcela; Mihailescu, Stefan; Targowska-Duda, Katarzyna M; Jozwiak, Krzysztof; García-Colunga, Jesús

    2014-10-01

    The pharmacological activity of bupropion was compared between α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed in heterologous cells and hippocampal and dorsal raphe nucleus neurons. The inhibitory activity of bupropion was studied on GH3-α7 cells by Ca2+ influx, as well as on neurons from the dorsal raphe nucleus and interneurons from the stratum radiatum of the hippocampal CA1 region by using a whole-cell voltage-clamp technique. In addition, the interaction of bupropion with the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor was determined by [3H]imipramine competition binding assays and molecular docking. The fast component of acetylcholine- and choline-induced currents from both brain regions was inhibited by methyllycaconitine, indicating the participation of α7-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Choline-induced currents in hippocampal interneurons were partially inhibited by 10 µM bupropion, a concentration that could be reached in the brain during clinical administration. Additionally, both agonist-induced currents were reversibly inhibited by bupropion at concentrations that coincide with its inhibitory potency (IC50=54 µM) and binding affinity (Ki=63 µM) for α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors from heterologous cells. The [3H]imipramine competition binding and molecular docking results support a luminal location for the bupropion binding site(s). This study may help to understand the mechanisms of actions of bupropion at neuronal and molecular levels related with its therapeutic actions on depression and for smoking cessation.

  16. Medial hypothalamic 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)1A receptors regulate neuroendocrine responses to stress and exploratory locomotor activity: application of recombinant adenovirus containing 5-HT1A sequences.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Holmes, Andrew; Ma, Li; Van de Kar, Louis D; Garcia, Francisca; Murphy, Dennis L

    2004-12-01

    Our previous studies found that serotonin transporter (SERT) knock-out mice showed increased sensitivity to minor stress and increased anxiety-like behavior but reduced locomotor activity. These mice also showed decreased density of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT1A) receptors in the hypothalamus, amygdala, and dorsal raphe. To evaluate the contribution of hypothalamic 5-HT1A receptors to these phenotypes of SERT knock-out mice, two studies were conducted. Recombinant adenoviruses containing 5-HT1A sense and antisense sequences (Ad-1AP-sense and Ad-1AP-antisense) were used to manipulate 5-HT1A receptors in the hypothalamus. The expression of the 5-HT1A genes is controlled by the 5-HT1A promoter, so that they are only expressed in 5-HT1A receptor-containing cells. (1) Injection of Ad-1AP-sense into the hypothalamus of SERT knock-out mice restored 5-HT1A receptors in the medial hypothalamus; this effect was accompanied by elimination of the exaggerated adrenocorticotropin responses to a saline injection (minor stress) and reduced locomotor activity but not by a change in increased exploratory anxiety-like behavior. (2) To further confirm the observation in SERT-/- mice, Ad-1AP-antisense was injected into the hypothalamus of normal mice. The density and the function of 5-HT1A receptors in the medial hypothalamus were significantly reduced in Ad-1AP-antisense-treated mice. Compared with the control group (injected with Ad-track), Ad-1A-antisense-treated mice showed a significant reduction in locomotor activity, but again no changes in exploratory anxiety-like behaviors, tested by elevated plus-maze and open-field tests. Thus, the present results demonstrate that medial hypothalamic 5-HT1A receptors regulate stress responses and locomotor activity but may not regulate exploratory anxiety-like behaviors. PMID:15574737

  17. 5-Hydroxytryptamine Receptor Subtypes and their Modulators with Therapeutic Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Pithadia, Anand B.; Jain, Sunita M.

    2009-01-01

    5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) has become one of the most investigated and complex biogenic amines. The main receptors and their subtypes, e.g., 5-HTI (5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HTID, 5-HTIE and 5-HT1F), 5-HT2 (5-HT2A, 5-HT2B and 5-HT2C), 5-HT3, 5-HT4, 5-HT5 (5-HT5A, 5-HT5B), 5-HT6 and 5-HT7 have been identified. Specific drugs which are capable of either selectively stimulating or inhibiting these receptor subtypes are being designed. This has generated therapeutic potentials of 5-HT receptor modulators in a variety of disease conditions. Conditions where 5-HT receptor modulators have established their use with distinct efficacy and advantages include migraine, anxiety, psychosis, obesity and cancer therapy-induced vomiting by cytotoxic drugs and radiation. Discovery of 5-HT, its biosynthesis, metabolism, physiological role and the potential of 5-HT receptor modulators in various nervous, cardiovascular and gastrointestinal tract disorders, bone growth and micturition have been discussed in this article. Keywords 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptors; Modulators; Biogenic amines PMID:22505971

  18. Estrogen receptor beta regulates the expression of tryptophan-hydroxylase 2 mRNA within serotonergic neurons of the rat dorsal raphe nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Donner, Nina C; Handa, Robert J

    2009-01-01

    Dysfunctions of the brain serotonin (5-HT) system are often associated with affective disorders, such as depression. The raphe nuclei target the limbic system and most forebrain areas and constitute the main source of 5-HT in the brain. All 5-HT neurons express tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (TPH2), the brain specific, rate-limiting enzyme for 5-HT synthesis. ERbeta agonists have been shown to attenuate anxiety-and despair-like behaviors in rodent models. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that ERbeta may contribute to the regulation of gene expression in 5-HT neurons of the dorsal raphe nuclei (DRN) by examining the effects of systemic and local application of the selective ERbeta agonist diarylpropionitrile (DPN) on tph2 mRNA expression. Ovariectomized (OVX) female rats were injected subcutaneously (s.c.) with DPN or vehicle once daily for 8 days. In situ hybridization revealed that systemic DPN-treatment elevated basal tph2 mRNA expression in the caudal and mid-dorsal DRN. Behavioral testing of all animals in the open field (OF) and on the elevated plus maze (EPM) on days 6 and 7 of treatment confirmed the anxiolytic nature of ERbeta activation. Another cohort of female OVX rats was stereotaxically implanted bilaterally with hormone-containing wax pellets flanking the DRN. Pellets contained either 17-beta-estradiol (E), DPN, or no hormone. Both DPN and E significantly enhanced tph2 mRNA expression in the mid-dorsal DRN. DPN also increased tph2 mRNA in the caudal DRN. DPN- and E-treated rats displayed a more active stress-coping behavior in the forced-swim test (FST). No behavioral differences were found in the OF or on the EPM. These data indicate that ERbeta acts at the level of the rat DRN to modulate tph2 mRNA expression and thereby influence 5-HT synthesis in DRN subregions. Our results also suggest that local activation of ERbeta neurons in the DRN may be sufficient to decrease despair-like behavior, but not anxiolytic behaviors. PMID:19559077

  19. Pharmacological properties of phenyldiguanide and other amidine derivatives in relation to those of 5-hydroxytryptamine

    PubMed Central

    Fastier, F. N.; McDowall, M. A.; Waal, Hendrieka

    1959-01-01

    Cats in which the coronary and allied chemoreflexes could not be obtained with small intravenous doses of 5-hydroxytryptamine were insensitive also to phenyldiguanide. In cats which responded to phenyldiguanide with reflex falls of blood pressure and heart rate, abolished by vagotomy, the effects of graded doses (5 to 150 μg./kg.) of phenyldiguanide bore a striking resemblance to those produced initially by 5-hydroxytryptamine in somewhat smaller doses. Differences in the cardiovascular responses to the two drugs are attributed to additional (non-reflex) actions of 5-hydroxytryptamine. The reflex actions of both drugs were blocked reversibly also by 2-naphthylguanidine (500 μg.). Certain other drugs (bufotenine, procaine, S-decylisothiourea) antagonized the depressor action of phenyldiguanide as well as the reflex depressor action of 5-hydroxytryptamine. Like 5-hydroxytryptamine, phenyldiguanide and certain other amidine derivatives caused pain when applied to the base of blisters in human subjects. Unlike 5-hydroxytryptamine, phenyldiguanide did not constrict perfused rat blood vessels or increase the tone of the rat fundal strip preparation of Vane (1957). Phenyldiguanide did not affect the sensitivity of these smooth muscle preparations to 5-hydroxytryptamine, but other amidine derivatives proved to be moderately strong antagonists of the vasoconstrictor actions of 5-hydroxytryptamine and of adrenaline. Unlike 5-hydroxytryptamine, phenyldiguanide did not produce gastric haemorrhage in the mouse. Phenyldiguanide did not prolong chloral hydrate sleeping time in mice by the same mechanism as did 5-hydroxytryptamine. Phenyldiguanide was not highly toxic to mice (LD50 being 240 mg./kg.). It is concluded that phenyldiguanide and certain other amidine derivatives act on sensory receptors which respond to 5-hydroxytryptamine, but that they show little pharmacological resemblance to 5-hydroxytryptamine in other respects. PMID:13821683

  20. Dorsal Raphe Serotonin Neurons in Mice: Immature Hyperexcitability Transitions to Adult State during First Three Postnatal Weeks Suggesting Sensitive Period for Environmental Perturbation

    PubMed Central

    Rood, Benjamin D.; Calizo, Lyngine H.; Piel, David; Spangler, Zachary P.; Campbell, Kaitlin

    2014-01-01

    Trauma during early life is a major risk factor for the development of anxiety disorders and suggests that the developing brain may be particularly sensitive to perturbation. Increased vulnerability most likely involves altering neural circuits involved in emotional regulation. The role of serotonin in emotional regulation is well established, but little is known about the postnatal development of the raphe where serotonin is made. Using whole-cell patch-clamp recording and immunohistochemistry, we tested whether serotonin circuitry in the dorsal and median raphe was functionally mature during the first 3 postnatal weeks in mice. Serotonin neurons at postnatal day 4 (P4) were hyperexcitable. The increased excitability was due to depolarized resting membrane potential, increased resistance, increased firing rate, lack of 5-HT1A autoreceptor response, and lack of GABA synaptic activity. Over the next 2 weeks, membrane resistance decreased and resting membrane potential hyperpolarized due in part to potassium current activation. The 5-HT1A autoreceptor-mediated inhibition did not develop until P21. The frequency of spontaneous inhibitory and excitatory events increased as neurons extended and refined their dendritic arbor. Serotonin colocalized with vGlut3 at P4 as in adulthood, suggesting enhanced release of glutamate alongside enhanced serotonin release. Because serotonin affects circuit development in other brain regions, altering the developmental trajectory of serotonin neuron excitability and release could have many downstream consequences. We conclude that serotonin neuron structure and function change substantially during the first 3 weeks of life during which external stressors could potentially alter circuit formation. PMID:24695701

  1. In utero exposure to diesel exhaust particles induces anxiogenic effects on male offspring via chronic activation of serotonergic neuron in dorsal raphe nucleus.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Satoshi; Oshio, Shigeru; Takeda, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Diesel exhaust consists of diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) and gaseous compounds. Because previous research suggested that in utero exposure to DEPs affected spatial learning and memory in male offspring, while epidemiological evidence suggested disturbances in affect after prenatal exposure to particulates, we hypothesized that DEP exposure during pregnancy might also disturb affect. Here, we explored the effects of in utero exposure to DEPs on anxiety in male ICR mice. DEP solutions were administered subcutaneously to pregnant ICR mice at a dose of 0 or 200 μg/kg body weight on gestation days 6, 9, 12, 15, and 18. We assessed anxiety in 6 week-old male offspring using the hole board test and elevated plus maze test. After the behavioral tests, animals were sacrificed and serotonin (5-HT) levels in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) were measured using HPLC. Mice exposed to DEPs in utero demonstrated increased anxiety in both behavioral tests. HPLC analysis revealed a significant increase in 5-HT levels in the DRN. Double immunolabeling of the DRN using anti-5-HT and anti-FosB (a chronic neuronal activation marker) antibodies indicated chronic activation of the DRN might underlie the increased anxiety after prenatal DEP exposure. PMID:27665768

  2. The serotonin 5-HT7 receptor agonist LP-44 microinjected into the dorsal raphe nucleus suppresses REM sleep in the rat.

    PubMed

    Monti, Jaime M; Leopoldo, Marcello; Jantos, Héctor

    2008-08-22

    The effects of LP-44, a selective 5-HT7 receptor agonist, and of SB-269970, a selective 5-HT7 receptor antagonist, on spontaneous sleep were studied in adult rats implanted for chronic sleep recordings. The 5-HT7 receptor ligands were microinjected directly into the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) during the light period of the 12-h light/12-h dark cycle. Infusion of LP-44 (1.25-5.0 mM) into the DRN induced a significant reduction of rapid-eye-movement sleep (REMS) and of the number of REM periods. Similar effects were observed after the direct administration into the DRN of SB-269970 (0.5-1.0 mM). Pretreatment with a dose of SB-269970 (0.5 mM) that significantly affects sleep variables antagonized the LP-44 (2.5 mM)-induced suppression of REMS and of the number of REM periods. It is proposed that the suppression of REMS after microinjection of LP-44 into the DRN is related, at least in part, to the activation of GABAergic neurons in the DRN that contribute to long projections that reach, among others, the laterodorsal and pedunculopontine tegmental nuclei involved in the promotion of REMS.

  3. Pyramidal Neurons in Rat Prefrontal Cortex Projecting to Ventral Tegmental Area and Dorsal Raphe Nucleus Express 5-HT2A Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez-Borsetti, Pablo; Cortés, Roser

    2009-01-01

    The prefrontal cortex (PFC) is involved in higher brain functions altered in schizophrenia. Classical antipsychotics modulate cortico-limbic circuits mainly through subcortical D2 receptor blockade, whereas second generation (atypical) antipsychotics preferentially target cortical 5-HT receptors. Anatomical and functional evidence supports a PFC-based control of the brainstem monoaminergic nuclei. Using a combination of retrograde tracing experiments and in situ hybridization we report that a substantial proportion of PFC pyramidal neurons projecting to the dorsal raphe (DR) and/or ventral tegmental area (VTA) express 5-HT2A receptors. Cholera-toxin B application into the DR and the VTA retrogradely labeled projection neurons in the medial PFC (mPFC) and in orbitofrontal cortex (OFC). In situ hybridization of 5-HT2A receptor mRNA in the same tissue sections labeled a large neuronal population in mPFC and OFC. The percentage of DR-projecting neurons expressing 5-HT2A receptor mRNA was ∼60% in mPFC and ∼75% in OFC (n = 3). Equivalent values for VTA-projecting neurons were ∼55% in both mPFC and ventral OFC. Thus, 5-HT2A receptor activation/blockade in PFC may have downstream effects on dopaminergic and serotonergic systems via direct descending pathways. Atypical antipsychotics may distally modulate monoaminergic cells through PFC 5-HT2A receptor blockade, presumably decreasing the activity of neurons receiving direct cortical inputs. PMID:19029064

  4. SiRNA-mediated serotonin transporter knockdown in the dorsal raphe nucleus rescues single prolonged stress-induced hippocampal autophagy in rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhong-Min; Zheng, Chun-Hua; Zhu, Zhen-Hua; Wu, Feng-Tian; Ni, Gui-Lian; Liang, Yong

    2016-01-15

    The neurobiological mechanisms underlying the development of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) remain elusive. One of the hypotheses is the dysfunction of serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmission, which is critically regulated by serotonin transporter (SERT). Therefore, we hypothesized that attenuation of SERT gene expression in the hippocampus could prevent hippocampal autophagy and the development of PTSD-like behavior. To this end, we infused SLC6A4 siRNAs into the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) to knockdown SERT gene expression after a single prolonged stress (SPS) treatment in rats. Then, we evaluated the effects of SERT gene knockdown on anxiety-related behaviors and extinction of contextual fear memory. We also examined the histological changes and the expression of Beclin-1, LC3-I, and LC3-II in the hippocampus. We found that SPS treatment did not alter anxiety-related behaviors but prolonged the extinction of contextual fear memory, and such a behavioral phenomenon was correlated with increased hippocampal autophagy, decreased 5-HT level, and increased expression of Beclin-1 and LC3-II/LC3-I ratio in the hippocampus. Furthermore, intra-DRN infusion of SLC6A4 siRNAs promoted the extinction of contextual fear memory, prevented hippocampal autophagy, increased 5-HT level, and decreased expression of Beclin-1 and LC3-II/LC3-I ratio. These results indicated that SERT may play a critical role in the pathogenesis of hippocampal autophagy, and is likely involved in the development of PTSD.

  5. Voltammetric detection of 5-hydroxytryptamine release in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Parastoo; Dankoski, Elyse C; Petrovic, Jelena; Keithley, Richard B; Wightman, R M

    2009-11-15

    5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) is an important molecule in the brain that is implicated in mood and emotional processes. In vivo, its dynamic release and uptake kinetics are poorly understood due to a lack of analytical techniques for its rapid measurement. Whereas fast-scan cyclic voltammetry with carbon fiber microelectrodes is used frequently to monitor subsecond dopamine release in freely moving and anesthetized rats, the electrooxidation of 5-HT forms products that quickly polymerize and irreversibly coat the carbon electrode surface. Previously described modifications of the electrochemical waveform allow stable and sensitive 5-HT measurements in mammalian tissue slice preparations and in the brain of fruit fly larvae. For in vivo applications in mammals, however, the problem of electrode deterioration persists. We identify the root of this problem to be fouling by extracellular metabolites such as 5-hydoxyindole acetic acid (5-HIAA), which is present in 200-1000 times the concentration of 5-HT and displays similar electrochemical properties, including filming of the electrode surface. To impede access of the 5-HIAA to the electrode surface, a thin layer of Nafion, a cation exchange polymer, has been electrodeposited onto cylindrical carbon-fiber microelectrodes. The presence of the Nafion film was confirmed with environmental scanning electron microscopy and was demonstrated by the diminution of the voltammetric signals for 5-HIAA as well as other common anionic species. The modified microelectrodes also display increased sensitivity to 5-HT, yielding a characteristic cyclic voltammogram that is easily distinguishable from other common electroactive brain species. The thickness of the Nafion coating and a diffusion coefficient (D) in the film for 5-HT were evaluated by measuring permeation through Nafion. In vivo, we used physiological, anatomical, and pharmacological evidence to validate the signal as 5-HT. Using Nafion-modified microelectrodes, we present the

  6. Lysergic acid diethylamide: role in conversion of plasma tryptophan to brain serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine).

    PubMed

    Lin, R C; Ngai, S H; Costa, E

    1969-10-10

    Injections of D-lysergic acid diethylamide decrease the turnover rate of 5-hydroxytryptamine of rat brain, as measured from the conversion of (14)C-tryptophan into (14)C-5-hydroxytryptamine. The 2-bromolysergic acid diethylamide given in doses fivefold greater than those of lysergic acid diethylamide fails to change the rate of (14)C-tryptophan conversion into (14)C-5-hydroxytryptamine. The effect of D-lysergic acid diethylamide is discussed with regard to its action on brain serotonergic neurons and its psychotomimetic effects.

  7. 5-hydroxytryptamine induced relaxation in the pig urinary bladder neck

    PubMed Central

    Recio, Paz; Barahona, María Victoria; Orensanz, Luis M; Bustamante, Salvador; Martínez, Ana Cristina; Benedito, Sara; García-Sacristán, Albino; Prieto, Dolores; Hernández, Medardo

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) is one of the inhibitory mediators in the urinary bladder outlet region. Here we investigated mechanisms involved in 5-HT-induced relaxations of the pig bladder neck. Experimental approach Urothelium-denuded strips of pig bladder were mounted in organ baths for isometric force recordings of responses to 5-HT and electrical field stimulation (EFS). Key results After phenylephrine-induced contraction, 5-HT and 5-HT receptor agonists concentration-dependently relaxed the preparations, with the potency order: 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT) > 5-HT = RS67333 > (±)-8-hydroxy-2-dipropylaminotetralinhydrobromide > m-chlorophenylbiguanide > α-methyl-5-HT > ergotamine. 5-HT and 5-CT relaxations were reduced by the 5-HT7 receptor antagonist (2R)-1-[(3-hydroxyphenyl)sulphonyl]-2-[2-(4-methyl-1-piperidinyl)ethyl]pyrrolidine hydrochloride and potentiated by (S)-N-tert-butyl-3-(4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-piperazin-1-yl)-2-phenylpropanamide dihydrochloride (WAY 100135) and cyanopindolol, 5-HT1A and 5-HT1A/1B receptor antagonists respectively. Inhibitors of 5-HT1B/1D, 5-HT2, 5-HT2B/2C, 5-HT3, 5-HT4, 5-HT5A and 5-HT6 receptors failed to modify 5-HT responses. Blockade of monoamine oxidase A/B, noradrenergic neurotransmission, α-adrenoceptors, muscarinic and purinergic receptors, nitric oxide synthase, guanylate cyclase and prostanoid synthesis did not alter relaxations to 5-HT. Inhibitors of Ca2+-activated K+ and ATP-dependent K+ channels failed to modify 5-HT responses but blockade of neuronal voltage-gated Na+-, Ca2+-and voltage-gated K+ (Kv)-channels potentiated these relaxations. Adenylyl cyclase activation and cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) inhibition potentiated and reduced, respectively, 5-HT-induced responses. Under non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic, non-nitrergic conditions, EFS induced neurogenic, frequency-dependent, relaxations which were resistant to WAY 100135 and cyanopindolol. Conclusions and implications 5-HT relaxed

  8. Naftopidil inhibits 5-hydroxytryptamine-induced bladder contraction in rats.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Takumi; Kasahara, Ken-ichi; Tomita, Ken-ichi; Ikegaki, Ichiro; Kuriyama, Hiroshi

    2013-01-30

    Naftopidil is an α(1D) and α(1A) subtype-selective α(1)-adrenoceptor antagonist that has been used to treat lower urinary tract symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia. In this study, we investigated the effects of naftopidil on 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)-induced rat bladder contraction (10(-8)-10(-4) M). Naftopidil (0.3, 1, and 3 μM) inhibited 5-HT-induced bladder contraction in a concentration-dependent manner. On the other hand, other α(1)-adrenoceptor antagonists, tamsulosin, silodosin or prazosin, did not inhibit 5-HT-induced bladder contraction. The 5-HT-induced bladder contraction was inhibited by both ketanserin and 4-(4-fluoronaphthalen-1-yl)-6-propan-2-ylpyrimidin-2-amine (RS127445), serotonin 5-HT(2A) and 5-HT(2B) receptor antagonists, respectively. In addition, 1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane (DOI) and α-methyl-5-HT, 5-HT(2A) and 5-HT(2) receptor agonists, respectively, induced bladder contraction. The 5-HT-induced bladder contraction was not inhibited by N-[2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazin-1-yl]ethyl]-N-pyridin-2-yl-cyclohexanecarboxamide (WAY-100635), [1-[2[(methylsulfonyl)amino]ethyl]-4-piperidinyl]methyl-1-methyl-1H-indole-3-carboxylate (GR113808) or (R)-3-[2-[2-(4-methylpiperidin-1-yl)ethyl]pyrrolidine-1-sulphonyl]phenol (SB269970), 5-HT(1A), 5-HT(4) and 5-HT(7) receptor antagonists, respectively. Naftopidil inhibited both the 5-HT(2A) and 5-HT(2) receptor agonists-induced bladder contractions. Naftopidil binds to the human 5-HT(2A) and 5-HT(2B) receptors with pKi values of 6.55 and 7.82, respectively. These results suggest that naftopidil inhibits 5-HT-induced bladder contraction via blockade of the 5-HT(2A) and 5-HT(2B) receptors in rats. Furthermore, 5-HT-induced bladder contraction was enhanced in bladder strips obtained from bladder outlet obstructed rats, with this contraction inhibited by naftopidil. The beneficial effects of naftopidil on storage symptoms such as urinary frequency and nocturia in patients with benign

  9. Electrophysiological evidence for convergence of inputs from the medial prefrontal cortex and lateral habenula on single neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus.

    PubMed

    Varga, V; Kocsis, B; Sharp, T

    2003-01-01

    Neuronal projections to the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) from the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and lateral habenula nucleus (LHb) provide the two key routes by which information processed by mood regulatory, cortico-limbic-striatal circuits input into the 5-HT system. These two projections may converge as it appears that both activate local GABAergic neurons to inhibit 5-HT neurons in the DRN. Here we have tested this hypothesis by measuring the effect of stimulation of the mPFC and LHb on the activity of 5-HT and non-5-HT, putative gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) neurons in the DRN using extracellular recordings in anaesthetized rats. A total of 119 5-HT neurons (regular, slow firing, broad spike width) and 21 non-5-HT, putative GABA neurons (fast-firing, narrow spike width) were tested. Electrical stimulation of the mPFC or LHb caused a poststimulus inhibition (30 ms latency) of 101/119 5-HT neurons, of which 61 (60%) were inhibited by both the mPFC and LHb. Electrical stimulation of the mPFC or LHb also caused a short latency (12-20 ms) poststimulus facilitation of 10/21 non-5-HT neurons, of which 5 (50%) were activated by both the mPFC and LHb. These data indicate that a significant number of 5-HT neurons and non-5-HT neurons in the DRN are influenced by both the mPFC and LHb. Moreover, the data are compatible with the hypothesis and that there is a convergence of mPFC and LHb inputs on local circuit GABAergic neurons in the DRN which in turn inhibit the activity of 5-HT neurons.

  10. Serotonergic neural links from the dorsal raphe nucleus modulate defensive behaviours organised by the dorsomedial hypothalamus and the elaboration of fear-induced antinociception via locus coeruleus pathways.

    PubMed

    Biagioni, Audrey Francisco; de Freitas, Renato Leonardo; da Silva, Juliana Almeida; de Oliveira, Rithiele Cristina; de Oliveira, Ricardo; Alves, Vani Maria; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2013-04-01

    Decrease of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-mediated neurotransmission in the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) evokes instinctive fear-like responses. The aim of the present study was to investigate the involvement of the serotonin (5-HT)- and norepinephrine-mediated pathways of the endogenous pain inhibitory system, including the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) and the locus coeruleus (LC), in the defensive responses and antinociceptive processes triggered by the blockade of GABAergic receptors in the DMH. The intra-hypothalamic microinjection of the GABA(A) receptor antagonist bicuculline (40 ng/200 nL) elicited elaborate defensive behaviours interspersed with exploratory responses. This escape behaviour was followed by significantly increased pain thresholds, a phenomenon known as fear-induced antinociception. Furthermore, at 5 and 14 days after DRN serotonin-containing neurons were damaged using the selective neurotoxin 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT), the frequency and duration of alertness and escape behaviour evoked by the GABA(A) receptor blockade in the DMH decreased, as well as fear-induced antinociception. Pre-treatment with the non-selective 5-HT receptor antagonist methysergide, the 5-HT(2A/2C) receptor antagonist ketanserin and the 5-HT(2A) receptor selective antagonist R-96544 in the LC also decreased fear-induced antinociception, without significant changes in the expression of defensive behaviours. These data suggest that the serotonergic neurons of the DRN are directly involved in the organisation of defensive responses as well as in the elaboration of the innate fear-induced antinociception. However, serotonin-mediated inputs from the NDR to the LC modulate only fear-induced antinociception and not the defensive behaviours evoked by GABA(A) receptor blockade in the DMH. PMID:23201351

  11. Retrograde study of CART- or NPY-neuronal projection from the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus to the dorsal raphe and/or the locus coeruleus in the rat.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Ye S; Lee, Ji S; Lee, Hyun S

    2013-06-26

    The present study was designed to reveal cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART)- or neuropeptide Y (NPY)-immunoreactive neuronal projections from the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (Arc) to the dorsal raphe (DR) and/or the locus coeruleus (LC) in the rat. Our results demonstrated that CART or NPY axon terminals formed close appositions to the neuronal profiles in the DR and the LC. Thus, arcuate sections were immunostained for the CART or NPY after the injections of green RetroBeads(™) into the DR and red tracer into the LC (or vice versa). First, retrogradely-labeled CART cells were mainly observed in the lateral Arc without colchicine. Of the total population of arcuate CART neurons, DR- and LC-projecting cells were 5.7% ± 0.9% and 6.6% ± 0.7%, respectively. In addition, a subset (3.3% ± 0.7%) of CART neurons provided divergent axon collaterals to the DR and the LC. Second, retrogradely-labeled NPY cells were observed in lateral or ventral borders of the medial Arc only after colchicine injection. Of the entire NPY cell population, DR- and LC-projecting neurons were 1.5% ± 0.3% and 1.3% ± 0.3%, respectively. Only a scanty proportion (0.1% ± 0.0%) sent axon collaterals to the DR and the LC. These observations suggested that arcuate CART or NPY system might have a potential influence on the brainstem monoaminergic nuclei, modulating their roles in feeding, nociception, emotional behaviors, arousal, and stress responses. Furthermore, a portion of arcuate CART neurons (along with only a few NPY cells) sending divergent axon collaterals to the DR/LC might have a simultaneous (and possibly more efficient) way to exert their specific influences on the monoaminergic nuclei.

  12. Glucocorticoid receptor deletion from the dorsal raphé nucleus of mice reduces dysphoria-like behavior and impairs hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis feedback inhibition.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Melanie Y; Jacobson, Lauren

    2014-05-01

    Glucocorticoids can cause depression and anxiety. Mechanisms for glucocorticoid effects on mood are largely undefined. The dorsal raphé nucleus (DRN) produces the majority of serotonin in the brain, and expresses glucocorticoid receptors (GR). Because we previously showed that antidepressants used to treat depression and anxiety decrease DRN GR expression, we hypothesized that deleting DRN GR would have anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like effects. We also hypothesized that DRN GR deletion would disinhibit activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Adeno-associated virus pseudotype AAV2/9 expressing either Cre recombinase (DRNGRKO mice) or GFP (DRN-GFP mice) was injected into the DRN of floxed GR mice to test these hypotheses. Three weeks after injection, mice underwent 21 days of social defeat or control handling and were tested for anxiety-like behavior (open-field test, elevated-plus maze), depression-like behavior [sucrose preference, forced-swim test (FST), tail-suspension test (TST)], social interaction, and circadian and stress-induced HPA activity. DRN GR deletion decreased anxiety-like behavior in control but not in defeated mice. DRN GR deletion decreased FST and tended to decrease TST despair-like behavior in both control and defeated mice, but did not affect sucrose preference. Exploration of social (a novel mouse) as well as neutral (an empty box) targets was increased in DRNGRKO mice, suggesting that DRN GR deletion also promotes active coping. DRN GR deletion increased stress-induced HPA activity without strongly altering circadian HPA activity. We have shown a novel role for DRN GR to mediate anxiety- and despair-like behavior and to regulate HPA negative feedback during acute stress.

  13. Markers of Serotonergic Function in the Orbitofrontal Cortex and Dorsal Raphé Nucleus Predict Individual Variation in Spatial-Discrimination Serial Reversal Learning

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, Rebecca L; Alsiö, Johan; Jupp, Bianca; Rabinovich, Rebecca; Shrestha, Saurav; Roberts, Angela C; Robbins, Trevor W; Dalley, Jeffrey W

    2015-01-01

    Dysfunction of the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) impairs the ability of individuals to flexibly adapt behavior to changing stimulus-reward (S-R) contingencies. Impaired flexibility also results from interventions that alter serotonin (5-HT) and dopamine (DA) transmission in the OFC and dorsomedial striatum (DMS). However, it is unclear whether similar mechanisms underpin naturally occurring variations in behavioral flexibility. In the present study, we used a spatial-discrimination serial reversal procedure to investigate interindividual variability in behavioral flexibility in rats. We show that flexibility on this task is improved following systemic administration of the 5-HT reuptake inhibitor citalopram and by low doses of the DA reuptake inhibitor GBR12909. Rats in the upper quintile of the distribution of perseverative responses during repeated S-R reversals showed significantly reduced levels of the 5-HT metabolite, 5-hydroxy-indoleacetic acid, in the OFC. Additionally, 5-HT2A receptor binding in the OFC of mid- and high-quintile rats was significantly reduced compared with rats in the low-quintile group. These perturbations were accompanied by an increase in the expression of monoamine oxidase-A (MAO-A) and MAO-B in the lateral OFC and by a decrease in the expression of MAO-A, MAO-B, and tryptophan hydroxylase in the dorsal raphé nucleus of highly perseverative rats. We found no evidence of significant differences in markers of DA and 5-HT function in the DMS or MAO expression in the ventral tegmental area of low- vs high-perseverative rats. These findings indicate that diminished serotonergic tone in the OFC may be an endophenotype that predisposes to behavioral inflexibility and other forms of compulsive behavior. PMID:25567428

  14. Markers of serotonergic function in the orbitofrontal cortex and dorsal raphé nucleus predict individual variation in spatial-discrimination serial reversal learning.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Rebecca L; Alsiö, Johan; Jupp, Bianca; Rabinovich, Rebecca; Shrestha, Saurav; Roberts, Angela C; Robbins, Trevor W; Dalley, Jeffrey W

    2015-06-01

    Dysfunction of the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) impairs the ability of individuals to flexibly adapt behavior to changing stimulus-reward (S-R) contingencies. Impaired flexibility also results from interventions that alter serotonin (5-HT) and dopamine (DA) transmission in the OFC and dorsomedial striatum (DMS). However, it is unclear whether similar mechanisms underpin naturally occurring variations in behavioral flexibility. In the present study, we used a spatial-discrimination serial reversal procedure to investigate interindividual variability in behavioral flexibility in rats. We show that flexibility on this task is improved following systemic administration of the 5-HT reuptake inhibitor citalopram and by low doses of the DA reuptake inhibitor GBR12909. Rats in the upper quintile of the distribution of perseverative responses during repeated S-R reversals showed significantly reduced levels of the 5-HT metabolite, 5-hydroxy-indoleacetic acid, in the OFC. Additionally, 5-HT2A receptor binding in the OFC of mid- and high-quintile rats was significantly reduced compared with rats in the low-quintile group. These perturbations were accompanied by an increase in the expression of monoamine oxidase-A (MAO-A) and MAO-B in the lateral OFC and by a decrease in the expression of MAO-A, MAO-B, and tryptophan hydroxylase in the dorsal raphé nucleus of highly perseverative rats. We found no evidence of significant differences in markers of DA and 5-HT function in the DMS or MAO expression in the ventral tegmental area of low- vs high-perseverative rats. These findings indicate that diminished serotonergic tone in the OFC may be an endophenotype that predisposes to behavioral inflexibility and other forms of compulsive behavior.

  15. Serotonergic neural links from the dorsal raphe nucleus modulate defensive behaviours organised by the dorsomedial hypothalamus and the elaboration of fear-induced antinociception via locus coeruleus pathways.

    PubMed

    Biagioni, Audrey Francisco; de Freitas, Renato Leonardo; da Silva, Juliana Almeida; de Oliveira, Rithiele Cristina; de Oliveira, Ricardo; Alves, Vani Maria; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2013-04-01

    Decrease of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-mediated neurotransmission in the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) evokes instinctive fear-like responses. The aim of the present study was to investigate the involvement of the serotonin (5-HT)- and norepinephrine-mediated pathways of the endogenous pain inhibitory system, including the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) and the locus coeruleus (LC), in the defensive responses and antinociceptive processes triggered by the blockade of GABAergic receptors in the DMH. The intra-hypothalamic microinjection of the GABA(A) receptor antagonist bicuculline (40 ng/200 nL) elicited elaborate defensive behaviours interspersed with exploratory responses. This escape behaviour was followed by significantly increased pain thresholds, a phenomenon known as fear-induced antinociception. Furthermore, at 5 and 14 days after DRN serotonin-containing neurons were damaged using the selective neurotoxin 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT), the frequency and duration of alertness and escape behaviour evoked by the GABA(A) receptor blockade in the DMH decreased, as well as fear-induced antinociception. Pre-treatment with the non-selective 5-HT receptor antagonist methysergide, the 5-HT(2A/2C) receptor antagonist ketanserin and the 5-HT(2A) receptor selective antagonist R-96544 in the LC also decreased fear-induced antinociception, without significant changes in the expression of defensive behaviours. These data suggest that the serotonergic neurons of the DRN are directly involved in the organisation of defensive responses as well as in the elaboration of the innate fear-induced antinociception. However, serotonin-mediated inputs from the NDR to the LC modulate only fear-induced antinociception and not the defensive behaviours evoked by GABA(A) receptor blockade in the DMH.

  16. Markers of serotonergic function in the orbitofrontal cortex and dorsal raphé nucleus predict individual variation in spatial-discrimination serial reversal learning.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Rebecca L; Alsiö, Johan; Jupp, Bianca; Rabinovich, Rebecca; Shrestha, Saurav; Roberts, Angela C; Robbins, Trevor W; Dalley, Jeffrey W

    2015-06-01

    Dysfunction of the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) impairs the ability of individuals to flexibly adapt behavior to changing stimulus-reward (S-R) contingencies. Impaired flexibility also results from interventions that alter serotonin (5-HT) and dopamine (DA) transmission in the OFC and dorsomedial striatum (DMS). However, it is unclear whether similar mechanisms underpin naturally occurring variations in behavioral flexibility. In the present study, we used a spatial-discrimination serial reversal procedure to investigate interindividual variability in behavioral flexibility in rats. We show that flexibility on this task is improved following systemic administration of the 5-HT reuptake inhibitor citalopram and by low doses of the DA reuptake inhibitor GBR12909. Rats in the upper quintile of the distribution of perseverative responses during repeated S-R reversals showed significantly reduced levels of the 5-HT metabolite, 5-hydroxy-indoleacetic acid, in the OFC. Additionally, 5-HT2A receptor binding in the OFC of mid- and high-quintile rats was significantly reduced compared with rats in the low-quintile group. These perturbations were accompanied by an increase in the expression of monoamine oxidase-A (MAO-A) and MAO-B in the lateral OFC and by a decrease in the expression of MAO-A, MAO-B, and tryptophan hydroxylase in the dorsal raphé nucleus of highly perseverative rats. We found no evidence of significant differences in markers of DA and 5-HT function in the DMS or MAO expression in the ventral tegmental area of low- vs high-perseverative rats. These findings indicate that diminished serotonergic tone in the OFC may be an endophenotype that predisposes to behavioral inflexibility and other forms of compulsive behavior. PMID:25567428

  17. Corticotropin-releasing Factor in the Rat Dorsal Raphe Nucleus Promotes Different Forms of Behavioral Flexibility Depending on Social Stress History.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Kevin P; Hill-Smith, Tiffany E; Lucki, Irwin; Valentino, Rita J

    2015-10-01

    The stress-related neuropeptide, corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) regulates the dorsal raphe nucleus-serotonin (DRN-5-HT) system during stress and this may underlie affective and cognitive dysfunctions that characterize stress-related psychiatric disorders. CRF acts on both CRF1 and CRF2 receptor subtypes in the DRN that exert opposing inhibitory and excitatory effects on DRN-5-HT neuronal activity and 5-HT forebrain release, respectively. The current study first assessed the cognitive effects of intra-DRN microinfusion of CRF or the selective CRF2 agonist, urocortin II in stress-naive rats on performance of an operant strategy set-shifting task that is mediated by the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). CRF (30 ng) facilitated strategy set-shifting performance, whereas higher doses of CRF and urocortin II that would interact with CRF2 were without effect, consistent with a CRF1-mediated action. This dose decreased 5-HT extracellular levels in the mPFC, further supporting a role for CRF1. The effects of CRF were then assessed in rats exposed to repeated social stress using the resident-intruder model. Repeated social stress shifted the CRF effect from facilitation of strategy set shifting to facilitation of reversal learning and this was most prominent in a subpopulation of rats that resist defeat. Notably, in this subpopulation of rats 5-HT neuronal responses to CRF have been demonstrated to shift from CRF1-mediated inhibition to CRF2-mediated excitation. Because 5-HT facilitates reversal learning, the present results suggest that stress-induced changes in the cellular effects of CRF in the DRN translate to changes in cognitive effects of CRF. Together, the results underscore the potential for stress history to shift cognitive processing through changes in CRF neurotransmission in the DRN and the association of this effect with coping strategy. PMID:25865931

  18. Glucocorticoid receptor deletion from the dorsal raphé nucleus of mice reduces dysphoria-like behavior and impairs hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis feedback inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Melanie Y.; Jacobson, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    Glucocorticoids can cause depression and anxiety. Mechanisms for glucocorticoid effects on mood are largely undefined. The dorsal raphé nucleus (DRN) produces the majority of serotonin in the brain, and expresses glucocorticoid receptors (GR). Since we previously showed that antidepressants used to treat depression and anxiety decrease DRN GR expression, we hypothesized that deleting DRN GR would have anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like effects. We also hypothesized that DRN GR deletion would disinhibit activity of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis. Adeno-associated virus pseudotype AAV2/9 expressing either Cre recombinase (DRNGRKO mice) or GFP (DRN-GFP mice) was injected into the DRN of floxed GR mice to test these hypotheses. Three weeks after injection, mice underwent 10d of social defeat or control handling and tested for anxiety-like behavior (open field test, elevated plus maze), depression-like behavior (sucrose preference, forced swim test (FST), tail suspension (TST)), social interaction, and circadian and stress-induced HPA activity. DRN GR deletion decreased anxiety-like behavior in control but not in defeated mice. DRN GR deletion decreased FST and tended to decrease TST despair-like behavior in both control and defeated mice, but did not affect sucrose preference. Exploration of social (a novel mouse) as well as neutral targets (an empty box) was increased in DRNGRKO mice, suggesting that DRN GR deletion also promotes active coping. DRN GR deletion increased stress-regulated HPA activity without strongly altering circadian HPA activity. We have shown a novel role for DRN GR to mediate anxiety- and despair-like behavior and to regulate HPA negative feedback during acute stress. PMID:24684372

  19. Prior cold water swim stress alters immobility in the forced swim test and associated activation of serotonergic neurons in the rat dorsal raphe nucleus.

    PubMed

    Drugan, R C; Hibl, P T; Kelly, K J; Dady, K F; Hale, M W; Lowry, C A

    2013-12-01

    Prior adverse experience alters behavioral responses to subsequent stressors. For example, exposure to a brief swim increases immobility in a subsequent swim test 24h later. In order to determine if qualitative differences (e.g. 19°C versus 25°C) in an initial stressor (15-min swim) impact behavioral, physiological, and associated neural responses in a 5-min, 25°C swim test 24h later, rats were surgically implanted with biotelemetry devices 1 week prior to experimentation then randomly assigned to one of six conditions (Day 1 (15 min)/Day 2 (5 min)): (1) home cage (HC)/HC, (2) HC/25°C swim, (3) 19°C swim/HC, (4) 19°C swim/25°C swim, (5) 25°C swim/HC, (6) 25°C swim/25°C swim. Core body temperature (Tb) was measured on Days 1 and 2 using biotelemetry; behavior was measured on Day 2. Rats were transcardially perfused with fixative 2h following the onset of the swim on Day 2 for analysis of c-Fos expression in midbrain serotonergic neurons. Cold water (19°C) swim on Day 1 reduced Tb, compared to both 25°C swim and HC groups on Day 1, and, relative to rats exposed to HC conditions on Day 1, reduced the hypothermic response to the 25°C swim on Day 2. The 19°C swim on Day 1, relative to HC exposure on Day 1, increased immobility during the 5-min swim on Day 2. Also, 19°C swim, relative to HC conditions, on Day 1 reduced swim (25°C)-induced increases in c-Fos expression in serotonergic neurons within the dorsal and interfascicular parts of the dorsal raphe nucleus. These results suggest that exposure to a 5-min 19°C cold water swim, but not exposure to a 5-min 25°C swim alters physiological, behavioral and serotonergic responses to a subsequent stressor.

  20. Social separation and diazepam withdrawal increase anxiety in the elevated plus-maze and serotonin turnover in the median raphe and hippocampus.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Lucinéia; de Andrade, Telma G C S; Graeff, Frederico G

    2010-05-01

    The present work aimed to evaluate the effects of social separation for 14 days (chronic stress) and of withdrawal from a 14-day treatment with diazepam (acute stress) on the exploratory behaviour of male rats in the elevated plus-maze and on serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) turnover in different brain structures. Social separation had an anxiogenic effect, evidenced by fewer entries into, and less time spent on the open arms of the elevated plus-maze. Separation also selectively increased 5-hydroxytryptamine turnover in the hippocampus and median raphe nucleus. Diazepam withdrawal had a similar anxiogenic effect in grouped animals and increased 5-hydroxytryptamine turnover in the same brain structures. Chronic treatment with imipramine during the 14 days of separation prevented the behavioural and neurochemical changes caused by social separation. It is suggested that the increase in anxiety determined by both acute and chronic stress is mediated by the activation of the median raphe nucleus-hippocampal 5-hydroxytryptamine pathway.

  1. The role of dorsal raphe nucleus serotonergic and non-serotonergic neurons, and of their receptors, in regulating waking and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep.

    PubMed

    Monti, Jaime M

    2010-10-01

    Based on electrophysiological, neurochemical, genetic and neuropharmacological approaches it is currently accepted that serotonin (5-HT) functions to promote waking (W) and to inhibit rapid-eye movement sleep (REMS). The serotonin-containing neurons of the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) provide part of the serotonergic innervation of the telencephalon, diencephalon, mesencephalon and rhombencephalon of laboratory animals and man. The DRN has been subdivided into several clusters on the basis of differences in cellular morphology, expression of other neurotransmitters and afferent and efferent connections. These differences among subpopulations of 5-HT neurons may have important implications for neural mechanisms underlying 5-HT modulation of sleep and waking. The DRN contains 5-HT and non-5-HT neurons. The latter express a variety of substances including dopamine, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate. In addition, nitric oxide and a number of neuropeptides have been characterized in the DRN. Available evidence tends to indicate that non-5-HT cells contribute to the regulation of the activity of 5-HT neurons during the sleep-wake cycle through local circuits and/or their mediation of the effects of afferent inputs. Mutant mice that do not express 5-HT(1A) or 5-HT(1B) receptor exhibit greater amounts of REMS than their wild-type couterparts. 5-HT(2A) and 5-HT(2C) receptor knockout mice show a significant increase of W and a reduction of slow wave sleep that is related, at least in part, to the increased release of norepinephrine and dopamine. A normal circadian sleep pattern is observed in 5-HT(7) receptor knockout mice; however, the mutants spend less time in REMS. Local microinjection of 5-HT(1B), 5-HT(2A/2C), 5-HT(3) and 5-HT(7) receptor agonists into the DRN selectively suppresses REMS in the rat. In contrast, microinjection of 5-HT(1A) receptor agonists promotes REMS. Similarly, local administration of the melanin-concentrating hormone or the GABA(A) receptor

  2. The major role of peripheral release of histamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine in formalin-induced nociception.

    PubMed

    Parada, C A; Tambeli, C H; Cunha, F Q; Ferreira, S H

    2001-01-01

    Formalin injected subcutaneously into the paw is a widely used model of pain. This procedure evokes a short-lasting period of flinching (phase 1) and a long-lasting period of intense flinching (phase 2) following a very short period of quiescence. Phase 2 has been extensively used to support the involvement of central (spinal cord) sensitization in inflammatory hyperalgesia. The present study evaluated the contribution of stimulation of peripheral nociceptors by the release of endogenous mediators at the site of lesion. The participation of histamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine was demonstrated by the treatment of the rat hindpaws with selective histamine H1 (pyrilamine and meclizine) and histamine H2 (cimetidine) receptor antagonists or selective 5-hydroxytryptamine(1A) (WAY100,135) and 5-hydroxytryptamine(4/3) (tropisetron) receptor antagonists. The co-administration of pyrilamine or meclizine with formalin (1%) significantly reduced phases 1 and 2, while cimetidine had no effect. Pyrilamine administration during the period of quiescence (10min after formalin administration) caused strong dose-related inhibition of phase 2. The co-administration of tropisetron with formalin caused a blockade of both phases, while with WAY100,135 caused only inhibition of the phase 2. In contrast, tropisetron administrated during the period of quiescence did not cause antinociception. Histamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine receptors could be strongly activated in naïve animals by administration of a mixture of both agonists or compound 48/80 (2microg/paw) which is known to release both mediators from mast cells. Pretreatment of the paws with a mast cell stabilizer, sodium cromoglycate, significantly reduced the second phase of the formalin injection model. From these results we suggest that phases 1 and 2 of the formalin test are dependent upon the ongoing afferent input. Furthermore, while histamine H1 participates in both phases, 5-hydroxytryptamine(4/3) participates in phase 1 and 5

  3. Effect of MDMA-Induced Axotomy on the Dorsal Raphe Forebrain Tract in Rats: An In Vivo Manganese-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Chuang-Hsin; Siow, Tiing-Yee; Weng, Shao-Ju; Hsu, Yi-Hua; Huang, Yuahn-Sieh; Chang, Kang-Wei; Cheng, Cheng-Yi; Ma, Kuo-Hsing

    2015-01-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), also known as "Ecstasy", is a common recreational drug of abuse. Several previous studies have attributed the central serotonergic neurotoxicity of MDMA to distal axotomy, since only fine serotonergic axons ascending from the raphe nucleus are lost without apparent damage to their cell bodies. However, this axotomy has never been visualized directly in vivo. The present study examined the axonal integrity of the efferent projections from the midbrain raphe nucleus after MDMA exposure using in vivo manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI). Rats were injected subcutaneously six times with MDMA (5 mg/kg) or saline once daily. Eight days after the last injection, manganese ions (Mn2+) were injected stereotactically into the raphe nucleus, and a series of MEMRI images was acquired over a period of 38 h to monitor the evolution of Mn2+-induced signal enhancement across the ventral tegmental area, the medial forebrain bundle (MFB), and the striatum. The MDMA-induced loss of serotonin transporters was clearly evidenced by immunohistological staining consistent with the Mn2+-induced signal enhancement observed across the MFB and striatum. MEMRI successfully revealed the disruption of the serotonergic raphe-striatal projections and the variable effect of MDMA on the kinetics of Mn2+ accumulation in the MFB and striatum. PMID:26378923

  4. Effect of MDMA-Induced Axotomy on the Dorsal Raphe Forebrain Tract in Rats: An In Vivo Manganese-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Chuang-Hsin; Siow, Tiing-Yee; Weng, Shao-Ju; Hsu, Yi-Hua; Huang, Yuahn-Sieh; Chang, Kang-Wei; Cheng, Cheng-Yi; Ma, Kuo-Hsing

    2015-01-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), also known as "Ecstasy", is a common recreational drug of abuse. Several previous studies have attributed the central serotonergic neurotoxicity of MDMA to distal axotomy, since only fine serotonergic axons ascending from the raphe nucleus are lost without apparent damage to their cell bodies. However, this axotomy has never been visualized directly in vivo. The present study examined the axonal integrity of the efferent projections from the midbrain raphe nucleus after MDMA exposure using in vivo manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI). Rats were injected subcutaneously six times with MDMA (5 mg/kg) or saline once daily. Eight days after the last injection, manganese ions (Mn2+) were injected stereotactically into the raphe nucleus, and a series of MEMRI images was acquired over a period of 38 h to monitor the evolution of Mn2+-induced signal enhancement across the ventral tegmental area, the medial forebrain bundle (MFB), and the striatum. The MDMA-induced loss of serotonin transporters was clearly evidenced by immunohistological staining consistent with the Mn2+-induced signal enhancement observed across the MFB and striatum. MEMRI successfully revealed the disruption of the serotonergic raphe-striatal projections and the variable effect of MDMA on the kinetics of Mn2+ accumulation in the MFB and striatum.

  5. Viral vector mediated expression of mutant huntingtin in the dorsal raphe produces disease-related neuropathology but not depressive-like behaviors in wildtype mice.

    PubMed

    Pitzer, Mark; Lueras, Jordan; Warden, Anna; Weber, Sydney; McBride, Jodi

    2015-05-22

    Huntington׳s disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a mutation in the HTT gene (mHTT) encoding the protein huntingtin. An expansion in the gene׳s CAG repeat length renders a misfolded, dysfunctional protein with an abnormally long glutamine (Q) stretch at the N terminus that often incorporates into inclusion bodies and leads to neurodegeneration in many regions of the brain. HD is characterized by motor and cognitive decline as well as mood disorders, with depression being particularly common. Approximately 40% of the HD population suffers from depressive symptoms. Because these symptoms often manifest a decade or more prior to the knowledge that the person is at risk for the disease, a portion of the early depression in HD appears to be a consequence of the pathology arising from expression of the mutant gene. While the depression in HD patients is often treated with serotonin agonists, there is scant experimental evidence that the depression in HD responds well to these serotonin treatments or in a similar manner to how non-HD depression tends to respond. Additionally, at very early sub-threshold depression levels, abnormal changes in several neuronal populations are already detectable in HD patients, suggesting that a variety of brain structures may be involved. Taken together, the serotonin system is a viable candidate. However, at present there is limited evidence of the precise nuclei or circuits that play a role in HD depression. With this in mind, the current study was designed to control for the widespread brain neuropathology that occurs in HD and in transgenic mouse models of HD and focuses specifically on the influence of the midbrain dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN). The DRN provides the majority of the serotonin to the forebrain and exhibits cell loss in non-HD depression. Therefore, we employed a viral vector delivery system to investigate whether the over-expression of mHTT in the DRN׳s ventral sub-nuclei alone is sufficient to produce

  6. Viral vector mediated expression of mutant huntingtin in the dorsal raphe produces disease-related neuropathology but not depressive-like behaviors in wildtype mice.

    PubMed

    Pitzer, Mark; Lueras, Jordan; Warden, Anna; Weber, Sydney; McBride, Jodi

    2015-05-22

    Huntington׳s disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a mutation in the HTT gene (mHTT) encoding the protein huntingtin. An expansion in the gene׳s CAG repeat length renders a misfolded, dysfunctional protein with an abnormally long glutamine (Q) stretch at the N terminus that often incorporates into inclusion bodies and leads to neurodegeneration in many regions of the brain. HD is characterized by motor and cognitive decline as well as mood disorders, with depression being particularly common. Approximately 40% of the HD population suffers from depressive symptoms. Because these symptoms often manifest a decade or more prior to the knowledge that the person is at risk for the disease, a portion of the early depression in HD appears to be a consequence of the pathology arising from expression of the mutant gene. While the depression in HD patients is often treated with serotonin agonists, there is scant experimental evidence that the depression in HD responds well to these serotonin treatments or in a similar manner to how non-HD depression tends to respond. Additionally, at very early sub-threshold depression levels, abnormal changes in several neuronal populations are already detectable in HD patients, suggesting that a variety of brain structures may be involved. Taken together, the serotonin system is a viable candidate. However, at present there is limited evidence of the precise nuclei or circuits that play a role in HD depression. With this in mind, the current study was designed to control for the widespread brain neuropathology that occurs in HD and in transgenic mouse models of HD and focuses specifically on the influence of the midbrain dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN). The DRN provides the majority of the serotonin to the forebrain and exhibits cell loss in non-HD depression. Therefore, we employed a viral vector delivery system to investigate whether the over-expression of mHTT in the DRN׳s ventral sub-nuclei alone is sufficient to produce

  7. Effect of Y-25130, a selective 5-hydroxytryptamine3 receptor antagonist, on gastric emptying in mice.

    PubMed

    Haga, K; Asano, K; Inaba, K; Morimoto, Y; Setoguchi, M

    1994-01-01

    The effect of Y-25130 on gastric emptying of nutrient test meals (solid chow) was examined in mice. In a dose range of 0.01-1 mg/kg, p.o., Y-25130 significantly accelerated gastric emptying of solid meals in a dose-dependent manner, at an ED30 of 0.021 mg/kg. Other 5-hydroxytryptamine3 receptor antagonists and prokinetic agents having 5-hydroxytryptamine3 receptor antagonistic properties accelerated the emptying of solid meals in the following rank order of potency: Y-25130 = granisetron > or = tropisetron > ondansetron > cisapride > metoclopramide. The acceleration of the gastric emptying showed a good correlation with the antagonistic potencies of these compounds on 5-hydroxytryptamine3 receptors, determined by the inhibition test of the von Bezold-Jarisch reflex in anesthetized rats (r2 = 0.99). Domperidone (1 and 10 mg/kg, p.o.) and trimebutine (10 and 100 mg/kg, p.o.) failed to increase the rate of emptying from the stomach. Cisplatin (30 mg/kg, i.p.), a chemotherapeutic agent, significantly delayed the gastric emptying of solid meals, and Y-25130 (0.1-1 mg/kg, p.o.) prevented such a delay in emptying in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that Y-25130 accelerates the gastric emptying in mice by antagonism of the 5-hydroxytryptamine3 receptor. PMID:7625886

  8. Release of ( sup 14 C)5-hydroxytryptamine from human platelets by red wine

    SciTech Connect

    Jarman, J.; Glover, V.; Sandler, M. )

    1991-01-01

    Red wine, at a final dilution of 1/50, caused released of ({sup 14}C)5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) from preloaded platelets, an effect which was not observed with any white wines or beers tested. Since 5-HT, is probably released from body stores during migraine attacks and red wine is known to provoke migraine episodes in susceptible individuals, release of 5-HT, possibly from central stores, could represent a plausible mechanism for its mode of action.

  9. Interactions between acetylcholine, 5-hydroxytryptamine, nicotine and morphine on isolated rabbit atria

    PubMed Central

    Chittal, S. M.; Dadkar, N. K.; Gaitondé, B. B.

    1968-01-01

    1. The effects of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and morphine on the responses to acetylcholine and nicotine of isolated rabbit atria were studied. 2. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (10 μg/ml.) and morphine (20 μg/ml.) blocked the negative chronotropic and inotropic actions of acetylcholine. 3. Nicotine (20 μg/ml.) produced stimulation of the atria, which was blocked by dichlorisoprenaline, morphine, 5-HT, bretylium and hemicholinium. Hemicholinium block was reversed by choline. 4. In reserpinized preparations, nicotine produced inhibition of atria and this action was also blocked by atropine, 5-HT and morphine. Inhibition induced by nicotine was potentiated by physostigmine. 5. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (20 μg/ml.) produced stimulation of atria. This was blocked by bretylium and reduced by hemicholinium. Hemicholinium block was reversed by choline. 6. It is concluded that 5-HT in low concentrations acts as a weak agonist at the cholinoceptive receptors and therefore blocks the action of acetylcholine. Furthermore, nicotine and larger doses of 5-HT have actions on ganglionic structures and liberate acetylcholine, which in turn releases catecholamines. PMID:4386371

  10. Interactions between acetylcholine, 5-hydroxytryptamine, nicotine and morphine on isolated rabbit atria.

    PubMed

    Chittal, S M; Dadkar, N K; Gaitondé, B B

    1968-09-01

    1. The effects of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and morphine on the responses to acetylcholine and nicotine of isolated rabbit atria were studied.2. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (10 mug/ml.) and morphine (20 mug/ml.) blocked the negative chronotropic and inotropic actions of acetylcholine.3. Nicotine (20 mug/ml.) produced stimulation of the atria, which was blocked by dichlorisoprenaline, morphine, 5-HT, bretylium and hemicholinium. Hemicholinium block was reversed by choline.4. In reserpinized preparations, nicotine produced inhibition of atria and this action was also blocked by atropine, 5-HT and morphine. Inhibition induced by nicotine was potentiated by physostigmine.5. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (20 mug/ml.) produced stimulation of atria. This was blocked by bretylium and reduced by hemicholinium. Hemicholinium block was reversed by choline.6. It is concluded that 5-HT in low concentrations acts as a weak agonist at the cholinoceptive receptors and therefore blocks the action of acetylcholine. Furthermore, nicotine and larger doses of 5-HT have actions on ganglionic structures and liberate acetylcholine, which in turn releases catecholamines.

  11. The effect of atropine on the activation of 5-hydroxytryptamine3 channels in rat nodose ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Fan, P; Weight, F F

    1994-10-01

    It has been suggested that changes in brain 5-hydroxytryptamine3 receptor function may contribute to some behavior disorders, such as anxiety, schizophrenia and drug abuse. We are using the whole-cell version of the patch-clamp technique to study the function of 5-hydroxytryptamine3 channels in neurons freshly dissociated from rat nodose ganglion. In these cells, 5-hydroxytryptamine elicits an inward current over the concentration range of 0.25-100 microM (EC50 = 2.62 microM) by activating 5-hydroxytryptamine3 receptors. The muscarinic cholinergic antagonist atropine reduced the amplitude of 5-hydroxytryptamine activated inward current in a concentration-dependent manner. Other muscarinic antagonists, scopolamine, dexetimide, the M1 muscarinic receptor antagonist pirenzepine, the M2 receptor antagonist methoctramine and the M3 receptor antagonist 4-DAMP methiodide also inhibited 5-hydroxytryptamine-induced inward current. Atropine did not appear to change the reversal potential of this current. In the presence of 5 microM atropine, the concentration-response curve for 5-hydroxytryptamine current was shifted to the right in a parallel fashion. The EC50 value for 5-hydroxytryptamine was increased from 2.62 to 8.76 microM. Schild plots of increasing atropine and 5-hydroxytryptamine concentrations revealed a pA2 value of 5.74 for atropine (apparent KD = 1.8 microM). These observations suggest that atropine competitively antagonizes the activation of a receptor for the neurotransmitter serotonin, a novel action of muscarinic antagonists in the nervous system. This effect of atropine may contribute to the clinical symptoms seen in severe atropine intoxication. PMID:7531305

  12. Dual actions of lysergic acid diethylamide tartrate (LSD), 2-bromo-D-lysergic acid diethylamide bitartrate (BOL) and methysergide on dorsal root potentials evoked by stimulation of raphe nuclei.

    PubMed

    Larson, A A; Chinn, C; Proudfit, H K; Anderson, E G

    1981-04-01

    A variety of drugs reported to antagonize serotonin were found to affect spinal cord potentials evoked by electrical stimulation of the caudal raphe nuclei of the cat. These brain stem-evoked dorsal root potentials (DRPs) consisted of a short latency depolarization (DRP-1), which was evoked by stimulation of a wide variety of sites in the medial brain stem and a long latency potential (DRP-2), which was elicited only when stimuli were applied near the raphe. The ability of serotonergic antagonists to increase or decrease these DRPs was dependent on the dose of the drug administered. High doses of lysergic acid diethylamide tartrate (LSD), 2-bromo-D-lysergic acid diethylamide bitartrate (BOL), methysergide and cinanserin each produced an immediate inhibition of DRP-2 and a simultaneous enhancement of DRP-1, both of which recovered by approximately 30 min. Each of the drugs produced a dose-related inhibition of DRP-2 at high doses, with LSD being the most potent and cinanserin the least potent. In contrast, low doses of LSD, BOL and methysergide elicited little or no immediate change in either DRP-2 or DRP-1, but produced an enhancement of DRP-2 which developed slowly over a period of 60 to 90 min. This increase in DRP-2 was most dramatic after administration of LSD and was not accompanied by changes in DRP-1. The inhibition of DRP-2 by high doses of LSD, BOL, methysergide and cinanserin may result primarily from inhibition of postsynaptic serotonergic receptors located on the primary afferent terminals. The increase in DRP-2 produced by low doses of LSD, BOL and methysergide is postulated to result from an interaction with receptors distinct from those which produced the inhibition of DRP-2 at higher doses.

  13. Reversal learning enhanced by lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD): concomitant rise in brain 5-hydroxytryptamine levels.

    PubMed

    King, A R; Martin, I L; Melville, K A

    1974-11-01

    1 Small doses of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) (12.5-50 mug/kg) consistently facilitated learning of a brightness discrimination reversal.2 2-Bromo-lysergic acid diethylamide (BOL-148), a structural analogue of LSD, with similar peripheral anti-5-hydroxytrypamine activity but no psychotomimetic properties, had no effect in this learning situation at a similar dose (25 mug/kg).3 LSD, but not BOL-148, caused a small but significant increase in brain 5-hydroxytryptamine levels, but had no effect on the levels of catecholamines in the brain at 25 mug/kg.

  14. Gene expression changes in serotonin, GABA-A receptors, neuropeptides and ion channels in the dorsal raphe nucleus of adolescent alcohol-preferring (P) rats following binge-like alcohol drinking.

    PubMed

    McClintick, Jeanette N; McBride, William J; Bell, Richard L; Ding, Zheng-Ming; Liu, Yunlong; Xuei, Xiaoling; Edenberg, Howard J

    2015-02-01

    Alcohol binge-drinking during adolescence is a serious public health concern with long-term consequences. We used RNA sequencing to assess the effects of excessive adolescent ethanol binge-drinking on gene expression in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) of alcohol preferring (P) rats. Repeated binges across adolescence (three 1h sessions across the dark-cycle per day, 5 days per week for 3 weeks starting at 28 days of age; ethanol intakes of 2.5-3 g/kg/session) significantly altered the expression of approximately one-third of the detected genes. Multiple neurotransmitter systems were altered, with the largest changes in the serotonin system (21 of 23 serotonin-related genes showed decreased expression) and GABA-A receptors (8 decreased and 2 increased). Multiple neuropeptide systems were also altered, with changes in the neuropeptide Y and corticotropin-releasing hormone systems similar to those associated with increased drinking and decreased resistance to stress. There was increased expression of 21 of 32 genes for potassium channels. Expression of downstream targets of CREB signaling was increased. There were also changes in expression of genes involved in inflammatory processes, axonal guidance, growth factors, transcription factors, and several intracellular signaling pathways. These widespread changes indicate that excessive binge drinking during adolescence alters the functioning of the DRN and likely its modulation of many regions of the central nervous system, including the mesocorticolimbic system.

  15. Gene expression changes in serotonin, GABA-A receptors, neuropeptides and ion channels in the dorsal raphe nucleus of adolescent alcohol-preferring (P) rats following binge-like alcohol drinking

    PubMed Central

    McClintick, Jeanette N.; McBride, William J.; Bell, Richard L.; Ding, Zheng-Ming; Liu, Yunlong; Xuei, Xiaoling; Edenberg, Howard J.

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol binge-drinking during adolescence is a serious public health concern with long-term consequences. We used RNA sequencing to assess the effects of excessive adolescent ethanol binge-drinking on gene expression in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) of alcohol preferring (P) rats. Repeated binges across adolescence (three 1h sessions across the dark-cycle per day, 5 days per week for 3 weeks starting at 28 days of age; ethanol intakes of 2.5 – 3 g/kg/session) significantly altered the expression of approximately one-third of the detected genes. Multiple neurotransmitter systems were altered, with the largest changes in the serotonin system (21 of 23 serotonin-related genes showed decreased expression) and GABA-A receptors (8 decreased and 2 increased). Multiple neuropeptide systems were also altered, with changes in the neuropeptide Y and corticotropin-releasing hormone systems similar to those associated with increased drinking and decreased resistance to stress. There was increased expression of 21 of 32 genes for potassium channels. Expression of downstream targets of CREB signaling was increased. There were also changes in expression of genes involved in inflammatory processes, axonal guidance, growth factors, transcription factors, and several intracellular signaling pathways. These widespread changes indicate that excessive binge drinking during adolescence alters the functioning of the DRN and likely its modulation of many regions of the central nervous system, including the mesocorticolimbic system. PMID:25542586

  16. Mechanisms of 5-hydroxytryptamine-induced contraction of isolated rat intrapulmonary bronchi.

    PubMed

    Szarek, J L; Zhang, J Z; Gruetter, C A

    1995-12-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory and others suggested that activation of 5-HT2 receptors mediates 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)-induced contraction of airway smooth muscle and that this response is dependent in part on endogenous acetylcholine (ACh). The purpose of the present study was to confirm a role for 5-HT2 receptors and endogenous ACh in 5-HT-induced contraction of rat bronchi. In this study, we examined the effects of 5-HT2 receptor antagonists (ketanserin and LY53857), acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (physostigmine and neostigmine), and a muscarinic receptor alkylating agent [propylbenzilylcholine mustard (PBCM)] on contractile responses evoked by 5-HT and the 5-HT2 receptor agonist, alpha-methyl-5-hydroxytryptamine (alpha-Me-5-HT). Concentration-response curves generated in isolated rat intrapulmonary bronchi in response to 5-HT and alpha-Me-5-HT were superimposable. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase by physostigmine or neostigmine potentiated contractile responses elicited by 5-HT and alpha-Me-5-HT. Alkylation of muscarinic receptors with PBCM decreased maximal responses elicited by 5-HT or alpha-Me-5-HT in a concentration-dependent manner. Maximum contraction attained with exogenous ACh was decreased by PBCM in a concentration-dependent manner and, at the highest concentration evaluated, ACh-induced contractions were abolished. 5-Hydroxytryptamine-induced contraction was inhibited competitively by low concentrations of the 5-HT2-receptor selective antagonist, ketanserin; higher concentrations abolished contractile responses to the amine. The inhibition of 5-HT-induced contractile responses by another 5-HT2-receptor selective antagonist, LY53857, was non-competitive in nature. Together, the results suggest that 5-HT contracts rat airways directly by activating 5-HT2 receptors located on airway smooth muscle and indirectly by activation of 5-HT2 receptors on parasympathetic nerve endings to cause release of ACh. The potential physiological implication of

  17. Iontophoretic release of acetylcholine, noradrenaline, 5-hydroxytryptamine and D-lysergic acid diethylamide from micropipettes.

    PubMed

    Bradley, P B; Candy, J M

    1970-10-01

    1. The in vitro iontophoretic release of tritium-labelled acetylcholine and 5-hydroxytryptamine from large and small micropipettes and noradrenaline and D-lysergic acid diethylamide from small micropipettes was determined by liquid scintillation counting.2. The release was directly proportional to the electrical charge passed in the range normally used in the iontophoretic study of these compounds. The transport numbers obtained for the large micropipettes were approximately double those with the small micropipettes. A very low transport number was found for D-lysergic acid diethylamide.3. The spontaneous leakage was small and did not vary appreciably with time.4. The iontophoretic release of acetylcholine in vitro agreed with the in vitro measurements.5. The brain-stem tissue concentration of D-lysergic acid diethylamide after intravenous injection into intact and decerebrate cats was determined.

  18. The effect of altered 5-hydroxytryptamine levels on beta-endorphin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soliman, Karam F. A.; Mash, Deborah C.; Walker, Charles A.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of altering the concentration of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) on beta-endorphin (beta-Ep) content in the hypothalamus, thalamus, and periaqueductal gray (PAG)-rostral pons regions of the rat brain. The selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine (10 mg/kg), significantly lowered beta-Ep content in the hypothalamus and the PAG. Parachlorophenylalanine, which inhibits 5-HT synthesis, significantly elevated beta-Ep in all brain parts studied. Intracisternal injections of the neurotoxin 5-prime, 7-prime-dihydroxytryptamine with desmethylimipramine pretreatment significantly increased beta-Ep content in the hypothalamus and the PAG. In adrenalectomized rats, fluoxetine significantly decreased beta-Ep levels in the hypothalamus and increased the levels in the PAG. The results indicate that 5-HT may modulate the levels of brain beta-Ep.

  19. Gene expression profiling analysis of 5-hydroxytryptamine signaling pathway in rat regenerating liver and different types of liver cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, C F; Yang, J; Zhao, W M; Li, Y; Guo, P J; Li, M H; Zhou, Y; Xu, C S

    2015-01-01

    We examined the gene expression profiles of the 5-hydroxytryptamine signaling pathway in the regenerating liver and 8 types of liver cells during rat liver regeneration, and explored expression differences in 5-hydroxytryptamine signaling pathway genes at the level of tissues and cells, as well as the role of the pathway on liver regeneration. Eight types of rat regenerating liver cells were isolated using Percoll density-gradient centrifugation and immunomagnetic bead methods. Rat Genome 230 2.0 Array was used to detect expression changes in 5-hydroxytryptamine signaling pathway genes. The results showed that 26, 47, 8, 21, 16, 19, 22, 27, and 20 genes changed significantly in hepatocytes, biliary epithelial cells, hepatic stellate cells, oval cells, sinusoidal endothelial cells, Kupffer cells, pit cells, dendritic cells, and the regenerating liver, respectively. Synthetic effects of 5-hydroxytryptamine signaling pathway genes in 8 types of liver cells showed that 26 genes were expressed significantly; the expression trends of 10 genes were the same in the regenerating liver, while others were different. Based on the gene expression profiles of the 8 types of liver cells, 5-hydroxytryptamine promoted hepatocyte proliferation through the RAS and STAT3 signaling pathways, proliferation and differentiation of sinusoidal endothelial cells through the STAT3 signaling pathway, and proliferation and apoptosis of pit cells through the AKT3 signaling pathway. There were large differences in genes involved in 5-hydroxytryptamine signaling at the tissue and cellular levels; thus, liver regeneration should be studied in-depth at the cellular level to reveal the molecular mechanism of liver regeneration.

  20. The effect of lysergic acid diethylamide, 5-hydroxytryptamine, and related compounds on the liver fluke, Fasciola hepatica.

    PubMed

    MANSOUR, T E

    1957-12-01

    The rhythmical activity of the liver fluke, Fasciola hepatica, was stimulated by 5-hydroxytryptamine and by lysergic acid diethylamide at very low concentrations. The effect was peripheral and was not mediated through the central ganglion. Other amines also stimulated rhythmical activity, the most potent being the indolamines.Bromolysergic acid diethylamide, and other analogues such as yohimbine, harmine, and dopamine depressed rhythmical movement and antagonized the stimulant action of 5-hydroxytryptamine and lysergic acid diethylamide. Evidence which suggests the presence of tryptamine receptors in the trematode is discussed.

  1. Blockade of the NMDA and AMPA/kainate receptors in the dorsal raphe nucleus prevents the 5-HT₃ receptor agonist m-chlorophenylbiguanide-induced suppression of REM sleep in the rat.

    PubMed

    Monti, Jaime M; Jantos, Héctor; Catenaccio, Valentina; Xavier, Silvia

    2011-07-01

    The effects of the selective 5-HT(3) receptor agonist m-chlorophenylbiguanide (m-CPBG), and of the NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) and AMPA (α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate)/kainate antagonists AP-5 [(±)-2-amino-5-phosphono-pentanoic acid] and CNQX (6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione), respectively, were studied in adult male Wistar rats implanted for chronic sleep recordings. The compounds were microinjected directly into the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) during the light period of the 12-h light/12-h dark cycle. Infusion of m-CPBG (2 and 4mM) into the DRN induced a significant reduction of rapid-eye-movement sleep (REMS) and of the number of REM periods. Local infusion of AP-5 (0.5-1 mM) and CNQX (2 mM) significantly increased slow wave sleep (SWS). Pretreatment with AP-5 (0.5 mM) or CNQX (0.5 mM) antagonized the m-CPBG-induced suppression of REMS. It is proposed that the reduction of REMS after microinjection of m-CPBG into de DRN is related to the activation of glutamatergic interneurons that express the 5-HT(3) receptor and make synaptic contacts with serotonergic cells. The resultant increase of serotonin release at postsynaptic sites involved in the induction of REMS would provoke the suppression of the behavioral state. Our findings provide, in addition, new details concerning the pharmacology of DRN serotonergic neurons in the rat that may become relevant to the development of drugs for enhancing cortical and subcortical serotonergic neurotransmission.

  2. Activation of a Habenulo–Raphe Circuit Is Critical for the Behavioral and Neurochemical Consequences of Uncontrollable Stress in the Male Rat

    PubMed Central

    Baratta, Michael V.; Amat, Jose; Watkins, Linda R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Exposure to uncontrollable stress [inescapable tailshock (IS)] produces behavioral changes that do not occur if the stressor is controllable [escapable tailshock (ES)] an outcome that is mediated by greater IS-induced dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] activation. It has been proposed that this differential activation occurs because the presence of control leads to top–down inhibition of the DRN from medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), not because uncontrollability produces greater excitatory input. Although mPFC inhibitory regulation over DRN 5-HT activation has received considerable attention, the relevant excitatory inputs that drive DRN 5-HT during stress have not. The lateral habenula (LHb) provides a major excitatory input to the DRN, but very little is known about the role of the LHb in regulating DRN-dependent behaviors. Here, optogenetic silencing of the LHb during IS blocked the typical anxiety-like behaviors produced by IS in male rats. Moreover, LHb silencing blocked the increase in extracellular basolateral amygdala 5-HT during IS and, surprisingly, during behavioral testing the following day. We also provide evidence that LHb–DRN pathway activation is not sensitive to the dimension of behavioral control. Overall, these experiments highlight a critical role for LHb in driving DRN activation and 5-HT release into downstream circuits that mediate anxiety-like behavioral outcomes of IS and further support the idea that behavioral control does not modulate excitatory inputs to the DRN. PMID:27785462

  3. Repeated exposure of rats to the convulsant agent flurothyl enhances 5-hydroxytryptamine- and dopamine-mediated behavioural responses

    PubMed Central

    Green, A.R.

    1978-01-01

    1 Rats were convulsed once daily for 7 days by exposure to the inhalant convulsant agent, flurothyl (Indoklon, bis (2,2,2-trifluouroethyl)ether). Twenty four hours after the final convulsion the rats were injected with tranylcypromine (20 mg/kg) followed 30 min later by L-DOPA (50 mg/kg), a procedure which increases brain dopamine concentrations. The flurothyl-treated rats showed a greater locomotor activity response than rats that had not been convulsed. 2 This enhanced response appears to be due to increased postsynaptic dopamine receptor sensitivity since flurothyl-treated rats also showed enhanced locomotor responses to methamphetamine (2 mg/kg) and apomorphine (2 mg/kg). 3 Enhanced 5-hydroxytryptamine-induced activity responses following administration of tranylcypromine (20 mg/kg) and L-tryptophan (50 mg/kg) were also seen 24 h after the last of 10 daily flurothyl-induced convulsions. 4 The increased 5-hydroxytryptamine response also appears to be due to increased postsynaptic sensitivity since the flurothyl-treated rats showed increased hyperactivity following administration of tranylcypromine (20 mg/kg) and the suggested 5-hydroxytryptamine agonist, 5-methoxy N,N-dimethyltryptamine (2 mg/kg). 5 No change in the brain concentration of 5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, tryptophan, dopamine or noradrenaline was observed 24 h after the last of 10 daily flurothyl-induced convulsions, compared to untreated rats. The rate of 5-hydroxytryptamine accumulation after tranylcypromine/L-tryptophan treatment and of dopamine and noradrenaline accumulation after tranylcypromine/L-DOPA treatment was similar in both groups. 6 Repeated flurothyl convulsion has the same effects on these behavioural tests as repeated electroconvulsive shock. Since both treatments have been used successfully to treat depression, it is suggested that the mechanism of action of electroconvulsive therapy may be by increasing postsynaptic responses to the monoamine neurotransmitters

  4. Inhibition of the serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) transporter reduces bone accrual during growth.

    PubMed

    Warden, Stuart J; Robling, Alexander G; Sanders, Megan S; Bliziotes, Michael M; Turner, Charles H

    2005-02-01

    Selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) antagonize the serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) transporter (5-HTT), and are frequently prescribed to children and adolescents to treat depression. However, recent findings of functional serotonergic pathways in bone cells and preliminary clinical evidence demonstrating detrimental effects of SSRIs on bone growth have raised questions regarding the effects of these drugs on the growing skeleton. The current work investigated the impact of 5-HTT inhibition on the skeleton in: 1) mice with a null mutation in the gene encoding for the 5-HTT; and 2) growing mice treated with a SSRI. In both models, 5-HTT inhibition had significant detrimental effects on bone mineral accrual. 5-HTT null mutant mice had a consistent skeletal phenotype of reduced mass, altered architecture, and inferior mechanical properties, whereas bone mineral accrual was impaired in growing mice treated with a SSRI. These phenotypes resulted from a reduction in bone formation without an increase in bone resorption and were not influenced by effects on skeletal mechanosensitivity or serum biochemistries. These findings indicate a role for the 5-HTT in the regulation of bone accrual in the growing skeleton and point to a need for further research into the prescription of SSRIs to children and adolescents.

  5. Radioimmunoassay of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) in cerebrospinal fluid, plasma, and serum

    SciTech Connect

    Engbaek, F.; Voldby, B

    1982-04-01

    A direct radioimmunoassay is described for serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) in cerebrospinal fluid, platelet-poor plasma, and serum. Antisera in rabbits was raised against serotonin diazotized to a conjugate of bovine albumin and D,L-p-aminophenylalanine. Polyethylene glycol, alone or in combination with anti-rabbit immunoglobulins, is used to separate bound and unbound tritiated serotonin. The minimum concentration of serotonin detectable is 2 nmol/L in a 200-..mu..L sample. Within-day precision (CV) is 4.3% between-day precision 7.7%. Analytical recoveries of serotonin are 109% and 101% for cerebrospinal fluid and plasma, respectively. Tryptophan, 5-hydroxytryptophan, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, and 5-hydroxytryptophol do not interfere with the assay. However, 5-methoxytryptamine and tryptamine cross react. Of samples of cerebrospinal fluid from patients with disc herniations (n=21) or low-pressure hydrocephalus (n=10), one-third had concentrations of 2-4 nmol/L and two-thirds were below the minimum detectable concentration. The observed range for the concentration of serotonin in plasma of 14 normal subjects was 5-14 nmol/L (mean +/- SD, 9 +/- 3 nmol/L). The observed ranges for serotonin in serum were: for 10 women 520-900 (mean +/- SD: 695 +/- 110) nmol/L and for 10 men 380-680 (520 +/- 94) nmol/L.

  6. Vasoconstrictor responses to 5-hydroxytryptamine in the autoperfused hindquarters of spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Calama, E; Morán, A; Ortiz de Urbina, A V; Martín, M L; San Román, L

    2004-06-01

    In this work we studied the responses and receptors involved in the effects of intra-arterial 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in the in situ autoperfused hindquarters of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Intra-arterial administration of the highest doses (50-1,000 ng/kg) produced a vasoconstrictor effect that was inhibited by ritanserin (a selective 5-HT2 receptor antagonist), SB 206553 (a selective 5-HT(2B/2C) receptor antagonist) and spiperone (a nonspecific 5-HT(1/2A) receptor antagonist), and was mimicked by alpha-methyl-5-HT (a selective 5-HT2 receptor agonist) and m-CPP (a selective 5-HT2C receptor agonist), but not by the intra-arterial administration of BW 723C86, a selective 5HT2B receptor agonist. SB 206553 and spiperone inhibited alpha-methyl-5HT-induced vasoconstriction in the hindquarters of SHR. Our data suggest that the vasoconstrictor response induced by 5-HT in the autoperfused hindquarters of SHR is mainly mediated by the activation of 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptors.

  7. Role of 5-hydroxytryptamine in the regulation of brain neuropeptides in normal and diabetic rat.

    PubMed

    Kolta, M G; Soliman, K F; Williams, B B

    1986-01-01

    The effect of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) alteration on brain dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE), beta-endorphin (beta E) and immunoreactive insulin (IRI) was studied in Sprague-Dawley diabetic and control rats. Diabetes was induced using alloxan (45 mg/kg), 15 days prior to sacrificing. Both control and diabetic animals were treated with either p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA, 300 mg/kg) 3 days prior to sacrificing or fluoxetine (10 mg/kg) twice daily for 3 days. PCPA treatment significantly decreased brain content of 5-HT and 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid (5-HIAA) while it caused significant increase and decrease in brain beta E and insulin levels, respectively, in both normal and diabetic rat. Meanwhile, the administration of fluoxetine resulted in significant increase in brain content of 5-HT, DA, NE and insulin but significant decline of beta E in diabetic and saline control rats. The results of this experiment indicate that 5-HT may be regulating both beta E and insulin regardless of the availability of pancreatic insulin.

  8. Role of 5-hydroxytryptamine in the regulation of brain neuropeptides in normal and diabetic rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolta, Malak G.; Williams, Byron B.; Soliman, Karam F. A.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) alteration on brain dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE), beta-endorphin (beta-E), and immunoreactive insulin was studied in Sprague-Dawley diabetic and control rats. Diabetes was induced using alloxan (45 mg/kg), 15 days prior to sacrificing. Both control and diabetic animals were treated with either p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA, 300 mg/kg) three days prior to sacrificing or fluoxetine (10 mg/kg) twice daily for three days. PCPA treatment significantly decreased brain content of 5-HT and 5-hydroxyindolel acetic acid, while it caused significant increase and decrease in brain beta-E and insulin levels, respectively, in both normal and diabetic rat. Meanwhile, the administration of fluoxetine resulted in significant increase in brain content of 5-HT, DA, NE and insulin but significant decline of beta-E in diabetic and saline control rats. The results of this experiment indicate that 5-HT may be regulating both beta-E and insulin regardless of the availability of pancreatic insulin.

  9. Characterization of the 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor which mediates contraction of the human isolated basilar artery.

    PubMed

    Parsons, A A; Whalley, E T

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports part of a study which investigated the identity of the receptor involved in 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) mediated contraction of the human basilar artery in vitro. 5-HT and a variety of 5-HT receptor agonists contracted human isolated basilar artery with a rank order of agonist potency: 5-carboxamidotryptamine greater than 5-HT greater than GR43175 much much greater than 2-methyl-5-HT. The maximum response produced by these agonists differed. The contractile responses to both 5-HT and GR43175 were resistant to antagonism by the 5-HT2 antagonist ketanserin and the 5-HT3 antagonist GR38032, indicating that neither 5-HT nor GR43175 activate 5-HT2 and 5-HT3 receptors in this tissue. In striking contrast, methiothepin (an antagonist at 5-HT1-like receptors) proved a potent antagonist of the contractile actions of both 5-HT and GR43175. Methiothepin did not antagonize the contractile response to the thromboxane-A2 mimetic U-46619. It is concluded that 5-HT and GR43175 contract the human isolated basilar artery by activating 5-HT1-like receptors. It is suggested that the antimigraine action of GR43175 may reflect its ability to constrict certain cranial arteries via 5-HT1-like receptor activation. PMID:2544283

  10. Methotrexate causes a change in intestinal 5-hydroxytryptamine metabolism in rats.

    PubMed

    Takano, Yuho; Machida, Takuji; Obara, Yusuke; Hirano, Megumi; Kudo, Sae; Takagi, Minako; Hamaue, Naoya; Iizuka, Kenji; Hirafuji, Masahiko

    2014-10-01

    The effects of methotrexate on 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) metabolism in the intestinal tissue of rats were investigated during the delayed phase after a single administration. Rats were i.p. injected with methotrexate or with saline as a control, and kaolin and food intakes were measured by an automatic monitoring apparatus. At 96 h after administration, dissected-out ileal tissue was frozen rapidly in liquid nitrogen for further analysis or fixed for immunohistochemical staining. Methotrexate at a dose of 50 mg/kg caused a time-dependent increase in kaolin intake lasting up to 72 h after administration, which returned to the control level at 96 h after administration. This dose of methotrexate caused a gradual decrease in body weight, food intake, and water intake lasting up to 72 h, which approached the control level at 96 h. Methotrexate caused pathologic changes, including a moderate inflammatory response in the ileal tissue and an increase in the number of L-tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH)-expressing cells in the ileal mucosa. Methotrexate also caused a significant increase in 5-HT and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) content and in TPH1 mRNA expression in the ileal tissues. It had no significant effects on mRNA expression of serotonin transporter, COX-1, or COX-2 or on myeloperoxidase activity. This study demonstrated, for the first time, that methotrexate caused a change in the ileal 5-HT metabolism associated with hyperplasia of mucosal enterochromaffin cells.

  11. In vivo modulation of vagal-identified dorsal medullary neurones by activation of different 5-Hydroxytryptamine2 receptors in rats

    PubMed Central

    Sévoz-Couche, Caroline; Spyer, K Michael; Jordan, David

    2000-01-01

    In in vivo experiments, DOI (a 5-HT2 receptor agonist), MK-212 (a 5-HT2C receptor agonist), and BW-723C86 (a 5-HT2B receptor agonist) were applied by ionophoresis to neurones in the rat nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) receiving vagal afferent input. The majority of the putative ‘monosynaptically' vagal activated cells were inhibited by both MK-212 (4/6) and DOI (2/4), but unaffected by BW-723C86 (12/14). In contrast, ‘polysynaptically' activated NTS cells were excited by both BW-723C86 (13/19) and DOI (9/10). Inactive ‘intermediate' cells were inhibited by BW-723C86 (9/12), MK-212 (5/6) and DOI (3/4), whilst active cells of this group were excited by BW-723C86 (7/13) and DOI (5/5). The selective 5-HT2B receptor antagonist LY-202715 significantly reduced the excitatory actions of BW-723C86 on ‘intermediate' and ‘polysynaptic' cells (13/13), but not the inhibitory effects observed on inactive Group 2 cells (n=5) whereas the selective 5-HT2C receptor antagonist RS-102221 reversed the inhibitory effects of MK-212 and DOI on ‘monosynaptic and ‘intermediate' neurones. Cardio-pulmonary afferent stimulation inhibited two of four putative ‘monosynaptically' activated calls and all four inactive intermediate cells. These were also inhibited by DOI and MK-212. In contrast, cardio-pulmonary afferents excited all five active intermediate cells and all six putative ‘polysynaptically' activated NTS cells, while all were also previously excited by BW-723C86 and/or DOI. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that neurones in the NTS are affected differently by 5-HT2 receptor ligands, in regard of their vagal postsynaptic location, the type of cardio-pulmonary afferent they receive and the different 5-HT2 receptors activated. PMID:11090119

  12. Habenular and other midbrain raphe afferents demonstrated by a modified retrograde tracing technique.

    PubMed

    Aghajanian, G K; Wang, R Y

    1977-02-18

    Afferents to th midbrain dorsal and median raphe nuclei in the rat were studied by means of the horseradish peroxidase (HRP) retrograde transport method. The HRP was given by means of a modified iontophoretic delivery technique. This technique permitted an efficient and localized deposition of a high concentration of HRP into the raphe nuclei. Afferents to the raphe as determined by this method could be categorized into 2 classes; those exclusively to the raphe and those also positive for adjacent reticular formation. The most striking afferent area to the raphe, both in terms of selectivity and density, was the lateral habenula. This result is in accord with previous studies using degeneration methods which indicate an habenular projection to the raphe area. There were afferents exclusively positive for the dorsal raphe nucleus emanating from the nucleus of the solitary tract. Most other raphe afferent areas were also positive for the reticular formation (e.g;, prefrontal cortex, medial forebrain bundle, preoptic nuclei, and reticular formation). The existence of a major afferent system from the lateral habenula to the midbrain raphe is consistent with the concept of a "dorsal pathway" which might be responsible for relaying information from forebrain limbic structures to the "midbrain limbic areas".

  13. Effect of 5-hydroxytryptamine on neurogenic vasoconstriction in the isolated, autoperfused hindquarters of the rat.

    PubMed

    Calama, E; Ortíz de Urbina, A V; Morán, A; Martín, M L; San Román, L

    2005-10-01

    1. In the present study, we analysed the effect of different doses of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; intravenous infusions of 0.001-40 microg/kg per min) in the autoperfused hindquarters of the rat subjected to electrical stimulation (frequencies of 0.5-20 Hz) of the lumbar chains, investigating the relationship between the adrenergic and serotonergic systems in this vascular bed. 2. Because we observed that 5-HT inhibited the increases in perfusion pressure induced by electrical stimulation of the lumbar chains, we used different agonists and antagonists to analyse the mechanism of action of 5-HT. 3. The effect of 5-HT was inhibited by methiothepin (a non-specific 5-HT receptor antagonist), but not by ritanserin (a selective 5-HT2 receptor antagonist). The effects of 5-HT were mimicked by 5-carboxamidotryptamine (a 5-HT1 receptor agonist) and L-694 247 (a selective 5-HT1D receptor agonist), but not by 8-hydroxy-2-dipropylaminotetralin (a 5-HT1A receptor agonist), CGS-12066B (a 5-HT1B receptor agonist), alpha-methyl-5-HT (a 5-HT2 receptor agonist), 1-(3-chlorophenyl) piperazine (a 5-HT2C receptor agonist) or 1-phenylbiguanide (a 5-HT3 receptor agonist). The selective 5-HT1D/1B receptor antagonist BRL 15572 inhibited the effect of the agonist L-694 247. 4. Our data suggest that 5-HT inhibits the increases in perfusion pressure induced by the electrical stimulation of the lumbar chains, acting on presynaptic 5-HT1D receptors and decreasing the release of noradrenaline from the sympathetic nerves in the hindquarter vascular bed of the rat.

  14. Activation of human 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 receptors via an allosteric transmembrane site.

    PubMed

    Lansdell, Stuart J; Sathyaprakash, Chaitra; Doward, Anne; Millar, Neil S

    2015-01-01

    In common with other members of the Cys-loop family of pentameric ligand-gated ion channels, 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 receptors (5-HT3Rs) are activated by the binding of a neurotransmitter to an extracellular orthosteric site, located at the interface of two adjacent receptor subunits. In addition, a variety of compounds have been identified that modulate agonist-evoked responses of 5-HT3Rs, and other Cys-loop receptors, by binding to distinct allosteric sites. In this study, we examined the pharmacological effects of a group of monoterpene compounds on recombinant 5-HT3Rs expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Two phenolic monoterpenes (carvacrol and thymol) display allosteric agonist activity on human homomeric 5-HT3ARs (64 ± 7% and 80 ± 4% of the maximum response evoked by the endogenous orthosteric agonist 5-HT, respectively). In addition, at lower concentrations, where agonist effects are less apparent, carvacrol and thymol act as potentiators of responses evoked by submaximal concentrations of 5-HT. By contrast, carvacrol and thymol have no agonist or potentiating activity on the closely related mouse 5-HT3ARs. Using subunit chimeras containing regions of the human and mouse 5-HT3A subunits, and by use of site-directed mutagenesis, we have identified transmembrane amino acids that either abolish the agonist activity of carvacrol and thymol on human 5-HT3ARs or are able to confer this property on mouse 5-HT3ARs. By contrast, these mutations have no significant effect on orthosteric activation of 5-HT3ARs by 5-HT. We conclude that 5-HT3ARs can be activated by the binding of ligands to an allosteric transmembrane site, a conclusion that is supported by computer docking studies. PMID:25338672

  15. Peptide YY3–36 and 5-Hydroxytryptamine Mediate Emesis Induction by Trichothecene Deoxynivalenol (Vomitoxin)

    PubMed Central

    Pestka, James J.

    2013-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON, vomitoxin), a trichothecene mycotoxin produced by Fusarium sp. that frequently occurs in cereal grains, has been associated with human and animal food poisoning. Although a common hallmark of DON-induced toxicity is the rapid onset of emesis, the mechanisms for this adverse effect are not fully understood. Recently, our laboratory has demonstrated that the mink (Neovison vison) is a suitable small animal model for investigating trichothecene-induced emesis. The goal of this study was to use this model to determine the roles of two gut satiety hormones, peptide YY3–36 (PYY3–36) and cholecystokinin (CCK), and the neurotransmitter 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in DON-induced emesis. Following ip exposure to DON at 0.1 and 0.25mg/kg bw, emesis induction ensued within 15–30min and then persisted up to 120min. Plasma DON measurement revealed that this emesis period correlated with the rapid distribution and clearance of the toxin. Significant elevations in both plasma PYY3–36 (30–60min) and 5-HT (60min) but not CCK were observed during emesis. Pretreatment with the neuropeptide Y2 receptor antagonist JNJ-31020028 attenuated DON- and PYY-induced emesis, whereas the CCK1 receptor antagonist devezapide did not alter DON’s emetic effects. The 5-HT3 receptor antagonist granisetron completely suppressed induction of vomiting by DON and the 5-HT inducer cisplatin. Granisetron pretreatment also partially blocked PYY3–36-induced emesis, suggesting a potential upstream role for this gut satiety hormone in 5-HT release. Taken together, the results suggest that both PYY3–36 and 5-HT play contributory roles in DON-induced emesis. PMID:23457120

  16. 5-Hydroxytryptamine promotes hepatocellular carcinoma proliferation by influencing β-catenin.

    PubMed

    Fatima, Sarwat; Shi, Xiaoke; Lin, Zesi; Chen, Guo-qing; Pan, Xiao-hua; Wu, Justin Che-Yuen; Ho, John W; Lee, Nikki P; Gao, Hengjun; Zhang, Ge; Lu, Aiping; Bian, Zhao Xiang

    2016-02-01

    5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), a neurotransmitter and vasoactive factor, has been reported to promote proliferation of serum-deprived hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells but the detailed intracellular mechanism is unknown. As Wnt/β-catenin signalling is highly dysregulated in a majority of HCC, this study explored the regulation of Wnt/β-catenin signalling by 5-HT. The expression of various 5-HT receptors was studied by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in HCC cell lines as well as in 33 pairs of HCC tumours and corresponding adjacent non-tumour tissues. Receptors 5-HT1D (21/33, 63.6%), 5-HT2B (12/33, 36.4%) and 5-HT7 (15/33, 45.4%) were overexpressed whereas receptors 5-HT2A (17/33, 51.5%) and 5-HT5 (30/33, 90.1%) were reduced in HCC tumour tissues. In vitro data suggests 5-HT increased total β-catenin, active β-catenin and decreased phosphorylated β-catenin protein levels in serum deprived HuH-7 and HepG2 cells compared to control cells under serum free medium without 5-HT. Activation of Wnt/β-catenin signalling was evidenced by increased expression of β-catenin downstream target genes, Axin2, cyclin D1, dickoppf-1 (DKK1) and glutamine synthetase (GS) by qPCR in serum-deprived HCC cell lines treated with 5-HT. Additionally, biochemical analysis revealed 5-HT disrupted Axin1/β-catenin interaction, a critical step in β-catenin phosphorylation. Increased Wnt/β-catenin activity was attenuated by antagonist of receptor 5-HT7 (SB-258719) in HCC cell lines and patient-derived primary tumour tissues in the presence of 5-HT. SB-258719 also reduced tumour growth in vivo. This study provides evidence of Wnt/β-catenin signalling activation by 5-HT and may represent a potential therapeutic target for hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:26474915

  17. Preclinical pharmacology and pharmacokinetics of AZD3783, a selective 5-hydroxytryptamine 1B receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Minli; Zhou, Diansong; Wang, Yi; Maier, Donna L; Widzowski, Daniel V; Sobotka-Briner, Cynthia D; Brockel, Becky J; Potts, William M; Shenvi, Ashok B; Bernstein, Peter R; Pierson, M Edward

    2011-11-01

    The preclinical pharmacology and pharmacokinetic properties of (2R)-6-methoxy-8-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)-N-(4-morpholin-4-ylphenyl)chromane-2-carboxamide (AZD3783), a potent 5-hydroxytryptamine 1B (5-HT(1B)) receptor antagonist, were characterized as part of translational pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic hypothesis testing in human clinical trials. The affinity of AZD3783 to the 5-HT(1B) receptor was measured in vitro by using membrane preparations containing recombinant human or guinea pig 5-HT(1B) receptors and in native guinea pig brain tissue. In vivo antagonist potency of AZD3783 for the 5HT(1B) receptor was investigated by measuring the blockade of 5-HT(1B) agonist-induced guinea pig hypothermia. The anxiolytic-like potency was assessed using the suppression of separation-induced vocalization in guinea pig pups. The affinity of AZD3783 for human and guinea pig 5-HT(1B) receptor (K(i), 12.5 and 11.1 nM, respectively) was similar to unbound plasma EC(50) values for guinea pig receptor occupancy (11 nM) and reduction of agonist-induced hypothermia (18 nM) in guinea pig. Active doses of AZD3783 in the hypothermia assay were similar to doses that reduced separation-induced vocalization in guinea pig pups. AZD3783 demonstrated favorable pharmacokinetic properties. The predicted pharmacokinetic parameters (total plasma clearance, 6.5 ml/min/kg; steady-state volume of distribution, 6.4 l/kg) were within 2-fold of the values observed in healthy male volunteers after a single 20-mg oral dose. This investigation presents a direct link between AZD3783 in vitro affinity and in vivo receptor occupancy to preclinical disease model efficacy. Together with predicted human pharmacokinetic properties, we have provided a model for the quantitative translational pharmacology of AZD3783 that increases confidence in the optimal human receptor occupancy required for antidepressant and anxiolytic effects in patients.

  18. Receptor mechanisms for 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in isolated ovine umbilical vein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Dyer, D C

    1990-08-10

    5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and 2,5-dimethoxy-4-methyl-amphetamine (DOM) produced a concentration-dependent contraction in isolated umbilical veins obtained from fetal lambs within 2 weeks of term. Contractions to 5-HT were antagonized by ketanserin, mianserin and methiothepin with the dissociation constants (KB) being 2.17 +/- 0.36, 1.37 +/- 0.55 and 1.98 +/- 0.48 nM, respectively. The order of potency of serotonergic agonists in this tissue was: DOM greater than 5-HT greater than alpha-methyl-5-HT greater than 1(3-chlorophenyl) piperazine (mCPP) greater than m-trifluoromethyl-phenylpiperazine (TFMPP) greater than 8-hydroxy-dipropylaminotetralin (8-OH-DPAT) = 2-methyl-5-HT. alpha-Methyl-5-HT was a full agonist compared to 5-HT. DOM possessed greater affinity but less efficacy than that of 5-HT. The affinities and efficacies of the other agonists studied were lower than those of 5-HT. Variation in the sensitivity and potency of agonists is primarily due to variations in their affinity for 5-HT receptors. Assessment of receptor occupancy vs. functional response demonstrated very little, if any, receptor reserve for 5-HT receptors in this tissue. Contractile responses to DOM, 8-OH-DPAT, mCPP and 2-methyl-5-HT were effectively blocked by ketanserin. The dissociation constants (KB) of ketanserin against these agonists were as follows: DOM, 2.78 +/- 0.85 nM; 8-OH-DPAT, 3.47 +/- 1.12 nM; mCPP, 1.45 +/- 0.51 nM; 2-methyl-5-HT, 1.99 +/- 0.74 nM. The dissociation constant of MDL 72222 (3-tropanyl-3,5-dichlorobenzoate) vs. 5-HT was 13833 nM. No antagonism by prazosin (10(-7) M) or yohimbine (10(-7) M) of the responses to 5-HT was observed. These results indicate that 5-HT2 receptors are present in the ovine umbilical vein. 5-HT3 receptors were not present in this tissue. Activation of alpha-adrenoceptors was not involved in the contractions to 5-HT.

  19. Characterization of the 5-hydroxytryptamine receptors mediating contraction in the pig isolated intravesical ureter

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Medardo; Barahona, María Victoria; Simonsen, Ulf; Recio, Paz; Rivera, Luis; Martínez, Ana Cristina; García-Sacristán, Albino; Orensanz, Luis M; Prieto, Dolores

    2003-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and to characterize the 5-HT receptors involved in 5-HT responses in the pig intravesical ureter. 5-HT (0.01–10 μM) concentration-dependently increased the tone of intravesical ureteral strips, whereas the increases in phasic contractions were concentration-independent. The 5-HT2 receptor agonist α-methyl 5-HT, mimicked the effect on tone whereas weak or no response was obtained with 5-CT, 8-OH-DPAT, m-chlorophenylbiguanide and RS 67333, 5-HT1, 5-HT1A, 5-HT3 and 5-HT4 receptor agonists, respectively. 5-HT did not induce relaxation of U46619-contracted ureteral preparations. Pargyline (100 μM), a monoaminooxidase A/B activity inhibitor, produced leftward displacements of the concentration-response curves for 5-HT. 5-HT-induced tone was reduced by the 5-HT2 and 5-HT2A receptor antagonists ritanserine (0.1 μM) and spiperone (0.2 μM), respectively. However, 5-HT contraction was not antagonized by cyanopindolol (2 μM), SDZ–SER 082 (1 μM), Y-25130 (1 μM) and GR 113808 (0.1 μM), which are respectively, 5-HT1A/1B, 5-HT2B/2C, 5-HT3, and 5-HT4 selective receptor antagonists. Removal of the urothelium did not modify 5-HT-induced contractions. Blockade of neuronal voltage-activated sodium channels, α-adrenergic receptors and adrenergic neurotransmission with tetrodotoxin (1 μM), phentolamine (0.3 μM) and guanethidine (10 μM), respectively, reduced the contractions to 5-HT. However, physostigmine (1 μM), atropine (0.1 μM) and suramin (30 μM), inhibitors of cholinesterase activity, muscarinic- and purinergic P2-receptors, respectively, failed to modify the contractions to 5-HT. These results suggest that 5-HT increases the tone of the pig intravesical ureter through 5-HT2A receptors located at the smooth muscle. Part of the 5-HT contraction is indirectly mediated via noradrenaline release from sympathetic nerves. PMID:12522083

  20. Multiple microvascular and astroglial 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor subtypes in human brain: molecular and pharmacologic characterization.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Z; Bouchelet, I; Olivier, A; Villemure, J G; Ball, R; Stanimirovic, D B; Hamel, E

    1999-08-01

    Physiologic and anatomic evidence suggest that 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) neurons regulate local cerebral blood flow and blood-brain barrier permeability. To evaluate the possibility that some of these effects occur directly on the blood vessels, molecular and/or pharmacologic approaches were used to assess the presence of 5-HT receptors in human brain microvascular fractions, endothelial and smooth muscle cell cultures, as well as in astroglial cells which intimately associate with intraparenchymal blood vessels. Isolated microvessels and capillaries consistently expressed messages for the h5-HT1B, h5-HT1D, 5-HT1F, 5-HT2A but not 5-HT7 receptors. When their distribution within the vessel wall was studied in more detail, it was found that capillary endothelial cells exhibited mRNA for the h5-HT1D and for the 5-HT7 receptors whereas microvascular smooth muscle cells, in addition to h5-HT1D and 5-HT7, also showed polymerase chain reaction products for h5-HT1B receptors. Expression of 5-HT1F and 5-HT2A receptor mRNAs was never detected in any of the microvascular cell cultures. In contrast, messages for all 5-HT receptors tested were detected in human brain astrocytes with a predominance of the 5-HT2A and 5-HT7 subtypes. In all cultures, sumatriptan inhibited (35-58%, P < .05) the forskolin-stimulated production of cyclic AMP, an effect blocked by the 5-HT1B/1D receptor antagonists GR127935 and GR55562. In contrast, 5-carboxamidotryptamine induced strong increases (> or = 400%, P < .005) in basal cyclic AMP levels that were abolished by mesulergine, a nonselective 5-HT7 receptor antagonist. Only astroglial cells showed a ketanserin-sensitive increase (177%, P < .05) in IP3 formation when exposed to 5-HT. These results show that specific populations of functional 5-HT receptors are differentially distributed within the various cellular compartments of the human cortical microvascular bed, and that human brain astroglial cells are endowed with multiple 5-HT receptors

  1. Anxiogenic-like effects and reduced stereological counting of immunolabelled 5-hydroxytryptamine6 receptors in rat nucleus accumbens by antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Otano, A; Frechilla, D; Cobreros, A; Cruz-Orive, L M; Insausti, A; Insausti, R; Hamon, M; Del Rio, J

    1999-01-01

    The physiological role of 5-hydroxytryptamine6 receptors in the central nervous system has not yet been elucidated. The high affinity of various psychotropic drugs for 5-hydroxytryptamine6 receptors has led to the suggestion that this receptor type may be a novel target in neuropsychiatry. We have found that continuous intracerebroventricular administration of a 5-hydroxytryptamine6 receptor antisense oligonucleotide, but not of a missense oligonucleotide, produced an anxiogenic-like response in rats using two different models of anxiety, the social interaction test and the elevated plus-maze. Neither oligonucleotide treatment modified locomotor activity, rectal temperature or food intake, suggesting a low or null neurotoxicity. The effectiveness of the treatment with the designed antisense oligonucleotide to block the synthesis of the protein encoded by the target mRNA was assessed by immunolabelling 5-hydroxytryptamine6 receptors in the nucleus accumbens, where this receptor is highly expressed, using previously characterized specific antibodies. The density of the immunostaining was quantified by means of an unbiased three-dimensional stereologic procedure, which revealed a significant reduction (-25%) in the number of immunolabelled neuronal elements. These results suggest that, in addition to other 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor subtypes, 5-hydroxytryptamine6 receptors in the nucleus accumbens may participate in anxiety-related neurobiological mechanisms.

  2. Organization of projections from the raphe nuclei to the vestibular nuclei in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halberstadt, A. L.; Balaban, C. D.

    2003-01-01

    Previous anatomic and electrophysiological evidence suggests that serotonin modulates processing in the vestibular nuclei. This study examined the organization of projections from serotonergic raphe nuclei to the vestibular nuclei in rats. The distribution of serotonergic axons in the vestibular nuclei was visualized immunohistochemically in rat brain slices using antisera directed against the serotonin transporter. The density of serotonin transporter-immunopositive fibers is greatest in the superior vestibular nucleus and the medial vestibular nucleus, especially along the border of the fourth ventricle; it declines in more lateral and caudal regions of the vestibular nuclear complex. After unilateral iontophoretic injections of Fluoro-Gold into the vestibular nuclei, retrogradely labeled neurons were found in the dorsal raphe nucleus (including the dorsomedial, ventromedial and lateral subdivisions) and nucleus raphe obscurus, and to a minor extent in nucleus raphe pallidus and nucleus raphe magnus. The combination of retrograde tracing with serotonin immunohistofluorescence in additional experiments revealed that the vestibular nuclei receive both serotonergic and non-serotonergic projections from raphe nuclei. Tracer injections in densely innervated regions (especially the medial and superior vestibular nuclei) were associated with the largest numbers of Fluoro-Gold-labeled cells. Differences were observed in the termination patterns of projections from the individual raphe nuclei. Thus, the dorsal raphe nucleus sends projections that terminate predominantly in the rostral and medial aspects of the vestibular nuclear complex, while nucleus raphe obscurus projects relatively uniformly throughout the vestibular nuclei. Based on the topographical organization of raphe input to the vestibular nuclei, it appears that dense projections from raphe nuclei are colocalized with terminal fields of flocculo-nodular lobe and uvula Purkinje cells. It is hypothesized that

  3. 5-Carboxamide tryptamine, a compound with high affinity for 5-hydroxytryptamine1 binding sites, dilates arterioles and constricts arteriovenous anastomoses.

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, P. R.; Verdouw, P. D.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of 5-carboxamide tryptamine, which activates non-5-hydroxytryptamine2-'atypical' receptors for 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in the dog saphenous vein, was studied on the complete distribution of cardiac output and common carotid blood flow in anaesthetized pigs. The drug was infused for 10 min at the rate of 0.025, 0.1 and 0.4 micrograms kg-1 min-1 either intravenously (cardiac output distribution) or intra-arterially (carotid distribution). 5-Carboxamide tryptamine decreased arterial blood pressure due to a reduction of cardiac output. This reduction was confined to its arteriovenous anastomotic component; the component used for the tissue perfusion (nutrient part) in fact increased. Similar changes were observed in the carotid blood flow distribution. Vasodilation was observed in several tissues, but the skin, ears and stomach responded most prominently. The effects of 5-carboxamide tryptamine on the carotid distribution were not significantly modified by cyproheptadine (1 mg kg-1). It is concluded that, like 5-HT, 5-carboxamide tryptamine constricts arteriovenous anastomoses and dilates arterioles by activating non-5-HT2-'atypical' receptors. These 'atypical' 5-HT receptors appear to be of the 5-HT1 type since both 5-carboxamide tryptamine and BEA 1654, a new piperazine derivative, produced similar vascular effects in the carotid bed of the pig and also showed a high and selective affinity for the 5-HT1 binding sites. PMID:3978321

  4. 5-Hydroxytryptamine receptors mediating vasoconstriction in pulmonary arteries from control and pulmonary hypertensive rats.

    PubMed Central

    MacLean, M. R.; Sweeney, G.; Baird, M.; McCulloch, K. M.; Houslay, M.; Morecroft, I.

    1996-01-01

    1. We investigated 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)-receptor mediated vasoconstriction in the main, first branch and resistance pulmonary arteries removed from control and pulmonary hypertensive rats. Contractile responses to 5-HT, 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT, non-selective 5-HT1 agonist), and sumatriptan (5-HT1D-like receptor agonist) were studied. The effects of methiothepin (non-selective 5-HT1 + 2-receptor antagonist) and ketanserin (5-HT2A receptor antagonist) and GR55562 (a novel selective 5-HT1D receptor antagonist) on 5-HT-mediated responses were also studied. Basal levels of adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate ([cyclic AMP]i) and guanosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate ([cyclic GMP]i) were determined and we assessed the degree of inherent tone in the vessels under study. 2. 5-HT was most potent in the resistance arteries. pEC50 values were 5.6 +/- 0.1, 5.3 +/- 0.1, 5.0 +/- 0.2 in the resistance arteries, pulmonary branch and main pulmonary artery, respectively (n = at least 5 from 5 animals). The sensitivity to, and maximum response of, 5-HT was increased in all the arteries removed from the chronic hypoxic (CH) rats. In CH rats the pEC50 values were 5.9 +/- 0.2, 6.3 +/- 0.2, 6.4 +/- 0.2 and the increase in the maximum response was 35%, 51% and 41% in the resistance arteries, pulmonary branch and main pulmonary artery, respectively. Sumatriptan did not contract any vessel from the control rats whilst 5-CT did contract the resistance arteries. In the CH rats, however, they both contracted the resistance arteries (responses to sumatriptan were small) (pEC50: 5-CT; 5.4 +/- 0.2) and the pulmonary artery branches (pEC50: sumatriptan, 5.4 +/- 0.2; 5-CT, 5.4 +/- 0.2). 5-CT also caused a contraction in the main pulmonary artery (pEC50: 6.0 +/- 0.3). 3. Ketanserin (1 nM-1 microM) caused a competitive antagonism of the 5-HT response in all vessels tested. In control rats, the estimated pKb values for ketanserin in resistance arteries, pulmonary branches and main pulmonary

  5. 5-Hydroxytryptamine 4(a) receptor expressed in Sf9 cells is palmitoylated in an agonist-dependent manner.

    PubMed Central

    Ponimaskin, E G; Schmidt, M F; Heine, M; Bickmeyer, U; Richter, D W

    2001-01-01

    The mouse 5-hydroxytryptamine 4(a) receptor [5-HT(4(a))] was expressed with a baculovirus system in insect cells and analysed for acylation. [(3)H]Palmitic acid was effectively incorporated into 5-HT(4(a)) and label was sensitive to the treatment with reducing agents indicating a thioester-type bond. Analysis of protein-bound fatty acids revealed that 5-HT(4(a)) contains predominantly palmitic acid. Treatment of infected Sf9 (Spodoptera frugiperda) cells with BIMU8 [(endo-N-8-methyl-8-azabicyclo[3.2.1]oct-3-yl)-2,3-dehydro-2-oxo-3-(prop-2-yl)-1H-benzimid-azole-1-carboxamide], a 5-HT(4) receptor-selective agonist, generated a dose-dependent increase in [(3)H]palmitate incorporation into 5-HT(4(a)) with an EC(50) of approx. 10 nM. The change in receptor labelling after stimulation with agonist was receptor-specific and did not result from general metabolic effects. We also used both pulse labelling and pulse-chase labelling to address the dynamics of 5-HT(4(a)) palmitoylation. Incorporation studies revealed that the rate of palmitate incorporation was increased approx. 3-fold after stimulation with agonist. Results of pulse-chase experiments show that activation with BIMU8 promoted the release of radiolabel from 5-HT(4(a)), thereby reducing the levels of receptor-bound palmitate to approximately one-half. Taken together, our results demonstrate that palmitoylation of 5-HT(4(a)) is a reversible process and that stimulation of 5-HT(4(a)) with agonist increases the turnover rate for receptor-bound palmitate. This provides evidence for a regulated cycling of receptor-bound palmitate and suggests a functional role for palmitoylation/depalmitoylation in 5-hydroxytryptamine-mediated signalling. PMID:11171060

  6. High-level stable expression of recombinant 5-HT1A 5-hydroxytryptamine receptors in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed Central

    Newman-Tancredi, A; Wootton, R; Strange, P G

    1992-01-01

    The human 5-hydroxytryptamine 5-HT1A receptor gene was transfected into Chinese hamster ovary cells. A series of recombinant monoclonal cell lines expressing the receptor were isolated and the properties of one cell line that expressed receptors at a high level (2.8 pmol/mg) were studied in detail. In ligand binding assays with the selective 5-HT1A receptor agonist 2-(NN-di[3H]propylamino)-8-hydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene ([3H]8-OH-DPAT) only a single class of saturable high-affinity binding sites was detected, with a pharmacological profile in competition experiments essentially identical to that of the 5-HT1A receptor of bovine hippocampus. [3H]8-OH-DPAT binding to the recombinant cell membranes was inhibited by GTP, showing that the receptors in the transfected cells couple to G-proteins. A series of 5-hydroxytryptamine agonists inhibited forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in the cells and, despite the high level of receptor expression, their apparent efficacies were similar to those observed for inhibition of adenylate cyclase in brain. This recombinant cell line provides a complete model system for studying the 5-HT1A receptor and its transmembrane signalling system. The recombinant cells can also be grown in suspension culture for long periods but, whereas 5-HT1A receptor numbers and receptor regulation by guanine nucleotides are maintained in suspension-grown cells, the inhibition of adenylate cyclase by the 5-HT1A receptor is gradually lost. Images Fig. 1. PMID:1386736

  7. Mescaline increases startle responding equally in normal and raphe-lesioned rats.

    PubMed

    Geyer, M A; Rose, G J; Petersen, L R

    1979-02-01

    To test the possible involvement of serotonin-containing cells of the midbrain in mediating the effects of mescaline on startle responding, electrolytic lesions were made in either the dorsal or median raphe nucleus in rats. Decreases in either striatal or hippocampal tryptophan hydroxylase activity confirmed the effectiveness of the lesions. One week later, startle was measured in response to 30 air-puff stimuli for each rat. Median, but not dorsal, raphe lesions increased startle magnitudes throughout the test session. The following day each group was divided into matched halves and were given 60 trials, 30 minutes after intraperitoneal injection of either saline or 10 mg/kg mescaline. Despite the large differences in baseline startle among the groups, mescaline produced comparable 25% increases in startle magnitudes in both sham- and raphe-lesioned animals. This result fails to support the hypothesis that increased startle responding produced by mescaline is mediated by the midbrain raphe nuclei.

  8. 5-Hydroxytryptamine 1A and 2B serotonin receptors in neurite outgrowth: involvement of early growth response protein 1.

    PubMed

    Anelli, Tonino; Cardarelli, Silvia; Ori, Michela; Nardi, Irma; Biagioni, Stefano; Poiana, Giancarlo

    2013-01-01

    Neurotransmitters play important roles in neurogenesis; in particular, acetylcholine and serotonin may regulate neurite elongation. Acetylcholine may also activate transcription factors such as early growth response protein 1 (EGR-1), which plays a role in neurite extension. N18TG2 neuroblastoma cells (which do not produce neurotransmitters and constitutively express muscarinic acetylcholine receptors) were transfected with constructs containing the cDNA for choline acetyltransferase, 5-hydroxytryptamine 1A (5-HT1A) and 5-HT2B serotonin receptors to study acetylcholine and serotonin interplay in neurite outgrowth. 5-HT1A receptor stimulation causes a decrease in EGR-1 levels and inhibition of neurite outgrowth; 5-HT2B stimulation, however, has no effect. Muscarinic cholinergic stimulation, on the other end, increases EGR-1 levels and fiber outgrowth. Inhibition of EGR-1 binding reduces fiber outgrowth activity. When both cholinergic and 5-HT1A receptors are stimulated, fiber outgrowth is restored; therefore, acetylcholine counterbalances the inhibitory effect of serotonin on neurite outgrowth. These results suggest that EGR-1 plays a role in the interplay of acetylcholine and serotonin in the regulation of neurite extension during development. PMID:24158140

  9. Long-lasting neuroprotective effect of sildenafil against 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine- induced 5-hydroxytryptamine deficits in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Puerta, Elena; Barros-Miñones, Lucia; Hervias, Isabel; Gomez-Rodriguez, Violeta; Orejana, Lourdes; Pizarro, Neus; de la Torre, Rafael; Jordán, Joaquín; Aguirre, Norberto

    2012-02-01

    Sildenafil, given shortly before 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), affords protection against 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) depletions caused by this amphetamine derivative by an acute preconditioning-like mechanism. Because acute and delayed preconditionings do not share the same mechanisms, we investigated whether sildenafil would also protect the 5-HT system of the rat if given 24 hr before MDMA. For this, MDMA (3 × 5 mg/kg i.p., every 2 hr) was administered to rats previously treated with sildenafil (8 mg/kg p.o.). One week later, 5-HT content and 5-HT transporter density were measured in the striatum, frontal cortex, and hippocampus of the rats. Our findings indicate that sildenafil afforded significant protection against MDMA-induced 5-HT deficits without altering the acute hyperthermic response to MDMA or its metabolic disposition. Sildenafil promoted ERK1/2 activation an effect that was paralleled by an increase in MnSOD expression that persisted 24 hr later. In addition, superoxide and superoxide-derived oxidants, shown by ethidium fluorescence, increased after the last MDMA injection, an effect that was prevented by sildenafil pretreatment. Similarly, MDMA increased nitrotyrosine concentration in the hippocampus, an effect not shown by sildenafil-pretreated rats. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that sildenafil produces a significant, long-lasting neuroprotective effect against MDMA-induced 5-HT deficits. This effect is apparently mediated by an increased expression of MnSOD and a subsequent reduced susceptibility to the oxidative stress caused by MDMA.

  10. Identification of 5-Hydroxytryptamine-Producing Cells by Detection of Fluorescence in Paraffin-Embedded Tissue Sections

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Y.; Onda, N.; Watanabe, Y.; Shibutani, M.

    2016-01-01

    5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) produced by enterochromaffin (EC) cells is an important enteric mucosal signaling ligand and has been implicated in several gastrointestinal diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease and functional disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome. The present study reports a new, simple and rapid visualization method of 5-HT-producing EC cells utilizing detection of fluorescence in paraffin-embedded tissue sections after formalin fixation. In human samples, there was a high incidence of fluorescence+ cells in the 5-HT+ cells in the pyloric, small intestinal and colonic glands, while co-localization was lacking between fluorescence+ and gastrin+ cells in the pyloric and small intestinal glands. Fluorescence+ EC cells were detected in the colon of mice and rats. Fluorescence+ cells were also observed in 5-HT+ β cells in the pancreatic islets of Langerhans in pregnant mice, while non-pregnant mouse pancreatic islet cells showed no 5-HT immunoreactivity or fluorescence. These results suggest that fluorescence+ cells are identical to 5-HT+ cells, and the source of fluorescence may be 5-HT itself or molecules related to its synthesis or degradation. This fluorescence signal detection method may be applicable for monitoring of inflammatory status of inflammatory bowel diseases in both the experimental and clinical settings. PMID:27734992

  11. Role of 5-hydroxytryptamine 1B (5-HT1B) receptors in the regulation of ethanol intake in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Sari, Youssef

    2012-01-01

    Evidence indicates that the serotonergic system is important in mediating dependence on and craving for alcohol. Among serotonin receptors, 5-hydroxytryptamine 1B (5-HT1B) receptors have been associated with drug abuse including alcohol. In this review, the neurocircuitry involving 5-HT1B receptors in central reward brain regions related to alcohol intake are discussed in detail. Emphasis has been placed on the pharmacological manipulations of 5-HT1B receptor-mediated alcohol intake. Furthermore, 5-HT1B auto- and hetero-receptors regulate alcohol intake through the regulatory mechanism involving release of 5-HT, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), dopamine, and glutamate is evaluated. Thus, interactions between 5-HT1B receptors and these neurotransmitter systems are suggested to modulate alcohol-drinking behavior. This review on the role of 5-HT1B receptors in neurotransmitter release and consequent alcohol intake provides important information about the potential therapeutic role of 5-HT1B receptors for the treatment of alcohol dependence. PMID:23118018

  12. 5-Hydroxytryptamine 1A and 2B serotonin receptors in neurite outgrowth: involvement of early growth response protein 1.

    PubMed

    Anelli, Tonino; Cardarelli, Silvia; Ori, Michela; Nardi, Irma; Biagioni, Stefano; Poiana, Giancarlo

    2013-01-01

    Neurotransmitters play important roles in neurogenesis; in particular, acetylcholine and serotonin may regulate neurite elongation. Acetylcholine may also activate transcription factors such as early growth response protein 1 (EGR-1), which plays a role in neurite extension. N18TG2 neuroblastoma cells (which do not produce neurotransmitters and constitutively express muscarinic acetylcholine receptors) were transfected with constructs containing the cDNA for choline acetyltransferase, 5-hydroxytryptamine 1A (5-HT1A) and 5-HT2B serotonin receptors to study acetylcholine and serotonin interplay in neurite outgrowth. 5-HT1A receptor stimulation causes a decrease in EGR-1 levels and inhibition of neurite outgrowth; 5-HT2B stimulation, however, has no effect. Muscarinic cholinergic stimulation, on the other end, increases EGR-1 levels and fiber outgrowth. Inhibition of EGR-1 binding reduces fiber outgrowth activity. When both cholinergic and 5-HT1A receptors are stimulated, fiber outgrowth is restored; therefore, acetylcholine counterbalances the inhibitory effect of serotonin on neurite outgrowth. These results suggest that EGR-1 plays a role in the interplay of acetylcholine and serotonin in the regulation of neurite extension during development.

  13. Characterisation of human 5-hydroxytryptamine2A and 5-hydroxytryptamine2C receptors expressed in the human neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y: comparative stimulation by hallucinogenic drugs.

    PubMed

    Newton, R A; Phipps, S L; Flanigan, T P; Newberry, N R; Carey, J E; Kumar, C; McDonald, B; Chen, C; Elliott, J M

    1996-12-01

    Stable transfection of the human neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y with the human 5-hydroxytryptamine2A (5-HT2A) or 5-HT2C receptor cDNA produced cell lines demonstrating ligand affinities that correlated closely with those for the corresponding endogenous receptors in human frontal cortex and choroid plexus, respectively. Stimulation of the recombinant receptors by 5-HT induced phosphoinositide hydrolysis with higher potency but lower efficacy at the 5-HT2C receptor (pEC50 = 7.80 +/- 0.06) compared with the 5-HT2A receptor (pEC50 = 7.30 +/- 0.08). Activation of the 5-HT2A receptor caused a transient fourfold increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration. Whole-cell recordings of cells clamped at -50 mV demonstrated a small inward current (2 pA) in response to 10 microM 5-HT for both receptors. There were no differences in potency or efficacy of phosphoinositide hydrolysis among four hallucinogenic [d-lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), 1-(4-iodo-2,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-2-aminopropane (DOI), 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine, and mescaline] and three nonhallucinogenic drugs (m-chlorophenylpiperazine, quipazine, and ergotamine). Comparison of equipotent doses producing 20% of the maximal response induced by 5-HT revealed selective activation of the 5-HT2A receptor by LSD and to a lesser degree by DOI, mescaline, and ergotamine. Quipazine and 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine were relatively nonselective, whereas m-chlorophenylpiperazine selectively activated the 5-HT2C receptor. It is unlikely therefore that hallucinosis is mediated primarily by activity at the 5-HT2C receptor, whereas activity at the 5-HT2A receptor may represent an important but not unique mechanism associated with hallucinogenic drug action.

  14. Unsurmountable antagonism of brain 5-hydroxytryptamine2 receptors by (+)-lysergic acid diethylamide and bromo-lysergic acid diethylamide.

    PubMed

    Burris, K D; Sanders-Bush, E

    1992-11-01

    Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) and its structural analogue 2-bromo-lysergic acid diethylamide (BOL) act as unsurmountable antagonists of serotonin-elicited contractions in smooth muscle preparations. Two different models, allosteric and kinetic, have been invoked to explain these findings. The present studies investigate the mechanism of antagonism of brain 5-hydroxytryptamine (5HT)2 receptors, utilizing cells transfected with 5HT2 receptor cDNA cloned from rat brain. A proximal cellular response, phosphoinositide hydrolysis, was examined in order to minimize possible postreceptor effects. Even though LSD behaved as a partial agonist and BOL as a pure antagonist, both drugs blocked the effect of serotonin in an unsurmountable manner, i.e., increasing concentrations of serotonin could not overcome the blocking effect of LSD or BOL. Radioligand binding studies showed that preincubation of membranes with either LSD or BOL reduced the density of [3H]ketanserin binding sites, suggesting that the drugs bind tightly to the 5HT2 receptor and are not displaced during the binding assay. Two additional experiments supported this hypothesis. First, the off-rate of [3H] LSD was slow (20 min), relative to that of [3H]ketanserin (approximately 4 min). Second, when the length of incubation with [3H]ketanserin was increased to 60 min, the LSD-induced decrease in Bmax was essentially eliminated. The possibility that LSD and BOL decrease [3H]ketanserin binding by interacting with an allosteric site was rejected, because neither drug altered the rate of dissociation of [3H]ketanserin. The most parsimonious interpretation of these results is that unsurmountable antagonism reflects prolonged occupancy of the receptor by slowly reversible antagonists.

  15. Reduced sensitivity to both positive and negative reinforcement in mice over-expressing the 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter.

    PubMed

    Line, Samantha J; Barkus, Chris; Rawlings, Nancy; Jennings, Katie; McHugh, Stephen; Sharp, Trevor; Bannerman, David M

    2014-12-01

    The 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) transporter (5-HTT) is believed to play a key role in both normal and pathological psychological states. Much previous data suggest that the s allele of the polymorphic regulatory region of the 5-HTT gene promoter is associated with reduced 5-HTT expression and vulnerability to psychiatric disorders, including anxiety and depression. In comparison, the l allele, which increases 5-HTT expression, is generally considered protective. However, recent data link this allele to both abnormal 5-HT signalling and psychopathic traits. Here, we studied the processing of aversive and rewarding cues in transgenic mice that over-express the 5-HTT (5-HTTOE mice). Compared with wild-type mice, 5-HTTOE mice froze less in response to both a tone that had previously been paired with footshock, and the conditioning context. In addition, on a decision-making T-maze task, 5-HTTOE mice displayed reduced preference for a larger, delayed reward and increased preference for a smaller, immediate reward, suggesting increased impulsiveness compared with wild-type mice. However, further inspection of the data revealed that 5-HTTOE mice displayed a relative insensitivity to reward magnitude, irrespective of delay. In contrast, 5-HTTOE mice appeared normal on tests of spatial working and reference memory, which required an absolute choice between options associated with either reward or no reward. Overall, the present findings suggest that 5-HTT over-expression results in a reduced sensitivity to both positive and negative reinforcers. Thus, these data show that increased 5-HTT expression has some maladaptive effects, supporting recent suggestions that l allele homozygosity may be a potential risk factor for disabling psychiatric traits.

  16. Treadmill exercise alleviates stress-induced impairment of social interaction through 5-hydroxytryptamine 1A receptor activation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Woon; Lim, Baek-Vin; Kim, Kijeong; Seo, Jin-Hee; Kim, Chang-Ju

    2015-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptors tyrosine kinase B (trkB), and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein (CREB) have been suggested as the neurobiological risk factors causing depressive disorder. Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of depression. We in-vestigated the effect of treadmill exercise on social interaction in relation with BDNF and 5-HT expressions following stress in rats. Stress was induced by applying inescapable 0.2 mA electric foot shock to the rats for 7 days. The rats in the exercise groups were forced to run on a motorized treadmill for 30 min once a day for 4 weeks. Social interaction test and western blot for BDNF, TrkB, pCREB, and 5-HT1A in the hippocampus were performed. The results indicate that the spend time with unfamiliar partner was decreased by stress, in contrast, treadmill exercise increased the spending time in the stress-induced rats. Expressions of BDNF, TrkB, and pCREB were decreased by stress, in contrast, treadmill exercise enhanced expressions of BDNF, TrkB, and pCREB in the stress-induced rats. In addition, 5-HT1A receptor expression was de-creased by stress, in contrast, treadmill exercise enhanced 5-HT1A expression in the stress-induced rats. In the present study, treadmill exercise alleviated stress-induced social interaction impairment through enhancing hippocampal plasticity and serotonergic function in the hippocampus. These effects of treadmill exercise are achieved through 5-HT1A receptor activation. PMID:26331133

  17. 5-Hydroxytryptamine-induced vasodilator responses in the hindquarters of the anaesthetized rat, involve beta2-adrenoceptors.

    PubMed

    Calama, E; García, M; Jarque, M J; Morán, A; Martín, M L; San Román, L

    2003-10-01

    These studies were conducted to examine the role of the vasoactive mediators nitric oxide (NO) and adrenaline (epinephrine) in the serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT)-induced vasodilator response in the hindquarter vascular bed of anaesthetized rats. Intra-arterial administration of doses of 5-HT in the range 0.12-25 ng kg(-1) produced a dose-independent vasodilator effect in the hindquarters. The selective 5-HT(1D/1B) receptor agonist, L-694,247 at intra-arterial doses of 0.0012-1000 ng kg(-1), as well as adrenaline (at doses of 0.05-50 ng kg(-1) i.a.), mimicked the dose-independent vasodilator effect induced by intra-arterial administration of 5-HT. Intravenous pre-treatment with the selective beta2-receptor antagonist ICI 118,551 (0.5 mg kg(-1)) blocked the vasodilator effect of 5-HT, adrenaline and L-694,247. Additionally, the inhibitor of NO synthase NG-nitro-L-arginine (L-NAME) (at a dose of 10 mg kg(-1) i.v.) blocked the vasodilator action of acetylcholine 300-3000 ng kg(-1)) but did not modify 5-HT-induced vasodilatation. The vasodilator effect produced by intra-arterial administration of 5-HT in the hindquarters was significantly inhibited both 30 min after denervation of the lumbar sympathetic chains and 1 h after bilateral adrenalectomy. Our data suggest that in the in-situ autoperfused hindquarters of the rat 5-HT-induced vasodilatation is mediated by a local 5-HT(1D) or 5-HT(1D/1B) activation, which in turn mediates the adrenal release of adrenaline, which then produces beta2-activation and vasodilatation.

  18. 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) reduces total peripheral resistance during chronic infusion: direct arterial mesenteric relaxation is not involved

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) delivered over 1 week results in a sustained fall in blood pressure in the sham and deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt rat. We hypothesized 5-HT lowers blood pressure through direct receptor-mediated vascular relaxation. In vivo, 5-HT reduced mean arterial pressure (MAP), increased heart rate, stroke volume, cardiac index, and reduced total peripheral resistance during a 1 week infusion of 5-HT (25 µg/kg/min) in the normotensive Sprague Dawley rat. The mesenteric vasculature was chosen as an ideal candidate for the site of 5-HT receptor mediated vascular relaxation given the high percentage of cardiac output the site receives. Real-time RT-PCR demonstrated that mRNA transcripts for the 5-HT2B, 5-HT1B, and 5-HT7 receptors are present in sham and DOCA-salt superior mesenteric arteries. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot validated the presence of the 5-HT2B, 5- HT1B and 5-HT7 receptor protein in sham and DOCA-salt superior mesenteric artery. Isometric contractile force was measured in endothelium-intact superior mesenteric artery and mesenteric resistance arteries in which the contractile 5- HT2A receptor was antagonized. Maximum concentrations of BW-723C86 (5- HT2B agonist), CP 93129 (5-HT1B agonist) or LP-44 (5-HT7 agonist) did not relax the superior mesenteric artery from DOCA-salt rats vs. vehicle. Additionally, 5-HT (10–9 M to 10–5 M) did not cause relaxation in either contracted mesenteric resistance arteries or superior mesenteric arteries from normotensive Sprague- Dawley rats. Thus, although 5-HT receptors known to mediate vascular relaxation are present in the superior mesenteric artery, they are not functional, and are therefore not likely involved in a 5-HT-induced fall in total peripheral resistance and MAP. PMID:22559843

  19. Treadmill exercise alleviates stress-induced impairment of social interaction through 5-hydroxytryptamine 1A receptor activation in rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Woon; Lim, Baek-Vin; Kim, Kijeong; Seo, Jin-Hee; Kim, Chang-Ju

    2015-08-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptors tyrosine kinase B (trkB), and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein (CREB) have been suggested as the neurobiological risk factors causing depressive disorder. Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of depression. We in-vestigated the effect of treadmill exercise on social interaction in relation with BDNF and 5-HT expressions following stress in rats. Stress was induced by applying inescapable 0.2 mA electric foot shock to the rats for 7 days. The rats in the exercise groups were forced to run on a motorized treadmill for 30 min once a day for 4 weeks. Social interaction test and western blot for BDNF, TrkB, pCREB, and 5-HT1A in the hippocampus were performed. The results indicate that the spend time with unfamiliar partner was decreased by stress, in contrast, treadmill exercise increased the spending time in the stress-induced rats. Expressions of BDNF, TrkB, and pCREB were decreased by stress, in contrast, treadmill exercise enhanced expressions of BDNF, TrkB, and pCREB in the stress-induced rats. In addition, 5-HT1A receptor expression was de-creased by stress, in contrast, treadmill exercise enhanced 5-HT1A expression in the stress-induced rats. In the present study, treadmill exercise alleviated stress-induced social interaction impairment through enhancing hippocampal plasticity and serotonergic function in the hippocampus. These effects of treadmill exercise are achieved through 5-HT1A receptor activation.

  20. Effects of chlorphentermine and phentermine on the pulmonary disposition of 5-hydroxytryptamine in the rat in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, T.; Mehendale, H.M.

    1983-06-01

    This study was designed to examine whether chlorphentermine (CP) affects pulmonary disposition of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in rat in vivo. Further, the effects of CP were compared with those of phentermine (P), the nonchlorinated congener. The right jugular vein and left carotid artery of male Sprague-Dawley rats were cannulated and fresh saline solution containing 150 micrograms indocyanine green and a mixture of labeled and unlabeled 5-HT was injected into the jugular vein, and arterial blood samples were collected for 20 s. In order to compare the effect of CP and P on pulmonary disposition of 5-HT, 2.6 nmol (/sup 14/C)-5-HT was employed for in vivo single-pass experiments. Each animal was used for 2 in vivo single-pass experiments. After the first experiment, which served as a control, animals received an indicated dose of CP or P, to commence the second ''drug-treated'' in vivo experiment. Pulmonary clearance of 5-HT was inhibited by prior administration of CP (1 mg/kg) by 42%, whereas at the highest dose (20 mg/kg) P inhibited 5-HT clearance by only 25%. Pulmonary accumulation of CP was greater than P at higher doses, and the inhibition of 5-HT clearance correlated with the pulmonary accumulation of these drugs. In addition to the in vivo demonstration of the CP inhibition of pulmonary clearance of 5-HT in the rat, these studies also demonstrate a higher affinity of the lung tissue for CP than for P and a greater propensity for the impairment of pulmonary 5-HT clearance.

  1. Assessment of 5-hydroxytryptamine efflux in rat brain during a mild, moderate and severe serotonin-toxicity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gongliang; Krishnamoorthy, Swapna; Ma, Zhiyuan; Vukovich, Nick P; Huang, Xupei; Tao, Rui

    2009-08-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT)-toxicity syndrome, an iatrogenic brain disorder induced by excessive efflux of 5-HT, has received much attention because of increasing incidents of serotonergic antidepressants. However, the neural mechanism by which extracellular 5-HT is elevated to a toxic level for the syndrome remains to be determined. The goal of the present study was to test the hypothesis that extracellular 5-HT is composed of two component effluxes responsible for distinct aspects of the syndrome. The first set of experiments was to characterize the syndrome by measuring changes in neuromuscular signs, body-core temperature and mortality rate. Our results indicate that the syndrome severity can be categorized into mild, moderate and severe levels. The second set of experiments was to determine a threshold of extracellular 5-HT for induction of each level of the syndrome. Our results demonstrate that there were an 11-fold increase in the mild syndrome and an over 55-fold increase in the severe syndrome. In the last series of experiments, the excessive increases in 5-HT were pharmacologically separated into primary and secondary component effluxes with the 5-HT2A receptor antagonists cyproheptadine and ketanserin and NMDA receptor antagonist (+)-MK-801. Our results suggest that the primary component efflux was caused by direct drug effects on 5-HT biosynthetic and metabolic pathways and secondary efflux ascribed to indirect drug effect on a positive-feedback circuit involving 5-HT2A and NMDA receptors. In summary, the primary efflux could be an initial cause for the induction of the syndrome while the secondary efflux might involve deterioration of the syndrome.

  2. In vivo labeling of 5-hydroxytryptamine uptake sites in mouse brain with ( sup 3 H)-6-nitroquipazine

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, K.; Goromaru, T. )

    1990-10-01

    6-Nitroquipazine (DU 24565; 6-nitro 2-piperazinylquinoline) is a very potent 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; serotonin) uptake inhibitor. It has been demonstrated very recently that (3H)-6-nitroquipazine is a suitable radioligand for studying 5-HT uptake sites. The present study evaluates (3H)6-nitroquipazine as a radioligand for in vivo labeling of 5-HT uptake sites in mouse brain. Very high uptake of radioactivity in the brain after i.v. administration of (3H)-6-nitroquipazine was shown. Regional distribution of the radioactivity in mouse brain 3 hr after injection of (3H)-6-nitroquipazine was in the order (highest to lowest) hypothalamus greater than midbrain greater than striatum greater than hippocampus greater than cerebral cortex greater than medulla oblongata greater than cerebellum. The regional distribution of in vivo (3H)-6-nitroquipazine binding in mouse brain was highly correlated with that in rat brain obtained from previous in vitro binding studies. Coadministration of carrier 6-nitroquipazine (5 mg/kg) significantly decreased the radioactivity in the hypothalamus, whereas that in the cerebellum and cerebral cortex was increased. Because the cerebellum has very low density of (3H)-6-nitroquipazine binding sites, the radioactivity in the cerebellum could, therefore, reflect the amount on nonspecific binding and free ligand. Kinetic studies showed highest in vivo specific binding 1 hr after injection of (3H)-6-nitroquipazine and slow clearance of specific binding. Specific binding in the hypothalamus was inhibited in a stereoselective manner by the stereoisomers of norzimelidine. Furthermore, specific binding in the hypothalamus was reduced by several 5-HT uptake inhibitors, in a dose-dependent manner.

  3. Pharmacological activity of (-)-discretamine, a novel vascular alpha-adrenoceptor and 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor antagonist, isolated from Fissistigma glaucescens.

    PubMed Central

    Ko, F. N.; Yu, S. M.; Su, M. J.; Wu, Y. C.; Teng, C. M.

    1993-01-01

    1. The pharmacological activity of (-)-discretamine, isolated from Fissistigma glaucescens, was determined in rat isolated thoracic aorta, cardiac tissues and ventricular myocytes and guinea-pig isolated trachea. 2. (-)-Discretamine was found to be an alpha 1-adrenoceptor blocking agent in rat thoracic aorta as revealed by its competitive antagonism of noradrenaline (pA2 = 7.20 +/- 0.10)- or phenylephrine (pA2 = 7.60 +/- 0.09)-induced vasoconstriction. It was as potent as phentolamine (pA2 = 7.51 +/- 0.10), but was more potent than yohimbine (pA2 = 6.18 +/- 0.06). Removal of endothelium significantly increased the antagonistic potency of (-)-discretamine on noradrenaline (pA2 = 7.52 +/- 0.09)- or phenylephrine (pA2 = 7.90 +/- 0.09)-induced vasoconstriction. 3. (-)-Discretamine was also an alpha 2-adrenoceptor blocking agent (pA2 = 6.30 +/- 0.15) and a 5-hydroxytryptamine antagonist (pA2 = 6.87 +/- 0.06), both in rat aorta denuded of endothelium. 4. (-)-Discretamine protected alpha-adrenoceptors from alkylation by the irreversible blocking agent, phenoxybenzamine. 5. [3H]-inositol monophosphate formation caused by noradrenaline (3 microM) in rat thoracic aorta was suppressed by (-)-discretamine (10 and 30 microM) and prazosin (3 microM). 6. A high concentration of (-)-discretamine (30 microM) did not affect the contraction induced by the thromboxane receptor agonist U-46619, prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2 alpha), angiotensin II, high K+ or endothelin in rat aorta denuded of endothelium. Neither cyclic AMP nor cyclic GMP content of rat thoracic aorta was changed by (-)-discretamine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7902181

  4. Parallel functional activity profiling reveals valvulopathogens are potent 5-hydroxytryptamine(2B) receptor agonists: implications for drug safety assessment.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xi-Ping; Setola, Vincent; Yadav, Prem N; Allen, John A; Rogan, Sarah C; Hanson, Bonnie J; Revankar, Chetana; Robers, Matt; Doucette, Chris; Roth, Bryan L

    2009-10-01

    Drug-induced valvular heart disease (VHD) is a serious side effect of a few medications, including some that are on the market. Pharmacological studies of VHD-associated medications (e.g., fenfluramine, pergolide, methysergide, and cabergoline) have revealed that they and/or their metabolites are potent 5-hydroxytryptamine(2B) (5-HT(2B)) receptor agonists. We have shown that activation of 5-HT(2B) receptors on human heart valve interstitial cells in vitro induces a proliferative response reminiscent of the fibrosis that typifies VHD. To identify current or future drugs that might induce VHD, we screened approximately 2200 U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved or investigational medications to identify 5-HT(2B) receptor agonists, using calcium-based high-throughput screening. Of these 2200 compounds, 27 were 5-HT(2B) receptor agonists (hits); 14 of these had previously been identified as 5-HT(2B) receptor agonists, including seven bona fide valvulopathogens. Six of the hits (guanfacine, quinidine, xylometazoline, oxymetazoline, fenoldopam, and ropinirole) are approved medications. Twenty-three of the hits were then "functionally profiled" (i.e., assayed in parallel for 5-HT(2B) receptor agonism using multiple readouts to test for functional selectivity). In these assays, the known valvulopathogens were efficacious at concentrations as low as 30 nM, whereas the other compounds were less so. Hierarchical clustering analysis of the pEC(50) data revealed that ropinirole (which is not associated with valvulopathy) was clearly segregated from known valvulopathogens. Taken together, our data demonstrate that patterns of 5-HT(2B) receptor functional selectivity might be useful for identifying compounds likely to induce valvular heart disease. PMID:19570945

  5. Reduced sensitivity to both positive and negative reinforcement in mice over-expressing the 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter.

    PubMed

    Line, Samantha J; Barkus, Chris; Rawlings, Nancy; Jennings, Katie; McHugh, Stephen; Sharp, Trevor; Bannerman, David M

    2014-12-01

    The 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) transporter (5-HTT) is believed to play a key role in both normal and pathological psychological states. Much previous data suggest that the s allele of the polymorphic regulatory region of the 5-HTT gene promoter is associated with reduced 5-HTT expression and vulnerability to psychiatric disorders, including anxiety and depression. In comparison, the l allele, which increases 5-HTT expression, is generally considered protective. However, recent data link this allele to both abnormal 5-HT signalling and psychopathic traits. Here, we studied the processing of aversive and rewarding cues in transgenic mice that over-express the 5-HTT (5-HTTOE mice). Compared with wild-type mice, 5-HTTOE mice froze less in response to both a tone that had previously been paired with footshock, and the conditioning context. In addition, on a decision-making T-maze task, 5-HTTOE mice displayed reduced preference for a larger, delayed reward and increased preference for a smaller, immediate reward, suggesting increased impulsiveness compared with wild-type mice. However, further inspection of the data revealed that 5-HTTOE mice displayed a relative insensitivity to reward magnitude, irrespective of delay. In contrast, 5-HTTOE mice appeared normal on tests of spatial working and reference memory, which required an absolute choice between options associated with either reward or no reward. Overall, the present findings suggest that 5-HTT over-expression results in a reduced sensitivity to both positive and negative reinforcers. Thus, these data show that increased 5-HTT expression has some maladaptive effects, supporting recent suggestions that l allele homozygosity may be a potential risk factor for disabling psychiatric traits. PMID:25283165

  6. Serotonin 5-hydroxytryptamine(2A) receptor activation suppresses tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced inflammation with extraordinary potency.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bangning; Becnel, Jaime; Zerfaoui, Mourad; Rohatgi, Rasika; Boulares, A Hamid; Nichols, Charles D

    2008-11-01

    The G protein-coupled serotonin 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)(2A) receptor is primarily recognized for its role in brain neurotransmission, where it mediates a wide variety of functions, including certain aspects of cognition. However, there is significant expression of this receptor in peripheral tissues, where its importance is largely unknown. We have now discovered that activation of 5-HT(2A) receptors in primary aortic smooth muscle cells provides a previously unknown and extremely potent inhibition of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha-mediated inflammation. 5-HT(2A) receptor stimulation with the agonist (R)-1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane [(R)-DOI] rapidly inhibits a variety of TNF-alpha-mediated proinflammatory markers, including intracellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), vascular adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1), and interleukin (IL)-6 gene expression, nitric-oxide synthase activity, and nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappaB, with IC(50) values of only 10 to 20 pM. It is significant that proinflammatory markers can also be inhibited by (R)-DOI hours after treatment with TNF-alpha. With the exception of a few natural toxins, no current drugs or small molecule therapeutics demonstrate a comparable potency for any physiological effect. TNF-alpha-mediated inflammatory pathways have been strongly implicated in a number of diseases, including atherosclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, type II diabetes, depression, schizophrenia, and Alzheimer's disease. Our results indicate that activation of 5-HT(2A) receptors represents a novel, and extraordinarily potent, potential therapeutic avenue for the treatment of disorders involving TNF-alpha-mediated inflammation. Note that because (R)-DOI can significantly inhibit the effects of TNF-alpha many hours after the administration of TNF-alpha, potential therapies could be aimed not only at preventing inflammation but also treating inflammatory injury that has already occurred or is ongoing. PMID

  7. Two types of receptors for 5-hydroxytryptamine on the cholinergic nerves of the guinea-pig myenteric plexus.

    PubMed Central

    Kilbinger, H.; Pfeuffer-Friederich, I.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) on spontaneous and electrically-evoked release of [3H]-acetylcholine (ACh) from guinea-pig myenteric plexus preparations preincubated with [3H]-choline have been investigated in the absence of cholinesterase inhibitors. 5-HT caused a transient increase in spontaneous release and an inhibition of the electrically-evoked release of [3H]-ACh. The 5-HT-induced contractions of the longitudinal muscle were clearly related to the increase in spontaneous release. The inhibitory effect was not due to activation of alpha-adrenoceptors since it was also observed in the presence of tolazoline and on strips from reserpine-pretreated guinea-pigs. After desensitization of the excitatory 5-HT receptors with 5-HT or metoclopramide the effects of 5-HT on spontaneous [3H]-ACh release were largely reduced. A variety of established antagonists at neuronal 5-HT receptors (i.e. metitepine 0.1-1 microM; methysergide 1 microM; ketanserin 0.1-1 microM; MDL 72222 0.1 microM; tropacocaine 1 microM) failed to block the excitation. The inhibition by 5-HT of the electrically evoked [3H]-ACh release was competitively antagonized by metitepine (pA2 7.6) and methysergide (pA2 7.0) but not by ketanserin. Tachyphylaxis to the inhibitory action of 5-HT did not occur. The results suggest that the excitatory 5-HT receptor ('M'-receptor) differs in its pharmacological properties from other neuronal 5-HT receptors. The presynaptically located inhibitory receptor may roughly correspond to the 5-HT1 receptor subtype but probably differs from the 5-HT autoreceptor. PMID:3161573

  8. Changes in 5-hydroxytryptamine and cortisol plasma levels in menopausal women after inhalation of clary sage oil.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Bok; Cho, Eun; Kang, Young-Sook

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the antidepressant-like effects of clary sage oil on human beings by comparing the neurotransmitter level change in plasma. The voluntary participants were 22 menopausal women in 50's. Subjects were classified into normal and depression tendency groups using each of Korean version of Beck Depression Inventory-I (KBDI-I), KBDI-II, and Korean version of Self-rating Depression Scale. Then, the changes in neurotransmitter concentrations were compared between two groups. After inhalation of clary sage oil, cortisol levels were significantly decreased while 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) concentration was significantly increased. Thyroid stimulating hormone was also reduced in all groups but not statistically significantly. The different change rate of 5-HT concentration between normal and depression tendency groups was variable according to the depression measurement inventory. When using KBDI-I and KBDI-II, 5-HT increased by 341% and 828% for the normal group and 484% and 257% for the depression tendency group, respectively. The change rate of cortisol was greater in depression tendency groups compared with normal groups, and this difference was statistically significant when using KBDI-II (31% vs. 16% reduction) and Self-rating Depression Scale inventory (36% vs. 8.3% reduction). Among three inventories, only KBDI-II differentiated normal and depression tendency groups with significantly different cortisol level. Finally, clary sage oil has antidepressant-like effect, and KBDI-II inventory may be the most sensitive and valid tool in screening for depression status or severity.

  9. 5-HT1 agonists reduce 5-hydroxytryptamine release in rat hippocampus in vivo as determined by brain microdialysis.

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, T.; Bramwell, S. R.; Grahame-Smith, D. G.

    1989-01-01

    1. An intracerebral perfusion method, brain microdialysis, was used to assess changes of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) release in the ventral hippocampus of the chloral hydrate-anaesthetized rat in response to systemic administration of a variety of 5-HT1 receptor agonists. 2. A stable output of reliably detectable endogenous 5-HT was measured in dialysates collected from ventral hippocampus with the 5-HT reuptake inhibitor, citalopram, present in the perfusion medium. 3. Under these conditions the putative 5-HT1A agonist 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) caused a dose-dependent (5-250 micrograms kg-1, s.c.) reduction of 5-HT in hippocampal dialysates. 4. Similarly, the putative 5-HT1A agonists gepirone (5 mg kg-1, s.c.), ipsapirone (5 mg kg-1, s.c.) and buspirone (5 mg kg-1, s.c.) markedly reduced levels of 5-HT in hippocampal perfusates whereas their common metabolite 1-(2-pyrimidinyl) piperazine (5 mg kg-1, s.c.), which does not bind to central 5-HT1A recognition sites, had no effect. 5. 5-Methoxy-3-(1,2,3,6-tetrahydro-4-pyridinyl)-1H-indole (RU 24969), a drug with reported high affinity for brain 5-HT1B binding sites, also produced a dose-dependent (0.25-5 mg kg-1, s.c.) decrease of hippocampal 5-HT output. 6. These data are direct biochemical evidence that systemically administered putative 5-HT1A and 5-HT1B agonists markedly inhibit 5-HT release in rat ventral hippocampus in vivo. PMID:2466516

  10. Participation of mast cell 5-hydroxytryptamine in the vasoconstrictor effect of neurotensin in the rat perfused hindquarter.

    PubMed

    Kérouac, R; St-Pierre, S; Rioux, F

    1984-03-01

    Neurotensin (NT) (1 X 10(-8) - 1.5 X 10(-6) g ml-1) caused a transient, dose-dependent increase in perfusion pressure in the rat perfused hindquarter. The vasoconstrictor effect of NT was associated with a short-lived, dose-dependent release of histamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in the hindquarter effluent. Compound 48/80, a classical mast cell secretagogue, also elicited a vasoconstrictor effect in, and release of histamine from, the rat hindquarter. The vasoconstrictor effect and the release of histamine and 5-HT evoked by NT were much smaller in hindquarters derived from rats pretreated with compound 48/80 for 4 days to cause mast cell depletion than in hindquarters derived from control rats. The mast cell inhibitor cromoglycate (4 mg ml-1) inhibited by about 50% the histamine releasing effect and vasoconstriction produced by the lowest concentrations of NT utilized. The histamine releasing effect of compound 48/80 was more sensitive to blockade by cromoglycate than that of NT. The steroidal antiinflammatory and antiallergic drug dexamethasone did not affect the histamine and 5-HT releasing effect of NT. The vasoconstrictor effects of NT, compound 48/80 and 5-HT were markedly reduced by the 5-HT receptor antagonist methysergide (1 X 10(-7) g ml-1). Histamine (1 X 10(-6) - 10(-4) g ml-1) evoked a decrease in perfusion pressure in hindquarters pre-exposed to noradrenaline. The results suggest the participation of mast cell 5-HT in the vasoconstrictor effect of NT in the rat perfused hindquarter.

  11. Tong Xie Yao Fang relieves irritable bowel syndrome in rats via mechanisms involving regulation of 5-hydroxytryptamine and substance P

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yue; Zhong, Lei; Wang, Jian-Wei; Zhao, Xue-Ying; Zhao, Wen-Jing; Kuang, Hai-Xue

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether the Chinese medicine Tong Xie Yao Fang (TXYF) improves dysfunction in an irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) rat model. METHODS: Thirty baby rats for IBS modeling were separated from mother rats (1 h per day) from days 8 to 21, and the rectum was expanded by angioplasty from days 8 to 12. Ten normal rats were used as normal controls. We examined the effects of TXYF on defection frequency, colonic transit function and smooth muscle contraction, and the expression of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and substance P (SP) in colonic and hypothalamus tissues by Western blot and RT-PCT techniques in both normal rats and IBS model rats with characterized visceral hypersensitivity. RESULTS: Defecation frequency was 1.8 ± 1.03 in normal rats and 4.5 ± 1.58 in IBS model rats (P < 0.001). However, the defecation frequency was significantly decreased (3.0 ± 1.25 vs 4.5 ± 1.58, P < 0.05), while the time (in seconds) of colon transit function was significantly increased (256.88 ± 20.32 vs 93.36 ± 17.28, P < 0.001) in IBS + TXYF group rats than in IBS group rats. Increased colonic smooth muscle tension and contract frequency in IBS model rats were significantly decreased by administration of TXYF. Exogenous agonist stimulants increased spontaneous activity and elicited contractions of colon smooth muscle in IBS model rats, and all of these actions were significantly reduced by TXYF involving 5-HT and SP down-regulation. CONCLUSION: TXYF can modulate the activity of the enteric nervous system and alter 5-HT and SP activities, which may contribute to the symptoms of IBS. PMID:25914462

  12. Transcriptome fingerprints distinguish hallucinogenic and nonhallucinogenic 5-hydroxytryptamine 2A receptor agonist effects in mouse somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    González-Maeso, Javier; Yuen, Tony; Ebersole, Barbara J; Wurmbach, Elisa; Lira, Alena; Zhou, Mingming; Weisstaub, Noelia; Hen, Rene; Gingrich, Jay A; Sealfon, Stuart C

    2003-10-01

    Most neuropharmacological agents and many drugs of abuse modulate the activity of heptahelical G-protein-coupled receptors. Although the effects of these ligands result from changes in cellular signaling, their neurobehavioral activity may not correlate with results of in vitro signal transduction assays. 5-Hydroxytryptamine 2A receptor (5-HT2AR) partial agonists that have similar pharmacological profiles differ in the behavioral responses they elicit. In vitro studies suggest that different agonists acting at the same receptor may establish distinct patterns of signal transduction. Testing this hypothesis in the brain requires a global signal transduction assay that is applicable in vivo. To distinguish the cellular effects of the different 5-HT2AR agonists, we developed an assay for global signal transduction on the basis of high throughput quantification of rapidly modulated transcripts. Study of the responses to agonists in human embryonic kidney 293 cells stably expressing 5-HT2ARs demonstrated that each agonist elicits a distinct transcriptome fingerprint. We therefore studied behavioral and cortical signal transduction responses in wild-type and 5-HT2AR null-mutant mice. The hallucinogenic chemicals (+/-)-2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine (DOI) and lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) stimulated a head-twitch behavioral response that was not observed with the nonhallucinogenic lisuride hydrogen maleate (LHM) and was absent in receptor null-mutant mice. We also found that DOI, LSD, and LHM each induced distinct transcriptome fingerprints in somatosensory cortex that were absent in 5-HT2AR null-mutants. Moreover, DOI and LSD showed similarities in the transcriptome fingerprints obtained that were not observed with the behaviorally inactive drug LHM. Our results demonstrate that chemicals acting at the 5-HT2AR induce specific cellular response patterns in vivo that are reflected in unique changes in the somatosensory cortex transcriptome.

  13. Chronic oral nicotine administration affects the circadian rhythm of dopamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine metabolism in the striata of mice.

    PubMed

    Pietila, K; Laakso, I; Ahtee, L

    1995-12-01

    The effect of chronic oral administration of nicotine on the circadian rhythm of striatal dopamine (DA) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) was studied in mice. Mice receiving nicotine in their drinking water and control mice drinking tap water were killed at 05:00, 11:00, 15:00 or 21:00 hours on the 50th day of chronic administration. The plasma concentrations of nicotine and cotinine, as well the striatal concentrations of DA, 5-HT and their metabolites 3,4 dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), 3-methoxytyramine (3-MT), homovanilic acid (HVA) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) were estimated. The largest plasma concentrations of nicotine and cotinine were found at 05:00, when they were more than double the concentrations found at the other times studied. This indicates that the mice, typically for nocturnal animals, consumed most of their daily drinking water at night. In the control mice, the striatal DA and 3-MT concentrations showed circadian variation and were lowest at 11:00. The 5-HIAA concentrations also varied, being highest at 11:00. In the nicotine-treated mice the circadian variations in striatal monoamines were altered and more pronounced than in the controls. The concentrations of DA, DOPAC, HVA and 5-HIAA were highest at 11:00 and that of 5-HT at 21:00. The striatal DA, DOPAC, HVA and 5-HIAA concentrations in the nicotine-treated mice were significantly higher at 11:00 and the 5-HT concentrations at 21:00 than in the control mice, and, in contrast to the control mice, in the mice treated with chronic nicotine no circadian rhythm was observed in the 3-MT. No elevation of striatal DA metabolites occurred in the nicotine-treated mice compared with the controls when the plasma nicotine concentration was at its peak at 05:00. This finding suggests development of tolerance to the nicotine-induced changes in striatal DA metabolism. Further, our findings suggest that the chronic administration of nicotine in the drinking water of mice alters the circadian

  14. Vasodilator and vasoconstrictor responses induced by 5-hydroxytryptamine in the in situ blood autoperfused hindquarters of the anaesthetized rat.

    PubMed

    Calama, E; Fernández, M M; Morán, A; Martín, M L; San Román, L

    2002-08-01

    In the present study we attempted to characterise the responses and receptors involved in the effects of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, serotonin) in in situ autoperfused rat hindquarters. Intra-arterial administration of the lowest doses of 5-HT used (0.12-12.5 ng/kg) induced vasodilator responses, whereas the highest doses (25-1000 ng/kg) produced vasoconstriction. The vasodilator effect was inhibited by methiothepin (a non-specific 5-HT(1,2,5,6,7) receptor antagonist) and by a 5-HT(1D/1B) receptor antagonist, i.e., 3-[4-(4-chlorophenyl)piperazin-1-yl]-1,1-diphenyl-2-propanolol (BRL 15572), but not by ritanserin (a selective 5-HT(2) receptor antagonist), 5-methyl-1-(3-pyridylcarbamoyl)-1,2,3,5-tetrahydropyrrolo[2,3-f] indole (SB 206553, a selective 5-HT(2B/2C) receptor antagonist) or mesulergine (a non-specific serotonergic antagonist that shows affinity to the 5-HT(7) receptor). This vasodilator effect was mimicked by administration of a selective 5-HT(1) receptor agonist - 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT) - and by 2-[5-[3-(4-methylsulphonylamino)benzyl-1,2,4-1 H-indol-3-yl]ethanamine (L-694,247, a selective 5-HT(1D/1B) receptor agonist). Methiothepin, but not mesulergine, inhibited 5-CT-induced vasodilatation and the selective 5-HT(1D/1B) receptor antagonist (BRL 15572) inhibited the vasodilator action induced by L-694,247. The vasoconstrictor effect of 5-HT was significantly decreased by methiothepin, ritanserin and SB 206553, and was mimicked by alpha-methyl-5-HT (a selective 5-HT(2) receptor agonist) but not by administration of BW 723C86, a selective 5HT(2B) receptor agonist. Ritanserin, SB 206553 and spiperone (a non-specific 5-HT(1/2A) receptor antagonist) inhibited the alpha-methyl-5HT-induced vasoconstriction.Our data suggest that the vasodilator response induced by 5-HT in autoperfused rat hindquarters is mainly mediated by 5-HT(1D/1B) receptors, whereas the vasoconstrictor effect is mainly due to the activation of 5-HT(2A) receptors.

  15. Pharmacological activity of (-)-discretamine, a novel vascular alpha-adrenoceptor and 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor antagonist, isolated from Fissistigma glaucescens.

    PubMed

    Ko, F N; Yu, S M; Su, M J; Wu, Y C; Teng, C M

    1993-10-01

    1. The pharmacological activity of (-)-discretamine, isolated from Fissistigma glaucescens, was determined in rat isolated thoracic aorta, cardiac tissues and ventricular myocytes and guinea-pig isolated trachea. 2. (-)-Discretamine was found to be an alpha 1-adrenoceptor blocking agent in rat thoracic aorta as revealed by its competitive antagonism of noradrenaline (pA2 = 7.20 +/- 0.10)- or phenylephrine (pA2 = 7.60 +/- 0.09)-induced vasoconstriction. It was as potent as phentolamine (pA2 = 7.51 +/- 0.10), but was more potent than yohimbine (pA2 = 6.18 +/- 0.06). Removal of endothelium significantly increased the antagonistic potency of (-)-discretamine on noradrenaline (pA2 = 7.52 +/- 0.09)- or phenylephrine (pA2 = 7.90 +/- 0.09)-induced vasoconstriction. 3. (-)-Discretamine was also an alpha 2-adrenoceptor blocking agent (pA2 = 6.30 +/- 0.15) and a 5-hydroxytryptamine antagonist (pA2 = 6.87 +/- 0.06), both in rat aorta denuded of endothelium. 4. (-)-Discretamine protected alpha-adrenoceptors from alkylation by the irreversible blocking agent, phenoxybenzamine. 5. [3H]-inositol monophosphate formation caused by noradrenaline (3 microM) in rat thoracic aorta was suppressed by (-)-discretamine (10 and 30 microM) and prazosin (3 microM). 6. A high concentration of (-)-discretamine (30 microM) did not affect the contraction induced by the thromboxane receptor agonist U-46619, prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2 alpha), angiotensin II, high K+ or endothelin in rat aorta denuded of endothelium. Neither cyclic AMP nor cyclic GMP content of rat thoracic aorta was changed by (-)-discretamine. 7. Contraction of guinea-pig trachea caused by histamine, leukotriene C4 or carbachol was not affected by (-)-discretamine (30 microM). (-)-Discretamine also did not block beta l- or beta2-adrenoceptor-mediated responses induced by isoprenaline in rat right atria and guinea-pig trachea.8. A voltage clamp study in rat ventricular single myocytes revealed that sodium inward current, slow

  16. A Sex-Specific MicroRNA-96/5-Hydroxytryptamine 1B Axis Influences Development of Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Emma; Morrell, Nicholas W.; Yang, Xudong D.; Long, Lu; Stevens, Hannah; Nilsen, Margaret; Loughlin, Lynn; Mair, Kirsty M.; Baker, Andrew H.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Females are predisposed to pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH); evidence suggests that serotonin, mutations in the bone morphogenetic protein receptor (BMPR) II gene, and estrogens influence development of PAH. The 5-hydroxytryptamine 1B receptor (5-HT1BR) mediates human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (hPASMC) proliferation. Objectives: We aimed to determine whether selected microRNAs (miRNAs) expressed in PASMCs are influenced by sex, BMPR-II mutations, and estrogens, and contribute to PASMC proliferation in PAH. Methods: Expression levels of miRNAs targeting genes related to PAH, estrogen, and serotonin were determined by quantitative RT-PCR in hPASMCs and mouse PASMCs harboring a heterozygous mutation in BMPR-II (BMPR-IIR899X+/− PASMCs). miRNA-96 targets 5-HT1BR and was selected for further investigation. miRNA target validation was confirmed by luciferase reporter assay. Precursor miRNA-96 was transfected into hPASMCs to examine effects on proliferation and 5-HT1BR expression. The effect of a miRNA-96 mimic on the development of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension in mice was also assessed. Measurements and Main Results: miRNA-96 expression was reduced in BMPR-IIR899X+/− PASMCs from female mice and hPASMCs from female patients with PAH; this was associated with increased 5-HT1BR expression and serotonin-mediated proliferation. 5-HT1BR was validated as a target for miRNA-96. Transfection of precursor miRNA-96 into hPASMCs reduced 5-HT1BR expression and inhibited serotonin-induced proliferation. Restoration of miRNA-96 expression in pulmonary arteries in vivo via administration of an miRNA-96 mimic reduced the development of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension in the mouse. Conclusions: Increased 5-HT1BR expression may be a consequence of decreased miRNA-96 expression in female patient PASMCs, and this may contribute to the development of PAH. PMID:25871906

  17. Role of midbrain raphe in stress-induced renin and prolactin secretion.

    PubMed

    Van de Kar, L D; Lorens, S A; McWilliams, C R; Kunimoto, K; Urban, J H; Bethea, C L

    1984-10-01

    Stress-induced changes in renin and prolactin secretion were studied using a conditioned emotional response paradigm. Three minutes after being placed in a chamber, the stressed animals received a brief electric shock (1.0 mA for 10 s through the grid floor), then were returned to their home cage. This procedure was repeated for 3 consecutive days. On the fourth day, the rats were placed in the chamber for 3 min, but instead of receiving shock, they were removed and sacrificed. Control animals were treated in the same manner, except that they never received foot shock. The sham-operated stressed rats evidenced significant elevations in plasma renin activity (270%) and prolactin level (550%). Electrolytic lesions in the dorsal raphe nucleus blocked the stress-induced increase in plasma renin activity but did not affect the stress-induced increase in prolactin secretion. Electrolytic lesions in the median raphe nucleus did not affect prolactin levels in either control or stressed animals. However, median raphe lesions led to a significant increase in plasma renin activity in non-stressed rats and potentiated the stress-induced elevation in plasma renin activity. These results suggest that neurons within the dorsal and median raphe nuclei are involved in the regulation of renin but not prolactin secretion during stress. The results also suggest that median raphe neurons play a role in basal renin secretion. PMID:6208972

  18. Does pharmacogenomics account for variability in control of acute chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting with 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 receptor antagonists?

    PubMed

    Trammel, Morgan; Roederer, Mary; Patel, Jai; McLeod, Howard

    2013-06-01

    Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting is one of the most concerning adverse drug effects from cytotoxic chemotherapy. Despite appropriate use of antiemetic guidelines, 20-30 % of patients experience breakthrough nausea and vomiting secondary to chemotherapy. To assess the variability of 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 receptor antagonist efficacy caused by genetic variation, a review of the available literature was conducted. From the literature, three sources of pharmacogenomic variability were identified: polymorphisms associated with 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 receptor subunits, drug metabolism via cytochromes P450, and drug transport in the body. Testing for receptor subunit polymorphisms is not applicable to a clinical setting at this time; however, cytochrome P450 2D6 testing is FDA-approved and widely accessible. Cytochrome P450 2D6 ultrarapid metabolizers and poor metabolizers displayed altered antiemetic efficacy when compared with intermediate metabolizers and extensive metabolizers. We postulate that testing for cytochrome P450 2D6 phenotypes may be the most accessible way to provide individualized antiemetic therapy in the future.

  19. Blockade of 5-hydroxytryptamine3 receptors prevents cisplatin-induced but not motion- or xylazine-induced emesis in the cat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucot, J. B.

    1989-01-01

    5-Hydroxytryptamine3 antagonists have been reported to prevent emesis elicited by cisplatin and radiation. This study investigated the possibility that drugs with this mechanism of action may be useful in preventing emesis elicited by other stimuli. The drugs ICS 205-930 (0.1 and 1.0 mg/kg) and MDL 72222 (0.1 and 1.0 mg/kg) were administered SC to cats before challenging them with either provocative motion or an emetic dose of xylazine. In no instance was a significant reduction in emesis evident. Zacopride was also administered before motion testing (0.01 to 10.0 mg/kg) and found to not have efficacy. To test the possibility that species or route of administration were factors in the negative results, 1.0 mg/kg of ICS 205-930 was administered SC before IV infusion of 7.5 mg/kg of cisplatin. There was a total suppression of emesis for the duration of the six-hour observation periods. This result verifies other work which found 5-hydroxytryptamine3 antagonists to be effective in preventing emesis elicited by cancer chemotherapeutic treatments. However, there is no evidence that they are effective in other syndromes, such as motion sickness and xylazine-induced emesis.

  20. Prophylaxis of Radiation-Induced Nausea and Vomiting Using 5-Hydroxytryptamine-3 Serotonin Receptor Antagonists: A Systematic Review of Randomized Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Salvo, Nadia; Doble, Brett; Khan, Luluel; Amirthevasar, Gayathri; Dennis, Kristopher; Pasetka, Mark; DeAngelis, Carlo; Tsao, May; Chow, Edward

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To systematically review the effectiveness and safety of 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 receptor antagonists (5-HT3 RAs) compared with other antiemetic medication or placebo for prophylaxis of radiation-induced nausea and vomiting. Methods and Materials: We searched the following electronic databases: MEDLINE, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Clinical Trials, and Web of Science. We also hand-searched reference lists of included studies. Randomized, controlled trials that compared a 5-HT3 RA with another antiemetic medication or placebo for preventing radiation-induced nausea and vomiting were included. We excluded studies recruiting patients receiving concomitant chemotherapy. When appropriate, meta-analysis was conducted using Review Manager (v5) software. Relative risks were calculated using inverse variance as the statistical method under a random-effects model. We assessed the quality of evidence by outcome using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation approach. Results: Eligibility screening of 47 articles resulted in 9 included in the review. The overall methodologic quality was moderate. Meta-analysis of 5-HT3 RAs vs. placebo showed significant benefit for 5-HT3 RAs (relative risk [RR] 0.70; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.57-0.86 for emesis; RR 0.84, 95% CI 0.73-0.96 for nausea). Meta-analysis comparing 5-HT3 RAs vs. metoclopramide showed a significant benefit of the 5-HT3 RAs for emetic control (RR 0.27, 95% CI 0.15-0.47). Conclusion: 5-Hydroxytryptamine-3 RAs are superior to placebo and other antiemetics for prevention of emesis, but little benefit was identified for nausea prevention. 5-Hydroxytryptamine-3 RAs are suggested for prevention of emesis. Limited evidence was found regarding delayed emesis, adverse events, quality of life, or need for rescue medication. Future randomized, controlled trials should evaluate different 5-HT3 antiemetics and new agents with novel mechanisms of action such at the NK

  1. Development of the serotonergic cells in murine raphe nuclei and their relations with rhombomeric domains.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Antonia; Merchán, Paloma; Sandoval, Juan E; Sánchez-Arrones, Luisa; Garcia-Cazorla, Angels; Artuch, Rafael; Ferrán, José L; Martínez-de-la-Torre, Margaret; Puelles, Luis

    2013-09-01

    The raphe nuclei represent the origin of central serotonergic projections. The literature distinguishes seven nuclei grouped into rostral and caudal clusters relative to the pons. The boundaries of these nuclei have not been defined precisely enough, particularly with regard to developmental units, notably hindbrain rhombomeres. We hold that a developmental point of view considering rhombomeres may explain observed differences in connectivity and function. There are twelve rhombomeres characterized by particular genetic profiles, and each develops between one and four distinct serotonergic populations. We have studied the distribution of the conventional seven raphe nuclei among these twelve units. To this aim, we correlated 5-HT-immunoreacted neurons with rhombomeric boundary landmarks in sagittal mouse brain sections at different developmental stages. Furthermore, we performed a partial genoarchitectonic analysis of the developing raphe nuclei, mapping all known serotonergic differentiation markers, and compared these results, jointly with others found in the literature, with our map of serotonin-containing populations, in order to examine regional variations in correspondence. Examples of regionally selective gene patterns were identified. As a result, we produced a rhombomeric classification of some 45 serotonergic populations, and suggested a corresponding modified terminology. Only a minor rostral part of the dorsal raphe nucleus lies in the midbrain. Some serotonergic neurons were found in rhombomere 4, contrary to the conventional assumption that it lacks such neurons. We expect that our reclassification of raphe nuclei may be useful for causal analysis of their differential molecular specification, as well as for studies of differential connectivity and function.

  2. Absence of serotonergic innervation from raphe nuclei in rat cerebral blood vessels--I. Histological evidence.

    PubMed

    Mathiau, P; Riche, D; Behzadi, G; Dimitriadou, V; Aubineau, P

    1993-02-01

    Anterograde tracing from dorsal raphe neurons by Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin and serotonin immunocytochemistry revealed no serotonergic projections from raphe nuclei to cerebral pial vessels in the rat. However, cerebrovascular nerve fibres, mainly located in major pial arteries, were immunoreactive to tryptophan-5-hydroxylase antibodies as previously shown by others. It thus seems that the rate-limiting enzyme catalysing the biosynthesis of serotonin, tryptophan-5-hydroxylase, is present in cerebrovascular nerve fibres which do not originate in the dorsal raphe nucleus and which do not contain enough serotonin to be labelled by serotonin immunocytochemistry. We also observed tryptophan hydroxylase-immunoreactive but no serotonin-immunoreactive nerve fibres in the femoral artery and, occasionally, in the dura mater. The femoral artery, like the dura mater, contained numerous mast cells reacting positively to both tryptophan hydroxylase and to serotonin immunocytochemistry. The colocalization of the enzyme and its final product thus appears to be a general feature, since it has already been demonstrated within the central nervous system. The only exception appears to be the tryptophan hydroxylase-immunoreactive nerves present in cerebral and peripheral vessels. These results suggest that there is not a true serotonergic (i.e. serotonin-containing) innervation in cerebral blood vessels. They also strongly suggest that the cerebrovascular nerve fibres which appear to contain tryptophan hydroxylase do not originate in the raphe nuclei.

  3. Comparison of the performance of different DFT methods in the calculations of the molecular structure and vibration spectra of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yue; Gao, Hongwei

    2012-04-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) is a monoamine neurotransmitter which plays an important role in treating acute or clinical stress. The comparative performance of different density functional theory (DFT) methods at various basis sets in predicting the molecular structure and vibration spectra of serotonin was reported. The calculation results of different methods including mPW1PW91, HCTH, SVWN, PBEPBE, B3PW91 and B3LYP with various basis sets including LANL2DZ, SDD, LANL2MB, 6-31G, 6-311++G and 6-311+G* were compared with the experimental data. It is remarkable that the SVWN/6-311++G and SVWN/6-311+G* levels afford the best quality to predict the structure of serotonin. The results also indicate that PBEPBE/LANL2DZ level show better performance in the vibration spectra prediction of serotonin than other DFT methods.

  4. Blockade of 5-hydroxytryptamine(3) receptors prevents cisplatin-induced but not motion- or xylazine-induced emesis in the cat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucot, James B.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of the 5-hydroxytryptamine(3) (5-HT-3) antagonists ICS 205-930 and MDL 72222 on the emesis induced by motion or by emetic doses of xylazine (0.66 mg/kg administered SC) or cisplatin (7.5 mg/kg infused over a period of 4-5 min) were investigated in cats. It was found that neither the low (0.1 mg/kg) or the high (1.0 mg.kg) doses of ICS 205-930 or MDL 72222 prevented emesis elicited by screening motion challenges or xylazine. On the other hand, treatment cats by 1.0 mg/kg of ICS 205-930 was effective against cisplatin-induced motion sickness, in agreement with earlier results obtained on other mammals.

  5. Anococcygeal Raphe Revisited: A Histological Study Using Mid-Term Human Fetuses and Elderly Cadavers

    PubMed Central

    Arakawa, Takashi; Abe, Hiroshi; Abe, Shinichi; Cho, Baik Hwan; Murakami, Gen; Sugihara, Kenichi

    2012-01-01

    Purpose We recently demonstrated the morphology of the anococcygeal ligament. As the anococcygeal ligament and raphe are often confused, the concept of the anococcygeal raphe needs to be re-examined from the perspective of fetal development, as well as in terms of adult morphology. Materials and Methods We examined the horizontal sections of 15 fetuses as well as adult histology. From cadavers, we obtained an almost cubic tissue mass containing the dorsal wall of the anorectum, the coccyx and the covering skin. Most sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin or Masson-trichrome solution. Results The adult ligament contained both smooth and striated muscle fibers. A similar band-like structure was seen in fetuses, containing: 1) smooth muscle fibers originating from the longitudinal muscle coat of the anal canal and 2) striated muscle fibers from the external anal sphincter (EAS). However, in fetuses, the levator ani muscle did not attach to either the band or the coccyx. Along and around the anococcygeal ligament, we did not find any aponeurotic tissue with transversely oriented fibers connecting bilateral levator ani slings. Instead, in adults, a fibrous tissue mass was located at a gap between bilateral levator ani slings; this site corresponded to the dorsal side of the ligament and the EAS in the immediately deep side of the natal skin cleft. Conclusion We hypothesize that a classically described raphe corresponds to the specific subcutaneous tissue on the superficial or dorsal side of the anococcygeal ligament. PMID:22665356

  6. Anxiolytic-like effect of mirtazapine mediates its effect in the median raphe nucleus.

    PubMed

    An, Yan; Inoue, Takeshi; Kitaichi, Yuji; Izumi, Takeshi; Nakagawa, Shin; Song, Ning; Chen, Chong; Li, Xiaobai; Koyama, Tsukasa; Kusumi, Ichiro

    2013-10-24

    Mirtazapine, a noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressant (NaSSA), blocks the α2-adrenergic autoreceptors and heteroreceptors, which are responsible for controlling noradrenaline and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) release. Though preclinical and clinical studies have shown that mirtazapine exerts an anxiolytic action, its precise brain target sites remain unclear. In the present study, we investigated the brain area(s) in which mirtazapine exerts its anxiolytic-like effects on the expression of contextual conditioned freezing in rats. Mirtazapine (3μg/site) was directly injected into three brain structures, the median raphe nucleus (MRN), hippocampus and amygdala. Freezing behavior tests were carried out 10min after injections. Our results showed that the intra-MRN injection of mirtazapine reduced freezing significantly, whereas injections into the hippocampus or the amygdala did not. In addition, the intra-MRN injection of mirtazapine did not affect locomotor activity. These results suggest that the anxiolytic-like effect of mirtazapine might be mediated by its action on the MRN. PMID:24513515

  7. A phase 1 randomized study evaluating the effect of omeprazole on the pharmacokinetics of a novel 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 4 agonist, revexepride (SSP-002358), in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, David; Corcoran, Mary; Velinova, Maria; Hossack, Stuart; Hoppenbrouwers, Mieke; Martin, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Background About 30% of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease continue to experience symptoms despite treatment with proton pump inhibitors. The 5-hydroxytryptamine 4 receptor agonist revexepride (SSP-002358) is a novel prokinetic that stimulates gastrointestinal motility, which has been suggested as a continued cause of symptoms in these patients. The aim of this study was to assess whether revexepride pharmacokinetics were affected by co-administration of omeprazole, in preparation for a proof-of-concept evaluation of revexepride added to proton pump inhibitor treatment. Methods In this phase 1, open-label, randomized, two-period crossover study, healthy adults aged 18–55 years were given a single dose of revexepride 1 mg or revexepride 1 mg + omeprazole 40 mg. Pharmacokinetic parameters were assessed for up to 48 hours after administration of the investigational product. Adverse events, clinical chemistry and hematology parameters, electrocardiograms, and vital signs were monitored. Results In total, 42 participants were enrolled and 40 completed the study. The median age was 24 years (18–54 years), 55% were women and 93% were white. The pharmacokinetic parameters of revexepride were similar without or with omeprazole co-administration. The mean area under the plasma concentration–time curve from time 0 to infinity (AUC0–∞) was 23.3 ng · h/mL (standard deviation [SD]: 6.33 ng · h/mL) versus 24.6 ng · h/mL (SD: 6.31 ng · h/mL), and maximum plasma concentrations (Cmax) were 3.89 ng/mL (SD: 1.30 ng/mL) and 4.12 ng/mL (SD: 1.29 ng/mL) in participants without and with omeprazole, respectively. For AUC0–∞ and Cmax, the 90% confidence intervals for the ratios of geometric least-squares means (with:without omeprazole) were fully contained within the pre-defined equivalence limits of 0.80–1.25. Mean apparent terminal phase half-life was 9.95 hours (SD: 2.06 hours) without omeprazole, and 11.0 hours (SD: 3.25 hours) with omeprazole. Conclusion

  8. Regulation of rat cortical 5-hydroxytryptamine2A-receptor mediated electrophysiological responses by repeated daily treatment with electroconvulsive shock or imipramine

    PubMed Central

    Marek, Gerard J.

    2008-01-01

    Down-regulation of 5-hydroxytryptamine2A (5-HT2A) receptors has been a consistent effect induced by most antidepressant drugs. In contrast, electroconvulsive shock (ECS) up-regulates the number of 5-HT2A receptor binding sites. However, the effects of antidepressants on 5-HT2A receptor-mediated responses on identified cells of the cerebral cortex has not been examined. The purpose of the present study was to compare the effects of the tricyclic antidepressant imipramine and ECS on 5-HT2A receptor-mediated electrophysiological responses involving glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission in the rat medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and piriform cortex, respectively. The electrophysiological effects of activating 5-HT2A receptors was consistent with 5-HT2A receptor binding regulation for imipramine and ECS except for the mPFC where chronic ECS decreased the potency of 5-HT at a 5-HT2A receptor-mediated response. These findings are consistent with the general hypothesis that chronic antidepressant treatments shift the balance of serotonergic neurotransmission towards inhibitory effects in the cortex. PMID:18294819

  9. Lack of systematic effects of the 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 receptor antagonist ICS 205-930 on gastric emptying and antral motor activity in patients with primary anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed Central

    Stacher, G; Bergmann, H; Granser-Vacariu, G V; Wiesnagrotzki, S; Wenzelabatzi, T A; Gaupmann, G; Kugi, A; Steinringer, H; Schneider, C; Höbart, J

    1991-01-01

    1. The 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 receptor antagonist, ICS 205-930, has been reported to have potent effects on gastric smooth muscle and to enhance gastric emptying in animals, but findings in man have been inconsistent. 2. This study investigated the effects of ICS 205-930 on gastric emptying of an isotopically labelled semisolid 1168 kJ meal and on antral contractility in patients with primary anorexia nervosa, a condition frequently associated with impaired gastric motor function. 3. Thirteen female patients (age 18-39 years, median 22 years; percentage of ideal body weight 52-90%, median 66%) participated each in two studies, in which 0.15-0.18 mg kg-1 ICS 205-930 or placebo were infused i.v. in crossover, double-blind fashion. Gastric emptying and antral contractility were recorded scintigraphically for 50 min. 4. ICS 205-930 did not affect gastric emptying: the mean percentage of meal remaining in the stomach after 50 min (69.6% +/- 3.2 s.e. mean) was nearly identical to that after placebo (70.7 +/- 3.3%). 5. Amplitude, frequency and propagation velocity of antral contractions differed only little after ICS 205-930 and placebo, respectively. 6. The results show that ICS 205-930 has no effect on the impaired gastric motor activity in primary anorexia nervosa and thus provide further evidence that the compound does not have prominent prokinetic effects in man. PMID:1768560

  10. Sensitive determination of norepinephrine, epinephrine, dopamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine by coupling HPLC with [Ag(HIO6 )2 ](5-) -luminol chemiluminescence detection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dong; Xie, He; Lu, Haifeng; Li, Wei; Zhang, Qunlin

    2016-09-01

    Based on the enhancing effects of norepinephrine (NE), epinephrine (EP), dopamine (DA) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) on the chemiluminescence (CL) reaction between [Ag(HIO6 )2 ](5-) and luminol in alkaline solution, a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method with CL detection was explored for the sensitive determination of monoamine neurotransmitters for the first time. The UV-visible absorption spectra were recorded to study the enhancement mechanism of monoamine neurotransmitters on the CL of [Ag(HIO6 )2 ](5-) and luminol reaction. The HPLC separation of NE, EP, DA and 5-HT was achieved with isocratic elution using a mixture of aqueous 0.2% phosphoric acid and methanol (5:95, v/v) within 11.0 min. Under the optimized conditions, the detection limits of NE, EP, DA, and 5-HT were 4.8, 0.9, 1.9 and 2.3 ng/mL, respectively, corresponding to 17.6-96.0 pg for 20 μL sample injection. The recoveries of monoamine neurotransmitters in rat brain were >95.6% with the precisions expressed by RSD <5.0%. The validated HPLC-CL method was successfully applied for the quantification of NE, EP, DA and 5-HT in rat brain. This method has promising potential for some biological and clinical investigations focusing on the levels of monoamine neurotransmitters. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26876580

  11. Detection of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in vitro using a hippocampal neuronal network-based biosensor with extracellular potential analysis of neurons.

    PubMed

    Hu, Liang; Wang, Qin; Qin, Zhen; Su, Kaiqi; Huang, Liquan; Hu, Ning; Wang, Ping

    2015-04-15

    5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) is an important neurotransmitter in regulating emotions and related behaviors in mammals. To detect and monitor the 5-HT, effective and convenient methods are demanded in investigation of neuronal network. In this study, hippocampal neuronal networks (HNNs) endogenously expressing 5-HT receptors were employed as sensing elements to build an in vitro neuronal network-based biosensor. The electrophysiological characteristics were analyzed in both neuron and network levels. The firing rates and amplitudes were derived from signal to determine the biosensor response characteristics. The experimental results demonstrate a dose-dependent inhibitory effect of 5-HT on hippocampal neuron activities, indicating the effectiveness of this hybrid biosensor in detecting 5-HT with a response range from 0.01μmol/L to 10μmol/L. In addition, the cross-correlation analysis of HNNs activities suggests 5-HT could weaken HNN connectivity reversibly, providing more specificity of this biosensor in detecting 5-HT. Moreover, 5-HT induced spatiotemporal firing pattern alterations could be monitored in neuron and network levels simultaneously by this hybrid biosensor in a convenient and direct way. With those merits, this neuronal network-based biosensor will be promising to be a valuable and utility platform for the study of neurotransmitter in vitro.

  12. Depressive behavior and alterations in receptors for dopamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine in the brain of the senescence accelerated mouse (SAM)-P10.

    PubMed

    Onodera, T; Watanabe, R; Tha, K K; Hayashi, Y; Murayama, T; Okuma, Y; Ono, C; Oketani, Y; Hosokawa, M; Nomura, Y

    2000-08-01

    The senescence accelerated mouse (SAM) is known as a murine model of aging. SAM consists of senescence accelerated-prone mouse (SAMP) and senescence accelerated-resistant mouse (SAMR). Previous studies reported that SAMP10 exhibits age-related learning impairments and behavioral depression in a tail suspension test after 7 months. We investigated the changes in emotional behavior in a forced swimming test and in receptors for dopamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in SAMP10. SAMP10 at 8 months showed an increase of immobility in the test compared with SAMR1. Treatment with desipramine (25 mg/kg, i.p., 3 days) in SAMP10 caused a decrease in immobility. In the cortex from SAMP10, [3H]quinpirole binding to D2/D3 dopamine receptors increased significantly compared with control SAMR1. In the hippocampus from SAMP10, [3H]8-hydroxy DPAT binding to 5-HT1A receptor increased. In midbrains from SAMP10, bindings of [3H]quinpirole and [3H]8-hydroxy DPAT increased. [3H]SCH23390 binding to D1/D5 receptors and [3H]ketanserin binding to 5-HT2 receptor in brain regions examined in SAMP10 were similar to those in SAMR1. The present findings represent the first neurochemical evidence of an increase of D2/D3 and 5-HT1A receptors in SAMP10. SAMP10 may be a useful model of aging associated depressive behavior. PMID:11001177

  13. Interaction between the effects of 5-hydroxytryptamine and adrenaline on the growth of platelet thrombi in the coronary artery of the anaesthetized dog.

    PubMed Central

    McAuliffe, S. J.; Snow, H. M.; Cox, B.; Smith, C. C.; Noble, M. I.

    1993-01-01

    1. The interaction between adrenaline and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) has been quantitated on the rate of thrombus formation, in the stenosed coronary artery with damaged endothelium of the anaesthetized dog. 2. Changes in the plasma concentration of adrenaline were produced by varying the rate of an intravenous infusion of adrenaline and in the effects of 5-HT, by intravenous injections of the selective 5-HT2 receptor antagonist, ICI 170809. 3. Increases in the plasma concentration of adrenaline, which did not cause significant changes in blood pressure and heart rate, increased the rate of thrombus formation. 4. Antagonism of the 5-HT2 receptor by ICI 170809, in the absence of an infusion of adrenaline, abolished thrombus formation (mean ED50 0.41 microgram kg-1, i.v.). 5. The effects of adrenaline were non-competitively antagonized by ICI 170809; maximum effects were obtained in the dose-range 50-200 micrograms kg-1, i.v., when the mean dose-ratio increase in adrenaline required to restore equivalent rates of thrombus formation was 39 fold. 6. These results are consistent with a synergism between adrenaline and 5-HT and emphasize the importance of both on thrombus formation. PMID:8358542

  14. Anxiolytic-like profile of mirtazapine in rat conditioned fear stress model: Functional significance of 5-hydroxytryptamine 1A receptor and alpha1-adrenergic receptor.

    PubMed

    Kakui, Nobukazu; Yokoyama, Fumikazu; Yamauchi, Miki; Kitamura, Koichi; Imanishi, Taiichiro; Inoue, Takeshi; Koyama, Tsukasa

    2009-05-01

    Mirtazapine is an antidepressant with a unique mechanism of action and has been categorized as a Noradrenergic and Specific Serotonergic Antidepressant (NaSSA). Although numerous clinical trials suggested the usefulness of mirtazapine for not only major depressive disorders but also a variety of anxiety disorders, efficacy studies in animal anxiety models have been rarely reported. The present study investigated a potential anxiolytic-like profile of mirtazapine in rat conditioned fear stress model. A 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) 1A receptor partial agonist, buspirone (1-5 mg/kg) exhibited a significant reduction in freezing time, and its maximal effect was reversed by a selective 5-HT(1A) antagonist, WAY-100635 (1 mg/kg). Mirtazapine (1-10 mg/kg) also reduced the freezing time in a dose-related fashion, a substantial proportion (approx. 50%) of which was likewise antagonized by WAY-100635 (1 mg/kg). Mianserin (1-30 mg/kg), a structural analogue for mirtazapine, was ineffective. Furthermore, co-administration of alpha1 adrenoceptor antagonist, prazosin (0.03 mg/kg) completely reversed mirtazapine (10 mg/kg)-induced reduction of freezing time. These findings represent the first demonstration that the anxiolytic-like action of mirtazapine involves activation of 5-HT(1A) receptor and alpha1 adrenoceptor to different extents, and are compatible with one aspect of mirtazapine's pharmacological profile as NaSSA. PMID:19167420

  15. The mechanism of body temperature changes induced by intraventricular injections of adrenaline, noradrenaline and 5-hydroxytryptamine in the ox (Bos taurus).

    PubMed

    Findlay, J D; Robertshaw, D

    1967-04-01

    1. Adrenaline, noradrenaline and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) were injected into the lateral ventricle of the ox. The effect of these drugs was measured on the respiratory rate, tidal volume, heat production, skin temperature of the ear, evaporative loss from the skin and the rectal temperature at 20 and 10 degrees C ambient temperature.2. Neither adrenaline (3 mg) nor noradrenaline (3 mg) had any effect on the temperature regulating mechanisms of the ox, except to produce vasoconstriction if vasodilatation was already present due to high ambient temperature or previous injection of 5-HT.3. Injection of 5-HT (5 mg) caused a rise in respiratory rate, a fall in tidal volume and heat production, elevation of ear skin temperature and skin evaporative loss and a decrease in rectal temperature. Sedation of the animals occurred.4. In its reaction to these monoamines the ox is similar to the goat, sheep and rabbit, but is unlike the cat and dog.5. It was concluded that neither adrenaline nor noradrenaline has a role in the central control of temperature regulation in the ox, but that 5-HT may be involved in the control of heat dissipation mechanisms.

  16. Regulation of rat cortical 5-hydroxytryptamine2A receptor-mediated electrophysiological responses by repeated daily treatment with electroconvulsive shock or imipramine.

    PubMed

    Marek, Gerard J

    2008-07-01

    Down-regulation of 5-hydroxytryptamine(2A) (5-HT(2A)) receptors has been a consistent effect induced by most antidepressant drugs. In contrast, electroconvulsive shock (ECS) up-regulates the number of 5-HT(2A) receptor binding sites. However, the effects of antidepressants on 5-HT(2A) receptor-mediated responses on identified cells of the cerebral cortex have not been examined. The purpose of the present study was to compare the effects of the tricyclic antidepressant imipramine and ECS on 5-HT(2A) receptor-mediated electrophysiological responses involving glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission in the rat medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and piriform cortex, respectively. The electrophysiological effects of activating 5-HT(2A) receptors were consistent with 5-HT(2A) receptor binding regulation for imipramine and ECS except for the mPFC where chronic ECS decreased the potency of 5-HT at a 5-HT(2A) receptor-mediated response. These findings are consistent with the general hypothesis that chronic antidepressant treatments shift the balance of serotonergic neurotransmission towards inhibitory effects in the cortex.

  17. Effects of chronic lesions in mesencephalic raphe nuclei on induction of pseudopregnancy.

    PubMed

    Maekawa, F; Yamanouchi, K

    1996-08-01

    The role of mesencephalic raphe nuclei in the induction of pseudopregnancy was investigated in female rats. The dorsal or median raphe nucleus lesions (DRL or MRL, respectively) were made by means of a radiofrequency lesion generator. Two or 3 weeks after the operation, in order to induce pseudopregnancy, the vagina was stimulated electrically on the day of proestrus or 1 mg/kg b.w. reserpine was injected on the day of diestrus I. Traumatization by passing thread to one uterine horn was performed to induce deciduoma 5 days after vaginal stimulation or 3 days after reserpine injection. As the results, decidual response was seen in most control and sham females in both vaginal stimulation and reserpine-treated groups. In contrast, incidences of deciduoma in DRL females with vaginal stimulation or reserpine-injection were significantly lower than those in control and sham groups. In the MRL females with either vaginal stimulation or reserpine-treatment, incidences of deciduoma were comparable to those of the control and sham operated groups. These results suggest that the dorsal raphe nucleus plays an important role in pseudopregnancy-inducing mechanisms in female rats.

  18. Monoaminergic activity in subregions of raphé nuclei elicited by prior stress and the neuropeptide corticotropin-releasing factor.

    PubMed

    Summers, C H; Kampshoff, J L; Ronan, P J; Lowry, C A; Prestbo, A A; Korzan, W J; Renner, K J

    2003-12-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) coordinates neuroendocrine responses to stressful stimuli; one mechanism through which CRF may modulate hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity is via actions on neuromodulatory systems such as serotonergic systems. Recent electrophysiological studies and the distribution of CRF receptors within midbrain and pontine raphé nuclei suggest that stress and CRF may have actions on topographically organized subpopulations of serotonergic neurones. We compared the effects of vehicle or intracerebroventricular r/hCRF injections (0, 0.1, 1 or 10 micro g) in rats previously maintained in home cages or restrained for 1 h, 24 h before injection, on monoamine and monoamine metabolite tissue concentrations in the dorsal (lateral wings, rostral midline, caudal midline), median (rostral, caudal) and interfascicular raphé subdivisions of the midbrain and pontine raphé nuclei, using brain microdissection and high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. At the lowest dose studied (0.1 micro g), CRF infusions in previously stressed rats decreased 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) concentrations only within the rostral median raphé nucleus. At higher doses, CRF infusions in previously stressed rats increased tissue concentrations of 5-HTP, serotonin (5-HT), or the serotonin metabolite, 5-HIAA, within rostral (but not caudal) regions of the median and dorsal raphé nuclei. By contrast, restraint stress alone had no effect on tissue concentrations of 5-HTP, 5-HT or 5-HIAA measured 24 h later in any subdivision, while CRF injections in rats not previously exposed to restraint stress, with few exceptions, also had no effect. These results suggest that the effects of CRF on serotonergic function are context-dependent, dose-dependent, and regionally specific within subdivisions of the brainstem raphé nuclei. PMID:14636174

  19. Prevention of 5-hydroxytryptamine2C receptor RNA editing and alternate splicing in C57BL/6 mice activates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and alters mood

    PubMed Central

    Bombail, Vincent; Qing, Wei; Chapman, Karen E; Holmes, Megan C

    2014-01-01

    The 5-hydroxytryptamine2C (5-HT)2C receptor is widely implicated in the aetiology of affective and eating disorders as well as regulation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis. Signalling through this receptor is regulated by A-to-I RNA editing, affecting three amino acids in the protein sequence, with unedited transcripts encoding a receptor (INI) that, in vitro, is hyperactive compared with edited isoforms. Targeted alteration (knock-in) of the Htr2c gene to generate ‘INI’ mice with no alternate splicing, solely expressing the full-length unedited isoform, did not produce an overt metabolic phenotype or altered anxiety behaviour, but did display reduced depressive-like and fear-associated behaviours. INI mice exhibited a hyperactive hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis, with increased nadir plasma corticosterone and corticotrophin-releasing hormone expression in the hypothalamus but responded normally to chronic stress and showed normal circadian activity and activity in a novel environment. The circadian patterns of 5-HT2C receptor mRNA and mbii52, a snoRNA known to regulate RNA editing and RNA splicing of 5-HT2C receptor pre-mRNA, were altered in INI mice compared with wild-type control mice. Moreover, levels of 5-HT1A receptor mRNA were increased in the hippocampus of INI mice. These gene expression changes may underpin the neuroendocrine and behavioural changes observed in INI mice. However, the phenotype of INI mice was not consistent with a globally hyperactive INI receptor encoded by the unedited transcript in the absence of alternate splicing. Hence, the in vivo outcome of RNA editing may be neuronal cell type specific. PMID:25257581

  20. 5-Hydroxytryptamine receptor agonists for the abortive treatment of vascular headaches block mast cell, endothelial and platelet activation within the rat dura mater after trigeminal stimulation.

    PubMed

    Buzzi, M G; Dimitriadou, V; Theoharides, T C; Moskowitz, M A

    1992-06-26

    Antidromic stimulation of small caliber trigeminal axons causes neurogenic inflammation in the dura mater and tongue as evidenced by marked increases in mast cell activation, protein extravasation, as well as in the numbers of endothelial cytoplasmic vesicles, endothelial microvilli and platelet aggregates within ipsilateral post-capillary venules. In this report, we examined the effects of pretreatment with serotonin1 receptor agonists, dihydroergotamine (50 micrograms/kg, i.v.) and sumatriptan (100 micrograms/kg, i.v.) on the light and electron microscopic changes which develop after trigeminal ganglion stimulation. Both dihydroergotamine and sumatriptan are useful in the acute treatment of vascular headaches and bind with high affinity to 5-HT1D receptors. Both drugs decreased significantly the number of dural vessels showing endothelial or platelet changes and the numbers of activated mast cells, but did not affect the neurogenic response in the tongue. The drugs also blocked the accumulation of horseradish peroxidase reaction product within the endothelium and perivascular space on the stimulated side. The receptor is not present on trigeminovascular fibers innervating extracranial cephalic tissues. Drug mechanism probably involves inhibition of a proximal step in the pathophysiological cascade (e.g., via activation of a prejunctional receptor) because (a) receptors for sumatriptan have not been identified on mast cells whereas the inflammatory response was attenuated in mast cells as well as within platelets and the endothelium and (b) previous work indicates that sumatriptan and dihydroergotamine block neurotransmitter release. Hence, constriction of vascular smooth muscle mediated by postjunctional 5-hydroxytryptamine receptors is unlikely to explain the anti-inflammatory actions of dihydroergotamine or sumatriptan reported here.

  1. Functional selectivity of hallucinogenic phenethylamine and phenylisopropylamine derivatives at human 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)2A and 5-HT2C receptors.

    PubMed

    Moya, Pablo R; Berg, Kelly A; Gutiérrez-Hernandez, Manuel A; Sáez-Briones, Patricio; Reyes-Parada, Miguel; Cassels, Bruce K; Clarke, William P

    2007-06-01

    2,5-Dimethoxy-4-substituted phenylisopropylamines and phenethylamines are 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) (5-HT)(2A/2C) agonists. The former are partial to full agonists, whereas the latter are partial to weak agonists. However, most data come from studies analyzing phospholipase C (PLC)-mediated responses, although additional effectors [e.g., phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2))] are associated with these receptors. We compared two homologous series of phenylisopropylamines and phenethylamines measuring both PLA(2) and PLC responses in Chinese hamster ovary-K1 cells expressing human 5-HT(2A) or 5-HT(2C) receptors. In addition, we assayed both groups of compounds as head shake inducers in rats. At the 5-HT(2C) receptor, most compounds were partial agonists for both pathways. Relative efficacy of some phenylisopropylamines was higher for both responses compared with their phenethylamine counterparts, whereas for others, no differences were found. At the 5-HT(2A) receptor, most compounds behaved as partial agonists, but unlike findings at 5-HT(2C) receptors, all phenylisopropylamines were more efficacious than their phenethylamine counterparts. 2,5-Dimethoxyphenylisopropylamine activated only the PLC pathway at both receptor subtypes, 2,5-dimethoxyphenethylamine was selective for PLC at the 5-HT(2C) receptor, and 2,5-dimethoxy-4-nitrophenethylamine was PLA(2)-specific at the 5-HT(2A) receptor. For both receptors, the rank order of efficacy of compounds differed depending upon which response was measured. The phenylisopropylamines were strong head shake inducers, whereas their phenethylamine congeners were not, in agreement with in vitro results and the involvement of 5-HT(2A) receptors in the head shake response. Our results support the concept of functional selectivity and indicate that subtle changes in ligand structure can result in significant differences in the cellular signaling profile.

  2. The 5-hydroxytryptamine1A receptor agonist, (+)-8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)-tetralin, increases cardiac output and renal perfusion in rats subjected to hypovolemic shock.

    PubMed

    Tiniakov, Ruslan; Osei-Owusu, Patrick; Scrogin, Karie E

    2007-02-01

    The 5-hydroxytryptamine(1A) receptor agonist, (+)-8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)-tetralin (8-OH-DPAT), raises blood pressure (BP) and venous tone in rats subjected to hemorrhagic shock. Here, BP, ascending aortic blood flow [i.e., estimate of cardiac output (CO)] and venous blood gases were measured to determine the hemodynamic effects of 8-OH-DPAT (30 nmol/kg i.v., n = 10), saline (n = 10), or an equipressor infusion of epinephrine (n = 10) in unanesthetized rats subjected to hemorrhagic shock (25 min of hypotensive hemorrhage, approximately 50 mm Hg). Renal and iliac blood flow were measured in separate groups of similarly hemorrhaged rats given the same dose of 8-OH-DPAT (n = 7) or saline (n = 6). Compared with saline treatment, 8-OH-DPAT produced a sustained rise in BP (+32 +/- 4 versus +9 +/- 2 mm Hg, 15 min after injection, P < 0.01) and CO (+27 +/- 5 versus +4 +/- 6 ml/min/kg, P < 0.01) but did not affect total peripheral resistance (TPR). Infusion of epinephrine reduced CO (-12 +/- 6 ml/min/kg, P < 0.01) and dramatically increased TPR [+0.37 +/- 0.11 versus +0.05 +/- 0.05 log (mm Hg/ml/min/kg), P < 0.01]. 8-OH-DPAT increased renal conductance (+7 +/- 1 versus +4 +/- 1 microl/min/mm Hg, P < 0.01) but did not significantly affect iliac conductance. 8-OH-DPAT attenuated further development of acidosis compared with either saline or epinephrine (-5.6 +/- 1.6 versus -13.0 +/- 2.0 versus -11.3 +/- 2.6 mmol/liter base excess 45 min after start of hemorrhage, both P < 0.01 versus 8-OH-DPAT). These data demonstrate that 8-OH-DPAT improves hemodynamics during circulatory shock, in part, through renal vasodilation and mobilizing of blood stores.

  3. Structure and function of the third intracellular loop of the 5-hydroxytryptamine2A receptor: the third intracellular loop is alpha-helical and binds purified arrestins.

    PubMed

    Gelber, E I; Kroeze, W K; Willins, D L; Gray, J A; Sinar, C A; Hyde, E G; Gurevich, V; Benovic, J; Roth, B L

    1999-05-01

    Understanding the precise structure and function of the intracellular domains of G protein-coupled receptors is essential for understanding how receptors are regulated, and how they transduce their signals from the extracellular milieu to intracellular sites. To understand better the structure and function of the intracellular domain of the 5-hydroxytryptamine2A (5-HT2A) receptor, a model G(alpha)q-coupled receptor, we overexpressed and purified to homogeneity the entire third intracellular loop (i3) of the 5-HT2A receptor, a region previously implicated in G-protein coupling. Circular dichroism spectroscopy of the purified i3 protein was consistent with alpha-helical and beta-loop, -turn, and -sheet structure. Using random peptide phage libraries, we identified several arrestin-like sequences as i3-interacting peptides. We subsequently found that all three known arrestins (beta-arrestin, arrestin-3, and visual arrestin) bound specifically to fusion proteins encoding the i3 loop of the 5-HT(2A) receptor. Competition binding studies with synthetic and recombinant peptides showed that the middle portion of the i3 loop, and not the extreme N and C termini, was likely to be involved in i3-arrestin interactions. Dual-label immunofluorescence confocal microscopic studies of rat cortex indicated that many cortical pyramidal neurons coexpressed arrestins (beta-arrestin or arrestin-3) and 5-HT2A receptors, particularly in intracellular vesicles. Our results demonstrate (a) that the i3 loop of the 5-HT2A receptor represents a structurally ordered domain composed of alpha-helical and beta-loop, -turn, and -sheet regions, (b) that this loop interacts with arrestins in vitro, and is hence active, and (c) that arrestins are colocalized with 5-HT2A receptors in vivo.

  4. Selective Recognition of 5-Hydroxytryptamine and Dopamine on a Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube-Chitosan Hybrid Film-Modified Microelectrode Array

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huiren; Wang, Li; Luo, Jinping; Song, Yilin; Liu, Juntao; Zhang, Song; Cai, Xinxia

    2015-01-01

    It is difficult to determine dopamine (DA) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) accurately because of the interference of ascorbic acid (AA) in vitro, which has a high concentration and can be oxidized at a potential close to DA and 5-HT at a conventional electrode, combined with the overlapping voltammetric signal of DA and 5-HT at a bare electrode. Herein, chitosan (CS) was used as a stabilizing matrix by electrochemical reaction, and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were modified onto the microelectrode array (MEA). The CS-MWCNT hybrid film-modified MEA was quite effective at simultaneously recognizing these species in a mixture and resolved the overlapping anodic peaks of AA, DA and 5-HT into three well-defined oxidation peaks in differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) at −80 mV, 105 mV and 300 mV (versus Ag|AgCl), respectively. The linear responses were obtained in the range of 5 × 10−6 M to 2 × 10−4 M for DA (r = 0.996) and in the range of 1 × 10−5 M to 3 × 10−4 M for 5-HT (r = 0.999) using the DPV under the presence of a single substance. While DA coexisted with 5-HT in the interference of 3 × 10−4 M AA, the linear responses were obtained in the range of 1 × 10−5 M to 3 × 10−4 M for selective molecular recognition of DA (r = 0.997) and 5-HT (r = 0.997) using the DPV. Therefore, this proposed MEA was successfully used for selective molecular recognition and determination of DA and 5-HT using the DPV, which has a potential application for real-time determination in vitro experiments. PMID:25580900

  5. The influence of 5-hydroxytryptamine re-uptake blockade on CCK receptor antagonist effects in the rat elevated zero-maze.

    PubMed

    Bickerdike, M J; Marsden, C A; Dourish, C T; Fletcher, A

    1994-12-27

    In this study, the elevated zero-maze model of anxiety was used to investigate CCK receptor antagonist effects on the behaviour of male Lister-hooded rats and to demonstrate, by administering antagonists in the presence or absence of selective 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) re-uptake inhibitors, the involvement of 5-HT in the mediation of these effects. Devazepide, a selective CCKA receptor antagonist, L-365,260 (3R(+)-N-2,3-dihydro-1-methyl-2-oxo-5-phenyl-1H-1,4-benzodiazepin- 3-yl-N1- (3-methyl-phenyl)urea) or CI-988 (4-([2-[[3-(1H-indol-3-yl)-2-methyl-1- oxo-2-[[(tricyclo[3.3.1.1.(3.7)]-dec-2-yloxy)-carbonyl]-amin o]- propyl]-amino]-1-phenylethyl]-amino)-4-oxo-[R-(R*,R*)]-butanoate- N-methyl-D-glucamine), both selective CCKB receptor antagonists, were administered 30 min prior to testing. Behavioural analysis during testing included measures of risk-assessment behaviours (e.g. stretched-attend posture) in addition to time spent on the open quadrants. Devazepide induced significant anxiolytic effects, whereas CI-988 produced inconsistent results and L-365,260 was ineffective. When administered simultaneously with the 5-HT re-uptake inhibitors zimelidine or Wy 27587 (N-[[[1-[(6- fluoro-2-naphthalenyl)methyl]-4-piperidinyl]amino] carbonyl]-3-pyridine carboxamide methyl sulphonate salt), the significant anxiolytic effect induced by devazepide was dose-dependently and significantly attenuated. Zimelidine and Wy27587 had little effect alone on zero-maze behaviour at the lower of two doses given. These data show that the elevated zero-maze, in conjunction with the analysis of 'risk-assessment' behaviours, is an anxiety model which is sensitive to the anxiolytic effects of CCK receptor antagonism.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Ionotrophic 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 receptor activates the protein kinase C-dependent phospholipase D pathway in human T-cells.

    PubMed Central

    Khan, N A; Hichami, A

    1999-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the role of the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) ionotrophic receptor 5-HT(3) in the activation of human Jurkat T-cells. 5-HT and 2-methyl-5-HT (2Me-5-HT), an agonist of the 5-HT(3) receptor, induced increases in intracellular free Na(+) concentrations, [Na(+)](i), via opening of the ionotrophic receptor in these cells. These two serotonergic (5-hydroxytryptaminergic) agents potentiated phytohaemagglutinin (PHA)-induced T-cell activation. However, they failed to potentiate dioctanoglycerol-plus-ionomycin-stimulated T-cell blastogenesis. Interestingly, an inhibitor of protein kinase C (PKC), GF 109203X, curtailed significantly 5-HT and 2Me-5-HT-potentiated T-cell activation. These results demonstrate that the opening of the 5-HT(3) ionotrophic receptor is implicated in T-cell activation via the PKC pathway. Furthermore, 5-HT and 2Me-5-HT stimulated phospholipase D (PLD) activity, as measured by the production of phosphatidylethanol and phosphatidylbutanol at the expense of phosphatidic acid (PA). GF 109203X significantly curtailed the 5-HT- and 2Me-5-HT-induced PLD activity and T-cell activation. The PLD/PA pathway stimulated by these two serotonergic agents resulted in the production of 1,2-diacylglycerol (DAG) mass in Jurkat T-cells. These results altogether suggest that 5-HT and 2Me-5-HT potentiate T-cell activation via increases in [Na(+)](i) and the activation of the PKC-dependent PLD pathway. PMID:10548551

  7. Ionotrophic 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 receptor activates the protein kinase C-dependent phospholipase D pathway in human T-cells.

    PubMed

    Khan, N A; Hichami, A

    1999-11-15

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the role of the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) ionotrophic receptor 5-HT(3) in the activation of human Jurkat T-cells. 5-HT and 2-methyl-5-HT (2Me-5-HT), an agonist of the 5-HT(3) receptor, induced increases in intracellular free Na(+) concentrations, [Na(+)](i), via opening of the ionotrophic receptor in these cells. These two serotonergic (5-hydroxytryptaminergic) agents potentiated phytohaemagglutinin (PHA)-induced T-cell activation. However, they failed to potentiate dioctanoglycerol-plus-ionomycin-stimulated T-cell blastogenesis. Interestingly, an inhibitor of protein kinase C (PKC), GF 109203X, curtailed significantly 5-HT and 2Me-5-HT-potentiated T-cell activation. These results demonstrate that the opening of the 5-HT(3) ionotrophic receptor is implicated in T-cell activation via the PKC pathway. Furthermore, 5-HT and 2Me-5-HT stimulated phospholipase D (PLD) activity, as measured by the production of phosphatidylethanol and phosphatidylbutanol at the expense of phosphatidic acid (PA). GF 109203X significantly curtailed the 5-HT- and 2Me-5-HT-induced PLD activity and T-cell activation. The PLD/PA pathway stimulated by these two serotonergic agents resulted in the production of 1,2-diacylglycerol (DAG) mass in Jurkat T-cells. These results altogether suggest that 5-HT and 2Me-5-HT potentiate T-cell activation via increases in [Na(+)](i) and the activation of the PKC-dependent PLD pathway.

  8. Emetic responses to T-2 toxin, HT-2 toxin and emetine correspond to plasma elevations of peptide YY3-36 and 5-hydroxytryptamine.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenda; Zhou, Hui-Ren; Bursian, Steven J; Link, Jane E; Pestka, James J

    2016-04-01

    Trichothecene mycotoxins are a family of potent translational inhibitors that are associated with foodborne outbreaks of human and animal gastroenteritis in which vomiting is a clinical hallmark. Deoxynivalenol (DON, vomitoxin) and other Type B trichothecenes have been previously demonstrated to cause emesis in the mink (Neovison vison), and this response has been directly linked to secretion of both the satiety hormone peptide YY3-36 (PYY3-36) and neurotransmitter 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT). Here, we characterized the emetic responses in the mink to T-2 toxin (T-2) and HT-2 toxin (HT-2), two highly toxic Type A trichothecenes that contaminate cereals, and further compared these effects to those of emetine, a natural alkaloid that is used medicinally and also well known to block translation and cause vomiting. Following intraperitoneal (IP) and oral exposure, all three agents caused vomiting with evident dose-dependent increases in both duration and number of emetic events as well as decreases in latency to emesis. T-2 and HT-2 doses causing emesis in 50 % of treated animals (ED50s) were 0.05 and 0.02 mg/kg BW following IP and oral administration, respectively, whereas the ED50s for emetine were 2.0 and 1.0 mg/kg BW for IP and oral exposure, respectively. Importantly, oral administration of all three toxins elicited marked elevations in plasma concentrations of PYY3-36 and 5-HT that corresponded to emesis. Taken together, the results suggest that T-2 and HT-2 were much more potent than emetine and that emesis induction by all three translational inhibitors co-occurred with increases in circulating levels of PYY3-36 and 5-HT.

  9. Sucrose preload reduces snacking after mild mental stress in healthy participants as a function of 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter gene promoter polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Markus, C Rob; Jonkman, Lisa M; Capello, Aimee; Leinders, Sacha; Hüsch, Fabian

    2015-01-01

    Brain serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) dysfunction is considered to promote food intake and eating-related disturbances, especially under stress or negative mood. Vulnerability for 5-HT disturbances is considered to be genetically determined, including a short (S) allele polymorphism in the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) that is associated with lower serotonin function. Since 5-HT function may be slightly increased by carbohydrate consumption, S-allele 5-HTTLPR carriers in particular may benefit from a sugar-preload due to their enhanced 5-HT vulnerability. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether a sugar-containing preload may reduce appetite and energy intake after exposure to stress to induce negative mood, depending on genetic 5-HT vulnerability. From a population of 771 healthy young male and female genotyped college students 31 S/S carriers (8 males, 23 females) and 26 long allele (L/L) carriers (9 males, 17 females) (mean ± S.D. 22 ± 1.6 years; body mass index, BMI, 18-33 kg/m(2)) were monitored for changes in appetite and snacking behavior after stress exposure. Results revealed an increased energy intake after mild mental stress (negative mood) mainly for high-fat sweet foods, which was significantly greater in S/S carriers, and only in these genotypes this intake was significantly reduced by a sucrose-containing preload. Although alternative explanations are possible, it is suggested that S/S participants may have enhanced brain (hypothalamic) 5-HT responsiveness to food that makes them more susceptible to the beneficial satiation effects of a sucrose-preload as well as to the negative effects of mild mental stress on weight gain.

  10. 5-Hydroxytryptamine2A serotonin receptors in the primate cerebral cortex: possible site of action of hallucinogenic and antipsychotic drugs in pyramidal cell apical dendrites.

    PubMed

    Jakab, R L; Goldman-Rakic, P S

    1998-01-20

    To identify the cortical sites where 5-hydroxytryptamine2A (5-HT2A) serotonin receptors respond to the action of hallucinogens and atypical antipsychotic drugs, we have examined the cellular and subcellular distribution of these receptors in the cerebral cortex of macaque monkeys (with a focus on prefrontal areas) by using light and electron microscopic immunocytochemical techniques. 5-HT2A receptor immunoreactivity was detected in all cortical layers, among which layers II and III and layers V and VI were intensely stained, and layer IV was weakly labeled. The majority of the receptor-labeled cells were pyramidal neurons and the most intense immunolabeling was consistently confined to their parallelly aligned proximal apical dendrites that formed two intensely stained bands above and below layer IV. In double-label experiments, 5-HT2A label was found in calbindin D28k-positive, nonphosphorylated-neurofilament-positive, and immuno-negative pyramidal cells, suggesting that probably all pyramidal cells express 5-HT2A receptors. 5-HT2A label was also found in large- and medium-size interneurons, some of which were immuno-positive for calbindin. 5-HT2A receptor label was also associated with axon terminals. These findings reconcile the data on the receptor's cortical physiology and localization by (i) establishing that 5-HT2A receptors are located postsynaptically and presynaptically, (ii) demonstrating that pyramidal neurons constitute the major 5-HT2A-receptor-expressing cells in the cortex, and (iii) supporting the view that the apical dendritic field proximal to the pyramidal cell soma is the "hot spot" for 5-HT2A-receptor-mediated physiological actions relevant to normal and "psychotic" functional states of the cerebral cortex.

  11. ( sup 3 H)-DOB(4-bromo-2,5-dimethoxyphenylisopropylamine) and ( sup 3 H) ketanserin label two affinity states of the cloned human 5-hydroxytryptamine2 receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Branchek, T.; Adham, N.; Macchi, M.; Kao, H.T.; Hartig, P.R. )

    1990-11-01

    The binding properties of the 5-hydroxytryptamine2 (5-HT2) receptor have been the subject of much interest and debate in recent years. The hallucinogenic amphetamine derivative 4-bromo-2,5-dimethoxyphenylisopropylamine (DOB) has been shown to bind to a small number of binding sites with properties very similar to (3H)ketanserin-labeled 5-HT2 receptors, but with much higher agonist affinities. Some researchers have interpreted this as evidence for the existence of a new subtype of 5-HT2 receptor (termed 5-HT2A), whereas others have interpreted these data as indicative of agonist high affinity and agonist low affinity states for the 5-HT2 receptor. In this investigation, a cDNA clone encoding the serotonin 5-HT2 receptor was transiently transfected into monkey kidney Cos-7 cells and stably transfected into mouse fibroblast L-M(TK-) cells. In both systems, expression of this single serotonin receptor cDNA led to the appearance of both (3H)DOB and (3H)ketanserin binding sites with properties that matched their binding characteristics in mammalian brain homogenates. Addition of guanosine 5'-(beta, gamma-imido) triphosphate (Gpp(NH)p) to this system caused a rightward shift and steepening of agonist competition curves for (3H) ketanserin binding, converting a two-site binding curve to a single low affinity binding state. Gpp(NH)p addition also caused a 50% decrease in the number of high affinity (3H)DOB binding sites, with no change in the dissociation constant of the remaining high affinity states. These data on a single human 5-HT2 receptor cDNA expressed in two different transfection host cells indicate that (3H)DOB and (3H)ketanserin binding reside on the same gene product, apparently interacting with agonist and antagonist conformations of a single human 5-HT2 receptor protein.

  12. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (serotonin)2A receptors in rat anterior cingulate cortex mediate the discriminative stimulus properties of d-lysergic acid diethylamide.

    PubMed

    Gresch, Paul J; Barrett, Robert J; Sanders-Bush, Elaine; Smith, Randy L

    2007-02-01

    d-Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), an indoleamine hallucinogen, produces profound alterations in mood, thought, and perception in humans. The brain site(s) that mediates the effects of LSD is currently unknown. In this study, we combine the drug discrimination paradigm with intracerebral microinjections to investigate the anatomical localization of the discriminative stimulus of LSD in rats. Based on our previous findings, we targeted the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) to test its involvement in mediating the discriminative stimulus properties of LSD. Rats were trained to discriminate systemically administered LSD (0.085 mg/kg s.c.) from saline. Following acquisition of the discrimination, bilateral cannulae were implanted into the ACC (AP, +1.2 mm; ML, +/-1.0 mm; DV, -2.0 mm relative to bregma). Rats were tested for their ability to discriminate varying doses of locally infused LSD (0.1875, 0.375, and 0.75 microg/side) or artificial cerebrospinal fluid (n = 3-7). LSD locally infused into ACC dose-dependently substituted for systemically administered LSD, with 0.75 microg/side LSD substituting completely (89% correct). Systemic administration of the selective 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) (5-HT)(2A) receptor antagonist R-(+)-alpha-(2,3-dimethoxyphenyl)-1-[2-(4-fluorophenylethyl)]-4-piperidine-methanol (M100907; 0.4 mg/kg) blocked the discriminative cue of LSD (0.375 microg/side) infused into ACC (from 68 to 16% drug lever responding). Furthermore, M100907 (0.5 microg/microl/side) locally infused into ACC completely blocked the stimulus effects of systemic LSD (0.04 mg/kg; from 80 to 12% on the LSD lever). Taken together, these data indicate that 5-HT(2A) receptors in the ACC are a primary target mediating the discriminative stimulus properties of LSD.

  13. Lack of serotonin reuptake during brain development alters rostral raphe-prefrontal network formation

    PubMed Central

    Witteveen, Josefine S.; Middelman, Anthonieke; van Hulten, Josephus A.; Martens, Gerard J. M.; Homberg, Judith R.; Kolk, Sharon M.

    2013-01-01

    Besides its “classical” neurotransmitter function, serotonin (5-HT) has been found to also act as a neurodevelopmental signal. During development, the 5-HT projection system, besides an external placental source, represents one of the earliest neurotransmitter systems to innervate the brain. One of the targets of the 5-HT projection system, originating in the brainstem raphe nuclei, is the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), an area involved in higher cognitive functions and important in the etiology of many neurodevelopmental disorders. Little is known, however, about the exact role of 5-HT and its signaling molecules in the formation of the raphe-prefrontal network. Using explant essays, we here studied the role of the 5-HT transporter (5-HTT), an important modulator of the 5-HT signal, in rostral raphe-prefrontal network formation. We found that the chemotrophic nature of the interaction between the origin (rostral raphe cluster) and a target (mPFC) of the 5-HT projection system was affected in rats lacking the 5-HTT (5-HTT−/−). While 5-HTT deficiency did not affect the dorsal raphe 5-HT-positive outgrowing neurites, the median raphe 5-HT neurites switched from a strong repulsive to an attractive interaction when co-cultured with the mPFC. Furthermore, the fasciculation of the mPFC outgrowing neurites was dependent on the amount of 5-HTT. In the mPFC of 5-HTT−/− pups, we observed clear differences in 5-HT innervation and the identity of a class of projection neurons of the mPFC. In the absence of the 5-HTT, the 5-HT innervation in all subareas of the early postnatal mPFC increased dramatically and the number of Satb2-positive callosal projection neurons was decreased. Together, these results suggest a 5-HTT dependency during early development of these brain areas and in the formation of the raphe-prefrontal network. The tremendous complexity of the 5-HT projection system and its role in several neurodevelopmental disorders highlights the need for

  14. Diabetes-induced changes in the 5-hydroxytryptamine inhibitory receptors involved in the pressor effect elicited by sympathetic stimulation in the pithed rat.

    PubMed

    García, Mónica; Morán, Asunción; Calama, Elena; Martín, Maria Luisa; Barthelmebs, Mariette; Román, Luis San

    2005-07-01

    1. We investigated the effect of alloxan-induced diabetes on the inhibitory mechanisms of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in the pressor responses induced by stimulation of sympathetic vasopressor outflow in pithed rats, and analysed the type and/or subtype of 5-HT receptors involved. 2. Diabetes was induced in male Wistar rats by a single s.c. injection of alloxan, then 4 weeks later, they were anaesthetized, pretreated with atropine and pithed. Electrical stimulation of the sympathetic outflow from the spinal cord (0.1, 0.5, 1 and 5 Hz) resulted in frequency-dependent increases in blood pressure. 3. Intravenous infusions of 5-HT (1-80 microg kg(-1) min(-1)) reduced the pressor effects obtained by electrical stimulation. The 5-HT(1) receptor agonist 5-carboxamidotryptamine, 5-CT (5 microg kg(-1) min(-1)), caused an inhibition of the pressor response, whereas the selective 5-HT(2) receptor agonist, alpha-methyl-5-HT (5 microg kg(-1) min(-1)) and the selective 5-HT(3) receptor agonist, 1-phenylbiguanide (40 microg kg(-1) min(-1)), did not modify the sympathetic pressor responses. 5-HT had no effect on exogenous noradrenaline (NA)-induced pressor responses. 4. The inhibition of electrically induced pressor responses by 5-HT (10 microg kg(-1) min(-1)) was unable to be elicited after i.v. treatment with methiothepin (100 microg kg(-1)) because of the marked inhibition produced by methiothepin alone. The 5-HT-induced inhibition was blocked after i.v. administration of WAY-100,635 (100 microg kg(-1)) and not affected by ritanserin (1 mg kg(-1)), MDL 72222 (2 mg kg(-1)). 5. The selective 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist, 8-hydroxydipropylaminotretalin hydrobromide (8-OH-DPAT) (5-20 microg kg(-1) min(-1)) but neither the rodent 5-HT(1B) receptor agonist, CGS-12066B (5 microg kg(-1) min(-1)), nor the selective nonrodent 5-HT(1B) and 5-HT(1D) receptor agonist, L-694,247 (5 and 40 microg kg(-1) min(-1)), inhibited the electrically induced pressor response. The selective 5-HT(1A) receptor

  15. 5-Hydroxytryptamine(1F) receptors do not participate in vasoconstriction: lack of vasoconstriction to LY344864, a selective serotonin(1F) receptor agonist in rabbit saphenous vein.

    PubMed

    Cohen, M L; Schenck, K

    1999-09-01

    Recently, several novel approaches to the treatment of migraine have been advanced, including selective 5-hydroxytryptamine (or serotonin) 1B/1D (5-HT(1B/1D)) receptor agonists such as sumatriptan and 5-HT(1F) receptor agonists such as LY344864. Many 5-HT(1B/1D) receptor agonists have been identified based on their ability to produce cerebral vascular contraction, whereas LY344864 was identified as an inhibitor of trigeminal nerve-mediated dural extravasation. In our study, several triptan derivatives were compared with LY344864 for their ability to contract the rabbit saphenous vein, a tissue used in the preclinical identification of sumatriptan-related agonists. Sumatriptan, zolmitriptan, rizatriptan, and naratriptan all contracted the rabbit saphenous vein from baseline tone, whereas LY344864 in concentrations up to 10(-4) M did not contract the rabbit saphenous vein. Furthermore, vascular contractions to sumatriptan were markedly augmented in the presence of prostaglandin F(2alpha) (PGF(2alpha)). However, even in the presence of PGF(2alpha) (3 x 10(-7) M), LY344864 did not contract the rabbit saphenous vein in concentrations well in excess of its 5-HT(1F) receptor affinity (pK(i) = 8.2). Only when concentrations exceeded those likely to activate 5-HT(1B) and 5-HT(1D) receptors (>10(-5) M) did modest contractile responses occur in the presence of PGF(2alpha). Use of these serotonergic agonists revealed a significant correlation between the contractile potency in the rabbit saphenous vein and the affinities of these agonists at 5-HT(1B) and 5-HT(1D) receptors, although contractile agonist potencies were not quantitatively similar to 5-HT(1B) or 5-HT(1D) receptor affinities. In contrast, no significant correlation existed between the contractile potencies of these serotonergic agonists in the rabbit saphenous vein and their affinity at 5-HT(1F) receptors. These data support the contention that activation of 5-HT(1F) receptors will not result in vascular

  16. Preliminary array analysis reveals novel genes regulated by ovarian steroids in the monkey raphe region.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Arubala P; Bethea, Cynthia L

    2005-06-01

    We hypothesize that ovarian hormones may improve serotonin neuron survival. We sought the effect of estradiol (E) and progesterone (P) on novel gene expression in the macaque dorsal raphe region with Affymetrix array analysis. Nine spayed rhesus macaques were treated with either placebo, E or E+P via Silastic implant for 1 month prior to euthanasia (n=3 per treatment). RNA was extracted from a small block of midbrain containing the dorsal raphe and examined on an Agilent Bioanalyzer. The RNA from each monkey was labeled and hybridized to an Affymetrix HG_U95AV Human GeneChip Array. After filtering and sorting, 25 named genes remained that were regulated by E, and 24 named genes remained that were regulated by supplemental P. These genes further sorted into functional categories that would promote neuronal plasticity, transmitter synthesis, and trafficking, as well as reduce apoptosis. The relative abundance of four pivotal genes was examined in all nine animals with quantitative RT-PCR and normalized by glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). E+/-P caused a significant threefold reduction in JNK-1 (a pro-apoptosis gene, p<0.007); and a significant sixfold decrease in kynurenine mono-oxygenase (produces neurotoxic quinolones, p<0.05). GABA-A receptor (alpha3 subunit; benzodiazepine site) and E2F1 (interferes with cytokine signaling) were unaffected by E, but increased sevenfold (p<0.02) and fourfold (p<0.009), respectively, upon treatment with P. In summary, subsets of genes related to tissue remodeling or apoptosis were up- or down-regulated by E and P in a tissue block containing the dorsal raphe. These changes could promote cellular resilience in the region where serotonin neurons originate.

  17. Self-transcendence trait and its relationship with in vivo serotonin transporter availability in brainstem raphe nuclei: An ultra-high resolution PET-MRI study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Hoon; Son, Young-Don; Kim, Jeong-Hee; Choi, Eun-Jung; Lee, Sang-Yoon; Joo, Yo-Han; Kim, Young-Bo; Cho, Zang-Hee

    2015-12-10

    Self-transcendence is an inherent human personality trait relating to the experience of spiritual aspects of the self. We examined the relationship between self-transcendence and serotonin transporter (SERT) availability in brainstem raphe nuclei, which are collections of five different serotonergic nuclei with rostro-caudal extension, using ultra-high resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) with (11)C-3-amino-4-(2-dimethylaminomethylphenylthio)benzonitrile ([(11)C]DASB) to elucidate potential roles of serotonergic neuronal activities in this personality trait. Sixteen healthy subjects completed 7.0T MRI and High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT) PET. The regions of interest (ROIs) included the dorsal raphe nucleus (R1), median raphe nucleus (R2), raphe pontis (R3), and the caudal raphe nuclei (R4 and R5). For the estimation of SERT availability, the binding potential (BPND) was derived using the simplified reference tissue model (SRTM2). The Temperament and Character Inventory was used to measure self-transcendence. The analysis revealed that the self-transcendence total score had a significant negative correlation with the [(11)C]DASB BPND in the caudal raphe (R5). The subscale score for spiritual acceptance was significantly negatively correlated with the [(11)C]DASB BPND in the median raphe nucleus (R2). The results indicate that the self-transcendence trait is associated with SERT availability in specific raphe subnuclei, suggesting that the serotonin system may serve as an important biological basis for human self-transcendence. Based on the connections of these nuclei with cortico-limbic and visceral autonomic structures, the functional activity of these nuclei and their related neural circuitry may play a crucial role in the manifestation of self-transcendence. PMID:26459992

  18. Diabetes-induced changes in the 5-hydroxytryptamine inhibitory receptors involved in the pressor effect elicited by sympathetic stimulation in the pithed rat

    PubMed Central

    García, Mónica; Morán, Asunción; Calama, Elena; Martín, Maria Luisa; Barthelmebs, Mariette; Román, Luis San

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the effect of alloxan-induced diabetes on the inhibitory mechanisms of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in the pressor responses induced by stimulation of sympathetic vasopressor outflow in pithed rats, and analysed the type and/or subtype of 5-HT receptors involved. Diabetes was induced in male Wistar rats by a single s.c. injection of alloxan, then 4 weeks later, they were anaesthetized, pretreated with atropine and pithed. Electrical stimulation of the sympathetic outflow from the spinal cord (0.1, 0.5, 1 and 5 Hz) resulted in frequency-dependent increases in blood pressure. Intravenous infusions of 5-HT (1–80 μg kg−1 min−1) reduced the pressor effects obtained by electrical stimulation. The 5-HT1 receptor agonist 5-carboxamidotryptamine, 5-CT (5 μg kg−1 min−1), caused an inhibition of the pressor response, whereas the selective 5-HT2 receptor agonist, α-methyl-5-HT (5 μg kg−1 min−1) and the selective 5-HT3 receptor agonist, 1-phenylbiguanide (40 μg kg−1 min−1), did not modify the sympathetic pressor responses. 5-HT had no effect on exogenous noradrenaline (NA)-induced pressor responses. The inhibition of electrically induced pressor responses by 5-HT (10 μg kg−1 min−1) was unable to be elicited after i.v. treatment with methiothepin (100 μg kg−1) because of the marked inhibition produced by methiothepin alone. The 5-HT-induced inhibition was blocked after i.v. administration of WAY-100,635 (100 μg kg−1) and not affected by ritanserin (1 mg kg−1), MDL 72222 (2 mg kg−1). The selective 5-HT1A receptor agonist, 8-hydroxydipropylaminotretalin hydrobromide (8-OH-DPAT) (5–20 μg kg−1 min−1) but neither the rodent 5-HT1B receptor agonist, CGS-12066B (5 μg kg−1 min−1), nor the selective nonrodent 5-HT1B and 5-HT1D receptor agonist, L-694,247 (5 and 40 μg kg−1 min−1), inhibited the electrically induced pressor response. The selective 5-HT1A

  19. The highly selective 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)2A receptor antagonist, EMD 281014, significantly increases swimming and decreases immobility in male congenital learned helpless rats in the forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jignesh G; Bartoszyk, Gerd D; Edwards, Emmeline; Ashby, Charles R

    2004-04-01

    We examined the effect of the highly selective 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)(2A) receptor antagonist 7-[4-[2-(4-fluoro-phenyl)-ethyl]-piperazine-1-carbonyl]-1H-indole-3-carbonitrile HCl (EMD 281014) in congenital learned helpless male rats in the forced swim test. The administration of EMD-281014 (0.3-30 mg/kg i.p.) to congenital learned helpless rats dose-dependently and significantly (at 10 and 30 mg/kg) decreased immobility and increased swimming compared to vehicle-treated animals. Thus, EMD 281014 produces effects in the forced swim test resembling those of antidepressants.

  20. Effects of creatine monohydrate supplementation and exercise on depression-like behaviors and raphe 5-HT neurons in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Nari; Leem, Yea Hyun; Kato, Morimasa; Chang, Hyukki

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The effects of creatine and exercise on chronic stress-induced depression are unclear. In the present study, we identified the effects of 4-week supplementation of creatine monohydrate and/or exercise on antidepressant behavior and raphe 5-HT expression in a chronic mild stress-induced depressed mouse model. [Methods] Seven-week-old male C57BL/6 mice (n=48) were divided randomly into 5 groups: (1) non-stress control (CON, n=10), (2) stress control (ST-CON, n=10), (3) stress and creatine intake (ST-Cr, n=10), (4) stress and exercise (ST-Ex, n=9), and (5) combined stress, exercise, and creatine intake (ST-Cr+Ex, n=9). After five weeks’ treatment, we investigated using both anti-behavior tests (the Tail Suspension Test (TST) and the Forced Swimming Test (FST)), and 5-HT expression in the raphe nuclei (the dorsal raphe (DR) and median raphe (MnR)). [Results] Stress for 4 weeks significantly increased depressive behaviors in the mice. Treatment with creatine supplementation combined with exercise significantly decreased depressive behaviors as compared with the CON-ST group in both the TST and FST tests. With stress, 5-HT expression in the raphe nuclei decreased significantly. With combined creatine and exercise, 5-HT positive cells increased significantly and had a synergic effect on both DR and MnR. [Conclusion] The present study found that even a single treatment of creatine or exercise has partial effects as an antidepressant in mice with chronic mild stress-induced depression. Furthermore, combined creatine and exercise has synergic effects and is a more effective prescription than a single treatment. PMID:27757384

  1. Origin and evolution of the canal raphe system in diatoms.

    PubMed

    Ruck, Elizabeth C; Theriot, Edward C

    2011-11-01

    One lineage of pennate diatoms has a slit through the siliceous cell wall, called a "raphe," that functions in motility. Raphid pennate diatoms number in the perhaps tens of thousands of species, with the diversity of raphe forms potentially matching this number. Three lineages-the Bacillariales, Rhopalodiales, and Surirellales-possess a complex and presumably highly derived raphe that is physically separated from the cell interior, most often by a set of siliceous braces. Because the relationship among these three lineages is unclear, the number of origins of the canal raphe system and the homology of it and its constitutive parts among these lineages, is equally unclear. We reconstructed the phylogeny of raphid pennate diatoms and included, for the first time, members of all three canal raphid diatom lineages, and used the phylogeny to test specific hypotheses about the origin of the canal raphe. The canal raphe appears to have evolved twice, once in the common ancestor of Bacillariales and once in the common ancestor of Rhopalodiales and Surirellales, which form a monophyletic group in our analyses. These results recommend careful follow-up morphogenesis studies of the canal raphe in these two lineages to determine the underlying developmental basis for this remarkable case of parallel evolution.

  2. Inhibitory modulation of chemoreflex bradycardia by stimulation of the nucleus raphe obscurus is mediated by 5-HT3 receptors in the NTS of awake rats.

    PubMed

    Weissheimer, Karin Viana; Machado, Benedito H

    2007-03-30

    Several studies demonstrated the involvement of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and its different receptor subtypes in the modulation of neurotransmission of cardiovascular reflexes in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS). Moreover, anatomic evidence suggests that nucleus raphe obscurus (ROb) is a source of 5-HT-containing terminals within the NTS. In the present study we investigated the possible changes in the cardiovascular responses to peripheral chemoreceptor activation by potassium cyanide (KCN, i.v.) following ROb stimulation with L-glutamate (10 nmol/50 nL) and also whether 5-HT3 receptors in the caudal commissural NTS are involved in this neuromodulation. The results showed that stimulation of the ROb with L-glutamate in awake rats (n=15) produced a significant reduction in the bradycardic response 30 s after the microinjection (-182+/-19 vs -236+/-10 bpm; Wilcoxon test) but no changes in the pressor response to peripheral chemoreceptor activation (43+/-4 vs 51+/-3 mmHg; two-way ANOVA) in relation to the control. Microinjection of 5--HT3 receptors antagonist granisetron (500 pmol/50 nL), but not the vehicle, into the caudal commissural NTS bilaterally prevented the reduction of chemoreflex bradycardia in response to microinjection of L-glutamate into ROb. These data indicate that 5-HT-containing projections from ROb to the NTS play an inhibitory neuromodulatory role in the chemoreflex evoked bradycardia by releasing 5-HT and activating 5-HT3 receptors in the caudal NTS.

  3. Role of serotonin transporter inhibition in the regulation of tryptophan hydroxylase in brainstem raphe nuclei: time course and regional specificity.

    PubMed

    MacGillivray, L; Lagrou, L M; Reynolds, K B; Rosebush, P I; Mazurek, M F

    2010-12-01

    Drugs that selectively inhibit the serotonin transporter (SERT) are widely prescribed for treatment of depression and a range of anxiety disorders. We studied the time course of changes in tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) in four raphe nuclei after initiation of two different SERT inhibitors, citalopram and fluoxetine. In the first experiment, groups of Sprague-Dawley rats received daily meals of rice pudding either alone (n=9) or mixed with citalopram 5 mg/kg/day (n=27). Rats were sacrificed after 24 h, 7 days or 28 days of treatment. Sections of dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), median raphe nucleus (MRN), raphe magnus nucleus (RMN) and caudal linear nucleus (CLN) were processed for TPH immunohistochemistry. Citalopram induced a significant reduction in DRN TPH-positive cell counts at 24 h (41%), 7 days (38%) and 28 days (52%). Similar reductions in TPH-positive cell counts were also observed at each timepoint in the MRN and in the RMN. In the MRN, citalopram resulted in significant reductions at 24 h (26%), 7 days (16%) and 28 days (23%). In the RMN, citalopram induced significant reductions of TPH-positive cell counts at 24 h (45%), 7 days (34%) and 28 days (43%). By contrast, no significant differences between control and treatment groups were observed in the CLN at any of the time points that we studied. To investigate whether these changes would occur with other SERT inhibitors, we conducted a second experiment, this time with a 28-day course of fluoxetine. As was observed with citalopram, fluoxetine induced significant reductions of TPH cell counts in the DRN (39%), MRN (38%) and RMN (41%), with no significant differences in the CLN. These results indicate that SERT inhibition can alter the regulation of TPH, the rate limiting enzyme for serotonin biosynthesis. This persistent and regionally specific downregulation of serotonin biosynthesis may account for some of the clinical withdrawal symptoms associated with drugs that inhibit SERT.

  4. Addition of the Neurokinin-1-Receptor Antagonist (RA) Aprepitant to a 5-Hydroxytryptamine-RA and Dexamethasone in the Prophylaxis of Nausea and Vomiting Due to Radiation Therapy With Concomitant Cisplatin

    SciTech Connect

    Jahn, Franziska; Jahn, Patrick; Sieker, Frank; Vordermark, Dirk; Jordan, Karin

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: To assess, in a prospective, observational study, the safety and efficacy of the addition of the neurokinin-1-receptor antagonist (NK1-RA) aprepitant to concomitant radiochemotherapy, for the prophylaxis of radiation therapy–induced nausea and vomiting. Patients and Methods: This prospective observational study compared the antiemetic efficacy of an NK1-RA (aprepitant), a 5-hydroxytryptamine-RA, and dexamethasone (aprepitant regimen) versus a 5-hydroxytryptamine-RA and dexamethasone (control regimen) in patients receiving concomitant radiochemotherapy with cisplatin at the Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Halle (Saale), Germany. The primary endpoint was complete response in the overall phase, defined as no vomiting and no use of rescue therapy in this period. Results: Fifty-nine patients treated with concomitant radiochemotherapy with cisplatin were included in this study. Thirty-one patients received the aprepitant regimen and 29 the control regimen. The overall complete response rates for cycles 1 and 2 were 75.9% and 64.5% for the aprepitant group and 60.7% and 54.2% for the control group, respectively. Although a 15.2% absolute difference was reached in cycle 1, a statistical significance was not detected (P=.22). Furthermore maximum nausea was 1.58 ± 1.91 in the control group and 0.73 ± 1.79 in the aprepitant group (P=.084); for the head-and-neck subset, 2.23 ± 2.13 in the control group and 0.64 ± 1.77 in the aprepitant group, respectively (P=.03). Conclusion: This is the first study of an NK1-RA–containing antiemetic prophylaxis regimen in patients receiving concomitant radiochemotherapy. Although the primary endpoint was not obtained, the absolute difference of 10% in efficacy was reached, which is defined as clinically meaningful for patients by international guidelines groups. Randomized phase 3 studies are necessary to further define the potential role of an NK1-RA in this setting.

  5. Adding 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor type 3 antagonists may reduce drug-induced nausea in poor insight obsessive-compulsive patients taking off-label doses of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors: a 52-week follow-up case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Poor-insight obsessive-compulsive disorder (PI-OCD) is a severe form of OCD where the 'typically obsessive' features of intrusive, 'egodystonic' feelings and thoughts are absent. PI-OCD is difficult to treat, often requiring very high doses of serotonergic drugs as well as antipsychotic augmentation. When this occurs, unpleasant side effects as nausea are common, eventually further reducing compliance to medication and increasing the need for pharmacological alternatives. We present the case of a PI-OCD patient who developed severe nausea after response to off-label doses of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), fluoxetine. Drug choices are discussed, providing pharmacodynamic rationales and hypotheses along with reports of rating scale scores, administered within a follow-up period of 52 weeks. A slight reduction of fluoxetine dose, augmentation with mirtazapine and a switch from amisulpride to olanzapine led to resolution of nausea while preserving the anti-OCD therapeutic effect. Mirtazapine and olanzapine have already been suggested for OCD treatment, although a lack of evidence exists about their role in the course of PI-OCD. Both mirtazapine and olanzapine also act as 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor type 3 (5-HT3) blockers, making them preferred choices especially in cases of drug-induced nausea. PMID:21143969

  6. Activation of dorsal raphe serotonin neurons underlies waiting for delayed rewards.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Katsuhiko; Miyazaki, Kayoko W; Doya, Kenji

    2011-01-12

    The serotonergic system plays a key role in the control of impulsive behaviors. Forebrain serotonin depletion leads to premature actions and steepens discounting of delayed rewards. However, there has been no direct evidence for serotonin neuron activity in relation to actions for delayed rewards. Here we show that serotonin neurons increase their tonic firing while rats wait for food and water rewards and conditioned reinforcement tones. The rate of tonic firing during the delay period was significantly higher for rewards than for tones, for which rats could not wait as long. When the delay was extended, tonic firing persisted until reward or tone delivery. When rats gave up waiting because of extended delay or reward omission, serotonin neuron firing dropped preceding the exit from reward sites. Serotonin neurons did not show significant response when an expected reward was omitted, which was predicted by the theory that serotonin signals negative reward prediction errors. These results suggest that increased serotonin neuron firing facilitates a rat's waiting behavior in prospect of forthcoming rewards and that higher serotonin activation enables longer waiting.

  7. Activation of dorsal raphe serotonin neurons underlies waiting for delayed rewards.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Katsuhiko; Miyazaki, Kayoko W; Doya, Kenji

    2011-01-12

    The serotonergic system plays a key role in the control of impulsive behaviors. Forebrain serotonin depletion leads to premature actions and steepens discounting of delayed rewards. However, there has been no direct evidence for serotonin neuron activity in relation to actions for delayed rewards. Here we show that serotonin neurons increase their tonic firing while rats wait for food and water rewards and conditioned reinforcement tones. The rate of tonic firing during the delay period was significantly higher for rewards than for tones, for which rats could not wait as long. When the delay was extended, tonic firing persisted until reward or tone delivery. When rats gave up waiting because of extended delay or reward omission, serotonin neuron firing dropped preceding the exit from reward sites. Serotonin neurons did not show significant response when an expected reward was omitted, which was predicted by the theory that serotonin signals negative reward prediction errors. These results suggest that increased serotonin neuron firing facilitates a rat's waiting behavior in prospect of forthcoming rewards and that higher serotonin activation enables longer waiting. PMID:21228157

  8. Regulation of dorsal raphe nucleus function by serotonin autoreceptors: a behavioral perspective

    PubMed Central

    McDevitt, Ross A; Neumaier, John F

    2011-01-01

    Neurotransmission by serotonin (5-HT) is tightly regulated by several autoreceptors that fine-tune serotonergic neurotransmission through negative feedback inhibition at the cell bodies (predominantly 5-HT1A) or at the axon terminals (predominantly 5-HT1B); however, more subtle roles for 5-HT1D and 5-HT2B autoreceptors have also been detected. This review provides an overview of 5-HT autoreceptors, focusing on their contribution in animal behavioral models of stress and emotion. Experiments targeting 5-HT autoreceptors in awake, behaving animals have generally shown that increasing autoreceptor feedback is anxiolytic and rewarding, while enhanced 5-HT function is aversive and anxiogenic; however, the role of serotonergic activity in behavioral models of helplessness is more complex. The prevailing model suggests that 5-HT autoreceptors become desensitized in response to stress exposure and antidepressant administration, two seemingly opposite manipulations. Thus there are still unresolved questions regarding the role of these receptors - and serotonin in general - in normal and pathological states. PMID:21620956

  9. Role of 5-Hydroxytryptamine 1A Receptors in 6-Hydroxydopmaine-induced Catalepsy-like Immobilization in Rats: a Therapeutic Approach for Treating Catalepsy of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    eyhani-rad, Siamak; Mohajjel Nayebi, Alireza; Mahmoudi, Javad; Samini, Morteza; Babapour, Vahab

    2012-01-01

    We have shown that buspirone, a partial agonist of 5-hydroxytryptamine 1A (5-HT1A) receptors, improves motor dysfunctions induced by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) and haloperidol in rats. The present work extends these findings by investigating the role of 5-HT1A receptors on catalepsy-like immobilization in rats, a model of Parkinson’s disease. Catalepsy was induced by unilateral infusion of 6-OH-dopamine (8 μg/2μL/rat) into the central region of the substantia nigra, compact part (SNc) and assayed by bar-test method 5, 60, 120 and 180 min after the drugs administration. The involvement of 5-HT1A receptors in 6-OHDA-induced catalepsy was studied through intraperitoneal (0.25, 0.5 and 1mg/Kg IP) and intrasubstantia nigra, compact part (10 μg/rat, intra-SNc) injection of 8-hydroxy-2-[di-n-propylamino] tetralin (8-OHDPAT) as well as administration of 1-(2-methoxyphenyl)-4-[4-(2-pthalimmido) butyl] piperazine hydrobromide (0.1, 0.5 and 1 mg/Kg, NAN-190, IP). NAN-190 (1 mg/Kg, IP) and 8-OHDPAT (1 mg/Kg, IP and 10 μg/rat, intra-SNc) increased and decreased 6-OHDA-induced catalepsy respectively. In normal (non 6-OHDA-lesioned) rats, NAN-190 (1 mg/Kg, IP) increased the elapsed time in bar-test while 8-OHDPAT did not produce any significant effect. The anticataleptic effect of 8-OHDPAT (1 mg/Kg, IP) was reversed markedly by co-injection with NAN-190 (1 mg/Kg, IP). These findings suggest that 5-HT1A receptors are involved in 6-OHDA-induced catalepsy-like immobilization. PMID:24250551

  10. Protein kinase C modulates the release of [3H]5-hydroxytryptamine in the spinal cord of the rat: the role of L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, V C; Jones, D J

    1992-11-01

    The present studies examined the relationship between protein kinase C (PKC) and L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels in modulating the release of neurotransmitter from K(+)-depolarized rat spinal cord synaptosomes. Activators of PKC, such as phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), mezerein and oleoyl acetylglycerol produced a concentration-dependent potentiation of K(+)-induced release of [3H]5-hydroxytryptamine ([3H]5-HT). Enhanced release was dependent on the concentration of both Ca2+ and K+ in the superfusion medium. Calcium-independent release of [3H]5-HT or release induced by the Ca2+ ionophore were unaffected by PKC activators. Calcium-dependent release of [3H]5-HT, evoked by K+, was enhanced under similar conditions by the L-type Ca2+ channel agonists Bay K 8644 and (+)-SDZ 202-791. Nimodipine, an L-type Ca2+ channel antagonist, while having no independent effect on K(+)-induced release of [3H]5-HT, abolished the potentiative effects of Bay K 8644 and PMA. Similarly, the PKC inhibitors, polymyxin B and staurosporine, blocked effects of both PMA and Bay K 8644 on K(+)-stimulated release of [3H]5-HT. Neither PMA nor Bay K 8644 altered the uptake of [3H]5-HT. These results suggest that PKC-dependent mechanisms utilize calcium influx, via the L-type calcium channel, to modulate release of neurotransmitter and indicate a possible functional link between PKC and L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels in the spinal cord.

  11. Circadian clock resetting by behavioral arousal: neural correlates in the midbrain raphe nuclei and locus coeruleus.

    PubMed

    Webb, I C; Patton, D F; Landry, G J; Mistlberger, R E

    2010-03-31

    Some procedures for stimulating arousal in the usual daily rest period (e.g., gentle handling, novel wheel-induced running) can phase shift circadian rhythms in Syrian hamsters, while other arousal procedures are ineffective (inescapable stress, caffeine, modafinil). The dorsal and median raphe nuclei (DRN, MnR) have been implicated in clock resetting by arousal and, in rats and mice, exhibit strong regionally specific responses to inescapable stress and anxiogenic drugs. To examine a possible role for the midbrain raphe nuclei in the differential effects of arousal procedures on circadian rhythms, hamsters were aroused for 3 h in the mid-rest period by confinement to a novel running wheel, gentle handling (with minimal activity) or physical restraint (with intermittent, loud compressed air stimulation) and sacrificed immediately thereafter. Regional expression of c-fos and tryptophan hydroxylase (TrpOH) were quantified immunocytochemically in the DRN, MnR and locus coeruleus (LC). Neither gentle handling nor wheel running had a large impact on c-fos expression in these areas, although the manipulations were associated with a small increase in c-Fos in TrpOH-like and TrpOH-negative cells, respectively, in the caudal interfascicular DRN region. By contrast, restraint stress significantly increased c-Fos in both TrpOH-like and TrpOH-negative cells in the rostral DRN and LC. c-Fos-positive cells in the DRN did not express tyrosine hydroxylase. These results reveal regionally specific monoaminergic correlates of arousal-induced circadian clock resetting, and suggest a hypothesis that strong activation of some DRN and LC neurons by inescapable stress may oppose clock resetting in response to arousal during the daily sleep period. More generally, these results complement evidence from other rodent species for functional topographic organization of the DRN. PMID:20079808

  12. Enhancement of the FGFR1 signaling in the FGFR1-5-HT1A heteroreceptor complex in midbrain raphe 5-HT neuron systems. Relevance for neuroplasticity and depression.

    PubMed

    Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O; Pérez-Alea, Mileidys; Narvaez, Manuel; Tarakanov, Alexander O; Mudó, Giuseppa; Jiménez-Beristain, Antonio; Agnati, Luigi F; Ciruela, Francisco; Belluardo, Natale; Fuxe, Kjell

    2015-07-31

    New findings show existence of FGFR1-5-HT1A heteroreceptor complexes in 5-HT nerve cells of the dorsal and median raphe nuclei of the rat midbrain and hippocampus. Synergistic receptor-receptor interactions in these receptor complexes indicated their enhancing role in hippocampal plasticity. The existence of FGFR1-5-HT1A heteroreceptor complexes also in midbrain raphe 5-HT nerve cells open up the possibility that antidepressant drugs by increasing extracellular 5-HT levels can cause an activation of the FGF-2/FGFR1 mechanism in these nerve cells as well. Therefore, the agonist modulation of the FGFR1-5-HT1A heteroreceptor complexes and their specific role is now determined in rat medullary raphe RN33B cells and in the caudal midline raphe area of the midbrain rich in 5-HT nerve cells. The combined i.c.v. treatment with FGF-2 and the 5-HT1A agonist 8-OHDPAT synergistically increased FGFR1 and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in the raphe midline area of the midbrain and in the RN33B cells. Cotreatment with FGF2 and the 5-HT1A agonist induced RN33B cell differentiation as seen from development of an increased number and length of extensions per cell and their increased 5-HT immunoreactivity. These signaling and differentiation events were dependent on the receptor interface since they were blocked by incubation with TMV but not by TMII of the 5-HT1A receptor. Taken together, the 5-HT1A autoreceptors by being part of a FGFR1-5-HT1A heteroreceptor complex in the midbrain raphe 5-HT nerve cells appears to have also a trophic role in the central 5-HT neuron systems besides playing a key role in reducing the firing of these neurons.

  13. Activation of mGlu2/3 metabotropic glutamate receptors negatively regulates the stimulation of inositol phospholipid hydrolysis mediated by 5-hydroxytryptamine2A serotonin receptors in the frontal cortex of living mice.

    PubMed

    Molinaro, G; Traficante, A; Riozzi, B; Di Menna, L; Curto, M; Pallottino, S; Nicoletti, F; Bruno, V; Battaglia, G

    2009-08-01

    The interaction between 5-hydroxytryptamine(2A) (5-HT(2A)) serotonin receptors and metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) 2/3 receptors underlies the antipsychotic activity of mGlu2/3 receptor agonists in experimental animals and humans. The molecular nature of this interaction is only partially known. We here report for the first time that pharmacological activation of mGlu2/3 receptors attenuates the stimulation of polyphosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis mediated by 5-HT(2A) receptors in the frontal cortex of living mice. Mice were injected intracerebroventricularly with [myo-(3)H]inositol and treated with drugs 1 h after a pretreatment with lithium, which blocks the conversion of inositol monophosphate into free inositol. Systemic injection of the mGlu2/3 receptor agonist (-)-2-oxa-4-aminocyclo[3.1.0]hexane-4,6-dicarboxylic acid (LY379268) inhibited the stimulation of PI hydrolysis induced by the hallucinogenic 5-HT(2A) receptor agonist (+/-)-1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane (DOI) without affecting the stimulation by mGlu1/5 or muscarinic receptors. The action of LY379268 was prevented by the preferential mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist (2S,1'S,2'S)-2-(9-xanthylmethyl)-2-(2'-carboxycyclopropyl)glycine (LY341495). N-(4'-cyano-biphenyl-3-yl)-N-(3-pyridinylmethyl)-ethanesulfonamide hydrochloride (LY566332), a selective mGlu2 receptor enhancer, also reduced DOI-stimulated PI hydrolysis when combined with subthreshold doses of LY379268. Systemic LY379268 inhibited DOI-stimulated PI hydrolysis in mice lacking either mGlu2 or mGlu3 receptors but was inactive in double mGlu2/mGlu3 receptor knockout mice, suggesting that both mGlu2 and mGlu3 receptors interact with 5-HT(2A) receptors. Surprisingly, contrasting results were obtained in cortical slice preparations, where LY379268 amplified both DOI- and 3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine-stimulated PI hydrolysis. Amplification was abrogated by the mGlu5 receptor antagonist 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine, suggesting that

  14. Raphe GABAergic neurons mediate the acquisition of avoidance after social defeat.

    PubMed

    Challis, Collin; Boulden, Janette; Veerakumar, Avin; Espallergues, Julie; Vassoler, Fair M; Pierce, R Christopher; Beck, Sheryl G; Berton, Olivier

    2013-08-28

    Serotonin (5-HT) modulates neural responses to socioaffective cues and can bias approach or avoidance behavioral decisions, yet the cellular mechanisms underlying its contribution to the regulation of social experiences remain poorly understood. We hypothesized that GABAergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) may participate in socioaffective regulation by controlling serotonergic tone during social interaction. We tested this hypothesis using whole-cell recording techniques in genetically identified DRN GABA and 5-HT neurons in mice exposed to social defeat, a model that induces long-lasting avoidance behaviors in a subset of mice responsive to serotonergic antidepressants. Our results revealed that social defeat engaged DRN GABA neurons and drove GABAergic sensitization that strengthened inhibition of 5-HT neurons in mice that were susceptible, but not resilient to social defeat. Furthermore, optogenetic silencing of DRN GABA neurons disinhibited neighboring 5-HT neurons and prevented the acquisition of social avoidance in mice exposed to a social threat, but did not affect a previously acquired avoidance phenotype. We provide the first characterization of GABA neurons in the DRN that monosynaptically inhibit 5-HT neurons and reveal their key role in neuroplastic processes underlying the development of social avoidance.

  15. Raphe GABAergic Neurons Mediate the Acquisition of Avoidance after Social Defeat

    PubMed Central

    Challis, Collin; Boulden, Janette; Veerakumar, Avin; Espallergues, Julie; Vassoler, Fair M.; Pierce, R. Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) modulates neural responses to socioaffective cues and can bias approach or avoidance behavioral decisions, yet the cellular mechanisms underlying its contribution to the regulation of social experiences remain poorly understood. We hypothesized that GABAergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) may participate in socioaffective regulation by controlling serotonergic tone during social interaction. We tested this hypothesis using whole-cell recording techniques in genetically identified DRN GABA and 5-HT neurons in mice exposed to social defeat, a model that induces long-lasting avoidance behaviors in a subset of mice responsive to serotonergic antidepressants. Our results revealed that social defeat engaged DRN GABA neurons and drove GABAergic sensitization that strengthened inhibition of 5-HT neurons in mice that were susceptible, but not resilient to social defeat. Furthermore, optogenetic silencing of DRN GABA neurons disinhibited neighboring 5-HT neurons and prevented the acquisition of social avoidance in mice exposed to a social threat, but did not affect a previously acquired avoidance phenotype. We provide the first characterization of GABA neurons in the DRN that monosynaptically inhibit 5-HT neurons and reveal their key role in neuroplastic processes underlying the development of social avoidance. PMID:23986235

  16. [THE THYROID STATUS OF RATS IMMUNIZED WITH PEPTIDES DERIVED FROM THE EXTRACELLULAR REGIONS OF THE TYPES 3 AND 4 MELANOCORTIN RECEPTORS AND THE 1B-SUBTYPE 5-HYDROXYTRYPTAMINE RECEPTOR].

    PubMed

    Derkach, K V; Moyseuk, I V; Shpakova, E A; Sphakov, A O

    2015-01-01

    The activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis is controlled by the brain neurotransmitter systems, including the melanocortin signaling system. Pharmacological inhibition of type 4 melanocortin receptor (M4R) leads to disruption of the functioning of HPT axis and to reduction of the level of thyroid hormones. At the same time, the data on how prolonged inhibition of M4R affects this axis and on its role in regulation of M3R are absent. The relationship between the thyroid status and the activity of 1B-subtype 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor (5-HT1BR) is scarcely explored. The aim of this work to study the effects of chronic inhibition of M3R, M4R and 5-HT1BR induced by immunization of rats with BSA-conjugated peptide derived from the extracellular regions of these receptors on the thyroid status and the activity of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH)-sensitive adenylyl cyclase signaling system (ACSS) in the thyroid glarid (TG) of the immunized animals. In rats immunized with the peptides K-[TSLHL WNRSSHGLHG11-25]-A of M4R, A[PTNPYCICTTAH269-280]-A of M3R and. [QAKAEE-EVSEC(Acm)-VVNTDH189-205]-A of 5-HT1BR levels of thyroid hormones such as fT4, tT4 and tT3 were significantly reduced. In rats immunized with M4R and M3R peptides, an increase of TSH was detected whereas in the animals immunized with 5-HT1BR peptide the level of TSH, on the contrary, was reduced. In the TG of rats immunized with M4R and M3R peptides, the stimulatory effects of hormones (TSH, PA-CAP-3 8) and GppNHp on adenylyl cyclase activity were attenuated, and the changes were most pronounced in the case M4R peptide immunization. After immunization with 5-HT1BR peptide the stimulatory effects of TSH, PACAP-38 and GppNHp were retained. Thus, the main cause of thyroid hormones deficit in rats immunized with M4R and M3R peptides was the decreased sensitivity of ACSS thyrocytes to TSH, whereas in rats iimunized with 5-HT1BR peptide the deficit of thyroid hormones was associated with decreased

  17. Malformations of dorsal induction.

    PubMed

    Kanekar, Sangam; Kaneda, Heather; Shively, Alexis

    2011-06-01

    Dorsal induction includes the formation and closure of neural tube, occurs during 3-5 weeks of gestation. Neurulation occurs in two phases, primary neurulation (formation of the neural plate and subsequently neural tube) and secondary neurulation (formation of distal cord and sacral and coccygeal segments). Failure of dorsal induction leads to anencephaly, exencephaly, cephaloceles, Chiari malformation and spinal dysraphism. In this article we discuss the relevant embryology, etiopathology and detail imaging appearances of these malformations.

  18. Specific neurotoxin lesions of median raphe serotonergic neurons disrupt maternal behavior in the lactating rat.

    PubMed

    Barofsky, A L; Taylor, J; Tizabi, Y; Kumar, R; Jones-Quartey, K

    1983-11-01

    Impairments in lactation after electrolytic lesions of the median raphe (MR) nucleus have been corrected by treatment with PRL. Specific serotonin neurotoxin lesions were used in the present study to determine whether decrements in litter growth after electrolytic lesions could be attributed to serotonergic neuron damage at the MR locus, and whether MR lesions (MRL) disrupted suckling-induced PRL release. Intracerebral microinjection of 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT) into the MR nucleus produced dose-related decrements in litter growth after either 4 micrograms (sham, 1.35 +/- 0.05; MRL, 1.04 +/- 0.05 g/pup X day; P less than 0.001) or 8 micrograms 5,7-DHT (sham, 1.35 +/- 0.06; MRL, 0.87 +/- 0.11 g/pup X day; P less than 0.001). Despite hypothalamic serotonin depletions of 15% and 55%, respectively, for the two doses of 5,7-DHT, there was no difference between sham and MRL animals in either basal or suckling-induced PRL release. When lesions were placed on day 1 of lactation (L) so that killing on day 7-L corresponded to the early maximal neurotoxin effect, MRL mothers still showed litter growth decrements (0.37 +/- 0.07; sham, 0.98 +/- 0.08 g/pup X day; P less than 0.001) and normal PRL values. When maternal behavior was examined, MRL animals exhibited a higher incidence of abnormal behaviors (failure to retrieve pups, cannibalism, and failure to initiate suckling during a 1-h test period; Fisher's exact P, Sham vs. MRL, less than 0.01, less than 0.05, and 0.15, respectively) than sham animals or animals with 5,7-DHT lesions in the dorsal raphe nucleus or superior colliculus. In addition, suckling behavior scores, determined from daily suckling behavior observations, were lowest in the MRL group and correlated with litter growth only in this group (r = 0.789; P less than 0.01). These data suggest that serotonergic elements in the MR nucleus play an obligatory role in maintaining normal maternal behavior during lactation, but they are not involved in suckling

  19. Antidepressant treatment in helpless rats: effect on the electrophysiological activity of raphe dorsalis serotonergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Maudhuit, C; Prévot, E; Dangoumau, L; Martin, P; Hamon, M; Adrien, J

    1997-04-01

    Chronic treatment with antidepressants renders serotonergic neuronal firing less sensitive to the inhibitory effect of serotonin (5-HT) reuptake blockers in the rat, and this has been considered as a major correlate of the therapeutic action of these drugs. We investigated whether the same mechanisms could be evidenced in an experimental model of depression, the learned helplessness paradigm. Rats rendered helpless by a single session of inescapable electrical footshocks exhibit, for several days, depression-like behavioural deficits which can be reversed by sub-chronic, but not acute, treatment with antidepressants. Recording of serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus revealed that, under baseline conditions, the spontaneous firing was similar in helpless rats and in non-helpless controls. However, neurons in the former group exhibited an enhanced sensitivity to the inhibitory action of the 5-HT reuptake blocker, citalopram (ED50 = 0.18 +/- 0.02 mg/kg IV in helpless rats versus 0.27 +/- 0.03 mg/kg IV in controls, P < 0.05). Treatment with zimeldine during 3 consecutive days induced in both helpless and control rats, a decrease in the inhibitory response of serotonergic neurons to the citalopram challenge, which resulted in a normalization of the neuronal reactivity in the helpless group (ED50 = 0.31 +/- 0.03 mg/kg IV). Since this adaptive phenomenon parallels the behavioural improvement induced by the repeated administration of zimeldine and other antidepressants in helpless rats, it might be considered as a crucial event in the mechanism of therapeutic action of these drugs.

  20. Medullary raphe neurones and baroreceptor modulation of the respiratory motor pattern in the cat

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, B G; Arata, A; Morris, K F; Hernandez, Y M; Shannon, R

    1998-01-01

    Perturbations of arterial blood pressure change medullary raphe neurone activity and the respiratory motor pattern. This study sought evidence for actions of baroresponsive raphe neurones on the medullary respiratory network.Blood pressure was perturbed by intravenous injection of an α1-adrenergic receptor agonist, unilateral pressure changes in the carotid sinus, or occlusion of the descending aorta in thirty-six Dial-urethane-anaesthetized, vagotomized, paralysed, artificially ventilated cats. Neurones were monitored with microelectrode arrays in two or three of the following domains: nucleus raphe obscurus-nucleus raphe pallidus, nucleus raphe magnus, and rostral and caudal ventrolateral medulla. Data were analysed with cycle-triggered histograms, peristimulus time and cumulative sum histograms, cross-correlograms and spike-triggered averages of efferent phrenic nerve activity.Prolongation of the expiratory phase and decreased peak integrated phrenic amplitude were most frequently observed. Of 707 neurones studied, 310 had altered firing rates during stimulation; changes in opposite directions were monitored simultaneously in fifty-six of eighty-seven data sets with at least two baroresponsive neurones.Short time scale correlations were detected between neurones in 347 of 3388 pairs. Seventeen pairs of baroresponsive raphe neurones exhibited significant offset correlogram features indicative of paucisynaptic interactions. In correlated raphe-ventrolateral medullary neurone pairs with at least one baroresponsive neurone, six of seven ventrolateral medullary decrementing expiratory (E-Decr) neurones increased their firing rate during baroreceptor stimulation. Thirteen of fifteen ventrolateral medullary inspiratory neurones correlated with raphe cells decreased their firing rate during baroreceptor stimulation.The results support the hypothesis that raphe neuronal assemblies transform and transmit information from baroreceptors to neurones in the ventral

  1. The effects of intracranial administration of hallucinogens on operant behavior in the rat. I. Lysergic acid diethylamide.

    PubMed

    Mokler, D J; Stoudt, K W; Sherman, L C; Rech, R H

    1986-10-01

    Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) was infused in one microliter volumes into discrete brain regions of rats trained to press a bar for food reinforcement. The sites were chosen as major areas of the brain 5-hydroxytryptamine (5HT) system: the dorsal and median raphe nuclei, dorsal hippocampus, lateral habenular nuclei, and the prefrontal cortex. Following training in a fixed ratio-40 (FR-40) operant behavior rats were implanted for the lateral habenular nuclei, dorsal hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex. Following recovery from surgery, LSD (8.6 to 86 micrograms) or vehicle was infused immediately before a daily operant session. Infusion of vehicle was inactive. LSD produced a dose-dependent decrease in reinforcements and an increase in 10-sec periods of non-responding (pause intervals). LSD was significantly more potent when infused into the dorsal raphe nucleus than following intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration, whereas LSD was less potent when infused into the median raphe, lateral habenula or dorsal hippocampus. ED50s for increases in pause intervals were 9, 13, 23, 25, and 54 micrograms for infusion into the dorsal raphe, prefrontal cortex, dorsal hippocampus, median raphe, and lateral habenular nuclei, respectively. The ED50 for ICV administration in a previous study was 15 micrograms. The ED50 of LSD placed into the prefrontal cortex did not differ significantly from that of the ICV infusion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Raphe obscurus neurons participate in thermoregulation in rats.

    PubMed

    Ulhoa, Melissa Araújo; da Silva, Nyam Florencio; Pires, José Guilherme Pinheiro; Futuro Neto, Henrique de Azevedo

    2013-04-01

    In mammalian, several evidences suggest that central serotonin participates in thermoregulation. Nucleus raphe obscurus (NRO), a serotonergic nucleus, has been recognized to be the source of generation of various hemodynamic patterns in different behavioral conditions, but its involvement in thermoregulation is unclear. In the present study, extracellular action potentials of NRO neurons were recorded in anesthetized rats, which were submitted to cold and warm stimuli in the tail. The firing rate of the neurons was compared before and after each stimulation. It was found that 59% of the neurons submitted to a cold stimulus trial had a significant increase in their firing frequency, while 48% of the neurons submitted to warm stimulation trial were inhibited. The opposite responses in neuronal activity of NRO units to cooling or heating suggest that these cells are involved in producing the homoeothermic vascular adaptations secondary to changes in cutaneous temperature in the rat tail.

  3. CO2-inhibited neurons in the medullary raphé are GABAergic

    PubMed Central

    Iceman, Kimberly E.; Corcoran, Andrea E.; Taylor, Barbara E.; Harris, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have reported subsets of medullary raphé neurons that are either stimulated or inhibited by CO2/pH in vitro, in situ, and in vivo. We tested the hypothesis that medullary raphé CO2-inhibited neurons are GABAergic. Extracellular recordings in unanesthetized juvenile in situ rat preparations showed reversible hypercapnia-induced suppression of 19% (63/323) of medullary raphé neurons, and this suppression persisted after antagonism of NMDA, AMPA/kainate, and GABAA receptors. We stained a subset of CO2-inhibited cells and found that most (11/12) had glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 immunoreactivity (GAD67-ir). These data indicate that the majority of acidosis-inhibited medullary raphé neurons are GABAergic, and that their chemosensitivity is independent of major fast synaptic inputs. Thus, CO2-sensitive GABAergic neurons may play a role in central CO2/pH chemoreception. PMID:25087734

  4. CO2-inhibited neurons in the medullary raphé are GABAergic.

    PubMed

    Iceman, Kimberly E; Corcoran, Andrea E; Taylor, Barbara E; Harris, Michael B

    2014-11-01

    Previous studies have reported subsets of medullary raphé neurons that are either stimulated or inhibited by CO2/pH in vitro, in situ, and in vivo. We tested the hypothesis that medullary raphé CO2-inhibited neurons are GABAergic. Extracellular recordings in unanesthetized juvenile in situ rat preparations showed reversible hypercapnia-induced suppression of 19% (63/323) of medullary raphé neurons, and this suppression persisted after antagonism of NMDA, AMPA/kainate, and GABAA receptors. We stained a subset of CO2-inhibited cells and found that most (11/12) had glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 immunoreactivity (GAD67-ir). These data indicate that the majority of acidosis-inhibited medullary raphé neurons are GABAergic, and that their chemosensitivity is independent of major fast synaptic inputs. Thus, CO2-sensitive GABAergic neurons may play a role in central CO2/pH chemoreception.

  5. Scrotal pearl is not always a sign of anorectal malformation: median raphe cyst.

    PubMed

    Soyer, Tutku; Karabulut, Ayşe Anıl; Boybeyi, Özlem; Günal, Yasemin Dere

    2013-01-01

    Pearls of meconium can be seen on the raphe of the scrotum and are considered as a sign of anorectal malformation (ARM). Scrotal pearls without ARM are rare in children and designated as median raphe cyst of the scrotum (MRC). A six-month-old boy with scrotal pearls without ARM is presented to discuss the clinical features and treatment modalities of MRC in infants. PMID:24577992

  6. Opposing roles for serotonin in cholinergic neurons of the ventral and dorsal striatum

    PubMed Central

    Virk, Michael S.; Sagi, Yotam; Medrihan, Lucian; Leung, Jenny; Kaplitt, Michael G.; Greengard, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the molecular similarities and differences between neurons in the ventral (vSt) and dorsal striatum (dSt) and their physiological implications. In the vSt, serotonin [5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] modulates mood control and pleasure response, whereas in the dSt, 5-HT regulates motor behavior. Here we show that, in mice, 5-HT depolarizes cholinergic interneurons (ChIs) of the dSt whereas hyperpolarizing ChIs from the vSt by acting on different 5-HT receptor isoforms. In the vSt, 5-HT1A (a postsynaptic receptor) and 5-HT1B (a presynaptic receptor) are highly expressed, and synergistically inhibit the excitability of ChIs. The inhibitory modulation by 5-HT1B, but not that by 5-HT1A, is mediated by p11, a protein associated with major depressive disorder. Specific deletion of 5-HT1B from cholinergic neurons results in impaired inhibition of ACh release in the vSt and in anhedonic-like behavior. PMID:26733685

  7. Serotonergic Regulation of Excitability of Principal Cells of the Dorsal Cochlear Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Zheng-Quan

    2015-01-01

    The dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN) is one of the first stations within the central auditory pathway where the basic computations underlying sound localization are initiated and heightened activity in the DCN may underlie central tinnitus. The neurotransmitter serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT), is associated with many distinct behavioral or cognitive states, and serotonergic fibers are concentrated in the DCN. However, it remains unclear what is the function of this dense input. Using a combination of in vitro electrophysiology and optogenetics in mouse brain slices, we found that 5-HT directly enhances the excitability of fusiform principal cells via activation of two distinct 5-HT receptor subfamilies, 5-HT2A/2CR (5-HT2A/2C receptor) and 5-HT7R (5-HT7 receptor). This excitatory effect results from an augmentation of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (Ih or HCN channels). The serotonergic regulation of excitability is G-protein-dependent and involves cAMP and Src kinase signaling pathways. Moreover, optogenetic activation of serotonergic axon terminals increased excitability of fusiform cells. Our findings reveal that 5-HT exerts a potent influence on fusiform cells by altering their intrinsic properties, which may enhance the sensitivity of the DCN to sensory input. PMID:25788672

  8. Dorsal spine osteoblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Pranshu; Singh, Rahul; Garg, Bharat B.

    2016-01-01

    Benign osteoblastoma is a rare primary neoplasm comprising less than 1% of primary bone tumors.[1] We report a case of a 20-year-old female patient presenting with progressive paraparesis over one year and back pain over the dorsal spine gradually increasing in severity over a year. Computerised tomomography (CT) of the spine revealed a well-defined 3.5 × 3.0 cm mass heterodense expansile bony lesion arising from the lamina of the D12 vertebra, having lytic and sclerotic component and causing compromise of the bony spinal canal. D12 laminectomy and total excision of the tumor was done. PMID:27057242

  9. Dorsal column stimulator applications

    PubMed Central

    Yampolsky, Claudio; Hem, Santiago; Bendersky, Damián

    2012-01-01

    Background: Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has been used to treat neuropathic pain since 1967. Following that, technological progress, among other advances, helped SCS become an effective tool to reduce pain. Methods: This article is a non-systematic review of the mechanism of action, indications, results, programming parameters, complications, and cost-effectiveness of SCS. Results: In spite of the existence of several studies that try to prove the mechanism of action of SCS, it still remains unknown. The mechanism of action of SCS would be based on the antidromic activation of the dorsal column fibers, which activate the inhibitory interneurons within the dorsal horn. At present, the indications of SCS are being revised constantly, while new applications are being proposed and researched worldwide. Failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS) is the most common indication for SCS, whereas, the complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is the second one. Also, this technique is useful in patients with refractory angina and critical limb ischemia, in whom surgical or endovascular treatment cannot be performed. Further indications may be phantom limb pain, chronic intractable pain located in the head, face, neck, or upper extremities, spinal lumbar stenosis in patients who are not surgical candidates, and others. Conclusion: Spinal cord stimulation is a useful tool for neuromodulation, if an accurate patient selection is carried out prior, which should include a trial period. Undoubtedly, this proper selection and a better knowledge of its underlying mechanisms of action, will allow this cutting edge technique to be more acceptable among pain physicians. PMID:23230533

  10. Flattening plasma corticosterone levels increases the prevalence of serotonergic dorsal raphe neurons inhibitory responses to nicotine in adrenalectomised rats.

    PubMed

    Frías-Domínguez, Carmen; Garduño, Julieta; Hernández, Salvador; Drucker-Colin, René; Mihailescu, Stefan

    2013-09-01

    Major depression is characterized by a diminished activity of the brain serotonergic system as well as by the flattening of plasma cortisol levels. Nicotine improves mood in patients with major depression and in experimentally depressed animals by increasing brain serotonin (5-HT), noradrenaline and dopamine levels. The present study was directed to determine if flattening plasma glucocorticoid levels changes nicotine's stimulatory effects upon 5-HT DRN neurons. The experiments were performed in brain slices obtained from rats previously (14 days) adrenalectomised and implanted subcutaneously with one pellet containing 75mg of corticosterone (Adx+CSR rats). Whole cell voltage and current clamp techniques were used to study the activity of immunocitochemically identified 5-HT DRN neurons. Administration of nicotine (1μM) in sham-operated animals produced stimulatory effects in all 5-HT DRN neurons studied. In Adx+CSR rats however, nicotine inhibited 75% of 5-HT DRN neurons and increased the potassium-dependent inward rectifying current. The inhibitory effect of nicotine upon 5-HT DRN neurons was dependent on serotonin release inside the DRN, since it was converted into a stimulatory response by the selective antagonist of 5-HT1A receptors N-[2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]ethyl]-N-(2-pyridyl)cyclohexanecarboxamide (WAY100635, 25nM). Adx+CSR rats also presented an increased function of 5-HT1A autoreceptors, since, in these rats, serotonin (1-10μM) produced a higher increase in the potassium dependent inward rectifying current in comparison with sham-operated animals. Serotonin release inside DRN was mediated by α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors since the selective antagonist of these receptors dihydro-β-erytroidine hydrobromide (DHβE, 100nM) blocked the inhibitory effects of nicotine 5-HT DRN neurons. These data indicate that, in the experimental model of adrenalectomised rats implanted with corticosterone pellets, nicotine increases the function of 5-HT1A receptors of 5-HT DRN neurons. PMID:23872451

  11. Hypothalamic and Other Connections with the Dorsal CA2 Area of the Mouse Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Zhenzhong; Gerfen, Charles R.; Young, W. Scott

    2013-01-01

    The CA2 area is an important, although relatively unexplored, component of the hippocampus. We used various tracers to provide a comprehensive analysis of CA2 connections in C57BL/6J mice. Using various adeno-associated viruses that express fluorescent proteins, we found a vasopressinergic projection from the paraventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus (PVN) to the CA2, as well as a projection from pyramidal neurons of the CA2 to the supramammillary nuclei. These projections were confirmed by retrograde tracing. As expected, we observed CA2 afferent projections from neurons in ipsilateral entorhinal cortical layer II as well as from bilateral dorsal CA2 and CA3 using retrograde tracers. Additionally, we saw CA2 neuronal input from bilateral medial septal nuclei, vertical and horizontal limbs of the nucleus of diagonal band of Broca, supramammillary nuclei (SUM) and median raphe nucleus. Dorsal CA2 injections of adeno-associated virus expressing green fluorescent protein revealed axonal projections primarily to dorsal CA1, CA2 and CA3 bilaterally. No projection was detected to the entorhinal cortex from the dorsal CA2. These results are consistent with recent observations that the dorsal CA2 forms disynaptic connections with the entorhinal cortex to influence dynamic memory processing. Mouse dorsal CA2 neurons send bilateral projections to the medial and lateral septal nuclei, vertical and horizontal limbs of the diagonal band of Broca and the SUM. Novel connections from the PVN and to the SUM suggest important regulatory roles for CA2 in mediating social and emotional input for memory processing. PMID:23172108

  12. Nucleus-specific alteration of raphe neurons in human neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Gabor G; Klöppel, Stefan; Fischer, Ingeborg; Dorner, Suzanne; Lindeck-Pozza, Elisabeth; Birner, Peter; Bötefür, Ingolf C; Pilz, Peter; Volk, Benedikt; Budka, Herbert

    2003-01-20

    Neurodegenerative diseases share symptoms suggested to be related to the serotonergic system. To evaluate the involvement of serotonergic raphe nuclei, we compared the percentage of neurons synthesizing serotonin in the nucleus centralis superior (NCS), raphe obscurus and pallidus (NROP) in Alzheimer's disease (AD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), Parkinson's disease (PD), multiple system atrophy (MSA), and control brains. We used immunohistochemistry for tryptophan hydroxylase (TpOH), phosphorylated tau, and alpha-synuclein. We observed a significant decrease in the NCS in the NROP in AD, but a significant increase in PSP and MSA. Cytoskeletal pathology was present in the NCS and NROP to a variable degree. We conclude that there is disease- and nucleus-specific alteration of serotonin synthesis in the raphe.

  13. In Vivo Adaptive Optics Imaging of the Temporal Raphe and Its Relationship to the Optic Disc and Fovea in the Human Retina

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Gang; Gast, Thomas J.; Burns, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the anatomy of the temporal raphe and its angular relationship to the optic disc and fovea in the human retina in vivo. Methods. Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) was used to image the temporal raphe in 11 young subjects. The raphe's angle relative to a horizontal line and the raphe-fovea-disc angle (angle between the raphe and the line connecting the disc and fovea center) were determined. In addition, to investigate the impact of aging on the raphe, we imaged the raphe at 9° eccentricity in 10 additional older healthy subjects and compared the raphe's anatomy between the two age groups. Results. The raphe's in vivo appearance was generally in agreement with major findings of ex vivo studies. The raphe angle was −1.67° ± 4.8°, with the ranges from −9° to 6°. It was related to the angle of the foveal depression relative to the disc. The raphe-fovea-disc angle was 170.3° ± 3.6°. The raphe gap, defined as the averaged distance between superior and inferior bundles, was significantly larger in the older subjects than in younger subjects (230.83 ± 113.22 μm vs. 1.93 ± 68.73 μm, P < 0.0001). Conclusions. The angle of the raphe in the study was not consistent with classic raphe models. While the angle showed relatively large individual variability, there seems to be a systematic relation between the disc, fovea, and raphe. It may be useful for individualizing retinal measurement strategies with regard to perimetry. PMID:25146991

  14. Increased serotonin-1A (5-HT1A) autoreceptor expression and reduced raphe serotonin levels in deformed epidermal autoregulatory factor-1 (Deaf-1) gene knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Czesak, Margaret; Le François, Brice; Millar, Anne M; Deria, Mariam; Daigle, Mireille; Visvader, Jane E; Anisman, Hymie; Albert, Paul R

    2012-02-24

    Altered regulation of the serotonin-1A (5-HT1A) receptor gene is implicated in major depression and mood disorders. The functional human 5-HT1A C(-1019)G promoter polymorphism (rs6295), which prevents the binding of Deaf-1/NUDR leading to dysregulation of the receptor, has been associated with major depression. In cell models Deaf-1 displays dual activity, repressing 5-HT1A autoreceptor expression in serotonergic raphe cells while enhancing postsynaptic 5-HT1A heteroreceptor expression in nonserotonergic neurons. A functional Deaf-1 binding site on the mouse 5-HT1A promoter was recognized by Deaf-1 in vitro and in vivo and mediated dual activity of Deaf-1 on 5-HT1A gene transcription. To address regulation by Deaf-1 in vivo, Deaf-1 knock-out mice bred to a C57BL/6 background were compared with wild-type siblings for changes in 5-HT1A RNA and protein by quantitative RT-PCR, in situ hybridization, and immunofluorescence. In the dorsal raphe, Deaf-1 knock-out mice displayed increased 5-HT1A mRNA, protein, and 5-HT1A-positive cell counts but reduced 5-HT levels, whereas other serotonergic markers, such as tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH)- or 5-HT-positive cells and TPH2 RNA levels, were unchanged. By contrast, 5-HT1A mRNA and 5-HT1A-positive cells were reduced in the frontal cortex of Deaf-1-null mice, with no significant change in hippocampal 5-HT1A RNA, protein, or cell counts. The region-specific alterations of brain 5-HT1A gene expression and reduced raphe 5-HT content in Deaf-1(-/-) mice indicate the importance of Deaf-1 in regulation of 5-HT1A gene expression and provide insight into the role of the 5-HT1A G(-1019) allele in reducing serotonergic neurotransmission by derepression of 5-HT1A autoreceptors.

  15. Differential interactions of indolealkylamines with 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor subtypes.

    PubMed

    McKenna, D J; Repke, D B; Lo, L; Peroutka, S J

    1990-03-01

    Affinities of drugs for 21 indolealkylamine derivatives, some with putative hallucinogenic activity, were determined at 5-HT1A, 5-HT2A and 5-HT2B recognition sites, using radioligand competition studies. Nearly all of the derivatives displayed greatest potency for the 5-HT2A receptor, labelled by [125I]R-(-)DOI in the cortex of the rat. Most derivatives displayed 2-10 times lower affinity at the HT2B receptor labelled by [3H]ketanserin in bovine cortex. Derivatives lacking ring substituents displayed lower affinities for all of the recognition sites, compared to derivatives substituted in the 4- or 5-position of the indole ring. The 4-hydroxylated derivatives displayed 25-380-fold selectivity for the 5-HT2A site, vs the 5-HT1A site, while the 5-substituted derivatives displayed approximately equal potency at the 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A sites. Affinity of all the compounds at the 5-HT2B site was greater than 300 nM. The 6-substituted derivatives displayed greater than micromolar affinities for all of the 5-HT recognition sites examined. The size of the N,N-dialkyl substituent was a secondary determinant of affinity, with groups larger than N,N-diisopropyl resulting in a marked reduction in affinity at both the 5-HT2A and 5-HT1A recognition sites. This study demonstrated that hallucinogenic 4-hydroxy-indolealkylamines, like psychotomimetic phenylisopropylamines, bind potently and selectively to the 5-HT2A recognition site, labelled by [125I]R-(-)DOI. This provides further evidence indicating that this recently described subtype of the 5-HT2 receptor may partially mediate the action of hallucinogenic agents.

  16. Control over a stressor involves the posterior dorsal striatum and the act/outcome circuit

    PubMed Central

    Amat, Jose; Christianson, John P.; Aleksejev, Roman M.; Kim, Janet; Richeson, Kaitlin R.; Watkins, Linda R.; Maier, Steven F.

    2016-01-01

    Controllable/escapable tailshocks (ESs) do not produce the behavioral and neurochemical outcomes produced by equal yoked uncontrollable/inescapable tailshocks (ISs). The prelimbic cortex is known to play a key role in mediating the protective effects of control. The concepts of act/outcome learning and control seem similar, and act/outcome learning is mediated by a circuit involving the prelimbic cortex and posterior dorsomedial striatum (DMS). Thus, we tested the involvement of the DMS in the protective effect of ES, in rats. First, we examined Fos immunoreactivity in both the DMS and dorsolateral striatum (DLS) after ES and yoked IS. We then investigated the effect of blocking DMS or DLS N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors with the specific antagonist D-(−)-2-amino-5-phosphopentanoic acid (D-AP5) on the release of dorsal raphe nucleus serotonin (5-HT) during ES, as well as on the level of anxiety produced by the ES experience 24 h later. ES, but not yoked IS, produced a large increase of Fos activity in the DMS. Consistent with the Fos data, D-AP5 in the DMS, but not in the DLS, prevented the inhibition of dorsal raphe nucleus 5-HT release normally produced by ES. Furthermore, D-AP5 administered into the DMS before ES, but not into the DLS, increased anxiety 24 h later, leading to levels similar to those produced by IS. These results suggest that, as with appetitive act/ outcome contingency learning, the protective effects of behavioral control over a stressor require the DMS. PMID:24862585

  17. Stimulation of raphe (obscurus) nucleus causes long-term potentiation of phrenic nerve activity in cat.

    PubMed

    Millhorn, D E

    1986-12-01

    1. The respiratory response, measured as integrated phrenic nerve activity, during and for up to an hour following 10 min of continuous electrical stimulation of raphe obscurus was quantitated in anaesthetized, artificially ventilated cats whose carotid sinus nerves and vagus nerves had been cut. End-tidal PCO2 and body temperature were kept constant with servocontrollers. 2. Stimulation of raphe obscurus caused a significant increase in both phrenic tidal activity and respiratory frequency that persisted following cessation of the stimulus. This persistent facilitation is referred to as 'long-term potentiation' of respiration. 3. Control stimulations in the parenchyma of the medulla oblongata failed to stimulate respiration and cause the long-term potentiation. 4. Both the direct facilitatory effects of raphe obscurus stimulation on phrenic nerve activity and the long-term potentiation of respiration following the stimulus were prevented by pre-treating cats with methysergide, a serotonin receptor antagonist. 5. The results are discussed in terms of the raphe obscurus being the potential source of the long-term potentiation of respiration that occurs following stimulation of carotid body afferents (Millhorn, Eldridge & Waldrop, 1980a, b). PMID:3114470

  18. Perineal raphe with special reference to its extension to the anus: a histological study using human fetuses

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yu; Li, Xiang Wu; Murakami, Gen; Rodríguez-Vázquez, José Francisco; Wilting, Joerg

    2016-01-01

    The raphe of the human penis and scrotum is considered to develop secondarily after disappearance of the initial midline seam by fusion of the bilateral genital folds. However, the fetal development was still obscure. We examined histological sections of 30 fetuses (17 males and 13 females) at 10–15 weeks. In male fetuses, the scrotum was not yet clearly identified because of no descent of testis. The perineal raphe was thin and wavy at 10 weeks, and it was continuous with and took a direction same as the inferior wall of the closed penile urethra after physiological hypospadias. Depending on growth of the bulbospongiosus muscle and corpus spongiosus penis, the midline intermuscular septum obtained a connection to the subcutaneous wavy raphe and made the latter thick and straight at 12–15 weeks. Notably, the perineal raphe extended posteriorly to attach to the external anal sphincter. In female fetuses, an epithelial fusion occurred along a short distance at the posterior end of the vestibule. However, in front of the external anal sphincter, a large midline mesenchymal tissue from the urorectal septum did not contain a raphe-like structure. Moreover, since the bilateral bulbospongiosus muscles were separated widely by the vestibule, they did not provide a midline septum. Fetal development of the perineal raphe was accelerated by reinforcement from the muscular septum. In contrast, without such a muscular support, the female raphe could not maintain its growth even if the seed appeared at the posterior end of the vestibule. PMID:27382513

  19. The 5-hydroxytryptamine2A receptor antagonist R-(+)-alpha-(2,3-dimethoxyphenyl)-1-[2-(4-fluorophenyl)ethyl-4-piperidinemethanol (M100907) attenuates impulsivity after both drug-induced disruption (dizocilpine) and enhancement (antidepressant drugs) of differential-reinforcement-of-low-rate 72-s behavior in the rat.

    PubMed

    Ardayfio, Paul A; Benvenga, Mark J; Chaney, Stephen F; Love, Patrick L; Catlow, John; Swanson, Steven P; Marek, Gerard J

    2008-12-01

    Previous work has suggested that N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonism and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)(2A) receptor blockade may enhance and attenuate, respectively, certain types of impulsivity mediated by corticothalamostriatal circuits. More specifically, past demonstrations of synergistic "antidepressant-like" effects of a 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonist and fluoxetine on differential-reinforcement-of-low-rate (DRL) 72-s schedule of operant reinforcement may speak to the role of 5-HT(2A) receptor blockade with respect to response inhibition as an important prefrontal cortical executive function relating to motor impulsivity. To examine the dynamic range over which 5-HT(2A) receptor blockade may exert effects on impulsivity, [R-(+)-alpha-(2,3-dimethoxyphenyl)-1-[2-(4-fluorophenyl)ethyl-4-piperidinemethanol] (M100907) was examined both alone and in combination with the psychotomimetic NMDA receptor antagonist dizocilpine [e.g., (-)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine maleate; MK-801] and two different antidepressants, the tricyclic antidepressant desmethylimipramine (DMI) and the monoamine oxidase inhibitor tranylcypromine in rats performing under a DRL 72-s schedule. MK-801 increased the response rate, decreased the number of reinforcers obtained, and exerted a leftward shift in the inter-response time (IRT) distribution as expected. A dose of M100907 that exerted minimal effect on DRL behavior by itself attenuated the psychotomimetic effects of MK-801. Extending previous M100907-fluoxetine observations, addition of a minimally active dose of M100907 to low doses of DMI and tranylcypromine enhanced the antidepressant-like effect of the antidepressants. Therefore, it may be that a tonic excitation of 5-HT(2A) receptors modulates impulsivity and function of corticothalamostriatal circuits over an extensive dynamic range. PMID:18772320

  20. 5-Amino-6-chloro-N-[(1-isobutylpiperidin-4-yl)methyl]-2-methylimidazo[1,2-alpha]pyridine-8-carboxamide (CJ-033,466), a novel and selective 5-hydroxytryptamine4 receptor partial agonist: pharmacological profile in vitro and gastroprokinetic effect in conscious dogs.

    PubMed

    Mikami, Tadayoshi; Ochi, Yasuo; Suzuki, Keiko; Saito, Toshiyuki; Sugie, Yutaka; Sakakibara, Minoru

    2008-04-01

    5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptors and dopamine(2) (D(2)) receptor modulate gastrointestinal motility. Gastroprokinetic agents that act on several 5-HT receptor subtypes and/or D(2) receptors are used clinically. Although the 5-HT(4) receptor is known to mediate the gastroprokinetic effects of these agents, the absence of highly selective 5-HT(4) receptor agonists has made it difficult to confirm the physiological consequences of selective 5-HT(4) receptor stimulation. In this study, we report the in vitro pharmacological profiles and the in vivo gastroprokinetic effects of 5-amino-6-chloro-N-[(1-isobutylpiperidin-4-yl)methyl]-2-methylimidazo[1,2-alpha]pyridine-8-carboxamide (CJ-033,466), a novel, potent, and selective 5-HT(4) partial agonist. Compared with preceding 5-HT(4) agonists such as cisapride, mosapride, and tegaserod, CJ-033,466 had a superior in vitro profile, with nanomolar agonistic activities for the 5-HT(4) receptor and 1000-fold greater selectivity for the 5-HT(4) receptor over other 5-HT and D(2) receptors. In vivo studies in conscious dogs showed that CJ-033,466 dose-dependently stimulated gastric antral motility in both the fasted and postprandial states at the same dose range and that it was 30 times more potent than cisapride. Furthermore, CJ-033,466 accelerated the gastric emptying rate in a gastroparesis dog model at the minimally effective dose established in the gastric motility study. In conclusion, CJ-033,466 is a potent and highly selective 5-HT(4) agonist that stimulates physiologically coordinated gastric motility, and it has no activity on other 5-HT receptor subtypes and D(2) receptors. Therefore, CJ-033,466 could be used to treat gastroparesis, providing better gastroprokinetics and reduced side effects mediated by the other receptors. PMID:18198343

  1. Postnatal changes in the number of serotonin-immunoreactive cells in midbrain raphe nuclei of male rats.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hiroyuki; Moriizumi, Tetsuji; Shimogawa, Yuji; Yamanouchi, Korehito

    2014-09-01

    To clarify the developmental changes in serotonergic neurons in the subdivisions of the dorsal (DR) and median raphe (MR) nuclei before puberty, the extent of the nuclei and the number of serotonin (5-HT) immunoreactive (ir) cells were measured in 5-, 15-, and 30-day-old rats and 8-week-old (adult) castrated male rats. The brains were fixed and 50 μm frozen sections prepared. After immunostaining for 5-HT, the number of 5-HT-ir cells in a 0.2 × 0.2 mm frame in the dorsal, ventral and lateral subdivisions of the DR (dDR, vDR and lDR, respectively) and MR were counted. Total numbers of 5-HT-ir cells counted in the frame of three sections in each rat were expressed as the number of cells per cubic millimeter (density). The results indicated that the densities of 5-HT-ir cells in the MR were almost the same in all age groups. On the other hand, among the subdivisions of the DR, the mean density of 5-HT-ir cells in 15-day-old rats was higher than that in the 5-day-old group in the lDR only. The area of the three sections of the DR and of the MR was also measured. The area of the DR in 15-day-old rats was found to be twice that in the 5-day-old rats, and differed from the area in 30-day-old rats and adults. There were no differences among the age groups in the areas of the MR. The results indicate that the expression of 5-HT in the lDR and extent of the DR increased to adult levels from days 5 to 15 after birth. In the dDR, vDR and MR, expression of 5-HT at postnatal day 5 was at adult levels already.

  2. 5-HT potentiation of the GABAA response in the rat sacral dorsal commissural neurones

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Tian-Le; Pang, Zhi-Ping; Li, Ji-Shuo; Akaike, Norio

    1998-01-01

    The modulatory effect of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) on the γ-aminobutyric acidA (GABAA) response was investigated in the neurones freshly dissociated from the rat sacral dorsal commissural nucleus (SDCN) using the nystatin perforated patch recording configuration under the voltage-clamp conditions.5-HT potentiated GABA-induced Cl− current (IGABA) without affecting the reversal potential of IGABA and the apparent affinity of GABA to its receptor.α-Methyl-5-HT mimicked the potentiation effect of 5-HT on IGABA while ketanserine blocked it. 1-Oleoyl-2-acetyl-glycerol (OAG) potentiated IGABA, and the effect of 5-HT on IGABA was occluded by OAG pretreatment. In the presence of chelerythrine, 5-HT failed to potentiate IGABA, suggesting that protein kinase C (PKC) is involved in the pathway through which the activation of the 5-HT2 receptor potentiates the IGABA.The facilitatory effect of 5-HT on IGABA remained in the presence of BAPTA-AM. LiCl also had no effect on 5-HT-induced potentiation of IGABA.H-89, genistein, okadaic acid and pervanadate all had no effects on 5-HT potentiation of IGABA. Pertussis toxin treatment for 6–8 h did not block the facilitatory effect of 5-HT on IGABA.The present results show that GABAA receptor in the rat SDCN could be modulated in situ by 5-HT, one of the major transmitters involved in the supraspinal control of nociception, and that the phosphorylation of GABAA receptor by PKC may be sufficient to support such modulation. The results also strongly support the hypothesis that the cotransmission by 5-HT and GABA has an important role in the spinal cord. PMID:9690871

  3. A group of non-serotonergic cells is CO2-stimulated in the medullary raphé

    PubMed Central

    Iceman, Kimberly E.; Harris, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    Serotonin/substance P synthesizing cells in the raphé nuclei of the brain are candidates for designation as central chemoreceptors that are stimulated by CO2/pH. We have previously demonstrated that these neurons are CO2-stimulated in situ. Evidence also suggests that CO2-inhibited raphé neurons recorded in vitro and in situ synthesize γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Unknown is whether there are other types of chemosensitive cells in the raphé. Here, we showed that a previously unrecognized pool of raphé neurons also exhibit chemosensitivity, and that they are not serotonergic. We used extracellular recording of individual raphé neurons in the unanesthetized juvenile rat in situ perfused decerebrate brainstem preparation to assess chemosensitivity of raphé neurons. Subsequent juxtacellular labeling of individually recorded cells, and immunohistochemistry for the serotonin synthesizing enzyme tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) and for neurokinin-1 receptor (NK1R; the receptor for substance P) indicated a group of CO2-stimulated cells that are not serotonergic, but express NK1R and are closely apposed to surrounding serotonergic cells. CO2-stimulated serotonergic (5-HT) and non-5-HT cells constitute distinct groups that have different firing characteristics and hypercapnic sensitivities. Non-5-HT cells fire faster and are more robustly stimulated by CO2 than are 5-HT cells. Thus, we have characterized a previously unrecognized type of CO2-stimulated medullary raphé neuron that is not serotonergic, but may receive input from neighboring serotonin/substance P synthesizing chemosensitive neurons. The potential network properties of the three types of chemosensitive raphé neurons (the present non-5-HT cells, serotonergic cells, and CO2-inhibited cells) remain to be elucidated. PMID:24333211

  4. A group of non-serotonergic cells is CO2-stimulated in the medullary raphé.

    PubMed

    Iceman, K E; Harris, M B

    2014-02-14

    Serotonin/substance P synthesizing cells in the raphé nuclei of the brain are candidates for designation as central chemoreceptors that are stimulated by CO2/pH. We have previously demonstrated that these neurons are CO2-stimulated in situ. Evidence also suggests that CO2-inhibited raphé neurons recorded in vitro and in situ synthesize GABA. Unknown is whether there are other types of chemosensitive cells in the raphé. Here, we showed that a previously unrecognized pool of raphé neurons also exhibit chemosensitivity, and that they are not serotonergic. We used extracellular recording of individual raphé neurons in the unanesthetized juvenile rat in situ perfused decerebrate brainstem preparation to assess chemosensitivity of raphé neurons. Subsequent juxtacellular labeling of individually recorded cells, and immunohistochemistry for the serotonin synthesizing enzyme tryptophan hydroxylase and for neurokinin-1 receptor (NK1R; the receptor for substance P) indicated a group of CO2-stimulated cells that are not serotonergic, but express NK1R and are closely apposed to surrounding serotonergic cells. CO2-stimulated 5-HT and non-5-HT cells constitute distinct groups that have different firing characteristics and hypercapnic sensitivities. Non-5-HT cells fire faster and are more robustly stimulated by CO2 than are 5-HT cells. Thus, we have characterized a previously unrecognized type of CO2-stimulated medullary raphé neuron that is not serotonergic, but may receive input from neighboring serotonin/substance P synthesizing chemosensitive neurons. The potential network properties of the three types of chemosensitive raphé neurons (the present non-5-HT cells, serotonergic cells, and CO2-inhibited cells) remain to be elucidated.

  5. Medullary raphe neuron activity is altered during fictive cough in the decerebrate cat.

    PubMed

    Baekey, David M; Morris, Kendall F; Nuding, Sarah C; Segers, Lauren S; Lindsey, Bruce G; Shannon, Roger

    2003-01-01

    Chemical lesions in the medullary raphe nuclei region influence cough. This study examined whether firing patterns of caudal medullary midline neurons were altered during cough. Extracellular neuron activity was recorded with microelectrode arrays in decerebrated, neuromuscular-blocked, ventilated cats. Cough-like motor patterns (fictive cough) in phrenic and lumbar nerves were elicited by mechanical stimulation of the intrathoracic trachea. Discharge patterns of respiratory and nonrespiratory-modulated neurons were altered during cough cycles (58/133); 45 increased and 13 decreased activity. Fourteen cells changed firing rate during the inspiratory and/or expiratory phases of cough. Altered patterns in 43 cells were associated with the duration of, or extended beyond, the cough episodes. The different response categories suggest that multiple factors influence the discharge patterns during coughing: e.g., respiratory-modulated and tonic inputs and intrinsic connections. These results suggest involvement of midline neurons (i.e., raphe nuclei) in the cough reflex.

  6. Further evidence for involvement of the dorsal hippocampus serotonergic and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic pathways in the expression of contextual fear conditioning in rats.

    PubMed

    Almada, Rafael C; Albrechet-Souza, Lucas; Brandão, Marcus L

    2013-12-01

    Intra-dorsal hippocampus (DH) injections of 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino) tetralin (8-OH-DPAT), a serotonin-1A (5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)-1A) receptor agonist, were previously shown to inhibit the expression of contextual fear when administered six hours after conditioning. However, further understanding of the consolidation and expression of aversive memories requires investigations of these and other mechanisms at distinct time points and the regions of the brain to which they are transferred. Thus, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the role of DH serotonergic and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic mechanisms in the expression of contextual fear 24 h after conditioning, reflected by fear-potentiated startle (FPS) and freezing behavior. The recruitment of the amygdala and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in these processes was also evaluated by measuring Fos protein immunoreactivity. Although intra-DH injections of 8-OH-DPAT did not produce behavioral changes, muscimol reduced both FPS and the freezing response. Fos protein immunoreactivity revealed that contextual fear promoted wide activation of the mPFC, which was significantly reduced after intra-DH infusions of muscimol. The present findings, together with previous data, indicate that in contrast to 5-HT, which appears to play a role during the early phases of contextual aversive memory consolidation, longer-lasting GABA-mediated mechanisms are recruited during the expression of contextual fear memories.

  7. Effects of serum immunoglobulins from patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) on depolarisation-induced calcium transients in isolated dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Joanne M; Dharmalingam, Backialakshmi; Marsh, Stephen J; Thompson, Victoria; Goebel, Andreas; Brown, David A

    2016-03-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is thought to have an auto-immune component. One such target recently proposed from the effects of auto-immune IgGs on Ca(2+) transients in cardiac myocytes and cell lines is the α1-adrenoceptor. We have tested whether such IgGs exerted comparable effects on nociceptive sensory neurons isolated from rat dorsal root ganglia. Depolarisation-induced [Ca(2+)]i transients were generated by applying 30 mM KCl for 2 min and monitored by Fura-2 fluorescence imaging. No IgGs tested (including 3 from CRPS patients) had any significant effect on these [Ca(2+)]i transients. However, IgG from one CRPS patient consistently and significantly reduced the K(+)-induced response of cells that had been pre-incubated for 24h with a mixture of inflammatory mediators (1 μM histamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine, bradykinin and PGE2). Since this pre-incubation also appeared to induce a comparable inhibitory response to the α1-agonist phenylephrine, this is compatible with the α1-adrenoceptor as a target for CRPS auto-immunity. A mechanism whereby this might enhance pain is suggested.

  8. Raphe serotonin neuron-specific oxytocin receptor knockout reduces aggression without affecting anxiety-like behavior in male mice only.

    PubMed

    Pagani, J H; Williams Avram, S K; Cui, Z; Song, J; Mezey, É; Senerth, J M; Baumann, M H; Young, W S

    2015-02-01

    Serotonin and oxytocin influence aggressive and anxiety-like behaviors, though it is unclear how the two may interact. That the oxytocin receptor is expressed in the serotonergic raphe nuclei suggests a mechanism by which the two neurotransmitters may cooperatively influence behavior. We hypothesized that oxytocin acts on raphe neurons to influence serotonergically mediated anxiety-like, aggressive and parental care behaviors. We eliminated expression of the oxytocin receptor in raphe neurons by crossing mice expressing Cre recombinase under control of the serotonin transporter promoter (Slc6a4) with our conditional oxytocin receptor knockout line. The knockout mice generated by this cross are normal across a range of behavioral measures: there are no effects for either sex on locomotion in an open-field, olfactory habituation/dishabituation or, surprisingly, anxiety-like behaviors in the elevated O and plus mazes. There was a profound deficit in male aggression: only one of 11 raphe oxytocin receptor knockouts showed any aggressive behavior, compared to 8 of 11 wildtypes. In contrast, female knockouts displayed no deficits in maternal behavior or aggression. Our results show that oxytocin, via its effects on raphe neurons, is a key regulator of resident-intruder aggression in males but not maternal aggression. Furthermore, this reduction in male aggression is quite different from the effects reported previously after forebrain or total elimination of oxytocin receptors. Finally, we conclude that when constitutively eliminated, oxytocin receptors expressed by serotonin cells do not contribute to baseline anxiety-like behaviors or maternal care.

  9. Raphe serotonin neuron-specific oxytocin receptor knockout reduces aggression without affecting anxiety-like behavior in male mice only

    PubMed Central

    Pagani, Jerome H.; Williams Avram, Sarah K.; Cui, Zhenzhong; Song, June; Mezey, Éva; Senerth, Julia M.; Baumann, Michael H.; Young, W. Scott

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin and oxytocin influence aggressive and anxiety-like behaviors, though it is unclear how the two may interact. That the oxytocin receptor is expressed in the serotonergic raphe nuclei suggests a mechanism by which the two neurotransmitters may cooperatively influence behavior. We hypothesized that oxytocin acts on raphe neurons to influence serotonergically-mediated anxiety-like, aggressive and parental care behaviors. We eliminated expression of the oxytocin receptor in raphe neurons by crossing mice expressing Cre recombinase under control of the serotonin transporter promoter (Slc6a4) with our conditional oxytocin receptor knockout line. The knockout mice generated by this cross are normal across a range of behavioral measures: there are no effects for either sex on locomotion in an open-field, olfactory habituation/dishabituation or, surprisingly, anxiety-like behaviors in the elevated O and plus mazes. There was a profound deficit in male aggression: only one of 11 raphe oxytocin receptor knockouts showed any aggressive behavior, compared to eight of 11 wildtypes. In contrast, female knockouts displayed no deficits in maternal behavior or aggression. Our results show that oxytocin, via its effects on raphe neurons, is a key regulator of resident-intruder aggression in males but not maternal aggression. Furthermore, this reduction in male aggression is quite different from the effects reported previously after forebrain or total elimination of oxytocin receptors. Finally, we conclude that when constitutively eliminated, oxytocin receptors expressed by serotonin cells do not contribute to baseline anxiety-like behaviors or maternal care. PMID:25677455

  10. Dorsal variant blister aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Couldwell, William T; Chamoun, Roukoz

    2012-01-01

    Dorsal variant proximal carotid blister aneurysms are treacherous lesions to manage. It is important to recognize this variant on preoperative angiographic imaging, in anticipation of surgical strategies for their treatment. Strategies include trapping the involved segment and revascularization if necessary. Other options include repair of the aneurysm rupture site directly. Given that these are not true berry aneurysms, repair of the rupture site involves wrapping or clip-grafting techniques. The case presented here was a young woman with a subarachnoid hemorrhage from a ruptured dorsal variant blister aneurysm. The technique used is demonstrated in the video and is a modified clip-wrap technique using woven polyester graft material. The patient was given aspirin preoperatively as preparation for the clip-wrap technique. It is the authors' current protocol to attempt a direct repair with clip-wrapping and leaving artery sacrifice with or without bypass as a salvage therapy if direct repair is not possible. Assessment of vessel patency after repair is performed by intraoperative Doppler and indocyanine green angiography. Intraoperative somatosensory and motor evoked potential monitoring is performed in all cases. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/crUreWGQdGo.

  11. Functional connectivity in raphé-pontomedullary circuits supports active suppression of breathing during hypocapnic apnea.

    PubMed

    Nuding, Sarah C; Segers, Lauren S; Iceman, Kimberly E; O'Connor, Russell; Dean, Jay B; Bolser, Donald C; Baekey, David M; Dick, Thomas E; Shannon, Roger; Morris, Kendall F; Lindsey, Bruce G

    2015-10-01

    Hyperventilation is a common feature of disordered breathing. Apnea ensues if CO2 drive is sufficiently reduced. We tested the hypothesis that medullary raphé, ventral respiratory column (VRC), and pontine neurons have functional connectivity and persistent or evoked activities appropriate for roles in the suppression of drive and rhythm during hyperventilation and apnea. Phrenic nerve activity, arterial blood pressure, end-tidal CO2, and other parameters were monitored in 10 decerebrate, vagotomized, neuromuscularly-blocked, and artificially ventilated cats. Multielectrode arrays recorded spiking activity of 649 neurons. Loss and return of rhythmic activity during passive hyperventilation to apnea were identified with the S-transform. Diverse fluctuating activity patterns were recorded in the raphé-pontomedullary respiratory network during the transition to hypocapnic apnea. The firing rates of 160 neurons increased during apnea; the rates of 241 others decreased or stopped. VRC inspiratory neurons were usually the last to cease firing or lose rhythmic activity during the transition to apnea. Mayer wave-related oscillations (0.04-0.1 Hz) in firing rate were also disrupted during apnea. Four-hundred neurons (62%) were elements of pairs with at least one hyperventilation-responsive neuron and a correlational signature of interaction identified by cross-correlation or gravitational clustering. Our results support a model with distinct groups of chemoresponsive raphé neurons contributing to hypocapnic apnea through parallel processes that incorporate disfacilitation and active inhibition of inspiratory motor drive by expiratory neurons. During apnea, carotid chemoreceptors can evoke rhythm reemergence and an inspiratory shift in the balance of reciprocal inhibition via suppression of ongoing tonic expiratory neuron activity. PMID:26203111

  12. Functional connectivity in raphé-pontomedullary circuits supports active suppression of breathing during hypocapnic apnea

    PubMed Central

    Nuding, Sarah C.; Segers, Lauren S.; Iceman, Kimberly E.; O'Connor, Russell; Dean, Jay B.; Bolser, Donald C.; Baekey, David M.; Dick, Thomas E.; Shannon, Roger; Morris, Kendall F.

    2015-01-01

    Hyperventilation is a common feature of disordered breathing. Apnea ensues if CO2 drive is sufficiently reduced. We tested the hypothesis that medullary raphé, ventral respiratory column (VRC), and pontine neurons have functional connectivity and persistent or evoked activities appropriate for roles in the suppression of drive and rhythm during hyperventilation and apnea. Phrenic nerve activity, arterial blood pressure, end-tidal CO2, and other parameters were monitored in 10 decerebrate, vagotomized, neuromuscularly-blocked, and artificially ventilated cats. Multielectrode arrays recorded spiking activity of 649 neurons. Loss and return of rhythmic activity during passive hyperventilation to apnea were identified with the S-transform. Diverse fluctuating activity patterns were recorded in the raphé-pontomedullary respiratory network during the transition to hypocapnic apnea. The firing rates of 160 neurons increased during apnea; the rates of 241 others decreased or stopped. VRC inspiratory neurons were usually the last to cease firing or lose rhythmic activity during the transition to apnea. Mayer wave-related oscillations (0.04–0.1 Hz) in firing rate were also disrupted during apnea. Four-hundred neurons (62%) were elements of pairs with at least one hyperventilation-responsive neuron and a correlational signature of interaction identified by cross-correlation or gravitational clustering. Our results support a model with distinct groups of chemoresponsive raphé neurons contributing to hypocapnic apnea through parallel processes that incorporate disfacilitation and active inhibition of inspiratory motor drive by expiratory neurons. During apnea, carotid chemoreceptors can evoke rhythm reemergence and an inspiratory shift in the balance of reciprocal inhibition via suppression of ongoing tonic expiratory neuron activity. PMID:26203111

  13. Response of serotonergic caudal raphe neurons in relation to specific motor activities in freely moving cats.

    PubMed

    Veasey, S C; Fornal, C A; Metzler, C W; Jacobs, B L

    1995-07-01

    Serotonergic neuronal responses during three specific motor activities were studied in nuclei raphe obscurus (NRO) and raphe pallidus (NRP) of freely moving cats by means of extracellular single-unit recordings. Responses to treadmill-induced locomotion were primarily excitatory, with 21 of 24 neurons displaying increased firing rates, directly related to treadmill speed. Individual regression analyses determined three response patterns: maximal activation at low speed (0.25 m/sec), augmentation of neuronal activity only at high treadmill speed (0.77 m/sec), and a linear increase. A smaller fraction of NRO and NRP serotonergic neurons (6 of 27) also responded to hypercarbic ventilatory challenge with increased firing rates. The magnitude of neuronal response was dependent upon the fraction of inspired CO2 and was related to ventilatory motor output, specifically, inspiratory amplitude. A subgroup of neurons responsive to hypercarbia in wakefulness demonstrated significant reductions in neuronal response to hypercarbia in slow-wave sleep. Finally, unit activity for 12 of 29 cells increased in response to spontaneous feeding, displaying two distinct patterns of neuronal response in relation to onset and termination of feeding: rapid activation and deactivation versus a gradual increase and decrease. More than half of the cells studied under all three conditions were responsive to more than one motor task. These results indicate that serotonergic caudal raphe neurons are responsive to specific motor system challenges, with many neurons responsive to multiple motor tasks, and that the responsiveness of serotonergic neurons to at least one motor task, hypercarbic ventilatory challenge, is state dependent.

  14. Functional connectivity in raphé-pontomedullary circuits supports active suppression of breathing during hypocapnic apnea.

    PubMed

    Nuding, Sarah C; Segers, Lauren S; Iceman, Kimberly E; O'Connor, Russell; Dean, Jay B; Bolser, Donald C; Baekey, David M; Dick, Thomas E; Shannon, Roger; Morris, Kendall F; Lindsey, Bruce G

    2015-10-01

    Hyperventilation is a common feature of disordered breathing. Apnea ensues if CO2 drive is sufficiently reduced. We tested the hypothesis that medullary raphé, ventral respiratory column (VRC), and pontine neurons have functional connectivity and persistent or evoked activities appropriate for roles in the suppression of drive and rhythm during hyperventilation and apnea. Phrenic nerve activity, arterial blood pressure, end-tidal CO2, and other parameters were monitored in 10 decerebrate, vagotomized, neuromuscularly-blocked, and artificially ventilated cats. Multielectrode arrays recorded spiking activity of 649 neurons. Loss and return of rhythmic activity during passive hyperventilation to apnea were identified with the S-transform. Diverse fluctuating activity patterns were recorded in the raphé-pontomedullary respiratory network during the transition to hypocapnic apnea. The firing rates of 160 neurons increased during apnea; the rates of 241 others decreased or stopped. VRC inspiratory neurons were usually the last to cease firing or lose rhythmic activity during the transition to apnea. Mayer wave-related oscillations (0.04-0.1 Hz) in firing rate were also disrupted during apnea. Four-hundred neurons (62%) were elements of pairs with at least one hyperventilation-responsive neuron and a correlational signature of interaction identified by cross-correlation or gravitational clustering. Our results support a model with distinct groups of chemoresponsive raphé neurons contributing to hypocapnic apnea through parallel processes that incorporate disfacilitation and active inhibition of inspiratory motor drive by expiratory neurons. During apnea, carotid chemoreceptors can evoke rhythm reemergence and an inspiratory shift in the balance of reciprocal inhibition via suppression of ongoing tonic expiratory neuron activity.

  15. Liposarcome dorsal: aspect clinique rare

    PubMed Central

    Agbessi, Odry; Arrob, Adil; Fiqhi, Kamal; Khalfi, Lahcen; Nassih, Mohammed; El Khatib, Karim

    2015-01-01

    Décrit la première fois par Virchow en 1860, le liposarcome est une tumeur mésenchymateuse rare. Cette rareté est relative car les liposarcomes représentent quand même 14 à 18% de l'ensemble des tumeurs malignes des parties molles et ils constituent le plus fréquent des sarcomes des parties molles. Pour la majorité des auteurs, il ne se développerait jamais sur un lipome ou une lipomatose préexistant. Nous rapportons un cas de volumineux liposarcome de la face dorsale du tronc. L'histoire de la maladie, l'aspect clinique inhabituel « de tumeur dans tumeur », l'aspect de la pièce opératoire nous fait évoquer la possibilité de la transformation maligne d'un lipome bénin préexistant. PMID:26113914

  16. Running Reduces Uncontrollable Stress-Evoked Serotonin and Potentiates Stress-Evoked Dopamine Concentrations in the Rat Dorsal Striatum.

    PubMed

    Clark, Peter J; Amat, Jose; McConnell, Sara O; Ghasem, Parsa R; Greenwood, Benjamin N; Maier, Steven F; Fleshner, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence from both the human and animal literature indicates that exercise reduces the negative consequences of stress. The neurobiological etiology for this stress protection, however, is not completely understood. Our lab reported that voluntary wheel running protects rats from expressing depression-like instrumental learning deficits on the shuttle box escape task after exposure to unpredictable and inescapable tail shocks (uncontrollable stress). Impaired escape behavior is a result of stress-sensitized serotonin (5-HT) neuron activity in the dorsal raphe (DRN) and subsequent excessive release of 5-HT into the dorsal striatum following exposure to a comparatively mild stressor. However, the possible mechanisms by which exercise prevents stress-induced escape deficits are not well characterized. The purpose of this experiment was to test the hypothesis that exercise blunts the stress-evoked release of 5-HT in the dorsal striatum. Changes to dopamine (DA) levels were also examined, since striatal DA signaling is critical for instrumental learning and can be influenced by changes to 5-HT activity. Adult male F344 rats, housed with or without running wheels for 6 weeks, were either exposed to tail shock or remained undisturbed in laboratory cages. Twenty-four hours later, microdialysis was performed in the medial (DMS) and lateral (DLS) dorsal striatum to collect extracellular 5-HT and DA before, during, and following 2 mild foot shocks. We report wheel running prevents foot shock-induced elevation of extracellular 5-HT and potentiates DA concentrations in both the DMS and DLS approximately 24 h following exposure to uncontrollable stress. These data may provide a possible mechanism by which exercise prevents depression-like instrumental learning deficits following exposure to acute stress. PMID:26555633

  17. Running Reduces Uncontrollable Stress-Evoked Serotonin and Potentiates Stress-Evoked Dopamine Concentrations in the Rat Dorsal Striatum

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Peter J.; Amat, Jose; McConnell, Sara O.; Ghasem, Parsa R.; Greenwood, Benjamin N.; Maier, Steven F.; Fleshner, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence from both the human and animal literature indicates that exercise reduces the negative consequences of stress. The neurobiological etiology for this stress protection, however, is not completely understood. Our lab reported that voluntary wheel running protects rats from expressing depression-like instrumental learning deficits on the shuttle box escape task after exposure to unpredictable and inescapable tail shocks (uncontrollable stress). Impaired escape behavior is a result of stress-sensitized serotonin (5-HT) neuron activity in the dorsal raphe (DRN) and subsequent excessive release of 5-HT into the dorsal striatum following exposure to a comparatively mild stressor. However, the possible mechanisms by which exercise prevents stress-induced escape deficits are not well characterized. The purpose of this experiment was to test the hypothesis that exercise blunts the stress-evoked release of 5-HT in the dorsal striatum. Changes to dopamine (DA) levels were also examined, since striatal DA signaling is critical for instrumental learning and can be influenced by changes to 5-HT activity. Adult male F344 rats, housed with or without running wheels for 6 weeks, were either exposed to tail shock or remained undisturbed in laboratory cages. Twenty-four hours later, microdialysis was performed in the medial (DMS) and lateral (DLS) dorsal striatum to collect extracellular 5-HT and DA before, during, and following 2 mild foot shocks. We report wheel running prevents foot shock-induced elevation of extracellular 5-HT and potentiates DA concentrations in both the DMS and DLS approximately 24 h following exposure to uncontrollable stress. These data may provide a possible mechanism by which exercise prevents depression-like instrumental learning deficits following exposure to acute stress. PMID:26555633

  18. Different actions for acute and chronic administration of mirtazapine on serotonergic transmission associated with raphe nuclei and their innervation cortical regions.

    PubMed

    Yamamura, Satoshi; Abe, Masao; Nakagawa, Masanori; Ochi, Shinichiro; Ueno, Shu-ichi; Okada, Motohiro

    2011-03-01

    The atypical antidepressant, mirtazapine enhances noradrenergic transmission, but its effects on serotonergic transmission remain to be clarified. The present study determined the effects of acute and chronic administration of mirtazapine on serotonergic transmissions in raphe nuclei and their innervation regions, frontal and entorhinal cortex, using multiple-probes microdialysis with real-time PCR and western blotting. Acute administration of mirtazapine did not affect extracellular serotonin level in raphe nuclei or cortex; however, chronic administration increased extracellular serotonin level in raphe nuclei without affecting that in cortex. Blockade of 5-HT1A receptor, but not that of the 5-HT2A/2C receptor, enhanced the effects of acute administration of mirtazapine on extracellular serotonin level in raphe nuclei. Chronic mirtazapine administration reduced the inhibitory function associated with somatodendritic 5-HT1A receptor in raphe nuclei, but enhanced postsynaptic 5-HT1A receptor in serotonergic innervated cortical regions. Chronic administration reduced the expression of mRNA and protein of serotonin transporter and 5-HT1A receptor in raphe nuclei, but not in the cortices. These results suggested that acute administration of mirtazapine probably activated serotonergic transmission, but its stimulatory action was abolished by activated inhibitory 5-HT1A receptor. Chronic administration of mirtazapine resulted in increased extracellular serotonin level via reduction of serotonin transporter with reduction of somatodendritic 5-HT1A autoreceptor function in raphe nuclei. These pharmacological actions of mirtazapine include its serotonergic profiles as noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressant (NaSSA). PMID:21195096

  19. Serotonergic projections from the caudal raphe nuclei to the hypoglossal nucleus in male and female rats

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Jessica R.; Thomas, Cathy F.; Behan, Mary

    2009-01-01

    The respiratory control system is sexually dimorphic. In many brain regions, including respiratory motor nuclei, serotonin (5HT) levels are higher in females than in males. We hypothesized that there could be sex differences in 5HT input to the hypoglossal nucleus, a region of the brainstem involved in upper airway control. Adult Fischer 344 rats were anesthetized and a retrograde transsynaptic neuroanatomical tracer, Bartha pseudorabies virus (PRV), was injected into the tongue. Sections through the medulla were reacted immunocytochemically for the presence of (i) PRV, (ii) tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH; marker of 5HT neurons), (iii) PRV combined with TPH, and (iv) 5HT. Sex hormone levels were measured in female rats and correlated with TPH immunoreactivity, as hypoglossal 5HT levels vary with the estrous cycle. The number of PRV neurons was comparable in male and female rats. The number and distribution of TPH immunoreactive neurons in the caudal raphe nuclei were similar in male and female rats. The subset of 5HT neurons that innervate hypoglossal motoneurons was also similar in male and female rats. With the exception of the ventrolateral region of the hypoglossal nucleus, 5HT immunoreactivity was similar in male and female rats. These data suggest that sex differences in 5HT modulation of hypoglossal motoneurons in male and female rats are not the result of sex differences in TPH or 5HT, but may result from differences in neurotransmitter release and reuptake, location of 5HT synaptic terminals on hypoglossal motoneurons, pre- and postsynaptic 5HT receptor expression, or the distribution of sex hormone receptors on hypoglossal or caudal raphe neurons. PMID:19073285

  20. Single-unit responses of serotonergic medullary raphe neurons to cardiovascular challenges in freely moving cats.

    PubMed

    Martin-Cora, Francisco J; Fornal, Casimir A; Jacobs, Barry L

    2005-12-01

    Single-unit activity of serotonergic neurons in the nuclei raphe obscurus (NRO) and raphe pallidus (NRP) were recorded in conjunction with heart rate in freely moving cats in response to systemic administration of vasoactive drugs and to graded haemorrhage. Bolus administration of phenylephrine hydrochloride and sodium nitroprusside (20 microg/kg, i.v.) produced a marked, transient reflex bradycardia (-42 b.p.m.) and tachycardia (+60 b.p.m.), respectively. The activity of NRO/NRP serotonergic neurons remained unchanged after phenylephrine and nitroprusside administration. The administration of hydralazine (1 mg/kg, i.v.), a long-acting vasodilator, produced sustained tachycardia (+60 b.p.m.), which was not accompanied by changes in neuronal activity, despite prolonged reflex activation of the sympathetic nervous system. The initial withdrawal of up to 15% of total blood volume increased heart rate (+12 b.p.m.), whereas the removal of 22.5% of total blood decreased heart rate (-44 b.p.m.). The activity of NRO/NRP serotonergic neurons remained unaltered throughout graded haemorrhage trials, despite the changes in sympathetic outflow. Thus, serotonergic NRO and NRP neurons appear to be insensitive to alterations in blood pressure and baroreceptor activity, and this lack of responsiveness does not support a specific role for these cells in cardiovascular regulation. Furthermore, these neurons do not appear to be involved in physiological mechanisms underlying alterations in autonomic outflow invoked by hypertension and hypotension. Taken within the context of our previous work, the present data suggest that medullary serotonergic neurons may modulate autonomic outflow, but only in relation to their primary role in motor control. PMID:16367786

  1. Behavioral correlates of the activity of serotonergic and non-serotonergic neurons in caudal raphe nuclei.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro-do-Valle, L E; Lucena, R L

    2001-07-01

    We investigated the behavioral correlates of the activity of serotonergic and non-serotonergic neurons in the nucleus raphe pallidus (NRP) and nucleus raphe obscurus (NRO) of unanesthetized and unrestrained cats. The animals were implanted with electrodes for recording single unit activity, parietal oscillographic activity, and splenius, digastric and masseter electromyographic activities. They were tested along the waking-sleep cycle, during sensory stimulation and during drinking behavior. The discharge of the serotonergic neurons decreased progressively from quiet waking to slow wave sleep and to fast wave sleep. Ten different patterns of relative discharge across the three states were observed for the non-serotonergic neurons. Several non-serotonergic neurons showed cyclic discharge fluctuations related to respiration during one, two or all three states. While serotonergic neurons were usually unresponsive to the sensory stimuli used, many non-serotonergic neurons responded to these stimuli. Several non-serotonergic neurons showed a phasic relationship with splenius muscle activity during auditory stimulation. One serotonergic neuron showed a tonic relationship with digastric muscle activity during drinking behavior. A few non-serotonergic neurons exhibited a tonic relationship with digastric and/or masseter muscle activity during this behavior. Many non-serotonergic neurons exhibited a phasic relationship with these muscle activities, also during this behavior. These results suggest that the serotonergic neurons in the NRP and NRO constitute a relatively homogeneous population from a functional point of view, while the non-serotonergic neurons form groups with considerable functional specificity. The data support the idea that the NRP and NRO are implicated in the control of somatic motor output.

  2. Personal authentication through dorsal hand vein patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chih-Bin; Hao, Shu-Sheng; Lee, Jen-Chun

    2011-08-01

    Biometric identification is an emerging technology that can solve security problems in our networked society. A reliable and robust personal verification approach using dorsal hand vein patterns is proposed in this paper. The characteristic of the approach needs less computational and memory requirements and has a higher recognition accuracy. In our work, the near-infrared charge-coupled device (CCD) camera is adopted as an input device for capturing dorsal hand vein images, it has the advantages of the low-cost and noncontact imaging. In the proposed approach, two finger-peaks are automatically selected as the datum points to define the region of interest (ROI) in the dorsal hand vein images. The modified two-directional two-dimensional principal component analysis, which performs an alternate two-dimensional PCA (2DPCA) in the column direction of images in the 2DPCA subspace, is proposed to exploit the correlation of vein features inside the ROI between images. The major advantage of the proposed method is that it requires fewer coefficients for efficient dorsal hand vein image representation and recognition. The experimental results on our large dorsal hand vein database show that the presented schema achieves promising performance (false reject rate: 0.97% and false acceptance rate: 0.05%) and is feasible for dorsal hand vein recognition.

  3. Individual cells in the raphe nuclei of the medulla oblongata in rat that contain immunoreactivities for both serotonin and enkephalin project to the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Millhorn, D E; Hökfelt, T; Verhofstad, A A; Terenius, L

    1989-01-01

    The ventral medulla oblongata of rats was analyzed with a double-labelling immunofluorescence technique using guinea pig antibodies directed against serotonin (5-HT) and rabbit antisera directed against enkephalin (ENK). Numerous cells in the region of nucleus raphe obscurus, nucleus raphe pallidus and nucleus raphe magnus showed immunostaining for either 5-HT or ENK. A substantial number of cells showed positive immunostaining for both 5-HT and ENK. 5-HT/ENK double-labelled cells were most frequently encountered in an area that extended from the rostral aspect of the inferior olivary nucleus to the pontomedullary border. This region corresponds anatomically to nucleus raphe magnus/nucleus paragigantocellularis. In addition, a number of the 5-HT/ENK-containing cells were retrogradely labelled with Fluoro-Gold dye that had been injected into the thoracic spinal cord several days prior to perfusion. Schematic drawings showing the anatomical distribution of 5-HT/ENK colocalization are provided. PMID:2744110

  4. The antinociceptive action of etorphine in the dorsal horn is due to a direct spinal action and not to activation of descending inhibition.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, S. L.; Ryall, R. W.

    1983-01-01

    1--Etorphine, microinjected into the brainstem or administered intravenously, inhibited the firing of dorsal horn neurones to noxious heat in spinal or non-spinal anaesthetized cats and in decerebrate, non-anaesthetized cats with intact spinal cords. 2--Small doses of etorphine sometimes caused facilitation, especially when the cord was intact, but this was invariably followed by inhibition at higher doses. 3--The ED50 for inhibition (mean 3.9 micrograms/kg) after microinjection into nucleus raphe magnus, nucleus reticularis magnocellularis or the lateral tegmental field was similar at all sites in anaesthetized, non-spinal cats. 4--The ED50 for microinjection was not increased by spinal transection in anaesthetized cats (mean ED50, 2.6 micrograms/kg) and was similar to the ED50 in decerebrate, non-anaesthetized cats. 5--Intravenous administration was 2 to 3 times more effective than microinjection and the time course of inhibition was faster after intravenous administration than after microinjection. 6--It is concluded that etorphine inhibits dorsal horn neurones after microinjection or intravenous administration by a direct action on the spinal cord and not by activating a descending inhibition. After microinjection it rapidly enters the general circulation and subsequently distributes into the spinal cord. 7--It is also concluded that naloxone readily gains entry to the circulation from the brain because microinjection antagonized the effects of systemic etorphine on dorsal horn neurones in spinal cats. PMID:6338986

  5. Fos and serotonin immunoreactivity in the raphe nuclei of the cat during carbachol-induced active sleep: a double-labeling study.

    PubMed

    Yamuy, J; Sampogna, S; López-Rodríguez, F; Luppi, P H; Morales, F R; Chase, M H

    1995-07-01

    The microinjection of carbachol into the nucleus pontis oralis produces a state which is polygraphically and behaviorally similar to active sleep (rapid eye movement sleep). In the present study, using double-labeling techniques for serotonin and the protein product of c-fos (Fos), we sought to examine whether immunocytochemically identified serotonergic neurons of the raphe nuclei of the cat were activated, as indicated by their expression of c-fos, during this pharmacologically-induced behavioral state (active sleep-carbachol). Compared with control cats, which were injected with saline, active sleep-carbachol cats exhibited a significantly greater number of c-fos-expressing neurons in the raphe dorsalis, magnus and pallidus. Whereas most of the c-fos-expressing neurons in the raphe dorsalis were small, those in the raphe magnus were medium-sized and in the raphe pallidus they were small and medium-sized. The mean number of serotonergic neurons that expressed c-fos (i.e. double-labeled cells) was similar in control and active sleep-carbachol cats. These data indicate that there is an increased number of non-serotonergic, c-fos-expressing neurons in the raphe dorsalis, magnus and pallidus during the carbachol-induced state.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7477901

  6. Dorsal and Ventral Pathways for Prosody.

    PubMed

    Sammler, Daniela; Grosbras, Marie-Hélène; Anwander, Alfred; Bestelmeyer, Patricia E G; Belin, Pascal

    2015-12-01

    Our vocal tone--the prosody--contributes a lot to the meaning of speech beyond the actual words. Indeed, the hesitant tone of a "yes" may be more telling than its affirmative lexical meaning. The human brain contains dorsal and ventral processing streams in the left hemisphere that underlie core linguistic abilities such as phonology, syntax, and semantics. Whether or not prosody--a reportedly right-hemispheric faculty--involves analogous processing streams is a matter of debate. Functional connectivity studies on prosody leave no doubt about the existence of such streams, but opinions diverge on whether information travels along dorsal or ventral pathways. Here we show, with a novel paradigm using audio morphing combined with multimodal neuroimaging and brain stimulation, that prosody perception takes dual routes along dorsal and ventral pathways in the right hemisphere. In experiment 1, categorization of speech stimuli that gradually varied in their prosodic pitch contour (between statement and question) involved (1) an auditory ventral pathway along the superior temporal lobe and (2) auditory-motor dorsal pathways connecting posterior temporal and inferior frontal/premotor areas. In experiment 2, inhibitory stimulation of right premotor cortex as a key node of the dorsal stream decreased participants' performance in prosody categorization, arguing for a motor involvement in prosody perception. These data draw a dual-stream picture of prosodic processing that parallels the established left-hemispheric multi-stream architecture of language, but with relative rightward asymmetry. PMID:26549262

  7. Topographic and quantitative description of rat dorsal column fibres arising from the lumbar dorsal roots.

    PubMed

    Smith, K J; Bennett, B J

    1987-08-01

    The number and topographic distribution of the profiles of degenerating primary afferent fibres were determined within the rat dorsal column 3-4 weeks after division of the lumbar and S2 dorsal roots. The degenerating fibres were identified in toluidine blue-stained 1 micron transverse sections taken at different spinal levels, and their positions were marked with the aid of a drawing tube. Fibres entered the dorsal column at its lateral margin and sent projections rostrally and caudally. Fibres ascending the column were displaced medially in an orderly progression as the fibres of more rostral roots entered the cord. Most ascending fibres were lost from the dorsal columns within 2-3 segments of their site of entry, with only 15%, on average, reaching cervical levels. The descending fibres maintained a less organised topographic distribution, and typically only 3% of fibres entering the dorsal column descended two segments from their site of entry.

  8. Simonsenia aveniformis sp. nov. (Bacillariophyceae), molecular phylogeny and systematics of the genus, and a new type of canal raphe system

    PubMed Central

    Witkowski, Andrzej; Gomes, Ana; Mann, David G.; Trobajo, Rosa; Li, Chunlian; Barka, Frederik; Gusev, Evgeniy; Dąbek, Przemysław; Grzonka, Justyna; Kurzydłowski, Krzysztof J.; Zgłobicka, Izabela; Harrison, Michael; Boski, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    The genus Simonsenia is reviewed and S. aveniformis described as new for science by light and electron microscopy. The new species originated from estuarine environments in southern Iberia (Atlantic coast) and was isolated into culture. In LM, Simonsenia resembles Nitzschia, with bridges (fibulae) beneath the raphe, which is marginal. It is only electron microscope (EM) examination that reveals the true structure of the raphe system, which consists of a raphe canal raised on a keel (wing), supported by rib like braces (fenestral bars) and tube-like portulae; between the portulae the keel is perforated by open windows (fenestrae). Based on the presence of portulae and a fenestrated keel, Simonsenia has been proposed to be intermediate between Bacillariaceae and Surirellaceae. However, an rbcL phylogeny revealed that Simonsenia belongs firmly in the Bacillariaceae, with which it shares a similar chloroplast arrangement, rather than in the Surirellaceae. Lack of homology between the surirelloid and simonsenioid keels is reflected in subtle differences in the morphology and ontogeny of the portulae and fenestrae. The diversity of Simonsenia has probably been underestimated, particularly in the marine environment. PMID:26596906

  9. Simonsenia aveniformis sp. nov. (Bacillariophyceae), molecular phylogeny and systematics of the genus, and a new type of canal raphe system.

    PubMed

    Witkowski, Andrzej; Gomes, Ana; Mann, David G; Trobajo, Rosa; Li, Chunlian; Barka, Frederik; Gusev, Evgeniy; Dąbek, Przemysław; Grzonka, Justyna; Kurzydłowski, Krzysztof J; Zgłobicka, Izabela; Harrison, Michael; Boski, Tomasz

    2015-11-24

    The genus Simonsenia is reviewed and S. aveniformis described as new for science by light and electron microscopy. The new species originated from estuarine environments in southern Iberia (Atlantic coast) and was isolated into culture. In LM, Simonsenia resembles Nitzschia, with bridges (fibulae) beneath the raphe, which is marginal. It is only electron microscope (EM) examination that reveals the true structure of the raphe system, which consists of a raphe canal raised on a keel (wing), supported by rib like braces (fenestral bars) and tube-like portulae; between the portulae the keel is perforated by open windows (fenestrae). Based on the presence of portulae and a fenestrated keel, Simonsenia has been proposed to be intermediate between Bacillariaceae and Surirellaceae. However, an rbcL phylogeny revealed that Simonsenia belongs firmly in the Bacillariaceae, with which it shares a similar chloroplast arrangement, rather than in the Surirellaceae. Lack of homology between the surirelloid and simonsenioid keels is reflected in subtle differences in the morphology and ontogeny of the portulae and fenestrae. The diversity of Simonsenia has probably been underestimated, particularly in the marine environment.

  10. Lithium modulates tryptophan hydroxylase 2 gene expression and serotonin release in primary cultures of serotonergic raphe neurons.

    PubMed

    Scheuch, Kathrin; Höltje, Markus; Budde, Holger; Lautenschlager, Marion; Heinz, Andreas; Ahnert-Hilger, Gudrun; Priller, Josef

    2010-01-11

    Lithium salts are mood-stabilizing agents with acute antimanic properties and proven efficacy in the long-term prevention of manic and depressive episodes. Furthermore, lithium augmentation is a well-established strategy to treat depressed patients, which do not respond to antidepressants alone. There is evidence to suggest that these effects of lithium are due to a synergism with central serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmission. In this study, we investigated the effects of lithium chloride (LiCl, 1 mM) on 5-HT uptake and release in primary serotonergic neurons from rat raphe nuclei. Short-term (8 h) and long-term (14 days) treatment with LiCl resulted in a 20% and 23% increase in 5-HT release, but neither influenced 5-HT uptake across the plasma membrane nor vesicular 5-HT uptake. In lithium-treated raphe neurons, the inhibition of 5-HT uptake by fluoxetine was unchanged. Using real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting, we examined the effect of lithium on tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TPH2) expression, the rate-limiting enzyme in brain 5-HT biosynthesis. Short-term lithium treatment resulted in a 45% decrease in tph2 mRNA expression and a 31% reduction of TPH2 protein levels, which was completely compensated after long-term treatment. Our results suggest that lithium can modify tph2 gene expression and 5-HT release in raphe neurons, providing new insight into the serotonergic mechanisms of action of lithium.

  11. Pronociceptive and Antinociceptive Effects of Buprenorphine in the Spinal Cord Dorsal Horn Cover a Dose Range of Four Orders of Magnitude

    PubMed Central

    Gerhold, Katharina J.; Drdla-Schutting, Ruth; Honsek, Silke D.; Forsthuber, Liesbeth

    2015-01-01

    Due to its distinct pharmacological profile and lower incidence of adverse events compared with other opioids, buprenorphine is considered a safe option for pain and substitution therapy. However, despite its wide clinical use, little is known about the synaptic effects of buprenorphine in nociceptive pathways. Here, we demonstrate dose-dependent, bimodal effects of buprenorphine on transmission at C-fiber synapses in rat spinal cord dorsal horn in vivo. At an analgesically active dose of 1500 μg·kg−1, buprenorphine reduced the strength of spinal C-fiber synapses. This depression required activation of spinal opioid receptors, putatively μ1-opioid receptors, as indicated by its sensitivity to spinal naloxone and to the selective μ1-opioid receptor antagonist naloxonazine. In contrast, a 15,000-fold lower dose of buprenorphine (0.1 μg·kg−1), which caused thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia in behaving animals, induced an enhancement of transmission at spinal C-fiber synapses. The ultra-low-dose buprenorphine-induced synaptic facilitation was mediated by supraspinal naloxonazine-insensitive, but CTOP-sensitive μ-opioid receptors, descending serotonergic pathways, and activation of spinal glial cells. Selective inhibition of spinal 5-hydroxytryptamine-2 receptors (5-HT2Rs), putatively located on spinal astrocytes, abolished both the induction of synaptic facilitation and the hyperalgesia elicited by ultra-low-dose buprenorphine. Our study revealed that buprenorphine mediates its modulatory effects on transmission at spinal C-fiber synapses by dose dependently acting on distinct μ-opioid receptor subtypes located at different levels of the neuraxis. PMID:26134641

  12. Dorsal wrist ganglion: Current review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Meena, Sanjay; Gupta, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    Ganglion cyst is the most common soft tissue tumour of hand. Sixty to seventy percent of ganglion cysts are found in the dorsal aspect of the wrist. They may affect any age group; however they are more common in the twenties to forties. Its origin and pathogenesis remains enigmatic. Non-surgical treatment is unreliable with a high recurrence rates. Open surgical excision leads to unsightly scar and poor outcome. Arthroscopy excision has shown very promising result with very low recurrence rate. We reviewed the current literature available on dorsal wrist ganglion. PMID:25983472

  13. Distinct Contributions of Median Raphe Nucleus to Contextual Fear Conditioning and Fear-Potentiated Startle

    PubMed Central

    Silva, R. C. B.; Cruz, A. P. M.; Avanzi, V.; Landeira-Fernandez, J.; Brandão, M. L.

    2002-01-01

    Ascending 5-HT projections from the median raphe nucleus (MRN), probably to the hippocampus, are implicated in the acquisition of contextual fear (background stimuli), as assessed by freezing behavior. Foreground cues like light, used as a conditioned stimulus (CS) in classical fear conditioning, also cause freezing through thalamic transmission to the amygdala. As the MRN projects to the hippocampus and amygdala, the role of this raphe nucleus in fear conditioning to explicit cues remains to be explained. Here we analyzed the behavior of rats with MRN electrolytic lesions in a contextual conditioning situation and in a fear-potentiated startle procedure. The animals received MRN electrolytic lesions either before or on the day after two consecutive training sessions in which they were submitted to 10 conditioning trials, each in an experimental chamber (same context) where they. received foot-shocks (0.6 mA, 1 sec) paired to a 4-sec light CS. Seven to ten days later, the animals were submitted to testing sessions for assessing conditioned fear when they were placed for five shocks, and the duration of contextual freezing was recorded. The animals were then submitted to a fear-potentiated startle in response to a 4-sec light-CS, followed by white noise (100 dB, 50 ms). Control rats (sham) tested in the same context showed more freezing than did rats with pre- or post-training MRN lesions. Startle was clearly potentiated in the presence of light CS in the sham-lesioned animals. Whereas pretraining lesions reduced both freezing and fear-potentiated startle, the post-training lesions reduced only freezing to context, without changing the fear-potentiated startle. In a second experiment, neurotoxic lesions of the MRN with local injections of N-methyl-D-aspartate or the activation of 5-HT1A somatodendritic auto-receptors of the MRN by microinjections of the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-hydroxy- 2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) before the training sessions also

  14. The modulation by 5-HT of glutamatergic inputs from the raphe pallidus to rat hypoglossal motoneurones, in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Bouryi, Vitali A; Lewis, David I

    2003-01-01

    Decreases in the activity of 5-HT-containing caudal raphe neurones during sleep are thought to be partially responsible for the resultant disfacilitation of hypoglossal motoneurones. Whilst 5-HT has a direct excitatory action on hypoglossal motoneurones as a result of activation of 5-HT2 receptors, microinjection of 5-HT2 antagonists into the hypoglossal nucleus reduces motor activity to a much lesser extent compared to the suppression observed during sleep suggesting other transmitters co-localised in caudal raphe neurones may also be involved. The aim of the present study was therefore to characterise raphe pallidus inputs to hypoglossal motoneurones. Whole cell recordings were made from hypoglossal motoneurones in vitro. 5-HT evoked a direct membrane depolarisation (8.45 ± 3.8 mV, P < 0.001) and increase in cell input resistance (53 ± 40 %, P < 0.001) which was blocked by the 5-HT2 antagonist, ritanserin (2.40 ± 2.7 vs. 7.04 ± 4.6 mV). Stimulation within the raphe pallidus evoked a monosynaptic EPSC that was significantly reduced by the AMPA/kainateantagonist, NBQX (22.8 ± 16 % of control, P < 0.001). In contrast, the 5-HT2 antagonist, ritanserin, had no effect on the amplitude of these EPSCs (106 ± 31 % of control, P = n.s.). 5-HT reduced these EPSCs to 50.0 ± 13 % of control (P < 0.001), as did the 5-HT1A agonist, 8-OH-DPAT (52.5 ± 17 %, P < 0.001) and the 5-HT1B agonist, CP 93129 (40.6 ± 29 %, P < 0.01). 8-OH-DPAT and CP 93129 increased the paired pulse ratio (1.38 ± 0.27 to 1.91 ± 0.54, P < 0.05 & 1.27 ± 0.08 to 1.44 ± 0.13, P < 0.01 respectively) but had no effect on the postsynaptic glutamate response (99 ± 4.4 % and 100 ± 2.5 %, P = n.s.). They also increased the frequency (P < 0.001), but not the amplitude, of miniature glutamatergic EPSCs in hypoglossal motoneurones. These data demonstrate that raphe pallidus inputs to hypoglossal motoneurones are predominantly glutamatergic in nature, with 5-HT decreasing the release of glutamate from

  15. [Postsynaptic reactions of cerebral cortex neurons, activated by nociceptive afferents during stimulation of the Raphe nuclei].

    PubMed

    Labakhua, T Sh; Dzhanashiia, T K; Gedevanishvili, G I; Dzhokhadze, L D; Tkemaladze, T T; Abzianidze, I V

    2012-01-01

    On cats, we studied the influence of stimulation of the Raphe nuclei (RN) on postsynaptic processes evoked in neurons of the somatosensory cortex by stimulation of nociceptive (intensive stimulation of the tooth pulp) and non-nociceptive (moderate stimulation of the ventroposteromedial--VPN--nucleus of the thalamus) afferent inputs. 6 cells, selectively excited by stimulation of nocciceptors and 9 cells, activated by both the above nociceptive and non-nociceptive influences (nociceptive and convergent neurons, respectively) were recorded intracellular. In neurons of both groups, responses to nociceptive stimulation (of sufficient intensity) looked like an EPSP-spike-IPSP (the letter of significant duration, up to 200-300 ms) compleх. Conditioning stimulation of the RN which preceded test stimulus applied to the tooth pulp or VPM nucleus by 100 to 800 ms, induced 40-60 % decrease of the IPSP amplitude only, while maхimal effect of influence, in both cases, was noted within intervals of 300-800 ms between conditioning and test stimulus. During stimulation of the RN, serotonin released via receptor and second messengers, provides postsynaptic modulation of GABAergic system, decreasing the IPSP amplitude which occurs after stimulation of both the tooth pulp and VPM thalamic nucleus. This process may be realized trough either pre- or postsynaptic mechanisms.

  16. Anxiolytic-like effect of mirtazapine mediates its effect in the median raphe nucleus.

    PubMed

    An, Yan; Inoue, Takeshi; Kitaichi, Yuji; Izumi, Takeshi; Nakagawa, Shin; Song, Ning; Chen, Chong; Li, XiaoBai; Koyama, Tsukasa; Kusumi, Ichiro

    2013-11-15

    Mirtazapine, a noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressant (NaSSA), blocks the α2-adrenergic autoreceptors and heteroreceptors, which are responsible for controlling noradrenaline and 5-hydroxy-tryptamine (5-HT) release. Though preclinical and clinical studies have shown that mirtazapine exerts an anxiolytic action, its precise brain target sites remain unclear. In the present study, we investigated the brain area(s) in which mirtazapine exerts its anxiolytic-like effects on the expression of contextual conditioned freezing in rats. Mirtazapine (3 μg/site) was directly injected into three brain structures, the median raphe nucleus (MRN), hippocampus and amygdala. Freezing behavior tests were carried out 10 min after injections. Our results showed that the intra-MRN injection of mirtazapine reduced freezing significantly, whereas injections into the hippocampus or the amygdala did not. In addition, the intra-MRN injection of mirtazapine did not affect locomotor activity. These results suggest that the anxiolytic-like effect of mirtazapine might be mediated by its action on the MRN. PMID:24436979

  17. Assembly of the dorsal horn somatotopic map.

    PubMed

    Brown, P B; Koerber, H R; Millecchia, R

    1997-01-01

    We hypothesize: (a) peripheral innervation densities determine map scales in dorsal horn, (b) dorsal horn cell (DHC) receptive field (RF) geometries are determined by map scales, and (c) morphologies of primary afferents (PAs) and DHCs reflect their developmental history. We suggest the following sequence: (A) PAs project in a somatotopic mediolateral sequence. (B) DHCs assemble prototype RFs by sampling presynaptic neuropil with their dendrites. (C) PAs then project to all levels where their RFs are contained within prototype RFs of DHCs. (D) A competitive mechanism produces the adult form of DHC RFs. (E) Adult distributions of PA terminals and DHC dendrites reflect this developmental history. (F) Mediolateral somatotopic gradients are determined by RF densities of axons entering at the same levels. (G) Map scales at different rostrocaudal levels are determined by somatotopic gradients. (H) Geometries of DHC RFs are determined by constant convergence and divergence of monosynaptic connections. (I) Secondary processes further modify geometries of DHC RFs. (J) Residual self-organizing capacity supports maintenance and plastic mechanisms. We adduce the following evidence: (1) agreement between monosynaptically coupled inputs and cells' excitatory low threshold mechanoreceptive fields; (2) the temporal sequence of events during penetration of the gray matter by PAs; (3)variation of PA terminal and DHC dendritic domains as a function of map scale; (4) somatotopic gradients and geometries of DHC RFs in adult dorsal horn; (5) calculations of peripheral innervation densities and dorsal horn map scales; and (6) constant divergence and convergence between PAs and DHCs. PMID:9399410

  18. On the origins of dorsal root potentials.

    PubMed

    LLOYD, D P C; McINTYRE, A K

    1949-03-20

    The "dorsal root potential" consists of five successive deflections designated for convenience, D.R.I, II, III, IV, and V. Of these, D.R.V alone constitutes the dorsal root potential of prior description. A study has been made of the general properties of those deflections not previously described. Dorsal root potentials are electrotonic extensions into the extramedullary root segment, the result of electrical interactions within the cord comparable to those that have been studied in peripheral nerve. Although the anatomical and electrical conditions of interaction are infinitely more complex in the cord than in nerve, it is seen that the fact of parallel distribution of primary afferent fibers pertaining to neighboring dorsal roots provides a sufficient anatomical basis for qualitative analysis in the first approximation of dorsal root potentials. An extension of the theory of interaction between neighboring nerve fibers has been made to include an especial case of interaction between fibers orientated at right angles to one another. The predictions have been tested in a nerve model and found correct. Given this elaboration, and the stated anatomical propositions, existing knowledge of interaction provides an adequate theoretical basis for an elementary understanding of dorsal root potentials. The study of general properties and the analysis of dorsal root potentials have led to the formulation of certain conclusions that follow. D.R.I, II, and III record the electrotonic spread of polarization resulting from the external field of impulses conducted in the intramedullary segment and longitudinal trajects of primary afferent fibers. D.R.IV arises in part as the result of activity in primary afferent fibers, and in part as the result of activity in secondary neurons. In either case the mode of production is the same, and the responsible agent is residual negativity in the active collaterals, or, more precisely, the external field of current flow about the

  19. Partial Raphe Dysfunction in Neurotransmission Is Sufficient to Increase Mortality after Anoxic Exposures in Mice at a Critical Period in Postnatal Development

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Karlene T.; Dosumu-Johnson, Ryan T.; Daubenspeck, J. Andrew; Brust, Rachael D.; Kreouzis, Vasileios; Kim, Jun Chul; Li, Aihua; Dymecki, Susan M.

    2016-01-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) cases often have abnormalities of the brainstem raphe serotonergic (5-HT) system. We hypothesize that raphe dysfunction contributes to a failure to autoresuscitate from multiple hypoxic events, leading to SIDS. We studied autoresuscitation in two transgenic mouse models in which exocytic neurotransmitter release was impaired via conditional expression of the light chain from tetanus toxin (tox) in raphe neurons expressing serotonergic bacterial artificial chromosome drivers Pet1 or Slc6a4. These used recombinase drivers targeted different portions of medullary raphe serotonergic, tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (Tph2)+ neurons by postnatal day (P) 5 through P12: approximately one-third in triple transgenic Pet1::Flpe, hβactin::cre, RC::PFtox mice; approximately three-fourths in Slc6a4::cre, RC::Ptox mice; with the first model capturing a near equal number of Pet1+,Tph2+ versus Pet1+,Tph2low or negative raphe cells. At P5, P8, and P12, “silenced” mice and controls were exposed to five, ∼37 s bouts of anoxia. Mortality was 5–10 times greater in “silenced” pups compared with controls at P5 and P8 (p = 0.001) but not P12, with cumulative survival not differing between experimental transgenic models. “Silenced” pups that eventually died took longer to initiate gasping (p = 0.0001), recover heart rate (p = 0.0001), and recover eupneic breathing (p = 0.011) during the initial anoxic challenges. Variability indices for baseline breathing distinguished “silenced” from controls but did not predict mortality. We conclude that dysfunction of even a portion of the raphe, as observed in many SIDS cases, can impair ability to autoresuscitate at critical periods in postnatal development and that baseline indices of breathing variability can identify mice at risk. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Many sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) cases exhibit a partial (∼26%) brainstem serotonin deficiency. Using recombinase drivers, we targeted

  20. Delayed effects of spiperone on serotonin1A receptors in the dorsal hippocampus of rats.

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, T; Blier, P; de Montigny, C

    1993-01-01

    The effects of 5-HT1A antagonists spiperone, methiothepin and BMY 7378 on [3H]-8-OH-DPAT binding were determined in vitro and ex vivo in rat hippocampus CA3 membrane preparations, and ex vivo in tissue sections of CA1 and CA3 subfields using quantitative autoradiography. In CA3 membranes from rats sacrificed 1 h or 24 h after administration of 5 mg/kg i.p. spiperone or methiothepin, no decrease in [3H]-8-OH-DPAT Bmax values approached statistical significance. Autoradiograms from identically treated rats showed significant increases in Kd values in both CA1 and CA3 hippocampal subfields 24 h but not 1 h after administration of the drugs, while no changes were observed in the dorsal raphe at either time. In vitro co-incubation of membranes with spiperone (200 or 500 nM) or methiothepin (500 nM) resulted in significant decreases in both affinity and Bmax values. In contrast, co-incubation with BMY 7378 (5 nM) increased only Kd values. GTP gamma S produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of specific [3H]8-OH-DPAT binding. At 0.1 mM of GTP gamma S, Kd values were increased three-fold and Bmax values were significantly decreased. When membranes were co-incubated with GTP gamma S and spiperone or BMY 7378, Kd values increased further. Moreover, the effects of spiperone and GTP gamma S on Bmax values were additive. It is concluded that BMY 7378 acts as a competitive antagonist at hippocampal post-synaptic 5-HT1A receptors, whereas spiperone and methiothepin exert their delayed antagonistic effects at these receptors through a non-competitive mechanism of action, possibly affecting the coupling of the receptors to their Gi/o proteins. PMID:8297925

  1. Deep dorsal vein arterialisation in vascular impotence.

    PubMed

    Wespes, E; Corbusier, A; Delcour, C; Vandenbosch, G; Struyven, J; Schulman, C C

    1989-11-01

    A series of 12 patients with vasculogenic impotence (4 arterial lesions; 8 arterial and venous lesions) underwent deep dorsal vein arterialisation after pre-operative assessment by a multidisciplinary approach. Cumulative graft patency was 58% (7 of 12 patients) up to 21 months but only 4 patients developed almost normal erections. Digital angiography, with and without the intracavernous injection of papaverine, was performed during follow-up to determine the vascular physiological status. At flaccidity, the corpora cavernosa were never opacified in the absence of a venocorporeal shunt. The penile glans was always visualised. Opacification of the deep dorsal vein and the circumflex system decreased with penile rigidity, resulting from their compression between Buck's fascia and the tunica albuginea. Intracavernous pressure recorded before and after the surgical procedure showed a marked increase when a caverno-venous shunt was performed. Hypervascularisation of the glans occurred in 2 cases. The relevance of this new surgical technique and its functional mechanism are discussed.

  2. Effect of lithium on behavioral disinhibition induced by electrolytic lesion of the median raphe nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Pezzato, Fernanda A.; Can, Adem; Hoshino, Katsumasa; Horta, José de Anchieta C.; Mijares, Miriam G.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Alterations in brainstem circuits have been proposed as a possible mechanism underlying the etiology of mood disorders. Projections from the median raphe nucleus (MnR) modulate dopaminergic activity in the forebrain and are also part of a behavioral disinhibition/inhibition system that produces phenotypes resembling behavioral variations manifested during manic and depressive phases of bipolar disorder. Objective Assess the effect of chronic lithium treatment on behavioral disinhibition induced by MnR lesions. Methods MnR electrolytic lesions were performed in C57BL/6J mice, with sham operated and intact animals as control groups. Following recovery, mice were chronically treated with lithium (LiCl, added in chow) followed by behavioral testing. Results MnR lesion induced manic-like behavioral alterations including hyperactivity in the open field (OF), stereotyped circling, anxiolytic/risk taking in the elevated plus maze (EPM) and light/dark box (LDB) tests, and increased basal body temperature. Lithium was specifically effective in reducing OF hyperactivity and stereotypy but did not reverse (EPM) or had a nonspecific effect (LDB) on anxiety/risk taking measures. Additionally, lithium decreased saccharin preference and prevented weight loss during single housing. Conclusions Our data support electrolytic lesions of the MnR as an experimental model of a hyper-excitable/disinhibited phenotype consistent with some aspects of mania that are attenuated by the mood stabilizer lithium. Given lithium’s relatively specific efficacy in treating mania, these data support the hypothesis that manic symptoms derive not only from the stimulation of excitatory systems but also from inactivation or decreased activity of inhibitory mechanisms. PMID:25345734

  3. The Alteration of Neonatal Raphe Neurons by Prenatal-Perinatal Nicotine. Meaning for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cerpa, Verónica J; Aylwin, María de la Luz O; Beltrán-Castillo, Sebastián; Bravo, Eduardo U; Llona, Isabel R; Richerson, George B; Eugenín, Jaime L

    2015-10-01

    Nicotine may link maternal cigarette smoking with respiratory dysfunctions in sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Prenatal-perinatal nicotine exposure blunts ventilatory responses to hypercapnia and reduces central respiratory chemoreception in mouse neonates at Postnatal Days 0 (P0) to P3. This suggests that raphe neurons, which are altered in SIDS and contribute to central respiratory chemoreception, may be affected by nicotine. We therefore investigated whether prenatal-perinatal nicotine exposure affects the activity, electrical properties, and chemosensitivity of raphe obscurus (ROb) neurons in mouse neonates. Osmotic minipumps, implanted subcutaneously in 5- to 7-day-pregnant CF1 mice, delivered nicotine bitartrate (60 mg kg(-1) d(-1)) or saline (control) for up to 28 days. In neonates, ventilation was recorded by head-out plethysmography, c-Fos (neuronal activity marker), or serotonin autoreceptors (5HT1AR) were immunodetected using light microscopy, and patch-clamp recordings were made from raphe neurons in brainstem slices under normocarbia and hypercarbia. Prenatal-perinatal nicotine exposure decreased the hypercarbia-induced ventilatory responses at P1-P5, reduced both the number of c-Fos-positive ROb neurons during eucapnic normoxia at P1-P3 and their hypercapnia-induced recruitment at P3, increased 5HT1AR immunolabeling of ROb neurons at P3-P5, and reduced the spontaneous firing frequency of ROb neurons at P3 without affecting their CO2 sensitivity or their passive and active electrical properties. These findings reveal that prenatal-perinatal nicotine reduces the activity of neonatal ROb neurons, likely as a consequence of increased expression of 5HT1ARs. This hypoactivity may change the functional state of the respiratory neural network leading to breathing vulnerability and chemosensory failure as seen in SIDS.

  4. Fos, nociception and the dorsal horn.

    PubMed

    Coggeshall, Richard E

    2005-12-01

    The protooncogene c-fos is rapidly activated after noxious stimuli to express the protein Fos in spinal dorsal horn neurons that are in the 'correct' locations for nociceptive information transfer. As such, therefore, mapping Fos expression in these neurons is at present the best global marker for efficiently locating populations of neurons in the awake animal that respond to nociceptive input. This allows, among other things, precise behavioral measurements to be correlated with Fos expression. Two arenas where mapping dorsal horn Fos expression has made a major impact are in the anatomy of nociceptive systems and as a useful assay for the analgesic properties of various therapeutic regimens. Also Fos expression is the only way to map populations of neurons that are responding to non-localized input such as withdrawal after addiction and vascular occlusion. Another insight is that it shows a clear activation of neurons in superficial 'pain-processing' laminae by innocuous stimuli after nerve lesions, a finding that presumably bears on the allodynia that often accompanies these lesions. It is to be understood, however, that the Fos localizations are not sufficient unto themselves, but the major function of these studies is to efficiently locate populations of cells in nociceptive pathways so that powerful anatomic and physiologic techniques can be brought to bear efficiently. Thus, the purpose of this review is to summarize the studies whose numbers are geometrically expanding that deal with Fos in the dorsal horn and the conclusions therefrom.

  5. Ventral and dorsal pathways for language

    PubMed Central

    Saur, Dorothee; Kreher, Björn W.; Schnell, Susanne; Kümmerer, Dorothee; Kellmeyer, Philipp; Vry, Magnus-Sebastian; Umarova, Roza; Musso, Mariacristina; Glauche, Volkmar; Abel, Stefanie; Huber, Walter; Rijntjes, Michel; Hennig, Jürgen; Weiller, Cornelius

    2008-01-01

    Built on an analogy between the visual and auditory systems, the following dual stream model for language processing was suggested recently: a dorsal stream is involved in mapping sound to articulation, and a ventral stream in mapping sound to meaning. The goal of the study presented here was to test the neuroanatomical basis of this model. Combining functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with a novel diffusion tensor imaging (DTI)-based tractography method we were able to identify the most probable anatomical pathways connecting brain regions activated during two prototypical language tasks. Sublexical repetition of speech is subserved by a dorsal pathway, connecting the superior temporal lobe and premotor cortices in the frontal lobe via the arcuate and superior longitudinal fascicle. In contrast, higher-level language comprehension is mediated by a ventral pathway connecting the middle temporal lobe and the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex via the extreme capsule. Thus, according to our findings, the function of the dorsal route, traditionally considered to be the major language pathway, is mainly restricted to sensory-motor mapping of sound to articulation, whereas linguistic processing of sound to meaning requires temporofrontal interaction transmitted via the ventral route. PMID:19004769

  6. Elicitation of feeding, drinking, and gnawing following microinjections of muscimol into the median raphe nucleus of rats.

    PubMed

    Klitenick, M A; Wirtshafter, D

    1989-05-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that injections of muscimol into the median raphe nucleus (MR) result in large increases in locomotor activity and food intake. The current experiment extends these results by showing that intra-MR muscimol injections in nondeprived rats also elicit nonprandial drinking and gnawing of wooden blocks. These findings indicate that stimulation of GABA receptors within the MR is able to energize a wide range of oral behaviors and is compatible with the view that the MR may be part of a "nonspecific" behavioral activation system. PMID:2730501

  7. Hedgehog and Fgf Signaling Pathways Regulate the Development of tphR-Expressing Serotonergic Raphe Neurons in Zebrafish Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Teraoka, H.; Russell, C.; Regan, J.; Chandrasekhar, A.; Concha, M. L.; Yokoyama, R.; Higashi, K.; Take-uchi, M.; Dong, W.; Hiraga, T.; Holder, N.; Wilson, S. W.

    2009-01-01

    Serotonin (5HT) plays major roles in the physiological regulation of many behavioral processes, including sleep, feeding, and mood, but the genetic mechanisms by which serotonergic neurons arise during development are poorly understood. In the present study, we have investigated the development of serotonergic neurons in the zebrafish. Neurons exhibiting 5HT-immunoreactivity (5HT-IR) are detected from 45 h postfertilization (hpf) in the ventral hindbrain raphe, the hypothalamus, pineal organ, and pretectal area. Tryptophan hydroxylases encode rate-limiting enzymes that function in the synthesis of 5HT. As part of this study, we cloned and analyzed a novel zebrafish tph gene named tphR. Unlike two other zebrafish tph genes (tphD1 and tphD2), tphR is expressed in serotonergic raphe neurons, similar to tph genes in mammalian species. tphR is also expressed in the pineal organ where it is likely to be involved in the pathway leading to synthesis of melatonin. To better understand the signaling pathways involved in the induction of the serotonergic phenotype, we analyzed tphR expression and 5HT-IR in embryos in which either Hh or Fgf signals are abrogated. Hindbrain 5HT neurons are severely reduced in mutants lacking activity of either Ace/Fgf8 or the transcription factor Noi/Pax2.1, which regulates expression of ace/fgf8, and probably other genes encoding signaling proteins. Similarly, serotonergic raphe neurons are absent in embryos lacking Hh activity confirming a conserved role for Hh signals in the induction of these cells. Conversely, over-activation of the Hh pathway increases the number of serotonergic neurons. As in mammals, our results are consistent with the transcription factors Nk2.2 and Gata3 acting downstream of Hh activity in the development of serotonergic raphe neurons. Our results show that the pathways involved in induction of hindbrain serotonergic neurons are likely to be conserved in all vertebrates and help establish the zebrafish as a model

  8. Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) immunoreactivity in non-neuronal cells within the raphe nuclei and subventricular region of the brainstem of the cat.

    PubMed

    Torterolo, Pablo; Lagos, Patricia; Sampogna, Sharon; Chase, Michael H

    2008-05-19

    Neurons that utilize melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) as a neuromodulator are localized within the postero-lateral hypothalamus and zona incerta. These neurons project diffusely throughout the central nervous system and have been implicated in critical physiological processes such as energy homeostasis and sleep. In the present report, we examined the distribution of MCH immunoreactivity in the brainstem of the cat. In addition to MCH+ axons, we found MCH-immunoreactive cells that have not been previously described either in the midbrain raphe nuclei or in the periaqueductal and periventricular areas. These MCH+ cells constituted: 1. ependymal cells that lined the fourth ventricle and aqueduct, 2. ependymal cells with long basal processes that projected deeply into the subventricular (subaqueductal) parenchyma, and, 3. cells in subventricular regions and the midbrain raphe nuclei. The MCH+ cells in the midbrain raphe nuclei were closely related to neuronal processes of serotonergic neurons. Utilizing Neu-N and GFAP immunohistochemistry we determined that the preceding MCH+ cells were neither neurons nor astrocytes. However, we found that vimentin, an intermediate-filament protein that is used as a marker for tanycytes, was specifically co-localized with MCH in these cells. We conclude that MCH is present in tanycytes whose processes innervate the midbrain raphe nuclei and adjacent subependymal regions. Because tanycytes are specialized cells that transport substances from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to neural parenchyma, we suggest that MCH is absorbed from the CSF by tanycytes and subsequently liberate to act upon neurons of brainstem nuclei. PMID:18410908

  9. Functions and Regulation of Circular Dorsal Ruffles

    PubMed Central

    Hoon, Jing-Ling; Wong, Wai-Keung

    2012-01-01

    Cells construct a number of plasma membrane structures to meet a range of physiological demands. Driven by juxtamembrane actin machinery, these actin-based membrane protrusions are essential for the operation and maintenance of cellular life. They are required for diverse cellular functions, such as directed cell motility, cell spreading, adhesion, and substrate/matrix degradation. Circular dorsal ruffles (CDRs) are one class of such structures characterized as F-actin-rich membrane projections on the apical cell surface. CDRs commence their formation minutes after stimulation as flat, open, and immature ruffles and progressively develop into fully enclosed circular ruffles. These “rings” then mature and contract centrifugally before subsiding. Serving a critical function in receptor internalization and cell migration, CDRs are thus highly dynamic but transient formations. Here, we review the current state of knowledge concerning the regulation of circular dorsal ruffles. We focus specifically on the biochemical pathways leading to CDR formation in order to better define the roles and functions of these enigmatic structures. PMID:22927640

  10. Isolated dorsal dislocation of the tarsal naviculum

    PubMed Central

    Hamdi, Kaziz; Hazem, Ben Ghozlen; Yadh, Zitoun; Faouzi, Abid

    2015-01-01

    Isolated dislocation of the tarsal naviculum is an unusual injury, scarcely reported in the literature. The naviculum is surrounded by the rigid bony and ligamentous support hence fracture dislocation is more common than isolated dislocation. The mechanism and treatment options remain unclear. In this case report, we describe a 31 year old man who sustained an isolated dorsal dislocation of the left tarsal naviculum, without fracture, when he was involved in a motor vehicle collision. The reported mechanism of the dislocation is a hyper plantar flexion force applied to the midfoot, resulting in a transient disruption of the ligamentous support of the naviculum bone, with dorsal displacement of the bone. The patient was treated with open reduction and Krischner-wire fixation of the navicular after the failure of closed reduction. The wires were removed after 6 weeks postoperatively. Physiotherapy for stiffness and midfoot pain was recommended for 2 months. At 6 months postoperatively, limping, midfoot pain and weakness were reported, no X-ray abnormalities were found. The patient returned to his obvious activities with a normal range of motion. PMID:26806978

  11. Function of dorsal fins in bamboo shark during steady swimming.

    PubMed

    Maia, Anabela; Wilga, Cheryl A

    2013-08-01

    To gain insight into the function of the dorsal fins in white-spotted bamboo sharks (Orectolobiformes: Hemiscyillidae) during steady swimming, data on three-dimensional kinematics and electromyographic recordings were collected. Bamboo sharks were induced to swim at 0.5 and 0.75 body lengths per second in a laminar flow tank. Displacement, lag and angles were analyzed from high-speed video images. Onset, offset, duration, duty cycle and asynchrony index were calculated from three muscle implants on each side of each dorsal fin. The dorsal fins were displaced more laterally than the undulating body. In addition, the dorsal tips had larger lateral displacement than the trailing edges. Increased speed was accompanied by an increase in tail beat frequency with constant tail beat amplitude. However, lateral displacement of the fins and duration of muscle bursts remained relatively constant with increased speed. The range of lateral motion was greater for the second dorsal fin (mean 33.3°) than for the first dorsal fin (mean 28.4°). Bending within the fin was greater for the second dorsal fin (mean 43.8°) than for the first dorsal fin (mean 30.8°). Muscle onset and offset among implants on the same side of each dorsal fin was similar. Three-dimensional conformation of the dorsal fins was caused by interactions between muscle activity, material properties, and incident flow. Alternating bilateral activity occurred in both dorsal fins, further supporting the active role of these hydrofoils in thrust production during steady swimming. The dorsal fins in bamboo sharks are capable of thrust production during steady swimming and do not appear to function as stabilizing structures.

  12. Dorsal Wrist Capsular Tears in Association with Scapholunate Instability: Results of an Arthroscopic Dorsal Capsuloplasty

    PubMed Central

    Binder, Adeline Cambon; Kerfant, Nathalie; Wahegaonkar, Abhijeet L.; Tandara, Andrea A.; Mathoulin, Christophe L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to report the association of dorsal wrist capsular avulsion with scapholunate ligament instability and to evaluate the results of an arthroscopy-assisted repair. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 10 patients with a mean age of 39.1 years suffering from chronic dorsal wrist pain. They underwent a wrist arthroscopy with an evaluation of the scapholunate ligament complex from the radiocarpal and midcarpal compartments. An avulsion of the dorsal intercarpal ligament (DICL) from the scapholunate interosseous ligament (SLIL) was visible from the radiocarpal compartment in all cases, while the SLIL was intact. The DICL tear was repaired with an arthroscopy-assisted dorsal capsuloplasty. Patients were assessed preoperatively and postoperatively by the QuickDASH (Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand) questionnaire, by the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) for pain, and by a clinical and radiological examination. Results Preoperatively, all patients had reduced flexion and radial deviation of the affected wrist. On the lateral radiograph, 5 of the 10 patients showed an increase of the scapholunate angle (60 to 85°). The scapholunate instability was graded as Messina–European Wrist Arthroscopy Society (EWAS) II in five cases and as grade IIIB in five cases. A tear of the ulnar part of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) was found in seven cases. At a mean followup of 16 months, the wrist range of motion (ROM), the grip strength, the QuickDASH, and the VAS of pain improved significatively. The scapholunate angle was normalized in all cases. Discussion Isolated tears of the DICL at its insertion from the dorsal part of the SLIL can be associated with scapholunate instability in the absence of an injury to the SLIL. The diagnosis is made arthroscopically. The arthroscopic dorsal capsuloplasty is a minimally invasive technique that provides short-term satisfactory results. Further studies are needed to determine whether

  13. Theories of the dorsal bundle extinction effect.

    PubMed

    Mason, S T; Iversen, S D

    1979-07-01

    Selective destruction of the noradrenaline systems in the rat brain using the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine has been found to cause resistance to extinction in a number of behavioural situations. Several theories concerning the behavioural mechanism altered by the lesion, and hence about the role of noradrenaline in normal brain functioning, are proposed and evaluated. Theories suggesting a role for noradrenaline in activity, perseveration, internal inhibition, frustrative non-reward, motivation, or secondary reinforcement, fail to explain all the available evidence and direct tests of each theory fails to support its predictions. A model which suggests that noreadrenaline is involved in attentional behaviour, specifically in filtering out or learning to ignore irrelevant environmental stimuli, is successful in explaining all available data and direct tests of the lesioned rats' attentional capacity serve to confirm many of the predictions of an attentional theory of the dorsal bundle extinction effect.

  14. Calcium Signaling in Intact Dorsal Root Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Gemes, Geza; Rigaud, Marcel; Koopmeiners, Andrew S.; Poroli, Mark J.; Zoga, Vasiliki; Hogan, Quinn H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Ca2+ is the dominant second messenger in primary sensory neurons. In addition, disrupted Ca2+ signaling is a prominent feature in pain models involving peripheral nerve injury. Standard cytoplasmic Ca2+ recording techniques use high K+ or field stimulation and dissociated neurons. To compare findings in intact dorsal root ganglia, we used a method of simultaneous electrophysiologic and microfluorimetric recording. Methods Dissociated neurons were loaded by bath-applied Fura-2-AM and subjected to field stimulation. Alternatively, we adapted a technique in which neuronal somata of intact ganglia were loaded with Fura-2 through an intracellular microelectrode that provided simultaneous membrane potential recording during activation by action potentials (APs) conducted from attached dorsal roots. Results Field stimulation at levels necessary to activate neurons generated bath pH changes through electrolysis and failed to predictably drive neurons with AP trains. In the intact ganglion technique, single APs produced measurable Ca2+ transients that were fourfold larger in presumed nociceptive C-type neurons than in nonnociceptive Aβ-type neurons. Unitary Ca2+ transients summated during AP trains, forming transients with amplitudes that were highly dependent on stimulation frequency. Each neuron was tuned to a preferred frequency at which transient amplitude was maximal. Transients predominantly exhibited monoexponential recovery and had sustained plateaus during recovery only with trains of more than 100 APs. Nerve injury decreased Ca2+ transients in C-type neurons, but increased transients in Aβ-type neurons. Conclusions Refined observation of Ca2+ signaling is possible through natural activation by conducted APs in undissociated sensory neurons and reveals features distinct to neuronal types and injury state. PMID:20526180

  15. The habenulo-raphe serotonergic circuit encodes an aversive expectation value essential for adaptive active avoidance of danger.

    PubMed

    Amo, Ryunosuke; Fredes, Felipe; Kinoshita, Masae; Aoki, Ryo; Aizawa, Hidenori; Agetsuma, Masakazu; Aoki, Tazu; Shiraki, Toshiyuki; Kakinuma, Hisaya; Matsuda, Masaru; Yamazaki, Masako; Takahoko, Mikako; Tsuboi, Takashi; Higashijima, Shin-ichi; Miyasaka, Nobuhiko; Koide, Tetsuya; Yabuki, Yoichi; Yoshihara, Yoshihiro; Fukai, Tomoki; Okamoto, Hitoshi

    2014-12-01

    Anticipation of danger at first elicits panic in animals, but later it helps them to avoid the real threat adaptively. In zebrafish, as fish experience more and more danger, neurons in the ventral habenula (vHb) showed tonic increase in the activity to the presented cue and activated serotonergic neurons in the median raphe (MR). This neuronal activity could represent the expectation of a dangerous outcome and be used for comparison with a real outcome when the fish is learning how to escape from a dangerous to a safer environment. Indeed, inhibiting synaptic transmission from vHb to MR impaired adaptive avoidance learning, while panic behavior induced by classical fear conditioning remained intact. Furthermore, artificially triggering this negative outcome expectation signal by optogenetic stimulation of vHb neurons evoked place avoidance behavior. Thus, vHb-MR circuit is essential for representing the level of expected danger and behavioral programming to adaptively avoid potential hazard.

  16. Quantification of the response of rat medullary raphe neurones to independent changes in pHo and PCO2

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wengang; Bradley, Stefania Risso; Richerson, George B

    2002-01-01

    The medullary raphe nuclei contain putative central respiratory chemoreceptor neurones that are highly sensitive to acidosis. To define the primary stimulus for chemosensitivity in these neurones, the response to hypercapnic acidosis was quantified and compared with the response to independent changes in PCO2 and extracellular pH (pHo). Neurones from the ventromedial medulla of neonatal rats (P0-P2) were dissociated and maintained in tissue culture for long enough to develop a mature response (up to 70 days). Perforated patch clamp recordings were used to record membrane potential and firing rate while changes were made in pHo, PCO2 and/or [NaHCO3]o from baseline values of 7.4, 5 % and 26 mm, respectively. Hypercapnic acidosis (PCO2 9 %; pHo 7.17) induced an increase in firing rate to 285 % of control in one subset of neurones (‘stimulated neurones’) and induced a decrease in firing rate to 21 % of control in a different subset of neurones (‘inhibited neurones’). Isocapnic acidosis (pHo 7.16; [NaHCO3]o 15 mm) induced an increase in firing rate of stimulated neurones to 309 % of control, and a decrease in firing rate of inhibited neurones to 38 % of control. In a different group of neurones, isohydric hypercapnia (9 % PCO2; [NaHCO3]o 40 mm) induced an increase in firing rate of stimulated neurones by the same amount (to 384 % of control) as in response to hypercapnic acidosis (to 327 % of control). Inhibited neurones also responded to isohydric hypercapnia in the same way as they did to hypercapnic acidosis. In Hepes-buffered solution, both types of neurone responded to changes in pHo in the same way as they responded to changes in pHo in bicarbonate-buffered Ringer solution. It has previously been shown that all acidosis-stimulated neurones in the medullary raphe are immunoreactive for tryptophan hydroxylase (TpOH-ir). Here it was found that TpOH-ir neurones in the medullary raphe were immunoreactive for carbonic anhydrase type II and type IV (CA II and CA

  17. Genetic variation in 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter expression causes adaptive changes in 5-HT₄ receptor levels.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Katie Ann; Licht, Cecilie Löe; Bruce, Aynsley; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Knudsen, Gitte Moos; Sharp, Trevor

    2012-09-01

    Genetic variation in 5-HT transporter (5-HTT) expression is a key risk factor for psychiatric disorder and has been linked to changes in the expression of certain 5-HT receptor subtypes. This study investigated the effect of variation in 5-HTT expression on 5-HT₄ receptor levels in both 5-HTT knockout (KO) and overexpressing (OE) mice using autoradiography with the selective 5-HT₄ receptor radioligand, [³H]SB207145. Compared to wild-type (5-HTT⁺/⁺) controls, homozygous 5-HTT KO mice (5-HTT⁻/⁻) had reduced 5-HT₄ receptor binding site density in all brain regions examined (35-65% of 5-HTT⁺/⁺). In contrast, the density of 5-HT₄ receptor binding sites was not significantly different between heterozygous 5-HTT KO mice (5-HTT⁻/⁺) and 5-HTT⁺/⁺ mice. The 5-HT synthesis inhibitor p-chlorophenylalanine (250 mg/kg twice daily for 3 d) abolished the difference in 5-HT₄ binding between 5-HTT⁻/⁻ and 5-HTT⁺/⁺ mice in all brain regions. Compared to wild-type (WT) littermate controls, 5-HTT OE mice had increased 5-HT₄ binding density across all brain regions, except amygdala (118-164% of WT) and this difference between genotypes was reduced by the 5-HTT inhibitor, fluoxetine (20 mg/kg twice daily, 3 d). Together, these findings suggest that variation in 5-HTT expression causes adaptive changes in 5-HT₄ receptor levels which are directly linked to alterations in 5-HT availability.

  18. 5-hydroxytryptamine and Lyme disease. Opportunity for a novel therapy to reduce the cerebellar tremor?

    PubMed

    Maximov, G K; Maximov, K G; Chokoeva, A A; Lotti, T; Wollina, U; Patterson, J W; Guarneri, C; Tana, C; Fioranelli, M; Roccia, M G; Kanazawa, N; Tchernev, G

    2016-01-01

    Lyme boreliosis is caused by the spirochete Borrelia burdorferi, which is transmitted by ticks. A 59 year-old woman developed pyrexia, strong headaches, ataxia, dysarthria and tremor of the limbs after a tick bite. She was unable to work and eat on her own. She was hospitalized three times and diagnosed with cerebellar intention tremor, cerebellar ataxia, dysarthria, bilateral horizontal gaze paralysis and a central lesion of the left facial nerve. There were no pyramidal, sensory or psychiatric disturbances. The brain MRI showed multifocal leucoencephalopathy with many hyperintense areas in both hemispheres, as well as in the left superior pedunculus cerebellaris. Diagnosis was confirmed by serologic examination. Treatment with cephtriaxone, doxycycline, methylprednisolone, cephixime and ciprofloxacine was administered without effect on the tremor, ataxia and horizontal gaze paralysis. Treatment was then administered with 5-hydroxytriptamine (5-HT) in increased doses. The result of the three-month treatment with 5-HT was a gradual diminution of the tremor and the ataxia and an increase in the ability to eat, walk and work independently. PMID:27373127

  19. Action of 5-hydroxytryptamine on intestinal ion transport in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Hardcastle, J; Hardcastle, P T; Redfern, J S

    1981-01-01

    1. 5-HT increased the electrical activity of rat jejunum both in vivo and in vitro. The increased potential difference and short-circuit current resulted from a stimulation of electrogenic chloride secretion. NaCl absorption may also have been inhibited. 2. 5-HT did not alter cyclic AMP levels in isolated enterocytes. 3. The 5-HT response in vivo was unaffected by atropine, cyproheptadine, propranolol and hexamethonium. Phenoxybenzamine reduced the maximum response without affecting the dose required to produce a 50% maximum response. Methysergide, at a dose of 40 mg/kg, had a similar effect while a lower dose of 2 mg/kg produced no change. Mianserin competitively antagonized the response to 5-HT, a dose of 2 mg/kg producing a fourfold increase in the amount of 5-HT required to produce a 50% maximum response. 4. Acetylcholine and 5-HT seem to act independently in inducing intestinal secretion since atropine did not block the response to 5-HT and Mianserin did not alter the response to acetylcholine. 5. Experiments in which the intestinal villi or crypts were subjected to preferential damage suggested that 5-HT primarily produced its response at the crypt cell level. PMID:6275078

  20. 5-Hydroxytryptamine type 7 receptor neuroprotection against NMDA-induced excitotoxicity is PDGFβ receptor dependent.

    PubMed

    Vasefi, Maryam S; Kruk, Jeff S; Heikkila, John J; Beazely, Michael A

    2013-04-01

    The serotonin (5-HT) type 7 receptor is expressed throughout the CNS including the hippocampus. Long-term (2-24 h) activation of 5-HT7 receptors regulates growth factor receptor expression, including the expression of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) β receptors. Direct activation of PDGFβ receptors in primary hippocampal and cortical neurons inhibits NMDA receptor activity and attenuates NMDA receptor-induced neurotoxicity. Our objective was to investigate whether the 5-HT7 receptor-induced increase in PDGFβ receptor expression would be similarly neuroprotective. We demonstrate that 5-HT7 receptor agonist treatment in primary hippocampal neurons also increases the expression of phospholipase C (PLC) γ, a downstream effector of PDGFβ receptors associated with the inhibition of NMDA receptor activity. To determine if the up-regulation of PDGFβ receptors is neuroprotective, primary hippocampal neurons were incubated with the 5-HT7 receptor agonist, LP 12, for 24 h. Indeed, LP 12 treatment prevented NMDA-induced neurotoxicity and this effect was dependent on PDGFβ receptor kinase activity. Treatment of primary neurons with LP 12 also differentially altered NMDA receptor subunit expression, reducing the expression of NR1 and NR2B, but not NR2A. These findings demonstrate the potential for providing growth factor receptor-dependent neuroprotective effects using small-molecule ligands of G protein-coupled receptors.

  1. Relative activities on and uptake by human blood platelets of 5-hydroxytryptamine and several analogues

    PubMed Central

    Born, G. V. R.; Juengjaroen, Kanchana; Michal, F.

    1972-01-01

    1. The specificity of platelet receptor sites for 5-HT uptake and for the rapid morphological change and aggregation was investigated with 5-hydroxy-tryptamine (5-HT) and seventeen analogues as well as with some antagonists of 5-HT. 2. The analogues, with the exception of 5-hydroxy-N'N'-dibutyltryptamine, caused the rapid morphological change in platelets. In concentrations below those needed to produce the agonistic action (viz. 0.05-2.0 μM), these analogues themselves inhibited competitively the shape change caused by 5-HT. 3. The velocity of change in shape caused by 5-HT was reduced in low Na media. 4. Ten analogues produced platelet aggregation; three of these, viz. 5-methoxy-α-methyltryptamine, 5-hydroxy-α-methyltryptamine and 5-hydroxy-N'N'-diisopropyltryptamine), were approximately equipotent with 5-HT. Six analogues did not induce platelet aggregation. 5. All the analogues which prevented the initial change in shape of platelets caused by 5-HT also inhibited its aggregating effect, apparently competitively with low Ki values (0.02-1.6 μM). 6. As with the inhibition of shape change, the inhibition of aggregation shows relatively low structural specificity of the receptor site. 7. Methysergide was a potent inhibitor of shape change and aggregation (Ki∼0.03 μM); imipramine was much less inhibitory (Ki∼5-10 μM). 8. Only one analogue (5-hydroxy-α-methyltryptamine) was taken up like 5-HT by platelets. All the other analogues inhibited the uptake of 5-HT by platelets (Ki=0.2-2.7 μM). 9. Methysergide was a weak inhibitor of 5-HT uptake (Ki∼125 μM) whereas imipramine was very effective (Ki∼0.3 μM). 10. Our results show that the initial change in shape of platelets is required for and precedes aggregation. The structural specificity of the platelet receptor concerned with shape change and aggregation caused by 5-HT appears low whereas the uptake mechanism is a highly specific one. The uptake probably proceeds through more than one step, the

  2. Sunscreen use on the dorsal hands at the beach.

    PubMed

    Warren, Donald B; Riahi, Ryan R; Hobbs, Jason B; Wagner, Richard F

    2013-01-01

    Background. Since skin of the dorsal hands is a known site for the development of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, an epidemiologic investigation was needed to determine if beachgoers apply sunscreen to the dorsal aspect of their hands as frequently as they apply it to other skin sites. Aim. The aim of the current study was to compare the use of sunscreen on the dorsal hands to other areas of the body during subtropical late spring and summer sunlight exposure at the beach. Materials and Methods. A cross-sectional survey from a convenience sample of beachgoers was designed to evaluate respondent understanding and protective measures concerning skin cancer on the dorsal hands in an environment with high natural UVR exposure. Results. A total of 214 surveys were completed and analyzed. Less than half of subjects (105, 49%) applied sunscreen to their dorsal hands. Women applied sunscreen to the dorsal hands more than men (55% women versus 40% men, P = 0.04). Higher Fitzpatrick Skin Type respondents were less likely to protect their dorsal hands from ultraviolet radiation (P = 0.001). Conclusions. More public education focused on dorsal hand protection from ultraviolet radiation damage is necessary to reduce the risk for squamous cell carcinomas of the hands.

  3. Dorsal hump morphology in pink salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha).

    PubMed

    Susuki, Kenta; Ichimura, Masaki; Koshino, Yosuke; Kaeriyama, Masahide; Takagi, Yasuaki; Adachi, Shinji; Kudo, Hideaki

    2014-05-01

    Mature male Pacific salmon (Genus Oncorhynchus) develop a dorsal hump, as a secondary male sexual characteristic, during the spawning period. Previous gross anatomical studies have indicated that the dorsal humps of salmon are mainly composed of cartilaginous tissue (Davidson [1935] J Morphol 57:169-183.) However, the histological and biochemical characteristics of such humps are poorly understood. In this study, the detailed microstructures and components of the dorsal humps of pink salmon were analyzed using histochemical techniques and electrophoresis. In mature males, free interneural spines and neural spines were located in a line near to the median septum of the dorsal hump. No cartilaginous tissue was detected within the dorsal hump. Fibrous and mucous connective tissues were mainly found in three regions of the dorsal hump: i) the median septum, ii) the distal region, and iii) the crescent-shaped region. Both the median septum and distal region consisted of connective tissue with a high water content, which contained elastic fibers and hyaluronic acid. It was also demonstrated that the lipid content of the dorsal hump connective tissue was markedly decreased in the mature males compared with the immature and maturing males. Although, the crescent-shaped region of the hump consisted of connective tissue, it did not contain elastic fibers, hyaluronic acid, or lipids. In an ultrastructural examination, it was found that all of the connective tissues in the dorsal hump were composed of collagen fibers. Gel electrophoresis of collagen extracts from these tissues found that the collagen in the dorsal hump is composed of Type I collagen, as is the case in salmon skin. These results indicate that in male pink salmon the dorsal hump is formed as a result of an increase in the amount of connective tissue, rather than cartilage, and the growth of free interneural spines and neural spines.

  4. β-Arrestins Negatively Regulate the Toll Pathway in Shrimp by Preventing Dorsal Translocation and Inhibiting Dorsal Transcriptional Activity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jie-Jie; Lan, Jiang-Feng; Shi, Xiu-Zhen; Yang, Ming-Chong; Niu, Guo-Juan; Ding, Ding; Zhao, Xiao-Fan; Yu, Xiao-Qiang; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2016-04-01

    The Toll signaling pathway plays an important role in the innate immunity ofDrosophila melanogasterand mammals. The activation and termination of Toll signaling are finely regulated in these animals. Although the primary components of the Toll pathway were identified in shrimp, the functions and regulation of the pathway are seldom studied. We first demonstrated that the Toll signaling pathway plays a central role in host defense againstStaphylococcus aureusby regulating expression of antimicrobial peptides in shrimp. We then found that β-arrestins negatively regulate Toll signaling in two different ways. β-Arrestins interact with the C-terminal PEST domain of Cactus through the arrestin-N domain, and Cactus interacts with the RHD domain of Dorsal via the ankyrin repeats domain, forming a heterotrimeric complex of β-arrestin·Cactus·Dorsal, with Cactus as the bridge. This complex prevents Cactus phosphorylation and degradation, as well as Dorsal translocation into the nucleus, thus inhibiting activation of the Toll signaling pathway. β-Arrestins also interact with non-phosphorylated ERK (extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase) through the arrestin-C domain to inhibit ERK phosphorylation, which affects Dorsal translocation into the nucleus and phosphorylation of Dorsal at Ser(276)that impairs Dorsal transcriptional activity. Our study suggests that β-arrestins negatively regulate the Toll signaling pathway by preventing Dorsal translocation and inhibiting Dorsal phosphorylation and transcriptional activity. PMID:26846853

  5. The sensory dorsal organs of crustaceans.

    PubMed

    Lerosey-Aubril, Rudy; Meyer, Roland

    2013-05-01

    The cuticle of crustaceans bears numerous organs, of which the functions of many are unknown. One of these, the sensory dorsal organ (SDO), is present in a wide diversity of taxa. Here we critically review the variability, ultrastructure, distribution, and possible function of this enigmatic cuticular organ. Previous data are complemented by new observations on larvae and adults of various malacostracans. The SDO is composed of four sensors arranged as the corners of a square, the centre of which is occupied by a gland. Pores or pegs surrounding this central complex may also form part of the organ. The arrangement and the external aspect of the five main elements varies greatly, but this apparently has little impact on their ultrastructural organisation. The sensors and the gland are associated with a particularly thin cuticle. Each sensor contains four outer dendritic segments and the central gland is made of a single large cell. It is not yet known what this large cell secretes. The SDO is innervated from the tritocerebrum and therefore belongs to the third cephalic segment. A similar organ, here called the posterior SDO, has been repeatedly observed more posteriorly on the carapace. It resembles the SDO but has a greater number of sensors (usually six, but up to ten) apparently associated with only two outer dendritic segments. The SDO and the posterior SDO are known in the Eumalacostraca, the Hoplocarida, and the Phyllocarida. Some branchiopods also possess a 'dorsal organ' resembling both the SDO and the ion-transporting organ more typical of this group. This may indicate a common origin for these two functionally distinct groups of organs. New observations on the posterior SDO support the hypothesis that the SDO and the posterior SDO are homologous to the lattice organ complexes of the costracans. However, the relationship between the SDO and the dorsal cephalic hump of calanoid copepods remains unclear. No correlation can be demonstrated between the presence

  6. Neuronal cell lines as model dorsal root ganglion neurons

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Kathleen; Baillie, Gregory J

    2016-01-01

    Background Dorsal root ganglion neuron-derived immortal cell lines including ND7/23 and F-11 cells have been used extensively as in vitro model systems of native peripheral sensory neurons. However, while it is clear that some sensory neuron-specific receptors and ion channels are present in these cell lines, a systematic comparison of the molecular targets expressed by these cell lines with those expressed in intact peripheral neurons is lacking. Results In this study, we examined the expression of RNA transcripts in the human neuroblastoma-derived cell line, SH-SY5Y, and two dorsal root ganglion hybridoma cell lines, F-11 and ND7/23, using Illumina next-generation sequencing, and compared the results with native whole murine dorsal root ganglions. The gene expression profiles of these three cell lines did not resemble any specific defined dorsal root ganglion subclass. The cell lines lacked many markers for nociceptive sensory neurons, such as the Transient receptor potential V1 gene, but expressed markers for both myelinated and unmyelinated neurons. Global gene ontology analysis on whole dorsal root ganglions and cell lines showed similar enrichment of biological process terms across all samples. Conclusions This paper provides insights into the receptor repertoire expressed in common dorsal root ganglion neuron-derived cell lines compared with whole murine dorsal root ganglions, and illustrates the limits and potentials of these cell lines as tools for neuropharmacological exploration. PMID:27130590

  7. 'What' Is Happening in the Dorsal Visual Pathway.

    PubMed

    Freud, Erez; Plaut, David C; Behrmann, Marlene

    2016-10-01

    The cortical visual system is almost universally thought to be segregated into two anatomically and functionally distinct pathways: a ventral occipitotemporal pathway that subserves object perception, and a dorsal occipitoparietal pathway that subserves object localization and visually guided action. Accumulating evidence from both human and non-human primate studies, however, challenges this binary distinction and suggests that regions in the dorsal pathway contain object representations that are independent of those in ventral cortex and that play a functional role in object perception. We review here the evidence implicating dorsal object representations, and we propose an account of the anatomical organization, functional contributions, and origins of these representations in the service of perception.

  8. A Comparative Study of Dorsal Buccal Mucosa Graft Substitution Urethroplasty by Dorsal Urethrotomy Approach versus Ventral Sagittal Urethrotomy Approach.

    PubMed

    Pahwa, Mrinal; Gupta, Sanjeev; Pahwa, Mayank; Jain, Brig D K; Gupta, Manu

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To compare the outcome of dorsal buccal mucosal graft (BMG) substitution urethroplasty by dorsal urethrotomy approach with ventral urethrotomy approach in management of stricture urethra. Methods and Materials. A total of 40 patients who underwent dorsal BMG substitution urethroplasty were randomized into two groups. 20 patients underwent dorsal onlay BMG urethroplasty as described by Barbagli, and the other 20 patients underwent dorsal BMG urethroplasty by ventral urethrotomy as described by Asopa. Operative time, success rate, satisfaction rate, and complications were compared between the two groups. Mean follow-up was 12 months (6-24 months). Results. Ventral urethrotomy group had considerably lesser operative time although the difference was not statistically significant. Patients in dorsal group had mean maximum flow rate of 19.6 mL/min and mean residual urine of 27 mL, whereas ventral group had a mean maximum flow rate of 18.8 and residual urine of 32 mL. Eighteen out of twenty patients voided well in each group, and postoperative imaging study in these patients showed a good lumen with no evidence of leak or extravasation. Conclusion. Though ventral sagittal urethrotomy preserves the blood supply of urethra and intraoperative time was less than dorsal urethrotomy technique, there was no statistically significant difference in final outcome using either technique.

  9. Current status of thoracic dorsal sympathectomy.

    PubMed

    Welch, E; Geary, J

    1984-01-01

    This article summarizes over 20 years of experience (1962 to 1982) with cervical sympathectomy (thoracic dorsal sympathectomy) in 46 patients undergoing 68 sympathectomies. All operations were performed through an anterior supraclavicular approach. Indications for surgery were intractable Raynaud's disease (26 patients), atherosclerotic obliterative arterial disease (five), causalgia (five), posttraumatic sympathetic dystrophy (seven), collagen vascular disorders (eight), hyperhidrosis (12), occupational-related digital thrombosis (four), and thrombosis secondary to intra-arterial injection (one). The incidence of complications and side effects, both temporary and permanent, including Horner's syndrome, is reviewed in detail. Particular reference is made to the various surgical techniques of managing the stellate ganglion; four patients had two-third to three-fourth resection of the stellate ganglion down to and including the T-3 thoracic ganglion, two had preservation of the stellate ganglion and resection of the T-2 through T-4 ganglia, seven had excision of the entire stellate ganglion down to and including the T-4 ganglion, seven had resection of the lower third of the stellate ganglion down to and including the T-4 ganglion, and 48 had removal of the lower half of the stellate ganglion down to and including the T-3 ganglion. The study reviews the literature germane to anatomic considerations and suggests revisions in current texts and atlases. By retrospective analysis of the records and a follow-up questionnaire, which provided an 86% follow-up (average 8.4 years), the paper points to the distinctive clinical characteristics of the different groups within the population undergoing the operation and provides guidelines for patient selection and conclusions on the place for this operation in the management of vascular diseases involving the upper extremity. PMID:6481864

  10. Damage in the dorsal striatum alleviates addictive behavior.

    PubMed

    Muskens, J B; Schellekens, A F A; de Leeuw, F E; Tendolkar, I; Hepark, S

    2012-01-01

    The ventral striatum has been assigned a major role in addictive behavior. In addition, clinical lesion studies have described involvement of the insula and globus pallidus. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of alleviation of alcohol and nicotine addiction after a cerebrovascular incident in the dorsal striatum. The patient was still abstinent from alcohol and nicotine at follow-up. This observation suggests that the dorsal striatum may play a critical role in addiction to alcohol and nicotine.

  11. Anti-aquaporin-4 antibody-positive dorsal midbrain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, Juyoun; Jeong, Seong-Hae; Park, Sang Min; Sohn, Eun Hee; Lee, Ae Young; Kim, Jae-Moon; Jo, Hyun-Jin; Lee, Yeon-Hee; Kim, Ji-Soo

    2015-04-01

    Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD) can cause various ocular motor disorders in addition to optic neuritis. Ocular motor findings associated with NMOSD include spontaneous vertical and gaze-evoked nystagmus, wall-eyed bilateral internuclear ophthalmoplegia, and trochlear nerve palsy. The association between dorsal midbrain syndrome and anti-aquaporin-4 antibody seropositivity has not been reported. Here, we report a patient displaying typical dorsal midbrain syndrome and anti-aquaporin-4 antibody seropositivity.

  12. Interactions between dorsal and ventral streams for controlling skilled grasp.

    PubMed

    van Polanen, Vonne; Davare, Marco

    2015-12-01

    The two visual systems hypothesis suggests processing of visual information into two distinct routes in the brain: a dorsal stream for the control of actions and a ventral stream for the identification of objects. Recently, increasing evidence has shown that the dorsal and ventral streams are not strictly independent, but do interact with each other. In this paper, we argue that the interactions between dorsal and ventral streams are important for controlling complex object-oriented hand movements, especially skilled grasp. Anatomical studies have reported the existence of direct connections between dorsal and ventral stream areas. These physiological interconnections appear to be gradually more active as the precision demands of the grasp become higher. It is hypothesised that the dorsal stream needs to retrieve detailed information about object identity, stored in ventral stream areas, when the object properties require complex fine-tuning of the grasp. In turn, the ventral stream might receive up to date grasp-related information from dorsal stream areas to refine the object internal representation. Future research will provide direct evidence for which specific areas of the two streams interact, the timing of their interactions and in which behavioural context they occur.

  13. Interactions between dorsal and ventral streams for controlling skilled grasp

    PubMed Central

    van Polanen, Vonne; Davare, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The two visual systems hypothesis suggests processing of visual information into two distinct routes in the brain: a dorsal stream for the control of actions and a ventral stream for the identification of objects. Recently, increasing evidence has shown that the dorsal and ventral streams are not strictly independent, but do interact with each other. In this paper, we argue that the interactions between dorsal and ventral streams are important for controlling complex object-oriented hand movements, especially skilled grasp. Anatomical studies have reported the existence of direct connections between dorsal and ventral stream areas. These physiological interconnections appear to be gradually more active as the precision demands of the grasp become higher. It is hypothesised that the dorsal stream needs to retrieve detailed information about object identity, stored in ventral stream areas, when the object properties require complex fine-tuning of the grasp. In turn, the ventral stream might receive up to date grasp-related information from dorsal stream areas to refine the object internal representation. Future research will provide direct evidence for which specific areas of the two streams interact, the timing of their interactions and in which behavioural context they occur. PMID:26169317

  14. Functional Connectivity of the Dorsal Striatum in Female Musicians

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Shoji; Kirino, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    The dorsal striatum (caudate/putamen) is a node of the cortico-striato-pallido-thalamo-cortical (CSPTC) motor circuit, which plays a central role in skilled motor learning, a critical feature of musical performance. The dorsal striatum receives input from a large part of the cerebral cortex, forming a hub in the cortical-subcortical network. This study sought to examine how the functional network of the dorsal striatum differs between musicians and nonmusicians. Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data were acquired from female university students majoring in music and nonmusic disciplines. The data were subjected to functional connectivity analysis and graph theoretical analysis. The functional connectivity analysis indicated that compared with nonmusicians, musicians had significantly decreased connectivity between the left putamen and bilateral frontal operculum (FO) and between the left caudate nucleus and cerebellum. The graph theoretical analysis of the entire brain revealed that the degrees, which represent the numbers of connections, of the bilateral putamen were significantly lower in musicians than in nonmusicians. In conclusion, compared with nonmusicians, female musicians have a smaller functional network of the dorsal striatum with decreased connectivity. These data are consistent with previous anatomical studies reporting a reduced volume of the dorsal striatum in musicians and ballet dancers, suggesting that long-term musical training reshapes the functional network of the dorsal striatum to be less extensive or selective. PMID:27148025

  15. Variation of dorsal horn cell dendritic spread with map scale.

    PubMed

    Brown, P B; Millecchia, R; Culberson, J L; Gladfelter, W; Covalt-Dunning, D

    1996-10-21

    Cells in laminae III, IV, and V of cat dorsal horn were injected with horseradish peroxidase or neurobiotin. Dorsal views of the dendritic domains were constructed in order to measure their lengths, widths, areas, and length/width ratios in the horizontal plane (the plane of the somatotopic map). Dendritic domain width and area in the horizontal plane were negatively correlated with fractional distance between the medial and lateral edges of the dorsal horn. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that dendritic domain width varies with map scale, which is maximal in the medial dorsal horn. This is similar to the variation in widths of primary afferent bouton distributions. The parallel variation of dorsal horn cell dendritic domain width and primary afferent bouton distribution width with map scale suggests that there is a causal relation between morphology and map scale in the dorsal horn representation of the hindlimb. This variation of adult morphology with map scale must reflect mechanisms responsible for the assembly of receptive fields. PMID:8906504

  16. Dorsal Augmentation in Rhinoplasty: A Survey and Review.

    PubMed

    Malone, Melanie; Pearlman, Steven

    2015-06-01

    Understanding the nuanced practices and grafting options of dorsal augmentation will improve outcomes and results in rhinoplasty. To better understand the practices of dorsal augmentation among our colleagues. To review the current literature regarding the indications, safety profiles, and outcomes of different materials used in dorsal augmentation. A PubMed search was performed to capture current articles containing reviews or large series regarding the safety and efficacy of various grafting materials used for dorsal augmentation. Of the many options available, autologous cartilage grafts maintain widespread use for dorsal augmentation and other techniques in rhinoplasty. Homologous cartilage grafts, namely irradiated rib, are a preferred alternative. Irradiated costal cartilage has been shown to have low complication rates and is unique in its abundance of supply, particularly in the revision rhinoplasty. Alloplastic implants, particularly silicone, are prevalent in Asian countries where they are a popular first-line choice. ePTFE has a favorable complication profile in primary rhinoplasty; however, caution is recommended when using ePTFE in revision cases. Porous polyethylene has a higher risk of associated complications than the other alloplastic implants listed, and therefore should be considered thoughtfully. Although cartilage is often the preferred graft for dorsal augmentation, there are many other autogenous, homologous, and alloplastic materials that have been shown to be safe and effective choices when applied in the proper setting. PMID:26126225

  17. Functional Connectivity of the Dorsal Striatum in Female Musicians.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Shoji; Kirino, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    The dorsal striatum (caudate/putamen) is a node of the cortico-striato-pallido-thalamo-cortical (CSPTC) motor circuit, which plays a central role in skilled motor learning, a critical feature of musical performance. The dorsal striatum receives input from a large part of the cerebral cortex, forming a hub in the cortical-subcortical network. This study sought to examine how the functional network of the dorsal striatum differs between musicians and nonmusicians. Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data were acquired from female university students majoring in music and nonmusic disciplines. The data were subjected to functional connectivity analysis and graph theoretical analysis. The functional connectivity analysis indicated that compared with nonmusicians, musicians had significantly decreased connectivity between the left putamen and bilateral frontal operculum (FO) and between the left caudate nucleus and cerebellum. The graph theoretical analysis of the entire brain revealed that the degrees, which represent the numbers of connections, of the bilateral putamen were significantly lower in musicians than in nonmusicians. In conclusion, compared with nonmusicians, female musicians have a smaller functional network of the dorsal striatum with decreased connectivity. These data are consistent with previous anatomical studies reporting a reduced volume of the dorsal striatum in musicians and ballet dancers, suggesting that long-term musical training reshapes the functional network of the dorsal striatum to be less extensive or selective. PMID:27148025

  18. Divergent in vivo activity of non‐serotonergic and serotonergic VGluT3–neurones in the median raphe region

    PubMed Central

    Domonkos, Andor; Nikitidou Ledri, Litsa; Laszlovszky, Tamás; Cserép, Csaba; Borhegyi, Zsolt; Papp, Edit; Nyiri, Gábor; Freund, Tamás F.

    2016-01-01

    Key points The median raphe is a key subcortical modulatory centre involved in several brain functions, such as regulation of the sleep–wake cycle, emotions and memory storage.A large proportion of median raphe neurones are glutamatergic and implement a radically different mode of communication compared to serotonergic cells, although their in vivo activity is unknown.We provide the first description of the in vivo, brain state‐dependent firing properties of median raphe glutamatergic neurones identified by immunopositivity for the vesicular glutamate transporter type 3 (VGluT3) and serotonin (5‐HT). Glutamatergic populations (VGluT3+/5‐HT– and VGluT3+/5‐HT+) were compared with the purely serotonergic (VGluT3–/5‐HT+ and VGluT3–/5‐HT–) neurones.VGluT3+/5‐HT+ neurones fired similar to VGluT3–/5‐HT+ cells, whereas they significantly diverged from the VGluT3+/5‐HT– population. Activity of the latter subgroup resembled the spiking of VGluT3–/5‐HT– cells, except for their diverging response to sensory stimulation.The VGluT3+ population of the median raphe may broadcast rapidly varying signals on top of a state‐dependent, tonic modulation. Abstract Subcortical modulation is crucial for information processing in the cerebral cortex. Besides the canonical neuromodulators, glutamate has recently been identified as a key cotransmitter of numerous monoaminergic projections. In the median raphe, a pure glutamatergic neurone population projecting to limbic areas was also discovered with a possibly novel, yet undetermined function. In the present study, we report the first functional description of the vesicular glutamate transporter type 3 (VGluT3)‐expressing median raphe neurones. Because there is no appropriate genetic marker for the separation of serotonergic (5‐HT+) and non‐serotonergic (5‐HT–) VGluT3+ neurones, we utilized immunohistochemistry after recording and juxtacellular labelling in anaesthetized rats. VGluT3+/5

  19. Role of the red nucleus in suppressing the jaw-opening reflex following stimulation of the raphe magnus nucleus.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Yoshihide; Ishizuka, Ken'Ichi; Iwasaki, Shin-ichi

    2014-08-01

    In a previous study, we found that electrical and chemical stimulation of the red nucleus (RN) suppressed the high-threshold afferent-evoked jaw-opening reflex (JOR). It has been reported that the RN receives bilaterally projection fibers from the raphe magnus nucleus (RMg), and that stimulation of the RMg inhibits the tooth pulp-evoked nociceptive JOR. These facts imply that RMg-induced inhibition of the JOR could be mediated via the RN. The present study first examines whether stimulation of the RMg suppresses the high-threshold afferent-evoked JOR. The JOR was evoked by electrical stimulation of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN), and was recorded as the electromyographic response of the anterior belly of the digastric muscle. The stimulus intensity was 4.0 (high-threshold) times the threshold. Conditioning electrical stimulation of the RMg significantly suppressed the JOR. A further study then examined whether electrically induced lesions of the RN or microinjection of muscimol into the RN affects RMg-induced suppression of the JOR. Electrically induced lesions of the bilateral RN and microinjection of muscimol into the bilateral RN both reduced the RMg-induced suppression of the JOR. These results suggest that RMg-induced suppression of the high-threshold afferent-evoked JOR is mediated by a relay in the RN. PMID:24929104

  20. The effect of continuous ELF-MFs on the level of 5-HIAA in the raphe nucleus of the rat

    PubMed Central

    Shahbazi-Gahrouei, Daryoush; Shiri, Leila; Alaei, Hojjatollah; Naghdi, Naser

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of continuous extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MFs) with a frequency of 10 Hz and an intensity of 690–720 μT on the level of 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid (5-HIAA) in adult male Wistar rats. A total of 24 adult Wistar male rats were used, and after exposure with an ELF-MF for 15 successive days, all rats in each test were anesthetized with chloral hydrate. Then, they were placed in a stereotaxic frame for surgery and a microdialysis process. Dialysate samples were analyzed to measure the amount of 5-HIAA by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) using electrochemical detection. Results showed that ELF-MF exposure for 15 days, 1 h daily, was not effective in altering the level of 5-HIAA. However, ELF-MF exposure for 15 days, 3 h daily, decreased the level of the 5-HIAA in the raphe nucleus. It can be concluded that ELF-MFs affect the serotonergic system and may be used to treat nervous system diseases. This study is an initial step towards helping cure depression using ELF-MFs. PMID:26811259

  1. Selective estrogen receptor-beta (SERM-beta) compounds modulate raphe nuclei tryptophan hydroxylase-1 (TPH-1) mRNA expression and cause antidepressant-like effects in the forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Clark, J A; Alves, S; Gundlah, C; Rocha, B; Birzin, E T; Cai, S-J; Flick, R; Hayes, E; Ho, K; Warrier, S; Pai, L; Yudkovitz, J; Fleischer, R; Colwell, L; Li, S; Wilkinson, H; Schaeffer, J; Wilkening, R; Mattingly, E; Hammond, M; Rohrer, S P

    2012-11-01

    Estrogen acts through two molecularly distinct receptors termed estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) and estrogen receptor beta (ERβ) which bind estradiol with similar affinities and mediate the effects of estrogen throughout the body. ERα plays a major role in reproductive physiology and behavior, and mediates classic estrogen signaling in such tissues as the uterus, mammary gland, and skeleton. ERβ, however, modulates estrogen signaling in the ovary, the immune system, prostate, gastrointestinal tract, and hypothalamus, and there is some evidence that ERβ can regulate ERα activity. Moreover, ERβ knockout studies and receptor distribution analyses in the CNS suggest that this receptor may play a role in the modulation of mood and cognition. In recent years several ERβ-specific compounds (selective estrogen receptor beta modulators; SERM-beta) have become available, and research suggests potential utility of these compounds in menopausal symptom relief, breast cancer prevention, diseases that have an inflammatory component, osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease, and inflammatory bowel disease, as well as modulation of mood, and anxiety. Here we demonstrate an antidepressant-like effect obtained using two SERM-beta compounds, SERM-beta1 and SERM-beta2. These compounds exhibit full agonist activity at ERβ in a cell based estrogen response element (ERE) transactivation assay. SERM-beta1 and 2 are non-proliferative with respect to breast as determined using the MCF-7 breast cancer cell-based assay and non-proliferative in the uterus as determined by assessing the effects of SERM-beta compounds on immature rat uterine weight and murine uterine weight. In vivo SERM-beta1 and 2 are brain penetrant and display dose dependent efficacy in the murine dorsal raphe assays for induction of tryptophan hydroxylase mRNA and progesterone receptor protein. These compounds show activity in the murine forced swim test and promote hippocampal neurogenesis acutely in rats. Taken

  2. Dorsal-Ventral Patterning and Neural Induction in Xenopus Embryos

    PubMed Central

    De Robertis, Edward M.; Kuroda, Hiroki

    2008-01-01

    We review the current status of research in dorsal-ventral (D-V) patterning in vertebrates. Emphasis is placed on recent work on Xenopus, which provides a paradigm for vertebrate development based on a rich heritage of experimental embryology. D-V patterning starts much earlier than previously thought, under the influence of a dorsal nuclear β-Catenin signal. At mid-blastula two signaling centers are present on the dorsal side: The prospective neuroectoderm expresses bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) antagonists, and the future dorsal endoderm secretes Nodal-related mesoderm-inducing factors. When dorsal mesoderm is formed at gastrula, a cocktail of growth factor antagonists is secreted by the Spemann organizer and further patterns the embryo. A ventral gastrula signaling center opposes the actions of the dorsal organizer, and another set of secreted antagonists is produced ventrally under the control of BMP4. The early dorsal β-Catenin signal inhibits BMP expression at the transcriptional level and promotes expression of secreted BMP antagonists in the prospective central nervous system (CNS). In the absence of mesoderm, expression of Chordin and Noggin in ectoderm is required for anterior CNS formation. FGF (fibroblast growth factor) and IGF (insulin-like growth factor) signals are also potent neural inducers. Neural induction by anti-BMPs such as Chordin requires mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation mediated by FGF and IGF. These multiple signals can be integrated at the level of Smad1. Phosphorylation by BMP receptor stimulates Smad1 transcriptional activity, whereas phosphorylation by MAPK has the opposite effect. Neural tissue is formed only at very low levels of activity of BMP-transducing Smads, which require the combination of both low BMP levels and high MAPK signals. Many of the molecular players that regulate D-V patterning via regulation of BMP signaling have been conserved between Drosophila and the vertebrates. PMID:15473842

  3. Pointing in visual periphery: is DF's dorsal stream intact?

    PubMed

    Hesse, Constanze; Ball, Keira; Schenk, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Observations of the visual form agnosic patient DF have been highly influential in establishing the hypothesis that separate processing streams deal with vision for perception (ventral stream) and vision for action (dorsal stream). In this context, DF's preserved ability to perform visually-guided actions has been contrasted with the selective impairment of visuomotor performance in optic ataxia patients suffering from damage to dorsal stream areas. However, the recent finding that DF shows a thinning of the grey matter in the dorsal stream regions of both hemispheres in combination with the observation that her right-handed movements are impaired when they are performed in visual periphery has opened up the possibility that patient DF may potentially also be suffering from optic ataxia. If lesions to the posterior parietal cortex (dorsal stream) are bilateral, pointing and reaching deficits should be observed in both visual hemifields and for both hands when targets are viewed in visual periphery. Here, we tested DF's visuomotor performance when pointing with her left and her right hand toward targets presented in the left and the right visual field at three different visual eccentricities. Our results indicate that DF shows large and consistent impairments in all conditions. These findings imply that DF's dorsal stream atrophies are functionally relevant and hence challenge the idea that patient DF's seemingly normal visuomotor behaviour can be attributed to her intact dorsal stream. Instead, DF seems to be a patient who suffers from combined ventral and dorsal stream damage meaning that a new account is needed to explain why she shows such remarkably normal visuomotor behaviour in a number of tasks and conditions. PMID:24626162

  4. Acquisition of the dorsal structures in chordate amphioxus

    PubMed Central

    Morov, Arseniy R.; Ukizintambara, Tharcisse; Sabirov, Rushan M.

    2016-01-01

    Acquisition of dorsal structures, such as notochord and hollow nerve cord, is likely to have had a profound influence upon vertebrate evolution. Dorsal formation in chordate development thus has been intensively studied in vertebrates and ascidians. However, the present understanding does not explain how chordates acquired dorsal structures. Here we show that amphioxus retains a key clue to answer this question. In amphioxus embryos, maternal nodal mRNA distributes asymmetrically in accordance with the remodelling of the cortical cytoskeleton in the fertilized egg, and subsequently lefty is first expressed in a patch of blastomeres across the equator where wnt8 is expressed circularly and which will become the margin of the blastopore. The lefty domain co-expresses zygotic nodal by the initial gastrula stage on the one side of the blastopore margin and induces the expression of goosecoid, not-like, chordin and brachyury1 genes in this region, as in the oral ectoderm of sea urchin embryos, which provides a basis for the formation of the dorsal structures. The striking similarity in the gene regulations and their respective expression domains when comparing dorsal formation in amphioxus and the determination of the oral ectoderm in sea urchin embryos suggests that chordates derived from an ambulacrarian-type blastula with dorsoventral inversion. PMID:27307516

  5. Acquisition of the dorsal structures in chordate amphioxus.

    PubMed

    Morov, Arseniy R; Ukizintambara, Tharcisse; Sabirov, Rushan M; Yasui, Kinya

    2016-06-01

    Acquisition of dorsal structures, such as notochord and hollow nerve cord, is likely to have had a profound influence upon vertebrate evolution. Dorsal formation in chordate development thus has been intensively studied in vertebrates and ascidians. However, the present understanding does not explain how chordates acquired dorsal structures. Here we show that amphioxus retains a key clue to answer this question. In amphioxus embryos, maternal nodal mRNA distributes asymmetrically in accordance with the remodelling of the cortical cytoskeleton in the fertilized egg, and subsequently lefty is first expressed in a patch of blastomeres across the equator where wnt8 is expressed circularly and which will become the margin of the blastopore. The lefty domain co-expresses zygotic nodal by the initial gastrula stage on the one side of the blastopore margin and induces the expression of goosecoid, not-like, chordin and brachyury1 genes in this region, as in the oral ectoderm of sea urchin embryos, which provides a basis for the formation of the dorsal structures. The striking similarity in the gene regulations and their respective expression domains when comparing dorsal formation in amphioxus and the determination of the oral ectoderm in sea urchin embryos suggests that chordates derived from an ambulacrarian-type blastula with dorsoventral inversion. PMID:27307516

  6. Dorsal and ventral language pathways in persistent developmental stuttering.

    PubMed

    Kronfeld-Duenias, Vered; Amir, Ofer; Ezrati-Vinacour, Ruth; Civier, Oren; Ben-Shachar, Michal

    2016-08-01

    Persistent developmental stuttering is a speech disorder that affects an individual's ability to fluently produce speech. While the disorder mainly manifests in situations that require language production, it is still unclear whether persistent developmental stuttering is indeed a language impairment, and if so, which language stream is implicated in people who stutter. In this study, we take a neuroanatomical approach to this question by examining the structural properties of the dorsal and ventral language pathways in adults who stutter (AWS) and fluent controls. We use diffusion magnetic resonance imaging and individualized tract identification to extract white matter volumes and diffusion properties of these tracts in samples of adults who do and do not stutter. We further quantify diffusion properties at multiple points along the tract and examine group differences within these diffusivity profiles. Our results show differences in the dorsal, but not in the ventral, language-related tracts. Specifically, AWS show reduced volume of the left dorsal stream, as well as lower anisotropy in the right dorsal stream. These data provide neuroanatomical support for the view that stuttering involves an impairment in the bidirectional mapping between auditory and articulatory cortices supported by the dorsal pathways, not in lexical access and semantic aspects of language processing which are thought to rely more heavily on the left ventral pathways. PMID:27179916

  7. An aboral-dorsalization hypothesis for chordate origin.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Nori

    2008-11-01

    Chordates originated from a common ancestor(s) shared with two other deuterostome groups, echinoderms and hemichordates, by creating a novel type of tadpole-like larva, which was characterized by a dorsal hollow neural tube and notochord. Recent molecular phylogeny supports the notion that echinoderms and hemichordates form a clade named the Ambulacraria and that, among the chordates, cephalochordates are more basal than urochordates and vertebrates. An aboral-dorsalization hypothesis is proposed to explain how the tadpole-type larva evolved. Embryological comparison of cephalochordates with nonchordate deuterostomes suggests that, because of limited space on the oral side of the ancestral embryo, morphogenesis to form the neural tube and notochord occurred on the aboral side of the embryo. Namely, the dorsalization of the aboral side of the ancestral embryo may have been a key developmental event that led to the formation of the basic chordate body plan.

  8. Crossed optic ataxia: possible role of the dorsal splenium.

    PubMed Central

    Ferro, J M; Bravo-Marques, J M; Castro-Caldas, A; Antunes, L

    1983-01-01

    An unusual combination of disconnective syndromes is reported: transcortical motor aphasia, left arm apraxia and optic ataxia. Neuropathological examination showed a left parieto-occipital and a subcortical frontal infarct and a lesion of the dorsal part of the posterior two-fifths of the callosum. The frontal lesion caused the transcortical motor aphasia and produced the left arm apraxia. Visuomotor incoordination in the right hemispace was due to the left parieto-occipital infarct, while the crossed optic ataxia in the left hemispace was attributed to the callosal lesion. It is proposed that the pathway that serves crossed visual reaching passes through the dorsal part of the posterior callosum. This case reinforces the growing evidence that fibres in the corpus callosum are arranged in ventro-dorsal functional lamination. Images PMID:6875586

  9. Dorsal intercarpal ligament capsulodesis for predynamic and dynamic scapholunate instability.

    PubMed

    Luchetti, R; Zorli, I Papini; Atzei, A; Fairplay, T

    2010-01-01

    We treated a prospective series of 18 patients (nine men and nine women) with a mean age of 35 years (range 15 to 57), with chronic predynamic or dynamic scapholunate instability by a dorsal intercarpal ligament capsulodesis using the modified Mayo technique. All the patients were assessed by the modified Mayo wrist score and DASH questionnaire. Wrist arthroscopy was done in all patients before open surgery in order to grade the scapholunate instability and correlate the findings with the radiographic and MRI results. At an average follow-up of 45 months (range 34 to 60) pain significantly diminished (P < 0.05) with improvement in the grip strength (P < 0.005) in all 18 cases. Wrist motion remained almost the same. The mean Mayo wrist score improved from 62 to 84 (P < 0.005).We recommend dorsal capsulodesis by using the dorsal intercarpal ligament flap for the treatment of scapholunate dissociation, when the ligament is still repairable.

  10. Dorsal and ventral stream sensitivity in normal development and hemiplegia.

    PubMed

    Gunn, Alison; Cory, Elizabeth; Atkinson, Janette; Braddick, Oliver; Wattam-Bell, John; Guzzetta, Andrea; Cioni, Giovanni

    2002-05-01

    Form and motion coherence thresholds can provide comparable measures of global visual processing in the ventral and dorsal streams respectively. Normal development of thresholds was tested in 360 normally developing children aged 4-11 and in normal adults. The two tasks showed similar developmental trends, with some greater variability and a slight delay in motion coherence compared to form coherence performance, in reaching adult levels. To examine the proposal of dorsal stream vulnerability related to specific developmental disorders, we compared 24 children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy with the normally developing group. Hemiplegic children performed significantly worse than controls on the motion coherence task for their age, but not on the form coherence task; however, within this group no specific brain area was significantly associated with poor motion compared to form coherence performance. These results suggest that extrastriate mechanisms mediating these thresholds normally develop in parallel, but that the dorsal stream has a greater, general vulnerability to early neurological impairment. PMID:11997698

  11. Minor papilla cannulation and dorsal ductography in pancreas divisum.

    PubMed

    Benage, D; McHenry, R; Hawes, R H; O'Connor, K W; Lehman, G A

    1990-01-01

    Until recently, pancreas divisum represented a major technical barrier to a complete evaluation of pancreatic ductal anatomy. Technical refinements have now made it possible to achieve minor papilla cannulation and dorsal ductography in more than 90% of attempts. In 120 consecutive dorsal ductograms, structural pathology was demonstrated in 36 subjects (30%): chronic pancreatitis in 23, pancreatic stones in 10, pseudocyst(s) in 4, ductal "cut-off" in 7, pancreatic cancer in 3, and partial agenesis in 1 (some patients had more than one finding). For patients in whom alcohol abuse was excluded, ductal pathology was present in 25%. Abnormal ventral ductograms were present in only 8% of cases, demonstrating that dorsal ductography has an appreciable additional diagnostic yield. When the clinical situation indicates the need for pancreatography, minor papilla cannulation should be performed if major papilla cannulation fails or reveals only the ventral pancreatogram of pancreas divisum.

  12. Arousal from sleep in response to intermittent hypoxia in rat pups is modulated by medullary raphe GABAergic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Darnall, Robert A; Schneider, Robert W; Tobia, Christine M; Zemel, Benjamin M

    2012-03-01

    Arousal is an important defense against hypoxia during sleep. Rat pups exhibit progressive arousal impairment (habituation) with multiple hypoxia exposures. The mechanisms are unknown. The medullary raphe (MR) is involved in autonomic functions, including sleep, and receives abundant GABAergic inputs. We hypothesized that inhibiting MR neurons with muscimol, a GABA(A) receptor agonist, or preventing GABA reuptake with nipecotic acid, would impair arousal and enhance arousal habituation and that blocking GABA(A) receptors with bicuculline would enhance arousal and attenuate habituation. Postnatal day 15 (P15) to P25 rat pups were briefly anesthetized, and microinjections with aCSF, muscimol, bicuculline, or nipecotic acid were made into the MR. After a ∼30-min recovery, pups were exposed to four 3-min episodes of hypoxia separated by 6 min of normoxia. The time to arousal from the onset of hypoxia (latency) was determined for each trial. Latency progressively increased across trials (habituation) in all groups. The overall latency was greater after muscimol and nipecotic acid compared with aCSF, bicuculline, or noninjected controls. Arousal habituation was reduced after bicuculline compared with aCSF, muscimol, nipecotic acid, or noninjected pups. Increases in latency were mirrored by decreases in chamber [O2] and oxyhemoglobin saturation. Heart rate increased during hypoxia and was greatest in muscimol-injected pups. Our results indicate that the MR plays an important, not previously described, role in arousal and arousal habituation during hypoxia and that these phenomena are modulated by GABAergic mechanisms. Arousal habituation may contribute to sudden infant death syndrome, which is associated with MR serotonergic and GABAergic receptor dysfunction. PMID:22160541

  13. Median raphe stimulation-induced motor inhibition concurrent with suppression of type 1 and type 2 hippocampal theta.

    PubMed

    Bland, Brian H; Bland, Cheryl E; MacIver, M Bruce

    2016-03-01

    This study investigated behavioral, anatomical and electrophysiological effects produced by electrical stimulation of posterior hypothalamic (PH) or median raphe (MR) nuclei, independently and during combined stimulation of both PH and MR. These three stimulation conditions were applied during spontaneous behavior in an open field and during PH stimulation-induced wheel running, while simultaneously recording hippocampal (HPC) field activity. An additional objective was to determine the effects of MR stimulation on Type 1 movement related theta and Type 2 sensory processing related theta. To achieve the latter, when behavioral studies were completed we studied the same rats under urethane anesthesia and then during urethane anesthesia with the addition of atropine sulfate (ATSO4). Here we demonstrated that electrical stimulation of a localized region of the MR nucleus resulted in a profound inhibition of both spontaneously occurring theta related motor behaviors and the theta related motor behaviors induced by electrical stimulation of the PH nucleus. Furthermore, this motor inhibition occurred concurrently with strong suppression of hippocampal theta field oscillations in the freely moving rat, a condition where the theta recorded is Type 2 sensory processing theta occurring coincidently with Type 1 movement related theta (Bland, 1986). Our results indicate that motor inhibition resulted from stimulation of neurons located in the mid central region of the MR, while stimulation in adjacent regions produced variable responses, including movements and theta activity. The present study provided evidence that the pharmacological basis of the suppression of Type 2 sensory processing HPC theta was cholinergic. However, MR inhibition of PH-induced wheel running was not affected by cholinergic blockade, which blocks Type 2 theta, indicating that MR stimulation-induced motor inhibition also requires the suppression of Type 1 theta.

  14. Infected cervico-dorsal dermoid cyst with fluid - fluid level

    PubMed Central

    Mahore, Amit; Avinash, K. M.; Muzumdar, Dattatraya; Ramadasi, Raghvendra

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 22-year-old female who was operated at the age of 3 months for cervico-dorsal swelling. She presented with gradual onset, progressively worsening dull aching pain in the cervico-dorsal region, 21 years following previous surgery. Magnetic resonance imaging showed intradural dermoid cyst with the fluid level. She underwent excision of the dermoid cyst with excision of the wall. The clinical profile, etiopathogenesis, radiological features, and management of intraspinal dermoid cysts are discussed in the light of current literature. PMID:26167217

  15. Dorsal minithoracotomy for ductus arteriosus clip closure in premature neonates.

    PubMed

    Vicente, Walter V A; Rodrigues, Alfredo J; Ribeiro, Paulo J F; Evora, Paulo R B; Menardi, Antonio C; Ferreira, Cesar A; Alves, Lafaiete; Bassetto, Solange

    2004-03-01

    We present a new surgical technique for patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) occlusion in premature neonates (PN). Through a dorsal minithoracotomy the PDA is dissected extrapleurally with q-tips and clipped. The short surgical time, avoidance of pleural drainage, and prevention of late breast deformity are the operation highlights. PMID:14992947

  16. Role of the Dorsal Hippocampus in Object Memory Load

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sannino, Sara; Russo, Fabio; Torromino, Giulia; Pendolino, Valentina; Calabresi, Paolo; De Leonibus, Elvira

    2012-01-01

    The dorsal hippocampus is crucial for mammalian spatial memory, but its exact role in item memory is still hotly debated. Recent evidence in humans suggested that the hippocampus might be selectively involved in item short-term memory to deal with an increasing memory load. In this study, we sought to test this hypothesis. To this aim we developed…

  17. Attention modulates the dorsal striatum response to love stimuli.

    PubMed

    Langeslag, Sandra J E; van der Veen, Frederik M; Röder, Christian H

    2014-02-01

    In previous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies concerning romantic love, several brain regions including the caudate and putamen have consistently been found to be more responsive to beloved-related than control stimuli. In those studies, infatuated individuals were typically instructed to passively view the stimuli or to think of the viewed person. In the current study, we examined how the instruction to attend to, or ignore the beloved modulates the response of these brain areas. Infatuated individuals performed an oddball task in which pictures of their beloved and friend served as targets and distractors. The dorsal striatum showed greater activation for the beloved than friend, but only when they were targets. The dorsal striatum actually tended to show less activation for the beloved than the friend when they were distractors. The longer the love and relationship duration, the smaller the response of the dorsal striatum to beloved-distractor stimuli was. We interpret our findings in terms of reinforcement learning. By virtue of using a cognitive task with a full factorial design, we show that the dorsal striatum is not activated by beloved-related information per se, but only by beloved-related information that is attended.

  18. Kinetic diversity of dopamine transmission in the dorsal striatum

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, I. Mitch; Nesbitt, Kathryn M.; Walters, Seth H.; Varner, Erika L.; Shu, Zhan; Bartlow, Kathleen M.; Jaquins-Gerstl, Andrea S.; Michael, Adrian C.

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine (DA), a highly significant neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system, operates on multiple time scales to affect a diverse array of physiological functions. The significance of DA in human health is heightened by its role in a variety of pathologies. Voltammetric measurements of electrically evoked dopamine release have brought to light the existence of a patchwork of DA kinetic domains in the dorsal striatum of the rat. Thus, it becomes necessary to consider how these domains might be related to specific aspects of DA's functions. Responses evoked in the fast and slow domains are distinct in both amplitude and temporal profile. Herein we report that responses evoked in fast domains can be further classified into four distinct types, types 1-4. The dorsal striatum, therefore, exhibits a total of at least five distinct evoked responses (4 fast types and 1 slow type). All five response types conform to kinetic models based entirely on first order rate expressions, which indicates that the heterogeneity among the response types arises from kinetic diversity within the dorsal striatum terminal field. We report also that functionally distinct sub-regions of the dorsal striatum express DA kinetic diversity in a selective manner. Thus, this study documents five response types, provides a thorough kinetic explanation for each of them, and confirms their differential association with functionally distinct sub-regions of this key DA terminal field. PMID:25683259

  19. Physical Interactions and Functional Relationships of Neuroligin 2 and Midbrain Serotonin Transporters.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ran; Quinlan, Meagan A; Iwamoto, Hideki; Wu, Hsiao-Huei; Green, Noah H; Jetter, Christopher S; McMahon, Douglas G; Veestra-VanderWeele, Jeremy; Levitt, Pat; Blakely, Randy D

    2015-01-01

    The neurotransmitter serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] modulates many key brain functions including those subserving sensation, emotion, reward, and cognition. Efficient clearance of 5-HT after release is achieved by the antidepressant-sensitive 5-HT transporter (SERT, SLC6A4). To identify novel SERT regulators, we pursued a proteomic analysis of mouse midbrain SERT complexes, evaluating findings in the context of prior studies that established a SERT-linked transcriptome. Remarkably, both efforts converged on a relationship of SERT with the synaptic adhesion protein neuroligin 2 (NLGN2), a post-synaptic partner for presynaptic neurexins, and a protein well-known to organize inhibitory GABAergic synapses. Western blots of midbrain reciprocal immunoprecipitations confirmed SERT/NLGN2 associations, and also extended to other NLGN2 associated proteins [e.g., α-neurexin (NRXN), gephyrin]. Midbrain SERT/NLGN2 interactions were found to be Ca(2+)-independent, supporting cis vs. trans-synaptic interactions, and were absent in hippocampal preparations, consistent with interactions arising in somatodendritic compartments. Dual color in situ hybridization confirmed co-expression of Tph2 and Nlgn2 mRNA in the dorsal raphe, with immunocytochemical studies confirming SERT:NLGN2 co-localization in raphe cell bodies but not axons. Consistent with correlative mRNA expression studies, loss of NLGN2 expression in Nlgn2 null mice produced significant reductions in midbrain and hippocampal SERT expression and function. Additionally, dorsal raphe 5-HT neurons from Nlgn2 null mice exhibit reduced excitability, a loss of GABAA receptor-mediated IPSCs, and increased 5-HT1A autoreceptor sensitivity. Finally, Nlgn2 null mice display significant changes in behaviors known to be responsive to SERT and/or 5-HT receptor manipulations. We discuss our findings in relation to the possible coordination of intrinsic and extrinsic regulation afforded by somatodendritic SERT:NLGN2 complexes

  20. Drosophila wing development in the absence of dorsal identity.

    PubMed

    O'Keefe, D D; Thomas, J B

    2001-03-01

    The developing wing disc of Drosophila is divided into distinct lineage-restricted compartments along both the anterior/posterior (A/P) and dorsal/ventral (D/V) axes. At compartment boundaries, morphogenic signals pattern the disc epithelium and direct appropriate outgrowth and differentiation of adult wing structures. The mechanisms by which affinity boundaries are established and maintained, however, are not completely understood. Compartment-specific adhesive differences and inter-compartment signaling have both been implicated in this process. The selector gene apterous (ap) is expressed in dorsal cells of the wing disc and is essential for D/V compartmentalization, wing margin formation, wing outgrowth and dorsal-specific wing structures. To better understand the mechanisms of Ap function and compartment formation, we have rescued aspects of the ap mutant phenotype with genes known to be downstream of Ap. We show that Fringe (Fng), a secreted protein involved in modulation of Notch signaling, is sufficient to rescue D/V compartmentalization, margin formation and wing outgrowth when appropriately expressed in an ap mutant background. When Fng and alphaPS1, a dorsally expressed integrin subunit, are co-expressed, a nearly normal-looking wing is generated. However, these wings are entirely of ventral identity. Our results demonstrate that a number of wing development features, including D/V compartmentalization and wing vein formation, can occur independently of dorsal identity and that inter-compartmental signaling, refined by Fng, plays the crucial role in maintaining the D/V affinity boundary. In addition, it is clear that key functions of the ap selector gene are mediated by only a small number of downstream effectors.

  1. The effect of some bacterial products on temperature and sleep in rat.

    PubMed

    Masek, K; Kadlecová, O; Petrovický, P

    1975-07-01

    The lipopolysaccharides from P. aeruginosa, S. minnesota and mucopeptide from Streptococcus group A injected intravenously into rats induce a dose-dependent changes of temperature. Simultaneously, a profound disturbance of sleep occurs. The administration of salicylate, which markedly suppressed the fever does not influence the mucopeptide-caused sleep disturbance. The most prominent change in the sleep pattern is a marked decrease of the total time of paradoxical sleep. The measurement of turnover rates of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and noradrenaline (NA) in hypothalamus and midbrain, areas involved in temperature and sleep control, after injection of streptococcal mucopeptide demonstrated a significant increase of 5-HT turnover in both areas during fever and paradoxical sleep deprivation. Small electrolytic lesions of the dorsal raphe nuclei which are the largest collection of neural cells containing 5-HT completely eliminated the pyrogenic potency of mucopeptide. The findings suggest that some bacterial products might increase the body temperature through the interference with activity of 5-HT-containing neurons of the raphe complex.

  2. Predicting Early Reading Skills from Pre-Reading Measures of Dorsal Stream Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kevan, Alison; Pammer, Kristen

    2009-01-01

    It is well documented that good reading skills may be dependent upon adequate dorsal stream processing. However, the degree to which dorsal stream deficits play a causal role in reading failure has not been established. This study used coherent motion and visual frequency doubling to examine whether dorsal stream sensitivity measured before the…

  3. Intrinsic neural circuits between dorsal midbrain neurons that control fear-induced responses and seizure activity and nuclei of the pain inhibitory system elaborating postictal antinociceptive processes: a functional neuroanatomical and neuropharmacological study.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Renato L; Ferreira, Célio M R; Ribeiro, Sandro J; Carvalho, Andressa D; Elias-Filho, Daoud H; Garcia-Cairasco, Norberto; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2005-02-01

    initial periods of the postictal analgesia, as compared to the involvement of beta-noradrenergic receptor. Neurochemical lesions of the locus coeruleus (LC) and neuronal damage of the dorsal raphe nucleus induced a significant decrease of the postictal analgesia, suggesting the involvement of these nuclei in this antinociceptive process. The functional neuroanatomical study of the neural link between the mesencephalic tectum and nuclei of the central pain inhibitory system showed evidence for the interconnection between superior colliculus, both dorsal and ventral periaqueductal gray matter (PAG), and inferior colliculus. Defensive substrates of the inferior colliculus, also involved with wild running and epilepsy, send inputs toward dorsal raphe nucleus and locus coeruleus. Since these nuclei are rich in monoamines and send neural connections toward other monoaminergic nuclei of the brainstem involved with the control of the nociceptive inputs in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord, the present results offer a neuroanatomical and psychopharmacological basis for the antinociceptive processes following tonic-clonic seizures.

  4. Late Spontaneous Migration of a Dorsal Column Stimulator Paddle Lead

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chao; Carter, David A

    2016-01-01

    The most frequently encountered complication of dorsal column stimulators is lead migration. The vast majority of these events are seen in the first few weeks to months. Late paddle lead migration is a very uncommon occurrence in this setting. We describe a case of a 51-year-old male with a history of reflex sympathetic dystrophy having undergone dorsal column stimulator insertion at the level of C1-C2. A good clinical benefit was appreciated in the postoperative period once the stimulator was turned on. Approximately six months postoperatively, the patient suddenly lost coverage. Radiographic imaging revealed that the lead had migrated caudally to the C3-C4 level. Subsequent revision surgery took place. This description highlights a common complication, but occurring outside the expected time frame after surgery. PMID:27672531

  5. Dorsal approaches to intradural extramedullary tumors of the craniovertebral junction

    PubMed Central

    Refai, Daniel; Shin, John H.; Iannotti, Christopher; Benzel, Edward C.

    2010-01-01

    Tumors of the craniovertebral junction (CVJ) pose significant challenges to cranial and spine surgeons. Familiarity with the complex anatomy and avoidance of injury to neurologic and vascular structures are essential to success. Multiple surgical approaches to address lesions at the CVJ have been promoted, including ventral and dorsal-based trajectories. However, optimal selection of the surgical vector to manage the pathology requires a firm understanding of the limitations and advantages of each approach. The selection of the best surgical trajectory must include several factors, such as obtaining the optimal exposure of the region of interest, avoiding injury to critical neurologic or vascular structures, identification of normal anatomical landmarks, the familiarity and comfort level of the surgeon to the approach, and the need for fixation. This review article focuses on dorsal approaches to the CVJ and the advantages and limitations in managing intradural extramedullary tumors. PMID:20890415

  6. [Deep dorsal penile vein thrombosis revealing Behcet's disease].

    PubMed

    Beddouche, Ali; Ouaziz, Hicham; Zougaghi, Sinane; Alaoui, Abdelilah; Dergamoun, Hamza; El Sayegh, Hachem; Iken, Ali; Benslimane, Lounis; Nouini, Yassine

    2016-01-01

    Deep dorsal penile vein thrombosis (DDPVT)is a rare and little known urologic emergency. It requires an early etiological and symptomatic approach to preserve erectile function and prevent recurrences. This study reports a case of dorsal penile vein thrombosis revealed by spontaneous priapism that didn't resolve adequately and confirmed by penile Doppler ultrasound. After management of priapism and DDPVT, the etiological investigation revealed Behcet's disease whose diagnosis was based on the association of a major criteria, such as oral aphthous ulcers with 3 minor criteria such as: genital aphthous ulcers, ocular involvement, and a positive skin pathergy test within 24h. The patient underwent etiological treatment with good clinical evolution and preservation of erectile function. PMID:27583081

  7. Late Spontaneous Migration of a Dorsal Column Stimulator Paddle Lead.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Galgano, Michael A; Carter, David A

    2016-01-01

    The most frequently encountered complication of dorsal column stimulators is lead migration. The vast majority of these events are seen in the first few weeks to months. Late paddle lead migration is a very uncommon occurrence in this setting. We describe a case of a 51-year-old male with a history of reflex sympathetic dystrophy having undergone dorsal column stimulator insertion at the level of C1-C2. A good clinical benefit was appreciated in the postoperative period once the stimulator was turned on. Approximately six months postoperatively, the patient suddenly lost coverage. Radiographic imaging revealed that the lead had migrated caudally to the C3-C4 level. Subsequent revision surgery took place. This description highlights a common complication, but occurring outside the expected time frame after surgery. PMID:27672531

  8. Preparation of teaser bulls by dorsal scrotal penile deflection.

    PubMed

    Jillella, D; Baker, A A; Eaton, R J

    1978-07-01

    A simple, quick and reliable technique of preparing teaser bulls has been developed. Four Bos indicus aged between 1 year 6 months and 2 years were subjected to this method by deflecting their penes backwards about 2 to 3 cm posterior and dorsal to the attachment of the scrotum. No serious postoperative complications were recorded. The sexual behaviour and libido of the bulls did not change after subjecting them to this technique. PMID:708335

  9. Mitotic activity in dorsal epidermis of Rana pipiens.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia-Arce, H.; Mizell, S.

    1972-01-01

    Study of statistically significant rhythms of mitotic division in dorsal epidermis of frogs, Rana pipiens, exposed to a 12:12 light:dark environment for 14 days. The results include the findings that (1) male animals have a primary period of 22 hr in summer and 18 hr in winter, (2) female animals have an 18 hr period, and (3) parapinealectomy and blinding abolish the rhythm.

  10. The Organization of Dorsal Frontal Cortex in Humans and Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Mars, Rogier B.; Noonan, MaryAnn P.; Neubert, Franz-Xaver; Jbabdi, Saad; O'Reilly, Jill X.; Filippini, Nicola; Thomas, Adam G.; Rushworth, Matthew F.

    2013-01-01

    The human dorsal frontal cortex has been associated with the most sophisticated aspects of cognition, including those that are thought to be especially refined in humans. Here we used diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) and functional MRI (fMRI) in humans and macaques to infer and compare the organization of dorsal frontal cortex in the two species. Using DW-MRI tractography-based parcellation, we identified 10 dorsal frontal regions lying between the human inferior frontal sulcus and cingulate cortex. Patterns of functional coupling between each area and the rest of the brain were then estimated with fMRI and compared with functional coupling patterns in macaques. Areas in human medial frontal cortex, including areas associated with high-level social cognitive processes such as theory of mind, showed a surprising degree of similarity in their functional coupling patterns with the frontal pole, medial prefrontal, and dorsal prefrontal convexity in the macaque. We failed to find evidence for “new” regions in human medial frontal cortex. On the lateral surface, comparison of functional coupling patterns suggested correspondences in anatomical organization distinct from those that are widely assumed. A human region sometimes referred to as lateral frontal pole more closely resembled area 46, rather than the frontal pole, of the macaque. Overall the pattern of results suggest important similarities in frontal cortex organization in humans and other primates, even in the case of regions thought to carry out uniquely human functions. The patterns of interspecies correspondences are not, however, always those that are widely assumed. PMID:23884933

  11. Spinal dorsal dermal sinus tract: An experience of 21 cases

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ishwar; Rohilla, Seema; Kumar, Prashant; Sharma, Saurabh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Spinal dorsal dermal sinus is a rare entity, which usually comes to clinical attention by cutaneous abnormalities, neurologic deficit, and/or infection. The present study was undertaken to know the clinical profile of these patients, to study associated anomalies and to assess the results of surgical intervention. Methods: Medical records of 21 patients treated for spinal dorsal dermal sinus from September 2007 to December 2013 were reviewed. Results: We had 21 patients with male: female ratio of 13:8. Only 2 patients were below 1-year of age, and most cases (15) were between 2 and 15 years (mean age = 8.2 years). Lumbar region (11 cases) was most frequently involved, followed by thoracic (4 cases), lumbosacral, and cervical region in 3 patients each. All of our patients presented with neurological deficits. Three patients were admitted with acute meningitis with acute onset paraplegia and had intraspinal abscess. The motor, sensory, and autonomic deficits were seen in 14, 6, and 8 patients, respectively. Scoliosis and congenital talipes equinovarus were the common associated anomalies. All patients underwent surgical exploration and repair of dysraphic state and excision of the sinus. Overall, 20 patients improved or neurological status stabilized and only 1 patient deteriorated. Postoperative wound infection was seen in 2 cases. Conclusions: All patients with spinal dorsal dermal sinuses should be offered aggressive surgical treatment in the form of total excision of sinus tract and correction of spinal malformation, as soon as diagnosed. PMID:26539316

  12. Correlation of peripheral innervation density and dorsal horn map scale.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Millecchia, R; Brown, P B

    1997-08-01

    Dorsal horn map scale and peripheral innervation density were compared to test a hypothesized linear relationship. In anesthetized cats, low-threshold mechanoreceptive peripheral nerve innervation fields (IFs) were measured by outlining areas of skin from which action potentials could be elicited in cutaneous nerves. The same nerves were processed histologically and used to count myelinated axons. Innervation density for each nerve was calculated as number of axons divided by IF area. Single units were recorded throughout the hindlimb representation, in laminae III and IV. These data, combined with single-unit data from other animals and with cell counts in laminae III and IV, permitted estimation of numbers of cells whose receptive field centers fell in contiguous 1-cm bands from tips of toes to proximal thigh. A similar estimate was performed with the use of the nerve innervation data, so that peripheral innervation densities and map scales for the different 1-cm bands of skin could be compared. Correlation between the two was quite high (r = 0.8), and highly significant (P = 2.5 x 10(-7)). These results are consistent with a proposed developmental model in which map scale, peripheral innervation density, and reciprocal of dorsal horn cell receptive field size are mutually proportional, as a result of developmental mechanisms that produce constant divergence and convergence between primary afferent axons and dorsal horn cells. PMID:9307105

  13. Effects of perinatal protein malnutrition and fenfluramine action on food intake and neuronal activation in the hypothalamus and raphe nuclei of neonate rats.

    PubMed

    Ferro Cavalcante, Taisy Cinthia; Marcelino da Silva, Amanda Alves; Amaral Almeida, Larissa Cavalcanti do; Tavares, Gabriel Araújo; de Farias Campina, Renata Cristinny; do Nascimento, Elizabeth; Lopes de Souza, Sandra

    2016-10-15

    In neonatal rats, hunger and satiety responses occur particularly via dehydration and gastric distention, respectively. The control of food intake in newborns is yet to be fully consolidated, particularly with respect to the participation of the hypothalamic nuclei and their relationship with the serotonergic pathway. Moreover, it is unclear how the environmental stressors in early life, like undernutrition, interfere in these events. Therefore, this study examined the serotonin-system's impact on food intake in rat neonates at postnatal day (P) 10 and P18 and the manner in which protein undernutrition during pregnancy and lactation interferes in this behavior. To accomplish this, Wistar rats were used, nutritionally manipulated by a diet having two protein levels, (8% and 17%) during pregnancy and lactation, to form the Control (n=10) and Low protein groups (n=10). At 10 and 18 postnatal days pups received an acute dose of fenfluramine (3mg/kg) or saline (0.9% NaCl) and subjected to milk consumption testing and then perfused to obtain the brains for the analysis of cell activation of the immunoreactive c-Fos in the hypothalamic and raphe nuclei. At 10days a reduction in weight gain was observed in both groups. On comparison of the neuronal activation for the paraventricular nucleus, an increased activation in response to fenfluramine was observed. At 18days, the weight gain percentage differed between the groups according to the nutritional manipulation, in which the control animals had no significant change while the undernourished presented increased weight gain with the use of fenfluramine. The marking of c-Fos in response to fenfluramine in the hypothalamic and raphe nuclei revealed, an especially lower activation of the PVN, MnR and DR compared intra-group. However when evaluating the effect of undernutrition, marking activation was observed to increase in all the nuclei analyzed, in the hypothalamus and raphe. Data from this study indicate that the action of

  14. The need to differentiate the magnocellular system from the dorsal stream in connection with dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Skottun, Bernt C

    2015-04-01

    A number of authors have postulated a "magnocellular-dorsal stream" deficit in dyslexia. Combining the magnocellular system and the dorsal stream into a single entity in this context faces the problem that contrast sensitivity data do not point to a magnocellular deficiency linked to dyslexia, while, on the other hand, motion perception data are largely consistent with a dorsal stream dysfunction. Thus, there are data both for and against a "magnocellular-dorsal stream" deficit in connection with dyslexia. It is here pointed out that this inconsistency is abolished once it is recognized that the magnocellular system and the dorsal stream are separate entities.

  15. Dorsal horn spatial representation of simple cutaneous stimuli.

    PubMed

    Brown, P B; Millecchia, R; Lawson, J J; Stephens, S; Harton, P; Culberson, J C

    1998-02-01

    A model of lamina III-IV dorsal horn cell receptive fields (RFs) has been developed to visualize the spatial patterns of cells activated by light touch stimuli. Low-threshold mechanoreceptive fields (RFs) of 551 dorsal horn neurons recorded in anesthetized cats were characterized by location of RF center in cylindrical coordinates, area, length/width ratio, and orientation of long axis. Best-fitting ellipses overlapped actual RFs by 90%. Exponentially smoothed mean and variance surfaces were estimated for these five variables, on a grid of 40 points mediolaterally by 20/segment rostrocaudally in dorsal horn segments L4-S1. The variations of model RF location, area, and length/width ratio with map location were all similar to previous observations. When elliptical RFs were simulated at the locations of the original cells, the RFs of real and simulated cells overlapped by 64%. The densities of cell representations of skin points on the hindlimb were represented as pseudocolor contour plots on dorsal view maps, and segmental representations were plotted on the standard views of the leg. Overlap of modeled and real segmental representations was at the 84% level. Simulated and observed RFs had similar relations between area and length/width ratio and location on the hindlimb: r(A) = 0.52; r(L/W) = 0.56. Although the representation of simple stimuli was orderly, and there was clearly only one somatotopic map of the skin, the representation of a single point often was not a single cluster of active neurons. When two-point stimuli were simulated, there usually was no fractionation of response zones or addition of new zones. Variation of stimulus size (area of skin contacted) produced less variation of representation size (number of cells responding) than movement of stimuli from one location to another. We conclude that stimulus features are preserved poorly in their dorsal horn spatial representation and that discrimination mechanisms that depend on detection of such

  16. Asymmetric distribution of Echinoid defines the epidermal leading edge during Drosophila dorsal closure

    PubMed Central

    Laplante, Caroline

    2011-01-01

    During Drosophila melanogaster dorsal closure, lateral sheets of embryonic epidermis assemble an actomyosin cable at their leading edge and migrate dorsally over the amnioserosa, converging at the dorsal midline. We show that disappearance of the homophilic cell adhesion molecule Echinoid (Ed) from the amnioserosa just before dorsal closure eliminates homophilic interactions with the adjacent dorsal-most epidermal (DME) cells, which comprise the leading edge. The resulting planar polarized distribution of Ed in the DME cells is essential for the localized accumulation of actin regulators and for actomyosin cable formation at the leading edge and for the polarized localization of the scaffolding protein Bazooka/PAR-3. DME cells with uniform Ed fail to assemble a cable and protrude dorsally, suggesting that the cable restricts dorsal migration. The planar polarized distribution of Ed in the DME cells thus provides a spatial cue that polarizes the DME cell actin cytoskeleton, defining the epidermal leading edge and establishing its contractile properties. PMID:21263031

  17. Characterization of blood flow in the mouse dorsal spinal venous system before and after dorsal spinal vein occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Farrar, Matthew J; Rubin, Jonathan D; Diago, Darcy M; Schaffer, Chris B

    2015-01-01

    The availability of transgenic strains has made the laboratory mouse a popular model for the study of healthy and diseased state spinal cord (SC). Essential to identifying physiologic and pathologic events is an understanding of the microvascular network and flow patterns of the SC. Using 2-photon excited fluorescence (2PEF) microscopy we performed in vivo measurements of blood flow in the lower thoracic portion of the mouse dorsal spinal vein (dSV) and in the first upstream branches supplying it, denoted as dorsal ascending venules (dAVs). We found that the dSV had large radiculomedullary veins (RMVs) exiting the SC, and that flow in the dSV between pairs of RMVs was bidirectional. Volumetric flow increased in each direction away from the point of bifurcation. Flow in the upstream dAVs varied with diameter in a manner consistent with a constant distal pressure source. By performing ex vivo 2PEF microscopy of fluorescent-gel perfused tissue, we created a 3-D map of the dorsal spinal vasculature. From these data, we constructed a simple model that predicted changes in the flow of upstream branches after occlusion of the dSV in different locations. Using an atraumatic model of dSV occlusion, we confirmed the predictions of this model in vivo. PMID:25564237

  18. Quantification of the response of rat medullary raphe neurones to independent changes in pH(o) and P(CO2).

    PubMed

    Wang, Wengang; Bradley, Stefania Risso; Richerson, George B

    2002-05-01

    The medullary raphe nuclei contain putative central respiratory chemoreceptor neurones that are highly sensitive to acidosis. To define the primary stimulus for chemosensitivity in these neurones, the response to hypercapnic acidosis was quantified and compared with the response to independent changes in P(CO2) and extracellular pH (pH(o)). Neurones from the ventromedial medulla of neonatal rats (P0-P2) were dissociated and maintained in tissue culture for long enough to develop a mature response (up to 70 days). Perforated patch clamp recordings were used to record membrane potential and firing rate while changes were made in pH(o), P(CO2) and/or [NaHCO(3)](o) from baseline values of 7.4, 5 % and 26 mM, respectively. Hypercapnic acidosis (P(CO2) 9 %; pH(o) 7.17) induced an increase in firing rate to 285 % of control in one subset of neurones ('stimulated neurones') and induced a decrease in firing rate to 21 % of control in a different subset of neurones ('inhibited neurones'). Isocapnic acidosis (pH(o) 7.16; [NaHCO(3)](o) 15 mM) induced an increase in firing rate of stimulated neurones to 309 % of control, and a decrease in firing rate of inhibited neurones to 38 % of control. In a different group of neurones, isohydric hypercapnia (9 % P(CO2); [NaHCO(3)](o) 40 mM) induced an increase in firing rate of stimulated neurones by the same amount (to 384 % of control) as in response to hypercapnic acidosis (to 327 % of control). Inhibited neurones also responded to isohydric hypercapnia in the same way as they did to hypercapnic acidosis. In Hepes-buffered solution, both types of neurone responded to changes in pH(o) in the same way as they responded to changes in pH(o) in bicarbonate-buffered Ringer solution. It has previously been shown that all acidosis-stimulated neurones in the medullary raphe are immunoreactive for tryptophan hydroxylase (TpOH-ir). Here it was found that TpOH-ir neurones in the medullary raphe were immunoreactive for carbonic anhydrase type II

  19. Effect of 17β-estradiol and flavonoids on the regulation of expression of newly identified oestrogen responsive genes in a rat raphe nuclei-derived cell line.

    PubMed

    Amer, Dena A M; Jähne, Maria; Weigt, Carmen; Kretzschmar, Georg; Vollmer, Günter

    2012-10-01

    Due to the health risks attributed to perimenopausal hormone therapy, phytoestrogens such as flavonoids are receiving widespread attention to help alleviate menopausal symptoms, including hormone-driven mood disorders. Based on our previous reporter gene study regarding their transactivational activity in raphe nuclei cells from a brain region involved in regulation of mood disturbances, we herein study their effects on the regulation of expression of 17β-estradiol (E2)-regulated genes. DNA microarray was used to globally assess E2-induced gene expression in RNDA cells, a rat raphe nuclei-derived cellular model expressing oestrogen receptor β. Out of 212 regulated genes, six were selected for verification and as endpoints for the effect of flavonoids on the regulation of mRNA expression in proliferating as well as differentiating RNDA cells. Under proliferative conditions, E2 up-regulated mRNA expression of Cml-5, Sox-18 and Krt-19. Similar effects were observed in response to 8-prenylnaringenin (8-PN), genistein (GEN), daidzein (DAI) and equol (EQ). In line with E2, mRNA expression of Nefm and Zdhhc-2 was down-regulated following 8-PN, GEN, DAI, EQ and naringenin treatment. No regulation was observed on Slc6a4 mRNA expression in response to E2 or the flavonoids in proliferating RNDA cells. When cells were shifted to conditions promoting differentiation, changes in cell morphology, in mRNA expression levels and in responsiveness towards E2 and the tested flavonoids were noticed. These expression studies additionally highlighted some of the genes as markers for RNDA cellular differentiation. RNDA cells should prove useful to elucidate molecular and cellular mechanisms of exogenous oestrogen receptor ligands with neural cell populations. PMID:22213181

  20. Reduced Presynaptic Dopamine Activity in Adolescent Dorsal Striatum

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Marguerite; Bondi, Corina; Torres, Gonzalo; Moghaddam, Bita

    2013-01-01

    Adolescence coincides with symptomatic onset of several psychiatric illnesses including schizophrenia and addiction. Excess limbic dopamine activity has been implicated in these vulnerabilities. We combined molecular and dynamic indices of dopamine neurotransmission to assess dopamine function in adolescent rats in two functionally distinct striatal subregions: nucleus accumbens (NAc) and dorsal striatum (DS). In adolescents, we find an overall reduction in dopamine availability selective to the DS. Dopamine release in the DS, but not in the NAc, was less responsive to amphetamine in adolescents compared to adults. The dopamine transporter (DAT) inhibitor, nomifensine, similarly inhibited basal and amphetamine-induced dopamine release in either regions of both the age groups, suggesting that the reduced effectiveness of amphetamine is not due to differences in DAT function. Furthermore, DAT and vesicular monoamine transporter-2 expressions were similar in the DS and NAc of adolescent rats. In contrast, expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) was reduced in the DS, but not in the NAc, of adolescents compared to adults. Behaviorally, adolescents were less sensitive to amphetamine but more sensitive to a TH inhibitor. These data indicate that, in contrast to the general notion that dopamine is hyperactive in adolescents, there is diminished presynaptic dopamine activity in adolescents that is selective to the DS and may result from attenuated TH activity. Given recent reports of altered dopamine activity in associative/dorsal striatum of individuals at a clinically high risk of psychosis, our data further support the idea that dorsal, as opposed to ventral, regions of the striatum are a locus of vulnerability for psychosis. PMID:23358239

  1. Reduced presynaptic dopamine activity in adolescent dorsal striatum.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Marguerite; Bondi, Corina; Torres, Gonzalo; Moghaddam, Bita

    2013-06-01

    Adolescence coincides with symptomatic onset of several psychiatric illnesses including schizophrenia and addiction. Excess limbic dopamine activity has been implicated in these vulnerabilities. We combined molecular and dynamic indices of dopamine neurotransmission to assess dopamine function in adolescent rats in two functionally distinct striatal subregions: nucleus accumbens (NAc) and dorsal striatum (DS). In adolescents, we find an overall reduction in dopamine availability selective to the DS. Dopamine release in the DS, but not in the NAc, was less responsive to amphetamine in adolescents compared to adults. The dopamine transporter (DAT) inhibitor, nomifensine, similarly inhibited basal and amphetamine-induced dopamine release in either regions of both the age groups, suggesting that the reduced effectiveness of amphetamine is not due to differences in DAT function. Furthermore, DAT and vesicular monoamine transporter-2 expressions were similar in the DS and NAc of adolescent rats. In contrast, expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) was reduced in the DS, but not in the NAc, of adolescents compared to adults. Behaviorally, adolescents were less sensitive to amphetamine but more sensitive to a TH inhibitor. These data indicate that, in contrast to the general notion that dopamine is hyperactive in adolescents, there is diminished presynaptic dopamine activity in adolescents that is selective to the DS and may result from attenuated TH activity. Given recent reports of altered dopamine activity in associative/dorsal striatum of individuals at a clinically high risk of psychosis, our data further support the idea that dorsal, as opposed to ventral, regions of the striatum are a locus of vulnerability for psychosis.

  2. Xenopus maternal RNAs from a dorsal animal blastomere induce a secondary axis in host embryos.

    PubMed

    Hainski, A M; Moody, S A

    1992-10-01

    The initial steps of dorsal axis formation are controlled by localized maternal determinants in Drosophila, and a similar process has been proposed in Xenopus. The present study demonstrates that there are axis-inducing RNA molecules located in a specific dorsal midline, animal blastomere (D1.1) of the 16-cell-stage embryo. This blastomere, although in the animal hemisphere at cleavage stages, populates most of the dorsal lip of the blastopore, the region of Spemann's organizer, during gastrulation, and is the major progenitor for dorsal mesodermal tissues. Cytosol from this blastomere causes ventral cells to take a more dorsal fate. RNA from this blastomere induces a secondary axis when injected into ventral blastomeres and restores the dorsal axis in UV-irradiated embryos. In Xenopus, activin beta B, goosecoid and Xwnt-8 RNAs can ectopically induce a dorsal axis; however, none is a maternal transcript. Therefore, the D1.1 blastomere probably contains dorsal determinant(s) that are either maternal members of these gene families, or other presently unknown molecule(s). Regardless of the identity of the determinant(s), this study presents the first indication that Xenopus maternal RNAs in the dorsal animal hemisphere are able to organize the dorsal axis. PMID:1286612

  3. Molecular cloning and expression analysis of a dorsal homologue from Eriocheir sinensis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ai-Qing; Jin, Xing-Kun; Li, Shuang; Guo, Xiao-Nv; Wu, Min-Hao; Li, Wei-Wei; Wang, Qun

    2013-12-01

    Dorsal as a crucial component of Toll signaling pathway, played important roles in induction and regulation of innate immune responses. In this study, we cloned a NF-κB-like transcription factor Dorsal from Eriocheir sinensis and designated it as EsDorsal. The full-length cDNA of EsDorsal was 2493 bp with a 2022-bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding a 673-amino acid protein. This protein contained a 171-residue conserved Rel homology domain (RHD) and a 102-residue Ig-like, plexins and transcription factors domain (IPT). By phylogenetic analysis, EsDorsal was clustered into one group together with other invertebrate Dorsals or NF-κBs, and then clustered with vertebrate NF-κBs. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis results showed that (a) EsDorsal had higher expression level in immune organs; (b) EsDorsal differentially induced after injection of lipopolysaccharides (LPS), peptidoglycan (PG) or zymosan (GLU). Importantly, EsDorsal was more responsive to LPS than GLU and PG. Collectively, EsDorsal was differentially inducibility in response to various PAMPs, suggesting its involvement in a specific innate immune regulation in E. sinensis. PMID:23981326

  4. A congenital mucocele of the anterior dorsal tongue.

    PubMed

    Wong Chung, J E R E; Ensink, R J H; Thijs, H F H; van den Hoogen, F J A

    2014-07-01

    We report on a new-born with a congenital mucocele on the anterior dorsal side of the tongue. The presentation as well as the differential diagnosis of congenital oral swellings is discussed. Because of breastfeeding problems the mucinous swelling was incised and drained two days after birth. Immediately after drainage the swelling disappeared. Congenital oral swellings are rare. Most of them are mucoceles. Post-partum treatment is surgically, but spontaneous remission has been described. High incidence of recurrence should be taken into account when (micro-)marsupialization or incision as sole treatment is performed.

  5. Single-level selective dorsal rhizotomy for spastic cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Graham, David; Cawker, Stephanie; Paget, Simon; Wimalasundera, Neil

    2016-01-01

    The management of cerebral palsy (CP) is complex and requires a multidisciplinary approach. Selective dorsal rhizotomy (SDR) is a neurosurgical technique that aims to reduce spasticity in the lower limbs. A minimally invasive approach to SDR involves a single level laminectomy at the conus and utilises intraoperative electromyography (EMG). When combined with physiotherapy, SDR is effective in selected children and has minimal complications. This review discusses the epidemiology of CP and the management using SDR within an integrated multidisciplinary centre. Particular attention is given to the single-level laminectomy technique of SDR and its rationale, and the patient workup, recovery and outcomes of SDR. PMID:27757432

  6. Lateropulsion due to a lesion of the dorsal spinocerebellar tract.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Kengo; Saikyo, Michiko; Mukose, Atsushi; Tomimatsu, Hirotaka; Yasuda, Hitoshi

    2005-12-01

    We report three cases showing body lateropulsion as the sole or predominant symptom of caudal lateral medullary infarction. All of them presented a small infarction on the lateral surface of the caudal medulla corresponding to the dorsal spinocerebellar tract (DSCT). Disturbed unconscious proprioception of the lower trunk and the lower limb conveyed by the DSCT might have been responsible for the isolated lateropulsion. Although lateropulsion itself improved within two weeks, one patient's condition progressed to typical lateral medullary infarction. Lateropulsion caused by DSCT infarction could be a prodromal symptom of perfusion failure of a vertebral artery or the posterior inferior cerebellar artery.

  7. 5-Hydroxytryptamine 2A receptor signaling cascade modulates adiponectin and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 expression in adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Uchida-Kitajima, Shoko; Yamauchi, Toshimasa; Takashina, Youko; Okada-Iwabu, Miki; Iwabu, Masato; Ueki, Kohjiro; Kadowaki, Takashi

    2008-09-01

    Knowledge of the regulatory factors associated with down-regulation of adiponectin gene expression and up-regulation of PAI-1 gene expression is crucial to understand the pathophysiological basis of obesity and metabolic diseases, and could establish new treatment strategies for these conditions. We showed that expression of 5-HT(2A) receptors was up-regulated in hypertrophic 3T3-L1 adipocytes, which exhibited decreased expression of adiponectin and increased expression of PAI-1. 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonists and suppression of 5-HT(2A) receptor gene expression enhanced adiponectin expression. Activation of Gq negatively regulated adiponectin expression, and inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase reversed the Gq-induced effect. Moreover, the 5-HT(2A) receptor blockade reduced PAI-1 expression. These findings indicate that antagonism of 5-HT(2A) receptors in adipocytes could improve the obesity-linked decreases in adiponectin expression and increases in PAI-1 expression.

  8. Urinary excretion of bufotenin (N,N-dimethyl-5-hydroxytryptamine) is increased in suspicious violent offenders: a confirmatory study.

    PubMed

    Kärkkäinen, J; Räisänen, M; Huttunen, M O; Kallio, E; Naukkarinen, H; Virkkunen, M

    1995-09-29

    We previously reported that violent offenders with paranoid symptoms or whose violent actions had been directed against family members had higher urinary levels of bufotenin than other violent offenders. In the present study, patients were evaluated with the Karolinska Scales of Personality (KSP), and urinary levels of bufotenin were determined by mass spectrometry. In drug-free patients suspiciousness was positively correlated, and socialization was negatively correlated, with urinary bufotenin excretion. These two personality variables were strongly interdependent. In drug users, bufotenin excretion was correlated positively with social desirability and negatively with irritability, but not with suspiciousness. Bufotenin excretion was not found to be associated with violence toward family members in the present study. The results are in keeping with the earlier finding that violent offenders with paranoid personality traits have higher urinary levels of bufotenin than other violent offenders.

  9. Improved efficacy of fluoxetine in increasing hippocampal 5-hydroxytryptamine outflow in 5-HT(1B) receptor knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Malagié, Isabelle; David, Denis J; Jolliet, Pascale; Hen, René; Bourin, Michel; Gardier, Alain M

    2002-05-17

    To test for the contribution of the 5-HT(1B) receptor subtype in mediating the effects of fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), we used intracerebral in vivo microdialysis in awake, freely moving 5-HT(1B) receptor knock-out mice. We show that a single systemic administration of fluoxetine (1, 5 or 10 mg/kg, i.p.) increased extracellular serotonin levels [5-HT](ext) in the ventral hippocampus and frontal cortex of wild-type and mutant mice. However, in the ventral hippocampus, fluoxetine, at the three doses studied, induced a larger increase in [5-HT](ext) in knock-out than in wild-type mice. In the frontal cortex, the effect of fluoxetine did not differ between the two genotypes. The region-dependent response to fluoxetine described here in mutants confirms data we recently reported for another SSRI, paroxetine. These data suggest that 5-HT(1B) autoreceptors limit the effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors on dialysate 5-HT levels at serotonergic nerve terminals located mainly in the ventral hippocampus. Alternative mechanisms, e.g., changes in 5-HT transporter and/or 5-HT(1A) receptor density in 5-HT(1B) receptor knock-out mice could also explain these findings.

  10. 5-Hydroxytryptamine1A receptor-activation hyperpolarizes pyramidal cells and suppresses hippocampal gamma oscillations via Kir3 channel activation

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, April; McBain, Chris J; Fisahn, André

    2014-01-01

    Rhythmic cortical neuronal oscillations in the gamma frequency band (30–80 Hz, gamma oscillations) have been associated with cognitive processes such as sensory perception and integration, attention, learning, and memory. Gamma oscillations are disrupted in disorders for which cognitive deficits are hallmark symptoms such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. In vitro, various neurotransmitters have been found to modulate gamma oscillations. Serotonin (5-HT) has long been known to be important for both behavioural and cognitive functions such as learning and memory. Multiple 5-HT receptor subtypes are expressed in the CA3 region of the hippocampus and high doses of 5-HT reduce the power of induced gamma oscillations. Hypothesizing that 5-HT may have cell- and receptor subtype-specific modulatory effects, we investigated the receptor subtypes, cell types and cellular mechanisms engaged by 5-HT in the modulation of gamma oscillations in mice and rats. We found that 5-HT decreases the power of kainate-induced hippocampal gamma oscillations in both species via the 5-HT1A receptor subtype. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings demonstrated that this decrease was caused by a hyperpolarization of CA3 pyramidal cells and a reduction of their firing frequency, but not by alteration of inhibitory neurotransmission. Finally, our results show that the effect on pyramidal cells is mediated via the G protein-coupled receptor inwardly rectifying potassium channel Kir3. Our findings suggest this novel cellular mechanism as a potential target for therapies that are aimed at alleviating cognitive decline by helping the brain to maintain or re-establish normal gamma oscillation levels in neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:25107925

  11. The action of SDZ 205,557 at 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT3 and 5-HT4) receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Eglen, R. M.; Alvarez, R.; Johnson, L. G.; Leung, E.; Wong, E. H.

    1993-01-01

    1. The interaction of the novel antagonist, SDZ 205,557 (2-methoxy-4-amino-5-chloro benzoic acid 2-(diethylamino) ethyl ester), at 5-HT3 and 5-HT4 receptors has been assessed in vitro and in vivo. 2. In guinea-pig hippocampus and in the presence of 0.4 microM 5-carboxamidotryptamine, 5-HT4-mediated stimulation of adenylyl cyclase was competitively antagonized by SDZ 205,557, with a pA2 value of 7.5, and a Schild slope of 0.81. In rat carbachol-contracted oesophagus, 5-HT4-receptor mediated relaxations were surmountably antagonized by SDZ 205,557 with a similar pA2 value (7.3). This value was agonist-independent with the exception of (R)-zacopride, against which a significantly lower value (6.4) was observed. 3. In functional studies of 5-HT3 receptors, SDZ 205,557 exhibited an affinity of 6.2 in guinea-pig ileum compared with 6.9 at binding sites labelled by [3H]-quipazine in NG108-15 cells. In the anaesthetized, vagotomized micropig, SDZ 205,557 produced only a transient blockade of 5-HT4-mediated tachycardia. This contrasted with tropisetron, which was active for over 60 min after administration. The half-lives for the inhibitory responses of SDZ 205,557 and tropisetron were 23 and 116 min, respectively. 4. In conclusion, SDZ 205,557 has similar affinity for 5-HT3 and 5-HT4 receptors. The apparent selectivity observed in guinea-pig is due to the atypical nature of the 5-HT3 receptor in this species. The short duration of action of this novel antagonist may complicate its use in vivo. SDZ 205,557 should, therefore, be used with appropriate caution in studies defining the 5-HT4 receptor. PMID:8448587

  12. The distribution and morphological characteristics of serotonergic cells in the brain of monotremes.

    PubMed

    Manger, P R; Fahringer, H M; Pettigrew, J D; Siegel, J M

    2002-01-01

    The distribution and cellular morphology of serotonergic neurons in the brain of two species of monotremes are described. Three clusters of serotonergic neurons were found: a hypothalamic cluster, a cluster in the rostral brainstem and a cluster in the caudal brainstem. Those in the hypothalamus consisted of two groups, the periventricular hypothalamic organ and the infundibular recess, that were intimately associated with the ependymal wall of the third ventricle. Within the rostral brainstem cluster, three distinct divisions were found: the dorsal raphe nucleus (with four subdivisions), the median raphe nucleus and the cells of the supralemniscal region. The dorsal raphe was within and adjacent to the periaqueductal gray matter, the median raphe was associated with the midline ventral to the dorsal raphe, and the cells of the supralemniscal region were in the tegmentum lateral to the median raphe and ventral to the dorsal raphe. The caudal cluster consisted of three divisions: the raphe obscurus nucleus, the raphe pallidus nucleus and the raphe magnus nucleus. The raphe obscurus nucleus was associated with the dorsal midline at the caudal-most part of the medulla oblongata. The raphe pallidus nucleus was found at the ventral midline of the medulla around the inferior olive. Raphe magnus was associated with the midline of the medulla and was found rostral to both the raphe obscurus and raphe pallidus. The results of our study are compared in an evolutionary context with those reported for other mammals and reptiles.

  13. Rule encoding in dorsal striatum impacts action selection.

    PubMed

    Bissonette, Gregory B; Roesch, Matthew R

    2015-10-01

    Cognitive flexibility is a hallmark of prefrontal cortical (PFC) function yet little is known about downstream area involvement. The medial dorsal striatum (mDS) receives major projections from the PFC and is uniquely situated to perform the integration of responses with rule information. In this study, we use a novel rule shifting task in rats that mirrors non-human primate and human studies in its temporal precision and counterbalanced responses. We record activity from single neurons in the mDS while rats switch between different rules for reward. Additionally, we pharmacologically inactivate mDS by infusion of a baclofen/muscimol cocktail. Inactivation of mDS impaired the ability to shift to a new rule and increased the number of regressive errors. While recording in mDS, we identified neurons modulated by direction whose activity reflected the conflict between competing rule information. We show that a subset of these neurons was also rule selective, and that the conflict between competing rule cues was resolved as behavioural performance improved. Other neurons were modulated by rule, but not direction. These neurons became selective before behavioural performance accurately reflected the current rule. These data provide an additional locus for investigating the mechanisms underlying behavioural flexibility. Converging lines of evidence from multiple human psychiatric disorders have implicated dorsal striatum as an important and understudied neural substrate of flexible cognition. Our data confirm the importance of mDS, and suggest a mechanism by which mDS mediates abstract cognition functions.

  14. High plasticity in epithelial morphogenesis during insect dorsal closure.

    PubMed

    Panfilio, Kristen A; Oberhofer, Georg; Roth, Siegfried

    2013-01-01

    Insect embryos complete the outer form of the body via dorsal closure (DC) of the epidermal flanks, replacing the transient extraembryonic (EE) tissue. Cell shape changes and morphogenetic behavior are well characterized for DC in Drosophila, but these data represent a single species with a secondarily reduced EE component (the amnioserosa) that is not representative across the insects. Here, we examine DC in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, providing the first detailed, functional analysis of DC in an insect with complete EE tissues (distinct amnion and serosa). Surprisingly, we find that differences between Drosophila and Tribolium DC are not restricted to the EE tissue, but also encompass the dorsal epidermis, which differs in cellular architecture and method of final closure (zippering). We then experimentally manipulated EE tissue complement via RNAi for Tc-zen1, allowing us to eliminate the serosa and still examine viable DC in a system with a single EE tissue (the amnion). We find that the EE domain is particularly plastic in morphogenetic behavior and tissue structure. In contrast, embryonic features and overall kinetics are robust to Tc-zen1(RNAi) manipulation in Tribolium and conserved with a more distantly related insect, but remain substantially different from Drosophila. Although correct DC is essential, plasticity and regulative, compensatory capacity have permitted DC to evolve within the insects. Thus, DC does not represent a strong developmental constraint on the nature of EE development, a property that may have contributed to the reduction of the EE component in the fly lineage.

  15. Language development and the ontogeny of the dorsal pathway.

    PubMed

    Friederici, Angela D

    2012-01-01

    In the absence of clear phylogenetic data on the neurobiological basis of the evolution of language, comparative studies across species and across ontogenetic stages within humans may inform us about the possible neural prerequisites of language. In the adult human brain, language-relevant regions located in the frontal and temporal cortex are connected via different fiber tracts: ventral and dorsal pathways. Ontogenetically, it has been shown that newborns display an adult-like ventral pathway at birth. The dorsal pathway, however, seems to display two subparts which mature at different rates: one part, connecting the temporal cortex to the premotor cortex, is present at birth, whereas the other part, connecting the temporal cortex to Broca's area, develops much later and is still not fully matured at the age of seven. At this age, typically developing children still have problems in processing syntactically complex sentences. We therefore suggest that the mastery of complex syntax, which is at the core of human language, crucially depends on the full maturation of the fiber connection between the temporal cortex and Broca's area. PMID:22347185

  16. Methamphetamine-induced structural plasticity in the dorsal striatum.

    PubMed

    Jedynak, Jakub P; Uslaner, Jason M; Esteban, José A; Robinson, Terry E

    2007-02-01

    Repeated exposure to psychostimulant drugs produces long-lasting changes in dendritic structure, presumably reflecting a reorganization in patterns of synaptic connectivity, in brain regions that mediate the psychomotor activating and incentive motivational effects of these drugs, including the nucleus accumbens and prefrontal cortex. However, repeated exposure to psychostimulant drugs also facilitates a transition in the control of some behaviors from action-outcome associations to behavior controlled by stimulus-response (S-R) habits. This latter effect is thought to be due to increasing engagement and control over behavior by the dorsolateral (but not dorsomedial) striatum. We hypothesized therefore that repeated exposure to methamphetamine would differentially alter the density of dendritic spines on medium spiny neurons (MSNs) in the dorsolateral vs. dorsomedial striatum. Rats were treated with repeated injections of methamphetamine, and 3 months later dendrites were visualized using Sindbis virus-mediated green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression in vivo. We report that prior exposure to methamphetamine produced a significant increase in mushroom and thin spines on MSNs in the dorsolateral striatum, but a significant decrease in mushroom spines in the dorsomedial striatum. This may be due to changes in the glutamatergic innervation of these two subregions of the dorsal striatum. Thus, we speculate that exposure to psychostimulant drugs may facilitate the development of S-R habits because this reorganizes patterns of synaptic connectivity in the dorsal striatum in a way that increases control over behavior by the dorsolateral striatum.

  17. Withdrawal from methylphenidate increases neural reactivity of dorsal midbrain.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, R; Bassi, G S; Cabral, A; Nobre, M J

    2010-12-01

    Ritalin (methylphenidate hydrochloride, MP) is a non-amphetamine psychostimulant and is the drug of choice to treat children and adults diagnosed with the attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Several studies have demonstrated that rats treated with MP during early developmental stage exhibit alterations in anxiety-related processes such as an increased response to stressful stimuli and elevated plasma levels of corticosterone. Accordingly, the present study was designed to further characterize the neural and behavioral consequences of withdrawal from MP in adult rats and its influence on the neural reactivity of the dorsal midbrain. After initial exposure to an elevated plus-maze (EPM), brainstem neural activation, elicited by exposure to EPM aversive cues, was analyzed using a Fos-protein immunolabeling technique. Additional independent groups of animals were submitted to electrical stimulation of the dorsal column (DPAG) or the startle response procedure, in order to verify the influence of withdrawal from MP on the expression of unconditioned fear induced by DPAG activation and the effects of or withdrawal from MP on motor response, respectively. Our results provide new findings about the influence of MP treatment in adult rats, showing that, after a sudden MP treatment-break, increased anxiety, associated with the neural sensitization of anxiety-related regions, ensues.

  18. Epidermal growth factor receptor in adult human dorsal root ganglia.

    PubMed

    Huerta, J J; Diaz-Trelles, R; Naves, F J; Llamosas, M M; Del Valle, M E; Vega, J A

    1996-09-01

    Transforming growth factor-alpha (TGFalpha) enhances neuronal survival and neurite outgrowth in cultured dorsal root ganglia (DRG) sensory neurons. It binds a membrane protein, denominated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFr). EGFr has been localized in developing and adult human DRG. However, it remains to be elucidated whether all DRG neurons express EGFr or whether differences exist among neuronal subtypes. This study was undertaken to investigate these topics in adult human DRG using immunoblotting, and combined immunohistochemistry and image analysis techniques. A mouse monoclonal antibody (clone F4) mapping within the intracytoplasmic domain of EGFr was used. Immunoblotting revealed two main proteins with estimated molecular masses of approximately/equal to 65 kDa and 170 kDa, and thus consistent with the full-length EGFr. Additional protein bands were also encountered. Light immunohistochemistry revealed specific immunoreactivity (IR) for EGFr-like proteins in most (86%) primary sensory neurons, the intensity of immunostaining being stronger in the small- and intermediate-sized ones. Furthermore, EGFr-like IR was also observed in the satellite glial cells of the ganglia as well as in the intraganglionic and dorsal root Schwann cells. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that EGFr, and other related proteins containing the epitope labeled with the antibody F4, are responsible for the EGFr IR reported in DRG. Furthermore, we demonstrated heterogeneity in the expression of EGFr-like IR in adult human primary sensory neurons, which suggests different responsiveness to their ligands.

  19. Gateways of ventral and dorsal streams in mouse visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Quanxin; Gao, Enquan; Burkhalter, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    It is widely held that the spatial processing functions underlying rodent navigation are similar to those encoding human episodic memory (Doeller et al, 2010). Spatial and nonspatial information are provided by all senses including vision. It has been suggested that visual inputs are fed to the navigational network in cortex and hippocampus through dorsal and ventral intracortical streams (Whitlock et al, 2008), but this has not been shown directly in rodents. We have used cyto- and chemoarchitectonic markers, topographic mapping of receptive fields and pathway tracing to determine in mouse visual cortex whether the lateromedial (LM) and the anterolateral fields (AL), which are the principal targets of primary visual cortex (V1) (Wang and Burkhalter, 2007) specialized for processing nonspatial and spatial visual information (Gao et al, 2006), are distinct areas with diverse connections. We have found that the LM/AL border coincides with a change in type 2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (m2AChR) expression in layer 4 and with the representation of the lower visual field periphery. Our quantitative analyses further show that LM strongly projects to temporal cortex as well as the lateral entorhinal cortex, which has weak spatial selectivity (Hargreaves et al, 2005). In contrast, AL has stronger connections with posterior parietal cortex, motor cortex and the spatially selective medial entorhinal cortex (Haftig et al, 2005). These results support the notion that LM and AL are architecturally, topographically and connectionally distinct areas of extrastriate visual cortex and that they are gateways for ventral and dorsal streams. PMID:21289200

  20. Dorsal clitoral nerve injury following transobturator midurethral sling

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Chailee F; Damitz, Lynn A; Gracely, Richard H; Mintz, Alice C; Zolnoun, Denniz A; Dellon, A Lee

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Transobturator slings can be successfully used to treat stress urinary incontinence and improve quality of life through a minimally invasive vaginal approach. Persistent postoperative pain can occur and pose diagnostic and therapeutic dilemmas. Following a sling procedure, a patient complained of pinching clitoral and perineal pain. Her symptoms of localized clitoral pinching and pain became generalized over the ensuing years, eventually encompassing the entire left vulvovaginal region. Aim The aim of this study was to highlight the clinical utility of conventional pain management techniques used for the evaluation and management of patients with postoperative pain following pelvic surgery. Methods We described a prototypical patient with persistent pain in and around the clitoral region complicating the clinical course of an otherwise successful sling procedure. We specifically discussed the utility of bedside sensory assessment techniques and selective nerve blocks in the evaluation and management of this prototypical patient. Results Neurosensory assessments and a selective nerve block enabled us to trace the source of the patient’s pain to nerve entrapment along the dorsal nerve of the clitoris. We then utilized a nerve stimulator-guided hydrodissection technique to release the scar contracture Conclusion This case demonstrates that the dorsal nerve of the clitoris is vulnerable to injury directly and/or indirectly. Assimilation of a time-honored pain management construct for the evaluation and management of patients’ pain may improve outcomes while obviating the need for invasive surgery. PMID:27729812

  1. A role for dorsal and ventral hippocampus in response learning.

    PubMed

    Fidalgo, C; Conejo, N M; González-Pardo, H; Lazo, P S; Arias, J L

    2012-07-01

    The hippocampus and the striatum have been traditionally considered as part of different and independent memory systems despite growing evidence supporting that both brain regions may even compete for behavioral control in particular learning tasks. In this regard, it has been reported that the hippocampus could be necessary for the use of idiothetic cues in several types of spatial learning tasks. Accordingly, the ventral striatum receives strong anatomical projections from the hippocampus, suggesting a participation of both regions in goal-directed behavior. Our work examined the role of the dorsal and ventral hippocampus on a response learning task. Cytochrome c oxidase (C.O.) quantitative histochemistry was used as an index of brain oxidative metabolism. In addition, determination of C.O. subunit I levels in the hippocampus by western blot analysis was performed to assess the contribution of this subunit to overall C.O. activity. Increased brain oxidative metabolism was found in most of the studied hippocampal subregions when experimental group was compared with a swim control group. However, no differences were found in the amount of C.O. subunit I expressed in the hippocampus by western blot analysis. Our results support that both the dorsal and ventral hippocampus are associated with the use of response strategies during response learning. PMID:22507525

  2. Predicting early reading skills from pre-reading measures of dorsal stream functioning.

    PubMed

    Kevan, Alison; Pammer, Kristen

    2009-12-01

    It is well documented that good reading skills may be dependent upon adequate dorsal stream processing. However, the degree to which dorsal stream deficits play a causal role in reading failure has not been established. This study used coherent motion and visual frequency doubling to examine whether dorsal stream sensitivity measured before the commencement of formal reading instruction can predict emerging literacy skills in Grade 1. We demonstrate that over age, IQ and Kindergarten Letter knowledge, pre-reading measures of dorsal stream functioning, as assessed by frequency doubling sensitivity, could predict early literacy skills. These findings suggest that the relationship between dorsal stream functioning and poor reading skills exists before children learn to read, strengthening the claim that dorsal stream deficits may play a contributing role in reading failure.

  3. Agenesis of the dorsal pancreas and its association with pancreatic tumors.

    PubMed

    Sakpal, Sujit Vijay; Sexcius, Lucretia; Babel, Nitin; Chamberlain, Ronald Scott

    2009-05-01

    Morphogenesis of the pancreas is a complex process; nevertheless, congenital anomalies are rare. At embryogenesis, the pancreas develops from the endoderm-lined dorsal and ventral buds of the duodenum. The ventral bud gives rise to the lower head and uncinate process of the pancreas; whereas, the dorsal bud gives rise to the upper head, isthmus, body, and tail of the pancreas. Rarely, developmental failure of the dorsal pancreatic bud at embryogenesis results in the agenesis of the dorsal pancreas--neck, body, and tail. Even rarer is the association of pancreatic tumors with agenesis of the dorsal pancreas. In addition to citing our case, we provide a comprehensive review on agenesis of the dorsal pancreas and its association with pancreatic tumors.

  4. [Palmar and dorsal nail anlage of the small finger. A case report].

    PubMed

    Hahn, P

    1998-07-01

    A congenital malformation of a 18-month-old boy is presented. Palmar and dorsal surface of the small finger presented a complete nail. Active flexion of the PIP and DIP joints was not possible. The small finger displayed typical dorsal skin both dorsally and palmarly. Flexion creases were absent. The palmar nail was removed, and the defect was covered by a cross-finger flap.

  5. Anti-dorsal root ganglion neuron antibody in a case of dorsal root ganglionitis associated with Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Satake, M; Yoshimura, T; Iwaki, T; Yamada, T; Kobayashi, T

    1995-10-01

    We report the case of a 59-year-old woman with primary Sjögren's syndrome who developed hypesthesia, hypalgesia, and neurogenic arthropathy in her lower limbs. Neurological examination and electrophysiological studies indicated involvement of the dorsal root ganglia. The immunohistochemistry of sections of rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) showed that the IgG in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from the patient bound to the neuronal perikarya of small DRG neurons but not to the cerebellum or peripheral nerves. These results, consistent with particular impairment of pain and touch senses, suggest that dorsal root ganglionitis in primary Sjögren's syndrome is mediated by humoral autoimmunity.

  6. Spatial convergence and divergence between cutaneous afferent axons and dorsal horn cells are not constant.

    PubMed

    Brown, P B; Harton, P; Millecchia, R; Lawson, J; Kunjara-Na-Ayudhya, T; Stephens, S; Miller, M A; Hicks, L; Culberson, J

    2000-05-01

    We have proposed a quantitative model of the development of dorsal horn cell receptive fields (RFs) and somatotopic organization (Brown et al. [1997] Somatosens. Motor Res. 14:93-106). One component of that model is a hypothesis that convergence and divergence of connections between low-threshold primary afferent mechanoreceptive axons and dorsal horn cells are invariant over skin location and dorsal horn location. The more limited, and more easily tested, hypothesis that spatial convergence and divergence between cutaneous mechanoreceptors and dorsal horn cell are constant was examined. Spatial divergence is the number of dorsal horn cells whose RFs overlap the RF center of a primary afferent, and spatial convergence is the number of afferent RF centers that lie within the RF of a dorsal horn cell. Innervation density was determined as a function of location on the hindlimb by using peripheral nerve recording and axon counting. A descriptive model of dorsal horn cell receptive fields (Brown et al. [1998] J. Neurophysiol. 31:833-848) was used to simulate RFs of the entire dorsal horn cell population in order to estimate RF area and map scale as a function of location on the hindlimb. Previously reported correlations among innervation density, map scale, and RF size were confirmed. However, these correlations were not linear. The hypothesis that spatial convergence and divergence are constant was rejected. The previously proposed model of development of dorsal horn cell somatotopy and RF geometries must be revised to take variable spatial convergence and divergence into account. PMID:10754502

  7. Crossed receptive field components and crossed dendrites in cat sacrocaudal dorsal horn.

    PubMed

    Gladfelter, W E; Millecchia, R J; Pubols, L M; Sonty, R V; Ritz, L A; Covalt-Dunning, D; Culberson, J; Brown, P B

    1993-10-01

    The hypothesis that sacrocaudal dorsal horn neurons with crossed receptive field components on the tail have dendrites which cross to the contralateral dorsal horn was tested in a combined electrophysiological and morphological study. Dorsal horn cells in the sacrocaudal spinal cord of anesthetized cats were penetrated with horseradish peroxidase-filled microelectrodes. After mapping their low threshold mechanoreceptive fields, cells were iontophoretically injected with horseradish peroxidase. A sample of 16 well-stained cells was obtained in laminae III and IV. Cells with receptive fields crossing the dorsal midline of the tail (n = 8) had somata in the lateral ipsilateral dorsal horn, and some of these cells (5/8) had dendrites which crossed to the lateral contralateral dorsal horn. Cells with receptive fields spanning the ventral midline (n = 2) were located near the center of the fused dorsal horn, and one of these had bilateral dendrites in this region. Cells with receptive fields on the lateral tail, crossing neither the dorsal nor the ventral midline (n = 6), had cell bodies in the middle of the ipsilateral dorsal horn; half had only ipsilateral dendrites, and half had crossed dendritic branches. Although the relationship between cell receptive field (RF) location (RF center, expressed as distance from tips of toes) and mediolateral location of the cell body was statistically significant, the correlation between crossed RF components and crossed dendritic branches was not significant. PMID:8254116

  8. The Presence of Nuclear Cactus in the Early Drosophila Embryo May Extend the Dynamic Range of the Dorsal Gradient

    PubMed Central

    O’Connell, Michael D.; Reeves, Gregory T.

    2015-01-01

    In a developing embryo, the spatial distribution of a signaling molecule, or a morphogen gradient, has been hypothesized to carry positional information to pattern tissues. Recent measurements of morphogen distribution have allowed us to subject this hypothesis to rigorous physical testing. In the early Drosophila embryo, measurements of the morphogen Dorsal, which is a transcription factor responsible for initiating the earliest zygotic patterns along the dorsal-ventral axis, have revealed a gradient that is too narrow to pattern the entire axis. In this study, we use a mathematical model of Dorsal dynamics, fit to experimental data, to determine the ability of the Dorsal gradient to regulate gene expression across the entire dorsal-ventral axis. We found that two assumptions are required for the model to match experimental data in both Dorsal distribution and gene expression patterns. First, we assume that Cactus, an inhibitor that binds to Dorsal and prevents it from entering the nuclei, must itself be present in the nuclei. And second, we assume that fluorescence measurements of Dorsal reflect both free Dorsal and Cactus-bound Dorsal. Our model explains the dynamic behavior of the Dorsal gradient at lateral and dorsal positions of the embryo, the ability of Dorsal to regulate gene expression across the entire dorsal-ventral axis, and the robustness of gene expression to stochastic effects. Our results have a general implication for interpreting fluorescence-based measurements of signaling molecules. PMID:25879657

  9. AAV-Mediated Gene Transfer to Dorsal Root Ganglion.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongwei; Fischer, Gregory; Hogan, Quinn H

    2016-01-01

    Transferring genetic molecules into the peripheral sensory nervous system to manipulate nociceptive pathophysiology is a powerful approach for experimental modulation of sensory signaling and potentially for translation into therapy for chronic pain. This can be efficiently achieved by the use of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) in conjunction with nociceptor-specific regulatory transgene cassettes. Among different routes of delivery, direct injection into the dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) offers the most efficient AAV-mediated gene transfer selectively into the peripheral sensory nervous system. Here, we briefly discuss the advantages and applications of intraganglionic microinjection, and then provide a detailed approach for DRG injection, including a list of the necessary materials and description of a method for performing DRG microinjection experiments. We also discuss our experience with several adeno-associated virus (AAV) options for in vivo transgene expression in DRG neurons.

  10. Purification of Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons from Rat by Immunopanning

    PubMed Central

    Zuchero, J. Bradley

    2015-01-01

    Dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRGs) are sensory neurons that facilitate somatosensation and have been used to study neurite outgrowth, regeneration, and degeneration and PNS and CNS myelination. Studies of DRGs have relied on cell isolation strategies that generally involve extended culture in the presence of antimitotic agents or other cytotoxic treatments that target dividing cells. The surviving cells typically are dependent on serum for growth. Other methods, involving purification of DRGs based on their large size, produce low yield. In contrast, the immunopanning-based method described here for prospective isolation of DRGs from rodents allows for rapid purification in the absence of antimitotic agents and serum. These DRG cultures take place in a defined medium. They are free of Schwann cells and other glia and thus can be used to study the role of glia in the biology of DRG neurons. PMID:25086011

  11. Synaptic inhibition and disinhibition in the spinal dorsal horn.

    PubMed

    Prescott, Steven A

    2015-01-01

    Nociceptive signals originating in the periphery must be transmitted to the brain to evoke pain. Rather than being conveyed unchanged, those signals undergo extensive processing in the spinal dorsal horn. Synaptic inhibition plays a crucial role in that processing. On the one hand, neuropathy and inflammation are associated with reduced spinal inhibition; on the other hand, the hypersensitivity associated with inflammatory and neuropathic pain can be reproduced by blocking inhibition at the spinal level. To understand the consequences of disinhibition and how to therapeutically reverse it, one must understand how synaptic inhibition normally operates. To that end, this chapter will discuss the structure and function of GABAA and glycine receptors together with the role of associated molecules involved in transmitter handling and chloride regulation. Mechanisms by which inhibition modulates cellular excitability will be described. The chapter will end with discussion of how inhibition goes awry under pathological conditions and what the implications are for the treatment of resulting pain. PMID:25744679

  12. Alexander disease with mild dorsal brainstem atrophy and infantile spasms.

    PubMed

    Torisu, Hiroyuki; Yoshikawa, Yoko; Yamaguchi-Takada, Yui; Yano, Tamami; Sanefuji, Masafumi; Ishizaki, Yoshito; Sawaishi, Yukio; Hara, Toshiro

    2013-05-01

    We present the case of a Japanese male infant with Alexander disease who developed infantile spasms at 8 months of age. The patient had a cluster of partial seizures at 4 months of age. He presented with mild general hypotonia and developmental delay. Macrocephaly was not observed. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings fulfilled all MRI-based criteria for the diagnosis of Alexander disease and revealed mild atrophy of the dorsal pons and medulla oblongata with abnormal intensities. DNA analysis disclosed a novel heterozygous missense mutation (c.1154 C>T, p.S385F) in the glial fibrillary acidic protein gene. At 8 months of age, tonic spasms occurred, and electroencephalography (EEG) revealed hypsarrhythmia. Lamotrigine effectively controlled the infantile spasms and improved the abnormal EEG findings. Although most patients with infantile Alexander disease have epilepsy, infantile spasms are rare. This comorbid condition may be associated with the distribution of the brain lesions and the age at onset of Alexander disease.

  13. The dorsal lingual epithelium of Rhinoclemmys pulcherrima incisa (Chelonia, Cryptodira).

    PubMed

    Josef Beisser, Christian; Lemell, Patrick; Weisgram, Josef

    2004-03-01

    This study employed light microscopic (LM), scanning electron microscopic (SEM), and transmission electron microscopic (TEM) methods to provide detailed morphological information on the histological and ultrastructural features of the dorsal tongue epithelium of Rhinoclemmys pulcherrima incisa. SEM revealed columnar papillae laterally, as well as papillae, which tend to have a ridge-like appearance in the center of the tongue. LM and TEM showed three different zones of lingual epithelium: a stratified apical area with serous cells at the top of the papillae, a stratified lateral area with both serous and mucus cells, and an unstratified glandular area consisting of distinct glandular ducts with mucus cells. Comparison with morphological data from other turtles shows that the lingual epithelial structure in R. p. incisa is in accordance with that observed for other generalized omnivores which prefer a terrestrial lifestyle, thus matching the ecological information about this species.

  14. The supracerebellar infratentorial approach to the dorsal midbrain.

    PubMed

    Kalani, M Yashar S; Martirosyan, Nikolay L; Nakaji, Peter; Spetzler, Robert F

    2016-01-01

    The supracerebellar infratentorial approach provides access to the dorsal midbrain, pineal region, and tentorial incisura. This approach can be used with the patient in a sitting, prone, park-bench, or supine position. For a patient with a supple neck and favorable anatomy, we prefer the supine position. The ipsilateral shoulder is elevated, the head turned to the contralateral side, the chin is tucked, and the neck extended toward the floor to open the craniocervical angle for added working room. Care must be taken to place the craniotomy laterally to make use of the ascending angle of the tentorium for ease of access to deep-seated lesions. The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/BZh6ljmE23k .

  15. Properties and plasticity of synaptic inputs to rat dorsal column neurones recorded in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nuñez, A; Buño, W

    2001-09-01

    1. The mechanisms regulating the flow of sensory signals and their modification by synaptic interactions in the dorsal column nuclei are incompletely understood. Therefore, we examined the interactions between EPSPs evoked by stimulation of dorsal column and corticofugal fibres in the dorsal column nuclei cells using an in vitro slice technique. 2. Dorsal column EPSPs had briefer durations at depolarised membrane potentials than corticofugal EPSPs. Superfusion of the NMDA receptor antagonist 2D(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (AP5) did not modify dorsal column EPSPs but reduced corticofugal EPSPs. Application of the AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX) abolished both dorsal column and corticofugal EPSPs in cells held at the resting potential. Therefore, dorsal column EPSPs were mediated by non-NMDA receptors but corticofugal EPSPs revealed both non-NMDA- and NMDA-dependent components. 3. Paired-pulse stimulation of dorsal column fibres elicited a depression of the second EPSP at pulse intervals of < 50 ms; however, paired-pulse stimulation of corticofugal fibres evoked facilitation of the second EPSP at pulse intervals of < 30 ms. When stimulation of the corticofugal fibres preceded stimulation of the dorsal column fibres, facilitation of the dorsal column EPSP was observed at pulse intervals of < 100 ms. This facilitation was blocked at hyperpolarised membrane potentials or in the presence of AP5, suggesting activation of NMDA receptors. There was a depression of corticofugal EPSPs by previous dorsal column stimulation. 4. Dorsal column EPSPs were gradually depressed during stimulation with barrages at frequencies of > 10 Hz, while corticofugal EPSPs were facilitated and summated at frequencies > 30 Hz. Hyperpolarisation and application of AP5 prevented the facilitation of corticofugal EPSPs. High frequency stimulation of the corticofugal input elicited a short-lasting AP5-sensitive facilitation of both corticofugal and

  16. EVALUATION OF HYPERALGESIA AND HISTOLOGICAL CHANGES OF DORSAL ROOT GANGLION INDUCED BY NUCLEUS PULPOSUS

    PubMed Central

    Grava, André Luiz de Souza; Ferrari, Luiz Fernando; Parada, Carlos Amílcar; Defino, Helton Luiz Aparecido

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the hyperalgesia and histological abnormalities induced by contact between the dorsal root ganglion and the nucleus pulposus. Methods: Twenty Wistar rats were used, divided into two experimental groups. In one of the groups, a fragment of autologous nucleus pulposus was removed from the sacrococcygeal region and deposited on the L5 dorsal root ganglia. In the other group (control), a fragment of adipose tissue was deposited on the L5 dorsal root ganglia. Mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia was evaluated on the third day and the first, third, fifth and seventh weeks after the operation. A L5 dorsal root ganglion was removed in the first, third, fifth and seventh weeks after the operation for histological study using HE staining and histochemical study using specific labeling for iNOS. Results: Higher intensity of mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia was observed in the group of animals in which the nucleus pulposus was placed in contact with the dorsal root ganglion. In this group, the histological study showed abnormalities of the dorsal root ganglion tissue, characterized by an inflammatory process and axonal degeneration. The histopathological abnormalities of the dorsal root ganglion tissue presented increasing intensity with increasing length of observation, and there was a correlation with maintenance of the hyperalgesia observed in the behavioral assessment. Immunohistochemistry using specific labeling for iNOS in the group of animals in which the nucleus pulposus was placed in contact with the dorsal root ganglion showed higher expression of this enzyme in the nuclei of the inflammatory cells (glial cells) surrounding the neurons. Conclusion: Contact between the nucleus pulposus and the dorsal root ganglion induced mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia and caused histological abnormalities in the dorsal root ganglion components. These abnormalities were characterized by an inflammatory and degenerative process in the structures of the dorsal root

  17. Study comparing the applicability of dorsal lumbotomy in older children

    PubMed Central

    Cloutier, Jonathan; Haidar, Nadim; Rompre-Deschenes, Marie-Pier; Grimard, Maryse; Bolduc, Stéphane

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Dismembered pyeloplasty through dorsal lumbotomy to correct ureteropelvic junction obstruction is mainly successfully performed in children under 5 years old for technical reasons. We compared children who underwent dorsal lumbotomy by age group (<5 vs. ≥5 years old) to determine if the surgical success and long-term results were comparable. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 134 children undergoing a pyeloplasty. Group 1 consisted of children <5 years old (n = 90) and Group 2 consisted of children ≥5 years old. Patients’ characteristics, as well as hospital stay, narcotic use, radiologic follow-up and success rate, were compared. Success was defined by absence of symptoms and ≥50% reduction in renal pelvis anteroposterior diameter and/or scintigraphic normalization of the drainage T1/2 when obtained. Univariate analysis was performed to compare the groups. Results: Mean age (years) and weight (kg) at surgery for Groups 1 and 2 were 1/8 kg and 11/35 kg, respectively. Mean operative time was 98 minutes versus 120 minutes, respectively; mean hospital stay was 2.5 days for both groups and analgesia requirement was 50% higher in Group 2. A Pippi-Salle stent was used in 90% (n = 120) of cases. Mean follow-up was 26 months and the success rate was 89% and 90% for Groups 1 and 2, respectively. Conclusion: Our study showed comparable success rates. We can infer that, as a technique, dismembered pyeloplasty is effective and safe in the younger and older children. PMID:21539770

  18. Selective resection of dorsal nerves of penis for premature ejaculation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, G-X; Yu, L-P; Bai, W-J; Wang, X-F

    2012-12-01

    Premature ejaculation (PE) is one of the most prevalent male sexual dysfunctions. Selective resection of the dorsal nerve (SRDN) of penis has recently been used for the treatment of PE and has shown some efficacy. To further clarify the efficacy and safety of SRDN on PE, we performed a preliminary, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical observational study. Persons with the complaints of rapid ejaculation, asking for circumcision because of redundant foreskin, intravaginal ejaculation latency time (IELT) within 2 min, not responding to antidepressant medication or disliking oral medication were randomly enrolled in two groups. From April 2007 to August 2010, a total of 101 eligible persons were enrolled, 40 of them received SRDN which dorsal nerves of the penis were selectively resected, and those (n = 61) enrolled in the control group were circumcised only. IELT and the Brief Male Sexual Function Inventory (BMSFI) questionnaire were implemented pre- and post-operatively for the evaluation of the effect and safety of the surgery. There are no statistically significant differences in the baseline data including mean ages, mean IELTs, perceived control abilities and the BMSFI mean scores between the two groups. With regard to the post-operative data of the surgery, both IELTs and perceived control abilities were significantly increased after SRDN (1.1 ± 0.9 min vs. 3.8 ± 3.1 min for pre- and post-operative IELT, respectively, p < 0.01),whereas the post-operative results were not significantly improved for the control group (1.2 ± 0.7 min vs. 1.5 ± 1.1 min, p > 0.05). Also, there were no statistically significant differences both in BMSFI composite and subscale scores between the two groups after surgery. Hence, we conclude that SRDN is effective in delaying ejaculation and improving ejaculatory control, whereas erectile function is not affected. The results imply that SRDN may be an alternative method for the treatment of PE for some patients.

  19. Bilateral dorsal funicular lesions alter sensorimotor behaviour in rats.

    PubMed

    Kanagal, Srikanth G; Muir, Gillian D

    2007-06-01

    Spinal cord injury models often involve damage to the corticospinal tract (CST) because of the functional importance of this pathway in humans. In rats, the main component of the CST travels in the dorsal funiculus and cannot be damaged without concurrent damage to overlying sensory fibers. To distinguish deficits due to the loss of CST from those due to sensory fiber damage, we bilaterally axotomized ascending sensory fibers in dorsal columns without CST damage in one group of rats (ascending sensory pathways, ASP) and compared the results to a group with damage to ascending sensory fibers with CST damage (ASP+CST). We assessed the ability of rats to perform a skilled reaching task and to walk over a horizontal ladder. We also measured the forces exerted on the ground (ground reaction forces, GRF) and limb contact patterns produced during overground locomotion. After ASP lesions alone, endpoint measurements of reaching success and footslip errors on the ladder showed transitory impairments, although detailed analysis revealed persistent deficits in skilled forelimb movements. ASP+CST lesions caused persistent deficits in reaching success and ladder footslips throughout the 8-week post-surgical period. Measurement of GRFs and limb timing during overground locomotion revealed differences in both groups at 8 weeks post-surgery compared to pre-surgical values, but no differences between ASP and ASP+CST groups. These results emphasize the normal contribution of both ascending sensory axons and CST axons during skilled limb movements and support a role for ascending sensory information, but not descending CST input, during overground locomotion. These results also illustrate the value of using sensitive methods to reveal detailed behavioural changes after spinal injury. PMID:17451687

  20. Behavioral and neurochemical effects of repeated MDMA administration during late adolescence in the rat.

    PubMed

    Cox, Brittney M; Shah, Mrudang M; Cichon, Teri; Tancer, Manuel E; Galloway, Matthew P; Thomas, David M; Perrine, Shane A

    2014-01-01

    Adolescents and young adults disproportionately abuse 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; 'Ecstasy'); however, since most MDMA research has concentrated on adults, the effects of MDMA on the developing brain remain obscure. Therefore, we evaluated place conditioning to MDMA (or saline) during late adolescence and assessed anxiety-like behavior and monoamine levels during abstinence. Rats were conditioned to associate 5 or 10mg/kg MDMA or saline with contextual cues over 4 twice-daily sessions. Five days after conditioning, anxiety-like behavior was examined with the open field test and brain tissue was collected to assess serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) and its metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) in the dorsal raphe, amygdala, and hippocampus by high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). In a separate group of rats, anxiety-like and avoidant behaviors were measured using the light-dark box test under similar experimental conditions. MDMA conditioning caused a place aversion at 10, but not at 5, mg/kg, as well as increased anxiety-like behavior in the open field and avoidant behavior in light-dark box test at the same dose. Additionally, 10mg/kg MDMA decreased 5-HT in the dorsal raphe, increased 5-HT and 5-HIAA in the amygdala, and did not alter levels in the hippocampus. Overall, we show that repeated high (10mg/kg), but not low (5mg/kg), dose MDMA during late adolescence in rats increases anxiety-like and avoidant behaviors, accompanied by region-specific alterations in 5-HT levels during abstinence. These results suggest that MDMA causes a region-specific dysregulation of the serotonin system during adolescence that may contribute to maladaptive behavior.

  1. Postnatal treadmill exercise attenuates prenatal stress-induced apoptosis through enhancing serotonin expression in aged-offspring rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Woon; Ji, Eun-Sang; Kim, Tae-Wook; Lee, Sang-Won; Lee, Choong-Yeol; Lee, Sam-Jun

    2015-02-01

    Maternal stress during pregnancy affects negative impact on health of offspring. In the present study, we compared the effects of maternal treadmill exercise and offspring treadmill exercise on prenatal stress-induced apoptosis and serotonin expression in offspring. Stress to the pregnant rats was induced by exposure of maternal rats to the hunting dog in an enclosed room. Exposure time was 10 min, three times per day, with a 1-h interval between exposures. This regimen was maintained from the seventh day of gestation until delivery. The pregnant rats in the exercise group were forced to run on a motorized tread-mill for 30 min once a day, started 7 days after pregnancy until delivery. The offspring in the exercise group were forced to run on a motorized treadmill for 30 min once a day, started 4 weeks after birth for 4 weeks. In the present results, offspring exposed to prenatal stress exhibited lower Bcl-2 level and higher Bax level in the hippocampus, lower 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) expression in the dorsal raphe, and higher c-Fos expression in the locus coeruleus compared to age-matched control rats. Treadmill exercise of offspring suppressed Bax expression and enhanced Bcl-2 expression in the hippocampus, increased 5-HT and TPH expression in the dorsal raphe, and enhanced c-Fos expression in the locus coeruleus of offspring. Tread-mill exercise of offspring suppressed prenatal stress-induced apoptosis and normalized prenatal stress-induced alterations in serotonin synthesis and neuronal activation. However maternal treadmill exercise during pregnancy exerted no significant effect on offspring. PMID:25830139

  2. Early post-natal administration of 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine destroys 5-HT neurons but does not affect spatial memory.

    PubMed

    Volpe, B T; Hendrix, C S; Park, D H; Towle, A C; Davis, H P

    1992-09-01

    The neurotransmitter serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) may play an important role in learning and memory. It has also been suggested that 5-HT abnormalities may mediate some aspects of the cognitive disorders associated with Korsakoff syndrome and Alzheimer's Disease. The effect of intracisternally applied 5-HT neurotoxin, 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT) on learning and memory in rodents was evaluated. Three-day-old rat pups were treated with pargyline (40 mg/kg, i.p.) followed by 5,7-DHT (50 micrograms/pup) and returned to the dam for a month. At 75 days of age, rats were tested on a learning set problem in the Morris water maze for 5 days followed by 30 days of testing in a 12-arm radial maze with 8 of the 12 arms baited. In the Morris water maze, the latency to locate the hidden platform did not differ significantly for 5,7-DHT treated and control rats (F less than 1.0). Similarly, 5,7-DHT treated rats performed comparably to controls on the 12-arm radial maze (F less than 1.0). At 106 days of age the assay of tryptophan hydroxylase activity in the dorsal raphe nuclei and hippocampus showed marked reduction (86%, 78%, respectively) in 5,7-DHT treated animals compared to vehicle injected controls. Immunocytochemical analysis was consistent with the biochemical results. In 5,7-DHT treated animals there was severe loss of neurons that bind 5-HT antibody in the dorsal and medial raphe nuclei.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Hand Path Priming in Manual Obstacle Avoidance: Rapid Decay of Dorsal Stream Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jax, Steven A.; Rosenbaum, David A.

    2009-01-01

    The dorsal, action-related, visual stream has been thought to have little or no memory. This hypothesis has seemed credible because functions related to the dorsal stream have been generally unsusceptible to priming from previous experience. Tests of this claim have yielded inconsistent results, however. We argue that these inconsistencies may be…

  4. Ampullary carcinoma in a patient with agenesis of the dorsal pancreas: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Jitendra H; Yadav, Amitabh; Nundy, Samiran

    2015-04-01

    The most common congenital anomaly of the pancreas is pancreatic divisum (Tadokoro et al. in Anat Res Int 2011:1-7, 2011). Agenesis of the dorsal pancreas is extremely rare (Schnedl et al. in World J Gastroenterol 15(3):376-377, 2009). We are reporting a case of agenesis of dorsal pancreas presented with ampullary carcinoma.

  5. Investigating the Functional Integrity of the Dorsal Visual Pathway in Autism and Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pellicano, Elizabeth; Gibson, Lisa Y.

    2008-01-01

    Numerous reports of elevated global motion thresholds across a variety of neurodevelopmental disorders have prompted researchers to suggest that abnormalities in global motion perception are a result of a general deficiency in the dorsal visual pathway. To test this hypothesis, we assessed the integrity of the dorsal visual pathway at lower…

  6. Sensory and spinal inhibitory dorsal midline crossing is independent of Robo3.

    PubMed

    Comer, John D; Pan, Fong Cheng; Willet, Spencer G; Haldipur, Parthiv; Millen, Kathleen J; Wright, Christopher V E; Kaltschmidt, Julia A

    2015-01-01

    Commissural neurons project across the midline at all levels of the central nervous system (CNS), providing bilateral communication critical for the coordination of motor activity and sensory perception. Midline crossing at the spinal ventral midline has been extensively studied and has revealed that multiple developmental lineages contribute to this commissural neuron population. Ventral midline crossing occurs in a manner dependent on Robo3 regulation of Robo/Slit signaling and the ventral commissure is absent in the spinal cord and hindbrain of Robo3 mutants. Midline crossing in the spinal cord is not limited to the ventral midline, however. While prior anatomical studies provide evidence that commissural axons also cross the midline dorsally, little is known of the genetic and molecular properties of dorsally-crossing neurons or of the mechanisms that regulate dorsal midline crossing. In this study, we describe a commissural neuron population that crosses the spinal dorsal midline during the last quarter of embryogenesis in discrete fiber bundles present throughout the rostrocaudal extent of the spinal cord. Using immunohistochemistry, neurotracing, and mouse genetics, we show that this commissural neuron population includes spinal inhibitory neurons and sensory nociceptors. While the floor plate and roof plate are dispensable for dorsal midline crossing, we show that this population depends on Robo/Slit signaling yet crosses the dorsal midline in a Robo3-independent manner. The dorsally-crossing commissural neuron population we describe suggests a substrate circuitry for pain processing in the dorsal spinal cord.

  7. Sensory and spinal inhibitory dorsal midline crossing is independent of Robo3.

    PubMed

    Comer, John D; Pan, Fong Cheng; Willet, Spencer G; Haldipur, Parthiv; Millen, Kathleen J; Wright, Christopher V E; Kaltschmidt, Julia A

    2015-01-01

    Commissural neurons project across the midline at all levels of the central nervous system (CNS), providing bilateral communication critical for the coordination of motor activity and sensory perception. Midline crossing at the spinal ventral midline has been extensively studied and has revealed that multiple developmental lineages contribute to this commissural neuron population. Ventral midline crossing occurs in a manner dependent on Robo3 regulation of Robo/Slit signaling and the ventral commissure is absent in the spinal cord and hindbrain of Robo3 mutants. Midline crossing in the spinal cord is not limited to the ventral midline, however. While prior anatomical studies provide evidence that commissural axons also cross the midline dorsally, little is known of the genetic and molecular properties of dorsally-crossing neurons or of the mechanisms that regulate dorsal midline crossing. In this study, we describe a commissural neuron population that crosses the spinal dorsal midline during the last quarter of embryogenesis in discrete fiber bundles present throughout the rostrocaudal extent of the spinal cord. Using immunohistochemistry, neurotracing, and mouse genetics, we show that this commissural neuron population includes spinal inhibitory neurons and sensory nociceptors. While the floor plate and roof plate are dispensable for dorsal midline crossing, we show that this population depends on Robo/Slit signaling yet crosses the dorsal midline in a Robo3-independent manner. The dorsally-crossing commissural neuron population we describe suggests a substrate circuitry for pain processing in the dorsal spinal cord. PMID:26257608

  8. Role of the right dorsal anterior insula in the urge to tic in Tourette syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tinaz, Sule; Malone, Patrick; Hallett, Mark; Horovitz, Silvina G.

    2016-01-01

    Background The mid-posterior part of the insula is involved in processing bodily sensations and urges and is activated during tic generation in Tourette syndrome. The dorsal anterior part of the insula, on the other hand, integrates sensory and emotional information with cognitive valuation, and is implicated in interoception. The right dorsal anterior insula also participates in urge suppression in healthy subjects. The current study examined the role of the right dorsal anterior insula in the urge to tic in Tourette syndrome. Methods Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 13 adult Tourette patients and 13 matched controls. The role of the right dorsal anterior insula within the urge-tic network was investigated using graph theory-based neural network analysis. The functional connectivity of the right dorsal anterior insula was also correlated with urge and tic severity. Results Even though the patients did not exhibit any overt tics, the right dorsal anterior insula demonstrated higher connectivity, especially with the frontostriatal nodes of the urge-tic network in patients compared to controls. The functional connectivity between the right dorsal anterior insula and bilateral supplementary motor area also correlated positively with urge severity in patients. Conclusions These results suggest that the right dorsal anterior insula is part of the urge-tic network and could influence the urge- and tic-related cortico-striato-thalamic regions even during rest in Tourette syndrome. It might be responsible for heightened awareness of bodily sensations generating premonitory urges in Tourette syndrome. PMID:25855089

  9. Chronic effects of antidepressants on serotonin release in rat raphe slice cultures: high potency of milnacipran in the augmentation of serotonin release.

    PubMed

    Nagayasu, Kazuki; Kitaichi, Maiko; Nishitani, Naoya; Asaoka, Nozomi; Shirakawa, Hisashi; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Kaneko, Shuji

    2013-11-01

    Most clinically-used antidepressants acutely increase monoamine levels in synaptic clefts, while their therapeutic effects often require several weeks of administration. Slow neuroadaptive changes in serotonergic neurons are considered to underlie this delayed onset of beneficial actions. Recently, we reported that sustained exposure of rat organotypic raphe slice cultures containing abundant serotonergic neurons to selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitors (citalopram, fluoxetine and paroxetine) caused the augmentation of exocytotic serotonin release. However, the ability of other classes of antidepressants to evoke a similar outcome has not been clarified. In this study, we investigated the sustained actions of two tricyclic antidepressants (imipramine and desipramine), one tetracyclic antidepressant (mianserin), three 5-HT and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (milnacipran, duloxetine and venlafaxine) and one noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressant (mirtazapine) on serotonin release in the slice cultures. For seven of nine antidepressants, sustained exposure to the agents at concentrations of 0.1-100 μ m augmented the level of increase in extracellular serotonin. The rank order of their potency was as follows: milnacipran>duloxetine>citalopram>venlafaxine>imipramine>fluoxetine>desipramine. Neither mirtazapine nor mianserin caused any augmentation. The highest augmentation by sustained exposure to milnacipran was partially attenuated by an α 1-adrenoceptor antagonist, benoxathian, while the duloxetine-, venlafaxine- and citalopram-mediated increases were not affected. These results suggest that inhibition of the 5-HT transporter is required for the enhancement of serotonin release. Furthermore, the potent augmentation by milnacipran is apparently due to the accompanied activation of the α 1-adrenoceptor.

  10. miR-15a and miR-16 regulate serotonin transporter expression in human placental and rat brain raphe cells.

    PubMed

    Moya, Pablo R; Wendland, Jens R; Salemme, Jennifer; Fried, Ruby L; Murphy, Dennis L

    2013-04-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) is a key regulatory molecule in serotonergic transmission implicated in numerous biological processes relevant to human disorders. Recently, it was shown that SERT expression is controlled by miR-16 in mouse brain. Here, we show that SERT expression is regulated additionally by miR-15a as well as miR-16 in human and rat tissues. This post-transcriptional regulation was observed and characterized in reporter assays and likewise when endogenous SERT expression was evaluated in human placental choriocarcinoma JAR cells and rat brain raphe RN46A cells - two cell lines that endogenously express SERT. Similar effects for miR-16 to those of miR-15a were found in both human and rat cell lines. The effects of miR-15a and miR-16 were comparable in extent to those originally reported for miR-16 in mice. These findings represent a novel layer of complexity for SERT expression regulation exerted by the mir-15a/16 cluster, whose genes are adjacently located at human chromosome 13q14.3.

  11. The dorsal prefrontal and dorsal anterior cingulate cortices exert complementary network signatures during encoding and retrieval in associative memory.

    PubMed

    Woodcock, Eric A; White, Richard; Diwadkar, Vaibhav A

    2015-09-01

    Cognitive control includes processes that facilitate execution of effortful cognitive tasks, including associative memory. Regions implicated in cognitive control during associative memory include the dorsal prefrontal (dPFC) and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC). Here we investigated the relative degrees of network-related interactions originating in the dPFC and dACC during oscillating phases of associative memory: encoding and cued retrieval. Volunteers completed an established object-location associative memory paradigm during fMRI. Psychophysiological interactions modeled modulatory network interactions from the dPFC and dACC during memory encoding and retrieval. Results were evaluated in second level analyses of variance with seed region and memory process as factors. Each seed exerted differentiable modulatory effects during encoding and retrieval. The dACC exhibited greater modulation (than the dPFC) on the fusiform and parahippocampal gyrus during encoding, while the dPFC exhibited greater modulation (than the dACC) on the fusiform, hippocampus, dPFC and basal ganglia. During retrieval, the dPFC exhibited greater modulation (than the dACC) on the parahippocampal gyrus, hippocampus, superior parietal lobule, and dPFC. The most notable finding was a seed by process interaction indicating that the dACC and the dPFC exerted complementary modulatory control on the hippocampus during each of the associative memory processes. These results provide evidence for differentiable, yet complementary, control-related modulation by the dACC and dPFC, while establishing the primacy of dPFC in exerting network control during both associative memory phases. Our approach and findings are relevant for understanding basic processes in human memory and psychiatric disorders that impact associative memory-related networks. PMID:25960314

  12. Trigeminal and spinal dorsal horn (dis)continuity and avian evolution.

    PubMed

    Wild, J Martin; Krützfeldt, Nils O E; Altshuler, Douglas L

    2010-01-01

    The organization of the dorsal horn in the avian spinal cord differs in different species. For instance, in pigeons and doves, cranes, cuckoos, songbirds, ratites and tinamous, the dorsal horn is organized in laminar fashion, such that laminae II and III are sandwiched between lamina I dorsally and lamina IV ventrally, as they are in mammals and other nonavian amniotes. In most other avian species, including chickens, however, the organization of the dorsal