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Sample records for 5-hydroxytryptamine modulates migration

  1. Modulation of the hypoxic sensory response of the carotid body by 5-hydroxytryptamine: role of the 5-HT2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Jacono, F J; Peng, Y-J; Kumar, G K; Prabhakar, N R

    2005-02-15

    Previous studies have shown that glomus cells of the carotid body express 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT). The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of 5-HT on the hypoxic sensory response (HSR) of the carotid body. Sensory activity was recorded from multi-fiber (n=16) and single-fiber (n=8) preparations of ex vivo carotid bodies harvested from anesthetized, adult rats. 5-HT (3 microM) had no significant effect on the magnitude or on the onset of the HSR. However, 5-HT consistently prolonged the time necessary for the sensory activity to return to baseline following the termination of the hypoxic challenge. Ketanserin (40 microM), a 5-HT2 receptor antagonist completely prevented 5-HT-induced prolongation of the HSR, whereas had no effect on the control HSR (onset, magnitude, and time for decay without 5-HT). Carotid bodies expressed 5-HT, but hypoxia did not facilitate 5-HT release. These observations suggest that 5-HT is not critical for the HSR of the rat carotid body, but it modulates the dynamics of the HSR via its action on 5-HT2 receptors.

  2. 5-Hydroxytryptamine modulates cytokine and chemokine production in LPS-primed human monocytes via stimulation of different 5-HTR subtypes.

    PubMed

    Dürk, Thorsten; Panther, Elisabeth; Müller, Tobias; Sorichter, Stephan; Ferrari, Davide; Pizzirani, Cinzia; Di Virgilio, Francesco; Myrtek, Daniel; Norgauer, Johannes; Idzko, Marco

    2005-05-01

    The neurotransmitter 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), commonly known as serotonin, is released at peripheral sites from activated enterochromaffin cells, mast cells and platelets. In this study we analyzed the biological activity and intracellular signaling of 5-HT in human monocytes. By reverse transcription (RT) and PCR, messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of 5-HT receptor 1E (5-HTR(1E)), 5-HTR(2A), 5-HTR(3), 5-HTR(4) and 5-HTR(7) could be revealed. Functional studies showed that 5-HT modulates the release of IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-8/CXCL8, IL-12p40 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), while it has no effect on the production of IL-18 and IFN-gamma in LPS-stimulated human blood monocytes. Moreover, RT and PCR revealed that 5-HT modulated mRNA levels of IL-6 and IL-8/CXCL8, but did not influence mRNA levels of IL-1beta and TNF-alpha. Pharmacological studies with isotype-selective receptor agonists allowed us to show that 5-HTR(3) subtype up-regulates the LPS-induced production of IL-1beta, IL-6 and IL-8/CXCL8, while it was not involved in TNF-alpha and IL-12p40 secretion. Furthermore, activation of the G(s)-coupled 5-HTR(4) and 5-HTR(7) subtypes increased intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) and secretion of IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-12p40 and IL-8/CXCL8, while, on the contrary, it inhibited LPS-induced TNF-alpha release. Interestingly, 5-HTR(1) and 5-HTR(2) agonists did not modulate the LPS-induced cytokine production in human monocytes. Our results point to a new role for 5-HT in inflammation by modulating cytokine production in monocytes via activation of 5-HTR(3), 5-HTR(4) and 5-HTR(7) subtypes.

  3. Neuropharmacology of 5-hydroxytryptamine

    PubMed Central

    Richard Green, A

    2006-01-01

    This review outlines the history of our knowledge of the neuropharmacology of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; serotonin), focusing primarily on the work of U.K. scientists. The existence of a vasoconstrictive substance in the blood has been known for over 135 years. The substance was named serotonin and finally identified as 5-HT in 1949. The presence of 5-HT in the brain was reported by Gaddum in 1954 and it was Gaddum who also demonstrated that the action of 5-HT (in the gut) was antagonised by the potent hallucinogen lysergic acid diethylamide. This provoked the notion that 5-HT played a pivotal role in the control of mood and subsequent investigations have generally confirmed this hypothesis. Over the last 50 years a good understanding has been gained of the mechanisms involved in control of the storage, synthesis and degradation of 5-HT in the brain. Knowledge has also been gained on control of the functional activity of this monoamine, often by the use of behavioural models. A considerable literature also now exists on the mechanisms by which many of the drugs used to treat psychiatric illness alter the functional activity of 5-HT, particularly the drugs used to treat depression. Over the last 20 years the number of identified 5-HT receptor subtypes has increased from 2 to 14, or possibly more. A major challenge now is to utilise this knowledge to develop receptor-specific drugs and use the information gained to better treat central nervous system disorders. PMID:16402098

  4. Chemocentric informatics approach to drug discovery: identification and experimental validation of selective estrogen receptor modulators as ligands of 5-hydroxytryptamine-6 receptors and as potential cognition enhancers.

    PubMed

    Hajjo, Rima; Setola, Vincent; Roth, Bryan L; Tropsha, Alexander

    2012-06-28

    We have devised a chemocentric informatics methodology for drug discovery integrating independent approaches to mining biomolecular databases. As a proof of concept, we have searched for novel putative cognition enhancers. First, we generated Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) models of compounds binding to 5-hydroxytryptamine-6 receptor (5-HT(6)R), a known target for cognition enhancers, and employed these models for virtual screening to identify putative 5-HT(6)R actives. Second, we queried chemogenomics data from the Connectivity Map ( http://www.broad.mit.edu/cmap/ ) with the gene expression profile signatures of Alzheimer's disease patients to identify compounds putatively linked to the disease. Thirteen common hits were tested in 5-HT(6)R radioligand binding assays and ten were confirmed as actives. Four of them were known selective estrogen receptor modulators that were never reported as 5-HT(6)R ligands. Furthermore, nine of the confirmed actives were reported elsewhere to have memory-enhancing effects. The approaches discussed herein can be used broadly to identify novel drug-target-disease associations.

  5. 5-Hydroxytryptamine 1A receptors in the dorsomedial hypothalamus connected to dorsal raphe nucleus inputs modulate defensive behaviours and mediate innate fear-induced antinociception.

    PubMed

    Biagioni, Audrey Franceschi; de Oliveira, Rithiele Cristina; de Oliveira, Ricardo; da Silva, Juliana Almeida; dos Anjos-Garcia, Tayllon; Roncon, Camila Marroni; Corrado, Alexandre Pinto; Zangrossi, Hélio; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2016-03-01

    The dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) is an important brainstem source of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), and 5-HT plays a key role in the regulation of panic attacks. The aim of the present study was to determine whether 5-HT1A receptor-containing neurons in the medial hypothalamus (MH) receive neural projections from DRN and to then determine the role of this neural substrate in defensive responses. The neurotracer biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) was iontophoretically microinjected into the DRN, and immunohistochemical approaches were then used to identify 5HT1A receptor-labelled neurons in the MH. Moreover, the effects of pre-treatment of the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) with 8-OH-DPAT and WAY-100635, a 5-HT1A receptor agonist and antagonist, respectively, followed by local microinjections of bicuculline, a GABAA receptor antagonist, were investigated. We found that there are many projections from the DRN to the perifornical lateral hypothalamus (PeFLH) but also to DMH and ventromedial (VMH) nuclei, reaching 5HT1A receptor-labelled perikarya. DMH GABAA receptor blockade elicited defensive responses that were followed by antinociception. DMH treatment with 8-OH-DPAT decreased escape responses, which strongly suggests that the 5-HT1A receptor modulates the defensive responses. However, DMH treatment with WAY-100635 failed to alter bicuculline-induced defensive responses, suggesting that 5-HT exerts a phasic influence on 5-HT1A DMH neurons. The activation of the inhibitory 5-HT1A receptor had no effect on antinociception. However, blockade of the 5-HT1A receptor decreased fear-induced antinociception. The present data suggest that the ascending pathways from the DRN to the DMH modulate panic-like defensive behaviours and mediate antinociceptive phenomenon by recruiting 5-HT1A receptor in the MH.

  6. Attenuation of hyperalgesia responses via the modulation of 5-hydroxytryptamine signalings in the rostral ventromedial medulla and spinal cord in a 6-hydroxydopamine-induced rat model of Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chen-Tao; Mao, Cheng-Jie; Zhang, Xiao-Qi; Zhang, Cai-Yi; Lv, Dong-Jun; Yang, Ya-Ping; Xia, Kai-Lin; Liu, Jun-Yi; Wang, Fen; Hu, Li-Fang; Xu, Guang-Yin

    2017-01-01

    Background Although pain is one of the most distressing non-motor symptoms among patients with Parkinson’s disease, the underlying mechanisms of pain in Parkinson’s disease remain elusive. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) in the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) and spinal cord in pain sensory abnormalities in a 6-hydroxydopamine-treated rat model of Parkinson’s disease. Methods The rotarod test was used to evaluate motor function. The radiant heat test and von Frey test were conducted to evaluate thermal and mechanical pain thresholds, respectively. Immunofluorescence was used to examine 5-hydroxytryptamine neurons and fibers in the rostral ventromedial medulla and spinal cord. High-performance liquid chromatography was used to determine 5-hydroxytryptamine and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid levels. Results The duration of running time on the rotarod test was significantly reduced in 6-hydroxydopamine-treated rats. Nociceptive thresholds of both mechanical and heat pain were reduced compared to sham-treated rats. In addition to the degeneration of cell bodies and fibers in the substantia nigra pars compacta, the number of rostral ventromedial medulla 5-hydroxytryptamine neurons and 5-hydroxytryptamine fibers in the spinal dorsal horn was dramatically decreased. 5-Hydroxytryptamine concentrations in both the rostral ventromedial medulla and spinal cord were reduced. Furthermore, the administration of citalopram significantly attenuated pain hypersensitivity. Interestingly, Intra-rostral ventromedial medulla (intra-RVM) microinjection of 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine partially reversed pain hypersensitivity of 6-hydroxydopamine-treated rats. Conclusions These results suggest that the decreased 5-hydroxytryptamine contents in the rostral ventromedial medulla and spinal dorsal horn may be involved in hyperalgesia in the 6-hydroxydopamine-induced rat model of Parkinson’s disease. PMID:28326933

  7. Fluvoxamine, a specific 5-hydroxytryptamine uptake inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Claassen, V; Davies, J E; Hertting, G; Placheta, P

    1977-08-01

    1. On the basis of both in vitro and in vivo experiments fluvoxamine has been characterized as a potential anti-depressant drug with almost exclusively 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) uptake inhibiting properties. 2. Fluvoxamine is effective in inhibiting 5-ht uptake by blood platelets and brain synaptosomes. Due to inhibition of the membrane pump the compound prevents 5-HT depletion by the tyramine-derivatives H 75/12 and H 77/77. As a result of the interference with the neuronal re-uptake mechanism for 5-HT, fluvoxamine produces a decreased 5-HT turnover in the brain. Effects of 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) are potentiated in mice and in combination with pargyline, fluvoxamine induces 5-HT-like behavioural effects. 3. In contrast to tricyclic antidepressants, noradrenaline uptake processes are either unaffected or only slightly inhibited by fluvoxamine. The noradrenaline depleting effects of tyramine derivates are not influenced by fluvoxamine. Reserpine effects, such as ptosis are affected only at very high doses of the test compound. The antagonism by fluvoxamine of the reserpine-induced lowering of the pentamethylenetetrazole convulsive threshold can be regarded as due to an effect upon 5-HT uptake. In contrast to the effects of desmethylimipramine and imipramine, no stimulatory effects are found in rats when rapidly acting reserpine-like compounds are given following a dose of fluvoxamine.

  8. Fluvoxamine, a specific 5-hydroxytryptamine uptake inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Claassen, V; Davies, J E; Hertting, G; Placheta, P

    1977-01-01

    1. On the basis of both in vitro and in vivo experiments fluvoxamine has been characterized as a potential anti-depressant drug with almost exclusively 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) uptake inhibiting properties. 2. Fluvoxamine is effective in inhibiting 5-ht uptake by blood platelets and brain synaptosomes. Due to inhibition of the membrane pump the compound prevents 5-HT depletion by the tyramine-derivatives H 75/12 and H 77/77. As a result of the interference with the neuronal re-uptake mechanism for 5-HT, fluvoxamine produces a decreased 5-HT turnover in the brain. Effects of 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) are potentiated in mice and in combination with pargyline, fluvoxamine induces 5-HT-like behavioural effects. 3. In contrast to tricyclic antidepressants, noradrenaline uptake processes are either unaffected or only slightly inhibited by fluvoxamine. The noradrenaline depleting effects of tyramine derivates are not influenced by fluvoxamine. Reserpine effects, such as ptosis are affected only at very high doses of the test compound. The antagonism by fluvoxamine of the reserpine-induced lowering of the pentamethylenetetrazole convulsive threshold can be regarded as due to an effect upon 5-HT uptake. In contrast to the effects of desmethylimipramine and imipramine, no stimulatory effects are found in rats when rapidly acting reserpine-like compounds are given following a dose of fluvoxamine. PMID:302726

  9. 5-hydroxytryptamine induced relaxation in the pig urinary bladder neck

    PubMed Central

    Recio, Paz; Barahona, María Victoria; Orensanz, Luis M; Bustamante, Salvador; Martínez, Ana Cristina; Benedito, Sara; García-Sacristán, Albino; Prieto, Dolores; Hernández, Medardo

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) is one of the inhibitory mediators in the urinary bladder outlet region. Here we investigated mechanisms involved in 5-HT-induced relaxations of the pig bladder neck. Experimental approach Urothelium-denuded strips of pig bladder were mounted in organ baths for isometric force recordings of responses to 5-HT and electrical field stimulation (EFS). Key results After phenylephrine-induced contraction, 5-HT and 5-HT receptor agonists concentration-dependently relaxed the preparations, with the potency order: 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT) > 5-HT = RS67333 > (±)-8-hydroxy-2-dipropylaminotetralinhydrobromide > m-chlorophenylbiguanide > α-methyl-5-HT > ergotamine. 5-HT and 5-CT relaxations were reduced by the 5-HT7 receptor antagonist (2R)-1-[(3-hydroxyphenyl)sulphonyl]-2-[2-(4-methyl-1-piperidinyl)ethyl]pyrrolidine hydrochloride and potentiated by (S)-N-tert-butyl-3-(4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-piperazin-1-yl)-2-phenylpropanamide dihydrochloride (WAY 100135) and cyanopindolol, 5-HT1A and 5-HT1A/1B receptor antagonists respectively. Inhibitors of 5-HT1B/1D, 5-HT2, 5-HT2B/2C, 5-HT3, 5-HT4, 5-HT5A and 5-HT6 receptors failed to modify 5-HT responses. Blockade of monoamine oxidase A/B, noradrenergic neurotransmission, α-adrenoceptors, muscarinic and purinergic receptors, nitric oxide synthase, guanylate cyclase and prostanoid synthesis did not alter relaxations to 5-HT. Inhibitors of Ca2+-activated K+ and ATP-dependent K+ channels failed to modify 5-HT responses but blockade of neuronal voltage-gated Na+-, Ca2+-and voltage-gated K+ (Kv)-channels potentiated these relaxations. Adenylyl cyclase activation and cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) inhibition potentiated and reduced, respectively, 5-HT-induced responses. Under non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic, non-nitrergic conditions, EFS induced neurogenic, frequency-dependent, relaxations which were resistant to WAY 100135 and cyanopindolol. Conclusions and implications 5-HT relaxed

  10. An examination of 5-hydroxytryptamine receptors in human saphenous vein.

    PubMed Central

    Docherty, J. R.; Hyland, L.

    1986-01-01

    We have examined the effects of antagonists on the isometric contraction of the human saphenous vein produced by 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT). The 5-HT2-antagonist ketanserin (1 microM) had little effect on the lower part of the concentration-response curve to 5-HT, but markedly shifted the upper part of the curve. Yohimbine caused an approximately parallel shift of the concentration-response curve to 5-HT, with a pA2 of 5.48, much lower than its pA2 against noradrenaline in the absence (6.36) or presence (7.06) of cocaine. It is concluded that there are two components to the contractile response to 5-HT in human saphenous vein: at low concentrations 5-HT activates a yohimbine-sensitive receptor, and at higher concentrations 5-HT activates a 5-HT2-receptor. PMID:3801780

  11. Pharmacological properties of phenyldiguanide and other amidine derivatives in relation to those of 5-hydroxytryptamine

    PubMed Central

    Fastier, F. N.; McDowall, M. A.; Waal, Hendrieka

    1959-01-01

    Cats in which the coronary and allied chemoreflexes could not be obtained with small intravenous doses of 5-hydroxytryptamine were insensitive also to phenyldiguanide. In cats which responded to phenyldiguanide with reflex falls of blood pressure and heart rate, abolished by vagotomy, the effects of graded doses (5 to 150 μg./kg.) of phenyldiguanide bore a striking resemblance to those produced initially by 5-hydroxytryptamine in somewhat smaller doses. Differences in the cardiovascular responses to the two drugs are attributed to additional (non-reflex) actions of 5-hydroxytryptamine. The reflex actions of both drugs were blocked reversibly also by 2-naphthylguanidine (500 μg.). Certain other drugs (bufotenine, procaine, S-decylisothiourea) antagonized the depressor action of phenyldiguanide as well as the reflex depressor action of 5-hydroxytryptamine. Like 5-hydroxytryptamine, phenyldiguanide and certain other amidine derivatives caused pain when applied to the base of blisters in human subjects. Unlike 5-hydroxytryptamine, phenyldiguanide did not constrict perfused rat blood vessels or increase the tone of the rat fundal strip preparation of Vane (1957). Phenyldiguanide did not affect the sensitivity of these smooth muscle preparations to 5-hydroxytryptamine, but other amidine derivatives proved to be moderately strong antagonists of the vasoconstrictor actions of 5-hydroxytryptamine and of adrenaline. Unlike 5-hydroxytryptamine, phenyldiguanide did not produce gastric haemorrhage in the mouse. Phenyldiguanide did not prolong chloral hydrate sleeping time in mice by the same mechanism as did 5-hydroxytryptamine. Phenyldiguanide was not highly toxic to mice (LD50 being 240 mg./kg.). It is concluded that phenyldiguanide and certain other amidine derivatives act on sensory receptors which respond to 5-hydroxytryptamine, but that they show little pharmacological resemblance to 5-hydroxytryptamine in other respects. PMID:13821683

  12. The effect of altered 5-hydroxytryptamine levels on beta-endorphin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soliman, Karam F. A.; Mash, Deborah C.; Walker, Charles A.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of altering the concentration of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) on beta-endorphin (beta-Ep) content in the hypothalamus, thalamus, and periaqueductal gray (PAG)-rostral pons regions of the rat brain. The selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine (10 mg/kg), significantly lowered beta-Ep content in the hypothalamus and the PAG. Parachlorophenylalanine, which inhibits 5-HT synthesis, significantly elevated beta-Ep in all brain parts studied. Intracisternal injections of the neurotoxin 5-prime, 7-prime-dihydroxytryptamine with desmethylimipramine pretreatment significantly increased beta-Ep content in the hypothalamus and the PAG. In adrenalectomized rats, fluoxetine significantly decreased beta-Ep levels in the hypothalamus and increased the levels in the PAG. The results indicate that 5-HT may modulate the levels of brain beta-Ep.

  13. Amantadin e tremor, a 5-hydroxytryptamine-mediated response?

    PubMed

    Cox, B; Tha, S J

    1975-02-01

    Amantadine-induced tremor has been investigated using mice. Experiments with, mebanazine, reserpine, diethyldithiocarbamate, and p-chlorophenylalanine suggest that the tremorgenic action of amantadine is influenced by a balance between three putative central nervous system (CNS) transmitters: noradrenaline, dopamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT). Drugs which reduce the concentration of the catecholamines in brain increase amantadine induced tremor. p-Chlorophenylalanine, which specifically depletes brain 5-HT, antagonises amantadine-induced tremor. An ED50 (tremor) dose of amantadine decreases the concentration of 5-hydroxy-indoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) in rat brain, particularly when this elevated due to pretreatment with 5-hydroxytryptophan. Neither inhibition of monoamine oxidase nor reduction of 5-HT-reuptake appear to be responsible for this decrease. Experiments on rat fundus suggest that amantadine increased the sensitivity of receptors to 5-HT. A similar mechanism of action in the CNS could explain both the tremor and the decrease in brain 5-HIAA. The possible relevance of these findings is discussed with respect to the known anti-Parkinson action of amantadine.

  14. Effects of 5-hydroxytryptamine on canine isolated coronary arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Porquet, M. F.; Pourrias, B.; Santamaria, R.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) were studied in vitro on proximal and distal portions of canine interventricular and circumflex coronary arterial strips. 5-HT produced concentration-related contractions in the proximal portion whether contracted previously with KCl or not. These responses were still present after either chemical sympathetic denervation or release of noradrenaline induced by K+-free salt solution. In contrast, the distal portions of coronary arteries did not respond to 5-HT. Concentration-response curves to 5-HT exhibited a classical hyperbolic shape with a calculated Hill-coefficient of approximately 1. Methysergide and phentolamine but not morphine shifted to the right and depressed the maximum of the dose-response curves to 5-HT. It is concluded that the contractions produced by 5-HT in the proximal portion of the interventricular and circumflex coronary arteries are not due to the release of endogenous noradrenaline. The vessels appear to possess separate receptors for 5-HT and noradrenaline and the 5-HT responses belong to neither the M nor the D type. PMID:7186819

  15. 5-Hydroxytryptamine-induced tachycardia in the pig: possible involvement of a new type of 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Bom, A. H.; Duncker, D. J.; Saxena, P. R.; Verdouw, P. D.

    1988-01-01

    1. The mechanism of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)-induced tachycardia is species-dependent and is mediated directly or indirectly either by '5-HT1-like' (cat), 5-HT2 (rat, dog) or 5-HT3 (rabbit) receptors, or by an action similar to tyramine (guinea-pig). The present investigation is devoted to the analysis of the positive chronotropic effect of 5-HT in the pentobarbitone-anaesthetized pig. 2. Intravenous bolus injections of 5-HT (3, 10 and 30 micrograms kg-1) in pigs resulted in dose-dependent increases in heart rate of 24 +/- 2, 38 +/- 3 and 51 +/- 3 beats min-1, respectively (n = 39). Topical application of a high concentration of 5-HT (150 micrograms kg-1 in 5 ml) on the right atrium was also followed by tachycardia (38 +/- 6 beats min-1, n = 4). 3. A number of drugs which antagonize responses mediated by different 5-HT receptors--phenoxybenzamine, methiothepin, metergoline, methysergide and mesulergine ('5-HT1-like' and 5-HT2 receptors), ketanserin, cyproheptadine, pizotifen and mianserin (5-HT2 receptors), and MDL 72222 and ICS 205-930 (5-HT3 receptors)--did not attenuate the chronotropic responses to 5-HT. 4. The 5-HT-induced tachycardia was also not affected by antagonists at alpha- and beta-adrenoceptors, muscarinic, nicotinic, histamine and dopamine receptors, and calcium channels. 5. Selective inhibitors of 5-HT-uptake, indalpine and fluvoxamine, themselves increased porcine heart rate and facilitated 5-HT-induced tachycardia both in magnitude and in duration.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3370393

  16. Interaction between tricyclic and nontricyclic 5-hydroxytryptamine uptake inhibitors and the presynaptic 5-hydroxytryptamine inhibitory autoreceptors in the rat hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Galzin, A M; Moret, C; Verzier, B; Langer, S Z

    1985-10-01

    In slices of the rat hypothalamus prelabeled with [3H]-5-hydroxytryptamine [( 3H]-5-HT), exposure to lysergic acid diethylamide or 5-methoxytryptamine decreased, in a concentration-dependent manner, the release of 3H-transmitter elicited by electrical stimulation. These inhibitory effects were antagonized by the 5-HT receptor antagonist methiothepin (1 microM). Exposure to methiothepin on its own increased in a concentration-dependent manner the electrically evoked overflow of [3H]-5-HT. Exposure to tricyclic antidepressants, like imipramine and amitriptyline, and to nontricyclic 5-HT uptake inhibitors, like paroxetine and citalopram, did not modify by themselves the electrically evoked overflow of [3H]-5-HT. Yet, the four inhibitors of neuronal uptake of 5-HT, antagonized the inhibition by lysergic acid diethylamide or 5-methoxytryptamine of the electrically induced release of [3H]-5-HT. After depletion of endogenous stores of 5-HT by pretreatment with para-chlorophenylalanine (300 mg/kg i.p.), the inhibitors of 5-HT uptake increased the electrically evoked release of [3H]-5-HT in a concentration-dependent manner. Their order of potency to enhance 5-HT overflow after pretreatment with parachlorophenylalanine paralleled their potency at inhibiting neuronal uptake of 5-HT (paroxetine = citalopram greater than imipramine greater than amitriptyline). In para-chlorophenylalanine-treated rat hypothalamic slices, these inhibitors of 5-HT uptake antagonized the inhibition by 5-HT autoreceptor agonists of the electrically evoked release of [3H]-5-HT to a similar extent than was observed in control rats. It is concluded that inhibition of 5-HT uptake reduces the effectiveness of 5-HT autoreceptor agonists to inhibit the electrically evoked release of [3H]-5-HT, irrespective of the chemical structure of the uptake inhibitor or of the levels of endogenous 5-HT achieved in the synaptic gap.

  17. Cerebral circulatory and metabolic effects of 5-hydroxytryptamine in anesthetized baboons.

    PubMed Central

    Harper, M A; MacKenzie, E T

    1977-01-01

    1. The cerebral circulatory effects of the intracarotid administration of 5-hydroxytryptamine were examined in anaesthetized baboons. Cerebral blood flow was measured by the intracarotid 133Xe technique, cerebral O2 consumption and glucose uptake were measured as indices of brain metabolism and electrocortical activity was continuously monitored. 2. Despite a marked reduction in the calibre of the internal carotid artery (assessed angiographically), the intracarotid infusion of 5-hydroxytryptamine 0-1 microgram/kg. min did not effect any significant changes in cerebral blood flow, O2 consumption or glucose uptake. 3. Following transient osmotic disruption of the blood-brain barrier with the intracarotid infusion of hypertonic urea, the same dose of 5-hydroxytryptamine effected a marked reduction in cerebral blood flow from 51 +/- 2 to 36 +/- 2 ml./100 g. min (mean +/- S.E.; P less than 0-01). Both indices of cerebral metabolism were reduced significantly and the e.e.g. showed a more pronounced suppression-burst pattern. 4. We postulate that the cerebral circulatory responses to 5-hydroxytryptamine are dependent upon the integrity of the blood-brain barrier and the predominant effect of the intravascular administration of 5-hydroxytryptamine is on cortical activity or metabolism, rather than on cerebrovascular smooth muscle. Images Plate 1 PMID:411921

  18. Ethanol Stabilizes the Open State of Single 5-Hydroxytryptamine3A(QDA) Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Feinberg-Zadek, Paula L.

    2010-01-01

    Ethanol enhancement of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)3A receptor-mediated responses may have important consequences in the intoxicating and addictive properties of ethanol. Although the exact mechanism is unknown, ethanol-mediated enhancement of 5-HT3 receptor current has been proposed to occur due to stabilization of the open-channel state. It has not been possible to directly measure the open state of the channel due to the extremely low single-channel conductance of 5-HT3A channels. Recently, three arginine residues within the large intracellular loop of the 5-HT3A subunit were substituted by their equivalent residues (glutamine, aspartate, and alanine) of the 5-HT3B subunit to produce a 5-HT3A(QDA) subunit that forms functional homomeric channels exhibiting a measurable single-channel conductance. Using whole-cell rapid-agonist application techniques and the cell-attached single-channel recording configuration, we examined human 5-HT3A(QDA) receptors expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. The agonist sensitivity, macroscopic kinetics, and modulation by ethanol were similar between mutant and wild-type channels, suggesting the substitutions had not altered these channel structure-function properties. The open time histogram for single-channel events mediated by 5-HT3A(QDA) receptors in the presence of maximal 5-HT was best fit by three exponentials, but in the presence of ethanol a fourth open state was evident. In summary, the QDA substitution greatly enhanced single-channel conductance with little effect on 5-HT3A channel's kinetic properties and ethanol enhances agonist action on 5-HT3A receptors by inducing a new, long-lived open-channel state. Furthermore, the 5-HT3A(QDA) receptor appears to be suitable for pharmacological studies of 5-HT3A receptor modulation at a single-channel level. PMID:20200118

  19. Effects of 5-hydroxytryptamine on the dorsal muscle of the leech (hirudo medicinalis)

    PubMed Central

    Schain, R. J.

    1961-01-01

    5-Hydroxytryptamine has an inhibiting effect on the leech muscle. It reduces the contractions produced by acetylcholine or nicotine and accelerates the relaxation of the muscle when these substances are washed out. This acceleration of relaxation allows a more rapid assay of acetylcholine in this preparation. PMID:13747232

  20. Age-dependent effects of the 5-hydroxytryptamine-2a-receptor polymorphism (His452Tyr) on human memory.

    PubMed

    Papassotiropoulos, Andreas; Henke, Katharina; Aerni, Amanda; Coluccia, Daniel; Garcia, Esmeralda; Wollmer, Marc A; Huynh, Kim-Dung; Monsch, Andreas U; Stähelin, Hannes B; Hock, Christoph; Nitsch, Roger M; de Quervain, Dominique J-F

    2005-05-31

    A polymorphism (His452Tyr) of the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)2a receptor is associated with episodic memory in healthy young humans. Because 5-HT2a-receptor density decreases with increasing age, we tested whether the 5-HT2a receptor genotype effect on memory is influenced by age. We investigated the association of the His452Tyr genotype with memory performance in 622 healthy study participants aged from 18 to 90 years. In young to middle-aged participants, age significantly influenced genotype effects on episodic memory: the His452Tyr genotype exerted a significant influence on memory only in young participants. In the group of elderly cognitively healthy participants, the His452Tyr genotype did not affect memory performance. We conclude that age strongly modulates the effect of the 5-HT2a receptor polymorphism at residue 452 on episodic memory.

  1. Redistribution by 5-hydroxytryptamine of carotid arterial blood at the expense of arteriovenous anastomotic blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Pramod R.; Verdouw, Pieter D.

    1982-01-01

    1. The effects of 5-hydroxytryptamine by intravenous (1, 5 and 10 μg kg-1 min-1 in cats) and intracarotid (0·5 and 2 μg kg-1 min-1 in pigs) routes were studied on the complete distribution of common carotid artery blood flow, measured with radioactive microspheres (15 μm). In addition, the amine was also infused (0·75-3 μg kg-1 min-1) into the carotid artery of cats to observe its influence on the shunting of microspheres in the jugular venous blood. 2. The basal total common carotid blood flow was distributed ipsilaterally mainly to extracerebral tissues and only little blood entered the brain. As shown by the presence of microspheres in the lungs after injection into the carotid artery (52% in cats; 82% in pigs), a major fraction of the carotid blood by-passed the capillary bed through arteriovenous anastomoses in the head (non-nutrient fraction). 3. 5-Hydroxytryptamine redistributed the blood in favour of the nutrient compartment at the expense of arteriovenous anastomotic fraction. In cats, tissue blood flow did not significantly change but, in the pig, blood flow to all tissues, particularly to skin and ears, was substantially increased despite a reduction in total carotid blood flow. This reduction was entirely due to a change in the non-nutrient fraction. 4. Intracarotid infusion of 5-hydroxytryptamine in vagosympathectomized intact or spinal cats decreased the number of microspheres appearing in the jugular venous blood, again indicating a reduction in arteriovenous anastomotic flow due to a constriction of these non-nutrient vessels. 5. Cyproheptadine (1 mg kg-1) completely reversed the effect of 5-hydroxytryptamine on the total carotid blood flow. However, the vasoconstriction of arteriovenous anastomoses was only partially attenuated and the vasodilatatory response was either unchanged (muscle) or even enhanced (skin, ear and bones). 6. It is suggested that 5-hydroxytryptamine causes vasoconstriction of the large arteries via D-receptors which are

  2. Release of ( sup 14 C)5-hydroxytryptamine from human platelets by red wine

    SciTech Connect

    Jarman, J.; Glover, V.; Sandler, M. )

    1991-01-01

    Red wine, at a final dilution of 1/50, caused released of ({sup 14}C)5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) from preloaded platelets, an effect which was not observed with any white wines or beers tested. Since 5-HT, is probably released from body stores during migraine attacks and red wine is known to provoke migraine episodes in susceptible individuals, release of 5-HT, possibly from central stores, could represent a plausible mechanism for its mode of action.

  3. The distribution of 5-hydroxytryptamine in the gastrointestinal tract of reptiles, birds and a prototherian mammal. An immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Adamson, S; Campbell, G

    1988-03-01

    The distribution of 5-hydroxytryptamine in the gut of several species of birds and reptiles, and of a prototherian mammal, the platypus, was studied using a monoclonal antibody. 5-Hydroxytryptamine-like immunoreactivity was found in enterochromaffin cells and, in birds, in thrombocytes. Immunoreactivity was not found in enteric neurons fixed immediately after dissection. A detailed study was made on one avian species, the budgerigar. Following incubation of intestine in physiological solution, immunoreactivity was found in nerve fibres in the gut wall that was more marked after incubation with the monoamine oxidase inhibitor pargyline. These fibres took up exogenous 5-hydroxytryptamine. Similar fibres were found in the intestinal nerves and in perivascular plexuses on mesenteric arteries. Both the uptake of 5-hydroxytryptamine and the appearance of neuronal immunoreactivity after incubation were inhibited by the amine uptake inhibitors desmethylimipramine or fluoxetine. Fibres taking up 5-hydroxytryptamine were damaged by pretreatment with 6-hydroxydopamine. It was concluded that the fibres showing immunoreactivity after incubation were adrenergic fibres that had taken up 5-hydroxytryptamine released in vitro from enterochromaffin cells or thrombocytes. These, and more limited observations made on the other species, suggest that birds, reptiles and prototherian mammals lack enteric neurons that use 5-hydroxytryptamine as a transmitter substance.

  4. Emesis and Defecations Induced by the 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT3) Receptor Anatagonist Zacopride in the Ferret

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-16

    and Defecations Induced by the 5 -Hydroxytryptamine ( 5 -HT 3) Receptor Antagonist Zacopride in the Ferret1 GREGORY L. KING Department of Physiology...benzamides and 5 -hydroxytryptamine ( 5 - Zacopride (4-amino-N-[ 1-azabicyclo(2.2.2)oct-3-yl]- 5 -chloro- HT:i) receptor antagonists are effective...prompted development of 5 - the dose-response properties of zacop -ide-induced emesis and HT, receptor antagonist antiemetics with limited gastric

  5. Participation of a transmembrane proton gradient in 5-hydroxytryptamine transport by platelet dense granules and dense-granule ghosts.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, J A; Salganicoff, L

    1981-01-01

    Dense granules, the storage organelles for 5-hydroxytryptamine in blood platelets, have been isolated from porcine platelets and are shown to transport 5-hydroxytryptamine in response to a transmembrane proton gradient (delta pH). Transport in the absence of delta pH is minimal, and it is shown that a rapid increase in transport takes place as delta pH increases. Direct measurements with [14C]methylamine show a delta pH of 1.1 units (acid inside) for intact granules. Osmotically active ghosts of dense granules from which 95% of the endogenous 5-hydroxytryptamine content has been released have also been prepared. Ghosts swell in the presence of ATP and Mg2+, and this swelling is shown to be due to the entry of protons via a process linked to ATP hydrolysis. Proton entry is also apparently linked to anion penetration in ghosts. Steady-state 5-hydroxytryptamine transport in ghosts is stimulated approx. 3-fold on the addition of ATP to the incubation medium, and the stimulation of 5-hydroxytryptamine transport in ghosts correlates with the formation of a transmembrane delta pH. Ghosts generate a delta pH of 1.1-1.3 pH units (acid inside) in the presence of 5 mM-ATP/2.5 mM-MgSO4. delta pH is generated within 3 min at 37 degrees C and is dissipated by the ionophore nigericin and by NH4Cl. It is shown that an Mg2+-stimulated ATPase activity is present on the ghost membrane, and inhibition of the ATPase leads to a corresponding decrease in 5-hydroxytryptamine transport. The results presented support the idea that 5-hydroxytryptamine transport into platelet dense granules is dependent on the presence of a transmembrane delta pH and, together with previous findings by others, suggest a generalized mechanism for biogenic amine transport into subcellular storage organelles. Images Fig. 2. PMID:6459780

  6. On the role of 5-hydroxytryptamine in drug-induced antinociception.

    PubMed Central

    Sugrue, M F

    1979-01-01

    1. The effects of four specific inhibitors of 5-hydroxytryptamine (K-HT) uptake on morphine-, methadone- or pethidine-induced antinociception was studied in rats. Antinociception was assessed by means of hot plate (55 degrees C) reaction times. The effect of the compounds on the uptake of [3H]-5-HT into rat whole brain synaptosomes was also investigated. 2. Pretreatment with Org 6582, citalopram, zimelidine or femoxetine at doses devoid of antinociceptive activity potentiated morphine- but not methadone- or pethidine-induced antinociception. 3. A temporal correlation existed between the ability of Org 6582 to potentiate morphine-induced antinociception and to block synaptosomal [3H]-5-HT uptake. 4. 5-HT plays a critical role in the antinociceptive effect of morphine but not of methadone or pethidine. PMID:435690

  7. Feeding increases 5-hydroxytryptamine and norepinephrine within the hypothalamus of chicks.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, T; Tazawa, M; Sugahara, K

    2001-11-01

    It is thought that hypothalamic 5-hydroxytryptamine (5HT) and norepinephrine (NE) are involved in the regulation of feeding in chicks. The present study was conducted to elucidate changes in the levels of extracellular 5HT and NE in the hypothalamus during feeding of chicks. In order to measure 5HT, NE and 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenylglycol (MHPG), which is a major metabolite of NE, we used brain microdialysis and high-pressure liquid chromatography with an electrochemical detector. After collecting samples to determine the basal levels of 5HT, NE and MHPG, food-deprived birds were given access to food. 5HT levels in the medial hypothalamus (MH) and lateral hypothalamus (LH) increased during the first 30 min of feeding, and then returned to basal levels. NE and MHPG in the LH increased during feeding, and remained elevated throughout the experiment. This study supports an idea that hypothalamic monoamines in the chick brain are involved in the regulation of feeding.

  8. Platelet 5-hydroxytryptamine release and aggregation promoted by cotton bracts tannin.

    PubMed

    Rohrbach, M S; Rolstad, R A; Tracy, P B; Russell, J A

    1984-01-01

    The effect of aqueous extracts of cotton bract (CBE) on platelet secretion and aggregation was examined by using washed bovine and human platelets. The CBE promoted the release of 75% to 90% of the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) stored in both human and bovine platelets in a dose-dependent manner. This release reaction occurred without the lysis of the platelets and was not inhibited by indomethacin, 2-deoxyglucose, or KCN. Fractionation of the CBE indicated that the platelet secretagogue present in the CBE was the condensed polyphenol, tannin. In addition to promoting the secretion of 5-HT, tannin also aggregated the platelets in a dose-dependent manner. We conclude that the secretion of platelet 5-HT and the aggregation of platelets by tannin could potentially contribute to the pulmonary symptoms associated with byssinosis.

  9. Depressive disorder and gastrointestinal dysfunction after myocardial infarct are associated with abnormal tryptophan-5-hydroxytryptamine metabolism in rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chunyan; Wang, Yangang

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the relationship between tryptophan-5-hydroxytryptamine metabolism, depressive disorder, and gastrointestinal dysfunction in rats after myocardial infarction. Our goal was to elucidate the physiopathologic bases of somatic/psychiatric depression symptoms after myocardial infarction. A myocardial infarction model was established by permanent occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery. Depression-like behavior was evaluated using the sucrose preference test, open field test, and forced swim test. Gastric retention and intestinal transit were detected using the carbon powder labeling method. Immunohistochemical staining was used to detect indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase expression in the hippocampus and ileum. High-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence and ultraviolet detection determined the levels of 5-hydroxytryptamine, its precursor tryptophan, and its metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid in the hippocampus, distal ileum, and peripheral blood. All data were analyzed using one-way analyses of variance. Three weeks after arterial occlusion, rats in the model group began to exhibit depression-like symptoms. For example, the rate of sucrose consumption was reduced, the total and central distance traveled in the open field test were reduced, and immobility time was increased, while swimming, struggling and latency to immobility were decreased in the forced swim test. Moreover, the gastric retention rate and gastrointestinal transit rate were increased in the model group. Expression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase was increased in the hippocampus and ileum, whereas 5-hydroxytryptamine metabolism was decreased, resulting in lower 5-hydroxytryptamine and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid levels in the hippocampus and higher levels in the ileum. Depressive disorder and gastrointestinal dysfunction after myocardial infarction involve abnormal tryptophan-5-hydroxytryptamine metabolism, which may explain the somatic, cognitive

  10. Effect of antibiotics on the 5-hydroxytryptamine content of the small intestine and other organs in rats and mice

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, T. J.

    1961-01-01

    Rats and mice were given antibiotics orally and by subcutaneous injection and the effects on tissue levels of 5-hydroxytryptamine and intestinal bacteria were studied. In mice it was found that antibiotics which caused a large reduction in the bacterial flora of the intestine when given orally also caused a significant increase in intestinal 5-hydroxytryptamine. In rats, neomycin caused a reduction in the urinary excretion of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid. In both rats and mice, many antibiotics caused a significant reduction in the weight of the spleen. PMID:19108146

  11. 5-Hydroxytryptamine2A/2C receptors of nucleus raphe magnus and gigantocellularis/paragigantocellularis pars α reticular nuclei modulate the unconditioned fear-induced antinociception evoked by electrical stimulation of deep layers of the superior colliculus and dorsal periaqueductal grey matter.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Ricardo; de Oliveira, Rithiele Cristina; Falconi-Sobrinho, Luiz Luciano; da Silva Soares, Raimundo; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2017-01-01

    The electrical stimulation of the dorsolateral columns of the periaquedutal grey matter (dlPAG) or deep layers of the superior colliculus (dlSC) evokes defensive behaviours followed by an antinociceptive response. Monoaminergic brainstem reticular nuclei are suggested to comprise the endogenous pain modulatory system. The aim of the present work was to investigate the role played by 5-HT2 subfamily of serotonergic receptors of the nucleus raphe magnus (NRM) and the gigantocellularis/paragigantocellularis pars α reticular nuclei (Gi/PGiα) in the elaboration of instinctive fear-induced antinociception elicited by electrical stimulation of dlPAG or of dlSC. The nociceptive thresholds were measured by the tail-flick test in Wistar rats. The 5-HT2A/2C-serotonergic receptors antagonist ritanserin was microinjected at different concentrations (0.05, 0.5 and 5.0μg/0.2μL) either in Gi/PGiα or in NRM. The blockade of 5-HT2 receptors in both Gi/PGiα and NRM decreased the innate fear-induced antinociception elicited by electrical stimulation of the dlSC or the dlPAG. These findings indicate that serotonin is involved in the hypo-algesia induced by unconditioned fear-induced behavioural responses and the 5-HT2A/2C-serotonergic receptor subfamily in neurons situated in the Gi/PGiα complex and NRM are critically recruited in pain modulation during the panic-like emotional behaviour.

  12. The 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter is functional in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells proliferation and is regulated by Interleukin-1 beta

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qing-Jie; Wang, Dong; Tang, Cheng-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (hCASMCs) proliferation and migration are key factors in coronary artery restenosis after percutaneous coronary intervention. Platelets release 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), which is a strong mitogen for pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells proliferation and migration. Here, we investigated the effects of 5-HT and role of 5-HT transporter (5-HTT) on hCASMCs proliferation and migration. The 5-HT (10-6-10-5 mol/l) significantly increased hCASMCs proliferation and migration, and these effects were inhibited by fluoxetine (10-5 mol/l) and citalopram (10-6 mol/l), two 5-HTT blocker. Overexpression in hCASMCs enhanced 5-HT induced cells proliferation and migration. The 5-HTT and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) expression were increased in rat balloon injury carotid arteries. Treatment with IL-1β (10 ng/ml, 3d) upregulates 5-HTT expression in hCASMCs and increased 5-HT induced currents in Human Embryonic Kidney 293-5-HTT cells. PMID:26221231

  13. Selective 5-hydroxytryptamine2 receptor antagonists protect against the neurotoxicity of methylenedioxymethamphetamine in rats.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, C J; Abbate, G M; Black, C K; Taylor, V L

    1990-11-01

    The serotonergic deficits resulting from methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA)-induced neurotoxicity were prevented by the simultaneous administration of 5-hydroxytryptamine2 (5-HT2) receptor antagonists such as MDL 11,939 or ritanserin. This effect was not region specific as protection was observed in the cortex, hippocampus and striatum 1 week after the administration of a single dose of MDMA. MDL 11,939 also showed some efficacy at reducing the deficits in 5-HT concentrations and tryptophan hydroxylase activity produced by multiple administrations of MDMA. Protection against the neurotoxicity required the administration of MDL 11,939 within 1 hr of MDMA indicating 5-HT2 receptor activation was an early event in the process leading to terminal damage. Examination of the effect of the 5-HT2 receptor blockade on the early neurochemical alterations induced by MDMA revealed an inhibitory effect on MDMA-stimulated dopamine synthesis. Analysis of these data and the associated changes in dopamine metabolites indicates that 5-HT2 receptor antagonists block MDMA-induced neurotoxicity by interfering with the ability of the dopamine neuron to maintain its cytoplasmic pool of transmitter and thereby sustain carrier-mediated dopamine release.

  14. Photoaffinity labeling of the 5-hydroxytryptamine 1A receptor in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Ransom, R W; Asarch, K B; Shih, J C

    1986-10-01

    1-[2-(4-Azidophenyl)ethyl]-4-(3-trifluoromethylphenyl)piperazine (p-azido-PAPP) inhibits [3H]5-hydroxytryptamine [( 3H]5-HT) binding to 5-HT1A and 5-HT1B sites in rat brain with equilibrium dissociation constants (KD) of 0.9 nM and 230 nM, respectively. [3H]p-Azido-PAPP was synthesized and its reversible and irreversible binding properties to the hippocampal 5-HT1A site characterized. [3H]p-Azido-PAPP labeled a single class of sites in rat hippocampal membranes with a KD of 1 nM and a maximal binding density of 370 fmol/mg protein. The pharmacological profile of [3H]p-azido-PAPP binding was consistent with the radioligand's selective interaction with the 5-HT1A receptor. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of membranes preincubated with [3H]p-azido-PAPP and irradiated showed a major band of incorporation of radioactivity at approximately 55,000 daltons. This incorporation could be blocked when membranes were incubated with 1 microM of several agents that have high affinity for 5-HT1A sites [5-HT, 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetraline, TVX Q 7821, spiperone, buspirone, d-lysergic acid diethylamide, metergoline]. The results indicate that on photolysis [3H]p-azido-PAPP irreversibly labels a polypeptide that is, or is a subunit of, the 5-HT1A receptor in rat hippocampus.

  15. Radioimmunoassay of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) in cerebrospinal fluid, plasma, and serum

    SciTech Connect

    Engbaek, F.; Voldby, B

    1982-04-01

    A direct radioimmunoassay is described for serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) in cerebrospinal fluid, platelet-poor plasma, and serum. Antisera in rabbits was raised against serotonin diazotized to a conjugate of bovine albumin and D,L-p-aminophenylalanine. Polyethylene glycol, alone or in combination with anti-rabbit immunoglobulins, is used to separate bound and unbound tritiated serotonin. The minimum concentration of serotonin detectable is 2 nmol/L in a 200-..mu..L sample. Within-day precision (CV) is 4.3% between-day precision 7.7%. Analytical recoveries of serotonin are 109% and 101% for cerebrospinal fluid and plasma, respectively. Tryptophan, 5-hydroxytryptophan, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, and 5-hydroxytryptophol do not interfere with the assay. However, 5-methoxytryptamine and tryptamine cross react. Of samples of cerebrospinal fluid from patients with disc herniations (n=21) or low-pressure hydrocephalus (n=10), one-third had concentrations of 2-4 nmol/L and two-thirds were below the minimum detectable concentration. The observed range for the concentration of serotonin in plasma of 14 normal subjects was 5-14 nmol/L (mean +/- SD, 9 +/- 3 nmol/L). The observed ranges for serotonin in serum were: for 10 women 520-900 (mean +/- SD: 695 +/- 110) nmol/L and for 10 men 380-680 (520 +/- 94) nmol/L.

  16. Skimmianine and related furoquinolines function as antagonists of 5-hydroxytryptamine receptors in animals.

    PubMed

    Cheng, J T; Chang, T K; Chen, I S

    1994-10-01

    1. Skimmianine, kokusaginine and confusameline, three furoquinolines extracted from the leaves of Evodia merrillii (Rutaceae), were investigated to characterize their selective effects on subtypes of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptors. 2. In the isolated membranes of rat cerebrocortex, using [3H]-5-HT and [3H]-ketanserin as radioligands, skimmianine and the two other furoquinolines displaced radioligand bindings in a concentration-dependent manner. Lower concentrations were required to affect [3H]-ketanserin binding than [3H]-5-HT binding in the order skimmianine > kokusaginine > confusameline. 3. Furoquinolines inhibited 5-HT-induced contraction mediated by 5-HT2 receptors in the presence of methiothepin in rat isolated aorta. Also, the combination of furoquinolines with ketanserin showed an additive antagonism. 4. These furoquinolines were inactive on the 5-carboxamidotryptamine-induced relaxation of guinea-pig ileum, a 5-HT1-mediated event. However, 5-HT-induced contraction via 5-HT2 receptors was reduced by these furoquinolines in a way similar to that in blood vessels. 5. The failure of these compounds to affect the 5-HT-induced Bezold-Jarisch-like reflex in anaesthetized rats, the major 5-HT3-mediated action, ruled out an action on 5-HT3 receptors. 6. The results obtained suggest that three furoquinoline alkaloids may act on 5-HT receptors in animals, more selectively to the 5-HT2 subtype, in the order of skimmianine > kokusaginine > confusameline.

  17. Effect of halothane on metabolism of 5-hydroxytryptamine by rat lungs perfused in situ.

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, C A; Wartell, S A; Rannels, D E

    1983-01-01

    The effect of halothane (2-bromo-2-chloro-1,1,1-trifluoroethane) on the uptake of 14C-labelled 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and its metabolism to 5-hydroxyindol-3-ylacetic acid (5-HIAA) was investigated in rat lungs perfused in situ. The rate of accumulation of 14C-labelled 5-HIAA in the tissue, monitored as an index of 5-HT metabolism, was linear with time, displayed saturation kinetics and remained stable for at least 180 min of perfusion. Exposure of the lungs to halothane (4%) for 60 min reversibly reduced production of 5-HIAA through an increase in the apparent Km for metabolism of the amine from 1.45 to 3.52 microM (P less than 0.001); the anaesthetic had no effect on the Vmax. of the process. The magnitude of the inhibition increased with time of exposure to the anaesthetic. Halothane exposure did not alter the distribution of [3H]sorbitol or [14C]5-HT, pulmonary vascular resistance, levels of ATP or the kinetics of amino acid transport in the tissue. Inhibition of protein synthesis by cycloheximide did not mimic the effect of the anaesthetic. These observations, together with those made in lungs exposed to inhibitors of 5-HT uptake and metabolism, were consistent with a halothane-mediated inhibition of 5-HT uptake, which did not appear to involve non-specific changes in membrane permeability. PMID:6847641

  18. Allergic sensitization modifies the pulmonary expression of 5-hydroxytryptamine receptors in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Córdoba-Rodríguez, Guadalupe; Vargas, Mario H; Ruiz, Víctor; Carbajal, Verónica; Campos-Bedolla, Patricia; Mercadillo-Herrera, Paulina; Arreola-Ramírez, José Luis; Segura-Medina, Patricia

    2016-03-01

    There is mounting evidence that 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) plays a role in asthma. However, scarce information exists about the pulmonary expression of 5-HT receptors and its modification after allergic sensitization. In the present work, we explored the expression of 5-HT1A, 5-HT2A, 5-HT3, 5-HT4, 5-ht5a, 5-HT6, and 5-HT7 receptors in lungs from control and sensitized guinea pigs through qPCR and Western blot. In control animals, mRNA from all receptors was detectable in lung homogenates, especially from 5-HT2A and 5-HT4 receptors. Sensitized animals had decreased mRNA expression of 5-HT2A and 5-HT4 receptors and increased that of 5-HT7 receptor. In contrast, they had increased protein expression of 5-HT2A receptor in bronchial epithelium and of 5-HT4 receptor in lung parenchyma. The degree of airway response to the allergic challenge was inversely correlated with mRNA expression of the 5-HT1A receptor. In summary, our results showed that major 5-HT receptor subtypes are constitutively expressed in the guinea pig lung, and that allergic sensitization modifies the expression of 5-HT2A, 5-HT4, and 5-HT7 receptors.

  19. Methotrexate causes a change in intestinal 5-hydroxytryptamine metabolism in rats.

    PubMed

    Takano, Yuho; Machida, Takuji; Obara, Yusuke; Hirano, Megumi; Kudo, Sae; Takagi, Minako; Hamaue, Naoya; Iizuka, Kenji; Hirafuji, Masahiko

    2014-10-05

    The effects of methotrexate on 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) metabolism in the intestinal tissue of rats were investigated during the delayed phase after a single administration. Rats were i.p. injected with methotrexate or with saline as a control, and kaolin and food intakes were measured by an automatic monitoring apparatus. At 96 h after administration, dissected-out ileal tissue was frozen rapidly in liquid nitrogen for further analysis or fixed for immunohistochemical staining. Methotrexate at a dose of 50 mg/kg caused a time-dependent increase in kaolin intake lasting up to 72 h after administration, which returned to the control level at 96 h after administration. This dose of methotrexate caused a gradual decrease in body weight, food intake, and water intake lasting up to 72 h, which approached the control level at 96 h. Methotrexate caused pathologic changes, including a moderate inflammatory response in the ileal tissue and an increase in the number of L-tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH)-expressing cells in the ileal mucosa. Methotrexate also caused a significant increase in 5-HT and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) content and in TPH1 mRNA expression in the ileal tissues. It had no significant effects on mRNA expression of serotonin transporter, COX-1, or COX-2 or on myeloperoxidase activity. This study demonstrated, for the first time, that methotrexate caused a change in the ileal 5-HT metabolism associated with hyperplasia of mucosal enterochromaffin cells.

  20. Species differences in the responses of pulmonary vascular preparations to 5-hydroxytryptamine.

    PubMed

    Morcillo, E J; Cortijo, J

    1999-01-01

    5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) has been implicated in pulmonary hypertension, hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, and the pulmonary side-effects of some drugs. 5-HT contracts bovine, ovine, canine, caprine, feline, rabbit, guinea-pig and rat isolated pulmonary arteries mainly by activation of 5-HT2A receptors but relaxes porcine pulmonary artery through activation of endothelial 5-HT2B receptors. Pharmacological responses of the pulmonary veins to 5-HT have been less studied and comprise both contraction (bovine, canine, feline, equine, rabbit) and relaxation (ovine, caprine). Functional and radioligand binding studies in human isolated intrapulmonary arteries and veins have demonstrated a mixed population of 5-HT1B/1D and 5-HT2A receptors mediating vasoconstriction but no evidence of involvement of 5-HT1A, 5-HT3 and 5-HT4 receptors. Remarkable differences exist in the in vitro pulmonary vasoreactivity to 5-HT and related drugs in humans compared with other mammals. Therefore, the use of human tissues is to be preferred to study pathophysiological responses of pulmonary circulation with clinical relevance.

  1. Portal veins of mice infected with Schistosoma mansoni exhibit an increased reactivity to 5-hydroxytryptamine.

    PubMed

    Silva, C L; Morel, N; Noël, F

    1998-01-01

    In chronic severe infection with Schistosoma mansoni, portal hypertension and related vascular alterations usually develop as a consequence of granulomatous response to eggs. In order to investigate a putative direct effect of worms on the reactivity of their host portal vein, mice infected only with male worms were used in the present study. An higher reactivity to 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) characterized by an increase in the maximal contraction and sensitivity was observed in portal vein from infected mice compared to healthy mice. Blockade of NO-synthase with l-NAME induced a small increase in 5-HT potency in portal vein from non-infected mice without changing the amplitude of the contractions, whereas it did not alter the reactivity of veins from infected mice. The present results show that unisexual infection of mice with male S. mansoni increased the reactivity of the portal vein to 5-HT which seems to be partially related to an alteration in the nitric oxide release by endothelium.

  2. Increased reactivity to 5-hydroxytryptamine of portal veins from mice infected with Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Silva, C L; Morel, N; Lenzi, H L; Noël, F

    1998-07-01

    In chronic severe infection with Schistosoma mansoni, portal hypertension accompanied by anatomical changes of the portal vasculature can develop as a consequence of granulomatous response to eggs. Mice infected unisexually with male worms were used in the present study in order to investigate a direct effect of worms on the reactivity of their host portal vein. A higher reactivity in the presence of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), but not in the presence of KCl 100 mM solution, was observed in portal vein from infected mice compared to healthy mice. It was characterized by an increase in the maximal contraction and sensitivity to 5-HT. Blockade of NO-synthase with N omega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) induced a small increase in 5-HT potency in the portal vein from non-infected mice, but did not change the amplitude of the contractions. In portal veins from infected mice, preincubation with L-NAME did not affect the reactivity to 5-HT. Histological analysis indicated endothelial damage, subendothelial fibrous plaques, and focal areas of inflammatory infiltrates in the adventitial layer. As a conclusion, these results show that unisexual infection of mice with male S. mansoni increased the reactivity of the portal vein to 5-HT which seems to be only partially related to an alteration in the endothelial production of nitric oxide.

  3. Interactions between GABA and 5-hydroxytryptamine in the guinea-pig ileum.

    PubMed

    Ong, J; Kerr, D I

    1983-10-28

    In isolated segments of the guinea-pig ileum, there was: (a) an early, short-lived (less than 20 s) depression by gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) of contractile responses to 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), acetylcholine(ACh), or nicotine, also seen with 3-amino-1-propanesulphonic acid (3APS) or muscimol in place of GABA, and sensitive to bicuculline, picrotoxinin or piretanide, and (b) a delayed, longer-lasting (30 s-1 min) depression of responses to 5-HT and nicotine, but not exogenously applied ACh, also seen with baclofen and only antagonised by delta-aminovaleric acid (DAVA). At 25 degrees C, all these effects were still observed but slowed, whilst at 37 degrees C after cold storage (6 degrees C) overnight, the early, short-lived depression was reduced or eliminated, yet the delayed depression was enhanced. It is concluded that the early, short-lived depression is mediated through GABAA-receptor sites, and the delayed, longer-lasting depression through GABAB-receptor sites on neurones of the myenteric plexus; effects consistent with GABA being a neurotransmitter in the enteric nervous system.

  4. γ-Aminobutyric acid suppresses enhancement of hamster sperm hyperactivation by 5-hydroxytryptamine

    PubMed Central

    FUJINOKI, Masakatsu; TAKEI, Gen L.

    2016-01-01

    Sperm hyperactivation is regulated by hormones present in the oviduct. In hamsters, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5HT) enhances hyperactivation associated with the 5HT2 receptor and 5HT4 receptor, while 17β-estradiol (E2) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) suppress the association of the estrogen receptor and GABAA receptor, respectively. In the present study, we examined the regulatory interactions among 5HT, GABA, and E2 in the regulation of hamster sperm hyperactivation. When sperm were exposed to E2 prior to 5HT exposure, E2 did not affect 5HT-enhanced hyperactivation. In contrast, GABA partially suppressed 5HT-enhanced hyperactivation when sperm were exposed to GABA prior to 5HT. GABA suppressed 5HT-enhanced hyperactivation associated with the 5HT2 receptor although it did not suppress 5HT-enhanced hyperactivation associated with the 5HT4 receptor. These results demonstrate that hamster sperm hyperactivation is regulated by an interaction between the 5HT2 receptor-mediated action of 5HT and GABA. PMID:27773888

  5. Role of 5-hydroxytryptamine in the regulation of brain neuropeptides in normal and diabetic rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolta, Malak G.; Williams, Byron B.; Soliman, Karam F. A.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) alteration on brain dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE), beta-endorphin (beta-E), and immunoreactive insulin was studied in Sprague-Dawley diabetic and control rats. Diabetes was induced using alloxan (45 mg/kg), 15 days prior to sacrificing. Both control and diabetic animals were treated with either p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA, 300 mg/kg) three days prior to sacrificing or fluoxetine (10 mg/kg) twice daily for three days. PCPA treatment significantly decreased brain content of 5-HT and 5-hydroxyindolel acetic acid, while it caused significant increase and decrease in brain beta-E and insulin levels, respectively, in both normal and diabetic rat. Meanwhile, the administration of fluoxetine resulted in significant increase in brain content of 5-HT, DA, NE and insulin but significant decline of beta-E in diabetic and saline control rats. The results of this experiment indicate that 5-HT may be regulating both beta-E and insulin regardless of the availability of pancreatic insulin.

  6. Influence of AMPA/kainate receptors on extracellular 5-hydroxytryptamine in rat midbrain raphe and forebrain

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Rui; Ma, Zhiyuan; Auerbach, Sidney B

    1997-01-01

    The regulation of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) release by excitatory amino acid (EAA) receptors was examined by use of microdialysis in the CNS of freely behaving rats. Extracellular 5-HT was measured in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), median raphe nucleus (MRN), nucleus accumbens, hypothalamus, frontal cortex, dorsal and ventral hippocampus. Local infusion of kainate produced increases in extracellular 5-HT in the DRN and MRN. Kainate infusion into forebrain sites had a less potent effect. In further studies of the DRN and nucleus accumbens, kainate-induced increases in extracellular 5-HT were blocked by the EAA receptor antagonists, kynurenate and 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (DNQX). The effect of infusing kainate into the DRN or nucleus accumbens was attenuated or abolished by tetrodotoxin (TTX), suggesting that the increase in extracellular 5-HT is dependent on 5-HT neuronal activity. In contrast, ibotenate-induced lesion of intrinsic neurones did not attenuate the effect of infusing kainate into the nucleus accumbens. Thus, the effect of kainate in the nucleus accumbens does not depend on intrinsic neurones. Infusion of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolaproprionate (AMPA) into the DRN and nucleus accumbens induced nonsignificant changes in extracellular 5-HT. Cyclothiazide and diazoxide, which attenuate receptor desensitization, greatly enhanced the effect of AMPA on 5-HT in the DRN, but not in the nucleus accumbens. In conclusion, AMPA/kainate receptors regulate 5-HT in the raphe and in forebrain sites. PMID:9283707

  7. Identification of 5-hydroxytryptamine1D binding sites in sheep caudate nucleus membranes.

    PubMed

    Pauwels, P J; Palmier, C; Briley, M

    1993-08-03

    Radioligand binding measurements were performed in membranes of sheep caudate nucleus using [3H]5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT). [3H]5-HT labeled a population of high affinity binding sites with a Kd of 1.9 +/- 0.1 nM and a Bmax of 19.8 +/- 2.2 fmol/mg tissue. Combined 5-HTID/E binding sites were the predominant 5-HT1 subtype, accounting for 78% of the total population of 5-HT1 binding sites. 5-Carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT) and sumatriptan yielded inhibition curves which best fitted a two-site model with high affinity values of 0.8 and 10.1 nM, and 1000 and 206 nM for their low affinity components. The proportion of the high affinity 5-CT and sumatriptan binding sites was 79 and 72%. The binding affinity profile of 5-HT1D binding sites [5-CT > 5-HT > d-LSD > 5-MeOT > sumatriptan > RU 24,969 > metergoline > tryptamine = rauwolscine = methylsergide > yohimbine = methiothepin > TFMPP = 8-OH-DPAT > 2-methyl-5-HT > mCPP = quipazine = CP 93,129 > ketanserin > (-)-propranolol = haloperidol = ipsapirone] compares well to that reported for 5-HT1D receptor sites in human caudate and cortex (correlation coefficient: 0.99 and 0.98). The present results indicate that sheep caudate nucleus is a valid tissue for studying interaction of compounds with 5-HT1D binding sites in the relative absence of 5-HT1E binding sites.

  8. Lamotrigine, carbamazepine and phenytoin differentially alter extracellular levels of 5-hydroxytryptamine, dopamine and amino acids.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Shagufta; Fowler, Leslie J; Whitton, Peter S

    2005-02-01

    We have studied the effects of treatment with the anticonvulsants lamotrigine (LTG), phenytoin (PHN) and carbamazepine (CBZ) on basal and stimulated extracellular aspartate (ASP), glutamate (GLU), taurine (TAU), GABA, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and dopamine (DA) in the hippocampus of freely moving rats using microdialysis. All of the drugs investigated have had inhibition of Na(+) channel activity implicated as their principal mechanism of action. Neither LTG (10-20 mg/kg), PHN (20-40 mg/kg) or CBZ (10-20 mg/kg) had an effect on the basal extracellular concentrations of any of the amino acids studied with the exception of glutamate, which was decreased at the highest LTG dose. However, when amino acid transmitter levels were increased with 50 microM veratridine, LTG was found to cause a dose-dependent decrease in dialysate levels of all four amino acids, with the effect being most pronounced for glutamate. In contrast, PHN decreased extracellular aspartate levels but had no effect on evoked-extracellular GLU, TAU or GABA. Somewhat unexpectedly, CBZ did not alter the stimulated increase in the excitatory amino acids, GLU and ASP, but, rather surprisingly for an antiepileptic drug, markedly decreased that of the inhibitory substances TAU and GABA. The three drugs had differing effects on basal extracellular 5-HT and DA. LTG caused a dose-dependent decrease in both, while CBZ and PHN both increased extracellular 5-HT and DA. When extracellular 5-HT and DA was evoked by veratridine LTG had no significant effect on this, while PHN but not CBZ increased stimulated extracellular 5-HT and both PHN and CBZ augmented DA. Thus, the effects of the three drugs studied seemed to depend on whether extracellular transmitter levels are evoked or basal and the particular transmitter in question. This suggests that there are marked differences in the neurochemical mechanisms of antiepileptic drug action of the three compounds studied.

  9. Inhibition by 5-hydroxytryptamine and noradrenaline in substantia gelatinosa of guinea-pig spinal trigeminal nucleus.

    PubMed

    Grudt, T J; Williams, J T; Travagli, R A

    1995-05-15

    1. Whole-cell and intracellular recordings were made from neurons in slices of guinea-pig spinal trigeminal nucleus pars caudalis. 2. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) hyperpolarized 70% of neurons by activating 5-HT1A receptors. The effect was mimicked by 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT) and (+/-)-2-dipropylamino-8-hydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronapthalene hydrobromide (8-OH-DPAT) and antagonized by 1-(2-methoxyphenyl)-4-[4-(2-phthalimido)-butyl]-piperazine hydrobromide (NAN 190) and pindobind-5-HT1A. Nine per cent of the neurons were depolarized by 5-HT. 3. In about 20% of recordings, 5-HT also evoked repetitive inhibitory postsynaptic potentials that were mediated by glycine. 4. Noradrenaline (NA) hyperpolarized 71% of neurons. This effect was mediated by activation of alpha 2-adrenoceptors, since 5-bromo-N-(4,5-dihydro-1H-imidazol-2-yl)-6-quinoxalinamine (UK14304) also caused a hyperpolarization and idazoxan (1 microM) blocked the hyperpolarization to both NA and UK14304. Phenylephrine depolarized a subset of neurons and this depolarization was blocked by prazosin, suggesting an action mediated by activation of alpha 1-adrenoceptors. 5. NA also evoked repetitive GABAA-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic potentials in about 20% of recordings. The increase in synaptic activity was mimicked by phenylephrine and blocked by prazosin. 6. These results indicate that there are at least two mechanisms through which 5-HT and NA inhibit neurons: (i) in many cells both 5-HT and NA mediate a hyperpolarization through an increase of a potassium conductance; (ii) 5-HT and NA also activated GABA- and glycine-containing interneurons to cause IPSPs in separate groups of cells.

  10. Potentiation of RSU-1069 tumour cytotoxicity by 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT).

    PubMed Central

    Chaplin, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    It is known that many solid animal tumours have a lower oxygenation level than most normal tissues and, in addition, that this level of oxygenation can be further decreased by systemic administration of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT). The present study has investigated if such selective decrease in tumour oxygenation can be exploited by using the hypoxic cell cytotoxin, RSU-1069. The results obtained show that 5-HT at a dose of 5 mg kg-1, although not cytotoxic alone, can potentiate the cytotoxic effects of RSU-1069 in the Lewis lung carcinoma over the dose range 0.01-0.15 mg g-1. Maximum potentiation occurs when 5-HT is administered after RSU-1069. Potentiation of RSU-1069 cytotoxicity was observed using both the soft agar excision assay as an endpoint as well as in situ growth delay. In addition, the study shows that potentiation of RSU-1069 (0.1 mg g-1) cytotoxicity can be seen with 5-HT doses as low as 0.5 mg kg-1. In contrast to the tumour cytotoxicity results, 5-HT at a dose of 5 mg kg-1 i.p. did not affect the systemic toxicity, as measured by LD50/7d of RSU-1069. Thus, these results indicate that 5-HT can increase the therapeutic efficiency of RSU-1069. Such a finding is consistent with the rationale that selective reduction in tumour blood flow and oxygenation induced by 5-HT can be exploited using the hypoxic cell cytotoxin RSU-1069. PMID:3801269

  11. An update on the role of the 5-hydroxytryptamine6 receptor in cognitive function.

    PubMed

    Fone, Kevin C F

    2008-11-01

    As the 5-hydroxytryptamine(6) (5-HT(6)) receptor is almost exclusively expressed in the CNS, particularly in areas associated with learning and memory, many studies have examined its role in cognitive function in the rodent, as reviewed herein. Most studies, in healthy adult rats, report that 5-HT(6) receptor antagonists enhance retention of spatial learning in the Morris water maze, improve consolidation in autoshaping tasks and reverse natural forgetting in object recognition. Antagonists appear to facilitate both cholinergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission, reversing scopolamine- and NMDA receptor antagonist-induced memory impairments. Recent reports show that the 5-HT(6) receptor antagonist, PRX-07034, restores the impairment of novel object recognition produced in rats reared in social isolation, a neurodevelopmental model producing behavioural changes similar to several core symptoms seen in schizophrenia. The 5-HT(6) receptor antagonist, Ro 04-6790, modestly improved reversal learning in isolation reared but not group-housed controls in the water maze. Ro 04-6790 also improved novel object discrimination both in adult rats that received chronic intermittent phencyclidine and drug-naïve 18-month-old rats. However, more information on their effect in animal models of schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease is required. Several selective high-affinity 5-HT(6) receptor agonists developed recently also improve object discrimination and extra-dimensional set-shifting behaviour. Thus both 5-HT(6) receptor agonist and antagonist compounds show promise as pro-cognitive agents in pre-clinical studies but the explanation for their paradoxical analogous effect is currently unclear, and is discussed in this article.

  12. Peptide displacement of ( sup 3 H)5-hydroxytryptamine binding to bovine cortical membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, Y.; Root-Bernstein, R.S.; Shih, J.C. )

    1990-12-01

    Chemical studies have demonstrated that peptides such as the encephalitogenic (EAE) peptide of myelin basic protein (MBP) and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) can bind serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) in vitro. The present research was undertaken to determine whether such binding interferes with 5-HT binding to its 5-HT1 receptors on bovine cerebral cortical membranes. EAE peptide and LHRH displaced ({sup 3}H)5-HT with IC50s of 4.0 x 10(-4) and 1.8 x 10(-3) M respectively. MBP itself also showed apparent displacing ability with an IC50 of 6.0 x 10(-5) M, though it also caused aggregation of cortical membranes that might have interfered with normal receptor binding. These results support previous suggestions that the tryptophan peptide region of MBP may act as a 5-HT receptor in the neural system. We also tested the effects of muramyl dipeptide (N-acetyl-muramyl-L-Ala-D-isoGln, MD), a bacterial cell-wall breakdown product that acts as a slow-wave sleep promoter, binds to LHRH and EAE peptide, and competes for 5-HT binding sites on macrophages. It showed no significant displacement of 5-HT binding to cortical membranes (IC50 greater than 10(-1) M), but its D-Ala analogue did (IC50 = 1.7 x 10(-3) M). Thus, it seems likely that the 5-HT-related effects of naturally occurring muramyl peptides are physiologically limited by receptor types.

  13. Nelotanserin, a novel selective human 5-hydroxytryptamine2A inverse agonist for the treatment of insomnia.

    PubMed

    Al-Shamma, Hussien A; Anderson, Christen; Chuang, Emil; Luthringer, Remy; Grottick, Andrew J; Hauser, Erin; Morgan, Michael; Shanahan, William; Teegarden, Bradley R; Thomsen, William J; Behan, Dominic

    2010-01-01

    5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)(2A) receptor inverse agonists are promising therapeutic agents for the treatment of sleep maintenance insomnias. Among these agents is nelotanserin, a potent, selective 5-HT(2A) inverse agonist. Both radioligand binding and functional inositol phosphate accumulation assays suggest that nelotanserin has low nanomolar potency on the 5-HT(2A) receptor with at least 30- and 5000-fold selectivity compared with 5-HT(2C) and 5-HT(2B) receptors, respectively. Nelotanserin dosed orally prevented (+/-)-1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane (DOI; 5-HT(2A) agonist)-induced hypolocomotion, increased sleep consolidation, and increased total nonrapid eye movement sleep time and deep sleep, the latter marked by increases in electroencephalogram (EEG) delta power. These effects on rat sleep were maintained after repeated subchronic dosing. In healthy human volunteers, nelotanserin was rapidly absorbed after oral administration and achieved maximum concentrations 1 h later. EEG effects occurred within 2 to 4 h after dosing, and were consistent with vigilance-lowering. A dose response of nelotanserin was assessed in a postnap insomnia model in healthy subjects. All doses (up to 40 mg) of nelotanserin significantly improved measures of sleep consolidation, including decreases in the number of stage shifts, number of awakenings after sleep onset, microarousal index, and number of sleep bouts, concomitant with increases in sleep bout duration. Nelotanserin did not affect total sleep time, or sleep onset latency. Furthermore, subjective pharmacodynamic effects observed the morning after dosing were minimal and had no functional consequences on psychomotor skills or memory. These studies point to an efficacy and safety profile for nelotanserin that might be ideally suited for the treatment of sleep maintenance insomnias.

  14. Peptide YY3–36 and 5-Hydroxytryptamine Mediate Emesis Induction by Trichothecene Deoxynivalenol (Vomitoxin)

    PubMed Central

    Pestka, James J.

    2013-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON, vomitoxin), a trichothecene mycotoxin produced by Fusarium sp. that frequently occurs in cereal grains, has been associated with human and animal food poisoning. Although a common hallmark of DON-induced toxicity is the rapid onset of emesis, the mechanisms for this adverse effect are not fully understood. Recently, our laboratory has demonstrated that the mink (Neovison vison) is a suitable small animal model for investigating trichothecene-induced emesis. The goal of this study was to use this model to determine the roles of two gut satiety hormones, peptide YY3–36 (PYY3–36) and cholecystokinin (CCK), and the neurotransmitter 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in DON-induced emesis. Following ip exposure to DON at 0.1 and 0.25mg/kg bw, emesis induction ensued within 15–30min and then persisted up to 120min. Plasma DON measurement revealed that this emesis period correlated with the rapid distribution and clearance of the toxin. Significant elevations in both plasma PYY3–36 (30–60min) and 5-HT (60min) but not CCK were observed during emesis. Pretreatment with the neuropeptide Y2 receptor antagonist JNJ-31020028 attenuated DON- and PYY-induced emesis, whereas the CCK1 receptor antagonist devezapide did not alter DON’s emetic effects. The 5-HT3 receptor antagonist granisetron completely suppressed induction of vomiting by DON and the 5-HT inducer cisplatin. Granisetron pretreatment also partially blocked PYY3–36-induced emesis, suggesting a potential upstream role for this gut satiety hormone in 5-HT release. Taken together, the results suggest that both PYY3–36 and 5-HT play contributory roles in DON-induced emesis. PMID:23457120

  15. Potentiation by endothelin-1 of 5-hydroxytryptamine-induced contraction in coronary artery of the pig.

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, K.; Ishigai, Y.; Uchida, H.; Tanaka, Y.

    1991-01-01

    1. In order to elucidate the physiological and potential pathological roles of endothelin-1 (ET-1) in coronary artery contraction and relaxation, we undertook the present study to examine the action of ET-1 itself, and the combined effects of ET-1 with vasoconstrictor agonists such as acetylcholine (ACh), histamine, and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), all of which have been implicated in the genesis of coronary spasm. 2. Isometric tension and cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in a ring segment of porcine coronary artery loaded with fura-2 were measured simultaneously. 3. ET-1 contracted the artery in a concentration-dependent manner; and nisoldipine, a Ca2+ channel blocking drug of the 1,4-dihydropyridine type, antagonized the ET-1 action non-competitively. A radio-receptor binding assay also indicated the mutually exclusive binding of ET-1 and (+)-[3H]-PN200-110, a Ca2+ channel ligand, to the membrane fraction of porcine coronary artery. 4. ET-1 (10-100 pM) increased tension and [Ca2+]i in a parallel manner, while at higher concentrations (1-10 nM) it produced further contraction with a small increase in [Ca2+]i. 5. ET-1 (30-100 pM) selectively potentiated the 5-HT-induced contraction 1.5 to 2 times over the control without causing a significant increase in [Ca2+]i, which seems to be qualitatively similar to a tumour promoting phorbol ester, 12-deoxyphorbol 13-isobutylate (DPB). Bay K 8644 (10 nM), on the other hand, potentiated the contraction in response to practically all agonists used and affected a concomitant increase in [Ca2+]i.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1810605

  16. Increased responsiveness to 5-hydroxytryptamine after antigenic challenge is inhibited by nifedipine and niflumic acid in rat trachea in vitro.

    PubMed

    Moura, Carlos Tiago Martins; Bezerra, Fernanda Carvalho; de Moraes, Isabelle Maciel; Magalhães, Pedro Jorge Caldas; Capaz, Francisco Ruy

    2005-12-01

    Antigenic challenge often induces hyperreactivity in asthmatic airway, although the precise mechanism(s) underlying this increased responsiveness is not entirely known. Tracheae obtained from ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized saline- or OVA-challenged rats were placed in 10 mL bath chambers for isometric recording of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)-induced contractions. 5-Hydroxytryptamine induced a stronger contraction compared with control in antigen-challenged trachea under normal or Ca2+-free conditions. In tracheae pretreated with the L-type Ca2+ channel blocker nifedipine (10(-6) mol/L) or the Ca2+-activated Cl- channel blocker niflumic acid (10(-4) mol/L), this hyperresponsiveness was not developed in either normal or Ca2+-free medium. The increased contractile response to 5-HT in allergic rat isolated trachea may be related to a greater ionic (Ca2+ and Cl-) channel involvement.

  17. Inhibitory 5-hydroxytryptamine receptors involved in pressor effects obtained by stimulation of sympathetic outflow from spinal cord in pithed rats.

    PubMed

    Morán, A; Velasco, C; Salvador, T; Martín, M L; San Román, L

    1994-12-01

    1. A study was made of the effects of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) on pressor response induced in vivo by electrical stimulation of the sympathetic outflow from the spinal cord of pithed rats. All animals had been pretreated with atropine. Intravenous infusion of 5-hydroxytryptamine at doses of 10 and 20 micrograms kg-1 min-1 reduced the pressor effects obtained by electrical stimulation at intervals of 10 min over the 1 h of infusion. 2. This inhibitory action of 5-HT was depressed by cyproheptadine and methiothepin but was not modified by ketanserin or MDL-72222. By contrast, the inhibitory action of 5-HT was lost in pithed rats that had been pretreated with exogenous noradrenaline. 3. The 5-HT1 receptor agonist 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT) caused an inhibition of the pressor response, whereas the 5-HT3 receptor agonist, 1-phenylbiguanide, produced a variable but significant increase in the pressor response. The 5-HT2 receptor agonist, m-CPP, did not modify the pressor sympathetic response. 4. Our results suggest that 5-hydroxytryptamine interferes with sympathetic neurotransmission by inhibiting pressor effects as a result of stimulation of the complete sympathetic outflow, and that this inhibition is mainly through a presynaptic 5-HT1 mechanism.

  18. 5-hydroxytryptamine stimulation of phospholipase D activity in the rabbit isolated mesenteric artery.

    PubMed

    Hinton, J M; Adams, D; Garland, C J

    1999-04-01

    1. The involvement of phospholipase D (PLD) in the 5-hydroxytryptamine 5-HT1B/5-HT1D-signalling pathway was assessed in the rabbit isolated mesenteric artery. 2. RT-PCR analysis of mesenteric smooth muscle cells revealed a strong signal corresponding to mRNA transcript for the 5-HT1B receptor. The PCR fragment corresponded to the known sequence for the 5-HT1B receptor. No signal corresponding to 5-HT1D mRNA was detected. 3. Neither 5-HT (3 microM) nor KCl (45 mM) individually stimulated any significant increase in the smooth muscle concentration of [33P]-PtdBut to reflect PLD activity. However, in the presence of KCl (45 mM), 5-HT evoked a concentration-dependent increase in [33P]-PtdBut, to a maximum of 84% with 5-HT (3 microM). 4. [33P]-PtdBut accumulation evoked by 5-HT in the presence of KCl was abolished in nominally calcium-free Krebs-Henseleit Buffer (KHB) or with the selective protein kinase C inhibitor, Ro-31 8220 (10 microM, 20 min). 5. 5-HT (3 microM) in the presence of KCl (45 mM) failed to increase either the accumulation of [33P]-phosphatidic acid in the presence of butanol, or total [3H]-inositol phosphates ([3H]-InsP) in the presence of LiCl (10 mM). 6. 5-HT (0.1-1 microM) abolished forskolin (1 microM) stimulated increases in cyclic AMP (15 fold increase), an action which was pertussis toxin-sensitive. 7. Therefore, in the presence of raised extracellular potassium 5-HT can stimulate PLD via 5-HT1B receptors in the rabbit mesenteric artery. This action requires extracellular calcium and the activation of protein kinase C. These characteristics are identical to the profile for 5-HT1B/5-HT1D-receptor evoked contraction in vascular smooth muscle cells, suggesting a role for PLD in this response to 5-HT.

  19. Functional properties of a cloned 5-hydroxytryptamine ionotropic receptor subunit: comparison with native mouse receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Hussy, N; Lukas, W; Jones, K A

    1994-01-01

    1. A comparative study of the whole-cell and single-channel properties of cloned and native mouse 5-hydroxytryptamine ionotropic receptors (5-HT3) was undertaken using mammalian cell lines expressing the cloned 5-HT3 receptor subunit A (5-HT3R-A), superior cervical ganglia (SCG) neurones and N1E-115 cells. 2. No pharmacological difference was found in the sensitivity to the agonists 5-HT and 2-methyl-5-HT, or to the antagonists d-tubocurare and 3-tropanyl-3,5-dichlorobenzoate (MDL-72222). 3. Current-voltage (I-V) relationships of whole-cell currents showed inward rectification in the three preparations. Rectification was stronger both in cells expressing the 5-HT3R-A subunit and in N1E-115 cells when compared with SCG neurones. 4. No clear openings could be resolved in 5-HT-activated currents in patches excised from cells expressing the 5-HT3R-A subunit or N1E-115 cells. Current fluctuation analysis of whole-cell and excised-patch records revealed a slope conductance of 0.4-0.6 pS in both preparations. Current-voltage relationships of these channels showed strong rectification that fully accounted for the whole-cell voltage dependence. 5. In contrast, single channels of about 10 pS were activated by 5-HT in patches excised from SCG neurones. The weak voltage dependence of their conductance did not account completely for the rectification of whole-cell currents. A lower unitary conductance (3.4 pS) was inferred from whole-cell noise analysis. 6. We conclude that the receptor expressed from the cloned cDNA is indistinguishable from the 5-HT3 receptor of N1E-115 cells, suggesting an identical structure for these two receptors. The higher conductance and different voltage dependence of the 5-HT3 receptor in SCG neurones might indicate the participation of an additional subunit in the structure of native ganglionic 5-HT3 receptors. Homo-oligomeric 5-HT3R-A channels may also be present as suggested by the lower conductance estimated by whole-cell noise analysis. PMID

  20. Structural basis of the anti-inflammatory activity of quercetin: inhibition of the 5-hydroxytryptamine type 2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Rotelli, Alejandra Ester; Aguilar, Carlos Fernando; Pelzer, Lilian Eugenia

    2009-09-01

    The anti-inflammatory activity of quercetin was evaluated through serotonin-induced rat-paw edema. The experiments showed that quercetin had an important effect on acute inflammatory processes. Docking of serotonin and quercetin into the homology model of the 5-Hydroxytryptamine Type 2 Receptor allowed to analyze the structural basis of the anti-inflammatory activity. Results showed that serotonin and quercetin bind in the same region of the active site with a similar binding energy but quercetin has a much bigger inhibition constant. Therefore, it seems possible that quercetin may act as a natural inhibitor of the receptor blocking the acute inflammation generated by serotonin.

  1. KIBRA Modulates Directional Migration of Podocytes

    PubMed Central

    Duning, Kerstin; Schurek, Eva-Maria; Schlüter, Marc; Bayer, Michael; Reinhardt, Hans-Christian; Schwab, Albrecht; Schaefer, Liliana; Benzing, Thomas; Schermer, Bernhard; Saleem, Moin A.; Huber, Tobias B.; Bachmann, Sebastian; Kremerskothen, Joachim; Weide, Thomas; Pavenstädt, Hermann

    2008-01-01

    Asymmetric delivery and distribution of macromolecules are essential for cell polarity and for cellular functions such as differentiation, division, and signaling. Injury of podocytes, which are polarized epithelial cells, changes the dynamics of the actin meshwork, resulting in foot process retraction and proteinuria. Although the spatiotemporal control of specific protein–protein interactions is crucial for the establishment of cell polarity, the mechanisms controlling polarity-dependent differentiation and division are incompletely understood. In this study, yeast two-hybrid screens were performed using a podocyte cDNA library and the polarity protein PATJ as bait. The protein KIBRA was identified as an interaction partner of PATJ and was localized to podocytes, tubular structures, and collecting ducts. The last four amino acids of KIBRA mediated binding to the eighth PDZ domain of PATJ. In addition, KIBRA directly bound to synaptopodin, an essential organizer of the podocyte cytoskeleton. Stable knockdown of KIBRA in immortalized podocytes impaired directed cell migration, suggesting that KIBRA modulates the motility of podocytes by linking polarity proteins and cytoskeleton-associated protein complexes. PMID:18596123

  2. Dopaminergic neurons modulate GABA neuron migration in the embryonic midbrain.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Anju; Won, Chungkil; Li, Suyan; Erdélyi, Ferenc; Szabó, Gábor; Kim, Kwang-Soo

    2012-09-01

    Neuronal migration, a key event during brain development, remains largely unexplored in the mesencephalon, where dopaminergic (DA) and GABA neurons constitute two major neuronal populations. Here we study the migrational trajectories of DA and GABA neurons and show that they occupy ventral mesencephalic territory in a temporally and spatially specific manner. Our results from the Pitx3-deficient aphakia mouse suggest that pre-existing DA neurons modulate GABA neuronal migration to their final destination, providing novel insights and fresh perspectives concerning neuronal migration and connectivity in the mesencephalon in normal as well as diseased brains.

  3. Selective 5-hydroxytryptamine2 antagonists have antidepressant-like effects on differential-reinforcement-of-low-rate 72-second schedule.

    PubMed

    Marek, G J; Li, A A; Seiden, L S

    1989-07-01

    The effects of eleven 5-hydroxytryptamine antagonists with varying selectivity for the 5-hydroxytryptamine2 (5-HT2) relative to the 5-HT1 binding site were assessed in rats responding under a differential-reinforcement-of-low rate 72-sec (DRL 72-s) schedule of reinforcement. Three drugs with a 1000-fold selectivity for the 5-HT2 binding site (ketanserin, ritanserin, pipamperone) increased the reinforcement rate and decreased the response rate similar to antidepressant drugs. The two drugs with roughly the same affinity for both 5-HT1 and 5-HT2 binding sites (methysergide and metergoline) did not increase the reinforcement rate. The maximal increase in the reinforcement rate after 5-HT antagonist administration was positively correlated with the selectivity of the 5-HT antagonists for the 5-HT2 versus the 5-HT1 binding site. The increase in the reinforcement rate after administration of 5-HT antagonists was not correlated with the affinity of the 5-HT antagonists for the alpha-1 adrenergic, alpha-2 adrenergic, histamine-1 or dopamine-2 receptors. The 1000-fold selective 5-HT2 antagonist xylamidine, which does not pass the blood-brain barrier, did not increase the reinforcement rate or decrease the response rate. Thus, selective antagonism of central 5-HT2 relative to 5-HT1 receptors results in antidepressant-like effects on the DRL 72-s schedule. Furthermore, the specificity of the DRL 72-s schedule as a screen for antidepressant drugs was strengthened by the observation that the alpha-1 adrenergic antagonist, prazosin, did not increase the reinforcement rate despite significant decreases in the response rate.

  4. The effect of DA-9701 on 5-hydroxytryptamine-induced contraction of feline esophageal smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Oh, Kyung Hoon; Nam, Yoonjin; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Kim, In Kyeom; Sohn, Uy Dong

    2014-04-22

    Serotonin, or 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), is a monoamine neurotransmitter found in blood platelets, the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, and the central nervous system (CNS) of animals and humans. The signaling pathways of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)-induced contractions in cat esophageal smooth muscle cell (ESMC)s have been identified, but the downstream components of the 5-HT signaling pathway remain unclear. DA-9701 is the standardized extract of the Pharbitis nil Choisy seed (Pharbitidis Semen, Convolvulaceae) and the root of Corydalis yahusuo W.T. Wang (Corydalis Tuber, Papaveraceae). DA-9701 is known to have strong gastroprokinetic effects and a good safety profile. In this study, we investigated the 5-HT signaling pathway at the G-protein level, and we explored the mechanisms by which DA-9701 induces smooth muscle contraction. Freshly isolated smooth muscle cells were harvested from the feline esophagus, and cells were permeabilized to measure their length. 5-HT produced esophageal smooth muscle contractions in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, 5-HT produced a relatively long-acting contraction. 5-HT binds to the 5-HT2, 5-HT3 and 5-HT4 receptors to induce smooth muscle contraction in feline ESMCs. These receptors, which are located in esophageal smooth muscle, are coupled to Gαq, Gαo and Gαs. These G proteins activate PLC, which leads to Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent MLCK activation, resulting in MLC20 phosphorylation and cell contraction. Conversely, DA-9701 inhibits 5-HT-induced contraction by inhibiting MLC20 phosphorylation.

  5. Selective blockade of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)7 receptors enhances 5-HT transmission, antidepressant-like behavior, and rapid eye movement sleep suppression induced by citalopram in rodents.

    PubMed

    Bonaventure, Pascal; Kelly, Lisa; Aluisio, Leah; Shelton, Jonathan; Lord, Brian; Galici, Ruggero; Miller, Kirsten; Atack, John; Lovenberg, Timothy W; Dugovic, Christine

    2007-05-01

    Evidence has accumulated supporting a role for 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)7 receptors in circadian rhythms, sleep, and mood disorders, presumably as a consequence of the modulation of 5-HT-mediated neuronal activity. We hypothesized that a selective 5-HT7 receptor antagonist, (2R)-1-[(3-hydroxyphenyl)sulfonyl]-2-[2-(4-methyl-1-piperidinyl)ethyl]-pyrrolidine (SB-269970), should increase activity of 5-HT neurons and potentiate the effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (citalopram). In rats, administration of 3 mg/kg s.c. citalopram alone increased the extracellular concentration of 5-HT. This effect of citalopram on extracellular 5-HT concentration was significantly enhanced by an ineffective dose of SB-269970. Combining this dose of SB-269970 with a low dose of citalopram also resulted in a significant increase in extracellular concentration of 5-HT, suggesting a potentiation of neurochemical effects. In mice, citalopram and SB-269970 dose-dependently decreased immobility time in the tail suspension test. The dose-effect curve of citalopram was shifted leftward by coadministration of an effective dose of SB-269970. Furthermore, combining ineffective doses of citalopram and SB-269970 also resulted in a significant decrease of immobility time in the tail suspension test, suggesting potentiation of antidepressant-like effects. In rats, SB-269970 potentiated the increase of rapid eye movement (REM) latency and the REM sleep decrease induced by citalopram. SB-269970 also reversed the increase in sleep fragmentation induced by citalopram. Rat plasma and brain concentrations of citalopram were not affected by coadministration of SB-269970, arguing for a pharmacodynamic rather than a pharmacokinetic mechanism. Overall, these results indicate that selective blockade of 5-HT7 receptors may enhance the antidepressant efficacy of citalopram and may provide a novel therapy to alleviate sleep disturbances associated with depression.

  6. Effects of 5-hydroxytryptamine, dopamine, and acetylcholine on accumulation of cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP in the anterior byssus retractor muscle of Mytilus edulis L. (Mollusca).

    PubMed

    Köhler, G; Lindl, T

    1980-02-01

    We investigated in vitro accumulation of adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (induced by 5-hydroxytryptamine and dopamine) and of guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (induced by acetylcholine) in the anterior byssus retractor muscle of Mytilus. The response to 5-hydroxytryptamine exceeded that induced by equimolar concentrations of dopamine. 1-methyl lysergic acid, a 5-hydroxytryptamine-blocking agent, diminished the 5-hydroxytryptamine-induced increase of cyclic AMP level. This parallels the effect of this amine on the contracted muscle. Acetylcholine, which causes a tonic contraction of the muscle, increased intracellular levels of cyclic GMP in a dose-dependent (max. 45-fold at 10(-4) M ACh) manner. The time course of the rise in cyclic GMP level was rapid and transient (peak concentration of cyclic GMP at 2 min). Mytolon was the most effective of all cholinergic blockers tested. It was concluded that cyclic nucleotides may play a role in the modulatory process of the transmitters. A direct relation to the relaxation-contraction process could not be established.

  7. Sevoflurane induced amnesia inhibits hippocampal Arc expression partially through 5-hydroxytryptamine-7 receptors in the bilateral basolateral amygdala in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fujun; Feng, Xiaomei; Zeng, Qingwen; Wang, Bo; Wilhelmsen, Kevin; Li, Qiang; Cao, Xiaohua; Yu, Buwei

    2014-03-06

    This study aimed to investigate whether the regulation of 5-hydroxytryptamine-7 (5-HT7) receptors in the bilateral basolateral amygdala (BLA) could alter the amnesic effects of sevoflurane and change the hippocampal expression of Arc and neural apoptosis. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into ten groups. First, the animals received bilateral injection of SB269970 (20, 50, or 100 pmol/0.2 μl) or saline (0.2 μl) or AS-19 (2, 10, or 50 pmol/0.2 μl), followed by inhalation of 2% sevoflurane or air for 2h. Then, fear conditioning training was carried out, and the percentage of freezing was detected 24h later. Furthermore, hippocampal Arc protein level and neural apoptosis were measured. Pre-training inhalation of sevoflurane reduced the extent of freezing, and hippocampal Arc expression. The largest dose of SB269970 (100 pmol) could block sevoflurane-induced amnesia and reverse the inhibitive effect of sevoflurane on Arc expression, while the maximal dose of AS-19 could exacerbate the amnesic effect, and further inhibit Arc expression. Furthermore, pre-training inhalation of 2% sevoflurane for 6h could not induce neural apoptosis in the hippocampus. The amnesic effect of sevoflurane might partly attribute to its impairment of memory formation in the hippocampus via activation of 5-HT7 receptors in the BLA.

  8. 5-Carboxamidotryptamine is a selective agonist at 5-hydroxytryptamine receptors mediating vasodilatation and tachycardia in anaesthetized cats.

    PubMed Central

    Connor, H. E.; Feniuk, W.; Humphrey, P. P.; Perren, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    We have attempted to characterize the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptors mediating bronchoconstriction, vasodilatation, vasodepression and tachycardia in anaesthetized cats following bilateral vagosympathectomy and beta-adrenoceptor blockade with propranolol. 5-HT (1-100 micrograms/kg-1 i.v.) caused dose-related bronchoconstriction and tachycardia but variable and complex effects on diastolic blood pressure and carotid arterial vascular resistance. In contrast, 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT; 0.01-1 micrograms kg-1 i.v.) caused consistent, dose-related decreases in diastolic blood pressure and carotid arterial vascular resistance and increases in heart rate. 5-CT did not cause bronchoconstriction. The 5-HT-induced bronchoconstriction was dose-dependently antagonized by methiothepin, methysergide and ketanserin (10-100 micrograms kg-1 i.v.). The highest doses used of these antagonists did not antagonize bronchoconstriction induced by prostaglandin F2 alpha. The high potency of all three antagonists indicate a 5-HT2-receptor mediated effect. The 5-HT- and 5-CT-induced tachycardia as well as the 5-CT-induced vasodepressor and carotid arterial vasodilator responses were dose-dependently antagonized by low doses of methiothepin (10-100 micrograms kg-1 i.v.) and by high doses of methysergide (100-1000 micrograms kg-1 i.v.) but were little affected by ketanserin in doses up to 1000 micrograms kg-1 i.v. These selective effects of 5-CT appear to be mediated by '5-HT1-like' receptors. PMID:2937503

  9. Superagonist, Full Agonist, Partial Agonist, and Antagonist Actions of Arylguanidines at 5-Hydroxytryptamine-3 (5-HT3) Subunit A Receptors.

    PubMed

    Alix, Katie; Khatri, Shailesh; Mosier, Philip D; Casterlow, Samantha; Yan, Dong; Nyce, Heather L; White, Michael M; Schulte, Marvin K; Dukat, Małgorzata

    2016-11-16

    Introduction of minor variations to the substitution pattern of arylguanidine 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 (5-HT3) receptor ligands resulted in a broad spectrum of functionally-active ligands from antagonist to superagonist. For example, (i) introduction of an additional Cl-substituent(s) to our lead full agonist N-(3-chlorophenyl)guanidine (mCPG, 2; efficacy % = 106) yielded superagonists 7-9 (efficacy % = 186, 139, and 129, respectively), (ii) a positional isomer of 2, p-Cl analog 11, displayed partial agonist actions (efficacy % = 12), and (iii) replacing the halogen atom at the meta or para position with an electron donating OCH3 group or a stronger electron withdrawing (i.e., CF3) group resulted in antagonists 13-16. We posit based on combined mutagenesis, crystallographic, and computational analyses that for the 5-HT3 receptor, the arylguanidines that are better able to simultaneously engage the primary and complementary subunits, thus keeping them in close proximity, have greater agonist character while those that are deficient in this ability are antagonists.

  10. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) Cellular Sequestration during Chronic Exposure Delays 5-HT3 Receptor Resensitization due to Its Subsequent Release*

    PubMed Central

    Hothersall, J. Daniel; Alexander, Amy; Samson, Andrew J.; Moffat, Christopher; Bollan, Karen A.; Connolly, Christopher N.

    2014-01-01

    The serotonergic synapse is dynamically regulated by serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)) with elevated levels leading to the down-regulation of the serotonin transporter and a variety of 5-HT receptors, including the 5-HT type-3 (5-HT3) receptors. We report that recombinantly expressed 5-HT3 receptor binding sites are reduced by chronic exposure to 5-HT (IC50 of 154.0 ± 45.7 μm, t½ = 28.6 min). This is confirmed for 5-HT3 receptor-induced contractions in the guinea pig ileum, which are down-regulated after chronic, but not acute, exposure to 5-HT. The loss of receptor function does not involve endocytosis, and surface receptor levels are unaltered. The rate and extent of down-regulation is potentiated by serotonin transporter function (IC50 of 2.3 ± 1.0 μm, t½ = 3.4 min). Interestingly, the level of 5-HT uptake correlates with the extent of down-regulation. Using TX-114 extraction, we find that accumulated 5-HT remains soluble and not membrane-bound. This cytoplasmically sequestered 5-HT is readily releasable from both COS-7 cells and the guinea pig ileum. Moreover, the 5-HT level released is sufficient to prevent recovery from receptor desensitization in the guinea pig ileum. Together, these findings suggest the existence of a novel mechanism of down-regulation where the chronic release of sequestered 5-HT prolongs receptor desensitization. PMID:25281748

  11. Comparative effects of niflumic acid and nifedipine on 5-hydroxytryptamine- and acetylcholine-induced contraction of the rat trachea.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, M C; Coelho, R R; Leal-Cardoso, J H; Criddle, D N

    2000-04-07

    The effects of niflumic acid, an inhibitor of Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) (Cl((Ca))) channels, were compared with those of the voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channel (VDCC) blocker nifedipine on 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)- and acetylcholine-induced contractions of the rat isolated trachea. Niflumic acid (3-100 microM) induced a concentration-dependent inhibition of 5-HT (10 microM)-induced contractions, with a reduction to 37.0+/-9.5% of the control at the highest concentration. One micromolar nifedipine, which completely blocked 60 mM KCl-induced contractions, reduced the response to 5-HT similarly to 39.2+/-11.5% of the control. The inhibition of the 5-HT response was not significantly different from that produced by the combined presence of nifedipine (1 microM) and niflumic acid (100 microM), suggesting that their effects were not additive. In contrast, neither niflumic acid (3-100 microM) nor nifedipine (1 microM) inhibited acetylcholine-induced contractions. The contraction to 5-HT (10 microM) in Cl(-)-free solution was decreased by more than approximately 85% of the control, whilst that of acetylcholine was reduced only by approximately 36%. Our data show that niflumic acid exerts selective inhibitory effects on 5-HT-induced contraction, and suggest that activation of Cl((Ca)) channels may be a mechanism whereby 5-HT (but not acetylcholine) induces Ca(2+) entry via VDCCs to elicit contraction.

  12. Mediation of 5-hydroxytryptamine-induced tachycardia in the pig by the putative 5-HT4 receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Villalón, C. M.; den Boer, M. O.; Heiligers, J. P.; Saxena, P. R.

    1990-01-01

    Intravenous bolus injections of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; 3, 10 and 30 micrograms kg-1), 5-methoxytryptamine (5-MeO-T; 3, 10 and 30 micrograms kg-1), renzapride (BRL 24924; 3, 10, 30 and 100 micrograms kg-1) and isoprenaline (0.03, 0.1 and 0.3 micrograms kg-1) to anaesthetized pigs increased heart rate by, respectively, 22 +/- 3, 44 +/- 3 and 65 +/- 4 beats min-1 (5-HT; n = 17); 12 +/- 1, 26 +/- 2 and 44 +/- 4 beats min-1 (5-MeO-T; n = 15), 5 +/- 2, 11 +/- 2, 18 +/- 4 and 37 +/- 5 beats min-1 (renzapride; n = 8) and 17 +/- 2, 46 +/- 3 and 75 +/- 3 beats min-1 (isoprenaline; n = 13). The responses to 5-HT, 5-MeO-T and renzapride were antagonized by ICS 205-930 (1 and 3 mg kg-1, i.v.), which did not modify the increases in heart rate by isoprenaline. Renzapride showed tachyphylaxis and attenuated the responses to 5-HT. These findings indicate that 5-HT elicits tachycardia in the pig by acting on a novel receptor, either similar or identical to the 5-HT4 receptor identified in mouse brain colliculi. PMID:2207493

  13. Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) immunoreactive endocrine and neural elements in the chromaffin enteropancreatic system of amphibians and reptiles.

    PubMed

    Trandaburu, Tiberiu; Trandaburu, Ioana

    2007-01-01

    The diffuse chromaffin enteropancreatic system of nine species of amphibians (newts, frogs) and reptiles (turtles, lizards, snakes) was investigated immunohistochemically for the presence and topographic distribution of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT). The study revealed various numbers of serotonin-producing cells in the pancreas and intestinal epithelium and also immunolabelled nerve profiles in the villi of all species studied. In addition, two different morphological populations of serotonin cells ("open" and "closed") were localized in the functional segments of the intestines in the representative species of all the taxa investigated. Semi-quantitative evaluation of the immunolabelled pancreatic and enteric cells revealed significantly different mean numbers of labelled cells in different amphibian and reptilian taxa, and also between the various successive gut segments of each taxon. The ratio between "open" and "closed" varieties of serotonin cells recorded along the intestines followed a decreasing trend, progressive in lizards and snakes and more abrupt in newts, frogs and turtles. The above findings may help resolve several key stages of the phylogenetic evolution of poikilothermic vertebrates.

  14. 6-Substituted tricyclic partial ergoline compounds are selective and potent 5-hydroxytryptamine sub 1A receptor agents

    SciTech Connect

    Slaughter, J.L.; Harrington, M.A.; Peroutka, S.J. )

    1990-01-01

    A series of 6 tricyclic partial ergoline derivatives was analyzed using radioligand binding assays. Four agents (LY 178210, LY 254089, LY 197205, and LY 197206) display high affinity for 5-hydroxytryptamine{sub 1A} (5-HT{sub 1A}) receptor binding sites labeled by ({sup 3}H)8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino) tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) and display {ge} 150 fold selectivity for the 5-HT{sub 1A} over the 5-HT{sub 1D} receptor binding site. The most potent agent investigated, LY 178210, is essentially inactive at a total of 12 other neurotransmitter receptor binding sites in the brain. Using a forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase assay as a model of 5-HT{sub 1A} receptor function, LY 178210 was found to display partial agonist activity which was blocked by 10{sup {minus}5} M ({minus})pindolol. These data indicate that LY 178210 is a potent and selective 5-HT{sub 1A} receptor partial agonist.

  15. Identification and characterization of a truncated variant of the 5-hydroxytryptamine(2A) receptor produced by alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Guest, P C; Salim, K; Skynner, H A; George, S E; Bresnick, J N; McAllister, G

    2000-09-08

    We have identified an alternatively spliced 5-hydroxytryptamine 2A receptor (5-HT(2A)-R) transcript by PCR of human brain cDNA using degenerate oligonucleotide primers to transmembrane (TM) domains 3 and 7 of the 5-HT(2)-R subfamily. The variant contains a 118-bp insertion at the exon II/III boundary of the 5-HT(2A)-R, which produces a frame shift in the coding sequence and a premature stop codon. PCR analysis showed that the truncated receptor (5-HT(2A-tr)) and native 5-HT(2A)-R were co-expressed in most brain tissues, with the highest levels being found in hippocampus, corpus collosum, amygdala and caudate nucleus. Western blot analysis of HEK-293 cells transfected transiently with a 5-HT(2A-tr) construct showed that a 30-kDa protein was expressed on cell membranes. Co-transfection studies showed no effect of the 5-HT(2A-tr) variant on 3H-ketanserin binding to the native 5-HT(2A)-R or on functional coupling of the 5-HT(2A)-R to 5-HT-stimulated Ca(2+) mobilization. The functional significance of the 5-HT(2A-tr) variant and other truncated receptors remains to be established.

  16. Identification of 5-Hydroxytryptamine-Producing Cells by Detection of Fluorescence in Paraffin-Embedded Tissue Sections

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Y.; Onda, N.; Watanabe, Y.; Shibutani, M.

    2016-01-01

    5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) produced by enterochromaffin (EC) cells is an important enteric mucosal signaling ligand and has been implicated in several gastrointestinal diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease and functional disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome. The present study reports a new, simple and rapid visualization method of 5-HT-producing EC cells utilizing detection of fluorescence in paraffin-embedded tissue sections after formalin fixation. In human samples, there was a high incidence of fluorescence+ cells in the 5-HT+ cells in the pyloric, small intestinal and colonic glands, while co-localization was lacking between fluorescence+ and gastrin+ cells in the pyloric and small intestinal glands. Fluorescence+ EC cells were detected in the colon of mice and rats. Fluorescence+ cells were also observed in 5-HT+ β cells in the pancreatic islets of Langerhans in pregnant mice, while non-pregnant mouse pancreatic islet cells showed no 5-HT immunoreactivity or fluorescence. These results suggest that fluorescence+ cells are identical to 5-HT+ cells, and the source of fluorescence may be 5-HT itself or molecules related to its synthesis or degradation. This fluorescence signal detection method may be applicable for monitoring of inflammatory status of inflammatory bowel diseases in both the experimental and clinical settings. PMID:27734992

  17. Release of endogenous 5-hydroxytryptamine from the myenteric plexus of the guinea-pig isolated small intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Holzer, P.; Skofitsch, G.

    1984-01-01

    The presence of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and its metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) in, and the release of these substances from, the myenteric plexus-longitudinal muscle (MPLM) layer of the guinea-pig isolated small intestine were investigated. 5-HT and 5-HIAA were measured by high performance liquid chromatography and electrochemical detection. Freshly prepared MPLM contained measurable amounts of 5-HT and 5-HIAA. For the release experiments, the MPLM was incubated in a medium containing the 5-HT uptake inhibitor fluoxetine and the monoamine oxidase inhibitor nialamide; this led to a decrease in the 5-HIAA content of the MPLM whereas the 5-HT content remained unchanged. There was a spontaneous release of 5-HT and 5-HIAA from the MPLM. The release of 5-HT was so small that it was just detectable; it seemed equivalent to about 0.8% of the tissue stores released per min. Depolarization of the tissue by increasing the [K+] or by exposing it to veratridine enhanced the release of 5-HT in a Ca2+-dependent manner whereas the release of 5-HIAA was not increased. Tetrodotoxin inhibited the veratridine-evoked release of 5-HT but did not affect the K+-evoked release of 5-HT. The presence of 5-HT in myenteric neurones and the characteristics of the release of 5-HT from these neurones strongly support the hypothesis that 5-HT is an enteric neurotransmitter. PMID:6200171

  18. Action of angiotensin II, 5-hydroxytryptamine and adenosine triphosphate on ionic currents in single ear artery cells of the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Hughes, A D; Bolton, T B

    1995-10-01

    1. Angiotensin II, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) evoked a transient inward current in isolated single car artery cells of rabbit held at -60 mV by whole cell voltage clamp in physiological saline using a KCL-containing pipette solution. Under these conditions agonist did not activate a calcium-dependent potassium current. 2. Responses to each agonist were transient and desensitized rapidly. Inward current at -60 mV holding potential was not abolished by blockade of voltage-dependent calcium channels or by buffering intracellular calcium with BAPTA, a calcium chelator, or following depletion of intracellular calcium stores with ryanodine. 3. The shape of the current-voltage relationships and the reversal potentials of the current induced by angiotensin II, 5-HT and ATP were similar under a variety of ionic conditions. Agonist-induced current was unaffected by replacing intracellular chloride with citrate ions or by replacing intracellular sodium with caesium or extracellular sodium with barium or calcium. Replacement of extracellular sodium with Tris shifted the reversal potential in all cases by around 30 mV negatively. 4. These data suggest that angiotensin II, 5-HT and ATP activate similar cationic conductances which are relatively non-selective allowing mono- and divalent cations to cross the smooth muscle cell membrane. These channels may allow the influx of calcium under physiological conditions.

  19. A noncanonical release of GABA and glutamate modulates neuronal migration.

    PubMed

    Manent, Jean-Bernard; Demarque, Michaël; Jorquera, Isabel; Pellegrino, Christophe; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Aniksztejn, Laurent; Represa, Alfonso

    2005-05-11

    Immature neurons express GABA and glutamate receptors before synapse formation, and both transmitters are released at an early developmental stage. We have now tested the hypothesis that the ongoing release of GABA and glutamate modulates neuronal migration. Using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine labeling and cocultures of hippocampal slices obtained from naive and green fluorescent protein-transgenic mice, we report that migration is severely affected by GABA(A) or NMDA receptor antagonist treatments. These effects were also present in munc18-1 knock-out slices in which soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE)-dependent vesicular secretion of transmitters has been deleted. GABA(A) antagonists were more efficient than NMDA antagonists to reduce cell migration, in keeping with the earlier maturation of GABAergic mechanisms. We conclude that GABA and, to a lesser degree, glutamate released in a SNARE-independent mechanism exert a paracrine action on neuronal migration.

  20. Parallel Functional Activity Profiling Reveals Valvulopathogens Are Potent 5-Hydroxytryptamine2B Receptor Agonists: Implications for Drug Safety Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xi-Ping; Setola, Vincent; Yadav, Prem N.; Allen, John A.; Rogan, Sarah C.; Hanson, Bonnie J.; Revankar, Chetana; Robers, Matt; Doucette, Chris

    2009-01-01

    Drug-induced valvular heart disease (VHD) is a serious side effect of a few medications, including some that are on the market. Pharmacological studies of VHD-associated medications (e.g., fenfluramine, pergolide, methysergide, and cabergoline) have revealed that they and/or their metabolites are potent 5-hydroxytryptamine2B (5-HT2B) receptor agonists. We have shown that activation of 5-HT2B receptors on human heart valve interstitial cells in vitro induces a proliferative response reminiscent of the fibrosis that typifies VHD. To identify current or future drugs that might induce VHD, we screened approximately 2200 U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved or investigational medications to identify 5-HT2B receptor agonists, using calcium-based high-throughput screening. Of these 2200 compounds, 27 were 5-HT2B receptor agonists (hits); 14 of these had previously been identified as 5-HT2B receptor agonists, including seven bona fide valvulopathogens. Six of the hits (guanfacine, quinidine, xylometazoline, oxymetazoline, fenoldopam, and ropinirole) are approved medications. Twenty-three of the hits were then “functionally profiled” (i.e., assayed in parallel for 5-HT2B receptor agonism using multiple readouts to test for functional selectivity). In these assays, the known valvulopathogens were efficacious at concentrations as low as 30 nM, whereas the other compounds were less so. Hierarchical clustering analysis of the pEC50 data revealed that ropinirole (which is not associated with valvulopathy) was clearly segregated from known valvulopathogens. Taken together, our data demonstrate that patterns of 5-HT2B receptor functional selectivity might be useful for identifying compounds likely to induce valvular heart disease. PMID:19570945

  1. 5-HT1 agonists reduce 5-hydroxytryptamine release in rat hippocampus in vivo as determined by brain microdialysis.

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, T.; Bramwell, S. R.; Grahame-Smith, D. G.

    1989-01-01

    1. An intracerebral perfusion method, brain microdialysis, was used to assess changes of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) release in the ventral hippocampus of the chloral hydrate-anaesthetized rat in response to systemic administration of a variety of 5-HT1 receptor agonists. 2. A stable output of reliably detectable endogenous 5-HT was measured in dialysates collected from ventral hippocampus with the 5-HT reuptake inhibitor, citalopram, present in the perfusion medium. 3. Under these conditions the putative 5-HT1A agonist 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) caused a dose-dependent (5-250 micrograms kg-1, s.c.) reduction of 5-HT in hippocampal dialysates. 4. Similarly, the putative 5-HT1A agonists gepirone (5 mg kg-1, s.c.), ipsapirone (5 mg kg-1, s.c.) and buspirone (5 mg kg-1, s.c.) markedly reduced levels of 5-HT in hippocampal perfusates whereas their common metabolite 1-(2-pyrimidinyl) piperazine (5 mg kg-1, s.c.), which does not bind to central 5-HT1A recognition sites, had no effect. 5. 5-Methoxy-3-(1,2,3,6-tetrahydro-4-pyridinyl)-1H-indole (RU 24969), a drug with reported high affinity for brain 5-HT1B binding sites, also produced a dose-dependent (0.25-5 mg kg-1, s.c.) decrease of hippocampal 5-HT output. 6. These data are direct biochemical evidence that systemically administered putative 5-HT1A and 5-HT1B agonists markedly inhibit 5-HT release in rat ventral hippocampus in vivo. PMID:2466516

  2. Interaction of tryptamine and ergoline compounds with threonine 196 in the ligand binding site of the 5-hydroxytryptamine6 receptor.

    PubMed

    Boess, F G; Monsma, F J; Meyer, V; Zwingelstein, C; Sleight, A J

    1997-09-01

    We examined the ligand-binding site of the 5-hydroxytryptamine6 (5-HT6) receptor using site-directed mutagenesis. Interactions with residues in two characteristic positions of trans-membrane region V are important for ligand binding in several bioamine receptors. In the 5-HT6 receptor, one of these residues is a threonine (Thr196), whereas in most other mammalian 5-HT receptors, the corresponding residue is alanine. After transient expression in human embryonic kidney 293 cells, we determined the effects of the mutation T196A on [3H]d-lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) binding and adenylyl cyclase stimulation. This mutation produced a receptor with a 10-fold reduced affinity for [3H]LSD and a 6-fold reduced affinity for 5-HT. The potency of both LSD and 5-HT for stimulation of adenylyl cyclase was also reduced by 18- and 7-fold, respectively. The affinity of other N1-unsubstituted ergolines (e.g., ergotamine, lisuride) was reduced 10-30 fold, whereas the affinity of N1-methylated ergolines (e.g., metergoline, methysergide, mesulergine) and other ligands, such as methiothepine, clozapine, ritanserin, amitriptyline, and mainserin, changed very little or increased. This indicates that in wild-type 5-HT6 receptor, Thr196 interacts with the N1 of N1-unsubstituted ergolines and tryptamines, probably forming a hydrogen bond. Based on molecular modeling, a serine residue in transmembrane region IV of the 5-HT2A receptor has previously been proposed to interact with the N1-position of 5-HT. When the corresponding residue of the 5-HT6 receptor (Ala154) was converted to serine, no change in the affinity of twelve 5-HT6 receptor ligands or in the potency of 5-HT and LSD could be detected, suggesting that this position does not contribute to the ligand binding site of the 5-HT6 receptor.

  3. Corticotropin-releasing factor increases GABA synaptic activity and induces inward current in 5-hydroxytryptamine dorsal raphe neurons.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Lynn G; Freeman-Daniels, Emily; Lemos, Julia C; Nunan, John D; Lamy, Christophe; Akanwa, Adaure; Beck, Sheryl G

    2008-11-26

    Stress-related psychiatric disorders such as anxiety and depression involve dysfunction of the serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] system. Previous studies have found that the stress neurohormone corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) inhibits 5-HT neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) in vivo. The goals of the present study were to characterize the CRF receptor subtypes (CRF-R1 and -R2) and cellular mechanisms underlying CRF-5-HT interactions. Visualized whole-cell patch-clamp recording techniques in brain slices were used to measure spontaneous or evoked GABA synaptic activity in DRN neurons of rats and CRF effects on these measures. CRF-R1 and -R2-selective agonists were bath applied alone or in combination with receptor-selective antagonists. CRF increased presynaptic GABA release selectively onto 5-HT neurons, an effect mediated by the CRF-R1 receptor. CRF increased postsynaptic GABA receptor sensitivity selectively in 5-HT neurons, an effect to which both receptor subtypes contributed. CRF also had direct effects on DRN neurons, eliciting an inward current in 5-HT neurons mediated by the CRF-R2 receptor and in non-5-HT neurons mediated by the CRF-R1 receptor. These results indicate that CRF has direct membrane effects on 5-HT DRN neurons as well as indirect effects on GABAergic synaptic transmission that are mediated by distinct receptor subtypes. The inhibition of 5-HT DRN neurons by CRF in vivo may therefore be primarily an indirect effect via stimulation of inhibitory GABA synaptic transmission. These results regarding the cellular mechanisms underlying the complex interaction between CRF, 5-HT, and GABA systems could contribute to the development of novel treatments for stress-related psychiatric disorders.

  4. CORTICOTROPIN-RELEASING FACTOR INCREASES GABA SYNAPTIC ACTIVITY AND INDUCES INWARD CURRENT IN 5-HYDROXYTRYPTAMINE DORSAL RAPHE NEURONS

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, Lynn G.; Freeman-Daniels, Emily; Lemos, Julia C.; Nunan, John D.; Lamy, Christophe; Akanwa, Adaure; Beck, Sheryl G.

    2008-01-01

    Stress-related psychiatric disorders such as anxiety and depression involve dysfunction of the serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) system. Previous studies have found that the stress neurohormone corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) inhibits 5-HT neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) in vivo. The goals of the present study were to characterize the CRF receptor subtypes (CRF-R1 and R2) and cellular mechanisms underlying CRF-5-HT interactions. Visualized whole-cell patch clamp recording techniques in brain slices were used to measure spontaneous or evoked GABA synaptic activity in DRN neurons of rats and CRF effects on these measures. CRF-R1 and -R2-selective agonists were bath applied alone or in combination with receptor-selective antagonists. CRF increased presynaptic GABA release selectively onto 5-HT neurons, an effect mediated by the CRF-R1 receptor. CRF increased postsynaptic GABA receptor sensitivity selectively in 5-HT neurons, an effect to which both receptor subtypes contributed. CRF also had direct effects on DRN neurons, eliciting an inward current in 5-HT neurons mediated by the CRF-R2 receptor and in non 5-HT neurons mediated by the CRF-R1 receptor. These results indicate that CRF has direct membrane effects on 5-HT DRN neurons as well as indirect effects on GABAergic synaptic transmission that are mediated by distinct receptor subtypes. The inhibition of 5-HT DRN neurons by CRF in vivo may therefore be largely an indirect effect via stimulation of inhibitory GABA synaptic transmission. These results regarding the cellular mechanisms underlying the complex interaction between CRF, 5-HT and GABA systems could contribute to the development of novel treatments for stress-related psychiatric disorders. PMID:19036986

  5. Predictive In Silico Studies of Human 5-hydroxytryptamine Receptor Subtype 2B (5-HT2B) and Valvular Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Terry-Elinor; Kumar, Krishna

    2014-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) receptors are neuromodulator neurotransmitter receptors which when activated generate a signal transduction pathway within cells resulting in cell-cell communication. 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) receptor 2B (5-HT2B) is a subtype of the seven members of 5-hydroxytrytamine (5-HT) family of receptors which is the largest member of the super family of 7-transmembrane G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). Not only do 5-HT receptors play physiological roles in the cardiovascular system, gastrointestinal and endocrine function and the central nervous, but they also play a role in behavioral functions. In particular 5-HT2B receptor is wide spread with regards to its distribution throughout bodily tissues and is expressed at high levels in the lungs, peripheral tissues, liver, kidney and prostate just to name a few. Hence 5-HT2B participates in multiple biological functions including CNS regulation, regulation of gastrointestinal motality, cardiovascular regulation and 5-HT transport system regulation. While 5-HT2B is a viable drug target and has therapeutic indications for treating obesity, psychotherapy, Parkinson’s disease etc. there is a growing concern regarding adverse drug reactions, specifically valvulopathy associated with 5-HT2B agonists. Due to the sequence homology experienced by 5-HT2 subtypes there is also a concern regarding the off target effects of 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C agonists. The concept of subtype selectivity is of paramount importance and can be tackled with the aid of in silico studies, specifically cheminformatics, to develop models to predict valvulopathy associated toxicity of drug candidates prior to clinical trials. This review has highlighted three in silico approaches thus far that have been successful in either predicting 5-HT2B toxicity of molecules or identifying important interactions between 5-HT2B and drug molecules that bring about valvulopathy related toxicities. PMID:23675941

  6. Effects of chlorphentermine and phentermine on the pulmonary disposition of 5-hydroxytryptamine in the rat in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, T.; Mehendale, H.M.

    1983-06-01

    This study was designed to examine whether chlorphentermine (CP) affects pulmonary disposition of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in rat in vivo. Further, the effects of CP were compared with those of phentermine (P), the nonchlorinated congener. The right jugular vein and left carotid artery of male Sprague-Dawley rats were cannulated and fresh saline solution containing 150 micrograms indocyanine green and a mixture of labeled and unlabeled 5-HT was injected into the jugular vein, and arterial blood samples were collected for 20 s. In order to compare the effect of CP and P on pulmonary disposition of 5-HT, 2.6 nmol (/sup 14/C)-5-HT was employed for in vivo single-pass experiments. Each animal was used for 2 in vivo single-pass experiments. After the first experiment, which served as a control, animals received an indicated dose of CP or P, to commence the second ''drug-treated'' in vivo experiment. Pulmonary clearance of 5-HT was inhibited by prior administration of CP (1 mg/kg) by 42%, whereas at the highest dose (20 mg/kg) P inhibited 5-HT clearance by only 25%. Pulmonary accumulation of CP was greater than P at higher doses, and the inhibition of 5-HT clearance correlated with the pulmonary accumulation of these drugs. In addition to the in vivo demonstration of the CP inhibition of pulmonary clearance of 5-HT in the rat, these studies also demonstrate a higher affinity of the lung tissue for CP than for P and a greater propensity for the impairment of pulmonary 5-HT clearance.

  7. Hypersensitivity of mesenteric veins to 5-hydroxytryptamine- and ketanserin-induced reduction of portal pressure in portal hypertensive rats.

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, S. A.; Groszmann, R. J.; Kaumann, A. J.

    1986-01-01

    Isolated superior mesenteric veins from portal hypertensive rats were 3 to 10 times more sensitive to 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and 3 times less sensitive to (-)-noradrenaline than veins from sham-operated rats. The sensitivity to vasopressin did not differ in the 2 groups. Ketanserin competitively antagonized the effects of 5-HT in superior mesenteric veins and portal veins with high affinity (KB values 0.1-0.3 nM), as expected for 5-HT2-receptors. The affinity of ketanserin for 5-HT2-receptors was similar in veins from normal, sham-operated or portal-hypertensive rats. Intraportal injections of low doses of 5-HT caused increases in portal pressure which were more pronounced in portal hypertensive rats than in sham-operated rats and were blocked by 0.3 mg kg-1 ketanserin in both groups. Ketanserin 0.3 mg kg-1 did not block the portal pressor response to (-)-noradrenaline in either group of rats. In portal hypertensive rats but not in sham-operated rats, 0.3 mg kg-1 ketanserin caused decreases in portal pressure, portal flow and cardiac output, as estimated by radioactive microspheres. The reduction in portal pressure caused by ketanserin was due mainly to a decrease in portal venous inflow secondary to a decreased cardiac output. The reduction in cardiac output, which was observed only in the portal hypertensive rats but not in sham-operated rats, is consistent with venous dilatation and pooling of blood in the portal venous system. The venous pooling could be secondary to the blockade of 5-HT2-receptors in the portal venous system. It is proposed that ketanserin should be explored for the treatment of patients with portal hypertension. PMID:3801785

  8. Reduced sensitivity to both positive and negative reinforcement in mice over-expressing the 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter.

    PubMed

    Line, Samantha J; Barkus, Chris; Rawlings, Nancy; Jennings, Katie; McHugh, Stephen; Sharp, Trevor; Bannerman, David M

    2014-12-01

    The 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) transporter (5-HTT) is believed to play a key role in both normal and pathological psychological states. Much previous data suggest that the s allele of the polymorphic regulatory region of the 5-HTT gene promoter is associated with reduced 5-HTT expression and vulnerability to psychiatric disorders, including anxiety and depression. In comparison, the l allele, which increases 5-HTT expression, is generally considered protective. However, recent data link this allele to both abnormal 5-HT signalling and psychopathic traits. Here, we studied the processing of aversive and rewarding cues in transgenic mice that over-express the 5-HTT (5-HTTOE mice). Compared with wild-type mice, 5-HTTOE mice froze less in response to both a tone that had previously been paired with footshock, and the conditioning context. In addition, on a decision-making T-maze task, 5-HTTOE mice displayed reduced preference for a larger, delayed reward and increased preference for a smaller, immediate reward, suggesting increased impulsiveness compared with wild-type mice. However, further inspection of the data revealed that 5-HTTOE mice displayed a relative insensitivity to reward magnitude, irrespective of delay. In contrast, 5-HTTOE mice appeared normal on tests of spatial working and reference memory, which required an absolute choice between options associated with either reward or no reward. Overall, the present findings suggest that 5-HTT over-expression results in a reduced sensitivity to both positive and negative reinforcers. Thus, these data show that increased 5-HTT expression has some maladaptive effects, supporting recent suggestions that l allele homozygosity may be a potential risk factor for disabling psychiatric traits.

  9. The Role of 5-Hydroxytryptamine in the Pathophysiology of Migraine and its Relevance to the Design of Novel Treatments.

    PubMed

    Villalón, Carlos M; VanDenBrink, Antoinette Maassen

    2016-07-28

    Migraine is a highly prevalent neurovascular disorder. Of the many factors that have been implicated over the years, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; serotonin) has long been involved in the pathophysiology of migraine. Certainly, some lines of evidence suggest: (i) a 5-HT depletion from blood platelets resulting in cranial extracerebral vasodilatation; and (ii) the effectiveness of an intravenous (i.v.) infusion of 5 HT to abort migraine in some patients. More direct evidence comes from some drugs that influence 5-HT release and/or interact (as agonists or antagonists) with 5-HT receptors to treat this disorder. Indeed, the development of sumatriptan and second generation triptans in the 1990's led to discover that these drugs produce selective cranial extracerebral vasoconstriction (via 5 HT1B receptors) and inhibition of the trigeminovascular system responses implicated in migraine (via 5 HT1D/5 HT1F receptors). Although the triptans represent the current mainstay of acute antimigraine treatment, a number of patients do not respond well to the triptans and are contraindicated in patients with cardiovascular pathologies. This mini-review outlines further developments in the design of novel (non-vasoconstrictor) antimigraine treatments acting via 5-HT receptors, including selective agonists at 5 HT1D and 5-HT1F receptors, agonists at 5-HT1B/1D receptors combined with other properties as well as antagonists at 5-HT2B/2C, 5-HT3 and 5 HT7 receptors. It also touches upon the recent development of antagonists and antibodies at calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and its receptors, which produce a direct blockade of the CGRPergic vasodilator mechanisms involved in migraine. These alternative pharmacological approaches will hopefully lead to less side effects.

  10. Treadmill exercise alleviates stress-induced impairment of social interaction through 5-hydroxytryptamine 1A receptor activation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Woon; Lim, Baek-Vin; Kim, Kijeong; Seo, Jin-Hee; Kim, Chang-Ju

    2015-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptors tyrosine kinase B (trkB), and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein (CREB) have been suggested as the neurobiological risk factors causing depressive disorder. Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of depression. We in-vestigated the effect of treadmill exercise on social interaction in relation with BDNF and 5-HT expressions following stress in rats. Stress was induced by applying inescapable 0.2 mA electric foot shock to the rats for 7 days. The rats in the exercise groups were forced to run on a motorized treadmill for 30 min once a day for 4 weeks. Social interaction test and western blot for BDNF, TrkB, pCREB, and 5-HT1A in the hippocampus were performed. The results indicate that the spend time with unfamiliar partner was decreased by stress, in contrast, treadmill exercise increased the spending time in the stress-induced rats. Expressions of BDNF, TrkB, and pCREB were decreased by stress, in contrast, treadmill exercise enhanced expressions of BDNF, TrkB, and pCREB in the stress-induced rats. In addition, 5-HT1A receptor expression was de-creased by stress, in contrast, treadmill exercise enhanced 5-HT1A expression in the stress-induced rats. In the present study, treadmill exercise alleviated stress-induced social interaction impairment through enhancing hippocampal plasticity and serotonergic function in the hippocampus. These effects of treadmill exercise are achieved through 5-HT1A receptor activation. PMID:26331133

  11. Increased extracellular dopamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine levels contribute to enhanced subthalamic nucleus neural activity during exhausting exercise

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Y; Liu, X

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore the mechanism underlying the enhanced subthalamic nucleus (STN) neural activity during exhausting exercise from the perspective of monoamine neurotransmitters and changes of their corresponding receptors. Rats were randomly divided into microdialysis and immunohistochemistry study groups. For microdialysis study, extracellular fluid of the STN was continuously collected with a microdialysis probe before, during and 90 min after one bout of exhausting exercise. Dopamine (DA) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) levels were subsequently detected with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). For immunohistochemistry study, the expression of DRD2 and HT2C receptors in the STN, before, immediately after and 90 min after exhaustion was detected through immunohistochemistry technique. Microdialysis study results showed that the extracellular DA and 5-HT neurotransmitters increased significantly throughout the procedure of exhausting exercise and the recovery period (P<0.05 or P<0.01). Immunohistochemistry study results showed that the expression levels of DRD2 and HT2C in the rat STN immediately after exhausting exercise and at the time point of 90 min after exhaustion were both higher than those of the rest condition, but the difference was not significant (P>0.05). Our results suggest that the increased extracellular DA and 5-HT in the STN might be one important factor leading to the enhanced STN neural activity and the development of fatigue during exhausting exercise. This study may essentially offer useful evidence for better understanding of the mechanism of the central type of exercise-induced fatigue. PMID:26424920

  12. 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) reduces total peripheral resistance during chronic infusion: direct arterial mesenteric relaxation is not involved

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) delivered over 1 week results in a sustained fall in blood pressure in the sham and deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt rat. We hypothesized 5-HT lowers blood pressure through direct receptor-mediated vascular relaxation. In vivo, 5-HT reduced mean arterial pressure (MAP), increased heart rate, stroke volume, cardiac index, and reduced total peripheral resistance during a 1 week infusion of 5-HT (25 µg/kg/min) in the normotensive Sprague Dawley rat. The mesenteric vasculature was chosen as an ideal candidate for the site of 5-HT receptor mediated vascular relaxation given the high percentage of cardiac output the site receives. Real-time RT-PCR demonstrated that mRNA transcripts for the 5-HT2B, 5-HT1B, and 5-HT7 receptors are present in sham and DOCA-salt superior mesenteric arteries. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot validated the presence of the 5-HT2B, 5- HT1B and 5-HT7 receptor protein in sham and DOCA-salt superior mesenteric artery. Isometric contractile force was measured in endothelium-intact superior mesenteric artery and mesenteric resistance arteries in which the contractile 5- HT2A receptor was antagonized. Maximum concentrations of BW-723C86 (5- HT2B agonist), CP 93129 (5-HT1B agonist) or LP-44 (5-HT7 agonist) did not relax the superior mesenteric artery from DOCA-salt rats vs. vehicle. Additionally, 5-HT (10–9 M to 10–5 M) did not cause relaxation in either contracted mesenteric resistance arteries or superior mesenteric arteries from normotensive Sprague- Dawley rats. Thus, although 5-HT receptors known to mediate vascular relaxation are present in the superior mesenteric artery, they are not functional, and are therefore not likely involved in a 5-HT-induced fall in total peripheral resistance and MAP. PMID:22559843

  13. 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) reduces total peripheral resistance during chronic infusion: direct arterial mesenteric relaxation is not involved.

    PubMed

    Davis, Robert Patrick; Pattison, Jill; Thompson, Janice M; Tiniakov, Ruslan; Scrogin, Karie E; Watts, Stephanie W

    2012-05-06

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) delivered over 1 week results in a sustained fall in blood pressure in the sham and deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt rat. We hypothesized 5-HT lowers blood pressure through direct receptor-mediated vascular relaxation. In vivo, 5-HT reduced mean arterial pressure (MAP), increased heart rate, stroke volume, cardiac index, and reduced total peripheral resistance during a 1 week infusion of 5-HT (25 µg/kg/min) in the normotensive Sprague Dawley rat. The mesenteric vasculature was chosen as an ideal candidate for the site of 5-HT receptor mediated vascular relaxation given the high percentage of cardiac output the site receives. Real-time RT-PCR demonstrated that mRNA transcripts for the 5-HT2B, 5-HT1B, and 5-HT7 receptors are present in sham and DOCA-salt superior mesenteric arteries. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot validated the presence of the 5-HT2B, 5- HT1B and 5-HT7 receptor protein in sham and DOCA-salt superior mesenteric artery. Isometric contractile force was measured in endothelium-intact superior mesenteric artery and mesenteric resistance arteries in which the contractile 5- HT2A receptor was antagonized. Maximum concentrations of BW-723C86 (5- HT2B agonist), CP 93129 (5-HT1B agonist) or LP-44 (5-HT7 agonist) did not relax the superior mesenteric artery from DOCA-salt rats vs. vehicle. Additionally, 5-HT (10-9 M to 10-5 M) did not cause relaxation in either contracted mesenteric resistance arteries or superior mesenteric arteries from normotensive Sprague- Dawley rats. Thus, although 5-HT receptors known to mediate vascular relaxation are present in the superior mesenteric artery, they are not functional, and are therefore not likely involved in a 5-HT-induced fall in total peripheral resistance and MAP.

  14. Changes in 5-hydroxytryptamine and cortisol plasma levels in menopausal women after inhalation of clary sage oil.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Bok; Cho, Eun; Kang, Young-Sook

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the antidepressant-like effects of clary sage oil on human beings by comparing the neurotransmitter level change in plasma. The voluntary participants were 22 menopausal women in 50's. Subjects were classified into normal and depression tendency groups using each of Korean version of Beck Depression Inventory-I (KBDI-I), KBDI-II, and Korean version of Self-rating Depression Scale. Then, the changes in neurotransmitter concentrations were compared between two groups. After inhalation of clary sage oil, cortisol levels were significantly decreased while 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) concentration was significantly increased. Thyroid stimulating hormone was also reduced in all groups but not statistically significantly. The different change rate of 5-HT concentration between normal and depression tendency groups was variable according to the depression measurement inventory. When using KBDI-I and KBDI-II, 5-HT increased by 341% and 828% for the normal group and 484% and 257% for the depression tendency group, respectively. The change rate of cortisol was greater in depression tendency groups compared with normal groups, and this difference was statistically significant when using KBDI-II (31% vs. 16% reduction) and Self-rating Depression Scale inventory (36% vs. 8.3% reduction). Among three inventories, only KBDI-II differentiated normal and depression tendency groups with significantly different cortisol level. Finally, clary sage oil has antidepressant-like effect, and KBDI-II inventory may be the most sensitive and valid tool in screening for depression status or severity.

  15. Synergistic effect of 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 and neurokinin 1 receptor antagonism in rodent models of somatic and visceral pain.

    PubMed

    Greenwood-Van Meerveld, Beverley; Mohammadi, Ehsan; Tyler, Karl; Pietra, Claudio; Bee, Lucy A; Dickenson, Anthony

    2014-10-01

    Synergistic activity has been observed between serotonergic 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 (5-HT3) and tachykinergic neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptor-mediated responses. This study investigated the efficacy of a 5-HT3 antagonist, palonosetron, and a NK1 antagonist, netupitant, alone or in combination in rodent models of somatic and visceral colonic hypersensitivity. In a rat model of experimental neuropathic pain, somatic hypersensitivity was quantified by the number of ipsilateral paw withdrawals to a von Frey filament (6g). Electrophysiologic responses were recorded in the dorsal horn neurons after mechanical or thermal stimuli. Acute colonic hypersensitivity was induced experimentally in rats by infusing dilute acetic acid (0.6%) directly into the colon. Colonic sensitivity was assessed by a visceromotor behavioral response quantified as the number of abdominal contractions in response to graded isobaric pressures (0-60 mm Hg) of colorectal distension. Palonosetron or netupitant was administered alone or in combination via oral gavage. When dosed alone, both significantly reduced somatic sensitivity, decreased the evoked response of spinal dorsal horn neurons to mechanical or thermal stimulation, and caused significant (P < 0.05) inhibition of colonic hypersensitivity in a dose-dependent manner. The combined administration of palonosetron and netupitant at doses that were ineffective alone significantly reduced both somatic and visceral sensitivity and decreased the evoked response of spinal dorsal horn neurons to mechanical or thermal stimulation. In summary, the combination of palonosetron with a NK1 receptor antagonist showed synergistic analgesic activity in rodent models of somatic and visceral hypersensitivity, and may prove to be a useful therapeutic approach to treat pain associated with irritable bowel syndrome.

  16. False labelling of dopaminergic terminals in the rabbit caudate nucleus: uptake and release of [3H]-5-hydroxytryptamine.

    PubMed Central

    Feuerstein, T. J.; Hertting, G.; Lupp, A.; Neufang, B.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of the catecholamine uptake inhibitor nomifensine and of the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) uptake blocker 6-nitroquipazine on the accumulation of [3H]-5-HT (0.1 microM, 60 min incubation) and [3H]-dopamine (0.1 microM, 30 min incubation) into slices of hippocampus and caudate nucleus of the rabbit was investigated. In addition, the influence of nomifensine on the electrically evoked [3H]-5-HT release from caudate nucleus slices and of nomifensine and 6-nitroquipazine on [3H]-5-HT released from caudate nucleus slices was analysed. In hippocampal slices, which contain practically no dopaminergic but densely distributed 5-hydroxytryptaminergic and noradrenergic nerve terminals (ratio of dopamine:5-HT:noradrenaline about 1:30:25), nomifensine (1, 10 microM) did not affect the accumulation of [3H]-5-HT; 6-nitroquipazine (1 microM) reduced [3H]-5-HT uptake to about 35% of controls. In the caudate nucleus, however, where dopamine is the predominant monoamine (ratio of dopamine:5-HT:noradrenaline about 400:25:15) nomifensine (1, 10 microM) reduced the tritium accumulation to 65% whereas 6-nitroquipazine (1 microM) was ineffective. The combination of both drugs (1 microM each) led to a further decrease to about 15%. The uptake of [3H]-dopamine into hippocampal slices was blocked by both nomifensine (1 microM) and 6-nitroquipazine (1 microM) whereas in caudate nucleus slices only nomifensine (1, 10 microM) reduced the accumulation of [3H]-dopamine. The combination of both drugs was not more effective than nomifensine alone. The different effects of both uptake inhibitors in the hippocampus and caudate nucleus suggest a neurone specific rather than a substrate specific mode of action.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3742155

  17. Contribution of a helix 5 locus to selectivity of hallucinogenic and nonhallucinogenic ligands for the human 5-hydroxytryptamine2A and 5-hydroxytryptamine2C receptors: direct and indirect effects on ligand affinity mediated by the same locus.

    PubMed

    Almaula, N; Ebersole, B J; Ballesteros, J A; Weinstein, H; Sealfon, S C

    1996-07-01

    An important determinant of the neurobehavioral responses induced by a drug is its relative receptor selectivity. The molecular basis of ligand selectivity of hallucinogenic and nonhallucinogenic compounds of varying structural classes for the human 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)2A and 5-HT2C receptors was investigated with the use of reciprocal site-directed mutagenesis. Because these two closely related receptor subtypes differ in the amino acid present at position 5.46 (residues 242 and 222 in the sequences, respectively), the effects of corresponding substitutions in the 5-HT2A[S5.46(242)-->A] and 5-HT2C[A5.46(222)-->S] receptors were studied in tandem. By studying both receptors, the direct and indirect effects of mutations on affinity and selectivity can be distinguished. The ergolines studied, mesulergine (selective for the 5-HT2C receptor) and d-lysergic acid diethylamide (selective for the 5-HT2A receptor), reversed their relative affinity with mutations in each receptor, supporting a direct role of this locus in the selectivity of these ligands. However, interchange mutations in either receptor led to decreased or unchanged affinity for (+/-)-1-)(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane and ketanserin, which have higher affinity for the 5-HT2A receptor, consistent with little contribution of this locus to the selectivity of these ligands. The indoleamines studied were affected differently by mutations in each receptor, suggesting that they bind differently to the two receptor subtypes. Mutation of this locus in the 5-HT2A receptor decreased the affinity of all indoleamines, whereas the interchange mutation of the 5-HT2C receptor did not affect indoleamine affinity. These results are consistent with a direct interaction between this side chain and indoleamines for the 5-HT2A receptor but not for the 5-HT2C receptor. Furthermore, this analysis shows that the higher affinity of 5-HT and tryptamine for the 5-HT2C receptor than for the 5-HT2A receptors is not

  18. C-reactive protein modulates human lung fibroblast migration.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Kazuhiko; Kohyama, Tadashi; Yamauchi, Yasuhiro; Kato, Jun; Takami, Kazutaka; Okazaki, Hitoshi; Desaki, Masashi; Nagase, Takahide; Rennard, Stephen I; Takizawa, Hajime

    2009-02-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) has been classically used as a marker of inflammation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of CRP on migration of human fetal lung fibroblasts (HFL-1) to human plasma fibronectin (HFn). Using the blindwell chamber technique, CRP inhibited HFL-1 migration in a dose-dependent fashion (at 1 microg/mL, inhibition: 32.5% +/- 7.1%; P < .05). Western blot analysis showed that CRP inhibited the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity in the presence of HFn. Moreover, the MAPK inhibitors SB202190 (25 microM) and SB203580 (25 microM) inhibited HFn-induced cell migration, suggesting an important role of p38 MAPK in HFn-induced migration. Taken together, these results suggest that the inhibitory effect of CRP is mediated by blocking MAPK. In summary, this study demonstrates that CRP directly modulates human lung fibroblasts migration. Thus, CRP may contribute to regulation of wound healing and may be endogenous antifibrotic factor acting on lung fibrosis.

  19. Antagonism of fenfluramine-induced hyperthermia in rats by some, but not all, selective inhibitors of 5-hydroxytryptamine uptake.

    PubMed Central

    Sugrue, M. F.

    1984-01-01

    The injection of fenfluramine (7.5 mg kg-1,i.p.) to rats housed at 27-28 degrees C was associated with an elevation of core body temperature which peaked at approximately 1 h post-injection. One h pretreatment with citalopram (20 mg kg-1, i.p.), chlorimipramine (10 mg kg-1, i.p.), femoxetine (10 mg kg-1, i.p.) and fluoxetine (20 mg kg-1, i.p.) resulted in an attenuated response to fenfluramine. In contrast, Org 6582 (20 mg kg-1) and zimelidine (20 mg kg-1) were devoid of an effect on fenfluramine-induced hyperthermia. The response to fenfluramine was was also blocked by i.p. injections of metergoline (0.2 mg kg-1), methysergide (5 mg kg-1) and mianserin (0.5 mg kg-1). Rectal temperature was unaltered by both the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) uptake inhibitors and the 5-HT receptor antagonists. The IC50 values (nM) for in vitro inhibition of [3H]-5-HT uptake into rat hypothalamic synaptosomes were for citalopram 2.4, chlorimipramine 8.8, femoxetine 14, fluoxetine 16, Org 6582 75 and zimelidine 250. The injection of all six compounds (20 mg kg-1, i.p.) 1 h before death was associated with an inhibition of [3H]-5-HT uptake into rat hypothalamic synaptosomes which ranged from 47.2% for chlorimipramine to 83.3% for citalopram. Rat hypothalamic 5-HT levels were decreased by approximately 50% 3 h after the injection of fenfluramine (15 mg kg-1, i.p.). This effect was blocked by a 1 h pretreatment with fluoxetine, Org 6582 and zimelidine (all 20 mg kg-1, i.p.). Ki values for displacement of specifically bound [3H]-5-HT (1 nM) to rat hypothalamic membranes were for metergoline 26 nM, methysergide 1.1 microM, mianserin 3.6 microM, chlorimipramine 9.2 microM and fluoxetine 32.7 microM. Values for citalopram, femoxetine, Org 6582 and zimelidine were in excess of 65.4 microM.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6722394

  20. The influence of cerebral 5-hydroxytryptamine on catalepsy induced by brain-amine depleting neuroleptics or by cholinomimetics

    PubMed Central

    Fuenmayor, Luis D.; Vogt, Marthe

    1979-01-01

    1 Catalepsy was produced in rats and mice by the subcutaneous injection of either tetrabenazine or the butyrophenone U-32,802A (4′-fluoro-4-{[4-(p-fluorophenyl)-3-cyclohexen-1-yl]amino} butyrophenone hydrochloride). Catalepsy was evaluated by the duration of total immobility on a vertical grid. 2 Pretreatment with p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA) reduced the intensity of catalepsy by 50% or more, whereas its time course remained the same. 3 5-Hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP), 10 mg/kg, enhanced the catalepsy induced by U-32,802A or tetrabenazine, provided it was administered soon (45 min) after the neuroleptic; injections at 90 min had no effect. Otherwise untreated rats given this dose of 5-HTP behaved normally on the grid. 4 The anticataleptic effect of PCPA was reversed by 5-HTP. 5 Measurable changes in 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) metabolism in the rat forebrain accompanied the modification of catalepsy by 5-HTP and PCPA. 6 Methysergide (5 mg/kg) given 30 min before the neuroleptics to either mice or rats reduced the catalepsy, assessed 2.5 h after the methysergide. It also prevented the increase in neuroleptic-induced catalepsy following 5-HTP, 10 mg/kg. 7 Tryptophan, like 5-HTP, increased the catalepsy seen in mice after U-32,802A and tetrabenazine, and increased the production of 5-hydroxyindol-3-ylacetic acid in the forebrain. 8 In the rat, intracerebroventricular injection of physostigmine produced catalepsy which was not modified by methysergide or PCPA but was abolished by atropine. Similarly, in the mouse, catalepsy induced by the subcutaneous injection of pilocarpine was abolished by atropine but not affected by either methysergide or 5-HTP. 9 Atropine greatly reduced the catalepsy induced by U-32,802A and tetrabenazine but lowered striatal homovanillic acid (HVA) only after U-32,802A. D,L-DOPA, 20 mg/kg, diminished the cataleptogenic effect of both neuroleptics and raised striatal HVA. 10 The results support the view that there is a facilitating or permissive

  1. Adrenoceptor- and cholinoceptor-mediated mechanisms in the regulation of 5-hydroxytryptamine release from isolated tracheae of newborn rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Freitag, A.; Wessler, I.; Racké, K.

    1996-01-01

    1. Isolated tracheae of newborn rabbits were incubated in vitro and the outflow of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) was determined by h.p.l.c. with electrochemical detection. Evidence has previously been provided that this 5-HT outflow derives from neuroendocrine epithelial (NEE) cells of the airway mucosa. 2. Phenylephrine (1, 10 and 30 microM) enhanced the outflow of 5-HT by 80, 290 and 205%, respectively. 5-HT outflow evoked by 10 microM phenylephrine was not affected by the presence of the neurotoxin tetrodotoxin (1 microM). 3. Rauwolscine, ARC 239 (an alpha(2B)-adrenoceptor preferring antagonist), yohimbine and prazosin antagonized the effect of 10 microM phenylephrine in a concentration-dependent manner with IC50 values of 150, 295, 300 and 1,700 nM, respectively. Comparison of the ratios (between all antagonists) of the present IC50 values with the corresponding ratios of Ki values obtained in binding studies for the alpha(2A)-, alpha(2B)-, alpha(2C)- and alpha(2D)-adrenoceptor subtypes strongly suggests the involvement of an alpha(2B)-receptor. 4. 5-HT outflow evoked by 10 microM phenylephrine was inhibited by 65% in the presence of 1 microM forskolin and abolished in the presence of 10 microM forskolin. 5. 5-HT outflow evoked by 10 microM phenylephrine was inhibited by about 45 and 70% in the presence of 0.1 and 1 microM isoprenaline, respectively. The inhibitory effect of 1 microM isoprenaline was only marginally antagonized by 1 microM, but blocked by 10 microM propranolol. 6. 5-HT outflow was not affected by the muscarine receptor agonist oxotremorine (10 microM), but was enhanced by 175% by 100 microM nicotine. The effect of nicotine was blocked by 100 microM hexamethonium and prevented by 1 microM tetrodotoxin or 1 microM yohimbine. 7. In conclusion, 5-HT release from NEE cells of the rabbit trachea is stimulated via alpha-adrenoceptors most likely of the alpha(2B)-subtype localized directly at the NEE cells. Activation of beta-adrenoceptors as well as

  2. Microtopography and flow modulate the direction of endothelial cell migration.

    PubMed

    Uttayarat, P; Chen, M; Li, M; Allen, F D; Composto, R J; Lelkes, P I

    2008-02-01

    The migration of vascular endothelial cells under flow can be modulated by the addition of chemical or mechanical stimuli. The aim of this study was to investigate how topographic cues derived from a substrate containing three-dimensional microtopography interact with fluid shear stress in directing endothelial cell migration. Subconfluent bovine aortic endothelial cells were seeded on fibronectin-coated poly(dimethylsiloxane) substrates patterned with a combinatorial array of parallel and orthogonal microgrooves ranging from 2 to 5 microm in width at a constant depth of 1 microm. During a 4-h time-lapse observation in the absence of flow, the majority of the prealigned cells migrated parallel to the grooves with the distribution of their focal adhesions (FAs) depending on the groove width. No change in this migratory pattern was observed after the cells were exposed to moderate shear stress (13.5 dyn/cm(2)), irrespective of groove direction with respect to flow. After 4-h exposure to high shear stress (58 dyn/cm(2)) parallel to the grooves, the cells continued to migrate in the direction of both grooves and flow. By contrast, when microgrooves were oriented perpendicular to flow, most cells migrated orthogonal to the grooves and downstream with flow. Despite the change in the migration direction of the cells under high shear stress, most FAs and actin microfilaments maintained their original alignment parallel to the grooves, suggesting that topographic cues were more effective than those derived from shear stress in guiding the orientation of cytoskeletal and adhesion proteins during the initial exposure to flow.

  3. Involvement of 5-hydroxytryptamine 5-HT₃ serotonergic receptors in the acquisition and reinstatement of the conditioned place preference induced by MDMA.

    PubMed

    Roger-Sánchez, Concepción; Rodríguez-Arias, Marta; Miñarro, Jose; Aguilar, Maria A

    2013-08-15

    Some MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine) users develop dependence as a result of chronic consumption. The present study evaluated the role of 5-hydroxytryptamine 5-HT₃ receptors in the acquisition, expression and reinstatement of the conditioned place preference (CPP) induced by MDMA. Adolescent male mice were conditioned with 10 mg/kg of MDMA and then treated with 1 or 3mg/kg of the 5-hydroxytryptamine 5-HT₃ antagonist MDL72222 during acquisition of conditioning (experiment 1), before expression of CPP in a post-conditioning test (experiment 2) or before a reinstatement test (experiment 3). MDL72222 was devoid of motivational effects but blocked acquisition of the MDMA-induced CPP. Moreover, following extinction, the low dose of MDL72222 blocked reinstatement of the CPP induced by priming with MDMA. Acute MDMA reduced levels of dihydroxypheylacetic acid (DOPAC) in the striatum and levels of acid 5-hydroxyindoleacetic (5-HIAA) in the cortex. Acute MDMA+MDL72222 also reduced striatal DOPAC. The repeated co-administration of MDMA plus MDL72222 (on PND 32-34-36-38) increased dopamine and decreased DOPAC in the striatum, and increased cortical serotonin and enhanced transporters of dopamine and serotonin. The acute administration (on PND ±55) of MDMA or MDL72222 increased levels of dopamine and reduced those of DOPAC in the striatum and co-administration of MDMA plus MDL72222 increased striatal serotonin. Our results confirm that 5-hydroxytryptamine 5-HT₃ receptors are involved in the acquisition of conditioned rewarding effects of MDMA and demonstrate that these receptors are also involved in reinstatement after extinction.

  4. Blockade of 5-hydroxytryptamine3 receptors prevents cisplatin-induced but not motion- or xylazine-induced emesis in the cat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucot, J. B.

    1989-01-01

    5-Hydroxytryptamine3 antagonists have been reported to prevent emesis elicited by cisplatin and radiation. This study investigated the possibility that drugs with this mechanism of action may be useful in preventing emesis elicited by other stimuli. The drugs ICS 205-930 (0.1 and 1.0 mg/kg) and MDL 72222 (0.1 and 1.0 mg/kg) were administered SC to cats before challenging them with either provocative motion or an emetic dose of xylazine. In no instance was a significant reduction in emesis evident. Zacopride was also administered before motion testing (0.01 to 10.0 mg/kg) and found to not have efficacy. To test the possibility that species or route of administration were factors in the negative results, 1.0 mg/kg of ICS 205-930 was administered SC before IV infusion of 7.5 mg/kg of cisplatin. There was a total suppression of emesis for the duration of the six-hour observation periods. This result verifies other work which found 5-hydroxytryptamine3 antagonists to be effective in preventing emesis elicited by cancer chemotherapeutic treatments. However, there is no evidence that they are effective in other syndromes, such as motion sickness and xylazine-induced emesis.

  5. Methylene blue modulates transendothelial migration of peripheral blood cells.

    PubMed

    Werner, Isabella; Guo, Fengwei; Bogert, Nicolai V; Stock, Ulrich A; Meybohm, Patrick; Moritz, Anton; Beiras-Fernandez, Andres

    2013-01-01

    Vasoplegia is a severe complication after cardiac surgery. Within the last years the administration of nitric oxide synthase inhibitor methylene blue (MB) became a new therapeutic strategy. Our aim was to investigate the role of MB on transendothelial migration of circulating blood cells, the potential role of cyclic cGMP, eNOS and iNOS in this process, and the influence of MB on endothelial cell apoptosis. Human vascular endothelial cells (HuMEC-1) were treated for 30 minutes or 2 hours with different concentrations of MB. Inflammation was mimicked by LPS stimulation prior and after MB. Transmigration of PBMCs and T-Lymphocytes through the treated endothelial cells was investigated. The influence of MB upon the different subsets of PBMCs (Granulocytes, T- and B-Lymphocytes, and Monocytes) was assessed after transmigration by means of flow-cytometry. The effect of MB on cell apoptosis was evaluated using Annexin-V and Propidium Iodide stainings. Analyses of the expression of cyclic cGMP, eNOS and iNOS were performed by means of RT-PCR and Western Blot. Results were analyzed using unpaired Students T-test. Analysis of endothelial cell apoptosis by MB indicated a dose-dependent increase of apoptotic cells. We observed time- and dose-dependent effects of MB on transendothelial migration of PBMCs. The prophylactic administration of MB led to an increase of transendothelial migration of PBMCs but not Jurkat cells. Furthermore, HuMEC-1 secretion of cGMP correlated with iNOS expression after MB administration but not with eNOS expression. Expression of these molecules was reduced after MB administration at protein level. This study clearly reveals that endothelial response to MB is dose- and especially time-dependent. MB shows different effects on circulating blood cell-subtypes, and modifies the release patterns of eNOS, iNOS, and cGMP. The transendothelial migration is modulated after treatment with MB. Furthermore, MB provokes apoptosis of endothelial cells in a dose

  6. Effects of p-chlorophenylalanine on the sensitivity of rat intestine to agonists and on intestinal 5-hydroxytryptamine levels during Nippostrongylus brasiliensis infection.

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, S. G.; Laniyonu, A. A.

    1984-01-01

    Infection of rats with the nematode N. brasiliensis caused non-specific increases in maximum response of isolated intestine to acetylcholine and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), and a specific subsensitivity to 5-HT. Intestinal levels of 5-HT, measured fluorimetrically, increased approximately 2 fold during infection. Treatment of infected rats with parachlorophenylalanine (PCPA) depleted the gut of 5-HT, and prevented the specific subsensitivity to the amine but not the increases in maximum response. Depletion of intestinal 5-HT did not prevent the immune expulsion of the parasites. It is concluded that the specific subsensitivity of the gut is due to the elevated levels of 5-HT during infection, but that the increased maximum responses are due to some other factor. Further, the lack of effect of PCPA on parasite rejection casts doubt on the proposed role of 5-HT in this process. PMID:6236863

  7. Comparison of the performance of different DFT methods in the calculations of the molecular structure and vibration spectra of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yue; Gao, Hongwei

    2012-04-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) is a monoamine neurotransmitter which plays an important role in treating acute or clinical stress. The comparative performance of different density functional theory (DFT) methods at various basis sets in predicting the molecular structure and vibration spectra of serotonin was reported. The calculation results of different methods including mPW1PW91, HCTH, SVWN, PBEPBE, B3PW91 and B3LYP with various basis sets including LANL2DZ, SDD, LANL2MB, 6-31G, 6-311++G and 6-311+G* were compared with the experimental data. It is remarkable that the SVWN/6-311++G and SVWN/6-311+G* levels afford the best quality to predict the structure of serotonin. The results also indicate that PBEPBE/LANL2DZ level show better performance in the vibration spectra prediction of serotonin than other DFT methods.

  8. 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor (5-HT1DR) promotes colorectal cancer metastasis by regulating Axin1/β-catenin/MMP-7 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Qing; Liu, Xuan; Zhou, Lihong; Song, Haiyan; Zhou, Xiqiu; Xu, Yangxian; Chen, Zhesheng; Cai, Jianfeng; Ji, Guang; Li, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in human cancer contributes to tumor metastasis, but the role of 5-HT receptor family in cancer has not been thoroughly explored. Here, we report overexpression of 5-HT1D receptor (5-HT1DR) was associated with Wnt signaling pathway and advanced tumor stage. The underlying mechanism of 5-HT1DR-promoted tumor invasion was through its activation on the Axin1/β-catenin/MMP-7 pathway. In an orthotopic colorectal cancer mouse model, we demonstrated that a 5-HT1DR antagonist (GR127935) effectively inhibited tumor metastasis through targeting Axin1. Furthermore, in intestinal epithelium cells, we observed that 5-HT1DR played an important role in cell invasion via Axin1/β-catenin/MMP-7 pathway. Together, our findings reveal an essential role of the physiologic level of 5-HT1DR in pulmonary metastasis of colorectal cancer. PMID:26214021

  9. Blockade of 5-hydroxytryptamine(3) receptors prevents cisplatin-induced but not motion- or xylazine-induced emesis in the cat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucot, James B.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of the 5-hydroxytryptamine(3) (5-HT-3) antagonists ICS 205-930 and MDL 72222 on the emesis induced by motion or by emetic doses of xylazine (0.66 mg/kg administered SC) or cisplatin (7.5 mg/kg infused over a period of 4-5 min) were investigated in cats. It was found that neither the low (0.1 mg/kg) or the high (1.0 mg.kg) doses of ICS 205-930 or MDL 72222 prevented emesis elicited by screening motion challenges or xylazine. On the other hand, treatment cats by 1.0 mg/kg of ICS 205-930 was effective against cisplatin-induced motion sickness, in agreement with earlier results obtained on other mammals.

  10. 5-Hydroxytryptamine1A receptor-activation hyperpolarizes pyramidal cells and suppresses hippocampal gamma oscillations via Kir3 channel activation.

    PubMed

    Johnston, April; McBain, Chris J; Fisahn, André

    2014-10-01

    Rhythmic cortical neuronal oscillations in the gamma frequency band (30-80 Hz, gamma oscillations) have been associated with cognitive processes such as sensory perception and integration, attention, learning, and memory. Gamma oscillations are disrupted in disorders for which cognitive deficits are hallmark symptoms such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease.In vitro, various neurotransmitters have been found to modulate gamma oscillations. Serotonin(5-HT) has long been known to be important for both behavioural and cognitive functions such as learning and memory. Multiple 5-HT receptor subtypes are expressed in the CA3 region of the hippocampus and high doses of 5-HT reduce the power of induced gamma oscillations.Hypothesizing that 5-HT may have cell- and receptor subtype-specific modulatory effects, we investigated the receptor subtypes, cell types and cellular mechanisms engaged by 5-HT in the modulation of gamma oscillations in mice and rats. We found that 5-HT decreases the power of kainate-induced hippocampal gamma oscillations in both species via the 5-HT1A receptor subtype. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings demonstrated that this decrease was caused by a hyperpolarization of CA3 pyramidal cells and a reduction of their firing frequency, but not by alteration of inhibitory neurotransmission. Finally, our results show that the effect on pyramidal cells is mediated via the G protein-coupled receptor inwardly rectifying potassium channel Kir3.Our findings suggest this novel cellular mechanism as a potential target for therapies that are aimed at alleviating cognitive decline by helping the brain to maintain or re-establish normal gamma oscillation levels in neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders.

  11. Effects of the benzodiazepine receptor agonist midazolam and antagonist flumazenil on 5-hydroxytryptamine release from guinea-pig intestine in vitro. Indirect support for a "natural" benzodiazepine-like substance in the intestine.

    PubMed

    Racké, K; Schwörer, H; Kilbinger, H

    1990-01-01

    Isolated segments of the guinea-pig small intestine and the guinea-pig stomach were vascularly perfused and the release of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid into the portal venous effluent determined by high pressure liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Test substances were applied intraarterially. The benzodiazepine receptor agonist, midazolam, concentration-dependently increased (by 58%, at 1 nmol/l) and decreased (by 32%, at 100 nmol/l) the release of 5-HT from small intestine preparations. Both effects were blocked by the benzodiazepine receptor antagonist flumazenil (10 nmol/l) The stimulatory effect of midazolam was also abolished in the presence of tetrodotoxin (1 mumol/l) or scopolamine (100 nmol/l). In the absence of tetrodotoxin, flumazenil (10 nmol/l) alone decreased the release of 5-HT from the small intestine by 41%, but it increased the release of 5-HT by 50% in the presence of tetrodotoxin. Both effects of flumazenil were abolished in the presence of bicuculline (50 mumol/l). In the absence of tetrodotoxin, flumazenil (10 nmol/l) decreased also the release of 5-HT and its metabolite from the perfused stomach by about 40%, whereas midazolam (1 nmol/l) caused an increase by about 60%. In conclusion, benzodiazepine receptors modulate the previously described intrinsic GABAergic regulation of 5-HT release from enterochromaffin cells in the guinea-pig intestine. It is suggested that an endogenous benzodiazepine-like substance of non-neuronal origin is present in the small intestine and stomach of the guinea-pig.

  12. The effect of three products of cigarette smoke (cyanide, thiocyanate and nicotine) on the concentration-response curves of 5-hydroxytryptamine, norepinephrine and epinephrine in the isolated human umbilical veins and arteries.

    PubMed

    Tunçel, N; Aydin, Y; Tikiz, H

    1994-02-01

    The effect of cyanide (10(-7) M), thiocyanate (10(-4) M) and nicotine (10(-7) M) on the concentration-response curves of 5-hydroxytryptamine, norepinephrine and epinephrine were investigated in human isolated umbilical arteries and veins. Cyanide significantly affected the responses of arterial strips to 5-hydroxytryptamine, norepinephrine and epinephrine: It caused significant leftward shifts of the 5-hydroxytryptamine concentration-response curves and significantly potentiated the contractile effects of norepinephrine and epinephrine in the case of norepinephrine, and epinephrine concentration reached 10(-6) and 10(-7) M respectively in the bath medium. Cyanide did not show any significant effect on the concentration-response curves of 5-hydroxytryptamine, norepinephrine and epinephrine in veins. Nicotine interacted with the response of adrenergic agonists both in arteries and veins; in arteries it potentiates the contractile response of epinephrine; in veins, it inhibited the dilatory responses of norepinephrine and potentiated the contractile effect of high concentration of epinephrine (10(-6) M). Thiocyanate did not cause any difference on any cumulative concentration-response curves either on the vessels. However, none of these individual effects of cyanide and nicotine were observed when the cyanide, thiocyanate and nicotine were added in combination in the isolated organ bath medium.

  13. A phase 1 randomized study evaluating the effect of omeprazole on the pharmacokinetics of a novel 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 4 agonist, revexepride (SSP-002358), in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, David; Corcoran, Mary; Velinova, Maria; Hossack, Stuart; Hoppenbrouwers, Mieke; Martin, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Background About 30% of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease continue to experience symptoms despite treatment with proton pump inhibitors. The 5-hydroxytryptamine 4 receptor agonist revexepride (SSP-002358) is a novel prokinetic that stimulates gastrointestinal motility, which has been suggested as a continued cause of symptoms in these patients. The aim of this study was to assess whether revexepride pharmacokinetics were affected by co-administration of omeprazole, in preparation for a proof-of-concept evaluation of revexepride added to proton pump inhibitor treatment. Methods In this phase 1, open-label, randomized, two-period crossover study, healthy adults aged 18–55 years were given a single dose of revexepride 1 mg or revexepride 1 mg + omeprazole 40 mg. Pharmacokinetic parameters were assessed for up to 48 hours after administration of the investigational product. Adverse events, clinical chemistry and hematology parameters, electrocardiograms, and vital signs were monitored. Results In total, 42 participants were enrolled and 40 completed the study. The median age was 24 years (18–54 years), 55% were women and 93% were white. The pharmacokinetic parameters of revexepride were similar without or with omeprazole co-administration. The mean area under the plasma concentration–time curve from time 0 to infinity (AUC0–∞) was 23.3 ng · h/mL (standard deviation [SD]: 6.33 ng · h/mL) versus 24.6 ng · h/mL (SD: 6.31 ng · h/mL), and maximum plasma concentrations (Cmax) were 3.89 ng/mL (SD: 1.30 ng/mL) and 4.12 ng/mL (SD: 1.29 ng/mL) in participants without and with omeprazole, respectively. For AUC0–∞ and Cmax, the 90% confidence intervals for the ratios of geometric least-squares means (with:without omeprazole) were fully contained within the pre-defined equivalence limits of 0.80–1.25. Mean apparent terminal phase half-life was 9.95 hours (SD: 2.06 hours) without omeprazole, and 11.0 hours (SD: 3.25 hours) with omeprazole. Conclusion

  14. Sensitive determination of norepinephrine, epinephrine, dopamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine by coupling HPLC with [Ag(HIO6 )2 ](5-) -luminol chemiluminescence detection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dong; Xie, He; Lu, Haifeng; Li, Wei; Zhang, Qunlin

    2016-09-01

    Based on the enhancing effects of norepinephrine (NE), epinephrine (EP), dopamine (DA) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) on the chemiluminescence (CL) reaction between [Ag(HIO6 )2 ](5-) and luminol in alkaline solution, a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method with CL detection was explored for the sensitive determination of monoamine neurotransmitters for the first time. The UV-visible absorption spectra were recorded to study the enhancement mechanism of monoamine neurotransmitters on the CL of [Ag(HIO6 )2 ](5-) and luminol reaction. The HPLC separation of NE, EP, DA and 5-HT was achieved with isocratic elution using a mixture of aqueous 0.2% phosphoric acid and methanol (5:95, v/v) within 11.0 min. Under the optimized conditions, the detection limits of NE, EP, DA, and 5-HT were 4.8, 0.9, 1.9 and 2.3 ng/mL, respectively, corresponding to 17.6-96.0 pg for 20 μL sample injection. The recoveries of monoamine neurotransmitters in rat brain were >95.6% with the precisions expressed by RSD <5.0%. The validated HPLC-CL method was successfully applied for the quantification of NE, EP, DA and 5-HT in rat brain. This method has promising potential for some biological and clinical investigations focusing on the levels of monoamine neurotransmitters. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Separate 5-hydroxytryptamine receptors on the salivary gland of the blowfly are linked to the generation of either cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate or calcium signals.

    PubMed Central

    Berridge, M. J.; Heslop, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    1 5'-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) stimulates the formation of two separate second messengers in the salivary gland of the blowfly. Activation of adenylate cyclase raises adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cyclic AMP) whereas the hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol (PI) is associated with an increase in calcium permeability. The possibility that these two signal pathways might be controlled by separate 5-HT receptors was studied by testing the specificity of 5-HT analogues and antagonists. 2 The parent compound 5-HT was found to stimulate both cyclic AMP formation and the related parameters of PI hydrolysis and calcium transport with similar dose-response relationships. 3 Certain analogues such as 4- and 5-fluoro-alpha-methyltryptamine were capable of raising cyclic AMP levels and stimulating fluid secretion but did not stimulate the hydrolysis of PI or the entry of calcium. 4 Other analogues, which had chloro or methyl substituents at the 5-position, were found to stimulate the hydrolysis of PI and the transport of calcium at much lower doses than those required to stimulate the formation of cyclic AMP. 5 Antagonists were also found to exert selective effects. Methysergide was a potent inhibitor of PI hydrolysis whereas cinanserin was far more selective in blocking the stimulatory effect of 5-HT on cyclic AMP formation. 6 It is concluded that 5-HT acts on two separate receptors, a 5-HT1 receptor acting through calcium and a 5-HT2 receptor which mediates its effects through cyclic AMP. PMID:6265018

  16. Effects of methysergide and 5-hydroxytryptamine on carotid blood flow distribution in pigs: further evidence for the presence of atypical 5-HT receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, P. R.; Verdouw, P. D.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of acute (50-350 micrograms kg-1, i.v.) and subacute (350 micrograms kg-1 orally per day for six days) administration of methysergide, and of intra-arterial infusions of 0.5 and 2.0 micrograms kg-1 min-1 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) on the distribution of carotid blood flow into the capillary (nutrient) and arterio-venous anastomotic (AVA) fractions were studied in anaesthetized pigs. The acute, but not the subacute, administration of methysergide caused a moderate reduction of carotid blood flow. This reduction, noticed only in the AVA fraction, was due to a constriction of the arterio-venous anastomoses (AVAs). Both doses of 5-HT reduced total carotid blood flow but its nutrient fraction--particularly that distributed to the skin and ears--increased substantially. The AVA fraction was greatly diminished. After treatment with methysergide, 5-HT no longer reduced the total carotid blood flow, but increased it. Despite this reversal the constriction of AVAs by the amine was only slightly diminished. On the other hand, the vasodilatation of the nutrient channels was enhanced. The results of the interaction between methysergide and 5-HT provide further evidence for the presence of 'atypical' 5-HT receptors (probably corresponding to 5-HT1 binding sites) mediating AVA contraction and nutrient vasodilatation. The 5-HT2 receptors mediate vasoconstriction and are located in the large conducting arteries and possibly, in smaller numbers, in the AVAs and arterioles. PMID:6478112

  17. Postnatal Treadmill Exercise Alleviates Prenatal Stress-Induced Anxiety in Offspring Rats by Enhancing Cell Proliferation Through 5-Hydroxytryptamine 1A Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Stress during pregnancy is a risk factor for the development of anxiety-related disorders in offspring later in life. The effects of treadmill exercise on anxiety-like behaviors and hippocampal cell proliferation were investigated using rats exposed to prenatal stress. Methods: Exposure of pregnant rats to a hunting dog in an enclosed room was used to induce stress. Anxiety-like behaviors of offspring were evaluated using the elevated plus maze test. Immunohistochemistry for the detection of 5-bromo-2ʹ- deoxyuridine and doublecortin (DCX) in the hippocampal dentate gyrus and 5-hydroxytryptamine 1A receptors (5-HT1A) in the dorsal raphe was conducted. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tyrosine kinase B (TrkB) levels in the hippocampus were evaluated by western blot analysis. Results: Offspring of maternal rats exposed to stress during pregnancy showed anxiety-like behaviors. Offspring also showed reduced expression of BDNF, TrkB, and DCX in the dentate gyrus, decreased cell proliferation in the hippocampus, and reduced 5-HT1A expression in the dorsal raphe. Postnatal treadmill exercise by offspring, but not maternal exercise during pregnancy, enhanced cell proliferation and expression of these proteins. Conclusions: Postnatal treadmill exercise ameliorated anxiety-like behaviors in offspring of stressed pregnant rats, and the alleviating effect of exercise on these behaviors is hypothesized to result from enhancement of cell proliferation through 5-HT1A activation in offspring rats. PMID:27230461

  18. Changes in the regulation of 5-hydroxytryptamine release by alpha2-adrenoceptors in the rat hippocampus after long-term desipramine treatment.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, M; Matsumoto, M; Numazawa, R; Togashi, H; Smith, C B; Saito, H

    1995-12-29

    In vivo microdialysis was used to measure the effects of long-term treatment of rats with desipramine upon the regulation by alpha2-adrenoceptors of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) release from the serotonergic neurons in the hippocampus. Rats were injected with saline or desipramine, 10 mg/kg, i.p., every 12 h for 14 days. When added to the perfusion solution, brimonidine, an alpha2-adrenoceptor agonist, significantly inhibited the K+-evoked release of 5-HT in the hippocampi of saline-treated, control rats. This action of brimonidine was prevented by pretreating the rats with idazoxan, an alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonist. Long-term desipramine treatment significantly reduced the inhibitory effect of brimonidine upon the K+-evoked 5-HT release. With long-term administration of desipramine, noradrenaline content in the hippocampi was significantly decreased as compared with that of the control rats, whereas the basal noradrenaline concentration in the dialysate was significantly increased. On the other hand, both the 5-HT content of the hippocampus and the basal 5-HT concentration in the dialysate were significantly increased. The present study suggests that long-term administration of desipramine causes a functional subsensitivity of the presynaptic alpha2-adrenoceptors that regulate serotonergic neuronal function in the rat hippocampus. It also supports the concept that changes in the sensitivity of alpha2-adrenoceptors that regulate neurotransmitter release play an important role in the mechanism of antidepressant drug action.

  19. gamma-Aminobutyric acid-A receptor-mediated suppression of 5-hydroxytryptamine-induced guinea-pig basilar artery smooth muscle contractility.

    PubMed

    Shirakawa, J; Hosoda, K; Taniyama, K; Matsumoto, S; Tanaka, C

    1989-01-01

    The mechanism of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-induced suppression of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5HT)-induced contractility of cerebral blood vessels was studied in single smooth muscle cells isolated from the guinea-pig basilar artery. GABA reduced 5HT-induced contraction of single smooth muscle cells, and the effect of GABA was mimicked by muscimol, but not baclofen. The response of muscimol was antagonized by bicuculline, thereby indicating that GABAA receptors exist on the smooth muscle of the basilar artery. Since GABA did not change the contraction induced by the addition of Ca2+ to the Ca2+-free medium in the presence of high K+, it is unlikely that GABA inhibits the influx of extracellular Ca2+. The caffeine-induced contraction in the Ca2+-free medium was reduced by GABA, and the effect of GABA was not obtained by treatment with furosemide and in the Cl- -free medium. These results indicate that GABA acts on the GABAA receptor located on smooth muscle cells and reduces the contractility of the basilar artery by suppression of the mobilization of intracellular Ca2+.

  20. The effects of single and repeated electroconvulsive shock administration on the release of 5-hydroxytryptamine and noradrenaline from cortical slices of rat brain.

    PubMed Central

    Green, A. R.; Heal, D. J.; Vincent, N. D.

    1987-01-01

    1 A method is described of measuring the K+-evoked release of endogenous 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and noradrenaline (NA) from slices prepared from rat cortex. 2 There was no difference in either the spontaneous (basal) or K+-evoked release of 5-HT or NA from cortical slices prepared from handled animals and those given a single electroconvulsive shock (ECS) either 30 min or 24 h earlier. 3 In chronic studies, rats were either handled or given an ECS 5 times over 10 days and cortical slices prepared. There was no difference in 5-HT or NA release between the groups 30 min after the last treatment other than a modest attentuation of spontaneous NA release following ECS treatment. However 24 h after the last treatment K+-evoked release (above basal release) of 5-HT and NA was inhibited by 84% and 48%, respectively. 4 These data demonstrate that following a single ECS, normal 5-HT and NA release is seen at a time when GABA release is markedly inhibited. After repeated ECS the release of both monoamines was markedly inhibited. These 5-HT changes may be involved in the enhanced 5-HT-receptor function seen after repeated ECS. PMID:3664089

  1. The mechanism of body temperature changes induced by intraventricular injections of adrenaline, noradrenaline and 5-hydroxytryptamine in the ox (bos taurus)

    PubMed Central

    Findlay, J. D.; Robertshaw, D.

    1967-01-01

    1. Adrenaline, noradrenaline and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) were injected into the lateral ventricle of the ox. The effect of these drugs was measured on the respiratory rate, tidal volume, heat production, skin temperature of the ear, evaporative loss from the skin and the rectal temperature at 20 and 10° C ambient temperature. 2. Neither adrenaline (3 mg) nor noradrenaline (3 mg) had any effect on the temperature regulating mechanisms of the ox, except to produce vasoconstriction if vasodilatation was already present due to high ambient temperature or previous injection of 5-HT. 3. Injection of 5-HT (5 mg) caused a rise in respiratory rate, a fall in tidal volume and heat production, elevation of ear skin temperature and skin evaporative loss and a decrease in rectal temperature. Sedation of the animals occurred. 4. In its reaction to these monoamines the ox is similar to the goat, sheep and rabbit, but is unlike the cat and dog. 5. It was concluded that neither adrenaline nor noradrenaline has a role in the central control of temperature regulation in the ox, but that 5-HT may be involved in the control of heat dissipation mechanisms. PMID:6034117

  2. Interaction between the effects of 5-hydroxytryptamine and adrenaline on the growth of platelet thrombi in the coronary artery of the anaesthetized dog.

    PubMed Central

    McAuliffe, S. J.; Snow, H. M.; Cox, B.; Smith, C. C.; Noble, M. I.

    1993-01-01

    1. The interaction between adrenaline and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) has been quantitated on the rate of thrombus formation, in the stenosed coronary artery with damaged endothelium of the anaesthetized dog. 2. Changes in the plasma concentration of adrenaline were produced by varying the rate of an intravenous infusion of adrenaline and in the effects of 5-HT, by intravenous injections of the selective 5-HT2 receptor antagonist, ICI 170809. 3. Increases in the plasma concentration of adrenaline, which did not cause significant changes in blood pressure and heart rate, increased the rate of thrombus formation. 4. Antagonism of the 5-HT2 receptor by ICI 170809, in the absence of an infusion of adrenaline, abolished thrombus formation (mean ED50 0.41 microgram kg-1, i.v.). 5. The effects of adrenaline were non-competitively antagonized by ICI 170809; maximum effects were obtained in the dose-range 50-200 micrograms kg-1, i.v., when the mean dose-ratio increase in adrenaline required to restore equivalent rates of thrombus formation was 39 fold. 6. These results are consistent with a synergism between adrenaline and 5-HT and emphasize the importance of both on thrombus formation. PMID:8358542

  3. Detection of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in vitro using a hippocampal neuronal network-based biosensor with extracellular potential analysis of neurons.

    PubMed

    Hu, Liang; Wang, Qin; Qin, Zhen; Su, Kaiqi; Huang, Liquan; Hu, Ning; Wang, Ping

    2015-04-15

    5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) is an important neurotransmitter in regulating emotions and related behaviors in mammals. To detect and monitor the 5-HT, effective and convenient methods are demanded in investigation of neuronal network. In this study, hippocampal neuronal networks (HNNs) endogenously expressing 5-HT receptors were employed as sensing elements to build an in vitro neuronal network-based biosensor. The electrophysiological characteristics were analyzed in both neuron and network levels. The firing rates and amplitudes were derived from signal to determine the biosensor response characteristics. The experimental results demonstrate a dose-dependent inhibitory effect of 5-HT on hippocampal neuron activities, indicating the effectiveness of this hybrid biosensor in detecting 5-HT with a response range from 0.01μmol/L to 10μmol/L. In addition, the cross-correlation analysis of HNNs activities suggests 5-HT could weaken HNN connectivity reversibly, providing more specificity of this biosensor in detecting 5-HT. Moreover, 5-HT induced spatiotemporal firing pattern alterations could be monitored in neuron and network levels simultaneously by this hybrid biosensor in a convenient and direct way. With those merits, this neuronal network-based biosensor will be promising to be a valuable and utility platform for the study of neurotransmitter in vitro.

  4. A slow voltage-dependent Na(+)-current induced by 5-hydroxytryptamine and the G-protein-coupled activation mechanism in the ganglion cells of Aplysia.

    PubMed

    Kudo, A; Sasaki, K; Tamazawa, Y; Matsumoto, M

    1991-01-01

    Application of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5HT) induces a slowly depolarizing response in the neurons of Aplysia abdominal ganglion. In voltage-clamped cells, 5HT induced a slow inward current that increased steeply with membrane depolarization from -85 mV showing a negative slope conductance, but never reversed into outward when hyperpolarized beyond the equilibrium potential for K+. The 5HT-induced response was markedly augmented in Ca(2+)-free media, but depressed in Na(+)-free media, and unaffected by a change in external potassium. Intracellular injection of guanosine 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) (GDP beta S) significantly depressed the 5HT response in a dose-dependent way. Injection of cholera toxin (CTX) selectively blocked the 5HT-induced response, the effect being irreversible. Neither 3'-deoxyadenosine, an inhibitor of adenylate cyclase, nor H-8, an inhibitor of protein kinase A, depressed the 5HT response. 3-Isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) did not augment the 5HT response appreciably. The 5HT responses were not depressed at all during a saturated response to Br-cyclic AMP injected intracellularly. It was concluded that the 5HT response is produced by opening of the voltage-dependent Na(+)-channels with activation of CTX-sensitive G-protein but not necessarily with an increase in intracellular cyclic AMP.

  5. Regulator of calcineurin 1 modulates cancer cell migration in vitro.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Allan V; Shinohara, Motoo; Porchia, Leonardo M; Chung, Yun Jae; McCarty, Samantha; Saji, Motoyasu; Ringel, Matthew D

    2009-01-01

    Metastasis suppressors and other regulators of cell motility play an important role in tumor invasion and metastases. We previously identified that activation of the G protein coupled receptor 54 (GPR54) by the metastasis suppressor metastin inhibits cell migration in association with overexpression of Regulator of calcineurin 1 (RCAN1), an endogenous regulator of calcineurin. Calcineurin inhibitors also blocked cell migration in vitro and RCAN1 protein levels were reduced in nodal metastases in thyroid cancer. The purpose of the current study was to determine directly if RCAN1 functions as a motility suppressor in vitro. Several cancer cell lines derived from different cancer types with different motility rates were evaluated for RCAN1 expression levels. Using these systems we determined that reduction of endogenous RCAN1 using siRNA resulted in an increase in cancer cell motility while expression of exogenous RCAN1 reduced cell motility. In one cell line with a high migratory rate, the stability of exogenously expressed RCAN1 protein was reduced and was rescued by treatment with a proteasome inhibitor. Finally, overexpression of RCAN1 was associated with an increase in cell adhesion to collagen IV and reduced calcineurin activity. In summary, we have demonstrated that the expression of exogenous RCAN1 reduces migration and alters adhesion; and that the loss of endogenous RCAN1 leads to an increase in migration in the examined cancer cell lines. These results are consistent with a regulatory role for RCAN1 in cancer cell motility in vitro.

  6. Substrate stiffness modulates lung cancer cell migration but not epithelial to mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Shukla, V C; Higuita-Castro, N; Nana-Sinkam, P; Ghadiali, S N

    2016-05-01

    Biomechanical properties of the tumor microenvironment, including matrix/substrate stiffness, play a significant role in tumor evolution and metastasis. Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) is a fundamental biological process that is associated with increased cancer cell migration and invasion. The goal of this study was to investigate (1) how substrate stiffness modulates the migration behaviors of lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549) and (2) if stiffness-induced changes in cell migration correlate with biochemical markers of EMT. Collagen-coated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates and an Ibidi migration assay were used to investigate how substrate stiffness alters the migration patterns of A549 cells. RT-PCR, western blotting and immunofluorescence were used to investigate how substrate stiffness alters biochemical markers of EMT, that is, E-cadherin and N-cadherin, and the phosphorylation of focal adhesion proteins. Increases in substrate stiffness led to slower, more directional migration but did not alter the biochemical markers of EMT. Interestingly, growth factor (i.e., Transforming Growth Factor-β) stimulation resulted in similar levels of EMT regardless of substrate stiffness. We also observed decreased levels of phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and paxillin on stiffer substrates which correlated with slower cell migration. These results indicate that substrate stiffness modulates lung cancer cell migration via focal adhesion signaling as opposed to EMT signaling.

  7. Translational evaluation of JNJ-18038683, a 5-hydroxytryptamine type 7 receptor antagonist, on rapid eye movement sleep and in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Bonaventure, Pascal; Dugovic, Christine; Kramer, Michelle; De Boer, Peter; Singh, Jaskaran; Wilson, Sue; Bertelsen, Kirk; Di, Jianing; Shelton, Jonathan; Aluisio, Leah; Dvorak, Lisa; Fraser, Ian; Lord, Brian; Nepomuceno, Diane; Ahnaou, Abdellah; Drinkenburg, Wilhelmus; Chai, Wenying; Dvorak, Curt; Sands, Steve; Carruthers, Nicholas; Lovenberg, Timothy W

    2012-08-01

    In rodents 5-hydroxytryptamine type 7 (5-HT(7)) receptor blockade has been shown to be effective in models of depression and to increase the latency to rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and decrease REM duration. In the clinic, the REM sleep reduction observed with many antidepressants may serve as a biomarker. We report here the preclinical and clinical evaluation of a 5-HT(7) receptor antagonist, (3-(4-chlorophenyl)-1,4,5,6,7,8-hexahydro-1-(phenylmethyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]azepine 2-hydroxy-1,2,3-propanetricarboxylate) (JNJ-18038683). In rodents, JNJ-18038683 increased the latency to REM sleep and decreased REM duration, and this effect was maintained after repeated administration for 7 days. The compound was effective in the mouse tail suspension test. JNJ-18038683 enhanced serotonin transmission, antidepressant-like behavior, and REM sleep suppression induced by citalopram in rodents. In healthy human volunteers JNJ-18038683 prolonged REM latency and reduced REM sleep duration, demonstrating that the effect of 5-HT(7) blockade on REM sleep translated from rodents to humans. Like in rats, JNJ-18038683 enhanced REM sleep suppression induced by citalopram in humans, although a drug-drug interaction could not be ruled out. In a double-blind, active, and placebo-controlled clinical trial in 225 patients suffering from major depressive disorder, neither treatment with pharmacologically active doses of JNJ-18038683 or escitalopram separated from placebo, indicating a failed study lacking assay sensitivity. Post hoc analyses using an enrichment window strategy, where all the efficacy data from sites with an implausible high placebo response [placebo group Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) < = 12] and from sites with no placebo response (MADRS > = 28) are removed, there was a clinically meaningful difference between JNJ-18038683 and placebo. Further clinical studies are required to characterize the potential antidepressant efficacy of JNJ-18038683.

  8. Medial hypothalamic 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)1A receptors regulate neuroendocrine responses to stress and exploratory locomotor activity: application of recombinant adenovirus containing 5-HT1A sequences.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Holmes, Andrew; Ma, Li; Van de Kar, Louis D; Garcia, Francisca; Murphy, Dennis L

    2004-12-01

    Our previous studies found that serotonin transporter (SERT) knock-out mice showed increased sensitivity to minor stress and increased anxiety-like behavior but reduced locomotor activity. These mice also showed decreased density of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT1A) receptors in the hypothalamus, amygdala, and dorsal raphe. To evaluate the contribution of hypothalamic 5-HT1A receptors to these phenotypes of SERT knock-out mice, two studies were conducted. Recombinant adenoviruses containing 5-HT1A sense and antisense sequences (Ad-1AP-sense and Ad-1AP-antisense) were used to manipulate 5-HT1A receptors in the hypothalamus. The expression of the 5-HT1A genes is controlled by the 5-HT1A promoter, so that they are only expressed in 5-HT1A receptor-containing cells. (1) Injection of Ad-1AP-sense into the hypothalamus of SERT knock-out mice restored 5-HT1A receptors in the medial hypothalamus; this effect was accompanied by elimination of the exaggerated adrenocorticotropin responses to a saline injection (minor stress) and reduced locomotor activity but not by a change in increased exploratory anxiety-like behavior. (2) To further confirm the observation in SERT-/- mice, Ad-1AP-antisense was injected into the hypothalamus of normal mice. The density and the function of 5-HT1A receptors in the medial hypothalamus were significantly reduced in Ad-1AP-antisense-treated mice. Compared with the control group (injected with Ad-track), Ad-1A-antisense-treated mice showed a significant reduction in locomotor activity, but again no changes in exploratory anxiety-like behaviors, tested by elevated plus-maze and open-field tests. Thus, the present results demonstrate that medial hypothalamic 5-HT1A receptors regulate stress responses and locomotor activity but may not regulate exploratory anxiety-like behaviors.

  9. PRX-08066, a novel 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 2B antagonist, reduces monocrotaline-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension and right ventricular hypertrophy in rats.

    PubMed

    Porvasnik, Stacy L; Germain, Sean; Embury, Jennifer; Gannon, Kimberley S; Jacques, Vincent; Murray, Justin; Byrne, Barry J; Shacham, Sharon; Al-Mousily, Faris

    2010-08-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a life-threatening disease that results in right ventricular failure. 5-((4-(6-Chlorothieno[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4-ylamino)piperidin-1-yl)methyl)-2-fluorobenzonitrile monofumarate (PRX-08066) is a selective 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 2B (5-HT2BR) antagonist that causes selective vasodilation of pulmonary arteries. In the current study, the effects of PRX-08066 were assessed by using the monocrotaline (MCT)-induced PAH rat model. Male rats received 40 mg/kg MCT or phosphate-buffered saline and were treated orally twice a day with vehicle or 50 or 100 mg/kg PRX-08066 for 5 weeks. Pulmonary and cardiac functions were evaluated by hemodynamics, heart weight, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), pulmonary artery (PA) morphology, and histology. Cardiac MRI demonstrated that PRX-08066 (100 mg/kg) significantly (P < 0.05) improved right ventricular ejection fraction. PRX-08066 significantly reduced peak PA pressure at 50 and 100 mg/kg (P < 0.05 and < 0.01, respectively) compared with MCT control animals. PRX-08066 therapy also significantly reduced right ventricle (RV)/body weight and RV/left ventricle + septum (P < 0.01 and < 0.001, respectively) compared with MCT-treated animals. Morphometric assessment of pulmonary arterioles revealed a significant reduction in medial wall thickening and lumen occlusion associated with both doses of PRX-08066 (P < 0.01). The 5-HT2BR antagonist PRX-08066 significantly attenuated the elevation in PA pressure and RV hypertrophy and maintained cardiac function. Pulmonary vascular remodeling was also diminished compared with MCT control rats. PRX-08066 prevents the severity of PAH in the MCT rat model.

  10. Brown adipose tissue sympathetic nerve activity is potentiated by activation of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)1A/5-HT7 receptors in the rat spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Madden, C. J.; Morrison, S. F.

    2008-01-01

    In urethane-chloralose anesthetized, neuromuscularly blocked, ventilated rats, microinjection of NMDA (12 pmol) into the right fourth thoracic segment (T4) spinal intermediolateral nucleus (IML) immediately increased ipsilateral brown adipose tissue (BAT) sympathetic nerve activity (SNA; peak +492% of control), expired CO2 (+0.1%) heart rate (+48 beats min−1) and arterial pressure (+8 mmHg). The increase in BAT SNA evoked by T4 IML microinjection of NMDA was potentiated when it was administered immediately following a T4 IML microinjection of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, 100 pmol) or the 5-HT1A/5-HT7 receptor agonist, 8-OH-DPAT (600 pmol), (area under the curve: 184%, and 259% of the NMDA-only response, respectively). In contrast, T4 IML microinjection of the 5-HT2 receptor agonist, DOI (28 pmol) did not potentiate the NMDA-evoked increase in BAT SNA (101% of NMDA-only response). Microinjection into the T4 IML of the selective 5-HT1A antagonist, WAY-100635 (500 pmol), plus the 5-HT7 antagonist, SB-269970 (500 pmol), prevented the 5-HT-induced potentiation of the NMDA-evoked increase in BAT SNA. When administered separately, WAY-100635 (800 pmol) and SB-269970 (800 pmol) attenuated the 8-OH-DPAT-induced potentiation of the NMDA-evoked increase in BAT SNA through effects on the amplitude and duration of the response, respectively. The selective 5-HT2 receptor antagonist, ketanserin (100 pmol), did not attenuate the potentiations of the NMDA-evoked increase in BAT SNA induced by either 5-HT or 8-OH-DPAT. These results demonstrate that activation of 5-HT1A/5-HT7 receptors can act synergistically with NMDA receptor activation within the IML to markedly increase BAT SNA. PMID:18082230

  11. Selective Recognition of 5-Hydroxytryptamine and Dopamine on a Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube-Chitosan Hybrid Film-Modified Microelectrode Array

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huiren; Wang, Li; Luo, Jinping; Song, Yilin; Liu, Juntao; Zhang, Song; Cai, Xinxia

    2015-01-01

    It is difficult to determine dopamine (DA) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) accurately because of the interference of ascorbic acid (AA) in vitro, which has a high concentration and can be oxidized at a potential close to DA and 5-HT at a conventional electrode, combined with the overlapping voltammetric signal of DA and 5-HT at a bare electrode. Herein, chitosan (CS) was used as a stabilizing matrix by electrochemical reaction, and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were modified onto the microelectrode array (MEA). The CS-MWCNT hybrid film-modified MEA was quite effective at simultaneously recognizing these species in a mixture and resolved the overlapping anodic peaks of AA, DA and 5-HT into three well-defined oxidation peaks in differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) at −80 mV, 105 mV and 300 mV (versus Ag|AgCl), respectively. The linear responses were obtained in the range of 5 × 10−6 M to 2 × 10−4 M for DA (r = 0.996) and in the range of 1 × 10−5 M to 3 × 10−4 M for 5-HT (r = 0.999) using the DPV under the presence of a single substance. While DA coexisted with 5-HT in the interference of 3 × 10−4 M AA, the linear responses were obtained in the range of 1 × 10−5 M to 3 × 10−4 M for selective molecular recognition of DA (r = 0.997) and 5-HT (r = 0.997) using the DPV. Therefore, this proposed MEA was successfully used for selective molecular recognition and determination of DA and 5-HT using the DPV, which has a potential application for real-time determination in vitro experiments. PMID:25580900

  12. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (serotonin)2A receptors in rat anterior cingulate cortex mediate the discriminative stimulus properties of d-lysergic acid diethylamide.

    PubMed

    Gresch, Paul J; Barrett, Robert J; Sanders-Bush, Elaine; Smith, Randy L

    2007-02-01

    d-Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), an indoleamine hallucinogen, produces profound alterations in mood, thought, and perception in humans. The brain site(s) that mediates the effects of LSD is currently unknown. In this study, we combine the drug discrimination paradigm with intracerebral microinjections to investigate the anatomical localization of the discriminative stimulus of LSD in rats. Based on our previous findings, we targeted the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) to test its involvement in mediating the discriminative stimulus properties of LSD. Rats were trained to discriminate systemically administered LSD (0.085 mg/kg s.c.) from saline. Following acquisition of the discrimination, bilateral cannulae were implanted into the ACC (AP, +1.2 mm; ML, +/-1.0 mm; DV, -2.0 mm relative to bregma). Rats were tested for their ability to discriminate varying doses of locally infused LSD (0.1875, 0.375, and 0.75 microg/side) or artificial cerebrospinal fluid (n = 3-7). LSD locally infused into ACC dose-dependently substituted for systemically administered LSD, with 0.75 microg/side LSD substituting completely (89% correct). Systemic administration of the selective 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) (5-HT)(2A) receptor antagonist R-(+)-alpha-(2,3-dimethoxyphenyl)-1-[2-(4-fluorophenylethyl)]-4-piperidine-methanol (M100907; 0.4 mg/kg) blocked the discriminative cue of LSD (0.375 microg/side) infused into ACC (from 68 to 16% drug lever responding). Furthermore, M100907 (0.5 microg/microl/side) locally infused into ACC completely blocked the stimulus effects of systemic LSD (0.04 mg/kg; from 80 to 12% on the LSD lever). Taken together, these data indicate that 5-HT(2A) receptors in the ACC are a primary target mediating the discriminative stimulus properties of LSD.

  13. The 5-hydroxytryptamine4 receptor agonists prucalopride and PRX-03140 increase acetylcholine and histamine levels in the rat prefrontal cortex and the power of stimulated hippocampal θ oscillations.

    PubMed

    Johnson, David E; Drummond, Elena; Grimwood, Sarah; Sawant-Basak, Aarti; Miller, Emily; Tseng, Elaine; McDowell, Laura L; Vanase-Frawley, Michelle A; Fisher, Katherine E; Rubitski, David M; Stutzman-Engwall, Kim J; Nelson, Robin T; Horner, Weldon E; Gorczyca, Roxanne R; Hajos, Mihaly; Siok, Chester J

    2012-06-01

    5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)(4) receptor agonists reportedly stimulate brain acetylcholine (ACh) release, a property that might provide a new pharmacological approach for treating cognitive deficits associated with Alzheimer's disease. The purpose of this study was to compare the binding affinities, functional activities, and effects on neuropharmacological responses associated with cognition of two highly selective 5-HT(4) receptor agonists, prucalopride and 6,7-dihydro-4-hydroxy-7-isopropyl-6-oxo-N-[3-(piperidin-1-yl)propyl]thieno[2,3-b]pyridine-5-carboxamide (PRX-03140). In vitro, prucalopride and PRX-03140 bound to native rat brain 5-HT(4) receptors with K(i) values of 30 nM and 110 nM, respectively, and increased cAMP production in human embryonic kidney-293 cells expressing recombinant rat 5-HT(4) receptors. In vivo receptor occupancy studies established that prucalopride and PRX-03140 were able to penetrate the brain and bound to 5-HT(4) receptors in rat brain, achieving 50% receptor occupancy at free brain exposures of 330 nM and 130 nM, respectively. Rat microdialysis studies revealed that prucalopride maximally increased ACh and histamine levels in the prefrontal cortex at 5 and 10 mg/kg, whereas PRX-03140 significantly increased cortical histamine levels at 50 mg/kg, failing to affect ACh release at doses lower than 150 mg/kg. In combination studies, donepezil-induced increases in cortical ACh levels were potentiated by prucalopride and PRX-03140. Electrophysiological studies in rats demonstrated that both compounds increased the power of brainstem-stimulated hippocampal θ oscillations at 5.6 mg/kg. These findings show for the first time that the 5-HT(4) receptor agonists prucalopride and PRX-03140 can increase cortical ACh and histamine levels, augment donepezil-induced ACh increases, and increase stimulated-hippocampal θ power, all neuropharmacological parameters consistent with potential positive effects on cognitive processes.

  14. Pharmacological profile of lurasidone, a novel antipsychotic agent with potent 5-hydroxytryptamine 7 (5-HT7) and 5-HT1A receptor activity.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Tadashi; Horisawa, Tomoko; Tokuda, Kumiko; Ishiyama, Takeo; Ogasa, Masaaki; Tagashira, Rie; Matsumoto, Kenji; Nishikawa, Hiroyuki; Ueda, Yoko; Toma, Satoko; Oki, Hitomi; Tanno, Norihiko; Saji, Ikutaro; Ito, Akira; Ohno, Yukihiro; Nakamura, Mitsutaka

    2010-07-01

    Lurasidone [(3aR,4S,7R,7aS)-2-[(1R,2R)-2-[4-(1,2-benzisothiazol-3-yl)piperazin-1-ylmethyl]cyclohexylmethyl]hexahydro-4,7-methano-2H-isoindole-1,3-dione hydrochloride; SM-13496] is an azapirone derivative and a novel antipsychotic candidate. The objective of the current studies was to investigate the in vitro and in vivo pharmacological properties of lurasidone. Receptor binding affinities of lurasidone and several antipsychotic drugs were tested under comparable assay conditions using cloned human receptors or membrane fractions prepared from animal tissue. Lurasidone was found to have potent binding affinity for dopamine D(2), 5-hydroxytryptamine 2A (5-HT(2A)), 5-HT(7), 5-HT(1A), and noradrenaline alpha(2C) receptors. Affinity for noradrenaline alpha(1), alpha(2A), and 5-HT(2C) receptors was weak, whereas affinity for histamine H(1) and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors was negligible. In vitro functional assays demonstrated that lurasidone acts as an antagonist at D(2) and 5-HT(7) receptors and as a partial agonist at the 5-HT(1A) receptor subtype. Lurasidone showed potent effects predictive of antipsychotic activity, such as inhibition of methamphetamine-induced hyperactivity and apomorphine-induced stereotyped behavior in rats, similar to other antipsychotics. Furthermore, lurasidone had only weak extrapyramidal effects in rodent models. In animal models of anxiety disorders and depression, treatment with lurasidone was associated with significant improvement. Lurasidone showed a preferential effect on the frontal cortex (versus striatum) in increasing dopamine turnover. Anti-alpha(1)-noradrenergic, anticholinergic, and central nervous system (CNS) depressant actions of lurasidone were also very weak. These results demonstrate that lurasidone possesses antipsychotic activity and antidepressant- or anxiolytic-like effects with potentially reduced liability for extrapyramidal and CNS depressant side effects.

  15. Sucrose preload reduces snacking after mild mental stress in healthy participants as a function of 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter gene promoter polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Markus, C Rob; Jonkman, Lisa M; Capello, Aimee; Leinders, Sacha; Hüsch, Fabian

    2015-01-01

    Brain serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) dysfunction is considered to promote food intake and eating-related disturbances, especially under stress or negative mood. Vulnerability for 5-HT disturbances is considered to be genetically determined, including a short (S) allele polymorphism in the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) that is associated with lower serotonin function. Since 5-HT function may be slightly increased by carbohydrate consumption, S-allele 5-HTTLPR carriers in particular may benefit from a sugar-preload due to their enhanced 5-HT vulnerability. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether a sugar-containing preload may reduce appetite and energy intake after exposure to stress to induce negative mood, depending on genetic 5-HT vulnerability. From a population of 771 healthy young male and female genotyped college students 31 S/S carriers (8 males, 23 females) and 26 long allele (L/L) carriers (9 males, 17 females) (mean ± S.D. 22 ± 1.6 years; body mass index, BMI, 18-33 kg/m(2)) were monitored for changes in appetite and snacking behavior after stress exposure. Results revealed an increased energy intake after mild mental stress (negative mood) mainly for high-fat sweet foods, which was significantly greater in S/S carriers, and only in these genotypes this intake was significantly reduced by a sucrose-containing preload. Although alternative explanations are possible, it is suggested that S/S participants may have enhanced brain (hypothalamic) 5-HT responsiveness to food that makes them more susceptible to the beneficial satiation effects of a sucrose-preload as well as to the negative effects of mild mental stress on weight gain.

  16. Selective recognition of 5-hydroxytryptamine and dopamine on a multi-walled carbon nanotube-chitosan hybrid film-modified microelectrode array.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huiren; Wang, Li; Luo, Jinping; Song, Yilin; Liu, Juntao; Zhang, Song; Cai, Xinxia

    2015-01-08

    It is difficult to determine dopamine (DA) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) accurately because of the interference of ascorbic acid (AA) in vitro, which has a high concentration and can be oxidized at a potential close to DA and 5-HT at a conventional electrode, combined with the overlapping voltammetric signal of DA and 5-HT at a bare electrode. Herein, chitosan (CS) was used as a stabilizing matrix by electrochemical reaction, and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were modified onto the microelectrode array (MEA). The CS-MWCNT hybrid film-modified MEA was quite effective at simultaneously recognizing these species in a mixture and resolved the overlapping anodic peaks of AA, DA and 5-HT into three well-defined oxidation peaks in differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) at -80 mV, 105 mV and 300 mV (versus Ag|AgCl), respectively. The linear responses were obtained in the range of 5 × 10(-6) M to 2 × 10(-4) M for DA (r = 0.996) and in the range of 1 × 10(-5) M to 3 × 10(-4) M for 5-HT (r = 0.999) using the DPV under the presence of a single substance. While DA coexisted with 5-HT in the interference of 3 × 10(-4) M AA, the linear responses were obtained in the range of 1 × 10(-5) M to 3 × 10(-4) M for selective molecular recognition of DA (r = 0.997) and 5-HT (r = 0.997) using the DPV. Therefore, this proposed MEA was successfully used for selective molecular recognition and determination of DA and 5-HT using the DPV, which has a potential application for real-time determination in vitro experiments.

  17. 5-Hydroxytryptamine2C receptor contribution to m-chlorophenylpiperazine and N-methyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxamide-induced anxiety-like behavior and limbic brain activation.

    PubMed

    Hackler, Elizabeth A; Turner, Greg H; Gresch, Paul J; Sengupta, Saikat; Deutch, Ariel Y; Avison, Malcolm J; Gore, John C; Sanders-Bush, Elaine

    2007-03-01

    Activation of 5-hydroxytryptamine2C (5-HT(2C)) receptors by the 5-HT(2) receptor agonist m-chlorophenylpiperazine (m-CPP) elicits anxiety in humans and anxiety-like behavior in animals. We compared the effects of m-CPP with the anxiogenic GABA(A) receptor inverse agonist N-methyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxamide (FG-7142) on both anxiety-like behavior and regional brain activation using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in the rat. We also determined whether the selective 5-HT(2C) receptor antagonist SB 242084 [6-chloro-2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-N-[6-[(2-methyl-3-pyridinyl)oxy]-3-pyridinyl]-1H-indole-1-carboxyamide dihydrochloride] would blunt m-CPP or FG-7142-induced neuronal activation. Both m-CPP (3 mg/kg i.p.) and FG-7142 (10 mg/kg i.p.) elicited anxiety-like behavior when measured in the social interaction test, and pretreatment with SB 242084 (1 mg/kg i.p.) completely blocked the behavioral effects of both anxiogenic drugs. Regional brain activation in vivo in response to anxiogenic drug challenge was determined by blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) fMRI using a powerful 9.4T magnet. Region of interest analyses revealed that m-CPP and FG-7142 significantly increased BOLD signals in brain regions that have been linked to anxiety, including the amygdala, dorsal hippocampus, and medial hypothalamus. These BOLD signal increases were blocked by pretreatment with SB 242084. In contrast, injection of m-CPP and FG-7142 resulted in BOLD signal decreases in the medial prefrontal cortex that were not blocked by SB 242084. In conclusion, the brain activation signals produced by anxiogenic doses of both m-CPP and FG-7142 are mediated at least partially by the 5-HT(2C) receptor, indicating that this receptor is a key component in anxiogenic neural circuitry.

  18. Effects of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) reuptake inhibition plus 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonism on the firing activity of norepinephrine neurons.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Steven T; Blier, Pierre

    2002-09-01

    YM992 [(S)-2-[[(7-fluoro-4-indanyl)oxy]methyl]morpholine monohydrochloride] is a selective serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) and a potent 5-HT(2A) antagonist. The aim of the present study was to assess, using in vivo extracellular unitary recordings, the effect of acute and sustained administration of YM992 (40 mg kg(-1) day(-1) s.c., using osmotic minipumps) on the spontaneous firing activity of locus coeruleus (LC) norepinephrine (NE) neurons. Acute intravenous injection of YM992 (4 mg kg(-1)) significantly decreased NE neuron firing activity by 29% and blocked the inhibitory effect of a subsequent injection of the 5-HT(2) agonist DOI [1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane hydrochloride]. A 2-day treatment with YM992 decreased the firing rate of NE neurons by 66%, whereas a partial recovery was observed after a 7-day treatment and a complete one after a 21-day treatment. Following the injection of the alpha(2)-adrenoceptor antagonist idazoxan (1 mg kg(-1) i.v.), NE neuron firing was equalized in controls and 2-day YM992-treated rats. This put into evidence an increased degree of activation of alpha(2)-adrenergic autoreceptors in the treated rats. The suppressant effect of the alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonist clonidine was significantly decreased in long-term YM992-treated rats. The recovery of LC firing activity after long-term YM992 administration could thus be explained by a decreased sensitivity of alpha(2)-adrenergic autoreceptors. Sustained SSRI administration leads to a gradual reduction of the firing activity of NE neurons during long-term administration, whereas YM992 produced opposite effects. The exact basis for the increased synaptic availability of NE by YM992 remains to be elucidated. This NE activity, resulting from 5-HT reuptake inhibition plus 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonism, might confer additional benefits in affective and anxiety disorders.

  19. Protein kinase mediated upregulation of endothelin A, endothelin B and 5-hydroxytryptamine 1B/1D receptors during organ culture in rat basilar artery

    PubMed Central

    Hansen-Schwartz, Jacob; Svensson, Carl-Lennart; Xu, Cang-Bao; Edvinsson, Lars

    2002-01-01

    Organ culture has been shown to upregulate both endothelin (ET) and 5-hydroxytryptamine 1B/1D (5-HT1B/1D) receptors in rat cerebral arteries. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the involvement of protein kinases, especially protein kinases C (PKC) and A (PKA) in this process. The effect of inhibiting protein kinases during organ culture with staurosporine (unspecific protein kinase inhitor), RO 31-7549 (specific inhibitor of classical PKC's) and H 89 (specific inhibitor of PKA) was examined using in vitro pharmacological examination of cultured vessel segments with ET-1 (unspecific ETA and ETB agonist), S6c (specific ETB agonist) and 5-CT (5-HT1 agonist). Levels of mRNA coding for the ETA, ETB, 5-HT1B and 5-HT1D receptors were analysed using real-time RT–PCR. Classical PKC's are critically involved in the appearance of the ETB receptor; co-culture with RO 31-7549 abolished the contractile response (6.9±1.8%) and reduced the ETB receptor mRNA by 44±4% as compared to the cultured control. Correlation between decreased ETB receptor mRNA and abolished contractile function indicates upstream involvement of PKC. Inhibition of PKA generally had an enhancing effect on the induced changes giving rise to a 7–25% increase in Emax in response to ET-1, S6c and 5-CT as compared to the cultured control. Staurosporine inhibited the culture induced upregulation of the response of both the ETA and the 5-HT1B/1D receptors, but had no significant effect on the mRNA levels of these receptors. This lack of correlation indicates an additional downstream involvement of protein kinases. PMID:12183337

  20. Wound re-epithelialization: modulating keratinocyte migration in wound healing.

    PubMed

    Raja; Sivamani, K; Garcia, Miki Shirakawa; Isseroff, R Rivkah

    2007-05-01

    An essential feature of a healed wound is the restoration of an intact epidermal barrier through wound epithelialization, also known as re-epithelialization. The directed migration of keratinocytes is critical to wound epithelialization and defects in this function are associated with the clinical phenotype of chronic non-healing wounds. A complex balance of signaling factors and surface proteins are expressed and regulated in a temporospatial manner that promote keratinocyte motility and survival to activate wound re-epithelialization. The majority of this review focuses on the mechanisms that regulate keratinocyte migration in the re-epithelialization process. This includes a review of cell attachments via desmosomes, hemidesmosomes, and integrins, the expression of keratins, the role of growth factors, cytokines and chemokines, eicosanoids, oxygen tension, antimicrobial peptides, and matrix metalloproteinases. Also reviewed are recently emerging novel mediators of keratinocyte motility including the role of electric fields, and signaling via the acetylcholine and beta-adrenergic receptors. These multiple regulators impact the ability of keratinocytes to migrate from the wound edge or other epidermal reservoirs to efficiently re-epithelialize a breach in the integrity of the epidermis. New discoveries will continue to uncover the elegant network of events that result in restoration of epidermal integrity and complete the wound repair process.

  1. Activation of constitutive 5-hydroxytryptamine(1B) receptor by a series of mutations in the BBXXB motif: positioning of the third intracellular loop distal junction and its G(o)alpha protein interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Pauwels, P J; Gouble, A; Wurch, T

    1999-01-01

    Constitutive activity of the recombinant human 5-hydroxytryptamine(1B) (5-HT(1B)) receptor (RC code 2.1.5HT.01.B) was investigated by mutagenesis of the BBXXB motif (in which B represents a basic residue and X a non-basic residue) located in the C-terminal portion of the third intracellular loop. In contrast with wild-type 5-HT(1B) receptors, three receptor mutants (Thr(313)-->Lys, Thr(313)-->Arg and Thr(313)-->Gln) increased their agonist-independent guanosine 5'-[gamma-[(35)S]thio]triphosphate binding response by 26-41%. This activity represented approx. 30% of the maximal response induced by 5-HT and could be reversed by the inverse agonists methiothepin and 3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-4-hydroxy-N-(4-pyridin-4-yl phenyl)-benzenamide (GR 55562). Enhanced agonist-independent and agonist-dependent 5-HT(1B) receptor activation was provided by co-expression of a pertussis toxin-resistant rat G(o)alpha Cys(351)-->Ile protein. The wild-type 5-HT(1B) receptor displayed a doubling in basal activity, whereas a spectrum of enhanced basal activities (313-571%) was observed with a series of diverse amino acid substitutions (isoleucine, glycine, asparagine, alanine, lysine, phenylalanine, glutamine and arginine) at the 5-HT(1B) receptor position 313 in the presence of pertussis toxin (100 ng/ml). Consequently, the constitutive 5-HT(1B) receptor activity can be modulated by the mutation of Thr(313), and displays a graded range between 11% and 59% of maximal 5-HT(1B) receptor activation by 5-HT. No clear pattern is apparent in the framework of traditionally cited amino acid characteristics (i.e. residue size, charge or hydrophobicity) to explain the observed constitutive activities. The various amino acid substitutions that yielded enhanced activity are unlikely to make similar intramolecular interactions within the 5-HT(1B) receptor. It is hypothesized that the positioning of the junction between the third intracellular loop and transmembrane domain VI is altered by mutation of

  2. Modulation of endothelial cell migration by ER stress and insulin resistance: a role during maternal obesity?

    PubMed

    Sáez, Pablo J; Villalobos-Labra, Roberto; Westermeier, Francisco; Sobrevia, Luis; Farías-Jofré, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    Adverse microenvironmental stimuli can trigger the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress pathway, which initiates the unfolded protein response (UPR), to restore protein-folding homeostasis. Several studies show induction of ER stress during obesity. Chronic UPR has been linked to different mechanisms of disease in obese and diabetic individuals, including insulin resistance (IR) and impaired angiogenesis. Endothelial cell (EC) migration is an initial step for angiogenesis, which is associated with remodeling of existing blood vessels. EC migration occurs according to the leader-follower model, involving coordinated processes of chemotaxis, haptotaxis, and mechanotaxis. Thus, a fine-tuning of EC migration is necessary to provide the right timing to form the required vessels during angiogenesis. ER stress modulates EC migration at different levels, usually impairing migration and angiogenesis, although different effects may be observed depending on the tissue and/or microenvironment. In the context of pregnancy, maternal obesity (MO) induces IR in the offspring. Interestingly, several proteins associated with obesity-induced IR are also involved in EC migration, providing a potential link with the ER stress-dependent alterations observed in obese individuals. Different signaling cascades that converge on cytoskeleton regulation directly impact EC migration, including the Akt and/or RhoA pathways. In addition, ER is the main intracellular reservoir for Ca(2+), which plays a pivotal role during EC migration. Therefore, ER stress-related alterations in Ca(2+) signaling or Ca(2+) levels might also produce distorted EC migration. However, the above findings have been studied in the context of adult obesity, and no information has been reported regarding the effect of MO on fetal EC migration. Here we summarize the state of knowledge about the possible mechanisms by which ER stress and IR might impact EC migration and angiogenesis in fetal endothelium exposed to MO during

  3. A behavioural and biochemical study in rats of 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor agonists and antagonists, with observations on structure-activity requirements for the agonists

    PubMed Central

    Green, A.R.; Hall, J.E.; Rees, A.R.

    1981-01-01

    1 The effect of the putative 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptor antagonists, methysergide, methergoline, mianserin, cyproheptadine, cinanserin (all at 10 mg/kg), methiothepin (5 mg/kg) and (-)-propranolol (20 mg/kg) on the behavioural responses to tranylcypromine (10 mg/kg) followed 30 min later by L-tryptophan (100 mg/kg) was examined. 2 Methysergide, methergoline, methiothepin and (-)-propranolol inhibited head weaving, forepaw treading and hind-limb abduction. Methysergide and methergoline increased reactivity. In contrast, cypropheptadine, cinanserin and mianserin had no effects on the behaviour. 3 Similar findings were obtained when the behaviours were elicited by administration of tranylcypromine (10 mg/kg) followed by the putative 5-HT receptor agonist, 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeODMT) (2 mg/kg). 4 When the behaviours were elicited by the putative 5-HT receptor agonist, quipazine (50 mg/kg), all the drugs effectively inhibited head weaving and forepaw treading. 5 When the dose of cypropheptadine was doubled to 20 mg/kg an inhibition of the tranylcypromine/L-tryptophan induced behaviours was seen. 6 Methiothepin produced a marked inhibition of apomorphine-induced locomotor activity whilst all the others enhanced this response, suggesting that only methiothepin inhibits the 5-HT behaviours by dopamine antagonism and that the increased reactivity seen following tranylcypromine/L-tryptophan after pretreatment with methysergide or methergoline might be due to enhanced dopamine function. 7 Pretreatment with p-chlorophenylalanine resulted in enhanced behavioural responses to both 5-MeODMT and quipazine. 8 Both methergoline and methiothepin decreased the rate of 5-HT synthesis in whole brain but not spinal cord and methergoline decreased spinal cord 5-HIAA concentration. None of the other drugs had any significant effects on the concentration of 5-HT, 5-HIAA or 5-HT synthesis rate in brain or spinal cord. 9 Experiments with compounds structurally related

  4. Efficacy and safety of 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 receptor antagonists in irritable bowel syndrome: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yurong; Xiong, Wenjie; Shen, Xiaoxue; Jiang, Ling; Lin, Lin

    2017-01-01

    Aim We assessed the efficacy and safety of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT3) receptor antagonists in adults with non-constipated irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) or diarrhea-predominant IBS (IBS-D). Methods We searched PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving adults with non-constipated IBS or IBS-D that compared 5-HT3 receptor antagonists with placebo or other conventional treatment. Dichotomous symptom data were pooled to obtain the relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for improving global IBS symptoms, abdominal pain and abnormal bowel habits, or stool consistency symptoms after therapy, and adverse events, including constipation. Meta- analysis was performed with Mantel Haenszel method using Revman 5.3 software. Results We included 21 RCTs; 16 were high quality (Jadad score ≥ 4). The pooled RR of global IBS symptoms improved by 5-HT3 receptor antagonists versus placebo or mebeverine was 1.56 (95% CI: 1.43–1.71); alosetron, ramosetron, and cilansetron had similar treatment effects. The pooled RR of abdominal pain relieved by 5-HT3 receptor antagonists versus placebo was 1.33 (95% CI: 1.26–1.39). The pooled RR showed that 5-HT3 receptor antagonists improved abnormal bowel habits or stool consistency symptoms (RR = 1.63, 95% CI: 1.33, 1.99). The pooled RR of adverse events following 5-HT3 receptor antagonist treatment was 1.15 (95% CI: 1.08, 1.22). Subgroup analysis indicated that alosetron had a high rate of adverse effects (RR = 1.16, 95% CI: 1.08, 1.25); adverse events following ramosetron treatment were not statistically significantly different. 5-HT3 receptor antagonists were likelier to cause constipation: the pooled RR of constipation developing with 5-HT3 receptor antagonist versus placebo was 3.71 (95% CI: 2.98–4.61). However, constipation was likelier in patients with non-constipated IBS after taking 5-HT3 receptor antagonists than in patients with IBS-D only

  5. Inhibitory action of niflumic acid on noradrenaline- and 5-hydroxytryptamine-induced pressor responses in the isolated mesenteric vascular bed of the rat.

    PubMed

    Criddle, D N; de Moura, R S; Greenwood, I A; Large, W A

    1997-03-01

    1. The effects of niflumic acid, an inhibitor of calcium-activated chloride currents, were compared with the actions of the calcium channel blocker nifedipine on noradrenaline- and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)-induced pressor responses of the rat perfused isolated mesenteric vascular bed. 2. Bolus injections of noradrenaline (1 and 10 nmol) increased the perfusion pressure in a dose-dependent manner. Nifedipine (1 microM) inhibited the increase in pressure produced by 1 nmol noradrenaline by 31 +/- 5%. Niflumic acid (10 and 30 microM) also inhibited the noradrenaline-induced increase in perfusion pressure and 30 microM niflumic acid reduced the pressor response to 1 nmol noradrenaline by 34 +/- 6%. 3. The increases in perfusion elicited by 5-HT (0.3 and 3 nmol) were reduced by niflumic acid (10 and 30 microM) in a concentration-dependent manner and 30 microM niflumic acid inhibited responses to 0.3 and 3 nmol 5-HT by, respectively, 49 +/- 8% and 50 +/- 7%. Nifedipine (1 microM) decreased the pressor response to 3 nmol 5-HT by 44 +/- 9%. 4. In the presence of a combination of 30 microM niflumic acid and 1 microM nifedipine the inhibition of the pressor effects of noradrenaline (10 nmol) and 5-HT (3 nmol) was not significantly greater than with niflumic acid (30 microM) alone. Thus the effects of niflumic acid and nifedipine were not additive. 5. In Ca-free conditions the transient contractions induced by 5-HT (3 nmol) were not reduced by 30 microM niflumic acid, suggesting that this agent does not inhibit calcium release from the intracellular store or the binding of 5-HT to its receptor. 6. Niflumic acid 30 microM did not inhibit the pressor responses induced by KCl (20 and 60 mumol) which were markedly reduced by 1 microM nifedipine. In addition, 1 microM levcromakalim decreased pressor responses produced by 20 mumol KCl. These data suggest that niflumic acid does not block directly calcium channels or activate potassium channels. 7. It is concluded that niflumic

  6. The 5-hydroxytryptamine2A receptor is involved in (+)-norfenfluramine-induced arterial contraction and blood pressure increase in deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ni, Wei; Fink, Gregory D; Watts, Stephanie W

    2007-05-01

    The highly effective anorexigen (+)-fenfluramine was widely used to control body weight until the association with primary pulmonary hypertension and valvular heart disease. (+)-Norfenfluramine is the major hepatic metabolite of (+)-fenfluramine and is primarily responsible for the anorexic effect as well as side effects. We reported that (+)-norfenfluramine causes vasoconstriction and a blood pressure increase in rats with normal blood pressure via the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)2A receptor. With the knowledge that (+)-norfenfluramine also has affinity for 5-HT2B receptors and that arterial 5-HT2B receptor expression is up-regulated in deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt hypertension, we tested the hypothesis that (+)-norfenfluramine-induced vasoconstriction and pressor effects are potentiated in DOCA-salt hypertensive rats in a 5-HT2 receptor-dependent manner. Contractions of arteries were measured using an isolated tissue bath system or myograph. Mean arterial blood pressure was measured in chronically instrumented conscious rats. Effects of (+)-norfenfluramine in stimulating arterial contraction (leftward shift versus SHAM, aorta, 5.13-fold; renal artery, 1.95-fold; mesenteric resistance artery, 1.77-fold) and raising blood pressure were significantly enhanced in hypertension. In arteries from both normotensive and hypertensive rats, (+)-norfenfluramine-induced contraction in aorta was inhibited by 5-HT2A receptor antagonists, ketanserin and LY53857 (4-isopropyl-7-methyl-9-(2-hydroxy-1-meth ylpropoxycarbonyl)4,6,6a,7,8,9,10,10a-octahydroindolo[4,3-fg]quinoline), but not by the 5-HT2B receptor antagonist, LY272015 [6-chloro-5-methyl-N-(5-quinolinyl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-indole-1-carboxamide]. Ketanserin (3 mg/kg) reduced (+)-norfenfluramine-induced pressor response in both SHAM and DOCA rats. Our results demonstrate that (+)-norfenfluramine-induced arterial contraction and blood pressure increases are potentiated in DOCA-salt hypertensive rats. However, it is the 5

  7. The effect of the selective 5-HT1A agonists alnespirone (S-20499) and 8-OH-DPAT on extracellular 5-hydroxytryptamine in different regions of rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Casanovas, J M; Lésourd, M; Artigas, F

    1997-01-01

    We have examined the effects of the systemic administration of the selective 5-HT1A agonist alnespirone (S-20499) on in vivo 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) release in the dorsal raphe nucleus, the median raphe nucleus and four forebrain areas innervated differentially by both (dorsal striatum, frontal cortex, ventral hippocampus and dorsal hippocampus). Alnespirone (0.1–3 mg kg−1, s.c.) dose-dependently reduced extracellular 5-HT in the six areas examined. In forebrain, the maximal reductions occurred in striatum and frontal cortex (maximal reduction to 23 and 29% of baseline, respectively). Those in dorsal and ventral hippocampus were more moderate (to ca 65% of baseline). In contrast, the decrease in 5-HT elicited in the median raphe nucleus was more marked than that in the dorsal raphe nucleus (to ca 30 and 60% of baseline, respectively). The selective 5-HT1A antagonist WAY-100635 (0.5 mg kg−1, s.c.) prevented the decrease in 5-HT induced by alnespirone (0.3 mg kg−1, s.c.) in frontal cortex. 8-OH-DPAT (0.025, 0.1 and 0.3 mg kg−1, s.c.) also reduced extracellular 5-HT in a regionally-selective manner (e.g., to 32% of baseline in striatum and to 69% in dorsal hippocampus at 0.1 mg kg−1, s.c.). In midbrain, 8-OH-DPAT reduced the dialysate 5-HT slightly more in the median than in the dorsal raphe nucleus at all doses examined. Doses of both compounds close to their respective ED50 values (0.3 mg kg−1 alnespirone, 0.025 mg kg−1 8-OH-DPAT) reduced 5-HT to a comparable extent in all regions examined. However, the reductions attained at higher doses were more pronounced for 8-OH-DPAT. These data show that the reduction of 5-HT release elicited by alnespirone and 8-OH-DPAT is more important in forebrain areas innervated by 5-hydroxytryptaminergic neurones of the dorsal raphe nucleus. This regional selectivity seems unlikely to be accounted for by differences in the sensitivity of 5-HT1A autoreceptors controlling 5-HT release, given

  8. Alkylindole-sensitive receptors modulate microglial cell migration and proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Susan; Cherry, Allison E.; Xu, Cong; Stella, Nephi

    2015-01-01

    Ligands targeting G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) expressed by microglia have been shown to regulate distinct components of their activation process, including cell proliferation, migration and differentiation into M1 or M2 phenotypes. Cannabinoids, including the active component of the Cannabis plant, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), and the synthetic alkylindole (AI) compound, WIN55212-2 (WIN-2), activate two molecularly identified GPCRs: CB1 and CB2. Previous studies reported that WIN-2 activates an additional unknown GPCR that is not activated by plant-derived cannabinoids, and evidence indicates that microglia express these receptors. Detailed studies on the role of AI-sensitive receptors in microglial cell activation were difficult as no selective pharmacological tools were available. Here, three newly-developed AI analogues allowed us to determine if microglia express AI-sensitive receptors and if so, study how they regulate the microglial cell activation process. We found that mouse microglia in primary culture express functional AI-sensitive receptors as measured by radioligand binding and changes in intracellular cAMP levels, and that these receptors control both basal and ATP-stimulated migration. AI analogues inhibit cell proliferation stimulated by macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) without affecting basal cell proliferation. Remarkably, AI analogues do not control the expression of effector proteins characteristic of M1 or M2 phenotypes; yet activating microglia with M1 and M2 cytokines reduces the microglial response to AI analogues. Our results suggest that microglia express functional AI-sensitive receptors that control select components of their activation process. Agonists of these novel targets might represent a novel class of therapeutics to influence the microglial cell activation process. PMID:25914169

  9. Modulation of cell spreading and migration by pp125FAK phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Sankar, S.; Mahooti-Brooks, N.; Hu, G.; Madri, J. A.

    1995-01-01

    We provide evidence for both matrix-dependent and pp60v-src tyrosine kinase-dependent modulation of cell migration via tyrosine phosphorylation of pp125FAK, a focal adhesion kinase, thought to be involved in integrin-mediated signaling. Enhanced pp125FAK tyrosine phosphorylation and cell spreading was associated with decreased migration. Cells plated on type I collagen were less spread and exhibited lower levels of pp125FAK tyrosine phosphorylation and faster migration rates compared with cells on fibronectin that were well spread, which exhibited enhanced levels of pp125FAK tyrosine phosphorylation and slower migration rates. Inside-out signaling via expression of pp60v-src or its kinase-negative mutant caused a decrease in cell migration by changing the extent of pp125FAK tyrosine phosphorylation to above or below the levels obtained with control cells plated on fibronectin. Hence, pp125FAK tyrosine phosphorylation appears to play a role in the signaling cascade pathway involved in regulation of extracellular matrix-modulated, integrin-mediated cell migration. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7677174

  10. The sites of action of 5-hydroxytryptamine in nerve-muscle preparations from the guinea-pig small intestine and colon

    PubMed Central

    Costa, M.; Furness, J.B.

    1979-01-01

    1 The sites of action of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) were examined in isolated segments of guinea-pig intestine. Mechanical records were taken from the longitudinal muscle of the ileum and proximal colon and from the circular muscle of the ileum and distal colon. 2 In order to examine direct actions of 5-HT, nerve-mediated responses were blocked with tetrodotoxin (0.2 μg/ml). There was a gradient in the responsiveness of the longitudinal muscle of the ileum; in the proximal ileum it was usually unresponsive, whereas in the distal ileum about 30% of the amplitude of contraction was caused by a direct effect on the muscle. In the circular muscle from all parts of the ileum, direct effects on the muscle were weak or absent. In the distal colon, the circular muscle was almost always unresponsive to direct effects of 5-HT even when concentrations of 5-HT as great as 100 μg/ml were used. All direct actions of 5-HT on intestinal muscle were blocked by methysergide (1 μg/ml), which itself did not affect nerve-mediated responses. 3 Excitatory cholinergic nerves and excitatory and inhibitory nerves which released unidentified substances were all stimulated by 5-HT. The contractions mediated through cholinergic nerves were blocked by hyoscine (0.6 μg/ml). 4 Tachyphylaxis to the action of 5-HT occurred both for effects mediated through nerves and for direct effects on the muscle. Responses returned promptly after 5-HT was washed from the organ bath. 5 While 5-HT blocked its own action on neural receptors, it did not antagonize the stimulation of nicotinic receptors on cholinergic neurones by 1-1 dimethyl-4-phenylpiperazinium iodide (DMPP). Moreover, pentolinium markedly reduced contractions caused by DMPP without significantly affecting responses to 5-HT. In contrast, (+)-tubocurarine, another nicotinic receptor antagonist, was effective in reducing contractions caused by 5-HT. 6 Phenyldiguanide, which has been reported to antagonize the stimulant action of 5-HT on

  11. Inhibitory action of niflumic acid on noradrenaline- and 5-hydroxytryptamine-induced pressor responses in the isolated mesenteric vascular bed of the rat

    PubMed Central

    Criddle, D N; Soares de Moura, R; Greenwood, I A; Large, W A

    1997-01-01

    The effects of niflumic acid, an inhibitor of calcium-activated chloride currents, were compared with the actions of the calcium channel blocker nifedipine on noradrenaline- and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)-induced pressor responses of the rat perfused isolated mesenteric vascular bed.Bolus injections of noradrenaline (1 and 10 nmol) increased the perfusion pressure in a dose-dependent manner. Nifedipine (1 μM) inhibited the increase in pressure produced by 1 nmol noradrenaline by 31±5%. Niflumic acid (10 and 30 μM) also inhibited the noradrenaline-induced increase in perfusion pressure and 30 μM niflumic acid reduced the pressor response to 1 nmol noradrenaline by 34±6%.The increases in perfusion elicited by 5-HT (0.3 and 3 nmol) were reduced by niflumic acid (10 and 30 μM) in a concentration-dependent manner and 30 μM niflumic acid inhibited responses to 0.3 and 3 nmol 5-HT by, respectively, 49±8% and 50±7%. Nifedipine (1 μM) decreased the pressor response to 3 nmol 5-HT by 44±9%.In the presence of a combination of 30 μM niflumic acid and 1 μM nifedipine the inhibition of the pressor effects of noradrenaline (10 nmol) and 5-HT (3 nmol) was not significantly greater than with niflumic acid (30 μM) alone. Thus the effects of niflumic acid and nifedipine were not additive.In Ca-free conditions the transient contractions induced by 5-HT (3 nmol) were not reduced by 30 μM niflumic acid, suggesting that this agent does not inhibit calcium release from the intracellular store or the binding of 5-HT to its receptor.Niflumic acid 30 μM did not inhibit the pressor responses induced by KCl (20 and 60 μmol) which were markedly reduced by 1 μM nifedipine. In addition, 1 μM levcromakalim decreased pressor responses produced by 20 μmol KCl. These data suggest that niflumic acid does not block directly calcium channels or activate potassium channels.It is concluded that niflumic acid selectively reduces a

  12. [Influence of occupational stress and 5-hydroxytryptamine 2A receptor gene polymorphisms on depression in workers in a thermal power plant].

    PubMed

    Wu, H; Wang, F F; Zhou, W H; Gu, G Z; Yu, S F

    2016-10-20

    Objective: To investigate the association of occupational stress and 5-hydroxytryptamine 2A (5-HT2A) receptor gene polymorphisms with depression. Methods: In November 2010, cluster sampling was used to select 589 workers in a thermal power plant as study subjects. Questionnaires were used to investigate demographic features and occupational stressors. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism was used to detect the genotypes of T102C and A-1438G in 5-HT2A receptor gene in 589 workers. Results: High-level daily hassles (OR=3.013, 95%CI 1.642~5.530) , more negative emotion (OR=4.808, 95% CI 2.662~8.681) , more body needs (OR=1.890, 95% CI 1.034~3.453) , and severe role conflict (OR=1.815, 95% CI 1.002~3.288) were risk factors for depression, while high rewards (OR=0.424, 95% CI 0.226~0.796) was the protective factor against depression (all P<0.05). There were no significant differences in T102C genotype and allele distributions between the groups with and without depression (P>0.05) ; there was a significant difference in A-1438G genotype distribution between the groups with and without depression (χ(2)= 9.573, P<0.05) , while there was no significant difference in A-1438G allele distribution between these groups (P>0.05). The risk of depression in the workers with high-level daily hassles who carried TC genotype (OR= 4.473, 95% CI 1.161~17.238) or CC genotype (OR=5.176, 95% CI 1.367~19.593) of T102C was 4.473 and 5.176 times that in those with low-level daily hassles who carried TT genotype, and the risk of depression in the workers with more negative emotions who carried TC genotype (OR=5.667, 95%CI 1.204~26.673) or CC genotype (OR=8.114, 95% CI 1.747~37.677) of T102C was 5.667 and 8.114 times that in those with less negative emotion who carried TT genotype. The risk of depression in the workers with high-level daily hassles who carried AG genotype (OR=4.505, 95% CI 2.215~9.162) or GG genotype (OR=6.484, 95% CI 2.562~ 16.414) of A-1438G

  13. The highly selective 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)2A receptor antagonist, EMD 281014, significantly increases swimming and decreases immobility in male congenital learned helpless rats in the forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jignesh G; Bartoszyk, Gerd D; Edwards, Emmeline; Ashby, Charles R

    2004-04-01

    We examined the effect of the highly selective 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)(2A) receptor antagonist 7-[4-[2-(4-fluoro-phenyl)-ethyl]-piperazine-1-carbonyl]-1H-indole-3-carbonitrile HCl (EMD 281014) in congenital learned helpless male rats in the forced swim test. The administration of EMD-281014 (0.3-30 mg/kg i.p.) to congenital learned helpless rats dose-dependently and significantly (at 10 and 30 mg/kg) decreased immobility and increased swimming compared to vehicle-treated animals. Thus, EMD 281014 produces effects in the forced swim test resembling those of antidepressants.

  14. Multi-factorial modulation of IGD motogenic potential in MSF (migration stimulating factor).

    PubMed

    Ellis, Ian R; Jones, Sarah J; Staunton, David; Vakonakis, Ioannis; Norman, David G; Potts, Jennifer R; Milner, Caroline M; Meenan, Nicola A G; Raibaud, Sophie; Ohea, Go; Schor, Ana M; Schor, Seth L

    2010-09-10

    Migration Stimulating Factor (MSF) is a genetically truncated isoform of fibronectin (Fn). MSF is a potent stimulator of fibroblast migration, whereas full length Fn is devoid of motogenic activity. MSF and Fn contain four IGD motifs, located in the 3rd, 5th, 7th and 9th type I modules; these modules are referred to as (3)FnI, (5)FnI, (7)FnI and (9)FnI, respectively. We have previously reported that mutation of IGD motifs in modules (7)FnI and (9)FnI of MSF is sufficient to completely abolish the motogenic response of target adult skin fibroblasts. We now report that the IGD sequences in (3)FnI and (5)FnI are also capable of exhibiting motogenic activity when present within fragments of MSF. When present within (1-5)FnI, these sequences require the presence of serum or vitronectin for their motogenic activity to be manifest, whereas the IGD sequences in (7)FnI and (9)FnI are bioactive in the absence of serum factors. All MSF and IGD-containing peptides stimulated the phosphorylation of the integrin binding protein focal adhesion kinase (FAK) but did not necessarily affect migration. These results suggest that steric hindrance determines the motogenic activity of MSF and Fn, and that both molecules contain cryptic bioactive fragments.

  15. Modulation of Cell Migration and Invasiveness by Tumor Suppressor TSC2 in Lymphangioleiomyomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Goncharova, Elena A.; Goncharov, Dmitriy A.; Lim, Poay N.; Noonan, Daniel; Krymskaya, Vera P.

    2006-01-01

    The loss of TSC2 function is associated with the pathobiology of lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM), which is characterized by the abnormal proliferation, migration, and differentiation of smooth muscle–like cells within the lungs. Although the etiology of LAM remains unknown, clinical and genetic evidence provides support for the neoplastic nature of LAM. The goal of this study was to determine the role of tumor suppressor TSC2 in the neoplastic potential of LAM cells. We show that primary cultures of human LAM cells exhibit increased migratory activity and invasiveness, which is abolished by TSC2 re-expression. We found that TSC2 also inhibits cell migration through its N-terminus, independent of its GTPase-activating protein activity. LAM cells show increased stress fiber and focal adhesion formation, which is attenuated by TSC2 re-expression. The small GTPase RhoA is activated in LAM cells compared with normal human mesenchymal cells. Pharmacologic inhibition of Rho activity abrogates LAM cell migration; RhoA activity was also abolished by TSC2 re-expression or TSC1 knockdown with specific siRNA. These data demonstrate that TSC2 controls cell migration through its N-terminus by associating with TSC1 and regulating RhoA activity, suggesting that TSC2 may play a critical role in modulating cell migration and invasiveness, which contributes to the pathobiology of LAM. PMID:16388022

  16. Matrix metalloproteinases modulate ameboid-like migration of neutrophils through inflamed interstitial tissue

    PubMed Central

    Lerchenberger, Max; Uhl, Bernd; Stark, Konstantin; Zuchtriegel, Gabriele; Eckart, Annekathrin; Miller, Meike; Puhr-Westerheide, Daniel; Praetner, Marc; Rehberg, Markus; Khandoga, Alexander G.; Lauber, Kirsten; Massberg, Steffen; Krombach, Fritz

    2013-01-01

    In vitro studies suggest that leukocytes locomote in an ameboid fashion independently of pericellular proteolysis. Whether this motility pattern applies for leukocyte migration in inflamed tissue is still unknown. In vivo microscopy on the inflamed mouse cremaster muscle revealed that blockade of serine proteases or of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) significantly reduces intravascular accumulation and transmigration of neutrophils. Using a novel in vivo chemotaxis assay, perivenular microinjection of inflammatory mediators induced directional interstitial migration of neutrophils. Blockade of actin polymerization, but not of actomyosin contraction abolished neutrophil interstitial locomotion. Multiphoton laser scanning in vivo microscopy showed that the density of the interstitial collagen network increases in inflamed tissue, thereby providing physical guidance to infiltrating neutrophils. Although neutrophils locomote through the interstitium without pericellular collagen degradation, inhibition of MMPs, but not of serine proteases, diminished their polarization and interstitial locomotion. In this context, blockade of MMPs was found to modulate expression of adhesion/signaling molecules on neutrophils. Collectively, our data indicate that serine proteases are critical for neutrophil extravasation, whereas these enzymes are dispensable for neutrophil extravascular locomotion. By contrast, neutrophil interstitial migration strictly relies on actin polymerization and does not require the pericellular degradation of collagen fibers but is modulated by MMPs. PMID:23757732

  17. Kaempferol inhibits vascular smooth muscle cell migration by modulating BMP-mediated miR-21 expression.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwangho; Kim, Sunghwan; Moh, Sang Hyun; Kang, Hara

    2015-09-01

    Bioflavonoids are known to induce cardioprotective effects by inhibiting vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation and migration. Kaempferol has been shown to inhibit VSMC proliferation. However, little is known about the effect of kaempferol on VSMC migration and the underlying molecular mechanisms. Our studies provide the first evidence that kaempferol inhibits VSMC migration by modulating the BMP4 signaling pathway and microRNA expression levels. Kaempferol activates the BMP signaling pathway, induces miR-21 expression and downregulates DOCK4, 5, and 7, leading to inhibition of cell migration. Moreover, kaempferol antagonizes the PDGF-mediated pro-migratory effect. Therefore, our study uncovers a novel regulatory mechanism of VSMC migration by kaempferol and suggests that miRNA modulation by kaempferol is a potential therapy for cardiovascular diseases.

  18. Endogenous migration modulators as parent compounds for the development of novel cardiovascular and anti-inflammatory drugs

    PubMed Central

    Poller, Wolfgang; Rother, Madlen; Skurk, Carsten; Scheibenbogen, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    Development of novel cell migration modulators for anti-inflammatory and cardiovascular therapy is a complex task since any modulator will necessarily interfere with a balanced system of physiological regulators directing proper positioning of diverse immune cell types within the body. Whereas this shall serve efficient pathogen elimination, lack of proper control over these processes may result in counterproductive chronic inflammation and progressive tissue injury instead of healing. Prediction of the therapeutic potential or side effects of any migration modulator is not possible based on theoretical considerations alone but needs to be experimentally evaluated in preclinical disease models and by clinical studies. Here, we briefly summarize basic mechanism of cell migration, and groups of synthetic drugs currently in use for migration modulation. We then discuss one fundamental problem encountered with single-target approaches that arises from the complexity of any inflammation, with multiple interacting and often redundant factors being involved. This issue is likely to arise for any class of therapeutic agent (small molecules, peptides, antibodies, regulatory RNAs) addressing a single gene or protein. Against this background of studies on synthetic migration modulators addressing single targets, we then discuss the potential of endogenous proteins as therapeutic migration modulators, or as parent compounds for the development of mimetic drugs. Regulatory proteins of this type commonly address multiple receptors and signalling pathways and act upon the immune response in a phase-specific manner. Based on recent evidence, we suggest investigation of such endogenous migration modulators as novel starting points for anti-inflammatory and cardiovascular drug development. PMID:22035209

  19. Mapping the binding site pocket of the serotonin 5-Hydroxytryptamine2A receptor. Ser3.36(159) provides a second interaction site for the protonated amine of serotonin but not of lysergic acid diethylamide or bufotenin.

    PubMed

    Almaula, N; Ebersole, B J; Zhang, D; Weinstein, H; Sealfon, S C

    1996-06-21

    Like other amine neurotransmitters that activate G-protein-coupled receptors, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) binds to the 5-HT2A receptor through the interaction of its cationic primary amino group with the conserved Asp3.32(155) in transmembrane helix 3. Computational experiments with a 5-HT2A receptor model suggest that the same functional group of 5-hydroxytryptamine also forms a hydrogen bond with the side chain of Ser3.36(159), which is adjacent in space to Asp3.32(155). However, other 5-HT2A receptor ligands like lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), in which the amine nitrogen is embedded in a heterocycle, or N,N-dimethyl 5-HT, in which the side chain is a tertiary amine, are found in the computational simulations to interact with the aspartate but not with the serine, due mainly to steric hindrance. The predicted difference in the interaction of various ligands in the same receptor binding pocket was tested with site-directed mutagenesis of Ser3.36(159) --> Ala and Ser3.36(159) --> Cys. The alanine substitution led to an 18-fold reduction in 5-HT affinity and the cysteine substitution to an intermediate 5-fold decrease. LSD affinity, in contrast, was unaffected by either mutation. N,N-Dimethyl 5-HT affinity was unaffected by the cysteine mutation and had a comparatively small 3-fold decrease in affinity for the alanine mutant. These findings identify a mode of ligand-receptor complexation that involves two receptor side chains interacting with the same functional group of specific serotonergic ligands. This interaction serves to orient the ligands in the binding pocket and may influence the degree of receptor activation.

  20. Modulation of mesangial cell migration by extracellular matrix components. Inhibition by heparinlike glycosaminoglycans

    SciTech Connect

    Person, J.M.; Lovett, D.H.; Raugi, G.J.

    1988-12-01

    Extension of mesangial cells (MC) into the pericapillary space is a pathologic response seen in several forms of glomerulonephritis. This process may involve both cytoplasmic extension by MC and actual cellular migration. For investigation of whether extracellular matrix factors could modulate this process, the migratory responses of rat MC were quantitatively examined using a cell culture model. Denuding (wounding) a portion of a confluent culture of MC was followed by migration of mesangial cells into the denuded area. The expected proliferative response to this treatment was blocked by irradiation. The migratory response began within 8 hours of wounding and continued for at least 80 hours. The MC migratory response was specifically inhibited in a dose-dependent and reversible manner by heparin and heparinlike glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Chondroitin sulfates and hyaluronic acid did not significantly inhibit MC migration. Glomerular basement membrane heparinlike GAGs may normally prevent MC extension into the pericapillary space. Changes in the density or composition of these substances during glomerular inflammatory processes could permit the development of MC pericapillary extensions and thereby lead to further alterations in basement membrane integrity.

  1. The palmitoylation state of PMP22 modulates epithelial cell morphology and migration.

    PubMed

    Zoltewicz, Susie J; Lee, Sooyeon; Chittoor, Vinita G; Freeland, Steven M; Rangaraju, Sunitha; Zacharias, David A; Notterpek, Lucia

    2012-12-03

    PMP22 (peripheral myelin protein 22), also known as GAS 3 (growth-arrest-specific protein 3), is a disease-linked tetraspan glycoprotein of peripheral nerve myelin and constituent of intercellular junctions in epithelia. To date, our knowledge of the post-translational modification of PMP22 is limited. Using the CSS-Palm 2.0 software we predicted that C85 (cysteine 85), a highly conserved amino acid located between the second and third transmembrane domains, is a potential site for palmitoylation. To test this, we mutated C85S (C85 to serine) and established stable cells lines expressing the WT (wild-type) or the C85S-PMP22. In Schwann and MDCK (Madin-Darby canine kidney) cells mutating C85 blocked the palmitoylation of PMP22, which we monitored using 17-ODYA (17-octadecynoic acid). While palmitoylation was not necessary for processing the newly synthesized PMP22 through the secretory pathway, overexpression of C85S-PMP22 led to pronounced cell spreading and uneven monolayer thinning. To further investigate the functional significance of palmitoylated PMP22, we evaluated MDCK cell migration in a wound-healing assay. While WT-PMP22 expressing cells were resistant to migration, C85S cells displayed lamellipodial protrusions and migrated at a similar rate to vector control. These findings indicate that palmitoylation of PMP22 at C85 is critical for the role of the protein in modulating epithelial cell shape and motility.

  2. TGFβ2 Differentially Modulates Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation and Migration in Electrospun Gelatin-Fibrinogen constructs

    PubMed Central

    Ardila, D. C.; Tamimi, E.; Danford, F.L.; Haskett, D. G.; Kellar, R. S.; Doetschman, T.; Vande Geest, J.P.

    2014-01-01

    A main goal of tissue engineering is the development of scaffolds that replace, restore and improve injured tissue. These scaffolds have to mimic natural tissue, constituted by an extracellular matrix (ECM) support, cells attached to the ECM, and signaling molecules such as growth factors that regulate cell function. In this study we created electrospun flat sheet scaffolds using different compositions of gelatin and fibrinogen. Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were seeded on the scaffolds, and proliferation and infiltration were evaluated. Additionally, different concentrations of Transforming Growth Factor-beta2 (TGFβ2) were added to the medium with the aim of elucidating its effect on cell proliferation, migration and collagen production. Our results demostrated that a scafold with a composition of 80% gelatin-20% fibrinogen is suitable for tissue engineering applications since it promotes cell growth and migration. The addition of TGFβ2 at low concentrations (≤1ng/ml) to the culture medium resulted in an increase in SMC proliferation and scaffold infiltration, and in the reduction of collagen production. In contrast, TGFβ2 at concentrations >1ng/ml inhibited cell proliferation and migration while stimulating collagen production. According to our results TGFβ2 concentration has a differential effect on SMC function and thus can be used as a biochemical modulator that can be beneficial for tissue engineering applications. PMID:25453947

  3. Hint1 suppresses migration and invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma cells in vitro by modulating girdin activity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xue-Song; Bao, Tian-Hao; Ke, Yang; Sun, De-Yun; Shi, Zhi-Tian; Tang, Hao-Ran; Wang, Lin

    2016-11-01

    Histidine triad nucleotide-binding protein 1 (Hint1) is a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor gene. Its role in cancer cell migration has not been previously speculated. In the current study, we examined the expression of Hint1 in metastatic and non-metastatic lymph nodes of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients and further elucidated the effect of Hint1 expression on girdin expression and phosphorylation of AKT and ERK1/2 and on the migration of HCC cells in vitro. Expression of Hint1 and girdin in primary HCC tissues and metastatic and non-metastatic lymph nodes was determined by RT-PCR assays. HepG2 cells were transfected with plasmid vectors overexpressing Hint1 or small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting Hint1, girdin, Hint1 plus girdin, or the scrambled RNA. Migration and invasion of HCC cells were examined by wound and Transwell assays. Protein expression was detected by immunofluorescence and immunoblotting assays. RT-PCR assays revealed that the messenger RNA (mRNA) transcript levels of Hint1 were markedly lower than those of primary HCC tissues and non-metastatic lymph nodes (P < 0.01). By contrast, the mRNA transcript levels of girdin were significantly higher than non-metastatic lymph nodes (P < 0.05). Furthermore, siRNA knockdown of HINT1 resulted in a significant increase in the mRNA transcript levels of girdin in HepG2 cells (P < 0.05). Wound assays and Transwell assays showed that Hint1 knockdown by siRNA significantly enhanced the migration and invasion of HepG2 cells compared to HepG2 cells transfected with scrambled siRNA. Hint1 knockdown also led to significantly increased phosphorylation of girdin and AKT in HepG2 cells (P < 0.05), which, however, was effectively aborted by girdin knockdown by siRNA (P < 0.05). Hint1 is downregulated in metastatic lymph nodes and is implicated in migration and invasion of HCC cells in vitro by modulating girdin and AKT expression and phosphorylation. The Hint1-girdin-AKT signaling axis should be

  4. Migration of the subtropical front as a modulator of glacial climate.

    PubMed

    Bard, Edouard; Rickaby, Rosalind E M

    2009-07-16

    Ice cores extracted from the Antarctic ice sheet suggest that glacial conditions, and the relationship between isotopically derived temperatures and atmospheric PCO(2) have been constant over the last 800,000 years of the Late Pleistocene epoch. But independent lines of evidence, such as the extent of Northern Hemisphere ice sheets, sea level and other temperature records, point towards a fluctuating severity of glacial periods, particularly during the more extreme glacial stadials centred around 340,000 and 420,000 years ago (marine isotope stages 10 and 12). Previously unidentified mechanisms therefore appear to have mediated the relationship between insolation, CO(2) and climate. Here we test whether northward migration of the subtropical front (STF) off the southeastern coast of South Africa acts as a gatekeeper for the Agulhas current, which controls the transport of heat and salt from the Indo-Pacific Ocean to the Atlantic Ocean. Using a new 800,000-year record of sea surface temperature and ocean productivity from ocean sediment core MD962077, we demonstrate that during cold stadials (particularly marine isotope stages 10 and 12), productivity peaked and sea surface temperature was up to 6 degrees C cooler than modern temperatures. This suggests that during these cooler stadials, the STF moved northward by up to 7 degrees latitude, nearly shutting off the Agulhas current. Our results, combined with faunal assemblages from the south Atlantic show that variable northwards migration of the Southern Hemisphere STF can modulate the severity of each glacial period by altering the strength of the Agulhas current carrying heat and salt to the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. We show hence that the degree of northwards migration of the STF can partially decouple global climate from atmospheric partial pressure of carbon dioxide, P CO(2), and help to resolve the long-standing puzzle of differing glacial amplitudes within a consistent range of atmospheric

  5. Modulators of estrogen receptor inhibit proliferation and migration of prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Piccolella, Margherita; Crippa, Valeria; Messi, Elio; Tetel, Marc J; Poletti, Angelo

    2014-01-01

    In the initial stages, human prostate cancer (PC) is an androgen-sensitive disease, which can be pharmacologically controlled by androgen blockade. This therapy often induces selection of androgen-independent PC cells with increased invasiveness. We recently demonstrated, both in cells and mice, that a testosterone metabolite locally synthetized in prostate, the 5α-androstane-3β, 17β-diol (3β-Adiol), inhibits PC cell proliferation, migration and invasion, acting as an anti-proliferative/anti-metastatic agent. 3β-Adiol is unable to bind androgen receptor (AR), but exerts its protection against PC by specifically interacting with estrogen receptor beta (ERβ). Because of its potential retro-conversion to androgenic steroids, 3β-Adiol cannot be used "in vivo", thus, the aims of this study were to investigate the capability of four ligands of ERβ (raloxifen, tamoxifen, genistein and curcumin) to counteract PC progression by mimicking the 3β-Adiol activity. Our results demonstrated that raloxifen, tamoxifen, genistein and curcumin decreased DU145 and PC3 cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner; in addition, all four compounds significantly decreased the detachment of cells seeded on laminin or fibronectin. Moreover, raloxifen, tamoxifen, genistein and curcumin-treated DU145 and PC3 cells showed a significant decrease in cell migration. Notably, all these effects were reversed by the anti-estrogen, ICI 182,780, suggesting that their actions are mediated by the estrogenic pathway, via the ERβ, the only isoform present in these PCs. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that by selectively activating the ERβ, raloxifen, tamoxifen, genistein and curcumin inhibit human PC cells proliferation and migration favoring cell adesion. These synthetic and natural modulators of ER action may exert a potent protective activity against the progression of PC even in its androgen-independent status.

  6. Addition of the Neurokinin-1-Receptor Antagonist (RA) Aprepitant to a 5-Hydroxytryptamine-RA and Dexamethasone in the Prophylaxis of Nausea and Vomiting Due to Radiation Therapy With Concomitant Cisplatin

    SciTech Connect

    Jahn, Franziska; Jahn, Patrick; Sieker, Frank; Vordermark, Dirk; Jordan, Karin

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: To assess, in a prospective, observational study, the safety and efficacy of the addition of the neurokinin-1-receptor antagonist (NK1-RA) aprepitant to concomitant radiochemotherapy, for the prophylaxis of radiation therapy–induced nausea and vomiting. Patients and Methods: This prospective observational study compared the antiemetic efficacy of an NK1-RA (aprepitant), a 5-hydroxytryptamine-RA, and dexamethasone (aprepitant regimen) versus a 5-hydroxytryptamine-RA and dexamethasone (control regimen) in patients receiving concomitant radiochemotherapy with cisplatin at the Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Halle (Saale), Germany. The primary endpoint was complete response in the overall phase, defined as no vomiting and no use of rescue therapy in this period. Results: Fifty-nine patients treated with concomitant radiochemotherapy with cisplatin were included in this study. Thirty-one patients received the aprepitant regimen and 29 the control regimen. The overall complete response rates for cycles 1 and 2 were 75.9% and 64.5% for the aprepitant group and 60.7% and 54.2% for the control group, respectively. Although a 15.2% absolute difference was reached in cycle 1, a statistical significance was not detected (P=.22). Furthermore maximum nausea was 1.58 ± 1.91 in the control group and 0.73 ± 1.79 in the aprepitant group (P=.084); for the head-and-neck subset, 2.23 ± 2.13 in the control group and 0.64 ± 1.77 in the aprepitant group, respectively (P=.03). Conclusion: This is the first study of an NK1-RA–containing antiemetic prophylaxis regimen in patients receiving concomitant radiochemotherapy. Although the primary endpoint was not obtained, the absolute difference of 10% in efficacy was reached, which is defined as clinically meaningful for patients by international guidelines groups. Randomized phase 3 studies are necessary to further define the potential role of an NK1-RA in this setting.

  7. An MEK-cofilin signalling module controls migration of human T cells in 3D but not 2D environments.

    PubMed

    Klemke, Martin; Kramer, Elisabeth; Konstandin, Mathias H; Wabnitz, Guido H; Samstag, Yvonne

    2010-09-01

    T cells infiltrate peripheral tissues to execute immunosurveillance and effector functions. For this purpose, T cells first migrate on the two-dimensional (2D) surface of endothelial cells to undergo transendothelial migration. Then they change their mode of movement to undergo migration within the three-dimensional (3D)-extracellular matrix of the infiltrated tissue. As yet, no molecular mechanisms are known, which control migration exclusively in either 2D or 3D environments. Here, we describe a signalling module that controls T-cell chemotaxis specifically in 3D environments. In chemotaxing T cells, Ras activity is spatially restricted to the lamellipodium. There, Ras initiates activation of MEK, which in turn inhibits LIM-kinase 1 activity, thereby allowing dephosphorylation of the F-actin-remodelling protein cofilin. Interference with this MEK-cofilin module by either inhibition of MEK or by knockdown of cofilin reduces speed and directionality of chemotactic migration in 3D-extracellular matrices, but not on 2D substrates. This MEK-cofilin module may have an important function in the tissue positioning of T cells during an immune response.

  8. Pharmacological Inhibition of polysialyltransferase ST8SiaII Modulates Tumour Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Al-Saraireh, Yousef M. J.; Sutherland, Mark; Springett, Bradley R.; Freiberger, Friedrich; Ribeiro Morais, Goreti; Loadman, Paul M.; Errington, Rachel J.; Smith, Paul J.; Fukuda, Minoru; Gerardy-Schahn, Rita; Patterson, Laurence H.; Shnyder, Steven D.; Falconer, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Polysialic acid (polySia), an α-2,8-glycosidically linked polymer of sialic acid, is a developmentally regulated post-translational modification predominantly found on NCAM (neuronal cell adhesion molecule). Whilst high levels are expressed during development, peripheral adult organs do not express polySia-NCAM. However, tumours of neural crest-origin re-express polySia-NCAM: its occurrence correlates with aggressive and invasive disease and poor clinical prognosis in different cancer types, notably including small cell lung cancer (SCLC), pancreatic cancer and neuroblastoma. In neuronal development, polySia-NCAM biosynthesis is catalysed by two polysialyltransferases, ST8SiaII and ST8SiaIV, but it is ST8SiaII that is the prominent enzyme in tumours. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of ST8SiaII inhibition by a small molecule on tumour cell migration, utilising cytidine monophosphate (CMP) as a tool compound. Using immunoblotting we showed that CMP reduced ST8iaII-mediated polysialylation of NCAM. Utilizing a novel HPLC-based assay to quantify polysialylation of a fluorescent acceptor (DMB-DP3), we demonstrated that CMP is a competitive inhibitor of ST8SiaII (Ki = 10 µM). Importantly, we have shown that CMP causes a concentration-dependent reduction in tumour cell-surface polySia expression, with an absence of toxicity. When ST8SiaII-expressing tumour cells (SH-SY5Y and C6-STX) were evaluated in 2D cell migration assays, ST8SiaII inhibition led to significant reductions in migration, while CMP had no effect on cells not expressing ST8SiaII (DLD-1 and C6-WT). The study demonstrates for the first time that a polysialyltransferase inhibitor can modulate migration in ST8SiaII-expressing tumour cells. We conclude that ST8SiaII can be considered a druggable target with the potential for interfering with a critical mechanism in tumour cell dissemination in metastatic cancers. PMID:23951351

  9. Macrophages Modulate Migration and Invasion of Human Tongue Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pirilä, Emma; Väyrynen, Otto; Sundquist, Elias; Päkkilä, Kaisa; Nyberg, Pia; Nurmenniemi, Sini; Pääkkönen, Virve; Pesonen, Paula; Dayan, Dan; Vered, Marilena; Uhlin-Hansen, Lars; Salo, Tuula

    2015-01-01

    Oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC) has a high mortality rate and the incidence is rising worldwide. Despite advances in treatment, the disease lacks specific prognostic markers and treatment modality. The spreading of OTSCC is dependent on the tumor microenvironment and involves tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). Although the presence of TAMs is associated with poor prognosis in OTSCC, the specific mechanisms underlying this are still unknown. The aim here was to investigate the effect of macrophages (Mfs) on HSC-3 tongue carcinoma cells and NF-kappaB activity. We polarized THP-1 cells to M1 (inflammatory), M2 (TAM-like) and R848 (imidazoquinoline-treated) type Mfs. We then investigated the effect of Mfs on HSC-3 cell migration and NF-kappaB activity, cytokine production and invasion using several different in vitro migration models, a human 3D tissue invasion model, antibody arrays, confocal microscopy, immunohistochemistry and a mouse invasion model. We found that in co-culture studies all types of Mfs fused with HSC-3 cells, a process which was partially due to efferocytosis. HSC-3 cells induced expression of epidermal growth factor and transforming growth factor-beta in co-cultures with M2 Mfs. Direct cell-cell contact between M2 Mfs and HSC-3 cells induced migration and invasion of HSC-3 cells while M1 Mfs reduced HSC-3 cell invasion. M2 Mfs had an excess of NF-kappaB p50 subunit and a lack of p65 subunits both in the presence and absence of HSC-3 cells, indicating dysregulation and pro-tumorigenic NF-kappaB activation. TAM-like cells were abundantly present in close vicinity to carcinoma cells in OTSCC patient samples. We conclude that M2 Mfs/TAMs have an important role in OTSCC regulating adhesion, migration, invasion and cytokine production of carcinoma cells favouring tumor growth. These results demonstrate that OTSCC patients could benefit from therapies targeting TAMs, polarizing TAM-like M2 Mfs to inflammatory macrophages and modulating NF

  10. Bi-Module Sensing Device to In Situ Quantitatively Detect Hydrogen Peroxide Released from Migrating Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ling; Tian, YunLi; Gao, AnXiu; Shi, ZhuanZhuan; Liu, YingShuai; Li, ChangMing

    2015-01-01

    Cell migration is one of the key cell functions in physiological and pathological processes, especially in tumor metastasis. However, it is not feasible to monitor the important biochemical molecules produced during cell migrations in situ by conventional cell migration assays. Herein, for the first time a device containing both electrochemical sensing and trans-well cell migration modules was fabricated to sensitively quantify biochemical molecules released from the cell migration process in situ. The fully assembled device with a multi-wall carbon nanotube/graphene/MnO2 nanocomposite functionalized electrode was able to successfully characterize hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production from melanoma A375 cells, larynx carcinoma HEp-2 cells and liver cancer Hep G2 under serum established chemotaxis. The maximum concentration of H2O2 produced from A375, HEp-2 and Hep G2 in chemotaxis was 130±1.3 nM, 70±0.7 nM and 63±0.7 nM, respectively. While the time required reaching the summit of H2O2 production was 3.0, 4.0 and 1.5 h for A375, HEp-2 and Hep G2, respectively. By staining the polycarbonate micropore membrane disassembled from the device, we found that the average migration rate of the A375, HEp-2 and Hep G2 cells were 98±6%, 38±4% and 32 ±3%, respectively. The novel bi-module cell migration platform enables in situ investigation of cell secretion and cell function simultaneously, highlighting its potential for characterizing cell motility through monitoring H2O2 production on rare samples and for identifying underlying mechanisms of cell migration. PMID:26035641

  11. Development and application of a sensitive high performance ion-exchange chromatography method for the simultaneous measurement of dopamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine and norepinephrine in microdialysates from the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Heidbreder, C A; Lacroix, L; Atkins, A R; Organ, A J; Murray, S; West, A; Shah, A J

    2001-12-15

    A high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method based on cation exchange separation has been developed for the measurement of dopamine (DA), 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and norepinephrine (NE) in microdialysates. The separation conditions have been optimised for using electrochemical detection. All three bioamines were resolved in less than 22 min using isocratic conditions. The optimum oxidation potential for the three bioamines was found to be +0.4 V vs. in situ Ag/AgCl reference electrode. Linear regression analysis of HPLC-peak area as a function of concentrations in the range 1-50 ng x ml(-1) gave coefficients of correlation between 0.998 and 0.999. The limit of detection for DA, 5-HT and NE was found to be between 50 and 100 pg x ml(-1) with a signal to noise ratio of 3:1. The method has been applied to the simultaneous measurement of the three monoamines in microdialysates from the medial prefrontal cortex under basal conditions and following the administration of the antipsychotic drug clozapine (10 mg x kg(-1) s.c.).

  12. Modulation of integrin α4β1 by ADAM28 promotes lymphocyte adhesion and transendothelial migration.

    PubMed

    McGinn, Owen J; English, William R; Roberts, Stephanie; Ager, Ann; Newham, Peter; Murphy, Gillian

    2011-10-01

    ADAMs (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase) are a family of type I transmembrane glycoproteins related to snake venom metalloproteases and disintegrins. They are regulatory proteins that modulate intercellular adhesion and the bioavailability of growth factors, and have been implicated in many disease states, including cancer, immunity and inflammation. One member of the ADAM family, ADAM28, has been reported to bind to the integrin α4β1 in humans; however, the distribution of ADAM28 and the biological consequences of ADAM28-α4β1 interactions are yet to be fully elucidated. The expression of ADAM28 in human and murine tissues was examined by multiple Affymetrix microarray analyses, real-time RT-PCR (reverse transcription-PCR) and immunohistochemical staining. We found that ADAM28 has a relatively restricted expression pattern in mouse and human and is highly expressed in the B-lymphocyte lineage, including chronic lymphocytic leukaemic B-cells. The murine B-lymphoma line L1-2 and recombinant soluble murine ADAM28 were used to investigate ADAM28-α4β1 interactions. Our data reveal that ADAM28 binding to α4β1 is typical of integrin-ligand interactions, since it is attenuated by anti-functional integrin antibodies, and is enhanced by Mn2+ and the integrin mAb (monoclonal antibody) 9EG7. However, a key finding was that soluble ADAM28 unexpectedly enhanced α4β1-dependent cell adhesion to VCAM-1 (vascular cell adhesion molecule-1). In so doing ADAM28 was able to influence lymphocyte adhesion to, and migration through, endothelial monolayers, suggesting a physiological role for ADAM28 in regulating the specific spatial and temporal transendothelial migration of lymphocytes.

  13. Transspinal direct current stimulation modulates migration and proliferation of adult newly born spinal cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Samaddar, Sreyashi; Vazquez, Kizzy; Ponkia, Dipen; Toruno, Pedro; Sahbani, Karim; Begum, Sultana; Abouelela, Ahmed; Mekhael, Wagdy; Ahmed, Zaghloul

    2017-02-01

    Direct current electrical fields have been shown to be a major factor in the regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, migration, and survival, as well as in the maturation of dividing cells during development. During adulthood, spinal cord cells are continuously produced in both animals and humans, and they hold great potential for neural restoration following spinal cord injury. While the effects of direct current electrical fields on adult-born spinal cells cultured ex vivo have recently been reported, the effects of direct current electrical fields on adult-born spinal cells in vivo have not been characterized. Here, we provide convincing findings that a therapeutic form of transspinal direct current stimulation (tsDCS) affects the migration and proliferation of adult-born spinal cells in mice. Specifically, cathodal tsDCS attracted the adult-born spinal cells, while anodal tsDCS repulsed them. In addition, both tsDCS polarities caused a significant increase in cell number. Regarding the potential mechanisms involved, both cathodal and anodal tsDCS caused significant increases in expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, while expression of nerve growth factor increased and decreased, respectively. In the spinal cord, both anodal and cathodal tsDCS increased blood flow. Since blood flow and angiogenesis are associated with the proliferation of neural stem cells, increased blood flow may represent a major factor in the modulation of newly born spinal cells by tsDCS. Consequently, we propose that the method and novel findings presented in the current study have the potential to facilitate cellular, molecular, and/or bioengineering strategies to repair injured spinal cords.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Our results indicate that transspinal direct current stimulation (tsDCS) affects the migratory pattern and proliferation of adult newly born spinal cells, a cell population which has been implicated in learning and memory. In addition, our results suggest a

  14. cAMP-induced Epac-Rap activation inhibits epithelial cell migration by modulating focal adhesion and leading edge dynamics.

    PubMed

    Lyle, Karen S; Raaijmakers, Judith H; Bruinsma, Wytse; Bos, Johannes L; de Rooij, Johan

    2008-06-01

    Epithelial cell migration is a complex process crucial for embryonic development, wound healing and tumor metastasis. It depends on alterations in cell-cell adhesion and integrin-extracellular matrix interactions and on actomyosin-driven, polarized leading edge protrusion. The small GTPase Rap is a known regulator of integrins and cadherins that has also been implicated in the regulation of actin and myosin, but a direct role in cell migration has not been investigated. Here, we report that activation of endogenous Rap by cAMP results in an inhibition of HGF- and TGFbeta-induced epithelial cell migration in several model systems, irrespective of the presence of E-cadherin adhesion. We show that Rap activation slows the dynamics of focal adhesions and inhibits polarized membrane protrusion. Importantly, forced integrin activation by antibodies does not mimic these effects of Rap on cell motility, even though it does mimic Rap effects in short-term cell adhesion assays. From these results, we conclude that Rap inhibits epithelial cell migration, by modulating focal adhesion dynamics and leading edge activity. This extends beyond the effect of integrin affinity modulation and argues for an additional function of Rap in controlling the migration machinery of epithelial cells.

  15. In-situ calibration: migrating control system IP module calibration from the bench to the storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Jonah M.; Chin, Michael

    2002-04-30

    The Control System for the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (LBNL) uses in-house designed IndustryPack(registered trademark) (IP) modules contained in compact PCI (cPCI) crates with 16-bit analog I/O to control instrumentation. To make the IP modules interchangeable, each module is calibrated for gain and offset compensation. We initially developed a method of verifying and calibrating the IP modules in a lab bench test environment using a PC with LabVIEW. The subsequent discovery that the ADCs have significant drift characteristics over periods of days of installed operation prompted development of an ''in-situ'' calibration process--one in which the IP modules can be calibrated without removing them from the cPCI crates in the storage ring. This paper discusses the original LabVIEW PC calibration and the migration to the proposed in-situ EPICS control system calibration.

  16. Plakophilin 2 Affects Cell Migration by Modulating Focal Adhesion Dynamics and Integrin Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Koetsier, Jennifer L.; Amargo, Evangeline V.; Todorović, Viktor; Green, Kathleen J.; Godsel, Lisa M.

    2014-01-01

    Plakophilin 2 (PKP2), a desmosome component, modulates the activity and localization of the small GTPase RhoA at sites of cell–cell contact. PKP2 regulates cortical actin rearrangement during junction formation, and its loss is accompanied by an increase in actin stress fibers. We hypothesized that PKP2 may regulate focal adhesion dynamics and cell migration. Here we show that PKP2-deficient cells bind efficiently to the extracellular matrix, but upon spreading display total cell areas ~30% smaller than control cells. Focal adhesions in PKP2-deficient cells are ~2× larger and more stable than in control cells, and vinculin displays an increased time for fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. Furthermore, β4 and β1 integrin protein and mRNA expression is elevated in PKP2-silenced cells. Normal focal adhesion phenotypes can be restored in PKP2-null cells by dampening the RhoA pathway or silencing β1 integrin. However, integrin expression levels are not restored by RhoA signaling inhibition. These data uncover a potential role for PKP2 upstream of β1 integrin and RhoA in integrating cell–cell and cell–substrate contact signaling in basal keratinocytes necessary for the morphogenesis, homeostasis, and reepithelialization of the stratified epidermis. PMID:23884246

  17. N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase V modulates radiosensitivity and migration of small cell lung cancer through epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chunyue; Huang, Miaojuan; Chen, Wenxia; Zhu, Weiliang; Meng, Hui; Guo, Linlang; Wei, Ting; Zhang, Jian

    2015-11-01

    N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase V (Gnt-V) has been linked to the migration of various human cancers. Recently we have found that inhibition of Gnt-V increases the radiosensitivity of cancer cells. However, the mechanisms by which Gnt-V mediates radiosensitivity and migration, especially in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) remain unknown. In our study, two SCLC cell lines (H1688 and H146) were used to investigate whether Gnt-V modulated the radiosensitivity and migration of SCLC cells through the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). The results showed that the expression of Gnt-V correlated with the N stage in patients with SCLC. Overexpression of Gnt-V led to a further increase in the relative viable cell number and survival fraction with a decrease in apoptosis rate and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, when the cells were treated with irradiation. By contrast, knockdown of Gnt-V with irradiation resulted in a further decrease in the relative viable cell number and survival fraction but an increase in apoptosis rate and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. Cells expressing high levels of Gnt-V increased migration whereas low levels of Gnt-V suppressed cell migration. Besides, the transient knockdown of ZEB2 led to an increase in radiosensitivity and an inhibition in the migration of SCLC cells. Furthermore, Gnt-V was negatively correlated with E-cadherin expression but positively correlated with N-cadherin, vimentin and ZEB2 expression. Finally, an in vivo study revealed that upregulation of Gnt-V caused tumour growth more quickly, as well as the expression of EMT-related markers (N-cadherin, vimentin and ZEB2). Taken together, the study suggested that an elevation of Gnt-V could lead to the radiosensitivity and migration of SCLC cells by inducing EMT, thereby highlighting Gnt-V as a potential therapeutic target for the prevention of EMT-associated tumour radioresistance and migration.

  18. Platelet 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) transporter and 5-HT2A receptor binding after chronic hypercorticosteronemia, (+/-)-1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane administration or neurotoxin-induced depletion of central nervous system 5-HT in the rat.

    PubMed

    Owens, M J; Ballenger, C A; Knight, D L; Nemeroff, C B

    1996-09-01

    There is considerable evidence that the number of platelet 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) transporter binding sites, as measured by [3H]imipramine binding, are significantly decreased, and platelet 5-HT2 receptor density is increased, in drug-free patients with major depression. To investigate whether these changes in the platelet 5-HT transporter or 5-HT2 receptor sites resulted from known or hypothesized biochemical changes observed in major depression, we examined, in the rat, whether a chronic hyperglucocorticoid state, or decreases or increases in central nervous system 5-HT neurotransmission, altered binding of the selective ligands [3H]citalopram and [125I] (+/-)-1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane to platelet and brain 5-HT transporters and 5-HT2 receptors, respectively. Chronic (6 weeks) hypercorticosteronemia did not alter either brain or platelet 5-HT transporter or 5-HT2A receptor binding. Similarly, 8-week administration of the 5-HT2A/5-HT2C agonist (+/-)-1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane, at a dose which down-regulates brain 5-HT2A/2C receptors, did not alter brain or platelet 5-HT transporters or platelet 5-HT2A receptors. Additionally, para-chloroamphetamine-(11 weeks) or fenfluramine-induced chronic (1.5-10 weeks) depletion of central nervous system 5-HT did not alter platelet 5-HT transporter or 5-HT2A receptor binding. Finally, there was no correlation between the number of 5-HT transporters in brain and platelets in any of the control or treatment groups. These findings suggest that the observed changes in platelet 5-HT transporter and 5-HT2A receptor binding in depressed patients are more apt to be of genetic origin (i.e., trait-dependent) rather than an epiphenomenon of hypercortisolemia or altered central nervous system 5-HT status.

  19. Chronic treatment with escitalopram but not R-citalopram translocates Galpha(s) from lipid raft domains and potentiates adenylyl cyclase: a 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter-independent action of this antidepressant compound.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lanqiu; Rasenick, Mark M

    2010-03-01

    Chronic antidepressant treatment has been shown to increase adenylyl cyclase activity, in part, due to translocation of Galpha(s) from lipid rafts to a nonraft fraction of the plasma membrane where they engage in a more facile stimulation of adenylyl cyclase. This effect holds for multiple classes of antidepressants, and for serotonin uptake inhibitors, it occurs in the absence of the serotonin transporter. In the present study, we examined the change in the amount of Galpha(s) in lipid raft and whole cell lysate after exposing C6 cells to escitalopram. The results showed that chronic (but not acute) escitalopram decreased the content of Galpha(s) in lipid rafts, whereas there was no change in overall Galpha(s) content. These effects were drug dose- and exposure time-dependent. Although R-citalopram has been reported to antagonize some effects of escitalopram, this compound was without effect on Galpha(s) localization in lipid rafts, and R-citalopram did not inhibit these actions of escitalopram. Escitalopram treatment increased cAMP accumulation, and this seemed due to increased coupling between Galpha(s) and adenylyl cyclase. Thus, escitalopram is potent, rapid and efficacious in translocating Galpha(s) from lipid rafts, and this effect seems to occur independently of 5-hydroxytryptamine transporters. Our results suggest that, although antidepressants display distinct affinities for well identified targets (e.g., monoamine transporters), several presynaptic and postsynaptic molecules are probably modified during chronic antidepressant treatment, and these additional targets may be required for clinical efficacy of these drugs.

  20. Effects of 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) and forskolin on intracellular free calcium in isolated and fura-2 loaded smooth-muscle cells from the anterior byssus retractor (catch) muscle of Mytilus edulis.

    PubMed

    Ishii, N; Simpson, A W; Ashley, C C

    1989-06-01

    Effects of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and forskolin on intracellular free calcium concentration [( Ca2+]i) were studied in suspensions of fura-2 loaded smooth-muscle cells from the anterior byssus retractor 'catch' muscle of Mytilus edulis. The successive addition of 5 mM carbachol (CCh) and 100 mM KCl to the suspension evoked a transient elevation of [Ca2+]i from the resting value of 124 +/- 2.7 nM (mean +/- SE, n = 18) to 300-400 nM, which was associated with contraction. The change in [Ca2+]i induced CCh was concentration-dependent with the EC50 of 10(-5) M. The resting [Ca2+]i was unaffected by 10 microM 5-HT. The change in [Ca2+]i induced by 5 mM CCh was suppressed by 5-HT from 167 +/- 14.0 (n = 11) to 124 +/- 14.9 (n = 8) nM whereas that induced by 100 mM KCl was enhanced from 321 +/- 31.9 to 405 +/- 17.6 nM (n = 8). 5-HT applied during the decaying phase of the CCh response caused a rapid decline in [Ca2+]i. In both the responses to CCh and KCl, the falling phase was accelerated by 5-HT. 10 microM forskolin, a potent activator of adenylate cyclase, mimicked the effects of 5-HT as did a membrane-permeant cyclic AMP analogue, 8-parachlorophenylthio cyclic AMP (cpt-cAMP). Application of 100 microM cpt-cAMP partially suppressed the Ca2+i response to CCh and enhanced that to KCl. D-Tubocurarine (500 microM) added during the decaying phase of the response induced by 100 microM CCh, caused a rapid decline in [Ca2+]i similar to that caused by both 5-HT and forskolin.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Sustained desensitization of hypothalamic 5-Hydroxytryptamine1A receptors after discontinuation of fluoxetine: inhibited neuroendocrine responses to 8-hydroxy-2-(Dipropylamino)Tetralin in the absence of changes in Gi/o/z proteins.

    PubMed

    Raap, D K; Garcia, F; Muma, N A; Wolf, W A; Battaglia, G; van de Kar, L D

    1999-02-01

    Long-term exposure to fluoxetine produces a desensitization of hypothalamic postsynaptic 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)1A receptors, indicated by a substantial inhibition of the 5-HT1A receptor-mediated stimulation of oxytocin and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) secretion. The present study investigated the time course and mechanism of this desensitization after discontinuation of fluoxetine administration. Male rats were injected with saline or fluoxetine (10 mg/kg/day, i.p.) for 14 days and were challenged with a 5-HT1A agonist, [8-hydroxy-2-(dipropylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) 50 microg/kg, s.c.] 2, 4, 7, 14, 28, or 60 days post-treatment. In control animals, 8-OH-DPAT significantly increased (approximately 15-fold) plasma levels of oxytocin and ACTH. At 2 days post-treatment, oxytocin and ACTH responses to 8-OH-DPAT were reduced by 74% and 68%, respectively. During further withdrawal from fluoxetine, there was a gradual increase in the oxytocin response toward control levels. However, even 60 days after discontinuation of fluoxetine, the oxytocin response was still significantly reduced by 26% compared with controls. In contrast, the suppressed ACTH response to 8-OH-DPAT (a less-sensitive indicator of desensitization) gradually returned to control levels by day 14 of withdrawal from fluoxetine. Interestingly, the sustained reductions in the hormone responses occurred in the absence of reductions in Gz or Gi protein levels in the hypothalamus. Furthermore, this desensitization was sustained in the absence of detectable levels of fluoxetine and norfluoxetine in plasma and brain tissue. These findings suggest that the sustained desensitization of hypothalamic 5-HT1A receptor systems, observed during fluoxetine withdrawal, may be due to altered interactions among the protein components of the 5-HT1A receptor system, rather than their absolute levels.

  2. MiR-211/STAT5A Signaling Modulates Migration of Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Improve its Therapeutic Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xinyang; Chen, Panpan; Wu, Yan; Wang, Kan; Xu, Yinchuan; Chen, Han; Zhang, Ling; Wu, Rongrong; Webster, Keith A; Yu, Hong; Zhu, Wei; Wang, Jian'an

    2016-07-01

    Our previous study showed that the therapeutic effects of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) transplantation were improved by enhancing migration. MicroRNA-211 (miR-211) can modulate the migratory properties of some cell types by mechanisms that are not fully understood. This study was designed to investigate a possible role for miR-211 in MSC migration, and whether genetic manipulation of miR-211 in MSCs could be used to enhance its beneficial effects of cell transplantation. Transwell assays confirmed that MSCs migration of was significantly impaired by miR-211 knockdown but enhanced by miR-211 overexpression. MiR-211 overexpressing MSCs also exhibited significantly increased cell engraftment in the peri-infarct areas of female rat hearts 2 days after intravenous transplantation of male MSCs as shown by GFP tracking and SYR gene quantification. This conferred a significant decrease in infarct size and improved cardiac performance. By using a loss or gain of gene function approach, we demonstrated that miR-211 targeted STAT5A to modulate MSCs migration, possibly by interacting with MAPK signaling. Furthermore, the beneficial effects of miR-211 overexpression in MSCs were abolished by simultaneous overexpression of STAT5A whereas the negative effects of miR-211 silencing on MSC migration were rescued by simultaneous downregulation of STAT5A. Finally, using ChIP-PCR and luciferase assays, we provide novel evidence that STAT3 can directly bind to promoter elements that activate miR-211 expression. STAT3/miR-211/STAT5A signaling plays a key role in MSCs migration. Intravenous infusion of genetically modified miR-211 overexpressing MSCs conveys enhanced protection from adverse post-MI remodeling compared with unmodified MSCs. Stem Cells 2016;34:1846-1858.

  3. Cellular adhesome screen identifies critical modulators of focal adhesion dynamics, cellular traction forces and cell migration behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Fokkelman, Michiel; Balcıoğlu, Hayri E.; Klip, Janna E.; Yan, Kuan; Verbeek, Fons J.; Danen, Erik H. J.; van de Water, Bob

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells migrate from the primary tumour into surrounding tissue in order to form metastasis. Cell migration is a highly complex process, which requires continuous remodelling and re-organization of the cytoskeleton and cell-matrix adhesions. Here, we aimed to identify genes controlling aspects of tumour cell migration, including the dynamic organization of cell-matrix adhesions and cellular traction forces. In a siRNA screen targeting most cell adhesion-related genes we identified 200+ genes that regulate size and/or dynamics of cell-matrix adhesions in MCF7 breast cancer cells. In a subsequent secondary screen, the 64 most effective genes were evaluated for growth factor-induced cell migration and validated by tertiary RNAi pool deconvolution experiments. Four validated hits showed significantly enlarged adhesions accompanied by reduced cell migration upon siRNA-mediated knockdown. Furthermore, loss of PPP1R12B, HIPK3 or RAC2 caused cells to exert higher traction forces, as determined by traction force microscopy with elastomeric micropillar post arrays, and led to considerably reduced force turnover. Altogether, we identified genes that co-regulate cell-matrix adhesion dynamics and traction force turnover, thereby modulating overall motility behaviour. PMID:27531518

  4. A space oddity: geographic and specific modulation of migration in Eudyptes penguins.

    PubMed

    Thiebot, Jean-Baptiste; Cherel, Yves; Crawford, Robert J M; Makhado, Azwianewi B; Trathan, Philip N; Pinaud, David; Bost, Charles-André

    2013-01-01

    Post-breeding migration in land-based marine animals is thought to offset seasonal deterioration in foraging or other important environmental conditions at the breeding site. However the inter-breeding distribution of such animals may reflect not only their optimal habitat, but more subtle influences on an individual's migration path, including such factors as the intrinsic influence of each locality's paleoenvironment, thereby influencing animals' wintering distribution. In this study we investigated the influence of the regional marine environment on the migration patterns of a poorly known, but important seabird group. We studied the inter-breeding migration patterns in three species of Eudyptes penguins (E. chrysolophus, E. filholi and E. moseleyi), the main marine prey consumers amongst the World's seabirds. Using ultra-miniaturized logging devices (light-based geolocators) and satellite tags, we tracked 87 migrating individuals originating from 4 sites in the southern Indian Ocean (Marion, Crozet, Kerguelen and Amsterdam Islands) and modelled their wintering habitat using the MADIFA niche modelling technique. For each site, sympatric species followed a similar compass bearing during migration with consistent species-specific latitudinal shifts. Within each species, individuals breeding on different islands showed contrasting migration patterns but similar winter habitat preferences driven by sea-surface temperatures. Our results show that inter-breeding migration patterns in sibling penguin species depend primarily on the site of origin and secondly on the species. Such site-specific migration bearings, together with similar wintering habitat used by parapatrics, support the hypothesis that migration behaviour is affected by the intrinsic characteristics of each site. The paleo-oceanographic conditions (primarily, sea-surface temperatures) when the populations first colonized each of these sites may have been an important determinant of subsequent migration

  5. A Space Oddity: Geographic and Specific Modulation of Migration in Eudyptes Penguins

    PubMed Central

    Thiebot, Jean-Baptiste; Cherel, Yves; Crawford, Robert J. M.; Makhado, Azwianewi B.; Trathan, Philip N.; Pinaud, David; Bost, Charles-André

    2013-01-01

    Post-breeding migration in land-based marine animals is thought to offset seasonal deterioration in foraging or other important environmental conditions at the breeding site. However the inter-breeding distribution of such animals may reflect not only their optimal habitat, but more subtle influences on an individual’s migration path, including such factors as the intrinsic influence of each locality’s paleoenvironment, thereby influencing animals’ wintering distribution. In this study we investigated the influence of the regional marine environment on the migration patterns of a poorly known, but important seabird group. We studied the inter-breeding migration patterns in three species of Eudyptes penguins (E. chrysolophus, E. filholi and E. moseleyi), the main marine prey consumers amongst the World’s seabirds. Using ultra-miniaturized logging devices (light-based geolocators) and satellite tags, we tracked 87 migrating individuals originating from 4 sites in the southern Indian Ocean (Marion, Crozet, Kerguelen and Amsterdam Islands) and modelled their wintering habitat using the MADIFA niche modelling technique. For each site, sympatric species followed a similar compass bearing during migration with consistent species-specific latitudinal shifts. Within each species, individuals breeding on different islands showed contrasting migration patterns but similar winter habitat preferences driven by sea-surface temperatures. Our results show that inter-breeding migration patterns in sibling penguin species depend primarily on the site of origin and secondly on the species. Such site-specific migration bearings, together with similar wintering habitat used by parapatrics, support the hypothesis that migration behaviour is affected by the intrinsic characteristics of each site. The paleo-oceanographic conditions (primarily, sea-surface temperatures) when the populations first colonized each of these sites may have been an important determinant of subsequent

  6. Focal adhesion kinase modulates radial glia-dependent neuronal migration through connexin-26.

    PubMed

    Valiente, Manuel; Ciceri, Gabriele; Rico, Beatriz; Marín, Oscar

    2011-08-10

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is an intracellular kinase and scaffold protein that regulates migration in many different cellular contexts but whose function in neuronal migration remains controversial. Here, we have analyzed the function of FAK in two populations of neurons with very distinct migratory behaviors: cortical interneurons, which migrate tangentially and independently of radial glia; and pyramidal cells, which undergo glial-dependent migration. We found that FAK is dispensable for glial-independent migration but is cell-autonomously required for the normal interaction of pyramidal cells with radial glial fibers. Loss of FAK function disrupts the normal morphology of migrating pyramidal cells, delays migration, and increases the tangential dispersion of neurons arising from the same radial unit. FAK mediates this process by regulating the assembly of Connexin-26 contact points in the membrane of migrating pyramidal cells. These results indicate that FAK plays a fundamental role in the dynamic regulation of Gap-mediated adhesions during glial-guided neuronal migration in the mouse.

  7. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor homolog from Plasmodium yoelii modulates monocyte recruitment and activation in spleen during infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanhui; Miura, Kazutoyo; Li, Jian; Tullo, Gregory; Zhu, Feng; Hong, Lingxian; Lin, Tianlong; Su, Xin-zhuan; Long, Carole

    2012-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) has been shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of severe malaria. Malaria parasites express an MIF homolog that may play a role in regulating host immune responses and a recent study showed that overexpression of MIF reduced parasitemia in a mouse malaria model. Another recent study showed migration of monocytes to the spleen contributed to the control of blood stage infection. However, there are few papers describing the effect of MIF on monocyte recruitment/activation during the infection. We generated recombinant P. yoelii MIF (rPyMIF) and investigated its function on purified mouse CD11b+ cells in vitro and monocyte responses in vivo. The result shows that rPyMIF protein bound to mouse CD11b+ cells and inhibited their random migration in vitro. On the other hand, rPyMIF did not induce cytokine release from the cells directly or modulate LPS-induced cytokine release. Mice immunized with rPyMIF showed transient, but significantly lower parasitemia than the control mice at day 3 after lethal Py17XL challenge. The total number of CD11b+ cells in the spleens was significantly higher in rPyMIF-immunized group. Further investigation revealed that there were significantly higher numbers of recruited and activated monocytes in the spleens of rPyMIF immunization group on day 3. These results indicate that PyMIF potentially modulates monocyte recruitment and activation during infection of P. yoelii erythrocytic stages. PMID:22015474

  8. Nitric Oxide Modulates Postnatal Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Fuseler, John W.; Valarmathi, Mani T.

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a small free-radical gas molecule, which is highly diffusible and can activate a wide range of downstream effectors, with rapid and widespread cellular effects. NO is a versatile signaling mediator with a plethora of cellular functions. For example, NO has been shown to regulate actin, the microfilament, dependent cellular functions, and also acts as a putative stem cell differentiation-inducing agent. In this study, using a wound-healing model of cellular migration, we have explored the effect of exogenous NO on the kinetics of movement and morphological changes in postnatal bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Cellular migration kinetics and morphological changes of the migrating MSCs were measured in the presence of an NO donor (S-Nitroso-N-Acetyl-D,L-Penicillamine, SNAP), especially, to track the dynamics of single-cell responses. Two experimental conditions were assessed, in which SNAP (200 μM) was applied to the MSCs. In the first experimental group (SN-1), SNAP was applied immediately following wound formation, and migration kinetics were determined for 24 h. In the second experimental group (SN-2), MSCs were pretreated for 7 days with SNAP prior to wound formation and the determination of migration kinetics. The generated displacement curves were further analyzed by non-linear regression analysis. The migration displacement of the controls and NO treated MSCs (SN-1 and SN-2) was best described by a two parameter exponential functions expressing difference constant coefficients. Additionally, changes in the fractal dimension (D) of migrating MSCs were correlated with their displacement kinetics for all the three groups. Overall, these data suggest that NO may evidently function as a stop migration signal by disordering the cytoskeletal elements required for cell movement and proliferation of MSCs. PMID:27933292

  9. Colonic Migrating Motor Complexes, High Amplitude Propagating Contractions, Neural Reflexes and the Importance of Neuronal and Mucosal Serotonin

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Terence K; Park, Kyu Joo; Hennig, Grant W

    2014-01-01

    The colonic migrating motor complex (CMMC) is a critical neurally mediated rhythmic propulsive contraction observed in the large intestine of many mammals. It seems to be equivalent to the high amplitude propagating contractions (HAPCs) in humans. This review focuses on the probable neural mechanisms involved in producing the CMMC or HAPC, their likely dependence on mucosal and neuronal serotonin and pacemaker insterstitial cells of Cajal networks and how intrinsic neural reflexes affect them. Discussed is the possibility that myenteric 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) neurons are not only involved in tonic inhibition of the colon, but are also involved in generating the CMMC and modulation of the entire enteric nervous system, including coupling motility to secretion and blood flow. Mucosal 5-HT appears to be important for the initiation and effective propagation of CMMCs, although this mechanism is a longstanding controversy since the 1950s, which we will address. We argue that the slow apparent propagation of the CMMC/HAPC down the colon is unlikely to result from a slowly conducting wave front of neural activity, but more likely because of an interaction between ascending excitatory and descending (serotonergic) inhibitory neural pathways interacting both within the myenteric plexus and at the level of the muscle. That is, CMMC/HAPC propagation appears to be similar to esophageal peristalsis. The suppression of inhibitory (neuronal nitric oxide synthase) motor neurons and mucosal 5-HT release by an upregulation of prostaglandins has important implications in a number of gastrointestinal disorders, especially slow transit constipation. PMID:25273115

  10. Endotoxin activation of endothelium for polymorphonuclear leucocyte transendothelial migration and modulation by interferon-gamma.

    PubMed Central

    Issekutz, A C; Lopes, N

    1993-01-01

    Endotoxin [lipopolysaccharide (LPS)] is a potent inflammatory stimulus and can activate human umbilical vein endothelium (HUVE) for leucocyte adhesiveness and transendothelial migration. Here we investigated the role of HUVE-secreted cytokines in this process. When HUVE monolayers were grown on filters and preincubated for 3 hr with LPS, 51Cr-labelled polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNL) migrated across the HUVE in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Maximal PMNL transmigration with LPS (1 ng/ml) was 26 +/- 3% of added PMNL in 75 min. Neutralizing antibodies to interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha) and IL-1 beta, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), IL-8 or recombinant IL-1 receptor antagonist had no effect on the activation by LPS of the HUVE for supporting migration of PMNL. The HUVE 'activated state' declined with prolonged (22 hr) exposure to LPS, as reflected by a decrease in PMNL transendothelial migration to 5.5 +/- 1% and in the expression of the endothelial cell adhesion molecule, E-selectin, as compared to stimulation with LPS for 3 hr. However, simultaneous exposure to interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) (200 IU/ml) and LPS maintained maximal PMNL transendothelial migration (28 +/- 4%) for at least 24 hr, prolonged E-selectin expression by HUVE and superinduced intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression. The PMNL transendothelial migration was blocked by > 90% by monoclonal antibody (mAb) to CD18 with either 3 hr of LPS or 22 hr LPS + IFN-gamma stimulation. Migration was partially inhibited by mAb to E-selectin (30-40%) or to ICAM-1 (35-45%) and by a combination of both reagents (50-60%) under both stimulation conditions. Thus, LPS activation of HUVE for PMNL transendothelial migration: (a) does not require secretion of IL-1, TNF-alpha or IL-8 by the endothelium, (b) IFN-gamma enhances and prolongs endothelial activation by LPS and may increase leucocyte infiltration in LPS or bacterial inflammatory reactions, and (c) CD18-dependent mechanisms are

  11. Annexin A6 and Late Endosomal Cholesterol Modulate Integrin Recycling and Cell Migration*

    PubMed Central

    García-Melero, Ana; Reverter, Meritxell; Hoque, Monira; Meneses-Salas, Elsa; Koese, Meryem; Conway, James R. W.; Johnsen, Camilla H.; Alvarez-Guaita, Anna; Morales-Paytuvi, Frederic; Elmaghrabi, Yasmin A.; Pol, Albert; Tebar, Francesc; Murray, Rachael Z.; Timpson, Paul; Enrich, Carlos; Grewal, Thomas; Rentero, Carles

    2016-01-01

    Annexins are a family of proteins that bind to phospholipids in a calcium-dependent manner. Earlier studies implicated annexin A6 (AnxA6) to inhibit secretion and participate in the organization of the extracellular matrix. We recently showed that elevated AnxA6 levels significantly reduced secretion of the extracellular matrix protein fibronectin (FN). Because FN is directly linked to the ability of cells to migrate, this prompted us to investigate the role of AnxA6 in cell migration. Up-regulation of AnxA6 in several cell models was associated with reduced cell migration in wound healing, individual cell tracking and three-dimensional migration/invasion assays. The reduced ability of AnxA6-expressing cells to migrate was associated with decreased cell surface expression of αVβ3 and α5β1 integrins, both FN receptors. Mechanistically, we found that elevated AnxA6 levels interfered with syntaxin-6 (Stx6)-dependent recycling of integrins to the cell surface. AnxA6 overexpression caused mislocalization and accumulation of Stx6 and integrins in recycling endosomes, whereas siRNA-mediated AnxA6 knockdown did not modify the trafficking of integrins. Given our recent findings that inhibition of cholesterol export from late endosomes (LEs) inhibits Stx6-dependent integrin recycling and that elevated AnxA6 levels cause LE cholesterol accumulation, we propose that AnxA6 and blockage of LE cholesterol transport are critical for endosomal function required for Stx6-mediated recycling of integrins in cell migration. PMID:26578516

  12. Annexin A6 and Late Endosomal Cholesterol Modulate Integrin Recycling and Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    García-Melero, Ana; Reverter, Meritxell; Hoque, Monira; Meneses-Salas, Elsa; Koese, Meryem; Conway, James R W; Johnsen, Camilla H; Alvarez-Guaita, Anna; Morales-Paytuvi, Frederic; Elmaghrabi, Yasmin A; Pol, Albert; Tebar, Francesc; Murray, Rachael Z; Timpson, Paul; Enrich, Carlos; Grewal, Thomas; Rentero, Carles

    2016-01-15

    Annexins are a family of proteins that bind to phospholipids in a calcium-dependent manner. Earlier studies implicated annexin A6 (AnxA6) to inhibit secretion and participate in the organization of the extracellular matrix. We recently showed that elevated AnxA6 levels significantly reduced secretion of the extracellular matrix protein fibronectin (FN). Because FN is directly linked to the ability of cells to migrate, this prompted us to investigate the role of AnxA6 in cell migration. Up-regulation of AnxA6 in several cell models was associated with reduced cell migration in wound healing, individual cell tracking and three-dimensional migration/invasion assays. The reduced ability of AnxA6-expressing cells to migrate was associated with decreased cell surface expression of αVβ3 and α5β1 integrins, both FN receptors. Mechanistically, we found that elevated AnxA6 levels interfered with syntaxin-6 (Stx6)-dependent recycling of integrins to the cell surface. AnxA6 overexpression caused mislocalization and accumulation of Stx6 and integrins in recycling endosomes, whereas siRNA-mediated AnxA6 knockdown did not modify the trafficking of integrins. Given our recent findings that inhibition of cholesterol export from late endosomes (LEs) inhibits Stx6-dependent integrin recycling and that elevated AnxA6 levels cause LE cholesterol accumulation, we propose that AnxA6 and blockage of LE cholesterol transport are critical for endosomal function required for Stx6-mediated recycling of integrins in cell migration.

  13. Fucoidan modulates cytokine production and migration of THP‑1‑derived macrophages via colony‑stimulating factor‑1.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Wang, Huayang; Shao, Qianqian; Kong, Beihua; Qu, Xun

    2017-04-01

    Fucoidan is known for its various biological activities, including immunomodulatory effects on immune cells. However, the effect of fucoidan on the functions of macrophages remains to be elucidated. The present study examined the effects of fucoidan on cytokine production and migration of THP‑1‑derived macrophages and its potential mechanisms. Fucoidan was added during the differentiation process of THP‑1‑derived macrophages along with lipopolysaccharide and interferon‑γ for 42 h, and then macrophages were harvested for functional assays. Fucoidan altered the morphology of THP‑1‑derived macrophages, and also attenuated their migration activity and pro‑inflammatory cytokine production. Additionally, THP‑1‑derived macrophages intensively produced colony‑stimulating factor‑1 (CSF‑1), which was significantly decreased by fucoidan. CSF‑1 neutralizing antibody attenuated the basic production level of pro‑inflammatory cytokines in macrophages. Furthermore, when recombinant human CSF‑1 was added along with fucoidan, the attenuating effects of fucoidan on migration and cytokine production were significantly reversed. In conclusion, the present study suggests that macrophages appear to be a potential target in the immunomodulatory action of fucoidan, and CSF‑1 may be involved in this modulation.

  14. Phosphorylation of serine-504 of tNOX (ENOX2) modulates cell proliferation and migration in cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Zih-Ming; Chuang, Show-Mei; Chang, Ting-Chia; Hong, Chen-Wei; Chou, Jou-Chun; Yang, Jaw-Ji; Chueh, Pin Ju

    2012-08-15

    Tumor-associated NADH oxidase (tNOX; ENOX2) is a growth-related protein expressed in transformed cells. Consistent with this function, tNOX knockdown by RNA interference leads to a significant reduction in cell proliferation and migration in HeLa cells, whereas tNOX overexpression confers an aggressive phenotype. Here, for the first time, we report that tNOX is phosphorylated by protein kinase C{delta} (PKC{delta}) both in vitro and in vivo. Replacement of serine-504 with alanine significantly reduces phosphorylation by PKC{delta}. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments reveal an interaction between tNOX and PKC{delta}. Moreover, whereas overexpression of wild-type tNOX in NIH3T3 cells increases cell proliferation and migration, overexpression of the S504A tNOX mutant leads to diminished cell proliferation and migration, reflecting reduced stability of the unphosphorylatable tNOX mutant protein. Collectively, these results suggest that phosphorylation of serine-504 by PKC{delta} modulates the biological function of tNOX.

  15. N-[2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]ethyl]-N-(2-nitrophenyl) cyclohexanecarboxamide: a novel pre- and postsynaptic 5-hydroxytryptamine(1A) receptor antagonist active on the lower urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Leonardi, A; Guarneri, L; Poggesi, E; Angelico, P; Velasco, C; Cilia, A; Testa, R

    2001-12-01

    N-[2-[4-(2-Methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]ethyl]-N-(2-nitrophenyl) cyclohexanecarboxamide (Rec 15/3079) was synthesized with the aim of obtaining a novel compound with 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)(1A) antagonistic properties and activity in controlling bladder function at the level of the central nervous system. Rec 15/3079 showed a selective high affinity for the 5-HT(1A) receptor (K(i) = 0.2 nM). At the human recombinant 5-HT(1A) receptor, Rec 15/3079 acted as a competitive, neutral antagonist in that it did not modify basal [(35)S]guanosine-5'-O-(3-thio)triphosphate binding to HeLa cell membranes but shifted the activation isotherm to 5-HT to the right, in a parallel manner, with a pK(b) value of 10.5. Accordingly, Rec 15/3079 (i.v.) potently antagonized 8-hydroxy-2-dipropylaminotetralin (8-OH-DPAT)-induced hypothermia in mice (ID(50) = 20 microg/kg) and 8-OH-DPAT-induced forepaw treading in rats (ID(50) = 36 microg/kg). In vitro Rec 15/3079 was poorly active in antagonizing carbachol-induced bladder (pD'(2) = 5.03) and norepinephrine-induced urethral (apparent pK(b) = 6) contractions. However, in anesthetized rats, Rec 15/3079 (10-100 microg/kg i.v.) blocked isovolumic bladder contractions with no effect on their amplitude. In conscious rats and guinea pigs with bladders filled with saline, Rec 15/3079 (300-1000 microg/kg i.v.) increased bladder volume capacity (BVC) without affecting bladder contractility. In conscious rats with bladders filled with dilute acetic acid, Rec 15/3079 (300 microg/kg i.v.) reversed the decrease of BVC induced by the acid. To evaluate apparent selective effect on lower urinary tract reflexes, Rec 15/3079 was tested in experimental models for sedative, analgesic, anxiolytic, and antidepressant activity. Rec 15/3079 showed only a slight decrease in the duration of immobility in the behavioral despair test (antidepressant activity) at 1 mg/kg i.v. No anxiolytic activity was observed at 10 mg/kg i.v. No effect was observed in the hot plate

  16. Pancortins interact with amyloid precursor protein and modulate cortical cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Heather C.; Townsend, Matthew; Bai, Jilin; Suth, Seiyam; Cavanaugh, William; Selkoe, Dennis J.; Young-Pearse, Tracy L.

    2012-01-01

    Neuronal precursor cell migration in the developing mammalian brain is a complex process requiring the coordinated interaction of numerous proteins. We have recently shown that amyloid precursor protein (APP) plays a role in migration into the cortical plate through its interaction with two cytosolic signaling proteins, disabled 1 (DAB1) and disrupted in schizophrenia 1 (DISC1). In order to identify extracellular factors that may signal through APP to regulate migration, we performed an unbiased mass spectrometry-based screen for factors that bind to the extracellular domain of APP in the rodent brain. Through this screen, we identified an interaction between APP and pancortins, proteins expressed throughout the developing and mature cerebral cortex. Via co-immunoprecipitation, we show that APP interacts with all four of the mammalian pancortin isoforms (AMY, AMZ, BMY, BMZ). We demonstrate that the BMZ and BMY isoforms of pancortin can specifically reduce β-secretase- but not α-secretase-mediated cleavage of endogenous APP in cell culture, suggesting a biochemical consequence of the association between pancortins and APP. Using in utero electroporation to overexpress and knock down specific pancortin isoforms, we reveal a novel role for pancortins in migration into the cortical plate. Interestingly, we observe opposing roles for alternate pancortin isoforms, with AMY overexpression and BMZ knock down both preventing proper migration of neuronal precursor cells. Finally, we show that BMZ can partially rescue a loss of APP expression and that APP can rescue effects of AMY overexpression, suggesting that pancortins act in conjunction with APP to regulate entry into the cortical plate. Taken together, these results suggest a biochemical and functional interaction between APP and pancortins, and reveal a previously unidentified role for pancortins in mammalian cortical development. PMID:22992957

  17. CalpB modulates border cell migration in Drosophila egg chambers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Calpains are calcium regulated intracellular cysteine proteases implicated in a variety of physiological functions and pathological conditions. The Drosophila melanogaster genome contains only two genes, CalpA and CalpB coding for canonical, active calpain enzymes. The movement of the border cells in Drosophila egg chambers is a well characterized model of the eukaryotic cell migration. Using this genetically pliable model we can investigate the physiological role of calpains in cell motility. Results We demonstrate at the whole organism level that CalpB is implicated in cell migration, while the structurally related CalpA paralog can not fulfill the same function. The downregulation of the CalpB gene by mutations or RNA interference results in a delayed migration of the border cells in Drosophila egg chambers. This phenotype is significantly enhanced when the focal adhesion complex genes encoding for α-PS2 integrin ( if), β-PS integrin ( mys) and talin ( rhea) are silenced. The reduction of CalpB activity diminishes the release of integrins from the rear end of the border cells. The delayed migration and the reduced integrin release phenotypes can be suppressed by expressing wild-type talin-head in the border cells but not talin-headR367A, a mutant form which is not able to bind β-PS integrin. CalpB can cleave talin in vitro, and the two proteins coimmunoprecipitate from Drosophila extracts. Conclusions The physiological function of CalpB in border cell motility has been demonstrated in vivo. The genetic interaction between the CalpB and the if, mys, as well as rhea genes, the involvement of active talin head-domains in the process, and the fact that CalpB and talin interact with each other collectively suggest that the limited proteolytic cleavage of talin is one of the possible mechanisms through which CalpB regulates cell migration. PMID:22827336

  18. Integrin {alpha}6 cleavage: A novel modification to modulate cell migration

    SciTech Connect

    Pawar, Sangita C.; Demetriou, Manolis C.; Nagle, Raymond B.; Bowden, G. Tim; Cress, Anne E. . E-mail: acress@azcc.arizona.edu

    2007-04-01

    Integrins play a major role in cell adhesion and migration. Previous work reported that a cleaved form of integrin {alpha}6 ({alpha}6p) was detected in invasive human prostate cancer tissue, absent in normal prostate tissue and was produced by urokinase-type Plasminogen Activator (uPA) in a plasmin-independent manner. Using site-directed mutagenesis we identified amino acid residues R594 and R595, located in the 'stalk' region of integrin {alpha}6, as essential for cleavage. The cleavage site is located on the extracellular region of the protein between the {beta}-barrel domain and the thigh domain. Prostate cancer cells (PC3N) were stably transfected to overexpress the cleavable, wild-type (PC3N-{alpha}6-WT) or the non-cleavable form of integrin {alpha}6 (PC3N-{alpha}6-RR). The number of cells invading laminin 111- and laminin 332-coated filters by PC3N-{alpha}6-WT cells increased by threefold as compared to PC3N-{alpha}6-RR cells. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) reduced the invasion of PC3N-{alpha}6-WT cells by approximately 42% through laminin 332-coated filters and plasmin inhibitor aprotinin had no significant effect. Linear cell migration increased production of integrin {alpha}6p in the PC3N-{alpha}6-WT cells and not in the PC3N-{alpha}6-RR cells and 32% of the PC3N-{alpha}6-WT cells migrated on laminin 111 in the linear migration assay as compared to the 5% PC3N-{alpha}6-RR cells. These data taken together suggest that the uPA-mediated cell surface cleavage of the {alpha}6 integrin extracellular domain is involved in tumor cell invasion and migration on laminin.

  19. Cigarette smoke modulates PC3 prostate cancer cell migration by altering adhesion molecules and the extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    YANG, SUPING; LONG, MINICA; TACHADO, SOUVENIR D.; SENG, SEYHA

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality among American males. Studies suggest that cigarette smoking is associated with the progression of PCa; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying this process have not been extensively investigated. PCa progression is characterized by increased cell migration and alterations in extracellular matrix (ECM)- and cell adhesion molecule (CAM)-related gene expression. In the present study, the influence of cigarette smoke medium (SM) on cell migration and on the expression of ECM- and CAM-related genes in PC3 prostate adenocarcinoma cells was investigated. According to a wound-healing assay, SM treatment promoted PC3 cell migration. RNA expression levels from SM-treated and control cells were analyzed using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) array. Of 84 genes analyzed, 27.38% (23/84) exhibited a ≥2-fold change in threshold cycle in PC3 cells following 0.5% SM treatment. Functional gene grouping analysis demonstrated that SM treatment modulated the RNA transcription of approximately 18.4% of CAMs and 33.93% of ECM-related genes. Quantitative PCR analysis showed that SM treatment led to a significant decrease in transcription levels of the following genes: Collagen 5 α-1(V), connective tissue growth factor, integrin β-2, kallmann syndrome 1, laminin α 3, matrix metallopeptidase 7 (MMP7), MMP13, secreted protein acidic cysteine-rich, thrombospondin-2 and versican; and that SM significantly increased the transcription levels of MMP2 and MMP12. Furthermore, MMP2 knockdown significantly reduced the migration of SM-treated PC3 cells. The present study provides novel insights into the association of cigarette smoking with PCa progression, via the alteration of ECM/CAM interactions. PMID:26351771

  20. Modulation of eosinophil generation and migration by Mangifera indica L. extract (Vimang).

    PubMed

    Sá-Nunes, Anderson; Rogerio, Alexandre P; Medeiros, Alexandra I; Fabris, Viciany E; Andreu, Gilberto P; Rivera, Dagmar G; Delgado, René; Faccioli, Lúcia H

    2006-09-01

    The effects of Vimang, an aqueous extract of the stem bark of Mangifera indica L. (Anacardiaceae), on cell migration in an experimental model of asthma was investigated. In vivo treatment of Toxocara canis-infected BALB/c mice for 18 days with 50 mg/kg Vimang reduced eosinophil migration into the bronchoalveolar space and peritoneal cavity. Also, eosinophil generation in bone marrow and blood eosinophilia were inhibited in infected mice treated with Vimang. This reduction was associated with inhibition of IL-5 production in serum and eotaxin in lung homogenates. In all these cases the effects of Vimang were more selective than those observed with dexamethasone. Moreover, Vimang treatment is not toxic for the animals, as demonstrated by the normal body weight increase during infection. These data confirm the potent anti-inflammatory effect of Vimang and support its potential use as an alternative therapeutic drug to the treatment of eosinophilic disorders including those caused by nematodes and allergic diseases.

  1. LGL1 modulates proliferation, apoptosis, and migration of human fetal lung fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Sweezey, Neil B; Kaplan, Feige

    2015-02-15

    Rapid growth and formation of new gas exchange units (alveogenesis) are hallmarks of the perinatal lung. Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), common in very premature infants, is characterized by premature arrest of alveogenesis. Mesenchymal cells (fibroblasts) regulate both lung branching and alveogenesis through mesenchymal-epithelial interactions. Temporal or spatial deficiency of late-gestation lung 1/cysteine-rich secretory protein LD2 (LGL1/CRISPLD2), expressed in and secreted by lung fibroblasts, can impair both lung branching and alveogenesis (LGL1 denotes late gestation lung 1 protein; LGL1 denotes the human gene; Lgl1 denotes the mouse/rat gene). Absence of Lgl1 is embryonic lethal. Lgl1 levels are dramatically reduced in oxygen toxicity rat models of BPD, and heterozygous Lgl1(+/-) mice exhibit features resembling human BPD. To explore the role of LGL1 in mesenchymal-epithelial interactions in developing lung, we developed a doxycycline (DOX)-inducible RNA-mediated LGL1 knockdown cellular model in human fetal lung fibroblasts (MRC5(LGL1KD)). We assessed the impact of LGL1 on cell proliferation, cell migration, apoptosis, and wound healing. DOX-induced MRC5(LGL1KD) suppressed cell growth and increased apoptosis of annexin V(+) staining cells and caspase 3/7 activity. LGL1-conditioned medium increased migration of fetal rat primary lung epithelial cells and human airway epithelial cells. Impaired healing by MRC5(LGL1KD) cells of a wound model was attenuated by addition of LGL1-conditioned medium. Suppression of LGL1 was associated with dysregulation of extracellular matrix genes (downregulated MMP1, ColXVα1, and ELASTIN) and proapoptosis genes (upregulated BAD, BAK, CASP2, and TNFRSF1B) and inhibition of 44/42MAPK phosphorylation. Our findings define a role for LGL1 in fibroblast expansion and migration, epithelial cell migration, and mesenchymal-epithelial signaling, key processes in fetal lung development.

  2. Migration of interfacial oxygen ions modulated resistive switching in oxide-based memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.; Gao, S.; Zeng, F.; Tang, G. S.; Li, S. Z.; Song, C.; Fu, H. D.; Pan, F.

    2013-07-01

    Oxides-based resistive switching memory induced by oxygen ions migration is attractive for future nonvolatile memories. Numerous works had focused their attentions on the sandwiched oxide materials for depressing the characteristic variations, but the comprehensive studies of the dependence of electrodes on the migration behavior of oxygen ions are overshadowed. Here, we investigated the interaction of various metals (Ni, Co, Al, Ti, Zr, and Hf) with oxygen atoms at the metal/Ta2O5 interface under electric stress and explored the effect of top electrode on the characteristic variations of Ta2O5-based memory device. It is demonstrated that chemically inert electrodes (Ni and Co) lead to the scattering switching characteristics and destructive gas bubbles, while the highly chemically active metals (Hf and Zr) formed a thick and dense interfacial intermediate oxide layer at the metal/Ta2O5 interface, which also degraded the resistive switching behavior. The relatively chemically active metals (Al and Ti) can absorb oxygen ions from the Ta2O5 film and avoid forming the problematic interfacial layer, which is benefit to the formation of oxygen vacancies composed conduction filaments in Ta2O5 film thus exhibit the minimum variations of switching characteristics. The clarification of oxygen ions migration behavior at the interface can lead further optimization of resistive switching performance in Ta2O5-based memory device and guide the rule of electrode selection for other oxide-based resistive switching memories.

  3. CCN1: a novel inflammation-regulated biphasic immune cell migration modulator.

    PubMed

    Löbel, Madlen; Bauer, Sandra; Meisel, Christian; Eisenreich, Andreas; Kudernatsch, Robert; Tank, Juliane; Rauch, Ursula; Kühl, Uwe; Schultheiss, Heinz-Peter; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Poller, Wolfgang; Scheibenbogen, Carmen

    2012-09-01

    In this study, we performed a comprehensive analysis of the effect of CCN1 on the migration of human immune cells. The molecule CCN1, produced by fibroblasts and endothelial cells, is considered as an important matrix protein promoting tissue repair and immune cell adhesion by binding various integrins. We recently reported that CCN1 therapy is able to suppress acute inflammation in vivo. Here, we show that CCN1 binds to various immune cells including T cells, B cells, NK cells, and monocytes. The addition of CCN1 in vitro enhances both actin polymerization and transwell migration. Prolonged incubation with CCN1, however, results in the inhibition of migration of immune cells by a mechanism that involves downregulation of PI3Kγ, p38, and Akt activation. Furthermore, we observed that immune cells themselves produce constitutively CCN1 and secretion is induced by pro-inflammatory stimuli. In line with this finding, patients suffering from acute inflammation had enhanced serum levels of CCN1. These findings extend the classical concept of CCN1 as a locally produced cell matrix adhesion molecule and suggest that CCN1 plays an important role in regulating immune cell trafficking by attracting and locally immobilizing immune cells.

  4. Navigator-3, a modulator of cell migration, may act as a suppressor of breast cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Dvashi, Hadas; Ben-Chetrit, Nir; Russell, Roslin; Carvalho, Silvia; Lauriola, Mattia; Nisani, Sophia; Mancini, Maicol; Nataraj, Nishanth; Kedmi, Merav; Roth, Lee; Köstler, Wolfgang; Zeisel, Amit; Yitzhaky, Assif; Zylberg, Jacques; Tarcic, Gabi; Eilam, Raya; Wigelman, Yoav; Will, Rainer; Lavi, Sara; Porat, Ziv; Wiemann, Stefan; Ricardo, Sara; Schmitt, Fernando; Caldas, Carlos; Yarden, Yosef

    2015-01-01

    Dissemination of primary tumor cells depends on migratory and invasive attributes. Here, we identify Navigator-3 (NAV3), a gene frequently mutated or deleted in human tumors, as a regulator of epithelial migration and invasion. Following induction by growth factors, NAV3 localizes to the plus ends of microtubules and enhances their polarized growth. Accordingly, NAV3 depletion trimmed microtubule growth, prolonged growth factor signaling, prevented apoptosis and enhanced random cell migration. Mathematical modeling suggested that NAV3-depleted cells acquire an advantage in terms of the way they explore their environment. In animal models, silencing NAV3 increased metastasis, whereas ectopic expression of the wild-type form, unlike expression of two, relatively unstable oncogenic mutants from human tumors, inhibited metastasis. Congruently, analyses of > 2,500 breast and lung cancer patients associated low NAV3 with shorter survival. We propose that NAV3 inhibits breast cancer progression by regulating microtubule dynamics, biasing directionally persistent rather than random migration, and inhibiting locomotion of initiated cells. PMID:25678558

  5. Modulation of CD86 expression in skin dendritic cells does not always correlate with changes in DC motility, migration and allostimulatory functions.

    PubMed

    Bechetoille, Nicolas; Boher, Aurélie; Gaydon, Amandine; Andre-Frei, Valérie

    2010-01-01

    CD86 expression is a well-known activation marker of dendritic cells (DC). In this study, we compared the level of CD86 expression in monocyte-derived skin DC with their motility, migratory abilities and allostimulatory capabilities. We show that motility and migration could be uncoupled from activation and that the immune response-modulating effects of certain compounds may correlate with down-regulation of CD86 expression rather than with effects on motility and migration.

  6. The Wnt gatekeeper SFRP4 modulates EMT, cell migration and downstream Wnt signalling in serous ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ford, Caroline E; Jary, Eve; Ma, Sean Si Qian; Nixdorf, Sheri; Heinzelmann-Schwarz, Viola A; Ward, Robyn L

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant Wnt signalling is implicated in numerous human cancers, and understanding the effects of modulation of pathway members may lead to the development of novel therapeutics. Expression of secreted frizzled related protein 4 (SFRP4), an extracellular modulator of the Wnt signalling pathway, is progressively lost in more aggressive ovarian cancer phenotypes. Here we show that recombinant SFRP4 (rSFRP4) treatment of a serous ovarian cancer cell line results in inhibition of β-catenin dependent Wnt signalling as measured by TOP/FOP Wnt reporter assay and decreased transcription of Wnt target genes, Axin2, CyclinD1 and Myc. In addition, rSFRP4 treatment significantly increased the ability of ovarian cancer cells to adhere to collagen and fibronectin, and decreased their ability to migrate across an inflicted wound. We conclude that these changes in cell behaviour may be mediated via mesenchymal to epithelial transition (MET), as rSFRP4 treatment also resulted in increased expression of the epithelial marker E-cadherin, and reduced expression of Vimentin and Twist. Combined, these results indicate that modulation of a single upstream gatekeeper of Wnt signalling can have effects on downstream Wnt signalling and ovarian cancer cell behaviour, as mediated through epithelial to mesenchymal plasticity (EMP). This raises the possibility that SFRP4 may be used both diagnostically and therapeutically in epithelial ovarian cancer.

  7. Melanoma Cell Adhesion and Migration Is Modulated by the Uronyl 2-O Sulfotransferase

    PubMed Central

    Nikolovska, Katerina; Spillmann, Dorothe; Haier, Jörg; Ladányi, Andrea; Stock, Christian; Seidler, Daniela G.

    2017-01-01

    Although the vast majority of melanomas are characterized by a high metastatic potential, if detected early, melanoma can have a good prognostic outcome. However, once metastasised, the prognosis is bleak. We showed previously that uronyl-2-O sulfotransferase (Ust) and 2-O sulfation of chondroitin/dermatan sulfate (CS/DS) are involved in cell migration. To demonstrate an impact of 2-O sulfation in metastasis we knocked-down Ust in mouse melanoma cells. This significantly reduced the amount of Ust protein and enzyme activity. Furthermore, in vitro cell motility and adhesion were significantly reduced correlating with the decrease of cellular Ust protein. Single cell migration of B16VshUst(16) cells showed a decreased cell movement phenotype. The adhesion of B16V cells to fibronectin depended on α5β1 but not αvβ3 integrin. Inhibition of glycosaminoglycan sulfation or blocking fibroblast growth factor receptor (FgfR) reduced α5 integrin in B16V cell lines. Interestingly, FgfR1 expression and activation was reduced in Ust knock-down cells. In vivo, pulmonary metastasis of B16VshUst cells was prevented due to a reduction of α5 integrin. As a proof of concept UST knock-down in human melanoma cells also showed a reduction in ITGa5 and adhesion. This is the first study showing that Ust, and consequently 2-O sulfation of the low affinity receptor for FgfR CS/DS, reduces Itga5 and leads to an impaired adhesion and migration of melanoma cells. PMID:28107390

  8. TRAF4 Is a Novel Phosphoinositide-Binding Protein Modulating Tight Junctions and Favoring Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Rousseau, Adrien; McEwen, Alastair G.; Poussin-Courmontagne, Pierre; Rognan, Didier; Nominé, Yves; Rio, Marie-Christine; Tomasetto, Catherine; Alpy, Fabien

    2013-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-associated factor 4 (TRAF4) is frequently overexpressed in carcinomas, suggesting a specific role in cancer. Although TRAF4 protein is predominantly found at tight junctions (TJs) in normal mammary epithelial cells (MECs), it accumulates in the cytoplasm of malignant MECs. How TRAF4 is recruited and functions at TJs is unclear. Here we show that TRAF4 possesses a novel phosphoinositide (PIP)-binding domain crucial for its recruitment to TJs. Of interest, this property is shared by the other members of the TRAF protein family. Indeed, the TRAF domain of all TRAF proteins (TRAF1 to TRAF6) is a bona fide PIP-binding domain. Molecular and structural analyses revealed that the TRAF domain of TRAF4 exists as a trimer that binds up to three lipids using basic residues exposed at its surface. Cellular studies indicated that TRAF4 acts as a negative regulator of TJ and increases cell migration. These functions are dependent from its ability to interact with PIPs. Our results suggest that TRAF4 overexpression might contribute to breast cancer progression by destabilizing TJs and favoring cell migration. PMID:24311986

  9. PREX2 promotes the proliferation, invasion and migration of pancreatic cancer cells by modulating the PI3K signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jianyi; Gong, Xuejun; Ouyang, Lu; He, Wen; Xiao, Rou; Tan, Li

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate-dependent Rac exchanger factor 2 (PREX2) is a novel regulator of the small guanosine triphosphatase Rac, and has been observed to be implicated in human cancer by inhibiting the activity of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), thus upregulating the activity of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway. However, the exact role of PREX2 in pancreatic cancer has not been reported to date. In the present study, the expression levels of PREX2 were observed to be frequently increased in pancreatic cancer specimens compared with those in their matched adjacent normal tissues. In addition, PREX2 expression was also frequently upregulated in several pancreatic cancer cell lines, including AsPC-1, BxPC-3, PANC-1 and CFAPC-1, compared with that in the normal pancreatic epithelial cell line HPC-Y5. Overexpression of PREX2 significantly promoted the proliferation, invasion and migration of pancreatic cancer PANC-1 cells, while small interfering RNA-induced knockdown of PREX2 expression significantly inhibited the proliferation, invasion and migration of these cells. Investigation of the molecular mechanism revealed that the overexpression of PREX2 upregulated the phosphorylation levels of PTEN, indicating that the activity of PTEN was reduced, which further increased the phosphorylation levels of AKT, which indicated that the activity of the PI3K signaling pathway was upregulated. By contrast, knockdown of PREX2 upregulated the activity of PTEN and inhibited the activity of the PI3K signaling pathway. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that PREX2 regulates the proliferation, invasion and migration of pancreatic cancer cells, probably at least via modulation of the activity of PTEN and the PI3K signaling pathway. PMID:27446408

  10. Kindlin-2 Modulates the Survival, Differentiation, and Migration of Induced Pluripotent Cell-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Eggenschwiler, Reto; Wichmann, Christian; Buhmann, Raymund; Cantz, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    Kindlin-2 is a multidomain intracellular protein that can be recruited to β-integrin domains to activate signaling, initiate transcriptional programs, and bind to E-cadherin. To explore its involvement in cell fate decisions in mesenchymal cells, we studied the effects of Kindlin-2 modification (overexpression/knockdown) in induced pluripotent cell-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (iPSC-MSCs). Kindlin-2 overexpression resulted in increased proliferation and reduced apoptosis of iPSC-MSCs, as well as inhibition of their differentiation towards osteocytes, adipocytes, and chondrocytes. In contrast, siRNA-mediated Kindlin-2 knockdown induced increased apoptosis and increased differentiation response in iPSC-MSCs. The ability of iPSC-MSCs to adhere to VCAM-1/SDF-1α under shear stress and to migrate in a wound scratch assay was significantly increased after Kindlin-2 overexpression. In contrast, inhibition of mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) was generally independent of Kindlin-2 modulation in iPSC-MSCs, except for decreased production of interleukin-2 (IL-2) after Kindlin-2 overexpression in iPS-MSCs. Thus, Kindlin-2 upregulates survival, proliferation, stemness, and migration potential in iPSC-MSCs and may therefore be beneficial in optimizing performance of iPSC-MSC in therapies. PMID:28163724

  11. Sphingosine 1-phosphate and human ether-a'-go-go-related gene potassium channels modulate migration in human anaplastic thyroid cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Asghar, Muhammad Yasir; Viitanen, Tero; Kemppainen, Kati; Törnquist, Kid

    2012-10-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is the most aggressive form of human thyroid cancer, lacking any effective treatment. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptors and human ether-a'-go-go-related gene (HERG (KCNH2)) potassium channels are important modulators of cell migration. In this study, we have shown that the S1P(1-3) receptors are expressed in C643 and THJ-16T human ATC cell lines, both at mRNA and protein level. S1P inhibited migration of these cells and of follicular FTC-133 thyroid cancer cells. Using the S1P(1,3) inhibitor VPC-23019, the S1P(2) inhibitor JTE-013, and the S1P(2) receptor siRNA, we showed that the effect was mediated through S1P(2). Treatment of the cells with the Rho inhibitor C3 transferase abolished the effect of S1P on migration. S1P attenuated Rac activity, and inhibiting Rac decreased migration. Sphingosine kinase inhibitor enhanced basal migration of cells, and addition of exogenous S1P inhibited migration. C643 cells expressed a nonconducting HERG protein, and S1P decreased HERG protein expression. The HERG blocker E-4031 decreased migration. Interestingly, downregulating HERG protein with siRNA decreased the basal migration. In experiments using HEK cells overexpressing HERG, we showed that S1P decreased channel protein expression and current and that S1P attenuated migration of the cells. We conclude that S1P attenuates migration of C643 ATC cells by activating S1P(2) and the Rho pathway. The attenuated migration is also, in part, dependent on a S1P-induced decrease of HERG protein.

  12. A Leishmania Ortholog of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Modulates Host Macrophage Responses

    SciTech Connect

    Kamir,D.; Zierow, S.; Leng, L.; Cho, Y.; Diaz, Y.; Griffith, J.; McDonald, C.; Merk, M.; Mitchell, R.; et al

    2008-01-01

    Parasitic organisms have evolved specialized strategies to evade immune defense mechanisms. We describe herein an ortholog of the cytokine, macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), which is produced by the obligate intracellular parasite, Leishmania major. The Leishmania MIF protein, Lm1740MIF, shows significant structural homology with human MIF as revealed by a high-resolution x-ray crystal structure (1.03 A). Differences between the two proteins in the N-terminal tautomerization site are evident, and we provide evidence for the selective, species-specific inhibition of MIF by small-molecule antagonists that target this site. Lm1740MIF shows significant binding interaction with the MIF receptor, CD74 (K(d) = 2.9 x 10(-8) M). Like its mammalian counterpart, Lm1740MIF induces ERK1/2 MAP kinase activation in a CD74-dependent manner and inhibits the activation-induced apoptosis of macrophages. The ability of Lm1740MIF to inhibit apoptosis may facilitate the persistence of Leishmania within the macrophage and contribute to its evasion from immune destruction.

  13. Semaphorin 3A Increases FAK Phosphorylation at Focal Adhesions to Modulate MDA-MB-231 Cell Migration and Spreading on Different Substratum Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Compere, Frances V.; Miller, Alex M.

    2017-01-01

    Interactions between integrin-mediated adhesions and the extracellular matrix (ECM) are important regulators of cell migration and spreading. However, mechanisms by which extracellular ligands regulate cell migration and spreading in response to changes in substratum concentration are not well understood. Semaphorin 3A (Sema3A) has been shown to inhibit cell motility and alter integrin signaling in various cell types. We propose that Sema3A alters focal adhesions to modulate breast carcinoma cell migration and spreading on substrata coated with different concentrations of ECM. We demonstrate that Sema3A inhibits MDA-MB-231 cell migration and spreading on substrata coated with high concentrations of collagen and fibronectin but enhances migration and spreading at lower concentrations of collagen and fibronectin. Sema3A increases focal adhesion kinase phosphorylation at tyrosine 397 (pFAK397) at focal adhesions on all substratum concentrations of collagen and fibronectin but decreased pFAK397 levels on laminin. Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) inhibition blocks the Sema3A-mediated effects on cell migration, spreading, and pFAK397 at focal adhesions when cultured on all concentrations of collagen. These results suggest that Sema3A shifts the optimal level of cell-matrix adhesions to a nonoptimal ECM coating concentration, in particular collagen, to yield maximal cell migration and spreading that may be mediated through a ROCK-dependent mechanism. PMID:28182100

  14. An oyster species-specific miRNA scaffold42648_5080 modulates haemocyte migration by targeting integrin pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Wang, Hao; Jiang, Shuai; Xu, Jiachao; Wang, Lingling; Qiu, Limei; Song, Linsheng

    2016-10-01

    miRNAs are important gene regulators at post-transcriptional level and can modulate diverse biological processes, including immune response. Dozens of species-specific miRNAs have been identified in oyster Crassostrea gigas while their functions remain largely unknown. In the present study, an oyster species-specific miRNA scaffold42648_5080 was found responsive to LPS stimulation and might target a total of 31 oyster genes possibly involved in cell communication, cellular localization and cellular response to stimulus. Besides, in gain-of-function assay of scaffold42648_5080 in vivo, the phagocytosis (30.90% in miRNA group verse 23.20% in miRNA control group), apoptosis (3.10% in miRNA group verse 5.30% in miRNA control group) and migration rate (13.88% in miRNA group verse 21.03% in miRNA control group) of oyster haemocytes were found significantly altered after the injection of scaffold42648_5080 mimics. Among the target genes, integrin-linked kinase (CgILK) was considered crucial in cell migration and its interaction with scaffold42648_5080 was then verified both in vitro and in vivo. Consequently, a significant decrease of relative luciferase ratio was observed in CgILK 3'-UTR luciferase reporter assay after transfection of scaffold42648_5080 mimics (0.70-fold of that in blank group, p < 0.01). Meanwhile, when scaffold42648_5080 was overexpressed in vivo (5.41-fold of miRNA control group, p < 0.01), the expression of CgILK declined significantly to 0.25-fold of miRNA control group (p < 0.01). Comparatively, a significant decrease of the haemocyte migration rate (19.76% verse 34.82% in siEGFP control group, p < 0.01) was observed after knock-down of CgILK in vivo. The present study, as far as we know, for the first time revealed the immunomodulation role of an oyster species-specific miRNA, which might provide new insights into miRNA-mediated adaptation mechanism of oysters.

  15. Light Emitting Diode-Generated Blue Light Modulates Fibrosis Characteristics: Fibroblast Proliferation, Migration Speed, and Reactive Oxygen Species Generation

    PubMed Central

    Mamalis, Andrew; Garcha, Manveer; Jagdeo, Jared

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Blue light is part of the visible light spectrum that does not generate harmful DNA adducts associated with skin cancer and photoaging, and may represent a safer therapeutic modality for treatment of keloid scars and other fibrotic skin diseases. Our laboratory previously demonstrated that light-emitting diode (LED) red and infrared light inhibits proliferation of skin fibroblasts. Moreover, different wavelengths of light can produce different biological effects. Furthermore, the effects of LED blue light (LED-BL) on human skin fibroblasts are not well characterized. This study investigated the effects of LED-BL on human skin fibroblast proliferation, viability, migration speed, and reactive oxygen-species (ROS) generation. Methods and Materials Irradiation of adult human skin fibroblasts using commercially-available LED-BL panels was performed in vitro, and modulation of proliferation and viability was quantified using the trypan blue dye exclusion assay, migratory speed was assessed using time-lapse video microscopy, and intracellular ROS generation was measured using the dihydrorhodamine flow cytometry assay. Statistical differences between groups were determined by ANOVA and Student s t-test. Results Human skin fibroblasts treated with LED-BL fluences of 5, 30, 45, and 80 J/cm2 demonstrated statistically significant dose-dependent decreases in relative proliferation of 8.4%, 29.1%, 33.8%, 51.7%, and 55.1%, respectively, compared to temperature and environment matched bench control plates, respectively. LED-BL fluences of 5, 30, 45 and 80 J/cm2 decreased fibroblast migration speed to 95 ± 7.0% (p = 0.64), 81.3 ± 5.5% (p = 0.021), 48.5 ± 2.7% (p < 0.0001), and 32.3 ± 1.9% (p < 0.0001), respectively, relative to matched controls. LED fluences of 5, 10, 30, and 80 J/cm2 resulted in statistically significant increases in reactive oxygen species of 110.4%, 116.6%, 127.5%, and 130%, respectively, relative to bench controls. Conclusion At

  16. Rac1 and Cdc42 differentially modulate cigarette smoke-induced airway cell migration through p120-catenin-dependent and -independent pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lili; Gallup, Marianne; Zlock, Lorna; Finkbeiner, Walter E; McNamara, Nancy A

    2013-06-01

    The adherens junction protein p120-catenin (p120ctn) shuttles between E-cadherin-bound and cytoplasmic pools to regulate E-cadherin/catenin complex stability and cell migration, respectively. When released from the adherens junction, p120ctn promotes cell migration through modulation of the Rho GTPases Rac1, Cdc42, and RhoA. Accordingly, the down-regulation and cytoplasmic mislocalization of p120ctn has been reported in all subtypes of lung cancers and is associated with grave prognosis. Previously, we reported that cigarette smoke induced cytoplasmic translocation of p120ctn and cell migration, but the underlying mechanism was unclear. Using primary human bronchial epithelial cells exposed to smoke-concentrated medium (Smk), we observed the translocation of Rac1 and Cdc42, but not RhoA, to the leading edge of polarized and migrating human bronchial epithelial cells. Rac1 and Cdc42 were robustly activated by smoke, whereas RhoA was inhibited. Accordingly, siRNA knockdown of Rac1 or Cdc42 completely abolished Smk-induced cell migration, whereas knockdown of RhoA had no effect. p120ctn/Rac1 double knockdown completely abolished Smk-induced cell migration, whereas p120ctn/Cdc42 double knockdown did not. These data suggested that Rac1 and Cdc42 coactivation was essential to smoke-promoted cell migration in the presence of p120ctn, whereas migration proceeded via Rac1 alone in the absence of p120ctn. Thus, Rac1 may provide an omnipotent therapeutic target in reversing cell migration during the early (intact p120ctn) and late (loss of p120ctn) stages of lung carcinogenesis.

  17. The small heat shock protein B8 (HSPB8) modulates proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Piccolella, Margherita; Crippa, Valeria; Cristofani, Riccardo; Rusmini, Paola; Galbiati, Mariarita; Cicardi, Maria Elena; Meroni, Marco; Ferri, Nicola; Morelli, Federica F; Carra, Serena; Messi, Elio; Poletti, Angelo

    2017-02-07

    Breast cancer (BC) is one of the major causes of cancer death in women and is closely related to hormonal dysregulation. Estrogen receptor (ER)-positive BCs are generally treated with anti hormone therapy using antiestrogens or aromatase inhibitors. However, BC cells may become resistant to endocrine therapy, a process facilitated by autophagy, which may either promote or suppress tumor expansion. The autophagy facilitator HSPB8 has been found overexpressed in some BC. Here we found that HSPB8 is highly expressed and differentially modulated by natural or synthetic selective ER modulators (SERMs), in the triple-positive hormone-sensitive BC (MCF-7) cells, but not in triple-negative MDA-MB-231 BC cells. Specific SERMs induced MCF-7 cells proliferation in a HSPB8 dependent manner whereas, did not modify MDA-MB-231 cell growth. ER expression was unaffected in HSPB8-depleted MCF-7 cells. HSPB8 over-expression did not alter the distribution of MCF-7 cells in the various phases of the cell cycle. Conversely and intriguingly, HSPB8 downregulation resulted in an increased number of cells resting in the G0/G1 phase, thus possibly reducing the ability of the cells to pass through the restriction point. In addition, HSPB8 downregulation reduced the migratory ability of MCF-7 cells. None of these modifications were observed, when another small HSP (HSPB1), also expressed in MCF-7 cells, was downregulated. In conclusion, our data suggest that HSPB8 is involved in the mechanisms that regulate cell cycle and cell migration in MCF-7 cells.

  18. Nerve growth factor modulates the tumor cells migration in ovarian cancer through the WNT/β-catenin pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bo; Cai, Shaoxi; Zhao, Yi; He, Qiyi; Yu, Xiaodong; Cheng, Longcong; Zhang, Yingfeng; Hu, Xiancheng; Ke, Ming; Chen, Sijia; Zou, Misha

    2016-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF)/nerve growth factor receptors (NGFRs) axis and canonical WNT/β-catenin pathway have shown to play crucial roles in tumor initiation, progression and prognosis. But little did we know the relationship between them in modulation of tumor progress. In this report, we found that NGF/NGFRs and β-catenin were coexpression in ovarian cancer cell lines, and NGF can decrease the expression level of β-catenin and affect its activities, which may be related to the NGF-induced down-regulation of B-cell CLL/lymphoma 9-like (BCL9L, BCL9-2). Furthermore, NGF can also increase or decrease the downstream target gene expression levels of WNT/β-catenin depending on the cell types. Especially, we created a novel in vitro cell growth model based on a microfluidic device to intuitively observe the effects of NGF/NGFRs on the motility behaviors of ovarian cancer cells. The results showed that the migration area and maximum distance into three dimensional (3D) matrigel were decreased in CAOV3 and OVCAR3 cells, but increased in SKOV3 cells following the stimulation with NGF. In addition, we found that the cell colony area was down-regulated in CAOV3 cells, however, it was augmented in OVCAR3 cells after treatment with NGF. The inhibitors of NGF/NGFRs, such as Ro 08-2750, K252a and LM11A-31,can all block NGF-stimulated changes of gene expression or migratory behavior on ovarian cancer cells. The different results among ovarian cancer cells illustrated the heterogeneity and complexity of ovarian cancer. Collectively, our results suggested for the first time that NGF is functionally linked to β-catenin in the migration of human ovarian cancer cells, which may be a novel therapeutic perspective to prevent the spread of ovarian carcinomas by studying the interaction between NGF/NGFRs and canonical WNT/β-catenin signaling. PMID:27835587

  19. Inter-kingdom Signaling by the Legionella Quorum Sensing Molecule LAI-1 Modulates Cell Migration through an IQGAP1-Cdc42-ARHGEF9-Dependent Pathway.

    PubMed

    Simon, Sylvia; Schell, Ursula; Heuer, Natalie; Hager, Dominik; Albers, Michael F; Matthias, Jan; Fahrnbauer, Felix; Trauner, Dirk; Eichinger, Ludwig; Hedberg, Christian; Hilbi, Hubert

    2015-12-01

    Small molecule signaling promotes the communication between bacteria as well as between bacteria and eukaryotes. The opportunistic pathogenic bacterium Legionella pneumophila employs LAI-1 (3-hydroxypentadecane-4-one) for bacterial cell-cell communication. LAI-1 is produced and detected by the Lqs (Legionella quorum sensing) system, which regulates a variety of processes including natural competence for DNA uptake and pathogen-host cell interactions. In this study, we analyze the role of LAI-1 in inter-kingdom signaling. L. pneumophila lacking the autoinducer synthase LqsA no longer impeded the migration of infected cells, and the defect was complemented by plasmid-borne lqsA. Synthetic LAI-1 dose-dependently inhibited cell migration, without affecting bacterial uptake or cytotoxicity. The forward migration index but not the velocity of LAI-1-treated cells was reduced, and the cell cytoskeleton appeared destabilized. LAI-1-dependent inhibition of cell migration involved the scaffold protein IQGAP1, the small GTPase Cdc42 as well as the Cdc42-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor ARHGEF9, but not other modulators of Cdc42, or RhoA, Rac1 or Ran GTPase. Upon treatment with LAI-1, Cdc42 was inactivated and IQGAP1 redistributed to the cell cortex regardless of whether Cdc42 was present or not. Furthermore, LAI-1 reversed the inhibition of cell migration by L. pneumophila, suggesting that the compound and the bacteria antagonistically target host signaling pathway(s). Collectively, the results indicate that the L. pneumophila quorum sensing compound LAI-1 modulates migration of eukaryotic cells through a signaling pathway involving IQGAP1, Cdc42 and ARHGEF9.

  20. Inter-kingdom Signaling by the Legionella Quorum Sensing Molecule LAI-1 Modulates Cell Migration through an IQGAP1-Cdc42-ARHGEF9-Dependent Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Sylvia; Schell, Ursula; Heuer, Natalie; Hager, Dominik; Albers, Michael F.; Matthias, Jan; Fahrnbauer, Felix; Trauner, Dirk; Eichinger, Ludwig; Hedberg, Christian; Hilbi, Hubert

    2015-01-01

    Small molecule signaling promotes the communication between bacteria as well as between bacteria and eukaryotes. The opportunistic pathogenic bacterium Legionella pneumophila employs LAI-1 (3-hydroxypentadecane-4-one) for bacterial cell-cell communication. LAI-1 is produced and detected by the Lqs (Legionella quorum sensing) system, which regulates a variety of processes including natural competence for DNA uptake and pathogen-host cell interactions. In this study, we analyze the role of LAI-1 in inter-kingdom signaling. L. pneumophila lacking the autoinducer synthase LqsA no longer impeded the migration of infected cells, and the defect was complemented by plasmid-borne lqsA. Synthetic LAI-1 dose-dependently inhibited cell migration, without affecting bacterial uptake or cytotoxicity. The forward migration index but not the velocity of LAI-1-treated cells was reduced, and the cell cytoskeleton appeared destabilized. LAI-1-dependent inhibition of cell migration involved the scaffold protein IQGAP1, the small GTPase Cdc42 as well as the Cdc42-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor ARHGEF9, but not other modulators of Cdc42, or RhoA, Rac1 or Ran GTPase. Upon treatment with LAI-1, Cdc42 was inactivated and IQGAP1 redistributed to the cell cortex regardless of whether Cdc42 was present or not. Furthermore, LAI-1 reversed the inhibition of cell migration by L. pneumophila, suggesting that the compound and the bacteria antagonistically target host signaling pathway(s). Collectively, the results indicate that the L. pneumophila quorum sensing compound LAI-1 modulates migration of eukaryotic cells through a signaling pathway involving IQGAP1, Cdc42 and ARHGEF9. PMID:26633832

  1. The Lutheran/Basal Cell Adhesion Molecule Promotes Tumor Cell Migration by Modulating Integrin-mediated Cell Attachment to Laminin-511 Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Kikkawa, Yamato; Ogawa, Takaho; Sudo, Ryo; Yamada, Yuji; Katagiri, Fumihiko; Hozumi, Kentaro; Nomizu, Motoyoshi; Miner, Jeffrey H.

    2013-01-01

    Cell-matrix interactions are critical for tumor cell migration. Lutheran (Lu), also known as basal cell adhesion molecule (B-CAM), competes with integrins for binding to laminin α5, a subunit of LM-511, a major component of basement membranes. Here we show that the preferential binding of Lu/B-CAM to laminin α5 promotes tumor cell migration. The attachment of Lu/B-CAM transfectants to LM-511 was slightly weaker than that of control cells, and this was because Lu/B-CAM disturbed integrin binding to laminin α5. Lu/B-CAM induced a spindle cell shape with pseudopods and promoted cell migration on LM-511. In addition, blocking with an anti-Lu/B-CAM antibody led to a flat cell shape and inhibited migration on LM-511, similar to the effects of an activating integrin β1 antibody. We conclude that tumor cell migration on LM-511 requires that Lu/B-CAM competitively modulates cell attachment through integrins. We suggest that this competitive interaction is involved in a balance between static and migratory cell behaviors. PMID:24036115

  2. 7α-Hydroxypregnenolone, a key neuronal modulator of locomotion, stimulates upstream migration by means of the dopaminergic system in salmon.

    PubMed

    Haraguchi, Shogo; Yamamoto, Yuzo; Suzuki, Yuko; Hyung Chang, Joon; Koyama, Teppei; Sato, Miku; Mita, Masatoshi; Ueda, Hiroshi; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi

    2015-07-29

    Salmon migrate upstream against an opposing current in their natal river. However, the molecular mechanisms that stimulate upstream migratory behavior are poorly understood. Here, we show that 7α-hydroxypregnenolone (7α-OH PREG), a newly identified neuronal modulator of locomotion, acts as a key factor for upstream migration in salmon. We first identified 7α-OH PREG and cytochrome P450 7α-hydroxylase (P4507α), a steroidogenic enzyme producing 7α-OH PREG, in the salmon brain and then found that 7α-OH PREG synthesis in the brain increases during upstream migration. Subsequently, we demonstrated that 7α-OH PREG increases upstream migratory behavior of salmon. We further found that 7α-OH PREG acts on dopamine neurons in the magnocellular preoptic nucleus during upstream migration. Thus, 7α-OH PREG stimulates upstream migratory behavior through the dopaminergic system in salmon. These findings provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms of fish upstream migration.

  3. Sphingosine-1-phosphate/S1P receptors signaling modulates cell migration in human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kong, Yaxian; Wang, Hong; Lin, Tao; Wang, Shuling

    2014-01-01

    The recruitment of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) to damaged tissues and sites of inflammation is an essential step for clinical therapy. However, the signals regulating the motility of these cells are still not fully understood. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), a bioactive sphingolipid metabolite, is known to have a variety of biological effects on various cells. Here, we investigated the roles of S1P and S1P receptors (S1PRs) in migration of human BMSCs. We found that S1P exerted a powerful migratory action on human BMSCs. Moreover, by employing RNA interference technology and pharmacological tools, we demonstrated that S1PR1 and S1PR3 are responsible for S1P-induced migration of human BMSCs. In contrast, S1PR2 mediates the inhibition of migration. Additionally, we explored the downstream signaling pathway of the S1P/S1PRs axis and found that activation of S1PR1 or S1PR3 increased migration of human BMSCs through a G i /extracellular regulated protein kinases 1/2- (ERK1/2-) dependent pathway, whereas activation of S1PR2 decreased migration through the Rho/Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) pathway. In conclusion, we reveal that the S1P/S1PRs signaling axis regulates the migration of human BMSCs via a dual-directional mechanism. Thus, selective modulation of S1PR's activity on human BMSCs may provide an effective approach to immunotherapy or tissue regeneration.

  4. LGR4 Is a Direct Target of MicroRNA-34a and Modulates the Proliferation and Migration of Retinal Pigment Epithelial ARPE-19 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Qiang; Zhou, Linglin; Tang, Jiajia; Ma, Nan; Xu, Ancong; Tang, Jiang; Zheng, Dandan; Chen, Xiaogang; Chen, Feng; Dong, Xiang Da; Tu, LiLi

    2016-01-01

    The pathology of proliferative vitreoretinopathy and proliferative diabetic retinopathy is linked to proliferation, migration, and adhesion of the retinal pigment epithelium. MicroRNA-34a (miR-34a) expression modulates changes in proliferation and migration of retinal pigment epithelial cell line ARPE-19. In this study, we determined that miR-34a interacts with LGR4, identified by bioinformatics using TargetScan Human 5.0, to affect these changes. Double luciferase gene reporter assay confirmed miR-34a involvement in mediating control. miR-34a mimic transfection decreased LGR4 expression. Western blot analysis documented corresponding protein expression inhibition. MTS, Ki67 immunostaining, scratch and transwell testing, along with attachment assay showed that miR-34a upregulation inhibited ARPE-19 cell proliferation, migration and attachment partly through downregulation of LGR4 protein expression. Western blot analysis revealed that both miR-34a upregulation and LGR4 downregulation induced declines in E2F1, p-CDC2, CDK2, CDK4 and CDK6 protein expression. Taken together, miR-34a gene expression upregulation inhibits ARPE-19 cell proliferation, migration and adhesion partly by suppressing LGR4 expression. These results substantiate earlier indications that both miR-34a and LGR4 are potential drug targets to prevent fibrosis in a clinical setting. PMID:27977785

  5. Ganglioside GM2 mediates migration of tumor cells by interacting with integrin and modulating the downstream signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Manjari; Mahata, Barun; Banerjee, Avisek; Chakraborty, Sohini; Debnath, Shibjyoti; Ray, Sougata Sinha; Ghosh, Zhumur; Biswas, Kaushik

    2016-07-01

    The definitive role of ganglioside GM2 in mediating tumor-induced growth and progression is still unknown. Here we report a novel role of ganglioside GM2 in mediating tumor cell migration and uncovered its mechanism. Data shows differential expression levels of GM2-synthase as well as GM2 in different human cancer cells. siRNA mediated knockdown of GM2-synthase in CCF52, A549 and SK-RC-26B cells resulted in significant inhibition of tumor cell migration as well as invasion in vitro without affecting cellular proliferation. Over-expression of GM2-synthase in low-GM2 expressing SK-RC-45 cells resulted in a consequent increase in migration thus confirming the potential role GM2 and its downstream partners play in tumor cell migration and motility. Further, treatment of SK-RC-45 cells with exogenous GM2 resulted in a dramatic increase in migratory and invasive capacity with no change in proliferative capacity, thereby confirming the role of GM2 in tumorigenesis specifically by mediating tumor migration and invasion. Gene expression profiling of GM2-synthase silenced cells revealed altered expression of several genes involved in cell migration primarily those controlling the integrin mediated signaling. GM2-synthase knockdown resulted in decreased phosphorylation of FAK, Src as well as Erk, while over-expression and/or exogenous GM2 treatment caused increased FAK and Erk phosphorylation respectively. Again, GM2 mediated invasion and Erk phosphorylation is blocked in integrin knockdown SK-RC-45 cells, thus confirming that GM2 mediated migration and phosphorylation of Erk is integrin dependent. Finally, confocal microscopy suggested co-localization while co-immunoprecipitation and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) confirmed direct interaction of membrane bound ganglioside, GM2 with the integrin receptor.

  6. Pyrogallol abates VSMC migration via modulation of Caveolin-1, matrix metalloproteinase and intima hyperplasia in carotid ligation mouse.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yu-Dong; Thiyagarajan, Varadharajan; Tsai, May-Jywan; Lue, Sheng-I; Chia, Yi-Chen; Shyue, Song-Kun; Weng, Ching-Feng

    2016-12-01

    Migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) contributes to intimal hyperplasia and other vascular diseases. Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) has been recognized as a proliferative inhibitor of VSMCs and is likely to be an important regulator of VSMC migration. The underlying mechanism of pyrogallol on the VSMC migration is not fully understood. This study attempted to dissect the role of Cav-1 and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) in VSMC migration and to investigate the effect of pyrogallol on VSMC mobility during carotid artery ligation mice. The mRNA expression of MMP-3 and MMP-13 was down-regulated in cultured VSMC prepared from Cav-1-deficient (Cav-1 KO) mice whereas MMP-14 expression was up-regulated. Pyrogallol effectively inhibited the migration of Cav-1 KO VSMC by promoting the expression of tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-2. Pyrogallol also inhibited the migration of Cav-1 wild type (WT) VSMC, however, by increasing TIMP-1 expression and repressing MMP-2 activity. In a parallel in vivo study, intra-peritoneal (ip) of pyrogallol to carotid artery ligated mice significantly suppressed intima formation in mice carotid artery. Furthermore, the proMMP-9 activity in pyrogallol-treated mice serum significantly increased from Day 0 to Day 2 and decreased from Day 2 to Day 7 in a time-dependent manner. In addition, WT mice treated with pyrogallol had significantly reduced neointima formation, whereas no differences were observed in Cav-1 knock out (KO) mice. These results suggest that pyrogallol not only inhibited VSMC migration but also effectively diminishes the severity of neointima hyperplasia, implying that pyrogallol possesses potential anti-atherogenic effects for the treatment of vascular diseases.

  7. Fibronectin Modulates Cell Adhesion and Signaling to Promote Single Cell Migration of Highly Invasive Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Grasieli de Oliveira; Bernardi, Lisiane; Lauxen, Isabel; Sant’Ana Filho, Manoel; Horwitz, Alan Rick; Lamers, Marcelo Lazzaron

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration is regulated by adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) through integrins and activation of small RhoGTPases, such as RhoA and Rac1, resulting in changes to actomyosin organization. During invasion, epithelial-derived tumor cells switch from laminin-enriched basal membrane to collagen and fibronectin-enriched connective tissue. How this switch affects the tumor migration is still unclear. We tested the hypothesis that ECM dictates the invasiveness of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC). We analyzed the migratory properties of two OSCC lines, a low invasive cell line with high e-cadherin levels (Linv/HE-cad) or a highly invasive cell line with low e-cadherin levels (Hinv/LE-cad), plated on different ECM components. Compared to laminin, fibronectin induced non-directional collective migration and decreased RhoA activity in Linv/HE-cad OSCC. For Hinv/LE-cad OSCC, fibronectin increased Rac1 activity and induced smaller adhesions, resulting in a fast single cell migration in both 2D and 3D environments. Consistent with these observations, human OSCC biopsies exhibited similar changes in cell-ECM adhesion distribution at the invasive front of the tumor, where cells encounter fibronectin. Our results indicate that ECM composition might induce a switch from collective to single cell migration according to tumor invasiveness due to changes in cell-ECM adhesion and the resulting signaling pathways that alter actomyosin organization. PMID:26978651

  8. NDUFV2 regulates neuronal migration in the developing cerebral cortex through modulation of the multipolar-bipolar transition.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tianda; Wu, Qinwei; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Dai

    2015-11-02

    Abnormalities during brain development are tightly linked several psychiatric disorders. Mutations in NADH dehydrogenase ubiquinone flavoprotein 2 (NDUFV2) are responsible for schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and Parkinson׳s disease. However, the function of NDUFV2 during brain development remains unclear. Here we reported that ndufv2 is expressed in the developing cerebral cortex. In utero suppression of ndufv2 arrested neuronal migration, leading to accumulation of ectopic neurons in the intermediate zone. ndufv2 inhibition did not affect radial glia scaffold, progenitor cells or neurons survival. However, the loss of ndufv2 impairs neuronal multipolar-bipolar transition in vivo and polarization in vitro. Moreover, ndufv2 affected actin cytoskeleton and tubulin stabilization in cortical neurons. Overall, our findings establish a new NDUFV2 dependent mechanism underlying neuronal migration and psychiatric disorders.

  9. Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) modulates adhesion, migration and invasion in bone tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Mak, Isabella W Y; Turcotte, Robert E; Ghert, Michelle

    2013-07-01

    Parathyroid-hormone-related protein (PTHrP) has been shown to be an important factor in osteolysis in the setting of metastatic carcinoma to the bone. However, PTHrP may also be central in the setting of primary bone tumors. Giant cell tumor of bone (GCT) is an aggressive osteolytic bone tumor characterized by osteoclast-like giant cells that are recruited by osteoblast-like stromal cells. The stromal cells of GCT are well established as the only neoplastic element of the tumor, and we have previously shown that PTHrP is highly expressed by these cells both in vitro and in vivo. We have also found that the stromal cells exposed to a monoclonal antibody to PTHrP exhibited rapid plate detachment and quickly died in vitro. Therefore, PTHrP may serve in an autocrine manner to increase cell proliferation and promote invasive properties in GCT. The purpose of this study was to use transcriptomic microarrays and functional assays to examine the effects of PTHrP neutralization on cell adhesion, migration and invasion. Microarray and proteomics data identified genes that were differentially expressed in GCT stromal cells under various PTHrP treatment conditions. Treatment of GCT stromal cells with anti-PTHrP antibodies showed a change in the expression of 13 genes from the integrin family relative to the IgG control. Neutralization of PTHrP reduced cell migration and invasion as evidenced by functional assays. Adhesion and anoikis assays demonstrated that although PTHrP neutralization inhibits cell adhesion properties, cell detachment related to PTHrP neutralization did not result in associated cell death, as expected in mesenchymal stromal cells. Based on the data presented herein, we conclude that PTHrP excreted by GCT stromal cells increases bone tumor cell local invasiveness and migration.

  10. Modulation of the uptake of critical nutrients by breast cancer cells by lactate: Impact on cell survival, proliferation and migration.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Marta; Araújo, João R; Correia-Branco, Ana; Gregório, Inês; Martel, Fátima; Keating, Elisa

    2016-02-15

    This work aimed to characterize the uptake of folate and glucose by breast cancer cells and to study the effect of lactate upon the transport of these nutrients and upon cell viability, proliferation and migration capacity. Data obtained showed that: a) MCF7 cells uptake (3)H-folic acid ((3)H-FA) at physiological but not at acidic pH; b) T47D cells accumulate (3)H-FA and (14)C-5-methyltetrahydrofolate ((14)C-5-MTHF) more efficiently at acidic than at physiological pH; c) (3)H-deoxyglucose ((3)H-DG) uptake by T47D cells is sodium-independent, inhibited by cytochalasin B (CYT B) and stimulated by insulin. Regarding the effect of lactate, in T47D cells, acute (26 min) and chronic (24 h) exposure to lactic acid (LA) stimulated (3)H-FA uptake. Acute exposure to LA also stimulated (3)H-DG uptake and chronic exposure to LA significantly stimulated T47D cell migratory capacity. In conclusion, the transport of folates is strikingly different in two phenotypically similar breast cancer cell lines: MCF7 and T47D cells. Additionally, lactate seems to act as a signaling molecule which increases the uptake of nutrients and promotes the migration capacity of T47D cells.

  11. Golgi phosphoprotein 2 (GOLPH2) is a novel bile acid-responsive modulator of oesophageal cell migration and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Anne-Marie; Bekiaris, Spiros; Duggan, Gina; Prichard, David; Kirca, Murat; Finn, Stephen; Reynolds, John V; Kelleher, Dermot; Long, Aideen

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aetiology of Barrett's oesophagus (BO) and oesophageal cancer is poorly understood. We previously demonstrated that Golgi structure and function is altered in oesophageal cancer cells. A Golgi-associated protein, GOLPH2, was previously established as a tissue biomarker for BO. Cellular functions for GOLPH2 are currently unknown, therefore in this study we sought to investigate functional roles for this Golgi-associated protein in oesophageal disease. Methods: Expression, intracellular localisation and secretion of GOLPH2 were identified by immunofluorescence, immunohistochemistry and western blot. GOLPH2 expression constructs and siRNA were used to identify cellular functions for GOLPH2. Results: We demonstrate that the structure of the Golgi is fragmented and the intracellular localisation of GOLPH2 is altered in BO and oesophageal adenocarcinoma tissue. GOLPH2 is secreted by oesophageal cancer cells and GOLPH2 expression, cleavage and secretion facilitate cell migration and invasion. Furthermore, exposure of cells to DCA, a bile acid component of gastric refluxate and known tumour promoter for oesophageal cancer, causes disassembly of the Golgi structure into ministacks, resulting in cleavage and secretion of GOLPH2. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that GOLPH2 may be a useful tissue biomarker for oesophageal disease. We provide a novel mechanistic insight into the aetiology of oesophageal cancer and reveal novel functions for GOLPH2 in regulating tumour cell migration and invasion, important functions for the metastatic process in oesophageal cancer. PMID:26461057

  12. The Lnc RNA SPRY4-IT1 Modulates Trophoblast Cell Invasion and Migration by Affecting the Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Qing; Huang, Shiyun; Zou, Yanfen; Xu, Yetao; Jiang, Ziyan; Zou, Shan; Xu, Haoqing; Sun, Lizhou

    2016-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a common, pregnancy-specific disease and a major contributor to maternal and foetal morbidity and mortality. Some placental abnormalities, including deficient implantation, abnormal trophoblast cell function, and improper placental vascular development, are believed to lead to preeclampsia. The long noncoding RNA SPRY4-IT1 is more highly expressed in preeclamptic human placentas than in normal placentas. We assessed the role of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-associated invasion and migration in HTR-8/SVneo trophoblast cells. Overexpression of SPRY4-IT1 suppressed trophoblast cell migration and invasion, whereas reduced expression of SPRY4-IT1 prevented the EMT process. Mechanistically, an RNA immunoprecipitation experiment showed that SPRY4-IT1 bound directly to HuR and mediated the β-catenin expression associated with EMT in HTR-8/SVneo cells. Moreover, the expression levels of genes in the WNT family, such as WNT3 and WNT5B, were changed after transfection of HTR-8/SVneo with SPRY4-IT1. Together, our results highlight the roles of SPRY4-IT1 in causing trophoblast cell dysfunction by acting through the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, and consequently in impairing spiral artery remodelling. These results suggest a new potential therapeutic target for intervention against preeclampsia. PMID:27853262

  13. Human pancreatic stellate cells modulate 3D collagen alignment to promote the migration of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Drifka, Cole R; Loeffler, Agnes G; Esquibel, Corinne R; Weber, Sharon M; Eliceiri, Kevin W; Kao, W John

    2016-12-01

    A hallmark of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the ability for cancer cells to aggressively infiltrate and navigate through a dense stroma during the metastatic process. Key features of the PDAC stroma include an abundant population of activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) and highly aligned collagen fibers; however, important questions remain regarding how collagen becomes aligned and what the biological manifestations are. To better understand how PSCs, aligned collagen, and PDAC cells might cooperate during the transition to invasion, we utilized a microchannel-based in vitro tumor model and advanced imaging technologies to recreate and examine in vivo-like heterotypic interactions. We found that PSCs participate in a collaborative process with cancer cells by orchestrating the alignment of collagen fibers that, in turn, are permissive to enhanced cell migration. Additionally, direct contact between PSCs, collagen, and PDAC cells is critical to invasion and co-migration of both cell types. This suggests PSCs may accompany and assist in navigating PDAC cells through the stromal terrain. Together, our data provides a new role for PSCs in stimulating the metastatic process and underscores the importance of collagen alignment in cancer progression.

  14. High Expression of LINC01420 indicates an unfavorable prognosis and modulates cell migration and invasion in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liting; Tang, Yanyan; He, Yi; Wang, Yumin; Lian, Yu; Xiong, Fang; Shi, Lei; Zhang, Shanshan; Gong, Zhaojian; Zhou, Yujuan; Liao, Qianjin; Zhou, Ming; Li, Xiaoling; Xiong, Wei; Li, Yong; Li, Guiyuan; Zeng, Zhaoyang; Guo, Can

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrated that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) deregulated in many cancer tissues including nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and had critical roles in cancer progression and metastasis. In this study, we aimed to assess a lncRNA LINC01420 expression in NPC and explore its role in NPC pathogenesis. Our research revealed that the expression level of LINC01420 in NPC tissues were higher than nasopharyngeal epithelial (NPE) tissues. Moreover, NPC patients with high LINC01420 expression level showed poor overall survival. Knockdown LINC01420 inhibited NPC cell migration and invasion in vitro. In summary, LINC01420 may play a critical role in NPC progression and may serve as a potential prognostic biomarker in NPC patients. PMID:28123602

  15. The selective 5-hydroxytryptamine 1A antagonist, AZD7371 [3(R)-(N,N-dicyclobutylamino)-8-fluoro-3,4-dihydro-2H-1-benzopyran-5-carboxamide (R,R)-tartrate monohydrate] (robalzotan tartrate monohydrate), inhibits visceral pain-related visceromotor, but not autonomic cardiovascular, responses to colorectal distension in rats.

    PubMed

    Lindström, E; Ravnefjord, A; Brusberg, M; Hjorth, S; Larsson, H; Martinez, V

    2009-06-01

    5-Hydroxytryptamine 1A (5-HT(1A)) receptors have been suggested as a target for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). A recent clinical trial investigating the efficacy of the selective 5-HT(1A) antagonist AZD7371 [3(R)-(N,N-dicyclobutylamino)-8-fluoro-3,4-dihydro-2H-1-benzopyran-5-carboxamide (R,R)-tartrate monohydrate] showed no symptomatic improvement in IBS patients. We characterized the mechanisms mediating potential analgesic effects of AZD7371 in a model of colorectal distension (CRD)-induced visceral pain in rats to understand its mechanism of action and the lack of clinical efficacy. Visceromotor and cardiovascular responses (telemetry) were assessed in conscious rats during noxious CRD (80 mm Hg). Effects of AZD7371 (3-300 nmol/kg i.v.; 1-30 micromol/kg p.o.) and a reference 5-HT(1A) antagonist, WAY-100635 (N-[2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]ethyl]-N-(2-pyridyl)cyclohexanecarboxamide maleate salt; 3-300 nmol/kg i.v.), were assessed. Effects of intracerebroventricular AZD7371 were also evaluated. Intravenous AZD7371 or WAY-100635 and oral AZD7371 dose-dependently inhibited visceromotor responses to CRD (ED(50), 203, 231, and 14 micromol/kg, respectively). In telemetrized rats, oral AZD7371 inhibited visceromotor responses to CRD without affecting the concomitant hypertensive and tachycardic responses. Intracerebroventricular AZD7371 did not affect visceromotor responses, whereas it inhibited micturition. None of the doses tested induced visible gross side effects. AZD7371, likely acting at a spinal site, inhibited the visceromotor but not the cardiovascular responses to visceral pain in the CRD model in rats. Although agents effective on multiple pain-related readouts in the CRD model (e.g., pregabalin or clonidine) alleviate IBS symptoms, AZD7371, which is effective on only one pain-related pseudoaffective readout, does not. Data from preclinical CRD models of visceral pain need to be interpreted cautiously as it relates to their clinical

  16. Modulation of tumor cell stiffness and migration by type IV collagen through direct activation of integrin signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng-Yi; Lin, Jo-Shi; Yang, Bei-Chang

    2014-08-01

    Excessive collagen deposition plays a critical role in tumor progression and metastasis. To understand how type IV collagen affects mechanical stiffness and migration, low-collagen-IV-expressing transfectants of B16F10, U118MG, and Huh7 (denoted shCol cells) were established by the lentiviral-mediated delivery of small interfering RNA against type IV-α1 collagen (Col4A1). Although having similar growth rates, shCol cells showed a flatter morphology compared to that of the corresponding controls. Notably, knocking down the Col4A1 gene conferred the cells with higher levels of elasticity and lower motility. Exposure to blocking antibodies against human β1 integrin or α2β1 integrin or the pharmacological inhibition of Src and ERK activity by PP1 and U0126, respectively, effectively reduced cell motility and raised cell stiffness. Reduced Src and ERK activities in shCol cells indicate the involvement of a collagen IV/integrin signaling pathway. The forced expression of β1 integrin significantly stimulated Src and ERK phosphorylation, reduced cell stiffness, and accelerated cell motility. In an experimental metastasis assay using C57BL/6 mice, B16F10 shCol cells formed significantly fewer and smaller lung nodules, confirming the contribution of collagen to metastasis. In summary, the integrin signaling pathway activated in a tumor environment with collagen deposition is responsible for low cell elasticity and high metastatic ability.

  17. Extracellular Superoxide Dismutase Expression in Papillary Thyroid Cancer Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells Modulates Cancer Cell Growth and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Parascandolo, Alessia; Rappa, Francesca; Cappello, Francesco; Kim, Jaehyup; Cantu, David A.; Chen, Herbert; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Hematti, Peiman; Castellone, Maria Domenica; Salvatore, Marco; Laukkanen, Mikko O.

    2017-01-01

    Tumor stroma-secreted growth factors, cytokines, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) influence tumor development from early stages to the metastasis phase. Previous studies have demonstrated downregulation of ROS-producing extracellular superoxide dismutase (SOD3) in thyroid cancer cell lines although according to recent data, the expression of SOD3 at physiological levels stimulates normal and cancer cell proliferation. Therefore, to analyze the expression of SOD3 in tumor stroma, we characterized stromal cells from the thyroid. We report mutually exclusive desmoplasia and inflammation in papillary and follicular thyroid cancers and the presence of multipotent mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) in non-carcinogenic thyroids and papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). The phenotypic and differentiation characteristics of Thyroid MSCs and PTC MSCs were comparable with bone marrow MSCs. A molecular level analysis showed increased FIBROBLAST ACTIVATING PROTEIN, COLLAGEN 1 TYPE A1, TENASCIN, and SOD3 expression in PTC MSCs compared to Thyroid MSCs, suggesting the presence of MSCs with a fibrotic fingerprint in papillary thyroid cancer tumors and the autocrine-paracrine conversion of SOD3 expression, which was enhanced by cancer cells. Stromal SOD3 had a stimulatory effect on cancer cell growth and an inhibitory effect on cancer cell migration, thus indicating that SOD3 might be a novel player in thyroid tumor stroma. PMID:28216675

  18. Unsaturated Fatty Acids Drive Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase (ADAM)-dependent Cell Adhesion, Proliferation, and Migration by Modulating Membrane Fluidity*

    PubMed Central

    Reiss, Karina; Cornelsen, Isabell; Husmann, Matthias; Gimpl, Gerald; Bhakdi, Sucharit

    2011-01-01

    The disintegrin-metalloproteinases ADAM10 and ADAM17 mediate the release of several cell signaling molecules and cell adhesion molecules such as vascular endothelial cadherin or L-selectin affecting endothelial permeability and leukocyte transmigration. Dysregulation of ADAM activity may contribute to the pathogenesis of vascular diseases, but the mechanisms underlying the control of ADAM functions are still incompletely understood. Atherosclerosis is characterized by lipid plaque formation and local accumulation of unsaturated free fatty acids (FFA). Here, we show that unsaturated FFA increase ADAM-mediated substrate cleavage. We demonstrate that these alterations are not due to genuine changes in enzyme activity, but correlate with changes in membrane fluidity as revealed by measurement of 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene fluorescence anisotropy and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching analyses. ELISA and immunoblot experiments conducted with granulocytes, endothelial cells, and keratinocytes revealed rapid increase of ectodomain shedding of ADAM10 and ADAM17 substrates upon membrane fluidization. Large amounts of unsaturated FFA may be liberated from cholesteryl esters in LDL that is entrapped in atherosclerotic lesions. Incubation of cells with thus modified LDL resulted in rapid cleavage of ADAM substrates with corresponding functional consequences on cell proliferation, cell migration, and endothelial permeability, events of high significance in atherogenesis. We propose that FFA represent critical regulators of ADAM function that may assume relevance in many biological settings through their influence on mobility of enzyme and substrate in lipid bilayers. PMID:21642425

  19. Unsaturated fatty acids drive disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM)-dependent cell adhesion, proliferation, and migration by modulating membrane fluidity.

    PubMed

    Reiss, Karina; Cornelsen, Isabell; Husmann, Matthias; Gimpl, Gerald; Bhakdi, Sucharit

    2011-07-29

    The disintegrin-metalloproteinases ADAM10 and ADAM17 mediate the release of several cell signaling molecules and cell adhesion molecules such as vascular endothelial cadherin or L-selectin affecting endothelial permeability and leukocyte transmigration. Dysregulation of ADAM activity may contribute to the pathogenesis of vascular diseases, but the mechanisms underlying the control of ADAM functions are still incompletely understood. Atherosclerosis is characterized by lipid plaque formation and local accumulation of unsaturated free fatty acids (FFA). Here, we show that unsaturated FFA increase ADAM-mediated substrate cleavage. We demonstrate that these alterations are not due to genuine changes in enzyme activity, but correlate with changes in membrane fluidity as revealed by measurement of 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene fluorescence anisotropy and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching analyses. ELISA and immunoblot experiments conducted with granulocytes, endothelial cells, and keratinocytes revealed rapid increase of ectodomain shedding of ADAM10 and ADAM17 substrates upon membrane fluidization. Large amounts of unsaturated FFA may be liberated from cholesteryl esters in LDL that is entrapped in atherosclerotic lesions. Incubation of cells with thus modified LDL resulted in rapid cleavage of ADAM substrates with corresponding functional consequences on cell proliferation, cell migration, and endothelial permeability, events of high significance in atherogenesis. We propose that FFA represent critical regulators of ADAM function that may assume relevance in many biological settings through their influence on mobility of enzyme and substrate in lipid bilayers.

  20. Identification of VLDLR as a novel endothelial cell receptor for fibrin that modulates fibrin-dependent transendothelial migration of leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Yakovlev, Sergiy; Mikhailenko, Irina; Cao, Chunzhang; Zhang, Li; Strickland, Dudley K; Medved, Leonid

    2012-01-12

    While testing the effect of the (β15-66)(2) fragment, which mimics a pair of fibrin βN-domains, on the morphology of endothelial cells, we found that this fragment induces redistribution of vascular endothelial-cadherin in a process that is inhibited by the receptor-associated protein (RAP). Based on this finding, we hypothesized that fibrin may interact with members of RAP-dependent low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor family. To test this hypothesis, we examined the interaction of (β15-66)(2), fibrin, and several fibrin-derived fragments with 2 members of this family by ELISA and surface plasmon resonance. The experiments showed that very LDL (VLDL) receptor (VLDLR) interacts with high affinity with fibrin through its βN-domains, and this interaction is inhibited by RAP and (β15-66)(2). Furthermore, RAP inhibited transendothelial migration of neutrophils induced by fibrin-derived NDSK-II fragment containing βN-domains, suggesting the involvement of VLDLR in fibrin-dependent leukocyte transmigration. Our experiments with VLDLR-deficient mice confirmed this suggestion by showing that, in contrast to wild-type mice, fibrin-dependent leukocyte transmigration does not occur in such mice. Altogether, the present study identified VLDLR as a novel endothelial cell receptor for fibrin that promotes fibrin-dependent leukocyte transmigration and thereby inflammation. Establishing the molecular mechanism underlying this interaction may result in the development of novel inhibitors of fibrin-dependent inflammation.

  1. Impairment of CCR6+ and CXCR3+ Th Cell Migration in HIV-1 Infection Is Rescued by Modulating Actin Polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Bernasconi, Enos; Speck, Roberto F.; Proietti, Michele; Sauermann, Ulrike; D’Agostino, Gianluca; Danelon, Gabriela; Rezzonico Jost, Tanja; Grassi, Fabio; Raeli, Lorenzo; Schöni-Affolter, Franziska; Stahl-Hennig, Christiane

    2017-01-01

    CD4+ T cell repopulation of the gut is rarely achieved in HIV-1–infected individuals who are receiving clinically effective antiretroviral therapy. Alterations in the integrity of the mucosal barrier have been indicated as a cause for chronic immune activation and disease progression. In this study, we present evidence that persistent immune activation causes impairment of lymphocytes to respond to chemotactic stimuli, thus preventing their trafficking from the blood stream to peripheral organs. CCR6+ and CXCR3+ Th cells accumulate in the blood of aviremic HIV-1–infected patients on long-term antiretroviral therapy, and their frequency in the circulation positively correlates to levels of soluble CD14 in plasma, a marker of chronic immune activation. Th cells show an impaired response to chemotactic stimuli both in humans and in the pathogenic model of SIV infection, and this defect is due to hyperactivation of cofilin and inefficient actin polymerization. Taking advantage of a murine model of chronic immune activation, we demonstrate that cytoskeleton remodeling, induced by okadaic acid, restores lymphocyte migration in response to chemokines, both in vitro and in vivo. This study calls for novel pharmacological approaches in those pathological conditions characterized by persistent immune activation and loss of trafficking of T cell subsets to niches that sustain their maturation and activities. PMID:27895171

  2. Interplay between PCBP2 and miRNA modulates ARHGDIA expression and function in glioma migration and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xihua; Yang, Bin; Liu, Wei; Tan, Xiaochao; Wu, Fan; Hu, Peishan; Jiang, Tao; Bao, Zhaoshi; Yuan, Jiangang; Qiang, Boqin; Peng, Xiaozhong; Han, Wei

    2016-01-01

    RNA-RNA and protein-RNA interactions are essential for post-transcriptional regulationin normal development and may be deregulated in cancer initiation and progression. The RNA-binding protein PCBP2, an oncogenic protein in human malignant gliomas, is an essential regulator of mRNA and miRNA biogenesis, stability and activity. Here, we identified Rho GDP dissociation inhibitor α (ARHGDIA) as a target mRNA that binds to PCBP2, and we uncovered the role of ARHGDIA as a putative metastasis suppressor through analyses of in vitro and in vivo models of EMT and metastasis. Furthermore, we demonstrated that ARHGDIA is a potential target of miR-151-5p and miR-16 in gliomas. The interaction between PCBP2 and the 3′UTR of the ARHGDIA mRNA may induce a local change in RNA structure that favors subsequent binding of miR-151-5p and miR-16, thus leading to the suppression of ARHGDIA expression. PCBP2 may facilitate miR-151-5p and miR-16 promotion of glioma cell migration and invasion through mitigating the function of ARHGDIA. PMID:26761212

  3. EOS7CA Version 1.0: TOUGH2 Module for Gas Migration in Shallow Subsurface Porous Media Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2015-06-22

    EOS7CA is a TOUGH2 module for mixtures of a non-condensible gas (NCG) and air (with or without a gas tracer), an aqueous phase, and water vapor. The user can select the NCG as being CO2, N2, or CH4. EOS7CA uses a cubic equation of state with a multiphase version of Darcy’s Law to model flow and transport of gas and aqueous phase mixtures over a range of pressures and temperatures appropriate to shallow subsurface porous media systems. The limitation to shallow systems arises from the use of Henry’s Law for gas solubility which is appropriate for low pressures but begins to over-predict solubility starting at pressures greater than approximately 1 MPa (10 bar). The components modeled in EOS7CA are water, brine, NCG, gas tracer, air, and optional heat.

  4. Antioxidative Dietary Compounds Modulate Gene Expression Associated with Apoptosis, DNA Repair, Inhibition of Cell Proliferation and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Likui; Gao, Shijuan; Jiang, Wei; Luo, Cheng; Xu, Maonian; Bohlin, Lars; Rosendahl, Markus; Huang, Wenlin

    2014-01-01

    Many dietary compounds are known to have health benefits owing to their antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties. To determine the molecular mechanism of these food-derived compounds, we analyzed their effect on various genes related to cell apoptosis, DNA damage and repair, oxidation and inflammation using in vitro cell culture assays. This review further tests the hypothesis proposed previously that downstream products of COX-2 (cyclooxygenase-2) called electrophilic oxo-derivatives induce antioxidant responsive elements (ARE), which leads to cell proliferation under antioxidative conditions. Our findings support this hypothesis and show that cell proliferation was inhibited when COX-2 was down-regulated by polyphenols and polysaccharides. Flattened macrophage morphology was also observed following the induction of cytokine production by polysaccharides extracted from viili, a traditional Nordic fermented dairy product. Coix lacryma-jobi (coix) polysaccharides were found to reduce mitochondrial membrane potential and induce caspase-3- and 9-mediated apoptosis. In contrast, polyphenols from blueberries were involved in the ultraviolet-activated p53/Gadd45/MDM2 DNA repair system by restoring the cell membrane potential. Inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 by saponin extracts of ginsenoside (Ginsen) and Gynostemma and inhibition of S100A4 by coix polysaccharides inhibited cancer cell migration and invasion. These observations suggest that antioxidants and changes in cell membrane potential are the major driving forces that transfer signals through the cell membrane into the cytosol and nucleus, triggering gene expression, changes in cell proliferation and the induction of apoptosis or DNA repair. PMID:25226533

  5. Modulating of ocular inflammation with macrophage migration inhibitory factor is associated with notch signalling in experimental autoimmune uveitis.

    PubMed

    Yang, H; Zheng, S; Mao, Y; Chen, Z; Zheng, C; Li, H; Sumners, C; Li, Q; Yang, P; Lei, B

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) could exaggerate inflammatory response in a mouse model of experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) and to explore the underlying mechanism. Mutant serotype 8 adeno-associated virus (AAV8) (Y733F)-chicken β-actin (CBA)-MIF or AAV8 (Y733F)-CBA-enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) vector was delivered subretinally into B10.RIII mice, respectively. Three weeks after vector delivery, EAU was induced with a subcutaneous injection of a mixture of interphotoreceptor retinoid binding protein (IRBP) peptide with CFA. The levels of proinflammatory cytokines were detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Retinal function was evaluated with electroretinography (ERG). We found that the expression of MIF and its two receptors CD74 and CD44 was increased in the EAU mouse retina. Compared to AAV8.CBA.eGFP-injected and untreated EAU mice, the level of proinflammatory cytokines, the expression of Notch1, Notch4, delta-like ligand 4 (Dll4), Notch receptor intracellular domain (NICD) and hairy enhancer of split-1 (Hes-1) increased, but the ERG a- and b-wave amplitudes decreased in AAV8.CBA.MIF-injected EAU mice. The Notch inhibitor N-[N-(3,5-difluorophenacetyl)-l-alanyl]-S-phenylglycine t-butyl ester (DAPT) reduced the expression of NICD, Hes-1 and proinflammatory cytokines. Further, a MIF antagonist ISO-1 attenuated intraocular inflammation, and inhibited the differentiation of T helper type 1 (Th1) and Th17 in EAU mice. We demonstrated that over-expression of MIF exaggerated ocular inflammation, which was associated with the activation of the Notch signalling. The expression of both MIF and its receptors are elevated in EAU mice. Over-expression of MIF exaggerates ocular inflammation, and this exaggerated inflammation is associated with the activation of the Notch signalling and Notch pathway. Our data suggest that the MIF-Notch axis

  6. Tetraspanins in Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xupin; Zhang, Jiaping; Huang, Yuesheng

    2015-01-01

    Tetraspanins are a superfamily of small transmembrane proteins that are expressed in almost all eukaryotic cells. Through interacting with one another and with other membrane and intracellular proteins, tetraspanins regulate a wide range of proteins such as integrins, cell surface receptors, and signaling molecules, and thereby engage in diverse cellular processes ranging from cell adhesion and migration to proliferation and differentiation. In particular, tetraspanins modulate the function of proteins involved in all determining factors of cell migration including cell–cell adhesion, cell–ECM adhesion, cytoskeletal protrusion/contraction, and proteolytic ECM remodeling. We herein provide a brief overview of collective in vitro and in vivo studies of tetraspanins to illustrate their regulatory functions in the migration and trafficking of cancer cells, vascular endothelial cells, skin cells (keratinocytes and fibroblasts), and leukocytes. We also discuss the involvement of tetraspanins in various pathologic and remedial processes that rely on cell migration and their potential value as targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26091149

  7. Extracellular matrix (ECM) modulates the EGF-induced migration of liver epithelial cells in serum-free, hormone-supplemented medium.

    PubMed

    Bade, E G; Nitzgen, B

    1985-04-01

    The influence of the extracellular matrix (ECM) glycoproteins collagen IV, laminin (LN), and fibronectin (FN) on the in vitro migration of epithelial cells was studied using the ECM migration track method (4) with preparations immunostained for LN and FN. The locomotion of rat liver epithelial cells stimulated to migrate in serum-free medium by epidermal growth factor (EGF) in the presence of insulin is inhibited by substratum-bound FN. The inhibition is concentration-dependent up to 0.7 microgram of the protein per cm2. Neither LN nor collagen IV decreased the number of migrating cells, indicating that the inhibition is a specific effect of fibronectin. The data also indicate that the FN-mediated inhibition of migration is an additional and not alternative mechanism to the well-established contact inhibition of locomotion (1) which also occurs in liver epithelial cell cultures. The system is being used for a further analysis of the factors that influence migration of normal and neoplastic epithelial cells and the biochemical mechanisms underlying the migration reaction.

  8. Non-Selective Cannabinoid Receptor Antagonists, Hinokiresinols Reduce Infiltration of Microglia/Macrophages into Ischemic Brain Lesions in Rat via Modulating 2-Arachidonolyglycerol-Induced Migration and Mitochondrial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Anthony Jalin, Angela M. A.; Rajasekaran, Maheswari; Prather, Paul L.; Kwon, Jin Sun; Gajulapati, Veeraswamy; Choi, Yongseok; Kim, Chunsook; Pahk, Kisoo; Ju, Chung; Kim, Won-Ki

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that therapeutic strategies to modulate the post-ischemic inflammatory responses are promising approaches to improve stroke outcome. Although the endocannabinoid system has been emerged as an endogenous therapeutic target to regulate inflammation after stroke insult, the downstream mechanisms and their potentials for therapeutic intervention remain controversial. Here we identified trans- and cis-hinokiresinols as novel non-selective antagonists for two G-protein-coupled cannabinoid receptors, cannabinoid receptor type 1 and type 2. The Electric Cell-substrate Impedance Sensing and Boyden chamber migration assays using primary microglial cultures revealed that both hinokiresinols significantly inhibited an endocannabinoid, 2-arachidonoylglycerol-induced migration. Hinokiresinols modulated 2-arachidonoylglycerol-induced mitochondrial bioenergetics in microglia as evidenced by inhibition of ATP turnover and reduction in respiratory capacity, thereby resulting in impaired migration activity. In rats subjected to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (1.5-h) followed by 24-h reperfusion, post-ischemic treatment with hinokiresinols (2 and 7-h after the onset of ischemia, 10 mg/kg) significantly reduced cerebral infarct and infiltration of ED1-positive microglial/macrophage cells into cerebral ischemic lesions in vivo. Co-administration of exogenous 2-AG (1 mg/kg, i.v., single dose at 2 h after starting MCAO) abolished the protective effect of trans-hinokiresionol. These results suggest that hinokiresinols may serve as stroke treatment by targeting the endocannabinoid system. Alteration of mitochondrial bioenergetics and consequent inhibition of inflammatory cells migration may be a novel mechanism underlying anti-ischemic effects conferred by cannabinoid receptor antagonists. PMID:26517721

  9. Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Trepat, Xavier; Chen, Zaozao; Jacobson, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Cell migration is fundamental to establishing and maintaining the proper organization of multicellular organisms. Morphogenesis can be viewed as a consequence, in part, of cell locomotion, from large-scale migrations of epithelial sheets during gastrulation, to the movement of individual cells during development of the nervous system. In an adult organism, cell migration is essential for proper immune response, wound repair, and tissue homeostasis, while aberrant cell migration is found in various pathologies. Indeed, as our knowledge of migration increases, we can look forward to, for example, abating the spread of highly malignant cancer cells, retarding the invasion of white cells in the inflammatory process, or enhancing the healing of wounds. This article is organized in two main sections. The first section is devoted to the single-cell migrating in isolation such as occurs when leukocytes migrate during the immune response or when fibroblasts squeeze through connective tissue. The second section is devoted to cells collectively migrating as part of multicellular clusters or sheets. This second type of migration is prevalent in development, wound healing, and in some forms of cancer metastasis. PMID:23720251

  10. Neutrophil migration across cultured intestinal epithelial monolayers is modulated by epithelial exposure to IFN-gamma in a highly polarized fashion

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Neutrophil, or polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN), migration across intestinal epithelial barriers, such as occurs in many disease states, appears to result in modifications of epithelial barrier and ion transport functions (Nash, S., J. Stafford, and J. L. Madara. 1987. J. Clin. Invest. 80:1104-1113; Madara, J. L., C. A. Parkos, S. P. Colgan, R. J. MacLeod, S. Nash, J. B. Matthews, C. Delp, and W. I. Lencer. 1992. J. Clin. Invest. 89:1938-1944). Here we investigate the effects of epithelial exposure to IFN-gamma on PMN migration across cultured monolayers of the human intestinal epithelial cell line T84. Transepithelial migration of PMN was initially assessed in the apical- to-basolateral direction, since previous studies indicate general qualitative similarities between PMN migration in the apical-to- basolateral and in the basolateral-to-apical directions. In the apical- to-basolateral direction, epithelial exposure to IFN-gamma markedly upregulated transepithelial migration of PMN in a dose- and time- dependent fashion as measured by both electrical and myeloperoxidase assays. This IFN-gamma-elicited effect on transmigration was specifically due to a IFN-gamma effect on epithelial cells and was not secondary to IFN-gamma effects on epithelial tight junction permeability. Moreover, this IFN-gamma effect was dependent on epithelial protein synthesis, and involved a pathway in which CD11b/18, but not ICAM-1 or CD11a/18, appeared to play a crucial role in PMN- epithelial adhesion. IFN-gamma also substantially modified PMN transepithelial migration in the natural, basolateral-to-apical direction. The IFN-gamma effect on naturally directed transmigration was also specifically due to an IFN-gamma effect on epithelial cells, showed comparable time and dose dependency to that of oppositely directed migration, was CD11b/18 dependent, and required epithelial protein synthesis. Additionally, however, important qualitative differences existed in how IFN-gamma affected

  11. Intermediate-conductance Calcium-activated Potassium Channel KCa3.1 and Chloride Channel Modulate Chemokine Ligand (CCL19/CCL21)-induced Migration of Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Zhifei; Gaurav, Rohit; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2014-01-01

    The role of ion channels is largely unknown in chemokine-induced migration in non-excitable cells such as dendritic cells. Here, we examined the role of KCa3.1 and chloride channels in lymphatic chemokines-induced migration of dendritic cells. The amplitude and kinetics of CCL19/21-induced Ca2+ influx were associated with CCR7 expression levels, extracellular free Ca2+ and Cl−, and independent of extracellular K+. Chemokines, CCL19 and CCL21, and KCa3.1 activator, 1-EBIO, induced plasma membrane hyperpolarization and K+ efflux, which was blocked by TRAM-34, suggesting that KCa3.1 carried larger conductance than the inward CRAC. Blockade of KCa3.1, low Cl− in the medium, and low dose of DIDS impaired CCL19/CCL21-induced Ca2+ influx, cell volume change, and DC migration. High doses of DIDS completely blocked DC migration possibly by significantly disrupting mitochondrial membrane potential. In conclusion, KCa3.1 and chloride channel are critical in human DC migration by synergistically regulating membrane potential, chemokine-induced Ca2+ influx, and cell volume. PMID:25583444

  12. Intermediate-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel KCa3.1 and chloride channel modulate chemokine ligand (CCL19/CCL21)-induced migration of dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zhifei; Gaurav, Rohit; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2015-07-01

    The role of ion channels is largely unknown in chemokine-induced migration in nonexcitable cells such as dendritic cells (DCs). Here, we examined the role of intermediate-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel (KCa3.1) and chloride channel (CLC3) in lymphatic chemokine-induced migration of DCs. The amplitude and kinetics of chemokine ligand (CCL19/CCL21)-induced Ca(2+) influx were associated with chemokine receptor 7 expression levels, extracellular-free Ca(2+) and Cl(-), and independent of extracellular K(+). Chemokines (CCL19 and CCL21) and KCa3.1 activator (1-ethyl-1,3-dihydro-2H-benzimidazol-2-one) induced plasma membrane hyperpolarization and K(+) efflux, which was blocked by 1-[(2-chlorophenyl)diphenylmethyl]-1H-pyrazole, suggesting that KCa3.1 carried larger conductance than the inward calcium release-activated calcium channel. Blockade of KCa3.1, low Cl(-) in the medium, and low dose of 4,4'-diisothiocyano-2,2'-stilbenedisulfonic acid (DIDS) impaired CCL19/CCL21-induced Ca(2+) influx, cell volume change, and DC migration. High doses of DIDS completely blocked DC migration possibly by significantly disrupting mitochondrial membrane potential. In conclusion, KCa3.1 and CLC3 are critical in human DC migration by synergistically regulating membrane potential, chemokine-induced Ca(2+) influx, and cell volume.

  13. Drinking modulates monocyte migration in healthy subjects: a randomised intervention study of water, ethanol, red wine and beer with or without alcohol.

    PubMed

    Imhof, Armin; Blagieva, Roza; Marx, Nikolaus; Koenig, Wolfgang

    2008-03-01

    Moderate alcohol consumption is associated with reduced cardiovascular mortality compared to non-consumption of alcohol and heavy drinking. Experimental data suggest a direct effect of alcohol on atherosclerotic lesion development. We assessed the effect of consumption of moderate amounts of alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages on monocyte migration, a crucial step in atherogenesis. Forty-nine healthy men and women (aged 22-56 years) were enrolled in this randomised controlled trial. After wash-out, participants were assigned to either ethanol (concentration 12.5%), beer (5.6%) or red wine (12.5%) equivalent to 30 grams of ethanol per day (g/d) for men and 20 g/d for women, or to the same amount of de-alcoholised beer or red wine, or to water. Monocyte migration was evaluated ex vivo using a modified Boyden chamber. Intake of ethanol or de-alcoholised red wine significantly reduced monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1)-induced monocyte migration by 58% (p<0.05; n=6) and 36% (p<0.05; n=7) and FMLP (N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine)-induced migration by 41% (p<0.05) and 36% (p<0.05), respectively. MCP-1 receptor expression was not affected by these interventions, as shown by flow cytometry. Short-term intervention with moderate amounts of ethanol and de-alcoholised red wine inhibits monocyte migration ex vivo. This might represent one mechanism by which alcoholic beverages lower cardiovascular risk.

  14. The CLC-2 Chloride Channel Modulates ECM Synthesis, Differentiation, and Migration of Human Conjunctival Fibroblasts via the PI3K/Akt Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lixia; Dong, Yaru; Zhao, Jing; Yin, Yuan; Zheng, Yajuan

    2016-06-09

    Recent evidence suggests that chloride channels are critical for cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation. We examined the effects of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 on chloride channel expression and associations with human conjunctival fibroblast (HConF) biology. To investigate the potential role of chloride channel (CLC)-2 in migration, transition to myofibroblasts and extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis of HconF, a small interfering RNA (siRNA) approach was applied. TGF-β1-induced migration and transition of fibroblasts to myofibroblasts characterized by α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression, supported by increased endogenous expression of CLC-2 protein and mRNA transcripts. ECM (collagen I and fibronectin) synthesis in HConF was enhanced by TGF-β1. CLC-2 siRNA treatment reduced TGF-β1-induced cell migration, transition of fibroblasts to myofibroblasts, and ECM synthesis of HConF. CLC-2 siRNA treatment in the presence of TGF-β1 inhibited phosphorylation of PI3K and Akt in HConF. These findings demonstrate that CLC-2 chloride channels are important for TGF-β1-induced migration, differentiation, and ECM synthesis via PI3K/Akt signaling in HConF.

  15. Targeting the metastasis suppressor, NDRG1, using novel iron chelators: regulation of stress fiber-mediated tumor cell migration via modulation of the ROCK1/pMLC2 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Zhang, Daohai; Zheng, Ying; Zhao, Qian; Zheng, Minhua; Kovacevic, Zaklina; Richardson, Des R

    2013-02-01

    The iron-regulated metastasis suppressor, N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1), is up-regulated by cellular iron depletion mediated by iron chelators and can inhibit cancer cell migration. However, the mechanism of how NDRG1 achieves this effect remains unclear. In this study, we implemented established and newly constructed NDRG1 overexpression and knockdown models using the DU145, HT29, and HCT116 cancer cell lines to investigate the molecular basis by which NDRG1 exerts its inhibitory effect on cell migration. Using these models, we demonstrated that NDRG1 overexpression inhibits cell migration by preventing actin-filament polymerization, stress fiber assembly and formation. In contrast, NDRG1 knockdown had the opposite effect. Moreover, we identified that NDRG1 inhibited an important regulatory pathway mediated by the Rho-associated, coiled-coil containing protein kinase 1 (ROCK1)/phosphorylated myosin light chain 2 (pMLC2) pathway that modulates stress fiber assembly. The phosphorylation of MLC2 is a key process in inducing stress fiber contraction, and this was shown to be markedly decreased or increased by NDRG1 overexpression or knockdown, respectively. The mechanism involved in the inhibition of MLC2 phosphorylation by NDRG1 was mediated by a significant (P < 0.001) decrease in ROCK1 expression that is a key kinase involved in MLC2 phosphorylation. Considering that NDRG1 is up-regulated after cellular iron depletion, novel thiosemicarbazone iron chelators (e.g., di-2-pyridylketone 4,4-dimethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone) were demonstrated to inhibit ROCK1/pMLC2-modulated actin-filament polymerization, stress fiber assembly, and formation via a mechanism involving NDRG1. These results highlight the role of the ROCK1/pMLC2 pathway in the NDRG1-mediated antimetastatic signaling network and the therapeutic potential of iron chelators at inhibiting metastasis.

  16. Upregulation of long noncoding RNA SPRY4-IT1 modulates proliferation, migration, apoptosis, and network formation in trophoblast cells HTR-8SV/neo.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yanfen; Jiang, Ziyan; Yu, Xiang; Sun, Ming; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Zuo, Qing; Zhou, Jing; Yang, Nana; Han, Ping; Ge, Zhiping; De, Wei; Sun, Lizhou

    2013-01-01

    SPRY4-IT1 has been reported to have extremely high expression in normal placenta tissues. It is a Long noncoding RNA (lncRNA), which is associated with cell growth, migration, invasion, and apoptosis in melanoma. A 2.8-fold increase of SPRY4-IT1 expression was validated by Real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) in severe preeclamptic placenta as compared with that of the normal ones (n=25) in this study. Furthermore, the role of SPRY4-IT1 in proliferation, migration, apoptosis, and network formation ability of trophoblast cells HTR-8/SVneo was assessed. Suppression of SPRY4-IT1 using siRNA treatment and its overexpression using plasmid targeting SPRY4-IT1 were performed in order to explore the biological function of SPRY4-IT1 in the development and progression of trophoblast cells HTR-8/SVneo, in vitro. The results showed that SPRY4-IT1 knockdown enhanced the cell migration and proliferation, and reduced the response of cells to apoptosis. However, exogenous SPRY4-IT1 overexpression significantly decreased the cell migration and proliferation, while increased cell apoptosis. Our study showed for the first time that aberrant expression of lncRNA SPRY4-IT1 might contribute to the abnormal condition of trophoblast cells HTR-8/SVneo. Therefore, we proposed SPRY4-IT1 as a novel lncRNA molecule, which might be associated with the pathogenesis of preeclampsia and might provide a new target for its early diagnosis and treatment.

  17. MicroRNA-106a suppresses proliferation, migration, and invasion of bladder cancer cells by modulating MAPK signaling, cell cycle regulators, and Ets-1-mediated MMP-2 expression.

    PubMed

    Shin, Seung-Shick; Park, Sung-Soo; Hwang, Byungdoo; Kim, Won Tae; Choi, Yung Hyun; Kim, Wun-Jae; Moon, Sung-Kwon

    2016-10-01

    Despite the clinical significance of tumorigenesis, little is known about the cellular signaling networks of microRNAs (miRs). Here we report a new finding that mir‑106a regulates the proliferation, migration, and invasion of bladder cancer cells. Basal expression levels of mir‑106a were significantly lower in bladder cancer cells than in normal urothelial cells. Overexpression of mir‑106a suppressed the proliferation of bladder cancer cell line EJ. Transient transfection of mir‑106a into EJ cells led to downregulation of ERK phosphorylation and upregulation of p38 and JNK phosphorylation over their levels in the control. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that mir‑106a-transfected cells accumulated in the G1-phase of the cell cycle, and cyclin D1 and CDK6 were significantly downregulated. This G1-phase cell cycle arrest was due in part to the upregulation of p21CIP1/WAF1. In addition, mir‑106a overexpression blocked the wound-healing migration and invasion of EJ cells. Furthermore, mir‑106a transfection resulted in decreased expression of MMP-2 and diminished binding activity of transcription factor Ets-1 in EJ cells. Collectively, we report the novel mir‑106a-mediated molecular signaling networks that regulate the proliferation, migration, and invasion of bladder cancer cells, suggesting that mir‑106a may be a therapeutic target for treating advanced bladder tumors.

  18. Notch 1 and 3 receptor signaling modulates vascular smooth muscle cell growth, apoptosis, and migration via a CBF-1/RBP-Jk dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Catherine; Morrow, David; Birney, Yvonne A; Coyle, Seamus; Hennessy, Colm; Scheller, Agnieszka; Cummins, Philip M; Walls, Dermot; Redmond, Eileen M; Cahill, Paul A

    2004-09-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) fate decisions (cell growth, migration, and apoptosis) are fundamental features in the pathogenesis of vascular disease. We investigated the role of Notch 1 and 3 receptor signaling in controlling adult SMC fate in vitro by establishing that hairy enhancer of split (hes-1 and -5) and related hrt's (hrt-1, -2, and -3) are direct downstream target genes of Notch 1 and 3 receptors in SMC and identified an essential role for nuclear protein CBF-1/RBP-Jk in their regulation. Constitutive expression of active Notch 1 and 3 receptors (Notch IC) resulted in a significant up-regulation of CBF-1/RBP-Jk-dependent promoter activity and Notch target gene expression concomitant with significant increases in SMC growth while concurrently inhibiting SMC apoptosis and migration. Moreover, inhibition of endogenous Notch mediated CBF-1/RBP-Jk regulated gene expression with a non-DNA binding mutant of CBF-1, a Notch IC deleted of its delta RAM domain and the Epstein-Barr virus encoded RPMS-1, in conjunction with pharmacological inhibitors of Notch IC receptor trafficking (brefeldin A and monensin), resulted in a significant decrease in cell growth while concomitantly increasing SMC apoptosis and migration. These findings suggest that endogenous Notch receptors and downstream target genes control vascular cell fate in vitro. Notch signaling, therefore, represents a novel therapeutic target for disease states in which changes in vascular cell fate occur in vivo.

  19. Rubus idaeus extract suppresses migration and invasion of human oral cancer by inhibiting MMP-2 through modulation of the Erk1/2 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi-Wen; Chuang, Chun-Yi; Hsieh, Yih-Shou; Chen, Pei-Ni; Yang, Shun-Fa; Shih-Hsuan-Lin; Chen, Yang-Yu; Lin, Chiao-Wen; Chang, Yu-Chao

    2017-03-01

    Raspberries (Rubus idaeus L.) have been extensively studies worldwide because of their beneficial effects on health. Recently reports indicate that crude extracts of Rubus idaeus (RIE) have antioxidant and anticancer ability. The aim of this study was to evaluate the mechanism of its antimetastatic ability in oral cancer cells. In this study, SCC-9 and SAS oral cancer cells were subjected to a treatment with RIE and then analyzed the effect of RIE on migration and invasion. The addition of RIE inhibited the migration and invasion ability of oral cancer cells. Real time PCR, western blot and zymography analysis demonstrated that mRNA, protein expression and enzyme activity of matrix metalloproteinases-2 (MMP-2) were down-regulated by RIE. Moreover, the phosphorylation of Focal adhesion kinase (FAK), src, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) were inhibited after RIE treatment. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that RIE exerted an inhibitory effect of migration and invasion in oral cancer cells and alter metastasis by suppression of MMP-2 expression through FAK/Scr/ERK signaling pathway. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 1037-1046, 2017.

  20. Methylmercury-Dependent Increases in Fluo4 Fluorescence in Neonatal Rat Cerebellar Slices Depend on Granule Cell Migrational Stage and GABAA Receptor Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Bradford, Aaron B.; Mancini, Jayme D.

    2016-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) disrupts cerebellar function, especially during development. Cerebellar granule cells (CGC), which are particularly susceptible to MeHg by unknown mechanisms, migrate during this process. Transient changes in intracellular Ca2+ (Ca2+i) are crucial to proper migration, and MeHg is well known to disrupt CGC Ca2+i regulation. Acutely prepared slices of neonatal rat cerebellum in conjunction with confocal microscopy and fluo4 epifluorescence were used to track changes induced by MeHg in CGC Ca2+i regulation in the external (EGL) and internal granule cell layers (IGL) as well as the molecular layer (ML). MeHg caused no cytotoxicity but did cause a time-dependent increase in fluo4 fluorescence that depended on the stage of CGC development. CGCs in the EGL were most susceptible to MeHg-induced increases in fluo4 fluorescence. MeHg increased fluorescence in CGC processes but only diffusely; Purkinje cells rarely fluoresced in these slices. Neither muscimol nor bicuculline alone altered baseline fluo4 fluorescence in any CGC layer, but each delayed the onset and reduced the magnitude of effect of MeHg on fluo4 fluorescence in the EGL and ML. In the IGL, both muscimol and bicuculline delayed the onset of MeHg-induced increases in fluo4 fluorescence but did not affect fluorescence magnitude. Thus, acute exposure to MeHg causes developmental stage-dependent increases in Ca2+i in CGCs. Effects are most prominent in CGCs during development or early stages of migration. GABAA receptors participate in an as yet unclear manner to MeHg-induced Ca2+i dysregulation of CGCs. PMID:26514794

  1. Calycosin inhibits migration and invasion through modulation of transforming growth factor beta-mediated mesenchymal properties in U87 and U251 cells

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Xiao-hu; Ou-yang, Jia; Xing, Ying; Li, Dan-yan; Liu, Ru-en; Xu, Ru-xiang

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the potential anticancer effects of calycosin against human glioblastoma cells, including the impacts on cell proliferation, apoptosis, and cell cycle distribution. We further studied its inhibitory activity on migration and invasion in U87 and U251 cells. Furthermore, transforming growth factor beta-mediated reductions of mesenchymal-associated genes/activators, matrix metalloproteinases-2, and -9 were detected in this process. Administration of calycosin in a glioblastoma xenograft model showed that calycosin could not only reduce tumor volume but also suppress transforming growth factor beta as well as its downstream molecules. These results revealed calycosin as a potential antitumor agent in human glioblastoma. PMID:26955262

  2. Migration Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crida, Aurélien

    2015-08-01

    The great variety of the architectures of the extra-solar planetary systems has revealed the fundamental role played by planetary migration: the interactions between the planets and the gaseous disk in which they form leads to a modification of their orbits. Here, I will review the basic processes and the most recent results in this area.Planets up to ~50 Earth masses are prone to so-called type I migration.I will describe the processes at play, namely the Lindblad and corotation torques, and explain how the total torque depends on the planet mass and the local disk structure. Application to realistic disks shows one or two sweet spot(s) for outward migration of planets roughly between 5 and 30 Earth masses around the snowline ; this is confirmed by dedicated 3D numerical simulations. This has strong consequences on the formation of hot Super-Earths or mini-Neptunes.For smaller mass planets, it has been recently proposed that the heating of the neighboring gas by the luminous planet can lead to a positive torque, hence promoting outward migration. On the other hand, if the planet is not a heat source, a cold finger appears, whose resulting torque is negative. Applications of these two recent results should be discussed.Giant planets open gaps in the proto-planetary disk, and then are supposedly subject to type II migration, following the viscous accretion of the disk. This standard picture has been questioned recently, as gas appears to drift through the gap. Although the gap opening process is well understood in 2D for a planet on a fixed orbit, recent results on 3D simulations or migrating planets make the picture more accurate.Our ever better understanding of planet-disk interactions is of crucial importance as the statistics on extra solar systems keep growing and the results of these interactions are now imaged.

  3. Migrating Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, N.; Hansen, B.; Holman, M.; Tremaine, S.

    1998-01-01

    A planet orbiting in a disk of planetesimals can experience an instability in which it migrates to smaller orbital radii. Resonant interactions between the planet and planetesimals remove angular momentum from the planetesimals, increasing their eccentricities. Subsequently, the planetesimals either collide with or are ejected by the planet, reducing the semimajor axis of the planet. If the surface density of planetesimals exceeds a critical value, corresponding to 0.03 solar masses of gas inside the orbit of Jupiter, the planet will migrate inward a large distance. This instability may explain the presence of Jupiter-mass objects in small orbits around nearby stars.

  4. Androgen receptor enhances cell adhesion and decreases cell migration via modulating β1-integrin-AKT signaling in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wen-Lung; Jeng, Long-Bin; Lai, Hsueh-Chou; Liao, Pei-Yin; Chang, Chawnshang

    2014-08-28

    The androgen receptor (AR) has been shown to promote the initiation and development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) during the early stage of the disease process and to suppress HCC cell invasion during the later stages of the disease. The mechanisms governing these dual yet opposite roles have yet to be elucidated. Using carcinogen-induced HCC in vivo mouse models and the in vitro human HCC cell line SKhep1, we found that knockout of AR in primary HCC cells led to a decrease in HCC cell focal adhesion capacity compared to cells from wildtype mice. Similar results were obtained after adding functional AR into human HCC SKhep1 cells. Further analysis revealed that the role AR plays in adhesion of HCC cells is governed, at least in part, by its ability to up-regulate β1-integrin and activate the PI3K/AKT pathway. We also found that AR-β1-integrin-mediated cell adhesion suppresses cell migration. Those findings indicate that the AR-β1-integrin-PI3K/AKT signaling pathway might play a role in the bimodal function of AR on cell adhesion and migration at the cellular level.

  5. Monarch Migration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Brad; Taylor, Orley

    1996-01-01

    Describes the Monarch Watch program that tracks the migration of the monarch butterfly. Presents activities that introduce students to research and international collaboration between students and researchers. Familiarizes students with monarchs, stimulates their interest, and helps them generate questions that can lead to good research projects.…

  6. Dateline Migration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomasi, Lydio E., Ed.

    1995-01-01

    Presents data on international migration and its effects in and between various countries in North America, Europe, and Africa. Discussions include refugee, immigrant, and migrant worker flows; the legal, political, and social problems surrounding immigrants; alien terrorism and law enforcement problems; and migrant effects on education, social…

  7. Novel migrating mouse neural crest cell assay system utilizing P0-Cre/EGFP fluorescent time-lapse imaging

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Neural crest cells (NCCs) are embryonic, multipotent stem cells. Their long-range and precision-guided migration is one of their most striking characteristics. We previously reported that P0-Cre/CAG-CAT-lacZ double-transgenic mice showed significant lacZ expression in tissues derived from NCCs. Results In this study, by embedding a P0-Cre/CAG-CAT-EGFP embryo at E9.5 in collagen gel inside a culture glass slide, we were able to keep the embryo developing ex vivo for more than 24 hours; this development was with enough NCC fluorescent signal intensity to enable single-cell resolution analysis, with the accompanying NCC migration potential intact and with the appropriate NCC response to the extracellular signal maintained. By implantation of beads with absorbed platelet-derived growth factor-AA (PDGF-AA), we demonstrated that PDGF-AA acts as an NCC-attractant in embryos. We also performed assays with NCCs isolated from P0-Cre/CAG-CAT-EGFP embryos on culture plates. The neuromediator 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) has been known to regulate NCC migration. We newly demonstrated that dopamine, in addition to 5-HT, stimulated NCC migration in vitro. Two NCC populations, with different axial levels of origins, showed unique distribution patterns regarding migration velocity and different dose-response patterns to both 5-HT and dopamine. Conclusions Although avian species predominated over the other species in the NCC study, our novel system should enable us to use mice to assay many different aspects of NCCs in embryos or on culture plates, such as migration, division, differentiation, and apoptosis. PMID:22070366

  8. Interdigestive migrating motor complex -its mechanism and clinical importance.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Toku

    2013-01-01

    Migrating motor complex (MMC) is well characterized by the appearance of gastrointestinal (GI) contractions in the interdigestive state. The physiological importance of gastric MMC is a mechanical and chemical cleansing of the empty stomach in preparation for the next meal. MMC cycle is mediated via the interaction between motilin and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) by the positive feedback mechanism in conscious dogs. Luminal administration of 5-HT initiates duodenal phase II and phase III with a concomitant increase of plasma motilin release. Duodenal 5-HT concentration is increased during gastric phase II and phase III. Intravenous infusion of motilin increases luminal 5-HT content and induces phase III. 5-HT4 antagonists significantly inhibit both of gastric and intestinal phase III, while 5-HT3 antagonists inhibit only gastric phase III. These suggest that gastric MMC is regulated via vagus, 5-HT3/4 receptors and motilin, while intestinal MMC is regulated via intrinsic primary afferent neurons (IPAN) and 5-HT4 receptors. We propose the possibility that maximally released motilin by a positive feedback depletes 5-HT granules in the duodenal EC cells, resulting in no more contractions. Stress is highly associated with the pathogenesis of functional dyspepsia (FD). Acoustic stress attenuates gastric phase III without affecting intestinal phase III in conscious dogs, via reduced vagal activity. Subset of FD patients shows reduced vagal activity and impaired gastric phase III. The impaired gastric MMC may aggravate dyspeptic symptoms following a food ingestion. Maintaining MMC cycle in the interdigestive state is an important factor to prevent the postprandial dyspeptic symptoms.

  9. Interdigestive migrating motor complex -its mechanism and clinical importance

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Toku

    2014-01-01

    Migrating motor complex (MMC) is well characterized by the appearance of gastrointestinal (GI) contractions in the interdigestive state. The physiological importance of gastric MMC is a mechanical and chemical cleansing of the empty stomach in preparation for the next meal. MMC cycle is mediated via the interaction between motilin and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) by the positive feedback mechanism in conscious dogs. Luminal administration of 5-HT initiates duodenal phase II and phase III with a concomitant increase of plasma motilin release. Duodenal 5-HT concentration is increased during gastric phase II and phase III. Intravenous infusion of motilin increases luminal 5-HT content and induces phase III. 5-HT4 antagonists significantly inhibit both of gastric and intestinal phase III, while 5-HT3 antagonists inhibit only gastric phase III. These suggest that gastric MMC is regulated via vagus, 5-HT3/4 receptors and motilin, while intestinal MMC is regulated via intrinsic primary afferent neurons (IPAN) and 5-HT4 receptors. We propose the possibility that maximally released motilin by a positive feedback depletes 5-HT granules in the duodenal EC cells, resulting in no more contractions. Stress is highly associated with the pathogenesis of functional dyspepsia (FD). Acoustic stress attenuates gastric phase III without affecting intestinal phase III in conscious dogs, via reduced vagal activity. Subset of FD patients shows reduced vagal activity and impaired gastric phase III. The impaired gastric MMC may aggravate dyspeptic symptoms following a food ingestion. Maintaining MMC cycle in the interdigestive state is an important factor to prevent the postprandial dyspeptic symptoms. PMID:24662475

  10. Peripheral 5-HT₁D and 5-HT₇ serotonergic receptors modulate sympathetic neurotransmission in chronic sarpogrelate treated rats.

    PubMed

    García-Pedraza, José Ángel; García, Mónica; Martín, María Luisa; Gómez-Escudero, Jesús; Rodríguez-Barbero, Alicia; Román, Luis San; Morán, Asunción

    2013-08-15

    5-HT₂ receptor activation induces vasoconstriction, hypertension and platelet aggregation; therefore, its blocking may be useful in cardiovascular diseases, probably due to alterations in the modulation of serotonergic system. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether 5-HT₂ receptor blockade changes serotonergic modulation of sympathetic neurotransmission in pithed rats. Serotonergic modulation of sympathetic neurotransmission was investigated in Wistar rats treated with sarpogrelate, a 5-HT₂ receptor antagonist, during 14 days (30 mg/kg/day). After central nervous system destruction, we conducted electrical stimulation throughout the spinal cord flow to study the 5-HT-related products action on adrenergic system. 5-Hydroxytryptamine exerted inhibition of sympathetic outflow in sarpogrelate-treated pithed rats. This effect was mimicked and enhanced by 5-CT (5-HT₁/₇ receptor agonist). L-694,247 and AS-19, 5-HT₁D and 5-HT₇ receptor agonists respectively, reproduced this action. Pretreatment with LY310762+SB258719 (5-HT₁D and 5-HT₇ receptor antagonists, respectively) completely abolished 5-CT inhibitory action. The nature of this action was prejunctional since these agonists did not modify the pressor responses induced by exogenous noradrenaline. Western Blot analysis confirmed a higher expression of 5-HT₁D receptors in sarpogrelate-treated rats. Experimental 5-HT₂ receptor blockade induces changes in the 5-HT receptors involved in the serotonergic inhibition of sympathetic-induced pressor responses. Prejunctional activation of 5-HT₁D and 5-HT₇ receptors induces a significantly higher serotonergic inhibition on adrenergic neurotransmission in sarpogrelate-treated pithed rats. The antagonism of 5-HT₂ receptors produces an enhancement of serotonergic sympathoinhibitory effect, which may explain the beneficial effects of this blockade in cardiovascular disorders where 5-hydroxytryptamine plays a crucial role.

  11. ClC-3 chloride channel modulates the proliferation and migration of osteosarcoma cells via AKT/GSK3β signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Du, Shuai; Yang, Liqing

    2015-01-01

    In cultured human osteosarcoma (OS) cells, we recently demonstrated that insulin-like growth factors (IGF-1)-induced MG-63 and 143B human OS cells proliferation were consistent with increasing ClC-3 expression, and ClC-3 was up-regulated in cells with high metastatic potency. Blockade of ClC-3 greatly suppressed the phosphorylation activation of Akt/GSK3β. We also found that blockade of ClC-3 effectively down-regulated the expression of cyclin D1 and cyclin E, and caused activation of p27(KIP) and p21(CIP). The synthesized effects on these proteins which play a major role in cell cycle regulation bring about G0/G1 cell cycle arrest in MG-63 cells, and finally abrogate the cell proliferation. Besides, ClC-3 deletion attenuates OS cell migration via down-regulation the expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9. Such information suggests that ClC-3 might be a potential target for anti-OS.

  12. MDMA modulates spontaneous firing of subthalamic nucleus neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Liebig, Luise; von Ameln-Mayerhofer, Andreas; Hentschke, Harald

    2015-01-01

    3,4-Methylene-dioxy-N-methylamphetamine (MDMA, 'ecstasy') has a broad spectrum of molecular targets in the brain, among them receptors and transporters of the serotonergic (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) and noradrenergic systems. Its action on the serotonergic system modulates motor systems in rodents and humans. Although parts of the basal ganglia could be identified as mediators of the motor effects of MDMA, very little is known about the role of the subthalamic nucleus (STN). Therefore, this study investigated the modulation of spontaneous action potential activity of the STN by MDMA (2.5-20 µM) in vitro. MDMA had very heterogeneous effects, ranging from a complete but reversible inhibition to a more than twofold increase in firing at 5 µM. On average, MDMA excited STN neurons moderately, but lost its excitatory effect in the presence of the 5-HT(2A) antagonist MDL 11,939. 5-HT(1A) receptors did not appear to play a major role. Effects of MDMA on transporters for serotonin (SERT) and norepinephrine (NET) were investigated by coapplication of the reuptake inhibitors citalopram and desipramine, respectively. Similar to the effects of 5-HT(2A) receptor blockade, antagonism of SERT and NET bestowed an inhibitory effect on MDMA. From these results, we conclude that both the 5-HT and the noradrenergic system mediate MDMA-induced effects on STN neurons.

  13. Effects of 5-hydroxytryptamine on human isolated placental chorionic arteries and veins.

    PubMed Central

    Reviriego, J.; Marín, J.

    1989-01-01

    1. Effects of 5-hydroxytrypamine (5-HT) on cylindrical segments of human chorionic arteries and veins were investigated. Concentrations of 5-HT (up to 3 x 10(-6) M) produced concentration-dependent contractions; higher concentrations induced a reduction of the maximal response. These responses were antagonized by methysergide and ketanserin in a non-competitive manner. The contractions elicited by low 5-HT concentrations were more affected by methysergide (10(-7) M) than by ketanserin (10(-7) M). Ketanserin apparently increased the responses to high 5-HT concentrations in veins. Arteries appeared to be more sensitive to both drugs than veins. Single concentrations of 5-HT elicited transient contractions in both kinds of vessel. 2. Marked tachyphylaxis was seen in segments exposed to high concentrations of 5-HT or in which a concentration-response curve was determined. 3. Contractions induced by 5-HT were reduced in a Ca2+-free medium. Veins were more affected by the Ca2+ antagonists, nifedipine (10(-7) M), nicardipine (10(-5) M) and diltiazem (10(-5) M) than arteries. 4. 5-HT (10(-6) M) enhanced 45Ca2+ uptake in those vessels in which a concentration-response curve had not been previously determined. In veins, this increase was reduced by the three Ca2+ antagonists. 5. The results indicate that 5-HT responses in these vessels were greatly dependent on extracellular Ca2+. A type of 5-HT1-receptor may mediate responses to low 5-HT concentrations, while higher concentrations may activate 5-HT2-receptors. 5-HT may desensitize the latter by interconversion between a high affinity and low affinity state, as suggested by others, a change prevented in part by ketanserin. PMID:2743086

  14. Effect of domoic acid on metabolism of 5-hydroxytryptamine in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Arias, B; Arufe, M; Alfonso, M; Duran, R

    1995-04-01

    Domoic acid (Dom) is a neurotoxic secondary amino acid that interacts with the glutamate receptors, producing neurological problems. In the present work, we study the effects of Dom on the levels of serotonin (5-HT) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) in discrete rat brain regions. The effects of Dom on the brain metabolism of serotonin are also discussed in this paper. Dom stimulates the rat brain serotoninergic system, increasing differentially the synthesis and the catabolism of 5-HT and the elimination of 5-HIAA.

  15. The occurrence and distribution of 5-hydroxytryptamine in Hymenolepis diminuta and H. nana.

    PubMed

    Lee, M B; Bueding, E; Schiller, E L

    1978-04-01

    The presence of 5-HT in Hymenolepis diminuta and Hymenolepis nana was detected by 2 biochemical methods and as yellow fluorescence in a histochemical method. In H. diminuta, 5-HT was found in a concentration of about 1.2 micron/g; this amount did not vary significantly in worms aged 6 to 18 days or more or in various regions of the worm. In H. nana, 5-HT was found in a concentration of about 1.8 micron/g. It was histochemically localized in H. diminuta and H. nana in a pattern similar to that of acetylcholinesterase previously described in these 2 cestodes, and it may be the opposing neuro-transmitter to acetylcholine. The lack of 5-HT in the vestigial rostellum of H. diminuta may be correlated with loss of function of this organ.

  16. Potentially hallucinogenic 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor ligands bufotenine and dimethyltryptamine in blood and tissues.

    PubMed

    Kärkkäinen, J; Forsström, T; Tornaeus, J; Wähälä, K; Kiuru, P; Honkanen, A; Stenman, U H; Turpeinen, U; Hesso, A

    2005-01-01

    Bufotenine and N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) are hallucinogenic dimethylated indolethylamines (DMIAs) formed from serotonin and tryptamine by the enzyme indolethylamine N-methyltransferase (INMT) ubiquitously present in non-neural tissues. In mammals, endogenous bufotenine and DMT have been identified only in human urine. The DMIAs bind effectively to 5HT receptors and their administration causes a variety of autonomic effects, which may reflect their actual physiological function. Endogenous levels of bufotenine and DMT in blood and a number of animal and human tissues were determined using highly sensitive and specific quantitative mass spectrometric techniques. A new finding was the detection of large amounts of bufotenine in stools, which may be an indication of its role in intestinal function. It is suggested that fecal and urinary bufotenine originate from epithelial cells of the intestine and the kidney, respectively, although the possibility of their synthesis by intestinal bacteria cannot be excluded. Only small amounts of the DMIAs were found in somatic or neural tissues and none in blood. This can be explained by rapid catabolism of the DMIAs by mitochondrial monoamino-oxidase or by the fact that the dimethylated products of serotonin and tryptamine are not formed in significant amounts in most mammalian tissues despite the widespread presence of INMT in tissues.

  17. Simultaneous Determination of 5-Hydroxytryptamine and Catecholamines in Tissues Using a Weak Cation Exchange Resin,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1972-02-01

    a flow rate of 0.2-0.25 ml/min. The recovery of the amines ranges from 87-94% and is shown in Table 2. (C) Addition of Tween 80 to disperse the lipid...the columns with water since Tween 80 fluoresced at the wavelength of the amines. Even when the columns were extensively washed, dopamine still had a

  18. Voltage-dependent inhibition of recombinant NMDA receptor-mediated currents by 5-hydroxytryptamine

    PubMed Central

    Kloda, Anna; Adams, David J

    2005-01-01

    The effect of 5-HT and related indolealkylamines on heteromeric recombinant NMDA receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes was investigated using the two-electrode voltage-clamp recording technique. In the absence of external Mg2+ ions, 5-HT inhibited NMDA receptor-mediated currents in a concentration-dependent manner. The inhibitory effect of 5-HT was independent of the NR1a and NR2 subunit combination. The inhibition of glutamate-evoked currents by 5-HT was use- and voltage-dependent. The voltage sensitivity of inhibition for NR1a+NR2 subunit combinations by 5-HT was similar, exhibiting an e-fold change per ∼20 mV, indicating that 5-HT binds to a site deep within the membrane electric field. The inhibition of the open NMDA receptor by external Mg2+ and 5-HT was not additive, suggesting competition between Mg2+ and 5-HT for a binding site in the NMDA receptor channel. The concentration-dependence curves for 5-HT and 5-methoxytryptamine (5-MeOT) inhibition of NMDA receptor-mediated currents are shifted to the right in the presence of external Mg2+. The related indolealkylamines inhibited glutamate-evoked currents with the following order of inhibitory potency: 5-MeOT=5-methyltryptamine>tryptamine>7-methyltryptamine>5-HT≫tryptophan=melatonin. Taken together, these data suggest that 5-HT and related compounds can attenuate glutamate-mediated excitatory synaptic responses and may provide a basis for drug treatment of excitoxic neurodegeneration. PMID:15655527

  19. Regulation of cellular interactions with laminin by integrin cytoplasmic domains: the A and B structural variants of the alpha 6 beta 1 integrin differentially modulate the adhesive strength, morphology, and migration of macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, L M; Mercurio, A M

    1994-01-01

    Several integrin alpha subunits have structural variants that are identical in their extracellular and transmembrane domains but that differ in their cytoplasmic domains. The functional significance of these variants, however, is unknown. In the present study, we examined the possibility that the A and B variants of the alpha 6 beta 1 integrin laminin receptor differ in function. For this purpose, we expressed the alpha 6A and alpha 6B cDNAs, as well as a truncated alpha 6 cDNA (alpha 6-delta CYT) in which the cytoplasmic domain sequence was deleted after the GFFKR pentapeptide, in P388D1 cells, an alpha 6 deficient macrophage cell line. Populations of stable alpha 6A, alpha 6B, and alpha 6-delta CYT transfectants that expressed equivalent levels of cell surface alpha 6 were obtained by fluorescence-activated cell sorter and shown to form heterodimers with endogenous beta 1 subunits. Upon attachment to laminin, the alpha 6A transfectants extended numerous pseudopodia. In contrast, the alpha 6B transfectants remained rounded and extended few processes. The transfectants were also examined for their ability to migrate toward a laminin substratum using Transwell chambers. The alpha 6A transfectants were three- to fourfold more migratory than the alpha 6B transfectants. The alpha 6-delta CYT transfectants did not attach to laminin in normal culture medium, but they did attach in the presence of Mn2+. The alpha 6-delta CYT transfectants migrated to a lesser extent than either the alpha 6A or alpha 6B transfectants in the presence of Mn2+. The alpha 6 transfectants differed significantly in the concentration of substratum bound laminin required for half-maximal adhesion in the presence of Mn2+:alpha 6A (2.1 micrograms/ml), alpha 6B (6.3 micrograms/ml), and alpha 6-delta CYT (8.8 micrograms/ml). Divalent cation titration studies revealed that these transfectants also differed significantly in both the [Ca2+] and [Mn2+] required to obtain half-maximal adhesion to laminin

  20. Texture sensing of cytoskeletal dynamics in cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Satarupa; Lee, Rachel; Hourwitz, Matthew J.; Sun, Xiaoyu; Parent, Carole; Fourkas, John T.; Losert, Wolfgang

    Migrating cells can be directed towards a target by gradients in properties such as chemical concentration or mechanical properties of the surrounding microenvironment. In previous studies we have shown that micro/nanotopographical features on scales comparable to those of natural collagen fibers can guide fast migrating amoeboid cells by aligning actin polymerization waves to such nanostructures. We find that actin microfilaments and microtubules are aligned along the nanoridge topographies, modulating overall cell polarity and directional migration in epithelial cells. This work shows that topographic features on a biologically relevant length scale can modulate migration outcomes by affecting the texture sensing property of the cytoskeleton.

  1. Microfluidic platform for the quantitative analysis of leukocyte migration signatures.

    PubMed

    Boneschansker, Leo; Yan, Jun; Wong, Elisabeth; Briscoe, David M; Irimia, Daniel

    2014-09-03

    Leukocyte migration into tissues is characteristic of inflammation. It is usually measured in vitro as the average displacement of populations of cells towards a chemokine gradient, not acknowledging other patterns of cell migration. Here, we designed and validated a microfluidic migration platform to simultaneously analyse four qualitative migration patterns: chemoattraction, -repulsion, -kinesis and -inhibition, using single-cell quantitative metrics of direction, speed, persistence and fraction of cells responding. We find that established chemokines, complement component 5a and IL-8 induce chemoattraction and repulsion in equal proportions, resulting in the dispersal of cells. These migration signatures are characterized by high persistence and speed and are independent of the chemokine dose or receptor expression. Furthermore, we find that twice as many T lymphocytes migrate away than towards stromal cell-derived factor 1 and their directional migration patterns are not persistent. Overall, our platform helps discover migratory signature responses and uncovers an avenue for precise characterization of leukocyte migration and therapeutic modulators.

  2. MICROFLUIDIC PLATFORM FOR THE QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS OF LEUKOCYTE MIGRATION SIGNATURES

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Elisabeth; Briscoe, David M.; Irimia, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Leukocyte migration into tissues is characteristic of inflammation. It is usually measured in vitro as the average displacement of populations of cells towards a chemokine gradient, not acknowledging other patterns of cell migration. Here, we designed and validated a microfluidic migration platform to simultaneously analyze four qualitative migration patterns: chemo-attraction, -repulsion, -kinesis and -inhibition, using single-cell quantitative metrics of direction, speed, persistence, and fraction of cells responding. We find that established chemokines C5a and IL-8 induce chemoattraction and repulsion in equal proportions, resulting in the dispersal of cells. These migration signatures are characterized by high persistence and speed and are independent of the chemokine dose or receptor expression. Furthermore, we find that twice as many T-lymphocytes migrate away than towards SDF-1 and their directional migration patterns are not persistent. Overall, our platform characterizes migratory signature responses and uncovers an avenue for precise characterization of leukocyte migration and therapeutic modulators. PMID:25183261

  3. Alcohol and violence: neuropeptidergic modulation of monoamine systems

    PubMed Central

    Miczek, Klaus A.; DeBold, Joseph F.; Hwa, Lara S.; Newman, Emily L.; de Almeida, Rosa M. M.

    2015-01-01

    Neurobiological processes underlying the epidemiologically-established link between alcohol and several types of social, aggressive, and violent behavior remain poorly understood. Acute low doses of alcohol, as well as withdrawal from long-term alcohol use, may lead to escalated aggressive behavior in a subset of individuals. An urgent task will be to disentangle the host of interacting genetic and environmental risk factors in individuals that are predisposed to engage in escalated aggressive behavior. The modulation of 5-hydroxytryptamine impulse flow by gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate, acting via distinct ionotropic and metabotropic receptor subtypes in the dorsal raphe nucleus during alcohol consumption, is of critical significance in the suppression and escalation of aggressive behavior. In anticipation and reaction to aggressive behavior, neuropeptides such as corticotropin-releasing factor, neuropeptide Y, opioid peptides, and vasopressin interact with monoamines, GABA, and glutamate to attenuate and amplify aggressive behavior in alcohol-consuming individuals. These neuromodulators represent novel molecular targets for intervention that await clinical validation. Intermittent episodes of brief social defeat during aggressive confrontations are sufficient to cause long-lasting neuroadaptations that can lead to the escalation of alcohol consumption. PMID:26285061

  4. Alcohol and violence: neuropeptidergic modulation of monoamine systems.

    PubMed

    Miczek, Klaus A; DeBold, Joseph F; Hwa, Lara S; Newman, Emily L; de Almeida, Rosa M M

    2015-09-01

    Neurobiological processes underlying the epidemiologically established link between alcohol and several types of social, aggressive, and violent behavior remain poorly understood. Acute low doses of alcohol, as well as withdrawal from long-term alcohol use, may lead to escalated aggressive behavior in a subset of individuals. An urgent task will be to disentangle the host of interacting genetic and environmental risk factors in individuals who are predisposed to engage in escalated aggressive behavior. The modulation of 5-hydroxytryptamine impulse flow by gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate, acting via distinct ionotropic and metabotropic receptor subtypes in the dorsal raphe nucleus during alcohol consumption, is of critical significance in the suppression and escalation of aggressive behavior. In anticipation and reaction to aggressive behavior, neuropeptides such as corticotropin-releasing factor, neuropeptide Y, opioid peptides, and vasopressin interact with monoamines, GABA, and glutamate to attenuate and amplify aggressive behavior in alcohol-consuming individuals. These neuromodulators represent novel molecular targets for intervention that await clinical validation. Intermittent episodes of brief social defeat during aggressive confrontations are sufficient to cause long-lasting neuroadaptations that can lead to the escalation of alcohol consumption.

  5. Serotonergic modulation of muscle acetylcholine receptors of different subunit composition.

    PubMed Central

    García-Colunga, J; Miledi, R

    1996-01-01

    Modulation of muscle acetylcholine (AcCho) receptors (AcChoRs) by serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5HT)] and other serotonergic compounds was studied in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Various combinations of alpha, beta, gamma, and delta subunit RNAs were injected into oocytes, and membrane currents elicited by AcCho were recorded under voltage clamp. Judging by the amplitudes of AcCho currents generated, the levels of functional receptor expression were: alpha beta gamma delta > alpha beta delta > alpha beta gamma > alpha gamma delta. The alpha beta gamma delta and alpha beta delta AcChoR Subtypes were strongly blocked by 5HT, whereas the alpha beta gamma receptor was blocked only slightly. The order of blocking potency of AcChoRs by 5HT was: alpha beta delta > alpha beta gamma delta > alpha beta gamma. 5HT receptor antagonists, such as methysergide and spiperone, were even more potent blockers of AcChoRs than 5HT but did not show much subunit selectivity. Blockage of alpha beta gamma delta and alpha beta delta receptors by 5HT was voltage-dependent, and the voltage dependence was abolished when the delta subunit was omitted. These findings may need to be taken into consideration when trying to elucidate the mode of action of many clinically important serotonergic compounds. Images Fig. 3 PMID:8633003

  6. Population, migration and urbanization.

    PubMed

    1982-06-01

    Despite recent estimates that natural increase is becoming a more important component of urban growth than rural urban transfer (excess of inmigrants over outmigrants), the share of migration in the total population growth has been consistently increasing in both developed and developing countries. From a demographic perspective, the migration process involves 3 elements: an area of origin which the mover leaves and where he or she is considered an outmigrant; the destination or place of inmigration; and the period over which migration is measured. The 2 basic types of migration are internal and international. Internal migration consists of rural to urban migration, urban to urban migration, rural to rural migration, and urban to rural migration. Among these 4 types of migration various patterns or processes are followed. Migration may be direct when the migrant moves directly from the village to the city and stays there permanently. It can be circular migration, meaning that the migrant moves to the city when it is not planting season and returns to the village when he is needed on the farm. In stage migration the migrant makes a series of moves, each to a city closer to the largest or fastest growing city. Temporary migration may be 1 time or cyclical. The most dominant pattern of internal migration is rural urban. The contribution of migration to urbanization is evident. For example, the rapid urbanization and increase in urban growth from 1960-70 in the Republic of Korea can be attributed to net migration. In Asia the largest component of the population movement consists of individuals and groups moving from 1 rural location to another. Recently, because urban centers could no longer absorb the growing number of migrants from other places, there has been increased interest in the urban to rural population redistribution. This reverse migration also has come about due to slower rates of employment growth in the urban centers and improved economic opportunities

  7. Targeting Epithelial Cell Migration to Accelerate Wound Healing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    the protein kinase C (PKC) family and the process can be enhanced or inhibited by modulating the levels of the RIPP complex proteins as well by...HACAT cells indicates that PKC may modulate migration on two-dimensional surface. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Wound healing, cell migration, protein kinase C ...ABSTRACT U c . THIS PAGE U UU 11 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (include area code) Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18

  8. [Circular migration in Indonesia].

    PubMed

    Mantra, I B

    1979-12-01

    The author examines circular migration in Indonesia, with primary focus on the 1970s. It is found that circular, or repeated return migration, generally occurs over short distances and for short periods and is more frequent than lifetime migration. The relationships between improvements in the national transport system, access to labor force opportunities in both the formal and informal sectors of the economy, and circular migration are discussed.

  9. More Myths of Migration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basch, Linda; Lerner, Gail

    1986-01-01

    Challenges "myths" about women and migration, including (1) the causes of migration are economic, not racism; (2) migrant women receive support from feminist groups and trade unions; (3) transnational corporations are positive forces in developing nations; (4) migration today has little impact on family life; and (5) most migrants cluster in…

  10. Migration and Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gois, William

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to highlight the role of adult education as a tool in addressing labour migration issues, specifically those concerning the protection of migrant workers' rights and the transformation of the impact of migration into positive holistic developmental gains. The view of labour migration as a means to forge the economic…

  11. Transcription factors make a turn into migration

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The formation of the brain depends on a tightly regulated process of proliferation, neuronal fate specification and migration which eventually leads to the final architecture of the cerebral cortex. The specification of different neuronal subtypes depends on a complex developmental program mastered by several transcription factors. Besides, it was shown that the same transcription factors can subsequently control neural migration. However, the mechanisms of this regulation are still unclear. Two papers recently published by Heng et al.1 and Nóbrega-Pereira et al.2 confirm that these transcription factors are involved in controlling neural migration. In addition, these studies show that these transcription factors can control neural migration via different molecular mechanisms: Heng and coworkers show that Neurogenin 2 controls neural migration by directly regulating the expression of the small GTPase Rnd2 (a modulator of cytoskeletal dynamics); whereas Nóbrega-Pereira and colleagues demonstrate that Nkx2-1 establishes the response to guidance cues, in migrating interneurons, by directly regulating the expression of the semaphorin receptor Neuropilin 2. Taken together, these findings support the idea that transcription factors are reused during development to control neural migration and they shed light on the molecular mechanisms underlying this regulation. PMID:19262164

  12. Alcohol-induced serotonergic modulation: the role of histone deacetylases.

    PubMed

    Agudelo, Marisela; Yoo, Changwon; Nair, Madhavan P

    2012-11-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that alcohol use disorders (AUDs) are regulated by multiple mechanisms such as neurotransmitters and enzymes. The neurotransmitter, serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) may contribute to alcohol effects and serotonin receptors, including 5-HT3, play an important role in AUDs. Recent studies have also implicated histone deacetylases (HDACs) and acetyltransferases (HATS) in regulation of drug addiction, and HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) have been reported as transcriptional modulators of monoaminergic neurotransmission. Therefore, we hypothesize that HDACs may play a role in ethanol-induced serotonergic modulation. The effects of ethanol on serotonin and 5-HT3, and the role HDACs, HDAC activity and the HDACi, trichostatin A (TSA), play in alcohol-induced serotonergic effects were studied. Human SK-N-MC and neurons, were treated with ethanol (0.05, 0.1 and 0.2%), and/or TSA (50 nM), and 5-HT3 levels were assessed at 24-72 h. Gene expression was evaluated by qRT-PCR and protein by western blot and flow cytometry. Serotonin release was assessed by ELISA and HDAC activity by fluorometric assay. Our results show an increase in 5-HT3 gene after ethanol treatment. Further, ethanol significantly increased HDACs 1 and 3 genes accompanied by an increased in HDAC activity while TSA significantly inhibited HDACs. Studies with TSA show a significant upregulation of ethanol effects on 5-HT3, while surprisingly TSA inhibited ethanol-induced serotonin production. These results suggest that ethanol affects 5-HT3 and serotonin through mechanisms involving HDACs and HATs. In summary, our studies demonstrate some of the novel properties of HDAC inhibitors and contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms involve in alcohol-serotonergic modulation in the CNS.

  13. [The theory of migration].

    PubMed

    Delbruck, C; Raffelhuschen, B

    1993-09-01

    "The present and expected migration flows in Europe require a detailed analysis of determinants and elements of migration decisions. This survey encompasses a view on classical--labor market and demand side oriented--theories, the more recent human capital approach as well as on migration under asymmetric information. Since these theories so far yield an unsatisfactory basis for description and forecasting of multilateral migration flows, a closer look at empirical methods of migration research is taken. Consequently, a description of possible policy oriented applications of the gravity model and the random utility approach, with their descriptive and normative characteristics, is given." (SUMMARY IN ENG)

  14. Analyzing bat migration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cryan, Paul M.; Diehl, Robert H.

    2009-01-01

    T HE MIGRATORY MOVEIvl.ENTS OF BATS have proven ex­ tremely difficult to determine. Despite extensive efforts during the past century to track the movements of bats across landscapes, efficient methods of following small- to medium-size volant animals <240 gl for extended periods (>8 weeks) over long distances (>100 km) have not been developed. Important questions about bat migration remain unanswered: Which bats migrate? Where do they go? How far do they move? How high and fast do they fly? What are their habitat needs during migration? How do bats orient and navigate during migration? Addressing these apparently simple questions will be a considerable challenge to anyone interested in advancing the study of bat migration. In this chapter, we present direct and indirect methods used to study bat migration as well as techniques that have worked for studying bird migration that could feasibly be adapted to the study of bats.

  15. Nuclear factor of activated T cells c1 mediates p21-activated kinase 1 activation in the modulation of chemokine-induced human aortic smooth muscle cell F-actin stress fiber formation, migration, and proliferation and injury-induced vascular wall remodeling.

    PubMed

    Kundumani-Sridharan, Venkatesh; Singh, Nikhlesh K; Kumar, Sanjay; Gadepalli, Ravisekhar; Rao, Gadiparthi N

    2013-07-26

    Recent literature suggests that cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) mediate cell migration. However, the mechanisms were not known. Therefore, the objective of this study is to test whether cyclin/CDKs activate Pak1, an effector of Rac1, whose involvement in the modulation of cell migration and proliferation is well established. Monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP1) induced Pak1 phosphorylation/activation in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) in a delayed time-dependent manner. MCP1 also stimulated F-actin stress fiber formation in a delayed manner in HASMCs, as well as the migration and proliferation of these cells. Inhibition of Pak1 suppressed MCP1-induced HASMC F-actin stress fiber formation, migration, and proliferation. MCP1 induced cyclin D1 expression as well as CDK6 and CDK4 activities, and these effects were dependent on activation of NFATc1. Depletion of NFATc1, cyclin D1, CDK6, or CDK4 levels attenuated MCP1-induced Pak1 phosphorylation/activation and resulted in decreased HASMC F-actin stress fiber formation, migration, and proliferation. CDK4, which appeared to be activated downstream of CDK6, formed a complex with Pak1 in response to MCP1. MCP1 also activated Rac1 in a time-dependent manner, and depletion/inhibition of its levels/activation abrogated MCP1-induced NFATc1-cyclin D1-CDK6-CDK4-Pak1 signaling and, thereby, decreased HASMC F-actin stress fiber formation, migration, and proliferation. In addition, smooth muscle-specific deletion of NFATc1 led to decreased cyclin D1 expression and CDK6, CDK4, and Pak1 activities, resulting in reduced neointima formation in response to injury. Thus, these observations reveal that Pak1 is a downstream effector of CDK4 and Rac1-dependent, NFATc1-mediated cyclin D1 expression and CDK6 activity mediate this effect. In addition, smooth muscle-specific deletion of NFATc1 prevented the capacity of vascular smooth muscle cells for MCP-1-induced activation of the cyclin D1-CDK6-CDK4-Pak1 signaling axis, affecting

  16. Pipoxolan Ameliorates Cerebral Ischemia via Inhibition of Neuronal Apoptosis and Intimal Hyperplasia through Attenuation of VSMC Migration and Modulation of Matrix Metalloproteinase-2/9 and Ras/MEK/ERK Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuh-Fung; Tsai, Huei-Yann; Wu, Kuo-Jen; Siao, Lian-Ru; Wood, W. Gibson

    2013-01-01

    Pipoxolan (PIPO) has anti-spasmodic effects, and it is used clinically to relieve smooth muscle spasms. Cerebrovascular disease is one of the leading causes of disability and death worldwide. The main aim of this study was to investigate the effects of PIPO on cerebral ischemia and vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration in vivo and in vitro. Cerebral infarction area, ratio of intima to media area (I/M ratio) and PCNA antibody staining of the carotid artery in vivo were measured. Cell viability of A7r5 cells, PDGF-BB-stimulated cell migration, and potential mechanisms of PIPO were evaluated by wound healing, transwell and Western blotting. PIPO (10 and 30 mg/kg p.o.) reduced: the cerebral infarction area; neurological deficit; TUNEL-positive cells; cleaved caspase 3-positive cells; intimal hyperplasia; and inhibited proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-positive cells in rodents. PIPO (5, 10 and 15 µM) significantly inhibited PDGF-BB-stimulated VSMC migration and reduced Ras, MEK, and p-ERK levels. Moreover, PIPO decreased levels of matrix metalloproteinases -2 and -9 in PDGF-BB-stimulated A7r5 cells. In summary, PIPO is protective in models of ischemia/reperfusion-induced cerebral infarction, carotid artery ligation-induced intimal hyperplasia and VSMC migration both in vivo and in vitro. PIPO could be potentially efficacious in preventing cerebrovascular and vascular diseases. PMID:24086601

  17. Pipoxolan ameliorates cerebral ischemia via inhibition of neuronal apoptosis and intimal hyperplasia through attenuation of VSMC migration and modulation of matrix metalloproteinase-2/9 and Ras/MEK/ERK signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuh-Fung; Tsai, Huei-Yann; Wu, Kuo-Jen; Siao, Lian-Ru; Wood, W Gibson

    2013-01-01

    Pipoxolan (PIPO) has anti-spasmodic effects, and it is used clinically to relieve smooth muscle spasms. Cerebrovascular disease is one of the leading causes of disability and death worldwide. The main aim of this study was to investigate the effects of PIPO on cerebral ischemia and vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration in vivo and in vitro. Cerebral infarction area, ratio of intima to media area (I/M ratio) and PCNA antibody staining of the carotid artery in vivo were measured. Cell viability of A7r5 cells, PDGF-BB-stimulated cell migration, and potential mechanisms of PIPO were evaluated by wound healing, transwell and Western blotting. PIPO (10 and 30 mg/kg p.o.) reduced: the cerebral infarction area; neurological deficit; TUNEL-positive cells; cleaved caspase 3-positive cells; intimal hyperplasia; and inhibited proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-positive cells in rodents. PIPO (5, 10 and 15 µM) significantly inhibited PDGF-BB-stimulated VSMC migration and reduced Ras, MEK, and p-ERK levels. Moreover, PIPO decreased levels of matrix metalloproteinases -2 and -9 in PDGF-BB-stimulated A7r5 cells. In summary, PIPO is protective in models of ischemia/reperfusion-induced cerebral infarction, carotid artery ligation-induced intimal hyperplasia and VSMC migration both in vivo and in vitro. PIPO could be potentially efficacious in preventing cerebrovascular and vascular diseases.

  18. Collagen-Derived N-Acetylated Proline-Glycine-Proline in Intervertebral Discs Modulates CXCR1/2 Expression and Activation in Cartilage Endplate Stem Cells to Induce Migration and Differentiation Toward a Pro-Inflammatory Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chencheng; Zhang, Yang; Yang, Minghui; Huang, Bo; Zhou, Yue

    2015-12-01

    The factors that regulate the migration and differentiation of cartilage endplate stem cells (CESCs) remain unknown. N-Acetylated proline-glycine-proline (N-Ac-PGP) is a chemokine that is involved in inflammatory diseases. The purpose of this study was to detect N-Ac-PGP in degenerative intervertebral discs (IVDs) and to determine its roles in the migration and differentiation of CESCs. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry results indicated that the levels of the proteases that generate N-Ac-PGP as well as N-Ac-PGP levels themselves increase with the progression of IVD degeneration. Immunohistochemistry and an N-Ac-PGP generation assay demonstrated that nucleus pulposus (NP) cells generate N-Ac-PGP from collagen. The effects of N-Ac-PGP on the migration and differentiation of CESCs were determined using migration assays, RT-PCR, immunoblot analysis, and ELISA. The results showed that the expression of N-Ac-PGP receptors (CXCR1 and CXCR2) in CESCs was upregulated by N-Ac-PGP. Additionally, N-Ac-PGP induced F-actin cytoskeletal rearrangement in CESCs and increased CESC chemotaxis. Furthermore, N-Ac-PGP recruited chondrocytes and spindle-shaped cells from the cartilage endplate (CEP) into the NP in vivo. These spindle-shaped cells expressed CD105 and Stro-1 (mesenchymal stem cell markers). N-Ac-PGP induced the differentiation of CESCs toward a pro-inflammatory phenotype with increased production of inflammatory cytokines rather than toward an NP-like phenotype. Our study indicated that, in the complex microenvironment of a degenerative disc, N-Ac-PGP is generated by NP cells and induces the migration of CESCs from the CEP into the NP. N-Ac-PGP induces a pro-inflammatory phenotype in CESCs, and these cells promote the inflammatory response in degenerative discs.

  19. Migration and its risks.

    PubMed

    O'brien, P

    1996-01-01

    "This essay applies the theories of Ulrich Beck...to the politics of migration in Germany. In particular, the essay focuses on Beck's notion of the waning influence, indeed even relevancy, of science and scientists regarding postmodern risk phenomena. The essay argues that migration to Germany can be understood as a Beckian risk phenomenon, helping to explain the decreasing influence of social scientists over the politics of migration in the Federal Republic."

  20. Cell migration, freshly squeezed.

    PubMed

    Welch, Matthew D

    2015-02-12

    Migrating cells exhibit distinct motility modes and can switch between modes based on chemical or physical cues. Liu et al. and Ruprecht et al. now describe how confinement and contractility influence motility mode plasticity and instigate a mode termed stable bleb migration in embryonic and tumor cells.

  1. Nitric oxide regulates neutrophil migration through microparticle formation.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Sarah; Dixon, Rachel; Norman, Keith; Hellewell, Paul; Ridger, Victoria

    2008-01-01

    The role of nitric oxide (NO) in regulating neutrophil migration has been investigated. Human neutrophil migration to interleukin (IL)-8 (1 nmol/L) was measured after a 1-hour incubation using a 96-well chemotaxis plate assay. The NO synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) significantly (P < 0.001) enhanced IL-8-induced migration by up to 45%. Anti-CD18 significantly (P < 0.001) inhibited both IL-8-induced and L-NAME enhanced migration. Antibodies to L-selectin or PSGL-1 had no effect on IL-8-induced migration but prevented the increased migration to IL-8 induced by L-NAME. L-NAME induced generation of neutrophil-derived microparticles that was significantly (P < 0.01) greater than untreated neutrophils or D-NAME. This microparticle formation was dependent on calpain activity and superoxide production. Only microparticles from L-NAME and not untreated or D-NAME-treated neutrophils induced a significant (P < 0.01) increase in IL-8-induced migration and transendothelial migration. Pretreatment of microparticles with antibodies to L-selectin (DREG-200) or PSGL-1 (PL-1) significantly (P < 0.001) inhibited this effect. The ability of L-NAME-induced microparticles to enhance migration was found to be dependent on the number of microparticles produced and not an increase in microparticle surface L-selectin or PSGL-1 expression. These data show that NO can modulate neutrophil migration by regulating microparticle formation.

  2. Migration and Environmental Hazards

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Lori M.

    2011-01-01

    Losses due to natural hazards (e.g., earthquakes, hurricanes) and technological hazards (e.g., nuclear waste facilities, chemical spills) are both on the rise. One response to hazard-related losses is migration, with this paper offering a review of research examining the association between migration and environmental hazards. Using examples from both developed and developing regional contexts, the overview demonstrates that the association between migration and environmental hazards varies by setting, hazard types, and household characteristics. In many cases, however, results demonstrate that environmental factors play a role in shaping migration decisions, particularly among those most vulnerable. Research also suggests that risk perception acts as a mediating factor. Classic migration theory is reviewed to offer a foundation for examination of these associations. PMID:21886366

  3. Galectin-1 promotes human neutrophil migration.

    PubMed

    Auvynet, Constance; Moreno, Samadhi; Melchy, Erika; Coronado-Martínez, Iris; Montiel, Jose Luis; Aguilar-Delfin, Irma; Rosenstein, Yvonne

    2013-01-01

    An important step of innate immune response is the recruitment of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) to injured tissues through chemotactic molecules. Galectins, a family of endogenous lectins, participate in numerous functions such as lymphoid cell migration, homing, cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. Particularly, galectin-3 (Gal-3) and -9 have been implicated in the modulation of acute and chronic inflammation by inducing the directional migration of monocytes/macrophages and eosinophils, whereas Gal-1 is considered to function as an anti-inflammatory molecule, capable of inhibiting the influx of PMN to the site of injury. In this study, we assessed the effect of Gal-1 on neutrophil recruitment, in the absence of additional inflammatory insults. Contrasting with its capacity to inhibit cell trafficking and modulate the release of mediators described in models of acute inflammation and autoimmunity, we evidenced that Gal-1 has the capacity to induce neutrophil migration both in vitro and in vivo. This effect is not mediated through a G-protein-coupled receptor but potentially through the sialoglycoprotein CD43, via carbohydrate binding and through the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. These results suggest a novel biological function for CD43 on neutrophils and highlight that depending on the environment, Gal-1 can act either as chemoattractant or, as a molecule that negatively regulates migration under acute inflammatory conditions, underscoring the potential of Gal-1 as a target for innovative drug development.

  4. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor 1a (p21) Modulates Response to Cocaine and Motivated Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Scholpa, Natalie E; Briggs, Sherri B; Wagner, John J; Cummings, Brian S

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the functional role of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1a (Cdkn1a or p21) in cocaine-induced responses using a knockout mouse model. Acute locomotor activity after cocaine administration (15 mg/kg, i.p.) was decreased in p21(-/-) mice, whereas cocaine-induced place preference was enhanced. Interestingly, κ-opioid-induced place aversion was also significantly enhanced. Concentration-dependent analysis of locomotor activity in response to cocaine demonstrated a rightward shift in the p21(-/-) mice. Pretreatment with a 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor antagonist did not alter the enhancement of cocaine-induced conditioned place preference in p21(-/-) mice, indicating a lack of involvement of serotonergic signaling in this response. Cocaine exposure increased p21 expression exclusively in the ventral sector of the hippocampus of rodents after either contingent or noncontingent drug administration. Increased p21 expression was accompanied by increased histone acetylation of the p21 promoter region in rats. Finally, increased neurogenesis in the dorsal hippocampus of p21(-/-) mice was also observed. These results show that functional loss of p21 altered the acute locomotor response to cocaine and the conditioned responses to either rewarding or aversive stimuli. Collectively, these findings demonstrate a previously unreported involvement of p21 in modulating responses to cocaine and in motivated behaviors.

  5. Bystander effects of ionizing radiation can be modulated by signaling amines

    SciTech Connect

    Poon, R.C.C.; Agnihotri, N.; Seymour, C.; Mothersill, C.

    2007-10-15

    Actual risk and risk management of exposure to ionizing radiation are among the most controversial areas in environmental health protection. Recent developments in radiobiology especially characterization of bystander effects have called into question established dogmas and are thought to cast doubt on the scientific basis of the risk assessment framework, leading to uncertainty for regulators and concern among affected populations. In this paper we test the hypothesis that small signaling molecules widely used throughout the animal kingdom for signaling stress or environmental change, such as 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, serotonin), L-DOPA, glycine or nicotine are involved in bystander signaling processes following ionizing radiation exposure. We report data which suggest that nano to micromolar concentrations of these agents can modulate bystander-induced cell death. Depletion of 5-HT present in tissue culture medium, occurred following irradiation of cells. This suggested that 5-HT might be bound by membrane receptors after irradiation. Expression of 5-HT type 3 receptors which are Ca{sup 2+} ion channels was confirmed in the cells using immunocytochemistry and receptor expression could be increased using radiation or 5-HT exposure. Zofran and Kitryl, inhibitors of 5-HT type 3 receptors, and reserpine a generic serotonin antagonist block the bystander effect induced by radiation or by serotonin. The results may be important for the mechanistic understanding of how low doses of radiation interact with cells to produce biological effects.

  6. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor 1a (p21) Modulates Response to Cocaine and Motivated Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Scholpa, Natalie E.; Briggs, Sherri B.; Wagner, John J.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the functional role of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1a (Cdkn1a or p21) in cocaine-induced responses using a knockout mouse model. Acute locomotor activity after cocaine administration (15 mg/kg, i.p.) was decreased in p21−/− mice, whereas cocaine-induced place preference was enhanced. Interestingly, κ-opioid–induced place aversion was also significantly enhanced. Concentration-dependent analysis of locomotor activity in response to cocaine demonstrated a rightward shift in the p21−/− mice. Pretreatment with a 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor antagonist did not alter the enhancement of cocaine-induced conditioned place preference in p21−/− mice, indicating a lack of involvement of serotonergic signaling in this response. Cocaine exposure increased p21 expression exclusively in the ventral sector of the hippocampus of rodents after either contingent or noncontingent drug administration. Increased p21 expression was accompanied by increased histone acetylation of the p21 promoter region in rats. Finally, increased neurogenesis in the dorsal hippocampus of p21−/− mice was also observed. These results show that functional loss of p21 altered the acute locomotor response to cocaine and the conditioned responses to either rewarding or aversive stimuli. Collectively, these findings demonstrate a previously unreported involvement of p21 in modulating responses to cocaine and in motivated behaviors. PMID:26791604

  7. Migration and AIDS.

    PubMed

    1998-01-01

    This article presents the perspectives of UNAIDS and the International Organization for Migration (IOM) on migration and HIV/AIDS. It identifies research and action priorities and policy issues, and describes the current situation in major regions of the world. Migration is a process. Movement is enhanced by air transport, rising international trade, deregulation of trade practices, and opening of borders. Movements are restricted by laws and statutes. Denial to freely circulate and obtain asylum is associated with vulnerability to HIV infections. A UNAIDS policy paper in 1997 and IOM policy guidelines in 1988 affirm that refugees and asylum seekers should not be targeted for special measures due to HIV/AIDS. There is an urgent need to provide primary health services for migrants, voluntary counseling and testing, and more favorable conditions. Research is needed on the role of migration in the spread of HIV, the extent of migration, availability of health services, and options for HIV prevention. Research must be action-oriented and focused on vulnerability to HIV and risk taking behavior. There is substantial mobility in West and Central Africa, economic migration in South Africa, and nonvoluntary migration in Angola. Sex workers in southeast Asia contribute to the spread. The breakup of the USSR led to population shifts. Migrants in Central America and Mexico move north to the US where HIV prevalence is higher.

  8. HTR2 Receptors in a Songbird Premotor Cortical-Like Area Modulate Spectral Characteristics of Zebra Finch Song

    PubMed Central

    Wood, William E.; Roseberry, Thomas K.; Perkel, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] is involved in modulating an array of complex behaviors including learning, depression, and circadian rhythms. Additionally, HTR2 receptors on layer V pyramidal neurons are thought to mediate the actions of psychedelic drugs; the native function of these receptors at this site, however, remains unknown. Previously, we found that activation of HTR2 receptors in the zebra finch forebrain song premotor structure the robust nucleus of the arcopallium (RA) led to increased excitation, and that endogenous 5-HT could roughly double spontaneous firing rate. Here, using in vivo single-unit recordings, we found that direct application of 5-HT to these same RA projection neurons, which are analogous to layer V cortical pyramidal neurons, caused a significant increase in the number of action potentials per song-related burst, and a dramatic decrease in signal-to-noise ratio. Injection of the serotonergic neurotoxin 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine into the third ventricle greatly reduced telencephalic 5-HT and resulted in decreased fundamental frequency of harmonic syllables as well as increased goodness of pitch. Both of these results can be explained by the observed actions of 5-HT on RA projection neurons, and both effects recovered to baseline within 2 weeks following the toxin injection. These results show that 5-HT is involved in modulating spectral properties of song, likely via effects on RA projection neurons, but that adult zebra finches can partially compensate for this deficit within 7 d. PMID:23407949

  9. Peripheral 5-HT1A and 5-HT7 Serotonergic Receptors Modulate Parasympathetic Neurotransmission in Long-Term Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Restrepo, Beatriz; Martín, María Luisa; San Román, Luis; Morán, Asunción

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed the modulation of serotonin on the bradycardia induced in vivo by vagal electrical stimulation in alloxan-induced long-term diabetic rats. Bolus intravenous administration of serotonin had a dual effect on the bradycardia induced either by vagal stimulation or exogenous Ach, increasing it at low doses and decreasing it at high doses of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), effect reproduced by 5-carboxamidotryptamine maleate (5-CT), a 5-HT1/7 agonist. The enhancement of the bradycardia at low doses of 5-CT was reproduced by 5-HT1A agonist 8-hydroxy-2-dipropylaminotetralin hydrobromide (8-OH-DPAT) and abolished by WAY-100,635, 5-HT1A antagonist. Pretreatment with 5-HT1 antagonist methiothepin blocked the stimulatory and inhibitory effect of 5-CT, whereas pimozide, 5-HT7 antagonist, only abolished 5-CT inhibitory action. In conclusion, long-term diabetes elicits changes in the subtype of the 5-HT receptor involved in modulation of vagally induced bradycardia. Activation of the 5-HT1A receptors induces enhancement, whereas attenuation is due to 5-HT7 receptor activation. This 5-HT dual effect occurs at pre- and postjunctional levels. PMID:21403818

  10. Treg engage lymphotoxin beta receptor for afferent lymphatic transendothelial migration

    PubMed Central

    Brinkman, C. Colin; Iwami, Daiki; Hritzo, Molly K.; Xiong, Yanbao; Ahmad, Sarwat; Simon, Thomas; Hippen, Keli L.; Blazar, Bruce R.; Bromberg, Jonathan S.

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are essential to suppress unwanted immunity or inflammation. After islet allo-transplant Tregs must migrate from blood to allograft, then via afferent lymphatics to draining LN to protect allografts. Here we show that Tregs but not non-Treg T cells use lymphotoxin (LT) during migration from allograft to draining LN, and that LT deficiency or blockade prevents normal migration and allograft protection. Treg LTαβ rapidly modulates cytoskeletal and membrane structure of lymphatic endothelial cells; dependent on VCAM-1 and non-canonical NFκB signalling via LTβR. These results demonstrate a form of T-cell migration used only by Treg in tissues that serves an important role in their suppressive function and is a unique therapeutic focus for modulating suppression. PMID:27323847

  11. Neuronal Migration Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understanding Sleep The Life and Death of a Neuron Order Publications Support Resources Patient Organizations Professional Societies ... birth defects caused by the abnormal migration of neurons in the developing brain and nervous system. In ...

  12. 5-HT4-Receptors Modulate Induction of Long-Term Depression but Not Potentiation at Hippocampal Output Synapses in Acute Rat Brain Slices

    PubMed Central

    Wawra, Matthias; Fidzinski, Pawel; Heinemann, Uwe; Mody, Istvan; Behr, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    The subiculum is the principal target of CA1 pyramidal cells and mediates hippocampal output to various cortical and subcortical regions of the brain. The majority of subicular pyramidal cells are burst-spiking neurons. Previous studies indicated that high frequency stimulation in subicular burst-spiking cells causes presynaptic NMDA-receptor dependent long-term potentiation (LTP) whereas low frequency stimulation induces postsynaptic NMDA-receptor-dependent long-term depression (LTD). In the present study, we investigate the effect of 5-hydroxytryptamine type 4 (5-HT4) receptor activation and blockade on both forms of synaptic plasticity in burst-spiking cells. We demonstrate that neither activation nor block of 5-HT4 receptors modulate the induction or expression of LTP. In contrast, activation of 5-HT4 receptors facilitates expression of LTD, and block of the 5-HT4 receptor prevents induction of short-term depression and LTD. As 5-HT4 receptors are positively coupled to adenylate cyclase 1 (AC1), 5-HT4 receptors might modulate PKA activity through AC1. Since LTD is blocked in the presence of 5-HT4 receptor antagonists, our data are consistent with 5-HT4 receptor activation by ambient serotonin or intrinsically active 5-HT4 receptors. Our findings provide new insight into aminergic modulation of hippocampal output. PMID:24505387

  13. Indonesia's migration transition.

    PubMed

    Hugo, G

    1995-01-01

    This article describes population movements in Indonesia in the context of rapid and marked social and economic change. Foreign investment in Indonesia is increasing, and global mass media is available to many households. Agriculture is being commercialized, and structural shifts are occurring in the economy. Educational levels are increasing, and women's role and status are shifting. Population migration has increased over the decades, both short and long distance, permanent and temporary, legal and illegal, and migration to and between urban areas. This article focuses specifically on rural-to-urban migration and international migration. Population settlements are dense in the agriculturally rich inner areas of Java, Bali, and Madura. Although the rate of growth of the gross domestic product was 6.8% annually during 1969-94, the World Bank ranked Indonesia as a low-income economy in 1992 because of the large population size. Income per capita is US $670. Indonesia is becoming a large exporter of labor to the Middle East, particularly women. The predominance of women as overseas contract workers is changing women's role and status in the family and is controversial due to the cases of mistreatment. Malaysia's high economic growth rate of over 8% per year means an additional 1.3 million foreign workers and technicians are needed. During the 1980s urban growth increased at a very rapid rate. Urban growth tended to occur along corridors and major transportation routes around urban areas. It is posited that most of the urban growth is due to rural-to-urban migration. Data limitations prevent an exact determination of the extent of rural-to-urban migration. More women are estimated to be involved in movements to cities during the 1980s compared to the 1970s. Recruiters and middlemen have played an important role in rural-to-urban migration and international migration.

  14. The planar cell polarity pathway directs parietal endoderm migration.

    PubMed

    LaMonica, Kristi; Bass, Maya; Grabel, Laura

    2009-06-01

    Parietal endoderm (PE) contributes to the yolk sac and is the first migratory cell type in the mammalian embryo. We can visualize PE migration in vitro using the F9 teratocarcinoma derived embryoid body outgrowth system and, show here that PE migration is directed by the non-canonical Wnt planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway via Rho/ROCK. Based on golgi apparatus localization and microtubule orientation, 68.6% of cells in control outgrowths are oriented in the direction of migration. Perturbation of Wnt signaling via sFRP treatment results in a loss of orientation coupled with an increase in cell migration. Inhibition of the PCP pathway at the level of Daam1 also results in a loss of cell orientation along with an increase in cell migration, as seen with sFRP treatment. Constitutively active Daam can inhibit the loss of orientation that occurs with sFRP treatment. We previously demonstrated that ROCK inhibition leads to an increase in cell migration, and we now show that these cells also lack oriented migration. Canonical Wnt signaling or the Rac arm of the PCP pathway does not appear to play a role in PE oriented migration. These data suggest the PCP pathway via Rho/ROCK modulates migration of PE.

  15. Astrocytes in Migration.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Jiang Shan; Gao, Kai; Chai, Rui Chao; Jia, Xi Hua; Luo, Dao Peng; Ge, Guo; Jiang, Yu Wu; Fung, Yin-Wan Wendy; Li, Lina; Yu, Albert Cheung Hoi

    2017-01-01

    Cell migration is a fundamental phenomenon that underlies tissue morphogenesis, wound healing, immune response, and cancer metastasis. Great progresses have been made in research methodologies, with cell migration identified as a highly orchestrated process. Brain is considered the most complex organ in the human body, containing many types of neural cells with astrocytes playing crucial roles in monitoring normal functions of the central nervous system. Astrocytes are mostly quiescent under normal physiological conditions in the adult brain but become migratory after injury. Under most known pathological conditions in the brain, spinal cord and retina, astrocytes are activated and become hypertrophic, hyperplastic, and up-regulating GFAP based on the grades of severity. These three observations are the hallmark in glia scar formation-astrogliosis. The reactivation process is initiated with structural changes involving cell process migration and ended with cell migration. Detailed mechanisms in astrocyte migration have not been studied extensively and remain largely unknown. Here, we therefore attempt to review the mechanisms in migration of astrocytes.

  16. [International migration in Latin America].

    PubMed

    Pellegrino, A

    1995-12-01

    Trends in international migration in Latin America are reviewed using data from published sources. Aspects considered include historical views; migration according to occupational status and educational level; migration to the United States; migration characteristics in different regions of Latin America; and the crisis of the 1980s and its impact on population distribution.

  17. The planar polarity pathway promotes coordinated cell migration during Drosophila oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bastock, Rebecca; Strutt, David

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Cell migration is fundamental in both animal morphogenesis and disease. The migration of individual cells is relatively well-studied, however in vivo cells often remain joined by cell-cell junctions and migrate in cohesive groups. How such groups of cells coordinate their migration is poorly understood. The planar polarity pathway coordinates the polarity of non-migrating cells in epithelial sheets and is required for cell rearrangements during vertebrate morphogenesis. It is therefore a good candidate to play a role in collective migration of groups of cells. Drosophila border cell migration is a well-characterised and genetically tractable model of collective cell migration, during which a group of about 6-10 epithelial cells detaches from the anterior end of the developing egg chamber and migrates invasively towards the oocyte. We find that the planar polarity pathway promotes this invasive migration, acting both in the migrating cells themselves and in the non-migratory polar follicle cells they carry along. Disruption of planar polarity signalling causes abnormalities in actin rich processes on the cell surface and leads to less efficient migration. This is apparently due in part to loss of regulation of Rho GTPase activity by the planar polarity receptor Frizzled, which itself becomes localised to the migratory edge of the border cells. We conclude that during collective cell migration the planar polarity pathway can mediate communication between motile and non-motile cells, which enhances the efficiency of migration via the modulation of actin dynamics. PMID:17652348

  18. Environmental concerns and international migration.

    PubMed

    Hugo, G

    1996-01-01

    "This article focuses on international migration occurring as a result of environmental changes and processes. It briefly reviews attempts to conceptualize environment-related migration and then considers the extent to which environmental factors have been and may be significant in initiating migration. Following is an examination of migration as an independent variable in the migration-environment relationship. Finally, ethical and policy dimensions are addressed."

  19. Draxin, an axon guidance protein, affects chick trunk neural crest migration.

    PubMed

    Su, Yuhong; Naser, Iftekhar B; Islam, Shahidul M; Zhang, Sanbing; Ahmed, Giasuddin; Chen, Sandy; Shinmyo, Yohei; Kawakami, Minoru; Yamamura, Ken-ichi; Tanaka, Hideaki

    2009-12-01

    The neural crest is a multipotent population of migratory cells that arises in the central nervous system and subsequently migrates along defined stereotypic pathways. In the present work, we analyzed the role of a repulsive axon guidance protein, draxin, in the migration of neural crest cells. Draxin is expressed in the roof plate of the chick trunk spinal cord and around the early migration pathway of neural crest cells. Draxin modulates chick neural crest cell migration in vitro by reducing the polarization of these cells. When exposed to draxin, the velocity of migrating neural crest cells was reduced, and the cells changed direction so frequently that the net migration distance was also reduced. Overexpression of draxin also caused some early migrating neural crest cells to change direction to the dorsolateral pathway in the chick trunk region, presumably due to draxin's inhibitory activity. These results demonstrate that draxin, an axon guidance protein, can also affect trunk neural crest migration in the chick embryo.

  20. Serotonergic modulation of neurotransmission in the rat basolateral amygdala.

    PubMed

    Rainnie, D G

    1999-07-01

    Whole cell patch-clamp recordings were obtained from projection neurons and interneurons of the rat basolateral amygdala (BLA) to understand local network interactions in morphologically identified neurons and their modulation by serotonin. Projection neurons and interneurons were characterized morphologically and electrophysiologically according to their intrinsic membrane properties and synaptic characteristics. Synaptic activity in projection neurons was dominated by spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) that were multiphasic, reached 181 +/- 38 pA in amplitude, lasted 296 +/- 27 mS, and were blocked by the GABAA receptor antagonist, bicuculline methiodide (30 microM). In interneurons, spontaneous synaptic activity was characterized by a burst-firing discharge patterns (200 +/- 40 Hz) that correlated with the occurrence of 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione-sensitive, high-amplitude (260 +/- 42 pA), long-duration (139 +/- 19 mS) inward excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs). The interevent interval of 831 +/- 344 mS for compound inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs), and 916 +/- 270 mS for EPSC bursts, suggested that spontaneous IPSP/Cs in projection neurons are driven by burst of action potentials in interneurons. Hence, BLA interneurons may regulate the excitability of projection neurons and thus determine the degree of synchrony within ensembles of BLA neurons. In interneurons 5-hydroxytryptamine oxalate (5-HT) evoked a direct, dose-dependent, membrane depolarization mediated by a 45 +/- 6.9 pA inward current, which had a reversal potential of -90 mV. The effect of 5-HT was mimicked by the 5-HT2 receptor agonist, alpha-methyl-5-hydroxytryptamine (alpha-methyl-5-HT), but not by the 5-HT1A receptor agonist, (+/-) 8-hydroxydipropylaminotetralin hydrobromide (8-OH-DPAT), or the 5-HT1B agonist, CGS 12066A. In projection neurons, 5-HT evoked an indirect membrane hyperpolarization ( approximately 2 mV) that was associated with a 75 +/- 42 p

  1. Migration and pension.

    PubMed

    Razin, A; Sadka, E

    1998-11-01

    "Migration has important implications for the financial soundness of the pension system.... While it is common sense to expect that young migrants, even if low-skilled, can help society pay the benefits to the currently elderly, it may nevertheless be reasonable to argue that these migrants would adversely affect current young since, after all, the migrants are net beneficiaries of the welfare state. In contrast to the adverse effects of low skilled migration in a static model, [the authors] show that in a Samuelsonian overlapping generations model...migration is a Pareto-improving measure. All the existing income (low and high) and age (young and old) groups living at the time of the migrant's arrival would be better off."

  2. More myths of migration.

    PubMed

    Basch, L; Lerner, G

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses some of the myths of migration. The 5 myths presented are: 1) racism has little to do with the causes of migration and does not necessarily impede the adjustment or success of migrants; 2) in areas where there is a strong feminist movement and trade unions, migrant women receive their support and can count on the solidarity of these organizations; 3) transnational corporations are positive forces in the developing countries where they operate--not only do they provide these states with new sources of capital, but they also impart new industrial skills to the labor force; 4) migration today is essentially short-term in nature--it therefore does not have a strong impact on family life; and 5) most migrants cluster together in ethnic enclaves which provide a strong source of support and diminish dislocation inherent in the migrant process.

  3. Migration from Packaging Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulenaer, B. De

    Various chemical compounds can be present in foodstuffs which may induce health problems in humans. The origin of these compounds can be very diverse. Mathematical modeling can sometimes be used to predict the concentration of these chemicals in the food. Particularly for compounds which are produced in the food during, e.g., processing and for compounds which migrate from a food contact material this technique can be very fruitful. For the former type of compounds, classical chemical kinetics can be applied. In this contribution, the modeling of the migration from polymeric food contact materials is considered. This migration phenomenon can be modeled mathematically since the physical processes which govern this process are very well studied and understood. Therefore, initially some of these fundamentals will be discussed in more detail.

  4. Detecting interstellar migrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matloff, Gregory L.; Pazmino, John

    1997-01-01

    Interstellar migrations may occur when a civilization's star enters the red giant phase, thereby dooming the life-bearing planet. Ecologically self-contained 'world ships', massing billions of kilograms and propelled by hyperthin, space manufactured solar sails thousands of kilometers in diameter unfurled near the home star are possible vehicles to transfer a threatened civilization to a neighboring star. Consideration of the nearest red giants reveals that Pollux is the nearest formerly solar-type red giant. Known stellar neighbors of Pollux are surveyed to determine likely directions for an interstellar migration departing Pollux. Such migrations might consist of many world ships launched over millennia on voyages of about 1000 terrestrial-year duration; discovery of such events will be serendipitous. The difficulties of observing solar-sail star ships near Pollux are considered. A facility dedicated to imaging extrasolar planets within 10 parsecs might be capable of detecting these large spacecraft.

  5. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)4 receptors in post mortem human brain tissue: distribution, pharmacology and effects of neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, G P; Mason, S L; Meldrum, A; De Keczer, S; Parnes, H; Eglen, R M; Wong, E H

    1995-01-01

    1. The distribution, pharmacology and effects of neurodegenerative diseases on 5-HT4 receptors in human brain have been characterized in vitro. 2. The 5-HT4 receptor in post mortem human brain tissue was specifically labelled with [3H]-GR 113808. In human putamen, this ligand labelled a homogeneous population of sites, with an apparent affinity (-log Kd) of 10.1 and a density (Bmax) of 5.73 fmol mg-1 tissue. The pharmacology of this site was characterized by use of a series of displacing ligands, and the following rank order of apparent affinities (with mean +/- s.d. -log Ki values in parentheses) was generated: GR113808 (10.05 +/- 0.04) > SDZ 205,557 (8.65 +/- 0.08) > DAU 6285 (7.95 +/- 0.04) > BIMU-1 (7.81 +/- 0.06) > DAU 6215 (7.42 +/- 0.23) > tropisetron (7.39 +/- 0.23) > 5-HT (7.32 +/- 1.00) > BIMU-8 (7.25 +/- 0.04) > (R)-zacopride (5.82 +/- 0.04). The Hill coefficients were not significantly different from unity, consistent with an interaction at a single site. A comparison of the affinities of these compounds with those obtained from guinea-pig striatum indicated no evidence of species differences. 3. The regional distribution of 5-HT4 receptors was assessed by determining the density of binding sites for [3H]-GR 113808.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7780656

  6. Effect of drugs influencing central 5-hydroxytryptamine mechanisms on amantadine-induced stereotyped behaviour in the rat.

    PubMed

    Dhavare, B S; Nandal, N V; Balsara, J J; Chandorkar, A G

    1983-01-01

    Pretreatment with L-tryptophan, a precursor of 5-HT, was found to decrease the intensity of stereotyped behaviour induced by amantadine, while methysergide, a 5-HT antagonist, was found to increase the intensity of amantadine-induced stereotypy. These results suggest that the intensity of amantadine-induced stereotypy depends on the balance between central dopamine and 5-HT systems and that the central 5-HT systems may have an opposing, tonic effect upon central dopamine systems involved in the mediation of stereotypy. In contrast to L-tryptophan, however, pretreatment with quipazine, a 5-HT agonist, and clomipramine, a selective 5-HT neuronal reuptake blocker, was found to potentiate the stereotyped behaviour induced by amantadine.

  7. Influence of some agents that affect 5-hydroxytryptamine metabolism and receptors on nitrazepam-induced sleep in mice.

    PubMed

    Wambebe, C

    1985-01-01

    The effects of 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP), citalopram, p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA), cyproheptadine, lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD-25), metitepine and NSD 1034 on nitrazepam-induced sleep were investigated in mice. Nitrazepam (1.6-25.6 mg kg-1, i.p.) induced a dose-dependent sedative-hypnotic effect. 5-HTP (8-128 mg kg-1 i.m.) did not induce behavioural sleep but sedated mice and significantly potentiated nitrazepam-induced sleep. Similarly, 5-HTP (4-32 mg kg-1, i.m.) increased pentobarbitone sleeping time. Citalopram (2.5-10 mg kg-1, i.p.) significantly potentiated nitrazepam sleep. PCPA (300-400 mg kg-1, i.p.) completely abolished nitrazepam sleep; 5-HTP (32 mg kg-1, i.m.) reversed this effect. NSD 1034 (75-150 mg kg-1, i.p.) antagonized the potentiating effect of 5-HTP (32 mg kg-1, i.m.) on nitrazepam sleep. Cyproheptadine (5-10 mg kg-1, i.p.) and LSD-25 (2.5-10 micrograms kg-1, i.p.) partially antagonized nitrazepam sleep. Similarly, 5-HTP-induced potentiation of nitrazepam sleep was antagonized by cyproheptadine and LSD-25. Metitepine (4-8 mg kg-1, i.p.) induced behavioural sleep and significantly potentiated nitrazepam sleep. Ro15-1788 (10 mg kg-1, i.p.) effectively antagonized nitrazepam-induced sleep. These results indicate that enhancement of central 5-HT neurotransmission may underlie nitrazepam-induced sleep in mice.

  8. The effects of nabumetone, a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, on cisplatin-induced 5-hydroxytryptamine release from the isolated rat ileum.

    PubMed

    Kudo, C; Minami, M; Hirafuji, M; Endo, T; Hamaue, N; Akita, K; Murakami, T; Kawaguchi, H

    2001-01-01

    In order to elucidate 5-HT release influenced by PGE2 in the background of the anticancer drug-induced emesis, the effect of nabumetone, a COX-2 inhibitor, on the release of 5-HT from the isolated rat ileum was investigated. PGE2 produced a concentration-dependent increase (10(-9) to 10 M) and decrease (10(-8) to 10(-6) M) in 5-HT release. Arachidonic acid also demonstrated a similar bell-shaped 5-HT release. The arachidonic acid-induced 5-HT release at 3 x 10(-6) M (313.04 +/- 25.90%) was significantly inhibited by the concomitant perfusion with BRL10720 (10(-6) M) (161.98 +/- 19.4%, p<0.01), an active metabolite of nabumetone, or indomethacin (3 x 10(-7) M)(190.01 +/- 16.19%, p<0.05). BRL10720 (10(-6) M)(428.57 +/- 51.72%, p<0.05) significantly inhibited the increase in 5-HT release induced by cisplatin (10(-6) M)(748.56 +/- 136.31%), suggesting that PGE2would be involved in cisplatin-induced 5-HT release. The increase in 5-HT release from the isolated ileum 72 hrs after cisplatin administration, in a delayed-emesis animal model, was significantly inhibited by the in vivo 3-day administration of nabumetone or BRL10720, but was not affected by the 3-day administration of dexamethasone. After 72 hours, however, the in vivo 3-days administration of nabumetone, BRL10720 or dexamethasone had no effect on the increase in ileal 5-HT levels induced by cisplatin. The use of COX-2 inhibitors to ameliorate delayed emesis induced by cisplatin-based anticancer chemotherapy has been proposed. On the other hand, there is a possibility that dexamethasone works through a mechanism other than 5-HT release in delayed emesis.

  9. 5-hydroxytryptamine 2C receptors in the dorsal striatum mediate stress-induced interference with negatively reinforced instrumental escape behavior.

    PubMed

    Strong, P V; Christianson, J P; Loughridge, A B; Amat, J; Maier, S F; Fleshner, M; Greenwood, B N

    2011-12-01

    Uncontrollable stress can interfere with instrumental learning and induce anxiety in humans and rodents. While evidence supports a role for serotonin (5-HT) and serotonin 2C receptors (5-HT(2C)R) in the behavioral consequences of uncontrollable stress, the specific sites of action are unknown. These experiments sought to delineate the role of 5-HT and 5-HT(2C)R in the dorsal striatum (DS) and the lateral/basolateral amygdala (BLA) in the expression of stress-induced instrumental escape deficits and exaggerated fear, as these structures are critical to instrumental learning and fear behaviors. Using in vivo microdialysis, we first demonstrated that prior uncontrollable, but not controllable, stress sensitizes extracellular 5-HT in the dorsal striatum, a result that parallels prior work in the BLA. Additionally, rats were implanted with bi-lateral cannula in either the DS or the BLA and exposed to uncontrollable tail shock stress. One day later, rats were injected with 5-HT(2C)R antagonist (SB242084) and fear and instrumental learning behaviors were assessed in a shuttle box. Separately, groups of non-stressed rats received an intra-DS or an intra-BLA injection of the 5-HT(2C)R agonist (CP809101) and behavior was observed. Intra-DS injections of the 5-HT(2C)R antagonist prior to fear/escape tests completely blocked the stress-induced interference with instrumental escape learning; a partial block was observed when injections were in the BLA. Antagonist administration in either region did not influence stress-induced fear behavior. In the absence of prior stress, intra-DS administration of the 5-HT(2C)R agonist was sufficient to interfere with escape behavior without enhancing fear, while intra-BLA administration of the 5-HT(2C)R agonist increased fear behavior but had no effect on escape learning. Results reveal a novel role of the 5-HT(2C)R in the DS in the expression of instrumental escape deficits produced by uncontrollable stress and demonstrate that the involvement of 5-HT(2C)R activation in stress-induced behaviors is regionally specific.

  10. Differential migration and proliferation of geometrical ensembles of cell clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Girish; Chen, Bo; Co, Carlos C.; Ho, Chia-Chi

    2011-06-10

    Differential cell migration and growth drives the organization of specific tissue forms and plays a critical role in embryonic development, tissue morphogenesis, and tumor invasion. Localized gradients of soluble factors and extracellular matrix have been shown to modulate cell migration and proliferation. Here we show that in addition to these factors, initial tissue geometry can feedback to generate differential proliferation, cell polarity, and migration patterns. We apply layer by layer polyelectrolyte assembly to confine multicellular organization and subsequently release cells to demonstrate the spatial patterns of cell migration and growth. The cell shapes, spreading areas, and cell-cell contacts are influenced strongly by the confining geometry. Cells within geometric ensembles are morphologically polarized. Symmetry breaking was observed for cells on the circular pattern and cells migrate toward the corners and in the direction parallel to the longest dimension of the geometric shapes. This migration pattern is disrupted when actomyosin based tension was inhibited. Cells near the edge or corner of geometric shapes proliferate while cells within do not. Regions of higher rate of cell migration corresponded to regions of concentrated growth. These findings demonstrate that multicellular organization can result in spatial patterns of migration and proliferation.

  11. What's driving migration?

    PubMed

    Kane, H

    1995-01-01

    During the 1990s investment in prevention of international or internal migration declined, and crisis intervention increased. The budgets of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees and the UN Development Program remained about the same. The operating assumption is that war, persecution, famine, and environmental and social disintegration are inevitable. Future efforts should be directed to stabilizing populations through investment in sanitation, public health, preventive medicine, land tenure, environmental protection, and literacy. Forces pushing migration are likely to increase in the future. Forces include depletion of natural resources, income disparities, population pressure, and political disruption. The causes of migration are not constant. In the past, migration occurred during conquests, settlement, intermarriage, or religious conversion and was a collective movement. Current migration involves mass movement of individuals and the struggle to survive. There is new pressure to leave poor squatter settlements and the scarcities in land, water, and food. The slave trade between the 1500s and the 1800s linked continents, and only 2-3 million voluntarily crossed national borders. Involuntary migration began in the early 1800s when European feudal systems were in a decline, and people sought freedom. Official refugees, who satisfy the strict 1951 UN definition, increased from 15 million in 1980 to 23 million in 1990 but remained a small proportion of international migrants. Much of the mass movement occurs between developing countries. Migration to developed countries is accompanied by growing intolerance, which is misinformed. China practices a form of "population transfer" in Tibet in order to dilute Tibetan nationalism. Colonization of countries is a new less expensive form of control over territory. Eviction of minorities is another popular strategy in Iraq. Public works projects supported by foreign aid displace millions annually. War and civil conflicts

  12. Analysing immune cell migration.

    PubMed

    Beltman, Joost B; Marée, Athanasius F M; de Boer, Rob J

    2009-11-01

    The visualization of the dynamic behaviour of and interactions between immune cells using time-lapse video microscopy has an important role in modern immunology. To draw robust conclusions, quantification of such cell migration is required. However, imaging experiments are associated with various artefacts that can affect the estimated positions of the immune cells under analysis, which form the basis of any subsequent analysis. Here, we describe potential artefacts that could affect the interpretation of data sets on immune cell migration. We propose how these errors can be recognized and corrected, and suggest ways to prevent the data analysis itself leading to biased results.

  13. [Migration, climate and health].

    PubMed

    Tellier, Siri; Carballo, Manuel; Calballo, Manuel

    2009-10-26

    Many tentative connections have been postulated between migration and climate. This article points to rural-urban migration, particularly into low elevation urban slums prone to flooding as an issue needing urgent attention by health professionals. It also notes the no-man's land in which environmental refugees find themselves and the consequences this may have. Finally, it points to the urgent need to reform health systems in both developing and developed countries to adapt to rapidly changing disease patterns and to become more responsive to them.

  14. Protein kinase Cepsilon is important for migration of neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Stensman, Helena; Larsson, Christer

    2008-01-01

    Background Migration is important for the metastatic capacity and thus for the malignancy of cancer cells. There is limited knowledge on regulatory factors that promote the migration of neuroblastoma cells. This study investigates the hypothesis that protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms regulate neuroblastoma cell motility. Methods PKC isoforms were downregulated with siRNA or modulated with activators and inhibitors. Migration was analyzed with scratch and transwell assays. Protein phosphorylation and expression levels were measured with Western blot. Results Stimulation with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) induced migration of SK-N-BE(2)C neuroblastoma cells. Treatment with the general protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor GF109203X and the inhibitor of classical isoforms Gö6976 inhibited migration while an inhibitor of PKCβ isoforms did not have an effect. Downregulation of PKCε, but not of PKCα or PKCδ, with siRNA led to a suppression of both basal and TPA-stimulated migration. Experiments using PD98059 and LY294002, inhibitors of the Erk and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathways, respectively, showed that PI3K is not necessary for TPA-induced migration. The Erk pathway might be involved in TPA-induced migration but not in migration driven by PKCε. TPA induced phosphorylation of the PKC substrate myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate (MARCKS) which was suppressed by the PKC inhibitors. Treatment with siRNA oligonucleotides against different PKC isoforms before stimulation with TPA did not influence the phosphorylation of MARCKS. Conclusion PKCε is important for migration of SK-N-BE(2)C neuroblastoma cells. Neither the Erk pathway nor MARCKS are critical downstream targets of PKCε but they may be involved in TPA-mediated migration. PMID:19077250

  15. Regulating prefrontal cortex activation: an emerging role for the 5-HT₂A serotonin receptor in the modulation of emotion-based actions?

    PubMed

    Aznar, Susana; Klein, Anders B

    2013-12-01

    The prefrontal cortex (PFC) is involved in mediating important higher-order cognitive processes such as decision making, prompting thereby our actions. At the same time, PFC activation is strongly influenced by emotional reactions through its functional interaction with the amygdala and the striatal circuitry, areas involved in emotion and reward processing. The PFC, however, is able to modulate amygdala reactivity via a feedback loop to this area. A role for serotonin in adjusting for this circuitry of cognitive regulation of emotion has long been suggested based primarily on the positive pharmacological effect of elevating serotonin levels in anxiety regulation. Recent animal and human functional magnetic resonance studies have pointed to a specific involvement of the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)2A serotonin receptor in the PFC feedback regulatory projection onto the amygdala. This receptor is highly expressed in the prefrontal cortex areas, playing an important role in modulating cortical activity and neural oscillations (brain waves). This makes it an interesting potential pharmacological target for the treatment of neuropsychiatric modes characterized by lack of inhibitory control of emotion-based actions, such as addiction and other impulse-related behaviors. In this review, we give an overview of the 5-HT2A receptor distribution (neuronal, intracellular, and anatomical) along with its functional and physiological effect on PFC activation, and how that relates to more recent findings of a regulatory effect of the PFC on the emotional control of our actions.

  16. Engineered Models of Confined Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Colin D.; Hung, Wei-Chien; Wirtz, Denis; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2017-01-01

    Cells in the body are physically confined by neighboring cells, tissues, and the extracellular matrix. Although physical confinement modulates intracellular signaling and the underlying mechanisms of cell migration, it is difficult to study in vivo. Furthermore, traditional two-dimensional cell migration assays do not recapitulate the complex topographies found in the body. Therefore, a number of experimental in vitro models that confine and impose forces on cells in well-defined microenvironments have been engineered. We describe the design and use of microfluidic microchannel devices, grooved substrates, micropatterned lines, vertical confinement devices, patterned hydrogels, and micropipette aspiration assays for studying cell responses to confinement. Use of these devices has enabled the delineation of changes in cytoskeletal reorganization, cell–substrate adhesions, intracellular signaling, nuclear shape, and gene expression that result from physical confinement. These assays and the physiologically relevant signaling pathways that have been elucidated are beginning to have a translational and clinical impact. PMID:27420571

  17. Brain Migration Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vinokur, Annie

    2006-01-01

    The "brain drain/brain gain" debate has been going on for the past 40 years, with irresolvable theoretical disputes and unenforceable policy recommendations that economists commonly ascribe to the lack of reliable empirical data. The recent report of the World Bank, "International migration, remittances and the brain drain", documents the…

  18. [Internal migration in Tanzania].

    PubMed

    Banyikwa, W F

    1982-01-01

    A general survey of population distribution in Tanzania is first presented using data from censuses taken between 1948 and 1979. Variations in distribution patterns are identified and discussed. The author then considers both spontaneous and planned internal migration trends and the factors affecting them. The effects of the official policy to resettle the rural population in larger villages are considered. (summary in ENG, RUS)

  19. Do downy woodpeckers migrate?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Browning, M.R.

    1995-01-01

    Seasonal movement and migration of Downy Woodpeckers (Picoides pubescens) are indicated in several sources in the literature. Analyses of 3784 recoveries of banded birds, with other data, indicate that the species is resident, and that movements of a few individuals may indicate dispersal.

  20. Method of migrating seismic records

    DOEpatents

    Ober, Curtis C.; Romero, Louis A.; Ghiglia, Dennis C.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of migrating seismic records that retains the information in the seismic records and allows migration with significant reductions in computing cost. The present invention comprises phase encoding seismic records and combining the encoded seismic records before migration. Phase encoding can minimize the effect of unwanted cross terms while still allowing significant reductions in the cost to migrate a number of seismic records.

  1. The commercialization of migration.

    PubMed

    Abrera-mangahas, M A

    1989-01-01

    International migration is not new to the Philippines. In the recent outflow of contract workers to the Middle East, there is a shift from individual and family initiated migrations to the more organized, highly commercial variety. While profit-taking intermediaries have played some role in the past, the increase in the number and influence of these intermediaries has altered the story of migration decision-making. In 1975, the signing of the bilateral labor agreement between the governments of Iran and the Philippines signalled the rising demand for Filipino contract workers. From 1970 to 1975, the number of Asian migrant workers in the Gulf countries rose from about 120,000 to 370,000. These figures rose dramatically to 3.3 million in 1985. The growing share of organized and commercialized migration has altered migration decision making. Primarily, intermediaries are able to broaden access to foreign job and high wage opportunities. Commercialization effectively raises the transaction costs for contract migration. Studies on recruitment costs and fees show that self-solicited foreign employment costs less than employment obtained through recruitment agents and intermediaries. The difference in the 2 prices is due, not only to overhead costs of intermediation, but more importantly to the rent exacted by agents from having job information and placement rights. In the Philippines in October 1987 the average placement fee was P8000, greatly exceeding the mandated maximum fee level of P5000. This average is understated because the computation includes the 17% who do not pay any fees. The widespread and popular view of recruitment intermediaries is negative, dominated by images of abuses and victims. Private intermediaries and the government bureaucracy need each other. Intermediaries need government; their consistent demand for incentives and protection is indicative. On the other hand, government expands its supervision of control of overseas employment via the

  2. Treg induction, migration, and function in transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Burrell, Bryna E.; Nakayama, Yumi; Xu, Jiangnan; Brinkman, C. Colin; Bromberg, Jonathan S.

    2012-01-01

    Treg are important in maintaining immune homeostasis and in regulating a variety of immune responses, making them attractive targets for modulating immune-related diseases. Success in using induction or transfer of Treg in mice to mediate transplant tolerance suggests Treg-based therapies as mechanisms of long-term drug free transplant tolerance in human patients. While more work is needed, critical analyses suggest that key factors in Treg induction, migration, and function are important areas to concentrate investigative efforts and therapeutic development. Elucidation of basic biology will aid in translating data gleaned from mice to humans so that Treg therapies become reality for patients. PMID:23125426

  3. [Migration in the Caribbean Basin].

    PubMed

    Pastor, R A

    1982-06-01

    A review of recent migration trends in the Caribbean region is presented. The region is defined as those countries and territories in or surrounding the Caribbean. Consideration is also given to migration from the region to the United States. The characteristics and consequences of these migration trends are discussed.

  4. SEROTONIN TRANSPORTER AND INTEGRIN BETA 3 GENES INTERACT TO MODULATE SEROTONIN UPTAKE IN MOUSE BRAIN

    PubMed Central

    Whyte, Alonzo; Jessen, Tammy; Varney, Seth; Carneiro, Ana MD

    2013-01-01

    Dysfunctions in serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) systems have been associated with several psychiatric illnesses, including anxiety, depression, obsessive-compulsive disorders and autism spectrum disorders. Convergent evidence from genetic analyses of human subjects has implicated the integrin β3 subunit gene (ITGB3) as a modulator of serotonergic systems via genetic interactions with the 5-HT transporter gene (SLC6A4, SERT). While genetic interactions may result from contributions of each gene at several levels, we hypothesize that ITGB3 modulates the 5-HT system at the level of the synapse, through the actions of integrin αvβ3. Here we utilized a genetic approach in mouse models to examine Itgb3 contributions to SERT function both in the context of normal and reduced SERT expression. As integrin αvβ3 is expressed in postsynaptic membranes, we isolated synaptoneurosomes, which maintain intact pre- and post-synaptic associations. Citalopram binding revealed significant Slc6a4-driven reductions in SERT expression in midbrain synapses, whereas no significant changes were observed in hippocampal or cortical projections. Expecting corresponding changes to SERT function, we also measured 5-HT uptake activity in synaptoneurosomal preparations. Itgb3 single heterozygous mice displayed significant reductions in 5-HT Vmax, with no chages in Km, in midbrain preparations. However, in the presence of both Itgb3 and Slc6a4 heterozygozity, 5-HT uptake was similar to wild-type levels, revealing a significant Slc6a4 by Itgb3 genetic interaction in the midbrain. Similar findings were observed in cortical preparations, whereas in the hippocampus, most Vmax changes were driven solely by Slc6a4. Our findings provide evidence that integrin αvβ3 is involved in the regulation of serotonergic systems in some, but not all 5-HT synapses, revealing novel contributions to synaptic specificity within the central nervous system. PMID:24083985

  5. Serotonin transporter and integrin beta 3 genes interact to modulate serotonin uptake in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Whyte, Alonzo; Jessen, Tammy; Varney, Seth; Carneiro, Ana M D

    2014-07-01

    Dysfunctions in serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) systems have been associated with several psychiatric illnesses, including anxiety, depression, obsessive-compulsive disorders and autism spectrum disorders. Convergent evidence from genetic analyses of human subjects has implicated the integrin β3 subunit gene (ITGB3) as a modulator of serotonergic systems via genetic interactions with the 5-HT transporter gene (SLC6A4, SERT). While genetic interactions may result from contributions of each gene at several levels, we hypothesize that ITGB3 modulates the 5-HT system at the level of the synapse, through the actions of integrin αvβ3. Here we utilized a genetic approach in mouse models to examine Itgb3 contributions to SERT function both in the context of normal and reduced SERT expression. As integrin αvβ3 is expressed in postsynaptic membranes, we isolated synaptoneurosomes, which maintain intact pre- and post-synaptic associations. Citalopram binding revealed significant Slc6a4-driven reductions in SERT expression in midbrain synapses, whereas no significant changes were observed in hippocampal or cortical projections. Expecting corresponding changes to SERT function, we also measured 5-HT uptake activity in synaptoneurosomal preparations. Itgb3 single heterozygous mice displayed significant reductions in 5-HT Vmax, with no changes in Km, in midbrain preparations. However, in the presence of both Itgb3 and Slc6a4 heterozygozity, 5-HT uptake was similar to wild-type levels, revealing a significant Slc6a4 by Itgb3 genetic interaction in the midbrain. Similar findings were observed in cortical preparations, whereas in the hippocampus, most Vmax changes were driven solely by Slc6a4. Our findings provide evidence that integrin αvβ3 is involved in the regulation of serotonergic systems in some, but not all 5-HT synapses, revealing novel contributions to synaptic specificity within the central nervous system.

  6. Extrasynaptic Neurotransmission in the Modulation of Brain Function. Focus on the Striatal Neuronal–Glial Networks

    PubMed Central

    Fuxe, Kjell; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O.; Romero-Fernandez, Wilber; Diaz-Cabiale, Zaida; Rivera, Alicia; Ferraro, Luca; Tanganelli, Sergio; Tarakanov, Alexander O.; Garriga, Pere; Narváez, José Angel; Ciruela, Francisco; Guescini, Michele; Agnati, Luigi F.

    2012-01-01

    Extrasynaptic neurotransmission is an important short distance form of volume transmission (VT) and describes the extracellular diffusion of transmitters and modulators after synaptic spillover or extrasynaptic release in the local circuit regions binding to and activating mainly extrasynaptic neuronal and glial receptors in the neuroglial networks of the brain. Receptor-receptor interactions in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) heteromers play a major role, on dendritic spines and nerve terminals including glutamate synapses, in the integrative processes of the extrasynaptic signaling. Heteromeric complexes between GPCR and ion-channel receptors play a special role in the integration of the synaptic and extrasynaptic signals. Changes in extracellular concentrations of the classical synaptic neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA found with microdialysis is likely an expression of the activity of the neuron-astrocyte unit of the brain and can be used as an index of VT-mediated actions of these two neurotransmitters in the brain. Thus, the activity of neurons may be functionally linked to the activity of astrocytes, which may release glutamate and GABA to the extracellular space where extrasynaptic glutamate and GABA receptors do exist. Wiring transmission (WT) and VT are fundamental properties of all neurons of the CNS but the balance between WT and VT varies from one nerve cell population to the other. The focus is on the striatal cellular networks, and the WT and VT and their integration via receptor heteromers are described in the GABA projection neurons, the glutamate, dopamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and histamine striatal afferents, the cholinergic interneurons, and different types of GABA interneurons. In addition, the role in these networks of VT signaling of the energy-dependent modulator adenosine and of endocannabinoids mainly formed in the striatal projection neurons will be underlined to understand the communication in the striatal cellular networks

  7. Forced Migration: Refugee Populations

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Joyceen S.

    2015-01-01

    Undocumented migration is a global phenomenon that manifests in various contexts. This article describes the impact of the movement of large numbers of people in several African countries, producing a unique type of migrant—the refugee. We describe issues that refugee movements create on fragile health care systems, situations that precipitate refugee movements, certain human rights violations that are of particular concern such as gender based violence (GBV) and child soldiers, and lastly, implications for nursing practice and policy. We use examples from several countries in Sub-Saharan Africa, including the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Rwanda, Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Mozambique. Drawing on key documents from the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, current literature, as well as the international experience of the authors, this article presents an overview of forced migration and discusses opportunities for nurses to impact research, practice and policy related to refugee health. PMID:25645484

  8. Computational model of mesenchymal migration in 3D under chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, F. O.; Gómez-Benito, M. J.; Folgado, J.; Fernandes, P. R.; García-Aznar, J. M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Cell chemotaxis is an important characteristic of cellular migration, which takes part in crucial aspects of life and development. In this work, we propose a novel in silico model of mesenchymal 3D migration with competing protrusions under a chemotactic gradient. Based on recent experimental observations, we identify three main stages that can regulate mesenchymal chemotaxis: chemosensing, dendritic protrusion dynamics and cell–matrix interactions. Therefore, each of these features is considered as a different module of the main regulatory computational algorithm. The numerical model was particularized for the case of fibroblast chemotaxis under a PDGF-bb gradient. Fibroblasts migration was simulated embedded in two different 3D matrices – collagen and fibrin – and under several PDGF-bb concentrations. Validation of the model results was provided through qualitative and quantitative comparison with in vitro studies. Our numerical predictions of cell trajectories and speeds were within the measured in vitro ranges in both collagen and fibrin matrices. Although in fibrin, the migration speed of fibroblasts is very low, because fibrin is a stiffer and more entangling matrix. Testing PDGF-bb concentrations, we noticed that an increment of this factor produces a speed increment. At 1 ng mL−1 a speed peak is reached after which the migration speed diminishes again. Moreover, we observed that fibrin exerts a dampening behavior on migration, significantly affecting the migration efficiency. PMID:27336322

  9. Computational model of mesenchymal migration in 3D under chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, F O; Gómez-Benito, M J; Folgado, J; Fernandes, P R; García-Aznar, J M

    2017-01-01

    Cell chemotaxis is an important characteristic of cellular migration, which takes part in crucial aspects of life and development. In this work, we propose a novel in silico model of mesenchymal 3D migration with competing protrusions under a chemotactic gradient. Based on recent experimental observations, we identify three main stages that can regulate mesenchymal chemotaxis: chemosensing, dendritic protrusion dynamics and cell-matrix interactions. Therefore, each of these features is considered as a different module of the main regulatory computational algorithm. The numerical model was particularized for the case of fibroblast chemotaxis under a PDGF-bb gradient. Fibroblasts migration was simulated embedded in two different 3D matrices - collagen and fibrin - and under several PDGF-bb concentrations. Validation of the model results was provided through qualitative and quantitative comparison with in vitro studies. Our numerical predictions of cell trajectories and speeds were within the measured in vitro ranges in both collagen and fibrin matrices. Although in fibrin, the migration speed of fibroblasts is very low, because fibrin is a stiffer and more entangling matrix. Testing PDGF-bb concentrations, we noticed that an increment of this factor produces a speed increment. At 1 ng mL(-1) a speed peak is reached after which the migration speed diminishes again. Moreover, we observed that fibrin exerts a dampening behavior on migration, significantly affecting the migration efficiency.

  10. Modulation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schilling, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    Bandwidth efficient digital modulation techniques, proposed for use on and/or applied to satellite channels, are reviewed. In a survey of recent works on digital modulation techniques, the performance of several schemes operating in various environments are compared. Topics covered include: (1) quadrature phase shift keying; (2) offset - QPSK and MSK; (3) combined modulation and coding; and (4) spectrally efficient modulation techniques.

  11. Erosion, Contamination, and Migration

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, J. D.

    2010-05-20

    This paper will summarize studies of carbon impurity sources, contamination, and migration developed through JET methane gas injection experiments. These studies were analyzed using the 2D SOL code EDGE2D/NIMBUS. The code is capable of repeating the JET analysis using the ITER geometry and SOL plasma. This allows assessment of whether the physical processes occurring in JET might also occur in ITER, and thus whether the JET results transfer, in any sense, to the ITER plasmas. Certainly, the ITER choice of wall materials (W and Be) is different than for the present JET C studies. So the present status of these studies is to relate JET carbon behavior to carbon in ITER.JET carbon sources were studied spectroscopically and analyzed with atomic physics models in EDGE2D. The carbon sources are dominated by chemical sputtering at rates which are within a factor-of-two of the published literature. The JET carbon contamination is dominated by main chamber sources which are ionized in the main chamber SOL about 1-2 cm from the separatrix. Contamination occurs from carbon ions which diffuse across the field lines and reach the separatrix before they can parallel transport to the divertor. JET carbon migration was studied by injecting methane composed of {sup 13}C on the last run day before an opening and then analyzing removed tiles to identify migration to those locations. Modeling was accomplished by the same EDGE2D models that were used to describe the carbon sources and contamination. The entire migration process is complicated.

  12. Erosion, Contamination, and Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strachan, J. D.

    2010-05-01

    This paper will summarize studies of carbon impurity sources, contamination, and migration developed through JET methane gas injection experiments. These studies were analyzed using the 2D SOL code EDGE2D/NIMBUS. The code is capable of repeating the JET analysis using the ITER geometry and SOL plasma. This allows assessment of whether the physical processes occurring in JET might also occur in ITER, and thus whether the JET results transfer, in any sense, to the ITER plasmas. Certainly, the ITER choice of wall materials (W and Be) is different than for the present JET C studies. So the present status of these studies is to relate JET carbon behavior to carbon in ITER. JET carbon sources were studied spectroscopically and analyzed with atomic physics models in EDGE2D. The carbon sources are dominated by chemical sputtering at rates which are within a factor-of-two of the published literature. The JET carbon contamination is dominated by main chamber sources which are ionized in the main chamber SOL about 1-2 cm from the separatrix. Contamination occurs from carbon ions which diffuse across the field lines and reach the separatrix before they can parallel transport to the divertor. JET carbon migration was studied by injecting methane composed of 13C on the last run day before an opening and then analyzing removed tiles to identify migration to those locations. Modeling was accomplished by the same EDGE2D models that were used to describe the carbon sources and contamination. The entire migration process is complicated.

  13. Migration and stratification

    PubMed Central

    Jasso, Guillermina

    2011-01-01

    Migration and stratification are increasingly intertwined. One day soon it will be impossible to understand one without the other. Both focus on life chances. Stratification is about differential life chances - who gets what and why - and migration is about improving life chances - getting more of the good things of life. To examine the interconnections of migration and stratification, we address a mix of old and new questions, carrying out analyses newly enabled by a unique new data set on recent legal immigrants to the United States (the New Immigrant Survey). We look at immigrant processing and lost documents, depression due to the visa process, presentation of self, the race-ethnic composition of an immigrant cohort (made possible by the data for the first time since 1961), black immigration from Africa and the Americas, skin-color diversity among couples formed by U.S. citizen sponsors and immigrant spouses, and English fluency among children age 8–12 and their immigrant parents. We find, inter alia, that children of previously illegal parents are especially more likely to be fluent in English, that native-born U.S. citizen women tend to marry darker, that immigrant applicants who go through the visa process while already in the United States are more likely to have their documents lost and to suffer visa depression, and that immigration, by introducing accomplished black immigrants from Africa (notably via the visa lottery), threatens to overturn racial and skin color associations with skill. Our analyses show the mutual embeddedness of migration and stratification in the unfolding of the immigrants' and their children's life chances and the impacts on the stratification structure of the United States. PMID:26321771

  14. Retrograde gastrojejunostomy tube migration.

    PubMed

    Adesina, Adeleke; Rammohan, Guhan; Jeanmonod, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Percutaneous enteral feeding tubes are placed about 250,000 times each year in the United States. Although they are relatively safe, their placement may be complicated by perforation, infection, bleeding, vomiting, dislodgment, and obstruction. There have been numerous reports of antegrade migration of gastrojejunostomy (G-J) tubes. We report a case of G-J tube regurgitation following protracted vomiting and discuss the management of this very rare entity.

  15. Gender and migration from Albania.

    PubMed

    Stecklov, Guy; Carletto, Calogero; Azzarri, Carlo; Davis, Benjamin

    2010-11-01

    This article examines the dynamics and causes of the shift in the gender composition of migration, and more particularly, in women's access to migration opportunities and decision-making. Our analysis focuses on Albania, a natural laboratory for studying international migration where out-migration was essentially nonexistent from the end of World War II to the end of the 1980s. Interest in the Albanian case is heightened because of the complex layers of inequality existing at the time when migration began: relatively low levels of inequality within the labor market and educational system-a product of the Communist era-while household relations remained heavily steeped in tradition and patriarchy. We use micro-level data from the Albania 2005 Living Standards Measurement Study, including migration histories for family members since migration began. Based on discrete-time hazard models, the analysis shows a dramatic increase in male migration and a gradual and uneven expansion of the female proportion of this international migration. Female migration, which is shown to be strongly associated with education, wealth, and social capital, appears responsive to economic incentives and constraints. Using information on the dependency of female migration to the household demographic structure as well as the sensitivity of female migration to household-level shocks, we show how household-level constraints and incentives affect male and female migration differently. Throughout this period, however, women's migration behavior appears more directly aligned with household-level factors, and there is little evidence to suggest that increased female migration signals rising behavioral independence among Albanian women.

  16. Conservation physiology of animal migration

    PubMed Central

    Lennox, Robert J.; Chapman, Jacqueline M.; Souliere, Christopher M.; Tudorache, Christian; Wikelski, Martin; Metcalfe, Julian D.; Cooke, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    Migration is a widespread phenomenon among many taxa. This complex behaviour enables animals to exploit many temporally productive and spatially discrete habitats to accrue various fitness benefits (e.g. growth, reproduction, predator avoidance). Human activities and global environmental change represent potential threats to migrating animals (from individuals to species), and research is underway to understand mechanisms that control migration and how migration responds to modern challenges. Focusing on behavioural and physiological aspects of migration can help to provide better understanding, management and conservation of migratory populations. Here, we highlight different physiological, behavioural and biomechanical aspects of animal migration that will help us to understand how migratory animals interact with current and future anthropogenic threats. We are in the early stages of a changing planet, and our understanding of how physiology is linked to the persistence of migratory animals is still developing; therefore, we regard the following questions as being central to the conservation physiology of animal migrations. Will climate change influence the energetic costs of migration? Will shifting temperatures change the annual clocks of migrating animals? Will anthropogenic influences have an effect on orientation during migration? Will increased anthropogenic alteration of migration stopover sites/migration corridors affect the stress physiology of migrating animals? Can physiological knowledge be used to identify strategies for facilitating the movement of animals? Our synthesis reveals that given the inherent challenges of migration, additional stressors derived from altered environments (e.g. climate change, physical habitat alteration, light pollution) or interaction with human infrastructure (e.g. wind or hydrokinetic turbines, dams) or activities (e.g. fisheries) could lead to long-term changes to migratory phenotypes. However, uncertainty remains

  17. Gender and Migration from Albania

    PubMed Central

    STECKLOV, GUY; CARLETTO, CALOGERO; AZZARRI, CARLO; DAVIS, BENJAMIN

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the dynamics and causes of the shift in the gender composition of migration, and more particularly, in women’s access to migration opportunities and decision-making. Our analysis focuses on Albania, a natural laboratory for studying international migration where out-migration was essentially nonexistent from the end of World War II to the end of the 1980s. Interest in the Albanian case is heightened because of the complex layers of inequality existing at the time when migration began: relatively low levels of inequality within the labor market and educational system—a product of the Communist era—while household relations remained heavily steeped in tradition and patriarchy. We use micro-level data from the Albania 2005 Living Standards Measurement Study, including migration histories for family members since migration began. Based on discrete-time hazard models, the analysis shows a dramatic increase in male migration and a gradual and uneven expansion of the female proportion of this international migration. Female migration, which is shown to be strongly associated with education, wealth, and social capital, appears responsive to economic incentives and constraints. Using information on the dependency of female migration to the household demographic structure as well as the sensitivity of female migration to household-level shocks, we show how household-level constraints and incentives affect male and female migration differently. Throughout this period, however, women’s migration behavior appears more directly aligned with household-level factors, and there is little evidence to suggest that increased female migration signals rising behavioral independence among Albanian women. PMID:21308565

  18. Conservation physiology of animal migration.

    PubMed

    Lennox, Robert J; Chapman, Jacqueline M; Souliere, Christopher M; Tudorache, Christian; Wikelski, Martin; Metcalfe, Julian D; Cooke, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    Migration is a widespread phenomenon among many taxa. This complex behaviour enables animals to exploit many temporally productive and spatially discrete habitats to accrue various fitness benefits (e.g. growth, reproduction, predator avoidance). Human activities and global environmental change represent potential threats to migrating animals (from individuals to species), and research is underway to understand mechanisms that control migration and how migration responds to modern challenges. Focusing on behavioural and physiological aspects of migration can help to provide better understanding, management and conservation of migratory populations. Here, we highlight different physiological, behavioural and biomechanical aspects of animal migration that will help us to understand how migratory animals interact with current and future anthropogenic threats. We are in the early stages of a changing planet, and our understanding of how physiology is linked to the persistence of migratory animals is still developing; therefore, we regard the following questions as being central to the conservation physiology of animal migrations. Will climate change influence the energetic costs of migration? Will shifting temperatures change the annual clocks of migrating animals? Will anthropogenic influences have an effect on orientation during migration? Will increased anthropogenic alteration of migration stopover sites/migration corridors affect the stress physiology of migrating animals? Can physiological knowledge be used to identify strategies for facilitating the movement of animals? Our synthesis reveals that given the inherent challenges of migration, additional stressors derived from altered environments (e.g. climate change, physical habitat alteration, light pollution) or interaction with human infrastructure (e.g. wind or hydrokinetic turbines, dams) or activities (e.g. fisheries) could lead to long-term changes to migratory phenotypes. However, uncertainty remains

  19. Lines of evidence for environmentally driven human migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, K. F.; D'Odorico, P.

    2012-12-01

    determine additional factors that may help explain migration at global, regional, continental and community-based (i.e. maximized module) scales. Lastly, we explore the relationship between migration and natural disasters (e.g. drought, flooding) to identify instances in which the environment is a proximate cause of human displacement and in turn use this information to determine if a subsequent cascade of human movements appears in neighboring countries as a result of the elevated inflow of migrants from the initial country of interest. In this way, we seek to gain a fuller picture of the environmental factors driving the dynamics of modern human migration.

  20. ILO - International Migration Programme.

    PubMed

    Boudraa, Miriam

    2011-01-01

    In a wide International Context characterised not only by the economical development but also by the social, cultural, political and individual development, we witness more and more to a exchange between the developed and the developing countries, which can be translated especially in the migration of the work force. In theory, all countries are either countries of origin either countries of transit or destination, and they are all responsible for the rights of migrant workers by promoting the rights, by monitoring and by preventing the abusive conditions. The process of migration of the workforce can be divided into three stages: the first coincides with the period prior to departure, the second is represented by the aftermath of the departure and the period of stay in the country of destination, the third stage corresponds to the return in the country of origin. The workers must be protected throughout this process by the international organizations that perform the catalytic role of communication and exchange between countries, for the only purpose of protecting the rights of immigrant and/or immigrants workers. The responsibility for the protection of workers is divided among the various players in the International Labour Organisation. Every country has to apply measures according to the international standards regarding workers' rights, standards that guide the various countries in the formulation and implementation of their policies and legislation. These standards are suggested by International Conventions, the ILO Conventions and other international instruments such as the human rights instrument. There has been a big step forward once the ILO Fundamental Conventions and Conventions on Migrant Workers where implemented and this implementation represented the use of the Guidelines "ILO Multilateral Framework on Labour Migration".

  1. Physical view on migration modes

    PubMed Central

    Mierke, Claudia Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Cellular motility is essential for many processes such as embryonic development, wound healing processes, tissue assembly and regeneration, immune cell trafficing and diseases such as cancer. The migration efficiency and the migratory potential depend on the type of migration mode. The previously established migration modes such as epithelial (non-migratory) and mesenchymal (migratory) as well as amoeboid (squeezing motility) relay mainly on phenomenological criteria such as cell morphology and molecular biological criteria such as gene expression. However, the physical view on the migration modes is still not well understood. As the process of malignant cancer progression such as metastasis depends on the migration of single cancer cells and their migration mode, this review focuses on the different migration strategies and discusses which mechanical prerequisites are necessary to perform a special migration mode through a 3-dimensional microenvironment. In particular, this review discusses how cells can distinguish and finally switch between the migration modes and what impact do the physical properties of cells and their microenvironment have on the transition between the novel migration modes such as blebbing and protrusive motility. PMID:26192136

  2. Physical view on migration modes.

    PubMed

    Mierke, Claudia Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Cellular motility is essential for many processes such as embryonic development, wound healing processes, tissue assembly and regeneration, immune cell trafficing and diseases such as cancer. The migration efficiency and the migratory potential depend on the type of migration mode. The previously established migration modes such as epithelial (non-migratory) and mesenchymal (migratory) as well as amoeboid (squeezing motility) relay mainly on phenomenological criteria such as cell morphology and molecular biological criteria such as gene expression. However, the physical view on the migration modes is still not well understood. As the process of malignant cancer progression such as metastasis depends on the migration of single cancer cells and their migration mode, this review focuses on the different migration strategies and discusses which mechanical prerequisites are necessary to perform a special migration mode through a 3-dimensional microenvironment. In particular, this review discusses how cells can distinguish and finally switch between the migration modes and what impact do the physical properties of cells and their microenvironment have on the transition between the novel migration modes such as blebbing and protrusive motility.

  3. Migration and AIDS.

    PubMed

    Decosas, J; Kane, F; Anarfi, J K; Sodji, K D; Wagner, H U

    1995-09-23

    A successful short-term solution to transmission of AIDS in Western Africa by migrants involves provision of accessible and acceptable basic health and social services to migrants at their destination. The aim is to establish a sense of security and community, which is a health requirement. When migrants are excluded from community life or victimized as carriers of HIV infections, they will be driven by basic survival needs and dysfunctional social organization, which results in the rapid spread of HIV. Closing borders and mass deportation may not be an option. The long-term solution is population policy, environmental protection, and economic development. The focus on mapping the spread of AIDS must shift to a consideration of the migrant social conditions that make them vulnerable to AIDS. The issue of migration and AIDS will be addressed at the First European Conference on Tropical Medicine in October 1995 in Hamburg, Germany. In Uganda, HIV seroprevalence rates ranged from 5.5% among the stable population to 12.4% among internal migrants moving between villages to 16.3% among migrants from other areas. A World Bank project is operating in Western Africa, which traces seasonal male migration from the Cameroon to Liberia, Senegal to Nigeria, and from the Sahel to the coast during dry seasons. National border rules may influence the routes but not the extent of migration. A major destination place is Cote d' Ivoire, which has 25% of total population comprised of migrants from other countries and one of the highest HIV prevalence rates in Western Africa. On plantations prostitutes are brought in. Each prostitute serves about 25 workers. The pattern of sexual mixing contributes to the high HIV rates. Female migration is smaller and usually concentrated in prostitution at place of destination. Illiteracy and poverty drive women migrants into the trade. Their frequent health problems are malaria, pelvic pain, menstrual irregularity, vaginal discharge, and genital

  4. Migration of Asteroidal Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ipatov, S. I.; Mather, J. C.

    2003-01-01

    Using the Bulirsh Stoer method of integration, we investigated the migration of dust particles under the gravitational influence of all planets, radiation pressure, Poynting Robertson drag and solar wind drag for equal to 0.01, 0.05, 0.1, 0.25, and 0.4. For silicate particles such values of correspond to diameters equal to about 40, 9, 4, 2, and 1 microns, respectively [1]. The relative error per integration step was taken to be less than 10sup-8. Initial orbits of the particles were close to the orbits of the first numbered mainbelt asteroids.

  5. [Obesity, migration and adolescence].

    PubMed

    Chamay-Weber, Catherine; Shehu-Brovina, Shqipe; Narring, Françoise

    2012-06-13

    Weight management interventions during adolescence are challenging. Migration adds complexity to this problem, making migrant families more vulnerable. Teenagers confront families to new values transmitted by the host society: opulence, junk food, video games. Obesity should not be seen as a single issue of calories-excess, but must be considered as being part of a larger problem, which takes into account the context of the familial and societal life of the migrants. The caregivers must have an overall view of the situation to provide appropriate approaches to weight management.

  6. Serotonin receptor-mediated stimulation of bovine smooth muscle cell prostacyclin synthesis and its modulation by platelet-derived growth factor.

    PubMed Central

    Coughlin, S R; Moskowitz, M A; Antoniades, H N; Levine, L

    1981-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 0.5 microM and above) stimulated the synthesis of prostacyclin (as measured by radioimmunoassay of 6-ketoprostaglandin F1 alpha) by bovine aortic smooth muscle cells in culture. This effect was structurally specific; a similar response was not elicited by the other indoles (tryptophan, n-acetylserotonin, 5-hydroxytryptophan, melatonin, or 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid) or by the amines phenylephrine, isoproterenol, dopamine, or histamine). The response was reversible and was saturable at serotonin concentrations of 10 microM or higher. An increase in prostacyclin synthesis was elicited by the addition of a serotonin agonist, quipazine (1 microM and above), and antagonized by the serotonin receptor blockers cyproheptadine, methysergide, or methiothepin but not by other aminergic receptor-blocking drugs (e.g., phentolamine or propranolol). This effect was selective for cell type because serotonin or quipazine (100 microM) did not increase prostacyclin synthesis by bovine aortic endothelial cells. The addition of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) to cultures of smooth muscle cells dramatically enhanced prostacyclin synthesis in response to the coadministration of serotonin. PDGF greatly increased the maximum response to serotonin without altering the half-maximal effective concentration for serotonin. This synergistic interaction was blocked by the addition of a serotonin-receptor blocking agent. Taken together, these data suggest that serotonin stimulates smooth muscle prostacyclin synthesis through a specific receptor-mediated mechanism that can be modulated by PDGF. Images PMID:7031670

  7. Excitation mechanism of non-migrating tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyoshi, Yasunobu; Pancheva, Dora; Mukhtarov, Plamen; Jin, Hidekatsu; Fujiwara, Hitoshi; Shinagawa, Hiroyuki

    2017-04-01

    Using an atmosphere-ionosphere coupled model, the excitation source and temporal (seasonal and interannual) variations in non-migrating tides are investigated in this study. We first focus our attention on temporal variations in eastward moving diurnal tide with zonal wavenumber 3 (DE3), which is the largest of all the non-migrating tides in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT). Our simulation results indicate that upward propagation of the DE3 excited in the troposphere is sensitive to the zonal mean zonal wind in the stratosphere and mesosphere. The DE3 amplitude is enhanced in the region where the vertical shear of the zonal mean zonal wind is positive (westerly shear). Quasi-2-year variation in the DE3 amplitude in the MLT region is generated by quasi-2-year variation in the zonal mean zonal wind between 40 and 70 km, which is modulated by the stratospheric QBO. The excitation mechanisms of SW3 (westward moving semidiurnal tide with zonal wavenumber 3) and SW1 (westward moving semidiurnal tide with zonal wavenumber 1) are also investigated. During equinoxes, the SW3 and SW1 are excited by tropospheric heating (latent heat release and solar radiative heating) associated with cumulus convection in the tropics, and propagate upward into the MLT region. On the other hand, during solstices, SW3 and SW1 are generated in the winter stratosphere and mesosphere through the nonlinear interaction between the stationary planetary wave and migrating semidiurnal tide, and propagate upward to the lower thermosphere. The excitation sources of other non-migrating tides are also discussed.

  8. Crustal thickening drives arc front migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlstrom, L.; Lee, C.; Manga, M.

    2012-12-01

    The position of active volcanism relative to the trench in arcs depends on melt focusing processes within the mantle wedge and the geometric parameters of subduction. Arc front migration has been observed in relic (Sierra Nevada, Andes) as well as active (Cascades) arcs, sometimes with cycles of retreat and return of the front towards the trench over millions of years. Other arcs, particularly where backarc extension dominates, exhibit a more stationary front in time relative to the trench. In addition, crustal indices of magmatism as measured by the ratio of trace elements La/Yb or isotopes 87}Sr/{86Sr covary with arc front migration (e.g., Haschke et al., 2002). Arc front migration is commonly attributed to variation in dip angle of the downgoing slab, delamination of overthickened crust, or to subduction erosion. Here we present an alternative hypothesis. Assuming mantle wedge melting is a largely temperature-dependant process, the maximum isotherm in the wedge sets arc front location. Isotherm location depends on slab angle, subduction velocity and wedge thermal diffusivity (England and Katz, 2010). It also depends on crustal thickness, which evolves as melt is transferred from the wedge to the crust. Arc front migration can thus occur purely through magmatic thickening of crust. Thickening proceeds through intrusive as well as extrusive volcanism, modulated by tectonics and surface erosion. Migration rate is set by the mantle melt flux into the crust, which decreases as thickening occurs. Thus slab angle need not change, and in the absence of other contribution processes front location and crustal thickness have long-time steady state values. We develop an analytic model of this process that produces migration rates consistent with published data and explains arc fronts that do not move (dominated by extension, such as in the case of intra-oceanic arcs). We present new geochemical and age data from the Peninsular Ranges Batholith that are also consistent with

  9. Crustal thickening drives arc front migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlstrom, Leif; Lee, Cin-Ty; Manga, Michael

    2014-05-01

    The location of volcanic arcs, relative to the trench evolves over time. Arc front migration has been observed in relic (Sierra Nevada, Andes) as well as active (Cascades) arcs, sometimes with cycles of retreat and return of the front towards the trench over millions of years. Other arcs, particularly where back-arc extension dominates, migrate more slowly, if at all. Coupled with arc migration there are systematic changes in the geochemistry of magmas such as the ratio of trace elements La/Yb and 87Sr/86Sr isotopes (e.g., Haschke et al., 2002). The position of active volcanic arcs relative to the trench is controlled by the location where melt is generated in the mantle wedge, in turn controlled by the geometry of subduction, and the processes that focus rising melt. Arc front migration is commonly attributed to variation in dip angle of the downgoing slab, delamination of overthickened crust, or to subduction erosion. Here we present an alternative hypothesis. Assuming mantle wedge melting is a largely temperature-dependant process, the maximum isotherm in the wedge sets arc front location. Isotherm location depends on slab angle, subduction velocity and wedge thermal diffusivity (England and Katz, 2010). It also depends on crustal thickness, which evolves as melt is transferred from the wedge to the crust. Arc front migration can thus occur purely through magmatic thickening of crust and lithosphere. Thickening rate is determined by the mantle melt flux into the crust, modulated by tectonics and surface erosion. It is not steady in time, as crustal thickening progressively truncates the mantle melt column and eventually shuts it off. Thus slab angle need not change, and in the absence of other contribution processes front location and crustal thickness have long-time steady state values. We develop a quantitative model for arc front migration that is consistent with published arc front data, and explains why arc fronts do not move when there is extension, such

  10. Cell migration in the forebrain.

    PubMed

    Marín, Oscar; Rubenstein, John L R

    2003-01-01

    The forebrain comprises an intricate set of structures that are required for some of the most complex and evolved functions of the mammalian brain. As a reflection of its complexity, cell migration in the forebrain is extremely elaborated, with widespread dispersion of cells across multiple functionally distinct areas. Two general modes of migration are distinguished in the forebrain: radial migration, which establishes the general cytoarchitectonical framework of the different forebrain subdivisions; and tangential migration, which increases the cellular complexity of forebrain circuits by allowing the dispersion of multiple neuronal types. Here, we review the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying each of these types of migrations and discuss how emerging concepts in neuronal migration are reshaping our understanding of forebrain development in normal and pathological situations.

  11. Migration control: a distance compensation strategy in ants.

    PubMed

    O'Shea-Wheller, Thomas A; Sendova-Franks, Ana B; Franks, Nigel R

    2016-08-01

    Migratory behaviour forms an intrinsic part of the life histories of many organisms but is often a high-risk process. Consequently, varied strategies have evolved to negate such risks, but empirical data relating to their functioning are limited. In this study, we use the model system of the house-hunting ant Temnothorax albipennis to demonstrate a key strategy that can shorten migration exposure times in a group of social insects. Colonies of these ants frequently migrate to new nest sites, and due to the nature of their habitat, the distances over which they do so are variable, leading to fluctuating potential costs dependent on migration parameters. We show that colonies of this species facultatively alter the dynamics of a migration and so compensate for the distance over which a given migration occurs. Specifically, they achieve this by modulating the rate of 'tandem running', in which workers teach each other the route to a new nest site. Using this method, colonies are able to engage a larger number of individuals in the migration process when the distance to be traversed is greater, and furthermore, the system appears to be based on perceived encounter rate at the individual level. This form of decentralised control highlights the adaptive nature of a behaviour of ecological importance, and indicates that the key to its robustness lies in the use of simple rules. Additionally, our results suggest that such coordinated group reactions are central to achieving the high levels of ecological success seen in many eusocial organisms.

  12. Process migration in UNIX environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Chin; Liu, J. W. S.

    1988-01-01

    To support process migration in UNIX environments, the main problem is how to encapsulate the location dependent features of the system in such a way that a host independent virtual environment is maintained by the migration handlers on the behalf of each migrated process. An object-oriented approach is used to describe the interaction between a process and its environment. More specifically, environmental objects were introduced in UNIX systems to carry out the user-environment interaction. The implementation of the migration handlers is based on both the state consistency criterion and the property consistency criterion.

  13. Cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptor inhibition decreases vascular smooth muscle migration and proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Rajesh, Mohanraj; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Hasko, Gyoergy; Pacher, Pal

    2008-12-26

    Vascular smooth muscle proliferation and migration triggered by inflammatory stimuli and chemoattractants such as platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) are key events in the development and progression of atherosclerosis and restenosis. Cannabinoids may modulate cell proliferation and migration in various cell types through cannabinoid receptors. Here we investigated the effects of CB{sub 1} receptor antagonist rimonabant (SR141716A), which has recently been shown to have anti-atherosclerotic effects both in mice and humans, on PDGF-induced proliferation, migration, and signal transduction of human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCASMCs). PDGF induced Ras and ERK 1/2 activation, while increasing proliferation and migration of HCASMCs, which were dose dependently attenuated by CB{sub 1} antagonist, rimonabant. These findings suggest that in addition to improving plasma lipid alterations and decreasing inflammatory cell migration and inflammatory response, CB{sub 1} antagonists may exert beneficial effects in atherosclerosis and restenosis by decreasing vascular smooth muscle proliferation and migration.

  14. Les questions de migrations internationales (Questions of International Migrations).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samman, Mouna Liliane

    1993-01-01

    Education about international migration should (1) utilize a framework of historical evolution; (2) stress the growing interdependence of nations; (3) emphasize universal moral values and the role of the individual in human rights; and (4) consider the complementary or competing portraits of international migration presented by the media. (DMM)

  15. Do serotonin(1-7) receptors modulate short and long-term memory?

    PubMed

    Meneses, A

    2007-05-01

    Evidence from invertebrates to human studies indicates that serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) system modulates short- (STM) and long-term memory (LTM). This work is primarily focused on analyzing the contribution of 5-HT, cholinergic and glutamatergic receptors as well as protein synthesis to STM and LTM of an autoshaping learning task. It was observed that the inhibition of hippocampal protein synthesis or new mRNA did not produce a significant effect on autoshaping STM performance but it did impair LTM. Both non-contingent protein inhibition and 5-HT depletion showed no effects. It was basically the non-selective 5-HT receptor antagonist cyproheptadine, which facilitated STM. However, the blockade of glutamatergic and cholinergic transmission impaired STM. In contrast, the selective 5-HT(1B) receptor antagonist SB-224289 facilitated both STM and LTM. Selective receptor antagonists for the 5-HT(1A) (WAY100635), 5-HT(1D) (GR127935), 5-HT(2A) (MDL100907), 5-HT(2C/2B) (SB-200646), 5-HT(3) (ondansetron) or 5-HT(4) (GR125487), 5-HT(6) (Ro 04-6790, SB-399885 and SB-35713) or 5-HT(7) (SB-269970) did not impact STM. Nevertheless, WAY100635, MDL100907, SB-200646, GR125487, Ro 04-6790, SB-399885 or SB-357134 facilitated LTM. Notably, some of these changes shown to be independent of food-intake. Concomitantly, these data indicate that '5-HT tone via 5-HT(1B) receptors' might function in a serial manner from STM to LTM, whereas working in parallel using 5-HT(1A), 5-HT(2A), 5-HT(2B/2C), 5-HT(4), or 5-HT(6) receptors.

  16. Module Configuration

    DOEpatents

    Oweis, Salah; D'Ussel, Louis; Chagnon, Guy; Zuhowski, Michael; Sack, Tim; Laucournet, Gaullume; Jackson, Edward J.

    2002-06-04

    A stand alone battery module including: (a) a mechanical configuration; (b) a thermal management configuration; (c) an electrical connection configuration; and (d) an electronics configuration. Such a module is fully interchangeable in a battery pack assembly, mechanically, from the thermal management point of view, and electrically. With the same hardware, the module can accommodate different cell sizes and, therefore, can easily have different capacities. The module structure is designed to accommodate the electronics monitoring, protection, and printed wiring assembly boards (PWAs), as well as to allow airflow through the module. A plurality of modules may easily be connected together to form a battery pack. The parts of the module are designed to facilitate their manufacture and assembly.

  17. Chandra Contaminant Migration Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swartz, Douglas A.; O'Dell, Steve L.

    2014-01-01

    High volatility cleans OBFs and low volatility produces a high build-up at OBF centers; only a narrow (factor of 2 or less) volatility range produces the observed spatial pattern. Simulations predict less accumulation above outer S-array CCDs; this may explain, in part, gratings/imaging C/MnL discrepancies. Simulations produce a change in center accumulation due solely to DH heater ON/OFF temperature change; but a 2nd contaminant and perhaps a change in source rate is also required. Emissivity E may depend on thickness; another model parameter. Additional physics, e.g., surface migration, is not warranted at this time. At t approx. 14 yrs, model produced 0.22 grams of contaminant, 0.085 grams remaining within ACIS cavity; 7 percent (6mg) on OBFs.

  18. Africa: Setting for Human Migration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buuba, Babacar Diop

    2007-01-01

    Analysis of African migrations can help to understand prehistoric, historical, ancient modern and contemporaneous migrations. Movements of populations were and continue to be so intense that, for some analysts, they constitute one of the dominant trends of the history and destiny of the very old continent. African and non-African states, whether…

  19. The Autophagy Machinery: A New Player in Chemotactic Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Coly, Pierre-Michaël; Gandolfo, Pierrick; Castel, Hélène; Morin, Fabrice

    2017-01-01

    Autophagy is a highly conserved self-degradative process that plays a key role in diverse cellular processes such as stress response or differentiation. A growing body of work highlights the direct involvement of autophagy in cell migration and cancer metastasis. Specifically, autophagy has been shown to be involved in modulating cell adhesion dynamics as well as epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. After providing a general overview of the mechanisms controlling autophagosome biogenesis and cell migration, we discuss how chemotactic G protein-coupled receptors, through the repression of autophagy, may orchestrate membrane trafficking and compartmentation of specific proteins at the cell front in order to support the critical steps of directional migration. PMID:28261054

  20. Modelling Rho GTPase biochemistry to predict collective cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merchant, Brian; Feng, James

    The collective migration of cells, due to individual cell polarization and intercellular contact inhibition of locomotion, features prominently in embryogenesis and metastatic cancers. Existing methods for modelling collectively migrating cells tend to rely either on highly abstracted agent-based models, or on continuum approximations of the group. Both of these frameworks represent intercellular interactions such as contact inhibition of locomotion as hard-coded rules defining model cells. In contrast, we present a vertex-dynamics framework which predicts polarization and contact inhibition of locomotion naturally from an underlying model of Rho GTPase biochemistry and cortical mechanics. We simulate the interaction between many such model cells, and study how modulating Rho GTPases affects migratory characteristics of the group, in the context of long-distance collective migration of neural crest cells during embryogenesis.

  1. Controlled levels of canonical Wnt signaling are required for neural crest migration.

    PubMed

    Maj, Ewa; Künneke, Lutz; Loresch, Elisabeth; Grund, Anita; Melchert, Juliane; Pieler, Tomas; Aspelmeier, Timo; Borchers, Annette

    2016-09-01

    Canonical Wnt signaling plays a dominant role in the development of the neural crest (NC), a highly migratory cell population that generates a vast array of cell types. Canonical Wnt signaling is required for NC induction as well as differentiation, however its role in NC migration remains largely unknown. Analyzing nuclear localization of β-catenin as readout for canonical Wnt activity, we detect nuclear β-catenin in premigratory but not migratory Xenopus NC cells suggesting that canonical Wnt activity has to decrease to basal levels to enable NC migration. To define a possible function of canonical Wnt signaling in Xenopus NC migration, canonical Wnt signaling was modulated at different time points after NC induction. This was accomplished using either chemical modulators affecting β-catenin stability or inducible glucocorticoid fusion constructs of Lef/Tcf transcription factors. In vivo analysis of NC migration by whole mount in situ hybridization demonstrates that ectopic activation of canonical Wnt signaling inhibits cranial NC migration. Further, NC transplantation experiments confirm that this effect is tissue-autonomous. In addition, live-cell imaging in combination with biophysical data analysis of explanted NC cells confirms the in vivo findings and demonstrates that modulation of canonical Wnt signaling affects the ability of NC cells to perform single cell migration. Thus, our data support the hypothesis that canonical Wnt signaling needs to be tightly controlled to enable migration of NC cells.

  2. Module Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    various testing methodologies for the evaluation and characterization of Transmit /Receive (T/R) modules for phased array radars. Discussed are techniques...for characterizing T/R modules in transmit and receive modes under ideal and emulated operation environments. Further, techniques for life testing...characteristics of T/R modules developed during the early and mid 1980’s. Data provided shows the performance in terms of gain and phase for both transmit

  3. Targeting Epithelial Cell Migration to Accelerate Wound Healing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    protein kinase C (PKC) family and the process can be enhanced or inhibited by modulating the levels of the RIPP complex proteins as well by regulating...migration, protein kinase C 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: U 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON...USAMRMC a. REPORT U b. ABSTRACT U c . THIS PAGE U UU 10 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (include area code) Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed

  4. Simple rules guide dragonfly migration

    PubMed Central

    Wikelski, Martin; Moskowitz, David; Adelman, James S; Cochran, Jim; Wilcove, David S; May, Michael L

    2006-01-01

    Every year billions of butterflies, dragonflies, moths and other insects migrate across continents, and considerable progress has been made in understanding population-level migratory phenomena. However, little is known about destinations and strategies of individual insects. We attached miniaturized radio transmitters (ca 300 mg) to the thoraxes of 14 individual dragonflies (common green darners, Anax junius) and followed them during their autumn migration for up to 12 days, using receiver-equipped Cessna airplanes and ground teams. Green darners exhibited distinct stopover and migration days. On average, they migrated every 2.9±0.3 days, and their average net advance was 58±11 km in 6.1±0.9 days (11.9±2.8 km d−1) in a generally southward direction (186±52°). They migrated exclusively during the daytime, when wind speeds were less than 25 km h−1, regardless of wind direction, but only after two nights of successively lower temperatures (decrease of 2.1±0.6 °C in minimum temperature). The migratory patterns and apparent decision rules of green darners are strikingly similar to those proposed for songbirds, and may represent a general migration strategy for long-distance migration of organisms with high self-propelled flight speeds. PMID:17148394

  5. Migration of dispersive GPR data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Powers, M.H.; Oden, C.P.; ,

    2004-01-01

    Electrical conductivity and dielectric and magnetic relaxation phenomena cause electromagnetic propagation to be dispersive in earth materials. Both velocity and attenuation may vary with frequency, depending on the frequency content of the propagating energy and the nature of the relaxation phenomena. A minor amount of velocity dispersion is associated with high attenuation. For this reason, measuring effects of velocity dispersion in ground penetrating radar (GPR) data is difficult. With a dispersive forward model, GPR responses to propagation through materials with known frequency-dependent properties have been created. These responses are used as test data for migration algorithms that have been modified to handle specific aspects of dispersive media. When either Stolt or Gazdag migration methods are modified to correct for just velocity dispersion, the results are little changed from standard migration. For nondispersive propagating wavefield data, like deep seismic, ensuring correct phase summation in a migration algorithm is more important than correctly handling amplitude. However, the results of migrating model responses to dispersive media with modified algorithms indicate that, in this case, correcting for frequency-dependent amplitude loss has a much greater effect on the result than correcting for proper phase summation. A modified migration is only effective when it includes attenuation recovery, performing deconvolution and migration simultaneously.

  6. Vulnerable to HIV / AIDS. Migration.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, I

    1998-01-01

    This special report discusses the impact of globalization, patterns of migration in Southeast Asia, gender issues in migration, the links between migration and HIV/AIDS, and spatial mobility and social networks. Migrants are particularly marginalized in countries that blame migrants for transmission of infectious and communicable diseases and other social ills. Effective control of HIV/AIDS among migrant and native populations requires a multisectoral approach. Programs should critically review the privatization of health care services and challenge economic models that polarize the rich and the poor, men and women, North and South, and migrant and native. Programs should recognize the equality between locals and migrants in receipt of health services. Countermeasures should have input from migrants in order to reduce the conditions that increase vulnerability to HIV/AIDS. Gender-oriented research is needed to understand women's role in migration. Rapid assessment has obscured the human dimension of migrants' vulnerability to HIV. Condom promotion is not enough. Migration is a major consequence of globalization, which holds the promise, real or imagined, of prosperity for all. Mass migration can be fueled by explosive regional developments. In Southeast Asia, migration has been part of the process of economic development. The potential to emigrate increases with greater per capita income. "Tiger" economies have been labor importers. Safe sex is not practiced in many Asian countries because risk is not taken seriously. Migrants tend to be used as economic tools, without consideration of social adjustment and sex behavior among singles.

  7. Dynamic contact guidance of migrating cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losert, Wolfgang; Sun, Xiaoyu; Guven, Can; Driscoll, Meghan; Fourkas, John

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the effects of nanotopographical surfaces on the cell migration and cell shape dynamics of the amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. Amoeboid motion exhibits significant contact guidance along surfaces with nanoscale ridges or grooves. We show quantitatively that nanoridges spaced 1.5 μm apart exhibit the greatest contact guidance efficiency. Using principal component analysis, we characterize the dynamics of the cell shape modulated by the coupling between the cell membrane and ridges. We show that motion parallel to the ridges is enhanced, while the turning, at the largest spatial scales, is suppressed. Since protrusion dynamics are principally governed by actin dynamics, we imaged the actin polymerization of cells on ridges. We found that actin polymerization occurs preferentially along nanoridges in a ``monorail'' like fashion. The ridges then provide us with a tool to study actin dynamics in an effectively reduced dimensional system.

  8. Study of photon migration in skeletal muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranasinghesagara, J.; Yao, G.

    2007-09-01

    A clear understanding of how light propagation in muscle is important for developing optical methods for muscle characterization. We investigated photon migration in muscle by imaging the optical reflectance from fresh prerigor skeletal muscles. We found the acquired reflectance patterns can not be described using existing theories. In order to quantify the equi-intensity contours of acquired reflectance images, we developed a numerical fitting function. Using this model, we studied the changes of reflectance profile during stretching and rigor process. The observed unique anisotropic features diminished after rigor completion. These results suggested that muscle sarcomere structures played important roles in modulating light propagation in whole muscle. To explain the observed patterns, we incorporated the sarcomere diffraction in a Monte Carlo model and we showed that the resulting reflectance profiles quantitatively resembled the experimental observation.

  9. [International migration: 1979].

    PubMed

    1981-01-01

    Statistics on international migration in Panama in 1979 are provided for the 3 airports, 6 seaports, and 2 border crossings used by international travelers. The categories of visitors, temporary visitors, immigrants, and residents among those entering and leaving the country are defined and the data collection procedures are briefly specified. Between 1975-79, the number of persons entering the country through all points increased from 392,449 to 520,454, while the number departing increased from 397,759 to a figure provisionally estimated at 514,250. In 1979, 317,303 men and 203,151 women entered the country, 427,527 by air, 89,764 by land, and 3,163 by sea. 473 men and 355 women immigrated, all arriving by air. 391,502 of those entering were visitors, 2,407 were temporary visitors, and 98,589 were residents, of whom 81,462 were Panamanian and 17,127 foreign. Another table indicates the number of persons by category entering at each point by month; December had the highest number of arrivals, 56,070, followed by July, with 47,889. Other tables indicate the number of arrivals by category according to country of nationality and country of permanent residence; the number of arrivals by sex and category in 5-year age groups; the number of visitors entering for motives related to travel according to nationality and country of residence; the number entering by duration of stay, according to reasons for travel and country of residence; the number entering through the airport at Tocumen or the border crossing at Paso de Canoa, by motives for travel, according to country of residence, and by sex and age; and the number of returning Panamanian residents by port of entry and nationality, according to point of origin. Data are also provided on the number leaving by category for each point of departure and month of departure.

  10. Neuronal migration and protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    Ohshima, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    The formation of the six-layered structure of the mammalian cortex via the inside-out pattern of neuronal migration is fundamental to neocortical functions. Extracellular cues such as Reelin induce intracellular signaling cascades through the protein phosphorylation. Migrating neurons also have intrinsic machineries to regulate cytoskeletal proteins and adhesion properties. Protein phosphorylation regulates these processes. Moreover, the balance between phosphorylation and dephosphorylation is modified by extracellular cues. Multipolar-bipolar transition, radial glia-guided locomotion and terminal translocation are critical steps of radial migration of cortical pyramidal neurons. Protein kinases such as Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) involve these steps. In this review, I shall give an overview the roles of protein kinases in neuronal migration. PMID:25628530

  11. Quantifying global international migration flows.

    PubMed

    Abel, Guy J; Sander, Nikola

    2014-03-28

    Widely available data on the number of people living outside of their country of birth do not adequately capture contemporary intensities and patterns of global migration flows. We present data on bilateral flows between 196 countries from 1990 through 2010 that provide a comprehensive view of international migration flows. Our data suggest a stable intensity of global 5-year migration flows at ~0.6% of world population since 1995. In addition, the results aid the interpretation of trends and patterns of migration flows to and from individual countries by placing them in a regional or global context. We estimate the largest movements to occur between South and West Asia, from Latin to North America, and within Africa.

  12. Radar studies of bird migration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, T. C.; Williams, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    Observations of bird migration with NASA radars were made at Wallops Island, Va. Simultaneous observations were made at a number of radar sites in the North Atlantic Ocean in an effort to discover what happened to those birds that were observed leaving the coast of North America headed toward Bermuda, the Caribbean and South America. Transatlantic migration, utilizing observations from a large number of radars is discussed. Detailed studies of bird movements at Wallops Island are presented.

  13. Migration, crisis and theoretical conflict.

    PubMed

    Bach, R L; Schraml, L A

    1982-01-01

    The nature of the distinction between the equilibrium and historical-structuralist positions on migration is examined. Theoretical and political differences in the two positions are considered both historically and in the context of the current global economic crisis. The proposal of Wood to focus on households as a strategy for integrating the two perspectives and for achieving a better understanding of migration and social change is discussed.

  14. The dynamics of mass migration

    PubMed Central

    Massey, Douglas S.; Zenteno, Rene M.

    1999-01-01

    We specify a set of equations defining a dynamic model of international migration and estimate its parameters by using data specially collected in Mexico. We then used it to project the a hypothetical Mexican community population forward in time. Beginning with a stable population of 10,000 people, we project ahead 50 years under three different assumptions: no international migration; constant probabilities of in- and out-migration, and dynamic schedules of out- and in-migration that change as migratory experience accumulates. This exercise represents an attempt to model the self-feeding character of international migration noted by prior observers and theorists. Our model quantifies the mechanisms of cumulative causation predicted by social capital theory and illustrates the shortcomings of standard projection methodologies. The failure to model dynamically changing migration schedules yields a 5% overstatement of the projected size of the Mexican population after 50 years, an 11% understatement of the total number of U.S. migrants, a 15% understatement of the prevalence of U.S. migratory experience in the Mexican population, and an 85% understatement of the size of the Mexican population living in the United States. PMID:10220465

  15. Hedgehog is a positive regulator of FGF signalling during embryonic tracheal cell migration.

    PubMed

    Butí, Elisenda; Mesquita, Duarte; Araújo, Sofia J

    2014-01-01

    Cell migration is a widespread and complex process that is crucial for morphogenesis and for the underlying invasion and metastasis of human cancers. During migration, cells are steered toward target sites by guidance molecules that induce cell direction and movement through complex intracellular mechanisms. The spatio-temporal regulation of the expression of these guidance molecules is of extreme importance for both normal morphogenesis and human disease. One way to achieve this precise regulation is by combinatorial inputs of different transcription factors. Here we used Drosophila melanogaster mutants with migration defects in the ganglionic branches of the tracheal system to further clarify guidance regulation during cell migration. By studying the cellular consequences of overactivated Hh signalling, using ptc mutants, we found that Hh positively regulates Bnl/FGF levels during embryonic stages. Our results show that Hh modulates cell migration non-autonomously in the tissues surrounding the action of its activity. We further demonstrate that the Hh signalling pathway regulates bnl expression via Stripe (Sr), a zinc-finger transcription factor with homology to the Early Growth Response (EGR) family of vertebrate transcription factors. We propose that Hh modulates embryonic cell migration by participating in the spatio-temporal regulation of bnl expression in a permissive mode. By doing so, we provide a molecular link between the activation of Hh signalling and increased chemotactic responses during cell migration.

  16. Rab, Arf, and Arl-Regulated Membrane Traffic in Cortical Neuron Migration.

    PubMed

    Tang, Bor Luen

    2016-07-01

    The migration of projection neurons from its birthplace in the subventricular zone to their final destination in the cortical plate is a complex process that requires a series of highly coordinated cellular events. Amongst the key factors involved in the processes are modulators of cytoskeletal dynamics, as well as cellular membrane traffic. Members of the small GTPases family responsible for the latter process, the Rabs and Arfs, have been recently implicated in cortical neuron migration. Rab5 and Rab11, which are key modulators of endocytosis and endocytic recycling respectively, ensure proper surface expression and distribution of N-cadherin, a key adhesion protein that tethers migrating neurons to the radial glia fiber tracts during pia-directed migration. Rab7, which is associated with lysosomal biogenesis and function, is important for the final step of terminal translocation when N-cadherin is downregulated by lysosomal degradation. Arf6 activity, which is known to be important in neuronal processes outgrowth, may negatively impact the multipolar-bipolar transition of cortical neurons undergoing radial migration, but the downstream effector of Arf6 in this regard is not yet known. In addition to the above, members of the Arl family which have been recently shown to be important in radial glia scaffold formation, would also be important for cortical neuron migration. In this short review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of the importance of membrane traffic regulated by the Rab, Arf, and Arl family members in cortical neuron migration.

  17. Distance and Intrastate College Student Migration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alm, James; Winters, John V.

    2009-01-01

    Most studies of student migration focus on "interstate" migration of college students, largely because the aggregate data typically used are limited in geographic specificity to states. However, interstate migration is only a small part of the total student migration. Public institutions generally get most of their students from within…

  18. Modulated Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Frederick C.

    1960-01-01

    The technique of modulation, or variable coefficients, is discussed and the analytical formulation is reviewed. Representative numerical results of the use of modulation are shown for the lifting and nonlifting cases. These results include the effects of modulation on peak acceleration, entry corridor, and heat absorption. Results are given for entry at satellite speed and escape speed. The indications are that coefficient modulation on a vehicle with good lifting capability offers the possibility of sizable loading reductions or, alternatively, wider corridors; thus, steep entries become practical from the loading standpoint. The amount of steepness depends on the acceptable heating penalty. The price of sizable fractions of the possible gains does not appear to be excessive.

  19. Effect of intravenous tropisetron on modulation of pain and central hypersensitivity in chronic low back pain patients.

    PubMed

    Neziri, Alban Y; Dickenmann, Martina; Scaramozzino, Pasquale; Andersen, Ole K; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Dickenson, Anthony H; Curatolo, Michele

    2012-02-01

    The activation of 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 (5-HT-3) receptors in spinal cord can enhance intrinsic spinal mechanisms of central hypersensitivity, possibly leading to exaggerated pain responses. Clinical studies suggest that 5-HT-3 receptor antagonists may have an analgesic effect. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study tested the hypothesis that the 5-HT-3 receptor antagonist tropisetron attenuates pain and central hypersensitivity in patients with chronic low back pain. Thirty patients with chronic low back pain, 15 of whom were women (aged 53 ± 14 years) and 15 men (aged 48 ± 14 years), were studied. A single intravenous injection of 0.9% saline solution, tropisetron 2mg, and tropisetron 5mg was administrated in 3 different sessions, in a double-blind crossover manner. The main outcome was the visual analogue scale (VAS) score of spontaneous low back pain before, and 15, 30, 60, and 90 minutes after drug administration. Secondary outcomes were nociceptive withdrawal reflexes to single and repeated electrical stimulation, area of reflex receptive fields, pressure pain detection and tolerance thresholds, conditioned pain modulation, and area of clinical pain. The data were analyzed by analysis of variance and panel multiple regressions. All 3 treatments reduced VAS scores. However, there was no statistically significant difference between tropisetron and placebo in VAS scores. Compared to placebo, tropisetron produced a statistically significant increase in pain threshold after single electrical stimulation, but no difference in all other secondary outcomes was found. A single-dose intravenous administration of tropisetron in patients with chronic low back pain had no significant specific effect on intensity of pain and most parameters of central hypersensitivity.

  20. An end-to-end software solution for the analysis of high-throughput single-cell migration data

    PubMed Central

    Masuzzo, Paola; Huyck, Lynn; Simiczyjew, Aleksandra; Ampe, Christophe; Martens, Lennart; Van Troys, Marleen

    2017-01-01

    The systematic study of single-cell migration requires the availability of software for assisting data inspection, quality control and analysis. This is especially important for high-throughput experiments, where multiple biological conditions are tested in parallel. Although the field of cell migration can count on different computational tools for cell segmentation and tracking, downstream data visualization, parameter extraction and statistical analysis are still left to the user and are currently not possible within a single tool. This article presents a completely new module for the open-source, cross-platform CellMissy software for cell migration data management. This module is the first tool to focus specifically on single-cell migration data downstream of image processing. It allows fast comparison across all tested conditions, providing automated data visualization, assisted data filtering and quality control, extraction of various commonly used cell migration parameters, and non-parametric statistical analysis. Importantly, the module enables parameters computation both at the trajectory- and at the step-level. Moreover, this single-cell analysis module is complemented by a new data import module that accommodates multiwell plate data obtained from high-throughput experiments, and is easily extensible through a plugin architecture. In conclusion, the end-to-end software solution presented here tackles a key bioinformatics challenge in the cell migration field, assisting researchers in their high-throughput data processing. PMID:28205527

  1. Thread Migration in the Presence of Pointers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronk, David; Haines, Matthew; Mehrotra, Piyush

    1996-01-01

    Dynamic migration of lightweight threads supports both data locality and load balancing. However, migrating threads that contain pointers referencing data in both the stack and heap remains an open problem. In this paper we describe a technique by which threads with pointers referencing both stack and non-shared heap data can be migrated such that the pointers remain valid after migration. As a result, threads containing pointers can now be migrated between processors in a homogeneous distributed memory environment.

  2. [Mexican migration policies after IRCA].

    PubMed

    Alba, F

    1999-01-01

    The evolution since 1964 of Mexican government policy regarding migrant workers in the US is discussed. For a decade after the "bracero" program was terminated by the US, the Mexican government attempted to encourage creation of another legal framework for migration, regarded as inevitable whether legal or clandestine. Around 1974-75, a more distant attitude, termed the "policy of no policy," acquired considerable support in Mexican government and academic circles. The no-policy strategy allowed Mexico to achieve certain objectives regarding migration without prompting US intervention in its internal affairs, as for example by a linkage of US migration policy to specific Mexican government actions. The 1986 passage of the US Immigration Reform and Control Act effectively ended the no-policy strategy that had allowed the Mexican government to count on the continued emigration of Mexican workers without compromising its position of promoting respect for migrant rights. The unilateral change in the status quo by the US led to substitution of the "policy of dialogue," a clear signal of the Mexican government's search for a new migration agreement. The policy of dialogue has entailed greater discussion of the two traditional Mexican objectives regarding migration. Some progress has apparently been made concerning migrant rights, but the second and less explicit objective, that of preventing abrupt changes in US immigration policy and in migratory flows, is harder to judge. The atmosphere of freer public debate in Mexico is politicizing migratory policy.

  3. Sedimentary record of erg migration

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, M.L.

    1986-06-01

    The sedimentary record of erg (eolian sand sea) migration consists of an idealized threefold division of sand-sea facies sequences. The basal division, here termed the fore-erg, is composed of a hierarchy of eolian sand bodies contained within sediments of the flanking depositional environment. The fore-erg represents the downwind, leading edge of the erg and records the onset of eolian sedimentation. Basin subsidence coupled with erg migration places the medial division, termed the central erg, over the fore-erg strata. Eolian influence on regional sedimentation patterns is greatest in the central erg, and most of the sand transported and deposited in the erg is contained within this region. Reduction in sand supply and continued erg migration will cover the central-erg deposits with a veneer of back-erg deposits. This upper division of the erg facies sequence resembles closely the fore-erg region. Back-erg deposits may be thin due to limited eolian influence on sedimentation or incomplete erg migration, or they may be completely absent because of great susceptibility to postdepositional erosion. Tectonic, climatic, and eustatic influences on sand-sea deposition will produce distinctive variations or modifications of the idealized erg facies sequence. The resulting variants in the sedimentary record of erg migration are illustrated with ancient examples from western North America, Europe, southern Africa, and South America. 38 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  4. Ethical concerns in nurse migration.

    PubMed

    McElmurry, Beverly J; Solheim, Karen; Kishi, Rieko; Coffia, Marcia A; Woith, Wendy; Janepanish, Poolsuk

    2006-01-01

    International nurse migration is natural and to be expected. Recently, however, those who have fostered nurse migration believe that it will solve nursing shortages in developed countries and offer nurse migrants better working conditions and an improved quality of life. Whether natural or manipulated, migration flow patterns largely occur from developing to developed countries. In this article, nurse migration is examined using primary health care (PHC) as an ethical framework. The unmanaged flow of nurse migrants from developing to developed countries is inconsistent with "health for all" principles. Removing key health personnel from countries experiencing resource shortages is contrary to PHC equity. Often, nurse migrants are placed in vulnerable, inequitable work roles, and employing nurse migrants fails to address basic causes of nurse shortages in developed countries, such as dissatisfaction with work conditions and decreased funding for academic settings. Nurse migration policies and procedures can be developed to satisfy PHC ethics criteria if they (1) leave developing countries enhanced rather than depleted, (2) contribute to country health outcomes consistent with essential care for all people, (3) are based on community participation, (4) address common nursing labor issues, and (5) involve equitable and clear financial arrangements.

  5. Cell migration in confined environments.

    PubMed

    Irimia, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    We describe a protocol for measuring the speed of human neutrophils migrating through small channels, in conditions of mechanical confinement comparable to those experienced by neutrophils migrating through tissues. In such conditions, we find that neutrophils move persistently, at constant speed for tens of minutes, enabling precise measurements at single cells resolution, for large number of cells. The protocol relies on microfluidic devices with small channels in which a solution of chemoattractant and a suspension of isolated neutrophils are loaded in sequence. The migration of neutrophils can be observed for several hours, starting within minutes after loading the neutrophils in the devices. The protocol is divided into four main steps: the fabrication of the microfluidic devices, the separation of neutrophils from whole blood, the preparation of the assay and cell loading, and the analysis of data. We discuss the practical steps for the implementation of the migration assays in biology labs, the adaptation of the protocols to various cell types, including cancer cells, and the supplementary device features required for precise measurements of directionality and persistence during migration.

  6. Lateral/basolateral amygdala serotonin type-2 receptors modulate operant self-administration of a sweetened ethanol solution via inhibition of principal neuron activity

    PubMed Central

    McCool, Brian A.; Christian, Daniel T.; Fetzer, Jonathan A.; Chappell, Ann M.

    2014-01-01

    The lateral/basolateral amygdala (BLA) forms an integral part of the neural circuitry controlling innate anxiety and learned fear. More recently, BLA dependent modulation of self-administration behaviors suggests a much broader role in the regulation of reward evaluation. To test this, we employed a self-administration paradigm that procedurally segregates “seeking” (exemplified as lever-press behaviors) from consumption (drinking) directed at a sweetened ethanol solution. Microinjection of the nonselective serotonin type-2 receptor agonist, alpha-methyl-5-hydroxytryptamine (α-m5HT) into the BLA reduced lever pressing behaviors in a dose-dependent fashion. This was associated with a significant reduction in the number of response-bouts expressed during non-reinforced sessions without altering the size of a bout or the rate of responding. Conversely, intra-BLA α-m5HT only modestly effected consumption-related behaviors; the highest dose reduced the total time spent consuming a sweetened ethanol solution but did not inhibit the total number of licks, number of lick bouts, or amount of solution consumed during a session. In vitro neurophysiological characterization of BLA synaptic responses showed that α-m5HT significantly reduced extracellular field potentials. This was blocked by the 5-HT2A/C antagonist ketanserin suggesting that 5-HT2-like receptors mediate the behavioral effect of α-m5HT. During whole-cell patch current-clamp recordings, we subsequently found that α-m5HT increased action potential threshold and hyperpolarized the resting membrane potential of BLA pyramidal neurons. Together, our findings show that the activation of BLA 5-HT2A/C receptors inhibits behaviors related to reward-seeking by suppressing BLA principal neuron activity. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that the BLA modulates reward-related behaviors and provides specific insight into BLA contributions during operant self-administration of a sweetened ethanol solution

  7. Tianeptine: 5-HT uptake sites and 5-HT(1-7) receptors modulate memory formation in an autoshaping Pavlovian/instrumental task.

    PubMed

    Meneses, Alfredo

    2002-05-01

    Recent studies using invertebrate and mammal species have revealed that, endogenous serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) modulates cognitive processes, particularly learning and memory, though, at present, it is unclear the manner, where, and how long 5-HT systems are involved. Hence in this work, an attempt was made to study the effects of 5-HT endogenous on memory formation, using a 5-HT uptake facilitator (tianeptine) and, selective 5-HT(1-7) receptor antagonists to determine whether 5-HT uptake sites and which 5-HT receptors are involved, respectively. Results showed that post-training tianeptine injection enhanced memory consolidation in an autoshaping Pavlovian/instrumental learning task, which has been useful to detect changes on memory formation elicited by drugs or aging. On interaction experiments, ketanserin (5-HT(1D/2A/2C) antagonist) slightly enhanced tianeptine effects, while WAY 100635 (5-HT(1A) antagonist), SB-224289 (5-HT(1B) inverse agonist), SB-200646 (5-HT(2B/2C) antagonist), ondansetron (5-HT(3) antagonist), GR 127487 (5-HT(4) antagonist), Ro 04-6790 (5-HT(6) antagonist), DR 4004 (5-HT(7) antagonist), or fluoxetine (an inhibitor of 5-HT reuptake) blocked the facilitatory tianeptine effect. Notably, together tianeptine and Ro 04-6790 impaired learning consolidation. Moreover, 5-HT depletion completely reversed the tianeptine effect. Tianeptine also normalized an impaired memory elicited by scopolamine (an antimuscarinic) or dizocilpine (non-competitive glutamatergic antagonist), while partially reversed that induced by TFMPP (5-HT(1B/1D/2A-2C/7) agonist/antagonist). Finally, tianeptine-fluoxetine coadministration had no effect on learning consolidation; nevertheless, administration of an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, phenserine, potentiated subeffective tianeptine or fluoxetine doses. Collectively, these data confirmed that endogenously 5-HT modulates, via uptake sites and 5-HT(1-7) receptors, memory consolidation, and are consistent with the

  8. An Ill Wind? Climate Change, Migration, and Health

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Jon

    2012-01-01

    Background: Climate change is projected to cause substantial increases in population movement in coming decades. Previous research has considered the likely causal influences and magnitude of such movements and the risks to national and international security. There has been little research on the consequences of climate-related migration and the health of people who move. Objectives: In this review, we explore the role that health impacts of climate change may play in population movements and then examine the health implications of three types of movements likely to be induced by climate change: forcible displacement by climate impacts, resettlement schemes, and migration as an adaptive response. Methods: This risk assessment draws on research into the health of refugees, migrants, and people in resettlement schemes as analogs of the likely health consequences of climate-related migration. Some account is taken of the possible modulation of those health risks by climate change. Discussion: Climate-change–related migration is likely to result in adverse health outcomes, both for displaced and for host populations, particularly in situations of forced migration. However, where migration and other mobility are used as adaptive strategies, health risks are likely to be minimized, and in some cases there will be health gains. Conclusions: Purposeful and timely policy interventions can facilitate the mobility of people, enhance well-being, and maximize social and economic development in both places of origin and places of destination. Nevertheless, the anticipated occurrence of substantial relocation of groups and communities will underscore the fundamental seriousness of human-induced climate change. PMID:22266739

  9. Controlled-aperture wave-equation migration

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, L.; Fehler, Michael C.; Sun, H.; Li, Z.

    2003-01-01

    We present a controlled-aperture wave-equation migration method that no1 only can reduce migration artiracts due to limited recording aperlurcs and determine image weights to balance the efl'ects of limited-aperture illumination, but also can improve thc migration accuracy by reducing the slowness perturbations within thc controlled migration regions. The method consists of two steps: migration aperture scan and controlled-aperture migration. Migration apertures for a sparse distribution of shots arc determined using wave-equation migration, and those for the other shots are obtained by interpolation. During the final controlled-aperture niigration step, we can select a reference slowness in c;ontrollecl regions of the slowness model to reduce slowncss perturbations, and consequently increase the accuracy of wave-equation migration inel hods that makc use of reference slownesses. In addition, the computation in the space domain during wavefield downward continuation is needed to be conducted only within the controlled apertures and therefore, the computational cost of controlled-aperture migration step (without including migration aperture scan) is less than the corresponding uncontrolled-aperture migration. Finally, we can use the efficient split-step Fourier approach for migration-aperture scan, then use other, more accurate though more expensive, wave-equation migration methods to perform thc final controlled-apertio.ee migration to produce the most accurate image.

  10. Neurobiology of Monarch Butterfly Migration.

    PubMed

    Reppert, Steven M; Guerra, Patrick A; Merlin, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the migration of the eastern North American monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) have revealed mechanisms behind its navigation. The main orientation mechanism uses a time-compensated sun compass during both the migration south and the remigration north. Daylight cues, such as the sun itself and polarized light, are processed through both eyes and integrated through intricate circuitry in the brain's central complex, the presumed site of the sun compass. Monarch circadian clocks have a distinct molecular mechanism, and those that reside in the antennae provide time compensation. Recent evidence shows that migrants can also use a light-dependent inclination magnetic compass for orientation in the absence of directional daylight cues. The monarch genome has been sequenced, and genetic strategies using nuclease-based technologies have been developed to edit specific genes. The monarch butterfly has emerged as a model system to study the neural, molecular, and genetic basis of long-distance animal migration.

  11. Mechanisms of Leukocyte Transendothelial Migration

    PubMed Central

    Muller, William A.

    2013-01-01

    Neither the innate nor adaptive immune system “responds” unless leukocytes cross blood vessels. This process occurs through diapedesis, in which the leukocyte moves in an ameboid fashion through tightly apposed endothelial borders and, in some cases, through the endothelial cell itself. This review focuses on the active role of the endothelial cell in diapedesis. Several mechanisms play a critical role in transendothelial migration, including signals derived from clustering of apically disposed intercellular adhesion molecule 1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, disruption or loosening of adherens junctions, and targeted recycling of platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule and other molecules from the recently described lateral border recycling compartment. Surprisingly, many of the same molecules and mechanisms that regulate paracellular migration also control transcellular migration. A hypothesis that integrates the various known mechanisms of transmigration is proposed. PMID:21073340

  12. Mechanisms of leukocyte transendothelial migration.

    PubMed

    Muller, William A

    2011-01-01

    Neither the innate nor adaptive immune system "responds" unless leukocytes cross blood vessels. This process occurs through diapedesis, in which the leukocyte moves in an ameboid fashion through tightly apposed endothelial borders and, in some cases, through the endothelial cell itself. This review focuses on the active role of the endothelial cell in diapedesis. Several mechanisms play a critical role in transendothelial migration, including signals derived from clustering of apically disposed intercellular adhesion molecule 1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, disruption or loosening of adherens junctions, and targeted recycling of platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule and other molecules from the recently described lateral border recycling compartment. Surprisingly, many of the same molecules and mechanisms that regulate paracellular migration also control transcellular migration. A hypothesis that integrates the various known mechanisms of transmigration is proposed.

  13. Firefighting Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    NASA and the U.S. Coast Guard are working jointly to develop a helicopter transportable firefighting module that can shave precious minutes in combating shipboard or harbor fires. The program was undertaken in 1975, after a series of disastrous fires on oil tankers indicated a need for a lightweight, self-contained system that could be moved quickly to the scene of a fire. A prototype module was delivered to the Coast Guard last year and service testing is under way. The compact module weighs little more than a ton but it contains everything needed to fight a fire. The key component is a high output pump, which delivers up to 2,000 gallons of sea water a minute; the pump can be brought up to maximum output in only one minute after turning on the power source, a small Allison gas turbine engine. The module also contains hose, a foam nozzle and a spray nozzle, three sets of protective clothing for firefighters, and fuel for three hours operation. Designed to be assembled without special tools, the module can be set up for operation in less than 20 minutes.

  14. Families, children, migration and AIDS.

    PubMed

    Haour-Knipe, Mary

    2009-01-01

    Migration is very often a family affair, and often involves children, directly or indirectly. It may give rise to better quality of life for an entire family, or to bitter disappointment, and may also increase vulnerability to HIV and AIDS. This review, carried out for the Joint Learning Initiative on Children and AIDS, links the literature on "migration", on "HIV and AIDS" and on "families". Three themes are sketched: (1) As both HIV prevalence and circular migration increase, former migrant workers affected by AIDS may return to their families for care and support, especially at the end of life, often under crisis conditions. Families thus lose promising members, as well as sources of support. However, very little is known about the children of such migrants. (2) Following patterns of migration established for far different reasons, children may have to relocate to different places, sometimes over long distances, if their AIDS-affected parents can no longer care for them. They face the same adaptation challenges as other children who move, but complicated by loss of parent(s), AIDS stigma, and often poverty. (3) The issue of migrant families living with HIV has been studied to some extent, but mainly in developed countries with a long history of migration, and with little attention paid to the children in such families. Difficulties include involuntary separation from family members, isolation and lack of support, disclosure and planning for children's care should the parent(s) die and differences in treatment access within the same family. Numerous research and policy gaps are defined regarding the three themes, and a call is made for thinking about migration, families and AIDS to go beyond description to include resilience theory, and to go beyond prevention to include care.

  15. Rural migration in southern Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Mosser, D.; Soden, D.L.

    1993-08-01

    This study reviews the history of migration in two rural counties in Southern Nevada. It is part of a larger study about the impact of a proposed high-level nuclear waste repository on in- and out-migration patterns in the state. The historical record suggests a boom and bust economic cycle has predominated in the region for the past century creating conditions that should be taken into account by decision makers when ascertaining the long-term impacts of the proposed repository.

  16. Climate Migration and Moral Responsibility.

    PubMed

    Nawrotzki, Raphael

    Even though anthropogenic climate change is largely caused by industrialized nations, its burden is distributed unevenly with poor developing countries suffering the most. A common response to livelihood insecurities and destruction is migration. Using Peter Singer's "historical principle" this paper argues that a morally just evaluation requires taking causality between climate change and migration under consideration. The historical principle is employed to emphasize shortcomings in commonly made philosophical arguments to oppose immigration. The article concludes that none of these arguments is able to override the moral responsibility of industrialized countries to compensate for harms that their actions have caused.

  17. Climate Migration and Moral Responsibility

    PubMed Central

    Nawrotzki, Raphael

    2016-01-01

    Even though anthropogenic climate change is largely caused by industrialized nations, its burden is distributed unevenly with poor developing countries suffering the most. A common response to livelihood insecurities and destruction is migration. Using Peter Singer’s “historical principle” this paper argues that a morally just evaluation requires taking causality between climate change and migration under consideration. The historical principle is employed to emphasize shortcomings in commonly made philosophical arguments to oppose immigration. The article concludes that none of these arguments is able to override the moral responsibility of industrialized countries to compensate for harms that their actions have caused. PMID:27668124

  18. Firefighting Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Aviation Power Supply's mobile firefighting module called Firefly II is mounted on a trailer pulled by a pickup truck. Trailer unit has two three- inch water cannons, and the pickup carries a six inch cannon. Completely self contained, module pumps 3,000 gallons of water a minute from hydrants or open bodies of water. Stream can go as far as 400 feet or can be employed in a high-loft mode to reach the tops of tall refinery towers. Compact Firefly II weighs only 2,500 pounds when fully fueled. Key component is a specially designed two stage pump. Power for the pump is generated by a gas turbine engine. Module also includes an electronic/pump controller, multiple hose connections, up to 1,500 feet of hose and fuel for four hours operation. Firefly trailer can be backed onto specially-built large fireboat.

  19. Firefighting Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Aviation Power Supply's mobile firefighting module called Firefly II is mounted on a trailer pulled by a pickup truck. Trailer unit has two three- inch water cannons, and the pickup carries a six inch cannon. Completely self contained, module pumps 3,000 gallons of water a minute from hydrants or open bodies of water. Stream can go as far as 400 feet or can be employed in a high-loft mode to reach the tops of tall refinery towers. Compact Firefly II weighs only 2,500 pounds when fully fueled. Key component is a specially designed two stage pump. Power for the pump is generated by a gas turbine engine. Module also includes an electronic/pump controller, multiple hose connections, up to 1,500 feet of hose and fuel for four hours operation. Firefly trailer can be backed onto specially-built large fireboat.

  20. Thermionic modules

    DOEpatents

    King, Donald B.; Sadwick, Laurence P.; Wernsman, Bernard R.

    2002-06-18

    Modules of assembled microminiature thermionic converters (MTCs) having high energy-conversion efficiencies and variable operating temperatures manufactured using MEMS manufacturing techniques including chemical vapor deposition. The MTCs incorporate cathode to anode spacing of about 1 micron or less and use cathode and anode materials having work functions ranging from about 1 eV to about 3 eV. The MTCs also exhibit maximum efficiencies of just under 30%, and thousands of the devices and modules can be fabricated at modest costs.

  1. [Preeclampsia, cellular migration and ion channels].

    PubMed

    Del Mónaco, Silvana M; Marino, Gabriela; Assef, Yanina; Kotsias, Basilio A

    2008-01-01

    The syncytiotrophoblast acts in human placenta as a transporting barrier regulating the transference of nutrients, solutes and water between maternal and fetal blood. This transepithelial transport involves movement of Na+ and its contribution to the osmotic pressure is an important determinant of the extracellular fluid volume. ENaC is a channel that mediates entry of Na+ from the luminal fluid into the cells in many reabsorbing epithelia; it is aldosterone, vasopressin, insulin and catecholamine-inducible, modulated by estrogens and progesterone and blocked by amiloride and its analogs. Multiple proteases are involved in the proteolytic processing and activation of ENaC subunits and aldosterone alters the protease-protease inhibitors balance. ENaC is also expressed in human placenta; although its function is not well known, the Na+ conductive properties may participate in electrolyte and extracellular volume homeostasis. The activity of ENaC channels and other ion channels and transporters is regulated by the state of actin filaments; on the other hand, changes in volume influence the actin cytoskeleton. Thus, there is an interaction between ENaC and components of the apical membrane cytoskeleton. In addition to their role in cellular homeostasis and electrical properties, Na+ currents through ENaC and other sodium channels are involved in cell migration, well documented in normal and cancer cells. In this work we presented evidences supporting the hypothesis that ENaC channels are required for the migration of BeWo cells, a human hormone-synthesizing trophoblastic cell line that express the three subunits of the ENaC channels. BeWo cell line has also been used as a model to investigate the placental transport mechanisms.

  2. Trade and migration: the case of NAFTA.

    PubMed

    Martin, P L

    1993-01-01

    "This article provides background information on NAFTA [the North American Free Trade Agreement], reviews data on its economic effects, and summarizes studies and projections of NAFTA's likely effects on Mexico-to-U.S. migration. Migration factors (demand-pull, supply-push, and networks) are examined to determine whether NAFTA's effect on economic development particularly in the border areas will accelerate or retard migration. The conclusion is that NAFTA is likely to produce a temporary migration hump, slightly raising already high migration levels in the 1990s, but reducing the volume of Mexico-to-U.S. migration that would otherwise occur over subsequent decades."

  3. Adhesion and migration of cells responding to microtopography.

    PubMed

    Estévez, Maruxa; Martínez, Elena; Yarwood, Stephen J; Dalby, Matthew J; Samitier, Josep

    2015-05-01

    It is known that cells respond strongly to microtopography. However, cellular mechanisms of response are unclear. Here, we study wild-type fibroblasts responding to 25 µm(2) posts and compare their response to that of FAK(-/-) fibroblasts and fibroblasts with PMA treatment to stimulate protein kinase C (PKC) and the small g-protein Rac. FAK knockout cells modulated adhesion number and size in a similar way to cells on topography; that is, they used more, smaller adhesions, but migration was almost completely stalled demonstrating the importance of FAK signaling in contact guidance and adhesion turnover. Little similarity, however, was observed to PKC stimulated cells and cells on the topography. Interestingly, with PKC stimulation the cell nuclei became highly deformable bringing focus on these surfaces to the study of metastasis. Surfaces that aid the study of cellular migration are important in developing understanding of mechanisms of wound healing and repair in aligned tissues such as ligament and tendon.

  4. Irc3 is a mitochondrial DNA branch migration enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Gaidutšik, Ilja; Sedman, Tiina; Sillamaa, Sirelin; Sedman, Juhan

    2016-01-01

    Integrity of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is essential for cellular energy metabolism. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a large number of nuclear genes influence the stability of mitochondrial genome; however, most corresponding gene products act indirectly and the actual molecular mechanisms of mtDNA inheritance remain poorly characterized. Recently, we found that a Superfamily II helicase Irc3 is required for the maintenance of mitochondrial genome integrity. Here we show that Irc3 is a mitochondrial DNA branch migration enzyme. Irc3 modulates mtDNA metabolic intermediates by preferential binding and unwinding Holliday junctions and replication fork structures. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the loss of Irc3 can be complemented with mitochondrially targeted RecG of Escherichia coli. We suggest that Irc3 could support the stability of mtDNA by stimulating fork regression and branch migration or by inhibiting the formation of irregular branched molecules. PMID:27194389

  5. Migration of accreting giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crida, A.; Bitsch, B.; Raibaldi, A.

    2016-12-01

    We present the results of 2D hydro simulations of giant planets in proto-planetary discs, which accrete gas at a more or less high rate. First, starting from a solid core of 20 Earth masses, we show that as soon as the runaway accretion of gas turns on, the planet is saved from type I migration : the gap opening mass is reached before the planet is lost into its host star. Furthermore, gas accretion helps opening the gap in low mass discs. Consequently, if the accretion rate is limited to the disc supply, then the planet is already inside a gap and in type II migration. We further show that the type II migration of a Jupiter mass planet actually depends on its accretion rate. Only when the accretion is high do we retrieve the classical picture where no gas crosses the gap and the planet follows the disc spreading. These results impact our understanding of planet migration and planet population synthesis models. The e-poster presenting these results in French can be found here: L'e-poster présentant ces résultats en français est disponible à cette adresse: http://sf2a.eu/semaine-sf2a/2016/posterpdfs/156_179_49.pdf.

  6. [Migration of dentists within Hungary].

    PubMed

    Balázs, Péter

    2010-09-01

    Concerning the human resource management in the health care, Hungarian analysts focus mainly on cross-national migration, which was instigated considerably by joining the European Union in 2004. Contrasted to other health care professionals, dentists emphasized also the importance of in-country migration (mobility) indicating serious dangers of developing inequalities in the dental service. From the point of view of health system planning, the main problem is to balance the needs and the number of professionals in regions and areas with extremely different socio-economic conditions. Under dictatorial governments, this "balancing" (which was experienced also in Hungary) is a forced allocation of young professionals to the target regions. In political freedom and free market economy, these measures are unthinkable. The present domestic area distribution, concerning also the supply through vacancies by old age inactivity and cross-national migration, is ruled by personal decisions of actually graduated and immigrant professionals respectively. Therefore, it is unavoidable to investigate the interrelation of factors (dentists' births place, study migration and decisions for practice allocation) ruling the in-country geographic patterns of dental practices. This evidence-based knowledge can only explain the present situation and provide guidelines for health policy decision makers.

  7. Irregular migration: an international perspective.

    PubMed

    Tomasi, S M

    1984-01-01

    Despite the heightened awareness of irregular migrations worldwide, a certain misappreciation or underestimation of the saliency of irregular migration issues persists. Conflict in the strife-torn Indian state of Assam, for example, has been widely publicized, but its roots in immigration issues linked to communal tensions are insufficiently understood. Conflict around the globe seems increasingly to involve, both as cause and effect, migrants in irregular status whose problematical or illegitimate presence itself is at issue. The global recession prompted governments in immigration-welcoming countries to adopt more restrictive stances vis-a-vis immigration at a time when global migratory pressures were expanding enormously. As if by a process of demonstration effect, 1 country after another began to view migratory flows with alarm--flows which previously had been regarded as benign or quantitatively unimportant. Part I of this special issue examines a variety of public responses to irregular migration. Part II looks at legalization issues in a number of national contexts. Part III contains 3 comparative reflections on immigration reform in industrial democracies. Part IV provides an overview and sampling of recent empirical and survey research findings on irregular status migrants, primarily in the US. This special issue is intended to encourage further research on irregular migration, foster better understanding of this complex phenomenon, and contribute to enlightened public policy-making.

  8. A Discrete Cell Migration Model

    SciTech Connect

    Nutaro, James J; Kruse, Kara L; Ward, Richard C; O'Quinn, Elizabeth; Woerner, Matthew M; Beckerman, Barbara G

    2007-01-01

    Migration of vascular smooth muscle cells is a fundamental process in the development of intimal hyperplasia, a precursor to development of cardiovascular disease and a potential response to injury of an arterial wall. Boyden chamber experiments are used to quantify the motion of cell populations in response to a chemoattractant gradient (i.e., cell chemotaxis). We are developing a mathematical model of cell migration within the Boyden chamber, while simultaneously conducting experiments to obtain parameter values for the migration process. In the future, the model and parameters will be used as building blocks for a detailed model of the process that causes intimal hyperplasia. The cell migration model presented in this paper is based on the notion of a cell as a moving sensor that responds to an evolving chemoattractant gradient. We compare the results of our three-dimensional hybrid model with results from a one-dimensional continuum model. Some preliminary experimental data that is being used to refine the model is also presented.

  9. Youth Migration from Rural Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haller, Emil J.; Monk, David H.

    The persistent net loss of young people from rural areas has potentially contradictory implications for educational policy. Believing that youth migration to urban areas is inevitable, one school board might feel obligated to prepare students for urban jobs. Another board might view such actions as community suicide and attempt to slow…

  10. [Moroccan international migration: recent trends].

    PubMed

    Lazaar, M

    1995-01-01

    Recent trends in emigration from Morocco are analyzed. The author describes the policies developed by the Moroccan government regarding emigration and the changing characteristics of the emigrants, as emigrants are becoming younger and are increasingly female. The author concludes that the increasing demand for migrant labor in Europe will result in increased emigration despite the development of restrictive migration policies.

  11. Job Migration: A Collaborative Effort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagoner, Cynthia L.

    2012-01-01

    Music teachers often change jobs several times during their careers. Reasons for job changes vary, but regardless, these changes bring a different set of challenges. Sharing knowledge and learning are part and parcel of collaboration. So what if, as education professionals, music teachers decided to collaborate during job migrations? For all music…

  12. Les questions de migrations internationales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samman, Mouna Liliane

    1993-03-01

    International migrations have growing implications for both countries of origin and countries of destination. In the latter, the presence of foreigners and of members of their families today creates problems of integration, causes argument and brings mounting xenophobia. Paralleling political, economic and social measures taken by public authorities to respond to these difficulties, education needs to assist in defusing the resulting social tensions by preparing the minds of learners and helping to develop new attitudes. In particular, when educational programmes address questions of international migration, these should be treated in the framework of historical evolution so that their real significance and their true temporal and spatial dimensions become apparent. It is also important that the growing interdependence between countries should be made plain, that national history should be placed in its international context, and that the true consequences of these developments should be made clear. In this context, learners need to be acquainted with Human Rights, thereby stressing universal moral values and the role of the individual. Lastly, questions relating to international migration are usually presented in the media in a selective and partial manner, and the young people who take in this information often accept the hasty judgments which are made of situations as proven facts. This is why all teaching about international migration needs to be considered or reconsidered in the light of the complementary or competing actions of the media.

  13. International Adoptions: The Quiet Migration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weil, Richard H.

    1984-01-01

    Examines patterns in the international migration of children for adoption since World War II, with emphasis on those going to Sweden, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Relates findings to political and cultural factors. Observes that Latin America became a major source area for the United States in the 1970s, but that Asia remained…

  14. Floodplain heterogeneity and meander migration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The impact of horizontal heterogeneity of floodplain soils on rates and patterns of meander migration is analyzed with a Ikeda et al. (1981)-type model for hydrodynamics and bed morphodynamics, coupled with a physically-based bank erosion model according to the approach developed by Motta et al. (20...

  15. Transcrystalline melt migration in clinopyroxene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonzogni, Yann; Provost, Ariel; Schiano, Pierre

    2011-03-01

    Glass inclusions in clinopyroxene phenocrysts from La Sommata (Vulcano Island, Aeolian Arc) were reheated and submitted to a sustained thermal gradient. Each remelted inclusion undergoes a transient textural and chemical reequilibration and concomitantly begins to migrate along a crystallographic direction, at a small angle with the thermal gradient. The completion of morphological evolution requires a characteristic time that is governed by chemical diffusion. Chemical reequilibration results in the formation of a colored halo that delineates the former location and shape of the inclusion after it has migrated away. Transcrystalline migration proceeds by dissolution of the host clinopyroxene ahead and precipitation astern. Its rate is not limited by Fick's law, but by the crystal-melt interface kinetics. Clinopyroxene dissolution and growth are slower than for olivine in similar conditions but obey the same analytical law, which can be transposed to equally or more sluggish melting or crystallization events in nature. When a gas bubble is initially present, it responds to elastic forces by quickly shifting toward the cold end of the inclusion, where it soon becomes engulfed as an isolated fluid inclusion in the reprecipitated crystal. This study confirms that transcrystalline melt migration, beside its possible implications for small-scale melt segregation and fluid-inclusion generation in the Earth's mantle, provides an experimental access to interfacial kinetic laws in near-equilibrium conditions.

  16. Clocks, cryptochromes and Monarch migrations.

    PubMed

    Kyriacou, Charalambos P

    2009-01-01

    The annual migration of the Monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) from eastern North America to central Mexico is one of nature's most inspiring spectacles. Recent studies including one in BMC Biology, have begun to dissect the molecular and neurogenetic basis for this most complex behavior.

  17. [Haitian migration to Santo Domingo].

    PubMed

    Latortue, P R

    1985-01-01

    This work examines the history of Haitian migration to the Dominican Republic, the central role of Haitian migration in Dominican society, working conditions of Haitian migrants in the Dominican Republic, and the relationship of the migration to economic development on the island of Hispaniola. Lack of data, the difficulty of measuring illegal movement, and the problem of defining Haitians in Santo Domingo have impeded understanding of migration to the Dominican Republic. It is believed by many authorities that Haitian migration to Santo Domingo is considerable and perhaps exceeds that to the US. Haitian migration to the Dominican Republic began after 1915 with the fall of the Haitian president, a worsening of economic conditions partly caused by stagnation in the agricultural sector, and the newly dominant role of the US in Haitian economic affairs. The Great Depression of the 1930s was a direct antecedent of the massacre of Haitians by Dominican police in which some 30 thousand persons were killed; the economic recession of the early 1980s has also caused an outburst of antiHaitian feeling in the Dominican Republic although 80% of laborers in the sugar industry are Haitians. Sugar is extremely important to the Dominican economy: in 1974, sugar covered 12% of cultivated land, produced 40% of foreign exchange earnings, and was responsable for 21% of taxable income. Dominicans however refuse to work in sugar plantations under the current technological. conditions and wage system. Although the government periodically demands the Dominicanization of the sugar work force, no such changes have been made. Sugar will probably continue to play a decisive role in the generation of foreign exchange despite introduction of more technologically advanced sectors which benefit from better prices in the international market. Possibilities of mechanizing sugar production in the Dominican Republic appear remote, and failure to modernize an important sector of the economy has

  18. Controlled surface topography regulates collective 3D migration by epithelial-mesenchymal composite embryonic tissues.

    PubMed

    Song, Jiho; Shawky, Joseph H; Kim, YongTae; Hazar, Melis; LeDuc, Philip R; Sitti, Metin; Davidson, Lance A

    2015-07-01

    Cells in tissues encounter a range of physical cues as they migrate. Probing single cell and collective migratory responses to physically defined three-dimensional (3D) microenvironments and the factors that modulate those responses are critical to understanding how tissue migration is regulated during development, regeneration, and cancer. One key physical factor that regulates cell migration is topography. Most studies on surface topography and cell mechanics have been carried out with single migratory cells, yet little is known about the spreading and motility response of 3D complex multi-cellular tissues to topographical cues. Here, we examine the response to complex topographical cues of microsurgically isolated tissue explants composed of epithelial and mesenchymal cell layers from naturally 3D organized embryos of the aquatic frog Xenopus laevis. We control topography using fabricated micropost arrays (MPAs) and investigate the collective 3D migration of these multi-cellular systems in these MPAs. We find that the topography regulates both collective and individual cell migration and that dense MPAs reduce but do not eliminate tissue spreading. By modulating cell size through the cell cycle inhibitor Mitomycin C or the spacing of the MPAs we uncover how 3D topographical cues disrupt collective cell migration. We find surface topography can direct both single cell motility and tissue spreading, altering tissue-scale processes that enable efficient conversion of single cell motility into collective movement.

  19. Role of dynamin in elongated cell migration in a 3D matrix.

    PubMed

    Lees, Justin G; Gorgani, Nick N; Ammit, Alaina J; McCluskey, Adam; Robinson, Phillip J; O'Neill, Geraldine M

    2015-03-01

    The use of 3-dimensional (3D) collagen gels has yielded new insights into the migratory behaviour of cancer cells. While the large GTPase dynamin has emerged as an important regulator of cancer cell migration and invasion under 2D conditions, its role in 3D migration is unclear. We have used a potent dynamin modulator, a bis-tyrphostin derivative, Ryngo® 1-23, to investigate the role of dynamin in 3D migration in 3 different cell lines. The compound specifically inhibits persistent, elongated 3D migration in U87MG and SMA-560 cells. Treated U87MG cells adopt a rounded morphology that is not due to apoptosis, loss of matrix metalloprotease activity or inhibition of clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Given that Ryngo 1-23 is known to regulate dynamin oligomerisation and actin dynamics at the leading edge, we analysed actin filament distribution. Ryngo 1-23 induced a switch in actin filament organization in 3D cultures resulting in the generation of multiple short actin-rich microspikes. Correlated with the change in actin filament distribution, cells displayed reduced collagen gel contraction. Since acto-myosin force transmission to the extra-cellular matrix underpins persistent, elongated migration, our results suggest that Ryngo 1-23 modulates this process in 3D migration via dynamin-mediated regulation of acto-myosin force transmission to the extra-cellular matrix.

  20. Laminin-Mediated Interactions in Thymocyte Migration and Development

    PubMed Central

    Savino, Wilson; Mendes-da-Cruz, Daniella Arêas; Golbert, Daiane Cristina Ferreira; Riederer, Ingo; Cotta-de-Almeida, Vinicius

    2015-01-01

    Intrathymic T-cell differentiation is a key process for the development and maintenance of cell-mediated immunity, and occurs concomitantly to highly regulated migratory events. We have proposed a multivectorial model for describing intrathymic thymocyte migration. One of the individual vectors comprises interactions mediated by laminins (LMs), a heterotrimeric protein family of the extracellular matrix. Several LMs are expressed in the thymus, being produced by microenvironmental cells, particularly thymic epithelial cells (TECs). Also, thymocytes and epithelial cells express integrin-type LM receptors. Functionally, it has been reported that the dy/dy mutant mouse (lacking the LM isoform 211) exhibits defective thymocyte differentiation. Several data show haptotactic effects of LMs upon thymocytes, as well as their adhesion on TECs; both effects being prevented by anti-LM or anti-LM receptor antibodies. Interestingly, LM synergizes with chemokines to enhance thymocyte migration, whereas classe-3 semaphorins and B ephrins, which exhibit chemorepulsive effects in the thymus, downregulate LM-mediated migratory responses of thymocytes. More recently, we showed that knocking down the ITGA6 gene (which encodes the α6 integrin chain of LM receptors) in human TECs modulates a large number of cell migration-related genes and results in changes of adhesion pattern of thymocytes onto the thymic epithelium. Overall, LM-mediated interactions can be placed at the cross-road of the multivectorial process of thymocyte migration, with a direct influence per se, as well as by modulating other molecular interactions associated with the intrathymic-trafficking events. PMID:26635793

  1. Tuning cell migration: contractility as an integrator of intracellular signals from multiple cues.

    PubMed

    Bordeleau, Francois; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A

    2016-01-01

    There has been immense progress in our understanding of the factors driving cell migration in both two-dimensional and three-dimensional microenvironments over the years. However, it is becoming increasingly evident that even though most cells share many of the same signaling molecules, they rarely respond in the same way to migration cues. To add to the complexity, cells are generally exposed to multiple cues simultaneously, in the form of growth factors and/or physical cues from the matrix. Understanding the mechanisms that modulate the intracellular signals triggered by multiple cues remains a challenge. Here, we will focus on the molecular mechanism involved in modulating cell migration, with a specific focus on how cell contractility can mediate the crosstalk between signaling initiated at cell-matrix adhesions and growth factor receptors.

  2. Tuning cell migration: contractility as an integrator of intracellular signals from multiple cues

    PubMed Central

    Bordeleau, Francois; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A.

    2016-01-01

    There has been immense progress in our understanding of the factors driving cell migration in both two-dimensional and three-dimensional microenvironments over the years. However, it is becoming increasingly evident that even though most cells share many of the same signaling molecules, they rarely respond in the same way to migration cues. To add to the complexity, cells are generally exposed to multiple cues simultaneously, in the form of growth factors and/or physical cues from the matrix. Understanding the mechanisms that modulate the intracellular signals triggered by multiple cues remains a challenge. Here, we will focus on the molecular mechanism involved in modulating cell migration, with a specific focus on how cell contractility can mediate the crosstalk between signaling initiated at cell-matrix adhesions and growth factor receptors. PMID:27508074

  3. The circular migration of smallholders in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Bigsten, A

    1996-01-01

    Circular migration is a central phenomenon in the lives of smallholders in East Africa. Many migration decisions are not individual decisions, but rather household decisions in which the household allocates its labor force among activities to maximize household utility. A probit model which incorporates circular migration and takes into account contacts, information, and indivisibilities is used to analyze migration among 763 farm households in the Central and Nyanza provinces of Kenya. Study data are from a 1982 survey. The pull of high urban wages appears to be a far more important determinant of migration decision outcomes than the push of land scarcity, while a strong local nonagricultural economy does not seem to restrict migration. Networks of personal contacts were found to be highly significant determinants of migration. These findings suggest that rural development will probably not reduce the flow of migration.

  4. Individual Decisions to Migrate During Civil Conflict

    PubMed Central

    Bohra-Mishra, Pratikshya; Massey, Douglas S.

    2012-01-01

    The existing literature on forced migration limits our understanding of how violence affects migration to competing destinations. This article adds to the literature on forced migration by studying how armed violence during a period of civil conflict in south-central Nepal influenced the likelihood of local, internal, and international migration. We find that violence has a nonlinear effect on migration, such that low to moderate levels of violence reduce the odds of movement, but when violence reaches high levels, the odds of movement increase. We also find that the effect of violence on mobility increases as the distance of the move increases. When we consider the influence of violence on microlevel decision-making, we find that the effects of individual and household-level determinants were mostly consistent with hypotheses derived from contemporary theories of voluntary migration and that no predictor of migration influenced the decision to migrate differently in the presence of violence. PMID:21541805

  5. Increases in reactive oxygen species enhance vascular endothelial cell migration through a mechanism dependent on the transient receptor potential melastatin 4 ion channel.

    PubMed

    Sarmiento, Daniela; Montorfano, Ignacio; Cerda, Oscar; Cáceres, Mónica; Becerra, Alvaro; Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio; Elorza, Alvaro A; Riedel, Claudia; Tapia, Pablo; Velásquez, Luis A; Varela, Diego; Simon, Felipe

    2015-03-01

    A hallmark of severe inflammation is reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction induced by increased inflammatory mediators secretion. During systemic inflammation, inflammation mediators circulating in the bloodstream interact with endothelial cells (ECs) raising intracellular oxidative stress at the endothelial monolayer. Oxidative stress mediates several pathological functions, including an exacerbated EC migration. Because cell migration critically depends on calcium channel-mediated Ca(2+) influx, the molecular identification of the calcium channel involved in oxidative stress-modulated EC migration has been the subject of intense investigation. The transient receptor potential melastatin 4 (TRPM4) protein is a ROS-modulated non-selective cationic channel that performs several cell functions, including regulating intracellular Ca(2+) overload and Ca(2+) oscillation. This channel is expressed in multiple tissues, including ECs, and contributes to the migration of certain immune cells. However, whether the TRPM4 ion channel participates in oxidative stress-mediated EC migration is not known. Herein, we investigate whether oxidative stress initiates or enhances EC migration and study the role played by the ROS-modulated TRPM4 ion channel in oxidative stress-mediated EC migration. We demonstrate that oxidative stress enhances, but does not initiate, EC migration in a dose-dependent manner. Notably, we demonstrate that the TRPM4 ion channel is critical in promoting H2O2-enhanced EC migration. These results show that TRPM4 is a novel pharmacological target for the possible treatment of severe inflammation and other oxidative stress-mediated inflammatory diseases.

  6. Information flow, job search, and migration.

    PubMed

    Vishwanath, T

    1991-10-01

    "In this paper, an individual model of rural-urban migration is studied, emphasizing the effects of information flow and urban wage dispersion. Migration is viewed in the context of a lifetime program of job search. It is shown that migration can occur even when the mean urban wage is no larger than the rural income flow.... Both the shape and spread of the urban wage dispersion are shown to affect migration behavior significantly." The geographical focus is on developing countries.

  7. Migration and rural opportunities in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Adepoju, A

    1984-01-01

    This study is concerned with migration to rural areas in Nigeria. The author examines the rural economic structures, social systems, and demographic features affecting such migration. These features are compared for migrants and nonmigrants in the cash cropping and subsistence cropping areas of southwestern Nigeria. The results suggest that rural migration in southwestern Nigeria is mainly urban-rural migration of a colonizing type. Data for the study are from a survey of 1,782 households in 12 villages.

  8. Nanoparticles migration in fractured rocks and affects on contaminant migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Missana, Tiziana; Garcia-Gutierrez, Miguel; Alonso, Ursula

    2014-05-01

    In previous studies, the transport behavior of artificial (gold and latex) and natural (smectite clay) colloids, within a planar fracture in crystalline rock, was analyzed. In order to better understand the effects of colloid size, shape and surface charge on nanoparticle migration and especially on filtration processes on natural rock surfaces, different clay colloids and oxide nanoparticles were selected and their transport studied as a function of the residence time. In all the cases, (a fraction of) the nanoparticles travelled in the fracture as fast as or faster than water (with a retardation factor, Rf ≤ 1) and the observed Rf, was related to the Taylor dispersion coefficient, accounting for colloid size, water velocity and fracture width. However, under most of the cases, in contrast to the behavior of a conservative tracer, colloids recovery was much lower than 100 %. Differences in recovery between different nanoparticles, under similar residence times, were analyzed. In order to evaluate the possible consequences, on contaminant migration, of the presence of nanoparticles in the system, transport tests were carried out with both colloids and sorbing radionuclides. The overall capacity for colloids of enhancing radionuclide migration in crystalline rock fractures is discussed. Acknowledgments: The research leading to these results received funding from EU FP7/2007-2011 grant agreement Nº 295487 (BELBAR, Bentonite Erosion: effects on the Long term performance of the engineered Barrier and Radionuclide Transport) and by the Spanish Government under the project NANOBAG (CTM2011-2797).

  9. Population distribution and internal migration.

    PubMed

    1994-07-01

    In China, population density is about 3 times higher than the world average. Currently, 94% of the population inhabit the developed eastern and southeastern parts of the country, which account for only 46% of China's territory. In contrast, the western and northwestern parts of China contain only 6% of the total population. From 1949 to 1990, the urban population grew from almost 57.7 million to 301.9 million. The strategy of urbanization is to strictly limit the size of large cities and to develop medium-sized and small cities in line with the level of economic development. From 1980 to 1990 the number of cities increased from 223 to 461 and the number of towns from 2874 to 55,000. The overwhelming majority of China's population still live in the countryside. According to the 1990 national population census, during the period from July 1, 1985, to July 1, 1990, the total number of migrants in China reached 34.13 million, of whom 18.83 million were male and 15.30 million were female. There were 23.02 million intra-provincial migrants and 11.07 million inter-provincial migrants. Among the causes of migration: 1) 14.67 million people migrated for job transfers, business, and recruitment, 2) 11.68 million migrated to live with relatives and for marriage, 3) 4.14 million migrated to study and for training. In addition, 3.64 million migrated because of retirement or for other reasons. The number of migrants nationwide topped 100 million in 1992, which is attributed to the large rural surplus labor force flowing into urban areas. Moreover, imbalanced regional economic development and the booming tourist industry have also added to population mobility. More than 40 million rural migrants are outside their official place of residence. The large size of the migrant population has brought about serious problems in increased city traffic and public security. The government is committed to controlling the surplus rural laborers by enabling this segment to migrate to those

  10. Juridical structures: refugees and migration.

    PubMed

    Veiter, T

    1988-01-01

    The juridical problems in regard to the concepts of refugee, expulsion, and migration are complicated. If one speaks about migration in Europe, one must 1st distinguish between Eastern and Western Europe. In the communist states of Eastern Europe the refugee problem does not exist officially, with the only existing refugee problem in Yugoslavia, which has signed and ratified the Geneva Refugee Convention of 1951. In the other East European states the right to asylum exists, but refugees are granted asylum only if they are persecuted in their country of origin for their communist ideas and activities. In speaking of migration, one must distinguish between migration, forced migration, mass migration, emigration, immigration, the shift of populations, and refugees. In the communist countries of Eastern Europe the right to emigration is not respected, although certain exceptions, as in Poland or Yugoslavia do exist. Generally, in the communist states emigration is not allowed and illegal emigration is punished as "Flight from the Republic." With a few exceptions, political and other persecutions are no longer so typical within Europe. In the last decades, the refugee problem has changed to other continents: Afghanistan/Pakistan, Iran, Sri Lanka, East Timor, Lebanon, Palestine, Sudan, Tchad, Ethiopia, Eritrea, and Angola. The refugee problem in Europe consists mainly in the large afflux of refugees coming from places with other cultural (and religious) attributes. The Islamic immigrants declare themselves regularly as political refugees and hope to be acknowledged as such by the receiving state. The fear of the governments and populations of the receiving countries is that it would not be possible to assimilate such aliens who do not belong to the Christian culture of Europe. Formerly, refugees came mostly from the Christian countries of Eastern Europe with the same race identity and the same religion. For years now, more and more foreign workers are a kind of migrant

  11. Regulation of cell migration via the EGFR signaling pathway in oral squamous cell carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Ohnishi, Yuichi; Yasui, Hiroki; Kakudo, Kenji; Nozaki, Masami

    2017-01-01

    Cell migration potency is essential in cancer metastasis and is often regulated by extracellular stimuli. Oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines include those that are sensitive, as well as resistant, to the effects of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor cetuximab on cell migration. In the present study, the molecular differences in the EGFR response to cell migration between the SAS cetuximab-sensitive and HSC4 cetuximab-resistant cell lines was examined. Treatment with the EGFR inhibitors AG1478 and cetuximab reduced the migration potency of SAS cells, but not HSC4 cells. The migration of the two cell lines was inhibited under serum-free culture conditions, and the addition of EGF to the serum-free medium promoted the migration of SAS cells, but not HSC4 cells. In addition, SAS cell migration was reduced by the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase and protein kinase B (Akt) inhibitors PD98059 and MK2206, whereas HSC4 cell migration was only inhibited by MK2206. EGF induced an increase in extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation levels in HSC4 cells, and stimulated Akt phosphorylation levels in SAS cells. Furthermore, the staining of actin filaments with phalloidin was significantly increased by the inhibition of EGFR in SAS cells, but was not observed as altered in HSC4 cells. Conversely, the addition of EGF to the culture medium decreased the accumulation of actin filaments in SAS cells. The results suggest that the EGF-EGFR signaling pathway has an important role in SAS cell migration via the modulation of actin dynamics, and that HSC4 cell migration is regulated by a serum component other than EGFR.

  12. Firefighting Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Firefly II pump module is NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center's commercial offshoot of a NASA/US Coast Guard program involving development of a lightweight, helicopter-transportable firefighting module for a quick response in combating shipboard or harbor fires. Operable on land or water, the Amphib One is equipped with 3 water cannons. When all 3 are operating, unit pumps more than 3,000 gallons a minute. Newly developed model used by U.S. Coast Guard can pump 5,000 gallons per minute. It was designed for applications such as firefighting onboard ship fires, emergency dockside water pumping, dewatering ships in danger of sinking, flood control, and emergency water supply at remote locations.

  13. NAFTA: The Mexican Economy, and Undocumented Migration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-28

    FINAL 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE NAFTA , the Mexican Economy, and Undocumented Migration 5a...ABSTRACT NAFTA , The Mexican Economy, and Undocumented Migration The North American Free Trade Agreement is variously blamed for undocumented...potential, and recommends measures to increase the chances of positive results. 15. SUBJECT TERMS NAFTA , Mexican undocumented migration 16

  14. [Urban employment and internal migration in Peru].

    PubMed

    Cotlear, D

    1984-06-01

    The relationship between internal migration and employment problems in Peru is examined. The author argues that regional differences in income distribution are the primary causes of migration, particularly to urban areas. A model of the migration process is developed and tested using data from official sources, surveys, and the published literature.

  15. Thermoelectric module

    DOEpatents

    Kortier, William E.; Mueller, John J.; Eggers, Philip E.

    1980-07-08

    A thermoelectric module containing lead telluride as the thermoelectric mrial is encapsulated as tightly as possible in a stainless steel canister to provide minimum void volume in the canister. The lead telluride thermoelectric elements are pressure-contacted to a tungsten hot strap and metallurgically bonded at the cold junction to iron shoes with a barrier layer of tin telluride between the iron shoe and the p-type lead telluride element.

  16. Linear modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A study of frequency division multiplexing (FDM) systems was made for the purpose of determining the system performance that can be obtained with available state of the art components. System performance was evaluated on the basis of past experience, system analysis, and component evaluation. The system study was specifically directed to the area of FDM systems using subcarrier channel frequencies from 4 kHz to 200 kHz and channel information bandwidths of dc to 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 kHz. The evaluation also assumes that the demodulation will be from a tape recorder which produces frequency modulation of + or - 1% on the signal due to the tape recorder wow and flutter. For the modulation system it is assumed that the pilot and carrier channel frequencies are stable to within + or - .005% and that the FM on the channel carriers is negligible. The modulator system was evaluated for the temperature range of -20 degree to +85 degree while the demodulator system was evaluated for operation at room temperature.

  17. Nuclide-migration field experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Erdal, B.R.; Wolfsberg, K.; Johnstone, J.K.; Erickson, K.L.; Friedman, A.M.; Fried, S.; Hines, J.J.

    1981-03-01

    When considering groundwater flow and radionuclide retention in the complex flow systems that can occur in geologic formations, one has a serious problem in determining if laboratory studies are being performed under conditions appropriate to natural systems. This document is the project plan for a program designed to begin to address these problems. The project is being carried out jointly by the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, and Argonne National Laboratory. The work has three principal objectives: (1) to develop the experimental, instrumental, and safety techniques necessary to conduct controlled, small-scale radionuclide migration field experiments, including those involving actinides; (2) to use these techniques to define radionuclide migration through rock by performing generic, at-depth experiments under closely monitored conditions; and (3) to determine whether available lithologic, geochemical, and hydrologic properties together with existing or developing transport models are sufficient and appropriate to describe real field conditions.

  18. Physicists' Forced Migrations under Hitler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyerchen, Alan

    2011-03-01

    When the Nazis came to power in early 1933 they initiated formal and informal measures that forced Jews and political opponents from public institutions such as universities. Some physicists retired and others went into industry, but most emigrated. International communication and contact made emigration a viable option despite the desperate economic times in the Great Depression. Another wave of emigrations followed the annexation of Austria in 1938. Individual cases as well as general patterns of migration and adaptation to new environments will be examined in this presentation. One important result of the forced migrations was that many of the physicists expelled under Hitler played important roles in strengthening physics elsewhere, often on the Allied side in World War II.

  19. Neural crest migration: trailblazing ahead

    PubMed Central

    McLennan, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Embryonic cell migration patterns are amazingly complex in the timing and spatial distribution of cells throughout the vertebrate landscape. However, advances in in vivo visualization, cell interrogation, and computational modeling are extracting critical features that underlie the mechanistic nature of these patterns. The focus of this review highlights recent advances in the study of the highly invasive neural crest cells and their migratory patterns during embryonic development. We discuss these advances within three major themes and include a description of computational models that have emerged to more rapidly integrate and test hypothetical mechanisms of neural crest migration. We conclude with technological advances that promise to reveal new insights and help translate results to human neural crest-related birth defects and metastatic cancer. PMID:25705385

  20. Tumor cell migration screen identifies SRPK1 as breast cancer metastasis determinant.

    PubMed

    van Roosmalen, Wies; Le Dévédec, Sylvia E; Golani, Ofra; Smid, Marcel; Pulyakhina, Irina; Timmermans, Annemieke M; Look, Maxime P; Zi, Di; Pont, Chantal; de Graauw, Marjo; Naffar-Abu-Amara, Suha; Kirsanova, Catherine; Rustici, Gabriella; Hoen, Peter A C 't; Martens, John W M; Foekens, John A; Geiger, Benjamin; van de Water, Bob

    2015-04-01

    Tumor cell migration is a key process for cancer cell dissemination and metastasis that is controlled by signal-mediated cytoskeletal and cell matrix adhesion remodeling. Using a phagokinetic track assay with migratory H1299 cells, we performed an siRNA screen of almost 1,500 genes encoding kinases/phosphatases and adhesome- and migration-related proteins to identify genes that affect tumor cell migration speed and persistence. Thirty candidate genes that altered cell migration were validated in live tumor cell migration assays. Eight were associated with metastasis-free survival in breast cancer patients, with integrin β3-binding protein (ITGB3BP), MAP3K8, NIMA-related kinase (NEK2), and SHC-transforming protein 1 (SHC1) being the most predictive. Examination of genes that modulate migration indicated that SRPK1, encoding the splicing factor kinase SRSF protein kinase 1, is relevant to breast cancer outcomes, as it was highly expressed in basal breast cancer. Furthermore, high SRPK1 expression correlated with poor breast cancer disease outcome and preferential metastasis to the lungs and brain. In 2 independent murine models of breast tumor metastasis, stable shRNA-based SRPK1 knockdown suppressed metastasis to distant organs, including lung, liver, and spleen, and inhibited focal adhesion reorganization. Our study provides comprehensive information on the molecular determinants of tumor cell migration and suggests that SRPK1 has potential as a drug target for limiting breast cancer metastasis.

  1. Microglial cell migration stimulated by ATP and C5a involve distinct molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Aaron M.; Stella, Nephi

    2009-01-01

    Microglial cells, the macrophages of the brain, play an essential role in the propagation of neuroinflammation. Increased microglial cell migration in response to specific chemoattractants has been documented, but less is known about the differences between these stimuli and the signal transduction pathways that mediate their effects. Current methods to measure cell migration are often labor-intensive and rely on the manual counting of cell number, so more efficient and objective methods are needed. Here we present an improved and higher-throughput Boyden Chamber technique that measures microglial cell migration by using DRAQ5, a nuclear dye that emits in the near-infrared. Out of a panel of chemoattractants tested, we found that ATP and C5a potently stimulate the migration of mouse primary microglial cells. The stimulatory effects of ATP and C5a displayed significant additivity, suggesting that each chemoattractant stimulated migration through independent molecular mechanisms. Accordingly, we found key differences in these responses: ATP stimulated a combination of both chemokinesis and chemotaxis, and this response was mediated by the ROCK signaling pathway; whereas C5a stimulated only chemotaxis and this response was mediated by the Rac1 signaling pathway. Finally, we found that functional PI3-kinase is only required for random basal microglial cell migration. Thus, our results show that distinct non-overlapping signal transduction pathways control different modes of microglial cell migration and suggest that the targeting of these distinct molecular mechanisms should modulate different aspects of neuroinflammation propagation. PMID:19053059

  2. ProBDNF inhibits collective migration and chemotaxis of rat Schwann cells.

    PubMed

    Ding, You-Quan; Li, Xuan-Yang; Xia, Guan-Nan; Ren, Hong-Yi; Zhou, Xin-Fu; Su, Bing-Yin; Qi, Jian-Guo

    2016-10-01

    Schwann cell migration, including collective migration and chemotaxis, is essential for the formation of coordinate interactions between Schwann cells and axons during peripheral nerve development and regeneration. Moreover, limited migration of Schwann cells imposed a serious obstacle on Schwann cell-astrocytes intermingling and spinal cord repair after Schwann cell transplantation into injured spinal cords. Recent studies have shown that mature brain-derived neurotrophic factor, a member of the neurotrophin family, inhibits Schwann cell migration. The precursor form of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, proBDNF, was expressed in the developing or degenerating peripheral nerves and the injured spinal cords. Since "the yin and yang of neurotrophin action" has been established as a common sense, proBDNF would be expected to promote Schwann cell migration. However, we found, in the present study, that exogenous proBDNF also inhibited in vitro collective migration and chemotaxis of RSC 96 cells, a spontaneously immortalized rat Schwann cell line. Moreover, proBDNF suppressed adhesion and spreading of those cells. At molecular level, proBDNF inhibits F-actin polymerization and focal adhesion dynamics in cultured RSC 96 cells. Therefore, our results suggested a special case against the classical opinion of "the yin and yang of neurotrophin action" and implied that proBDNF might modulate peripheral nerve development or regeneration and spinal cord repair through perturbing native or transplanted Schwann cell migration.

  3. Tumor cell migration screen identifies SRPK1 as breast cancer metastasis determinant

    PubMed Central

    van Roosmalen, Wies; Le Dévédec, Sylvia E.; Golani, Ofra; Smid, Marcel; Pulyakhina, Irina; Timmermans, Annemieke M.; Look, Maxime P.; Zi, Di; Pont, Chantal; de Graauw, Marjo; Naffar-Abu-Amara, Suha; Kirsanova, Catherine; Rustici, Gabriella; Hoen, Peter A.C. ‘t; Martens, John W.M.; Foekens, John A.; Geiger, Benjamin; van de Water, Bob

    2015-01-01

    Tumor cell migration is a key process for cancer cell dissemination and metastasis that is controlled by signal-mediated cytoskeletal and cell matrix adhesion remodeling. Using a phagokinetic track assay with migratory H1299 cells, we performed an siRNA screen of almost 1,500 genes encoding kinases/ph